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Sample records for induced gamma frequency

  1. Intrinsic Cornu Ammonis Area 1 Theta-Nested Gamma Oscillations Induced by Optogenetic Theta Frequency Stimulation

    PubMed Central

    Butler, James L.; Mendonça, Philipe R. F.; Robinson, Hugh P. C.

    2016-01-01

    Gamma oscillations (30–120 Hz) are thought to be important for various cognitive functions, including perception and working memory, and disruption of these oscillations has been implicated in brain disorders, such as schizophrenia and Alzheimer's disease. The cornu ammonis area 1 (CA1) of the hippocampus receives gamma frequency inputs from upstream regions (cornu ammonis area 3 and medial entorhinal cortex) and generates itself a faster gamma oscillation. The exact nature and origin of the intrinsic CA1 gamma oscillation is still under debate. Here, we expressed channelrhodopsin-2 under the CaMKIIα promoter in mice and prepared hippocampal slices to produce a model of intrinsic CA1 gamma oscillations. Sinusoidal optical stimulation of CA1 at theta frequency was found to induce robust theta-nested gamma oscillations with a temporal and spatial profile similar to CA1 gamma in vivo. The results suggest the presence of a single gamma rhythm generator with a frequency range of 65–75 Hz at 32°C. Pharmacological analysis found that the oscillations depended on both AMPA and GABAA receptors. Cell-attached and whole-cell recordings revealed that excitatory neuron firing slightly preceded interneuron firing within each gamma cycle, suggesting that this intrinsic CA1 gamma oscillation is generated with a pyramidal–interneuron circuit mechanism. SIGNIFICANCE STATEMENT This study demonstrates that the cornu ammonis area 1 (CA1) is capable of generating intrinsic gamma oscillations in response to theta input. This gamma generator is independent of activity in the upstream regions, highlighting that CA1 can produce its own gamma oscillation in addition to inheriting activity from the upstream regions. This supports the theory that gamma oscillations predominantly function to achieve local synchrony, and that a local gamma generated in each area conducts the signal to the downstream region. PMID:27076416

  2. Comparison of gamma-ray-induced chromosome ring and inversion frequencies

    SciTech Connect

    Muehlmann, M.C.; Bedford, J.S.

    1995-08-01

    A method was used to detect chromosome inversions as apparent or false sister chromatid exchanges (SCEs) in the first mitosis after {gamma} irradiation of human G{sub o} cells. Dose-response relationships for small inversions have not been measured and reported previously, but it has been assumed that these are induced with a frequency equal to that of their easily mesured asymmetrical counterpart, the interstitial deletion. Our experiments confirm this expectation. The results also demonstrate, as others have suggested, that in protocols where SCEs have been reported in the first postirradiation mitosis after incorporation of BrdU in the previous cell cycle, the X- or {gamma}-ray treatment of G{sub o}{sup {minus}} or G{sub 1}-phase cells produces virtually no true SCEs. 23 refs., 3 figs., 2 tabs.

  3. Seizure-induced alterations in fast-spiking basket cell GABA currents modulate frequency and coherence of gamma oscillation in network simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Proddutur, Archana; Yu, Jiandong; Elgammal, Fatima S.; Santhakumar, Vijayalakshmi

    2013-12-01

    Gamma frequency oscillations have been proposed to contribute to memory formation and retrieval. Fast-spiking basket cells (FS-BCs) are known to underlie development of gamma oscillations. Fast, high amplitude GABA synapses and gap junctions have been suggested to contribute to gamma oscillations in FS-BC networks. Recently, we identified that, apart from GABAergic synapses, FS-BCs in the hippocampal dentate gyrus have GABAergic currents mediated by extrasynaptic receptors. Our experimental studies demonstrated two specific changes in FS-BC GABA currents following experimental seizures [Yu et al., J. Neurophysiol. 109, 1746 (2013)]: increase in the magnitude of extrasynaptic (tonic) GABA currents and a depolarizing shift in GABA reversal potential (EGABA). Here, we use homogeneous networks of a biophysically based model of FS-BCs to examine how the presence of extrasynaptic GABA conductance (gGABA-extra) and experimentally identified, seizure-induced changes in gGABA-extra and EGABA influence network activity. Networks of FS-BCs interconnected by fast GABAergic synapses developed synchronous firing in the dentate gamma frequency range (40-100 Hz). Systematic investigation revealed that the biologically realistic range of 30 to 40 connections between FS-BCs resulted in greater coherence in the gamma frequency range when networks were activated by Poisson-distributed dendritic synaptic inputs rather than by homogeneous somatic current injections, which were balanced for FS-BC firing frequency in unconnected networks. Distance-dependent conduction delay enhanced coherence in networks with 30-40 FS-BC interconnections while inclusion of gap junctional conductance had a modest effect on coherence. In networks activated by somatic current injections resulting in heterogeneous FS-BC firing, increasing gGABA-extra reduced the frequency and coherence of FS-BC firing when EGABA was shunting (-74 mV), but failed to alter average FS-BC frequency when EGABA was depolarizing

  4. Seizure-induced alterations in fast-spiking basket cell GABA currents modulate frequency and coherence of gamma oscillation in network simulations

    SciTech Connect

    Proddutur, Archana; Yu, Jiandong; Elgammal, Fatima S.; Santhakumar, Vijayalakshmi

    2013-12-15

    Gamma frequency oscillations have been proposed to contribute to memory formation and retrieval. Fast-spiking basket cells (FS-BCs) are known to underlie development of gamma oscillations. Fast, high amplitude GABA synapses and gap junctions have been suggested to contribute to gamma oscillations in FS-BC networks. Recently, we identified that, apart from GABAergic synapses, FS-BCs in the hippocampal dentate gyrus have GABAergic currents mediated by extrasynaptic receptors. Our experimental studies demonstrated two specific changes in FS-BC GABA currents following experimental seizures [Yu et al., J. Neurophysiol. 109, 1746 (2013)]: increase in the magnitude of extrasynaptic (tonic) GABA currents and a depolarizing shift in GABA reversal potential (E{sub GABA}). Here, we use homogeneous networks of a biophysically based model of FS-BCs to examine how the presence of extrasynaptic GABA conductance (g{sub GABA-extra}) and experimentally identified, seizure-induced changes in g{sub GABA-extra} and E{sub GABA} influence network activity. Networks of FS-BCs interconnected by fast GABAergic synapses developed synchronous firing in the dentate gamma frequency range (40–100 Hz). Systematic investigation revealed that the biologically realistic range of 30 to 40 connections between FS-BCs resulted in greater coherence in the gamma frequency range when networks were activated by Poisson-distributed dendritic synaptic inputs rather than by homogeneous somatic current injections, which were balanced for FS-BC firing frequency in unconnected networks. Distance-dependent conduction delay enhanced coherence in networks with 30–40 FS-BC interconnections while inclusion of gap junctional conductance had a modest effect on coherence. In networks activated by somatic current injections resulting in heterogeneous FS-BC firing, increasing g{sub GABA-extra} reduced the frequency and coherence of FS-BC firing when E{sub GABA} was shunting (−74 mV), but failed to alter average

  5. Hippocampal gamma-frequency oscillations: from interneurones to pyramidal cells, and back.

    PubMed

    Mann, Edward O; Radcliffe, Catrin A; Paulsen, Ole

    2005-01-01

    GABAergic interneurones are necessary for the emergence of hippocampal gamma-frequency network oscillations, during which they play a key role in the synchronization of pyramidal cell firing. However, it remains to be resolved how distinct interneurone subtypes contribute to gamma-frequency oscillations, in what way the spatiotemporal pattern of interneuronal input affects principal cell activity, and by which mechanisms the interneurones themselves are synchronized. Here we summarize recent evidence from cholinergically induced gamma-frequency network oscillations in vitro, showing that perisomatic-targeting GABAergic interneurones provide prominent rhythmic inhibition in pyramidal cells, and that these interneurones are synchronized by recurrent excitation. We conclude by presenting a minimal integrate-and-fire network model which demonstrates that this excitatory-inhibitory feedback loop is sufficient to explain the generation of intrahippocampal gamma-frequency oscillations. PMID:15539391

  6. Running speed alters the frequency of hippocampal gamma oscillations

    PubMed Central

    Ahmed, Omar J.; Mehta, Mayank R.

    2012-01-01

    Successful spatial navigation is thought to employ a combination of at least two strategies: the following of landmark cues and path integration. Path integration requires that the brain use the speed and direction of movement in a meaningful way to continuously compute the position of the animal. Indeed, the running speed of rats modulates both the firing rate of neurons and the spectral properties of low frequency, theta oscillations seen in the local field potential (LFP) of the hippocampus, a region important for spatial memory formation. Higher frequency, gamma-band LFP oscillations are usually associated with decision-making, increased attention and improved reaction times. Here, we show that increased running speed is accompanied by large, systematic increases in the frequency of hippocampal CA1 network oscillations spanning the entire gamma range (30–120 Hz) and beyond. These speed-dependent changes in frequency are seen on both linear tracks and two-dimensional platforms, and are thus independent of the behavioral task. Synchrony between anatomically distant CA1 regions also shifts to higher gamma frequencies as running speed increases. The changes in frequency are strongly correlated with changes in the firing rates of individual interneurons, consistent with models of gamma generation. Our results suggest that as a rat runs faster, there are faster gamma frequency transitions between sequential place cell-assemblies. This may help to preserve the spatial specificity of place cells and spatial memories at vastly different running speeds. PMID:22623683

  7. Gamma Frequency and the Spatial Tuning of Primary Visual Cortex

    PubMed Central

    Fusca, Marco; Rees, Geraint; Schwarzkopf, D. Samuel; Barnes, Gareth

    2016-01-01

    Visual stimulation produces oscillatory gamma responses in human primary visual cortex (V1) that also relate to visual perception. We have shown previously that peak gamma frequency positively correlates with central V1 cortical surface area. We hypothesized that people with larger V1 would have smaller receptive fields and that receptive field size, not V1 area, might explain this relationship. Here we set out to test this hypothesis directly by investigating the relationship between fMRI estimated population receptive field (pRF) size and gamma frequency in V1. We stimulated both the near-center and periphery of the visual field using both large and small stimuli in each location and replicated our previous finding of a positive correlation between V1 surface area and peak gamma frequency. Counter to our expectation, we found that between participants V1 size (and not PRF size) accounted for most of the variability in gamma frequency. Within-participants we found that gamma frequency increased, rather than decreased, with stimulus eccentricity directly contradicting our initial hypothesis. PMID:27362265

  8. The identification of gamma ray induced EAS

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Blake, P. R.; Nash, W. F.

    1985-01-01

    Some of the penetrating particles in gamma-induced EAS from Cygnus X-3 observed by a single layer of flash-bulbs under 880 g cm/2 concrete, may be punched through photons rather than muons. An analysis of the shielded flash-tube response detected from EAS is presented. The penetration of the electro-magnetic component through 20 cm of Pb is observed at core distances approx. 10 m.

  9. Resting GABA and glutamate concentrations do not predict visual gamma frequency or amplitude.

    PubMed

    Cousijn, Helena; Haegens, Saskia; Wallis, George; Near, Jamie; Stokes, Mark G; Harrison, Paul J; Nobre, Anna C

    2014-06-24

    Gamma band oscillations arise in neuronal networks of interconnected GABAergic interneurons and excitatory pyramidal cells. A previous study found a correlation between visual gamma peak frequency, as measured with magnetoencephalography, and resting GABA levels, as measured with magnetic resonance spectroscopy (MRS), in 12 healthy volunteers. If true, this would allow studies in clinical populations testing modulation of this relationship, but this finding has not been replicated. We addressed this important question by measuring gamma oscillations and GABA, as well as glutamate, in 50 healthy volunteers. Visual gamma activity was evoked using an established gratings paradigm, and we applied a beamformer spatial filtering technique to extract source-reconstructed gamma peak frequency and amplitude from the occipital lobe. We determined gamma peak frequency and amplitude from the location with maximal activation and from the location of the MRS voxel to assess the relationship of GABA with gamma. Gamma peak frequency was estimated from the highest value of the raw spectra and by a Gaussian fit to the spectra. MRS data were acquired from occipital cortex. We did not replicate the previously found correlation between gamma peak frequency and GABA concentration. Calculation of a Bayes factor provided strong evidence in favor of the null hypothesis. We also did not find a correlation between gamma activity and glutamate or between gamma and the ratio of GABA/glutamate. Our results suggest that cortical gamma oscillations do not have a consistent, demonstrable relationship to excitatory/inhibitory network activity as proxied by MRS measurements of GABA and glutamate. PMID:24927588

  10. Resting GABA and glutamate concentrations do not predict visual gamma frequency or amplitude

    PubMed Central

    Cousijn, Helena; Haegens, Saskia; Wallis, George; Near, Jamie; Stokes, Mark G.; Harrison, Paul J.; Nobre, Anna C.

    2014-01-01

    Gamma band oscillations arise in neuronal networks of interconnected GABAergic interneurons and excitatory pyramidal cells. A previous study found a correlation between visual gamma peak frequency, as measured with magnetoencephalography, and resting GABA levels, as measured with magnetic resonance spectroscopy (MRS), in 12 healthy volunteers. If true, this would allow studies in clinical populations testing modulation of this relationship, but this finding has not been replicated. We addressed this important question by measuring gamma oscillations and GABA, as well as glutamate, in 50 healthy volunteers. Visual gamma activity was evoked using an established gratings paradigm, and we applied a beamformer spatial filtering technique to extract source-reconstructed gamma peak frequency and amplitude from the occipital lobe. We determined gamma peak frequency and amplitude from the location with maximal activation and from the location of the MRS voxel to assess the relationship of GABA with gamma. Gamma peak frequency was estimated from the highest value of the raw spectra and by a Gaussian fit to the spectra. MRS data were acquired from occipital cortex. We did not replicate the previously found correlation between gamma peak frequency and GABA concentration. Calculation of a Bayes factor provided strong evidence in favor of the null hypothesis. We also did not find a correlation between gamma activity and glutamate or between gamma and the ratio of GABA/glutamate. Our results suggest that cortical gamma oscillations do not have a consistent, demonstrable relationship to excitatory/inhibitory network activity as proxied by MRS measurements of GABA and glutamate. PMID:24927588

  11. Spatial synchronization of visual stimulus-evoked gamma frequency oscillations in the rat superior colliculus.

    PubMed

    Baranauskas, Gytis; Svirskis, Gytis; Tkatch, Tatiana

    2016-02-10

    In the superior colliculus, visual stimuli can induce gamma frequency oscillations of neuronal activity. It has been shown that in cats, these oscillations are synchronized over distances of greater than 300 μm that may contribute toward visual information processing. We investigated the spatial properties of such oscillations in a rodent because the availability of molecular tools could enable future studies on the role of these oscillations in visual information processing. Using extracellular electrode array recordings in anesthetized rats, we found that visual stimuli-induced gamma and eta frequency (30-115 Hz) oscillations of the local field potential that were synchronized over distances of ∼ 600 μm. Multiple-unit events were phase locked to the local field potential signal and showed prominent oscillations during OFF responses. The rate of lower than 5 ms cross-electrode coincidences was in line with the response-corrected predictions for each electrode. These data suggest that the synchronized superior colliculus neuronal activity is largely network driven, whereas common synaptic inputs play a minor role. PMID:26735701

  12. Input-Dependent Frequency Modulation of Cortical Gamma Oscillations Shapes Spatial Synchronization and Enables Phase Coding

    PubMed Central

    Lowet, Eric; Roberts, Mark; Hadjipapas, Avgis; Peter, Alina; van der Eerden, Jan; De Weerd, Peter

    2015-01-01

    Fine-scale temporal organization of cortical activity in the gamma range (∼25–80Hz) may play a significant role in information processing, for example by neural grouping (‘binding’) and phase coding. Recent experimental studies have shown that the precise frequency of gamma oscillations varies with input drive (e.g. visual contrast) and that it can differ among nearby cortical locations. This has challenged theories assuming widespread gamma synchronization at a fixed common frequency. In the present study, we investigated which principles govern gamma synchronization in the presence of input-dependent frequency modulations and whether they are detrimental for meaningful input-dependent gamma-mediated temporal organization. To this aim, we constructed a biophysically realistic excitatory-inhibitory network able to express different oscillation frequencies at nearby spatial locations. Similarly to cortical networks, the model was topographically organized with spatially local connectivity and spatially-varying input drive. We analyzed gamma synchronization with respect to phase-locking, phase-relations and frequency differences, and quantified the stimulus-related information represented by gamma phase and frequency. By stepwise simplification of our models, we found that the gamma-mediated temporal organization could be reduced to basic synchronization principles of weakly coupled oscillators, where input drive determines the intrinsic (natural) frequency of oscillators. The gamma phase-locking, the precise phase relation and the emergent (measurable) frequencies were determined by two principal factors: the detuning (intrinsic frequency difference, i.e. local input difference) and the coupling strength. In addition to frequency coding, gamma phase contained complementary stimulus information. Crucially, the phase code reflected input differences, but not the absolute input level. This property of relative input-to-phase conversion, contrasting with latency

  13. MEG sensor and source measures of visually induced gamma-band oscillations are highly reliable.

    PubMed

    Tan, H-R M; Gross, J; Uhlhaas, P J

    2016-08-15

    High frequency brain oscillations are associated with numerous cognitive and behavioral processes. Non-invasive measurements using electro-/magnetoencephalography (EEG/MEG) have revealed that high frequency neural signals are heritable and manifest changes with age as well as in neuropsychiatric illnesses. Despite the extensive use of EEG/MEG-measured neural oscillations in basic and clinical research, studies demonstrating test-retest reliability of power and frequency measures of neural signals remain scarce. Here, we evaluated the test-retest reliability of visually induced gamma (30-100Hz) oscillations derived from sensor and source signals acquired over two MEG sessions. The study required participants (N=13) to detect the randomly occurring stimulus acceleration while viewing a moving concentric grating. Sensor and source MEG measures of gamma-band activity yielded comparably strong reliability (average intraclass correlation, ICC=0.861). Peak stimulus-induced gamma frequency (53-72Hz) yielded the highest measures of stability (ICCsensor=0.940; ICCsource=0.966) followed by spectral signal change (ICCsensor=0.890; ICCsource=0.893) and peak frequency bandwidth (ICCsensor=0.856; ICCsource=0.622). Furthermore, source-reconstruction significantly improved signal-to-noise for spectral amplitude of gamma activity compared to sensor estimates. Our assessments highlight that both sensor and source derived estimates of visually induced gamma-band oscillations from MEG signals are characterized by high test-retest reliability, with source derived oscillatory measures conferring an improvement in the stability of peak-frequency estimates. Importantly, our finding of high test-retest reliability supports the feasibility of pharma-MEG studies and longitudinal aging or clinical studies. PMID:27153980

  14. Method for induced gamma ray logging

    SciTech Connect

    Randall, R.R.

    1987-04-07

    In a nuclear well logging operation, a method is described for indicating the presence of gas in a fluid filled zone of a subsurface earth formation, comprising the steps of: cyclically irradiating the subsurface earth formation with bursts of high energy neutrons; detecting for one or more burst cycles the impingement of gamma radiation upon a first gamma radiation detector means during and between each of the burst; determining a first parameter indicative of the count of detected impingements of primarily inelastic gamma radiation upon the first detector means; determining a second parameter indicative of the count of detected impingements of primarily capture gamma radiation upon the first detector means; and comparing the first and second parameters to determine the presence of gas.

  15. Frequency of gamma oscillations in humans is modulated by velocity of visual motion

    PubMed Central

    Butorina, Anna V.; Sysoeva, Olga V.; Prokofyev, Andrey O.; Nikolaeva, Anastasia Yu.; Stroganova, Tatiana A.

    2015-01-01

    Gamma oscillations are generated in networks of inhibitory fast-spiking (FS) parvalbumin-positive (PV) interneurons and pyramidal cells. In animals, gamma frequency is modulated by the velocity of visual motion; the effect of velocity has not been evaluated in humans. In this work, we have studied velocity-related modulations of gamma frequency in children using MEG/EEG. We also investigated whether such modulations predict the prominence of the “spatial suppression” effect (Tadin D, Lappin JS, Gilroy LA, Blake R. Nature 424: 312-315, 2003) that is thought to depend on cortical center-surround inhibitory mechanisms. MEG/EEG was recorded in 27 normal boys aged 8–15 yr while they watched high-contrast black-and-white annular gratings drifting with velocities of 1.2, 3.6, and 6.0°/s and performed a simple detection task. The spatial suppression effect was assessed in a separate psychophysical experiment. MEG gamma oscillation frequency increased while power decreased with increasing velocity of visual motion. In EEG, the effects were less reliable. The frequencies of the velocity-specific gamma peaks were 64.9, 74.8, and 87.1 Hz for the slow, medium, and fast motions, respectively. The frequency of the gamma response elicited during slow and medium velocity of visual motion decreased with subject age, whereas the range of gamma frequency modulation by velocity increased with age. The frequency modulation range predicted spatial suppression even after controlling for the effect of age. We suggest that the modulation of the MEG gamma frequency by velocity of visual motion reflects excitability of cortical inhibitory circuits and can be used to investigate their normal and pathological development in the human brain. PMID:25925324

  16. Method for induced gamma ray logging

    SciTech Connect

    Randall, R.R.

    1987-02-24

    This patent describes a nuclear well logging operation. A method is described for determining a parameter responsive to the condition of a borehole transversing a subsurface earth formation, comprising the steps of: cyclically irradiating the subsurface earth formation with bursts of high energy neutrons; detecting for one or more burst cycles the impingement of gamma radiation upon a first gamma radiation detector means during and between each of the bursts; determining first count of detected impingements of primarily inelastic gamma radiation upon the first detection means; and normalizing the first count to remove the effects upon the first count of variations in the bursts of high energy neutrons, the normalized first count producing the parameter responsive to the condition of the borehole.

  17. High Energy Neutron Induced Gamma Production

    SciTech Connect

    Brown, D A; Johnson, M; Navratil, P

    2007-09-28

    N Division has an interest in improving the physics and accuracy of the gamma data it provides to its customers. It was asked to look into major gamma producing reactions for 14 MeV incident neutrons for several low-Z materials and determine whether LLNL's processed data files faithfully represent the current state of experimental and theoretical knowledge for these reactions. To address this, we surveyed the evaluations of the requested materials, made recommendations for the next ENDL release and noted isotopes that will require further experimental study. This process uncovered several major problems in our translation and processing of the ENDF formatted evaluations, most of which have been resolved.

  18. Gamma hydroxybutyrate--a coma inducing recreational drug.

    PubMed Central

    Ryan, J M; Stell, I

    1997-01-01

    The effects of gamma hydroxybutyrate, a coma inducing recreational drug, are described and illustrated by case reports of five patients presenting to accident and emergency (A&E). All had depressed levels of consciousness. There was strong circumstantial evidence of gamma hydroxybutyrate ingestion in all cases, and laboratory evidence in two. All recovered and supportive treatment. gamma Hydroxybutyrate has become a fashionable recreational drug. The majority of people who have ingested it will recover spontaneously without long term sequelae but its toxic effects may be dramatic while they last, particularly when it is taken with other drugs or alcohol. Images Figure 3 Figure 1 PMID:9248920

  19. Multisensory stimuli elicit altered oscillatory brain responses at gamma frequencies in patients with schizophrenia

    PubMed Central

    Stone, David B.; Coffman, Brian A.; Bustillo, Juan R.; Aine, Cheryl J.; Stephen, Julia M.

    2014-01-01

    Deficits in auditory and visual unisensory responses are well documented in patients with schizophrenia; however, potential abnormalities elicited from multisensory audio-visual stimuli are less understood. Further, schizophrenia patients have shown abnormal patterns in task-related and task-independent oscillatory brain activity, particularly in the gamma frequency band. We examined oscillatory responses to basic unisensory and multisensory stimuli in schizophrenia patients (N = 46) and healthy controls (N = 57) using magnetoencephalography (MEG). Time-frequency decomposition was performed to determine regions of significant changes in gamma band power by group in response to unisensory and multisensory stimuli relative to baseline levels. Results showed significant behavioral differences between groups in response to unisensory and multisensory stimuli. In addition, time-frequency analysis revealed significant decreases and increases in gamma-band power in schizophrenia patients relative to healthy controls, which emerged both early and late over both sensory and frontal regions in response to unisensory and multisensory stimuli. Unisensory gamma-band power predicted multisensory gamma-band power differently by group. Furthermore, gamma-band power in these regions predicted performance in select measures of the Measurement and Treatment Research to Improve Cognition in Schizophrenia (MATRICS) test battery differently by group. These results reveal a unique pattern of task-related gamma-band power in schizophrenia patients relative to controls that may indicate reduced inhibition in combination with impaired oscillatory mechanisms in patients with schizophrenia. PMID:25414652

  20. Multisensory stimuli elicit altered oscillatory brain responses at gamma frequencies in patients with schizophrenia.

    PubMed

    Stone, David B; Coffman, Brian A; Bustillo, Juan R; Aine, Cheryl J; Stephen, Julia M

    2014-01-01

    Deficits in auditory and visual unisensory responses are well documented in patients with schizophrenia; however, potential abnormalities elicited from multisensory audio-visual stimuli are less understood. Further, schizophrenia patients have shown abnormal patterns in task-related and task-independent oscillatory brain activity, particularly in the gamma frequency band. We examined oscillatory responses to basic unisensory and multisensory stimuli in schizophrenia patients (N = 46) and healthy controls (N = 57) using magnetoencephalography (MEG). Time-frequency decomposition was performed to determine regions of significant changes in gamma band power by group in response to unisensory and multisensory stimuli relative to baseline levels. Results showed significant behavioral differences between groups in response to unisensory and multisensory stimuli. In addition, time-frequency analysis revealed significant decreases and increases in gamma-band power in schizophrenia patients relative to healthy controls, which emerged both early and late over both sensory and frontal regions in response to unisensory and multisensory stimuli. Unisensory gamma-band power predicted multisensory gamma-band power differently by group. Furthermore, gamma-band power in these regions predicted performance in select measures of the Measurement and Treatment Research to Improve Cognition in Schizophrenia (MATRICS) test battery differently by group. These results reveal a unique pattern of task-related gamma-band power in schizophrenia patients relative to controls that may indicate reduced inhibition in combination with impaired oscillatory mechanisms in patients with schizophrenia. PMID:25414652

  1. Functional role of induced gamma oscillatory responses in processing noxious and innocuous sensory events in humans.

    PubMed

    Liu, C C; Chien, J H; Chang, Y W; Kim, J H; Anderson, W S; Lenz, F A

    2015-12-01

    Gamma time-frequency responses (TFRs) induced by painful laser in the contralateral primary somatosensory (SI) cortex have been shown to correlate with perceived pain-intensity in human. Given the functional roles of gamma TFRs in the cortical spaces, it remains unclear whether such a relationship is sustained for other brain regions where the laser-evoked potentials (LEPs) are presented. In this study, we delivered the painful laser pluses at random pain-intensity levels (i.e. strong, medium and weak) in a single train to the dorsal hand of six patients with uncontrolled epilepsy. The laser stimulus produced a painful pinprick sensation by activating nociceptors located in the superficial layers of the skin. For each patient, arrays of >64 subdural electrodes were implanted directly covering the contralateral SI, parasylvian (PS) and medial frontal (MF) cortices to study the stimulus related gamma (TFRs) in the neocortex. In addition, using the same stimulation paradigm, the modality specificity of gamma TFRs was further examined by applying innocuous vibrotactile stimuli to the same regions of the dorsal hand in a separated group of five patients. Our results showed that gamma TFRs are not modality specific, but the largest gamma TFRs were consistently found within the SI region and noxious laser elicited significantly stronger gamma TFRs than innocuous nonpainful vibratory stimuli. Furthermore, stronger pain induced stronger gamma TFRs in the cortices of SI (r=0.4, p<0.001) and PS (r=0.29, p=0.005). Given that potentially harmful noxious stimulus would automatically capture greater attention than the innocuous ones, our results support the hypothesis that the degree of SI and PS gamma TFRs is associated with an attentional drive provoked by painful stimuli. PMID:26408986

  2. Frequencies of Virus-Specific CD4+ and CD8+ T Lymphocytes Secreting Gamma Interferon after Acute Natural Rotavirus Infection in Children and Adults

    PubMed Central

    Jaimes, María C.; Rojas, Olga Lucía; González, Ana María; Cajiao, Isabela; Charpilienne, Annie; Pothier, Pierre; Kohli, Evelyne; Greenberg, Harry B.; Franco, Manuel A.; Angel, Juana

    2002-01-01

    Human rotavirus-specific CD4+ and CD8+ T-cell responses in peripheral blood lymphocytes were studied using a flow cytometric assay that detects the intracellular accumulation of cytokines after short-term in vitro antigen stimulation. The frequencies of virus-specific T cells that secrete gamma interferon and interleukin-13 (IL-13) were determined in adults and children during the acute or convalescent phase of rotavirus-induced diarrhea, in asymptomatically infected adults and laboratory workers who worked with human stool samples containing rotavirus, and in healthy adults. Significantly higher frequencies of rotavirus-specific interferon gamma-secreting CD8+ and CD4+ T cells, but not IL-13-secreting T cells, were detected in symptomatically infected adults and exposed laboratory workers than in healthy adults and children with acute rotavirus diarrhea. The levels of rotavirus-specific T cells returned to levels found in healthy adults by 32 days after the onset of rotavirus diarrhea in most adult subjects. Children with rotavirus diarrhea had undetectable or very low levels of CD4+ and CD8+ T cells that secrete gamma interferon. Adult cytomegalovirus-seropositive individuals had frequencies of cytomegalovirus-specific T cells that secrete gamma interferon that were approximately 20 times the level of rotavirus-specific T cells. This result suggests that rotavirus is a relatively poor inducer of circulating memory T cells that secrete gamma interferon. The frequencies of gamma interferon-secreting CD4+ and CD8+ T cells and the frequencies of IL-13-secreting CD4+ T cells responding to the T-cell superantigen staphylococcal enterotoxin B (SEB) were lower in children than in adults. In both adults and children, the frequencies of CD4+ cells secreting gamma interferon in response to SEB were higher than the frequencies of cells secreting IL-13. PMID:11967291

  3. Frequency-Domain Multiplexed Readout for Superconducting Gamma-Ray Detectors

    SciTech Connect

    Dreyer, Jonathan G.; Arnold, Kam; Lanting, Trevor M.; Dobbs, Matt A.; Friedrich, Stephan; Lee, Adrian T.; Spieler, Helmuth G.

    2006-08-30

    We are developing a frequency-multiplexed readout for arrays of high-resolution Gamma detectors based on superconducting transition edge sensors (TESs). Each sensor is part of an LCR resonant circuit and is biased at an identifying carrier frequency. Several carrier signals are added and amplified with a single SQUID preamplifier at 4 K. Gamma absorption modulates the amplitude of the carrier, and demodulation at room temperature retrieves the initial temperature evolution of the sensor. This multiplexing system has originally been developed to read out large arrays of bolometers for cosmic microwave background studies. To accommodate the faster Gamma-ray signals, its demodulator bandwidth is being extended to 20 kHz to allow reading out up to eight TESs with a detector bandwidth of 10 kHz. Here we characterize the system noise performance and show how this multiplexing scheme can be adapted to read out arrays of superconducting Gamma-ray detectors.

  4. Detection of 16 gamma-ray pulsars through blind frequency searches using the Fermi LAT.

    PubMed

    Abdo, A A; Ackermann, M; Ajello, M; Anderson, B; Atwood, W B; Axelsson, M; Baldini, L; Ballet, J; Barbiellini, G; Baring, M G; Bastieri, D; Baughman, B M; Bechtol, K; Bellazzini, R; Berenji, B; Bignami, G F; Blandford, R D; Bloom, E D; Bonamente, E; Borgland, A W; Bregeon, J; Brez, A; Brigida, M; Bruel, P; Burnett, T H; Caliandro, G A; Cameron, R A; Caraveo, P A; Casandjian, J M; Cecchi, C; Celik, O; Chekhtman, A; Cheung, C C; Chiang, J; Ciprini, S; Claus, R; Cohen-Tanugi, J; Conrad, J; Cutini, S; Dermer, C D; de Angelis, A; de Luca, A; de Palma, F; Digel, S W; Dormody, M; do Couto e Silva, E; Drell, P S; Dubois, R; Dumora, D; Farnier, C; Favuzzi, C; Fegan, S J; Fukazawa, Y; Funk, S; Fusco, P; Gargano, F; Gasparrini, D; Gehrels, N; Germani, S; Giebels, B; Giglietto, N; Giommi, P; Giordano, F; Glanzman, T; Godfrey, G; Grenier, I A; Grondin, M-H; Grove, J E; Guillemot, L; Guiriec, S; Gwon, C; Hanabata, Y; Harding, A K; Hayashida, M; Hays, E; Hughes, R E; Jóhannesson, G; Johnson, R P; Johnson, T J; Johnson, W N; Kamae, T; Katagiri, H; Kataoka, J; Kawai, N; Kerr, M; Knödlseder, J; Kocian, M L; Kuss, M; Lande, J; Latronico, L; Lemoine-Goumard, M; Longo, F; Loparco, F; Lott, B; Lovellette, M N; Lubrano, P; Madejski, G M; Makeev, A; Marelli, M; Mazziotta, M N; McConville, W; McEnery, J E; Meurer, C; Michelson, P F; Mitthumsiri, W; Mizuno, T; Monte, C; Monzani, M E; Morselli, A; Moskalenko, I V; Murgia, S; Nolan, P L; Norris, J P; Nuss, E; Ohsugi, T; Omodei, N; Orlando, E; Ormes, J F; Paneque, D; Parent, D; Pelassa, V; Pepe, M; Pesce-Rollins, M; Pierbattista, M; Piron, F; Porter, T A; Primack, J R; Rainò, S; Rando, R; Ray, P S; Razzano, M; Rea, N; Reimer, A; Reimer, O; Reposeur, T; Ritz, S; Rochester, L S; Rodriguez, A Y; Romani, R W; Ryde, F; Sadrozinski, H F-W; Sanchez, D; Sander, A; Saz Parkinson, P M; Scargle, J D; Sgrò, C; Siskind, E J; Smith, D A; Smith, P D; Spandre, G; Spinelli, P; Starck, J-L; Strickman, M S; Suson, D J; Tajima, H; Takahashi, H; Takahashi, T; Tanaka, T; Thayer, J G; Thompson, D J; Tibaldo, L; Tibolla, O; Torres, D F; Tosti, G; Tramacere, A; Uchiyama, Y; Usher, T L; Van Etten, A; Vasileiou, V; Vilchez, N; Vitale, V; Waite, A P; Wang, P; Watters, K; Winer, B L; Wolff, M T; Wood, K S; Ylinen, T; Ziegler, M

    2009-08-14

    Pulsars are rapidly rotating, highly magnetized neutron stars emitting radiation across the electromagnetic spectrum. Although there are more than 1800 known radio pulsars, until recently only seven were observed to pulse in gamma rays, and these were all discovered at other wavelengths. The Fermi Large Area Telescope (LAT) makes it possible to pinpoint neutron stars through their gamma-ray pulsations. We report the detection of 16 gamma-ray pulsars in blind frequency searches using the LAT. Most of these pulsars are coincident with previously unidentified gamma-ray sources, and many are associated with supernova remnants. Direct detection of gamma-ray pulsars enables studies of emission mechanisms, population statistics, and the energetics of pulsar wind nebulae and supernova remnants. PMID:19574346

  5. Enhanced Stimulus-Induced Gamma Activity in Humans during Propofol-Induced Sedation

    PubMed Central

    Diukova, Ana; Singh, Krish; Hall, Judith; Wise, Richard

    2013-01-01

    Stimulus-induced gamma oscillations in the 30–80 Hz range have been implicated in a wide number of functions including visual processing, memory and attention. While occipital gamma-band oscillations can be pharmacologically modified in animal preparations, pharmacological modulation of stimulus-induced visual gamma oscillations has yet to be demonstrated in non-invasive human recordings. Here, in fifteen healthy humans volunteers, we probed the effects of the GABAA agonist and sedative propofol on stimulus-related gamma activity recorded with magnetoencephalography, using a simple visual grating stimulus designed to elicit gamma oscillations in the primary visual cortex. During propofol sedation as compared to the normal awake state, a significant 60% increase in stimulus-induced gamma amplitude was seen together with a 94% enhancement of stimulus-induced alpha suppression and a simultaneous reduction in the amplitude of the pattern-onset evoked response. These data demonstrate, that propofol-induced sedation is accompanied by increased stimulus-induced gamma activity providing a potential window into mechanisms of gamma-oscillation generation in humans. PMID:23483920

  6. Ion-induced gammas for photofission interrogation of HEU.

    SciTech Connect

    Doyle, Barney Lee (Sandia National Laboratories, Albuquerque, NM); Antolak, Arlyn J.; Morse, Daniel H.; Provencio, Paula Polyak (Sandia National Laboratories, Albuquerque, NM)

    2006-03-01

    High-energy photons and neutrons can be used to actively interrogate for heavily shielded special nuclear material (SNM), such as HEU (highly enriched uranium), by detecting prompt and/or delayed induced fission signatures. In this work, we explore the underlying physics for a new type of photon source that generates high fluxes of mono-energetic gamma-rays from low-energy (<500 keV) proton-induced nuclear reactions. The characteristic energies (4- to 18-MeV) of the gamma-rays coincide with the peak of the photonuclear cross section. The source could be designed to produce gamma-rays of certain selected energies, thereby improving the probability of detecting shielded HEU or providing a capability to determine enrichment inside sealed containers. The fundamental physics of such an interrogation source were studied in this LDRD through scaled ion accelerator experiments and radiation transport modeling. The data were used to assess gamma and neutron yields, background, and photofission-induced signal levels from several (p,{gamma}) target materials under consideration.

  7. Evaluation of gamma interferon (IFN-gamma)-induced protein 10 (IP-10) responses for detection of cattle infected with Mycobacterium bovis: comparisons to IFN-gamma responses

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Gamma interferon (IFN-gamma)-induced protein 10 (IP-10) has recently shown promise as a diagnostic biomarker of Mycobacterium tuberculosis infection of humans. The aim of the current study was to compare IP-10 and IFN-gamma responses upon Mycobacterium bovis infection in cattle using archived sample...

  8. Induced Background in the Mars Observer Gamma-Ray Spectrometer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Boynton, William V.; Evans, Larry G.; Starr, Richard; Bruekner, Johnnes; Bailey, S. H.; Trombka, Jacob I.

    1997-01-01

    Gamma-Ray Spectrometers in space must necessarily work in an environment of a background of lines due to natural and cosmic-ray induced radioactivity and lines due to prompt emission following nuclear reactions caused by primary and secondary cosmic rays. The Gamma-Ray Spectrometer (GRS) on the Mar Observer mission has provided important data allowing one to estimate for future missions the extent of the background due to cosmic rays. These data will help in the design of instruments and in calculation of realistic background intensities that may effect the sensitivity of determining the intensity of lines of interest.

  9. Neutron-induced gamma-ray production

    SciTech Connect

    Nelson, R.O.; Drake, D.M.; Haight, R.C.; Laymon, C.M.; Wender, S.A.; Young, P.G. ); Drosg, M.; Pavlik, A.; Vonach, H. . Inst. fuer Radiumforschung und Kernphysik); Larson, D.C. )

    1990-01-01

    High resolution Ge detectors coupled with the WNR high-intensity, high-energy, pulsed neutron source at LAMPF recently have been used to measure a variety of reactions including (n,xn) for 1 {le} x {le} 11, (n,n{alpha}), (n,np), etc. The reactions are identified by the known gamma-ray energies of prompt transitions between the low lying states in the final nuclei. With our spallation neutron source cross section data are obtained at all neutron energies from a few MeV to over 200 MeV. Applications of the data range from assisting the interpretation of the planned Mars Observer mission to map the elemental composition of the martian surface, to providing data for nuclear model verification and understanding reaction mechanisms. For example, a study of the Pb(n,xn) reactions for 2 {le} x {le} 11 populating the first excited states of the even Pb isotopes is underway. These data will be used to test preequilibrium and other reaction models. 9 refs., 5 figs.

  10. Memory Retrieval Time and Memory Capacity of the CA3 Network: Role of Gamma Frequency Oscillations

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    de Almeida, Licurgo; Idiart, Marco; Lisman, John E.

    2007-01-01

    The existence of recurrent synaptic connections in CA3 led to the hypothesis that CA3 is an autoassociative network similar to the Hopfield networks studied by theorists. CA3 undergoes gamma frequency periodic inhibition that prevents a persistent attractor state. This argues against the analogy to Hopfield nets, in which an attractor state can be…

  11. Characterization of gamma radiation inducible thioredoxin h from Spirogyra varians.

    PubMed

    Yoon, Minchul; Yang, Ho-Yeon; Lee, Seung-Sik; Kim, Dong-Ho; Kim, Gwang-Hoon; Choi, Jong-il

    2013-08-15

    In this study, thioredoxin h (Trxh) was isolated and characterized from the fresh water green alga Spirogyra varians, which was one amongst the pool of proteins induced upon gamma radiation treatment. cDNA clones encoding S. varians thioredoxin h were isolated from a pre-constructed S. varians cDNA library. Trxh had a molecular mass of 13.5kDa and contained the canonical WCGPC active site. Recombinant Trxh showed the disulfide reduction activity, and exhibited insulin reduction activity. Also, Trxh had higher 5,5'-dithiobis(2-nitrobenzoic acid) reduction activity with Arabidopsis thioredoxin reductase (TR) than with Escherichia coli TR. Specific expression of the Trxh gene was further analyzed at mRNA and protein levels and was found to increase by gamma irradiation upto the absorbed dose of 3kGy, suggesting that Trxh may have potential functions in protection of biomolecules from gamma irradiation. PMID:23830452

  12. Reversible tobramycin-induced bilateral high-frequency vestibular toxicity.

    PubMed

    Walsh, R M; Bath, A P; Bance, M L

    2000-01-01

    We report an unusual case of tobramycin-induced bilateral high-frequency vestibular toxicity with subsequent clinical and objective evidence of functional recovery. In those patients with a clinical presentation suggestive of aminoglycoside-induced bilateral vestibular toxicity (ataxia and oscillopsia) and normal low-frequency (ENG-caloric) responses, high-frequency rotation chair testing should be performed to exclude a high-frequency vestibular deficit. PMID:10810261

  13. Increased frequency of {gamma}{delta} T cells in cerebrospinal fluid and peripheral blood of patients with multiple sclerosis: Reactivity, cytotoxicity, and T cell receptor V gene rearrangements

    SciTech Connect

    Stinissen, P.; Vandevyver, C.; Medaer, R.

    1995-05-01

    Infiltrating {gamma}{delta} T cells are potentially involved in the central nervous system demyelination in multiple sclerosis (MS). To further study this hypothesis, we analyzed the frequency and functional properties of {gamma}{delta} T cells in peripheral blood (PB) and paired cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) of patients with MS and control subjects, including patients with other neurologic diseases (OND) and healthy individuals. The frequency analysis was performed under limiting dilution condition using rIL-2 and PHA. After PHA stimulation, a significantly increased frequency of {gamma}{delta} T cells was observed in PB and in CSF of MS patients as compared with PB and CSF of patients with OND. The frequency was represented equally in OND patients and normal individuals. Similarly, the IL-2-responsive {gamma}{delta} T cells occurred at a higher frequency in PB of MS than of control subjects. Forty-three percent of the {gamma}{delta} T cell clones isolates from PB and CSF of MS patients responded to heat shock protein (HSP70) but not HSP65, whereas only 2 of 30 control {gamma}{delta} T cell clones reacted to the HSP. The majority of the {gamma}{delta} T cell clones were able to induce non-MHC-restricted cytolysis of Daudi cells. All clones displayed a substantial reactivity to bacterial superantigens staphylococcal enterotoxin B and toxic shock syndrome toxin-1, irrespective of their {gamma}{delta} V gene usage. Furthermore, the {gamma}{delta} T cell clones expressed predominantly TCRDV2 and GV2 genes, whereas the clones derived from CSF of MS patients expressed either DV1 or DV2 genes. The obtained {gamma}{delta} clones, in general, represented rather heterogeneous clonal origins, even though a predominant clonal origin was found in a set of 10 {gamma}{delta} clones derived from one patient with MS. The present study provides new evidence supporting a possible role of {gamma}{delta} T cells in the secondary inflammatory processes in MS. 39 refs., 5 figs., 4 tabs.

  14. Development of Sensory Gamma Oscillations and Cross-Frequency Coupling from Childhood to Early Adulthood

    PubMed Central

    Cho, Raymond Y.; Walker, Christopher P.; Polizzotto, Nicola R.; Wozny, Thomas A.; Fissell, Catherine; Chen, Chi-Ming A.; Lewis, David A.

    2015-01-01

    Given the importance of gamma oscillations in normal and disturbed cognition, there has been growing interest in their developmental trajectory. In the current study, age-related changes in sensory cortical gamma were studied using the auditory steady-state response (ASSR), indexing cortical activity entrained to a periodic auditory stimulus. A large sample (n = 188) aged 8–22 years had electroencephalography recording of ASSR during 20-, 30-, and 40-Hz click trains, analyzed for evoked amplitude, phase-locking factor (PLF) and cross-frequency coupling (CFC) with lower frequency oscillations. Both 40-Hz evoked power and PLF increased monotonically from 8 through 16 years, and subsequently decreased toward ages 20–22 years. CFC followed a similar pattern, with strongest age-related modulation of 40-Hz amplitude by the phase of delta oscillations. In contrast, the evoked power, PLF and CFC for the 20- and 30-Hz stimulation were distinct from the 40-Hz condition, with flat or decreasing profiles from childhood to early adulthood. The inverted U-shaped developmental trajectory of gamma oscillations may be consistent with interacting maturational processes—such as increasing fast GABA inhibition that enhances gamma activity and synaptic pruning that decreases gamma activity—that may continue from childhood through to adulthood. PMID:24334917

  15. Did gamma ray burst induce Cambrian explosion?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Pisin; Ruffini, R.

    2015-06-01

    One longstanding mystery in bio-evolution since Darwin's time is the origin of the Cambrian explosion that happened around 540 million years ago (Mya), where an extremely rapid increase of species occurred. Here we suggest that a nearby GRB event 500 parsecs away, which should occur about once per 5 Gy, might have triggered the Cambrian explosion. Due to a relatively lower cross section and the conservation of photon number in Compton scattering, a substantial fraction of the GRB photons can reach the sea level and would induce DNA mutations in organisms protected by a shallow layer of water or soil, thus expediting the bio-diversification. This possibility of inducing genetic mutations is unique among all candidate sources for major incidents in the history of bio-evolution. A possible evidence would be the anomalous abundance of certain nuclear isotopes with long half-lives transmuted by the GRB photons in geological records from the Cambrian period. Our notion also imposes constraints on the evolution of exoplanet organisms and the migration of panspermia.

  16. Explosive Material Identification via Neutron-Induced Gamma Rays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Freiberg, David; Litz, Marc

    2014-09-01

    With the increase in the usage of improvised explosive devices, both vehicle-borne and buried, it has become increasingly important to quickly identify potentially explosive materials before they can be detonated. In a field test performed in January of 2014, 14 MeV neutrons generated in a deuterium-tritium reaction induced gamma emissions in explosive material targets. The resulting gamma rays were counted in LaBr3 detectors in both a time-binned associated particle imaging (API) mode and a repetitively pulsed mode. The details of the resulting data sets were analyzed, and gamma lines for carbon, oxygen, and nitrogen were identified in the spectra produced by both modes. Post-test noise reduction techniques included empty hole background subtraction, Compton background subtraction, peak area integration, and time-of-flight gating. The induced C, O, and N gamma line intensities and ratios were compared to the elemental weight ratios expected for each type of material. The composition results are indicative of the known elemental weights in the target materials. The statistics are limited because of the short, 20 second data collection periods, and would improve greatly with longer exposure times in the future.

  17. Ontogeny of kainate-induced gamma oscillations in the rat CA3 hippocampus in vitro

    PubMed Central

    Tsintsadze, Vera; Minlebaev, Marat; Suchkov, Dimitry; Cunningham, Mark O.; Khazipov, Roustem

    2015-01-01

    GABAergic inhibition, which is instrumental in the generation of hippocampal gamma oscillations, undergoes significant changes during development. However, the development of hippocampal gamma oscillations remains largely unknown. Here, we explored the developmental features of kainate-induced oscillations (KA-Os) in CA3 region of rat hippocampal slices. Up to postnatal day P5, the bath application of kainate failed to evoke any detectable oscillations. KA-Os emerged by the end of the first postnatal week; these were initially weak, slow (20–25 Hz, beta range) and were poorly synchronized with CA3 units and synaptic currents. Local field potential (LFP) power, synchronization of units and frequency of KA-Os increased during the second postnatal week to attain gamma (30–40 Hz) frequency by P15–21. Both beta and gamma KA-Os are characterized by alternating sinks and sources in the pyramidal cell layer, likely generated by summation of the action potential—associated currents and GABAergic synaptic currents, respectively. Blockade of GABA(A) receptors with gabazine completely suppressed KA-Os at all ages indicating that GABAergic mechanisms are instrumental in their generation. Bumetanide, a NKCC1 chloride co-transporter antagonist which renders GABAergic responses inhibitory in the immature hippocampal neurons, failed to induce KA-Os at P2–4 indicating that the absence of KA-Os in neonates is not due to depolarizing actions of GABA. The linear developmental profile, electrographic features and pharmacological properties indicate that CA3 hippocampal beta and gamma KA-Os are fundamentally similar in their generative mechanisms and their delayed onset and developmental changes likely reflect the development of perisomatic GABAergic inhibition. PMID:26041996

  18. Central and Peripheral Metabolic Changes Induced by Gamma-Hydroxybutyrate

    PubMed Central

    Luca, Gianina; Vienne, Julie; Vaucher, Angélique; Jimenez, Sonia; Tafti, Mehdi

    2015-01-01

    Study Objectives: Gamma-hydroxybutyrate (GHB) was originally introduced as an anesthetic but was first abused by bodybuilders and then became a recreational or club drug.1 Sodium salt of GHB is currently used for the treatment of cataplexy in patients with narcolepsy. The mode of action and metabolism of GHB is not well understood. GHB stimulates growth hormone release in humans and induces weight loss in treated patients, suggesting an unexplored metabolic effect. In different experiments the effect of GHB administration on central (cerebral cortex) and peripheral (liver) biochemical processes involved in the metabolism of the drug, as well as the effects of the drug on metabolism, were evaluated in mice. Design: C57BL/6J, gamma-aminobutyric acid B (GABAB) knockout and obese (ob/ob) mice were acutely or chronically treated with GHB at 300 mg/kg. Measurements and Results: Respiratory ratio decreased under GHB treatment, independent of food intake, suggesting a shift in energy substrate from carbohydrates to lipids. GHB-treated C57BL/6J and GABAB null mice but not ob/ob mice gained less weight than matched controls. GHB dramatically increased the corticosterone level but did not affect growth hormone or prolactin. Metabolome profiling showed that an acute high dose of GHB did not increase the brain GABA level. In the brain and the liver, GHB was metabolized into succinic semialdehyde by hydroxyacid-oxoacid transhydrogenase. Chronic administration decreased glutamate, s-adenosylhomocysteine, and oxidized gluthathione, and increased omega-3 fatty acids. Conclusions: Our findings indicate large central and peripheral metabolic changes induced by gamma-hydroxybutyrate (GHB) with important relevance to its therapeutic use. Citation: Luca G, Vienne J, Vaucher A, Jimenez S, Tafti M. Central and peripheral metabolic changes induced by gamma-hydroxybutyrate. SLEEP 2015;38(2):305–313. PMID:25515097

  19. Stimulus-induced and state-dependent sustained gamma activity is tightly coupled to the hemodynamic response in humans.

    PubMed

    Koch, Stefan P; Werner, Peter; Steinbrink, Jens; Fries, Pascal; Obrig, Hellmuth

    2009-11-01

    A prompt behavioral response to a stimulus depends both on the salience of the stimulus as well as the subject's preparedness. Thus, both stimulus properties and cognitive factors, such as attention, may determine the strength of neuronal synchronization in the gamma range. For a comprehensive investigation of stimulus-response processing through noninvasive imaging, it is, however, a crucial issue whether both kinds of gamma modulation elicit a hemodynamic response. Here, we show that, in the human visual cortex, stimulus strength and internal state modulate sustained gamma activity and hemodynamic response in close correspondence. When participants reported velocity changes of gratings varying in contrast, gamma activity (35-70 Hz) increased systematically with contrast. For stimuli of constant contrast, the amplitude of gamma activity before the behaviorally relevant velocity change was inversely correlated to the behavioral response latency. This indicates that gamma activity also reflects an overall attentive state. For both sources of variance, gamma activity was tightly coupled to the hemodynamic response measured through optical topography. Because of the close relationship between high-frequency neuronal activity and the hemodynamic signal, we conclude that both stimulus-induced and state-dependent gamma activity trigger a metabolic demand and are amenable to vascular-based imaging. PMID:19890006

  20. Alpha particle induced gamma yields in uranium hexafluoride

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Croft, Stephen; Swinhoe, Martyn T.; Miller, Karen A.

    2013-01-01

    Fluorine has a relatively large (α,n) production cross-section in the MeV range, the energy range of interest for special nuclear materials. In the uranium fuel cycle enriched UF6 in particular is a reasonably prolific source of (α,n) neutrons because along with 235U, 234U becomes enriched and it has a relatively short half-life. This enables the mass content of storage cylinders containing UF6 to be verified by neutron counting methods. In association with such measurements high resolution gamma-ray spectrometry (HRGS) measurements using a high-purity Ge detector are often undertaken to determine the 235U enrichment based off the intensity of the direct 186 keV line. The specific (α,n) neutron production, neutrons per second per gram of U, is sensitive to the relative isotopic composition, particularly the 234U concentration, and the traditional gross neutron counting approach is needed to quantitatively interpret the data. In addition to F(α,n) neutrons, α-induced reaction γ-rays are generated, notably at 110, 197, 582, 891, 1236 and 1275 keV. If one could observe 19F(α,xγ) gamma-lines in the HRGS spectra the thought was that perhaps the α-activity could be estimated directly, and in turn the 234U abundance obtained. For example, by utilizing the ratio of the detected 197-186 keV full energy peaks. However, until now there has been no readily available estimate of the expected strength of the reaction gamma-rays nor any serious consideration as to whether they might be diagnostic or not. In this work we compute the thick target yields of the chief reaction gamma-rays in UF6 using published thin target data. Comparisons are made to the neutron production rates to obtain γ/n estimates, and also to the 235U decay line at 186 keV which we take as a fiducial line. It is shown that the reaction gamma-rays are produced but are far too weak for practical safeguards purposes. Now that the underlying numerical data is readily available however, it can be used to

  1. Areas V1 and V2 show microsaccade-related 3-4-Hz covariation in gamma power and frequency.

    PubMed

    Lowet, E; Roberts, M J; Bosman, C A; Fries, P; De Weerd, P

    2016-05-01

    Neuronal gamma-band synchronization (25-80 Hz) in visual cortex appears sustained and stable during prolonged visual stimulation when investigated with conventional averages across trials. However, recent studies in macaque visual cortex have used single-trial analyses to show that both power and frequency of gamma oscillations exhibit substantial moment-by-moment variation. This has raised the question of whether these apparently random variations might limit the functional role of gamma-band synchronization for neural processing. Here, we studied the moment-by-moment variation in gamma oscillation power and frequency, as well as inter-areal gamma synchronization, by simultaneously recording local field potentials in V1 and V2 of two macaque monkeys. We additionally analyzed electrocorticographic V1 data from a third monkey. Our analyses confirm that gamma-band synchronization is not stationary and sustained but undergoes moment-by-moment variations in power and frequency. However, those variations are neither random and nor a possible obstacle to neural communication. Instead, the gamma power and frequency variations are highly structured, shared between areas and shaped by a microsaccade-related 3-4-Hz theta rhythm. Our findings provide experimental support for the suggestion that cross-frequency coupling might structure and facilitate the information flow between brain regions. PMID:26547390

  2. Electron heating mode transition induced by mixing radio frequency and ultrahigh frequency dual frequency powers in capacitive discharges

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sahu, B. B.; Han, Jeon G.

    2016-05-01

    Electron heating mode transitions induced by mixing the low- and high-frequency power in dual-frequency nitrogen discharges at 400 mTorr pressure are presented. As the low-frequency (13.56 MHz) power decreases and high-frequency (320 MHz) power increases for the fixed power of 200 W, there is a transition of electron energy distribution function (EEDF) from Druyvesteyn to bi-Maxwellian type characterized by a distinguished warm electron population. It is shown that this EEDF evolution is attributed to the transition from collisional to collisionless stochastic heating of the low-energy electrons.

  3. UNVEILING THE NATURE OF THE UNIDENTIFIED GAMMA-RAY SOURCES. III. GAMMA-RAY BLAZAR-LIKE COUNTERPARTS AT LOW RADIO FREQUENCIES

    SciTech Connect

    Massaro, F.; Funk, S.; D'Abrusco, R.; Paggi, A.; Giroletti, M.; Masetti, N.; Tosti, G.; Nori, M.

    2013-07-01

    About one-third of the {gamma}-ray sources listed in the second Fermi Large Area Telescope catalog (2FGL) have no firmly established counterpart at lower energies and so are classified as unidentified gamma-ray sources (UGSs). Here, we propose a new approach to find candidate counterparts for the UGSs based on the 325 MHz radio survey performed with the Westerbork Synthesis Radio Telescope in the northern hemisphere. First, we investigate the low-frequency radio properties of blazars, the largest known population of {gamma}-ray sources; then we search for sources with similar radio properties combining the information derived from the Westerbork Northern Sky Survey (WENSS) with those of the NRAO Very Large Array Sky Survey. We present a list of candidate counterparts for 32 UGSs with at least one counterpart in the WENSS. We also performed an extensive research in the literature to look for infrared and optical counterparts of the {gamma}-ray blazar candidates selected using the low-frequency radio observations to confirm their nature. On the basis of our multifrequency research, we identify 23 new {gamma}-ray blazar candidates out of the 32 UGSs investigated. Comparison with previous results on the UGSs is also presented. Finally, we speculate on the advantages of using low-frequency radio observations to associate UGSs and to search for {gamma}-ray pulsar candidates.

  4. Individual differences and specificity of prefrontal gamma frequency-tACS on fluid intelligence capabilities.

    PubMed

    Santarnecchi, E; Muller, T; Rossi, S; Sarkar, A; Polizzotto, N R; Rossi, A; Cohen Kadosh, R

    2016-02-01

    Emerging evidence suggests that transcranial alternating current stimulation (tACS) is an effective, frequency-specific modulator of endogenous brain oscillations, with the potential to alter cognitive performance. Here, we show that reduction in response latencies to solve complex logic problem indexing fluid intelligence is obtained through 40 Hz-tACS (gamma band) applied to the prefrontal cortex. This improvement in human performance depends on individual ability, with slower performers at baseline receiving greater benefits. The effect could have not being explained by regression to the mean, and showed task and frequency specificity: it was not observed for trials not involving logical reasoning, as well as with the application of low frequency 5 Hz-tACS (theta band) or non-periodic high frequency random noise stimulation (101-640 Hz). Moreover, performance in a spatial working memory task was not affected by brain stimulation, excluding possible effects on fluid intelligence enhancement through an increase in memory performance. We suggest that such high-level cognitive functions are dissociable by frequency-specific neuromodulatory effects, possibly related to entrainment of specific brain rhythms. We conclude that individual differences in cognitive abilities, due to acquired or developmental origins, could be reduced during frequency-specific tACS, a finding that should be taken into account for future individual cognitive rehabilitation studies. PMID:26707084

  5. Photon-induced positron annihilation lifetime spectroscopy using ultrashort laser-Compton-scattered gamma-ray pulses.

    PubMed

    Taira, Y; Toyokawa, H; Kuroda, R; Yamamoto, N; Adachi, M; Tanaka, S; Katoh, M

    2013-05-01

    High-energy ultrashort gamma-ray pulses can be generated via laser Compton scattering with 90° collisions at the UVSOR-II electron storage ring. As an applied study of ultrashort gamma-ray pulses, a new photon-induced positron annihilation lifetime spectroscopy approach has been developed. Ultrashort gamma-ray pulses with a maximum energy of 6.6 MeV and pulse width of 2.2 ps created positrons throughout bulk lead via pair production. Annihilation gamma rays were detected by a BaF2 scintillator mounted on a photomultiplier tube. A positron lifetime spectrum was obtained by measuring the time difference between the RF frequency of the electron storage ring and the detection time of the annihilation gamma rays. We calculated the response of the BaF2 scintillator and the time jitter caused by the variation in the total path length of the ultrashort gamma-ray pulses, annihilation gamma rays, and scintillation light using a Monte Carlo simulation code. The positron lifetime for bulk lead was successfully measured. PMID:23742543

  6. Photon-induced positron annihilation lifetime spectroscopy using ultrashort laser-Compton-scattered gamma-ray pulses

    SciTech Connect

    Taira, Y.; Toyokawa, H.; Kuroda, R.; Yamamoto, N.; Adachi, M.; Tanaka, S.; Katoh, M.

    2013-05-15

    High-energy ultrashort gamma-ray pulses can be generated via laser Compton scattering with 90 Degree-Sign collisions at the UVSOR-II electron storage ring. As an applied study of ultrashort gamma-ray pulses, a new photon-induced positron annihilation lifetime spectroscopy approach has been developed. Ultrashort gamma-ray pulses with a maximum energy of 6.6 MeV and pulse width of 2.2 ps created positrons throughout bulk lead via pair production. Annihilation gamma rays were detected by a BaF{sub 2} scintillator mounted on a photomultiplier tube. A positron lifetime spectrum was obtained by measuring the time difference between the RF frequency of the electron storage ring and the detection time of the annihilation gamma rays. We calculated the response of the BaF{sub 2} scintillator and the time jitter caused by the variation in the total path length of the ultrashort gamma-ray pulses, annihilation gamma rays, and scintillation light using a Monte Carlo simulation code. The positron lifetime for bulk lead was successfully measured.

  7. Photon-induced positron annihilation lifetime spectroscopy using ultrashort laser-Compton-scattered gamma-ray pulses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Taira, Y.; Toyokawa, H.; Kuroda, R.; Yamamoto, N.; Adachi, M.; Tanaka, S.; Katoh, M.

    2013-05-01

    High-energy ultrashort gamma-ray pulses can be generated via laser Compton scattering with 90° collisions at the UVSOR-II electron storage ring. As an applied study of ultrashort gamma-ray pulses, a new photon-induced positron annihilation lifetime spectroscopy approach has been developed. Ultrashort gamma-ray pulses with a maximum energy of 6.6 MeV and pulse width of 2.2 ps created positrons throughout bulk lead via pair production. Annihilation gamma rays were detected by a BaF2 scintillator mounted on a photomultiplier tube. A positron lifetime spectrum was obtained by measuring the time difference between the RF frequency of the electron storage ring and the detection time of the annihilation gamma rays. We calculated the response of the BaF2 scintillator and the time jitter caused by the variation in the total path length of the ultrashort gamma-ray pulses, annihilation gamma rays, and scintillation light using a Monte Carlo simulation code. The positron lifetime for bulk lead was successfully measured.

  8. Cell death is induced by ciglitazone, a peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor {gamma} (PPAR{gamma}) agonist, independently of PPAR{gamma} in human glioma cells

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, Myoung Woo; Kim, Dae Seong; Kim, Hye Ryung; Kim, Hye Jin; Yang, Jin Mo; Ryu, Somi; Noh, Yoo Hun; Lee, Soo Hyun; Son, Meong Hi; Jung, Hye Lim; Yoo, Keon Hee; Koo, Hong Hoe; Sung, Ki Woong

    2012-01-06

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Greater than 30 {mu}M ciglitazone induces cell death in glioma cells. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Cell death by ciglitazone is independent of PPAR{gamma} in glioma cells. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer CGZ induces cell death by the loss of MMP via decreased Akt. -- Abstract: Peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor {gamma} (PPAR{gamma}) regulates multiple signaling pathways, and its agonists induce apoptosis in various cancer cells. However, their role in cell death is unclear. In this study, the relationship between ciglitazone (CGZ) and PPAR{gamma} in CGZ-induced cell death was examined. At concentrations of greater than 30 {mu}M, CGZ, a synthetic PPAR{gamma} agonist, activated caspase-3 and induced apoptosis in T98G cells. Treatment of T98G cells with less than 30 {mu}M CGZ effectively induced cell death after pretreatment with 30 {mu}M of the PPAR{gamma} antagonist GW9662, although GW9662 alone did not induce cell death. This cell death was also observed when cells were co-treated with CGZ and GW9662, but was not observed when cells were treated with CGZ prior to GW9662. In cells in which PPAR{gamma} was down-regulated cells by siRNA, lower concentrations of CGZ (<30 {mu}M) were sufficient to induce cell death, although higher concentrations of CGZ ( Greater-Than-Or-Slanted-Equal-To 30 {mu}M) were required to induce cell death in control T98G cells, indicating that CGZ effectively induces cell death in T98G cells independently of PPAR{gamma}. Treatment with GW9662 followed by CGZ resulted in a down-regulation of Akt activity and the loss of mitochondrial membrane potential (MMP), which was accompanied by a decrease in Bcl-2 expression and an increase in Bid cleavage. These data suggest that CGZ is capable of inducing apoptotic cell death independently of PPAR{gamma} in glioma cells, by down-regulating Akt activity and inducing MMP collapse.

  9. Cholinergic Blockade Reduces Theta-Gamma Phase Amplitude Coupling and Speed Modulation of Theta Frequency Consistent with Behavioral Effects on Encoding

    PubMed Central

    Gillet, Shea N.; Climer, Jason R.; Hasselmo, Michael E.

    2013-01-01

    Large-scale neural activation dynamics in the hippocampal-entorhinal circuit local field potential, observable as theta and gamma rhythms and coupling between these rhythms, is predictive of encoding success. Behavioral studies show that systemic administration of muscarinic acetylcholine receptor antagonists selectively impairs encoding, suggesting that they may also disrupt the coupling between the theta and gamma bands. Here, we tested the hypothesis that muscarinic antagonists selectively disrupt coupling between theta and gamma. Specifically, we characterized the effects of systemically administered scopolamine on movement-induced theta and gamma rhythms recorded in the superficial layers of the medial entorhinal cortex (MEC) of freely moving rats. We report the novel result that gamma power at the peak of theta was most reduced following muscarinic blockade, significantly shifting the phase of maximal gamma power to occur at later phases of theta. We also characterize the existence of multiple distinct gamma bands in the superficial layers of the MEC. Further, we observed that theta frequency was significantly less modulated by movement speed following muscarinic blockade. Finally, the slope relating speed to theta frequency, a correlate of familiarity with a testing enclosure, increased significantly less between the preinjection and recovery trials when scopolamine was administered during the intervening injection session than when saline was administered, suggesting that scopolamine reduced encoding of the testing enclosure. These data are consistent with computational models suggesting that encoding and retrieval occur during the peak and trough of theta, respectively, and support the theory that acetylcholine regulates the balance between encoding versus retrieval. PMID:24336727

  10. Comparative gene expression profiles induced by PPAR{gamma} and PPAR{alpha}/{gamma} agonists in rat hepatocytes

    SciTech Connect

    Rogue, Alexandra; Renaud, Marie Pierre; Claude, Nancy; Guillouzo, Andre; Spire, Catherine

    2011-07-01

    Species-differential toxic effects have been described with PPAR{alpha} and PPAR{gamma} agonists between rodent and human liver. PPAR{alpha} agonists (fibrates) are potent hypocholesterolemic agents in humans while they induce peroxisome proliferation and tumors in rodent liver. By contrast, PPAR{gamma} agonists (glitazones) and even dual PPAR{alpha}/{gamma} agonists (glitazars) have caused idiosyncratic hepatic and nonhepatic toxicities in human without evidence of any damage in rodent during preclinical studies. The mechanisms involved in such differences remain largely unknown. Several studies have identified the major target genes of PPAR{alpha} agonists in rodent liver while no comprehensive analysis has been performed on gene expression changes induced by PPAR{gamma} and dual PPAR{alpha}/{gamma} agonists. Here, we investigated transcriptomes of rat hepatocytes after 24 h treatment with two PPAR{gamma} (troglitazone and rosiglitazone) and two PPAR{alpha}/{gamma} (muraglitazar and tesaglitazar) agonists. Although, hierarchical clustering revealed a gene expression profile characteristic of each PPAR agonist class, only a limited number of genes was specifically deregulated by glitazars. Functional analyses showed that many genes known as PPAR{alpha} targets were also modulated by both PPAR{gamma} and PPAR{alpha}/{gamma} agonists and quantitative differences in gene expression profiles were observed between these two classes. Moreover, most major genes modulated in rat hepatocytes were also found to be deregulated in rat liver after tesaglitazar treatment. Taken altogether, these results support the conclusion that differential toxic effects of PPAR{alpha} and PPAR{gamma} agonists in rodent liver do not result from transcriptional deregulation of major PPAR target genes but rather from qualitative and/or quantitative differential responses of a small subset of genes.

  11. Lymphocytes from wasted mice express enhanced spontaneous and {gamma}-ray-induced apoptosis

    SciTech Connect

    Woloschak, G.E. |; Chang-Liu, Chin-Mei; Chung, Jen; Libertin, C.R.

    1993-09-01

    Mice bearing the autosomal recessive mutation wasted (wst/wst) display a disease pattern including faulty repair of DNA damage in lymphocytes after radiation exposure, neurologic abnormalities, and immunodeficiency. Many of the features of this mouse model have suggested a premature or increased spontaneous frequency of apoptosis in thymocytes; past work has shown an inability to establish cultured T cell lines, an abnormally high death rate of stimulated T cells in culture, and an increased sensitivity of T cells to the killing effects of ionizing radiations in wst/wst mice relative to controls. The experiments reported here were designed to examine splenic and thymic lymphocytes from wasted and control mice for signs of early apoptosis. Our results revealed enhanced expression of Rp-8 mRNA (associated with apoptosis) in thymic lymphocytes and reduced expression in splenic lymphocytes of wst/wst mice relative to controls; expression of Rp-2 and Td-30 mRNA (induced during apoptosis) were not detectable in spleen or thymus. Higher spontaneous DNA fragmentation was observed in wasted mice than in controls; however, {gamma}-ray-induced DNA fragmentation peaked at a lower dose and occurred to a greater extent in wasted mice relative to controls. These results provide evidence for high spontaneous and {gamma}-ray-induced apoptosis in T cells of wasted mice as a mechanism underlying the observed lymphocyte and DNA repair abnormalities.

  12. GABAB receptor-mediated, layer-specific synaptic plasticity reorganizes gamma-frequency neocortical response to stimulation.

    PubMed

    Ainsworth, Matthew; Lee, Shane; Kaiser, Marcus; Simonotto, Jennifer; Kopell, Nancy J; Whittington, Miles A

    2016-05-10

    Repeated presentations of sensory stimuli generate transient gamma-frequency (30-80 Hz) responses in neocortex that show plasticity in a task-dependent manner. Complex relationships between individual neuronal outputs and the mean, local field potential (population activity) accompany these changes, but little is known about the underlying mechanisms responsible. Here we show that transient stimulation of input layer 4 sufficient to generate gamma oscillations induced two different, lamina-specific plastic processes that correlated with lamina-specific changes in responses to further, repeated stimulation: Unit rates and recruitment showed overall enhancement in supragranular layers and suppression in infragranular layers associated with excitatory or inhibitory synaptic potentiation onto principal cells, respectively. Both synaptic processes were critically dependent on activation of GABAB receptors and, together, appeared to temporally segregate the cortical representation. These data suggest that adaptation to repetitive sensory input dramatically alters the spatiotemporal properties of the neocortical response in a manner that may both refine and minimize cortical output simultaneously. PMID:27118845

  13. GABAB receptor-mediated, layer-specific synaptic plasticity reorganizes gamma-frequency neocortical response to stimulation

    PubMed Central

    Ainsworth, Matthew; Lee, Shane; Kaiser, Marcus; Simonotto, Jennifer; Kopell, Nancy J.

    2016-01-01

    Repeated presentations of sensory stimuli generate transient gamma-frequency (30–80 Hz) responses in neocortex that show plasticity in a task-dependent manner. Complex relationships between individual neuronal outputs and the mean, local field potential (population activity) accompany these changes, but little is known about the underlying mechanisms responsible. Here we show that transient stimulation of input layer 4 sufficient to generate gamma oscillations induced two different, lamina-specific plastic processes that correlated with lamina-specific changes in responses to further, repeated stimulation: Unit rates and recruitment showed overall enhancement in supragranular layers and suppression in infragranular layers associated with excitatory or inhibitory synaptic potentiation onto principal cells, respectively. Both synaptic processes were critically dependent on activation of GABAB receptors and, together, appeared to temporally segregate the cortical representation. These data suggest that adaptation to repetitive sensory input dramatically alters the spatiotemporal properties of the neocortical response in a manner that may both refine and minimize cortical output simultaneously. PMID:27118845

  14. Southern analysis of genomic alterations in gamma-ray-induced aprt- hamster cell mutants

    SciTech Connect

    Grosovsky, A.J.; Drobetsky, E.A.; deJong, P.J.; Glickman, B.W.

    1986-06-01

    The role of genomic alterations in mutagenesis induced by ionizing radiation has been the subject of considerable speculation. By Southern blotting analysis we show here that 9 of 55 (approximately 1/6) gamma-ray-induced mutants at the adenine phosphoribosyl transferase (aprt) locus of Chinese hamster ovary (CHO) cells have a detectable genomic rearrangement. These fall into two classes: intragenic deletions and chromosomal rearrangements. In contrast, no major genomic alterations were detected among 67 spontaneous mutants, although two restriction site loss events were observed. Three gamma-ray-induced mutants were found to be intragenic deletions; all may have identical break-points. The remaining six gamma-ray-induced mutants demonstrating a genomic alteration appear to be the result of chromosomal rearrangements, possibly translocation or inversion events. None of the remaining gamma-ray-induced mutants showed any observable alteration in blotting pattern indicating a substantial role for point mutation in gamma-ray-induced mutagenesis at the aprt locus.

  15. Gamma Radiation Induced Calibration Shift for Four Cryogenic Thermometer Types

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Courts, S. Scott; Yeager, C. J.

    2004-06-01

    Cryogenic temperature sensors utilized in space environments are exposed to ionizing radiation with the total dose dependent upon the length of the mission. Based upon their minimal size and robust packaging, four models of cryogenic Resistance Thermometer Devices (RTDs) manufactured by Lake Shore Cryotronics, Inc. were tested to determine their reliability for space applications with regard to radiation. Samples of Cernox™ RTDs (CX-1050-SD), ruthenium oxide RTDs (models RX-102A-AA and RX-103A-AA), and silicon diode thermometers (model DT-670-SD) were irradiated at room temperature by a cesium-137 gamma source to total doses ranging from 5 Gy to 10 kGy. This paper presents the resulting temperature shifts induced by the gamma radiation as a function of total dose over the 1.4 K to 325 K temperature range. These data show that 1) Cernox™ RTDs exhibit high radiation hardness to 10 kGy from 1.4 K to 325 K, 2) ruthenium oxide RTDs show moderate radiation hardness to 10 kGy below 10 K, and 3) silicon diodes temperature sensors exhibit some radiation tolerance to low levels of radiation (especially below 70 K), but quickly shift calibration at radiation levels above 300 Gy, especially above 100 K.

  16. Clonally Expanding Thymocytes Having Lineage Capability in Gamma-Ray-Induced Mouse Atrophic Thymus

    SciTech Connect

    Yamamoto, Takashi; Morita, Shin-ichi; Go, Rieka; Obata, Miki; Katsuragi, Yoshinori; Fujita, Yukari; Maeda, Yoshitaka; Yokoyama, Minesuke; Aoyagi, Yutaka; Ichikawa, Hitoshi; Mishima, Yukio; Kominami, Ryo

    2010-05-01

    Purpose: To characterize, in the setting of gamma-ray-induced atrophic thymus, probable prelymphoma cells showing clonal growth and changes in signaling, including DNA damage checkpoint. Methods and Materials: A total of 111 and 45 mouse atrophic thymuses at 40 and 80 days, respectively, after gamma-irradiation were analyzed with polymerase chain reaction for D-J rearrangements at the TCRbeta locus, flow cytometry for cell cycle, and Western blotting for the activation of DNA damage checkpoints. Results: Limited D-J rearrangement patterns distinct from normal thymus were detected at high frequencies (43 of 111 for 40-day thymus and 21 of 45 for 80-day thymus). Those clonally expanded thymocytes mostly consisted of CD4{sup +}CD8{sup +} double-positive cells, indicating the retention of lineage capability. They exhibited pausing at a late G1 phase of cell cycle progression but did not show the activation of DNA damage checkpoints such as gammaH2AX, Chk1/2, or p53. Of interest is that 17 of the 52 thymuses showing normal D-J rearrangement patterns at 40 days after irradiation showed allelic loss at the Bcl11b tumor suppressor locus, also indicating clonal expansion. Conclusion: The thymocytes of clonal growth detected resemble human chronic myeloid leukemia in possessing self-renewal and lineage capability, and therefore they can be a candidate of the lymphoma-initiating cells.

  17. Gamma Ray and Very Low Frequency Radio Observations from a Balloon-Borne Platform

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Quinn, C.; Sheldon, A.; Cully, C. M.; Davalos, A.; Osakwe, C.; Galts, D.; Delfin, J.; Duffin, C.; Mansell, J.; Russel, M.; Bootsma, M.; Williams, R.; Patrick, M.; Mazzino, M. L.; Knudsen, D. J.

    2015-12-01

    The University of Calgary's Student Organization for Aerospace Research (SOAR) built an instrument to participate in the High Altitude Student Platform (HASP) initiative organized by Louisiana State University and supported by the NASA Balloon Program Office (BPO) and the Louisiana Space Consortium (LaSPACE). The HASP platform will be launched in early September 2015 from Fort Sumner, New Mexico and will reach heights of 36 kilometers with a flight duration of 15 to 20 hours. The instrument, Atmospheric Phenomenon Observer Gamma/VLF Emissions Experiment (APOGEE), measures Terrestrial Gamma-Ray Flashes (TGF) and sferics from lightning strikes with the use of Geiger tubes and a VLF detector. TGFs, which are quick bursts of high energy radiation that can occur alongside lightning, are believed to be the result of Relativistic Runaway Electron Avalanche (RREA). RREA occurs when a large number of relativistic electrons overcome atmospheric frictional forces and accelerate to relativistic velocities which excite secondary electrons that collide with the atmosphere causing bremsstrahlung radiation. Lightning strikes also produce sferics within the Extremely Low Frequency (ELF) and Very Low Frequency (VLF) bands which can be detected and used to locate the strikes. The goal of APOGEE is to further investigate the link between TGFs and RREA. These phenomena are very difficult to measure together as Bremsstrahlung radiation is easily detected from space but ionospheric reflection facilitates surface detection of sferics. A high altitude balloon provides a unique opportunity to study both phenomena using one instrument because both phenomena can easily be detected from its altitude. APOGEE has been designed and built by undergraduate students at the University of Calgary with faculty assistance and funding, and is equipped with three devices for data collection: a camera to have visual conformation of events, a series of Geiger Tubes to obtain directional gamma readings, and

  18. Beta and gamma frequency-range abnormalities in parkinsonian patients under cognitive sensorimotor task.

    PubMed

    Dushanova, Juliana; Philipova, Dolja; Nikolova, Gloria

    2010-06-15

    Parkinson's disease (PD) is a neurodegenerative disorder caused by a disruption of dopaminergic neurotransmission in the basal ganglia. Some of PD clinical symptoms are suggested to stem directly from the excessive synchrony between the basal ganglia and cortical circuits. Our present investigation explores the functional relationships between event-related desynchronization/synchronization (ERD/ERS) of beta and gamma band activity for idiopathic non-demented Parkinson's patients (PP) and control subjects (CS) during auditory discrimination tasks between two tone types (LT: 800 Hz, HT: 1000 Hz) within two post-stimulus intervals of 0-250 and 250-600 ms. Beta1 (13-20 Hz) ERD was found for both groups within both intervals more expressed in CS except for frontal beta1 synchronization in CS during the second interval. Beta2 (20-32 Hz) ERD was revealed in CS after both tones during both post-stimulus intervals. Beta2 ERS was only observed in PP. The most prominent beta2 ERS followed HT during the second interval. Gamma frequency (32-50 Hz) ERD was found in both groups except for fronto-parietal ERS for PP during the first interval after LT. During the second interval, either tone, we found prominent ERS for PP and ERD for CS everywhere except for a frontal ERS after HT. Deviations of the beta and gamma ERD/ERS for the PP compared with CS during the sensorimotor and cognitive processing are a clear evidence for disturbances in the temporal and regional integration of these frequency components and the relationships between cortical and the basal ganglia circuits in parkinsonism. PMID:20392453

  19. Early and Late Chromosome Damages in Human Lymphocytes Induced by Gamma Rays and Fe Ions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sunagawa, Mayumi; Zhang, Ye; Yeshitla, Samrawit; Kadhim, Munira; Wilson, Bobby; Wu, Honglu

    2014-01-01

    Chromosomal translocations and inversions are considered stable, and cells containing these types of chromosome aberrations can survive multiple cell divisions. An efficient method to detect an inversion is multi-color banding fluorescent in situ hybridization (mBAND) which allows identification of both inter- and intrachromosome aberrations simultaneously. Post irradiation, chromosome aberrations may also arise after multiple cell divisions as a result of genomic instability. To investigate the stable or late-arising chromosome aberrations induced after radiation exposure, we exposed human lymphocytes to gamma rays and Fe ions ex vivo, and cultured the cells for multiple generations. Chromosome aberrations were analyzed in cells collected at first mitosis and at several time intervals during the culture period post irradiation. With gamma irradiation, about half of the damages observed at first mitosis remained after 7 day- and 14 day- culture, suggesting the transmissibility of damages to the surviving progeny. Detailed analysis of chromosome break ends participating in exchanges revealed a greater fraction of break ends involved in intrachromosome aberrations in the 7- and 14-day samples in comparison to the fraction at first mitosis. In particular, simple inversions were found at 7 and 14 days, but not at the first mitosis, suggesting that some of the aberrations might be formed days post irradiation. In contrast, at the doses that produced similar frequencies of gamma-induced chromosome aberrations as observed at first mitosis, a significantly lower yield of aberrations remained at the same population doublings after Fe ion exposure. At these equitoxic doses, more complex type aberrations were observed for Fe ions, indicating that Fe ion-induced initial chromosome damages are more severe and may lead to cell death. Comparison between low and high doses of Fe ion irradiation in the induction of late damages will also be discussed.

  20. Mechanism of interferon-gamma-induced increase in T84 intestinal epithelial tight junction.

    PubMed

    Boivin, Michel A; Roy, Praveen K; Bradley, Angela; Kennedy, John C; Rihani, Tuhama; Ma, Thomas Y

    2009-01-01

    Interferon-gamma (IFN-gamma) is an important proinflammatory cytokine that plays a central role in the intestinal inflammatory process of inflammatory bowel disease. IFN-gamma induced disturbance of the intestinal epithelial tight junction (TJ) barrier has been postulated to be an important mechanism contributing to intestinal inflammation. The intracellular mechanisms that mediate the IFN-gamma induced increase in intestinal TJ permeability remain unclear. The aim of this study was to examine the role of the phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase (PI3-K) pathway in the regulation of the IFN-gamma induced increase in intestinal TJ permeability using the T84 intestinal epithelial cell line. IFN-gamma caused an increase in T84 intestinal epithelial TJ permeability and depletion of TJ protein, occludin. The IFN-gamma induced increase in TJ permeability and alteration in occludin protein was associated with rapid activation of PI3-K; and inhibition of PI3-K activation prevented the IFN-gamma induced effects. IFN-gamma also caused a delayed but more prolonged activation of nuclear factor-kappaB (NF-kappaB); inhibition of NF-kappaB also prevented the increase in T84 TJ permeability and alteration in occludin expression. The IFN-gamma induced activation of NF-kappaB was mediated by a cross-talk with PI3-K pathway. In conclusion, the IFN-gamma induced increase in T84 TJ permeability and alteration in occludin protein expression were mediated by the PI3-K pathway. These results show for the first time that the IFN-gamma modulation of TJ protein and TJ barrier function is regulated by a cross-talk between PI3-K and NF-kappaB pathways. PMID:19128033

  1. Repeated doses of gamma rays induce resistance to N-methyl-N'-nitro-N-nitrosoguanidine in Chinese hamster cells

    SciTech Connect

    Osmak, M.

    1988-09-01

    Chinese hamster V79 cells were preirradiated repeatedly with gamma rays and then exposed to ultraviolet (uv) light or N-methyl-N'-nitro-N-nitrosoguanidine (MNNG). The cell killing and induction of mutation at the hypoxanthine-guanine phosphoribosyltransferase locus were examined following these treatments. Cells preirradiated with multiple fractions of gamma rays exhibit the same sensitivity to uv light as the control cells with respect to cell survival and mutation induction. Following treatment with MNNG, resistance to cell killing was observed along with a decreased frequency of mutations induced. These results indicate that the progeny of cells irradiated with multiple fractions of gamma rays could display subsequent changes in sensitivity to lethal and mutagenic effects of additional treatment with DNA-damaging agents.

  2. Atomic jump frequencies in intermetallic compounds studied using perturbed angular correlation of gamma rays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Newhouse, Randal Leslie

    Atomic jump frequencies were determined in a variety of intermetallic compounds through analysis of nuclear relaxation of spectra measured using the nuclear hyperfine technique, perturbed angular correlation (PAC) of gamma rays. Observed at higher temperatures, this relaxation is attributed to fluctuations in the orientation or magnitude of electric field gradients (EFG) at nuclei of 111In/Cd probe atoms as the atoms make diffusive jumps. Jump frequencies were obtained by fitting dynamically relaxed PAC spectra using either an empirical relaxation function or using ab initio relaxation models created using the program PolyPacFit. Jump frequency activation enthalpies were determined from measurements over a range of temperatures. Diffusion was studied in the following systems: 1) Pseudo-binary alloys having the L12 crystal structure such as In3(La1-xPrx). The goal was to see how jump frequencies were affected by random disorder. 2) The family of layered phases, LanCoIn3n+2 ( n=0,1,2,3…∞). The goal was to see how jump frequencies varied with the spacing of Co layers, which were found to block diffusion. 3) Phases having the FeGa3 structure. The goal was to analyze dynamical relaxation for probe atoms having multiple inequivalent jump vectors. 4) Phases having the tetragonal Al4Ba structure. The goal was to search for effects in the PAC spectra caused by fluctuations in magnitudes of EFGs without fluctuations in orientations. Ab initio relaxation models were developed to simulate and fit dynamical relaxation for PAC spectra of FeGa3, and several phases with the Al4Ba structure in order to determine underlying microscopic jump frequencies. In the course of this work, site preferences also were observed for 111In/Cd probe atoms in several FeGa 3 and Al4Ba phases.

  3. Deformation-induced {alpha}{sub 2} {yields} {gamma} phase transformation in TiAl alloys

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, C.L.; Lu, W.; Sun Dai; He, L.L.; Ye, H.Q.

    2010-11-15

    Deformation-induced {alpha}{sub 2} {yields} {gamma} phase transformation in high Nb containing TiAl alloys was investigated using high-resolution transmission electron microscopy (HREM) and energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDS). The dislocations appearing at the tip of deformation-induced {gamma} plate (DI-{gamma}) and the stacking sequence change of the {alpha}{sub 2} matrix were two key evidences for determining the occurrence of the deformation-induced {alpha}{sub 2} {yields} {gamma} phase transformation. Compositional analysis revealed that the product phase of the room-temperature transformation was not standard {gamma} phase; on the contrary, the product phase of the high-temperature transformation was standard {gamma} phase.

  4. Ih Tunes Theta/Gamma Oscillations and Cross-Frequency Coupling In an In Silico CA3 Model

    PubMed Central

    Neymotin, Samuel A.; Hilscher, Markus M.; Moulin, Thiago C.; Skolnick, Yosef; Lazarewicz, Maciej T.; Lytton, William W.

    2013-01-01

    channels are uniquely positioned to act as neuromodulatory control points for tuning hippocampal theta (4–12 Hz) and gamma (25 Hz) oscillations, oscillations which are thought to have importance for organization of information flow. contributes to neuronal membrane resonance and resting membrane potential, and is modulated by second messengers. We investigated oscillatory control using a multiscale computer model of hippocampal CA3, where each cell class (pyramidal, basket, and oriens-lacunosum moleculare cells), contained type-appropriate isoforms of . Our model demonstrated that modulation of pyramidal and basket allows tuning theta and gamma oscillation frequency and amplitude. Pyramidal also controlled cross-frequency coupling (CFC) and allowed shifting gamma generation towards particular phases of the theta cycle, effected via 's ability to set pyramidal excitability. Our model predicts that in vivo neuromodulatory control of allows flexibly controlling CFC and the timing of gamma discharges at particular theta phases. PMID:24204609

  5. EIGHT {gamma}-RAY PULSARS DISCOVERED IN BLIND FREQUENCY SEARCHES OF FERMI LAT DATA

    SciTech Connect

    Saz Parkinson, P. M.; Dormody, M.; Ziegler, M.; Belfiore, A.; Johnson, R. P.; Ray, P. S.; Abdo, A. A.; Grove, J. E.; Gwon, C.; Ballet, J.; Burnett, T. H.; Caliandro, G. A.; Camilo, F.; Caraveo, P. A.; De Luca, A.; Ferrara, E. C.; Harding, A. K.; Johnson, T. J.; Freire, P. C. C. E-mail: mdormody@ucsc.ed E-mail: Paul.Ray@nrl.navy.mi

    2010-12-10

    We report the discovery of eight {gamma}-ray pulsars in blind frequency searches of {approx}650 source positions using the Large Area Telescope (LAT), on board the Fermi Gamma-ray Space Telescope. We present the timing models, light curves, and detailed spectral parameters of the new pulsars. PSRs J1023-5746, J1044-5737, J1413-5205, J1429-5911, and J1954+2836 are young ({tau}{sub c} < 100 kyr), energetic (E-dot {approx}>10{sup 36} erg s{sup -1}), and located within the Galactic plane (|b| < 3{sup 0}). The remaining three pulsars, PSRs J1846+0919, J1957+5033, and J2055+25, are less energetic, and located off the plane. Five pulsars are associated with sources included in the Fermi-LAT bright {gamma}-ray source list, but only one, PSR J1413-6205, is clearly associated with an EGRET source. PSR J1023-5746 has the smallest characteristic age ({tau}{sub c} = 4.6 kyr) and is the most energetic (E-dot = 1.1x10{sup 37} erg s{sup -1}) of all {gamma}-ray pulsars discovered so far in blind searches. By analyzing >100 ks of publicly available archival Chandra X-ray data, we have identified the likely counterpart of PSR J1023-5746 as a faint, highly absorbed source, CXOU J102302.8-574606. The large X-ray absorption indicates that this could be among the most distant {gamma}-ray pulsars detected so far. PSR J1023-5746 is positionally coincident with the TeV source HESS J1023-575, located near the young stellar cluster Westerlund 2, while PSR J1954+2836 is coincident with a 4.3{sigma} excess reported by Milagro at a median energy of 35 TeV. PSRs J1957+5033 and J2055+25 have the largest characteristic ages ({tau}{sub c} {approx} 1 Myr) and are the least energetic (E-dot {approx}5x10{sup 33} erg s{sup -1}) of the newly discovered pulsars. We used recent XMM observations to identify the counterpart of PSR J2055+25 as XMMU J205549.4+253959. Deep radio follow-up observations of the eight pulsars resulted in no detections of pulsations and upper limits comparable to the faintest known

  6. The mirror illusion induces high gamma oscillations in the absence of movement.

    PubMed

    Butorina, A; Prokofyev, A; Nazarova, M; Litvak, V; Stroganova, T

    2014-12-01

    We tested whether mirror visual feedback (MVF) from a moving hand induced high gamma oscillation (HGO) response in the hemisphere contralateral to the mirror and ipsilateral to the self-paced movement. MEG was recorded in 14 subjects under three conditions: bilateral synchronous movements of both index fingers (BILATERAL), movements of the right hand index finger while observing the immobile left index finger (NOMIRROR), and movements of the right hand index finger while observing its mirror reflection (MIRROR). The right hemispheric spatiospectral regions of interests (ROIs) in the sensor space, sensitive to bilateral movements, were found by statistical comparison of the BILATERAL spectral responses to baseline. For these ROIs, the post-movement HGO responses were compared between the MIRROR and NOMIRROR conditions. We found that MVF from the moving hand, similarly to the real movements of the opposite hand, induced HGOs (55-85Hz) in the sensorimotor cortex. This MVF effect was frequency-specific and did not spread to oscillations in other frequency bands. This is the first study demonstrating movement-related HGO induced by MVF from the moving hand in the absence of proprioceptive feedback signaling. Our findings support the hypothesis that MVF can trigger the feedback-based control processes specifically associated with perception of one's own movements. PMID:25241908

  7. Investigation of Annual Modulation Signal from Radon Induced Gamma Rays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Chao; Mei, Dongming

    2015-10-01

    The phenomenon of annual modulation is believed to be one of the signatures induced by Weakly Interacting Massive Particles(WIMPs) through elastic scattering off nucleus in the target for direct dark matter searches. Both DAMA and CoGeNT experiments have claimed the discovery of dark matter in terms of annual modulation while many other experiments have ruled out the entire claimed region. However, the sources that caused the annual modulation in DAMA and CoGeNT are still unknown which need to be investigated. Annual modulations of Radon at underground sites are reported by many experiments. As a potential source, we investigate (alpha, gamma) reactions, induced by radon decay chain, occurring on the surface of those common shielding materials and explain how this background annual modulation may mimic dark matter signature. This work is supported by NSF in part by the NSF PHY-0758120, DOE Grant DE-FG02-10ER46709, and the State of South Dakota.

  8. Atorvastatin enhances kainate-induced gamma oscillations in rat hippocampal slices.

    PubMed

    Li, Chengzhang; Wang, Jiangang; Zhao, Jianhua; Wang, Yali; Liu, Zhihua; Guo, Fang Li; Wang, Xiao Fang; Vreugdenhil, Martin; Lu, Cheng Biao

    2016-09-01

    Atorvastatin has been shown to affect cognitive functions in rodents and humans. However, the underlying mechanism is not fully understood. Because hippocampal gamma oscillations (γ, 20-80 Hz) are associated with cognitive functions, we studied the effect of atorvastatin on persistent kainate-induced γ oscillation in the CA3 area of rat hippocampal slices. The involvement of NMDA receptors and multiple kinases was tested before and after administration of atorvastatin. Whole-cell current-clamp and voltage-clamp recordings were made from CA3 pyramidal neurons and interneurons before and after atorvastatin application. Atorvastatin increased γ power by ~ 50% in a concentration-dependent manner, without affecting dominant frequency. Whereas atorvastatin did not affect intrinsic properties of both pyramidal neurons and interneurons, it increased the firing frequency of interneurons but not that of pyramidal neurons. Furthermore, whereas atorvastatin did not affect synaptic current amplitude, it increased the frequency of spontaneous inhibitory post-synaptic currents, but did not affect the frequency of spontaneous excitatory post-synaptic currents. The atorvastatin-induced enhancement of γ oscillations was prevented by pretreatment with the PKA inhibitor H89, the ERK inhibitor U0126, or the PI3K inhibitor wortmanin, but not by the NMDA receptor antagonist D-AP5. Taken together, these results demonstrate that atorvastatin enhanced the kainate-induced γ oscillation by increasing interneuron excitability, with an involvement of multiple intracellular kinase pathways. Our study suggests that the classical cholesterol-lowering agent atorvastatin may improve cognitive functions compromised in disease, via the enhancement of hippocampal γ oscillations. PMID:27336700

  9. Activation of PPAR{gamma} is not involved in butyrate-induced epithelial cell differentiation

    SciTech Connect

    Ulrich, S.; Waechtershaeuser, A.; Loitsch, S.; Knethen, A. von; Bruene, B.; Stein, J. . E-mail: j.stein@em.uni-frankfurt.de

    2005-10-15

    Histone deacetylase-inhibitors affect growth and differentiation of intestinal epithelial cells by inducing expression of several transcription factors, e.g. Peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor {gamma} (PPAR{gamma}) or vitamin D receptor (VDR). While activation of VDR by butyrate mainly seems to be responsible for cellular differentiation, the activation of PPAR{gamma} in intestinal cells remains to be elucidated. The aim of this study was to determine the role of PPAR{gamma} in butyrate-induced cell growth inhibition and differentiation induction in Caco-2 cells. Treatment with PPAR{gamma} ligands ciglitazone and BADGE (bisphenol A diglycidyl) enhanced butyrate-induced cell growth inhibition in a dose- and time-dependent manner, whereas cell differentiation was unaffected after treatment with PPAR{gamma} ligands rosiglitazone and MCC-555. Experiments were further performed in dominant-negative PPAR{gamma} mutant cells leading to an increase in cell growth whereas butyrate-induced cell differentiation was again unaffected. The present study clearly demonstrated that PPAR{gamma} is involved in butyrate-induced inhibition of cell growth, but seems not to play an essential role in butyrate-induced cell differentiation.

  10. Signals features extraction in liquid-gas flow measurements using gamma densitometry. Part 2: frequency domain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hanus, Robert; Zych, Marcin; Petryka, Leszek; Jaszczur, Marek; Hanus, Paweł

    2016-03-01

    Knowledge of the structure of a flow is really significant for the proper conduct a number of industrial processes. In this case a description of a two-phase flow regimes is possible by use of the time-series analysis e.g. in frequency domain. In this article the classical spectral analysis based on Fourier Transform (FT) and Short-Time Fourier Transform (STFT) were applied for analysis of signals obtained for water-air flow using gamma ray absorption. The presented method was illustrated by use data collected in experiments carried out on the laboratory hydraulic installation with a horizontal pipe of 4.5 m length and inner diameter of 30 mm equipped with two 241Am radioactive sources and scintillation probes with NaI(Tl) crystals. Stochastic signals obtained from detectors for plug, bubble, and transitional plug - bubble flows were considered in this work. The recorded raw signals were analyzed and several features in the frequency domain were extracted using autospectral density function (ADF), cross-spectral density function (CSDF), and the STFT spectrogram. In result of a detail analysis it was found that the most promising to recognize of the flow structure are: maximum value of the CSDF magnitude, sum of the CSDF magnitudes in the selected frequency range, and the maximum value of the sum of selected amplitudes of STFT spectrogram.

  11. Connection of Very High Energy Gamma-ray Flares in Blazars to Activity at Lower Frequencies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marscher, Alan P.; Jorstad, Svetlana G.

    2016-04-01

    The author will briefly review the results of multi-wavelength observations of blazars that emit very high-energy (VHE) gamma rays. The VHE gamma-ray emission is generally episodic, including flares that are often very short-lived. While many of these flares have counterparts only at X-ray energies, or no counterparts at all, some events are seen also at optical wavelengths, and a number are associated with the passage of new superluminal knots passing through the core in mm-wave VLBA images. Two explanations for the short-term VHE flares in the relativistic jets are supersonic turbulence and ultra-fast plasma jets resulting from magnetic reconnections. Observations of frequency-dependent linear polarization during flares can potentially decide between these models. VLBA images can help to locate VHE events that are seen at millimeter wavelengths. In some cases, the flares take place near the parsec-scale core, while in others they occur closer to the black hole.This research is supported in part by NASA through Swift Guest Investigator grants NNX15AR45G and NNX15AR34G.

  12. Prostatic inflammation induces urinary frequency in adult mice.

    PubMed

    Lee, Sanghee; Yang, Guang; Bushman, Wade

    2015-01-01

    Lower urinary tract symptoms (LUTS) including urinary frequency and nocturia are common in aging men. Recent studies have revealed a strong association of prostatic inflammation with LUTS. We developed an animal model of bacterial induced, isolated prostatic inflammation and examined the effect of prostatic inflammation on voiding behavior in adult C57BL/6J mice. Prostatic inflammation was induced by transurethral inoculation of uropathogenic E. coli-1677. Bacterial cystitis was prevented by continuous administration of nitrofurantoin. Hematoxylin and eosin (H&E) staining and bacterial culture were preformed to validate our animal model. Voiding behavior was examined by metabolic cage testing on post-instillation day 1 (PID 1), PID 4, PID 7 and PID 14 and both voiding frequency and volume per void were determined. Mice with prostatic inflammation showed significantly increased voiding frequency at PID 1, 7 and 14, and decreased volume per void at all time points, as compared to mice instilled with saline and receiving nitrofurantoin (NTF). Linked analysis of voiding frequency and voided volumes revealed an overwhelming preponderance of high frequency, low volume voiding in mice with prostatic inflammation. These observations suggest that prostatic inflammation may be causal for symptoms of urinary frequency and nocturia. PMID:25647072

  13. Prostatic Inflammation Induces Urinary Frequency in Adult Mice

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Sanghee; Yang, Guang; Bushman, Wade

    2015-01-01

    Lower urinary tract symptoms (LUTS) including urinary frequency and nocturia are common in aging men. Recent studies have revealed a strong association of prostatic inflammation with LUTS. We developed an animal model of bacterial induced, isolated prostatic inflammation and examined the effect of prostatic inflammation on voiding behavior in adult C57BL/6J mice. Prostatic inflammation was induced by transurethral inoculation of uropathogenic E. coli—1677. Bacterial cystitis was prevented by continuous administration of nitrofurantoin. Hematoxylin and eosin (H&E) staining and bacterial culture were preformed to validate our animal model. Voiding behavior was examined by metabolic cage testing on post-instillation day 1 (PID 1), PID 4, PID 7 and PID 14 and both voiding frequency and volume per void were determined. Mice with prostatic inflammation showed significantly increased voiding frequency at PID 1, 7 and 14, and decreased volume per void at all time points, as compared to mice instilled with saline and receiving nitrofurantoin (NTF). Linked analysis of voiding frequency and voided volumes revealed an overwhelming preponderance of high frequency, low volume voiding in mice with prostatic inflammation. These observations suggest that prostatic inflammation may be causal for symptoms of urinary frequency and nocturia. PMID:25647072

  14. INDUCED EEG GAMMA OSCILLATION ALIGNMENT IMPROVES DIFFERENTIATION BETWEEN AUTISM AND ADHD GROUP RESPONSES IN A FACIAL CATEGORIZATION TASK.

    PubMed

    Gross, Eric; El-Baz, Ayman S; Sokhadze, Guela E; Sears, Lonnie; Casanova, Manuel F; Sokhadze, Estate M

    2012-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: Children diagnosed with an autism spectrum disorder (ASD) often lack the ability to recognize and properly respond to emotional stimuli. Emotional deficits also characterize children with attention deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD), in addition to exhibiting limited attention span. These abnormalities may effect a difference in the induced EEG gamma wave burst (35-45 Hz) peaked approximately 300-400 milliseconds following an emotional stimulus. Because induced gamma oscillations are not fixed at a definite point in time post-stimulus, analysis of averaged EEG data with traditional methods may result in an attenuated gamma burst power. METHODS: We used a data alignment technique to improve the averaged data, making it a better representation of the individual induced EEG gamma oscillations. A study was designed to test the response of a subject to emotional stimuli, presented in the form of emotional facial expression images. In a four part experiment, the subjects were instructed to identify gender in the first two blocks of the test, followed by differentiating between basic emotions in the final two blocks (i.e. anger vs. disgust). EEG data was collected from ASD (n=10), ADHD (n=9), and control (n=11) subjects via a 128 channel EGI system, and processed through a continuous wavelet transform and bandpass filter to isolate the gamma frequencies. A custom MATLAB code was used to align the data from individual trials between 200-600 ms post-stimulus, EEG site, and condition by maximizing the Pearson product-moment correlation coefficient between trials. The gamma power for the 400 ms window of maximum induced gamma burst was then calculated and compared between subject groups. RESULTS AND CONCLUSION: Condition (anger/disgust recognition, gender recognition) × Alignment × Group (ADHD, ASD, Controls) interaction was significant at most of parietal topographies (e.g., P3-P4, P7-P8). These interactions were better manifested in the aligned data set

  15. INDUCED EEG GAMMA OSCILLATION ALIGNMENT IMPROVES DIFFERENTIATION BETWEEN AUTISM AND ADHD GROUP RESPONSES IN A FACIAL CATEGORIZATION TASK

    PubMed Central

    Gross, Eric; El-Baz, Ayman S.; Sokhadze, Guela E.; Sears, Lonnie; Casanova, Manuel F.; Sokhadze, Estate M.

    2012-01-01

    Introduction Children diagnosed with an autism spectrum disorder (ASD) often lack the ability to recognize and properly respond to emotional stimuli. Emotional deficits also characterize children with attention deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD), in addition to exhibiting limited attention span. These abnormalities may effect a difference in the induced EEG gamma wave burst (35–45 Hz) peaked approximately 300–400 milliseconds following an emotional stimulus. Because induced gamma oscillations are not fixed at a definite point in time post-stimulus, analysis of averaged EEG data with traditional methods may result in an attenuated gamma burst power. Methods We used a data alignment technique to improve the averaged data, making it a better representation of the individual induced EEG gamma oscillations. A study was designed to test the response of a subject to emotional stimuli, presented in the form of emotional facial expression images. In a four part experiment, the subjects were instructed to identify gender in the first two blocks of the test, followed by differentiating between basic emotions in the final two blocks (i.e. anger vs. disgust). EEG data was collected from ASD (n=10), ADHD (n=9), and control (n=11) subjects via a 128 channel EGI system, and processed through a continuous wavelet transform and bandpass filter to isolate the gamma frequencies. A custom MATLAB code was used to align the data from individual trials between 200–600 ms post-stimulus, EEG site, and condition by maximizing the Pearson product-moment correlation coefficient between trials. The gamma power for the 400 ms window of maximum induced gamma burst was then calculated and compared between subject groups. Results and Conclusion Condition (anger/disgust recognition, gender recognition) × Alignment × Group (ADHD, ASD, Controls) interaction was significant at most of parietal topographies (e.g., P3–P4, P7–P8). These interactions were better manifested in the aligned

  16. Untangling Cortico-Striatal Connectivity and Cross-Frequency Coupling in L-DOPA-Induced Dyskinesia

    PubMed Central

    Belić, Jovana J.; Halje, Pär; Richter, Ulrike; Petersson, Per; Hellgren Kotaleski, Jeanette

    2016-01-01

    We simultaneously recorded local field potentials (LFPs) in the primary motor cortex and sensorimotor striatum in awake, freely behaving, 6-OHDA lesioned hemi-parkinsonian rats in order to study the features directly related to pathological states such as parkinsonian state and levodopa-induced dyskinesia. We analyzed the spectral characteristics of the obtained signals and observed that during dyskinesia the most prominent feature was a relative power increase in the high gamma frequency range at around 80 Hz, while for the parkinsonian state it was in the beta frequency range. Here we show that during both pathological states effective connectivity in terms of Granger causality is bidirectional with an accent on the striatal influence on the cortex. In the case of dyskinesia, we also found a high increase in effective connectivity at 80 Hz. In order to further understand the 80-Hz phenomenon, we performed cross-frequency analysis and observed characteristic patterns in the case of dyskinesia but not in the case of the parkinsonian state or the control state. We noted a large decrease in the modulation of the amplitude at 80 Hz by the phase of low frequency oscillations (up to ~10 Hz) across both structures in the case of dyskinesia. This may suggest a lack of coupling between the low frequency activity of the recorded network and the group of neurons active at ~80 Hz. PMID:27065818

  17. Comparison of EEG and MEG in source localization of induced human gamma-band oscillations during visual stimulus.

    PubMed

    Mideksa, K G; Hoogenboom, N; Hellriegel, H; Krause, H; Schnitzler, A; Deuschl, G; Raethjen, J; Heute, U; Muthuraman, M

    2015-08-01

    High frequency gamma oscillations are indications of information processing in cortical neuronal networks. Recently, non-invasive detection of these oscillations have become one of the main research areas in magnetoencephalography (MEG) and electroencephalography (EEG) studies. The aim of this study, which is a continuation of our previous MEG study, is to compare the capability of the two modalities (EEG and MEG) in localizing the source of the induced gamma activity due to a visual stimulus, using a spatial filtering technique known as dynamic imaging of coherent sources (DICS). To do this, the brain activity was recorded using simultaneous MEG and EEG measurement and the data were analyzed with respect to time, frequency, and location of the strongest response. The spherical head modeling technique, such as, the three-shell concentric spheres and an overlapping sphere (local sphere) have been used as a forward model to calculate the external electromagnetic potentials and fields recorded by the EEG and MEG, respectively. Our results from the time-frequency analysis, at the sensor level, revealed that the parieto-occipital electrodes and sensors from both modalities showed a clear and sustained gamma-band activity throughout the post-stimulus duration and that both modalities showed similar strongest gamma-band peaks. It was difficult to interpret the spatial pattern of the gamma-band oscillatory response on the scalp, at the sensor level, for both modalities. However, the source analysis result revealed that MEG3 sensor type, which measure the derivative along the longitude, showed the source more focally and close to the visual cortex (cuneus) as compared to that of the EEG. PMID:26738178

  18. Chronic stimulation of cultured neuronal networks boosts low-frequency oscillatory activity at theta and gamma with spikes phase-locked to gamma frequencies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leondopulos, Stathis S.; Boehler, Michael D.; Wheeler, Bruce C.; Brewer, Gregory J.

    2012-04-01

    Slow wave oscillations in the brain are essential for coordinated network activity but have not been shown to self-organize in vitro. Here, the development of dissociated hippocampal neurons into an active network with oscillations on multi-electrode arrays was evaluated in the absence and presence of chronic external stimulation. Significant changes in signal power were observed in the range of 1-400 Hz with an increase in amplitude during bursts. Stimulation increased oscillatory activity primarily in the theta (4-11 Hz) and slow gamma (30-55 Hz) bands. Spikes were most prominently phase-locked to the slow gamma waves. Notably, the dissociated network self-organized to exhibit sustained delta, theta, beta and gamma oscillations without input from cortex, thalamus or organized pyramidal cell layers.

  19. Optogenetically induced spatiotemporal gamma oscillations and neuronal spiking activity in primate motor cortex

    PubMed Central

    Lu, Yao; Truccolo, Wilson; Wagner, Fabien B.; Vargas-Irwin, Carlos E.; Ozden, Ilker; Zimmermann, Jonas B.; May, Travis; Agha, Naubahar S.; Wang, Jing

    2015-01-01

    Transient gamma-band (40–80 Hz) spatiotemporal patterns are hypothesized to play important roles in cortical function. Here we report the direct observation of gamma oscillations as spatiotemporal waves induced by targeted optogenetic stimulation, recorded by intracortical multichannel extracellular techniques in macaque monkeys during their awake resting states. Microelectrode arrays integrating an optical fiber at their center were chronically implanted in primary motor (M1) and ventral premotor (PMv) cortices of two subjects. Targeted brain tissue was transduced with the red-shifted opsin C1V1(T/T). Constant (1-s square pulses) and ramp stimulation induced narrowband gamma oscillations during awake resting states. Recordings across 95 microelectrodes (4 × 4-mm array) enabled us to track the transient gamma spatiotemporal patterns manifested, e.g., as concentric expanding and spiral waves. Gamma oscillations were induced well beyond the light stimulation volume, via network interactions at distal electrode sites, depending on optical power. Despite stimulation-related modulation in spiking rates, neuronal spiking remained highly asynchronous during induced gamma oscillations. In one subject we examined stimulation effects during preparation and execution of a motor task and observed that movement execution largely attenuated optically induced gamma oscillations. Our findings demonstrate that, beyond previously reported induced gamma activity under periodic drive, a prolonged constant stimulus above a certain threshold may carry primate motor cortex network dynamics into gamma oscillations, likely via a Hopf bifurcation. More broadly, the experimental capability in combining microelectrode array recordings and optogenetic stimulation provides an important approach for probing spatiotemporal dynamics in primate cortical networks during various physiological and behavioral conditions. PMID:25761956

  20. Optogenetically induced spatiotemporal gamma oscillations and neuronal spiking activity in primate motor cortex.

    PubMed

    Lu, Yao; Truccolo, Wilson; Wagner, Fabien B; Vargas-Irwin, Carlos E; Ozden, Ilker; Zimmermann, Jonas B; May, Travis; Agha, Naubahar S; Wang, Jing; Nurmikko, Arto V

    2015-06-01

    Transient gamma-band (40-80 Hz) spatiotemporal patterns are hypothesized to play important roles in cortical function. Here we report the direct observation of gamma oscillations as spatiotemporal waves induced by targeted optogenetic stimulation, recorded by intracortical multichannel extracellular techniques in macaque monkeys during their awake resting states. Microelectrode arrays integrating an optical fiber at their center were chronically implanted in primary motor (M1) and ventral premotor (PMv) cortices of two subjects. Targeted brain tissue was transduced with the red-shifted opsin C1V1(T/T). Constant (1-s square pulses) and ramp stimulation induced narrowband gamma oscillations during awake resting states. Recordings across 95 microelectrodes (4 × 4-mm array) enabled us to track the transient gamma spatiotemporal patterns manifested, e.g., as concentric expanding and spiral waves. Gamma oscillations were induced well beyond the light stimulation volume, via network interactions at distal electrode sites, depending on optical power. Despite stimulation-related modulation in spiking rates, neuronal spiking remained highly asynchronous during induced gamma oscillations. In one subject we examined stimulation effects during preparation and execution of a motor task and observed that movement execution largely attenuated optically induced gamma oscillations. Our findings demonstrate that, beyond previously reported induced gamma activity under periodic drive, a prolonged constant stimulus above a certain threshold may carry primate motor cortex network dynamics into gamma oscillations, likely via a Hopf bifurcation. More broadly, the experimental capability in combining microelectrode array recordings and optogenetic stimulation provides an important approach for probing spatiotemporal dynamics in primate cortical networks during various physiological and behavioral conditions. PMID:25761956

  1. Dependence of enhanced asymmetry-induced transport on collision frequency

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eggleston, D. L.

    2014-07-01

    A single-particle code with collisional effects is used to study how asymmetry-induced radial transport in a non-neutral plasma depends on collision frequency. For asymmetries of the form ϕ1(r) cos(kz) cos(ωt-lθ), two sources for the transport have been identified: resonant particles and axially trapped particles. The simulation shows that this latter type, which occurs near the radius where ω matches the azimuthal rotation frequency ωR, is usually dominant at low collision frequency ν but becomes negligible at higher ν. This behavior can be understood by noting that axially trapped particles have a lower trapping frequency than resonant particles. In the low ν (banana) regime, the radial oscillations have amplitude Δr ≈ vr/ωT, so axially trapped particles dominate, and the transport may even exceed the resonant particle plateau regime level. As ν increases, collisions start to interrupt the slower axially trapped particle oscillations, while the resonant particles are still in the banana regime, so the axially trapped particle contribution to the transport decreases. At the largest ν values, axially trapped particle transport is negligible and the observed diffusion coefficient matches that given by plateau regime resonant particle theory. Heuristic models based on these considerations give reasonable agreement with the observed scaling laws for the value of the collision frequency where axially trapped particle transport starts to decrease and for the enhancement of the diffusion coefficient produced by axially trapped particles.

  2. Transport induced by ion cyclotron range of frequencies waves

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Debing Xu, Yingfeng; Wang, Shaojie

    2014-11-15

    The Vlasov equation, which includes the effect of the ion cyclotron range of frequencies (ICRF) waves, can be written as the Fokker-Planck equation which describes the quasilinear transport in phase space by using the Lie-transform method. The radial transport fluxes of particle, energy and parallel momentum driven by ICRF waves in the slab geometry have been derived. The results show that the ICRF-induced radial redistributions of particle, energy and parallel momentum are driven by the inhomogeneity in energy of the equilibrium distribution function, and related to the correlation between the excursion in the real space and the excursion in energy. For the case with strong asymmetry of k{sub y} spectrum, the ICRF-induced radial transport driven by the energy inhomogeneity dominates the ICRF-induced radial transport driven by the spatial inhomogeneity.

  3. Interferon-gamma induces the synthesis and activation of cytosolic phospholipase A2.

    PubMed Central

    Wu, T; Levine, S J; Lawrence, M G; Logun, C; Angus, C W; Shelhamer, J H

    1994-01-01

    Both IFN-alpha/beta and IFN-gamma have recently been demonstrated to induce a rapid but transient activation of phospholipase A2 (PLA2) in BALB/c 3T3 fibroblasts and a human neuroblastoma cell line. We report that IFN-gamma induces the synthesis and prolonged activation of cytosolic phospholipase A2 (cPLA2) in a human bronchial epithelial cell line (BEAS 2B). Treatment of the cells with IFN-gamma (300 U/ml) increased the release of [3H]arachidonic acid (AA) from prelabeled cells with a maximal effect at 12 h after stimulation. The increased [3H]AA release was inhibited by the PLA2 inhibitor p-bromophenacyl bromide (10(-5) M). Calcium ionophore A23187 (10(-5) M) further increased the [3H]AA release from the IFN-gamma-treated cells. Subcellular enzyme activity assay revealed that IFN-gamma increased PLA2 activity in both the cytosol and membrane fractions with a translocation of the cPLA2 to cell membranes in a Ca(2+)-free cell lysing buffer. Treatment with IFN-gamma also induced the release of 15-HETE, an arachidonic acid metabolite. Immunoblot showed that IFN-gamma induced the synthesis of cPLA2 protein. Nuclear run-on assay demonstrated that IFN-gamma initiated cPLA2 gene transcription within 15 min, and this effect was sustained at 4 h and returned to near control level at 12 h. The cPLA2 mRNA level was assayed by reverse transcription and PCR. IFN-gamma was found to increase the cPLA2 mRNA after 2-24 h treatment. Furthermore, the IFN-gamma induced cPLA2 mRNA increase was blocked by inhibitors of protein kinase C and calcium/calmodulin-dependent protein kinases, suggesting the involvement of these protein kinases in IFN-gamma-induced gene expression of cPLA2. This study shows that IFN-gamma induces the synthesis and prolonged activation of cPLA2. Images PMID:8113394

  4. Nordihydroguaiaretic acid inhibits IFN-gamma-induced STAT tyrosine phosphorylation in rat brain astrocytes.

    PubMed

    Jeon, Sae-Bom; Ji, Kyung-Ae; You, Hye-Jin; Kim, Jae-Hong; Jou, Ilo; Joe, Eun-Hye

    2005-03-11

    The Janus kinase (JAK) and signal transducers and activators of transcription (STAT) signal cascades are major pathways that mediate the inflammatory functions of interferon-gamma (IFN-gamma), an important pro-inflammatory cytokine. Therefore, regulation of JAK/STAT signaling should modulate IFN-gamma-mediated inflammation. In this study, we found that nordihydroguaiaretic acid (NDGA), a well-known lipoxygenase (LO) inhibitor, suppressed IFN-gamma-induced inflammatory responses in brain astrocytes. In the presence of NDGA, interferon regulatory factor-1 expression was significantly reduced. Expression of monocyte chemotactic protein-1 and interferon-gamma inducible protein-10 mRNA in response to IFN-gamma was significantly suppressed in the presence of NDGA, as was tyrosine-phosphorylation of JAK and STAT. However, the 5-LO products, leukotriene B(4) (LTB(4)) and leukotriene C(4), were not detected in cells treated with IFN-gamma, indicating that the effect of NDGA seemed to be independent of 5-LO inhibition. In addition, two other 5-LO inhibitors (Rev5901 and AA861) did not mimic the effect of NDGA, and the 5-LO metabolites, 5-hydroxyeicosatetraenoic acid and LTB(4), were unable to reverse NDGA-driven suppression of STAT activation or affect basal STAT phosphorylation. Taken together, these results suggest that NDGA regulates IFN-gamma-mediated inflammation through mechanisms unrelated to the inhibition of 5-LO. PMID:15694390

  5. Low-Frequency Repetitive Transcranial Magnetic Stimulation (rTMS) Modulates Evoked-Gamma Frequency Oscillations in Autism Spectrum Disorder (ASD)

    PubMed Central

    Baruth, Joshua M.; Casanova, Manuel F.; El-Baz, Ayman; Horrell, Tim; Mathai, Grace; Sears, Lonnie; Sokhadze, Estate

    2010-01-01

    Introduction It has been reported that individuals with Autism Spectrum Disorder (ASD) have abnormal reactions to the sensory environment and visuo-perceptual abnormalities. Electrophysiological research has provided evidence that gamma band activity (30-80 Hz) is a physiological indicator of the co-activation of cortical cells engaged in processing visual stimuli and integrating different features of a stimulus. A number of studies have found augmented and indiscriminative gamma band power at early stages of visual processing in ASD; this may be related to decreased inhibitory processing and an increase in the ratio of cortical excitation to inhibition. Low frequency or ‘slow’ (≤1HZ) repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation (rTMS) has been shown to increase inhibition of stimulated cortex by the activation of inhibitory circuits. Methods We wanted to test the hypothesis of gamma band abnormalities at early stages of visual processing in ASD by investigating relative evoked (i.e. ~ 100 ms) gamma power in 25 subjects with ASD and 20 age-matched controls using Kanizsa illusory figures. Additionally, we wanted to assess the effects of 12 sessions of bilateral ‘slow’ rTMS to the dorsolateral prefrontal cortex (DLPFC) on evoked gamma activity using a randomized controlled design. Results In individuals with ASD evoked gamma activity was not discriminative of stimulus type, whereas in controls early gamma power differences between target and non-target stimuli were highly significant. Following rTMS individuals with ASD showed significant improvement in discriminatory gamma activity between relevant and irrelevant visual stimuli. We also found significant improvement in the responses on behavioral questionnaires (i.e., irritability, repetitive behavior) as a result of rTMS. Conclusion We proposed that ‘slow’ rTMS may have increased cortical inhibitory tone which improved discriminatory gamma activity at early stages of visual processing. rTMS has the

  6. Synchronization of Firing in Cortical Fast-Spiking Interneurons at Gamma Frequencies: A Phase-Resetting Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Tsumoto, Kunichika; Tateno, Takashi; Aihara, Kazuyuki; Robinson, Hugh P. C.

    2010-01-01

    Fast-spiking (FS) cells in the neocortex are interconnected both by inhibitory chemical synapses and by electrical synapses, or gap-junctions. Synchronized firing of FS neurons is important in the generation of gamma oscillations, at frequencies between 30 and 80 Hz. To understand how these synaptic interactions control synchronization, artificial synaptic conductances were injected in FS cells, and the synaptic phase-resetting function (SPRF), describing how the compound synaptic input perturbs the phase of gamma-frequency spiking as a function of the phase at which it is applied, was measured. GABAergic and gap junctional conductances made distinct contributions to the SPRF, which had a surprisingly simple piecewise linear form, with a sharp midcycle break between phase delay and advance. Analysis of the SPRF showed how the intrinsic biophysical properties of FS neurons and their interconnections allow entrainment of firing over a wide gamma frequency band, whose upper and lower frequency limits are controlled by electrical synapses and GABAergic inhibition respectively. PMID:20941393

  7. Laser frequency locking based on Rydberg electromagnetically induced transparency

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yuechun, Jiao; Jingkui, Li; Limei, Wang; Hao, Zhang; Linjie, Zhang; Jianming, Zhao; Suotang, Jia

    2016-05-01

    We present a laser frequency locking to Rydberg transition with electromagnetically induced transparency (EIT) spectra in a room-temperature cesium vapor cell. Cesium levels 6S1/2, 6P3/2, and the nD5/2 state, compose a cascade three-level system, where a coupling laser drives Rydberg transition, and probe laser detects the EIT signal. The error signal, obtained by demodulating the EIT signal, is used to lock the coupling laser frequency to Rydberg transition. The laser frequency fluctuation, ∼0.7 MHz, is obtained after locking on, with the minimum Allan variance to be 8.9 × 10‑11. This kind of locking method can be used to stabilize the laser frequency to the excited transition. Project supported by the National Basic Research Program of China (Grant No. 2012CB921603), the National Natural Science Foundation of China (Grants Nos. 11274209, 61475090, 61378039, and 61378013), and the Research Project Supported by Shanxi Scholarship Council of China (Grant No. 2014-009).

  8. Gamma radiation induced degradation in PE-PP block copolymer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ravi, H. R.; Sreepad, H. R.; Ahmed, Khaleel; Govindaiah, T. N.

    2012-06-01

    In the present investigation, effect of gamma irradiation on the PP-PE block copolymer has been studied. The polymer has been subjected to gamma irradiation from 100 to 500 Mrad dosages. Characterization of the polymer using XRD and FTIR was done both before irradiation and after irradiation in each step. Effect of irradiation on the electrical properties of the material has also been studied. FTIR study shows that the sample loses C - C stretching mode of vibration but gains C=C stretching mode of vibration after irradiation. Present investigation clearly indicates that though the electrical conductivity increases in the material, it undergoes degradation and shows brittleness due to irradiation.

  9. Gamma radiation induced degradation in PE-PP block copolymer

    SciTech Connect

    Ravi, H. R.; Sreepad, H. R.; Ahmed, Khaleel; Govindaiah, T. N.

    2012-06-05

    In the present investigation, effect of gamma irradiation on the PP-PE block copolymer has been studied. The polymer has been subjected to gamma irradiation from 100 to 500 Mrad dosages. Characterization of the polymer using XRD and FTIR was done both before irradiation and after irradiation in each step. Effect of irradiation on the electrical properties of the material has also been studied. FTIR study shows that the sample loses C - C stretching mode of vibration but gains C=C stretching mode of vibration after irradiation. Present investigation clearly indicates that though the electrical conductivity increases in the material, it undergoes degradation and shows brittleness due to irradiation.

  10. Neutron-induced 2.2 MeV background in gamma ray telescopes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zanrosso, E. M.; Long, J. L.; Zych, A. D.; White, R. S.

    1985-01-01

    Neutron-induced gamma ray production is an important source of background in Compton scatter gamma ray telescopes where organic scintillator material is used. Most important is deuteron formation when atmospheric albedo and locally produced neutrons are thermalized and subsequently absorbed in the hydrogenous material. The resulting 2.2 MeV gamma ray line radiation essentially represents a continuous isotropic source within the scintillator itself. Interestingly, using a scintillator material with a high hydrogen-to-carbon ratio to minimize the scintillator material with a high hydrogen-to-carbon ratio to minimize the neutron-induced 4.4 MeV carbon line favors the np reaction. The full problem of neutron-induced background in Compton scatter telescopes has been previously discussed. Results are presented of observations with the University of California balloon-borne Compton scatter telescope where the 2.2 MeV induced line emission is prominently seen.

  11. Dependence of enhanced asymmetry-induced transport on collision frequency

    SciTech Connect

    Eggleston, D. L.

    2014-07-15

    A single-particle code with collisional effects is used to study how asymmetry-induced radial transport in a non-neutral plasma depends on collision frequency. For asymmetries of the form ϕ{sub 1}(r) cos(kz) cos(ωt−lθ), two sources for the transport have been identified: resonant particles and axially trapped particles. The simulation shows that this latter type, which occurs near the radius where ω matches the azimuthal rotation frequency ω{sub R}, is usually dominant at low collision frequency ν but becomes negligible at higher ν. This behavior can be understood by noting that axially trapped particles have a lower trapping frequency than resonant particles. In the low ν (banana) regime, the radial oscillations have amplitude Δr ≈ v{sub r}/ω{sub T}, so axially trapped particles dominate, and the transport may even exceed the resonant particle plateau regime level. As ν increases, collisions start to interrupt the slower axially trapped particle oscillations, while the resonant particles are still in the banana regime, so the axially trapped particle contribution to the transport decreases. At the largest ν values, axially trapped particle transport is negligible and the observed diffusion coefficient matches that given by plateau regime resonant particle theory. Heuristic models based on these considerations give reasonable agreement with the observed scaling laws for the value of the collision frequency where axially trapped particle transport starts to decrease and for the enhancement of the diffusion coefficient produced by axially trapped particles.

  12. Detection of SNM by delayed gamma rays from induced fission

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rennhofer, H.; Crochemore, J.-M.; Roesgen, E.; Pedersen, B.

    2011-10-01

    The Pulsed Neutron Interrogation Test Assembly (PUNITA) is an experimental device for research in NDA methods and field applicable instrumentation for nuclear safeguards and security applications. PUNITA incorporates a standard 14-MeV (D-T) pulsed neutron generator inside a large graphite mantle. The generator target is surrounded by a thick tungsten filter with the purpose to increase the neutron output and to tailor the neutron energy spectrum. In this configuration a sample may be exposed to a relatively high average thermal neutron flux of about (2.2±0.1)×10 3 s -1 cm -2 at only 10% of the maximum target neutron emission. The sample cavity is large enough to allow variation of the experimental setup including the fissile sample, neutron and gamma detectors, and shielding materials. The response from SNM samples of different fissile material content was investigated with various field-applicable scintillation gamma detectors such as the 3×2 in. LaBr 3 detector. Shielding in the form of tungsten and cadmium was applied to the detector to improve the signal to background ratio. Gamma and neutron shields surrounding the samples were also tested for the purpose of simulating clandestine conduct. The energy spectra of delayed gamma rays were recorded in the range 100 keV-9 MeV. In addition time spectra of delayed gamma rays in the range 3.3-8 MeV were recorded in the time period of 10 ms-120 s after the 14-MeV neutron burst. The goal of the experiment was to optimize the sample/detector configuration including the energy range and time period for SNM detection. The results show, for example, that a 170 g sample of depleted uranium can be detected with the given setup in less than 3 min of investigation. Samples of higher enrichment or higher mass are detected in much shorter time.

  13. Neutron induced background in the COMPTEL detector on the Gamma Ray Observatory

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Morris, D. J.; Aarts, H.; Bennett, K.; Busetta, M.; Byrd, R.; Collmar, W.; Connors, A.; Diehl, R.; Eymann, G.; Foster, C.

    1992-01-01

    Interactions of neutrons in a prototype of the Compton imaging telescope (COMPTEL) gamma ray detector for the Gamma Ray Observatory were studied to determine COMPTEL's sensitivity as a neutron telescope and to estimate the gamma ray background resulting from neutron interactions. The IUCF provided a pulsed neutron beam at five different energies between 18 and 120 MeV. These measurements showed that the gamma ray background from neutron interactions is greater than previously expected. It was thought that most such events would be due to interactions in the upper detector modules of COMPTEL and could be distinguished by pulse shape discrimination. Rather, the bulk of the gamma ray background appears to be due to interactions in passive material, primarily aluminum, surrounding the D1 modules. In a considerable fraction of these interactions, two or more gamma rays are produced simultaneously, with one interacting in the D1 module and the other interacting in the module of the lower (D2) detector. If the neutron interacts near the D1 module, the D1 D2 time of flight cannot distinguish such an event from a true gamma ray event. In order to assess the significance of this background, the flux of neutrons in orbit has been estimated based on observed events with neutron pulse shape signature in D1. The strength of this neutron induced background is estimated. This is compared with the rate expected from the isotropic cosmic gamma ray flux.

  14. Measurement of 60Co-gamma ray-induced DNA damage by capillary electrophoresis.

    PubMed

    Nackerdien, Z; Atha, D

    1996-08-01

    Capillary electrophoresis was employed in this study to monitor 60Co-gamma ray-induced damage to a 1 kb DNA ladder which consists of restriction fragments ranging from 75 to 12,000 bp. DNA samples (0.5 mg/ml) were exposed to 0-60 Gy of gamma-radiation in the presence and absence of 110 mumol/l ethidium bromide (EB). The analysis showed peak broadening without significant changes in the size distribution of irradiated fragments. Radiation-induced conformational changes may account for this peak broadening. EB addition caused small increases in the retention times of DNA fragments without affecting the overall DNA damage. This indicates that the presence of intercalated EB during radiation will not stabilize the DNA against 60Co-gamma ray-induced damage. PMID:8876442

  15. Delayed gamma radiation from lightning induced nuclear reactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Greenfield, M. B.; Sakuma, K.; Ikeda, Y.; Kubo, K.

    2004-03-01

    An increase in atmospheric gamma radiation observed with NaI and Ge detectors positioned about 15 m above ground was observed following natural lightning near Tokyo, Japan [1]. Background subtracted gamma ray rates GRR following numerous lightning strokes observed since 2001 persisted for a few hours and subsequently decayed with a half-life of about 50 minutes. Using a 3x3 Ge detector, with 2 KeV resolution, positioned about 2 m from one of the NaI detectors increases in GRR were observed minutes after the onset of lightning with a delayed 50 min exponential decay. Although most of the increase in activity occured at less than a few 100 KeV, on July 11, 2003 a 1267 +/-2 KeV line was observed. Although the statistics of this event were poor, the appearance of this line with an exponential decay of 50 min half-life suggests the possibility that it may be due to 39Cl (1267 MeV; half-life = 55.5 min) via the 40Ar(gamma,p)39Cl, 40Ar(p,2p)39Cl and/or 40Ar(n,d)39Cl reactions. Observations of > 10 MeV gamma rays observed in NaI detectors within 10s of meters from and coincident with rocket-triggered lightning at the International Center for Lightning Research and Testing suggest that charged particles accelerated in intense electric fields associated with lightning give rise to photons with sufficient energy to initiate nuclear reactions [2]. Further work to explain the cause of this anomalous activity is underway using natural and triggered lightning. 1. M. B. Greenfield et al., Journal of Applied Physics 93 no. 3 (2003) pp 1839-184. 2. J. R. Dwyer et al., Science 299, (2003), pp 694-697 and recent communications

  16. Gamma Tocopherol and Lovastatin Additively Induced Apoptosis in Human Colorectal Carcinoma Cell Line (HT29)

    PubMed Central

    Zeidooni, Leila; Rezaei, Mohsen; Hashemi Tabar, Mahmood

    2012-01-01

    Background Programmed cell death (apoptosis) is a physiological process needed to remove unwanted or damaged cells. It has been hypothesized that any failure of programmed cell death leads to the development of neoplasm. Identifying new agents which induce apoptosis in tumor cells is of great significance in treatment of neoplasms. Numerous studies suggest that exposure of tumor cells to statins and gamma tocopherol can lead to cell death. Objectives The aim of this study was to evaluate the cell death induced by gamma tocopherol and lovastatin in human colorectal carcinoma cell line (HT29) using flow cytometry. Material and Methods HT29 cells were grown in DMEM medium, exposed to different concentrations of lovastatin (10,20,40,100μM ) and gamma tocopherol (25,50,100,200μM) for 48 and 72 hours, individually and in combination (100μM both, 48 h). Phenotype of apoptosis was determined by means of flow cytometry. Results All Concentrations of lovastatin (10, 20, 40, 100 μM) and gamma tocopherol (25, 50, 100, 200 μM) induced an apoptotic response in HT29 cells. In combination, a significant increase in apoptosis phenotype was also demonstrated (P < 0.05). Conclusions This study showed that lovastatin when combined with gamma tocopherol, could induce apoptosis in HT29 cells more potently than each agent alone, which uncovers the significance of targeting the proliferative signaling in different points of the pathway. PMID:24624174

  17. IL-4 acts as a homeostatic regulator of IL-2-induced TNF and IFN-gamma.

    PubMed Central

    Bello-Fernandez, C; Oblakowski, P; Meager, A; Duncombe, A S; Rill, D M; Hoffbrand, A V; Brenner, M K

    1991-01-01

    Interleukin-4 (IL-4) is a cytokine secreted by interleukin-2 (IL-2)-activated lymphocytes. IL-2-stimulated lymphocytes also secrete two cytokines, tumour necrosis factor (TNF) and gamma-interferon (IFN-gamma), which contribute to effector function and which may themselves recruit fresh, cytokine-secreting effector cells. We have now investigated whether the IL-4 induced is able to homeostatically regulate secretion of the TNF and IFN-gamma. Peripheral blood mononuclear cells or lymphocytes from normal donors and from patients with neoplastic disease were cultured in the presence of IL-2 alone, IL-4 alone or with both cytokines. IL-2 induced high levels of TNF and IFN-gamma secretion in both groups. The addition of recombinant IL-4 to these IL-2-stimulated cultures lead to significant inhibition of IFN-gamma and TNF production. IFN-gamma secretion was reduced by 50-99% in normal donors and by between 11% and 99% in patients (P less than 0.001). TNF levels induced by IL-2 were similarly reduced by IL-4 both in normal donors (P less than 0.003) and in patients (P less than 0.01). These inhibitory effects were produced by IL-4 at doses of IL-2 attainable in vivo. Inhibition appears to represent a homeostatic regulatory mechanism which may limit recruitment of fresh activated killer (AK) cells. When endogenous IL-4 activity in IL-2-activated lymphocytes was blocked by anti-IL-4 antibody, significantly higher levels of IFN-gamma and TNF were secreted (P less than 0.05). Since both TNF and IFN-gamma may contribute to the anti-neoplastic action of IL-2, manipulating the level of IL-4 activity in vivo could augment the benefits of IL-2 immunotherapy. PMID:1901829

  18. Hydroxymethyl-phytochelatins [(gamma-glutamylcysteine)n-serine] are metal-induced peptides of the Poaceae.

    PubMed

    Klapheck, S; Fliegner, W; Zimmer, I

    1994-04-01

    Exposure of several species of the family Poaceae to cadmium results in the formation of metal-induced peptides of the general structure (gamma-Glu-Cys)n-Ser (n=2-4). They are assumed to be formed from hydroxymethyl-glutathione (gamma-Glu-Cys-Ser) and are termed hydroxymethyl-phytochelatins (hm-PCs) in analogy to the homo-phytochelatins [(gamma-Glu-Cys)n-beta-Ala], discovered in legumes, and the phytochelatins [PCs, (gamma-Glu-Cys)n-Gly] found in most other plants and many fungi. The hm-PCs were isolated from the roots of cadmium-exposed rice (Oryza sativa L. cv Strella), and their structure was confirmed by amino acid analysis after total and enzymic hydrolysis and by tandem mass spectrometry. The hm-PCs probably play a significant role in heavy metal detoxication in rice. In addition to this new form of gamma-Glu-Cys (gamma EC) peptide, PCs and gamma EC peptides without C-terminal Ser or Gly are found. All gamma EC peptides are synthesized without delay after incubation of rice plants in 100 microM CdCl2 in the roots as well as in the shoots. Incubation times exceeding 24 h or higher concentrations of cadmium result in a selective enrichment of gamma EC peptides with higher chain length and an increased ratio of PCs to hm-PCs. gamma EC peptide synthesis is accompanied by a decrease of the glutathione content and an increase of the hydroxymethyl-glutathione content in roots and shoots of rice plants. PMID:8016264

  19. Hydroxymethyl-phytochelatins [(gamma-glutamylcysteine)n-serine] are metal-induced peptides of the Poaceae.

    PubMed Central

    Klapheck, S; Fliegner, W; Zimmer, I

    1994-01-01

    Exposure of several species of the family Poaceae to cadmium results in the formation of metal-induced peptides of the general structure (gamma-Glu-Cys)n-Ser (n=2-4). They are assumed to be formed from hydroxymethyl-glutathione (gamma-Glu-Cys-Ser) and are termed hydroxymethyl-phytochelatins (hm-PCs) in analogy to the homo-phytochelatins [(gamma-Glu-Cys)n-beta-Ala], discovered in legumes, and the phytochelatins [PCs, (gamma-Glu-Cys)n-Gly] found in most other plants and many fungi. The hm-PCs were isolated from the roots of cadmium-exposed rice (Oryza sativa L. cv Strella), and their structure was confirmed by amino acid analysis after total and enzymic hydrolysis and by tandem mass spectrometry. The hm-PCs probably play a significant role in heavy metal detoxication in rice. In addition to this new form of gamma-Glu-Cys (gamma EC) peptide, PCs and gamma EC peptides without C-terminal Ser or Gly are found. All gamma EC peptides are synthesized without delay after incubation of rice plants in 100 microM CdCl2 in the roots as well as in the shoots. Incubation times exceeding 24 h or higher concentrations of cadmium result in a selective enrichment of gamma EC peptides with higher chain length and an increased ratio of PCs to hm-PCs. gamma EC peptide synthesis is accompanied by a decrease of the glutathione content and an increase of the hydroxymethyl-glutathione content in roots and shoots of rice plants. PMID:8016264

  20. Gamma-ray-induced damage and recovery behavior in an erbium-doped fiber laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bussjager, Rebecca J.; Hayduk, Michael J.; Johns, Steven T.; Taylor, Linda R.; Taylor, Edward W.

    2002-01-01

    Erbium-doped fiber lasers (EDFLs) may soon find applications in space as high bit rate optical communication systems and photonic analog-to-digital converters (ADCs). The rapid advancement in digital signal processing systems has led to an increased interest in the direct digitization of high- frequency analog signals. The potential high bandwidth, reduced weight, and reduced power requirements makes photonics an attractive technology for wide-band signal conversion as well as for use in space-based platforms. It is anticipated that photonic ADCs will be able to operate at sampling rates and resolutions far greater than current electronic ADCs. The high repetition rates and narrow pulse widths produced by EDFLs allow for high-speed impulse sampling of analog signals thus making it a vital component of a photonic ADC. In this paper we report on the in situ gamma-ray irradiation of an actively mode-locked EDFL operating at 1530 nm. The onset, growth and extent of ionization induced damage under time-resolved operational conditions is presented. The laser consisted of approximately 3 meters of erbium-doped fiber pumped by a laser diode operating at 980 nm. The picosecond pulses produced by the laser were initiated and controlled by a Mach-Zehnder lithium niobate electro-optic modulator. The active mode-locking element allowed for the precise timing control of the laser repetition rate which is critical in high-speed optical networking systems as well as in photonic ADCs.

  1. Low frequency terahertz-induced demagnetization in ferromagnetic nickel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shalaby, Mostafa; Vicario, Carlo; Hauri, Christoph P.

    2016-05-01

    A laser stimulus at terahertz (THz) frequency is expected to offer superior control over magnetization dynamics compared to an optical pulse, where ultrafast demagnetization is mediated by heat deposition. As a THz field cycle occurs on a timescale similar to the natural speed of spin motions, this can open a path for triggering precessional magnetization motion and ultimately ultrafast magnetic switching by the THz magnetic field component, without quenching. Here, we explore the ultrafast magnetic response of a ferromagnetic nickel thin film excited by a strong (33 MV/cm) terahertz transient in non-resonant conditions. While the magnetic laser pulse component induces ultrafast magnetic precessions, we experimentally found that at high pump fluence, the THz pulse leads to large quenching which dominates the precessional motion by far. Furthermore, degradation of magnetic properties sets in and leads to permanent modifications of the Ni thin film and damage.

  2. Low-frequency Electrical Response to Microbial Induced Sulfide Precipitation

    SciTech Connect

    Ntarlagiannis, Dimitrios; Williams, Kenneth H.; Slater, Lee D.; Hubbard, Susan S.

    2005-11-19

    We investigated the sensitivity of low-frequency electrical measurements to microbeinduced metal sulfide precipitation. Three identical sand-packed monitoring columns were used; a geochemical column, an electrical column and a control column. In the first experiment, continuous upward flow of nutrients and metals in solution was established in each column. Cells of Desulfovibrio vulgaris (D. vulgaris) were injected into the center of the geochemical and electrical columns. Geochemical sampling and post-experiment destructive analysis showed that microbial induced sulfate reduction led to metal precipitation on bacteria cells, forming motile biominerals. Precipitation initially occurred in the injection zone, followed by chemotactic migration of D. vulgaris and ultimate accumulation around the nutrient source at the column base.

  3. Interferon-gamma gene polymorphism influences the frequency of a Chlamydia trachomatis cervical infection in young women.

    PubMed

    Eleutério, José; Teles, Rosiane A; Linhares, Iara M; Normand, Neil; Witkin, Steven S

    2015-11-01

    Cervicitis associated with Chlamydia trachomatis is frequent worldwide, but the factors determining susceptibility to infection remain incompletely determined. We evaluated whether a functional single nucleotide polymorphism at position +874 in the gene coding for interferon gamma (rs2430561) influenced the likelihood of having a cervical C. trachomatis infection. This was a cross-sectional study of 142 sexually-active women attending a general gynaecology service on the outskirts of the city of Fortaleza in northeastern Brazil between August 2011 and August 2012. Endocervical swabs were evaluated for C. trachomatis DNA using hybrid capture. DNA from buccal swabs was utilised for detection of the interferon gamma 874 T/A single nucleotide polymorphism by gene amplification, endonuclease digestion and gel electrophoresis. Nineteen women (13.4%) were positive for C. trachomatis in their cervix. Positivity was 21.7% in women with the A,A genotype versus 7.0% in women with one or two T alleles (p = 0.0227). The variant T allele frequency, associated with elevated interferon gamma production, was 36.2% in women who were negative for C. trachomatis as opposed to 18.4% in women who were positive for a cervical infection with this organism (p = 0.0415). Possession of the T allele at position +874 in the gene coding for interferon gamma is associated with a reduced likelihood of a C. trachomatis cervical infection. PMID:25505046

  4. Influence of combined alpha, beta and gamma radionuclide contamination on the frequency of waxy-reversions in barley pollen.

    PubMed

    Bubryak, I; Vilensky, E; Naumenko, V; Grodzisky, D

    1992-02-01

    The mutagenic effectiveness of chronic, combined alpha-, beta-, and gamma-irradiation caused by radionuclide contamination of the biogeocenosis was studied in comparison with chronic gamma-irradiation from an external 60Co source. The waxy-test on barley pollen proved to be sufficiently sensitive to evaluate the increase in waxy-reversion frequencies in plants exposed to a 3 mSv dose. A dose of 50-200 mSv from external irradiation was needed to double the mutation rate in barley pollen. Moreover, the smaller doses (dose rates) were more harmful than the higher doses if measured as the increase in mutation frequency per unit of irradiation. Higher genotoxicity was observed from combined irradiation due to radionuclide contamination than from similar doses from an external gamma source. We concluded that mutagenic effects in plant cells, in the case of radionuclide contamination of the biogeocenosis, could not be extrapolated only on the basis of measured dose, but separate investigations should be carried out to establish the genotoxicity of specific radionuclide mixtures and possible toxic chemical synergisms. PMID:1574702

  5. FIGARO: a New Facility for Studying Neutron-Induced Reactions that Produce Gamma Rays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zanini, L.; Haight, R. C.; Devlin, M.; Aprahamian, A.

    2000-04-01

    FIGARO (Fast neutron-Induced GAmma-Ray Observer) was established in 1999 at LANSCE/WNR. This new capability is intended to extend our research into nuclear reactions and nuclear structure using gamma rays as the principal probe. The detector will consist of an array of germanium and NE-213 neutron detectors, operating in coincidence, placed at a distance of about 20 m from the neutron source. The scientific goals of FIGARO include: investigation of nuclear level densities using gamma-ray transitions as an indicator of angular momentum populated in the reaction; investigations of pre-equilibrium reactions; and study of cross sections and neutron emission spectra in (n,n') excitations. A first measurement, with the detection of only gamma-rays, has been performed with a ^59Co sample. By comparison with existing data(T. E. Slusarchyk, ORNL/TM-11404(1989)) we can assess the performance of the detector. Results will be discussed.

  6. Interferon-gamma induced disruption of GABAergic inhibition in the spinal dorsal horn in vivo.

    PubMed

    Vikman, Kristina S; Duggan, Arthur W; Siddall, Philip J

    2007-12-15

    The proinflammatory cytokine interferon-gamma (IFN-gamma), which can be present in elevated levels in the central nervous system during pathological conditions, may be involved in the generation of persistent pain states by inducing neuronal hyperexcitability. The aim of the present study was to examine whether loss of dorsal horn GABAergic inhibition may underlie this IFN-gamma-mediated neuronal hyperexcitability. Repetitive intrathecal injections of recombinant rat IFN-gamma (1000 U) or control buffer were administered to rats every second day for eight days. Electrophysiological recordings from lumbar dorsal horn neurons (n=46) were performed under halothane anaesthesia. Cellular responses were recorded before, during and after microiontophoretic application of the GABA antagonist bicuculline. In control animals, all cellular responses studied were significantly enhanced in the presence of bicuculline, including increased spontaneous activity, enhanced responses to innocuous and noxious mechanical stimulation and reduced paired-pulse depression. In contrast, in IFN-gamma-treated animals, bicuculline ejection had little or no facilitating effect on neuronal responses and instead a significant proportion of neurons displayed reduced responses. Seventy-four percent of cells from IFN-gamma treated animals showed a reduction in the response to noxious stimulation and 47% of the cells showed increased rather than reduced paired-pulse depression in the presence of bicuculline, thus suggesting IFN-gamma-induced excitatory actions by GABA. These findings show that the prolonged presence of increased levels of IFN-gamma in the central nervous system may contribute to the generation of central sensitization and persistent pain by reducing inhibitory tone in the dorsal horn. This implies a potential link between disinhibition and cytokine action in the spinal cord. PMID:17407800

  7. The perception of coherent and non-coherent auditory objects: a signature in gamma frequency band.

    PubMed

    Knief, A; Schulte, M; Bertran, O; Pantev, C

    2000-07-01

    The pertinence of gamma band activity in magnetoencephalographic and electroencephalographic recordings for the performance of a gestalt recognition process is a question at issue. We investigated the functional relevance of gamma band activity for the perception of auditory objects. An auditory experiment was performed as an analog to the Kanizsa experiment in the visual modality, comprising four different coherent and non-coherent stimuli. For the first time functional differences of evoked gamma band activity due to the perception of these stimuli were demonstrated by various methods (localization of sources, wavelet analysis and independent component analysis, ICA). Responses to coherent stimuli were found to have more features in common compared to non-coherent stimuli (e.g. closer located sources and smaller number of ICA components). The results point to the existence of a pitch processor in the auditory pathway. PMID:10867289

  8. mBAND Analysis of Late Chromosome Aberrations in Human Lymphocytes Induced by Gamma Rays and Fe Ions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sunagawa, Mayumi; Zhang, Ye; Yeshitla, Samrawit; Kadhim, Munira; Wilson, Bobby; Wu, Honglu

    2014-01-01

    Chromosomal translocations and inversions are considered stable, and cells containing these types of chromosome aberrations can survive multiple cell divisions. An efficient method to detect an inversion is multi-color banding fluorescent in situ hybridization (mBAND) which allows identification of both inter- and intrachromosome aberrations simultaneously. Post irradiation, chromosome aberrations may also arise after multiple cell divisions as a result of genomic instability. To investigate the stable or late-arising chromosome aberrations induced after radiation exposure, we exposed human lymphocytes to gamma rays and Fe ions ex vivo, and cultured the cells for multiple generations. Chromosome aberrations were analyzed in cells collected at first mitosis and at several time intervals during the culture period post irradiation. With gamma irradiation, about half of the damages observed at first mitosis remained after 7 day- and 14 day- culture, suggesting the transmissibility of damages to the surviving progeny. Detailed analysis of chromosome break ends participating in exchanges revealed a greater fraction of break ends involved in intrachromosome aberrations in the 7- and 14-day samples in comparison to the fraction at first mitosis. In particular, simple inversions were found at 7 and 14 days, but not at the first mitosis, suggesting that some of the aberrations might be formed days post irradiation. In contrast, at the doses that produced similar frequencies of gamma-induced chromosome aberrations as observed at first mitosis, a significantly lower yield of aberrations remained at the same population doublings after Fe ion exposure. At these equitoxic doses, more complex type aberrations were observed for Fe ions, indicating that Fe ion-induced initial chromosome damages are more severe and may lead to cell death. Comparison between low and high doses of Fe ion irradiation in the induction of late damages will also be discussed.

  9. Gamma-ray burst constraints on the galactic frequency of extrasolar Oort Clouds

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shull, J. Michael; Stern, S. Alan

    1995-01-01

    With the strong Compton Gamma-Ray Observatory/Burst and Transient Source Experiment (CGRO/BATSE) evidence that most gamma-ray bursts do not come from galactic neutron stars, models involving the accretion of a comet onto a neutron star (NS) no longer appear to be strong contenders for explaining the majority of bursts. If this is the case, then it is worth asking whether the lack of an observed galactic gamma-ray burst population provides a useful constraint on the number of comets and comet clouds in the galaxy. Owing to the previously unrecognized structural weakness of cometary nuclei, we find the capture cross sections for comet-NS events to be much higher than previously published estimates, with tidal breakup at distances R(sub b) approx. equals 4 x 10(exp 10) cm from the NS. As a result, impacts of comets onto field NSs penetrating the Oort Clouds of other stars are found to dominate all other galactic NS-comet capture rates by a factor of 100. This in turn predicts that if comet clouds are common, there should be a significant population of repeater sources with (1) a galactic distribution, (2) space-correlated repetition, and (3) a wide range of peak luminosities and luminosity time histories. If all main sequence stars have Oort Clouds like our own, we predict approximately 4000 such repeater sources in the Milky Way at any time, each repeating on time scales of months to years. Based on estimates of the sensitivity of the CGRO/BATSE instrument and assuming isotropic gamma-ray beaming from such events, we estimate that a population of approximately 20-200 of these galactic NS-Oort Cloud gamma-ray repeater sources should be detectable by CGRO. In addition, if giant planet formation is common in the galaxy, we estimate that the accretion of isolated comets injected to the interstellar medium by giant planet formation should produce an additional source of galactic, nonrepeating, events. Comparing these estimates to the 3-4 soft gamma-ray repeater sources

  10. Membrane properties and the balance between excitation and inhibition control gamma-frequency oscillations arising from feedback inhibition.

    PubMed

    Economo, Michael N; White, John A

    2012-01-01

    Computational studies as well as in vivo and in vitro results have shown that many cortical neurons fire in a highly irregular manner and at low average firing rates. These patterns seem to persist even when highly rhythmic signals are recorded by local field potential electrodes or other methods that quantify the summed behavior of a local population. Models of the 30-80 Hz gamma rhythm in which network oscillations arise through 'stochastic synchrony' capture the variability observed in the spike output of single cells while preserving network-level organization. We extend upon these results by constructing model networks constrained by experimental measurements and using them to probe the effect of biophysical parameters on network-level activity. We find in simulations that gamma-frequency oscillations are enabled by a high level of incoherent synaptic conductance input, similar to the barrage of noisy synaptic input that cortical neurons have been shown to receive in vivo. This incoherent synaptic input increases the emergent network frequency by shortening the time scale of the membrane in excitatory neurons and by reducing the temporal separation between excitation and inhibition due to decreased spike latency in inhibitory neurons. These mechanisms are demonstrated in simulations and in vitro current-clamp and dynamic-clamp experiments. Simulation results further indicate that the membrane potential noise amplitude has a large impact on network frequency and that the balance between excitatory and inhibitory currents controls network stability and sensitivity to external inputs. PMID:22275859

  11. External gamma irradiation-induced effects in early-life stages of zebrafish, Danio rerio.

    PubMed

    Gagnaire, B; Cavalié, I; Pereira, S; Floriani, M; Dubourg, N; Camilleri, V; Adam-Guillermin, C

    2015-12-01

    In the general context of validation of tools useful for the characterization of ecological risk linked to ionizing radiation, the effects of an external gamma irradiation were studied in zebrafish larvae irradiated for 96 h with two dose rates: 0.8 mGy/d, which is close to the level recommended to protect ecosystems from adverse effects of ionizing radiation (0.24 mGy/d) and a higher dose rate of 570 mGy/d. Several endpoints were investigated, such as mortality, hatching, and some parameters of embryo-larval development, immunotoxicity, apoptosis, genotoxicity, neurotoxicity and histological alterations. Results showed that an exposure to gamma rays induced an acceleration of hatching for both doses and a decrease of yolk bag diameter for the highest dose, which could indicate an increase of global metabolism. AChE activity decreased with the low dose rate of gamma irradiation and alterations were also shown in muscles of irradiated larvae. These results suggest that gamma irradiation can induce damages on larval neurotransmission, which could have repercussions on locomotion. DNA damages, basal ROS production and apoptosis were also induced by irradiation, while ROS stimulation index and EROD biotransformation activity were decreased and gene expression of acetylcholinesterase, choline acetyltransferase, cytochrome p450 and myeloperoxidase increased. These results showed that ionizing radiation induced an oxidative stress conducting to DNA damages. This study characterized further the modes of action of ionizing radiation in fish. PMID:26517177

  12. A third interferon-gamma-induced subunit exchange in the 20S proteasome.

    PubMed

    Groettrup, M; Kraft, R; Kostka, S; Standera, S; Stohwasser, R; Kloetzel, P M

    1996-04-01

    The 20S proteasome is a protease complex of functional importance for antigen processing. Two of the 14 proteasome subunits, delta and MB1, can be replaced by the major histocompatibility complex (MHC)-encoded and interferon-gamma (IFN-gamma)-inducible subunits LMP2 and LMP7, respectively. LMP2 and LMP7 alter the cleavage site specificity of the 20S proteasome and are required for the efficient generation of T cell epitopes from a number of viral proteins and for optimal MHC class I cell surface expression. We compared the 20S proteasome subunit pattern from IFN-gamma-induced and non-induced mouse fibroblasts on two-dimensional gels and identified a third subunit exchange by microsequencing: the non-MHC-encoded subunit MECL-1 is induced by IFN-gamma and replaces a sofar barely characterized beta subunit designated 'MC14'. In analogy to LMP2 and LMP7, MECL-1 may be functional in MHC class I-restricted antigen presentation. PMID:8625980

  13. Continuous versus pulse neutron induced gamma spectroscopy for soil carbon analysis

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Neutron induced gamma spectra analysis (NGA) provides a means of measuring carbon in large soil volumes without destructive sampling. Calibration of the NGA system must account for system background and the interference of other nuclei on the carbon peak at 4.43 MeV. Accounting for these factors pro...

  14. Sucrose delays membrane deterioration of chrysanthemum flowers induced by gamma-rays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kikuchi, O. K.; Todoriki, S.; Hayashi, T.

    1998-06-01

    Fluidity of the flower membranes of cut chrysanthemums ( Dendranthema grandiflorum Kitamura) decreased soon after gamma-irradiation at 750Gy and continued to decrease during storage following irradiation. Holding chrysanthemum cut inflorescence in 2% sucrose suppressed the decrease. The results suggest that sugars reduce radiation-induced physiological deterioration of chrysanthemum flower membranes.

  15. Role of inducible nitric oxide synthase-derived nitric oxide in lipopolysaccharide plus interferon-gamma-induced pulmonary inflammation.

    PubMed

    Zeidler, Patti C; Millecchia, Lyndell M; Castranova, Vincent

    2004-02-15

    Exposure of mice to lipopolysaccharide (LPS) plus interferon-gamma (IFN-gamma) increases nitric oxide (NO) production, which is proposed to play a role in the resulting pulmonary damage and inflammation. To determine the role of inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS)-induced NO in this lung reaction, the responses of inducible nitric oxide synthase knockout (iNOS KO) versus C57BL/6J wild-type (WT) mice to aspirated LPS + IFN-gamma were compared. Male mice (8-10 weeks) were exposed to LPS (1.2 mg/kg) + IFN-gamma (5000 U/mouse) or saline. At 24 or 72 h postexposure, lungs were lavaged with saline and the acellular fluid from the first bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL) was analyzed for total antioxidant capacity (TAC), lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) activity, albumin, tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-alpha), and macrophage inflammatory protein-2 (MIP-2). The cellular fraction of the total BAL was used to determine alveolar macrophage (AM) and polymorphonuclear leukocyte (PMN) counts, and AM zymosan-stimulated chemiluminescence (AM-CL). Pulmonary responses 24 h postexposure to LPS + IFN-gamma were characterized by significantly decreased TAC, increased BAL AMs and PMNs, LDH, albumin, TNF-alpha, and MIP-2, and enhanced AM-CL to the same extent in both WT and iNOS KO mice. Responses 72 h postexposure were similar; however, significant differences were found between WT and iNOS KO mice. iNOS KO mice demonstrated a greater decline in total antioxidant capacity, greater BAL PMNs, LDH, albumin, TNF-alpha, and MIP-2, and an enhanced AM-CL compared to the WT. These data suggest that the role of iNOS-derived NO in the pulmonary response to LPS + IFN-gamma is anti-inflammatory, and this becomes evident over time. PMID:14962504

  16. Process for gamma ray induced degradation of polychlorinated biphenyls

    DOEpatents

    Meikrantz, D.H.; Mincher, B.J.; Arbon, R.E.

    1998-08-25

    The invention is a process for the in-situ destruction of polychlorinated biphenyl (PCB) compounds in transformer oils and transformers. These compounds are broken down selectively by irradiation of the object or mixture using spent nuclear fuel or any isotopic source of high energy gamma radiation. For example, the level of applied dose required to decompose 400 ppm of polychlorinated biphenyl in transformer oil to less than 50 ppm is 500 kilograms. Destruction of polychlorinated biphenyls to levels of less than 50 ppm renders the transformer oil or transformer non-PCB contaminated under current regulations. Therefore, this process can be used to treat PCB contaminated oil and equipment to minimize or eliminate the generation of PCB hazardous waste. 5 figs.

  17. Gamma-ray-induced degradation of lignocellulosic materials

    SciTech Connect

    Han, Y.W.; Timpa, J.; Ciegler, A.; Courtney, J.; Curry, W.F.; Lambremont, E.N.

    1981-11-01

    Lignocellulosic plant materials were treated with various swelling agents and exposed to gamma radiation from 60Co or 137Cs. At dosages of 50 Mrad or above, lignocellulosic materials were extensively degraded and solubilized in water. Addition of water, NaOH, or H2SO4 to the substrate increased the degree of solubilization. Complete solubilization was achieved for samples of sugarcane bagasse, newspaper, cotton linters, cotton cloth, sawdust, and alpha-cellulose powder. About 35% total sugar and 5% reducing sugar per dry weight of sugarcane bagasse could be obtained by this method. Most of the soluble carbohydrates seemed to be disaccharides or larger molecules and glucose degradation products. Solubilization of cellulose was dosage dependent and although the rate of solubilization was increased by adding alkali, released sugar was further decomposed by the alkali and by high dosages of radiation. (Refs. 14).

  18. Process for gamma ray induced degradation of polychlorinated biphenyls

    DOEpatents

    Meikrantz, David H.; Mincher, Bruce J.; Arbon, Rodney E.

    1998-01-01

    The invention is a process for the in-situ destruction of polychlorinated biphenyl (PCB) compounds in transformer oils and transformers. These compounds are broken down selectively by irradiation of the object or mixture using spent nuclear fuel or any isotopic source of high energy gamma radiation. For example, the level of applied dose required to decompose 400 ppm of polychlorinated biphenyl in transformer oil to less than 50 ppm is 500 kilogray. Destruction of polychlorinated biphenyls to levels of less than 50 ppm renders the transformer oil or transformer non-PCB contaminated under current regulations. Therefore, this process can be used to treat PCB contaminated oil and equipment to minimize or eliminate the generation of PCB hazardous waste.

  19. Interferon-gamma-induced dephosphorylation of STAT3 and apoptosis are dependent on the mTOR pathway

    SciTech Connect

    Fang Peng . E-mail: fangp@ohsu.edu; Hwa, Vivian; Rosenfeld, Ron G.

    2006-05-01

    Interferon-gamma (IFN-{gamma}) exhibits diverse biological activities, including control of cell growth and tumor suppression. Here, we report that the treatment of M12 cells, a human metastatic prostate cancer cell line, with IFN-{gamma}, resulted in marked inhibition of cell proliferation and induced apoptosis. These effects were not seen with either IFN-{alpha} or IFN-{beta}. M12 cells, like many other human cancer cells, contain constitutively activated signal transducer and activator of transcription 3 (STAT3). The basal levels of both Akt and ERK1/2 phosphorylation are also markedly elevated in M12 cells. Strikingly, IFN-{gamma}-induced apoptosis and growth inhibition of M12 cells were associated with persistent suppression of the constitutive tyrosine-phosphorylated STAT3 (pY-STAT3). The IFN-{gamma}-induced dephosphorylation of pY-STAT3, however, was inhibited when the mTOR pathway was specifically blocked by rapamycin. Inhibition of PI-3K with low-dose LY294002, or MAPK with PD98059 also suppressed the mTOR/p70 S6k pathway, and correlated with the blockage of IFN-{gamma}-induced dephosphorylation of pY-STAT3. Simultaneously, treatment with LY294002, PD98059, or rapamycin abolished IFN-{gamma}-induced apoptosis in M12 cells. The inhibition of the mTOR pathway, however, did not affect IFN-{gamma}-induced activation of STAT1 pathway, and suppression of STAT1 expression by siRNA had no effect on IFN-{gamma}-induced dephosphorylation of pY-STAT3. Taken together, these results demonstrate that an intact mTOR pathway is critical for IFN-{gamma}-induced suppression of pY-STAT3 and apoptosis. Our study thus provides novel insights into the contributions of signaling pathways other than the classical JAK/STAT1 pathway in the anti-proliferative, proapoptotic actions of IFN-{gamma}.

  20. Gamma-ray burst constraints on the galactic frequency of extra-solar Oort clouds

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shull, J. Michael; Stern, S. Alan

    1994-01-01

    With the strong CGRO/BATSE evidence that most gamma-ray bursts do not come from galactic neutron stars, models involving the accretion of a comet onto a neutron star (NS) no longer appear to be strong contenders for explaining the majority of bursts. If this is the case, then it is worth asking whether the lack of an observed galactic gamma-ray burst population provides a useful constraint on the number of comets and comet clouds in the galaxy. Owing to the previously unrecognized structural weakness of cometary nuclei, we find the capture cross sections for comet-NS events to be much higher than previously published estimates, with tidal breakup at distances R(sub b) approximately equals to 4 x 10(exp 10) cm from the NS. As a result, impacts of comets onto field NS's penetrating the Oort Clouds of other stars are found to dominate all other galactic NS-comet capture rates by a factor of 100. This in turn predicts that if comet clouds are common, there should be a significant population of repeater sources with (1) a galactic distribution, (2) space-correlated repetition, and (3) a wide range of peak luminosities and luminosity time histories. If all main sequences stars have Oort Clouds like our own, we predict approximately 4000 such repeater sources in the Milky Way at any time, each repeating on timescales of months to years. Based on estimates of the sensitivity of the CGRO/BATSE instrument and assuming isotropic gamma-ray beaming from such events, we estimate that a population of approximately 20-200 of these galactic NS-Oort Cloud gamma-ray repeater sources should be detectable by CGRO. In addition, if giant planet formation is common in the galaxy, we estimate that the accretion of isolated comets injected to the interstellar medium by giant planet formation should produce an additional source of galactic, nonrepeating events. Comparing these estimates to the three to four soft gamma-ray repeater sources detected by BATSE, one is forced to conclude that (1

  1. Neutron-induced gamma-ray spectroscopy: simulations for chemical mapping of planetary surfaces

    SciTech Connect

    Brueckner, J.; Waenke, H.; Reedy, R.C.

    1986-01-01

    Cosmic rays interact with the surface of a planetary body and produce a cascade of secondary particles, such as neutrons. Neutron-induced scattering and capture reactions play an important role in the production of discrete gamma-ray lines that can be measured by a gamma-ray spectrometer on board of an orbiting spacecraft. These data can be used to determine the concentration of many elements in the surface of a planetary body, which provides clues to its bulk composition and in turn to its origin and evolution. To investigate the gamma rays made by neutron interactions, thin targets were irradiated with neutrons having energies from 14 MeV to 0.025 eV. By means of foil activation technique the ratio of epithermal to thermal neutrons was determined to be similar to that in the Moon. Gamma rays emitted by the targets and the surrounding material were detected by a high-resolution germanium detector in the energy range of 0.1 to 8 MeV. Most of the gamma-ray lines that are expected to be used for planetary gamma-ray spectroscopy were found in the recorded spectra and the principal lines in these spectra are presented. 58 refs., 7 figs., 9 tabs.

  2. Size dependence of the pressure-induced gamma to alpha structuraltransition in iron oxide nanocrystals

    SciTech Connect

    Clark, S.M.; Prilliman, S.G.; Erdonmez, C.K.; Rockenberger, J.; Zaziski, D.J.; Kwong, J.; Alivisatos, A.P.

    2005-09-01

    The size trend for the pressure-induced gamma-Fe2O3(maghemite) to alpha-Fe2O3 (hematite) structural phase transition in nanocrystals has been observed. The transition pressure was found to increase with decreasing nanocrystal size: 7 nm nanocrystals transformed at 272GPa, 5 nm at 343GPa and 3 nm at 372GPa. Annealing of a bulk sample of gamma-Fe2O3 was found to reduce the transition pressure from 352 to242GPa. The bulk modulus was determined to be 2626GPa for 7 nm nanocrystals of gamma-Fe2O3, which is significantly higher than for the value of 1906 GPa that we measured for bulk samples. For alpha-Fe2O3, the bulk moduli for 7 nm nanocrystals (3365) and bulk (30030) were found to be almost the same within error. The bulk modulus for the gamma phase was found to decrease with decreasing particle size between 10 and 3.2 nm particle size. Values for the ambient pressure molar volume were found within 1 percent to be: 33.0 cm3/mol for bulk gamma-Fe2O3, 32.8 cm3/mol for 7 nm diameter gamma-Fe2O3 nanocrystals, 30.7 cm3/mol for bulk alpha-Fe2O3 and 30.6 cm3/mol for alpha-Fe2O3 nanocrystals.

  3. Interferon-gamma sensitizes colonic epithelial cell lines to physiological and therapeutic inducers of colonocyte apoptosis.

    PubMed

    O'Connell, J; Bennett, M W; Nally, K; O'Sullivan, G C; Collins, J K; Shanahan, F

    2000-12-01

    Homeostasis in the colonic epithelium is achieved by a continuous cycle of proliferation and apoptosis, in which imbalances are associated with disease. Inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) and colon cancer are associated with either excessive or insufficient apoptosis of colonic epithelial cells, respectively. By using two colonic epithelial cell lines, HT29 and SW620, we investigated how the epithelial cell's sensitivity to apoptosis was regulated by the proinflammatory cytokine interferon-gamma (IFN-gamma). We found that IFN-gamma sensitized HT29 cells, and to a lesser extent SW620, to diverse inducers of apoptosis of physiologic or therapeutic relevance to the colon. These apoptosis inducers included Fas (CD95/APO-1) ligand (FasL), short-chain fatty acids, and chemotherapeutic drugs. The extent of IFN-gamma-mediated apoptosis sensitization in these two cell lines correlated well with the degree of IFN-gamma-mediated upregulation of the proapoptotic protease caspase-1. Although IFN-gamma alone effectively sensitized HT29 cells to apoptosis, inclusion of the protein synthesis inhibitor cyclohexamide (CHX) during apoptotic challenge was necessary for maximal sensitization of SW620. The requirement of CHX to sensitize SW620 cells to apoptosis implies a need to inhibit translation of antiapoptotic proteins absent from HT29. In particular, the antiapoptotic protein Bcl-2 was strongly expressed in SW620 cells but absent from HT29. Our results indicate that IFN-gamma increases the sensitivity of colonic epithelial cells to diverse apoptotic stimuli in concert, via upregulation of caspase-1. Our findings implicate caspase-1 and Bcl-2 as important central points of control determining the general sensitivity of colonic epithelial cells to apoptosis. PMID:11056003

  4. Low-frequency electrical response to microbial induced sulfide precipitation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ntarlagiannis, Dimitrios; Williams, Kenneth Hurst; Slater, Lee; Hubbard, Susan

    2005-12-01

    We investigated the sensitivity of low-frequency electrical measurements to microbe-induced metal sulfide precipitation. Three identical sand-packed monitoring columns were used; a geochemical column, an electrical column and a control column. In the first experiment, continuous upward flow of nutrients and metals in solution was established in each column. Cells of Desulfovibrio vulgaris (D. vulgaris) were injected into the center of the geochemical and electrical columns. Geochemical sampling and post-experiment destructive analysis showed that microbial induced sulfate reduction led to metal precipitation on bacteria cells, forming motile biominerals. Precipitation initially occurred in the injection zone, followed by chemotactic migration of D. vulgaris and ultimate accumulation around the nutrient source at the column base. Results from this experiment conducted with metals show (1) polarization anomalies, up to 14 mrad, develop at the bacteria injection and final accumulation areas, (2) the onset of polarization increase occurs concurrently with the onset of lactate consumption, (3) polarization profiles are similar to calculated profiles of the rate of lactate consumption, and (4) temporal changes in polarization and conduction correlate with a geometrical rearrangement of metal-coated bacterial cells. In a second experiment, the same biogeochemical conditions were established except that no metals were added to the flow solution. Polarization anomalies were absent when the experiment was replicated without metals in solution. We therefore attribute the polarization increase observed in the first experiment to a metal-fluid interfacial mechanism that develops as metal sulfides precipitate onto microbial cells and form biominerals. Temporal changes in polarization and conductivity reflect changes in (1) the amount of metal-fluid interfacial area, and (2) the amount of electronic conduction resulting from microbial growth, chemotactic movement and final

  5. Modifications induced by gamma irradiation to Makrofol polymer nuclear track detector

    PubMed Central

    Tayel, A.; Zaki, M.F.; El Basaty, A.B.; Hegazy, Tarek M.

    2014-01-01

    The aim of the present study was extended from obtaining information about the interaction of gamma rays with Makrofol DE 7-2 track detector to introduce the basis that can be used in concerning simple sensor for gamma irradiation and bio-engineering applications. Makrofol polymer samples were irradiated with 1.25 MeV 60Co gamma radiations at doses ranging from 20 to 1000 kG y. The modifications of irradiated samples so induced were analyzed using UV–vis spectrometry, photoluminescence spectroscopy, and the measurements of Vickers’ hardness. Moreover, the change in wettability of irradiated Makrofol was investigated by the contact angle determination of the distilled water. UV–vis spectroscopy shows a noticeable decrease in the energy band gap due to gamma irradiation. This decrease could be attributed to the appearance of a shift to UV spectra toward higher wavelength region after irradiation. Photoluminescence spectra reveal a remarkable change in the integrated photoluminescence intensity with increasing gamma doses, which may be resulted from some matrix disorder through the creation of some defected states in the irradiated polymer. The hardness was found to increase from 4.78 MPa for the unirradiated sample to 23.67 MPa for the highest gamma dose. The contact angle investigations show that the wettability of the modified samples increases with increasing the gamma doses. The result obtained from present investigation furnishes evidence that the gamma irradiations are a successful technique to modify the Makrofol DE 7-2 polymer properties to use it in suitable applications. PMID:25750755

  6. High-Frequency Gravitational Wave Induced Nuclear Fusion

    SciTech Connect

    Fontana, Giorgio; Baker, Robert M. L. Jr.

    2007-01-30

    Nuclear fusion is a process in which nuclei, having a total initial mass, combine to produce a single nucleus, having a final mass less than the total initial mass. Below a given atomic number the process is exothermic; that is, since the final mass is less than the combined initial mass and the mass deficit is converted into energy by the nuclear fusion. On Earth nuclear fusion does not happen spontaneously because electrostatic barriers prevent the phenomenon. To induce controlled, industrial scale, nuclear fusion, only a few methods have been discovered that look promising, but net positive energy production is not yet possible because of low overall efficiency of the systems. In this paper we propose that an intense burst of High Frequency Gravitational Waves (HFGWs) could be focused or beamed to a target mass composed of appropriate fuel or target material to efficiently rearrange the atomic or nuclear structure of the target material with consequent nuclear fusion. Provided that efficient generation of HFGW can be technically achieved, the proposed fusion reactor could become a viable solution for the energy needs of mankind and alternatively a process for beaming energy to produce a source of fusion energy remotely - even inside solid materials.

  7. Time Variability of VHE Gamma-Ray Induced Pair Cascades in AGN Environments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roustazadeh, Parisa; Thrush, Samantha Elaine; Boettcher, Markus

    2016-01-01

    In a series of previous papers, we had investigated the three-dimensional development of pair cascades initiated by very-high-energy gamma-rays from the relativistic jets of blazars, especially in the case of low-frequency peaked blazars which are expected to host dense radiation environments. Gamma-gamma absorption and pair production leads to the development of pair cascades which will be deflected and partially isotropised by magnetic fields in the nuclear environment. This has been suggested to make a significant contribution to the Fermi gamma-ray emission of radio galaxies. In this work, we present the study of the time dependence of these cascades, demonstrating that they can be variable on time scales much shorter than the light-crossing time through the characteristic extent of the circumnuclear radiation field. Thus, this interpretation is still consistent with the Fermi gamma-ray emission of radio galaxies such as NGC 1275, even considering the recently observed short-term variability.

  8. Induced Radioactivity in Recovered Skylab Materials. [gamma ray spectra

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fishman, G. J.; Meegan, C. A.

    1980-01-01

    Four radioactive isotopes found in aluminum and stainless steel samples from Skylab debris were recovered in Australia. The low-level activity was induced by high-energy protons and neutrons in the space environment. Measurements of the specific activities are given.

  9. Apoptosis-promoted tumorigenesis: gamma-irradiation-induced thymic lymphomagenesis requires Puma-driven leukocyte death.

    PubMed

    Michalak, Ewa M; Vandenberg, Cassandra J; Delbridge, Alex R D; Wu, Li; Scott, Clare L; Adams, Jerry M; Strasser, Andreas

    2010-08-01

    Although tumor development requires impaired apoptosis, we describe a novel paradigm of apoptosis-dependent tumorigenesis. Because DNA damage triggers apoptosis through p53-mediated induction of BH3-only proteins Puma and Noxa, we explored their roles in gamma-radiation-induced thymic lymphomagenesis. Surprisingly, whereas Noxa loss accelerated it, Puma loss ablated tumorigenesis. Tumor suppression by Puma deficiency reflected its protection of leukocytes from gamma-irradiation-induced death, because their glucocorticoid-mediated decimation in Puma-deficient mice activated cycling of stem/progenitor cells and restored thymic lymphomagenesis. Our demonstration that cycles of cell attrition and repopulation by stem/progenitor cells can drive tumorigenesis has parallels in human cancers, such as therapy-induced malignancies. PMID:20679396

  10. Gamma ray astronomy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Paciesas, William S.

    1992-01-01

    Miscellaneous tasks related to mission operations and data analysis for the Burst and Transient Source Experiment on the Gamma Ray Observatory, to collection, analysis, and interpretation of data from the Marshall Space Flight Center Very Low Frequency transient monitoring program, and to compilation and analysis of induced radioactivity data were performed. The results are summarized and relevant references are included.

  11. Frequency distributions of solar gamma ray events related and not related with spes in 1980-1995

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pérez Enriquez, R.; Miroshnichenko, L. I.

    1999-08-01

    The advent of new and better instruments in space has resulted in a considerable increase in the number of solar gamma-ray events (GRE) detected. In this paper, we analyze available SMM/GRS and GRANAT/PHEBUS data on the hard X-ray and gamma-ray events, and their associations with solar proton events (SPE) at the Earth's orbit, for the observation period of 1980-1995. About 58% of the GREs under study were found to be SPE-related ones. Size (frequency) distributions have been obtained, for the first time, for the events with different types of emissions (bremsstrahlung, narrow GR lines, positron annihilation line, neutron capture line, SPEs, etc.). We discuss the possible relationships between size distributions implied by the parameter correlation. The distribution for GR events turns out to be generally harder than that for X-ray bursts. The GREs involving energetic particles in space are shown to have a harder frequency distribution in comparison with that for GREs without detectable SPEs. There is also a tendency for the GREs with highest fluences to be related with SPEs. Finally, no correlation seems to exist between the GRL fluence and maximum flux of >10 MeV protons near the Earth.

  12. Gamma radiation induced darkening in barium gallo-germanate glass.

    PubMed

    Chen, Xiaodong; Heng, Xiaobo; Tang, Guowu; Zhu, Tingting; Sun, Min; Shan, Xiujie; Wen, Xin; Guo, Jingyuan; Qian, Qi; Yang, Zhongmin

    2016-05-01

    Barium gallo-germanate (BGG) glass is an important glass matrix material used for mid-infrared transmission and mid-infrared fiber laser. In this study, we investigated the γ-ray irradiation induced darkening effect of BGG glass. Optical transmittance spectra, electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) and thermoluminescence (TL) spectra were employed to investigate the γ-ray irradiation induced defects. Two kinds of Ge-related defects in the irradiated BGG glass, named Ge-related non-bridging oxygen hole center (Ge-NBOHC) and Ge-related electron centers (GEC), were verified. In addition, the absorption bands of the two defects have been separated and the peak absorptivity of Ge-NBOHC and GEC defects is at 375 nm and 315 nm, respectively. PMID:27137531

  13. Electromagnetic coupling in frequency domain induced polarisation data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Routh, Partha Sarathi

    2000-11-01

    Frequency domain induced polarization (IP) surveys are commonly carried out to provide information about the chargeability structure of the earth. The goals might be as diverse as trying to delineate a mineralized and/or alteration zone for mineral exploration, or to find a region of contaminants for an environmental problem. Unfortunately, the measured responses can have contributions from inductive and galvanic effects of the ground. The inductive components are called EM coupling effects. They are considered to be ``noise'' and much of this thesis is devoted towards either removing these effects, or reformulating the inverse problem so that inductive effects are part of the ``signal''. If the forward modeling is based on galvanic responses only, then the inductive responses must first be removed from the data. The motivation for attacking the problem in this manner is that it is easier to solve D.C. resistivity equation than the full Maxwell's equation. The separation of the inductive response from the total response is derived by expressing the total electric field as a product of an IP response function, and an electric field which depends on EM coupling response. This enables me to generate formulae to obtain IP amplitude (PFE) and phase response from the raw data. The data can then be inverted, using a galvanic forward modeling. I illustrate this with 1D and 3D synthetic examples. To handle field data sets, I have developed an approximate method for estimating the EM coupling effects based upon the assumption that the earth is locally 1D. The 1D conductivity is obtained from a 2D inversion of the low frequency DC resistivity data. Application of this method to a field data set has shown encouraging results. I also examine the EM coupling problem in terms of complex conductivity. I show that if the forward modeling is carried out with full Maxwell's equation, then there is no need to remove EM coupling. I illustrate this with 1D synthetic example. In summary

  14. Sex-dependent Differences in Intestinal Tumorigenesis Induced in Apc1638N/+ Mice by Exposure to {gamma} Rays

    SciTech Connect

    Trani, Daniela; Moon, Bo-Hyun; Kallakury, Bhaskar; Hartmann, Dan P.; Datta, Kamal; Fornace, Albert J.

    2013-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of the present study was to assess the effect of 1 and 5 Gy radiation doses and to investigate the interplay of gender and radiation with regard to intestinal tumorigenesis in an adenomatous polyposis coli (APC) mutant mouse model. Methods and Materials: Apc1638N/+ female and male mice were exposed whole body to either 1 Gy or 5 Gy of {gamma} rays and euthanized when most of the treated mice became moribund. Small and large intestines were processed to determine tumor burden, distribution, and grade. Expression of proliferation marker Ki-67 and estrogen receptor (ER)-{alpha} were also assessed by immunohistochemistry. Results: We observed that, with both 1 Gy and 5 Gy of {gamma} rays, females displayed reduced susceptibility to radiation-induced intestinal tumorigenesis compared with males. As for radiation effect on small intestinal tumor progression, although no substantial differences were found in the relative frequency and degree of dysplasia of adenomas in irradiated animals compared with controls, invasive carcinomas were found in 1-Gy- and 5-Gy-irradiated animals. Radiation exposure was also shown to induce an increase in protein levels of proliferation marker Ki-67 and sex-hormone receptor ER-{alpha} in both non tumor mucosa and intestinal tumors from irradiated male mice. Conclusions: We observed important sex-dependent differences in susceptibility to radiation-induced intestinal tumorigenesis in Apc1638N/+ mutants. Furthermore, our data provide evidence that exposure to radiation doses as low as 1 Gy can induce a significant increase in intestinal tumor multiplicity as well as enhance tumor progression in vivo.

  15. Frequency and wavelength prediction of ultrasonic induced liquid surface waves.

    PubMed

    Mahravan, Ehsan; Naderan, Hamid; Damangir, Ebrahim

    2016-12-01

    A theoretical investigation of parametric excitation of liquid free surface by a high frequency sound wave is preformed, using potential flow theory. Pressure and velocity distributions, resembling the sound wave, are applied to the free surface of the liquid. It is found that for impinging wave two distinct capillary frequencies will be excited: One of them is the same as the frequency of the sound wave, and the other is equal to the natural frequency corresponding to a wavenumber equal to the horizontal wavenumber of the sound wave. When the wave propagates in vertical direction, mathematical formulation leads to an equation, which has resonance frequency equal to half of the excitation frequency. This can explain an important contradiction between the frequency and the wavelength of capillary waves in the two cases of normal and inclined interaction of the sound wave and the free surface of the liquid. PMID:27566141

  16. Flicker-light induced visual phenomena: frequency dependence and specificity of whole percepts and percept features.

    PubMed

    Allefeld, Carsten; Pütz, Peter; Kastner, Kristina; Wackermann, Jiří

    2011-12-01

    Flickering light induces visual hallucinations in human observers. Despite a long history of the phenomenon, little is known about the dependence of flicker-induced subjective impressions on the flicker frequency. We investigate this question using Ganzfeld stimulation and an experimental paradigm combining a continuous frequency scan (1-50 Hz) with a focus on re-occurring, whole percepts. On the single-subject level, we find a high degree of frequency stability of percepts. To generalize across subjects, we apply two rating systems, (1) a set of complex percept classes derived from subjects' reports and (2) an enumeration of elementary percept features, and determine distributions of occurrences over flicker frequency. We observe a stronger frequency specificity for complex percept classes than elementary percept features. Comparing the similarity relations among percept categories to those among frequency profiles, we observe that though percepts are preferentially induced by particular frequencies, the frequency does not unambiguously determine the experienced percept. PMID:21123084

  17. High-frequency solitons in media with induced scattering from damped low-frequency waves with nonuniform dispersion and nonlinearity

    SciTech Connect

    Aseeva, N. V. Gromov, E. M.; Tyutin, V. V.

    2015-12-15

    The dynamics of high-frequency field solitons is considered using the extended nonhomogeneous nonlinear Schrödinger equation with induced scattering from damped low-frequency waves (pseudoinduced scattering). This scattering is a 3D analog of the stimulated Raman scattering from temporal spatially homogeneous damped low-frequency modes, which is well known in optics. Spatial inhomogeneities of secondorder linear dispersion and cubic nonlinearity are also taken into account. It is shown that the shift in the 3D spectrum of soliton wavenumbers toward the short-wavelength region is due to nonlinearity increasing in coordinate and to decreasing dispersion. Analytic results are confirmed by numerical calculations.

  18. Toxoplasma gondii-induced immune suppression by human peripheral blood monocytes: role of gamma interferon.

    PubMed Central

    Channon, J Y; Kasper, L H

    1996-01-01

    The ability of Toxoplasma gondii to evade the host immune response during primary infection in humans is poorly understood. In murine toxoplasmosis, infected spleen macrophages release soluble factors that mediate a transient immunosuppression, which may allow the parasite to become established. When an enriched population of human monocytes from seronegative individuals was incubated with toxoplasmas in vitro, soluble factors that mediated market suppression of mitogen-induced lymphocyte DNA synthesis were released. Irradiated tachyzoites that do not undergo replication were sufficient stimuli for near-maximal soluble factor release. Up to 50% of the soluble factor-mediated suppression is attributable to a gamma interferon (IFN-gamma)-dependent pathway, and the mediator of the remaining inhibition is neither interleukin-10, transforming growth factor beta, prostaglandin E2, lipoxygenase products, nitric oxide, nor tumor necrosis factor alpha-induced mitochondrial cell-derived reactive oxygen intermediates. IFN-gamma also mediates the up-regulation of an antigen-presenting cell phenotype by both infected and uninfected macrophages. However, IFN-gamma does not activate macrophages to become toxoplasmacidal; instead, intracellular toxoplasmas replicate and reinfect, eventually lysing the macrophage population. These results suggest that T. gondii is able to evade the naive host immune response by induction of soluble immunosuppressive factors that allow the parasite to become established during an acute infection. PMID:8606076

  19. Protective effect of ginseng against gamma-irradiation-induced oxidative stress and endothelial dysfunction in rats

    PubMed Central

    Mansour, Heba Hosny

    2013-01-01

    This study investigated the potential protective effects of ginseng on gamma-irradiation-induced oxidative stress and endothelial dysfunction in rats. Twenty four male albino rats were divided into four groups. In the control group, rats were administered vehicle by tube for 7 consecutive days. The second group was administered ginseng extract (100 mg/kg, by gavage) for 7 consecutive days. Animals in the third group were administered vehicle by tube for 7 consecutive days, then exposed to single dose gamma-irradiation (6 Gy). The Fourth group received ginseng extract for 7 consecutive days, one hour later rats were exposed to gamma-irradiation. Oral administration of ginseng extract prior to irradiation produced a significant protection which was evidenced by a significant reduction in serum creatine kinase (CPK) and lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) activities and asymmetric dimethylarginine (ADMA), urea and creatinine levels with significant increase in serum total nitrate/nitrite (NO(x)) level. Moreover, ginseng significantly increased cardiac and renal superoxide dismutase (SOD) and glutathione peroxidase (GSHPx) activities, and reduced glutathione (GSH) content, associated with a significant depletion in malondialdehyde (MDA) and NO(x) levels compared to irradiated group. This study suggests that ginseng may serve as a potential protective agent against gamma-irradiation-induced cardio-nephrotoxicity via enhancing the antioxidant activity and inhibition of endothelial dysfunction. PMID:26622217

  20. Aβ1-42-induced dysfunction in synchronized gamma oscillation during working memory.

    PubMed

    Bai, Wenwen; Xia, Mi; Liu, Tiaotiao; Tian, Xin

    2016-07-01

    Amyloid-β peptide (Aβ) is recognized as a causative factor for the cognitive impairments in Alzheimer's disease (AD). The studies on the effects of Aβ to cognitive impairments are beneficial for lifting the veil of the pathophysiology in AD. Neuronal oscillations are proposed to play an important role in cognition and its ensuing behavior. Specially, the synchronized gamma oscillations are essential for the successful execution of working memory. However, whether the Aβ will induce the abnormal neuronal oscillations and working memory deficits has remained largely unexplored. In the present study, rats (control and Aβ-injected groups) were trained to perform a delay-alternation task on Y-maze while spikes and local field potentials (LFPs) were recorded from multi-electrodes implanted in the medial prefrontal cortex (mPFC), an area that is strongly modulated by working memory. Synchronized neuronal oscillations were assessed by phase locking between spike trains and LFPs. We found the significant working memory impairment in the Aβ-injected group. Moreover, in the control group, during the memory retention period, a transient burst of gamma synchronization preceded an animal's correct choice, but not an animal's error choice. In the Aβ-injected group, however, gamma synchronization experience no change in neither correct nor error trials. Our results indicate that the Aβ1-42-induced dysfunction in gamma synchronization may provide a potential mechanism for working memory deficits. PMID:27058924

  1. Change in Ion Beam Induced Current from Si Metal-Oxide-Semiconductor Capacitors after Gamma-Ray Irradiation

    SciTech Connect

    Ohshima, T.; Onoda, S.; Hirao, T.; Takahashi, Y.; Vizkelethy, G.; Doyle, B. L.

    2009-03-10

    To investigate the effects of gamma-ray irradiation on transient current induced in MOS capacitors by heavy ion incidence, Si MOS capacitors were irradiated with gamma-rays up to 60.9 kGy(SiO2). The change in Transient Ion Beam Induced Current (TIBIC) signals due to gamma-ray irradiation was investigated using 15 MeV-oxygen ion microbeams. After gamma-ray irradiation, the peak current of the TIBIC signal vs. bias voltage curve shifted toward negative voltages. This shift can be interpreted in terms of the charge trapped in the oxide. In this dose range, no significant effects of the interface traps induced by gamma-ray irradiation on the TIBIC signals were observed.

  2. Effects of Frequency Drift on the Quantification of Gamma-Aminobutyric Acid Using MEGA-PRESS

    PubMed Central

    Tsai, Shang-Yueh; Fang, Chun-Hao; Wu, Thai-Yu; Lin, Yi-Ru

    2016-01-01

    The MEGA-PRESS method is the most common method used to measure γ-aminobutyric acid (GABA) in the brain at 3T. It has been shown that the underestimation of the GABA signal due to B0 drift up to 1.22 Hz/min can be reduced by post-frequency alignment. In this study, we show that the underestimation of GABA can still occur even with post frequency alignment when the B0 drift is up to 3.93 Hz/min. The underestimation can be reduced by applying a frequency shift threshold. A total of 23 subjects were scanned twice to assess the short-term reproducibility, and 14 of them were scanned again after 2–8 weeks to evaluate the long-term reproducibility. A linear regression analysis of the quantified GABA versus the frequency shift showed a negative correlation (P < 0.01). Underestimation of the GABA signal was found. When a frequency shift threshold of 0.125 ppm (15.5 Hz or 1.79 Hz/min) was applied, the linear regression showed no statistically significant difference (P > 0.05). Therefore, a frequency shift threshold at 0.125 ppm (15.5 Hz) can be used to reduce underestimation during GABA quantification. For data with a B0 drift up to 3.93 Hz/min, the coefficients of variance of short-term and long-term reproducibility for the GABA quantification were less than 10% when the frequency threshold was applied. PMID:27079873

  3. Effects of Frequency Drift on the Quantification of Gamma-Aminobutyric Acid Using MEGA-PRESS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsai, Shang-Yueh; Fang, Chun-Hao; Wu, Thai-Yu; Lin, Yi-Ru

    2016-04-01

    The MEGA-PRESS method is the most common method used to measure γ-aminobutyric acid (GABA) in the brain at 3T. It has been shown that the underestimation of the GABA signal due to B0 drift up to 1.22 Hz/min can be reduced by post-frequency alignment. In this study, we show that the underestimation of GABA can still occur even with post frequency alignment when the B0 drift is up to 3.93 Hz/min. The underestimation can be reduced by applying a frequency shift threshold. A total of 23 subjects were scanned twice to assess the short-term reproducibility, and 14 of them were scanned again after 2–8 weeks to evaluate the long-term reproducibility. A linear regression analysis of the quantified GABA versus the frequency shift showed a negative correlation (P < 0.01). Underestimation of the GABA signal was found. When a frequency shift threshold of 0.125 ppm (15.5 Hz or 1.79 Hz/min) was applied, the linear regression showed no statistically significant difference (P > 0.05). Therefore, a frequency shift threshold at 0.125 ppm (15.5 Hz) can be used to reduce underestimation during GABA quantification. For data with a B0 drift up to 3.93 Hz/min, the coefficients of variance of short-term and long-term reproducibility for the GABA quantification were less than 10% when the frequency threshold was applied.

  4. Ultrasound-induced DNA damage and signal transductions indicated by gammaH2AX

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Furusawa, Yukihiro; Fujiwara, Yoshisada; Zhao, Qing-Li; Hassan, Mariame Ali; Ogawa, Ryohei; Tabuchi, Yoshiaki; Takasaki, Ichiro; Takahashi, Akihisa; Ohnishi, Takeo; Kondo, Takashi

    2011-09-01

    Ultrasound (US) has been shown to induce cancer cell death via different forms including apoptosis. Here, we report the potential of low-intensity pulsed US (LIPUS) to induce genomic DNA damage and subsequent DNA damage response. Using the ionizing radiation-induced DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs) as the positive control, we were able to observe the induction of DSBs (as neutral comet tails) and the subsequent formation of gammaH2AX-positive foci (by immunofluorescence detection) in human leukemia cells following exposure to LIPUS. The LIPUS-induced DNA damage arose most likely from the mechanical, but not sonochemical, effect of cavitation, based on our observation that the suppression of inertial cavitation abrogated the gammH2AX foci formation, whereas scavenging of free radical formation (e.g., hydroxyl radical) had no protective effect on it. Treatment with the specific kinase inhibitor of ATM or DNA-PKcs, which can phosphorylate H2AX Ser139, revealed that US-induced gammaH2AX was inhibited more effectively by the DNA-PK inhibitor than ATM kinase inhibitor. Notably, these inhibitor effects were opposite to those with radiation-induced gammH2AX. In conclusion, we report, for the first time that US can induce DNA damage and the DNA damage response as indicated by gammaH2AX was triggered by the cavitational mechanical effects. Thus, it is expected that the data shown here may provide a better understanding of the cellular responses to US.

  5. Phenomena induced by powerful HF pumping towards magnetic zenith with a frequency near the F-region critical frequency and the third electron gyro harmonic frequency

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blagoveshchenskaya, N. F.; Carlson, H. C.; Kornienko, V. A.; Borisova, T. D.; Rietveld, M. T.; Yeoman, T. K.; Brekke, A.

    2009-01-01

    Multi-instrument observational data from an experiment on 13 October 2006 at the EISCAT/HEATING facility at Tromsø, Norway are analysed. The experiment was carried out in the evening hours when the electron density in the F-region dropped, and the HF pump frequency fH was near and then above the critical frequency of the F2 layer. The distinctive feature of this experiment is that the pump frequency was just below the third electron gyro harmonic frequency, while both the HF pump beam and UHF radar beam were directed towards the magnetic zenith (MZ). The HF pump-induced phenomena were diagnosed with several instruments: the bi-static HF radio scatter on the London-Tromsø-St. Petersburg path, the CUTLASS radar in Hankasalmi (Finland), the European Incoherent Scatter (EISCAT) UHF radar at Tromsø and the Tromsø ionosonde (dynasonde). The results show thermal electron excitation of the HF-induced striations seen simultaneously from HF bi-static scatter and CUTLASS radar observations, accompanied by increases of electron temperature when the heater frequency was near and then above the critical frequency of the F2 layer by up to 0.4 MHz. An increase of the electron density up to 25% accompanied by strong HF-induced electron heating was observed, only when the heater frequency was near the critical frequency and just below the third electron gyro harmonic frequency. It is concluded that the combined effect of upper hybrid resonance and gyro resonance at the same altitude gives rise to strong electron heating, the excitation of striations, HF ray trapping and extension of HF waves to altitudes where they can excite Langmuir turbulence and fluxes of electrons accelerated to energies that produce ionization.

  6. Gamma-radiation induced changes in the physical and chemical properties of lignocellulose.

    PubMed

    Khan, Ferdous; Ahmad, S R; Kronfli, E

    2006-08-01

    gamma-radiation induced effects on the physical and chemical properties of natural lignocellulose (jute) polymer were investigated. Samples were irradiated to required total doses at a particular dose rate. The changes in the parameters such as the tensile strength, elongation at break, and work done at rupture for the lignocellulose samples on irradiation with the gamma-rays from a cobalt-60 source were measured. The mechanical properties were found to have nonlinear relations with the radiation doses. The chemical stability of irradiated fibers was found to degrade progressively with the increase of radiation dose. Additionally, other chemical changes of the samples due to exposure to high-energy radiation were also investigated using fluorescence and infrared spectroscopic analysis. Differential scanning calorimetry and thermogravimetric studies showed a significant reduction in thermal stability. The wide-angle X-ray diffraction study showed that structural changes of cellulose appeared due to the radiation-induced chemical reaction of lignocellulose. PMID:16903675

  7. Monte Carlo simulation of induced radioactive background in gamma-ray detector materials

    SciTech Connect

    Truscott, P.R.; Evans, H.E.; Dyer, C.S.; Cosby, M.; Knight, P.R.; Moss, C.E.

    1998-06-01

    Induced activation in detector materials constitutes a major source of background for space-borne {gamma}-ray instruments. Future detector systems will utilize a variety of background reduction techniques and novel detector materials to maximize signal-to-noise and resolution of the measurements taken, and assessment of the merits of different designs will require detailed attention to a wide range of physical processes. The Integrated Radiation Transport Suite (IRTS) has been applied to simulate the effects of spacecraft shielding against Van Allen and galactic cosmic-ray protons, the production of secondary hadrons, and induced radioactivity in and the response of {gamma}-ray detector materials. This paper discusses the physics requirements for these simulations, and the degree of success of the models through comparisons with experimental data obtained from Space Shuttle flights and proton-beam irradiation of detector materials.

  8. Lignocellulolytic mutants of Pleurotus ostreatus induced by gamma-ray radiation and their genetic similarities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Y.-K.; Chang, H.-H.; Kim, J.-S.; Kim, J. K.; Lee, K.-S.

    2000-02-01

    To induce the lignocellulolytic mutants of Pleurotus ostreatus, the mycelia were irradiated by gamma-ray radiation to doses of 1-2 kGy. Five strains were isolated by the criteria of clamp connection, fruiting body formation, growth rate and activities of extracellular enzymes. All isolated strains were able to form the fruiting bodies and grew similarly to the control. The extracellular enzymes activities in liquid media of isolated strains were up to 10 times higher than the control. Genetic similarities of the isolated strains ranged from 64.4% to 93.3% of the control. From these results, it seems that the genetic diversity of P. ostreatus could be changed and useful strains be induced by gamma-ray radiation to recycle or reuse biowastes.

  9. Short-Latency Median-Nerve Somatosensory-Evoked Potentials and Induced Gamma-Oscillations in Humans

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fukuda, Miho; Nishida, Masaaki; Juhasz, Csaba; Muzik, Otto; Sood, Sandeep; Chugani, Harry T.; Asano, Eishi

    2008-01-01

    Recent studies have suggested that cortical gamma-oscillations are tightly linked with various forms of physiological activity. In the present study, the dynamic changes of intracranially recorded median-nerve somatosensory-evoked potentials (SEPs) and somatosensory-induced gamma-oscillations were animated on a three-dimensional MR image, and the…

  10. Gamma radiation induces hydrogen absorption by copper in water

    PubMed Central

    Lousada, Cláudio M.; Soroka, Inna L.; Yagodzinskyy, Yuriy; Tarakina, Nadezda V.; Todoshchenko, Olga; Hänninen, Hannu; Korzhavyi, Pavel A.; Jonsson, Mats

    2016-01-01

    One of the most intricate issues of nuclear power is the long-term safety of repositories for radioactive waste. These repositories can have an impact on future generations for a period of time orders of magnitude longer than any known civilization. Several countries have considered copper as an outer corrosion barrier for canisters containing spent nuclear fuel. Among the many processes that must be considered in the safety assessments, radiation induced processes constitute a key-component. Here we show that copper metal immersed in water uptakes considerable amounts of hydrogen when exposed to γ-radiation. Additionally we show that the amount of hydrogen absorbed by copper depends on the total dose of radiation. At a dose of 69 kGy the uptake of hydrogen by metallic copper is 7 orders of magnitude higher than when the absorption is driven by H2(g) at a pressure of 1 atm in a non-irradiated dry system. Moreover, irradiation of copper in water causes corrosion of the metal and the formation of a variety of surface cavities, nanoparticle deposits, and islands of needle-shaped crystals. Hence, radiation enhanced uptake of hydrogen by spent nuclear fuel encapsulating materials should be taken into account in the safety assessments of nuclear waste repositories. PMID:27086752

  11. Gamma radiation induces hydrogen absorption by copper in water

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lousada, Cláudio M.; Soroka, Inna L.; Yagodzinskyy, Yuriy; Tarakina, Nadezda V.; Todoshchenko, Olga; Hänninen, Hannu; Korzhavyi, Pavel A.; Jonsson, Mats

    2016-04-01

    One of the most intricate issues of nuclear power is the long-term safety of repositories for radioactive waste. These repositories can have an impact on future generations for a period of time orders of magnitude longer than any known civilization. Several countries have considered copper as an outer corrosion barrier for canisters containing spent nuclear fuel. Among the many processes that must be considered in the safety assessments, radiation induced processes constitute a key-component. Here we show that copper metal immersed in water uptakes considerable amounts of hydrogen when exposed to γ-radiation. Additionally we show that the amount of hydrogen absorbed by copper depends on the total dose of radiation. At a dose of 69 kGy the uptake of hydrogen by metallic copper is 7 orders of magnitude higher than when the absorption is driven by H2(g) at a pressure of 1 atm in a non-irradiated dry system. Moreover, irradiation of copper in water causes corrosion of the metal and the formation of a variety of surface cavities, nanoparticle deposits, and islands of needle-shaped crystals. Hence, radiation enhanced uptake of hydrogen by spent nuclear fuel encapsulating materials should be taken into account in the safety assessments of nuclear waste repositories.

  12. Gamma radiation induces hydrogen absorption by copper in water.

    PubMed

    Lousada, Cláudio M; Soroka, Inna L; Yagodzinskyy, Yuriy; Tarakina, Nadezda V; Todoshchenko, Olga; Hänninen, Hannu; Korzhavyi, Pavel A; Jonsson, Mats

    2016-01-01

    One of the most intricate issues of nuclear power is the long-term safety of repositories for radioactive waste. These repositories can have an impact on future generations for a period of time orders of magnitude longer than any known civilization. Several countries have considered copper as an outer corrosion barrier for canisters containing spent nuclear fuel. Among the many processes that must be considered in the safety assessments, radiation induced processes constitute a key-component. Here we show that copper metal immersed in water uptakes considerable amounts of hydrogen when exposed to γ-radiation. Additionally we show that the amount of hydrogen absorbed by copper depends on the total dose of radiation. At a dose of 69 kGy the uptake of hydrogen by metallic copper is 7 orders of magnitude higher than when the absorption is driven by H2(g) at a pressure of 1 atm in a non-irradiated dry system. Moreover, irradiation of copper in water causes corrosion of the metal and the formation of a variety of surface cavities, nanoparticle deposits, and islands of needle-shaped crystals. Hence, radiation enhanced uptake of hydrogen by spent nuclear fuel encapsulating materials should be taken into account in the safety assessments of nuclear waste repositories. PMID:27086752

  13. Constitutive and IFN-gamma-induced nuclear import of STAT1 proceed through independent pathways.

    PubMed

    Meyer, Thomas; Begitt, Andreas; Lödige, Inga; van Rossum, Marleen; Vinkemeier, Uwe

    2002-02-01

    STAT1 functions as both a constitutive transcriptional regulator and, in response to cytokine stimulation of cells, as an inducible tyrosine-phosphorylated transcription factor. Here, we identify and characterize a non-transferable nuclear targeting sequence in the STAT1 DNA-binding domain. This conserved signal is critical for the interferon-gamma (IFN-gamma)-induced nuclear import of phosphorylated STAT1 dimers and requires adjacent positively charged and hydrophobic residues for functioning. Additionally, the constitutive nucleocytoplasmic shuttling of STAT1 in the absence of IFN-gamma stimulation is revealed. Nuclear import and export of unphosphorylated STAT1 are demonstrated to be sensitive towards wheat germ agglutinin and to occur independently of the import receptor p97. Loss-of-function mutations of the dimer-specific import signal block nuclear entry of tyrosine-phosphorylated STAT1, which in turn also prevents induction of cytokine-inducible target genes. Nevertheless, nuclear import of unphosphorylated STAT1 continues and the STAT1-dependent constitutive expression of caspases and the tumor necrosis factor-alpha-mediated induction of apoptosis proceed unaltered. Thus, tyrosine-phosphorylated and unphosphorylated STAT1 molecules shuttle via independent pathways to distinct sets of target genes. PMID:11823427

  14. Inhibition of gamma-irradiation induced adhesion molecules and NO production by alginate in human endothelial cells.

    PubMed

    Son, E W; Cho, C K; Rhee, D K; Pyo, S

    2001-10-01

    Inflammation is a frequent radiation-induced reaction following therapeutic irradiation. Treatment of human umbilical endothelial cells (HUVEC) with gamma-irradiation (gammaIR) induces the expression of adhesion proteins such as intercellular adhesion molecule-1 (ICAM-1), vascular cell adhesion molecule-1 (VCAM-1), and E-selectin. Since the upregulation of these proteins on endothelial cell surface has been known to be associated with inflammation, interfering with the expression of adhesion molecules is an important therapeutic target. In the present study, we demonstrate that high mannuronic acid-containing alginate (HMA) inhibits gammaIR induced expression of ICAM-1, VCAM-1, and E-selectin on HUVEC in a dose dependent manner. HMA also inhibited gammaIR induced production of Nitric oxide (NO). These data suggest that HMA has therapeutic potential for the treatment of various inflammatory disorder associated with an increase of endothelial leukocyte adhesion molecules. PMID:11693551

  15. Gamma radiation-induced blue shift of resonance peaks of Bragg gratings in pure silica fibres

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Faustov, A. V.; Gusarov, A. I.; Mégret, P.; Wuilpart, M.; Kinet, D.; Zhukov, A. V.; Novikov, S. G.; Svetukhin, V. V.; Fotiadi, A. A.

    2016-02-01

    We report the first observation of a significant gamma radiation-induced blue shift of the reflection/transmission peak of fibre Bragg gratings inscribed into pure-silica core fibres via multiphoton absorption of femtosecond pulses. At a total dose of ~100 kGy, the shift is ~20 pm. The observed effect is attributable to the ionising radiation-induced decrease in the density of the silica glass when the rate of colour centre formation is slow. We present results of experimental measurements that provide the key parameters of the dynamics of the gratings for remote dosimetry and temperature sensing.

  16. Adsorption induced differential surface stress versus adsorption induced resonance frequency change: a comparison

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Amirola, J.; Rodriguez, A.; Castaner, L.; Lozano, J.; Gutierrez, F. J.; Horrillo, M. C.

    2005-07-01

    In order to compare their gas sensing properties two kinds of sensors based on silicon cantilevers of similar characteristics have been fabricated: On one side we fabricated gravimetric gas sensors based on silicon cantilevers acting as resonators. The active layers consisted of polymer films deposited on top of the cantilevers. Sensors were maintained oscillating at their natural resonance frequency with electronic circuitry also developed in this work. Basically they consist of mass-spring mechanical resonators in which the mass increment due to gas sorption in the polymer provokes a shift on the resonance frequency. The output signal is a sinusoidal voltage extracted directly from the oscillator, and the amount of gas absorbed is related to the frequency of this output signal. The second type of sensors consisted of capacitors in which one electrode is a silicon cantilever and the other is a fixed metallic electrode fabricated parallel to the silicon cantilever. The silicon cantilever of these devices is covered with the same polymer films as for the resonators. The sensing principle in this case relies on the bending produced by the internal mechanical stress induced by the absorption of the gas in the polymeric layer. In these devices the signal is obtained by measuring the capacitance between the two plates of the capacitor, in this case the out coming signal was the current of the capacitor: an amplitude modulated signal. The gas response of both types of sensors have been characterized and a comparison is presented in this paper.

  17. Emotion Recognition with Eigen Features of Frequency Band Activities Embedded in Induced Brain Oscillations Mediated by Affective Pictures.

    PubMed

    Aydin, Serap; Demirtaş, Serdar; Ateş, Kahraman; Tunga, M Alper

    2016-05-01

    In this study, singular spectrum analysis (SSA) has been used for the first time in order to extract emotional features from well-defined electroencephalography (EEG) frequency band activities (BAs) so-called delta (0.5-4 Hz), theta (4-8 Hz), alpha (8-16 Hz), beta (16-32 Hz), gamma (32-64 Hz). These five BAs were estimated by applying sixth-level multi-resolution wavelet decomposition (MRWD) with Daubechies wavelets (db-8) to single channel nonaveraged emotional EEG oscillations of 6 s for each scalp location over 16 recording sites (Fp1, Fp2, F3, F4, F7, F8, C3, C4, P3, P4, T3, T4, T5, T6, O1, O2). Every trial was mediated by different emotional stimuli which were selected from international affective picture system (IAPS) to induce emotional states such as pleasant (P), neutral (N), and unpleasant (UP). Largest principal components (PCs) of BAs were considered as emotional features and data mining approaches were used for the first time in order to classify both three different (P, N, UP) and two contrasting (P and UP) emotional states for 30 healthy controls. Emotional features extracted from gamma BAs (GBAs) for 16 recording sites provided the high classification accuracies of 87.1% and 100% for classification of three emotional states and two contrasting emotional states, respectively. In conclusion, we found the followings: (1) Eigenspectra of high frequency BAs in EEG are highly sensitive to emotional hemispheric activations, (2) emotional states are mostly mediated by GBA, (3) pleasant pictures induce the higher cortical activation in contrast to unpleasant pictures, (4) contrasting emotions induce opposite cortical activations, (5) cognitive activities are necessary for an emotion to occur. PMID:26971786

  18. Physical properties of the gamma-ray binary LS 5039 through low- and high-frequency radio observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marcote, B.; Ribó, M.; Paredes, J. M.; Ishwara-Chandra, C. H.

    2015-07-01

    We have studied in detail the 0.15-15 GHz radio spectrum of the gamma-ray binary LS 5039 to look for a possible turnover and absorption mechanisms at low frequencies, and to constrain the physical properties of its emission. We have analysed two archival Very Large Array monitorings, all the available archival Giant Metrewave Radio Telescope (GMRT) data and a coordinated quasi-simultaneous observational campaign conducted in 2013 with Giant Metrewave Radio Telescope and Westerbork Synthesis Radio Telescope. The data show that the radio emission of LS 5039 is persistent on day, week and year time-scales, with a variability ≲ 25 per cent at all frequencies, and no signature of orbital modulation. The obtained spectra reveal a power-law shape with a curvature below 5 GHz and a turnover at ˜0.5GHz, which can be reproduced by a one-zone model with synchrotron self-absorption plus Razin effect. We obtain a coherent picture for the size of the emitting region of ˜0.85 mas, setting a magnetic field of B ˜ 20 mG, an electron density of ne ˜ 4 × 105 cm-3 and a mass-loss rate of dot{M}˜ 5× 10^{-8} M_{⊙ yr^{-1}}. These values imply a significant mixing of the stellar wind with the relativistic plasma outflow from the compact companion. At particular epochs the Razin effect is negligible, implying changes in the injection and the electron density or magnetic field. The Razin effect is reported for the first time in a gamma-ray binary, giving further support to the young non-accreting pulsar scenario.

  19. GAMMA-RAY LOUDNESS, SYNCHROTRON PEAK FREQUENCY, AND PARSEC-SCALE PROPERTIES OF BLAZARS DETECTED BY THE FERMI LARGE AREA TELESCOPE

    SciTech Connect

    Linford, J. D.; Taylor, G. B.; Schinzel, F. K.

    2012-09-20

    The parsec-scale radio properties of 232 active galactic nuclei, most of which are blazars, detected by the Large Area Telescope (LAT) on board the Fermi Gamma-ray Space Telescope have been observed contemporaneously by the Very Long Baseline Array (VLBA) at 5 GHz. Data from both the first 11 months (1FGL) and the first 2 years (2FGL) of the Fermi mission were used to investigate these sources' {gamma}-ray properties. We use the ratio of the {gamma}-ray-to-radio luminosity as a measure of {gamma}-ray loudness. We investigate the relationship of several radio properties to {gamma}-ray loudness and to the synchrotron peak frequency. There is a tentative correlation between {gamma}-ray loudness and synchrotron peak frequency for BL Lac objects in both 1FGL and 2FGL, and for flat-spectrum radio quasars (FSRQs) in 2FGL. We find that the apparent opening angle tentatively correlates with {gamma}-ray loudness for FSRQs, but only when we use the 2FGL data. We also find that the total VLBA flux density correlates with the synchrotron peak frequency for BL Lac objects and FSRQs. The core brightness temperature also correlates with synchrotron peak frequency, but only for the BL Lac objects. The low-synchrotron-peaked (LSP) BL Lac object sample shows indications of contamination by FSRQs which happen to have undetectable emission lines. There is evidence that the LSP BL Lac objects are more strongly beamed than the rest of the BL Lac object population.

  20. Incidence and nature of tumors induced in Sprague-Dawley rats by gamma-irradiation

    SciTech Connect

    Gross, L.; Dreyfuss, Y.; Faraggiana, T.

    1988-05-01

    In our previous studies carried out on inbred rats of the Sprague-Dawley strain, the tumor incidence was increased following irradiation (150 rads, 5 times, at weekly intervals), from 22 to 93% in females and from 5 to 59% in males. Experiments here reported suggest that 2 consecutive total-body gamma-irradiations of 150 rads each are sufficient to induce in rats the development of tumors, some malignant; 18 of 19 females (94.7%) developed tumors at an average age of 11.4 mo, and seven of the 14 males in this group (50%) developed tumors at an average age of 10.4 mo. In the second group, which received 3 consecutive gamma-irradiations, 20 of 23 females (86.9%) and 5 of 13 males (38.4%) developed tumors at average ages of 9.1 and 7.5 mo, respectively. In the third group, among rats which received 4 consecutive gamma-irradiations, 17 of 19 females (89.4%) and 4 of 12 males (33.3%) developed tumors at average ages of 9.4 and 10.5 mo, respectively. The etiology of tumors either developing spontaneously or induced by irradiation in rats remains to be clarified. Our attempts to detect virus particles by electron microscopy in such tumors or lymphomas have not been successful. As a working hypothesis, we are tempted to theorize that tumors or lymphomas developing spontaneously or induced by gamma irradiation in rats are caused by latent viral agents which are integrated into the cell genome and are cell associated, i.e., not separable from the rat tumor cells by conventional methods thus far used.

  1. Short bouts of vocalization induce long lasting fast gamma oscillations in a sensorimotor nucleus

    PubMed Central

    Lewandowski, Brian; Schmidt, Marc

    2011-01-01

    Performance evaluation is a critical feature of motor learning. In the vocal system, it requires the integration of auditory feedback signals with vocal motor commands. The network activity that supports such integration is unknown, but it has been proposed that vocal performance evaluation occurs offline. Recording from NIf, a sensorimotor structure in the avian song system, we show that short bouts of singing in adult male zebra finches (Taeniopygia guttata) induce persistent increases in firing activity and coherent oscillations in the fast gamma range (90–150 Hz). Single units are strongly phase-locked to these oscillations, which can last up to 30 s, often outlasting vocal activity by an order of magnitude. In other systems, oscillations often are triggered by events or behavioral tasks but rarely outlast the event that triggered them by more than 1 second. The present observations are the longest reported gamma oscillations triggered by an isolated behavioral event. In mammals, gamma oscillations have been associated with memory consolidation and are hypothesized to facilitate communication between brain regions. We suggest that the timing and persistent nature of NIf’s fast gamma oscillations make them well suited to facilitate the integration of auditory and vocal motor traces associated with vocal performance evaluation. PMID:21957255

  2. Radiation-induced degradation of cyclohexanebutyric acid in aqueous solutions by gamma ray irradiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jia, Wenbao; He, Yanquan; Ling, Yongsheng; Hei, Daqian; Shan, Qing; Zhang, Yan; Li, Jiatong

    2015-04-01

    The radiation-induced degradation of cyclohexanebutyric acid under gamma ray irradiation was investigated. Degradation experiments were performed with 100 mL sealed Pyrex glass vessels loaded with 80 mL of cyclohexanebutyric acid solutions at various initial concentrations of 10, 20, and 40 mg L-1. The absorbed doses were controlled at 0, 0.65, 1.95, 3.25, 6.5, 9.75, and 13 kGy. The results showed that gamma ray irradiation could effectively degrade cyclohexanebutyric acid in aqueous solutions. The removal rate of cyclohexanebutyric acid increased significantly with the increase of absorbed dose and the decrease of its initial concentration. At the same time, the removal of chemical oxygen demand (COD) was as effective as that of cyclohexanebutyric acid. The kinetic studies showed that the degradation of cyclohexanebutyric acid followed pseudo first-order reaction. Above all, the proposed mechanism obtained when NaNO2, NaNO3 and tert-butanol were added showed that the •OH radical played a major role in the gamma degradation process of cyclohexanebutyric acid, while •H and eaq- played a minor role in the gamma degradation process. The degradation products were identified by Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR) and gas chromatography/mass spectrometry (GC/MS) during cyclohexanebutyric acid degradation.

  3. Investigation of the induced gate noise of nanoscale MOSFETs in the very high frequency region

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jeon, Jongwook; Kim, Yoon; Kang, Myounggon

    2016-06-01

    In this paper, we investigated the induced gate current noise of nanoscale N/PMOS devices. To analyze the induced gate noise, the induced gate current noise source model was analytically derived. By using the proposed model, the induced gate noise source was compared with other noise sources, and its impact on noise parameters was also analyzed in long-channel and nanoscale N/PMOS devices in the very high frequency region (>100 GHz). The results showed that the induced gate noise of sub-40 nm CMOS technology is negligible, even in the design of very high frequency circuits.

  4. Evidence for an Inducible Repair-Recombination System in the Female Germ Line of Drosophila Melanogaster. II. Differential Sensitivity to Gamma Rays

    PubMed Central

    Laurencon, A.; Bregliano, J. C.

    1995-01-01

    In a previous paper, we reported that the reactivity level, which regulates the frequency of transposition of I factor, a LINE element-like retrotransposon, is enhanced by the same agents that induce the SOS response in Escherichia coli. In this report, we describe experimental evidence that, for identical genotypes, the reactivity levels correlate with the sensitivity of oogenesis to gamma rays, measured by the number of eggs laid and by frequency of dominant lethals. This strongly supports the hypothesis that the reactivity level is one manifestation of an inducible DNA repair system taking place in the female germ line of Drosophila melanogaster. The implications of this finding for the understanding of the regulation of I factor are discussed and some other possible biological roles of this system are outlined. PMID:8647394

  5. The {alpha}-induced thick-target {gamma}-ray yield from light elements

    SciTech Connect

    Heaton, R.K. |

    1994-10-01

    The {alpha}-induced thick-target {gamma}-ray yield from light elements has been measured in the energy range 5.6 MeV {le} E{sub {alpha}} {le} 10 MeV. The {gamma}-ray yield for > 2.1 MeV from thick targets of beryllium, boron nitride, sodium fluoride, magnesium, aluminum and silicon were measured using the {alpha}-particle beam from the Lawrence Berkeley Laboratories 88 in. cyclotron. The elemental yields from this experiment were used to construct the {alpha}-induced direct production {gamma}-ray spectrum from materials in the SNO detector, a large volume ultra-low background neutrino detector located in the Creighton mine near Sudbury, Canada. This background source was an order of magnitude lower than predicted by previous calculations. These measurements are in good agreement with theoretical calculations of this spectrum based on a statistical nuclear model of the reaction, with the gross high energy spectrum structure being reproduced to within a factor of two. Detailed comparison of experimental and theoretical excitation population distribution of several residual nuclei indicate the same level of agreement within experimental uncertainties.

  6. Immunocytochemical localization of gamma-glutamyltransferase in induced hyperplastic nodules of rat liver.

    PubMed Central

    Spater, H W; Quintana, N; Becker, F F; Novikoff, A B

    1983-01-01

    The immunocytochemical localization of gamma-glutamyltransferase [(5-glutamyl)-peptide:amino-acid 5-glutamyltransferase, EC 2.3.2.2; gamma-GluTase] was demonstrated in hyperplastic liver induced by the carcinogen 2-acetylaminofluorene (2-AAF). The method used a specific antiserum and protein A-horseradish peroxidase and permitted visualization of antigenic sites at both the light and electron microscopic levels. Electron microscopy revealed deposits of 3,3'-diaminobenzidine (DAB) reaction product in the plasma membranes of (i) hyperplastic cells, (ii) bile canaliculi, (iii) endothelial cell membranes, and (iv) lymphocytes. The so-called ATPase activity was localized in the plasma membrane in bile canaliculi and in endothelial cells; the hyperplastic cells show marked variability in the levels of this activity. Images PMID:6136038

  7. Gamma-ray irradiation induced bulk photochromism in WO3-P2O5 glass

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shen, Wei; Baccaro, Stefania; Cemmi, Alessia; Xu, Xiaoqing; Chen, Guorong

    2015-11-01

    In the present work, photochromism of WO3-P2O5 glass under gamma-ray irradiation was reported. As-prepared glass samples with different WO3 content are all optically transparent in the visible wavelength range thanks to the addition of a small amount of oxidizing couple Sb2O3-NaNO3. The photochromic properties are identified by transmission spectra of the glasses before and after irradiation. The results show that the irradiation induced darkening results from the reduction of W6+ to W5+ or W4+. The existence of WO6 clusters in glasses of high WO3 content is proved by XPS, which is the main reason for the obvious photochromic effects. The WO3-P2O5 glass is a promising candidate in gamma-ray sensitive detector.

  8. Induced ICER I{gamma} down-regulates cyclin A expression and cell proliferation in insulin-producing {beta} cells

    SciTech Connect

    Inada, Akari; Weir, Gordon C.; Bonner-Weir, Susan . E-mail: susan.bonner-weir@joslin.harvard.edu

    2005-04-15

    We have previously found that cyclin A expression is markedly reduced in pancreatic {beta}-cells by cell-specific overexpression of repressor inducible cyclic AMP early repressor (ICER I{gamma}) in transgenic mice. Here we further examined regulatory effects of ICER I{gamma} on cyclin A gene expression using Min6 cells, an insulin-producing cell line. The cyclin A promoter luciferase assay showed that ICER I{gamma} directly repressed cyclin A gene transcription. In addition, upon ICER I{gamma} overexpression, cyclin A mRNA levels markedly decreased, thereby confirming an inhibitory effect of ICER I{gamma} on cyclin A expression. Suppression of cyclin A results in inhibition of BrdU incorporation. Under normal culture conditions endogenous cyclin A is abundant in these cells, whereas ICER is hardly detectable. However, serum starvation of Min6 cells induces ICER I{gamma} expression with a concomitant very low expression level of cyclin A. Cyclin A protein is not expressed unless the cells are in active DNA replication. These results indicate a potentially important anti-proliferative effect of ICER I{gamma} in pancreatic {beta} cells. Since ICER I{gamma} is greatly increased in diabetes as well as in FFA- or high glucose-treated islets, this effect may in part exacerbate diabetes by limiting {beta}-cell proliferation.

  9. Gamma-radiation-induced dielectric relaxation characteristics of layered crystals of phlogopite mica

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kaur, Navjeet; Singh, Mohan; Singh, Lakhwant; Awasthi, A. M.; Kumar, Jitender

    2013-12-01

    In the present investigation, the influence of gamma irradiation on the dielectric relaxation characteristics of phlogopite mica was studied over the frequency range of 0.1 Hz-10 MHz and in the temperature range of 593-813 K by measuring the dielectric permittivity, electric modulus and conductivity. By comparing the dielectric spectra obtained for pristine and irradiated samples, it was observed that gamma irradiation significantly enhances the dielectric constants (ɛ‧ and ɛ″) of phlogopite mica because of the production of defects and lattice disorder by the gamma irradiation. The values of the activation energy for pristine and irradiated mica (determined from the electric modulus and the conductivity) were found to be substantially similar, suggesting that the same types of charge carriers are involved in the relaxation mechanism. The experimentally measured electric modulus and conductivity data could be well interpreted by the Havriliak-Negami dielectric relaxation function. The scaling of the electric-modulus spectra of both pristine and irradiated mica results in a master curve, which indicates that the relaxation mechanism is independent of temperature. Cole-Cole plots were also employed to analyze the non-Debye relaxation mechanism. This research will boost the reader's interest concerning the emerging contributions of irradiation and materials such as mica in electrical engineering.

  10. Role of phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase-gamma in mediating lung neutrophil sequestration and vascular injury induced by E. coli sepsis.

    PubMed

    Ong, Evan; Gao, Xiao-Pei; Predescu, Dan; Broman, Michael; Malik, Asrar B

    2005-12-01

    We addressed the in vivo role of phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase-gamma (PI3K-gamma) in signaling the sequestration of polymorphonuclear leukocytes (PMNs) in lungs and in the mechanism of inflammatory lung vascular injury. We studied mice with deletion of the p110 catalytic subunit of PI3K-gamma (PI3K-gamma(-/-) mice). We measured lung tissue PMN sequestration, microvascular permeability, and edema formation after bacteremia induced by intraperitoneal Escherichia coli challenge. PMN infiltration into the lung interstitium in PI3K-gamma(-/-) mice as assessed morphometrically was increased 100% over that in control mice within 1 h after bacterial challenge. PI3K-gamma(-/-) mice also developed a greater increase in lung microvascular permeability after E. coli challenge, resulting in edema formation. The augmented lung tissue PMN sequestration in PI3K-gamma(-/-) mice was associated with increased expression of the PMN adhesive proteins CD47 and beta(3)-integrins. We observed increased association of CD47 and beta(3)-integrins with the extracellular matrix protein vitronectin in lungs of PI3K-gamma(-/-) mice after E. coli challenge. PMNs from these mice also showed increased beta(3)-integrin expression and augmented beta(3)-integrin-dependent PMN adhesion to vitronectin. These results point to a key role of PMN PI3K-gamma in negatively regulating CD47 and beta(3)-integrin expression in gram-negative sepsis. PI3K-gamma activation in PMNs induced by E. coli may modulate the extent of lung tissue PMN sequestration secondary to CD47 and beta(3)-integrin expression. Therefore, the level of PI3K-gamma activation may be an important determinant of PMN-dependent lung vascular injury. PMID:16183669

  11. Studies on radiosensitive lines of Drosophila. IX. Analysis of fertility and frequency of dominant lethal mutations in the gamma-irradiated females of the mutant line rad(2)201/sup G1/

    SciTech Connect

    Varentsova, E.R.; Sharygin, V.I.; Khromykh, Yu.M.

    1986-03-01

    Fertility and frequency of dominant lethal mutations (DLM) induced by gamma rays in females at the age of 0-5 h and 5-7 days were studied in the radiosensitive mutant rad(2)201/sup G1/ of Drosophila. It has been found that the oocytes of mutant lines are more radiosensitive as compared to those of the wild type flies when compared on the basis of DLM frequency obtained through the entire maturation period. The early oocytes of stages 2-7, i.e., at the stages corresponding to the recombination-defective properties of mutation rad(2)201/sup g1/ are the most sensitive. It has also been demonstrated that the gamma-ray doses exceeding 10 Gy cause a strong sterilizing effect in the mutant females as a result of destruction and resorption of the egg chamber, irradiated at the stages of previtellogenic growth of oocytes. In the radiosensitive mutant females, the sensitivity of the oocytes for DLM induction does not correlate with the sensitivity of the ovarian follicles toward the resorbing effect of gamma rays. The possible involvement of the mutant locus in the genetic processes in different specialized cells of the sexual pathway in Drosophila is discussed.

  12. Repair of gamma-ray-induced DNA base damage in xeroderma pigmentosum cells

    SciTech Connect

    Fornace, A.J. Jr.; Dobson, P.P.; Kinsella, T.J.

    1986-04-01

    The repair of DNA damage produced by /sup 137/Cs gamma irradiation was measured with a preparation from Micrococcus luteus containing DNA damage-specific endonucleases in combination with alkaline elution. The frequency of these endonuclease sensitive sites (ESS) was determined after 54 or 110 Gy of oxic irradiation in normal and xeroderma pigmentosum (XP) fibroblasts from complementation groups A, C, D, and G. Repair was rapid in all cell strains with greater than 50% repair after 1.5 h of repair incubation. At later repair times, 12-17 h, more ESS remained in XP than in normal cells. The frequency of excess ESS in XP cells was approximately 0.04 per 10(9) Da of DNA per Gy which was equivalent to 10% of the initial ESS produced. The removal of ESS was comparable in XP cells with normal radiosensitivity and XP3BR cells which have been reported to be moderately radiosensitive.

  13. Prompt Gamma Emission in Resonance Neutron Induced Fission of 239Pu

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ruskov, I.; Kopatch, Yu. N.; Panteleev, Ts.; Skoy, V. R.; Shvetsov, V. N.; Dermendjiev, E.; Janeva, N.; Pikelner, L. B.; Grigoriev, Yu. V.; Mezentseva, Zh. V.; Ivanov, I.

    The scientific interest in the resonance neutron induced capture and fission reactions on 239Pu is continuously rising during the last decade. From a practical point of view, this is because more precise data on capture and fission cross sections, fission fragment mass and kinetic energy distributions, variation of prompt fission neutron and gamma yields in the resonance neutron region, are needed for the modelling of new generation nuclear power plants and for nuclear spent fuel and waste transmutation. From a heuristic and fundamental point of view, such a research improves our knowledge and understanding of the fission phenomena itself. To achieve these goals more powerful neutron sources and more precise fission product detectors have to be used. At the Joint Institute for Nuclear Research (JINR) Frank Laboratory of Neutron Physics (FLNP), where already half a century the thermal and resonance neutron induced nuclear reactions are studied, a new electron accelerator driven white spectrum pulsed neutron source IREN has been built and successfully tested. The improved characteristics of this facility, in comparison with those of the former pulse neutron fast reactor IBR-30, will allow measuring some of the neutron-nuclear reaction data with better precision and accuracy. A new experimental setup for detecting gamma rays (and neutrons) has been designed and is under construction. It will consist of 2 rings (arrays) of 12 NaI(Tl) detectors each (or 1 array of 24 detectors) with variable ring diameter and distance between both rings. Such a setup will make possible not only to measure the multiplicity, energy and angular anisotropy of prompt fission gammas, but also to separate the contribution of prompt fission neutrons by their longer time-of-flight from the fissile target to the detectors. The signals from all the 24 detectors will be recorded simultaneously in digitized form and will be stored on the hard disk of the personal computer for further off

  14. Physiological and molecular characterization of the enhanced salt tolerance induced by low-dose gamma irradiation in Arabidopsis seedlings

    SciTech Connect

    Qi, Wencai; Zhang, Liang; Xu, Hangbo; Wang, Lin; Jiao, Zhen

    2014-07-25

    Highlights: • 50-Gy gamma irradiation markedly promotes the seedling growth under salt stress in Arabidopsis. • The contents of H{sub 2}O{sub 2} and MDA are obviously reduced by low-dose gamma irradiation under salt stress. • Low-dose gamma irradiation stimulates the activities of antioxidant enzymes under salt stress. • Proline accumulation is required for the low-gamma-ray-induced salt tolerance. • Low gamma rays differentially regulate the expression of genes related to salt stress. - Abstract: It has been established that gamma rays at low doses stimulate the tolerance to salt stress in plants. However, our knowledge regarding the molecular mechanism underlying the enhanced salt tolerance remains limited. In this study, we found that 50-Gy gamma irradiation presented maximal beneficial effects on germination index and root length in response to salt stress in Arabidopsis seedlings. The contents of H{sub 2}O{sub 2} and MDA in irradiated seedlings under salt stress were significantly lower than those of controls. The activities of antioxidant enzymes and proline levels in the irradiated seedlings were markedly increased compared with the controls. Furthermore, transcriptional expression analysis of selected genes revealed that some components of salt stress signaling pathways were stimulated by low-dose gamma irradiation under salt stress. Our results suggest that gamma irradiation at low doses alleviates the salt stress probably by modulating the physiological responses as well as stimulating the stress signal transduction in Arabidopsis seedlings.

  15. Lattice-induced nonadiabatic frequency shifts in optical lattice clocks

    SciTech Connect

    Beloy, K.

    2010-09-15

    We consider the frequency shift in optical lattice clocks which arises from the coupling of the electronic motion to the atomic motion within the lattice. For the simplest of three-dimensional lattice geometries this coupling is shown to affect only clocks based on blue-detuned lattices. We have estimated the size of this shift for the prospective strontium lattice clock operating at the 390-nm blue-detuned magic wavelength. The resulting fractional frequency shift is found to be on the order of 10{sup -18} and is largely overshadowed by the electric quadrupole shift. For lattice clocks based on more complex geometries or other atomic systems, this shift could potentially be a limiting factor in clock accuracy.

  16. Activation of peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor-{gamma} (PPAR{gamma}) induces cell death through MAPK-dependent mechanism in osteoblastic cells

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, Sung Hun; Yoo, Chong Il; Kim, Hui Taek; Park, Ji Yeon; Kwon, Chae Hwa; Keun Kim, Yong . E-mail: kim430@pusan.ac.kr

    2006-09-01

    The present study was undertaken to determine the role of the mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) subfamilies in cell death induced by PPAR{gamma} agonists in osteoblastic cells. Ciglitazone and troglitazone, PPAR{gamma} agonists, resulted in a concentration- and time-dependent cell death, which was largely attributed to apoptosis. But a PPAR{alpha} agonist ciprofibrate did not affect the cell death. Ciglitazone caused reactive oxygen species (ROS) generation and ciglitazone-induced cell death was prevented by antioxidants, suggesting an important role of ROS generation in the ciglitazone-induced cell death. ROS generation and cell death induced by ciglitazone were inhibited by the PPAR{gamma} antagonist GW9662. Ciglitazone treatment caused activation of extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK) and p38. Activation of ERK was dependent on epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) and that of p38 was independent. Ciglitazone-induced cell death was significantly prevented by PD98059, an inhibitor of ERK upstream kinase MEK1/2, and SB203580, a p38 inhibitor. Ciglitazone treatment increased Bax expression and caused a loss of mitochondrial membrane potential, and its effect was prevented by N-acetylcysteine, PD98059, and SB203580. Ciglitazone induced caspase activation, which was prevented by PD98059 and SB203580. The general caspase inhibitor z-DEVD-FMK and the specific inhibitor of caspases-3 DEVD-CHO exerted the protective effect against the ciglitazone-induced cell death. The EGFR inhibitors AG1478 and suramin protected against the ciglitazone-induced cell death. Taken together, these findings suggest that the MAPK signaling pathways play an active role in mediating the ciglitazone-induced cell death of osteoblasts and function upstream of a mitochondria-dependent mechanism. These data may provide a novel insight into potential therapeutic strategies for treatment of osteoporosis.

  17. Effects of carotenoids on damage of biological lipids induced by gamma irradiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saito, Takeshi; Fujii, Noriko

    2014-05-01

    Carotenoids are considered to be involved in the radioresistant mechanisms of radioresistant bacteria. In these bacterial cells, carotenoids are present in biological lipids, and therefore may be related to the radiation-induced damage of lipids. However, only limited data are available for the role of carotenoids in such damage. In this study, we irradiated an α-linolenic acid-benzene solution with gamma rays and analyzed the resulting oxidative degradation and peroxidation damage in the presence or absence of two typical carotenoids: β-carotene and astaxanthin. The analyses revealed that oxidative degradation and peroxidation of α-linolenic acid, as evaluated by the amount of malondialdehyde and conjugated diene formed, respectively, increased in a dose-dependent manner. Moreover, 8.5×10-3 M β-carotene inhibited gamma radiation-induced oxidative degradation of α-linolenic acid, whereas 5.0×10-5 and 5.0×10-6 M β-carotene, and 5.0×10-7 and 5.0×10-8 M astaxanthin promoted degradation. In contrast, neither β-carotene nor astaxanthin affected peroxidation of α-linolenic acid. These results suggest that an optimum concentration of carotenoids in radioresistant bacteria protects biological lipid structures from radiation-induced damage.

  18. Simulation of synergistic effects on lateral PNP bipolar transistors induced by neutron and gamma irradiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Chenhui; Bai, Xiaoyan; Chen, Wei; Yang, Shanchao; Liu, Yan; Jin, Xiaoming; Ding, Lili

    2015-10-01

    With semiconductor device simulation software TCAD, numerical simulations of ionizing/displacement synergistic effects on 6 kinds of lateral PNP bipolar transistors induced by the mixed irradiation of neutron and gamma are carried out by means of changing the minority carrier lifetimes, adding charged traps to the oxide layer and increasing the surface recombination velocity in Si/SiO2 interface. The results indicate that ionizing/displacement synergistic effects on the lateral PNP bipolar transistors are not a simple sum of total ionizing dose effects and displacement effects, and total ionizing dose effects can enhance neutron displacement damages, leading to greater gain degradation. The physical mechanisms of ionizing/displacement synergistic effects are analyzed based on the results. The positive charge in the oxide layer and Si/SiO2 interface traps induced by gamma irradiation can enhance the recombination processes of carriers in the bulk defects induced by neutron irradiation, and this is the main cause of ionizing/displacement synergistic effects on the lateral PNP bipolar transistors.

  19. Continuous versus pulse neutron induced gamma spectroscopy for soil carbon analysis.

    PubMed

    Kavetskiy, A; Yakubova, G; Torbert, H A; Prior, S A

    2015-02-01

    Neutron induced gamma spectra analysis (NGA) provides a means of measuring carbon in large soil volumes without destructive sampling. Calibration of the NGA system must account for system background and the interference of other nuclei on the carbon peak at 4.43 MeV. Accounting for these factors produced measurements in agreement with theoretical considerations. The continuous NGA mode was twice as fast and just as accurate as the pulse mode, thus this mode was preferable for routine soil carbon analysis. PMID:25497322

  20. Spectroscopic evaluation of painted layer structural changes induced by gamma radiation in experimental models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Manea, Mihaela M.; Moise, Ioan V.; Virgolici, Marian; Negut, Constantin D.; Barbu, Olimpia-Hinamatsuri; Cutrubinis, Mihalis; Fugaru, Viorel; Stanculescu, Ioana R.; Ponta, Corneliu C.

    2012-02-01

    The degradation of cultural heritage objects by insects and microorganisms is an important issue for conservators, art specialists and humankind in general. Gamma irradiation is an efficient method of polychrome wooden artifacts disinfestation. Color changes and other modifications in the physical chemical properties of materials induced by gamma irradiation are feared by cultural heritage responsible committees and they have to be evaluated objectively and precisely. In this paper FTIR and FT-Raman spectroscopy methods were used to investigate the structural changes in some experimental models of tempera paint layers on wood following 11 kGy gamma irradiation at two dose rates. Radiation chemistry depends on the particular pigment, matrix formed by protein, resin (in case of varnished samples) and water presence. For the majority of painted layer in experimental models very small spectral variations were observed. Small changes in the FTIR spectra were observed for the raw sienna experimental model: for the higher dose rate the egg yolk protein oxidation peaks and the CH stretching bands due to lipids degradation products increased.

  1. Increased limb involvement in murine collagen-induced arthritis following treatment with anti-interferon-gamma.

    PubMed Central

    Williams, R O; Williams, D G; Feldmann, M; Maini, R N

    1993-01-01

    We have tested the effect of administering H22, a hamster neutralizing MoAb to murine interferon-gamma (IFN-gamma) in collagen-induced arthritis. Mice were immunized with human type II collagen in adjuvant on day 1 and boosted with soluble collagen on day 21. H22 was administered (250 micrograms, intraperitoneally) either during the induction of arthritis (on days 0, 6, 13 and 20) or around the time of disease manifestation (on days 21, 28, 35 and 42). Control mice received either an isotype-matched non-neutralizing MoAb or saline. Both treatment regimes gave similar results. Treatment with H22 did not significantly affect the incidence of arthritis, time of onset, degree of oedema, histopathological severity, or level of anti-type II collagen IgG. However, a highly significant increase (P < 0.01) in the number of limbs affected by arthritis was observed in the H22-treated group, irrespective of whether the antibody was administered during the induction of arthritis, or during the time of clinical manifestation of disease. From these results it was concluded that anti-IFN-gamma treatment caused an increase in the number of arthritic lesions, but did not affect the severity of each individual lesion. PMID:8485917

  2. Inhibitory effect of interferon gamma on frequency of Ehrlichia canis-infected cells in vitro.

    PubMed

    Tajima, Tomoko; Wada, Makoto

    2013-12-15

    Ehrlichia canis is an obligate intracellular bacterium that infects the macrophage-monocyte cells of dogs, causing canine monocytic ehrlichiosis. Interferon-γ (IFN-γ), along with other cytokines, mediates the immune response to such intracellular bacterial invasions. To determine the role of IFN-γ in the immunity of dogs to E. canis infection, peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC) and white blood cells (WBC) were collected from E. canis-infected dogs and added to a culture of E. canis in DH82 cells. The number of E. canis inclusion-positive cells was significantly reduced in cultures containing PBMC and WBC from E. canis-infected dogs compared to uninfected dogs. However, this resistance was inhibited by the addition of an anti-dog IFN-γ antibody. Resistance was also observed when PBMC were added to the Cell Culture Inserts, which prohibited contact of PBMC to DH82 cells, while allowed the diffusion of soluble cell products. The results of this study indicate that resistance was not dependent on cell to cell contact, but was associated with soluble cell products, such as IFN-γ. The addition of recombinant canine IFN-γ to the E. canis culture also reduced the number of infected cells. A commercial recombinant canine IFN-γ, which is sold in Japan, was also effective at reducing E. canis-infected cell number. These results indicate that IFN-γ has an inhibitory effect on the frequency of E. canis-infected cells in vitro and that contact between effector and target cells is not necessary for the resistance. PMID:24148826

  3. Gamma delta T cells promote inflammation and insulin resistance during high fat diet-induced obesity in mice

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Gamma delta T cells are resident in adipose tissue and increase during diet-induced obesity. Their possible contribution to the inflammatory response that accompanies diet-induced obesity was investigated in mice after a 5-10 week high milk fat diet. The high milk fat diet resulted in significant in...

  4. Phosphoinositide 3-kinase-gamma induces Xenopus oocyte maturation via lipid kinase activity.

    PubMed Central

    Hehl, S; Stoyanov, B; Oehrl, W; Schönherr, R; Wetzker, R; Heinemann, S H

    2001-01-01

    Type-I phosphoinositide 3-kinases (PI3Ks) were characterized as a group of intracellular signalling proteins expressing both protein and lipid kinase activities. Recent studies implicate PI3Ks as mediators of oocyte maturation, but the molecular mechanisms are poorly defined. Here we used the Xenopus oocyte expression system as a model to investigate a possible contribution of the gamma-isoform of PI3K (PI3Kgamma) in the different pathways leading to cell-cycle progression by monitoring the time course of germinal vesicle breakdown (GVBD). Expression of a constitutive active PI3Kgamma (PI3Kgamma-CAAX) induced GVBD and increased the levels of phosphorylated Akt/protein kinase B and mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK). Furthermore, PI3Kgamma-CAAX accelerated progesterone-induced GVBD, but had no effect on GVBD induced by insulin. The effects of PI3Kgamma-CAAX could be suppressed by pre-incubation of the oocytes with LY294002, PD98059 or roscovitine, inhibitors of PI3K, MEK (MAPK/extracellular-signal-regulated protein kinase kinase) and cdc2/cyclin B kinase, respectively. Mutants of PI3Kgamma-CAAX, in which either lipid kinase or both lipid and protein kinase activities were altered or eliminated, did not induce significant GVBD. Our data demonstrate that expression of PI3Kgamma in Xenopus oocytes accelerates their progesterone-induced maturation and that lipid kinase activity is required to induce this effect. PMID:11736661

  5. Mycobacterium tuberculosis induces apoptosis in gamma/delta T lymphocytes from patients with advanced clinical forms of active tuberculosis.

    PubMed Central

    Duarte, R; Kindlelán, J M; Carracedo, J; Sánchez-Guijo, P; Ramírez, R

    1997-01-01

    Antigens from inactivated Mycobacterium tuberculosis H37Ra induce activation in a subpopulation of gamma/delta (gamma/delta) T lymphocytes in a manner that resembles that of superantigens from alpha/beta T cells. After culture in vitro with H37Ra proteins, gamma/delta T lymphocytes from patients with advanced clinical forms of active tuberculosis (ACF-TBC) display cytotoxic activity against homotypic target cells exposed to H37Ra. Cytotoxicity by gamma/delta T lymphocytes from ACF-TBC patients occurs in a range similar to that observed in healthy subjects. Following activation, H37Ra-stimulated gamma/delta T lymphocytes from healthy subjects did proliferate in the presence of exogenous recombinant human interleukin 2. However, under the same conditions, gamma/delta T lymphocytes from ACF-TBC patients not only did not proliferate but died by apoptosis. These results suggest that in gamma/delta T lymphocytes from patients with ACF-TBC, antigens from M. tuberculosis may induce cell activation that leads to apoptotic cell death. PMID:9008275

  6. Man-induced low-frequency seismic events in Italy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Latorre, Diana; Amato, Alessandro; Cattaneo, Marco; Carannante, Simona; Michelini, Alberto

    2014-12-01

    Unconventional seismic events in Italy are detected by scanning three years of continuous waveforms recorded by the Italian National Seismic Network. Cross correlation of signal templates with continuous seismic records has evidenced unusual events with similar low-frequency characteristics in several Italian regions. Spectral analysis and spatiotemporal distribution of these events, some of which are previously interpreted as tectonic long-period transients, suggest that they are not natural, but produced by huge cement factories. Since there are at least 57 full-cycle cement plants operating in Italy, each affecting areas of about 1250 to 2800 km2, we argue that significant portions of the Italian territory (23% to 51%) can be affected by this man-made noise. Seismic noise analyses, such as those used for microzonation or crustal structure investigations, as well as data mining techniques used to retrieve anomalous transient signals, should thus take into account this peculiar and pervasive source of seismic waves.

  7. Elimination of radiation-induced {gamma}-H2AX foci in mammalian nucleus can occur by histone exchange

    SciTech Connect

    Svetlova, Maria; Solovjeva, Liudmila; Nishi, Kayoko; Nazarov, Igor; Siino, Joseph; Tomilin, Nikolai . E-mail: nvtom@mail.ru

    2007-06-29

    Double-strand breaks in mammalian DNA lead to rapid phosphorylation of C-terminal serines in histone H2AX ({gamma}-H2AX) and formation of large nuclear {gamma}-H2AX foci. After DNA repair these foci disappear, but molecular mechanism of elimination of {gamma}-H2AX foci remains unclear. H2AX protein can be phosphorylated and dephosphorylated in vitro in the absence of chromatin. Here, we compared global exchange of GFP-H2AX with kinetics of formation and elimination of radiation-induced {gamma}-H2AX foci. Maximal number of {gamma}-H2AX foci is observed one hour after irradiation, when {approx}20% of GFP-H2AX is exchanged suggesting that formation of the foci mostly occurs by in situ H2AX phosphorylation. However, slow elimination of {gamma}-H2AX foci is weakly affected by an inhibitor of protein phosphatases calyculin A which is known as an agent suppressing dephosphorylation of {gamma}-H2AX. This indicates that elimination of {gamma}-H2AX foci may be independent of dephosphorylation of H2AX which can occur after its removal from the foci by exchange.

  8. Mutagenesis in Caenorhabditis elegans. II. A spectrum of mutational events induced with 1500 r of gamma-radiation

    SciTech Connect

    Rosenbluth, R.E.; Cuddeford, C.; Baillie, D.L.

    1985-03-01

    The authors previously established a gamma-ray dose-response curve for recessive lethal events (lethals) captured over the eT1 balancer. In this paper they analyze the nature of lethal events produced, with a frequency of 0.04 per eT1 region, at a dose of 1500 r. To do so, they developed a protocol that, in the absence of cytogenetics, allows balanced lethals to be analyzed for associated chromosomal rearrangements. A set of 35 lethal strains was chosen for the analysis. Although the dosage was relatively low, a large number of multiple-break events were observed. The fraction of lethals associated with rearrangements was found to be 0.76. Currently most X- and gamma-ray dosages used for mutagenesis in C. elegans are 6000-8000 r. From the data it was conservatively estimated that 43% of rearrangements induced with 8000 r would be accompanied by additional chromosome breaks in the genome. With 1500 r the value was 5%. The 35 lethals studied were derived from 875 screened F1's. Among these lethals there were (1) at least two unc-36 duplications, (2) at least four translocations, (3) at least six deficiencies of chromosome V (these delete about 90% of the unc-60 to unc-42 region) and (4) several unanalyzed rearrangements. Thus, it is possible to recover desired rearrangements at reasonable rates with a dose of only 1500 r. The authors suggest that the levels of ionizing radiation employed in most published C. elegans studies are excessive and efforts should be made to use reduced levels in the future.

  9. Ligand-induced IFN gamma receptor tyrosine phosphorylation couples the receptor to its signal transduction system (p91).

    PubMed Central

    Greenlund, A C; Farrar, M A; Viviano, B L; Schreiber, R D

    1994-01-01

    Herein we report that interferon-gamma (IFN gamma) induces the rapid and reversible tyrosine phosphorylation of the IFN gamma receptor. Using a panel of receptor intracellular domain mutants, we show that a membrane-proximal LPKS sequence (residues 266-269) is required for ligand-induced tyrosine kinase activation and/or kinase-receptor association and biological responsiveness, and a functionally critical membrane-distal tyrosine residue (Y440) is a target of the activated enzyme. The biological significance of Y440 phosphorylation was demonstrated by showing that a receptor-derived nonapeptide corresponding to receptor residues 436-444 and containing phosphorylated Y440 bound specifically to p91, blocked p91 phosphorylation and inhibited the generation of an active p91-containing transcription factor complex. In contrast, nonphosphorylated wild-type, phosphorylated mutant, or phosphorylated irrelevant peptides did not. Moreover, the phosphorylated Y440-containing peptide did not interact with a related but distinct latent transcription factor (p113) which is activatible by IFN alpha but not IFN gamma. These results thus document the specific and inducible association of p91 with the phosphorylated IFN gamma receptor and thereby elucidate the mechanism by which ligand couples the IFN gamma receptor to its signal transduction system. Images PMID:8156998

  10. Oxidative stress and gamma radiation-induced cancellous bone loss with musculoskeletal disuse

    PubMed Central

    Kondo, Hisataka; Yumoto, Kenji; Alwood, Joshua S.; Mojarrab, Rose; Wang, Angela; Almeida, Eduardo A. C.; Searby, Nancy D.; Limoli, Charles L.

    2010-01-01

    Exposure of astronauts in space to radiation during weightlessness may contribute to subsequent bone loss. Gamma irradiation of postpubertal mice rapidly increases the number of bone-resorbing osteoclasts and causes bone loss in cancellous tissue; similar changes occur in skeletal diseases associated with oxidative stress. Therefore, we hypothesized that increased oxidative stress mediates radiation-induced bone loss and that musculoskeletal disuse changes the sensitivity of cancellous tissue to radiation exposure. Musculoskeletal disuse by hindlimb unloading (1 or 2 wk) or total body gamma irradiation (1 or 2 Gy of 137Cs) of 4-mo-old, male C57BL/6 mice each decreased cancellous bone volume fraction in the proximal tibiae and lumbar vertebrae. The extent of radiation-induced acute cancellous bone loss in tibiae and lumbar vertebrae was similar in normally loaded and hindlimb-unloaded mice. Similarly, osteoclast surface in the tibiae increased 46% as a result of irradiation, 47% as a result of hindlimb unloading, and 64% as a result of irradiation + hindlimb unloading compared with normally loaded mice. Irradiation, but not hindlimb unloading, reduced viability and increased apoptosis of marrow cells and caused oxidative damage to lipids within mineralized tissue. Irradiation also stimulated generation of reactive oxygen species in marrow cells. Furthermore, injection of α-lipoic acid, an antioxidant, mitigated the acute bone loss caused by irradiation. Together, these results showed that disuse and gamma irradiation, alone or in combination, caused a similar degree of acute cancellous bone loss and shared a common cellular mechanism of increased bone resorption. Furthermore, irradiation, but not disuse, may increase the number of osteoclasts and the extent of acute bone loss via increased reactive oxygen species production and ensuing oxidative damage, implying different molecular mechanisms. The finding that α-lipoic acid protected cancellous tissue from the

  11. Frequency of light-flashes induced by Cerenkov radiation from heavy cosmic-ray nuclei

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Madey, R.; Mcnulty, P. J.

    1972-01-01

    The expected frequency was calculated for light flashes induced in the dark-adapted eye by Cerenkov radiation from the flux of heavy nuclei that exists in space beyond the geomagnetic field. The expected frequency of light flashes depends on the threshold number of photons that must be absorbed in a rod cluster. The results of the calculation are presented as a curve of the mean frequency of light flashes versus the threshold number of absorbed photons. The results are not sensitive to variations in the path length from 5 to 15 grams per square centimeter of water-equivalent before the nucleus reaches the retina. Calculations were based on the fluxes and energy spectra of galactic cosmic ray nuclei of helium to iron, measured at a time of minimum solar modulation. The expected light flash frequencies induced by Cerenkov radiation are consistent with the frequencies reported by the astronauts on Apollo missions 11 through 14.

  12. Radioprotective effect of Haberlea rhodopensis (Friv.) leaf extract on gamma-radiation-induced DNA damage, lipid peroxidation and antioxidant levels in rabbit blood.

    PubMed

    Georgieva, Svetlana; Popov, Borislav; Bonev, Georgi

    2013-01-01

    Different concentrations of H. rhodopensis total extract (HRE; 0.03, 0.06 and 0.12 g/kg body weight) were injected im, into rabbits 2 h before collecting the blood samples. The whole blood samples were exposed in vitro to 2.0 Gy 60Co gamma-radiation. The radiation-induced changes were estimated by using the chromosome aberration test (CA) and cytokinesis blocked micronucleus assay (CBMN) in peripheral lymphocytes, and by determining the malondialdehyde levels (MDA) in blood plasma and the superoxide dismutase (SOD) and catalase (CAT) activity in erythrocytes. Radiation significantly increased the chromosome aberration and micronuclei frequencies as well as MDA levels and decreased the antioxidant enzyme activity. On the other hand, the HRE pretreatment significantly decreased the CA, MN frequencies and MDA levels and increased the SOD and CAT activity in a concentration dependent manner. The most effective was the highest concentration of HRE (0.12 g/kg body weight). The results suggest that HRE as a natural product with a nantioxidant capacity could play a modulatory role against the cellular damage induced by gamma-irradiation. The possible mechanism involved in the radioprotective potential of HRE is discussed. PMID:23441477

  13. A stable frequency comb directly referenced to rubidium electromagnetically induced transparency and two-photon transitions

    SciTech Connect

    Hou, Dong; Wu, Jiutao; Zhang, Shuangyou; Ren, Quansheng; Zhang, Zhigang; Zhao, Jianye

    2014-03-17

    We demonstrate an approach to create a stable erbium-fiber-based frequency comb at communication band by directly locking the combs to two rubidium atomic transitions resonances (electromagnetically induced transparency absorption and two-photon absorption), respectively. This approach directly transfers the precision and stability of the atomic transitions to the comb. With its distinguishing feature of compactness by removing the conventional octave-spanning spectrum and f-to-2f beating facilities and the ability to directly control the comb's frequency at the atomic transition frequency, this stable optical comb can be widely used in optical communication, frequency standard, and optical spectroscopy and microscopy.

  14. Low frequency vibrations induce malformations in two aquatic species in a frequency-, waveform-, and direction-specific manner.

    PubMed

    Vandenberg, Laura N; Stevenson, Claire; Levin, Michael

    2012-01-01

    Environmental toxicants such as industrial wastes, air particulates from machinery and transportation vehicles, and pesticide run-offs, as well as many chemicals, have been widely studied for their effects on human and wildlife populations. Yet other potentially harmful environmental pollutants such as electromagnetic pulses, noise and vibrations have remained incompletely understood. Because developing embryos undergo complex morphological changes that can be affected detrimentally by alterations in physical forces, they may be particularly susceptible to exposure to these types of pollutants. We investigated the effects of low frequency vibrations on early embryonic development of two aquatic species, Xenopus laevis (frogs) and Danio rerio (zebrafish), specifically focusing on the effects of varying frequencies, waveforms, and applied direction. We observed treatment-specific effects on the incidence of neural tube defects, left-right patterning defects and abnormal tail morphogenesis in Xenopus tadpoles. Additionally, we found that low frequency vibrations altered left-right patterning and tail morphogenesis, but did not induce neural tube defects, in zebrafish. The results of this study support the conclusion that low frequency vibrations are toxic to aquatic vertebrates, with detrimental effects observed in two important model species with very different embryonic architectures. PMID:23251546

  15. Low Frequency Vibrations Induce Malformations in Two Aquatic Species in a Frequency-, Waveform-, and Direction-Specific Manner

    PubMed Central

    Vandenberg, Laura N.; Stevenson, Claire; Levin, Michael

    2012-01-01

    Environmental toxicants such as industrial wastes, air particulates from machinery and transportation vehicles, and pesticide run-offs, as well as many chemicals, have been widely studied for their effects on human and wildlife populations. Yet other potentially harmful environmental pollutants such as electromagnetic pulses, noise and vibrations have remained incompletely understood. Because developing embryos undergo complex morphological changes that can be affected detrimentally by alterations in physical forces, they may be particularly susceptible to exposure to these types of pollutants. We investigated the effects of low frequency vibrations on early embryonic development of two aquatic species, Xenopus laevis (frogs) and Danio rerio (zebrafish), specifically focusing on the effects of varying frequencies, waveforms, and applied direction. We observed treatment-specific effects on the incidence of neural tube defects, left-right patterning defects and abnormal tail morphogenesis in Xenopus tadpoles. Additionally, we found that low frequency vibrations altered left-right patterning and tail morphogenesis, but did not induce neural tube defects, in zebrafish. The results of this study support the conclusion that low frequency vibrations are toxic to aquatic vertebrates, with detrimental effects observed in two important model species with very different embryonic architectures. PMID:23251546

  16. Estrogen-related receptor gamma induces cardiac hypertrophy by activating GATA4.

    PubMed

    Kwon, Duk-Hwa; Eom, Gwang Hyeon; Kee, Hae Jin; Nam, Yoon Seok; Cho, Young Kuk; Kim, Don-Kyu; Koo, Ja Young; Kim, Hyung-Seok; Nam, Kwang-Il; Kim, Kyung Keun; Lee, In-Kyu; Park, Seung Bum; Choi, Hueng-Sik; Kook, Hyun

    2013-12-01

    Estrogen-related receptor gamma (ERRγ) is an orphan nuclear receptor that has biological roles mainly in metabolism and that controls metabolic switching in perinatal heart. In adult heart diseases, however, the functional roles of ERRγ have not yet been elucidated. In the present study, we aimed to characterize the role of ERRγ in cardiac hypertrophy. The functional roles of ERRγ in the development of cardiac hypertrophy were examined in primary cultured cardiomyocytes and in animal models. ERRγ expression was increased in hearts from human hypertrophic cardiomyopathy patients and in both cellular and animal models of cardiac hypertrophy. Transgenic overexpression in mouse heart as well as forced expression of ERRγ in cardiomyocytes induced hypertrophic phenotypes. Knock-down of ERRγ blocked agonist-induced hypertrophic phenotypes. ERRγ bound directly to the proximal ERR-responsive element in the GATA4 promoter in a sequence-specific manner and thereby induced transcription. ERRγ-induced hypertrophy was blocked by inhibition of GATA4. GSK-5182, an inverse agonist of ERRγ, completely blocked cardiac hypertrophy in cardiomyocytes. It also prevented aortic banding-induced cardiac hypertrophy and fibrosis in mouse heart. These findings demonstrate a novel ERRγ/GATA4 signal cascade in the development of cardiac hypertrophy and suggest GSK-5182 as a possible therapeutic. PMID:24083978

  17. The repair of gamma-radiation-induced DNA damage is inhibited by microcystin-LR, the PP1 and PP2A phosphatase inhibitor.

    PubMed

    Lankoff, A; Bialczyk, J; Dziga, D; Carmichael, W W; Gradzka, I; Lisowska, H; Kuszewski, T; Gozdz, S; Piorun, I; Wojcik, A

    2006-01-01

    The genotoxic activity of microcystin-LR (MC-LR) is a matter of debate. MC-LR is known to be a phosphatase inhibitor and it may be expected that it is involved in the regulation of the activity of DNA-dependent protein kinase (DNA-PK), the key enzyme involved in the repair of radiation-induced DNA damage. We studied the effect of MC-LR on the repair capacity of radiation-induced DNA damage in human lymphocytes and human glioblastoma cell lines MO59J and MO59K. A dose of 0.5 microg/ml of MC-LR was chosen because it induced very little early apoptosis which gives no false positive results in the comet assay. Human lymphocytes in G0-phase of the cell cycle were pre-treated with MC-LR for 3 h and irradiated with 2 Gy of gamma radiation. The kinetics of DNA repair was assessed by the comet assay. In addition the frequencies of chromosomal aberrations were analysed. The pre-treatment with MC-LR inhibited the repair of radiation-induced damage and lead to enhanced frequencies of chromosomal aberrations including dicentric chromosomes. The results of a split-dose experiment, where cells were exposed to two 1.5 Gy doses of radiation separated by 3 h with or without MC-LR, confirmed that the toxin increased the frequency of dicentric chromosomes. We also determined the effect of MC-LR and ionizing radiation on the frequency of gamma-H2AX foci. The pre-treatment with MC-LR resulted in reduced numbers of gamma-H2AX foci in irradiated cells. In order to elucidate the impact of MC-LR on DNA-PK we examined the kinetics of DNA repair in human glioblastoma MO59J and MO59K cells. Both cell lines were exposed to 10 Gy of X-rays and DNA repair was analysed by the comet assay. A strong inhibitory effect was observed in the MO59K but not in the MO59J cells. These results indicate that DNA-PK might be involved in DNA repair inhibition by MC-LR. PMID:16434448

  18. Radio frequency glow discharge-induced acidification of fluoropolymers.

    PubMed

    Krawczyk, Benjamin M; Baltrusaitis, Jonas; Yoder, Colin M; Vargo, Terrence G; Bowden, Ned B; Kader, Khalid N

    2011-12-01

    Fluoropolymer surfaces are unique in view of the fact that they are quite inert, have low surface energies, and possess high thermal stabilities. Attempts to modify fluoropolymer surfaces have met with difficulties in that it is difficult to control the modification to maintain bulk characteristics of the polymer. In a previously described method, the replacement of a small fraction of surface fluorine by acid groups through radio frequency glow discharge created a surface with unexpected reactivity allowing for attachment of proteins in their active states. The present study demonstrates that 1-ethyl-3-[3-dimethylaminopropyl] carbodiimide hydrochloride (EDC) reacts with the acid groups on fluoropolymer surfaces in a novel reaction not previously described. This reaction yields an excellent leaving group in which a primary amine on proteins can substitute to form a covalent bond between a protein and these surfaces. In an earlier study, we demonstrated that collagen IV could be deposited on a modified PTFE surface using EDC as a linker. Once collagen IV is attached to the surface, it assembles to form a functional stratum resembling collagen IV in native basement membrane. In this study, we show data suggesting that the fluorine to carbon ratio determines the acidity of the fluoropolymer surfaces and how well collagen IV attaches to and assembles on four different fluoropolymer surfaces. PMID:21887736

  19. CHO cell repair of single-strand and double-strand DNA breaks induced by gamma- and alpha-radiations.

    PubMed

    Cole, A; Shonka, F; Corry, P; Cooper, W G

    1975-01-01

    Neutral and alkaline sucrose gradient sedimentation analysis was used to measure double- and single-strand breaks in the DNA of Chinese hamster ovary (CHO) cells exposed to either gamma- or alpha-radiation. After irradiation, cells were incubated for 15-180 min to test the ability of the cell to rejoin the DNA breaks. Essentially complete rejoining was observed for single-strand breaks induced by gamma- or alpha-doses below 20 krad and for double-strand breaks induced by gamma doses below 60 krad. Approximately 80% rejoining was observed for double-strand breaks induced by alpha doses below 40 krad. At higher doses, the repair system appeared to saturate in such a way that essentially no additional breaks were rejoined. PMID:1191188

  20. Frequency weighting for vibration-induced white finger compatible with exposure-response models.

    PubMed

    Brammer, Anthony J; Pitts, Paul M

    2012-01-01

    An analysis has been performed to derive a frequency weighting for the development of vibration-induced white finger (VWF). It employs a model to compare health risks for pairs of population groups that are selected to have similar health outcomes from operating power tools or machines with markedly different acceleration spectra (rock drills, chain saws, pavement breakers and motorcycles). The model defines the Relative Risk, RR(f(trial)), which is constructed from the ratio of daily exposures and includes a trial frequency weighting that is applied to the acceleration spectra. The trial frequency weighting consists of a frequency-independent primary frequency range, and subordinate frequency ranges in which the response to vibration diminishes, with cut-off frequencies that are changed to influence the magnitude of RR(f(trial)). The frequency weighting so derived when RR(f(trial)) = 1 is similar to those obtained by other methods (W(hf), W(hT)). It consists of a frequency independent range from about 25 Hz to 500 Hz (-3 dB frequencies), with an amplitude cut-off rate of 12 dB/octave below 25 Hz and above 500 Hz. The range is compatible with studies of vasoconstriction in persons with VWF. The results provide further evidence that the ISO frequency weighting may be inappropriate for assessing the risk of developing VWF. PMID:23060253

  1. Method and System for Gamma-Ray Localization Induced Spacecraft Navigation Using Celestial Gamma-Ray Sources

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sheikh, Suneel I. (Inventor); Hisamoto, Chuck (Inventor); Arzoumanian, Zaven (Inventor)

    2015-01-01

    A method and system for spacecraft navigation using distant celestial gamma-ray bursts which offer detectable, bright, high-energy events that provide well-defined characteristics conducive to accurate time-alignment among spatially separated spacecraft. Utilizing assemblages of photons from distant gamma-ray bursts, relative range between two spacecraft can be accurately computed along the direction to each burst's source based upon the difference in arrival time of the burst emission at each spacecraft's location. Correlation methods used to time-align the high-energy burst profiles are provided. The spacecraft navigation may be carried out autonomously or in a central control mode of operation.

  2. Differential modulation of high-frequency gamma-electroencephalogram activity and sleep-wake state by noradrenaline and serotonin microinjections into the region of cholinergic basalis neurons.

    PubMed

    Cape, E G; Jones, B E

    1998-04-01

    Several lines of evidence indicate that cholinergic basalis neurons play an important role in cortical activation. The present study was undertaken to determine the effect of noradrenergic and serotonergic modulation of the cholinergic neurons on cortical EEG activity and sleep-wake states. The neurotransmitters were injected into the region of the basalis neurons by remote control in freely moving, naturally sleeping-waking rats during the day when the rats are normally asleep the majority of the time. Effects were observed on behavior and EEG activity, including high-frequency gamma activity (30-60 Hz), which has been demonstrated to reflect behavioral and cortical arousal in the rat. Noradrenaline, which has been shown in previous in vitro studies to depolarize and excite the cholinergic cells, produced a dose-dependent increase in gamma-EEG activity, a decrease in delta activity, and an increase in waking. Serotonin, which has been found in previous in vitro studies to hyperpolarize the cholinergic neurons, produced a dose-dependent decrease in gamma-EEG activity with no significant change in amounts of wake or slow wave sleep. Both chemicals resulted in a dose-dependent decrease in paradoxical sleep. These results demonstrate that noradrenaline and serotonin exert differential modulatory effects on EEG activity through the basal forebrain, the one facilitating gamma activity and eliciting waking and the other diminishing gamma activity and not significantly affecting slow wave sleep. The results also confirm that the cholinergic basalis neurons play an important role in cortical activation and particularly in the high-frequency gamma activity that underlies cortical and behavioral arousal of the wake state. PMID:9502823

  3. Molecular characterisation of murine acute myeloid leukaemia induced by 56Fe ion and 137Cs gamma ray irradiation.

    PubMed

    Steffen, Leta S; Bacher, Jeffery W; Peng, Yuanlin; Le, Phuong N; Ding, Liang-Hao; Genik, Paula C; Ray, F Andrew; Bedford, Joel S; Fallgren, Christina M; Bailey, Susan M; Ullrich, Robert L; Weil, Michael M; Story, Michael D

    2013-01-01

    Exposure to sparsely ionising gamma- or X-ray irradiation is known to increase the risk of leukaemia in humans. However, heavy ion radiotherapy and extended space exploration will expose humans to densely ionising high linear energy transfer (LET) radiation for which there is currently no understanding of leukaemia risk. Murine models have implicated chromosomal deletion that includes the hematopoietic transcription factor gene, PU.1 (Sfpi1), and point mutation of the second PU.1 allele as the primary cause of low-LET radiation-induced murine acute myeloid leukaemia (rAML). Using array comparative genomic hybridisation, fluorescence in situ hybridisation and high resolution melt analysis, we have confirmed that biallelic PU.1 mutations are common in low-LET rAML, occurring in 88% of samples. Biallelic PU.1 mutations were also detected in the majority of high-LET rAML samples. Microsatellite instability was identified in 42% of all rAML samples, and 89% of samples carried increased microsatellite mutant frequencies at the single-cell level, indicative of ongoing instability. Instability was also observed cytogenetically as a 2-fold increase in chromatid-type aberrations. These data highlight the similarities in molecular characteristics of high-LET and low-LET rAML and confirm the presence of ongoing chromosomal and microsatellite instability in murine rAML. PMID:22987027

  4. Molecular characterisation of murine acute myeloid leukaemia induced by 56Fe ion and 137Cs gamma ray irradiation

    PubMed Central

    Bacher, Jeffery W.

    2013-01-01

    Exposure to sparsely ionising gamma- or X-ray irradiation is known to increase the risk of leukaemia in humans. However, heavy ion radiotherapy and extended space exploration will expose humans to densely ionising high linear energy transfer (LET) radiation for which there is currently no understanding of leukaemia risk. Murine models have implicated chromosomal deletion that includes the hematopoietic transcription factor gene, PU.1 (Sfpi1), and point mutation of the second PU.1 allele as the primary cause of low-LET radiation-induced murine acute myeloid leukaemia (rAML). Using array comparative genomic hybridisation, fluorescence in situ hybridisation and high resolution melt analysis, we have confirmed that biallelic PU.1 mutations are common in low-LET rAML, occurring in 88% of samples. Biallelic PU.1 mutations were also detected in the majority of high-LET rAML samples. Microsatellite instability was identified in 42% of all rAML samples, and 89% of samples carried increased microsatellite mutant frequencies at the single-cell level, indicative of ongoing instability. Instability was also observed cytogenetically as a 2-fold increase in chromatid-type aberrations. These data highlight the similarities in molecular characteristics of high-LET and low-LET rAML and confirm the presence of ongoing chromosomal and microsatellite instability in murine rAML. PMID:22987027

  5. PPAR{gamma} ligands induce growth inhibition and apoptosis through p63 and p73 in human ovarian cancer cells

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, Soyeon; Lee, Jae-Jung; Heo, Dae Seog

    2011-03-18

    Research highlights: {yields} PPAR{gamma} ligands increased the rate of apoptosis and inhibition of proliferation in ovarian cancer cells. {yields} PPAR{gamma} ligands induced p63 and p73 expression, but not p53. {yields} p63 and p73 leads to an increase in p21 expression and apoptosis in ovarian cancer cells with treatment PPAR{gamma} ligands. {yields} These findings suggest that PPAR{gamma} ligands suppressed growth of ovarian cancer cells through upregulation of p63 and p73. -- Abstract: Peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor gamma (PPAR{gamma}) agonists, including thiazolidinediones (TZDs), can induce anti-proliferation, differentiation, and apoptosis in various cancer cell types. This study investigated the mechanism of the anticancer effect of TZDs on human ovarian cancer. Six human ovarian cancer cell lines (NIH:OVCAR3, SKOV3, SNU-251, SNU-8, SNU-840, and 2774) were treated with the TZD, which induced dose-dependent inhibition of cell growth. Additionally, these cell lines exhibited various expression levels of PPAR{gamma} protein as revealed by Western blotting. Flow cytometry showed that the cell cycle was arrested at the G1 phase, as demonstrated by the appearance of a sub-G1 peak. This observation was corroborated by the finding of increased levels of Bax, p21, PARP, and cleaved caspase 3 in TGZ-treated cells. Interestingly, when we determined the effect of p53-induced growth inhibition in these three human ovarian cancer cells, we found that they either lacked p53 or contained a mutant form of p53. Furthermore, TGZ induced the expression of endogenous or exogenous p63 and p73 proteins and p63- or p73-directed short hairpin (si) RNAs inhibited the ability of TGZ to regulate expression of p21 in these cells. Thus, our results suggest that PPAR{gamma} ligands can induce growth suppression of ovarian cancer cells and mediate p63 and p73 expression, leading to enhanced growth inhibition and apoptosis. The tumor suppressive effects of PPAR{gamma} ligands

  6. Successful memory encoding is associated with increased cross-frequency coupling between frontal theta and posterior gamma oscillations in human scalp-recorded EEG.

    PubMed

    Friese, Uwe; Köster, Moritz; Hassler, Uwe; Martens, Ulla; Trujillo-Barreto, Nelson; Gruber, Thomas

    2013-02-01

    Although previous studies have established that successful memory encoding is associated with increased synchronization of theta-band and gamma-band oscillations, it is unclear if there is a functional relationship between oscillations in these frequency bands. Using scalp-recorded EEG in healthy human participants, we demonstrate that cross-frequency coupling between frontal theta phase and posterior gamma power is enhanced during the encoding of visual stimuli which participants later on remember versus items which participants subsequently forget ("subsequent memory effect," SME). Conventional wavelet analyses and source localizations revealed SMEs in spectral power of theta-, alpha-, and gamma-band. Successful compared to unsuccessful encoding was reflected in increased theta-band activity in right frontal cortex as well as increased gamma-band activity in parietal-occipital regions. Moreover, decreased alpha-band activity in prefrontal and occipital cortex was also related to successful encoding. Overall, these findings support the idea that during the formation of new memories frontal cortex regions interact with cortical representations in posterior areas. PMID:23142278

  7. Increase in short-term memory capacity induced by down-regulating individual theta frequency via transcranial alternating current stimulation.

    PubMed

    Vosskuhl, Johannes; Huster, René J; Herrmann, Christoph S

    2015-01-01

    Working memory (WM) and short-term memory (STM) supposedly rely on the phase-amplitude coupling (PAC) of neural oscillations in the theta and gamma frequency ranges. The ratio between the individually dominant gamma and theta frequencies is believed to determine an individual's memory capacity. The aim of this study was to establish a causal relationship between the gamma/theta ratio and WM/STM capacity by means of transcranial alternating current stimulation (tACS). To achieve this, tACS was delivered at a frequency below the individual theta frequency. Thereby the individual ratio of gamma to theta frequencies was changed, resulting in an increase of STM capacity. Healthy human participants (N = 33) were allocated to two groups, one receiving verum tACS, the other underwent a sham control protocol. The electroencephalogram (EEG) was measured before stimulation and analyzed with regard to the properties of PAC between theta and gamma frequencies to determine individual stimulation frequencies. After stimulation, EEG was recorded again in order to find after-effects of tACS in the oscillatory features of the EEG. Measures of STM and WM were obtained before, during and after stimulation. Frequency spectra and behavioral data were compared between groups and different measurement phases. The tACS- but not the sham stimulated group showed an increase in STM capacity during stimulation. WM was not affected in either groups. An increase in task-related theta amplitude after stimulation was observed only for the tACS group. These augmented theta amplitudes indicated that the manipulation of individual theta frequencies was successful and caused the increase in STM capacity. PMID:26005411

  8. Increase in short-term memory capacity induced by down-regulating individual theta frequency via transcranial alternating current stimulation

    PubMed Central

    Vosskuhl, Johannes; Huster, René J.; Herrmann, Christoph S.

    2015-01-01

    Working memory (WM) and short-term memory (STM) supposedly rely on the phase-amplitude coupling (PAC) of neural oscillations in the theta and gamma frequency ranges. The ratio between the individually dominant gamma and theta frequencies is believed to determine an individual’s memory capacity. The aim of this study was to establish a causal relationship between the gamma/theta ratio and WM/STM capacity by means of transcranial alternating current stimulation (tACS). To achieve this, tACS was delivered at a frequency below the individual theta frequency. Thereby the individual ratio of gamma to theta frequencies was changed, resulting in an increase of STM capacity. Healthy human participants (N = 33) were allocated to two groups, one receiving verum tACS, the other underwent a sham control protocol. The electroencephalogram (EEG) was measured before stimulation and analyzed with regard to the properties of PAC between theta and gamma frequencies to determine individual stimulation frequencies. After stimulation, EEG was recorded again in order to find after-effects of tACS in the oscillatory features of the EEG. Measures of STM and WM were obtained before, during and after stimulation. Frequency spectra and behavioral data were compared between groups and different measurement phases. The tACS- but not the sham stimulated group showed an increase in STM capacity during stimulation. WM was not affected in either groups. An increase in task-related theta amplitude after stimulation was observed only for the tACS group. These augmented theta amplitudes indicated that the manipulation of individual theta frequencies was successful and caused the increase in STM capacity. PMID:26005411

  9. Properties of light induced EPR signals in enamel and their possible interference with gamma-induced signals

    SciTech Connect

    Shalom, S.V.; Chumak, V.V.; Haskell, E.H.; Hayes, R.B.; Kenner, G.H.

    1996-01-01

    Exposure of enamel to UV light (sunlight and artificial) results in EPR signals with g-factors of 2.0018 (perpendicular),1.9975 (parallel), 2.0045, 20052, and 2.0083. The first two signals correspond to the components of the radiation induced signal and the third signal corresponds to the native signal reported in dosimetry and dating studies. The remaining signals were found to be stable and sensitive to both gamma and sunlight exposure. Their sensitivity response to light and radiation was considerably different which gives rise to the possibility that the g=2.0052 and g=2.0083 signals might be used as indicators of the dose resulting from light exposure.

  10. AC electric field induced dielectrophoretic assembly behavior of gold nanoparticles in a wide frequency range

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Weiyu; Wang, Chunhui; Ding, Haitao; Shao, Jinyou; Ding, Yucheng

    2016-05-01

    In this work, we focus on frequency-dependence of pearl chain formations (PCF) of gold nanoparticles driven by AC dielectrophoresis (DEP), especially in a low field-frequency range, where induced double-layer charging effect at ideally polarizable surfaces on particle DEP behavior and surrounding liquid motion need not be negligible. As field frequency varies, grown features of DEP assembly structures ranging from low-frequency non-bridged gap to high-frequency single gold nanoparticle-made nanowires bridging the electrodes are demonstrated experimentally. Specifically, at 10 kHz, a kind of novel channel-like structure with parallel opposing banks is formed at the center of interelectrode gap. In stark contrast, at 1 MHz, thin PCF with diameter of 100 nm is created along the shortest distance of the isolation spacing. Moreover, a particular conductive path of nanoparticle chains is produced at 1 MHz in a DEP device embedded with multiple floating electrodes. A theoretical framework taking into account field-induced double-layer polarization at both the particle/electrolyte and electrode/electrolyte interface is developed to correlate these experimental observations with induced-charge electrokinetic (ICEK) phenomenon. And a RC circuit model is helpful in accounting for the formation of this particular non-bridged channel-like structure induced by a low-frequency AC voltage. As compared to thin PCF formed at high field frequency that effectively short circuits the electrode pair, though it is difficult for complete PCF bridging to occur at low frequency, the non-bridged conducting microstructure has potential to further miniaturize the size of electrode gap fabricated by standard micromachining process and may find useful application in biochemical sensing.

  11. Glyphosate Inhibits PPAR Gamma Induction and Differentiation of Preadipocytes and is able to Induce Oxidative Stress.

    PubMed

    Martini, Claudia N; Gabrielli, Matías; Brandani, Javier N; Vila, María Del C

    2016-08-01

    Glyphosate-based herbicides (GF) are extensively used for weed control. Thus, it is important to investigate their putative toxic effects. We have reported that GF at subagriculture concentrations inhibits proliferation and differentiation to adipocytes of 3T3-L1 fibroblasts. In this investigation, we evaluated the effect of GF on genes upregulated during adipogenesis. GF was able to inhibit the induction of PPAR gamma, the master gene in adipogenesis but not C/EBP beta, which precedes PPAR gamma activation. GF also inhibited differentiation and proliferation of another model of preadipocyte: mouse embryonic fibroblasts. In exponentially growing 3T3-L1 cells, GF increased lipid peroxidation and the activity of the antioxidant enzyme, superoxide dismutase. We also found that proliferation was inhibited with lower concentrations of GF when time of exposure was extended. Thus, GF was able to inhibit proliferation and differentiation of preadipocytes and to induce oxidative stress, which is indicative of its ability to alter cellular physiology. PMID:27044015

  12. Gamma-ray bursts and cosmic rays from accretion-induced collapse

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dar, Arnon; Kozlovsky, Ben Z.; Nussinov, Shmuel; Ramaty, Reuven

    1992-01-01

    It is shown that the birth of naked or nearly naked neutron stars in accretion-induced collapse or in the bare collapse of white dwarfs can produce cosmological gamma-ray bursts and can provide the required injection rate of cosmic rays into the interstellar space. It is estimated that most of the e(+)e(-) pairs annihilate in flight on a short time scale in the vicinity of the neutron star. It is shown that the gamma-ray bursts, the 0.511 MeV Galactic annihilation radiation, and the cosmic rays exclude the possibility that the large uncertainties in the Galactic pulsar birthrate and the Galactic SN II explosion rate would allow a significant contribution to the pulsar birthrate from naked or nearly naked neutron star formation. The upper bound on the Galactic birthrate of naked or nearly naked neutron stars of less than 1 in 1000 yr makes it very unlikely that a neutrino burst unaccompanied by optical emission from the birth of a naked or nearly naked neutron star will be detected in the near future by underground neutrino telescopes.

  13. Boron analysis for neutron capture therapy using particle-induced gamma-ray emission.

    PubMed

    Nakai, Kei; Yamamoto, Yohei; Okamoto, Emiko; Yamamoto, Tetsuya; Yoshida, Fumiyo; Matsumura, Akira; Yamada, Naoto; Kitamura, Akane; Koka, Masashi; Satoh, Takahiro

    2015-12-01

    The neutron source of BNCT is currently changing from reactor to accelerator, but peripheral facilities such as a dose-planning system and blood boron analysis have still not been established. To evaluate the potential application of particle-induced gamma-ray emission (PIGE) for boron measurement in clinical boron neutron capture therapy, boronophenylalanine dissolved within a cell culture medium was measured using PIGE. PIGE detected 18 μgB/mL f-BPA in the culture medium, and all measurements of any given sample were taken within 20 min. Two hours of f-BPA exposure was required to create a boron distribution image. However, even though boron remained in the cells, the boron on the cell membrane could not be distinguished from the boron in the cytoplasm. PMID:26242558

  14. {gamma} Irradiation-induced degradation of organochlorinated pollutants in fatty esters and in Cod

    SciTech Connect

    Lepine, F.L.; Brochu, F.; Milot, S.

    1995-02-01

    The {gamma} irradiation-induced degradation of 2,2-bis(4-chlorophenyl)-1,1,1-trichloroethane (DDT), 2,2-bis(4-chlorophenyl)-1,1-dichloroethane (DDD), and 2,2-bis(4-chlorophenyl)-1,1-dichloroethylene (DDE) dissolved in methyl myristate and methyl oleate was studied. DDT and DDE produced DDD and 2,2-bis(4-chlorophenyl)chloroethylene (DDMU) respectively, in agreement with a previous study performed with aliphatic solvents. The degradation of these two former compounds was larger in methyl myristate than in methyl oleate and addition products between methyl myristate and the organochlorines were found. While DDD, DDE, and many PCB congeners in a cod sample were not measurably degraded at 15 KGy, DDT underwent 30% degradation. 9 refs., 1 fig., 2 tabs.

  15. Superhigh moduli and tension-induced phase transition of monolayer gamma-boron at finite temperatures.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Junhua; Yang, Zhaoyao; Wei, Ning; Kou, Liangzhi

    2016-01-01

    Two dimensional (2D) gamma-boron (γ-B28) thin films have been firstly reported by the experiments of the chemical vapor deposition in the latest study. However, their mechanical properties are still not clear. Here we predict the superhigh moduli (785 ± 42 GPa at 300 K) and the tension-induced phase transition of monolayer γ-B28 along a zigzag direction for large deformations at finite temperatures using molecular dynamics (MD) simulations. The new phase can be kept stable after unloading process at these temperatures. The predicted mechanical properties are reasonable when compared with our results from density functional theory. This study provides physical insights into the origins of the new phase transition of monolayer γ-B28 at finite temperatures. PMID:26979283

  16. Superhigh moduli and tension-induced phase transition of monolayer gamma-boron at finite temperatures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Junhua; Yang, Zhaoyao; Wei, Ning; Kou, Liangzhi

    2016-03-01

    Two dimensional (2D) gamma-boron (γ-B28) thin films have been firstly reported by the experiments of the chemical vapor deposition in the latest study. However, their mechanical properties are still not clear. Here we predict the superhigh moduli (785 ± 42 GPa at 300 K) and the tension-induced phase transition of monolayer γ-B28 along a zigzag direction for large deformations at finite temperatures using molecular dynamics (MD) simulations. The new phase can be kept stable after unloading process at these temperatures. The predicted mechanical properties are reasonable when compared with our results from density functional theory. This study provides physical insights into the origins of the new phase transition of monolayer γ-B28 at finite temperatures.

  17. Superhigh moduli and tension-induced phase transition of monolayer gamma-boron at finite temperatures

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Junhua; Yang, Zhaoyao; Wei, Ning; Kou, Liangzhi

    2016-01-01

    Two dimensional (2D) gamma-boron (γ-B28) thin films have been firstly reported by the experiments of the chemical vapor deposition in the latest study. However, their mechanical properties are still not clear. Here we predict the superhigh moduli (785 ± 42 GPa at 300 K) and the tension-induced phase transition of monolayer γ-B28 along a zigzag direction for large deformations at finite temperatures using molecular dynamics (MD) simulations. The new phase can be kept stable after unloading process at these temperatures. The predicted mechanical properties are reasonable when compared with our results from density functional theory. This study provides physical insights into the origins of the new phase transition of monolayer γ-B28 at finite temperatures. PMID:26979283

  18. Development of a Reference Database for Particle-Induced Gamma-ray Emission spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dimitriou, P.; Becker, H.-W.; Bogdanović-Radović, I.; Chiari, M.; Goncharov, A.; Jesus, A. P.; Kakuee, O.; Kiss, A. Z.; Lagoyannis, A.; Räisänen, J.; Strivay, D.; Zucchiatti, A.

    2016-03-01

    Particle-Induced Gamma-ray Emission (PIGE) is a powerful analytical technique that exploits the interactions of rapid charged particles with nuclei located near a sample surface to determine the composition and structure of the surface regions of solids by measurement of characteristic prompt γ rays. The potential for depth profiling of this technique has long been recognized, however, the implementation has been limited owing to insufficient knowledge of the physical data and lack of suitable user-friendly computer codes for the applications. Although a considerable body of published data exists in the nuclear physics literature for nuclear reaction cross sections with γ rays in the exit channel, there is no up-to-date, comprehensive compilation specifically dedicated to IBA applications. A number of PIGE cross-section data had already been uploaded to the Ion Beam Analysis Nuclear Data Library (IBANDL)

  19. Ways of making-sense: Local gamma synchronization reveals differences between semantic processing induced by music and language.

    PubMed

    Barraza, Paulo; Chavez, Mario; Rodríguez, Eugenio

    2016-01-01

    Similar to linguistic stimuli, music can also prime the meaning of a subsequent word. However, it is so far unknown what is the brain dynamics underlying the semantic priming effect induced by music, and its relation to language. To elucidate these issues, we compare the brain oscillatory response to visual words that have been semantically primed either by a musical excerpt or by an auditory sentence. We found that semantic violation between music-word pairs triggers a classical ERP N400, and induces a sustained increase of long-distance theta phase synchrony, along with a transient increase of local gamma activity. Similar results were observed after linguistic semantic violation except for gamma activity, which increased after semantic congruence between sentence-word pairs. Our findings indicate that local gamma activity is a neural marker that signals different ways of semantic processing between music and language, revealing the dynamic and self-organized nature of the semantic processing. PMID:26734990

  20. Estimation of temperature impact on gamma-induced degradation parameters of N-channel MOS transistor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jafari, H.; Feghhi, S. A. H.

    2015-03-01

    The physical parameters of MOS transistors can be impressed by ionizing radiation and that leads to circuit degradation and failure. These effects require analyzing the basic mechanism that results in the buildup of induced defect in radiation environments. The reliable estimation also needs to consider external factors, particularly temperature fluctuations. I-V characteristic of the device was obtained using a temperature-dependent adapted form of charge-sheet model under heating cycle during irradiation with several ionizing dose levels at different gate biases. In this work, the analytical calculation for estimating the irradiation temperature impact on gamma-induced degradation parameters of N-channel MOS transistors at different gate biases was investigated. The experimental measurement was done in order to verify and parameterize the analytical model calculations. The results indicated that inserting irradiation temperature in the calculations caused a significant variation in radiation-induced MOS transistor parameters such as threshold voltage shift and off-state leakage current. According to the results, these variations were about 10.1% and 23.4% for voltage shifts and leakage currents respectively during investigated heating cycle for total dose of 20 krad at 9 V gate bias.

  1. Theoretical analyses of cellular transmembrane voltage in suspensions induced by high-frequency fields.

    PubMed

    Zou, Yong; Wang, Changzhen; Peng, Ruiyun; Wang, Lifeng; Hu, Xiangjun

    2015-04-01

    A change of the transmembrane voltage is considered to cause biophysical and biochemical responses in cells. The present study focuses on the cellular transmembrane voltage (Δφ) induced by external fields. We detail analytical equations for the transmembrane voltage induced by external high-frequency (above the relaxation frequency of the cell membrane) fields on cells of a spherical shape in suspensions and layers. At direct current (DC) and low frequencies, the cell membrane was assumed to be non-conductive under physiologic conditions. However, with increasing frequency, the permittivity of the cytoplasm/extracellular medium and conductivity of the membrane must be accounted for. Our main work is to extend application of the analytical solution of Δφ to the high-frequency range. We first introduce the transmembrane voltage generated by DC and low-frequency exposures on a single cell. Then, we focus on cell suspensions exposed to high-frequency fields. Using the effective medium theory and the reasonable assumption, the approximate analytical solution of Δφ on cells in suspensions and layers can be derived. Phenomenological effective medium theory equations cannot be used to calculate the local electric field of cell suspensions, so we raised a possible solution based on the Bergman theory. PMID:25528063

  2. Radiation-induced chromosome aberrations in ataxia telangiectasia cells: high frequency of deletions and misrejoining detected by fluorescence in situ hybridization

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kawata, Tetsuya; Ito, Hisao; George, Kerry; Wu, Honglu; Uno, Takashi; Isobe, Kouichi; Cucinotta, Francis A.

    2003-01-01

    The mechanisms underlying the hyper-radiosensitivity of AT cells were investigated by analyzing chromosome aberrations in the G(2) and M phases of the cell cycle using a combination of chemically induced premature chromosome condensation (PCC) and fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) with chromosome painting probes. Confluent cultures of normal fibroblast cells (AG1522) and fibroblast cells derived from an individual with AT (GM02052) were exposed to gamma rays and allowed to repair at 37 degrees C for 24 h. At doses that resulted in 10% survival, GM02052 cells were approximately five times more sensitive to gamma rays than AG1522 cells. For a given dose, GM02052 cells contained a much higher frequency of deletions and misrejoining than AG1522 cells. For both cell types, a good correlation was found between the percentage of aberrant cells and cell survival. The average number of color junctions, which represent the frequency of chromosome misrejoining, was also found to correlate well with survival. However, in a similar surviving population of GM02052 and AG1522 cells, induced by 1 Gy and 6 Gy, respectively, AG1522 cells contained four times more color junctions and half as many deletions as GM02052 cells. These results indicate that both repair deficiency and misrepair may be involved in the hyper-radiosensitivity of AT cells.

  3. Interleukin-2 protects neonatal mice from lethal herpes simplex virus infection: a macrophage-mediated, gamma interferon-induced mechanism.

    PubMed

    Kohl, S; Loo, L S; Drath, D B; Cox, P

    1989-02-01

    Administration of human recombinant interleukin-2 (IL-2) protected neonatal mice from a lethal herpes simplex virus (HSV) infection. Protection was not associated with viral antibody production, enhanced natural killer cell cytotoxicity, or intrinsic resistance of macrophages to viral infection. Protection was associated with increased macrophage-mediated antiviral antibody-dependent cellular cytotoxicity (ADCC). Spleen cells from IL-2-treated neonatal mice and from neonatal mice that were treated in vitro with IL-2 transferred protection to neonatal mice. These cells, by adherence, silica, and asialo GM 1 antibody treatment, were shown to be macrophages. IL-2 treatment in vitro enhanced the neonatal macrophages' ADCC function and superoxide release. Similar protection was induced by gamma interferon (IFN-gamma)-treated spleen cells. Antibody to IFN-gamma ablated both IFN-gamma- and IL-2-induced protection by adherent spleen cells. Thus, IL-2-mediated protection against murine neonatal HSV infection was affected by stimulated macrophage activity, via helper T cell-produced IFN-gamma. PMID:2492588

  4. Magnitude and Frequency of Rainfall-induced Landslides at the Chenyulan and Tsengwen Watersheds in Taiwan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jan, C.; Yang, S.

    2013-12-01

    We investigate the landslide magnitude associated with rainfall at the Chenyulan and Tsengwen watersheds in the central Taiwan. The dependences of landslide magnitude in area on regional average rainfall characteristics for landslides between 1988 and 2009, and the frequency-magnitude distribution of landslides caused by Typhoon Morakot in 2009 are presented in this paper. The results indicate that both total rainfall depth and maximum rainfall intensity are the major factors to the magnitude of rainfall-induced landslide. We also found that the rainfall erosivity index that is used to estimate soil erosion is well related with the landslide magnitude. Moreover, via the rainfall erosivity index, we also clarify that the magnitude of rainfall-induced landslide is affected by the Chi-Chi earthquake that occurred in 1999 in subsequent five years. The result suggests that the rainfall erosivity index could be a good parameter to evaluate the characteristics of rainfall-induced landslides. We also study the relation of landslide magnitude (in area) against its occurrence frequency caused by a severe rainfall brought by Typhoon Morakot in 2009. The landslide magnitude (in area) varies from 600 m2 to 600,000 m2. A cumulative frequency-magnitude relation in a power-law scaling is presented herein. Figure 1. Cumulative landslide frequency - mangitude distribution Figure 2. Non-cumulative landslide frequency - mangitude distribution

  5. Low-Dose Gamma Radiation Does Not Induce an Adaptive Response for Micronucleus Induction in Mouse Splenocytes.

    PubMed

    Bannister, L A; Serran, M L; Mantha, R R

    2015-11-01

    Low-dose ionizing radiation is known to induce radioadaptive responses in cells in vitro as well as in mice in vivo. Low-dose radiation decreases the incidence and increases latency for spontaneous and radiation-induced tumors in mice, potentially as a result of enhanced cellular DNA repair efficiency or a reduction in genomic instability. In this study, the cytokinesis-block micronucleus (CBMN) assay was used to examine dose response and potential radioadaptive response for cytogenetic damage and cell survival in C57BL/6 and BALB/c spleen cells exposed in vitro or in vivo to low-dose 60Co gamma radiation. The effects of genetic background, radiation dose and dose rate, sampling time and cell cycle were investigated with respect to dose response and radioadaptive response. In C57BL/6 mice, a linear-quadratic dose-response relationship for the induction of micronuclei (MN) was observed for doses between 100 mGy and 2 Gy. BALB/c mice exhibited increased radiosensitivity for MN induction compared to C57BL/6 mice. A 20 mGy dose had no effect on MN frequencies in splenocytes of either mouse strain, however, increased spleen weight and a reduced number of dead cells were noted in the C57BL/6 strain only. Multiple experimental parameters were investigated in radioadaptive response studies, including dose and dose rate of the priming dose (20 mGy at 0.5 mGy/min and 100 mGy at 10 mGy/min), time interval (4 and 24 h) between priming and challenge doses, cell cycle stage (resting or proliferating) at exposure and kinetics after the challenge dose. Radioadaptive responses were not observed for MN induction for either mouse strain under any of the experimental conditions investigated. In contrast, a synergistic response for radiation-induced micronuclei in C57BL/6 spleen was detected after in vivo 20 mGy irradiation. This increase in the percentage of cells with cytogenetic damage was associated with a reduction in the number of nonviable spleen cells, suggesting that low

  6. Gamma-Tocotrienol Modulates Radiation-Induced MicroRNA Expression in Mouse Spleen.

    PubMed

    Ghosh, Sanchita P; Pathak, Rupak; Kumar, Parameet; Biswas, Shukla; Bhattacharyya, Sharmistha; Kumar, Vidya P; Hauer-Jensen, Martin; Biswas, Roopa

    2016-05-01

    Ionizing radiation causes depletion of hematopoietic cells and enhances the risk of developing secondary hematopoietic malignancies. Vitamin E analog gamma-tocotrienol (GT3), which has anticancer properties, promotes postirradiation hematopoietic cell recovery by enhancing spleen colony-forming capacity, and provides protection against radiation-induced lethality in mice. However, the underlying molecular mechanism involved in GT3-mediated postirradiation survival is not clearly understood. Recent studies have shown that natural dietary products including vitamin E provide a benefit to biological systems by modulating microRNA (miR) expression. In this study, we show that GT3 differentially modulates the miR footprint in the spleen of irradiated mice compared to controls at early times (day 1), as well as later times (day 4 and 15) after total-body irradiation. We observed that miR expression was altered in a dose- and time-dependent manner in GT3-pretreated spleen tissues from total-body irradiated mice. GT3 appeared to affect the expression of a number of radiation-modulated miRs known to be involved in hematopoiesis and lymphogenesis. Moreover, GT3 pretreatment also suppressed the upregulation of radiation-induced p53, suggesting the function of GT3 in the prevention of radiation-induced damage to the spleen. In addition, we have shown that GT3 significantly reduced serum levels of Flt3L, a biomarker of radiation-induced bone marrow aplasia. Further in silico analyses of the effect of GT3 implied the association of p38 MAPK, ERK and insulin signaling pathways. Our study provides initial insight into the mechanism by which GT3 mediates protection of spleen after total-body irradiation. PMID:27128741

  7. Application of coupled analysis methods for prediction of blast-induced dominant vibration frequency

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Haibo; Li, Xiaofeng; Li, Jianchun; Xia, Xiang; Wang, Xiaowei

    2016-03-01

    Blast-induced dominant vibration frequency (DVF) involves a complex, nonlinear and small sample system considering rock properties, blasting parameters and topography. In this study, a combination of grey relational analysis and dimensional analysis procedures for prediction of dominant vibration frequency are presented. Six factors are selected from extensive effect factor sequences based on grey relational analysis, and then a novel blast-induced dominant vibration frequency prediction is obtained by dimensional analysis. In addition, the prediction is simplified by sensitivity analysis with 195 experimental blast records. Validation is carried out for the proposed formula based on the site test database of the firstperiod blasting excavation in the Guangdong Lufeng Nuclear Power Plant (GLNPP). The results show the proposed approach has a higher fitting degree and smaller mean error when compared with traditional predictions.

  8. Apigenin ameliorates gamma radiation-induced cytogenetic alterations in cultured human blood lymphocytes.

    PubMed

    Begum, Naziya; Prasad, N Rajendra; Kanimozhi, G; Hasan, Annie Q

    2012-08-30

    The aim of the present study was to assess the protective effect of apigenin, a dietary flavone, against cytogenetic alterations in human peripheral blood lymphocytes (HPBL) induced by Cobalt-60 radiation (3Gy). Results of MTT [3-(4, 5-dimethyl-2-thiaozolyl)-2,5-diphenyl-2H tetrazolium bromide] assay revealed that 37.2μM of apigenin was found to be non-toxic in HPBL. At this dose (37.2μM) of apigenin, the LD(50) radiation dose of HPBL increased from 2.9Gy to 3.4Gy, which resulted in a DMF of 1.17. Apigenin (37.2μM) treatment 1h before irradiation significantly (p<0.05) reduced DNA damage in irradiated HPBL as measured by comet assay (% tail DNA, tail length, tail moment, and olive tail moment). Moreover, apigenin treatment significantly decreased the frequencies of dicentric (DC), acentric fragments (AF), and acentric rings (AR) in irradiated HPBL. Apigenin pretreatment also reduced the radiation-induced CBMN (cytokinesis blocked micronuclei) anomalies such as micronuclei (MNi), nucleoplasmic bridges (NPB) and nuclear buds (NBUD) in HPBL. These results also showed that there was a significant correlation between NPB and DC frequencies and MNi and AF+AR. Treatment with apigenin alone had no significant effect on DNA damage and chromosomal aberrations in HPBL. Thus, the current studies indicate that apigenin protects HPBL from radiation-induced cytogenetic alterations. PMID:22516036

  9. Epoxides Derived from Dietary Dihomo-Gamma-Linolenic Acid Induce Germ Cell Death in C. elegans

    PubMed Central

    Deline, Marshall; Keller, Julia; Rothe, Michael; Schunck, Wolf-Hagen; Menzel, Ralph; Watts, Jennifer L.

    2015-01-01

    Dietary fats are not created equally, slight differences in structure lead to crucial differences in function. Muticellular organisms use polyunsaturated fatty acid as substrates to produce potent signaling molecules crucial for many physiological processes, including reproduction. Here we explored the mechanism responsible for germ cell loss induced by dietary supplementation of dihomo-gamma-linolenic acid (DGLA, 20:3n-6) in the roundworm Caenorhabditis elegans. In this study we found that C. elegans CYP-33E2 activity produces a range of epoxy and hydroxy metabolites from dietary DGLA. Knockdown of cyp-33E2 suppressed the DGLA-induced sterility phenotype. Additionally, direct exposure of two specific DGLA-derived epoxy products, 8,9- and 14,15-epoxyeicosadienoic acids, produced germ cell abnormalities in the C. elegans gonad. We propose that sterility is mediated by the production of toxic DGLA-derived epoxides that trigger germ cell destruction. These studies are the first to establish a biological activity for a CYP-produced metabolite of DGLA. PMID:26486965

  10. Microscopic observations of X-ray and gamma-ray induced decomposition of ammonium perchlorate crystals

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Herley, P. J.; Levy, P. W.

    1972-01-01

    The X-ray and gamma-ray induced decomposition of ammonium perchlorate was studied by optical, transmission, and scanning electron microscopy. This material is a commonly used oxidizer in solid propellents which could be employed in deep-space probes, and where they will be subjected to a variety of radiations for as long as ten years. In some respects the radiation-induced damage closely resembles the effects produced by thermal decomposition, but in other respects the results differ markedly. Similar radiation and thermal effects include the following: (1) irregular or ill-defined circular etch pits are formed in both cases; (2) approximately the same size pits are produced; (3) the pit density is similar; (4) the c face is considerably more reactive than the m face; and (5) most importantly, many of the etch pits are aligned in crystallographic directions which are the same for thermal or radiolytic decomposition. Thus, dislocations play an important role in the radiolytic decomposition process.

  11. Geraniin down regulates gamma radiation-induced apoptosis by suppressing DNA damage.

    PubMed

    Bing, So Jin; Ha, Danbee; Kim, Min Ju; Park, Eunjin; Ahn, Ginnae; Kim, Dae Seung; Ko, Ryeo Kyeong; Park, Jae Woo; Lee, Nam Ho; Jee, Youngheun

    2013-07-01

    Gamma ray irradiation triggers DNA damage and apoptosis of proliferating stem cells and peripheral immune cells, resulting in the destruction of intestinal crypts and lymphoid system. Geraniin is a natural compound extracts from an aquatic plant Nymphaea tetragona and possesses good antioxidant property. In this study, we demonstrate that geraniin rescues radiosensitive splenocytes and jejunal crypt cells from radiation-induced DNA damage and apoptosis. Isolated splenocytes from C57BL/6 mice treated with geraniin were protected against radiation injury of 2 Gy irradiation through the enhancement of the proliferation and attenuation of DNA damage. Also, geraniin inhibited apoptosis in radiosensitive splenocytes by reducing the expression level and immunoreactivity of proapoptotic p53 and Bax and increasing those of anti-apoptotic Bcl-2. In mice exposed to radiation, geraniin treatment protected splenocytes and intestinal crypt cells from radiation-induced cell death. Our results suggest that geraniin presents radioprotective effects by regulating DNA damage on splenocytes, exerting immunostimulatory capacities and inhibiting apoptosis of radiosensitive immune cells and jejunal crypt cells. Therefore, geraniin can be a radioprotective agent against γ-irradiation exposure. PMID:23541438

  12. Evaluation of the cosmic-ray induced background in coded aperture high energy gamma-ray telescopes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Owens, Alan; Barbier, Loius M.; Frye, Glenn M.; Jenkins, Thomas L.

    1991-01-01

    While the application of coded-aperture techniques to high-energy gamma-ray astronomy offers potential arc-second angular resolution, concerns were raised about the level of secondary radiation produced in a thick high-z mask. A series of Monte-Carlo calculations are conducted to evaluate and quantify the cosmic-ray induced neutral particle background produced in a coded-aperture mask. It is shown that this component may be neglected, being at least a factor of 50 lower in intensity than the cosmic diffuse gamma-rays.

  13. Monitoring of gamma-irradiated Yb-doped optical fibers through the pump induced refractive index change effect

    SciTech Connect

    Pekukhova, I.; Fotiadi, A. A.; Shubin, A. V.; Tomashuk, A. L.; Novikov, S. G.; Zolotovskiy, I. O.; Antipov, O. L.; Panajotov, K.; Thienpont, H.; Megret, P.

    2011-07-01

    We report on the method for monitoring of the modifications in Yb-doped optical fibers irradiated by gamma-rays with the doses 1, 2, 4 and 8 kGy. This method is based on the refractive index change (RIC) effect induced in the tested fibers by square modulated optical pump pulses of 1 ms duration at 980 nm with the power up to 100 mW. The applied in-situ monitoring is based on interferometric technique and highlights the key parameters of the RIC effect that allows to characterize quantitatively the degree of the fiber degradation under the gamma irradiation. (authors)

  14. Collision-induced frequency shifts in bright matter-wave solitons and soliton molecules

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martin, A. D.

    2016-02-01

    A recent experiment has detected collision-induced frequency shifts in bright matter-wave solitons [J. H. V. Nguyen et al., Nat. Phys. 10, 918 (2014), 10.1038/nphys3135]. Using a particle model, we derive the frequency shift for two solitons in a harmonic trap, and compare it to the recent experimental results and reported theoretical approximation. We find regimes where the frequency shift is much smaller than previously predicted, and propose experiments to test these findings. We also predict that reducing the experimental trap frequency will reveal soliton molecules or soliton bound states in a cold-atom system. The bound-state dynamics are found to be both highly phase dependent and sensitive to the residual 3D nature of the experiment.

  15. Spectral analysis of paramagnetic centers induced in human tooth enamel by x-rays and gamma radiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kirillov, V. A.; Kuchuro, I. I.

    2010-03-01

    Based on study of spectral and relaxation characteristics, we have established that paramagnetic centers induced in tooth enamel by x-rays and gamma radiation are identical in nature. We show that for the same exposure dose, the intensity of the electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) signal induced by x-radiation with effective energy 34 keV is about an order of magnitude higher than the amplitude of the signal induced by gamma radiation. We have identified a three-fold attenuation of the EPR signal along the path of the x-radiation from the buccal to the lingual side of a tooth, which is evidence that the individual had undergone diagnostic x-ray examination of the dentition or skull. We have shown that the x-ray exposure doses reconstructed from the EPR spectra are an order of magnitude higher than the applied doses, while the dose loads due to gamma radiation are equal to the applied doses. The data obtained indicate that for adequate reconstruction of individual absorbed doses from EPR spectra of tooth enamel in the population subjected to the combined effect of x-radiation and accidental external gamma radiation as a result of the disaster at the Chernobyl nuclear power plant, we need to take into account the contribution to the dose load from diagnostic x-rays in examination of the teeth, jaw, or skull.

  16. Search for Neutrino-induced Cascades from Gamma-Ray Bursts with AMANDA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Achterberg, A.; Ackermann, M.; Adams, J.; Ahrens, J.; Andeen, K.; Auffenberg, J.; Bahcall, J. N.; Bai, X.; Baret, B.; Barwick, S. W.; Bay, R.; Beattie, K.; Becka, T.; Becker, J. K.; Becker, K.-H.; Berghaus, P.; Berley, D.; Bernardini, E.; Bertrand, D.; Besson, D. Z.; Blaufuss, E.; Boersma, D. J.; Bohm, C.; Bolmont, J.; Böser, S.; Botner, O.; Bouchta, A.; Braun, J.; Burgess, C.; Burgess, T.; Castermans, T.; Chirkin, D.; Christy, B.; Clem, J.; Cowen, D. F.; D'Agostino, M. V.; Davour, A.; Day, C. T.; De Clercq, C.; Demirörs, L.; Descamps, F.; Desiati, P.; De Young, T.; Diaz-Velez, J. C.; Dreyer, J.; Dumm, J. P.; Duvoort, M. R.; Edwards, W. R.; Ehrlich, R.; Eisch, J.; Ellsworth, R. W.; Evenson, P. A.; Fadiran, O.; Fazely, A. R.; Filimonov, K.; Foerster, M. M.; Fox, B. D.; Franckowiak, A.; Gaisser, T. K.; Gallagher, J.; Ganugapati, R.; Geenen, H.; Gerhardt, L.; Goldschmidt, A.; Goodman, J. A.; Gozzini, R.; Griesel, T.; Grullon, S.; Groß, A.; Gunasingha, R. M.; Gurtner, M.; Hallgren, A.; Halzen, F.; Han, K.; Hanson, K.; Hardtke, D.; Hardtke, R.; Hart, J. E.; Hasegawa, Y.; Hauschildt, T.; Hays, D.; Heise, J.; Helbing, K.; Hellwig, M.; Herquet, P.; Hill, G. C.; Hodges, J.; Hoffman, K. D.; Hommez, B.; Hoshina, K.; Hubert, D.; Hughey, B.; Hulth, P. O.; Hultqvist, K.; Hülß, J.-P.; Hundertmark, S.; Inaba, M.; Ishihara, A.; Jacobsen, J.; Japaridze, G. S.; Johansson, H.; Jones, A.; Joseph, J. M.; Kampert, K.-H.; Karg, T.; Karle, A.; Kawai, H.; Kelley, J. L.; Kitamura, N.; Klein, S. R.; Klepser, S.; Kohnen, G.; Kolanoski, H.; Köpke, L.; Kowalski, M.; Kowarik, T.; Krasberg, M.; Kuehn, K.; Labare, M.; Landsman, H.; Leich, H.; Leier, D.; Liubarsky, I.; Lundberg, J.; Lünemann, J.; Madsen, J.; Mase, K.; Matis, H. S.; McCauley, T.; McParland, C. P.; Meli, A.; Messarius, T.; Mészáros, P.; Miyamoto, H.; Mokhtarani, A.; Montaruli, T.; Morey, A.; Morse, R.; Movit, S. M.; Münich, K.; Nahnhauer, R.; Nam, J. W.; Nießen, P.; Nygren, D. R.; Ögelman, H.; Olivas, A.; Patton, S.; Peña-Garay, C.; Pérez de los Heros, C.; Piegsa, A.; Pieloth, D.; Pohl, A. C.; Porrata, R.; Pretz, J.; Price, P. B.; Przybylski, G. T.; Rawlins, K.; Razzaque, S.; Resconi, E.; Rhode, W.; Ribordy, M.; Rizzo, A.; Robbins, S.; Roth, P.; Rott, C.; Rutledge, D.; Ryckbosch, D.; Sander, H.-G.; Sarkar, S.; Schlenstedt, S.; Schmidt, T.; Schneider, D.; Seckel, D.; Semburg, B.; Seo, S. H.; Seunarine, S.; Silvestri, A.; Smith, A. J.; Solarz, M.; Song, C.; Sopher, J. E.; Spiczak, G. M.; Spiering, C.; Stamatikos, M.; Stanev, T.; Steffen, P.; Stezelberger, T.; Stokstad, R. G.; Stoufer, M. C.; Stoyanov, S.; Strahler, E. A.; Straszheim, T.; Sulanke, K.-H.; Sullivan, G. W.; Sumner, T. J.; Taboada, I.; Tarasova, O.; Tepe, A.; Thollander, L.; Tilav, S.; Tluczykont, M.; Toale, P. A.; Turčan, D.; van Eijndhoven, N.; Vandenbroucke, J.; Van Overloop, A.; Viscomi, V.; Voigt, B.; Wagner, W.; Walck, C.; Waldmann, H.; Walter, M.; Wang, Y.-R.; Wendt, C.; Wiebusch, C. H.; Wikström, G.; Williams, D. R.; Wischnewski, R.; Wissing, H.; Woschnagg, K.; Xu, X. W.; Yodh, G.; Yoshida, S.; Zornoza, J. D.

    2007-07-01

    Using the neutrino telescope AMANDA-II, we have conducted two analyses searching for neutrino-induced cascades from gamma-ray bursts. No evidence of astrophysical neutrinos was found, and limits are presented for several models. We also present neutrino effective areas which allow the calculation of limits for any neutrino production model. The first analysis looked for a statistical excess of events within a sliding window of 1 or 100 s (for short and long burst classes, respectively) during the years 2001-2003. The resulting upper limit on the diffuse flux normalization times E2 for the Waxman-Bahcall model at 1 PeV is 1.6×10-6 GeV cm-2 s-1 sr-1 (a factor of 120 above the theoretical prediction). For this search 90% of the neutrinos would fall in the energy range 50 TeV to 7 PeV. The second analysis looked for neutrino-induced cascades in coincidence with 73 bursts detected by BATSE in the year 2000. The resulting upper limit on the diffuse flux normalization times E2, also at 1 PeV, is 1.5×10-6 GeV cm-2 s-1 sr-1 (a factor of 110 above the theoretical prediction) for the same energy range. The neutrino-induced cascade channel is complementary to the up-going muon channel. We comment on its advantages for searches of neutrinos from GRBs and its future use with IceCube.

  17. EPR spectra induced by gamma-irradiation of some dry medical herbs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yordanov, N. D.; Lagunov, O.; Dimov, K.

    2009-04-01

    The radiation-induced EPR spectra in some medical herbs are reported. The samples studied are: (i) leaves of nettle, common balm, peppermint and thyme; (ii) stalks of common balm, thyme, milfoil, yarrow and marigold; (iii) blossoms of yarrow and marigold; (iv) blossoms and leaves of hawthorn and tutsan; and (v) roots of common valerian, nettle, elecampane (black and white), restharrows and carlina. Before irradiation all samples exhibit one weak anisotropic singlet EPR line with effective g-value of 2.0050±0.0002. The radiation-induced spectra fall into three groups. EPR spectra of irradiated blossoms of yarrow and marigold, stalks of common balm, thyme, tutsan and yarrow as well as roots of common valerian, nettle and elecampane (black and white) show "cellulose-like" EPR spectrum typical for irradiated plants. It is characterized by one intense central line with g=2.0050±0.0005 and two weak satellite lines situated ca. 30 G left and right to it. EPR spectra of gamma-irradiated restharrows and carlina are complex. They may be represented by one triplet corresponding to the "cellulose-like" EPR spectrum, one relatively intense singlet, situated in the center of the spectrum, and five weak additional satellite lines left and right to the center. The last spectrum was assigned as "carbohydrate-like" type. Only one intense EPR singlet with g=2.0048±0.0005 was recorded after irradiation of leaves of nettle and common balm. The lifetime of the radiation-induced EPR spectra was followed for a period of 3 months.

  18. Noise-Induced Frequency Modifications of Tamarin Vocalizations: Implications for Noise Compensation in Nonhuman Primates

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Previous research suggests that nonhuman primates have limited flexibility in the frequency content of their vocalizations, particularly when compared to human speech. Consistent with this notion, several nonhuman primate species have demonstrated noise-induced changes in call amplitude and duration, with no evidence of changes to spectral content. This experiment used broad- and narrow-band noise playbacks to investigate the vocal control of two call types produced by cotton-top tamarins (Saguinus Oedipus). In ‘combination long calls’ (CLCs), peak fundamental frequency and the distribution of energy between low and high frequency harmonics (spectral tilt) changed in response to increased noise amplitude and bandwidth. In chirps, peak and maximum components of the fundamental frequency increased with increasing noise level, with no changes to spectral tilt. Other modifications included the Lombard effect and increases in chirp duration. These results provide the first evidence for noise-induced frequency changes in nonhuman primate vocalizations and suggest that future investigations of vocal plasticity in primates should include spectral parameters. PMID:26107515

  19. Frequency Dependence of Petechial Hemorrhage and Cardiomyocyte Injury Induced during Myocardial Contrast Echocardiography.

    PubMed

    Miller, Douglas L; Lu, Xiaofang; Fabiilli, Mario; Fields, Kristina; Dou, Chunyan

    2016-08-01

    Myocardial contrast echocardiography (MCE) for perfusion imaging can induce microscale bio-effects during intermittent high-Mechanical Index scans. The dependence of MCE-induced bio-effects on the ultrasonic frequency was examined in rats at 1.6, 2.5 and 3.5 MHz. Premature complexes were counted in the electrocardiogram, petechial hemorrhages with microvascular leakage on the heart surface were observed at the time of exposure, plasma troponin elevation was measured after 4 h and cardiomyocyte injury was detected at 24 h. Increasing response to exposure above an apparent threshold was observed for all endpoints at each frequency. The effects decreased with increasing ultrasonic frequency, and the thresholds increased. Linear regressions for frequency-dependent thresholds indicated coefficients and exponents of 0.6 and 1.07 for petechial hemorrhages, respectively, and 1.02 and 0.8 for cardiomyocyte death, compared with 1.9 and 0.5 (square root) for the guideline limit of the mechanical index. The results clarify the dependence of cardiac bio-effects on frequency, and should allow development of theoretical descriptions of the phenomena and improved safety guidance for MCE. PMID:27126240

  20. Electron avalanches and diffused {gamma}-mode in radio-frequency capacitively coupled atmospheric-pressure microplasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, D. W.; Iza, F.; Kong, M. G.

    2009-07-20

    Space-, time- and wavelength-resolved optical emission profiles suggest that the helium emission at 706 nm can be used to indicate the presence of high energy electrons and estimate the sheath in helium rf discharges containing small concentration of air impurities. Furthermore, the experimental data supports the theoretical predictions of energetic electron avalanches transiting across the discharge gap in rf microdischarges and the absence of an {alpha}-mode. Nonetheless, microdischarges sustained between bare metal electrodes and operating in the {gamma}-mode can produce diffuse glowlike discharges rather than the typical radially constricted plasmas observed in millimeter-size rf atmospheric-pressure {gamma} discharges.

  1. Abdominal {gamma}-Radiation Induces an Accumulation of Function-Impaired Regulatory T Cells in the Small Intestine

    SciTech Connect

    Billiard, Fabienne; Buard, Valerie; Benderitter, Marc; Linard, Christine

    2011-07-01

    Purpose: To assess the frequency and the functional characteristics of one major component of immune tolerance, the CD4{sup +}FoxP3{sup +} regulatory T cells (Tregs) in a mouse model of abdominal irradiation. Methods and Materials: Mice were exposed to a single abdominal dose of {gamma}-radiation (10 Gy). We evaluated small intestine Treg infiltration by Foxp3 immunostaining and the functional suppressive activity of Tregs isolated from mesenteric lymph nodes. Results: Foxp3 immunostaining showed that radiation induced a long-term infiltration of the intestine by Tregs (levels 5.5 times greater than in controls). Co-culture of Tregs from mesenteric lymph nodes with CD4{sup +} effector cells showed that the Tregs had lost their suppressive function. This loss was associated with a significant decrease in the levels of Foxp3, TGF-{beta}, and CTLA-4 mRNA, all required for optimal Treg function. At Day 90 after irradiation, Tregs regained their suppressive activity as forkhead box P3 (Foxp3), transforming growth factor beta (TGF-{beta}), and cytotoxic T-lymphocyte antigen 4 (CTLA-4) expression returned to normal. Analysis of the secretory function of mesenteric lymph node Tregs, activated in vitro with anti-CD3/anti-CD28 Abs, showed that this dysfunction was independent of a defect in interleukin-10 secretion. Conclusion: Radiation caused a long-term accumulation of function-impaired Foxp3{sup +}CD4{sup +} Tregs in the intestine. Our study provides new insights into how radiation affects the immune tolerance in peripheral tissues.

  2. Human B-cell lymphoma cell lines are highly sensitive to apoptosis induced by all-trans retinoic acid and interferon-gamma.

    PubMed

    Niitsu, Nozomi; Higashihara, Masaaki; Honma, Yoshio

    2002-08-01

    When cells were incubated in the presence of both interferon-gamma (IFN-gamma) and all-trans retinoic acid (ATRA), the concentration of IFN-gamma required to induce apoptosis of B-cell lymphoma cells was much lower than that required for myeloid or erythroid cell lines. The concentration of IFN-gamma that effectively inhibited the proliferation of BALM-3 cells was 1/40 of that required for BALM-1 cells. STAT-1 phosphorylation, IRF-1 mRNA and protein expression and RAR-beta expression were enhanced to a greater degree in BALM-3 cells treated with IFN-gamma and ATRA than in BALM-1 cells treated with IFN-gamma and ATRA, suggesting that these IFN-gamma related genes were involved in the induction of apoptosis of BALM-3 cells. PMID:12191570

  3. Frequency-dependent polarization-angle-phase-shift in the microwave-induced magnetoresistance oscillations

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, Han-Chun; Ye, Tianyu; Mani, R. G.; Wegscheider, W.

    2015-02-14

    Linear polarization angle, θ, dependent measurements of the microwave radiation-induced oscillatory magnetoresistance, R{sub xx}, in high mobility GaAs/AlGaAs 2D electron devices have shown a θ dependence in the oscillatory amplitude along with magnetic field, frequency, and extrema-dependent phase shifts, θ{sub 0}. Here, we suggest a microwave frequency dependence of θ{sub 0}(f) using an analysis that averages over other smaller contributions, when those contributions are smaller than estimates of the experimental uncertainty.

  4. Gamma-induced positron annihilation spectroscopy and application to radiation-damaged alloys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wells, D. P.; Hunt, A. W.; Tchelidze, L.; Kumar, J.; Smith, K.; Thompson, S.; Selim, F.; Williams, J.; Harmon, J. F.; Maloy, S.; Roy, A.

    2006-06-01

    Radiation damage and other defect studies of materials are limited to thin samples because of inherent limitations of well-established techniques such as diffraction methods and traditional positron annihilation spectroscopy (PAS) [P. Hautojarvi, et al., Positrons in Solids, Springer, Berlin, 1979, K.G. Lynn, et al., Appl. Phys. Lett. 47 (1985) 239]. This limitation has greatly hampered industrial and in-situ applications. ISU has developed new methods that use pair-production to produce positrons throughout the volume of thick samples [F.A. Selim, D.P. Wells, et al., Nucl. Instr. and Meth. B 192 (2002) 197, F.A. Selim, D.P. Wells, et al., Nucl. Instru. Meth. A 495 (2002) 154, F.A. Selim, et al., J. Rad. Phys. Chem. 68 (2004) 427, F.A. Selim, D.P. Wells, et al., Nucl. Instr. and Meth. B 241 (2005) 253, A.W. Hunt, D.P. Wells, et al., Nucl. Instr. and Meth. B. 241 (2005) 262]. Unlike prior work at other laboratories that use bremsstrahlung beams to create positron beams (via pair-production) that are then directed at a sample of interest, we produce electron-positron pairs directly in samples of interest, and eliminate the intermediate step of a positron beam and its attendant penetrability limitations. Our methods include accelerator-based bremsstrahlung-induced pair-production in the sample for positron annihilation energy spectroscopy measurements (PAES), coincident proton-capture gamma-rays (where one of the gammas is used for pair-production in the sample) for positron annihilation lifetime spectroscopy (PALS), or photo-nuclear activation of samples for either type of measurement. The positrons subsequently annihilate with sample electrons, emitting coincident 511 keV gamma-rays [F.A. Selim, D.P. Wells, et al., Nucl. Instr. and Meth. B 192 (2002) 197, F.A. Selim, D.P. Wells, et al., Nucl. Instru. Meth. A 495 (2002) 154, F.A. Selim, et al., J. Rad. Phys. Chem. 68 (2004) 427, F.A. Selim, D.P. Wells, et al., Nucl. Instr. and Meth. B 241 (2005) 253, A.W. Hunt, D

  5. Comparison of protein expression profile changes in human fibroblasts induced by low doses of gamma rays and energetic protons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Ye; Clement, Jade; Gridley, Diala; Rohde, Larry; Wu, Honglu

    Extrapolation of known radiation risks to the risks from low dose and low dose-rate exposures of human population, especially prolonged exposure of astronauts in the space radiation environment, relies in part on the mechanistic understanding of radiation induced biological consequences at the molecular level. While some genomic data at the mRNA level are available for cells or animals exposed to radiation, the data at the protein level are still lacking. Here, we studied protein expression profile changes using Panorama antibody microarray chips that contain antibodies to more than 200 proteins (or modified proteins) involved in cell signaling that included mostly apoptosis, cytoskeleton, cell cycle and signal transduction. Normal human fibroblasts were cultured till fully confluent and then exposed to 2 cGy of gamma rays at either low (1 cGy/hr) or high (0.2 Gy/min) dose-rate, or to 2 cGy of 150 MeV protons at high dose-rate. The proteins were isolated at 2 and 6 hours after exposure and labeled with Cy3 for the irradiated cells and with Cy5 for the control samples before loaded onto the protein microarray chips. The intensities of the protein spots were analyzed using ScanAlyze software and normalized by the summed fluorescence intensities and the housekeeping proteins. Comparison of the overall protein expression profiles in gamma-irradiated cells showed significantly higher inductions at the high dose-rate than at the low dose-rate. The protein profile in cells after the proton exposure showed a much earlier induction pattern in comparison to both the high and low dose-rate gamma exposures. The same expression patterns were also found in individual cell signaling cascades. At 6 hours post irradiation, high dose-rate gamma rays induced cellular protein level changes (ratio to control ˜2) mostly in apoptosis, cell cycle and cytoskeleton, while low dose-rate gamma rays induced similar changes with smaller fold-change values. In comparison, protons induced

  6. Discharge-induced frequency modulation of RF excited CO sub 2 waveguide lasers

    SciTech Connect

    Colley, A.D.; Baker, H.J.; Hall, D.R. . Dept. of Physics); Abramski, K.M. )

    1991-07-01

    In this paper the mechanisms causing a shift in the oscillation frequency of an RF excited CO{sub 2} waveguide laser through changes in the discharge excitation power are investigated. Frequency shifts in the range of +0.5 to 1 MHz per watt of RF input power have been measured. These are shown to be consistent with the effects of thermal expansion of the laser gas caused by an increase of the gas temperature due to RF power absorption. It is also shown that the effects of gas dissociation are small but significant whereas, contrary to earlier suggestions, the effects of electron density fluctuations are negligible. The discharge induced frequency shift may be used as a simple frequency modulator with a frequency deviation of {plus minus}30 MHz, although the usefulness of this effect is limited to a bandwidth of about 500 Hz, due to the acoustic resonance of the waveguide channel. However, by independent RF power modulation of a short section of the waveguide, this bandwidth has been increased to 3.5 kHz, with a sensitivity of 0.7 MHz/W and a frequency deviation of {plus minus}10 MHZ.

  7. High-frequency audiometry: a means for early diagnosis of noise-induced hearing loss.

    PubMed

    Mehrparvar, Amir H; Mirmohammadi, Seyyed J; Ghoreyshi, Abbas; Mollasadeghi, Abolfazl; Loukzadeh, Ziba

    2011-01-01

    Noise-induced hearing loss (NIHL), an irreversible disorder, is a common problem in industrial settings. Early diagnosis of NIHL can help prevent the progression of hearing loss, especially in speech frequencies. For early diagnosis of NIHL, audiometry is performed routinely in conventional frequencies. We designed this study to compare the effect of noise on high-frequency audiometry (HFA) and conventional audiometry. In a historical cohort study, we compared hearing threshold and prevalence of hearing loss in conventional and high frequencies of audiometry among textile workers divided into two groups: With and without exposure to noise more than 85 dB. The highest hearing threshold was observed at 4000 Hz, 6000 Hz and 16000 Hz in conventional right ear audiometry, conventional left ear audiometry and HFA in each ear, respectively. The hearing threshold was significantly higher at 16000 Hz compared to 4000. Hearing loss was more common in HFA than conventional audiometry. HFA is more sensitive to detect NIHL than conventional audiometry. It can be useful for early diagnosis of hearing sensitivity to noise, and thus preventing hearing loss in lower frequencies especially speech frequencies. PMID:22122956

  8. Investigation of low frequency molecular Bremsstrahlung radiation from laser induced breakdown of air

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Paturi, Prem Kiran; Lakshminarayanan, Vinoth Kumar; Elle, Manikanta; Chelikani, Leela; Acrhem Team

    2015-05-01

    Low frequency electromagnetic radiation (30-1000 MHz), due to molecular Bremsstrahlung, from ns and ps laser induced breakdown (LIB) of atmospheric air is studied. In the plasma formed by the LIB of atmospheric air, interaction of charged particles with neutral clusters of atoms and molecules result in the emission of low frequency radiation. With increasing laser intensity, the plasma frequency (ωP) comes closer to the laser frequency (ωL) , leading to higher degree of ionization. This is observed to reduce the electron-neutral interactions decreasing the low frequency emissions. Thus the emissions from ps LIB are 2-3 orders smaller than those from ns LIB. While traversing from the loose to tight focusing conditions, the emissions from ns LIB and ps LIB were observed to be increasing and decreasing, respectively. This confirms the role of the number of seed electrons and their interaction with neutrals on the low frequency emissions. The emissions were observed to be spectral selective, dependent on the polarization state of the input laser pulses and the detecting antenna. The work is supported by Defence Research and Developement Organization, India through Grants-in-Aid Program.

  9. Collision-induced radio-frequency transitions in CH 3I

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tamassia, F.; Danieli, R.; Scappini, F.

    1999-02-01

    The highly sensitive method of radio-frequency-infrared double resonance inside a CO 2 laser is applied to study collision-induced transitions in CH 3I in a four-level double resonance scheme. Pure nuclear quadrupole resonances are observed as the result of collision population transfer between different rotational levels. The intensity ratios of the collision-induced dips to the corresponding three-level double resonance signals are measured for a number of transitions in the ground and excited vibrational states. Collision selection rules in the pure gas and in mixtures with polar and non-polar gases are discussed.

  10. Detectability of Planck-scale-induced Blurring with Gamma-ray Bursts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Steinbring, Eric

    2015-03-01

    Microscopic fluctuations inherent to the fuzziness of spacetime at the Planck scale might accumulate in wavefronts propagating a cosmological distance and lead to noticeable blurring in an image of a pointlike source. Distant quasars viewed in the optical and ultraviolet with Hubble Space Telescope (HST) may show this weakly, and if real suggests a stronger effect should be seen for gamma-ray bursts (GRBs) in X-rays and γ-rays. Those telescopes, however, operate far from their diffraction limits. A description of how Planck-scale-induced blurring could be sensed at high energy, including with cosmic rays, while still agreeing with the HST results is discussed. It predicts dilated apparent source size and inflated uncertainties in positional centroids, effectively a threshold angular accuracy restricting knowledge of source location on the sky. These outcomes are found to be consistent with an analysis of the 10 highest-redshift GRB detections reported for the Fermi satellite. Confusion with photon cascade and scattering phenomena is also possible; prospects for a definitive multiwavelength measurement are considered.