Science.gov

Sample records for induced vibrational cooling

  1. Flow-induced vibration of component cooling water heat exchangers

    SciTech Connect

    Yeh, Y.S.; Chen, S.S. . Nuclear Engineering Dept.; Argonne National Lab., IL )

    1990-01-01

    This paper presents an evaluation of flow-induced vibration problems of component cooling water heat exchangers in one of Taipower's nuclear power stations. Specifically, it describes flow-induced vibration phenomena, tests to identify the excitation mechanisms, measurement of response characteristics, analyses to predict tube response and wear, various design alterations, and modifications of the original design. Several unique features associated with the heat exchangers are demonstrated, including energy-trapping modes, existence of tube-support-plate (TSP)-inactive modes, and fluidelastic instability of TSP-active and -inactive modes. On the basis of this evaluation, the difficulties and future research needs for the evaluation of heat exchangers are identified. 11 refs., 19 figs., 3 tabs.

  2. Flow-induced vibration

    SciTech Connect

    Blevins, R.D.

    1990-01-01

    This book reports on dimensional analysis; ideal fluid models; vortex-induced vibration; galloping and flutter; instability of tube and cylinder arrays; vibrations induced by oscillating flow; vibration induced by turbulence and sound; damping of structures; sound induced by vortex shedding; vibrations of a pipe containing a fluid flow; indices. It covers the analysis of the vibrations of structures exposed to fluid flows; explores applications for offshore platforms and piping; wind-induced vibration of buildings, bridges, and towers; and acoustic and mechanical vibration of heat exchangers, power lines, and process ducting.

  3. Vibrational cooling in large molecular systems: Pentacene in naphthalene

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chang, Ta-Chau; Dlott, Dana D.

    1989-04-01

    Ultrafast laser experiments are conducted on low temperature crystals of pentacene in naphthalene (PTC/N) to study the process of vibrational cooling. A vibration of the excited singlet state, denoted Sν1, is excited, and the decay out of this state, as well as the subsequent arrival at the vibrationless ground state S01, are monitored by photon echoes, absorption recovery, and a new technique, pump-induced coherent Stokes Raman scattering [T.-C. Chang and D. D. Dlott, Chem. Phys. Lett. 147, 18 (1988)]. Eight vibrational modes of PTC, ranging from 260 to 1350 cm-1 are studied. The experimental results are interpreted using a previously developed model of vibrational cooling [J. R. Hill and D. D. Dlott, J. Chem. Phys. 89, 830 (1988)]. This model predicts the dependence of the vibrational cooling rate on the amount of excess vibrational energy and the temperature. The motion of the vibrational probability distribution toward the ground state is predicted to occur with a temperature independent ``vibrational velocity'' which describes the rate of vibrational energy dissipation. Using the model, we fit all eight data sets with a single adjustable parameter, the vibrational velocity, and we obtain the value V0=10±2 cm-1/ps. The prediction of a nearly temperature independent V0 is confirmed over the temperature range 1.5 to 35 K. Finally, we discuss the application of these measurements to the problem of heme cooling in optically excited heme proteins.

  4. Vibrational Cooling of Photoassociated Homonuclear Cold Molecules

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Passagem, Henry; Ventura, Paulo; Tallant, Jonathan; Marcassa, Luis

    2015-05-01

    In this work, we produce vibrationally cold homonuclear Rb molecules using spontaneous optical pumping. The vibrationally cooled molecules are produced in three steps. In the first step, we use a photoassociation laser to produce molecules in high vibrational levels of the singlet ground state. Then in a second step, a 50 W broadband laser at 1071 nm, which bandwidth is about 2 nm, is used to transfer the molecules to lower vibrational levels via optical pumping through the excited state. This process transfers the molecules from vibrational levels around ν ~= 113 to a distribution of levels below ν = 35 . The molecules can be further cooled using a broadband light source near 685 nm. In order to obtain such broadband source, we have used a 5 mW superluminescent diode, which is amplified in a tapered amplifier using a double pass configuration. After the amplification, the spectrum is properly shaped and we end up with about 90 mW distributed in the 682-689 nm range. The final vibrational distribution is probed using resonance-enhanced multiphoton ionization with a pulsed dye laser near 670 nm operating at 4KHz. The results are presented and compared with theoretical simulations. This work was supported by Fapesp and INCT-IQ.

  5. Flow-Induced Vibration of a Reed in a Channel: Effect of Reed Shape on Convective Heat Transfer with Application to Electronic Cooling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rips, Aaron; Shoele, Kourosh; Glezer, Ari; Mittal, Rajat

    2015-11-01

    Flow-induced vibration of a reed (a thin plate or flag) in a channel can improve heat transfer efficiency in forced convection applications, allowing for more heat transfer for the same fan power. Such systems have wide ranging applications in electronic and power cooling. We investigate the effect of 3D reed shape on heat transfer enhancement. To study 3D effects, we first use 2D fluid-structure interaction (FSI) simulations of an optimized reed (in terms of mass and stiffness) to generate a prescribed reed motion. We then apply that motion to a pseudo 3D reed (i.e. infinitely stiff in the spanwise direction) and study the heat transfer enhancement in a 3D channel. This method allows us to explore a large parameter space exhaustively, and using this method, we examine the effect of several parameters, such as reed planform and spanwise gap, on the heat transfer enhancements for forced convection in a channel. Simulations indicate that these geometrical feature have a significant effect on the vortex dynamics in the wake as well as the heat transfer efficiency. This work was supported by grants from AFOSR, EPRI and NSF.

  6. Flow-induced vibration: 1992

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, S.S.

    1992-09-01

    A joint program on flow-induced vibration (FIV) as established in July 1988 between Taiwan Power Company (Taipower or TPC) and ANL. The main objectives of the program are to provide a technology transfer program on FIV for Taipower staff and to assist Taipower with various aspects of FIV including evaluation of reports and proposals, review of designs, resolution of design issues, recommendation for design modifications, and selected research studies. During the first two years, the following tasks were accomplished: A technology transfer program on FIV was completed and key Taipower staff members were prepared to handle future problems in the subject area. The modified component cooling water (CCW) heat exchangers were assessed and the basis for a license from the Taiwan Atomic Energy Council (AEC) was established. The seismic reanalysis of Chin Shan spent-fuel racks was assessed and a report was submitted to the Taiwan AEC. Fluid/structure interaction activities were coordinated and provided a list of potential bidders for a fluid transient project and related publications and a recommendation for purchasing technical data on fluid coupling. Flow-induced vibration of tube arrays was reviewed and the needs of Taipower in the area of fluid/structure interaction were identified as were the procedures necessary for Taipower to accomplish its goals. A computer program, ARRAY, was established to compute the added-mass matrices for tube arrays. Taipower expressed interest in extending the joint program so that ANL could provide continuing assistance. The program was extended for several years (May 1, 1991, to June 30, 1994). Work from May 1, 1991, through June 30, 1992, summarized in this report, included technology transfer, assessment of sensing line and valve vibrations, literature survey, and tests on motion-dependent fluid forces acting on tube arrays in crossflow.

  7. Angular vibrations of cryogenically cooled double-crystal monochromators.

    PubMed

    Sergueev, I; Döhrmann, R; Horbach, J; Heuer, J

    2016-09-01

    The effect of angular vibrations of the crystals in cryogenically cooled monochromators on the beam performance has been studied theoretically and experimentally. A simple relation between amplitude of the vibrations and size of the focused beam is developed. It is shown that the double-crystal monochromator vibrations affect not only the image size but also the image position along the optical axis. Several methods to measure vibrations with the X-ray beam are explained and analyzed. The methods have been applied to systematically study angular crystal vibrations at monochromators installed at the PETRA III light source. Characteristic values of the amplitudes of angular vibrations for different monochromators are presented. PMID:27577762

  8. Flow-induced vibrations-1987

    SciTech Connect

    Au-Yang, M.K.; Chen, S.S.

    1987-01-01

    This book contains 20 selections. Some of the titles are: Acoustic resonance in heat exchanger tube bundles--Part 1. Physical nature of the phenomenon; Theoretical and experimental studies on heat exchanger U-bend tube bundle vibration characteristics; Experimental model analysis of metallic pipeline conveying fluid; Leakage flow-induced vibration of an eccentric tube-in-tube slip joint; and A study on the vibrations of pipelines caused by internal pulsating flows.

  9. SHAKE OUT WORKER DUMPING COOLED MOLDS ONTO THE VIBRATING CONVEYOR ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    SHAKE OUT WORKER DUMPING COOLED MOLDS ONTO THE VIBRATING CONVEYOR THAT TRANSPORTS SAND AND CASTINGS TO THE SEPARATION SCREEN. - Southern Ductile Casting Company, Centerville Foundry, 101 Airport Road, Centreville, Bibb County, AL

  10. Continuous Vibrational Cooling of Ground State Rb2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tallant, Jonathan; Marcassa, Luis

    2014-05-01

    The process of photoassociation generally results in a distribution of vibrational levels in the electronic ground state that is energetically close to the dissociation limit. Several schemes have appeared that aim to transfer the population from the higher vibrational levels to lower ones, especially the ground vibrational state. We demonstrate continuous production of vibrationally cooled Rb2 using optical pumping. The vibrationally cooled molecules are produced in three steps. First, we use a dedicated photoassociation laser to produce molecules in high vibrational levels of the X1Σg+ state. Second, a broadband fiber laser at 1071 nm is used to transfer the molecules to lower vibrational levels via optical pumping through the A1Σu+ state. This process transfers the molecules from vibrational levels around ν ~= 113 to a distribution of levels where ν < 35. The molecules may then be further cooled using a broadband superluminescent diode near 685 nm that has its frequency spectrum shaped. The resulting vibrational distributions are probed using resonance-enhanced multiphoton ionization with a pulsed dye laser near 670 nm. The results are presented and compared with theoretical simulations. This work was supported by Fapesp and INCT-IQ.

  11. Vibration-Induced Droplet Atomization

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smith, M. K.; James, A.; Vukasinovic, B.; Glezer, A.

    1999-01-01

    Thermal management is critical to a number of technologies used in a microgravity environment and in Earth-based systems. Examples include electronic cooling, power generation systems, metal forming and extrusion, and HVAC (heating, venting, and air conditioning) systems. One technique that can deliver the large heat fluxes required for many of these technologies is two-phase heat transfer. This type of heat transfer is seen in the boiling or evaporation of a liquid and in the condensation of a vapor. Such processes provide very large heat fluxes with small temperature differences. Our research program is directed toward the development of a new, two-phase heat transfer cell for use in a microgravity environment. In this paper, we consider the main technology used in this cell, a novel technique for the atomization of a liquid called vibration-induced droplet atomization. In this process, a small liquid droplet is placed on a thin metal diaphragm that is made to vibrate by an attached piezoelectric transducer. The vibration induces capillary waves on the free surface of the droplet that grow in amplitude and then begin to eject small secondary droplets from the wave crests. In some situations, this ejection process develops so rapidly that the entire droplet seems to burst into a small cloud of atomized droplets that move away from the diaphragm at speeds of up to 50 cm/s. By incorporating this process into a heat transfer cell, the active atomization and transport of the small liquid droplets could provide a large heat flux capability for the device. Experimental results are presented that document the behavior of the diaphragm and the droplet during the course of a typical bursting event. In addition, a simple mathematical model is presented that qualitatively reproduces all of the essential features we have seen in a burst event. From these two investigations, we have shown that delayed droplet bursting results when the system passes through a resonance

  12. Vibration white finger and digital systolic pressure during cooling.

    PubMed Central

    Ekenvall, L; Lindblad, L E

    1986-01-01

    A cold provocation test (measurement of finger systolic pressure during combined body and local finger cooling) was performed on 111 male patients exposed to vibration and with a typical history of cold induced white finger. A new method of calculating the test result is described--namely, digital systolic blood pressure in the cooled test finger as a percentage of the systolic pressure in the arm (DP%). The conventional way of calculating the result, the systolic pressure in the cooled test finger as a percentage of the systolic pressure in the test finger when heated to 30 degrees C, corrected for changes in systemic pressure by the use of a reference finger (FSP%), requires the measurement of the systolic pressure in a reference finger. The two ways of calculating the test results give a similar sensitivity (74% for FSP%, 79% for DP% if all histories are regarded as true) but the new method does not require pressure measurements in a reference finger. This makes the test easier to perform and the result easier to understand. PMID:3964577

  13. Single-molecule electronics: Cooling individual vibrational modes by the tunneling current

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lykkebo, Jacob; Romano, Giuseppe; Gagliardi, Alessio; Pecchia, Alessandro; Solomon, Gemma C.

    2016-03-01

    Electronic devices composed of single molecules constitute the ultimate limit in the continued downscaling of electronic components. A key challenge for single-molecule electronics is to control the temperature of these junctions. Controlling heating and cooling effects in individual vibrational modes can, in principle, be utilized to increase stability of single-molecule junctions under bias, to pump energy into particular vibrational modes to perform current-induced reactions, or to increase the resolution in inelastic electron tunneling spectroscopy by controlling the life-times of phonons in a molecule by suppressing absorption and external dissipation processes. Under bias the current and the molecule exchange energy, which typically results in heating of the molecule. However, the opposite process is also possible, where energy is extracted from the molecule by the tunneling current. Designing a molecular "heat sink" where a particular vibrational mode funnels heat out of the molecule and into the leads would be very desirable. It is even possible to imagine how the vibrational energy of the other vibrational modes could be funneled into the "cooling mode," given the right molecular design. Previous efforts to understand heating and cooling mechanisms in single molecule junctions have primarily been concerned with small models, where it is unclear which molecular systems they correspond to. In this paper, our focus is on suppressing heating and obtaining current-induced cooling in certain vibrational modes. Strategies for cooling vibrational modes in single-molecule junctions are presented, together with atomistic calculations based on those strategies. Cooling and reduced heating are observed for two different cooling schemes in calculations of atomistic single-molecule junctions.

  14. Single-molecule electronics: Cooling individual vibrational modes by the tunneling current.

    PubMed

    Lykkebo, Jacob; Romano, Giuseppe; Gagliardi, Alessio; Pecchia, Alessandro; Solomon, Gemma C

    2016-03-21

    Electronic devices composed of single molecules constitute the ultimate limit in the continued downscaling of electronic components. A key challenge for single-molecule electronics is to control the temperature of these junctions. Controlling heating and cooling effects in individual vibrational modes can, in principle, be utilized to increase stability of single-molecule junctions under bias, to pump energy into particular vibrational modes to perform current-induced reactions, or to increase the resolution in inelastic electron tunneling spectroscopy by controlling the life-times of phonons in a molecule by suppressing absorption and external dissipation processes. Under bias the current and the molecule exchange energy, which typically results in heating of the molecule. However, the opposite process is also possible, where energy is extracted from the molecule by the tunneling current. Designing a molecular "heat sink" where a particular vibrational mode funnels heat out of the molecule and into the leads would be very desirable. It is even possible to imagine how the vibrational energy of the other vibrational modes could be funneled into the "cooling mode," given the right molecular design. Previous efforts to understand heating and cooling mechanisms in single molecule junctions have primarily been concerned with small models, where it is unclear which molecular systems they correspond to. In this paper, our focus is on suppressing heating and obtaining current-induced cooling in certain vibrational modes. Strategies for cooling vibrational modes in single-molecule junctions are presented, together with atomistic calculations based on those strategies. Cooling and reduced heating are observed for two different cooling schemes in calculations of atomistic single-molecule junctions. PMID:27004879

  15. Vibrational Cooling in A Cold Ion Trap: Vibrationally Resolved Photoelectron Spectroscopy of Cold C60- Anions

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Xue B.; Woo, Hin-koon; Wang, Lai S.

    2005-08-01

    We demonstrate vibrational cooling of anions via collisions with a background gas in an ion trap attached to a cryogenically controlled cold head (10 ? 400 K). Photoelectron spectra of vibrationally cold C60- anions, produced by electrospray ionization and cooled in the cold ion trap, have been obtained. Relative to spectra taken at room temperature, vibrational hot bands are completely eliminated, yielding well resolved vibrational structures and a more accurate electron affinity for neutral C60. The electron affinity of C60 is measured to be 2.683 ? 0.008 eV. The cold spectra reveal complicated vibrational structures for the transition to the C60 ground state due to the Jahn-Teller effect in the ground state of C60-. Vibrational excitations in the two Ag modes and eight Hg modes are observed, providing ideal data to assess the vibronic couplings in C60-.

  16. Chaotic vortex induced vibrations

    SciTech Connect

    Zhao, J.; Sheridan, J.; Leontini, J. S.; Lo Jacono, D.

    2014-12-15

    This study investigates the nature of the dynamic response of an elastically mounted cylinder immersed in a free stream. A novel method is utilized, where the motion of the body during a free vibration experiment is accurately recorded, and then a second experiment is conducted where the cylinder is externally forced to follow this recorded trajectory. Generally, the flow response during both experiments is identical. However, particular regimes exist where the flow response is significantly different. This is taken as evidence of chaos in these regimes.

  17. Passive vibration isolation for SITELLE's closed cycle cooled cryostats

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baril, Marc; Benedict, Tom; Barrick, Gregory; Ho, Kevin

    2012-09-01

    The SITELLE Imaging Fourier Transform Spectrometer system being developed by l'Université Laval at ABB-Bomem will require two identical CCD detector systems. Our requirements for the cryogenic system for these cameras are: cooling to below 190 K, extremely low vibrational input from the cryogenic system (<1 mg RMS from 0-2 kHz), hands-off operation over long periods of time and low original capital outlay and continued operation cost. These constraints drove towards the selection of a Polycold PCC cooled system which exhibits relatively low vibrational noise and can efficiently achieve the required cooling power in our target temperature range. This paper will present work performed to passively mitigate high frequency vibrations imparted by the Polycold PCC cryo-head on the detector cryostat.

  18. Cold molecules: Formation, ro-vibrational cooling and electronic conversion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Horchani, R.

    2016-05-01

    The possibility of controlling all the motion as well as the internal quantum state of a sample of molecules is a long term goal in the cold molecules field. Although many different techniques have been used to produce ultra-cold molecules, in this paper, we will concentrate on the optical pumping technique successfully used to achieve rotational and vibrational cooling of Cs2 molecules. We will review the different photo-association schemes for molecule formation, the detection schemes through photoionization, the ro-vibrational cooling into a single level and finally the electronic conversion. In addition, we will present a theoretical model for both ro-vibrational cooling and electronic conversion that can be used for the preparation of different experiments.

  19. Positron cooling by vibrational and rotational excitation of molecular gases

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Danielson, J. R.; Natisin, M. R.; Surko, C. M.

    2015-05-01

    Measurements of positron temperature as a function of time are presented when a positron gas, confined in an electromagnetic trap at an elevated temperature (>= 1200 K), is cooled by interactions with the 300 K molecular gases CF4, N2 and CO. A simple model describing positron cooling and thermalization by coupling to vibrational modes (CF4, CO), dipole-coupled rotational modes (CO), and quadrupole-coupled rotational modes (CO, N2) is presented with cooling-rate predictions calculated in the Born approximation. Comparisons to the measured positron cooling-rate curves permit estimates of the magnitudes of the relevant cross sections. The results are compared with experiment for the case of vibrational excitation, where direct measurements exist; and they provide estimates of the rotational excitation cross sections where direct measurements are not currently possible. A new experiment using cryogenically cooled buffer gases is underway, and measurements of positron cooling to 50 K will be presented. Work supported by NSF grant PHY-1401794.

  20. System and method of active vibration control for an electro-mechanically cooled device

    DOEpatents

    Lavietes, Anthony D.; Mauger, Joseph; Anderson, Eric H.

    2000-01-01

    A system and method of active vibration control of an electro-mechanically cooled device is disclosed. A cryogenic cooling system is located within an environment. The cooling system is characterized by a vibration transfer function, which requires vibration transfer function coefficients. A vibration controller generates the vibration transfer function coefficients in response to various triggering events. The environments may differ by mounting apparatus, by proximity to vibration generating devices, or by temperature. The triggering event may be powering on the cooling system, reaching an operating temperature, or a reset action. A counterbalance responds to a drive signal generated by the vibration controller, based on the vibration signal and the vibration transfer function, which adjusts vibrations. The method first places a cryogenic cooling system within a first environment and then generates a first set of vibration transfer function coefficients, for a vibration transfer function of the cooling system. Next, the cryogenic cooling system is placed within a second environment and a second set of vibration transfer function coefficients are generated. Then, a counterbalance is driven, based on the vibration transfer function, to reduce vibrations received by a vibration sensitive element.

  1. Attenuation of cryocooler induced vibration in spaceborne infrared payloads

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Veprik, A.; Twitto, A.

    2014-01-01

    Recent advancement of operational responsive space programs calls for a development of compact, reliable, low power and vibration free cryogenic cooling for sophisticated infrared payloads. The refrigeration in a typical closed cycle split Stirling linear cryocooler is achieved by a cyclic compression and expansion of a gaseous working agent due to a synchronized reciprocation of electro-dynamically and pneumatically actuated compressor and expander pistons. Attenuation of the cryocooler induced vibration usually relies on the concept of actively assisted momentum cancellation. In a typical dual-piston compressor this objective is achieved by actively synchronizing the motion of oppositely moving piston assemblies; a typical single-piston expander may be counterbalanced by a motorized counter-balancer. The above approach produces complexity, weight, size, high incurred costs and affects reliability. The authors analyze the case of passive attenuation the vibration export induced by the split Stirling linear cryocooler comprised of inline mounted single-piston compressor and expander. Placement of all the moving components onto a common axis results in a single axis consolidation of vibration export and enables use of single tuned dynamic absorber and low frequency vibration mount. From theoretical analysis and full-scale testing, the performance of such vibration protection arrangement is similar to known systems of active vibration cancellation.

  2. Vibrational Spectroscopy of Sympathetically Cooled CaH^+ Molecular Ions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khanyile, Ncamiso B.; Goeders, James E.; Brown, Kenneth R.

    2013-06-01

    The search for time variation in the fundamental constants of nature such as the fine structure constant(α) and the proton/electron mass ratio(μ), is an area of active research. Comparing the vibrational overtones of CaH^+ with electronic transitions in atoms has been proposed as a means to detect possible time variation of μ Before these precision measurements can be realized, the survey spectroscopy needs to be performed. We describe our experiments using a Coulomb crystal of sympathetically cooled CaH^+ and laser-cooled Ca^+ ions to measure the vibrational overtones by resonance-enhanced multiphoton photo-dissociation (REMPD) in a linear Paul trap. The dissociation of CaH^+ is detected by observing the change in the crystal composition by monitoring the Ca^+ fluorescence. Future single ion experiments for the precision measurement are also discussed. J. Uzan, Rev. Mod. Phys. 75, 403 (2003). M. Kajita and Y. Moriwaki, J. Phys. B: At. Mol. Opt. Phys. 42, 154022(2009).

  3. Picosecond vibrational cooling in mixed molecular crystals studied with a new coherent raman scattering technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chang, Ta-Chau; Dlott, Dana D.

    1988-05-01

    We demonstrate the pump-induced coherent Stokes Raman scattering (CSRS) technique by measuring vibrational cooling in low temperature crystals of pentacene in naphthalene following excitation of a vibration 747 cm -1 above the S 1 origin. Using picosecond photon echoes and a two-color pump-probe technique, we find that the initial state decays in 33 ps, and reappears at the origin 25 ps later. We show that pump-induced CSRS simultaneously measures the decay from the initial state and reappearance at the origin. This technique has many of the advantages of conventional coherent Raman (e.g. intense coherent signals), but is a direct measure of the population dynamics in the initial and final states.

  4. Vibrational Relaxation of the Aqueous Proton in Acetonitrile: Ultrafast Cluster Cooling and Vibrational Predissociation.

    PubMed

    Ottosson, N; Liu, L; Bakker, H J

    2016-07-28

    We study the ultrafast O-H stretch vibrational relaxation dynamics of protonated water clusters embedded in a matrix of deuterated acetonitrile, using polarization-resolved mid-IR femtosecond spectroscopy. The clusters are produced by mixing triflic (trifluoromethanesulfonic) acid and H2O in molar ratios of 1:1, 1:2, and 1:3, thus varying the degree of hydration of the proton. At all hydration levels the excited O-H stretch vibration of the hydrated proton shows an ultrafast vibrational relaxation with a time constant T1 < 100 fs, leading to an ultrafast local heating of the protonated water cluster. This excess thermal energy, initially highly localized to the region of the excited proton, first re-distributes over the aqueous cluster and then dissipates into the surrounding acetonitrile matrix. For clusters with a triflic acid to H2O ratio of 1:3 these processes occur with time constants of 320 ± 20 fs and 1.4 ± 0.1 ps, respectively. The cooling of the clusters reveals a long-living, underlying transient absorption change with high anisotropy. We argue that this feature stems from the vibrational predissociation of a small fraction of the proton hydration structures, directly following the ultrafast infrared excitation. PMID:27333302

  5. Radiofrequency ablation with a vibrating catheter: A new method for electrode cooling.

    PubMed

    Yu, Kaihong; Yamashita, Tetsui; Shingyochi, Shigeaki; Matsumoto, Kazuo; Ohta, Makoto

    2016-05-01

    A new electrode cooling system using a vibrating catheter is described for conditions of low blood flow when saline irrigation cannot be used. Vibrations of the catheter are hypothesized to disturb blood flow around the electrode, leading to increased convective cooling of the electrode. The aim of this study is to confirm the cooling effect of vibration and investigate the associated mechanisms. As methods, an in vitro system with polyvinyl alcohol-hydrogel (PVA-H) as ablated tissue and saline flow in an open channel was used to measure changes in electrode and tissue temperatures under vibration of 0-63Hz and flow velocity of 0-0.1m/s. Flow around the catheter was observed using particle image velocimetry (PIV). Results show that under conditions of no flow, electrode temperatures decreased with increasing vibration frequency, and in the absence of vibrations, electrode temperatures decreased with increasing flow velocity. In the presence of vibrations, electrode temperatures decreased under conditions of low flow velocity, but not under those of high flow velocity. PIV analyses showed disturbed flow around the vibrating catheter, and flow velocity around the catheter increased with higher-frequency vibrations. In conclusion, catheter vibration facilitated electrode cooling by increasing flow around the catheter, and cooling was proportional to vibration frequency. PMID:27013053

  6. Bellows flow-induced vibrations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tygielski, P. J.; Smyly, H. M.; Gerlach, C. R.

    1983-01-01

    The bellows flow excitation mechanism and results of comprehensive test program are summarized. The analytical model for predicting bellows flow induced stress is refined. The model includes the effects of an upstream elbow, arbitrary geometry, and multiple piles. A refined computer code for predicting flow induced stress is described which allows life prediction if a material S-N diagram is available.

  7. Combination of Ultrasonic Vibration and Cryogenic Cooling for Cutting Performance Improvement of Inconel 718 Turning

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, S. Y.; Chung, C. T.; Cheng, Y. Y.

    2011-01-01

    The main objective of this study is to develop a thermo-elastic-plastic coupling model, based on a combination skill of ultrasonically assisted cutting and cryogenic cooling, under large deformation for Inconel 718 alloy machining process. The improvement extent on cutting performance and tool life promotion may be examined from this investigation. The critical value of the strain energy density of the workpiece will be utilized as the chip separation and the discontinuous chip segmentation criteria. The forced convection cooling and a hydrodynamic lubrication model will be considered and formulated in the model. Finite element method will be applied to create a complete numerical solution for this ultrasonic vibration cutting model. During the analysis, the cutting tool is incrementally advanced forward with superimposed ultrasonic vibration in a back and forth step-by-step manner, from an incipient stage of tool-workpiece engagement to a steady state of chip formation, a whole simulation of orthogonal cutting process under plane strain deformation is thus undertaken. High shear strength induces a fluctuation phenomenon of shear angle, high shear strain rate, variation of chip types and chip morphology, tool-chip contact length variation, the temperature distributions within the workpiece, chip and tool, periodic fluctuation in cutting forces can be determined from the developed model. A complete comparison of machining characteristics between some different combinations of ultrasonically assisted cutting and cryogenic cooling with conventional cutting operation can be acquired. Finally, the high-speed turning experiment for Inconel 718 alloy will be taken in the laboratory to validate the accuracy of the model, and the progressive flank wear, crater wear, notching and chipping of the tool edge can also be measured in the experiments.

  8. Vortex-induced vibrations under oblique shedding

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bourguet, Remi; Karniadakis, George; Triantafyllou, Michael

    2014-11-01

    A slender flexible body with bluff cross-section placed at normal incidence within a current may be subjected to vortex-induced vibrations (VIV). In practical applications, the structures (e.g. marine risers, towing cables) are often inclined with respect to the direction of the oncoming flow, sometimes at large angles. The vibrations that may appear in such configurations are investigated in the present work on the basis of direct numerical simulation results. We find that a flexible cylinder inclined at 80 degrees exhibits regular large-amplitude vibrations and that the structural responses are excited under the lock-in condition, i.e. synchronization between body oscillation and vortex formation, which is the central mechanism of VIV. We show that the lock-in condition may involve parallel vortex shedding, where the vortex rows are aligned with the body axis, but also oblique vortex shedding patterns. The excited structural wavenumber and the spanwise wavenumber of the obliquely shed vortices coincide; therefore, the flexible structure and the wake are locked both temporally and spatially. In addition, we find that the VIV occurring under oblique shedding may reach very high frequencies compared to the vibrations observed under parallel shedding.

  9. CFD Simulations of Vibration Induced Droplet Ejection.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    James, Ashley; Smith, Marc K.; Glezer, Ari

    1998-11-01

    Vibration-induced droplet ejection is a process that occurs when a liquid droplet is placed on a vibrating membrane. Above a critical value of the excitation amplitude, Faraday waves form on the surface of the drop. As the amplitude is increased secondary drops are ejected from the wave crests. A Navier-Stokes solver designed to simulate the transient fluid mechanics of the process is presented. The solver is based on a MAC method on a staggered grid. A volume of fluid method is implemented to track the free surface. The volume fraction is advected via a second-order, unsplit method that minimizes numerical diffusion of the interface. Surface tension is incorporated as a continuum surface force. This work is intended to provide a comprehensive description of the fluid dynamics involved in vibration-induced droplet ejection, with the aim of understanding the mechanism behind the ejection process. The evolution of the interface through droplet ejection will be simulated. The dependence of the ejection process on the driving parameters will be evaluated and the resonance characteristics of the drop will be determined. The results of the computations will be compared with experimental results.

  10. Human Response to Aircraft-Noise-Induced Building Vibration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cawthorn, J. M.; Dempsey, T. K.; DeLoach, R.

    1978-01-01

    The effects of noise induced building structure vibration and the rattle of objects on human response to aircraft flyover noise were investigated in a series of studies conducted in both the field and the laboratory. The subjective detection thresholds for vibration and rattle were determined as well as the effect of vibration and rattle upon aircraft noise annoyance.

  11. Recycler Electron Cooling Project: Mechanical vibrations in the Pelletron and their effect on the beam

    SciTech Connect

    Kazakevich, Grigory M.; Burov, A.; Boffo, C.; Joireman, P.; Saewert, G.; Schmidt, C.W.; Shemyakin, A.; /Fermilab

    2005-07-01

    The Fermilab's Recycler ring will employ an electron cooler to cool stored 8.9 GeV antiprotons [1]. The cooler is based on an electrostatic accelerator, Pelletron [2], working in an energy-recovery regime. A full-scale prototype of the cooler has been assembled and commissioned in a separate building [3]. The main goal of the experiments with the prototype was to demonstrate stable operation with a 3.5 MeV, 0.5 A DC electron beam while preserving a high beam quality in the cooling section. The quality is characterized, first of all, by a spread of electron velocities in the cooling section, which may be significantly affected by mechanical vibration of the Pelletron elements. This paper describes the results of vibration measurements in the Pelletron terminal and correlates them with the beam motion in the cooling section.

  12. Vibration syndrome diagnosis using a cooling test verified by computerized photoplethysmography.

    PubMed

    Dyszkiewicz, Andrzej; Tendera, Michał

    2006-04-01

    This study addresses the problem of vibration syndrome diagnosis by means of a cooling test verified by photoplethysmography. Measurement was taken on a small area on the fingertip plexus in which many arterio-venous anastomoses are present. In the opinion of many authors, flow disorders in this area are more typical for developing vibration syndrome than changes in the micro vessels. The study group comprised 128 subjects (58 women aged 40.9 +/- 5.4 years and 70 men aged 38.7 +/- 8.8 years) exposed to vibration. The control group consisted of 41 people (20 women aged 39.6 +/- 7.3 years and 21 men aged 39.3 +/- 6.4 years) who were not exposed to vibration. The patients were examined by a questionnaire and then a vibration perception threshold test and a cooling test were performed. The cooling test was verified both visually and using the computer method. Measurement data (S1, S2 and A) for each patient were obtained from averaging three pulse graphs. We departed from an average of 60 graphs (and more), the standard established in the literature, because of the cooling test specification, which causes huge thermodynamic parameter changeability in the plexus mass of the small finger under pulse waves coming one after another. A longer measurement time will reflect the thermal drift of the tested area in a direction to compensate for the reduced temperature. In the control group, all subjects showed an increase in planimetric indicators during the cooling test verified by computerized photoplethysmography. In the study group visual verification of the cooling test was positive in eight cases (6.2%) and the vibration perception threshold test was positive in seven cases (5.5%), but in computerized photoplethysmography the planimetric indicators decreased after cooling in 87 (67.4%) cases. Computer photoplethysmography is highly specific and shows greater sensitivity in detecting preclinical forms of vascular-type vibration syndrome when compared with palesthesiometry

  13. [Scalp cooling for chemotherapy-induced alopecia].

    PubMed

    Komen, Marion M C; Smorenburg, Carolien H; van den Hurk, Corina J G; Nortier, J W R Hans

    2011-01-01

    Alopecia is a very common side effect of cytostatic therapy and is considered one of the most emotionally distressing effects. To prevent alopecia scalp cooling is currently used in some indications in medical oncology in 59 hospitals in the Netherlands. The success of scalp cooling depends on various factors such as type of chemotherapy, dose, infusion time, number of treatment cycles and combinations of drugs. In general, scalp cooling is well tolerated. The reported side-effects are headache, coldness, dizziness and sometimes claustrophobia. An increase in the risk of scalp metastases has not been demonstrated. Proceeding from the South Netherlands Comprehensive Cancer Centre a national working group is put together in order to draw up a national guideline for chemotherapy-induced alopecia. PMID:22085565

  14. Vortex-induced vibration parameters: Critical review

    SciTech Connect

    Pantazopoulos, M.S.

    1994-12-31

    This paper presents the results of a research study to develop an empirical basis for modeling hydrodynamic vortex-induced vibrations in marine risers, tethers, and other slender marine structures. Published model tests were reviewed, and evaluated, including more than 150 model tests compiled to provide extensive insight and understanding of the hydrodynamic VIV parameters. The data could provide values for the VIV parameters used in a VIV analysis model. The most important VIV parameters are: the lift coefficient, the shedding frequency (Strouhal number), the correlation length, and the shedding frequency bandwidth. The empirical data are based on steady flow model tests that are applicable to long, flexible cylinders simulating marine risers undergoing large amplitude vibrations of the order of up to one riser diameter. The empirical data account for the lock-in phenomenon that is the most important consideration to predict accurately VIV extreme response. Conclusions and recommendations are included to develop an empirical methodology that captures the hydrodynamic VIV phenomena. These recommendations provide the basis for the development of a VIV prediction model that is a significant extension from previous models in the literature, because it can predict lock-in behavior of a flexible cylinder in shear flow.

  15. Vortex-induced vibration and damping of thermowells

    SciTech Connect

    Blevins, R.D.; Tilden, B.W.; Martens, D.H.

    1996-12-01

    Thermowells that protect temperature measuring instrumentation are cantilevered into process piping. The thermowells are subject to vortex-induced vibrations by the process fluid. The resonant response is limited by damping. Damping measurements of thermowells were made and used to establish criteria for acceptable design under vortex-induced vibration.

  16. Suppression of Vortex Induced Vibrations by Fairings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, Yue; Yan, Hongmei; Constantinides, Yiannis; Oakley, Owen; Karniadakis, George

    2013-11-01

    Fairings are nearly-neutrally buoyant devices, which are fitted along the axis of long circular risers to suppress vortex induced vibrations (VIV) and possibly reduce the drag force. Here we study numerically how VIV can be practically eliminated by using free-to-rotate fairings. Since the mass ratio and rotational inertia are both low for the fairings, direct numerical simulations based on standard flow-structure interaction algorithms fail because of the so-called added mass effect. To resolve this problem we introduce fictitious methods and successfully stabilize the simulations. In particular, we investigate the effect of rotational friction Cf on the stabilization effect of the fairings. We found that there exists a critical value for the rotational friction, and when Cf is close to this value, large oscillations and unsymmetrical trajectories can be observed for the riser but for smaller Cf values VIV are suppressed substantially.

  17. Circular cylinder wakes and vortex-induced vibrations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bearman, P. W.

    2011-07-01

    This paper presents a selective review of recent research on vortex-induced vibrations of isolated circular cylinders and the flow and vibration of circular cylinders in a tandem arrangement; a common thread being that the topics raised are of particular interest to the author. The influence of Reynolds number on the response of isolated cylinders is presented and recent developments using forced vibration are discussed. The response of a cylinder free to respond in the in-line and transverse directions is contrasted with that of a cylinder responding in only one direction. The interference between two circular cylinders is discussed and prominence given to the case of cylinders in a tandem arrangement. The origin of the time-mean lift force on the downstream cylinder is considered together with the cause of the large amplitude transverse vibration experienced by the cylinder above vortex resonance. This wake-induced vibration is shown to be a form of vortex-induced vibration.

  18. Electromagnetically-induced-transparency ground-state cooling of long ion strings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lechner, Regina; Maier, Christine; Hempel, Cornelius; Jurcevic, Petar; Lanyon, Ben P.; Monz, Thomas; Brownnutt, Michael; Blatt, Rainer; Roos, Christian F.

    2016-05-01

    Electromagnetically-induced-transparency (EIT) cooling is a ground-state cooling technique for trapped particles. EIT offers a broader cooling range in frequency space compared to more established methods. In this work, we experimentally investigate EIT cooling in strings of trapped atomic ions. In strings of up to 18 ions, we demonstrate simultaneous ground-state cooling of all radial modes in under 1 ms. This is a particularly important capability in view of emerging quantum simulation experiments with large numbers of trapped ions. Our analysis of the EIT cooling dynamics is based on a technique enabling single-shot measurements of phonon numbers, by rapid adiabatic passage on a vibrational sideband of a narrow transition.

  19. Prediction of vibrations induced by underground railway traffic in Beijing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gupta, S.; Liu, W. F.; Degrande, G.; Lombaert, G.; Liu, W. N.

    2008-02-01

    This paper examines the problem of subway induced vibrations on line 4 of Beijing metro, which is currently under construction and is planned to pass in close proximity of the Physics Laboratory of Beijing University. The laboratory has a lot of equipment that is very sensitive to traffic induced vibrations and future operation of metro line 4 is a matter of concern. Hence, it is important to study the influence of subway induced vibrations inside the laboratory and to propose a viable solution to mitigate the vibrations. In this paper, the tunnel north of Chengfulu station is modelled using a coupled periodic FE-BE model and the free-field response due to moving trains is predicted. In addition, vibration measurements have been performed on the site of the Physics Laboratory to estimate the existing vibration levels due to road traffic. The predicted and measured vibrations are superimposed to assess the vibrations due to the combined effect of road and railway traffic in the vicinity of the Physics Laboratory. Apart from the numerical investigations, vibration measurements have also been performed on a similar site at line 1 of Beijing metro to substantiate the estimated results on metro line 4. Finally, it is studied how the vibrations can be controlled using a floating slab track, which is widely used as an effective measure of vibration isolation in tunnels. The efficiency of a 7.9 Hz floating slab track as a vibration countermeasure is assessed in this paper. This study demonstrates the applicability of the numerical model for the relevant assessment of subway induced vibrations and its use to study the performance of different track structures in the tunnel.

  20. Vibration Monitoring Using Fiber Optic Sensors in a Lead-Bismuth Eutectic Cooled Nuclear Fuel Assembly.

    PubMed

    De Pauw, Ben; Lamberti, Alfredo; Ertveldt, Julien; Rezayat, Ali; van Tichelen, Katrien; Vanlanduit, Steve; Berghmans, Francis

    2016-01-01

    Excessive fuel assembly vibrations in nuclear reactor cores should be avoided in order not to compromise the lifetime of the assembly and in order to prevent the occurrence of safety hazards. This issue is particularly relevant to new reactor designs that use liquid metal coolants, such as, for example, a molten lead-bismuth eutectic. The flow of molten heavy metal around and through the fuel assembly may cause the latter to vibrate and hence suffer degradation as a result of, for example, fretting wear or mechanical fatigue. In this paper, we demonstrate the use of optical fiber sensors to measure the fuel assembly vibration in a lead-bismuth eutectic cooled installation which can be used as input to assess vibration-related safety hazards. We show that the vibration characteristics of the fuel pins in the fuel assembly can be experimentally determined with minimal intrusiveness and with high precision owing to the small dimensions and properties of the sensors. In particular, we were able to record local strain level differences of about 0.2 μϵ allowing us to reliably estimate the vibration amplitudes and modal parameters of the fuel assembly based on optical fiber sensor readings during different stages of the operation of the facility, including the onset of the coolant circulation and steady-state operation. PMID:27110782

  1. Aerodynamic induced vibrations on reactor containment fan coolers

    SciTech Connect

    Jones, R. )

    1989-05-01

    Diagnosis of problems on reactor containment fan coolers is not always straightforward. This article describes the method of investigation employed at Tennessee Valley Authority's Sequoyah Nuclear Power Station to diagnose and correct aerodynamic induced vibrations on the coolers.

  2. Damping Parameters for flow-induced vibration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vandiver, J. Kim

    2012-11-01

    A dimensionless damping parameter, c*=2cω/ρU, is defined for cylinders experiencing flow-induced vibration. It overcomes the limitations of "mass-damping" parameters, which first came into use in 1955. A review of the history of mass-damping parameters reveals that they have been used in three principal variations, commonly expressed as Sc, SG and α. For spring-mounted rigid cylinders all three forms reduce to a constant times the following dimensionless group, 2c/πρDωn, where 'c' is the structural damping constant per unit length of cylinder and ωnis the natural frequency of the oscillator, including, when so specified, the fluid added mass. All have been used to predict A*max=Amax/D, the peak response amplitude for VIV. None are useful at organizing response at reduced velocities away from the peak in response. The proposed alternative, c*, may be used to characterize VIV at all reduced velocities in the lock-in range. The simple product of A* and c* is shown to equal CL, the lift coefficient, thus providing a simple method for compiling CL data from free response measurements. Mass-damping parameters are not well-suited to the organization of the response of flexible cylinders in sheared flows or for cylinders equipped with strakes or fairings. c* is well-suited for use with sheared flows or for cylinders with partial coverage of strakes or fairings. Data from three independent sources are used to illustrate the applications of c*. It is shown that the method of modal analysis may be used to generalize the application of c* to flexible risers. An example for a riser with partial fairing coverage is presented.

  3. Mechanical characteristics of strained vibrating strings and a vibration-induced electric field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bivin, Yu. K.

    2012-11-01

    The mechanical characteristics of vibrating strings strained between rigid supports and a vibration-induced electric field are studied. Experiments are conducted with nylon, rubber, and metallic strings. Vibrations are excited by a pinch at different sites along the string. The motion of the string is filmed, and the attendant electric field is detected. Experimental data are analyzed under the assumption that the field is induced by unlike charges generated by the moving string. It is found that the field allows one to determine the time characteristics of the motion of the string and discriminate the types of its deformations. Young moduli observed under the static extension of thin nylon strings are compared with those calculated from the natural frequencies of vibration measured for differently strained strings. The mathematical pattern of the motion of the string is compared with the real situation.

  4. Concorde Noise-Induced Building Vibrations, Montgomery County, Maryland

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mayes, W. H.; Scholl, H. F.; Stephens, D. G.; Holliday, B. G.; Deloach, R.; Finley, T. D.; Holmes, H. K.; Lewis, R. B.; Lynch, J. W.

    1976-01-01

    A series of studies are reported to assess the noise induced building vibrations associated with Concorde operations. The levels of induced vibration and associated indoor/outdoor noise levels resulting from aircraft and nonaircraft events in selected homes, historic and other buildings near Dulles International Airport were recorded. The building response resulting from aircraft operations was found to be directly proportional to the overall sound pressure level and approximately independent of the aircraft type. The noise levels and, consequently, the response levels were observed to be higher for the Concorde operations than for the CTOL operations. Furthermore, the vibration could be closely reproduced by playing aircraft noise through a loudspeaker system located near the vibration measurement location. Nonaircraft events such as door closing were again observed to result in higher response levels than those induced by aircraft.

  5. A review of two-phase flow-induced vibration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, S. S.

    1987-08-01

    Two-phase flow exists in many shell-and-tube heat exchangers and power generation components. The flowing fluid is a source of energy that can induce small-amplitude subcritical oscillations and large-amplitude dynamic instabilities. In fact, many practical system components have experienced excessive flow-induced vibrations. To prevent unacceptable flow-induced vibration, we must understand excitation mechanisms, develop analytical and experimental techniques, and provide reliable design guidelines. Thus, we are conducting a comprehensive program to study structural vibration in components subjected to two-phase flow. This report reviews the current understanding of vibration of circular cylinders in quiescent fluid, crossflow, and axial flow, with emphasis on excitation mechanisms, mathematical models, and available experimental data. A unified theory is presented for cylinders oscillating under different flow conditions. Based on the theory, future research needs are outlined.

  6. Organ pipe resonance induced vibration in piping system

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, T.

    1996-12-01

    Acoustic-induced vibration is a fluid-structure interaction phenomenon. The feedback mechanism between the acoustic pressure pulsation and the structure movements determines the excited acoustic modes which, in turn, amplify the structure response when confidence frequency and mode shape matching occurs. The acoustic modes are not determined from the acoustic boundary conditions alone, structure feedback is as responsible for determining the acoustic modes and shaping the resulting forcing functions. Acoustic-induced piping vibration, when excited, does not attenuate much with distance. Pressure pulsation can be transmitted throughout the piping system and its branch connections. It is this property that makes vibration monitoring difficult, because vibration can surface at locations far away from the acoustic source when resonance occurs. For a large piping system with interconnected branches, the monitoring task can be formidable, particularly when there is no indication what the real source is. In organ pipe resonance induced vibration, the initiating acoustic source may be inconspicuous or unavoidable during operation. In these situations, the forcing function approach can offer an optimal tool for vibration assessment. The forcing function approach was used in the evaluation of a standby steam piping vibration problem. Monitoring locations and instrument specifications were determined from the acoustic eigenfunction profiles. Measured data confirmed the presence of coherent vibrations in the large bore piping. The developed forcing function permits design evaluation of the piping system, which leads to remedial actions and enables fatigue life determination, thus providing confidence to system operation. The forcing function approach is shown to be useful in finding potential vibration area and verifying the integrity of weak structure links. Application is to steam lines at BWR plants.

  7. Flow-induced vibration of the SSME LOX posts

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, S.S.; Jendrzejczyk, J.A.

    1986-01-01

    Cracking of liquid-oxygen (LOX) posts was observed in several evaluation tests. The design modification consists of attaching impingement shields to LOX posts in the upstream row. This has improved the vibration/fatigue problem of LOX posts. However, that modification results in an increased pressure drop that ultimately affects the lifetime of other components. This paper presents a preliminary assessment of the LOX post vibration problem including a review of relevant parameters, flow induced vibration mechanisms, and scoping calculation and experiment. 11 refs.

  8. Numerical and theoretical analysis of beam vibration induced acoustic streaming and the associated heat transfer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wan, Qun

    The purpose of this research is to numerically and analytically investigate the acoustic streaming and the associated heat transfer, which are induced by a beam vibrating in either standing or traveling waveforms. Analytical results show that the beam vibrating in standing waveforms scatters the acoustic waves into the free space, which have a larger attenuation coefficient and longer propagating traveling wavelength than those of the plane wave. In contrast to a constant Reynolds stress in the plane wave, the Reynolds stress generated by such acoustic wave is expected to drive the free space streaming away from the anti-nodes and towards nodes of the standing wave vibration. The sonic and ultrasonic streamings within the channel between the vibrating beam and a parallel stationary beam are also investigated. The acoustic streaming is utilized to cool the stationary beam, which has either a heat source attached to it or subjected to a uniform heat flux. The sonic streaming is found to be mainly the boundary layer streaming dominating the whole channel while the ultrasonic streaming is clearly composed of two boundary layer streamings near both beams and a core region streaming, which is driven by the streaming velocity at the edge of the boundary layer near the vibrating beam. The standing wave vibration of the beam induces acoustic streaming in a series of counterclockwise eddies, which is directed away from the anti-nodes and towards the nodes. The magnitude of the sonic streaming is proportional to o2A 2 while that of the ultrasonic streaming is proportional to o 3/2A2. Numerical results show that the acoustic streaming induced by the beam vibrating in either standing or traveling waveforms has almost the same cooling efficiency for the heat source and the heat flux cases although the flow and temperature fields within the channel are different. The hysteresis of the ultrasonic streaming flow patterns associated with the change of the aspect ratio of the channel

  9. Vibrational ground state cooling of a neutral atom in a tightly focused optical dipole trap

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aljunid, Syed; Maslennikov, Gleb; Paesold, Martin; Durak, Kadir; Leong, Victor; Kurtsiefer, Christian

    2012-06-01

    Recent experiments have shown that an efficient interaction between a single trapped atom and light can be established by concentrating light field at the location of the atom by focusing [1-3]. However, to fully exploit the benefits of strong focusing one has to localize the atom at the maximum of the field strength [4]. The position uncertainty due to residual kinetic energy of the atom in the dipole trap (depth ˜1mK) after molasses cooling is significant (few 100 nm). It limits the interaction between a focused light mode and an atom already for moderate focusing strength [2]. To address this problem we implement a Raman Sideband cooling technique, similar to the one commonly used in ion traps [5], to cool a single ^87Rb atom to the ground state of the trap. We have cooled the atom along the transverse trap axis (trap frequency ντ=55,), to a mean vibrational state nτ=0.55 and investigate the impact on atom-light interfaces.[4pt] [1] M. K. Tey, et al., Nature Physics 4 924 (2008)[0pt] [2] M. K. Tey et. al., New J. Phys. 11, 043011 (2009)[0pt] [3] S.A. Aljunid et al., PRL 103, 153601 (2009)[0pt] [4] C. Teo and V. Scarani Opt. Comm. 284 4485-4490 (2011)[0pt] [5] C. Monroe et al., PRL 75, 4011 (1995)

  10. Scale modeling flow-induced vibrations of reactor components

    SciTech Connect

    Mulcahy, T M

    1982-06-01

    Similitude relationships currently employed in the design of flow-induced vibration scale-model tests of nuclear reactor components are reviewed. Emphasis is given to understanding the origins of the similitude parameters as a basis for discussion of the inevitable distortions which occur in design verification testing of entire reactor systems and in feature testing of individual component designs for the existence of detrimental flow-induced vibration mechanisms. Distortions of similitude parameters made in current test practice are enumerated and selected example tests are described. Also, limitations in the use of specific distortions in model designs are evaluated based on the current understanding of flow-induced vibration mechanisms and structural response.

  11. Poiseuille flow-induced vibrations of two cylinders in tandem

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, Jianzhong; Jiang, Renjie; Chen, Zhongli; Ku, Xiaoke

    2013-07-01

    Laminar flows past two tandem cylinders which are free to move transversely in a parallel-wall channel were studied numerically by the lattice Boltzmann method. With fixed Reynolds number Re=100, blockage ratio β=1/4 and structural damping ξ=0, the effect of streamwise separation between two cylinders at a range of S/D=[1.1, 10] on the motions of cylinders and fluids was studied for both mass ratios of m(*)=1 and m(*)=0.1. A variety of distinct vibration regimes involving periodic, quasi-periodic and non-periodic vibrations with corresponding flow patterns were observed. A detailed analysis of the vibration amplitudes, vibration frequencies and relative equilibrium positions for both mass ratios demonstrated that as S/D increases, the interaction of the two cylinders first enhances and then reduces. In the strong coupling regime, both cylinders oscillate periodically around the centerline of the channel with large vibration amplitudes and high vibration frequencies. By comparing with the case of an isolated cylinder, a further study indicated that the gap flow plays an important role in such a dynamic system, and the vortex cores formation behind the front cylinder causes the interaction of the cylinders decouple rapidly. Based on the present observations, such a dynamic model system can be considered as a novel type of vortex-induced vibrations (VIV) and is expected to find applications in fluid mixing and heat transfer.

  12. Vibrational overtone spectroscopy of bound and predissociative states of hydrogen peroxide cooled in a supersonic expansion

    SciTech Connect

    Butler, L.; Ticich, T.M.; Likar, M.D.; Crim, F.F.

    1986-08-15

    The vibrational overtone excitation spectra of both bound and predissociative states of hydrogen peroxide molecules cooled in a supersonic expansion show features that are obscured otherwise. Spectra of p-italicr-italice-italicd-italici-italics-italics-italico-italicc-italici-italica-italict-italici-italicv-italice-italic states are measured by detecting the decomposition product following excitation of an overtone vibration. Spectra of b-italico-italicu-italicn-italicd-italic states are obtained by a two-photon excitation technique in which a second photon excites the molecule from its bound vibrational overtone state to a dissociative state. The features in the bound state (4..nu../sub OH/) spectrum are 0.08 to 0.13 cm/sup -1/ wide, reflecting small inhomogeneous broadening, but those to the predissociative state (6..nu../sub OH/) are 1.5 +- 0.3 cm/sup -1/ wide. This width, which corresponds to a lifetime of about 3.5 ps, reflects coupling into the dissociative continuum.

  13. Reduction of vortex-induced vibration in vane geometries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, B. L.; O'Farrell, J. M.; Lowrey, G. A.; Nesman, Tomas E.

    Computations using a time-accurate, compressible Navier-Stokes flow model were conducted to analyze both unsteady laminar and turbulent flows over two curved configurations of vanes which were shaped to treat a 4.0 kHz vibration problem which has occurred in several SSMEs. This problem involves vortex shedding from vanes which causes excessive vane vibration and cracking. The original vane configuration exhibited strong flow-induced vibrations at a Strouhal number near 0.19 for a the first bending mode excitation. Scalloping of the leading edge raised the frequency of the vane's first torsional mode, which in turn increased the onset flow velocity at lock-in. Beveling the vane's trailing edge eliminated vortex shedding at the trailing edge, which decoupled the flow oscillation from the vibrating wave. A modified vane configuration with a beveled trailing edge at a 30 deg angle was also studied.

  14. Flow-induced vibration of circular cylindrical structures

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, S.S.

    1987-01-01

    This book presents the flow-induced vibration of circular cylinders in quiescent fluid, axial flow, and crossflow, and applications of the analytical methods and experimental data in design evaluation of various system components consisting of circular cylinders. The information is organized into five general topical areas: Introduction: Chapter 1 presents an overview of flow-induced vibration of circular cylinders. It includes examples of flow-induced vibration, various fluid force components, and nondimensional parameters as well as different excitation mechanisms. The general principles are applicable under different flow conditions. Quiescent Fluid: Fluid inertia and fluid damping are discussed in Chapters 2, 3 and 4. Various flow theories are applied in different situations. Axial Flow: Axial flow can cause subcritical vibration and instability. Chapter 5 summarizes the results for internal flow, while Chapter 6 considers external flow. Both theoretical results and experimental data are examined. Crossflow: Different excitation mechanisms can be dominant in different conditions for crossflow. Those include turbulent buffeting, acoustic resonance, vortex excitation, and dynamic instability. Design Considerations: Applications of the general methods of analysis in the design evaluation of system components are described and various techniques to avoid detrimental vibration are presented.

  15. Drop motion induced by vertical vibrations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sartori, Paolo; Quagliati, Damiano; Varagnolo, Silvia; Pierno, Matteo; Mistura, Giampaolo; Magaletti, Francesco; Massimo Casciola, Carlo

    2015-11-01

    We have studied the motion of liquid drops on an inclined plate subject to vertical vibrations. The liquids comprised distilled water and different aqueous solutions of glycerol, ethanol and isopropanol spanning the range 1-39 mm2 s-1 in kinematic viscosities and 40-72 mN m-1 in surface tension. At sufficiently low oscillating amplitudes, the drops are always pinned to the surface. Vibrating the plate above a certain amplitude yields sliding of the drop. Further increasing the oscillating amplitude drives the drop upward against gravity. In the case of the most hydrophilic aqueous solutions, this motion is not observed and the drop only slides downward. Images taken with a fast camera show that the drop profile evolves in a different way during sliding and climbing. In particular, the climbing drop experiences a much bigger variation in its profile during an oscillating period. Complementary numerical simulations of 2D drops based on a diffuse interface approach confirm the experimental findings. The overall qualitative behavior is reproduced suggesting that the contact line pinning due to contact angle hysteresis is not necessary to explain the drop climbing.

  16. Low Head, Vortex Induced Vibrations River Energy Converter

    SciTech Connect

    Bernitsas, Michael B.; Dritz, Tad

    2006-06-30

    Vortex Induced Vibrations Aquatic Clean Energy (VIVACE) is a novel, demonstrated approach to extracting energy from water currents. This invention is based on a phenomenon called Vortex Induced Vibrations (VIV), which was first observed by Leonardo da Vinci in 1504AD. He called it ‘Aeolian Tones.’ For decades, engineers have attempted to prevent this type of vibration from damaging structures, such as offshore platforms, nuclear fuel rods, cables, buildings, and bridges. The underlying concept of the VIVACE Converter is the following: Strengthen rather than spoil vortex shedding; enhance rather than suppress VIV; harness rather than mitigate VIV energy. By maximizing and utilizing this unique phenomenon, VIVACE takes this “problem” and successfully transforms it into a valuable resource for mankind.

  17. Solar Induced Climate Changes and Cooling of the Earth

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yousef, Shahinaz M.

    2011-06-01

    Evidences are given for the cooling effect induced by solar weak cycles. It is forecasted that the coming solar cycle number 24, which has started on January 2008, would be very weak. This cycle would be followed by several weak cycles. Its very start on January 2008 have induced a climate change that forced global cooling, Indeed all global temperature monitors have shown temperature drops. The GISS monitor showed a 0.75°C drop between January 2007 and January 2008. This sharp temperature drop characterizes cooling induced by weak cycles as was evident by historical temperature records. It also happened in the right exact timing of the start of cycle 24. This cooling is real and could last for some time. The cooling well width is location dependant. Last January cooling left many countries in deep freeze. Cooling is very serious and can destroy crops and cause famines. This cooling is instrumentally recorded. This is an appeal to scientists to consider the present cooling seriously, after all the truth ought to be followed. Alert is also given to the reaponsible authorities to work promptly to choose the proper crops that can tolerate the cold otherwise it would be a disaster worldwide.

  18. Evaluating vehicular-induced bridge vibrations for energy harvesting applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reichenbach, Matthew; Fasl, Jeremiah; Samaras, Vasilis A.; Wood, Sharon; Helwig, Todd; Lindenberg, Richard

    2012-04-01

    Highway bridges are vital links in the transportation network in the United States. Identifying possible safety problems in the approximately 600,000 bridges across the country is generally accomplished through labor-intensive, visual inspections. Ongoing research sponsored by NIST seeks to improve inspection practices by providing real-time, continuous monitoring technology for steel bridges. A wireless sensor network with a service life of ten years that is powered by an integrated energy harvester is targeted. In order to achieve the target ten-year life for the monitoring system, novel approaches to energy harvesting for use in recharging batteries are investigated. Three main sources of energy are evaluated: (a) vibrational energy, (b) solar energy, and (c) wind energy. Assessing the energy produced from vehicular-induced vibrations and converted through electromagnetic induction is the focus of this paper. The goal of the study is to process acceleration data and analyze the vibrational response of steel bridges to moving truck loads. Through spectral analysis and harvester modeling, the feasibility of vibration-based energy harvesting for longterm monitoring can be assessed. The effects of bridge conditions, ambient temperature, truck traffic patterns, and harvester position on the power content of the vibrations are investigated. With sensor nodes continually recharged, the proposed real-time monitoring system will operate off the power grid, thus reducing life cycle costs and enhancing inspection practices for state DOTs. This paper will present the results of estimating the vibration energy of a steel bridge in Texas.

  19. Wind induced vibration of a stack

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, S.S.; Cai, Y.

    1992-12-01

    A stack supported by guy wires at four levels is subjected to large-amplitude oscillations when the wind speed is over 15 m/s. The excitation mechanisms are identified based on scoping calculations, analytical prediction using a finite element code, and observation of the stack/wire response. The stack is determined to be excited by vortex shedding. Once lock-in resonance occurs, the guy wires are excited by the transverse motion of the stack. Large-amplitude oscillations of the guy wires are due to parametric resonance. Several methods are recommended to alleviate vibrational problem for short-term and long-term solutions. A new stack which is modified based on the results of this study is not subjected to any unacceptable oscillations.

  20. Wind induced vibration of a stack

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, S.S.; Cai, Y.

    1992-01-01

    A stack supported by guy wires at four levels is subjected to large-amplitude oscillations when the wind speed is over 15 m/s. The excitation mechanisms are identified based on scoping calculations, analytical prediction using a finite element code, and observation of the stack/wire response. The stack is determined to be excited by vortex shedding. Once lock-in resonance occurs, the guy wires are excited by the transverse motion of the stack. Large-amplitude oscillations of the guy wires are due to parametric resonance. Several methods are recommended to alleviate vibrational problem for short-term and long-term solutions. A new stack which is modified based on the results of this study is not subjected to any unacceptable oscillations.

  1. Flow-induced vibration of circular cylindrical structures

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, S.S.

    1985-06-01

    This report summarizes the flow-induced vibration of circular cylinders in quiescent fluid, axial flow, and crossflow, and applications of the analytical methods and experimental data in design evaluation of various system components consisting of circular cylinders. 219 figs., 30 tabs. (JDB)

  2. Stochastic modelling of traffic-induced building vibration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Y. L.; Hong, X. J.

    2008-06-01

    Because of rapid urbanization, more and more buildings are constructed closer to roadsides than they used to be. This gives rise to some environmental problems, for traffic-induced ground vibration deteriorates the human comfort in neighbouring buildings and affects the normal operation of nearby high-tech facilities. This paper presents a framework for quantifying traffic-induced building vibration in a stochastic way. Vehicle distribution along a roadway is first simulated based on vehicle spacing distribution and vehicle-type distribution. In consideration of buildings in proximity to the roadway, not only Rayleigh waves but also body waves induced by moving vehicle forces are included in the determination of the frequency-response function of a half-space. The combination of the moving force spectra with the frequency-response function of the half-space then leads to evolutionary ground spectra. The framework further provides a method for deriving the evolutionary spectra of a building to the evolutionary ground spectra. The proposed framework is finally applied to a typical three-dimensional high-tech facility, in which the effects of both a single heavy truck and a two-way traffic flow on building vibration are investigated. The results show that traffic-induced ground vibration impedes the normal operation of the high-tech facility.

  3. Rocket Launch-Induced Vibration and Ignition Overpressure Response

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Caimi, Raoul E.; Margashayam, Ravi N.; Nayfeh, Jamal F.; Thompson, Karen (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    Rocket-induced vibration and ignition overpressure response environments are predicted in the low-frequency (5 to 200 hertz) range. The predictions are necessary to evaluate their impact on critical components, structures, and facilities in the immediate vicinity of the rocket launch pad.

  4. Laser cooling of the vibrational motion of Na{sub 2} combining the effects of zero-width resonances and exceptional points

    SciTech Connect

    Lefebvre, R.; Jaouadi, A.; Dulieu, O.; Atabek, O.

    2011-10-15

    We propose various scenarios for molecular vibrational cooling combining the effects of two kinds of resonance states occurring during the photodissociation of Na{sub 2} taken as an illustrative example. Such resonances result from an appropriate sampling of laser parameters (wavelength and intensity): (a) For particular choices of intensity and wavelength, two resonance energies can be brought to complete coalescence, with their positions and widths becoming equal and leading to a so-called exceptional point (EP) in the parameter plane. Advantage can be taken from such points for very selective laser-controlled vibrational transfer strategies. (b) For specific intensities, far beyond the perturbation regime, some resonances can have a zero width (infinite lifetime). They are referred to as a zero-width resonance (ZWR) and may be used for vibrational purification purposes. We show how appropriately shaped, experimentally reachable laser pulses, encircling EPs or inducing ZWRs, may be used for a thorough and comprehensive control aiming at population transfer or purification schemes, which, starting from an initial field-free vibrational distribution, ends up in the ground vibrational level.

  5. Numerical Simulation of Airfoil Vibrations Induced by Compressible Flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Feistauer, Miloslav; Kučera, Václav; Šimánek, Petr

    2010-09-01

    The paper is concerned with the numerical solution of interaction of compressible flow and a vibrating airfoil with two degrees of freedom, which can rotate around an elastic axis and oscillate in the vertical direction. Compressible flow is described by the Euler or Navier-Stokes equations written in the ALE form. This system is discretized by the semi-implicit discontinuous Galerkin finite element method (DGFEM) and coupled with the solution of ordinary differential equations describing the airfoil motion. Computational results showing the flow induced airfoil vibrations are presented.

  6. Nonlinear restoring forces in vortex-induced vibration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mackowski, A. W.; Williamson, C. H. K.

    2011-11-01

    When studying vortex-induced vibration of a rigid circular cylinder, almost all experimental and computational studies involve the cylinder being supported by linear springs. However, there are cases in which we may be interested in the VIV response of a cylinder supported by nonlinear springs. A system with nonlinearities in the restoring force has the potential to increase the amplitude response envelope, critical to the success of aero-vibrating energy harvesters. On the other hand, designing nonlinear restoring forces to decrease the amplitude response may lead to structures more able to withstand flow-induced vibration. In addition, adding nonlinear terms to the restoring force on a rigid cylinder might be used to simulate higher-order dynamics of long, elastic marine cables. To experimentally observe the effects of nonlinear springs on flow-induced vibration, we apply a novel approach that lets us parametrically control the nature of the springs and the strength of the nonlinearities. The technique, called Cyber-Physical Fluid Dynamics, uses a force-feedback control system to simulate arbitrary forces on a submerged body [the details of this system were shown in the APS presentation of Mackowski & Williamson (2010)]. We present results using this technique to explore the amplitude response of a circular cylinder in a crossflow.

  7. Fluid patterns and dynamics induced by vibrations in microgravity conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Porter, Jeff; Tinao Perez-Miravete, Ignacio; Laverón-Simavilla, Ana

    Understanding the effects of vibrations is extremely important in microgravity environments where residual acceleration, or g-jitter, is easily generated by crew manoeuvring or machinery, and can have a significant impact on material processing systems and on-board experiments. Indeed, vibrations can dramatically affect fluid behaviour whether gravity is present or not, inducing instability in some cases while suppressing it in others. We will describe the results of investigations being conducted at the ESA affiliated Spanish User Support and Operations Centre (E-USOC) on the effect of vibrations on fluids interfaces, most notably with the forcing oriented parallel to the fluid surface. Pattern formation properties will be described in detail, and the importance of symmetry constraints and mean flows will be considered. Current exper-imental results are intriguing and have challenged existing assumptions in the field, particularly with regard to the parametric instability underlying subharmonic cross-waves. They suggest an intimate connection between Faraday waves, which are observed in vertically vibrated systems, and cross-waves, which are found in horizontally forced systems. Concurrent theoretical work, based on the analysis of reduced models, and on numerical simulations, will then be described. Finally, this research will be placed in a microgravity context and used to motivate the defini-tion of a proposed set of experiments on the International Space Station (ISS). The experiments would be in the large-aspect-ratio-limit, requiring relatively high frequency but low amplitude vibrations, where comparatively little microgravity research has been done. The interest of such a microgravity experiment will be discussed, with emphasis on fluid management and the potential of vibrations to act as a kind of artificial gravity by orienting surfaces (or density contours) perpendicular to the axis of vibration.

  8. A numerical investigation of flow induced vibrations in a rocket engine manifold

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peugeot, John W.

    2011-12-01

    Flow induced vibrations are common in liquid rocket engine components and have been the subject of several recent studies within the Space Shuttle and Delta launch vehicle programs. Understanding how unsteady flow phenomena develop is important when investigating failures in existing hardware and in the design of new propulsion systems. In this study, a subsonic turbulent flow in a rocket engine manifold is analyzed using a compressible form of the viscous flow equations coupled with a hybrid RANS-DES turbulence model. It is found that vortex shedding and pressure perturbations within a manifold significantly influence the stability of shear layers and flow through exit cooling tubes. By adding a chamfer to the inlet of the cooling tubes, it was demonstrated that greater shear layer stability can be obtaIned at a given pressure ratio.

  9. Flow-induced vibrations of a rotating cylinder

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bourguet, Remi; Lo Jacono, David

    2013-11-01

    The flow-induced vibrations of a circular cylinder, free to oscillate in the cross-flow direction and subjected to a forced rotation about its axis, are studied by means of two- and three-dimensional numerical simulations, at a Reynolds number equal to 100. This problem serves as a paradigm to investigate the impact of symmetry breaking on the phenomenon of vortex-induced vibrations (VIV), previously described in the non-rotating case. The cylinder exhibits free oscillations up to a rotation rate close to 4. Under forced rotation, the vibration amplitude reaches 1.9 diameters, i.e. three times the maximum amplitude in the non-rotating case. Contrary to galloping responses, the free vibrations of the rotating cylinder are found to involve a condition of wake-body synchronization similar to the lock-in condition driving non-rotating cylinder VIV. A variety of flow patterns including novel asymmetric wake topologies is identified; it is shown that free oscillations may develop in the absence of vortex shedding. The symmetry breaking substantially alters the fluid force spectra and phasing mechanisms. The flow three-dimensional transition is found to occur at high rotation rates; its influence on the fluid-structure system behavior is analyzed.

  10. Streaming Induced by Ultrasonic Vibration in a Water Vessel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nomura, Shinfuku; Murakami, Koichi; Sasaki, Yuuichi

    2000-06-01

    The flow pattern induced by ultrasonic vibration in a water vessel is investigated experimentally using several liquids. In tap water, vortex streaming of cavitation bubbles around the pressure node of a standing wave occurred because of the large number of cavitation bubbles generated by the ultrasonic vibration. Acoustic streaming of the Rayleigh type caused by cavitation bubble streaming is also induced in tap water. In a glycerin aqueous solution of 30%, Eckart streaming, which flowed upward from the vibrator, occurred due to the dissipation of ultrasonic energy caused by viscosity. On the other hand, in degassed water, streaming is hardly generated at all since a uniform and stable standing wave is formed in the water vessel. The velocity of the acoustic streaming generated in the water vessel by 27.8 kHz vibration is 1 to 6 mm/s. The cavitation bubble streaming in tap water is completely independent of normal Rayleigh or Eckart streaming. This bubble streaming is considerably faster than previous streaming.

  11. A nonlinear vortex induced vibration model of marine risers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Juan; Huang, Weiping

    2013-03-01

    With the exploitation of oil and gas in deep water, the traditional vortex induced vibration (VIV) theory is challenged by the unprecedented flexibility of risers. A nonlinear time-dependent VIV model is developed in this paper based on a VIV lift force model and the Morison equation. Both the inline vibration induced by the flow due to vortex shedding and the fluid-structure interaction in the transverse direction are included in the model. One of the characteristics of the model is the response-dependent lift force with nonlinear damping, which is different from other VIV models. The calculations show that the model can well describe the VIV of deepwater risers with the results agreeing with those calculated by other models.

  12. Bifurcation study of a model of flow-induced vibration

    SciTech Connect

    Allison, A.M.E.; Corless, R.M.

    1996-12-01

    Here the mathematical model proposed by Tamura and Shimada (1987) which involves the interaction of vortex-induced vibration and galloping for a cylinder of square cross-section is considered. Their model agrees well with experiment with respect to two-dimensional nonresonant conditions which they showed numerically and the present authors showed analytically (Allison and Corless, 1995). Here the previous analytical investigation extending the solution to the resonance region is continued, again using the perturbation technique, the method of multiple scales. Using the computer algebra language MAPLE, Groebner bases are used in the bifurcation studies of the nonzero equilibria solutions to examine the response of the model. The results of the symbolic computation are verified by using MATLAB to independently examine the eigenvalues of the Jacobian matrix along the solution curves. This study is relevant to wind induced vibrations in power transmission lines.

  13. Vortex-Induced Vibration of a Flexible Cantilever

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fujarra, A. L. C.; Pesce, C. P.; Flemming, F.; Williamson, C. H. K.

    2001-04-01

    This study is concerned with the vortex-induced vibrations of a flexible cantilever in a fluid flow. Our cantilever comprises a leaf spring encased within a rubber flexible cylinder, restricting the vibrations of the body in a water channel flow to principally transverse motion. It is found that the transverse amplitude response of the cantilever has a marked similarity with transverse vibrations of an elastically mounted rigid cylinder, in that there is a clear initial branch extending to high amplitudes, with a jump to a lower branch response, as normalized velocity is increased. The continuous initial branch suggests that a distinct upper branch does not exist for the cantilever, as is found for a rigid cylinder under similar conditions of low mass and damping. Good agreement is found between the response amplitude and frequency for two identical cantilevers, one set up by Pesce and Fujarra, where strain is measured to infer the body dynamics, and the other arrangement by Flemming and Williamson, where the tip motion is measured using optical techniques. An interesting large-amplitude response mode is found at higher normalized velocities (U*>12) outside the principal synchronization regime (typically U*=4-8), which is observed for an increasing velocity, or may be triggered by manual streamwise disturbances of the body. This vibration mode is due to a coupled streamwise-transverse motion, where the streamwise amplitude becomes non-negligible, and may be related to a further vibration mode at high normalized speed, found for a vibrating pivoted rod, by Kitagawa et al. (1999).

  14. rf-induced Sisyphus cooling in a magnetic trap

    SciTech Connect

    Janis, J.; Banks, M.; Bigelow, N.P.

    2005-01-01

    We show an rf-induced Sisyphus cooling process for magnetic traps that may easily be applied to many of the current Bose-Einstein condensation experiments. Through Monte Carlo simulations of magnetically trapped {sup 87}Rb we have shown a cooling rate of {approx}15 {mu}K/s. We have also shown a greater efficiency than evaporative cooling from 250{yields}{approx}7 {mu}K with an efficiency {alpha}=d ln T/d ln N>3 over the majority of this range.

  15. Canted undulator front-end exit-mask flow-induced vibration measurements.

    SciTech Connect

    Collins, J.; Doose, C. L.; Attig, J. N.; Baehl, M. M.

    2004-11-10

    All of the high-heat-load critical components in the new canted-undulator front-end (CU FE) design use wire-coil inserts inside of the cooling channels to significantly enhance heat transfer. Wire-coil inserts have replaced the copper-mesh inserts used in previous front-end high-heat-load critical-component designs. The exit mask, the most downstream component in the CU FE line relative to the x-ray beam path, has an exit aperture of 2 mm vertical x 3 mm horizontal and is the most sensitive component, in terms of final beam stability, of all of the CU FE components. In general, final beam stability is determined by the storage-ring output-beam stability and not by the CU FE components. Although front-end components are not very sensitive to vibration, several measurements have been performed to assess the flow-induced vibration associated with the CU FE exit mask. Results yield only 0.16 {micro}mrms vertical displacement and 1.0 {micro}mrms horizontal displacement under worst-case conditions. The maximum displacement values are very small compared to the aperture size, and therefore flow-induced vibration has a negligible effect on the CU FE output beam stability. More general measurements have also been performed to directly compare flow-induced vibration in an open, unrestricted tube relative to the same tube containing either a wire-coil insert or a copper-mesh insert. Operational performance data are presented for these heat-transfer-enhancing inserts, and the advantages and disadvantages, in terms of selection criteria, are discussed.

  16. Laser-Induced Fluorescence Spectroscopy of Jet-Cooled t-Butoxy.

    PubMed

    Liu, Jinjun; Reilly, Neil J; Mason, Amy; Miller, Terry A

    2015-12-10

    The vibrational structures of the Ã(2)A1 and X̃(2)E states of t-butoxy were obtained in jet-cooled laser-induced fluorescence (LIF) and dispersed fluorescence (DF) spectroscopic measurements. The observed transitions are assigned based on vibrational frequencies calculated using the complete active space self-consistent field (CASSCF) method and the predicted Franck-Condon factors. The spin-orbit splitting was measured to be 36(5) cm(-1) for the lowest vibrational level of the ground (X̃(2)E) state, which is significantly smaller than that of methoxy, and increases with increasing vibrational quantum number of the CO stretch mode. Vibronic analysis of the DF spectra suggests that Jahn-Teller active modes of the ground-state t-butoxy radical are similar to those of methoxy and would be the same if methyl groups were replaced by hydrogen atoms. The rotational and fine structure of the LIF transition to the first CO stretch overtone level of the Ã(2)A1 state has been simulated using a spectroscopic model first proposed for methoxy, yielding an accurate determination of the rotational constants of both à and X̃ states. PMID:26524342

  17. Reductions in finger blood flow induced by 125-Hz vibration: effect of area of contact with vibration.

    PubMed

    Ye, Ying; Griffin, Michael J

    2013-04-01

    To investigate whether the Pacinian channel is involved in vibration-induced reductions of finger blood flow (FBF), vibrotactile thresholds and vasoconstriction have been studied with 125-Hz vibration and two contact areas: 3- or 6-mm-diameter vibrating probes with 2-mm gaps to fixed surrounds. Fifteen subjects provided thresholds for perceiving vibration at the thenar eminence of the right hand with both contact areas. With both contact areas, FBF was then measured in the middle fingers of both hands during five successive 5-min periods: (i) no force and no vibration, (ii) force and no vibration, (iii) force with vibration 15 dB above threshold, (iv) force and no vibration, and (v) no force and no vibration. Thresholds were in the ranges of 0.16-0.66 ms(-2) r.m.s. (6-mm probe) and 0.32-1.62 ms(-2) r.m.s. (3-mm probe). With the magnitude of vibration 15 dB above each individual's threshold with the 3-mm probe, the median reduction in FBF with the 6-mm probe (to 70 and 77 % of pre-exposure FBF on the exposed right hand and the unexposed left hand, respectively) was greater than with the 3-mm probe (79 and 85 %). There were similar reductions in FBF when vibration was presented by the two contactors at the same sensation level (i.e. 15 dB above threshold with each probe). The findings are consistent with reductions in FBF arising from excitation of the Pacinian channel: increasing the area excited by vibration increases Pacinian activation and provokes stronger perception of vibration and greater vasoconstriction. PMID:23064872

  18. Experimental validation of a numerical model for subway induced vibrations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gupta, S.; Degrande, G.; Lombaert, G.

    2009-04-01

    This paper presents the experimental validation of a coupled periodic finite element-boundary element model for the prediction of subway induced vibrations. The model fully accounts for the dynamic interaction between the train, the track, the tunnel and the soil. The periodicity or invariance of the tunnel and the soil in the longitudinal direction is exploited using the Floquet transformation, which allows for an efficient formulation in the frequency-wavenumber domain. A general analytical formulation is used to compute the response of three-dimensional invariant or periodic media that are excited by moving loads. The numerical model is validated by means of several experiments that have been performed at a site in Regent's Park on the Bakerloo line of London Underground. Vibration measurements have been performed on the axle boxes of the train, on the rail, the tunnel invert and the tunnel wall, and in the free field, both at the surface and at a depth of 15 m. Prior to these vibration measurements, the dynamic soil characteristics and the track characteristics have been determined. The Bakerloo line tunnel of London Underground has been modelled using the coupled periodic finite element-boundary element approach and free field vibrations due to the passage of a train at different speeds have been predicted and compared to the measurements. The correspondence between the predicted and measured response in the tunnel is reasonably good, although some differences are observed in the free field. The discrepancies are explained on the basis of various uncertainties involved in the problem. The variation in the response with train speed is similar for the measurements as well as the predictions. This study demonstrates the applicability of the coupled periodic finite element-boundary element model to make realistic predictions of the vibrations from underground railways.

  19. Study on the Axial-Flow-Induced Vibration of Coil Springs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fujita, K.; Ito, T.; Kohno, N.; Nunokawa, K.

    1993-08-01

    Flow-induced vibration of coil springs due to an axial flow was investigated experimentally using a fundamental test apparatus. The effects of spring stiffness, gap between the spring and the inner rod and initial compression of the spring on the vibration of the coil spring were clarified, and a stability diagram is presented for this vibration. Furthermore, the effectiveness of the counter-measures developed for suppressing the flow-induced vibration are confirmed.

  20. Current-induced runaway vibrations in dehydrogenated graphene nanoribbons

    PubMed Central

    Christensen, Rasmus Bjerregaard; Lü, Jing-Tao; Hedegård, Per

    2016-01-01

    Summary We employ a semi-classical Langevin approach to study current-induced atomic dynamics in a partially dehydrogenated armchair graphene nanoribbon. All parameters are obtained from density functional theory. The dehydrogenated carbon dimers behave as effective impurities, whose motion decouples from the rest of carbon atoms. The electrical current can couple the dimer motion in a coherent fashion. The coupling, which is mediated by nonconservative and pseudo-magnetic current-induced forces, change the atomic dynamics, and thereby show their signature in this simple system. We study the atomic dynamics and current-induced vibrational instabilities using a simplified eigen-mode analysis. Our study illustrates how armchair nanoribbons can serve as a possible testbed for probing the current-induced forces. PMID:26925354

  1. Current-induced runaway vibrations in dehydrogenated graphene nanoribbons.

    PubMed

    Christensen, Rasmus Bjerregaard; Lü, Jing-Tao; Hedegård, Per; Brandbyge, Mads

    2016-01-01

    We employ a semi-classical Langevin approach to study current-induced atomic dynamics in a partially dehydrogenated armchair graphene nanoribbon. All parameters are obtained from density functional theory. The dehydrogenated carbon dimers behave as effective impurities, whose motion decouples from the rest of carbon atoms. The electrical current can couple the dimer motion in a coherent fashion. The coupling, which is mediated by nonconservative and pseudo-magnetic current-induced forces, change the atomic dynamics, and thereby show their signature in this simple system. We study the atomic dynamics and current-induced vibrational instabilities using a simplified eigen-mode analysis. Our study illustrates how armchair nanoribbons can serve as a possible testbed for probing the current-induced forces. PMID:26925354

  2. Vibration Monitoring Using Fiber Optic Sensors in a Lead-Bismuth Eutectic Cooled Nuclear Fuel Assembly †

    PubMed Central

    De Pauw, Ben; Lamberti, Alfredo; Ertveldt, Julien; Rezayat, Ali; van Tichelen, Katrien; Vanlanduit, Steve; Berghmans, Francis

    2016-01-01

    Excessive fuel assembly vibrations in nuclear reactor cores should be avoided in order not to compromise the lifetime of the assembly and in order to prevent the occurrence of safety hazards. This issue is particularly relevant to new reactor designs that use liquid metal coolants, such as, for example, a molten lead-bismuth eutectic. The flow of molten heavy metal around and through the fuel assembly may cause the latter to vibrate and hence suffer degradation as a result of, for example, fretting wear or mechanical fatigue. In this paper, we demonstrate the use of optical fiber sensors to measure the fuel assembly vibration in a lead-bismuth eutectic cooled installation which can be used as input to assess vibration-related safety hazards. We show that the vibration characteristics of the fuel pins in the fuel assembly can be experimentally determined with minimal intrusiveness and with high precision owing to the small dimensions and properties of the sensors. In particular, we were able to record local strain level differences of about 0.2 μϵ allowing us to reliably estimate the vibration amplitudes and modal parameters of the fuel assembly based on optical fiber sensor readings during different stages of the operation of the facility, including the onset of the coolant circulation and steady-state operation. PMID:27110782

  3. Numerical Approximations of Flow Induced Vibrations of Vocal Folds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sváček, P.; Horáček, J.

    2010-09-01

    The paper is interested in numerical modelling of incompressible channel flow interacting with elastic part of its walls simulating vocal fold oscillations. The flow in moving domain is described with the aid of the Arbitrary Lagrangian-Eulerian method, see e.g. [1], and governed by the 2D incompressible Navier-Stokes equations. The flow model is coupled with the structural motion modelled by an aeroelastic two degrees of freedom model of the oscillating vocal folds, cf. [2], [9]. The described fluid-structure interaction problem is discretized in time and space, see also [1]. The numerical results of a channel flow modelling the glottal region of the human vocal tract including the vibrating vocal folds are shown. The vibrations of the channel walls are either prescribed (1st case) or induced by the aerodynamical forces (2nd case).

  4. Laser-induced vibration of a thin soap film.

    PubMed

    Emile, Olivier; Emile, Janine

    2014-09-21

    We report on the vibration of a thin soap film based on the optical radiation pressure force. The modulated low power laser induces a counter gravity flow in a vertical free-standing draining film. The thickness of the soap film is then higher in the upper region than in the lower region of the film. Moreover, the lifetime of the film is dramatically increased by a factor of 2. Since the laser beam only acts mechanically on the film interfaces, such a film can be employed in an optofluidic diaphragm pump, the interfaces behaving like a vibrating membrane and the liquid in-between being the fluid to be pumped. Such a pump could then be used in delicate micro-equipment, in chips where temperature variations are detrimental and even in biological systems. PMID:25017934

  5. Interaction-induced adiabatic cooling for antiferromagnetism in optical lattices

    SciTech Connect

    Dare, A.-M.; Raymond, L.; Albinet, G.; Tremblay, A.-M. S.

    2007-08-01

    In the experimental context of cold-fermion optical lattices, we discuss the possibilities to approach the pseudogap or ordered phases by manipulating the scattering length or the strength of the laser-induced lattice potential. Using the two-particle self-consistent approach, as well as quantum Monte Carlo simulations, we provide isentropic curves for the two- and three-dimensional Hubbard models at half-filling. These quantitative results are important for practical attempts to reach the ordered antiferromagnetic phase in experiments on optical lattices of two-component fermions. We find that adiabatically turning on the interaction in two dimensions to cool the system is not very effective. In three dimensions, adiabatic cooling to the antiferromagnetic phase can be achieved in such a manner, although the cooling efficiency is not as high as initially suggested by dynamical mean-field theory. Adiabatic cooling by turning off the repulsion beginning at strong coupling is possible in certain cases.

  6. Cross flow induced vibrations in staggered arrays of cylindrical structures

    SciTech Connect

    Marn, J.

    1991-12-31

    Flow induced vibrations cause by instability is the subject of this investigation. The bulk of the work performed is theoretical in nature, the comparison with some of existing experimental data is given for each of four models described. First model encompasses the effects of prescribed motion on the cylinder. Such circumstances occur in the case of vortex shedding initiated instability. The reduced velocity within the cylinder array is low and there is no coupling between the adjacent cylinders. Second model assumes certain form of vibration and corresponding behavior of the perturbed velocity field in temporal and one of spatial coordinates thus transforming partial differential equations into ordinary differential equations and takes into account the motion of the neighboring cylinder. This corresponds to fluid elastic controlled instabilities. The resulting equations are solved analytically. The model is used for better understanding of the equations of cylinder motion as well as for quick estimates of threshold of instability. Third model relaxes an assumption about the form of vibration in spatial direction and uses the vorticity formulation of equation of fluid motion to account for fluid-solid interaction. This model analysis is of two phase (air-water mixture) flow. The void fraction distribution is found to be the single most decisive factor to determine the onset of instability for such a domain. In conclusion, two distinct mechanism were found to be responsible for flow induced vibration caused instabilities, (1) outside source controlled periodic excitation (such as vortex shedding) -- described by the first model and (2) fluid elastic forces -- described by second, third and fourth models. For the values of reduced velocity below 0.7 first model is proposed, for the values above 0.7, the rest.

  7. Flow-induced vibration and instability of some nuclear-reactor-system components. [PWR

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, S.S.

    1983-01-01

    The high-velocity coolant flowing through a reactor system component is a source of energy that can induce component vibration and instability. In fact, many reactor components have suffered from excessive vibration and/or dynamic instability. The potential for detrimental flow-induced vibration makes it necessary that design engineers give detailed considerations to the flow-induced vibration problems. Flow-induced-vibration studies have been performed in many countries. Significant progress has been made in understanding the different phenomena and development of design guidelines to avoid damaging vibration. The purpose of this paper is to present an overview of the recent progress in several selected areas, to discuss some new results and to indentify future research needs. Specifically, the following areas will be presented: examples of flow-induced-vibration problems in reactor components; excitation mechanisms and component response characteristics; instability mechanisms and stability criteria; design considerations; and future research needs.

  8. Flow induced vibrations in arrays of irregularly spaced cylinders

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Taub, Gordon; Michelin, Sébastien

    2014-11-01

    Historically the main industrial applications of cylinder arrays in cross flows favored regular arrangements of cylinders. For this reason, most past studies of Flow Induced Vibrations (FIV) in large cylinder arrays have focused on such arrangements. Recently there has been some interest in generating renewable energy using FIV of bluff bodies. In such applications it will likely be beneficial to enhance, rather than suppress FIV. It is not known a priori if regular or irregularly spaced arrays are most adequate for this type of application. In this study, wind tunnel experiments were conducted on one regularly spaced array and four different irregularly spaced arrays of cylinders in a cross flow. Each arrangement of cylinders was examined under eight different orientations to a cross flow ranging between 10 m/s and 17 m/s. The average amplitude of vibration of the cylinders was found to highly depend on arrangement and orientation. The typical amplitude of vibration of the rods in the irregular arrangements were found to be an order of magnitude larger than that of the regular array. A simple model was proposed in order to predict if a given arrangement was likely to produce large oscillations, and the validity of the model was examined. This research was supported by a Marie Curie International Reintegration Grant within the 7th European Community Framework Program (Grant PIRG08-GA-2010-276762).

  9. Flow induced vibrations in the SSME injector heads

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lepore, Frank A.

    1991-01-01

    A description is given of the flowfield in the Space Shuttle Main Engine (SSME) powerhead, the mechanisms which control flow-induced vibrations, and previous experimental work. An in-depth description is given of the development phase of the program , which includes the analysis, design, and fabrication of liquid oxygen (LOX) posts models used in the experimental phase, as well as test facilities, equipment, and procedures used. Also covered is the experimental data analysis, which includes overall steady state powerhead flowfield as well as the high frequency response of the LOX posts.

  10. A Randomized Trial on the Effect of Bone Tissue on Vibration-induced Muscle Strength Gain and Vibration-induced Reflex Muscle Activity

    PubMed Central

    Cidem, Muharrem; Karacan, İlhan; Diraçoğlu, Demirhan; Yıldız, Aysel; Küçük, Suat Hayri; Uludağ, Murat; Gün, Kerem; Özkaya, Murat; Karamehmetoğlu, Şafak Sahir

    2014-01-01

    Background: Whole-body vibration (WBV) induces reflex muscle activity and leads to increased muscle strength. However, little is known about the physiological mechanisms underlying the effects of whole-body vibration on muscular performance. Tonic vibration reflex is the most commonly cited mechanism to explain the effects of whole-body vibration on muscular performance, although there is no conclusive evidence that tonic vibration reflex occurs. The bone myoregulation reflex is another neurological mechanism used to explain the effects of vibration on muscular performance. Bone myoregulation reflex is defined as a reflex mechanism in which osteocytes exposed to cyclic mechanical loading induce muscle activity. Aims: The aim of this study was to assess whether bone tissue affected vibration-induced reflex muscle activity and vibration-induced muscle strength gain. Study Design: A prospective, randomised, controlled, double-blind, parallel-group clinical trial. Methods: Thirty-four participants were randomised into two groups. High-magnitude whole-body vibration was applied in the exercise group, whereas low-magnitude whole-body vibration exercises were applied in the control group throughout 20 sessions. Hip bone mineral density, isokinetic muscle strength, and plasma sclerostin levels were measured. The surface electromyography data were processed to obtain the Root Mean Squares, which were normalised by maximal voluntarily contraction. Results: In the exercise group, muscle strength increased in the right and left knee flexors (23.9%, p=0.004 and 27.5%, p<0.0001, respectively). However, no significant change was observed in the knee extensor muscle strength. There was no significant change in the knee muscle strength in the control group. The vibration-induced corrected Root Mean Squares of the semitendinosus muscle was decreased by 2.8 times (p=0.005) in the exercise group, whereas there was no change in the control group. Sclerostin index was decreased by 15

  11. Flow Induced Vibration Program at Argonne National Laboratory

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1984-01-01

    Argonne National Laboratory has had a Flow Induced Vibration Program since 1967; the Program currently resides in the Laboratory's Components Technology Division. Throughout its existence, the overall objective of the program has been to develop and apply new and/or improved methods of analysis and testing for the design evaluation of nuclear reactor plant components and heat exchange equipment from the standpoint of flow induced vibration. Historically, the majority of the program activities have been funded by the US Atomic Energy Commission (AEC), Energy Research and Development Administration (ERDA), and Department of Energy (DOE). Current DOE funding is from the Breeder Mechanical Component Development Division, Office of Breeder Technology Projects; Energy Conversion and Utilization Technology (ECUT) Program, Office of Energy Systems Research; and Division of Engineering, Mathematical and Geosciences, Office of Basic Energy Sciences. Testing of Clinch River Breeder Reactor upper plenum components has been funded by the Clinch River Breeder Reactor Plant (CRBRP) Project Office. Work has also been performed under contract with Foster Wheeler, General Electric, Duke Power Company, US Nuclear Regulatory Commission, and Westinghouse.

  12. Vibrational Studies of Adsorbate-Induced Reconstruction on Molybdenum Surfaces.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lopinski, Gregory Peter

    Adsorbate-induced rearrangement of the substrate structure strongly modifies the adsorbate-substrate and adsorbate-adsorbate interactions, leading to the complex behavior observed in many chemisorption systems. In this thesis the H/Mo(211), O/Mo(211) and Na/Mo(100) systems have been studied using high resolution electron energy loss spectroscopy (HREELS) to observe vibrations of the adsorbed atoms. The vibrational data is correlated with observations of the long-range order probed by LEED as well as the work function changes induced by adsorption. Adsorbate -induced substrate reconstruction plays an important role in all three of these systems. Studies of the coadsorption systems O+H/Mo(211) and Na+O/Mo(100) indicate how these effects can influence interactions between adsorbates. For H/Mo(211), above 1ML a (1 x 1) to (1 x 2) transition is observed and attributed to modification of the substrate periodicity. Below 1ML, H atoms are bridge bonded and induce local distortions of the substrate. The transition to the (1 x 2) phase involves the ordering of these displacements and occupation of three-fold sites partially populated by conversion of the bridge bonded species. This conversion accounts for the sawtooth-like coverage dependence of the work function. The structural model proposed for this system is also supported by the desorption parameters and partial molar entropy extracted from adsorption isobars. Oxygen adsorption on Mo(211) involves the occupation of multiple binding sites, with both the long-range order and the local geometry of the adsorbate phases strongly temperature dependent. Coadsorption of low coverages of oxygen and hydrogen leads to segregation of the two adsorbates which can be understood in terms of a substrate-mediated repulsive interaction between O and H. For Na/Mo(100), the frequency of the Na-Mo symmetric stretch mode does not shift with coverage although the mode intensity is strongly coverage dependent. The absence of a frequency shift

  13. Characterization of vortex-induced vibration of a flexible cylinder

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shang, Jessica; Stone, Howard; Smits, Alexander

    2012-11-01

    In this study, the phenomena of 3D vortex-induced vibration (VIV) of a flexible cylinder (diameter D) is shown to be distinct from 2D VIV. We seek to identify correlations between wake regimes and vibration responses for a low mass-ratio (m* = 1.2), flexible (E = 1 . 2 MPa, natural frequency in water fN = 0 . 37 Hz) cantilevered cylinder undergoing cross-flow for reduced velocity U* = 20-120 (U* = U /fN D). A P+S wake mode appears for a range of U*; the onset of this range may be correlated with a hysteretic jump to an upper branch in the transverse amplitude response (AY* =AY / D) at several locations along the midspan. This asymmetric wake mode does not present a unique transverse frequency response (fY* =fY /fN) in the cylinder. The upper branch in the amplitude response gives way to an abrupt decrease in AY* to a lower branch, accompanied by a bifurcation in fY*. The bifurcation takes place over a narrow range of U* where the lower fY* gradually transfers power to a higher fY*, and may demarcate a wake transition regime between laminar and turbulence states.

  14. Added mass and critical mass in vortex induced vibration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Konstantinidis, Efstathios

    2015-11-01

    The critical mass phenomenon is the observation that a circular cylinder suspended freely in a fluid stream without a mechanical restoring force exhibits significant vortex induced vibration if its mass is below some value whereas insignificant vibration occurs if the mass is above this value. While the phenomenon is known, its origin remains largely unknown. Furthermore, there are several outstanding questions regarding this phenomenon which cannot be explained on the basis of the existing theoretical framework. In this work, a new formulation of the added mass in the context of potential flow is presented. This leads to a new expression for the potential force, which is more complex than the classical one, that is subsequently employed in simplified form in order to analytically model the flow-structure interaction by decomposing the fluid force into potential and vortex components via the equation of cylinder motion. It is found that the model predicts a significant increase in the amplitude response of a freely suspended cylinder in sharp contrast to predictions using the classical formulation of the added mass. Finally, the model equations are employed to exemplify the phenomenology of the critical mass in real flows.

  15. Jet-Cooled Laser-Induced Fluorescence Spectroscopy of T-Butoxy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reilly, Neil J.; Cheng, Lan; Stanton, John F.; Miller, Terry A.; Liu, Jinjun

    2015-06-01

    The vibrational structures of the tilde A ^2A_1 and tilde X ^2E states of t-butoxy were obtained in jet-cooled laser-induced fluorescence (LIF) and dispersed fluorescence (DF) spectroscopic measurements. The observed transitions are assigned based on vibrational frequencies calculated using Complete Active Space Self-Consistent Field (CASSCF) method and the predicted Franck-Condon factors. The spin-orbit (SO) splitting was measured to be 35(5) cm-1 for the lowest vibrational level of the ground (tilde X ^2E) state and increases with increasing vibrational quantum number of the CO stretch mode. Vibronic analysis of the DF spectra suggests that Jahn-Teller (JT)-active modes of the ground-state t-butoxy radical are similar to those of methoxy and would be the same if methyl groups were replaced by hydrogen atoms. Coupled-cluster calculations show that electron delocalization, introduced by the substitution of hydrogens with methyl groups, reduces the electronic contribution of the SO splittings by only around ten percent, and a calculation on the vibronic levels based on quasidiabatic model Hamiltonian clearly attributes the relatively small SO splitting of the tilde X ^2E state of t-butoxy mainly to stronger reduction of orbital angular momentum by the JT-active modes when compared to methoxy. The rotational and fine structure of the LIF transition to the first CO stretch overtone level of the tilde A^2A_1 state has been simulated using a spectroscopic model first proposed for methoxy, yielding an accurate determination of the rotational constants of both tilde A and tilde X states.

  16. Light-induced vibration in the hearing organ.

    PubMed

    Ren, Tianying; He, Wenxuan; Li, Yizeng; Grosh, Karl; Fridberger, Anders

    2014-01-01

    The exceptional sensitivity of mammalian hearing organs is attributed to an active process, where force produced by sensory cells boost sound-induced vibrations, making soft sounds audible. This process is thought to be local, with each section of the hearing organ capable of amplifying sound-evoked movement, and nearly instantaneous, since amplification can work for sounds at frequencies up to 100 kHz in some species. To test these fundamental precepts, we developed a method for focally stimulating the living hearing organ with light. Light pulses caused intense and highly damped mechanical responses followed by traveling waves that developed with considerable delay. The delayed response was identical to movements evoked by click-like sounds. This shows that the active process is neither local nor instantaneous, but requires mechanical waves traveling from the cochlear base toward its apex. A physiologically-based mathematical model shows that such waves engage the active process, enhancing hearing sensitivity. PMID:25087606

  17. Time-dependent Navier-Stokes computations for flow-induced vibrations of vanes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, B. L.; O'Farrel, J. M.; Holt, J. B.; Dougherty, N. S.

    Flows over two curved vane configurations were computed using a time-accurate compressible Navier-Stokes flow model. One configuration showed the presence of strong flow-induced vibrations at Strouhal numbers near 0.19 and 0.38 for bending and torsional excitation. In the other configuration, a simple modification reduced both types of response. Laminar flows were analyzed for the effects of flow-induced vibrations, and flow fields were solved for a rigid vane and a vane undergoing forced vibrations at prescribed amplitude and frequency simulating vibration response to a coupled vortex-shedding/elastic motion feedback cycle.

  18. Hybrid isolation of micro vibrations induced by reaction wheels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Dae-Oen; Park, Geeyong; Han, Jae-Hung

    2016-02-01

    As the technology for precision satellite payloads continues to advance, the requirements for the pointing stability of the satellites are becoming extremely high. In many situations, even small amplitude disturbances generated by the onboard components may cause serious degradation in the performance of high precision payloads. In such situations, vibration isolators can be installed to reduce the vibration transmission. In this work, a hybrid vibration isolator comprising passive and active components is proposed to provide an effective solution to the vibration problems caused by the reaction wheel disturbances. Firstly, mathematical modeling and experimental study of a single axis vibration isolator having high damping and high roll-off rate for the high frequency region and active components that enhance isolation performance for narrow frequency bands are presented. This concept is then extended to multi-axis by forming Stewart platform and the performance is experimentally verified. The tests on a flexible testbed show effective vibration isolation by the proposed vibration isolator.

  19. Laser induced vibrational energy transfer in iron pentacarbonyl

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Langsam, Yedidyah; Ronn, A. M.

    1984-01-01

    The internal kinetics of Fe(CO)5 as well as the kinetics between Fe(CO)5 and other nonreactive species were studied using the technique of laser induced fluorescence. The energy transfer behavior of this large polyatomic is discussed in terms of existing V-V and V-T/R theories and collisional energy transfer. Iron pentacarbonyl's vibrational energy structure is treated by means of a simple three and four level energy transfer scheme. Subsequent to excitation of the 10 μ region by a CO2 laser, infrared fluorescence has been detected from the ˜16, ˜5, and ˜4 μ regions of Fe(CO)5. A single exponential decay rate of 13.6 ms-1 Torr-1 is observed from the ˜5 μ region, in good agreement with other decay rates established for smaller polyatomics possessing similar vibrational level structure. Under conditions of low fluence (˜30 mJ/cm2), this region is activated at a rate of 474 ms-1 Torr-1 suggesting a rapid near resonant collisional energy transfer. Under conditions of high fluence (˜5 J/cm2), the activation of the ˜5 μ region proceeds at a rate of 1250 ms-1 Torr-1 suggesting a different pathway for the determining step of the excitation process. The rare gas deactivation rates as well as those with Ni(CO)4, CO(CO)3No, and CO (as well as the reverse rate) and the crossover rate from excited Fe(CO)5 to CO in high rare gas dilution have also been determined.

  20. Improved Modal Dynamics of Wind Turbines to Avoid Stall-induced Vibrations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hansen, M. H.

    2003-04-01

    Stall-induced edgewise blade vibrations have occasionally been observed on three-bladed wind turbines over the last decade. Experiments and numerical simulations have shown that these blade vibrations are related to certain vibration modes of the turbines. A recent experiment with a 600 kW turbine has shown that a backward whirling mode associated with edgewise blade vibrations is less aerodynamically damped than the corresponding forward whirling mode. In this article the mode shapes of the particular turbine are analysed, based on a simplified turbine model described in a multi-blade formulation. It is shown that the vibrations of the blades for the backward and forward edgewise whirling modes are different, which can explain the measured difference in aerodynamic damping. The modal dynamics of the entire turbine is important for stability assessments; blade-only analysis can be misleading. In some cases the modal dynamics may even be improved to avoid stall-induced vibrations.

  1. Vibrational predissociation and vibrationally induced isomerization of 3-aminophenol-ammonia.

    PubMed

    Heid, Cornelia G; Merrill, Wyatt G; Case, Amanda S; Crim, F Fleming

    2015-01-01

    We investigate the vibrational predissociation dynamics of the hydrogen-bonded 3-aminophenol-ammonia cluster (3-AP-NH3) in the OH and NH stretching regions. Vibrational excitation provides enough energy to dissociate the cluster into its constituent 3-AP and NH3 monomers, and we detect the 3-AP fragments via (1 + 1) resonance-enhanced multiphoton ionization (REMPI). The distribution of vibrational states of the 3-AP fragment suggests the presence of two distinct dissociation pathways. The first dissociation channel produces a broad, unstructured feature in the REMPI-action spectrum after excitation of any of the OH or NH stretching vibrations, pointing to a nearly statistical dissociation pathway with extensive coupling among the vibrations in the cluster during the vibrational predissociation. The second dissociation channel produces distinct, resolved features on top of the broad feature but only following excitation of the OH or symmetric NH3 stretch in the cluster. This striking mode-specificity is consistent with strong coupling of these two modes to the dissociation coordinate (the O-H⋯N bond). The presence of clearly resolved transitions to the electronic origin and to the 10a(2) + 10b(2) state of the cis-3-AP isomer shows that vibrational excitation is driving the isomerization of the trans-3-AP-NH3 isomer to the cis-3-AP-NH3 isomer in the course of the dissociation. PMID:25573564

  2. Vibrational predissociation and vibrationally induced isomerization of 3-aminophenol-ammonia

    SciTech Connect

    Heid, Cornelia G.; Merrill, Wyatt G.; Case, Amanda S. Crim, F. Fleming

    2015-01-07

    We investigate the vibrational predissociation dynamics of the hydrogen-bonded 3-aminophenol-ammonia cluster (3-AP-NH{sub 3}) in the OH and NH stretching regions. Vibrational excitation provides enough energy to dissociate the cluster into its constituent 3-AP and NH{sub 3} monomers, and we detect the 3-AP fragments via (1 + 1) resonance-enhanced multiphoton ionization (REMPI). The distribution of vibrational states of the 3-AP fragment suggests the presence of two distinct dissociation pathways. The first dissociation channel produces a broad, unstructured feature in the REMPI-action spectrum after excitation of any of the OH or NH stretching vibrations, pointing to a nearly statistical dissociation pathway with extensive coupling among the vibrations in the cluster during the vibrational predissociation. The second dissociation channel produces distinct, resolved features on top of the broad feature but only following excitation of the OH or symmetric NH{sub 3} stretch in the cluster. This striking mode-specificity is consistent with strong coupling of these two modes to the dissociation coordinate (the O–H⋯N bond). The presence of clearly resolved transitions to the electronic origin and to the 10a{sup 2} + 10b{sup 2} state of the cis-3-AP isomer shows that vibrational excitation is driving the isomerization of the trans-3-AP-NH{sub 3} isomer to the cis-3-AP-NH{sub 3} isomer in the course of the dissociation.

  3. Characterization of Train-Induced Vibration and its Effect on Fecal Corticosterone Metabolites in Mice

    PubMed Central

    Atanasov, Nicholas A; Sargent, Jennifer L; Parmigiani, John P; Palme, Rupert; Diggs, Helen E

    2015-01-01

    Excessive environmental vibrations can have deleterious effects on animal health and experimental results, but they remain poorly understood in the animal laboratory setting. The aims of this study were to characterize train-associated vibration in a rodent vivarium and to assess the effects of this vibration on the reproductive success and fecal corticosterone metabolite levels of mice. An instrumented cage, featuring a high-sensitivity microphone and accelerometer, was used to characterize the vibrations and sound in a vivarium that is near an active railroad. The vibrations caused by the passing trains are 3 times larger in amplitude than are the ambient facility vibrations, whereas most of the associated sound was below the audible range for mice. Mice housed in the room closest to the railroad tracks had pregnancy rates that were 50% to 60% lower than those of mice of the same strains but bred in other parts of the facility. To verify the effect of the train vibrations, we used a custom-built electromagnetic shaker to simulate the train-induced vibrations in a controlled environment. Fecal pellets were collected from male and female mice that were exposed to the simulated vibrations and from unexposed control animals. Analysis of the fecal samples revealed that vibrations similar to those produced by a passing train can increase the levels of fecal corticosterone metabolites in female mice. These increases warrant attention to the effects of vibration on mice and, consequently, on reproduction and experimental outcomes. PMID:26632783

  4. Characterization of Train-Induced Vibration and its Effect on Fecal Corticosterone Metabolites in Mice.

    PubMed

    Atanasov, Nicholas A; Sargent, Jennifer L; Parmigiani, John P; Palme, Rupert; Diggs, Helen E

    2015-11-01

    Excessive environmental vibrations can have deleterious effects on animal health and experimental results, but they remain poorly understood in the animal laboratory setting. The aims of this study were to characterize train-associated vibration in a rodent vivarium and to assess the effects of this vibration on the reproductive success and fecal corticosterone metabolite levels of mice. An instrumented cage, featuring a high-sensitivity microphone and accelerometer, was used to characterize the vibrations and sound in a vivarium that is near an active railroad. The vibrations caused by the passing trains are 3 times larger in amplitude than are the ambient facility vibrations, whereas most of the associated sound was below the audible range for mice. Mice housed in the room closest to the railroad tracks had pregnancy rates that were 50% to 60% lower than those of mice of the same strains but bred in other parts of the facility. To verify the effect of the train vibrations, we used a custom-built electromagnetic shaker to simulate the train-induced vibrations in a controlled environment. Fecal pellets were collected from male and female mice that were exposed to the simulated vibrations and from unexposed control animals. Analysis of the fecal samples revealed that vibrations similar to those produced by a passing train can increase the levels of fecal corticosterone metabolites in female mice. These increases warrant attention to the effects of vibration on mice and, consequently, on reproduction and experimental outcomes. PMID:26632783

  5. MIMO adaptive control of thruster-firing-induced vibration of satellites using multifunctional platforms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ma, Kougen; Ghasemi-Nejhad, Mehrdad N.

    2005-05-01

    This paper presents the concept, control strategy, and simulations of suppressing the thruster-firing-induced vibration of satellites. First, a satellite vibration reduction concept of utilizing the UHM multifunctional platform is discussed, and the structural configurations of the platform as well as the combination of the platform and a satellite are described. A satellite-like frame with the platform is analyzed, and the predominant modes of the frame are determined. A MIMO adaptive control scheme is then developed to suppress the frame vibration, and a convergence factor vector concept is introduced to ease the multi-channel convergence rate control. This controller is adjusted based on the vibration information of the frame and drives the platform to isolate the vibration transmission from the firing thruster to the satellite structure. The entire system has ten actuators: four piezoelectric stack actuators and six piezoelectric patch actuators. Eleven vibration components of the frame and platform are controlled. Nine components are in the frame for the satellite vibration suppression, and two are in the top-device plate of the platform for the thruster vibration suppression. Finally, simulations are performed to suppress the vibration of the frame for three platform positions to simulate the misalignment correction of the satellite thrust vector. The results demonstrate that the entire frame vibration at its dominant frequency decreases to 7-10% of its uncontrolled value in the three platform positions, and the thruster vibration decreases to 7.5% of its uncontrolled value.

  6. Phase modulation for reduced vibration sensitivity in laser-cooled clocks in space

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Klipstein, W.; Dick, G.; Jefferts, S.; Walls, F.

    2001-01-01

    The standard interrogation technique in atomic beam clocks is square-wave frequency modulation (SWFM), which suffers a first order sensitivity to vibrations as changes in the transit time of the atoms translates to perceived frequency errors. Square-wave phase modulation (SWPM) interrogation eliminates sensitivity to this noise.

  7. A trial study of vibration-induced effects on the spontaneous potential

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weibin, Sun; Weiting, Qiu; Zhanxiang, He

    2008-06-01

    Vibrator excitation generates not only reflections and refractions of wave fields on the subsurface interfaces but also electromagnetic waves with different frequencies. In this paper, we address the vibration-induced effects on the spontaneous potential field. The effects of controllable vibration on the spontaneous potential field were studied under real field geologic conditions. Experimental data confirmed that the vibration-induced effects on the spontaneous potential field do exist under field conditions. Monitoring records over a long time interval showed that there exist three information zones in the vibration-induced effects on the spontaneous potential field. These are the signal-varying zone, the extreme-stable zone, and the relaxation-recovery zone. Combined with different well-site data, it was concluded that the time-varying features of the anomalies in the information zones was closely related to the properties of the subsurface liquid (oil and water).

  8. Ice-Induced Non-Linear Vibration of AN Offshore Platform

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jin, D. P.; Hu, H. Y.

    1998-07-01

    The non-linear behavior of ice-induced vibration of an offshore platform with four legs is investigated in this paper. The equations of motion of the system are derived by using the Hamiltonian Principle. The force of moving ice based on the self-excitation and locking is used to model the phenomenon of contact between the ice and the platform. By using the approach of multiple scales, the primary resonance of the ice-induced vibration of the platform is analyzed. The numerical results show that there exist several kinds of combination resonances, including self-excited vibration and locking vibration. These results coincide with those observed from an offshore platform in the North China Sea, and hence enable one to gain insight into the ice-induced vibration of offshore platforms.

  9. Vibration induced white-feet: Overview and field study of vibration exposure and reported symptoms in workers

    PubMed Central

    Eger, Tammy; Thompson, Aaron; Leduc, Mallorie; Krajnak, Kristine; Goggins, Katie; Godwin, Alison; House, Ron

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND Workers who stand on platforms or equipment that vibrate are exposed to foot-transmitted vibration (FTV). Exposure to FTV can lead to vibration white feet/toes resulting in blanching of the toes, and tingling and numbness in the feet and toes. OBJECTIVES The objectives are 1) to review the current state of knowledge of the health risks associated with foot-transmitted vibration (FTV), and 2) to identify the characteristics of FTV and discuss the associated risk of vibration-induced injury. PARTICIPANTS Workers who operated locomotives (n = 3), bolting platforms (n = 10), jumbo drills (n = 7), raise drilling platforms (n = 4), and crushers (n = 3), participated. METHODS A tri-axial accelerometer was used to measure FTV in accordance with ISO 2631-1 guidelines. Frequency-weighted root-mean-square acceleration and the dominant frequency are reported. Participants were also asked to report pain/ache/discomfort in the hands and/or feet. RESULTS Reports of pain/discomfort/ache were highest in raise platform workers and jumbo drill operators who were exposed to FTV in the 40 Hz and 28 Hz range respectively. Reports of discomfort/ache/pain were lowest in the locomotive and crusher operators who were exposed to FTV below 10 Hz. These findings are consistent with animal studies that have shown vascular and neural damage in exposed appendages occurs at frequencies above 40 Hz. CONCLUSIONS Operators exposed to FTV at 40 Hz appear to be at greater risk of experiencing vibration induced injury. Future research is required to document the characteristics of FTV and epidemiological evidence is required to link exposure with injury. PMID:24004754

  10. Development of Design Criteria for Fluid Induced Structural Vibrations in Steam Generators and Heat Exchangers

    SciTech Connect

    Uvan Catton; Vijay K. Dhir; Deepanjan Mitra; Omar Alquaddoomi; Pierangelo Adinolfi

    2004-04-06

    Flow-induced vibration in heat exchangers has been a major cause of concern in the nuclear industry for several decades. Many incidents of failure of heat exchangers due to apparent flow-induced vibration have been reported through the USNRC incident reporting system. Almost all heat exchangers have to deal with this problem during their operation. The phenomenon has been studied since the 1970s and the database of experimental studies on flow-induced vibration is constantly updated with new findings and improved design criteria for heat exchangers.

  11. Low vibration cooling using a pulse tube cooler and cryostat for the GRAVITY beam combiner instrument at the VLTI

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haug, M.; Haussmann, F.; Kellner, S.; Kern, L.; Eisenhauer, F.; Lizon, J.-L.; Dietrich, M.; Thummes, G.

    2014-07-01

    GRAVITY is a second generation VLTI instrument for high-precision narrow-angle astrometry and phase-referenced interferometric imaging in the astronomical K-band. The cryostat of the beam combiner instrument provides the required temperatures for the various subunits ranging from 40K to 290K with a milli-Kelvin temperature stability for some selected units. The bath cryostat is cooled with liquid nitrogen and makes use of the exhaust gas to cool the main optical bench to an intermediate temperature of 240K. The fringe tracking detector will be cooled separately by a single-stage pulse tube cooler to a temperature of 40K. The pulse tube cooler is optimized for minimum vibrations. In particular its warm side is connected to the 80K reservoir of the LN2 cryostat to minimize the required input power. All temperature levels are actively stabilized by electric heaters. The cold bench is supported separately from the vacuum vessel and the liquid nitrogen reservoir to minimize the transfer of acoustic noise onto the instrument.

  12. Evaluation and study on PMD performance of OPGW optical cables in wind induced vibration and galloping test environment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Jie; Zhao, Ziyuan

    2010-08-01

    This paper describes the concepts of wind induced vibration and galloping of power transmission lines, indicates the necessity of evaluation in wind induced vibration and galloping test environment, proposes the evaluation method of wind induced vibration and galloping, summarizes and analyzes the measured PMD performance data of OPGW optical fiber obtained from wind induced vibration and galloping tests on OPGW, and reaches a conclusion that the PMD performance parameters of OPGW cable stocks meet the industry standard in wind induced vibration and galloping environment, and will play an important role in project construction guidance and operation maintenance.

  13. Harbor Seal Vibrissa Morphology Reduces Vortex-Induced Vibrations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beem, Heather; Dahl, Jason; Triantafyllou, Michael

    2011-11-01

    Studies show that harbor seals are adept at tracking small movements in the water, such as those left in the wake of fish, by using their highly sensitive whiskers to detect fluid structures, even without auditory or visual cues. The present work investigates the intriguing claim that the unique morphology of the harbor seal whisker suppresses Vortex Induced Vibrations (VIV). This implies that the geometry is specialized to reduce the background noise caused by the whisker's own wake in the detection of the upstream target. Forces on a rigid whisker model (scale: 50x) being towed steadily down a water tank while experiencing imposed oscillations are measured. A range of frequencies and amplitudes are tested, the hydrodynamic lift coefficient in phase with velocity (CL,v) is calculated for each, and values are combined in a contour plot. The region of positive CL,v peaks at an amplitude ratio of 0.1, indicating that the whisker's undulatory, asymmetric structure considerably reduces (but does not entirely suppress) regions where the structure experiences VIV in comparison with a standard cylinder, whose peak reaches an amplitude ratio of 0.8.

  14. Higher Harmonic Forces in Purely Crossflow Vortex-Induced Vibrations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Modarres-Sadeghi, Yahya; Seyed-Aghazadeh, Banafsheh; Bourguet, Remi; Karniadakis, George; Triantafyllou, Michael

    2013-11-01

    In vortex-induced vibrations (VIV) of flexibly-mounted rigid cylinders free to oscillate both in the inline and crossflow directions, higher (3rd) harmonic forces have already been observed in the crossflow direction. In the present work, we report higher harmonic force components for a flexibly-mounted rigid cylinder with only one degree of freedom in the crossflow direction. We show that the inline displacement is not necessary to observe higher harmonic components in the crossflow force spectrum. Due to the relative velocity of the cylinder with respect to the oncoming flow, the lift and drag forces make an angle with respect to the crossflow and inline directions, and the contribution of the components of each of these forces in the crossflow direction results in a 3rd harmonic force component. These higher harmonic components have been observed in self-excited VIV experiments, performed in a water tunnel for a Reynolds number range of Re = 400-1000, as well as in numerical simulation results at Re = 100. We also find that the maximum ratio of the 3rd harmonic to the 1st harmonic occurs when the phase between the crossflow force and displacement changes from 0 to 180 degrees, resulting in a small first harmonic component.

  15. Suppressing molecular vibrations in organic semiconductors by inducing strain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kubo, Takayoshi; Häusermann, Roger; Tsurumi, Junto; Soeda, Junshi; Okada, Yugo; Yamashita, Yu; Akamatsu, Norihisa; Shishido, Atsushi; Mitsui, Chikahiko; Okamoto, Toshihiro; Yanagisawa, Susumu; Matsui, Hiroyuki; Takeya, Jun

    2016-04-01

    Organic molecular semiconductors are solution processable, enabling the growth of large-area single-crystal semiconductors. Improving the performance of organic semiconductor devices by increasing the charge mobility is an ongoing quest, which calls for novel molecular and material design, and improved processing conditions. Here we show a method to increase the charge mobility in organic single-crystal field-effect transistors, by taking advantage of the inherent softness of organic semiconductors. We compress the crystal lattice uniaxially by bending the flexible devices, leading to an improved charge transport. The mobility increases from 9.7 to 16.5 cm2 V-1 s-1 by 70% under 3% strain. In-depth analysis indicates that compressing the crystal structure directly restricts the vibration of the molecules, thus suppresses dynamic disorder, a unique mechanism in organic semiconductors. Since strain can be easily induced during the fabrication process, we expect our method to be exploited to build high-performance organic devices.

  16. Suppressing molecular vibrations in organic semiconductors by inducing strain.

    PubMed

    Kubo, Takayoshi; Häusermann, Roger; Tsurumi, Junto; Soeda, Junshi; Okada, Yugo; Yamashita, Yu; Akamatsu, Norihisa; Shishido, Atsushi; Mitsui, Chikahiko; Okamoto, Toshihiro; Yanagisawa, Susumu; Matsui, Hiroyuki; Takeya, Jun

    2016-01-01

    Organic molecular semiconductors are solution processable, enabling the growth of large-area single-crystal semiconductors. Improving the performance of organic semiconductor devices by increasing the charge mobility is an ongoing quest, which calls for novel molecular and material design, and improved processing conditions. Here we show a method to increase the charge mobility in organic single-crystal field-effect transistors, by taking advantage of the inherent softness of organic semiconductors. We compress the crystal lattice uniaxially by bending the flexible devices, leading to an improved charge transport. The mobility increases from 9.7 to 16.5 cm(2) V(-1) s(-1) by 70% under 3% strain. In-depth analysis indicates that compressing the crystal structure directly restricts the vibration of the molecules, thus suppresses dynamic disorder, a unique mechanism in organic semiconductors. Since strain can be easily induced during the fabrication process, we expect our method to be exploited to build high-performance organic devices. PMID:27040501

  17. Suppressing molecular vibrations in organic semiconductors by inducing strain

    PubMed Central

    Kubo, Takayoshi; Häusermann, Roger; Tsurumi, Junto; Soeda, Junshi; Okada, Yugo; Yamashita, Yu; Akamatsu, Norihisa; Shishido, Atsushi; Mitsui, Chikahiko; Okamoto, Toshihiro; Yanagisawa, Susumu; Matsui, Hiroyuki; Takeya, Jun

    2016-01-01

    Organic molecular semiconductors are solution processable, enabling the growth of large-area single-crystal semiconductors. Improving the performance of organic semiconductor devices by increasing the charge mobility is an ongoing quest, which calls for novel molecular and material design, and improved processing conditions. Here we show a method to increase the charge mobility in organic single-crystal field-effect transistors, by taking advantage of the inherent softness of organic semiconductors. We compress the crystal lattice uniaxially by bending the flexible devices, leading to an improved charge transport. The mobility increases from 9.7 to 16.5 cm2 V−1 s−1 by 70% under 3% strain. In-depth analysis indicates that compressing the crystal structure directly restricts the vibration of the molecules, thus suppresses dynamic disorder, a unique mechanism in organic semiconductors. Since strain can be easily induced during the fabrication process, we expect our method to be exploited to build high-performance organic devices. PMID:27040501

  18. Tangential acceleration feedback control of friction induced vibration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nath, Jyayasi; Chatterjee, S.

    2016-09-01

    Tangential control action is studied on a phenomenological mass-on-belt model exhibiting friction-induced self-excited vibration attributed to the low-velocity drooping characteristics of friction which is also known as Stribeck effect. The friction phenomenon is modelled by the exponential model. Linear stability analysis is carried out near the equilibrium point and local stability boundary is delineated in the plane of control parameters. The system is observed to undergo a Hopf bifurcation as the eigenvalues determined from the linear stability analysis are found to cross the imaginary axis transversally from RHS s-plane to LHS s-plane or vice-versa as one varies the control parameters, namely non-dimensional belt velocity and the control gain. A nonlinear stability analysis by the method of Averaging reveals the subcritical nature of the Hopf bifurcation. Thus, a global stability boundary is constructed so that any choice of control parameters from the globally stable region leads to a stable equilibrium. Numerical simulations in a MATLAB SIMULINK model and bifurcation diagrams obtained in AUTO validate these analytically obtained results. Pole crossover design is implemented to optimize the filter parameters with an independent choice of belt velocity and control gain. The efficacy of this optimization (based on numerical results) in the delicate low velocity region is also enclosed.

  19. Light-induced basilar membrane vibrations in the sensitive cochlea

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grosh, Karl; Ren, Tianying; He, Wenxuan; Fridberger, Anders; Li, Yizeng; Nankali, Amir

    2015-12-01

    The exceptional sensitivity of mammalian hearing organ is attributed to an outer hair cell-mediated active process, where forces produced by sensory cells boost sound-induced vibrations, making soft sounds audible. This process is thought to be local, with each section of the hearing organ capable of amplifying sound-evoked movement, and nearly instantaneous, since amplification can work for sounds at frequencies up to 100 kHz in some species. To test these precepts, we developed a method for focally stimulating the living hearing organ with light. Light pulses caused intense and highly damped mechanical responses followed by traveling waves that developed with considerable delay. The delayed response was identical to movements evoked by click-like sounds. A physiologically based mathematical model shows that such waves engage the active process, enhancing hearing sensitivity. The experiments and the theoretical analysis show that the active process is neither local nor instantaneous, but requires mechanical waves traveling from the cochlear base toward its apex.

  20. Regimes of flow induced vibration for tandem, tethered cylinders

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nave, Gary; Stremler, Mark

    2015-11-01

    In the wake of a bluff body, there are a number of dynamic response regimes that exist for a trailing bluff body depending on spacing, structural restoring forces, and the mass-damping parameter m* ζ . For tandem cylinders with low values of m* ζ , two such regimes of motion are Gap Flow Switching and Wake Induced Vibration. In this study, we consider the dynamics of a single degree-of-freedom rigid cylinder in the wake of another in these regimes for a variety of center-to-center cylinder spacings (3-5 diameters) and Reynolds numbers (4,000-11,000). The system consists of a trailing cylinder constrained to a circular arc around a fixed leading cylinder, which, for small angle displacements, bears a close resemblance to the transversely oscillating cylinders found more commonly in existing literature. From experiments on this system, we compare and contrast the dynamic response within these two regimes. Our results show sustained oscillations in the absence of a structural restoring force in all cases, providing experimental support for the wake stiffness assumption, which is based on the mean lift toward the center line of flow.

  1. Mode competition in streamwise-only vortex induced vibrations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cagney, N.; Balabani, S.

    2013-08-01

    Time-resolved Particle-Image Velocimetry (PIV) has been used to study mode competition and transient behaviour in the wake of a cylinder experiencing Vortex-Induced Vibrations (VIV) in the streamwise direction. The cylinder response regime contained two branches, occurring above and below the onset of synchronisation between the wake and the cylinder motion (lock-in). During the first branch, the wake exhibited both the S-I mode (in which two vortices are shed simultaneously per vibration cycle) and the alternate A-II mode (similar to the well known von Kármán vortex street). An extended PIV data set acquired in this region revealed mode switching between the S-I and A-II modes. A criterion based on Proper-Orthogonal Decomposition was developed to identify which mode was dominant as a function of time. The A-II mode was found to be dominant for over 90% of the instantaneous fields examined, while the S-I mode appeared to be more unstable.Symmetrically shed vortices were found to rearrange downstream into an alternate structure in which the wake was no longer synchronised to the cylinder motion. The dominant frequency of transverse velocity fluctuations was measured throughout the wake in order to study the effects of this breakdown in more detail. For the majority of the wake, the fluctuations occurred at the Strouhal frequency, while in a region in the near wake the fluctuations occurred at the frequency of the cylinder motion. It is thought that during the first response branch vortices are formed at the cylinder response frequency, but tend to quickly rearrange downstream into an alternate structure which is no longer synchronised to the cylinder motion. As a result, the fluctuating drag will be synchronised to the structural motion, and is capable of providing positive energy transfer in the apparent absence of lock-in. Finally, the spatial dependence of the frequency of velocity fluctuations throughout the wake is used to explain some of the conflicting

  2. Study on thermally induced vibration of flexible boom in various thermal environments of vacuum chamber

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kong, Changduk; Oh, Kyung-Won; Park, Hyun-Bum; Sugiyama, Y.

    2005-02-01

    In order to simulate the thermally-induced vibration phenomenon of the flexible thin boom structure of the spacecraft such as the thin solar panel and the flexible cantilever with the attached tip mass in space, the thermally-induced vibration including thermal flutter of the flexible thin boom with the concentrated tip mass was experimentally investigated at various thermal environments using a heat lamp and both vacuum and air condition using the vacuum chamber. In this experimental study, divergence speed, natural frequency and thermal strains of the thermally-induced vibration were comparatively evaluated at various thermal environment conditions. Finally the thermally-induced vibration of the flexible boom structure of the earth orbit satellite in solar radiation environment from the earth eclipse region including umbra and penumbra was simulated using the vacuum chamber and power control of the heating lamp.

  3. Flow-induced vibration of a steam control valve

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yonezawa, Koichi; Ogawa, Ryohei; Ogi, Kanako; Takino, Tomofumi; Tsujimoto, Yoshinobu; Endo, Takahide; Tezuka, Kenichi; Morita, Ryo; Inada, Fumio

    2012-11-01

    Main steam control valves in power plants are required to operate underwide ranges of valve openings and pressure ratios. In the present paper, experimental and numerical investigations are conducted using rigid and flexible valve head supports to clarify the mechanisms of valve head vibrations that are caused by unsteady flows around the valve. The results obtained using the rigid support without valve head vibration show that the unsteady flow around the valve head causes pressure fluctuations on the valve head surface with random and impulsive wave forms. When using the flexible support, the valve head vibrates near the natural frequency of the valve head support system, and vibrations are excited around the operating conditions where the pressure fluctuation becomes greater when using the rigidly supported valve head. When the valve head vibration increases, the pressure fluctuation becomes periodic with the same frequency as the valve head vibration. The numerical results show that the response of the separated jet lags behind the valve head motion. As a result, the lateral fluid force adds negative damping on the vibration on the valve head.

  4. Accelerator vibration issues

    SciTech Connect

    Tennant, R.A.

    1985-01-01

    Vibrations induced in accelerator structures can cause particle-beam jitter and alignment difficulties. Sources of these vibrations may include pump oscillations, cooling-water turbulence, and vibrations transmitted through the floor to the accelerator structure. Drift tubes (DT) in a drift tube linac (DTL) are components likely to affect beam jitter and alignment because they normally have a heavy magnet structure on the end of a long and relatively small support stem. The natural vibrational frequencies of a drift tube have been compared with theoretical predictions. In principle, by knowing natural frequencies of accelerator components and system vibrational frequncies, an accelerator can be designed that does not have these frequencies coinciding. 2 refs., 2 figs., 2 tabs.

  5. Acoustically-coupled flow-induced vibration of a computational vocal fold model

    PubMed Central

    Daily, David Jesse; Thomson, Scott L.

    2012-01-01

    The flow-induced vibration of synthetic vocal fold models has been previously observed to be acoustically-coupled with upstream flow supply tubes. This phenomenon was investigated using a finite element model that included flow–structure–acoustic interactions. The length of the upstream duct was varied to explore the coupling between model vibration and subglottal acoustics. Incompressible and slightly compressible flow models were tested. The slightly compressible model exhibited acoustic coupling between fluid and solid domains in a manner consistent with experimental observations, whereas the incompressible model did not, showing the slightly compressible approach to be suitable for simulating acoustically-coupled vocal fold model flow-induced vibration. PMID:23585700

  6. Acoustically-coupled flow-induced vibration of a computational vocal fold model.

    PubMed

    Daily, David Jesse; Thomson, Scott L

    2013-01-15

    The flow-induced vibration of synthetic vocal fold models has been previously observed to be acoustically-coupled with upstream flow supply tubes. This phenomenon was investigated using a finite element model that included flow-structure-acoustic interactions. The length of the upstream duct was varied to explore the coupling between model vibration and subglottal acoustics. Incompressible and slightly compressible flow models were tested. The slightly compressible model exhibited acoustic coupling between fluid and solid domains in a manner consistent with experimental observations, whereas the incompressible model did not, showing the slightly compressible approach to be suitable for simulating acoustically-coupled vocal fold model flow-induced vibration. PMID:23585700

  7. Railway ground vibrations induced by wheel and rail singular defects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kouroussis, Georges; Connolly, David P.; Alexandrou, Georgios; Vogiatzis, Konstantinos

    2015-10-01

    Railway local irregularities are a growing source of ground-borne vibration and can cause negative environmental impacts, particularly in urban areas. Therefore, this paper analyses the effect of railway track singular defects (discontinuities) on ground vibration generation and propagation. A vehicle/track/soil numerical railway model is presented, capable of accurately predicting vibration levels. The prediction model is composed of a multibody vehicle model, a flexible track model and a finite/infinite element soil model. Firstly, analysis is undertaken to assess the ability of wheel/rail contact models to accurately simulate the force generation at the wheel/rail contact, in the presence of a singular defect. It is found that, although linear contact models are sufficient for modelling ground vibration on smooth tracks, when singular defects are present higher accuracy wheel/rail models are required. Furthermore, it is found that the variation in wheel/rail force during the singular defect contact depends on the track flexibility, and thus requires a fully coupled vehicle/track/foundation model. Next, a parametric study of ground vibrations generated by singular rail and wheel defects is undertaken. Six shapes of discontinuity are modelled, representing various defect types such as transition zones, switches, crossings, rail joints and wheel flats. The vehicle is modelled as an AM96 train set and it is found that ground vibration levels are highly sensitive to defect height, length and shape.

  8. The use of scalp cooling for chemotherapy-induced hair loss.

    PubMed

    Young, Annie; Arif, Azra

    Chemotherapy-induced hair loss is a common and distressing side effect of cancer therapy and is one of the major unmet challenges in cancer management. Scalp cooling can prevent chemotherapy-induced hair loss in some cancer patients with solid tumours receiving certain chemotherapy regimens. Recent evidence indicates that this technique does not increase the risk of scalp metastasis. A reduction in post-chemotherapy infusion duration of scalp cooling and the advancement in cool cap technology may assist clinicians in promoting scalp cooling to cancer patients. This article discusses recent research, scalp cooling guidelines, products available and implications for nurses and their organisations in providing scalp cooling. It also considers recent advancements in identifying genes associated with chemotherapy-induced hair loss and international research collaborations including a registry and a 'chemotherapy-induced hair loss action group'--all striving to improve the patient experience of chemotherapy-induced hair loss. PMID:27231746

  9. Whole-body vibration-induced muscular reflex: Is it a stretch-induced reflex?

    PubMed Central

    Cakar, Halil Ibrahim; Cidem, Muharrem; Sebik, Oguz; Yilmaz, Gizem; Karamehmetoglu, Safak Sahir; Kara, Sadik; Karacan, Ilhan; Türker, Kemal Sıtkı

    2015-01-01

    [Purpose] Whole-body vibration (WBV) can induce reflex responses in muscles. A number of studies have reported that the physiological mechanisms underlying this type of reflex activity can be explained by reference to a stretch-induced reflex. Thus, the primary objective of this study was to test whether the WBV-induced muscular reflex (WBV-IMR) can be explained as a stretch-induced reflex. [Subjects and Methods] The present study assessed 20 healthy males using surface electrodes placed on their right soleus muscle. The latency of the tendon reflex (T-reflex) as a stretch-induced reflex was compared with the reflex latency of the WBV-IMR. In addition, simulations were performed at 25, 30, 35, 40, 45, and 50 Hz to determine the stretch frequency of the muscle during WBV. [Results] WBV-IMR latency (40.5 ± 0.8 ms; 95% confidence interval [CI]: 39.0–41.9 ms) was significantly longer than T-reflex latency (34.6 ± 0.5 ms; 95% CI: 33.6–35.5 ms) and the mean difference was 6.2 ms (95% CI of the difference: 4.7–7.7 ms). The simulations performed in the present study demonstrated that the frequency of the stretch signal would be twice the frequency of the vibration. [Conclusion] These findings do not support the notion that WBV-IMR can be explained by reference to a stretch-induced reflex. PMID:26310784

  10. Vibration-induced changes in EMG during human locomotion.

    PubMed

    Verschueren, Sabine M P; Swinnen, Stephan P; Desloovere, Kaat; Duysens, Jacques

    2003-03-01

    The present study was set up to examine the contribution of Ia afferent input in the generation of electromyographic (EMG) activity. Subjects walked blindfolded along a walkway while tendon vibration was applied continuously to a leg muscle. The effects of vibration were measured on mean EMG activity in stance and swing phase. The results show that vibration of the quadriceps femoris (Q) at the knee and of biceps femoris (BF) at the knee enhanced the EMG activity of these muscles and this occurred mainly in the stance phase of walking. These results suggest involvement of Ia afferent input of Q and BF in EMG activation during stance. In contrast, vibration of muscles at the ankle and hip had no significant effect on burst amplitude. Additionally, the onset time of tibialis anterior was measured to look at timing of phase transitions. Only vibration of quadriceps femoris resulted in an earlier onset of tibialis anterior within the gait cycle, suggesting involvement of these Ia afferents in the triggering of phase transitions. In conclusion, the results of the present study suggest involvement of Ia afferent input in the control of muscle activity during locomotion in humans. A limited role in timing of phase transitions is proposed as well. PMID:12626612

  11. Noise-Induced Building Vibrations Caused by Concorde and Conventional Aircraft Operations at Dulles and Kennedy International Airports

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mayes, W. H.; Stephens, D. G.; Holmes, H. K.; Lewis, R. B.; Holliday, B. G.; Ward, D. W.; Deloach, R.; Cawthorn, J. M.; Finley, T. D.; Lynch, J. W.

    1978-01-01

    Outdoor and indoor noise levels resulting from aircraft flyovers and certain nonaircraft events were recorded, as were the associated vibration levels in the walls, windows, and floors at building test sites. In addition, limited subjective tests were conducted to examine the human detection and annoyance thresholds for building vibration and rattle caused by aircraft noise. Representative peak levels of aircraft noise-induced building vibrations are reported and comparisons are made with structural damage criteria and with vibration levels induced by common domestic events. In addition, results of a pilot study are reported which indicate the human detection threshold for noise-induced floor vibrations.

  12. Isomer selective infrared spectroscopy of supersonically cooled cis- and trans-N-phenylamides in the region from the amide band to NH stretching vibration.

    PubMed

    Miyazaki, Mitsuhiko; Saikawa, Jiro; Ishizuki, Hideki; Taira, Takunori; Fujii, Masaaki

    2009-08-01

    We measured the infrared (IR) spectra of supersonically cooled N-phenylformamide (formanilide) and N-phenylacetamide (acetanilide) in the amide band and X-H stretch vibration regions by using IR-UV depletion spectroscopy combined with a newly developed mid-IR light source based on difference frequency generation in ZnGeP(2). The two rotational isomers, cis- and trans- of the amide group were separately monitored to record the IR spectra. Both of the conformers showed similar features in the amide I and II regions, while major differences of the isomers appeared in the amide III vibration region. The IR spectrum of trans-acetanilide closely resembles that of trans-formanilide, except for vibrations of the methyl group; that is, substitution of the formyl hydrogen to a methyl group has only a minor effect on the amide vibrations. PMID:19606319

  13. Different ways of reducing vibrations induced by cryogenic instruments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lizon, J. L.; Jakob, G.; de Marneffe, B.; Preumont, A.

    2010-07-01

    The infrared instruments and most of the detectors have to be operated at cryogenics temperatures. Today, this is generally achieved using mechanical coolers. Compared to traditional nitrogen systems, these coolers, which large implementation started 15 years ago, have the advantage of reducing considerably the operation effort at the observatories. Depending of the technology, these coolers are all generating a level of vibration which in most of the cases is not compatible with the extremely high stability requirement of the large size telescope. This paper described different ways which have been used at ESO to reduce the vibration caused by the large IR instruments. We show how we reached the goal to have the cryogenic instruments so quiet that they do not affect the operation of the interferometry mode of the VLT. The last section of the paper reports on a unique system based on a counter vibration principle.

  14. Fretting wear behaviors of a dual-cooled nuclear fuel rod under a simulated rod vibration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Young-Ho; Kim, Hyung-Kyu; Kang, Heung-Seok; Yoon, Kyung-Ho; Kim, Jae-Yong; Lee, Kang-Hee

    2012-06-01

    Recently, a dual-cooled fuel (i.e., annular fuel) that is compatible with current operating PWR plants has been proposed in order to realize both a considerable amount of power uprating and an increase of safety margins. As the design concept should be compatible with current operating PWR plants, however, it shows a narrow gap between the fuel rods when compared with current solid nuclear fuel arrays and needs to modify the spacer grid shapes and their positions. In this study, fretting wear tests have been performed to evaluate the wear resistance of a dual-cooled fuel by using a proposed spring and dimple of spacer grids that have a cantilever type and hemispherical shape, respectively. As a result, the wear volume of the spring specimen gradually increases as the contact condition is changed from a certain gap, just contact to positive force. However, in the dimple specimen, just contact condition shows a large wear volume. In addition, a circular rod motion at upper region of contact surface is gradually increased and its diametric size depends on the wear depth increase. Based on the test results, the fretting wear resistance of the proposed spring and dimple is analyzed by comparing the wear measurement results and rod motion in detail.

  15. Fretting wear behaviors of a dual-cooled nuclear fuel rod under a simulated rod vibration

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, Young-Ho; Kim, Hyung-Kyu; Kang, Heung-Seok; Yoon, Kyung-Ho; Kim, Jae-Yong; Lee, Kang-Hee

    2012-06-06

    Recently, a dual-cooled fuel (i.e., annular fuel) that is compatible with current operating PWR plants has been proposed in order to realize both a considerable amount of power uprating and an increase of safety margins. As the design concept should be compatible with current operating PWR plants, however, it shows a narrow gap between the fuel rods when compared with current solid nuclear fuel arrays and needs to modify the spacer grid shapes and their positions. In this study, fretting wear tests have been performed to evaluate the wear resistance of a dual-cooled fuel by using a proposed spring and dimple of spacer grids that have a cantilever type and hemispherical shape, respectively. As a result, the wear volume of the spring specimen gradually increases as the contact condition is changed from a certain gap, just contact to positive force. However, in the dimple specimen, just contact condition shows a large wear volume. In addition, a circular rod motion at upper region of contact surface is gradually increased and its diametric size depends on the wear depth increase. Based on the test results, the fretting wear resistance of the proposed spring and dimple is analyzed by comparing the wear measurement results and rod motion in detail.

  16. Experimental investigations on flow induced vibration of an externally excited flexible plate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Purohit, Ashish; Darpe, Ashish K.; Singh, S. P.

    2016-06-01

    Flow-induced vibration of a harmonically actuated flexible plate in the wake of an upstream bluff body is experimentally investigated. The experiments are performed in an open-ended wind tunnel. A flexible plate trailing a bluff body is under fluid induced excitation due to the flowing fluid. The additional external excitation to the trailing plate is applied using an electro-magnetic exciter. The frequency and amplitude of the external harmonic excitation are selected as variable parameters in the experiments and their effect on the plate vibration and is investigated. To know the nature of acoustic pressure wave generated from the vibrating system, near-field acoustic pressure is also measured. A laser vibrometer, a pressure microphone and a high-speed camera are employed to measure the plate vibration, pressure signal, and instantaneous images of the plate motion respectively. The results obtained indicate that the dynamics of the plate is influenced by both the flow-induced excitation and external harmonic excitation. When frequency of the two excitations is close enough, a large vibration level and a high tonal sound pressure are observed. At higher amplitude of external excitation, the frequency component corresponding to the flow-induced excitation is found to reduce significantly in the frequency spectrum of the vibration signal. It is observed that, for certain range of excitation frequency, the plate vibration first reduces, reaches a minimum value and then increases with increase in the level of external excitation. A fair qualitative agreement of the experimental results with numerical simulation result of the past study has been noted. In addition to the experiments, the role of phase difference between the flow-induced excitation generated from the front obstacle and externally applied harmonic excitation is investigated through numerical simulations. The result obtained reveals that the final steady state vibration of the coupled system is

  17. Flow-induced vibration of circular cylindrical structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Shoei-Sheng

    The vibrational response of circular cylinder (CC) structures subjected to flow is characterized analytically, summarizing the results of recent theoretical and experimental investigations. Topics addressed include a single CC in quiescent fluid, multiple CCs in quiescent fluid, CC shells containing fluid, pipes conveying fluid, and CCs in axial flow. Consideration is given to cross-flow configurations involving a single CC, an array of CCs, and two CCs; the fluid-elastic instability of a group of CCs in cross flow; and design techniques. Diagrams and graphs are provided, and the vibration of damped linear systems, the general fluid equations, and characteristic equations and adjoint eigenfunctions are treated in appendices.

  18. Field measurements and analyses of environmental vibrations induced by high-speed Maglev.

    PubMed

    Li, Guo-Qiang; Wang, Zhi-Lu; Chen, Suwen; Xu, You-Lin

    2016-10-15

    Maglev, offers competitive journey-times compared to the railway and subway systems in markets for which distance between the stations is 100-1600km owing to its high acceleration and speed; however, such systems may have excessive vibration. Field measurements of Maglev train-induced vibrations were therefore performed on the world's first commercial Maglev line in Shanghai, China. Seven test sections along the line were selected according to the operating conditions, covering speeds from 150 to 430km/h. Acceleration responses of bridge pier and nearby ground were measured in three directions and analyzed in both the time and frequency domain. The effects of Maglev train speed on vibrations of the bridge pier and ground were studied in terms of their peak accelerations. Attenuation of ground vibration was investigated up to 30m from the track centerline. Effects of guideway configuration were also analyzed based on the measurements through two different test sections with same train speed of 300km/h. The results showed that peak accelerations exhibited a strong correlation with both train speed and distance off the track. Guideway configuration had a significant effect on transverse vibration, but a weak impact on vertical and longitudinal vibrations of both bridge pier and ground. Statistics indicated that, contrary to the commonly accepted theory and experience, vertical vibration is not always dominant: transverse and longitudinal vibrations should also be considered, particularly near turns in the track. Moreover, measurements of ground vibration induced by traditional high-speed railway train were carried out with the same testing devices in Bengbu in the Anhui Province. Results showed that the Maglev train generates significantly different vibration signatures as compared to the traditional high-speed train. The results obtained from this paper can provide good insights on the impact of Maglev system on the urban environment and the quality of human life

  19. Active Control of Panel Vibrations Induced by a Boundary Layer Flow

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chow, Pao-Liu

    1998-01-01

    In recent years, active and passive control of sound and vibration in aeroelastic structures have received a great deal of attention due to many potential applications to aerospace and other industries. There exists a great deal of research work done in this area. Recent advances in the control of sound and vibration can be found in the several conference proceedings. In this report we will summarize our research findings supported by the NASA grant NAG-1-1175. The problems of active and passive control of sound and vibration has been investigated by many researchers for a number of years. However, few of the articles are concerned with the sound and vibration with flow-structure interaction. Experimental and numerical studies on the coupling between panel vibration and acoustic radiation due to flow excitation have been done by Maestrello and his associates at NASA/Langley Research Center. Since the coupled system of nonlinear partial differential equations is formidable, an analytical solution to the full problem seems impossible. For this reason, we have to simplify the problem to that of the nonlinear panel vibration induced by a uniform flow or a boundary-layer flow with a given wall pressure distribution. Based on this simplified model, we have been able to study the control and stabilization of the nonlinear panel vibration, which have not been treated satisfactorily by other authors. The vibration suppression will clearly reduce the sound radiation power from the panel. The major research findings will be presented in the next three sections. In Section II we shall describe our results on the boundary control of nonlinear panel vibration, with or without flow excitation. Section III is concerned with active control of the vibration and sound radiation from a nonlinear elastic panel. A detailed description of our work on the parametric vibrational control of nonlinear elastic panel will be presented in Section IV. This paper will be submitted to the Journal

  20. Numerical simulation of vortex-induced vibration of a square cylinder at a low Reynolds number

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Ming; Cheng, Liang; Zhou, Tongming

    2013-02-01

    Vortex-induced vibrations (VIV) of a square cylinder at a Reynolds number of 100 and a low mass ratio of 3 are studied numerically by solving the Navier-Stokes equations using the finite element method. The equation of motion of the square cylinder is solved to simulate the vibration and the Arbitrary Lagrangian Eulerian scheme is employed to model the interaction between the vibrating cylinder and the fluid flow. The numerical model is validated against the published results of flow past a stationary square cylinder and the results of VIV of a circular cylinder at low Reynolds numbers. The effect of flow approaching angle (α) on the response of the square cylinder is investigated. It is found that α affects not only the vibration amplitude but also the lock-in regime. Among the three values of α (α = 0°, 45°, and 22.5°) that are studied, the smallest vibration amplitude and the narrowest lock-in regime occur at α = 0°. It is discovered that the vibration locks in with the natural frequency in two regimes of reduced velocity for α = 22.5°. Single loop vibration trajectories are observed in the lock-in regime at α = 22.5° and 45°, which is distinctively different from VIV of a circular cylinder. As a result, the vibration frequency in the in-line direction is the same as that in the cross-flow direction.

  1. Active control of panel vibrations induced by a boundary layer flow

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chow, Pao-Liu

    1995-01-01

    The problems of active and passive control of sound and vibration has been investigated by many researchers for a number of years. However, few of the articles are concerned with the sound and vibration with flow-structure interaction. Experimental and numerical studies on the coupling between panel vibration and acoustic radiation due to flow excitation have been done by Maestrello and his associates at NASA/Langley Research Center. Since the coupled system of nonlinear partial differential equations is formidable, an analytical solution to the full problem seems impossible. For this reason, we have to simplify the problem to that of the nonlinear panel vibration induced by a uniform flow or a boundary-layer flow with a given wall pressure distribution. Based on this simplified model, we have been able to consider the control and stabilization of the nonlinear panel vibration, which have not been treated satisfactorily by other authors. Although the sound radiation has not been included, the vibration suppression will clearly reduce the sound radiation power from the panel. The major research findings are presented in three sections. In section two we describe results on the boundary control of nonlinear panel vibration, with or without flow excitation. Sections three and four are concerned with some analytical and numerical results in the optimal control of the linear and nonlinear panel vibrations, respectively, excited by the flow pressure fluctuations. Finally, in section five, we draw some conclusions from research findings.

  2. Computational insights into intriguing vibration-induced pulsing diradical character in perfluoropentacene and the perfluorination effect.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Fengying; Feng, Yiwei; Song, Xinyu; Bu, Yuxiang

    2016-06-28

    As an n-type organic semiconductor compound, perfluoropentacene has more widespread applications in organic electronics because of its higher electron mobility compared with its parent pentacene. Herein, we explore intriguing dynamic electronic properties of perfluoropentacene caused by structural vibrations using density functional theory calculations. Perfluoropentacene could exhibit diradical character because of the persistent vibrations, although it belongs to a closed-shell singlet molecule in its equilibrium configuration. Not all the vibration-induced structural changes can induce diradical character, but only those leading to a small singlet-triplet energy gap, especially the small HOMO-LUMO gap, as well as the short cross-linking C-C bonds and distorted carbon ring structures in polyacetylene chains make great contributions. Due to molecular vibrations, the diradical character of dynamic perfluoropentacene exhibits pulsing behavior. Compared with pentacene, its perfluorination can not only considerably stabilize two frontier molecular orbitals, but also reduce the HOMO-LUMO gap, thus leading to an increase of the number of vibrational modes which can make the diradical character appear. In particular, perfluorination makes 19 diradical vibrational modes appear in the low frequency region. These observations indicate that some low energy pulses can trigger perfluoropentacene molecular vibrations according to some low energy modes and thus the appearance of pulsing diradical character or molecular magnetism. Clearly, the observed novel characters of a molecule possessing hidden pulsing diradical character and tunable magnetism in this work would contribute to opening up promising areas for designing peculiar magnetic materials. PMID:27250923

  3. Streamwise vortex-induced and galloping-like vibrations of a rotating cylinder

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bourguet, Remi; Lo Jacono, David

    2015-11-01

    The flow-induced vibrations of an elastically mounted circular cylinder, free to oscillate in the direction parallel to the current and subjected to a forced rotation about its axis, are investigated numerically at a Reynolds number equal to 100. The cylinder is found to oscillate up to a rotation rate close to 2 (first vibration region), then the body and the flow are steady until a rotation rate close to 2.7, where a second vibration region begins. Each vibration region is characterized by a specific regime of response. In the first region, the oscillation amplitude follows a bell-shaped evolution as a function of the reduced velocity (inverse of the natural frequency) and the vibration develops under a condition of wake-body synchronization: such behavior resembles the vortex-induced vibrations previously described in the absence of rotation. In the second region, the vibration amplitude increases unboundedly with the reduced velocity and may become very large, higher than 2.5 body diameters in the present parameter space. Such galloping-like responses were not observed when the body was restrained to oscillate in the cross-flow direction. They cannot be predicted through quasi-steady analysis and it is found that body oscillation and flow unsteadiness remain synchronized.

  4. Incorporating a disturbance observer with direct velocity feedback for control of human-induced vibrations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nyawako, Donald; Reynolds, Paul; Hudson, Emma

    2016-04-01

    Feedback control strategies are desirable for disturbance rejection of human-induced vibrations in civil engineering structures as human walking forces cannot easily be measured. In relation to human-induced vibration control studies, most past researches have focused on floors and footbridges and the widely used linear controller implemented in the trials has been the direct velocity feedback (DVF) scheme. With appropriate compensation to enhance its robustness, it has been shown to be effective at damping out the problematic modes of vibration of the structures in which the active vibration control systems have been implemented. The work presented here introduces a disturbance observer (DOB) that is used with an outer-loop DVF controller. Results of analytical studies presented in this work based on the dynamic properties of a walkway bridge structure demonstrate the potential of this approach for enhancing the vibration mitigation performance offered by a purely DVF controller. For example, estimates of controlled frequency response functions indicate improved attenuation of vibration around the dominant frequency of the walkway bridge structure as well as at higher resonant frequencies. Controlled responses from three synthesized walking excitation forces on a walkway bridge structure model show that the inclusion of the disturbance observer with an outer loop DVF has potential to improve on the vibration mitigation performance by about 3.5% at resonance and 6-10% off-resonance. These are realised with hard constraints being imposed on the low frequency actuator displacements.

  5. Vibration-induced jitter control in satellite optical communication

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xue, Zheng-yan; Qi, Bo; Ren, Ge

    2013-08-01

    Laser satellite communication has become especially attractive in recent years. However, because the laser beam is very narrow and there is a long distance between satellites, the laser communication channel is very sensitive to vibrations of the optical platform. These vibrations cause optical jitter, leading to the reduction of received signals and bit-error rate degradation. Consequently, optical jitter control with PAT (pointing acquisition and tracking) subsystems is a critical problem in laser satellite communication. To compensate for the platform vibration effectively in realtime, in this paper, an adaptive feedback control technique based on Youla-parameterization is presented, which can adapt to the current disturbance acting on the laser beam by adjusting its parameters in realtime to maintain optimal performance. The main idea is to use the well-known Youla parameterization formula to construct a feedback control scheme with the guaranteed closed loop stability, and the feedback controller is a function of plant coprime factors and a free parameter Q. For adaptive disturbance estimation, the free parameter Q is set to an adaptive finite impulse response (FIR) filter, the coefficients of which are updated by a recursive least-squares (RLS) algorithm in realtime. It is shown in experiment that the adaptive feedback control technique based on Youla-parameterization can reject the optical jitter caused by satellite platform vibration effectively and improve the performance of the system.

  6. Statistics of complex eigenvalues in friction-induced vibration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nobari, Amir; Ouyang, Huajiang; Bannister, Paul

    2015-03-01

    Self-excited vibrations appear in many mechanical systems with sliding contacts. There are several mechanisms whereby friction can cause the self-excited vibration to become unstable. Of these mechanisms, mode coupling is thought to be responsible for generating annoying high-frequency noise and vibration in brakes. Conventionally, in order to identify whether a system is stable or not, complex eigenvalue analysis is performed. However, what has recently received much attention of researchers is the variability and uncertainty of input variables in the stability analysis of self-excited vibrations. For this purpose, a second-order perturbation method is extended and employed in the current study. The moments of the output distribution along with its joint moment generating function are used for quantifying the statistics of the complex eigenvalues. Moreover, the eigen-derivatives required for the perturbation method are presented in a way that they can deal with the asymmetry of the stiffness matrix and non-proportional damping. Since the eigen-derivatives of such systems are complex-valued numbers, it is mathematically more informative and convenient to derive the statistics of the eigenvalues in a complex form, without decomposing them into two real-valued real and imaginary parts. Then, the variance and pseudo-variance of the complex eigenvalues are used for determining the statistics of the real and imaginary parts. The reliability and robustness of the system in terms of stability can also be quantified by the approximated output distribution.

  7. A simple model to predict train-induced vibration: theoretical formulation and experimental validation

    SciTech Connect

    Rossi, Federico; Nicolini, Andrea

    2003-05-01

    No suitable handy tool is available to predict train-induced vibration on environmental impact assessment. A simple prediction model is proposed which has been calibrated for high speed trains. The model input data are train characteristics, train speed and track properties; model output data are soil time-averaged velocity and velocity level. Model results have been compared with numerous vibration data retrieved from measurement campaigns led along the most important high-speed European rail tracks. Model performances have been tested by comparing measured and predicted vibration values.

  8. Texture-induced vibrations in the forearm during tactile exploration

    PubMed Central

    Delhaye, Benoit; Hayward, Vincent; Lefèvre, Philippe; Thonnard, Jean-Louis

    2012-01-01

    Humans can detect and discriminate between fine variations of surface roughness using active touch. It is hitherto believed that roughness perception is mediated mostly by cutaneous and subcutaneous afferents located in the fingertips. However, recent findings have shown that following abolishment of cutaneous afferences resulting from trauma or pharmacological intervention, the ability of subjects to discriminate between textures roughness was not significantly altered. These findings suggest that the somatosensory system is able to collect textural information from other sources than fingertip afference. It follows that signals resulting of the interaction of a finger with a rough surface must be transmitted to stimulate receptor populations in regions far away from the contact. This transmission was characterized by measuring in the wrist vibrations originating at the fingertip and thus propagating through the finger, the hand and the wrist during active exploration of textured surfaces. The spectral analysis of the vibrations taking place in the forearm tissues revealed regularities that were correlated with the scanned surface and the speed of exploration. In the case of periodic textures, the vibration signal contained a fundamental frequency component corresponding to the finger velocity divided by the spatial period of the stimulus. This regularity was found for a wide range of textural length scales and scanning velocities. For non-periodic textures, the spectrum of the vibration did not contain obvious features that would enable discrimination between the different stimuli. However, for both periodic and non-periodic stimuli, the intensity of the vibrations could be related to the microgeometry of the scanned surfaces. PMID:22783177

  9. State-to-state vibrational kinetics of H2 and H_2^+ in a post-shock cooling gas with primordial composition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Coppola, C. M.; Mizzi, G.; Bruno, D.; Esposito, F.; Galli, D.; Palla, F.; Longo, S.

    2016-04-01

    The radiative cooling of shocked gas with primordial chemical composition is an important process relevant to the formation of the first stars and structures, as well as taking place also in high-velocity cloud collisions and supernovae explosions. Among the different processes that need to be considered, the formation kinetics and cooling of molecular hydrogen are of prime interest, since they provide the only way to lower the gas temperature to values well below ˜104 K. In previous works, the internal energy level structure of H2 and its cation has been treated in the approximation of ro-vibrational ground state at low densities, or trying to describe the dynamics using some arbitrary v > 0 H2 level that is considered representative of the excited vibrational manifold. In this study, we compute the vibrationally resolved kinetics for the time-dependent chemical and thermal evolution of the post-shock gas in a medium of primordial composition. The calculated non-equilibrium distributions are used to evaluate effects on the cooling function of the gas and on the cooling time. Finally, we discuss the dependence of the results to different initial values of the shock velocity and redshift.

  10. Out-of-plane low-frequency vibrations and nonradiative decay in the 1ππ* state of jet-cooled 5-methylcytosine.

    PubMed

    Trachsel, Maria A; Lobsiger, Simon; Leutwyler, Samuel

    2012-09-13

    We investigate the UV vibronic spectrum and excited-state nonradiative processes of jet-cooled 5-methylcytosine (5MCyt) using two-color resonant two-photon ionization spectroscopy at 0.3 and 0.05 cm(–1) resolution. In contrast to cytosine, which shows only five bands above its electronic origin, the lowest electronic transition of 5MCyt exhibits about 25 low-frequency vibronic bands that extend to 0(0)(0) + 450 cm(–1), allowing to extract detailed information on the excited-state electronic and nuclear structure. Most bands are overtones and combinations of the out-of-plane vibrations ν'(1), ν'(2), and ν'(3). Their large intensities reflect butterfly-, boat-, and twist-deformations of the 5MCyt framework upon electronic excitation. From the rotational contours of the 0(0)(0), 1(0)(2), 2(0)(2), and 3(0)(2) bands, the transition is found to be polarized along the in-plane a/b axes, characteristic of a (1)ππ* transition. Approximate second-order coupled-cluster (CC2) and time-dependent B3LYP calculations both predict that 5MCyt undergoes an out-of-plane deformation in its (1)ππ* (S(2)) state but both methods overestimate the out-of-plane ν'(1), ν'(2), and ν'(3) vibrational frequencies by a factor of 3–5. The TD-B3LYP (1)ππ* transition dipole moment direction is 10%:90% a:b, in good agreement with experiment. From the Lorentzian line shape contributions needed to fit the rotational contours, a lower limit to the 5MCyt (1)ππ* state lifetime at the 0(0)(0), 1(0)(2), 2(0)(2), and 3(0)(2) bands is determined as τ ≥ 30 ps. These values are in stark contrast to the ultrafast (picosecond) lifetimes measured for jet-cooled cytosine by femtosecond pump–probe techniques. They also confirm the observation from the R2PI spectrum that 5-methylation of cytosine increases its excited-state lifetime. The higher out-of-plane overtone and combination bands disappear from the spectrum by ~460 cm(–1), signaling the onset of lifetimes τ < 0.5 ps, induced by

  11. Topographic analysis of the skull vibration-induced nystagmus test with piezoelectric accelerometers and force sensors.

    PubMed

    Dumas, Georges; Lion, Alexis; Perrin, Philippe; Ouedraogo, Evariste; Schmerber, Sébastien

    2016-03-23

    Vibration-induced nystagmus is elicited by skull or posterior cervical muscle stimulations in patients with vestibular diseases. Skull vibrations delivered by the skull vibration-induced nystagmus test are known to stimulate the inner ear structures directly. This study aimed to measure the vibration transfer at different cranium locations and posterior cervical regions to contribute toward stimulus topographic optimization (experiment 1) and to determine the force applied on the skull with a hand-held vibrator to study the test reproducibility and provide recommendations for good clinical practices (experiment 2). In experiment 1, a 100 Hz hand-held vibrator was applied on the skull (vertex, mastoids) and posterior cervical muscles in 11 healthy participants. Vibration transfer was measured by piezoelectric sensors. In experiment 2, the vibrator was applied 30 times by two experimenters with dominant and nondominant hands on a mannequin equipped to measure the force. Experiment 1 showed that after unilateral mastoid vibratory stimulation, the signal transfer was higher when recorded on the contralateral mastoid than on the vertex or posterior cervical muscles (P<0.001). No difference was observed between the different vibratory locations when vibration transfer was measured on vertex and posterior cervical muscles. Experiment 2 showed that the force applied to the mannequin varied according to the experimenters and the handedness, higher forces being observed with the most experienced experimenter and with the dominant hand (10.3±1.0 and 7.8±2.9 N, respectively). The variation ranged from 9.8 to 29.4% within the same experimenter. Bone transcranial vibration transfer is more efficient from one mastoid to the other mastoid than other anatomical sites. The mastoid is therefore the optimal site for skull vibration-induced nystagmus test in patients with unilateral vestibular lesions and enables a stronger stimulation of the healthy side. In clinical practice

  12. Tyre induced vibrations of the car-trailer system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beregi, S.; Takács, D.; Stépán, G.

    2016-02-01

    The lateral and yaw dynamics of the car-trailer combination are analysed by means of a single track model. The equations of motion are derived rigorously by means of the Appell-Gibbs equations for constant longitudinal velocity of the vehicle. The tyres are described with the help of the so-called delayed tyre model, which is based on a brush model with pure rolling contact. The lateral forces and aligning torques of the tyre/road interaction are calculated via the instantaneous lateral deformations in the contact patches. The linear stability analysis of the rectilinear motion is performed via the analytically determined characteristic function of the system. Stability charts are constructed with respect to the vehicle longitudinal velocity and the payload position on the trailer. Self-excited lateral vibrations are detected with different vibration modes at low and at high longitudinal speeds of the vehicle. The effects of the tyre parameters are also investigated.

  13. Investigations and results concerning railway-induced ground-borne vibrations in Germany

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Degen, K. G.; Behr, W.; Grütz, H.-P.

    2006-06-01

    Besides noise reduction, ground-borne vibrations induced by railways are another important environmental issue associated with the construction of new or the reconstruction of existing railway lines that had to be tackled during the last decade. Annoyance can occur, particularly for lines in urban areas at small distances to neighbouring houses or lines in shallow depth tunnels under buildings. The ground-borne vibrations can be perceived by the inhabitants via the floor vibrations, as well as via the air-borne noise radiated inside the building by the vibrating building structures (secondary noise). At present, legal specifications for judging railway-induced ground-borne vibrations do not exist in Germany. In order to review common practices, an experimental psycho-physical laboratory study was performed. To estimate the annoyance of railway-induced vibrations, the mean vibration energy of a train pass-by seems much more significant and related to the annoyance than the commonly used RMS value according to the German standard DIN 4150-2. The minimum difference in vibration that can be felt by people was found at a signal difference of 25%. This paper will review results of a project performed in cooperation with the engineering office Obermeyer in Munich and the Technical University of Munich [A. Said, D. Fleischer, H. Kilcher, H. Fastl, H.-P. Grütz, Zur Bewertung von Erschütterungsimmissionen aus dem Schienenverkehr, Zeitschrift fuer Lärmbekämpfung, Vol. 48(6), Springer VDI Verlag, Düsseldorf, 2001.] and will link them to further demands on research and on development of suitable guiding principles and legislative regulations.

  14. Power extraction using flow-induced vibration of a circular cylinder placed near another fixed cylinder

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nishi, Yoshiki; Ueno, Yuta; Nishio, Masachika; Quadrante, Luis Antonio Rodrigues; Kokubun, Kentaroh

    2014-05-01

    We conducted an experiment in a towing tank to investigate the performance of an energy extraction system using the flow-induced vibration of a circular cylinder. This experiment tested three different cases involving the following arrangements of cylinder(s) of identical diameter: the upstream fixed-downstream movable arrangement (case F); the upstream movable-downstream fixed arrangement (case R); and a movable isolated cylinder (case I). In cases F and R, the separation distance (ratio of the distance between the centers of the two cylinders to their diameters) is fixed at 1.30. Measurement results show that while cases F and I generate vortex-induced vibration (VIV) resonance responses, case R yields wake-induced vibration (WIV) at reduced velocity over 9.0, which is significantly larger than that of the VIV response, leading to the induction of higher electronic power in a generator. Accordingly, primary energy conversion efficiency is higher in the case involving WIV.

  15. Simulation of scalp cooling by external devices for prevention of chemotherapy-induced alopecia.

    PubMed

    Pliskow, Bradley; Mitra, Kunal; Kaya, Mehmet

    2016-02-01

    Hypothermia of the scalp tissue during chemotherapy treatment (scalp cooling) has been shown to reduce or prevent chemotherapy-induced hair loss. In this study, numerical models are developed to investigate the interaction between different types of external scalp cooling devices and the human scalp tissue. This work focuses on improving methods of modeling scalp cooling devices as it relates specifically to the prevention of chemotherapy-induced alopecia. First, the cooling power needed for any type of device to achieve therapeutic levels of scalp hypothermia is investigated. Subsequently, two types of scalp cooling devices are simulated: a pre-cooled/frozen cap design and a liquid-cooled cap design. For an average patient, simulations show that 38.5W of heat must be extracted from the scalp tissue for this therapy in order to cool the hair follicle to 22°C. In practice, the cooling power must be greater than this amount to account for thermal losses of the device. Simulations show that pre-cooled and liquid-cooled cap designs result in different tissue temperatures over the course of the procedure. However, it is the temperature of the coolant that largely determines the resulting tissue temperature. Simulations confirm that the thermal resistance of the hair/air layer has a large impact on the resulting tissue temperatures. The results should be correlated with experimental data as an effort to determine the optimal parameter choices for this model. PMID:26857974

  16. Concorde noise-induced building vibrations John F. Kennedy International Airport

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mayes, W. H.; Deloach, R.; Stephens, D. G.; Cawthorn, J. M.; Holmes, H. K.; Lewis, R. B.; Holliday, B. G.; Ward, D. W.

    1978-01-01

    The outdoor and indoor noise levels resulting from aircraft flyovers and certain nonaircraft events were recorded at six home sites along with the associated vibration levels in the walls, windows, and floors of these test homes. Limited subjective tests conducted to examine the human detection and annoyance thresholds for building vibration and rattle caused by aircraft noise showed that both vibration and rattle were detected subjectively in several houses for some operations of both the Concorde and subsonic aircraft. Preliminary results indicate that the relationship between window vibration and aircraft noise is: (1) linear, with vibration levels being accurately predicted from OASPL levels measured near the window; (2) consistent from flyover to flyover for a given aircraft type under approach conditions; (3) no different for Concorde than for other conventional jet transports (in the case of window vibrations induced under approach power conditions); and (4) relatively high levels of window vibration measured during Concorde operations are due more to higher OASPL levels than to unique Concorde source characteristics.

  17. Tactile perception of skin and skin cream by friction induced vibrations.

    PubMed

    Ding, Shuyang; Bhushan, Bharat

    2016-11-01

    Skin cream smooths, softens, and moistens skin by altering surface roughness and tribological properties of skin. Sliding generates vibrations that activate mechanoreceptors located in skin. The brain interprets tactile information to identify skin feel. Understanding the tactile sensing mechanisms of skin with and without cream treatment is important to numerous applications including cosmetics, textiles, and robotics sensors. In this study, frequency spectra of friction force and friction induced vibration signals were carried out to investigate tactile perception by an artificial finger sliding on skin. The influence of normal load, velocity, and cream treatment time were studied. Coherence between friction force and vibration signals were found. The amplitude of vibration decreased after cream treatment, leading to smoother perception. Increasing normal load or velocity between contacting surfaces generated a smoother perception with cream treatment, but rougher perception without treatment. As cream treatment time increases, skin becomes smoother. The related mechanisms are discussed. PMID:27474814

  18. Scale-model characterization of flow-induced vibrational response of FFTF reactor internals

    SciTech Connect

    Ryan, J. A.; Mahoney, J. J.

    1980-10-01

    Fast Test Reactor core internal and peripheral components were assessed for flow-induced vibrational characteristics under scaled and simulated prototype flow conditions in the Hydraulic Core Mockup as an integral part of the Fast Test Reactor Vibration Program. The Hydraulic Core Mockup was an 0.285 geometric scale model of the Fast Test Reactor internals designed to simulate prototype vibrational and hydraulic characteristics. Using water to simulate sodium coolant, vibrational characteristics were measured and determined for selected model components over the scaled flow range of 36 to 110%. Additionally, in-situ shaker tests were conducted on selected Hydraulic Core Mockup outlet plenum components to establish modal characteristics. Most components exhibited resonant response at all test flow rates; however, the measured dynamic response was neither abnormal nor anomalously flow-rate dependent, and the predicted prototype components' response were deemed acceptable.

  19. Reducing Operator-Induced Machine Vibration Using a Complex Pole/zero Prefilter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    INGRAM, G. A.; FRANCHEK, M. A.; CHIU, G. T.-C.

    2002-02-01

    A systematic prefilter design process for reducing operator-induced rigid body vibrations of rubber tire mounted machines is presented. The contribution of this work is the development of a systematic prefilter design process and interpretation of the results. The class of heavy equipment considered in this work are those machines having rigid body main frame vibrations dominated by linear dynamics. The reduction in machine vibrations is accomplished through the design of prefilters that reduce the machine resonant frequencies from the operator commands. The machine information required for the design process includes the bandwidth of the electro-hydraulic (E/H) valves and rigid body resonant frequencies of the machine mainframe. The prespecified performance in the design process is the desired attenuation of machine resonant frequencies which is related to the acceptable level of machine vibration. The design methodology has been applied to a telescopic boom lift to illustrate the procedure and the effectiveness of the design.

  20. Fluidic harvesters in free stream turbulence undergoing flow-induced vibrations or flutter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gomez, Joan; Azadeh Ranjbar, Vahid; Goushcha, Oleg; Andreopoulos, Yiannis; Elvin, Niell

    2015-11-01

    In the present experimental work we investigated the performance of fluidic harvesters consisting of cylindrical body mounted of the tip of a flexible beam in the presence of nearly homogeneous and isotropic turbulence. Circular, semi-circular and square shapes have been tested. It was found that turbulence interferes with resonance conditions between the flow and the structure in the case of vortex induced vibrations and has absolutely no effect in flutter dominated case. As a result, turbulence increases the power output of non-linear harvesters subjected to vortex induces vibration and it has no effect in harvester under flutter conditions. Supported by NSF Grant: CBET #1033117.

  1. Whole-body vibration induces pain and lumbar spinal inflammation responses in the rat that vary with the vibration profile.

    PubMed

    Zeeman, Martha E; Kartha, Sonia; Winkelstein, Beth A

    2016-08-01

    Whole-body vibration (WBV) is linked epidemiologically to neck and back pain in humans, and to forepaw mechanical allodynia and cervical neuroinflammation in a rodent model of WBV, but the response of the low back and lumbar spine to WBV is unknown. A rat model of WBV was used to determine the effect of different WBV exposures on hind paw behavioral sensitivity and neuroinflammation in the lumbar spinal cord. Rats were exposed to 30 min of WBV at either 8 or 15 Hz on days 0 and 7, with the lumbar spinal cord assayed using immunohistochemistry at day 14. Behavioral sensitivity was measured using mechanical stimulation of the hind paws to determine the onset, persistence, and/or recovery of allodynia. Both WBV exposures induce mechanical allodynia 1 day following WBV, but only the 8 Hz WBV induces a sustained decrease in the withdrawal threshold through day 14. Similarly, increased activation of microglia, macrophages, and astrocytes in the superficial dorsal horn of the lumbar spinal cord is only evident after the painful 8 Hz WBV. Moreover, extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK)-phosphorylation is most robust in neurons and astrocytes of the dorsal horn, with the most ERK phosphorylation occurring in the 8 Hz group. These findings indicate that a WBV exposure that induces persistent pain also induces a host of neuroimmune cellular activation responses that are also sustained. This work indicates there is an injury-dependent response that is based on the vibration parameters, providing a potentially useful platform for studying mechanisms of painful spinal injuries. © 2016 Orthopaedic Research Society. Published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. J Orthop Res 34:1439-1446, 2016. PMID:27571442

  2. Measurement of ground and nearby building vibration and noise induced by trains in a metro depot.

    PubMed

    Zou, Chao; Wang, Yimin; Wang, Peng; Guo, Jixing

    2015-12-01

    Metro depots are where subway trains are parked and where maintenance is carried out. They usually occupy the largest ground areas in metro projects. Due to land utilization problems, Chinese cities have begun to develop over-track buildings above metro depots for people's life and work. The frequently moving trains, when going into and out of metro depots, can cause excessive vibration and noise to over-track buildings and adversely affect the living quality of the building occupants. Considering the current need of reliable experimental data for the construction of metro depots, field measurements of vibration and noise on the ground and inside a nearby 3-story building subjected to moving subway trains were conducted in a metro depot at Guangzhou, China. The amplitudes and frequency contents of velocity levels were quantified and compared. The composite A-weighted equivalent sound levels and maximum sound levels were captured. The predicted models for vibration and noise of metro depot were proposed based on existing models and verified. It was found that the vertical vibrations were significantly greater than the horizontal vibrations on the ground and inside the building near the testing line. While at the throat area, the horizontal vibrations near the curved track were remarkably greater than the vertical vibrations. The attenuation of the vibrations with frequencies above 50 Hz was larger than the ones below 50 Hz, and the frequencies of vibration transmitting to adjacent buildings were mainly within 10-50 Hz. The largest equivalent sound level generated in the throat area was smaller than the testing line one, but the instantaneous maximum sound level induced by wheels squeal, contact between wheels and rail joints as well as turnout was close to or even greater than the testing line one. The predicted models gave a first estimation for design and assessment of newly built metro depots. PMID:26254076

  3. Vibration-induced elastic deformation of Fabry-Perot cavities

    SciTech Connect

    Chen Lisheng; Hall, John L.; Ye Jun; Yang Tao; Zang Erjun; Li Tianchu

    2006-11-15

    We perform a detailed numerical analysis of Fabry-Perot cavities used for state-of-the-art laser stabilization. Elastic deformation of Fabry-Perot cavities with various shapes and mounting methods is quantitatively analyzed using finite-element analysis. We show that with a suitable choice of mounting schemes it is feasible to minimize the susceptibility of the resonator length to vibrational perturbations. This investigation offers detailed information on stable optical cavities that may benefit the development of ultrastable optical local oscillators in optical atomic clocks and precision measurements probing the fundamental laws of physics.

  4. Building vibrations induced by noise from rotorcraft and propeller aircraft flyovers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shepherd, Kevin P.; Hubbard, Harvey H.

    1992-01-01

    Noise and building vibrations were measured for a series of helicopter and propeller-driven aircraft flyovers at WFF during May 1978. The building response data are compared with similar data acquired earlier at sites near Dulles and Kennedy Airports for operation of commercial jet transports, including the Concorde supersonic transport. Results show that noise-induced vibration levels in windows and walls are directly proportional to sound pressure level and that for a given noise level, the acceleration levels induced by a helicopter or a propeller-driven aircraft flyover cannot be distinguished from the acceleration levels induced by a commercial jet transport flyover. Noise-induced building acceleration levels were found to be lower than those levels which might be expected to cause structural damage and were also lower than some acceleration levels induced by such common domestic events as closing windows and doors.

  5. Dissociative ionization of liquid water induced by vibrational overtone excitation

    SciTech Connect

    Natzle, W.C.

    1983-03-01

    Photochemistry of vibrationally activated ground electronic state liquid water to produce H/sup +/ and OH/sup -/ ions has been initiated by pulsed, single-photon excitation of overtone and combination transitions. Transient conductivity measurements were used to determine quantum yields as a function of photon energy, isotopic composition, and temperature. The equilibrium relaxation rate following perturbation by the vibrationally activated reaction was also measured as a function of temperature reaction and isotopic composition. In H/sub 2/O, the quantum yield at 283 +- 1 K varies from 2 x 10/sup -9/ to 4 x 10/sup -5/ for wave numbers between 7605 and 18140 cm/sup -1/. In D/sub 2/O, the dependence of quantum yield on wavelength has the same qualitative shape as for H/sub 2/O, but is shifted to lower quantum yields. The position of a minimum in the quantum yield versus hydrogen mole fraction curve is consistent with a lower quantum yield for excitation of HOD in D/sub 2/O than for excitation of D/sub 2/O. The ionic recombination distance of 5.8 +- 0.5 A is constant within experimental error with temperature in H/sub 2/O and with isotopic composition at 25 +- 1/sup 0/C.

  6. Flow-Induced Vibration of Free Edges of Thin Films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chang, Y. B.; Moretti, P. M.

    2002-10-01

    During manufacturing processes of thin materials such as paper, photographic film, and magnetic film, which are handled as continuous sheets and subjected to drying air-flows, the interaction of the air with the web can cause the free edges to vibrate violently. This phenomenon is related to the waving motion of a flag in the wind, except that the thin films under consideration are under tension in the direction of the air-flow or at right angles to it. A travelling-wave analysis was done based on incompressible potential-flow theory; the critical flow speed, wave speed, wavelength, and flutter frequency were predicted. A closed-form solution of the critical flow speed is suggested. Experiments were carried out with stationary thin films mounted in a wind tunnel where the direction of tension was perpendicular to the flow direction. It was shown that the analysis, which assumes that the film is infinitely long in the flow direction, could successfully predict the critical flow speed above which violent edge vibrations occur.

  7. Application of coupled analysis methods for prediction of blast-induced dominant vibration frequency

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Haibo; Li, Xiaofeng; Li, Jianchun; Xia, Xiang; Wang, Xiaowei

    2016-03-01

    Blast-induced dominant vibration frequency (DVF) involves a complex, nonlinear and small sample system considering rock properties, blasting parameters and topography. In this study, a combination of grey relational analysis and dimensional analysis procedures for prediction of dominant vibration frequency are presented. Six factors are selected from extensive effect factor sequences based on grey relational analysis, and then a novel blast-induced dominant vibration frequency prediction is obtained by dimensional analysis. In addition, the prediction is simplified by sensitivity analysis with 195 experimental blast records. Validation is carried out for the proposed formula based on the site test database of the firstperiod blasting excavation in the Guangdong Lufeng Nuclear Power Plant (GLNPP). The results show the proposed approach has a higher fitting degree and smaller mean error when compared with traditional predictions.

  8. Laser-induced fluorescence, dispersed fluorescence and lifetime measurements of jet-cooled chloro-substituted benzyl radicals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hamatani, Satoshi; Tsuji, Kazuhide; Kawai, Akio; Shibuya, Kazuhiko

    2002-07-01

    We measured the laser-induced fluorescence (LIF) and dispersed fluorescence (DF) spectra of jet-cooled α-, o- and m-chlorobenzyl radicals after they were generated by the 193 nm photolysis of the corresponding parent molecules. The vibronically resolved spectra were obtained to analyze their D1-D0 transitions. The fluorescence lifetimes of α-, o-, m- and p-chlorobenzyls in the zeroth vibrational levels of the D1 states were measured to estimate the oscillator strengths of a series of benzyl derivatives. It was found that the α-substitution is inefficient to break the `accidental forbiddenness' of the D1-D0 transition of benzyl, while the ring-substitution enhances the oscillator strength by 50%.

  9. Poiseuille flow-induced vibrations of two tandem circular cylinders with different mass ratios

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jiang, Ren-Jie; Lin, Jian-Zhong

    2016-06-01

    Flow-induced vibrations of two tandem circular cylinders with different mass ratios confined between two parallel walls are numerically studied via a lattice Boltzmann method. With fixed Reynolds number Re = 100 and blockage ratio β = 1/4, the effects of mass ratio m* = [0.0625, 16] and streamwise separation between two cylinders S/D = [1.125, 10] on the cylinder motions and vortex wake modes are investigated. A variety of distinct cylinder motion regimes involving the symmetric periodic vibration, biased quasi-periodic vibration, beating vibration, and steady regimes, with the corresponding wake structures, e.g., two rows of alternately rotating vortices, a single row of same-sign vortices, and steady wake, are observed. For each current case, the cylinder motion type is exclusive and in the binary oscillation regime, both cylinders always vibrate at a common primary frequency. The lighter cylinder usually oscillates at a larger amplitude than the heavier one, while the heavier cylinder undergoes larger lift force than the lighter one. The lift force and cylinder displacement always behave as an out-of-phase state. In the gap-interference region, large-amplitude oscillations could be produced extensively and in the wake-interference region, the cylinder motions and fluid flows are mainly dependent on the upstream cylinder. When the separation is large enough, both cylinders behave as two isolated ones. The mechanisms for the excitations of cylinder vibrations have also been analysed.

  10. Light-induced vibration characteristics of free-standing carbon nanotube films fabricated by vacuum filtration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Junying; Zhu, Yong; Wang, Xin; Wang, Ning; Zhang, Jie

    2014-07-01

    In this paper, we fabricated carbon nanotube (CNT) films with different thickness by vacuum filtration method, and the films were separated from Mixed Cellulose Ester membranes with burn-off process. The thickness of CNT films with different concentrations of CNTs 50 mg, 100 mg, 150 mg, and 200 mg are 10.36 μm, 20.90 μm, 30.19 μm, and 39.98 μm respectively. The CNT bundles are homogeneously distributed and entangled with each other, and still maintain 2D continuous network structures after burn-off process. The optical absorptivity of the films is between 84% and 99% at wavelengths ranging from 400 nm to 2500 nm. Vibration characteristics were measured with the Fabry-Perot (F-P) interferometer vibration measurement system. CNT films vibrate only under the xenon light irradiating perpendicularly to the surface. Vibration recorded by Fabry-Perot interferometer is considered to be caused by the time-dependent thermal moment, which is due to the temperature differences of two sides of CNT films. The vibration frequency spectrums between 0.1 ˜ 0.5 Hz were obtained by the Fast Fourier Transform spectra from time domain to frequency domain, and showed a linear relationship with films thickness, which is in accordance with theoretical model of thermal induced vibration.

  11. Light-induced vibration characteristics of free-standing carbon nanotube films fabricated by vacuum filtration

    SciTech Connect

    Li, Junying; Zhu, Yong Wang, Ning; Zhang, Jie; Wang, Xin

    2014-07-14

    In this paper, we fabricated carbon nanotube (CNT) films with different thickness by vacuum filtration method, and the films were separated from Mixed Cellulose Ester membranes with burn-off process. The thickness of CNT films with different concentrations of CNTs 50 mg, 100 mg, 150 mg, and 200 mg are 10.36 μm, 20.90 μm, 30.19 μm, and 39.98 μm respectively. The CNT bundles are homogeneously distributed and entangled with each other, and still maintain 2D continuous network structures after burn-off process. The optical absorptivity of the films is between 84% and 99% at wavelengths ranging from 400 nm to 2500 nm. Vibration characteristics were measured with the Fabry-Perot (F-P) interferometer vibration measurement system. CNT films vibrate only under the xenon light irradiating perpendicularly to the surface. Vibration recorded by Fabry-Perot interferometer is considered to be caused by the time-dependent thermal moment, which is due to the temperature differences of two sides of CNT films. The vibration frequency spectrums between 0.1 ∼ 0.5 Hz were obtained by the Fast Fourier Transform spectra from time domain to frequency domain, and showed a linear relationship with films thickness, which is in accordance with theoretical model of thermal induced vibration.

  12. Droplet Manipulation Using Acoustic Streaming Induced by a Vibrating Membrane.

    PubMed

    Phan, Hoang Van; Alan, Tuncay; Neild, Adrian

    2016-06-01

    We present a simple method for on-demand manipulation of aqueous droplets in oil. With numerical simulations and experiments, we show that a vibrating membrane can produce acoustic streaming. By making use of this vortical flow, we manage to repulse the droplets away from the membrane edges. Then, by simply aligning the membrane at 45° to the flow, the droplets can be forced to follow the membrane's boundaries, thus steering them across streamlines and even between different oil types. We also characterize the repulsion and steering effect with various excitation voltages at different water and oil flow rates. The maximum steering frequency we have achieved is 165 Hz. The system is extremely robust and reliable: the same membrane can be reused after many days and with different oils and/or surfactants at the same operating frequency. PMID:27119623

  13. Air Blast-Induced Vibration of a Laminated Spherical Shell

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yzgüksel, Hzgüseyin Murat; Türkmen, Halit S.

    The scope of this study is to investigate the dynamic behavior of a laminated spherical shell subjected to air blast load. The shell structure considered here is a hemisphere in shape and made of a glass/epoxy laminated composite material. The blast experiments are performed on the spherical shell. The strain-time history of the center of the spherical shell panel is obtained experimentally. The blast loaded spherical shell is also modeled and analyzed using ANSYS finite element software. The static analysis is performed to characterize the material. The dynamic response of the spherical shell panel obtained numerically is compared to the experimental results. It is observed that the response frequency corresponds to the higher vibration modes of the panel. The qualitative agreement is found between the numerical and experimental results.

  14. Flow-induced vibration of an array of cylindrical pendulums

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Junyoung; Kim, Hyeonseong; Kim, Daegyoum

    2015-11-01

    We investigated experimentally self-excited vibration of an array of cylindrical pendulums in a uniform flow in order to find its potential application to energy harvesting. A cylindrical pendulum is fixed to a rigid upper plate via a thin elastic sheet so that it can swing perpendicularly to the free stream. Although this type of model has been studied for electrical energy generation, few studies have been conducted in order to understand the detailed physics of fluid-structure interaction. In this study, the flow pattern and dynamics of pendulums were examined by varying distance among the pendulums, free-stream fluid velocity, density ratio of the fluid and the pendulums. The interaction of an upstream bluff body and pendulums was also considered to investigate how the wake of the bluff body affects the oscillations of cylinders. With this experimental setup, the pendulums show various patterns such as stationary mode and out-of-phase oscillation mode.

  15. Vibration-induced field fluctuations in a superconducting magnet

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Britton, J. W.; Bohnet, J. G.; Sawyer, B. C.; Uys, H.; Biercuk, M. J.; Bollinger, J. J.

    2016-06-01

    Superconducting magnets enable precise control of nuclear and electron spins, and are used in experiments that explore biological and condensed-matter systems, and fundamental atomic particles. In high-precision applications, a common view is that slow (<1 Hz ) drift of the homogeneous magnetic-field limits control and measurement precision. We report on previously undocumented higher-frequency field noise (10-200 Hz) that limits the coherence time of Be+9 electron-spin qubits in the 4.46 -T field of a superconducting magnet. We measure a spin-echo T2 coherence time of ˜6 ms for the Be+9 electron-spin resonance at 124 GHz , limited by part-per-billion fractional fluctuations in the magnet's homogeneous field. Vibration isolation of the magnet improved T2 to ˜50 ms.

  16. Acoustically Induced Vibration of Structures: Reverberant Vs. Direct Acoustic Testing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kolaini, Ali R.; O'Connell, Michael R.; Tsoi, Wan B.

    2009-01-01

    Large reverberant chambers have been used for several decades in the aerospace industry to test larger structures such as solar arrays and reflectors to qualify and to detect faults in the design and fabrication of spacecraft and satellites. In the past decade some companies have begun using direct near field acoustic testing, employing speakers, for qualifying larger structures. A limited test data set obtained from recent acoustic tests of the same hardware exposed to both direct and reverberant acoustic field testing has indicated some differences in the resulting structural responses. In reverberant acoustic testing, higher vibration responses were observed at lower frequencies when compared with the direct acoustic testing. In the case of direct near field acoustic testing higher vibration responses appeared to occur at higher frequencies as well. In reverberant chamber testing and direct acoustic testing, standing acoustic modes of the reverberant chamber or the speakers and spacecraft parallel surfaces can strongly couple with the fundamental structural modes of the test hardware. In this paper data from recent acoustic testing of flight hardware, that yielded evidence of acoustic standing wave coupling with structural responses, are discussed in some detail. Convincing evidence of the acoustic standing wave/structural coupling phenomenon will be discussed, citing observations from acoustic testing of a simple aluminum plate. The implications of such acoustic coupling to testing of sensitive flight hardware will be discussed. The results discussed in this paper reveal issues with over or under testing of flight hardware that could pose unanticipated structural and flight qualification issues. Therefore, it is of paramount importance to understand the structural modal coupling with standing acoustic waves that has been observed in both methods of acoustic testing. This study will assist the community to choose an appropriate testing method and test setup in

  17. Effect of angle on flow-induced vibrations of pinniped vibrissae.

    PubMed

    Murphy, Christin T; Eberhardt, William C; Calhoun, Benton H; Mann, Kenneth A; Mann, David A

    2013-01-01

    Two types of vibrissal surface structures, undulated and smooth, exist among pinnipeds. Most Phocidae have vibrissae with undulated surfaces, while Otariidae, Odobenidae, and a few phocid species possess vibrissae with smooth surfaces. Variations in cross-sectional profile and orientation of the vibrissae also exist between pinniped species. These factors may influence the way that the vibrissae behave when exposed to water flow. This study investigated the effect that vibrissal surface structure and orientation have on flow-induced vibrations of pinniped vibrissae. Laser vibrometry was used to record vibrations along the whisker shaft from the undulated vibrissae of harbor seals (Phoca vitulina) and northern elephant seals (Mirounga angustirostris) and the smooth vibrissae of California sea lions (Zalophus californianus). Vibrations along the whisker shaft were measured in a flume tank, at three orientations (0°, 45°, 90°) to the water flow. The results show that vibration frequency and velocity ranges were similar for both undulated and smooth vibrissae. Angle of orientation, rather than surface structure, had the greatest effect on flow-induced vibrations. Vibration velocity was up to 60 times higher when the wide, flat aspect of the whisker faced into the flow (90°), compared to when the thin edge faced into the flow (0°). Vibration frequency was also dependent on angle of orientation. Peak frequencies were measured up to 270 Hz and were highest at the 0° orientation for all whiskers. Furthermore, CT scanning was used to quantify the three-dimensional structure of pinniped vibrissae that may influence flow interactions. The CT data provide evidence that all vibrissae are flattened in cross-section to some extent and that differences exist in the orientation of this profile with respect to the major curvature of the hair shaft. These data support the hypothesis that a compressed cross-sectional profile may play a key role in reducing self-noise of the

  18. Effect of Angle on Flow-Induced Vibrations of Pinniped Vibrissae

    PubMed Central

    Murphy, Christin T.; Eberhardt, William C.; Calhoun, Benton H.; Mann, Kenneth A.; Mann, David A.

    2013-01-01

    Two types of vibrissal surface structures, undulated and smooth, exist among pinnipeds. Most Phocidae have vibrissae with undulated surfaces, while Otariidae, Odobenidae, and a few phocid species possess vibrissae with smooth surfaces. Variations in cross-sectional profile and orientation of the vibrissae also exist between pinniped species. These factors may influence the way that the vibrissae behave when exposed to water flow. This study investigated the effect that vibrissal surface structure and orientation have on flow-induced vibrations of pinniped vibrissae. Laser vibrometry was used to record vibrations along the whisker shaft from the undulated vibrissae of harbor seals (Phoca vitulina) and northern elephant seals (Mirounga angustirostris) and the smooth vibrissae of California sea lions (Zalophus californianus). Vibrations along the whisker shaft were measured in a flume tank, at three orientations (0°, 45°, 90°) to the water flow. The results show that vibration frequency and velocity ranges were similar for both undulated and smooth vibrissae. Angle of orientation, rather than surface structure, had the greatest effect on flow-induced vibrations. Vibration velocity was up to 60 times higher when the wide, flat aspect of the whisker faced into the flow (90°), compared to when the thin edge faced into the flow (0°). Vibration frequency was also dependent on angle of orientation. Peak frequencies were measured up to 270 Hz and were highest at the 0° orientation for all whiskers. Furthermore, CT scanning was used to quantify the three-dimensional structure of pinniped vibrissae that may influence flow interactions. The CT data provide evidence that all vibrissae are flattened in cross-section to some extent and that differences exist in the orientation of this profile with respect to the major curvature of the hair shaft. These data support the hypothesis that a compressed cross-sectional profile may play a key role in reducing self-noise of the

  19. Effect of vehicle weight on natural frequencies of bridges measured from traffic-induced vibration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Chul-Young; Jung, Dae-Sung; Kim, Nam-Sik; Kwon, Soon-Duck; Feng, Maria Q.

    2003-06-01

    Recently, ambient vibration test (AVT) is widely used to estimate dynamic characteristics of large civil structures. Dynamic characteristics can be affected by various environmental factors such as humidity, intensity of wind, and temperature. Besides these environmental conditions, the mass of vehicles may change the measured values when traffic-induced vibration is used as a source of AVT for bridges. The effect of vehicle mass on dynamic characteristics is investigated through traffic-induced vibration tests on three bridges; (1) three-span suspension bridge (128m +404m + 128m), (2) five-span continuous steel box girder bridge (59m + 3@95m + 59m), (3) simply supported plate girder bridge (46m). Acceleration histories of each measurement location under normal traffic are recorded for 30 minutes at field. These recorded histories are divided into individual vibrations and are combined into two groups according to the level of vibration ; one by heavy vehicles such as trucks and buses and the other by light vehicles such as passenger cars. Separate processing of the two groups of signals shows that, for the middle and long-span bridges, the difference can be hardly detected, but, for the short span bridges whose mass is relatively small, the measured natural frequencies can change up to 5.4%.

  20. Whole-body vibration training induces hypertrophy of the human patellar tendon.

    PubMed

    Rieder, F; Wiesinger, H-P; Kösters, A; Müller, E; Seynnes, O R

    2016-08-01

    Animal studies suggest that regular exposure to whole-body vibration (WBV) induces an anabolic response in bone and tendon. However, the effects of this type of intervention on human tendon properties and its influence on the muscle-tendon unit function have never been investigated. The aim of this study was to investigate the effect of WBV training on the patellar tendon mechanical, material and morphological properties, the quadriceps muscle architecture and the knee extension torque-angle relationship. Fifty-five subjects were randomized into either a vibration, an active control, or an inactive control group. The active control subjects performed isometric squats on a vibration platform without vibration. Muscle and tendon properties were measured using ultrasonography and dynamometry. Vibration training induced an increase in proximal (6.3%) and mean (3.8%) tendon cross-sectional area, without any appreciable change in tendon stiffness and modulus or in muscle architectural parameters. Isometric torque at a knee angle of 90° increased in active controls (6.7%) only and the torque-angle relation remained globally unchanged in all groups. The present protocol did not appreciably alter knee extension torque production or the musculo-tendinous parameters underpinning this function. Nonetheless, this study shows for the first time that WBV elicits tendon hypertrophy in humans. PMID:26173589

  1. Concorde noise-induced building vibrations for Sully Plantation, Chantilly, Virginia

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mayes, W. H.; Scholl, H. F.; Stephens, D. G.; Holliday, B. G.; Deloach, R.; Holmes, H. K.; Lewis, R. B.; Lynch, J. W.

    1976-01-01

    A study to assess the noise-induced building vibrations associated with Concorde operations is presented. The approach is to record the levels of induced vibrations and associated indoor/outdoor noise levels in selected homes, historic and other buildings near Dulles and Kennedy International Airports. Presented is a small, representative sample of data recorded at Sully Plantation, Chantilly, Virginia during the period of May 20 through May 28, 1976. Recorded data provide relationships between the vibration levels of walls, floors, windows, and the noise associated with Concorde operations (2 landings and 3 takeoffs), other aircraft, nonaircraft sources, and normal household activities. Results suggest that building vibrations resulting from aircraft operations were proportional to the overall sound pressure levels and relatively insensitive to spectral differences associated with the different types of aircraft. Furthermore, the maximum levels of vibratory response resulting from Concorde operations were higher than those associated with conventional aircraft. The vibrations of nonaircraft events were observed in some cases to exceed the levels resulting from aircraft operations. These nonaircraft events are currently being analyzed in greater detail.

  2. Vibrational relaxation and dissociative recombination of H{sub 2}{sup +} induced by slow electrons

    SciTech Connect

    Ngassam, V.; Motapon, O.; Florescu, A.; Pichl, L.; Schneider, I. F.; Suzor-Weiner, A.

    2003-09-01

    We present calculations of cross sections and rate coefficients for the dissociative recombination of H{sub 2}{sup +} ions initially in v=0-6 vibrational levels, together with rate coefficients for the competing electron-induced vibrational deexcitation. We used the multichannel quantum defect theory with a second-order treatment of the K matrix, and show that electronic interactions dominate not only the dissociative recombination but also the vibrational relaxation induced by slow electrons. Most of our rate coefficients for dissociative recombination are in good agreement with the measurements at the TSR storage ring [S. Krohn et al., Phys. Rev. A 62, 032713 (2000)]. On the contrary, our rates for vibrational deexcitation, close to former results obtained by R-matrix calculations [B. K. Sarpal and J. Tennyson, Mon. Not. R. Astron. Soc. 263, 909 (1993)], are smaller by up to one order of magnitude than the experimental values which are deduced from the time evolution of the vibrational populations, measured by the Coulomb explosion imaging method.

  3. Regarding "A new method for predicting nonlinear structural vibrations induced by ground impact loading" [Journal of Sound and Vibration, 331/9 (2012) 2129-2140

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cartmell, Matthew P.

    2016-09-01

    The Editor wishes to make the reader aware that the paper "A new method for predicting nonlinear structural vibrations induced by ground impact loading" by Jun Liu, Yu Zhang, Bin Yun, Journal of Sound and Vibration, 331 (2012) 2129-2140, did not contain a direct citation of the fundamental and original work in this field by Dr. Mark Svinkin. The Editor regrets that this omission was not noted at the time that the above paper was accepted and published.

  4. Cooling dynamics of carbon cluster anions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shiromaru, H.; Furukawa, T.; Ito, G.; Kono, N.; Tanuma, H.; Matsumoto, J.; Goto, M.; Majima, T.; Sundén, A. E. K.; Najafian, K.; Pettersson, M. S.; Dynefors, B.; Hansen, K.; Azuma, T.

    2015-09-01

    A series of ion storage experiments on small carbon cluster anions was conducted to understand size-dependent cooling processes. The laser-induced delayed electron detachment time profile show clear even/odd alternation due to the presence of the electronic cooling. The time evolution of the internal energy distribution was simulated for Cn- (n=4 to 7) with a common procedure taking vibrational and electronic cooling into account.

  5. Experimental investigation of railway train-induced vibrations of surrounding ground and a nearby multi-story building

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xia, He; Chen, Jianguo; Wei, Pengbo; Xia, Chaoyi; de Roeck, G.; Degrande, G.

    2009-03-01

    In this paper, a field experiment was carried out to study train-induced environmental vibrations. During the field experiment, velocity responses were measured at different locations of a six-story masonry structure near the Beijing-Guangzhou Railway and along a small road adjacent to the building. The results show that the velocity response levels of the environmental ground and the building floors increase with train speed, and attenuate with the distance to the railway track. Heavier freight trains induce greater vibrations than lighter passenger trains. In the multi-story building, the lateral velocity levels increase monotonically with floor elevation, while the vertical ones increase with floor elevation in a fluctuating manner. The indoor floor vibrations are much lower than the outdoor ground vibrations. The lateral vibration of the building along the direction of weak structural stiffness is greater than along the direction with stronger stiffness. A larger room produces greater floor vibrations than the staircase at the same elevation, and the vibration at the center of a room is greater than at its corner. The vibrations of the building were compared with the Federal Transportation Railroad Administration (FTA) criteria for acceptable ground-borne vibrations expressed in terms of rms velocity levels in decibels. The results show that the train-induced building vibrations are serious, and some exceed the allowance given in relevant criterion.

  6. Observed three-dimensional structure of ocean cooling induced by Pacific tropical cyclones

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Guihua; Wu, Lingwei; Johnson, Nathaniel C.; Ling, Zheng

    2016-07-01

    Sea surface cooling along tropical cyclone (TC) tracks has been well observed, but a complete understanding of the full three-dimensional structure of upper ocean TC-induced cooling is still needed. In this study, observed ocean temperature profiles derived from Argo floats and TC statistics from 1996 to 2012 are used to determine the three-dimensional structure of TC-induced cooling over the northwest Pacific. The average TC-induced sea surface temperature change derived from Argo reaches -1.4°C, which agrees well with satellite-derived estimates. The Argo profiles further reveal that this cooling can extend to a depth of ~30 m and can persist for about 20 days. The time scale of cooling recovery is somewhat longer in subsurface layers between a depth of ~10-15 m. Over the ocean domain where the mixed layer is shallower (deeper), the cooling is stronger (weaker), shallower (deeper), and more (less) persistent. The effect of initial MLD on the cooling derived from Argo observations may be only half of the idealized piecewise continuous model of tropical cyclone. These findings have implications for the total upper ocean heat content change induced by northwest Pacific TCs.

  7. On the analysis of labyrinth seal flow induced vibration by Oscillating Fluid Mechanics Method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Zuoyi; Jing, Youhao; Sun, Yongzhong

    1994-12-01

    A numerical model and a solution method to analyze the labyrinth seal flow induced vibration by Oscillating Fluid Mechanics Method (OFMM) are presented in this paper, including the basic equations and solution procedure to determine the oscillating velocity, pressure and the dynamic characteristic coefficients of Labyrinth seal such as the stiffness coefficients and damping coefficients. The results show that this method has the advantages of both less time consuming and high accuracy. In addition, it can be applied to the field diagnosis of the vibration of the axis of turbomachinery system.

  8. Leakage flow-induced vibrations for variations of a tube-in-tube slip joint

    SciTech Connect

    Mulcahy, T.M.

    1986-01-01

    Variations in the design of a specific slip joint separating two cantilevered, telescoping tubes conveying water were studied to determine their effect upon the leakage flow-induced vibration self-excitation mechanism known to exist for the original slip joint geometry. The important parameters controlling the self-excitation mechanism were identified, which, along with previous results, allowed the determination of a comprehensive set of design rules to avoid unstable vibrations. This was possible even though a new self-excitation mechanism was found when the engagement of the two tubes was small. 9 refs.

  9. Sliding mode control of wind-induced vibrations using fuzzy sliding surface and gain adaptation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thenozhi, Suresh; Yu, Wen

    2016-04-01

    Although fuzzy/adaptive sliding mode control can reduce the chattering problem in structural vibration control applications, they require the equivalent control and the upper bounds of the system uncertainties. In this paper, we used fuzzy logic to approximate the standard sliding surface and designed a dead-zone adaptive law for tuning the switching gain of the sliding mode control. The stability of the proposed controller is established using Lyapunov stability theory. A six-storey building prototype equipped with an active mass damper has been used to demonstrate the effectiveness of the proposed controller towards the wind-induced vibrations.

  10. Flow-Induced Multiple-Mode Vibrations of Gates with Submerged Discharge

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Billeter, P.; Staubli, T.

    2000-04-01

    An experimental investigation of flow-induced vibrations of gates with multiple degrees of freedom is presented. An underflown vertical gate plate with submerged discharge was allowed to oscillate both in the cross-flow (z -) and in the streamwise (x -) direction. The two purposes of the investigation were to further the insight into the hydrodynamic coupling mechanisms of the two vibration modes and to determine the interaction of the unsteady lift and drag forces. Self-excited vibration tests were run with reduced velocities Vrzand Vrxfrom 0.8 to 14, covering a range in which the instability-induced excitation (IIE) due to impinging-leading-edge vortices (ILEV) as well as the transition to galloping (MIE) occurred. The ratio of the natural frequencies of the two vibration modes fx 0/fz 0, the gate opening ratio s/d, and the submergence of the gate plate were varied. Depending on the ranges of reduced velocities and frequency ratios, a complex interaction of two different kinds of instability-induced excitation was detected. Furthermore, it was found that streamwise IIE-excitation and cross-flow galloping coexist. To assess the relevant fluid dynamic amplification and attenuation mechanisms, simultaneous body response and flow velocity measurements were carried out.

  11. Magnetically induced rotor vibration in dual-stator permanent magnet motors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xie, Bang; Wang, Shiyu; Wang, Yaoyao; Zhao, Zhifu; Xiu, Jie

    2015-07-01

    Magnetically induced vibration is a major concern in permanent magnet (PM) motors, which is especially true for dual-stator motors. This work develops a two-dimensional model of the rotor by using energy method, and employs this model to examine the rigid- and elastic-body vibrations induced by the inner stator tooth passage force and that by the outer. The analytical results imply that there exist three typical vibration modes. Their presence or absence depends on the combination of magnet/slot, force's frequency and amplitude, the relative position between two stators, and other structural parameters. The combination and relative position affect these modes via altering the force phase. The predicted results are verified by magnetic force wave analysis by finite element method (FEM) and comparison with the existing results. Potential directions are also given with the anticipation of bringing forth more interesting and useful findings. As an engineering application, the magnetically induced vibration can be first reduced via the combination and then a suitable relative position.

  12. Cryo Cooler Induced Micro-Vibration Disturbances to the Hubble Space Telescope

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jedrich, Nick; Zimbelman, Darrell; Turczyn, Mark; Sills, Joel; Voorhees, Carl; Clapp, Brian; Brumfield, Mark (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    This paper presents an overview of the Hubble Space Telescope (HST) Near Infrared Camera and Multi-Object Spectrometer (NICMOS) Cryo Cooler (MCC) system, a description of the micro-vibration characterization testing performed, and a discussion of the simulated performance. The NCC is a reverse Brayton cycle system that employs micro turbo-machinery to provide cooling to the NICMOS instrument. Extensive testing was conducted to quantify the expected on-orbit disturbances caused by the micro turbo-machinery and provide input to a flexible-body dynamic simulation to demonstrate compliance with the HST 7 milli-arcsecond root mean square jitter requirement.

  13. Phospholipase A2 induced airway hyperreactivity to cooling and acetylcholine in rat trachea: pharmacological modulation.

    PubMed Central

    Chand, N.; Diamantis, W.; Mahoney, T. P.; Sofia, R. D.

    1988-01-01

    1. Rat isolated tracheal smooth muscle preparations respond to phospholipase A2 (PLA2) and phospholipase C (PLC) with contractile responses of highly variable magnitudes. Rat tracheae exposed to PLA2 or PLC for a period of 10-30 min, exhibit airway hyperreactivity (AH) to cooling (10 degrees C), i.e., respond with strong contractile responses. Phospholipase D neither contracted rat tracheae nor induced AH to cooling. 2. PLA2-induced AH to cooling was dependent on the presence of extracellular Ca2+ in the physiological solution. 3. Verapamil, azelastine, diltiazem and TMB-8 (each 10 microM) significantly attenuated PLA2-induced AH. This effect was not shared by nifedipine (10 microM). 4. Bepridil (10 microM), a Ca2+ and calmodulin antagonist, also significantly attenuated AH induced by PLA2. 5. Indomethacin (a cyclo-oxygenase inhibitor), AA-861 (a selective 5-lipoxygenase inhibitor), FPL 55712 (a leukotriene receptor antagonist), methysergide (a 5-hydroxytryptamine D-receptor antagonist) and pyrilamine (a histamine H1-receptor antagonist) exerted little or no effect on PLA2-induced AH to cooling. 6. Atropine significantly attenuated PLA2-induced AH suggesting the participation of acetylcholine. 7. Nordihydroguaiaretic acid (an antioxidant; 5-lipoxygenase inhibitor) and BW 755C (an antioxidant; a dual inhibitor of cyclo-oxygenase and 5-lipoxygenase) significantly attenuated PLA2-induced AH to cooling. 8. In conclusion, these data show that PLA2 (an enzyme involved in the synthesis of Paf-acether, prostaglandins, thromboxanes, leukotrienes, diacylglycerol, superoxide free radicals and lipid peroxides, etc.) induces AH to cooling and acetylcholine in rat trachea. The induction of AH to cooling is dependent on the presence of extracellular Ca2+ and is significantly attenuated by verapamil, diltiazem, bepridil, atropine and azelastine (an antiallergic/antiasthmatic drug). PMID:3207972

  14. Enhancing Vortex Induced Vibration of a Circular Cylinder by Using Roughness Strips

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vinod, Ashwin; Banerjee, Arindam

    2012-11-01

    The current experimental work focuses on studying the effects of surface roughness on vortex induced vibration (VIV) of an elastically mounted circular cylinder which is free to vibrate in a direction transverse to the flow. Our objective is to identify configurations which lead to high amplitudes of vibrations and a greater range of synchronization that can be successfully used for energy harvesting. Different configurations such as smooth cylinders, cylinder with zero roughness strips, and prescribed roughness (using sand paper) were used. Experiments were also conducted with the zero roughness strips at different angles around the cylinder to verify the effect of the position of the strip. All results were also found to be dependent on the spring stiffness. Variations were observed in the amplitude and frequency response profiles for the different cases investigated. The authors acknowledge support of the Office of Naval Research (Grant # ONR-N000141210495, Program Manager: Ronald Joslin).

  15. Fatigue behavior of flexhoses and bellows due to flow-induced vibrations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Desai, P. V.; Thornhill, L.

    1986-01-01

    The analysis and results developed in a fresh approach to calculate flow induced vibration response of a flexible flow passage are summarized. The vibration results are further examined in the frequency domain to obtain dominant frequency information. A cumulative damage analysis due to cyclic strains is performed to obtain the number of cycles to failure for a metallic bellows of particular specifications under a variety of operational conditions. Sample plots of time and frequency domain responses are included. The complex listing of a computer program is provided. The program successively executes each of the analyses needed to calculate the vibration response, the frequency response, the cyclic strains and the number of cycles to failure. The program prompts the user for necessary input information. Sample data from the program is provided. The fatigue life results obtained by the computer model lie within an acceptable range of previously measured available data.

  16. Concorde noise-induced building vibrations: International Airport Dulles. [studies by Langley Research Center

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mayes, W. H.; Scholl, H. F.; Stephens, D. G.; Holliday, B. G.; Deloach, R.; Finley, T. D.; Holmes, H. K.; Lewis, R. B.; Lynch, J. W.

    1977-01-01

    A series of studies were conducted to assess the noise-induced building vibrations associated with Concorde operations. The vibration levels of windows, walls, and floors were measured along with the associated noise levels of Concorde, subsonic aircraft and some nonaircraft events. Test sites included Sully Plantation which is adjacent to Dulles International Airport and three residential homes located in Montgomery County, Maryland. The measured vibration response levels due to Concorde operations were found to be: (1) higher than the levels due to other aircraft, (2) less than the levels due to certain household events which involve direct impulsive loading such as door and window closing, (3) less than criteria levels for building damage, and (4) comparable to levels which are perceptible to people.

  17. Dynamics of the Turbulent Wake of Rigid and Flexible Cylinders Subject to Vortex-Induced Vibrations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Evangelinos, Constantinos; Karniadakis, George Em.

    1998-11-01

    We present DNS simulation results for flow past a flexible cylinder subject to vortex-induced vibrations at a Reynolds number of 1000. The structure is modeled using the wave equation (simplified cable) or the beam equation. The structural parameters are chosen to obtain lock-in excitation for the fundamental mode of vibration. The transition to a traveling wave solution from the standing wave initial conditions is studied, along with the phase relationship in time between structural displacement and hydrodynamic force variations. The differences and similarities between a cable and a beam are investigated further by looking at the energy variations of the excited structural modes in time. Time history point statistics for the near wake are examined, and spectra and correlation lengths are compared with each other, with those for a stationary cylinder, and with those of a rigid vibrating cylinder.

  18. Vibration Induced Osteogenic Commitment of Mesenchymal Stem Cells is Enhanced by Cytoskeletal Remodeling but not Fluid Shear

    PubMed Central

    Uzer, Gunes; Pongkitwitoon, Suphannee; Chan, M Ete; Judex, Stefan

    2013-01-01

    Consistent across studies in humans, animals and cells, the application of vibrations can be anabolic and/or anti-catabolic to bone. The physical mechanisms modulating the vibration-induced response have not been identified. Recently, we developed an in vitro model in which candidate parameters including acceleration magnitude and fluid shear can be controlled independently during vibrations. Here, we hypothesized that vibration induced fluid shear does not modulate mesenchymal stem cell (MSC) proliferation and mineralization and that cell’s sensitivity to vibrations can be promoted via actin stress fiber formation. Adipose derived human MSCs were subjected to vibration frequencies and acceleration magnitudes that induced fluid shear stress ranging from 0.04Pa to 5Pa. Vibrations were applied at magnitudes of 0.15g, 1g, and 2g using frequencies of both 100Hz and 30Hz. After 14d and under low fluid shear conditions associated with 100Hz oscillations, mineralization was greater in all vibrated groups than in controls. Greater levels of fluid shear produced by 30Hz vibrations enhanced mineralization only in the 2g group. Over 3d, vibrations led to the greatest increase in total cell number with the frequency/acceleration combination that induced the smallest level of fluid shear. Acute experiments showed that actin remodeling was necessary for early mechanical up-regulation of RUNX-2 mRNA levels. During osteogenic differentiation, mechanically induced up-regulation of actin remodeling genes including Wiskott-Aldrich syndrome (WAS) protein, a critical regulator of Arp2/3 complex, was related to the magnitude of the applied acceleration but not to fluid shear. These data demonstrate that fluid shear does not regulate vibration induced proliferation and mineralization and that cytoskeletal remodeling activity may play a role in MSC mechanosensitivity. PMID:23870506

  19. Veno-venous extracorporeal blood shunt cooling to induce mild hypothermia in dog experiments and review of cooling methods.

    PubMed

    Behringer, Wilhelm; Safar, Peter; Wu, Xianren; Nozari, Ala; Abdullah, Ali; Stezoski, S William; Tisherman, Samuel A

    2002-07-01

    Mild hypothermia (33-36 degrees C) might be beneficial when induced during or after insults to the brain (cardiac arrest, brain trauma, stroke), spinal cord (trauma), heart (acute myocardial infarction), or viscera (hemorrhagic shock). Reaching the target temperature rapidly in patients inside and outside hospitals remains a challenge. This study was to test the feasibility of veno-venous extracorporeal blood cooling for the rapid induction of mild hypothermia in dogs, using a simple pumping-cooling device. Ten custom-bred hunting dogs (21-28 kg) were lightly anesthetized and mechanically ventilated. In five dogs, two catheters were inserted through femoral veins, one peripheral and the other into the inferior vena cava. The catheters were connected via a coiled plastic tube as heat exchanger (15 m long, 3 mm inside diameter, 120 ml priming volume), which was immersed in an ice-water bath. A small roller-pump produced a veno-venous flow of 200 ml/min (about 10% of cardiac output). In five additional dogs (control group), a clinically practiced external cooling method was employed, using alcohol over the skin of the trunk and fanning plus ice-bags. During spontaneous normotension, veno-venous cooling delivered blood into the vena cava at 6.2 degrees C standard deviation (SD 1.4) and decreased tympanic membrane (Tty) temperature from 37.5 to 34.0 degrees C at 5.2 min (SD 0.7), and to 32.0 degrees C at 7.9 min (SD 1.3). Skin surface cooling decreased tympanic temperature from 37.5 to 34.0 degrees C at 19.9 min (SD 3.7), and to 32.0 degrees C at 29.9 (SD 5.1) (P=0.001). Heart rates at Tty 34 and 32 degrees C were significantly lower than at baseline in both groups, but within physiological range, without difference between groups. There were no arrhythmias. We conclude that in large dogs the induction of mild systemic hypothermia with extracorporeal veno-venous blood shunt cooling is simple and four times more rapid than skin surface cooling. PMID:12104113

  20. Verification of an empirical prediction method for railway induced vibrations by means of numerical simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Verbraken, H.; Lombaert, G.; Degrande, G.

    2011-04-01

    Vibrations induced by the passage of trains are a major environmental concern in urban areas. In practice, vibrations are often predicted using empirical methods such as the detailed vibration assessment procedure of the Federal Railroad Administration (FRA) of the U.S. Department of Transportation. This procedure allows predicting ground surface vibrations and re-radiated noise in buildings. Ground vibrations are calculated based on force densities, measured when a vehicle is running over a track, and line source transfer mobilities, measured on site to account for the effect of the local geology on wave propagation. Compared to parametric models, the advantage of this approach is that it inherently takes into account all important parameters. It can only be used, however, when an appropriate estimation of the force density is available. In this paper, analytical expressions are derived for the force density and the line source transfer mobility of the FRA procedure. The derivation of these expressions is verified using a coupled finite element-boundary element method.

  1. Vibration amplitude and induced temperature limitation of high power air-borne ultrasonic transducers.

    PubMed

    Saffar, Saber; Abdullah, Amir

    2014-01-01

    The acoustic impedances of matching layers, their internal loss and vibration amplitude are the most important and influential parameters in the performance of high power airborne ultrasonic transducers. In this paper, the optimum acoustic impedances of the transducer matching layers were determined by using a genetic algorithm, the powerful tool for optimizating domain. The analytical results showed that the vibration amplitude increases significantly for low acoustic impedance matching layers. This enhancement is maximum and approximately 200 times higher for the last matching layer where it has the same interface with the air than the vibration amplitude of the source, lead zirconate titanate-pizo electric while transferring the 1 kW is desirable. This large amplitude increases both mechanical failure and temperature of the matching layers due to the internal loss of the matching layers. It has analytically shown that the temperature in last matching layer with having the maximum vibration amplitude is high enough to melt or burn the matching layers. To verify suggested approach, the effect of the amplitude of vibration on the induced temperature has been investigated experimentally. The experimental results displayed good agreement with the theoretical predictions. PMID:23664304

  2. Nature and occurrence of cooling-induced cracking in volcanic rocks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Browning, John; Meredith, Philip G.; Gudmundssom, Agust

    2015-04-01

    Several hypotheses have been proposed regarding the role of thermo-mechanical contraction in producing cracks and joints in volcanic rocks. Nevertheless, most studies of thermally-induced cracking to date have focused on the generation of cracks formed during heating. In this latter case, the cracks are formed under an overall compressional regime. By contrast, cooling cracks are formed under an overall tensile regime. Therefore, both the nature and mechanism of crack formation during cooling are hypothesised to be different from those for crack formation during heating. Furthermore, it remains unclear whether cooling simply reactivates pre-existing cracks, induces the growth of new cracks, or both. We present results from experiments based on a new method for testing ideas on cooling-induced cracking. Cored samples of volcanic rock (basaltic to dacitic in composition) were heated at varying rates to different maximum temperatures inside a tube furnace. In the highest temperature experiments samples of both rocks were raised to the liquidus temperature appropriate to their composition, forcing melt interaction and crack annealing. We present in-situ seismic velocity and acoustic emission data, which were recorded throughout each heating and cooling cycle. It is found consistently that the rate of acoustic emission is much higher during cooling than during heating. In addition, acoustic emission events produced on cooling tend to be significantly higher in energy than those produced during heating. We therefore suggest that cracks formed during cooling are significantly larger than those formed during heating. Thin-section and crack morphology analysis of our cyclically heated samples provide further evidence of contrasting fracture morphologies. These new data are important for assessing the contribution of cooling-induced damage within volcanic structures and layers such as sills and lava flows. Our observations may also help to constrain evolving ideas regarding

  3. Cryotherapy-Induced Persistent Vasoconstriction After Cutaneous Cooling: Hysteresis Between Skin Temperature and Blood Perfusion.

    PubMed

    Khoshnevis, Sepideh; Craik, Natalie K; Matthew Brothers, R; Diller, Kenneth R

    2016-03-01

    The goal of this study was to investigate the persistence of cold-induced vasoconstriction following cessation of active skin-surface cooling. This study demonstrates a hysteresis effect that develops between skin temperature and blood perfusion during the cooling and subsequent rewarming period. An Arctic Ice cryotherapy unit (CTU) was applied to the knee region of six healthy subjects for 60 min of active cooling followed by 120 min of passive rewarming. Multiple laser Doppler flowmetry perfusion probes were used to measure skin blood flow (expressed as cutaneous vascular conductance (CVC)). Skin surface cooling produced a significant reduction in CVC (P < 0.001) that persisted throughout the duration of the rewarming period. In addition, there was a hysteresis effect between CVC and skin temperature during the cooling and subsequent rewarming cycle (P < 0.01). Mixed model regression (MMR) showed a significant difference in the slopes of the CVC-skin temperature curves during cooling and rewarming (P < 0.001). Piecewise regression was used to investigate the temperature thresholds for acceleration of CVC during the cooling and rewarming periods. The two thresholds were shown to be significantly different (P = 0.003). The results show that localized cooling causes significant vasoconstriction that continues beyond the active cooling period despite skin temperatures returning toward baseline values. The significant and persistent reduction in skin perfusion may contribute to nonfreezing cold injury (NFCI) associated with cryotherapy. PMID:26632263

  4. Development of Design Criteria for Fluid Induced Structural Vibration in Steam Generators and Heat Exchangers

    SciTech Connect

    Catton, Ivan; Dhir, Vijay K.; Alquaddoomi, O.S.; Mitra, Deepanjan; Adinolfi, Pierangelo

    2004-03-26

    OAK-B135 Flow-induced vibration in heat exchangers has been a major cause of concern in the nuclear industry for several decades. Many incidents of failure of heat exchangers due to apparent flow-induced vibration have been reported through the USNRC incident reporting system. Almost all heat exchangers have to deal with this problem during their operation. The phenomenon has been studied since the 1970s and the database of experimental studies on flow-induced vibration is constantly updated with new findings and improved design criteria for heat exchangers. In the nuclear industry, steam generators are often affected by this problem. However, flow-induced vibration is not limited to nuclear power plants, but to any type of heat exchanger used in many industrial applications such as chemical processing, refrigeration and air conditioning. Specifically, shell and tube type heat exchangers experience flow-induced vibration due to the high velocity flow over the tube banks. Flow-induced vibration in these heat exchangers leads to equipment breakdown and hence expensive repair and process shutdown. The goal of this research is to provide accurate measurements that can help modelers to validate their models using the measured experimental parameters and thereby develop better design criteria for avoiding fluid-elastic instability in heat exchangers. The research is divided between two primary experimental efforts, the first conducted using water alone (single phase) and the second using a mixture of air or steam and water as the working fluid (two phase). The outline of this report is as follows: After the introduction to fluid-elastic instability, the experimental apparatus constructed to conduct the experiments is described in Chapter 2 along with the measurement procedures. Chapter 3 presents results obtained on the tube array and the flow loop, as well as techniques used in data processing. The project performance is described and evaluated in Chapter 4 followed by

  5. Effect of angle of attack on an optimized vortex induced vibrated energy harvester: A numerical approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haque, Md. Rejaul; Chowdhury, M. Arshad Zahangir; Goswami, Anjan

    2016-07-01

    A two-dimensional numerical study of flow induced vibration is reported in this paper to investigate flow over a semi-cricular D-shaped bluff body oriented at different angles-of-attack to determine an optimized design for energy harvesting. Bluff body structure governs fluid streamlines; therefore obtaining a suitable range of "lock in frequency" for energy harvesting purpose is dependent on refining and optimizing bluff body's shape and structure. A cantilever based novel energy harvester design incorporates the suitable angle-of-attack for optimized performance. This optimization was done by performing computations for 30°, 60° and 90° angles-of-attack. The frequency of vibration of the body was calculated at different Reynolds Number. A Fast Fourier Transformation yielded frequency of vortex shedding. From the wake velocity profile, lift oscillation and frequency of vortex shedding is estimated. Strouhal numbers of the body were analyzed at different angles-of-attack. A higher synchronized bandwidth of shedding frequencies is an indication of an optimized harvester design at different Reynolds number. The `D' shaped bluff bodies (with angle of attack of 30°,60° and 90°) are more suitable than that of cylindrical shaped bluff bodies. The research clearly stated that, bluff bodies shape has a prominent influence on vortex induced vibration and semicircular bluff body gives the highest vibration or energy under stated conditions.

  6. Low frequency vibration induced streaming in a Hele-Shaw cell

    SciTech Connect

    Costalonga, M.; Brunet, P.; Peerhossaini, H.

    2015-01-15

    When an acoustic wave propagates in a fluid, it can generate a second order flow whose characteristic time is much longer than the period of the wave. Within a range of frequency between ten and several hundred Hz, a relatively simple and versatile way to generate streaming flow is to put a vibrating object in the fluid. The flow develops vortices in the viscous boundary layer located in the vicinity of the source of vibrations, leading in turn to an outer irrotational streaming called Rayleigh streaming. Because the flow originates from non-linear time-irreversible terms of the Navier-Stokes equation, this phenomenon can be used to generate efficient mixing at low Reynolds number, for instance in confined geometries. Here, we report on an experimental study of such streaming flow induced by a vibrating beam in a Hele-Shaw cell of 2 mm span using long exposure flow visualization and particle-image velocimetry measurements. Our study focuses especially on the effects of forcing frequency and amplitude on flow dynamics. It is shown that some features of this flow can be predicted by simple scaling arguments and that this vibration-induced streaming facilitates the generation of vortices.

  7. Flow-Induced Vibrations of Prismatic Bodies and Grids of Prisms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Naudascher, E.; Wang, Y.

    1993-05-01

    Flow-induced transverse, torsional, streamwise, and plunging vibrations of prismatic bodies and grids composed of prisms are reviewed for a wide range of cross-sectional shapes and angles of incidence. For flow at zero incidence, rectangular prisms are susceptible to three kinds of vortex-induced excitation, in addition to galloping and wake breathing, depending on their chord-to-thickness ratio. These include leading-edge vortex shedding (LEVS), impinging leading-edge vortices (ILEV), and trailing-edge vortex shedding (TEVS). A prism with elongated cross-section typical of elements of a trashrack or a headlight screen, which is free to vibrate in the transverse direction, may be excited by different harmonics of ILEV for incidence angles up to 13° and by alternate-edge vortex shedding (AEVS) for larger angles. Excitation by ILEV diminishes drastically with increases of the degree of turbulence in the approach flow. If a rectangular prism of elongated section has a degree of freedom in the longitudinal direction, on the other hand, it may undergo violent plunging vibrations, excited by AEVS, for incidence angles of about 13° and larger. Rounding the leading and trailing edges amplifies this excitation. As demonstrated by a practical example, serious vibrations can be avoided if the grid or trashrack is stiff enough, so that the maximum reduced velocity stays below the critical values marking the onsets of all the possible sources of excitation.

  8. Concorde noise-induced building vibrations, Sully Plantation - Report no. 2, Chantilly, Virginia

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1976-01-01

    Noise-induced building vibrations associated with Concorde operations were studied. The approach is to record the levels of induced vibrations and associated indoor/outdoor noise levels in selected homes, historic and other buildings near Dulles International Airport. Representative data are presented which were recorded at Sully Plantation, Chantilly, Virginia during the periods of May 20 through May 28, 1976, and June 14 through June 17, 1976. Recorded data provide relationships between the vibration levels of windows, walls, floors, and the noise associated with Concorde operations, other aircraft, and nonaircraft events. The results presented are drawn from the combined May-June data base which is considerably larger than the May data base covered. The levels of window, wall and floor vibratory response resulting from Concorde operations are higher than the vibratory levels associated with conventional aircraft. Furthermore, the vibratory responses of the windows are considerably higher than those of the walls and floors. The window response is higher for aircraft than recorded nonaircraft events and exhibits a linear response relationship with the overall sound pressure level. For a given sound pressure level, the Concorde may cause more vibration than a conventional aircraft due to spectral or other differences. However, the responses associated with Concorde appear to be much more dependent upon sound pressure level than spectral or other characteristics of the noise.

  9. Low frequency vibration induced streaming in a Hele-Shaw cell

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Costalonga, M.; Brunet, P.; Peerhossaini, H.

    2015-01-01

    When an acoustic wave propagates in a fluid, it can generate a second order flow whose characteristic time is much longer than the period of the wave. Within a range of frequency between ten and several hundred Hz, a relatively simple and versatile way to generate streaming flow is to put a vibrating object in the fluid. The flow develops vortices in the viscous boundary layer located in the vicinity of the source of vibrations, leading in turn to an outer irrotational streaming called Rayleigh streaming. Because the flow originates from non-linear time-irreversible terms of the Navier-Stokes equation, this phenomenon can be used to generate efficient mixing at low Reynolds number, for instance in confined geometries. Here, we report on an experimental study of such streaming flow induced by a vibrating beam in a Hele-Shaw cell of 2 mm span using long exposure flow visualization and particle-image velocimetry measurements. Our study focuses especially on the effects of forcing frequency and amplitude on flow dynamics. It is shown that some features of this flow can be predicted by simple scaling arguments and that this vibration-induced streaming facilitates the generation of vortices.

  10. Use of single crystal and soft piezoceramics for alleviation of flow separation induced vibration in a smart helicopter rotor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thakkar, Dipali; Ganguli, Ranjan

    2006-04-01

    Dynamic stall and flow separation induced vibration alleviation is investigated using single crystal and soft piezoceramic-induced shear actuation. PZT-5H performs well to reduce vibration at cruise speed (about 50%) but fails to achieve a substantial vibration reduction (about 20%) at high speed forward flight because dynamic stall and flow separation require a larger stroke for vibration reduction. {\\mathrm {PZN\\mbox {-}8%PT}}\\langle 111\\rangle -induced shear actuation is found to generate a larger stroke and eventually a higher vibration reduction (about 60-70%) at both cruise and high speed flight. It is observed that the controller performs satisfactorily up to a noise level of 20% in the sensed data. Optimum placement of actuators along the span, as well as the eventualities of actuator failure and degradation are also addressed.

  11. Do the Amazon and Orinoco freshwater plumes really matter for hurricane-induced ocean surface cooling?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hernandez, O.; Jouanno, J.; Durand, F.

    2016-04-01

    Recent studies suggested that the plume of low-saline waters formed by the discharge of the Amazon and Orinoco rivers could favor Atlantic Tropical Cyclone (TC) intensification by weakening the cool wake and its impact on the hurricane growth potential. The main objective of this study is to quantify the effects of the Amazon-Orinoco river discharges in modulating the amplitude of TC-induced cooling in the western Tropical Atlantic. Our approach is based on the analysis of TC cool wake statistics obtained from an ocean regional numerical simulation with ¼º horizontal resolution over the 1998-2012 period, forced with realistic TC winds. In both model and observations, the amplitude of TC-induced cooling in plume waters (0.3-0.4ºC) is reduced significantly by around 50-60% compared to the cooling in open ocean waters out of the plume (0.6-0.7ºC). A twin simulation without river runoff shows that TC-induced cooling over the plume region (defined from the reference experiment) is almost unchanged (˜0.03ºC) despite strong differences in salinity stratification and the absence of barrier layers. This argues for a weaker than thought cooling inhibition effect of salinity stratification and barrier layers in this region. Indeed, results suggest that haline stratification and barrier layers caused by the river runoff may explain only ˜10% of the cooling difference between plume waters and open ocean waters. Instead, the analysis of the background oceanic conditions suggests that the regional distribution of the thermal stratification is the main factor controlling the amplitude of cooling in the plume region.

  12. Soft Computing Approach to Evaluate and Predict Blast-Induced Ground Vibration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khandelwal, Manoj

    2010-05-01

    Drilling and blasting is still one of the major economical operations to excavate a rock mass. The consumption of explosive has been increased many folds in recent years. These explosives are mainly used for the exploitation of minerals in mining industry or the removal of undesirable rockmass for community development. The amount of chemical energy converted into mechanical energy to fragment and displace the rockmass is minimal. Only 20 to 30% of this explosive energy is utilized for the actual fragmentation and displacement of rockmass and rest of the energy is wasted in undesirable ill effects, like, ground vibration, air over pressure, fly rock, back break, noise, etc. Ground vibration induced due to blasting is very crucial and critical as compared to other ill effects due to involvement of public residing in the close vicinity of mining sites, regulating and ground vibration standards setting agencies together with mine owners and environmentalists and ecologists. Also, with the emphasis shifting towards eco-friendly, sustainable and geo-environmental activities, the field of ground vibration have now become an important and imperative parameter for safe and smooth running of any mining and civil project. The ground vibration is a wave motion, spreading outward from the blast like ripples spreading outwards due to impact of a stone dropped into a pond of water. As the vibration passes through the surface structures, it induces vibrations in those structures also. Sometimes, due to high ground vibration level, dwellings may get damaged and there is always confrontation between mine management and the people residing in the surroundings of the mine area. There is number of vibration predictors available suggested by different researchers. All the predictors estimate the PPV based on mainly two parameters (maximum charge used per delay and distance between blast face to monitoring point). However, few predictors considered attenuation/damping factor too. For

  13. Hybrid predictions of railway induced ground vibration using a combination of experimental measurements and numerical modelling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuo, K. A.; Verbraken, H.; Degrande, G.; Lombaert, G.

    2016-07-01

    Along with the rapid expansion of urban rail networks comes the need for accurate predictions of railway induced vibration levels at grade and in buildings. Current computational methods for making predictions of railway induced ground vibration rely on simplifying modelling assumptions and require detailed parameter inputs, which lead to high levels of uncertainty. It is possible to mitigate against these issues using a combination of field measurements and state-of-the-art numerical methods, known as a hybrid model. In this paper, two hybrid models are developed, based on the use of separate source and propagation terms that are quantified using in situ measurements or modelling results. These models are implemented using term definitions proposed by the Federal Railroad Administration and assessed using the specific illustration of a surface railway. It is shown that the limitations of numerical and empirical methods can be addressed in a hybrid procedure without compromising prediction accuracy.

  14. Determination of the effects of wind-induced vibration on cylindrical beams

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Artusa, E. A.

    1991-01-01

    The objective of the analysis was to determine the critical length to diameter ratio (L/Do) of a hollow, cylindrical beam subjected to wind-induced vibration. The sizes of beams ranged from 4 to 24 inches and were composed of ASTM grade A and grade B and American Petroleum Institute grade X42 steels. Calculations used maximum steady-state wind speeds of 130 mph associated with hurricane conditions possible at the Kennedy Space Center. The study examined the effect that different end support and load conditions have on the natural frequencies of the beams. Finally, methods of changing the frequency of the wind-induced vibration were examined. The conclusions drawn were that the greatest possible L/Do is achieved using welded supports and limiting the maximum applied axial and bending loads to less than 50 percent.

  15. Non-linear system identification in flow-induced vibration

    SciTech Connect

    Spanos, P.D.; Zeldin, B.A.; Lu, R.

    1996-12-31

    The paper introduces a method of identification of non-linear systems encountered in marine engineering applications. The non-linearity is accounted for by a combination of linear subsystems and known zero-memory non-linear transformations; an equivalent linear multi-input-single-output (MISO) system is developed for the identification problem. The unknown transfer functions of the MISO system are identified by assembling a system of linear equations in the frequency domain. This system is solved by performing the Cholesky decomposition of a related matrix. It is shown that the proposed identification method can be interpreted as a {open_quotes}Gram-Schmidt{close_quotes} type of orthogonal decomposition of the input-output quantities of the equivalent MISO system. A numerical example involving the identification of unknown parameters of flow (ocean wave) induced forces on offshore structures elucidates the applicability of the proposed method.

  16. Correlation diagram model for interpreting propensity rules in collision induced vibrational relaxation

    SciTech Connect

    McDonald, D.B.; Rice, S.A.

    1981-05-01

    Propensity rules for collision induced vibrational energy transfer are derived by a correlation diagram technique similar to that used by Woodward and Hoffman to treat symmetry restrictions in concerted reactions. A rough quantification is accomplished by an ad hoc generalization of the modified SSH breathing sphere model. Predicted relative transfer rates agree qualitatively and, in some cases, quantitatively with those observed for collisions of benzene, aniline, and pyrazine with inert atoms.

  17. Nonlinear dynamics of a stack/cable system subjected to vortex-induced vibration

    SciTech Connect

    Cai, Y.; Chen, S.S.

    1995-12-31

    A model of a stack/wire system, wind-induced vibration of the stack based on an unsteady-flow theory, and nonlinear dynamics of the stack`s heavy elastic suspended cables was developed in this study. The response characteristics of the stack and cables are presented for different conditions. The dominant excitation mechanisms are lock-in resonance of the stack by vortex shedding and parametric resonance of suspended cables by stack motion at their support ends.

  18. Nonlinear dynamics of a stack/cable system subjected to vortex-induced vibration

    SciTech Connect

    Cai, Y.; Chen, S.S.

    1997-08-01

    A model of a stack/wire system, wind-induced vibration of the stack based on an unsteady-flow theory, and nonlinear dynamics of the stack`s heavy elastic suspended cables was developed in this study. The response characteristics of the stack and cables are presented for different conditions. The dominant excitation mechanisms are lock-in resonance of the stack by vortex shedding and parametric resonance of suspended cables by stack motion at their support ends.

  19. Passive control of vortex induced vibration in internal flow using body shape

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sánchez–Sanz, M.; Velazquez, A.

    2011-10-01

    We present a concept for passive control of vortex induced vibration (VIV) that uses the body shape of a prismatic body as the control parameter in 2D internal flow. We consider that the Reynolds number based on the prism cross section height is 200 and that the blockage ratio of the channel is 2.5. The working fluid is water and the solid-to-fluid density ratio is 1, so that the prism presents neutral buoyancy and the body shape parameter γ acts as the only control parameter. Two very different fluid dynamics regimes are observed depending on γ with an abrupt transition between them for γ = γ c , where γ c represents a critical value obtained numerically. For γ < γ c the cylinder oscillation is controlled by vortex shedding and represents a typical case of vortex induced vibration. For γ > γ c the oscillation is a mixture of galloping and vortex induced vibration that causes the prism motion to shift from a stable periodic motion to a highly irregular pattern. The physical explanation for the change of regime is given based on the cylinder equation of motion.

  20. Investigation of the Flow-Induced Vibration in the E2 Test Facility

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Castillo, Luciano

    2001-01-01

    An investigation of flow induced vibration due to coupling between the fluid flow and the propellants lines (LOX and RP-1) was performed. Various flow rate conditions were studied to check whether flow induced vibration was possible due to vortex shedding in both valves and pipe lines. Resonance test was conducted for all segments of the LOX-feedline for the preburner under test. In addition, critical values of frequency and velocity are calculated using a mass damping model. A simple chart characterizing the relation between frequency and velocity is developed for each component; i.e. propellant lines, valves and flow meters. It was found that flow induced vibration occurs for various segments with flow rates of 113 lb/s, 275 lb/s and 40 lb/s. Even more interesting using critical conditions for buckling, it was found that the valve or pipe may collapse for a flow rate of 275 lb/s and valve height of 10% of pipe diameter. Furthermore, two models for the acoustic pressure acting on the segments particularly for the valve are proposed.

  1. Investigation of the Flow-Induced Vibration in the E2 Test Facility

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Castillo, Luciano

    2001-01-01

    An investigation of flow induced vibration due to coupling between the fluid flow and the propellants lines (LOX and RP-1) was performed. Various flow rate conditions were studied to check whether flow induced vibration was possible due to vortex shedding in both valves and pipe lines. Resonances test was conducted for all segments of the LOX-feedline for the preburner under test. In addition, critical values of frequency and velocity are calculated using a mass damping model. A simple chart characterizing the relation between frequency and velocity is developed for each component; i.e. propellant lines, valves and flow meters. It was found that flow induced vibration occurs for various segments with flow rates of 113 1b/s, 275 lb/s and 40 lb/s. Even more interesting using critical conditions for buckling, it was found that the valve or pipe may collapse for a flow rate of 275 lb/s and valve height of 10% of pipe diameter. Furthermore, two models for the acoustic pressure acting on the segments particularly for the valve are proposed.

  2. Thermally-induced bending-torsion coupling vibration of large scale space structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xue, Ming-De; Duan, Jin; Xiang, Zhi-Hai

    2007-09-01

    In this paper, a finite element scheme is developed to solve the problem of thermally-induced bending-torsion coupling vibration of large scale space structures, which are usually composed of thin-walled beams with open and closed cross-section. A two-noded finite element is proposed to analyze the transient temperature field over the longitudinal and circumferential direction of a beam. Since this temperature element can share the same mesh with the two-noded beam element of Euler-Bernoulli type, a unified finite element scheme is easily formulated to solve the thermal-structural coupling problem. This scheme is characterized with very strong nonlinear formulation, due to the consideration of the thermal radiation and the coupling effect between structural deformations and the incident normal heat flux. Moreover, because the warping is taken into account, not only the thermal axial force and thermal bending moments but also the thermal bi-moment are presented in the formulation. Consequently, the thermally-induced bending-torsion coupling vibration can be simulated. The performance of the proposed computational scheme is illustrated by the analysis of the well-known failure of Hubble space telescope solar arrays. The results reveal that the thermally-induced bending-torsion coupling vibration is obviously presented in that case and could be regarded as a cause of failure.

  3. The effect of cooling on the acetylcholine-induced current of identified Helix pomatia Br neuron.

    PubMed

    Nedeljkovic, Miodrag; Kartelija, Gordana; Radenovic, Lidija; Todorovic, Natasa

    2005-05-01

    The Br neuron of the snail Helix pomatia, involved in neuronal regulation of various homeostatic and adaptive mechanisms, represents an interesting model for studying effects of temperature changes on neuronal activity of poikilotherms. The acetylcholine (ACh) induces a transient, inward dose-dependent current in the identified Br neuron. In the work presented, we analyses the effects of cooling on the ACh-induced inward current. The amplitude of ACh-induced inward current was markedly decreased after cooling and the speed of the decay of ACh response was decreased. Sensitivity to cooling of Ach-activated current on the Br neuron is mediated by a mechanism that does not involve change in the apparent receptor affinity or the cooperativity of binding. PMID:15759140

  4. Evaporative cooling over the Tibetan Plateau induced by vegetation growth.

    PubMed

    Shen, Miaogen; Piao, Shilong; Jeong, Su-Jong; Zhou, Liming; Zeng, Zhenzhong; Ciais, Philippe; Chen, Deliang; Huang, Mengtian; Jin, Chun-Sil; Li, Laurent Z X; Li, Yue; Myneni, Ranga B; Yang, Kun; Zhang, Gengxin; Zhang, Yangjian; Yao, Tandong

    2015-07-28

    In the Arctic, climate warming enhances vegetation activity by extending the length of the growing season and intensifying maximum rates of productivity. In turn, increased vegetation productivity reduces albedo, which causes a positive feedback on temperature. Over the Tibetan Plateau (TP), regional vegetation greening has also been observed in response to recent warming. Here, we show that in contrast to arctic regions, increased growing season vegetation activity over the TP may have attenuated surface warming. This negative feedback on growing season vegetation temperature is attributed to enhanced evapotranspiration (ET). The extra energy available at the surface, which results from lower albedo, is efficiently dissipated by evaporative cooling. The net effect is a decrease in daily maximum temperature and the diurnal temperature range, which is supported by statistical analyses of in situ observations and by decomposition of the surface energy budget. A daytime cooling effect from increased vegetation activity is also modeled from a set of regional weather research and forecasting (WRF) mesoscale model simulations, but with a magnitude smaller than observed, likely because the WRF model simulates a weaker ET enhancement. Our results suggest that actions to restore native grasslands in degraded areas, roughly one-third of the plateau, will both facilitate a sustainable ecological development in this region and have local climate cobenefits. More accurate simulations of the biophysical coupling between the land surface and the atmosphere are needed to help understand regional climate change over the TP, and possible larger scale feedbacks between climate in the TP and the Asian monsoon system. PMID:26170316

  5. Evaporative cooling over the Tibetan Plateau induced by vegetation growth

    PubMed Central

    Shen, Miaogen; Piao, Shilong; Jeong, Su-Jong; Zhou, Liming; Zeng, Zhenzhong; Ciais, Philippe; Chen, Deliang; Huang, Mengtian; Jin, Chun-Sil; Li, Laurent Z. X.; Li, Yue; Myneni, Ranga B.; Yang, Kun; Zhang, Gengxin; Zhang, Yangjian; Yao, Tandong

    2015-01-01

    In the Arctic, climate warming enhances vegetation activity by extending the length of the growing season and intensifying maximum rates of productivity. In turn, increased vegetation productivity reduces albedo, which causes a positive feedback on temperature. Over the Tibetan Plateau (TP), regional vegetation greening has also been observed in response to recent warming. Here, we show that in contrast to arctic regions, increased growing season vegetation activity over the TP may have attenuated surface warming. This negative feedback on growing season vegetation temperature is attributed to enhanced evapotranspiration (ET). The extra energy available at the surface, which results from lower albedo, is efficiently dissipated by evaporative cooling. The net effect is a decrease in daily maximum temperature and the diurnal temperature range, which is supported by statistical analyses of in situ observations and by decomposition of the surface energy budget. A daytime cooling effect from increased vegetation activity is also modeled from a set of regional weather research and forecasting (WRF) mesoscale model simulations, but with a magnitude smaller than observed, likely because the WRF model simulates a weaker ET enhancement. Our results suggest that actions to restore native grasslands in degraded areas, roughly one-third of the plateau, will both facilitate a sustainable ecological development in this region and have local climate cobenefits. More accurate simulations of the biophysical coupling between the land surface and the atmosphere are needed to help understand regional climate change over the TP, and possible larger scale feedbacks between climate in the TP and the Asian monsoon system. PMID:26170316

  6. Long-term daily vibration exposure alters current perception threshold (CPT) sensitivity and myelinated axons in a rat-tail model of vibration-induced injury.

    PubMed

    Krajnak, Kristine; Raju, Sandya G; Miller, G Roger; Johnson, Claud; Waugh, Stacey; Kashon, Michael L; Riley, Danny A

    2016-01-01

    Repeated exposure to hand-transmitted vibration through the use of powered hand tools may result in pain and progressive reductions in tactile sensitivity. The goal of the present study was to use an established animal model of vibration-induced injury to characterize changes in sensory nerve function and cellular mechanisms associated with these alterations. Sensory nerve function was assessed weekly using the current perception threshold test and tail-flick analgesia test in male Sprague-Dawley rats exposed to 28 d of tail vibration. After 28 d of exposure, Aβ fiber sensitivity was reduced. This reduction in sensitivity was partly attributed to structural disruption of myelin. In addition, the decrease in sensitivity was also associated with a reduction in myelin basic protein and 2',3'- cyclic nucleotide phosphodiasterase (CNPase) staining in tail nerves, and an increase in circulating calcitonin gene-related peptide (CGRP) concentrations. Changes in Aβ fiber sensitivity and CGRP concentrations may serve as early markers of vibration-induced injury in peripheral nerves. It is conceivable that these markers may be utilized to monitor sensorineural alterations in workers exposed to vibration to potentially prevent additional injury. PMID:26852665

  7. US LMFBR (Liquid Metal Fast Breeder Reactor): flow induced vibration program (1977-1986): A summary and overview

    SciTech Connect

    Wambsganss, M.W.; Chen, S.S.; Mulcahy, T.M.; Jendrzejczyk, J.A.

    1986-09-01

    This paper summarizes the activities and accomplishments under the US LMFBR Flow Induced Vibration Program for the period 1977-1986. Since 1977 represents the date of the last IAEA IWGFR Specialists Meeting on LMFBR Flow Induced Vibration, this paper thus provides an update to the results presented at that meeting. This period also represents a period of substantial change for the US LMFBR program. A major reactor project, the FFTF, was completed and a second major project, the CRBR plant, was terminated. This change adversely impacted the US flow induced vibration program. Nevertheless, base technology activities have continued. In this paper, research in the following areas is summarized: Vibration characteristics and scaling, Turbulent buffeting and vortex shedding, Fluidelastic instabilities of tube bundles in crossflow, and Instabilities induced by leakage flows.

  8. Vortex-induced vibrations of pipes conveying fluid in the subcritical and supercritical regimes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dai, H. L.; Wang, L.; Qian, Q.; Ni, Q.

    2013-05-01

    In this paper, the vortex-induced vibrations of a hinged-hinged pipe conveying fluid are examined, by considering the internal fluid velocities ranging from the subcritical to the supercritical regions. The nonlinear coupled equations of motion are discretized by employing a four-mode Galerkin method. Based on numerical simulations, diagrams of the displacement amplitude versus the external fluid reduced velocity are constructed for pipes transporting subcritical and supercritical fluid flows. It is shown that when the internal fluid velocity is in the subcritical region, the pipe is always vibrating periodically around the pre-buckling configuration and that with increasing external fluid reduced velocity the peak amplitude of the pipe increases first and then decreases, with jumping phenomenon between the upper and lower response branches. When the internal fluid velocity is in the supercritical region, however, the pipe displays various dynamical behaviors around the post-buckling configuration such as inverse period-doubling bifurcations, periodic and chaotic motions. Moreover, the bifurcation diagrams for vibration amplitude of the pipe with varying internal fluid velocities are constructed for each of the lowest four modes of the pipe in the lock-in conditions. The results show that there is a significant difference between the vibrations of the pipe around the pre-buckling configuration and those around the post-buckling configuration.

  9. Influence of subglottic stenosis on the flow-induced vibration of a computational vocal fold model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smith, Simeon L.; Thomson, Scott L.

    2013-04-01

    The effect of subglottic stenosis on vocal fold vibration is investigated. An idealized stenosis is defined, parameterized, and incorporated into a two-dimensional, fully coupled finite element model of the vocal folds and laryngeal airway. Flow-induced responses of the vocal fold model to varying severities of stenosis are compared. The model vibration was not appreciably affected by stenosis severities of up to 60% occlusion. Model vibration was altered by stenosis severities of 90% or greater, evidenced by decreased superior model displacement, glottal width amplitude, and flow rate amplitude. Predictions of vibration frequency and maximum flow declination rate were also altered by high stenosis severities. The observed changes became more pronounced with increasing stenosis severity and inlet pressure, and the trends correlated well with flow resistance calculations. Flow visualization was used to characterize subglottal flow patterns in the space between the stenosis and the vocal folds. Underlying mechanisms for the observed changes, possible implications for human voice production, and suggestions for future work are discussed.

  10. Vortex-induced vibrations of a flexible cylinder at large inclination angle.

    PubMed

    Bourguet, Rémi; Triantafyllou, Michael S

    2015-01-28

    The free vibrations of a flexible circular cylinder inclined at 80° within a uniform current are investigated by means of direct numerical simulation, at Reynolds number 500 based on the body diameter and inflow velocity. In spite of the large inclination angle, the cylinder exhibits regular in-line and cross-flow vibrations excited by the flow through the lock-in mechanism, i.e. synchronization of body motion and vortex formation. A profound reconfiguration of the wake is observed compared with the stationary body case. The vortex-induced vibrations are found to occur under parallel, but also oblique vortex shedding where the spanwise wavenumbers of the wake and structural response coincide. The shedding angle and frequency increase with the spanwise wavenumber. The cylinder vibrations and fluid forces present a persistent spanwise asymmetry which relates to the asymmetry of the local current relative to the body axis, owing to its in-line bending. In particular, the asymmetrical trend of flow-body energy transfer results in a monotonic orientation of the structural waves. Clockwise and counter-clockwise figure eight orbits of the body alternate along the span, but the latter are found to be more favourable to structure excitation. Additional simulations at normal incidence highlight a dramatic deviation from the independence principle, which states that the system behaviour is essentially driven by the normal component of the inflow velocity. PMID:25512586

  11. Active control of panel vibrations induced by boundary-layer flow

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chow, Pao-Liu

    1991-01-01

    Some problems in active control of panel vibration excited by a boundary layer flow over a flat plate are studied. In the first phase of the study, the optimal control problem of vibrating elastic panel induced by a fluid dynamical loading was studied. For a simply supported rectangular plate, the vibration control problem can be analyzed by a modal analysis. The control objective is to minimize the total cost functional, which is the sum of a vibrational energy and the control cost. By means of the modal expansion, the dynamical equation for the plate and the cost functional are reduced to a system of ordinary differential equations and the cost functions for the modes. For the linear elastic plate, the modes become uncoupled. The control of each modal amplitude reduces to the so-called linear regulator problem in control theory. Such problems can then be solved by the method of adjoint state. The optimality system of equations was solved numerically by a shooting method. The results are summarized.

  12. Seal whisker-inspired circular cylinders reduce vortex-induced vibrations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beem, Heather; Triantafyllou, Michael

    2012-11-01

    Recent work shows that the undulatory, asymmetric geometry of harbor seal whiskers passively reduces vortex-induced vibration (VIV) amplitudes to less than 0.1 times the whisker diameter. This reduction holds in frontal flows, but due to the elliptical cross-section of the whisker, flows that approach from large angles of attack generate significant vibrational response. The present study investigates the possibility of extending the vibration reduction to unidirectional bodies, such that flows from all angles cause reduced VIV. A method for developing a new geometry that incorporates the ``whisker'' features into bodies with uniform, circular cross-section is presented. This geometry and multiple variations on it are fabricated into rigid models. Forces are measured on the models while they undergo imposed oscillations and are towed down a water tank. Contour plots of CL , v show peak VIV amplitudes to decrease as much as 28% from that of a standard cylinder. This result holds promise for applications where vibration reduction is desired, regardless of the angle of oncoming flow.

  13. Vortex-induced vibrations of a flexible cylinder at large inclination angle

    PubMed Central

    Bourguet, Rémi; Triantafyllou, Michael S.

    2015-01-01

    The free vibrations of a flexible circular cylinder inclined at 80° within a uniform current are investigated by means of direct numerical simulation, at Reynolds number 500 based on the body diameter and inflow velocity. In spite of the large inclination angle, the cylinder exhibits regular in-line and cross-flow vibrations excited by the flow through the lock-in mechanism, i.e. synchronization of body motion and vortex formation. A profound reconfiguration of the wake is observed compared with the stationary body case. The vortex-induced vibrations are found to occur under parallel, but also oblique vortex shedding where the spanwise wavenumbers of the wake and structural response coincide. The shedding angle and frequency increase with the spanwise wavenumber. The cylinder vibrations and fluid forces present a persistent spanwise asymmetry which relates to the asymmetry of the local current relative to the body axis, owing to its in-line bending. In particular, the asymmetrical trend of flow–body energy transfer results in a monotonic orientation of the structural waves. Clockwise and counter-clockwise figure eight orbits of the body alternate along the span, but the latter are found to be more favourable to structure excitation. Additional simulations at normal incidence highlight a dramatic deviation from the independence principle, which states that the system behaviour is essentially driven by the normal component of the inflow velocity. PMID:25512586

  14. Influence of subglottic stenosis on the flow-induced vibration of a computational vocal fold model.

    PubMed

    Smith, Simeon L; Thomson, Scott L

    2013-04-01

    The effect of subglottic stenosis on vocal fold vibration is investigated. An idealized stenosis is defined, parameterized, and incorporated into a two-dimensional, fully-coupled finite element model of the vocal folds and laryngeal airway. Flow-induced responses of the vocal fold model to varying severities of stenosis are compared. The model vibration was not appreciably affected by stenosis severities of up to 60% occlusion. Model vibration was altered by stenosis severities of 90% or greater, evidenced by decreased superior model displacement, glottal width amplitude, and flow rate amplitude. Predictions of vibration frequency and maximum flow declination rate were also altered by high stenosis severities. The observed changes became more pronounced with increasing stenosis severity and inlet pressure, and the trends correlated well with flow resistance calculations. Flow visualization was used to characterize subglottal flow patterns in the space between the stenosis and the vocal folds. Underlying mechanisms for the observed changes, possible implications for human voice production, and suggestions for future work are discussed. PMID:23503699

  15. Novel magnetically induced membrane vibration (MMV) for fouling control in membrane bioreactors.

    PubMed

    Bilad, Muhammad R; Mezohegyi, Gergo; Declerck, Priscilla; Vankelecom, Ivo F J

    2012-01-01

    Conventional submerged membrane bioreactors (MBRs) rely on the coarse bubbles aeration to generate shear at the liquid-membrane interface to limit membrane fouling. Unfortunately, it is a very energy consuming method, still often resulting in a rapid decrease of membrane permeability and consequently in higher expenses. In this paper, the feasibility of a novel magnetically induced membrane vibration (MMV) system was studied in a lab-scale MBR treating synthetic wastewater. The effects on membrane fouling of applied electrical power of different operation strategies, of membrane flux and of the presence of multiple membranes on one vibrating engine on membrane fouling were investigated. The filtration performance was evaluated by determining the filtration resistance profiles and critical flux. The results showed clear advantages of the vibrating system over conventional MBR processes by ensuring higher fluxes at lower fouling rates. Intermittent vibration was found a promising strategy for both efficient fouling control and significant energy saving. The optimised MMV system is presumed to lead to significant energy and cost reduction in up-scaled MBR operations. PMID:22082526

  16. Influence of subglottic stenosis on the flow-induced vibration of a computational vocal fold model

    PubMed Central

    Smith, Simeon L.; Thomson, Scott L.

    2012-01-01

    The effect of subglottic stenosis on vocal fold vibration is investigated. An idealized stenosis is defined, parameterized, and incorporated into a two-dimensional, fully-coupled finite element model of the vocal folds and laryngeal airway. Flow-induced responses of the vocal fold model to varying severities of stenosis are compared. The model vibration was not appreciably affected by stenosis severities of up to 60% occlusion. Model vibration was altered by stenosis severities of 90% or greater, evidenced by decreased superior model displacement, glottal width amplitude, and flow rate amplitude. Predictions of vibration frequency and maximum flow declination rate were also altered by high stenosis severities. The observed changes became more pronounced with increasing stenosis severity and inlet pressure, and the trends correlated well with flow resistance calculations. Flow visualization was used to characterize subglottal flow patterns in the space between the stenosis and the vocal folds. Underlying mechanisms for the observed changes, possible implications for human voice production, and suggestions for future work are discussed. PMID:23503699

  17. Collision-induced vibrational absorption in molecular hydrogens

    SciTech Connect

    Reddy, S.P.

    1993-05-01

    Collision induced absorption (CIA) spectra of the first overtone bands of H{sub 2}, D{sub 2}, and HD have been recorded for gas densities up to 500 amagat at 77-300 K. Analyses of these spectra reveal that (1) contrary to the observations in the fundamental bands, the contribution of the isotropic overlap interaction to the first overtone bands is negligible, (2) the squares of the matrix elements B{sub 32}(R)/ea{sub o} [= {lambda}{sub 32} exp(-(R-{sigma})/{rho}{sub 32}) + 3 (R/a{sub o}){sup -4}] where the subscripts 3 and 2 represent L and {lambda}, respectively, account for the absorption intensity of the bands and (3) the mixed term, 2,3 {lambda}{sub 32} exp (-(R-{sigma})/{rho}{sub 32}) <{vert_bar}Q{vert_bar}> <{alpha}> (R/a){sup -4}, gives a negative contribution. In the CIA spectra of H{sub 2} in its second overtone region recorded at 77, 201 and 298 K for gas densities up to 1000 amagat, a dip in the Q branch with characteristic Q{sub p} and Q{sub R} components has been observed. The analysis of the absorption profiles reveals, in addition to the previously known effects, the occurrence of the triple-collision transitions of H{sub 2} of the type Q{sub 1}(J) + Q{sub 1}(J) + Q{sub 1}(J) for the first time. From the profile analysis the absorption coefficient of these transitions is obtained.

  18. Predictions of Experimentally Observed Stochastic Ground Vibrations Induced by Blasting

    PubMed Central

    Kostić, Srđan; Perc, Matjaž; Vasović, Nebojša; Trajković, Slobodan

    2013-01-01

    In the present paper, we investigate the blast induced ground motion recorded at the limestone quarry “Suva Vrela” near Kosjerić, which is located in the western part of Serbia. We examine the recorded signals by means of surrogate data methods and a determinism test, in order to determine whether the recorded ground velocity is stochastic or deterministic in nature. Longitudinal, transversal and the vertical ground motion component are analyzed at three monitoring points that are located at different distances from the blasting source. The analysis reveals that the recordings belong to a class of stationary linear stochastic processes with Gaussian inputs, which could be distorted by a monotonic, instantaneous, time-independent nonlinear function. Low determinism factors obtained with the determinism test further confirm the stochastic nature of the recordings. Guided by the outcome of time series analysis, we propose an improved prediction model for the peak particle velocity based on a neural network. We show that, while conventional predictors fail to provide acceptable prediction accuracy, the neural network model with four main blast parameters as input, namely total charge, maximum charge per delay, distance from the blasting source to the measuring point, and hole depth, delivers significantly more accurate predictions that may be applicable on site. We also perform a sensitivity analysis, which reveals that the distance from the blasting source has the strongest influence on the final value of the peak particle velocity. This is in full agreement with previous observations and theory, thus additionally validating our methodology and main conclusions. PMID:24358140

  19. Turbulent boundary layer induced vibration up to high frequencies by means of local energy methods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hardy, Pierre; Jezequel, Louis; Ichchou, Mohammed; Jacques, Yves

    2002-11-01

    The local energy method developed in the last years revealed appropriate in medium and high frequencies and supplies an accurate description of the spread of vibration and acoustic fields up to high frequencies. Our aim in the paper is to provide a complete description of the turbulent boundary layer (TBL) induced vibration by means of this method, for a simply supported thin plate. The first step in the energy method proof is the characterization of energy input from a given model of the TBL pressure interspectrum. Then, is deduced the uncoherent structural response of the panel, and the uncoherent normal mean square velocity. The latter provides, using the acoustic radiation resistance, a prediction of noise radiating by the panel up to high frequencies. Accuracy of the local energy analysis versus the usual random normal modes decomposition is demonstrated. Ultimately, a numerical parametric survey is given for various internal loss level. Precisely, the link between results provided here and SEA predictions of TBL structural induced vibration is discussed.

  20. Nonlinear characteristics analysis of vortex-induced vibration for a three-dimensional flexible tube

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Feng, Zhipeng; Jiang, Naibin; Zang, Fenggang; Zhang, Yixiong; Huang, Xuan; Wu, Wanjun

    2016-05-01

    Vortex-induced vibration of a three-dimensional flexible tube is one of the key problems to be considered in many engineering situations. This paper aims to investigate the nonlinear dynamic behaviors and response characteristics of a three-dimensional tube under turbulent flow. The three-dimensional unsteady, viscous, incompressible Navier-Stokes equation and LES turbulence model are solved with the finite volume approach, and the dynamic equilibrium equations are discretized by the finite element theory. A three-dimensional fully coupled numerical model for vortex-induced vibration of flexible tube is proposed. The model realized the fluid-structure interaction with solving the fluid flow and the structure vibration simultaneously. Based on this model, Response regimes, trajectory, phase difference, fluid force coefficient and vortex shedding frequency are obtained. The nonlinear phenomena of lock-in, phase-switch are captured successfully. Meanwhile, the limit cycle, bifurcation of lift coefficient and displacement are analyzed using phase portrait and Poincare section. The results reveal that, a quasi-upper branch occurs in the present fluid-flexible tube coupling system with high mass-damping and low mass ratio. There is no bifurcation of lift coefficient and lateral displacement occurred in the three-dimensional flexible tube submitted to uniform turbulent flow.

  1. Competitive reaction pathways in vibrationally induced photodissociation of H2SO4.

    PubMed

    Yosa Reyes, Juvenal; Nagy, Tibor; Meuwly, Markus

    2014-09-14

    Vibrationally induced photodissociation of sulfuric acid into H2O + SO3 is investigated based on reactive molecular dynamics (MD) simulations. Multisurface adiabatic reactive MD simulations allow us to follow both, H-transfer and water elimination after excitation of the ν9 OH-stretching mode. Analysis of several thousand trajectories finds that the H2O and SO3 fragments have distinct final state distributions with respect to translational, rotational, and vibrational degrees of freedom. Rotational distributions peak at quantum numbers j ≤ 5 for water and j ≈ 60 for SO3. The final state distributions should be useful in identifying products in forthcoming experiments. Based on the MD trajectories, a kinetic scheme has been developed which is able to explain most of the trajectory data and suggests that IVR is very rapid. Typical lifetimes of the excited complex range from several 10 picoseconds to hundreds of nanoseconds, depending on the excitation level. Including temperature and pressure profiles characteristic for the stratosphere in the kinetic model shows that excitations higher than ν9 = 4 can significantly contribute to the photolysis rate. This extends and specifies earlier work in that multi-level modeling is required to understand the significance of vibrationally induced decomposition pathways of sulfuric acid in the middle atmosphere. PMID:25072517

  2. Vortex-induced vibration of two elastically coupled cylinders in side-by-side arrangement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cui, Zhendong; Zhao, Ming; Teng, Bin

    2014-01-01

    Vortex-induced vibration (VIV) of two elastically coupled circular cylinders in side-by-side arrangement is investigated numerically. The Reynolds-averaged Navier-Stokes equations are solved by the finite element method for simulating the flow and the equation of motion is solved for calculating the vibration. The mass ratio (the ratio of the mass of the cylinder to the displaced fluid mass) is 2 and the Reynolds number is 5000 in the simulations. Simulations are carried out for one symmetric configuration (referred to be Case A) and one asymmetric configuration (referred to be Case B). In both Case A and Case B, the primary response frequencies of the two cylinders are found to be the same both inside and outside the lock-in regimes. Five response regimes are found in both cases and they are the first-mode lock-in regime, the second-mode lock-in regime, the sum-frequency lock-in regime and two transition regimes. When the vibration is transiting from the first- to the second-mode lock-in regimes, the vibration of each cylinder contains both first- and the second-mode natural frequencies, and the vibrations are usually irregular. In the transition regime between the second-mode lock-in and the sum-frequency lock-in regimes, the response frequencies of both cylinders increases with an increase in the reduced velocity until they are close to the sum of the two natural frequencies. In both cases, the lower boundary reduced velocity of the total lock-in regime (the sum of the five lock-in regimes) is about 3 and the upper boundary reduced velocity is about 11 times the first-to-second-mode natural frequency ratio.

  3. Collision--induced absorption in dense atmospheres of cool stars

    SciTech Connect

    Borysow, Aleksandra; Joergensen, Uffe Graae

    1999-04-01

    In the atmosphere of the Sun the major interaction between the matter and the radiation is through light absorption by ions (predominantly the negative ion of hydrogen atoms), neutral atoms and a small amount of polar molecules. The majority of stars in the universe are, however, cooler and denser than our Sun, and for a large fraction of these, the above absorption processes are very weak. Here, collision-induced absorption (CIA) becomes the dominant opacity source. The radiation is absorbed during very short mutual passages ('collisions') of two non-polar molecules (and/or atoms), while their electric charge distributions are temporarily distorted which gives rise to a transient dipole moment. We present here a review of the present-day knowledge about the impact of collision-induced absorption processes on the structure and the spectrum of such stars.

  4. Modeling and control of flow-induced vibrations of a flexible hydrofoil in viscous flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Caverly, Ryan James; Li, Chenyang; Chae, Eun Jung; Forbes, James Richard; Young, Yin Lu

    2016-06-01

    In this paper, a reduced-order model (ROM) of the flow-induced vibrations of a flexible cantilevered hydrofoil is developed and used to design an active feedback controller. The ROM is developed using data from high-fidelity viscous fluid-structure interaction (FSI) simulations and includes nonlinear terms to accurately capture the effect of lock-in. An active linear quadratic Gaussian (LQG) controller is designed based on a linearization of the ROM and is implemented in simulation with the ROM and the high-fidelity viscous FSI model. A controller saturation method is also presented that ensures that the control force applied to the system remains within a prescribed range. Simulation results demonstrate that the LQG controller successfully suppresses vibrations in both the ROM and viscous FSI simulations using a reasonable amount of control force.

  5. Low Mass-Damping Vortex-Induced Vibrations of a Single Cylinder at Moderate Reynolds Number.

    PubMed

    Jus, Y; Longatte, E; Chassaing, J-C; Sagaut, P

    2014-10-01

    The feasibility and accuracy of large eddy simulation is investigated for the case of three-dimensional unsteady flows past an elastically mounted cylinder at moderate Reynolds number. Although these flow problems are unconfined, complex wake flow patterns may be observed depending on the elastic properties of the structure. An iterative procedure is used to solve the structural dynamic equation to be coupled with the Navier-Stokes system formulated in a pseudo-Eulerian way. A moving mesh method is involved to deform the computational domain according to the motion of the fluid structure interface. Numerical simulations of vortex-induced vibrations are performed for a freely vibrating cylinder at Reynolds number 3900 in the subcritical regime under two low mass-damping conditions. A detailed physical analysis is provided for a wide range of reduced velocities, and the typical three-branch response of the amplitude behavior usually reported in the experiments is exhibited and reproduced by numerical simulation. PMID:25278637

  6. Chemical reactions of water molecules on Ru(0001) induced by selective excitation of vibrational modes

    SciTech Connect

    Mugarza, Aitor; Shimizu, Tomoko K.; Ogletree, D. Frank; Salmeron, Miquel

    2009-05-07

    Tunneling electrons in a scanning tunneling microscope were used to excite specific vibrational quantum states of adsorbed water and hydroxyl molecules on a Ru(0 0 0 1) surface. The excited molecules relaxed by transfer of energy to lower energy modes, resulting in diffusion, dissociation, desorption, and surface-tip transfer processes. Diffusion of H{sub 2}O molecules could be induced by excitation of the O-H stretch vibration mode at 445 meV. Isolated molecules required excitation of one single quantum while molecules bonded to a C atom required at least two quanta. Dissociation of single H{sub 2}O molecules into H and OH required electron energies of 1 eV or higher while dissociation of OH required at least 2 eV electrons. In contrast, water molecules forming part of a cluster could be dissociated with electron energies of 0.5 eV.

  7. Flow-induced vibration of the SSME Lox posts: additional issues. [Space shuttle main engine

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, S.S.

    1984-12-01

    A mathematical model is presented for flow-induced vibration of the Space Shuttle Main Engine (SSME) liquid oxygen (LOX) posts. The definition of the critical flow velocity is addressed, and detuning of the vibrations of the LOX posts is discussed. Nonuniform flow distributions in the axial and transverse directions are examined briefly, followed by upstream turbulence. The dependence of response upon post location is addressed briefly. Scruton's number, a mass-damping parameter, is defined and its value for the SSME LOX posts is given. Also discussed are the interaction of turbulent buffeting and fluidelastic instability, post arrangement, and swirlers around the posts. The differences are discussed between the quasi-static, the analytical, and the general analytical mathematical models. (LEW)

  8. Flow-induced vibrations of square and rectangular cylinders at low Reynolds number

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Ming

    2015-04-01

    One-degree-of-freedom (1-dof) and two-degrees-of-freedom (2-dof) flow-induced vibrations (FIVs) of square and rectangular cylinders at a mass ratio of 10 and a low Reynolds number of 200 are studied numerically by solving the two-dimensional incompressible Navier-Stokes equations. The aim of the study is to identify the effects of the aspect ratio α, defined to be the ratio of the cylinder dimension in the cross-flow direction to that in the inline direction, on the vortex-induced vibration (VIV) and galloping responses. Simulations are conducted for aspect ratios of 0.3, 0.5, 0.7, 1 and 1.25 and reduced velocities ranging from 1 to 30. Distinct VIV lock-in and galloping regimes are found for all the aspect ratios except α = 0.3, for which only VIV lock-in is found. The VIV lock-in regime and the galloping regime are separated by a reduced velocity range, where the response amplitude is very small and the response frequency is a linear function of the reduced velocity. It is found that the maximum amplitude in the VIV lock-in regime decreases with increasing aspect ratio. Galloping does not start until the reduced velocity exceeds a critical value. The critical reduced velocity for galloping increases with increasing aspect ratio. For α = 0.5, galloping starts at Vr = 7 and 6 for 1-dof and 2-dof vibrations, respectively. The critical reduced velocity for galloping is increased to 17 at α = 1.25 for both 1-dof and 2-dof vibrations. Because the response amplitude in the inline direction is much smaller than that in the cross-flow direction, the response amplitude and frequency in 2-dof vibration are very similar to their counterparts in 1-dof vibration. However, the response amplitude in 2-dof galloping is greater than that in 1-dof galloping. A 2T vortex shedding mode is observed in the VIV lock-in regime for α = 0.3 and 0.5.

  9. Coupled analysis of multi-impact energy harvesting from low-frequency wind induced vibrations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, Jin; Zhang, Wei

    2015-04-01

    Energy need from off-grid locations has been critical for effective real-time monitoring and control to ensure structural safety and reliability. To harvest energy from ambient environments, the piezoelectric-based energy-harvesting system has been proven very efficient to convert high frequency vibrations into usable electrical energy. However, due to the low frequency nature of the vibrations of civil infrastructures, such as those induced from vehicle impacts, wind, and waves, the application of a traditional piezoelectric-based energy-harvesting system is greatly restrained since the output power drops dramatically with the reduction of vibration frequencies. This paper focuses on the coupled analysis of a proposed piezoelectric multi-impact wind-energy-harvesting device that can effectively up-convert low frequency wind-induced vibrations into high frequency ones. The device consists of an H-shape beam and four bimorph piezoelectric cantilever beams. The H-shape beam, which can be easily triggered to vibrate at a low wind speed, is originated from the first Tacoma Narrows Bridge, which failed at wind speeds of 18.8 m s-1 in 1940. The multi-impact mechanism between the H-shape beam and the bimorph piezoelectric cantilever beams is incorporated to improve the harvesting performance at lower frequencies. During the multi-impact process, a series of sequential impacts between the H-shape beam and the cantilever beams can trigger high frequency vibrations of the cantilever beams and result in high output power with a considerably high efficiency. In the coupled analysis, the coupled structural, aerodynamic, and electrical equations are solved to obtain the dynamic response and the power output of the proposed harvesting device. A parametric study for several parameters in the coupled analysis framework is carried out including the external resistance, wind speed, and the configuration of the H-shape beam. The average harvested power for the piezoelectric cantilever

  10. Suppression of vortex-induced vibration using the rotary oscillation of a cylinder

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Du, Lin; Sun, Xiaofeng

    2015-02-01

    An active control method for suppressing the response of an elastically mounted cylinder by forcing rotary oscillation is presented. Vortex-induced vibration (VIV) of structures is related to the interaction between body and shedding vortex. In the synchronization/lock-in regime, when the vortex shedding frequency fs matches the natural frequency fN of the spring-mass system, large displacement amplitude in the transverse direction is observed. The effect of rotary oscillation on unsteady laminar flow past a freely vibrating cylinder has been investigated. In this study, the cylinder has two degrees of freedom: forced rotary oscillation and vortex induced vibration. The investigation is based on the solutions of flow equations by using the immersed boundary method at moderate Reynolds number. The present computational results indicate the rotary oscillation control can be implemented to suppress the response amplitude of VIV by locking the vortex shedding frequency fs at the forcing frequency fr in the "lock-on" region. The "lock-on" phenomenon occurs in the wake of a rotationally oscillating cylinder, which is free to vibrate in the transverse direction. The essence of the present active control method is to change the frequency of the vortex shedding, rather than suppress it. The response of an elastically mounted cylinder is drastically suppressed to less than 1% of the cylinder diameter, when proper frequency ratio fr/fN and rotational velocity are imposed. Detailed analyses of aerodynamic performance are given to interpret the mechanism of the suppression of response caused by forced rotary oscillation. The effects of mass ratio and velocity rate of rotary oscillation are also found to play an important role in the spring-mass system. The efficiency of the present method increases with Reynolds number.