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Sample records for induces functional plasticity

  1. Musical Training Induces Functional Plasticity in Human Hippocampus

    PubMed Central

    Esposito, Fabrizio; di Salle, Francesco; Boller, Christian; Hilti, Caroline C.; Habermeyer, Benedikt; Scheffler, Klaus; Wetzel, Stephan; Seifritz, Erich; Cattapan-Ludewig, Katja

    2010-01-01

    Training can change the functional and structural organization of the brain, and animal models demonstrate that the hippocampus formation is particularly susceptible to training-related neuroplasticity. In humans, however, direct evidence for functional plasticity of the adult hippocampus induced by training is still missing. Here, we used musicians' brains as a model to test for plastic capabilities of the adult human hippocampus. By using functional magnetic resonance imaging optimized for the investigation of auditory processing, we examined brain responses induced by temporal novelty in otherwise isochronous sound patterns in musicians and musical laypersons, since the hippocampus has been suggested previously to be crucially involved in various forms of novelty detection. In the first cross-sectional experiment, we identified enhanced neural responses to temporal novelty in the anterior left hippocampus of professional musicians, pointing to expertise-related differences in hippocampal processing. In the second experiment, we evaluated neural responses to acoustic temporal novelty in a longitudinal approach to disentangle training-related changes from predispositional factors. For this purpose, we examined an independent sample of music academy students before and after two semesters of intensive aural skills training. After this training period, hippocampal responses to temporal novelty in sounds were enhanced in musical students, and statistical interaction analysis of brain activity changes over time suggests training rather than predisposition effects. Thus, our results provide direct evidence for functional changes of the adult hippocampus in humans related to musical training. PMID:20107063

  2. Lim kinase, a bi-functional effector in injury-induced structural plasticity of synapses

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Weiwei; Townes-Anderson, Ellen

    2016-01-01

    The structural plasticity of synaptic terminals contributes to normal nervous system function but also to neural degeneration, in the form of terminal retraction, and regeneration, due to process growth. Synaptic morphological change is mediated through the actin cytoskeleton, which is enriched in axonal and dendritic terminals. Whereas the three RhoGTPases, RhoA, Cdc42 and Rac, function as upstream signaling nodes sensitive to extracellular stimuli, LIMK-cofilin activity serves as a common downstream effector to up-regulate actin turnover, which is necessary for both polymerization and depolymerization. The dual effects of LIMK activity make LIMK a potential target of therapeutic intervention for injury-induced synaptic plasticity, as LIMK inhibition can stabilize actin cytoskeleton and preserve existing structure. This therapeutic benefit of LIMK inhibition has been demonstrated in animal models of injury-induced axon retraction and neuritic sprouting by rod photoreceptors. A better understanding of the regulation of LIMK-cofilin activity and the interaction with the microtubular cytoskeleton may open new ways to promote synaptic regeneration that can benefit neuronal degenerative disease.

  3. Role of IGF-1 in cortical plasticity and functional deficit induced by sensorimotor restriction.

    PubMed

    Mysoet, Julien; Dupont, Erwan; Bastide, Bruno; Canu, Marie-Hélène

    2015-09-01

    In the adult rat, sensorimotor restriction by hindlimb unloading (HU) is known to induce impairments in motor behavior as well as a disorganization of somatosensory cortex (shrinkage of the cortical representation of the hindpaw, enlargement of the cutaneous receptive fields, decreased cutaneous sensibility threshold). Recently, our team has demonstrated that IGF-1 level was decreased in the somatosensory cortex of rats submitted to a 14-day period of HU. To determine whether IGF-1 is involved in these plastic mechanisms, a chronic cortical infusion of this substance was performed by means of osmotic minipump. When administered in control rats, IGF-1 affects the size of receptive fields and the cutaneous threshold, but has no effect on the somatotopic map. In addition, when injected during the whole HU period, IGF-1 is interestingly implied in cortical changes due to hypoactivity: the shrinkage of somatotopic representation of hindlimb is prevented, whereas the enlargement of receptive fields is reduced. IGF-1 has no effect on the increase in neuronal response to peripheral stimulation. We also explored the functional consequences of IGF-1 level restoration on tactile sensory discrimination. In HU rats, the percentage of paw withdrawal after a light tactile stimulation was decreased, whereas it was similar to control level in HU-IGF-1 rats. Taken together, the data clearly indicate that IGF-1 plays a key-role in cortical plastic mechanisms and in behavioral alterations induced by a decrease in sensorimotor activity. PMID:25958232

  4. VEGF induces sensory and motor peripheral plasticity, alters bladder function, and promotes visceral sensitivity

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background This work tests the hypothesis that bladder instillation with vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) modulates sensory and motor nerve plasticity, and, consequently, bladder function and visceral sensitivity. In addition to C57BL/6J, ChAT-cre mice were used for visualization of bladder cholinergic nerves. The direct effect of VEGF on the density of sensory nerves expressing the transient receptor potential vanilloid subfamily 1 (TRPV1) and cholinergic nerves (ChAT) was studied one week after one or two intravesical instillations of the growth factor. To study the effects of VEGF on bladder function, mice were intravesically instilled with VEGF and urodynamic evaluation was assessed. VEGF-induced alteration in bladder dorsal root ganglion (DRG) neurons was performed on retrogradly labeled urinary bladder afferents by patch-clamp recording of voltage gated Na+ currents. Determination of VEGF-induced changes in sensitivity to abdominal mechanostimulation was performed by application of von Frey filaments. Results In addition to an overwhelming increase in TRPV1 immunoreactivity, VEGF instillation resulted in an increase in ChAT-directed expression of a fluorescent protein in several layers of the urinary bladder. Intravesical VEGF caused a profound change in the function of the urinary bladder: acute VEGF (1 week post VEGF treatment) reduced micturition pressure and longer treatment (2 weeks post-VEGF instillation) caused a substantial reduction in inter-micturition interval. In addition, intravesical VEGF resulted in an up-regulation of voltage gated Na+ channels (VGSC) in bladder DRG neurons and enhanced abdominal sensitivity to mechanical stimulation. Conclusions For the first time, evidence is presented indicating that VEGF instillation into the mouse bladder promotes a significant increase in peripheral nerve density together with alterations in bladder function and visceral sensitivity. The VEGF pathway is being proposed as a key modulator of

  5. Using brain-computer interfaces to induce neural plasticity and restore function

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grosse-Wentrup, Moritz; Mattia, Donatella; Oweiss, Karim

    2011-04-01

    Analyzing neural signals and providing feedback in realtime is one of the core characteristics of a brain-computer interface (BCI). As this feature may be employed to induce neural plasticity, utilizing BCI technology for therapeutic purposes is increasingly gaining popularity in the BCI community. In this paper, we discuss the state-of-the-art of research on this topic, address the principles of and challenges in inducing neural plasticity by means of a BCI, and delineate the problems of study design and outcome evaluation arising in this context. We conclude with a list of open questions and recommendations for future research in this field.

  6. Functional near-infrared spectroscopy maps cortical plasticity underlying altered motor performance induced by transcranial direct current stimulation

    PubMed Central

    Hodics, Timea; Hervey, Nathan; Kondraske, George; Stowe, Ann M.; Alexandrakis, George

    2013-01-01

    Abstract. Transcranial direct current stimulation (tDCS) of the human sensorimotor cortex during physical rehabilitation induces plasticity in the injured brain that improves motor performance. Bi-hemispheric tDCS is a noninvasive technique that modulates cortical activation by delivering weak current through a pair of anodal–cathodal (excitation–suppression) electrodes, placed on the scalp and centered over the primary motor cortex of each hemisphere. To quantify tDCS-induced plasticity during motor performance, sensorimotor cortical activity was mapped during an event-related, wrist flexion task by functional near-infrared spectroscopy (fNIRS) before, during, and after applying both possible bi-hemispheric tDCS montages in eight healthy adults. Additionally, torque applied to a lever device during isometric wrist flexion and surface electromyography measurements of major muscle group activity in both arms were acquired concurrently with fNIRS. This multiparameter approach found that hemispheric suppression contralateral to wrist flexion changed resting-state connectivity from intra-hemispheric to inter-hemispheric and increased flexion speed (p<0.05). Conversely, exciting this hemisphere increased opposing muscle output resulting in a decrease in speed but an increase in accuracy (p<0.05 for both). The findings of this work suggest that tDCS with fNIRS and concurrent multimotor measurements can provide insights into how neuroplasticity changes muscle output, which could find future use in guiding motor rehabilitation. PMID:24193947

  7. Structural Plasticity and Hippocampal Function

    PubMed Central

    Leuner, Benedetta; Gould, Elizabeth

    2010-01-01

    The hippocampus is a region of the mammalian brain that shows an impressive capacity for structural reorganization. Preexisting neural circuits undergo modifications in dendritic complexity and synapse number, and entirely novel neural connections are formed through the process of neurogenesis. These types of structural change were once thought to be restricted to development. However, it is now generally accepted that the hippocampus remains structurally plastic throughout life. This article reviews structural plasticity in the hippocampus over the lifespan, including how it is investigated experimentally. The modulation of structural plasticity by various experiential factors as well as the possible role it may have in hippocampal functions such as learning and memory, anxiety, and stress regulation are also considered. Although significant progress has been made in many of these areas, we highlight some of the outstanding issues that remain. PMID:19575621

  8. Nociception-induced spatial and temporal plasticity of synaptic connection and function in the hippocampal formation of rats: a multi-electrode array recording

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Xiao-Yan; Liu, Ming-Gang; Yuan, Dong-Liang; Wang, Yan; He, Ying; Wang, Dan-Dan; Chen, Xue-Feng; Zhang, Fu-Kang; Li, Hua; He, Xiao-Sheng; Chen, Jun

    2009-01-01

    Background Pain is known to be processed by a complex neural network (neuromatrix) in the brain. It is hypothesized that under pathological state, persistent or chronic pain can affect various higher brain functions through ascending pathways, leading to co-morbidities or mental disability of pain. However, so far the influences of pathological pain on the higher brain functions are less clear and this may hinder the advances in pain therapy. In the current study, we studied spatiotemporal plasticity of synaptic connection and function in the hippocampal formation (HF) in response to persistent nociception. Results On the hippocampal slices of rats which had suffered from persistent nociception for 2 h by receiving subcutaneous bee venom (BV) or formalin injection into one hand paw, multisite recordings were performed by an 8 × 8 multi-electrode array probe. The waveform of the field excitatory postsynaptic potential (fEPSP), induced by perforant path electrical stimulation and pharmacologically identified as being activity-dependent and mediated by ionotropic glutamate receptors, was consistently positive-going in the dentate gyrus (DG), while that in the CA1 was negative-going in shape in naïve and saline control groups. For the spatial characteristics of synaptic plasticity, BV- or formalin-induced persistent pain significantly increased the number of detectable fEPSP in both DG and CA1 area, implicating enlargement of the synaptic connection size by the injury or acute inflammation. Moreover, the input-output function of synaptic efficacy was shown to be distinctly enhanced by the injury with the stimulus-response curve being moved leftward compared to the control. For the temporal plasticity, long-term potentiation produced by theta burst stimulation (TBS) conditioning was also remarkably enhanced by pain. Moreover, it is strikingly noted that the shape of fEPSP waveform was drastically deformed or split by a TBS conditioning under the condition of

  9. Cortical plasticity induced by different degrees of peripheral nerve injuries: a rat functional magnetic resonance imaging study under 9.4 Tesla

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Major peripheral nerve injuries not only result in local deficits but may also cause distal atrophy of target muscles or permanent loss of sensation. Likewise, these injuries have been shown to instigate long-lasting central cortical reorganization. Methods Cortical plasticity changes induced after various types of major peripheral nerve injury using an electrical stimulation technique to the rat upper extremity and functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) were examined. Studies were completed out immediately after injury (acute stage) and at two weeks (subacute stage) to evaluate time affect on plasticity. Results After right-side median nerve transection, cortical representation of activation of the right-side ulnar nerve expanded intra-hemispherically into the cortical region that had been occupied by the median nerve representation After unilateral transection of both median and ulnar nerves, cortical representation of activation of the radial nerve on the same side of the body also demonstrated intra-hemispheric expansion. However, simultaneous electrical stimulation of the contralateral uninjured median and ulnar nerves resulted in a representation that had expanded both intra- and inter-hemispherically into the cortical region previously occupied by the two transected nerve representations. Conclusions After major peripheral nerve injury, an adjacent nerve, with similar function to the injured nerve, may become significantly over-activated in the cortex when stimulated. This results in intra-hemispheric cortical expansion as the only component of cortical plasticity. When all nerves responsible for a certain function are injured, the same nerves on the contralateral side of the body are affected and become significantly over-activated during a task. Both intra- and inter-hemispheric cortical expansion exist, while the latter dominates cortical plasticity. PMID:23659705

  10. Plasticity of renal endocrine function.

    PubMed

    Kurt, Birgül; Kurtz, Armin

    2015-03-15

    The kidneys are important endocrine organs. They secrete humoral factors, such as calcitriol, erythropoietin, klotho, and renin into the circulation, and therefore, they are essentially involved in the regulation of a variety of processes ranging from bone formation to erythropoiesis. The endocrine functions are established by cells, such as proximal or distal tubular cells, renocortical interstitial cells, or mural cells of afferent arterioles. These endocrine cells are either fixed in number, such as tubular cells, which individually and gradually upregulate or downregulate hormone production, or they belong to a pool of cells, which display a recruitment behavior, such as erythropoietin- and renin-producing cells. In the latter case, regulation of humoral function occurs via (de)recruitment of active endocrine cells. As a consequence renin- and erythropoietin-producing cells in the kidney show a high degree of plasticity by reversibly switching between distinct cell states. In this review, we will focus on the characteristics of renin- and of erythropoietin-producing cells, especially on their origin and localization, their reversible transformations, and the mediators, which are responsible for transformation. Finally, we will discuss a possible interconversion of renin and erythropoietin expression. PMID:25608752

  11. Evaluation of cortical plasticity in children with cerebral palsy undergoing constraint-induced movement therapy based on functional near-infrared spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cao, Jianwei; Khan, Bilal; Hervey, Nathan; Tian, Fenghua; Delgado, Mauricio R.; Clegg, Nancy J.; Smith, Linsley; Roberts, Heather; Tulchin-Francis, Kirsten; Shierk, Angela; Shagman, Laura; MacFarlane, Duncan; Liu, Hanli; Alexandrakis, George

    2015-04-01

    Sensorimotor cortex plasticity induced by constraint-induced movement therapy (CIMT) in six children (10.2±2.1 years old) with hemiplegic cerebral palsy was assessed by functional near-infrared spectroscopy (fNIRS). The activation laterality index and time-to-peak/duration during a finger-tapping task and the resting-state functional connectivity were quantified before, immediately after, and 6 months after CIMT. These fNIRS-based metrics were used to help explain changes in clinical scores of manual performance obtained concurrently with imaging time points. Five age-matched healthy children (9.8±1.3 years old) were also imaged to provide comparative activation metrics for normal controls. Interestingly, the activation time-to-peak/duration for all sensorimotor centers displayed significant normalization immediately after CIMT that persisted 6 months later. In contrast to this improved localized activation response, the laterality index and resting-state connectivity metrics that depended on communication between sensorimotor centers improved immediately after CIMT, but relapsed 6 months later. In addition, for the subjects measured in this work, there was either a trade-off between improving unimanual versus bimanual performance when sensorimotor activation patterns normalized after CIMT, or an improvement occurred in both unimanual and bimanual performance but at the cost of very abnormal plastic changes in sensorimotor activity.

  12. Evaluation of cortical plasticity in children with cerebral palsy undergoing constraint-induced movement therapy based on functional near-infrared spectroscopy

    PubMed Central

    Cao, Jianwei; Khan, Bilal; Hervey, Nathan; Tian, Fenghua; Delgado, Mauricio R.; Clegg, Nancy J.; Smith, Linsley; Roberts, Heather; Tulchin-Francis, Kirsten; Shierk, Angela; Shagman, Laura; MacFarlane, Duncan; Liu, Hanli; Alexandrakis, George

    2015-01-01

    Abstract. Sensorimotor cortex plasticity induced by constraint-induced movement therapy (CIMT) in six children (10.2±2.1 years old) with hemiplegic cerebral palsy was assessed by functional near-infrared spectroscopy (fNIRS). The activation laterality index and time-to-peak/duration during a finger-tapping task and the resting-state functional connectivity were quantified before, immediately after, and 6 months after CIMT. These fNIRS-based metrics were used to help explain changes in clinical scores of manual performance obtained concurrently with imaging time points. Five age-matched healthy children (9.8±1.3 years old) were also imaged to provide comparative activation metrics for normal controls. Interestingly, the activation time-to-peak/duration for all sensorimotor centers displayed significant normalization immediately after CIMT that persisted 6 months later. In contrast to this improved localized activation response, the laterality index and resting-state connectivity metrics that depended on communication between sensorimotor centers improved immediately after CIMT, but relapsed 6 months later. In addition, for the subjects measured in this work, there was either a trade-off between improving unimanual versus bimanual performance when sensorimotor activation patterns normalized after CIMT, or an improvement occurred in both unimanual and bimanual performance but at the cost of very abnormal plastic changes in sensorimotor activity. PMID:25900145

  13. Erythropoietin Restores Long-Term Neurocognitive Function Involving Mechanisms of Neuronal Plasticity in a Model of Hyperoxia-Induced Preterm Brain Injury

    PubMed Central

    Sifringer, Marco; van de Looij, Yohan; Herz, Josephine; Sizonenko, Stéphane V.; Kempe, Karina; Palasz, Joanna; Hadamitzky, Martin; Fandrey, Joachim

    2016-01-01

    Cerebral white and grey matter injury is the leading cause of an adverse neurodevelopmental outcome in prematurely born infants. High oxygen concentrations have been shown to contribute to the pathogenesis of neonatal brain damage. Here, we focused on motor-cognitive outcome up to the adolescent and adult age in an experimental model of preterm brain injury. In search of the putative mechanisms of action we evaluated oligodendrocyte degeneration, myelination, and modulation of synaptic plasticity-related molecules. A single dose of erythropoietin (20,000 IU/kg) at the onset of hyperoxia (24 hours, 80% oxygen) in 6-day-old Wistar rats improved long-lasting neurocognitive development up to the adolescent and adult stage. Analysis of white matter structures revealed a reduction of acute oligodendrocyte degeneration. However, erythropoietin did not influence hypomyelination occurring a few days after injury or long-term microstructural white matter abnormalities detected in adult animals. Erythropoietin administration reverted hyperoxia-induced reduction of neuronal plasticity-related mRNA expression up to four months after injury. Thus, our findings highlight the importance of erythropoietin as a neuroregenerative treatment option in neonatal brain injury, leading to improved memory function in adolescent and adult rats which may be linked to increased neuronal network connectivity. PMID:27493706

  14. Erythropoietin Restores Long-Term Neurocognitive Function Involving Mechanisms of Neuronal Plasticity in a Model of Hyperoxia-Induced Preterm Brain Injury.

    PubMed

    Hoeber, Daniela; Sifringer, Marco; van de Looij, Yohan; Herz, Josephine; Sizonenko, Stéphane V; Kempe, Karina; Serdar, Meray; Palasz, Joanna; Hadamitzky, Martin; Endesfelder, Stefanie; Fandrey, Joachim; Felderhoff-Müser, Ursula; Bendix, Ivo

    2016-01-01

    Cerebral white and grey matter injury is the leading cause of an adverse neurodevelopmental outcome in prematurely born infants. High oxygen concentrations have been shown to contribute to the pathogenesis of neonatal brain damage. Here, we focused on motor-cognitive outcome up to the adolescent and adult age in an experimental model of preterm brain injury. In search of the putative mechanisms of action we evaluated oligodendrocyte degeneration, myelination, and modulation of synaptic plasticity-related molecules. A single dose of erythropoietin (20,000 IU/kg) at the onset of hyperoxia (24 hours, 80% oxygen) in 6-day-old Wistar rats improved long-lasting neurocognitive development up to the adolescent and adult stage. Analysis of white matter structures revealed a reduction of acute oligodendrocyte degeneration. However, erythropoietin did not influence hypomyelination occurring a few days after injury or long-term microstructural white matter abnormalities detected in adult animals. Erythropoietin administration reverted hyperoxia-induced reduction of neuronal plasticity-related mRNA expression up to four months after injury. Thus, our findings highlight the importance of erythropoietin as a neuroregenerative treatment option in neonatal brain injury, leading to improved memory function in adolescent and adult rats which may be linked to increased neuronal network connectivity. PMID:27493706

  15. Differential patterns of functional and structural plasticity within and between inferior frontal gyri support training-induced improvements in inhibitory control proficiency.

    PubMed

    Chavan, Camille F; Mouthon, Michael; Draganski, Bogdan; van der Zwaag, Wietske; Spierer, Lucas

    2015-07-01

    Ample evidence indicates that inhibitory control (IC), a key executive component referring to the ability to suppress cognitive or motor processes, relies on a right-lateralized fronto-basal brain network. However, whether and how IC can be improved with training and the underlying neuroplastic mechanisms remains largely unresolved. We used functional and structural magnetic resonance imaging to measure the effects of 2 weeks of training with a Go/NoGo task specifically designed to improve frontal top-down IC mechanisms. The training-induced behavioral improvements were accompanied by a decrease in neural activity to inhibition trials within the right pars opercularis and triangularis, and in the left pars orbitalis of the inferior frontal gyri. Analyses of changes in brain anatomy induced by the IC training revealed increases in grey matter volume in the right pars orbitalis and modulations of white matter microstructure in the right pars triangularis. The task-specificity of the effects of training was confirmed by an absence of change in neural activity to a control working memory task. Our combined anatomical and functional findings indicate that differential patterns of functional and structural plasticity between and within inferior frontal gyri enhanced the speed of top-down inhibition processes and in turn IC proficiency. The results suggest that training-based interventions might help overcoming the anatomic and functional deficits of inferior frontal gyri manifesting in inhibition-related clinical conditions. More generally, we demonstrate how multimodal neuroimaging investigations of training-induced neuroplasticity enable revealing novel anatomo-functional dissociations within frontal executive brain networks. PMID:25801718

  16. Striatal plasticity and basal ganglia circuit function.

    PubMed

    Kreitzer, Anatol C; Malenka, Robert C

    2008-11-26

    The dorsal striatum, which consists of the caudate and putamen, is the gateway to the basal ganglia. It receives convergent excitatory afferents from cortex and thalamus and forms the origin of the direct and indirect pathways, which are distinct basal ganglia circuits involved in motor control. It is also a major site of activity-dependent synaptic plasticity. Striatal plasticity alters the transfer of information throughout basal ganglia circuits and may represent a key neural substrate for adaptive motor control and procedural memory. Here, we review current understanding of synaptic plasticity in the striatum and its role in the physiology and pathophysiology of basal ganglia function. PMID:19038213

  17. KVP meter errors induced by plastic wrap

    SciTech Connect

    Jefferies, D.; Morris, J.W.; White, V.P. )

    1991-02-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine whether erroneous kVp meter readings, induced by plastic wrap, affected the actual kVp (output) of a dental X-ray machine. To evaluate the effect of plastic wrap on dental X-ray machine kVp meters, a radiation output device was used to measure output in mR/ma.s. An intraoral dental X-ray unit (S.S. White Model {number sign}90W) was used to make the exposures. First, the kVp meter was not covered with plastic wrap and output readings were recorded at various kVp settings with the milliamperage and time held constant. Secondly, the same kVp settings were selected before the plastic wrap was placed. Milliamperage and time were again held to the same constant. The X-ray console was then covered with plastic wrap prior to measuring the output for each kVp. The wrap possessed a static charge. This charge induced erroneous kVp meter readings. Out-put readings at the various induced kVp settings were then recorded. A kVp of 50 with no wrap present resulted in the same output as a kVp of 50 induced to read 40 or 60 kVp by the presence of wrap. Similar results were obtained at other kVp settings. This indicates that the plastic wrap influences only the kVp meter needle and not the actual kilovoltage of the X-ray machine. Dental X-ray machine operators should select kVp meter readings prior to placing plastic wrap and should not adjust initial settings if the meter is deflected later by the presence of wrap. The use of such a procedure will result in proper exposures, fewer retakes, and less patient radiation. If plastic wrap leads to consistent exposure errors, clinicians may wish to use a 0.5% sodium hypochlorite disinfectant as an alternative to the barrier technique.

  18. Strengthening connections: functional connectivity and brain plasticity

    PubMed Central

    Kelly, Clare; Castellanos, F. Xavier

    2014-01-01

    The ascendancy of functional neuroimaging has facilitated the addition of network-based approaches to the neuropsychologist’s toolbox for evaluating the sequelae of brain insult. In particular, intrinsic functional connectivity (iFC) mapping of resting state fMRI (R-fMRI) data constitutes an ideal approach to measuring macro-scale networks in the human brain. Beyond the value of iFC mapping for charting how the functional topography of the brain is altered by insult and injury, iFC analyses can provide insights into effects of experience-dependent plasticity at the macro level of large-scale functional networks. Such insights are foundational to the design of training and remediation interventions that will best facilitate recovery of function. In this review, we consider what is currently known about the origin and function of iFC in the brain, and how this knowledge is informative in neuropsychological settings. We then summarize studies that have examined experience-driven plasticity of iFC in healthy control participants, and frame these findings in terms of a schema that may aid in the interpretation of results and the generation of hypothesis for rehabilitative studies. Finally, we outline some caveats to the R-fMRI approach, as well as some current developments that are likely to bolster the utility of the iFC paradigm for neuropsychology. PMID:24496903

  19. Stress- and Allostasis-Induced Brain Plasticity

    PubMed Central

    McEwen, Bruce S.; Gianaros, Peter J.

    2014-01-01

    The brain is the key organ of stress processes. It determines what individuals will experience as stressful, it orchestrates how individuals will cope with stressful experiences, and it changes both functionally and structurally as a result of stressful experiences. Within the brain, a distributed, dynamic, and plastic neural circuitry coordinates, monitors, and calibrates behavioral and physiological stress response systems to meet the demands imposed by particular stressors. These allodynamic processes can be adaptive in the short term (allostasis) and maladaptive in the long term (allostatic load). Critically, these processes involve bidirectional signaling between the brain and body. Consequently, allostasis and allostatic load can jointly affect vulnerability to brain-dependent and stress-related mental and physical health conditions. This review focuses on the role of brain plasticity in adaptation to, and pathophysiology resulting from, stressful experiences. It also considers interventions to prevent and treat chronic and prevalent health conditions via allodynamic brain mechanisms. PMID:20707675

  20. Stress induced neuroendocrine-immune plasticity

    PubMed Central

    Liezmann, Christiane; Stock, Daniel; Peters, Eva M. J.

    2012-01-01

    Research over the past decade has revealed close interaction between the nervous and immune systems in regulation of peripheral inflammation linking psychosocial stress with chronic somatic disease and aging. Moreover emerging data suggests that chronic inflammations lead to a pro-inflammatory status underlying premature aging called inflammaging. In this context, the spleen can be seen as a switch board monitoring peripherally derived neuroendocrine-immune mediators in the blood and keeping up a close communication with the central stress response via its mainly sympathetic innervation. The effect aims at balanced and well-timed stress axis activation and immune adaptation in acute peripheral inflammatory events. Constant adjustment to the needs generated by environmental and endogenous challenges is provided by neuroendocrine-immune plasticity. However, maladaptive plasticity induced e.g., by chronic stress-axis activation and excessive non-neuronal derived neuroendocrine mediators may be at the heart of the observed stress sensitivity promote inflammaging under chronic inflammatory conditions. We here review the role of neurotransmitters, neuropeptides and neurotrophins as stress mediators modulating the immune response in the spleen and their potential role in inflammaging. PMID:23467333

  1. Repetitive magnetic stimulation induces plasticity of inhibitory synapses.

    PubMed

    Lenz, Maximilian; Galanis, Christos; Müller-Dahlhaus, Florian; Opitz, Alexander; Wierenga, Corette J; Szabó, Gábor; Ziemann, Ulf; Deller, Thomas; Funke, Klaus; Vlachos, Andreas

    2016-01-01

    Repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation (rTMS) is used as a therapeutic tool in neurology and psychiatry. While repetitive magnetic stimulation (rMS) has been shown to induce plasticity of excitatory synapses, it is unclear whether rMS can also modify structural and functional properties of inhibitory inputs. Here we employed 10-Hz rMS of entorhinohippocampal slice cultures to study plasticity of inhibitory neurotransmission on CA1 pyramidal neurons. Our experiments reveal a rMS-induced reduction in GABAergic synaptic strength (2-4 h after stimulation), which is Ca(2+)-dependent and accompanied by the remodelling of postsynaptic gephyrin scaffolds. Furthermore, we present evidence that 10-Hz rMS predominantly acts on dendritic, but not somatic inhibition. Consistent with this finding, a reduction in clustered gephyrin is detected in CA1 stratum radiatum of rTMS-treated anaesthetized mice. These results disclose that rTMS induces coordinated Ca(2+)-dependent structural and functional changes of specific inhibitory postsynapses on principal neurons. PMID:26743822

  2. Repetitive magnetic stimulation induces plasticity of inhibitory synapses

    PubMed Central

    Lenz, Maximilian; Galanis, Christos; Müller-Dahlhaus, Florian; Opitz, Alexander; Wierenga, Corette J.; Szabó, Gábor; Ziemann, Ulf; Deller, Thomas; Funke, Klaus; Vlachos, Andreas

    2016-01-01

    Repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation (rTMS) is used as a therapeutic tool in neurology and psychiatry. While repetitive magnetic stimulation (rMS) has been shown to induce plasticity of excitatory synapses, it is unclear whether rMS can also modify structural and functional properties of inhibitory inputs. Here we employed 10-Hz rMS of entorhinohippocampal slice cultures to study plasticity of inhibitory neurotransmission on CA1 pyramidal neurons. Our experiments reveal a rMS-induced reduction in GABAergic synaptic strength (2–4 h after stimulation), which is Ca2+-dependent and accompanied by the remodelling of postsynaptic gephyrin scaffolds. Furthermore, we present evidence that 10-Hz rMS predominantly acts on dendritic, but not somatic inhibition. Consistent with this finding, a reduction in clustered gephyrin is detected in CA1 stratum radiatum of rTMS-treated anaesthetized mice. These results disclose that rTMS induces coordinated Ca2+-dependent structural and functional changes of specific inhibitory postsynapses on principal neurons. PMID:26743822

  3. Th17 Cell Plasticity and Functions in Cancer Immunity

    PubMed Central

    Guéry, Leslie; Hugues, Stéphanie

    2015-01-01

    Th17 cells represent a particular subset of T helper lymphocytes characterized by high production of IL-17 and other inflammatory cytokines. Th17 cells participate in antimicrobial immunity at mucosal and epithelial barriers and particularly fight against extracellular bacteria and fungi. While a role for Th17 cells in promoting inflammation and autoimmune disorders has been extensively and elegantly demonstrated, it is still controversial whether and how Th17 cells influence tumor immunity. Although Th17 cells specifically accumulate in many different types of tumors compared to healthy tissues, the outcome might however differ from a tumor type to another. Th17 cells were consequently associated with both good and bad prognoses. The high plasticity of those cells toward cells exhibiting either anti-inflammatory or in contrast pathogenic functions might contribute to Th17 versatile functions in the tumor context. On one hand, Th17 cells promote tumor growth by inducing angiogenesis (via IL-17) and by exerting themselves immunosuppressive functions. On the other hand, Th17 cells drive antitumor immune responses by recruiting immune cells into tumors, activating effector CD8+ T cells, or even directly by converting toward Th1 phenotype and producing IFN-γ. In this review, we are discussing the impact of the tumor microenvironment on Th17 cell plasticity and function and its implications in cancer immunity. PMID:26583099

  4. Endocrine regulation of predator-induced phenotypic plasticity.

    PubMed

    Dennis, Stuart R; LeBlanc, Gerald A; Beckerman, Andrew P

    2014-11-01

    Elucidating the developmental and genetic control of phenotypic plasticity remains a central agenda in evolutionary ecology. Here, we investigate the physiological regulation of phenotypic plasticity induced by another organism, specifically predator-induced phenotypic plasticity in the model ecological and evolutionary organism Daphnia pulex. Our research centres on using molecular tools to test among alternative mechanisms of developmental control tied to hormone titres, receptors and their timing in the life cycle. First, we synthesize detail about predator-induced defenses and the physiological regulation of arthropod somatic growth and morphology, leading to a clear prediction that morphological defences are regulated by juvenile hormone and life-history plasticity by ecdysone and juvenile hormone. We then show how a small network of genes can differentiate phenotype expression between the two primary developmental control pathways in arthropods: juvenoid and ecdysteroid hormone signalling. Then, by applying an experimental gradient of predation risk, we show dose-dependent gene expression linking predator-induced plasticity to the juvenoid hormone pathway. Our data support three conclusions: (1) the juvenoid signalling pathway regulates predator-induced phenotypic plasticity; (2) the hormone titre (ligand), rather than receptor, regulates predator-induced developmental plasticity; (3) evolution has favoured the harnessing of a major, highly conserved endocrine pathway in arthropod development to regulate the response to cues about changing environments (risk) from another organism (predator). PMID:25284611

  5. Plasticity and functional recovery in neurology.

    PubMed

    Ramachandran, V S

    2005-01-01

    Experiments on patients with phantom limbs suggest that neural connections in the adult human brain are much more malleable than previously assumed. Three weeks after amputation of an arm, sensations from the ipsilateral face are referred to the phantom; this effect is caused by the sensory input from the face skin 'invading' and activating deafferented hand zones in the cortex and thalamus. Many phantom arms are 'paralysed' in a painful position. If a mirror is propped vertically in the sagittal plane and the patient looks at the reflection of his/her normal hand, this reflection appears superimposed on the 'felt' position of the phantom. Remarkably, if the real arm is moved, the phantom is felt to move as well and this sometimes relieves the painful cramps in the phantom. Mirror visual feedback (MVF) has shown promising results with chronic regional pain syndrome and hemiparesis following stroke. These results suggest two reasons for a paradigm shift in neurorehabilitation. First, there appears to be tremendous latent plasticity even in the adult brain. Second, the brain should be thought of, not as a hierarchy of organised autonomous modules, each of which delivers its output to the next level, but as a set of complex interacting networks that are in a state of dynamic equilibrium with the brain's environment. Both principles can be potentially exploited in a clinical context to facilitate recovery of function. PMID:16138492

  6. Synaptic plasticity functions in an organic electrochemical transistor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gkoupidenis, Paschalis; Schaefer, Nathan; Strakosas, Xenofon; Fairfield, Jessamyn A.; Malliaras, George G.

    2015-12-01

    Synaptic plasticity functions play a crucial role in the transmission of neural signals in the brain. Short-term plasticity is required for the transmission, encoding, and filtering of the neural signal, whereas long-term plasticity establishes more permanent changes in neural microcircuitry and thus underlies memory and learning. The realization of bioinspired circuits that can actually mimic signal processing in the brain demands the reproduction of both short- and long-term aspects of synaptic plasticity in a single device. Here, we demonstrate the implementation of neuromorphic functions similar to biological memory, such as short- to long-term memory transition, in non-volatile organic electrochemical transistors (OECTs). Depending on the training of the OECT, the device displays either short- or long-term plasticity, therefore, exhibiting non von Neumann characteristics with merged processing and storing functionalities. These results are a first step towards the implementation of organic-based neuromorphic circuits.

  7. The Current Status of Somatostatin-Interneurons in Inhibitory Control of Brain Function and Plasticity

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    The mammalian neocortex contains many distinct inhibitory neuronal populations to balance excitatory neurotransmission. A correct excitation/inhibition equilibrium is crucial for normal brain development, functioning, and controlling lifelong cortical plasticity. Knowledge about how the inhibitory network contributes to brain plasticity however remains incomplete. Somatostatin- (SST-) interneurons constitute a large neocortical subpopulation of interneurons, next to parvalbumin- (PV-) and vasoactive intestinal peptide- (VIP-) interneurons. Unlike the extensively studied PV-interneurons, acknowledged as key components in guiding ocular dominance plasticity, the contribution of SST-interneurons is less understood. Nevertheless, SST-interneurons are ideally situated within cortical networks to integrate unimodal or cross-modal sensory information processing and therefore likely to be important mediators of experience-dependent plasticity. The lack of knowledge on SST-interneurons partially relates to the wide variety of distinct subpopulations present in the sensory neocortex. This review informs on those SST-subpopulations hitherto described based on anatomical, molecular, or electrophysiological characteristics and whose functional roles can be attributed based on specific cortical wiring patterns. A possible role for these subpopulations in experience-dependent plasticity will be discussed, emphasizing on learning-induced plasticity and on unimodal and cross-modal plasticity upon sensory loss. This knowledge will ultimately contribute to guide brain plasticity into well-defined directions to restore sensory function and promote lifelong learning. PMID:27403348

  8. The Current Status of Somatostatin-Interneurons in Inhibitory Control of Brain Function and Plasticity.

    PubMed

    Scheyltjens, Isabelle; Arckens, Lutgarde

    2016-01-01

    The mammalian neocortex contains many distinct inhibitory neuronal populations to balance excitatory neurotransmission. A correct excitation/inhibition equilibrium is crucial for normal brain development, functioning, and controlling lifelong cortical plasticity. Knowledge about how the inhibitory network contributes to brain plasticity however remains incomplete. Somatostatin- (SST-) interneurons constitute a large neocortical subpopulation of interneurons, next to parvalbumin- (PV-) and vasoactive intestinal peptide- (VIP-) interneurons. Unlike the extensively studied PV-interneurons, acknowledged as key components in guiding ocular dominance plasticity, the contribution of SST-interneurons is less understood. Nevertheless, SST-interneurons are ideally situated within cortical networks to integrate unimodal or cross-modal sensory information processing and therefore likely to be important mediators of experience-dependent plasticity. The lack of knowledge on SST-interneurons partially relates to the wide variety of distinct subpopulations present in the sensory neocortex. This review informs on those SST-subpopulations hitherto described based on anatomical, molecular, or electrophysiological characteristics and whose functional roles can be attributed based on specific cortical wiring patterns. A possible role for these subpopulations in experience-dependent plasticity will be discussed, emphasizing on learning-induced plasticity and on unimodal and cross-modal plasticity upon sensory loss. This knowledge will ultimately contribute to guide brain plasticity into well-defined directions to restore sensory function and promote lifelong learning. PMID:27403348

  9. Reducing diffusion induced stress in planar electrodes by plastic shakedown and cyclic plasticity of current collector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Song, Yicheng; Li, Zongzan; Zhang, Junqian

    2014-10-01

    This paper proposes a strategy to reduce the diffusion induced stress and enhance the capacity of a layered electrode by allowing the plastic deformation of current collector. Based on analytical formulations of the stress in whole electrode, three types of elastoplastic behaviors of current collector, i.e. pure elastic deformation, plastic shakedown and cyclic plasticity, are identified. Criterions separating the three cases are proposed. It is found applying a thin current collector and allowing it to plastically yield in the charge/discharge cycles is beneficial not only to capacity as more space can be provided for active materials but also to electrochemical stability because the stress in active layer is significantly reduced. Structural design corresponding to plastic shakedown shows good balance between the said improvements and structural safety, whereas the case of cyclic plasticity further enhances the improvements. Therefore, structural designing scheme is provided for the former case according to the criterion of plastic shakedown but for the latter one based on the Coffin-Manson relation with expected cycle life.

  10. Regeneration, Plasticity, and Induced Molecular Programs in Adult Zebrafish Brain

    PubMed Central

    Cosacak, Mehmet Ilyas; Papadimitriou, Christos; Kizil, Caghan

    2015-01-01

    Regenerative capacity of the brain is a variable trait within animals. Aquatic vertebrates such as zebrafish have widespread ability to renew their brains upon damage, while mammals have—if not none—very limited overall regenerative competence. Underlying cause of such a disparity is not fully evident; however, one of the reasons could be activation of peculiar molecular programs, which might have specific roles after injury or damage, by the organisms that regenerate. If this hypothesis is correct, then there must be genes and pathways that (a) are expressed only after injury or damage in tissues, (b) are biologically and functionally relevant to restoration of neural tissue, and (c) are not detected in regenerating organisms. Presence of such programs might circumvent the initial detrimental effects of the damage and subsequently set up the stage for tissue redevelopment to take place by modulating the plasticity of the neural stem/progenitor cells. Additionally, if transferable, those “molecular mechanisms of regeneration” could open up new avenues for regenerative therapies of humans in clinical settings. This review focuses on the recent studies addressing injury/damage-induced molecular programs in zebrafish brain, underscoring the possibility of the presence of genes that could be used as biomarkers of neural plasticity and regeneration. PMID:26417601

  11. Characterization and Discrimination of Plastic Materials Using Laser-Induced Fluorescence.

    PubMed

    Spizzichino, Valeria; Caneve, Luisa; Colao, Francesco; Ruggiero, Ludovica

    2016-06-01

    The most meaningful spectral components in laser-induced fluorescence (LIF) spectra for several different commercial plastics have been individuated and used to automatically discriminate among different plastic materials and between plastics and complex organic materials, such as woods. Starting from LIF measurements on known samples, a number of significant wavelengths have been identified by principal component analysis (PCA). These have been used to produce intensity ratios functional to the discrimination. Threshold values for such ratios have been individuated in order to obtain an automatic recognition of plastics. The work done has been preparatory to the design and development of a multispectral imaging LIF system for fast detection of plastic debris in a post-blast scene. PMID:27076514

  12. Effect of Serotonin on Paired Associative Stimulation-Induced Plasticity in the Human Motor Cortex

    PubMed Central

    Batsikadze, Giorgi; Paulus, Walter; Kuo, Min-Fang; Nitsche, Michael A

    2013-01-01

    Serotonin modulates diverse brain functions. Beyond its clinical antidepressant effects, it improves motor performance, learning and memory formation. These effects might at least be partially caused by the impact of serotonin on neuroplasticity, which is thought to be an important foundation of the respective functions. In principal accordance, selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors enhance long-term potentiation-like plasticity induced by transcranial direct current stimulation (tDCS) in humans. As other neuromodulators have discernable effects on different kinds of plasticity in humans, here we were interested to explore the impact of serotonin on paired associative stimulation (PAS)-induced plasticity, which induces a more focal kind of plasticity, as compared with tDCS, shares some features with spike timing-dependent plasticity, and is thought to be relative closely related to learning processes. In this single-blinded, placebo-controlled, randomized crossover study, we administered a single dose of 20 mg citalopram or placebo medication and applied facilitatory- and excitability-diminishing PAS to the left motor cortex of 14 healthy subjects. Cortico-spinal excitability was explored via single-pulse transcranial magnetic stimulation-elicited MEP amplitudes up to the next evening after plasticity induction. After citalopram administration, inhibitory PAS-induced after-effects were abolished and excitatory PAS-induced after-effects were enhanced trendwise, as compared with the respective placebo conditions. These results show that serotonin modulates PAS-induced neuroplasticity by shifting it into the direction of facilitation, which might help to explain mechanism of positive therapeutic effects of serotonin in learning and medical conditions characterized by enhanced inhibitory or reduced facilitatory plasticity, including depression and stroke. PMID:23680943

  13. Hydrogen-Induced Plastic Deformation in ZnO

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lukáč, F.; Čížek, J.; Vlček, M.; Procházka, I.; Anwand, W.; Brauer, G.; Traeger, F.; Rogalla, D.; Becker, H.-W.

    In the present work hydrothermally grown ZnO single crystals covered with Pd over-layer were electrochemically loaded with hydrogen and the influence of hydrogen on ZnO micro structure was investigated by positron annihilation spectroscopy (PAS). Nuclear reaction analysis (NRA) was employed for determination of depth profile of hydrogen concentration in the sample. NRA measurements confirmed that a substantial amount of hydrogen was introduced into ZnO by electrochemical charging. The bulk hydrogen concentration in ZnO determined by NRA agrees well with the concentration estimated from the transported charge using the Faraday's law. Moreover, a subsurface region with enhanced hydrogen concentration was found in the loaded crystals. Slow positron implantation spectroscopy (SPIS) investigations of hydrogen-loaded crystal revealed enhanced concentration of defects in the subsurface region. This testifies hydrogen-induced plastic deformation of the loaded crystal. Absorbed hydrogen causes a significant lattice expansion. At low hydrogen concentrations this expansion is accommodated by elastic straining, but at higher concentrations hydrogen-induced stress exceeds the yield stress in ZnO and plastic deformation of the loaded crystal takes place. Enhanced hydrogen concentration detected in the subsurface region by NRA is, therefore, due to excess hydrogen trapped at open volume defects introduced by plastic deformation. Moreover, it was found that hydrogen-induced plastic deformation in the subsurface layer leads to typical surface modification: formation of hexagonal shape pyramids on the surface due to hydrogen-induced slip in the [0001] direction.

  14. In vitro functional screening as a means to identify new plasticizers devoid of reproductive toxicity.

    PubMed

    Boisvert, Annie; Jones, Steven; Issop, Leeyah; Erythropel, Hanno C; Papadopoulos, Vassilios; Culty, Martine

    2016-10-01

    Plasticizers are indispensable additives providing flexibility and malleability to plastics. Among them, several phthalates, including di (2-ethylhexyl) phthalate (DEHP), have emerged as endocrine disruptors, leading to their restriction in consumer products and creating a need for new, safer plasticizers. The goal of this project was to use in vitro functional screening tools to select novel non-toxic plasticizers suitable for further in vivo evaluation. A panel of novel compounds with satisfactory plasticizer properties and biodegradability were tested, along with several commercial plasticizers, such as diisononyl-cyclohexane-1,2-dicarboxylate (DINCH®). MEHP, the monoester metabolite of DEHP was also included as reference compound. Because phthalates target mainly testicular function, including androgen production and spermatogenesis, we used the mouse MA-10 Leydig and C18-4 spermatogonial cell lines as surrogates to examine cell survival, proliferation, steroidogenesis and mitochondrial integrity. The most promising compounds were further assessed on organ cultures of rat fetal and neonatal testes, corresponding to sensitive developmental windows. Dose-response studies revealed the toxicity of most maleates and fumarates, while identifying several dibenzoate and succinate plasticizers as innocuous on Leydig and germ cells. Interestingly, DINCH®, a plasticizer marketed as a safe alternative to phthalates, exerted a biphasic effect on steroid production in MA-10 and fetal Leydig cells. MEHP was the only plasticizer inducing the formation of multinucleated germ cells (MNG) in organ culture. Overall, organ cultures corroborated the cell line data, identifying one dibenzoate and one succinate as the most promising candidates. The adoption of such collaborative approaches for developing new chemicals should help prevent the development of compounds potentially harmful to human health. PMID:27423704

  15. Berberine chloride improved synaptic plasticity in STZ induced diabetic rats.

    PubMed

    Moghaddam, Hamid Kalalian; Baluchnejadmojarad, Tourandokht; Roghani, Mehrdad; Goshadrou, Fatemeh; Ronaghi, Abdolaziz

    2013-09-01

    Previous studies indicated that diabetes affects synaptic transmission in the hippocampus, leading to impairments of synaptic plasticity and defects in learning and memory. Although berberine treatment ameliorates memory impairment and improves synaptic plasticity in streptozotocin (STZ) induced diabetic rats, it is not clear if the effects are pre- or post-synaptic or both. The aim of this study was to evaluate the effects of berberine chloride on short-term plasticity in inhibitory interneurons in the dentate gyrus of STZ-induced diabetic rats. Experimental groups included: The control, control berberine treated (100 mg/kg), diabetic and diabetic berberine treated (50,100 mg/kg/day for 12 weeks) groups. The paired pulse paradigm was used to stimulate the perforant pathway and field excitatory post-synaptic potentials (fEPSP) were recorded in dentate gyrus (DG). In comparison with control, paired pulse facilitation in the diabetic group was significantly increased (P < 0.01) and this effect prevented by chronic berberine treatment (50,100 mg/kg). However, there were no differences between responses of the control berberine 100 mg/kg treated and diabetes berberine treated (50 and 100 mg/kg) groups as compared to the control group. The present results suggest that the pre-synaptic component of synaptic plasticity in the dentate gyrus is affected under diabetic conditions and that berberine prevents this effect. PMID:23640014

  16. Structural and Functional Plasticity in the Maternal Brain Circuitry.

    PubMed

    Pereira, Mariana

    2016-09-01

    Parenting recruits a distributed network of brain structures (and neuromodulators) that coordinates caregiving responses attuned to the young's affect, needs, and developmental stage. Many of these structures and connections undergo significant structural and functional plasticity, mediated by the interplay between maternal hormones and social experience while the reciprocal relationship between the mother and her infant forms and develops. These alterations account for the remarkable behavioral plasticity of mothers. This review will examine the molecular and neurobiological modulation and plasticity through which parenting develops and adjusts in new mothers, primarily discussing recent findings in nonhuman animals. A better understanding of how parenting impacts the brain at the molecular, cellular, systems/network, and behavioral levels is likely to significantly contribute to novel strategies for treating postpartum neuropsychiatric disorders in new mothers, and critical for both the mother's physiological and mental health and the development and well-being of her young. PMID:27589496

  17. Plasticity of Cu nanoparticles: Dislocation-dendrite-induced strain hardening and a limit for displacive plasticity

    PubMed Central

    Albe, Karsten

    2013-01-01

    Summary The plastic behaviour of individual Cu crystallites under nanoextrusion is studied by molecular dynamics simulations. Single-crystal Cu fcc nanoparticles are embedded in a spherical force field mimicking the effect of a contracting carbon shell, inducing pressure on the system in the range of gigapascals. The material is extruded from a hole of 1.1–1.6 nm radius under athermal conditions. Simultaneous nucleation of partial dislocations at the extrusion orifice leads to the formation of dislocation dendrites in the particle causing strain hardening and high flow stress of the material. As the extrusion orifice radius is reduced below 1.3 Å we observe a transition from displacive plasticity to solid-state amorphisation. PMID:23616936

  18. Neural Plasticity in Multiple Sclerosis: The Functional and Molecular Background

    PubMed Central

    Ksiazek-Winiarek, Dominika Justyna; Szpakowski, Piotr; Glabinski, Andrzej

    2015-01-01

    Multiple sclerosis is an autoimmune neurodegenerative disorder resulting in motor dysfunction and cognitive decline. The inflammatory and neurodegenerative changes seen in the brains of MS patients lead to progressive disability and increasing brain atrophy. The most common type of MS is characterized by episodes of clinical exacerbations and remissions. This suggests the presence of compensating mechanisms for accumulating damage. Apart from the widely known repair mechanisms like remyelination, another important phenomenon is neuronal plasticity. Initially, neuroplasticity was connected with the developmental stages of life; however, there is now growing evidence confirming that structural and functional reorganization occurs throughout our lifetime. Several functional studies, utilizing such techniques as fMRI, TBS, or MRS, have provided valuable data about the presence of neuronal plasticity in MS patients. CNS ability to compensate for neuronal damage is most evident in RR-MS; however it has been shown that brain plasticity is also preserved in patients with substantial brain damage. Regardless of the numerous studies, the molecular background of neuronal plasticity in MS is still not well understood. Several factors, like IL-1β, BDNF, PDGF, or CB1Rs, have been implicated in functional recovery from the acute phase of MS and are thus considered as potential therapeutic targets. PMID:26229689

  19. Brain-Controlled Neuromuscular Stimulation to Drive Neural Plasticity and Functional Recovery

    PubMed Central

    Ethier, C.; Gallego, J.A.; Miller, L.E.

    2015-01-01

    There is mounting evidence that appropriately timed neuromuscular stimulation can induce neural plasticity and generate functional recovery from motor disorders. This review addresses the idea that coordinating stimulation with a patient’s voluntary effort might further enhance neurorehabilitation. Studies in cell cultures and behaving animals have delineated the rules underlying neural plasticity when single neurons are used as triggers. However, the rules governing more complex stimuli and larger networks are less well understood. We argue that functional recovery might be optimized if stimulation were modulated by a brain machine interface, to matched the details of the patient’s voluntary intent. The potential of this novel approach highlights the need for a better understanding of the complex rules underlying this form of plasticity. PMID:25827275

  20. Brain-controlled neuromuscular stimulation to drive neural plasticity and functional recovery.

    PubMed

    Ethier, C; Gallego, J A; Miller, L E

    2015-08-01

    There is mounting evidence that appropriately timed neuromuscular stimulation can induce neural plasticity and generate functional recovery from motor disorders. This review addresses the idea that coordinating stimulation with a patient's voluntary effort might further enhance neurorehabilitation. Studies in cell cultures and behaving animals have delineated the rules underlying neural plasticity when single neurons are used as triggers. However, the rules governing more complex stimuli and larger networks are less well understood. We argue that functional recovery might be optimized if stimulation were modulated by a brain machine interface, to match the details of the patient's voluntary intent. The potential of this novel approach highlights the need for a better understanding of the complex rules underlying this form of plasticity. PMID:25827275

  1. Cortical plasticity and preserved function in early blindness

    PubMed Central

    Renier, Laurent; De Volder, Anne G.; Rauschecker, Josef P.

    2013-01-01

    The “neural Darwinism” theory predicts that when one sensory modality is lacking, as in congenital blindness, the target structures are taken over by the afferent inputs from other senses that will promote and control their functional maturation (Edelman, 1993). This view receives support from both cross-modal plasticity experiments in animal models and functional imaging studies in man, which are presented here. PMID:23453908

  2. An Evolutionary Computation Approach to Examine Functional Brain Plasticity.

    PubMed

    Roy, Arnab; Campbell, Colin; Bernier, Rachel A; Hillary, Frank G

    2016-01-01

    One common research goal in systems neurosciences is to understand how the functional relationship between a pair of regions of interest (ROIs) evolves over time. Examining neural connectivity in this way is well-suited for the study of developmental processes, learning, and even in recovery or treatment designs in response to injury. For most fMRI based studies, the strength of the functional relationship between two ROIs is defined as the correlation between the average signal representing each region. The drawback to this approach is that much information is lost due to averaging heterogeneous voxels, and therefore, the functional relationship between a ROI-pair that evolve at a spatial scale much finer than the ROIs remain undetected. To address this shortcoming, we introduce a novel evolutionary computation (EC) based voxel-level procedure to examine functional plasticity between an investigator defined ROI-pair by simultaneously using subject-specific BOLD-fMRI data collected from two sessions seperated by finite duration of time. This data-driven procedure detects a sub-region composed of spatially connected voxels from each ROI (a so-called sub-regional-pair) such that the pair shows a significant gain/loss of functional relationship strength across the two time points. The procedure is recursive and iteratively finds all statistically significant sub-regional-pairs within the ROIs. Using this approach, we examine functional plasticity between the default mode network (DMN) and the executive control network (ECN) during recovery from traumatic brain injury (TBI); the study includes 14 TBI and 12 healthy control subjects. We demonstrate that the EC based procedure is able to detect functional plasticity where a traditional averaging based approach fails. The subject-specific plasticity estimates obtained using the EC-procedure are highly consistent across multiple runs. Group-level analyses using these plasticity estimates showed an increase in the strength

  3. An Evolutionary Computation Approach to Examine Functional Brain Plasticity

    PubMed Central

    Roy, Arnab; Campbell, Colin; Bernier, Rachel A.; Hillary, Frank G.

    2016-01-01

    One common research goal in systems neurosciences is to understand how the functional relationship between a pair of regions of interest (ROIs) evolves over time. Examining neural connectivity in this way is well-suited for the study of developmental processes, learning, and even in recovery or treatment designs in response to injury. For most fMRI based studies, the strength of the functional relationship between two ROIs is defined as the correlation between the average signal representing each region. The drawback to this approach is that much information is lost due to averaging heterogeneous voxels, and therefore, the functional relationship between a ROI-pair that evolve at a spatial scale much finer than the ROIs remain undetected. To address this shortcoming, we introduce a novel evolutionary computation (EC) based voxel-level procedure to examine functional plasticity between an investigator defined ROI-pair by simultaneously using subject-specific BOLD-fMRI data collected from two sessions seperated by finite duration of time. This data-driven procedure detects a sub-region composed of spatially connected voxels from each ROI (a so-called sub-regional-pair) such that the pair shows a significant gain/loss of functional relationship strength across the two time points. The procedure is recursive and iteratively finds all statistically significant sub-regional-pairs within the ROIs. Using this approach, we examine functional plasticity between the default mode network (DMN) and the executive control network (ECN) during recovery from traumatic brain injury (TBI); the study includes 14 TBI and 12 healthy control subjects. We demonstrate that the EC based procedure is able to detect functional plasticity where a traditional averaging based approach fails. The subject-specific plasticity estimates obtained using the EC-procedure are highly consistent across multiple runs. Group-level analyses using these plasticity estimates showed an increase in the strength

  4. Voluntary Exercise Induces Astrocytic Structural Plasticity in the Globus Pallidus

    PubMed Central

    Tatsumi, Kouko; Okuda, Hiroaki; Morita-Takemura, Shoko; Tanaka, Tatsuhide; Isonishi, Ayami; Shinjo, Takeaki; Terada, Yuki; Wanaka, Akio

    2016-01-01

    Changes in astrocyte morphology are primarily attributed to the fine processes where intimate connections with neurons form the tripartite synapse and participate in neurotransmission. Recent evidence has shown that neurotransmission induces dynamic synaptic remodeling, suggesting that astrocytic fine processes may adapt their morphologies to the activity in their environment. To illustrate such a neuron-glia relationship in morphological detail, we employed a double transgenic Olig2CreER/WT; ROSA26-GAP43-EGFP mice, in which Olig2-lineage cells can be visualized and traced with membrane-targeted GFP. Although Olig2-lineage cells in the adult brain usually become mature oligodendrocytes or oligodendrocyte precursor cells with NG2-proteoglycan expression, we found a population of Olig2-lineage astrocytes with bushy morphology in several brain regions. The globus pallidus (GP) preferentially contains Olig2-lineage astrocytes. Since the GP exerts pivotal motor functions in the indirect pathway of the basal ganglionic circuit, we subjected the double transgenic mice to voluntary wheel running to activate the GP and examined morphological changes of Olig2-lineage astrocytes at both the light and electron microscopic levels. The double transgenic mice were divided into three groups: control group mice were kept in a cage with a locked running wheel for 3 weeks, Runner group were allowed free access to a running wheel for 3 weeks, and the Runner-Rest group took a sedentary 3-week rest after a 3-week running period. GFP immunofluorescence analysis and immunoelectron microscopy revealed that astrocytic fine processes elaborated complex arborization in the Runner mice, and reverted to simple morphology comparable to that of the Control group in the Runner-Rest group. Our results indicated that the fine processes of the Olig2-lineage astrocytes underwent plastic changes that correlated with overall running activities, suggesting that they actively participate in motor

  5. Voluntary Exercise Induces Astrocytic Structural Plasticity in the Globus Pallidus.

    PubMed

    Tatsumi, Kouko; Okuda, Hiroaki; Morita-Takemura, Shoko; Tanaka, Tatsuhide; Isonishi, Ayami; Shinjo, Takeaki; Terada, Yuki; Wanaka, Akio

    2016-01-01

    Changes in astrocyte morphology are primarily attributed to the fine processes where intimate connections with neurons form the tripartite synapse and participate in neurotransmission. Recent evidence has shown that neurotransmission induces dynamic synaptic remodeling, suggesting that astrocytic fine processes may adapt their morphologies to the activity in their environment. To illustrate such a neuron-glia relationship in morphological detail, we employed a double transgenic Olig2(CreER/WT); ROSA26-GAP43-EGFP mice, in which Olig2-lineage cells can be visualized and traced with membrane-targeted GFP. Although Olig2-lineage cells in the adult brain usually become mature oligodendrocytes or oligodendrocyte precursor cells with NG2-proteoglycan expression, we found a population of Olig2-lineage astrocytes with bushy morphology in several brain regions. The globus pallidus (GP) preferentially contains Olig2-lineage astrocytes. Since the GP exerts pivotal motor functions in the indirect pathway of the basal ganglionic circuit, we subjected the double transgenic mice to voluntary wheel running to activate the GP and examined morphological changes of Olig2-lineage astrocytes at both the light and electron microscopic levels. The double transgenic mice were divided into three groups: control group mice were kept in a cage with a locked running wheel for 3 weeks, Runner group were allowed free access to a running wheel for 3 weeks, and the Runner-Rest group took a sedentary 3-week rest after a 3-week running period. GFP immunofluorescence analysis and immunoelectron microscopy revealed that astrocytic fine processes elaborated complex arborization in the Runner mice, and reverted to simple morphology comparable to that of the Control group in the Runner-Rest group. Our results indicated that the fine processes of the Olig2-lineage astrocytes underwent plastic changes that correlated with overall running activities, suggesting that they actively participate in motor

  6. Cortical Plasticity and Olfactory Function in Early Blindness

    PubMed Central

    Araneda, Rodrigo; Renier, Laurent A.; Rombaux, Philippe; Cuevas, Isabel; De Volder, Anne G.

    2016-01-01

    Over the last decade, functional brain imaging has provided insight to the maturation processes and has helped elucidate the pathophysiological mechanisms involved in brain plasticity in the absence of vision. In case of congenital blindness, drastic changes occur within the deafferented “visual” cortex that starts receiving and processing non visual inputs, including olfactory stimuli. This functional reorganization of the occipital cortex gives rise to compensatory perceptual and cognitive mechanisms that help blind persons achieve perceptual tasks, leading to superior olfactory abilities in these subjects. This view receives support from psychophysical testing, volumetric measurements and functional brain imaging studies in humans, which are presented here. PMID:27625596

  7. Cortical Plasticity and Olfactory Function in Early Blindness.

    PubMed

    Araneda, Rodrigo; Renier, Laurent A; Rombaux, Philippe; Cuevas, Isabel; De Volder, Anne G

    2016-01-01

    Over the last decade, functional brain imaging has provided insight to the maturation processes and has helped elucidate the pathophysiological mechanisms involved in brain plasticity in the absence of vision. In case of congenital blindness, drastic changes occur within the deafferented "visual" cortex that starts receiving and processing non visual inputs, including olfactory stimuli. This functional reorganization of the occipital cortex gives rise to compensatory perceptual and cognitive mechanisms that help blind persons achieve perceptual tasks, leading to superior olfactory abilities in these subjects. This view receives support from psychophysical testing, volumetric measurements and functional brain imaging studies in humans, which are presented here. PMID:27625596

  8. Investigating brain functional evolution and plasticity using microelectrode array technology.

    PubMed

    Napoli, Alessandro; Obeid, Iyad

    2015-10-01

    The aim of this work was to investigate long and short-term plasticity responsible for memory formation in dissociated neuronal networks. In order to address this issue, a set of experiments was designed and implemented in which the microelectrode array electrode grid was divided into four quadrants, two of which were chronically stimulated, every two days for one hour with a stimulation paradigm that varied over time. Overall network and quadrant responses were then analyzed to quantify what level of plasticity took place in the network and how this was due to the stimulation interruption. The results demonstrate that there were no spatial differences in the stimulus-evoked activity within quadrants. Furthermore, the implemented stimulation protocol induced depression effects in the neuronal networks as demonstrated by the consistently lower network activity following stimulation sessions. Finally, the analysis demonstrated that the inhibitory effects of the stimulation decreased over time, thus suggesting a habituation phenomenon. These findings are sufficient to conclude that electrical stimulation is an important tool to interact with dissociated neuronal cultures, but localized stimuli are not enough to drive spatial synaptic potentiation or depression. On the contrary, the ability to modulate synaptic temporal plasticity was a feasible task to achieve by chronic network stimulation. PMID:26476356

  9. Cell-specific synaptic plasticity induced by network oscillations

    PubMed Central

    Zarnadze, Shota; Bäuerle, Peter; Santos-Torres, Julio; Böhm, Claudia; Schmitz, Dietmar; Geiger, Jörg RP

    2016-01-01

    Gamma rhythms are known to contribute to the process of memory encoding. However, little is known about the underlying mechanisms at the molecular, cellular and network levels. Using local field potential recording in awake behaving mice and concomitant field potential and whole-cell recordings in slice preparations we found that gamma rhythms lead to activity-dependent modification of hippocampal networks, including alterations in sharp wave-ripple complexes. Network plasticity, expressed as long-lasting increases in sharp wave-associated synaptic currents, exhibits enhanced excitatory synaptic strength in pyramidal cells that is induced postsynaptically and depends on metabotropic glutamate receptor-5 activation. In sharp contrast, alteration of inhibitory synaptic strength is independent of postsynaptic activation and less pronounced. Further, we found a cell type-specific, directionally biased synaptic plasticity of two major types of GABAergic cells, parvalbumin- and cholecystokinin-expressing interneurons. Thus, we propose that gamma frequency oscillations represent a network state that introduces long-lasting synaptic plasticity in a cell-specific manner. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.14912.001 PMID:27218453

  10. Cell-specific synaptic plasticity induced by network oscillations.

    PubMed

    Zarnadze, Shota; Bäuerle, Peter; Santos-Torres, Julio; Böhm, Claudia; Schmitz, Dietmar; Geiger, Jörg Rp; Dugladze, Tamar; Gloveli, Tengis

    2016-01-01

    Gamma rhythms are known to contribute to the process of memory encoding. However, little is known about the underlying mechanisms at the molecular, cellular and network levels. Using local field potential recording in awake behaving mice and concomitant field potential and whole-cell recordings in slice preparations we found that gamma rhythms lead to activity-dependent modification of hippocampal networks, including alterations in sharp wave-ripple complexes. Network plasticity, expressed as long-lasting increases in sharp wave-associated synaptic currents, exhibits enhanced excitatory synaptic strength in pyramidal cells that is induced postsynaptically and depends on metabotropic glutamate receptor-5 activation. In sharp contrast, alteration of inhibitory synaptic strength is independent of postsynaptic activation and less pronounced. Further, we found a cell type-specific, directionally biased synaptic plasticity of two major types of GABAergic cells, parvalbumin- and cholecystokinin-expressing interneurons. Thus, we propose that gamma frequency oscillations represent a network state that introduces long-lasting synaptic plasticity in a cell-specific manner. PMID:27218453

  11. Aging reduces experience-induced sensorimotor plasticity. A magnetoencephalographic study.

    PubMed

    Mary, Alison; Bourguignon, Mathieu; Wens, Vincent; Op de Beeck, Marc; Leproult, Rachel; De Tiège, Xavier; Peigneux, Philippe

    2015-01-01

    Modulation of the mu-alpha and mu-beta spontaneous rhythms reflects plastic neural changes within the primary sensorimotor cortex (SM1). Using magnetoencephalography (MEG), we investigated how aging modifies experience-induced plasticity after learning a motor sequence, looking at post- vs. pre-learning changes in the modulation of mu rhythms during the execution of simple hand movements. Fifteen young (18-30 years) and fourteen older (65-75 years) right-handed healthy participants performed auditory-cued key presses using all four left fingers simultaneously (Simple Movement task - SMT) during two separate sessions. Following both SMT sessions, they repeatedly practiced a 5-elements sequential finger-tapping task (FTT). Mu power calculated during SMT was averaged across 18 gradiometers covering the right sensorimotor region and compared before vs. after sequence learning in the alpha (9/10/11Hz) and the beta (18/20/22Hz) bands separately. Source power maps in the mu-alpha and mu-beta bands were localized using Dynamic Statistical Parametric Mapping (dSPM). The FTT sequence was performed faster at retest than at the end of the learning session, indicating an offline boost in performance. Analyses conducted on SMT sessions revealed enhanced rebound after learning in the right SM1, 3000-3500ms after the initiation of movement, in young as compared to older participants. Source reconstruction indicated that mu-beta is located in the precentral gyrus (motor processes) and mu-alpha is located in the postcentral gyrus (somatosensory processes) in both groups. The enhanced post-movement rebound in young subjects potentially reflects post-training plastic changes in SM1. Age-related decreases in post-training modulatory effects suggest reduced experience-dependent plasticity in the aging brain. PMID:25315784

  12. Effects of plasticizers and their mixtures on estrogen receptor and thyroid hormone functions.

    PubMed

    Ghisari, Mandana; Bonefeld-Jorgensen, Eva Cecilie

    2009-08-25

    Plasticizers are additives used to increase the flexibility or plasticity of the material to which they are added, normally rigid plastic and as additives in paint and adhesives. They are suspected to interfere with the endocrine system, including the estrogen and the thyroid hormone (TH) systems. We investigated in vitro the thyroid hormone-like and estrogenic activities of a range of widely used plasticizers and phenols including benzyl butyl phthalate (BBP), dibutyl phthalate (DBP), dioctyl phthalate (DOP), diisodecyl phthalate (DIDP), diisononyl phthalate (DINP), di(2-ethylhexyl) phthalate (DEHP), bis(2-ethylhexyl) adipate (DEHA), 4-tert-octylphenol (tOP), 4-chloro-3-methylphenol (CMP), 2,4-dichlorophenol (2,4-DCP), 2-phenylphenol (2-PP) and resorcinol. The TH disrupting potential was determined by the effect on the TH-dependent rat pituitary GH3 cell proliferation (T-screen). The estrogenic activities of the compounds were assessed in MVLN cells, stably transfected with an estrogen receptor (ER) luciferase reporter vector. Furthermore, the combined effect of a multi-components mixture of six plasticizers was evaluated for its estrogenic and TH-like activities. All the tested compounds, but 2-PP, significantly affected the GH3 cell proliferation. tOP, BBP and DBP activated ER transactivity, whereas DEHP antagonized the 17beta-estradiol induced ER function. The mixture significantly induced ER transactivity in an additive manner, whereas in the T-screen, the observed mixture effect was lower than predicted, suggesting a potential antagonizing effect of the mixture. In conclusion, the tested plasticizers and phenols elicited endocrine-disrupting potential that can be mediated via interference with the estrogen and TH systems. Moreover, the observed mixture effect stresses the importance of considering the combined effect of the compounds for risk assessment of human health. PMID:19463926

  13. Plasticity-induced anisotropy in amorphous solids: the Bauschinger effect.

    PubMed

    Karmakar, Smarajit; Lerner, Edan; Procaccia, Itamar

    2010-08-01

    Amorphous solids that underwent a strain in one direction such that they responded in a plastic manner "remember" that direction also when relaxed back to a state with zero mean stress. We address the question "what is the order parameter that is responsible for this memory?" and is therefore the reason for the different subsequent responses of the material to strains in different directions. We identify such an order parameter which is readily measurable, we discuss its trajectory along the stress-strain curve, and propose that it and its probability distribution function must form a necessary component of a theory of elastoplasticity. PMID:20866873

  14. Plasticity-induced anisotropy in amorphous solids: The Bauschinger effect

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karmakar, Smarajit; Lerner, Edan; Procaccia, Itamar

    2010-08-01

    Amorphous solids that underwent a strain in one direction such that they responded in a plastic manner “remember” that direction also when relaxed back to a state with zero mean stress. We address the question “what is the order parameter that is responsible for this memory?” and is therefore the reason for the different subsequent responses of the material to strains in different directions. We identify such an order parameter which is readily measurable, we discuss its trajectory along the stress-strain curve, and propose that it and its probability distribution function must form a necessary component of a theory of elastoplasticity.

  15. Peripheral Chemoreceptors: Function and Plasticity of the Carotid Body

    PubMed Central

    Kumar, Prem; Prabhakar, Nanduri R.

    2014-01-01

    The discovery of the sensory nature of the carotid body dates back to the beginning of the 20th century. Following these seminal discoveries, research into carotid body mechanisms moved forward progressively through the 20th century, with many descriptions of the ultrastructure of the organ and stimulus-response measurements at the level of the whole organ. The later part of 20th century witnessed the first descriptions of the cellular responses and electrophysiology of isolated and cultured type I and type II cells, and there now exist a number of testable hypotheses of chemotransduction. The goal of this article is to provide a comprehensive review of current concepts on sensory transduction and transmission of the hypoxic stimulus at the carotid body with an emphasis on integrating cellular mechanisms with the whole organ responses and highlighting the gaps or discrepancies in our knowledge. It is increasingly evident that in addition to hypoxia, the carotid body responds to a wide variety of blood-borne stimuli, including reduced glucose and immune-related cytokines and we therefore also consider the evidence for a polymodal function of the carotid body and its implications. It is clear that the sensory function of the carotid body exhibits considerable plasticity in response to the chronic perturbations in environmental O2 that is associated with many physiological and pathological conditions. The mechanisms and consequences of carotid body plasticity in health and disease are discussed in the final sections of this article. PMID:23728973

  16. Remaining Flexible in Old Alliances: Functional Plasticity in Constrained Mutualisms

    PubMed Central

    Wheeler, Diana E.

    2009-01-01

    Central to any beneficial interaction is the capacity of partners to detect and respond to significant changes in the other. Recent studies of microbial mutualists show their close integration with host development, immune responses, and acclimation to a dynamic external environment. While the significance of microbial players is broadly appreciated, we are just beginning to understand the genetic, ecological, and physiological mechanisms that generate variation in symbiont functions, broadly termed “symbiont plasticity” here. Some possible mechanisms include shifts in symbiont community composition, genetic changes via DNA acquisition, gene expression fluctuations, and variation in symbiont densities. In this review, we examine mechanisms for plasticity in the exceptionally stable mutualisms between insects and bacterial endosymbionts. Despite the severe ecological and genomic constraints imposed by their specialized lifestyle, these bacteria retain the capacity to modulate functions depending on the particular requirements of the host. Focusing on the mutualism between Blochmannia and ants, we discuss the roles of gene expression fluctuations and shifts in bacterial densities in generating symbiont plasticity. This symbiont variation is best understood by considering ant colony as the host superorganism. In this eusocial host, the bacteria meet the needs of the colony and not necessarily the individual ants that house them. PMID:19435425

  17. Temperature Dependence of Shock-Induced Plasticity: A Molecular Dynamics Approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hatano, Takahiro

    2004-07-01

    Molecular dynamics simulation on a fcc perfect crystal with the Lennard-Jones potential is performed in order to investigate temperature dependence of shock-induced plasticity. It is found that the critical piston velocity above which stacking faults emerge shifts downwards once the temperature exceeds approximately half the melting temperature. Also Hugoniot elastic limit is found to be a decreasing function of temperature, whereas the corresponding critical strain is insensitive to temperature. The discrepancy between the simulation and the experiments where Hugoniot elastic limit is a increasing function of temperature is discussed.

  18. Plastic flow induced by single ion impacts on gold

    SciTech Connect

    Birtcher, R.C.; Donnelly, S.E.

    1996-12-01

    In situ TEM was used to follow RT irradiation of thinned bulk and 62nm thick gold films with Xe ions at 50-400 keV. Energy spikes from single ion impacts give rise to surface craters and holes which exist until annihilated by subsequent ion impacts. Video recording provided details with a time resolution of 33 ms. Craters were produced on the irradiated surface at all ion energies and on the opposite surface when the ions had enough energy to traverse the specimen. Crater sizes were as large as 12nm for the higher energy irradiations. On average, about 6% of impinging ions result in craters. A single 200 keV Xe ion may produce a hole in thin gold foils. Hole formation involves the movement by plastic flow of massive amounts of material, on the order of tens of thousand Au atoms per ion impact. Individual ion impacts also result in a filling of both holes and craters as well as a thickening of the gold foil. Change in morphology during irradiation is attributed to a localized, thermal-spike induced melting, coupled with plastic flow under the influence of surface forces.

  19. EPO induces changes in synaptic transmission and plasticity in the dentate gyrus of rats.

    PubMed

    Almaguer-Melian, William; Mercerón-Martínez, Daymara; Delgado-Ocaña, Susana; Pavón-Fuentes, Nancy; Ledón, Nuris; Bergado, Jorge A

    2016-06-01

    Erythropoietin has shown wide physiological effects on the central nervous system in animal models of disease, and in healthy animals. We have recently shown that systemic EPO administration 15 min, but not 5 h, after daily training in a water maze is able to induce the recovery of spatial memory in fimbria-fornix chronic-lesioned animals, suggesting that acute EPO triggers mechanisms which can modulate the active neural plasticity mechanism involved in spatial memory acquisition in lesioned animals. Additionally, this EPO effect is accompanied by the up-regulation of plasticity-related early genes. More remarkably, this time-dependent effects on learning recovery could signify that EPO in nerve system modulate specific living-cellular processes. In the present article, we focus on the question if EPO could modulate the induction of long-term synaptic plasticity like LTP and LTD, which presumably could support our previous published data. Our results show that acute EPO peripheral administration 15 min before the induction of synaptic plasticity is able to increase the magnitude of the LTP (more prominent in PSA than fEPSP-Slope) to facilitate the induction of LTD, and to protect LTP from depotentiation. These findings showing that EPO modulates in vivo synaptic plasticity sustain the assumption that EPO can act not only as a neuroprotective substance, but is also able to modulate transient neural plasticity mechanisms and therefore to promote the recovery of nerve function after an established chronic brain lesion. According to these results, EPO could be use as a molecular tool for neurorestaurative treatments. Synapse 70:240-252, 2016. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:26860222

  20. Switching roles: the functional plasticity of adult tissue stem cells.

    PubMed

    Wabik, Agnieszka; Jones, Philip H

    2015-05-01

    Adult organisms have to adapt to survive, and the same is true for their tissues. Rates and types of cell production must be rapidly and reversibly adjusted to meet tissue demands in response to both local and systemic challenges. Recent work reveals how stem cell (SC) populations meet these requirements by switching between functional states tuned to homoeostasis or regeneration. This plasticity extends to differentiating cells, which are capable of reverting to SCs after injury. The concept of the niche, the micro-environment that sustains and regulates stem cells, is broadening, with a new appreciation of the role of physical factors and hormonal signals. Here, we review different functions of SCs, the cellular mechanisms that underlie them and the signals that bias the fate of SCs as they switch between roles. PMID:25812989

  1. Switching roles: the functional plasticity of adult tissue stem cells

    PubMed Central

    Wabik, Agnieszka; Jones, Philip H

    2015-01-01

    Adult organisms have to adapt to survive, and the same is true for their tissues. Rates and types of cell production must be rapidly and reversibly adjusted to meet tissue demands in response to both local and systemic challenges. Recent work reveals how stem cell (SC) populations meet these requirements by switching between functional states tuned to homoeostasis or regeneration. This plasticity extends to differentiating cells, which are capable of reverting to SCs after injury. The concept of the niche, the micro-environment that sustains and regulates stem cells, is broadening, with a new appreciation of the role of physical factors and hormonal signals. Here, we review different functions of SCs, the cellular mechanisms that underlie them and the signals that bias the fate of SCs as they switch between roles. PMID:25812989

  2. Texture developed during deformation of Transformation Induced Plasticity (TRIP) steels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bhargava, M.; Shanta, C.; Asim, T.; Sushil, M.

    2015-04-01

    Automotive industry is currently focusing on using advanced high strength steels (AHSS) due to its high strength and formability for closure applications. Transformation Induced Plasticity (TRIP) steel is promising material for this application among other AHSS. The present work is focused on the microstructure development during deformation of TRIP steel sheets. To mimic complex strain path condition during forming of automotive body, Limit Dome Height (LDH) tests were conducted and samples were deformed in servo hydraulic press to find the different strain path. FEM Simulations were done to predict different strain path diagrams and compared with experimental results. There is a significant difference between experimental and simulation results as the existing material models are not applicable for TRIP steels. Micro texture studies were performed on the samples using EBSD and X-RD techniques. It was observed that austenite is transformed to martensite and texture developed during deformation had strong impact on limit strain and strain path.

  3. Hydrogen Effects in Prestrained Transformation Induced Plasticity Steel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ronevich, J. A.; De Cooman, B. C.; Speer, J. G.; De Moor, E.; Matlock, D. K.

    2012-07-01

    Thermal desorption analysis (TDA) was performed on laboratory heat-treated transformation induced plasticity (TRIP) steel with 14.5 pct retained austenite (RA), ultimate tensile strength (UTS) of 880 MPa, and elongation to failure of 33 pct. Samples were tensile prestrained 5 pct at 253 K (-20 °C), 296 K (23 °C), and 375 K (102 °C) to generate different amounts of deformation-induced martensite, 10.5, 5.5, and 0.5 pct, respectively, prior to cathodically charging to a hydrogen content of 1 to 2 ppm. TDA was performed on charged samples to determine the location and strength of hydrogen trapping sites. TDA results suggest that dislocations were the main trapping sites in prestrained TRIP steel. The TDA peak intensity increased with prestrain, suggesting that the quantity of hydrogen trap sites increased with deformation. Tensile tests were performed on the four hydrogen-charged TRIP steel conditions. As confirmed with transmission electron microscope images, samples with more homogeneous dislocation distributions ( i.e., prestrained at 375 K (102 °C)) exhibited greater resistance to hydrogen embrittlement than samples that included a high dislocation density adjacent to the formations of strain-induced martensite ( i.e., samples prestrained at 253 K (-20 °C) and 296 K (23 °C)).

  4. [Components of plastic disrupt the function of the nervous system].

    PubMed

    Szychowski, Konrad Andrzej; Wójtowicz, Anna Katarzyna

    2013-01-01

    Development of the chemical industry leads to the development of new chemical compounds, which naturally do not exist in the environment. These chemicals are used to reduce flammability, increase plasticity, or improve solubility of other substances. Many of these compounds, which are components of plastic, the new generation of cosmetics, medical devices, food packaging and other everyday products, are easily released into the environment. Many studies have shown that a major lipophilicity characterizes substances such as phthalates, BPA, TBBPA and PCBs. This feature allows them to easily penetrate into living cells, accumulate in the tissues and the organs, and affect human and animal health. Due to the chemical structures, these compounds are able to mimic some endogenous hormones such as estradiol and to disrupt the hormone homeostasis. They can also easily pass the placental barrier and the blood-brain barrier. As numerous studies have shown, these chemicals disturb the proper functions of the nervous system from the earliest moments of life. It has been proven that these compounds affect neurogenesis as well as the synaptic transmission process. As a consequence, they interfere with the formation of the sex of the brain, as well as with the learning processes, memory and behavior. Additionally, the cytotoxic and pro-apoptotic effect may cause neurodegenerative diseases. This article presents the current state of knowledge about the effects of phthalates, BPA, TBBPA, and PCBs on the nervous system. PMID:23752602

  5. Histone Deacetylase Inhibition Facilitates Massed Pattern-Induced Synaptic Plasticity and Memory

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pandey, Kiran; Sharma, Kaushik P.; Sharma, Shiv K.

    2015-01-01

    Massed training is less effective for long-term memory formation than the spaced training. The role of acetylation in synaptic plasticity and memory is now well established. However, the role of this important protein modification in synaptic plasticity induced by massed pattern of stimulation or memory induced by massed training is not well…

  6. Neighborhood matters: divergent patterns of stress-induced plasticity across the brain.

    PubMed

    Chattarji, Sumantra; Tomar, Anupratap; Suvrathan, Aparna; Ghosh, Supriya; Rahman, Mohammed Mostafizur

    2015-10-01

    The fact that exposure to severe stress leads to the development of psychiatric disorders serves as the basic rationale for animal models of stress disorders. Clinical and neuroimaging studies have shown that three brain areas involved in learning and memory--the hippocampus, amygdala and prefrontal cortex--undergo distinct structural and functional changes in individuals with stress disorders. These findings from patient studies pose several challenges for animal models of stress disorders. For instance, why does stress impair cognitive function, yet enhance fear and anxiety? Can the same stressful experience elicit contrasting patterns of plasticity in the hippocampus, amygdala and prefrontal cortex? How does even a brief exposure to traumatic stress lead to long-lasting behavioral abnormalities? Thus, animal models of stress disorders must not only capture the unique spatio-temporal features of structural and functional alterations in these brain areas, but must also provide insights into the underlying neuronal plasticity mechanisms. This Review will address some of these key questions by describing findings from animal models on how stress-induced plasticity varies across different brain regions and thereby gives rise to the debilitating emotional and cognitive symptoms of stress-related psychiatric disorders. PMID:26404711

  7. Muscarinic M1 receptors modulate endotoxemia-induced loss of synaptic plasticity.

    PubMed

    Zivkovic, Aleksandar R; Sedlaczek, Oliver; von Haken, Rebecca; Schmidt, Karsten; Brenner, Thorsten; Weigand, Markus A; Bading, Hilmar; Bengtson, C Peter; Hofer, Stefan

    2015-01-01

    Septic encephalopathy is associated with rapid deterioration of cortical functions. Using magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) we detected functional abnormalities in the hippocampal formation of patients with septic delirium. Hippocampal dysfunction was further investigated in an animal model for sepsis using lipopolysaccharide (LPS) injections to induce endotoxemia in rats, followed by electrophysiological recordings in brain slices. Endotoxemia induced a deficit in long term potentiation which was completely reversed by apamin, a blocker of small conductance calcium-activated potassium (SK) channels, and partly restored by treatment with physostigmine (eserine), an acetylcholinesterase inhibitor, or TBPB, a selective M1 muscarinic acetylcholine receptor agonist. These results suggest a novel role for SK channels in the etiology of endotoxemia and explain why boosting cholinergic function restores deficits in synaptic plasticity. Drugs which enhance cholinergic or M1 activity in the brain may prove beneficial in treatment of septic delirium in the intensive care unit. PMID:26531194

  8. Intermittent hypoxia induces functional recovery following cervical spinal injury

    PubMed Central

    Vinit, Stéphane; Lovett-Barr, Mary Rachael; Mitchell, Gordon S.

    2009-01-01

    Respiratory-related complications are the leading cause of death in spinal cord injury (SCI) patients. Few effective SCI treatments are available after therapeutic interventions are performed in the period shortly after injury (e.g. spine stabilization and prevention of further spinal damage). In this review we explore the capacity to harness endogenous spinal plasticity induced by intermittent hypoxia to optimize function of surviving (spared) neural pathways associated with breathing. Two primary questions are addressed: 1) does intermittent hypoxia induce plasticity in spinal synaptic pathways to respiratory motor neurons following experimental SCI? and 2) can this plasticity improve respiratory function? In normal rats, intermittent hypoxia induces serotonin-dependent plasticity in spinal pathways to respiratory motor neurons. Early experiments suggest that intermittent hypoxia also enhances respiratory motor output in experimental models of cervical SCI, (cervical hemisection) and that the capacity to induce functional recovery is greater with longer durations post-injury. Available evidence suggests that intermittent hypoxia-induced spinal plasticity has considerable therapeutic potential to treat respiratory insufficiency following chronic cervical spinal injury. PMID:19651247

  9. Involvement of ryanodine receptors in neurotrophin-induced hippocampal synaptic plasticity and spatial memory formation.

    PubMed

    Adasme, Tatiana; Haeger, Paola; Paula-Lima, Andrea C; Espinoza, Italo; Casas-Alarcón, M Mercedes; Carrasco, M Angélica; Hidalgo, Cecilia

    2011-02-15

    Ryanodine receptors (RyR) amplify activity-dependent calcium influx via calcium-induced calcium release. Calcium signals trigger postsynaptic pathways in hippocampal neurons that underlie synaptic plasticity, learning, and memory. Recent evidence supports a role of the RyR2 and RyR3 isoforms in these processes. Along with calcium signals, brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) is a key signaling molecule for hippocampal synaptic plasticity and spatial memory. Upon binding to specific TrkB receptors, BDNF initiates complex signaling pathways that modify synaptic structure and function. Here, we show that BDNF-induced remodeling of hippocampal dendritic spines required functional RyR. Additionally, incubation with BDNF enhanced the expression of RyR2, RyR3, and PKMζ, an atypical protein kinase C isoform with key roles in hippocampal memory consolidation. Consistent with their increased RyR protein content, BDNF-treated neurons generated larger RyR-mediated calcium signals than controls. Selective inhibition of RyR-mediated calcium release with inhibitory ryanodine concentrations prevented the PKMζ, RyR2, and RyR3 protein content enhancement induced by BDNF. Intrahippocampal injection of BDNF or training rats in a spatial memory task enhanced PKMζ, RyR2, RyR3, and BDNF hippocampal protein content, while injection of ryanodine at concentrations that stimulate RyR-mediated calcium release improved spatial memory learning and enhanced memory consolidation. We propose that RyR-generated calcium signals are key features of the complex neuronal plasticity processes induced by BDNF, which include increased expression of RyR2, RyR3, and PKMζ and the spine remodeling required for spatial memory formation. PMID:21282625

  10. Involvement of ryanodine receptors in neurotrophin-induced hippocampal synaptic plasticity and spatial memory formation

    PubMed Central

    Adasme, Tatiana; Haeger, Paola; Paula-Lima, Andrea C.; Espinoza, Italo; Casas-Alarcón, M. Mercedes; Carrasco, M. Angélica; Hidalgo, Cecilia

    2011-01-01

    Ryanodine receptors (RyR) amplify activity-dependent calcium influx via calcium-induced calcium release. Calcium signals trigger postsynaptic pathways in hippocampal neurons that underlie synaptic plasticity, learning, and memory. Recent evidence supports a role of the RyR2 and RyR3 isoforms in these processes. Along with calcium signals, brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) is a key signaling molecule for hippocampal synaptic plasticity and spatial memory. Upon binding to specific TrkB receptors, BDNF initiates complex signaling pathways that modify synaptic structure and function. Here, we show that BDNF-induced remodeling of hippocampal dendritic spines required functional RyR. Additionally, incubation with BDNF enhanced the expression of RyR2, RyR3, and PKMζ, an atypical protein kinase C isoform with key roles in hippocampal memory consolidation. Consistent with their increased RyR protein content, BDNF-treated neurons generated larger RyR-mediated calcium signals than controls. Selective inhibition of RyR-mediated calcium release with inhibitory ryanodine concentrations prevented the PKMζ, RyR2, and RyR3 protein content enhancement induced by BDNF. Intrahippocampal injection of BDNF or training rats in a spatial memory task enhanced PKMζ, RyR2, RyR3, and BDNF hippocampal protein content, while injection of ryanodine at concentrations that stimulate RyR-mediated calcium release improved spatial memory learning and enhanced memory consolidation. We propose that RyR-generated calcium signals are key features of the complex neuronal plasticity processes induced by BDNF, which include increased expression of RyR2, RyR3, and PKMζ and the spine remodeling required for spatial memory formation. PMID:21282625

  11. Spin-orbit torque induced spike-timing dependent plasticity

    SciTech Connect

    Sengupta, Abhronil Al Azim, Zubair; Fong, Xuanyao; Roy, Kaushik

    2015-03-02

    Nanoelectronic devices that mimic the functionality of synapses are a crucial requirement for performing cortical simulations of the brain. In this work, we propose a ferromagnet-heavy metal heterostructure that employs spin-orbit torque to implement spike-timing dependent plasticity. The proposed device offers the advantage of decoupled spike transmission and programming current paths, thereby leading to reliable operation during online learning. Possible arrangement of such devices in a crosspoint architecture can pave the way for ultra-dense neural networks. Simulation studies indicate that the device has the potential of achieving pico-Joule level energy consumption (maximum 2 pJ per synaptic event) which is comparable to the energy consumption for synaptic events in biological synapses.

  12. Spin-orbit torque induced spike-timing dependent plasticity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sengupta, Abhronil; Al Azim, Zubair; Fong, Xuanyao; Roy, Kaushik

    2015-03-01

    Nanoelectronic devices that mimic the functionality of synapses are a crucial requirement for performing cortical simulations of the brain. In this work, we propose a ferromagnet-heavy metal heterostructure that employs spin-orbit torque to implement spike-timing dependent plasticity. The proposed device offers the advantage of decoupled spike transmission and programming current paths, thereby leading to reliable operation during online learning. Possible arrangement of such devices in a crosspoint architecture can pave the way for ultra-dense neural networks. Simulation studies indicate that the device has the potential of achieving pico-Joule level energy consumption (maximum 2 pJ per synaptic event) which is comparable to the energy consumption for synaptic events in biological synapses.

  13. Functional Improvement after Photothrombotic Stroke in Rats Is Associated with Different Patterns of Dendritic Plasticity after G-CSF Treatment and G-CSF Treatment Combined with Concomitant or Sequential Constraint-Induced Movement Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Leukel, Petra; Bauer, Henrike; Schäbitz, Wolf-Rüdiger; Sommer, Clemens J.; Minnerup, Jens

    2016-01-01

    We have previously shown that granulocyte-colony stimulating factor (G-CSF) treatment alone, or in combination with constraint movement therapy (CIMT) either sequentially or concomitantly, results in significantly improved sensorimotor recovery after photothrombotic stroke in rats in comparison to untreated control animals. CIMT alone did not result in any significant differences compared to the control group (Diederich et al., Stroke, 2012;43:185–192). Using a subset of rat brains from this former experiment the present study was designed to evaluate whether dendritic plasticity would parallel improved functional outcomes. Five treatment groups were analyzed (n = 6 each) (i) ischemic control (saline); (ii) CIMT (CIMT between post-stroke days 2 and 11); (iii) G-CSF (10 μg/kg G-CSF daily between post-stroke days 2 and 11); (iv) combined concurrent group (CIMT plus G-CSF) and (v) combined sequential group (CIMT between post-stroke days 2 and 11; 10 μg/kg G-CSF daily between post-stroke days 12 and 21, respectively). After impregnation of rat brains with a modified Golgi-Cox protocol layer V pyramidal neurons in the peri-infarct cortex as well as the corresponding contralateral cortex were analyzed. Surprisingly, animals with a similar degree of behavioral recovery exhibited quite different patterns of dendritic plasticity in both peri-lesional and contralesional areas. The cause for these patterns is not easily to explain but puts the simple assumption that increased dendritic complexity after stroke necessarily results in increased functional outcome into perspective. PMID:26752421

  14. Functional Improvement after Photothrombotic Stroke in Rats Is Associated with Different Patterns of Dendritic Plasticity after G-CSF Treatment and G-CSF Treatment Combined with Concomitant or Sequential Constraint-Induced Movement Therapy.

    PubMed

    Frauenknecht, Katrin; Diederich, Kai; Leukel, Petra; Bauer, Henrike; Schäbitz, Wolf-Rüdiger; Sommer, Clemens J; Minnerup, Jens

    2016-01-01

    We have previously shown that granulocyte-colony stimulating factor (G-CSF) treatment alone, or in combination with constraint movement therapy (CIMT) either sequentially or concomitantly, results in significantly improved sensorimotor recovery after photothrombotic stroke in rats in comparison to untreated control animals. CIMT alone did not result in any significant differences compared to the control group (Diederich et al., Stroke, 2012;43:185-192). Using a subset of rat brains from this former experiment the present study was designed to evaluate whether dendritic plasticity would parallel improved functional outcomes. Five treatment groups were analyzed (n = 6 each) (i) ischemic control (saline); (ii) CIMT (CIMT between post-stroke days 2 and 11); (iii) G-CSF (10 μg/kg G-CSF daily between post-stroke days 2 and 11); (iv) combined concurrent group (CIMT plus G-CSF) and (v) combined sequential group (CIMT between post-stroke days 2 and 11; 10 μg/kg G-CSF daily between post-stroke days 12 and 21, respectively). After impregnation of rat brains with a modified Golgi-Cox protocol layer V pyramidal neurons in the peri-infarct cortex as well as the corresponding contralateral cortex were analyzed. Surprisingly, animals with a similar degree of behavioral recovery exhibited quite different patterns of dendritic plasticity in both peri-lesional and contralesional areas. The cause for these patterns is not easily to explain but puts the simple assumption that increased dendritic complexity after stroke necessarily results in increased functional outcome into perspective. PMID:26752421

  15. Plasticity in functional traits in the context of climate change: a case study of the subalpine forb Boechera stricta (Brassicaceae).

    PubMed

    Anderson, Jill T; Gezon, Zachariah J

    2015-04-01

    Environmental variation often induces shifts in functional traits, yet we know little about whether plasticity will reduce extinction risks under climate change. As climate change proceeds, phenotypic plasticity could enable species with limited dispersal capacity to persist in situ, and migrating populations of other species to establish in new sites at higher elevations or latitudes. Alternatively, climate change could induce maladaptive plasticity, reducing fitness, and potentially stalling adaptation and migration. Here, we quantified plasticity in life history, foliar morphology, and ecophysiology in Boechera stricta (Brassicaceae), a perennial forb native to the Rocky Mountains. In this region, warming winters are reducing snowpack and warming springs are advancing the timing of snow melt. We hypothesized that traits that were historically advantageous in hot and dry, low-elevation locations will be favored at higher elevation sites due to climate change. To test this hypothesis, we quantified trait variation in natural populations across an elevational gradient. We then estimated plasticity and genetic variation in common gardens at two elevations. Finally, we tested whether climatic manipulations induce plasticity, with the prediction that plants exposed to early snow removal would resemble individuals from lower elevation populations. In natural populations, foliar morphology and ecophysiology varied with elevation in the predicted directions. In the common gardens, trait plasticity was generally concordant with phenotypic clines from the natural populations. Experimental snow removal advanced flowering phenology by 7 days, which is similar in magnitude to flowering time shifts over 2-3 decades of climate change. Therefore, snow manipulations in this system can be used to predict eco-evolutionary responses to global change. Snow removal also altered foliar morphology, but in unexpected ways. Extensive plasticity could buffer against immediate fitness

  16. Functional Plasticity in Somatosensory Cortex Supports Motor Learning by Observing.

    PubMed

    McGregor, Heather R; Cashaback, Joshua G A; Gribble, Paul L

    2016-04-01

    An influential idea in neuroscience is that the sensory-motor system is activated when observing the actions of others [1, 2]. This idea has recently been extended to motor learning, in which observation results in sensory-motor plasticity and behavioral changes in both motor and somatosensory domains [3-9]. However, it is unclear how the brain maps visual information onto motor circuits for learning. Here we test the idea that the somatosensory system, and specifically primary somatosensory cortex (S1), plays a role in motor learning by observing. In experiment 1, we applied stimulation to the median nerve to occupy the somatosensory system with unrelated inputs while participants observed a tutor learning to reach in a force field. Stimulation disrupted motor learning by observing in a limb-specific manner. Stimulation delivered to the right arm (the same arm used by the tutor) disrupted learning, whereas left arm stimulation did not. This is consistent with the idea that a somatosensory representation of the observed effector must be available during observation for learning to occur. In experiment 2, we assessed S1 cortical processing before and after observation by measuring somatosensory evoked potentials (SEPs) associated with median nerve stimulation. SEP amplitudes increased only for participants who observed learning. Moreover, SEPs increased more for participants who exhibited greater motor learning following observation. Taken together, these findings support the idea that motor learning by observing relies on functional plasticity in S1. We propose that visual signals about the movements of others are mapped onto motor circuits for learning via the somatosensory system. PMID:26972317

  17. Functional and Structural Brain Plasticity Enhanced by Motor and Cognitive Rehabilitation in Multiple Sclerosis.

    PubMed

    Prosperini, Luca; Piattella, Maria Cristina; Giannì, Costanza; Pantano, Patrizia

    2015-01-01

    Rehabilitation is recognized to be important in ameliorating motor and cognitive functions, reducing disease burden, and improving quality of life in patients with multiple sclerosis (MS). In this systematic review, we summarize the existing evidences that motor and cognitive rehabilitation may enhance functional and structural brain plasticity in patients with MS, as assessed by means of the most advanced neuroimaging techniques, including diffusion tensor imaging and task-related and resting-state functional magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). In most cases, the rehabilitation program was based on computer-assisted/video game exercises performed in either an outpatient or home setting. Despite their heterogeneity, all the included studies describe changes in white matter microarchitecture, in task-related activation, and/or in functional connectivity following both task-oriented and selective training. When explored, relevant correlation between improved function and MRI-detected brain changes was often found, supporting the hypothesis that training-induced brain plasticity is specifically linked to the trained domain. Small sample sizes, lack of randomization and/or an active control group, as well as missed relationship between MRI-detected changes and clinical performance, are the major drawbacks of the selected studies. Knowledge gaps in this field of research are also discussed to provide a framework for future investigations. PMID:26064692

  18. Functional and Structural Brain Plasticity Enhanced by Motor and Cognitive Rehabilitation in Multiple Sclerosis

    PubMed Central

    Prosperini, Luca; Piattella, Maria Cristina

    2015-01-01

    Rehabilitation is recognized to be important in ameliorating motor and cognitive functions, reducing disease burden, and improving quality of life in patients with multiple sclerosis (MS). In this systematic review, we summarize the existing evidences that motor and cognitive rehabilitation may enhance functional and structural brain plasticity in patients with MS, as assessed by means of the most advanced neuroimaging techniques, including diffusion tensor imaging and task-related and resting-state functional magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). In most cases, the rehabilitation program was based on computer-assisted/video game exercises performed in either an outpatient or home setting. Despite their heterogeneity, all the included studies describe changes in white matter microarchitecture, in task-related activation, and/or in functional connectivity following both task-oriented and selective training. When explored, relevant correlation between improved function and MRI-detected brain changes was often found, supporting the hypothesis that training-induced brain plasticity is specifically linked to the trained domain. Small sample sizes, lack of randomization and/or an active control group, as well as missed relationship between MRI-detected changes and clinical performance, are the major drawbacks of the selected studies. Knowledge gaps in this field of research are also discussed to provide a framework for future investigations. PMID:26064692

  19. Striatal Plasticity in L-DOPA- and Graft-Induced Dyskinesia; The Common Link?

    PubMed Central

    Rylander Ottosson, Daniella; Lane, Emma

    2016-01-01

    One of the major symptoms of the neurodegenerative condition Parkinson’s disease (PD) is a slowness or loss of voluntary movement, yet frustratingly therapeutic strategies designed to restore movement can result in the development of excessive abnormal movements known as dyskinesia. These dyskinesias commonly develop as a result of pharmacotherapy in the form of L-DOPA administration, but have also been identified following deep brain stimulation (DBS) and intrastriatal cell transplantation. In the case of L-DOPA these movements can be treatment limiting, and whilst they are not long lasting or troubling following DBS, recognition of their development had a near devastating effect on the field of cell transplantation for PD.Understanding the relationship between these therapeutic approaches and the development of dyskinesia may improve our ability to restore function without disabling side effects. Interestingly, despite the fact that dopaminergic cell transplantation repairs many of the changes induced by the disease process and through L-DOPA treatment, there appears to be a relationship between the two. In rodent models of the disease, the severity of dyskinesia induced by L-DOPA prior to the transplantation procedure correlated with post-transplantation, graft-induced dyskinesia. A review of clinical data also suggested that the worse preoperational dyskinesia causes worsened graft-induced dyskinesia (GID). Understanding how these aberrant behaviors come about has been of keen interest to open up these therapeutic options more widely and one major underlying theory is the effects of these approaches on the plasticity of synapses within the basal ganglia. This review uniquely brings together developments in understanding the role of striatal synaptic plasticity in both L-DOPA and GID to guide and stimulate further investigations on the important striatal plasticity. PMID:26903804

  20. Flood induced phenotypic plasticity in amphibious genus Elatine (Elatinaceae)

    PubMed Central

    Sramkó, Gábor; Horváth, Orsolya; Popiela, Agnieszka; Mesterházy, Attila; Lukács, Balázs András

    2015-01-01

    Vegetative characters are widely used in the taxonomy of the amphibious genus Elatine L. However, these usually show great variation not just between species but between their aquatic and terrestrial forms. In the present study we examine the variation of seed and vegetative characters in nine Elatine species (E. brachysperma, E. californica, E. gussonei, E. hexandra, E. hungarica, E. hydropiper, E. macropoda, E. orthosperma and E. triandra) to reveal the extension of plasticity induced by the amphibious environment, and to test character reliability for species identification. Cultivated plant clones were kept under controlled conditions exposed to either aquatic or terrestrial environmental conditions. Six vegetative characters (length of stem, length of internodium, length of lamina, width of lamina, length of petioles, length of pedicel) and four seed characters (curvature, number of pits / lateral row, 1st and 2nd dimension) were measured on 50 fruiting stems of the aquatic and on 50 stems of the terrestrial form of the same clone. MDA, NPMANOVA Random Forest classification and cluster analysis were used to unravel the morphological differences between aquatic and terrestrial forms. The results of MDA cross-validated and Random Forest classification clearly indicated that only seed traits are stable within species (i.e., different forms of the same species keep similar morphology). Consequently, only seed morphology is valuable for taxonomic purposes since vegetative traits are highly influenced by environmental factors. PMID:26713235

  1. Nitric Oxide Signaling in Hypergravity-Induced Neuronal Plasticity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Holstein, Gay R.

    2003-01-01

    The goal of this research project was to identify the neurons and circuits in the vestibular nuclei and nucleus prepositus hypoglossi that utilize nitric oxide (NO) for intercellular signaling during gravity-induced plasticity. This objective was pursued using histochemical and immunocytochemical approaches to localize NO-producing neurons and characterize the fine morphology of the cells in ground-based studies of normal rats, rats adapted to hypergravity, and rats adapted to hypergravity and then re-adapted to the 1G environment. NO-producing neurons were identified and studied using four methodologies: i) immunocytochemistry employing polyclonal antibodies directed against neuronal nitric oxide synthase (nNOS), to provide an indication of the capacity of a cell for NO production; ii) immunocytochemistry employing a monoclonal antibody directed against L-citrulline, to provide an indirect index of the enzyme's activity; iii) histochemistry based on the NADPH-diaphorase reaction, for fuI1 cytological visualization of neurons; and iv) double immunofluorescence to co-localize nNOS and L-citrulline in individual vestibular nuclei (VN) and neurons.

  2. Training-induced behavioral and brain plasticity in inhibitory control

    PubMed Central

    Spierer, Lucas; Chavan, Camille F.; Manuel, Aurelie L.

    2013-01-01

    Deficits in inhibitory control, the ability to suppress ongoing or planned motor or cognitive processes, contribute to many psychiatric and neurological disorders. The rehabilitation of inhibition-related disorders may therefore benefit from neuroplasticity-based training protocols aiming at normalizing inhibitory control proficiency and the underlying brain networks. Current literature on training-induced behavioral and brain plasticity in inhibitory control suggests that improvements may follow either from the development of automatic forms of inhibition or from the strengthening of top-down, controlled inhibition. Automatic inhibition develops in conditions of consistent and repeated associations between inhibition-triggering stimuli and stopping goals. Once established, the stop signals directly elicit inhibition, thereby bypassing slow, top-down executive control and accelerating stopping processes. In contrast, training regimens involving varying stimulus-response associations or frequent inhibition failures prevent the development of automatic inhibition and thus strengthen top-down inhibitory processes rather than bottom-up ones. We discuss these findings in terms of developing optimal inhibitory control training regimens for rehabilitation purposes. PMID:23914169

  3. Indentation-derived elastic modulus of multilayer thin films: Effect of unloading induced plasticity

    SciTech Connect

    Jamison, Ryan Dale; Shen, Yu -Lin

    2015-08-13

    Nanoindentation is useful for evaluating the mechanical properties, such as elastic modulus, of multilayer thin film materials. A fundamental assumption in the derivation of the elastic modulus from nanoindentation is that the unloading process is purely elastic. In this work, the validity of elastic assumption as it applies to multilayer thin films is studied using the finite element method. The elastic modulus and hardness from the model system are compared to experimental results to show validity of the model. Plastic strain is shown to increase in the multilayer system during the unloading process. Additionally, the indentation-derived modulus of a monolayer material shows no dependence on unloading plasticity while the modulus of the multilayer system is dependent on unloading-induced plasticity. Lastly, the cyclic behavior of the multilayer thin film is studied in relation to the influence of unloading-induced plasticity. Furthermore, it is found that several cycles are required to minimize unloading-induced plasticity.

  4. Smart plastic functionalization by nanoimprint and injection molding

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zalkovskij, Maksim; Thamdrup, Lasse H.; Smistrup, Kristian; Andén, Thomas; Johansson, Alicia C.; Mikkelsen, Niels Jørgen; Madsen, Morten Hannibal; Garnæs, Jørgen; Kristiansen, Tommy Tungelund; Diemer, Mads; Døssing, Michael; Minzari, Daniel; Tang, Peter Torben; Kristensen, Anders; Taboryski, Rafael; Essendrop, Søren; Nielsen, Theodor; Bilenberg, Brian

    2015-03-01

    In this paper, we present a route for making smart functionalized plastic parts by injection molding with sub-micrometer surface structures. The method is based on combining planar processes well known and established within silicon micro and sub-micro fabrication with proven high resolution and high fidelity with truly freeform injection molding inserts. The link between the planar processes and the freeform shaped injection molding inserts is enabled by the use of nanoimprint with flexible molds for the pattern definition combined with unidirectional sputter etching for transferring the pattern. With this approach, we demonstrate the transfer of down to 140 nm wide holes on large areas with good structure fidelity on an injection molding steel insert. The durability of the sub-micrometer structures on the inserts have been investigated by running two production series of 102,000 and 73,000 injection molded parts, respectively, on two different inserts and inspecting the inserts before and after the production series and the molded parts during the production series.

  5. Stability and Plasticity of Auditory Brainstem Function Across the Lifespan

    PubMed Central

    Skoe, Erika; Krizman, Jennifer; Anderson, Samira; Kraus, Nina

    2015-01-01

    The human auditory brainstem is thought to undergo rapid developmental changes early in life until age ∼2 followed by prolonged stability until aging-related changes emerge. However, earlier work on brainstem development was limited by sparse sampling across the lifespan and/or averaging across children and adults. Using a larger dataset than past investigations, we aimed to trace more subtle variations in auditory brainstem function that occur normally from infancy into the eighth decade of life. To do so, we recorded auditory brainstem responses (ABRs) to a click stimulus and a speech syllable (da) in 586 normal-hearing healthy individuals. Although each set of ABR measures (latency, frequency encoding, response consistency, nonstimulus activity) has a distinct developmental profile, across all measures developmental changes were found to continue well past age 2. In addition to an elongated developmental trajectory and evidence for multiple auditory developmental processes, we revealed a period of overshoot during childhood (5–11 years old) for latency and amplitude measures, when the latencies are earlier and the amplitudes are greater than the adult value. Our data also provide insight into the capacity for experience-dependent auditory plasticity at different stages in life and underscore the importance of using age-specific norms in clinical and experimental applications. PMID:24366906

  6. Stability and plasticity of auditory brainstem function across the lifespan.

    PubMed

    Skoe, Erika; Krizman, Jennifer; Anderson, Samira; Kraus, Nina

    2015-06-01

    The human auditory brainstem is thought to undergo rapid developmental changes early in life until age ∼2 followed by prolonged stability until aging-related changes emerge. However, earlier work on brainstem development was limited by sparse sampling across the lifespan and/or averaging across children and adults. Using a larger dataset than past investigations, we aimed to trace more subtle variations in auditory brainstem function that occur normally from infancy into the eighth decade of life. To do so, we recorded auditory brainstem responses (ABRs) to a click stimulus and a speech syllable (da) in 586 normal-hearing healthy individuals. Although each set of ABR measures (latency, frequency encoding, response consistency, nonstimulus activity) has a distinct developmental profile, across all measures developmental changes were found to continue well past age 2. In addition to an elongated developmental trajectory and evidence for multiple auditory developmental processes, we revealed a period of overshoot during childhood (5-11 years old) for latency and amplitude measures, when the latencies are earlier and the amplitudes are greater than the adult value. Our data also provide insight into the capacity for experience-dependent auditory plasticity at different stages in life and underscore the importance of using age-specific norms in clinical and experimental applications. PMID:24366906

  7. Rapid functional plasticity of the somatosensory cortex after finger amputation.

    PubMed

    Weiss, T; Miltner, W H; Huonker, R; Friedel, R; Schmidt, I; Taub, E

    2000-09-01

    Recent research indicates that areas of the primary somatosensory (SI) and primary motor cortex show massive cortical reorganization after amputation of the upper arm, forearm or fingers. Most of these studies were carried out months or several years after amputation. In the present study, we describe cortical reorganization of areas in the SI of a patient who underwent amputation of the traumatized middle and ring fingers of his right hand 10 days before cortical magnetic source imaging data were obtained. Somatosensory-evoked magnetic fields (SEF) to mechanical stimuli to the finger tips were recorded and single moving dipoles were calculated using a realistic volume conductor model. Results reveal that the dipoles representing the second and fifth fingers of the affected hand were closer together than the comparable dipoles of the unaffected hand. Our findings demonstrate that neural cell assemblies in SI which formerly represented the right middle and ring fingers of this amputee became reorganized and invaded by neighbouring cell assemblies of the index and little finger of the same hand. These results indicate that functional plasticity occurs within a period of 10 days after amputation. PMID:11037286

  8. Synaptic competition in structural plasticity and cognitive function

    PubMed Central

    Ramiro-Cortés, Yazmín; Hobbiss, Anna F.; Israely, Inbal

    2014-01-01

    Connections between neurons can undergo long-lasting changes in synaptic strength correlating with changes in structure. These events require the synthesis of new proteins, the availability of which can lead to cooperative and competitive interactions between synapses for the expression of plasticity. These processes can occur over limited spatial distances and temporal periods, defining dendritic regions over which activity may be integrated and could lead to the physical rewiring of synapses into functional groups. Such clustering of inputs may increase the computational power of neurons by allowing information to be combined in a greater than additive manner. The availability of new proteins may be a key modulatory step towards activity-dependent, long-term growth or elimination of spines necessary for remodelling of connections. Thus, the aberrant growth or shrinkage of dendritic spines could occur if protein levels are misregulated. Indeed, such perturbations can be seen in several mental retardation disorders, wherein either too much or too little protein translation exists, matching an observed increase or decrease in spine density, respectively. Cellular events which alter protein availability could relieve a constraint on synaptic competition and disturb synaptic clustering mechanisms. These changes may be detrimental to modifications in neural circuitry following activity. PMID:24298158

  9. Epigenetic Readers of Lysine Acetylation Regulate Cocaine-Induced Plasticity

    PubMed Central

    Sartor, Gregory C.; Powell, Samuel K.; Brothers, Shaun P.

    2015-01-01

    Epigenetic processes that regulate histone acetylation play an essential role in behavioral and molecular responses to cocaine. To date, however, only a small fraction of the mechanisms involved in the addiction-associated acetylome have been investigated. Members of the bromodomain and extraterminal (BET) family of epigenetic “reader” proteins (BRD2, BRD3, BRD4, and BRDT) bind acetylated histones and serve as a scaffold for the recruitment of macromolecular complexes to modify chromatin accessibility and transcriptional activity. The role of BET proteins in cocaine-induced plasticity, however, remains elusive. Here, we used behavioral, pharmacological, and molecular techniques to examine the involvement of BET bromodomains in cocaine reward. Of the BET proteins, BRD4, but not BRD2 or BRD3, was significantly elevated in the nucleus accumbens (NAc) of mice and rats following repeated cocaine injections and self-administration. Systemic and intra-accumbal inhibition of BRD4 with the BET inhibitor, JQ1, attenuated the rewarding effects of cocaine in a conditioned place preference procedure but did not affect conditioned place aversion, nor did JQ1 alone induce conditioned aversion or preference. Investigating the underlying mechanisms, we found that repeated cocaine injections enhanced the binding of BRD4, but not BRD3, to the promoter region of Bdnf in the NAc, whereas systemic injection of JQ1 attenuated cocaine-induced expression of Bdnf in the NAc. JQ1 and siRNA-mediated knockdown of BRD4 in vitro also reduced expression of Bdnf. These findings indicate that disrupting the interaction between BET proteins and their acetylated lysine substrates may provide a new therapeutic avenue for the treatment of drug addiction. SIGNIFICANCE STATEMENT Proteins involved in the “readout” of lysine acetylation marks, referred to as BET bromodomain proteins (including BRD2, BRD3, BRD4, and BRDT), have been shown to be key regulators of chromatin dynamics and disease, and

  10. Insult-induced adaptive plasticity of the auditory system

    PubMed Central

    Gold, Joshua R.; Bajo, Victoria M.

    2014-01-01

    The brain displays a remarkable capacity for both widespread and region-specific modifications in response to environmental challenges, with adaptive processes bringing about the reweighing of connections in neural networks putatively required for optimizing performance and behavior. As an avenue for investigation, studies centered around changes in the mammalian auditory system, extending from the brainstem to the cortex, have revealed a plethora of mechanisms that operate in the context of sensory disruption after insult, be it lesion-, noise trauma, drug-, or age-related. Of particular interest in recent work are those aspects of auditory processing which, after sensory disruption, change at multiple—if not all—levels of the auditory hierarchy. These include changes in excitatory, inhibitory and neuromodulatory networks, consistent with theories of homeostatic plasticity; functional alterations in gene expression and in protein levels; as well as broader network processing effects with cognitive and behavioral implications. Nevertheless, there abounds substantial debate regarding which of these processes may only be sequelae of the original insult, and which may, in fact, be maladaptively compelling further degradation of the organism's competence to cope with its disrupted sensory context. In this review, we aim to examine how the mammalian auditory system responds in the wake of particular insults, and to disambiguate how the changes that develop might underlie a correlated class of phantom disorders, including tinnitus and hyperacusis, which putatively are brought about through maladaptive neuroplastic disruptions to auditory networks governing the spatial and temporal processing of acoustic sensory information. PMID:24904256

  11. Brain plasticity and functionality explored by nonlinear optical microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sacconi, L.; Allegra, L.; Buffelli, M.; Cesare, P.; D'Angelo, E.; Gandolfi, D.; Grasselli, G.; Lotti, J.; Mapelli, J.; Strata, P.; Pavone, F. S.

    2010-02-01

    In combination with fluorescent protein (XFP) expression techniques, two-photon microscopy has become an indispensable tool to image cortical plasticity in living mice. In parallel to its application in imaging, multi-photon absorption has also been used as a tool for the dissection of single neurites with submicrometric precision without causing any visible collateral damage to the surrounding neuronal structures. In this work, multi-photon nanosurgery is applied to dissect single climbing fibers expressing GFP in the cerebellar cortex. The morphological consequences are then characterized with time lapse 3-dimensional two-photon imaging over a period of minutes to days after the procedure. Preliminary investigations show that the laser induced fiber dissection recalls a regenerative process in the fiber itself over a period of days. These results show the possibility of this innovative technique to investigate regenerative processes in adult brain. In parallel with imaging and manipulation technique, non-linear microscopy offers the opportunity to optically record electrical activity in intact neuronal networks. In this work, we combined the advantages of second-harmonic generation (SHG) with a random access (RA) excitation scheme to realize a new microscope (RASH) capable of optically recording fast membrane potential events occurring in a wide-field of view. The RASH microscope, in combination with bulk loading of tissue with FM4-64 dye, was used to simultaneously record electrical activity from clusters of Purkinje cells in acute cerebellar slices. Complex spikes, both synchronous and asynchronous, were optically recorded simultaneously across a given population of neurons. Spontaneous electrical activity was also monitored simultaneously in pairs of neurons, where action potentials were recorded without averaging across trials. These results show the strength of this technique in describing the temporal dynamics of neuronal assemblies, opening promising

  12. Cyclin Y inhibits plasticity-induced AMPA receptor exocytosis and LTP

    PubMed Central

    Cho, Eunsil; Kim, Dong-Hyun; Hur, Young-Na; Whitcomb, Daniel J.; Regan, Philip; Hong, Jung-Hwa; Kim, Hanna; Ho Suh, Young; Cho, Kwangwook; Park, Mikyoung

    2015-01-01

    Cyclin Y (CCNY) is a member of the cyclin protein family, known to regulate cell division in proliferating cells. Interestingly, CCNY is expressed in neurons that do not undergo cell division. Here, we report that CCNY negatively regulates long-term potentiation (LTP) of synaptic strength through inhibition of AMPA receptor trafficking. CCNY is enriched in postsynaptic fractions from rat forebrain and is localized adjacent to postsynaptic sites in dendritic spines in rat hippocampal neurons. Using live-cell imaging of a pH-sensitive AMPA receptor, we found that during LTP-inducing stimulation, CCNY inhibits AMPA receptor exocytosis in dendritic spines. Furthermore, CCNY abolishes LTP in hippocampal slices. Taken together, our findings demonstrate that CCNY inhibits plasticity-induced AMPA receptor delivery to synapses and thereby blocks LTP, identifying a novel function for CCNY in post-mitotic cells. PMID:26220330

  13. Perspectives of TRPV1 Function on the Neurogenesis and Neural Plasticity

    PubMed Central

    Ramírez-Barrantes, R.; Cordova, C.; Poblete, H.; Muñoz, P.; Marchant, I.; Wianny, F.; Olivero, P.

    2016-01-01

    The development of new strategies to renew and repair neuronal networks using neural plasticity induced by stem cell graft could enable new therapies to cure diseases that were considered lethal until now. In adequate microenvironment a neuronal progenitor must receive molecular signal of a specific cellular context to determine fate, differentiation, and location. TRPV1, a nonselective calcium channel, is expressed in neurogenic regions of the brain like the subgranular zone of the hippocampal dentate gyrus and the telencephalic subventricular zone, being valuable for neural differentiation and neural plasticity. Current data show that TRPV1 is involved in several neuronal functions as cytoskeleton dynamics, cell migration, survival, and regeneration of injured neurons, incorporating several stimuli in neurogenesis and network integration. The function of TRPV1 in the brain is under intensive investigation, due to multiple places where it has been detected and its sensitivity for different chemical and physical agonists, and a new role of TRPV1 in brain function is now emerging as a molecular tool for survival and control of neural stem cells. PMID:26881090

  14. Yield Functions and Plastic Potentials for BCC Metals and Possibly Other Materials

    SciTech Connect

    Christensen, R M

    2005-09-29

    Yield functions and plastic potentials are expressed in terms of the invariants of the stress tensor for polycrystalline metals and other isotropic materials. The plastic volume change data of Richmond is used to evaluate the embedded materials properties for some bcc metals and one polymer. A general form for the plastic potential is found that is intended to represent and cover a wide range of materials types.

  15. Immunosenescence and macrophage functional plasticity: dysregulation of macrophage function by age-associated microenvironmental changes

    PubMed Central

    Stout, Robert D.; Suttles, Jill

    2005-01-01

    Summary The macrophage lineage displays extreme functional and phenotypic heterogeneity which appears to due in large part to the ability of macrophages to functionally adapt to changes in their tissue microenvironment. This functional plasticity plays a critical role in their ability to respond to tissue damage and/or infection and to contribute to clearance of damaged tissue and invading microorganisms, to contribute to recruitment of the adaptive immune system, and to contribute to resolution of the wound and of the immune response. Evidence has accumulated that environmental influences, such as stromal function and imbalances in hormones and cytokines, contribute significantly to the dysfunction of the adaptive immune system. The innate immune sytem also appears to be dysfunctional in aged animals and humans. Herein, the hypothesis is presented and discussed that the observed age-associated “dysfunction” of macrophages is the result of their functional adaptation to the age-associated changes in tissue environments. The resultant loss of orchestration of the manifold functional capabilities of macrophages would undermine the efficacy of both the innate and adaptive immune systems. If the macrophages maintain functional plasticity during this dysregulation, they would be a prime target of cytokine therapy that could enhance both innate and adaptive immune systems. PMID:15882345

  16. MeCP2 phosphorylation limits psychostimulant-induced behavioral and neuronal plasticity.

    PubMed

    Deng, Jie V; Wan, Yehong; Wang, Xiaoting; Cohen, Sonia; Wetsel, William C; Greenberg, Michael E; Kenny, Paul J; Calakos, Nicole; West, Anne E

    2014-03-26

    The methyl-DNA binding protein MeCP2 is emerging as an important regulator of drug reinforcement processes. Psychostimulants induce phosphorylation of MeCP2 at Ser421; however, the functional significance of this posttranslational modification for addictive-like behaviors was unknown. Here we show that MeCP2 Ser421Ala knock-in mice display both a reduced threshold for the induction of locomotor sensitization by investigator-administered amphetamine and enhanced behavioral sensitivity to the reinforcing properties of self-administered cocaine. These behavioral differences were accompanied in the knock-in mice by changes in medium spiny neuron intrinsic excitability and nucleus accumbens gene expression typically observed in association with repeated exposure to these drugs. These data show that phosphorylation of MeCP2 at Ser421 functions to limit the circuit plasticities in the nucleus accumbens that underlie addictive-like behaviors. PMID:24671997

  17. MeCP2 Phosphorylation Limits Psychostimulant-Induced Behavioral and Neuronal Plasticity

    PubMed Central

    Deng, Jie V.; Wan, Yehong; Wang, Xiaoting; Cohen, Sonia; Wetsel, William C.; Greenberg, Michael E.; Kenny, Paul J.; Calakos, Nicole

    2014-01-01

    The methyl-DNA binding protein MeCP2 is emerging as an important regulator of drug reinforcement processes. Psychostimulants induce phosphorylation of MeCP2 at Ser421; however, the functional significance of this posttranslational modification for addictive-like behaviors was unknown. Here we show that MeCP2 Ser421Ala knock-in mice display both a reduced threshold for the induction of locomotor sensitization by investigator-administered amphetamine and enhanced behavioral sensitivity to the reinforcing properties of self-administered cocaine. These behavioral differences were accompanied in the knock-in mice by changes in medium spiny neuron intrinsic excitability and nucleus accumbens gene expression typically observed in association with repeated exposure to these drugs. These data show that phosphorylation of MeCP2 at Ser421 functions to limit the circuit plasticities in the nucleus accumbens that underlie addictive-like behaviors. PMID:24671997

  18. Indices of adrenal deficiency involved in brain plasticity and functional control reorganization in hemodialysis patients with polysulfone membrane: BOLD-fMRI study.

    PubMed

    Belaïch, Rachida; Boujraf, Saïd; Benzagmout, Mohammed; Maaroufi, Mustapha; Housni, Abdelkhalek; Batta, Fatima; Tizniti, Siham; Magoul, Rabia; Sqalli, Tarik

    2016-06-01

    This work purpose was to estimate the implication of suspected adrenal function deficiencies, which was influenced by oxidative stress (OS) that are generating brain plasticity, and reorganization of the functional control. This phenomenon was revealed in two-hemodialysis patients described in this paper. Blood oxygenation level dependent functional magnetic resonance imaging (BOLD-fMRI) revealed a significant activation of the motor cortex. Hemodialysis seems to originate an inflammatory state of the cerebral tissue reflected by increased OS, while expected to decrease since hemodialysis eliminates free radicals responsible for OS. Considering adrenal function deficiencies, sensitivity to OS and assessed hyponatremia and hypercalcemia, adrenal function deficiencies is strongly suspected in both patients. This probably contributes to amplify brain plasticity and a reorganization of functional control after hemodialysis that is compared to earlier reported studies. Brain plasticity and functional control reorganization was revealed by BOLD-fMRI with a remarkable sensitivity. Brain plastic changes are originated by elevated OS associating indices of adrenal function deficiencies. These results raise important issues about adrenal functional deficiencies impact on brain plasticity in chronic hemodialysis-patients. This motivates more global studies of plasticity induced factors in this category of patients including adrenal functional deficiencies and OS. PMID:27301905

  19. Inhibition of Tnf-α R1 signaling can rescue functional cortical plasticity impaired in early post-stroke period.

    PubMed

    Liguz-Lecznar, Monika; Zakrzewska, Renata; Kossut, Malgorzata

    2015-10-01

    Tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α) is one of the key players in stroke progression and can interfere with brain functioning. We previously documented an impairment of experience-dependent plasticity in the cortex neighboring the stroke-induced lesion, which was accompanied with an upregulation of Tnf-α level in the brain of ischemic mice 1 week after the stroke. Because TNF receptor 1 (TnfR1) signaling is believed to be a major mediator of the cytotoxicity of Tnf-α through activation of caspases, we used an anti-inflammatory intervention aimed at Tnf-α R1 pathway, in order to try to attenuate the detrimental effect of post-stroke inflammation, and investigated if this will be effective in protecting plasticity in the infarct proximity. Aged mice (12-14 months) were subjected to the photothrombotic stroke localized near somatosensory cortex, and immediately after ischemia sensory deprivation was introduced to induce plasticity. Soluble TNF-α R1 (sTNF-α R1), which competed for TNF-α with receptors localized in the brain, was delivered chronically directly into the brain tissue for the whole period of deprivation using ALZET Micro-Osmotic pumps. We have shown that such approach undertaken simultaneously with the stroke reduced the level of TNF-α in the peri-ischemic tissue and was successful in preserving the post-stroke deprivation-induced brain plasticity. PMID:26189092

  20. Exercise induces cortical plasticity after neonatal spinal cord injury in the rat.

    PubMed

    Kao, Tina; Shumsky, Jed S; Murray, Marion; Moxon, Karen A

    2009-06-10

    Exercise-induced cortical plasticity is associated with improved functional outcome after brain or nerve injury. Exercise also improves functional outcomes after spinal cord injury, but its effects on cortical plasticity are not known. The goal of this investigation was to study the effect of moderate exercise (treadmill locomotion, 3 min/d, 5 d/week) on the somatotopic organization of forelimb and hindlimb somatosensory cortex (SI) after neonatal thoracic transection. We used adult rats spinalized as neonates because some of these animals develop weight-supported stepping, and, therefore, the relationship between cortical plasticity and stepping could also be examined. Acute, single-neuron mapping was used to determine the percentage of cortical cells responding to cutaneous forelimb stimulation in normal, spinalized, and exercised spinalized rats. Multiple single-neuron recording from arrays of chronically implanted microwires examined the magnitude of response of these cells in normal and exercised spinalized rats. Our results show that exercise not only increased the percentage of responding cells in the hindlimb SI but also increased the magnitude of the response of these cells. This increase in response magnitude was correlated with behavioral outcome measures. In the forelimb SI, neonatal transection reduced the percentage of responding cells to forelimb stimulation, but exercise reversed this loss. This restoration in the percentage of responding cells after exercise was accompanied by an increase in their response magnitude. Therefore, the increase in responsiveness of hindlimb SI to forelimb stimulation after neonatal transection and exercise may be due, in part, to the effect of exercise on the forelimb SI. PMID:19515923

  1. Inflammation-Induced Plasticity in Melanoma Therapy and Metastasis.

    PubMed

    Hölzel, Michael; Tüting, Thomas

    2016-06-01

    Phenotype switching contributes to nongenomic heterogeneity in melanoma and other cancers. These dynamic and in part reversible phenotype changes impose diagnostic and therapeutic challenges. Understanding the reciprocal coevolution of melanoma and immune cell phenotypes during disease progression and in response to therapy is a prerequisite to improve current treatment strategies. Here we discuss how proinflammatory signals promote melanoma cell plasticity and govern interactions of melanoma and immune cells in the tumor microenvironment. We examine phenotypic plasticity and heterogeneity in different melanoma mouse models with respect to their utility for translational research and emphasize the interplay between melanoma cells and neutrophils as a critical driver of metastasis. PMID:27151281

  2. Role of plastic deformation in shock-induced phase transitions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ghimire, Punam; Germann, T. C.; Ravelo, R.

    2015-06-01

    Non-equilibrium molecular dynamics (NEMD) simulations of shock-wave propagation in fcc single crystals exhibit high elastic limits and large anisotropies in the yield strength. They can be used to explore the role of plastic deformation in the morphology and kinetics of solid-solid phase transformations. We report on large-scale atomistic simulations of defect-mediated phase transformations under shock and quasi-isentropic compression (QIC). An analytical embedded atom method (EAM) description is used to model a fcc-bcc phase transition (PT) boundary fitted to occur below or above the elastic-plastic threshold in order to model systems undergoing a PT with and without plasticity. For cases where plastic deformation precedes the phase transformation, the defect-mediated PT proceeds at faster rates than the defect-free ones. The bcc fraction growth rate can be correlated with a sharp decrease in the dislocation densities originally present in the parent phase. This work was supported by the Air Force Office of Scientific Research under AFOSR Award FA9550-12-1-0476. Work at Los Alamos was performed under the auspices of the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) under Contract No. DE-AC52-06NA25396.

  3. Measuring and Inducing Brain Plasticity in Chronic Aphasia

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fridriksson, Julius

    2011-01-01

    Brain plasticity associated with anomia recovery in aphasia is poorly understood. Here, I review four recent studies from my lab that focused on brain modulation associated with long-term anomia outcome, its behavioral treatment, and the use of transcranial brain stimulation to enhance anomia treatment success in individuals with chronic aphasia…

  4. Fretting induced plasticity in blade/disk contacts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gao, Guofeng

    Finite element analyses of fretting contacts were developed for different pad geometries and material combinations. A better understanding of the surface tractions and life predictions for crack nucleation and propagation is achieved by including the effects of plasticity and the representative crack in the finite element modeling. Pure elastic finite element results were validated with the existing elastic solution suite based on Singular Integral Equations (SIEs). The elastic-perfectly-plastic analysis of a rigid cylindrical pad on an isotropic half-space was compared with the results in the literature. Different shapes of rigid indenters were examined and the results were compared with those from the SIEs. Fretting contacts with similar and dissimilar isotropic materials were studied. The effects of plasticity on fretting life were highlighted by comparing the results from pure elastic analyses and elastic-plastic analyses. Finite element modelings involving SCN materials with different rotations of material principle axes were also investigated. The crack nucleation life was calculated with the Modified Manson-McKnight model. This model, modified by stressed area approach, usually generates significantly conservative estimates when pure elastic stress results are used. When plasticity is taken into account, the life prediction accuracy for crack nucleation was proven to be improved tremendously. A representative crack was incorporated into the FEM model at the trailing edge of contact to study its effects on surface tractions and crack propagation life. The originally smooth pressure distribution has a singularity at the edge of contact and the contact size expands due to the crack growth. The crack propagation life was evaluated by using the modified crack closure method and the Paris law.

  5. Phenotypic plasticity alone cannot explain climate-induced change in avian migration timing.

    PubMed

    Buskirk, Josh; Mulvihill, Robert S; Leberman, Robert C

    2012-10-01

    Recent climate change has been linked to shifts in the timing of life-cycle events in many organisms, but there is debate over the degree to which phenological changes are caused by evolved genetic responses of populations or by phenotypic plasticity of individuals. We estimated plasticity of spring arrival date in 27 species of bird that breed in the vicinity of an observatory in eastern North America. For 2441 individuals detected in multiple years, arrival occurred earlier during warm years, especially in species that migrate short distances. Phenotypic plasticity averaged -0.93 days °C(-1) ± 0.70 (95% CI). However, plasticity accounted for only 13-25% of the climate-induced trend in phenology observed over 46 years. Although our approach probably underestimates the full scope of plasticity, the data suggest that part of the response to environmental change has been caused by microevolution. The estimated evolutionary rates are plausible (0.016 haldanes). PMID:23145329

  6. Experimental febrile seizures induce age-dependent structural plasticity and improve memory in mice.

    PubMed

    Tao, K; Ichikawa, J; Matsuki, N; Ikegaya, Y; Koyama, R

    2016-03-24

    Population-based studies have demonstrated that children with a history of febrile seizure (FS) perform better than age-matched controls at hippocampus-dependent memory tasks. Here, we report that FSs induce two distinct structural reorganizations in the hippocampus and bidirectionally modify future learning abilities in an age-dependent manner. Compared with age-matched controls, adult mice that had experienced experimental FSs induced by hyperthermia (HT) on postnatal day 14 (P14-HT) performed better in a cognitive task that requires dentate granule cells (DGCs). The enhanced memory performance correlated with an FS-induced persistent increase in the density of large mossy fiber terminals (LMTs) of the DGCs. The memory enhancement was not observed in mice that had experienced HT-induced seizures at P11 which exhibited abnormally located DGCs in addition to the increased LMT density. The ectopic DGCs of the P11-HT mice were abolished by the diuretic bumetanide, and this pharmacological treatment unveiled the masked memory enhancement. Thus, this work provides a novel basis for age-dependent structural plasticity in which FSs influence future brain function. PMID:26794590

  7. Extracellular proteolysis in structural and functional plasticity of mossy fiber synapses in hippocampus

    PubMed Central

    Wiera, Grzegorz; Mozrzymas, Jerzy W.

    2015-01-01

    Brain is continuously altered in response to experience and environmental changes. One of the underlying mechanisms is synaptic plasticity, which is manifested by modification of synapse structure and function. It is becoming clear that regulated extracellular proteolysis plays a pivotal role in the structural and functional remodeling of synapses during brain development, learning and memory formation. Clearly, plasticity mechanisms may substantially differ between projections. Mossy fiber synapses onto CA3 pyramidal cells display several unique functional features, including pronounced short-term facilitation, a presynaptically expressed long-term potentiation (LTP) that is independent of NMDAR activation, and NMDA-dependent metaplasticity. Moreover, structural plasticity at mossy fiber synapses ranges from the reorganization of projection topology after hippocampus-dependent learning, through intrinsically different dynamic properties of synaptic boutons to pre- and postsynaptic structural changes accompanying LTP induction. Although concomitant functional and structural plasticity in this pathway strongly suggests a role of extracellular proteolysis, its impact only starts to be investigated in this projection. In the present report, we review the role of extracellular proteolysis in various aspects of synaptic plasticity in hippocampal mossy fiber synapses. A growing body of evidence demonstrates that among perisynaptic proteases, tissue plasminogen activator (tPA)/plasmin system, β-site amyloid precursor protein-cleaving enzyme 1 (BACE1) and metalloproteinases play a crucial role in shaping plastic changes in this projection. We discuss recent advances and emerging hypotheses on the roles of proteases in mechanisms underlying mossy fiber target specific synaptic plasticity and memory formation. PMID:26582976

  8. The Neuroplastin adhesion molecules: key regulators of neuronal plasticity and synaptic function.

    PubMed

    Beesley, Philip W; Herrera-Molina, Rodrigo; Smalla, Karl-Heinz; Seidenbecher, Constanze

    2014-11-01

    The Neuroplastins Np65 and Np55 are neuronal and synapse-enriched immunoglobulin superfamily molecules that play important roles in a number of key neuronal and synaptic functions including, for Np65, cell adhesion. In this review we focus on the physiological roles of the Neuroplastins in promoting neurite outgrowth, regulating the structure and function of both inhibitory and excitatory synapses in brain, and in neuronal and synaptic plasticity. We discuss the underlying molecular and cellular mechanisms by which the Neuroplastins exert their physiological effects and how these are dependent upon the structural features of Np65 and Np55, which enable them to bind to a diverse range of protein partners. In turn this enables the Neuroplastins to interact with a number of key neuronal signalling cascades. These include: binding to and activation of the fibroblast growth factor receptor; Np65 trans-homophilic binding leading to activation of p38 MAPK and internalization of glutamate (GluR1) receptor subunits; acting as accessory proteins for monocarboxylate transporters, thus affecting neuronal energy supply, and binding to GABAA α1, 2 and 5 subunits, thus regulating the composition and localization of GABAA receptors. An emerging theme is the role of the Neuroplastins in regulating the trafficking and subcellular localization of specific binding partners. We also discuss the involvement of Neuroplastins in a number of pathophysiological conditions, including ischaemia, schizophrenia and breast cancer and the role of a single nucleotide polymorphism in the human Neuroplastin (NPTN) gene locus in impairment of cortical development and cognitive functions. Neuroplastins are neuronal cell adhesion molecules, which induce neurite outgrowth and play important roles in synaptic maturation and plasticity. This review summarizes the functional implications of Neuroplastins for correct synaptic membrane protein localization, neuronal energy supply, expression of LTP and LTD

  9. Multi-functionality and plasticity characterize epithelial cells in Hydra

    PubMed Central

    Buzgariu, W; Al Haddad, S; Tomczyk, S; Wenger, Y; Galliot, B

    2015-01-01

    Epithelial sheets, a synapomorphy of all metazoans but porifers, are present as 2 layers in cnidarians, ectoderm and endoderm, joined at their basal side by an extra-cellular matrix named mesoglea. In the Hydra polyp, epithelial cells of the body column are unipotent stem cells that continuously self-renew and concomitantly express their epitheliomuscular features. These multifunctional contractile cells maintain homeostasis by providing a protective physical barrier, by digesting nutrients, by selecting a stable microbiota, and by rapidly closing wounds. In addition, epithelial cells are highly plastic, supporting the adaptation of Hydra to physiological and environmental changes, such as long starvation periods where survival relies on a highly dynamic autophagy flux. Epithelial cells also play key roles in developmental processes as evidenced by the organizer activity they develop to promote budding and regeneration. We propose here an integrative view of the homeostatic and developmental aspects of epithelial plasticity in Hydra. PMID:26716072

  10. Multi-functionality and plasticity characterize epithelial cells in Hydra.

    PubMed

    Buzgariu, W; Al Haddad, S; Tomczyk, S; Wenger, Y; Galliot, B

    2015-01-01

    Epithelial sheets, a synapomorphy of all metazoans but porifers, are present as 2 layers in cnidarians, ectoderm and endoderm, joined at their basal side by an extra-cellular matrix named mesoglea. In the Hydra polyp, epithelial cells of the body column are unipotent stem cells that continuously self-renew and concomitantly express their epitheliomuscular features. These multifunctional contractile cells maintain homeostasis by providing a protective physical barrier, by digesting nutrients, by selecting a stable microbiota, and by rapidly closing wounds. In addition, epithelial cells are highly plastic, supporting the adaptation of Hydra to physiological and environmental changes, such as long starvation periods where survival relies on a highly dynamic autophagy flux. Epithelial cells also play key roles in developmental processes as evidenced by the organizer activity they develop to promote budding and regeneration. We propose here an integrative view of the homeostatic and developmental aspects of epithelial plasticity in Hydra. PMID:26716072

  11. Epigenetics of drought-induced trans-generational plasticity: consequences for range limit development.

    PubMed

    Alsdurf, Jacob; Anderson, Cynthia; Siemens, David H

    2015-01-01

    Genetic variation gives plants the potential to adapt to stressful environments that often exist beyond their geographic range limits. However, various genetic, physiological or developmental constraints might prevent the process of adaptation. Alternatively, environmentally induced epigenetic changes might sustain populations for several generations in stressful areas across range boundaries, but previous work on Boechera stricta, an upland mustard closely related to Arabidopsis, documented a drought-induced trans-generational plastic trade-off that could contribute to range limit development. Offspring of parents who were drought treated had higher drought tolerance, but lower levels of glucosinolate toxins. Both drought tolerance and defence are thought to be needed to expand the range to lower elevations. Here, we used methylation-sensitive amplified fragment length polymorphisms to determine whether environmentally induced DNA methylation and thus epigenetics could be a mechanism involved in the observed trans-generational plastic trade-off. We compared 110 offspring from the same self-fertilizing lineages whose parents were exposed to experimental drought stress treatments in the laboratory. Using three primer combinations, 643 polymorphic epi-loci were detected. Discriminant function analysis (DFA) on the amount of methylation detected resulted in significant combinations of epi-loci that distinguished the parent drought treatments in the offspring. Principal component (PC) and univariate association analyses also detected the significant differences, even after controlling for lineage, planting flat, developmental differences and multiple testing. Univariate tests also indicated significant associations between the amount of methylation and drought tolerance or glucosinolate toxin concentration. One epi-locus that was implicated in DFA, PC and univariate association analysis may be directly involved in the trade-off because increased methylation at this

  12. Epigenetics of drought-induced trans-generational plasticity: consequences for range limit development

    PubMed Central

    Alsdurf, Jacob; Anderson, Cynthia; Siemens, David H.

    2016-01-01

    Genetic variation gives plants the potential to adapt to stressful environments that often exist beyond their geographic range limits. However, various genetic, physiological or developmental constraints might prevent the process of adaptation. Alternatively, environmentally induced epigenetic changes might sustain populations for several generations in stressful areas across range boundaries, but previous work on Boechera stricta, an upland mustard closely related to Arabidopsis, documented a drought-induced trans-generational plastic trade-off that could contribute to range limit development. Offspring of parents who were drought treated had higher drought tolerance, but lower levels of glucosinolate toxins. Both drought tolerance and defence are thought to be needed to expand the range to lower elevations. Here, we used methylation-sensitive amplified fragment length polymorphisms to determine whether environmentally induced DNA methylation and thus epigenetics could be a mechanism involved in the observed trans-generational plastic trade-off. We compared 110 offspring from the same self-fertilizing lineages whose parents were exposed to experimental drought stress treatments in the laboratory. Using three primer combinations, 643 polymorphic epi-loci were detected. Discriminant function analysis (DFA) on the amount of methylation detected resulted in significant combinations of epi-loci that distinguished the parent drought treatments in the offspring. Principal component (PC) and univariate association analyses also detected the significant differences, even after controlling for lineage, planting flat, developmental differences and multiple testing. Univariate tests also indicated significant associations between the amount of methylation and drought tolerance or glucosinolate toxin concentration. One epi-locus that was implicated in DFA, PC and univariate association analysis may be directly involved in the trade-off because increased methylation at this

  13. Fasting induces a form of autonomic synaptic plasticity that prevents hypoglycemia.

    PubMed

    Wang, Manqi; Wang, Qian; Whim, Matthew D

    2016-05-24

    During fasting, activation of the counter-regulatory response (CRR) prevents hypoglycemia. A major effector arm is the autonomic nervous system that controls epinephrine release from adrenal chromaffin cells and, consequently, hepatic glucose production. However, whether modulation of autonomic function determines the relative strength of the CRR, and thus the ability to withstand food deprivation and maintain euglycemia, is not known. Here we show that fasting leads to altered transmission at the preganglionic → chromaffin cell synapse. The dominant effect is a presynaptic, long-lasting increase in synaptic strength. Using genetic and pharmacological approaches we show this plasticity requires neuropeptide Y, an adrenal cotransmitter and the activation of adrenal Y5 receptors. Loss of neuropeptide Y prevents a fasting-induced increase in epinephrine release and results in hypoglycemia in vivo. These findings connect plasticity within the sympathetic nervous system to a physiological output and indicate the strength of the final synapse in this descending pathway plays a decisive role in maintaining euglycemia. PMID:27092009

  14. Plastic flow in FCC metals induced by single-ion impacts.

    SciTech Connect

    Birtcher, R. C.; Donnelly, S. E.

    1997-10-30

    Irradiation of Au and Pb foils with Xe ions at temperatures between 30 and 450 K has been monitored using in-situ transmission electron microscopy. Single ion impacts give rise to surface craters on the irradiated surface with sizes as large as 12 nm. Approximately 2--5% of impinging ions produce craters on Au while only about 0.6% produce craters on Pb. Larger craters on Au frequently have expelled material associated with them. Temporal details of crater formation and annihilation has been recorded on video with a time-resolution of 33 milliseconds. Craters annihilate in discrete steps due to subsequent ion impacts or anneal in a continuous manner due to surface diffusion. Craters production (those persisting for one or more video-frames) as a function of temperature indicates that the surface diffusion process responsible for thermal annealing of craters has an activation energy of 0.76 eV in Au. Crater creation results from plastic flow associated with near surface cascades. Crater annihilation in discrete steps results from plastic flow induced by subsequent ion impacts, including those that do not themselves produce a crater.

  15. Plastic flow in fcc metals induced by single-ion impacts

    SciTech Connect

    Birtcher, R.C.; Donnelly, S.E.

    1997-09-01

    Irradiation of Au and Pb foils with Xe ions at temperatures between 30 and 450 K has been monitored using in-situ transmission electron microscopy. Single ion impacts give rise to surface craters on the irradiated surface with sizes as large as 12 nm. Approximately 2--5% of impinging ions produce craters on Au while only about 0.6% produce craters on Pb. Larger craters on Au frequently have expelled material associated with them. Temporal details of crater formation and annihilation has been recorded on video with a time resolution of 33 milliseconds. Craters annihilate in discrete steps due to subsequent ion impacts or anneal in a continuous manner due to surface diffusion. Craters production (those persisting for one or more video frames) as a function of temperature indicates that the surface diffusion process responsible for thermal annealing of craters has an activation energy of 0.76 eV in Au. Crater creation results from plastic flow associated with near surface cascades. Crater annihilation in discrete steps results from plastic flow induced by subsequent ion impacts, including those that do not themselves produce a crater.

  16. Microglia-Induced Maladaptive Plasticity Can Be Modulated by Neuropeptides In Vivo

    PubMed Central

    Morara, Stefano; Colangelo, Anna Maria; Provini, Luciano

    2015-01-01

    Microglia-induced maladaptive plasticity is being recognized as a major cause of deleterious self-sustaining pathological processes that occur in neurodegenerative and neuroinflammatory diseases. Microglia, the primary homeostatic guardian of the central nervous system, exert critical functions both during development, in neural circuit reshaping, and during adult life, in the brain physiological and pathological surveillance. This delicate critical role can be disrupted by neural, but also peripheral, noxious stimuli that can prime microglia to become overreactive to a second noxious stimulus or worsen underlying pathological processes. Among regulators of microglia, neuropeptides can play a major role. Their receptors are widely expressed in microglial cells and neuropeptide challenge can potently influence microglial activity in vitro. More relevantly, this regulator activity has been assessed also in vivo, in experimental models of brain diseases. Neuropeptide action in the central nervous system has been associated with beneficial effects in neurodegenerative and neuroinflammatory pathological experimental models. This review describes some of the mechanisms of the microglia maladaptive plasticity in vivo and how neuropeptide activity can represent a useful therapeutical target in a variety of human brain pathologies. PMID:26273481

  17. Temperature and kairomone induced life history plasticity in coexisting Daphnia

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Bernot, R.J.; Dodds, W.K.; Quist, M.C.; Guy, C.S.

    2006-01-01

    We investigated the life history alterations of coexisting Daphnia species responding to environmental temperature and predator cues. In a laboratory experiment, we measured Daphnia life history plasticity under different predation risk and temperature treatments that simulate changing environmental conditions. Daphnia pulicaria abundance and size at first reproduction (SFR) declined, while ephippia (resting egg) formation increased at high temperatures. Daphnia mendotae abundance and clutch size increased with predation risk at high temperatures, but produced few ephippia. Thus, each species exhibited phenotypic plasticity, but responded in sharply different ways to the same environmental cues. In Glen Elder reservoir, Kansas USA, D. pulicaria dominance shifted to D. mendotae dominance as temperature and predation risk increased from March to June in both 1999 and 2000. Field estimates of life history shifts mirrored the laboratory experiment results, suggesting that similar phenotypic responses to seasonal cues contribute to seasonal Daphnia population trends. These results illustrate species-specific differences in life history plasticity among coexisting zooplankton taxa. ?? Springer-Verlag 2006.

  18. Shrink-Induced Superhydrophobic and Antibacterial Surfaces in Consumer Plastics

    PubMed Central

    Freschauf, Lauren R.; McLane, Jolie; Sharma, Himanshu; Khine, Michelle

    2012-01-01

    Structurally modified superhydrophobic surfaces have become particularly desirable as stable antibacterial surfaces. Because their self-cleaning and water resistant properties prohibit bacteria growth, structurally modified superhydrophobic surfaces obviate bacterial resistance common with chemical agents, and therefore a robust and stable means to prevent bacteria growth is possible. In this study, we present a rapid fabrication method for creating such superhydrophobic surfaces in consumer hard plastic materials with resulting antibacterial effects. To replace complex fabrication materials and techniques, the initial mold is made with commodity shrink-wrap film and is compatible with large plastic roll-to-roll manufacturing and scale-up techniques. This method involves a purely structural modification free of chemical additives leading to its inherent consistency over time and successive recasting from the same molds. Finally, antibacterial properties are demonstrated in polystyrene (PS), polycarbonate (PC), and polyethylene (PE) by demonstrating the prevention of gram-negative Escherichia coli (E. coli) bacteria growth on our structured plastic surfaces. PMID:22916100

  19. Dissociating barrel development and lesion-induced plasticity in the mouse somatosensory cortex.

    PubMed

    Rebsam, Alexandra; Seif, Isabelle; Gaspar, Patricia

    2005-01-19

    In the mouse somatosensory cortex, thalamocortical axons (TCAs) corresponding to individual whiskers cluster into restricted barrel domains during the first days of life. If whiskers are lesioned before that time, the cortical space devoted to the afferents from the damaged whisker shrinks and becomes occupied by thalamocortical afferents from neighboring unlesioned whiskers. This plasticity ends by postnatal day 3 (P3) to P4 when barrels emerge. To test whether TCA development and lesion-induced plasticity are linked, we used monoamine oxidase A knock-out (MAOA-KO) mice in which normal TCA development is halted by an excess of serotonin. Normal TCA development can be restored when serotonin levels are lowered by parachlorophenylalanine (PCPA). By varying the time of PCPA administration, we found that barrel development can be reinitiated until P11, although the emergence of TCA clusters becomes gradually slower and less complete. In mice in which barrels emerge 3 d later than the normal schedule, at P6 instead of P3, we examined lesion-induced plasticity. We find a progressive decline of the lesion-induced plasticity and a closure at P3, similar to normal mice, showing that this plasticity is not influenced by an excess of serotonin levels. Thus, in MAOA-KO mice, the emergence of barrel patterning can be delayed without a concomitant delay in lesion-induced plasticity, and the cortical space devoted to one whisker representation cannot be modified by the periphery once patterning is imprinted in the subcortical relays. We conclude that the closure of the lesion-induced plasticity period in the barrelfield is probably not determined at the cortical level. PMID:15659608

  20. Plasticity of functional traits varies clinally along a rainfall gradient in Eucalyptus tricarpa.

    PubMed

    McLean, Elizabeth H; Prober, Suzanne M; Stock, William D; Steane, Dorothy A; Potts, Brad M; Vaillancourt, René E; Byrne, Margaret

    2014-06-01

    Widespread species often occur across a range of climatic conditions, through a combination of local genetic adaptations and phenotypic plasticity. Species with greater phenotypic plasticity are likely to be better positioned to cope with rapid anthropogenic climate changes, while those displaying strong local adaptations might benefit from translocations to assist the movement of adaptive genes as the climate changes. Eucalyptus tricarpa occurs across a climatic gradient in south-eastern Australia, a region of increasing aridity, and we hypothesized that this species would display local adaptation to climate. We measured morphological and physiological traits reflecting climate responses in nine provenances from sites of 460 to 1040 mm annual rainfall, in their natural habitat and in common gardens near each end of the gradient. Local adaptation was evident in functional traits and differential growth rates in the common gardens. Some traits displayed complex combinations of plasticity and genetic divergence among provenances, including clinal variation in plasticity itself. Provenances from drier locations were more plastic in leaf thickness, whereas leaf size was more plastic in provenances from higher rainfall locations. Leaf density and stomatal physiology (as indicated by δ(13)C and δ(18)O) were highly and uniformly plastic. In addition to variation in mean trait values, genetic variation in trait plasticity may play a role in climate adaptation. PMID:24329726

  1. High-fat diet induces hepatic insulin resistance and impairment of synaptic plasticity.

    PubMed

    Liu, Zhigang; Patil, Ishan Y; Jiang, Tianyi; Sancheti, Harsh; Walsh, John P; Stiles, Bangyan L; Yin, Fei; Cadenas, Enrique

    2015-01-01

    High-fat diet (HFD)-induced obesity is associated with insulin resistance, which may affect brain synaptic plasticity through impairment of insulin-sensitive processes underlying neuronal survival, learning, and memory. The experimental model consisted of 3 month-old C57BL/6J mice fed either a normal chow diet (control group) or a HFD (60% of calorie from fat; HFD group) for 12 weeks. This model was characterized as a function of time in terms of body weight, fasting blood glucose and insulin levels, HOMA-IR values, and plasma triglycerides. IRS-1/Akt pathway was assessed in primary hepatocytes and brain homogenates. The effect of HFD in brain was assessed by electrophysiology, input/output responses and long-term potentiation. HFD-fed mice exhibited a significant increase in body weight, higher fasting glucose- and insulin levels in plasma, lower glucose tolerance, and higher HOMA-IR values. In liver, HFD elicited (a) a significant decrease of insulin receptor substrate (IRS-1) phosphorylation on Tyr608 and increase of Ser307 phosphorylation, indicative of IRS-1 inactivation; (b) these changes were accompanied by inflammatory responses in terms of increases in the expression of NFκB and iNOS and activation of the MAP kinases p38 and JNK; (c) primary hepatocytes from mice fed a HFD showed decreased cellular oxygen consumption rates (indicative of mitochondrial functional impairment); this can be ascribed partly to a decreased expression of PGC1α and mitochondrial biogenesis. In brain, HFD feeding elicited (a) an inactivation of the IRS-1 and, consequentially, (b) a decreased expression and plasma membrane localization of the insulin-sensitive neuronal glucose transporters GLUT3/GLUT4; (c) a suppression of the ERK/CREB pathway, and (d) a substantial decrease in long-term potentiation in the CA1 region of hippocampus (indicative of impaired synaptic plasticity). It may be surmised that 12 weeks fed with HFD induce a systemic insulin resistance that impacts

  2. Natural Selection Canalizes Expression Variation of Environmentally Induced Plasticity-Enabling Genes

    PubMed Central

    Shaw, Joseph R.; Hampton, Thomas H.; King, Benjamin L.; Whitehead, Andrew; Galvez, Fernando; Gross, Robert H.; Keith, Nathan; Notch, Emily; Jung, Dawoon; Glaholt, Stephen P.; Chen, Celia Y.; Colbourne, John K.; Stanton, Bruce A.

    2014-01-01

    Many organisms survive fluctuating and extreme environmental conditions by manifesting multiple distinct phenotypes during adulthood by means of developmental processes that enable phenotypic plasticity. We report on the discovery of putative plasticity-enabling genes that are involved in transforming the gill of the euryhaline teleost fish, Fundulus heteroclitus, from its freshwater to its seawater gill-type, a process that alters both morphology and function. Gene expression that normally enables osmotic plasticity is inhibited by arsenic. Gene sets defined by antagonistic interactions between arsenic and salinity show reduced transcriptional variation among individual fish, suggesting unusually accurate and precise regulatory control of these genes, consistent with the hypothesis that they participate in a canalized developmental response. We observe that natural selection acts to preserve canalized gene expression in populations of killifish that are most tolerant to abrupt salinity change and that these populations show the least variability in their transcription of genes enabling plasticity of the gill. We found that genes participating in this highly canalized and conserved plasticity-enabling response had significantly fewer and less complex associations with transcriptional regulators than genes that respond only to arsenic or salinity. Collectively these findings, which are drawn from the relationships between environmental challenge, plasticity, and canalization among populations, suggest that the selective processes that facilitate phenotypic plasticity do so by targeting the regulatory networks that gives rise to the response. These findings also provide a generalized, conceptual framework of how genes might interact with the environment and evolve toward the development of plastic traits. PMID:25158801

  3. Natural selection canalizes expression variation of environmentally induced plasticity-enabling genes.

    PubMed

    Shaw, Joseph R; Hampton, Thomas H; King, Benjamin L; Whitehead, Andrew; Galvez, Fernando; Gross, Robert H; Keith, Nathan; Notch, Emily; Jung, Dawoon; Glaholt, Stephen P; Chen, Celia Y; Colbourne, John K; Stanton, Bruce A

    2014-11-01

    Many organisms survive fluctuating and extreme environmental conditions by manifesting multiple distinct phenotypes during adulthood by means of developmental processes that enable phenotypic plasticity. We report on the discovery of putative plasticity-enabling genes that are involved in transforming the gill of the euryhaline teleost fish, Fundulus heteroclitus, from its freshwater to its seawater gill-type, a process that alters both morphology and function. Gene expression that normally enables osmotic plasticity is inhibited by arsenic. Gene sets defined by antagonistic interactions between arsenic and salinity show reduced transcriptional variation among individual fish, suggesting unusually accurate and precise regulatory control of these genes, consistent with the hypothesis that they participate in a canalized developmental response. We observe that natural selection acts to preserve canalized gene expression in populations of killifish that are most tolerant to abrupt salinity change and that these populations show the least variability in their transcription of genes enabling plasticity of the gill. We found that genes participating in this highly canalized and conserved plasticity-enabling response had significantly fewer and less complex associations with transcriptional regulators than genes that respond only to arsenic or salinity. Collectively these findings, which are drawn from the relationships between environmental challenge, plasticity, and canalization among populations, suggest that the selective processes that facilitate phenotypic plasticity do so by targeting the regulatory networks that gives rise to the response. These findings also provide a generalized, conceptual framework of how genes might interact with the environment and evolve toward the development of plastic traits. PMID:25158801

  4. The Geometry of Plasticity-Induced Sensitization in Isoinhibitory Rate Motifs.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Gautam; Ching, ShiNung

    2016-09-01

    A well-known phenomenon in sensory perception is desensitization, wherein behavioral responses to persistent stimuli become attenuated over time. In this letter, our focus is on studying mechanisms through which desensitization may be mediated at the network level and, specifically, how sensitivity changes arise as a function of long-term plasticity. Our principal object of study is a generic isoinhibitory motif: a small excitatory-inhibitory network with recurrent inhibition. Such a motif is of interest due to its overrepresentation in laminar sensory network architectures. Here, we introduce a sensitivity analysis derived from control theory in which we characterize the fixed-energy reachable set of the motif. This set describes the regions of the phase-space that are more easily (in terms of stimulus energy) accessed, thus providing a holistic assessment of sensitivity. We specifically focus on how the geometry of this set changes due to repetitive application of a persistent stimulus. We find that for certain motif dynamics, this geometry contracts along the stimulus orientation while expanding in orthogonal directions. In other words, the motif not only desensitizes to the persistent input, but heightens its responsiveness (sensitizes) to those that are orthogonal. We develop a perturbation analysis that links this sensitization to both plasticity-induced changes in synaptic weights and the intrinsic dynamics of the network, highlighting that the effect is not purely due to weight-dependent disinhibition. Instead, this effect depends on the relative neuronal time constants and the consequent stimulus-induced drift that arises in the motif phase-space. For tightly distributed (but random) parameter ranges, sensitization is quite generic and manifests in larger recurrent E-I networks within which the motif is embedded. PMID:27391684

  5. Vitamin C reverses lead-induced deficits in hippocampal synaptic plasticity in rats.

    PubMed

    Karamian, Ruhollah; Komaki, Alireza; Salehi, Iraj; Tahmasebi, Lida; Komaki, Hamidreza; Shahidi, Siamak; Sarihi, Abdolrahman

    2015-07-01

    Lead (Pb) is a neurotoxic metal that is widely distributed in the environment. In experimental animals, chronic exposure to this neurotoxicant resulted in impaired synaptic plasticity and cognitive function. In this study, we examined the protective effects of vitamin C (ascorbic acid) against Pb exposure-induced impairment of long-term potentiation (LTP). Forty-four adult male Wistar rats were divided into six groups and subjected to the following treatments for three months: (1) vehicle (distilled water); (2) Pb; (3) ascorbic acid; (4) Pb+ascorbic acid; (5) Pb (two months) followed by ascorbic acid; and (6) ascorbic acid (one month) followed by Pb. After treatment, the population spike (PS) amplitude and slope of excitatory postsynaptic potentials (EPSP) were measured in the dentate gyrus(DG) of rats in vivo. Following these measurements, blood samples were collected for the following biochemical assays: malondialdehyde (MDA), total antioxidant capacity (TAC), and total oxidant status (TOS). There was a significant increase in plasma MDA and TOS in the Pb-intoxicated group compared to the control group. There was a significant increase in TAC levels in the ascorbic acid group. Our results also show that Pb exposure caused a decrease in the EPSP slope and PS amplitude when compared with the control group, whereas vitamin C increased these parameters. Co-administration of Pb with vitamin C inhibited the effects of Pb. These findings suggested that Pb exposure caused impairment in LTP, that may have been mediated through oxidative damage. Vitamin C ameliorated the Pb-induced impairment of synaptic plasticity in the DG via antioxidant activity. PMID:26004788

  6. The disorganized visual cortex in reelin-deficient mice is functional and allows for enhanced plasticity.

    PubMed

    Pielecka-Fortuna, Justyna; Wagener, Robin Jan; Martens, Ann-Kristin; Goetze, Bianka; Schmidt, Karl-Friedrich; Staiger, Jochen F; Löwel, Siegrid

    2015-11-01

    A hallmark of neocortical circuits is the segregation of processing streams into six distinct layers. The importance of this layered organization for cortical processing and plasticity is little understood. We investigated the structure, function and plasticity of primary visual cortex (V1) of adult mice deficient for the glycoprotein reelin and their wild-type littermates. In V1 of rl-/- mice, cells with different laminar fates are present at all cortical depths. Surprisingly, the (vertically) disorganized cortex maintains a precise retinotopic (horizontal) organization. Rl-/- mice have normal basic visual capabilities, but are compromised in more challenging perceptual tasks, such as orientation discrimination. Additionally, rl-/- animals learn and memorize a visual task as well as their wild-type littermates. Interestingly, reelin deficiency enhances visual cortical plasticity: juvenile-like ocular dominance plasticity is preserved into late adulthood. The present data offer an important insight into the capabilities of a disorganized cortical system to maintain basic functional properties. PMID:25119525

  7. When Music and Long-Term Memory Interact: Effects of Musical Expertise on Functional and Structural Plasticity in the Hippocampus

    PubMed Central

    Groussard, Mathilde; La Joie, Renaud; Rauchs, Géraldine; Landeau, Brigitte; Chételat, Gaël; Viader, Fausto; Desgranges, Béatrice; Eustache, Francis; Platel, Hervé

    2010-01-01

    The development of musical skills by musicians results in specific structural and functional modifications in the brain. Surprisingly, no functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) study has investigated the impact of musical training on brain function during long-term memory retrieval, a faculty particularly important in music. Thus, using fMRI, we examined for the first time this process during a musical familiarity task (i.e., semantic memory for music). Musical expertise induced supplementary activations in the hippocampus, medial frontal gyrus, and superior temporal areas on both sides, suggesting a constant interaction between episodic and semantic memory during this task in musicians. In addition, a voxel-based morphometry (VBM) investigation was performed within these areas and revealed that gray matter density of the hippocampus was higher in musicians than in nonmusicians. Our data indicate that musical expertise critically modifies long-term memory processes and induces structural and functional plasticity in the hippocampus. PMID:20957158

  8. Intermittent hypercapnia induces long-lasting ventilatory plasticity to enhance CO2 responsiveness to overcome dysfunction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mosher, Bryan Patrick

    The ability of the brain to detect (central CO2 chemosensitivity) and respond to (central CO2 chemoresponsiveness) changes in tissue CO2/pH, is a homeostatic process essential for mammalian life. Dysfunction of the serotonin (5-HT) mechanisms compromises ventilatory CO 2 chemosensitivity/responsiveness and may enhance vulnerability to pathologies such as the Sudden Infant Death Syndrome (SIDS). The laboratory of Dr. Michael Harris has shown medullary raphe contributions to central chemosensitivity involving both 5-HT- and gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA)-mediated mechanisms. I tested the hypothesis that postnatal exposure to mild intermittent hypercapnia (IHc) induces respiratory plasticity, due in part to strengthening of bicuculline- and saclofen-sensitive mechanisms (GABAA and GABAB receptor antagonists respectively). Rats were exposed to IHc-pretreatment (8 cycles of 5 % CO2) for 5 days beginning at postnatal day 12 (P12). I subsequently assessed CO2 responsiveness using an in situ perfused brainstem preparation. Hypercapnic responses were determined with and without pharmacological manipulation. In addition, IHc-pretreatment effectiveness was tested for its ability to overcome dysfunction in the CO2 responsiveness induced by a dietary tryptophan restriction. This dysfunctional CO2 responsiveness has been suggested to arise from a chronic, partial 5-HT reduction imparted by the dietary restriction. Results show IHc-pretreatment induced plasticity sufficient for CO2 responsiveness despite removal of otherwise critical ketanserin-sensitive mechanisms. CO2 responsiveness following IHc-pretreatment was absent if ketanserin was combined with bicuculline and saclofen, indicating that the plasticity was dependent upon bicuculline- and saclofen-sensitive mechanisms. IHc--induced plasticity was also capable of overcoming the ventilatory defects associated with maternal dietary restriction. Duration of IHc-induced plasticity was also investigated and found to last far into

  9. Modelling irradiation-induced softening in BCC iron by crystal plasticity approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xiao, Xiazi; Terentyev, Dmitry; Yu, Long; Song, Dingkun; Bakaev, A.; Duan, Huiling

    2015-11-01

    Crystal plasticity model (CPM) for BCC iron to account for radiation-induced strain softening is proposed. CPM is based on the plastically-driven and thermally-activated removal of dislocation loops. Atomistic simulations are applied to parameterize dislocation-defect interactions. Combining experimental microstructures, defect-hardening/absorption rules from atomistic simulations, and CPM fitted to properties of non-irradiated iron, the model achieves a good agreement with experimental data regarding radiation-induced strain softening and flow stress increase under neutron irradiation.

  10. Playing and listening to tailor-made notched music: cortical plasticity induced by unimodal and multimodal training in tinnitus patients.

    PubMed

    Pape, Janna; Paraskevopoulos, Evangelos; Bruchmann, Maximilian; Wollbrink, Andreas; Rudack, Claudia; Pantev, Christo

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND. The generation and maintenance of tinnitus are assumed to be based on maladaptive functional cortical reorganization. Listening to modified music, which contains no energy in the range of the individual tinnitus frequency, can inhibit the corresponding neuronal activity in the auditory cortex. Music making has been shown to be a powerful stimulator for brain plasticity, inducing changes in multiple sensory systems. Using magnetoencephalographic (MEG) and behavioral measurements we evaluated the cortical plasticity effects of two months of (a) active listening to (unisensory) versus (b) learning to play (multisensory) tailor-made notched music in nonmusician tinnitus patients. Taking into account the fact that uni- and multisensory trainings induce different patterns of cortical plasticity we hypothesized that these two protocols will have different affects. RESULTS. Only the active listening (unisensory) group showed significant reduction of tinnitus related activity of the middle temporal cortex and an increase in the activity of a tinnitus-coping related posterior parietal area. CONCLUSIONS. These findings indicate that active listening to tailor-made notched music induces greater neuroplastic changes in the maladaptively reorganized cortical network of tinnitus patients while additional integration of other sensory modalities during training reduces these neuroplastic effects. PMID:24895541

  11. Playing and Listening to Tailor-Made Notched Music: Cortical Plasticity Induced by Unimodal and Multimodal Training in Tinnitus Patients

    PubMed Central

    Rudack, Claudia

    2014-01-01

    Background. The generation and maintenance of tinnitus are assumed to be based on maladaptive functional cortical reorganization. Listening to modified music, which contains no energy in the range of the individual tinnitus frequency, can inhibit the corresponding neuronal activity in the auditory cortex. Music making has been shown to be a powerful stimulator for brain plasticity, inducing changes in multiple sensory systems. Using magnetoencephalographic (MEG) and behavioral measurements we evaluated the cortical plasticity effects of two months of (a) active listening to (unisensory) versus (b) learning to play (multisensory) tailor-made notched music in nonmusician tinnitus patients. Taking into account the fact that uni- and multisensory trainings induce different patterns of cortical plasticity we hypothesized that these two protocols will have different affects. Results. Only the active listening (unisensory) group showed significant reduction of tinnitus related activity of the middle temporal cortex and an increase in the activity of a tinnitus-coping related posterior parietal area. Conclusions. These findings indicate that active listening to tailor-made notched music induces greater neuroplastic changes in the maladaptively reorganized cortical network of tinnitus patients while additional integration of other sensory modalities during training reduces these neuroplastic effects. PMID:24895541

  12. IL-12 drives functional plasticity of human group 2 innate lymphoid cells.

    PubMed

    Lim, Ai Ing; Menegatti, Silvia; Bustamante, Jacinta; Le Bourhis, Lionel; Allez, Matthieu; Rogge, Lars; Casanova, Jean-Laurent; Yssel, Hans; Di Santo, James P

    2016-04-01

    Group 2 innate lymphoid cells (ILC2) include IL-5- and IL-13-producing CRTh2(+)CD127(+)cells that are implicated in early protective immunity at mucosal surfaces. Whereas functional plasticity has been demonstrated for both human and mouse ILC3 subsets that can reversibly give rise to IFN-γ-producing ILC1, plasticity of human or mouse ILC2 has not been shown. Here, we analyze the phenotypic and functional heterogeneity of human peripheral blood ILC2. Although subsets of human CRTh2(+)ILC2 differentially express CD117 (c-kit receptor), some ILC2 surface phenotypes are unstable and can be modulated in vitro. Surprisingly, human IL-13(+)ILC2 can acquire the capacity to produce IFN-γ, thereby generating plastic ILC2. ILC2 cultures demonstrated that IFN-γ(+)ILC2 clones could be derived and were stably associated with increased T-BET expression. The inductive mechanism for ILC2 plasticity was mapped to the IL-12-IL-12R signaling pathway and was confirmed through analysis of patients with Mendelian susceptibility to mycobacterial disease due to IL-12Rβ1 deficiencies that failed to generate plastic ILC2. We also detected IL-13(+)IFN-γ(+)ILC2 ex vivo in intestinal samples from Crohn's disease patients. These results demonstrate cytokine production plasticity for human ILC2 and further suggest that environmental cues can dictate ILC phenotype and function for these tissue-resident innate effector cells. PMID:26976630

  13. In situ identification of elastic-plastic strain distribution in a microalloyed transformation induced plasticity steel using digital image correlation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eskandari, M.; Zarei-Hanzaki, A.; Yadegari, M.; Soltani, N.; Asghari, A.

    2014-03-01

    A non-contact strain measurement technique, based on an in-situ digital image correlation (DIC) method in association with magnetic martensite point measurement (Feritoscopy testing) was applied to study inhomogeneous deformation corresponding to martensitic transformation of a microalloyed low carbon transformation induced plasticity steel during tensile straining. The progress of inhomogeneous deformation is traced by the strain maps. The microstructural observation is used to validate the DIC results. The experimental steel shows continuous yielding with a high true fracture strength of 1410±10 MPa at 25 °C along with the lack of tensile necking. The DIC results show that the yield point is controlled by stress-assisted martensite transformation, which in turn induces the strain inhomogeneity. The latter starts prior to the yield point after straining to 0.016. The microstructural evolution reveals the ɛ-martensite is obtained through stress-assisted martensite formation. After yielding, thanks to the strain-induced martensite transformation, the deformation inhomogeneity in strain maps is increased with strain, corresponding to increasing the volume fraction of martensite. The results suggest that the continuous yielding and initial strain hardening is controlled by stress-assisted martensite formation while the higher total elongation to fracture (80%) and the tensile necking behavior is mainly influenced by the strain-induced martensite transformation.

  14. Indentation-derived elastic modulus of multilayer thin films: Effect of unloading induced plasticity

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Jamison, Ryan Dale; Shen, Yu -Lin

    2015-08-13

    Nanoindentation is useful for evaluating the mechanical properties, such as elastic modulus, of multilayer thin film materials. A fundamental assumption in the derivation of the elastic modulus from nanoindentation is that the unloading process is purely elastic. In this work, the validity of elastic assumption as it applies to multilayer thin films is studied using the finite element method. The elastic modulus and hardness from the model system are compared to experimental results to show validity of the model. Plastic strain is shown to increase in the multilayer system during the unloading process. Additionally, the indentation-derived modulus of a monolayermore » material shows no dependence on unloading plasticity while the modulus of the multilayer system is dependent on unloading-induced plasticity. Lastly, the cyclic behavior of the multilayer thin film is studied in relation to the influence of unloading-induced plasticity. Furthermore, it is found that several cycles are required to minimize unloading-induced plasticity.« less

  15. Functional and Phenotypic Plasticity of CD4+ T Cell Subsets

    PubMed Central

    Caza, Tiffany; Landas, Steve

    2015-01-01

    The remarkable plasticity of CD4+ T cells allows individuals to respond to environmental stimuli in a context-dependent manner. A balance of CD4+ T cell subsets is critical to mount responses against pathogen challenges to prevent inappropriate activation, to maintain tolerance, and to participate in antitumor immune responses. Specification of subsets is a process beginning in intrathymic development and continuing within the circulation. It is highly flexible to adapt to differences in nutrient availability and the tissue microenvironment. CD4+ T cell subsets have significant cross talk, with the ability to “dedifferentiate” given appropriate environmental signals. This ability is dependent on the metabolic status of the cell, with mTOR acting as the rheostat. Autoimmune and antitumor immune responses are regulated by the balance between regulatory T cells and Th17 cells. When a homeostatic balance of subsets is not maintained, immunopathology can result. CD4+ T cells carry complex roles within tumor microenvironments, with context-dependent immune responses influenced by oncogenic drivers and the presence of inflammation. Here, we examine the signals involved in CD4+ T cell specification towards each subset, interconnectedness of cytokine networks, impact of mTOR signaling, and cellular metabolism in lineage specification and provide a supplement describing techniques to study these processes. PMID:26583116

  16. Levodopa-induced plasticity: a double-edged sword in Parkinson's disease?

    PubMed Central

    Calabresi, Paolo; Ghiglieri, Veronica; Mazzocchetti, Petra; Corbelli, Ilenia; Picconi, Barbara

    2015-01-01

    The long-term replacement therapy with the dopamine (DA) precursor 3,4-dihydroxy-l-phenylalanine (L-DOPA) is a milestone in the treatment of Parkinson's disease (PD). Although this drug precursor can be metabolized into the active neurotransmitter DA throughout the brain, its therapeutic benefit is due to restoring extracellular DA levels within the dorsal striatum, which lacks endogenous DA as a consequence of the neurodegenerative process induced by the disease. In the early phases of PD, L-DOPA treatment is able to restore both long-term depression (LTD) and long-term potentiation (LTP), two major forms of corticostriatal synaptic plasticity that are altered by dopaminergic denervation. However, unlike physiological DA transmission, this therapeutic approach in the advanced phase of the disease leads to abnormal peaks of DA, non-synaptically released, which are supposed to trigger behavioural sensitization, namely L-DOPA-induced dyskinesia. This condition is characterized by a loss of synaptic depotentiation, an inability to reverse previously induced LTP. In the advanced stages of PD, L-DOPA can also induce non-motor fluctuations with cognitive dysfunction and neuropsychiatric symptoms such as compulsive behaviours and impulse control disorders. Although the mechanisms underlying the role of L-DOPA in both motor and behavioural symptoms are still incompletely understood, recent data from electrophysiological and imaging studies have increased our understanding of the function of the brain areas involved and of the mechanisms implicated in both therapeutic and adverse actions of L-DOPA in PD patients. PMID:26009763

  17. Interhemispheric Plasticity Protects the Deafferented Somatosensory Cortex from Functional Takeover After Nerve Injury

    PubMed Central

    Koretsky, Alan P.

    2014-01-01

    Abstract Functional changes across brain hemispheres have been reported after unilateral cortical or peripheral nerve injury. Interhemispheric callosal connections usually underlie this cortico-cortical plasticity. However, the effect of the altered callosal inputs on local cortical plasticity in the adult brain is not well studied. Ipsilateral functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) activation has been reliably detected in the deafferented barrel cortex (BC) at 2 weeks after unilateral infraorbital denervation (IO) in adult rats. The ipsilateral fMRI signal relies on callosal-mediated interhemispheric plasticity. This form of interhemispheric plasticity provides a good chronic model to study the interaction between callosal inputs and local cortical plasticity. The receptive field of forepaw in the primary somatosensory cortex (S1), which is adjacent to the BC, was mapped with fMRI. The S1 receptive field expanded to take over a portion of the BC in 2 weeks after both ascending inputs and callosal inputs were removed in IO rats with ablated contralateral BC (IO+ablation). This expansion, estimated specifically by fMRI mapping, is significantly larger than what has been observed in the IO rats with intact callosal connectivity, as well as in the rats with sham surgery. This work indicates that altered callosal inputs prevent the functional takeover of the deafferented BC from adjacent cortices and may help preserve the functional identity of the BC. PMID:25117691

  18. Apparent plasticity in functional traits determining competitive ability and spatial distribution: a case from desert

    PubMed Central

    Xie, Jiang-Bo; Xu, Gui-Qing; Jenerette, G. Darrel; Bai, Yong-fei; Wang, Zhong-Yuan; Li, Yan

    2015-01-01

    Species competitive abilities and their distributions are closely related to functional traits such as biomass allocation patterns. When we consider how nutrient supply affects competitive abilities, quantifying the apparent and true plasticity in functional traits is important because the allometric relationships among traits are universal in plants. We propose to integrate the notion of allometry and the classical reaction norm into a composite theoretical framework that quantifies the apparent and true plasticity. Combining the framework with a meta-analysis, a series of field surveys and a competition experiment, we aimed to determine the causes of the dune/interdune distribution patterns of two Haloxylon species in the Gurbantonggut Desert. We found that (1) the biomass allocation patterns of both Haloxylon species in responses to environmental conditions were apparent rather than true plasticity and (2) the allometric allocation patterns affected the plants’ competition for soil nutrient supply. A key implication of our results is that the apparent plasticity in functional traits of plants determines their response to environmental change. Without identifying the apparent and true plasticity, we would substantially overestimate the magnitude, duration and even the direction of plant responses in functional traits to climate change. PMID:26190745

  19. Learning-induced neural plasticity of speech processing before birth

    PubMed Central

    Partanen, Eino; Kujala, Teija; Näätänen, Risto; Liitola, Auli; Sambeth, Anke; Huotilainen, Minna

    2013-01-01

    Learning, the foundation of adaptive and intelligent behavior, is based on plastic changes in neural assemblies, reflected by the modulation of electric brain responses. In infancy, auditory learning implicates the formation and strengthening of neural long-term memory traces, improving discrimination skills, in particular those forming the prerequisites for speech perception and understanding. Although previous behavioral observations show that newborns react differentially to unfamiliar sounds vs. familiar sound material that they were exposed to as fetuses, the neural basis of fetal learning has not thus far been investigated. Here we demonstrate direct neural correlates of human fetal learning of speech-like auditory stimuli. We presented variants of words to fetuses; unlike infants with no exposure to these stimuli, the exposed fetuses showed enhanced brain activity (mismatch responses) in response to pitch changes for the trained variants after birth. Furthermore, a significant correlation existed between the amount of prenatal exposure and brain activity, with greater activity being associated with a higher amount of prenatal speech exposure. Moreover, the learning effect was generalized to other types of similar speech sounds not included in the training material. Consequently, our results indicate neural commitment specifically tuned to the speech features heard before birth and their memory representations. PMID:23980148

  20. Learning-Induced Plasticity in Medial Prefrontal Cortex Predicts Preference Malleability

    PubMed Central

    Garvert, Mona M.; Moutoussis, Michael; Kurth-Nelson, Zeb; Behrens, Timothy E.J.; Dolan, Raymond J.

    2015-01-01

    Summary Learning induces plasticity in neuronal networks. As neuronal populations contribute to multiple representations, we reasoned plasticity in one representation might influence others. We used human fMRI repetition suppression to show that plasticity induced by learning another individual’s values impacts upon a value representation for oneself in medial prefrontal cortex (mPFC), a plasticity also evident behaviorally in a preference shift. We show this plasticity is driven by a striatal “prediction error,” signaling the discrepancy between the other’s choice and a subject’s own preferences. Thus, our data highlight that mPFC encodes agent-independent representations of subjective value, such that prediction errors simultaneously update multiple agents’ value representations. As the resulting change in representational similarity predicts interindividual differences in the malleability of subjective preferences, our findings shed mechanistic light on complex human processes such as the powerful influence of social interaction on beliefs and preferences. PMID:25611512

  1. Phenotypic plasticity and function of the hard palate in growing rabbits.

    PubMed

    Menegaz, Rachel A; Sublett, Samantha V; Figueroa, Said D; Hoffman, Timothy J; Ravosa, Matthew J

    2009-02-01

    Morphological variation related to differential loading is well known for many craniomandibular elements. Yet, the function of the hard palate, and in particular the manner in which cortical and trabecular bone of the palate respond to masticatory loads, remains more ambiguous. Here, experimental data are presented that address the naturalistic influence of biomechanical loading on the postweaning development and structure of the hard palate. A rabbit model was used to test the hypothesis that variation in the morphology of the hard palate is linked to variation in masticatory stresses. Rabbit siblings were divided as weanlings into soft and hard/tough dietary treatment groups of 10 subjects each and were raised for 15 weeks until subadulthood. MicroCT analyses indicate that rabbits subjected to elevated masticatory loading developed hard palates with significantly greater bone area, greater cortical bone thickness along the oral lamina, and thicker anterior palates. Such diet-induced levels of palatal plasticity are comparable to those for other masticatory elements, which likely reflect osteogenic responses for maintaining the functional integrity of the palate vis-à-vis elevated stresses during unilateral mastication. These data support a role for mechanical loading in the determination of palatal morphology, especially its internal structure, in living and fossil mammals such as the hominin Paranthropus. Furthermore, these findings have potential implications for the evolution of the mammalian secondary hard palate as well as for clinical considerations of human oral pathologies. PMID:19089904

  2. Brain plasticity as a basis for recovery of function in humans.

    PubMed

    Bach-y-Rita, P

    1990-01-01

    One of the factors leading to the virtual neglect of the long-term potential for functional recovery following brain damage was the eclipse of plasticity concepts during the 100 years following Broca's 1861 publication on location of function. However, in the last 30 years evidence has been accumulating that demonstrates the plasticity of the brain and thus recovery potential is a subject of practical as well as theoretical interest. "Unmasking" of relatively inactive pathways, the taking over of functional representation by undamaged brain tissue, and neuronal group selection are among the mechanisms that are being explored. Human models of recovery of function include hemispherectomy patients that have regained bilateral function, facial paralysis patients who recover function (with appropriate rehabilitation) after VII-XII cranial nerve anastomosis, and patients with muscle transpositions to re-establish lost motor functions. The role of early and late rehabilitation, with attention to psychosocial and environmental factors, appears to be critical for recovery. PMID:2395525

  3. Training-induced neural plasticity in golf novices.

    PubMed

    Bezzola, Ladina; Mérillat, Susan; Gaser, Christian; Jäncke, Lutz

    2011-08-31

    Previous neuroimaging studies in the field of motor learning have shown that learning a new skill induces specific changes of neural gray and white matter in human brain areas necessary to control the practiced task. Former longitudinal studies investigating motor skill learning have used strict training protocols with little ecological validity rather than physical leisure activities, although there are several retrospective and cross-sectional studies suggesting neuroprotective effects of physical leisure activities. In the present longitudinal MRI study, we used voxel-based morphometry to investigate training-induced gray matter changes in golf novices between the age of 40 and 60 years, an age period when an active life style is assumed to counteract cognitive decline. As a main result, we demonstrate that 40 h of golf practice, performed as a leisure activity with highly individual training protocols, are associated with gray matter increases in a task-relevant cortical network encompassing sensorimotor regions and areas belonging to the dorsal stream. A new and striking result is the relationship between training intensity (time needed to complete the 40 training hours) and structural changes observed in the parieto-occipital junction. Thus, we demonstrate that a physical leisure activity induces training-dependent changes in gray matter and assume that a strict and controlled training protocol is not mandatory for training-induced adaptations of gray matter. PMID:21880905

  4. A systematic review of non-motor rTMS induced motor cortex plasticity

    PubMed Central

    Nordmann, Grégory; Azorina, Valeriya; Langguth, Berthold; Schecklmann, Martin

    2015-01-01

    Motor cortex excitability can be measured by single- and paired-pulse transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS). Repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation (rTMS) can induce neuroplastic effects in stimulated and in functionally connected cortical regions. Due to its ability to non-invasively modulate cortical activity, rTMS has been investigated for the treatment of various neurological and psychiatric disorders. However, such studies revealed a high variability of both clinical and neuronal effects induced by rTMS. In order to better elucidate this meta-plasticity, rTMS-induced changes in motor cortex excitability have been monitored in various studies in a pre-post stimulation design. Here, we give a literature review of studies investigating motor cortex excitability changes as a neuronal marker for rTMS effects over non-motor cortical areas. A systematic literature review in April 2014 resulted in 29 articles in which motor cortex excitability was assessed before and after rTMS over non-motor areas. The majority of the studies focused on the stimulation of one of three separate cortical areas: the prefrontal area (17 studies), the cerebellum (8 studies), or the temporal cortex (3 studies). One study assessed the effects of multi-site rTMS. Most studies investigated healthy controls but some also stimulated patients with neuropsychiatric conditions (e.g., affective disorders, tinnitus). Methods and findings of the identified studies were highly variable showing no clear systematic pattern of interaction of non-motor rTMS with measures of motor cortex excitability. Based on the available literature, the measurement of motor cortex excitability changes before and after non-motor rTMS has only limited value in the investigation of rTMS related meta-plasticity as a neuronal state or as a trait marker for neuropsychiatric diseases. Our results do not suggest that there are systematic alterations of cortical excitability changes during rTMS treatment, which calls

  5. Mitigating cutting-induced plasticity in the contour method, Part 2: Numerical analysis

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Muránsky, O.; Hamelin, C. J.; Hosseinzadeh, F.; Prime, M. B.

    2016-09-01

    Cutting-induced plasticity can have a significant effect on the measurement accuracy of the contour method. The present study examines the benefit of a double-embedded cutting configuration that relies on self-restraint of the specimen, relative to conventional edge-crack cutting configurations. A series of finite element analyses are used to simulate the planar sectioning performed during double-embedded and conventional edge-crack contour cutting configurations. The results of numerical analyses are first compared to measured results to validate the cutting simulations. The simulations are then used to compare the efficacy of different cutting configurations by predicting the deviation of the residual stress profile frommore » an original (pre-cutting) reference stress field, and the extent of cutting-induced plasticity. Comparisons reveal that while the double-embedded cutting configuration produces the most accurate residual stress measurements, the highest levels of plastic flow are generated in this process. As a result, this cutting-induced plastic deformation is, however, largely confined to small ligaments formed as a consequence of the sample sectioning process, and as such it does not significantly affect the back-calculated residual stress field.« less

  6. The Formation of Multi-synaptic Connections by the Interaction of Synaptic and Structural Plasticity and Their Functional Consequences

    PubMed Central

    Fauth, Michael; Wörgötter, Florentin; Tetzlaff, Christian

    2015-01-01

    Cortical connectivity emerges from the permanent interaction between neuronal activity and synaptic as well as structural plasticity. An important experimentally observed feature of this connectivity is the distribution of the number of synapses from one neuron to another, which has been measured in several cortical layers. All of these distributions are bimodal with one peak at zero and a second one at a small number (3–8) of synapses. In this study, using a probabilistic model of structural plasticity, which depends on the synaptic weights, we explore how these distributions can emerge and which functional consequences they have. We find that bimodal distributions arise generically from the interaction of structural plasticity with synaptic plasticity rules that fulfill the following biological realistic constraints: First, the synaptic weights have to grow with the postsynaptic activity. Second, this growth curve and/or the input-output relation of the postsynaptic neuron have to change sub-linearly (negative curvature). As most neurons show such input-output-relations, these constraints can be fulfilled by many biological reasonable systems. Given such a system, we show that the different activities, which can explain the layer-specific distributions, correspond to experimentally observed activities. Considering these activities as working point of the system and varying the pre- or postsynaptic stimulation reveals a hysteresis in the number of synapses. As a consequence of this, the connectivity between two neurons can be controlled by activity but is also safeguarded against overly fast changes. These results indicate that the complex dynamics between activity and plasticity will, already between a pair of neurons, induce a variety of possible stable synaptic distributions, which could support memory mechanisms. PMID:25590330

  7. [Involvement and plasticity of brainstem cholinergic neurons in cocaine-induced addiction].

    PubMed

    Kaneda, Katsuyuki; Shinohara, Fumiya; Kurosawa, Ryo; Taoka, Naofumi; Ide, Soichiro; Minami, Masabumi

    2014-04-01

    Although the involvement and plasticity of the mesocorticolimbic dopamine (DA) system in cocaine-induced addiction have been studied extensively, the role of the brainstem cholinergic system in cocaine addiction remains largely unexplored. The laterodorsal tegmental nucleus (LDT) contains cholinergic neurons that innervate the ventral tegmental area (VTA) and is crucial for regulating the activity of VTA DA neurons, implying that LDT may also be associated with cocaine addiction. In this review, we summarize our recent findings showing that cholinergic transmission from the LDT to the VTA is involved in acquisition and expression of cocaine-induced conditioned place preference and that, after repeated cocaine exposures, these neurons exhibit synaptic plasticity, which is dependent on NMDA receptor activation, nitric oxide production, and the activity of medial prefrontal cortex. The findings strongly suggest that LDT cholinergic neurons may critically contribute to developing cocaine-induced addiction. PMID:24946392

  8. Ryanodine Receptor Activation Induces Long-Term Plasticity of Spine Calcium Dynamics.

    PubMed

    Johenning, Friedrich W; Theis, Anne-Kathrin; Pannasch, Ulrike; Rückl, Martin; Rüdiger, Sten; Schmitz, Dietmar

    2015-06-01

    A key feature of signalling in dendritic spines is the synapse-specific transduction of short electrical signals into biochemical responses. Ca2+ is a major upstream effector in this transduction cascade, serving both as a depolarising electrical charge carrier at the membrane and an intracellular second messenger. Upon action potential firing, the majority of spines are subject to global back-propagating action potential (bAP) Ca2+ transients. These transients translate neuronal suprathreshold activation into intracellular biochemical events. Using a combination of electrophysiology, two-photon Ca2+ imaging, and modelling, we demonstrate that bAPs are electrochemically coupled to Ca2+ release from intracellular stores via ryanodine receptors (RyRs). We describe a new function mediated by spine RyRs: the activity-dependent long-term enhancement of the bAP-Ca2+ transient. Spines regulate bAP Ca2+ influx independent of each other, as bAP-Ca2+ transient enhancement is compartmentalized and independent of the dendritic Ca2+ transient. Furthermore, this functional state change depends exclusively on bAPs travelling antidromically into dendrites and spines. Induction, but not expression, of bAP-Ca2+ transient enhancement is a spine-specific function of the RyR. We demonstrate that RyRs can form specific Ca2+ signalling nanodomains within single spines. Functionally, RyR mediated Ca2+ release in these nanodomains induces a new form of Ca2+ transient plasticity that constitutes a spine specific storage mechanism of neuronal suprathreshold activity patterns. PMID:26098891

  9. Ryanodine Receptor Activation Induces Long-Term Plasticity of Spine Calcium Dynamics

    PubMed Central

    Pannasch, Ulrike; Rückl, Martin; Rüdiger, Sten; Schmitz, Dietmar

    2015-01-01

    A key feature of signalling in dendritic spines is the synapse-specific transduction of short electrical signals into biochemical responses. Ca2+ is a major upstream effector in this transduction cascade, serving both as a depolarising electrical charge carrier at the membrane and an intracellular second messenger. Upon action potential firing, the majority of spines are subject to global back-propagating action potential (bAP) Ca2+ transients. These transients translate neuronal suprathreshold activation into intracellular biochemical events. Using a combination of electrophysiology, two-photon Ca2+ imaging, and modelling, we demonstrate that bAPs are electrochemically coupled to Ca2+ release from intracellular stores via ryanodine receptors (RyRs). We describe a new function mediated by spine RyRs: the activity-dependent long-term enhancement of the bAP-Ca2+ transient. Spines regulate bAP Ca2+ influx independent of each other, as bAP-Ca2+ transient enhancement is compartmentalized and independent of the dendritic Ca2+ transient. Furthermore, this functional state change depends exclusively on bAPs travelling antidromically into dendrites and spines. Induction, but not expression, of bAP-Ca2+ transient enhancement is a spine-specific function of the RyR. We demonstrate that RyRs can form specific Ca2+ signalling nanodomains within single spines. Functionally, RyR mediated Ca2+ release in these nanodomains induces a new form of Ca2+ transient plasticity that constitutes a spine specific storage mechanism of neuronal suprathreshold activity patterns. PMID:26098891

  10. Tunable ultraviolet laser-induced fluorescence detection of trace plastics and dissolved organic compounds in water

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sivaprakasam, Vasanthi; Killinger, Dennis K.

    2003-11-01

    We developed a tunable (220-285-nm) UV and fixed 266-nm laser-induced fluorescence (LIF) system using a spectrometer and a cooled CCD imaging detector to measure the excitation-emission matrix spectra of various compounds in water, including quinine sulfate and plastic compound bisphenol-A. The LIF instrument was used for the fast, nonspecific determination of trace amounts of dissolved organic compounds present in natural water supplies and various brand name bottled distilled water and bottled drinking water. Plastic-related compounds that leached out of plastic utensils and containers were also detected with this instrument. The sensitivity of the system was approximately 1-2 orders of magnitude better than that for a commercial system.

  11. Tunable ultraviolet laser-induced fluorescence detection of trace plastics and dissolved organic compounds in water.

    PubMed

    Sivaprakasam, Vasanthi; Killinger, Dennis K

    2003-11-20

    We developed a tunable (220-285-nm) UV and fixed 266-nm laser-induced fluorescence (LIF) system using a spectrometer and a cooled CCD imaging detector to measure the excitation-emission matrix spectra of various compounds in water, including quinine sulfate and plastic compound bisphenol-A. The LIF instrument was used for the fast, nonspecific determination of trace amounts of dissolved organic compounds present in natural water supplies and various brand name bottled distilled water and bottled drinking water. Plastic-related compounds that leached out of plastic utensils and containers were also detected with this instrument. The sensitivity of the system was approximately 1-2 orders of magnitude better than that for a commercial system. PMID:14658478

  12. Synapse elimination accompanies functional plasticity in hippocampal neurons.

    PubMed

    Bastrikova, Natalia; Gardner, Gregory A; Reece, Jeff M; Jeromin, Andreas; Dudek, Serena M

    2008-02-26

    A critical component of nervous system development is synapse elimination during early postnatal life, a process known to depend on neuronal activity. Changes in synaptic strength in the form of long-term potentiation (LTP) and long-term depression (LTD) correlate with dendritic spine enlargement or shrinkage, respectively, but whether LTD can lead to an actual separation of the synaptic structures when the spine shrinks or is lost remains unknown. Here, we addressed this issue by using concurrent imaging and electrophysiological recording of live synapses. Slices of rat hippocampus were cultured on multielectrode arrays, and the neurons were labeled with genes encoding red or green fluorescent proteins to visualize presynaptic and postsynaptic neuronal processes, respectively. LTD-inducing stimulation led to a reduction in the synaptic green and red colocalization, and, in many cases, it induced a complete separation of the presynaptic bouton from the dendritic spine. This type of synapse loss was associated with smaller initial spine size and greater synaptic depression but not spine shrinkage during LTD. All cases of synapse separation were observed without an accompanying loss of the spine during this period. We suggest that repeated low-frequency stimulation simultaneous with LTD induction is capable of restructuring synaptic contacts. Future work with this model will be able to provide critical insight into the molecular mechanisms of activity- and experience-dependent refinement of brain circuitry during development. PMID:18287055

  13. Stable learning of functional maps in self-organizing spiking neural networks with continuous synaptic plasticity

    PubMed Central

    Srinivasa, Narayan; Jiang, Qin

    2013-01-01

    This study describes a spiking model that self-organizes for stable formation and maintenance of orientation and ocular dominance maps in the visual cortex (V1). This self-organization process simulates three development phases: an early experience-independent phase, a late experience-independent phase and a subsequent refinement phase during which experience acts to shape the map properties. The ocular dominance maps that emerge accommodate the two sets of monocular inputs that arise from the lateral geniculate nucleus (LGN) to layer 4 of V1. The orientation selectivity maps that emerge feature well-developed iso-orientation domains and fractures. During the last two phases of development the orientation preferences at some locations appear to rotate continuously through ±180° along circular paths and referred to as pinwheel-like patterns but without any corresponding point discontinuities in the orientation gradient maps. The formation of these functional maps is driven by balanced excitatory and inhibitory currents that are established via synaptic plasticity based on spike timing for both excitatory and inhibitory synapses. The stability and maintenance of the formed maps with continuous synaptic plasticity is enabled by homeostasis caused by inhibitory plasticity. However, a prolonged exposure to repeated stimuli does alter the formed maps over time due to plasticity. The results from this study suggest that continuous synaptic plasticity in both excitatory neurons and interneurons could play a critical role in the formation, stability, and maintenance of functional maps in the cortex. PMID:23450808

  14. Impacts of discarded plastic bags on marine assemblages and ecosystem functioning.

    PubMed

    Green, Dannielle Senga; Boots, Bas; Blockley, David James; Rocha, Carlos; Thompson, Richard

    2015-05-01

    The accumulation of plastic debris is a global environmental problem due to its durability, persistence, and abundance. Although effects of plastic debris on individual marine organisms, particularly mammals and birds, have been extensively documented (e.g., entanglement and choking), very little is known about effects on assemblages and consequences for ecosystem functioning. In Europe, around 40% of the plastic items produced are utilized as single-use packaging, which rapidly accumulate in waste management facilities and as litter in the environment. A range of biodegradable plastics have been developed with the aspiration of reducing the persistence of litter; however, their impacts on marine assemblages or ecosystem functioning have never been evaluated. A field experiment was conducted to assess the impact of conventional and biodegradable plastic carrier bags as litter on benthic macro- and meio-faunal assemblages and biogeochemical processes (primary productivity, redox condition, organic matter content, and pore-water nutrients) on an intertidal shore near Dublin, Ireland. After 9 weeks, the presence of either type of bag created anoxic conditions within the sediment along with reduced primary productivity and organic matter and significantly lower abundances of infaunal invertebrates. This indicates that both conventional and biodegradable bags can rapidly alter marine assemblages and the ecosystem services they provide. PMID:25822754

  15. Motor Network Plasticity and Low-Frequency Oscillations Abnormalities in Patients with Brain Gliomas: A Functional MRI Study

    PubMed Central

    Niu, Chen; Zhang, Ming; Min, Zhigang; Rana, Netra; Zhang, Qiuli; Liu, Xin; Li, Min; Lin, Pan

    2014-01-01

    Brain plasticity is often associated with the process of slow-growing tumor formation, which remodels neural organization and optimizes brain network function. In this study, we aimed to investigate whether motor function plasticity would display deficits in patients with slow-growing brain tumors located in or near motor areas, but who were without motor neurological deficits. We used resting-state functional magnetic resonance imaging to probe motor networks in 15 patients with histopathologically confirmed brain gliomas and 15 age-matched healthy controls. All subjects performed a motor task to help identify individual motor activity in the bilateral primary motor cortex (PMC) and supplementary motor area (SMA). Frequency-based analysis at three different frequencies was then used to investigate possible alterations in the power spectral density (PSD) of low-frequency oscillations. For each group, the average PSD was determined for each brain region and a nonparametric test was performed to determine the difference in power between the two groups. Significantly reduced inter-hemispheric functional connectivity between the left and right PMC was observed in patients compared with controls (P<0.05). We also found significantly decreased PSD in patients compared to that in controls, in all three frequency bands (low: 0.01–0.02 Hz; middle: 0.02–0.06 Hz; and high: 0.06–0.1 Hz), at three key motor regions. These findings suggest that in asymptomatic patients with brain tumors located in eloquent regions, inter-hemispheric connection may be more vulnerable. A comparison of the two approaches indicated that power spectral analysis is more sensitive than functional connectivity analysis for identifying the neurological abnormalities underlying motor function plasticity induced by slow-growing tumors. PMID:24806463

  16. Effect of crystalline grain structures on the mechanical properties of twinning-induced plasticity steel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Kun; Wang, Dan; Han, Fusheng

    2016-02-01

    In order to improve the mechanical properties of twinning-induced plasticity steel, the grain morphology was tailored by different solidification technologies combined with deformation and heat treatment processing routes. Three typical grain morphologies, i.e., equiaxed, columnar as well as equiaxed/columnar grains were formed, and their mechanical behaviors were comparatively studied. Among the three materials, the equiaxed grain material exhibited the highest strength but the lowest plasticity. Depending on the grain size, the smaller the grain size, the higher the strength, but the lower the elongation. The columnar grain material possessed the most excellent plasticity but the weakest strength. These properties presented a non-monotonic dependence on the dendrite spacing, and the moderate spacing resulted in the optimum combination of strength and plasticity. The equiaxed/columnar grain coexisted material showed interesting properties, i.e., the strength and plasticity were just between those of single grain-shaped materials. The three materials also presented different strain hardening behaviors particularly in the uniform deformation stage. The equiaxed grain material showed a constant strain hardening rate, while the columnar grain and equiaxed/columnar grain materials showed a progressively increasing rate with increasing the true strain.

  17. Phenotypic plasticity alone cannot explain climate-induced change in avian migration timing

    PubMed Central

    Buskirk, Josh; Mulvihill, Robert S; Leberman, Robert C

    2012-01-01

    Recent climate change has been linked to shifts in the timing of life-cycle events in many organisms, but there is debate over the degree to which phenological changes are caused by evolved genetic responses of populations or by phenotypic plasticity of individuals. We estimated plasticity of spring arrival date in 27 species of bird that breed in the vicinity of an observatory in eastern North America. For 2441 individuals detected in multiple years, arrival occurred earlier during warm years, especially in species that migrate short distances. Phenotypic plasticity averaged −0.93 days °C−1 ± 0.70 (95% CI). However, plasticity accounted for only 13–25% of the climate-induced trend in phenology observed over 46 years. Although our approach probably underestimates the full scope of plasticity, the data suggest that part of the response to environmental change has been caused by microevolution. The estimated evolutionary rates are plausible (0.016 haldanes). PMID:23145329

  18. Exercise-Induced Cognitive Plasticity, Implications for Mild Cognitive Impairment and Alzheimer’s Disease

    PubMed Central

    Foster, Philip P.; Rosenblatt, Kevin P.; Kuljiš, Rodrigo O.

    2011-01-01

    Lifestyle factors such as intellectual stimulation, cognitive and social engagement, nutrition, and various types of exercise appear to reduce the risk for common age-associated disorders such as Alzheimer’s disease (AD) and vascular dementia. In fact, many studies have suggested that promoting physical activity can have a protective effect against cognitive deterioration later in life. Slowing or a deterioration of walking speed is associated with a poor performance in tests assessing psychomotor speed and verbal fluency in elderly individuals. Fitness training influences a wide range of cognitive processes, and the largest positive impact observed is for executive (a.k.a. frontal lobe) functions. Studies show that exercise improves additional cognitive functions such as tasks mediated by the hippocampus, and result in major changes in plasticity in the hippocampus. Interestingly, this exercise-induced plasticity is also pronounced in APOE ε4 carriers who express a risk factor for late-onset AD that may modulate the effect of treatments. Based on AD staging by Braak and Braak (1991) and Braak et al. (1993) we propose that the effects of exercise occur in two temporo-spatial continua of events. The “inward” continuum from isocortex (neocortex) to entorhinal cortex/hippocampus for amyloidosis and a reciprocal “outward” continuum for neurofibrillary alterations. The exercise-induced hypertrophy of the hippocampus at the core of these continua is evaluated in terms of potential for prevention to stave off neuronal degeneration. Exercise-induced production of growth factors such as the brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) has been shown to enhance neurogenesis and to play a key role in positive cognitive effects. Insulin-like growth factor (IGF-1) may mediate the exercise-induced response to exercise on BDNF, neurogenesis, and cognitive performance. It is also postulated to regulate brain amyloid β (Aβ) levels by increased clearance via the choroid

  19. Video-Game Play Induces Plasticity in the Visual System of Adults with Amblyopia

    PubMed Central

    Li, Roger W.; Ngo, Charlie; Nguyen, Jennie; Levi, Dennis M.

    2011-01-01

    Abnormal visual experience during a sensitive period of development disrupts neuronal circuitry in the visual cortex and results in abnormal spatial vision or amblyopia. Here we examined whether playing video games can induce plasticity in the visual system of adults with amblyopia. Specifically 20 adults with amblyopia (age 15–61 y; visual acuity: 20/25–20/480, with no manifest ocular disease or nystagmus) were recruited and allocated into three intervention groups: action videogame group (n = 10), non-action videogame group (n = 3), and crossover control group (n = 7). Our experiments show that playing video games (both action and non-action games) for a short period of time (40–80 h, 2 h/d) using the amblyopic eye results in a substantial improvement in a wide range of fundamental visual functions, from low-level to high-level, including visual acuity (33%), positional acuity (16%), spatial attention (37%), and stereopsis (54%). Using a cross-over experimental design (first 20 h: occlusion therapy, and the next 40 h: videogame therapy), we can conclude that the improvement cannot be explained simply by eye patching alone. We quantified the limits and the time course of visual plasticity induced by video-game experience. The recovery in visual acuity that we observed is at least 5-fold faster than would be expected from occlusion therapy in childhood amblyopia. We used positional noise and modelling to reveal the neural mechanisms underlying the visual improvements in terms of decreased spatial distortion (7%) and increased processing efficiency (33%). Our study had several limitations: small sample size, lack of randomization, and differences in numbers between groups. A large-scale randomized clinical study is needed to confirm the therapeutic value of video-game treatment in clinical situations. Nonetheless, taken as a pilot study, this work suggests that video-game play may provide important principles for treating amblyopia, and perhaps

  20. Spatiotemporal plasticity of miRNAs functions: The miR-17-92 case.

    PubMed

    Bonaldi, Tiziana; Mihailovich, Marija

    2016-05-01

    The functional effect of a specific miRNA is tightly linked to the transcriptome, thus having the potential to elicit distinct outcomes in different cellular states. Our recent discovery of a dual role of the miR-17-92 cluster, which shifts from oncogene to tumor suppressor during lymphoma progression, exemplifies the spatiotemporal plasticity of miRNAs. PMID:27314099

  1. Function-selective domain architecture plasticity potentials in eukaryotic genome evolution.

    PubMed

    Linkeviciute, Viktorija; Rackham, Owen J L; Gough, Julian; Oates, Matt E; Fang, Hai

    2015-12-01

    To help evaluate how protein function impacts on genome evolution, we introduce a new concept of 'architecture plasticity potential' - the capacity to form distinct domain architectures - both for an individual domain, or more generally for a set of domains grouped by shared function. We devise a scoring metric to measure the plasticity potential for these domain sets, and evaluate how function has changed over time for different species. Applying this metric to a phylogenetic tree of eukaryotic genomes, we find that the involvement of each function is not random but highly selective. For certain lineages there is strong bias for evolution to involve domains related to certain functions. In general eukaryotic genomes, particularly animals, expand complex functional activities such as signalling and regulation, but at the cost of reducing metabolic processes. We also observe differential evolution of transcriptional regulation and a unique evolutionary role of channel regulators; crucially this is only observable in terms of the architecture plasticity potential. Our findings provide a new layer of information to understand the significance of function in eukaryotic genome evolution. A web search tool, available at http://supfam.org/Pevo, offers a wide spectrum of options for exploring functional importance in eukaryotic genome evolution. PMID:25980317

  2. Function-selective domain architecture plasticity potentials in eukaryotic genome evolution

    PubMed Central

    Linkeviciute, Viktorija; Rackham, Owen J.L.; Gough, Julian; Oates, Matt E.; Fang, Hai

    2015-01-01

    To help evaluate how protein function impacts on genome evolution, we introduce a new concept of ‘architecture plasticity potential’ – the capacity to form distinct domain architectures – both for an individual domain, or more generally for a set of domains grouped by shared function. We devise a scoring metric to measure the plasticity potential for these domain sets, and evaluate how function has changed over time for different species. Applying this metric to a phylogenetic tree of eukaryotic genomes, we find that the involvement of each function is not random but highly selective. For certain lineages there is strong bias for evolution to involve domains related to certain functions. In general eukaryotic genomes, particularly animals, expand complex functional activities such as signalling and regulation, but at the cost of reducing metabolic processes. We also observe differential evolution of transcriptional regulation and a unique evolutionary role of channel regulators; crucially this is only observable in terms of the architecture plasticity potential. Our findings provide a new layer of information to understand the significance of function in eukaryotic genome evolution. A web search tool, available at http://supfam.org/Pevo, offers a wide spectrum of options for exploring functional importance in eukaryotic genome evolution. PMID:25980317

  3. Adaptive Motor Imagery: A Multimodal Study of Immobilization-Induced Brain Plasticity.

    PubMed

    Burianová, Hana; Sowman, Paul F; Marstaller, Lars; Rich, Anina N; Williams, Mark A; Savage, Greg; Al-Janabi, Shahd; de Lissa, Peter; Johnson, Blake W

    2016-03-01

    The consequences of losing the ability to move a limb are traumatic. One approach that examines the impact of pathological limb nonuse on the brain involves temporary immobilization of a healthy limb. Here, we investigated immobilization-induced plasticity in the motor imagery (MI) circuitry during hand immobilization. We assessed these changes with a multimodal paradigm, using functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) to measure neural activation, magnetoencephalography (MEG) to track neuronal oscillatory dynamics, and transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS) to assess corticospinal excitability. fMRI results show a significant decrease in neural activation for MI of the constrained hand, localized to sensorimotor areas contralateral to the immobilized hand. MEG results show a significant decrease in beta desynchronization and faster resynchronization in sensorimotor areas contralateral to the immobilized hand. TMS results show a significant increase in resting motor threshold in motor cortex contralateral to the constrained hand, suggesting a decrease in corticospinal excitability in the projections to the constrained hand. These results demonstrate a direct and rapid effect of immobilization on MI processes of the constrained hand, suggesting that limb nonuse may not only affect motor execution, as evidenced by previous studies, but also MI. These findings have important implications for the effectiveness of therapeutic approaches that use MI as a rehabilitation tool to ameliorate the negative effects of limb nonuse. PMID:25477368

  4. MSK1 Regulates Environmental Enrichment-Induced Hippocampal Plasticity and Cognitive Enhancement

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Karelina, Kate; Hansen, Katelin F.; Choi, Yun-Sik; DeVries, A. Courtney; Arthur, J. Simon C.; Obrietan, Karl

    2012-01-01

    Environmental enrichment (EE) has marked beneficial effects on cognitive capacity. Given the possibility that this form of neuronal plasticity could function via the actuation of the same cellular signaling pathways that underlie learning/memory formation, we examined whether the MAPK cascade effector, mitogen/stress-activated kinase 1 (MSK1),…

  5. Strain-induced Defects in Carbon Nanotubes: Electronic Tuning and Plastic Limits

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Peihong; Lammert, Paul; Crespi, Vincent

    1998-03-01

    Bond rotation defects can tune the electronic structures of carbon nanotubes (PRL 79, 2093; link). These defects can be created by simple elastic deformations. Continuum elasticity theory augments atomistic calculations of plastic limits and bandgaps as a function of tension.

  6. Learning-induced plasticity in auditory spatial representations revealed by electrical neuroimaging.

    PubMed

    Spierer, Lucas; Tardif, Eric; Sperdin, Holger; Murray, Micah M; Clarke, Stephanie

    2007-05-16

    Auditory spatial representations are likely encoded at a population level within human auditory cortices. We investigated learning-induced plasticity of spatial discrimination in healthy subjects using auditory-evoked potentials (AEPs) and electrical neuroimaging analyses. Stimuli were 100 ms white-noise bursts lateralized with varying interaural time differences. In three experiments, plasticity was induced with 40 min of discrimination training. During training, accuracy significantly improved from near-chance levels to approximately 75%. Before and after training, AEPs were recorded to stimuli presented passively with a more medial sound lateralization outnumbering a more lateral one (7:1). In experiment 1, the same lateralizations were used for training and AEP sessions. Significant AEP modulations to the different lateralizations were evident only after training, indicative of a learning-induced mismatch negativity (MMN). More precisely, this MMN at 195-250 ms after stimulus onset followed from differences in the AEP topography to each stimulus position, indicative of changes in the underlying brain network. In experiment 2, mirror-symmetric locations were used for training and AEP sessions; no training-related AEP modulations or MMN were observed. In experiment 3, the discrimination of trained plus equidistant untrained separations was tested psychophysically before and 0, 6, 24, and 48 h after training. Learning-induced plasticity lasted <6 h, did not generalize to untrained lateralizations, and was not the simple result of strengthening the representation of the trained lateralizations. Thus, learning-induced plasticity of auditory spatial discrimination relies on spatial comparisons, rather than a spatial anchor or a general comparator. Furthermore, cortical auditory representations of space are dynamic and subject to rapid reorganization. PMID:17507569

  7. Physical exercise in overweight to obese individuals induces metabolic- and neurotrophic-related structural brain plasticity

    PubMed Central

    Mueller, Karsten; Möller, Harald E.; Horstmann, Annette; Busse, Franziska; Lepsien, Jöran; Blüher, Matthias; Stumvoll, Michael; Villringer, Arno; Pleger, Burkhard

    2015-01-01

    Previous cross-sectional studies on body-weight-related alterations in brain structure revealed profound changes in the gray matter (GM) and white matter (WM) that resemble findings obtained from individuals with advancing age. This suggests that obesity may lead to structural brain changes that are comparable with brain aging. Here, we asked whether weight-loss-dependent improved metabolic and neurotrophic functioning parallels the reversal of obesity-related alterations in brain structure. To this end we applied magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) together with voxel-based morphometry and diffusion-tensor imaging in overweight to obese individuals who participated in a fitness course with intensive physical training twice a week over a period of 3 months. After the fitness course, participants presented, with inter-individual heterogeneity, a reduced body mass index (BMI), reduced serum leptin concentrations, elevated high-density lipoprotein-cholesterol (HDL-C), and alterations of serum brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) concentrations suggesting changes of metabolic and neurotrophic function. Exercise-dependent changes in BMI and serum concentration of BDNF, leptin, and HDL-C were related to an increase in GM density in the left hippocampus, the insular cortex, and the left cerebellar lobule. We also observed exercise-dependent changes of diffusivity parameters in surrounding WM structures as well as in the corpus callosum. These findings suggest that weight-loss due to physical exercise in overweight to obese participants induces profound structural brain plasticity, not primarily of sensorimotor brain regions involved in physical exercise, but of regions previously reported to be structurally affected by an increased body weight and functionally implemented in gustation and cognitive processing. PMID:26190989

  8. A plastic stabilizer dibutyltin dilaurate induces subchronic neurotoxicity in rats☆

    PubMed Central

    Jin, Minghua; Song, Peilin; Li, Na; Li, Xuejun; Chen, Jiajun

    2012-01-01

    Dibutyltin dilaurate functions as a stabilizer for polyvinyl chloride. In this study, experimental rats were intragastrically administered 5, 10, or 20 mg/kg dibutyltin dilaurate to model sub-chronic poisoning. After exposure, our results showed the activities of superoxide dismutase and glutathione peroxidase decreased in rat brain tissue, while the malondialdehyde and nitric oxide content, as well as nitric oxide synthase activity in rat brain tissue increased. The cell cycle in the right parietal cortex was disordered and the rate of apoptosis increased. DNA damage was aggravated in the cerebral cortex, and the ultrastructure of the right parietal cortex tissues was altered. The above changes became more apparent with exposure to increasing doses of dibutyltin dilaurate. Our experimental findings confirmed the neurotoxicity of dibutyltin dilaurate in rat brain tissues, and demonstrated that the poisoning was dose-dependent. PMID:25538742

  9. Measurements of growth and decay of radiation induced attenuation during the irradiation and recovery of plastic optical fibres

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kovačević, M. S.; Savović, S.; Djordjevich, A.; Bajić, J.; Stupar, D.; Kovačević, M.; Simić, S.

    2013-04-01

    In this work, we present the experimental study of the radiation-induced attenuation in step-index polymethyl-methacrylate based plastic optical fibre by exposure to low dose rate ionizing radiation. The low dose exposure has been found to induce significant permanent attenuation in plastic optical fibres. Based on the experimental results, the formula between radiation-induced attenuation and radiation dose is obtained accordingly. The recovery properties of plastic optical fibre also were investigated. The fibre begins to recover immediately after irradiation, but it does not fully recover, i.e. the irradiation leads to permanent damage of polymer.

  10. SIRT1 is essential for normal cognitive function and synaptic plasticity

    PubMed Central

    Michán, Shaday; Li, Ying; Chou, Maggie Meng-Hsiu; Parrella, Edoardo; Ge, Huanying; Long, Jeffrey M.; Allard, Joanne S.; Lewis, Kaitlyn; Miller, Marshall; Xu, Wei; Mervis, Ronald F.; Chen, Jing; Guerin, Karen I.; Smith, Lois E. H.; McBurney, Michael W.; Sinclair, David A.; Baudry, Michel; de Cabo, Rafael; Longo, Valter D.

    2010-01-01

    Conservation of normal cognitive functions relies on the proper performance of the nervous system at the cellular and molecular level. The mammalian NAD+-dependent deacetylase, SIRT1, impacts different processes potentially involved in the maintenance of brain integrity such as chromatin remodeling, DNA repair, cell survival and neurogenesis. Here we show that SIRT1 is expressed in neurons of the hippocampus, a key structure in learning and memory. Using a combination of behavioral and electrophysiological paradigms we analyzed the effects of SIRT1 deficiency and overexpression on mouse learning and memory as well as on synaptic plasticity. We demonstrated that the absence of SIRT1 impaired cognitive abilities, including immediate memory, classical conditioning and spatial learning. In addition, we found that the cognitive deficits in SIRT1 knockout mice were associated with defects in synaptic plasticity without alterations in basal synaptic transmission or NMDA receptor function. Brains of SIRT1-KO mice exhibited normal morphology and dendritic spine structure but display a decrease in dendritic branching, branch length and complexity of neuronal dendritic arbors. Also, a decrease in ERK1/2 phosphorylation and altered expression of hippocampal genes involved in synaptic function, lipid metabolism and myelination were detected in SIRT1-KO mice. In contrast, mice with high levels of SIRT1 expression in brain exhibited regular synaptic plasticity and memory. We conclude that SIRT1 is indispensable for normal learning, memory and synaptic plasticity in mice. PMID:20660252

  11. Selector function of MHC I molecules is determined by protein plasticity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bailey, Alistair; Dalchau, Neil; Carter, Rachel; Emmott, Stephen; Phillips, Andrew; Werner, Jörn M.; Elliott, Tim

    2015-10-01

    The selection of peptides for presentation at the surface of most nucleated cells by major histocompatibility complex class I molecules (MHC I) is crucial to the immune response in vertebrates. However, the mechanisms of the rapid selection of high affinity peptides by MHC I from amongst thousands of mostly low affinity peptides are not well understood. We developed computational systems models encoding distinct mechanistic hypotheses for two molecules, HLA-B*44:02 (B*4402) and HLA-B*44:05 (B*4405), which differ by a single residue yet lie at opposite ends of the spectrum in their intrinsic ability to select high affinity peptides. We used in vivo biochemical data to infer that a conformational intermediate of MHC I is significant for peptide selection. We used molecular dynamics simulations to show that peptide selector function correlates with protein plasticity, and confirmed this experimentally by altering the plasticity of MHC I with a single point mutation, which altered in vivo selector function in a predictable way. Finally, we investigated the mechanisms by which the co-factor tapasin influences MHC I plasticity. We propose that tapasin modulates MHC I plasticity by dynamically coupling the peptide binding region and α3 domain of MHC I allosterically, resulting in enhanced peptide selector function.

  12. Extraction, identification, and functional characterization of a bioactive substance from automated compound-handling plastic tips.

    PubMed

    Watson, John; Greenough, Emily B; Leet, John E; Ford, Michael J; Drexler, Dieter M; Belcastro, James V; Herbst, John J; Chatterjee, Moneesh; Banks, Martyn

    2009-06-01

    Disposable plastic labware is ubiquitous in contemporary pharmaceutical research laboratories. Plastic labware is routinely used for chemical compound storage and during automated liquid-handling processes that support assay development, high-throughput screening, structure-activity determinations, and liability profiling. However, there is little information available in the literature on the contaminants released from plastic labware upon DMSO exposure and their resultant effects on specific biological assays. The authors report here the extraction, by simple DMSO washing, of a biologically active substance from one particular size of disposable plastic tips used in automated compound handling. The active contaminant was identified as erucamide ((Z)-docos-13-enamide), a long-chain mono-unsaturated fatty acid amide commonly used in plastics manufacturing, by gas chromatography/mass spectroscopy analysis of the DMSO-extracted material. Tip extracts prepared in DMSO, as well as a commercially obtained sample of erucamide, were active in a functional bioassay of a known G-protein-coupled fatty acid receptor. A sample of a different disposable tip product from the same vendor did not release detectable erucamide following solvent extraction, and DMSO extracts prepared from this product were inactive in the receptor functional assay. These results demonstrate that solvent-extractable contaminants from some plastic labware used in the contemporary pharmaceutical research and development (R&D) environment can be introduced into physical and biological assays during routine compound management liquid-handling processes. These contaminants may further possess biological activity and are therefore a potential source of assay-specific confounding artifacts. PMID:19470712

  13. Plastic cap evolution law derived from induced transverse isotropy in dilatational triaxial compression.

    SciTech Connect

    Macon, David James; Brannon, Rebecca Moss; Strack, Otto Eric

    2014-02-01

    Mechanical testing of porous materials generates physical data that contain contributions from more than one underlying physical phenomenon. All that is measurable is the (3z(Bensemble(3y (Bhardening modulus. This thesis is concerned with the phenomenon of dilatation in triaxial compression of porous media, which has been modeled very accurately in the literature for monotonic loading using models that predict dilatation under triaxial compression (TXC) by presuming that dilatation causes the cap to move outwards. These existing models, however, predict a counter-intuitive (and never validated) increase in hydrostatic compression strength. This work explores an alternative approach for modeling TXC dilatation based on allowing induced elastic anisotropy (which makes the material both less stiff and less strong in the lateral direction) with no increase in hydrostatic strength. Induced elastic anisotropy is introduced through the use of a distortion operator. This operator is a fourth-order tensor consisting of a combination of the undeformed stiffness and deformed compliance and has the same eigenprojectors as the elastic compliance. In the undeformed state, the distortion operator is equal to the fourth-order identity. Through the use of the distortion operator, an evolved stress tensor is introduced. When the evolved stress tensor is substituted into an isotropic yield function, a new anisotropic yield function results. In the case of the von Mises isotropic yield function (which contains only deviatoric components), it is shown that the distortion operator introduces a dilatational contribution without requiring an increase in hydrostatic strength. In the thesis, an introduction and literature review of the cap function is given. A transversely isotropic compliance is presented, based on a linear combination of natural bases constructed about a transverse-symmetry axis. Using a probabilistic distribution of cracks constructed for the case of transverse isotropy

  14. Prolonged vestibular stimulation induces homeostatic plasticity of the vestibulo-ocular reflex in larval Xenopus laevis.

    PubMed

    Dietrich, Haike; Straka, Hans

    2016-07-01

    Vestibulo-ocular reflexes (VOR) stabilise retinal images during head/body motion in vertebrates by generating spatio-temporally precise extraocular motor commands for corrective eye movements. While VOR performance is generally robust with a relatively stable gain, cerebellar circuits are capable of adapting the underlying sensory-motor transformation. Here, we studied cerebellum-dependent VOR plasticity by recording head motion-induced lateral rectus and superior oblique extraocular motor discharge in semi-intact preparations of Xenopus laevis tadpoles. In the absence of visual feedback, prolonged sinusoidal rotation caused either an increase or decrease of the VOR gain depending on the motion stimulus amplitude. The observed changes in extraocular motor discharge gradually saturated after 20 min of constant rotation and returned to baseline in the absence of motion stimulation. Furthermore, plastic changes in lateral rectus and superior oblique motor commands were plane-specific for horizontal and vertical rotations, respectively, suggesting that alterations are restricted to principal VOR connections. Comparison of multi- and single-unit activity indicated that plasticity occurs in all recorded units of a given extraocular motor nucleus. Ablation of the cerebellum abolished motoneuronal gain changes and prevented the induction of plasticity, thus demonstrating that both acquisition and retention of this type of plasticity require an intact cerebellar circuitry. In conclusion, the plane-specific and stimulus intensity-dependent modification of the VOR gain through the feed-forward cerebellar circuitry represents a homeostatic plasticity that likely maintains an optimal working range for the underlying sensory-motor transformation. PMID:27152983

  15. Orexin A induces bidirectional modulation of synaptic plasticity: Inhibiting long-term potentiation and preventing depotentiation.

    PubMed

    Lu, Guan-Ling; Lee, Chia-Hsu; Chiou, Lih-Chu

    2016-08-01

    The orexin system consists of two peptides, orexin A and B and two receptors, OX1R and OX2R. It is implicated in learning and memory regulation while controversy remains on its role in modulating hippocampal synaptic plasticity in vivo and in vitro. Here, we investigated effects of orexin A on two forms of synaptic plasticity, long-term potentiation (LTP) and depotentiation of field excitatory postsynaptic potentials (fEPSPs), at the Schaffer Collateral-CA1 synapse of mouse hippocampal slices. Orexin A (≧30 nM) attenuated LTP induced by theta burst stimulation (TBS) in a manner antagonized by an OX1R (SB-334867), but not OX2R (EMPA), antagonist. Conversely, at 1 pM, co-application of orexin A prevented the induction of depotentiation induced by low frequency stimulation (LFS), i.e. restoring LTP. This re-potentiation effect of sub-nanomolar orexin A occurred at LFS of 1 Hz, but not 2 Hz, and with LTP induced by either TBS or tetanic stimulation. It was significantly antagonized by SB-334867, EMPA and TCS-1102, selective OX1R, OX2R and dual OXR antagonists, respectively, and prevented by D609, SQ22536 and H89, inhibitors of phospholipase C (PLC), adenylyl cyclase (AC) and protein kinase A (PKA), respectively. LFS-induced depotentiation was antagonized by blockers of NMDA, A1-adenosine and type 1/5 metabotropic glutamate (mGlu1/5) receptors, respectively. However, orexin A (1 pM) did not affect chemical-induced depotentiation by agonists of these receptors. These results suggest that orexin A bidirectionally modulates hippocampal CA1 synaptic plasticity, inhibiting LTP via OX1Rs at moderate concentrations while inducing re-potentiation via OX1Rs and OX2Rs, possibly through PLC and AC-PKA signaling at sub-nanomolar concentrations. PMID:26965217

  16. The Strength of Plastic Bonded Explosives as a Function of Pressure, Strain Rate and Temperature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wiegand, Donald

    2005-07-01

    Measurements as a function of strain rate and temperature have indicated the importance of the polymer binder in determining the strength of plastic bonded explosives at ambient conditions and low strain rate. Recent measurements of strength as a function of pressure further support this conclusion. As pressure or strain rate are increased or temperature is decreased the strength increases as does the strength of many polymers. In addition, at relatively large values of pressure or strain rate and/or relatively low values of temperature the strength is less sensitive to changes of these quantities. These trends suggest that as the polymer binder becomes stronger with increasing pressure or strain rate or with decreasing temperature, the strength of the explosive component of these composites becomes more important in determining the strength of the composite. Results will be presented for plastic bonded explosives, e.g., LX-14, that demonstrate these trends as a function of pressure, strain rate and temperature.

  17. An objective function for Hebbian self-limiting synaptic plasticity rules

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gros, Claudius; Eckmann, Samuel; Echeveste, Rodrigo

    Objective functions, formulated in terms of information theoretical measures with respect to the input and output probability distributions, provide a useful framework for the formulation of guiding principles for information processing systems, such as neural networks. In the present work, a guiding principle for neural plasticity is formulated in terms of an objective function expressed as the Fisher information with respect to an operator that we denote as the synaptic flux. By minimization of this objective function, we obtain Hebbian self-limiting synaptic plasticity rules, avoiding unbounded weight growth. Furthermore, we show how the rules are selective to directions of maximal negative excess kurtosis, making them suitable for independent component analysis. As an application, the non-linear bars problem is studied, in which each neuron is presented with a non-linear superposition of horizontal and vertical bars. We show that, under the here presented rules, the neurons are able to find the independent components of the input.

  18. Plasticity in plant functional traits is shaped by variability in neighbourhood species composition.

    PubMed

    Abakumova, Maria; Zobel, Kristjan; Lepik, Anu; Semchenko, Marina

    2016-07-01

    Plant functional traits can vary widely as a result of phenotypic plasticity to abiotic conditions. Trait variation may also reflect responses to the identity of neighbours, although not all species are equally responsive to their biotic surroundings. We hypothesized that responses to neighbours are shaped by spatial community patterns and resulting variability in neighbour composition. More precisely, we tested the theoretical prediction that plasticity is most likely to evolve if alternative environments (in this case, different neighbour species) are common and encountered at similar frequencies. We estimated the frequencies of encountering different neighbour species in the field for 27 grassland species and measured the aboveground morphological responses of each species to conspecific vs heterospecific neighbours in a common garden. Responses to neighbour identity were dependent on how frequently the experimental neighbours were encountered by the focal species in their home community, with the greatest plasticity observed in species that encountered both neighbours (conspecific and heterospecific) with high and even frequency. Biotic interactions with neighbouring species can impose selection on plasticity in functional traits, which may feed back through trait divergence and niche differentiation to influence species coexistence and community structure. PMID:26996338

  19. Measurement of therapeutic photon beams-induced Cerenkov radiation generated in PMMA- and PS-based plastic optical fibers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Bongsoo; Shin, Sang Hun; Yoo, Wook Jae; Jang, Kyoung Won

    2016-07-01

    In this study, we characterized Cerenkov radiation generated in polystyrene (PS)- and polymethyl methacrylate (PMMA)-based plastic optical fibers (POFs) to select an adequate optical fiber for producing Cerenkov radiation. To determine the relationship between the absorbed dose and the intensity of Cerenkov radiation, we calculated the energy depositions of photon beams and fluxes of electrons inducing Cerenkov radiation using the Monte Carlo N-Particle eXtended code. Also, intensities of Cerenkov radiation generated in PS- and PMMA-based POFs were measured as functions of dose rate and monitor unit. At last, therapeutic photon beams-induced Cerenkov radiation in PS- and PMMA-based POFs was measured according to depths of solid water phantom.

  20. FNIRS-based evaluation of cortical plasticity in children with cerebral palsy undergoing constraint-induced movement therapy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cao, Jianwei; Khan, Bilal; Hervey, Nathan; Tian, Fenghua; Delgado, Mauricio R.; Clegg, Nancy J.; Smith, Linsley; Roberts, Heather; Tulchin-Francis, Kirsten; Shierk, Angela; Shagman, Laura; MacFarlane, Duncan; Liu, Hanli; Alexandrakis, George

    2015-03-01

    Sensorimotor cortex plasticity induced by constraint-induced movement therapy (CIMT) in six children (10.2 ± 2.1 years old) with hemiplegic cerebral palsy (CP) was assessed by functional near-infrared spectroscopy (fNIRS). The activation laterality index and time-to-peak/duration during a finger tapping task were quantified before, immediately after, and six months after CIMT. Five age-matched healthy children (9.8 ± 1.3 years old) were also imaged at the same time points to provide comparative activation metrics for normal controls. In children with CP the activation time-to-peak/duration for all sensorimotor centers displayed significant normalization immediately after CIMT that persisted six months later. In contrast to this longer term improvement in localized activation response, the laterality index that depended on communication between sensorimotor centers improved immediately after CIMT, but relapsed six months later.

  1. Activation of InsP3 receptors is sufficient for inducing graded intrinsic plasticity in rat hippocampal pyramidal neurons

    PubMed Central

    Ashhad, Sufyan; Johnston, Daniel

    2014-01-01

    The synaptic plasticity literature has focused on establishing necessity and sufficiency as two essential and distinct features in causally relating a signaling molecule to plasticity induction, an approach that has been surprisingly lacking in the intrinsic plasticity literature. In this study, we complemented the recently established necessity of inositol trisphosphate (InsP3) receptors (InsP3R) in a form of intrinsic plasticity by asking if InsP3R activation was sufficient to induce intrinsic plasticity in hippocampal neurons. Specifically, incorporation of d-myo-InsP3 in the recording pipette reduced input resistance, maximal impedance amplitude, and temporal summation but increased resonance frequency, resonance strength, sag ratio, and impedance phase lead. Strikingly, the magnitude of plasticity in all these measurements was dependent on InsP3 concentration, emphasizing the graded dependence of such plasticity on InsP3R activation. Mechanistically, we found that this InsP3-induced plasticity depended on hyperpolarization-activated cyclic nucleotide-gated channels. Moreover, this calcium-dependent form of plasticity was critically reliant on the release of calcium through InsP3Rs, the influx of calcium through N-methyl-d-aspartate receptors and voltage-gated calcium channels, and on the protein kinase A pathway. Our results delineate a causal role for InsP3Rs in graded adaptation of neuronal response dynamics, revealing novel regulatory roles for the endoplasmic reticulum in neural coding and homeostasis. PMID:25552640

  2. Effects of L-Dopa and pramipexole on plasticity induced by QPS in human motor cortex.

    PubMed

    Enomoto, Hiroyuki; Terao, Yasuo; Kadowaki, Suguru; Nakamura, Koichiro; Moriya, Arata; Nakatani-Enomoto, Setsu; Kobayashi, Shunsuke; Yoshihara, Akioh; Hanajima, Ritsuko; Ugawa, Yoshikazu

    2015-09-01

    Abnormal plasticity has been reported in the brain of patients with Parkinson's disease (PD), especially in the striatum. Although both L-Dopa and dopamine agonist remain to be the mainstay of the treatment in PD, their differential effects on cortical plasticity are unclear. We applied quadripulse stimulation (QPS) over the primary motor cortex (M1) in ten normal subjects to induce bidirectional long-term motor cortical plasticity. A long-term potentiation (LTP)-like effect was induced in the primary motor cortex (M1) by high-frequency QPS5 (interpulse interval of 5 ms) over M1, whereas a long-term depression (LTD)-like effect was induced by low-frequency QPS50 (interpulse interval of 50 ms), and the effects lasted up to 90 min after the stimulation pulses have ceased. In a double-blind randomized placebo-controlled crossover design, L-Dopa carbidopa 100 mg, pramipexole 1.5 mg [150 mg LED (L-Dopa equivalent dose)], or placebo was administered to the subjects 30 min before applying QPS. L-Dopa enhanced both LTP- and LTD-like plasticity as compared to placebo. In contrast, neither an LTP-like effect nor an LTD-like effect was modulated by pramipexole. The lack of LTP enhancement by pramipexole is compatible with the finding that D1 activation strengthens LTP because pramipexole is almost purely a D2 agonist. The lack of LTD enhancement by pramipexole is also consistent with the finding that both D1 and D2 coactivation is required for LTD. This is the first report to show that dopamine enhances LTD as well as LTP in the human brain and that coactivation of D1 and D2 is a requisite for LTD enhancement in normal humans. PMID:25663170

  3. Brain plasticity and functional losses in the aged: scientific bases for a novel intervention.

    PubMed

    Mahncke, Henry W; Bronstone, Amy; Merzenich, Michael M

    2006-01-01

    Aging is associated with progressive losses in function across multiple systems, including sensation, cognition, memory, motor control, and affect. The traditional view has been that functional decline in aging is unavoidable because it is a direct consequence of brain machinery wearing down over time. In recent years, an alternative perspective has emerged, which elaborates on this traditional view of age-related functional decline. This new viewpoint--based upon decades of research in neuroscience, experimental psychology, and other related fields--argues that as people age, brain plasticity processes with negative consequences begin to dominate brain functioning. Four core factors--reduced schedules of brain activity, noisy processing, weakened neuromodulatory control, and negative learning--interact to create a self-reinforcing downward spiral of degraded brain function in older adults. This downward spiral might begin from reduced brain activity due to behavioral change, from a loss in brain function driven by aging brain machinery, or more likely from both. In aggregate, these interrelated factors promote plastic changes in the brain that result in age-related functional decline. This new viewpoint on the root causes of functional decline immediately suggests a remedial approach. Studies of adult brain plasticity have shown that substantial improvement in function and/or recovery from losses in sensation, cognition, memory, motor control, and affect should be possible, using appropriately designed behavioral training paradigms. Driving brain plasticity with positive outcomes requires engaging older adults in demanding sensory, cognitive, and motor activities on an intensive basis, in a behavioral context designed to re-engage and strengthen the neuromodulatory systems that control learning in adults, with the goal of increasing the fidelity, reliability, and power of cortical representations. Such a training program would serve a substantial unmet need in

  4. IL-1 is a critical regulator of group 2 innate lymphoid cell function and plasticity.

    PubMed

    Ohne, Yoichiro; Silver, Jonathan S; Thompson-Snipes, LuAnn; Collet, Magalie A; Blanck, Jean Philippe; Cantarel, Brandi L; Copenhaver, Alan M; Humbles, Alison A; Liu, Yong-Jun

    2016-06-01

    Group 2 innate lymphoid cells (ILC2 cells) are important for type 2 immune responses and are activated by the epithelial cytokines interleukin 33 (IL-33), IL-25 and thymic stromal lymphopoietin (TSLP). Here we demonstrated that IL-1β was a critical activator of ILC2 cells, inducing proliferation and cytokine production and regulating the expression of epithelial cytokine receptors. IL-1β also governed ILC2 plasticity by inducing low expression of the transcription factor T-bet and the cytokine receptor chain IL-12Rβ2, which enabled the conversion of these cells into an ILC1 phenotype in response to IL-12. This transition was marked by an atypical chromatin landscape characterized by the simultaneous transcriptional accessibility of the locus encoding interferon-γ (IFN-γ) and the loci encoding IL-5 and IL-13. Finally, IL-1β potentiated ILC2 activation and plasticity in vivo, and IL-12 acted as the switch that determined an ILC2-versus-ILC1 response. Thus, we have identified a previously unknown role for IL-1β in facilitating ILC2 maturation and plasticity. PMID:27111142

  5. Notch Is Required in Adult Drosophila Sensory Neurons for Morphological and Functional Plasticity of the Olfactory Circuit

    PubMed Central

    Struhl, Gary

    2015-01-01

    Olfactory receptor neurons (ORNs) convey odor information to the central brain, but like other sensory neurons were thought to play a passive role in memory formation and storage. Here we show that Notch, part of an evolutionarily conserved intercellular signaling pathway, is required in adult Drosophila ORNs for the structural and functional plasticity of olfactory glomeruli that is induced by chronic odor exposure. Specifically, we show that Notch activity in ORNs is necessary for the odor specific increase in the volume of glomeruli that occurs as a consequence of prolonged odor exposure. Calcium imaging experiments indicate that Notch in ORNs is also required for the chronic odor induced changes in the physiology of ORNs and the ensuing changes in the physiological response of their second order projection neurons (PNs). We further show that Notch in ORNs acts by both canonical cleavage-dependent and non-canonical cleavage-independent pathways. The Notch ligand Delta (Dl) in PNs switches the balance between the pathways. These data define a circuit whereby, in conjunction with odor, N activity in the periphery regulates the activity of neurons in the central brain and Dl in the central brain regulates N activity in the periphery. Our work highlights the importance of experience dependent plasticity at the first olfactory synapse. PMID:26011623

  6. Classification of plastic materials by imaging laser-induced ablation plumes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Negre, Erwan; Motto-Ros, Vincent; Pelascini, Frederic; Yu, Jin

    2016-08-01

    A method of rapid classification and identification of plastic materials has been studied in this work. Such method is based on fast spectroscopic imagery of laser-induced ablation plume on plastics to be analyzed. More specifically, a classification schema has been developed first according to the nature of the CC bonds which characterize the polymer matrix. Our results show that the spatial distribution and the evolution of the molecular species in the ablation plume, such as C2 and CN, exhibit clear different behaviors for polymers without any native CC bond, with CC single bonds or with CC double bonds respectively. Therefore the morphological parameters of the populations of the molecular species extracted from the time-resolved spectroscopic images of the plumes provide efficient indicators to classify the polymers characterized by the above mentioned different kinds of CC bonds. When dealing with different polymers with the same kind of CC bond, CC single bond for instance, other indicators should be introduced to provide the further discrimination. Such indicators can be for example a specific native molecular bond other than CC bonds, CN for example, the total emission intensity of which may exhibit specific time evolution. The robustness of the developed classification schema has been then studied with respect to two of the most frequently used additives in plastics fabrication, graphite and titanium. Our results show a negligible influence of these additives in the morphology of the populations of the molecular species when such additives are mixed into the polymer matrix with the percentages usually used in plastics productions, which demonstrates the validity of the developed classification schema for plastics.

  7. Posttranslational marks control architectural and functional plasticity of the nuclear pore complex basket.

    PubMed

    Niño, Carlos A; Guet, David; Gay, Alexandre; Brutus, Sergine; Jourquin, Frédéric; Mendiratta, Shweta; Salamero, Jean; Géli, Vincent; Dargemont, Catherine

    2016-01-18

    The nuclear pore complex (NPC) serves as both the unique gate between the nucleus and the cytoplasm and a major platform that coordinates nucleocytoplasmic exchanges, gene expression, and genome integrity. To understand how the NPC integrates these functional constraints, we dissected here the posttranslational modifications of the nuclear basket protein Nup60 and analyzed how they intervene to control the plasticity of the NPC. Combined approaches highlight the role of monoubiquitylation in regulating the association dynamics of Nup60 and its partner, Nup2, with the NPC through an interaction with Nup84, a component of the Y complex. Although major nuclear transport routes are not regulated by Nup60 modifications, monoubiquitylation of Nup60 is stimulated upon genotoxic stress and regulates the DNA-damage response and telomere repair. Together, these data reveal an original mechanism contributing to the plasticity of the NPC at a molecular-organization and functional level. PMID:26783300

  8. Posttranslational marks control architectural and functional plasticity of the nuclear pore complex basket

    PubMed Central

    Niño, Carlos A.; Guet, David; Gay, Alexandre; Brutus, Sergine; Jourquin, Frédéric; Mendiratta, Shweta; Salamero, Jean; Géli, Vincent

    2016-01-01

    The nuclear pore complex (NPC) serves as both the unique gate between the nucleus and the cytoplasm and a major platform that coordinates nucleocytoplasmic exchanges, gene expression, and genome integrity. To understand how the NPC integrates these functional constraints, we dissected here the posttranslational modifications of the nuclear basket protein Nup60 and analyzed how they intervene to control the plasticity of the NPC. Combined approaches highlight the role of monoubiquitylation in regulating the association dynamics of Nup60 and its partner, Nup2, with the NPC through an interaction with Nup84, a component of the Y complex. Although major nuclear transport routes are not regulated by Nup60 modifications, monoubiquitylation of Nup60 is stimulated upon genotoxic stress and regulates the DNA-damage response and telomere repair. Together, these data reveal an original mechanism contributing to the plasticity of the NPC at a molecular-organization and functional level. PMID:26783300

  9. Cocaine-induced adaptations in cellular redox balance contributes to enduring behavioral plasticity.

    PubMed

    Uys, Joachim D; Knackstedt, Lori; Hurt, Phelipe; Tew, Kenneth D; Manevich, Yefim; Hutchens, Steven; Townsend, Danyelle M; Kalivas, Peter W

    2011-11-01

    Impaired glutamate homeostasis in the nucleus accumbens has been linked to cocaine relapse in animal models, and results in part from cocaine-induced downregulation of the cystine-glutamate exchanger. In addition to regulating extracellular glutamate, the uptake of cystine by the exchanger is a rate-limiting step in the synthesis of glutathione (GSH). GSH is critical for balancing cellular redox in response to oxidative stress. Cocaine administration induces oxidative stress, and we first determined if downregulated cystine-glutamate exchange alters redox homeostasis in rats withdrawn from daily cocaine injections and then challenged with acute cocaine. Among the daily cocaine-induced changes in redox homeostasis were an increase in protein S-glutathionylation and a decrease in expression of GSH-S-transferase pi (GSTpi). To mimic reduced GSTpi, a genetic mouse model of GSTpi deletion or pharmacological inhibition of GSTpi by administering ketoprofen during daily cocaine administration was used. The capacity of cocaine to induce conditioned place preference or locomotor sensitization was augmented, indicating that reducing GSTpi may contribute to cocaine-induced behavioral neuroplasticity. Conversely, an acute cocaine challenge after withdrawal from daily cocaine elicited a marked increase in accumbens GSTpi, and the expression of behavioral sensitization to a cocaine challenge injection was inhibited by ketoprofen pretreatment; supporting a protective effect by the acute cocaine-induced rise in GSTpi. Together, these data indicate that cocaine-induced oxidative stress induces changes in GSTpi that contribute to cocaine-induced behavioral plasticity. PMID:21796101

  10. Cocaine-Induced Adaptations in Cellular Redox Balance Contributes to Enduring Behavioral Plasticity

    PubMed Central

    Uys, Joachim D; Knackstedt, Lori; Hurt, Phelipe; Tew, Kenneth D; Manevich, Yefim; Hutchens, Steven; Townsend, Danyelle M; Kalivas, Peter W

    2011-01-01

    Impaired glutamate homeostasis in the nucleus accumbens has been linked to cocaine relapse in animal models, and results in part from cocaine-induced downregulation of the cystine–glutamate exchanger. In addition to regulating extracellular glutamate, the uptake of cystine by the exchanger is a rate-limiting step in the synthesis of glutathione (GSH). GSH is critical for balancing cellular redox in response to oxidative stress. Cocaine administration induces oxidative stress, and we first determined if downregulated cystine–glutamate exchange alters redox homeostasis in rats withdrawn from daily cocaine injections and then challenged with acute cocaine. Among the daily cocaine-induced changes in redox homeostasis were an increase in protein S-glutathionylation and a decrease in expression of GSH-S-transferase pi (GSTpi). To mimic reduced GSTpi, a genetic mouse model of GSTpi deletion or pharmacological inhibition of GSTpi by administering ketoprofen during daily cocaine administration was used. The capacity of cocaine to induce conditioned place preference or locomotor sensitization was augmented, indicating that reducing GSTpi may contribute to cocaine-induced behavioral neuroplasticity. Conversely, an acute cocaine challenge after withdrawal from daily cocaine elicited a marked increase in accumbens GSTpi, and the expression of behavioral sensitization to a cocaine challenge injection was inhibited by ketoprofen pretreatment; supporting a protective effect by the acute cocaine-induced rise in GSTpi. Together, these data indicate that cocaine-induced oxidative stress induces changes in GSTpi that contribute to cocaine-induced behavioral plasticity. PMID:21796101

  11. Multiscale model of global inner-core anisotropy induced by hcp alloy plasticity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lincot, A.; Cardin, Ph.; Deguen, R.; Merkel, S.

    2016-02-01

    The Earth's solid inner core exhibits a global seismic anisotropy of several percents. It results from a coherent alignment of anisotropic Fe alloy crystals through the inner-core history that can be sampled by present-day seismic observations. By combining self-consistent polycrystal plasticity, inner-core formation models, Monte-Carlo search for elastic moduli, and simulations of seismic measurements, we introduce a multiscale model that can reproduce a global seismic anisotropy of several percents aligned with the Earth's rotation axis. Conditions for a successful model are an hexagonal close packed structure for the inner-core Fe alloy, plastic deformation by pyramidal slip, and large-scale flow induced by a low-degree inner-core formation model. For global anisotropies ranging between 1 and 3%, the elastic anisotropy in the single crystal ranges from 5 to 20% with larger velocities along the c axis.

  12. Jump-in induced plastic yield onset of approaching microcontacts in the presence of adhesion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kadin, Y.; Kligerman, Y.; Etsion, I.

    2008-01-01

    Approach between two deformable microbodies in the presence of adhesion is sometimes accompanied by discontinuous change of the surface profile at the narrow region near their summits (jump-in phenomenon). Previous studies of adhesive spherical contact showed that neck formation during jump-in always involves onset of local plastic yield near the edge of the contact zone. The current paper reveals that pure elastic jump-in is also feasible. The solution is based on a Lennard-Jones potential in combination with the von Mises yield criterion. The theoretical strength rather than the engineering yield strength of the material is used and the sufficient condition for jump-in induced onset of plastic yield under this extreme strength is discussed.

  13. RU24722 induces spatially organized phenotypic plasticity in the locus coeruleus.

    PubMed

    Debure, L I; Bezin, L; Ginovart, N; Rousset, C; Pujol, J F; Weissmann, D

    1994-09-01

    The plasticity of tyrosine hydroxylase (TH) expression in rat locus coeruleus (LC) was evaluated after RU24722 TH induction using, as a new parameter of characterization, the quantitative topology of LC defined by TH-positive cells. This new phenotype was spatially organized into cell subpopulations in the medial LC, dorsal and ventro-lateral to the initial perikaryal space. Reserpine and parachlorophenylalanine, which elicited a similar increase in the TH content, failed to induce a significant change in the number of TH-expressing cells. Activation of TH expression is not sufficient to reveal the existence of such a plasticity and some original but still unknown mechanism(s) of control of TH expression is affected by RU24722. PMID:7827334

  14. Myelin Associated Inhibitors: A Link Between Injury-Induced and Experience-Dependent Plasticity

    PubMed Central

    Akbik, Feras; Cafferty, William B. J.; Strittmatter, Stephen M.

    2011-01-01

    SUMMARY In the adult, both neurologic recovery and anatomical growth after a CNS injury are limited. Two classes of growth inhibitors, myelin associated inhibitors (MAIs) and extracellular matrix associated inhibitors, limit both functional recovery and anatomical rearrangements in animal models of spinal cord injury. Here we focus on how MAIs limit a wide spectrum of growth that includes regeneration, sprouting, and plasticity in both the intact and lesioned CNS. Three classic myelin associated inhibitors, Nogo-A, MAG, and OMgp, signal through their common receptors, Nogo-66 Receptor-1 (NgR1) and Paired-Immunoglobulin-like-Receptor-1 (PirB), to regulate cytoskeletal dynamics and inhibit growth. Initially described as inhibitors of axonal regeneration, subsequent work has demonstrated that MAIs also limit activity and experience-dependent plasticity in the intact, adult CNS. MAIs therefore represent a point of convergence for plasticity that limits anatomical rearrangements regardless of the inciting stimulus, blurring the distinction between injury studies and more “basic” plasticity studies. PMID:21699896

  15. Cortical Plasticity Induced by Spike-Triggered Microstimulation in Primate Somatosensory Cortex

    PubMed Central

    Song, Weiguo; Kerr, Cliff C.; Lytton, William W.; Francis, Joseph T.

    2013-01-01

    Electrical stimulation of the nervous system for therapeutic purposes, such as deep brain stimulation in the treatment of Parkinson’s disease, has been used for decades. Recently, increased attention has focused on using microstimulation to restore functions as diverse as somatosensation and memory. However, how microstimulation changes the neural substrate is still not fully understood. Microstimulation may cause cortical changes that could either compete with or complement natural neural processes, and could result in neuroplastic changes rendering the region dysfunctional or even epileptic. As part of our efforts to produce neuroprosthetic devices and to further study the effects of microstimulation on the cortex, we stimulated and recorded from microelectrode arrays in the hand area of the primary somatosensory cortex (area 1) in two awake macaque monkeys. We applied a simple neuroprosthetic microstimulation protocol to a pair of electrodes in the area 1 array, using either random pulses or pulses time-locked to the recorded spiking activity of a reference neuron. This setup was replicated using a computer model of the thalamocortical system, which consisted of 1980 spiking neurons distributed among six cortical layers and two thalamic nuclei. Experimentally, we found that spike-triggered microstimulation induced cortical plasticity, as shown by increased unit-pair mutual information, while random microstimulation did not. In addition, there was an increased response to touch following spike-triggered microstimulation, along with decreased neural variability. The computer model successfully reproduced both qualitative and quantitative aspects of the experimental findings. The physiological findings of this study suggest that even simple microstimulation protocols can be used to increase somatosensory information flow. PMID:23472086

  16. Neuropeptide Y Gates a Stress-Induced, Long-Lasting Plasticity in the Sympathetic Nervous System

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Qian; Wang, Manqi

    2013-01-01

    Acute stress evokes the fight-or-flight reflex, which via release of the catecholamine hormones affects the function of every major organ. Although the reflex is transient, it has lasting consequences that produce an exaggerated response when stress is reexperienced. How this change is encoded is not known. We investigated whether the reflex affects the adrenal component of the sympathetic nervous system, a major branch of the stress response. Mice were briefly exposed to the cold-water forced swim test (FST) which evoked an increase in circulating catecholamines. Although this hormonal response was transient, the FST led to a long-lasting increase in the catecholamine secretory capacity measured amperometrically from chromaffin cells and in the expression of tyrosine hydroxylase. A variety of approaches indicate that these changes are regulated postsynaptically by neuropeptide Y (NPY), an adrenal cotransmitter. Using immunohistochemistry, RT-PCR, and NPY(GFP) BAC mice, we find that NPY is synthesized by all chromaffin cells. Stress failed to increase secretory capacity in NPY knock-out mice. Genetic or pharmacological interference with NPY and Y1 (but not Y2 or Y5) receptor signaling attenuated the stress-induced change in tyrosine hydroxylase expression. These results indicate that, under basal conditions, adrenal signaling is tonically inhibited by NPY, but stress overrides this autocrine negative feedback loop. Because acute stress leads to a lasting increase in secretory capacity in vivo but does not alter sympathetic tone, these postsynaptic changes appear to be an adaptive response. We conclude that the sympathetic limb of the stress response exhibits an activity-dependent form of long-lasting plasticity. PMID:23904607

  17. A role for synaptic plasticity in the adolescent development of executive function

    PubMed Central

    Selemon, L D

    2013-01-01

    Adolescent brain maturation is characterized by the emergence of executive function mediated by the prefrontal cortex, e.g., goal planning, inhibition of impulsive behavior and set shifting. Synaptic pruning of excitatory contacts is the signature morphologic event of late brain maturation during adolescence. Mounting evidence suggests that glutamate receptor-mediated synaptic plasticity, in particular long term depression (LTD), is important for elimination of synaptic contacts in brain development. This review examines the possibility (1) that LTD mechanisms are enhanced in the prefrontal cortex during adolescence due to ongoing synaptic pruning in this late developing cortex and (2) that enhanced synaptic plasticity in the prefrontal cortex represents a key molecular substrate underlying the critical period for maturation of executive function. Molecular sites of interaction between environmental factors, such as alcohol and stress, and glutamate receptor mediated plasticity are considered. The accentuated negative impact of these factors during adolescence may be due in part to interference with LTD mechanisms that refine prefrontal cortical circuitry and when disrupted derail normal maturation of executive function. Diminished prefrontal cortical control over risk-taking behavior could further exacerbate negative outcomes associated with these behaviors, as for example addiction and depression. Greater insight into the neurobiology of the adolescent brain is needed to fully understand the molecular basis for heightened vulnerability during adolescence to the injurious effects of substance abuse and stress. PMID:23462989

  18. Functional Plasticity in Childhood Brain Disorders: When, What, How, and Whom to Assess

    PubMed Central

    Dennis, Maureen; Spiegler, Brenda J.; Simic, Nevena; Sinopoli, Katia J.; Wilkinson, Amy; Yeates, Keith Owen; Taylor, H. Gerry; Bigler, Erin D.; Fletcher, Jack M.

    2014-01-01

    At every point in the lifespan, the brain balances malleable processes representing neural plasticity that promote change with homeostatic processes that promote stability. Whether a child develops typically or with brain injury, his or her neural and behavioral outcome is constructed through transactions between plastic and homeostatic processes and the environment. In clinical research with children in whom the developing brain has been malformed or injured, behavioral outcomes provide an index of the result of plasticity, homeostasis, and environmental transactions. When should we assess outcome in relation to age at brain insult, time since brain insult, and age of the child at testing? What should we measure? Functions involving reacting to the past and predicting the future, as well as social-affective skills, are important. How should we assess outcome? Information from performance variability, direct measures and informants, overt and covert measures, and laboratory and ecological measures should be considered. In whom are we assessing outcome? Assessment should be cognizant of individual differences in gene, socio-economic status (SES), parenting, nutrition, and interpersonal supports, which are moderators that interact with other factors influencing functional outcome. PMID:24821533

  19. Young blood reverses age-related impairments in cognitive function and synaptic plasticity in mice.

    PubMed

    Villeda, Saul A; Plambeck, Kristopher E; Middeldorp, Jinte; Castellano, Joseph M; Mosher, Kira I; Luo, Jian; Smith, Lucas K; Bieri, Gregor; Lin, Karin; Berdnik, Daniela; Wabl, Rafael; Udeochu, Joe; Wheatley, Elizabeth G; Zou, Bende; Simmons, Danielle A; Xie, Xinmin S; Longo, Frank M; Wyss-Coray, Tony

    2014-06-01

    As human lifespan increases, a greater fraction of the population is suffering from age-related cognitive impairments, making it important to elucidate a means to combat the effects of aging. Here we report that exposure of an aged animal to young blood can counteract and reverse pre-existing effects of brain aging at the molecular, structural, functional and cognitive level. Genome-wide microarray analysis of heterochronic parabionts--in which circulatory systems of young and aged animals are connected--identified synaptic plasticity-related transcriptional changes in the hippocampus of aged mice. Dendritic spine density of mature neurons increased and synaptic plasticity improved in the hippocampus of aged heterochronic parabionts. At the cognitive level, systemic administration of young blood plasma into aged mice improved age-related cognitive impairments in both contextual fear conditioning and spatial learning and memory. Structural and cognitive enhancements elicited by exposure to young blood are mediated, in part, by activation of the cyclic AMP response element binding protein (Creb) in the aged hippocampus. Our data indicate that exposure of aged mice to young blood late in life is capable of rejuvenating synaptic plasticity and improving cognitive function. PMID:24793238

  20. Narrative skill in children with early unilateral brain injury: a possible limit to functional plasticity.

    PubMed

    Demir, Ozlem Ece; Levine, Susan C; Goldin-Meadow, Susan

    2010-07-01

    Children with pre- or perinatal brain injury (PL) exhibit marked plasticity for language learning. Previous work has focused mostly on the emergence of earlier-developing skills, such as vocabulary and syntax. Here we ask whether this plasticity for earlier-developing aspects of language extends to more complex, later-developing language functions by examining the narrative production of children with PL. Using an elicitation technique that involves asking children to create stories de novo in response to a story stem, we collected narratives from 11 children with PL and 20 typically developing (TD) children. Narratives were analysed for length, diversity of the vocabulary used, use of complex syntax, complexity of the macro-level narrative structure and use of narrative evaluation. Children's language performance on vocabulary and syntax tasks outside the narrative context was also measured. Findings show that children with PL produced shorter stories, used less diverse vocabulary, produced structurally less complex stories at the macro-level, and made fewer inferences regarding the cognitive states of the story characters. These differences in the narrative task emerged even though children with PL did not differ from TD children on vocabulary and syntax tasks outside the narrative context. Thus, findings suggest that there may be limitations to the plasticity for language functions displayed by children with PL, and that these limitations may be most apparent in complex, decontextualized language tasks such as narrative production. PMID:20590727

  1. Flow-induced birefringence: the hidden PSF killer in high performance injection-molded plastic optics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chidley, Matthew D.; Tkaczyk, Tomasz; Kester, Robert; Descour, Michael R.

    2006-02-01

    A 7-mm OD, NA = 1 water immersion injection-molded plastic endoscope objective has been fabricated for a laser scanning fiber confocal reflectance microscope (FCRM) system specifically designed for in vivo detection of cervical and oral pre-cancers. Injection-molded optics was selected for the ability to incorporate aspheric surfaces into the optical design and its high volume capabilities. Our goal is high performance disposable endoscope probes. This objective has been built and tested as a stand-alone optical system, a Strehl ratio greater than 0.6 has been obtained. One of the limiting factors of optical performance is believed to be flow-induced birefringence. We have investigated different configurations for birefringence visualization and believe the circular polariscope is most useful for inspection of injection-molded plastic optics. In an effort to decrease birefringence effects, two experiments were conducted. They included: (1) annealing of the optics after fabrication and (2) modifying the injection molding prameters (packing pressures, injection rates, and hold time). While the second technique showed improvement, the annealing process could not improve quality without physically warping the lenses. Therefore, to effectively reduce flow-induced birefringence, molding conditions have to be carefully selected. These parameters are strongly connected to the physical part geometry. Both optical design and fabrication technology have to be considered together to deliver low birefringence while maintaining the required manufacturing tolerances. In this paper we present some of our current results that illustrate how flow-induced birefringence can degrade high performance injection-molded plastic optical systems.

  2. Experimental tonic hand pain modulates the corticospinal plasticity induced by a subsequent hand deafferentation.

    PubMed

    Mavromatis, N; Gagné, M; Voisin, J I A V; Reilly, K T; Mercier, C

    2016-08-25

    Sensorimotor reorganization is believed to play an important role in the development and maintenance of phantom limb pain, but pain itself might modulate sensorimotor plasticity induced by deafferentation. Clinical and basic research support this idea, as pain prior to amputation increases the risk of developing post-amputation pain. The aim of this study was to examine the influence of experimental tonic cutaneous hand pain on the plasticity induced by temporary ischemic hand deafferentation. Sixteen healthy subjects participated in two experimental sessions (Pain, No Pain) in which transcranial magnetic stimulation was used to assess corticospinal excitability in two forearm muscles (flexor carpi radialis and flexor digitorum superficialis) before (T0, T10, T20, and T40) and after (T60 and T75) inflation of a cuff around the wrist. The cuff was inflated at T45 in both sessions and in the Pain session capsaicin cream was applied on the dorsum of the hand at T5. Corticospinal excitability was significantly greater during the Post-inflation phase (p=0.002) and increased similarly in both muscles (p=0.861). Importantly, the excitability increase in the Post-inflation phase was greater for the Pain than the No-Pain condition (p=0.006). Post-hoc analyses revealed a significant difference between the two conditions during the Post-inflation phase (p=0.030) but no difference during the Pre-inflation phase (p=0.601). In other words, the corticospinal facilitation was greater when pain was present prior to cuff inflation. These results indicate that pain can modulate the plasticity induced by another event, and could partially explain the sensorimotor reorganization often reported in chronic pain populations. PMID:27291642

  3. Aluminizing a Ni sheet through severe plastic deformation induced by ball collisions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Romankov, S.; Shchetinin, I. V.; Park, Y. C.

    2015-07-01

    Aluminizing a Ni sheet was performed through severe plastic deformation induced by ball collisions. The Ni sheet was fixed in the center of a mechanically vibrated vial between two connected parts. The balls were loaded into the vial on both sides of the Ni disk. Al disks, which were fixed on the top and the bottom of the vial, served as the sources of Al contamination. During processing, the Ni sheet was subject to intense ball collisions. The Al fragments were transferred and alloyed to the surface of the Ni sheet by these collisions. The combined effects of deformation-induced plastic flow, mechanical intermixing, and grain refinement resulted in the formation of a dense, continuous nanostructured Al layer on the Ni surface on both sides of the sheet. The Al layer consisted of Al grains with an average size of about 40 nm. The Al layer was reinforced with nano-sized Ni flakes that were introduced from the Ni surface during processing. The local amorphization at the Ni/Al interface revealed that the bonding between Ni and Al was formed by mechanical intermixing of atomic layers at the interface. The hardness of the fabricated Al layer was 10 times that of the initial Al plate. The ball collisions destroyed the initial rolling texture of the Ni sheet and induced the formation of the mixed [1 0 0] + [1 1 1] fiber texture. The laminar rolling structure of the Ni was transformed into an ultrafine grain structure.

  4. Identification of Functional Synaptic Plasticity from Spiking Activities Using Nonlinear Dynamical Modeling

    PubMed Central

    Song, Dong; Chan, Rosa H. M.; Robinson, Brian S.; Marmarelis, Vasilis Z.; Opris, Ioan; Hampson, Robert E.; Deadwyler, Sam A.; Berger, Theodore W.

    2014-01-01

    This paper presents a systems identification approach for studying the long-term synaptic plasticity using natural spiking activities. This approach consists of three modeling steps. First, a multi-input, single-output (MISO), nonlinear dynamical spiking neuron model is formulated to estimate and represent the synaptic strength in means of functional connectivity between input and output neurons. Second, this MISO model is extended to a nonstationary form to track the time-varying properties of the synaptic strength. Finally, a Volterra modeling method is used to extract the synaptic learning rule, e.g., spike-timing-dependent plasticity, for the explanation of the input-output nonstationarity as the consequence of the past input-output spiking patterns. This framework is developed to study the underlying mechanisms of learning and memory formation in behaving animals, and may serve as the computational basis for building the next-generation adaptive cortical prostheses. PMID:25280984

  5. The maternal brain under stress: Consequences for adaptive peripartum plasticity and its potential functional implications.

    PubMed

    Slattery, David A; Hillerer, Katharina M

    2016-04-01

    The peripartum period represents a time during which all mammalian species undergo substantial physiological and behavioural changes, which prepare the female for the demands of motherhood. In addition to behavioural and physiological alterations, numerous brain regions, such as the medial prefrontal cortex, olfactory bulb, medial amygdala and hippocampus are subject to substantial peripartum-associated neuronal, dendritic and synaptic plasticity. These changes, which are temporally- and spatially-distinct, are strongly influenced by gonadal and adrenal hormones, such as estrogen and cortisol/corticosterone, which undergo dramatic fluctuations across this period. In this review, we describe our current knowledge regarding these plasticity changes and describe how stress affects such normal adaptations. Finally, we discuss the mechanisms potentially underlying these neuronal, dendritic and synaptic changes and their functional relevance for the mother and her offspring. PMID:26828151

  6. Tau pathology induces loss of GABAergic interneurons leading to altered synaptic plasticity and behavioral impairments

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Tau is a microtubule stabilizing protein and is mainly expressed in neurons. Tau aggregation into oligomers and tangles is considered an important pathological event in tauopathies, such as frontotemporal dementia (FTD) and Alzheimer’s disease (AD). Tauopathies are also associated with deficits in synaptic plasticity such as long-term potentiation (LTP), but the specific role of tau in the manifestation of these deficiencies is not well-understood. We examined long lasting forms of synaptic plasticity in JNPL3 (BL6) mice expressing mutant tau that is identified in some inherited FTDs. Results We found that aged (>12 months) JNPL3 (BL6) mice exhibit enhanced hippocampal late-phase (L-LTP), while young JNPL3 (BL6) mice (age 6 months) displayed normal L-LTP. This enhanced L-LTP in aged JNPL3 (BL6) mice was rescued with the GABAAR agonist, zolpidem, suggesting a loss of GABAergic function. Indeed, we found that mutant mice displayed a reduction in hippocampal GABAergic interneurons. Finally, we also found that expression of mutant tau led to severe sensorimotor-gating and hippocampus-dependent memory deficits in the aged JNPL3 (BL6) mice. Conclusions We show for the first time that hippocampal GABAergic function is impaired by pathological tau protein, leading to altered synaptic plasticity and severe memory deficits. Increased understanding of the molecular mechanisms underlying the synaptic failure in AD and FTD is critical to identifying targets for therapies to restore cognitive deficiencies associated with tauopathies. PMID:24252661

  7. Why and How Physical Activity Promotes Experience-Induced Brain Plasticity

    PubMed Central

    Kempermann, Gerd; Fabel, Klaus; Ehninger, Dan; Babu, Harish; Leal-Galicia, Perla; Garthe, Alexander; Wolf, Susanne A.

    2010-01-01

    Adult hippocampal neurogenesis is an unusual case of brain plasticity, since new neurons (and not just neurites and synapses) are added to the network in an activity-dependent way. At the behavioral level the plasticity-inducing stimuli include both physical and cognitive activity. In reductionistic animal studies these types of activity can be studied separately in paradigms like voluntary wheel running and environmental enrichment. In both of these, adult neurogenesis is increased but the net effect is primarily due to different mechanisms at the cellular level. Locomotion appears to stimulate the precursor cells, from which adult neurogenesis originates, to increased proliferation and maintenance over time, whereas environmental enrichment, as well as learning, predominantly promotes survival of immature neurons, that is the progeny of the proliferating precursor cells. Surprisingly, these effects are additive: boosting the potential for adult neurogenesis by physical activity increases the recruitment of cells following cognitive stimulation in an enriched environment. Why is that? We argue that locomotion actually serves as an intrinsic feedback mechanism, signaling to the brain, including its neural precursor cells, increasing the likelihood of cognitive challenges. In the wild (other than in front of a TV), no separation of physical and cognitive activity occurs. Physical activity might thus be much more than a generally healthy garnish to leading “an active life” but an evolutionarily fundamental aspect of “activity,” which is needed to provide the brain and its systems of plastic adaptation with the appropriate regulatory input and feedback. PMID:21151782

  8. Softening Behavior of a Cold Rolled High-Mn Twinning-Induced Plasticity Steel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dastranjy Nezhadfar, P.; Rezaeian, A.; Sojudi Papkiadeh, M.

    2015-10-01

    The present study deals with the static and dynamic microstructural evolution of a high-Mn twinning-induced plasticity steel. Static recrystallization (SRX) is considered through cold rolling followed by annealing with different holding times. Dynamic recrystallization (DRX) was explored by hot compression tests at different temperatures and strain rates. The microstructural observations demonstrated that new grains nucleate at the prior grain boundaries and grain size decreased when cold rolling was followed by annealing. Additionally to the grain size reduction due to the SRX, nucleation sites for DRX increased. It is shown that flow stress level increased as a result of grain refinement caused by static and DRX.

  9. D03 Ordered Phase Strengthening in Dual Phase Twinning-Induced Plasticity Steel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Imandoust, A.; Zarei-Hanzaki, A.; Ou, Keng-Liang; Yu, Chih-Hua

    2015-05-01

    The formation of Fe3Al (D03 type) ordered phase in the ferrite phase has been identified in a dual phase twinning-induced plasticity (TWIP) steel through TEM studies. The presence of D03 ordered phase was detected in water-quenched microstructure, and its evolution during heating at moderate temperatures (200-500 °C) was properly addressed. Based on the present results, the precipitation of D03 ordered phase during heating at moderate temperatures could be considered as a new strengthening mechanism in dual phase TWIP steels.

  10. Inactivity-induced respiratory plasticity: protecting the drive to breathe in disorders that reduce respiratory neural activity.

    PubMed

    Strey, K A; Baertsch, N A; Baker-Herman, T L

    2013-11-01

    Multiple forms of plasticity are activated following reduced respiratory neural activity. For example, in ventilated rats, a central neural apnea elicits a rebound increase in phrenic and hypoglossal burst amplitude upon resumption of respiratory neural activity, forms of plasticity called inactivity-induced phrenic and hypoglossal motor facilitation (iPMF and iHMF), respectively. Here, we provide a conceptual framework for plasticity following reduced respiratory neural activity to guide future investigations. We review mechanisms giving rise to iPMF and iHMF, present new data suggesting that inactivity-induced plasticity is observed in inspiratory intercostals (iIMF) and point out gaps in our knowledge. We then survey conditions relevant to human health characterized by reduced respiratory neural activity and discuss evidence that inactivity-induced plasticity is elicited during these conditions. Understanding the physiological impact and circumstances in which inactivity-induced respiratory plasticity is elicited may yield novel insights into the treatment of disorders characterized by reductions in respiratory neural activity. PMID:23816599

  11. Inactivity-induced respiratory plasticity: Protecting the drive to breathe in disorders that reduce respiratory neural activity☆

    PubMed Central

    Strey, K.A.; Baertsch, N.A.; Baker-Herman, T.L.

    2013-01-01

    Multiple forms of plasticity are activated following reduced respiratory neural activity. For example, in ventilated rats, a central neural apnea elicits a rebound increase in phrenic and hypoglossal burst amplitude upon resumption of respiratory neural activity, forms of plasticity called inactivity-induced phrenic and hypoglossal motor facilitation (iPMF and iHMF), respectively. Here, we provide a conceptual framework for plasticity following reduced respiratory neural activity to guide future investigations. We review mechanisms giving rise to iPMF and iHMF, present new data suggesting that inactivity-induced plasticity is observed in inspiratory intercostals (iIMF) and point out gaps in our knowledge. We then survey conditions relevant to human health characterized by reduced respiratory neural activity and discuss evidence that inactivity-induced plasticity is elicited during these conditions. Understanding the physiological impact and circumstances in which inactivity-induced respiratory plasticity is elicited may yield novel insights into the treatment of disorders characterized by reductions in respiratory neural activity. PMID:23816599

  12. Alcohol Elicits Functional and Structural Plasticity Selectively in Dopamine D1 Receptor-Expressing Neurons of the Dorsomedial Striatum

    PubMed Central

    Cheng, Yifeng; Wang, Xuehua; Roltsch Hellard, Emily; Ma, Tengfei; Gil, Hannah; Ben Hamida, Sami

    2015-01-01

    Addiction is thought to be a maladaptive form of learning and memory caused by drug-evoked aberrant synaptic plasticity. We previously showed that alcohol facilitates synaptic plasticity in the dorsomedial striatum (DMS), a brain region that drives goal-directed behaviors. The majority of DMS cells are medium spiny neurons (MSNs) that express dopamine D1 receptors (D1Rs) or D2 receptors (D2Rs), which drive “Go” or “No-Go” behaviors, respectively. Here, we report that alcohol induces cell type-specific synaptic and structural plasticity in the DMS. Using mice that express a fluorescence marker to visualize D1R or D2R MSNs, we show that repeated cycles of systemic administration of alcohol or alcohol consumption induces a long-lasting increase in AMPAR activity specifically in DMS D1R but not in D2R MSNs. Importantly, we report that alcohol consumption increases the complexity of dendritic branching and the density of mature mushroom-shaped spines selectively in DMS D1R MSNs. Finally, we found that blockade of D1R but not D2R activity in the DMS attenuates alcohol consumption. Together, these data suggest that alcohol intake produces profound functional and structural plasticity events in a subpopulation of neurons in the DMS that control reinforcement-related learning. SIGNIFICANCE STATEMENT Alcohol addiction is considered maladaptive learning and memory processes. Here we unraveled a long-lasting cellular mechanism that may contribute to the memory of alcohol-seeking behaviors. Specifically, we found that alcohol consumption produces a long-lasting enhancement of channel activity and persistent alterations of neuronal morphology in a part of the brain (DMS) that controls alcohol-drinking behaviors. Furthermore, we show that these alterations occur only in a subpopulation of neurons that positively control reward and reinforcement of drugs of abuse. Finally, we report that blocking the activity of this neuronal population reduces alcohol intake. As such

  13. Visual system plasticity in mammals: the story of monocular enucleation-induced vision loss

    PubMed Central

    Nys, Julie; Scheyltjens, Isabelle; Arckens, Lutgarde

    2015-01-01

    The groundbreaking work of Hubel and Wiesel in the 1960’s on ocular dominance plasticity instigated many studies of the visual system of mammals, enriching our understanding of how the development of its structure and function depends on high quality visual input through both eyes. These studies have mainly employed lid suturing, dark rearing and eye patching applied to different species to reduce or impair visual input, and have created extensive knowledge on binocular vision. However, not all aspects and types of plasticity in the visual cortex have been covered in full detail. In that regard, a more drastic deprivation method like enucleation, leading to complete vision loss appears useful as it has more widespread effects on the afferent visual pathway and even on non-visual brain regions. One-eyed vision due to monocular enucleation (ME) profoundly affects the contralateral retinorecipient subcortical and cortical structures thereby creating a powerful means to investigate cortical plasticity phenomena in which binocular competition has no vote.In this review, we will present current knowledge about the specific application of ME as an experimental tool to study visual and cross-modal brain plasticity and compare early postnatal stages up into adulthood. The structural and physiological consequences of this type of extensive sensory loss as documented and studied in several animal species and human patients will be discussed. We will summarize how ME studies have been instrumental to our current understanding of the differentiation of sensory systems and how the structure and function of cortical circuits in mammals are shaped in response to such an extensive alteration in experience. In conclusion, we will highlight future perspectives and the clinical relevance of adding ME to the list of more longstanding deprivation models in visual system research. PMID:25972788

  14. Tailored Parallel Graphene Stripes in Plastic Film with Conductive Anisotropy by Shear-Induced Self-Assembly.

    PubMed

    Mao, Cui; Huang, Jinrui; Zhu, Yutian; Jiang, Wei; Tang, Qingxin; Ma, Xiaojing

    2013-01-01

    We present a simple but efficient route to prepare a highly anisotropic conductive plastic thin film from the polypropylene/(styrene-ethylene/butadiene-styrene) triblock copolymer/graphene blend via shear-induced self-assembly. Under the shear-flow induction, GE nanosheets dispersed in the polymer matrix can spontaneously assemble into ordered parallel stripes, which endow the materials significantly conductive anisotropy. The electrical resistivity in the direction parallel to the graphene stripes is almost four orders of magnitude lower than that which is perpendicular to the stripes. This study provides a new method for the precise control of the organization of functional nano-objects in polymer matrix, which can be widely extended to the fabrication of other multifunctional anisotropic materials of interest in various fields. PMID:26291209

  15. Cortical cross-modal plasticity following deafness measured using functional near-infrared spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Dewey, Rebecca S; Hartley, Douglas E H

    2015-07-01

    Evidence from functional neuroimaging studies suggests that the auditory cortex can become more responsive to visual and somatosensory stimulation following deafness, and that this occurs predominately in the right hemisphere. Extensive cross-modal plasticity in prospective cochlear implant recipients is correlated with poor speech outcomes following implantation, highlighting the potential impact of central auditory plasticity on subsequent aural rehabilitation. Conversely, the effects of hearing restoration with a cochlear implant on cortical plasticity are less well understood, since the use of most neuroimaging techniques in CI recipients is either unsafe or problematic due to the electromagnetic artefacts generated by CI stimulation. Additionally, techniques such as functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) are confounded by acoustic noise produced by the scanner that will be perceived more by hearing than by deaf individuals. Subsequently it is conceivable that auditory responses to acoustic noise produced by the MR scanner may mask auditory cortical responses to non-auditory stimulation, and render inter-group comparisons less significant. Uniquely, functional near-infrared spectroscopy (fNIRS) is a silent neuroimaging technique that is non-invasive and completely unaffected by the presence of a CI. Here, we used fNIRS to study temporal-lobe responses to auditory, visual and somatosensory stimuli in thirty profoundly-deaf participants and thirty normally-hearing controls. Compared with silence, acoustic noise stimuli elicited a significant group fNIRS response in the temporal region of normally-hearing individuals, which was not seen in profoundly-deaf participants. Visual motion elicited a larger group response within the right temporal lobe of profoundly-deaf participants, compared with normally-hearing controls. However, bilateral temporal lobe fNIRS activation to somatosensory stimulation was comparable in both groups. Using fNIRS these results

  16. Caudal Ganglionic Eminence Precursor Transplants Disperse and Integrate as Lineage-Specific Interneurons but Do Not Induce Cortical Plasticity.

    PubMed

    Larimer, Phillip; Spatazza, Julien; Espinosa, Juan Sebastian; Tang, Yunshuo; Kaneko, Megumi; Hasenstaub, Andrea R; Stryker, Michael P; Alvarez-Buylla, Arturo

    2016-08-01

    The maturation of inhibitory GABAergic cortical circuits regulates experience-dependent plasticity. We recently showed that the heterochronic transplantation of parvalbumin (PV) or somatostatin (SST) interneurons from the medial ganglionic eminence (MGE) reactivates ocular dominance plasticity (ODP) in the postnatal mouse visual cortex. Might other types of interneurons similarly induce cortical plasticity? Here, we establish that caudal ganglionic eminence (CGE)-derived interneurons, when transplanted into the visual cortex of neonatal mice, migrate extensively in the host brain and acquire laminar distribution, marker expression, electrophysiological properties, and visual response properties like those of host CGE interneurons. Although transplants from the anatomical CGE do induce ODP, we found that this plasticity reactivation is mediated by a small fraction of MGE-derived cells contained in the transplant. These findings demonstrate that transplanted CGE cells can successfully engraft into the postnatal mouse brain and confirm the unique role of MGE lineage neurons in the induction of ODP. PMID:27425623

  17. Transformation-induced plasticity in high-temperature shape memory alloys: a one-dimensional continuum model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sakhaei, Amir Hosein; Lim, Kian-Meng

    2016-07-01

    A constitutive model based on isotropic plasticity consideration is presented in this work to model the thermo-mechanical behavior of high-temperature shape memory alloys. In high-temperature shape memory alloys (HTSMAs), both martensitic transformation and rate-dependent plasticity (creep) occur simultaneously at high temperatures. Furthermore, transformation-induced plasticity is another deformation mechanism during martensitic transformation. All these phenomena are considered as dissipative processes to model the mechanical behavior of HTSMAs in this study. The constitutive model was implemented for one-dimensional cases, and the results have been compared with experimental data from thermal cycling test for actuator applications.

  18. Measurements of response functions of EJ-299-33A plastic scintillator for fast neutrons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hartman, J.; Barzilov, A.; Peters, E. E.; Yates, S. W.

    2015-12-01

    Monoenergetic neutron response functions were measured for an EJ-299-33A plastic scintillator. The 7-MV Van de Graaff accelerator at the University of Kentucky Accelerator Laboratory was used to produce proton and deuteron beams for reactions with gaseous tritium and deuterium targets, yielding monoenergetic neutrons by means of the 3H(p,n)3He, 2H(d,n)3He, and 3H(d,n)4He reactions. The neutron energy was selected by tuning the charged-particle's energy and using the angular dependence of the neutron emission. The resulting response functions were measured for 0.1-MeV steps in neutron energy from 0.1 MeV to 8.2 MeV and from 12.2 MeV to 20.2 MeV. Experimental data were processed using a procedure for digital pulse-shape discrimination, which allowed characterization of the response functions of the plastic scintillator to neutrons only. The response functions are intended for use in neutron spectrum unfolding methods.

  19. Plasticity of GABAA Receptors during Pregnancy and Postpartum Period: From Gene to Function

    PubMed Central

    Licheri, Valentina; Talani, Giuseppe; Gorule, Ashish A.; Mostallino, Maria Cristina; Biggio, Giovanni; Sanna, Enrico

    2015-01-01

    Pregnancy needs complex pathways that together play a role in proper growth and protection of the fetus preventing its premature loss. Changes during pregnancy and postpartum period include the manifold machinery of neuroactive steroids that plays a crucial role in neuronal excitability by local modulation of specific inhibitory receptors: the GABAA receptors. Marked fluctuations in both blood and brain concentration of neuroactive steroids strongly contribute to GABAA receptor function and plasticity. In this review, we listed several interesting results regarding the regulation and plasticity of GABAA receptor function during pregnancy and postpartum period in rats. The increase in brain levels of neuroactive steroids during pregnancy and their sudden decrease immediately before delivery are causally related to changes in the expression/function of specific GABAA receptor subunits in the hippocampus. These data suggest that alterations in GABAA receptor expression and function may be related to neurological and psychiatric disorders associated with crucial periods in women. These findings could help to provide potential new treatments for these women's disabling syndromes. PMID:26413323

  20. The Structurally Plastic CH2 Domain Is Linked to Distinct Functions of Fimbrins/Plastins.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Ruihui; Chang, Ming; Zhang, Meng; Wu, Youjun; Qu, Xiaolu; Huang, Shanjin

    2016-08-19

    Fimbrins/plastins have been implicated in the generation of distinct actin structures, which are linked to different cellular processes. Historically, fimbrins/plastins were mainly considered as generating tight actin bundles. Here, we demonstrate that different members of the fimbrin/plastin family have diverged biochemically during evolution to generate either tight actin bundles or loose networks with distinct biochemical and biophysical properties. Using the phylogenetically and functionally distinct Arabidopsis fimbrins FIM4 and FIM5 we found that FIM4 generates both actin bundles and cross-linked actin filaments, whereas FIM5 only generates actin bundles. The distinct functions of FIM4 and FIM5 are clearly observed at single-filament resolution. Domain swapping experiments showed that cooperation between the conformationally plastic calponin-homology domain 2 (CH2) and the N-terminal headpiece determines the function of the full-length protein. Our study suggests that the structural plasticity of fimbrins/plastins has biologically meaningful consequences, and provides novel insights into the structure-function relationship of fimbrins/plastins as well as shedding light on how cells generate distinct actin structures. PMID:27261463

  1. Plastic protein microarray to investigate the molecular pathways of magnetic nanoparticle-induced nanotoxicity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Yingshuai; Li, Xuelian; Bao, Shujuan; Lu, Zhisong; Li, Qing; Li, Chang Ming

    2013-05-01

    Superparamagnetic iron oxide nanoparticles (SPIONs) (about 15 nm) were synthesized via a hydrothermal method and characterized by field emission scanning electron microscopy, transmission electron microscopy, dynamic light scattering, x-ray diffraction, and vibrating sample magnetometer. The molecular pathways of SPIONs-induced nanotoxicity was further investigated by protein microarrays on a plastic substrate from evaluation of cell viability, reactive oxygen species (ROS) generation and cell apoptosis. The experimental results reveal that 50 μg ml-1 or higher levels of SPIONs cause significant loss of cell viability, considerable generation of ROS and cell apoptosis. It is proposed that high level SPIONs could induce cell apoptosis via a mitochondria-mediated intrinsic pathway by activation of caspase 9 and caspase 3, an increase of the Bax/Bcl-2 ratio, and down-regulation of HSP70 and HSP90 survivor factors.

  2. Intraoperative mapping during repeat awake craniotomy reveals the functional plasticity of adult cortex.

    PubMed

    Southwell, Derek G; Hervey-Jumper, Shawn L; Perry, David W; Berger, Mitchel S

    2016-05-01

    OBJECT To avoid iatrogenic injury during the removal of intrinsic cerebral neoplasms such as gliomas, direct electrical stimulation (DES) is used to identify cortical and subcortical white matter pathways critical for language, motor, and sensory function. When a patient undergoes more than 1 brain tumor resection as in the case of tumor recurrence, the use of DES provides an unusual opportunity to examine brain plasticity in the setting of neurological disease. METHODS The authors examined 561 consecutive cases in which patients underwent DES mapping during surgery forglioma resection. "Positive" and "negative" sites-discrete cortical regions where electrical stimulation did (positive) or did not (negative) produce transient sensory, motor, or language disturbance-were identified prior to tumor resection and documented by intraoperative photography for categorization into functional maps. In this group of 561 patients, 18 were identified who underwent repeat surgery in which 1 or more stimulation sites overlapped with those tested during the initial surgery. The authors compared intraoperative sensory, motor, or language mapping results between initial and repeat surgeries, and evaluated the clinical outcomes for these patients. RESULTS A total of 117 sites were tested for sensory (7 sites, 6.0%), motor (9 sites, 7.7%), or language (101 sites, 86.3%) function during both initial and repeat surgeries. The mean interval between surgical procedures was 4.1 years. During initial surgeries, 95 (81.2%) of 117 sites were found to be negative and 22 (18.8%) of 117 sites were found to be positive. During repeat surgeries, 103 (88.0%) of 117 sites were negative and 14 (12.0%) of 117 were positive. Of the 95 sites that were negative at the initial surgery, 94 (98.9%) were also negative at the repeat surgery, while 1 (1.1%) site was found to be positive. Of the 22 sites that were initially positive, 13 (59.1%) remained positive at repeat surgery, while 9 (40.9%) had become

  3. IκB Kinase Regulates Social Defeat Stress-Induced Synaptic and Behavioral Plasticity

    PubMed Central

    Christoffel, Daniel J.; Golden, Sam A.; Dumitriu, Dani; Robison, Alfred J.; Janssen, William G.; Ahn, H. Francisca; Krishnan, Vaishnav; Reyes, Cindy M.; Han, Ming-Hu; Ables, Jessica L.; Eisch, Amelia J.; Dietz, David M.; Ferguson, Deveroux; Neve, Rachael L.; Greengard, Paul; Kim, Yong; Morrison, John H.; Russo, Scott J.

    2011-01-01

    The neurobiological underpinnings of mood and anxiety disorders have been linked to the nucleus accumbens (NAc), a region important in processing the rewarding and emotional salience of stimuli. Using chronic social defeat stress, an animal model of mood and anxiety disorders, we investigated whether alterations in synaptic plasticity are responsible for the long-lasting behavioral symptoms induced by this form of stress. We hypothesized that chronic social defeat stress alters synaptic strength or connectivity of medium spiny neurons (MSNs) in the NAc to induce social avoidance. To test this, we analyzed the synaptic profile of MSNs via confocal imaging of Lucifer-yellow-filled cells, ultrastructural analysis of the postsynaptic density, and electrophysiological recordings of miniature EPSCs (mEPSCs) in mice after social defeat. We found that NAc MSNs have more stubby spine structures with smaller postsynaptic densities and an increase in the frequency of mEPSCs after social defeat. In parallel to these structural changes, we observed significant increases in IκB kinase (IKK) in the NAc after social defeat, a molecular pathway that has been shown to regulate neuronal morphology. Indeed, we find using viral-mediated gene transfer of dominant-negative and constitutively active IKK mutants that activation of IKK signaling pathways during social defeat is both necessary and sufficient to induce synaptic alterations and behavioral effects of the stress. These studies establish a causal role for IKK in regulating stress-induced adaptive plasticity and may present a novel target for drug development in the treatment of mood and anxiety disorders in humans. PMID:21209217

  4. Precipitate-induced plastic anisotropy: Explicit solutions of the plastic anisotropy due to plate-shaped precipitates

    SciTech Connect

    Lyttle, M.T.; Wert, J.A.

    1999-05-01

    In some aluminum alloys, the observed plastic anisotropy cannot be explained solely by the measured Taylor factor variation. Qualitatively, it has been suggested that this difference results from a secondary effect due to plate-shaped precipitates. Models addressing the effect of plastically-deforming and elastically-deforming precipitates have been previously proposed. In the present article, explicit solutions of the anisotropic strengthening increment are presented for the case of plate-shaped precipitates. These solutions allow a quantitative consideration of the effect of precipitates on different habit planes and of the effect due to stress aging. Generally, in fcc materials, precipitates on {l_brace}100{r_brace} habit planes are predicted to minimize the anisotropy due to texture; precipitates on {l_brace}111{r_brace} habit planes are predicted to accentuate the anisotropy due to texture; and precipitates on other habit planes are predicted to produce a minor effect resulting from an averaging over a greater number of crystallographically equivalent habit planes. Stress aging to alter the relative orientation distribution of a single precipitate type is predicted to produce only slight changes in the plastic anisotropy. Larger effects on the yield variation will be observed when stress aging alters the relative volume fractions of two precipitate types on different habit planes.

  5. Lesion-induced and activity-dependent structural plasticity of Purkinje cell dendritic spines in cerebellar vermis and hemisphere.

    PubMed

    Gelfo, Francesca; Florenzano, Fulvio; Foti, Francesca; Burello, Lorena; Petrosini, Laura; De Bartolo, Paola

    2016-09-01

    Neuroplasticity allows the brain to encode experience and learn behaviors, and also to re-acquire lost functions after damage. The cerebellum is a suitable structure to address this topic because of its strong involvement in learning processes and compensation of lesion-induced deficits. This study was aimed to characterize the effects of a hemicerebellectomy (HCb) combined or not with the exposition to environmental enrichment (EE) on dendritic spine density and size in Purkinje cell proximal and distal compartments of cerebellar vermian and hemispherical regions. Male Wistar rats were housed in enriched or standard environments from the 21st post-natal day (pnd) onwards. At the 75th pnd, rats were submitted to HCb or sham lesion. Neurological symptoms and spatial performance in the Morris water maze were evaluated. At the end of testing, morphological analyses assessed dendritic spine density, area, length, and head diameter on vermian and hemispherical Purkinje cells. All hemicerebellectomized (HCbed) rats showed motor compensation, but standard-reared HCbed animals exhibited cognitive impairment that was almost completely compensated in enriched HCbed rats. The standard-reared HCbed rats showed decreased density with augmented size of Purkinje cell spines in the vermis, and augmented both density and size in the hemisphere. Enriched HCbed rats almost completely maintained the spine density and size induced by EE. Both lesion-induced and activity-dependent cerebellar plastic changes may be interpreted as "beneficial" brain reactions, aimed to support behavioral performance rescuing. PMID:26420278

  6. Plasticity in the brainstem vagal circuits controlling gastric motor function triggered by corticotropin releasing factor.

    PubMed

    Browning, Kirsteen N; Babic, Tanja; Toti, Luca; Holmes, Gregory M; Coleman, F Holly; Travagli, R Alberto

    2014-10-15

    Stress impairs gastric emptying, reduces stomach compliance and induces early satiety via vagal actions. We have shown recently that the ability of the anti-stress neuropeptide oxytocin (OXT) to modulate vagal brainstem circuits undergoes short-term plasticity via alterations in cAMP levels subsequent to vagal afferent fibre-dependent activation of metabotropic glutamate receptors. The aim of the present study was to test the hypothesis that the OXT-induced gastric response undergoes plastic changes in the presence of the prototypical stress hormone, corticotropin releasing factor (CRF). Whole cell patch clamp recordings showed that CRF increased inhibitory GABAergic synaptic transmission to identified corpus-projecting dorsal motor nucleus of the vagus (DMV) neurones. In naive brainstem slices, OXT perfusion had no effect on inhibitory synaptic transmission; following exposure to CRF (and recovery from its actions), however, re-application of OXT inhibited GABAergic transmission in the majority of neurones tested. This uncovering of the OXT response was antagonized by pretreatment with protein kinase A or adenylate cyclase inhibitors, H89 and di-deoxyadenosine, respectively, indicating a cAMP-mediated mechanism. In naive animals, OXT microinjection in the dorsal vagal complex induced a NO-mediated corpus relaxation. Following CRF pretreatment, however, microinjection of OXT attenuated or, at times reversed, the gastric relaxation which was insensitive to l-NAME but was antagonized by pretreatment with a VIP antagonist. Immunohistochemical analyses of vagal motoneurones showed an increased number of oxytocin receptors present on GABAergic terminals of CRF-treated or stressed vs. naive rats. These results indicate that CRF alters vagal inhibitory circuits that uncover the ability of OXT to modulate GABAergic currents and modifies the gastric corpus motility response to OXT. PMID:25128570

  7. The concept of brain plasticity--Paillard's systemic analysis and emphasis on structure and function (followed by the translation of a seminal paper by Paillard on plasticity).

    PubMed

    Will, Bruno; Dalrymple-Alford, John; Wolff, Mathieu; Cassel, Jean-Christophe

    2008-09-01

    Although rejected for the most part of the 20th Century, the idea of brain plasticity began to receive wide acceptance from the 1970s. Yet there has been relatively little theoretical comment on the definition and use of "plasticity" in the field of neurobiology. An early exception to this lack of critical reflection on neural plasticity was provided by Jacques Paillard in a seminal paper that he published in 1976 [Paillard J. Réflexions sur l'usage du concept de plasticité en neurobiology. J Psychol 1976;1:33-47]. As this valuable contribution was published in French, the present authors provide an English adaptation to help convey his ideas to an international audience, together with a contemporary commentary on this paper. Paillard's definition of the term "plasticity" is probably as pertinent today as it was 30 years ago, especially in terms of its relevance to multiple levels of analysis of brain function (molecular, cellular, systemic). Sadly, Jacques Paillard died in 2006; our comments therefore also include a brief biographical tribute to this outstanding neuroscientist. PMID:18222008

  8. The effects of L-arginine on spatial memory and synaptic plasticity impairments induced by lipopolysaccharide

    PubMed Central

    Anaeigoudari, Akbar; Shafei, Mohammad Naser; Soukhtanloo, Mohammad; Sadeghnia, Hamid Reza; Reisi, Parham; Nosratabadi, Reza; Behradnia, Sepehr; Hosseini, Mahmoud

    2015-01-01

    Background: An important role of nitric oxide (NO) in neuroinflammation has been suggested. It is also suggested that NO has a critical role in learning and memory. Neuro-inflammation induced by lipopolysaccharide (LPS) has been reported that deteriorates learning and memory. The effect of L-arginine (LA) as a precursor of NO on LPS-induced spatial learning and memory and neuronal plasticity impairment was evaluated. Materials and Methods: The animals were grouped into: (1) Control, (2) LPS, (3) LA-LPS, and (4) LA. The rats received intraperitoneally LPS (1 mg/kg) 2 h before experiments and LA (200 mg/kg) 30 min before LPS. The animals were examined in Morris water maze (MWM). Long-term potentiation (LTP) from CA1 area of the hippocampus was also assessed by 100 Hz stimulation in the ipsilateral Schaffer collateral pathway. Results: In MWM, time latency and traveled path were higher in LPS group than the control group (P < 0.001) whereas in LA-LPS group they were shorter than LPS group (P < 0.001). The amplitude and slope of field excitatory postsynaptic potential (fEPSP) decreased in LPS group compared to control group (P < 0.05 and P < 0.01) whereas, there was not any significant difference in these parameters between LPS and LA-LPS groups. Conclusion: Administration of LPS impaired spatial memory and synaptic plasticity. Although LA ameliorated deleterious effects of LPS on learning of spatial tasks, it could not restore LPS-induced LTP impairment. PMID:26601090

  9. Erythropoietin-induced changes in brain gene expression reveal induction of synaptic plasticity genes in experimental stroke

    PubMed Central

    Mengozzi, Manuela; Cervellini, Ilaria; Villa, Pia; Erbayraktar, Zübeyde; Gökmen, Necati; Yilmaz, Osman; Erbayraktar, Serhat; Manohasandra, Mathini; Van Hummelen, Paul; Vandenabeele, Peter; Chernajovsky, Yuti; Annenkov, Alexander; Ghezzi, Pietro

    2012-01-01

    Erythropoietin (EPO) is a neuroprotective cytokine in models of ischemic and nervous system injury, where it reduces neuronal apoptosis and inflammatory cytokines and increases neurogenesis and angiogenesis. EPO also improves cognition in healthy volunteers and schizophrenic patients. We studied the effect of EPO administration on the gene-expression profile in the ischemic cortex of rats after cerebral ischemia at early time points (2 and 6 h). EPO treatment up-regulated genes already increased by ischemia. Hierarchical clustering and analysis of overrepresented functional categories identified genes implicated in synaptic plasticity—Arc, BDNF, Egr1, and Egr2, of which Egr2 was the most significantly regulated. Up-regulation of Arc, BDNF, Dusp5, Egr1, Egr2, Egr4, and Nr4a3 was confirmed by quantitative PCR. We investigated the up-regulation of Egr2/Krox20 further because of its role in neuronal plasticity. Its elevation by EPO was confirmed in an independent in vivo experiment of cerebral ischemia in rats. Using the rat neuroblastoma B104, we found that wild-type cells that do not express EPO receptor (EPOR) do not respond to EPO by inducing Egr2. However, EPOR-expressing B104 cells induce Egr2 early upon incubation with EPO, indicating that Egr2 induction is a direct effect of EPO and that EPOR mediates this effect. Because these changes occur in vivo before decreased inflammatory cytokines or neuronal apoptosis is evident, these findings provide a molecular mechanism for the neuroreparative effects of cytokines and suggest a mechanism of neuroprotection by which promotion of a plastic phenotype results in decreased inflammation and neuronal death. PMID:22645329

  10. Inhibitory plasticity underlies visual deprivation-induced loss of retinocollicular map refinement in adulthood

    PubMed Central

    Carrasco, María Magdalena; Mao, Yu-Ting; Pallas, Sarah L.

    2016-01-01

    Increasing evidence shows that sensory experience is not necessary for initial patterning of neural circuitry but is essential for maintenance and plasticity. We have investigated the role of visual experience in development and plasticity of inhibitory synapses in the retinocollicular pathway of an altricial rodent, the Syrian hamster. We reported previously that visual receptive field (RF) refinement in superior colliculus (SC) occurs with the same time course in dark-reared (DR) as in normally-reared hamsters, but RFs in DR animals become unrefined in adulthood. Here we provide support for the hypothesis that this failure to maintain refined RFs into adulthood results from inhibitory plasticity at both pre- and postsynaptic levels. Iontophoretic application of gabazine, a GABAA receptor antagonist, or muscimol, a GABAA receptor agonist, had less of an effect on RF size and excitability of adult long-term DR animals than in short-term DR animals or normal animals. Consistent with these physiological observations, the percentage of GABA-immunoreactive neurons was significantly decreased in the SC of adult DR animals compared to normal animals. Thus GABAergic inhibition in the SC of long-term DR animals is reduced, weakening the inhibitory surround and contributing substantially to the visual deprivation-induced enlargement of RFs in adult DR animals. Our results argue that early, visually-driven activity is necessary to maintain the inhibitory circuitry intrinsic to the adult SC and to protect against the consequences of visual deprivation. These findings provide the first demonstration that visual experience maintains neuronal receptive field properties through maintenance of normal levels of inhibition. PMID:21050281

  11. Light-induced plasticity in leaf hydraulics, venation, anatomy, and gas exchange in ecologically diverse Hawaiian lobeliads.

    PubMed

    Scoffoni, Christine; Kunkle, Justin; Pasquet-Kok, Jessica; Vuong, Christine; Patel, Amish J; Montgomery, Rebecca A; Givnish, Thomas J; Sack, Lawren

    2015-07-01

    Leaf hydraulic conductance (Kleaf ) quantifies the capacity of a leaf to transport liquid water and is a major constraint on light-saturated stomatal conductance (gs ) and photosynthetic rate (Amax ). Few studies have tested the plasticity of Kleaf and anatomy across growth light environments. These provided conflicting results. The Hawaiian lobeliads are an excellent system to examine plasticity, given the striking diversity in the light regimes they occupy, and their correspondingly wide range of Amax , allowing maximal carbon gain for success in given environments. We measured Kleaf , Amax , gs and leaf anatomical and structural traits, focusing on six species of lobeliads grown in a common garden under two irradiances (300/800 μmol photons m(-2)  s(-1) ). We tested hypotheses for light-induced plasticity in each trait based on expectations from optimality. Kleaf , Amax , and gs differed strongly among species. Sun/shade plasticity was observed in Kleaf , Amax, and numerous traits relating to lamina and xylem anatomy, venation, and composition, but gs was not plastic with growth irradiance. Species native to higher irradiance showed greater hydraulic plasticity. Our results demonstrate that a wide set of leaf hydraulic, stomatal, photosynthetic, anatomical, and structural traits tend to shift together during plasticity and adaptation to diverse light regimes, optimizing performance from low to high irradiance. PMID:25858142

  12. Inbreeding and adaptive plasticity: an experimental analysis on predator-induced responses in the water flea Daphnia

    PubMed Central

    Swillen, Ine; Vanoverbeke, Joost; De Meester, Luc

    2015-01-01

    Several studies have emphasized that inbreeding depression (ID) is enhanced under stressful conditions. Additionally, one might imagine a loss of adaptively plastic responses which may further contribute to a reduction in fitness under environmental stress. Here, we quantified ID in inbred families of the cyclical parthenogen Daphnia magna in the absence and presence of fish predation risk. We test whether predator stress affects the degree of ID and if inbred families have a reduced capacity to respond to predator stress by adaptive phenotypic plasticity. We obtained two inbred families through clonal selfing within clones isolated from a fish pond. After mild purging under standardized conditions, we compared life history traits and adaptive plasticity between inbred and outbred lineages (directly hatched from the natural dormant egg bank of the same pond). Initial purging of lineages under standardized conditions differed among inbred families and exceeded that in outbreds. The least purged inbred family exhibited strong ID for most life history traits. Predator-induced stress hardly affected the severity of ID, but the degree to which the capacity for adaptive phenotypic plasticity was retained varied strongly among the inbred families. The least purged family overall lacked the capacity for adaptive phenotypic plasticity, whereas the family that suffered only mild purging exhibited a potential for adaptive plasticity that was comparable to the outbred population. We thus found that inbred offspring may retain the capacity to respond to the presence of fish by adaptive phenotypic plasticity, but this strongly depends on the parental clone engaging in selfing. PMID:26257883

  13. Inbreeding and adaptive plasticity: an experimental analysis on predator-induced responses in the water flea Daphnia.

    PubMed

    Swillen, Ine; Vanoverbeke, Joost; De Meester, Luc

    2015-07-01

    Several studies have emphasized that inbreeding depression (ID) is enhanced under stressful conditions. Additionally, one might imagine a loss of adaptively plastic responses which may further contribute to a reduction in fitness under environmental stress. Here, we quantified ID in inbred families of the cyclical parthenogen Daphnia magna in the absence and presence of fish predation risk. We test whether predator stress affects the degree of ID and if inbred families have a reduced capacity to respond to predator stress by adaptive phenotypic plasticity. We obtained two inbred families through clonal selfing within clones isolated from a fish pond. After mild purging under standardized conditions, we compared life history traits and adaptive plasticity between inbred and outbred lineages (directly hatched from the natural dormant egg bank of the same pond). Initial purging of lineages under standardized conditions differed among inbred families and exceeded that in outbreds. The least purged inbred family exhibited strong ID for most life history traits. Predator-induced stress hardly affected the severity of ID, but the degree to which the capacity for adaptive phenotypic plasticity was retained varied strongly among the inbred families. The least purged family overall lacked the capacity for adaptive phenotypic plasticity, whereas the family that suffered only mild purging exhibited a potential for adaptive plasticity that was comparable to the outbred population. We thus found that inbred offspring may retain the capacity to respond to the presence of fish by adaptive phenotypic plasticity, but this strongly depends on the parental clone engaging in selfing. PMID:26257883

  14. Stress hormones mediate predator-induced phenotypic plasticity in amphibian tadpoles.

    PubMed

    Middlemis Maher, Jessica; Werner, Earl E; Denver, Robert J

    2013-05-01

    Amphibian tadpoles display extensive anti-predator phenotypic plasticity, reducing locomotory activity and, with chronic predator exposure, developing relatively smaller trunks and larger tails. In many vertebrates, predator exposure alters activity of the neuroendocrine stress axis. We investigated predator-induced effects on stress hormone production and the mechanistic link to anti-predator defences in Rana sylvatica tadpoles. Whole-body corticosterone (CORT) content was positively correlated with predator biomass in natural ponds. Exposure to caged predators in mesocosms caused a reduction in CORT by 4 hours, but increased CORT after 4 days. Tadpoles chronically exposed to exogenous CORT developed larger tails relative to their trunks, matching morphological changes induced by predator chemical cue; this predator effect was blocked by the corticosteroid biosynthesis inhibitor metyrapone. Tadpole tail explants treated in vitro with CORT increased tissue weight, suggesting that CORT acts directly on the tail. Short-term treatment of tadpoles with CORT increased predation mortality, likely due to increased locomotory activity. However, long-term CORT treatment enhanced survivorship, likely due to induced morphology. Our findings support the hypothesis that tadpole physiological and behavioural/morphological responses to predation are causally interrelated. Tadpoles initially suppress CORT and behaviour to avoid capture, but increase CORT with longer exposure, inducing adaptive phenotypic changes. PMID:23466985

  15. Fungal metabolic plasticity and sexual development mediate induced resistance to arthropod fungivory.

    PubMed

    Döll, Katharina; Chatterjee, Subhankar; Scheu, Stefan; Karlovsky, Petr; Rohlfs, Marko

    2013-11-22

    Prey organisms do not tolerate predator attack passively but react with a multitude of inducible defensive strategies. Although inducible defence strategies are well known in plants attacked by herbivorous insects, induced resistance of fungi against fungivorous animals is largely unknown. Resistance to fungivory is thought to be mediated by chemical properties of fungal tissue, i.e. by production of toxic secondary metabolites. However, whether fungi change their secondary metabolite composition to increase resistance against arthropod fungivory is unknown. We demonstrate that grazing by a soil arthropod, Folsomia candida, on the filamentous fungus Aspergillus nidulans induces a phenotype that repels future fungivores and retards fungivore growth. Arthropod-exposed colonies produced significantly higher amounts of toxic secondary metabolites and invested more in sexual reproduction relative to unchallenged fungi. Compared with vegetative tissue and asexual conidiospores, sexual fruiting bodies turned out to be highly resistant against fungivory in facultative sexual A. nidulans. This indicates that fungivore grazing triggers co-regulated allocation of resources to sexual reproduction and chemical defence in A. nidulans. Plastic investment in facultative sex and chemical defence may have evolved as a fungal strategy to escape from predation. PMID:24068353

  16. Cocaine- and morphine-induced synaptic plasticity in the nucleus accumbens.

    PubMed

    Alcantara, Adriana A; Lim, Helen Y; Floyd, Christopher E; Garces, Juanita; Mendenhall, John M; Lyons, Chelsea L; Berlanga, Monica L

    2011-04-01

    The critical brain areas and molecular mechanisms involved in drug abuse and dependence have been extensively studied. Drug-induced persistent behaviors such as sensitization, tolerance, or relapse, however, far outlast any previously reported mechanisms. A challenge in the field of addiction, therefore, has been to identify drug-induced changes in brain circuitry that may subserve long-lasting changes in behavior. This study examined behavioral changes and electron microscopic evidence of altered synaptic connectivity within the nucleus accumbens (NAc) following repeated administration of cocaine or morphine. The unbiased quantitative stereological physical disector method was used to estimate the number of synapses per neuron. Increases in the synapse-to-neuron ratio were found in the NAc shell of cocaine-treated (49.1%) and morphine-treated (55.1%) rats and in the NAc core of cocaine-treated animals (49.1%). This study provides direct ultrastructural evidence of drug-induced synaptic plasticity and identifies synaptic remodeling as a potential neural substrate underlying drug-induced behavioral sensitization. PMID:20730804

  17. Young blood reverses age-related impairments in cognitive function and synaptic plasticity in mice

    PubMed Central

    Villeda, Saul A; Plambeck, Kristopher E; Middeldorp, Jinte; Castellano, Joseph M; Mosher, Kira I; Luo, Jian; Smith, Lucas K; Bieri, Gregor; Lin, Karin; Berdnik, Daniela; Wabl, Rafael; Udeochu, Joe; Wheatley, Elizabeth G; Zou, Bende; Simmons, Danielle A; Xie, Xinmin S; Longo, Frank M; Wyss-Coray, Tony

    2014-01-01

    As human lifespan increases, a greater fraction of the population is suffering from age-related cognitive impairments, making it important to elucidate a means to combat the effects of aging1,2. Here we report that exposure of an aged animal to young blood can counteract and reverse pre-existing effects of brain aging at the molecular, structural, functional and cognitive level. Genome-wide microarray analysis of heterochronic parabionts—in which circulatory systems of young and aged animals are connected—identified synaptic plasticity–related transcriptional changes in the hippocampus of aged mice. Dendritic spine density of mature neurons increased and synaptic plasticity improved in the hippocampus of aged heterochronic parabionts. At the cognitive level, systemic administration of young blood plasma into aged mice improved age-related cognitive impairments in both contextual fear conditioning and spatial learning and memory. Structural and cognitive enhancements elicited by exposure to young blood are mediated, in part, by activation of the cyclic AMP response element binding protein (Creb) in the aged hippocampus. Our data indicate that exposure of aged mice to young blood late in life is capable of rejuvenating synaptic plasticity and improving cognitive function. PMID:24793238

  18. Luoyutong Treatment Promotes Functional Recovery and Neuronal Plasticity after Cerebral Ischemia-Reperfusion Injury in Rats

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Ning-qun; Wang, Li-ye; Zhao, Hai-ping; Liu, Ping; Wang, Rong-liang; Song, Jue-xian; Gao, Li; Ji, Xun-ming; Luo, Yu-min

    2015-01-01

    Luoyutong (LYT) capsule has been used to treat cerebrovascular diseases clinically in China and is now patented and approved by the State Food and Drug Administration. In this retrospective validation study we investigated the ability of LYT to protect against cerebral ischemia-reperfusion injury in rats. Cerebral ischemia-reperfusion injury was induced by middle cerebral artery occlusion followed by reperfusion. Capsule containing LYT (high dose and medium dose) as treatment group and Citicoline Sodium as positive control treatment group were administered daily to rats 30 min after reperfusion. Treatment was continued for either 3 days or 14 days. A saline solution was administered to control animals. Behavior tests were performed after 3 and 14 days of treatment. Our findings revealed that LYT treatment improved the neurological outcome, decreased cerebral infarction volume, and reduced apoptosis. Additionally, LYT improved neural plasticity, as the expression of synaptophysin, microtubule associated protein, and myelin basic protein was upregulated by LYT treatment, while neurofilament 200 expression was reduced. Moreover, levels of brain derived neurotrophic factor and basic fibroblast growth factor were increased. Our results suggest that LYT treatment may protect against ischemic injury and improve neural plasticity. PMID:26697095

  19. Luoyutong Treatment Promotes Functional Recovery and Neuronal Plasticity after Cerebral Ischemia-Reperfusion Injury in Rats.

    PubMed

    Wang, Ning-Qun; Wang, Li-Ye; Zhao, Hai-Ping; Liu, Ping; Wang, Rong-Liang; Song, Jue-Xian; Gao, Li; Ji, Xun-Ming; Luo, Yu-Min

    2015-01-01

    Luoyutong (LYT) capsule has been used to treat cerebrovascular diseases clinically in China and is now patented and approved by the State Food and Drug Administration. In this retrospective validation study we investigated the ability of LYT to protect against cerebral ischemia-reperfusion injury in rats. Cerebral ischemia-reperfusion injury was induced by middle cerebral artery occlusion followed by reperfusion. Capsule containing LYT (high dose and medium dose) as treatment group and Citicoline Sodium as positive control treatment group were administered daily to rats 30 min after reperfusion. Treatment was continued for either 3 days or 14 days. A saline solution was administered to control animals. Behavior tests were performed after 3 and 14 days of treatment. Our findings revealed that LYT treatment improved the neurological outcome, decreased cerebral infarction volume, and reduced apoptosis. Additionally, LYT improved neural plasticity, as the expression of synaptophysin, microtubule associated protein, and myelin basic protein was upregulated by LYT treatment, while neurofilament 200 expression was reduced. Moreover, levels of brain derived neurotrophic factor and basic fibroblast growth factor were increased. Our results suggest that LYT treatment may protect against ischemic injury and improve neural plasticity. PMID:26697095

  20. In situ spectroscopic study of the plastic deformation of amorphous silicon under nonhydrostatic conditions induced by indentation

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Gerbig, Yvonne B.; Michaels, C. A.; Bradby, Jodie E.; Haberl, Bianca; Cook, Robert F.

    2015-12-17

    Indentation-induced plastic deformation of amorphous silicon (a-Si) thin films was studied by in situ Raman imaging of the deformed contact region of an indented sample, employing a Raman spectroscopy-enhanced instrumented indentation technique (IIT). The occurrence and evolving spatial distribution of changes in the a-Si structure caused by processes, such as polyamorphization and crystallization, induced by indentation loading were observed. Furthermore, the obtained experimental results are linked with previously published work on the plastic deformation of a-Si under hydrostatic compression and shear deformation to establish a model for the deformation behavior of a-Si under indentation loading.

  1. Local inhibitory plasticity tunes macroscopic brain dynamics and allows the emergence of functional brain networks.

    PubMed

    Hellyer, Peter J; Jachs, Barbara; Clopath, Claudia; Leech, Robert

    2016-01-01

    Rich, spontaneous brain activity has been observed across a range of different temporal and spatial scales. These dynamics are thought to be important for efficient neural functioning. A range of experimental evidence suggests that these neural dynamics are maintained across a variety of different cognitive states, in response to alterations of the environment and to changes in brain configuration (e.g., across individuals, development and in many neurological disorders). This suggests that the brain has evolved mechanisms to maintain rich dynamics across a broad range of situations. Several mechanisms based around homeostatic plasticity have been proposed to explain how these dynamics emerge from networks of neurons at the microscopic scale. Here we explore how a homeostatic mechanism may operate at the macroscopic scale: in particular, focusing on how it interacts with the underlying structural network topology and how it gives rise to well-described functional connectivity networks. We use a simple mean-field model of the brain, constrained by empirical white matter structural connectivity where each region of the brain is simulated using a pool of excitatory and inhibitory neurons. We show, as with the microscopic work, that homeostatic plasticity regulates network activity and allows for the emergence of rich, spontaneous dynamics across a range of brain configurations, which otherwise show a very limited range of dynamic regimes. In addition, the simulated functional connectivity of the homeostatic model better resembles empirical functional connectivity network. To accomplish this, we show how the inhibitory weights adapt over time to capture important graph theoretic properties of the underlying structural network. Therefore, this work presents suggests how inhibitory homeostatic mechanisms facilitate stable macroscopic dynamics to emerge in the brain, aiding the formation of functional connectivity networks. PMID:26348562

  2. Plasticity of human auditory-evoked fields induced by shock conditioning and contingency reversal

    PubMed Central

    Kluge, Christian; Bauer, Markus; Leff, Alexander Paul; Heinze, Hans-Jochen; Dolan, Raymond J.; Driver, Jon

    2011-01-01

    We used magnetoencephalography (MEG) to assess plasticity of human auditory cortex induced by classical conditioning and contingency reversal. Participants listened to random sequences of high or low tones. A first baseline phase presented these without further associations. In phase 2, one of the frequencies (CS+) was paired with shock on half its occurrences, whereas the other frequency (CS−) was not. In phase 3, the contingency assigning CS+ and CS− was reversed. Conditioned pupil dilation was observed in phase 2 but extinguished in phase 3. MEG revealed that, during phase-2 initial conditioning, the P1m, N1m, and P2m auditory components, measured from sensors over auditory temporal cortex, came to distinguish between CS+ and CS−. After contingency reversal in phase 3, the later P2m component rapidly reversed its selectivity (unlike the pupil response) but the earlier P1m did not, whereas N1m showed some new learning but not reversal. These results confirm plasticity of human auditory responses due to classical conditioning, but go further in revealing distinct constraints on different levels of the auditory hierarchy. The later P2m component can reverse affiliation immediately in accord with an updated expectancy after contingency reversal, whereas the earlier auditory components cannot. These findings indicate distinct cognitive and emotional influences on auditory processing. PMID:21746922

  3. Vagus Nerve Stimulation as a Tool to Induce Plasticity in Pathways Relevant for Extinction Learning.

    PubMed

    Childs, Jessica E; Alvarez-Dieppa, Amanda C; McIntyre, Christa K; Kroener, Sven

    2015-01-01

    Extinction describes the process of attenuating behavioral responses to neutral stimuli when they no longer provide the reinforcement that has been maintaining the behavior. There is close correspondence between fear and human anxiety, and therefore studies of extinction learning might provide insight into the biological nature of anxiety-related disorders such as post-traumatic stress disorder, and they might help to develop strategies to treat them. Preclinical research aims to aid extinction learning and to induce targeted plasticity in extinction circuits to consolidate the newly formed memory. Vagus nerve stimulation (VNS) is a powerful approach that provides tight temporal and circuit-specific release of neurotransmitters, resulting in modulation of neuronal networks engaged in an ongoing task. VNS enhances memory consolidation in both rats and humans, and pairing VNS with exposure to conditioned cues enhances the consolidation of extinction learning in rats. Here, we provide a detailed protocol for the preparation of custom-made parts and the surgical procedures required for VNS in rats. Using this protocol we show how VNS can facilitate the extinction of conditioned fear responses in an auditory fear conditioning task. In addition, we provide evidence that VNS modulates synaptic plasticity in the pathway between the infralimbic (IL) medial prefrontal cortex and the basolateral complex of the amygdala (BLA), which is involved in the expression and modulation of extinction memory. PMID:26325100

  4. Defect induced plasticity and failure mechanism of boron nitride nanotubes under tension

    SciTech Connect

    Anoop Krishnan, N. M. Ghosh, Debraj

    2014-07-28

    The effects of Stone-Wales (SW) and vacancy defects on the failure behavior of boron nitride nanotubes (BNNTs) under tension are investigated using molecular dynamics simulations. The Tersoff-Brenner potential is used to model the atomic interaction and the temperature is maintained close to 300 K. The effect of a SW defect is studied by determining the failure strength and failure mechanism of nanotubes with different radii. In the case of a vacancy defect, the effect of an N-vacancy and a B-vacancy is studied separately. Nanotubes with different chiralities but similar diameter is considered first to evaluate the chirality dependence. The variation of failure strength with the radius is then studied by considering nanotubes of different diameters but same chirality. It is observed that the armchair BNNTs are extremely sensitive to defects, whereas the zigzag configurations are the least sensitive. In the case of pristine BNNTs, both armchair and zigzag nanotubes undergo brittle failure, whereas in the case of defective BNNTs, only the zigzag ones undergo brittle failure. An interesting defect induced plastic behavior is observed in defective armchair BNNTs. For this nanotube, the presence of a defect triggers mechanical relaxation by bond breaking along the closest zigzag helical path, with the defect as the nucleus. This mechanism results in a plastic failure.

  5. An Evaluation of the Plasticity-Induced Crack-Closure Concept and Measurement Methods

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Newman, James C., Jr.

    1998-01-01

    An assessment of the plasticity-induced crack-closure concept is made, in light of some of the questions that have been raised on the validity of the concept, and the assumptions that have been made concerning crack-dp damage below the crack-opening stress. The impact of using other crack-tip parameters, such as the cyclic crack-tip displacement, to model crack-growth rate behavior was studied. Crack-growth simulations, using a crack-closure model, showed a close relation between traditional Delta K eff, and the cyclic crack-tip displacement (Delta eff) for an aluminum alloy and a steel. Evaluations of the cyclic hysteresis energy demonstrated that the cyclic plastic damage below the crack-opening stress was negligible in the Paris crack-growth regime. Some of the standard and newly proposed remote measurement methods to determine the 'effective' crack-tip driving parameter were evaluated on middle-crack tension specimens. A potential source of the Kmax effect on crack-growth rates was studied on an aluminum alloy. Results showed that the ratio of Kmax to Kc had a strong effect on crack-growth rates at high stress ratios and at low stress ratios for very high stress levels. The crack-closure concept and the traditional crack-growth rate equations were able to correlate and predict crack-growth rates under these extreme conditions.

  6. Plastic Change in the Auditory Minimum Threshold Induced by Intercollicular Effects in Mice.

    PubMed

    Mei, Hui-Xian; Tang, Jia; Fu, Zi-Ying; Cheng, Liang; Chen, Qi-Cai

    2016-01-01

    In the auditory pathway, the commissure of the inferior colliculus (IC) interconnects the two ICs on both sides of the dorsal midbrain. This interconnection could mediate an interaction between the two ICs during sound signal processing. The intercollicular effects evoked by focal electric stimulation for 30 min could inhibit or facilitate auditory responses and induce plastic changes in the response minimum threshold (MT) of IC neurons. Changes in MT are dependent on the best frequency (BF) and MT difference. The MT shift is larger in IC neurons with BF differences ≤2 kHz than in those with BF differences >2 kHz. Moreover, MTs that shift toward electrically stimulated IC neurons increase with the increasing MT difference between the two ICs. The shift in MT lasts for a certain period of time and then returns to previous levels within ~150 min. The collicular interactions are either reciprocal or unilateral under alternate stimulating and recording conditions in both ICs. Our results suggest that intercollicular effects may be involved in the acoustic experience-dependent plasticity of the MT of IC neurons. PMID:27057363

  7. Vagus Nerve Stimulation as a Tool to Induce Plasticity in Pathways Relevant for Extinction Learning

    PubMed Central

    Childs, Jessica E.; Alvarez-Dieppa, Amanda C.; McIntyre, Christa K.; Kroener, Sven

    2015-01-01

    Extinction describes the process of attenuating behavioral responses to neutral stimuli when they no longer provide the reinforcement that has been maintaining the behavior. There is close correspondence between fear and human anxiety, and therefore studies of extinction learning might provide insight into the biological nature of anxiety-related disorders such as post-traumatic stress disorder, and they might help to develop strategies to treat them. Preclinical research aims to aid extinction learning and to induce targeted plasticity in extinction circuits to consolidate the newly formed memory. Vagus nerve stimulation (VNS) is a powerful approach that provides tight temporal and circuit-specific release of neurotransmitters, resulting in modulation of neuronal networks engaged in an ongoing task. VNS enhances memory consolidation in both rats and humans, and pairing VNS with exposure to conditioned cues enhances the consolidation of extinction learning in rats. Here, we provide a detailed protocol for the preparation of custom-made parts and the surgical procedures required for VNS in rats. Using this protocol we show how VNS can facilitate the extinction of conditioned fear responses in an auditory fear conditioning task. In addition, we provide evidence that VNS modulates synaptic plasticity in the pathway between the infralimbic (IL) medial prefrontal cortex and the basolateral complex of the amygdala (BLA), which is involved in the expression and modulation of extinction memory. PMID:26325100

  8. Plastic Change in the Auditory Minimum Threshold Induced by Intercollicular Effects in Mice

    PubMed Central

    Mei, Hui-Xian; Tang, Jia; Fu, Zi-Ying; Cheng, Liang; Chen, Qi-Cai

    2016-01-01

    In the auditory pathway, the commissure of the inferior colliculus (IC) interconnects the two ICs on both sides of the dorsal midbrain. This interconnection could mediate an interaction between the two ICs during sound signal processing. The intercollicular effects evoked by focal electric stimulation for 30 min could inhibit or facilitate auditory responses and induce plastic changes in the response minimum threshold (MT) of IC neurons. Changes in MT are dependent on the best frequency (BF) and MT difference. The MT shift is larger in IC neurons with BF differences ≤2 kHz than in those with BF differences >2 kHz. Moreover, MTs that shift toward electrically stimulated IC neurons increase with the increasing MT difference between the two ICs. The shift in MT lasts for a certain period of time and then returns to previous levels within ~150 min. The collicular interactions are either reciprocal or unilateral under alternate stimulating and recording conditions in both ICs. Our results suggest that intercollicular effects may be involved in the acoustic experience-dependent plasticity of the MT of IC neurons. PMID:27057363

  9. Alternative functions of core cell cycle regulators in neuronal migration, neuronal maturation, and synaptic plasticity

    PubMed Central

    Frank, Christopher L.; Tsai, Li-Huei

    2009-01-01

    Recent studies have demonstrated that boundaries separating a cycling cell from a post-mitotic neuron are not as concrete as expected. Novel and unique physiological functions in neurons have been ascribed for proteins fundamentally required for cell cycle progression and control. These “core” cell cycle regulators serve diverse post-mitotic functions that span various developmental stages of a neuron, including neuronal migration, axonal elongation, axon pruning, dendrite morphogenesis, and synaptic maturation and plasticity. In this review, we detail the non-proliferative post-mitotic roles that these cell cycle proteins have recently been reported to play, the significance of their expression in neurons, mechanistic insight when available, and future prospects. PMID:19447088

  10. Promoting plasticity in the spinal cord with chondroitinase improves functional recovery after peripheral nerve repair.

    PubMed

    Galtrey, Clare M; Asher, Richard A; Nothias, Fatiha; Fawcett, James W

    2007-04-01

    Functional recovery after peripheral nerve repair in humans is often disappointing. A major reason for this is the inaccuracy of re-innervation of muscles and sensory structures. We hypothesized that promoting plasticity in the spinal cord, through digestion of chondroitin sulphate proteoglycans (CSPGs) with chondroitinase ABC (ChABC), might allow the CNS to compensate for inaccurate peripheral re-innervation and improve functional recovery. The median and ulnar nerves were injured and repaired to produce three grades of inaccuracy of peripheral re-innervation by (i) crush of both nerves; (ii) correct repair of median to median and ulnar to ulnar; and (iii) crossover of the median and ulnar nerves. Mapping of the motor neuron pool of the flexor carpi radialis muscle showed precise re-innervation after nerve crush, inaccurate regeneration after correct repair, more inaccurate after crossover repair. Recovery of forelimb function, assessed by skilled paw reaching, grip strength and sensory testing varied with accuracy of re-innervation. This was not due to differences in the number of regenerated axons. Single injections of ChABC into the spinal cord led to long-term changes in the extracellular matrix, with hyaluronan and neurocan being removed and not fully replaced after 8 weeks. ChABC treatment produce increased sprouting visualized by MAP1BP staining and improved functional recovery in skilled paw reaching after correct repair and in grip strength after crossover repair. There was no hyperalgesia. Enhanced plasticity in the spinal cord, therefore, allows the CNS to compensate for inaccurate motor and sensory re-innervation of the periphery, and may be a useful adjunct therapy to peripheral nerve repair. PMID:17255150