Science.gov

Sample records for induces ifng dependent

  1. Allergen challenge induces Ifng dependent GTPases in the lungs as part of a Th1 transcriptome response in a murine model of allergic asthma.

    PubMed

    Dharajiya, Nilesh; Vaidya, Swapnil; Sinha, Mala; Luxon, Bruce; Boldogh, Istvan; Sur, Sanjiv

    2009-01-01

    According to the current paradigm, allergic airway inflammation is mediated by Th2 cytokines and pro-inflammatory chemokines. Since allergic inflammation is self-limited, we hypothesized that allergen challenge simultaneously induces anti-inflammatory genes to counter-balance the effects of Th2 cytokines and chemokines. To identify these putative anti-inflammatory genes, we compared the gene expression profile in the lungs of ragweed-sensitized mice four hours after challenge with either PBS or ragweed extract (RWE) using a micro-array platform. Consistent with our hypothesis, RWE challenge concurrently upregulated Th1-associated early target genes of the Il12/Stat4 pathway, such as p47 and p65 GTPases (Iigp, Tgtp and Gbp1), Socs1, Cxcl9, Cxcl10 and Gadd45g with the Th2 genes Il4, Il5, Ccl2 and Ccl7. These Th1-associated genes remain upregulated longer than the Th2 genes. Augmentation of the local Th1 milieu by administration of Il12 or CpG prior to RWE challenge further upregulated these Th1 genes. Abolition of the Th1 response by disrupting the Ifng gene increased allergic airway inflammation and abrogated RWE challenge-induced upregulation of GTPases, Cxcl9, Cxcl10 and Socs1, but not Gadd45g. Our data demonstrate that allergen challenge induces two sets of Th1-associated genes in the lungs: 1) Ifng-dependent genes such as p47 and p65 GTPases, Socs1, Cxcl9 and Cxcl10 and 2) Ifng-independent Th1-inducing genes like Gadd45g. We propose that allergen-induced airway inflammation is regulated by simultaneous upregulation of Th1 and Th2 genes, and that persistent unopposed upregulation of Th1 genes resolves allergic inflammation. PMID:20027288

  2. Targeting by AutophaGy proteins (TAG): Targeting of IFNG-inducible GTPases to membranes by the LC3 conjugation system of autophagy

    PubMed Central

    Park, Sungwoo; Choi, Jayoung; Biering, Scott B.; Dominici, Erin; Williams, Lelia E.; Hwang, Seungmin

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT LC3 has been used as a marker to locate autophagosomes. However, it is also well established that LC3 can localize on various membranous structures other than autophagosomes. We recently demonstrated that the LC3 conjugation system (ATG7, ATG3, and ATG12–ATG5-ATG16L1) is required to target LC3 and IFNG (interferon, gamma)-inducible GTPases to the parasitophorus vacuole membrane (PVM) of a protist parasite Toxoplasma gondii and consequently for IFNG to control T. gondii infection. Here we show that not only LC3, but also its homologs (GABARAP, GABARAPL1, and GABARAPL2) localize on the PVM of T. gondii in a conjugation-dependent manner. Knockout/knockdown of all LC3 homologs led to a significant reduction in targeting of the IFNG-inducible GTPases to the PVM of T. gondii and the IFNG-mediated control of T. gondii infection. Furthermore, when we relocated the ATG12–ATG5-ATG16L1 complex, which specifies the conjugation site of LC3 homologs, to alternative target membranes, the IFNG-inducible GTPases were targeted to the new target membranes rather than the PVM of T. gondii. These data suggest that the localization of LC3 homologs onto a membrane by the LC3 conjugation system is necessary and sufficient for targeting of the IFNG-inducible GTPases to the membrane, implying Targeting by AutophaGy proteins (TAG). Our data further suggest that the conjugation of ubiquitin-like LC3 homologs to the phospholipids of membranes may change the destiny of the membranes beyond degradation through lysosomal fusion, as the conjugation of ubiquitin to proteins changes the destiny of the proteins beyond proteasomal degradation. PMID:27172324

  3. Eomesodermin promotes interferon-γ expression and binds to multiple conserved noncoding sequences across the Ifng locus in mouse thymoma cell lines.

    PubMed

    Fukuoka, Natsuki; Harada, Misuzu; Nishida, Ai; Ito, Yuko; Shiota, Hideki; Kataoka, Takao

    2016-02-01

    The T-box transcription factors T-bet and eomesodermin (Eomes) have been shown to regulate the lineage-specific expression of interferon-γ (IFN-γ). However, in contrast to T-bet, the role of Eomes in the expression of IFN-γ remains unclear. In this study, we investigated the Eomes-dependent expression of IFN-γ in the mouse thymoma BW5147 and EL4 cells, which do not express T-bet or Eomes. The ectopic expression of Eomes induced BW5147 and EL4 cells to produce IFN-γ in response to phorbol 12-myristate 13-acetate (PMA) and ionomycin (IM). In BW5147 cells, Eomes augmented luciferase activity driven by the Ifng promoter encoding from -2500 to +113 bp; however, it was not increased by a stimulation with PMA and IM. A chromatin immunoprecipitation assay showed that Eomes bound to the Ifng promoter and conserved noncoding sequence (CNS) -22 kb across the Ifng locus with high efficacy in BW5147 cells. Moreover, Eomes increased permissive histone modifications in the Ifng promoter and multiple CNSs. The stimulation with PMA and IM greatly augmented Eomes binding to CNS-54, CNS-34, CNS+19 and CNS+30, which was inhibited by FK506. These results indicated that Eomes bound to the Ifng promoter and multiple CNSs in stimulation-dependent and stimulation-independent manners. PMID:26749212

  4. IFNG-mediated immune responses enhance autophagy against Mycobacterium tuberculosis antigens in patients with active tuberculosis

    PubMed Central

    Rovetta, Ana I; Peña, Delfina; Hernández Del Pino, Rodrigo E; Recalde, Gabriela M; Pellegrini, Joaquín; Bigi, Fabiana; Musella, Rosa M; Palmero, Domingo J; Gutierrez, Marisa; Colombo, María I; García, Verónica E

    2015-01-01

    Protective immunity against Mycobacterium tuberculosis (Mtb) requires IFNG. Besides, IFNG-mediated induction of autophagy suppresses survival of virulent Mtb in macrophage cell lines. We investigated the contribution of autophagy to the defense against Mtb antigen (Mtb-Ag) in cells from tuberculosis patients and healthy donors (HD). Patients were classified as high responders (HR) if their T cells produced significant IFNG against Mtb-Ag; and low responders (LR) when patients showed weak or no T cell responses to Mtb-Ag. The highest autophagy levels were detected in HD cells whereas the lowest quantities were observed in LR patients. Interestingly, upon Mtb-Ag stimulation, we detected a positive correlation between IFNG and MAP1LC3B-II/LC3-II levels. Actually, blockage of Mtb-Ag-induced IFNG markedly reduced autophagy in HR patients whereas addition of limited amounts of IFNG significantly increased autophagy in LR patients. Therefore, autophagy collaborates with human immune responses against Mtb in close association with specific IFNG secreted against the pathogen. PMID:25426782

  5. Interferon gamma-mediated BoHV-4 replication restriction in bovine endometrial stromal cells is host IDO1 gene expression independent and BoHV-4 IE2 gene expression dependent.

    PubMed

    Jacca, Sarah; Franceschi, Valentina; Agosti, Mattia; Cavirani, Sandro; Mistretta, Federico; Donofrio, Gaetano

    2014-11-01

    In the present work the interaction between bovine herpesvirus 4 (BoHV-4)-infected bovine endometrial stromal cells (BESCs) and interferon gamma (IFNG) was investigated. Starting from the particular tropism of BoHV-4 toward BESCs, a pure population of these cells, free of CD45-positive cells, was prepared and proven to have a bona fide mesenchymal derivation as shown by vimentin-positive and cytokeratin-negative staining. BESCs expressed functional IFNG receptors (IFNGR) 1 and 2 but not IFNG ligand. BESCs transfected with a new reporter construct made by cloning the bovine indoleamine 2, 3-dioxygenase 1 (IDO1) promoter in front of the luciferase reporter gene responded to exogenous IFNG treatment. Further, IFNG-treated or constitutively secreting IFNG BESCs strongly restricted BoHV-4 replication and consequent cytopathic effect. IDO1 expression in BESCs was tightly induced by IFNG and IDO1 was previously shown to be the mediator for some of the IFNG pathogenostatic effects. However, IDO1 inhibitors and IDO1 constitutive expression could not respectively abrogate or recapitulate IFNG effect on BoHV-4-infected BESCs, whereas BoHV-4 immediate early (IE2) gene expression was transcriptionally depressed by IFNG axis activation independently from IDO1 expression; this was further confirmed by revealing a BoHV-4 IE2 gene promoter area containing potential responsive elements interacting with inhibitory transcription factors induced by IFNG in BESCs. The data achieved in this work highlight at least two issues: first, the role of BESCs as target/effector cells for the IFNG; second, the importance of uterine IFNG integrity to control BoHV-4 infection recrudescence from a persistent/latent state to a chronic disease, endometritis. PMID:25273529

  6. IFNG polymorphisms are associated with tuberculosis in Han Chinese pediatric female population.

    PubMed

    Shen, Chen; Jiao, Wei-Wei; Feng, Wei-Xing; Wu, Xi-Rong; Xiao, Jing; Miao, Qing; Sun, Lin; Wang, Bin-Bin; Wang, Jing; Liu, Fang; Shen, Dan; Shen, A-Dong

    2013-09-01

    Host genetic factors play a major role in determining differential susceptibility to human tuberculosis (TB), a re-emerging infectious disease throughout the world. Genetic variations in the IFNG gene coding for interferon gamma (IFN-γ), have been identified in TB patients. To investigate the association of the IFNG polymorphisms with TB susceptibility in Chinese pediatric population. A case-control study of 189 TB patients and 164 controls was performed using single-nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) analysis. Genomic DNA was extracted from leukocytes in peripheral blood. Three SNPs of IFNG, including -1616C/T (rs2069705), +874A/T (rs2430561), and +3234C/T (rs2069718), were selected for genotyping and analysis. The +874A and +3234C alleles were more frequent among TB patients (P = 0.108 and P = 0.088), especially in females (both P = 0.029), although this difference was not significant since Bonferroni corrected significance threshold was 0.025 (two of three SNPs were found to be in linkage disequilibrium). More pronounced differences for the +874 and +3234 polymorphisms were found under the genotype comparison between TB cases and controls in the total population [P = 0.026 (borderline non-significance) and P = 0.020, respectively], and in the female subgroup (P = 0.020 and P = 0.020). The dominant model of inheritance was shown to be significant for +874A and +3234C alleles (both P = 0.019) in the female subgroup. The +874A and +3234C alleles were more frequently found in extrapulmonary TB patients than in controls (P = 0.039). Haplotype analysis carried out on these three SNPs showed the TTT haplotype to be more frequent in controls than in TB cases, and this difference showed a strong significance (P = 0.005). The +874A and +3234C alleles may be related to TB susceptibility in the female subgroup in the Chinese pediatric population of North China. The higher rate of +874A (known to correlate with lower IFN-γ expression) in the extrapulmonary

  7. Evidence for genetic association of TBX21 and IFNG with systemic lupus erythematosus in a Chinese Han population.

    PubMed

    Leng, Rui-Xue; Pan, Hai-Feng; Liu, Juan; Yang, Xiao-Ke; Zhang, Chao; Tao, Sha-Sha; Wang, De-Guang; Li, Xiao-Mei; Li, Xiang-Pei; Yang, Wanling; Ye, Dong-Qing

    2016-01-01

    TBX21 recode T-bet which is an important transcription factor that drives the Th1 immune response primarily by promoting expression of the interferon-gamma (IFNG) gene. Recent studies have shown that genetic variants in TBX21 and IFNG are connected with risk of systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE). The aim of the present study was to replicate these genetic associations with SLE in Anhui Chinese population. Genotyping of 3 variants (rs4794067 in TBX21, rs2069705 and rs2069718 in IFNG) was performed. A total of 3732 subjects were included in the final analysis. The study only identified the association of rs2069705 with SLE susceptibility (T vs. C: odds ratio [OR] = 1.12, 95% confidence interval [CI] = 1.00-1.26, P = 0.046). Combined analysis with Hong Kong GWAS showed that the OR for rs2069705 was 1.10 (95% CI: 1.01-1.21, P = 0.027). Further pooled analysis with Korean populations involving 10498 subjects showed a more significant association between rs2069705 and SLE (T vs. C: OR = 1.11, 95%CI = 1.04-1.19, P = 0.002; TT + TC vs. CC: OR = 1.11, 95%CI = 1.02-1.21, P = 0.012; TT vs. TC + CC: OR = 1.28, 95%CI = 1.07-1.54, P = 0.008; TT vs. CC: OR =  .33, 95%CI = 1.10-1.60, P = 0.003). In addition, we also identified a significant genetic interaction between rs2069705 and rs4794067 in Anhui Chinese population. Our study suggests that IFNG and IFNG-TBX21 interaction are involved in SLE susceptibility. PMID:26916970

  8. Evidence for genetic association of TBX21 and IFNG with systemic lupus erythematosus in a Chinese Han population

    PubMed Central

    Leng, Rui-Xue; Pan, Hai-Feng; Liu, Juan; Yang, Xiao-Ke; Zhang, Chao; Tao, Sha-Sha; Wang, De-Guang; Li, Xiao-Mei; Li, Xiang-Pei; Yang, Wanling; Ye, Dong-Qing

    2016-01-01

    TBX21 recode T-bet which is an important transcription factor that drives the Th1 immune response primarily by promoting expression of the interferon-gamma (IFNG) gene. Recent studies have shown that genetic variants in TBX21 and IFNG are connected with risk of systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE). The aim of the present study was to replicate these genetic associations with SLE in Anhui Chinese population. Genotyping of 3 variants (rs4794067 in TBX21, rs2069705 and rs2069718 in IFNG) was performed. A total of 3732 subjects were included in the final analysis. The study only identified the association of rs2069705 with SLE susceptibility (T vs. C: odds ratio [OR] = 1.12, 95% confidence interval [CI] = 1.00–1.26, P = 0.046). Combined analysis with Hong Kong GWAS showed that the OR for rs2069705 was 1.10 (95% CI: 1.01–1.21, P = 0.027). Further pooled analysis with Korean populations involving 10498 subjects showed a more significant association between rs2069705 and SLE (T vs. C: OR = 1.11, 95%CI = 1.04–1.19, P = 0.002; TT + TC vs. CC: OR = 1.11, 95%CI = 1.02–1.21, P = 0.012; TT vs. TC + CC: OR = 1.28, 95%CI = 1.07–1.54, P = 0.008; TT vs. CC: OR = 1.33, 95%CI = 1.10–1.60, P = 0.003). In addition, we also identified a significant genetic interaction between rs2069705 and rs4794067 in Anhui Chinese population. Our study suggests that IFNG and IFNG-TBX21 interaction are involved in SLE susceptibility. PMID:26916970

  9. TNF, IL12B, and IFNG Gene Polymorphisms in Serbian Patients with Psoriasis

    PubMed Central

    Popadic, Svetlana; Savic, Emina; Markovic, Milos; Ramic, Zorica; Medenica, Ljiljana; Pravica, Vera; Spuran, Zorica; Trajkovic, Vladimir

    2015-01-01

    Background Psoriasis is a common chronic inflammatory skin disease with a strong genetic basis. Cytokines such as tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-α), interleukins (ILs) such are IL-12 and IL-23, and interferon gamma (IFN-γ) are released from various inflammatory and resident cells, and have been implicated in the initiation/maintenance of inflammation. Certain alleles of the aforementioned cytokines may be associated with disease susceptibility/severity. Objective To investigate the association of three common functional gene polymorphisms, namely TNF -308 G/A (rs1800629), IL12B (encoding the p40 subunit of IL-12/23) +1188 A/C (rs3212227), and IFNG +874 T/A (rs2430561) with psoriasis development and severity in Serbian patients. Methods We genotyped 130 patients with psoriasis (26 of whom also had psoriatic arthritis) and 259 controls; rs1800629 and rs3212227, and rs2430561, by real-time PCR assay. Results The TNF GG genotype was detected at a higher frequency in patients with psoriasis compared to control subjects (OR, 1.420; 95% CI, 0.870~2.403) without statistical significance (p=0.191). Lack of the TNF G allele was associated with lower psoriasis severity (p=0.007). The IL12B AC genotype was underrepresented in the patients with psoriatic arthritis compared to healthy subjects (OR, 0.308; 95% CI, 0.090~1.057; p=0.049). The distribution of the rs2430561 allele and genotype frequencies was similar between patients with psoriasis and controls. Conclusion Our study demonstrates an effect of the rs1800629 on psoriasis severity, and a marginal impact of the rs3212227 on susceptibility to psoriatic arthritis. Collectively, our results obtained in a Serbian cohort expand current knowledge regarding individual predisposition to psoriatic disease. PMID:25834350

  10. Density-dependent adjustment of inducible defenses

    PubMed Central

    Tollrian, Ralph; Duggen, Sonja; Weiss, Linda C.; Laforsch, Christian; Kopp, Michael

    2015-01-01

    Predation is a major factor driving evolution, and organisms have evolved adaptations increasing their survival chances. However, most defenses incur trade-offs between benefits and costs. Many organisms save costs by employing inducible defenses as responses to fluctuating predation risk. The level of defense often increases with predator densities. However, individual predation risk should not only depend on predator density but also on the density of conspecifics. If the predator has a saturating functional response one would predict a negative correlation between prey density and individual predation risk and hence defense expression. Here, we tested this hypothesis using six model systems, covering a taxonomic range from protozoa to rotifers and crustaceans. In all six systems, we found that the level of defense expression increased with predator density but decreased with prey density. In one of our systems, i.e. in Daphnia, we further show that the response to prey density is triggered by a chemical cue released by conspecifics and congeners. Our results indicate that organisms adjust the degree of defense to the acute predation risk, rather than merely to predators’ densities. Our study suggests that density-dependent defense expression reflects accurate predation-risk assessment and is a general principle in many inducible-defense systems. PMID:26235428

  11. [Cereal-dependent exercise-induced anaphylaxis].

    PubMed

    Seoane-Rodríguez, Marta; Caralli, María Elisa; Morales-Cabeza, Cristina; Micozzi, Sarah; De Barrio-Fernández, Manuel; Rojas Pérez-Ezquerra, Patricia

    2016-01-01

    Wheat-dependent exercise-induced anaphylaxis (WDEIA) is increasing. In vitro test such as omega-5-gliadin levels are useful in the diagnosis, while oral single blind challenge tests (OCT) with wheat plus exercise continuous being the gold standard diagnostic method. This paper reports the case of a 38-year-old woman, with several episodes of anaphylaxis after eating different foods and doing exercise after ingestion. An allergy study was performed with positive skin prick tests for wheat, barley and rye. Total IgE 238.0KU/L, positive specific IgE (>100KU/L) to wheat, barley and rye, and negative to rTri-a-19 omega-5 gliadin. OCT with bread and exercise was positive. In this case of wheat-dependent exerciseinduced anaphylaxis (WDEIA) with negative serum specific IgE to omega-5-gliadin, negative results with gamma, alpha, bheta y omega-gliadin doesn't exclude the diagnosis of WDEIA. PMID:26943835

  12. Toxoplasma gondii-skeletal muscle cells interaction increases lipid droplet biogenesis and positively modulates the production of IL-12, IFN-g and PGE2

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background The interest in the mechanisms involved in Toxoplasma gondii lipid acquisition has steadily increased during the past few decades, but it remains not completely understood. Here, we investigated the biogenesis and the fate of lipid droplets (LD) of skeletal muscle cells (SkMC) during their interaction with T. gondii by confocal and electron microscopy. We also evaluated whether infected SkMC modulates the production of prostaglandin E2 (PGE2), cytokines interleukin-12 (IL-12) and interferon-gamma (INF-g), and also the cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2) gene induction. Methods Primary culture of skeletal muscle cells were infected with tachyzoites of T. gondii and analysed by confocal microscopy for observation of LD. Ultrastructural cytochemistry was also used for lipid and sarcoplasmatic reticulum (SR) detection. Dosage of cytokines (IL-12 and INF-g) by ELISA technique and enzyme-linked immunoassay (EIA) for PGE2 measurement were employed. The COX-2 gene expression analysis was performed by real time reverse transcriptase polymerase chain reaction (qRT-PCR). Results We demonstrated that T. gondii infection of SkMC leads to increase in LD number and area in a time course dependent manner. Moreover, the ultrastructural analysis demonstrated that SR and LD are in direct contact with parasitophorous vacuole membrane (PVM), within the vacuolar matrix, around it and interacting directly with the membrane of parasite, indicating that LD are recruited and deliver their content inside the parasitophorous vacuole (PV) in T. gondii-infected SkMC. We also observed a positive modulation of the production of IL-12 and IFN-g, increase of COX-2 mRNA levels in the first hour of T. gondii-SkMC interaction and an increase of prostaglandin E2 (PGE2) synthesis from 6 h up to 48 h of infection. Conclusions Taken together, the close association between SR and LD with PV could represent a source of lipids as well as other nutrients for the parasite survival, and together with the

  13. Retinoids induce Nur77-dependent apoptosis in mouse thymocytes.

    PubMed

    Kiss, Beáta; Tóth, Katalin; Sarang, Zsolt; Garabuczi, Éva; Szondy, Zsuzsa

    2015-03-01

    Nur77 is a transcription factor, which plays a determinant role in mediating T cell receptor-induced cell death of thymocytes. In addition to regulation of transcription, Nur77 contributes to apoptosis induction by targeting mitochondria, where it can convert Bcl-2, an anti-apoptotic protein into a proapoptotic molecule. Previous studies have demonstrated that retinoids are actively produced in the mouse thymus and can induce a transcription-dependent apoptosis in mouse thymocytes. Here we show that retinoic acids induce the expression of Nur77, and retinoid-induced apoptosis is completely dependent on Nur77, as retinoids were unable to induce apoptosis in Nur77 null thymocytes. In wild-type thymocytes retinoids induced enhanced expression of the apoptosis-related genes FasL, TRAIL, NDG-1, Gpr65 and Bid, all of them in a Nur77-dependent manner. The combined action of these proteins led to Caspase 8-dependent Bid cleavage in the mitochondria. In addition, we could demonstrate the Nur77-dependent induction of STAT1 leading to enhanced Bim expression, and the mitochondrial translocation of Nur77 leading to the exposure of the Bcl-2/BH3 domain. The retinoid-induced apoptosis was dependent on both Caspase 8 and STAT1. Our data together indicate that retinoids induce a Nur77-dependent cell death program in thymocytes activating the mitochondrial pathway of apoptosis. PMID:25576519

  14. Polymorphisms on IFNG, IL12B and IL12RB1 genes and paracoccidioidomycosis in the Brazilian population.

    PubMed

    Carvalho, F M C; Busser, F D; Freitas, V L T; Furucho, C R; Sadahiro, A; Kono, A S G; Criado, P R; Moretti, M L; Sato, P K; Shikanai-Yasuda, M A

    2016-09-01

    Paracoccidioidomycosis (PCM) is a systemic chronic mycosis, endemic in Latin America, especially Brazil, and is the eighth leading cause of death among chronic and recurrent infectious diseases. PCM infection is characterized by the presence of Th1 immune response; the acute form, by a mixed Th2/Th9, while the chronic form is characterized by Th17/Th22 profiles. The occurrence and severity of human PCM may also be associated with genetic factors such as single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNP) on cytokines encoding genes. We investigated the association between these polymorphisms and the different clinical forms of PCM. We included 156 patients with PCM (40 with the acute form, 99 with the chronic multifocal and 17 with the chronic unifocal form) and assayed their DNA samples for IFNG +874 T/A SNP by PCR-ARMS (Amplification Refractory Mutational System), IL12B +1188 A/C SNP on 3' UTR and IL12RB1 641 A/G SNP on exon 7 by PCR-RFLP (Restriction Fragment Length Polymorphism). We found similar genotypic and allelic frequencies of the investigated SNPs among the clinical forms of PCM. Considering male patients, the IL12RB1 641 AA genotype was more frequent in the chronic multifocal form while heterozygosis was in the chronic unifocal form of PCM (p=0.048). Although our data suggest that the AA genotype (IL12RB1) may be associated with the more disseminated chronic disease, more patients of the chronic unifocal PCM group need to be analyzed as well as the secretion patterns of IFN-γ combined with the IL-12Rβ1 expression for a better comprehension of this association. PMID:27223631

  15. Spatial Heterogeneity Induces Scale Dependent Rock Friction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yamashita, F.; Fukuyama, E.; Xu, S.; Takizawa, S.; Mizoguchi, K.; Kawakata, H.; Passelègue, F. X.; Schubnel, A.

    2014-12-01

    We carried out large-scale biaxial friction experiments (Fukuyama et al., 2012; 2014) using a pair of meter-sized Indian gabbro as specimens, whose contacting area was 1.5 × 0.1 m2, normal stress was up to 6.7 MPa and loading velocity was up to 3 × 10-2 m/s. After each experiment, we found localized damages (i.e. grooves) were generated on the fault surface and gouges were distributed around them. We confirmed work rate dependency of rock friction as revealed by centimeter-sized rock samples (Di Toro et al., 2011), but further found that the meter-sized rock friction starts to decrease at one order of magnitude smaller work rate than that of the centimeter sized rock (Yamashita et al., 2013, AGU fall meeting). Here, we concluded that this difference is caused by stress localization and associated increase in heterogeneity on the fault as shown by: 1) Total amount of deviations of each local shear stress from the average, which were monitored by strain gauge array, increased with the decrease in friction. 2) Friction coefficients were negatively correlated with degree of spatial heterogeneity evaluated from the distribution of grooves and gouges. 3) Melt textures were found in the collected gouges by microscopic observation using HRSEM. Based on these observations, we propose a stress localization model; the fault surfaces are composed of patched and non-patched areas with high and low normal stress, respectively. The high normal stress patch leads to high shear stress, high mechanical work and thus production of much wear material (gouge), which further causes additional increase in normal stress. Assuming that the local friction follows the results by centimeter-sized gabbro experiments, we numerically simulated a slip-dependent friction for both patched and non-patched areas, and successively reproduced a weakening in macroscopic friction. We confirmed that the work rate dependency of simulated friction was consistent with that of biaxial experiments (Fig. 1

  16. Temperature dependence of optically induced cell deformations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fritsch, Anatol; Kiessling, Tobias R.; Stange, Roland; Kaes, Josef A.

    2012-02-01

    The mechanical properties of any material change with temperature, hence this must be true for cellular material. In biology many functions are known to undergo modulations with temperature, like myosin motor activity, mechanical properties of actin filament solutions, CO2 uptake of cultured cells or sex determination of several species. As mechanical properties of living cells are considered to play an important role in many cell functions it is surprising that only little is known on how the rheology of single cells is affected by temperature. We report the systematic temperature dependence of single cell deformations in Optical Stretcher (OS) measurements. The temperature is changed on a scale of about 20 minutes up to hours and compared to defined temperature shocks in the range of milliseconds. Thereby, a strong temperature dependence of the mechanics of single suspended cells is revealed. We conclude that the observable differences arise rather from viscosity changes of the cytosol than from structural changes of the cytoskeleton. These findings have implications for the interpretation of many rheological measurements, especially for laser based approaches in biological studies.

  17. Selective fishing induces density-dependent growth.

    PubMed

    Svedäng, Henrik; Hornborg, Sara

    2014-01-01

    Over the last decades, views on fisheries management have oscillated between alarm and trust in management progress. The predominant policy for remedying the world fishing crisis aims at maximum sustainable yield (MSY) by adjusting gear selectivity and fishing effort. Here we report a case study on how striving for higher yields from the Eastern Baltic cod stock by increasing selectivity has become exceedingly detrimental for its productivity. Although there is a successive increase in numbers of undersized fish, growth potential is severely reduced, and fishing mortality in fishable size has increased. Once density-dependent growth is introduced, the process is self-enforcing as long as the recruitment remains stable. Our findings suggest that policies focusing on maximum yield while targeting greater sizes are risky and should instead prioritize catch rates over yield. Disregarding the underlying population structure may jeopardize stock productivity, with dire consequences for the fishing industry and ecosystem structure and function. PMID:24920387

  18. IFNG +874T/A polymorphism and cytokine plasma levels are associated with susceptibility to Mycobacterium tuberculosis infection and clinical manifestation of tuberculosis.

    PubMed

    Vallinoto, Antonio C R; Graça, Ednelza S; Araújo, Mauro S; Azevedo, Vânia N; Cayres-Vallinoto, Izaura; Machado, Luiz Fernando A; Ishak, Marluisa O G; Ishak, Ricardo

    2010-07-01

    Regarding the importance of interferon-gamma (IFN-gamma) in protective immunity against Mycobacterium tuberculosis and the functional role of IFNG +874T/A single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) in the IFN-gamma production, the present study investigated the relationship of this genetic polymorphism with susceptibility to tuberculosis (TB). A total of 129 patients with pulmonary tuberculosis (PTB), 33 with extrapulmonary tuberculosis (EPTB), and 156 control subjects were studied. Blood samples were drawn and plasma was used to measure IFN-gamma serum concentration by enzyme-linked immunoassay. DNA samples were extracted from leukocytes and used to investigate +874T/A polymorphism in IFNG gene using allele-specific oligonucleotide-polymerase chain reaction. An association between the presence of the allele +874A and the genotype +874AA with the active tuberculosis was found (p < 0.0001, 95% confidence interval = 1.64-3.22), at the same time that allele + 874T and genotype +874T/T were more frequent in the control group. The average plasma concentration of IFN-gamma among patients with tuberculosis was significantly lower than in the control group, and were lower in the EPTB group than in the group with PTB, suggesting a relationship of low plasma levels of this cytokine with active tuberculosis and the progression to more serious forms of the disease. Furthermore, we observed the association of the +874T/T and +874A/A genotypes with high and low IFN-gamma plasma concentrations, respectively, both in TB patients and in the control groups. Thus our findings suggest an association of the IFNG +874T/A polymorphism with susceptibility to M. tuberculosis infection in the studied population. PMID:20353805

  19. Artesunate induces AIF-dependent apoptosis in A549 cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Chen-juan; Chen, Tong-Sheng

    2012-03-01

    Artesunate (ART), a semi-synthetic derivative of the sesquiterpene artemisinin extracted from the Chinese herb Artemisia annua, exerts a broad spectrum of clinical activity against human cancers. It has been shown that ART induces cancer cells death through apoptosis pathway. This study investigated whether ART treatment induced reactive oxygen species (ROS)-dependent cell death in the apoptosis fashion in human lung adenocarconoma A549 cell line and the proapoptotic protein apoptosis inducing factor (AIF) is involved in ART-induced apoptosis. Cells treated with ART exhibited typical apoptotic morphology as chromatin condensation, margination and shrunken nucleus. ART treatment also induced a loss of mitochondrial membrane potential and AIF release from mitochondria. Silencing AIF can remarkable attenuated ART-induced apoptosis. Collectively, ART induces apoptosis by caspase-independent intrinsic pathway in A549 cells.

  20. Signaling induced by hop/STI-1 depends on endocytosis

    SciTech Connect

    Americo, Tatiana A.; Chiarini, Luciana B.; Linden, Rafael . E-mail: rlinden@biof.ufrj.br

    2007-06-29

    The co-chaperone hop/STI-1 is a ligand of the cell surface prion protein (PrP{sup C}), and their interaction leads to signaling and biological effects. Among these, hop/STI-1 induces proliferation of A172 glioblastoma cells, dependent on both PrP{sup C} and activation of the Erk pathway. We tested whether clathrin-mediated endocytosis affects signaling induced by hop/STI-1. Both hyperosmolarity induced by sucrose and monodansyl-cadaverine blocked Erk activity induced by hop/STI-1, without affecting the high basal Akt activity typical of A172. The endocytosis inhibitors also affected the sub-cellular distribution of phosphorylated Erk, consistent with blockade of the latter's activity. The data indicate that signaling induced by hop/STI-1 depends on endocytosis. These findings are consistent with a role of sub-cellular trafficking in signal transduction following engagement by PrP{sup C} by ligands such as hop/STI-1, and may help help unravel both the functions of the prion protein, as well as possible loss-of-function components of prion diseases.

  1. Time-dependent induced potentials in convoy electron emission

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Acuña, G. P.; Miraglia, J. E.

    2006-11-01

    We study the time-dependent induced potentials at the convoy electron position due to the self-interaction with a metal surface and to the shock wave created by the positive hole (vacancy) left. The time evolution of these potentials are calculated using the linear response theory. Results obtained are fitted with simple functions. We find that those two potentials nearly cancel each other in the first ten atomic units of time.

  2. State dependence of Rydberg interaction-induced collisional loss

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Feng, Zhigang; Zhao, Kejia; Miao, Jingyuan; Li, Difei; Yang, Zhijun; Wu, Zhaochun; He, Zhao; Zhao, Jianming; Jia, Suotang

    2016-09-01

    We present a simple analytical formula from an existing theoretical model and theoretically investigate in detail the state dependence of interaction-induced collisional loss rate coefficients, and the various parameter effects on collisional loss rate. We also investigate the different mechanisms and corresponding effects on collisional loss by analyzing our previous experimental results using the present formula, and even investigate the time evolution of Rydberg atom number for different Rydberg states.

  3. Structure dependent hydrogen induced etching features of graphene crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thangaraja, Amutha; Shinde, Sachin M.; Kalita, Golap; Papon, Remi; Sharma, Subash; Vishwakarma, Riteshkumar; Sharma, Kamal P.; Tanemura, Masaki

    2015-06-01

    H2 induced etching of graphene is of significant interest to understand graphene growth process as well as to fabricate nanoribbons and various other structures. Here, we demonstrate the structure dependent H2 induced etching behavior of graphene crystals. We synthesized graphene crystals on electro-polished Cu foil by an atmospheric pressure chemical vapor deposition process, where some of the crystals showed hexagonal shaped snowflake-dendritic morphology. Significant differences in H2 induced etching behavior were observed for the snowflake-dendritic and regular graphene crystals by annealing in a gas mixture of H2 and Ar. The regular graphene crystals were etched anisotropically creating hexagonal holes with pronounced edges, while etching of all the dendritic crystals occurred from the branches of lobs creating symmetrical fractal structures. The etching behavior provides important clue of graphene nucleation and growth as well as their selective etching to fabricate well-defined structures for nanoelectronics.

  4. Atomic Number Dependence of Ion-Induced Electron Emission

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arrale, Abdikarim Mohamed

    Knowledge of the atomic number (Z_1 ) dependence of ion-induced electron emission yields (gamma) can be the basis for a general understanding of ion-atom interaction phenomena and, in particular, for the design of Z_1 -sensitive detectors that could be useful, for example, in the separation of isobars in accelerator mass spectrometry. The Z_1 dependence of ion-induced electron emission yields has been investigated using heavy ions of identical velocity (v = 2 v_0, with v_0 as the Bohr velocity) incident in a normal direction on sputter-cleaned carbon foils. Yields measured in this work plotted as a function of the ion's atomic number reveal an oscillatory behavior with pronounced maxima and minima. This nonmonotonic dependence of the yield on Z_1 will be discussed in the light of existing theories. Ion-induced electron emission yields from contaminated surfaces are well known to be enhanced relative to the yields from atomically clean surfaces. Under the bombardment of energetic ions, the surfaces become sputter-cleaned with time, and the yields from the samples are reduced accordingly. The time dependent reduction of yields observed are shown to be due to various effects such as the desorption of contaminant atoms and molecules by incident ions and the adsorption of residual gas onto previously clean sites. Experimental results obtained in the present work show the lower, saturated yield (gamma_{rm s} ) to be a function of residual gas pressure (P) and the fluence (phi_{rm i}) of the ion. We present a dynamic equilibrium model which explains the increase in yields for surface gas contamination, the decrease in yields for contaminant desorption, and the pressure/fluence dependence of the time required to reach gamma_{ rm s}. The predictions of the model agree well with the observations of gamma _{rm s} as a function of the ratio of gas flux to ion flux, and the electron yields of clean and gas covered surfaces.

  5. Cytokine induced changes in proteasome subunit composition are concentration dependent.

    PubMed

    Stohwasser, R; Kloetzel, P M

    1996-09-01

    In eukaryotes, 20S proteasome subunit composition is controlled by the cytokine interferon-gamma (IFN-gamma). IFN-gamma induces the synthesis of the beta-subunits LMP2, LMP7 and MECL-1, which in consequence replace their constitutive subunit homologs delta, MB1 and MC14/Z in the 20S complex. By pulse labeling mouse RMA cells and immunoprecipitation of proteasome complexes with the antibody MP3, we have analysed the effect of different IFN-gamma concentrations on proteasomal subunit composition. Our experiments show that IFN-gamma concentrations as low as 5 U/ml induce subunit substitutions and that overall proteasomal subunit composition is dependent on the cytokine concentration used. An IFN-gamma concentration of 50 U/ml is sufficient for complete replacement of subunit delta by LMP2. In contrast, IFN-gamma treatment never induces a complete replacement of subunit MC14 by MECL-1. These subunits are present at an approximate 1:1 molar ratio, suggesting that both subunits coexist in the same 20S proteasome complex. Furthermore, different regulatory mechanisms have to be postulated for the synthesis and incorporation of the three IFN-gamma inducible proteasome subunits. Both IFN-gamma as well as IL-2 also seem to influence the modification state of the alpha subunit C8. Since the subunit composition is dependent on the cytokine concentration used and strongly influences the proteolytic properties of the 20S proteasome complex, our experiments represent a caveat for experiments in which IFN-gamma dependent proteasomal enzyme characteristics have been analysed without monitoring the subunit composition. PMID:9067255

  6. Dietary cholesterol directly induces acute inflammasome-dependent intestinal inflammation.

    PubMed

    Progatzky, Fränze; Sangha, Navjyot J; Yoshida, Nagisa; McBrien, Marie; Cheung, Jackie; Shia, Alice; Scott, James; Marchesi, Julian R; Lamb, Jonathan R; Bugeon, Laurence; Dallman, Margaret J

    2014-01-01

    Prolonged ingestion of a cholesterol- or saturated fatty acid-enriched diet induces chronic, often systemic, auto-inflammatory responses resulting in significant health problems worldwide. In vivo information regarding the local and direct inflammatory effect of these dietary components in the intestine and, in particular, on the intestinal epithelium is lacking. Here we report that both mice and zebrafish exposed to high-fat (HFDs) or high-cholesterol (HCDs) diets develop acute innate inflammatory responses within hours, reflected in the localized interleukin-1β-dependent accumulation of myeloid cells in the intestine. Acute HCD-induced intestinal inflammation is dependent on cholesterol uptake via Niemann-Pick C1-like 1 and inflammasome activation involving apoptosis-associated Speck-like protein containing a caspase recruitment domain, which leads to Caspase-1 activity in intestinal epithelial cells. Extended exposure to HCD results in localized, inflammation-dependent, functional dysregulation as well as systemic pathologies. Our model suggests that dietary cholesterol initiates intestinal inflammation in epithelial cells. PMID:25536194

  7. Dietary cholesterol directly induces acute inflammasome-dependent intestinal inflammation

    PubMed Central

    Progatzky, Fränze; Sangha, Navjyot J.; Yoshida, Nagisa; McBrien, Marie; Cheung, Jackie; Shia, Alice; Scott, James; Marchesi, Julian R.; Lamb, Jonathan R.; Bugeon, Laurence; Dallman, Margaret J.

    2014-01-01

    Prolonged ingestion of a cholesterol- or saturated fatty acid-enriched diet induces chronic, often systemic, auto-inflammatory responses resulting in significant health problems worldwide. In vivo information regarding the local and direct inflammatory effect of these dietary components in the intestine and, in particular, on the intestinal epithelium is lacking. Here we report that both mice and zebrafish exposed to high-fat (HFDs) or high-cholesterol (HCDs) diets develop acute innate inflammatory responses within hours, reflected in the localized interleukin-1β-dependent accumulation of myeloid cells in the intestine. Acute HCD-induced intestinal inflammation is dependent on cholesterol uptake via Niemann-Pick C1-like 1 and inflammasome activation involving apoptosis-associated Speck-like protein containing a caspase recruitment domain, which leads to Caspase-1 activity in intestinal epithelial cells. Extended exposure to HCD results in localized, inflammation-dependent, functional dysregulation as well as systemic pathologies. Our model suggests that dietary cholesterol initiates intestinal inflammation in epithelial cells. PMID:25536194

  8. REDUCED NITRIC OXIDE PRODUCTION AND INOS MRNA EXPRESSION IN IFN-G STIMULATED CHICKEN MACROPHAGES TRANSFECTED WITH INOS SIRNAS

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Utilizing RNA interference technology with siRNA in the HD-11 macrophage cell line, we determined how the inhibition or knock-down of the iNOS (inducible nitric oxide synthase) gene affected IFN-y' induced macrophage production of nitric oxide (NO) and mRNA expression of genes involved in this biolo...

  9. Pump/Probe Angular Dependence of Hanle Electromagnetically Induced Transparency

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jackson, Richard; Campbell, Kaleb; Crescimanno, Michael; Bali, Samir

    2015-05-01

    We investigate the dependence of Hanle Electromagnetically Induced Transparency (EIT) on angular separation between pump and probe field propagation directions in room-temperature Rb vapor. We observe the FWHM of the probe transmission spectrum and the amplitude of the EIT signal while varying the angular separation from 0 to 1 milliradian. Following the work of Ref., we examine potential applications in information storage and retrieval. We are grateful to Miami University for their generous financial support, and to the Miami University Instrumentation lab for their invaluable contributions.

  10. Food-dependent exercise-induced anaphylaxis: is wheat unique?

    PubMed

    Wong, Gabriel K; Krishna, Mamidipudi T

    2013-12-01

    This review draws comparisons between wheat-dependent exercise-induced anaphylaxis (WDEIA) and other food-dependent exercise-induced anaphylaxis (FDEIAs) and discusses the importance of co-factors in its pathophysiology. FDEIA remains an enigmatic condition since it was first described 30 years ago. The sporadic and unpredictable nature of its reactions has puzzled clinicians and scientists for decades, but recent studies on WDEIA have enlightened us about the pathophysiology of this condition. The identification of defined allergic epitopes such as Tri a 19, α-gliadin, β-gliadin and γ-gliadin in WDEIA enables it to become the perfect model for studying FDEIA, but WDEIA is by no means a unique condition. On a larger scale, FDEIA represents a crucial link between IgE-mediated and anaphylactoid reactions and provides supportive evidence for the concept of 'summation anaphylaxis' and the need to overcome the 'allergen threshold'. Future work should focus on identifying more of the FDEIA epitopes and understanding their distinct molecular properties. The development of a biomarker in order to identify patients susceptible to co-factor influences would be invaluable. PMID:24127054

  11. Interferon-gamma-inducible kynurenines/pteridines inflammation cascade: implications for aging and aging-associated psychiatric and medical disorders

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    This review of literature and our data suggests that up-regulated production of interferon-gamma (IFNG) in periphery and brain triggers a merger of tryptophan (TRY)–kynurenine (KYN) and guanine–tetrahydrobiopterin (BH4) metabolic pathways into inflammation cascade involved in aging and aging-associated medical and psychiatric disorders (AAMPD) (metabolic syndrome, depression, vascular cognitive impairment). IFNG-inducible KYN/pteridines inflammation cascade is characterized by up-regulation of nitric oxide synthase (NOS) activity (induced by KYN) and decreased formation of NOS cofactor, BH4, that results in uncoupling of NOS that shifting arginine from NO to superoxide anion production. Superoxide anion and free radicals among KYN derivatives trigger phospholipase A2-arachidonic acid cascade associated with AAMPD. IFNG-induced up-regulation of indoleamine 2,3-dioxygenase (IDO), rate-limiting enzyme of TRY–KYN pathway, decreases TRY conversion into serotonin (substrate of antidepressant effect) and increases production of KYN associated with diabetes [xanthurenic acid (XA)], anxiety (KYN), psychoses and cognitive impairment (kynurenic acid). IFNG-inducible KYN/pteridines inflammation cascade is impacted by IFNG (+874) T/A genotypes, encoding cytokine production. In addition to literature data on KYN/TRY ratio (IDO activity index), we observe neopterin levels (index of activity of rate-limiting enzyme of guanine–BH4 pathway) to be higher in carriers of high (T) than of low (A) producers alleles; and to correlate with AAMPD markers (e.g., insulin resistance, body mass index, mortality risk), and with IFN-alpha-induced depression in hepatitis C patients. IFNG-inducible cascade is influenced by environmental factors (e.g., vitamin B6 deficiency increases XA formation) and by pharmacological agents; and might offer new approaches for anti-aging and anti-AAMPD interventions. PMID:20811799

  12. Salinity dependence of spectral induced polarization in sands and sandstones

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Revil, A.; Skold, M.

    2011-11-01

    In electrolyte-saturated sands, the reversible storage of electrical charges is responsible for a phase lag between the current (injected and retrieved by two current electrodes) and the electrical field recorded by two voltage electrodes. This phenomenon is called 'spectral induced polarization' in geophysics and can potentially be used to monitor salt tracer tests in shallow aquifers to infer their permeability and dispersivity tensors. We demonstrate analytically that the polarization of the inner part of the electrical triple layer coating the surface of the grains (named the Stern layer in electrochemistry) is consistent with available data. We also perform new experiments using silica sands saturated by NaCl and CaCl2 pore water solutions. The salinity dependence of quadrature conductivity can be modelled using an analytical solution of the triple layer model, which offers a simple way to interpret laboratory and field data. This analytical solution depends on the total site density of the mineral surface, the pH value and the sorption coefficient of the cation in the Stern layer. This model shows that both the specific surface conductivity of the Stern layer and the quadrature conductivity of the porous material depend on the conductivity of the pore water. The quadrature conductivity is becoming independent of the salinity above 1 S m-1. The parameters entering the analytical model are consistent with independent estimates from titration data and zeta potential measurements, which are two classical methods to characterize the electrical triple layer at the pore water mineral interface.

  13. From Induced Seismicity to Direct Time-Dependent Seismic Hazard

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Convertito, V.; Maercklin, N.; Sharma, N.; Zollo, A.

    2012-12-01

    The growing installation of industrial facilities for subsurface exploration worldwide requires continuous refinements in understanding both the mechanisms by which seismicity is induced by field operations and the related seismic hazard. Particularly in proximity of densely populated areas, induced low-to-moderate magnitude seismicity characterized by high-frequency content can be clearly felt by the surrounding inhabitants and, in some cases, may produce damage. In this respect we propose a technique for time-dependent probabilistic seismic hazard analysis to be used in geothermal fields as a monitoring tool for the effects of on-going field operations. The technique integrates the observed features of the seismicity induced by fluid injection and extraction with a local ground-motion prediction equation. The result of the analysis is the time-evolving probability of exceedance of peak ground acceleration (PGA), which can be compared with selected critical values to manage field operations. To evaluate the reliability of the proposed technique, we applied it to data collected in The Geysers geothermal field in northern California between 1 September 2007 and 15 November 2010. We show that the period considered the seismic hazard at The Geysers was variable in time and space, which is a consequence of the field operations and the variation of both seismicity rate and b-value. We conclude that, for the exposure period taken into account (i.e., two months), as a conservative limit, PGA values corresponding to the lowest probability of exceedance (e.g., 30%) must not be exceeded to ensure safe field operations. We suggest testing the proposed technique at other geothermal areas or in regions where seismicity is induced, for example, by hydrocarbon exploitation or carbon dioxide storage.

  14. Dependence induced increases in intragastric alcohol consumption in mice.

    PubMed

    Fidler, Tara L; Powers, Matthew S; Ramirez, Jason J; Crane, Andrew; Mulgrew, Jennifer; Smitasin, Phoebe; Cunningham, Christopher L

    2012-01-01

    Three experiments used the intragastric alcohol consumption (IGAC) procedure to examine the effects of variations in passive ethanol exposure on withdrawal and voluntary ethanol intake in two inbred mouse strains, C57BL/6J (B6) and DBA/2J (D2). Experimental treatments were selected to induce quantitative differences in ethanol dependence and withdrawal severity by: (1) varying the periodicity of passive ethanol exposure (three, six or nine infusions/day); (2) varying the dose per infusion (low, medium or high); and (3) varying the duration of passive exposure (3, 5 or 10 days). All experiments included control groups passively exposed to water. B6 mice generally self-infused more ethanol than D2 mice, but passive ethanol exposure increased IGAC in both strains, with D2 mice showing larger relative increases during the first few days of ethanol access. Bout data supported the characterization of B6 mice as sippers and D2 mice as gulpers. Three larger infusions per day produced a stronger effect on IGAC than six or nine smaller infusions, especially in D2 mice. Increased IGAC was strongly predicted by cumulative ethanol dose and intoxication during passive exposure in both strains. Withdrawal during the passive exposure phase was also a strong predictor of increased IGAC in D2 mice. However, B6 mice showed little withdrawal, precluding analysis of its potential role. Overall, these data support the hypothesis that dependence-induced increases in IGAC are jointly determined by two processes that might vary across genotypes: (1) tolerance to aversive postabsorptive ethanol effects and (2) negative reinforcement (i.e. alleviation of withdrawal by self-administered ethanol). PMID:21955048

  15. Granulocyte-dependent autoantibody-induced skin blistering.

    PubMed

    Csorba, Kinga; Sitaru, Sebastian; Sitaru, Cassian

    2012-01-01

    Autoimmune phenomena occur in healthy individuals, but when self-tolerance fails, the autoimmune response may result in specific pathology. According to Witebsky's postulates, one of the criteria in diagnosing a disease as autoimmune is the reproduction of the disease in experimental animals by the passive transfer of autoantibodies. For epidermolysis bullosa acquisita (EBA), a prototypic organ-specific autoimmune disease of skin and mucous membranes, several experimental models were recently established. In the animal model described in our present work, purified IgG antibodies against a stretch of 200 amino acids (aa 757-967) of collagen VII are injected repeatedly into mice reproducing the blistering phenotype as well as the histo- and immunopathological features characteristic to human EBA (1). Full-blown widespread disease is usually seen 5-6 days after the first injection and the extent of the disease correlates with the dose of the administered collagen VII-specific IgG. The tissue damage (blister formation) in the experimental EBA is depending on the recruitment and activation of granulocytes by tissue-bound autoantibodies (2,-4). Therefore, this model allows for the dissection of the granulocyte-dependent inflammatory pathway involved in the autoimmune tissue damage, as the model reproduces only the T cell-independent phase of the efferent autoimmune response. Furthermore, its value is underlined by a number of studies demonstrating the blister-inducing potential of autoantibodies in vivo and investigating the mechanism of the blister formation in EBA (1,3,-6). Finally, this model will greatly facilitate the development of new anti-inflammatory therapies in autoantibody-induced diseases. Overall, the passive transfer animal model of EBA is an accessible and instructive disease model and will help researchers to analyze not only EBA pathogenesis but to answer fundamental biologically and clinically essential autoimmunity questions. PMID:23092942

  16. Granulocyte-dependent Autoantibody-induced Skin Blistering

    PubMed Central

    Csorba, Kinga; Sitaru, Sebastian; Sitaru, Cassian

    2012-01-01

    Autoimmune phenomena occur in healthy individuals, but when self-tolerance fails, the autoimmune response may result in specific pathology. According to Witebsky's postulates, one of the criteria in diagnosing a disease as autoimmune is the reproduction of the disease in experimental animals by the passive transfer of autoantibodies. For epidermolysis bullosa acquisita (EBA), a prototypic organ-specific autoimmune disease of skin and mucous membranes, several experimental models were recently established. In the animal model described in our present work, purified IgG antibodies against a stretch of 200 amino acids (aa 757-967) of collagen VII are injected repeatedly into mice reproducing the blistering phenotype as well as the histo- and immunopathological features characteristic to human EBA 1. Full-blown widespread disease is usually seen 5-6 days after the first injection and the extent of the disease correlates with the dose of the administered collagen VII-specific IgG. The tissue damage (blister formation) in the experimental EBA is depending on the recruitment and activation of granulocytes by tissue-bound autoantibodies 2,-4. Therefore, this model allows for the dissection of the granulocyte-dependent inflammatory pathway involved in the autoimmune tissue damage, as the model reproduces only the T cell-independent phase of the efferent autoimmune response. Furthermore, its value is underlined by a number of studies demonstrating the blister-inducing potential of autoantibodies in vivo and investigating the mechanism of the blister formation in EBA 1,3,-6. Finally, this model will greatly facilitate the development of new anti-inflammatory therapies in autoantibody-induced diseases. Overall, the passive transfer animal model of EBA is an accessible and instructive disease model and will help researchers to analyze not only EBA pathogenesis but to answer fundamental biologically and clinically essential autoimmunity questions. PMID:23092942

  17. Competition dependence of retrieval-induced forgetting in motor memory.

    PubMed

    Tempel, Tobias; Aslan, Alp; Frings, Christian

    2016-05-01

    In two experiments, we examined the competition dependence of retrieval-induced forgetting (RIF) in motor memory. Participants learned sequential finger movements as responses to letter stimuli. The learning phase comprised two parts. In both parts, half of the motor sequences were to be executed at one of two locations (the left or right side of a keyboard) by pressing the corresponding response keys. Retrieval practice of half of the motor sequences at one location induced forgetting of the nonpracticed motor sequences at that location. However, RIF was prevented in Experiment 1 when retrieval practice took place before the nonpracticed items had even been encoded. In Experiment 2, RIF was prevented by intentionally forgetting the nonpracticed motor sequences prior to retrieval practice. These results suggest that precluding competition by related items during retrieval practice precluded them from being affected by RIF. The present findings support an inhibitory account and speak against the alternative assumptions that associative blocking or a mental context change causes RIF. PMID:26667470

  18. Handedness Dependent Electromagnetically Induced Transparency in Hybrid Chiral Metamaterials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kang, Lei; Hao Jiang, Zhi; Yue, Taiwei; Werner, Douglas H.

    2015-07-01

    We provide the first experimental demonstration of the handedness dependent electromagnetically induced transparency (EIT) in chiral metamaterials during the interaction with circularly polarized waves. The observed chiral-sensitive EIT phenomena arise from the coherent excitation of a non-radiative mode in the component split ring resonators (SRRs) produced by the corresponding Born-Kuhn type (radiative) resonators that are responsible for the pronounced chirality. The coherent coupling, which is dominated by the bonding and antibonding resonances of the Born-Kuhn type resonators, leads to an extremely steep dispersion for a circularly polarized wave of predefined handedness. Accordingly, retrieved effective medium parameters from simulated results further reveal a difference of 80 in the group indices for left- and right-handed circularly polarized waves at frequencies within the EIT window, which can potentially result in handedness-sensitive pulse delays. These chiral metamaterials which enable a handedness dependent EIT effect may provide more degrees of freedom for designing circular polarization based communication devices.

  19. Sugar-induced plant growth is dependent on brassinosteroids

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Yongqiang; He, Junxian

    2015-01-01

    Sugars, the end products of photosynthesis, not only fuel growth and development of plants as carbon and energy sources, but also function as signaling molecules to modulate a range of important processes during plant growth and development. We recently found that sugar can promote hypocotyl elongation in Arabidopsis in darkness and this is largely dependent on brassinosteroids (BRs), a group of essential phytohormones involved in mediation of plant cell elongation. Sugars not only positively regulate the transcription of BZR1, the gene encoding the BR-activated transcription factor BRASSINAZOLE RESISTANT1 (BRZ1), but also stabilize the BZR1 protein. Based on these results, we proposed that BZR1 may act as a converging node for crosstalk between BR and sugar signaling in regulating plant growth in darkness. In this short communication, we present some new data showing that HEXOKINASE1 (HXK1), the first identified glucose (Glc) sensor in plants, was positively involved in Glc promotion of hypocotyl elongation in Arabidopsis in the dark. It appears that the function of HXK1 is dependent on the presence of BR, suggesting that BR may act downstream of HXK1 to positively regulate Glc-induced hypocotyl elongation in Arabidopsis in darkness. PMID:26340221

  20. Handedness Dependent Electromagnetically Induced Transparency in Hybrid Chiral Metamaterials

    PubMed Central

    Kang, Lei; Hao Jiang, Zhi; Yue, Taiwei; Werner, Douglas H.

    2015-01-01

    We provide the first experimental demonstration of the handedness dependent electromagnetically induced transparency (EIT) in chiral metamaterials during the interaction with circularly polarized waves. The observed chiral-sensitive EIT phenomena arise from the coherent excitation of a non-radiative mode in the component split ring resonators (SRRs) produced by the corresponding Born−Kuhn type (radiative) resonators that are responsible for the pronounced chirality. The coherent coupling, which is dominated by the bonding and antibonding resonances of the Born−Kuhn type resonators, leads to an extremely steep dispersion for a circularly polarized wave of predefined handedness. Accordingly, retrieved effective medium parameters from simulated results further reveal a difference of 80 in the group indices for left- and right-handed circularly polarized waves at frequencies within the EIT window, which can potentially result in handedness-sensitive pulse delays. These chiral metamaterials which enable a handedness dependent EIT effect may provide more degrees of freedom for designing circular polarization based communication devices. PMID:26183735

  1. Handedness Dependent Electromagnetically Induced Transparency in Hybrid Chiral Metamaterials.

    PubMed

    Kang, Lei; Hao Jiang, Zhi; Yue, Taiwei; Werner, Douglas H

    2015-01-01

    We provide the first experimental demonstration of the handedness dependent electromagnetically induced transparency (EIT) in chiral metamaterials during the interaction with circularly polarized waves. The observed chiral-sensitive EIT phenomena arise from the coherent excitation of a non-radiative mode in the component split ring resonators (SRRs) produced by the corresponding Born-Kuhn type (radiative) resonators that are responsible for the pronounced chirality. The coherent coupling, which is dominated by the bonding and antibonding resonances of the Born-Kuhn type resonators, leads to an extremely steep dispersion for a circularly polarized wave of predefined handedness. Accordingly, retrieved effective medium parameters from simulated results further reveal a difference of 80 in the group indices for left- and right-handed circularly polarized waves at frequencies within the EIT window, which can potentially result in handedness-sensitive pulse delays. These chiral metamaterials which enable a handedness dependent EIT effect may provide more degrees of freedom for designing circular polarization based communication devices. PMID:26183735

  2. Counterintuitive DNA Sequence Dependence in Supercoiling-Induced DNA Melting

    PubMed Central

    Vlijm, Rifka; v.d. Torre, Jaco; Dekker, Cees

    2015-01-01

    The metabolism of DNA in cells relies on the balance between hybridized double-stranded DNA (dsDNA) and local de-hybridized regions of ssDNA that provide access to binding proteins. Traditional melting experiments, in which short pieces of dsDNA are heated up until the point of melting into ssDNA, have determined that AT-rich sequences have a lower binding energy than GC-rich sequences. In cells, however, the double-stranded backbone of DNA is destabilized by negative supercoiling, and not by temperature. To investigate what the effect of GC content is on DNA melting induced by negative supercoiling, we studied DNA molecules with a GC content ranging from 38% to 77%, using single-molecule magnetic tweezer measurements in which the length of a single DNA molecule is measured as a function of applied stretching force and supercoiling density. At low force (<0.5pN), supercoiling results into twisting of the dsDNA backbone and loop formation (plectonemes), without inducing any DNA melting. This process was not influenced by the DNA sequence. When negative supercoiling is introduced at increasing force, local melting of DNA is introduced. We measured for the different DNA molecules a characteristic force Fchar, at which negative supercoiling induces local melting of the dsDNA. Surprisingly, GC-rich sequences melt at lower forces than AT-rich sequences: Fchar = 0.56pN for 77% GC but 0.73pN for 38% GC. An explanation for this counterintuitive effect is provided by the realization that supercoiling densities of a few percent only induce melting of a few percent of the base pairs. As a consequence, denaturation bubbles occur in local AT-rich regions and the sequence-dependent effect arises from an increased DNA bending/torsional energy associated with the plectonemes. This new insight indicates that an increased GC-content adjacent to AT-rich DNA regions will enhance local opening of the double-stranded DNA helix. PMID:26513573

  3. Tissue Crowding Induces Caspase-Dependent Competition for Space.

    PubMed

    Levayer, Romain; Dupont, Carole; Moreno, Eduardo

    2016-03-01

    Regulation of tissue size requires fine tuning at the single-cell level of proliferation rate, cell volume, and cell death. Whereas the adjustment of proliferation and growth has been widely studied [1-5], the contribution of cell death and its adjustment to tissue-scale parameters have been so far much less explored. Recently, it was shown that epithelial cells could be eliminated by live-cell delamination in response to an increase of cell density [6]. Cell delamination was supposed to occur independently of caspase activation and was suggested to be based on a gradual and spontaneous disappearance of junctions in the delaminating cells [6]. Studying the elimination of cells in the midline region of the Drosophila pupal notum, we found that, contrary to what was suggested before, Caspase 3 activation precedes and is required for cell delamination. Yet, using particle image velocimetry, genetics, and laser-induced perturbations, we confirmed [6] that local tissue crowding is necessary and sufficient to drive cell elimination and that cell elimination is independent of known fitness-dependent competition pathways [7-9]. Accordingly, activation of the oncogene Ras in clones was sufficient to compress the neighboring tissue and eliminate cells up to several cell diameters away from the clones. Mechanical stress has been previously proposed to contribute to cell competition [10, 11]. These results provide the first experimental evidences that crowding-induced death could be an alternative mode of super-competition, namely mechanical super-competition, independent of known fitness markers [7-9], that could promote tumor growth. PMID:26898471

  4. The nest site lottery: how selectively neutral density dependent growth suppression induces frequency dependent selection.

    PubMed

    Argasinski, K; Broom, M

    2013-12-01

    Modern developments in population dynamics emphasize the role of the turnover of individuals. In the new approaches stable population size is a dynamic equilibrium between different mortality and fecundity factors instead of an arbitrary fixed carrying capacity. The latest replicator dynamics models assume that regulation of the population size acts through feedback driven by density dependent juvenile mortality. Here, we consider a simplified model to extract the properties of this approach. We show that at the stable population size, the structure of the frequency dependent evolutionary game emerges. Turnover of individuals induces a lottery mechanism where for each nest site released by a dead adult individual a single newborn is drawn from the pool of newborn candidates. This frequency dependent selection leads towards the strategy maximizing the number of newborns per adult death. However, multiple strategies can maximize this value. Among them, the strategy with the greatest mortality (which implies the greatest instantaneous growth rate) is selected. This result is important for the discussion about universal fitness measures and which parameters are maximized by natural selection. This is related to the fitness measures R0 and r, because the number of newborns per single dead individual equals the lifetime production of newborn R0 in models without aging. We thus have a two-stage procedure, instead of a single fitness measure, which is a combination of R0 and r. According to the nest site lottery mechanism, at stable population size, selection favors strategies with the greatest r, i.e. those with the highest turnover, from those with the greatest R0. PMID:24071631

  5. Dependence of enhanced asymmetry-induced transport on collision frequency

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eggleston, D. L.

    2014-07-01

    A single-particle code with collisional effects is used to study how asymmetry-induced radial transport in a non-neutral plasma depends on collision frequency. For asymmetries of the form ϕ1(r) cos(kz) cos(ωt-lθ), two sources for the transport have been identified: resonant particles and axially trapped particles. The simulation shows that this latter type, which occurs near the radius where ω matches the azimuthal rotation frequency ωR, is usually dominant at low collision frequency ν but becomes negligible at higher ν. This behavior can be understood by noting that axially trapped particles have a lower trapping frequency than resonant particles. In the low ν (banana) regime, the radial oscillations have amplitude Δr ≈ vr/ωT, so axially trapped particles dominate, and the transport may even exceed the resonant particle plateau regime level. As ν increases, collisions start to interrupt the slower axially trapped particle oscillations, while the resonant particles are still in the banana regime, so the axially trapped particle contribution to the transport decreases. At the largest ν values, axially trapped particle transport is negligible and the observed diffusion coefficient matches that given by plateau regime resonant particle theory. Heuristic models based on these considerations give reasonable agreement with the observed scaling laws for the value of the collision frequency where axially trapped particle transport starts to decrease and for the enhancement of the diffusion coefficient produced by axially trapped particles.

  6. Corticospinal modulation induced by sounds depends on action preparedness

    PubMed Central

    Marinovic, Welber; Tresilian, James R; de Rugy, Aymar; Sidhu, Simranjit; Riek, Stephan

    2014-01-01

    Abstract A loud acoustic stimulus (LAS) presented during movement preparation can induce an early release of the prepared action. Because loud sound has been found to have an inhibitory effect on motor cortex excitability, it is possible that the motor cortex plays little role in the early release of prepared responses. We sought to shed new light on this suggestion by probing changes in corticospinal excitability after LAS presentation during preparation for an anticipatory action. Unexpectedly, we show that the changes in corticospinal excitability after LAS presentation are not fixed. Based on the magnitude of motor-evoked potentials elicited by transcranial magnetic and electric stimulation of the motor cortex, we demonstrate that the effects of auditory stimuli on corticospinal excitability depend on the level of readiness for action: inhibition in early preparation and facilitation close to movement onset. We also show that auditory stimuli can regulate intracortical excitability by increasing intracortical facilitation and reducing short-interval intracortical inhibition. Together, these findings indicate that, at least in part, the early release of motor responses by auditory stimuli involves the motor cortex. PMID:24081157

  7. Dependence of enhanced asymmetry-induced transport on collision frequency

    SciTech Connect

    Eggleston, D. L.

    2014-07-15

    A single-particle code with collisional effects is used to study how asymmetry-induced radial transport in a non-neutral plasma depends on collision frequency. For asymmetries of the form ϕ{sub 1}(r) cos(kz) cos(ωt−lθ), two sources for the transport have been identified: resonant particles and axially trapped particles. The simulation shows that this latter type, which occurs near the radius where ω matches the azimuthal rotation frequency ω{sub R}, is usually dominant at low collision frequency ν but becomes negligible at higher ν. This behavior can be understood by noting that axially trapped particles have a lower trapping frequency than resonant particles. In the low ν (banana) regime, the radial oscillations have amplitude Δr ≈ v{sub r}/ω{sub T}, so axially trapped particles dominate, and the transport may even exceed the resonant particle plateau regime level. As ν increases, collisions start to interrupt the slower axially trapped particle oscillations, while the resonant particles are still in the banana regime, so the axially trapped particle contribution to the transport decreases. At the largest ν values, axially trapped particle transport is negligible and the observed diffusion coefficient matches that given by plateau regime resonant particle theory. Heuristic models based on these considerations give reasonable agreement with the observed scaling laws for the value of the collision frequency where axially trapped particle transport starts to decrease and for the enhancement of the diffusion coefficient produced by axially trapped particles.

  8. Stress-induced neuroinflammatory priming is time of day dependent.

    PubMed

    Fonken, Laura K; Weber, Michael D; Daut, Rachel A; Kitt, Meagan M; Frank, Matthew G; Watkins, Linda R; Maier, Steven F

    2016-04-01

    Circadian rhythms are endogenous cycles of physiology and behavior that align with the daily rotation of the planet and resulting light-dark cycle. The circadian system ensures homeostatic balance and regulates many aspects of physiology, including the stress response and susceptibility to and/or severity of stress-related sequelae. Both acute and chronic stressors amplify neuroinflammatory responses to a subsequent immune challenge, however it is not known whether circadian timing of the stressor regulates the priming response. Here, we test whether stress-induced neuroinflammatory priming is regulated by the circadian system. As has been previously shown, exposure to 100 inescapable tails shocks (IS) increased hippocampal cytokines following a subsequent inflammatory challenge. However, this effect was limited to animals that experienced the stressor during the light phase. Rats exposed to stress during the dark phase did not alter inflammatory potential following lipopolysaccharide (LPS) challenge. To determine whether microglia might be involved in diurnal differences in neuroinflammatory priming, microglia were isolated 24h after stress that occurred either during the middle of the light or dark phase. Only microglia isolated from animals stressed during the light phase demonstrated an exaggerated inflammatory response when treated ex vivo with LPS. To determine possible circadian dependency of microglia responsiveness to glucocorticoids - the likely proximal mediator for stress associated neuroinflammatory priming - microglia were isolated during the middle of the light or dark phase and treated ex vivo with corticosterone. Glucocorticoids treatment downregulated CX3CR1 and CD200R, two genes involved in microglial inflammatory "off" signaling; however, there was no effect of time of day on expression of either gene. Importantly, while absolute concentrations of corticosterone were comparable following IS during the light and dark phase, the magnitude of

  9. Spin-dependent deprotonation induced giant magnetocurrent in electrochemical cells.

    PubMed

    Pan, Haiping; Shen, Yan; Duan, Jiashun; Lu, Kai; Hu, Bin

    2016-04-21

    A giant magnetocurrent (>100%) is observed in the electrochemical system based on tertiary amines at room temperature. This giant magnetocurrent is ascribed to spin-dependent deprotonation during the oxidation of tertiary amines. This presents a new approach of using spin-dependent deprotonation to generate giant magnetocurrent in electrochemical reactions. PMID:27009519

  10. No association of IFNG+874T/A SNP and NOS2A-954G/C SNP variants with nitric oxide radical serum levels or susceptibility to tuberculosis in a Brazilian population subset.

    PubMed

    Leandro, Ana Cristina C S; Rocha, Márcia Andrade; Lamoglia-Souza, Andreia; VandeBerg, John L; Rolla, Valeria Cavalcanti; Bonecini-Almeida, Maria da Gloria

    2013-01-01

    Tuberculosis (TB) is one of the most common infectious diseases in the world. Mycobacterium tuberculosis infection leads to pulmonary active disease in approximately 5-10% of exposed individuals. Both bacteria- and host-related characteristics influence latent infection and disease. Host genetic predisposition to develop TB may involve multiple genes and their polymorphisms. It was reported previously that interferon gamma (IFN-γ) and nitric oxide synthase 2 (NOS2) are expressed on alveolar macrophages from TB patients and are responsible for bacilli control; thus, we aimed this study at genotyping single nucleotide polymorphisms IFNG+874T/A SNP and NOS2A-954G/C SNP to estimate their role on TB susceptibility and determine whether these polymorphisms influence serum nitrite and NOx(-) production. This case-control study enrolled 172 TB patients and 179 healthy controls. Neither polymorphism was associated with susceptibility to TB. NOS2A-954G/C SNP was not associated with serum levels of nitrite and NOx(-). These results indicate that variants of IFNG+874T/A SNP and NOS2A-954G/C SNP do not influence TB susceptibility or the secretion of nitric oxide radicals in the study population. PMID:24024215

  11. Revisiting the Heterogeneous IFN-γ Response of Bacille of Calmette-Guérin (BCG)-Revaccinated Healthy Volunteers in a Randomized Controlled Trial: Effect of the Body Mass Index and of the IFNG+874 A/T Polymorphism

    PubMed Central

    Conceição, Elisabete L.; Nascimento-Sampaio, Francisco S.; Schwingel, Paulo A.; Oliveira, Evelin S.; Rocha, Michael S.; Vieira, Igor; Mendes, Carlos M. C.; Souza-Machado, Adelmir; Oliveira, Martha M.; Barral-Netto, Manoel; Marinho, Jamocyr M.

    2016-01-01

    In trials evaluating the immune responses to Bacille of Calmette-Guérin (BCG), the genetic background and the nutritional status are host-related factors that could affect the heterogeneity in these parameters. The IFNG+874 A/T (rs 62559044) polymorphism has been reported to influence the IFN-γ production by BCG-vaccinated individuals challenged in vitro with mycobacterial antigens. The body mass index (BMI) is a proxy for the nutritional status and has been associated both with the susceptibility to tuberculosis and with the IFN-γ response. We show that although the IFNG+874 A/T polymorphism was not associated with the heterogeneity of IFN-γ production in a randomized controlled trial that evaluated long-term immune responses to BCG revaccination previously conducted in Salvador, Bahia, Brazil, the effect of this polymorphism on the observed increase in IFN-γ production among revaccinated subjects was adjusted in individuals with a low BMI. PMID:27472280

  12. SHP-1-dependent macrophage differentiation exacerbates virus-induced myositis

    PubMed Central

    Watson, Neva B.; Schneider, Karin M.; Massa, Paul T.

    2015-01-01

    Virus-induced myositis is an emerging global affliction that remains poorly characterized with few treatment options. Moreover, muscle-tropic viruses often spread to the central nervous system causing dramatically increased morbidity. Therefore, there is an urgent need to explore genetic factors involved in this class of human disease. This report investigates critical innate immune pathways affecting murine virus-induced myositis. Of particular importance, the key immune regulator SHP-1, which normally suppresses macrophage-mediated inflammation, is a major factor in promoting clinical disease in muscle. We show that Theiler’s murine encephalomyelitis virus infection of skeletal myofibers induces inflammation and subsequent dystrophic calcification with loss of ambulation in wild type mice. Surprisingly, although similar extensive myofiber infection and inflammation is observed in SHP-1-deficient (SHP-1−/−) mice, these mice neither accumulate dead calcified myofibers nor lose ambulation. Macrophages were the predominant effector cells infiltrating WT and SHP-1−/− muscle, and an increased infiltration of immature monocytes/macrophages correlated with absence of clinical disease in SHP-1−/− mice, while mature M1-like macrophages corresponded with increased myofiber degeneration in WT mice. Furthermore, blocking SHP-1 activation in WT macrophages blocked virus-induced myofiber degeneration, and pharmacologic ablation of macrophages inhibited muscle calcification in TMEV-infected WT animals. These data suggest that following TMEV infection of muscle, SHP-1 promotes M1 differentiation of infiltrating macrophages, and these inflammatory macrophages are likely involved in damaging muscle fibers. These findings reveal a pathological role for SHP-1 in promoting inflammatory macrophage differentiation and myofiber damage in virus-infected skeletal muscle, thus identifying SHP-1 and M1 macrophages as essential mediators of virus-induced myopathy. PMID:25681345

  13. Time dependent measurements of induced fission for SNM interrogation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beck, A.; Israelashvili, I.; Wengrowicz, U.; Caspi, E. N.; Yaar, I.; Osovizki, A.; Ocherashvili, A.; Rennhofer, H.; Pedersen, B.; Crochemore, J.-M.; Roesgen, E.

    2013-08-01

    Gammas from induced fissions were measured and separated into prompt and delayed particles. To this end, a dedicated detector was realized, based on a plastic scintillator, a wavelength shifter fiber and a silicon photomultiplier (SiPM). Results are presented from the interrogation of Special Nuclear Materials (SNM), employing a pulsed neutron generator in the PUNITA graphite moderator incorporating the above detector assembly. The detector response is presented, as well as the sensitivities for prompt and delayed processes within the same experimental setup.

  14. Subwavelength optical lattices induced by position-dependent dark states

    SciTech Connect

    Sun Qingqing; Evers, Joerg; Kiffner, Martin; Zubairy, M. Suhail

    2011-05-15

    A method for the generation of subwavelength optical lattices based on multilevel dark states is proposed. The dark state is formed by a suitable combination of standing wave light fields, leading to position-dependent populations of the ground states. An additional field coupling dispersively to one of the ground states translates this position dependence into a subwavelength optical potential. We provide two semiclassical approaches to understand the involved physics, and demonstrate that they lead to identical results in a certain meaningful limit. Then we apply a Monte Carlo simulation technique to study the full quantum dynamics of the subwavelength trapping. Finally, we discuss the relevant time scales for the trapping, optimum conditions, and possible implementations.

  15. Resistance to BRAF inhibitors induces glutamine dependency in melanoma cells

    PubMed Central

    Baenke, Franziska; Chaneton, Barbara; Smith, Matthew; Van Den Broek, Niels; Hogan, Kate; Tang, Haoran; Viros, Amaya; Martin, Matthew; Galbraith, Laura; Girotti, Maria R.; Dhomen, Nathalie; Gottlieb, Eyal; Marais, Richard

    2016-01-01

    BRAF inhibitors can extend progression-free and overall survival in melanoma patients whose tumors harbor mutations in BRAF. However, the majority of patients eventually develop resistance to these drugs. Here we show that BRAF mutant melanoma cells that have developed acquired resistance to BRAF inhibitors display increased oxidative metabolism and increased dependency on mitochondria for survival. Intriguingly, the increased oxidative metabolism is associated with a switch from glucose to glutamine metabolism and an increased dependence on glutamine over glucose for proliferation. We show that the resistant cells are more sensitive to mitochondrial poisons and to inhibitors of glutaminolysis, suggesting that targeting specific metabolic pathways may offer exciting therapeutic opportunities to treat resistant tumors, or to delay emergence of resistance in the first-line setting. PMID:26365896

  16. Polarization dependent, surface plasmon induced photoconductance in gold nanorod arrays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Diefenbach, S.; Erhard, N.; Schopka, J.; Martin, A.; Karnetzky, C.; Iacopino, D.; Holleitner, A. W.

    2014-03-01

    We report on the photoconductance in two-dimensional arrays of gold nanorods which is strongly enhanced at the frequency of the longitudinal surface plasmon of the nanorods. The arrays are formed by a combination of droplet deposition and stamping of gold nanorod solutions on SiO2 substrates. We find that the plasmon induced photoconductance is sensitive to the linear polarization of the exciting photons. We interpret the occurrence of the photoconductance as a bolometric enhancement of the arrays' conductance upon excitation of the longitudinal surface plasmon resonance of the nanorods.

  17. Theoretical analysis for temperature dependence of laser- induced damage threshold of optical thin films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mikami, K.; Motokoshi, S.; Somekawa, T.; Jitsuno, T.; Fujita, M.; Tanaka, KA; Azechi, H.

    2016-03-01

    The temperature dependence of the laser-induced damage threshold on optical coatings was studied in detail for laser pulses from 123 K to 473 K at different temperatures. The laser-induced damage threshold increased with decreasing temperatures when we tested long pulses (200 ps and 4 ns). The temperature dependence, however, was reversed for pulses shorter than a few picoseconds (100 fs testing). We propose a scaling model with a flowchart that includes three separate processes: free-electron generation, electron multiplication, and electron heating. Furthermore, we calculated the temperature dependence of laser-induced damage thresholds at different temperatures. Our calculation results agreed well with the experimental results.

  18. Orientation dependence of shock induced dislocations in Tantalum single crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pang, Bo; Jones, I.; Chiu, Yulung; Millett, J.; Whiteman, Glenn; Bourne, N.

    2013-06-01

    Shock wave deformation of monocrystalline tantalum to a pressure of 6.2 GPa and duration of 1.7 μs generates profuse dislocations. Three orientations (100),(110),(111) were tested to examine the orientation dependence of the dislocation generation. The dislocations were characterised by transmission electron microscopy. The difference in the Burgers vectors of the primary dislocations in the specimens with different orientations showed a distinct anisotropy and will be discussed in light of the models of slip behaviour in one-dimensional strain (Smith 1958) and (Meyers 1978). The front and rear surfaces of the specimens were both investigated to examine the effects of wave duration.

  19. Fumarate induces redox-dependent senescence by modifying glutathione metabolism

    PubMed Central

    Zheng, Liang; Cardaci, Simone; Jerby, Livnat; MacKenzie, Elaine D.; Sciacovelli, Marco; Johnson, T. Isaac; Gaude, Edoardo; King, Ayala; Leach, Joshua D. G.; Edrada-Ebel, RuAngelie; Hedley, Ann; Morrice, Nicholas A.; Kalna, Gabriela; Blyth, Karen; Ruppin, Eytan; Frezza, Christian; Gottlieb, Eyal

    2015-01-01

    Mutations in the tricarboxylic acid (TCA) cycle enzyme fumarate hydratase (FH) are associated with a highly malignant form of renal cancer. We combined analytical chemistry and metabolic computational modelling to investigate the metabolic implications of FH loss in immortalized and primary mouse kidney cells. Here, we show that the accumulation of fumarate caused by the inactivation of FH leads to oxidative stress that is mediated by the formation of succinicGSH, a covalent adduct between fumarate and glutathione. Chronic succination of GSH, caused by the loss of FH, or by exogenous fumarate, leads to persistent oxidative stress and cellular senescence in vitro and in vivo. Importantly, the ablation of p21, a key mediator of senescence, in Fh1-deficient mice resulted in the transformation of benign renal cysts into a hyperplastic lesion, suggesting that fumarate-induced senescence needs to be bypassed for the initiation of renal cancers. PMID:25613188

  20. Opiate dependence induces network state shifts in the limbic system.

    PubMed

    Dejean, C; Boraud, T; Le Moine, C

    2013-11-01

    Among current theories of addiction, hedonic homeostasis dysregulation predicts that the brain reward systems, particularly the mesolimbic dopamine system, switch from a physiological state to a new "set point." In opiate addiction, evidence show that the dopamine system principal targets, prefrontal cortex (PFC), nucleus accumbens (NAC) and basolateral amygdala complex (BLA) also adapt to repeated drug stimulation. Here we investigated the impact of chronic morphine on the dynamics of the network of these three interconnected structures. For that purpose we performed simultaneous electrophysiological recordings in freely-moving rats subcutaneously implanted with continuous-release morphine pellets. Chronic morphine produced a shift in the network state underpinned by changes in Delta and Gamma oscillations in the LFP of PFC, NAC and BLA, in correlation to behavioral changes. However despite continuous stimulation by the drug, an apparent normalization of the network activity and state occurred after 2 days indicating large scale adaptations. Blockade of μ opioid receptors was nonetheless sufficient to disrupt this acquired new stability in morphine-dependent animals. In line with the homeostatic dysregulation theory of addiction, our study provides original direct evidence that the PFC-NAC-BLA network of the dependent brain is characterized by a de novo balance for which the drug of abuse becomes the main contributor. PMID:23911767

  1. IL-18 induces PD-1-dependent immunosuppression in cancer.

    PubMed

    Terme, Magali; Ullrich, Evelyn; Aymeric, Laetitia; Meinhardt, Kathrin; Desbois, Mélanie; Delahaye, Nicolas; Viaud, Sophie; Ryffel, Bernard; Yagita, Hideo; Kaplanski, Gilles; Prévost-Blondel, Armelle; Kato, Masashi; Schultze, Joachim L; Tartour, Eric; Kroemer, Guido; Chaput, Nathalie; Zitvogel, Laurence

    2011-08-15

    Immunosuppressive cytokines subvert innate and adaptive immune responses during cancer progression. The inflammatory cytokine interleukin-18 (IL-18) is known to accumulate in cancer patients, but its pathophysiological role remains unclear. In this study, we show that low levels of circulating IL-18, either exogenous or tumor derived, act to suppress the NK cell arm of tumor immunosurveillance. IL-18 produced by tumor cells promotes the development of NK-controlled metastases in a PD-1-dependent manner. Accordingly, PD-1 is expressed by activated mature NK cells in lymphoid organs of tumor bearers and is upregulated by IL-18. RNAi-mediated knockdown of IL-18 in tumors, or its systemic depletion by IL-18-binding protein, are sufficient to stimulate NK cell-dependent immunosurveillance in various tumor models. Together, these results define IL-18 as an immunosuppressive cytokine in cancer. Our findings suggest novel clinical implementations of anti-PD-1 antibodies in human malignancies that produce IL-18. PMID:21724589

  2. Spin-orbit torque induced spike-timing dependent plasticity

    SciTech Connect

    Sengupta, Abhronil Al Azim, Zubair; Fong, Xuanyao; Roy, Kaushik

    2015-03-02

    Nanoelectronic devices that mimic the functionality of synapses are a crucial requirement for performing cortical simulations of the brain. In this work, we propose a ferromagnet-heavy metal heterostructure that employs spin-orbit torque to implement spike-timing dependent plasticity. The proposed device offers the advantage of decoupled spike transmission and programming current paths, thereby leading to reliable operation during online learning. Possible arrangement of such devices in a crosspoint architecture can pave the way for ultra-dense neural networks. Simulation studies indicate that the device has the potential of achieving pico-Joule level energy consumption (maximum 2 pJ per synaptic event) which is comparable to the energy consumption for synaptic events in biological synapses.

  3. Spin-orbit torque induced spike-timing dependent plasticity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sengupta, Abhronil; Al Azim, Zubair; Fong, Xuanyao; Roy, Kaushik

    2015-03-01

    Nanoelectronic devices that mimic the functionality of synapses are a crucial requirement for performing cortical simulations of the brain. In this work, we propose a ferromagnet-heavy metal heterostructure that employs spin-orbit torque to implement spike-timing dependent plasticity. The proposed device offers the advantage of decoupled spike transmission and programming current paths, thereby leading to reliable operation during online learning. Possible arrangement of such devices in a crosspoint architecture can pave the way for ultra-dense neural networks. Simulation studies indicate that the device has the potential of achieving pico-Joule level energy consumption (maximum 2 pJ per synaptic event) which is comparable to the energy consumption for synaptic events in biological synapses.

  4. Skill Dependent Audiovisual Integration in the Fusiform Induces Repetition Suppression

    PubMed Central

    McNorgan, Chris; Booth, James R.

    2015-01-01

    Learning to read entails mapping existing phonological representations to novel orthographic representations and is thus an ideal context for investigating experience driven audiovisual integration. Because two dominant brain-based theories of reading development hinge on the sensitivity of the visual-object processing stream to phonological information, we were interested in how reading skill relates to audiovisual integration in this area. Thirty-two children between 8 and 13 years of age spanning a range of reading skill participated in a functional magnetic resonance imaging experiment. Participants completed a rhyme judgment task to word pairs presented unimodally (auditory- or visual-only) and cross-modally (auditory followed by visual). Skill-dependent sub-additive audiovisual modulation was found in left fusiform gyrus, extending into the putative visual word form area, and was correlated with behavioral orthographic priming. These results suggest learning to read promotes facilitatory audiovisual integration in the ventral visual-object processing stream and may optimize this region for orthographic processing. PMID:25585276

  5. AN EXTRACT OF PENICILLIUM CHRYSOGENUM INDUCES DOSE-DEPENDENT ALLERGIC ASTHMA RESPONSES IN MICE

    EPA Science Inventory

    Rationale: Penicillium chrysogenum, a common indoor mold, is known to have several allergens and can induce allergic responses in a mouse model of allergic penicilliosis. Our hypothesis is that soluble components of P. chrysogenum (PCE) can dose-dependently induce responses typ...

  6. Simulated apnoeas induce serotonin-dependent respiratory long-term facilitation in rats

    PubMed Central

    Mahamed, Safraaz; Mitchell, Gordon S

    2008-01-01

    Long-term facilitation (LTF) is a form of respiratory neuroplasticity frequently induced by acute intermittent isocapnic hypoxia (AIH, three 5 min isocapnic hypoxic episodes). Although repetitive apnoeas are a frequent natural occurrence producing brief (< 30 s) episodes of hypoxia and hypercapnia, it is unknown if repetitive apnoeas also elicit LTF. Apnoea-induced LTF may preserve upper airway patency during sleep, thereby limiting further apnoeic events. We tested the hypothesis that repeated, brief ventilator-induced apnoeas are sufficient to induce serotonin-dependent phrenic and hypoglossal (XII) LTF in anaesthetized rats. Anaesthetized, male Sprague–Dawley rats were exposed to three or six 25 s ventilator apnoeas with 5 min intervals, and compared to time control and AIH-treated rats. Three and six ventilator apnoeas induced phrenic and XII LTF with a magnitude similar to AIH. Both apnoea-induced and AIH-induced LTF were associated with a decreased CO2 recruitment threshold for phrenic and XII activity (∼4 mmHg). Spinal methysergide, a serotonin receptor antagonist, blocked apnoea-induced LTF but not changes in the CO2-recruitment threshold. Thus, brief ventilator apnoeas elicit phrenic and XII LTF. Similar to AIH-induced LTF, apnoea-induced LTF is serotonin dependent, and the relevant serotonin receptors for phrenic LTF are located in the cervical spinal cord. Apnoea-induced LTF may have implications for the maintenance of breathing stability, particularly during sleep. PMID:18292130

  7. Mumps Virus Induces Protein-Kinase-R-Dependent Stress Granules, Partly Suppressing Type III Interferon Production.

    PubMed

    Hashimoto, Shin; Yamamoto, Soh; Ogasawara, Noriko; Sato, Toyotaka; Yamamoto, Keisuke; Katoh, Hiroshi; Kubota, Toru; Shiraishi, Tsukasa; Kojima, Takashi; Himi, Tetsuo; Tsutsumi, Hiroyuki; Yokota, Shin-Ichi

    2016-01-01

    Stress granules (SGs) are cytoplasmic granular aggregations that are induced by cellular stress, including viral infection. SGs have opposing antiviral and proviral roles, which depend on virus species. The exact function of SGs during viral infection is not fully understood. Here, we showed that mumps virus (MuV) induced SGs depending on activation of protein kinase R (PKR). MuV infection strongly induced interferon (IFN)-λ1, 2 and 3, and IFN-β through activation of IFN regulatory factor 3 (IRF3) via retinoic acid inducible gene-I (RIG-I) and the mitochondrial antiviral signaling (MAVS) pathway. MuV-induced IFNs were strongly upregulated in PKR-knockdown cells. MuV-induced SG formation was suppressed by knockdown of PKR and SG marker proteins, Ras-GTPase-activating protein SH3-domain-binding protein 1 and T-cell-restricted intracellular antigen-1, and significantly increased the levels of MuV-induced IFN-λ1. However, viral titer was not altered by suppression of SG formation. PKR was required for induction of SGs by MuV infection and regulated type III IFN (IFN-λ1) mRNA stability. MuV-induced SGs partly suppressed type III IFN production by MuV; however, the limited suppression was not sufficient to inhibit MuV replication in cell culture. Our results provide insight into the relationship between SGs and IFN production induced by MuV infection. PMID:27560627

  8. Mumps Virus Induces Protein-Kinase-R-Dependent Stress Granules, Partly Suppressing Type III Interferon Production

    PubMed Central

    Hashimoto, Shin; Yamamoto, Soh; Ogasawara, Noriko; Sato, Toyotaka; Yamamoto, Keisuke; Katoh, Hiroshi; Kubota, Toru; Shiraishi, Tsukasa; Kojima, Takashi; Himi, Tetsuo; Tsutsumi, Hiroyuki; Yokota, Shin-ichi

    2016-01-01

    Stress granules (SGs) are cytoplasmic granular aggregations that are induced by cellular stress, including viral infection. SGs have opposing antiviral and proviral roles, which depend on virus species. The exact function of SGs during viral infection is not fully understood. Here, we showed that mumps virus (MuV) induced SGs depending on activation of protein kinase R (PKR). MuV infection strongly induced interferon (IFN)-λ1, 2 and 3, and IFN-β through activation of IFN regulatory factor 3 (IRF3) via retinoic acid inducible gene-I (RIG-I) and the mitochondrial antiviral signaling (MAVS) pathway. MuV-induced IFNs were strongly upregulated in PKR-knockdown cells. MuV-induced SG formation was suppressed by knockdown of PKR and SG marker proteins, Ras-GTPase-activating protein SH3-domain-binding protein 1 and T-cell-restricted intracellular antigen-1, and significantly increased the levels of MuV-induced IFN-λ1. However, viral titer was not altered by suppression of SG formation. PKR was required for induction of SGs by MuV infection and regulated type III IFN (IFN-λ1) mRNA stability. MuV-induced SGs partly suppressed type III IFN production by MuV; however, the limited suppression was not sufficient to inhibit MuV replication in cell culture. Our results provide insight into the relationship between SGs and IFN production induced by MuV infection. PMID:27560627

  9. Cocaine-induced psychosis and impulsivity in cocaine-dependent patients.

    PubMed

    Roncero, Carlos; Daigre, Constanza; Grau-López, Lara; Rodríguez-Cintas, Laia; Barral, Carmen; Pérez-Pazos, Jesús; Gonzalvo, Begoña; Corominas, Margarita; Casas, Miguel

    2013-01-01

    Cocaine-dependent patients have high impulsiveness. Cocaine-induced psychosis is common among cocaine-dependent patients. Different risk factors associated with cocaine-induced psychosis have been reported. The aim of this study is to analyze the relationship between psychotic symptoms in cocaine-dependent patients and impulsivity and mental disorders characterized by impulsivity. This descriptive study included 287 outpatients with cocaine dependence according to the DSM-IV-TR criteria. The Structured Clinical Interview for DSM-IV Axis I and II, the Barratt Impulsiveness Scale, and a specific questionnaire on the presence of cocaine-induced psychosis were used to assess patients. Symptoms were observed in 59.9% of the study population. Total and cognitive impulsiveness scores obtained from the Barratt Impulsiveness Scale were significantly higher in patients with cocaine-induced psychosis. Individuals from this group reported more overdose incidents, initiated more treatments during their lifetime, and had a significantly greater prevalence of attention deficit hyperactivity disorder. Patients with cocaine-induced psychosis have a greater degree of impulsivity and a higher prevalence of attention deficit hyperactivity disorder. Thus, if these disorders are observed in cocaine-dependent participants, the presence of psychotic symptoms should be evaluated to prevent further occurrence and their consequences. PMID:24074192

  10. Frequency-dependent polarization-angle-phase-shift in the microwave-induced magnetoresistance oscillations

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, Han-Chun; Ye, Tianyu; Mani, R. G.; Wegscheider, W.

    2015-02-14

    Linear polarization angle, θ, dependent measurements of the microwave radiation-induced oscillatory magnetoresistance, R{sub xx}, in high mobility GaAs/AlGaAs 2D electron devices have shown a θ dependence in the oscillatory amplitude along with magnetic field, frequency, and extrema-dependent phase shifts, θ{sub 0}. Here, we suggest a microwave frequency dependence of θ{sub 0}(f) using an analysis that averages over other smaller contributions, when those contributions are smaller than estimates of the experimental uncertainty.

  11. TRAIL induces necroptosis involving RIPK1/RIPK3-dependent PARP-1 activation

    PubMed Central

    Jouan-Lanhouet, S; Arshad, M I; Piquet-Pellorce, C; Martin-Chouly, C; Le Moigne-Muller, G; Van Herreweghe, F; Takahashi, N; Sergent, O; Lagadic-Gossmann, D; Vandenabeele, P; Samson, M; Dimanche-Boitrel, M-T

    2012-01-01

    Although TRAIL (tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-related apoptosis inducing ligand) is a well-known apoptosis inducer, we have previously demonstrated that acidic extracellular pH (pHe) switches TRAIL-induced apoptosis to regulated necrosis (or necroptosis) in human HT29 colon and HepG2 liver cancer cells. Here, we investigated the role of RIPK1 (receptor interacting protein kinase 1), RIPK3 and PARP-1 (poly (ADP-ribose) polymerase-1) in TRAIL-induced necroptosis in vitro and in concanavalin A (Con A)-induced murine hepatitis. Pretreatment of HT29 or HepG2 with pharmacological inhibitors of RIPK1 or PARP-1 (Nec-1 or PJ-34, respectively), or transient transfection with siRNAs against RIPK1 or RIPK3, inhibited both TRAIL-induced necroptosis and PARP-1-dependent intracellular ATP depletion demonstrating that RIPK1 and RIPK3 were involved upstream of PARP-1 activation and ATP depletion. In the mouse model of Con A-induced hepatitis, where death of mouse hepatocytes is dependent on TRAIL and NKT (Natural Killer T) cells, PARP-1 activity was positively correlated with liver injury and hepatitis was prevented both by Nec-1 or PJ-34. These data provide new insights into TRAIL-induced necroptosis with PARP-1 being active effector downstream of RIPK1/RIPK3 initiators and suggest that pharmacological inhibitors of RIPKs and PARP-1 could be new treatment options for immune-mediated hepatitis. PMID:22814620

  12. Quinolinic acid induces cell apoptosis in PC12 cells through HIF-1-dependent RTP801 activation.

    PubMed

    Huang, Xiaojia; Yang, Kaiyong; Zhang, Yi; Wang, Qiang; Li, Yongjin

    2016-04-01

    Neurological disease comprises a series of disorders featuring brain dysfunction and neuronal cell death. Among the factors contributing to neuronal death, excitotoxicity induced by excitatory amino acids, such as glutamate, plays a critical role. However, the mechanisms about how the excitatory amino acids induce neuronal death remain elucidated. In this study, we investigated the role of HIF-1α (hypoxia inducible factor-1α) and RTP801 in cell apoptosis induced by quinolinic acid (QUIN), a glutamatergic agonist, in PC12 cells. We found that QUIN at 5 μM increased the expression of HIF-1α significantly with a peak at 24 h. After the treatment with QUIN (5-20 μM) for 24 h, the cells exhibited decreased viability and cell apoptosis with a concomitant increased expression of apoptosis related proteins. QUIN treatment also induced the generation of intracellular reactive oxygen species and RTP801 up-regulation in a HIF-1α-dependent manner that were inhibited by 2-methoxyestradiol, a HIF-1α inhibitor. Importantly, HIF-1 or RTP801 invalidation by siRNA rescued the cell apoptosis induced by QUIN or cobalt chloride, a chemical inducer of HIF-1. Taken together, these findings support the concept that neurotoxicity induced by QUIN is associated with HIF-1-dependent RTP801 activation and provide insight into the potential of RTP801 inhibitor in treatment of neurological disorders. PMID:26738727

  13. Nonlinear temperature dependence of glue-induced birefringence in polarization maintaining FBG sensors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hopf, Barbara; Koch, Alexander W.; Roths, Johannes

    2016-05-01

    Glue-induced stresses decrease the accuracy of surface-mounted fiber Bragg gratings (FBG). Significant temperature dependent glue-induced birefringence was verified when a thermally cured epoxy-based bonding technique had been used. Determining the peak separation of two azimuthally aligned FBGs in PM fibers combined with a polarization resolved measurement set-up in a temperature range between -30°C and 150°C revealed high glue-induced stresses at low temperatures. Peak separations of about 60 pm and a nonlinear temperature dependence of the glue-induced birefringence due to stress relaxation processes and a visco-elastic behavior of the used adhesive have been shown.

  14. STING-Dependent Cytosolic DNA Sensing Promotes Radiation-Induced Type I Interferon-Dependent Antitumor Immunity in Immunogenic Tumors.

    PubMed

    Deng, Liufu; Liang, Hua; Xu, Meng; Yang, Xuanming; Burnette, Byron; Arina, Ainhoa; Li, Xiao-Dong; Mauceri, Helena; Beckett, Michael; Darga, Thomas; Huang, Xiaona; Gajewski, Thomas F; Chen, Zhijian J; Fu, Yang-Xin; Weichselbaum, Ralph R

    2014-11-20

    Ionizing radiation-mediated tumor regression depends on type I interferon (IFN) and the adaptive immune response, but several pathways control I IFN induction. Here, we demonstrate that adaptor protein STING, but not MyD88, is required for type I IFN-dependent antitumor effects of radiation. In dendritic cells (DCs), STING was required for IFN-? induction in response to irradiated-tumor cells. The cytosolic DNA sensor cyclic GMP-AMP (cGAMP) synthase (cGAS) mediated sensing of irradiated-tumor cells in DCs. Moreover, STING was essential for radiation-induced adaptive immune responses, which relied on type I IFN signaling on DCs. Exogenous IFN-? treatment rescued the cross-priming by cGAS or STING-deficient DCs. Accordingly, activation of STING by a second messenger cGAMP administration enhanced antitumor immunity induced by radiation. Thus radiation-mediated antitumor immunity in immunogenic tumors requires a functional cytosolic DNA-sensing pathway and suggests that cGAMP treatment might provide a new strategy to improve radiotherapy. PMID:25517616

  15. Neoalbaconol induces cell death through necroptosis by regulating RIPK-dependent autocrine TNFα and ROS production

    PubMed Central

    Li, Wei; Xiao, Lanbo; Luo, Xiangjian; Liu, Xiaolan; Yang, Lifang; Peng, Songling; Ding, Zhihui; Feng, Tao; Zhou, Jian; Fan, Jia; Bode, Ann M.; Dong, Zigang; Liu, Jikai; Cao, Ya

    2015-01-01

    Necroptosis/regulated necrosis is a caspase-independent, but receptor interacting protein kinase (RIPK)-dependent form of cell death. In previous studies, neoalbaconol (NA), a constituent extracted from Albatrellus confluens, was demonstrated to induce necroptosis in some cancer cell lines. The molecular mechanism of NA-induced necroptosis is described in this research study. We determined that NA-induced cell death is partly dependent on tumor necrosis factor α (TNFα) feed-forward signaling. More importantly, NA abolished the ubiquitination of RIPK1 by down-regulating E3 ubiquitin ligases, cellular inhibitors of apoptosis protein 1/2 (cIAP1/2) and TNFα receptor-associated factors (TRAFs). The suppression of RIPK1 ubiquitination induced the activation of the non-canonical nuclear factor-κB (NF-κB) pathway and stimulated the transcription of TNFα. Moreover, we also found that NA caused RIPK3-mediated reactive oxygen species (ROS) production and contribution to cell death. Taken together, these results suggested that two distinct mechanisms are involved in NA-induced necroptosis and include RIPK1/NF-κB-dependent expression of TNFα and RIPK3-dependent generation of ROS. PMID:25575821

  16. Neoalbaconol induces cell death through necroptosis by regulating RIPK-dependent autocrine TNFα and ROS production.

    PubMed

    Yu, Xinfang; Deng, Qipan; Li, Wei; Xiao, Lanbo; Luo, Xiangjian; Liu, Xiaolan; Yang, Lifang; Peng, Songling; Ding, Zhihui; Feng, Tao; Zhou, Jian; Fan, Jia; Bode, Ann M; Dong, Zigang; Liu, Jikai; Cao, Ya

    2015-02-10

    Necroptosis/regulated necrosis is a caspase-independent, but receptor interacting protein kinase (RIPK)-dependent form of cell death. In previous studies, neoalbaconol (NA), a constituent extracted from Albatrellus confluens, was demonstrated to induce necroptosis in some cancer cell lines. The molecular mechanism of NA-induced necroptosis is described in this research study. We determined that NA-induced cell death is partly dependent on tumor necrosis factor α (TNFα) feed-forward signaling. More importantly, NA abolished the ubiquitination of RIPK1 by down-regulating E3 ubiquitin ligases, cellular inhibitors of apoptosis protein 1/2 (cIAP1/2) and TNFα receptor-associated factors (TRAFs). The suppression of RIPK1 ubiquitination induced the activation of the non-canonical nuclear factor-κB (NF-κB) pathway and stimulated the transcription of TNFα. Moreover, we also found that NA caused RIPK3-mediated reactive oxygen species (ROS) production and contribution to cell death. Taken together, these results suggested that two distinct mechanisms are involved in NA-induced necroptosis and include RIPK1/NF-κB-dependent expression of TNFα and RIPK3-dependent generation of ROS. PMID:25575821

  17. Chitin particles induce size-dependent but carbohydrate-independent innate eosinophilia.

    PubMed

    Kogiso, Mari; Nishiyama, Akihito; Shinohara, Tsutomu; Nakamura, Masataka; Mizoguchi, Emiko; Misawa, Yoshinori; Guinet, Elisabeth; Nouri-Shirazi, Mahyar; Dorey, C Kathleen; Henriksen, Ruth Ann; Shibata, Yoshimi

    2011-07-01

    Murine Mϕ that phagocytose CMP develop into M1; this response depends on the size and the chemical composition of the particles. In contrast, recent studies concluded that chitin particles induce M2 and eosinophil migration, promoting acquired Th2 immune responses against chitin-containing microbes or allergens. This study examined whether these apparently inconsistent responses to chitin could be induced by variation in the size and chemical composition of the chitin particles. We compared the responses of Mϕ with CMP, LCB, and Sephadex G-100 beads (>40 μm). Beads were given i.p. to WT mice and to mice deficient in a CRTH2, a receptor for the eosinophil chemoattractant PGD(2). In contrast to the M1 activation induced by CMP, i.p. administration of LCB or Sephadex beads induced within 24 h a CRTH2-dependent peritoneal eosinophilia, as well as CRTH2-independent activation of peritoneal Mϕ that expressed Arg I, an M2 phenotype. LCB-induced Mϕ exhibited elevated Arg I and a surface MR, reduced surface TLR2 levels, and no change in the levels of CHI3L1 or IL-10 production. Our results indicate that the effects of chitin in vivo are highly dependent on particle size and that large, nonphagocytosable beads, independent of their chemical composition, induce innate eosinophilia and activate Mϕ expressing several M2, but not M1, phenotypes. PMID:21447645

  18. LPA1-induced cytoskeleton reorganization drives fibrosis through CTGF-dependent fibroblast proliferation

    PubMed Central

    Sakai, Norihiko; Chun, Jerold; Duffield, Jeremy S.; Wada, Takashi; Luster, Andrew D.; Tager, Andrew M.

    2013-01-01

    There has been much recent interest in lysophosphatidic acid (LPA) signaling through one of its receptors, LPA1, in fibrotic diseases, but the mechanisms by which LPA-LPA1 signaling promotes pathological fibrosis remain to be fully elucidated. Using a mouse peritoneal fibrosis model, we demonstrate central roles for LPA and LPA1 in fibroblast proliferation. Genetic deletion or pharmacological antagonism of LPA1 protected mice from peritoneal fibrosis, blunting the increases in peritoneal collagen by 65.4 and 52.9%, respectively, compared to control animals and demonstrated that peritoneal fibroblast proliferation was highly LPA1 dependent. Activation of LPA1 on mesothelial cells induced these cells to express connective tissue growth factor (CTGF), driving fibroblast proliferation in a paracrine fashion. Activation of mesothelial cell LPA1 induced CTGF expression by inducing cytoskeleton reorganization in these cells, causing nuclear translocation of myocardin-related transcription factor (MRTF)-A and MRTF-B. Pharmacological inhibition of MRTF-induced transcription also diminished CTGF expression and fibrosis in the peritoneal fibrosis model, mitigating the increase in peritoneal collagen content by 57.9% compared to controls. LPA1-induced cytoskeleton reorganization therefore makes a previously unrecognized but critically important contribution to the profibrotic activities of LPA by driving MRTF-dependent CTGF expression, which, in turn, drives fibroblast proliferation.—Sakai, N., Chun, J., Duffield, J. S., Wada, T., Luster, A. D., Tager, A. M. LPA1-induced cytoskeleton reorganization drives fibrosis through CTGF-dependent fibroblast proliferation. PMID:23322166

  19. VEGF secretion during hypoxia depends on free radicals-induced Fyn kinase activity in mast cells

    SciTech Connect

    Garcia-Roman, Jonathan; Ibarra-Sanchez, Alfredo; Lamas, Monica; Gonzalez Espinosa, Claudia

    2010-10-15

    Research highlights: {yields} Bone marrow-derived mast cells (BMMCs) secrete functional VEGF but do not degranulate after Cobalt chloride-induced hypoxia. {yields} CoCl{sub 2}-induced VEGF secretion in mast cells occurs by a Ca{sup 2+}-insensitive but brefeldin A and Tetanus toxin-sensitive mechanism. {yields} Trolox and N-acetylcysteine inhibit hypoxia-induced VEGF secretion but only Trolox inhibits Fc{epsilon}RI-dependent anaphylactic degranulation in mast cells. {yields} Src family kinase Fyn activation after free radical production is necessary for hypoxia-induced VEGF secretion in mast cells. -- Abstract: Mast cells (MC) have an important role in pathologic conditions such as asthma and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD), where hypoxia conduce to deleterious inflammatory response. MC contribute to hypoxia-induced angiogenesis producing factors such as vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF), but the mechanisms behind the control of hypoxia-induced VEGF secretion in this cell type is poorly understood. We used the hypoxia-mimicking agent cobalt chloride (CoCl{sub 2}) to analyze VEGF secretion in murine bone marrow-derived mast cells (BMMCs). We found that CoCl{sub 2} promotes a sustained production of functional VEGF, able to induce proliferation of endothelial cells in vitro. CoCl{sub 2}-induced VEGF secretion was independent of calcium rise but dependent on tetanus toxin-sensitive vesicle-associated membrane proteins (VAMPs). VEGF exocytosis required free radicals formation and the activation of Src family kinases. Interestingly, an important deficiency on CoCl{sub 2}-induced VEGF secretion was observed in Fyn kinase-deficient BMMCs. Moreover, Fyn kinase was activated by CoCl{sub 2} in WT cells and this activation was prevented by treatment with antioxidants such as Trolox and N-acetylcysteine. Our results show that BMMCs are able to release VEGF under hypoxic conditions through a tetanus toxin-sensitive mechanism, promoted by free radicals-dependent

  20. Eiger-induced cell death relies on Rac1-dependent endocytosis

    PubMed Central

    Ruan, W; Srinivasan, A; Lin, S; Kara, k-I; Barker, P A

    2016-01-01

    Signaling via tumor necrosis factor receptor (TNFR) superfamily members regulates cellular life and death decisions. A subset of mammalian TNFR proteins, most notably the p75 neurotrophin receptor (p75NTR), induces cell death through a pathway that requires activation of c-Jun N-terminal kinases (JNKs). However the receptor-proximal signaling events that mediate this remain unclear. Drosophila express a single tumor necrosis factor (TNF) ligand termed Eiger (Egr) that activates JNK-dependent cell death. We have exploited this model to identify phylogenetically conserved signaling events that allow Egr to induce JNK activation and cell death in vivo. Here we report that Rac1, a small GTPase, is specifically required in Egr-mediated cell death. rac1 loss of function blocks Egr-induced cell death, whereas Rac1 overexpression enhances Egr-induced killing. We identify Vav as a GEF for Rac1 in this pathway and demonstrate that dLRRK functions as a negative regulator of Rac1 that normally acts to constrain Egr-induced death. Thus dLRRK loss of function increases Egr-induced cell death in the fly. We further show that Rac1-dependent entry of Egr into early endosomes is a crucial prerequisite for JNK activation and for cell death and show that this entry requires the activity of Rab21 and Rab7. These findings reveal novel regulatory mechanisms that allow Rac1 to contribute to Egr-induced JNK activation and cell death. PMID:27054336

  1. Eiger-induced cell death relies on Rac1-dependent endocytosis.

    PubMed

    Ruan, W; Srinivasan, A; Lin, S; Kara, K-I; Barker, P A

    2016-01-01

    Signaling via tumor necrosis factor receptor (TNFR) superfamily members regulates cellular life and death decisions. A subset of mammalian TNFR proteins, most notably the p75 neurotrophin receptor (p75NTR), induces cell death through a pathway that requires activation of c-Jun N-terminal kinases (JNKs). However the receptor-proximal signaling events that mediate this remain unclear. Drosophila express a single tumor necrosis factor (TNF) ligand termed Eiger (Egr) that activates JNK-dependent cell death. We have exploited this model to identify phylogenetically conserved signaling events that allow Egr to induce JNK activation and cell death in vivo. Here we report that Rac1, a small GTPase, is specifically required in Egr-mediated cell death. rac1 loss of function blocks Egr-induced cell death, whereas Rac1 overexpression enhances Egr-induced killing. We identify Vav as a GEF for Rac1 in this pathway and demonstrate that dLRRK functions as a negative regulator of Rac1 that normally acts to constrain Egr-induced death. Thus dLRRK loss of function increases Egr-induced cell death in the fly. We further show that Rac1-dependent entry of Egr into early endosomes is a crucial prerequisite for JNK activation and for cell death and show that this entry requires the activity of Rab21 and Rab7. These findings reveal novel regulatory mechanisms that allow Rac1 to contribute to Egr-induced JNK activation and cell death. PMID:27054336

  2. Proteome Analysis of Rat Hippocampus Following Morphine-induced Amnesia and State-dependent Learning

    PubMed Central

    Jafarinejad-Farsangi, Saeideh; Farazmand, Ali; Rezayof, Ameneh; Darbandi, Niloufar

    2015-01-01

    Morphine’s effects on learning and memory processes are well known to depend on synaptic plasticity in the hippocampus. Whereas the role of the hippocampus in morphine-induced amnesia and state-dependent learning is established, the biochemical and molecular mechanisms underlying these processes are poorly understood. The present study intended to investigate whether administration of morphine can change the expression level of rat hippocampal proteins during learning of a passive avoidance task. A step-through type passive avoidance task was used for the assessment of memory retention. To identify the complex pattern of protein expression induced by morphine, we compared rat hippocampal proteome either in morphine-induced amnesia or in state-dependent learning by two-dimensional gel electerophoresis and combined mass spectrometry (MS and MS/MS). Post-training administration of morphine decreased step-through latency. Pre-test administration of morphine induced state-dependent retrieval of the memory acquired under post-training morphine influence. In the hippocampus, a total of 18 proteins were identified whose MASCOT (Modular Approach to Software Construction Operation and Test) scores were inside 95% confidence level. Of these, five hippocampal proteins altered in morphine-induced amnesia and ten proteins were found to change in the hippocampus of animals that had received post-training and pre-test morphine. These proteins show known functions in cytoskeletal architecture, cell metabolism, neurotransmitter secretion and neuroprotection. The findings indicate that the effect of morphine on memory formation in passive avoidance learning has a morphological correlate on the hippocampal proteome level. In addition, our proteomicscreensuggests that morphine induces memory impairment and state-dependent learning through modulating neuronal plasticity. PMID:25901168

  3. Time-dependent effects of rapamycin on consolidation of predator stress-induced hyperarousal.

    PubMed

    Fifield, Kathleen; Hebert, Mark; Williams, Kimberly; Linehan, Victoria; Whiteman, Jesse D; Mac Callum, Phillip; Blundell, Jacqueline

    2015-06-01

    Previous studies have indicated that rapamycin, a potent inhibitor of the mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) pathway, blocks consolidation of shock-induced associative fear memories. Moreover, rapamycin's block of associative fear memories is time-dependent. It is unknown, however, if rapamycin blocks consolidation of predator stress-induced non-associative fear memories. Furthermore, the temporal pattern of mTOR activation following predator stress is unknown. Thus, the goal of the current studies was to determine if rapamycin blocks consolidation of predator stress-induced fear memories and if so, whether rapamycin's effect is time-dependent. Male rats were injected systemically with rapamycin at various time points following predator stress. Predator stress involves an acute, unprotected exposure of a rat to a cat, which causes long-lasting non-associative fear memories manifested as generalized hyperarousal and increased anxiety-like behaviour. We show that rapamycin injected immediately after predator stress blocked consolidation of stress-induced startle. However, rapamycin injected 9, 24 or 48h post predator stress potentiated stress-induced startle. Consistent with shock-induced associative fear memories, we show that mTOR signalling is essential for consolidation of predator stress-induced hyperarousal. However, unlike shock-induced fear memories, a second, persistent, late phase mTOR-dependent process following predator stress actually dampens startle. Consistent with previous findings, our data support the potential role for rapamycin in treatment of stress related disorders such as posttraumatic stress disorder. However, our data suggest timing of rapamycin administration is critical. PMID:25746515

  4. Bergenin decreases the morphine-induced physical dependence via antioxidative activity in mice.

    PubMed

    Yun, Jaesuk; Lee, Yeonju; Yun, Kyunghwa; Oh, Seikwan

    2015-06-01

    Oxidative stress plays a role in the development of physical dependence induced by morphine. Bergenin, a polyphenol found in many Asian, African, and South American medicinal plants, is a potent antinarcotic agent with wide spectrum of pharmacological activities including antioxidant action. In the present study, we observed that bergenin decreased the development of physical dependence induced by morphine in mice and the antioxidant activity of bergenin plays a role in the antinarcotic effects through adapting to morphine-induced oxidative stress in the brain. The naloxone-precipitated withdrawal symptom (jumping frequency) was significantly ameliorated (50% of control group) by administration of bergenin (20 mg/kg) in morphine-treated mice. Furthermore, morphine-induced down-regulation of glutathione (GSH) contents was reversed by bergenin administration in the frontal cortex and liver. Bergenin had no effects on the increased levels of nfr2-dependent antioxidant enzyme HO1 and NQO1 in the frontal cortex, striatum, and liver of morphine-treated mice. However, the morphine-induced increase in nrf2 nuclear translocation in the frontal cortex and striatum was inhibited by bergenin treatment. These results suggest that bergenin has a potential antinarcotic effect via regulation of GSH contents and oxidative stress. PMID:25542428

  5. Spermidine-Induced Improvement of Reconsolidation of Memory Involves Calcium-Dependent Protein Kinase in Rats

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Girardi, Bruna Amanda; Ribeiro, Daniela Aymone; Signor, Cristiane; Muller, Michele; Gais, Mayara Ana; Mello, Carlos Fernando; Rubin, Maribel Antonello

    2016-01-01

    In this study, we determined whether the calcium-dependent protein kinase (PKC) signaling pathway is involved in the improvement of fear memory reconsolidation induced by the intrahippocampal administration of spermidine in rats. Male Wistar rats were trained in a fear conditioning apparatus using a 0.4-mA footshock as an unconditioned stimulus.…

  6. Zeeman Electromagnetically Induced Transparency with crossed pump and probe beams: Small angle dependence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Campbell, Kaleb; Madkhaly, Samaya; de Medeiros, Dillon; Bali, Samir; Macklin Quantum Information Sciences Collaboration

    2016-05-01

    Progress toward undergraduate oriented experiments on image storage in room-temperature atomic vapor using Electromagnetically Induced Transparency is described. Using a scanning longitudinal magnetic field technique we diagnose and suppress stray magnetic fields and polarization impurity. We consider the pump-probe angular dependence of the EIT signal but at much smaller angles of less than a milliradian.

  7. STRAIN-DEPENDENT SUSCEPTIBILITY TO TRANSPLACENTALLY-INDUCED MURINE LUNG TUMORS

    EPA Science Inventory

    STRAIN-DEPENDENT SUSCEPTIBILITY TO TRANSPLACENTALLY-INDUCED MURINE LUNG TUMORS
    M S Miller, J E Moore, M Xu, G B Nelson, S T Dance, N D Kock, J A Ross Wake Forest University, Winston-Salem, NC and USEPA, Research Triangle Park, NC

    Previously, our laboratory demonstrated...

  8. Dihydroartemisinin attenuates lipopolysaccharide-induced osteoclastogenesis and bone loss via the mitochondria-dependent apoptosis pathway.

    PubMed

    Dou, C; Ding, N; Xing, J; Zhao, C; Kang, F; Hou, T; Quan, H; Chen, Y; Dai, Q; Luo, F; Xu, J; Dong, S

    2016-01-01

    Dihydroartemisinin (DHA) is a widely used antimalarial drug isolated from the plant Artemisia annua. Recent studies suggested that DHA has antitumor effects utilizing its reactive oxygen species (ROS) yielding mechanism. Here, we reported that DHA is inhibitory on lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-induced osteoclast (OC) differentiation, fusion and bone-resorption activity in vitro. Intracellular ROS detection revealed that DHA could remarkably increase ROS accumulation during LPS-induced osteoclastogenesis. Moreover, cell apoptosis was also increased by DHA treatment. We found that DHA-activated caspase-3 increased Bax/Bcl-2 ratio during LPS-induced osteoclastogenesis. Meanwhile, the translocation of apoptotic inducing factor (AIF) and the release of cytochrome c from the mitochondria into the cytosol were observed, indicating that ROS-mediated mitochondrial dysfunction is crucial in DHA-induced apoptosis during LPS-induced osteoclastogenesis. In vivo study showed that DHA treatment decreased OC number, prevents bone loss, rescues bone microarchitecture and restores bone strength in LPS-induced bone-loss mouse model. Together, our findings indicate that DHA is protective against LPS-induced bone loss through apoptosis induction of osteoclasts via ROS accumulation and the mitochondria-dependent apoptosis pathway. Therefore, DHA may be considered as a new therapeutic candidate for treating inflammatory bone loss. PMID:27031959

  9. Dihydroartemisinin attenuates lipopolysaccharide-induced osteoclastogenesis and bone loss via the mitochondria-dependent apoptosis pathway

    PubMed Central

    Dou, C; Ding, N; Xing, J; Zhao, C; Kang, F; Hou, T; Quan, H; Chen, Y; Dai, Q; Luo, F; Xu, J; Dong, S

    2016-01-01

    Dihydroartemisinin (DHA) is a widely used antimalarial drug isolated from the plant Artemisia annua. Recent studies suggested that DHA has antitumor effects utilizing its reactive oxygen species (ROS) yielding mechanism. Here, we reported that DHA is inhibitory on lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-induced osteoclast (OC) differentiation, fusion and bone-resorption activity in vitro. Intracellular ROS detection revealed that DHA could remarkably increase ROS accumulation during LPS-induced osteoclastogenesis. Moreover, cell apoptosis was also increased by DHA treatment. We found that DHA-activated caspase-3 increased Bax/Bcl-2 ratio during LPS-induced osteoclastogenesis. Meanwhile, the translocation of apoptotic inducing factor (AIF) and the release of cytochrome c from the mitochondria into the cytosol were observed, indicating that ROS-mediated mitochondrial dysfunction is crucial in DHA-induced apoptosis during LPS-induced osteoclastogenesis. In vivo study showed that DHA treatment decreased OC number, prevents bone loss, rescues bone microarchitecture and restores bone strength in LPS-induced bone-loss mouse model. Together, our findings indicate that DHA is protective against LPS-induced bone loss through apoptosis induction of osteoclasts via ROS accumulation and the mitochondria-dependent apoptosis pathway. Therefore, DHA may be considered as a new therapeutic candidate for treating inflammatory bone loss. PMID:27031959

  10. Shear stress-induced NO production is dependent on ATP autocrine signaling and capacitative calcium entry

    PubMed Central

    Andrews, Allison M.; Jaron, Dov; Buerk, Donald G.; Barbee, Kenneth A.

    2014-01-01

    Flow-induced production of nitric oxide (NO) by endothelial cells plays a fundamental role in vascular homeostasis. However, the mechanisms by which shear stress activates NO production remain unclear due in part to limitations in measuring NO, especially under flow conditions. Shear stress elicits the release of ATP, but the relative contribution of autocrine stimulation by ATP to flow-induced NO production has not been established. Furthermore, the importance of calcium in shear stress-induced NO production remains controversial, and in particular the role of capacitive calcium entry (CCE) has yet to be determined. We have utilized our unique NO measurement device to investigate the role of ATP autocrine signaling and CCE in shear stress-induced NO production. We found that endogenously released ATP and downstream activation of purinergic receptors and CCE plays a significant role in shear stress-induced NO production. ATP-induced eNOS phophorylation under static conditions is also dependent on CCE. Inhibition of protein kinase C significantly inhibited eNOS phosphorylation and the calcium response. To our knowledge, we are the first to report on the role of CCE in the mechanism of acute shear stress-induced NO response. In addition, our work highlights the importance of ATP autocrine signaling in shear stress-induced NO production. PMID:25386222

  11. IKK{epsilon} modulates RSV-induced NF-{kappa}B-dependent gene transcription

    SciTech Connect

    Bao Xiaoyong; Indukuri, Hemalatha; Liu Tianshuang; Liao Suiling; Tian, Bing; Brasier, Allan R.; Garofalo, Roberto P.; Casola, Antonella

    2010-12-20

    Respiratory syncytial virus (RSV), a negative-strand RNA virus, is the most common cause of epidemic respiratory disease in infants and young children. RSV infection of airway epithelial cells induces the expression of immune/inflammatory genes through the activation of a subset of transcription factors, including Nuclear Factor-{kappa}B (NF-{kappa}B). In this study we have investigated the role of the non canonical I{kappa}B kinase (IKK){epsilon} in modulating RSV-induced NF-{kappa}B activation. Our results show that inhibition of IKK{epsilon} activation results in significant impairment of viral-induced NF-{kappa}B-dependent gene expression, through a reduction in NF-{kappa}B transcriptional activity, without changes in nuclear translocation or DNA-binding activity. Absence of IKK{epsilon} results in a significant decrease of RSV-induced NF-{kappa}B phosphorylation on serine 536, a post-translational modification important for RSV-induced NF-{kappa}B-dependent gene expression, known to regulate NF-{kappa}B transcriptional activity without affecting nuclear translocation. This study identifies a novel mechanism by which IKK{epsilon} regulates viral-induced cellular signaling.

  12. P53-dependent upregulation of neutral sphingomyelinase-2: role in doxorubicin-induced growth arrest

    PubMed Central

    Shamseddine, A A; Clarke, C J; Carroll, B; Airola, M V; Mohammed, S; Rella, A; Obeid, L M; Hannun, Y A

    2015-01-01

    Neutral sphingomyelinase-2 (nSMase2) is a ceramide-generating enzyme that has been implicated in growth arrest, apoptosis and exosome secretion. Although previous studies have reported transcriptional upregulation of nSMase2 in response to daunorubicin, through Sp1 and Sp3 transcription factors, the role of the DNA damage pathway in regulating nSMase2 remains unclear. In this study, we show that doxorubicin induces a dose-dependent induction of nSMase2 mRNA and protein with concomitant increases in nSMase activity and ceramide levels. Upregulation of nSMase2 was dependent on ATR, Chk1 and p53, thus placing it downstream of the DNA damage pathway. Moreover, overexpression of p53 was sufficient to transcriptionally induce nSMase2, without the need for DNA damage. DNA-binding mutants as well as acetylation mutants of p53 were unable to induce nSMase2, suggesting a role of nSMase2 in growth arrest. Moreover, knockdown of nSMase2 prevented doxorubicin-induced growth arrest. Finally, p53-induced nSMase2 upregulation appears to occur via a novel transcription start site upstream of exon 3. These results identify nSMase2 as a novel p53 target gene, regulated by the DNA damage pathway to induce cell growth arrest. PMID:26512957

  13. IKKε MODULATES RSV-INDUCED NF-κB-DEPENDENT GENE TRANSCRIPTION

    PubMed Central

    Bao, Xiaoyong; Indukuri, Hemalatha; Liu, Tianshuang; Liao, Sui-Ling; Tian, Bing; Brasier, Allan R.; Garofalo, Roberto P.; Casola, Antonella

    2010-01-01

    Respiratory syncytial virus (RSV), a negative-strand RNA virus, is the most common cause of epidemic respiratory disease in infants and young children. RSV infection of airway epithelial cells induces the expression of immune/inflammatory genes through the activation of a subset of transcription factors, including Nuclear Factor-κB (NF-κB). In this study we have investigated the role of the non canonical IκB kinase (IKK)ε in modulating RSV-induced NF-κB activation. Our results show that inhibition of IKKε activation results in significant impairment of viral-induced NF-κB-dependent gene expression, through a reduction in NF-κB transcriptional activity, without changes in nuclear translocation or DNA-binding activity. Absence of IKKε results in a significant decrease of RSV-induced NF-κB phosphorylation on serine 536, a post-translational modification important for RSV-induced NF-κB-dependent gene expression, known to regulate NF-κB transcriptional activity without affecting nuclear translocation. This study identifies a novel mechanism by which IKKε regulates viral-induced cellular signaling. PMID:20961594

  14. Combined study of microwave-power-dependence and linear-polarization-dependence of the microwave-radiation-induced magnetoresistance oscillations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ye, Tianyu; Liu, Han-Chun; Mani, Ramesh; Wegscheider, Werner; Georgia State University Collaboration; ETH Zurich Collaboration

    2014-03-01

    Microwave radiation induced magnetoresistance oscillations (MRIMOs) represent an interesting electrical property of the high mobility two dimensional electron gas (2DEG) at low temperatures in a perpendicular magnetic field and under microwave excitation. Some questions under discussion in this topic include: (a) whether MRIMOs' amplitudes grow linearly with the microwave power and (b) how the MRIMO amplitudes change with the rotation of the microwave polarization with respect to the sample. In this study, we utilize swept microwave power and continuously changed linear polarized microwave polarization angle as two variables in four-terminal low-frequency lock-in magnetoresistance measurements of the 2DEG samples. The results show that amplitude of MRIMOs varies non-linearly with the microwave power. Also, the microwave polarization dependence measurements show that MRIMOs depend sensitively on the polarization angle of the linearly polarized microwaves, while the oscillatory magnetoresistance follows a cosine square function of the polarization angle. We provide a simple model that conveys our understanding of our observations. Basic research at Georgia State University is supported by the DOE-BES, MSE Division under DE-SC0001762. Microwave work is supported by the ARO under W911NF-07-01-0158.

  15. Cytokine-induced neutrophil chemoattractant (CINC)-1 induces fever by a prostaglandin-dependent mechanism in rats.

    PubMed

    Soares, Denis Melo; Machado, Renes R; Yamashiro, Lívia H; Melo, Miriam C C; Souza, Glória E P

    2008-10-01

    Cytokine-induced neutrophil chemoattractant-1 (CINC-1), a member of the ELR+CXC subfamily [ELR motif (glutamic acid-leucine-arginine) adjacent to the cysteine-X-cysteine (CXC) motif located at the N-terminus of the protein], is an acute-phase protein and its synthesis is induced by endogenous and exogenous pyrogens. However, there are no studies on the pyrogenic property of CINC-1. Therefore, the present study evaluates whether centrally administered CINC-1 promotes an integrated febrile response along with an increase in the prostaglandin (PG)E2 content of the cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) of rats. The effects of antipyretic drugs on fever and on the PGE2 content of the CSF as well as the effectiveness of a neutralizing anti-CINC-1 antibody on the fever induced by CINC-1 have also been investigated. Intracerebroventricular (i.c.v.) injection of CINC-1 induced a dose-dependent bell-shaped rise on body temperature and increased PGE2 concentration in the CSF of conscious rats. Injected into the preoptic area of the anterior hypothalamus (AH/POA) (i.h.), CINC-1 also induced a dose-dependent bell-shaped increase in body temperature along with a decrease on tail skin temperature. Indomethacin (INDO, 2 mg kg(-1), i.p.) and ibuprofen (IBU, 10 mg kg(-1), i.p.) markedly reduced the fever evoked by i.c.v. injection of CINC-1 (25 ng/site). Orally given celecoxib (5 mg kg(-1), 30 min. before) abolished the fever induced by CINC-1 i.c.v. or i.h. (50 pg) injection. The antipyretic drugs also blocked the PGE(2) increase after CINC-1 i.c.v. injection. Co-injected anti-CINC antibody (10 ng/site) strongly reduced the febrile response induced by CINC-1 (50 pg/site) injected intrahypothalamically. This is the first time that centrally injected CINC-1 has been reported to act directly on the pyrogen-sensitive neurons of AH/POA, promoting a thermoregulatory response that seems to depend on other endogenous pyrogens synthesis and, as seen here, on PGE2. PMID:18694739

  16. Cell cycle age dependence for radiation-induced G/sub 2/ arrest: evidence for time-dependent repair

    SciTech Connect

    Rowley, R.

    1985-09-01

    Exponentially growing eucaryotic cells, irradiated in interphase, are delayed in progression to mitosis chiefly by arrest in G/sub 2/. The sensitivity of Chinese hamster ovary cells to G/sub 2/ arrest induction by X rays increases through the cell cycle, up to the X-ray transition point (TP) in G/sub 2/. This age response can be explained by cell cycle age-dependent changes in susceptibility of the target(s) for G/sub 2/ arrest and/or by changes in capability for postirradiation recovery from G/sub 2/ arrest damage. Discrimination between sensitivity changes and repair phenomena is possible only if the level of G/sub 2/ arrest-causing damage sustained by a cell at the time of irradiation and the level ultimately expressed as arrest can be determined. The ability of caffeine to ameliorate radiation-induced G/sub 2/ arrest, while inhibiting repair of G/sub 2/ arrest-causing damage makes such an analysis possible. In the presence of caffeine, progression of irradiated cells was relatively unperturbed, but on caffeine removal, G/sub 2/ arrest was expressed. The duration of G/sub 2/ arrest was independent of the length of the prior caffeine exposure. This finding indicates that the target for G/sub 2/ arrest induction is present throughout the cell cycle and that the level of G/sub 2/ arrest damage incurred is initially constant for all cell cycle phases. The data are consistent with the existence of a time-dependent recovery mechanism to explain the age dependence for radiation induction of G/sub 2/ arrest.

  17. Captopril augments acetylcholine-induced bronchial smooth muscle contractions in vitro via kinin-dependent mechanisms.

    PubMed

    Agrawal, Naman; Akella, Aparna; Deshpande, Shripad B

    2016-06-01

    Angiotensin converting enzyme (ACE) inhibitors therapy is aassociated with bothersome dry cough as an adverse effect. The mechanisms underlying this adverse effect are not clear. Therefore, influence of captopril (an ACE inhibitor) on acetylcholine (ACh)-induced bronchial smooth muscle contractions was investigated. Further, the mechanisms underlying the captopril-induced changes were also explored. In vitro contractions of rat bronchial smooth muscle to cumulative concentrations of ACh were recorded before and after exposure to captopril. Further, the involvement of kinin and inositol triphosphate (IP₃) pathways for captopril-induced alterations were explored. ACh produced concentration-dependent (5-500 µM) increase in bronchial smooth muscle contractions. Pre-treatment with captopril augmented the ACh-induced contractions at each concentration significantly. Pre-treatment with aprotinin (kinin synthesis inhibitor) or heparin (inositol triphosphate, IP₃-inhibitor), blocked the captopril-induced augmentation of bronchial smooth muscle contractions evoked by ACh. Further, captopril-induced augmentation was absent in calcium-free medium. These results suggest that captopril sensitizes bronchial smooth muscles to ACh-induced contractions. This sensitization may be responsible for dry cough associated with captopril therapy. PMID:27468462

  18. Experimental febrile seizures induce age-dependent structural plasticity and improve memory in mice.

    PubMed

    Tao, K; Ichikawa, J; Matsuki, N; Ikegaya, Y; Koyama, R

    2016-03-24

    Population-based studies have demonstrated that children with a history of febrile seizure (FS) perform better than age-matched controls at hippocampus-dependent memory tasks. Here, we report that FSs induce two distinct structural reorganizations in the hippocampus and bidirectionally modify future learning abilities in an age-dependent manner. Compared with age-matched controls, adult mice that had experienced experimental FSs induced by hyperthermia (HT) on postnatal day 14 (P14-HT) performed better in a cognitive task that requires dentate granule cells (DGCs). The enhanced memory performance correlated with an FS-induced persistent increase in the density of large mossy fiber terminals (LMTs) of the DGCs. The memory enhancement was not observed in mice that had experienced HT-induced seizures at P11 which exhibited abnormally located DGCs in addition to the increased LMT density. The ectopic DGCs of the P11-HT mice were abolished by the diuretic bumetanide, and this pharmacological treatment unveiled the masked memory enhancement. Thus, this work provides a novel basis for age-dependent structural plasticity in which FSs influence future brain function. PMID:26794590

  19. Radiation-Induced Salivary Gland Dysfunction Results From p53-Dependent Apoptosis

    SciTech Connect

    Avila, Jennifer L.; Grundmann, Oliver; Burd, Randy; Limesand, Kirsten H.

    2009-02-01

    Purpose: Radiotherapy for head-and-neck cancer causes adverse secondary side effects in the salivary glands and results in diminished quality of life for the patient. A previous in vivo study in parotid salivary glands demonstrated that targeted head-and-neck irradiation resulted in marked increases in phosphorylated p53 (serine{sup 18}) and apoptosis, which was suppressed in transgenic mice expressing a constitutively active mutant of Akt1 (myr-Akt1). Methods and Materials: Transgenic and knockout mouse models were exposed to irradiation, and p53-mediated transcription, apoptosis, and salivary gland dysfunction were analyzed. Results: The proapoptotic p53 target genes PUMA and Bax were induced in parotid salivary glands of mice at early time points after therapeutic radiation. This dose-dependent induction requires expression of p53 because no radiation-induced expression of PUMA and Bax was observed in p53-/- mice. Radiation also induced apoptosis in the parotid gland in a dose-dependent manner, which was p53 dependent. Furthermore, expression of p53 was required for the acute and chronic loss of salivary function after irradiation. In contrast, apoptosis was not induced in p53-/- mice, and their salivary function was preserved after radiation exposure. Conclusions: Apoptosis in the salivary glands after therapeutic head-and-neck irradiation is mediated by p53 and corresponds to salivary gland dysfunction in vivo.

  20. Snf1-Dependent Transcription Confers Glucose-Induced Decay upon the mRNA Product

    PubMed Central

    Braun, Katherine A.; Dombek, Kenneth M.

    2015-01-01

    In the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae, the switch from respiratory metabolism to fermentation causes rapid decay of transcripts encoding proteins uniquely required for aerobic metabolism. Snf1, the yeast ortholog of AMP-activated protein kinase, has been implicated in this process because inhibiting Snf1 mimics the addition of glucose. In this study, we show that the SNF1-dependent ADH2 promoter, or just the major transcription factor binding site, is sufficient to confer glucose-induced mRNA decay upon heterologous transcripts. SNF1-independent expression from the ADH2 promoter prevented glucose-induced mRNA decay without altering the start site of transcription. SNF1-dependent transcripts are enriched for the binding motif of the RNA binding protein Vts1, an important mediator of mRNA decay and mRNA repression whose expression is correlated with decreased abundance of SNF1-dependent transcripts during the yeast metabolic cycle. However, deletion of VTS1 did not slow the rate of glucose-induced mRNA decay. ADH2 mRNA rapidly dissociated from polysomes after glucose repletion, and sequences bound by RNA binding proteins were enriched in the transcripts from repressed cells. Inhibiting the protein kinase A pathway did not affect glucose-induced decay of ADH2 mRNA. Our results suggest that Snf1 may influence mRNA stability by altering the recruitment activity of the transcription factor Adr1. PMID:26667037

  1. Ofloxacin induces apoptosis in microencapsulated juvenile rabbit chondrocytes by caspase-8-dependent mitochondrial pathway

    SciTech Connect

    Sheng Zhiguo; Cao Xiaojuan; Peng Shuangqing Wang Changyong; Li Qianqian; Wang Yimei; Liu Mifeng

    2008-01-15

    Quinolones (QNs)-induced arthropathy is an important toxic effect in immature animals leading to restriction of their therapeutic use in pediatrics. However, the exact mechanism still remains unclear. Recently, we have demonstrated that ofloxacin, a typical QN, induces apoptosis of alginate microencapsulated juvenile rabbit joint chondrocytes by disturbing the {beta}{sub 1} integrin functions and inactivating the ERK/MAPK signaling pathway. In this study, we extend our initial observations to further elucidate the mechanism(s) of ofloxacin-induced apoptosis by utilizing specific caspase inhibitors. Pretreatment with both caspase-9-specific inhibitor zLEHD-fmk and caspase-8 inhibitor zIETD-fmk attenuated ofloxacin-induced apoptosis and activation of caspase-3 of chondrocyte in a concentration-dependent manner, as determined by fluorescent dye staining, enzyme activity assay and immunoblotting. Furthermore, the activation of caspase-9, -8 and -3 stimulated by ofloxacin was significantly inhibited in the presence of zIETD-fmk while pretreatment with zLEHD-fmk only blocked the activation of caspase-9 and -3. Ofloxacin also stimulated a concentration-dependent translocation of cytochrome c from mitochondria into the cytosol and a decrease of mitochondrial transmembrane potential, which was completely inhibited by zIETD-fmk. In addition, ofloxacin was found to increase the level of Bax, tBid, p53 in a concentration- and time-dependent manner. Taken together, The current results indicate that the caspase-8-dependent mitochondrial pathway is primarily involved in the ofloxacin-induced apoptosis of microencapsulated juvenile rabbit joint chondrocytes.

  2. Challenges in Modelling of Lightning-Induced Delamination; Effect of Temperature-Dependent Interfacial Properties

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Naghipour, P.; Pineda, E. J.; Arnold, S.

    2014-01-01

    Lightning is a major cause of damage in laminated composite aerospace structures during flight. Due to the dielectric nature of Carbon fiber reinforced polymers (CFRPs), the high energy induced by lightning strike transforms into extreme, localized surface temperature accompanied with a high-pressure shockwave resulting in extensive damage. It is crucial to develop a numerical tool capable of predicting the damage induced from a lightning strike to supplement extremely expensive lightning experiments. Delamination is one of the most significant failure modes resulting from a lightning strike. It can be extended well beyond the visible damage zone, and requires sophisticated techniques and equipment to detect. A popular technique used to model delamination is the cohesive zone approach. Since the loading induced from a lightning strike event is assumed to consist of extreme localized heating, the cohesive zone formulation should additionally account for temperature effects. However, the sensitivity to this dependency remains unknown. Therefore, the major focus point of this work is to investigate the importance of this dependency via defining various temperature dependency profiles for the cohesive zone properties, and analyzing the corresponding delamination area. Thus, a detailed numerical model consisting of multidirectional composite plies with temperature-dependent cohesive elements in between is subjected to lightning (excessive amount of heat and pressure) and delamination/damage expansion is studied under specified conditions.

  3. Bupivacaine induces apoptosis through caspase-dependent and -independent pathways in canine mammary tumor cells.

    PubMed

    Chiu, Yi-Shu; Cheng, Yeong-Hsiang; Lin, Sui-Wen; Chang, Te-Sheng; Liou, Chian-Jiun; Lai, Yu-Shen

    2015-06-01

    Local anesthetics have been reported to induce apoptosis in various cell lines. In this study, we showed that bupivacaine also induced apoptosis in DTK-SME cells, a vimentin(+)/AE1(+)/CK7(+)/HSP27(+), tumorigenic, immortalized, canine mammary tumor cell line. Bupivacaine induced apoptosis in DTK-SME cells in a time- and concentration-dependent manner. Apoptosis-associated morphological changes, including cell shrinkage and rounding, chromatin condensation, and formation of apoptotic bodies, were observed in the bupivacaine-treated DTK-SME cells. Apoptosis was further confirmed with annexin V staining, TUNEL staining, and DNA laddering assays. At the molecular level, the activation of caspases-3, -8, and -9 corresponded well to the degree of DNA fragmentation triggered by bupivacaine. We also demonstrated that the pan-caspase inhibitor, z-VAD-fmk, only partially inhibited the apoptosis induced by bupivacaine. Moreover, treated cells increased expression of endonuclease G, a death effector that acts independently of caspases. Our data suggested that bupivacaine-induced apoptosis occurs through both caspase-dependent and caspase-independent apoptotic pathways. PMID:25843897

  4. Iodine deficiency induces a VEGF-dependent microvascular response in salivary glands and in the stomach.

    PubMed

    Vanderstraeten, Jessica; Derradji, Hanane; Craps, Julie; Sonveaux, Pierre; Colin, Ides M; Many, Marie-Christine; Gérard, Anne-Catherine

    2016-08-01

    Despite efforts to optimize iodine supply in iodine deficient countries, iodine deficiency (ID) remains a global problem worldwide. Activation of the local microvasculature by ID in the thyroid gland aims at improving the local supply of iodide. For this purpose, the thyrocytes secrete vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) that acts on adjacent capillaries, via a reactive oxygen species (ROS)/Hypoxia Inducible factor (HIF)-dependent pathway. Beside the thyroid, other organs including salivary glands and the stomach do express the sodium/iodide symporter (NIS) and are able to take iodide up, potentially rendering them sensitive to ID. To verify this hypothesis, ID-induced effects on the local microvasculature were studied in salivary glands and in the stomach. ID was induced by feeding young mice with an iodide-deficient diet and NIS inhibitor perchlorate in the drinking water. In salivary glands, ID induced a transient increase in HIF-1α protein expression accompanied by a transient, VEGF-dependent increase in blood flow. In the gastric mucosa, ID transiently increased VEGF expression in the mucin-secreting epithelium and in ghrelin-secreting endocrine cells. These observations suggest that microvascular changes in response to ID occur in NIS-expressing tissues other than the thyroid. NIS expressing cells could be viewed as iodide sensors that respond to ID by inducing vascular changes, probably to optimize iodide bioavailability at regional or systemic levels. PMID:26838679

  5. Light-dependent expression of flg22-induced defense genes in Arabidopsis

    PubMed Central

    Sano, Satoshi; Aoyama, Mayu; Nakai, Kana; Shimotani, Koji; Yamasaki, Kanako; Sato, Masa H.; Tojo, Daisuke; Suwastika, I. Nengah; Nomura, Hironari; Shiina, Takashi

    2014-01-01

    Chloroplasts have been reported to generate retrograde immune signals that activate defense gene expression in the nucleus. However, the roles of light and photosynthesis in plant immunity remain largely elusive. In this study, we evaluated the effects of light on the expression of defense genes induced by flg22, a peptide derived from bacterial flagellins which acts as a potent elicitor in plants. Whole-transcriptome analysis of flg22-treated Arabidopsis thaliana seedlings under light and dark conditions for 30 min revealed that a number of (30%) genes strongly induced by flg22 (>4.0) require light for their rapid expression, whereas flg22-repressed genes include a significant number of genes that are down-regulated by light. Furthermore, light is responsible for the flg22-induced accumulation of salicylic acid (SA), indicating that light is indispensable for basal defense responses in plants. To elucidate the role of photosynthesis in defense, we further examined flg22-induced defense gene expression in the presence of specific inhibitors of photosynthetic electron transport: 3-(3,4-dichlorophenyl)-1,1-dimethylurea (DCMU) and 2,5-dibromo-3-methyl-6-isopropyl-benzoquinone (DBMIB). Light-dependent expression of defense genes was largely suppressed by DBMIB, but only partially suppressed by DCMU. These findings suggest that photosynthetic electron flow plays a role in controlling the light-dependent expression of flg22-inducible defense genes. PMID:25346742

  6. Retrieval-Induced versus Context-Induced Forgetting: Does Retrieval-Induced Forgetting Depend on Context Shifts?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Soares, Julia S.; Polack, Cody W.; Miller, Ralph R.

    2016-01-01

    Retrieval-induced forgetting (RIF) is the observation that retrieval of target information causes forgetting of related nontarget information. A number of accounts of this phenomenon have been proposed, including a context-shift-based account (Jonker, Seli, & Macleod, 2013). This account proposes that RIF occurs as a result of the context…

  7. Two cases of food-dependent exercise-induced anaphylaxis with different culprit foods

    PubMed Central

    Mobayed, Hassan M.S.; Ali Al-Nesf, Maryam

    2014-01-01

    Food-dependent exercise-induced anaphylaxis (FDEIA) is one of the severe allergic reactions in which symptoms develop only if exercise takes place within a few hours of eating a specific food. It is important to consider FDEIA in cases of unexplained anaphylaxis as reactions can occur several hours after ingesting the culprit food(s). We herein report the first two cases of FDEIA in the Middle East. The first one is induced by wheat, while the other by peanut. The pathophysiology, predisposing factors, diagnosis, and treatment of FDEIA are also summarized here. PMID:24551018

  8. Distance-dependent photo-induced electron transport in nanometer-sized junctions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Albee, Brian; Liu, Xuejun; Tork Ladani, Faezeh; Dutta, Rajen K.; Potma, Eric O.

    2016-05-01

    We describe photo-induced current experiments observed in nm-sized electro-migrated nano gaps, using surface plasmon polaritons (SPPs) as the source of the optical driving field. For gaps smaller than 5 nm, we observe a stable photo-induced current that is linear with the intensity of the SPP mode, whereas the photo-current in wider gaps shows a highly nonlinear dependence that is reminiscent of field emission. The results are explained by a modified Wentzel-Kramers-Brillouin tunneling model, which reproduces the observed transition from optical rectification to optically driven field emission in the nano junction.

  9. T8 cell suppression of antigen- and mitogen-induced T4 cell dependent immunoglobulin production.

    PubMed Central

    Nilsson, E; von Stedingk, L V; Biberfeld, G

    1986-01-01

    The suppressor effect of T8 cells on antigen-induced, as compared to pokeweed mitogen-induced, T4 cell dependent immunoglobulin (Ig) production by B cells of healthy subjects was studied. The antigens used were purified protein derivative of tuberculin (PPD) and tetanus toxoid (TT). The suppressor effect of T8 cells on IgG, IgM and IgA responses in co-cultures of T4 cells and B cells was significantly stronger in the pokeweed mitogen driven system than in PPD- and TT-driven cultures under the same experimental conditions. PMID:2948744

  10. Oxidative stress–dependent phosphorylation activates ZNRF1 to induce neuronal/axonal degeneration

    PubMed Central

    Wakatsuki, Shuji; Furuno, Akiko; Ohshima, Makiko

    2015-01-01

    Oxidative stress is a well-known inducer of neuronal apoptosis and axonal degeneration. We previously showed that the E3 ubiquitin ligase ZNRF1 promotes Wallerian degeneration by degrading AKT to induce GSK3B activation. We now demonstrate that oxidative stress serves as an activator of the ubiquitin ligase activity of ZNRF1 by inducing epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR)–mediated phosphorylation at the 103rd tyrosine residue and that the up-regulation of ZNRF1 activity by oxidative stress leads to neuronal apoptosis and Wallerian degeneration. We also show that nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide phosphate–reduced oxidase activity is required for the EGFR-dependent phosphorylation-induced activation of ZNRF1 and resultant AKT degradation via the ubiquitin proteasome system to induce Wallerian degeneration. These results indicate the pathophysiological significance of the EGFR–ZNRF1 pathway induced by oxidative stress in the regulation of neuronal apoptosis and Wallerian degeneration. A deeper understanding of the regulatory mechanism for ZNRF1 catalytic activity via phosphorylation will provide a potential therapeutic avenue for neurodegeneration. PMID:26572622

  11. Phycocyanin prevents methylglyoxal-induced mitochondrial-dependent apoptosis in INS-1 cells by Nrf2.

    PubMed

    Gao, Yingnv; Liu, Chen; Wan, Guoqing; Wang, Xinshuo; Cheng, Xiaodong; Ou, Yu

    2016-02-01

    Methylglyoxal (MG) is a reactive dicarbonyl compound, whose abnormal accumulation in diabetic patients exerts deleterious effects on cells and tissues. The β-cell is the main target cell of Type 2 diabetes, and its insulin secretion injury and cell apoptosis can be due to mitochondrial dysfunction. Previous studies have demonstrated MG induced β-cell apoptosis. However, little is known about the effect of MG on β-cell mitochondrial dysfunction. Phycocyanin (PC) has been demonstrated to possess various biological activities including the effects on diabetic models in vivo. The aim of this study was to determine the protective effect of PC against methylglyoxal (MG)-induced dysfunction in pancreatic β-cell INS-1 and also the mechanism. We demonstrated that MG induced mitochondrial dysfunction by the decline in ATP levels, and the increase of the level of intracellular reactive oxygen species (ROS). Furthermore, MG released cytochrome c and apoptosis-inducing factor (AIF) from the mitochondrion, induced changes in the expression of Bcl-2 family members, activated caspases and increased PARP cleavage. Interestingly, PC activated nuclear erythroid-related factor 2 (Nrf2), and Nrf2 activation as well as antioxidant enzymes HO-1 and glyoxalase 1 (Glo-1) were confirmed to be involved in the mechanisms underlying the protection of PC by RNA interference. Altogether, these results demonstrated that PC prevented mitochondrial-dependent apoptosis in MG-induced INS-1 cells and the effect was associated with Nrf2 activation. PMID:26805012

  12. Cdc42-Dependent Activation of NADPH Oxidase Is Involved in Ethanol-Induced Neuronal Oxidative Stress

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Xin; Ke, Zunji; Chen, Gang; Xu, Mei; Bower, Kimberly A.; Frank, Jacqueline A.; Zhang, Zhuo; Shi, Xianglin; Luo, Jia

    2012-01-01

    It has been suggested that excessive reactive oxygen species (ROS) and oxidative stress play an important role in ethanol-induced damage to both the developing and mature central nervous system (CNS). The mechanisms underlying ethanol-induced neuronal ROS, however, remain unclear. In this study, we investigated the role of NADPH oxidase (NOX) in ethanol-induced ROS generation. We demonstrated that ethanol activated NOX and inhibition of NOX reduced ethanol-promoted ROS generation. Ethanol significantly increased the expression of p47phox and p67phox, the essential subunits for NOX activation in cultured neuronal cells and the cerebral cortex of infant mice. Ethanol caused serine phosphorylation and membrane translocation of p47phox and p67phox, which were prerequisites for NOX assembly and activation. Knocking down p47phox with the small interfering RNA was sufficient to attenuate ethanol-induced ROS production and ameliorate ethanol-mediated oxidative damage, which is indicated by a decrease in protein oxidation and lipid peroxidation. Ethanol activated cell division cycle 42 (Cdc42) and overexpression of a dominant negative (DN) Cdc42 abrogate ethanol-induced NOX activation and ROS generation. These results suggest that Cdc42-dependent NOX activation mediates ethanol-induced oxidative damages to neurons. PMID:22662267

  13. Superoxide anion-induced pain and inflammation depends on TNFα/TNFR1 signaling in mice.

    PubMed

    Yamacita-Borin, Fabiane Y; Zarpelon, Ana C; Pinho-Ribeiro, Felipe A; Fattori, Victor; Alves-Filho, Jose C; Cunha, Fernando Q; Cunha, Thiago M; Casagrande, Rubia; Verri, Waldiceu A

    2015-09-25

    Inhibition of tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNFα) and superoxide anion production reduces inflammation and pain. The present study investigated whether superoxide anion-induced pain depends on TNFα signaling and the role of superoxide anion in TNFα-induced hyperalgesia to clarify the interrelation between these two mediators in the context of pain. Intraplantar injection of a superoxide anion donor (potassium superoxide) induced mechanical hyperalgesia (0.5-5h after injection), neutrophil recruitment (myeloperoxidase activity), and overt pain-like behaviors (paw flinching, paw licking, and abdominal writhings) in wild-type mice. Tumor necrosis factor receptor 1 deficiency (TNFR1-/-) and treatment of wild-type mice with etanercept (a soluble TNFR2 receptor that inhibits TNFα actions) inhibited superoxide anion-induced pain-like behaviors. TNFR1(-/-) mice were also protected from superoxide anion donor-induced oxidative stress, suggesting the role of this pathway in the maintenance of oxidative stress. Finally, we demonstrated that Apocynin (an NADPH oxidase inhibitor) or Tempol (a superoxide dismutase mimetic) treatment inhibited TNFα-induced paw mechanical hyperalgesia and neutrophil recruitment (myeloperoxidase activity). These results demonstrate that TNFα/TNFR1 signaling is important in superoxide anion-triggered pain and that TNFα/TNFR1 signaling amplifies the oxidative stress triggered by superoxide anion, which contributes to sustaining pain and inflammation. PMID:26291484

  14. Symptom-dependent taste aversion induced by an anticoagulant rodenticide in the brown rat (Rattus norvegicus).

    PubMed

    Smith, P; Inglis, I R; Cowan, D P; Kerins, G M; Bull, D S

    1994-09-01

    In a series of 3 experiments with different experimental paradigms, feeding patterns of laboratory rats (Rattus norvegicus) were monitored in 2-choice feeding tests after intubation with a sublethal dose of an anticoagulant rodenticide. We report for the first time that contrary to accepted wisdom, anticoagulants can induce taste aversions. Furthermore, we report behavioral symptoms within the 1st day after dosing. Our data suggest that the taste aversion is induced through an inhibition of the vitamin K cycle and is transient, attenuating over the same period as the levels of vitamin K-dependent proteins return to normal. Because the taste aversion is expressed most strongly when symptoms are most pronounced and is not expressed after symptoms have disappeared, we term this novel form of control symptom-dependent taste aversion. PMID:7924258

  15. Mediation of poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase-1-dependent cell death by apoptosis-inducing factor.

    PubMed

    Yu, Seong-Woon; Wang, Hongmin; Poitras, Marc F; Coombs, Carmen; Bowers, William J; Federoff, Howard J; Poirier, Guy G; Dawson, Ted M; Dawson, Valina L

    2002-07-12

    Poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase-1 (PARP-1) protects the genome by functioning in the DNA damage surveillance network. PARP-1 is also a mediator of cell death after ischemia-reperfusion injury, glutamate excitotoxicity, and various inflammatory processes. We show that PARP-1 activation is required for translocation of apoptosis-inducing factor (AIF) from the mitochondria to the nucleus and that AIF is necessary for PARP-1-dependent cell death. N-methyl-N'-nitro-N-nitrosoguanidine, H2O2, and N-methyl-d-aspartate induce AIF translocation and cell death, which is prevented by PARP inhibitors or genetic knockout of PARP-1, but is caspase independent. Microinjection of an antibody to AIF protects against PARP-1-dependent cytotoxicity. These data support a model in which PARP-1 activation signals AIF release from mitochondria, resulting in a caspase-independent pathway of programmed cell death. PMID:12114629

  16. AGEs Promote Oxidative Stress and Induce Apoptosis in Retinal Pigmented Epithelium Cells RAGE-dependently.

    PubMed

    Wang, Xin-Ling; Yu, Tao; Yan, Qi-Chang; Wang, Wei; Meng, Nan; Li, Xue-Jiao; Luo, Ya-Hong

    2015-06-01

    Advanced glycation end products (AGEs) are extremely accumulated in diabetes mellitus, particularly in retinal vascular and epithelium cells, and are confirmed to contribute to diabetic retinopathy (DR). In the present study, we determined the promotion by AGEs to the oxidative stress and mitochondrial dysfunction in retinal pigmented epithelium ARPE-19 cells and investigated the influence by the knockdown or the overexpression of receptor for AGEs (RAGE) on the AGE-promoted oxidative stress and mitochondrial dysfunction. Furthermore, we determined the induction by AGEs to the cell apoptosis and to the activation of B-cell lymphoma 2 (Bcl-2) families in the AGE-BSA-induced apoptosis, and examined the RAGE-dependence in such induction. Results demonstrated that AGE-BSA upregulated the hydrogen peroxide production and induced mitochondrial dysfunction in ARPE-19 cells, dose-dependently. And the further investigation indicated that the AGE-RAGE interaction was required for the induction of oxidative stress and mitochondrial dysfunction. Moreover, the AGE-BSA treatment promoted a significantly high level of apoptotic cells, and the Bcl-2 family was implicated in the AGE-BSA-induced apoptosis, there was a significant high level of Cyt c release, Bcl-2-associated X protein (Bax) induction, Bcl-2 reduction, and caspase 9 activation in the AGE-BSA-treated cells. In conclusion, the present study recognized the apoptosis induction by AGE-BSAs in the retinal epithelium ARPE-19 cells, RAGE-dependently. The mitochondrial dysfunction was induced, and the Bcl-2 family was deregulated during the AGE-BSA-induced ARPE-19 cell apoptosis. PMID:25682235

  17. Dependence of proximity-induced supercurrent on junction length in multilayer-graphene Josephson junctions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kanda, A.; Sato, T.; Goto, H.; Tomori, H.; Takana, S.; Ootuka, Y.; Tsukagoshi, K.

    2010-11-01

    We report experimental observation of the proximity-induced supercurrent in superconductor-multilayer graphene-superconductor junctions. We find that the supercurrent is a linearly decreasing function of the junction length (separation of the superconducting electrodes), which is quite different from the usual behavior of exponential dependence. We suggest that this behavior originates from the intrinsic large contact resistance between the multilayer and the superconducting electrodes.

  18. Deficiency in glutamine but not glucose induces MYC-dependent apoptosis in human cells

    PubMed Central

    Yuneva, Mariia; Zamboni, Nicola; Oefner, Peter; Sachidanandam, Ravi; Lazebnik, Yuri

    2007-01-01

    The idea that conversion of glucose to ATP is an attractive target for cancer therapy has been supported in part by the observation that glucose deprivation induces apoptosis in rodent cells transduced with the proto-oncogene MYC, but not in the parental line. Here, we found that depletion of glucose killed normal human cells irrespective of induced MYC activity and by a mechanism different from apoptosis. However, depletion of glutamine, another major nutrient consumed by cancer cells, induced apoptosis depending on MYC activity. This apoptosis was preceded by depletion of the Krebs cycle intermediates, was prevented by two Krebs cycle substrates, but was unrelated to ATP synthesis or several other reported consequences of glutamine starvation. Our results suggest that the fate of normal human cells should be considered in evaluating nutrient deprivation as a strategy for cancer therapy, and that understanding how glutamine metabolism is linked to cell viability might provide new approaches for treatment of cancer. PMID:17606868

  19. TRPV1 Activation in Primary Cortical Neurons Induces Calcium-Dependent Programmed Cell Death.

    PubMed

    Song, Juhyun; Lee, Jun Hong; Lee, Sung Ho; Park, Kyung Ah; Lee, Won Taek; Lee, Jong Eun

    2013-03-01

    Transient receptor potential cation channel, subfamily V, member 1 (TRPV1, also known as vanilloid receptor 1) is a receptor that detects capsaicin, a pungent component of chili peppers, and noxious heat. Although its function in the primary nociceptor as a pain receptor is well established, whether TRPV1 is expressed in the brain is still under debate. In this study, the responses of primary cortical neurons were investigated. Here, we report that 1) capsaicin induces caspase-3-dependent programmed cell death, which coincides with increased production of nitric oxide and peroxynitrite ; that 2) the prolonged capsaicin treatment induces a steady increase in the degree of capase-3 activation, which is prevented by the removal of capsaicin; 3) and that blocking calcium entry and calcium-mediated signaling prevents capsaicin-induced cell death. These results indicate that cortical neurons express TRPV1 whose prolonged activation causes cell death. PMID:23585723

  20. Flicker-light induced visual phenomena: frequency dependence and specificity of whole percepts and percept features.

    PubMed

    Allefeld, Carsten; Pütz, Peter; Kastner, Kristina; Wackermann, Jiří

    2011-12-01

    Flickering light induces visual hallucinations in human observers. Despite a long history of the phenomenon, little is known about the dependence of flicker-induced subjective impressions on the flicker frequency. We investigate this question using Ganzfeld stimulation and an experimental paradigm combining a continuous frequency scan (1-50 Hz) with a focus on re-occurring, whole percepts. On the single-subject level, we find a high degree of frequency stability of percepts. To generalize across subjects, we apply two rating systems, (1) a set of complex percept classes derived from subjects' reports and (2) an enumeration of elementary percept features, and determine distributions of occurrences over flicker frequency. We observe a stronger frequency specificity for complex percept classes than elementary percept features. Comparing the similarity relations among percept categories to those among frequency profiles, we observe that though percepts are preferentially induced by particular frequencies, the frequency does not unambiguously determine the experienced percept. PMID:21123084

  1. Flickering task–irrelevant distractors induce dilation of target duration depending upon cortical distance

    PubMed Central

    Okajima, Miku; Yotsumoto, Yuko

    2016-01-01

    Flickering stimuli are perceived to be longer than stable stimuli. This so-called “flicker-induced time dilation” has been investigated in a number of studies, but the factors critical for this effect remain unclear. We explored the spatial distribution of the flicker effect and examined how the flickering task-irrelevant distractors spatially distant from the target induce time dilation. In two experiments, we demonstrated that flickering distractors dilated the perceived duration of the target stimulus even though the target stimulus itself was stable. In addition, when the distractor duration was much longer than the target duration, a flickering distractor located ipsilateral to the target caused greater time dilation than did a contralateral distractor. Thus the amount of dilation depended on the distance between the cortical areas responsible for the stimulus locations. These findings are consistent with the recent study reporting that modulation of neural oscillators encoding the interval duration could explain flicker-induced time dilation. PMID:27577614

  2. Food-dependent exercise-induced anaphylaxis due to wheat in a young woman.

    PubMed

    Ahanchian, Hamid; Farid, Reza; Ansari, Elham; Kianifar, Hamid Reza; Jabbari Azad, Farahzad; Jafari, Seyed Ali; Purreza, Reza; Noorizadeh, Shadi

    2013-03-01

    Food Dependent Exercise-Induced Allergy is a rare condition. However, the occurrence of anaphylaxis is increasing especially in young people. The diagnosis of anaphylaxis is based on clinical criteria and can be supported by laboratory tests such as serum tryptase and positive skin test results for specific IgE to potential triggering allergens. Anaphylaxis prevention needs strict avoidance of confirmed relevant allergen. Food-exercise challenge test may be an acceptable method for diagnosis of Food Dependent Exercise-Induced Allergy and dietary elimination of food is recommended to manage it. In this study, a 32 year-old woman visited the allergy clinic with a history of several episodes of hives since 11 years ago and 3 life-threatening attacks of anaphylaxis during the previous 6 months. The onsets of majority of these attacks were due to physical activity after breakfast. On Blood RAST test, the panel of common food Allergens was used and she had positive test only to wheat flour. On skin prick tests for common food allergens she showed a 6 millimeter wheal with 14 mm flare to Wheat Extract. The rest of allergens were negative.The patient was diagnosed as wheat-dependent exercise-induced, and all foods containing wheat were omitted from her diet. In this report we emphasized on the importance of careful history taking in anaphylaxis diagnosis. PMID:23454785

  3. Irofulven induces replication-dependent CHK2 activation related to p53 status1

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Yutian; Wiltshire, Timothy; Senft, Jamie; Reed, Eddie; Wang, Weixin

    2007-01-01

    CHK2 and p53 are frequently mutated in human cancers. CHK2 is known to phosphorylate and stabilize p53. CHK2 has also been implicated in DNA repair and apoptosis induction. However, whether p53 affects CHK2 activation and whether CHK2 activation modulates chemosensitivity are unclear. In this study, we found that in response to the DNA damage agent, irofulven, CHK2 activation, rather than its expression, is inversely correlated to p53 status. Irofulven inhibits DNA replication and induces chromosome aberrations (breaks and radials) and p53-dependent cell cycle arrest. Pretreatment of cells with the DNA polymerase inhibitor, aphidicolin, resulted in reduction of irofulven-induced CHK2 activation and foci formation, indicating that CHK2 activation by irofulven is replication-dependent. Furthermore, by using ovarian cancer cell lines expressing dominant-negative CHK2 and CHK2-knockout HCT116 cells, we found that CHK2 activation contributes to the control of S and G2/M cell cycle arrests, but not chemosensitivity to irofulven. Overall, this study demonstrates that in response to irofulven-induced DNA damage, the activation of CHK2 is dependent on DNA replication and related to p53 status. By controlling cell cycle arrest and DNA replication, p53 affects CHK2 activation. CHK2 activation contributes to cell cycle arrest, but not chemosensitivity. PMID:17118344

  4. β-caryophyllene ameliorates cisplatin-induced nephrotoxicity in a cannabinoid 2 receptor-dependent manner

    PubMed Central

    Horváth, Béla; Mukhopadhyay, Partha; Kechrid, Malek; Patel, Vivek; Tanashian, Galin; Wink, David A.; Gertsch, Jürg; Pacher, Pál

    2012-01-01

    (E)-β-caryophyllene (BCP) is a natural sequiterpene found in many essential oils of spice (best known for contributing to the spiciness of black pepper) and food plants with recognized anti-inflammatory properties. Recently it was shown that BCP is a natural agonist of endogenous cannabinoid 2 (CB2) receptors, which are expressed in immune cells and mediate anti-inflammatory effects. In this study we aimed to test the effects of BCP in a clinically relevant murine model of nephropathy (induced by the widely used antineoplastic drug cisplatin) in which the tubular injury is largely dependent on inflammation and oxidative/nitrative stress. β-caryophyllene dose-dependently ameliorated cisplatin-induced kidney dysfunction, morphological damage, and renal inflammatory response (chemokines MCP-1 and MIP-2, cytokines TNF-α and IL-1β, adhesion molecule ICAM-1, and neutrophil and macrophage infiltration). It also markedly mitigated oxidative/nitrative stress (NOX-2, NOX-4 expression, 4-HNE and 3-NT content) and cell death. The protective effects of BCP against biochemical and histological markers of nephropathy were absent in CB2 knockout mice. Thus, BCP may be an excellent therapeutic agent to prevent cisplatin-induced nephrotoxicity through a CB2 receptor dependent pathway. Given the excellent safety profile of BCP in humans it has tremendous therapeutic potential in multitude of diseases associated with inflammation and oxidative stress. PMID:22326488

  5. Acute stress-induced antinociception is cGMP-dependent but heme oxygenase-independent

    PubMed Central

    Carvalho-Costa, P.G.; Branco, L.G.S.; Leite-Panissi, C.R.A.

    2014-01-01

    Endogenous carbon monoxide (CO), which is produced by the enzyme heme oxygenase (HO), participates as a neuromodulator in physiological processes such as thermoregulation and nociception by stimulating the formation of 3′,5′-cyclic guanosine monophosphate (cGMP). In particular, the acute physical restraint-induced fever of rats can be blocked by inhibiting the enzyme HO. A previous study reported that the HO-CO-cGMP pathway plays a key phasic antinociceptive role in modulating noninflammatory acute pain. Thus, this study evaluated the involvement of the HO-CO-cGMP pathway in antinociception induced by acute stress in male Wistar rats (250-300 g; n=8/group) using the analgesia index (AI) in the tail flick test. The results showed that antinociception induced by acute stress was not dependent on the HO-CO-cGMP pathway, as neither treatment with the HO inhibitor ZnDBPG nor heme-lysinate altered the AI. However, antinociception was dependent on cGMP activity because pretreatment with the guanylate cyclase inhibitor 1H-[1,2,4] oxadiazolo [4,3-a] quinoxaline-1-one (ODQ) blocked the increase in the AI induced by acute stress. PMID:25387672

  6. In vivo evidence for an endothelium-dependent mechanism in radiation-induced normal tissue injury

    PubMed Central

    Rannou, Emilie; François, Agnès; Toullec, Aurore; Guipaud, Olivier; Buard, Valérie; Tarlet, Georges; Mintet, Elodie; Jaillet, Cyprien; Iruela-Arispe, Maria Luisa; Benderitter, Marc; Sabourin, Jean-Christophe; Milliat, Fabien

    2015-01-01

    The pathophysiological mechanism involved in side effects of radiation therapy, and especially the role of the endothelium remains unclear. Previous results showed that plasminogen activator inhibitor-type 1 (PAI-1) contributes to radiation-induced intestinal injury and suggested that this role could be driven by an endothelium-dependent mechanism. We investigated whether endothelial-specific PAI-1 deletion could affect radiation-induced intestinal injury. We created a mouse model with a specific deletion of PAI-1 in the endothelium (PAI-1KOendo) by a Cre-LoxP system. In a model of radiation enteropathy, survival and intestinal radiation injury were followed as well as intestinal gene transcriptional profile and inflammatory cells intestinal infiltration. Irradiated PAI-1KOendo mice exhibited increased survival, reduced acute enteritis severity and attenuated late fibrosis compared with irradiated PAI-1flx/flx mice. Double E-cadherin/TUNEL labeling confirmed a reduced epithelial cell apoptosis in irradiated PAI-1KOendo. High-throughput gene expression combined with bioinformatic analyses revealed a putative involvement of macrophages. We observed a decrease in CD68+cells in irradiated intestinal tissues from PAI-1KOendo mice as well as modifications associated with M1/M2 polarization. This work shows that PAI-1 plays a role in radiation-induced intestinal injury by an endothelium-dependent mechanism and demonstrates in vivo that the endothelium is directly involved in the progression of radiation-induced enteritis. PMID:26510580

  7. Uracil-induced signaling pathways for DUOX-dependent gut immunity

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Kyung-Ah; Kim, Boram; You, Hyejin; Lee, Won-Jae

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT Intestinal dual oxidase (DUOX) activation is the first line of host defense against enteric infection in Drosophila. DUOX enzymatic activity is mainly controlled by phospholipase C-β (PLCβ)-dependent calcium mobilization, whereas DUOX gene expression is mainly controlled by the MEKK1-p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase pathway. Furthermore, bacterial-derived uracil molecules act as ligands for DUOX activation. However, our current understanding of uracil-induced signal transduction pathways remain incomplete. We have recently found that uracil stimulates Hedgehog signaling, which in turn upregulates cadherin99C (Cad99C) expression in enterocytes. Cad99C molecules, along with PLCβ and protein kinase C, induce the formation of signaling endosomes that facilitate intracellular calcium mobilization for DUOX activity. These observations illustrate the complexity of signaling cascades in uracil-induced signaling pathways. Here, we further demonstrated the role of lipid raft formation and calmodulin-dependent protein kinase-II on endosome formation and calcium mobilization, respectively. Moreover, we will provide a brief discussion on two different models for uracil recognition and uracil-induced DUOX activation in Drosophila enterocytes. PMID:26655037

  8. Salmonella typhimurium-induced M1 macrophage polarization is dependent on the bacterial O antigen.

    PubMed

    Luo, Fengling; Sun, Xiaoming; Qu, Zhen; Zhang, Xiaolian

    2016-02-01

    Recently, macrophages were shown to be capable of differentiating toward two phenotypes after antigen stimulation: a classically activated (M1) or an alternatively activated phenotype (M2). To investigate the effect of Salmonella enteric serovar typhimurium (S. typhimurium) on macrophage differentiation, we compared macrophage phenotypes after infection of murine bone marrow-derived macrophages with wild-type S. typhimurium and its isogenic rfc mutant. S. typhimurium C5 induced M1 macrophage polarization and enhanced inducible nitric oxide synthase expression by macrophages; this induction was dependent on Toll-like receptor 4. In contrast, the Δrfc mutant (S. typhimurium C5 rfc::Km(r)) lost this function and induced an M2 response in the macrophages. Here, we propose that S. typhimurium C5 is capable of polarizing macrophages towards the M1 phenotype and that this polarization is dependent on the O antigen encoded by rfc. Our finding indicates that M1 macrophage polarization induced by S. typhimurium may be related to the ability of this intracellular bacterium to survive and replicate within macrophages, which is essential for systemic disease. PMID:26745982

  9. Simvastatin induces apoptosis by a Rho-dependent mechanism in cultured cardiac fibroblasts and myofibroblasts

    SciTech Connect

    Copaja, Miguel; Venegas, Daniel; Aranguiz, Pablo; Canales, Jimena; Vivar, Raul; Catalan, Mabel; Olmedo, Ivonne; Rodriguez, Andrea E.; Chiong, Mario; Leyton, Lisette; Lavandero, Sergio; Diaz-Araya, Guillermo

    2011-08-15

    Several clinical trials have shown the beneficial effects of statins in the prevention of coronary heart disease. Additionally, statins promote apoptosis in vascular smooth muscle cells, in renal tubular epithelial cells and also in a variety of cell lines; yet, the effects of statins on cardiac fibroblast and myofibroblast, primarily responsible for cardiac tissue healing are almost unknown. Here, we investigated the effects of simvastatin on cardiac fibroblast and myofibroblast viability and studied the molecular cell death mechanism triggered by simvastatin in both cell types. Methods: Rat neonatal cardiac fibroblasts and myofibroblasts were treated with simvastatin (0.1-10 {mu}M) up to 72 h. Cell viability and apoptosis were evaluated by trypan blue exclusion method and by flow cytometry, respectively. Caspase-3 activation and Rho protein levels and activity were also determined by Western blot and pull-down assay, respectively. Results: Simvastatin induces caspase-dependent apoptosis of cardiac fibroblasts and myofibroblasts in a concentration- and time-dependent manner, with greater effects on fibroblasts than myofibroblasts. These effects were prevented by mevalonate, farnesylpyrophosphate and geranylgeranylpyrophosphate, but not squalene. These last results suggest that apoptosis was dependent on small GTPases of the Rho family rather than Ras. Conclusion: Simvastatin triggered apoptosis of cardiac fibroblasts and myofibroblasts by a mechanism independent of cholesterol synthesis, but dependent of isoprenilation of Rho protein. Additionally, cardiac fibroblasts were more susceptible to simvastatin-induced apoptosis than cardiac myofibroblasts. Thus simvastatin could avoid adverse cardiac remodeling leading to a less fibrotic repair of the damaged tissues. - Research Highlights: > Simvastatin decreases CF and CMF viability independent of cholesterol synthesis. > Simvastatin induces CF and CMF apoptosis in a caspase-dependent manner being CMF more resistant

  10. Progesterone receptors induce FOXO1-dependent senescence in ovarian cancer cells

    PubMed Central

    Diep, Caroline H.; Charles, Nathan J.; Gilks, C. Blake; Kalloger, Steve E.; Argenta, Peter A.; Lange, Carol A.

    2013-01-01

    Loss of nuclear progesterone receptors (PR) and low circulating progesterone levels are associated with increased ovarian cancer (OC) risk. However, PR are abundantly expressed in a significant percentage of serous and endometrioid ovarian tumors; patients with PR+ tumors typically experience longer progression-free survival relative to those with PR-null tumors. The molecular mechanisms of these protective effects are poorly understood. To study PR action in OC in the absence of added estrogen (i.e., needed to induce robust PR expression), we created ES-2 OC cells stably expressing vector control or GFP-tagged PR-B (GFP-PR). Progestin (R5020) stimulation of ES-2 cells stably expressing GFP-PR induced cellular senescence characterized by altered cellular morphology, prolonged survival, senescence-associated β-galactosidase activity, G1 cell cycle arrest and upregulation of the cell cycle inhibitor, p21, as well as the Forkhead-box transcription factor, FOXO1; these results repeated in unmodified ER+/PR+ PEO4 OC cells. PR-B and FOXO1 were detected within the same PRE-containing regions of the p21 upstream promoter. Knockdown of p21 resulted in molecular compensation via FOXO1-dependent upregulation of numerous FOXO1 target genes (p15, p16, p27) and an increased rate of senescence. Inhibition of FOXO1 (with AS1842856) or stable FOXO1 knockdown inhibited progestin-induced p21 expression and blocked progestin-induced senescence. Overall, these findings support a role for PR as a tumor suppressor in OC cells, which exhibits inhibitory effects by inducing FOXO1-dependent cellular senescence. Clinical “priming” of the PR-FOXO1-p21 signaling pathway using PR agonists may provide a useful strategy to induce irreversible cell cycle arrest and thereby sensitize OC cells to existing chemotherapies as part of combination “two-step” therapies. PMID:23574718

  11. Fission dynamics within time-dependent Hartree-Fock. II. Boost-induced fission

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goddard, Philip; Stevenson, Paul; Rios, Arnau

    2016-01-01

    Background: Nuclear fission is a complex large-amplitude collective decay mode in heavy nuclei. Microscopic density functional studies of fission have previously concentrated on adiabatic approaches based on constrained static calculations ignoring dynamical excitations of the fissioning nucleus and the daughter products. Purpose: We explore the ability of dynamic mean-field methods to describe induced fission processes, using quadrupole boosts in the nuclide 240Pu as an example. Methods: Following upon the work presented in Goddard et al. [Phys. Rev. C 92, 054610 (2015)], 10.1103/PhysRevC.92.054610, quadrupole-constrained Hartree-Fock calculations are used to create a potential energy surface. An isomeric state and a state beyond the second barrier peak are excited by means of instantaneous as well as temporally extended gauge boosts with quadrupole shapes. The subsequent deexcitation is studied in a time-dependent Hartree-Fock simulation, with emphasis on fissioned final states. The corresponding fission fragment mass numbers are studied. Results: In general, the energy deposited by the quadrupole boost is quickly absorbed by the nucleus. In instantaneous boosts, this leads to fast shape rearrangements and violent dynamics that can ultimately lead to fission. This is a qualitatively different process than the deformation-induced fission. Boosts induced within a finite time window excite the system in a relatively gentler way and do induce fission but with a smaller energy deposition. Conclusions: The fission products obtained using boost-induced fission in time-dependent Hartree-Fock are more asymmetric than the fragments obtained in deformation-induced fission or the corresponding adiabatic approaches.

  12. Zinc pyrithione induces ERK- and PKC-dependent necrosis distinct from TPEN-induced apoptosis in prostate cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Carraway, Robert E; Dobner, Paul R

    2012-02-01

    Zinc dyshomeostasis can induce cell death. However, the mechanisms involved have not been fully elucidated in prostate cancer (PCa) cells, which differ dramatically from normal cells in their zinc handling ability. Here, we studied the effects of the ionophore Zn-pyrithione (ZP) and the chelator N,N,N',N'-tetrakis(2-pyridylmethyl)ethylenediamine (TPEN). Both compounds induced cell death at micromolar concentrations when incubated with androgen-dependent (LNCaP), androgen-independent (PC3, DU145) and androgen-sensitive (C4-2) PCa cell-lines. Compared to PCa cells, RWPE1 prostate epithelial cells were less sensitive to ZP and more sensitive to TPEN, but total cellular zinc levels were changed similarly. ZnSO4 enhanced the toxicity of ZP, but inhibited the effects of TPEN as expected. The morphological/biochemical responses to ZP and TPEN differed. ZP decreased ATP levels and stimulated ERK, AKT and PKC phosphorylation. DNA laddering was observed only at low doses of ZP but all doses of TPEN. TPEN activated caspase 3/7 and induced PARP-cleavage, DNA-fragmentation, ROS-formation and apoptotic bodies. PKC and ERK-pathway inhibitors, and antioxidants protected against ZP-induced but not TPEN-induced death. Inhibitors of MPTP-opening protected both. Cell death in response to TPEN (but not ZP) was diminished by a calpain inhibitor and largely prevented by a caspase 3 inhibitor. Overall, the results indicated primarily a necrotic cell death for ZP and an apoptotic cell death for TPEN. The enhanced sensitivity of PCa cells to ZP and the apparent ability of ZP and TPEN to kill quiescent and rapidly dividing cells in a p53-independent manner suggest that ZP/TPEN might be used to develop adjunct treatments for PCa. PMID:22027089

  13. Chronic CRF1 receptor blockade reduces heroin intake escalation and dependence-induced hyperalgesia.

    PubMed

    Park, Paula E; Schlosburg, Joel E; Vendruscolo, Leandro F; Schulteis, Gery; Edwards, Scott; Koob, George F

    2015-03-01

    Opioids represent effective drugs for the relief of pain, yet chronic opioid use often leads to a state of increased sensitivity to pain that is exacerbated during withdrawal. A sensitization of pain-related negative affect has been hypothesized to closely interact with addiction mechanisms. Neuro-adaptive changes occur as a consequence of excessive opioid exposure, including a recruitment of corticotropin-releasing factor (CRF) and norepinephrine (NE) brain stress systems. To better understand the mechanisms underlying the transition to dependence, we determined the effects of functional antagonism within these two systems on hyperalgesia-like behavior during heroin withdrawal utilizing models of both acute and chronic dependence. We found that passive or self-administered heroin produced a significant mechanical hypersensitivity. During acute opioid dependence, systemic administration of the CRF1 receptor antagonist MPZP (20 mg/kg) alleviated withdrawal-induced mechanical hypersensitivity. In contrast, several functional adrenergic system antagonists (clonidine, prazosin, propranolol) failed to alter mechanical hypersensitivity in this state. We then determined the effects of chronic MPZP or clonidine treatment on extended access heroin self-administration and found that MPZP, but not clonidine, attenuated escalation of heroin intake, whereas both drugs alleviated chronic dependence-associated hyperalgesia. These findings suggest that an early potentiation of CRF signaling occurs following opioid exposure that begins to drive both opioid-induced hyperalgesia and eventually intake escalation. PMID:24330252

  14. Arsenic-induced SUMO-dependent recruitment of RNF4 into PML nuclear bodies.

    PubMed

    Geoffroy, Marie-Claude; Jaffray, Ellis G; Walker, Katherine J; Hay, Ronald T

    2010-12-01

    In acute promyelocytic leukemia (APL), the promyelocytic leukemia (PML) protein is fused to the retinoic acid receptor alpha (RAR). Arsenic is an effective treatment for this disease as it induces SUMO-dependent ubiquitin-mediated proteasomal degradation of the PML-RAR fusion protein. Here we analyze the nuclear trafficking dynamics of PML and its SUMO-dependent ubiquitin E3 ligase, RNF4 in response to arsenic. After administration of arsenic, PML immediately transits into nuclear bodies where it undergoes SUMO modification. This initial recruitment of PML into nuclear bodies is not dependent on RNF4, but RNF4 quickly follows PML into the nuclear bodies where it is responsible for ubiquitylation of SUMO-modified PML and its degradation by the proteasome. While arsenic restricts the mobility of PML, FRAP analysis indicates that RNF4 continues to rapidly shuttle into PML nuclear bodies in a SUMO-dependent manner. Under these conditions FRET studies indicate that RNF4 interacts with SUMO in PML bodies but not directly with PML. These studies indicate that arsenic induces the rapid reorganization of the cell nucleus by SUMO modification of nuclear body-associated PML and uptake of the ubiquitin E3 ligase RNF4 leading to the ubiquitin-mediated degradation of PML. PMID:20943951

  15. Charge-state dependence of kinetic electron emission induced by slow ions in metals

    SciTech Connect

    Juaristi, J.I.; Dubus, A.; Roesler, M.

    2003-07-01

    A calculation is performed in order to analyze the charge-state dependence of the kinetic electron emission induced by slow ions in metals. All stages of the emission process are included: the excitation of the electrons, the neutralization of the projectile during its passage through the solid, and the transport of the excited electrons from where they are created to the surface. It is shown that the number of excited electrons depends strongly on the ion charge state. Nevertheless, due to the fast neutralization of the ions within the escape depth of the excited electrons, no significant initial charge-state dependence is expected in the kinetic electron yield. This result is consistent with available experimental data.

  16. alpha1-noradrenergic receptor antagonism blocks dependence-induced increases in responding for ethanol.

    PubMed

    Walker, Brendan M; Rasmussen, Dennis D; Raskind, Murray A; Koob, George F

    2008-03-01

    The purpose of this study was to test the hypothesis that blockade of alpha1-adrenergic receptors may suppress the excessive ethanol consumption associated with acute withdrawal in ethanol-dependent rats. Following the acquisition and stabilization of operant ethanol self-administration in male Wistar rats, dependence was induced in half the animals by subjecting them to a 4-week intermittent vapor exposure period in which animals were exposed to ethanol vapor for 14h/day. Subsequent to dependence induction, the effect of alpha1-noradrenergic receptor antagonist prazosin (0.0, 0.25, 0.5, 1, 1.5, and 2.0mg/kg IP) was tested on operant responding for ethanol in vapor-exposed and control rats during acute withdrawal. In ethanol-dependent animals, prazosin significantly suppressed responding at the 1.5 and 2.0mg/kg doses, whereas only the 2.0mg/kg dose was effective in nondependent animals, identifying an increase in the sensitivity to prazosin in dependent animals. Conversely, at the lowest dose tested (0.25mg/kg), prazosin increased responding in nondependent animals, which is consistent with the effect of anxiolytics on ethanol self-administration in nondependent animals. None of the doses tested reliably affected concurrent water self-administration. These results suggest the involvement of the noradrenergic system in the excessive alcohol drinking seen during acute withdrawal in ethanol-dependent rats. PMID:18358987

  17. GM1 induces p38 and microtubule dependent ramification of rat primary microglia in vitro.

    PubMed

    Park, Ji-Young; Kim, Hee Young; Jou, Ilo; Park, Sang Myun

    2008-12-01

    Microglia are immunologically competent cells in the central nervous system and considered to be a key player in brain inflammation. The morphological change of microglia has been shown to be linked to functional phenotypes both in vivo and in vitro. As an attempt to identify factors that regulate microglial morphology, we investigated the effect of gangliosides on microglial ramification in vitro. Brain gangliosides mixture and GM1 induced typical ramification of cultured rat primary microglia, however, GD1a and GT1b did not. Although GM1 significantly induced the expression of neurotrophin-3 (NT-3), NT-3 did not induce typical morphological changes in cultured rat primary microglia. SB203580 (an inhibitor of p38), and paclitaxel and nocodazole (microtubule-disrupting drugs) inhibited GM1-induced microglial ramification, but Jaki (an inhibitor of JAK), PD98059 (an inhibitor of Erk1/2), SP600125 (an inhibitor of JNK), and cytochalasin B and latrunculin B (actin polymerization inhibitors) did not, suggesting that GM1 induced ramification of microglia in p38- and microtubule-dependent manner. This in vitro system would be helpful in understanding the mechanisms of microglial ramification and physiological roles of gangliosides in microglia. PMID:18930716

  18. Dose and Time-Dependent Selective Neurotoxicity Induced by Mephedrone in Mice

    PubMed Central

    Martínez-Clemente, José; López-Arnau, Raúl; Abad, Sonia; Pubill, David; Escubedo, Elena; Camarasa, Jorge

    2014-01-01

    Mephedrone is a drug of abuse marketed as ‘bath salts". There are discrepancies concerning its long-term effects. We have investigated the neurotoxicity of mephedrone in mice following different exposition schedules. Schedule 1: four doses of 50 mg/kg. Schedule 2: four doses of 25 mg/kg. Schedule 3: three daily doses of 25 mg/kg, for two consecutive days. All schedules induced, in some animals, an aggressive behavior and hyperthermia as well as a decrease in weight gain. Mephedrone (schedule 1) induced dopaminergic and serotoninergic neurotoxicity that persisted 7 days after exposition. At a lower dose (schedule 2) only a transient dopaminergic injury was found. In the weekend consumption pattern (schedule 3), mephedrone induced dopamine and serotonin transporter loss that was accompanied by a decrease in tyrosine hydroxylase and tryptophan hydroxylase 2 expression one week after exposition. Also, mephedrone induced a depressive-like behavior, as well as a reduction in striatal D2 density, suggesting higher susceptibility to addictive drugs. In cultured cortical neurons, mephedrone induced a concentration-dependent cytotoxic effect. Using repeated doses for 2 days in an elevated ambient temperature we evidenced a loss of frontal cortex dopaminergic and hippocampal serotoninergic neuronal markers that suggest injuries at nerve endings. PMID:24892744

  19. Prostaglandin-dependent modulation of dopaminergic neurotransmission elicits inflammation-induced aversion in mice

    PubMed Central

    Fritz, Michael; Klawonn, Anna M.; Nilsson, Anna; Singh, Anand Kumar; Zajdel, Joanna; Björk Wilhelms, Daniel; Lazarus, Michael; Löfberg, Andreas; Jaarola, Maarit; Örtegren Kugelberg, Unn; Billiar, Timothy R.; Hackam, David J.; Sodhi, Chhinder P.; Breyer, Matthew D.; Jakobsson, Johan; Schwaninger, Markus; Schütz, Günther; Rodriguez Parkitna, Jan; Saper, Clifford B.; Blomqvist, Anders; Engblom, David

    2015-01-01

    Systemic inflammation causes malaise and general feelings of discomfort. This fundamental aspect of the sickness response reduces the quality of life for people suffering from chronic inflammatory diseases and is a nuisance during mild infections like common colds or the flu. To investigate how inflammation is perceived as unpleasant and causes negative affect, we used a behavioral test in which mice avoid an environment that they have learned to associate with inflammation-induced discomfort. Using a combination of cell-type–specific gene deletions, pharmacology, and chemogenetics, we found that systemic inflammation triggered aversion through MyD88-dependent activation of the brain endothelium followed by COX1-mediated cerebral prostaglandin E2 (PGE2) synthesis. Further, we showed that inflammation-induced PGE2 targeted EP1 receptors on striatal dopamine D1 receptor–expressing neurons and that this signaling sequence induced aversion through GABA-mediated inhibition of dopaminergic cells. Finally, we demonstrated that inflammation-induced aversion was not an indirect consequence of fever or anorexia but that it constituted an independent inflammatory symptom triggered by a unique molecular mechanism. Collectively, these findings demonstrate that PGE2-mediated modulation of the dopaminergic motivational circuitry is a key mechanism underlying the negative affect induced by inflammation. PMID:26690700

  20. ATP-Dependent Lon Protease Contributes to Helicobacter pylori-Induced Gastric Carcinogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Luo, Bin; Wang, Minggang; Hou, Nengyi; Hu, Xiao; Jia, Guiqing; Qin, Xianpeng; Zuo, Xiaofei; Liu, Yang; Luo, Kun; Song, Wei; Wang, Kang; Pang, Minghui

    2016-01-01

    Helicobacter pylori infection is the strongest risk factor for development of gastric cancer. Host cellular stress responses, including inflammatory and immune responses, have been reported highly linked to H. pylori-induced carcinogenesis. However, whether mitochondrial regulation and metabolic reprogramming, which are potently associated with various cancers, play a role in H. pylori-induced gastric carcinogenesis is largely unknown. Here we revealed that Lon protease (Lonp1), which is a key inductive of mitochondrial unfolded protein response (UPRmt) and is required to maintain the mitochondrial quality, was greatly induced in H. pylori infected gastric epithelial cells. Importantly, we uncovered that knockdown of Lonp1 expression significantly diminished the metabolic switch to glycolysis and gastric cell proliferation associated with low multiplicity of H. pylori infection. In addition, Lonp1 overexpression in gastric epithelial cells also promoted glycolytic switch and cell overgrowth, suggesting H. pylori effect is Lonp1 dependent. We further demonstrated that H. pylori induced Lonp1 expression and cell overgrowth, at least partially, via HIF-1α regulation. Collectively, our results concluded the relevance of Lonp1 for cell proliferation and identified Lonp1 as a key regulator of metabolic reprogramming in H. pylori-induced gastric carcinogenesis. PMID:27108387

  1. Spinal cord injury-induced immune deficiency syndrome enhances infection susceptibility dependent on lesion level.

    PubMed

    Brommer, Benedikt; Engel, Odilo; Kopp, Marcel A; Watzlawick, Ralf; Müller, Susanne; Prüss, Harald; Chen, Yuying; DeVivo, Michael J; Finkenstaedt, Felix W; Dirnagl, Ulrich; Liebscher, Thomas; Meisel, Andreas; Schwab, Jan M

    2016-03-01

    Pneumonia is the leading cause of death after acute spinal cord injury and is associated with poor neurological outcome. In contrast to the current understanding, attributing enhanced infection susceptibility solely to the patient's environment and motor dysfunction, we investigate whether a secondary functional neurogenic immune deficiency (spinal cord injury-induced immune deficiency syndrome, SCI-IDS) may account for the enhanced infection susceptibility. We applied a clinically relevant model of experimental induced pneumonia to investigate whether the systemic SCI-IDS is functional sufficient to cause pneumonia dependent on spinal cord injury lesion level and investigated whether findings are mirrored in a large prospective cohort study after human spinal cord injury. In a mouse model of inducible pneumonia, high thoracic lesions that interrupt sympathetic innervation to major immune organs, but not low thoracic lesions, significantly increased bacterial load in lungs. The ability to clear the bacterial load from the lung remained preserved in sham animals. Propagated immune susceptibility depended on injury of central pre-ganglionic but not peripheral postganglionic sympathetic innervation to the spleen. Thoracic spinal cord injury level was confirmed as an independent increased risk factor of pneumonia in patients after motor complete spinal cord injury (odds ratio = 1.35, P < 0.001) independently from mechanical ventilation and preserved sensory function by multiple regression analysis. We present evidence that spinal cord injury directly causes increased risk for bacterial infection in mice as well as in patients. Besides obvious motor and sensory paralysis, spinal cord injury also induces a functional SCI-IDS ('immune paralysis'), sufficient to propagate clinically relevant infection in an injury level dependent manner. PMID:26754788

  2. Keap1 redox-dependent regulation of doxorubicin-induced oxidative stress response in cardiac myoblasts.

    PubMed

    Nordgren, Kendra K S; Wallace, Kendall B

    2014-01-01

    Doxorubicin (DOX) is a widely prescribed treatment for a broad scope of cancers, but clinical utility is limited by the cumulative, dose-dependent cardiomyopathy that occurs with repeated administration. DOX-induced cardiotoxicity is associated with the production of reactive oxygen species (ROS) and oxidation of lipids, DNA and proteins. A major cellular defense mechanism against such oxidative stress is activation of the Keap1/Nrf2-antioxidant response element (ARE) signaling pathway, which transcriptionally regulates expression of antioxidant genes such as Nqo1 and Gstp1. In the present study, we address the hypothesis that an initial event associated with DOX-induced oxidative stress is activation of the Keap1/Nrf2-dependent expression of antioxidant genes and that this is regulated through drug-induced changes in redox status of the Keap1 protein. Incubation of H9c2 rat cardiac myoblasts with DOX resulted in a time- and dose-dependent decrease in non-protein sulfhydryl groups. Associated with this was a near 2-fold increase in Nrf2 protein content and enhanced transcription of several of the Nrf2-regulated down-stream genes, including Gstp1, Ugt1a1, and Nqo1; the expression of Nfe2l2 (Nrf2) itself was unaltered. Furthermore, both the redox status and the total amount of Keap1 protein were significantly decreased by DOX, with the loss of Keap1 being due to both inhibited gene expression and increased autophagic, but not proteasomal, degradation. These findings identify the Keap1/Nrf2 pathway as a potentially important initial response to acute DOX-induced oxidative injury, with the primary regulatory events being the oxidation and autophagic degradation of the redox sensor Keap1 protein. PMID:24211725

  3. Febuxostat protects rats against lipopolysaccharide-induced lung inflammation in a dose-dependent manner.

    PubMed

    Fahmi, Alaa N A; Shehatou, George S G; Shebl, Abdelhadi M; Salem, Hatem A

    2016-03-01

    The aim of the present work was to investigate possible protective effects of febuxostat, a highly potent xanthine oxidase inhibitor, against acute lung injury (ALI) induced by lipopolysaccharide (LPS) in rats. Male Sprague Dawley rats were randomly divided into six groups, as follows: (i) vehicle control group; (ii) and (iii) febuxostat 10 and febuxostat 15 groups, drug-treated controls; (iv) LPS group, receiving an intraperitoneal injection of LPS (7.5 mg/kg); (v) and (vi) febuxostat 10-LPS and febuxostat 15-LPS groups, receiving oral treatment of febuxostat (10 and 15 mg/kg/day, respectively) for 7 days before LPS. After 18 h administration of LPS, blood was collected for C-reactive protein (CRP) measurement. Bronchoalveolar lavage fluid (BALF) was examined for leukocyte infiltration, lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) activity, protein content, and total nitrate/nitrite. Lung weight gain was determined, and lung tissue homogenate was prepared and evaluated for oxidative stress. Tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α) was assessed in BALF and lung homogenate. Moreover, histological changes of lung tissues were evaluated. LPS elicited lung injury characterized by increased lung water content (by 1.2 fold), leukocyte infiltration (by 13 fold), inflammation and oxidative stress (indicated by increased malondialdehyde (MDA), by 3.4 fold), and reduced superoxide dismutase (SOD) activity (by 34 %). Febuxostat dose-dependently decreased LPS-induced lung edema and elevations in BALF protein content, infiltration of leukocytes, and LDH activity. Moreover, the elevated levels of TNF-α in BALF and lung tissue of LPS-treated rats were attenuated by febuxostat pretreatment. Febuxostat also displayed a potent antioxidant activity by decreasing lung tissue levels of MDA and enhancing SOD activity. Histological analysis of lung tissue further demonstrated that febuxostat dose-dependently reversed LPS-induced histopathological changes. These findings demonstrate a significant dose-dependent

  4. Regulation of Complement Dependent Cytotoxicity by TGF-β-induced Epithelial-Mesenchymal Transition

    PubMed Central

    Goswami, Moloy T.; Reka, Ajaya Kumar; Kurapati, Himabindu; Kaza, Viritha; Chen, Jun; Standiford, Theodore J; Keshamouni, Venkateshwar G.

    2015-01-01

    The process of Epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT), in addition to being an initiating event for tumor metastasis, is implicated in conferring several clinically relevant properties to disseminating cancer cells. These include stem cell like properties, resistance to targeted therapies and ability to evade immune surveillance. Enrichment analysis of gene expression changes during TGF-β induced EMT in lung cancer cells identified complement cascade as one of the significantly enriched pathway. Further analysis of the genes in the complement pathway revealed an increase in the expression of complement inhibitors and a decrease in the expression of proteins essential for complement activity. In this study, we tested whether EMT confers resistance to complement-dependent cytotoxicity (CDC) in lung cancer cells and promotes tumor progression. CD59 is a potent inhibitor of membrane attack complex that mediates complement-dependent cell lysis. We observed a significant increase in the CD59 expression on the surface of cells after TGF-β-induced EMT. Furthermore, CD59 knock down restored susceptibility of cells undergoing EMT to Cetuximab-mediated CDC. TGF-β-induced CD59 expression during EMT is dependent on Smad3 but not Smad2. ChIP analysis confirmed that Smad3 directly binds to the CD59 promoter. Stable knock-down of CD59 in A549 cells inhibited experimental metastasis. These results demonstrate that TGF-β-induced EMT and CD59 expression confers an immune evasive mechanism to disseminating tumor cells facilitating tumor progression. Together, our data demonstrates that CD59 inhibition may serve as an adjuvant to enhance the efficacy of antibody-mediated therapies, as well as to inhibit metastasis in lung cancer. PMID:26148233

  5. Regulation of complement-dependent cytotoxicity by TGF-β-induced epithelial-mesenchymal transition.

    PubMed

    Goswami, M T; Reka, A K; Kurapati, H; Kaza, V; Chen, J; Standiford, T J; Keshamouni, V G

    2016-04-14

    The process of epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT), in addition to being an initiating event for tumor metastasis, is implicated in conferring several clinically relevant properties to disseminating cancer cells. These include stem cell-like properties, resistance to targeted therapies and ability to evade immune surveillance. Enrichment analysis of gene expression changes during transforming growth factor-β (TGF-β)-induced EMT in lung cancer cells identified complement cascade as one of the significantly enriched pathway. Further analysis of the genes in the complement pathway revealed an increase in the expression of complement inhibitors and a decrease in the expression of proteins essential for complement activity. In this study, we tested whether EMT confers resistance to complement-dependent cytotoxicity (CDC) in lung cancer cells and promotes tumor progression. CD59 is a potent inhibitor of membrane attack complex that mediates complement-dependent cell lysis. We observed a significant increase in the CD59 expression on the surface of cells after TGF-β-induced EMT. Furthermore, CD59 knockdown restored susceptibility of cells undergoing EMT to cetuximab-mediated CDC. TGF-β-induced CD59 expression during EMT is dependent on Smad3 but not on Smad2. Chromatin immunoprecipitation analysis confirmed that Smad3 directly binds to the CD59 promoter. Stable knockdown of CD59 in A549 cells inhibited experimental metastasis. These results demonstrate that TGF-β-induced EMT and CD59 expression confers an immune-evasive mechanism to disseminating tumor cells facilitating tumor progression. Together, our data demonstrates that CD59 inhibition may serve as an adjuvant to enhance the efficacy of antibody-mediated therapies, as well as to inhibit metastasis in lung cancer. PMID:26148233

  6. P53 dependent and independent apoptosis induced by lidamycin in human colorectal cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Chen, Lihui; Jiang, Jianming; Cheng, Chunlei; Yang, Ajing; He, Qiyang; Li, Diandong; Wang, Zhen

    2007-06-01

    Enediyne compound is one class of antibiotics with very potent anti-cancer activity. However, the role of p53 in enediyne antibiotic-induced cell killing remains elusive. Here we reported the involvement of p53 signaling pathway in apoptosis induction by lidamycin (LDM), a member of the enediyne antibiotic family. We found that LDM at low drug concentration of 10 nmol/L induces apoptotic cell death much more effectively in human colorectal cancer cells with wild type p53 than those with mutant or deleted p53. p53 is functionally activated as an early event in response to low dose LDM that precedes the significant apoptosis induction. The primarily activation of mitochondria as well as the activation of p53 transcriptional targets such as Puma, Bad and Bax in HCT116 p53 wild type cells further demonstrates the key role of p53 in mediating the compound-induced apoptosis. This is further supported by the observation that the absence of Bax or Puma decreases apoptosis dramatically while Bcl-2 overexpression confers partially resistance after drug treatment. Activation of p53 signaling pathway leads to activation of caspases and caspases inhibitor VAD-fmk completely blocks low dose LDM induced apoptosis through the inhibition of mitochondria pathway. In contrast, LDM at higher concentration causes rapid apoptosis through more direct DNA damaging mechanism that is independent of activation of p53 and caspases and cannot be blocked by caspase inhibitor. Taken together, LDM induces apoptosis in a p53-dependent manner when given at low doses, but in a p53-independent manner when given at high doses. This dosage-dependent regimen can be applied to cancer clinic based upon the p53 status of cancer patients. PMID:17534142

  7. Testosterone induces leucocyte migration by NADPH oxidase-driven ROS- and COX2-dependent mechanisms.

    PubMed

    Chignalia, Andreia Z; Oliveira, Maria Aparecida; Debbas, Victor; Dull, Randal O; Laurindo, Francisco R M; Touyz, Rhian M; Carvalho, Maria Helena C; Fortes, Zuleica B; Tostes, Rita C

    2015-07-01

    The mechanisms whereby testosterone increases cardiovascular risk are not clarified. However, oxidative stress and inflammation seem to be determinants. Herein, we sought to determine whether exogenous testosterone, at physiological levels, induces leucocyte migration, a central feature in immune and inflammatory responses and the mediating mechanisms. We hypothesized that testosterone induces leucocyte migration via NADPH oxidase (NADPHox)-driven reactive oxygen species (ROS) and cyclooxygenase (COX)-dependent mechanisms. Sixteen-week-old Wistar rats received an intraperitoneal injection (5 ml) of either testosterone (10(-7) mol/l) or saline. Rats were pre-treated with 5 ml of sodium salicylate (SS, non-selective COX inhibitor, 1.25 × 10(-3) mol/l, 1 h prior to testosterone or saline), flutamide (androgen receptor antagonist, 10(-5) mol/l), apocynin (NADPHox inhibitor, 3 × 10(-4) mol/l), N-[2-Cyclohexyloxy-4-nitrophenyl]methanesulfonamide (NS398, COX2 inhibitor, 10(-4) mol/l) or saline, 4 h before testosterone or saline administration. Leucocyte migration was assessed 24 h after testosterone administration by intravital microscopy of the mesenteric bed. Serum levels of testosterone were measured by radioimmunoassay. NADPHox activity was assessed in membrane fractions of the mesenteric bed by dihydroethidium (DHE) fluorescence and in isolated vascular smooth muscle cells (VSMC) by HPLC. NADPHox subunits and VCAM (vascular cell adhesion molecule) expression were determined by immunoblotting. Testosterone administration did not change serum levels of endogenous testosterone, but increased venular leucocyte migration to the adventia, NADPHox activity and expression (P < 0.05). These effects were blocked by flutamide. SS inhibited testosterone-induced leucocyte migration (P<0.05). Apocynin and NS398 abolished testosterone-induced leucocyte migration and NADPHox activity (P<0.05). Testosterone induces leucocyte migration via NADPHox- and COX2-dependent mechanisms and

  8. Lidocaine induces ROCK-dependent membrane blebbing and subsequent cell death in rabbit articular chondrocytes.

    PubMed

    Maeda, Tsutomu; Toyoda, Futoshi; Imai, Shinji; Tanigawa, Hitoshi; Kumagai, Kousuke; Matsuura, Hiroshi; Matsusue, Yoshitaka

    2016-05-01

    Local anesthetics are administered intraarticularly for pain control in orthopedic clinics and surgeries. Although previous studies have shown that local anesthetics can be toxic to chondrocytes, the underlying cellular mechanisms remain unclear. The present study investigates acute cellular responses associated with lidocaine-induced toxicity to articular chondrocytes. Rabbit articular chondrocytes were exposed to lidocaine and their morphological changes were monitored with live cell microscopy. The viability of chondrocytes was evaluated using a fluorescence based LIVE/DEAD assay. Acute treatment of chondrocytes with lidocaine (3-30 mM) induced spherical protrusions on the cell surface (so called "membrane blebbing") in a time- and concentration-dependent manner. The concentration-response relationship for the lidocaine effect was shifted leftward by elevating extracellular pH, as expected for the non-ionized lidocaine being involved in the bleb formation. ROCK (Rho-kinase) inhibitors Y-27632 and fasudil completely prevented the lidocaine-induced membrane blebbing, suggesting that ROCK activation is required for bleb formation. Caspase-3 levels were unchanged by 10 mM lidocaine (p = 0.325) and a caspase inhibitor z-VAD-fmk did not affect the lidocaine-induced blebbing (p = 0.964). GTP-RhoA levels were significantly increased (p < 0.001), but Rho inhibitor-1 failed to suppress the membrane blebbing (p = 0.875). Lidocaine (30 mM) reduced the cell viability of isolated chondrocytes (p < 0.001) and in situ chondrocytes (p < 0.001). The chondrotoxicity was attenuated by pretreatment of cells with ROCK inhibitors or a myosin-II inhibitor blebbistatin (p < 0.001). These findings suggest that lidocaine induces ROCK-dependent membrane blebbing and thereby produces a cytotoxic effect on chondrocytes. © 2015 Orthopaedic Research Society. Published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. J Orthop Res 34:754-762, 2016. PMID:26519731

  9. Cadmium Induces p53-Dependent Apoptosis in Human Prostate Epithelial Cells

    PubMed Central

    Aimola, Pierpaolo; Carmignani, Marco; Volpe, Anna Rita; Di Benedetto, Altomare; Claudio, Luigi; Waalkes, Michael P.; van Bokhoven, Adrie; Tokar, Erik J.; Claudio, Pier Paolo

    2012-01-01

    Cadmium, a widespread toxic pollutant of occupational and environmental concern, is a known human carcinogen. The prostate is a potential target for cadmium carcinogenesis, although the underlying mechanisms are still unclear. Furthermore, cadmium may induce cell death by apoptosis in various cell types, and it has been hypothesized that a key factor in cadmium-induced malignant transformation is acquisition of apoptotic resistance. We investigated the in vitro effects produced by cadmium exposure in normal or tumor cells derived from human prostate epithelium, including RWPE-1 and its cadmium-transformed derivative CTPE, the primary adenocarcinoma 22Rv1 and CWR-R1 cells and LNCaP, PC-3 and DU145 metastatic cancer cell lines. Cells were treated for 24 hours with different concentrations of CdCl2 and apoptosis, cell cycle distribution and expression of tumor suppressor proteins were analyzed. Subsequently, cellular response to cadmium was evaluated after siRNA-mediated p53 silencing in wild type p53-expressing RWPE-1 and LNCaP cells, and after adenoviral p53 overexpression in p53-deficient DU145 and PC-3 cell lines. The cell lines exhibited different sensitivity to cadmium, and 24-hour exposure to different CdCl2 concentrations induced dose- and cell type-dependent apoptotic response and inhibition of cell proliferation that correlated with accumulation of functional p53 and overexpression of p21 in wild type p53-expressing cell lines. On the other hand, p53 silencing was able to suppress cadmium-induced apoptosis. Our results demonstrate that cadmium can induce p53-dependent apoptosis in human prostate epithelial cells and suggest p53 mutation as a possible contributing factor for the acquisition of apoptotic resistance in cadmium prostatic carcinogenesis. PMID:22448262

  10. Phase-Dependent Shifting of the Adrenal Clock by Acute Stress-Induced ACTH.

    PubMed

    Engeland, William C; Yoder, J Marina; Karsten, Carley A; Kofuji, Paulo

    2016-01-01

    The adrenal cortex has a molecular clock that generates circadian rhythms in glucocorticoid production, yet it is unclear how the clock responds to acute stress. We hypothesized that stress-induced ACTH provides a signal that phase shifts the adrenal clock. To assess whether acute stress phase shifts the adrenal clock in vivo in a phase-dependent manner, mPER2:LUC mice on a 12:12-h light:dark cycle underwent restraint stress for 15 min or no stress at zeitgeber time (ZT) 2 (early subjective day) or at ZT16 (early subjective night). Adrenal explants from mice stressed at ZT2 showed mPER2:LUC rhythms that were phase-advanced by ~2 h, whereas adrenals from mice stressed at ZT16 showed rhythms that were phase-delayed by ~2 h. The biphasic response was also observed in mice injected subcutaneously either with saline or with ACTH at ZT2 or ZT16. Blockade of the ACTH response with the glucocorticoid, dexamethasone, prevented restraint stress-induced phase shifts in the mPER2:LUC rhythm both at ZT2 and at ZT16. The finding that acute stress results in a phase-dependent shift in the adrenal mPER2:LUC rhythm that can be blocked by dexamethasone indicates that stress-induced effectors, including ACTH, act to phase shift the adrenal clock rhythm. PMID:27445984

  11. A rice membrane calcium-dependent protein kinase is induced by gibberellin.

    PubMed Central

    Abo-el-Saad, M; Wu, R

    1995-01-01

    A rice (Oryza sativa) seed plasma-membrane calcium-dependent serine/threonine protein kinase (CDPK) has been partially purified. Comparing results in seeds that were treated with and without the plant hormone gibberellin (GA) for 10 min showed that rice CDPK was highly induced by GA. After separating solubilized membrane proteins by sodium dodecyl sulfate-gel electrophoresis, followed by renaturation, a radiolabeled phosphoprotein band of approximately 58 kD was detected, and it was apparently produced by autophosphorylation. There are five aspects of the rice CDPK that show similarity to mammalian protein kinase C (PKC) and to other plant CDPKs: (a) Histone IIIS and PKC peptide-ser25 (19-31) are phosphorylated by rice CDPK. (b) The phosphorylation reaction is strictly dependent on calcium. (c) The activity of the rice CDPK is inhibited by either staurosporine or the PKC inhibitory peptide (19-36). (d) Addition of calmodulin has no effect on the activity of the enzyme; however, the CDPK is inhibited by the calmodulin antagonists trifluoperazine and W-7. (e) The rice CDPK reacts with a mammalian anti-PKC antibody in immunoblotting analysis. However, there is one major difference between the rice CDPK and other CDPKs: the rice CDPK is induced by GA, whereas no mammalian PKC or other plant CDPKs are known to be induced by any hormone. PMID:7610167

  12. Mechanical stimulation induces formin-dependent assembly of a perinuclear actin rim

    PubMed Central

    Shao, Xiaowei; Li, Qingsen; Mogilner, Alex; Bershadsky, Alexander D.; Shivashankar, G. V.

    2015-01-01

    Cells constantly sense and respond to mechanical signals by reorganizing their actin cytoskeleton. Although a number of studies have explored the effects of mechanical stimuli on actin dynamics, the immediate response of actin after force application has not been studied. We designed a method to monitor the spatiotemporal reorganization of actin after cell stimulation by local force application. We found that force could induce transient actin accumulation in the perinuclear region within ∼2 min. This actin reorganization was triggered by an intracellular Ca2+ burst induced by force application. Treatment with the calcium ionophore A23187 recapitulated the force-induced perinuclear actin remodeling. Blocking of actin polymerization abolished this process. Overexpression of Klarsicht, ANC-1, Syne Homology (KASH) domain to displace nesprins from the nuclear envelope did not abolish Ca2+-dependent perinuclear actin assembly. However, the endoplasmic reticulum- and nuclear membrane-associated inverted formin-2 (INF2), a potent actin polymerization activator (mutations of which are associated with several genetic diseases), was found to be important for perinuclear actin assembly. The perinuclear actin rim structure colocalized with INF2 on stimulation, and INF2 depletion resulted in attenuation of the rim formation. Our study suggests that cells can respond rapidly to external force by remodeling perinuclear actin in a unique Ca2+- and INF2-dependent manner. PMID:25941386

  13. Viral Single-Strand DNA Induces p53-Dependent Apoptosis in Human Embryonic Stem Cells

    PubMed Central

    Hirsch, Matthew L.; Fagan, B. Matthew; Dumitru, Raluca; Bower, Jacquelyn J.; Yadav, Swati; Porteus, Matthew H.; Pevny, Larysa H.; Samulski, R. Jude

    2011-01-01

    Human embryonic stem cells (hESCs) are primed for rapid apoptosis following mild forms of genotoxic stress. A natural form of such cellular stress occurs in response to recombinant adeno-associated virus (rAAV) single-strand DNA genomes, which exploit the host DNA damage response for replication and genome persistence. Herein, we discovered a unique DNA damage response induced by rAAV transduction specific to pluripotent hESCs. Within hours following rAAV transduction, host DNA damage signaling was elicited as measured by increased gamma-H2AX, ser15-p53 phosphorylation, and subsequent p53-dependent transcriptional activation. Nucleotide incorporation assays demonstrated that rAAV transduced cells accumulated in early S-phase followed by the induction of apoptosis. This lethal signaling sequalae required p53 in a manner independent of transcriptional induction of Puma, Bax and Bcl-2 and was not evident in cells differentiated towards a neural lineage. Consistent with a lethal DNA damage response induced upon rAAV transduction of hESCs, empty AAV protein capsids demonstrated no toxicity. In contrast, DNA microinjections demonstrated that the minimal AAV origin of replication and, in particular, a 40 nucleotide G-rich tetrad repeat sequence, was sufficient for hESC apoptosis. Our data support a model in which rAAV transduction of hESCs induces a p53-dependent lethal response that is elicited by a telomeric sequence within the AAV origin of replication. PMID:22114676

  14. Phase-Dependent Shifting of the Adrenal Clock by Acute Stress-Induced ACTH

    PubMed Central

    Engeland, William C.; Yoder, J. Marina; Karsten, Carley A.; Kofuji, Paulo

    2016-01-01

    The adrenal cortex has a molecular clock that generates circadian rhythms in glucocorticoid production, yet it is unclear how the clock responds to acute stress. We hypothesized that stress-induced ACTH provides a signal that phase shifts the adrenal clock. To assess whether acute stress phase shifts the adrenal clock in vivo in a phase-dependent manner, mPER2:LUC mice on a 12:12-h light:dark cycle underwent restraint stress for 15 min or no stress at zeitgeber time (ZT) 2 (early subjective day) or at ZT16 (early subjective night). Adrenal explants from mice stressed at ZT2 showed mPER2:LUC rhythms that were phase-advanced by ~2 h, whereas adrenals from mice stressed at ZT16 showed rhythms that were phase-delayed by ~2 h. The biphasic response was also observed in mice injected subcutaneously either with saline or with ACTH at ZT2 or ZT16. Blockade of the ACTH response with the glucocorticoid, dexamethasone, prevented restraint stress-induced phase shifts in the mPER2:LUC rhythm both at ZT2 and at ZT16. The finding that acute stress results in a phase-dependent shift in the adrenal mPER2:LUC rhythm that can be blocked by dexamethasone indicates that stress-induced effectors, including ACTH, act to phase shift the adrenal clock rhythm. PMID:27445984

  15. Lipopolysaccharide induces intestinal glucocorticoid synthesis in a TNFalpha-dependent manner.

    PubMed

    Noti, Mario; Corazza, Nadia; Tuffin, Gérald; Schoonjans, Kristina; Brunner, Thomas

    2010-05-01

    Stringent control of immune responses in the intestinal mucosa is critical for the maintenance of immune homeostasis and prevention of tissue damage, such as observed during inflammatory bowel disease. Intestinal epithelial cells, primarily thought to form a simple physical barrier, critically regulate intestinal immune cell functions by producing immunoregulatory glucocorticoids on T-cell activation. In this study we investigated whether stimulation of cells of the innate immune system results in the induction of intestinal glucocorticoids synthesis and what role TNF-alpha plays in this process. Stimulation of the innate immune system with lipopolysaccharide (LPS) led to an up-regulation of colonic steroidogenic enzymes and the induction of intestinal glucocorticoid synthesis. The observed induction was dependent on macrophage effector functions, as depletion of macrophages using clodronate-containing liposomes, but not absence of T and B cells, inhibited intestinal glucocorticoid synthesis. LPS-induced glucocorticoid synthesis was critically dependent on TNF-alpha as it was significantly decreased in TNF-alpha-deficient animals. Both TNF receptor-1 and -2 were found to be equally involved in LPS- and T-cell-induced intestinal GC synthesis. These results describe a novel and critical role of TNF-alpha in immune cell-induced intestinal glucocorticoid synthesis. PMID:20056718

  16. Arsenic induces apoptosis in mouse liver is mitochondria dependent and is abrogated by N-acetylcysteine

    SciTech Connect

    Santra, Amal . E-mail: asantra2000@yahoo.co.in; Chowdhury, Abhijit; Ghatak, Subhadip; Biswas, Ayan; Dhali, Gopal Krishna

    2007-04-15

    Arsenicosis, caused by arsenic contamination of drinking water supplies, is a major public health problem in India and Bangladesh. Chronic liver disease, often with portal hypertension occurs in chronic arsenicosis, contributes to the morbidity and mortality. The early cellular events that initiate liver cell injury due to arsenicosis have not been studied. Our aim was to identify the possible mechanisms related to arsenic-induced liver injury in mice. Liver injury was induced in mice by arsenic treatment. The liver was used for mitochondrial oxidative stress, mitochondrial permeability transition (MPT). Evidence of apoptosis was sought by TUNEL test, caspase assay and histology. Pretreatment with N-acetyl-L-cysteine (NAC) was done to modulate hepatic GSH level. Arsenic treatment in mice caused liver injury associated with increased oxidative stress in liver mitochondria and alteration of MPT. Altered MPT facilitated cytochrome c release in the cytosol, activation of caspase 9 and caspase 3 activities and apoptotic cell death. Pretreatment of NAC to arsenic-treated mice abrogated all these alteration suggesting a glutathione (GSH)-dependent mechanism. Oxidative stress in mitochondria and inappropriate MPT are important in the pathogenesis of arsenic induced apoptotic liver cell injury. The phenomenon is GSH dependent and supplementation of NAC might have beneficial effects.

  17. Calmodulin-dependent protein kinases mediate calcium-induced slow motility of mammalian outer hair cells.

    PubMed

    Puschner, B; Schacht, J

    1997-08-01

    Cochlear outer hair cells in vitro respond to elevation of intracellular calcium with slow shape changes over seconds to minutes ('slow motility'). This process is blocked by general calmodulin antagonists suggesting the participation of calcium/calmodulin-dependent enzymatic reactions. The present study proposes a mechanism for these reactions. Length changes of outer hair cells isolated from the guinea pig cochlea were induced by exposure to the calcium ionophore ionomycin. ATP levels remained unaffected by this treatment ruling out depletion of ATP (by activation of calcium-dependent ATPases) as a cause of the observed shape changes. Involvement of protein kinases was suggested by the inhibition of shape changes by K252a, a broad-spectrum inhibitor of protein kinase activity. Furthermore, the inhibitors ML-7 and ML-9 blocked the shape changes at concentrations compatible with inhibition of myosin light chain kinase (MLCK). KN-62, an inhibitor of Ca2+/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase II (CaMKII), also attenuated the length changes. Inhibitors with selectivity for cyclic nucleotide-dependent protein kinases (H-89, staurosporine) were tested to assess potential additional contributions by such enzymes. The dose dependence of their action supported the notion that the most likely mechanism of slow motility involves phosphorylation reactions catalyzed by MLCK or CaMKII or both. PMID:9282907

  18. Dependence-induced ethanol drinking and GABA neurotransmission are altered in Alk deficient mice.

    PubMed

    Schweitzer, Paul; Cates-Gatto, Chelsea; Varodayan, Florence P; Nadav, Tali; Roberto, Marisa; Lasek, Amy W; Roberts, Amanda J

    2016-08-01

    Anaplastic lymphoma kinase (ALK) is a receptor tyrosine kinase that is expressed in the brain and implicated in alcohol abuse in humans and behavioral responses to ethanol in mice. Previous studies have shown an association of human ALK with acute responses to alcohol and alcohol dependence. In addition, Alk knockout (Alk -/-) mice consume more ethanol in a binge-drinking test and show increased sensitivity to ethanol sedation. However, the function of ALK in excessive drinking following the establishment of ethanol dependence has not been examined. In this study, we tested Alk -/- mice for dependence-induced drinking using the chronic intermittent ethanol-two bottle choice drinking (CIE-2BC) protocol. We found that Alk -/- mice initially consume more ethanol prior to CIE exposure, but do not escalate ethanol consumption after exposure, suggesting that ALK may promote the escalation of drinking after ethanol dependence. To determine the mechanism(s) responsible for this behavioral phenotype we used an electrophysiological approach to examine GABA neurotransmission in the central nucleus of the amygdala (CeA), a brain region that regulates alcohol consumption and shows increased GABA signaling after chronic ethanol exposure. GABA transmission in ethanol-naïve Alk -/- mice was enhanced at baseline and potentiated in response to acute ethanol application when compared to wild-type (Alk +/+) mice. Moreover, basal GABA transmission was not elevated by CIE exposure in Alk -/- mice as it was in Alk +/+ mice. These data suggest that ALK plays a role in dependence-induced drinking and the regulation of presynaptic GABA release in the CeA. PMID:26946429

  19. 3,39-Diindolylmethane Ameliorates Staphylococcal Enterotoxin B–Induced Acute Lung Injury through Alterations in the Expression of MicroRNA that Target Apoptosis and Cell-Cycle Arrest in Activated T Cells.

    PubMed

    Elliott, David M; Nagarkatti, Mitzi; Nagarkatti, Prakash S

    2016-04-01

    3,39-Diindolylmethane (DIM), a natural indole found in cruciferous vegetables, has significant anti-cancer and anti-inflammatory properties. In this current study, we investigated the effects of DIM on acute lung injury (ALI) induced by exposure to staphylococcal enterotoxin B (SEB). We found that pretreatment of mice with DIM led to attenuation of SEB-induced inflammation in the lungs, vascular leak, and IFN-g secretion. Additionally, DIM could induce cell-cycle arrest and cell death in SEB-activated T cells in a concentration-dependent manner. Interestingly, microRNA (miRNA) microarray analysis uncovered an altered miRNA profile in lung-infiltrating mononuclear cells after DIM treatment of SEB-exposed mice. Moreover, computational analysis of miRNA gene targets and regulation networks indicated that DIM alters miRNA in the cell death and cell-cycle progression pathways. Specifically, DIM treatment significantly downregulated several miRNA and a correlative increase associated gene targets. Furthermore, overexpression and inhibition studies demonstrated that DIM-induced cell death, at least in part, used miR-222. Collectively, these studies demonstrate for the first time that DIM treatment attenuates SEB-induced ALI and may do so through the induction of microRNAs that promote apoptosis and cell-cycle arrest in SEB-activated T cells. PMID:26818958

  20. Small compound 6-O-angeloylplenolin induces caspase-dependent apoptosis in human multiple myeloma cells

    PubMed Central

    LIU, YING; DONG, YING; ZHANG, BO; CHENG, YONG-XIAN

    2013-01-01

    6-O-angeloylplenolin (6-OAP) is a sesquiterpene lactone agent that has been previously demonstrated to inhibit the growth of multiple myeloma (MM) cells through mitotic arrest with accumulated cyclin B1. In the present study, the levels of apoptosis were analyzed in dexamethasone-sensitive (MM.1S), dexamethasone-resistant (U266) and chemotherapy-sensitive (RPMI 8226) myeloma cell lines. Enhanced apoptosis was identified following a 48-h incubation with 6-OAP (0–10 μM) that induced a dose-dependent decrease in pro-casp-3 and the cleavage of its substrate, anti-poly (ADP-ribose) polymerase (PARP). In addition, time-dependent cleavage of PARP was also detected in U266 and MM.1S cells. The mechanism of 6-OAP cytotoxicity in all cell lines was associated with the induction of apoptosis with the presence of cleaved caspase-3 and PARP. In conclusion, 6-OAP-induced apoptosis is caspase-dependent. These observations are likely to provide a framework for future studies of 6-OAP therapy in MM. PMID:24137368

  1. Spin-dependent masses and field-induced quantum critical points

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McCollam, A.; Daou, R.; Julian, S. R.; Bergemann, C.; Flouquet, J.; Aoki, D.

    2005-04-01

    We discuss spin-dependent mass enhancements associated with field-induced quantum critical points in heavy-fermion systems. We have recently observed this phenomenon on a branch of the Fermi surface of CeRu2Si2 above its metamagnetic transition, complementing earlier work. In CeCoIn5, at high fields above a field-induced quantum critical point, we see a strong spin-dependence of the effective mass on the thermodynamically dominant sheets of the Fermi surface. These observations reinforce the suggestion that ‘missing mass’ in some cerium-based heavy-fermion systems will be found on heavy spin-polarised branches of the Fermi surface. In all cases where this phenomenon is observed the linear coefficient of specific heat is field dependent; however, CeCoIn5 seems to be the first such heavy-fermion system in which the f-electrons are definitely contributing to the Fermi volume, which puts it beyond the existing theory intended for metamagnetic systems.

  2. Frequency Dependence of Petechial Hemorrhage and Cardiomyocyte Injury Induced during Myocardial Contrast Echocardiography.

    PubMed

    Miller, Douglas L; Lu, Xiaofang; Fabiilli, Mario; Fields, Kristina; Dou, Chunyan

    2016-08-01

    Myocardial contrast echocardiography (MCE) for perfusion imaging can induce microscale bio-effects during intermittent high-Mechanical Index scans. The dependence of MCE-induced bio-effects on the ultrasonic frequency was examined in rats at 1.6, 2.5 and 3.5 MHz. Premature complexes were counted in the electrocardiogram, petechial hemorrhages with microvascular leakage on the heart surface were observed at the time of exposure, plasma troponin elevation was measured after 4 h and cardiomyocyte injury was detected at 24 h. Increasing response to exposure above an apparent threshold was observed for all endpoints at each frequency. The effects decreased with increasing ultrasonic frequency, and the thresholds increased. Linear regressions for frequency-dependent thresholds indicated coefficients and exponents of 0.6 and 1.07 for petechial hemorrhages, respectively, and 1.02 and 0.8 for cardiomyocyte death, compared with 1.9 and 0.5 (square root) for the guideline limit of the mechanical index. The results clarify the dependence of cardiac bio-effects on frequency, and should allow development of theoretical descriptions of the phenomena and improved safety guidance for MCE. PMID:27126240

  3. PUMA promotes Bax translocation in FOXO3a-dependent pathway during STS-induced apoptosis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Yingjie; Chen, Qun

    2009-08-01

    PUMA (p53 up-regulated modulator of apoptosis, also called Bbc3) was first identified as a BH3-only Bcl-2 family protein that is transcriptionally up-regulated by p53 and activated upon p53-dependent apoptotic stimuli, such as treatment with DNA-damaging drugs or UV irradiation. Recently studies have been shown that Puma is also up-regulated in response to certain p53-independent apoptotic stimuli, such as growth factor deprivation or treatment with glucocorticoids or STS (staurosporine). However, the molecular mechanisms of PUMA up-regulation and how PUMA functions in response to p53-independent apoptotic stimuli remain poorly understood. In this study, based on real-time single cell analysis, flow cytometry and western blotting technique, we investigated the function of PUMA in living human lung adenocarcinoma cells (ASTC-a-1) after STS treatment. Our results show that FOXO3a was activated by STS stimulation and then translocated from cytosol to nucleus. The expression of PUMA was up-regulated via a FOXO3a-dependent manner after STS treatment, while p53 had little function in this process. Moreover, cell apoptosis and Bax translocation induced by STS were not blocked by Pifithrin-α (p53 inhibitor), which suggested that p53 was not involved in this signaling pathway. Taken together, these results indicate that PUMA promoted Bax translocation in a FOXO3a-dependment pathway during STS-induced apoptosis, while p53 was dispensable in this process.

  4. Gartanin induces autophagy through JNK activation which extenuates caspase-dependent apoptosis.

    PubMed

    Kim, Mun-Ock; Lee, Hyun-Sun; Chin, Young-Won; Moon, Dong-Oh; Ahn, Jong-Seog

    2015-07-01

    Hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) is the third leading cause of cancer-related death worldwide. Development of novel agents to eradicate liver cancer cells is required for treatment of HCC. Gartanin, a xanthone-type compound isolated from mangosteen, is known to possess potent antioxidant, anti-inflammatory, antifungal and antineoplastic properties. In the present study, we investigated the cytotoxic effect of gartanin on HCC and explored the cell death mechanism. We showed that gartanin induced both the extrinsic and intrinsic apoptotic pathways, which were interconnected by caspase-8, -9 and -3 activation. We also provided convincing evidence that gartanin induced autophagy in various cancer cells, as demonstrated by acridine orange staining of intracellular acidic vesicles, the degradation of p62, the conversion of LC3-I to LC3-II and GFP-LC3 punctate fluorescence. Additionally, gartanin induced the formation of typical autophagosomes and autolysosomes and enhanced the degradation rate of intracellular granule(s), including mitochondria. Notably, gartanin-mediated apoptotic cell death was further potentiated by pretreatment with autophagy inhibitors (3-methyladenine and bafilomycin A1) or small interfering RNAs against the autophagic genes (Atg5). These findings suggested that gartanin-mediated autophagic response protected against eventual cell death induced by gartanin. Moreover, gartanin treatment led to phosphorylation/activation of JNK and JNK-dependent phosphorylation of Bcl-2. Importantly, JNK inhibitor (SP600125) inhibited autophagy yet promoted gartanin-induced apoptosis, indicating a key requirement of the JNK-Bcl-2 pathway in the activation of autophagy by gartanin. Taken together, our data suggested that the JNK-Bcl-2 pathway was the critical regulator of gartanin-induced protective autophagy and a potential drug target for chemotherapeutic combination. PMID:25955534

  5. Calcium-dependent phospholipase A2 modulates infection-induced diaphragm dysfunction.

    PubMed

    Supinski, Gerald S; Alimov, Alexander P; Wang, Lin; Song, Xiao-Hong; Callahan, Leigh A

    2016-05-15

    Calpain activation contributes to the development of infection-induced diaphragm weakness, but the mechanisms by which infections activate calpain are poorly understood. We postulated that skeletal muscle calcium-dependent phospholipase A2 (cPLA2) is activated by cytokines and has downstream effects that induce calpain activation and muscle weakness. We determined whether cPLA2 activation mediates cytokine-induced calpain activation in isolated skeletal muscle (C2C12) cells and infection-induced diaphragm weakness in mice. C2C12 cells were treated with the following: 1) vehicle; 2) cytomix (TNF-α 20 ng/ml, IL-1β 50 U/ml, IFN-γ 100 U/ml, LPS 10 μg/ml); 3) cytomix + AACOCF3, a cPLA2 inhibitor (10 μM); or 4) AACOCF3 alone. At 24 h, we assessed cell cPLA2 activity, mitochondrial superoxide generation, calpain activity, and calpastatin activity. We also determined if SS31 (10 μg/ml), a mitochondrial superoxide scavenger, reduced cytomix-mediated calpain activation. Finally, we determined if CDIBA (10 μM), a cPLA2 inhibitor, reduced diaphragm dysfunction due to cecal ligation puncture in mice. Cytomix increased C2C12 cell cPLA2 activity (P < 0.001) and superoxide generation; AACOCF3 and SS31 blocked increases in superoxide generation (P < 0.001). Cytomix also activated calpain (P < 0.001) and inactivated calpastatin (P < 0.01); both AACOCF3 and SS31 prevented these changes. Cecal ligation puncture reduced diaphragm force in mice, and CDIBA prevented this reduction (P < 0.001). cPLA2 modulates cytokine-induced calpain activation in cells and infection-induced diaphragm weakness in animals. We speculate that therapies that inhibit cPLA2 may prevent diaphragm weakness in infected, critically ill patients. PMID:26968769

  6. Acrolein induces vasodilatation of rodent mesenteric bed via an EDHF-dependent mechanism

    SciTech Connect

    Awe, S.O.; Adeagbo, A.S.O.; D'Souza, S.E.; Bhatnagar, A.; Conklin, D.J. . E-mail: dj.conklin@louisville.edu

    2006-12-15

    Acrolein is generated endogenously during lipid peroxidation and inflammation and is an environmental pollutant. Protein adducts of acrolein are detected in atherosclerotic plaques and neurons of patients with Alzheimer's disease. To understand vascular effects of acrolein exposure, we studied acrolein vasoreactivity in perfused rodent mesenteric bed. Acrolein induced endothelium-dependent vasodilatation that was more robust and more sensitive than dilation induced by 4-hydroxy-trans-2-nonenal, trans-2-hexenal, or propionaldehyde. Acrolein-induced vasodilatation was mediated by K{sup +}-sensitive components, e.g., it was abolished in 0 [K{sup +}]{sub o} buffer or in 3 mM tetrabutylammonium, inhibited 75% in 50 {mu}M ouabain, and inhibited 64% in 20 mM K{sup +} buffer. Moreover, combined treatment with the Ca{sup 2+}-activated K{sup +} channel inhibitors 1-[(2-chlorophenyl)diphenylmethyl]-1H-pyrazole (TRAM-34, 100 nM) and apamin (5 {mu}M) significantly reduced vasodilatation without altering sensitivity to acrolein. However, acrolein-induced % dilation was unaffected by L-NAME or indomethacin pretreatment indicating mechanistic independence of NO and prostaglandins. Moreover, acrolein induced vasodilatation in cirazoline-precontracted mesenteric bed of eNOS-null mice confirming eNOS independence. Pretreatment with 6-(2-propargyloxyphenyl) hexanoic acid (PPOH 50 {mu}M), an epoxygenase inhibitor, or the superoxide dismutase mimetic Tempol (100 {mu}M) significantly attenuated acrolein-induced vasodilatation. Collectively, these data indicate that acrolein stimulates mesenteric bed vasodilatation due to endothelium-derived signal(s) that is K{sup +}-, ouabain-, PPOH-, and Tempol-sensitive, and thus, a likely endothelium-derived hyperpolarizing factor (EDHF). These data indicate that low level acrolein exposure associated with vascular oxidative stress or inflammation stimulates vasodilatation via EDHF release in medium-sized arteries - a novel function.

  7. Idarubicin induces mTOR-dependent cytotoxic autophagy in leukemic cells

    SciTech Connect

    Ristic, Biljana; Bosnjak, Mihajlo; Arsikin, Katarina; Mircic, Aleksandar; Suzin-Zivkovic, Violeta; Bogdanovic, Andrija; Perovic, Vladimir; Martinovic, Tamara; Kravic-Stevovic, Tamara; Bumbasirevic, Vladimir; Trajkovic, Vladimir; Harhaji-Trajkovic, Ljubica

    2014-08-01

    We investigated if the antileukemic drug idarubicin induces autophagy, a process of programmed cellular self-digestion, in leukemic cell lines and primary leukemic cells. Transmission electron microscopy and acridine orange staining demonstrated the presence of autophagic vesicles and intracellular acidification, respectively, in idarubicin-treated REH leukemic cell line. Idarubicin increased punctuation/aggregation of microtubule-associated light chain 3B (LC3B), enhanced the conversion of LC3B-I to autophagosome-associated LC3B-II in the presence of proteolysis inhibitors, and promoted the degradation of the selective autophagic target p62, thus indicating the increase in autophagic flux. Idarubicin inhibited the phosphorylation of the main autophagy repressor mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) and its downstream target p70S6 kinase. The treatment with the mTOR activator leucine prevented idarubicin-mediated autophagy induction. Idarubicin-induced mTOR repression was associated with the activation of the mTOR inhibitor AMP-activated protein kinase and down-regulation of the mTOR activator Akt. The suppression of autophagy by pharmacological inhibitors or LC3B and beclin-1 genetic knockdown rescued REH cells from idarubicin-mediated oxidative stress, mitochondrial depolarization, caspase activation and apoptotic DNA fragmentation. Idarubicin also caused mTOR inhibition and cytotoxic autophagy in K562 leukemic cell line and leukocytes from chronic myeloid leukemia patients, but not healthy controls. By demonstrating mTOR-dependent cytotoxic autophagy in idarubicin-treated leukemic cells, our results warrant caution when considering combining idarubicin with autophagy inhibitors in leukemia therapy. - Highlights: • Idarubicin induces autophagy in leukemic cell lines and primary leukemic cells. • Idarubicin induces autophagy by inhibiting mTOR in leukemic cells. • mTOR suppression by idarubicin is associated with AMPK activation and Akt blockade.

  8. Correlation between Cyclin Dependent Kinases and Artemisinin-Induced Dormancy in Plasmodium falciparum In Vitro

    PubMed Central

    Gray, Karen-Ann; Gresty, Karryn J.; Chen, Nanhua; Zhang, Veronica; Gutteridge, Clare E.; Peatey, Christopher L.; Chavchich, Marina; Waters, Norman C.; Cheng, Qin

    2016-01-01

    Background Artemisinin-induced dormancy provides a plausible explanation for recrudescence following artemisinin monotherapy. This phenomenon shares similarities with cell cycle arrest where cyclin dependent kinases (CDKs) and cyclins play an important role. Methods Transcription profiles of Plasmodium falciparum CDKs and cyclins before and after dihydroartemisinin (DHA) treatment in three parasite lines, and the effect of CDK inhibitors on parasite recovery from DHA-induced dormancy were investigated. Results After DHA treatment, parasites enter a dormancy phase followed by a recovery phase. During the dormancy phase parasites up-regulate pfcrk1, pfcrk4, pfcyc2 and pfcyc4, and down-regulate pfmrk, pfpk5, pfpk6, pfcrk3, pfcyc1 and pfcyc3. When entering the recovery phase parasites immediately up-regulate all CDK and cyclin genes. Three CDK inhibitors, olomoucine, WR636638 and roscovitine, produced distinct effects on different phases of DHA-induced dormancy, blocking parasites recovery. Conclusions The up-regulation of PfCRK1 and PfCRK4, and down regulation of other CDKs and cyclins correlate with parasite survival in the dormant state. Changes in CDK expression are likely to negatively regulate parasite progression from G1 to S phase. These findings provide new insights into the mechanism of artemisinin-induced dormancy and cell cycle regulation of P. falciparum, opening new opportunities for preventing recrudescence following artemisinin treatment. PMID:27326764

  9. Norcantharidin induces melanoma cell apoptosis through activation of TR3 dependent pathway

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Shujing; Yu, Hong; Kumar, Suresh M.; Martin, James S.; Bing, Zhanyong; Sheng, Weiqi; Bosenberg, Marcus

    2011-01-01

    Norcantharidin (NCTD) has been reported to induce tumor cell apoptosis. However, the underlying mechanism behinds its antitumor effect remains elusive. We have previously shown that TR3 expression is significantly decreased in metastatic melanomas and involved in melanoma cell apoptosis. In this study, we showed that NCTD inhibited melanoma cell proliferation and induced apoptosis in a dose related manner. NCTD induced translocation of TR3 from nucleus to mitochondria where it co-localized with Bcl-2 in melanoma cells. NCTD also increased cytochome c release from mitochondria to the cytoplasm. These changes were accompanied by increased expression of Bax and cleaved caspase-3 along with decreased expression of Bcl2 and NF-κB2. The effects of NCTD were inhibited by knockdown of TR3 expression using TR3 specific shRNA in melanoma cells. Furthermore, NCTD significantly decreased tumor volume and improved survival of Tyr::CreER; BRAFCa/+; Ptenlox/lox transgenic mice. Our data indicates that NCTD inhibits melanoma growth by inducing tumor cell apoptosis via activation of a TR3 dependent pathway. These results suggest that NCTD is a potential therapeutic agent for melanoma. PMID:22123174

  10. T Lymphocytes Induce Endothelial Cell Matrix Metalloproteinase Expression by a CD40L-Dependent Mechanism

    PubMed Central

    Mach, François; Schönbeck, Uwe; Fabunmi, Rosalind P.; Murphy, Curran; Atkinson, Elizabeth; Bonnefoy, Jean-Yves; Graber, Pierre; Libby, Peter

    1999-01-01

    Neovascularization frequently accompanies chronic immune responses characterized by T cell infiltration and activation. Angiogenesis requires endothelial cells (ECs) to penetrate extracellular matrix, a process that involves matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs). We report here that activated human T cells mediate contact-dependent expression of MMPs in ECs through CD40/CD40 ligand signaling. Ligation of CD40 on ECs induced de novo expression of gelatinase B (MMP-9), increased interstitial collagenase (MMP-1) and stromelysin (MMP-3), and activated gelatinase A (MMP-2). Recombinant human CD40L induced expression of MMPs by human vascular ECs to a greater extent than did maximally effective concentrations of interleukin-1β or tumor necrosis factor-α. Moreover, activation of human vascular ECs through CD40 induced tube formation in a three-dimensional fibrin matrix gel assay, an effect antagonized by a MMP inhibitor. These results demonstrated that activation of ECs by interaction with T cells induced synthesis and release of MMPs and promoted an angiogenic function of ECs via CD40L-CD40 signaling. As vascular cells at the sites of chronic inflammation, such as atherosclerotic plaques, express CD40 and its ligand, our findings suggest that ligation of CD40 on ECs can mediate aspects of vascular remodeling and neovessel formation during atherogenesis and other chronic immune reactions. PMID:9916937

  11. XPD-dependent activation of apoptosis in response to triplex-induced DNA damage

    PubMed Central

    Kaushik Tiwari, Meetu; Rogers, Faye A.

    2013-01-01

    DNA sequences capable of forming triplexes are prevalent in the human genome and have been found to be intrinsically mutagenic. Consequently, a balance between DNA repair and apoptosis is critical to counteract their effect on genomic integrity. Using triplex-forming oligonucleotides to synthetically create altered helical distortions, we have determined that pro-apoptotic pathways are activated by the formation of triplex structures. Moreover, the TFIIH factor, XPD, occupies a central role in triggering apoptosis in response to triplex-induced DNA strand breaks. Here, we show that triplexes are capable of inducing XPD-independent double strand breaks, which result in the formation of γH2AX foci. XPD was subsequently recruited to the triplex-induced double strand breaks and co-localized with γH2AX at the damage site. Furthermore, phosphorylation of H2AX tyrosine 142 was found to stimulate the signaling pathway of XPD-dependent apoptosis. We suggest that this mechanism may play an active role in minimizing genomic instability induced by naturally occurring noncanonical structures, perhaps protecting against cancer initiation. PMID:23913414

  12. p53-dependent SIRT6 expression protects Aβ42-induced DNA damage

    PubMed Central

    Jung, Eun Sun; Choi, Hyunjung; Song, Hyundong; Hwang, Yu Jin; Kim, Ahbin; Ryu, Hoon; Mook-Jung, Inhee

    2016-01-01

    Alzheimer’s disease (AD) is the most common type of dementia and age-related neurodegenerative disease. Elucidating the cellular changes that occur during ageing is an important step towards understanding the pathogenesis and progression of neurodegenerative disorders. SIRT6 is a member of the mammalian sirtuin family of anti-aging genes. However, the relationship between SIRT6 and AD has not yet been elucidated. Here, we report that SIRT6 protein expression levels are reduced in the brains of both the 5XFAD AD mouse model and AD patients. Aβ42, a major component of senile plaques, decreases SIRT6 expression, and Aβ42-induced DNA damage is prevented by the overexpression of SIRT6 in HT22 mouse hippocampal neurons. Also, there is a strong negative correlation between Aβ42-induced DNA damage and p53 levels, a protein involved in DNA repair and apoptosis. In addition, upregulation of p53 protein by Nutlin-3 prevents SIRT6 reduction and DNA damage induced by Aβ42. Taken together, this study reveals that p53-dependent SIRT6 expression protects cells from Aβ42-induced DNA damage, making SIRT6 a promising new therapeutic target for the treatment of AD. PMID:27156849

  13. Mitochondrial dependent oxidative stress in cell culture induced by laser radiation at 1265 nm.

    PubMed

    Saenko, Yury V; Glushchenko, Eugenia S; Zolotovskii, Igor O; Sholokhov, Evgeny; Kurkov, Andrey

    2016-04-01

    Photodynamic therapy is the main technique applied for surface carcinoma treatment. This technique employs singlet oxygen generated via a laser excited photosensitizer as a main damaging agent. However, prolonged sensitivity to intensive light, relatively low tissue penetration by activating light the cost of photosensitizer (PS) administration can limit photodynamic therapy applications. Early was reported singlet oxygen generation without photosensitizer induced by a laser irradiation at the wavelength of 1250-1270 nm. Here, we study the dynamics of oxidative stress, DNA damage, changes of mitochondrial potential, and mitochondrial mass induced by a laser at 1265 nm have been studied in HCT-116 and CHO-K cells. Laser irradiation of HCT-116 and CHO-K cells has induced a dose-dependent cell death via increasing intracellular reactive oxygen species (ROS) concentration, increase of DNA damage, decrease of mitochondrial potential, and reduced glutathione. It has been shown that, along with singlet oxygen generation, the increase of the intracellular ROS concentration induced by mitochondrial damage contributes to the damaging effect of the laser irradiation at 1265 nm. PMID:26796703

  14. IFN-alpha/beta-dependent cross-priming induced by specific toll-like receptor agonists.

    PubMed

    Durand, Vanessa; Wong, Simon Y C; Tough, David F; Le Bon, Agnes

    2006-04-12

    Toll-like receptors (TLR) are pattern recognition receptors that have been identified as crucial in the initiation of innate immune responses against pathogens. They are thought to be involved in shaping appropriate adaptive immune responses, although their precise contribution has not yet been fully characterised. Our aim was to investigate in vivo the effect of different TLR stimuli on cellular immune responses. We examined the ability of a range of TLR stimuli to induce CD8+ T cell responses against a model soluble protein antigen, ovalbumin (OVA). We found that TLR 3, TLR 4, and TLR 9 agonists induced functional cross-priming, and that this process was dependent on IFN-alpha/beta signalling pathway. PMID:16823911

  15. Aggresome-like structure induced by isothiocyanates is novel proteasome-dependent degradation machinery

    SciTech Connect

    Mi, Lixin; Gan, Nanqin; Chung, Fung-Lung

    2009-10-16

    Unwanted or misfolded proteins are either refolded by chaperones or degraded by the ubiquitin-proteasome system (UPS). When UPS is impaired, misfolded proteins form aggregates, which are transported along microtubules by motor protein dynein towards the juxta-nuclear microtubule-organizing center to form aggresome, a single cellular garbage disposal complex. Because aggresome formation results from proteasome failure, aggresome components are degraded through the autophagy/lysosome pathway. Here we report that small molecule isothiocyanates (ITCs) can induce formation of aggresome-like structure (ALS) through covalent modification of cytoplasmic {alpha}- and {beta}-tubulin. The formation of ALS is related to neither proteasome inhibition nor oxidative stress. ITC-induced ALS is a proteasome-dependent assembly for emergent removal of misfolded proteins, suggesting that the cell may have a previously unknown strategy to cope with misfolded proteins.

  16. Growing tumors induce a local STING dependent Type I IFN response in dendritic cells.

    PubMed

    Andzinski, Lisa; Spanier, Julia; Kasnitz, Nadine; Kröger, Andrea; Jin, Lei; Brinkmann, Melanie M; Kalinke, Ulrich; Weiss, Siegfried; Jablonska, Jadwiga; Lienenklaus, Stefan

    2016-09-15

    The importance of endogenous Type I IFNs in cancer immune surveillance is well established by now. Their role in polarization of tumor-associated neutrophilic granulocytes into anti-tumor effector cells has been recently demonstrated. Yet, the cellular source of Type I IFNs as well as the mode of induction is not clearly defined. Here, we demonstrate that IFN-β is induced by growing murine tumors. Induction is mainly mediated via STING-dependent signaling pathways, suggesting tumor derived DNA as trigger. Transcription factors IRF3 and IRF5 were activated under these conditions which is consistent with tumor infiltrating dendritic cells (DCs) being the major cellular source of IFN-β at the tumor site. Besides DCs, tumor cells themselves are induced to contribute to the production of IFN-β. Taken together, our data provide further information on immune surveillance by Type I IFNs and suggest novel potent cellular targets for future cancer therapy. PMID:27116225

  17. Picosecond laser-induced breakdown at 5321 and 5347 A - Observation of frequency-dependent behavior

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smith, W. L.; Bechtel, J. H.; Bloembergen, N.

    1977-01-01

    A study is presented of picosecond laser-induced breakdown at 3547 and 5321 A of several materials. The thresholds obtained for breakdown at 5321 A are compared to previous results obtained at 1.064 microns using the same laser system. This comparison illustrates the transition of bulk laser-induced breakdown as it becomes increasingly frequency dependent. UV picosecond pulses are obtained by mixing 5321 A and 1.064 micron pulses in a KH2PO4 crystal. Upper and lower bounds on the 3547 A breakdown threshold are defined, although some effects of walk-off distortion and self-focusing are observed. The results are discussed with reference to models for the intrinsic processes involved in the breakdown, i.e., avalanche and multiphoton ionization.

  18. Modeling Time Dependent Earthquake Magnitude Distributions Associated with Injection-Induced Seismicity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maurer, J.; Segall, P.

    2015-12-01

    Understanding and predicting earthquake magnitudes from injection-induced seismicity is critically important for estimating hazard due to injection operations. A particular problem has been that the largest event often occurs post shut-in. A rigorous analysis would require modeling all stages of earthquake nucleation, propagation, and arrest, and not just initiation. We present a simple conceptual model for predicting the distribution of earthquake magnitudes during and following injection, building on the analysis of Segall & Lu (2015). The analysis requires several assumptions: (1) the distribution of source dimensions follows a Gutenberg-Richter distribution; (2) in environments where the background ratio of shear to effective normal stress is low, the size of induced events is limited by the volume perturbed by injection (e.g., Shapiro et al., 2013; McGarr, 2014), and (3) the perturbed volume can be approximated by diffusion in a homogeneous medium. Evidence for the second assumption comes from numerical studies that indicate the background ratio of shear to normal stress controls how far an earthquake rupture, once initiated, can grow (Dunham et al., 2011; Schmitt et al., submitted). We derive analytical expressions that give the rate of events of a given magnitude as the product of three terms: the time-dependent rate of nucleations, the probability of nucleating on a source of given size (from the Gutenberg-Richter distribution), and a time-dependent geometrical factor. We verify our results using simulations and demonstrate characteristics observed in real induced sequences, such as time-dependent b-values and the occurrence of the largest event post injection. We compare results to Segall & Lu (2015) as well as example datasets. Future work includes using 2D numerical simulations to test our results and assumptions; in particular, investigating how background shear stress and fault roughness control rupture extent.

  19. Diosgenin induces apoptosis in IGF-1-stimulated human thyrocytes through two caspase-dependent pathways

    SciTech Connect

    Mu, Shumin; Tian, Xingsong; Ruan, Yongwei; Liu, Yuantao; Bian, Dezhi; Ma, Chunyan; Yu, Chunxiao; Feng, Mei; Wang, Furong; Gao, Ling; Zhao, Jia-jun

    2012-02-10

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Diosgenin induces apoptosis in IGF-1-treated thyrocytes through two caspase pathways. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Diosgenin inhibits FLIP and activates caspase-8 in FAS related-pathway. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Diosgenin increases ROS, regulates the ratio of Bax/Bcl-2 in mitochondrial pathway. -- Abstract: Insulin-like growth factor-1 (IGF-1) is a growth factor of the thyroid that has been shown in our previous study to possess proliferative and antiapoptotic effects in FRTL-5 cell lines through the upregulation of cyclin D and Fas-associated death domain-like interleukin-1-converting enzyme (FLICE)-inhibitory protein (FLIP). Diosgenin, a natural steroid sapogenin from plants, has been shown to induce apoptosis in many cell lines, with the exception of thyroid cells. In this report, we investigated the apoptotic effect and mechanism of diosgenin in IGF-1-stimulated primary human thyrocytes. Primary human thyrocytes were preincubated with or without IGF-1 for 24 h and subsequently exposed to varying concentrations of diosgenin for different times. We found that diosgenin induced apoptosis in human thyrocytes pretreated with IGF-1 in a dose-dependent manner through the activation of caspase cascades. Moreover, diosgenin inhibited FLIP and activated caspase-8 in the FAS-related apoptotic pathway. Diosgenin increased the production of ROS, regulated the balance of Bax and Bcl-2 and cleaved caspase-9 in the mitochondrial apoptotic pathway. These results indicate that diosgenin induces apoptosis in IGF-1-stimulated primary human thyrocytes through two caspase-dependent pathways.

  20. Cigarette Smoke Induces Human Epidermal Receptor 2-Dependent Changes in Epithelial Permeability.

    PubMed

    Mishra, Rangnath; Foster, Daniel; Vasu, Vihas T; Thaikoottathil, Jyoti V; Kosmider, Beata; Chu, Hong Wei; Bowler, Russell P; Finigan, James H

    2016-06-01

    The airway epithelium constitutes a protective barrier against inhaled insults, such as viruses, bacteria, and toxic fumes, including cigarette smoke (CS). Maintenance of bronchial epithelial integrity is central for airway health, and defective epithelial barrier function contributes to the pathogenesis of CS-mediated diseases, such as chronic obstructive pulmonary disease. Although CS has been shown to increase epithelial permeability, current understanding of the mechanisms involved in CS-induced epithelial barrier disruption remains incomplete. We have previously identified that the receptor tyrosine kinase human epidermal receptor (HER) 2 growth factor is activated by the ligand neuregulin-1 and increases epithelial permeability in models of inflammatory acute lung injury. We hypothesized that CS activates HER2 and that CS-mediated changes in barrier function would be HER2 dependent in airway epithelial cells. We determined that HER2 was activated in whole lung, as well as isolated epithelial cells, from smokers, and that acute CS exposure resulted in HER2 activation in cultured bronchial epithelial cells. Mechanistic studies determined that CS-mediated HER2 activation is independent of neuregulin-1 but required upstream activation of the epidermal growth factor receptor. HER2 was required for CS-induced epithelial permeability as knockdown of HER2 blocked increases in permeability after CS. CS caused an increase in IL-6 production by epithelial cells that was dependent on HER2-mediated extracellular signal-regulated kinases (Erk) activation. Finally, blockade of IL-6 attenuated CS-induced epithelial permeability. Our data indicate that CS activates pulmonary epithelial HER2 and that HER2 is a central mediator of CS-induced epithelial barrier dysfunction. PMID:26600084

  1. Peptide LSARLAF induces integrin β3 dependent outside-in signaling in platelets

    PubMed Central

    Niu, Haixia; Xu, Zhenlu; Li, Ding; Zhang, Lin; Wang, Kemin; Taylor, Donald B.; Liu, Junling; Gartner, T. Kent

    2012-01-01

    Introduction Peptide LSARLAF (LSA) can bind and activate integrin αIIbβ3 in the absence of ‘inside-out’ signal. The active αIIbβ3 mediates ‘outside-in’ signaling that elicits platelet aggregation, granule secretion and TxA2 production. Here we identify the membrane glycoproteins which mediate LSA-induced platelet activation other than αIIbβ3, and determine the roles of Src, PLCγ2, FcRγ-chain, and SLP-76 in LSA-induced platelet activation. Method Ligand-receptor binding assay was performed to study the effect of peptide LSA or its control peptide FRALASL (FRA) on integrins binding to their ligands. Spreading of CHO cells expressing αIIbβ3 or αVβ3 on immobilized fibrinogen was measured in the presence of LSA or FRA. Washed β3, Src, FcRγ-chain, LAT and SLP-76 deficient platelets aggregation and secretion were tested in response to LSA. Results Ligand-receptor binding assay indicated that LSA promoted the binding of multiple ligands to αIIbβ3 or αVβ3. LSA also enhanced CHO cells with αIIbβ3 or αVβ3 expression spreading on immobilized fibrinogen. β3 deficient platelets failed to aggregate and secrete in response to LSA. The phosphorylation of PLCγ2 and Syk was also β3 dependent. Src, FcRγ-chain, LAT and SLP-76 deficient platelets did not aggregate, secrete ATP or produce TxA2 in response to LSA. Conclusion LSA-induced platelet activation is β3 dependent, and signaling molecules Src, FcRγ-chain, SLP-76 and LAT play crucial roles in LSA-induced β3 mediated signaling. PMID:22482832

  2. Radiation fosters dose-dependent and chemotherapy-induced immunogenic cell death

    PubMed Central

    Golden, Encouse B; Frances, Derek; Pellicciotta, Ilenia; Demaria, Sandra; Helen Barcellos-Hoff, Mary; Formenti, Silvia C

    2014-01-01

    Established tumors are typified by an immunosuppresive microenvironment. Countering this naturally occurring phenomenon, emerging evidence suggests that radiation promotes a proimmunogenic milieu within the tumor capable of stimulating host cancer-specific immune responses. Three cryptic immunogenic components of cytotoxic-agent induced cell death—namely, calreticulin cell surface exposure, the release of high mobility group box 1 (HMGB1) protein, and the liberation of ATP—have been previously shown to be critical for dendritic cell (DC) activation and effector T-cell priming. Thus, these immune-mobilizing components commonly presage tumor rejection in response to treatment. We initially set out to address the hypothesis that radiation-induced immunogenic cell death (ICD) is dose-dependent. Next, we hypothesized that radiation would enhance chemotherapy-induced ICD when given concomitantly, as suggested by the favorable clinical outcomes observed in response to analogous concurrent chemoradiation regimens. Thus, we designed an in vitro assay to examine the 3 hallmark features of ICD at clinically relevant doses of radiation. We then tested the immunogenic-death inducing effects of radiation combined with carboplatin or paclitaxel, focusing on these combinations to mimic chemoradiation regimens actually used in clinical trials of early stage triple negative [NCT0128953/NYU-10–01969] and locally advanced [NYU-06209] breast cancer patients, respectively. Despite the obvious limitations of an in vitro model, radiotherapy produced both a dose-dependent induction and chemotherapeutic enhancement of ICD. These findings provide preliminary evidence that ICD stimulated by either high-dose radiotherapy alone, or concurrent chemoradiation regimens, may contribute to the establishment of a peritumoral proimmunogenic milieu. PMID:25071979

  3. Keap1 redox-dependent regulation of doxorubicin-induced oxidative stress response in cardiac myoblasts

    SciTech Connect

    Nordgren, Kendra K.S. Wallace, Kendall B.

    2014-01-01

    Doxorubicin (DOX) is a widely prescribed treatment for a broad scope of cancers, but clinical utility is limited by the cumulative, dose-dependent cardiomyopathy that occurs with repeated administration. DOX-induced cardiotoxicity is associated with the production of reactive oxygen species (ROS) and oxidation of lipids, DNA and proteins. A major cellular defense mechanism against such oxidative stress is activation of the Keap1/Nrf2-antioxidant response element (ARE) signaling pathway, which transcriptionally regulates expression of antioxidant genes such as Nqo1 and Gstp1. In the present study, we address the hypothesis that an initial event associated with DOX-induced oxidative stress is activation of the Keap1/Nrf2-dependent expression of antioxidant genes and that this is regulated through drug-induced changes in redox status of the Keap1 protein. Incubation of H9c2 rat cardiac myoblasts with DOX resulted in a time- and dose-dependent decrease in non-protein sulfhydryl groups. Associated with this was a near 2-fold increase in Nrf2 protein content and enhanced transcription of several of the Nrf2-regulated down-stream genes, including Gstp1, Ugt1a1, and Nqo1; the expression of Nfe2l2 (Nrf2) itself was unaltered. Furthermore, both the redox status and the total amount of Keap1 protein were significantly decreased by DOX, with the loss of Keap1 being due to both inhibited gene expression and increased autophagic, but not proteasomal, degradation. These findings identify the Keap1/Nrf2 pathway as a potentially important initial response to acute DOX-induced oxidative injury, with the primary regulatory events being the oxidation and autophagic degradation of the redox sensor Keap1 protein. - Highlights: • DOX caused a ∼2-fold increase in Nrf2 protein content. • DOX enhanced transcription of several Nrf2-regulated down-stream genes. • Redox status and total amount of Keap1 protein were significantly decreased by DOX. • Loss of Keap1 protein was due to

  4. Scalable network of quadrangle entanglements via multiple phase-dependent electromagnetically induced transparency

    SciTech Connect

    Hu Xiangming; Sun Hong; Wang Fei

    2010-10-15

    One important class of multipartite continuous variable entanglement is described by a closed polygon, where every vertex represents one optical field and every side corresponds to the entanglement between the two connected vertices. Here we show that it is possible to obtain a scalable network of quadrangle entanglements by using multiple phase-dependent electromagnetically induced transparency. For 4,6,8,...,2n (n{>=}2) mode cases the network consists of 1,9,36,...,(1/4)n{sup 2} (n-1){sup 2} quadrangles, respectively. This suggests an efficient way of creating complex quantum networks and has great potentials for quantum information and computation.

  5. Chewing gum does not induce context-dependent memory when flavor is held constant.

    PubMed

    Overman, Amy A; Sun, Justin; Golding, Abbe C; Prevost, Darius

    2009-10-01

    This study examined the effect of chewing gum on memory when flavor is held constant. Four separate groups of participants (total n=101) completed a word recall task. At learning and recall, participants either chewed a piece of gum or sucked a sweet. Each participant completed the memory task twice, once with abstract words and once with concrete words. A significant effect of word type (concrete vs. abstract) was found, however recall performance was not improved by matched oral activity at learning and recall. The results cast further doubt on the ability of chewing gum to induce context-dependent memory effects. PMID:19589361

  6. Temperature Dependence of Shock-Induced Plasticity: A Molecular Dynamics Approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hatano, Takahiro

    2004-07-01

    Molecular dynamics simulation on a fcc perfect crystal with the Lennard-Jones potential is performed in order to investigate temperature dependence of shock-induced plasticity. It is found that the critical piston velocity above which stacking faults emerge shifts downwards once the temperature exceeds approximately half the melting temperature. Also Hugoniot elastic limit is found to be a decreasing function of temperature, whereas the corresponding critical strain is insensitive to temperature. The discrepancy between the simulation and the experiments where Hugoniot elastic limit is a increasing function of temperature is discussed.

  7. 2-Methoxy-6-acetyl-7-methyljuglone (MAM), a natural naphthoquinone, induces NO-dependent apoptosis and necroptosis by H2O2-dependent JNK activation in cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Sun, Wen; Bao, Jiaolin; Lin, Wei; Gao, Hongwei; Zhao, Wenwen; Zhang, Qingwen; Leung, Chung-Hang; Ma, Dik-Lung; Lu, Jinjian; Chen, Xiuping

    2016-03-01

    Redox signaling plays a fundamental role in maintaining cell physiological activities. A deregulation of this balance through oxidative stress or nitrosative stress has been implicated in cancer. Here, we reported that 2-methoxy-6-acetyl-7-methyl juglone (MAM), a natural naphthoquinone isolated from Polygonum cuspidatum Sieb. et Zucc, caused hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) dependent activation of JNK and induced the expression of inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS), thereby leading to nitric oxide (NO) generation in multiple cancer cells. Nitrosative stress induced necroptosis in A549 lung cancer cells, but resulted in caspase-dependent intrinsic apoptosis in B16-F10 melanoma and MCF7 breast cancer cells. In addition, a decrease in GSH/GSSG levels accompanied with increased ROS production was observed. Reversal of ROS generation and cell death in GSH pretreated cells indicated the involvement of GSH depletion in MAM mediated cytotoxicity. In summary, a natural product MAM induced NO-dependent multiple forms of cell death in cancer cells mediated by H2O2-dependent JNK activation in cancer cells. GSH depletion might play an initial role in MAM-induced cytotoxicity. PMID:26802903

  8. Experimental investigation of the factors influencing temperature dependence of radiation-induced attenuation in optical fiber

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jin, Jing; Xu, Raomei; Liu, Jixun; Song, Ningfang

    2014-03-01

    The effects of transmission wavelength, total dose and light source power on temperature dependence of radiation-induced attenuation (RIA) in Ge-P co-doped fibers were investigated. Three fibers irradiated up to total dose of 100 Gy and 10,000 Gy were used as test samples. A test system for temperature dependence of RIA was built up. The influence of transmission wavelength, total dose and light power on temperature sensitivity and linearity of RIA in three irradiated fibers were researched. The test results show that temperature sensitivity and linearity of RIA in optical fibers could be improved by adjusting total dose and selecting transmission wavelength. The light source power does not have obvious influence on temperature sensitivity and linearity. The Ge-P co-doped fiber at 850 nm transmission wavelength with higher total dose is a very promising candidate for fiber-optic temperature sensor.

  9. Hyaluronan-induced VEGF-C promotes fibrosis-induced lymphangiogenesis via Toll-like receptor 4-dependent signal pathway.

    PubMed

    Jung, Yu Jin; Lee, Ae Sin; Nguyen-Thanh, Tung; Kang, Kyung Pyo; Lee, Sik; Jang, Kyu Yun; Kim, Myung Ki; Kim, Sun Hee; Park, Sung Kwang; Kim, Won

    2015-10-23

    Hyaluronan (HA), a component of the extracellular matrix, modulates cellular behavior including angiogenesis. However, little is known about the effect of HA on lymphangiogenesis in fibrosis model. In this study, we investigated the roles of HA in lymphangiogenesis of unilateral ureteral obstruction (UUO). We found that HA cooperated synergistically with vascular endothelial cell growth factor-C to stimulate capillary-like tube formation and increase migration of cells in a haptotaxis assay. Accumulation of HA in the cortical interstitial space was positively correlated with the number of lymphatic vessels after UUO. Depletion of macrophages with clodronate decreased UUO-induced HA accumulation and lymphangiogenesis. Additionally, hyaluronan synthase (HAS) mRNA expression and HA production were increased in bone marrow-derived macrophages upon stimulation with TGF-β1. Transfer of mHAS2 and mHAS3 knock-down CD11b-positive macrophages to SCID mice resulted in a partial decrease in UUO-induced lymphangiogenesis. HA increased expression of vascular endothelial cell growth factor-C in macrophages. Vascular endothelial cell growth factor-C expression and LYVE-1-positive lymphatic area was significantly lower in the UUO-kidney from TLR4 null mice than that from TLR4 wild-type mice. Collectively, these results suggest that HA increases lymphangiogenesis in renal fibrosis model and also stimulates vascular endothelial cell growth factor-C production from macrophages through Toll-like receptor 4-dependent signal pathway. PMID:26362177

  10. Bile acids induce uncoupling protein 1-dependent thermogenesis and stimulate energy expenditure at thermoneutrality in mice.

    PubMed

    Zietak, Marika; Kozak, Leslie P

    2016-03-01

    It has been proposed that diet-induced obesity at thermoneutrality (TN; 29°C) is reduced by a UCP1-dependent thermogenesis; however, it has not been shown how UCP1-dependent thermogenesis can be activated in the absence of sympathetic activity. A recent study provides such a mechanism by showing that dietary bile acids (BAs) suppress obesity in mice fed a high-fat diet (HFD) by a mechanism dependent on type 2 deiodinase (DIO2); however, neither a role for UCP1 nor the influence of sympathetic activity was properly assessed. To test whether the effects of BAs on adiposity are independent of Ucp1 and cold-activated thermogenesis, obesity phenotypes were determined in C57BL6/J.(+)/(+) (WT) and C57BL6/J.Ucp1.(-)/(-) mice (Ucp1-KO) housed at TN and fed a HFD with or without 0.5% (wt/wt) cholic acid (CA) for 9 wk. CA in a HFD reduced adiposity and hepatic lipogenesis and improved glucose tolerance in WT but not in Ucp1-KO mice and was accompanied by increases in food intake and energy expenditure (EE). In iBAT, CA increased Ucp1 mRNA and protein levels 1.5- and twofold, respectively, and increased DIO2 and TGR5 protein levels in WT mice. Despite enhanced Dio2 expression in Ucp1-KO and Ucp1-KO-CA treated mice, this did not enhance the ability of BAs to reduce obesity. By comparing the effects of BAs on WT and Ucp1-KO mice at TN, our study showed that BAs suppress diet-induced obesity by increasing EE through a mechanism dependent on Ucp1 expression, which is likely independent of adrenergic signaling. PMID:26714852

  11. Involvement of Wee1 in the circadian rhythm-dependent intestinal damage induced by docetaxel.

    PubMed

    Obi-Ioka, Yuri; Ushijima, Kentaro; Kusama, Mikio; Ishikawa-Kobayashi, Eiko; Fujimura, Akio

    2013-10-01

    Docetaxel, a semisynthetic taxane, is effective for the treatment of some solid cancers; however, docetaxel-induced intestinal damage leads to poor prognosis in some patients. Although such adverse effects have been reported to depend on the dosing-time of docetaxel, the mechanisms involved remain unclear. Wee1 expression is controlled by the clock gene complex, clock/bmal1, and contributes to cell-cycle progression. The present study was undertaken to evaluate the potential role of Wee1 in the circadian rhythm-dependent profile of docetaxel. Male mice were maintained under a 12-hour light/dark cycle. Intestinal damage after repeated dosing of docetaxel (20 mg/kg) for 3 weeks was more severe at 14 hours after light on (HALO) than at 2 HALO. The intestinal protein expressions of Wee1, phosphorylated CDK1, and cleaved Caspase-3 were higher in the 14-HALO group than in the 2-HALO group, whereas that of survivin was lower in the 14-HALO group. Thus, it is speculated that elevated Wee1 expression inhibited CDK1 activity more by phosphorylation, which in turn caused the lower expression of survivin and consequently more activated Caspase-3 in the 14-HALO group. There were no significant differences in plasma docetaxel concentrations between the 2- and 14-HALO groups. Bindings of CLOCK and BMAL1 to the E-box regions at the wee1 gene promoter were not altered by docetaxel treatment at 2 and 14 HALO. These findings suggest that Wee1 is directly or indirectly involved in the mechanism of the circadian rhythm-dependent changes in docetaxel-induced intestinal damage. However, the mechanism for a circadian rhythm-dependent change in intestinal Wee1 expression by docetaxel remains to be determined. PMID:23892568

  12. IRES-Dependent Translational Control during Virus-Induced Endoplasmic Reticulum Stress and Apoptosis

    PubMed Central

    Hanson, Paul J.; Zhang, Huifang M.; Hemida, Maged Gomaa; Ye, Xin; Qiu, Ye; Yang, Decheng

    2012-01-01

    Many virus infections and stresses can induce endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress response, a host self-defense mechanism against viral invasion and stress. During this event, viral and cellular gene expression is actively regulated and often encounters a switching of the translation initiation from cap-dependent to internal ribosome-entry sites (IRES)-dependent. This switching is largely dependent on the mRNA structure of the 5′ untranslated region (5′ UTR) and on the particular stress stimuli. Picornaviruses and some other viruses contain IRESs within their 5′ UTR of viral genome and employ an IRES-driven mechanism for translation initiation. Recently, a growing number of cellular genes involved in growth control, cell cycle progression and apoptosis were also found to contain one or more IRES within their long highly structured 5′ UTRs. These genes initiate translation usually by a cap-dependent mechanism under normal physiological conditions; however, in certain environments, such as infection, starvation, and heat shock they shift translation initiation to an IRES-dependent modality. Although the molecular mechanism is not entirely understood, a number of studies have revealed that several cellular biochemical processes are responsible for the switching of translation initiation to IRES-dependent. These include the cleavage of translation initiation factors by viral and/or host proteases, phosphorylation (inactivation) of host factors for translation initiation, overproduction of homologous proteins of cap-binding protein eukaryotic initiation factors (eIF)4E, suppression of cap-binding protein eIF4E expression by specific microRNA, activation of enzymes for mRNA decapping, as well as others. Here, we summarize the recent advances in our understanding of the molecular mechanisms for the switching of translation initiation, particularly for the proteins involved in cell survival and apoptosis in the ER stress pathways during viral infections. PMID

  13. Temperature dependence of spectral induced polarization data: experimental results and membrane polarization theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bairlein, Katharina; Bücker, Matthias; Hördt, Andreas; Hinze, Björn

    2016-04-01

    Spectral induced polarization measurements are affected by temperature variations due to a variety of temperature-dependent parameters that control the complex electrical conductivity. Most important is the influence of the ion mobility, which increases with increasing temperature. It is responsible for the increase of the conductivity of the fluid in the pores with temperature and influences the electrical double layer on the mineral surface. This work is based on laboratory measurements of 13 sandstone samples from different sources with different geological and petrophysical characteristics. We measured the complex impedance in a frequency range from 0.01 to 100 Hz and a temperature range from 0 to 40 °C. The main observation is a decrease of the characteristic time (defined by the inverse of the frequency, at which the phase shift is maximum) with increasing temperature. The strength of this decrease differs from one sample to another. The temperature dependence of the phase shift magnitude cannot easily be generalized, as it depends on the particular sample. The experimental findings suggest that neglecting the influence of temperature on complex conductivity may lead to significant errors when estimating hydraulic conductivity from relaxation time. We also simulate the temperature dependence with a theoretical model of membrane polarization and review some of the model properties, with an emphasis on the temperature dependence of the parameters. The model reproduces several features characterizing the measured data, including the temperature dependence of the characteristic times. Computed tomography and microscope images of the pore structure of three samples also allow us to associate differences in the geometrical parameters used in the modelling with pore scale parameters of the actual samples.

  14. The P-element-induced silencing effect of KP transposons is dose dependent in Drosophila melanogaster.

    PubMed

    Sameny, Alireza; Locke, John

    2011-09-01

    Transposable elements are found in the genomes of all eukaryotes and play a critical role in altering gene expression and genome organization. In Drosophila melanogaster, transposable P elements are responsible for the phenomenon of hybrid dysgenesis. KP elements, a deletion-derivative of the complete P element, can suppress this mutagenic effect. KP elements can also silence the expression of certain other P-element-mediated transgenes in a process called P-element-dependent silencing (PDS), which is thought to involve the recruitment of heterochromatin proteins. To explore the mechanism of this silencing, we have mobilized KP elements to create a series of strains that contain single, well-defined KP insertions that show PDS. To understand the quantitative role of KP elements in PDS, these single inserts were combined in a series of crosses to obtain genotypes with zero, one, or two KP elements, from which we could examine the effect of KP gene dose. The extent of PDS in these genotypes was shown to be dose dependent in a logarithmic rather than linear fashion. A logarithmic dose dependency is consistent with the KP products interacting with heterochromatic proteins in a concentration-dependent manner such that two molecules are needed to induce gene silencing. PMID:21888571

  15. Diet-induced antisecretory factor prevents intracranial hypertension in a dosage-dependent manner.

    PubMed

    Johansson, Ewa; Al-Olama, Mohamed; Hansson, Hans-Arne; Lange, Stefan; Jennische, Eva

    2013-06-28

    Intake of specially processed cereal (SPC) stimulates endogenous antisecretory factor (AF) activity, and SPC intake has proven to be beneficial for a number of clinical conditions. The aim of the present study was to investigate the dosage relationship between SPC intake and plasma AF activity and to further correlate achieved AF levels to a biological effect. SPC was fed to rats in concentrations of 5, 10 or 15% for 2 weeks. A further group was fed 5% SPC for 4 weeks. AF activity and the complement factors C3c and factor H were analysed in plasma after the feeding period. Groups of rats fed the various SPC concentrations were subjected to a standardised freezing brain injury, known to induce increases in intracranial pressure (ICP). The AF activity in plasma increased after intake of SPC, in a dosage- and time-dependent manner. The complement factors C3c and factor H increased in a time-dependent manner. Measurements of ICP in animals fed with SPC prior to the brain injury showed that the ICP was significantly lower, compared with that of injured rats fed with a standard feed, and that the change was dose and time dependent. AF activity increases, in a dosage- and time-dependent manner, after intake of SPC. The inverse relationship between ICP after a head injury and the percentage of SPC in the feed indicate that the protective effect is, to a large extent, due to AF. PMID:23153478

  16. Ethanol-Induced Activation of ATP-Dependent Proton Extrusion in Elodea densa Leaves 1

    PubMed Central

    Marrè, Maria T.; Venegoni, Alberto; Moroni, Anna

    1992-01-01

    In Elodea densa leaves, ethanol up to 0.17 m stimulates H+ extrusion activity. This effect is strictly dependent on the presence of K+ in the medium and is suppressed by the presence of the plasmalemma H+-ATPase inhibitor vanadate. Stimulation of H+ extrusion is associated with (a) a decrease in cellular ATP level, (b) a marked hyperpolarization of transmembrane electrical potential, and (c) an increase in net K+ influx. These results suggest that ethanol-induced H+ extrusion is mediated by an activation of the plasma membrane ATP-dependent, electrogenic proton pump. This stimulating effect is associated with an increase of cell sap pH and of the capacity to take up the weak acid 5,5-dimethyloxazolidine-2,4-dione, which is interpretable as due to an increase of cytosolic pH. This indicates that the stimulation of H+ extrusion by ethanol does not depend on a cytosolic acidification by products of ethanol metabolism. The similarity of the effects of ethanol and those of photosynthesis on proton pump activity in E. densa leaves suggests that a common metabolic situation is responsible for the activation of the ATP-dependent H+-extruding mechanism. PMID:16653093

  17. fMLP-Induced IL-8 Release Is Dependent on NADPH Oxidase in Human Neutrophils

    PubMed Central

    Hidalgo, María A.; Carretta, María D.; Teuber, Stefanie E.; Zárate, Cristian; Cárcamo, Leonardo; Concha, Ilona I.; Burgos, Rafael A.

    2015-01-01

    N-Formyl-methionyl-leucyl-phenylalanine (fMLP) and platelet-activating factor (PAF) induce similar intracellular signalling profiles; but only fMLP induces interleukin-8 (IL-8) release and nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide phosphate reduced (NADPH) oxidase activity in neutrophils. Because the role of ROS on IL-8 release in neutrophils is until now controversial, we assessed if NADPH oxidase is involved in the IL-8 secretions and PI3K/Akt, MAPK, and NF-κB pathways activity induced by fMLP. Neutrophils were obtained from healthy volunteers. IL-8 was measured by ELISA, IL-8 mRNA by qPCR, and ROS production by luminol-amplified chemiluminescence, reduction of ferricytochrome c, and FACS. Intracellular pH changes were detected by spectrofluorescence. ERK1/2, p38 MAPK, and Akt phosphorylation were analysed by immunoblotting and NF-κB was analysed by immunocytochemistry. Hydroxy-3-methoxyaceto-phenone (HMAP), diphenyleneiodonium (DPI), and siRNA Nox2 reduced the ROS and IL-8 release in neutrophils treated with fMLP. HMAP, DPI, and amiloride (a Na+/H+ exchanger inhibitor) inhibited the Akt phosphorylation and did not affect the p38 MAPK and ERK1/2 activity. DPI and HMAP reduced NF-κB translocation induced by fMLP. We showed that IL-8 release induced by fMLP is dependent on NADPH oxidase, and ROS could play a redundant role in cell signalling, ultimately activating the PI3K/Akt and NF-κB pathways in neutrophils. PMID:26634216

  18. fMLP-Induced IL-8 Release Is Dependent on NADPH Oxidase in Human Neutrophils.

    PubMed

    Hidalgo, María A; Carretta, María D; Teuber, Stefanie E; Zárate, Cristian; Cárcamo, Leonardo; Concha, Ilona I; Burgos, Rafael A

    2015-01-01

    N-Formyl-methionyl-leucyl-phenylalanine (fMLP) and platelet-activating factor (PAF) induce similar intracellular signalling profiles; but only fMLP induces interleukin-8 (IL-8) release and nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide phosphate reduced (NADPH) oxidase activity in neutrophils. Because the role of ROS on IL-8 release in neutrophils is until now controversial, we assessed if NADPH oxidase is involved in the IL-8 secretions and PI3K/Akt, MAPK, and NF-κB pathways activity induced by fMLP. Neutrophils were obtained from healthy volunteers. IL-8 was measured by ELISA, IL-8 mRNA by qPCR, and ROS production by luminol-amplified chemiluminescence, reduction of ferricytochrome c, and FACS. Intracellular pH changes were detected by spectrofluorescence. ERK1/2, p38 MAPK, and Akt phosphorylation were analysed by immunoblotting and NF-κB was analysed by immunocytochemistry. Hydroxy-3-methoxyaceto-phenone (HMAP), diphenyleneiodonium (DPI), and siRNA Nox2 reduced the ROS and IL-8 release in neutrophils treated with fMLP. HMAP, DPI, and amiloride (a Na(+)/H(+) exchanger inhibitor) inhibited the Akt phosphorylation and did not affect the p38 MAPK and ERK1/2 activity. DPI and HMAP reduced NF-κB translocation induced by fMLP. We showed that IL-8 release induced by fMLP is dependent on NADPH oxidase, and ROS could play a redundant role in cell signalling, ultimately activating the PI3K/Akt and NF-κB pathways in neutrophils. PMID:26634216

  19. The New World arenavirus Tacaribe virus induces caspase-dependent apoptosis in infected cells.

    PubMed

    Wolff, Svenja; Groseth, Allison; Meyer, Bjoern; Jackson, David; Strecker, Thomas; Kaufmann, Andreas; Becker, Stephan

    2016-04-01

    The Arenaviridae is a diverse and growing family of viruses that already includes more than 25 distinct species. While some of these viruses have a significant impact on public health, others appear to be non-pathogenic. At present little is known about the host cell responses to infection with different arenaviruses, particularly those found in the New World; however, apoptosis is known to play an important role in controlling infection of many viruses. Here we show that infection with Tacaribe virus (TCRV), which is widely considered the prototype for non-pathogenic arenaviruses, leads to stronger induction of apoptosis than does infection with its human-pathogenic relative Junín virus. TCRV-induced apoptosis occurred in several cell types during late stages of infection and was shown to be caspase-dependent, involving the activation of caspases 3, 7, 8 and 9. Further, UV-inactivated TCRV did not induce apoptosis, indicating that the activation of this process is dependent on active viral replication/transcription. Interestingly, when apoptosis was inhibited, growth of TCRV was not enhanced, indicating that apoptosis does not have a direct negative effect on TCRV infection in vitro. Taken together, our data identify and characterize an important virus-host cell interaction of the prototypic, non-pathogenic arenavirus TCRV, which provides important insight into the growing field of arenavirus research aimed at better understanding the diversity in responses to different arenavirus infections and their functional consequences. PMID:26769540

  20. Hypoxia-induced and calpain-dependent cleavage of filamin A regulates the hypoxic response.

    PubMed

    Zheng, Xiaowei; Zhou, Alex-Xianghua; Rouhi, Pegah; Uramoto, Hidetaka; Borén, Jan; Cao, Yihai; Pereira, Teresa; Akyürek, Levent M; Poellinger, Lorenz

    2014-02-18

    The cellular response to hypoxia is regulated by hypoxia-inducible factor-1α and -2α (HIF-1α and -2α). We have discovered that filamin A (FLNA), a large cytoskeletal actin-binding protein, physically interacts with HIF-1α and promotes tumor growth and angiogenesis. Hypoxia induces a calpain-dependent cleavage of FLNA to generate a naturally occurring C-terminal fragment that accumulates in the cell nucleus. This fragment interacts with the N-terminal portion of HIF-1α spanning amino acid residues 1-390 but not with HIF-2α. In hypoxia this fragment facilitates the nuclear localization of HIF-1α, is recruited to HIF-1α target gene promoters, and enhances HIF-1α function, resulting in up-regulation of HIF-1α target gene expression in a hypoxia-dependent fashion. These results unravel an important mechanism that selectively regulates the nuclear accumulation and function of HIF-1α and potentiates angiogenesis and tumor progression. PMID:24550283

  1. NRF2 Oxidative Stress Induced by Heavy Metals is Cell Type Dependent

    PubMed Central

    Simmons, Steven O; Fan, Chun-Yang; Yeoman, Kim; Wakefield, John; Ramabhadran, Ram

    2011-01-01

    Exposure to metallic environmental toxicants has been demonstrated to induce a variety of oxidative stress responses in mammalian cells. The transcription factor Nrf2 is activated in response to oxidative stress and coordinates the expression of antioxidant gene products. In this study, we describe the development of an Nrf2-specific reporter gene assay that can be used to study the oxidative stress response in multiple cell types. Using five different cell lines, the Nrf2-activating potency of twenty metals was assessed across a range of concentrations. While ten of the metals tested (cadmium, cobalt, copper, gold, iron, lead, mercury, silver, sodium arsenite and zinc) stimulated Nrf2-dependent transcriptional activity in at least three of the engineered cell lines, only three (cadmium, copper and sodium arsenite) were active in all five cell lines. A comparison of metal-induced Nrf2 transcriptional activation revealed significant differences in the absolute magnitude of activation as well as the relative potencies between the cell lines tested. However, there was no direct correlation between activity and potency. Taken together, these results show that the capacity to stimulate Nrf2 activity and relative potencies of these test compounds are highly dependent on the cell type tested. Since oxidative stress is thought to be involved in the mode of action of many toxicological studies, this observation may inform the design of paradigms for toxicity testing for toxicant prioritization and characterization. PMID:21643505

  2. Detergent sclerosants at sub-lytic concentrations induce endothelial cell apoptosis through a caspase dependent pathway.

    PubMed

    Cooley-Andrade, Osvaldo; Cheung, Kelvin; Chew, An-Ning; Connor, David Ewan; Parsi, Kurosh

    2016-07-01

    To investigate the apoptotic effects of detergent sclerosants sodium tetradecylsulphate (STS) and polidocanol (POL) on endothelial cells at sub-lytic concentrations. Human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs) were isolated and labelled with antibodies to assess for apoptosis and examined with confocal microscopy and flow cytometry. Isolated HUVECs viability was assessed using propidium iodide staining. Early apoptosis was determined by increased phosphatidylserine exposure by lactadherin binding. Caspase 3, 8, 9 and Bax activation as well as inhibitory assays with Pan Caspase (Z-VAD-FMK) and Bax (BI-6C9) were assessed to identify apoptotic pathways. Porimin activation was used to assess cell membrane permeability. Cell lysis reached almost 100 % with STS at 0.3 % and with POL at 0.6 %. Apoptosis was seen with both STS and POL at concentrations ranging from 0.075 to 0.15 %. PS exposure increased with both STS and POL and exhibited a dose-dependent trend. Active Caspase 3, 8 and 9 but not Bax were increased in HUVECs stimulated with low concentrations of both STS and POL. Inhibitory assays demonstrated Caspase 3, 8, 9 inhibition at low concentrations (0.075 to 0.6 %) with both STS and POL. Both agents increased the activation of porimin at all concentrations. Both sclerosants induced endothelial cell (EC) apoptosis at sub-lytic concentrations through a caspase-dependant pathway. Both agents induced EC oncosis. PMID:27225250

  3. ROS-dependent phosphorylation of Bax by wortmannin sensitizes melanoma cells for TRAIL-induced apoptosis

    PubMed Central

    Quast, S-A; Berger, A; Eberle, J

    2013-01-01

    The pathways of reactive oxygen species (ROS)-mediated apoptosis induction, of Bax activation and the sensitization of tumor cells for TRAIL (TNF-related apoptosis-inducing ligand)-induced apoptosis are still largely elusive. Here, sensitization of melanoma cells for TRAIL by the PI3-kinase inhibitor wortmannin correlated to the activation of mitochondrial apoptosis pathways. Apoptosis was dependent on Bax and abrogated by Bcl-2 overexpression. The synergistic enhancement was explained by Bax activation through wortmannin, which tightly correlated to the characteristic Bax phosphorylation patterns. Thus, wortmannin resulted in early reduction of the Bax-inactivating phosphorylation at serine-184, whereas the Bax-activating phosphorylation at threonine-167 was enhanced. Proving the responsibility of the pathway, comparable effects were obtained with an Akt inhibitor (MK-2206); while suppressed phosphorylation of serine-184 may be attributed to reduced Akt activity itself, the causes of enhanced threonine-167 phosphorylation were addressed here. Characteristically, production of ROS was seen early in response to wortmannin and MK-2206. Providing the link between ROS and Bax, we show that abrogated ROS production by α-tocopherol or by NADPH oxidase 4 (NOX4) siRNA suppressed apoptosis and Bax activation. This correlated with reduced Bax phosphorylation at threonine-167. The data unraveled a mechanism by which NOX4-dependent ROS production controls apoptosis via Bax phosphorylation. The pathway may be considered for proapoptotic, anticancer strategies. PMID:24113173

  4. Carrier-dependent and Ca2+-dependent 5-HT and dopamine release induced by (+)-amphetamine, 3,4-methylendioxy-methamphetamine, p-chloroamphetamine and (+)-fenfluramine

    PubMed Central

    Crespi, Daniela; Mennini, Tiziana; Gobbi, Marco

    1997-01-01

    The mechanism underlying 5-hydroxytryptamine (5-HT) and/or dopamine release induced by (+)-amphetamine ((+)-Amph), 3,4-methylendioxymethamphetamine (MDMA), p-chloroamphetamine (pCA) and (+)-fenfluramine ((+)-Fen) was investigated in rat brain superfused synaptosomes preloaded with the 3H neurotransmitters. Their rank order of potency for [3H]-5-HT-releasing activity was the same as for inhibition of 5-HT uptake (pCA⩾MDMA⩾(+)-Fen>>(+)-Amph). Similarly, their rank order as [3H]-dopamine releasers and dopamine uptake inhibitors was the same ((+)-Amph>>pCA=MDMA>>(+)-Fen). We also confirmed that the release induced by these compounds was prevented by selective transporter inhibitors (indalpine or nomifensine). [3H]-5-HT and/or [3H]-dopamine release induced by all these compounds was partially (31–80%), but significantly Ca2+-dependent. Lack of extracellular Ca2+ did not alter uptake mechanisms nor did it modify the carrier-dependent dopamine-induced [3H]-dopamine release. (+)-Amph-induced [3H]-dopamine release and pCA- and MDMA-induced [3H]-5-HT release were significantly inhibited by ω-agatoxin-IVA, a specific blocker of P-type voltage-operated Ca2+-channels, similar to the previous results on (+)-Fen-induced [3H]-5-HT release. Methiothepin inhibited the Ca2+-dependent component of (+)-Amph-induced [3H]-dopamine release with high potency (70 nM), as previously found with (+)-Fen-induced [3H]-5-HT release. The inhibitory effect of methiothepin was not due to its effects as a transporter inhibitor or Ca2+-channel blocker and is unlikely to be due to its antagonist properties on 5-HT1/2, dopamine or any other extracellular receptor. These results indicate that the release induced by these compounds is both ‘carrier-mediated' and Ca2+-dependent (possibly exocytotic-like), with the specific carrier allowing the amphetamines to enter the synaptosome. The Ca2+-dependent release is mediated by Ca2+-influx (mainly through P-type Ca2+-channels), possibly triggered by

  5. Alcohol-Induced Changes in Opioid Peptide Levels in Adolescent Rats Are Dependent on Housing Conditions

    PubMed Central

    Palm, Sara; Nylander, Ingrid

    2014-01-01

    Background Endogenous opioids are implicated in the mechanism of action of alcohol and alcohol affects opioids in a number of brain areas, although little is known about alcohol's effects on opioids in the adolescent brain. One concern, in particular when studying young animals, is that alcohol intake models often are based on single housing that may result in alcohol effects confounded by the lack of social interactions. The aim of this study was to investigate short- and long-term alcohol effects on opioids and the influence of housing conditions on these effects. Methods In the first part, opioid peptide levels were measured after one 24-hour session of single housing and 2-hour voluntary alcohol intake in adolescent and adult rats. In the second part, a model with a cage divider inserted during 2-hour drinking sessions was tested and the effects on opioids were examined after 6 weeks of adolescent voluntary intake in single-and pair-housed rats, respectively. Results The effects of single housing were age specific and affected Met-enkephalin-Arg6Phe7 (MEAP) in particular. In adolescent rats, it was difficult to distinguish between effects induced by alcohol and single housing, whereas alcohol-specific effects were seen in dynorphin B (DYNB), beta-endorphin (BEND), and MEAP levels in adults. Voluntary drinking affected several brain areas and the majority of alcohol-induced effects were not dependent on housing. However, alcohol effects on DYNB and BEND in the amygdala were dependent on housing. Housing alone affected MEAP in the cingulate cortex. Conclusions Age-specific housing- and alcohol-induced effects on opioids were found. In addition, prolonged voluntary alcohol intake under different housing conditions produced several alcohol-induced effects independent of housing. However, housing-dependent effects were found in areas implicated in stress, emotionality, and alcohol use disorder. Housing condition and age may therefore affect the reasons and

  6. Sugar-Dependent Gibberellin-Induced Chalcone Synthase Gene Expression in Petunia Corollas.

    PubMed Central

    Moalem-Beno, D.; Tamari, G.; Leitner-Dagan, Y.; Borochov, A.; Weiss, D.

    1997-01-01

    The induction of anthocyanin synthesis and anthocyanin biosynthetic gene expression in detached petunia (Petunia hybrida) corollas by gibberellic acid (GA3) requires sucrose. Neither sucrose nor GA3 alone can induce these processes. We found that GA3 enhances sucrose uptake by 20 to 30%, and we tested whether this is the mechanism by which the hormone induces gene expression. Changing the intracellular level of sucrose with the inhibitors p-chloromercuribenzenesulfonic acid and vanadate did not inhibit the induction of chalcone synthase gene (chs) expression by GA3. Growing detached corollas in various sucrose concentrations did not affect the induction of the gene but did affect its level of expression and the level of anthocyanin accumulated. Only metabolic sugars promoted GA3-induced anthocyanin accumulation. Mannitol and sorbitol had no effect and 3-O-methylglucose only slightly promoted chs expression and anthocyanin accumulation. Our results do not support the suggestion that sugars act as specific signals in the activation of anthocyanin biosynthetic gene expression during petunia corolla development. We suggest that sugars are essential as general sources of carbohydrates for carbon metabolism, upon which the induction of pigmentation is dependent. PMID:12223616

  7. Material-induced chondrogenic differentiation of mesenchymal stem cells is material-dependent.

    PubMed

    Zheng, Li; Yang, Jinsong; Fan, Hongsong; Zhang, Xingdong

    2014-05-01

    Certain materials may mimic natural cartilage to provide an amenable cellular microenvironment for the chondrogenic differentiation of mesenchymal stem cells. The chondrogenic differentiation of bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells (BMSCs) has been demonstrated to be induced by collagen-based hydrogels in vivo, but whether the induction is material-driven or self-differentiation has not been elucidated. In the present study, BMSCs were encapsulated in porous materials, namely, a biphasic calcium phosphate ceramic (BCP), silk fibroin protein matrix (SFP) and collagen sponge (CS), to further study the chondrogenic effects of various materials. Diffusion chambers that allow the body fluid to permeate and deter the host cells from invasion were also loaded with the cell-scaffold constructs. Chambers containing the scaffold-BMSC composites were implanted subcutaneously in the dorsa of rabbits. The specimens in the chamber were harvested for histological and immunohistochemical analyses eight weeks after implantation. The results showed that no chondrogenic differentiation of the BMSCs occurred when the BMSCs were encapsulated in BCP, SFP and CS, indicating that chondrogenesis induced by materials is material-dependent and that these particular porous materials are not suitable for inducing chondrogenesis. However, the diffusion chamber was effective in preventing host immune rejection, host cell invasion and vascular invasion. The results are likely to serve as a valuable clinical reference when selecting an appropriate scaffold for cartilage repair. PMID:24940401

  8. TLR ligand–induced podosome disassembly in dendritic cells is ADAM17 dependent

    PubMed Central

    West, Michele A.; Prescott, Alan R.; Chan, Kui Ming; Zhou, Zhongjun; Rose-John, Stefan; Scheller, Jürgen; Watts, Colin

    2008-01-01

    Toll-like receptor (TLR) signaling induces a rapid reorganization of the actin cytoskeleton in cultured mouse dendritic cells (DC), leading to enhanced antigen endocytosis and a concomitant loss of filamentous actin–rich podosomes. We show that as podosomes are lost, TLR signaling induces prominent focal contacts and a transient reduction in DC migratory capacity in vitro. We further show that podosomes in mouse DC are foci of pronounced gelatinase activity, dependent on the enzyme membrane type I matrix metalloprotease (MT1-MMP), and that DC transiently lose the ability to degrade the extracellular matrix after TLR signaling. Surprisingly, MMP inhibitors block TLR signaling–induced podosome disassembly, although stimulated endocytosis is unaffected, which demonstrates that the two phenomena are not obligatorily coupled. Podosome disassembly caused by TLR signaling occurs normally in DC lacking MT1-MMP, and instead requires the tumor necrosis factor α–converting enzyme ADAM17 (a disintegrin and metalloprotease 17), which demonstrates a novel role for this “sheddase” in regulating an actin-based structure. PMID:18762577

  9. Neural Cell Apoptosis Induced by Microwave Exposure Through Mitochondria-dependent Caspase-3 Pathway

    PubMed Central

    Zuo, Hongyan; Lin, Tao; Wang, Dewen; Peng, Ruiyun; Wang, Shuiming; Gao, Yabing; Xu, Xinping; Li, Yang; Wang, Shaoxia; Zhao, Li; Wang, Lifeng; Zhou, Hongmei

    2014-01-01

    To determine whether microwave (MW) radiation induces neural cell apoptosis, differentiated PC12 cells and Wistar rats were exposed to 2.856GHz for 5min and 15min, respectively, at an average power density of 30 mW/cm2. JC-1 and TUNEL staining detected significant apoptotic events, such as the loss of mitochondria membrane potential and DNA fragmentation, respectively. Transmission electron microscopy and Hoechst staining were used to observe chromatin ultrastructure and apoptotic body formation. Annexin V-FITC/PI double staining was used to quantify the level of apoptosis. The expressions of Bax, Bcl-2, cytochrome c, cleaved caspase-3 and PARP were examined by immunoblotting or immunocytochemistry. Caspase-3 activity was measured using an enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. The results showed chromatin condensation and apoptotic body formation in neural cells 6h after microwave exposure. Moreover, the mitochondria membrane potential decreased, DNA fragmentation increased, leading to an increase in the apoptotic cell percentage. Furthermore, the ratio of Bax/Bcl-2, expression of cytochrome c, cleaved caspase-3 and PARP all increased. In conclusion, microwave radiation induced neural cell apoptosis via the classical mitochondria-dependent caspase-3 pathway. This study may provide the experimental basis for further investigation of the mechanism of the neurological effects induced by microwave radiation. PMID:24688304

  10. Bortezomib induces AMPK-dependent autophagosome formation uncoupled from apoptosis in drug resistant cells

    PubMed Central

    Jaganathan, Sajjeev; Malek, Ehsan; Vallabhapurapu, Subrahmanya; Vallabhapurapu, Sivakumar; Driscoll, James J.

    2014-01-01

    The proteasome inhibitor bortezomib is an effective anti-cancer agent for the plasma cell malignancy multiple myeloma but clinical response is hindered by the emergence of drug resistance through unknown mechanisms. Drug sensitive myeloma cells were exposed to bortezomib to generate drug resistant cells that displayed a significant increase in subunits of the energy sensor AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK). AMPK activity in resistant cells was increased and bortezomib resistant cells contained a ~4-fold greater level of autophagosomes than drug sensitive cells. Real-time measurements indicated that bortezomib reduced the oxygen consumption rate in drug sensitive cells more readily than in resistant cells. Genetic ablation of AMPK activity reduced the bortezomib effect on autophagy. The autophagy-related gene (Atg)5 is required for autophagosome formation and enhances cellular susceptibility to apoptotic stimuli. Atg5 knockout eliminated bortezomib-induced autophagosome formation and reduced susceptibility to bortezomib. Bortezomib treatment of myeloma cells lead to ATG5 cleavage through a calpain-dependent manner while calpain inhibition or a calpain-insensitive Atg5 mutant promoted bortezomib-resistance. In contrast, AICAR, an AMPK activator, enhanced bortezomib-induced cleavage of ATG5 and increased bortezomib-induced killing. Taken together, the results demonstrate that ATG5 cleavage provokes apoptosis and represents a molecular link between autophagy and apoptosis with therapeutic implications. PMID:25481044

  11. Temperature dependencies of hydrogen-induced blistering of thin film multilayers

    SciTech Connect

    Kuznetsov, A. S.; Gleeson, M. A.; Bijkerk, F.

    2014-05-07

    We report on the influence of sample temperature on the development of hydrogen-induced blisters in Mo/Si thin-film multilayers. In general, the areal number density of blisters decreases with increasing exposure temperature, whereas individual blister size increases with exposure temperatures up to ∼200 °C but decreases thereafter. Comparison as a function of sample temperature is made between exposures to a flux containing both hydrogen ions and neutrals and one containing only neutrals. In the case of the neutral-only flux, blistering is observed for exposure temperatures ≥90 °C. The inclusion of ions promotes blister formation at <90 °C, while retarding their growth at higher temperatures. In general, ion-induced effects become less evident with increasing exposure temperature. At 200 °C, the main effect discernable is reduced blister size as compared with the equivalent neutral-only exposure. The temperature during exposure is a much stronger determinant of the blistering outcome than either pre- or post-annealing of the sample. The trends observed for neutral-only exposures are attributed to competing effects of defect density thermal equilibration and H-atom induced modification of the Si layers. Energetic ions modify the blistering via (temperature dependent) enhancement of H-mobility and re-crystallization of amorphous Si.

  12. Natural compound Alternol induces oxidative stress-dependent apoptotic cell death preferentially in prostate cancer cells

    PubMed Central

    Tang, Yuzhe; Chen, Ruibao; Huang, Yan; Li, Guodong; Huang, Yiling; Chen, Jiepeng; Duan, Lili; Zhu, Bao-Ting; Thrasher, J Brantley; Zhang, Xu; Li, Benyi

    2014-01-01

    Prostate cancers at the late stage of castration resistance are not responding well to most of current therapies available in clinic, reflecting a desperate need of novel treatment for this life-threatening disease. In this study, we evaluated the anti-cancer effect of a recently isolated natural compound Alternol in multiple prostate cancer cell lines with the properties of advanced prostate cancers in comparison to prostate-derived non-malignant cells. As assessed by trypan blue exclusion assay, a significant cell death was observed in all prostate cancer cell lines except DU145 but not in non-malignant (RWPE-1and BPH1) cells. Further analyses revealed that Alternol-induced cell death was an apoptotic response in a dose- and time-dependent manner, as evidenced by the appearance of apoptosis hallmarks such as Caspase-3 processing and PARP cleavage. Interestingly, Alternol-induced cell death was completely abolished by reactive oxygen species (ROS) scavengers, N-acetylcysteine (N-Ac) and dihydrolipoic acid (DHLA). We also demonstrated that the pro-apoptotic Bax protein was activated after Alternol treatment and was critical for Alternol-induced apoptosis. Animal xenograft experiments in nude mice showed that Alternol treatment largely suppressed tumor growth of PC-3 xenografts but not Bax-null DU-145 xenografts in vivo. These data suggest that Alternol might serve as a novel anticancer agent for late stage prostate cancer patient. PMID:24688053

  13. STAT6-Dependent Collagen Synthesis in Human Fibroblasts Is Induced by Bovine Milk

    PubMed Central

    Kippenberger, Stefan; Zöller, Nadja; Kleemann, Johannes; Müller, Jutta; Kaufmann, Roland; Hofmann, Matthias; Bernd, August; Meissner, Markus; Valesky, Eva

    2015-01-01

    Since the domestication of the urus, 10.000 years ago, mankind utilizes bovine milk for different purposes. Besides usage as a nutrient also the external application of milk on skin has a long tradition going back to at least the ancient Aegypt with Cleopatra VII as a great exponent. In order to test whether milk has impact on skin physiology, cultures of human skin fibroblasts were exposed to commercial bovine milk. Our data show significant induction of proliferation by milk (max. 2,3-fold, EC50: 2,5% milk) without toxic effects. Surprisingly, bovine milk was identified as strong inducer of collagen 1A1 synthesis at both, the protein (4-fold, EC50: 0,09% milk) and promoter level. Regarding the underlying molecular pathways, we show functional activation of STAT6 in a p44/42 and p38-dependent manner. More upstream, we identified IGF-1 and insulin as key factors responsible for milk-induced collagen synthesis. These findings show that bovine milk contains bioactive molecules that act on human skin cells. Therefore, it is tempting to test the herein introduced concept in treatment of atrophic skin conditions induced e.g. by UV light or corticosteroids. PMID:26134630

  14. STAT6-Dependent Collagen Synthesis in Human Fibroblasts Is Induced by Bovine Milk.

    PubMed

    Kippenberger, Stefan; Zöller, Nadja; Kleemann, Johannes; Müller, Jutta; Kaufmann, Roland; Hofmann, Matthias; Bernd, August; Meissner, Markus; Valesky, Eva

    2015-01-01

    Since the domestication of the urus, 10.000 years ago, mankind utilizes bovine milk for different purposes. Besides usage as a nutrient also the external application of milk on skin has a long tradition going back to at least the ancient Aegypt with Cleopatra VII as a great exponent. In order to test whether milk has impact on skin physiology, cultures of human skin fibroblasts were exposed to commercial bovine milk. Our data show significant induction of proliferation by milk (max. 2,3-fold, EC50: 2,5% milk) without toxic effects. Surprisingly, bovine milk was identified as strong inducer of collagen 1A1 synthesis at both, the protein (4-fold, EC50: 0,09% milk) and promoter level. Regarding the underlying molecular pathways, we show functional activation of STAT6 in a p44/42 and p38-dependent manner. More upstream, we identified IGF-1 and insulin as key factors responsible for milk-induced collagen synthesis. These findings show that bovine milk contains bioactive molecules that act on human skin cells. Therefore, it is tempting to test the herein introduced concept in treatment of atrophic skin conditions induced e.g. by UV light or corticosteroids. PMID:26134630

  15. Age-dependence of free radical-induced oxidative damage in ischemic-reperfused rat heart.

    PubMed

    Nagy, K; Takács, I E; Pankucsi, C

    1996-01-01

    Oxygen free radical-induced oxidative damage is involved in both aging and ischemia-reperfusion. The purpose of this study was to determine the aging-induced oxidative alterations in rat heart as well as the age-dependence of heart injury following ischemia-reperfusion. A comparative study was performed on young and old ischemic-reperfused rat hearts. Protein oxidation and the ascorbyl radical level in heart tissue were determined in order to characterize the oxidative stress. Comparing the control conditions, old hearts have 31% more oxidized proteins as measured by protein carbonyl content, and 18% lower ascorbyl radical level as determined by ESR, than young ones. The extent of increase of protein oxidation and ascorbyl free radical depletion induced by ischemia-reperfusion is less pronounced in the old hearts (7 and 8% respectively), as compared to the young ones (55 and 21% respectively). Pre-treatment with a free radical scavenger, such as centrophenoxine, diminished the ischemia-reperfusion injury in both young and old rat hearts. PMID:15374178

  16. Wheat-dependent exercise-induced anaphylaxis sensitized with hydrolyzed wheat protein in soap.

    PubMed

    Chinuki, Yuko; Morita, Eishin

    2012-12-01

    Wheat-dependent exercise-induced anaphylaxis (WDEIA) is a specific form of wheat allergy typically induced by exercise after ingestion of wheat products. Wheat ω-5 gliadin is a major allergen associated with conventional WDEIA, and detection of serum immunoglobulin E (IgE) specific to recombinant ω-5 gliadin is a reliable method for its diagnosis. Recently, an increased incidence of a new subtype of WDEIA, which is likely to be sensitized via a percutaneous and/or rhinoconjunctival route to hydrolyzed wheat protein (HWP), has been observed. All of the patients with this new subtype had used the same brand of soap, which contained HWP. Approximately half of these patients developed contact allergy several months later and subsequently developed WDEIA. In each of these patients, contact allergy with soap exposure preceded food ingestion-induced reactions. Other patients directly developed generalized symptoms upon ingestion of wheat products. The predominant observed symptom of the new WDEIA subtype was angioedema of the eyelids; a number of patients developed anaphylaxis. This new subtype of WDEIA has little serum ω-5 gliadin-specific serum IgE. PMID:23093796

  17. p14(ARF) Prevents Proliferation of Aneuploid Cells by Inducing p53-Dependent Apoptosis.

    PubMed

    Veneziano, Lorena; Barra, Viviana; Lentini, Laura; Spatafora, Sergio; Di Leonardo, Aldo

    2016-02-01

    Weakening the Spindle Assembly Checkpoint by reduced expression of its components induces chromosome instability and aneuploidy that are hallmarks of cancer cells. The tumor suppressor p14(ARF) is overexpressed in response to oncogenic stimuli to stabilize p53 halting cell progression. Previously, we found that lack or reduced expression of p14(ARF) is involved in the maintenance of aneuploid cells in primary human cells, suggesting that it could be part of a pathway controlling their proliferation. To investigate this aspect further, p14(ARF) was ectopically expressed in HCT116 cells after depletion of the Spindle Assembly Checkpoint MAD2 protein that was used as a trigger for aneuploidy. p14(ARF) Re-expression reduced the number of aneuploid cells in MAD2 post-transcriptionally silenced cells. Also aberrant mitoses, frequently displayed in MAD2-depleted cells, were decreased when p14(ARF) was expressed at the same time. In addition, p14(ARF) ectopic expression in MAD2-depleted cells induced apoptosis associated with increased p53 protein levels. Conversely, p14(ARF) ectopic expression did not induce apoptosis in HCT116 p53KO cells. Collectively, our results suggest that the tumor suppressor p14(ARF) may have an important role in counteracting proliferation of aneuploid cells by activating p53-dependent apoptosis. PMID:25752701

  18. Oncotic necrosis and caspase-dependent apoptosis during galactosamine-induced liver injury in rats.

    PubMed

    Gujral, Jaspreet S; Farhood, Anwar; Jaeschke, Hartmut

    2003-07-01

    The mode of cell death during galactosamine (Gal)-induced liver injury was originally thought to be oncotic necrosis but recently it was suggested to be apoptosis. Thus, the objective was to assess whether apoptosis and oncosis are sequential or independent events in the pathophysiology. In addition, the role of caspases in Gal-induced apoptotic signaling was investigated. A dose of 500 mg/kg Gal caused a time-dependent increase in plasma alanine transaminase (ALT) levels (24 h: 430 +/- 122 U/L) in female Sprague-Dawley rats. This was accompanied by processing of procaspase-3 and significant increases in hepatic and plasma caspase-3 activities. Using morphology and TUNEL staining, apoptotic and oncotic cells were quantitated. The number of apoptotic hepatocytes increased from 0.14% in controls to 5.4 +/- 1.0% 24 h after Gal treatment. In addition, the number of cells with oncotic morphology increased from 0 to 6.9% of total hepatocytes. Treatment with the pan-caspase inhibitor IDN-7314 (10 mg/kg) or pretreatment with uridine (1 g/kg), reduced all parameters of apoptosis to baseline. However, IDN-7314 administration did not affect plasma ALT activities and the number of oncotic cells at 6 h and only modestly reduced these parameters at 24 h. Uridine, on the other hand, prevented the increase of plasma ALT levels and reduced the number of apoptotic and oncotic cells by >80%. In conclusion, galactosamine-induced hepatocellular apoptosis in rats is caspase dependent. Although some of the apoptotic cells may undergo secondary necrosis, a significant number of hepatocytes die through oncotic necrosis as an independent mechanism of cell death. PMID:12831781

  19. Local factors modify the dose dependence of 56Fe-induced atherosclerosis.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kucik, Dennis; Gupta, Kiran; Wu, Xing; Yu, Tao; Chang, Polly; Kabarowski, Janusz; Yu, Shaohua

    2012-07-01

    Radiation exposure from a number of terrestrial sources is associated with an increased risk of cardiovascular disease, but evidence establishing whether high-LET radiation has similar effects has been lacking. We recently demonstrated that 600 MeV/n 56Fe induces atherosclerosis as well. Ten-week old male apolipoprotein-E deficient mice, a well-characterized atherosclerosis animal model, were exposed to 0 (control) 2, or 5Gy 56Fe targeted to the chest and neck. In these mice, 56Fe-induced atherosclerosis was similar in character to that induced by X-rays in the same mouse model and to that resulting from therapeutic radiation in cancer patients. Atherosclerosis was exacerbated by 56Fe only in targeted areas, however, suggesting a direct effect of the radiation on the arteries themselves. This is in contrast to some other risk factors, such as high cholesterol or tobacco use, which have systemic effects. The radiation dose required to accelerate development of atherosclerotic plaques, however, differed depending on the vessel that was irradiated and even the location within the vessel. For example, atherosclerosis in the aortic arch was accelerated only by the highest dose (5 Gy), while the carotid arteries and the aortic root showed effects at 2 Gy (a dose four- to eight-fold lower than the dose of X-rays that produces similar effects in this model). Since shear stress is disrupted in the area of the aortic root, it is likely that at least part of the site-specificity is due to additive or synergistic effects of radiation and local hydrodynamics. Other factors, such as local oxidative stress or gene expression may also have been involved. Since the pro-atherogenic effects of 56Fe depend on additional local factors, this suggests that radiation exposure, when unavoidable, might be mitigated by modification of factors unrelated to the radiation itself.

  20. Gremlin Induces Ocular Hypertension in Mice Through Smad3-Dependent Signaling

    PubMed Central

    McDowell, Colleen M.; Hernandez, Humberto; Mao, Weiming; Clark, Abbot F.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose Transforming growth factor–β2 induces extracellular matrix (ECM) remodeling, which likely contributes to the defective function of the trabecular meshwork (TM) leading to glaucomatous ocular hypertension. Bone morphogenetic proteins (BMPs) inhibit these profibrotic effects of TGFβ2. The BMP antagonist gremlin is elevated in glaucomatous TM cells and increases IOP in an ex vivo perfusion culture model. The purpose of this study was to determine whether gremlin regulates ECM proteins in the TM, signals through the Smad3-dependent pathway, and induces ocular hypertension in mice. Methods Ad5.Gremlin or Ad5.TGFβ2 was injected intravitreally into one eye of each mouse. Intraocular pressure measurements were taken using a TonoLab tonometer. Gremlin, TGFβ2, fibronectin (FN), and collagen-1 (Col-1) expression in the TM was determined by immunofluorescence, Western immunoblot, and quantitative (q)PCR analyses. Results Ad5.Gremlin or Ad5.TGFβ2 each caused significant IOP elevation in mice. Immunofluorescence and Western blot analysis demonstrated that gremlin and TGFβ2 reciprocally increased the expression of each other, and both increased FN expression in the TM and surrounding tissues. Ad5.Gremlin elevated IOP and increased Fn and Col-1 gene expression in the TM of Smad3 wild-type (WT) mice, but had no effect in Smad3 HET or Smad3 KO mice. Conclusions Our results demonstrate that intravitreal injections of either Ad5.Gremlin or Ad5.TGFβ2 elevate IOP and upregulate the ECM protein FN in the TM of mice. These data show that gremlin signals through the Smad3-dependent pathway in the TM to elevate IOP. We determined for the first time gremlin's role in inducing ocular hypertension in an in vivo model system. PMID:26284554

  1. Cocaine induces state-dependent learning of sexual conditioning in male Japanese quail.

    PubMed

    Gill, Karin E; Rice, Beth Ann; Akins, Chana K

    2015-01-01

    State dependent learning effects have been widely studied in a variety of drugs of abuse. However, they have yet to be studied in relation to sexual motivation. The current study investigated state-dependent learning effects of cocaine in male Japanese quail (Coturnix japonica) using a sexual conditioning paradigm. Cocaine-induced state-dependent learning effects were investigated using a 2×2 factorial design with training state as one factor and test state as the other factor. During a 14-day training phase, male quail were injected once daily with 10mg/kg cocaine or saline and then placed in a test chamber after 15min. In the test chamber, sexual conditioning trials consisted of presentation of a light conditioned stimulus (CS) followed by sexual reinforcement. During the state dependent test, half of the birds received a shift in drug state from training to testing (Coc→Sal or Sal→Coc) while the other half remained in the same drug state (Coc→Coc or Sal→Sal). Results showed that male quail that were trained and tested in the same state (Coc→Coc or Sal→Sal) showed greater sexual conditioning than male quail that were trained and tested in different states (Sal→Coc) except when cocaine was administered chronically prior to the test (Coc→Sal). For the latter condition, sexual conditioning persisted from cocaine training to the saline test. The findings suggest that state dependent effects may alter sexual motivation and that repeated exposure to cocaine during sexual activity may increase sexual motivation which, in turn, may lead to high risk sexual activities. An alternative explanation for the findings is also discussed. PMID:25447336

  2. Developmental regulation of p53-dependent radiation-induced thymocyte apoptosis in mice

    PubMed Central

    Gentil Dit Maurin, A; Lemercier, C; Collin-Faure, V; Marche, P N; Jouvin-Marche, E; Candéias, S M

    2015-01-01

    The production of T cell receptor αβ+ (TCRαβ+) T lymphocytes in the thymus is a tightly regulated process that can be monitored by the regulated expression of several surface molecules, including CD4, CD8, cKit, CD25 and the TCR itself, after TCR genes have been assembled from discrete V, D (for TCR-β) and J gene segments by a site-directed genetic recombination. Thymocyte differentiation is the result of a delicate balance between cell death and survival: developing thymocytes die unless they receive a positive signal to proceed to the next stage. This equilibrium is altered in response to various physiological or physical stresses such as ionizing radiation, which induces a massive p53-dependent apoptosis of CD4+CD8+ double-positive (DP) thymocytes. Interestingly, these cells are actively rearranging their TCR-α chain genes. To unravel an eventual link between V(D)J recombination activity and thymocyte radio-sensitivity, we analysed the dynamics of thymocyte apoptosis and regeneration following exposure of wild-type and p53-deficient mice to different doses of γ-radiation. p53-dependent radio-sensitivity was already found to be high in immature CD4−CD8− (double-negative, DN) cKit+CD25+ thymocytes, where TCR-β gene rearrangement is initiated. However, TCR-αβ−CD8+ immature single-positive thymocytes, an actively cycling intermediate population between the DN and DP stages, are the most radio-sensitive cells in the thymus, even though their apoptosis is only partially p53-dependent. Within the DP population, TCR-αβ+ thymocytes that completed TCR-α gene recombination are more radio-resistant than their TCR-αβ− progenitors. Finally, we found no correlation between p53 activation and thymocyte sensitivity to radiation-induced apoptosis. PMID:24635132

  3. Anticancer agent icaritin induces apoptosis through caspase-dependent pathways in human hepatocellular carcinoma cells.

    PubMed

    Sun, Li; Peng, Qisong; Qu, Lili; Gong, Lailing; Si, Jin

    2015-04-01

    Icaritin is an active ingredient derived from the plant Herba epimedium, which exhibits various pharmacological and biological activities. However, the function, and the underlying mechanisms of icaritin on the growth of SMMC‑7721 human hepatoma cells have yet to be elucidated. The present study aimed to investigate the function and underlying mechanisms of icaritin in the growth of SMMC‑7721 cells. The cells were treated with varying concentrations of icaritin for 12, 24 and 48 h, respectively, prior to cytotoxic analysis. Apoptosis of SMMC‑7721 cells following treatment with icaritin was measured using flow cytometry. The gene expression of mitochondria‑ and Fas‑mediated caspase‑dependent pathways was detected by reverse transcription‑quantitative polymerase chain reaction and western blotting. Statistical analysis was performed by Student's t‑test and one‑way analysis or variance. The present study demonstrated that treatment with icaritin significantly inhibited growth, and induced apoptosis of SMMC‑7721 cells, in a time‑ and dose‑dependent manner. In addition, icaritin triggered the mitochondrial/caspase apoptotic pathway, by decreasing the Bcl‑2/Bax protein ratio and increasing activation of caspase‑3. Icaritin also activated the Fas‑mediated apoptosis pathway, as was evident by the increased expression levels of Fas and activation of caspase‑8. These data suggest that icaritin may be a potent growth inhibitor and induce apoptosis of SMMC‑7721 cells through the mitochondria‑ and Fas‑mediated caspase‑dependent pathways. The present study may provide experimental evidence for preclinical and clinical evaluations of icaritin for HCC therapy. PMID:25434584

  4. Nitrovasodilator-induced relaxation and tolerance development in porcine vena cordis magna: dependence on intact endothelium.

    PubMed Central

    Kojda, G.; Beck, J. K.; Meyer, W.; Noack, E.

    1994-01-01

    1. Isolated segments of porcine vena cordis magna exhibited a reproducible contractile activity upon application of prostaglandin F2 alpha (PGF2 alpha) or KCl, that was independent of the presence of intact endothelium. Substance P (3 nM) elicited strictly endothelium-dependent relaxations amounting to 46.1 +/- 1.4% (n = 206) of contractions induced by 10 microM PGF2 alpha. 2. S-nitroso-N-acetyl-D,L-penicillamine (SNAP), a compound that spontaneously liberates nitric oxide, concentration-dependently relaxed PGF2 alpha-precontracted (50 microM) venous segments. Tolerance induction (incubation with 100 microM SNAP for 30 min) within the same segments resulted in a 3 fold attenuation of this effect, which was not further reduced after additional preincubation with glyceryl trinitrate (GTN). Removal of endothelium or the presence of N omega-nitro-L-arginine methylester (L-NAME) significantly improved the potency of SNAP before and after tolerance induction. 3. Concentration-dependent relaxations induced by GTN in non-tolerant veins were similar in the presence and absence of endothelium but much more reduced in tolerant endothelium-denuded (75 fold) compared to intact (20 fold) segments. In contrast, the presence of L-NAME significantly improved GTN-activity solely in non-tolerant veins, which, therefore, also resulted in a more pronounced attenuation of activity due to tolerance induction (100 fold). Preincubation of intact veins with SNAP also reduced GTN-activity but to a lesser extent (10 fold). 4. The more delayed but much longer, and compared to GTN somewhat weaker, acting new nitrovasodilator N-(3-nitrato-pivaloyl)-1-cysteineethylester (SPM 3672) was more potent in denuded than intact non-tolerant venous segments.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:7521258

  5. INSULIN INDUCED EPIDERMAL GROWTH FACTOR ACTIVATION IN VASCULAR SMOOTH MUSCLE CELLS IS ADAM-DEPENDENT

    PubMed Central

    Roztocil, Elisa; Nicholl, Suzanne M.; Davies, Mark G.

    2008-01-01

    Background With the rise in metabolic syndrome, understanding the role of insulin signaling within the cells of vasculature has become more important but yet remains poorly defined. The study examines the role of insulin actions on a pivotal cross-talk receptor, Epidermal Growth Factor Receptor (EGFR). EGFR is transactivated by both G-protein-coupled receptors and receptor linked tyrosine kinases and is key to many of their responses. Objective To determine the pathway of EGFR transactivation by insulin in human coronary smooth muscle cells (VSMC) Methods VSMC were cultured in vitro. Assays of EGFR phosphorylation were examined in response to insulin in the presence and absence of the plasmin inhibitors (e-aminocaproic acid and aprotinin) matrix metalloprotease (MMP) inhibitor GM6001, the ADAM (A Disintegrin And Metalloproteinase Domain) inhibitors TAPI-0 and TAPI-1, Heparin binding epidermal growth factor (HB-EGF) inhibitor, CRM197, HB-EGF inhibitory antibodies, EGF inhibitory antibodies and the EGFR inhibitor AG1478. Results Insulin induced time-dependent EGFR phosphorylation, which was inhibited by AG1478 in a concentration dependent manner. Application of the plasmin inhibitors did not block the response. EGFR phosphorylation by insulin was blocked by inhibition of MMP activity and the ligand HB-EGF. The presence of the ADAM inhibitors, TAPI-0 and TAPI-1 significantly decreased EGFR activation. EGFR phosphorylation by EGF was not interrupted by inhibition of plasmin, MMPs TAPIs, or HB-EGF. Direct blockade of the EGFR prevented activation by both insulin and EGF. Conclusion Insulin can induce transactivation of EGFR by an ADAM-mediated, HB-EGF dependent process. This is the first description of crosstalk via ADAM between insulin and EGFR in vascular SMC. Targeting a pivotal cross-talk receptor such as EGFR, which can be transactivated by both G-protein-coupled receptors and receptor tyrosine kinases is an attractive molecular target. PMID:18656632

  6. Helicity-dependent photocurrent induced by the in-plane transverse electric current in an InAs quantum well

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, J. B.; Wu, X. G.; Wang, G. W.; Xu, Y. Q.; Niu, Z. C.; Zhang, X. H.

    2016-08-01

    We report the observation of a new type of helicity-dependent photocurrent induced by an in-plane transverse direct electric current in an InAs quantum well. The amplitude of the photocurrent depends linearly on the transverse current. Moreover, the observed incident azimuth-angle dependence of this photocurrent is different from that induced by the circular photogalvanic effect. This new photocurrent appears as a result of an asymmetrical carrier distribution in both the conduction and valence bands induced by the transverse current. The photoexcited carrier density created by interband transition processes is thus modulated and leads to the observed new azimuth-angle dependence. The observed efficient generation of the helicity-dependent photocurrent offers an effective approach to manipulate electron spins in two-dimensional semiconductor systems with the added advantage of electrical control of the spin-related photocurrent in spintronic applications.

  7. Helicity-dependent photocurrent induced by the in-plane transverse electric current in an InAs quantum well.

    PubMed

    Li, J B; Wu, X G; Wang, G W; Xu, Y Q; Niu, Z C; Zhang, X H

    2016-01-01

    We report the observation of a new type of helicity-dependent photocurrent induced by an in-plane transverse direct electric current in an InAs quantum well. The amplitude of the photocurrent depends linearly on the transverse current. Moreover, the observed incident azimuth-angle dependence of this photocurrent is different from that induced by the circular photogalvanic effect. This new photocurrent appears as a result of an asymmetrical carrier distribution in both the conduction and valence bands induced by the transverse current. The photoexcited carrier density created by interband transition processes is thus modulated and leads to the observed new azimuth-angle dependence. The observed efficient generation of the helicity-dependent photocurrent offers an effective approach to manipulate electron spins in two-dimensional semiconductor systems with the added advantage of electrical control of the spin-related photocurrent in spintronic applications. PMID:27501858

  8. Helicity-dependent photocurrent induced by the in-plane transverse electric current in an InAs quantum well

    PubMed Central

    Li, J. B.; Wu, X. G.; Wang, G. W.; Xu, Y. Q.; Niu, Z. C.; Zhang, X. H.

    2016-01-01

    We report the observation of a new type of helicity-dependent photocurrent induced by an in-plane transverse direct electric current in an InAs quantum well. The amplitude of the photocurrent depends linearly on the transverse current. Moreover, the observed incident azimuth-angle dependence of this photocurrent is different from that induced by the circular photogalvanic effect. This new photocurrent appears as a result of an asymmetrical carrier distribution in both the conduction and valence bands induced by the transverse current. The photoexcited carrier density created by interband transition processes is thus modulated and leads to the observed new azimuth-angle dependence. The observed efficient generation of the helicity-dependent photocurrent offers an effective approach to manipulate electron spins in two-dimensional semiconductor systems with the added advantage of electrical control of the spin-related photocurrent in spintronic applications. PMID:27501858

  9. Acidosis Mediates the Switching of Gs-PKA and Gi-PKCε Dependence in Prolonged Hyperalgesia Induced by Inflammation

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Wei-Yu; Dai, Shih-Ping; Chang, Yan-Ching; Sun, Wei-Hsin

    2015-01-01

    Chronic inflammatory pain, when not effectively treated, is a costly health problem and has a harmful effect on all aspects of health-related quality of life. Previous studies suggested that in male Sprague Dawley rats, prostaglandin E2 (PGE2)-induced short-term hyperalgesia depends on protein kinase A (PKA) activity, whereas long-lasting hyperalgesia induced by PGE2 with carrageenan pre-injection, requires protein kinase Cε (PKCε). However, the mechanism underlying the kinase switch with short- to long-term hyperalgesia remains unclear. In this study, we used the inflammatory agents carrageenan or complete Freund’s adjuvant (CFA) to induce long-term hyperalgesia, and examined PKA and PKCε dependence and switching time. Hyperalgesia induced by both agents depended on PKA/PKCε and Gs/Gi-proteins, and the switching time from PKA to PKCε and from Gs to Gi was about 3 to 4 h after inflammation induction. Among the single inflammatory mediators tested, PGE2 and 5-HT induced transient hyperalgesia, which depended on PKA and PKCε, respectively. Only acidic solution-induced hyperalgesia required Gs-PKA and Gi-PKCε, and the switch time for kinase dependency matched inflammatory hyperalgesia, in approximately 2 to 4 h. Thus, acidosis in inflamed tissues may be a decisive factor to regulate switching of PKA and PKCε dependence via proton-sensing G-protein–coupled receptors. PMID:25933021

  10. Plant Dependence on Rhizobia for Nitrogen Influences Induced Plant Defenses and Herbivore Performance

    PubMed Central

    Dean, Jennifer M.; Mescher, Mark C.; De Moraes, Consuelo M.

    2014-01-01

    Symbiotic rhizobia induce many changes in legumes that could affect aboveground interactions with herbivores. We explored how changing the intensity of Bradyrhizobium japonicum, as modulated by soil nitrogen (N) levels, influenced the interaction between soybean (Glycine max) and herbivores of different feeding guilds. When we employed a range of fertilizer applications to manipulate soil N, plants primarily dependent on rhizobia for N exhibited increased root nodulation and higher levels of foliar ureides than plants given N fertilizer; yet all treatments maintained similar total N levels. Soybean podworm (Helicoverpa zea) larvae grew best on plants with the highest levels of rhizobia but, somewhat surprisingly, preferred to feed on high-N-fertilized plants when given a choice. Induction of the defense signaling compound jasmonic acid (JA) by H. zea feeding damage was highest in plants primarily dependent on rhizobia. Differences in rhizobial dependency on soybean did not appear to affect interactions with the phloem-feeding soybean aphid (Aphis glycines). Overall, our results suggest that rhizobia association can affect plant nutritional quality and the induction of defense signaling pathways and that these effects may influence herbivore feeding preferences and performance—though such effects may vary considerably for different classes of herbivores. PMID:24451132

  11. Hyposmotic stress induces cell growth arrest via proteasome activation and cyclin/cyclin-dependent kinase degradation.

    PubMed

    Tao, Guo-Zhong; Rott, Lusijah S; Lowe, Anson W; Omary, M Bishr

    2002-05-31

    Ordered cell cycle progression requires the expression and activation of several cyclins and cyclin-dependent kinases (Cdks). Hyperosmotic stress causes growth arrest possibly via proteasome-mediated degradation of cyclin D1. We studied the effect of hyposmotic conditions on three colonic (Caco2, HRT18, HT29) and two pancreatic (AsPC-1 and PaCa-2) cell lines. Hyposmosis caused reversible cell growth arrest of the five cell lines in a cell cycle-independent fashion, although some cell lines accumulated at the G(1)/S interface. Growth arrest was followed by apoptosis or by formation of multinucleated giant cells, which is consistent with cell cycle catastrophe. Hyposmosis dramatically decreased Cdc2, Cdk2, Cdk4, cyclin B1, and cyclin D3 expression in a time-dependent fashion, in association with an overall decrease in cellular protein synthesis. However, some protein levels remained unaltered, including cyclin E and keratin 8. Selective proteasome inhibition prevented Cdk and cyclin degradation and reversed hyposmotic stress-induced growth arrest, whereas calpain and lysosome enzyme inhibitors had no measurable effect on cell cycle protein degradation. Therefore, hyposmotic stress inhibits cell growth and, depending on the cell type, causes cell cycle catastrophe with or without apoptosis. The growth arrest is due to decreased protein synthesis and proteasome activation, with subsequent degradation of several cyclins and Cdks. PMID:11897780

  12. Pulsewidth dependence of laser-induced periodic surface structure formed on yttria-stabilized zirconia polycrystal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kakehata, Masayuki; Yashiro, Hidehiko; Oyane, Ayako; Ito, Atsuo; Torizuka, Kenji

    2016-03-01

    Three-mol% yttria-stabilized tetragonal zirconia polycrystal (3Y-TZP) is a fine engineering ceramic that offers high fracture resistance and flexural strength. Thus, it is often applied in mechanical components and medical implants. The surface roughness can be controlled to improve the device characters in some applications. Ultrashort pulse lasers can form laser-induced periodic surface structures (LIPSS) on 3Y-TZP, which have never been investigated in detail. Therefore, this paper reports the formation and characteristics of LIPSS formed on 3Y-TZP, focusing on the pulsewidth dependence. The LIPSS was formed by a Ti:sapphire chirped-pulse amplification system, which generates 810 nmcentered 80-fs pulses at a 570 Hz repetition rate. The measured ablation threshold peak fluence was ~1.5 J/cm2 and the LIPSS was formed at the peak fluence of 2.7-7.7 J/cm2. For linearly polarized pulses, the lines of the LIPSS were oriented parallel to the polarization direction, and their period was comparable to or larger than the center wavelength of the laser. These characteristics differ from the reported characteristics of LIPSS on metals and dielectrics. The pulsewidth dependence of the ablation and LIPSS was investigated for different pulsewidths and signs of chirp. Under the investigated fluence condition, the LIPSS period increased with increasing pulsewidth for both signs of chirp. Similar pulsewidth dependencies were observed for circularly polarized pulses.

  13. AMPK induces vascular smooth muscle cell senescence via LKB1 dependent pathway

    SciTech Connect

    Sung, Jin Young; Woo, Chang-Hoon; Kang, Young Jin; Lee, Kwang Youn; Choi, Hyoung Chul

    2011-09-16

    Highlights: {yields} An aging model was established by stimulating VSMC with adriamycin. {yields} Adriamycin increased p-LKB1, p-AMPK, p53 and p21 expressions. {yields} Inhibition of AMPK diminished SA-{beta}-gal staining and restored VSMC proliferation. {yields} p53 and p21 siRNA attenuated adriamycin-induced SA-{beta}-gal staining in VSMC. {yields} p53-p21 pathway is a mediator of LKB1/AMPK induced VSMC senescence. -- Abstract: Vascular cells have a limited lifespan with limited cell proliferation and undergo cellular senescence. The functional changes associated with cellular senescence are thought to contribute to age-related vascular disorders. AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK) has been discussed in terms of beneficial or harmful effects for aging-related diseases. However, the detailed functional mechanisms of AMPK are largely unclear. An aging model was established by stimulating vascular smooth muscle cell (VSMC) with adriamycin. Adriamycin progressively increased the mRNA and protein expressions of AMPK. The phosphorylation levels of LKB1 and acetyl-CoA carboxylase (ACC), the upstream and downstream of AMPK, were dramatically increased by adriamycin stimulation. The expressions of p53 and p21, which contribute to vascular senescence, were also increased. Inhibition of AMPK diminished senescence-associated {beta}-galactosidase (SA-{beta}-gal) staining, and restored VSMC proliferation. Cytosolic translocation of LKB1 by adriamycin could be a mechanism for AMPK activation in senescence. Furthermore, p53 siRNA and p21 siRNA transfection attenuated adriamycin-induced SA-{beta}-gal staining. These results suggest that LKB1 dependent AMPK activation elicits VSMC senescence and p53-p21 pathway is a mediator of LKB1/AMPK-induced senescence.

  14. p53-dependent apoptosis contributes to di-(2-ethylhexyl) phthalate-induced hepatotoxicity.

    PubMed

    Ha, Mei; Wei, Li; Guan, Xie; Li, Lianbing; Liu, Changjiang

    2016-01-01

    Di-(2-ethylhexyl) phthalate (DEHP) is used extensively in many personal care and consumer products, resulting in widespread non-occupational human exposure through multiple routes and media. DEHP has various deleterious effects including hepatotoxicity. p53 protein is a central sensor in cell apoptosis. In order to clarify the roles of p53 in DEHP-induced hepatotoxicity, Sprague-Dawley (SD) rats were dosed daily with DEHP by gavage for 30 days; BRL cells (rat liver cell line) were treated with DEHP for 24 h after pretreatment with NAC or small interfering RNA (siRNA). Results indicated that after exposure to DEHP, hepatic histological changes such as hepatocyte edema, vacuolation and hepatic sinusoidal dilation, and increased apoptosis index were observed. In the liver, DEHP induced oxidative stress and DNA damage, which activated p53 in vivo and in vitro. Pretreatment with NAC significantly reduced ROS level and p53 expression in BRL cells. The suppressed Mdm2 also contributed to p53 accumulation. Activated p53 mediated hepatocyte apoptosis via the intrinsic mitochondrial pathway, inhibiting anti-apoptotic Bcl-2 and Bcl-xL and inducing pro-apoptotic Bax, cytochrome c and caspases. In p53-silenced BRL cells, hepatocyte apoptosis mediated by p53 was attenuated. PCNA protein level was upregulated after p53 gene silencing. However, the Fas/FasL apoptotic pathway did not exhibit activated signs in DEHP-caused hepatotoxicity. Taken together, DEHP-caused oxidative stress and Mdm2 downregulation contribute to p53 activation. The p53-dependent apoptotic pathway plays critical and indispensable roles in DEHP-induced hepatotoxicity, while the Fas/FasL pathway does not involve in this molecular event. PMID:26549752

  15. Higher sensitivity to cadmium induced cell death of basal forebrain cholinergic neurons: a cholinesterase dependent mechanism.

    PubMed

    Del Pino, Javier; Zeballos, Garbriela; Anadon, María José; Capo, Miguel Andrés; Díaz, María Jesús; García, Jimena; Frejo, María Teresa

    2014-11-01

    Cadmium is an environmental pollutant, which is a cause of concern because it can be greatly concentrated in the organism causing severe damage to a variety of organs including the nervous system which is one of the most affected. Cadmium has been reported to produce learning and memory dysfunctions and Alzheimer like symptoms, though the mechanism is unknown. On the other hand, cholinergic system in central nervous system (CNS) is implicated on learning and memory regulation, and it has been reported that cadmium can affect cholinergic transmission and it can also induce selective toxicity on cholinergic system at peripheral level, producing cholinergic neurons loss, which may explain cadmium effects on learning and memory processes if produced on central level. The present study is aimed at researching the selective neurotoxicity induced by cadmium on cholinergic system in CNS. For this purpose we evaluated, in basal forebrain region, the cadmium toxic effects on neuronal viability and the cholinergic mechanisms related to it on NS56 cholinergic mourine septal cell line. This study proves that cadmium induces a more pronounced, but not selective, cell death on acetylcholinesterase (AChE) on cholinergic neurons. Moreover, MTT and LDH assays showed a dose dependent decrease of cell viability in NS56 cells. The ACh treatment of SN56 cells did not revert cell viability reduction induced by cadmium, but siRNA transfection against AChE partially reduced it. Our present results provide new understanding of the mechanisms contributing to the harmful effects of cadmium on the function and viability of neurons, and the possible relevance of cadmium in the pathogenesis of neurodegenerative diseases. PMID:25201352

  16. Time-dependent changes of autophagy and apoptosis in lipopolysaccharide-induced rat acute lung injury

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Li; Zhang, Lijun; Yu, Liangzhu; Han, Lu; Ji, Wanli; Shen, Hui; Hu, Zhenwu

    2016-01-01

    Objective(s): Abnormal lung cell death including autophagy and apoptosis is the central feature in acute lung injury (ALI). To identify the cellular mechanisms and the chronology by which different types of lung cell death are activated during lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-induced ALI, we decided to evaluate autophagy (by LC3-II and autophagosome) and apoptosis (by caspase-3) at different time points after LPS treatment in a rat model of LPS-induced ALI. Materials and Methods: Sprague-Dawley rats were randomly divided into two groups: control group and LPS group. ALI was induced by LPS intraperitoneal injection (3 mg/kg). The lung tissues were collected to measure lung injury score by histopathological evaluation, the protein expression of LC3-II and caspase-3 by Western blot, and microstructural changes by electron microscopy analysis. Results: During ALI, lung cell death exhibited modifications in the death process at different stages of ALI. At early stages (1 hr and 2 hr) of ALI, the mode of lung cell death started with autophagy in LPS group and reached a peak at 2 hr. As ALI process progressed, apoptosis was gradually increased in the lung tissues and reached its maximal level at later stages (6 hr), while autophagy was time-dependently decreased. Conclusion: These findings suggest that activated autophagy and apoptosis might play distinct roles at different stages of LPS-induced ALI. This information may enhance the understanding of lung pathophysiology at the cellular level during ALI and pulmonary infection, and thus help optimize the timing of innovating therapeutic approaches in future experiments with this model. PMID:27482344

  17. 2-Hydroxyethyl methacrylate-induced apoptosis through the ATM- and p53-dependent intrinsic mitochondrial pathway.

    PubMed

    Schweikl, Helmut; Petzel, Christine; Bolay, Carola; Hiller, Karl-Anton; Buchalla, Wolfgang; Krifka, Stephanie

    2014-03-01

    Resin monomers of dental composites like 2-hydroxyethyl methacrylate (HEMA) disturb cell functions including responses of the innate immune system, mineralization and differentiation of dental pulp-derived cells, or induce cell death via apoptosis. The induction of apoptosis is related to the availability of the antioxidant glutathione, although a detailed understanding of the signaling pathways is still unknown. The present study provides insight into the causal relationship between oxidative stress, oxidative DNA damage, and the specific signaling pathway leading to HEMA-induced apoptosis in RAW264.7 mouse macrophages. The differential expression of the antioxidative enzymes superoxide dismutase, glutathione peroxidase, and catalase in HEMA-exposed cells indicated oxidative stress, which was associated with the cleavage of pro-caspase 3 as a critical apoptosis executioner. A 2-fold increase in the amount of mitochondrial superoxide anions after a 24 h exposure to HEMA (6-8 mM) was paralleled by a considerable decrease in the mitochondrial membrane potential (MMP). Additionally, expression of proteins critical for the signaling of apoptosis through the intrinsic mitochondrial pathway was detected. Transcription-dependent and transcription-independent mechanisms of p53-regulated apoptosis were activated, and p53 was translocated from the cytosol to mitochondria. HEMA-induced transcriptional activity of p53 was indicated by increased levels of PUMA localized to mitochondria as a potent inducer of apoptosis. The expression of Bcl-xL and Bax suggested that cells responded to stress caused by HEMA via the activation of a complicated and antagonistic machinery of pro- and anti-apoptotic Bcl-2 family members. A HEMA-induced and oxidative stress-sensitive delay of the cell cycle, indicating a DNA damage response, occurred independent of the influence of KU55399, a potent inhibitor of ATM (ataxia-telangiectasia mutated) activity. However, ATM, a protein kinase which

  18. Sodium-dependent GABA-induced currents in GAT1-transfected HeLa cells.

    PubMed Central

    Risso, S; DeFelice, L J; Blakely, R D

    1996-01-01

    1. HeLa cells were infected with recombinant vaccinia virus containing the T7 RNA polymerase gene and transfected with the cDNA for a rat GABA transporter, GAT1, cloned downstream of a T7 RNA polymerase promoter. Six to sixteen hours after transfection, whole-cell recording with a voltage ramp in the range -90 to 50 mV revealed GABA-induced currents (approximately -100 pA at -60 mV in 100 microM GABA, 16 h after transfection at room temperature). No GABA-induced currents were observed in parental HeLa cells or in mock-transfected cells. 2. GABA-induced currents were suppressed by extracellular perfusion with GABA-free solutions or addition of GAT1 inhibitors SKF89976-A or SKF100330-A. At fixed voltage the GABA dependence of the inward current fitted the Michaelis-Menten equation with a Hill coefficient, n, near unity and an equilibrium constant, K(m), near 3 microM. The Na+ dependence of the inward currents fitted the Michaelis-Menten equation with n approximately equal to 2 and K(m) approximately equal to 10 mM. The constants n and K(m) for GABA and Na+ were independent of voltage in the range -90 to -30 mV. 3. GABA-induced currents reverse direction in the range 5-10 mV. The implication of this result is that GAT1 can mediate electrogenic (electrophoretic) influx or efflux of GABA depending on the membrane voltage. The presence of an outward current in our experiments is consistent with radioactive-labelled flux data from resealed vesicle studies. However, it is inconsistent with frog oocyte expression experiments using the sample clone. In oocytes, GAT1 generates no outward current in a similar voltage range. Smaller intracellular volume or higher turnover rates in the mammalian expression system may explain the outward currents. 4. External GABA induces inward current, and internal GABA induces outward current. However, in cells initially devoid of internal GABA, external GABA can also facilitate an outward current. This GAT1-mediated outward current occurs

  19. Baicalein induces apoptosis via ROS-dependent activation of caspases in human bladder cancer 5637 cells.

    PubMed

    Choi, Eun-Ok; Park, Cheol; Hwang, Hye-Jin; Hong, Su Hyun; Kim, Gi-Young; Cho, Eun-Ju; Kim, Wun-Jae; Choi, Yung Hyun

    2016-09-01

    Baicalein is a flavonoid derived originally from the root of Scutellaria baicalensis Georgi, which has been used in Oriental medicines for treating various diseases. Although this compound has been reported to have anticancer activities in several human cancer cell lines, the therapeutic effects of baicalein on human bladder cancer and its mechanisms of action have not been extensively studied. This study investigated the proapoptotic effects of baicalein in human bladder cancer 5637 cells. For this study, cell viability and apoptosis were evaluated using the 3-(4,5-dimethylthia-zol-2-yl)-2,5-diphenyltetrazolium bromide assay, trypan blue dye exclusion assay 4,6-diamidino-2-phenylindole staining, and flow cytometry. Measurements of the mitochondrial membrane potential (MMP), caspase activity assays and western blots were conducted to determine whether 5637 cell death occurred by apoptosis. Treatment with baicalein resulted in a concentration-dependent growth inhibition coupled with apoptosis induction, as indicated by the results of nuclei morphology examination and flow cytometry analyses. The induction of the apoptotic cell death of 5637 cells by baicalein exhibited a correlation with the downregulation of members of the inhibitor of apoptosis protein (IAP) family, including cIAP-1 and cIAP-2, and the activation of caspase-9 and -3 accompanied by proteolytic degradation of poly(ADP-ribose)-polymerase. The study also showed that baicalein decreases the expression of the proapoptotic protein Bax, increases antiapoptotic Bcl-2 expression, and noticeably aggravates the loss of MMP. Concomitantly, the data showed that baicalein increases the levels of death receptors and their associated ligands and enhances the activation of caspase-8 and truncation of Bid. However, the pan-caspase inhibitor can reverse baicalein-induced apoptosis, demonstrating that it is a caspase-dependent pathway. Moreover, it was found that baicalein can induce the production of reactive oxygen

  20. Dependence of Memory Effects of Induced Magnetic Anisotropy on Pressure and Possibility of Using These Effects in Industry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vechfinskii, V. S.; Remizov, A. E.

    2016-05-01

    This paper examines the dependence of memory effects of induced magnetic anisotropy (IMA) on pressure. The authors suggest an empirical formula for this dependence and analyze the possibility of using IMA properties in aviation industry, particularly in wear control of gas turbine engines.

  1. Endotoxin-Induced Endothelial Fibrosis Is Dependent on Expression of Transforming Growth Factors β1 and β2

    PubMed Central

    Echeverría, César; Montorfano, Ignacio; Tapia, Pablo; Riedel, Claudia; Cabello-Verrugio, Claudio

    2014-01-01

    During endotoxemia-induced inflammatory disease, bacterial endotoxins circulate in the bloodstream and interact with endothelial cells (ECs), inducing dysfunction of the ECs. We previously reported that endotoxins induce the conversion of ECs into activated fibroblasts. Through endotoxin-induced endothelial fibrosis, ECs change their morphology and their protein expression pattern, thereby suppressing endothelial markers and upregulating fibrotic proteins. The most commonly used fibrotic inducers are transforming growth factor β1 (TGF-β1) and TGF-β2. However, whether TGF-β1 and TGF-β2 participate in endotoxin-induced endothelial fibrosis remains unknown. We have shown that the endotoxin-induced endothelial fibrosis process is dependent on the TGF-β receptor, ALK5, and the activation of Smad3, a protein that is activated by ALK5 activation, thus suggesting that endotoxin elicits TGF-β production to mediate endotoxin-induced endothelial fibrosis. Therefore, we investigated the dependence of endotoxin-induced endothelial fibrosis on the expression of TGF-β1 and TGF-β2. Endotoxin-treated ECs induced the expression and secretion of TGF-β1 and TGF-β2. TGF-β1 and TGF-β2 downregulation inhibited the endotoxin-induced changes in the endothelial marker VE-cadherin and in the fibrotic proteins α-SMA and fibronectin. Thus, endotoxin induces the production of TGF-β1 and TGF-β2 as a mechanism to promote endotoxin-induced endothelial fibrosis. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first report showing that endotoxin induces endothelial fibrosis via TGF-β secretion, which represents an emerging source of vascular dysfunction. These findings contribute to understanding the molecular mechanism of endotoxin-induced endothelial fibrosis, which could be useful in the treatment of inflammatory diseases. PMID:24935972

  2. Modeling Injection Induced Seismicity with Poro-Elasticity and Time-Dependent Earthquake Nucleation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lu, S.; Segall, P.

    2014-12-01

    The standard approach to modeling injection-induced seismicity (IIS) considers Coulomb failure stress changes accounting only for pore-pressure changes, which are solved by the diffusion equation. However, this "diffusion" triggering mechanism is not comprehensive. Lab experiments indicate earthquake nucleation also depends on stress history. Here we add two effects in modeling IIS: 1) poro-elastic coupling between solid stresses and pore-pressure, and 2) time dependent earthquake nucleation under applied stresses. In this model, we compute stress and pore-pressure changes due to a point source injecting in a homogeneous, poro-elastic full space (Rudnicki, 1986). The Coulomb stress history is used to compute seismicity rate changes based on the time-dependent nucleation model of Dieterich (1994). Our new model reveals: 1) poro-elastic coupling breaks the radial symmetry in seismicity, 2) nucleation introduces a characteristic nucleation time ta, which affects the temporal evolution of seismicity rates, and 3) for some fault geometries, the seismicity rate may increase following shut in. For constant injection flux, the log of seismicity rate scales with the change in Coulomb stress at short time, consistent with diffusion profiles. At longer time, the model predicts seismicity rates decaying with time, consistent with some observations. The contour shape and decay time are characterized by ta. For finite injection with box-car flux history, seismicity rates plummet near the injector, but may continue for some time at greater distance. Depending on fault orientations, seismicity rates may increase after shut-in due to coupling effects. It has been observed in some cases that the maximum magnitude of induced quakes occurs after shut-in. This may be understood by the fact that the volume of perturbed crust increases with injection time, which influences probability of triggering an event of a given magnitude. Whether coupling effects are important in post shut

  3. RRM2 induces NF-{kappa}B-dependent MMP-9 activation and enhances cellular invasiveness

    SciTech Connect

    Duxbury, Mark S.; Whang, Edward E. . E-mail: ewhang1@partners.org

    2007-03-02

    Ribonucleotide reductase is a dimeric enzyme that catalyzes conversion of ribonucleotide 5'-diphosphates to their 2'-deoxynucleotide forms, a rate-limiting step in the production of 2'-deoxyribonucleoside 5'-triphosphates required for DNA synthesis. The ribonucleotide reductase M2 subunit (RRM2) is a determinant of malignant cellular behavior in a range of human cancers. We examined the effect of RRM2 overexpression on pancreatic adenocarcinoma cellular invasiveness and nuclear factor-{kappa}B (NF-{kappa}B) transcription factor activity. RRM2 overexpression increases pancreatic adenocarcinoma cellular invasiveness and MMP-9 expression in a NF-{kappa}B-dependent manner. RNA interference (RNAi)-mediated silencing of RRM2 expression attenuates cellular invasiveness and NF-{kappa}B activity. NF-{kappa}B is a key mediator of the invasive phenotypic changes induced by RRM2 overexpression.

  4. Intravital imaging reveals p53-dependent cancer cell death induced by phototherapy via calcium signaling

    PubMed Central

    Missiroli, Sonia; Poletti, Federica; Ramirez, Fabian Galindo; Morciano, Giampaolo; Morganti, Claudia; Pandolfi, Pier Paolo; Mammano, Fabio; Pinton, Paolo

    2015-01-01

    One challenge in biology is signal transduction monitoring in a physiological context. Intravital imaging techniques are revolutionizing our understanding of tumor and host cell behaviors in the tumor environment. However, these deep tissue imaging techniques have not yet been adopted to investigate the second messenger calcium (Ca2+). In the present study, we established conditions that allow the in vivo detection of Ca2+ signaling in three-dimensional tumor masses in mouse models. By combining intravital imaging and a skinfold chamber technique, we determined the ability of photodynamic cancer therapy to induce an increase in intracellular Ca2+ concentrations and, consequently, an increase in cell death in a p53-dependent pathway. PMID:25544762

  5. Specific Inhibition of Cyclin-dependent Kinase 5 Activity Induces Motor Neuron Development in vivo

    PubMed Central

    Kanungo, Jyotshnabala; Zheng, Ya-Li; Amin, Niranjana D.; Kaur, Sukhbir; Ramchandran, Ramani; Pant, Harish C.

    2009-01-01

    Cyclin-dependent kinase 5 (cdk5) is a ubiquitous protein activated by specific activators, p35 and p39. Cdk5 regulates neuronal migration, differentiation, axonogenesis, synaptic transmission and apoptosis. However, its role in motor neuron development remains unexplored. Here, using gain and loss-of-function analyses in developing zebrafish embryos, we report that cdk5 plays a critical role in spinal and cranial motor neuron development. Cdk5 knockdown results in supernumerary spinal and cranial motor neurons. While a dominant negative, kinase-dead cdk5 promotes the generation of supernumerary motor neurons; over-expression of cdk5 suppresses motor neuron development. Thus, modulating cdk5 activity seems promising in inducing motor neuron development in vivo. PMID:19523926

  6. Different temporal patterns of vector soliton bunching induced by polarization-dependent saturable absorber

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Wei-Cheng; Chen, Guo-Jie; Han, Ding-An; Li, Bin

    2014-06-01

    A fiber laser with either a polarization-independent semiconductor saturable absorption mirror (PID-SESAM) or a polarization-dependent SESAM (PD-SESAM) as a passive mode-locker is constructed for obtaining the vector soliton bunching. The temporal patterns of the soliton bunching generated from the fiber laser with a PD-SESAM are much more abundant than that in fiber laser with a PID-SESAM. Only the vibrating soliton bunching is generated from the fiber laser with a PID-SESAM. However, there are another three interesting temporal patterns of the soliton bunching generated from the fiber laser with a PD-SESAM except for the vibrating soliton bunching. They are variable length soliton bunching, breathing soliton bunching and stable soliton bunching along the slow axis induced by polarization instability. It is found that the polarization property of the saturable absorber plays a pivotal role for achieving different temporal patterns of the soliton bunching.

  7. Temperature and Pressure Dependence of Signal Amplitudes for Electrostriction Laser-Induced Thermal Acoustics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Herring, Gregory C.

    2015-01-01

    The relative signal strength of electrostriction-only (no thermal grating) laser-induced thermal acoustics (LITA) in gas-phase air is reported as a function of temperature T and pressure P. Measurements were made in the free stream of a variable Mach number supersonic wind tunnel, where T and P are varied simultaneously as Mach number is varied. Using optical heterodyning, the measured signal amplitude (related to the optical reflectivity of the acoustic grating) was averaged for each of 11 flow conditions and compared to the expected theoretical dependence of a pure-electrostriction LITA process, where the signal is proportional to the square root of [P*P /( T*T*T)].

  8. Dissipative time-dependent quantum transport theory: Quantum interference and phonon induced decoherence dynamics

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Yu Chen, GuanHua; Yam, ChiYung

    2015-04-28

    A time-dependent inelastic electron transport theory for strong electron-phonon interaction is established via the equations of motion method combined with the small polaron transformation. In this work, the dissipation via electron-phonon coupling is taken into account in the strong coupling regime, which validates the small polaron transformation. The corresponding equations of motion are developed, which are used to study the quantum interference effect and phonon-induced decoherence dynamics in molecular junctions. Numerical studies show clearly quantum interference effect of the transport electrons through two quasi-degenerate states with different couplings to the leads. We also found that the quantum interference can be suppressed by the electron-phonon interaction where the phase coherence is destroyed by phonon scattering. This indicates the importance of electron-phonon interaction in systems with prominent quantum interference effect.

  9. Acanthamoeba castellanii Induces Host Cell Death via a Phosphatidylinositol 3-Kinase-Dependent Mechanism

    PubMed Central

    Sissons, James; Kim, Kwang Sik; Stins, Monique; Jayasekera, Samantha; Alsam, Selwa; Khan, Naveed Ahmed

    2005-01-01

    Granulomatous amoebic encephalitis due to Acanthamoeba castellanii is a serious human infection with fatal consequences, but it is not clear how the circulating amoebae interact with the blood-brain barrier and transmigrate into the central nervous system. We studied the effects of an Acanthamoeba encephalitis isolate belonging to the T1 genotype on human brain microvascular endothelial cells, which constitute the blood-brain barrier. Using an apoptosis-specific enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay, we showed that Acanthamoeba induces programmed cell death in brain microvascular endothelial cells. Next, we observed that Acanthamoeba specifically activates phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase. Acanthamoeba-mediated brain endothelial cell death was abolished using LY294002, a phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase inhibitor. These results were further confirmed using brain microvascular endothelial cells expressing dominant negative forms of phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase. This is the first demonstration that Acanthamoeba-mediated brain microvascular endothelial cell death is dependent on phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase. PMID:15845472

  10. Dose-dependent protective effect of BPC 157 on capsaicin-induced rhinitis in rats.

    PubMed

    Kalogjera, L; Ries, M; Baudoin, T; Ferencic, Z; Trotic, R; Pegan, B

    1997-01-01

    Protection of BPC 157 on capsaicin-induced rhinitis was studied in Wistar rats for its effect on mastocyte infiltration, degranulation and inflammatory cell infiltration. Animals were pretreated with 10 microg/kg, 10 ng/kg or 2 ml saline i.p. and capsaicin (0.05 ml/nostril of 1750 nmol/l sol.) was applied intranasally. They were then euthanized at 1, 3 and 12 h after capsaicin provocation. Nasal mucosa was analyzed and scored for mastocyte infiltration, degranulation and inflammatory cell infiltration. BPC 157 pretreatment significantly prevented mastocyte infiltration at 1 h. Polymorphonuclear leukocyte infiltration was significantly reduced in rats pretreated with 10 microg/kg BPC 157. A dose-dependent effect of BPC 157 pretreatment was demonstrated only for polymorphonuclear leukocyte infiltration at 12 h. PMID:9065615