Science.gov

Sample records for induces potent immune

  1. Genetic immunization in the lung induces potent local and systemic immune responses.

    PubMed

    Song, Kaimei; Bolton, Diane L; Wei, Chih-Jen; Wilson, Robert L; Camp, Jeremy V; Bao, Saran; Mattapallil, Joseph J; Herzenberg, Leonore A; Herzenberg, Leonard A; Andrews, Charla A; Sadoff, Jerald C; Goudsmit, Jaap; Pau, Maria Grazia; Seder, Robert A; Kozlowski, Pamela A; Nabel, Gary J; Roederer, Mario; Rao, Srinivas S

    2010-12-21

    Successful vaccination against respiratory infections requires elicitation of high levels of potent and durable humoral and cellular responses in the lower airways. To accomplish this goal, we used a fine aerosol that targets the entire lung surface through normal respiration to deliver replication-incompetent recombinant adenoviral vectors expressing gene products from several infectious pathogens. We show that this regimen induced remarkably high and stable lung T-cell responses in nonhuman primates and that it also generated systemic and respiratory tract humoral responses of both IgA and IgG isotypes. Moreover, strong immunogenicity was achieved even in animals with preexisting antiadenoviral immunity, overcoming a critical hurdle to the use of these vectors in humans, who commonly are immune to adenoviruses. The immunogenicity profile elicited with this regimen, which is distinct from either intramuscular or intranasal delivery, has highly desirable properties for protection against respiratory pathogens. We show that it can be used repeatedly to generate mucosal humoral, CD4, and CD8 T-cell responses and as such may be applicable to other mucosally transmitted pathogens such as HIV. Indeed, in a lethal challenge model, we show that aerosolized recombinant adenoviral immunization completely protects ferrets against H5N1 highly pathogenic avian influenza virus. Thus, genetic immunization in the lung offers a powerful platform approach to generating protective immune responses against respiratory pathogens. PMID:21135247

  2. Lentiviral vector encoding ubiquitinated hepatitis B core antigen induces potent cellular immune responses and therapeutic immunity in HBV transgenic mice.

    PubMed

    Dai, Shenglan; Zhuo, Meng; Song, Linlin; Chen, Xiaohua; Yu, Yongsheng; Zang, Guoqing; Tang, Zhenghao

    2016-07-01

    Predominant T helper cell type 1 (Th1) immune responses accompanied by boosted HBV-specific cytotoxic T lymphocyte (CTL) activity are essential for the clearance of hepatitis B virus (HBV) in chronic hepatitis B (CHB) patients. Ubiquitin (Ub) serves as a signal for the target protein to be recognized and degraded through the ubiquitin-proteasome system (UPS). Ubiquitinated hepatitis B core antigen (Ub-HBcAg) has been proved to be efficiently degraded into the peptides, which can be presented by major histocompatibility complex (MHC) class I resulting in stimulating cell-mediated responses. In the present study, lentiviral vectors encoding Ub-HBcAg (LV-Ub-HBcAg) were designed and constructed as a therapeutic vaccine for immunotherapy. HBcAg-specific cellular immune responses and anti-viral effects induced by LV-Ub-HBcAg were evaluated in HBV transgenic mice. We demonstrated that immunization with LV-Ub-HBcAg promoted the secretion of cytokines interleukin-2 (IL-2), interferon-γ (IFN-γ) and tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α), generated remarkably high percentages of IFN-γ-secreting CD8(+) T cells and CD4(+) T cells, and enhanced HBcAg-specific CTL activity in HBV transgenic mice. More importantly, vaccination with LV-Ub-HBcAg could efficiently decreased the levels of serum hepatitis B surface antigen (HBsAg), HBV DNA and the expression of HBsAg and HBcAg in liver tissues of HBV transgenic mice. In addition, LV-Ub-HBcAg could upregulate the expression of T cell-specific T-box transcription factor (T-bet) and downregulate the expression of GATA-binding protein 3 (GATA-3) in spleen T lymphocytes. The therapeutic vaccine LV-Ub-HBcAg could break immune tolerance, and induce potent HBcAg specific cellular immune responses and therapeutic effects in HBV transgenic mice. PMID:26874581

  3. Immunization with adenovirus LIGHT-engineered dendritic cells induces potent T cell responses and therapeutic immunity in HBV transgenic mice.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Wenzheng; Chen, Ran; Kong, Xiaobo; Long, Fengying; Shi, Yaru

    2014-07-31

    LIGHT, a TNF superfamily member (TNFSF14), is a type II transmembrane protein expressed on activated T cells and immature dendritic cells (DCs). However, the expression of LIGHT on mature DCs is down-regulated. Recent studies demonstrated that LIGHT provides potent costimulatory activity for T cells, enhancing proliferation and the production of Th1 cytokines independently of the B7-CD28 pathway. Here, we evaluated the effectiveness of peptide-pulsed DC-mediated antiviral immunity in HBV transgenic mice and the immunoadjuvant effect of LIGHT. The bone marrow-derived DCs were modified in vitro with an adenovirus (Ad) vector expressing mouse LIGHT (Ad-LIGHT), the expression of costimulatory molecules was up-regulated and the secretion of cytokines IL-12 and IFN-γ increased. LIGHT-modified DCs enhanced allostimulation for T cells in mixed lymphocyte reaction (MLR). HBV peptide-pulsed DCs elicited HBV specific CD8+ T cell response and reduced the level of HBsAg and HBV DNA in sera of HBV transgenic mice. Importantly, LIGHT-modified DCs could induce stronger antiviral immunity. These results support the concept that genetic modification of DCs with a recombinant LIGHT adenovirus vector may be a useful strategy for antiviral immunotherapy. PMID:24951859

  4. Characterization of Nonpathogenic, Live, Viral Vaccine Vectors Inducing Potent Cellular Immune Responses

    PubMed Central

    Publicover, Jean; Ramsburg, Elizabeth; Rose, John K.

    2004-01-01

    Experimental vaccines based on recombinant vesicular stomatitis viruses (VSV) expressing foreign viral proteins are protective in several animal disease models. Although these attenuated viruses are nonpathogenic in nonhuman primates when given by nasal, oral, or intramuscular routes, they are pathogenic in mice when given intranasally, and further vector attenuation may be required before human trials with VSV-based vectors can begin. Mutations truncating the VSV glycoprotein (G) cytoplasmic domain from 29 to 9 or 1 amino acid (designated CT9 or CT1, respectively) were shown previously to attenuate VSV growth in cell culture and pathogenesis in mice. Here we show that VSV recombinants carrying either the CT1 or CT9 deletion and expressing the human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) Env protein are nonpathogenic in mice, even when given by the intranasal route. We then carried out a detailed analysis of the CD8+ T-cell responses, including in vivo cytotoxic T-cell activity, induced by these vectors. When given by either the intranasal or intraperitoneal route, the VSV-CT9 vector expressing HIV Env elicited primary and memory CD8+ T-cell responses to Env equivalent to those elicited by recombinant wild-type VSV expressing Env. The VSV-CT1 vector also induced potent CD8+ T-cell responses after intraperitoneal vaccination, but was less effective when given by the intranasal route. The VSV-CT1 vector was also substantially less effective than the VSV-CT9 or wild-type vector at inducing antibody to Env. The VSV-CT9 vector appears ideal because of its lack of pathogenesis, propagation to high titers in vitro, and stimulation of strong cellular and humoral immune responses. PMID:15308726

  5. Immunization with antigenic peptides complexed with β-glucan induces potent cytotoxic T-lymphocyte activity in combination with CpG-ODNs.

    PubMed

    Mochizuki, Shinichi; Morishita, Hiromi; Kobiyama, Kouji; Aoshi, Taiki; Ishii, Ken J; Sakurai, Kazuo

    2015-12-28

    The induction of antigen-specific immune responses requires immunization with not only antigens, but also adjuvants. CpG oligonucleotides (CpG-ODNs) are well-known ligands for Toll-like receptor 9 and a potent adjuvant that induces both Th1-type humoral and cellular immune responses including cytotoxic T-lymphocyte responses. We previously demonstrated that β-glucan schizophyllan (SPG) can form complexes with CpG-ODNs with attached dA40 (CpG-dA/SPG), which can accumulate in macrophages in the draining inguinal lymph nodes and induce strong immune responses by co-administration of antigenic proteins, namely ovalbumin (OVA). Immunization with antigenic peptides, OVA257-264, did not induce these antigen-specific immune responses even in combination with CpG-dA/SPG, indicating that peptides require a carrier to antigen presenting cells. In this study, we prepared conjugates comprising OVA257-264 and dA40, and made complexes with SPG. Immunization with OVA257-264-dA/SPG induced peptide-specific immune responses in combination with CpG-dA regardless of complexation with SPG both in vitro and in vivo. When splenocytes from immunized mice were incubated with E.G7-OVA tumor model cells presenting OVA peptides, the number of cells drastically decreased after 24h. Furthermore, mice pre-immunized with OVA257-264-dA/SPG and CpG-ODNs exhibited a long delay in tumor growth after tumor inoculation. Therefore, these peptide-dA/SPG and CpG-dA/SPG complexes could be used as a potent vaccine for the treatment of cancers and infectious diseases. PMID:26562685

  6. Intranasal Immunization with DOTAP Cationic Liposomes Combined with DC-Cholesterol Induces Potent Antigen-Specific Mucosal and Systemic Immune Responses in Mice

    PubMed Central

    Iwase, Naoko; Takahashi, Saeko; Yamakita, Yuki; Iwata, Tomoko; Muto, Shoko; Sato, Emi; Takayama, Noriko; Honjo, Emi; Kiyono, Hiroshi; Kunisawa, Jun; Aramaki, Yukihiko

    2015-01-01

    Despite the progress made by modern medicine, infectious diseases remain one of the most important threats to human health. Vaccination against pathogens is one of the primary methods used to prevent and treat infectious diseases that cause illness and death. Vaccines administered by the mucosal route are potentially a promising strategy to combat infectious diseases since mucosal surfaces are a major route of entry for most pathogens. However, this route of vaccination is not widely used in the clinic due to the lack of a safe and effective mucosal adjuvant. Therefore, the development of safe and effective mucosal adjuvants is key to preventing infectious diseases by enabling the use of mucosal vaccines in the clinic. In this study, we show that intranasal administration of a cationic liposome composed of 1,2-dioleoyl-3-trimethylammonium-propane (DOTAP) and 3β-[N-(N',N'-dimethylaminoethane)-carbamoyl] (DC-chol) (DOTAP/DC-chol liposome) has a potent mucosal adjuvant effect in mice. Intranasal vaccination with ovalbumin (OVA) in combination with DOTAP/DC-chol liposomes induced the production of OVA-specific IgA in nasal tissues and increased serum IgG1 levels, suggesting that the cationic DOTAP/DC-chol liposome leads to the induction of a Th2 immune response. Additionally, nasal-associated lymphoid tissue and splenocytes from mice treated with OVA plus DOTAP/DC-chol liposome showed high levels of IL–4 expression. DOTAP/DC-chol liposomes also enhanced OVA uptake by CD11c+ dendritic cells in nasal-associated lymphoid tissue. These data demonstrate that DOTAP/DC-chol liposomes elicit immune responses via an antigen-specific Th2 reaction. These results suggest that cationic liposomes merit further development as a mucosal adjuvant for vaccination against infectious diseases. PMID:26440657

  7. A Newly Emerged Swine-Origin Influenza A(H3N2) Variant Dampens Host Antiviral Immunity but Induces Potent Inflammasome Activation.

    PubMed

    Cao, Weiping; Mishina, Margarita; Ranjan, Priya; De La Cruz, Juan A; Kim, Jin Hyang; Garten, Rebecca; Kumar, Amrita; García-Sastre, Adolfo; Katz, Jacqueline M; Gangappa, Shivaprakash; Sambhara, Suryaprakash

    2015-12-15

    We compared the innate immune response to a newly emerged swine-origin influenza A(H3N2) variant containing the M gene from 2009 pandemic influenza A(H1N1), termed "A(H3N2)vpM," to the immune responses to the 2010 swine-origin influenza A(H3N2) variant and seasonal influenza A(H3N2). Our results demonstrated that A(H3N2)vpM-induced myeloid dendritic cells secreted significantly lower levels of type I interferon (IFN) but produced significantly higher levels of proinflammatory cytokines and induced potent inflammasome activation. The reduction in antiviral immunity with increased inflammatory responses upon A(H3N2)vpM infection suggest that these viruses have the potential for increased disease severity in susceptible hosts. PMID:26068782

  8. A plant-expressed conjugate vaccine breaks CD4+ tolerance and induces potent immunity against metastatic Her2+ breast cancer

    PubMed Central

    Chotprakaikiat, Warayut; Allen, Alex; Bui-Minh, Duc; Harden, Elena; Jobsri, Jantipa; Cavallo, Federica; Gleba, Yuri; Stevenson, Freda K.; Ottensmeier, Christian; Klimyuk, Victor; Savelyeva, Natalia

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Passive antibody therapy for cancer is an effective but costly treatment modality. Induction of therapeutically potent anticancer antibodies by active vaccination is an attractive alternative but has proven challenging in cancer due to tolerogenic pressure in patients. Here, we used the clinically relevant cancer target Her2, known to be susceptible to targeting by antibody therapy, to demonstrate how potent antibody can be induced by vaccination. A novel 44kD Her2 protein fragment was generated and found to be highly effective at inducing anti-Her2 antibody including trastuzumab-like reactivities. In the tolerant and spontaneous BALB-neuT mouse model of metastatic breast cancer this Her2-targeting vaccine was only effective if the fragment was conjugated to a foreign immunogenic carrier; Fragment C of tetanus toxin. Only the conjugate vaccine induced high affinity anti-Her2 antibody of multiple isotypes and suppressed tumor development. The magnitude of CD4+ T-cell help and breadth of cytokines secreted by the CD4+ T helper (Th) cells induced to the foreign antigen was critical. We used a highly efficient plant-based bio-manufacturing process for protein antigens, magnICON, for vaccine expression, to underpin feasibility of future clinical testing. Hence, our novel Her2-targeting conjugate vaccine combines preclinical efficacy with clinical deliverability, thus setting the scene for therapeutic testing. PMID:27471642

  9. Cryo-thermal therapy elicits potent anti-tumor immunity by inducing extracellular Hsp70-dependent MDSC differentiation.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Jun; Zhang, Yan; Zhang, Aili; He, Kun; Liu, Ping; Xu, Lisa X

    2016-01-01

    Achieving control of metastatic disease is a long-sought goal in cancer therapy. Treatments that encourage a patient's own immune system are bringing new hopes in reaching such a goal. In clinic, local hyperthermia and cryoablation have been explored to induce anti-tumor immune responses against tumors. We have also developed a novel therapeutic modality of cryo-thermal treatment by alternating liquid nitrogen (LN2) cooling and radio frequency (RF) heating, and better therapeutic effect was achieved in treating metastatic cancer in animal model. In this study, we investigated the mechanism of systemic immune response elicited by cryo-thermal therapy. In the 4T1 murine mammary carcinoma model, we found that local cryo-thermal therapy resulted in a considerable reduction of distant lung metastases, and improved long-term survival. Moreover, results of tumor re-challenge experiments indicated generation of a strong tumor-specific immune memory after the local treatment of primary tumors. Our further study indicated that cryo-thermal therapy caused an elevated extracellular release of Hsp70. Subsequently, Hsp70 induced differentiation of MDSCs into mature DCs, contributing to the relief of MDSCs-mediated immunosuppression and ultimately the activation of strong anti-tumor immune response. Our findings reveal new insight into the mechanism of robust therapeutic effects of cryo-thermal therapy against metastatic cancers. PMID:27256519

  10. Cryo-thermal therapy elicits potent anti-tumor immunity by inducing extracellular Hsp70-dependent MDSC differentiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, Jun; Zhang, Yan; Zhang, Aili; He, Kun; Liu, Ping; Xu, Lisa X.

    2016-06-01

    Achieving control of metastatic disease is a long-sought goal in cancer therapy. Treatments that encourage a patient’s own immune system are bringing new hopes in reaching such a goal. In clinic, local hyperthermia and cryoablation have been explored to induce anti-tumor immune responses against tumors. We have also developed a novel therapeutic modality of cryo-thermal treatment by alternating liquid nitrogen (LN2) cooling and radio frequency (RF) heating, and better therapeutic effect was achieved in treating metastatic cancer in animal model. In this study, we investigated the mechanism of systemic immune response elicited by cryo-thermal therapy. In the 4T1 murine mammary carcinoma model, we found that local cryo-thermal therapy resulted in a considerable reduction of distant lung metastases, and improved long-term survival. Moreover, results of tumor re-challenge experiments indicated generation of a strong tumor-specific immune memory after the local treatment of primary tumors. Our further study indicated that cryo-thermal therapy caused an elevated extracellular release of Hsp70. Subsequently, Hsp70 induced differentiation of MDSCs into mature DCs, contributing to the relief of MDSCs-mediated immunosuppression and ultimately the activation of strong anti-tumor immune response. Our findings reveal new insight into the mechanism of robust therapeutic effects of cryo-thermal therapy against metastatic cancers.

  11. Cryo-thermal therapy elicits potent anti-tumor immunity by inducing extracellular Hsp70-dependent MDSC differentiation

    PubMed Central

    Zhu, Jun; Zhang, Yan; Zhang, Aili; He, Kun; Liu, Ping; Xu, Lisa X.

    2016-01-01

    Achieving control of metastatic disease is a long-sought goal in cancer therapy. Treatments that encourage a patient’s own immune system are bringing new hopes in reaching such a goal. In clinic, local hyperthermia and cryoablation have been explored to induce anti-tumor immune responses against tumors. We have also developed a novel therapeutic modality of cryo-thermal treatment by alternating liquid nitrogen (LN2) cooling and radio frequency (RF) heating, and better therapeutic effect was achieved in treating metastatic cancer in animal model. In this study, we investigated the mechanism of systemic immune response elicited by cryo-thermal therapy. In the 4T1 murine mammary carcinoma model, we found that local cryo-thermal therapy resulted in a considerable reduction of distant lung metastases, and improved long-term survival. Moreover, results of tumor re-challenge experiments indicated generation of a strong tumor-specific immune memory after the local treatment of primary tumors. Our further study indicated that cryo-thermal therapy caused an elevated extracellular release of Hsp70. Subsequently, Hsp70 induced differentiation of MDSCs into mature DCs, contributing to the relief of MDSCs-mediated immunosuppression and ultimately the activation of strong anti-tumor immune response. Our findings reveal new insight into the mechanism of robust therapeutic effects of cryo-thermal therapy against metastatic cancers. PMID:27256519

  12. Generation and screening of a large collection of novel simian Adenovirus allows the identification of vaccine vectors inducing potent cellular immunity in humans

    PubMed Central

    Colloca, Stefano; Folgori, Antonella; Ammendola, Virginia; Capone, Stefania; Cirillo, Agostino; Siani, Loredana; Naddeo, Mariarosaria; Grazioli, Fabiana; Esposito, Maria Luisa; Ambrosio, Maria; Sparacino, Angela; Bartiromo, Marta; Meola, Annalisa; Smith, Kira; Kurioka, Ayako; O’Hara, Geraldine A.; Ewer, Katie J.; Hill, Adrian V. S.; Traboni, Cinzia; Barnes, Eleanor; Klenerman, Paul; Cortese, Riccardo; Nicosia, Alfredo

    2013-01-01

    Replication defective Adenovirus vectors based on the human serotype 5 (Ad5) have been shown to induce protective immune responses against diverse pathogens and cancer in animal models and to elicit robust and sustained cellular immunity in humans. However, most humans have anti-Ad5 neutralising antibodies that can impair the immunological potency of such vaccines. Here we show that most other human Adenoviruses from rare serotypes are far less potent as vaccine vectors than Ad5 in mice and non-human primates, casting doubt on their potential efficacy in humans. To identify novel vaccine carriers suitable for vaccine delivery in humans we isolated and sequenced over a thousand Adenovirus strains from chimpanzees (ChAd). Replication-defective vectors were generated from different ChAd serotypes and were screened for neutralization by human sera and for ability to grow in human cell lines already approved for clinical studies. Most importantly, we devised a screening strategy to rank the ChAd vectors by immunological potency in mice which predicts their immunogenicity in non-human primates and humans. The vectors studied varied by up to a thousand-fold in potency for CD8 T cell induction in mice. Two of the most potent ChAd vectors were selected for clinical studies as carriers for Malaria and Hepatitis C virus (HCV) genetic vaccines. These ChAd vectors were found to be safe and immunologically potent in Phase I clinical trials thereby validating our screening approach. The ChAd vectors that we have developed represent a large collection of non cross-reactive, potent vectors that can be exploited for diverse vaccine strategies. PMID:22218691

  13. Modification of sPD1 with CRT induces potent anti-tumor immune responses in vitro and in vivo.

    PubMed

    Wang, Gongze; Li, Zhiying; Tian, Huiqun; Wu, Wei; Liu, Chaoqi

    2015-12-01

    As a key factor for tumor occurrence and development, tumor cells escape immune surveillance and inhibit the body immune killer effect through negative signaling pathways. In this research, we designed and expressed the fusion protein CRT-sPD1 to block PD1/PDL1 negative signal pathway, indirectly bind CRT to the tumor cell surface and to increase the cell immunogenicity activity. Results from western blotting, flow cytometry (FCM) and ELISA showed that the cell lines that stably express CRT, PD1 and CRT-sPD1 protein were obtained and the transfected cellular supernatant contained PD1 and CRT-sPD1 could bind to PDL1 on the surface of EL4 cells. Vitro experiments indicated the secreted mCRT-sPD1 protein could bind to PDL1 and enhance lymphocyte proliferation and CTL activity. We also found that fusion protein CRT-sPD1 could activate and induce the immune system to kill the tumor cells, specifically inhibit the tumor growth and prolong the survival period in mouse tumor model. And all these suggested that CRT-sPD1 could be used as drug development and utilization of cancer immunotherapy. PMID:26653551

  14. Self-adjuvanted mRNA vaccines induce local innate immune responses that lead to a potent and boostable adaptive immunity.

    PubMed

    Kowalczyk, Aleksandra; Doener, Fatma; Zanzinger, Kai; Noth, Janine; Baumhof, Patrick; Fotin-Mleczek, Mariola; Heidenreich, Regina

    2016-07-19

    mRNA represents a new platform for the development of therapeutic and prophylactic vaccines with high flexibility with respect to production and application. We have previously shown that our two component self-adjuvanted mRNA-based vaccines (termed RNActive® vaccines) induce balanced immune responses comprising both humoral and cellular effector as well as memory responses. Here, we evaluated the early events upon intradermal application to gain more detailed insights into the underlying mode of action of our mRNA-based vaccine. We showed that the vaccine is taken up in the skin by both non-leukocytic and leukocytic cells, the latter being mostly represented by antigen presenting cells (APCs). mRNA was then transported to the draining lymph nodes (dLNs) by migratory dendritic cells. Moreover, the encoded protein was expressed and efficiently presented by APCs within the dLNs as shown by T cell proliferation and immune cell activation, followed by the induction of the adaptive immunity. Importantly, the immunostimulation was limited to the injection site and lymphoid organs as no proinflammatory cytokines were detected in the sera of the immunized mice indicating a favorable safety profile of the mRNA-based vaccines. Notably, a substantial boostability of the immune responses was observed, indicating that mRNA can be used effectively in repetitive immunization schedules. The evaluation of the immunostimulation following prime and boost vaccination revealed no signs of exhaustion as demonstrated by comparable levels of cytokine production at the injection site and immune cell activation within dLNs. In summary, our data provide mechanistic insight into the mode of action and a rational for the use of mRNA-based vaccines as a promising immunization platform. PMID:27269061

  15. Whole recombinant Hansenula polymorpha expressing hepatitis B virus surface antigen (yeast-HBsAg) induces potent HBsAg-specific Th1 and Th2 immune responses.

    PubMed

    Bian, Guanglin; Cheng, Yuming; Wang, Zekun; Hu, Yunwen; Zhang, Xiaonan; Wu, Min; Chen, Zhiao; Shi, Bisheng; Sun, Shuhui; Shen, Yan; Chen, Er Jia; Yao, Xin; Wen, Yumei; Yuan, Zhenghong

    2009-12-10

    Recent studies have suggested that yeast cell wall components possess adjuvant activities. In the present study, heat-killed whole recombinant Hansenula polymorpha yeast expressing hepatitis B surface antigen (yeast-HBsAg) was generated, and the immune responses elicited by yeast-HBsAg were investigated in mice. The studies showed that yeast-HBsAg as well as yeast greatly promotes the accumulation of immune cells in mouse spleen and contributes to the maturation of dendritic cells (DCs). Yeast-HBsAg not only induces significantly higher antibody responses (including IgG, IgG1 and IgG2a), but also increases the IgG2a/IgG1 ratio, while alum combined with HBsAg (HBsAg+alum) only enhances antibody responses, but not the IgG2a/IgG1 ratio compared to HBsAg alone. Analysis of HBsAg-specific cytokines revealed that yeast-HBsAg is associated with production of both IFN-gamma and IL-4, but neither IFN-gamma nor IL-4 was detected in the HBsAg+alum-immunized group. Moreover, yeast-HBsAg induces potent HBsAg-specific lymphocyte proliferation and Cytotoxic T lymphocyte (CTL) responses. In conclusion, yeast-HBsAg enhances both HBsAg-specific Th1 and Th2 immune responses, while alum only enhances Th2 immune responses, suggesting that yeast-HBsAg may be an ideal candidate for an effective vaccine for the control of chronic hepatitis B virus (HBV) infection. PMID:19789093

  16. Combined PD-1 blockade and GITR triggering induce a potent antitumor immunity in murine cancer models and synergizes with chemotherapeutic drugs

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    -γ production and cytolytic activity of spleen cells from treated mice. More importantly, combined treatment of anti-PD-1/GITR mAb and chemotherapeutic drugs (cisplatin or paclitaxel) further increased the antitumor efficacy with 80% of mice obtaining tumor-free long-term survival in murine ID8 ovarian cancer and 4 T1 breast cancer models. Conclusions Combined anti-PD-1/GITR mAb treatment induces a potent antitumor immunity, which can be further promoted by chemotherapeutic drugs. A combined strategy of anti-PD-1/GITR mAb plus cisplatin or paclitaxel should be considered translation into clinic. PMID:24502656

  17. Protective Killed Leptospira borgpetersenii Vaccine Induces Potent Th1 Immunity Comprising Responses by CD4 and γδ T Lymphocytes

    PubMed Central

    Naiman, Brian M.; Alt, David; Bolin, Carole A.; Zuerner, Richard; Baldwin, Cynthia L.

    2001-01-01

    Leptospira borgpetersenii serovar hardjo is the most common cause of bovine leptospirosis and also causes zoonotic infections of humans. A protective killed vaccine against serovar hardjo was shown to induce strong antigen-specific proliferative responses by peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC) from vaccinated cattle by 2 months after the first dose of vaccine. This response was absent from nonvaccinated control cattle. The mean response peaked by 2 months after completion of the two-dose vaccination regimen, and substantial proliferation was measured in in vitro cultures throughout the 7 months of the study period. Variations in magnitude of the response occurred among the vaccinated animals, but by 7 months postvaccination there was a substantial antigen-specific response with PBMC from all vaccinated animals. Up to one-third of the PBMC from vaccinated animals produced gamma interferon (IFN-γ) after 7 days in culture with antigen, as ascertained by flow cytometric analysis, and significant levels of IFN-γ were measured in culture supernatants by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. Two-color immunofluorescence revealed that one-third of the IFN-γ-producing cells were γδ T cells, with the remaining cells being CD4+ T cells. The significance of this study is the very potent Th1-type immune response induced and sustained following vaccination with a killed bacterial vaccine adjuvanted with aluminum hydroxide and the involvement of γδ T cells in the response. Moreover, induction of this Th1-type cellular immune response is associated with the protection afforded by the bovine leptospiral vaccine against L. borgpetersenii serovar hardjo. PMID:11705932

  18. Vaccination of colorectal cancer patients with TroVax given alongside chemotherapy (5-fluorouracil, leukovorin and irinotecan) is safe and induces potent immune responses.

    PubMed

    Harrop, Richard; Drury, Noel; Shingler, William; Chikoti, Priscilla; Redchenko, Irina; Carroll, Miles W; Kingsman, Susan M; Naylor, Stuart; Griffiths, Richard; Steven, Neil; Hawkins, Robert E

    2008-07-01

    Modified vaccinia Ankara (MVA) encoding the tumor antigen 5T4 (TroVax) has been evaluated in an open label phase II study in metastatic colorectal cancer patients. The primary objective was to assess the safety and immunogenicity of TroVax injected before, during and after treatment with 5-fluorouracil, leukovorin and irinotecan. TroVax was administered to 19 patients with metastatic colorectal cancer. Twelve patients had blood samples taken following each of the six injections and were considered to be evaluable for assessment of immunological responses. Both antibody and cellular responses specific for the tumor antigen 5T4 and the viral vector MVA were monitored throughout the study. Administration of TroVax alongside chemotherapy was safe and well tolerated with no SAEs attributed to the vaccine and no enhancement of chemo-related toxicity. Of the 12 patients who were evaluable for assessment of immune responses, ten mounted 5T4-specific antibody responses with titers ranging from 10 to > 5,000. IFNgamma ELISPOT responses specific for 5T4 were detected in 11 patients with frequencies exceeding one in 1,000 PBMCs in five patients. Eight patients presented with elevated circulating CEA concentrations, six of whom showed decreases in excess of 50% during chemotherapy and four had CEA levels which remained stable for > 1 month following completion of chemotherapy. Of the 19 intention to treat (ITT) patients, one had a CR, six had PRs and five had SD. Potent 5T4-specific cellular and/or humoral immune responses were induced in all 12 evaluable patients and were detectable in most patients during the period in which chemotherapy was administered. These data demonstrate that TroVax can be layered on top of chemotherapy regimens without any evidence of enhanced toxicity or reduced immunological or therapeutic efficacy. PMID:18060404

  19. Synthetic Consensus HIV-1 DNA Induces Potent Cellular Immune Responses and Synthesis of Granzyme B, Perforin in HIV Infected Individuals

    PubMed Central

    Morrow, Matthew P; Tebas, Pablo; Yan, Jian; Ramirez, Lorenzo; Slager, Anna; Kraynyak, Kim; Diehl, Malissa; Shah, Divya; Khan, Amir; Lee, Jessica; Boyer, Jean; Kim, J Joseph; Sardesai, Niranjan Y; Weiner, David B; Bagarazzi, Mark L

    2015-01-01

    This study evaluated the safety and immunogenicity of PENNVAX-B in 12 HIV infected individuals. PENNVAX-B is a combination of three optimized synthetic plasmids encoding for multiclade HIV Gag and Pol and a consensus CladeB Env delivered by electroporation. HIV infected individuals whose virus was effectively suppressed using highly active antiretroviral therapy (HAART) received PENNVAX-B DNA followed by electroporation with CELLECTRA-5P at study weeks 0, 4, 8, and 16. Local administration site and systemic reactions to PENNVAX-B were recorded after each treatment along with any adverse events. Pain of the treatment procedure was assessed using a Visual Analog Scale. Whole PBMCs were isolated for use in IFN ELISpot and Flow Cytometric assays. PENNVAX-B was generally safe and well tolerated. Overall, the four dose regimen was not associated with any serious adverse events or severe local or systemic reactions. A rise in antigen-specific SFU was detected in the INFγ ELISpot assay in all 12 participants. T cells from 8/12 participants loaded with both granzyme B and perforin in response to HIV antigen, an immune finding characteristic of long-term nonprogressors (LTNPs) and elite controllers (ECs). Thus administration of PENNVAX-B may prove useful adjunctive therapy to ART for treatment and control of HIV infection. PMID:25531694

  20. Synthetic consensus HIV-1 DNA induces potent cellular immune responses and synthesis of granzyme B, perforin in HIV infected individuals.

    PubMed

    Morrow, Matthew P; Tebas, Pablo; Yan, Jian; Ramirez, Lorenzo; Slager, Anna; Kraynyak, Kim; Diehl, Malissa; Shah, Divya; Khan, Amir; Lee, Jessica; Boyer, Jean; Kim, J Joseph; Sardesai, Niranjan Y; Weiner, David B; Bagarazzi, Mark L

    2015-03-01

    This study evaluated the safety and immunogenicity of PENNVAX-B in 12 HIV infected individuals. PENNVAX-B is a combination of three optimized synthetic plasmids encoding for multiclade HIV Gag and Pol and a consensus CladeB Env delivered by electroporation. HIV infected individuals whose virus was effectively suppressed using highly active antiretroviral therapy (HAART) received PENNVAX-B DNA followed by electroporation with CELLECTRA-5P at study weeks 0, 4, 8, and 16. Local administration site and systemic reactions to PENNVAX-B were recorded after each treatment along with any adverse events. Pain of the treatment procedure was assessed using a Visual Analog Scale. Whole PBMCs were isolated for use in IFN ELISpot and Flow Cytometric assays. PENNVAX-B was generally safe and well tolerated. Overall, the four dose regimen was not associated with any serious adverse events or severe local or systemic reactions. A rise in antigen-specific SFU was detected in the INFγ ELISpot assay in all 12 participants. T cells from 8/12 participants loaded with both granzyme B and perforin in response to HIV antigen, an immune finding characteristic of long-term nonprogressors (LTNPs) and elite controllers (ECs). Thus administration of PENNVAX-B may prove useful adjunctive therapy to ART for treatment and control of HIV infection. PMID:25531694

  1. Vaccinia viruses with a serpin gene deletion and expressing IFN-γ induce potent immune responses without detectable replication in vivo

    PubMed Central

    Legrand, Fatema A.; Verardi, Paulo H.; Chan, Kenneth S.; Peng, Yue; Jones, Leslie A.; Yilma, Tilahun D.

    2005-01-01

    In a continuing effort to develop safe and efficacious vaccine and immunotherapeutic vectors, we constructed recombinant vaccinia virus (rVV) vaccines lacking either the B13R (SPI-2) or the B22R (SPI-1) immune-modulating gene and coexpressing IFN-γ. B13R and B22R are nonessential VV immune-modulating genes that have antiapoptotic and antiinflammatory properties with sequence homology to serine protease inhibitors (serpins). IFN-γ is a cytokine with potent immunoregulatory, antineoplastic, and antiviral properties. We observed that these rVVs with a deletion in a serpin gene and expressing IFN-γ replicated to high titers in tissue culture yet were avirulent in both immunocompromised and immunocompetent mice with no detectable viral replication in these animals. A single immunization elicited potent humoral, T helper, and cytotoxic T cell immune responses in mice despite the absence of any detectable virus replication in vivo. IFN-γ coexpression and the inactivation of one or more VV immune-modulating genes provide an optimized method for increasing the safety while maintaining the efficacy of rVV vaccines. This strategy provides a method for developing highly safe and efficacious vaccines for smallpox and other diseases and immunotherapeutic vectors. PMID:15705716

  2. Targeting the Genital Tract Mucosa with a Lipopeptide/Recombinant Adenovirus Prime/Boost Vaccine Induces Potent and Long-Lasting CD8+ T Cell Immunity Against Herpes: Importance of Myeloid Differentiation Factor 881

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Xiuli; Dervillez, Xavier; Chentoufi, Aziz Alami; Badakhshan, Tina; Bettahi, Ilham; BenMohamed, Lbachir

    2012-01-01

    Targeting the mucosal immune system of the genital tract (GT) with subunit vaccines failed to induce potent and durable local CD8+ T cell immunity, crucial for protection against many sexually transmitted viral (STV) pathogens, including herpes simplex virus type 2 (HSV-2) that causes genital herpes. In this study, we aimed to investigate the potential of a novel lipopeptide/adenovirus type 5 (Lipo/rAdv5) prime/boost mucosal vaccine for induction of CD8+ T cell immunity to protect the female genital tract from herpes. The lipopeptide and the rAdv5 vaccine express the immunodominant HSV-2 CD8+ T cell epitope (gB498-505) and both were delivered intravaginally (IVAG) in the progesterone-induced B6 mouse model of genital herpes. Compared to its homologous lipopeptide/lipopeptide (Lipo/Lipo); the Lipo/rAdv5 prime/boost immunized mice: (i) developed potent and sustained HSV-specific CD8+ T cells, detected in both the GT draining nodes (GT-DLN) and in the vaginal mucosa (VM); (ii) had significantly lower virus titers; (iii) had decreased overt signs of genital herpes disease; and (iv) did not succumb to lethal infection (p < 0.005), following intravaginal HSV-2 challenge. Polyfunctional CD8+ T cells, producing IFN-γ, TNF-α and IL-2 and exhibiting cytotoxic activity, were associated with protection (p < 0.005). The protective CD8+ T cell response was significantly compromised in the absence of the adaptor myeloid differentiation factor 88 (MyD88) (p = 0.0001). Taken together, these findings indicate that targeting the VM with a Lipo/rAdv5 prime/boost vaccine elicits a potent, MyD88-dependent, and long-lasting mucosal CD8+ T cell protective immunity against sexually transmitted herpes infection and disease. PMID:23018456

  3. Diversity Against Adversity: How Adaptive Immune System Evolves Potent Antibodies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heo, Muyoung; Zeldovich, Konstantin B.; Shakhnovich, Eugene I.

    2011-07-01

    Adaptive immunity is an amazing mechanism, whereby new protein functions—affinity of antibodies (Immunoglobulins) to new antigens—evolve through mutation and selection in a matter of a few days. Despite numerous experimental studies, the fundamental physical principles underlying immune response are still poorly understood. In considerable departure from past approaches, here, we propose a microscopic multiscale model of adaptive immune response, which consists of three essential players: The host cells, viruses, and B-cells in Germinal Centers (GC). Each moiety carries a genome, which encodes proteins whose stability and interactions are determined from their sequences using laws of Statistical Mechanics, providing an exact relationship between genomic sequences and strength of interactions between pathogens and antibodies and antibodies and host proteins (autoimmunity). We find that evolution of potent antibodies (the process known as Affinity Maturation (AM)) is a delicate balancing act, which has to reconcile the conflicting requirements of protein stability, lack of autoimmunity, and high affinity of antibodies to incoming antigens. This becomes possible only when antibody producing B cells elevate their mutation rates (process known as Somatic Hypermutation (SHM)) to fall into a certain range—not too low to find potency increasing mutations but not too high to destroy stable Immunoglobulins and/or already achieved affinity. Potent antibodies develop through clonal expansion of initial B cells expressing marginally potent antibodies followed by their subsequent affinity maturation through mutation and selection. As a result, in each GC the population of mature potent Immunoglobulins is monoclonal being ancestors of a single cell from initial (germline) pool. We developed a simple analytical theory, which provides further rationale to our findings. The model and theory reveal the molecular factors that determine the efficiency of affinity maturation

  4. The highly attenuated vaccinia virus strain modified virus Ankara induces apoptosis in melanoma cells and allows bystander dendritic cells to generate a potent anti-tumoral immunity

    PubMed Central

    Greiner, S; Humrich, J Y; Thuman, P; Sauter, B; Schuler, G; Jenne, L

    2006-01-01

    Vaccinia virus (VV) has been tested as oncolytic virus against malignant melanoma in clinical trials for more than 40 years. Until now, mainly strains comparable to viral strains used for smallpox vaccination have been probed for anti-tumoral therapy. We have shown recently that the wild-type strain Western Reserve (WR) can interfere with crucial functions of monocyte-derived dendritic cells (DCs). Our aim was to examine whether viral immune evasion mechanisms might be responsible for the ineffectiveness of WR-based vaccination strategies and whether the highly attenuated strain modified virus Ankara (MVA) differs from WR with respect to its possible immunostimulatory capacity after intratumoral injection. Using in vitro experiments, we compared the effect of both strains on melanoma cells and on local bystander DCs. We found that both VV-strains infected melanoma cells efficiently and caused disintegration of the actin cytoskeleton, as shown by fluorescence microscopy. In addition, both VV-strains caused apoptotic cell death in melanoma cells after infection. In contrast to MVA, WR underwent a complete viral replication cycle in melanoma cells. Bystander DCs were consecutively infected by newly generated WR virions and lost their capacity to induce allogeneic T cell proliferation. DCs in contact with MVA-infected melanoma cells retained their capacity to induce T cell proliferation. Immature DCs were capable of phagocytosing MVA-infected melanoma cells. Priming of autologous CD8+ T cells by DCs that had phagocytosed MVA-infected, MelanA positive melanoma cells resulted in the induction of T cell clones specifically reactive against the model antigen MelanA as shown by enzyme-linked immunospot (ELISPOT) analysis. We conclude that the clinical trials with oncolytic wild-type VV failed probably because of suppression of bystander DCs and consecutive suppression of T cell-mediated anti-melanoma immunity. The attenuated VV-strain MVA facilitates the generation of

  5. One-prime multi-boost strategy immunization with recombinant DNA, adenovirus, and MVA vector vaccines expressing HPV16 L1 induces potent, sustained, and specific immune response in mice.

    PubMed

    Li, Li-Li; Wang, He-Rong; Zhou, Zhi-Yi; Luo, Jing; Xiao, Xiang-Qian; Wang, Xiao-Li; Li, Jin-Tao; Zhou, Yu-Bai; Zeng, Yi

    2016-04-01

    Human papillomavirus (HPV) is associated with various human diseases, including cancer, and developing vaccines is a cost-efficient strategy to prevent HPV-related disease. The major capsid protein L1, which an increasing number of studies have confirmed is typically expressed early in infection, is a promising antigen for such a vaccine, although the E6 and E7 proteins have been characterized more extensively. Thus, the L1 gene from HPV16 was inserted into a recombinant vector, AdHu5, and MVA viral vectors, and administered by prime-boost immunization. Virus-like particles were used as control antigens. Our results indicate that prime-boost immunization with heterologous vaccines induced robust and sustained cellular and humoral response specific to HPV16 L1. In particular, sera obtained from mice immunized with DNA + DNA + Ad + MVA had excellent antitumor activity in vivo. However, the data also confirm that virus-like particles can only elicit low levels cellular immunity and not be long-lasting, and are therefore unsuitable for treatment of existing HPV infections. PMID:26821205

  6. LV305, a dendritic cell-targeting integration-deficient ZVexTM-based lentiviral vector encoding NY-ESO-1, induces potent anti-tumor immune response

    PubMed Central

    Albershardt, Tina Chang; Campbell, David James; Parsons, Andrea Jean; Slough, Megan Merrill; ter Meulen, Jan; Berglund, Peter

    2016-01-01

    We have engineered an integration-deficient lentiviral vector, LV305, to deliver the tumor antigen NY-ESO-1 to human dendritic cells in vivo through pseudotyping with a modified Sindbis virus envelop protein. Mice immunized once with LV305 developed strong, dose-dependent, multifunctional, and cytotoxic NY-ESO-1-specific cluster of differentiation 8 (CD8) T cells within 14 days post-immunization and could be boosted with LV305 at least twice to recall peak-level CD8 T-cell responses. Immunization with LV305 protected mice against tumor growth in an NY-ESO-1-expressing CT26 lung metastasis model, with the protective effect abrogated upon depletion of CD8 T cells. Adoptive transfer of CD8 T cells, alone or together with CD4 T cells or natural killer cells, from LV305-immunized donor mice to tumor-bearing recipient mice conferred significant protection against metastatic tumor growth. Biodistribution of injected LV305 in mice was limited to the site of injection and the draining lymph node, and injected LV305 exhibited minimal excretion. Mice injected with LV305 developed little to no adverse effects, as evaluated by toxicology studies adherent to good laboratory practices. Taken together, these data support the development of LV305 as a clinical candidate for treatment against tumors expressing NY-ESO-1. PMID:27626061

  7. LV305, a dendritic cell-targeting integration-deficient ZVex(TM)-based lentiviral vector encoding NY-ESO-1, induces potent anti-tumor immune response.

    PubMed

    Albershardt, Tina Chang; Campbell, David James; Parsons, Andrea Jean; Slough, Megan Merrill; Ter Meulen, Jan; Berglund, Peter

    2016-01-01

    We have engineered an integration-deficient lentiviral vector, LV305, to deliver the tumor antigen NY-ESO-1 to human dendritic cells in vivo through pseudotyping with a modified Sindbis virus envelop protein. Mice immunized once with LV305 developed strong, dose-dependent, multifunctional, and cytotoxic NY-ESO-1-specific cluster of differentiation 8 (CD8) T cells within 14 days post-immunization and could be boosted with LV305 at least twice to recall peak-level CD8 T-cell responses. Immunization with LV305 protected mice against tumor growth in an NY-ESO-1-expressing CT26 lung metastasis model, with the protective effect abrogated upon depletion of CD8 T cells. Adoptive transfer of CD8 T cells, alone or together with CD4 T cells or natural killer cells, from LV305-immunized donor mice to tumor-bearing recipient mice conferred significant protection against metastatic tumor growth. Biodistribution of injected LV305 in mice was limited to the site of injection and the draining lymph node, and injected LV305 exhibited minimal excretion. Mice injected with LV305 developed little to no adverse effects, as evaluated by toxicology studies adherent to good laboratory practices. Taken together, these data support the development of LV305 as a clinical candidate for treatment against tumors expressing NY-ESO-1. PMID:27626061

  8. SCIB2, an antibody DNA vaccine encoding NY-ESO-1 epitopes, induces potent antitumor immunity which is further enhanced by checkpoint blockade

    PubMed Central

    Xue, Wei; Metheringham, Rachael L.; Brentville, Victoria A.; Gunn, Barbara; Symonds, Peter; Yagita, Hideo; Ramage, Judith M.; Durrant, Lindy G.

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Checkpoint blockade has demonstrated promising antitumor responses in approximately 10–40% of patients. However, the majority of patients do not make a productive immune response to their tumors and do not respond to checkpoint blockade. These patients may benefit from an effective vaccine that stimulates high-avidity T cell responses in combination with checkpoint blockade. We have previously shown that incorporating TRP-2 and gp100 epitopes into the CDR regions of a human IgG1 DNA (ImmunoBody®: IB) results in significant tumor regression both in animal models and patients. This vaccination strategy is superior to others as it targets antigen to antigen-presenting cells and stimulates high-avidity T cell responses. To broaden the application of this vaccination strategy, 16 NY-ESO-1 epitopes, covering over 80% of HLA phenotypes, were incorporated into the IB (SCIB2). They produced higher frequency and avidity T cell responses than peptide vaccination. These T cells were of sufficient avidity to kill NY-ESO-1-expressing tumor cells, and in vivo controlled the growth of established B16-NY-ESO-1 tumors, resulting in long-term survival (35%). When SCIB2 was given in combination with Treg depletion, CTLA-4 blockade or PD-1 blockade, long-term survival from established tumors was significantly enhanced to 56, 67 and 100%, respectively. Translating these responses into the clinic by using a combination of SCIB2 vaccination and checkpoint blockade can only further improve clinical responses. PMID:27471648

  9. The potent anti-inflammatory agent escin does not increase corticosterone secretion and immune cell apoptosis in mice.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Leiming; Wang, Hongsheng; Fan, Huaying; Wang, Tian; Jiang, Na; Yu, Pengfei; Fu, Fenghua

    2011-09-01

    Escin exerts potent glucocorticoid-like anti-inflammatory effects. The aim of this study was to investigate whether the anti-inflammatory effect of escin is through the up-regulation of glucocorticoids and if escin induces pathological changes in immune organs. Mice were administrated with escin intravenously for 7 days before observing the relevant parameters. The results showed that escin exhibits a potent anti-inflammatory effect, but does not increase corticosterone secretion in mice, and does not increase immune cell apoptosis in the spleen and thymus of mice. These findings suggest that the anti-inflammatory effect of escin is not dependent on the release of corticosterone. PMID:21596110

  10. Dectin-1-activated dendritic cells trigger potent antitumour immunity through the induction of Th9 cells.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Yinghua; Chu, Xiao; Chen, Jintong; Wang, Ying; Gao, Sujun; Jiang, Yuxue; Zhu, Xiaoqing; Tan, Guangyun; Zhao, Wenjie; Yi, Huanfa; Xu, Honglin; Ma, Xingzhe; Lu, Yong; Yi, Qing; Wang, Siqing

    2016-01-01

    Dectin-1 signalling in dendritic cells (DCs) has an important role in triggering protective antifungal Th17 responses. However, whether dectin-1 directs DCs to prime antitumour Th9 cells remains unclear. Here, we show that DCs activated by dectin-1 agonists potently promote naive CD4(+) T cells to differentiate into Th9 cells. Abrogation of dectin-1 in DCs completely abolishes their Th9-polarizing capability in response to dectin-1 agonist curdlan. Notably, dectin-1 stimulation of DCs upregulates TNFSF15 and OX40L, which are essential for dectin-1-activated DC-induced Th9 cell priming. Mechanistically, dectin-1 activates Syk, Raf1 and NF-κB signalling pathways, resulting in increased p50 and RelB nuclear translocation and TNFSF15 and OX40L expression. Furthermore, immunization of tumour-bearing mice with dectin-1-activated DCs induces potent antitumour response that depends on Th9 cells and IL-9 induced by dectin-1-activated DCs in vivo. Our results identify dectin-1-activated DCs as a powerful inducer of Th9 cells and antitumour immunity and may have important clinical implications. PMID:27492902

  11. Dectin-1-activated dendritic cells trigger potent antitumour immunity through the induction of Th9 cells

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Yinghua; Chu, Xiao; Chen, Jintong; Wang, Ying; Gao, Sujun; Jiang, Yuxue; Zhu, Xiaoqing; Tan, Guangyun; Zhao, Wenjie; Yi, Huanfa; Xu, Honglin; Ma, Xingzhe; Lu, Yong; Yi, Qing; Wang, Siqing

    2016-01-01

    Dectin-1 signalling in dendritic cells (DCs) has an important role in triggering protective antifungal Th17 responses. However, whether dectin-1 directs DCs to prime antitumour Th9 cells remains unclear. Here, we show that DCs activated by dectin-1 agonists potently promote naive CD4+ T cells to differentiate into Th9 cells. Abrogation of dectin-1 in DCs completely abolishes their Th9-polarizing capability in response to dectin-1 agonist curdlan. Notably, dectin-1 stimulation of DCs upregulates TNFSF15 and OX40L, which are essential for dectin-1-activated DC-induced Th9 cell priming. Mechanistically, dectin-1 activates Syk, Raf1 and NF-κB signalling pathways, resulting in increased p50 and RelB nuclear translocation and TNFSF15 and OX40L expression. Furthermore, immunization of tumour-bearing mice with dectin-1-activated DCs induces potent antitumour response that depends on Th9 cells and IL-9 induced by dectin-1-activated DCs in vivo. Our results identify dectin-1-activated DCs as a powerful inducer of Th9 cells and antitumour immunity and may have important clinical implications. PMID:27492902

  12. Highly optimized DNA vaccine targeting human telomerase reverse transcriptase stimulates potent antitumor immunity

    PubMed Central

    Shin, Thomas H.; Obeng-Adjei, Nyamekye; Morrow, Matthew P.; Walters, Jewell N.; Khan, Amir S.; Sardesai, Niranjan Y.; Weiner, David B.

    2014-01-01

    High levels of human Telomerase Reverse Transcriptase (hTERT) are detected in over 85% of human cancers. Immunological analysis supports hTERT is a widely applicable target recognized by T cells and can be potentially studied as a broad cancer immune therapeutic, or a unique line of defense against tumor recurrence. There remains an urgent need to develop more potent hTERT vaccines. Here, a synthetic highly optimized full-length hTERT DNA vaccine (phTERT) was designed and the induced immunity was examined in mice and non-human primates. When delivered by electroporation, phTERT elicited strong, broad hTERT-specific CD8 responses including induction of T-cells expressing CD107a, IFN-γ and TNF-α in mice. The ability of phTERT to overcome tolerance was evaluated in a NHP model, whose TERT is 96% homologous to that of hTERT. Immunized monkeys exhibited robust (average 1834 SFU/106 PBMCs), diverse (multiple immunodominant epitopes) IFN-γ responses and antigen-specific perforin release (average 332 SFU/106 PBMCs), suggesting phTERT breaks tolerance and induces potent cytotoxic responses in this human relevant model. Moreover, in an HPV16-associated tumor model, vaccination of phTERT slows tumor growth and improves survival rate in both prophylactic and therapeutic studies. Lastly, in vivo cytotoxicity assay confirmed that phTERT-induced CD8 T cells exhibited specific CTL activity, capable of eliminating hTERT-pulsed target cells. These findings support that this synthetic EP-delivered DNA phTERT may have a role as a broad therapeutic cancer vaccine candidate. PMID:24777680

  13. OX40 engagement and chemotherapy combination provides potent antitumor immunity with concomitant regulatory T cell apoptosis

    PubMed Central

    Hirschhorn-Cymerman, Daniel; Rizzuto, Gabrielle A.; Merghoub, Taha; Cohen, Adam D.; Avogadri, Francesca; Lesokhin, Alexander M.; Weinberg, Andrew D.; Wolchok, Jedd D.

    2009-01-01

    Expansion and recruitment of CD4+ Foxp3+ regulatory T (T reg) cells are mechanisms used by growing tumors to evade immune elimination. In addition to expansion of effector T cells, successful therapeutic interventions may require reduction of T reg cells within the tumor microenvironment. We report that the combined use of the alkylating agent cyclophosphamide (CTX) and an agonist antibody targeting the co-stimulatory receptor OX40 (OX86) provides potent antitumor immunity capable of regressing established, poorly immunogenic B16 melanoma tumors. CTX administration resulted in tumor antigen release, which after OX86 treatment significantly enhanced the antitumor T cell response. We demonstrated that T reg cells are an important cellular target of the combination therapy. Paradoxically, the combination therapy led to an expansion of T reg cells in the periphery. In the tumor, however, the combination therapy induced a profound T reg cell depletion that was accompanied by an influx of effector CD8+ T cells leading to a favorable T effector/T reg cell ratio. Closer examination revealed that diminished intratumoral T reg cell levels resulted from hyperactivation and T reg cell–specific apoptosis. Thus, we propose that CTX and OX40 engagement represents a novel and rational chemoimmunotherapy. PMID:19414558

  14. DNA vaccines targeting heavy chain C-terminal fragments of Clostridium botulinum neurotoxin serotypes A, B, and E induce potent humoral and cellular immunity and provide protection from lethal toxin challenge

    PubMed Central

    Scott, Veronica L; Villarreal, Daniel O; Hutnick, Natalie A; Walters, Jewell N; Ragwan, Edwin; Bdeir, Khalil; Yan, Jian; Sardesai, Niranjan Y; Finnefrock, Adam C; Casimiro, Danilo R; Weiner, David B

    2015-01-01

    Botulinum neurotoxins (BoNTs) are deadly, toxic proteins produced by the bacterium Clostridium botulinum that can cause significant diseases in humans. The use of the toxic substances as potential bioweapons has raised concerns by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention and the United States Military. Currently, there is no licensed vaccine to prevent botulinum intoxication. Here we present an immunogenicity study to evaluate the efficacy of novel monovalent vaccines and a trivalent cocktail DNA vaccine targeting the heavy chain C-terminal fragments of Clostridium botulinum neurotoxin serotypes A, B, and E. These synthetic DNA vaccines induced robust humoral and polyfunctional CD4+ T-cell responses which fully protected animals against lethal challenge after just 2 immunizations. In addition, naïve animals administered immunized sera mixed with the lethal neurotoxin were 100% protected against intoxication. The data demonstrate the protective efficacy induced by a combinative synthetic DNA vaccine approach. This study has importance for the development of vaccines that provide protective immunity against C. botulinum neurotoxins and other toxins. PMID:26158319

  15. CIS is a potent checkpoint in NK cell-mediated tumor immunity.

    PubMed

    Delconte, Rebecca B; Kolesnik, Tatiana B; Dagley, Laura F; Rautela, Jai; Shi, Wei; Putz, Eva M; Stannard, Kimberley; Zhang, Jian-Guo; Teh, Charis; Firth, Matt; Ushiki, Takashi; Andoniou, Christopher E; Degli-Esposti, Mariapia A; Sharp, Phillip P; Sanvitale, Caroline E; Infusini, Giuseppe; Liau, Nicholas P D; Linossi, Edmond M; Burns, Christopher J; Carotta, Sebastian; Gray, Daniel H D; Seillet, Cyril; Hutchinson, Dana S; Belz, Gabrielle T; Webb, Andrew I; Alexander, Warren S; Li, Shawn S; Bullock, Alex N; Babon, Jeffery J; Smyth, Mark J; Nicholson, Sandra E; Huntington, Nicholas D

    2016-07-01

    The detection of aberrant cells by natural killer (NK) cells is controlled by the integration of signals from activating and inhibitory ligands and from cytokines such as IL-15. We identified cytokine-inducible SH2-containing protein (CIS, encoded by Cish) as a critical negative regulator of IL-15 signaling in NK cells. Cish was rapidly induced in response to IL-15, and deletion of Cish rendered NK cells hypersensitive to IL-15, as evidenced by enhanced proliferation, survival, IFN-γ production and cytotoxicity toward tumors. This was associated with increased JAK-STAT signaling in NK cells in which Cish was deleted. Correspondingly, CIS interacted with the tyrosine kinase JAK1, inhibiting its enzymatic activity and targeting JAK for proteasomal degradation. Cish(-/-) mice were resistant to melanoma, prostate and breast cancer metastasis in vivo, and this was intrinsic to NK cell activity. Our data uncover a potent intracellular checkpoint in NK cell-mediated tumor immunity and suggest possibilities for new cancer immunotherapies directed at blocking CIS function. PMID:27213690

  16. Potent Innate Immune Response to Pathogenic Leptospira in Human Whole Blood

    PubMed Central

    Hartskeerl, Rudy A.; van Gorp, Eric C. M.; Schuller, Simone; Monahan, Avril M.; Nally, Jarlath E.; van der Poll, Tom; van 't Veer, Cornelis

    2011-01-01

    Background Leptospirosis is caused by pathogenic spirochetes of the genus Leptospira. The bacteria enter the human body via abraded skin or mucous membranes and may disseminate throughout. In general the clinical picture is mild but some patients develop rapidly progressive, severe disease with a high case fatality rate. Not much is known about the innate immune response to leptospires during haematogenous dissemination. Previous work showed that a human THP-1 cell line recognized heat-killed leptospires and leptospiral LPS through TLR2 instead of TLR4. The LPS of virulent leptospires displayed a lower potency to trigger TNF production by THP-1 cells compared to LPS of non-virulent leptospires. Methodology/Principal Findings We investigated the host response and killing of virulent and non-virulent Leptospira of different serovars by human THP-1 cells, human PBMC's and human whole blood. Virulence of each leptospiral strain was tested in a well accepted standard guinea pig model. Virulent leptospires displayed complement resistance in human serum and whole blood while in-vitro attenuated non-virulent leptospires were rapidly killed in a complement dependent manner. In vitro stimulation of THP-1 and PBMC's with heat-killed and living leptospires showed differential serovar and cell type dependence of cytokine induction. However, at low, physiological, leptospiral dose, living virulent complement resistant strains were consistently more potent in whole blood stimulations than the corresponding non-virulent complement sensitive strains. At higher dose living virulent and non-virulent leptospires were equipotent in whole blood. Inhibition of different TLRs indicated that both TLR2 and TLR4 as well as TLR5 play a role in the whole blood cytokine response to living leptospires. Conclusions/Significance Thus, in a minimally altered system as human whole blood, highly virulent Leptospira are potent inducers of the cytokine response. PMID:21483834

  17. STING Pathway Activation Stimulates Potent Immunity against Acute Myeloid Leukemia.

    PubMed

    Curran, Emily; Chen, Xiufen; Corrales, Leticia; Kline, Douglas E; Dubensky, Thomas W; Duttagupta, Priyanka; Kortylewski, Marcin; Kline, Justin

    2016-06-14

    Type I interferon (IFN), essential for spontaneous T cell priming against solid tumors, is generated through recognition of tumor DNA by STING. Interestingly, we observe that type I IFN is not elicited in animals with disseminated acute myeloid leukemia (AML). Further, survival of leukemia-bearing animals is not diminished in the absence of type I IFN signaling, suggesting that STING may not be triggered by AML. However, the STING agonist, DMXAA, induces expression of IFN-β and other inflammatory cytokines, promotes dendritic cell (DC) maturation, and results in the striking expansion of leukemia-specific T cells. Systemic DMXAA administration significantly extends survival in two AML models. The therapeutic effect of DMXAA is only partially dependent on host type I IFN signaling, suggesting that other cytokines are important. A synthetic cyclic dinucleotide that also activates human STING provided a similar anti-leukemic effect. These data demonstrate that STING is a promising immunotherapeutic target in AML. PMID:27264175

  18. Neutralizing antibodies to HIV-1 induced by immunization

    PubMed Central

    McCoy, Laura E.

    2013-01-01

    Most neutralizing antibodies act at the earliest steps of viral infection and block interaction of the virus with cellular receptors to prevent entry into host cells. The inability to induce neutralizing antibodies to HIV has been a major obstacle to HIV vaccine research since the early days of the epidemic. However, in the past three years, the definition of a neutralizing antibody against HIV has been revolutionized by the isolation of extremely broad and potent neutralizing antibodies from HIV-infected individuals. Considerable hurdles remain for inducing neutralizing antibodies to a protective level after immunization. Meanwhile, novel technologies to bypass the induction of antibodies are being explored to provide prophylactic antibody-based interventions. This review addresses the challenge of inducing HIV neutralizing antibodies upon immunization and considers notable recent advances in the field. A greater understanding of the successes and failures for inducing a neutralizing response upon immunization is required to accelerate the development of an effective HIV vaccine. PMID:23401570

  19. A pan-inhibitor of DASH family enzymes induces immune-mediated regression of murine sarcoma and is a potent adjuvant to dendritic cell vaccination and adoptive T-cell therapy.

    PubMed

    Duncan, Brynn B; Highfill, Steven L; Qin, Haiying; Bouchkouj, Najat; Larabee, Shannon; Zhao, Peng; Woznica, Iwona; Liu, Yuxin; Li, Youhua; Wu, Wengen; Lai, Jack H; Jones, Barry; Mackall, Crystal L; Bachovchin, William W; Fry, Terry J

    2013-10-01

    Multimodality therapy consisting of surgery, chemotherapy, and radiation will fail in approximately 40% of patients with pediatric sarcomas and result in substantial long-term morbidity in those who are cured. Immunotherapeutic regimens for the treatment of solid tumors typically generate antigen-specific responses too weak to overcome considerable tumor burden and tumor suppressive mechanisms and are in need of adjuvant assistance. Previous work suggests that inhibitors of DASH (dipeptidyl peptidase IV activity and/or structural homologs) enzymes can mediate tumor regression by immune-mediated mechanisms. Herein, we demonstrate that the DASH inhibitor, ARI-4175, can induce regression and eradication of well-established solid tumors, both as a single agent and as an adjuvant to a dendritic cell (DC) vaccine and adoptive cell therapy (ACT) in mice implanted with the M3-9-M rhabdomyosarcoma cell line. Treatment with effective doses of ARI-4175 correlated with recruitment of myeloid (CD11b) cells, particularly myeloid DCs, to secondary lymphoid tissues and with reduced frequency of intratumoral monocytic (CD11bLy6-CLy6-G) myeloid-derived suppressor cells. In immunocompetent mice, combining ARI-4175 with a DC vaccine or ACT with tumor-primed T cells produced significant improvements in tumor responses against well-established M3-9-M tumors. In M3-9-M-bearing immunodeficient (Rag1) mice, ACT combined with ARI-4175 produced greater tumor responses and significantly improved survival compared with either treatment alone. These studies warrant the clinical investigation of ARI-4175 for treatment of sarcomas and other malignancies, particularly as an adjuvant to tumor vaccines and ACT. PMID:23994886

  20. A pan-inhibitor of DASH family enzymes induces immune-mediated regression of murine sarcoma and is a potent adjuvant to dendritic cell vaccination and adoptive T-cell therapy

    PubMed Central

    Duncan, Brynn B.; Highfill, Steven L.; Qin, Haiying; Bouchkouj, Najat; Larabee, Shannon; Zhao, Peng; Woznica, Iwona; Liu, Yuxin; Li, Youhua; Wu, Wengen; Lai, Jack H.; Jones, Barry; Mackall, Crystal L.; Bachovchin, William W.; Fry, Terry J.

    2013-01-01

    Current multimodality therapy consisting of surgery, chemotherapy and radiation will fail in approximately 40% of patients with pediatric sarcomas and results in substantial long-term morbidity in those who are cured. Immunotherapeutic regimens for the treatment of solid tumors typically generate antigen-specific responses too weak to overcome considerable tumor burden and tumor suppressive mechanisms and are in need of adjuvant assistance. Previous work suggests that inhibitors of DASH (Dipeptidyl peptidase IV activity and/or structural homologues) enzymes can mediate tumor regression via immune-mediated mechanisms. Here we demonstrate that the DASH inhibitor, ARI-4175, can induce regression and eradication of well-established solid tumors, both as a single agent and as an adjuvant to a dendritic cell (DC) vaccine and adoptive cell therapy (ACT) in mice implanted with the M3-9-M rhabdomyosarcoma (RMS) cell line. Treatment with effective doses of ARI-4175 correlated with recruitment of myeloid (CD11b+) cells, particularly myeloid dendritic cells (DCs), to secondary lymphoid tissues and with reduced frequency of intratumoral monocytic (CD11b+Ly6-ChiLy6-Glo) myeloid-derived suppressor cells. In immunocompetent mice, combining ARI-4175 with a DC vaccine or ACT with tumor-primed T cells produced significant improvements in tumor responses against well-established M3-9-M tumors. In M3-9-M-bearing immunodeficient (Rag1-/-) mice, ACT combined with ARI-4175 produced greater tumor responses and significantly improved survival compared to either treatment alone. These studies warrant the clinical investigation of ARI-4175 for treatment of sarcomas and other malignancies particularly as an adjuvant to tumor vaccines and ACT. PMID:23994886

  1. A novel naturally occurring tandem promoter in modified vaccinia virus ankara drives very early gene expression and potent immune responses.

    PubMed

    Wennier, Sonia T; Brinkmann, Kay; Steinhäußer, Charlotte; Mayländer, Nicole; Mnich, Claudia; Wielert, Ursula; Dirmeier, Ulrike; Hausmann, Jürgen; Chaplin, Paul; Steigerwald, Robin

    2013-01-01

    Modified vaccinia virus Ankara (MVA) has been shown to be suitable for the generation of experimental vaccines against cancer and infectious diseases, eliciting strong humoral and cellular immune responses. In viral vectored vaccines, strong recombinant antigen expression and timing of expression influence the quantity and quality of the immune response. Screening of synthetic and native poxvirus promoters for strong protein expression in vitro and potent immune responses in vivo led to the identification of the MVA13.5L promoter, a unique and novel naturally occurring tandem promoter in MVA composed of two 44 nucleotide long repeated motifs, each containing an early promoter element. The MVA13.5L gene is highly conserved across orthopoxviruses, yet its function is unknown. The unique structure of its promoter is not found for any other gene in the MVA genome and is also conserved in other orthopoxviruses. Comparison of the MVA13.5L promoter activity with synthetic poxviral promoters revealed that the MVA13.5L promoter produced higher levels of protein early during infection in HeLa cells and particularly in MDBK cells, a cell line in which MVA replication stops at an early stage before the expression of late genes. Finally, a recombinant antigen expressed under the control of this novel promoter induced high antibody titers and increased CD8 T cell responses in homologous prime-boost immunization compared to commonly used promoters. In particular, the recombinant antigen specific CD8 T cell responses dominated over the immunodominant B8R vector-specific responses after three vaccinations and even more during the memory phase. These results have identified the native MVA13.5L promoter as a new potent promoter for use in MVA vectored preventive and therapeutic vaccines. PMID:23951355

  2. A Novel Naturally Occurring Tandem Promoter in Modified Vaccinia Virus Ankara Drives Very Early Gene Expression and Potent Immune Responses

    PubMed Central

    Wennier, Sonia T.; Brinkmann, Kay; Steinhäußer, Charlotte; Mayländer, Nicole; Mnich, Claudia; Wielert, Ursula; Dirmeier, Ulrike; Hausmann, Jürgen; Chaplin, Paul; Steigerwald, Robin

    2013-01-01

    Modified vaccinia virus Ankara (MVA) has been shown to be suitable for the generation of experimental vaccines against cancer and infectious diseases, eliciting strong humoral and cellular immune responses. In viral vectored vaccines, strong recombinant antigen expression and timing of expression influence the quantity and quality of the immune response. Screening of synthetic and native poxvirus promoters for strong protein expression in vitro and potent immune responses in vivo led to the identification of the MVA13.5L promoter, a unique and novel naturally occurring tandem promoter in MVA composed of two 44 nucleotide long repeated motifs, each containing an early promoter element. The MVA13.5L gene is highly conserved across orthopoxviruses, yet its function is unknown. The unique structure of its promoter is not found for any other gene in the MVA genome and is also conserved in other orthopoxviruses. Comparison of the MVA13.5L promoter activity with synthetic poxviral promoters revealed that the MVA13.5L promoter produced higher levels of protein early during infection in HeLa cells and particularly in MDBK cells, a cell line in which MVA replication stops at an early stage before the expression of late genes. Finally, a recombinant antigen expressed under the control of this novel promoter induced high antibody titers and increased CD8 T cell responses in homologous prime-boost immunization compared to commonly used promoters. In particular, the recombinant antigen specific CD8 T cell responses dominated over the immunodominant B8R vector-specific responses after three vaccinations and even more during the memory phase. These results have identified the native MVA13.5L promoter as a new potent promoter for use in MVA vectored preventive and therapeutic vaccines. PMID:23951355

  3. Interleukin-12-secreting human papillomavirus type 16-transformed cells provide a potent cancer vaccine that generates E7-directed immunity.

    PubMed

    Hallez, S; Detremmerie, O; Giannouli, C; Thielemans, K; Gajewski, T F; Burny, A; Leo, O

    1999-05-01

    The development of a vaccine that would be capable of preventing or curing the (pre)cancerous lesions induced by genital oncogenic human papillomaviruses (HPVs) is the focus of much research. Many studies are presently evaluating vaccines based on the viral E6 and E7 oncoproteins, both of which are continually expressed by tumor cells. The success of a cancer vaccine relies, in large part, on the induction of a tumor-specific Th1-type immunity. In this study, we have evaluated the ability of B7-related and/or interleukin-12 (IL-12)-expressing, non-immunogenic murine HPV16-transformed BMK-16/myc cells, to achieve this goal. BMK-16/myc cells engineered to express surface B7-1 or B7-2 molecules remain tumorigenic in syngeneic BALB/c mice, suggesting that expression of these molecules alone is not sufficient to induce tumor regression. In contrast, mice injected with tumor cells engineered to secrete IL-12 remained tumor-free, demonstrating that IL-12 expression is sufficient to induce tumor rejection. IL-12-secreting BMK-16/myc cells were further shown to induce potent and specific long-term tumor resistance, even after irradiation. B7-1 was found to slightly but systematically improve anti-tumor immunity elicited by IL-12-secreting BMK-16/myc cells. Injection of irradiated B7-1/IL-12+ BMK-16/myc cells generates long-lasting, Th1-type, BMK-16/myc-directed immunity in tumor-resistant mice. These mice display a memory-type, E7-specific, cell-mediated immune response, which is potentially significant for clinical applications. PMID:10209958

  4. Rosiglitazone-induced immune thrombocytopenia.

    PubMed

    Liu, Xiaojing; Huang, Tao; Sahud, Mervyn A

    2006-05-01

    Rosiglitazone is one of the members in the thiazolidinedione (TZD) class of anti-diabetic agents that have proven efficacy in the treatment of patients with type 2 diabetes. We studied serum from a patient who developed acute, severe thrombocytopenia after exposure to rosiglitazone maleate (Avandia) and proposed the mechanisms for rosiglitazone-induced thrombocytopenia. Tested by flow cytometry, the patient's serum was positive for rosiglitazone-induced antibody with the binding ratio of 5.93 (mean fluorescence intensity, MFI) in the presence of the patient's serum and rosiglitazone in a final concentration of 0.53 mmol/l. The antibody was found to bind both glycoprotein (GP) IIb-IIIa complex and GP Ib/IX complex by MAIPA assay using five different monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) against GP complexes Ib/IX, GPIIb/IIIa or GPIa/IIa. Immunoprecipitation studies showed that both GPIIb/IIIa and GP Ib/IX complex were precipitated by antibody in the presence, but not in the absence of rosiglitazone. These findings provide evidence that immune thrombocytopenia can be caused by sensitivity to the antidiabetic agent rosiglitazone maleate. This report documents the first case of rosiglitazone-induced immune thrombocytopenia. PMID:16702039

  5. Memory T Cell-Derived interferon-γ Instructs Potent Innate Cell Activation For Protective Immunity

    PubMed Central

    Soudja, Saidi M’Homa; Chandrabos, Ceena; Yakob, Ernest; Veenstra, Mike; Palliser, Deborah; Lauvau, Grégoire

    2014-01-01

    SUMMARY Cells of the innate immune system are essential for host defenses against primary microbial pathogen infections, yet their involvement in effective memory responses of vaccinated individuals has been poorly investigated. Here we show that memory T cells instruct innate cells to become potent effector cells in a systemic and a mucosal model of infection. Memory T cells controlled phagocyte, dendritic cell and NK or NK T cell mobilization and induction of a strong program of differentiation, which included their expression of effector cytokines and microbicidal pathways, all of which were delayed in non-vaccinated hosts. Disruption of IFN-γ-signaling in Ly6C+ monocytes, dendritic cells and macrophages impaired these processes and the control of pathogen growth. These results reveal how memory T cells, through rapid secretion of IFN-γ, orchestrate extensive modifications of host innate immune responses that are essential for effective protection of vaccinated hosts. PMID:24931122

  6. Potent and broad neutralization of HIV-1 by a llama antibody elicited by immunization

    PubMed Central

    McCoy, Laura E.; Quigley, Anna Forsman; Strokappe, Nika M.; Bulmer-Thomas, Bianca; Seaman, Michael S.; Mortier, Daniella; Rutten, Lucy; Chander, Nikita; Edwards, Carolyn J.; Ketteler, Robin; Davis, David; Verrips, Theo

    2012-01-01

    Llamas (Lama glama) naturally produce heavy chain–only antibodies (Abs) in addition to conventional Abs. The variable regions (VHH) in these heavy chain–only Abs demonstrate comparable affinity and specificity for antigens to conventional immunoglobulins despite their much smaller size. To date, immunizations in humans and animal models have yielded only Abs with limited ability to neutralize HIV-1. In this study, a VHH phagemid library generated from a llama that was multiply immunized with recombinant trimeric HIV-1 envelope proteins (Envs) was screened directly for HIV-1 neutralization. One VHH, L8CJ3 (J3), neutralized 96 of 100 tested HIV-1 strains, encompassing subtypes A, B, C, D, BC, AE, AG, AC, ACD, CD, and G. J3 also potently neutralized chimeric simian-HIV strains with HIV subtypes B and C Env. The sequence of J3 is highly divergent from previous anti–HIV-1 VHH and its own germline sequence. J3 achieves broad and potent neutralization of HIV-1 via interaction with the CD4-binding site of HIV-1 Env. This study may represent a new benchmark for immunogens to be included in B cell–based vaccines and supports the development of VHH as anti–HIV-1 microbicides. PMID:22641382

  7. Alarmin IL-33 acts as an immunoadjuvant for enhancing antigen-specific cell-mediated immunity resulting in potent anti-tumor immunity

    PubMed Central

    Villarreal, Daniel O.; Wise, Megan C.; Walters, Jewell N.; Reuschel, Emma; Choi, Min Joung; Obeng-Adjei, Nyamekye; Yan, Jian; Morrow, Matthew P.; Weiner, David B.

    2014-01-01

    Interleukin 33 (IL-33) has emerged as a cytokine that can exhibit pleiotropic properties. Here we examine IL-33 for its immunoadjuvant effects in an HPV-associated cancer immune therapy model in which cell-mediated immunity is critical for protection. It is known that two biologically active forms of IL-33 exist: full-length IL-33 and mature IL-33. The potential ability of both isoforms to act as vaccine adjuvants to influence the CD4 Th1 and CD8 T cell immune responses has not been well defined. We show that both isoforms of IL-33 are capable of enhancing potent antigen (Ag)-specific effector and memory T cell immunity in vivo in a DNA vaccine setting. We also show that while both forms of IL-33 drove robust IFN-γ responses, neither form drove high secretion of IL-4 or any elevation of IgE levels. Moreover, both isoforms augmented vaccine-induced Ag-specific polyfunctional CD4+ and CD8+ T cell responses, with a large proportion of CD8+ T cells undergoing cytolytic plurifunctional degranulation. Therapeutic studies indicated that established TC-1-bearing mice undergo rapid and complete regression after therapeutic vaccination with both IL-33 adjuvant isoforms used in conjunction with an HPV DNA vaccine. Furthermore, using the P14 transgenic mouse model, we show that IL-33 can significantly expand the magnitude of Ag-specific CD8+ T cell responses and elicit bonafide effector-memory CD8+ T cells. Overall, the data suggests the potential use of these two IL-33 isoforms as immunoadjuvant candidates in future vaccination against other pathogens and in the context of anti-tumor immune-based therapy. PMID:24448242

  8. Foot-and-mouth disease virus-like particles produced by a SUMO fusion protein system in Escherichia coli induce potent protective immune responses in guinea pigs, swine and cattle

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Foot-and-mouth disease virus (FMDV) causes a highly contagious infection in cloven-hoofed animals. The format of FMD virus-like particles (VLP) as a non-replicating particulate vaccine candidate is a promising alternative to conventional inactivated FMDV vaccines. In this study, we explored a prokaryotic system to express and assemble the FMD VLP and validated the potential of VLP as an FMDV vaccine candidate. VLP composed entirely of FMDV (Asia1/Jiangsu/China/2005) capsid proteins (VP0, VP1 and VP3) were simultaneously produced as SUMO fusion proteins by an improved SUMO fusion protein system in E. coli. Proteolytic removal of the SUMO moiety from the fusion proteins resulted in the assembly of VLP with size and shape resembling the authentic FMDV. Immunization of guinea pigs, swine and cattle with FMD VLP by intramuscular inoculation stimulated the FMDV-specific antibody response, neutralizing antibody response, T-cell proliferation response and secretion of cytokine IFN-γ. In addition, immunization with one dose of the VLP resulted in complete protection of these animals from homologous FMDV challenge. The 50% protection dose (PD50) of FMD VLP in cattle is up to 6.34. These results suggest that FMD VLP expressed in E. coli are an effective vaccine in guinea pigs, swine and cattle and support further development of these VLP as a vaccine candidate for protection against FMDV. PMID:23826638

  9. Novel vaccine development strategies for inducing mucosal immunity

    PubMed Central

    Fujkuyama, Yoshiko; Tokuhara, Daisuke; Kataoka, Kosuke; Gilbert, Rebekah S; McGhee, Jerry R; Yuki, Yoshikazu; Kiyono, Hiroshi; Fujihashi, Kohtaro

    2012-01-01

    To develop protective immune responses against mucosal pathogens, the delivery route and adjuvants for vaccination are important. The host, however, strives to maintain mucosal homeostasis by responding to mucosal antigens with tolerance, instead of immune activation. Thus, induction of mucosal immunity through vaccination is a rather difficult task, and potent mucosal adjuvants, vectors or other special delivery systems are often used, especially in the elderly. By taking advantage of the common mucosal immune system, the targeting of mucosal dendritic cells and microfold epithelial cells may facilitate the induction of effective mucosal immunity. Thus, novel routes of immunization and antigen delivery systems also show great potential for the development of effective and safe mucosal vaccines against various pathogens. The purpose of this review is to introduce several recent approaches to induce mucosal immunity to vaccines, with an emphasis on mucosal tissue targeting, new immunization routes and delivery systems. Defining the mechanisms of mucosal vaccines is as important as their efficacy and safety, and in this article, examples of recent approaches, which will likely accelerate progress in mucosal vaccine development, are discussed. PMID:22380827

  10. Nucleic acid-containing amyloid fibrils potently induce type I interferon and stimulate systemic autoimmunity

    PubMed Central

    Di Domizio, Jeremy; Dorta-Estremera, Stephanie; Gagea, Mihai; Ganguly, Dipyaman; Meller, Stephan; Li, Ping; Zhao, Bihong; Tan, Filemon K.; Bi, Liqi; Gilliet, Michel; Cao, Wei

    2012-01-01

    The immunopathophysiologic development of systemic autoimmunity involves numerous factors through complex mechanisms that are not fully understood. In systemic lupus erythematosus, type I IFN (IFN-I) produced by plasmacytoid dendritic cells (pDCs) critically promotes the autoimmunity through its pleiotropic effects on immune cells. However, the host-derived factors that enable abnormal IFN-I production and initial immune tolerance breakdown are largely unknown. Previously, we found that amyloid precursor proteins form amyloid fibrils in the presence of nucleic acids. Here we report that nucleic acid-containing amyloid fibrils can potently activate pDCs and enable IFN-I production in response to self-DNA, self-RNA, and dead cell debris. pDCs can take up DNA-containing amyloid fibrils, which are retained in the early endosomes to activate TLR9, leading to high IFNα/β production. In mice treated with DNA-containing amyloid fibrils, a rapid IFN response correlated with pDC infiltration and activation. Immunization of nonautoimmune mice with DNA-containing amyloid fibrils induced antinuclear serology against a panel of self-antigens. The mice exhibited positive proteinuria and deposited antibodies in their kidneys. Intriguingly, pDC depletion obstructed IFN-I response and selectively abolished autoantibody generation. Our study reveals an innate immune function of nucleic acid-containing amyloid fibrils and provides a potential link between compromised protein homeostasis and autoimmunity via a pDC-IFN axis. PMID:22904191

  11. Immune-stimulating complexes as adjuvants for inducing local and systemic immunity after oral immunization with protein antigens.

    PubMed Central

    Mowat, A M; Maloy, K J; Donachie, A M

    1993-01-01

    Orally active synthetic vaccines containing purified antigens would have many benefits for immunizing against systemic and mucosal diseases. However, several factors have limited the development of such vaccines, including the poor immunogenicity of purified proteins and their usual ability to induce tolerance when given orally. Here, we show that incorporation of ovalbumin (OVA) into immune-stimulating complexes (ISCOMS) containing saponin prevents the induction of oral tolerance in mice. In parallel, the spleen and mesenteric lymph node of mice fed OVA ISCOMS are primed for class I major histocompatibility complex (MHC)-restricted cytotoxic T-cell activity which recognizes physiologically processed epitopes on OVA. Oral immunization with OVA ISCOMS also stimulates high secretory IgA antibody responses in the intestine itself, as well as serum IgG antibodies. None of these active immune responses are detectable in mice fed OVA alone. Despite the potent priming of mucosal priming by OVA ISCOMS, re-exposure to antigen does not induce the intestinal immunopathology found in other systems after the breakdown of oral tolerance. Thus, ISCOMS have several unique properties as vectors for oral immunization and could provide a basis for future mucosal vaccines. PMID:7508416

  12. Highly potent, synthetically accessible prostratin analogs induce latent HIV expression in vitro and ex vivo

    PubMed Central

    Beans, Elizabeth J.; Fournogerakis, Dennis; Gauntlett, Carolyn; Heumann, Lars V.; Kramer, Rainer; Marsden, Matthew D.; Murray, Danielle; Zack, Jerome A.; Wender, Paul A.

    2013-01-01

    Highly active antiretroviral therapy (HAART) decreases plasma viremia below the limits of detection in the majority of HIV-infected individuals, thus serving to slow disease progression. However, HAART targets only actively replicating virus and is unable to eliminate latently infected, resting CD4+ T cells. Such infected cells are potentially capable of reinitiating virus replication upon cessation of HAART, thus leading to viral rebound. Agents that would eliminate these reservoirs, when used in combination with HAART, could thus provide a strategy for the eradication of HIV. Prostratin is a preclinical candidate that induces HIV expression from latently infected CD4+ T cells, potentially leading to their elimination through a virus-induced cytopathic effect or host anti-HIV immunity. Here, we report the synthesis of a series of designed prostratin analogs and report in vitro and ex vivo studies of their activity relevant to induction of HIV expression. Members of this series are up to 100-fold more potent than the preclinical lead (prostratin) in binding to cell-free PKC, and in inducing HIV expression in a latently infected cell line and prostratin-like modulation of cell surface receptor expression in primary cells from HIV-negative donors. Significantly, selected members were also tested for HIV induction in resting CD4+ T cells isolated from infected individuals receiving HAART and were found to exhibit potent induction activity. These more potent agents and by extension related tunable analogs now accessible through the studies described herein should facilitate research and preclinical advancement of this strategy for HIV/AIDS eradication. PMID:23812750

  13. Structurally well-defined macrophage activating factor derived from vitamin D3-binding protein has a potent adjuvant activity for immunization.

    PubMed

    Yamamoto, N; Naraparaju, V R

    1998-06-01

    Freund's adjuvant produced severe inflammation that augments development of antibodies. Thus, mixed administration of antigens with adjuvant was not required as long as inflammation was induced in the hosts. Since macrophage activation for phagocytosis and antigen processing is the first step of antibody development, inflammation-primed macrophage activation plays a major role in immune development. Therefore, macrophage activating factor should act as an adjuvant for immunization. The inflammation-primed macrophage activation process is the major macrophage activating cascade that requires participation of serum vitamin D3-binding protein (DBP; human DBP is known as Gc protein) and glycosidases of B and T lymphocytes. Stepwise incubation of Gc protein with immobilized beta-galactosidase and sialidase efficiently generated the most potent macrophage activating factor (designated GcMAF) we have ever encountered. Administration of GcMAF (20 or 100 pg/mouse) resulted in stimulation of the progenitor cells for extensive mitogenesis and activation of macrophages. Administration of GcMAF (100 pg/mouse) along with immunization of mice with sheep red blood cells (SRBC) produced a large number of anti-SRBC antibody secreting splenic cells in 2-4 days. Thus, GcMAF has a potent adjuvant activity for immunization. Although malignant tumours are poorly immunogenic, 4 days after GcMAF-primed immunization of mice with heat-killed Ehrlich ascites tumour cells, the ascites tumour was no longer transplantable in these mice. PMID:9682967

  14. Harnessing DNA-induced immune responses for improving cancer vaccines

    PubMed Central

    Herrada, Andrés A.; Rojas-Colonelli, Nicole; González-Figueroa, Paula; Roco, Jonathan; Oyarce, César; Ligtenberg, Maarten A.; Lladser, Alvaro

    2012-01-01

    DNA vaccines have emerged as an attractive strategy to promote protective cellular and humoral immunity against the encoded antigen. DNA vaccines are easy to generate, inexpensive to produce and purify at large-scale, highly stable and safe. In addition, plasmids used for DNA vaccines act as powerful “danger signals” by stimulating several DNA-sensing innate immune receptors that promote the induction of protective adaptive immunity. The induction of tumor-specific immune responses represents a major challenge for DNA vaccines because most of tumor-associated antigens are normal non-mutated self-antigens. As a consequence, induction of potentially self-reactive T cell responses against such poorly immunogenic antigens is controlled by mechanisms of central and peripheral tolerance as well as tumor-induced immunosuppression. Although several DNA vaccines against cancer have reached clinical testing, disappointing results have been observed. Therefore, the development of new adjuvants that strongly stimulate the induction of antitumor T cell immunity and counteract immune-suppressive regulation is an attractive approach to enhance the potency of DNA vaccines and overcome tumor-associated tolerance. Understanding the DNA-sensing signaling pathways of innate immunity that mediate the induction of T cell responses elicited by DNA vaccines represents a unique opportunity to develop novel adjuvants that enhance vaccine potency. The advance of DNA adjuvants needs to be complemented with the development of potent delivery systems, in order to step toward successful clinical application. Here, we briefly discuss recent evidence showing how to harness DNA-induced immune response to improve the potency of cancer vaccines and counteract tumor-associated tolerance. PMID:23111166

  15. Interbilayer-crosslinked multilamellar vesicles as synthetic vaccines for potent humoral and cellular immune responses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moon, James J.; Suh, Heikyung; Bershteyn, Anna; Stephan, Matthias T.; Liu, Haipeng; Huang, Bonnie; Sohail, Mashaal; Luo, Samantha; Ho Um, Soong; Khant, Htet; Goodwin, Jessica T.; Ramos, Jenelyn; Chiu, Wah; Irvine, Darrell J.

    2011-03-01

    Vaccines based on recombinant proteins avoid the toxicity and antivector immunity associated with live vaccine (for example, viral) vectors, but their immunogenicity is poor, particularly for CD8+ T-cell responses. Synthetic particles carrying antigens and adjuvant molecules have been developed to enhance subunit vaccines, but in general these materials have failed to elicit CD8+ T-cell responses comparable to those for live vectors in preclinical animal models. Here, we describe interbilayer-crosslinked multilamellar vesicles formed by crosslinking headgroups of adjacent lipid bilayers within multilamellar vesicles. Interbilayer-crosslinked vesicles stably entrapped protein antigens in the vesicle core and lipid-based immunostimulatory molecules in the vesicle walls under extracellular conditions, but exhibited rapid release in the presence of endolysosomal lipases. We found that these antigen/adjuvant-carrying vesicles form an extremely potent whole-protein vaccine, eliciting endogenous T-cell and antibody responses comparable to those for the strongest vaccine vectors. These materials should enable a range of subunit vaccines and provide new possibilities for therapeutic protein delivery.

  16. Combining somatic mutations present in different in vivo affinity-matured antibodies isolated from immunized Lama glama yields ultra-potent antibody therapeutics.

    PubMed

    Klarenbeek, Alex; Blanchetot, Christophe; Schragel, Georg; Sadi, Ava S; Ongenae, Nico; Hemrika, Wieger; Wijdenes, John; Spinelli, Silvia; Desmyter, Aline; Cambillau, Christian; Hultberg, Anna; Kretz-Rommel, Anke; Dreier, Torsten; De Haard, Hans J W; Roovers, Rob C

    2016-04-01

    Highly potent human antibodies are required to therapeutically neutralize cytokines such as interleukin-6 (IL-6) that is involved in many inflammatory diseases and malignancies. Although a number of mutagenesis approaches exist to perform antibody affinity maturation, these may cause antibody instability and production issues. Thus, a robust and easy antibody affinity maturation strategy to increase antibody potency remains highly desirable. By immunizing llama, cloning the 'immune' antibody repertoire and using phage display, we selected a diverse set of IL-6 antagonistic Fabs. Heavy chain shuffling was performed on the Fab with lowest off-rate, resulting in a panel of variants with even lower off-rate. Structural analysis of the Fab:IL-6 complex suggests that the increased affinity was partly due to a serine to tyrosine switch in HCDR2. This translated into neutralizing capacity in an in vivo model of IL-6 induced SAA production. Finally, a novel Fab library was designed, encoding all variations found in the natural repertoire of VH genes identified after heavy chain shuffling. High stringency selections resulted in identification of a Fab with 250-fold increased potency when re-formatted into IgG1. Compared with a heavily engineered anti-IL-6 monoclonal antibody currently in clinical development, this IgG was at least equally potent, showing the engineering process to have had led to a highly potent anti-IL-6 antibody. PMID:26945588

  17. The catalytic A1 domains of cholera toxin and heat-labile enterotoxin are potent DNA adjuvants that evoke mixed Th1/Th17 cellular immune responses

    PubMed Central

    Bagley, Kenneth; Xu, Rong; Ota-Setlik, Ayuko; Egan, Michael; Schwartz, Jennifer; Fouts, Timothy

    2015-01-01

    DNA encoded adjuvants are well known for increasing the magnitude of cellular and/or humoral immune responses directed against vaccine antigens. DNA adjuvants can also tune immune responses directed against vaccine antigens to better protect against infection of the target organism. Two potent DNA adjuvants that have unique abilities to tune immune responses are the catalytic A1 domains of Cholera Toxin (CTA1) and Heat-Labile Enterotoxin (LTA1). Here, we have characterized the adjuvant activities of CTA1 and LTA1 using HIV and SIV genes as model antigens. Both of these adjuvants enhanced the magnitude of antigen-specific cellular immune responses on par with those induced by the well-characterized cytokine adjuvants IL-12 and GM-CSF. CTA1 and LTA1 preferentially enhanced cellular responses to the intracellular antigen SIVmac239-gag over those for the secreted HIVBaL-gp120 antigen. IL-12, GM-CSF and electroporation did the opposite suggesting differences in the mechanisms of actions of these diverse adjuvants. Combinations of CTA1 or LTA1 with IL-12 or GM-CSF generated additive and better balanced cellular responses to both of these antigens. Consistent with observations made with the holotoxin and the CTA1-DD adjuvant, CTA1 and LTA1 evoked mixed Th1/Th17 cellular immune responses. Together, these results show that CTA1 and LTA1 are potent DNA vaccine adjuvants that favor the intracellular antigen gag over the secreted antigen gp120 and evoke mixed Th1/Th17 responses against both of these antigens. The results also indicate that achieving a balanced immune response to multiple intracellular and extracellular antigens delivered via DNA vaccination may require combining adjuvants that have different and complementary mechanisms of action. PMID:26042527

  18. The catalytic A1 domains of cholera toxin and heat-labile enterotoxin are potent DNA adjuvants that evoke mixed Th1/Th17 cellular immune responses.

    PubMed

    Bagley, Kenneth; Xu, Rong; Ota-Setlik, Ayuko; Egan, Michael; Schwartz, Jennifer; Fouts, Timothy

    2015-01-01

    DNA encoded adjuvants are well known for increasing the magnitude of cellular and/or humoral immune responses directed against vaccine antigens. DNA adjuvants can also tune immune responses directed against vaccine antigens to better protect against infection of the target organism. Two potent DNA adjuvants that have unique abilities to tune immune responses are the catalytic A1 domains of Cholera Toxin (CTA1) and Heat-Labile Enterotoxin (LTA1). Here, we have characterized the adjuvant activities of CTA1 and LTA1 using HIV and SIV genes as model antigens. Both of these adjuvants enhanced the magnitude of antigen-specific cellular immune responses on par with those induced by the well-characterized cytokine adjuvants IL-12 and GM-CSF. CTA1 and LTA1 preferentially enhanced cellular responses to the intracellular antigen SIVmac239-gag over those for the secreted HIVBaL-gp120 antigen. IL-12, GM-CSF and electroporation did the opposite suggesting differences in the mechanisms of actions of these diverse adjuvants. Combinations of CTA1 or LTA1 with IL-12 or GM-CSF generated additive and better balanced cellular responses to both of these antigens. Consistent with observations made with the holotoxin and the CTA1-DD adjuvant, CTA1 and LTA1 evoked mixed Th1/Th17 cellular immune responses. Together, these results show that CTA1 and LTA1 are potent DNA vaccine adjuvants that favor the intracellular antigen gag over the secreted antigen gp120 and evoke mixed Th1/Th17 responses against both of these antigens. The results also indicate that achieving a balanced immune response to multiple intracellular and extracellular antigens delivered via DNA vaccination may require combining adjuvants that have different and complementary mechanisms of action. PMID:26042527

  19. A potent multivalent vaccine for modulation of immune system in atherosclerosis: an in silico approach

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Purpose Atherosclerosis is classically defined as an immune-mediated disease characterized by accumulation of low-density lipoprotein cholesterol over intima in medium sized and large arteries. Recent studies have demonstrated that both innate and adaptive immune responses are involved in atherosclerosis. In addition, experimental and human models have recognized many autoantigens in pathophysiology of this disease. Oxidized low-density lipoproteins, β2 glycoprotein I (β-2-GPI), and heat shock protein 60 (HSP60) are the best studied of them which can represent promising approach to design worthwhile vaccines for modulation of atherosclerosis. Materials and Methods In silico approaches are the best tools for design and evaluation of the vaccines before initiating the experimental study. In this study, we identified immunogenic epitopes of HSP60, ApoB-100, and β-2-GPI as major antigens to construct a chimeric protein through bioinformatics tools. Additionally, we have evaluated physico-chemical properties, structures, stability, MHC binding properties, humoral and cellular immune responses, and allergenicity of this chimeric protein by means of bioinformatics tools and servers. Results Validation results indicated that 89.1% residues locate in favorite or additional allowed region of Ramachandran plot. Also, based on Ramachandran plot analysis this protein could be classified as a stable fusion protein. In addition, the epitopes in the chimeric protein had strong potential to induce both the B-cell and T-cell mediated immune responses. Conclusion Our results supported that this chimeric vaccine could be effectively utilized as a multivalent vaccine for prevention and modulation of atherosclerosis. PMID:26866024

  20. Direct tumor recognition by a human CD4+ T-cell subset potently mediates tumor growth inhibition and orchestrates anti-tumor immune responses

    PubMed Central

    Matsuzaki, Junko; Tsuji, Takemasa; Luescher, Immanuel F.; Shiku, Hiroshi; Mineno, Junichi; Okamoto, Sachiko; Old, Lloyd J.; Shrikant, Protul; Gnjatic, Sacha; Odunsi, Kunle

    2015-01-01

    Tumor antigen-specific CD4+ T cells generally orchestrate and regulate immune cells to provide immune surveillance against malignancy. However, activation of antigen-specific CD4+ T cells is restricted at local tumor sites where antigen-presenting cells (APCs) are frequently dysfunctional, which can cause rapid exhaustion of anti-tumor immune responses. Herein, we characterize anti-tumor effects of a unique human CD4+ helper T-cell subset that directly recognizes the cytoplasmic tumor antigen, NY-ESO-1, presented by MHC class II on cancer cells. Upon direct recognition of cancer cells, tumor-recognizing CD4+ T cells (TR-CD4) potently induced IFN-γ-dependent growth arrest in cancer cells. In addition, direct recognition of cancer cells triggers TR-CD4 to provide help to NY-ESO-1-specific CD8+ T cells by enhancing cytotoxic activity, and improving viability and proliferation in the absence of APCs. Notably, the TR-CD4 either alone or in collaboration with CD8+ T cells significantly inhibited tumor growth in vivo in a xenograft model. Finally, retroviral gene-engineering with T cell receptor (TCR) derived from TR-CD4 produced large numbers of functional TR-CD4. These observations provide mechanistic insights into the role of TR-CD4 in tumor immunity, and suggest that approaches to utilize TR-CD4 will augment anti-tumor immune responses for durable therapeutic efficacy in cancer patients. PMID:26447332

  1. CpG DNA is a potent enhancer of systemic and mucosal immune responses against hepatitis B surface antigen with intranasal administration to mice.

    PubMed

    McCluskie, M J; Davis, H L

    1998-11-01

    Mucosal immunity is difficult to induce with subunit vaccines unless such vaccines are administered with a mucosal adjuvant such as cholera toxin (CT); however, CT is toxic in humans. Synthetic oligodeoxynucleotides containing immunostimulatory CpG motifs (CpG) are potent adjuvants for the induction of Th1-like systemic immune responses against parenterally delivered proteins. Here, we show in mice that intranasal delivery of hepatitis B surface Ag, which alone has no effect, elicits good immune responses when given with CpG oligodeoxynucleotides and/or CT. Overall, CpG is superior to CT for the induction of humoral and cell-mediated systemic immunity as well as mucosal immune responses (IgA) at local (lung) and distant (feces) sites. Furthermore, CpG and CT act synergistically, giving stronger responses than those observed with 10 times more of either adjuvant alone. Ab isotypes were predominantly IgG1 (Th2-like) with CT, mixed IgG1/IgG2a (Th0) with CpG, and predominantly IgG2a (Th1-like) with CpG and CT together. PMID:9794366

  2. CXCL11-Armed oncolytic poxvirus elicits potent antitumor immunity and shows enhanced therapeutic efficacy

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Zuqiang; Ravindranathan, Roshni; Li, Jun; Kalinski, Pawel; Guo, Z. Sheng; Bartlett, David L.

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT We have armed a tumor-selective oncolytic vaccinia virus (vvDD) with the chemokine (CK) CXCL11, in order to enhance its ability to attract CXCR3+ antitumor CTLs and possibly NK cells to the tumor microenvironment (TME) and improve its therapeutic efficacy. As expected, vvDD-CXCL11 attracted high numbers of tumor-specific T cells to the TME in a murine AB12 mesothelioma model. Intratumoral virus-directed CXCL11 expression enhanced local numbers of CD8+ CTLs and levels of granzyme B, while reducing expression of several suppressive molecules, TGF-β, COX2, and CCL22 in the TME. Unexpectedly, we observed that vvDD-CXCL11, but not parental vvDD, induced a systemic increase in tumor-specific IFNγ-producing CD8+ T cells in the spleen and other lymph organs, indicating the induction of systemic antitumor immunity. This effect was associated with enhanced therapeutic efficacy and a survival benefit in tumor-bearing mice treated with vvDD-CXCL11, mediated by CD8+ T cells and IFNγ, but not CD4+ T cells. These results demonstrate that intratumoral expression of CXCL11, in addition to promoting local trafficking of T cells and to a lesser extent NK cells, has a novel function as a factor eliciting systemic immunity to cancer-associated antigens. Our data provide a rationale for expressing CXCL11 to enhance the therapeutic efficacy of oncolytic viruses (OVs) and cancer vaccines. PMID:27141352

  3. Tumor-induced immune dysfunction.

    PubMed

    Kiessling, R; Wasserman, K; Horiguchi, S; Kono, K; Sjöberg, J; Pisa, P; Petersson, M

    1999-10-01

    Immune system-based approaches for the treatment of malignant disease over the past decades have often focused on cytolytic effector cells such as cytotoxic T lymphocytes (CTL), and natural killer (NK) cells. It has also been demonstrated that tumor-bearing mice can be cured using a wide variety of approaches, some of which involve cytokine-mediated enhancement of CTL and NK cell activity. However, the apparent success in mice stands in contrast to the current situation in the clinic, wherein only a minority of patients have thus far benefited from CTL- or NK cell-based antitumor approaches. The underlying causes of tumor-associated immune suppression of CTL and NK cell activity are discussed, and features of interest shared with HIV infection, leprosy, and rheumatoid arthritis are also be mentioned. Remarkable and very recent observations have shed more light upon the causes of dysfunctional alterations in CTL and NK cells often associated with these diseases, that in turn have suggested new immunotherapeutic approaches for cancer and infectious disease. PMID:10501847

  4. Injury-induced immune responses in Hydra.

    PubMed

    Wenger, Yvan; Buzgariu, Wanda; Reiter, Silke; Galliot, Brigitte

    2014-08-01

    The impact of injury-induced immune responses on animal regenerative processes is highly variable, positive or negative depending on the context. This likely reflects the complexity of the innate immune system that behaves as a sentinel in the transition from injury to regeneration. Early-branching invertebrates with high regenerative potential as Hydra provide a unique framework to dissect how injury-induced immune responses impact regeneration. A series of early cellular events likely require an efficient immune response after amputation, as antimicrobial defence, epithelial cell stretching for wound closure, migration of interstitial progenitors toward the wound, cell death, phagocytosis of cell debris, or reconstruction of the extracellular matrix. The analysis of the injury-induced transcriptomic modulations of 2636 genes annotated as immune genes in Hydra identified 43 genes showing an immediate/early pulse regulation in all regenerative contexts examined. These regulations point to an enhanced cytoprotection via ROS signaling (Nrf, C/EBP, p62/SQSMT1-l2), TNFR and TLR signaling (TNFR16-like, TRAF2l, TRAF5l, jun, fos-related, SIK2, ATF1/CREB, LRRC28, LRRC40, LRRK2), proteasomal activity (p62/SQSMT1-l1, Ced6/Gulf, NEDD8-conjugating enzyme Ubc12), stress proteins (CRYAB1, CRYAB2, HSP16.2, DnaJB9, HSP90a1), all potentially regulating NF-κB activity. Other genes encoding immune-annotated proteins such as NPYR4, GTPases, Swap70, the antiproliferative BTG1, enzymes involved in lipid metabolism (5-lipoxygenase, ACSF4), secreted clotting factors, secreted peptidases are also pulse regulated upon bisection. By contrast, metalloproteinases and antimicrobial peptide genes largely follow a context-dependent regulation, whereas the protease inhibitor α2macroglobulin gene exhibits a sustained up-regulation. Hence a complex immune response to injury is linked to wound healing and regeneration in Hydra. PMID:25086685

  5. Oxazolone-Induced Contact Hypersensitivity Reduces Lymphatic Drainage but Enhances the Induction of Adaptive Immunity

    PubMed Central

    Aebischer, David; Willrodt, Ann-Helen; Halin, Cornelia

    2014-01-01

    Contact hypersensitivity (CHS) induced by topical application of haptens is a commonly used model to study dermal inflammatory responses in mice. Several recent studies have indicated that CHS-induced skin inflammation triggers lymphangiogenesis but may negatively impact the immune-function of lymphatic vessels, namely fluid drainage and dendritic cell (DC) migration to draining lymph nodes (dLNs). On the other hand, haptens have been shown to exert immune-stimulatory activity by inducing DC maturation. In this study we investigated how the presence of pre-established CHS-induced skin inflammation affects the induction of adaptive immunity in dLNs. Using a mouse model of oxazolone-induced skin inflammation we observed that lymphatic drainage was reduced and DC migration from skin to dLNs was partially compromised. At the same time, a significantly stronger adaptive immune response towards ovalbumin (OVA) was induced when immunization had occurred in CHS-inflamed skin as compared to uninflamed control skin. In fact, immunization with sterile OVA in CHS-inflamed skin evoked a delayed-type hypersensitivity (DTH) response comparable to the one induced by conventional immunization with OVA and adjuvant in uninflamed skin. Striking phenotypic and functional differences were observed when comparing DCs from LNs draining uninflamed or CHS-inflamed skin. DCs from LNs draining CHS-inflamed skin expressed higher levels of co-stimulatory molecules and MHC molecules, produced higher levels of the interleukin-12/23 p40 subunit (IL-12/23-p40) and more potently induced T cell activation in vitro. Immunization experiments revealed that blockade of IL-12/23-p40 during the priming phase partially reverted the CHS-induced enhancement of the adaptive immune response. Collectively, our findings indicate that CHS-induced skin inflammation generates an overall immune-stimulatory milieu, which outweighs the potentially suppressive effect of reduced lymphatic vessel function. PMID:24911791

  6. Induction of antigen-specific immunity by pH-sensitive carbonate apatite as a potent vaccine carrier

    SciTech Connect

    Hebishima, Takehisa; Tada, Seiichi; Takeshima, Shin-nosuke; Akaike, Toshihiro; Ito, Yoshihiro; Aida, Yoko

    2011-12-02

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer To develop effective vaccine, we examined the effects of CO{sub 3}Ap as an antigen carrier. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer OVA contained in CO{sub 3}Ap was taken up by BMDCs more effectively than free OVA. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer OVA-immunized splenocytes was activated by OVA contained in CO{sub 3}Ap effectively. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer OVA contained in CO{sub 3}Ap induced strong OVA-specific immune responses to C57BL/6 mice. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer CO{sub 3}Ap is promising antigen carrier for the achievement of effective vaccine. -- Abstract: The ability of carbonate apatite (CO{sub 3}Ap) to enhance antigen-specific immunity was examined in vitro and in vivo to investigate its utility as a vaccine carrier. Murine bone marrow-derived dendritic cells took up ovalbumin (OVA) containing CO{sub 3}Ap more effectively than free OVA. Interestingly, mice immunized with OVA-containing CO{sub 3}Ap produced OVA-specific antibodies more effectively than mice immunized with free OVA. Furthermore, immunization of C57BL/6 mice with OVA-containing CO{sub 3}Ap induced the proliferation and antigen-specific production of IFN-{gamma} by splenocytes more strongly than immunization with free OVA. Moreover, no significant differences were detected in the induction of delayed-type hypersensitivity responses, an immune reaction involving an antigen-specific, cell-mediated immune response between OVA-containing CO{sub 3}Ap and OVA-containing alumina salt (Alum), suggesting that CO{sub 3}Ap induced cell-mediated immune response to the same degree as Alum, which is commonly used for clinical applications. This study is the first to demonstrate the induction of antigen-specific immune responses in vivo by CO{sub 3}Ap.

  7. The requirement for potent adjuvants to enhance the immunogenicity and protective efficacy of protein vaccines can be overcome by prior immunization with a recombinant adenovirus

    PubMed Central

    de Cassan, Simone C.; Forbes, Emily K.; Douglas, Alexander D.; Milicic, Anita; Singh, Bijender; Gupta, Puneet; Chauhan, Virander S.; Chitnis, Chetan E.; Gilbert, Sarah C.; Hill, Adrian V. S.; Draper, Simon J.

    2011-01-01

    A central goal in vaccinology is the induction of high and sustained antibody responses. Protein-in-adjuvant formulations are commonly used to achieve such responses. However, their clinical development can be limited by the reactogenicity of some of the most potent pre-clinical adjuvants and the cost and complexity of licensing new adjuvants for human use. Also, few adjuvants induce strong cellular immunity which is important for protection against many diseases, such as malaria. We compared classical adjuvants such as alum to new pre-clinical adjuvants and adjuvants in clinical development such as Abisco®100, CoVaccine HT™, Montanide®ISA720 and SE-GLA, for their ability to induce high and sustained antibody responses and T cell responses. These adjuvants induced a broad range of antibody responses when used in a three-shot protein-in-adjuvant regime using the model antigen ovalbumin and leading blood-stage malaria vaccine candidate antigens. Surprisingly, this range of antibody immunogenicity was greatly reduced when a protein-in-adjuvant vaccine was used to boost antibody responses primed by a human adenovirus serotype 5 (AdHu5) vaccine recombinant for the same antigen. This AdHu5-protein regime also induced a more cytophilic antibody response and demonstrated improved efficacy of merozoite surface protein-1 (MSP-1) protein vaccines against a Plasmodium yoelii blood-stage challenge. This indicates that the differential immunogenicity of protein vaccine adjuvants may be largely overcome by prior immunization with recombinant adenovirus, especially for adjuvants that are traditionally considered poorly immunogenic in the context of subunit vaccination, and may circumvent the need for more potent chemical adjuvants. PMID:21813775

  8. A novel TLR2 agonist from Bordetella pertussis is a potent adjuvant that promotes protective immunity with an acellular pertussis vaccine.

    PubMed

    Dunne, A; Mielke, L A; Allen, A C; Sutton, C E; Higgs, R; Cunningham, C C; Higgins, S C; Mills, K H G

    2015-05-01

    Bordetella pertussis causes whooping cough, a severe and often lethal respiratory infection in infants. A recent resurgence of pertussis has been linked with waning or suboptimal immunity induced with acellular pertussis vaccines (Pa) that were introduced to most developed countries in the 1990s because of safety concerns around the use of whole-cell pertussis vaccines (Pw). Pa are composed of individual B. pertussis antigens absorbed to alum and promote strong antibody, T helper type 2 (Th2) and Th17 responses, but are less effective at inducing cellular immunity mediated by Th1 cells. In contrast, Pw, which include endogenous Toll-like receptor (TLR) agonists, induce Th1 as well as Th17 responses. Here we report the identification and characterization of novel TLR2-activating lipoproteins from B. pertussis. These proteins contain a characteristic N-terminal signal peptide that is unique to Gram-negative bacteria and we demonstrate that one of these lipoproteins, BP1569, activates murine dendritic cells and macrophages and human mononuclear cells via TLR2. Furthermore, we demonstrated that a corresponding synthetic lipopeptide LP1569 has potent immunostimulatory and adjuvant properties, capable of enhancing Th1, Th17, and IgG2a antibody responses induced in mice with an experimental Pa that conferred superior protection against B. pertussis infection than an equivalent vaccine formulated with alum. PMID:25315966

  9. Effective equine immunization protocol for production of potent poly-specific antisera against Calloselasma rhodostoma, Cryptelytrops albolabris and Daboia siamensis.

    PubMed

    Sapsutthipas, Sompong; Leong, Poh Kuan; Akesowan, Surasak; Pratanaphon, Ronachai; Tan, Nget Hong; Ratanabanangkoon, Kavi

    2015-03-01

    Snake envenomation has been estimated to affect 1.8 million people annually with about 94,000 deaths mostly in poor tropical countries. Specific antivenoms are the only rational and effective therapy for these cases. Efforts are being made to produce effective, affordable and sufficient antivenoms for these victims. The immunization process, which has rarely been described in detail, is one step that needs to be rigorously studied and improved especially with regard to the production of polyspecific antisera. The polyspecific nature of therapeutic antivenom could obviate the need to identify the culprit snake species. The aim of this study was to produce potent polyspecific antisera against 3 medically important vipers of Thailand and its neighboring countries, namely Cryptelytrops albolabris "White lipped pit viper" (CA), Calleoselasma rhodostoma "Malayan pit viper" (CR), and Daboia siamensis "Russell's viper" (DS). Four horses were immunized with a mixture of the 3 viper venoms using the 'low dose, low volume multi-site' immunization protocol. The antisera showed rapid rise in ELISA titers against the 3 venoms and reached plateau at about the 8th week post-immunization. The in vivo neutralization potency (P) of the antisera against CA, CR and DS venoms was 10.40, 2.42 and 0.76 mg/ml, respectively and was much higher than the minimal potency limits set by Queen Soavabha Memorial Institute (QSMI). The corresponding potency values for the QSMI monospecific antisera against CA, CR and DS venoms were 7.28, 3.12 and 1.50 mg/ml, respectively. The polyspecific antisera also effectively neutralized the procoagulant, hemorrhagic, necrotic and nephrotoxic activities of the viper venoms. This effective immunization protocol should be useful in the production of potent polyspecific antisera against snake venoms, and equine antisera against tetanus, diphtheria or rabies. PMID:25774998

  10. Effective Equine Immunization Protocol for Production of Potent Poly-specific Antisera against Calloselasma rhodostoma, Cryptelytrops albolabris and Daboia siamensis

    PubMed Central

    Sapsutthipas, Sompong; Leong, Poh Kuan; Akesowan, Surasak; Pratanaphon, Ronachai; Tan, Nget Hong; Ratanabanangkoon, Kavi

    2015-01-01

    Snake envenomation has been estimated to affect 1.8 million people annually with about 94,000 deaths mostly in poor tropical countries. Specific antivenoms are the only rational and effective therapy for these cases. Efforts are being made to produce effective, affordable and sufficient antivenoms for these victims. The immunization process, which has rarely been described in detail, is one step that needs to be rigorously studied and improved especially with regard to the production of polyspecific antisera. The polyspecific nature of therapeutic antivenom could obviate the need to identify the culprit snake species. The aim of this study was to produce potent polyspecific antisera against 3 medically important vipers of Thailand and its neighboring countries, namely Cryptelytrops albolabris "White lipped pit viper" (CA), Calleoselasma rhodostoma “Malayan pit viper” (CR), and Daboia siamensis “Russell’s viper” (DS). Four horses were immunized with a mixture of the 3 viper venoms using the ‘low dose, low volume multi-site’ immunization protocol. The antisera showed rapid rise in ELISA titers against the 3 venoms and reached plateau at about the 8th week post-immunization. The in vivo neutralization potency (P) of the antisera against CA, CR and DS venoms was 10.40, 2.42 and 0.76 mg/ml, respectively and was much higher than the minimal potency limits set by Queen Soavabha Memorial Institute (QSMI). The corresponding potency values for the QSMI monospecific antisera against CA, CR and DS venoms were 7.28, 3.12 and 1.50 mg/ml, respectively. The polyspecific antisera also effectively neutralized the procoagulant, hemorrhagic, necrotic and nephrotoxic activities of the viper venoms. This effective immunization protocol should be useful in the production of potent polyspecific antisera against snake venoms, and equine antisera against tetanus, diphtheria or rabies. PMID:25774998

  11. Dendritic cell based immunotherapy using tumor stem cells mediates potent antitumor immune responses.

    PubMed

    Dashti, Amir; Ebrahimi, Marzieh; Hadjati, Jamshid; Memarnejadian, Arash; Moazzeni, Seyed Mohammad

    2016-04-28

    Cancer stem cells (CSCs) are demonstrated to be usually less sensitive to conventional methods of cancer therapies, resulting in tumor relapse. It is well-known that an ideal treatment would be able to selectively target and kill CSCs, so as to avoid the tumor reversion. The aim of our present study was to evaluate the effectiveness of a dendritic cell (DC) based vaccine against CSCs in a mouse model of malignant melanoma. C57BL/6 mouse bone marrow derived DCs pulsed with a murine melanoma cell line (B16F10) or CSC lysates were used as a vaccine. Immunization of mice with CSC lysate-pulsed DCs was able to induce a significant prophylactic effect by a higher increase in lifespan and obvious depression of tumor growth in tumor bearing mice. The mice vaccinated with DCs loaded with CSC-lysate were revealed to produce specific cytotoxic responses to CSCs. The proliferation assay and cytokine (IFN-γ and IL-4) secretion of mice vaccinated with CSC lysate-pulsed DCs also showed more favorable results, when compared to those receiving B16F10 lysate-pulsed DCs. These findings suggest a potential strategy to improve the efficacy of DC-based immunotherapy of cancers. PMID:26803056

  12. Poly(lactide-co-glycolide) microspheres: a potent oral delivery system to elicit systemic immune response against inactivated rabies virus.

    PubMed

    Ramya, R; Verma, P C; Chaturvedi, V K; Gupta, P K; Pandey, K D; Madhanmohan, M; Kannaki, T R; Sridevi, R; Anukumar, B

    2009-03-26

    Rabies is an endemic, fatal zoonotic disease in the developing countries. Oral vaccination strategies are suitable for rabies control in developing countries. Studies were performed to investigate the suitability of poly(lactide-co-glycolide) (PLG) microspheres as an oral delivery system for beta-propiolactone inactivated concentrated rabies virus (CRV). Immune responses induced by encapsulated (PLG+CRV) and un-encapsulated inactivated rabies virus after oral and intraperitoneal route administrations were compared. The anti-rabies virus IgG antibody titer, virus neutralizing antibody (VNA) titers obtained by mouse neutralization test (MNT) and IgG2a and IgG1 titers of mice group immunized orally with PLG+CRV showed significantly (p<0.001) higher response than the group immunized orally with un-encapsulated CRV. There was no significant difference (p>0.05) between groups inoculated by intraperitoneal route. The stimulation index (SI) obtained by lymphoproliferation assay of PLG+CRV oral group also showed significantly (p<0.001) higher response than the group immunized orally with un-encapsulated CRV, suggesting that oral immunization activates Th1-mediated cellular immunity. Immunized mice of all experimental groups were challenged intracerebrally with a lethal dose of virulent rabies virus Challenge Virus Standard (CVS). The survival rates of mice immunized orally with PLG+CRV and CRV alone were 75% and 50%, respectively, whereas intraperitoneally immunized groups showed 100% protection. The overall results of humoral, cellular immune response and survival rates of mice immunized orally with PLG+CRV were significantly (p<0.001) higher than those of mice immunized orally with CRV alone. These data suggest that the PLG encapsulated inactivated rabies virus can be used for oral immunization against rabies. PMID:19356617

  13. Boosting BCG-primed mice with chimeric DNA vaccine HG856A induces potent multifunctional T cell responses and enhanced protection against Mycobacterium tuberculosis.

    PubMed

    Ji, Ping; Hu, Zhi-Dong; Kang, Han; Yuan, Qin; Ma, Hui; Wen, Han-Li; Wu, Juan; Li, Zhong-Ming; Lowrie, Douglas B; Fan, Xiao-Yong

    2016-02-01

    The tuberculosis pandemic continues to rampage despite widespread use of the current Bacillus Calmette-Guerin (BCG) vaccine. Because DNA vaccines can elicit effective antigen-specific immune responses, including potent T cell-mediated immunity, they are promising vehicles for antigen delivery. In a prime-boost approach, they can supplement the inadequate anti-TB immunological memory induced by BCG. Based on this, a chimeric DNA vaccine HG856A encoding Mycobacterium tuberculosis (M. tuberculosis) immunodominant antigen Ag85A plus two copies of ESAT-6 was constructed. Potent humoral immune responses, as well as therapeutic effects induced by this DNA vaccine, were observed previously in M. tuberculosis-infected mice. In this study, we further evaluated the antigen-specific T cell immune responses and showed that repeated immunization with HG856A gave modest protection against M. tuberculosis challenge infection and significantly boosted the immune protection primed by BCG vaccination. Enhanced protection was accompanied by increased multifunctional Th1 CD4(+) T cell responses, most notably by an elevated frequency of M. tuberculosis antigen-specific IL-2-producing CD4(+) T cells post-vaccination. These data confirm the potential of chimeric DNA vaccine HG856A as an anti-TB vaccine candidate. PMID:26111521

  14. Neuro-immune interactions in chemical-induced airway hyperreactivity.

    PubMed

    Devos, Fien C; Boonen, Brett; Alpizar, Yeranddy A; Maes, Tania; Hox, Valérie; Seys, Sven; Pollaris, Lore; Liston, Adrian; Nemery, Benoit; Talavera, Karel; Hoet, Peter H M; Vanoirbeek, Jeroen A J

    2016-08-01

    Asthma may be induced by chemical sensitisers, via mechanisms that are still poorly understood. This type of asthma is characterised by airway hyperreactivity (AHR) and little airway inflammation. Since potent chemical sensitisers, such as toluene-2,4-diisocyanate (TDI), are also sensory irritants, it is suggested that chemical-induced asthma relies on neuro-immune mechanisms.We investigated the involvement of transient receptor potential channels (TRP) A1 and V1, major chemosensors in the airways, and mast cells, known for their ability to communicate with sensory nerves, in chemical-induced AHR.In vitro intracellular calcium imaging and patch-clamp recordings in TRPA1- and TRPV1-expressing Chinese hamster ovarian cells showed that TDI activates murine TRPA1, but not TRPV1. Using an in vivo model, in which an airway challenge with TDI induces AHR in TDI-sensitised C57Bl/6 mice, we demonstrated that AHR does not develop, despite successful sensitisation, in Trpa1 and Trpv1 knockout mice, and wild-type mice pretreated with a TRPA1 blocker or a substance P receptor antagonist. TDI-induced AHR was also abolished in mast cell deficient Kit(Wsh) (/Wsh) mice, and in wild-type mice pretreated with the mast cell stabiliser ketotifen, without changes in immunological parameters.These data demonstrate that TRPA1, TRPV1 and mast cells play an indispensable role in the development of TDI-elicited AHR. PMID:27126687

  15. Stress induced neuroendocrine-immune plasticity

    PubMed Central

    Liezmann, Christiane; Stock, Daniel; Peters, Eva M. J.

    2012-01-01

    Research over the past decade has revealed close interaction between the nervous and immune systems in regulation of peripheral inflammation linking psychosocial stress with chronic somatic disease and aging. Moreover emerging data suggests that chronic inflammations lead to a pro-inflammatory status underlying premature aging called inflammaging. In this context, the spleen can be seen as a switch board monitoring peripherally derived neuroendocrine-immune mediators in the blood and keeping up a close communication with the central stress response via its mainly sympathetic innervation. The effect aims at balanced and well-timed stress axis activation and immune adaptation in acute peripheral inflammatory events. Constant adjustment to the needs generated by environmental and endogenous challenges is provided by neuroendocrine-immune plasticity. However, maladaptive plasticity induced e.g., by chronic stress-axis activation and excessive non-neuronal derived neuroendocrine mediators may be at the heart of the observed stress sensitivity promote inflammaging under chronic inflammatory conditions. We here review the role of neurotransmitters, neuropeptides and neurotrophins as stress mediators modulating the immune response in the spleen and their potential role in inflammaging. PMID:23467333

  16. The Carbomer-Lecithin Adjuvant Adjuplex Has Potent Immunoactivating Properties and Elicits Protective Adaptive Immunity against Influenza Virus Challenge in Mice.

    PubMed

    Wegmann, Frank; Moghaddam, Amin E; Schiffner, Torben; Gartlan, Kate H; Powell, Timothy J; Russell, Rebecca A; Baart, Matthijs; Carrow, Emily W; Sattentau, Quentin J

    2015-09-01

    The continued discovery and development of adjuvants for vaccine formulation are important to safely increase potency and/or reduce the antigen doses of existing vaccines and tailor the adaptive immune response to newly developed vaccines. Adjuplex is a novel adjuvant platform based on a purified lecithin and carbomer homopolymer. Here, we analyzed the adjuvant activity of Adjuplex in mice for the soluble hemagglutinin (HA) glycoprotein of influenza A virus. The titration of Adjuplex revealed an optimal dose of 1% for immunogenicity, eliciting high titers of HA-specific IgG but inducing no significant weight loss. At this dose, Adjuplex completely protected mice from an otherwise lethal influenza virus challenge and was at least as effective as the adjuvants monophosphoryl lipid A (MPL) and alum in preventing disease. Adjuplex elicited balanced Th1-/Th2-type immune responses with accompanying cytokines and triggered antigen-specific CD8(+) T-cell proliferation. The use of the peritoneal inflammation model revealed that Adjuplex recruited dendritic cells (DCs), monocytes, and neutrophils in the context of innate cytokine and chemokine secretion. Adjuplex neither triggered classical maturation of DCs nor activated a pathogen recognition receptor (PRR)-expressing NF-κB reporter cell line, suggesting a mechanism of action different from that reported for classical pathogen-associated molecular pattern (PAMP)-activated innate immunity. Taken together, these data reveal Adjuplex to be a potent and well-tolerated adjuvant with application for subunit vaccines. PMID:26135973

  17. The Carbomer-Lecithin Adjuvant Adjuplex Has Potent Immunoactivating Properties and Elicits Protective Adaptive Immunity against Influenza Virus Challenge in Mice

    PubMed Central

    Wegmann, Frank; Moghaddam, Amin E.; Schiffner, Torben; Gartlan, Kate H.; Powell, Timothy J.; Russell, Rebecca A.; Baart, Matthijs; Carrow, Emily W.

    2015-01-01

    The continued discovery and development of adjuvants for vaccine formulation are important to safely increase potency and/or reduce the antigen doses of existing vaccines and tailor the adaptive immune response to newly developed vaccines. Adjuplex is a novel adjuvant platform based on a purified lecithin and carbomer homopolymer. Here, we analyzed the adjuvant activity of Adjuplex in mice for the soluble hemagglutinin (HA) glycoprotein of influenza A virus. The titration of Adjuplex revealed an optimal dose of 1% for immunogenicity, eliciting high titers of HA-specific IgG but inducing no significant weight loss. At this dose, Adjuplex completely protected mice from an otherwise lethal influenza virus challenge and was at least as effective as the adjuvants monophosphoryl lipid A (MPL) and alum in preventing disease. Adjuplex elicited balanced Th1-/Th2-type immune responses with accompanying cytokines and triggered antigen-specific CD8+ T-cell proliferation. The use of the peritoneal inflammation model revealed that Adjuplex recruited dendritic cells (DCs), monocytes, and neutrophils in the context of innate cytokine and chemokine secretion. Adjuplex neither triggered classical maturation of DCs nor activated a pathogen recognition receptor (PRR)-expressing NF-κB reporter cell line, suggesting a mechanism of action different from that reported for classical pathogen-associated molecular pattern (PAMP)-activated innate immunity. Taken together, these data reveal Adjuplex to be a potent and well-tolerated adjuvant with application for subunit vaccines. PMID:26135973

  18. Potent monoclonal antibodies against Clostridium difficile toxin A elicited by DNA immunization.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Chunhua; Jin, Ke; Xiao, Yanling; Cheng, Ying; Huang, Zuhu; Wang, Shixia; Lu, Shan

    2013-10-01

    Recent studies have demonstrated that DNA immunization is effective in eliciting antigen-specific antibody responses against a wide range of infectious disease targets. The polyclonal antibodies elicited by DNA vaccination exhibit high sensitivity to conformational epitopes and high avidity. However, there have been limited reports in literature on the production of monoclonal antibodies (mAb) by DNA immunization. Here, by using Clostridium difficile (C. diff) toxin A as a model antigen, we demonstrated that DNA immunization was effective in producing a panel of mAb that are protective against toxin A challenge and can also be used as sensitive reagents to detect toxin A from various testing samples. The immunoglobulin (Ig) gene usage for such mAb was also investigated. Further studies should be conducted to fully establish DNA immunization as a unique platform to produce mAb in various hosts. PMID:23851482

  19. Potent monoclonal antibodies against Clostridium difficile toxin A elicited by DNA immunization

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Chunhua; Jin, Ke; Xiao, Yanling; Cheng, Ying; Huang, Zuhu; Wang, Shixia; Lu, Shan

    2013-01-01

    Recent studies have demonstrated that DNA immunization is effective in eliciting antigen-specific antibody responses against a wide range of infectious disease targets. The polyclonal antibodies elicited by DNA vaccination exhibit high sensitivity to conformational epitopes and high avidity. However, there have been limited reports in literature on the production of monoclonal antibodies (mAb) by DNA immunization. Here, by using Clostridium difficile (C. diff) toxin A as a model antigen, we demonstrated that DNA immunization was effective in producing a panel of mAb that are protective against toxin A challenge and can also be used as sensitive reagents to detect toxin A from various testing samples. The immunoglobulin (Ig) gene usage for such mAb was also investigated. Further studies should be conducted to fully establish DNA immunization as a unique platform to produce mAb in various hosts. PMID:23851482

  20. 4-1BB Agonists: Multi-Potent Potentiators of Tumor Immunity

    PubMed Central

    Bartkowiak, Todd; Curran, Michael A.

    2015-01-01

    Immunotherapy is a rapidly expanding field of oncology aimed at targeting, not the tumor itself, but the immune system combating the cancerous lesion. Of the many approaches currently under study to boost anti-tumor immune responses; modulation of immune co-receptors on lymphocytes in the tumor microenvironment has thus far proven to be the most effective. Antibody blockade of the T cell co-inhibitory receptor cytotoxic T lymphocyte antigen-4 (CTLA-4) has become the first FDA approved immune checkpoint blockade; however, tumor infiltrating lymphocytes express a diverse array of additional stimulatory and inhibitory co-receptors, which can be targeted to boost tumor immunity. Among these, the co-stimulatory receptor 4-1BB (CD137/TNFSF9) possesses an unequaled capacity for both activation and pro-inflammatory polarization of anti-tumor lymphocytes. While functional studies of 4-1BB have focused on its prominent role in augmenting cytotoxic CD8 T cells, 4-1BB can also modulate the activity of CD4 T cells, B cells, natural killer cells, monocytes, macrophages, and dendritic cells. 4-1BB’s expression on both T cells and antigen presenting cells, coupled with its capacity to promote survival, expansion, and enhanced effector function of activated T cells, has made it an alluring target for tumor immunotherapy. In contrast to immune checkpoint blocking antibodies, 4-1BB agonists can both potentiate anti-tumor and anti-viral immunity, while at the same time ameliorating autoimmune disease. Despite this, 4-1BB agonists can trigger high grade liver inflammation which has slowed their clinical development. In this review, we discuss how the underlying immunobiology of 4-1BB activation suggests the potential for therapeutically synergistic combination strategies in which immune adverse events can be minimized. PMID:26106583

  1. Identification and molecular characterization of peroxiredoxin 6 from Japanese eel (Anguilla japonica) revealing its potent antioxidant properties and putative immune relevancy.

    PubMed

    Priyathilaka, Thanthrige Thiunuwan; Kim, Yucheol; Udayantha, H M V; Lee, Seongdo; Herath, H M L P B; Lakmal, H H Chaminda; Elvitigala, Don Anushka Sandaruwan; Umasuthan, Navaneethaiyer; Godahewa, G I; Kang, Seong Il; Jeong, Hyung Bok; Kim, Shin Kwon; Kim, Dae Jung; Lim, Bong Soo

    2016-04-01

    Peroxiredoxins (Prdx) are thiol specific antioxidant enzymes that play a pivotal role in cellular oxidative stress by reducing toxic peroxide compounds into nontoxic products. In this study, we identified and characterized a peroxiredoxin 6 counterpart from Japanese eel (Anguilla japonica) (AjPrdx6) at molecular, transcriptional and protein level. The identified full-length coding sequence of AjPrdx6 (669 bp) coded for a polypeptide of 223 aa residues (24.9 kDa). Deduced protein of AjPrdx6 showed analogy to characteristic structural features of 1-cysteine peroxiredoxin sub-family. According to the topology of the generated phylogenetic reconstruction AjPrdx6 showed closest evolutionary relationship with Salmo salar. As detected by Quantitative real time PCR (qPCR), AjPrdx6 mRNA was constitutively expressed in all the tissues examined. Upon the immune challenges with Edwardsiella tarda, lipopolysaccharides and polyinosinic:polycytidylic acid, expression of AjPrdx6 mRNA transcripts were significantly induced. The general functional properties of Prdx6 were confirmed using purified recombinant AjPrdx6 protein by deciphering its potent protective effects on cultured vero cells (kidney epithelial cell from an African green monkey) against H2O2-induced oxidative stress and protection against oxidative DNA damage elicited by mixed function oxidative (MFO) system. Altogether, our findings suggest that AjPrdx6 is a potent antioxidant protein in Japanese eels and its putative immune relevancy in pathogen stress mounted by live-bacteria or pathogen associated molecular patterns (PAMPs). PMID:26911410

  2. Antitumor Immunity Induced after α Irradiation123

    PubMed Central

    Gorin, Jean-Baptiste; Ménager, Jérémie; Gouard, Sébastien; Maurel, Catherine; Guilloux, Yannick; Faivre-Chauvet, Alain; Morgenstern, Alfred; Bruchertseifer, Frank; Chérel, Michel; Davodeau, François; Gaschet, Joëlle

    2014-01-01

    Radioimmunotherapy (RIT) is a therapeutic modality that allows delivering of ionizing radiation directly to targeted cancer cells. Conventional RIT uses β-emitting radioisotopes, but recently, a growing interest has emerged for the clinical development of α particles. α emitters are ideal for killing isolated or small clusters of tumor cells, thanks to their specific characteristics (high linear energy transfer and short path in the tissue), and their effect is less dependent on dose rate, tissue oxygenation, or cell cycle status than γ and X rays. Several studies have been performed to describe α emitter radiobiology and cell death mechanisms induced after α irradiation. But so far, no investigation has been undertaken to analyze the impact of α particles on the immune system, when several studies have shown that external irradiation, using γ and X rays, can foster an antitumor immune response. Therefore, we decided to evaluate the immunogenicity of murine adenocarcinoma MC-38 after bismuth-213 (213Bi) irradiation using a vaccination approach. In vivo studies performed in immunocompetent C57Bl/6 mice induced a protective antitumor response that is mediated by tumor-specific T cells. The molecular mechanisms potentially involved in the activation of adaptative immunity were also investigated by in vitro studies. We observed that 213Bi-treated MC-38 cells release “danger signals” and activate dendritic cells. Our results demonstrate that α irradiation can stimulate adaptive immunity, elicits an efficient antitumor protection, and therefore is an immunogenic cell death inducer, which provides an attractive complement to its direct cytolytic effect on tumor cells. PMID:24862758

  3. New Approach for Producing and Purifying IL-15 Heterodimers That Have Potent Immune Effect | Poster

    Cancer.gov

    By Nancy Parrish, Staff Writer Cytokines are proteins that play a crucial role in the human immune system by delivering messages that trigger the activation of immune cells to fight off attacks from viruses or other invaders. Cristina Bergamaschi, Ph.D., NCI Center for Cancer Research, has been studying the mechanism of expression and function of a cytokine known as interleukin-15 (IL-15) for the last five years, in collaboration with Elena Chertova, Ph.D., and other researchers in the Retroviral Protein Chemistry Core (RPCC) of the AIDS and Cancer Virus Program (ACVP), Frederick National Laboratory for Cancer Research.

  4. Swine Interferon-Inducible Transmembrane Proteins Potently Inhibit Influenza A Virus Replication

    PubMed Central

    Lanz, Caroline; Yángüez, Emilio; Andenmatten, Dario

    2014-01-01

    Human interferon-inducible transmembrane proteins (IFITMs) were identified as restriction factors of influenza A virus (IAV). Given the important role of pigs in the zoonotic cycle of IAV, we cloned swine IFITMs (swIFITMs) and found two IFITM1-like proteins, one homologue of IFITM2, and a homologue of IFITM3. We show that swIFITM2 and swIFITM3 localize to endosomes and display potent antiviral activities. Knockdown of swIFITMs strongly reduced virus inhibition by interferon, establishing the swIFITMs as potent restriction factors in porcine cells. PMID:25320322

  5. Structure-based redesign of lysostaphin yields potent antistaphylococcal enzymes that evade immune cell surveillance

    PubMed Central

    Blazanovic, Kristina; Zhao, Hongliang; Choi, Yoonjoo; Li, Wen; Salvat, Regina S; Osipovitch, Daniel C; Fields, Jennifer; Moise, Leonard; Berwin, Brent L; Fiering, Steven N; Bailey-Kellogg, Chris; Griswold, Karl E

    2015-01-01

    Staphylococcus aureus infections exert a tremendous burden on the health-care system, and the threat of drug-resistant strains continues to grow. The bacteriolytic enzyme lysostaphin is a potent antistaphylococcal agent with proven efficacy against both drug-sensitive and drug-resistant strains; however, the enzyme’s own bacterial origins cause undesirable immunogenicity and pose a barrier to clinical translation. Here, we deimmunized lysostaphin using a computationally guided process that optimizes sets of mutations to delete immunogenic T cell epitopes without disrupting protein function. In vitro analyses showed the methods to be both efficient and effective, producing seven different deimmunized designs exhibiting high function and reduced immunogenic potential. Two deimmunized candidates elicited greatly suppressed proliferative responses in splenocytes from humanized mice, while at the same time the variants maintained wild-type efficacy in a staphylococcal pneumonia model. Overall, the deimmunized enzymes represent promising leads in the battle against S. aureus. PMID:26151066

  6. Induction of Potent Humoral and Cell-Mediated Immune Responses by Attenuated Vaccinia Virus Vectors with Deleted Serpin Genes

    PubMed Central

    Legrand, Fatema A.; Verardi, Paulo H.; Jones, Leslie A.; Chan, Kenneth S.; Peng, Yue; Yilma, Tilahun D.

    2004-01-01

    Vaccinia virus (VV) has been effectively utilized as a live vaccine against smallpox as well as a vector for vaccine development and immunotherapy. Increasingly there is a need for a new generation of highly attenuated and efficacious VV vaccines, especially in light of the AIDS pandemic and the threat of global bioterrorism. We therefore developed recombinant VV (rVV) vaccines that are significantly attenuated and yet elicit potent humoral and cell-mediated immune responses. B13R (SPI-2) and B22R (SPI-1) are two VV immunomodulating genes with sequence homology to serine protease inhibitors (serpins) that possess antiapoptotic and anti-inflammatory properties. We constructed and characterized rVVs that have the B13R or B22R gene insertionally inactivated (vΔB13R and vΔB22R) and coexpress the vesicular stomatitis virus glycoprotein (v50ΔB13R and v50ΔB22R). Virulence studies with immunocompromised BALB/cBy nude mice indicated that B13R or B22R gene deletion decreases viral replication and significantly extends time of survival. Viral pathogenesis studies in immunocompetent CB6F1 mice further demonstrated that B13R or B22R gene inactivation diminishes VV virulence, as measured by decreased levels of weight loss and limited viral spread. Finally, rVVs with B13R and B22R deleted elicited potent humoral, T-helper, and cytotoxic T-cell immune responses, revealing that the observed attenuation did not reduce immunogenicity. Therefore, inactivation of immunomodulating genes such as B13R or B22R represents a general method for enhancing the safety of rVV vaccines while maintaining a high level of immunogenicity. Such rVVs could serve as effective vectors for vaccine development and immunotherapy. PMID:14990697

  7. Drug-induced immune hemolytic anemia

    MedlinePlus

    Immune hemolytic anemia secondary to drugs; Anemia - immune hemolytic - secondary to drugs ... In some cases, a drug can cause the immune system to mistake your own red blood cells for foreign substances. The body responds by making ...

  8. Bacterial Riboswitches and Ribozymes Potently Activate the Human Innate Immune Sensor PKR.

    PubMed

    Hull, Chelsea M; Anmangandla, Ananya; Bevilacqua, Philip C

    2016-04-15

    The innate immune system provides the first line of defense against pathogens through the recognition of nonspecific patterns in RNA to protect the cell in a generalized way. The human RNA-activated protein kinase, PKR, is a dsRNA binding protein and an essential sensor in the innate immune response, which recognizes viral and bacterial pathogens through their RNAs. Upon activation via RNA-dependent autophosphorylation, PKR phosphorylates the eukaryotic initiation factor eIF2α, leading to termination of translation. PKR has a well-characterized role in recognizing viral RNA, where it binds long stretches of double-stranded RNA nonsequence specifically to promote activation; however, the mechanism by which bacterial RNA activates PKR and the mode by which self RNA avoids activating PKR are unknown. We characterized activation of PKR by three functional bacterial RNAs with pseudoknots and extensive tertiary structure: the cyclic di-GMP riboswitch, the glmS riboswitch-ribozyme, and the twister ribozyme, two of which are ligand-activated. These RNAs were found to activate PKR with comparable potency to long dsRNA. Enzymatic structure mapping in the absence and presence of PKR reveals a clear PKR footprint and provides a structural basis for how these bacterial RNAs activate PKR. In the case of the cyclic di-GMP riboswitch and the glmS riboswitch-ribozyme, PKR appears to dimerize on the peripheral double-stranded regions of the native RNA tertiary structure. Overall, these results provide new insights into how PKR acts as an innate immune signaling protein for the presence of bacteria and suggest a reason for the apparent absence of protein-free riboswitches and ribozymes in the human genome. PMID:27011290

  9. Potent inhibition of Hendra virus infection via RNA interference and poly I:C immune activation.

    PubMed

    McCaskill, Jana L; Marsh, Glenn A; Monaghan, Paul; Wang, Lin-Fa; Doran, Timothy; McMillan, Nigel A J

    2013-01-01

    Hendra virus (HeV) is a highly pathogenic zoonotic paramyxovirus that causes fatal disease in a wide range of species, including humans. HeV was first described in Australia in 1994, and has continued to re-emerge with increasing frequency. HeV is of significant concern to human health due to its high mortality rate, increasing emergence, absence of vaccines and limited post exposure therapies. Here we investigate the use of RNA interference (RNAi) based therapeutics targeting HeV in conjunction with the TLR3 agonist Poly I:C and show that they are potent inhibitors of HeV infection in vitro. We found that short interfering RNAs (siRNAs) targeting the abundantly expressed N, P and M genes of HeV caused over 95% reduction of HeV virus titre, protein and mRNA. Furthermore, we found that the combination of HeV targeting siRNA and Poly I:C had an additive effect in suppressing HeV infection. Our results demonstrate for the first time that RNAi and type I interferon stimulation are effective inhibitors of HeV replication in vitro and may provide an effective therapy for this highly lethal, zoonotic pathogen. PMID:23691205

  10. Drug-induced immune neutropenia/agranulocytosis.

    PubMed

    Curtis, Brian R

    2014-01-01

    Neutrophils are the most abundant white blood cell in blood and play a critical role in preventing infections as part of the innate immune system. Reduction in neutrophils below an absolute count of 500 cells/pL is termed severe neutropenia or agranulocytosis. Drug-induced immune neutropenia (DIIN) occurs when drug-dependent antibodies form against neutrophil membrane glycoproteins and cause neutrophil destruction. Affected patients have fever, chills, and infections; severe infections left untreated can result in death. Treatment with granulocyte colony-stimulating factor can hasten neutrophil recovery. Cumulative data show that severe neutropenia or agranulocytosis associated with exposure to nonchemotherapy drugs ranges from approximately 1.6 to 15.4 cases per million population per year. Drugs most often associated with neutropenia or agranulocytosis include dipyrone, diclofenac, ticlopidine, calcium dobesilate, spironolactone, antithyroid drugs (e.g., propylthiouracil), carbamazepine, sulfamethoxazole- trimethoprim, [3-lactam antibiotics, clozapine, levamisole, and vancomycin. Assays used for detection of neutrophil drug-dependent antibodies (DDAbs) include flow cytometry, monoclonal antibody immobilization of granulocyte antigens, enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay, immunoblotting, granulocyte agglutination, and granulocytotoxicity. However, testing for neutrophil DDAbs is rarely performed owing to its complexity and lack of availability. Mechanisms proposed for DIIN have not been rigorously studied, but those that have been studied include drug- or hapten-induced antibody formation and autoantibody production against drug metabolite or protein adducts covalently attached to neutrophil membrane proteins. This review will address acute, severe neutropenia caused by neutrophil-reactive antibodies induced by nonchemotherapy drugs-DIIN PMID:25247619

  11. Antiplatelet antibodies in oxaliplatin-induced immune thrombocytopenia

    PubMed Central

    McNamara, Michael J; Curtis, Brian R; McCrae, Keith R

    2014-01-01

    Lesson Drug-induced immune thrombocytopenia may be potentially fatal; here we report the development of severe thrombocytopenia with strong oxaliplatin-dependent antiplatelet antibodies. PMID:25057402

  12. Recombinant human bone morphogenetic protein-9 potently induces osteogenic differentiation of human periodontal ligament fibroblasts.

    PubMed

    Fuchigami, Sawako; Nakamura, Toshiaki; Furue, Kirara; Sena, Kotaro; Shinohara, Yukiya; Noguchi, Kazuyuki

    2016-04-01

    To accomplish effective periodontal regeneration for periodontal defects, several regenerative methods using growth and differentiation factors, including bone morphogenetic proteins (BMPs), have been developed. Bone morphogenetic protein-9 exhibits the most potent osteogenic activity of this growth factor family. However, it is unclear whether exogenous BMP-9 can induce osteogenic differentiation in human periodontal ligament (PDL) fibroblasts. Here, we examined the effects of recombinant human (rh) BMP-9 on osteoblastic differentiation in human PDL fibroblasts in vitro, compared with rhBMP-2. Recombinant human BMP-9 potently induced alkaline phosphatase (ALP) activity, mineralization, and increased expression of runt-related transcription factor-2/core binding factor alpha 1 (RUNX2/CBFA1), osterix, inhibitor of DNA binding/differentiation-1 (ID1), osteopontin, and bone sialoprotein genes, compared with rhBMP-2. The levels of rhBMP-9-induced osterix and ALP mRNA were significantly reduced in activin receptor-like kinase-1 and -2 small interfering RNA (siRNA)-transfected human PDL fibroblasts. Recombinant human BMP-9-induced ALP activity was not inhibited by noggin, in contrast to rhBMP-2 induced ALP activity, which was. Phosphorylation of SMAD1/5/8 in human PDL fibroblasts was induced by addition of rhBMP-9. Recombinant human BMP-9-induced ALP activity was suppressed by SB203580, SP600125, and U0126, which are inhibitors of p38, c-Jun N-terminal kinase (JNK), and extracellular signal-regulated kinase 1/2 (ERK1/2), respectively. Our data suggest that rhBMP-9 is a potent inducer of the differentiation of human PDL fibroblasts into osteoblast-like cells and that this may be mediated by the SMAD and mitogen-activated protein kinase (p38, ERK1/2, and JNK) pathways. PMID:26879145

  13. Immunotherapy against HPV16/18 generates potent TH1 and cytotoxic cellular immune responses.

    PubMed

    Bagarazzi, Mark L; Yan, Jian; Morrow, Matthew P; Shen, Xuefei; Parker, R Lamar; Lee, Jessica C; Giffear, Mary; Pankhong, Panyupa; Khan, Amir S; Broderick, Kate E; Knott, Christine; Lin, Feng; Boyer, Jean D; Draghia-Akli, Ruxandra; White, C Jo; Kim, J Joseph; Weiner, David B; Sardesai, Niranjan Y

    2012-10-10

    Despite the development of highly effective prophylactic vaccines against human papillomavirus (HPV) serotypes 16 and 18, prevention of cervical dysplasia and cancer in women infected with high-risk HPV serotypes remains an unmet medical need. We report encouraging phase 1 safety, tolerability, and immunogenicity results for a therapeutic HPV16/18 candidate vaccine, VGX-3100, delivered by in vivo electroporation (EP). Eighteen women previously treated for cervical intraepithelial neoplasia grade 2 or 3 (CIN2/3) received a three-dose (intramuscular) regimen of highly engineered plasmid DNA encoding HPV16 and HPV18 E6/E7 antigens followed by EP in a dose escalation study (0.3, 1, and 3 mg per plasmid). Immunization was well tolerated with reports of mild injection site reactions and no study-related serious or grade 3 and 4 adverse events. No dose-limiting toxicity was noted, and pain was assessed by visual analog scale, with average scores decreasing from 6.2/10 to 1.4 within 10 min. Average peak interferon-γ enzyme-linked immunospot magnitudes were highest in the 3 mg cohort in comparison to the 0.3 and 1 mg cohorts, suggesting a trend toward a dose effect. Flow cytometric analysis revealed the induction of HPV-specific CD8(+) T cells that efficiently loaded granzyme B and perforin and exhibited full cytolytic functionality in all cohorts. These data indicate that VGX-3100 is capable of driving robust immune responses to antigens from high-risk HPV serotypes and could contribute to elimination of HPV-infected cells and subsequent regression of the dysplastic process. PMID:23052295

  14. Induced hyperlipaemia and immune challenge in locusts.

    PubMed

    Mullen, Lisa M; Lightfoot, Mary E; Goldsworthy, Graham J

    2004-05-01

    Injections of immunogens, such as beta-1,3-glucan or lipopolysaccharide (LPS), bring about a marked hyperlipaemia with associated changes in lipophorins and apolipophorin-III in the haemolymph of Locusta migratoria. These changes are similar to those observed after injection of adipokinetic hormone (AKH). The possibility that endogenous AKH is released as part of the response to these immunogens is investigated using passive immunisation against AKH-I, and measurement of AKH-I titre in the haemolymph after injection of immunogens. The data presented show that, despite the similarity of the changes brought about by the presence of immunogens in the haemolymph to those brought about by AKH, there is no release of endogenous AKH after injection of laminarin or LPS. A direct effect of the immunogens on release of neutral lipids by the fat body cannot be demonstrated in vitro, and the mechanism by which hyperlipaemia is induced during immune challenge remains uncertain. PMID:15121454

  15. U1 RNA Induces Innate Immunity Signaling

    PubMed Central

    Hoffman, Robert W.; Gazitt, Tal; Foecking, Mark F.; Ortmann, Robert A.; Misfeldt, Michael; Jorgenson, Rebecca; Young, Steven L.; Greidinger, Eric L.

    2006-01-01

    Objective The U1–70-kd RNP is a prominent target of autoimmunity in connective tissue diseases. In this study, we explored whether its endogenous ligand, U1 RNA, mediates a proimmune signal and may be immunogenic. Methods We assayed the proliferation of control and MyD88-knockout splenocytes in response to in vitro–synthesized U1 RNA, and measured interleukin-6 (IL-6) and IL-8 secretion induced by U1 RNA in a human cell line competent for signaling through Toll-like receptor 3 (TLR-3) and TLR-5. Results Treatment with U1 RNA or with poly(I-C), a known agonist of TLR-3, induced approximately twice as much control splenocyte proliferation as did treatment with RNase-digested U1 RNA. Proliferation in response to either poly(I-C) or U1 RNA by MyD88-knockout splenocytes was similarly attenuated. Similar to poly(I-C), U1 RNA induced significant secretion of both IL-6 and IL-8 from a TLR-3–expressing human cell line; in contrast, the TLR-5 agonist flagellin induced predominantly IL-8 secretion. Pretreatment of U1 RNA with RNase abolished IL-6 and IL-8 secretion. Conclusion U1 RNA is capable of inducing manifestations consistent with TLR-3 activation. The ability of U1 RNA (which has a substantial double-stranded secondary structure) to activate TLR-3 may contribute to the immunogenicity of the U1–70-kd autoantigen. Stimulation of innate immunity by native RNA molecules with a double-stranded secondary structure may help explain the high prevalence of autoimmunity to RNA binding proteins. PMID:15457457

  16. Retinoic acid induces homing of protective T and B cells to the gut after subcutaneous immunization in mice.

    PubMed

    Hammerschmidt, Swantje I; Friedrichsen, Michaela; Boelter, Jasmin; Lyszkiewicz, Marcin; Kremmer, Elisabeth; Pabst, Oliver; Förster, Reinhold

    2011-08-01

    Diarrheal diseases represent a major health burden in developing countries. Parenteral immunization typically does not induce efficient protection against enteropathogens because it does not stimulate migration of immune cells to the gut. Retinoic acid (RA) is critical for gut immunity, inducing upregulation of gut-homing receptors on activated T cells. In this study, we have demonstrated that RA can redirect immune responses elicited by s.c. vaccination of mice from skin-draining inguinal LNs (ingLNs) to the gut. When present during priming, RA induced robust upregulation of gut-homing receptors in ingLNs, imprinting gut-homing capacity on T cells. Concurrently, RA triggered the generation of gut-tropic IgA+ plasma cells in ingLNs and raised the levels of antigen-specific IgA in the intestinal lumen and blood. RA applied s.c. in vivo induced autonomous RA production in ingLN DCs, further driving efficient induction of gut-homing molecules on effector cells. Importantly, RA-supplemented s.c. immunization elicited a potent immune response in the small intestine that protected mice from cholera toxin–induced diarrhea and diminished bacterial loads in Peyer patches after oral infection with Salmonella. Thus, the use of RA as a gut-homing navigator represents a powerful tool to induce protective immunity in the intestine after s.c. immunization, offering what we believe to be a novel approach for vaccination against enteropathogens. PMID:21737878

  17. Distinct Pathways of Humoral and Cellular Immunity Induced with the Mucosal Administration of a Nanoemulsion Adjuvant

    PubMed Central

    Makidon, Paul E.; Janczak, Katarzyna W.; Blanco, Luz P.; Swanson, Benjamin; Smith, Douglas M.; Pham, Tiffany; Szabo, Zsuzsanna; Kukowska-Latallo, Jolanta F.; Baker, James R.

    2014-01-01

    Nasal administration of an oil-in-water nanoemulsion (NE) adjuvant W805EC produces potent systemic and mucosal, Th-1– and Th-17–balanced cellular responses. However, its molecular mechanism of action has not been fully characterized and is of particular interest because NE does not contain specific ligands for innate immune receptors. In these studies, we demonstrate that W805EC NE adjuvant activates innate immunity, induces specific gene transcription, and modulates NF-κB activity via TLR2 and TLR4 by a mechanism that appears to be distinct from typical TLR agonists. Nasal immunization with NE-based vaccine showed that the TLR2, TLR4, and MyD88 pathways and IL-12 and IL-12Rβ1 expression are not required for an Ab response, but they are essential for the induction of balanced Th-1 polarization and Th-17 cellular immunity. NE adjuvant induces MHC class II, CD80, and CD86 costimulatory molecule expression and dendritic cell maturation. Further, upon immunization with NE, adjuvant mice deficient in the CD86 receptor had normal Ab responses but significantly reduced Th-1 cellular responses, whereas animals deficient in both CD80 and CD86 or lacking CD40 failed to produce either humoral or cellular immunity. Overall, our data show that intranasal administration of Ag with NE induces TLR2 and TLR4 activation along with a MyD88-independent Ab response and a MyD88-dependent Th-1 and Th-17 cell–mediated immune response. These findings suggest that the unique properties of NE adjuvant may offer novel opportunities for understanding previously unrecognized mechanisms of immune activation important for generating effective mucosal and systemic immune responses. PMID:24532579

  18. Drug-induced immune hemolytic anemia

    MedlinePlus

    Immune hemolytic anemia secondary to drugs; Anemia - immune hemolytic - secondary to drugs ... Drugs that can cause this type of hemolytic anemia include: Cephalosporins (a class of antibiotics), most common ...

  19. Interleukin-15-Induced CD56+ Myeloid Dendritic Cells Combine Potent Tumor Antigen Presentation with Direct Tumoricidal Potential

    PubMed Central

    Anguille, Sébastien; Lion, Eva; Tel, Jurjen; de Vries, I. Jolanda M; Couderé, Karen; Fromm, Phillip D.; Van Tendeloo, Viggo F.

    2012-01-01

    Dendritic cells (DCs) are the quintessential antigen-presenting cells of the human immune system and play a prime role in coordinating innate and adaptive immune responses, explaining the strong and still growing interest in their application for cancer immunotherapy. Much current research in the field of DC-based immunotherapy focuses on optimizing the culture conditions for in vitro DC generation in order to assure that DCs with the best possible immunogenic qualities are being used for immunotherapy. In this context, monocyte-derived DCs that are alternatively induced by interleukin-15 (IL-15 DCs) have attracted recent attention due to their superior immunostimulatory characteristics. In this study, we show that IL-15 DCs, in addition to potent tumor antigen-presenting function, possess tumoricidal potential and thus qualify for the designation of killer DCs. Notwithstanding marked expression of the natural killer (NK) cell marker CD56 on a subset of IL-15 DCs, we found no evidence of a further phenotypic overlap between IL-15 DCs and NK cells. Allostimulation and antigen presentation assays confirmed that IL-15 DCs should be regarded as bona fide myeloid DCs not only from the phenotypic but also from the functional point of view. Concerning their cytotoxic activity, we demonstrate that IL-15 DCs are able to induce apoptotic cell death of the human K562 tumor cell line, while sparing tumor antigen-specific T cells. The cytotoxicity of IL-15 DCs is predominantly mediated by granzyme B and, to a small extent, by tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α)-related apoptosis-inducing ligand (TRAIL) but is independent of perforin, Fas ligand and TNF-α. In conclusion, our data provide evidence of a previously unappreciated role for IL-15 in the differentiation of human monocytes towards killer DCs. The observation that IL-15 DCs have killer DC capacity lends further support to their implementation in DC-based immunotherapy protocols. PMID:23284789

  20. Multivalent TB vaccines targeting the esx gene family generate potent and broad cell-mediated immune responses superior to BCG

    PubMed Central

    Villarreal, Daniel O; Walters, Jewell; Laddy, Dominick J; Yan, Jian; Weiner, David B

    2014-01-01

    Development of a broad-spectrum synthetic vaccine against TB would represent an important advance to the limited vaccine armamentarium against TB. It is believed that the esx family of TB antigens may represent important vaccine candidates. However, only 4 esx antigens have been studied as potential vaccine antigens. The challenge remains to develop a vaccine that simultaneously targets all 23 members of the esx family to induce enhanced broad-spectrum cell-mediated immunity. We sought to investigate if broader cellular immune responses could be induced using a multivalent DNA vaccine representing the esx family protein members delivered via electroporation. In this study, 15 designed esx antigens were created to cross target all members of the esx family. They were distributed into groups of 3 self-processing antigens each, resulting in 5 trivalent highly optimized DNA plasmids. Vaccination with all 5 constructs elicited robust antigen-specific IFN-γ responses to all encoded esx antigens and induced multifunctional CD4 Th1 and CD8 T cell responses. Importantly, we show that when all constructs are combined into a cocktail, the RSQ-15 vaccine, elicited substantial broad Ag-specific T cell responses to all esx antigens as compared with vaccination with BCG. Moreover, these vaccine-induced responses were highly cross-reactive with BCG encoded esx family members and were highly immune effective in a BCG DNA prime-boost format. Furthermore, we demonstrate the vaccine potential and immunopotent profile of several novel esx antigens never previously studied. These data highlight the likely importance of these novel immunogens for study as preventative or therapeutic synthetic TB vaccines in combination or as stand alone antigens. PMID:25424922

  1. Elimination of IL-10 inducing T-helper epitopes from an IGFBP-2 vaccine ensures potent anti-tumor activity

    PubMed Central

    Cecil, Denise L.; Holt, Gregory E.; Park, Kyong Hwa; Gad, Ekram; Rastetter, Lauren; Childs, Jennifer; Higgins, Doreen; Disis, Mary L.

    2014-01-01

    Immunization against self-tumor antigens can induce T-regulatory cells which inhibit proliferation of Type I CD4+ T-helper (Th1) and CD8+ cytotoxic T-cells. Type I T-cells are required for potent anti-tumor immunity. We questioned whether immunosuppressive epitopes could be identified and deleted from a cancer vaccine targeting IGFBP-2 and enhance vaccine efficacy. Screening breast cancer patient lymphocytes with IFN-γ and IL-10 ELISPOT, we found epitopes in the N-terminus of IGFBP-2 that elicited predominantly Th1 while the C-terminus stimulated Th2 and mixed Th1/Th2 responses. Epitope-specific Th2 demonstrated a higher functional avidity for antigen than epitopes which induced IFN-γ (p=0.014). We immunized TgMMTV-neu mice with DNA constructs encoding IGFBP-2 N-and C-termini. T-cell lines expanded from the C-terminus vaccinated animals secreted significantly more Type II cytokines than those vaccinated with the N-terminus and could not control tumor growth when infused into tumor-bearing animals. In contrast, N-terminus epitope-specific T-cells secreted Th1 cytokines and significantly inhibited tumor growth, as compared with naïve T-cells, when adoptively transferred (p=0.005). To determine whether removal of Th2 inducing epitopes had any effect on the vaccinated anti-tumor response, we immunized mice with the N-terminus, C-terminus and a mix of equivalent concentrations of both vaccines. The N-terminus vaccine significantly inhibited tumor growth (p<0.001) as compared to the C-terminus vaccine which had no anti-tumor effect. Mixing the C-terminus with the N-terminus vaccine abrogated the anti-tumor response of the N-terminus vaccine alone. The clinical efficacy of cancer vaccines targeting self-tumor antigens may be greatly improved by identification and removal of immunosuppressive epitopes. PMID:24778415

  2. Human Anti-CD40 Antibody and Poly IC:LC Adjuvant Combination Induces Potent T Cell Responses in the Lung of Non-Human Primates1

    PubMed Central

    Thompson, Elizabeth A; Liang, Frank; Lindgren, Gustaf; Sandgren, Kerrie J; Quinn, Kylie M; Darrah, Patricia A; Koup, Richard A; Seder, Robert A; Kedl, Ross M; Loré, Karin

    2015-01-01

    Non-live vaccine platforms that induce potent cellular immune responses in mucosal tissue would have broad application for vaccines against infectious diseases and tumors. Induction of cellular immunity could be optimized by targeted activation of multiple innate and co-stimulatory signaling pathways, such as CD40 or toll-like receptors (TLRs). In this study, we evaluated immune activation and elicitation of T cell responses in non-human primates (NHPs) after immunization with peptide antigens adjuvanted with an agonistic αCD40Ab, with or without the TLR3 ligand poly IC:LC. We found that intravenous administration of the αCD40Ab induced rapid and transient innate activation characterized by IL-12 production and upregulated co-stimulatory and lymph node homing molecules on dendritic cells. Using fluorescently-labeled Abs for in vivo tracking, the αCD40Ab bound to all leucocytes, except T cells, and disseminated to multiple organs. CD4+ and CD8+ T cell responses were significantly enhanced when the αCD40Ab was co-administered with poly IC:LC compared to either adjuvant given alone and were almost exclusively compartmentalized to the lung. Notably, antigen-specific T cells in the bronchoalveolar lavage were sustained at ~5–10%. These data indicate that systemic administration of αCD40Ab may be particularly advantageous for vaccines and/or therapies requiring T cell immunity in the lung. PMID:26123354

  3. Human Anti-CD40 Antibody and Poly IC:LC Adjuvant Combination Induces Potent T Cell Responses in the Lung of Nonhuman Primates.

    PubMed

    Thompson, Elizabeth A; Liang, Frank; Lindgren, Gustaf; Sandgren, Kerrie J; Quinn, Kylie M; Darrah, Patricia A; Koup, Richard A; Seder, Robert A; Kedl, Ross M; Loré, Karin

    2015-08-01

    Nonlive vaccine platforms that induce potent cellular immune responses in mucosal tissue would have broad application for vaccines against infectious diseases and tumors. Induction of cellular immunity could be optimized by targeted activation of multiple innate and costimulatory signaling pathways, such as CD40 or TLRs. In this study, we evaluated immune activation and elicitation of T cell responses in nonhuman primates after immunization with peptide Ags adjuvanted with an agonistic anti-CD40Ab, with or without the TLR3 ligand poly IC:LC. We found that i.v. administration of the anti-CD40Ab induced rapid and transient innate activation characterized by IL-12 production and upregulated costimulatory and lymph node homing molecules on dendritic cells. Using fluorescently labeled Abs for in vivo tracking, we found that the anti-CD40Ab bound to all leukocytes, except T cells, and disseminated to multiple organs. CD4(+) and CD8(+) T cell responses were significantly enhanced when the anti-CD40Ab was coadministered with poly IC:LC compared with either adjuvant given alone and were almost exclusively compartmentalized to the lung. Notably, Ag-specific T cells in the bronchoalveolar lavage were sustained at ∼5-10%. These data indicate that systemic administration of anti-CD40Ab may be particularly advantageous for vaccines and/or therapies that require T cell immunity in the lung. PMID:26123354

  4. Oral Immunization with a Recombinant Lactococcus lactis-Expressing HIV-1 Antigen on Group A Streptococcus Pilus Induces Strong Mucosal Immunity in the Gut.

    PubMed

    Chamcha, Venkateswarlu; Jones, Andrew; Quigley, Bernard R; Scott, June R; Amara, Rama Rao

    2015-11-15

    The induction of a potent humoral and cellular immune response in mucosal tissue is important for the development of an effective HIV vaccine. Most of the current HIV vaccines under development use the i.m. route for immunization, which is relatively poor in generating potent and long-lived mucosal immune responses. In this article, we explore the ability of an oral vaccination with a probiotic organism, Lactococcus lactis, to elicit HIV-specific immune responses in the mucosal and systemic compartments of BALB/c mice. We expressed the HIV-1 Gag-p24 on the tip of the T3 pilus of Streptococcus pyogenes as a fusion to the Cpa protein (LL-Gag). After four monthly LL-Gag oral immunizations, we observed strong Gag-specific IgG and IgA responses in serum, feces, and vaginal secretions. However, the Gag-specific CD8 T cell responses in the blood were at or below our detection limit. After an i.m. modified vaccinia Ankara/Gag boost, we observed robust Gag-specific CD8 T cell responses both in systemic and in mucosal tissues, including intraepithelial and lamina propria lymphocytes of the small intestine, Peyer's patches, and mesenteric lymph nodes. Consistent with strong immunogenicity, the LL-Gag induced activation of CD11c(+) CD11b(+) dendritic cells in the Peyer's patches after oral immunization. Our results demonstrate that oral immunization with L. lactis expressing an Ag on the tip of the group A Streptococcus pilus serves as an excellent vaccine platform to induce strong mucosal humoral and cellular immunity against HIV. PMID:26482408

  5. A case of oxaliplatin-induced immune-mediated thrombocytopenia

    PubMed Central

    Suh, Seong Eun; Jang, Moon Ju; Chong, So Young; Aster, Richard H.; Curtis, Brian R.

    2014-01-01

    Oxaliplatin is a platinum compound used in patients with gastrointestinal malignancies. It is known to evoke a drug-induced immune-mediated thrombocytopenia, which has not been reported in Korea. We describe a 53-year-old man who developed oxaliplatin-induced immune-mediated thrombocytopenia during chemotherapy for colon cancer. Oxaliplatin-dependent IgG platelet antibodies were detected in his serum on flow cytometry. He was treated with immunoglobulin and corticosteroids without any complications. Physicians should consider oxaliplatin-induced immune-mediated thrombocytopenia, when a sudden, isolated thrombocytopenia develops during chemotherapy with oxaliplatin. PMID:24724069

  6. Mucosal and systemic immune responses induced by a single time vaccination strategy in mice.

    PubMed

    González Aznar, Elizabeth; Romeu, Belkis; Lastre, Miriam; Zayas, Caridad; Cuello, Maribel; Cabrera, Osmir; Valdez, Yolanda; Fariñas, Mildrey; Pérez, Oliver

    2015-08-01

    Vaccination is considered by the World Health Organization as the most cost-effective strategy for controlling infectious diseases. In spite of great successes with vaccines, many infectious diseases are still leading killers, because of the inadequate coverage of many vaccines. Several factors have been responsible: number of doses, high vaccine reactogenicity, vaccine costs, vaccination policy, among others. Contradictorily, few vaccines are of single dose and even less of mucosal administration. However, more common infections occur via mucosa, where secretory immunoglobulin A plays an essential role. As an alternative, we proposed a novel protocol of vaccination called Single Time Vaccination Strategy (SinTimVaS) by immunizing 2 priming doses at the same time: one by mucosal route and the other by parenteral route. Here, the mucosal and systemic responses induced by Finlay adjuvants (AF Proteoliposome 1 and AF Cochleate 1) implementing SinTimVaS in BALB/c mice were evaluated. One intranasal dose of AF Cochleate 1 and an intramuscular dose of AF Proteoliposome 1 adsorbed onto aluminum hydroxide, with bovine serum albumin or tetanus toxoid as model antigens, administrated at the same time, induced potent specific mucosal and systemic immune responses. Also, we demonstrated that SinTimVaS using other mucosal routes like oral and sublingual, in combination with the subcutaneous route elicits immune responses. SinTimVaS, as a new immunization strategy, could increase vaccination coverage and reduce time-cost vaccines campaigns, adding the benefits of immune response in mucosa. PMID:26140382

  7. Murine Dendritic Cells Pulsed with Whole Tumor Lysates Mediate Potent Antitumor Immune Responses in vitro and in vivo

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fields, R. C.; Shimizu, K.; Mule, J. J.

    1998-08-01

    The highly efficient nature of dendritic cells (DC) as antigen-presenting cells raises the possibility of uncovering in tumor-bearing hosts very low levels of T cell reactivity to poorly immunogenic tumors that are virtually undetectable by other means. Here, we demonstrate the in vitro and in vivo capacities of murine bone marrow-derived, cytokine-driven DC to elicit potent and specific anti-tumor responses when pulsed with whole tumor lysates. Stimulation of naive spleen-derived T cells by tumor lysate-pulsed DC generated tumor-specific proliferative cytokine release and cytolytic reactivities in vitro. In addition, in two separate strains of mice with histologically distinct tumors, s.c. injections of DC pulsed with whole tumor lysates effectively primed these animals to reject subsequent lethal challenges with viable parental tumor cells and, important to note, also mediated significant reductions in the number of metastases established in the lungs. Tumor rejection depended on host-derived CD8+ T cells and, to a lesser extent, CD4+ T cells. Spleens from mice that had rejected their tumors contained specific precursor cytotoxic T lymphocytes. The use of whole tumor lysates as a source of tumor-associated antigen(s) for pulsing of DC circumvents several limitations encountered with other methods as well as provides certain distinct advantages, which are discussed. These data serve as rationale for our recent initiation of a phase I clinical trial of immunization with autologous tumor lysate-pulsed DC in adult and pediatric cancer patients.

  8. Systemic immunogenicity of para-Phenylenediamine and Diphenylcyclopropenone: two potent contact allergy-inducing haptens.

    PubMed

    Svalgaard, Jesper Dyrendom; Særmark, Carina; Dall, Morten; Buschard, Karsten; Johansen, Jeanne D; Engkilde, Kåre

    2014-01-01

    p-Phenylenediamine (PPD) and Diphenylcyclopropenone (DPCP) are two potent haptens. Both haptens are known to cause delayed-type hypersensitivity, involving a cytokine response and local infiltration of T-cell subpopulations, resulting in contact dermatitis. We investigated the systemic immune effects of PPD and DPCP, two relatively unexplored skin allergens. The dorsal sides of the ears of BALB/c mice were exposed to PPD or DPCP (0.1% w/v or 0.01% w/v), or vehicle alone. Mice were treated once daily for 3 days (induction period) and subsequently twice per week for 8 weeks. Local and systemic immune responses in the auricular and pancreatic lymph nodes, spleen, liver, serum, and ears were analyzed with cytokine profiling MSD, flow cytometry, and qPCR. Ear swelling increased significantly in mice treated with 1% PPD, 0.01% DPCP or 0.1% DPCP, compared with vehicle treatment, indicating that the mice were sensitized and that there was a local inflammation. Auricular lymph nodes, pancreatic lymph nodes, spleen, and liver showed changes in regulatory T-cell, B-cell, and NKT-cell frequencies, and increased activation of CD8(+) T cells and B cells. Intracellular cytokine profiling revealed an increase in the IFN-γ- and IL-4-positive NKT cells present in the liver following treatment with both haptens. Moreover, we saw a tendency toward a systemic increase in IL-17A. We observed systemic immunological effects of PPD and DPCP. Furthermore, concentrations too low to increase ear thickness and cause clinical symptoms may still prime the immune system. These systemic immunological effects may potentially predispose individuals to certain diseases. PMID:24385090

  9. A novel dendritic cell-targeted lentiviral vector, encoding Ag85A-ESAT6 fusion gene of Mycobacterium tuberculosis, could elicit potent cell-mediated immune responses in mice.

    PubMed

    Shakouri, Mehdi; Moazzeni, Seyed Mohammad; Ghanei, Mostafa; Arashkia, Arash; Etemadzadeh, Mohammad Hossein; Azadmanesh, Kayhan

    2016-07-01

    Tuberculosis (TB) is an infectious disease caused by Mycobacterium tuberculosis (Mtb), leading to high mortality worldwide. It is well-established that cellular immunity plays a critical role to control Mtb infection. Dendritic Cells (DCs) are potent antigen presenting cells, which play an important role to prime cell-mediated immune responses. In vivo targeting of DCs has been shown to induce both strong cellular immunity and protection against tumor challenges. The aim of the present study was not only to assess the immunizing potential of a novel DC-targeted recombinant lentivirus expressing fusion antigen Ag85A-ESAT6 of Mtb, but also to compare it with a recombinant lentivirus with broad cellular tropism expressing the same antigen in mice. The findings demonstrated that our novel recombinant DC-targeted lentivector was able to successfully transduce and express the fusion antigen Ag85A-E6 in vitro and in vivo. Moreover, a single footpad injection of targeted lentivectors could elicit strong T-helper 1 (Th1) immunity against the above mentioned antigen, as indicated by the specific high-level production of IFN-γ and IL-2 using spleen lymphocytes and lymphoproliferative responses. Despite of these promising results, more attempts are required to elucidate the protective and therapeutic efficacy of this approach in future. PMID:27267270

  10. Designed, synthetically accessible bryostatin analogues potently induce activation of latent HIV reservoirs in vitro

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dechristopher, Brian A.; Loy, Brian A.; Marsden, Matthew D.; Schrier, Adam J.; Zack, Jerome A.; Wender, Paul A.

    2012-09-01

    Bryostatin is a unique lead in the development of potentially transformative therapies for cancer, Alzheimer's disease and the eradication of HIV/AIDS. However, the clinical use of bryostatin has been hampered by its limited supply, difficulties in accessing clinically relevant derivatives, and side effects. Here, we address these problems through the step-economical syntheses of seven members of a new family of designed bryostatin analogues using a highly convergent Prins-macrocyclization strategy. We also demonstrate for the first time that such analogues effectively induce latent HIV activation in vitro with potencies similar to or better than bryostatin. Significantly, these analogues are up to 1,000-fold more potent in inducing latent HIV expression than prostratin, the current clinical candidate for latent virus induction. This study provides the first demonstration that designed, synthetically accessible bryostatin analogues could serve as superior candidates for the eradication of HIV/AIDS through induction of latent viral reservoirs in conjunction with current antiretroviral therapy.

  11. Allogeneic IgG combined with dendritic cell stimuli induces anti-tumor T cell immunity

    PubMed Central

    Carmi, Yaron; Spitzer, Matthew H.; Linde, Ian L.; Burt, Bryan M; Prestwood, Tyler R.; Perlman, Nikola; Davidson, Matthew G.; Kenkel, Justin A.; Segal, Ehud; Pusapati, Ganesh V.; Bhattacharya, Nupur; Engleman, Edgar G.

    2015-01-01

    While cancers grow in their hosts and evade host immunity through immunoediting and immunosuppression1–5, tumors are rarely transmissible between individuals. Much like transplanted allogeneic organs, allogeneic tumors are reliably rejected by host T cells, even when the tumor and host share the same major histocompatibility complex (MHC) alleles, the most potent determinants of transplant rejection6–10. How such tumor-eradicating immunity is initiated remains unknown, though elucidating this process could provide a roadmap for inducing similar responses against naturally arising tumors. We found that allogeneic tumor rejection is initiated by naturally occurring tumor-binding IgG antibodies, which enable dendritic cells (DC) to internalize tumor antigens and subsequently activate tumor-reactive T cells. We exploited this mechanism to successfully treat autologous and autochthonous tumors. Either systemic administration of DC loaded with allogeneic IgG (alloIgG)-coated tumor cells or intratumoral injection of alloIgG in combination with DC stimuli induced potent T cell mediated anti-tumor immune responses, resulting in tumor eradication in mouse models of melanoma, pancreas, lung and breast cancer. Moreover, this strategy led to eradication of distant tumors and metastases, as well as the injected primary tumors. To assess the clinical relevance of these findings, we studied antibodies and cells from patients with lung cancer. T cells from these patients responded vigorously to autologous tumor antigens after culture with alloIgG-loaded DC, recapitulating our findings in mice. These results reveal that tumor-binding alloIgG can induce powerful anti-tumor immunity that can be exploited for cancer immunotherapy. PMID:25924063

  12. Ultraviolet-induced alloantigen-specific immunosuppression in transplant immunity

    PubMed Central

    Hori, Tomohide; Kuribayashi, Kagemasa; Saito, Kanako; Wang, Linan; Torii, Mie; Uemoto, Shinji; Iida, Taku; Yagi, Shintaro; Kato, Takuma

    2015-01-01

    After the first observation of the immunosuppressive effects of ultraviolet (UV) irradiation was reported in 1974, therapeutic modification of immune responses by UV irradiation began to be investigated in the context immunization. UV-induced immunosuppression is via the action of regulatory T cells (Tregs). Antigen-specific Tregs were induced by high-dose UV-B irradiation before antigen immunization in many studies, as it was considered that functional alteration and/or modulation of antigen-presenting cells by UV irradiation was required for the induction of antigen-specific immunosuppression. However, it is also reported that UV irradiation after immunization induces antigen-specific Tregs. UV-induced Tregs are also dominantly transferable, with interleukin-10 being important for UV-induced immunosuppression. Currently, various possible mechanisms involving Treg phenotype and cytokine profile have been suggested. UV irradiation accompanied by alloantigen immunization induces alloantigen-specific transferable Tregs, which have potential therapeutic applications in the transplantation field. Here we review the current status of UV-induced antigen-specific immunosuppression on the 40th anniversary of its discovery. PMID:25815267

  13. Radiotherapy combined with TLR7/8 activation induces strong immune responses against gastrointestinal tumors.

    PubMed

    Schölch, Sebastian; Rauber, Conrad; Tietz, Alexandra; Rahbari, Nuh N; Bork, Ulrich; Schmidt, Thomas; Kahlert, Christoph; Haberkorn, Uwe; Tomai, Mark A; Lipson, Kenneth E; Carretero, Rafael; Weitz, Jürgen; Koch, Moritz; Huber, Peter E

    2015-03-10

    In addition to local cytotoxic activity, radiotherapy may also elicit local and systemic antitumor immunity, which may be augmented by immunotherapeutic agents including Toll-like receptor (TLR) 7/8 agonists. Here, we investigated the ability of 3M-011 (854A), a TLR7/8 agonist, to boost the antigen-presenting activity of dendritic cells (DC) as an adjuvant to radiotherapy. The combined treatment induced marked local and systemic responses in subcutaneous and orthotopic mouse models of colorectal and pancreatic cancer. In vitro cytotoxicity assays as well as in vivo depletion experiments with monoclonal antibodies identified NK and CD8 T cells as the cell populations mediating the cytotoxic effects of the treatment, while in vivo depletion of CD11c+ dendritic cells (DC) in CD11c-DTR transgenic mice revealed DC as the pivotal immune hub in this setting. The specificity of the immune reaction was confirmed by ELISPOT assays. TLR7/8 agonists therefore seem to be potent adjuvants to radiotherapy, inducing strong local and profound systemic immune responses to tumor antigens released by conventional therapy. PMID:25609199

  14. Radiotherapy combined with TLR7/8 activation induces strong immune responses against gastrointestinal tumors

    PubMed Central

    Tietz, Alexandra; Rahbari, Nuh N.; Bork, Ulrich; Schmidt, Thomas; Kahlert, Christoph; Haberkorn, Uwe; Tomai, Mark A.; Lipson, Kenneth E.; Carretero, Rafael; Weitz, Jürgen; Koch, Moritz; Huber, Peter E.

    2015-01-01

    In addition to local cytotoxic activity, radiotherapy may also elicit local and systemic antitumor immunity, which may be augmented by immunotherapeutic agents including Toll-like receptor (TLR) 7/8 agonists. Here, we investigated the ability of 3M-011 (854A), a TLR7/8 agonist, to boost the antigen-presenting activity of dendritic cells (DC) as an adjuvant to radiotherapy. The combined treatment induced marked local and systemic responses in subcutaneous and orthotopic mouse models of colorectal and pancreatic cancer. In vitro cytotoxicity assays as well as in vivo depletion experiments with monoclonal antibodies identified NK and CD8 T cells as the cell populations mediating the cytotoxic effects of the treatment, while in vivo depletion of CD11c+ dendritic cells (DC) in CD11c-DTR transgenic mice revealed DC as the pivotal immune hub in this setting. The specificity of the immune reaction was confirmed by ELISPOT assays. TLR7/8 agonists therefore seem to be potent adjuvants to radiotherapy, inducing strong local and profound systemic immune responses to tumor antigens released by conventional therapy. PMID:25609199

  15. Alpha-alumina nanoparticles induce efficient autophagy-dependent cross-presentation and potent antitumour response

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Haiyan; Li, Yuhuan; Jiao, Jun; Hu, Hong-Ming

    2011-10-01

    Therapeutic cancer vaccination is an attractive strategy because it induces T cells of the immune system to recognize and kill tumour cells in cancer patients. However, it remains difficult to generate large numbers of T cells that can recognize the antigens on cancer cells using conventional vaccine carrier systems. Here we show that α-Al2O3 nanoparticles can act as an antigen carrier to reduce the amount of antigen required to activate T cells in vitro and in vivo. We found that α-Al2O3 nanoparticles delivered antigens to autophagosomes in dendritic cells, which then presented the antigens to T cells through autophagy. Immunization of mice with α-Al2O3 nanoparticles that are conjugated to either a model tumour antigen or autophagosomes derived from tumour cells resulted in tumour regression. These results suggest that α-Al2O3 nanoparticles may be a promising adjuvant in the development of therapeutic cancer vaccines.

  16. Immune Escape Mechanisms are Plasmodium's Secret Weapons Foiling the Success of Potent and Persistently Efficacious Malaria Vaccines.

    PubMed

    Farooq, Fouzia; Bergmann-Leitner, Elke S

    2015-12-01

    Despite decades of active research, an efficacious vaccine mediating long-term protection is still not available. This review highlights various mechanisms and the different facets by which the parasites outsmart the immune system. An understanding of how the parasites escape immune recognition and interfere with the induction of a protective immune response that provides sterilizing immunity will be crucial to vaccine design. PMID:26342537

  17. Active immunization by a dengue virus-induced cytokine.

    PubMed Central

    Chaturvedi, U C; Mukerjee, R; Dhawan, R

    1994-01-01

    Dengue type 2 virus (DV)-induced cytotoxic factor (CF) is capable of reproducing various pathological lesions in mice that are seen in human dengue. The present study was undertaken to investigate the protective effect of active immunization of mice with CF. Mice were immunized with 5 microgram of CF and prevention of CF-induced increase in capillary permeability and damage to the blood-brain barrier were studied at weekly intervals, up to 48 weeks, by challenging with 3 microgram of CF. Maximum protection against increase in capillary permeability and damage to the blood-brain barrier was observed in week 4 after immunization. A breakthrough in the protection occurred with higher doses of CF in a dose-dependent manner. Challenge with a lethal intracerebral (i.c.) dose of DV showed significantly prolonged mean survival time and delayed onset of symptoms of sickness in the immunized mice compared with the normal mice, but the titre of the virus in the brain was similar in the two groups. On i.p. challenge with the virus the protection against damage to the blood-brain barrier was 86 +/- 7% at week 4 and 17 +/- 4% at week 26 after immunization. Sera obtained from the immunized mice showed the presence of CF-specific antibodies by ELISA, Western blot, and by neutralization of the cytotoxic activity of CF in vitro. The present study describes successful prevention of a cytokine-induced pathology by specific active immunization. PMID:8187327

  18. Immune markers and correlates of protection for vaccine induced immune responses.

    PubMed

    Thakur, Aneesh; Pedersen, Lasse E; Jungersen, Gregers

    2012-07-13

    Vaccines have been a major innovation in the history of mankind and still have the potential to address the challenges posed by chronic intracellular infections including tuberculosis, HIV and malaria which are leading causes of high morbidity and mortality across the world. Markers of an appropriate humoral response currently remain the best validated correlates of protective immunity after vaccination. Despite advancements in the field of immunology over the past few decades currently there are, however, no sufficiently validated immune correlates of vaccine induced protection against chronic infections in neither human nor veterinary medicine. Technological and conceptual advancements within cell-mediated immunology have led to a number of new immunological read-outs with the potential to emerge as correlates of vaccine induced protection. For T(H)1 type responses, antigen-specific production of interferon-gamma (IFN-γ) has been promoted as a quantitative marker of protective cell-mediated immune responses over the past couple of decades. More recently, however, evidence from several infections has pointed towards the quality of the immune response, measured through increased levels of antigen-specific polyfunctional T cells capable of producing a triad of relevant cytokines, as a better correlate of sustained protective immunity against this type of infections. Also the possibilities to measure antigen-specific cytotoxic T cells (CTL) during infection or in response to vaccination, through recombinant major histocompatibility complex (MHC) class I tetramers loaded with relevant peptides, has opened a new vista to include CTL responses in the evaluation of protective immune responses. Here, we review different immune markers and new candidates for correlates of a protective vaccine induced immune response against chronic infections and how successful they have been in defining the protective immunity in human and veterinary medicine. PMID:22658928

  19. Sand fly salivary proteins induce strong cellular immunity in a natural reservoir of visceral leishmaniasis with adverse consequences for Leishmania.

    PubMed

    Collin, Nicolas; Gomes, Regis; Teixeira, Clarissa; Cheng, Lily; Laughinghouse, Andre; Ward, Jerrold M; Elnaiem, Dia-Eldin; Fischer, Laurent; Valenzuela, Jesus G; Kamhawi, Shaden

    2009-05-01

    Immunity to a sand fly salivary protein protects against visceral leishmaniasis (VL) in hamsters. This protection was associated with the development of cellular immunity in the form of a delayed-type hypersensitivity response and the presence of IFN-gamma at the site of sand fly bites. To date, there are no data available regarding the cellular immune response to sand fly saliva in dogs, the main reservoirs of VL in Latin America, and its role in protection from this fatal disease. Two of 35 salivary proteins from the vector sand fly Lutzomyia longipalpis, identified using a novel approach termed reverse antigen screening, elicited strong cellular immunity in dogs. Immunization with either molecule induced high IgG(2) antibody levels and significant IFN-gamma production following in vitro stimulation of PBMC with salivary gland homogenate (SGH). Upon challenge with uninfected or infected flies, immunized dogs developed a cellular response at the bite site characterized by lymphocytic infiltration and IFN-gamma and IL-12 expression. Additionally, SGH-stimulated lymphocytes from immunized dogs efficiently killed Leishmania infantum chagasi within autologous macrophages. Certain sand fly salivary proteins are potent immunogens obligatorily co-deposited with Leishmania parasites during transmission. Their inclusion in an anti-Leishmania vaccine would exploit anti-saliva immunity following an infective sand fly bite and set the stage for a protective anti-Leishmania immune response. PMID:19461875

  20. New-to-nature sophorose analog: a potent inducer for gene expression in Trichoderma reesei.

    PubMed

    Huang, Tom Tao; Wages, John M

    2016-04-01

    Controlled hydrolysis of lactonic sophorolipids from Starmerella bombicola yields a previously undescribed sophorose analog that potently induces cellulase in Trichoderma reesei Rut-C30. Acid treatment of natural sophorolipids results in a mixture of monoacetylated, deacetylated, and diacetylated sophorolipids in acidic and lactonic forms. Isolation of the active components of the mixture, followed by structure determination by MS and NMR, reveals a new chemical entity, in which the lactone ring has been opened at the C-1' rather than at the C-4″ position of the sophorose moiety. This sophorose ester is resistant to degradation by the host and is at least 28 times more powerful an inducer than sophorose in shake-flask culture. Even at low concentrations (0.05 mM), the chemically modified sophorolipid effectively induces cellulase. With further improvements, this highly enabling technology can potentially reduce the cost of enzymes produced in T. reesei and can facilitate the rapid deployment of enzyme plants to support the nascent cellulosic biofuels and biochemicals industries. PMID:26920480

  1. Knockdown of Burton's tyrosine kinase confers potent protection against sepsis-induced acute lung injury.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Panyu; Ma, Bing; Xu, Shuogui; Zhang, Shijie; Tang, Hongtai; Zhu, Shihui; Xiao, Shichu; Ben, Daofeng; Xia, Zhaofan

    2014-11-01

    Sepsis is a common and critical complication in surgical patients that often leads to multiple organ failure syndrome (MOFS), including acute lung injury (ALI) and acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS). Despite intensive supportive care and treatment modalities, the mortality of these patients remains high. In this study, we investigated the role of Burton's tyrosine kinase (BTK), a member of the Btk/Tec family of cytoplasmic tyrosine kinases, in the pathogenesis of sepsis, and evaluated the protective effect of in vivo Btk RNA interference in a mouse model of cecal ligation and puncture (CLP)-induced sepsis. After intratracheal injection of Btk siRNA, the mice were then subjected to CLP to induce sepsis. The results demonstrated that this approach conferred potent protection against sepsis-induced ALI, as evidenced by a significant reduction in pathological scores, epithelial cell apoptosis, pulmonary edema, vascular permeability, and the expression of inflammatory cytokines and neutrophil infiltration in the lung tissues of septic mice. In addition, RNA interference of Btk significantly suppressed p-38 and iNOS signaling pathways in transduced alveolar macrophages in vitro. These results identify a novel role for BTK in lethal sepsis and provide a potential new therapeutic approach to sepsis and ALI. PMID:24906236

  2. Antigens from Rhipicephalus sanguineus ticks elicit potent cell-mediated immune responses in resistant but not in susceptible animals.

    PubMed

    Ferreira, Beatriz R; Szabó, Matias J P; Cavassani, Karen A; Bechara, Gervásio H; Silva, João S

    2003-07-10

    In the present study we compared the immunological reactions between Rhipicephalus sanguineus tick-infested susceptible (dogs and mice) and tick-resistant hosts (guinea pigs), elucidating some of the components of efficient protective responses against ticks. We found that T-cells from guinea pigs infested with adult ticks proliferate vigorously in the presence of concanavalin A (ConA), whereas ConA-induced cell proliferation of tick-infested mice and dogs was significantly decreased at 43.1 and 94.0%, respectively, compared to non-infested controls. Moreover, cells from mice and dogs submitted to one or three successive infestations did not exhibit a T-cell proliferative response to tick antigens, whilst cells from thrice tick-infested guinea pigs, when cultured with either a tick extract or tick saliva, displayed a significant increase in cell proliferation. Also, we evaluated the response of tick-infested mice to a cutaneous hypersensitivity test induced by a tick extract. Tick-infested mice developed a significant immediate reaction, whereby a 29.9% increase in the footpad thickness was observed. No delayed-type hypersensitivity (DTH) reaction was detected. Finally, the differential cell count at the tick attachment site in repeatedly infested mice exhibited a 6.6- and 4.1-fold increase in the percentage of eosinophils and neutrophils, respectively, compared to non-infested animals, while a decrease of 77.0-40.9 in the percentage of mononuclear cells was observed. The results of the cutaneous hypersensitivity test and the cellular counts at the tick feeding site for mice support the view that tick-infested mice develop an immune response to R. sanguineus ticks very similar to dogs, the natural host of this species of tick, but very different from guinea pigs (resistant host), which develop a DTH reaction in addition to a basophil and mononuclear cell infiltration at the tick-attachment site. In conclusion, saliva introduced during tick infestations reduces the

  3. Characterization of Potent SMAC Mimetics that Sensitize Cancer Cells to TNF Family-Induced Apoptosis.

    PubMed

    Welsh, Kate; Milutinovic, Snezana; Ardecky, Robert J; Gonzalez-Lopez, Marcos; Ganji, Santhi Reddy; Teriete, Peter; Finlay, Darren; Riedl, Stefan; Matsuzawa, Shu-Ichi; Pinilla, Clemencia; Houghten, Richard; Vuori, Kristiina; Reed, John C; Cosford, Nicholas D P

    2016-01-01

    Members of the Inhibitor of APoptosis (IAP) protein family suppress apoptosis within tumor cells, particularly in the context of immune cell-mediated killing by the tumor necrosis factor (TNF) superfamily cytokines. Most IAPs are opposed endogenously by the second mitochondrial activator of caspases (SMAC), which binds to selected baculovirus IAP repeat (BIR) domains of IAPs to displace interacting proteins. The development of SMAC mimetics as novel anticancer drugs has gained impetus, with several agents now in human clinical trials. To further understand the cellular mechanisms of SMAC mimetics, we focused on IAP family members cIAP1 and cIAP2, which are recruited to TNF receptor complexes where they support cell survival through NF-κB activation while suppressing apoptosis by preventing caspase activation. We established fluorescence polarization (FP) assays for the BIR2 and BIR3 domains of human cIAP1 and cIAP2 using fluorochrome-conjugated SMAC peptides as ligands. A library of SMAC mimetics was profiled using the FP assays to provide a unique structure activity relationship (SAR) analysis compared to previous assessments of binding to XIAP. Potent compounds displayed mean inhibitory binding constants (Ki) of 9 to 27 nM against the BIR3 domains of cIAP1 and cIAP2, respectively. Selected compounds were then characterized using cytotoxicity assays in which a cytokine-resistant human tumor cell line was sensitized to either TNF or lymphotoxin-α (LT-α). Cytotoxicity correlated closely with cIAP1 and cIAP2 BIR3 binding activity with the most potent compounds able to reduce cell viability by 50%. Further testing demonstrated that active compounds also inhibit RIP1 binding to BIR3 of cIAP1 and cIAP2 in vitro and reduce steady-state cIAP1 protein levels in cells. Altogether, these data inform the SAR for our SMAC mimetics with respect to cIAP1 and cIAP2, suggesting that these IAP family members play an important role in tumor cell resistance to cytotoxicity

  4. The route of immunization with adenoviral vaccine influences the recruitment of cytotoxic T lymphocytes in the lung that provide potent protection from influenza A virus.

    PubMed

    Suda, Tatsuya; Kawano, Masaaki; Nogi, Yasuhisa; Ohno, Naohito; Akatsuka, Toshitaka; Matsui, Masanori

    2011-09-01

    Virus-specific cytotoxic T lymphocytes (CTLs) in the lung are considered to confer protection from respiratory viruses. Several groups demonstrated that the route of priming was likely to have an implication for the trafficking of antigen-specific CTLs. Therefore, we investigated whether the route of immunization with adenoviral vaccine influenced the recruitment of virus-specific CTLs in the lung that should provide potent protection from influenza A virus. Mice were immunized with recombinant adenovirus expressing the matrix (M1) protein of influenza A virus via various immunization routes involving intraperitoneal, intranasal, intramuscular, or intravenous administration as well as subcutaneous administration in the hind hock. We found that the immunization route dramatically impacted the recruitment of M1-specific IFN-γ(+) CD8(+) T cells both in the lung and the spleen. Surprisingly, hock immunization was most effective for the accumulation in the lung of IFN-γ-producing CD8(+) T cells that possessed M1-specific cytolytic activity. Further, antigen-driven IFN-γ(+) CD8(+) T cells in the lung, but not in the spleen, were likely to be correlated with the resistance to challenge with influenza A virus. These results may improve our ability to design vaccines that target virus-specific CTL responses to respiratory viruses such as influenza A virus. PMID:21722671

  5. CRISPR-Induced Distributed Immunity in Microbial Populations

    PubMed Central

    Young, Mark J.; Weitz, Joshua S.; Whitaker, Rachel J.

    2014-01-01

    In bacteria and archaea, viruses are the primary infectious agents, acting as virulent, often deadly pathogens. A form of adaptive immune defense known as CRISPR-Cas enables microbial cells to acquire immunity to viral pathogens by recognizing specific sequences encoded in viral genomes. The unique biology of this system results in evolutionary dynamics of host and viral diversity that cannot be fully explained by the traditional models used to describe microbe-virus coevolutionary dynamics. Here, we show how the CRISPR-mediated adaptive immune response of hosts to invading viruses facilitates the emergence of an evolutionary mode we call distributed immunity - the coexistence of multiple, equally-fit immune alleles among individuals in a microbial population. We use an eco-evolutionary modeling framework to quantify distributed immunity and demonstrate how it emerges and fluctuates in multi-strain communities of hosts and viruses as a consequence of CRISPR-induced coevolution under conditions of low viral mutation and high relative numbers of viral protospacers. We demonstrate that distributed immunity promotes sustained diversity and stability in host communities and decreased viral population density that can lead to viral extinction. We analyze sequence diversity of experimentally coevolving populations of Streptococcus thermophilus and their viruses where CRISPR-Cas is active, and find the rapid emergence of distributed immunity in the host population, demonstrating the importance of this emergent phenomenon in evolving microbial communities. PMID:25000306

  6. Hypoxia-induced MIR155 is a potent autophagy inducer by targeting multiple players in the MTOR pathway

    PubMed Central

    Wan, Gang; Xie, Weidong; Liu, Zhenyan; Xu, Wei; Lao, Yuanzhi; Huang, Nunu; Cui, Kai; Liao, Meijian; He, Jie; Jiang, Yuyang; Yang, Burton B; Xu, Hongxi; Xu, Naihan; Zhang, Yaou

    2014-01-01

    Hypoxia activates autophagy, an evolutionarily conserved cellular catabolic process. Dysfunction in the autophagy pathway has been implicated in an increasing number of human diseases, including cancer. Hypoxia induces upregulation of a specific set of microRNAs (miRNAs) in a variety of cell types. Here, we describe hypoxia-induced MIR155 as a potent inducer of autophagy. Enforced expression of MIR155 increases autophagic activity in human nasopharyngeal cancer and cervical cancer cells. Knocking down endogenous MIR155 inhibits hypoxia-induced autophagy. We demonstrated that MIR155 targets multiple players in MTOR signaling, including RHEB, RICTOR, and RPS6KB2. MIR155 suppresses target-gene expression by directly interacting with their 3′ untranslated regions (UTRs), mutations of the binding sites abolish their MIR155 responsiveness. Furthermore, by downregulating MTOR signaling, MIR155 also attenuates cell proliferation and induces G1/S cell cycle arrest. Collectively, these data present a new role for MIR155 as a key regulator of autophagy via dysregulation of MTOR pathway. PMID:24262949

  7. Induced immunity against hepatitis B virus

    PubMed Central

    Said, Zeinab Nabil Ahmed; Abdelwahab, Kouka Saadeldin

    2015-01-01

    Prevention of hepatitis B virus (HBV) infection with its consequent development of HBV chronic liver disease and hepatocellular carcinoma is a global mandatory goal. Fortunately, safe and effective HBV vaccines are currently available. Universal hepatitis B surface antigen HBV vaccination coverage is almost done. Growing knowledge based upon monitoring and surveillance of HBV vaccination programs has accumulated and the policy of booster vaccination has been evaluated. This review article provides an overview of the natural history of HBV infection, immune responses and the future of HBV infection. It also summarizes the updated sources, types and uses of HBV vaccines, whether in the preclinical phase or in the post-field vaccination. PMID:26140085

  8. Induced immunity against hepatitis B virus.

    PubMed

    Said, Zeinab Nabil Ahmed; Abdelwahab, Kouka Saadeldin

    2015-06-28

    Prevention of hepatitis B virus (HBV) infection with its consequent development of HBV chronic liver disease and hepatocellular carcinoma is a global mandatory goal. Fortunately, safe and effective HBV vaccines are currently available. Universal hepatitis B surface antigen HBV vaccination coverage is almost done. Growing knowledge based upon monitoring and surveillance of HBV vaccination programs has accumulated and the policy of booster vaccination has been evaluated. This review article provides an overview of the natural history of HBV infection, immune responses and the future of HBV infection. It also summarizes the updated sources, types and uses of HBV vaccines, whether in the preclinical phase or in the post-field vaccination. PMID:26140085

  9. Fenugreek potent activity against nitrate-induced diabetes in young and adult male rats.

    PubMed

    El-Wakf, Azza M; Hassan, Hanaa A; Mahmoud, Ashraf Z; Habza, Marwa N

    2015-05-01

    Nitrate has described as an endocrine disruptor that promotes onset of diabetes. This study was undertaken to evaluate diabetic effect of high nitrate intake in young and adult male rats and its amelioration by fenugreek administration. The study revealed significant increase in serum glucose and blood glycosylated hemoglobin (HbA1c%), while serum insulin and liver glycogen were decreased among nitrate exposed animals, in particular the young group. A significant reduction in the body weight gain and serum thyroid hormones (T4 & T3) was also recorded. Further reduction in serum levels of urea and creatinine, as well as total protein in serum, liver and pancreas was demonstrated, with elevation in their levels in the urine of all nitrate exposed groups. Meanwhile, the activity of serum transaminases (ALT and AST) was increased, with decline in their activity in the liver tissue. In addition, an elevation in serum total bilirubin, tissues (liver and pancreas) nitric oxide and lipid profile, as well as liver activity of glucose-6-phosphatase was recorded. Fenugreek administration to nitrate exposed rats was found to be effective in alleviating hyperglycemia and other biochemical changes characterizing nitrate-induced diabetes. So, fenugreek can be considered to possess potent activity against onset of nitrate induced-diabetes. PMID:24615531

  10. Dense fibrillar collagen is a potent inducer of invadopodia via a specific signaling network

    PubMed Central

    Swatkoski, Stephen; Matsumoto, Kazue; Campbell, Catherine B.; Petrie, Ryan J.; Dimitriadis, Emilios K.; Li, Xin; Mueller, Susette C.; Bugge, Thomas H.; Gucek, Marjan

    2015-01-01

    Cell interactions with the extracellular matrix (ECM) can regulate multiple cellular activities and the matrix itself in dynamic, bidirectional processes. One such process is local proteolytic modification of the ECM. Invadopodia of tumor cells are actin-rich proteolytic protrusions that locally degrade matrix molecules and mediate invasion. We report that a novel high-density fibrillar collagen (HDFC) matrix is a potent inducer of invadopodia, both in carcinoma cell lines and in primary human fibroblasts. In carcinoma cells, HDFC matrix induced formation of invadopodia via a specific integrin signaling pathway that did not require growth factors or even altered gene and protein expression. In contrast, phosphoproteomics identified major changes in a complex phosphosignaling network with kindlin2 serine phosphorylation as a key regulatory element. This kindlin2-dependent signal transduction network was required for efficient induction of invadopodia on dense fibrillar collagen and for local degradation of collagen. This novel phosphosignaling mechanism regulates cell surface invadopodia via kindlin2 for local proteolytic remodeling of the ECM. PMID:25646088

  11. [Immune-regulating effect of phenibut under lipopolysaccharide-induced immune stress conditions].

    PubMed

    Samotrueva, M A; Tiurenkov, I N; Teplyĭ, D L; Kuleshevskaia, N R; Khlebtsova, E V

    2010-05-01

    The immunoregulating effect of phenibut has been demonstrated on the model of immune stress caused by the injection of lipopolysaccharide from Pseudomonas aeruginosa. The degree of expression of the specific (in a delayed-type hypersensitivity reaction and passive hemagglutination) and nonspecific (phagocytic activity of neutrophils) links of immunomodulation was studied. The formation of lipopolysaccharide (LPS) induced immune stress is characterized by the increase of the indicated parameters of immunity. It is found that phenibut (under intraabdominal injection of 25 mg/kg within 5 days) removes the manifestations of hyperreactivity of the cellular link of immunity, and also restores the amount of phagocytic cells, which is evidence of the immunomodulating properties of the drug under conditions of hyperimmunization. PMID:20597368

  12. Maternal immunity enhances Mycoplasma hyopneumoniae vaccination induced cell-mediated immune responses in piglets

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Passively acquired maternal derived immunity (MDI) is a double-edged sword. Maternal derived antibody-mediated immunity (AMI) and cell-mediated immunity (CMI) are critical immediate defenses for the neonate; however, MDI may interfere with the induction of active immunity in the neonate, i.e. passive interference. The effect of antigen-specific MDI on vaccine-induced AMI and CMI responses to Mycoplasma hyopneumoniae (M. hyopneumoniae) was assessed in neonatal piglets. To determine whether CMI and AMI responses could be induced in piglets with MDI, piglets with high and low levels of maternal M. hyopneumoniae-specific immunity were vaccinated against M. hyopneumoniae at 7 d of age. Piglet M. hyopneumoniae-specific antibody, lymphoproliferation, and delayed type hypersensitivity (DTH) responses were measured 7 d and 14 d post vaccination. Results Piglets with M. hyopneumoniae-specific MDI failed to show vaccine-induced AMI responses; there was no rise in M. hyopneumoniae antibody levels following vaccination of piglets in the presence of M. hyopneumoniae-specific MDI. However, piglets with M. hyopneumoniae-specific MDI had primary (antigen-specific lymphoproliferation) and secondary (DTH) M. hyopneumoniae-specific CMI responses following vaccination. Conclusions In this study neonatal M. hyopneumoniae-specific CMI was not subject to passive interference by MDI. Further, it appears that both maternal derived and endogenous CMI contribute to M. hyopneumoniae-specific CMI responses in piglets vaccinated in the face of MDI. PMID:24903770

  13. Nanomaterial Induced Immune Responses and Cytotoxicity.

    PubMed

    Ali, Ashraf; Suhail, Mohd; Mathew, Shilu; Shah, Muhammad Ali; Harakeh, Steve M; Ahmad, Sultan; Kazmi, Zulqarnain; Alhamdan, Mohammed Abdul Rahman; Chaudhary, Adeel; Damanhouri, Ghazi Abdullah; Qadri, Ishtiaq

    2016-01-01

    Nanomaterials are utilized in a wide array of end user products such as pharmaceuticals, electronics, clothes and cosmetic products. Due to its size (< 100 nm), nanoparticles have the propensity to enter through the airway and skin, making its path perilous with the potential to cause damages of varying severity. Once within the body, these particles have unconstrained access to different tissues and organs including the brain, liver, and kidney. As a result, nanomaterials may cause the perturbation of the immune system eliciting an inflammatory response and cytotoxicity. This potential role is dependent on many factors such as the characteristics of the nanomaterials, presence or absence of diseases, and genetic predisposition. Cobalt and nickel nanoparticles, for example, were shown to have inflammogenic properties, while silver nanoparticles were shown to reduce allergic inflammation. Just as asbestos fibers, carbon nanotubes were shown to cause lungs damage. Some nanomaterials were shown, based on animal studies, to result in cell damage, leading to the formation of pre-cancerous lesions. This review highlights the impact of nanomaterials on immune system and its effect on human health with toxicity consideration. It recommends the development of suitable animal models to study the toxicity and bio-clearance of nanomaterials and propose safety guidelines. PMID:27398432

  14. Subclinical Chlamydial Infection of the Female Mouse Genital Tract Generates a Potent Protective Immune Response: Implications for Development of Live Attenuated Chlamydial Vaccine Strains

    PubMed Central

    Su, Hua; Messer, Ronald; Whitmire, William; Hughes, Scott; Caldwell, Harlan D.

    2000-01-01

    Chlamydia trachomatis is a major cause of sexually transmitted disease (STD) for which a vaccine is needed. CD4+ T-helper type 1 (Th1) cell-mediated immunity is an important component of protective immunity against murine chlamydial genital infection. Conventional vaccine approaches have not proven effective in eliciting chlamydial-specific CD4 Th1 immunity at the genital mucosa. Thus, it is possible that the development of a highly efficacious vaccine against genital infection will depend on the generation of a live attenuated C. trachomatis vaccine. Attenuated strains of C. trachomatis do not exist, so their potential utility as vaccines cannot be tested in animal models of infection. We have developed a surrogate model to study the effect of chlamydial attenuation on infection and immunity of the female genital tract by treating mice with a subchlamydiacidal concentration of oxytetracycline following vaginal infection. Compared to untreated control mice, antibiotic-treated mice shed significantly fewer infectious organisms (3 log10) from the cervico-vagina, produced a minimal inflammatory response in urogenital tissue, and did not experience infection-related sequelae. Antibiotic-treated mice generated levels of chlamydia-specific antibody and cell-mediated immunity equivalent to those of control mice. Importantly, antibiotic-treated mice were found to be as immune as control untreated mice when rechallenged vaginally. These findings demonstrate that subclinical chlamydial infection of the murine female genital tract is sufficient to stimulate a potent protective immune response. They also present indirect evidence supporting the possible use of live attenuated chlamydial organisms in the development of vaccines against chlamydial STDs. PMID:10603387

  15. Induction of Potent and Long-Lived Antibody and Cellular Immune Responses in the Genitorectal Mucosa Could be the Critical Determinant of HIV Vaccine Efficacy

    PubMed Central

    Chanzu, Nadia; Ondondo, Beatrice

    2014-01-01

    The field of HIV prevention has indeed progressed in leaps and bounds, but with major limitations of the current prevention and treatment options, the world remains desperate for an HIV vaccine. Sadly, this continues to be elusive, because more than 30 years since its discovery there is no licensed HIV vaccine. Research aiming to define immunological biomarkers to accurately predict vaccine efficacy have focused mainly on systemic immune responses, and as such, studies defining correlates of protection in the genitorectal mucosa, the primary target site for HIV entry and seeding are sparse. Clearly, difficulties in sampling and analysis of mucosal specimens, as well as their limited size have been a major deterrent in characterizing the type (mucosal antibodies, cytokines, chemokines, or CTL), threshold (magnitude, depth, and breadth) and viral inhibitory capacity of HIV-1-specific immune responses in the genitorectal mucosa, where they are needed to immediately block HIV acquisition and arrest subsequent virus dissemination. Nevertheless, a few studies document the existence of HIV-specific immune responses in the genitorectal mucosa of HIV-infected aviremic and viremic controllers, as well as in highly exposed persistently seronegative (HEPS) individuals with natural resistance to HIV-1. Some of these responses strongly correlate with protection from HIV acquisition and/or disease progression, thus providing significant clues of the ideal components of an efficacious HIV vaccine. In this study, we provide an overview of the key features of protective immune responses found in HEPS, elite and viremic controllers, and discuss how these can be achieved through mucosal immunization. Inevitably, HIV vaccine development research will have to consider strategies that elicit potent antibody and cellular immune responses within the genitorectal mucosa or induction of systemic immune cells with an inherent potential to home and persist at mucosal sites of HIV entry. PMID

  16. Protective antitumor immunity induced by tumor cell lysates conjugated with diphtheria toxin and adjuvant epitope in mouse breast tumor models

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Ze-Yu; Xing, Yun; Liu, Bin; Lu, Lei; Huang, Xiao; Ge, Chi-Yu; Yao, Wen-Jun; Xu, Mao-Lei; Gao, Zhen-Qiu; Cao, Rong-Yue; Wu, Jie; Li, Tai-Ming

    2012-01-01

    Cancer cell vaccine-based immunotherapy has received increasing interest in many clinical trials involving patients with breast cancer. Combining with appropriate adjuvants can enhance the weak immunogenic properties of tumor cell lysates (TCL). In this study, diphtheria toxin (DT) and two tandem repeats of mycobacterial heat shock protein 70 (mHSP70) fragment 407-426 (M2) were conjugated to TCL with glutaraldehyde, and the constructed cancer cell vaccine was named DT-TCL-M2. Subcutaneous injection of DT-TCL-M2 in mice effectively elicited tumor-specific polyclonal immune responses, including humoral and cellular immune responses. High levels of antibodies against TCL were detected in the serum of immunized mice with ELISA and verified with Western blot analyses. The splenocytes from immunized mice showed potent cytotoxicity on Ehrlich ascites carcinoma cells. Moreover, the protective antitumor immunity induced by DT-TCL-M2 inhibited tumor growth in a mouse breast tumor model. DT-TCL-M2 also attenuated tumor-induced angiogenesis and slowed tumor growth in a mouse intradermal tumor model. These findings demonstrate that TCL conjugated with appropriate adjuvants induced effective antitumor immunity in vivo. Improvements in potency could further make cancer cell vaccines a useful and safe method for preventing cancer recurrence after resection. PMID:22464650

  17. WSSV-induced crayfish Dscam shows durable immune behavior.

    PubMed

    Ng, Tze Hann; Hung, Hsin-Yi; Chiang, Yi-An; Lin, Jia-Hung; Chen, Yi-Ning; Chuang, Ya-Chu; Wang, Han-Ching

    2014-09-01

    One of the major gaps in our understanding of arthropod specific immune priming concerns the mechanism[s] by which the observed long-term (>2 weeks) protective effects might be mediated. Hypervariable Dscam (Down syndrome cell adhesion molecule) might support arthropod innate immunity with specificity for more extended periods. We show here that, in the relatively long-lived arthropod Cherax quadricarinatus, CqDscam does not behave like a typical, immediately-acting, short-lived innate immune factor: CqDscam was not induced within hours after challenge with a lethal virus, but instead was only up-regulated after 2-5 days. This initial response faded within ∼ 2 weeks, but another maximum was reached ∼ 1 month later. At around 2 months after the initial challenge, the virus-induced CqDscam bound to the virus virion and acted to neutralize the virus However, although CqDscam helped crayfish to survive during persistent infection, it nevertheless failed to provide any enhanced protection against a subsequent WSSV challenge. Thus, CqDscam is capable of supporting extended anti-virus immune memory in arthropods. Also, during a persistent virus infection, the balance of "immune firepower" in crayfish appears to be altered such that the general immune factors become depleted while CqDscam becomes relatively predominant. PMID:24973514

  18. Eicosapentaenoic acid inhibits glucose-induced membrane cholesterol crystalline domain formation through a potent antioxidant mechanism.

    PubMed

    Mason, R Preston; Jacob, Robert F

    2015-02-01

    Lipid oxidation leads to endothelial dysfunction, inflammation, and foam cell formation during atherogenesis. Glucose also contributes to lipid oxidation and promotes pathologic changes in membrane structural organization, including the development of cholesterol crystalline domains. In this study, we tested the comparative effects of eicosapentaenoic acid (EPA), an omega-3 fatty acid indicated for the treatment of very high triglyceride (TG) levels, and other TG-lowering agents (fenofibrate, niacin, and gemfibrozil) on lipid oxidation in human low-density lipoprotein (LDL) as well as membrane lipid vesicles prepared in the presence of glucose (200 mg/dL). We also examined the antioxidant effects of EPA in combination with atorvastatin o-hydroxy (active) metabolite (ATM). Glucose-induced changes in membrane structural organization were measured using small angle x-ray scattering approaches and correlated with changes in lipid hydroperoxide (LOOH) levels. EPA was found to inhibit LDL oxidation in a dose-dependent manner (1.0-10.0 µM) and was distinguished from the other TG-lowering agents, which had no significant effect as compared to vehicle treatment alone. Similar effects were observed in membrane lipid vesicles exposed to hyperglycemic conditions. The antioxidant activity of EPA, as observed in glucose-treated vesicles, was significantly enhanced in combination with ATM. Glucose treatment produced highly-ordered, membrane-restricted, cholesterol crystalline domains, which correlated with increased LOOH levels. Of the agents tested in this study, only EPA inhibited glucose-induced cholesterol domain formation. These data demonstrate that EPA, at pharmacologic levels, inhibits hyperglycemia-induced changes in membrane lipid structural organization through a potent antioxidant mechanism associated with its distinct, physicochemical interactions with the membrane bilayer. PMID:25449996

  19. Chemotherapy-induced antitumor immunity requires formyl peptide receptor 1.

    PubMed

    Vacchelli, Erika; Ma, Yuting; Baracco, Elisa E; Sistigu, Antonella; Enot, David P; Pietrocola, Federico; Yang, Heng; Adjemian, Sandy; Chaba, Kariman; Semeraro, Michaela; Signore, Michele; De Ninno, Adele; Lucarini, Valeria; Peschiaroli, Francesca; Businaro, Luca; Gerardino, Annamaria; Manic, Gwenola; Ulas, Thomas; Günther, Patrick; Schultze, Joachim L; Kepp, Oliver; Stoll, Gautier; Lefebvre, Céline; Mulot, Claire; Castoldi, Francesca; Rusakiewicz, Sylvie; Ladoire, Sylvain; Apetoh, Lionel; Bravo-San Pedro, José Manuel; Lucattelli, Monica; Delarasse, Cécile; Boige, Valérie; Ducreux, Michel; Delaloge, Suzette; Borg, Christophe; André, Fabrice; Schiavoni, Giovanna; Vitale, Ilio; Laurent-Puig, Pierre; Mattei, Fabrizio; Zitvogel, Laurence; Kroemer, Guido

    2015-11-20

    Antitumor immunity driven by intratumoral dendritic cells contributes to the efficacy of anthracycline-based chemotherapy in cancer. We identified a loss-of-function allele of the gene coding for formyl peptide receptor 1 (FPR1) that was associated with poor metastasis-free and overall survival in breast and colorectal cancer patients receiving adjuvant chemotherapy. The therapeutic effects of anthracyclines were abrogated in tumor-bearing Fpr1(-/-) mice due to impaired antitumor immunity. Fpr1-deficient dendritic cells failed to approach dying cancer cells and, as a result, could not elicit antitumor T cell immunity. Experiments performed in a microfluidic device confirmed that FPR1 and its ligand, annexin-1, promoted stable interactions between dying cancer cells and human or murine leukocytes. Altogether, these results highlight the importance of FPR1 in chemotherapy-induced anticancer immune responses. PMID:26516201

  20. Effective antibody therapy induces host protective antitumor immunity that is augmented by TLR4 agonist treatment

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Shangzi; Astsaturov, Igor A.; Bingham, Catherine A.; McCarthy, Kenneth M.; von Mehren, Margaret; Xu, Wei; Alpaugh, R. Katherine; Tang, Yong; Littlefield, Bruce A.; Hawkins, Lynn D.; Ishizaka, Sally T.; Weiner, Louis M.

    2012-01-01

    Toll-like receptors are potent activators of the innate immune system and generate signals leading to the initiation of the adaptive immune response that can be utilized for therapeutic purposes. We tested the hypothesis that combined treatment with a toll-like receptor agonist and an anti-tumor monoclonal antibody is effective and induces host-protective anti-tumor immunity. C57BL/6 human mutated HER2 (hmHER2) transgenic mice that constitutively express kinase-deficient human HER2 under control of the CMV promoter were established. These mice demonstrate immunological tolerance to D5-HER2, a syngeneic human HER2-expressing melanoma cell line. This human HER2 tolerant model offers the potential to serve as a preclinical model to test both antibody therapy and the immunization potential of human HER2 targeted therapeutics. Here we show that E6020, a toll like receptor-4 (TLR4) agonist effectively boosted the antitumor efficacy of the monoclonal antibody trastuzumab in immunodeficient C57BL/6 SCID mice as well as in C57BL/6 hmHER2 transgenic mice. E6020 and trastuzumab co-treatment resulted in significantly greater inhibition of tumor growth than was observed with either agent individually. Furthermore, mice treated with the combination of trastuzumab and the TLR4 agonist were protected against re-challenge with human HER2 transfected tumor cells in hmHER2 transgenic mouse strains. These findings suggest that combined treatment with trastuzumab and a TLR4 agonist not only promotes direct anti-tumor effects but also induces a host-protective human HER2-directed adaptive immune response indicative of a memory response. These data provide an immunological rationale for testing TLR4 agonists in combination with antibody therapy in patients with cancer. PMID:21842208

  1. Intranasal Immunization with Nontypeable Haemophilus influenzae Outer Membrane Vesicles Induces Cross-Protective Immunity in Mice

    PubMed Central

    Roier, Sandro; Leitner, Deborah R.; Iwashkiw, Jeremy; Schild-Prüfert, Kristina; Feldman, Mario F.; Krohne, Georg; Reidl, Joachim; Schild, Stefan

    2012-01-01

    Abstract Haemophilus influenzae is a Gram-negative human-restricted bacterium that can act as a commensal and a pathogen of the respiratory tract. Especially nontypeable H. influenzae (NTHi) is a major threat to public health and is responsible for several infectious diseases in humans, such as pneumonia, sinusitis, and otitis media. Additionally, NTHi strains are highly associated with exacerbations in patients suffering from chronic obstructive pulmonary disease. Currently, there is no licensed vaccine against NTHi commercially available. Thus, this study investigated the utilization of outer membrane vesicles (OMVs) as a potential vaccine candidate against NTHi infections. We analyzed the immunogenic and protective properties of OMVs derived from various NTHi strains by means of nasopharyngeal immunization and colonization studies with BALB/c mice. The results presented herein demonstrate that an intranasal immunization with NTHi OMVs results in a robust and complex humoral and mucosal immune response. Immunoprecipitation revealed the most important immunogenic proteins, such as the heme utilization protein, protective surface antigen D15, heme binding protein A, and the outer membrane proteins P1, P2, P5 and P6. The induced immune response conferred not only protection against colonization with a homologous NTHi strain, which served as an OMV donor for the immunization mixtures, but also against a heterologous NTHi strain, whose OMVs were not part of the immunization mixtures. These findings indicate that OMVs derived from NTHi strains have a high potential to act as a vaccine against NTHi infections. PMID:22880074

  2. Ad35 and Ad26 Vaccine Vectors Induce Potent and Cross-Reactive Antibody and T-Cell Responses to Multiple Filovirus Species

    PubMed Central

    Zahn, Roland; Gillisen, Gert; Roos, Anna; Koning, Marina; van der Helm, Esmeralda; Spek, Dirk; Weijtens, Mo; Grazia Pau, Maria; Radošević, Katarina; Weverling, Gerrit Jan; Custers, Jerome; Vellinga, Jort; Schuitemaker, Hanneke; Goudsmit, Jaap; Rodríguez, Ariane

    2012-01-01

    Filoviruses cause sporadic but highly lethal outbreaks of hemorrhagic fever in Africa in the human population. Currently, no drug or vaccine is available for treatment or prevention. A previous study with a vaccine candidate based on the low seroprevalent adenoviruses 26 and 35 (Ad26 and Ad35) was shown to provide protection against homologous Ebola Zaire challenge in non human primates (NHP) if applied in a prime-boost regimen. Here we have aimed to expand this principle to construct and evaluate Ad26 and Ad35 vectors for development of a vaccine to provide universal filovirus protection against all highly lethal strains that have caused major outbreaks in the past. We have therefore performed a phylogenetic analysis of filovirus glycoproteins to select the glycoproteins from two Ebola species (Ebola Zaire and Ebola Sudan/Gulu,), two Marburg strains (Marburg Angola and Marburg Ravn) and added the more distant non-lethal Ebola Ivory Coast species for broadest coverage. Ad26 and Ad35 vectors expressing these five filovirus glycoproteins were evaluated to induce a potent cellular and humoral immune response in mice. All adenoviral vectors induced a humoral immune response after single vaccination in a dose dependent manner that was cross-reactive within the Ebola and Marburg lineages. In addition, both strain-specific as well as cross-reactive T cell responses could be detected. A heterologous Ad26–Ad35 prime-boost regime enhanced mainly the humoral and to a lower extend the cellular immune response against the transgene. Combination of the five selected filovirus glycoproteins in one multivalent vaccine potentially elicits protective immunity in man against all major filovirus strains that have caused lethal outbreaks in the last 20 years. PMID:23236343

  3. Identification and characterization of the biosynthetic gene cluster of polyoxypeptin A, a potent apoptosis inducer

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Polyoxypeptin A was isolated from a culture broth of Streptomyces sp. MK498-98 F14, which has a potent apoptosis-inducing activity towards human pancreatic carcinoma AsPC-1 cells. Structurally, polyoxypeptin A is composed of a C15 acyl side chain and a nineteen-membered cyclodepsipeptide core that consists of six unusual nonproteinogenic amino acid residues (N-hydroxyvaline, 3-hydroxy-3-methylproline, 5-hydroxypiperazic acid, N-hydroxyalanine, piperazic acid, and 3-hydroxyleucine) at high oxidation states. Results A gene cluster containing 37 open reading frames (ORFs) has been sequenced and analyzed for the biosynthesis of polyoxypeptin A. We constructed 12 specific gene inactivation mutants, most of which abolished the production of polyoxypeptin A and only ΔplyM mutant accumulated a dehydroxylated analogue polyoxypeptin B. Based on bioinformatics analysis and genetic data, we proposed the biosynthetic pathway of polyoxypeptin A and biosynthetic models of six unusual amino acid building blocks and a PKS extender unit. Conclusions The identified gene cluster and proposed pathway for the biosynthesis of polyoxypeptin A will pave a way to understand the biosynthetic mechanism of the azinothricin family natural products and provide opportunities to apply combinatorial biosynthesis strategy to create more useful compounds. PMID:24506891

  4. Insulin-like growth factor I/somatomedin C: a potent inducer of oligodendrocyte development

    SciTech Connect

    McMorris, F.A.; Smith, T.M.; DeSalvo, S.; Furlanetto, R.W.

    1986-02-01

    Cell cultures established from cerebrum of 1-day-old rats were used to investigate hormonal regulation of the development of oligodendrocytes, which synthesize myelin in the central nervous system. The number of oligodendrocytes that developed was preferentially increased by insulin, or by insulin-like growth factor I (IGF-I), also known as somatomedin C. High concentrations of insulin were required for substantial induction of oligodendrocyte development, whereas only 3.3 ng of IGF-I per ml was needed for a 2-fold increase in oligodendrocyte numbers. At an IGF-I concentration of 100 ng/ml, oligodendrocyte numbers were increased 6-fold in cultures grown in the presence of 10% fetal bovine serum, or up to 60-fold in cultures maintained in serum-free medium. IGF-I produced less than a 2-fold increase in the number of nonoligodendroglial cells in the same cultures. Type I IGF receptors were identified on oligodendrocytes and on a putative oligodendrocyte precursor cell population identified by using mouse monoclonal antibody A2B5. Radioligand binding assays were done. These results indicate that IGF-I is a potent inducer of oligodendrocyte development and suggest a possible mechanism based on IGF deficiency for the hypomyelination that results from early postnatal malnutrition.

  5. Potent degradation of neuronal miRNAs induced by highly complementary targets

    PubMed Central

    de la Mata, Manuel; Gaidatzis, Dimos; Vitanescu, Mirela; Stadler, Michael B; Wentzel, Corinna; Scheiffele, Peter; Filipowicz, Witold; Großhans, Helge

    2015-01-01

    MicroRNAs (miRNAs) regulate target mRNAs by silencing them. Reciprocally, however, target mRNAs can also modulate miRNA stability. Here, we uncover a remarkable efficacy of target RNA-directed miRNA degradation (TDMD) in rodent primary neurons. Coincident with degradation, and while still bound to Argonaute, targeted miRNAs are 3′ terminally tailed and trimmed. Absolute quantification of both miRNAs and their decay-inducing targets suggests that neuronal TDMD is multiple turnover and does not involve co-degradation of the target but rather competes with miRNA-mediated decay of the target. Moreover, mRNA silencing, but not TDMD, relies on cooperativity among multiple target sites to reach high efficacy. This knowledge can be harnessed for effective depletion of abundant miRNAs. Our findings bring insight into a potent miRNA degradation pathway in primary neurons, whose TDMD activity greatly surpasses that of non-neuronal cells and established cell lines. Thus, TDMD may be particularly relevant for miRNA regulation in the nervous system. PMID:25724380

  6. Extracellular amastigotes of Trypanosoma cruzi are potent inducers of phagocytosis in mammalian cells

    PubMed Central

    Fernandes, Maria Cecilia; Flannery, Andrew R; Andrews, Norma; Mortara, Renato A

    2013-01-01

    The protozoan parasite Trypanosoma cruzi, the aetiological agent of Chagas' disease, has two infective life cycle stages, trypomastigotes and amastigotes. While trypomastigotes actively enter mammalian cells, highly infective extracellular amastigotes (type I T. cruzi) rely on actin-mediated uptake, which is generally inefficient in non-professional phagocytes. We found that extracellular amastigotes (EAs) of T. cruzi G strain (type I), but not Y strain (type II), were taken up 100-fold more efficiently than inert particles. Mammalian cell lines showed levels of parasite uptake comparable to macrophages, and extensive actin recruitment and polymerization was observed at the site of entry. EA uptake was not dependent on parasite-secreted molecules and required the same molecular machinery utilized by professional phagocytes during large particle phagocytosis. Transcriptional silencing of synaptotagmin VII and CD63 significantly inhibited EA internalization, demonstrating that delivery of supplemental lysosomal membrane to form the phagosome is involved in parasite uptake. Importantly, time-lapse live imaging using fluorescent reporters revealed phagosome-associated modulation of phosphoinositide metabolism during EA uptake that closely resembles what occurs during phagocytosis by macrophages. Collectively, our results demonstrate that T. cruzi EAs are potent inducers of phagocytosis in non-professional phagocytes, a process that may facilitate parasite persistence in infected hosts. PMID:23241026

  7. DEVELOPMENT OF MOLECULAR BIOMARKERS TO MEASURE ENVIRONMENTALLY INDUCED IMMUNE RESPONSES

    EPA Science Inventory

    This study will generate a panel of sensitive molecular biomarkers to measure environmentally induced changes in systemic and local immune responses within small biological samples. Once tested and characterized, these reagents can be immediately incorporated as a part of the...

  8. High-content screening in zebrafish embryos identifies butafenacil as a potent inducer of anemia.

    PubMed

    Leet, Jessica K; Lindberg, Casey D; Bassett, Luke A; Isales, Gregory M; Yozzo, Krystle L; Raftery, Tara D; Volz, David C

    2014-01-01

    Using transgenic zebrafish (fli1:egfp) that stably express enhanced green fluorescent protein (eGFP) within vascular endothelial cells, we recently developed and optimized a 384-well high-content screening (HCS) assay that enables us to screen and identify chemicals affecting cardiovascular development and function at non-teratogenic concentrations. Within this assay, automated image acquisition procedures and custom image analysis protocols are used to quantify body length, heart rate, circulation, pericardial area, and intersegmental vessel area within individual live embryos exposed from 5 to 72 hours post-fertilization. After ranking developmental toxicity data generated from the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency's (EPA's) zebrafish teratogenesis assay, we screened 26 of the most acutely toxic chemicals within EPA's ToxCast Phase-I library in concentration-response format (0.05-50 µM) using this HCS assay. Based on this screen, we identified butafenacil as a potent inducer of anemia, as exposure from 0.39 to 3.125 µM butafenacil completely abolished arterial circulation in the absence of effects on all other endpoints evaluated. Butafenacil is an herbicide that inhibits protoporphyrinogen oxidase (PPO)--an enzyme necessary for heme production in vertebrates. Using o-dianisidine staining, we then revealed that severe butafenacil-induced anemia in zebrafish was due to a complete loss of hemoglobin following exposure during early development. Therefore, six additional PPO inhibitors within the ToxCast Phase-I library were screened to determine whether anemia represents a common adverse outcome for these herbicides. Embryonic exposure to only one of these PPO inhibitors--flumioxazin--resulted in a similar phenotype as butafenacil, albeit not as severe as butafenacil. Overall, this study highlights the potential utility of this assay for (1) screening chemicals for cardiovascular toxicity and (2) prioritizing chemicals for future hypothesis-driven and mechanism

  9. High-Content Screening in Zebrafish Embryos Identifies Butafenacil as a Potent Inducer of Anemia

    PubMed Central

    Leet, Jessica K.; Lindberg, Casey D.; Bassett, Luke A.; Isales, Gregory M.; Yozzo, Krystle L.; Raftery, Tara D.; Volz, David C.

    2014-01-01

    Using transgenic zebrafish (fli1:egfp) that stably express enhanced green fluorescent protein (eGFP) within vascular endothelial cells, we recently developed and optimized a 384-well high-content screening (HCS) assay that enables us to screen and identify chemicals affecting cardiovascular development and function at non-teratogenic concentrations. Within this assay, automated image acquisition procedures and custom image analysis protocols are used to quantify body length, heart rate, circulation, pericardial area, and intersegmental vessel area within individual live embryos exposed from 5 to 72 hours post-fertilization. After ranking developmental toxicity data generated from the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency's (EPA's) zebrafish teratogenesis assay, we screened 26 of the most acutely toxic chemicals within EPA's ToxCast Phase-I library in concentration-response format (0.05–50 µM) using this HCS assay. Based on this screen, we identified butafenacil as a potent inducer of anemia, as exposure from 0.39 to 3.125 µM butafenacil completely abolished arterial circulation in the absence of effects on all other endpoints evaluated. Butafenacil is an herbicide that inhibits protoporphyrinogen oxidase (PPO) – an enzyme necessary for heme production in vertebrates. Using o-dianisidine staining, we then revealed that severe butafenacil-induced anemia in zebrafish was due to a complete loss of hemoglobin following exposure during early development. Therefore, six additional PPO inhibitors within the ToxCast Phase-I library were screened to determine whether anemia represents a common adverse outcome for these herbicides. Embryonic exposure to only one of these PPO inhibitors – flumioxazin – resulted in a similar phenotype as butafenacil, albeit not as severe as butafenacil. Overall, this study highlights the potential utility of this assay for (1) screening chemicals for cardiovascular toxicity and (2) prioritizing chemicals for future hypothesis

  10. Specific humoral and cellular immunity induced by Trypanosoma cruzi DNA immunization in a canine model.

    PubMed

    Arce-Fonseca, Minerva; Ballinas-Verdugo, Martha A; Zenteno, Emma R Abreu; Suárez-Flores, Davinia; Carrillo-Sánchez, Silvia C; Alejandre-Aguilar, Ricardo; Rosales-Encina, José Luis; Reyes, Pedro A; Rodríguez-Morales, Olivia

    2013-01-01

    Chagas disease has a high incidence in Mexico and other Latin American countries. Because one of the most important known methods of prevention is vector control, which has been effective only in certain areas of South America, the development of a vaccine to protect people at risk has been proposed. In this study, we assessed the cellular and humoral immune response generated following immunization with pBCSP and pBCSSP4 plasmids containing the genes encoding a trans-sialidase protein (present in all three forms of T. cruzi) and an amastigote specific glycoprotein, respectively, in a canine model. Thirty-five beagle dogs were divided randomly into 5 groups (n=7) and were immunized twice intramuscularly with 500 μg of pBCSSP4, pBCSP, pBk-CMV (empty plasmid) or saline solution. Fifteen days after the last immunization the 4 groups were infected intraperitoneally with 500,000 metacyclic trypomastigotes. The fifth group was unimmunized/infected. The parasitaemia in the immunized/infected dogs was for a shorter period (14 vs. 29 days) and the parasite load was lower. The concentration of IgG1 (0.612±0.019 O.D.) and IgG2 (1.167±0.097 O.D.) subclasses was measured (absorbance) 15 days after the last immunization with both recombinant plasmids, the majority of which were IgG2. The treatment of parasites using the serum from dogs immunized with pBCSP and pBCSSP4 plasmids produced 54% (±11.8) and 68% (±21.4) complement-mediated lysis, respectively. At 12 h post immunization, an increase in cytokines was not observed; however, vaccination with pBCSSP4 significantly increased the levels of IFN-γ and IL-10 at 9 months post-infection. The recombinant plasmid immunization stimulated the spleen cell proliferation showing a positive stimulatory index above 2.0. In conclusion, immunization using both genes effectively induces a humoral and cellular immune response. PMID:23497041

  11. Specific humoral and cellular immunity induced by Trypanosoma cruzi DNA immunization in a canine model

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Chagas disease has a high incidence in Mexico and other Latin American countries. Because one of the most important known methods of prevention is vector control, which has been effective only in certain areas of South America, the development of a vaccine to protect people at risk has been proposed. In this study, we assessed the cellular and humoral immune response generated following immunization with pBCSP and pBCSSP4 plasmids containing the genes encoding a trans-sialidase protein (present in all three forms of T. cruzi) and an amastigote specific glycoprotein, respectively, in a canine model. Thirty-five beagle dogs were divided randomly into 5 groups (n = 7) and were immunized twice intramuscularly with 500 μg of pBCSSP4, pBCSP, pBk-CMV (empty plasmid) or saline solution. Fifteen days after the last immunization the 4 groups were infected intraperitoneally with 500 000 metacyclic trypomastigotes. The fifth group was unimmunized/infected. The parasitaemia in the immunized/infected dogs was for a shorter period (14 vs. 29 days) and the parasite load was lower. The concentration of IgG1 (0.612 ± 0.019 O.D.) and IgG2 (1.167 ± 0.097 O.D.) subclasses was measured (absorbance) 15 days after the last immunization with both recombinant plasmids, the majority of which were IgG2. The treatment of parasites using the serum from dogs immunized with pBCSP and pBCSSP4 plasmids produced 54% (± 11.8) and 68% (± 21.4) complement-mediated lysis, respectively. At 12 h post immunization, an increase in cytokines was not observed; however, vaccination with pBCSSP4 significantly increased the levels of IFN-γ and IL-10 at 9 months post-infection. The recombinant plasmid immunization stimulated the spleen cell proliferation showing a positive stimulatory index above 2.0. In conclusion, immunization using both genes effectively induces a humoral and cellular immune response. PMID:23497041

  12. Potent Cell-Intrinsic Immune Responses in Dendritic Cells Facilitate HIV-1-Specific T Cell Immunity in HIV-1 Elite Controllers

    PubMed Central

    Martin-Gayo, Enrique; Buzon, Maria Jose; Ouyang, Zhengyu; Hickman, Taylor; Cronin, Jacqueline; Pimenova, Dina; Walker, Bruce D.; Lichterfeld, Mathias; Yu, Xu G.

    2015-01-01

    The majority of HIV-1 elite controllers (EC) restrict HIV-1 replication through highly functional HIV-1-specific T cell responses, but mechanisms supporting the evolution of effective HIV-1-specific T cell immunity in these patients remain undefined. Cytosolic immune recognition of HIV-1 in conventional dendritic cells (cDC) can facilitate priming and expansion of HIV-1-specific T cells; however, HIV-1 seems to be able to avoid intracellular immune recognition in cDCs in most infected individuals. Here, we show that exposure of cDCs from EC to HIV-1 leads to a rapid and sustained production of type I interferons and upregulation of several interferon-stimulated effector genes. Emergence of these cell-intrinsic immune responses was associated with a reduced induction of SAMHD1 and LEDGF/p75, and an accumulation of viral reverse transcripts, but inhibited by pharmacological blockade of viral reverse transcription or siRNA-mediated silencing of the cytosolic DNA sensor cGAS. Importantly, improved cell-intrinsic immune recognition of HIV-1 in cDCs from elite controllers translated into stronger abilities to stimulate and expand HIV-1-specific CD8 T cell responses. These data suggest an important role of cell-intrinsic type I interferon secretion in dendritic cells for the induction of effective HIV-1-specific CD8 T cells, and may be helpful for eliciting functional T cell immunity against HIV-1 for preventative or therapeutic clinical purposes. PMID:26067651

  13. Inducible immune proteins in the dampwood termite Zootermopsis angusticollis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rosengaus, Rebeca B.; Cornelisse, Tara; Guschanski, Katerina; Traniello, James F. A.

    2007-01-01

    Dampwood termites, Zootermopsis angusticollis (Isoptera: Termopsidae), mount an immune response to resist microbial infection. Here we report on results of a novel analysis that allowed us to electrophoretically assess changes in hemolymph proteins in the same individual before and after exposure to a pathogen. We demonstrate that contact with a sublethal concentration of the entomopathogenic fungus Metarhizium anisopliae (Deuteromycotina:Hypomycetes) induces the production of protective proteins in nymphs, pseudergates (false workers), and soldiers. Termites exposed to an immunizing dosage of fungal conidia consistently showed an enhancement of constitutive proteins (62-85 kDa) in the hemolymph as well as an induction of novel proteins (28-48 kDa) relative to preimmunization levels. No significant differences in protein banding patterns relative to baseline levels in control and naïve termites were observed. Incubating excised and eluted induced proteins produced by immunized pseudergates or immunized soldiers with conidia significantly reduced the germination of the fungus. The fungistatic effect of eluted proteins differed significantly among five colonies examined. Our results show that the upregulation of protective proteins in the hemolymph underscores the in vivo immune response we previously recorded in Z. angusticollis.

  14. CD226 as a genetic adjuvant to enhance immune efficacy induced by Ag85A DNA vaccination.

    PubMed

    Li, Yan; Yang, Fangli; Zhu, Junfeng; Sang, Lixuan; Han, Xue; Wang, Danan; Shan, Fengping; Li, Shengjun; Sun, Xun; Lu, Changlong

    2015-03-01

    Antigen-85A (Ag85A) is one of the major proteins secreted by Mycobacterium tuberculosis. Many studies on animal models have shown that vaccination with the recombinant Ag85A-DNA or Ag85A protein induces powerful immune response. However, these vaccines cannot generate sufficient protective immunity in the systemic compartment. CD226, a member of the immunoglobulin superfamily, is expressed in the majority of NK cells, T cells, monocytes, and platelets, and can be served as a co-stimulator that contributes to multiple innate and adaptive responses. However, there has been no study where either CD226 protein or DNA has been used as an adjuvant for vaccine development. The aim of this study was to develop a novel Ag85A DNA vaccine with CD226 as the genetic adjuvant to increase the immune efficacy induced by Ag85A. Oral vaccination with pcDNA3.1-Ag85A-CD226 DNA induced potent immune responses in mice. CD226 was an effective genetic adjuvant that improved the immune efficacy induced by Ag85A and enhanced the activity of cytotoxic T lymphocytes (CTL) and NK cells in mice. Th1 dominant cytokines (i.e. IL-2, IFN-γ and TNF-α), cellular immunity (i.e. CD4(+)IFN-γ(+)T cells and CD8(+)IFN-γ(+)T cells in splenocytes) and MLNs were also significantly elevated by pcDNA3.1-Ag85A-CD226 DNA vaccination. Our results suggest that CD226 is an effective adjuvant to enhance the immune efficacy induced by Ag85A. Our findings provide a new strategy for the development of a DNA vaccine co-expressing Ag85A and CD226. PMID:25582686

  15. Investigating the Role for IL-21 in Rabies Virus Vaccine-induced Immunity

    PubMed Central

    Dorfmeier, Corin L.; Tzvetkov, Evgeni P.; Gatt, Anthony; McGettigan, James P.

    2013-01-01

    Over two-thirds of the world's population lives in regions where rabies is endemic, resulting in over 15 million people receiving multi-dose post-exposure prophylaxis (PEP) and over 55,000 deaths per year globally. A major goal in rabies virus (RABV) research is to develop a single-dose PEP that would simplify vaccination protocols, reduce costs associated with RABV prevention, and save lives. Protection against RABV infections requires virus neutralizing antibodies; however, factors influencing the development of protective RABV-specific B cell responses remain to be elucidated. Here we used a mouse model of IL-21 receptor-deficiency (IL-21R−/−) to characterize the role for IL-21 in RABV vaccine-induced immunity. IL-21R−/− mice immunized with a low dose of a live recombinant RABV-based vaccine (rRABV) produced only low levels of primary or secondary anti-RABV antibody response while wild-type mice developed potent anti-RABV antibodies. Furthermore, IL-21R−/− mice immunized with low-dose rRABV were only minimally protected against pathogenic RABV challenge, while all wild-type mice survived challenge, indicating that IL-21R signaling is required for antibody production in response to low-dose RABV-based vaccination. IL-21R−/− mice immunized with a higher dose of vaccine produced suboptimal anti-RABV primary antibody responses, but showed potent secondary antibodies and protection similar to wild-type mice upon challenge with pathogenic RABV, indicating that IL-21 is dispensable for secondary antibody responses to live RABV-based vaccines when a primary response develops. Furthermore, we show that IL-21 is dispensable for the generation of Tfh cells and memory B cells in the draining lymph nodes of immunized mice but is required for the detection of optimal GC B cells or plasma cells in the lymph node or bone marrow, respectively, in a vaccine dose-dependent manner. Collectively, our preliminary data show that IL-21 is critical for the development of

  16. Investigating the role for IL-21 in rabies virus vaccine-induced immunity.

    PubMed

    Dorfmeier, Corin L; Tzvetkov, Evgeni P; Gatt, Anthony; McGettigan, James P

    2013-01-01

    Over two-thirds of the world's population lives in regions where rabies is endemic, resulting in over 15 million people receiving multi-dose post-exposure prophylaxis (PEP) and over 55,000 deaths per year globally. A major goal in rabies virus (RABV) research is to develop a single-dose PEP that would simplify vaccination protocols, reduce costs associated with RABV prevention, and save lives. Protection against RABV infections requires virus neutralizing antibodies; however, factors influencing the development of protective RABV-specific B cell responses remain to be elucidated. Here we used a mouse model of IL-21 receptor-deficiency (IL-21R-/-) to characterize the role for IL-21 in RABV vaccine-induced immunity. IL-21R-/- mice immunized with a low dose of a live recombinant RABV-based vaccine (rRABV) produced only low levels of primary or secondary anti-RABV antibody response while wild-type mice developed potent anti-RABV antibodies. Furthermore, IL-21R-/- mice immunized with low-dose rRABV were only minimally protected against pathogenic RABV challenge, while all wild-type mice survived challenge, indicating that IL-21R signaling is required for antibody production in response to low-dose RABV-based vaccination. IL-21R-/- mice immunized with a higher dose of vaccine produced suboptimal anti-RABV primary antibody responses, but showed potent secondary antibodies and protection similar to wild-type mice upon challenge with pathogenic RABV, indicating that IL-21 is dispensable for secondary antibody responses to live RABV-based vaccines when a primary response develops. Furthermore, we show that IL-21 is dispensable for the generation of Tfh cells and memory B cells in the draining lymph nodes of immunized mice but is required for the detection of optimal GC B cells or plasma cells in the lymph node or bone marrow, respectively, in a vaccine dose-dependent manner. Collectively, our preliminary data show that IL-21 is critical for the development of optimal vaccine-induced

  17. A Drosophila immune response against Ras-induced overgrowth

    PubMed Central

    Hauling, Thomas; Krautz, Robert; Markus, Robert; Volkenhoff, Anne; Kucerova, Lucie; Theopold, Ulrich

    2014-01-01

    ABSTRACT Our goal is to characterize the innate immune response against the early stage of tumor development. For this, animal models where genetic changes in specific cells and tissues can be performed in a controlled way have become increasingly important, including the fruitfly Drosophila melanogaster. Many tumor mutants in Drosophila affect the germline and, as a consequence, also the immune system itself, making it difficult to ascribe their phenotype to a specific tissue. Only during the past decade, mutations have been induced systematically in somatic cells to study the control of tumorous growth by neighboring cells and by immune cells. Here we show that upon ectopic expression of a dominant-active form of the Ras oncogene (RasV12), both imaginal discs and salivary glands are affected. Particularly, the glands increase in size, express metalloproteinases and display apoptotic markers. This leads to a strong cellular response, which has many hallmarks of the granuloma-like encapsulation reaction, usually mounted by the insect against larger foreign objects. RNA sequencing of the fat body reveals a characteristic humoral immune response. In addition we also identify genes that are specifically induced upon expression of RasV12. As a proof-of-principle, we show that one of the induced genes (santa-maria), which encodes a scavenger receptor, modulates damage to the salivary glands. The list of genes we have identified provides a rich source for further functional characterization. Our hope is that this will lead to a better understanding of the earliest stage of innate immune responses against tumors with implications for mammalian immunity. PMID:24659248

  18. The Imidazoquinoline Toll-Like Receptor-7/8 Agonist Hybrid-2 Potently Induces Cytokine Production by Human Newborn and Adult Leukocytes

    PubMed Central

    Ganapathi, Lakshmi; Van Haren, Simon; Dowling, David J.; Bergelson, Ilana; Shukla, Nikunj M.; Malladi, Subbalakshmi S.; Balakrishna, Rajalakshmi; Tanji, Hiromi; Ohto, Umeharu; Shimizu, Toshiyuki; David, Sunil A.; Levy, Ofer

    2015-01-01

    Background Newborns and young infants are at higher risk for infections than adults, and manifest suboptimal vaccine responses, motivating a search for novel immunomodulators and/or vaccine adjuvants effective in early life. In contrast to most TLR agonists (TLRA), TLR8 agonists such as imidazoquinolines (IMQs) induce adult-level Th1-polarizing cytokine production from human neonatal cord blood monocytes and are candidate early life adjuvants. We assessed whether TLR8-activating IMQ congeners may differ in potency and efficacy in inducing neonatal cytokine production in vitro, comparing the novel TLR7/8-activating IMQ analogues Hybrid-2, Meta-amine, and Para-amine to the benchmark IMQ resiquimod (R848). Methods TLRA-induced NF-κB activation was measured in TLR-transfected HEK cells. Cytokine production in human newborn cord and adult peripheral blood and in monocyte-derived dendritic cell cultures were measured by ELISA and multiplex assays. X-ray crystallography characterized the interaction of human TLR8 with Hybrid-2. Results Hybrid-2 selectively activated both TLR7 and 8 and was more potent than R848 in inducing adult-like levels of TNF-α, and IL-1β. Consistent with its relatively high in vitro activity, crystallographic studies suggest that absence in Hybrid-2 of an ether oxygen of the C2-ethoxymethyl substituent, which can engage in unfavorable electrostatic and/or dipolar interactions with the carbonyl oxygen of Gly572 in human TLR8, may confer greater efficacy and potency compared to R848. Conclusions Hybrid-2 is a selective and potent TLR7/8 agonist that is a candidate adjuvant for early life immunization. PMID:26274907

  19. Potent Paracrine Effects of human induced Pluripotent Stem Cell-derived Mesenchymal Stem Cells Attenuate Doxorubicin-induced Cardiomyopathy

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Yuelin; Liang, Xiaoting; Liao, Songyan; Wang, Weixin; Wang, Junwen; Li, Xiang; Ding, Yue; Liang, Yingmin; Gao, Fei; Yang, Mo; Fu, Qingling; Xu, Aimin; Chai, Yuet-Hung; He, Jia; Tse, Hung-Fat; Lian, Qizhou

    2015-01-01

    Transplantation of bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells (BM-MSCs) can protect cardiomyocytes against anthracycline-induced cardiomyopathy (AIC) through paracrine effects. Nonetheless the paracrine effects of human induced pluripotent stem cell-derived MSCs (iPSC-MSCs) on AIC are poorly understood. In vitro studies reveal that doxorubicin (Dox)-induced reactive oxidative stress (ROS) generation and cell apoptosis in neonatal rat cardiomyocytes (NRCMs) are significantly reduced when treated with conditioned medium harvested from BM-MSCs (BM-MSCs-CdM) or iPSC-MSCs (iPSC-MSCs-CdM). Compared with BM-MSCs-CdM, NRCMs treated with iPSC-MSCs-CdM exhibit significantly less ROS and cell apoptosis in a dose-dependent manner. Transplantation of BM-MSCs-CdM or iPSC-MSCs-CdM into mice with AIC remarkably attenuated left ventricular (LV) dysfunction and dilatation. Compared with BM-MSCs-CdM, iPSC-MSCs-CdM treatment showed better alleviation of heart failure, less cardiomyocyte apoptosis and fibrosis. Analysis of common and distinct cytokines revealed that macrophage migration inhibitory factor (MIF) and growth differentiation factor-15 (GDF-15) were uniquely overpresented in iPSC-MSC-CdM. Immunodepletion of MIF and GDF-15 in iPSC-MSCs-CdM dramatically decreased cardioprotection. Injection of GDF-15/MIF cytokines could partially reverse Dox-induced heart dysfunction. We suggest that the potent paracrine effects of iPSC-MSCs provide novel “cell-free” therapeutic cardioprotection against AIC, and that MIF and GDF-15 in iPSC-MSCs-CdM are critical for these enhanced cardioprotective effects. PMID:26057572

  20. Adenosine signaling and the energetic costs of induced immunity.

    PubMed

    Lazzaro, Brian P

    2015-04-01

    Life history theory predicts that trait evolution should be constrained by competing physiological demands on an organism. Immune defense provides a classic example in which immune responses are presumed to be costly and therefore come at the expense of other traits related to fitness. One strategy for mitigating the costs of expensive traits is to render them inducible, such that the cost is paid only when the trait is utilized. In the current issue of PLOS Biology, Bajgar and colleagues elegantly demonstrate the energetic and life history cost of the immune response that Drosophila melanogaster larvae induce after infection by the parasitoid wasp Leptopilina boulardi. These authors show that infection-induced proliferation of defensive blood cells commands a diversion of dietary carbon away from somatic growth and development, with simple sugars instead being shunted to the hematopoetic organ for rapid conversion into the raw energy required for cell proliferation. This metabolic shift results in a 15% delay in the development of the infected larva and is mediated by adenosine signaling between the hematopoietic organ and the central metabolic control organ of the host fly. The adenosine signal thus allows D. melanogaster to rapidly marshal the energy needed for effective defense and to pay the cost of immunity only when infected. PMID:25915419

  1. Immunization with avian metapneumovirus harboring chicken Fc induces higher immune responses.

    PubMed

    Paudel, Sarita; Easwaran, Maheswaran; Jang, Hyun; Jung, Ho-Kyoung; Kim, Joo-Hun; Shin, Hyun-Jin

    2016-07-15

    In this study, we evaluated the immune responses of avian metapneumovirus harboring chicken Fc molecule. Stable Vero cells expressing chicken Fc chimera on its surface (Vero-cFc) were established, and we confirmed that aMPV grown in Vero-cFc incorporated host derived chimera Fc into the aMPV virions. Immunization of chicken with aMPV-cFc induced higher level of antibodies and inflammatory cytokines; (Interferon (IFN)-γ and Interleukin (IL)-1β) compared to those of aMPV. The increased levels of antibodies and inflammatory cytokines in chicken immunized with aMPV-cFc were statistically significantly (p<0.05) to that of aMPV and control. The aMPV-cFc group also generated the highest neutralizing antibody response. After challenges, chickens immunized with aMPV-cFc showed much less pathological signs in nasal turbinates and trachea so that we could confirm aMPV-cFc induced higher protection than that of aMPV. The greater ability of aMPV harboring chicken Fc to that of aMPV presented it as a possible vaccine candidate. PMID:27130629

  2. Drug-Induced Glomerular Disease: Immune-Mediated Injury

    PubMed Central

    Markowitz, Glen S.; Radhakrishnan, Jai

    2015-01-01

    Drug-induced autoimmune disease was initially described decades ago, with reports of vasculitis and a lupus-like syndrome in patients taking hydralazine, procainamide, and sulfadiazine. Over the years, multiple other agents have been linked to immune-mediated glomerular disease, often with associated autoantibody formation. Certain clinical and laboratory features may distinguish these entities from their idiopathic counterparts, and making this distinction is important in the diagnosis and management of these patients. Here, drug-induced, ANCA-associated vasculitis, drug-induced lupus, and drug-associated membranous nephropathy are reviewed. PMID:26092827

  3. Vaccination with Irradiated Tumor Cells Engineered to Secrete Murine Granulocyte-Macrophage Colony-Stimulating Factor Stimulates Potent, Specific, and Long-Lasting Anti-Tumor Immunity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dranoff, Glenn; Jaffee, Elizabeth; Lazenby, Audrey; Golumbek, Paul; Levitsky, Hyam; Brose, Katja; Jackson, Valerie; Hamada, Hirofumi; Pardoll, Drew; Mulligan, Richard C.

    1993-04-01

    To compare the ability of different cytokines and other molecules to enhance the immunogenicity of tumor cells, we generated 10 retroviruses encoding potential immunomodulators and studied the vaccination properties of murine tumor cells transduced by the viruses. Using a B16 melanoma model, in which irradiated tumor cells alone do not stimulate significant anti-tumor immunity, we found that irradiated tumor cells expressing murine granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor (GM-CSF) stimulated potent, long-lasting, and specific anti-tumor immunity, requiring both CD4^+ and CD8^+ cells. Irradiated cells expressing interleukins 4 and 6 also stimulated detectable, but weaker, activity. In contrast to the B16 system, we found that in a number of other tumor models, the levels of anti-tumor immunity reported previously in cytokine gene transfer studies involving live, transduced cells could be achieved through the use of irradiated cells alone. Nevertheless, manipulation of the vaccine or challenge doses made it possible to demonstrate the activity of murine GM-CSF in those systems as well. Overall, our results have important implications for the clinical use of genetically modified tumor cells as therapeutic cancer vaccines.

  4. Suxiao Jiuxin Pill Induces Potent Relaxation and Inhibition on Contraction in Human Artery and the Mechanism

    PubMed Central

    Bai, Xiao-Yan; Zhang, Ping; Yang, Qin; Liu, Xiao-Cheng; Wang, Jun; Tong, Yong-Ling; Xiong, Song-Jin; Liu, Li-Hua; Wang, Lei; He, Guo-Wei

    2014-01-01

    Suxiao Jiuxin Pill, a compound Chinese traditional medicine with main components of tetramethylpyrazine and borneol, is widely used for antiangina treatment in China but its pharmacological effect on human blood vessels is unknown. We investigated the effect and possible mechanism of SJP in the human internal mammary artery (IMA, n = 78) taken from patients undergoing coronary surgery. SJP caused full relaxation in KCl- (99.4 ± 10.5%, n = 6) and U46619- (99.9 ± 5.6%, n = 6) contracted IMA. Pretreatment of IMA with plasma concentrations of SJP (1 mg/mL), calculated from the plasma concentration of its major component borneol, significantly depressed the maximal contraction to KCl (from 35.8 ± 6.0 mN to 12.6 ± 5.6 mN, P = 0.03) and U46619 (from 19.4 ± 2.9 mN to 5.7 ± 2.4 mN, P = 0.007) while SJP at 10 mg/mL abolished the subsequent contraction. Endothelium denudation and inhibition of eNOS significantly altered the SJP-induced relaxation without changes of eNOS expression. We conclude that SJP has a potent inhibitory effect on the vasoconstriction mediated by a variety of vasoconstrictors in human arteries. The vasorelaxation involves both endothelium-dependent and -independent mechanisms. Thus, the effect of SJP on human arteries demonstrated in this study may prove to be particularly important in vasorelaxing therapy in cardiovascular disease. PMID:24808920

  5. Vaccination with vascular progenitor cells derived from induced pluripotent stem cells elicits antitumor immunity targeting vascular and tumor cells.

    PubMed

    Koido, Shigeo; Ito, Masaki; Sagawa, Yukiko; Okamoto, Masato; Hayashi, Kazumi; Nagasaki, Eijiro; Kan, Shin; Komita, Hideo; Kamata, Yuko; Homma, Sadamu

    2014-05-01

    Vaccination of BALB/c mice with dendritic cells (DCs) loaded with the lysate of induced vascular progenitor (iVP) cells derived from murine-induced pluripotent stem (iPS) cells significantly suppressed the tumor of CMS-4 fibrosarcomas and prolonged the survival of CMS-4-inoculated mice. This prophylactic antitumor activity was more potent than that of immunization with DCs loaded with iPS cells or CMS-4 tumor cells. Tumors developed slowly in mice vaccinated with DCs loaded with iVP cells (DC/iVP) and exhibited a limited vascular bed. Immunohistochemistry and a tomato-lectin perfusion study demonstrated that the tumors that developed in the iVP-immunized mice showed a marked decrease in tumor vasculature. Immunization with DC/iVP induced a potent suppressive effect on vascular-rich CMS-4 tumors, a weaker effect on BNL tumors with moderate vasculature, and nearly no effect on C26 tumors with poor vasculature. Treatment of DC/iVP-immunized mice with a monoclonal antibody against CD4 or CD8, but not anti-asialo GM1, inhibited the antitumor activity. CD8(+) T cells from DC/iVP-vaccinated mice showed significant cytotoxic activity against murine endothelial cells and CMS-4 cells, whereas CD8(+) T cells from DC/iPS-vaccinated mice did not. DNA microarray analysis showed that the products of 29 vasculature-associated genes shared between genes upregulated by differentiation from iPS cells into iVP cells and genes shared by iVP cells and isolated Flk-1(+) vascular cells in CMS-4 tumor tissue might be possible targets in the immune response. These results suggest that iVP cells from iPS cells could be used as a cancer vaccine targeting tumor vascular cells and tumor cells. PMID:24627093

  6. Radiation-induced effects and the immune system in cancer

    PubMed Central

    Kaur, Punit; Asea, Alexzander

    2012-01-01

    Chemotherapy and radiation therapy (RT) are standard therapeutic modalities for patients with cancers, and could induce various tumor cell death modalities, releasing tumor-derived antigens as well as danger signals that could either be captured for triggering anti-tumor immune response. Historic studies examining tissue and cellular responses to RT have predominantly focused on damage caused to proliferating malignant cells leading to their death. However, there is increasing evidence that RT also leads to significant alterations in the tumor microenvironment, particularly with respect to effects on immune cells and infiltrating tumors. This review will focus on immunologic consequences of RT and discuss the therapeutic reprogramming of immune responses in tumors and how it regulates efficacy and durability to RT. PMID:23251903

  7. Immune-mediated drug-induced liver disease.

    PubMed

    Liu, Zhang-Xu; Kaplowitz, Neil

    2002-08-01

    Drug-induced immune-mediated hepatic injury is an adverse immune response against the liver that results in a disease with hepatitic, cholestatic, or mixed clinical features. Drugs such as halothane, tienilic acid, dihydralazine, and anticonvulsants trigger a hepatitic reaction, and drugs such as chlorpromazine, erythromycins, amoxicillin-calvulanic acid, sulfonamides and sulindac trigger a cholestatic or mixed reaction. Unstable metabolites derived from the metabolism of the drug may bind to cellular proteins or macromolecules, leading to a direct toxic effect on hepatocytes. Protein adducts formed in the metabolism of the drug may be recognized by the immune system as neoantigens. Immunocyte activation may then generate autoantibodies and cell-mediated immune responses, which in turn damage the hepatocytes. Cytochromes 450 are the major oxidative catalysts in drug metabolism, and they can form a neoantigen by covalently binding with the drug metabolite that they produce. Autoantibodies that develop are selectively directed against the particular cytochrome isoenzyme that metabolized the parent drug. The hapten hypothesis proposes that the drug metabolite can act as a hapten and can modify the self of the individual by covalently binding to proteins. The danger hypothesis proposes that the immune system only responds to a foreign antigen if the antigen is associated with a danger signal, such as cell stress or cell death. Most clinically overt adverse hepatic events associated with drugs are unpredictable, and they have intermediate (1 to 8 weeks) or long latency (up to 12 months) periods characteristic of hypersensitivity reactions. Immune-mediated drug-induced liver disease nearly always disappears or becomes quiescent when the drug is removed. Methyldopa, minocycline, and nitrofurantoin can produce a chronic hepatitis resembling AIH if the drug is continued. PMID:12362579

  8. The role of probiotics and prebiotics in inducing gut immunity.

    PubMed

    Vieira, Angélica T; Teixeira, Mauro M; Martins, Flaviano S

    2013-01-01

    The gut immune system is influenced by many factors, including dietary components and commensal bacteria. Nutrients that affect gut immunity and strategies that restore a healthy gut microbial community by affecting the microbial composition are being developed as new therapeutic approaches to treat several inflammatory diseases. Although probiotics (live microorganisms) and prebiotics (food components) have shown promise as treatments for several diseases in both clinical and animal studies, an understanding of the molecular mechanisms behind the direct and indirect effects on the gut immune response will facilitate better and possibly more efficient therapy for diseases. In this review, we will first describe the concept of prebiotics, probiotics, and symbiotics and cover the most recently well-established scientific findings regarding the direct and indirect mechanisms by which these dietary approaches can influence gut immunity. Emphasis will be placed on the relationship of diet, the microbiota, and the gut immune system. Second, we will highlight recent results from our group, which suggest a new dietary manipulation that includes the use of nutrient products (organic selenium and Lithothamnium muelleri) and probiotics (Saccharomyces boulardii UFMG 905 and Bifidobacterium sp.) that can stimulate and manipulate the gut immune response, inducing intestinal homeostasis. Furthermore, the purpose of this review is to discuss and translate all of this knowledge into therapeutic strategies and into treatment for extra-intestinal compartment pathologies. We will conclude by discussing perspectives and molecular advances regarding the use of prebiotics or probiotics as new therapeutic strategies that manipulate the microbial composition and the gut immune responses of the host. PMID:24376446

  9. The Role of Probiotics and Prebiotics in Inducing Gut Immunity

    PubMed Central

    Vieira, Angélica T.; Teixeira, Mauro M.; Martins, Flaviano S.

    2013-01-01

    The gut immune system is influenced by many factors, including dietary components and commensal bacteria. Nutrients that affect gut immunity and strategies that restore a healthy gut microbial community by affecting the microbial composition are being developed as new therapeutic approaches to treat several inflammatory diseases. Although probiotics (live microorganisms) and prebiotics (food components) have shown promise as treatments for several diseases in both clinical and animal studies, an understanding of the molecular mechanisms behind the direct and indirect effects on the gut immune response will facilitate better and possibly more efficient therapy for diseases. In this review, we will first describe the concept of prebiotics, probiotics, and symbiotics and cover the most recently well-established scientific findings regarding the direct and indirect mechanisms by which these dietary approaches can influence gut immunity. Emphasis will be placed on the relationship of diet, the microbiota, and the gut immune system. Second, we will highlight recent results from our group, which suggest a new dietary manipulation that includes the use of nutrient products (organic selenium and Lithothamnium muelleri) and probiotics (Saccharomyces boulardii UFMG 905 and Bifidobacterium sp.) that can stimulate and manipulate the gut immune response, inducing intestinal homeostasis. Furthermore, the purpose of this review is to discuss and translate all of this knowledge into therapeutic strategies and into treatment for extra-intestinal compartment pathologies. We will conclude by discussing perspectives and molecular advances regarding the use of prebiotics or probiotics as new therapeutic strategies that manipulate the microbial composition and the gut immune responses of the host. PMID:24376446

  10. Boletus edulis ribonucleic acid - a potent apoptosis inducer in human colon adenocarcinoma cells.

    PubMed

    Lemieszek, Marta Kinga; Ribeiro, Miguel; Guichard Alves, Helena; Marques, Guilhermina; Nunes, Fernando Milheiro; Rzeski, Wojciech

    2016-07-13

    Despite the large popularity of the Boletus edulis mushroom, little is known about its influence on human health and the possibilities of its therapeutic use. Nevertheless, several reports revealed the usefulness of biopolymers isolated from it in cancer treatment. Our previous studies have shown that B. edulis water soluble biopolymers are not toxic against normal colon epithelial cells (CCD841 CoTr) and at the same concentration range elicited a very prominent antiproliferative effect in colon cancer cells (LS180) which was accompanied with cell cycle arrest in the G0/G1 phase. The purpose of the present study was to verify the proapoptotic properties of a selected fraction from B. edulis - BE3, as well as determine its chemical nature. The BE3 fraction was extracted with hot water and purified by anion-exchange chromatography. Further chemical examinations revealed that BE3 consists mainly of ribonucleic acid (59.1%). The ability of BE3 to induce programmed cell death was examined in human colon cancer cell lines LS180 and HT-29 by measuring caspase activation, DNA fragmentation and expression of BAX, BCL2, TP53 and CDKN1A genes. The sensitivity of colon cancer cells with silenced BAX, TP53 and CDKN1A expression to BE3 treatment was also evaluated. We have demonstrated for the first time that the BE3 fraction is a potent apoptosis inducer in human colon cancer cells. The revealed mechanism of apoptosis triggering was dependent on the presence of functional p53 and consequently was a little different in investigated cell lines. Our results indicated that BE3 stimulated proapoptotic genes BAX (LS180, HT-29), TP53 (LS180) and CDKN1A (HT-29) while at the same time silenced the expression of the key prosurvival gene BCL2 (LS180, HT-29). The obtained results indicate the high therapeutic potential of the BE3 fraction against colon cancer, yet it is necessary to further confirm fraction efficacy and safety in animal and clinical studies. PMID:27302173

  11. Bacterial Outer Membrane Vesicles Induce Plant Immune Responses.

    PubMed

    Bahar, Ofir; Mordukhovich, Gideon; Luu, Dee Dee; Schwessinger, Benjamin; Daudi, Arsalan; Jehle, Anna Kristina; Felix, Georg; Ronald, Pamela C

    2016-05-01

    Gram-negative bacteria continuously pinch off portions of their outer membrane, releasing membrane vesicles. These outer membrane vesicles (OMVs) are involved in multiple processes including cell-to-cell communication, biofilm formation, stress tolerance, horizontal gene transfer, and virulence. OMVs are also known modulators of the mammalian immune response. Despite the well-documented role of OMVs in mammalian-bacterial communication, their interaction with plants is not well studied. To examine whether OMVs of plant pathogens modulate the plant immune response, we purified OMVs from four different plant pathogens and used them to treat Arabidopsis thaliana. OMVs rapidly induced a reactive oxygen species burst, medium alkalinization, and defense gene expression in A. thaliana leaf discs, cell cultures, and seedlings, respectively. Western blot analysis revealed that EF-Tu is present in OMVs and that it serves as an elicitor of the plant immune response in this form. Our results further show that the immune coreceptors BAK1 and SOBIR1 mediate OMV perception and response. Taken together, our results demonstrate that plants can detect and respond to OMV-associated molecules by activation of their immune system, revealing a new facet of plant-bacterial interactions. PMID:26926999

  12. Flagella-induced immunity against experimental cholera in adult rabbits.

    PubMed Central

    Yancey, R J; Willis, D L; Berry, L J

    1979-01-01

    The adult rabbit ligated ileal loop model was used to evaluate the prophylactic potential of a crude flagellar (CF) vaccine produced from the classical. Inaba strain CA401. A greater than 1,000-fold increase in the challenge inoculum was required to induce an intestinal fluid response in actively immunized adult rabbits equivalent to that produced in unimmunized animals. Similar protection was afforded against challenge with classical and El Tor biotypes of both Inaba and Ogawa serotypes. Highly virulent 35S-labeled vibrios were inhibited in their ability to associated with the intestinal mucosa of CF-immunized rabbits. The protection conferred by CF immunization was found to be superior to that of a commercial bivalent vaccine and also to that of glutaraldehyde-treated cholera toxoid. The critical immunogenic component of CF appears to be a flagella-derived protein. The immunogenicity of CF was destroyed by heat treatment, and absorption of CF-immune serum with aflagellated mutant vibrios did not diminish its ability to confer a high level of passive protection. The intestinal protection of CF-immunized rabbits was completely reversed by the introduction of both goat anti-rabbit immunoglobulins A and G, but by neither alone. PMID:478635

  13. Is immunity a mechanism contributing to statin-induced diabetes?

    PubMed Central

    Henriksbo, Brandyn D; Schertzer, Jonathan D

    2015-01-01

    Statins lower cholesterol and are commonly prescribed for prevention and treatment of cardiovascular disease risk. Statins have pleotropic actions beyond cholesterol lowering, including decreased protein prenylation, which can alter immune function. The general anti-inflammatory effect of statins may be a key pleiotropic effect that improves cardiovascular disease risk. However, a series of findings have shown that statins increase the pro-inflammatory cytokine, IL-1β, via decreased protein prenylation in immune cells. IL-1β can be regulated by the NLRP3 inflammasome containing caspase-1. Statins have been associated with an increased risk of new onset diabetes. Inflammation can promote ineffective insulin action (insulin resistance), which often precedes diabetes. This review highlights the links between statins, insulin resistance and immunity via the NLRP3 inflammasome. We propose that statin-induced changes in immunity should be investigated as a mechanism underlying increased risk of diabetes. It is possible that statin-related insulin resistance occurs through a separate pathway from various mechanisms that confer cardiovascular benefits. Therefore, understanding the potential mechanisms that segregate statin-induced cardiovascular effects from those that cause dysglycemia may lead to improvements in this drugs class. PMID:26451278

  14. Salmonella enterica induces and subverts the plant immune system

    PubMed Central

    García, Ana V.; Hirt, Heribert

    2014-01-01

    Infections with Salmonella enterica belong to the most prominent causes of food poisoning and infected fruits and vegetables represent important vectors for salmonellosis. Although it was shown that plants raise defense responses against Salmonella, these bacteria persist and proliferate in various plant tissues. Recent reports shed light into the molecular interaction between plants and Salmonella, highlighting the defense pathways induced and the means used by the bacteria to escape the plant immune system and accomplish colonization. It was recently shown that plants detect Salmonella pathogen-associated molecular patterns (PAMPs), such as the flagellin peptide flg22, and activate hallmarks of the defense program known as PAMP-triggered immunity (PTI). Interestingly, certain Salmonella strains carry mutations in the flg22 domain triggering PTI, suggesting that a strategy of Salmonella is to escape plant detection by mutating PAMP motifs. Another strategy may rely on the type III secretion system (T3SS) as T3SS mutants were found to induce stronger plant defense responses than wild type bacteria. Although Salmonella effector delivery into plant cells has not been shown, expression of Salmonella effectors in plant tissues shows that these bacteria also possess powerful means to manipulate the plant immune system. Altogether, these data suggest that Salmonella triggers PTI in plants and evolved strategies to avoid or subvert plant immunity. PMID:24772109

  15. Selective and potent Akt inhibition triggers anti-myeloma activities and enhances fatal endoplasmic reticulum stress induced by proteasome inhibition

    PubMed Central

    Mimura, Naoya; Hideshima, Teru; Shimomura, Toshiyasu; Suzuki, Rikio; Ohguchi, Hiroto; Rizq, Ola; Kikuchi, Shohei; Yoshida, Yasuhiro; Cottini, Francesca; Jakubikova, Jana; Cirstea, Diana; Gorgun, Gullu; Minami, Jiro; Tai, Yu-Tzu; Richardson, Paul G.; Utsugi, Teruhiro; Iwama, Atsushi; Anderson, Kenneth C.

    2014-01-01

    The PI3K/Akt pathway plays a crucial role in the pathogenesis of multiple myeloma (MM) in the bone marrow (BM) milieu. However, efficacy of selective and potent Akt inhibition has not yet been fully elucidated. In this study, we therefore examined the biologic impact of selective and potent Akt inhibition by a novel allosteric inhibitor TAS-117. TAS-117 induced significant growth inhibition, associated with downregulation of phosphorylated Akt (p-Akt), selectively in MM cell lines with high baseline p-Akt. Cytotoxicity of TAS-117 was also observed in patients MM cells, but not in normal peripheral blood mononuclear cells. Importantly, TAS-117 induced significant cytotoxicity in MM cells even in the presence of BM stromal cells, associated with inhibition of IL-6 secretion. Oral administration of TAS-117 significantly inhibited human MM cell growth in murine xenograft models. TAS-117 triggered apoptosis and autophagy, as well as induction of endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress response with minimal expression of CHOP, a fatal ER-stress marker. Importantly, TAS-117 enhanced bortezomib-induced cytotoxicity, associated with increased CHOP and PARP cleavage and blockade of bortezomib-induced p-Akt, suggesting that TAS-117 augments bortezomib-induced ER stress and apoptotic signaling. Carfilzomib-induced cytotoxicity was similarly enhanced by TAS-117. Importantly, TAS-117 enhanced bortezomib-induced cytotoxicity in vivo, associated with prolonged host survival. Our results show that selective and potent Akt inhibition by TAS-117 triggers anti-MM activities in vitro and in vivo, as well as enhances cytotoxicity of proteasome inhibition, providing the preclinical framework for clinical evaluation of selective Akt inhibitors, alone and in combination with proteasome inhibitors in MM. PMID:24934808

  16. Selective and potent Akt inhibition triggers anti-myeloma activities and enhances fatal endoplasmic reticulum stress induced by proteasome inhibition.

    PubMed

    Mimura, Naoya; Hideshima, Teru; Shimomura, Toshiyasu; Suzuki, Rikio; Ohguchi, Hiroto; Rizq, Ola; Kikuchi, Shohei; Yoshida, Yasuhiro; Cottini, Francesca; Jakubikova, Jana; Cirstea, Diana; Gorgun, Gullu; Minami, Jiro; Tai, Yu-Tzu; Richardson, Paul G; Utsugi, Teruhiro; Iwama, Atsushi; Anderson, Kenneth C

    2014-08-15

    The PI3K/Akt pathway plays a crucial role in the pathogenesis of multiple myeloma (MM) in the bone marrow (BM) milieu. However, efficacy of selective and potent Akt inhibition has not yet been fully elucidated. In this study, we, therefore, examined the biologic impact of selective and potent Akt inhibition by a novel allosteric inhibitor TAS-117. TAS-117 induced significant growth inhibition, associated with downregulation of phosphorylated Akt (p-Akt), selectively in MM cell lines with high baseline p-Akt. Cytotoxicity of TAS-117 was also observed in patient MM cells, but not in normal peripheral blood mononuclear cells. Importantly, TAS-117 induced significant cytotoxicity in MM cells even in the presence of BM stromal cells, associated with inhibition of IL6 secretion. Oral administration of TAS-117 significantly inhibited human MM cell growth in murine xenograft models. TAS-117 triggered apoptosis and autophagy, as well as induction of endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress response with minimal expression of C/EBP homologous protein (CHOP), a fatal ER stress marker. Importantly, TAS-117 enhanced bortezomib-induced cytotoxicity, associated with increased CHOP and PARP cleavage and blockade of bortezomib-induced p-Akt, suggesting that TAS-117 augments bortezomib-induced ER stress and apoptotic signaling. Carfilzomib-induced cytotoxicity was similarly enhanced by TAS-117. Importantly, TAS-117 enhanced bortezomib-induced cytotoxicity in vivo, associated with prolonged host survival. Our results show that selective and potent Akt inhibition by TAS-117 triggers anti-MM activities in vitro and in vivo, as well as enhances cytotoxicity of proteasome inhibition, providing the preclinical framework for clinical evaluation of selective Akt inhibitors, alone and in combination with proteasome inhibitors in MM. PMID:24934808

  17. Requirements for innate immune pathways in environmentally induced autoimmunity.

    PubMed

    Pollard, Kenneth Michael; Kono, Dwight H

    2013-01-01

    There is substantial evidence that environmental triggers in combination with genetic and stochastic factors play an important role in spontaneous autoimmune disease. Although the specific environmental agents and how they promote autoimmunity remain largely unknown, in part because of diverse etiologies, environmentally induced autoimmune models can provide insights into potential mechanisms. Studies of idiopathic and environmentally induced systemic autoimmunity show that they are mediated by common adaptive immune response genes. By contrast, although the innate immune system is indispensable for autoimmunity, there are clear differences in the molecular and cellular innate components that mediate specific systemic autoimmune diseases, suggesting distinct autoimmune-promoting pathways. Some of these differences may be related to the bifurcation of toll-like receptor signaling that distinguishes interferon regulatory factor 7-mediated type I interferon production from nuclear factor-κB-driven proinflammatory cytokine expression. Accordingly, idiopathic and pristane-induced systemic autoimmunity require both type I interferon and proinflammatory cytokines whereas the less aggressive mercury-induced autoimmunity, although dependent on nucleic acid-binding toll-like receptors, does not require type I interferon but needs proinflammatory cytokines. Scavenger receptors and the inflammasome may contribute to silica-induced autoimmunity. Greater understanding of the innate mechanisms responsible for idiopathic and environmentally induced autoimmunity should yield new information into the processes that instigate and drive systemic autoimmunity. PMID:23557436

  18. Antitumor immunity induced by hybrid murine tumor cells: requirements for optimal immunization

    SciTech Connect

    McCune, C.S.; O'Donnell, R.W.; Horan, P.K.; Budd, H.S.; Spennacchio, J.L.; Chuang, C.; Henshaw, E.C.

    1982-09-01

    Hybrid tumor cells have been evaluated for their ability to induce specific antitumor immunity in inbred female C3H/He mice challenged with the syngeneic BA tumor. Hybrid cells were produced by fusion of BA cells with a BALB/c renal adenocarcinoma, which is hypoxanthine phosphoribosyl transferase-deficient and grows well in culture. Corynebacterium parvum was evaluated as an adjuvant for BA and hybrid cells. The BA tumor was shown to be poorly immunogenic, and four weekly injections of BA cells alone or C. parvum alone did not confer significant immunity. When BA cells and C. parvum were mixed, survival time was prolonged and most mice remained tumor-free. Hybrid cell lines derived from the BA tumor were produced in culture in unlimited quantities and were successfully used as immunogens. The addition of C. parvum to hybrids gave a significant incremental increase in survival when compared to the survival resulting from immunization by hybrids without adjuvant. When hybrids without adjuvant were used, several weekly injections were required for effective immunization. Irradiated and unirradiated hybrids were compared, and it was found that irradiation did not diminish hybrid immunogenicity. The potential problems and advantages of this concept of therapy are discussed.

  19. Radiation exposure induces inflammasome pathway activation in immune cells.

    PubMed

    Stoecklein, Veit M; Osuka, Akinori; Ishikawa, Shizu; Lederer, Madeline R; Wanke-Jellinek, Lorenz; Lederer, James A

    2015-02-01

    Radiation exposure induces cell and tissue damage, causing local and systemic inflammatory responses. Because the inflammasome pathway is triggered by cell death and danger-associated molecular patterns, we hypothesized that the inflammasome may signal acute and chronic immune responses to radiation. Using a mouse radiation model, we show that radiation induces a dose-dependent increase in inflammasome activation in macrophages, dendritic cells, NK cells, T cells, and B cells as judged by cleaved caspase-1 detection in cells. Time course analysis showed the appearance of cleaved caspase-1 in cells by day 1 and sustained expression until day 7 after radiation. Also, cells showing inflammasome activation coexpressed the cell surface apoptosis marker annexin V. The role of caspase-1 as a trigger for hematopoietic cell losses after radiation was studied in caspase-1(-/-) mice. We found less radiation-induced cell apoptosis and immune cell loss in caspase-1(-/-) mice than in control mice. Next, we tested whether uric acid might mediate inflammasome activation in cells by treating mice with allopurinol and discovered that allopurinol treatment completely blocked caspase-1 activation in cells. Finally, we demonstrate that radiation-induced caspase-1 activation occurs by a Nod-like receptor family protein 3-independent mechanism because radiation-exposed Nlrp3(-/-) mice showed caspase-1 activation profiles that were indistinguishable from those of wild-type mice. In summary, our data demonstrate that inflammasome activation occurs in many immune cell types following radiation exposure and that allopurinol prevented radiation-induced inflammasome activation. These results suggest that targeting the inflammasome may help control radiation-induced inflammation. PMID:25539818

  20. A Bacterial Flagellin, Vibrio vulnificus FlaB, Has a Strong Mucosal Adjuvant Activity To Induce Protective Immunity

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Shee Eun; Kim, Soo Young; Jeong, Byung Chul; Kim, Young Ran; Bae, Soo Jang; Ahn, Ouk Seon; Lee, Je-Jung; Song, Ho-Chun; Kim, Jung Mogg; Choy, Hyon E.; Chung, Sun Sik; Kweon, Mi-Na; Rhee, Joon Haeng

    2006-01-01

    Flagellin, the structural component of flagellar filament in various locomotive bacteria, is the ligand for Toll-like receptor 5 (TLR5) of host cells. TLR stimulation by various pathogen-associated molecular patterns leads to activation of innate and subsequent adaptive immune responses. Therefore, TLR ligands are considered attractive adjuvant candidates in vaccine development. In this study, we show the highly potent mucosal adjuvant activity of a Vibrio vulnificus major flagellin (FlaB). Using an intranasal immunization mouse model, we observed that coadministration of the flagellin with tetanus toxoid (TT) induced significantly enhanced TT-specific immunoglobulin A (IgA) responses in both mucosal and systemic compartments and IgG responses in the systemic compartment. The mice immunized with TT plus FlaB were completely protected from systemic challenge with a 200× minimum lethal dose of tetanus toxin. Radiolabeled FlaB administered into the nasal cavity readily reached the cervical lymph nodes and systemic circulation. FlaB bound directly to human TLR5 expressed on cultured epithelial cells and consequently induced NF-κB and interleukin-8 activation. Intranasally administered FlaB colocalized with CD11c as patches in putative dendritic cells and caused an increase in the number of TLR5-expressing cells in cervical lymph nodes. These results indicate that flagellin would serve as an efficacious mucosal adjuvant inducing protective immune responses through TLR5 activation. PMID:16369026

  1. Isoliquiritigenin is a potent inhibitor of NLRP3 inflammasome activation and diet-induced adipose tissue inflammation.

    PubMed

    Honda, Hiroe; Nagai, Yoshinori; Matsunaga, Takayuki; Okamoto, Naoki; Watanabe, Yasuharu; Tsuneyama, Koichi; Hayashi, Hiroaki; Fujii, Isao; Ikutani, Masashi; Hirai, Yoshikatsu; Muraguchi, Atsushi; Takatsu, Kiyoshi

    2014-12-01

    Inflammasome activation initiates the development of many inflammatory diseases, including obesity and type 2 diabetes. Therefore, agents that target discrete activation steps could represent very important drugs. We reported previously that ILG, a chalcone from Glycyrrhiza uralensis, inhibits LPS-induced NF-κB activation. Here, we show that ILG potently inhibits the activation of NLRP3 inflammasome, and the effect is independent of its inhibitory potency on TLR4. The inhibitory effect of ILG was stronger than that of parthenolide, a known inhibitor of the NLRP3 inflammasome. GL, a triterpenoid from G. uralensis, had similar inhibitory effects on NLRP3 activity, but high concentrations of GL were required. In contrast, activation of the AIM2 inflammasome was inhibited by GL but not by ILG. Moreover, GL inhibited NLRP3- and AIM2-activated ASC oligomerization, whereas ILG inhibited NLRP3-activated ASC oligomerization. Low concentrations of ILG were highly effective in IAPP-induced IL-1β production compared with the sulfonylurea drug glyburide. In vivo analyses revealed that ILG potently attenuated HFD-induced obesity, hypercholesterolemia, and insulin resistance. Furthermore, ILG treatment improved HFD-induced macrovesicular steatosis in the liver. Finally, ILG markedly inhibited diet-induced adipose tissue inflammation and IL-1β and caspase-1 production in white adipose tissue in ex vivo culture. These results suggest that ILG is a potential drug target for treatment of NLRP3 inflammasome-associated inflammatory diseases. PMID:25210146

  2. Dendritic cells transduced with wild-type p53 gene elicit potent anti-tumour immune responses

    PubMed Central

    Ishida, T; Chada, S; Stipanov, M; Nadaf, S; Ciernik, F I; Gabrilovich, D I; Carbone, D P

    1999-01-01

    In this study we have tested the concept of using wild-type p53 gene for immunotherapy of cancer. Dendritic cells (DC) were transduced with a human wild-type p53 containing recombinant adenovirus (Ad-p53). About a half of DC transduced with this virus expressed p53 protein by FACS analysis 48 h after infection. Mice immunized twice with Ad-p53 DC developed substantial cytotoxic T lymphocyte (CTL) responses against tumour cells expressing wild-type and different mutant human and murine p53 genes. Very low CTL responses were observed against target cells infected with control adenovirus (Ad-c). Immunization with Ad-p53 provided complete tumour protection in 85% of mice challenged with tumour cells expressing human mutant p53 and in 72.7% of mice challenged with tumour cells with murine mutant p53. Treatment with Ad-p53-transduced DC significantly slowed the growth of established tumours. Thus, DC transduced with wild-type p53 may be a promising new tool for the immunotherapy of cancer. PMID:10444254

  3. Hepatotoxicants induce cytokine imbalance in response to innate immune system.

    PubMed

    Goto, Shima; Deguchi, Jiro; Nishio, Naoki; Nomura, Naruaki; Funabashi, Hitoshi

    2015-06-01

    In recent years, attention has been paid to innate immune systems as mechanisms to initiate or promote drug-induced liver injury (DILI). Kupffer cells are hepatic resident macrophages and might be involved in the pathogenesis of DILI by release of pro- and anti-inflammatory mediators such as cytokines, chemokines, reactive oxygen species, and/or nitric oxides. The purpose of this study was to investigate alterations in mediator levels induced by hepatotoxic compounds in isolated Kupffer cells and discuss the relation between balance of each cytokine or chemokine and potential of innate immune-mediated DILI. Primary cultured rat Kupffer cells were treated with hepatotoxic (acetaminophen, troglitazone, trovafloxacin) or non-hepatotoxic (pioglitazone, levofloxacin) compounds with or without lipopolysaccharide (LPS). After 24 hr treatment, cell supernatants were collected and various levels of mediators released by Kupffer cells were examined. Although hepatotoxicants had no effect on the LPS-induced tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-α) secretion, they enhanced the release of pro-inflammatory cytokine interleukin-1 beta (IL-1β) and suppressed the anti-inflammatory cytokines interleukin-6 (IL-6) and interleukin-10 (IL-10) induced by LPS. These cytokine shifts were not associated with switching the phenotypes of M1 and M2 macrophages in Kupffer cells. In conclusion, the present study suggested that the levels of some specific cytokines are affected by DILI-related drugs with LPS stimulation, and imbalance between pro- and anti-inflammatory cytokines, induced by the up-regulation of IL-1β and the down-regulation of IL-6 or IL-10, plays a key role in innate immune-mediated DILI. PMID:25972199

  4. Protective immunity spectrum induced by immunization with a vaccine from the TBEV strain Sofjin.

    PubMed

    Chernokhaeva, L L; Rogova, Yu V; Vorovitch, M F; Romanova, L Iu; Kozlovskaya, L I; Maikova, G B; Kholodilov, I S; Karganova, G G

    2016-04-29

    Tick-borne encephalitis (TBE) circulates widely in the territory of Eurasia with up to 10,000 cases registered annually. The TBE virus (TBEV) includes three main subtypes: European, Siberian and Far-Eastern, and two new Asiatic variants, phylogenetically distant from the others. The inactivated antigen of European or Far-Eastern strains is used in commercial TBE vaccines. A set of 14 TBEV strains, isolated in 1937-2008, with different passage histories, representing all subtypes and variants, was used in this work. The chosen set covers almost all the TBE area. Sera of mice, immunized with the TBE vaccine Moscow, prepared from the TBEV strain Sofjin, were studied in a plaque neutralization test against the set of TBEV strains. The vaccine induced antibodies at a protective titer against all TBEV strains and Omsk hemorrhagic fever virus (OHFV) with Е protein amino acid distances of 0.008-0.069, but not against Powassan virus. We showed that after a course of two immunizations, factors such as the period between vaccinations (1-4 weeks), the challenging virus dose (30-1000 LD50) and terms of challenge (1-4 weeks after the last immunization) did not significantly affect the assessment of protective efficacy of the vaccine in vivo. The protective effect of the TBE vaccine Moscow against the set of TBEV strains and the OHFV was demonstrated in in vivo experiments. TBE vaccine Moscow did not protect mice against 10 LD50 of the Powassan virus. We showed that this range of Е protein amino acid distances between the vaccine strain and challenging virus do not have a decisive impact on the TBE vaccine protective effect in vitro and in vivo. Moreover, the TBE vaccine Moscow induces an immune response protective against a wide range of TBEV variants. PMID:27013433

  5. Prostaglandin E2 is a potent regulator of interleukin-12- and interleukin-18-induced natural killer cell interferon-γ synthesis

    PubMed Central

    Walker, William; Rotondo, Dino

    2004-01-01

    Synthesis of interferon (IFN)-γ by natural killer (NK) cells is an important pro-inflammatory event with interleukin (IL)-12 and IL-18 playing major inductive roles. However, other temporal events are likely to regulate such processes and as prostaglandin E2 (PGE2) is ubiquitous during inflammation this study tested the hypothesis that PGE2 was capable of directly modulating cytokine-induced NK cell IFN-γ synthesis in the absence of other immune cells. Using homogenous NK cell lines to establish direct effects, PGE2 (0·1–1 µm) was found to suppress NK cell IFN-γ synthesis and antagonized the potent synergistic IFN-γ-inducing effects of IL-12 and IL-18. The actions of PGE2 were mimicked by synthetic PGE2 analogues including misoprostol and butaprost. The selective EP2 receptor agonist butaprost, but not the EP1/EP3 agonist sulprostone, suppressed IFN-γ synthesis and exclusively competed with PGE2 for receptor binding on NK cells. Further analysis showed that PGE2 did not modulate IL-12 receptor mRNA expression and the effects of PGE2 could be mimicked by the phosphodiesterase inhibitor 3-iosobutyl-1-methylxanthine. The absence of demonstrable receptor modulation coupled with the observed suppression of IFN-γ synthesis by both EP2 receptor-selective agonists and IBMX suggest that PGE2 acts directly on NK cells via EP2 receptors with its downstream effects on cAMP metabolism. This conclusion is further supported by findings that PGE2 and its analogues consistently elevated levels of cAMP in NK cells. The ability of PGE2 to antagonize the potent inductive signal provided by the combination of IL-12 and IL-18 supports the concept that PGE2 may play an important role in limiting innate inflammatory processes in vivo through direct suppression of NK cell IFN-γ synthesis. PMID:15009430

  6. Modulation of Innate Immune Mechanisms to Enhance Leishmania Vaccine-Induced Immunity: Role of Coinhibitory Molecules.

    PubMed

    Gannavaram, Sreenivas; Bhattacharya, Parna; Ismail, Nevien; Kaul, Amit; Singh, Rakesh; Nakhasi, Hira L

    2016-01-01

    No licensed human vaccines are currently available against any parasitic disease including leishmaniasis. Several antileishmanial vaccine formulations have been tested in various animal models, including genetically modified live-attenuated parasite vaccines. Experimental infection studies have shown that Leishmania parasites utilize a broad range of strategies to undermine effector properties of host phagocytic cells, i.e., dendritic cells (DCs) and macrophages (MΦ). Furthermore, Leishmania parasites have evolved strategies to actively inhibit TH1 polarizing functions of DCs and to condition the infected MΦ toward anti-inflammatory/alternative/M2 phenotype. The altered phenotype of phagocytic cells is characterized by decreased production of antimicrobial reactive oxygen, nitrogen molecules, and pro-inflammatory cytokines, such as IFN-γ, IL-12, and TNF-α. These early events limit the activation of TH1-effector cells and set the stage for pathogenesis. Furthermore, this early control of innate immunity by the virulent parasites results in substantial alteration in the adaptive immunity characterized by reduced proliferation of CD4(+) and CD8(+) T cells and TH2-biased immunity that results in production of anti-inflammatory cytokines, such as TGF-β, and IL-10. More recent studies have also documented the induction of coinhibitory ligands, such as CTLA-4, PD-L1, CD200, and Tim-3, that induce exhaustion and/or non-proliferation in antigen-experienced T cells. Most of these studies focus on viral infections in chronic phase, thus limiting the direct application of these results to parasitic infections and much less to parasitic vaccines. However, these studies suggest that vaccine-induced protective immunity can be modulated using strategies that enhance the costimulation that might reduce the threshold necessary for T cell activation and conversely by strategies that reduce or block inhibitory molecules, such as PD-L1 and CD200. In this review, we will focus on

  7. Modulation of Innate Immune Mechanisms to Enhance Leishmania Vaccine-Induced Immunity: Role of Coinhibitory Molecules

    PubMed Central

    Gannavaram, Sreenivas; Bhattacharya, Parna; Ismail, Nevien; Kaul, Amit; Singh, Rakesh; Nakhasi, Hira L.

    2016-01-01

    No licensed human vaccines are currently available against any parasitic disease including leishmaniasis. Several antileishmanial vaccine formulations have been tested in various animal models, including genetically modified live-attenuated parasite vaccines. Experimental infection studies have shown that Leishmania parasites utilize a broad range of strategies to undermine effector properties of host phagocytic cells, i.e., dendritic cells (DCs) and macrophages (MΦ). Furthermore, Leishmania parasites have evolved strategies to actively inhibit TH1 polarizing functions of DCs and to condition the infected MΦ toward anti-inflammatory/alternative/M2 phenotype. The altered phenotype of phagocytic cells is characterized by decreased production of antimicrobial reactive oxygen, nitrogen molecules, and pro-inflammatory cytokines, such as IFN-γ, IL-12, and TNF-α. These early events limit the activation of TH1-effector cells and set the stage for pathogenesis. Furthermore, this early control of innate immunity by the virulent parasites results in substantial alteration in the adaptive immunity characterized by reduced proliferation of CD4+ and CD8+ T cells and TH2-biased immunity that results in production of anti-inflammatory cytokines, such as TGF-β, and IL-10. More recent studies have also documented the induction of coinhibitory ligands, such as CTLA-4, PD-L1, CD200, and Tim-3, that induce exhaustion and/or non-proliferation in antigen-experienced T cells. Most of these studies focus on viral infections in chronic phase, thus limiting the direct application of these results to parasitic infections and much less to parasitic vaccines. However, these studies suggest that vaccine-induced protective immunity can be modulated using strategies that enhance the costimulation that might reduce the threshold necessary for T cell activation and conversely by strategies that reduce or block inhibitory molecules, such as PD-L1 and CD200. In this review, we will focus on the

  8. Heterologous Prime-Boost Oral Immunization with GK-1 Peptide from Taenia crassiceps Cysticerci Induces Protective Immunity▿

    PubMed Central

    Fragoso, Gladis; Esquivel-Guadarrama, Fernando; Santana, M. Angélica; Bobes, Raul J.; Hernández, Beatriz; Cervantes, Jacquelynne; Segura, René; Goldbaum, Fernando A.; Sciutto, Edda; Rosas, Gabriela

    2011-01-01

    Oral immunization is a goal in vaccine development, particularly for pathogens that enter the host through the mucosal system. This study was designed to explore the immunogenic properties of the Taenia crassiceps protective peptide GK-1 administered orally. Mice were orally immunized with the synthetic GK-1 peptide in its linear form with or without the Brucella lumazine synthase (BLS) protein adjuvant or as a chimera recombinantly bound to BLS (BLS-GK-1). Mice were boosted twice with GK-1 only at 15-day intervals. A significant rate of protection of 64.7% was achieved in GK-1-immunized mice, and that rate significantly increased to 91.8 and 96% when mice were primed with GK-1 coadministered with BLS as an adjuvant and BLS as a carrier, respectively. Specific antibodies and T cell activation and proliferation accompanied the protection induced, revealing the potent immunogenicity of GK-1. Through immunohistochemical studies, GK-1 was detected in T and B cell zones of the Peyer's patches (PP) and mesenteric lymph nodes. In the latter, abundant proliferating cells were detected by 5′-bromo-2′-deoxyuridine incorporation. No proliferation was detected in PP. Altogether, these results portray the potent immunogenic properties of GK-1 administered orally and reinforce the usefulness of BLS as an adjuvant and adequate vaccine delivery system for oral vaccines. PMID:21593234

  9. The role of cytokines in immune changes induced by spaceflight

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sonnenfeld, G.; Miller, E. S.

    1993-01-01

    It has become apparent that spaceflight alters many immune responses. Among the regulatory components of the immune response that have been shown to be affected by spaceflight is the cytokine network. Spaceflight, as well as model systems of spaceflight, have been shown to affect the production and action of various cytokines including interferons, interleukins, colony stimulating factors, and tumor necrosis factors. These changes have been shown not to involve a general shutdown of the cytokine network but, rather, to involve selective alterations of specific cytokine functions by spaceflight. The full breadth of changes in cytokines induced by spaceflight, as well as mechanisms, duration, adaptation, reversibility, and significance to resistance to infection and neoplastic diseases, remains to be established.

  10. Immune response to stem cells and strategies to induce tolerance.

    PubMed

    Batten, Puspa; Rosenthal, Nadia A; Yacoub, Magdi H

    2007-08-29

    Although recent progress in cardiovascular tissue engineering has generated great expectations for the exploitation of stem cells to restore cardiac form and function, the prospects of a common mass-produced cell resource for clinically viable engineered tissues and organs remain problematic. The refinement of stem cell culture protocols to increase induction of the cardiomyocyte phenotype and the assembly of transplantable vascularized tissue are areas of intense current research, but the problem of immune rejection of heterologous cell type poses perhaps the most significant hurdle to overcome. This article focuses on the potential advantages and problems encountered with various stem cell sources for reconstruction of the damaged or failing myocardium or heart valves and also discusses the need for integrating advances in developmental and stem cell biology, immunology and tissue engineering to achieve the full potential of cardiac tissue engineering. The ultimate goal is to produce 'off-the-shelf' cells and tissues capable of inducing specific immune tolerance. PMID:17584730

  11. Immunity-Based Evolutionary Interpretation of Diet-Induced Thermogenesis.

    PubMed

    Liao, Wan-Hui; Henneberg, Maciej; Langhans, Wolfgang

    2016-06-14

    Diet-induced thermogenesis (DIT) has often been argued to be a physiological defense against obesity, but no empirical proof of its effectiveness in limiting human body weight gain is available. We here propose an immune explanation of DIT-i.e., that it results from the coevolution of host and gut microbiota (especially Firmicutes) that ferment ingested food and proliferate, causing periodic, vagally mediated increases in thermogenesis aimed at curtailing their expansion. Because of this evolutionary adaptive significance related to the immune system, DIT is not effective as an "adaptation" to maintain a certain body mass. Were DIT an effective adaptation to prevent obesity, the current obesity epidemic might not have occurred. PMID:27304499

  12. Trypanosoma cruzi Adjuvants Potentiate T Cell-Mediated Immunity Induced by a NY-ESO-1 Based Antitumor Vaccine

    PubMed Central

    Junqueira, Caroline; Guerrero, Ana Tereza; Galvão-Filho, Bruno; Andrade, Warrison A.; Salgado, Ana Paula C.; Cunha, Thiago M.; Ropert, Catherine; Campos, Marco Antônio; Penido, Marcus L. O.; Mendonça-Previato, Lúcia; Previato, José Oswaldo; Ritter, Gerd; Cunha, Fernando Q.; Gazzinelli, Ricardo T.

    2012-01-01

    Immunological adjuvants that induce T cell-mediate immunity (TCMI) with the least side effects are needed for the development of human vaccines. Glycoinositolphospholipids (GIPL) and CpGs oligodeoxynucleotides (CpG ODNs) derived from the protozoa parasite Trypanosoma cruzi induce potent pro-inflammatory reaction through activation of Toll-Like Receptor (TLR)4 and TLR9, respectively. Here, using mouse models, we tested the T. cruzi derived TLR agonists as immunological adjuvants in an antitumor vaccine. For comparison, we used well-established TLR agonists, such as the bacterial derived monophosphoryl lipid A (MPL), lipopeptide (Pam3Cys), and CpG ODN. All tested TLR agonists were comparable to induce antibody responses, whereas significant differences were noticed in their ability to elicit CD4+ T and CD8+ T cell responses. In particular, both GIPLs (GTH, and GY) and CpG ODNs (B344, B297 and B128) derived from T. cruzi elicited interferon-gamma (IFN-γ) production by CD4+ T cells. On the other hand, the parasite derived CpG ODNs, but not GIPLs, elicited a potent IFN-γ response by CD8+ T lymphocytes. The side effects were also evaluated by local pain (hypernociception). The intensity of hypernociception induced by vaccination was alleviated by administration of an analgesic drug without affecting protective immunity. Finally, the level of protective immunity against the NY-ESO-1 expressing melanoma was associated with the magnitude of both CD4+ T and CD8+ T cell responses elicited by a specific immunological adjuvant. PMID:22567144

  13. Orchestration of host-pathogen interaction: relevance of iron in generation of potent anti-M. tuberculosis immunity.

    PubMed

    Rai, Ambak K; Sharma, Shivesh; Punj, Vasu

    2014-01-01

    Pathogenesis of tuberculosis is marked with infection of macrophages followed by expansion of M. tuberculosis. Every step of this host-pathogen interaction is determined by the battle between the pathogen and host immune factors. It starts with phagocytosis of bacilli by mononuclear cells including alveolar macrophages and Dendritic Cells (DCs), both of which are Antigen Presenting Cells (APCs). Phagocytosed M. tuberculosis is subject to degradation by various means inside the phagolysosome. This very specific anti-M. tuberculosis mechanism within the phagocytes is well orchestrated. Upon activation, macrophages exhibit elevated levels of various intermediates via the oxidative burst, which effectively kills the pathogen and inhibits its dissemination. Generation of these intermediates and then their neutralization is intricately linked with the balance of divalent and trivalent iron metals in and outside of the cell. This review will bring the insight of host-M. tuberculosis interaction and its effectiveness in containment of the disease. Furthermore, the physiological balance of iron, its pathogen driven perturbance as well as its effect on the disease will also be discussed. PMID:25429656

  14. Diffuse traumatic brain injury induces prolonged immune dysregulation and potentiates hyperalgesia following a peripheral immune challenge

    PubMed Central

    Rowe, Rachel K; Ellis, Gavin I; Harrison, Jordan L; Bachstetter, Adam D; Corder, Gregory F; Van Eldik, Linda J; Taylor, Bradley K; Marti, Francesc

    2016-01-01

    Background Nociceptive and neuropathic pain occurs as part of the disease process after traumatic brain injury (TBI) in humans. Central and peripheral inflammation, a major secondary injury process initiated by the traumatic brain injury event, has been implicated in the potentiation of peripheral nociceptive pain. We hypothesized that the inflammatory response to diffuse traumatic brain injury potentiates persistent pain through prolonged immune dysregulation. Results To test this, adult, male C57BL/6 mice were subjected to midline fluid percussion brain injury or to sham procedure. One cohort of mice was analyzed for inflammation-related cytokine levels in cortical biopsies and serum along an acute time course. In a second cohort, peripheral inflammation was induced seven days after surgery/injury with an intraplantar injection of carrageenan. This was followed by measurement of mechanical hyperalgesia, glial fibrillary acidic protein and Iba1 immunohistochemical analysis of neuroinflammation in the brain, and flow cytometric analysis of T-cell differentiation in mucosal lymph. Traumatic brain injury increased interleukin-6 and chemokine ligand 1 levels in the cortex and serum that peaked within 1–9 h and then resolved. Intraplantar carrageenan produced mechanical hyperalgesia that was potentiated by traumatic brain injury. Further, mucosal T cells from brain-injured mice showed a distinct deficiency in the ability to differentiate into inflammation-suppressing regulatory T cells (Tregs). Conclusions We conclude that traumatic brain injury increased the inflammatory pain associated with cutaneous inflammation by contributing to systemic immune dysregulation. Regulatory T cells are immune suppressors and failure of T cells to differentiate into regulatory T cells leads to unregulated cytokine production which may contribute to the potentiation of peripheral pain through the excitation of peripheral sensory neurons. In addition, regulatory T cells are

  15. Induction of potent local cellular immunity with low dose X4 SHIV{sub SF33A} vaginal exposure

    SciTech Connect

    Tasca, Silvana; Tsai, Lily; Trunova, Nataliya; Gettie, Agegnehu; Saifuddin, Mohammed; Bohm, Rudolf; Chakrabarti, Lisa; Cheng-Mayer, Cecilia

    2007-10-10

    Intravaginal inoculation of rhesus macaques with varying doses of the CXCR4 (X4)-tropic SHIV{sub SF33A} isolate revealed a threshold inoculum for establishment of systemic virus infection and a dose dependency in overall viral burden and CD4+ T cell depletion. While exposure to inoculum size of 1000 or greater 50% tissue infectious dose (TCID{sub 50}) resulted in high viremia and precipitous CD4+ T cell loss, occult infection was observed in seven of eight macaques exposed to 500 TCID{sub 50} of the same virus. The latter was characterized by intermittent detection of low level virus with no evidence of seroconversion or CD4+ T cell decline, but with signs of an ongoing antiviral T cell immune response. Upon vaginal re-challenge with the same limiting dose 11-12 weeks after the first, classic pathogenic X4 SHIV{sub SF33A} infection was established in four of the seven previously exposed seronegative macaques, implying enhanced susceptibility to systemic infection with prior exposure. Pre-existing peripheral SIV gag-specific CD4+ T cells were more readily demonstrable in macaques that became systemically infected following re-exposure than those that were not. In contrast, early presence of circulating polyfunctional cytokine secreting CD8+ T cells or strong virus-specific proliferative responses in draining lymph nodes and in the gut associated lymphoid tissue (GALT) following the first exposure was associated with protection from systemic re-infection. These studies identify the gut and lymphoid tissues proximal to the genital tract as sites of robust CD8 T lymphocyte responses that contribute to containment of virus spread following vaginal transmission.

  16. [Auto-immune hypoglycemic syndrome induced by pyritinol].

    PubMed

    Faguer de Moustier, B; Burgard, M; Boitard, C; Desplanque, N; Fanjoux, J; Tchobroutsky, G

    1988-01-01

    The auto-immune hypoglycemic syndrome is characterized by the association of hypoglycemia (clinical and/or biological) and anti-insulin antibodies in patients who have never received exogenous insulin. Initially this syndrome was most often described in Japanese patients some of whom were treated with drugs containing a sulfydril group. We now recall the case of a female caucasian patient treated with Pyritinol for rhumatoid polyarthritis and who presented severe spontaneous hypoglycemia linked with the presence of anti-insulin antibodies in her serum. The level of her antibodies decreased abruptly on suspension of the drug. The recent and more developed characterization techniques of the different forms of circulating insulin and of their antibodies may help to differenciate an auto-immune hypoglycemia from hypoglycemia due to the secret auto-administration of bovine and porcine insuline, and permit us to suggest that an abnormality in the structure of the molecule of insulin might be a cause of this syndrome. However, the exact mechanism of hypoglycemia linked with the presence of anti-insulin auto-antibodies is not yet clear as is the predisposition of a drug with a sulfydril group to induce such an auto-immune phenomenon. PMID:3066650

  17. Targeted approaches to induce immune tolerance for Pompe disease therapy

    PubMed Central

    Doerfler, Phillip A; Nayak, Sushrusha; Corti, Manuela; Morel, Laurence; Herzog, Roland W; Byrne, Barry J

    2016-01-01

    Enzyme and gene replacement strategies have developed into viable therapeutic approaches for the treatment of Pompe disease (acid α-glucosidase (GAA) deficiency). Unfortunately, the introduction of GAA and viral vectors encoding the enzyme can lead to detrimental immune responses that attenuate treatment benefits and can impact patient safety. Preclinical and clinical experience in addressing humoral responses toward enzyme and gene therapy for Pompe disease have provided greater understanding of the immunological consequences of the provided therapy. B- and T-cell modulation has been shown to be effective in preventing infusion-associated reactions during enzyme replacement therapy in patients and has shown similar success in the context of gene therapy. Additional techniques to induce humoral tolerance for Pompe disease have been the targeted expression or delivery of GAA to discrete cell types or tissues such as the gut-associated lymphoid tissues, red blood cells, hematopoietic stem cells, and the liver. Research into overcoming preexisting immunity through immunomodulation and gene transfer are becoming increasingly important to achieve long-term efficacy. This review highlights the advances in therapies as well as the improved understanding of the molecular mechanisms involved in the humoral immune response with emphasis on methods employed to overcome responses associated with enzyme and gene therapies for Pompe disease. PMID:26858964

  18. Targeted approaches to induce immune tolerance for Pompe disease therapy.

    PubMed

    Doerfler, Phillip A; Nayak, Sushrusha; Corti, Manuela; Morel, Laurence; Herzog, Roland W; Byrne, Barry J

    2016-01-01

    Enzyme and gene replacement strategies have developed into viable therapeutic approaches for the treatment of Pompe disease (acid α-glucosidase (GAA) deficiency). Unfortunately, the introduction of GAA and viral vectors encoding the enzyme can lead to detrimental immune responses that attenuate treatment benefits and can impact patient safety. Preclinical and clinical experience in addressing humoral responses toward enzyme and gene therapy for Pompe disease have provided greater understanding of the immunological consequences of the provided therapy. B- and T-cell modulation has been shown to be effective in preventing infusion-associated reactions during enzyme replacement therapy in patients and has shown similar success in the context of gene therapy. Additional techniques to induce humoral tolerance for Pompe disease have been the targeted expression or delivery of GAA to discrete cell types or tissues such as the gut-associated lymphoid tissues, red blood cells, hematopoietic stem cells, and the liver. Research into overcoming preexisting immunity through immunomodulation and gene transfer are becoming increasingly important to achieve long-term efficacy. This review highlights the advances in therapies as well as the improved understanding of the molecular mechanisms involved in the humoral immune response with emphasis on methods employed to overcome responses associated with enzyme and gene therapies for Pompe disease. PMID:26858964

  19. Candesartan ameliorates impaired fear extinction induced by innate immune activation.

    PubMed

    Quiñones, María M; Maldonado, Lizette; Velazquez, Bethzaly; Porter, James T

    2016-02-01

    Patients with post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) tend to show signs of a relatively increased inflammatory state suggesting that activation of the immune system may contribute to the development of PTSD. In the present study, we tested whether activation of the innate immune system can disrupt acquisition or recall of auditory fear extinction using an animal model of PTSD. Male adolescent rats received auditory fear conditioning in context A. The next day, an intraperitoneal injection of lipopolysaccharide (LPS; 100 μg/kg) prior to auditory fear extinction in context B impaired acquisition and recall of extinction. LPS (100 μg/kg) given after extinction training did not impair extinction recall suggesting that LPS did not affect consolidation of extinction. In contrast to cued fear extinction, contextual fear extinction was not affected by prior injection of LPS (100 μg/kg). Although LPS also reduced locomotion, we could dissociate the effects of LPS on extinction and locomotion by using a lower dose of LPS (50 μg/kg) which impaired locomotion without affecting extinction. In addition, 15 h after an injection of 250 μg/kg LPS in adult rats, extinction learning and recall were impaired without affecting locomotion. A sub-chronic treatment with candesartan, an angiotensin II type 1 receptor blocker, prevented the LPS-induced impairment of extinction in adult rats. Our results demonstrate that activation of the innate immune system can disrupt auditory fear extinction in adolescent and adult animals. These findings also provide direction for clinical studies of novel treatments that modulate the innate immune system for stress-related disorders like PTSD. PMID:26520214

  20. Simvastatin Potently Induces Calcium-dependent Apoptosis of Human Leiomyoma Cells*

    PubMed Central

    Borahay, Mostafa A.; Kilic, Gokhan S.; Yallampalli, Chandrasekha; Snyder, Russell R.; Hankins, Gary D. V.; Al-Hendy, Ayman; Boehning, Darren

    2014-01-01

    Statins are drugs commonly used for the treatment of high plasma cholesterol levels. Beyond these well known lipid-lowering properties, they possess broad-reaching effects in vivo, including antitumor effects. Statins inhibit the growth of multiple tumors. However, the mechanisms remain incompletely understood. Here we show that simvastatin inhibits the proliferation of human leiomyoma cells. This was associated with decreased mitogen-activated protein kinase signaling and multiple changes in cell cycle progression. Simvastatin potently stimulated leiomyoma cell apoptosis in a manner mechanistically dependent upon apoptotic calcium release from voltage-gated calcium channels. Therefore, simvastatin possesses antitumor effects that are dependent upon the apoptotic calcium release machinery. PMID:25359773

  1. Hemocyanins Stimulate Innate Immunity by Inducing Different Temporal Patterns of Proinflammatory Cytokine Expression in Macrophages

    PubMed Central

    Zhong, Ta-Ying; Arancibia, Sergio; Born, Raimundo; Tampe, Ricardo; Villar, Javiera; Del Campo, Miguel; Manubens, Augusto

    2016-01-01

    Hemocyanins induce a potent Th1-dominant immune response with beneficial clinical outcomes when used as a carrier/adjuvant in vaccines and nonspecific immunostimulant in cancer. However, the mechanisms by which hemocyanins trigger innate immune responses, leading to beneficial adaptive immune responses, are unknown. This response is triggered by a proinflammatory signal from various components, of which macrophages are an essential part. To understand how these proteins influence macrophage response, we investigated the effects of mollusks hemocyanins with varying structural and immunological properties, including hemocyanins from Concholepas concholepas, Fissurella latimarginata, and Megathura crenulata (keyhole limpet hemocyanin), on cultures of peritoneal macrophages. Hemocyanins were phagocytosed and slowly processed. Analysis of this process showed differential gene expression along with protein levels of proinflammatory markers, including IL-1β, IL-6, IL-12p40, and TNF-α. An extended expression analysis of 84 cytokines during a 24-h period showed a robust proinflammatory response for F. latimarginata hemocyanin in comparison with keyhole limpet hemocyanin and C. concholepas hemocyanin, which was characterized by an increase in the transcript levels of M1 cytokines involved in leukocyte recruitment. These cytokine genes included chemokines (Cxcl1, Cxcl3, Cxcl5, Ccl2, and Ccl3), ILs (Il1b and Ifng), growth factors (Csf2 and Csf3), and TNF family members (Cd40lg). The protein levels of certain cytokines were increased. However, every hemocyanin maintains downregulated key M2 cytokine genes, including Il4 and Il5. Collectively, our data demonstrate that hemocyanins are able to trigger the release of proinflammatory factors with different patterns of cytokine expression, suggesting differential signaling pathways and transcriptional network mechanisms that lead to the activation of M1-polarized macrophages. PMID:27183578

  2. Hemocyanins Stimulate Innate Immunity by Inducing Different Temporal Patterns of Proinflammatory Cytokine Expression in Macrophages.

    PubMed

    Zhong, Ta-Ying; Arancibia, Sergio; Born, Raimundo; Tampe, Ricardo; Villar, Javiera; Del Campo, Miguel; Manubens, Augusto; Becker, María Inés

    2016-06-01

    Hemocyanins induce a potent Th1-dominant immune response with beneficial clinical outcomes when used as a carrier/adjuvant in vaccines and nonspecific immunostimulant in cancer. However, the mechanisms by which hemocyanins trigger innate immune responses, leading to beneficial adaptive immune responses, are unknown. This response is triggered by a proinflammatory signal from various components, of which macrophages are an essential part. To understand how these proteins influence macrophage response, we investigated the effects of mollusks hemocyanins with varying structural and immunological properties, including hemocyanins from Concholepas concholepas, Fissurella latimarginata, and Megathura crenulata (keyhole limpet hemocyanin), on cultures of peritoneal macrophages. Hemocyanins were phagocytosed and slowly processed. Analysis of this process showed differential gene expression along with protein levels of proinflammatory markers, including IL-1β, IL-6, IL-12p40, and TNF-α. An extended expression analysis of 84 cytokines during a 24-h period showed a robust proinflammatory response for F. latimarginata hemocyanin in comparison with keyhole limpet hemocyanin and C. concholepas hemocyanin, which was characterized by an increase in the transcript levels of M1 cytokines involved in leukocyte recruitment. These cytokine genes included chemokines (Cxcl1, Cxcl3, Cxcl5, Ccl2, and Ccl3), ILs (Il1b and Ifng), growth factors (Csf2 and Csf3), and TNF family members (Cd40lg). The protein levels of certain cytokines were increased. However, every hemocyanin maintains downregulated key M2 cytokine genes, including Il4 and Il5 Collectively, our data demonstrate that hemocyanins are able to trigger the release of proinflammatory factors with different patterns of cytokine expression, suggesting differential signaling pathways and transcriptional network mechanisms that lead to the activation of M1-polarized macrophages. PMID:27183578

  3. Potent and Broadly Reactive HIV-2 Neutralizing Antibodies Elicited by a Vaccinia Virus Vector Prime-C2V3C3 Polypeptide Boost Immunization Strategy▿ †

    PubMed Central

    Marcelino, José Maria; Borrego, Pedro; Rocha, Cheila; Barroso, Helena; Quintas, Alexandre; Novo, Carlos; Taveira, Nuno

    2010-01-01

    Human immunodeficiency virus type 2 (HIV-2) infection affects about 1 to 2 million individuals, the majority living in West Africa, Europe, and India. As for HIV-1, new strategies for the prevention of HIV-2 infection are needed. Our aim was to produce new vaccine immunogens that elicit the production of broadly reactive HIV-2 neutralizing antibodies (NAbs). Native and truncated envelope proteins from the reference HIV-2ALI isolate were expressed in vaccinia virus or in bacteria. This source isolate was used due to its unique phenotype combining CD4 independence and CCR5 usage. NAbs were not elicited in BALB/c mice by single immunization with a truncated and fully glycosylated envelope gp125 (gp125t) or a recombinant polypeptide comprising the C2, V3, and C3 envelope regions (rpC2-C3). A strong and broad NAb response was, however, elicited in mice primed with gp125t expressed in vaccinia virus and boosted with rpC2-C3. Serum from these animals potently neutralized (median 50% neutralizing titer, 3,200) six of six highly divergent primary HIV-2 isolates. Coreceptor usage and the V3 sequence of NAb-sensitive isolates were similar to that of the vaccinating immunogen (HIV-2ALI). In contrast, NAbs were not reactive on three X4 isolates that displayed major changes in V3 loop sequence and structure. Collectively, our findings demonstrate that broadly reactive HIV-2 NAbs can be elicited by using a vaccinia virus vector-prime/rpC2-C3-boost immunization strategy and suggest a potential relationship between escape to neutralization and cell tropism. PMID:20844029

  4. Potent and broadly reactive HIV-2 neutralizing antibodies elicited by a vaccinia virus vector prime-C2V3C3 polypeptide boost immunization strategy.

    PubMed

    Marcelino, José Maria; Borrego, Pedro; Rocha, Cheila; Barroso, Helena; Quintas, Alexandre; Novo, Carlos; Taveira, Nuno

    2010-12-01

    Human immunodeficiency virus type 2 (HIV-2) infection affects about 1 to 2 million individuals, the majority living in West Africa, Europe, and India. As for HIV-1, new strategies for the prevention of HIV-2 infection are needed. Our aim was to produce new vaccine immunogens that elicit the production of broadly reactive HIV-2 neutralizing antibodies (NAbs). Native and truncated envelope proteins from the reference HIV-2ALI isolate were expressed in vaccinia virus or in bacteria. This source isolate was used due to its unique phenotype combining CD4 independence and CCR5 usage. NAbs were not elicited in BALB/c mice by single immunization with a truncated and fully glycosylated envelope gp125 (gp125t) or a recombinant polypeptide comprising the C2, V3, and C3 envelope regions (rpC2-C3). A strong and broad NAb response was, however, elicited in mice primed with gp125t expressed in vaccinia virus and boosted with rpC2-C3. Serum from these animals potently neutralized (median 50% neutralizing titer, 3,200) six of six highly divergent primary HIV-2 isolates. Coreceptor usage and the V3 sequence of NAb-sensitive isolates were similar to that of the vaccinating immunogen (HIV-2ALI). In contrast, NAbs were not reactive on three X4 isolates that displayed major changes in V3 loop sequence and structure. Collectively, our findings demonstrate that broadly reactive HIV-2 NAbs can be elicited by using a vaccinia virus vector-prime/rpC2-C3-boost immunization strategy and suggest a potential relationship between escape to neutralization and cell tropism. PMID:20844029

  5. DS-03SONIC HEDGEHOG ANTAGONISTS POTENTLY INDUCE APOPTOSIS IN THE CEREBELLAR EXTERNAL GRANULE LAYER: IMPLICATIONS FOR MEDULLOBLASTOMA TREATMENT

    PubMed Central

    Noguchi, Kevin; Cabrera, Omar; Swiney, Brant; Smith, Julie; Farber, Nuri

    2014-01-01

    There is a great interest in Hedgehog signaling both for its role in cerebellar development and medulloblastoma (MB) treatment. The cerebellum maintains its own proliferative layer called the external granule layer (EGL) that produces over 90% of its neurons. During development, the established dogma views Hedgehog signaling as a robust mitogenic stimulator of EGL proliferation. However, in other regions of the body, Hedgehog stimulation acts as a survival signal by potently inducing NPC apoptosis when signaling is lost. In this manner, the sonic hedgehog ligand's concentration gradient determines NPC survival or death thereby morphologically sculpting the developing nervous system. Therefore, we tested whether Hedgehog signaling also acts as a survival signal in the EGL by administering several Hedgehog antagonists (vismodegib, cyclopamine, and jervine). Remarkably, we found all Hedgehog antagonists (HAs) potently induced EGL apoptosis within a few hours of administration. This suggests a large portion of the HAs' anti-proliferative effects are due to the apoptotic loss of a large number of EGL NPCs. This research may also have important implications for MB formation and treatment. There is convincing evidence that EGL neural progenitor cells (NPCs) can be the tumor initiating cells for MBs (the most common malignant brain tumor in children). Therefore, we examined if HAs can also produce apoptosis in Patched mice which exhibit constitutive Hedgehog stimulation and are prone to MB formation. We found HA administration also potently increased apoptosis in both EGL NPCs and preneoplasms. This may have important implications for the treatment of MBs with HAs. For example, apoptosis involves signaling mechanisms distinct from proliferation that may need to be disabled for malignant transformation. In addition, the requirement for Hedgehog signaling may prevent metastasis by killing tumor cells as they spread to regions where such signaling is absent.

  6. Immunological aspects of the immune response induced by mosquito allergens.

    PubMed

    Cantillo, José Fernando; Fernández-Caldas, Enrique; Puerta, Leonardo

    2014-01-01

    Allergies caused by mosquito bites may produce local or systemic reactions. The inhalation of mosquito allergens may also cause asthma and/or allergic rhinoconjunctivitis in sensitized individuals. The mechanisms implicated in the development of these immune responses involve IgE antibodies, different subtypes of IgG and proinflammatory cytokines as well as basophils, eosinophils and mast cells. Several allergenic components have been identified in the saliva and bodies of mosquitoes and some of these are present in different mosquito species. The most common species implicated in allergic reactions belong to the genera Aedes, Culex and Anopheles. Several Aedes aegypti allergens have been cloned and sequenced. The recombinant molecules show IgE reactivity similar to that of the native allergens, making them good candidates for the diagnosis of mosquito allergies. Allergen-specific immunotherapy with mosquito extracts induces a protective response characterized by a decreased production of IgE antibodies, increased IgG levels, a reduction in the severity of cutaneous and respiratory symptoms and the need for medication. The aims of this review are to summarize the progress made in the characterization of mosquito allergens and discuss the types of immune responses induced by mosquito bites and the inhalation of mosquito allergens in atopic individuals. PMID:25661054

  7. Role of Baicalin in Anti-Influenza Virus A as a Potent Inducer of IFN-Gamma

    PubMed Central

    Chu, Ming; Xu, Lan; Zhang, Ming-bo; Chu, Zheng-yun; Wang, Yue-dan

    2015-01-01

    Baicalin (BA) is a flavonoid compound purified from Scutellaria baicalensis Georgi and has been shown to possess a potent inhibitory activity against viruses. However, the role of BA in anti-influenza virus has not been extensively studied, and the immunological mechanism of BA in antiviral activity remains unknown. Here, we observed that BA could protect mice from infection by influenza virus A/PR/8/34 (H1N1), associated with increasing IFN-γ production, but presented no effects in IFN-γ or IFN-γ receptor deficient mice. Further study indicated that BA could inhibit A/PR/8/34 replication through IFN-γ in human PBMC. Moreover, BA can directly induce IFN-γ production in human CD4+ and CD8+ T cells and NK cells, and activate JAK/STAT-1 signaling pathway. Collectively, BA exhibited anti-influenza virus A (H1N1) activity in vitro and in vivo as a potent inducer of IFN-γ in major IFN-γ producing cells. PMID:26783516

  8. Punica granatum (pomegranate) flower extract possesses potent antioxidant activity and abrogates Fe-NTA induced hepatotoxicity in mice.

    PubMed

    Kaur, Gurpreet; Jabbar, Zoobi; Athar, Mohammad; Alam, M Sarwar

    2006-07-01

    Most pomegranate (Punica granatum Linn., Punicaceae) fruit parts are known to possess enormous antioxidant activity. The present study evaluated antioxidant and hepatoprotective activity of pomegranate flowers. Alcoholic (ethanolic) extract of flowers was prepared and used in the present study. The extract was found to contain a large amount of polyphenols and exhibit enormous reducing ability, both indicative of potent antioxidant ability. The extract showed 81.6% antioxidant activity in DPPH model system. The ability of extract to scavenge reactive oxygen species (ROS) and reactive nitrogen species (RNS) was tested and it was found to significantly scavenge superoxide (O(2)(.-)) (by up to 53.3%), hydrogen peroxide (H(2)O(2)) (by up to 30%), hydroxyl radicals (()OH) (by up to 37%) and nitric oxide (NO) (by up to 74.5%). The extract also inhibited (.)OH induced oxidation of lipids and proteins in vitro. These results indicated pomegranate flower extract to exert a significant antioxidant activity in vitro. The efficacy of extract was tested in vivo and it was found to exhibit a potent protective activity in acute oxidative tissue injury animal model: ferric nitrilotriacetate (Fe-NTA) induced hepatotoxicity in mice. Intraperitoneal administration of 9 mg/kg body wt. Fe-NTA to mice induced oxidative stress and liver injury. Pretreatment with pomegranate flower extract at a dose regimen of 50-150 mg/kg body wt. for a week significantly and dose dependently protected against Fe-NTA induced oxidative stress as well as hepatic injury. The extract afforded up to 60% protection against hepatic lipid peroxidation and preserved glutathione (GSH) levels and activities of antioxidant enzymes viz., catalase (CAT), glutathione peroxidase (GPX) glutathione reductase (GR) and glutathione-S-transferase (GST) by up to 36%, 28.5%, 28.7%, 40.2% and 42.5% respectively. A protection against Fe-NTA induced liver injury was apparent as inhibition in the modulation of liver markers viz

  9. Ring-truncated deguelin derivatives as potent Hypoxia Inducible Factor-1α (HIF-1α) inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Kim, Ho Shin; Hong, Mannkyu; Lee, Su-Chan; Lee, Ho-Young; Suh, Young-Ger; Oh, Dong-Chan; Seo, Ji Hae; Choi, Hoon; Kim, Jun Yong; Kim, Kyu-Won; Kim, Jeong Hun; Kim, Joohwan; Kim, Young-Myeong; Park, So-Jung; Park, Hyun-Ju; Lee, Jeewoo

    2015-11-01

    A series of fluorophenyl and pyridine analogues of 1 and 2 were synthesized as ring-truncated deguelin surrogates and evaluated for their HIF-1α inhibition. Their structure-activity relationship was systematically investigated based on the variation of the linker B-region moiety. Among the inhibitors, compound 25 exhibited potent HIF-1α inhibition in a dose-dependent manner and significant antitumor activity in H1299 with less toxicity than deguelin. It also inhibited in vitro hypoxia-mediated angiogenic processes in HRMECs. The docking study indicates that 25 occupied the C-terminal ATP-binding pocket of HSP90 in a similar mode as 1, which implies that the anticancer and antiangiogenic activities of 25 are derived from HIF-1α destabilization by binding to the C-terminal ATP-binding site of hHSP90. PMID:26457742

  10. G-CSF/anti-G-CSF antibody complexes drive the potent recovery and expansion of CD11b+Gr-1+ myeloid cells without compromising CD8+ T cell immune responses

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Administration of recombinant G-CSF following cytoreductive therapy enhances the recovery of myeloid cells, minimizing the risk of opportunistic infection. Free G-CSF, however, is expensive, exhibits a short half-life, and has poor biological activity in vivo. Methods We evaluated whether the biological activity of G-CSF could be improved by pre-association with anti-G-CSF mAb prior to injection into mice. Results We find that the efficacy of G-CSF therapy can be enhanced more than 100-fold by pre-association of G-CSF with an anti-G-CSF monoclonal antibody (mAb). Compared with G-CSF alone, administration of G-CSF/anti-G-CSF mAb complexes induced the potent expansion of CD11b+Gr-1+ myeloid cells in mice with or without concomitant cytoreductive treatment including radiation or chemotherapy. Despite driving the dramatic expansion of myeloid cells, in vivo antigen-specific CD8+ T cell immune responses were not compromised. Furthermore, injection of G-CSF/anti-G-CSF mAb complexes heightened protective immunity to bacterial infection. As a measure of clinical value, we also found that antibody complexes improved G-CSF biological activity much more significantly than pegylation. Conclusions Our findings provide the first evidence that antibody cytokine complexes can effectively expand myeloid cells, and furthermore, that G-CSF/anti-G-CSF mAb complexes may provide an improved method for the administration of recombinant G-CSF. PMID:24279871

  11. Encorafenib (LGX818), a potent BRAF inhibitor, induces senescence accompanied by autophagy in BRAFV600E melanoma cells.

    PubMed

    Li, Zhen; Jiang, Ke; Zhu, Xiaofang; Lin, Guibin; Song, Fei; Zhao, Yongfu; Piao, Yongjun; Liu, Jiwei; Cheng, Wei; Bi, Xiaolin; Gong, Peng; Song, Zhiqi; Meng, Songshu

    2016-01-28

    Encorafenib (LGX818) is a new-generation BRAF inhibitor that is under evaluation in clinical trials. However, the underlying mechanism remains to be elucidated. Here we show that LGX818 potently decreased ERK phosphorylation and inhibited proliferation in BRAFV600E melanoma cell lines. Moreover, LGX818 downregulated CyclinD1 in a glycogen synthase kinase 3β-independent manner and induced cell cycle arrest in the G1 phase, Surprisingly, LGX818 triggered cellular senescence in BRAFV600E melanoma cells, as evidenced by increased β-galactosidase staining, while no appreciable induction of apoptosis was detected, as determined by Annexin V and propidium iodide staining and immunoblot analysis of caspase-3 processing and poly (ADP-ribose) polymerase cleavage. Increased p27KIP1 expression and retinoblastoma protein activation were detected during LGX818-induced senescence. Additionally, inhibition of dual-specificity tyrosine phosphorylation-regulated kinase 1B by AZ191 reversed LGX818-induced CyclinD1 turnover and senescence. Interestingly, autophagy is triggered through inhibition of the mTOR/70S6K pathway during LGX818-induced senescence. Moreover, autophagy inhibition by pharmacological and genetic regulation attenuates LGX818-induced senescence. Notably, combining LGX818 with autophagy modulators has anti-proliferative effect in LGX818-resistant BRAF mutant melanoma cells. Altogether, we uncovered a mechanism by which LGX818 exerts its anti-tumor activity in BRAFV600E melanoma cells. PMID:26586345

  12. Immunizations

    MedlinePlus

    ... How Can I Help a Friend Who Cuts? Immunizations KidsHealth > For Teens > Immunizations Print A A A ... That Shot? en español Las vacunas Why Are Vaccinations Important? Measles, mumps, and whooping cough may seem ...

  13. Immunization

    MedlinePlus

    ... a lot worse. Some are even life-threatening. Immunization shots, or vaccinations, are essential. They protect against things like measles, ... B, polio, tetanus, diphtheria, and pertussis (whooping cough). Immunizations are important for adults as well as children. ...

  14. Immunization

    MedlinePlus

    ... a lot worse. Some are even life-threatening. Immunization shots, or vaccinations, are essential. They protect against ... B, polio, tetanus, diphtheria, and pertussis (whooping cough). Immunizations are important for adults as well as children. ...

  15. Chronic hepatitis C viral infection subverts vaccine‐induced T‐cell immunity in humans

    PubMed Central

    Kelly, Christabel; Swadling, Leo; Capone, Stefania; Brown, Anthony; Richardson, Rachel; Halliday, John; von Delft, Annette; Oo, Ye; Mutimer, David; Kurioka, Ayako; Hartnell, Felicity; Collier, Jane; Ammendola, Virginia; Sorbo, Mariarosaria Del; Grazioli, Fabiana; Esposito, Maria Luisa; Marco, Stefania Di; Siani, Loredana; Traboni, Cinzia; Hill, Adrian V.S.; Colloca, Stefano; Nicosia, Alfredo; Cortese, Riccardo; Folgori, Antonella; Klenerman, Paul

    2016-01-01

    Adenoviral vectors encoding hepatitis C virus (HCV) nonstructural (NS) proteins induce multispecific, high‐magnitude, durable CD4+ and CD8+ T‐cell responses in healthy volunteers. We assessed the capacity of these vaccines to induce functional HCV‐specific immune responses and determine T‐cell cross‐reactivity to endogenous virus in patients with chronic HCV infection. HCV genotype 1‐infected patients were vaccinated using heterologous adenoviral vectors (ChAd3‐NSmut and Ad6‐NSmut) encoding HCV NS proteins in a dose escalation, prime‐boost regimen, with and without concomitant pegylated interferon‐α/ribavirin therapy. Analysis of immune responses ex vivo used human leukocyte antigen class I pentamers, intracellular cytokine staining, and fine mapping in interferon‐γ enzyme‐linked immunospot assays. Cross‐reactivity of T cells with population and endogenous viral variants was determined following viral sequence analysis. Compared to healthy volunteers, the magnitude of HCV‐specific T‐cell responses following vaccination was markedly reduced. CD8+ HCV‐specific T‐cell responses were detected in 15/24 patients at the highest dose, whereas CD4+ T‐cell responses were rarely detectable. Analysis of the host circulating viral sequence showed that T‐cell responses were rarely elicited when there was sequence homology between vaccine immunogen and endogenous virus. In contrast, T cells were induced in the context of genetic mismatch between vaccine immunogen and endogenous virus; however, these commonly failed to recognize circulating epitope variants and had a distinct partially functional phenotype. Vaccination was well tolerated but had no significant effect on HCV viral load. Conclusion: Vaccination with potent HCV adenoviral vectored vaccines fails to restore T‐cell immunity except where there is genetic mismatch between vaccine immunogen and endogenous virus; this highlights the major challenge of overcoming T‐cell exhaustion

  16. Antitumor immune responses induced by photodynamic immunotherapy in rats

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Wei R.; Robinson, Karen E.; Adams, Robert L.; Singhal, Anil K.; Nordquist, Robert E.

    1998-05-01

    A new laser immunotherapy was used to treat metastatic mammary rat tumors. This new modality consists of three components: a near-infrared diode laser, a photosensitizer, and an immunoadjuvant. The sensitizer-adjuvant solution was injected directly to the tumor, followed by a non-invasive laser application. The new method resulted in total eradication of the treated primary tumors and eradication of untreated metastases at remote sites. Observed was the long-term survival of treated tumor-bearing rats: up to 120 days after tumor inoculation, a 300% increase in survival length compared with untreated control tumor-bearing rats. In addition, the successfully treated rats were refractory to tumor rechallenge with 10 times of the original tumor dose. Fluorescein and peroxidase immunochemical assays were also performed using sera from cured rats as the primary antibody. Strong antibody binding to both live and preserved tumor cells was observed. Western blot analysis, using the cured rat serum as primary antibody also showed distinctive protein binding, suggesting the induction of tumor-specific humoral immune response. These results indicated that an immune response was induced by the treatment of laser, photosensitizer and immunoadjuvant.

  17. Leukemogenesis induced by wild-type and STI571-resistant BCR/ABL is potently suppressed by C/EBPα

    PubMed Central

    Ferrari-Amorotti, Giovanna; Keeshan, Karen; Zattoni, Michela; Guerzoni, Clara; Iotti, Giorgio; Cattelani, Sara; Donato, Nick J.; Calabretta, Bruno

    2006-01-01

    Chronic phase–to–blast crisis transition in chronic myelogenous leukemia (CML) is associated with differentiation arrest and down-regulation of C/EBPα, a transcription factor essential for granulocyte differentiation. Patients with CML in blast crisis (CML-BC) became rapidly resistant to therapy with the breakpoint cluster region–Abelson murine leukemia (BCR/ABL) kinase inhibitor imatinib (STI571) because of mutations in the kinase domain that interfere with drug binding. We show here that the restoration of C/EBPα activity in STI571-sensitive or -resistant 32D-BCR/ABL cells induced granulocyte differentiation, inhibited proliferation in vitro and in mice, and suppressed leukemogenesis. Moreover, activation of C/EBPα eradicated leukemia in 4 of 10 and in 6 of 7 mice injected with STI571-sensitive or -resistant 32D-BCR/ABL cells, respectively. Differentiation induction and proliferation inhibition were required for optimal suppression of leukemogenesis, as indicated by the effects of p42 C/EBPα, which were more potent than those of K298E C/EBPα, a mutant defective in DNA binding and transcription activation that failed to induce granulocyte differentiation. Activation of C/EBPα in blast cells from 4 patients with CML-BC, including one resistant to STI571 and BMS-354825 and carrying the T315I Abl kinase domain mutation, also induced granulocyte differentiation. Thus, these data indicate that C/EBPα has potent antileukemia effects even in cells resistant to ATP-binding competitive tyrosine kinase inhibitors, and they portend the development of anti-leukemia therapies that rely on C/EBPα activation. PMID:16670262

  18. Steric-electronic effects in malarial peptides inducing sterile immunity

    SciTech Connect

    Moreno-Vranich, Armando; Patarroyo, Manuel E.

    2012-07-13

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Is it evident that the residues position are relevant regarding of {phi} angular value. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The geometry considered for detailing the alterations undergone by HABPs. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The inter planar interactions ruled by clashes between the atoms making them up. -- Abstract: Conserved Plasmodium falciparum high activity binding peptides' (HABPs) most relevant proteins involved in malaria parasite invasion are immunologically silent; critical binding residues must therefore be specifically replaced to render them highly immunogenic and protection-inducing. Such changes have a tremendous impact on these peptides' steric-electronic effects, such as modifications to peptide length peptide bonds and electronic orbitals' disposition, to allow a better fit into immune system MHCII molecules and better interaction with the TCR which might account for the final immunological outcome.

  19. Human placenta-derived adherent cells induce tolerogenic immune responses.

    PubMed

    Liu, Wei; Morschauser, Andrew; Zhang, Xin; Lu, Xiaohua; Gleason, Joseph; He, Shuyang; Chen, Hong-Jung; Jankovic, Vladimir; Ye, Qian; Labazzo, Kristen; Herzberg, Uri; Albert, Vivian R; Abbot, Stewart E; Liang, Bitao; Hariri, Robert

    2014-05-01

    Human placenta-derived adherent cells (PDAC cells) are a culture expanded, undifferentiated mesenchymal-like population derived from full-term placental tissue, with immunomodulatory and anti-inflammatory properties. PDA-001 (cenplacel-L), an intravenous formulation of PDAC cells, is in clinical development for the treatment of autoimmune and inflammatory diseases. To elucidate the mechanisms underlying the immunoregulatory properties of PDAC cells, we investigated their effects on immune cell populations, including T cells and dendritic cells (DC) in vitro and in vivo. PDAC cells suppressed T-cell proliferation in an OT-II T-cell adoptive transfer model, reduced the severity of myelin oligodendrocyte glycoprotein peptide-induced experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis and ameliorated inflammation in a delayed type hypersensitivity response model. In vitro, PDAC cells suppressed T-cell proliferation and inhibited Th1 and Th17 differentiation. Analysis of tissues derived from PDAC cell-treated animals revealed diminished CD86 expression on splenic DC, suggesting that they can also modulate DC populations. Furthermore, PDAC cells modulate the differentiation and maturation of mouse bone marrow-derived DC. Similarly, human DC differentiated from CD14(+) monocytes in the presence of PDAC cells acquired a tolerogenic phenotype. These tolerogenic DC failed to induce allogeneic T-cell proliferation and differentiation toward Th1, but skewed T-cell differentiation toward Th2. Inhibition of cyclo-oxygenase-2 activity resulted in a significant, but not complete, abrogation of PDAC cells' effects on DC phenotype and function, implying a role for prostaglandin E2 in PDAC-mediated immunomodulation. This study identifies modulation of DC differentiation toward immune tolerance as a key mechanism underlying the immunomodulatory activities of PDAC cells. PMID:25505962

  20. Polar Lipids of Burkholderia pseudomallei Induce Different Host Immune Responses

    PubMed Central

    Gonzalez-Juarrero, Mercedes; Mima, Naoko; Trunck, Lily A.; Schweizer, Herbert P.; Bowen, Richard A.; Dascher, Kyle; Mwangi, Waithaka; Eckstein, Torsten M.

    2013-01-01

    Melioidosis is a disease in tropical and subtropical regions of the world that is caused by Burkholderia pseudomallei. In endemic regions the disease occurs primarily in humans and goats. In the present study, we used the goat as a model to dissect the polar lipids of B. pseudomallei to identify lipid molecules that could be used for adjuvants/vaccines or as diagnostic tools. We showed that the lipidome of B. pseudomallei and its fractions contain several polar lipids with the capacity to elicit different immune responses in goats, namely rhamnolipids and ornithine lipids which induced IFN-γ, whereas phospholipids and an undefined polar lipid induced strong IL-10 secretion in CD4+ T cells. Autologous T cells co-cultured with caprine dendritic cells (cDCs) and polar lipids of B. pseudomallei proliferated and up-regulated the expression of CD25 (IL-2 receptor) molecules. Furthermore, we demonstrated that polar lipids were able to up-regulate CD1w2 antigen expression in cDCs derived from peripheral blood monocytes. Interestingly, the same polar lipids had only little effect on the expression of MHC class II DR antigens in the same caprine dendritic cells. Finally, antibody blocking of the CD1w2 molecules on cDCs resulted in decreased expression for IFN-γ by CD4+ T cells. Altogether, these results showed that polar lipids of B. pseudomallei are recognized by the caprine immune system and that their recognition is primarily mediated by the CD1 antigen cluster. PMID:24260378

  1. Therapeutic efficacy of oral immunization with a non-genetically modified Lactococcus lactis-based vaccine CUE-GEM induces local immunity against Helicobacter pylori infection.

    PubMed

    Liu, Wei; Tan, Zhoulin; Xue, Jinfeng; Luo, Wenjin; Song, Hui; Lv, Xiaobo; Zheng, Tianjing; Xi, Tao; Xing, Yingying

    2016-07-01

    The gastric bacterial pathogen Helicobacter pylori persistently colonizes the gastric mucosa of humans and plays a critical role in the development of gastritis, peptic ulceration and gastric adenocarcinoma. Consequently, the eradication of H. pylori might contribute to the prevention of H. pylori-associated gastric diseases. In this study, a multi-epitope vaccine CTB-UE (CUE) was displayed on the surface of non-genetically modified Lactococcus lactis particles (GEM) to enhance immunogenicity. This particulate vaccine CUE-GEM induced serum and mucosal specific antibody responses against native H. pylori urease and provided potent protection to eliminate H. pylori colonization and relieve gastritis in an H. pylori-infected BALB/c mouse model. The immuno-protective mechanisms are highly associated with CD4(+) Th cell-mediated and humoral immunity, especially local immunity. There might be two main aspects of this association. One aspect is related to the suppression of urease activity by promotion of the production of specific mucosal neutralizing antibody. The other aspect is correlated with alleviating gastritis by regulating the gastric pro-inflammatory cytokine profile, especially IFN-γ and IL-17. These results demonstrated that conjugating antigen vaccines with GEM particles could lead to promising oral therapeutic vaccine formulations against H. pylori infection. PMID:26846746

  2. Beta-amyrin from Ardisia elliptica Thunb. is more potent than aspirin in inhibiting collagen-induced platelet aggregation.

    PubMed

    Ching, Jianhong; Chua, Tung-Kian; Chin, Lee-Cheng; Lau, Aik-Jiang; Pang, Yun-Keng; Jaya, Johannes Murti; Tan, Chay-Hoon; Koh, Hwee-Ling

    2010-03-01

    Ardisia elliptica Thunberg (Myrsinaceae) is a medicinal plant traditionally used for alleviating chest pains, treatment of fever, diarrhoea, liver poisoning and parturition complications. The objectives of the study were to investigate the effect of A. elliptica on collagen induced platelet aggregation and to isolate and purify potential antiplatelet components. Fresh A. elliptica leaves were extracted using methanol (70% v/v) by Soxhlet extraction and the extract was analysed for its inhibition of collagen-induced platelet aggregation. Inhibition of platelet aggregation was assessed by incubating the extracts with rabbit blood and collagen in a whole blood aggregometer and measuring the impedance. The leaf extract was found to inhibit platelet aggregation with an IC50 value of 167 microg/ml. Using bioassay guided fractionation, beta-amyrin was isolated and purified. The IC50 value of beta-amyrin was found to be 4.5 microg/ml (10.5 microM) while that of aspirin was found to be 11 microg/ml (62.7 microM), indicating that beta-amyrin was six times as active as aspirin in inhibiting platelet aggregation. This paper is the first report that beta-amyrin isolated from A. elliptica is more potent than aspirin in inhibiting collagen-induced platelet aggregation. In conclusion, A. elliptica leaves were found to inhibit collagen-induced platelet aggregation and one of the bioactive components responsible for the observed effect was determined to be beta-amyrin. PMID:21046981

  3. Vemurafenib potently induces endoplasmic reticulum stress-mediated apoptosis in BRAFV600E melanoma cells

    PubMed Central

    Beck, Daniela; Niessner, Heike; Smalley, Keiran S.M.; Flaherty, Keith; Paraiso, Kim H.T.; Busch, Christian; Sinnberg, Tobias; Vasseur, Sophie; Iovanna, Juan Lucio; Drießen, Stefan; Stork, Björn; Wesselborg, Sebastian; Schaller, Martin; Biedermann, Tilo; Bauer, Jürgen; Lasithiotakis, Konstantinos; Weide, Benjamin; Eberle, Jürgen; Schittek, Birgit; Schadendorf, Dirk; Garbe, Claus; Kulms, Dagmar; Meier, Friedegund

    2013-01-01

    The V600E mutation in the kinase BRAF is frequently detected in melanomas and results in constitutive activation of BRAF, which then promotes cell proliferation by the mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) signaling pathway. Although the BRAFV600E kinase inhibitor vemurafenib has remarkable antitumor activity in patients with BRAFV600E-mutated melanoma, its effects are limited by the onset of drug resistance. We found that exposure of melanoma cell lines with the BRAFV600E mutation to vemurafenib decreased the abundance of anti-apoptotic proteins and induced intrinsic mitochondrial apoptosis. Vemurafenib-treated melanoma cells showed increased cytosolic concentration of calcium, a potential trigger for endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress, which can lead to apoptosis. Consistent with an ER stress-induced response, vemurafenib decreased the abundance of the ER chaperone protein GRP78, increased the abundance of the spliced isoform of the transcription factor X-box protein 1 (XBP1) (which transcriptionally activates genes involved in ER stress responses), increased the phosphorylation of the translation initiation factor eIF2α (which would be expected to inhibit protein synthesis), and induced the expression of ER stress-related genes. Knockdown of the ER stress response protein ATF4 significantly reduced vemurafenib-induced apoptosis. Moreover, the ER stress inducer thapsigargin prevented invasive growth of tumors formed from vemurafenib-sensitive melanoma cells in vivo. In melanoma cells with low sensitivity or resistance to vemurafenib, combination treatment with thapsigargin augmented or induced apoptosis. Thus, thapsigargin or other inducers of ER stress may be useful in combination therapies to overcome vemurafenib resistance. PMID:23362240

  4. Among-lake reciprocal transplants induce convergent expression of immune genes in threespine stickleback.

    PubMed

    Stutz, William E; Schmerer, Matthew; Coates, Jessica L; Bolnick, Daniel I

    2015-09-01

    Geographic variation in parasite communities can drive evolutionary divergence in host immune genes. However, biotic and abiotic environmental variation can also induce plastic differences in immune function among populations. At present, there is little information concerning the relative magnitudes of heritable vs. induced immune divergence in natural populations. We examined immune gene expression profiles of threespine stickleback (Gasterosteus aculeatus) from six lakes on Vancouver Island, British Columbia. Parasite community composition differs between lake types (large or small, containing limnetic- or benthic-like stickleback) and between watersheds. We observed corresponding differences in immune gene expression profiles among wild-caught stickleback, using a set of seven immune genes representing distinct branches of the immune system. To evaluate the role of environmental effects on this differentiation, we experimentally transplanted wild-caught fish into cages in their native lake, or into a nearby foreign lake. Transplanted individuals' immune gene expression converged on patterns typical of their destination lake, deviating from their native expression profile. Transplant individuals' source population had a much smaller effect, suggesting relatively weak genetic underpinning of population differences in immunity, as viewed through gene expression. This strong environmental regulation of immune gene expression provides a counterpoint to the large emerging literature documenting microevolution and genetic diversification of immune function. Our findings illustrate the value of studying immunity in natural environmental settings where the immune system has evolved and actively functions. PMID:26118468

  5. Sodium orthovanadate (vanadate), a potent mitigator of radiation-induced damage to the hematopoietic system in mice

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Bing; Tanaka, Kaoru; Morita, Akinori; Ninomiya, Yasuharu; Maruyama, Kouichi; Fujita, Kazuko; Hosoi, Yoshio; Nenoi, Mitsuru

    2013-01-01

    Previous in vitro and in vivo studies have shown that sodium orthovanadate (vanadate), an inorganic vanadium compound, could effectively suppress radiation-induced p53-mediated apoptosis via both transcription-dependent and transcription-independent pathways. As a potent radiation protector administered at a dose of 20 mg/kg body weight (20 mg/kg) prior to total body irradiation (TBI) by intra-peritoneal (ip) injection, it completely protected mice from hematopoietic syndrome and partially from gastrointestinal syndrome. In the present study, radiation mitigation effects from vanadate were investigated by ip injection of vanadate after TBI in mice. Results showed that a single administration of vanadate at a dose of 20 mg/kg markedly improved the 30-day survival rate and the peripheral blood hemogram, relieved bone marrow aplasia and decreased occurrence of the bone marrow micronucleated erythrocytes in the surviving animals. The dose reduction factor was 1.2 when a single dose of 20 mg/kg was administered 15 min after TBI in mice using the 30-day survival test as the endpoint. Results also showed that either doubling the vanadate dose (40 mg/kg) in a single administration or continuing the vanadate treatment (after a single administration at 20 mg/kg) from the following day at a dose of 5 mg/kg per day for 4 consecutive days further significantly improved the efficacy for rescuing bone marrow failure in the 30-day survival test. Taken together, these findings indicate that vanadate would be a potent mitigator suppressing the acute lethality (hematopoietic syndrome) and minimizing the detrimental effects (anhematopoiesis and delayed genotoxic effects) induced by TBI in mice. PMID:23349341

  6. Prohibitin (PHB) acts as a potent survival factor against ceramide induced apoptosis in rat granulosa cells*

    PubMed Central

    Chowdhury, Indrajit; Branch, Alicia; Olatinwo, Moshood; Thomas, Kelwyn; Matthews, Roland; Thompson, Winston E.

    2011-01-01

    Aim Ceramide is a key factor in inducing germ cell apoptosis by translocating from cumulus cells into the adjacent oocyte and lipid rafts through gap junctions. Therefore studies designed to elucidate the mechanistic pathways in ceramide induced granulosa cell (GC) apoptosis and follicular atresia may potentially lead to the development of novel lipid-based therapeutic strategies that will prevent infertility and premature menopause associated with chemo and/or radiation therapy in female cancer patients. Our previous studies have shown that Prohibitin (PHB) is intimately involved in GCs differentiation, atresia, and luteolysis. Main methods In the present study, we have examined the functional effects of loss-/gain-of-function of PHB using adenoviral technology in delaying apoptosis induced by the physiological ligand ceramide in rat GCs. Key findings Under these experimental conditions, exogenous ceramide C-8 (50μM) augmented the expression of mitochondrial PHB and subsequently cause the physical destruction of GC by the release of mitochondrial cytochrome c and activation of caspase-3. In further studies, silencing of PHB expression by adenoviral small interfering RNA (shRNA) sensitized GCs to ceramide C8-induce apoptosis. In contrast, adenovirus (Ad) directed overexpression of PHB in GCs resulted in increased PHB content in mitochondria and delayed the onset of ceramide induced apoptosis in the infected GCs. Significance Taken together, these results provide novel evidences that a critical level of PHB expression within the mitochondria plays a key intra-molecular role in GC fate by mediating the inhibition of apoptosis and may therefore, contribute significantly to ceramide induced follicular atresia. PMID:21763324

  7. Unveiling Unexpected Immune Activities Induced by Your Pneumococcal Vaccine

    PubMed Central

    Hurwitz, Julia L.

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT In modern-day vaccine design, a good pneumococcal capsular polysaccharide vaccine is measured by its ability to induce opsonic antibodies. These antibodies label bacteria for phagocytosis by neutrophils and thereby overcome the capsule’s barrier function. Doyle and Pirofski have raised a serious challenge to the current paradigm by describing anti-capsular antibodies that are highly protective but nonopsonic [C.R. Doyle and L. Pirofski, mBio 7(1):e02260-15, 2016, doi:10.1128/mBio.02260-15]. In fact, some functions are not related to neutrophils or phagocytosis at all. An increased awareness of these activities is critical not only for accurate comparisons of vaccine candidates but also for improvements in vaccination outcomes in settings of neutropenia. When vaccine developers select a single gatekeeper assay (e.g., an opsonophagocytic assay for bacteria or a neutralization assay for viruses), promising vaccine candidates may be missed. Doyle and Pirofski stress that multiple functions, not just one, should be investigated to enhance discovery of antibody mechanisms and to best assess vaccine-induced correlates of immune protection. PMID:26908576

  8. A cardiac myosin-specific autoimmune response is induced by immunization with Trypanosoma cruzi proteins.

    PubMed

    Leon, Juan S; Daniels, Melvin D; Toriello, Krista M; Wang, Kegiang; Engman, David M

    2004-06-01

    Trypanosoma cruzi is the protozoan parasite that causes Chagas' heart disease, a potentially fatal cardiomyopathy prevalent in Central and South America. Infection with T. cruzi induces cardiac myosin autoimmunity in susceptible humans and mice, and this autoimmunity has been suggested to contribute to cardiac inflammation. To address how T. cruzi induces cardiac myosin autoimmunity, we investigated whether immunity to T. cruzi antigens could induce cardiac myosin-specific autoimmunity in the absence of live parasites. We immunized A/J mice with a T. cruzi Brazil-derived protein extract emulsified in complete Freund's adjuvant and found that these mice developed cardiac myosin-specific delayed-type hypersensitivity (DTH) and autoantibodies in the absence of detectable cardiac damage. The induction of autoimmunity was specific since immunization with extracts of the related protozoan parasite Leishmania amazonensis did not induce myosin autoimmunity. The immunogenetic makeup of the host was important for this response, since C57BL/6 mice did not develop cardiac myosin DTH upon immunization with T. cruzi extract. Perhaps more interesting, mice immunized with cardiac myosin developed T. cruzi-specific DTH and antibodies. This DTH was also antigen specific, since immunization with skeletal myosin and myoglobin did not induce T. cruzi-specific immunity. These results suggest that immunization with cardiac myosin or T. cruzi antigen can induce specific, bidirectionally cross-reactive immune responses in the absence of detectable cardiac damage. PMID:15155647

  9. Design, synthesis and SARs of novel salicylanilides as potent inhibitors of RANKL-induced osteoclastogenesis and bone resorption.

    PubMed

    Chen, Chun-Liang; Lee, Chia-Chung; Liu, Fei-Lan; Chen, Tsung-Chih; Ahmed Ali, Ahmed Atef; Chang, Deh-Ming; Huang, Hsu-Shan

    2016-07-19

    Inhibiting osteoclastogenesis is a promising therapeutic target for treating osteoclast-related diseases. Herein, we synthesized a series of modified salicylanilides and their corresponding 3-phenyl-2H-benzo[e][1,3]oxazine-2,4(3H)-dione and 10-phenyldibenzo[b,f][1,4]oxazepin-11(10H)-one derivatives, and investigated the effects of such compounds on RANKL-induced osteoclast formation. Among them, a salicylanilide derivative (A04) and its 3-phenyl-2H-benzo[e][1,3]oxazine-2,4(3H)-dione derivative (B04) markedly suppressed RANKL-induced osteoclast differentiation and showed no significant cytotoxic effects at doses higher than that required to inhibit osteoclast formation. Both compounds reduced osteoclast formation and bone resorptive activity of osteoclasts in a dose-dependent manner. Further, the anti-osteoclastogenic effects of A04 and B04 may operate through reducing the RANKL-induced nuclear translocation of NFATc1. Accordingly, we present the potent anti-osteoclastogenic compounds A04 and B04 as promising candidates for further optimization as anti-resorptive agents. PMID:27089213

  10. Differences in immune responses against Leishmania induced by infection and by immunization with killed parasite antigen: implications for vaccine discovery.

    PubMed

    Mendonça, Sergio C F

    2016-01-01

    The leishmaniases are a group of diseases caused by different species of the protozoan genus Leishmania and transmitted by sand fly vectors. They are a major public health problem in almost all continents. There is no effective control of leishmaniasis and its geographical distribution is expanding in many countries. Great effort has been made by many scientists to develop a vaccine against leishmaniasis, but, so far, there is still no effective vaccine against the disease. The only way to generate protective immunity against leishmaniasis in humans is leishmanization, consisting of the inoculation of live virulent Leishmania as a means to acquire long-lasting immunity against subsequent infections. At present, all that we know about human immune responses to Leishmania induced by immunization with killed parasite antigens came from studies with first generation candidate vaccines (killed promastigote extracts). In the few occasions that the T cell-mediated immune responses to Leishmania induced by infection and immunization with killed parasite antigens were compared, important differences were found both in humans and in animals. This review discusses these differences and their relevance to the development of a vaccine against leishmaniasis, the major problems involved in this task, the recent prospects for the selection of candidate antigens and the use of attenuated Leishmania as live vaccines. PMID:27600664

  11. Modified Vaccinia Virus Ankara Encoding Influenza Virus Hemagglutinin Induces Heterosubtypic Immunity in Macaques

    PubMed Central

    Florek, Nicholas W.; Weinfurter, Jason T.; Jegaskanda, Sinthujan; Brewoo, Joseph N.; Powell, Tim D.; Young, Ginger R.; Das, Subash C.; Hatta, Masato; Broman, Karl W.; Hungnes, Olav; Dudman, Susanne G.; Kawaoka, Yoshihiro; Kent, Stephen J.; Stinchcomb, Dan T.

    2014-01-01

    ABSTRACT Current influenza virus vaccines primarily aim to induce neutralizing antibodies (NAbs). Modified vaccinia virus Ankara (MVA) is a safe and well-characterized vector for inducing both antibody and cellular immunity. We evaluated the immunogenicity and protective efficacy of MVA encoding influenza virus hemagglutinin (HA) and/or nucleoprotein (NP) in cynomolgus macaques. Animals were given 2 doses of MVA-based vaccines 4 weeks apart and were challenged with a 2009 pandemic H1N1 isolate (H1N1pdm) 8 weeks after the last vaccination. MVA-based vaccines encoding HA induced potent serum antibody responses against homologous H1 or H5 HAs but did not stimulate strong T cell responses prior to challenge. However, animals that received MVA encoding influenza virus HA and/or NP had high frequencies of virus-specific CD4+ and CD8+ T cell responses within the first 7 days of H1N1pdm infection, while animals vaccinated with MVA encoding irrelevant antigens did not. We detected little or no H1N1pdm replication in animals that received vaccines encoding H1 (homologous) HA, while a vaccine encoding NP from an H5N1 isolate afforded no protection. Surprisingly, H1N1pdm viral shedding was reduced in animals vaccinated with MVA encoding HA and NP from an H5N1 isolate. This reduced shedding was associated with cross-reactive antibodies capable of mediating antibody-dependent cellular cytotoxicity (ADCC) effector functions. Our results suggest that ADCC plays a role in cross-protective immunity against influenza. Vaccines optimized to stimulate cross-reactive antibodies with ADCC function may provide an important measure of protection against emerging influenza viruses when NAbs are ineffective. IMPORTANCE Current influenza vaccines are designed to elicit neutralizing antibodies (NAbs). Vaccine-induced NAbs typically are effective but highly specific for particular virus strains. Consequently, current vaccines are poorly suited for preventing the spread of newly emerging

  12. Immune mechanisms in acetaminophen-induced acute liver failure.

    PubMed

    Krenkel, Oliver; Mossanen, Jana C; Tacke, Frank

    2014-12-01

    An overdose of acetaminophen (N-acetyl-p-aminophenol, APAP), also termed paracetamol, can cause severe liver damage, ultimately leading to acute liver failure (ALF) with the need of liver transplantation. APAP is rapidly taken up from the intestine and metabolized in hepatocytes. A small fraction of the metabolized APAP forms cytotoxic mitochondrial protein adducts, leading to hepatocyte necrosis. The course of disease is not only critically influenced by dose of APAP and the initial hepatocyte damage, but also by the inflammatory response following acetaminophen-induced liver injury (AILI). As revealed by mouse models of AILI and corresponding translational studies in ALF patients, necrotic hepatocytes release danger-associated-molecular patterns (DAMPs), which are recognized by resident hepatic macrophages, Kupffer cell (KC), and neutrophils, leading to the activation of these cells. Activated hepatic macrophages release various proinflammatory cytokines, such as TNF-α or IL-1β, as well as chemokines (e.g., CCL2) thereby further enhancing inflammation and increasing the influx of immune cells, like bone-marrow derived monocytes and neutrophils. Monocytes are mainly recruited via their receptor CCR2 and aggravate inflammation. Infiltrating monocytes, however, can mature into monocyte-derived macrophages (MoMF), which are, in cooperation with neutrophils, also involved in the resolution of inflammation. Besides macrophages and neutrophils, distinct lymphocyte populations, especially γδ T cells, are also linked to the inflammatory response following an APAP overdose. Natural killer (NK), natural killer T (NKT) and T cells possibly further perpetuate inflammation in AILI. Understanding the complex interplay of immune cell subsets in experimental models and defining their functional involvement in disease progression is essential to identify novel therapeutic targets for human disease. PMID:25568858

  13. Enveloped Virus-Like Particle Expression of Human Cytomegalovirus Glycoprotein B Antigen Induces Antibodies with Potent and Broad Neutralizing Activity

    PubMed Central

    Kirchmeier, Marc; Fluckiger, Anne-Catherine; Soare, Catalina; Bozic, Jasminka; Ontsouka, Barthelemy; Ahmed, Tanvir; Diress, Abebaw; Pereira, Lenore; Schödel, Florian; Plotkin, Stanley; Dalba, Charlotte; Klatzmann, David

    2014-01-01

    A prophylactic vaccine to prevent the congenital transmission of human cytomegalovirus (HCMV) in newborns and to reduce life-threatening disease in immunosuppressed recipients of HCMV-infected solid organ transplants is highly desirable. Neutralizing antibodies against HCMV confer significant protection against infection, and glycoprotein B (gB) is a major target of such neutralizing antibodies. However, one shortcoming of past HCMV vaccines may have been their failure to induce high-titer persistent neutralizing antibody responses that prevent the infection of epithelial cells. We used enveloped virus-like particles (eVLPs), in which particles were produced in cells after the expression of murine leukemia virus (MLV) viral matrix protein Gag, to express either full-length CMV gB (gB eVLPs) or the full extracellular domain of CMV gB fused with the transmembrane and cytoplasmic domains from vesicular stomatitis virus (VSV)-G protein (gB-G eVLPs). gB-G-expressing eVLPs induced potent neutralizing antibodies in mice with a much greater propensity toward epithelial cell-neutralizing activity than that induced with soluble recombinant gB protein. An analysis of gB antibody binding titers and T-helper cell responses demonstrated that high neutralizing antibody titers were not simply due to enhanced immunogenicity of the gB-G eVLPs. The cells transiently transfected with gB-G but not gB plasmid formed syncytia, consistent with a prefusion gB conformation like those of infected cells and viral particles. Two of the five gB-G eVLP-induced monoclonal antibodies we examined in detail had neutralizing activities, one of which possessed particularly potent epithelial cell-neutralizing activity. These data differentiate gB-G eVLPs from gB antigens used in the past and support their use in a CMV vaccine candidate with improved neutralizing activity against epithelial cell infection. PMID:24334684

  14. Enveloped virus-like particle expression of human cytomegalovirus glycoprotein B antigen induces antibodies with potent and broad neutralizing activity.

    PubMed

    Kirchmeier, Marc; Fluckiger, Anne-Catherine; Soare, Catalina; Bozic, Jasminka; Ontsouka, Barthelemy; Ahmed, Tanvir; Diress, Abebaw; Pereira, Lenore; Schödel, Florian; Plotkin, Stanley; Dalba, Charlotte; Klatzmann, David; Anderson, David E

    2014-02-01

    A prophylactic vaccine to prevent the congenital transmission of human cytomegalovirus (HCMV) in newborns and to reduce life-threatening disease in immunosuppressed recipients of HCMV-infected solid organ transplants is highly desirable. Neutralizing antibodies against HCMV confer significant protection against infection, and glycoprotein B (gB) is a major target of such neutralizing antibodies. However, one shortcoming of past HCMV vaccines may have been their failure to induce high-titer persistent neutralizing antibody responses that prevent the infection of epithelial cells. We used enveloped virus-like particles (eVLPs), in which particles were produced in cells after the expression of murine leukemia virus (MLV) viral matrix protein Gag, to express either full-length CMV gB (gB eVLPs) or the full extracellular domain of CMV gB fused with the transmembrane and cytoplasmic domains from vesicular stomatitis virus (VSV)-G protein (gB-G eVLPs). gB-G-expressing eVLPs induced potent neutralizing antibodies in mice with a much greater propensity toward epithelial cell-neutralizing activity than that induced with soluble recombinant gB protein. An analysis of gB antibody binding titers and T-helper cell responses demonstrated that high neutralizing antibody titers were not simply due to enhanced immunogenicity of the gB-G eVLPs. The cells transiently transfected with gB-G but not gB plasmid formed syncytia, consistent with a prefusion gB conformation like those of infected cells and viral particles. Two of the five gB-G eVLP-induced monoclonal antibodies we examined in detail had neutralizing activities, one of which possessed particularly potent epithelial cell-neutralizing activity. These data differentiate gB-G eVLPs from gB antigens used in the past and support their use in a CMV vaccine candidate with improved neutralizing activity against epithelial cell infection. PMID:24334684

  15. Laminin 411 acts as a potent inducer of umbilical cord mesenchymal stem cell differentiation into insulin-producing cells

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    T1DM rats. Conclusions Our results demonstrate that laminin 411 acts as a potent differentiation inducer of IPCs from UC-MSCs via the Pdx1 and Ngn3 signaling pathways. Moreover, transfusion of laminin 411 induced-IPCs more efficiently improves symptoms and survival of T1DM rats. These novel finding highlights a potential clinical application of laminin 411 induced-IPCs in the treatment of T1DM, which calls for further studies. PMID:24885418

  16. Recombinant varicella vaccines induce neutralizing antibodies and cellular immune responses to SIV and reduce viral loads in immunized rhesus macaques

    PubMed Central

    Traina-Dorge, V.; Pahar, B.; Marx, P.; Kissinger, P.; Montefiori, D.; Ou, Y.; Gray, W.L.

    2010-01-01

    The development of an effective AIDS vaccine remains one of the highest priorities in HIV research. The live, attenuated varicella-zoster virus (VZV) Oka vaccine, safe and effective for prevention of chickenpox and zoster, also has potential as a recombinant vaccine against other pathogens, including human immunodeficiency virus (HIV). The simian varicella model, utilizing simian varicella virus (SVV), offers an approach to evaluate recombinant varicella vaccine candidates. Recombinant SVV (rSVV) vaccine viruses expressing simian immunodeficiency virus (SIV) env and gag antigens were constructed. The hypothesis tested was that a live, attenuated rSVV-SIV vaccine will induce immune responses against SIV in the rhesus macaques and provide protection against SIV challenge. The results demonstrated that rSVV-SIV vaccination induced low levels of neutralizing antibodies and cellular immune responses to SIV in immunized rhesus macaques and significantly reduced viral loads following intravenous challenge with pathogenic SIVmac251-CX-1. PMID:20654666

  17. Effect of helminth-induced immunity on infections with microbial pathogens

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Helminth infections are ubiquitous worldwide and can trigger potent immune responses that differ from and potentially antagonize host protective responses to microbial pathogens. In this Review we focus on the three main killers in infectious disease—AIDS, tuberculosis and malaria—and critically assesses whether helminths adversely influence host control of these diseases. We also discuss emerging concepts for how M2 macrophages and helminth-modulated dendritic cells can potentially influence the protective immune response to concurrent infections. Finally, we present evidence advocating for more efforts to determine how and to what extent helminths interfere with the successful control of specific concurrent coinfections. PMID:24145791

  18. An injectable, low-toxicity phospholipid-based phase separation gel that induces strong and persistent immune responses in mice.

    PubMed

    Han, Lu; Xue, Jiao; Wang, Luyao; Peng, Ke; Zhang, Zhirong; Gong, Tao; Sun, Xun

    2016-10-01

    Sustained antigen delivery using incomplete Freund's adjuvant (IFA) can induce strong, long-term immune response, but it can also cause severe side effects. Here we describe an injectable, phospholipid-based phase separation gel (PPSG) that readily transforms in situ into a drug depot. PPSG loaded with the model antigen ovalbumin (OVA) supported sustained OVA release in mice that lasted nearly one month. Immunizing mice with a single injection of PPSG/OVA elicited a strong and persistent increase in titers of OVA-specific IgG, IgG1 and IgG2a. Co-administering CpG-ODN further increased antibody titers. Such co-administration recruited dendritic cells to injection sites and activated dendritic cells in the draining lymph nodes. Moreover, immunization with PPSG/OVA/CpG resulted in potent memory antibody responses and high frequency of memory T cells. Remarkably, PPSG/OVA/CpG was associated with much lower toxicity at injection sites than IFA/OVA/CpG, and it showed no systemic toxicity such as to lymph nodes or spleen. These findings illustrate the potential of injectable PPSG for sustained, minimally toxic delivery of antigens and adjuvants. PMID:27522253

  19. Modulation of peanut-induced allergic immune responses by oral lactic acid bacteria-based vaccines in mice.

    PubMed

    Ren, Chengcheng; Zhang, Qiuxiang; Wang, Gang; Ai, Chunqing; Hu, Mengsha; Liu, Xiaoming; Tian, Fengwei; Zhao, Jianxin; Chen, Yongquan; Wang, Miao; Zhang, Hao; Chen, Wei

    2014-01-01

    Peanut allergy (PNA) has becoming a non-negligible health concern worldwide. Thus far, allergen-specific immunotherapy aimed at inducing mucosal tolerance has widely been regarded as a major management strategy for PNA. The safety profiles and the intrinsic probiotic properties of lactic acid bacteria (LAB) render them attractive delivery vehicles for mucosal vaccines. In the present study, we exploited genetically modified Lactococcus lactis to produce peanut allergen Ara h 2 via different protein-targeting systems and their immunomodulatory potency for allergic immune responses in mice were investigated. By comparison with the strain expressing the cytoplasmic form of Ara h 2 (LL1), the strains expressing the secreted and anchored forms of Ara h 2 (LL2 and LL3) were more potent in redirecting a Th2-polarized to a non-allergic Th1 immune responses. Induction of SIgA and regulatory T cells were also observed at the local levels by orally administration of recombinant L. lactis. Our results indicate that allergen-producing L. lactis strains modulated allergic immune responses and may be developed as promising mucosal vaccines for managing allergic diseases. PMID:24770368

  20. Potent hepatoprotective effect in CCl4-induced hepatic injury in mice of phloroacetophenone from Myrcia multiflora

    PubMed Central

    Ferreira, Eduardo Antonio; Gris, Eliana Fortes; Felipe, Karina Bettega; Correia, João Francisco Gomes; Cargnin-Ferreira, Eduardo; Wilhelm Filho, Danilo; Pedrosa, Rozangela Curi

    2010-01-01

    Background This study investigated the hepatoprotective effect and antioxidant properties of phloroacetophenone (2′,4′,6′-trihydroxyacetophenone – THA), an acetophenone derived from the plant Myrcia multiflora. Material & Method The free radical scavenging activity in vitro and induction of oxidative hepatic damage by carbon tetrachloride (CCl4) (0.5 ml/kg, i.p.) were tested in male Swiss mice (25±5 g). Results This compound exhibited in vitro antioxidant effects on FeCl2–ascorbate-induced lipid peroxidation (LPO) in mouse liver homogenate, scavenging hydroxyl and superoxide radicals, and 2,2-diphenyl-1-picrylhydrazyl. The in vivo assays showed that THA significantly (p<0.01) prevented the increases of hepatic LPO as measured by the levels of thiobarbituric acid-reactive substances, mitochondrial swelling. It also protected hepatocytes against protein carbonylation and oxidative DNA damage. Consistent with these observations, THA pre-treatment normalized the activities of antioxidant enzymes, such as catalase, glutathione peroxidase, and superoxide dismutase, and increased the levels of reduced glutathione (GSH) in CCl4-treated mice. In addition, THA treatment significantly prevented the elevation of serum enzymatic activities of alanine amino transferase, aspartate amino transferase, and lactate dehydrogenase, as well as histological alterations induced by CCl4. Silymarin (SIL) (24 mg/kg), a known hepatoprotective drug used for comparison, led to a significant decrease (p<0.01) in activities of theses enzymes in way very similar to that observed in pre-treatment with THA. Conclusion These results suggest that the protective effects are due to reduction of oxidative damage induced by CCl4 resulting from the antioxidant properties of THA. PMID:21483585

  1. Circulating Pneumolysin Is a Potent Inducer of Cardiac Injury during Pneumococcal Infection.

    PubMed

    Alhamdi, Yasir; Neill, Daniel R; Abrams, Simon T; Malak, Hesham A; Yahya, Reham; Barrett-Jolley, Richard; Wang, Guozheng; Kadioglu, Aras; Toh, Cheng-Hock

    2015-05-01

    Streptococcus pneumoniae accounts for more deaths worldwide than any other single pathogen through diverse disease manifestations including pneumonia, sepsis and meningitis. Life-threatening acute cardiac complications are more common in pneumococcal infection compared to other bacterial infections. Distinctively, these arise despite effective antibiotic therapy. Here, we describe a novel mechanism of myocardial injury, which is triggered and sustained by circulating pneumolysin (PLY). Using a mouse model of invasive pneumococcal disease (IPD), we demonstrate that wild type PLY-expressing pneumococci but not PLY-deficient mutants induced elevation of circulating cardiac troponins (cTns), well-recognized biomarkers of cardiac injury. Furthermore, elevated cTn levels linearly correlated with pneumococcal blood counts (r=0.688, p=0.001) and levels were significantly higher in non-surviving than in surviving mice. These cTn levels were significantly reduced by administration of PLY-sequestering liposomes. Intravenous injection of purified PLY, but not a non-pore forming mutant (PdB), induced substantial increase in cardiac troponins to suggest that the pore-forming activity of circulating PLY is essential for myocardial injury in vivo. Purified PLY and PLY-expressing pneumococci also caused myocardial inflammatory changes but apoptosis was not detected. Exposure of cultured cardiomyocytes to PLY-expressing pneumococci caused dose-dependent cardiomyocyte contractile dysfunction and death, which was exacerbated by further PLY release following antibiotic treatment. We found that high PLY doses induced extensive cardiomyocyte lysis, but more interestingly, sub-lytic PLY concentrations triggered profound calcium influx and overload with subsequent membrane depolarization and progressive reduction in intracellular calcium transient amplitude, a key determinant of contractile force. This was coupled to activation of signalling pathways commonly associated with cardiac

  2. Mucosal Immunization with Newcastle Disease Virus Vector Coexpressing HIV-1 Env and Gag Proteins Elicits Potent Serum, Mucosal, and Cellular Immune Responses That Protect against Vaccinia Virus Env and Gag Challenges

    PubMed Central

    Khattar, Sunil K.; Manoharan, Vinoth; Bhattarai, Bikash; LaBranche, Celia C.; Montefiori, David C.

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT Newcastle disease virus (NDV) avirulent strain LaSota was used to coexpress gp160 Env and p55 Gag from a single vector to enhance both Env-specific and Gag-specific immune responses. The optimal transcription position for both Env and Gag genes in the NDV genome was determined by generating recombinant NDV (rNDV)-Env-Gag (gp160 located between the P and M genes and Gag between the HN and L genes), rNDV-Gag-Env (Gag located between the P and M genes and gp160 between the HN and L genes), rNDV-Env/Gag (gp160 followed by Gag located between the P and M genes), and rNDV-Gag/Env (Gag followed by gp160 located between the P and M genes). All the recombinant viruses replicated at levels similar to those seen with parental NDV in embryonated chicken eggs and in chicken fibroblast cells. Both gp160 and Gag proteins were expressed at high levels in cell culture, with gp160 found to be incorporated into the envelope of NDV. The Gag and Env proteins expressed by all the recombinants except rNDV-Env-Gag self-assembled into human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) virus-like particles (VLPs). Immunization of guinea pigs by the intranasal route with these rNDVs produced long-lasting Env- and Gag-specific humoral immune responses. The Env-specific humoral and mucosal immune responses and Gag-specific humoral immune responses were higher in rNDV-Gag/Env and rNDV-Env/Gag than in the other recombinants. rNDV-Gag/Env and rNDV-Env/Gag were also more efficient in inducing cellular as well as protective immune responses to challenge with vaccinia viruses expressing HIV-1 Env and Gag in mice. These results suggest that vaccination with a single rNDV coexpressing Env and Gag represents a promising strategy to enhance immunogenicity and protective efficacy against HIV. PMID:26199332

  3. Ursolic acid-loaded chitosan nanoparticles induce potent anti-angiogenesis in tumor.

    PubMed

    Jin, Hua; Pi, Jiang; Yang, Fen; Wu, Chaomin; Cheng, Xueli; Bai, Haihua; Huang, Dan; Jiang, Jinhuan; Cai, Jiye; Chen, Zheng W

    2016-08-01

    Angiogenesis provides necessary nutrients and oxygen for tumor growth and metastasis; thus, every stage of angiogenesis process is the potential target for cancer therapies. Ursolic acid (UA) is reported to decrease tumor burden through anti-angiogenesis pathway, but its poor water solubility greatly limits its efficiency and clinical application. Here, a simple method for preparing UA-loaded chitosan nanoparticles (CH-UA-NPs) with anti-angiogenesis and anti-tumor activity was demonstrated. In vitro, CH-UA-NPs could significantly inhibit the proliferation, migration, and tube formation of human umbilical vascular endothelial cells (HUVECs). After uptake by HUVECs, CH-UA-NPs were mainly localized in lysosomes and mitochondria, but not nuclei. CH-UA-NPs induced the destruction of lysosome membrane integrity, collapse of mitochondrial membrane potential, and reorganization of cell cytoskeleton. All these changes led to the apoptosis or necrosis in HUVECs. In vivo, CH-UA-NPs could inhibit the angiogenesis in chicken chorioallantoic membrane (CAM) model and H22 xenograft model. Notably, comparing with free UA, such synthesized CH-UA-NPs could save about tenfold of UA doses, implying that this could significantly decrease the side effects induced by high doses of UA in biological organism. Our data showed that CH-UA-NPs and this nanoparticle-based drug delivery system could be as a potential drug candidate for anti-angiogenesis treatment. PMID:26883344

  4. Complement anaphylatoxin C3a is a potent inducer of embryonic chick retina regeneration.

    PubMed

    Haynes, Tracy; Luz-Madrigal, Agustin; Reis, Edimara S; Echeverri Ruiz, Nancy P; Grajales-Esquivel, Erika; Tzekou, Apostolia; Tsonis, Panagiotis A; Lambris, John D; Del Rio-Tsonis, Katia

    2013-01-01

    Identifying the initiation signals for tissue regeneration in vertebrates is one of the major challenges in regenerative biology. Much of the research thus far has indicated that certain growth factors have key roles. Here we show that complement fragment C3a is sufficient to induce complete regeneration of the embryonic chick retina from stem/progenitor cells present in the eye, independent of fibroblast growth factor receptor signaling. Instead, C3a induces retina regeneration via STAT3 activation, which in turn activates the injury- and inflammation-responsive factors, IL-6, IL-8 and TNF-α. This activation sets forth regulation of Wnt2b, Six3 and Sox2, genes associated with retina stem and progenitor cells. Thus, our results establish a mechanism for retina regeneration based on injury and inflammation signals. Furthermore, our results indicate a unique function for complement anaphylatoxins that implicate these molecules in the induction and complete regeneration of the retina, opening new avenues of experimentation in the field. PMID:23942241

  5. A lysophosphatidic acid analogue is revealed as a potent inhibitor of phosphatidylcholine synthesis, inducing apoptosis.

    PubMed Central

    Gueguen, Geneviéve; Granci, Virginie; Rogalle, Pierre; Briand-Mésange, Fabienne; Wilson, Michéle; Klaébé, Alain; Tercé, François; Chap, Hugues; Salles, Jean-Pierre; Simon, Marie-Françoise; Gaits, Frédérique

    2002-01-01

    A previous study demonstrated that cross-desensitization experiments performed with the lysophosphatidic acid (LPA) analogues (R)- and (S)-N-palmitoyl-norleucinol 1-phosphate (PNPAs) inhibited LPA-induced platelet aggregation without any stereospecificity. Here we report opposite biological effects of the two enantiomers on mitogenesis of IMR-90 fibroblasts in relation to their respective metabolism. (R)PNPA was proliferative, while (S)PNPA induced apoptosis by specifically inhibiting phosphatidylcholine biosynthesis at the last step of the CDP-choline pathway controlled by cholinephosphotransferase. This effect was not direct but required dephosphorylation of PNPAs by ecto-lipid phosphate phosphatase before cellular uptake of the generated N-palmitoyl-norleucinols (PNOHs). Inhibition of cholinephosphotransferase by the derivative (S)PNOH was confirmed by an in vitro assay. (S)PNPA proapoptotic effects led us to clarify the mechanism linking cholinephosphotransferase inhibition to apoptosis. Three proapoptotic responses were observed: the activation of caspase-3, the production of ceramides from newly synthesized pools (as demonstrated by the inhibitor Fumonisin B1) and finally the activation of stress-activated protein kinase, p38 and c-Jun N-terminal kinases 1/2, as a result of ceramide increase. Thus our data demonstrate that synthetic analogues of LPA might display stereospecific effects leading to apoptosis independently of classical LPA-activated pathways. PMID:12197836

  6. Immunoglobulin A1 Protease, an Exoenzyme of Pathogenic Neisseriae, Is a Potent Inducer of Proinflammatory Cytokines

    PubMed Central

    Lorenzen, Dirk R.; Düx, Frank; Wölk, Uwe; Tsirpouchtsidis, Anastasios; Haas, Gaby; Meyer, Thomas F.

    1999-01-01

    A characteristic of human pathogenic Neisseriae is the production and secretion of an immunoglobulin (Ig)A1-specific serine protease (IgA1 protease) that cleaves preferentially human IgA1 and other target proteins. Here we show a novel function for native IgA1 protease, i.e., the induction of proinflammatory cytokines such as tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-α, interleukin (IL)-1β, IL-6, and IL-8 from peripheral blood mononuclear cells. The capacity of IgA1 protease to elicit such cytokine responses in monocytes was enhanced in the presence of T lymphocytes. IgA1 protease did not induce the regulatory cytokine IL-10, which was, however, found in response to lipopolysaccharide and phytohemagglutinin. The immunomodulatory effects caused by IgA1 protease require a native form of the enzyme, and denaturation abolished cytokine induction. However, the proteolytic activity is not required for the cytokine induction by IgA1 protease. Our results indicate that IgA1 protease exhibits important immunostimulatory properties and may contribute substantially to the pathogenesis of neisserial infections by inducing large amounts of TNF-α and other proinflammatory cytokines. In particular, IgA1 protease may represent a key virulence determinant of bacterial meningitis. PMID:10523603

  7. Pleomorphic forms of Borrelia burgdorferi induce distinct immune responses.

    PubMed

    Meriläinen, Leena; Brander, Heini; Herranen, Anni; Schwarzbach, Armin; Gilbert, Leona

    2016-01-01

    Borrelia burgdorferi is the causative agent of tick-borne Lyme disease. As a response to environmental stress B. burgdorferi can change its morphology to a round body form. The role of B. burgdorferi pleomorphic forms in Lyme disease pathogenesis has long been debated and unclear. Here, we demonstrated that round bodies were processed differently in differentiated macrophages, consequently inducing distinct immune responses compared to spirochetes in vitro. Colocalization analysis indicated that the F-actin participates in internalization of both forms. However, round bodies end up less in macrophage lysosomes than spirochetes suggesting that there are differences in processing of these forms in phagocytic cells. Furthermore, round bodies stimulated distinct cytokine and chemokine production in these cells. We confirmed that spirochetes and round bodies present different protein profiles and antigenicity. In a Western blot analysis Lyme disease patients had more intense responses to round bodies when compared to spirochetes. These results suggest that round bodies have a role in Lyme disease pathogenesis. PMID:27139815

  8. Humoral immunity induced by mucosal and/or systemic SIV-specific vaccine platforms suggest novel combinatorial approaches for enhancing responses

    PubMed Central

    Vargas-Inchaustegui, Diego A.; Tuero, Iskra; Mohanram, Venkatramanan; Musich, Thomas; Pegu, Poonam; Valentin, Antonio; Sui, Yongjun; Rosati, Margherita; Bear, Jenifer; Venzon, David J.; Kulkarni, Viraj; Alicea, Candido; Pilkington, Guy R.; Liyanage, Namal P.M.; Demberg, Thorsten; Gordon, Shari N.; Wang, Yichuan; Hogg, Alison E.; Frey, Blake; Patterson, L. Jean; DiPasquale, Janet; Montefiori, David C.; Sardesai, Niranjan Y.; Reed, Steven G.; Berzofsky, Jay A.; Franchini, Genoveffa; Felber, Barbara K.; Pavlakis, George N.; Robert-Guroff, Marjorie

    2014-01-01

    Combinatorial HIV/SIV vaccine approaches targeting multiple arms of the immune system might improve protective efficacy. We compared SIV-specific humoral immunity induced in rhesus macaques by five vaccine regimens. Systemic regimens included ALVAC-SIVenv priming and Env boosting (ALVAC/Env); DNA immunization; and DNA plus Env co-immunization (DNA&Env). RepAd/Env combined mucosal replication-competent Ad-env priming with systemic Env boosting. A Peptide/Env regimen, given solely intrarectally, included HIV/SIV peptides followed by MVA-env and Env boosts. Serum antibodies mediating neutralizing, phagocytic and ADCC activities were induced by ALVAC/Env, RepAd/Env and DNA&Env vaccines. Memory B cells and plasma cells were maintained in bone marrow. RepAd/Env vaccination induced early SIV-specific IgA in rectal secretions before Env boosting, although mucosal IgA and IgG responses were readily detected at necropsy in ALVAC/Env, RepAd/Env, DNA&Env and DNA vaccinated animals. Our results suggest combined RepAd priming with ALVAC/Env or DNA&Env regimen boosting might induce potent, functional, long-lasting systemic and mucosal SIV-specific antibodies. PMID:24907411

  9. Humoral immunity induced by mucosal and/or systemic SIV-specific vaccine platforms suggests novel combinatorial approaches for enhancing responses.

    PubMed

    Vargas-Inchaustegui, Diego A; Tuero, Iskra; Mohanram, Venkatramanan; Musich, Thomas; Pegu, Poonam; Valentin, Antonio; Sui, Yongjun; Rosati, Margherita; Bear, Jenifer; Venzon, David J; Kulkarni, Viraj; Alicea, Candido; Pilkington, Guy R; Liyanage, Namal P M; Demberg, Thorsten; Gordon, Shari N; Wang, Yichuan; Hogg, Alison E; Frey, Blake; Patterson, L Jean; DiPasquale, Janet; Montefiori, David C; Sardesai, Niranjan Y; Reed, Steven G; Berzofsky, Jay A; Franchini, Genoveffa; Felber, Barbara K; Pavlakis, George N; Robert-Guroff, Marjorie

    2014-08-01

    Combinatorial HIV/SIV vaccine approaches targeting multiple arms of the immune system might improve protective efficacy. We compared SIV-specific humoral immunity induced in rhesus macaques by five vaccine regimens. Systemic regimens included ALVAC-SIVenv priming and Env boosting (ALVAC/Env); DNA immunization; and DNA plus Env co-immunization (DNA&Env). RepAd/Env combined mucosal replication-competent Ad-env priming with systemic Env boosting. A Peptide/Env regimen, given solely intrarectally, included HIV/SIV peptides followed by MVA-env and Env boosts. Serum antibodies mediating neutralizing, phagocytic and ADCC activities were induced by ALVAC/Env, RepAd/Env and DNA&Env vaccines. Memory B cells and plasma cells were maintained in the bone marrow. RepAd/Env vaccination induced early SIV-specific IgA in rectal secretions before Env boosting, although mucosal IgA and IgG responses were readily detected at necropsy in ALVAC/Env, RepAd/Env, DNA&Env and DNA vaccinated animals. Our results suggest that combined RepAd priming with ALVAC/Env or DNA&Env regimen boosting might induce potent, functional, long-lasting systemic and mucosal SIV-specific antibodies. PMID:24907411

  10. Th1-biased immune responses induced by DNA-based immunizations are mediated via action on professional antigen-presenting cells to up-regulate IL-12 production

    PubMed Central

    Asakura, Y; Liu, L -J; Shono, N; Hinkula, J; Kjerrström, A; Aoki, I; Okuda, K; Wahren, B; Fukushima, J

    2000-01-01

    The efficacy of DNA-based immunization in conferring protective immunity against certain microbial pathogens including human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) has been described. The potential advantage of DNA-based immunization over the traditional vaccines largely results from its capacity to efficiently induce Th1-biased immune responses against an encoded antigen. We describe how Th1-biased immune responses are induced by DNA-based immunization, using a DNA vaccine construct encoding HIV-1 gp160 cDNA and an eukaryotic expression plasmid carrying murine IFN-γ cDNA. Transfection of an eukaryotic expression plasmid carrying immunostimulatory sequences (ISS) as well as a gene of interest (DNA vaccine) into professional antigen presenting cells (APC) induced transactivation of IL-12 mRNA, which resulted in antigen-specific Th1-biased immune responses against the encoded antigen. Th1-biased immune responses induced by DNA-based immunization were substantially upregulated by a codelivery of an ectopic IFN-γ expression system, and this augmentation was mediated via action on professional antigen presenting cells to upregulate IL-12 production. Taken together, it appears likely that Th1-biased immune responses induced by DNA-based immunization are mediated via action on professional antigen-presenting cells to produce IL-12. Interestingly, the model provided strikingly resembles that previously described in infection with Listeria monocytogenes, an intracellular Gram-positive bacterium that induces strong Th1-biased immune responses. The result suggests that DNA-based immunization mimics certain aspects of natural infection with microbial organisms like attenuated vaccines, which in turn provides a rationale to the question of why DNA-based immunization so efficiently induces protective immunity against these microbial pathogens. PMID:10606974