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Sample records for induces protective responses

  1. Protective responses induced by herbicide safeners in wheat

    PubMed Central

    Taylor, Victoria L.; Cummins, Ian; Brazier-Hicks, Melissa; Edwards, Robert

    2013-01-01

    Safeners are agrochemicals which enhance tolerance to herbicides in cereals including wheat (Triticum aestivum L.) by elevating the expression of xenobiotic detoxifying enzymes, such as glutathione transferases (GSTs). When wheat plants were spray-treated with three safener chemistries, namely cloquintocet mexyl, mefenpyr diethyl and fenchlorazole ethyl, an apparently identical subset of GSTs derived from the tau, phi and lambda classes accumulated in the foliage. Treatment with the closely related mefenpyr diethyl and fenchlorazole ethyl enhanced seedling shoot growth, but this effect was not determined with the chemically unrelated cloquintocet mexyl. Focussing on cloquintocet mexyl, treatments were found to only give a transient induction of GSTs, with the period of elevation being dose dependent. Examining the role of safener metabolism in controlling these responses, it was determined that cloquintocet mexyl was rapidly hydrolysed to the respective carboxylic acid. Studies with cloquintocet showed that the acid was equally effective at inducing GSTs as the ester and appeared to be the active safener. Studies on the tissue induction of GSTs showed that whilst phi and tau class enzymes were induced in all tissues, the induction of the lambda enzymes was restricted to the meristems. To test the potential protective effects of cloquintocet mexyl in wheat on chemicals other than herbicides, seeds were pre-soaked in safeners prior to sowing on soil containing oil and a range of heavy metals. Whilst untreated seeds were unable to germinate on the contaminated soil, safener treatments resulted in seedlings briefly growing before succumbing to the pollutants. Our results show that safeners exert a range of protective and growth promoting activities in wheat that extend beyond enhancing tolerance to herbicides. PMID:23564986

  2. Immune markers and correlates of protection for vaccine induced immune responses.

    PubMed

    Thakur, Aneesh; Pedersen, Lasse E; Jungersen, Gregers

    2012-07-13

    Vaccines have been a major innovation in the history of mankind and still have the potential to address the challenges posed by chronic intracellular infections including tuberculosis, HIV and malaria which are leading causes of high morbidity and mortality across the world. Markers of an appropriate humoral response currently remain the best validated correlates of protective immunity after vaccination. Despite advancements in the field of immunology over the past few decades currently there are, however, no sufficiently validated immune correlates of vaccine induced protection against chronic infections in neither human nor veterinary medicine. Technological and conceptual advancements within cell-mediated immunology have led to a number of new immunological read-outs with the potential to emerge as correlates of vaccine induced protection. For T(H)1 type responses, antigen-specific production of interferon-gamma (IFN-γ) has been promoted as a quantitative marker of protective cell-mediated immune responses over the past couple of decades. More recently, however, evidence from several infections has pointed towards the quality of the immune response, measured through increased levels of antigen-specific polyfunctional T cells capable of producing a triad of relevant cytokines, as a better correlate of sustained protective immunity against this type of infections. Also the possibilities to measure antigen-specific cytotoxic T cells (CTL) during infection or in response to vaccination, through recombinant major histocompatibility complex (MHC) class I tetramers loaded with relevant peptides, has opened a new vista to include CTL responses in the evaluation of protective immune responses. Here, we review different immune markers and new candidates for correlates of a protective vaccine induced immune response against chronic infections and how successful they have been in defining the protective immunity in human and veterinary medicine. PMID:22658928

  3. Sulforaphane protects Microcystin-LR-induced toxicity through activation of the Nrf2-mediated defensive response

    SciTech Connect

    Gan Nanqin; Mi Lixin; Sun Xiaoyun; Dai Guofei; Chung Funglung; Song Lirong

    2010-09-01

    Microcystins (MCs), a cyclic heptapeptide hepatotoxins, are mainly produced by the bloom-forming cyanobacerium Microcystis, which has become an environmental hazard worldwide. Long term consumption of MC-contaminated water may induce liver damage, liver cancer, and even human death. Therefore, in addition to removal of MCs in drinking water, novel strategies that prevent health damages are urgently needed. Sulforaphane (SFN), a natural-occurring isothiocyanate from cruciferous vegetables, has been reported to reduce and eliminate toxicities from xenobiotics and carcinogens. The purpose of the present study was to provide mechanistic insights into the SFN-induced antioxidative defense system against MC-LR-induced cytotoxicity. We performed cell viability assays, including MTS assay, colony formation assay and apoptotic cell sorting, to study MC-LR-induced cellular damage and the protective effects by SFN. The results showed that SFN protected MC-LR-induced damages at a nontoxic and physiological relevant dose in HepG2, BRL-3A and NIH 3 T3 cells. The protection was Nrf2-mediated as evident by transactivation of Nrf2 and activation of its downstream genes, including NQO1 and HO-1, and elevated intracellular GSH level. Results of our studies indicate that pretreatment of cells with 10 {mu}M SFN for 12 h significantly protected cells from MC-LR-induced damage. SFN-induced protective response was mediated through Nrf2 pathway.

  4. Role of Humoral versus Cellular Responses Induced by a Protective Dengue Vaccine Candidate

    PubMed Central

    Zellweger, Raphaël M.; Miller, Robyn; Eddy, William E.; White, Laura J.; Johnston, Robert E.; Shresta, Sujan

    2013-01-01

    With 2.5 billion people at risk, dengue is a major emerging disease threat and an escalating public health problem worldwide. Dengue virus causes disease ranging from a self-limiting febrile illness (dengue fever) to the potentially fatal dengue hemorrhagic fever/dengue shock syndrome. Severe dengue disease is associated with sub-protective levels of antibody, which exacerbate disease upon re-infection. A dengue vaccine should generate protective immunity without increasing severity of disease. To date, the determinants of vaccine-mediated protection against dengue remain unclear, and additional correlates of protection are urgently needed. Here, mice were immunized with viral replicon particles expressing the dengue envelope protein ectodomain to assess the relative contribution of humoral versus cellular immunity to protection. Vaccination with viral replicon particles provided robust protection against dengue challenge. Vaccine-induced humoral responses had the potential to either protect from or exacerbate dengue disease upon challenge, whereas cellular immune responses were beneficial. This study explores the immunological basis of protection induced by a dengue vaccine and suggests that a safe and efficient vaccine against dengue should trigger both arms of the immune system. PMID:24204271

  5. Mycobacterium-Induced Potentiation of Type 1 Immune Responses and Protection against Malaria Are Host Specific

    PubMed Central

    Page, Kathleen R.; Jedlicka, Anne E.; Fakheri, Benjamin; Noland, Gregory S.; Kesavan, Anup K.; Scott, Alan L.; Kumar, Nirbhay; Manabe, Yukari C.

    2005-01-01

    Malaria and tuberculosis are endemic in many regions of the world, and coinfection with the two pathogens is common. In this study, we examined the effects of long- and short-term infection with Mycobacterium tuberculosis on the course of a lethal form of murine malaria in resistant (C57BL/6) and susceptible (BALB/c) mice. C57BL/6 mice coinfected with M. tuberculosis CDC1551 and Plasmodium yoelii 17XL had a lower peak parasitemia and increased survival compared to mice infected with P. yoelii 17XL alone. Splenic microarray analysis demonstrated potentiation of type 1 immune responses in coinfected C57BL/6 mice, which was especially prominent 5 days after infection with P. yoelii 17XL. Splenocytes from coinfected C57BL/6 mice produced higher levels of gamma interferon (IFN-γ) and tumor necrosis factor alpha than splenocytes from mice infected with either pathogen alone. Interestingly, mycobacterium-induced protection against lethal P. yoelii is mouse strain specific. BALB/c mice were significantly more susceptible than C57BL/6 mice to infection with P. yoelii 17XL and were not protected against lethal malaria by coinfection with M. tuberculosis. In addition, M. tuberculosis did not augment IFN-γ responses in BALB/c mice subsequently infected with P. yoelii 17XL. These data indicate that M. tuberculosis-induced potentiation of type 1 immune responses is associated with protection against lethal murine malaria. PMID:16299335

  6. Immune responses and protection induced by Brucella suis S2 bacterial ghosts in mice.

    PubMed

    Liu, Jun; Li, Yi; Sun, Yang; Ji, Xue; Zhu, Lingwei; Guo, Xuejun; Zhou, Wei; Zhou, Bo; Liu, Shuang; Zhang, Ruian; Feng, Shuzhang

    2015-08-15

    With the purpose of generating Brucella suis bacterial ghosts and investigating the immunogenicity of bacterial ghosts as a vaccine candidate, the lysis gene E and temperature-sensitive regulator cassette were cloned into a shuttle plasmid, pBBR1MCS-2, for construction of a recombinant temperature-sensitive shuttle lysis plasmid, pBBR1MCS-E. pBBR1MCS-E was then introduced into attenuated B. suis live vaccine S2 bacteria, and the resultant transformants were used for production of B. suis ghosts (BSGs) by inducing lysis gene E expression. The BSGs were characterized by observing their morphology by transmission electron microscopy. The safety and immunogenicity of BSGs were further evaluated using a murine model, the result suggested that BSG was as safe as formalin-killed B. suis. In mice, BSG demonstrated a similar capacity of inducing pathogen-specific serum IgG antibody response, spleen CD3(+) and CD4(+) T cell responses, induce secretion of gamma interferon and interleukin-4, and protection levels against Brucella melitensis 16M challenge, as the attenuated B. suis live vaccine. These data suggesting that BSG could confer protection against Brucella infection in a mouse model of disease and may be developed as a new vaccine candidate against Brucella infection. PMID:26022514

  7. A conditionally lethal mutant of Salmonella Typhimurium induces a protective response in mice.

    PubMed

    Hidalgo, Alejandro A; Villagra, Nicolás A; Jerez, Sebastián A; Fuentes, Juan A; Mora, Guido C

    2016-02-01

    Here we present the design of a conditionally lethal mutant of Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium (S. Typhimurium) which growth depends on tetracycline (Tet). Four mutants of S. Typhimurium, with Tet-conditional growth, were created by inserting the tetRA cassette. Three of the mutants presented a conditional-lethal phenotype in vitro. One mutant in the yabB gene remained conditional inside cells and did not persisted after 24 h in cell cultures. The capacity of S. Typhimurium yabB::tetRA to invade deep organs was investigated in intraperitoneally (IP) infected mice fed with or without chlortetracycline (CTet), a Tet analog with lower antibiotic activity. The yabB::tetRA mutant was undetectable in liver or spleen of animals under normal diet, while in mice under diet including CTet, yabB::tetRA invaded at a level comparable to the WT in mice under normal diet. Moreover, yabB::tetRA produced a strong humoral-immunoresponse after one IP immunization with 10(6) bacteria, measured as serum reactivity against S. Typhimurium whole cell extract. By contrast, oral immunization with 10(6) bacteria was weaker and variable on inducing antibodies. Consistently, IP infected mice were fully protected in a challenge with 10(4) oral S. Typhimurium, while protection was partial in orally immunized mice. Our data indicate that S. Typhimurium yabB::tetRA is a conditionally attenuated strain capable of inducing a protective response in mice in non-permissive conditions. PMID:26792728

  8. West Nile Virus Infection of Drosophila melanogaster Induces a Protective RNAi Response

    PubMed Central

    Chotkowski, Heather L.; Ciota, Alexander T.; Jia, Yongqing; Puig-Basagoiti, Francesc; Kramer, Laura D.; Shi, Pei-Yong; Glaser, Robert L.

    2008-01-01

    To determine if West Nile virus (WNV) infection of insect cells induces a protective RNAi response, Drosophila melanogaster S2 and Aedes albopictus C6/36 cells were infected with WNV, and the production of WNV-homologous small RNAs was assayed as an indicator of RNAi induction. A distinct population of ~25 nt WNV-homologous small RNAs was detected in infected S2 cells but not C6/36 cells. RNAi knockdown of Argonaute 2 in S2 cells resulted in slightly increased susceptibility to WNV infection, suggesting that some WNV-homologous small RNAs produced in infected S2 cells are functional small interfering RNAs. WNV was shown to infect adult D. melanogaster, and adult flies containing mutations in each of four different RNAi genes (Argonaute 2, spindle-E, piwi, and Dicer-2) were significantly more susceptible to WNV infection than wildtype flies. These results combined with the analysis of WNV infection of S2 and C6/36 cells support the conclusion that WNV infection of D. melanogaster, but perhaps not Ae. albopictus, induces a protective RNAi response. PMID:18501400

  9. Intranasal immunization with protective antigen of Bacillus anthracis induces a long-term immunological memory response.

    PubMed

    Woo, Sun-Je; Kang, Seok-Seong; Park, Sung-Moo; Yang, Jae Seung; Song, Man Ki; Yun, Cheol-Heui; Han, Seung Hyun

    2015-10-01

    Although intranasal vaccination has been shown to be effective for the protection against inhalational anthrax, establishment of long-term immunity has yet to be achieved. Here, we investigated whether intranasal immunization with recombinant protective antigen (rPA) of Bacillus anthracis induces immunological memory responses in the mucosal and systemic compartments. Intranasal immunization with rPA plus cholera toxin (CT) sustained PA-specific antibody responses for 6 months in lung, nasal washes, and vaginal washes as well as serum. A significant induction of PA-specific memory B cells was observed in spleen, cervical lymph nodes (CLNs) and lung after booster immunization. Furthermore, intranasal immunization with rPA plus CT remarkably generated effector memory CD4(+) T cells in the lung. PA-specific CD4(+) T cells preferentially increased the expression of Th1- and Th17-type cytokines in lung, but not in spleen or CLNs. Collectively, the intranasal immunization with rPA plus CT promoted immunologic memory responses in the mucosal and systemic compartments, providing long-term immunity. PMID:26278659

  10. T-Cell Immune Response Assessment as a Complement to Serology and Intranasal Protection Assays in Determining the Protective Immunity Induced by Acellular Pertussis Vaccines in Mice

    PubMed Central

    Ausiello, C. M.; Lande, R.; Stefanelli, P.; Fazio, C.; Fedele, G.; Palazzo, R.; Urbani, F.; Mastrantonio, P.

    2003-01-01

    The relative value of antibodies and/or T-cell immune responses to Bordetella pertussis antigens in the immunity induced by acellular pertussis (aP) vaccines is still an open issue, probably due to the incomplete knowledge on the mechanisms of protective immunity to pertussis. The relevance of T-cell immune responses in protection from pertussis has been demonstrated in murine and human models of infection; thus, in this study, the ability of different vaccine preparations of three component (pertussis toxin, filamentous hemagglutinin, and pertactin) aP vaccines to induce T-cell responses was investigated in mice. All vaccine preparations examined passed the immunogenicity control test, based on antibody titer assessment, according to European Pharmacopoeia standards, and protected mice from B. pertussis intranasal challenge, but not all preparations were able to prime T cells to pertussis toxin, the specific B. pertussis antigen. In particular, one vaccine preparation was unable to induce proliferation and gamma interferon (IFN-γ) production while the other two gave borderline results. The evaluation of T-cell responses to pertussis toxin antigen may provide information on the protective immunity induced by aP vaccines in animal models. Considering the critical role of the axis interleukin-12-IFN-γ for protection from pertussis, our results suggest that testing the induction of a key protective cytokine such as IFN-γ could be an additional tool for the evaluation of the immune response induced by aP vaccines. PMID:12853397

  11. Rod photoreceptors protect from cone degeneration-induced retinal remodeling and restore visual responses in zebrafish

    PubMed Central

    Saade, Carole J.; Alvarez-Delfin, Karen; Fadool, James M.

    2013-01-01

    Humans are largely dependent upon cone-mediated vision. However, death or dysfunction of rods, the predominant photoreceptor subtype, results in secondary loss of cones, remodeling of retinal circuitry and blindness. The changes in circuitry may contribute to the vision deficit and undermine attempts at restoring sight. We exploit zebrafish larvae as a genetic model to specifically characterize changes associated with photoreceptor degenerations in a cone-dominated retina. Photoreceptors form synapses with two types of second order neurons, bipolar cells and horizontal cells. Using cell-specific reporter gene expression and immunolabeling for postsynaptic glutamate receptors, significant remodeling is observed following cone degeneration in the pde6cw59 larval retina but not rod degeneration in the Xops:mCFPq13 line. In adults, rods and cones are present in approximately equal numbers, and in pde6cw59 mutants glutamate receptor expression and synaptic structures in the outer plexiform layer are preserved, and visual responses are gained in these once-blind fish. We propose that the abundance of rods in the adult protects the retina from cone degeneration-induced remodeling. We test this hypothesis by genetically manipulating the number of rods in larvae. We show that an increased number and uniform distribution of rods in lor/tbx2bp22bbtl or six7 morpholino-injected larvae protect from pde6cw59-induced secondary changes. The observations that remodeling is a common consequence of photoreceptor death across species, and that in zebrafish a small number of surviving photoreceptors afford protection from degeneration-induced changes provides a model for systematic analysis of factors that slow or even prevent the secondary deteriorations associated with neural degenerative disease. PMID:23365220

  12. Mucosal vaccination with attenuated Mycobacterium tuberculosis induces strong central memory responses and protects against tuberculosis

    PubMed Central

    Kaushal, Deepak; Foreman, Taylor W.; Gautam, Uma S.; Alvarez, Xavier; Adekambi, Toidi; Rangel-Moreno, Javier; Golden, Nadia A.; Johnson, Ann-Marie F.; Phillips, Bonnie L.; Ahsan, Muhammad H.; Russell-Lodrigue, Kasi E.; Doyle, Lara A.; Roy, Chad J.; Didier, Peter J.; Blanchard, James L.; Rengarajan, Jyothi; Lackner, Andrew A.; Khader, Shabaana A.; Mehra, Smriti

    2015-01-01

    Tuberculosis (TB) is a global pandaemic, partially due to the failure of vaccination approaches. Novel anti-TB vaccines are therefore urgently required. Here we show that aerosol immunization of macaques with the Mtb mutant in SigH (MtbΔsigH) results in significant recruitment of inducible bronchus-associated lymphoid tissue (iBALT) as well as CD4+ and CD8+ T cells expressing activation and proliferation markers to the lungs. Further, the findings indicate that pulmonary vaccination with MtbΔsigH elicited strong central memory CD4+ and CD8+ T-cell responses in the lung. Vaccination with MtbΔsigH results in significant protection against a lethal TB challenge, as evidenced by an approximately three log reduction in bacterial burdens, significantly diminished clinical manifestations and granulomatous pathology and characterized by the presence of profound iBALT. This highly protective response is virtually absent in unvaccinated and BCG-vaccinated animals after challenge. These results suggest that future TB vaccine candidates can be developed on the basis of MtbΔsigH. PMID:26460802

  13. Trypanosomiasis-Induced B Cell Apoptosis Results in Loss of Protective Anti-Parasite Antibody Responses and Abolishment of Vaccine-Induced Memory Responses

    PubMed Central

    Radwanska, Magdalena; Guirnalda, Patrick; De Trez, Carl; Ryffel, Bernard; Black, Samuel; Magez, Stefan

    2008-01-01

    African trypanosomes of the Trypanosoma brucei species are extra-cellular parasites that cause human African trypanosomiasis (HAT) as well as infections in game animals and livestock. Trypanosomes are known to evade the immune response of their mammalian host by continuous antigenic variation of their surface coat. Here, we aim to demonstrate that in addition, trypanosomes (i) cause the loss of various B cell populations, (ii) disable the hosts' capacity to raise a long-lasting specific protective anti-parasite antibody response, and (iii) abrogate vaccine-induced protective response to a non-related human pathogen such as Bordetella pertussis. Using a mouse model for T. brucei, various B cell populations were analyzed by FACS at different time points of infection. The results show that during early onset of a T. brucei infection, spleen remodeling results in the rapid loss of the IgM+ marginal zone (IgM+MZ) B cell population characterized as B220+IgMHighIgDInt CD21HighCD23LowCD1d+CD138−. These cells, when isolated during the first peak of infection, stained positive for Annexin V and had increased caspase-3 enzyme activity. Elevated caspase-3 mRNA levels coincided with decreased mRNA levels of the anti-apoptotic Bcl-2 protein and BAFF receptor (BAFF-R), indicating the onset of apoptosis. Moreover, affected B cells became unresponsive to stimulation by BCR cross-linking with anti-IgM Fab fragments. In vivo, infection-induced loss of IgM+ B cells coincided with the disappearance of protective variant-specific T-independent IgM responses, rendering the host rapidly susceptible to re-challenge with previously encountered parasites. Finally, using the well-established human diphtheria, tetanus, and B. pertussis (DTPa) vaccination model in mice, we show that T. brucei infections abrogate vaccine-induced protective responses to a non-related pathogen such as B. pertussis. Infections with T. brucei parasites result in the rapid loss of T–cell independent IgM+MZ B

  14. Protective Vaccine-Induced CD4+ T Cell-Independent B Cell Responses against Rabies Infection

    PubMed Central

    Dorfmeier, Corin L.; Lytle, Andrew G.; Dunkel, Amber L.; Gatt, Anthony

    2012-01-01

    A major goal in rabies virus (RV) research is to develop a single-dose postexposure prophylaxis (PEP) that would simplify vaccination protocols, reduce costs associated with rabies prevention in humans, and save lives. Live replication-deficient RV-based vaccines are emerging as promising single-dose vaccines to replace currently licensed inactivated RV-based vaccines. Nonetheless, little is known about how effective B cells develop in response to live RV-based vaccination. Understanding this fundamental property of rabies immunology may help in developing a single-dose RV vaccine. Typically, vaccines induce B cells secreting high-affinity, class-switched antibodies during germinal center (GC) reactions; however, there is a lag time between vaccination and the generation of GC B cells. In this report, we show that RV-specific antibodies are detected in mice immunized with live but not inactivated RV-based vaccines before B cells displaying a GC B cell phenotype (B220+GL7hiCD95hi) are formed, indicating a potential role for T cell-independent and early extrafollicular T cell-dependent antibody responses in the protection against RV infection. Using two mouse models of CD4+ T cell deficiency, we show that B cells secreting virus-neutralizing antibodies (VNAs) are induced via T cell-independent mechanisms within 4 days postimmunization with a replication-deficient RV-based vaccine. Importantly, mice that are completely devoid of T cells (B6.129P2-Tcrβtm1Mom Tcrδtm1Mom/J) show protection against pathogenic challenge shortly after immunization with a live replication-deficient RV-based vaccine. We show that vaccines that can exploit early pathways of B cell activation and development may hold the key for the development of a single-dose RV vaccine wherein the rapid induction of VNA is critical. PMID:22896601

  15. Biofilm Matrix Exoproteins Induce a Protective Immune Response against Staphylococcus aureus Biofilm Infection

    PubMed Central

    Gil, Carmen; Solano, Cristina; Burgui, Saioa; Latasa, Cristina; García, Begoña; Toledo-Arana, Alejandro

    2014-01-01

    The Staphylococcus aureus biofilm mode of growth is associated with several chronic infections that are very difficult to treat due to the recalcitrant nature of biofilms to clearance by antimicrobials. Accordingly, there is an increasing interest in preventing the formation of S. aureus biofilms and developing efficient antibiofilm vaccines. Given the fact that during a biofilm-associated infection, the first primary interface between the host and the bacteria is the self-produced extracellular matrix, in this study we analyzed the potential of extracellular proteins found in the biofilm matrix to induce a protective immune response against S. aureus infections. By using proteomic approaches, we characterized the exoproteomes of exopolysaccharide-based and protein-based biofilm matrices produced by two clinical S. aureus strains. Remarkably, results showed that independently of the nature of the biofilm matrix, a common core of secreted proteins is contained in both types of exoproteomes. Intradermal administration of an exoproteome extract of an exopolysaccharide-dependent biofilm induced a humoral immune response and elicited the production of interleukin 10 (IL-10) and IL-17 in mice. Antibodies against such an extract promoted opsonophagocytosis and killing of S. aureus. Immunization with the biofilm matrix exoproteome significantly reduced the number of bacterial cells inside a biofilm and on the surrounding tissue, using an in vivo model of mesh-associated biofilm infection. Furthermore, immunized mice also showed limited organ colonization by bacteria released from the matrix at the dispersive stage of the biofilm cycle. Altogether, these data illustrate the potential of biofilm matrix exoproteins as a promising candidate multivalent vaccine against S. aureus biofilm-associated infections. PMID:24343648

  16. Photodynamic Therapy Can Induce a Protective Innate Immune Response against Murine Bacterial Arthritis via Neutrophil Accumulation

    PubMed Central

    Tanaka, Masamitsu; Mroz, Pawel; Dai, Tianhong; Huang, Liyi; Morimoto, Yuji; Kinoshita, Manabu; Yoshihara, Yasuo; Nemoto, Koichi; Shinomiya, Nariyoshi; Seki, Suhji; Hamblin, Michael R.

    2012-01-01

    Background Local microbial infections induced by multiple-drug-resistant bacteria in the orthopedic field can be intractable, therefore development of new therapeutic modalities is needed. Photodynamic therapy (PDT) is a promising alternative modality to antibiotics for intractable microbial infections, and we recently reported that PDT has the potential to accumulate neutrophils into the infected site which leads to resolution of the infection. PDT for cancer has long been known to be able to stimulate the innate and adaptive arms of the immune system. Methodology/Principal Findings In the present study, a murine methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) arthritis model using bioluminescent MRSA and polystyrene microparticles was established, and both the therapeutic (Th-PDT) and preventive (Pre-PDT) effects of PDT using methylene blue as photosensitizer were examined. Although Th-PDT could not demonstrate direct bacterial killing, neutrophils were accumulated into the infectious joint space after PDT and MRSA arthritis was reduced. With the preconditioning Pre-PDT regimen, neutrophils were quickly accumulated into the joint immediately after bacterial inoculation and bacterial growth was suppressed and the establishment of infection was inhibited. Conclusions/Significance This is the first demonstration of a protective innate immune response against a bacterial pathogen produced by PDT. PMID:22761911

  17. Anthracyclines Induce DNA Damage Response-Mediated Protection against Severe Sepsis

    PubMed Central

    Figueiredo, Nuno; Chora, Angelo; Raquel, Helena; Pejanovic, Nadja; Pereira, Pedro; Hartleben, Björn; Neves-Costa, Ana; Moita, Catarina; Pedroso, Dora; Pinto, Andreia; Marques, Sofia; Faridi, Hafeez; Costa, Paulo; Gozzelino, Raffaella; Zhao, Jimmy L.; Soares, Miguel P.; Gama-Carvalho, Margarida; Martinez, Jennifer; Zhang, Qingshuo; Döring, Gerd; Grompe, Markus; Simas, J. Pedro; Huber, Tobias B.; Baltimore, David; Gupta, Vineet; Green, Douglas R.; Ferreira, João A.; Moita, Luis F.

    2014-01-01

    Summary Severe sepsis remains a poorly understood systemic inflammatory condition with high mortality rates and limited therapeutic options in addition to organ support measures. Here we show that the clinically approved group of anthracyclines acts therapeutically at a low dose regimen to confer robust protection against severe sepsis in mice. This salutary effect is strictly dependent on the activation of DNA damage response and autophagy pathways in the lung, as demonstrated by deletion of the ataxia telangiectasia mutated (Atm) or the autophagy-related protein 7 (Atg7) specifically in this organ. The protective effect of anthracyclines occurs irrespectively of pathogen burden, conferring disease tolerance to severe sepsis. These findings demonstrate that DNA damage responses, including the ATM and Fancony Anemia pathways, are important modulators of immune responses and might be exploited to confer protection to inflammation-driven conditions, including severe sepsis. PMID:24184056

  18. Anthracyclines induce DNA damage response-mediated protection against severe sepsis.

    PubMed

    Figueiredo, Nuno; Chora, Angelo; Raquel, Helena; Pejanovic, Nadja; Pereira, Pedro; Hartleben, Björn; Neves-Costa, Ana; Moita, Catarina; Pedroso, Dora; Pinto, Andreia; Marques, Sofia; Faridi, Hafeez; Costa, Paulo; Gozzelino, Raffaella; Zhao, Jimmy L; Soares, Miguel P; Gama-Carvalho, Margarida; Martinez, Jennifer; Zhang, Qingshuo; Döring, Gerd; Grompe, Markus; Simas, J Pedro; Huber, Tobias B; Baltimore, David; Gupta, Vineet; Green, Douglas R; Ferreira, João A; Moita, Luis F

    2013-11-14

    Severe sepsis remains a poorly understood systemic inflammatory condition with high mortality rates and limited therapeutic options in addition to organ support measures. Here we show that the clinically approved group of anthracyclines acts therapeutically at a low dose regimen to confer robust protection against severe sepsis in mice. This salutary effect is strictly dependent on the activation of DNA damage response and autophagy pathways in the lung, as demonstrated by deletion of the ataxia telangiectasia mutated (Atm) or the autophagy-related protein 7 (Atg7) specifically in this organ. The protective effect of anthracyclines occurs irrespectively of pathogen burden, conferring disease tolerance to severe sepsis. These findings demonstrate that DNA damage responses, including the ATM and Fanconi Anemia pathways, are important modulators of immune responses and might be exploited to confer protection to inflammation-driven conditions, including severe sepsis. PMID:24184056

  19. Plant responses to abiotic stresses: heavy metal-induced oxidative stress and protection by mycorrhization.

    PubMed

    Schützendübel, Andres; Polle, Andrea

    2002-05-01

    cadmium results in unspecific necrosis. Plants in certain mycorrhizal associations are less sensitive to cadmium stress than non-mycorrhizal plants. Data about antioxidative systems in mycorrhizal fungi in pure culture and in symbiosis are scarce. The present results indicate that mycorrhization stimulated the phenolic defence system in the Paxillus-Pinus mycorrhizal symbiosis. Cadmium-induced changes in mycorrhizal roots were absent or smaller than those in non-mycorrhizal roots. These observations suggest that although changes in rhizospheric conditions were perceived by the root part of the symbiosis, the typical Cd-induced stress responses of phenolics were buffered. It is not known whether mycorrhization protected roots from Cd-induced injury by preventing access of cadmium to sensitive extra- or intracellular sites, or by excreted or intrinsic metal-chelators, or by other defence systems. It is possible that mycorrhizal fungi provide protection via GSH since higher concentrations of this thiol were found in pure cultures of the fungi than in bare roots. The development of stress-tolerant plant-mycorrhizal associations may be a promising new strategy for phytoremediation and soil amelioration measures. PMID:11997381

  20. alpha-Galactosylceramide can act as a nasal vaccine adjuvant inducing protective immune responses against viral infection and tumor.

    PubMed

    Ko, Sung-Youl; Ko, Hyun-Jeong; Chang, Woo-Sung; Park, Se-Ho; Kweon, Mi-Na; Kang, Chang-Yuil

    2005-09-01

    alpha-Galactosylceramide (alpha-GalCer) is a ligand of invariant Valpha14+ NKT cells and is presented by CD1d molecule on APC. NKT cells produce a large amount of Th1 and Th2 cytokines in response to alpha-GalCer-presented APC. In this study, we assessed whether alpha-GalCer could act as an effective nasal vaccine adjuvant for mucosal vaccine that would be capable of inducing systemic as well as mucosal immune responses. When alpha-GalCer was administered with OVA via the intranasal route to C57BL/6 and BALB/c mice, significant OVA-specific mucosal secretory IgA, systemic IgG, and CTL responses were induced with mixed Th1 and Th2 cytokine profiles seen in both strains of mice. Interestingly, as BALB/c mice were intranasally immunized with PR8 hemagglutinin Ag isolated from influenza virus A/PR/8/34 together with alpha-GalCer, significant protection was afforded against influenza viral infection. When alpha-GalCer was coimmunized with a replication-deficient live adenovirus to BALB/c mice, it significantly induced both humoral and cellular immune responses. In addition, intranasal administration of OVA with alpha-GalCer showed complete protection against EG7 tumor challenge in C57BL/6. The adjuvant effects induced by intranasal coadministration with alpha-GalCer were blocked in CD1d-/- mice, indicating that the immune responses were exclusively mediated by CD1d molecule on APC. Most interestingly, intranasally coadministered alpha-GalCer activated naive T cells and triggered them to differentiate into functional effector T cells when CFSE-labeled OT-1 cells were adoptively transferred into syngeneic mice. Overall, our results are the first to show that alpha-GalCer can act as a nasal vaccine adjuvant inducing protective immune responses against viral infections and tumors. PMID:16116223

  1. An Alphavirus Vector-Based Tetravalent Dengue Vaccine Induces a Rapid and Protective Immune Response in Macaques That Differs Qualitatively from Immunity Induced by Live Virus Infection

    PubMed Central

    Sariol, Carlos A.; Mattocks, Melissa D.; Wahala M. P. B., Wahala; Yingsiwaphat, Vorraphun; Collier, Martha L.; Whitley, Jill; Mikkelsen, Rochelle; Rodriguez, Idia V.; Martinez, Melween I.; de Silva, Aravinda; Johnston, Robert E.

    2013-01-01

    Despite many years of research, a dengue vaccine is not available, and the more advanced live attenuated vaccine candidate in clinical trials requires multiple immunizations with long interdose periods and provides low protective efficacy. Here, we report important contributions to the development of a second-generation dengue vaccine. First, we demonstrate that a nonpropagating vaccine vector based on Venezuelan equine encephalitis virus replicon particles (VRP) expressing two configurations of dengue virus E antigen (subviral particles [prME] and soluble E dimers [E85]) successfully immunized and protected macaques against dengue virus, while antivector antibodies did not interfere with a booster immunization. Second, compared to prME-VRP, E85-VRP induced neutralizing antibodies faster, to higher titers, and with improved protective efficacy. Third, this study is the first to map antigenic domains and specificities targeted by vaccination versus natural infection, revealing that, unlike prME-VRP and live virus, E85-VRP induced only serotype-specific antibodies, which predominantly targeted EDIII, suggesting a protective mechanism different from that induced by live virus and possibly live attenuated vaccines. Fourth, a tetravalent E85-VRP dengue vaccine induced a simultaneous and protective response to all 4 serotypes after 2 doses given 6 weeks apart. Balanced responses and protection in macaques provided further support for exploring the immunogenicity and safety of this vaccine candidate in humans. PMID:23302884

  2. CD8 T Cell Response Maturation Defined by Anentropic Specificity and Repertoire Depth Correlates with SIVΔnef-induced Protection

    PubMed Central

    Adnan, Sama; Colantonio, Arnaud D.; Yu, Yi; Gillis, Jacqueline; Wong, Fay E.; Becker, Ericka A.; Reeves, R. Keith; Lifson, Jeffrey D.; O’Connor, Shelby L.; Johnson, R. Paul

    2015-01-01

    The live attenuated simian immunodeficiency virus (LASIV) vaccine SIVΔnef is one of the most effective vaccines in inducing protection against wild-type lentiviral challenge, yet little is known about the mechanisms underlying its remarkable protective efficacy. Here, we exploit deep sequencing technology and comprehensive CD8 T cell epitope mapping to deconstruct the CD8 T cell response, to identify the regions of immune pressure and viral escape, and to delineate the effect of epitope escape on the evolution of the CD8 T cell response in SIVΔnef-vaccinated animals. We demonstrate that the initial CD8 T cell response in the acute phase of SIVΔnef infection is mounted predominantly against more variable epitopes, followed by widespread sequence evolution and viral escape. Furthermore, we show that epitope escape expands the CD8 T cell repertoire that targets highly conserved epitopes, defined as anentropic specificity, and generates de novo responses to the escaped epitope variants during the vaccination period. These results correlate SIVΔnef-induced protection with expanded anentropic specificity and increased response depth. Importantly, these findings render SIVΔnef, long the gold standard in HIV/SIV vaccine research, as a proof-of-concept vaccine that highlights the significance of the twin principles of anentropic specificity and repertoire depth in successful vaccine design. PMID:25688559

  3. Low-dose radiation exposure induces a HIF-1-mediated adaptive and protective metabolic response

    PubMed Central

    Lall, R; Ganapathy, S; Yang, M; Xiao, S; Xu, T; Su, H; Shadfan, M; Asara, J M; Ha, C S; Ben-Sahra, I; Manning, B D; Little, J B; Yuan, Z-M

    2014-01-01

    Because of insufficient understanding of the molecular effects of low levels of radiation exposure, there is a great uncertainty regarding its health risks. We report here that treatment of normal human cells with low-dose radiation induces a metabolic shift from oxidative phosphorylation to aerobic glycolysis resulting in increased radiation resistance. This metabolic change is highlighted by upregulation of genes encoding glucose transporters and enzymes of glycolysis and the oxidative pentose phosphate pathway, concomitant with downregulation of mitochondrial genes, with corresponding changes in metabolic flux through these pathways. Mechanistically, the metabolic reprogramming depends on HIF1α, which is induced specifically by low-dose irradiation linking the metabolic pathway with cellular radiation dose response. Increased glucose flux and radiation resistance from low-dose irradiation are also observed systemically in mice. This highly sensitive metabolic response to low-dose radiation has important implications in understanding and assessing the health risks of radiation exposure. PMID:24583639

  4. Protective effect of taraxasterol against LPS-induced endotoxic shock by modulating inflammatory responses in mice.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Xuemei; Xiong, Huanzhang; Li, Hongyu; Cheng, Yao

    2014-02-01

    Taraxasterol, a pentacyclic-triterpene, was isolated from the Chinese medicinal herb Taraxacum officinale. In the present study, we investigated the protective effect of taraxasterol on murine model of endotoxic shock and the mechanism of its action. Mice were treated with 2.5, 5 and 10 mg/kg of taraxasterol prior to a lethal dose of lipopolysaccharide (LPS) challenge. Survival of mice was monitored twice a day for 7 days. To further understand the mechanism, the serum levels of inflammatory cytokine tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α), interferon-γ (IFN-γ), interleukin-1β (IL-1β), interleukin-6 (IL-6) and mediator nitric oxide (NO), prostaglandin E₂ (PGE₂) as well as histology of lungs were examined. The results showed that taraxasterol significantly improved mouse survival and attenuated tissue injury of the lungs in LPS-induced endotoxemic mice. Further studies revealed that taraxasterol significantly reduced TNF-α, IFN-γ, IL-1β, IL-6, NO and PGE₂ levels in sera from mice with endotoxic shock. These results indicate that taraxasterol has a protective effect on murine endotoxic shock induced by LPS through modulating inflammatory cytokine and mediator secretion. This finding might provide a new strategy for the treatment of endotoxic shock and associated inflammation. PMID:24286370

  5. Trypanosoma cruzi extracts elicit protective immune response against chemically induced colon and mammary cancers.

    PubMed

    Ubillos, Luis; Freire, Teresa; Berriel, Edgardo; Chiribao, María Laura; Chiale, Carolina; Festari, María Florencia; Medeiros, Andrea; Mazal, Daniel; Rondán, Mariella; Bollati-Fogolín, Mariela; Rabinovich, Gabriel A; Robello, Carlos; Osinaga, Eduardo

    2016-04-01

    Trypanosoma cruzi, the protozoan parasite that causes Chagas' disease, has anticancer effects mediated, at least in part, by parasite-derived products which inhibit growth of tumor cells. We investigated whether immunity to T. cruzi antigens could induce antitumor activity, using two rat models which reproduce human carcinogenesis: colon cancer induced by 1,2-dimethylhydrazine (DMH), and mammary cancer induced by N-nitroso-N-methylurea (NMU). We found that vaccination with T. cruzi epimastigote lysates strongly inhibits tumor development in both animal models. Rats immunized with T. cruzi antigens induce activation of both CD4(+) and CD8(+) T cells and splenocytes from these animals showed higher cytotoxic responses against tumors as compared to rats receiving adjuvant alone. Tumor-associated immune responses included increasing number of CD11b/c(+) His48(-) MHC II(+) cells corresponding to macrophages and/or dendritic cells, which exhibited augmented NADPH-oxidase activity. We also found that T. cruzi lysate vaccination developed antibodies specific for colon and mammary rat cancer cells, which were capable of mediating antibody-dependent cellular cytotoxicity (ADCC) in vitro. Anti-T. cruzi antibodies cross-reacted with human colon and breast cancer cell lines and recognized 41/60 (68%) colon cancer and 38/63 (60%) breast cancer samples in a series of 123 human tumors. Our results suggest that T. cruzi antigens can evoke an integrated antitumor response involving both the cellular and humoral components of the immune response and provide novel insights into the understanding of the intricate relationship between parasite infection and tumor growth. PMID:26519949

  6. Sulforaphane protects against acrolein-induced oxidative stress and inflammatory responses: modulation of Nrf-2 and COX-2 expression

    PubMed Central

    Deng, Yu-Hui; Cui, Fa-Cai

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Acrolein (2-propenal) is a reactive α, β-unsaturated aldehyde which causes a health hazard to humans. The present study focused on determining the protection offered by sulforaphane against acrolein-induced damage in peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC). Material and methods Acrolein-induced oxidative stress was determined through evaluating the levels of reactive oxygen species, protein carbonyl and sulfhydryl content, thiobarbituric acid reactive species, total oxidant status and antioxidant status (total antioxidant capacity, glutathione, superoxide dismutase, catalase, glutathione peroxidase, glutathione-S-transferase activity). Also, Nrf-2 expression levels were determined using western blot analysis. Acrolein-induced inflammation was determined through analyzing expression of cyclooxygenase-2 by western blot and PGE2 levels by ELISA. The protection offered by sulforaphane against acrolein-induced oxidative stress and inflammation was studied. Results Acrolein showed a significant (p < 0.001) increase in the levels of oxidative stress parameters and down-regulated Nrf-2 expression. Acrolein-induced inflammation was observed through upregulation (p < 0.001) of COX-2 and PGE2 levels. Pretreatment with sulforaphane enhanced the antioxidant status through upregulating Nrf-2 expression (p < 0.001) in PBMC. Acrolein-induced inflammation was significantly inhibited through suppression of COX-2 (p < 0.001) and PGE2 levels (p < 0.001). Conclusions The present study provides clear evidence that pre-treatment with sulforaphane completely restored the antioxidant status and prevented inflammatory responses mediated by acrolein. Thus the protection offered by sulforaphane against acrolein-induced damage in PBMC is attributed to its anti-oxidant and anti-inflammatory potential. PMID:27478470

  7. Dose Response of Attenuated Bordetella pertussis BPZE1-Induced Protection in Mice▿

    PubMed Central

    Mielcarek, Nathalie; Debrie, Anne-Sophie; Mahieux, Severine; Locht, Camille

    2010-01-01

    Despite the availability of efficacious vaccines, the incidence of whooping cough is still high in many countries and is even increasing in countries with high vaccine coverage. Most severe and life-threatening pertussis cases occur in infants who are too young to be sufficiently protected by current vaccine regimens. As a potential solution to this problem, we have developed an attenuated live Bordetella pertussis vaccine strain, named BPZE1. Here, we show that after a single administration, BPZE1 induces dose-dependent protection against challenge with virulent B. pertussis in low-dose and in high-dose intranasal mouse lung colonization models. In addition, we observed BPZE1 dose-dependent antibody titers to B. pertussis antigens, as well as cell-mediated immunity, evidenced by the amounts of gamma interferon (IFN-γ) released from spleen cells upon stimulation with B. pertussis antigens. These two parameters may perhaps be used as readouts in clinical trials in humans that are currently being planned. PMID:20107007

  8. An Oral Vaccine Based on U-Omp19 Induces Protection against B. abortus Mucosal Challenge by Inducing an Adaptive IL-17 Immune Response in Mice

    PubMed Central

    Pasquevich, Karina A.; Ibañez, Andrés E.; Coria, Lorena M.; García Samartino, Clara; Estein, Silvia M.; Zwerdling, Astrid; Barrionuevo, Paula; Oliveira, Fernanda S.; Seither, Christine; Warzecha, Heribert; Oliveira, Sergio C.; Giambartolomei, Guillermo H.; Cassataro, Juliana

    2011-01-01

    As Brucella infections occur mainly through mucosal surfaces, the development of mucosal administered vaccines could be radical for the control of brucellosis. In this work we evaluated the potential of Brucella abortus 19 kDa outer membrane protein (U-Omp19) as an edible subunit vaccine against brucellosis. We investigated the protective immune response elicited against oral B. abortus infection after vaccination of mice with leaves from transgenic plants expressing U-Omp19; or with plant-made or E. coli-made purified U-Omp19. All tested U-Omp19 formulations induced protection against Brucella when orally administered without the need of adjuvants. U-Omp19 also induced protection against a systemic challenge when parenterally administered. This built-in adjuvant ability of U-Omp19 was independent of TLR4 and could be explained at least in part by its capability to activate dendritic cells in vivo. While unadjuvanted U-Omp19 intraperitoneally administered induced a specific Th1 response, following U-Omp19 oral delivery a mixed specific Th1-Th17 response was induced. Depletion of CD4+ T cells in mice orally vaccinated with U-Omp19 resulted in a loss of the elicited protection, indicating that this cell type mediates immune protection. The role of IL-17 against Brucella infection has never been explored. In this study, we determined that if IL-17A was neutralized in vivo during the challenge period, the mucosal U-Omp19 vaccine did not confer mucosal protection. On the contrary, IL-17A neutralization during the infection did not influence at all the subsistence and growth of this bacterium in PBS-immunized mice. All together, our results indicate that an oral unadjuvanted vaccine based on U-Omp19 induces protection against a mucosal challenge with Brucella abortus by inducing an adaptive IL-17 immune response. They also indicate different and important new aspects i) IL-17 does not contribute to reduce the bacterial burden in non vaccinated mice and ii) IL-17 plays a

  9. Outer Membrane Protein A (OmpA) of Shigella flexneri 2a, Induces Protective Immune Response in a Mouse Model

    PubMed Central

    Pore, Debasis; Mahata, Nibedita; Pal, Amit; Chakrabarti, Manoj K.

    2011-01-01

    Background In our earlier studies 34 kDa outer membrane protein (OMP) of Shigella flexneri 2a has been identified as an efficient immunostimulant. Key Results In the present study MALDI-TOF MS analysis of the purified 34 kDa OMP of Shigella flexneri 2a shows considerable sequence homology (Identity 65%) with the OmpA of S. flexneri 2a. By using the specific primers, the gene of interest has been amplified from S. flexneri 2a (N.Y-962/92) genomic DNA, cloned in pET100/D-TOPO® vector and expressed using induction with isopropyl thiogalactoside (IPTG) for the first time. Immunogenicity and protective efficacy of the recombinant OmpA has been evaluated in an intranasally immunized murine pulmonary model. The recombinant protein induces significantly enhanced protein specific IgG and IgA Abs in both mucosal and systemic compartments and IgA secreting cells in the systemic compartment (spleen). The mice immunized with OmpA have been protected completely from systemic challenge with a lethal dose of virulent S. flexneri 2a. Immunization with the protein causes mild polymorphonuclear neutrophil infiltration in the lung, without inducing the release of large amounts of proinflammatory cytokines. Conclusion These results suggest that the OmpA of S. flexneri 2a can be an efficacious mucosal immunogen inducing protective immune responses. Our findings also demonstrate that antibodies and Th1 immune response may be associated with the marked protective efficacy of immunized mice after intranasal shigellae infection. PMID:21818362

  10. Recombinant Forms of Leishmania amazonensis Excreted/Secreted Promastigote Surface Antigen (PSA) Induce Protective Immune Responses in Dogs.

    PubMed

    Petitdidier, Elodie; Pagniez, Julie; Papierok, Gérard; Vincendeau, Philippe; Lemesre, Jean-Loup; Bras-Gonçalves, Rachel

    2016-05-01

    Preventive vaccination is a highly promising strategy for interrupting leishmaniasis transmission that can, additionally, contribute to elimination. A vaccine formulation based on naturally excreted secreted (ES) antigens was prepared from L. infantum promastigote culture supernatant. This vaccine achieved successful results in Phase III trials and was licensed and marketed as CaniLeish. We recently showed that newly identified ES promastigote surface antigen (PSA), from both viable promastigotes and axenically-grown amastigotes, represented the major constituent and the highly immunogenic antigen of L. infantum and L. amazonensis ES products. We report here that three immunizations with either the recombinant ES LaPSA-38S (rPSA) or its carboxy terminal part LaPSA-12S (Cter-rPSA), combined with QA-21 as adjuvant, confer high levels of protection in naive L. infantum-infected Beagle dogs, as checked by bone marrow parasite absence in respectively 78.8% and 80% of vaccinated dogs at 6 months post-challenge. The parasite burden in infected vaccinated dogs was significantly reduced compared to placebo group, as measured by q-PCR. Moreover, our results reveal humoral and cellular immune response clear-cut differences between vaccinated and control dogs. An early increase in specific IgG2 antibodies was observed in rPSA/QA-21- and Cter-rPSA/QA-21-immunized dogs only. They were found functionally active in vitro and were highly correlated with vaccine protection. In vaccinated protected dogs, IFN-γ and NO productions, as well as anti-leishmanial macrophage activity, were increased. These data strongly suggest that ES PSA or its carboxy-terminal part, in recombinant forms, induce protection in a canine model of zoonotic visceral leishmaniasis by inducing a Th1-dominant immune response and an appropriate specific antibody response. These data suggest that they could be considered as important active components in vaccine candidates. PMID:27223609

  11. Recombinant Forms of Leishmania amazonensis Excreted/Secreted Promastigote Surface Antigen (PSA) Induce Protective Immune Responses in Dogs

    PubMed Central

    Petitdidier, Elodie; Pagniez, Julie; Papierok, Gérard; Vincendeau, Philippe; Lemesre, Jean-Loup; Bras-Gonçalves, Rachel

    2016-01-01

    Preventive vaccination is a highly promising strategy for interrupting leishmaniasis transmission that can, additionally, contribute to elimination. A vaccine formulation based on naturally excreted secreted (ES) antigens was prepared from L. infantum promastigote culture supernatant. This vaccine achieved successful results in Phase III trials and was licensed and marketed as CaniLeish. We recently showed that newly identified ES promastigote surface antigen (PSA), from both viable promastigotes and axenically-grown amastigotes, represented the major constituent and the highly immunogenic antigen of L. infantum and L. amazonensis ES products. We report here that three immunizations with either the recombinant ES LaPSA-38S (rPSA) or its carboxy terminal part LaPSA-12S (Cter-rPSA), combined with QA-21 as adjuvant, confer high levels of protection in naive L. infantum-infected Beagle dogs, as checked by bone marrow parasite absence in respectively 78.8% and 80% of vaccinated dogs at 6 months post-challenge. The parasite burden in infected vaccinated dogs was significantly reduced compared to placebo group, as measured by q-PCR. Moreover, our results reveal humoral and cellular immune response clear-cut differences between vaccinated and control dogs. An early increase in specific IgG2 antibodies was observed in rPSA/QA-21- and Cter-rPSA/QA-21-immunized dogs only. They were found functionally active in vitro and were highly correlated with vaccine protection. In vaccinated protected dogs, IFN-γ and NO productions, as well as anti-leishmanial macrophage activity, were increased. These data strongly suggest that ES PSA or its carboxy-terminal part, in recombinant forms, induce protection in a canine model of zoonotic visceral leishmaniasis by inducing a Th1-dominant immune response and an appropriate specific antibody response. These data suggest that they could be considered as important active components in vaccine candidates. PMID:27223609

  12. Protective effects of taurine on doxorubicin-induced acute hepatotoxicity through suppression of oxidative stress and apoptotic responses.

    PubMed

    Nagai, Katsuhito; Fukuno, Shuhei; Oda, Ayano; Konishi, Hiroki

    2016-01-01

    The organ toxicity of doxorubicin (DOX), an anthracycline antineoplastic agent, narrows the therapeutic window despite its clinical usefulness. In the present study, we determined whether taurine protected against DOX-induced hepatic injury, and explored the molecular mechanisms underlying the suppressive effects of taurine in terms of alterations in oxidative stress and apoptotic responses. DOX-induced body weight loss was completely suppressed by taurine treatment. Elevations in the serum activity levels of lactate dehydrogenase, aspartate aminotransferase, and alanine aminotransferase by DOX were also dose-dependently attenuated by a concurrent treatment with taurine. Superoxide dismutase activity and reduced glutathione content in the liver were decreased following the administration of DOX, whereas these changes were suppressed when 10 mg/kg taurine was given in combination with DOX. Taurine attenuated the increased expression of mRNAs for Fas and Bax after DOX exposure. Furthermore, the formation of cleaved caspase-3 protein in the group given DOX with taurine was lower than that in the group treated with DOX alone. Our results suggest that taurine can protect against DOX-induced acute hepatic damage, the underlying mechanism of which is attributable to the suppression of oxidative stress and apoptotic responses. PMID:26426519

  13. A cell wall protein-based vaccine candidate induce protective immune response against Sporothrix schenckii infection.

    PubMed

    Portuondo, Deivys Leandro; Batista-Duharte, Alexander; Ferreira, Lucas Souza; Martínez, Damiana Téllez; Polesi, Marisa Campos; Duarte, Roberta Aparecida; de Paula E Silva, Ana Carolina Alves; Marcos, Caroline Maria; Almeida, Ana Marisa Fusco de; Carlos, Iracilda Zeppone

    2016-02-01

    Sporotrichosis is a subcutaneous mycosis caused by several closely related thermo-dimorphic fungi of the Sporothrix schenckii species complex, affecting humans and other mammals. In the last few years, new strategies have been proposed for controlling sporotrichosis owning to concerns about its growing incidence in humans, cats, and dogs in Brazil, as well as the toxicity and limited efficacy of conventional antifungal drugs. In this study, we assessed the immunogenicity and protective properties of two aluminum hydroxide (AH)-adsorbed S. schenckii cell wall protein (ssCWP)-based vaccine formulations in a mouse model of systemic S. schenckii infection. Fractioning by SDS-PAGE revealed nine protein bands, two of which were functionally characterized: a 44kDa peptide hydrolase and a 47kDa enolase, which was predicted to be an adhesin. Sera from immunized mice recognized the 47kDa enolase and another unidentified 71kDa protein, whereas serum from S. schenckii-infected mice recognized both these proteins plus another unidentified 9.4kDa protein. Furthermore, opsonization with the anti-ssCWP sera led to markedly increased phagocytosis and was able to strongly inhibit the fungus' adhesion to fibroblasts. Immunization with the higher-dose AH-adjuvanted formulation led to increased ex vivo release of IL-12, IFN-γ, IL-4, and IL-17, whereas only IL-12 and IFN-γ were induced by the higher-dose non-adjuvanted formulation. Lastly, passive transference of the higher-dose AH-adjuvanted formulation's anti-ssCWP serum was able to afford in vivo protection in a subsequent challenge with S. schenckii, becoming a viable vaccine candidate for further testing. PMID:26547105

  14. Streptozotocin induced activation of oxidative stress responsive splenic cell signaling pathways: Protective role of arjunolic acid

    SciTech Connect

    Manna, Prasenjit; Ghosh, Jyotirmoy; Das, Joydeep

    2010-04-15

    Present study investigates the beneficial role of arjunolic acid (AA) against the alteration in the cytokine levels and simultaneous activation of oxidative stress responsive signaling pathways in spleen under hyperglycemic condition. Diabetes was induced by injection of streptozotocin (STZ) (at a dose of 70 mg/kg body weight, injected in the tail vain). STZ administration elevated the levels of IL-2 as well as IFN-gamma and attenuated the level of TNF-alpha in the sera of diabetic animals. In addition, hyperglycemia is also associated with the increased production of intracellular reactive intermediates resulting with the elevation in lipid peroxidation, protein carbonylation and reduction in intracellular antioxidant defense. Investigating the oxidative stress responsive cell signaling pathways, increased expressions (immunoreactive concentrations) of phosphorylated p65 as well as its inhibitor protein phospho IkappaBalpha and phosphorylated mitogen activated protein kinases (MAPKs) have been observed in diabetic spleen tissue. Studies on isolated splenocytes revealed that hyperglycemia caused disruption of mitochondrial membrane potential, elevation in the concentration of cytosolic cytochrome c as well as activation of caspase 3 leading to apoptotic cell death. Histological examination revealed that diabetic induction depleted the white pulp scoring which is in agreement with the reduced immunological response. Treatment with AA prevented the hyperglycemia and its associated pathogenesis in spleen tissue. Results suggest that AA might act as an anti-diabetic and immunomodulatory agent against hyperglycemia.

  15. Barrier protective effects of withaferin A in HMGB1-induced inflammatory responses in both cellular and animal models

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, Wonhwa; Kim, Tae Hoon; Ku, Sae-Kwang; Min, Kyoung-jin; Lee, Hyun-Shik; Kwon, Taeg Kyu; Bae, Jong-Sup

    2012-07-01

    Withaferin A (WFA), an active compound from Withania somnifera, is widely researched for its anti-inflammatory, cardioactive and central nervous system effects. In this study, we first investigated the possible barrier protective effects of WFA against pro-inflammatory responses in human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs) and in mice induced by high mobility group box 1 protein (HMGB1) and the associated signaling pathways. The barrier protective activities of WFA were determined by measuring permeability, leukocytes adhesion and migration, and activation of pro-inflammatory proteins in HMGB1-activated HUVECs. We found that WFA inhibited lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-induced HMGB1 release and HMGB1-mediated barrier disruption, expression of cell adhesion molecules (CAMs) and adhesion/transendothelial migration of leukocytes to human endothelial cells. WFA also suppressed acetic acid-induced hyperpermeability and carboxymethylcellulose-induced leukocytes migration in vivo. Further studies revealed that WFA suppressed the production of interleukin 6, tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α) and activation of nuclear factor-κB (NF-κB) by HMGB1. Collectively, these results suggest that WFA protects vascular barrier integrity by inhibiting hyperpermeability, expression of CAMs, adhesion and migration of leukocytes, thereby endorsing its usefulness as a therapy for vascular inflammatory diseases. -- Highlights: ► Withaferin A inhibited LPS induced HMGB1 release. ► Withaferin A reduced HMGB1-mediated hyperpermeability. ► Withaferin A inhibited HMGB1-mediated adhesion and migration of leukocytes. ► Withaferin A inhibited HMGB1-mediated activation of NF-κB, IL-6 and TNF-α.

  16. Micheliolide inhibits LPS-induced inflammatory response and protects mice from LPS challenge

    PubMed Central

    Qin, Xiangyang; Jiang, Xinru; Jiang, Xin; Wang, Yuli; Miao, Zhulei; He, Weigang; Yang, Guizhen; Lv, Zhenhui; Yu, Yizhi; Zheng, Yuejuan

    2016-01-01

    Sepsis is the principal cause of fatality in the intensive care units worldwide. It involves uncontrolled inflammatory response resulting in multi-organ failure and even death. Micheliolide (MCL), a sesquiterpene lactone, was reported to inhibit dextran sodium sulphate (DSS)-induced inflammatory intestinal disease, colitis-associated cancer and rheumatic arthritis. Nevertheless, the role of MCL in microbial infection and sepsis is unclear. We demonstrated that MCL decreased lipopolysaccharide (LPS, the main cell wall component of Gram-negative bacteria)-mediated production of cytokines (IL-6, TNF-α, MCP-1, etc) in Raw264.7 cells, primary macrophages, dendritic cells and human monocytes. MCL plays an anti-inflammatory role by inhibiting LPS-induced activation of NF-κB and PI3K/Akt/p70S6K pathways. It has negligible impact on the activation of mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) pathways. In the acute peritonitis mouse model, MCL reduced the secretion of IL-6, TNF-α, IL-1β, MCP-1, IFN-β and IL-10 in sera, and ameliorated lung and liver damage. MCL down-regulated the high mortality rate caused by lethal LPS challenge. Collectively, our data illustrated that MCL enabled maintenance of immune equilibrium may represent a potentially new anti-inflammatory and immunosuppressive drug candidate in the treatment of sepsis and septic shock. PMID:26984741

  17. Modification of Ad5 Hexon Hypervariable Regions Circumvents Pre-Existing Ad5 Neutralizing Antibodies and Induces Protective Immune Responses

    PubMed Central

    Bruder, Joseph T.; Semenova, Elena; Chen, Ping; Limbach, Keith; Patterson, Noelle B.; Stefaniak, Maureen E.; Konovalova, Svetlana; Thomas, Charlie; Hamilton, Melissa; King, C. Richter; Richie, Thomas L.; Doolan, Denise L.

    2012-01-01

    The development of an effective malaria vaccine is a high global health priority. Vaccine vectors based on adenovirus type 5 are capable of generating robust and protective T cell and antibody responses in animal models and are currently being evaluated in clinical trials for HIV and malaria. They appear to be more effective in terms of inducing antigen-specific immune responses as compared with non-Ad5 serotype vectors. However, the high prevalence of neutralizing antibodies to Ad5 in the human population, particularly in the developing world, has the potential to limit the effectiveness of Ad5-based vaccines. We have generated novel Ad5-based vectors that precisely replace the hexon hypervariable regions with those derived from Ad43, a subgroup D serotype with low prevalence of neutralizing antibody in humans. We have demonstrated that these hexon-modified adenovectors are not neutralized efficiently by Ad5 neutralizing antibodies in vitro using sera from mice, rabbits and human volunteers. We have also generated hexon-modified adenovectors that express a rodent malaria parasite antigen, PyCSP, and demonstrated that they are as immunogenic as an unmodified vector. Furthermore, in contrast to the unmodified vector, the hexon-modified adenovectors induced robust T cell responses in mice with high levels of Ad5 neutralizing antibody. We also show that the hexon-modified vector can be combined with unmodified Ad5 vector in prime-boost regimens to induce protective responses in mice. Our data establish that these hexon-modified vectors are highly immunogenic even in the presence of pre-existing anti-adenovirus antibodies. These hexon-modified adenovectors may have advantages in sub-Saharan Africa where there is a high prevalence of Ad5 neutralizing antibody in the population. PMID:22496772

  18. Progranulin protects against endotoxin-induced acute kidney injury by downregulating renal cell death and inflammatory responses in mice.

    PubMed

    Xu, Xiaoying; Gou, Linfeng; Zhou, Meng; Yang, Fusheng; Zhao, Yihan; Feng, Tingting; Shi, Peikun; Ghavamian, Armin; Zhao, Weiming; Yu, Yuan; Lu, Yi; Yi, Fan; Liu, Guangyi; Tang, Wei

    2016-09-01

    Progranulin (PGRN), a pluripotent secreted growth factor, is involved in various physiologic and disease processes. However, the role of PGRN in endotoxin-induced septic acute kidney injury (AKI) remains unknown. The objective of this study is to investigate the protective effects of PGRN on an endotoxin-induced AKI mouse model by using PGRN-deficient mice and recombinant PGRN (rPGRN) pretreatment. PGRN levels were increased in kidneys of wild-type (WT) mice at 6 and 24h after lipopolysaccharide (LPS) injection. Renal function detection, hematoxylin and eosin staining, immunohistochemical staining, ELISA and in situ terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase-mediated uridine triphosphate nick-end labeling were used to reveal tissue injury, inflammatory cell infiltration, production of inflammatory mediators and cell death in mouse kidneys after LPS injection. PGRN deficiency resulted in severe kidney injury and increased apoptotic death, inflammatory cell infiltration, production of pro-inflammatory mediators and the expression and nucleus-to-cytoplasmic translocation of HMGB1 in the kidney. In addition, rPGRN administration before LPS treatment ameliorated the endotoxin-induced AKI in WT mice. PGRN may be a novel biologic agent with therapeutic potential for endotoxin-induced septic AKI possibly by inhibiting LPS-induced renal cell death and inflammatory responses in mice. PMID:27367257

  19. Calcium channel blockers protect against aluminium-induced DNA damage and block adaptive response to genotoxic stress in plant cells.

    PubMed

    Achary, V Mohan M; Parinandi, Narasimham L; Panda, Brahma B

    2013-03-18

    Calcium is an important second messenger in signal transduction pathways. The role of Ca(2+) signalling in Al-induced DNA damage, cell death, and adaptive response to genotoxic stress caused by ethyl methanesulfonate (EMS) or methylmercuric chloride (MMCl) in the root cells of Allium cepa was investigated in the current study. Root cells in planta were treated with Al(3+) (800μM of AlCl(3)) for 3h without or with 2h pre-treatment with the Ca(2+) chelator (EGTA) or Ca(2+) channel blockers (lanthanum chloride, verapamil) or CaM/CDPK antagonist (W7). In addition, root cells in planta were conditioned by treatment with Al(3+) (5 or 10μM of AlCl(3)) for 2h followed by the genotoxic challenge with MMCl (1.25μM) or EMS (2.5 or 5mM) for 3h without or with the pre-treatment of the chosen Ca(2+) chelator/channel blockers/antagonist. Following the treatments, cell death and DNA damage were investigated in the root cells by comet assay. Furthermore, genotoxicity in the root meristems was determined after 18-30h of recovery. These results revealed that Al(3+) (800μM) significantly induced DNA damage and cell death in the root cells of A. cepa. On the other hand, conditioning of the root cells with Al(3+) at low concentrations (5 or 10μM) offered adaptive response leading to the protection against genotoxic stress induced by MMCl and EMS. Pre-treatment of root cells with the Ca(2+) chelator/channel blockers/antagonist not only alleviated Al(3+)-induced DNA damage and cell death induced but also blocked the Al(3+)-mediated adaptive response to genotoxic stress induced by MMCl and EMS. For the first time, the results of the present study highlighted the role of Ca(2+) signalling underlying the biphasic mode of action of Al(3+) that induced DNA damage and cell death at high doses and offered adaptation to genotoxic response in plants at low doses. PMID:23313746

  20. Vanadyl bisacetylacetonate protects β cells from palmitate-induced cell death through the unfolded protein response pathway.

    PubMed

    Gao, Zhonglan; Zhang, Chengyue; Yu, Siwang; Yang, Xiaoda; Wang, Kui

    2011-06-01

    Endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress induced by free fatty acids (FFA) is important to β-cell loss during the development of type 2 diabetes. To test whether vanadium compounds could influence ER stress and the responses in their mechanism of antidiabetic effects, we investigated the effects and the mechanism of vanadyl bisacetylacetonate [VO(acac)(2)] on β cells upon treatment with palmitate, a typical saturated FFA. The experimental results showed that VO(acac)(2) could enhance FFA-induced signaling pathways of unfolded protein responses by upregulating the prosurvival chaperone immunoglobulin heavy-chain binding protein/78-kDa glucose-regulated protein and downregulating the expression of apoptotic C/EBP homologous protein, and consequently the reduction of insulin synthesis. VO(acac)(2) also ameliorated FFA-disturbed Ca(2+) homeostasis in β cells. Overall, VO(acac)(2) enhanced stress adaption, thus protecting β cells from palmitate-induced apoptosis. This study provides some new insights into the mechanisms of antidiabetic vanadium compounds. PMID:21512771

  1. Cellular and Humoral Immune Responses and Protection against Schistosomes Induced by a Radiation-Attenuated Vaccine in Chimpanzees

    PubMed Central

    Eberl, Matthias; Langermans, Jan A. M.; Frost, Patrice A.; Vervenne, Richard A.; van Dam, Govert J.; Deelder, André M.; Thomas, Alan W.; Coulson, Patricia S.; Wilson, R. Alan

    2001-01-01

    The radiation-attenuated Schistosoma mansoni vaccine is highly effective in rodents and primates but has never been tested in humans, primarily for safety reasons. To strengthen its status as a paradigm for a human recombinant antigen vaccine, we have undertaken a small-scale vaccination and challenge experiment in chimpanzees (Pan troglodytes). Immunological, clinical, and parasitological parameters were measured in three animals after multiple vaccinations, together with three controls, during the acute and chronic stages of challenge infection up to chemotherapeutic cure. Vaccination induced a strong in vitro proliferative response and early gamma interferon production, but type 2 cytokines were dominant by the time of challenge. The controls showed little response to challenge infection before the acute stage of the disease, initiated by egg deposition. In contrast, the responses of vaccinated animals were muted throughout the challenge period. Vaccination also induced parasite-specific immunoglobulin M (IgM) and IgG, which reached high levels at the time of challenge, while in control animals levels did not rise markedly before egg deposition. The protective effects of vaccination were manifested as an amelioration of acute disease and overall morbidity, revealed by differences in gamma-glutamyl transferase level, leukocytosis, eosinophilia, and hematocrit. Moreover, vaccinated chimpanzees had a 46% lower level of circulating cathodic antigen and a 38% reduction in fecal egg output, compared to controls, during the chronic phase of infection. PMID:11500405

  2. A Nonhuman Primate Scrub Typhus Model: Protective Immune Responses Induced by pKarp47 DNA Vaccination in Cynomolgus Macaques

    PubMed Central

    Chattopadhyay, Suchismita; Jiang, Ju; Nawtaisong, Pruksa; Lee, John S.; Tan, Esterlina; Dela Cruz, Eduardo; Burgos, Jasmin; Abalos, Rodolfo; Blacksell, Stuart D.; Lombardini, Eric; Turner, Gareth D.; Day, Nicholas P. J.; Richards, Allen L.

    2015-01-01

    We developed an intradermal (ID) challenge cynomolgus macaque (Macaca fascicularis) model of scrub typhus, the leading cause of treatable undifferentiated febrile illness in tropical Asia, caused by the obligate intracellular bacterium, Orientia tsutsugamushi. A well-characterized animal model is required for the development of clinically relevant diagnostic assays and evaluation of therapeutic agents and candidate vaccines. We investigated scrub typhus disease pathophysiology and evaluated two O. tsutsugamushi 47-kDa, Ag-based candidate vaccines, a DNA plasmid vaccine (pKarp47), and a virus-vectored vaccine (Kp47/47-Venezuelan equine encephalitis virus replicon particle) for safety, immunogenicity, and efficacy against homologous ID challenge with O. tsutsugamushi Karp. Control cynomolgus macaques developed fever, classic eschars, lymphadenopathy, bacteremia, altered liver function, increased WBC counts, pathogen-specific Ab (IgM and IgG), and cell-mediated immune responses. Vaccinated macaques receiving the DNA plasmid pKarp47 vaccine had significantly increased O. tsutsugamushi–specific, IFN-γ–producing PBMCs (p = 0.04), reduced eschar frequency and bacteremia duration (p ≤ 0.01), delayed bacteremia onset (p < 0.05), reduced circulating bacterial biomass (p = 0.01), and greater reduction of liver transaminase levels (p < 0.03) than controls. This study demonstrates a vaccine-induced immune response capable of conferring sterile immunity against high-dose homologous ID challenge of O. tsutsugamushi in a nonhuman primate model, and it provides insight into cell-mediated immune control of O. tsutsugamushi and dissemination dynamics, highlights the importance of bacteremia indices for evaluation of both natural and vaccine-induced immune responses, and importantly, to our knowledge, has determined the first phenotypic correlates of immune protection in scrub typhus. We conclude that this model is suitable for detailed investigations into vaccine-induced

  3. A nonhuman primate scrub typhus model: protective immune responses induced by pKarp47 DNA vaccination in cynomolgus macaques.

    PubMed

    Paris, Daniel H; Chattopadhyay, Suchismita; Jiang, Ju; Nawtaisong, Pruksa; Lee, John S; Tan, Esterlina; Dela Cruz, Eduardo; Burgos, Jasmin; Abalos, Rodolfo; Blacksell, Stuart D; Lombardini, Eric; Turner, Gareth D; Day, Nicholas P J; Richards, Allen L

    2015-02-15

    We developed an intradermal (ID) challenge cynomolgus macaque (Macaca fascicularis) model of scrub typhus, the leading cause of treatable undifferentiated febrile illness in tropical Asia, caused by the obligate intracellular bacterium, Orientia tsutsugamushi. A well-characterized animal model is required for the development of clinically relevant diagnostic assays and evaluation of therapeutic agents and candidate vaccines. We investigated scrub typhus disease pathophysiology and evaluated two O. tsutsugamushi 47-kDa, Ag-based candidate vaccines, a DNA plasmid vaccine (pKarp47), and a virus-vectored vaccine (Kp47/47-Venezuelan equine encephalitis virus replicon particle) for safety, immunogenicity, and efficacy against homologous ID challenge with O. tsutsugamushi Karp. Control cynomolgus macaques developed fever, classic eschars, lymphadenopathy, bacteremia, altered liver function, increased WBC counts, pathogen-specific Ab (IgM and IgG), and cell-mediated immune responses. Vaccinated macaques receiving the DNA plasmid pKarp47 vaccine had significantly increased O. tsutsugamushi-specific, IFN-γ-producing PBMCs (p = 0.04), reduced eschar frequency and bacteremia duration (p ≤ 0.01), delayed bacteremia onset (p < 0.05), reduced circulating bacterial biomass (p = 0.01), and greater reduction of liver transaminase levels (p < 0.03) than controls. This study demonstrates a vaccine-induced immune response capable of conferring sterile immunity against high-dose homologous ID challenge of O. tsutsugamushi in a nonhuman primate model, and it provides insight into cell-mediated immune control of O. tsutsugamushi and dissemination dynamics, highlights the importance of bacteremia indices for evaluation of both natural and vaccine-induced immune responses, and importantly, to our knowledge, has determined the first phenotypic correlates of immune protection in scrub typhus. We conclude that this model is suitable for detailed investigations into vaccine-induced immune

  4. Immunization with Neospora caninum profilin induces limited protection and a regulatory T-cell response in mice.

    PubMed

    Mansilla, Florencia Celeste; Quintana, María Eugenia; Langellotti, Cecilia; Wilda, Maximiliano; Martinez, Andrea; Fonzo, Adriana; Moore, Dadín Prando; Cardoso, Nancy; Capozzo, Alejandra Victoria

    2016-01-01

    Profilins are actin-binding proteins that regulate the polymerization of actin filaments. In apicomplexan parasites, they are essential for invasion. Profilins also trigger the immune response of the host by activating TLRs on dendritic cells (DCs), inducing the production of pro-inflammatory cytokines. In this study we characterized for the first time the immune response and protection elicited by a vaccine based on Neospora caninum profilin in mice. Groups of eight BALB/c mice received either two doses of a recombinant N. caninum profilin expressed in Escherichia coli. (rNcPRO) or PBS, both formulated with an aqueous soy-based adjuvant enriched in TLR-agonists. Specific anti-profilin antibodies were detected in rNcPRO-vaccinated animals, mainly IgM and IgG3, which were consumed after infection. Splenocytes from rNcPRO-immunized animals proliferated after an in vitro stimulation with rNcPRO before and after challenge. An impairment of the cellular response was observed in NcPRO vaccinated and infected mice following an in vitro stimulation with native antigens of N. caninum, related to an increase in the percentage of CD4+CD25+FoxP3+. Two out of five rNcPRO-vaccinated challenged mice were protected; they were negative for parasite DNA in the brain and showed no histopathological lesions, which were found in all PBS-vaccinated animals. As a whole, our results provide evidence of a regulatory response elicited by immunization with rNcPRO, and suggest a role of profilin in the modulation and/or evasion of immune responses against N. caninum. PMID:26551412

  5. Targeted Overexpression of Inducible 6-Phosphofructo-2-kinase in Adipose Tissue Increases Fat Deposition but Protects against Diet-induced Insulin Resistance and Inflammatory Responses*

    PubMed Central

    Huo, Yuqing; Guo, Xin; Li, Honggui; Xu, Hang; Halim, Vera; Zhang, Weiyu; Wang, Huan; Fan, Yang-Yi; Ong, Kuok Teong; Woo, Shih-Lung; Chapkin, Robert S.; Mashek, Douglas G.; Chen, Yanming; Dong, Hui; Lu, Fuer; Wei, Lai; Wu, Chaodong

    2012-01-01

    Increasing evidence demonstrates the dissociation of fat deposition, the inflammatory response, and insulin resistance in the development of obesity-related metabolic diseases. As a regulatory enzyme of glycolysis, inducible 6-phosphofructo-2-kinase (iPFK2, encoded by PFKFB3) protects against diet-induced adipose tissue inflammatory response and systemic insulin resistance independently of adiposity. Using aP2-PFKFB3 transgenic (Tg) mice, we explored the ability of targeted adipocyte PFKFB3/iPFK2 overexpression to modulate diet-induced inflammatory responses and insulin resistance arising from fat deposition in both adipose and liver tissues. Compared with wild-type littermates (controls) on a high fat diet (HFD), Tg mice exhibited increased adiposity, decreased adipose inflammatory response, and improved insulin sensitivity. In a parallel pattern, HFD-fed Tg mice showed increased hepatic steatosis, decreased liver inflammatory response, and improved liver insulin sensitivity compared with controls. In both adipose and liver tissues, increased fat deposition was associated with lipid profile alterations characterized by an increase in palmitoleate. Additionally, plasma lipid profiles also displayed an increase in palmitoleate in HFD-Tg mice compared with controls. In cultured 3T3-L1 adipocytes, overexpression of PFKFB3/iPFK2 recapitulated metabolic and inflammatory changes observed in adipose tissue of Tg mice. Upon treatment with conditioned medium from iPFK2-overexpressing adipocytes, mouse primary hepatocytes displayed metabolic and inflammatory responses that were similar to those observed in livers of Tg mice. Together, these data demonstrate a unique role for PFKFB3/iPFK2 in adipocytes with regard to diet-induced inflammatory responses in both adipose and liver tissues. PMID:22556414

  6. Evaluation of adaptive immune responses and heterologous protection induced by inactivated bluetongue virus vaccines.

    PubMed

    Breard, Emmanuel; Belbis, Guillaume; Viarouge, Cyril; Nomikou, Kyriaki; Haegeman, Andy; De Clercq, Kris; Hudelet, Pascal; Hamers, Claude; Moreau, Francis; Lilin, Thomas; Durand, Benoit; Mertens, Peter; Vitour, Damien; Sailleau, Corinne; Zientara, Stéphan

    2015-01-15

    Eradication of bluetongue virus is possible, as has been shown in several European countries. New serotypes have emerged, however, for which there are no specific commercial vaccines. This study addressed whether heterologous vaccines would help protect against 2 serotypes. Thirty-seven sheep were randomly allocated to 7 groups of 5 or 6 animals. Four groups were vaccinated with commercial vaccines against BTV strains 2, 4, and 9. A fifth positive control group was given a vaccine against BTV-8. The other 2 groups were unvaccinated controls. Sheep were then challenged by subcutaneous injection of either BTV-16 (2 groups) or BTV-8 (5 groups). Taken together, 24/25 sheep from the 4 experimental groups developed detectable antibodies against the vaccinated viruses. Furthermore, sheep that received heterologous vaccines showed significantly reduced viraemia and clinical scores for BTV-16 when compared to unvaccinated controls. Reductions in clinical signs and viraemia among heterologously vaccinated sheep were not as common after challenge with BTV-8. This study shows that heterologous protection can occur, but that it is difficult to predict if partial or complete protection will be achieved following inactivated-BTV vaccination. PMID:25500308

  7. New pre-pandemic influenza vaccines: an egg- and adjuvant-independent human adenoviral vector strategy induces long-lasting protective immune responses in mice.

    PubMed

    Hoelscher, M A; Jayashankar, L; Garg, S; Veguilla, V; Lu, X; Singh, N; Katz, J M; Mittal, S K; Sambhara, S

    2007-12-01

    Highly pathogenic avian H5N1 influenza viruses that are currently circulating in southeast Asia may acquire the potential to cause the next influenza pandemic. A number of alternate approaches are being pursued to generate cross-protective, dose-sparing, safe, and effective vaccines, as traditional vaccine approaches, i.e., embryonated egg-grown, are not immunogenic. We developed a replication-incompetent adenoviral vector-based, adjuvant- and egg-independent pandemic influenza vaccine strategy as a potential alternative to conventional egg-derived vaccines. In this paper, we address suboptimal dose and longevity of vaccine-induced protective immunity and demonstrate that a vaccine dose as little as 1 x 10(6) plaque-forming unit (PFU) is sufficient to induce protective immune responses against a highly pathogenic H5N1 virus. Furthermore, the vaccine-induced humoral and cellular immune responses and protective immunity persisted at least for a year. PMID:17957181

  8. Icariin protects against titanium particle-induced osteolysis and inflammatory response in a mouse calvarial model.

    PubMed

    Shao, Hongguo; Shen, Ji; Wang, Mingjun; Cui, Jingfu; Wang, Yijun; Zhu, Shijun; Zhang, Wen; Yang, Huilin; Xu, Yaozeng; Geng, Dechun

    2015-08-01

    Periprosthetic osteolysis and subsequent aseptic loosening are common in implant failure, a complication with revision surgery being the only established treatment. Wear particle-induced inflammation and extensive osteoclastogenesis play critical roles in periprosthetic osteolysis. A recent approach in limiting osteolysis is therefore focused on inhibiting osteoclastic bone resorption. This study aimed to investigate the potential impact of icariin, the major ingredient of Epimedium, on titanium particle-induced osteolysis in a mouse calvarial model. Eighty-four male C57BL/J6 mice were divided randomly into four groups. Mice in the sham group underwent sham surgery only, whereas animals in the vehicle, low- and high-concentration icariin groups received titanium particles. Mice in the low- and high-concentration icariin groups were gavage-fed with icariin at 0.1 or 0.3 mg/g/day, respectively, until sacrifice. Mice in the sham and vehicle groups received phosphate-buffered saline daily. After 2 weeks, mouse calvariae were collected for micro-computed tomography, histomorphometry and molecular analysis. Icariin significantly reduced particle-induced bone resorption compared with the vehicle group. Icariin also prevented an increase in receptor activator of nuclear factor kappa B ligand/osteoprotegerin ratio and subsequently suppressed osteoclast formation in titanium particle-charged calvariae. In addition, immunohistochemical analysis and enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay showed icariin significantly reduced expression and secretion of tumor necrosis factor-α, interleukin-1β and interleukin-6 in the calvariae of titanium-stimulated mice. Collectively, these results suggest that icariin represents a potential treatment for titanium particle-induced osteolysis and could be developed as a new therapeutic candidate for the prevention and treatment of aseptic loosening. PMID:25985156

  9. Vaccination with phosphoglycan-deficient Leishmania major protects highly susceptible mice from virulent challenge without inducing a strong Th1 response.

    PubMed

    Uzonna, Jude E; Späth, Gerald F; Beverley, Stephen M; Scott, Phillip

    2004-03-15

    Long-term immunity to Leishmania may require the continued presence of parasites, but previous attempts to create attenuated parasites that persist without causing disease have had limited success. Since Leishmania major mutants that lack lipophosphoglycan and other secreted phosphoglycans, termed lpg2-, persist indefinitely in infected mice without inducing any disease, we tested their ability to provide protection to virulent L. major challenge. In response to leishmanial Ag stimulation, cells from lpg2--infected mice produced minimal levels of IL-4 and IL-10, as well as very low levels of IFN-gamma. Nevertheless, when BALB/c mice infected with lpg2- parasites were challenged with virulent L. major they were protected from disease. Thus, these findings report on attenuated parasites that may be used to induce long-term protection against leishmaniasis and indicate that the immunity induced can be maintained in the absence of a strong Th1 response. PMID:15004184

  10. Bm86 antigen induces a protective immune response against Boophilus microplus following DNA and protein vaccination in sheep.

    PubMed

    De Rose, R; McKenna, R V; Cobon, G; Tennent, J; Zakrzewski, H; Gale, K; Wood, P R; Scheerlinck, J P; Willadsen, P

    1999-11-30

    Vaccination of sheep with a plasmid bearing the full length gene for the tick antigen Bm86 either alone or co-administered with plasmid carrying the ovine genes for the cytokines, granulocyte and macrophage colony stimulating factor (GM-CSF) or interleukin (IL)-1beta induced a relatively low level of protection against subsequent tick infestation. This tick damage reached statistical significance only for the groups which were vaccinated with plasmid encoding for Bm86, co-administered with plasmid encoding for ovine GM-CSF. Antibody titres measured against Bm86 were also low in all groups injected with the Bm86 DNA vaccine. Antibody production and anti-tick effect were significantly less than that achieved by two vaccinations with recombinant Bm86 protein. In all cases only a low level of antigen-specific stimulation of peripheral blood lymphocytes was recorded, as measured either by the incorporation of tritiated thymidine or the release of IFN-gamma. Injection of DNA encoding for Bm86, either alone or with co-administered cytokine genes, did however prime for a strong subsequent antibody response following a single injection of recombinant Bm86 protein in adjuvant. Antibody production nevertheless appeared to be slightly less effective than following two vaccinations with recombinant protein. The persistence of antibody following vaccination was the same regardless of the method of primary sensitization. In all cases the half-life of the antibody response was approximately 40-50 days indicating that, in contrast to results reported in mice, DNA vaccination in sheep did not result in sustained antibody production. PMID:10587297

  11. Dried Plum Protects From Radiation-Induced Bone Loss by Attenuating Pro-Osteoclastic and Oxidative Stress Responses

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Globus, Ruth

    2015-01-01

    Future space explorations beyond the earths magnetosphere will increase human exposure to space radiation and associated risks to skeletal health. We hypothesize that oxidative stress resulting from radiation exposure plays a major role in progressive bone loss and dysfunction in associated tissue. In animal studies, increased free radical formation is associated with pathological changes in bone structure, enhanced bone resorption, reduced bone formation and decreased bone mineral density, which can lead to skeletal fragility. Our long-term goals are to define the mechanisms and risk of bone loss in the spaceflight environment and to facilitate the development of effective countermeasures. We had previously reported that exposure to low or high-LET radiation correlates with an acute increase in the expression of pro-osteoclastic and oxidative stress genes in bone during the early response to radiation followed by pathological changes in skeletal structure. We then conducted systematic screening for potential countermeasures against bone loss where we tested the ability of various antioxidants to mitigate the radiation-induced increase in expression of these markers. For the screen, 16-week old C57Bl6J mice were treated with a dietary antioxidant cocktail, injectable DHLA or a dried plum-enriched diet (DP). Mice were then exposed to 2Gy 137Cs radiation and one day later, marrow cells were collected and the relevant genes analyzed for expression levels. Among the candidate countermeasures tested, DP was most effective in reducing the expression of genes associated with bone loss. Furthermore, analysis of skeletal structure by microcomputed tomography (microCT) revealed that DP also prevents the radiation-induced deterioration in skeletal microarchitecture as indicated by parameters such as percent bone volume (BVTV), trabecular spacing and trabecular number. We also found that DP has similar protective effects on skeletal structure in a follow-up study using 1 Gy of

  12. Sulforaphane protects against ethanol-induced oxidative stress and apoptosis in neural crest cells by the induction of Nrf2-mediated antioxidant response

    PubMed Central

    Chen, X; Liu, J; Chen, S-Y

    2013-01-01

    Background and Purpose Nuclear factor erythroid 2-related factor (Nrf2) is a transcription factor that up-regulates a diverse array of antioxidant genes and protects cells from oxidative damage. This study is designed to determine whether D-L-sulforaphane (SFN) can protect neural crest cells (NCCs), an ethanol-sensitive cell population implicated in fetal alcohol spectrum disorders, against ethanol-induced apoptosis and whether protective effects of SFN are mediated by the induction of Nrf2-mediated antioxidant response. Experimental Approach Control, SFN-treated or Nrf2-siRNA transfected NCCs were exposed to ethanol. Nrf2 activation, the expression and activities of Nrf2 downstream antioxidant proteins, reactive oxygen species generation and apoptosis were determined in control and ethanol-exposed NCCs. Key Results Exposure of NCCs to SFN alone significantly increased Nrf2 activation and the expression of Nrf2 downstream antioxidants as well as the activities of the antioxidant enzymes. Treatment of NCCs with SFN along with ethanol significantly decreased ethanol-induced oxidative stress and apoptosis. In contrast, knockdown of Nrf2 by siRNA significantly increased the sensitivity of NCCs to ethanol-induced oxidative stress and apoptosis. Suppression of Nrf2 signalling in NCCs also significantly diminished SFN-mediated antioxidant response and abolished the protective effects of SFN on ethanol-induced oxidative stress and apoptosis. Conclusions and Implications These results demonstrated that Nrf2-mediated antioxidant response plays an important role in the susceptibility of NCCs to ethanol-induced oxidative stress and apoptosis and that the protection of SFN against ethanol-induced oxidative stress and apoptosis in NCCs is mediated by the induction of Nrf2 signalling. PMID:23425096

  13. Aspirin-triggered resolvin D1 down-regulates inflammatory responses and protects against endotoxin-induced acute kidney injury

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, Jiao; Shetty, Sreerama; Zhang, Ping; Gao, Rong; Hu, Yuxin; Wang, Shuxia; Li, Zhenyu; Fu, Jian

    2014-06-01

    The presence of endotoxin in blood can lead to acute kidney injury (AKI) and septic shock. Resolvins, the endogenous lipid mediators derived from docosahexaenoic acid, have been reported to exhibit potent anti-inflammatory action. Using a mouse model of lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-induced AKI, we investigated the effects of aspirin-triggered resolvin D1 (AT-RvD1) on inflammatory kidney injury. Administration of AT-RvD1 1 h after LPS challenge protected the mice from kidney injury as indicated by the measurements of blood urea nitrogen, serum creatinine, and morphological alterations associated with tubular damage. The protective effects were evidenced by decreased neutrophil infiltration in the kidney indicating reduction in inflammation. AT-RvD1 treatment restored kidney cell junction protein claudin-4 expression, which was otherwise reduced after LPS challenge. AT-RvD1 treatment inhibited endotoxin-induced NF-κB activation and suppressed LPS-induced ICAM-1 and VCAM-1 expression in the kidney. Moreover, AT-RvD1 treatment markedly decreased LPS-induced IL-6 level in the kidney and blocked IL-6-mediated signaling including STAT3 and ERK phosphorylation. Our findings demonstrate that AT-RvD1 is a potent anti-inflammatory mediator in LPS-induced kidney injury, and AT-RvD1 has therapeutic potential against AKI during endotoxemia.

  14. Echinacoside Protects against 6-Hydroxydopamine-Induced Mitochondrial Dysfunction and Inflammatory Responses in PC12 Cells via Reducing ROS Production

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Yue-Hua; Xuan, Zhao-Hong; Tian, Shuo; Du, Guan-Hua

    2015-01-01

    Parkinson's disease (PD) is a neurodegenerative disorder characterized by progressive loss of dopaminergic (DA) neurons at the substantia nigra. Mitochondrial dysfunction and inflammatory responses are involved in the mechanism of cell damage in PD. 6-Hydroxydopamine (6-OHDA), a dopamine analog, specifically damages dopaminergic neurons. Echinacoside (ECH) is a phenylethanoid glycoside isolated from the stems of Cistanche salsa, showing a variety of neuroprotective effects in previous studies. The present study was to investigate its effect against 6-OHDA-induced neurotoxicity and possible mechanisms in PC12 cells. The results showed that 6-OHDA reduced cell viability, decreased oxidation-reduction activity, decreased mitochondrial membrane potential, and induced mitochondria-mediated apoptosis compared with untreated PC12 cells. However, echinacoside treatment significantly attenuated these changes induced by 6-OHDA. In addition, echinacoside also could significantly alleviate the inflammatory responses induced by 6-OHDA. Further research showed that echinacoside could reduce 6-OHDA-induced ROS production in PC12 cells. These results suggest that the underlying mechanism of echinacoside against 6-OHDA-induced neurotoxicity may be involve in attenuating mitochondrial dysfunction and inflammatory responses by reducing ROS production. PMID:25788961

  15. A Curcumin Derivative That Inhibits Vinyl Carbamate-Induced Lung Carcinogenesis via Activation of the Nrf2 Protective Response

    PubMed Central

    Shen, Tao; Jiang, Tao; Long, Min; Chen, Jun; Ren, Dong-Mei; Wong, Pak Kin

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Aims: Lung cancer has a high worldwide morbidity and mortality. The employment of chemopreventive agents is effective to reduce lung cancer. Nuclear factor erythroid 2-related factor 2 (Nrf2) mitigates insults from both exogenous and endogenous sources and thus has been verified as a target for chemoprevention. Curcumin has long been recognized as a chemopreventive agent, but poor bioavailability and weak Nrf2 induction have prohibited clinical application. Thus, we have developed new curcumin derivatives and tested their Nrf2 induction. Results: Based on curcumin, we synthesized curcumin analogs with five carbon linkages and established a structure–activity relationship for Nrf2 induction. Among these derivatives, bis[2-hydroxybenzylidene]acetone (BHBA) was one of the most potent Nrf2 inducers with minimal toxicity and improved pharmacological properties and was thus selected for further investigation. BHBA activated the Nrf2 pathway in the canonical Keap1-Cys151-dependent manner. Furthermore, BHBA was able to protect human lung epithelial cells against sodium arsenite [As(III)]-induced cytotoxicity. More importantly, in an in vivo vinyl carbamate-induced lung cancer model in A/J mice, preadministration of BHBA significantly reduced lung adenocarcinoma, while curcumin failed to show any effects even at high doses. Innovation: The curcumin derivative, BHBA, is a potent inducer of Nrf2. It was demonstrated to protect against As(III) toxicity in lung epithelial cells in an Nrf2-dependent manner. Furthermore, compared with curcumin, BHBA displayed improved chemopreventive activities in a carcinogen-induced lung cancer model. Conclusion: Taken together, our results demonstrate that BHBA, a curcumin analog with improved Nrf2-activating and chemopreventive activities both in vitro and in vivo, could be developed into a chemoprotective pharmacological agent. Antioxid. Redox Signal. 23, 651–664. PMID:25891177

  16. No protection by oral terbutaline against exercise-induced asthma in children: a dose-response study.

    PubMed

    Fuglsang, G; Hertz, B; Holm, E B

    1993-04-01

    We wanted to assess the protective effects on exercise-induced asthma as well as the clinical efficacy and safety of increasing doses of a new sustained-release formulation of terbutaline sulphate, in 17 asthmatic children aged 6-12 yrs (mean 9 yrs). Placebo, 2, 4 and 6 mg terbutaline were given b.i.d. for 14 days, in a randomized, double-blind, cross-over design. At the end of each two week period, an exercise test was performed and plasma terbutaline was measured. Compared with placebo, no significant effect was seen on asthma symptoms monitored at home, or on exercise-induced asthma. The percentage falls in FEV1 after the exercise test were 36, 35, 27 and 28%, after placebo, 4, 8 and 12 mg terbutaline.day-1, respectively. There was no correlation between plasma terbutaline and dose of terbutaline. A small but statistically significant dose-related increase in morning and evening peak expiratory flow (PEF) recordings occurred, but the incidence of side-effects also increased with the dose given. There was a trend towards more side-effects when the high doses were used, and two patients withdrew from the study because of side-effects at this dose. It is concluded that continuous treatment, even with high doses of oral terbutaline, does not offer clinically useful protection against exercise-induced asthma. PMID:8491302

  17. Sargassum fulvellum Protects HaCaT Cells and BALB/c Mice from UVB-Induced Proinflammatory Responses

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Chan; Park, Gyu Hwan; Ahn, Eun Mi; Park, Chan-Ik; Jang, Jung-Hee

    2013-01-01

    Ultraviolet (UV) radiation has been reported to induce cutaneous inflammation such as erythema and edema via induction of proinflammatory enzymes and mediators. Sargassum fulvellum is a brown alga of Sargassaceae family which has been demonstrated to exhibit antipyretic, analgesic, antiedema, antioxidant, antitumor, fibrinolytic, and hepatoprotective activities. The purpose of this study is to investigate anti-inflammatory effects of ethylacetate fraction of ethanol extract of Sargassum fulvellum (SFE-EtOAc) in HaCaT keratinocytes and BALB/c mice. In HaCaT cells, SFE-EtOAc effectively inhibited UVB-induced cytotoxicity (60 mJ/cm2) and the expression of proinflammatory proteins such as cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2), tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α), and inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS). Furthermore, SFE-EtOAc significantly reduced UVB-induced production of proinflammatory mediators including prostaglandin E2 (PGE2) and nitric oxide (NO). In BALB/c mice, topical application of SFE-EtOAc prior to UVB irradiation (200 mJ/cm2) effectively suppressed the UVB-induced protein expression of COX-2, iNOS, and TNF-α and subsequently attenuated generation of PGE2 and NO as well. In another experiment, SFE-EtOAc pretreatment suppressed UVB-induced reactive oxygen species production and exhibited an antioxidant potential by upregulation of antioxidant enzymes such as catalase and Cu/Zn-superoxide dismutase in HaCaT cells. These results suggest that SFE-EtOAc could be an effective anti-inflammatory agent protecting against UVB irradiation-induced skin damages. PMID:23935680

  18. Sargassum fulvellum Protects HaCaT Cells and BALB/c Mice from UVB-Induced Proinflammatory Responses.

    PubMed

    Lee, Chan; Park, Gyu Hwan; Ahn, Eun Mi; Park, Chan-Ik; Jang, Jung-Hee

    2013-01-01

    Ultraviolet (UV) radiation has been reported to induce cutaneous inflammation such as erythema and edema via induction of proinflammatory enzymes and mediators. Sargassum fulvellum is a brown alga of Sargassaceae family which has been demonstrated to exhibit antipyretic, analgesic, antiedema, antioxidant, antitumor, fibrinolytic, and hepatoprotective activities. The purpose of this study is to investigate anti-inflammatory effects of ethylacetate fraction of ethanol extract of Sargassum fulvellum (SFE-EtOAc) in HaCaT keratinocytes and BALB/c mice. In HaCaT cells, SFE-EtOAc effectively inhibited UVB-induced cytotoxicity (60 mJ/cm(2)) and the expression of proinflammatory proteins such as cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2), tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α), and inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS). Furthermore, SFE-EtOAc significantly reduced UVB-induced production of proinflammatory mediators including prostaglandin E2 (PGE2) and nitric oxide (NO). In BALB/c mice, topical application of SFE-EtOAc prior to UVB irradiation (200 mJ/cm(2)) effectively suppressed the UVB-induced protein expression of COX-2, iNOS, and TNF-α and subsequently attenuated generation of PGE2 and NO as well. In another experiment, SFE-EtOAc pretreatment suppressed UVB-induced reactive oxygen species production and exhibited an antioxidant potential by upregulation of antioxidant enzymes such as catalase and Cu/Zn-superoxide dismutase in HaCaT cells. These results suggest that SFE-EtOAc could be an effective anti-inflammatory agent protecting against UVB irradiation-induced skin damages. PMID:23935680

  19. Outer membrane vesicles induce immune responses to virulence proteins and protect against colonization by enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Roy, Koushik; Hamilton, David J; Munson, George P; Fleckenstein, James M

    2011-11-01

    Enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli (ETEC) strains are a heterogeneous group of pathogens that produce heat-labile (LT) and/or heat-stable (ST) enterotoxins. Collectively, these pathogens are responsible for hundreds of thousands of deaths annually in developing countries, particularly in children under the age of 5 years. The heterogeneity of previously investigated molecular targets and the lack of complete sustained protection afforded by antitoxin immunity have impeded progress to date toward a broadly protective vaccine. Many pathogens, including ETEC, have the capacity to form outer membrane vesicles (OMV), which often contain one or more virulence proteins. Prompted by recent studies that identified several immunogenic virulence proteins in outer membrane vesicles of ETEC, we sought to examine the immunogenicity and protective efficacy of these structures in a murine model of infection. Here we demonstrate that immunization with OMV impairs ETEC colonization of the small intestine and stimulates antibodies that recognize the heat-labile toxin and two additional putative virulence proteins, the EtpA adhesin and CexE. Similar to earlier studies with EtpA, vaccination with LT alone also inhibited intestinal colonization. Together, these findings suggest that OMV could be exploited to deliver protective antigens relevant to development of ETEC vaccines. PMID:21900530

  20. Rabbit hemorrhagic disease virus capsid, a versatile platform for foreign B-cell epitope display inducing protective humoral immune responses

    PubMed Central

    Moreno, Noelia; Mena, Ignacio; Angulo, Iván; Gómez, Yolanda; Crisci, Elisa; Montoya, María; Castón, José R.; Blanco, Esther; Bárcena, Juan

    2016-01-01

    Virus-like particles (VLPs), comprised of viral structural proteins devoid of genetic material, are tunable nanoparticles that can be chemically or genetically engineered, to be used as platforms for multimeric display of foreign antigens. Here, we report the engineering of chimeric VLPs, derived from rabbit hemorrhagic disease virus (RHDV) for presentation of foreign B-cell antigens to the immune system. The RHDV capsid comprises 180 copies of a single capsid subunit (VP60). To evaluate the ability of chimeric RHDV VLPs to elicit protective humoral responses against foreign antigens, we tested two B-cell epitopes: a novel neutralizing B-cell epitope, derived from feline calicivirus capsid protein, and a well characterized B-cell epitope from the extracellular domain of influenza A virus M2 protein (M2e). We generated sets of chimeric RHDV VLPs by insertion of the foreign B-cell epitopes at three different locations within VP60 protein (which involved different levels of surface accessibility) and in different copy numbers per site. The immunogenic potential of the chimeric VLPs was analyzed in the mouse model. The results presented here indicated that chimeric RHDV VLPs elicit potent protective humoral responses against displayed foreign B-cell epitopes, demonstrated by both, in vitro neutralization and in vivo protection against a lethal challenge. PMID:27549017

  1. Rabbit hemorrhagic disease virus capsid, a versatile platform for foreign B-cell epitope display inducing protective humoral immune responses.

    PubMed

    Moreno, Noelia; Mena, Ignacio; Angulo, Iván; Gómez, Yolanda; Crisci, Elisa; Montoya, María; Castón, José R; Blanco, Esther; Bárcena, Juan

    2016-01-01

    Virus-like particles (VLPs), comprised of viral structural proteins devoid of genetic material, are tunable nanoparticles that can be chemically or genetically engineered, to be used as platforms for multimeric display of foreign antigens. Here, we report the engineering of chimeric VLPs, derived from rabbit hemorrhagic disease virus (RHDV) for presentation of foreign B-cell antigens to the immune system. The RHDV capsid comprises 180 copies of a single capsid subunit (VP60). To evaluate the ability of chimeric RHDV VLPs to elicit protective humoral responses against foreign antigens, we tested two B-cell epitopes: a novel neutralizing B-cell epitope, derived from feline calicivirus capsid protein, and a well characterized B-cell epitope from the extracellular domain of influenza A virus M2 protein (M2e). We generated sets of chimeric RHDV VLPs by insertion of the foreign B-cell epitopes at three different locations within VP60 protein (which involved different levels of surface accessibility) and in different copy numbers per site. The immunogenic potential of the chimeric VLPs was analyzed in the mouse model. The results presented here indicated that chimeric RHDV VLPs elicit potent protective humoral responses against displayed foreign B-cell epitopes, demonstrated by both, in vitro neutralization and in vivo protection against a lethal challenge. PMID:27549017

  2. (-)-Patchouli alcohol protects against Helicobacter pylori urease-induced apoptosis, oxidative stress and inflammatory response in human gastric epithelial cells.

    PubMed

    Xie, Jianhui; Lin, Zhixiu; Xian, Yanfang; Kong, Songzhi; Lai, Zhengquan; Ip, Siupo; Chen, Haiming; Guo, Huizhen; Su, Zuqing; Yang, Xiaobo; Xu, Yang; Su, Ziren

    2016-06-01

    (-)-Patchouli alcohol (PA), the major active principle of Pogostemonis Herba, has been reported to have anti-Helicobacter pylori and gastroprotective effects. In the present work, we aimed to investigate the possible protective effect of PA on H. pylori urease (HPU)-injured human gastric epithelial cells (GES-1) and to elucidate the underlying mechanisms of action. Results showed that pre-treatment with PA (5.0, 10.0, 20.0μM) was able to remarkably ameliorate the cytotoxicity induced by 17.0U/mg HPU in GES-1 cells. Flow cytometric analysis on cellular apoptosis showed that pre-treatment with PA effectively attenuated GES-1 cells from the HPU-induced apoptosis. Moreover, the cytoprotective effect of PA was found to be associated with amelioration of the HPU-induced disruption of MMP, attenuating oxidative stress by decreasing contents of intracellular ROS and MDA, and increasing superoxide dismutase (SOD) and catalase (CAT) enzymatic activities. In addition, pre-treatment with PA markedly attenuated the secretion of nitric oxide (NO) and pro-inflammatory cytokines such as interleukin-2 (IL-2), interleukin-4 (IL-4) and tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α), whereas elevated the anti-inflammatory cytokine interleukin-13 (IL-13) in the HPU-stimulated GES-1 cells. Molecular docking assay suggested that PA engaged in the active site of urease bearing nickel ions and interacted with important residues via covalent binding, thereby restricting the active urease catalysis conformation. Our experimental findings suggest that PA could inhibit the cellular processes critically involved in the pathogenesis of H. pylori infection, and its protective effects against the HPU-induced cytotoxicity in GES-1 cells are believed to be associated with its anti-apoptotic, antioxidative, anti-inflammatory and HPU inhibitory actions. PMID:27017292

  3. Boosting BCG-primed mice with chimeric DNA vaccine HG856A induces potent multifunctional T cell responses and enhanced protection against Mycobacterium tuberculosis.

    PubMed

    Ji, Ping; Hu, Zhi-Dong; Kang, Han; Yuan, Qin; Ma, Hui; Wen, Han-Li; Wu, Juan; Li, Zhong-Ming; Lowrie, Douglas B; Fan, Xiao-Yong

    2016-02-01

    The tuberculosis pandemic continues to rampage despite widespread use of the current Bacillus Calmette-Guerin (BCG) vaccine. Because DNA vaccines can elicit effective antigen-specific immune responses, including potent T cell-mediated immunity, they are promising vehicles for antigen delivery. In a prime-boost approach, they can supplement the inadequate anti-TB immunological memory induced by BCG. Based on this, a chimeric DNA vaccine HG856A encoding Mycobacterium tuberculosis (M. tuberculosis) immunodominant antigen Ag85A plus two copies of ESAT-6 was constructed. Potent humoral immune responses, as well as therapeutic effects induced by this DNA vaccine, were observed previously in M. tuberculosis-infected mice. In this study, we further evaluated the antigen-specific T cell immune responses and showed that repeated immunization with HG856A gave modest protection against M. tuberculosis challenge infection and significantly boosted the immune protection primed by BCG vaccination. Enhanced protection was accompanied by increased multifunctional Th1 CD4(+) T cell responses, most notably by an elevated frequency of M. tuberculosis antigen-specific IL-2-producing CD4(+) T cells post-vaccination. These data confirm the potential of chimeric DNA vaccine HG856A as an anti-TB vaccine candidate. PMID:26111521

  4. Adrenomedullin protects from experimental arthritis by down-regulating inflammation and Th1 response and inducing regulatory T cells.

    PubMed

    Gonzalez-Rey, Elena; Chorny, Alejo; O'Valle, Francisco; Delgado, Mario

    2007-01-01

    Rheumatoid arthritis is a chronic autoimmune disease of unknown etiology characterized by chronic inflammation in the joints and subsequent destruction of the cartilage and bone. The present study proposes a new strategy for the treatment of arthritis: the administration of the immunomodulatory neuropeptide adrenomedullin. Treatment with adrenomedullin significantly reduced incidence and severity of collagen-induced arthritis, an experimental model of rheumatoid arthritis, completely abrogating joint swelling and destruction of cartilage and bone. The therapeutic effect of adrenomedullin was associated with a striking reduction of the two deleterious components of the disease, ie, the Th1-driven autoimmune and inflammatory responses. Adrenomedullin also induced the generation and/or activation of efficient CD4+ CD25+ regulatory T cells in arthritis with capacity to suppress autoreactive response and restore immune tolerance, which could play a pivotal role in the therapeutic effect of adrenomedullin on experimental arthritis contributing to the restoration of immune tolerance. PMID:17200199

  5. Sestrin2 is induced by glucose starvation via the unfolded protein response and protects cells from non-canonical necroptotic cell death

    PubMed Central

    Ding, Boxiao; Parmigiani, Anita; Divakaruni, Ajit S.; Archer, Kellie; Murphy, Anne N.; Budanov, Andrei V.

    2016-01-01

    Sestrin2 is a member of a family of stress responsive proteins, which controls cell viability via antioxidant activity and regulation of the mammalian target of rapamycin protein kinase (mTOR). Sestrin2 is induced by different stress insults, which diminish ATP production and induce energetic stress in the cells. Glucose is a critical substrate for ATP production utilized via glycolysis and mitochondrial respiration as well as for glycosylation of newly synthesized proteins in the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) and Golgi. Thus, glucose starvation causes both energy deficiency and activation of ER stress followed by the unfolding protein response (UPR). Here, we show that UPR induces Sestrin2 via ATF4 and NRF2 transcription factors and demonstrate that Sestrin2 protects cells from glucose starvation-induced cell death. Sestrin2 inactivation sensitizes cells to necroptotic cell death that is associated with a decline in ATP levels and can be suppressed by Necrostatin 7. We propose that Sestrin2 protects cells from glucose starvation-induced cell death via regulation of mitochondrial homeostasis. PMID:26932729

  6. Mycobacterial Membrane Vesicles Administered Systemically in Mice Induce a Protective Immune Response to Surface Compartments of Mycobacterium tuberculosis

    PubMed Central

    Carreño, Leandro J.; Batista-Gonzalez, Ana; Baena, Andres; Venkataswamy, Manjunatha M.; Xu, Jiayong; Yu, Xiaobo; Wallstrom, Garrick; Magee, D. Mitchell; LaBaer, Joshua; Achkar, Jacqueline M.; Jacobs, William R.; Chan, John; Porcelli, Steven A.; Casadevall, Arturo

    2014-01-01

    ABSTRACT Pathogenic and nonpathogenic species of bacteria and fungi release membrane vesicles (MV), containing proteins, polysaccharides, and lipids, into the extracellular milieu. Previously, we demonstrated that several mycobacterial species, including bacillus Calmette-Guerin (BCG) and Mycobacterium tuberculosis, release MV containing lipids and proteins that subvert host immune response in a Toll-like receptor 2 (TLR2)-dependent manner (R. Prados-Rosales et al., J. Clin. Invest. 121:1471–1483, 2011, doi:10.1172/JCI44261). In this work, we analyzed the vaccine potential of MV in a mouse model and compared the effects of immunization with MV to those of standard BCG vaccination. Immunization with MV from BCG or M. tuberculosis elicited a mixed humoral and cellular response directed to both membrane and cell wall components, such as lipoproteins. However, only vaccination with M. tuberculosis MV was able to protect as well as live BCG immunization. M. tuberculosis MV boosted BCG vaccine efficacy. In summary, MV are highly immunogenic without adjuvants and elicit immune responses comparable to those achieved with BCG in protection against M. tuberculosis. PMID:25271291

  7. Bee venom phospholipase A2 induces a primary type 2 response that is dependent on the receptor ST2 and confers protective immunity.

    PubMed

    Palm, Noah W; Rosenstein, Rachel K; Yu, Shuang; Schenten, Dominik D; Florsheim, Esther; Medzhitov, Ruslan

    2013-11-14

    Venoms consist of toxic components that are delivered to their victims via bites or stings. Venoms also represent a major class of allergens in humans. Phospholipase A2 (PLA2) is a conserved component of venoms from multiple species and is the major allergen in bee venom. Here we examined how bee venom PLA2 is sensed by the innate immune system and induces a type 2 immune response in mice. We found that bee venom PLA2 induced a T helper type 2 (Th2) cell-type response and group 2 innate lymphoid cell activation via the enzymatic cleavage of membrane phospholipids and release of interleukin-33. Furthermore, we showed that the IgE response to PLA2 could protect mice from future challenge with a near-lethal dose of PLA2. These data suggest that the innate immune system can detect the activity of a conserved component of venoms and induce a protective immune response against a venom toxin. PMID:24210353

  8. Bee venom phospholipase A2 induces a primary type 2 response that is dependent on the receptor ST2 and confers protective immunity

    PubMed Central

    Palm, Noah W.; Rosenstein, Rachel K.; Yu, Shuang; Schenten, Dominik; Florsheim, Esther; Medzhitov, Ruslan

    2013-01-01

    SUMMARY Venoms consist of toxic components that are delivered to their victims via bites or stings. Venoms also represent a major class of allergens in humans. Phospholipase A2 (PLA2) is a conserved component of venoms from multiple species and is the major allergen in bee venom. Here we examined how bee venom PLA2 is sensed by the innate immune system and induces a type 2 immune response in mice. We found that bee venom PLA2 induced a T helper type 2 (Th2) cell-type response and group 2 innate lymphoid cell activation via the enzymatic cleavage of membrane phospholipids and release of interleukin-33. Furthermore, we showed that the IgE response to PLA2 could protect mice from future challenge with a near-lethal dose of PLA2. These data suggest that the innate immune system can detect the activity of a conserved component of venoms and induce a protective immune response against a venom toxin. PMID:24210353

  9. Evaluation of the protective immune response induced in mice by immunization with Schistosoma mansoni schistosomula tegument (Smteg) in association with CpG-ODN.

    PubMed

    Teixeira de Melo, Tatiane; Araujo, Juliano Michel; Campos de Sena, Isabela; Carvalho Alves, Clarice; Araujo, Neusa; Toscano Fonseca, Cristina

    2013-01-01

    In schistosomiasis, the current control strategy does not prevent reinfection, therefore, vaccine strategies are essential to combat the Schistosoma mansoni. The efficacy vaccine depends on parasite stage and effective adjuvant. We have recently demonstrated that S. mansoni schistosomula tegument (Smteg) is able to activate dendritic cells up regulate CD40 and CD86 molecules and induce a partial protection in mice (43-48%) when formulated with Freund's adjuvant. In this study we evaluated the ability of Smteg + alum or Smteg + alum + CpG-ODN to induce protection in mice. Our results demonstrate that Smteg + alum + CpG-ODN induced a partial reduction in worm burden (43.1%), reduction in the number of eggs eliminated in the feces. The protective response was associated with a predominant Th1 type of immune response, with increased production of specific IgG2c, IFN-γ and TNF-α, B cells proliferation and CD4 cells and macrophages activation. PMID:23099420

  10. Microbiota regulate the ability of lung dendritic cells to induce IgA class-switch recombination and generate protective gastrointestinal immune responses

    PubMed Central

    Ruane, Darren; Chorny, Alejo; Lee, Haekyung; Faith, Jeremiah; Pandey, Gaurav; Shan, Meimei; Simchoni, Noa; Rahman, Adeeb; Garg, Aakash; Weinstein, Erica G.; Oropallo, Michael; Gaylord, Michelle; Ungaro, Ryan; Cunningham-Rundles, Charlotte; Alexandropoulos, Konstantina; Mucida, Daniel; Merad, Miriam; Cerutti, Andrea

    2016-01-01

    Protective immunoglobulin A (IgA) responses to oral antigens are usually orchestrated by gut dendritic cells (DCs). Here, we show that lung CD103+ and CD24+CD11b+ DCs induced IgA class-switch recombination (CSR) by activating B cells through T cell–dependent or –independent pathways. Compared with lung DCs (LDC), lung CD64+ macrophages had decreased expression of B cell activation genes and induced significantly less IgA production. Microbial stimuli, acting through Toll-like receptors, induced transforming growth factor-β (TGF-β) production by LDCs and exerted a profound influence on LDC-mediated IgA CSR. After intranasal immunization with inactive cholera toxin (CT), LDCs stimulated retinoic acid–dependent up-regulation of α4β7 and CCR9 gut-homing receptors on local IgA-expressing B cells. Migration of these B cells to the gut resulted in IgA-mediated protection against an oral challenge with active CT. However, in germ-free mice, the levels of LDC-induced, CT–specific IgA in the gut are significantly reduced. Herein, we demonstrate an unexpected role of the microbiota in modulating the protective efficacy of intranasal vaccination through their effect on the IgA class-switching function of LDCs. PMID:26712806

  11. Microbiota regulate the ability of lung dendritic cells to induce IgA class-switch recombination and generate protective gastrointestinal immune responses.

    PubMed

    Ruane, Darren; Chorny, Alejo; Lee, Haekyung; Faith, Jeremiah; Pandey, Gaurav; Shan, Meimei; Simchoni, Noa; Rahman, Adeeb; Garg, Aakash; Weinstein, Erica G; Oropallo, Michael; Gaylord, Michelle; Ungaro, Ryan; Cunningham-Rundles, Charlotte; Alexandropoulos, Konstantina; Mucida, Daniel; Merad, Miriam; Cerutti, Andrea; Mehandru, Saurabh

    2016-01-11

    Protective immunoglobulin A (IgA) responses to oral antigens are usually orchestrated by gut dendritic cells (DCs). Here, we show that lung CD103(+) and CD24(+)CD11b(+) DCs induced IgA class-switch recombination (CSR) by activating B cells through T cell-dependent or -independent pathways. Compared with lung DCs (LDC), lung CD64(+) macrophages had decreased expression of B cell activation genes and induced significantly less IgA production. Microbial stimuli, acting through Toll-like receptors, induced transforming growth factor-β (TGF-β) production by LDCs and exerted a profound influence on LDC-mediated IgA CSR. After intranasal immunization with inactive cholera toxin (CT), LDCs stimulated retinoic acid-dependent up-regulation of α4β7 and CCR9 gut-homing receptors on local IgA-expressing B cells. Migration of these B cells to the gut resulted in IgA-mediated protection against an oral challenge with active CT. However, in germ-free mice, the levels of LDC-induced, CT-specific IgA in the gut are significantly reduced. Herein, we demonstrate an unexpected role of the microbiota in modulating the protective efficacy of intranasal vaccination through their effect on the IgA class-switching function of LDCs. PMID:26712806

  12. Stroke volume changes induced by a recruitment maneuver predict fluid responsiveness in patients with protective ventilation in the operating theater.

    PubMed

    De Broca, Bruno; Garnier, Jeremie; Fischer, Marc-Olivier; Archange, Thomas; Marc, Julien; Abou-Arab, Osama; Dupont, Hervé; Lorne, Emmanuel; Guinot, Pierre-Grégoire

    2016-07-01

    During abdominal surgery, the use of protective ventilation with a low tidal volume, positive expiratory pressure (PEEP) and recruitment maneuvers (RMs) may limit the applicability of dynamic preload indices. The objective of the present study was to establish whether or not the variation in stroke volume (SV) during an RM could predict fluid responsiveness.We prospectively included patients receiving protective ventilation (tidal volume: 6 mL kg, PEEP: 5-7 cmH2O; RMs). Hemodynamic variables, such as heart rate, arterial pressure, SV, cardiac output (CO), respiratory variation in SV (ΔrespSV) and pulse pressure (ΔrespPP), and the variation in SV (ΔrecSV) as well as pulse pressure (ΔrecPP) during an RM were measured at baseline, at the end of the RM, and after fluid expansion. Responders were defined as patients with an SV increase of at least 15% after infusion of 500 mL of crystalloid solution.Thirty-seven (62%) of the 60 included patients were responders. Responders and nonresponders differed significantly in terms of the median ΔrecSV (26% [19-37] vs 10% [4-12], respectively; P < 0.0001). A ΔrecSV value more than 16% predicted fluid responsiveness with an area under the receiver-operating characteristic curve (AU) of 0.95 (95% confidence interval [CI]: 0.91-0.99; P < 0.0001) and a narrow gray zone between 15% and 17%. The area under the curve values for ΔrecPP and ΔrespSV were, respectively, 0.81 (95%CI: 0.7-0.91; P = 0.0001) and 0.80 (95%CI: 0.70-0.94; P < 0.0001). ΔrespPP did not predict fluid responsiveness.During abdominal surgery with protective ventilation, a ΔrecSV value more than 16% accurately predicted fluid responsiveness and had a narrow gray zone (between 15% and 17%). ΔrecPP and ΔrespSV (but not ΔrespPP) were also predictive. PMID:27428237

  13. Stroke volume changes induced by a recruitment maneuver predict fluid responsiveness in patients with protective ventilation in the operating theater

    PubMed Central

    De Broca, Bruno; Garnier, Jeremie; Fischer, Marc-Olivier; Archange, Thomas; Marc, Julien; Abou-Arab, Osama; Dupont, Hervé; Lorne, Emmanuel; Guinot, Pierre-grégoire

    2016-01-01

    Abstract During abdominal surgery, the use of protective ventilation with a low tidal volume, positive expiratory pressure (PEEP) and recruitment maneuvers (RMs) may limit the applicability of dynamic preload indices. The objective of the present study was to establish whether or not the variation in stroke volume (SV) during an RM could predict fluid responsiveness. We prospectively included patients receiving protective ventilation (tidal volume: 6 mL kg−1, PEEP: 5–7 cmH2O; RMs). Hemodynamic variables, such as heart rate, arterial pressure, SV, cardiac output (CO), respiratory variation in SV (ΔrespSV) and pulse pressure (ΔrespPP), and the variation in SV (ΔrecSV) as well as pulse pressure (ΔrecPP) during an RM were measured at baseline, at the end of the RM, and after fluid expansion. Responders were defined as patients with an SV increase of at least 15% after infusion of 500 mL of crystalloid solution. Thirty-seven (62%) of the 60 included patients were responders. Responders and nonresponders differed significantly in terms of the median ΔrecSV (26% [19–37] vs 10% [4–12], respectively; P < 0.0001). A ΔrecSV value more than 16% predicted fluid responsiveness with an area under the receiver-operating characteristic curve (AU) of 0.95 (95% confidence interval [CI]: 0.91–0.99; P < 0.0001) and a narrow gray zone between 15% and 17%. The area under the curve values for ΔrecPP and ΔrespSV were, respectively, 0.81 (95%CI: 0.7–0.91; P = 0.0001) and 0.80 (95%CI: 0.70–0.94; P < 0.0001). ΔrespPP did not predict fluid responsiveness. During abdominal surgery with protective ventilation, a ΔrecSV value more than 16% accurately predicted fluid responsiveness and had a narrow gray zone (between 15% and 17%). ΔrecPP and ΔrespSV (but not ΔrespPP) were also predictive. PMID:27428237

  14. Multiple B-cell epitope vaccine induces a Staphylococcus enterotoxin B-specific IgG1 protective response against MRSA infection.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Zhuo; Sun, He-Qiang; Wei, Shan-Shan; Li, Bin; Feng, Qiang; Zhu, Jiang; Zeng, Hao; Zou, Quan-Ming; Wu, Chao

    2015-01-01

    No vaccine against methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) has been currently approved for use in humans. Staphylococcus enterotoxin B (SEB) is one of the most potent MRSA exotoxins. In the present study, we evaluated the efficacy and immunologic mechanisms of an SEB multiple B-cell epitope vaccine against MRSA infection. Synthetic overlapping peptide ELISA identified three novel B-cell immunodominant SEB epitopes (in addition to those previously known): SEB31-48, SEB133-150, and SEB193-210. Six B-cell immunodominant epitopes (amino acid residues 31-48, 97-114, 133-150, 193-210, 205-222, and 247-261) were sufficient to induce robust IgG1/IgG2b-specific protective responses against MRSA infection. Therefore, we constructed a recombinant MRSA SEB-specific multiple B-cell epitope vaccine Polypeptides by combining the six SEB immunodominant epitopes and demonstrated its ability to induce a robust SEB-specific IgG1 response to MRSA, as well as a Th2-directing isotype response. Moreover, Polypeptides-induced antisera stimulated synergetic opsonophagocytosis killing of MRSA. Most importantly, Polypeptides was more effective at clearing the bacteria in MRSA-infected mice than the whole SEB antigen, and was able to successfully protect mice from infection by various clinical MRSA isolates. Altogether, these results support further evaluation of the SEB multiple B-cell epitope-vaccine to address MRSA infection in humans. PMID:26201558

  15. Multiple B-cell epitope vaccine induces a Staphylococcus enterotoxin B-specific IgG1 protective response against MRSA infection

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Zhuo; Sun, He-Qiang; Wei, Shan-Shan; Li, Bin; Feng, Qiang; Zhu, Jiang; Zeng, Hao; Zou, Quan-Ming; Wu, Chao

    2015-01-01

    No vaccine against methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) has been currently approved for use in humans. Staphylococcus enterotoxin B (SEB) is one of the most potent MRSA exotoxins. In the present study, we evaluated the efficacy and immunologic mechanisms of an SEB multiple B-cell epitope vaccine against MRSA infection. Synthetic overlapping peptide ELISA identified three novel B-cell immunodominant SEB epitopes (in addition to those previously known): SEB31–48, SEB133–150, and SEB193–210. Six B-cell immunodominant epitopes (amino acid residues 31–48, 97–114, 133–150, 193–210, 205–222, and 247–261) were sufficient to induce robust IgG1/IgG2b-specific protective responses against MRSA infection. Therefore, we constructed a recombinant MRSA SEB-specific multiple B-cell epitope vaccine Polypeptides by combining the six SEB immunodominant epitopes and demonstrated its ability to induce a robust SEB-specific IgG1 response to MRSA, as well as a Th2-directing isotype response. Moreover, Polypeptides-induced antisera stimulated synergetic opsonophagocytosis killing of MRSA. Most importantly, Polypeptides was more effective at clearing the bacteria in MRSA-infected mice than the whole SEB antigen, and was able to successfully protect mice from infection by various clinical MRSA isolates. Altogether, these results support further evaluation of the SEB multiple B-cell epitope-vaccine to address MRSA infection in humans. PMID:26201558

  16. Leptin induces the phagocytosis and protective immune response in Leishmania donovani infected THP-1 cell line and human PBMCs.

    PubMed

    Dayakar, Alti; Chandrasekaran, Sambamurthy; Veronica, Jalaja; Maurya, Radheshyam

    2016-01-01

    Visceral leishmaniasis (VL) is an infectious disease responsible for several deaths in malnourished children due to impaired cell-mediated immunity, which is accompanied by low circulating leptin levels. The cytokine function of leptin is implicated for several immune regulation activities such as hematopoiesis, angiogenesis, innate and adaptive immunity. Its deficiency associated with polarization of Th2 response, which coincides with VL pathogenesis. To determine the cytokine role of leptin in case of experimental VL, we tested the leptin associated Th1/Th2 type cytokine profile at mRNA level from Leishmania donovani infected human monocytic leukemia cell line (THP-1) and peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs). We also tested the effect of leptin on macrophages activation (viz. studying the phosphorylation of signaling moieties), phagocytic activity and intracellular reactive oxygen species (ROS) production during infection. We observed that leptin induced Th1 specific response by upregulation of IL-1α, IL-1β, IL-8 and TNF-α in THP-1 and IFN-γ, IL-12 and IL-2 in PBMCs. We also observed the downregulation of Th2 type cytokine i.e. IL-10 in THP-1 and unaltered expression of cytokines i.e. TGF-β, IL-10 and IL-4 in PBMCs. In addition, leptin stimulates the macrophages by inducing phosphorylation of Erk1/2 and Akt which are usually dephosphorylated in L. donovani infection. In concordance, leptin also induces the macrophage phagocytic activity by enhancing the intracellular ROS generation which helps in phagolysosome formation and oxidative killing of the parasite. In compilation, leptin is able to maintain the defensive environment against L. donovani infection through the classical macrophage activity. PMID:26688099

  17. Vaccination with replication-deficient recombinant adenoviruses encoding the main surface antigens of toxoplasma gondii induces immune response and protection against infection in mice.

    PubMed

    Caetano, Bráulia C; Bruña-Romero, Oscar; Fux, Blima; Mendes, Erica A; Penido, Marcus L O; Gazzinelli, Ricardo T

    2006-04-01

    We have generated recombinant adenoviruses encoding three genetically modified surface antigens (SAGs) of the parasite Toxoplasma gondii, that is, AdSAG1, AdSAG2, and AdSAG3. Modifications included the removal of their glycosylphosphatidylinositol (GPI) anchoring motifs and, in some cases, the exchange of the native signal peptide for influenza virus hemagglutinin signal sequence. Adenovirus immunization of BALB/c mice elicited potent antibody responses against each protein, displaying a significant bias toward a helper T cell type 1 (Th1) profile in animals vaccinated with AdSAG1. Furthermore, the presence of parasite-specific IFN-gamma-producing T cells was analyzed by proliferation assays and enzyme-linked immunospot assays in the same animals. Splenocytes from immunized mice secreted IFN-gamma after in vitro stimulation with tachyzoite lysate antigen or with a fraction enriched for membrane-purified GPI-anchored proteins (F3) from the T. gondii tachyzoite surface. Epitopes recognized by CD8+ T cells were identified in SAG1 and SAG3, but not SAG2, sequences, although this protein also induced a specific response. We also tested the capacity of the immune responses detected to protect mice against a challenge with live T. gondii parasites. Although no protection was observed against tachyzoites of the highly virulent RH strain, a significant reduction in cyst loads in the brain was observed in animals challenged with the P-Br strain. Thus, up to 80% of the cysts were eliminated from animals vaccinated with a mixture of the three recombinant viruses. Because adenoviruses seemed capable of inducing Th1-biased protective immune responses against T. gondii antigens, other parasite antigens should be tested alone or in combination with those described here to further develop a protective vaccine against toxoplasmosis. PMID:16610929

  18. Protective Killed Leptospira borgpetersenii Vaccine Induces Potent Th1 Immunity Comprising Responses by CD4 and γδ T Lymphocytes

    PubMed Central

    Naiman, Brian M.; Alt, David; Bolin, Carole A.; Zuerner, Richard; Baldwin, Cynthia L.

    2001-01-01

    Leptospira borgpetersenii serovar hardjo is the most common cause of bovine leptospirosis and also causes zoonotic infections of humans. A protective killed vaccine against serovar hardjo was shown to induce strong antigen-specific proliferative responses by peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC) from vaccinated cattle by 2 months after the first dose of vaccine. This response was absent from nonvaccinated control cattle. The mean response peaked by 2 months after completion of the two-dose vaccination regimen, and substantial proliferation was measured in in vitro cultures throughout the 7 months of the study period. Variations in magnitude of the response occurred among the vaccinated animals, but by 7 months postvaccination there was a substantial antigen-specific response with PBMC from all vaccinated animals. Up to one-third of the PBMC from vaccinated animals produced gamma interferon (IFN-γ) after 7 days in culture with antigen, as ascertained by flow cytometric analysis, and significant levels of IFN-γ were measured in culture supernatants by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. Two-color immunofluorescence revealed that one-third of the IFN-γ-producing cells were γδ T cells, with the remaining cells being CD4+ T cells. The significance of this study is the very potent Th1-type immune response induced and sustained following vaccination with a killed bacterial vaccine adjuvanted with aluminum hydroxide and the involvement of γδ T cells in the response. Moreover, induction of this Th1-type cellular immune response is associated with the protection afforded by the bovine leptospiral vaccine against L. borgpetersenii serovar hardjo. PMID:11705932

  19. Prophylactic acetylsalicylic acid attenuates the inflammatory response but fails to protect exercise-induced liver damage in exercised rats.

    PubMed

    Huang, Kuo-Chin; Chiu, Yi-Han; Liao, Kuang-Wen; Ke, Chun-Yen; Lee, Chung-Jen; Chao, Yann-Fen C; Lee, Ru-Ping

    2016-09-01

    This study evaluated the effects of acetylsalicylic acid (ASA) on exercise-induced inflammatory response, muscle damage, and liver injury in rats. Wistar-Kyoto (WKY) rats were divided into six groups: control (C), exercise (E), C+20mg ASA, E+20mg ASA, C+100mg/kg ASA, and E+100mg ASA groups. ASA or a vehicle was orally administered through gavage 1h before a treadmill test. Upon trial completion, blood was drawn at 1, 12, and 24h for biochemical analysis, and livers were excised at 24h for a histological assessment. Our results revealed that 100mg/kg ASA significantly reduced interleukin (IL)-6 and tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-α levels in the E groups; however, the IL-10 level was considerably increased. Moreover, aspartate aminotransferase (AST), alanine aminotransferase (ALT) levels and histological hepatic damage increased significantly in the E+100mg ASA group compared with the corresponding changes in the E group. These results suggest that the prophylactic administration of particularly high-dose ASA alleviates exercise-induced inflammatory response but exacerbates liver injury. PMID:27262381

  20. Translational repression protects human keratinocytes from UVB-induced apoptosis through a discordant eIF2 kinase stress response

    PubMed Central

    Collier, Ann E.; Wek, Ronald C.; Spandau, Dan F

    2015-01-01

    This study delineates the mechanisms by which ultraviolet B (UVB) regulates protein synthesis in human keratinocytes and the importance of translational control in cell survival. Translation initiation is regulated by phosphorylation of eukaryotic initiation factor 2 (eIF2~P), which causes decreased global protein synthesis coincident with enhanced translation of selected stress-related transcripts, such as ATF4. ATF4 is a transcriptional activator of the Integrated Stress Response (ISR), which has cytoprotective functions as well as apoptotic signals through the downstream transcriptional regulator CHOP (GADD153/DDIT3). We determined that UVB irradiation is a potent inducer of eIF2~P in keratinocytes, leading to decreased levels of translation initiation. However, expression of ATF4 or CHOP was not induced by UVB as compared to traditional ISR activators. The rationale for this discordant response is that ATF4 mRNA is reduced by UVB, and despite its ability to be preferentially translated there are diminished levels of available transcript. Forced expression of ATF4 and CHOP protein prior to UVB irradiation significantly enhanced apoptosis, suggesting that this portion of the ISR is deleterious in keratinocytes following UVB. Inhibition of eIF2~P and translational control reduced viability following UVB, which was alleviated by cycloheximide, indicating that translation repression through eIF2~P is central to keratinocyte survival. PMID:25950825

  1. Protective Effects of the Polyphenol Sesamin on Allergen-Induced TH2 Responses and Airway Inflammation in Mice

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Ching-Huei; Shen, Mei-Lin; Zhou, Ning; Lee, Chen-Chen; Kao, Shung-Te; Wu, Dong Chuan

    2014-01-01

    Allergic asthma is a lifelong airway condition that affects people of all ages. In recent decades, asthma prevalence continues to increase globally, with an estimated number of 250,000 annual deaths attributed to the disease. Although inhaled corticosteroids and β-adrenergic receptor agonists are the primary therapeutic avenues that effectively reduce asthma symptoms, profound side effects may occur in patients with long-term treatments. Therefore, development of new therapeutic strategies is needed as alternative or supplement to current asthma treatments. Sesamin is a natural polyphenolic compound with strong anti-oxidative effects. Several studies have reported that sesamin is effective in preventing hypertension, thrombotic tendency, and neuroinflammation. However, it is still unknown whether sesamin can reduce asthma-induced allergic inflammation and airway hyperresponsiveness (AHR). Our study has revealed that sesamin exhibited significant anti-inflammatory effects in ovalbumin (OVA)-induced murine asthma model. We found that treatments with sesamin after OVA sensitization and challenge significantly decreased expression levels of interleukin-4 (IL-4), IL-5, IL-13, and serum IgE. The numbers of total inflammatory cells and eosinophils in BALF were also reduced in the sesamin-treated animals. Histological results demonstrated that sesamin attenuated OVA-induced eosinophil infiltration, airway goblet cell hyperplasia, mucus occlusion, and MUC5AC expression in the lung tissue. Mice administered with sesamin showed limited increases in AHR compared with mice receiving vehicle after OVA challenge. OVA increased phosphorylation levels of IκB-α and nuclear expression levels of NF-κB, both of which were reversed by sesamin treatments. These data indicate that sesamin is effective in treating allergic asthma responses induced by OVA in mice. PMID:24755955

  2. Biodegradable nanoparticle-entrapped vaccine induces cross-protective immune response against a virulent heterologous respiratory viral infection in pigs.

    PubMed

    Dwivedi, Varun; Manickam, Cordelia; Binjawadagi, Basavaraj; Joyappa, Dechamma; Renukaradhya, Gourapura J

    2012-01-01

    Biodegradable nanoparticle-based vaccine development research is unexplored in large animals and humans. In this study, we illustrated the efficacy of nanoparticle-entrapped UV-killed virus vaccine against an economically important respiratory viral disease of pigs called porcine reproductive and respiratory syndrome virus (PRRSV). We entrapped PLGA [poly (lactide-co-glycolides)] nanoparticles with killed PRRSV antigens (Nano-KAg) and detected its phagocytosis by pig alveolar macrophages. Single doses of Nano-KAg vaccine administered intranasally to pigs upregulated innate and PRRSV specific adaptive responses. In a virulent heterologous PRRSV challenge study, Nano-KAg vaccine significantly reduced the lung pathology and viremia, and the viral load in the lungs. Immunologically, enhanced innate and adaptive immune cell population and associated cytokines with decreased secretion of immunosuppressive mediators were observed at both mucosal sites and blood. In summary, we demonstrated the benefits of intranasal delivery of nanoparticle-based viral vaccine in eliciting cross-protective immune response in pigs, a potential large animal model. PMID:23240064

  3. Enhanced and durable protective immune responses induced by a cocktail of recombinant BCG strains expressing antigens of multistage of Mycobacterium tuberculosis.

    PubMed

    Liang, Jinping; Teng, Xindong; Yuan, Xuefeng; Zhang, Ying; Shi, Chunwei; Yue, Tingting; Zhou, Lei; Li, Jianrong; Fan, Xionglin

    2015-08-01

    Although Bacillus Calmette-Guérin (BCG) vaccine confers protection from Mycobacterium tuberculosis infection in children, its immune protection gradually wanes over time, and consequently leads to an inability to prevent the reactivation of latent infection of M. tuberculosis. Therefore, improving BCG for better control of tuberculosis (TB) is urgently needed. We thus hypothesized that recombinant BCG overexpressing immunodominant antigens expressed at different growth stages of M. tuberculosis could provide a more comprehensive protection against primary and latent M. tuberculosis infection. Here, a novel cocktail of recombinant BCG (rBCG) strains, namely ABX, was produced by combining rBCG::85A, rBCG::85B, and rBCG::X, which overexpressed respective multistage antigens Ag85A, Ag85B, and HspX of M. tuberculosis. Our results showed that ABX was able to induce a stronger immune protection than individual rBCGs or BCG against primary TB infection in C57BL/6 mice. Mechanistically, the immune protection was attributed to stronger antigen-specific CD4(+) Th1 responses, higher numbers of IFN-γ(+) CD4(+) TEM and IL-2(+) CD8(+) TCM cells elicited by ABX. These findings thus provide a novel strategy for the improvement of BCG efficacy and potentially a promising prophylactic TB vaccine candidate, warranting further investigation. PMID:25974877

  4. Molecular Mechanisms of Lipoic Acid Protection against Aflatoxin B1-Induced Liver Oxidative Damage and Inflammatory Responses in Broilers

    PubMed Central

    Ma, Qiugang; Li, Yan; Fan, Yu; Zhao, Lihong; Wei, Hua; Ji, Cheng; Zhang, Jianyun

    2015-01-01

    Alpha-lipoic acid (α-LA) was evaluated in this study for its molecular mechanisms against liver oxidative damage and inflammatory responses induced by aflatoxin B1 (AFB1). Birds were randomly allocated into four groups with different diets for three weeks: a basal diet, a 300 mg/kg α-LA supplementation in a basal diet, a diet containing 74 μg/kg AFB1, and 300 mg/kg α-LA supplementation in a diet containing 74 μg/kg AFB1. In the AFB1 group, the expression of GSH-PX mRNA was down-regulated (p < 0.05), and the levels of lipid peroxide and nitric oxide were increased (p < 0.05) in the chicken livers compared to those of the control group. Additionally, the mRNA level of the pro-inflammatory factor interleukin-6 was up-regulated significantly (p < 0.05), the protein expressions of both the nuclear factor kappa B (NF-κB) p65 and the inducible nitric oxide synthase were enhanced significantly (p < 0.05) in the AFB1 group. All of these negative effects were inhibited by α-LA. These results indicate that α-LA may be effective in preventing hepatic oxidative stress, down-regulating the expression of hepatic pro-inflammatory cytokines, as well as inhibiting NF-κB expression. PMID:26694462

  5. Molecular Mechanisms of Lipoic Acid Protection against Aflatoxin B₁-Induced Liver Oxidative Damage and Inflammatory Responses in Broilers.

    PubMed

    Ma, Qiugang; Li, Yan; Fan, Yu; Zhao, Lihong; Wei, Hua; Ji, Cheng; Zhang, Jianyun

    2015-12-01

    Alpha-lipoic acid (α-LA) was evaluated in this study for its molecular mechanisms against liver oxidative damage and inflammatory responses induced by aflatoxin B₁ (AFB₁). Birds were randomly allocated into four groups with different diets for three weeks: a basal diet, a 300 mg/kg α-LA supplementation in a basal diet, a diet containing 74 μg/kg AFB₁, and 300 mg/kg α-LA supplementation in a diet containing 74 μg/kg AFB₁. In the AFB₁ group, the expression of GSH-PX mRNA was down-regulated (p < 0.05), and the levels of lipid peroxide and nitric oxide were increased (p < 0.05) in the chicken livers compared to those of the control group. Additionally, the mRNA level of the pro-inflammatory factor interleukin-6 was up-regulated significantly (p < 0.05), the protein expressions of both the nuclear factor kappa B (NF-κB) p65 and the inducible nitric oxide synthase were enhanced significantly (p < 0.05) in the AFB₁ group. All of these negative effects were inhibited by α-LA. These results indicate that α-LA may be effective in preventing hepatic oxidative stress, down-regulating the expression of hepatic pro-inflammatory cytokines, as well as inhibiting NF-κB expression. PMID:26694462

  6. Expression of VP7, a Bluetongue virus group specific antigen by viral vectors: analysis of the induced immune responses and evaluation of protective potential in sheep.

    PubMed

    Bouet-Cararo, Coraline; Contreras, Vanessa; Caruso, Agathe; Top, Sokunthea; Szelechowski, Marion; Bergeron, Corinne; Viarouge, Cyril; Desprat, Alexandra; Relmy, Anthony; Guibert, Jean-Michel; Dubois, Eric; Thiery, Richard; Bréard, Emmanuel; Bertagnoli, Stephane; Richardson, Jennifer; Foucras, Gilles; Meyer, Gilles; Schwartz-Cornil, Isabelle; Zientara, Stephan; Klonjkowski, Bernard

    2014-01-01

    Bluetongue virus (BTV) is an economically important Orbivirus transmitted by biting midges to domestic and wild ruminants. The need for new vaccines has been highlighted by the occurrence of repeated outbreaks caused by different BTV serotypes since 1998. The major group-reactive antigen of BTV, VP7, is conserved in the 26 serotypes described so far, and its role in the induction of protective immunity has been proposed. Viral-based vectors as antigen delivery systems display considerable promise as veterinary vaccine candidates. In this paper we have evaluated the capacity of the BTV-2 serotype VP7 core protein expressed by either a non-replicative canine adenovirus type 2 (Cav-VP7 R0) or a leporipoxvirus (SG33-VP7), to induce immune responses in sheep. Humoral responses were elicited against VP7 in almost all animals that received the recombinant vectors. Both Cav-VP7 R0 and SG33-VP7 stimulated an antigen-specific CD4+ response and Cav-VP7 R0 stimulated substantial proliferation of antigen-specific CD8+ lymphocytes. Encouraged by the results obtained with the Cav-VP7 R0 vaccine vector, immunized animals were challenged with either the homologous BTV-2 or the heterologous BTV-8 serotype and viral burden in plasma was followed by real-time RT-PCR. The immune responses triggered by Cav-VP7 R0 were insufficient to afford protective immunity against BTV infection, despite partial protection obtained against homologous challenge. This work underscores the need to further characterize the role of BTV proteins in cross-protective immunity. PMID:25364822

  7. Expression of VP7, a Bluetongue Virus Group Specific Antigen by Viral Vectors: Analysis of the Induced Immune Responses and Evaluation of Protective Potential in Sheep

    PubMed Central

    Bouet-Cararo, Coraline; Contreras, Vanessa; Caruso, Agathe; Top, Sokunthea; Szelechowski, Marion; Bergeron, Corinne; Viarouge, Cyril; Desprat, Alexandra; Relmy, Anthony; Guibert, Jean-Michel; Dubois, Eric; Thiery, Richard; Bréard, Emmanuel; Bertagnoli, Stephane; Richardson, Jennifer; Foucras, Gilles; Meyer, Gilles; Schwartz-Cornil, Isabelle; Zientara, Stephan; Klonjkowski, Bernard

    2014-01-01

    Bluetongue virus (BTV) is an economically important Orbivirus transmitted by biting midges to domestic and wild ruminants. The need for new vaccines has been highlighted by the occurrence of repeated outbreaks caused by different BTV serotypes since 1998. The major group-reactive antigen of BTV, VP7, is conserved in the 26 serotypes described so far, and its role in the induction of protective immunity has been proposed. Viral-based vectors as antigen delivery systems display considerable promise as veterinary vaccine candidates. In this paper we have evaluated the capacity of the BTV-2 serotype VP7 core protein expressed by either a non-replicative canine adenovirus type 2 (Cav-VP7 R0) or a leporipoxvirus (SG33-VP7), to induce immune responses in sheep. Humoral responses were elicited against VP7 in almost all animals that received the recombinant vectors. Both Cav-VP7 R0 and SG33-VP7 stimulated an antigen-specific CD4+ response and Cav-VP7 R0 stimulated substantial proliferation of antigen-specific CD8+ lymphocytes. Encouraged by the results obtained with the Cav-VP7 R0 vaccine vector, immunized animals were challenged with either the homologous BTV-2 or the heterologous BTV-8 serotype and viral burden in plasma was followed by real-time RT-PCR. The immune responses triggered by Cav-VP7 R0 were insufficient to afford protective immunity against BTV infection, despite partial protection obtained against homologous challenge. This work underscores the need to further characterize the role of BTV proteins in cross-protective immunity. PMID:25364822

  8. Multi-antigen vaccines based on complex adenovirus vectors induce protective immune responses against H5N1 avian influenza viruses.

    PubMed

    Holman, David H; Wang, Danher; Raja, Nicholas U; Luo, Min; Moore, Kevin M; Woraratanadharm, Jan; Mytle, Nutan; Dong, John Y

    2008-05-19

    There are legitimate concerns that the highly pathogenic H5N1 avian influenza virus could adapt for human-to-human transmission and cause a pandemic similar to the 1918 "Spanish flu" that killed 50 million people worldwide. We have developed pandemic influenza vaccines by incorporating multiple antigens from both avian and Spanish influenza viruses into complex recombinant adenovirus vectors. In vaccinated mice, these vaccines induced strong humoral and cellular immune responses against pandemic influenza virus antigens, and protected vaccinated mice against lethal H5N1 virus challenge. These results indicate that this multi-antigen, broadly protective vaccine may serve as a safer and more effective approach than traditional methods for development of a pandemic influenza vaccine. PMID:18395306

  9. A specific CpG oligodeoxynucleotide induces protective antiviral responses against grass carp reovirus in grass carp Ctenopharyngodon idella.

    PubMed

    Su, Hang; Yuan, Gailing; Su, Jianguo

    2016-07-01

    CpG oligodeoxynucleotides (ODNs) show strong immune stimulatory activity in vertebrate, however, they possess specific sequence feature among species. In this study, we screened out an optimal CpG ODN sequence for grass carp (Ctenopharyngodon idella), 1670A 5'-TCGAACGTTTTAACGTTTTAACGTT-3', from six published sequences and three sequences designed by authors based on grass carp head kidney mononuclear cells and CIK (C. idella kidney) cells proliferation. VP4 mRNA expression was strongly inhibited by CpG ODN 1670A in CIK cells with GCRV infection, showing its strong antiviral activity. The mechanism via toll-like receptor 9 (TLR9)-mediated signaling pathway was measured by real-time quantitative RT-PCR, and TLR21 did not play a role in the immune response to CpG ODN. The late up-regulation of CiRIG-I mRNA expression indicated that RIG-I-like receptors (RLRs) signaling pathway participated in the immune response to CpG ODN which is the first report on the interaction between CpG and RLRs. We also found that the efficient CpG ODN can activates interferon system. Infected with GCRV, type I interferon expression was reduced and type II interferon was induced by the efficient CpG ODN in CIK cells, especially IFNγ2, suggesting that IFNγ2 played an important role in response to the efficient CpG ODN. These results provide a theoretical basis and new development trend for further research on CpG and the application of CpG vaccine adjuvant in grass carp disease control. PMID:26972738

  10. Genetically modified rabies virus ERA strain is safe and induces long-lasting protective immune response in dogs after oral vaccination.

    PubMed

    Shuai, Lei; Feng, Na; Wang, Xijun; Ge, Jinying; Wen, Zhiyuan; Chen, Weiye; Qin, Lide; Xia, Xianzhu; Bu, Zhigao

    2015-09-01

    Oral immunization in free-roaming dogs is one of the most practical approaches to prevent rabies for developing countries. The safe, efficient and long-lasting protective oral rabies vaccine for dogs is highly sought. In this study, rabies virus (RABV) Evelyn-Rokitnicki-Abelseth (ERA) strain wild-type (rERA) and a genetically modified type (rERAG333E) containing a mutation from arginine to glutamic acid at residue 333 of glycoprotein (G333E) were generated by reverse genetic. The recombinant virus rERAG333E retained growth properties of similar to the parent strain rERA in BHK-21 cell culture. The G333E mutation showed genetic stability during passage into neuroblastoma cells and in the brains of suckling mice and was significantly reduced the virulence of rERA in mice. rERAG333E was immunogenic in dogs by intramuscular inoculation. Mice orally vaccinated with rERAG333E induced strong and one year longer virus neutralizing antibodies (VNA) to RABV, and were completely protected from challenge with lethal street virus at 12months after immunization. Dogs received oral vaccination with rERAG333E induced strong protective RABV VNA response, which lasted for over 3years, and moderate saliva RABV-specific IgA. Moreover, sizeable booster responses to RABV VNA were induced by a second oral dose 1year after the first dose. These results demonstrated that the genetically modified ERA vaccine strain has the potential to serve as a safe and efficient oral live vaccine against rabies in dogs. PMID:26093157

  11. Prostate stem cell antigen vaccination induces a long-term protective immune response against prostate cancer in the absence of autoimmunity.

    PubMed

    Garcia-Hernandez, Maria de la Luz; Gray, Andrew; Hubby, Bolyn; Klinger, Otto J; Kast, W Martin

    2008-02-01

    Prostate stem cell antigen (PSCA) is an attractive antigen to target using therapeutic vaccines because of its overexpression in prostate cancer, especially in metastatic tissues, and its limited expression in other organs. Our studies offer the first evidence that a PSCA-based vaccine can induce long-term protection against prostate cancer development in prostate cancer-prone transgenic adenocarcinoma mouse prostate (TRAMP) mice. Eight-week-old TRAMP mice displaying prostate intraepithelial neoplasia were vaccinated with a heterologous prime/boost strategy consisting of gene gun-delivered PSCA-cDNA followed by Venezuelan equine encephalitis virus replicons encoding PSCA. Our results show the induction of an immune response against a newly defined PSCA epitope that is mediated primarily by CD8 T cells. The prostates of PSCA-vaccinated mice were infiltrated by CD4-positive, CD8-positive, CD11b-positive, and CD11c-positive cells. Vaccination induced MHC class I expression and cytokine production [IFN-gamma, tumor necrosis factor-alpha, interleukin 2 (IL-2), IL-4, and IL-5] within prostate tumors. This tumor microenvironment correlated with low Gleason scores and weak PSCA staining on tumor cells present in hyperplastic zones and in areas that contained focal and well-differentiated adenocarcinomas. PSCA-vaccinated TRAMP mice had a 90% survival rate at 12 months of age. In contrast, all control mice had succumbed to prostate cancer or had heavy tumor loads. Crucially, this long-term protective immune response was not associated with any measurable induction of autoimmunity. The possibility of inducing long-term protection against prostate cancer by vaccination at the earliest signs of its development has the potential to cause a dramatic paradigm shift in the treatment of this disease. PMID:18245488

  12. Monotropein exerts protective effects against IL-1β-induced apoptosis and catabolic responses on osteoarthritis chondrocytes.

    PubMed

    Wang, Feng; Wu, Longhuo; Li, Linfu; Chen, Siyi

    2014-12-01

    Osteoarthritis, characterized by a loss of articular cartilage accompanied with inflammation, is the most common age-associated degenerative disease. Monotropein, an iridoids glycoside isolated from the roots of Morinda officinalis How, has been demonstrated to exhibit anti-inflammatory activity. In the present study, monotropein was firstly to exhibit cartilage protective activity by down regulating the pro-inflammatory cytokines in the knee synovial fluid in vivo. The anti-apoptotic and anti-catabolic effects of monotropein on rat OA chondrocytes treated by IL-1β were investigated in vitro. In cultured chondrocytes, monotropein attenuated apoptosis in a dose-dependent manner in response to IL-1β stimulation. Moreover, treatment with monotropein, the expressions of MMP-3 and MMP-13 were significantly decreased, the expression of COL2A1 was increased. Taken together, these findings suggested that monotropein exerted anti-apoptosis and anti-catabolic activity in chondrocytes, which might support its possible therapeutic role in OA. PMID:25466264

  13. A novel fusion protein domain III-capsid from dengue-2, in a highly aggregated form, induces a functional immune response and protection in mice

    SciTech Connect

    Valdes, Iris; Bernardo, Lidice; Pavon, Alekis; Guzman, Maria G.

    2009-11-25

    Based on the immunogenicity of domain III from the Envelope protein of dengue virus as well as the proven protective capacity of the capsid antigen, we have designed a novel domain III-capsid chimeric protein with the goal of obtaining a molecule potentially able to induce both humoral and cell-mediated immunity (CMI). After expression of the recombinant gene in Escherichia coli, the domain III moiety retained its antigenicity as evaluated with anti-dengue sera. In order to explore alternatives for modulating the immunogenicity of the protein, it was mixed with oligodeoxynucleotides in order to obtain particulated aggregates and then immunologically evaluated in mice in comparison with non-aggregated controls. Although the humoral immune response induced by both forms of the protein was equivalent, the aggregated variant resulted in a much stronger CMI as measured by in vitro IFN-gamma secretion and protection experiments, mediated by CD4{sup +} and CD8{sup +} cells. The present work provides additional evidence in support for a crucial role of CMI in protection against dengue virus and describes a novel vaccine candidate against the disease based on a recombinant protein that can stimulate both arms of the acquired immune system.

  14. Protective role of nuclear factor erythroid 2-related factor 2 in the hemorrhagic shock-induced inflammatory response

    PubMed Central

    ZHAO, HAIGE; HAO, SIJING; XU, HONGFEI; MA, LIANG; ZHANG, ZHENG; NI, YIMING; YU, LUYANG

    2016-01-01

    Hemorrhagic shock (HS) following trauma or major surgery significantly contributes to mortality. However, the mechanisms through which HS activates the inflammatory response are not yet fully understood. Nuclear factor-erythroid 2 (NF-E2) p45-related factor-2 (Nrf2), a bZIP transcription factor, is a master regulator of robust cytoprotective defenses. The present study investigated the role of Nrf2 in the pathophysiology of HS. Nrf2 expression in peripheral leukocytes obtained from patients with surgery-associated hemorrhage subjected to resuscitation treatment (termed HS patients) or healthy donors was examined by RT-qPCR. A marked increase in Nrf2 expression was detected in the leukocytes obtained from the HS patients, which indicates a correlation between Nrf2 expression and the development of HS. Wild-type (WT; Nrf2+/+) and Nrf2-deficient [Nrf2−/− or Nrf2-knockout (KO)] mice were subjected to surgery to induce HS. Systemic inflammation was significantly elevated in the Nrf2-KO mice compared with the WT mice following HS, as assessed by an increase in serum cytokine levels [interleukin (IL)-6, tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-α and IL-1β], as well as high-mobility group box 1 protein (HMGB1) expression. The Nrf2-KO mice exhibited more severe lung and liver injury following HS as evidenced by increased tissue damage, increased myeloperoxidase (MPO) activity and the increased production of pro-inflammatory cytokines. Additionally, Nrf2 deficiency augmented cytokine production induced by the exposure of peritoneal mouse macrophages to lipopolysaccha-ride (LPS) following HS. Taken together, these results suggest that Nrf2 is a critical host factor which limits immune dysregulation and organ injury following HS. PMID:26935388

  15. Protective role of nuclear factor erythroid 2-related factor 2 in the hemorrhagic shock-induced inflammatory response.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Haige; Hao, Sijing; Xu, Hongfei; Ma, Liang; Zhang, Zheng; Ni, Yiming; Yu, Luyang

    2016-04-01

    Hemorrhagic shock (HS) following trauma or major surgery significantly contributes to mortality. However, the mechanisms through which HS activates the inflammatory response are not yet fully understood. Nuclear factor-erythroid 2 (NF-E2) p45-related factor-2 (Nrf2), a bZIP transcription factor, is a master regulator of robust cytoprotective defenses. The present study investigated the role of Nrf2 in the pathophysiology of HS. Nrf2 expression in peripheral leukocytes obtained from patients with surgery-associated hemorrhage subjected to resuscitation treatment (termed HS patients) or healthy donors was examined by RT-qPCR. A marked increase in Nrf2 expression was detected in the leukocytes obtained from the HS patients, which indicates a correlation between Nrf2 expression and the development of HS. Wild-type (WT; Nrf2+/+) and Nrf2-deficient [Nrf2-/- or Nrf2‑knockout (KO)] mice were subjected to surgery to induce HS. Systemic inflammation was significantly elevated in the Nrf2-KO mice compared with the WT mice following HS, as assessed by an increase in serum cytokine levels [interleukin (IL)-6, tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-α and IL-1β], as well as high-mobility group box 1 protein (HMGB1) expression. The Nrf2-KO mice exhibited more severe lung and liver injury following HS as evidenced by increased tissue damage, increased myeloperoxidase (MPO) activity and the increased production of pro-inflammatory cytokines. Additionally, Nrf2 deficiency augmented cytokine production induced by the exposure of peritoneal mouse macrophages to lipopolysaccharide (LPS) following HS. Taken together, these results suggest that Nrf2 is a critical host factor which limits immune dysregulation and organ injury following HS. PMID:26935388

  16. Francisella tularensis type B ΔdsbA mutant protects against type A strain and induces strong inflammatory cytokine and Th1-like antibody response in vivo.

    PubMed

    Straskova, Adela; Spidlova, Petra; Mou, Sherry; Worsham, Patricia; Putzova, Daniela; Pavkova, Ivona; Stulik, Jiri

    2015-11-01

    Francisella tularensis subspecies tularensis is a highly virulent intracellular bacterial pathogen, causing the disease tularemia. However, a safe and effective vaccine for routine application against F. tularensis has not yet been developed. We have recently constructed the deletion mutants for the DsbA homolog protein (ΔdsbA/FSC200) and a hypothetical protein IglH (ΔiglH/FSC200) in the type B F. tularensis subsp. holarctica FSC200 strain, which exerted different protection capacity against parental virulent strain. In this study, we further investigated the immunological correlates for these different levels of protection provided by ΔdsbA/FSC200 and ΔiglH/FSC200 mutants. Our results show that ΔdsbA/FSC200 mutant, but not ΔiglH/FSC200 mutant, induces an early innate inflammatory response leading to strong Th1-like antibody response. Furthermore, vaccination with ΔdsbA/FSC200 mutant, but not with ΔiglH/FSC200, elicited protection against the subsequent challenge with type A SCHU S4 strain in mice. An immunoproteomic approach was used to map a spectrum of antigens targeted by Th1-like specific antibodies, and more than 80 bacterial antigens, including novel ones, were identified. Comparison of tularemic antigens recognized by the ΔdsbA/FSC200 post-vaccination and the SCHU S4 post-challenge sera then revealed the existence of 22 novel SCHU S4 specific antibody clones. PMID:26253078

  17. Protective effects of green tea polyphenol extracts against ethanol-induced gastric mucosal damages in rats: stress-responsive transcription factors and MAP kinases as potential targets.

    PubMed

    Lee, Jeong-Sang; Oh, Tae-Young; Kim, Young-Kyung; Baik, Joo-Hyun; So, Sung; Hahm, Ki-Baik; Surh, Young-Joon

    2005-11-11

    There are multiple lines of compelling evidence from epidemiologic and laboratory studies supporting that frequent consumption of green tea is inversely associated with the risk of chronic human diseases including cancer. The chemopreventive and chemoprotective effects of green tea have been largely attributed to antioxidative and anti-inflammatory activities of its polyphenolic constituents, such as epigallocatechin gallate. The present study was designed to evaluate the efficacy of green tea polyphenols in protecting against alcohol-induced gastric damage and to elucidate the underlying mechanisms. Intragastric administration of ethanol to male Sprague-Dawley rats caused significant gastric mucosal damage, which was accompanied by elevated expression of cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2) and inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS) as well as transient activation of redox-sensitive transcription factors, such as NF-kappaB and AP-1, and mitogen-activated protein kinases (MAPKs). Oral administration of the green tea polyphenolic extract (GTE) significantly ameliorated mucosal damages induced by ethanol and also attenuated the ethanol-induced expression of COX-2 and iNOS. Inactivation of MAPKs, especially p38 and ERKl/2, by GTE might be responsible for inhibition of ethanol-induced expression of COX-2 and iNOS. PMID:16095631

  18. A multi-subunit Chlamydia vaccine inducing neutralizing antibodies and strong IFN-γ+ CMI responses protects against a genital infection in minipigs

    PubMed Central

    Bøje, Sarah; Olsen, Anja Weinreich; Erneholm, Karin; Agerholm, Jørgen Steen; Jungersen, Gregers; Andersen, Peter; Follmann, Frank

    2016-01-01

    Chlamydia is the most widespread sexually transmitted bacterial disease and a prophylactic vaccine is highly needed. Ideally, this vaccine is required to induce a combined response of Th1 cell-mediated immune (CMI) response in concert with neutralizing antibodies. Using a novel Göttingen minipig animal model, we evaluated the immunogenicity and efficacy of a multi-subunit vaccine formulated in the strong Th1-inducing adjuvant CAF01. We evaluated a mixture of two fusion proteins (Hirep1 and CTH93) designed to promote either neutralizing antibodies or cell-mediated immunity, respectively. Hirep1 is a novel immunogen based on the variant domain (VD) 4 region from major outer membrane protein (MOMP) serovar (Sv) D, SvE and SvF, and CTH93 is a fusion molecule of three antigens (CT043, CT414 and MOMP). Pigs were immunized twice intramuscularly with either Hirep1+CTH93/CAF01, UV-inactivated Chlamydia trachomatis SvD bacteria (UV-SvD/CAF01) or CAF01. The Hirep1+CTH93/CAF01 vaccine induced a strong CMI response against the vaccine antigens and high titers of antibodies, particularly against the VD4 region of MOMP. Sera from Hirep1+CTH93/CAF01 immunized pigs neutralized C. trachomatis SvD and SvF infectivity in vitro. Both Hirep1+CTH93/CAF01 and UV-SvD/CAF01 vaccination protected pigs against a vaginal C. trachomatis SvD infection. In conclusion, the Hirep1+CTH93/CAF01 vaccine proved highly immunogenic and equally protective as UV-SvD/CAF01 showing promise for the development of a subunit vaccine against Chlamydia. PMID:26268662

  19. Protective Effect of Brown Alga Phlorotannins against Hyper-inflammatory Responses in Lipopolysaccharide-Induced Sepsis Models.

    PubMed

    Yang, Yeong-In; Woo, Jeong-Hwa; Seo, Yun-Ji; Lee, Kyung-Tae; Lim, Yunsook; Choi, Jung-Hye

    2016-01-27

    Brown algae have been recognized as a food ingredient and health food supplement in Japan and Korea, and phlorotannins are unique marine phenol compounds produced exclusively by brown algae. Sepsis is a whole-body inflammatory condition with a mortality rate of 30-40%. Here, we investigated the effects of a phlorotannin-rich extract of the edible brown alga Ecklonia cava against hyper-inflammatory response in LPS-induced septic shock mouse model. E. cava extract significantly increased the survival rate and attenuated liver and kidney damage in the mice. In addition, E. cava attenuated serum levels of NO, PGE2, and HMGB-1. In macrophages, treatment with E. cava extract down-regulated iNOS, COX-2, TNF-α, IL-6, and HMGB-1. In addition, E. cava suppressed the NIK/TAK1/IKK/IκB/NFκB pathway. Moreover, E. cava increased Nrf2 and HO-1 expression. HO-1 knockdown using siRNA restored the extract-suppressed NO and PGE2 production. Dieckol, a major compound in the extract, reduced mortality, tissue toxicity, and serum levels of the inflammatory factors in septic mice. These data suggest that brown algae phlorotannins suppress septic shock through negative regulation of pro-inflammatory factors via the NIK/TAK1/IKK/IκB/NFκB and Nrf2/HO-1 pathways. PMID:26730445

  20. A Multiple Antigenic Peptide Mimicking Peptidoglycan Induced T Cell Responses to Protect Mice from Systemic Infection with Staphylococcus aureus

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Xiang-Yu; Huang, Zhao-Xia; Chen, Yi-Guo; Lu, Xiao; Zhu, Ping; Wen, Kun; Fu, Ning; Liu, Bei-Yi

    2015-01-01

    Due to the enormous capacity of Staphylococcus aureus to acquire antibiotic resistance, it becomes imperative to develop vaccines for decreasing the risk of its life-threatening infections. Peptidoglycan (PGN) is a conserved and major component of S. aureus cell wall. However, it has not been used as a vaccine candidate since it is a thymus-independent antigen. In this study, we synthesized a multiple antigenic peptide, named MAP27, which comprised four copies of a peptide that mimics the epitope of PGN. After immunization with MAP27 five times and boosting with heat-inactivated bacterium one time, anti-MAP27 serum bound directly to S. aureus or PGN. Immunization with MAP27 decreased the bacterial burden in organs of BALB/c mice and significantly prolonged their survival time after S. aureus lethal-challenge. The percentage of IFN-γ+CD3+ T cells and IL-17+CD4+ T cells in spleen, as well as the levels of IFN-γ, IL-17A/F and CCL3 in spleen and lung, significantly increased in the MAP27-immunized mice after infection. Moreover, in vitro incubation of heat-inactivated S. aureus with splenocytes isolated from MAP27-immunized mice stimulated the production of IFN-γ and IL-17A/F. Our findings demonstrated that MAP27, as a thymus-dependent antigen, is efficient at eliciting T cell-mediated responses to protect mice from S. aureus infection. This study sheds light on a possible strategy to design vaccines against S. aureus. PMID:26317210

  1. A combined DNA vaccine encoding BCSP31, SOD, and L7/L12 confers high protection against Brucella abortus 2308 by inducing specific CTL responses.

    PubMed

    Yu, Da-Hai; Hu, Xi-Dan; Cai, Hong

    2007-06-01

    We constructed a combined DNA vaccine comprising genes encoding the antigens BCSP31, superoxide dismutase (SOD), and L7/L12 and evaluated its immunogenicity and protective efficacy. Immunization of mice with the combined DNA vaccine offered high protection against Brucella abortus (B. abortus) infection. The vaccine induced a vigorous specific immunoglobulin G (IgG) response, with higher IgG2a than IgG1 titers. Cytokine profiling performed at the same time showed a biased Th1-type immune response with significantly increased interferon-gamma and tumor necrosis factor-alpha stimulation. CD8(+), but not CD4(+), T cells accumulated at significantly higher levels after administration of the vaccine. Granzyme B-producing CD8(+) T cells were significantly higher in number in samples prepared from combined DNA-vaccinated mice compared with S19-vaccinated mice, demonstrating that the cytotoxicity lysis pathway is involved in the response to Brucella infection. The success of our combined DNA vaccine in a mouse model suggests its potential efficacy against brucellosis infection in large animals. PMID:17570767

  2. Prime-booster vaccination of cattle with an influenza viral vector Brucella abortus vaccine induces a long-term protective immune response against Brucella abortus infection.

    PubMed

    Tabynov, Kaissar; Yespembetov, Bolat; Ryskeldinova, Sholpan; Zinina, Nadezhda; Kydyrbayev, Zhailaubay; Kozhamkulov, Yerken; Inkarbekov, Dulat; Sansyzbay, Abylai

    2016-01-20

    This study analyzed the duration of the antigen-specific humoral and T-cell immune responses and protectiveness of a recently-developed influenza viral vector Brucella abortus (Flu-BA) vaccine expressing Brucella proteins Omp16 and L7/L12 and containing the adjuvant Montadine Gel01 in cattle. At 1 month post-booster vaccination (BV), both humoral (up to 3 months post-BV; GMT IgG ELISA titer 214±55 to 857±136, with a prevalence of IgG2a over IgG1 isotype antibodies) and T-cell immune responses were observed in vaccinated heifers (n=35) compared to control animals (n=35, injected with adjuvant/PBS only). A pronounced T-cell immune response was induced and maintained for 12 months post-BV, as indicated by the lymphocyte stimulation index (2.7±0.4 to 10.1±0.9 cpm) and production of IFN-γ (13.7±1.7 to 40.0±3.0 ng/ml) at 3, 6, 9, and 12 months post-BV. Prime-boost vaccination provided significant protection against B. abortus infection at 3, 6, 9 and 12 months (study duration) post-BV (7 heifers per time point; alpha=0.03-0.01 vs. control group). Between 57.1 and 71.4% of vaccinated animals showed no signs of B. abortus infection (or Brucella isolation) at 3, 6, 9 and 12 months post-BV; the severity of infection, as indicated by the index of infection (P=0.0003 to <0.0001) and rates of Brucella colonization (P=0.03 to <0.0001), was significantly lower for vaccinated diseased animals than appropriate control animals. Good protection from B. abortus infection was also observed among pregnant vaccinated heifers (alpha=0.03), as well as their fetuses and calves (alpha=0.01), for 12 months post-BV. Additionally, 71.4% of vaccinated heifers calved successfully whereas all pregnant control animals aborted (alpha=0.01). Prime-boost vaccination of cattle with Flu-BA induces an antigen-specific humoral and pronounced T cell immune response and most importantly provides good protectiveness, even in pregnant heifers, for at least 12 months post-BV. PMID:26709638

  3. Tanshinone I Activates the Nrf2-Dependent Antioxidant Response and Protects Against As(III)-Induced Lung Inflammation In Vitro and In Vivo

    PubMed Central

    Tao, Shasha; Zheng, Yi; Lau, Alexandria; Jaramillo, Melba C.; Chau, Binh T.; Lantz, R. Clark; Wong, Pak K.

    2013-01-01

    Abstract Aims: The NF-E2 p45-related factor 2 (Nrf2) signaling pathway regulates the cellular antioxidant response and activation of Nrf2 has recently been shown to limit tissue damage from exposure to environmental toxicants, including As(III). In an attempt to identify improved molecular agents for systemic protection against environmental insults, we have focused on the identification of novel medicinal plant-derived Nrf2 activators. Results: Tanshinones [tanshinone I (T-I), tanshinone IIA, dihydrotanshinone, cryptotanshinone], phenanthrenequinone-based redox therapeutics derived from the medicinal herb Salvia miltiorrhiza, have been tested as experimental therapeutics for Nrf2-dependent cytoprotection. Using a dual luciferase reporter assay overexpressing wild-type or mutant Kelch-like ECH-associated protein-1 (Keap1), we demonstrate that T-I is a potent Keap1-C151-dependent Nrf2 activator that stabilizes Nrf2 by hindering its ubiquitination. In human bronchial epithelial cells exposed to As(III), T-I displays pronounced cytoprotective activity with upregulation of Nrf2-orchestrated gene expression. In Nrf2 wild-type mice, systemic administration of T-I attenuates As(III) induced inflammatory lung damage, a protective effect not observed in Nrf2 knockout mice. Innovation: Tanshinones have been identified as a novel class of Nrf2-inducers for antioxidant tissue protection in an in vivo As(III) inhalation model, that is relevant to low doses of environmental exposure. Conclusion: T-I represents a prototype Nrf2-activator that displays cytoprotective activity upon systemic administration targeting lung damage originating from environmental insults. T-I based Nrf2-directed systemic intervention may provide therapeutic benefit in protecting other organs against environmental insults. Antioxid. Redox Signal. 19, 1647–1661. PMID:23394605

  4. Venezuelan Equine Encephalitis Virus Replicon Particles Encoding Respiratory Syncytial Virus Surface Glycoproteins Induce Protective Mucosal Responses in Mice and Cotton Rats▿

    PubMed Central

    Mok, Hoyin; Lee, Sujin; Utley, Thomas J.; Shepherd, Bryan E.; Polosukhin, Vasiliy V.; Collier, Martha L.; Davis, Nancy L.; Johnston, Robert E.; Crowe, James E.

    2007-01-01

    Respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) is an important viral pathogen that causes severe lower respiratory tract infection in infants, the elderly, and immunocompromised individuals. There are no licensed RSV vaccines to date. To prevent RSV infection, immune responses in both the upper and lower respiratory tracts are required. Previously, immunization with Venezuelan equine encephalitis virus replicon particles (VRPs) demonstrated effectiveness in inducing mucosal protection against various pathogens. In this study, we developed VRPs encoding RSV fusion (F) or attachment (G) glycoproteins and evaluated the immunogenicity and efficacy of these vaccine candidates in mice and cotton rats. VRPs, when administered intranasally, induced surface glycoprotein-specific virus neutralizing antibodies in serum and immunoglobulin A (IgA) antibodies in secretions at the respiratory mucosa. In addition, fusion protein-encoding VRPs induced gamma interferon (IFN-γ)-secreting T cells in the lungs and spleen, as measured by reaction with an H-2Kd-restricted CD8+ T-cell epitope. In animals vaccinated with F protein VRPs, challenge virus replication was reduced below the level of detection in both the upper and lower respiratory tracts following intranasal RSV challenge, while in those vaccinated with G protein VRPs, challenge virus was detected in the upper but not the lower respiratory tract. Close examination of histopathology of the lungs of vaccinated animals following RSV challenge revealed no enhanced inflammation. Immunization with VRPs induced balanced Th1/Th2 immune responses, as measured by the cytokine profile in the lungs and antibody isotype of the humoral immune response. These results represent an important first step toward the use of VRPs encoding RSV proteins as a prophylactic vaccine for RSV. PMID:17928349

  5. Antibody response is required for protection from Theiler's virus-induced encephalitis in C57BL/6 mice in the absence of CD8{sup +} T cells

    SciTech Connect

    Kang, B.-S.; Palma, Joann P.; Lyman, Michael A.; Dal Canto, Mauro; Kim, Byung S. . E-mail: bskim@northwestern.edu

    2005-09-15

    Intracerebral infection of susceptible mice with Theiler's murine encephalomyelitis virus (TMEV) induces immune-mediated demyelinating disease and this system serves as a relevant infectious model for human multiple sclerosis. It was previously shown that {beta}{sub 2}M-deficient C57BL/6 mice lacking functional CD8{sup +} T cells display increased viral persistence and enhanced susceptibility to TMEV-induced demyelination, and yet the majority of mice are free of clinical signs. To understand the mechanisms involved in this general resistance of C57BL/6 mice in the absence of CTL responses, mice ({mu}MT) deficient in the B-cell compartment lacking membrane IgM molecules were treated with anti-CD8 antibody and then infected with TMEV. Although little difference in the proliferative responses of peripheral T cells to UV-inactivated TMEV and the resistance to demyelinating disease was observed between virus-infected {mu}MT and control B6 mice, the levels of CD4{sup +} T cells were higher in the CNS of {mu}MT mice. However, after treatment with anti-CD8 antibody, 100% of the mice displayed clinical gray matter disease and prolonged viral persistence in {mu}MT mice, while only 10% of B6 mice showed clinical symptoms and very low viral persistence. Transfusion of sera from TMEV-infected B6 mice into anti-CD8 antibody-treated {mu}MT mice partially restored resistance to virus-induced encephalitis. These results indicate that the early anti-viral antibody response is also important in the protection from TMEV-induced encephalitis particularly in the absence of CD8{sup +} T cells.

  6. The bovine viral diarrhea virus E2 protein formulated with a novel adjuvant induces strong, balanced immune responses and provides protection from viral challenge in cattle.

    PubMed

    Snider, Marlene; Garg, Ravendra; Brownlie, Robert; van den Hurk, Jan V; van Drunen Littel-van den Hurk, Sylvia

    2014-11-28

    Bovine viral diarrhea virus (BVDV) is still one of the most serious pathogens in cattle, meriting the development of improved vaccines. Recently, we developed a new adjuvant consisting of poly[di(sodium carboxylatoethylphenoxy)]-phosphazene (PCEP), either CpG ODN or poly(I:C), and an immune defense regulator (IDR) peptide. As this adjuvant has been shown to mediate the induction of robust, balanced immune responses, it was evaluated in an E2 subunit vaccine against BVDV in lambs and calves. The BVDV type 2 E2 protein was produced at high levels in a mammalian expression system and purified. When formulated with either CpG ODN or poly(I:C), together with IDR and PCEP, the E2 protein elicited high antibody titers and production of IFN-γ secreting cells in lambs. As the immune responses were stronger when poly(I:C) was used, the E2 protein with poly(I:C), IDR and PCEP was subsequently tested in cattle. Robust virus neutralizing antibodies as well as cell-mediated immune responses, including CD8(+) cytotoxic T cell (CTL) responses, were induced. The fact that CTL responses were demonstrated in calves vaccinated with an E2 protein subunit vaccine indicates that this adjuvant formulation promotes cross-presentation. Furthermore, upon challenge with a high dose of virulent BVDV-2, the vaccinated calves showed almost no temperature response, weight loss, leukopenia or virus replication, in contrast to the control animals, which had severe clinical disease. These data suggest that this E2 subunit formulation induces significant protection from BVDV-2 challenge, and thus is a promising BVDV vaccine candidate; in addition, the adjuvant platform has applications in bovine vaccines in general. PMID:25454860

  7. Human papillomavirus types detected in skin warts and cancer differ in their transforming properties but commonly counteract UVB induced protective responses in human keratinocytes

    SciTech Connect

    Shterzer, Naama; Heyman, Dariya; Shapiro, Beny; Yaniv, Abraham; Jackman, Anna; Serour, Francis; Chaouat, Malka; Gonen, Pinhas; Tommasino, Massimo; Sherman, Levana

    2014-11-15

    In the present study, E6E7 and E6 proteins of human papillomaviruses (HPVs) associated with skin warts and cancer were compared for their transforming and carcinogenic abilities in primary human keratinocytes (PHKs). We show that E6E7 of cancer associated beta HPV types, notably 49 and 24, were able to extend the life span and enhance the clonogenic efficiency of PHKs when maintained in serum free/low calcium medium. Activities of the beta HPV E6E7 were lower than those of HPV16 E6E7. In contrast, E6 proteins from HPV types detected in skin warts or cancer, notably 10, 49 and 38, attenuated UVB induced protective responses in PHKs including cell death, proliferation arrest and accumulation of the proapoptotic proteins, p53, bax or bak. Together, this investigation revealed functional differences and commonalities between HPVs associated with skin warts and cancer, and allowed the identification of specific properties of beta HPVs supporting their involvement in skin carcinogenesis. - Highlights: • Primary keratinocytes were used to evaluate transforming and carcinogenic abilities of cutaneous HPVs. • E6E7 of cancer associated β HPV types transform primary human keratinocytes. • E6 proteins of cancer and wart associated HPVs inhibit UVB induced cell death. • E6s of cancer and wart associated HPVs attenuate UVB induced proliferation arrest. • E6s of cancer and wart associated HPVs attenuate UVB induced apoptosis signaling.

  8. An Attenuated Duck Plague Virus (DPV) Vaccine Induces both Systemic and Mucosal Immune Responses To Protect Ducks against Virulent DPV Infection

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Juan; Wang, Mingshu; Shu, Bing; Yu, Xia; Zhu, Dekang; Chen, Shun; Yin, Zhongqiong; Chen, Xiaoyue

    2014-01-01

    Duck plague (DP) is a severe disease caused by DP virus (DPV). Control of the disease is recognized as one of the biggest challenges in avian medicine. Vaccination is an efficient way to control DPV, and an attenuated vaccine is the main routine vaccine. The attenuated DPV vaccine strain CHa is a modified live vaccine, but the systemic and mucosal immune responses induced by this vaccine have been poorly understood. In this study, the immunogenicity and efficacy of the vaccine were evaluated after subcutaneous immunization of ducks. CD4+ and CD8+ T cells were counted by flow cytometry, and humoral and mucosal Ig antibodies were analyzed by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA). The results showed that high levels of T cells and Ig antibodies were present postimmunization and that there were more CD4+ T cells than CD8+ T cells. Titers of humoral IgG were higher than those of humoral IgA. Local IgA was found in each sample, whereas local IgG was found only in the spleen, thymus, bursa of Fabricius, harderian gland, liver, bile, and lung. In a protection assay, the attenuated DPV vaccine completely protected ducks against 1,000 50% lethal doses (LD50) of the lethal DPV strain CHv via oral infection. These data suggest that this subcutaneous vaccine elicits sufficient systemic and mucosal immune responses against lethal DPV challenge to be protective in ducks. This study provides broad insights into understanding the immune responses to the attenuated DPV vaccine strain CHa through subcutaneous immunization in ducks. PMID:24451329

  9. Nitric oxide protects neuroblastoma cells from apoptosis induced by serum deprivation through cAMP-response element-binding protein (CREB) activation.

    PubMed

    Ciani, Elisabetta; Guidi, Sandra; Della Valle, Giuliano; Perini, Giovanni; Bartesaghi, Renata; Contestabile, Antonio

    2002-12-20

    The transcription factor cAMP-response element-binding protein (CREB) mediates survival in many cells, including neurons. Recently, death of cerebellar granule neurons due to nitric oxide (NO) deprivation was shown to be accompanied by down-regulation of CREB activity (). We now provide evidence that overproduction of endogenous NO or supplementation with exogenous NO renders SK-N-BE human neuroblastoma cells more resistant to apoptosis induced by serum deprivation. Parental cells underwent apoptosis after 24 h of serum deprivation, an outcome largely absent in clones overexpressing human neuronal nitric oxide synthase (nNOS). This protective effect was reversed by the inhibition of NOS itself or soluble guanylyl cyclase, pointing at cGMP as an intermediate effector of NO-mediated rescue. A slow-releasing NO donor protected parental cells to a significant extent, thus confirming the survival effect of NO. The impaired viability of serum-deprived parental cells was accompanied by a strong decrease of CREB phosphorylation and transcriptional activity, effects significantly attenuated in nNOS-overexpressing clones. To confirm the role of CREB in survival, the ectopic expression of CREB and/or protein kinase A largely counteracted serum deprivation-induced cell death of SK-N-BE cells, whereas transfection with a CREB negative mutant was ineffective. These experiments indicate that CREB activity is an important step for NO-mediated survival in neuronal cells. PMID:12368293

  10. Deletion of Nuclear Factor kappa B p50 Subunit Decreases Inflammatory Response and Mildly Protects Neurons from Transient Forebrain Ischemia-induced Damage.

    PubMed

    Rolova, Taisia; Dhungana, Hiramani; Korhonen, Paula; Valonen, Piia; Kolosowska, Natalia; Konttinen, Henna; Kanninen, Katja; Tanila, Heikki; Malm, Tarja; Koistinaho, Jari

    2016-08-01

    Transient forebrain ischemia induces delayed death of the hippocampal pyramidal neurons, particularly in the CA2 and medial CA1 area. Early pharmacological inhibition of inflammatory response can ameliorate neuronal death, but it also inhibits processes leading to tissue regeneration. Therefore, research efforts are now directed to modulation of post-ischemic inflammation, with the aim to promote beneficial effects of inflammation and limit adverse effects. Transcription factor NF-κB plays a key role in the inflammation and cell survival/apoptosis pathways. In the brain, NF-κB is predominantly found in the form of a heterodimer of p65 (RelA) and p50 subunit, where p65 has a transactivation domain while p50 is chiefly involved in DNA binding. In this study, we subjected middle-aged Nfkb1 knockout mice (lacking p50 subunit) and wild-type controls of both sexs to 17 min of transient forebrain ischemia and assessed mouse performance in a panel of behavioral tests after two weeks of post-operative recovery. We found that ischemia failed to induce clear memory and motor deficits, but affected spontaneous locomotion in genotype- and sex-specific way. We also show that both the lack of the NF-κB p50 subunit and female sex independently protected CA2 hippocampal neurons from ischemia-induced cell death. Additionally, the NF-κB p50 subunit deficiency significantly reduced ischemia-induced microgliosis, astrogliosis, and neurogenesis. Lower levels of hippocampal microgliosis significantly correlated with faster spatial learning. We conclude that NF-κB regulates the outcome of transient forebrain ischemia in middle-aged subjects in a sex-specific way, having an impact not only on neuronal death but also specific inflammatory responses and neurogenesis. PMID:27493832

  11. Local and systemic mycorrhiza-induced protection against the ectoparasitic nematode Xiphinema index involves priming of defence gene responses in grapevine

    PubMed Central

    Hao, Zhipeng; Fayolle, Léon; van Tuinen, Diederik; Chatagnier, Odile; Gianinazzi, Silvio; Gianinazzi-Pearson, Vivienne

    2012-01-01

    The ectoparasitic dagger nematode (Xiphinema index), vector of Grapevine fanleaf virus (GFLV), provokes gall formation and can cause severe damage to the root system of grapevines. Mycorrhiza formation by Glomus (syn. Rhizophagus) intraradices BEG141 reduced both gall formation on roots of the grapevine rootstock SO4 (Vitis berlandieri×V. riparia) and nematode number in the surrounding soil. Suppressive effects increased with time and were greater when the nematode was post-inoculated rather than co-inoculated with the arbuscular mycorrhizal (AM) fungus. Using a split-root system, decreased X. index development was shown in mycorrhizal and non-mycorrhizal parts of mycorrhizal root systems, indicating that both local and systemic induced bioprotection mechanisms were active against the ectoparasitic nematode. Expression analyses of ESTs (expressed sequence tags) generated in an SSH (subtractive suppressive hybridization) library, representing plant genes up-regulated during mycorrhiza-induced control of X. index, and of described grapevine defence genes showed activation of chitinase 1b, pathogenesis-related 10, glutathione S-transferase, stilbene synthase 1, 5-enolpyruvyl shikimate-3-phosphate synthase, and a heat shock proein 70-interacting protein in association with the observed local and/or systemic induced bioprotection against the nematode. Overall, the data suggest priming of grapevine defence responses by the AM fungus and transmission of a plant-mediated signal to non-mycorrhizal tissues. Grapevine gene responses during AM-induced local and systemic bioprotection against X. index point to biological processes that are related either to direct effects on the nematode or to protection against nematode-imposed stress to maintain root tissue integrity. PMID:22407649

  12. Deletion of Nuclear Factor kappa B p50 Subunit Decreases Inflammatory Response and Mildly Protects Neurons from Transient Forebrain Ischemia-induced Damage

    PubMed Central

    Rolova, Taisia; Dhungana, Hiramani; Korhonen, Paula; Valonen, Piia; Kolosowska, Natalia; Konttinen, Henna; Kanninen, Katja; Tanila, Heikki; Malm, Tarja; Koistinaho, Jari

    2016-01-01

    Transient forebrain ischemia induces delayed death of the hippocampal pyramidal neurons, particularly in the CA2 and medial CA1 area. Early pharmacological inhibition of inflammatory response can ameliorate neuronal death, but it also inhibits processes leading to tissue regeneration. Therefore, research efforts are now directed to modulation of post-ischemic inflammation, with the aim to promote beneficial effects of inflammation and limit adverse effects. Transcription factor NF-κB plays a key role in the inflammation and cell survival/apoptosis pathways. In the brain, NF-κB is predominantly found in the form of a heterodimer of p65 (RelA) and p50 subunit, where p65 has a transactivation domain while p50 is chiefly involved in DNA binding. In this study, we subjected middle-aged Nfkb1 knockout mice (lacking p50 subunit) and wild-type controls of both sexs to 17 min of transient forebrain ischemia and assessed mouse performance in a panel of behavioral tests after two weeks of post-operative recovery. We found that ischemia failed to induce clear memory and motor deficits, but affected spontaneous locomotion in genotype- and sex-specific way. We also show that both the lack of the NF-κB p50 subunit and female sex independently protected CA2 hippocampal neurons from ischemia-induced cell death. Additionally, the NF-κB p50 subunit deficiency significantly reduced ischemia-induced microgliosis, astrogliosis, and neurogenesis. Lower levels of hippocampal microgliosis significantly correlated with faster spatial learning. We conclude that NF-κB regulates the outcome of transient forebrain ischemia in middle-aged subjects in a sex-specific way, having an impact not only on neuronal death but also specific inflammatory responses and neurogenesis. PMID:27493832

  13. Molecular characterization of the Corynebacterium pseudotuberculosis hsp60-hsp10 operon, and evaluation of the immune response and protective efficacy induced by hsp60 DNA vaccination in mice

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Heat shock proteins (HSPs) are important candidates for the development of vaccines because they are usually able to promote both humoral and cellular immune responses in mammals. We identified and characterized the hsp60-hsp10 bicistronic operon of the animal pathogen Corynebacterium pseudotuberculosis, a Gram-positive bacterium of the class Actinobacteria, which causes caseous lymphadenitis (CLA) in small ruminants. Findings To construct the DNA vaccine, the hsp60 gene of C. pseudotuberculosis was cloned in a mammalian expression vector. BALB/c mice were immunized by intramuscular injection with the recombinant plasmid (pVAX1/hsp60). Conclusion This vaccination induced significant anti-hsp60 IgG, IgG1 and IgG2a isotype production. However, immunization with this DNA vaccine did not confer protective immunity. PMID:21774825

  14. Mucosal, Cellular, and Humoral Immune Responses Induced by Different Live Infectious Bronchitis Virus Vaccination Regimes and Protection Conferred against Infectious Bronchitis Virus Q1 Strain

    PubMed Central

    Chhabra, Rajesh; Forrester, Anne; Lemiere, Stephane; Awad, Faez; Chantrey, Julian

    2015-01-01

    The objectives of the present study were to assess the mucosal, cellular, and humoral immune responses induced by two different infectious bronchitis virus (IBV) vaccination regimes and their efficacy against challenge by a variant IBV Q1. One-day-old broiler chicks were vaccinated with live H120 alone (group I) or in combination with CR88 (group II). The two groups were again vaccinated with CR88 at 14 days of age (doa). One group was kept as the control (group III). A significant increase in lachrymal IgA levels was observed at 4 doa and then peaked at 14 doa in the vaccinated groups. The IgA levels in group II were significantly higher than those in group I from 14 doa. Using immunohistochemistry to examine changes in the number of CD4+ and CD8+ cells in the trachea, it was found that overall patterns of CD8+ cells were dominant compared to those of CD4+ cells in the two vaccinated groups. CD8+ cells were significantly higher in group II than those in group I at 21 and 28 doa. All groups were challenged oculonasally with a virulent Q1 strain at 28 doa, and their protection was assessed. The two vaccinated groups gave excellent ciliary protection against Q1, although group II's histopathology lesion scores and viral RNA loads in the trachea and kidney showed greater levels of protection than those in group I. These results suggest that greater protection is achieved from the combined vaccination of H120 and CR88 of 1-day-old chicks, followed by CR88 at 14 doa. PMID:26202435

  15. Egg yolk IgY: protection against rotavirus induced diarrhea and modulatory effect on the systemic and mucosal antibody responses in newborn calves.

    PubMed

    Vega, C; Bok, M; Chacana, P; Saif, L; Fernandez, F; Parreño, V

    2011-08-15

    Bovine rotavirus (BRV) is an important cause of diarrhea in newborn calves. Local passive immunity is the most efficient protective strategy to control the disease. IgY technology (the use of chicken egg yolk immunoglobulins) is an economic and practical alternative to prevent BRV diarrhea in dairy calves. The aim of this study was to evaluate the protection and immunomodulation induced by the oral administration of egg yolk enriched in BRV specific IgY to experimentally BRV infected calves. All calves in groups Gp 1, 2 and 3 received control colostrum (CC; BRV virus neutralization Ab titer - VN=65,536; ELISA BRV IgG(1)=16,384) prior to gut closure. After gut closure, calves received milk supplemented with 6% BRV-immune egg yolk [(Gp 1) VN=2048; ELISA IgY Ab titer=4096] or non-immune control egg yolk [(Gp 2) VN<4; ELISA IgY Ab titer<4] twice a day, for 14 days. Calves receiving CC only or colostrum deprived calves (CD) fed antibody (Ab) free milk served as controls (Gp 3 and 4, respectively). Calves were inoculated with 10(5.85)focus forming units (FFU) of virulent BRV IND at 2 days of age. Control calves (Gp 3 and 4) and calves fed control IgY (Gp 2) were infected and developed severe diarrhea. Around 80% calves in Gp 1 (IgY 4096) were infected, but they showed 80% (4/5) protection against BRV diarrhea. Bovine RV-specific IgY Ab were detected in the feces of calves in Gp 1, indicating that avian antibodies (Abs) remained intact after passage through the gastrointestinal tract. At post infection day 21, the duodenum was the major site of BRV specific antibody secreting cells (ASC) in all experimental groups. Mucosal ASC responses of all isotypes were significantly higher in the IgY treated groups, independently of the specificity of the treatment, indicating that egg yolk components modulated the immune response against BRV infection at the mucosal level. These results indicate that supplementing newborn calves' diets for the first 14 days of life with egg yolk

  16. Immunization with a DNA Vaccine Cocktail Induces a Th1 Response and Protects Mice Against Mycobacterium avium subsp. paratuberculosis Challenge

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Several novel antigens of Mycobacterium avium subsp. paratuberculosis have been studied as vaccine components and their immunogenicity has been evaluated. Previously, we reported that 85 antigen complex (85A, 85B, and 85C), superoxide dismutase (SOD), and 35kDa protein could induce significant lymph...

  17. Co-expression of Interleukin-15 Enhances the Protective Immune Responses Induced by Immunization with a Murine Malaria MVA-Based Vaccine Encoding the Circumsporozoite Protein

    PubMed Central

    Parra, Marcela; Liu, Xia; Derrick, Steven C.; Yang, Amy; Molina-Cruz, Alvaro; Barillas-Mury, Carolina; Zheng, Hong; Thao Pham, Phuong; Sedegah, Martha; Belmonte, Arnel; Litilit, Dianne D.; Waldmann, Thomas A.; Kumar, Sanjai; Morris, Sheldon L.; Perera, Liyanage P.

    2015-01-01

    Malaria remains a major global public health problem with an estimated 200 million cases detected in 2012. Although the most advanced candidate malaria vaccine (RTS,S) has shown promise in clinical trials, its modest efficacy and durability have created uncertainty about the impact of RTS,S immunization (when used alone) on global malaria transmission. Here we describe the development and characterization of a novel modified vaccinia virus Ankara (MVA)–based malaria vaccine which co-expresses the Plasmodium yoelii circumsporozoite protein (CSP) and IL-15. Vaccination/challenge studies showed that C57BL/6 mice immunized with the MVA-CSP/IL15 vaccine were protected significantly better against a P. yoelii 17XNL sporozoite challenge than either mice immunized with an MVA vaccine expressing only CSP or naïve controls. Importantly, the levels of total anti-CSP IgG were elevated about 100-fold for the MVA-CSP/IL15 immunized group compared to mice immunized with the MVA-CSP construct that does not express IL-15. Among the IgG subtypes, the IL-15 expressing MVA-CSP vaccine induced levels of IgG1 (8 fold) and IgG2b (80 fold) higher than the MVA-CSP construct. The significantly enhanced humoral responses and protection detected after immunization with the MVA-CSP/IL15 vaccine suggest that this IL-15 expressing MVA construct could be considered in the development of future malaria immunization strategies. PMID:26505634

  18. Co-expression of Interleukin-15 Enhances the Protective Immune Responses Induced by Immunization with a Murine Malaria MVA-Based Vaccine Encoding the Circumsporozoite Protein.

    PubMed

    Parra, Marcela; Liu, Xia; Derrick, Steven C; Yang, Amy; Molina-Cruz, Alvaro; Barillas-Mury, Carolina; Zheng, Hong; Thao Pham, Phuong; Sedegah, Martha; Belmonte, Arnel; Litilit, Dianne D; Waldmann, Thomas A; Kumar, Sanjai; Morris, Sheldon L; Perera, Liyanage P

    2015-01-01

    Malaria remains a major global public health problem with an estimated 200 million cases detected in 2012. Although the most advanced candidate malaria vaccine (RTS,S) has shown promise in clinical trials, its modest efficacy and durability have created uncertainty about the impact of RTS,S immunization (when used alone) on global malaria transmission. Here we describe the development and characterization of a novel modified vaccinia virus Ankara (MVA)-based malaria vaccine which co-expresses the Plasmodium yoelii circumsporozoite protein (CSP) and IL-15. Vaccination/challenge studies showed that C57BL/6 mice immunized with the MVA-CSP/IL15 vaccine were protected significantly better against a P. yoelii 17XNL sporozoite challenge than either mice immunized with an MVA vaccine expressing only CSP or naïve controls. Importantly, the levels of total anti-CSP IgG were elevated about 100-fold for the MVA-CSP/IL15 immunized group compared to mice immunized with the MVA-CSP construct that does not express IL-15. Among the IgG subtypes, the IL-15 expressing MVA-CSP vaccine induced levels of IgG1 (8 fold) and IgG2b (80 fold) higher than the MVA-CSP construct. The significantly enhanced humoral responses and protection detected after immunization with the MVA-CSP/IL15 vaccine suggest that this IL-15 expressing MVA construct could be considered in the development of future malaria immunization strategies. PMID:26505634

  19. An optimized, synthetic DNA vaccine encoding the toxin A and toxin B receptor binding domains of Clostridium difficile induces protective antibody responses in vivo.

    PubMed

    Baliban, Scott M; Michael, Amanda; Shammassian, Berje; Mudakha, Shikata; Khan, Amir S; Cocklin, Simon; Zentner, Isaac; Latimer, Brian P; Bouillaut, Laurent; Hunter, Meredith; Marx, Preston; Sardesai, Niranjan Y; Welles, Seth L; Jacobson, Jeffrey M; Weiner, David B; Kutzler, Michele A

    2014-10-01

    Clostridium difficile-associated disease (CDAD) constitutes a large majority of nosocomial diarrhea cases in industrialized nations and is mediated by the effects of two secreted toxins, toxin A (TcdA) and toxin B (TcdB). Patients who develop strong antitoxin antibody responses can clear C. difficile infection and remain disease free. Key toxin-neutralizing epitopes have been found within the carboxy-terminal receptor binding domains (RBDs) of TcdA and TcdB, which has generated interest in developing the RBD as a viable vaccine target. While numerous platforms have been studied, very little data describes the potential of DNA vaccination against CDAD. Therefore, we created highly optimized plasmids encoding the RBDs from TcdA and TcdB in which any putative N-linked glycosylation sites were altered. Mice and nonhuman primates were immunized intramuscularly, followed by in vivo electroporation, and in these animal models, vaccination induced significant levels of both anti-RBD antibodies (blood and stool) and RBD-specific antibody-secreting cells. Further characterization revealed that sera from immunized mice and nonhuman primates could detect RBD protein from transfected cells, as well as neutralize purified toxins in an in vitro cytotoxicity assay. Mice that were immunized with plasmids or given nonhuman-primate sera were protected from a lethal challenge with purified TcdA and/or TcdB. Moreover, immunized mice were significantly protected when challenged with C. difficile spores from homologous (VPI 10463) and heterologous, epidemic (UK1) strains. These data demonstrate the robust immunogenicity and efficacy of a TcdA/B RBD-based DNA vaccine in preclinical models of acute toxin-associated and intragastric, spore-induced colonic disease. PMID:25024365

  20. An Optimized, Synthetic DNA Vaccine Encoding the Toxin A and Toxin B Receptor Binding Domains of Clostridium difficile Induces Protective Antibody Responses In Vivo

    PubMed Central

    Baliban, Scott M.; Michael, Amanda; Shammassian, Berje; Mudakha, Shikata; Khan, Amir S.; Cocklin, Simon; Zentner, Isaac; Latimer, Brian P.; Bouillaut, Laurent; Hunter, Meredith; Marx, Preston; Sardesai, Niranjan Y.; Welles, Seth L.; Jacobson, Jeffrey M.; Weiner, David B.

    2014-01-01

    Clostridium difficile-associated disease (CDAD) constitutes a large majority of nosocomial diarrhea cases in industrialized nations and is mediated by the effects of two secreted toxins, toxin A (TcdA) and toxin B (TcdB). Patients who develop strong antitoxin antibody responses can clear C. difficile infection and remain disease free. Key toxin-neutralizing epitopes have been found within the carboxy-terminal receptor binding domains (RBDs) of TcdA and TcdB, which has generated interest in developing the RBD as a viable vaccine target. While numerous platforms have been studied, very little data describes the potential of DNA vaccination against CDAD. Therefore, we created highly optimized plasmids encoding the RBDs from TcdA and TcdB in which any putative N-linked glycosylation sites were altered. Mice and nonhuman primates were immunized intramuscularly, followed by in vivo electroporation, and in these animal models, vaccination induced significant levels of both anti-RBD antibodies (blood and stool) and RBD-specific antibody-secreting cells. Further characterization revealed that sera from immunized mice and nonhuman primates could detect RBD protein from transfected cells, as well as neutralize purified toxins in an in vitro cytotoxicity assay. Mice that were immunized with plasmids or given nonhuman-primate sera were protected from a lethal challenge with purified TcdA and/or TcdB. Moreover, immunized mice were significantly protected when challenged with C. difficile spores from homologous (VPI 10463) and heterologous, epidemic (UK1) strains. These data demonstrate the robust immunogenicity and efficacy of a TcdA/B RBD-based DNA vaccine in preclinical models of acute toxin-associated and intragastric, spore-induced colonic disease. PMID:25024365

  1. Report: Protective effects of rice bran oil in haloperidol-induced tardive dyskinesia and serotonergic responses in rats.

    PubMed

    Samad, Noreen; Haleem, Muhammad Abdul; Haleem, Darakhshan Jabeen

    2016-07-01

    Effect of administration of Rice bran oil (RBO) was evaluated on haloperidol elicited tardive dyskinesia in rats. Albino Wistar rats treated with haloperidol in drinking water at a dose of 0.2mg/kg/day and RBO by oral tubes at a dose of 0.4 mL/day for 5 weeks. Motor coordination, VCMs and 8-hydroxy-2-(di-n-propylamino) tetraline)[8-OH-DPAT] _syndrome were monitored. Striatal serotonin (5-hydroxytryptamine; 5-HT) and 5-hydroxyindolacetic acid (5-HIAA) levels were determined by high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC-EC). Rats treated with haloperidol orally at a dose of for a period of 5 weeks developed VCMs, which increased progressively as the treatment continued for 5 weeks. Motor coordination impairment started after the 1st week and was maximally impaired after 3 weeks and gradually returned to the 1st week value. Co-administration of RBO prevented haloperidol_induced VCMs as well impairment of motor coordination. The intensity of 8-OH-DPAT_induced syndrome and decreased 5-HT metabolism were greater in water + haloperidol treated animals than RBO + haloperidol treated animals. The present study suggested that involvement of free radical in the development of TD and point to RBO as a possible therapeutic option to treat this hyperkinetic motor disorder. PMID:27592482

  2. Immunization of Mice with a Live Transconjugant Shigella Hybrid Strain Induced Th1 and Th17 Cell-Mediated Immune Responses and Confirmed Passive Protection Against Heterologous Shigellae.

    PubMed

    Nag, D; Koley, H; Sinha, R; Mukherjee, P; Sarkar, C; Withey, J H; Gachhui, R

    2016-02-01

    An avirulent, live transconjugant Shigella hybrid (LTSHΔstx) strain was constructed in our earlier study by introducing a plasmid vector, pPR1347, into a Shiga toxin gene deleted Shigella dysenteriae 1. Three successive oral administrations of LTSHΔstx to female adult mice produced comprehensive passive heterologous protection in their offspring against challenge with wild-type shigellae. Production of NO and different cytokines such asIL-12p70, IL-1β and IL-23 in peritoneal mice macrophages indicated that LTSHΔstx induced innate and adaptive immunity in mice. Furthermore, production of IFN-γ, IL-10 and IL-17 in LTSH-primed splenic CD4+ T cell suggested that LTSHΔstx may induce Th1 and Th17 cell-mediated immune responses. Exponential increase of the serum IgG and IgA titre against whole shigellae was observed in immunized adult mice during and after the immunization with the highest peak on day 35. Antigen-specific sIgA was also determined from intestinal lavage of immunized mice. The stomach extracts of neonates from immunized mice, mainly containing mother's milk, contained significant levels of anti-LTSHΔstx immunoglobulin. These studies suggest that the LTSHΔstx could be a new live oral vaccine candidate against shigellosis in the near future. PMID:26478541

  3. Cell culture (Vero) derived whole virus (H5N1) vaccine based on wild-type virus strain induces cross-protective immune responses

    PubMed Central

    Kistner, Otfried; Howard, Keith; Spruth, Martin; Wodal, Walter; Brühl, Peter; Gerencer, Marijan; Crowe, Brian A.; Savidis-Dacho, Helga; Livey, Ian; Reiter, Manfred; Mayerhofer, Ines; Tauer, Christa; Grillberger, Leopold; Mundt, Wolfgang; Falkner, Falko G.; Barrett, P. Noel

    2007-01-01

    The rapid spread and the transmission to humans of avian influenza virus (H5N1) has induced world-wide fears of a new pandemic and raised concerns over the ability of standard influenza vaccine production methods to rapidly supply sufficient amounts of an effective vaccine. We report here on a robust and flexible strategy which uses wild-type virus grown in a continuous cell culture (Vero) system to produce an inactivated whole virus vaccine. Candidate vaccines based on clade 1 and clade 2 influenza H5N1 strains were developed and demonstrated to be highly immunogenic in animal models. The vaccines induce cross-neutralising antibodies, highly cross-reactive T-cell responses and are protective in a mouse challenge model not only against the homologous virus but against other H5N1 strains, including those from another clade. These data indicate that cell culture-grown, whole virus vaccines, based on the wild-type virus, allow the rapid high yield production of a candidate pandemic vaccine. PMID:17614165

  4. Metformin and the ATM DNA damage response (DDR): accelerating the onset of stress-induced senescence to boost protection against cancer.

    PubMed

    Menendez, Javier A; Cufí, Sílvia; Oliveras-Ferraros, Cristina; Martin-Castillo, Begoña; Joven, Jorge; Vellon, Luciano; Vazquez-Martin, Alejandro

    2011-11-01

    By activating the ataxia telangiectasia mutated (ATM)-mediated DNA Damage Response (DDR), the AMPK agonist metformin might sensitize cells against further damage, thus mimicking the precancerous stimulus that induces an intrinsic barrier against carcinogenesis. Herein, we present the new hypothesis that metformin might function as a tissue sweeper of pre-malignant cells before they gain stem cell/tumor initiating properties. Because enhanced glycolysis (the Warburg effect) plays a causal role in the gain of stem-like properties of tumor-initiating cells by protecting them from the pro-senescent effects of mitochondrial respiration-induced oxidative stress, metformin's ability to disrupt the glycolytic metabotype may generate a cellular phenotype that is metabolically protected against immortalization. The bioenergetic crisis imposed by metformin, which may involve enhanced mitochondrial biogenesis and oxidative stress, can lower the threshold for cellular senescence by pre-activating an ATM-dependent pseudo-DDR. This allows an accelerated onset of cellular senescence in response to additional oncogenic stresses. By pushing cancer cells to use oxidative phosphorylation instead of glycolysis, metformin can rescue cell surface major histocompatibility complex class I (MHC-I) expression that is downregulated by oncogenic transformation, a crucial adaptation of tumor cells to avoid the adaptive immune response by cytotoxic T-lymphocytes (CTLs). Aside from restoration of tumor immunosurveillance at the cell-autonomous level, metformin can activate a senescence-associated secretory phenotype (SASP) to reinforce senescence growth arrest, which might trigger an immune-mediated clearance of the senescent cells in a non-cell-autonomous manner. By diminishing the probability of escape from the senescence anti-tumor barrier, the net effect of metformin should be a significant decrease in the accumulation of dysfunctional, pre-malignant cells in tissues, including those with the

  5. Electroporation enhances immune responses and protection induced by a bovine viral diarrhea virus DNA vaccine in newborn calves with maternal antibodies.

    PubMed

    van Drunen Littel-van den Hurk, Sylvia; Lawman, Zoe; Wilson, Don; Luxembourg, Alain; Ellefsen, Barry; van den Hurk, Jan V; Hannaman, Drew

    2010-09-01

    Bovine viral diarrhea virus (BVDV) is one of the major pathogens in cattle. In this study, newborn calves with maternal antibodies were vaccinated with a BVDV DNA vaccine, either by conventional intramuscular (IM) injection or with the TriGrid™ Delivery System for IM delivery (TDS-IM). The calves vaccinated with the TDS-IM developed more rapidly and effectively BVDV-specific humoral and cell-mediated immune responses in the presence of maternal antibodies. Overall, the immune responses induced by delivery with the TDS-IM remained stronger than those elicited by conventional IM injection of the BVDV DNA vaccine. Accordingly, electroporation-mediated delivery of the BVDV DNA vaccine resulted in close to complete protection from clinical signs of disease, while conventional IM administration did not fully prevent morbidity and mortality following challenge with BVDV-2. These results demonstrate the TDS-IM to be effective as a delivery system for a BVDV DNA vaccine in newborn calves in the presence of maternal antibodies, which supports the potential of electroporation as a delivery method for prophylactic DNA vaccines. PMID:20670907

  6. Cold/menthol TRPM8 receptors initiate the cold-shock response and protect germ cells from cold-shock-induced oxidation.

    PubMed

    Borowiec, Anne-Sophie; Sion, Benoit; Chalmel, Frédéric; D Rolland, Antoine; Lemonnier, Loïc; De Clerck, Tatiana; Bokhobza, Alexandre; Derouiche, Sandra; Dewailly, Etienne; Slomianny, Christian; Mauduit, Claire; Benahmed, Mohamed; Roudbaraki, Morad; Jégou, Bernard; Prevarskaya, Natalia; Bidaux, Gabriel

    2016-09-01

    Testes of most male mammals present the particularity of being externalized from the body and are consequently slightly cooler than core body temperature (4-8°C below). Although, hypothermia of the testis is known to increase germ cells apoptosis, little is known about the underlying molecular mechanisms, including cold sensors, transduction pathways, and apoptosis triggers. In this study, using a functional knockout mouse model of the cold and menthol receptors, dubbed transient receptor potential melastatine 8 (TRPM8) channels, we found that TRPM8 initiated the cold-shock response by differentially modulating cold- and heat-shock proteins. Besides, apoptosis of germ cells increased in proportion to the cooling level in control mice but was independent of temperature in knockout mice. We also observed that the rate of germ cell death correlated positively with the reactive oxygen species level and negatively with the expression of the detoxifying enzymes. This result suggests that the TRPM8 sensor is a key determinant of germ cell fate under hypothermic stimulation.-Borowiec, A.-S., Sion, B., Chalmel, F., Rolland, A. D., Lemonnier, L., De Clerck, T., Bokhobza, A., Derouiche, S., Dewailly, E., Slomianny, C., Mauduit, C., Benahmed, M., Roudbaraki, M., Jégou, B., Prevarskaya, N., Bidaux, G. Cold/menthol TRPM8 receptors initiate the cold-shock response and protect germ cells from cold-shock-induced oxidation. PMID:27317670

  7. Cold/menthol TRPM8 receptors initiate the cold-shock response and protect germ cells from cold-shock–induced oxidation

    PubMed Central

    Borowiec, Anne-Sophie; Sion, Benoit; Chalmel, Frédéric; D. Rolland, Antoine; Lemonnier, Loïc; De Clerck, Tatiana; Bokhobza, Alexandre; Derouiche, Sandra; Dewailly, Etienne; Slomianny, Christian; Mauduit, Claire; Benahmed, Mohamed; Roudbaraki, Morad; Jégou, Bernard; Prevarskaya, Natalia; Bidaux, Gabriel

    2016-01-01

    Testes of most male mammals present the particularity of being externalized from the body and are consequently slightly cooler than core body temperature (4–8°C below). Although, hypothermia of the testis is known to increase germ cells apoptosis, little is known about the underlying molecular mechanisms, including cold sensors, transduction pathways, and apoptosis triggers. In this study, using a functional knockout mouse model of the cold and menthol receptors, dubbed transient receptor potential melastatine 8 (TRPM8) channels, we found that TRPM8 initiated the cold-shock response by differentially modulating cold- and heat-shock proteins. Besides, apoptosis of germ cells increased in proportion to the cooling level in control mice but was independent of temperature in knockout mice. We also observed that the rate of germ cell death correlated positively with the reactive oxygen species level and negatively with the expression of the detoxifying enzymes. This result suggests that the TRPM8 sensor is a key determinant of germ cell fate under hypothermic stimulation.—Borowiec, A.-S., Sion, B., Chalmel, F., Rolland, A. D., Lemonnier, L., De Clerck, T., Bokhobza, A., Derouiche, S., Dewailly, E., Slomianny, C., Mauduit, C., Benahmed, M., Roudbaraki, M., Jégou, B., Prevarskaya, N., Bidaux, G. Cold/menthol TRPM8 receptors initiate the cold-shock response and protect germ cells from cold-shock–induced oxidation. PMID:27317670

  8. Attenuated Salmonella enterica serovar Typhi and Shigella flexneri 2a strains mucosally deliver DNA vaccines encoding measles virus hemagglutinin, inducing specific immune responses and protection in cotton rats.

    PubMed

    Pasetti, Marcela F; Barry, Eileen M; Losonsky, Genevieve; Singh, Mahender; Medina-Moreno, Sandra M; Polo, John M; Ulmer, Jeffrey; Robinson, Harriet; Sztein, Marcelo B; Levine, Myron M

    2003-05-01

    Measles remains a leading cause of child mortality in developing countries. Residual maternal measles antibodies and immunologic immaturity dampen immunogenicity of the current vaccine in young infants. Because cotton rat respiratory tract is susceptible to measles virus (MV) replication after intranasal (i.n.) challenge, this model can be used to assess the efficacy of MV vaccines. Pursuing a new measles vaccine strategy that might be effective in young infants, we used attenuated Salmonella enterica serovar Typhi CVD 908-htrA and Shigella flexneri 2a CVD 1208 vaccines to deliver mucosally to cotton rats eukaryotic expression plasmid pGA3-mH and Sindbis virus-based DNA replicon pMSIN-H encoding MV hemagglutinin (H). The initial i.n. dose-response with bacterial vectors alone identified a well-tolerated dosage (1 x 10(9) to 7 x 10(9) CFU) and a volume (20 micro l) that elicited strong antivector immune responses. Animals immunized i.n. on days 0, 28, and 76 with bacterial vectors carrying DNA plasmids encoding MV H or immunized parenterally with these naked DNA vaccine plasmids developed MV plaque reduction neutralizing antibodies and proliferative responses against MV antigens. In a subsequent experiment of identical design, cotton rats were challenged with wild-type MV 1 month after the third dose of vaccine or placebo. MV titers were significantly reduced in lung tissue of animals immunized with MV DNA vaccines delivered either via bacterial live vectors or parenterally. Since attenuated serovar Typhi and S. flexneri can deliver measles DNA vaccines mucosally in cotton rats, inducing measles immune responses (including neutralizing antibodies) and protection, boosting strategies can now be evaluated in animals primed with MV DNA vaccines. PMID:12692223

  9. Transurethral instillation with fusion protein MrpH.FimH induces protective innate immune responses against uropathogenic Escherichia coli and Proteus mirabilis.

    PubMed

    Habibi, Mehri; Asadi Karam, Mohammad Reza; Bouzari, Saeid

    2016-06-01

    Urinary tract infections (UTIs) are among the most common infections in human. Innate immunity recognizes pathogen-associated molecular patterns (PAMPs) by Toll-like receptors (TLRs) to activate responses against pathogens. Recently, we demonstrated that MrpH.FimH fusion protein consisting of MrpH from Proteus mirabilis and FimH from Uropathogenic Escherichia coli (UPEC) results in the higher immunogenicity and protection, as compared with FimH and MrpH alone. In this study, we evaluated the innate immunity and adjuvant properties induced by fusion MrpH.FimH through in vitro and in vivo methods. FimH and MrpH.FimH were able to induce significantly higher IL-8 and IL-6 responses than untreated or MrpH alone in cell lines tested. The neutrophil count was significantly higher in the fusion group than other groups. After 6 h, IL-8 and IL-6 production reached a peak, with a significant decline at 24 h post-instillation in both bladder and kidney tissues. Mice instilled with the fusion and challenged with UPEC or P. mirabilis showed a significant decrease in the number of bacteria in bladder and kidney compared to control mice. The results of these studies demonstrate that the use of recombinant fusion protein encoding TLR-4 ligand represents an effective vaccination strategy that does not require the use of a commercial adjuvant. Furthermore, MrpH.FimH was presented as a promising vaccine candidate against UTIs caused by UPEC and P. mirabilis. PMID:26918627

  10. Novel linear DNA vaccines induce protective immune responses against lethal infection with influenza virus type A/H5N1

    PubMed Central

    Kendirgi, Frédéric; Yun, Nadezda E.; Linde, Nathaniel S.; Zacks, Michele A.; Smith, Jeanon N.; Smith, Jennifer K.; McMicken, Harilyn; Chen, Yin; Paessler, Slobodan

    2008-01-01

    Vaccine development for possible influenza pandemics has been challenging. Conventional vaccines such as inactivated and live attenuated virus preparations are limited in terms of production speed and capacity. DNA vaccination has emerged as a potential alternative to conventional vaccines against influenza pandemics. In this study, we use a novel, cell-free DNA manufacturing process (synDNA™) to produce prototype linear DNA vaccines against the influenza virus type A/H5N1. This synDNA™ process does not require bacterial fermentation, so it avoids the use of antibiotic resistance genes and other nucleic acid sequences unrelated to the antigen gene expression in the actual therapeutic DNA construct. The efficacy of various vaccines expressing the hemagglutinin and neuraminidase proteins (H5N1 synDNA™), hemagglutinin alone (H5 synDNA™) or neuraminidase alone (N1 synDNA™) was evaluated in mice. Two of the constructs (H5 synDNA™ and H5N1 synDNA™) induced a robust protective immune response with up to 93% of treated mice surviving a lethal challenge of a virulent influenza A/Vietnam/1203/04 H5N1 isolate. In combination with a potent biological activity and simplified production footprint, these characteristics make DNA vaccines prepared with our synDNA™ process highly suitable as alternatives to other vaccine preparations. PMID:18443425

  11. Novel linear DNA vaccines induce protective immune responses against lethal infection with influenza virus type A/H5N1.

    PubMed

    Kendirgi, Frédéric; Yun, Nadezda E; Linde, Nathaniel S; Zacks, Michele A; Smith, Jeanon N; Smith, Jennifer K; McMicken, Harilyn; Chen, Yin; Paessler, Slobodan

    2008-01-01

    Vaccine development for possible influenza pandemics has been challenging. Conventional vaccines such as inactivated and live attenuated virus preparations are limited in terms of production speed and capacity. DNA vaccination has emerged as a potential alternative to conventional vaccines against influenza pandemics. In this study, we use a novel, cell-free DNA manufacturing process (synDNA) to produce prototype linear DNA vaccines against the influenza virus type A/H5N1. This synDNA process does not require bacterial fermentation, so it avoids the use of antibiotic resistance genes and other nucleic acid sequences unrelated to the antigen gene expression in the actual therapeutic DNA construct. The efficacy of various vaccines expressing the hemagglutinin and neuraminidase proteins (H5N1 synDNA), hemagglutinin alone (H5 synDNA) or neuraminidase alone (N1 synDNA) was evaluated in mice. Two of the constructs (H5 synDNA and H5N1 synDNA) induced a robust protective immune response with up to 93% of treated mice surviving a lethal challenge of a virulent influenza A/Vietnam/1203/04 H5N1 isolate. In combination with a potent biological activity and simplified production footprint, these characteristics make DNA vaccines prepared with our synDNA process highly suitable as alternatives to other vaccine preparations. PMID:18443425

  12. Green tea extract protects against nonalcoholic steatohepatitis in ob/ob mice by decreasing oxidative and nitrative stress responses induced by proinflammatory enzymes.

    PubMed

    Chung, Min-Yu; Park, Hea Jin; Manautou, Jose E; Koo, Sung I; Bruno, Richard S

    2012-04-01

    Oxidative and nitrative stress responses resulting from inflammation exacerbate liver injury associated with nonalcoholic steatohepatitis (NASH) by inducing lipid peroxidation and protein nitration. The objective of this study was to investigate whether the anti-inflammatory properties of green tea extract (GTE) would protect against NASH by suppressing oxidative and nitrative damage mediated by proinflammatory enzymes. Obese mice (ob/ob) and their 5-week-old C57BL6 lean littermates were fed 0%, 0.5% or 1% GTE for 6 weeks (n=12-13 mice/group). In obese mice, hepatic lipid accumulation, inflammatory infiltrates and serum alanine aminotransferase activity were markedly increased, whereas these markers of hepatic steatosis, inflammation and injury were significantly reduced among obese mice fed GTE. GTE also normalized hepatic 4-hydroxynonenal and 3-nitro-tyrosine (N-Tyr) concentrations to those observed in lean controls. These oxidative and nitrative damage markers were correlated with alanine aminotransferase (P<.05; r=0.410-0.471). Improvements in oxidative and nitrative damage by GTE were also associated with lower hepatic nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide phosphate oxidase activity. Likewise, GTE reduced protein expression levels of hepatic myeloperoxidase and inducible nitric oxide synthase and decreased the concentrations of nitric oxide metabolites. Correlative relationships between nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide phosphate oxidase and hepatic 4-hydroxynonenal (r=0.364) as well as nitric oxide metabolites and N-Tyr (r=0.598) suggest that GTE mitigates lipid peroxidation and protein nitration by suppressing the generation of reactive oxygen and nitrogen species. Further study is warranted to determine whether GTE can be recommended as an effective dietary strategy to reduce the risk of obesity-triggered NASH. PMID:21543212

  13. Co-administration of plasmid expressing IL-12 with 14-kDa Schistosoma mansoni fatty acid-binding protein cDNA alters immune response profiles and fails to enhance protection induced by Sm14 DNA vaccine alone.

    PubMed

    Fonseca, Cristina T; Pacífico, Lucila G G; Barsante, Michele M; Rassi, Tatiana; Cassali, Geovanni D; Oliveira, Sérgio C

    2006-08-01

    Schistosomiasis is an endemic disease that affects 200 million people worldwide. DNA-based vaccine is a promising strategy to induce protective immunity against schistosomiasis, since both humoral and cellular immune responses are involved in parasite elimination. In this study, we evaluated the ability of Sm14 cDNA alone or in association with a plasmid expressing murine interleukin (IL)-12 to induce protection against challenge infection. Mice were immunized with four doses of the DNA vaccine and the levels of protection were determined by worm burden recovery after challenge infection. Specific antibody production to rSm14 was determined by ELISA, and cytokine production was measured in splenocyte culture supernatants stimulated with rSm14 and in bronchoalveolar lavage of vaccinated mice after challenge infection. DNA immunization with pCI/Sm14 alone induced 40.5% of worm reduction. However, the use of pCI/IL-12 as adjuvant to pCI/Sm14 immunization failed to enhance protection against challenge infection. Protection induced by pCI/Sm14 immunization correlates with specific IgG antibody production against Sm14, Th1 type of immune response with high levels of interferon (IFN)-gamma and low levels of IL-4 in splenocyte culture supernatants and in bronchoalveolar lavage after challenge infection. IL-12 co-administration with pCI/Sm14 induced a significant production of nitric oxide in splenocyte culture supernatants and also lymphocyte suppression, with reduced percentage of T cells producing IFN-gamma and tumor necrosis factor-alpha. PMID:16914349

  14. MF59- and Al(OH)3-Adjuvanted Staphylococcus aureus (4C-Staph) Vaccines Induce Sustained Protective Humoral and Cellular Immune Responses, with a Critical Role for Effector CD4 T Cells at Low Antibody Titers

    PubMed Central

    Monaci, Elisabetta; Mancini, Francesca; Lofano, Giuseppe; Bacconi, Marta; Tavarini, Simona; Sammicheli, Chiara; Arcidiacono, Letizia; Giraldi, Monica; Galletti, Bruno; Rossi Paccani, Silvia; Torre, Antonina; Fontana, Maria Rita; Grandi, Guido; de Gregorio, Ennio; Bensi, Giuliano; Chiarot, Emiliano; Nuti, Sandra; Bagnoli, Fabio; Soldaini, Elisabetta; Bertholet, Sylvie

    2015-01-01

    Staphylococcus aureus (S. aureus) is an important opportunistic pathogen that may cause invasive life-threatening infections, like sepsis and pneumonia. Due to the increasing antibiotic resistance, the development of an effective vaccine against S. aureus is needed. Although a correlate of protection against staphylococcal diseases is not yet established, several findings suggest that both antibodies and CD4 T cells might contribute to optimal immunity. In this study, we show that adjuvanting a multivalent vaccine (4C-Staph) with MF59, an oil-in-water emulsion licensed in human vaccines, further potentiated antigen-specific IgG titers and CD4 T-cell responses compared to alum and conferred protection in the peritonitis model of S. aureus infection. Moreover, we showed that MF59- and alum-adjuvanted 4C-Staph vaccines induced persistent antigen-specific humoral and T-cell responses, and protected mice from infection up to 4 months after immunization. Furthermore, 4C-Staph formulated with MF59 was used to investigate which immune compartment is involved in vaccine-induced protection. Using CD4 T cell-depleted mice or B cell-deficient mice, we demonstrated that both T and B-cell responses contributed to 4C-Staph vaccine-mediated protective immunity. However, the role of CD4 T cells seemed more evident in the presence of low-antibody responses. This study provides preclinical data further supporting the use of the adjuvanted 4C-Staph vaccines against S. aureus diseases, and provides critical insights on the correlates of protective immunity necessary to combat this pathogen. PMID:26441955

  15. Recombinant Bivalent Fusion Protein rVE Induces CD4+ and CD8+ T-Cell Mediated Memory Immune Response for Protection Against Yersinia enterocolitica Infection

    PubMed Central

    Singh, Amit K.; Kingston, Joseph J.; Gupta, Shishir K.; Batra, Harsh V.

    2015-01-01

    Studies investigating the correlates of immune protection against Yersinia infection have established that both humoral and cell mediated immune responses are required for the comprehensive protection. In our previous study, we established that the bivalent fusion protein (rVE) comprising immunologically active regions of Y. pestis LcrV (100–270 aa) and YopE (50–213 aa) proteins conferred complete passive and active protection against lethal Y. enterocolitica 8081 challenge. In the present study, cohort of BALB/c mice immunized with rVE or its component proteins rV, rE were assessed for cell mediated immune responses and memory immune protection against Y. enterocolitica 8081. rVE immunization resulted in extensive proliferation of both CD4 and CD8 T cell subsets; significantly high antibody titer with balanced IgG1: IgG2a/IgG2b isotypes (1:1 ratio) and up-regulation of both Th1 (TNF-α, IFN-γ, IL-2, and IL-12) and Th2 (IL-4) cytokines. On the other hand, rV immunization resulted in Th2 biased IgG response (11:1 ratio) and proliferation of CD4+ T-cell; rE group of mice exhibited considerably lower serum antibody titer with predominant Th1 response (1:3 ratio) and CD8+ T-cell proliferation. Comprehensive protection with superior survival (100%) was observed among rVE immunized mice when compared to the significantly lower survival rates among rE (37.5%) and rV (25%) groups when IP challenged with Y. enterocolitica 8081 after 120 days of immunization. Findings in this and our earlier studies define the bivalent fusion protein rVE as a potent candidate vaccine molecule with the capability to concurrently stimulate humoral and cell mediated immune responses and a proof of concept for developing efficient subunit vaccines against Gram negative facultative intracellular bacterial pathogens. PMID:26733956

  16. Beta-D-glucoside protects against advanced glycation end products (AGEs)-mediated diabetic responses by suppressing ERK and inducing PPAR gamma DNA binding.

    PubMed

    Mahali, Sidhartha K; Manna, Sunil K

    2012-12-15

    Accumulation of advanced glycation end products (AGEs), due to excessive amounts of 3- or 4-carbon sugars derived from glucose; cause multiple consequences in diabetic patients and older persons. The transcription factor, peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor gamma (PPARγ), is down regulated in the diabetic condition. Drugs targeting PPARγ were developed for diabetes therapy. We found that AGE inhibited PPARγ activity in different cell types induced by PPARγ activators, like troglitazone, rosiglitazone, oleamide, and anandamide. AGE induced translocation of PPARγ from nucleus to cytoplasm, increased on activation of ERK in cells. Antioxidants that inhibit AGE-induced NF-κB activation by preventing ROI generation were unable to protect AGE-mediated decrease in PPARγ activity. Only mangiferin, a β-D-glucoside, prevented AGE-mediated decrease in PPARγ activity and inhibited phosphorylation of ERK and cytoplasmic translocation of PPARγ. Mangiferin interacts with PPARγ and enhanced its DNA binding activity as predicted by in silico and shown by in vitro DNA-binding activity. Overall, the data suggest that (i) mangiferin inhibited AGE-induced ERK activation thereby inhibited PPARγ phosphorylation and cytoplasmic translocation; (ii) mangiferin interacts with PPARγ and enhances its DNA-binding ability. With these dual effects, mangiferin can be a likely candidate for developing therapeutic drug against diabetes. PMID:23058985

  17. Fibroblast growth factor 21 protects mouse brain against D-galactose induced aging via suppression of oxidative stress response and advanced glycation end products formation.

    PubMed

    Yu, Yinhang; Bai, Fuliang; Wang, Wenfei; Liu, Yaonan; Yuan, Qingyan; Qu, Susu; Zhang, Tong; Tian, Guiyou; Li, Siming; Li, Deshan; Ren, Guiping

    2015-06-01

    Fibroblast growth factor 21 (FGF21) is a hormone secreted predominantly in the liver, pancreas and adipose tissue. Recently, it has been reported that FGF21-Transgenic mice can extend their lifespan compared with wild type counterparts. Thus, we hypothesize that FGF21 may play some roles in aging of organisms. In this study d-galactose (d-gal)-induced aging mice were used to study the mechanism that FGF21 protects mice from aging. The three-month-old Kunming mice were subcutaneously injected with d-gal (180mg·kg(-1)·d(-1)) for 8weeks and administered simultaneously with FGF21 (1, 2 or 5mg·kg(-1)·d(-1)). Our results showed that administration of FGF21 significantly improved behavioral performance of d-gal-treated mice in water maze task and step-down test, reduced brain cell damage in the hippocampus, and attenuated the d-gal-induced production of MDA, ROS and advanced glycation end products (AGEs). At the same time, FGF21 also markedly renewed the activities of superoxide dismutase (SOD), catalase (CAT), glutathione peroxidase (GPx) and total anti-oxidation capability (T-AOC), and decreased the enhanced total cholinesterase (TChE) activity in the brain of d-gal-treated mice. The expression of aldose reductase (AR), sorbitol dehydrogenase (SDH) and member-anchored receptor for AGEs (RAGE) declined significantly after FGF21 treatment. Furthermore, FGF21 suppressed inflamm-aging by inhibiting IκBα degradation and NF-κB p65 nuclear translocation. The expression levels of pro-inflammatory cytokines, such as TNF-α and IL-6, decreased significantly. In conclusion, these results suggest that FGF21 protects the aging mice brain from d-gal-induced injury by attenuating oxidative stress damage and decreasing AGE formation. PMID:25871519

  18. Protective and Pathogenic Responses to Chikungunya Virus Infection

    PubMed Central

    Long, Kristin M.; Heise, Mark T.

    2015-01-01

    Chikungunya virus (CHIKV) is an arbovirus responsible for causing epidemic outbreaks of human disease characterized by painful and often debilitating arthralgia. Recently CHIKV has moved into the Caribbean and the Americas resulting in massive outbreaks in naïve human populations. Given the importance of CHIKV as an emerging disease, a significant amount of effort has gone into interpreting the virus-host interactions that contribute to protection or virus-induced pathology following CHIKV infection, with the long term goal of using this information to develop new therapies or safe and effective anti-CHIKV vaccines. This work has made it clear that numerous distinct host responses are involved in the response to CHIKV infection, where some aspects of the host innate and adaptive immune response protect from or limit virus-induced disease, while other pathways actually exacerbate the virus-induced disease process. This review will discuss mechanisms that have been identified as playing a role in the host response to CHIKV infection and illustrate the importance of carefully evaluating these responses to determine whether they play a protective or pathologic role during CHIKV infection. PMID:26366337

  19. Constitutive or Inducible Protective Mechanisms against UV-B Radiation in the Brown Alga Fucus vesiculosus? A Study of Gene Expression and Phlorotannin Content Responses

    PubMed Central

    Creis, Emeline; Delage, Ludovic; Charton, Sophie; Goulitquer, Sophie; Leblanc, Catherine; Potin, Philippe; Ar Gall, Erwan

    2015-01-01

    A role as UV sunscreens has been suggested for phlorotannins, the phenolic compounds that accumulate in brown algae in response to a number of external stimuli and take part in cell wall structure. After exposure of the intertidal brown alga Fucus vesiculosus to artificial UV-B radiation, we examined its physiological responses by following the transcript level of the pksIII gene encoding a phloroglucinol synthase, likely to be involved in the first step of phlorotannins biosynthesis. We also monitored the expression of three targeted genes, encoding a heat shock protein (hsp70), which is involved in global stress responses, an aryl sulfotransferase (ast), which could be involved in the sulfation of phlorotannins, and a vanadium bromoperoxidase (vbpo), which can potentially participate in the scavenging of Reactive Oxygen Species (ROS) and in the cross-linking and condensation of phlorotannins. We investigated whether transcriptional regulation of these genes is correlated with an induction of phlorotannin accumulation by establishing metabolite profiling of purified fractions of low molecular weight phlorotannins. Our findings demonstrated that a high dose of UV-B radiation induced a significant overexpression of hsp70 after 12 and 24 hours following the exposure to the UV-B treatment, compared to control treatment. The physiological performance of algae quantified by the photosynthetic efficiency (Fv/Fm) was slightly reduced. However UV-B treatment did not induce the accumulation of soluble phlorotannins in F. vesiculosus during the kinetics of four weeks, a result that may be related to the lack of induction of the pksIII gene expression. Taken together these results suggest a constitutive accumulation of phlorotannins occurring during the development of F.vesiculosus, rather than inducible processes. Gene expression studies and phlorotannin profiling provide here complementary approaches to global quantifications currently used in studies of phenolic compounds

  20. The surgically induced stress response.

    PubMed

    Finnerty, Celeste C; Mabvuure, Nigel Tapiwa; Ali, Arham; Kozar, Rosemary A; Herndon, David N

    2013-09-01

    The stress response to surgery, critical illness, trauma, and burns encompasses derangements of metabolic and physiological processes that induce perturbations in the inflammatory, acute phase, hormonal, and genomic responses. Hypermetabolism and hypercatabolism result, leading to muscle wasting, impaired immune function and wound healing, organ failure, and death. The surgery-induced stress response is largely similar to that triggered by traumatic injuries; the duration of the stress response, however, varies according to the severity of injury (surgical or traumatic). This spectrum of injuries and insults ranges from small lacerations to severe insults such as large poly-traumatic and burn injuries. Burn injuries provide an extreme model of trauma induced stress responses that can be used to study the long-term effects of a prolonged stress response. Although the stress response to acute trauma evolved to confer improved chances of survival following injury, in modern surgical practice the stress response can be detrimental. PMID:24009246

  1. Deletion of African swine fever virus interferon inhibitors from the genome of a virulent isolate reduces virulence in domestic pigs and induces a protective response.

    PubMed

    Reis, Ana Luisa; Abrams, Charles C; Goatley, Lynnette C; Netherton, Chris; Chapman, Dave G; Sanchez-Cordon, Pedro; Dixon, Linda K

    2016-09-01

    African swine fever virus (ASFV) encodes multiple copies of MGF360 and MGF530/505 gene families. These genes have been implicated in the modulation of the type I interferon (IFN) response. We investigated the effect of modulating the IFN response on virus attenuation and induction of protective immunity by deleting genes MGF360 (MGF360-10L, 11L, 12L, 13L, 14L) and MGF530/505 (MGF530/505-1R, 2R and 3R) and interrupting genes (MGF360-9L and MGF530/505-4R) in the genome of the virulent ASFV isolate Benin 97/1. Replication of this deletion mutant, BeninΔMGF, in porcine macrophages in vitro was similar to that of the parental virulent virus Benin 97/1 and the natural attenuated isolate OURT88/3, which has a similar deletion of MGF360 and 530/505 genes. Levels of IFN-β mRNA in macrophages infected with virulent Benin 97/1 isolate were barely detectable but high levels were detected in macrophages infected with OURT88/3 and intermediate levels in macrophages infected with BeninΔMGF. The data confirms that these MGF360 and MGF530/505 genes have roles in suppressing induction of type I IFN. Immunisation and boost of pigs with BeninΔMGF showed that the virus was attenuated and all pigs (5/5) were protected against challenge with a lethal dose of virulent Benin 97/1. A short transient fever was observed at day 5 or 6 post-immunisation but no other clinical signs. Following immunisation and boost with the OURT88/3 isolate 3 of 4 pigs were protected against challenge. Differences were observed in the cellular and antibody responses in pigs immunised with BeninΔMGF compared to OURT88/3. Deletion of IFN modulators is a promising route for construction of rationally attenuated ASFV candidate vaccine strains. PMID:27521231

  2. Electrode array-eluted dexamethasone protects against electrode insertion trauma induced hearing and hair cell losses, damage to neural elements, increases in impedance and fibrosis: A dose response study.

    PubMed

    Bas, Esperanza; Bohorquez, Jorge; Goncalves, Stefania; Perez, Enrique; Dinh, Christine T; Garnham, Carolyn; Hessler, Roland; Eshraghi, Adrien A; Van De Water, Thomas R

    2016-07-01

    We evaluated the effects of dexamethasone base (DXMb) containing electrode arrays in a guinea pig model of cochlear implantation to determine if eluted DXMb could protect the cochlea against electrode insertion trauma (EIT)-induced: 1) loss of hair cells; 2) disruption of neural elements; 3) increases in hearing thresholds; 4) increased electrical impedance and 5) fibrosis. A guinea pig model of EIT-induced hearing and hair cell losses was used to test silicone electrode arrays that contained either 10%, 1%, 0.1%, or 0% levels of micronized DXMb. These four types of electrode arrays were implanted into the scala tympani via basal turn cochleostomies and left in place for 3 months. Hearing thresholds were determined by ABR and CAP recordings in response to a series of defined pure tone stimuli (i.e. 16-0.5 kHz). Changes in impedance were measured between the implant electrode and a reference electrode. Hair cell counts and neural element integrity were determined by confocal microscopy analyses of stained organ of Corti whole mounts obtained from 90 day post-implantation animals. Fibrosis was measured in Masson trichrome stained cross-sections through the organ of Corti. The results showed that either 10% or 1.0% DXMb eluting electrode arrays protected; hearing thresholds, hair cells, and neural elements against EIT-induced losses and damage. Electrode arrays with 0.1% DXMb only partial protected against EIT-induced hearing loss and damage to the cochlea. Protection of hearing thresholds and organ of Corti sensory elements by electrode-eluted DXMb was still apparent at 3 months post-EIT. All three concentrations of DXMb in the electrode arrays prevented EIT-induced increases in impedance. EIT-initiated fibrosis was significantly reduced within the implanted cochlea of the two DXMb concentrations tested. In conclusion, DXMb eluting electrodes protected the cochlea against long term increases in hearing thresholds, loss of hair cells, damage to neural elements and

  3. Toxin ζ reversible induces dormancy and reduces the UDP-N-acetylglucosamine pool as one of the protective responses to cope with stress.

    PubMed

    Tabone, Mariangela; Ayora, Silvia; Alonso, Juan C

    2014-09-01

    Toxins of the ζ/PezT family, found in the genome of major human pathogens, phosphorylate the peptidoglycan precursor uridine diphosphate-N-acetylglucosamine (UNAG) leading to unreactive UNAG-3P. Transient over-expression of a PezT variant impairs cell wall biosynthesis and triggers autolysis in Escherichia coli. Conversely, physiological levels of ζ reversibly induce dormancy produce a sub-fraction of membrane-compromised cells, and a minor subpopulation of Bacillus subtilis cells become tolerant of toxin action. We report here that purified ζ is a strong UNAG-dependent ATPase, being GTP a lower competitor. In vitro, ζ toxin phosphorylates a fraction of UNAG. In vivo, ζ-mediated inactivation of UNAG by phosphorylation does not deplete the active UNAG pool, because expression of the toxin enhances the efficacy of genuine cell wall inhibitors (fosfomycin, vancomycin or ampicillin). Transient ζ expression together with fosfomycin treatment halt cell proliferation, but ε2 antitoxin expression facilitates the exit of ζ-induced dormancy, suggesting that there is sufficient UNAG for growth. We propose that ζ induces diverse cellular responses to cope with stress, being the reduction of the UNAG pool one among them. If the action of ζ is not inhibited, e.g., by de novo ε2 antitoxin synthesis, the toxin markedly enhances the efficacy of antimicrobial treatment without massive autolysis in Firmicutes. PMID:25238046

  4. Toxin ζ Reversible Induces Dormancy and Reduces the UDP-N-Acetylglucosamine Pool as One of the Protective Responses to Cope with Stress

    PubMed Central

    Tabone, Mariangela; Ayora, Silvia; Alonso, Juan C.

    2014-01-01

    Toxins of the ζ/PezT family, found in the genome of major human pathogens, phosphorylate the peptidoglycan precursor uridine diphosphate-N-acetylglucosamine (UNAG) leading to unreactive UNAG-3P. Transient over-expression of a PezT variant impairs cell wall biosynthesis and triggers autolysis in Escherichia coli. Conversely, physiological levels of ζ reversibly induce dormancy produce a sub-fraction of membrane-compromised cells, and a minor subpopulation of Bacillus subtilis cells become tolerant of toxin action. We report here that purified ζ is a strong UNAG-dependent ATPase, being GTP a lower competitor. In vitro, ζ toxin phosphorylates a fraction of UNAG. In vivo, ζ-mediated inactivation of UNAG by phosphorylation does not deplete the active UNAG pool, because expression of the toxin enhances the efficacy of genuine cell wall inhibitors (fosfomycin, vancomycin or ampicillin). Transient ζ expression together with fosfomycin treatment halt cell proliferation, but ε2 antitoxin expression facilitates the exit of ζ-induced dormancy, suggesting that there is sufficient UNAG for growth. We propose that ζ induces diverse cellular responses to cope with stress, being the reduction of the UNAG pool one among them. If the action of ζ is not inhibited, e.g., by de novo ε2 antitoxin synthesis, the toxin markedly enhances the efficacy of antimicrobial treatment without massive autolysis in Firmicutes. PMID:25238046

  5. Mucosal co-immunization with AIM2 enhances protective SIgA response and increases prophylactic efficacy of chitosan-DNA vaccine against coxsackievirus B3-induced myocarditis

    PubMed Central

    Chai, Dafei; Yue, Yan; Xu, Wei; Dong, Chunsheng; Xiong, Sidong

    2014-01-01

    Coxsackievirus B3 (CVB3) infection is considered as the most common cause of viral myocarditis with no available vaccine. Considering that CVB3 mainly invades through the gastrointestinal mucosa, the development of CVB3-specific mucosal vaccine, which is the most efficient way to induce mucosal immune responses, gains more and more attention. In this study, we used absent in melanoma 2 (AIM2) as a mucosal adjuvant to enhance the immunogenicity and immunoprotection of CVB3-specific chitosan-pVP1 vaccine. Mice were intranasally co-immunized with 50 μg chitosan-pAIM2 and equal amount of chitosan-pVP1 vaccine 4 times at 2 week-intervals, and then challenged with CVB3 2 weeks after the last immunization. Compared with chitosan-pVP1 vaccine immunization alone, chitosan-pAIM2 co-immunization enhanced resistance to CVB3-induced myocarditis evidenced by significantly enhanced ejection fractions from 55.40 ± 9.35 to 80.31 ± 11.35, improved myocarditis scores from 1.50 ± 0.45 to 0.30 ± 0.15, reduced viral load from 3.33 ± 0.50 to 0.50 ± 0.65, and increased survival rate from 40.0% to 75.5%. This increased immunoprotection might be attributed to the augmented level of CVB3-specific fecal SIgA with high affinity and neutralizing ability. In addition, co-immunization with chitosan-pAIM2 remarkably facilitated dendritic cells (DCs) recruitment to mesenteric lymph nodes (MLN), and promoted the expression of IgA-inducing factors (BAFF, APRIL, iNOS, RALDH1, IL-6, TGF-β), which might account for its mucosal adjuvant effect. This strategy may represent a promising prophylactic vaccine against CVB3-induced myocarditis. PMID:24614684

  6. Rotavirus immune responses and correlates of protection

    PubMed Central

    Angel, Juana; Franco, Manuel A.; Greenberg, Harry B.

    2012-01-01

    Selected topics in the field of rotavirus immunity are reviewed focusing on recent developments that may improve efficacy and safety of current and future vaccines. Rotaviruses have developed multiple mechanisms to evade interferon-mediated innate immunity. Compared to more developed regions of the world, protection induced by natural infection and vaccination is reduced in developing countries where, among other factors, high viral challenge loads are common and where infants are infected at an early age. Studies in developing countries indicate that rotavirus-specific serum IgA levels are not an optimal correlate of protection following vaccination, and better correlates need to be identified. Protection against rotavirus following vaccination is substantially heterotypic; nonetheless, a role for homotypic immunity in selection of circulating post vaccination strains needs further study. PMID:22677178

  7. Commercial Building Motor Protection Response Report

    SciTech Connect

    James, Daniel P.; Kueck, John

    2015-06-17

    When voltages recover, motors may immediately reenergize and reaccelerate, or delay for a few minutes, or stay stalled. The estimated motor response is given for both the voltage sag magnitude and voltage sag duration. These response estimates are based on experience and available test data. Good data is available for voltage sag response for many components such as relays and contactors, but little data is available for both voltage sag and recovery response. The tables in Appendix A include data from recent voltage sag and recovery tests performed by SCE and BPA on air conditioners and energy management systems. The response of the motor can vary greatly depending on the type of protection and control. The time duration for the voltage sag consists of those times that are of interest for bulk power system modelers.

  8. Protective action of the immunomodulator ginsan against carbon tetrachloride-induced liver injury via control of oxidative stress and the inflammatory response

    SciTech Connect

    Shim, Ji-Young; Kim, Mi-Hyoung; Kim, Hyung-Doo; Ahn, Ji-Yeon; Yun, Yeon-Sook; Song, Jie-Young

    2010-02-01

    The aim of the present study was to evaluate immunomodulator ginsan, a polysaccharide extracted from Panax ginseng, on carbon tetrachloride (CCl{sub 4})-induced liver injury. BALB/c mice were injected i.p. with ginsan 24 h prior to CCl{sub 4} administration. Serum liver enzyme levels, histology, expression of antioxidant enzymes, and several cytokines/chemokines were subsequently evaluated. Ginsan treatment markedly suppressed the serum alanine aminotransferase (ALT) and aspartate aminotransferase (AST) levels, and hepatic histological necrosis increased by CCl{sub 4} treatment. Ginsan inhibited CCl{sub 4} induced lipid peroxidation through the cytochrome P450 2E1 (CYP2E1) downregulation. The hepatoprotective effect of ginsan was attributed to induction of anti-oxidant protein contents, such as superoxide dismutase (SOD), catalase, and glutathione peroxidase (GPX) as well as restoration of the hepatic glutathione (GSH) concentration. The marked increase of proinflammatory cytokines (IL-1beta, IFN-gamma) and chemokines (MCP-1, MIP-2beta, KC) in CCl{sub 4} treated mice was additionally attenuated by ginsan, thereby preventing leukocyte infiltration and local inflammation. Our results suggest that ginsan effectively prevent liver injury, mainly through downregulation of oxidative stress and inflammatory response.

  9. BAD Modulates Counterregulatory Responses to Hypoglycemia and Protective Glucoprivic Feeding

    PubMed Central

    Osundiji, Mayowa A.; Godes, Marina L.; Evans, Mark L.; Danial, Nika N.

    2011-01-01

    Hypoglycemia or glucoprivation triggers protective hormonal counterregulatory and feeding responses to aid the restoration of normoglycemia. Increasing evidence suggests pertinent roles for the brain in sensing glucoprivation and mediating counterregulation, however, the precise nature of the metabolic signals and molecular mediators linking central glucose sensing to effector functions are not fully understood. Here, we demonstrate that protective hormonal and feeding responses to hypoglycemia are regulated by BAD, a BCL-2 family protein with dual functions in apoptosis and metabolism. BAD-deficient mice display impaired glycemic and hormonal counterregulatory responses to systemic glucoprivation induced by 2-deoxy-D-glucose. BAD is also required for proper counterregulatory responses to insulin-induced hypoglycemia as evident from significantly higher glucose infusion rates and lower plasma epinephrine levels during hyperinsulinemic hypoglycemic clamps. Importantly, RNA interference-mediated acute knockdown of Bad in the brain provided independent genetic evidence for its relevance in central glucose sensing and proper neurohumoral responses to glucoprivation. Moreover, BAD deficiency is associated with impaired glucoprivic feeding, suggesting that its role in adaptive responses to hypoglycemia extends beyond hormonal responses to regulation of feeding behavior. Together, these data indicate a previously unappreciated role for BAD in the control of central glucose sensing. PMID:22162752

  10. Mitochondrial peroxiredoxin 3 (Prx3) from rock bream (Oplegnathus fasciatus): immune responses and role of recombinant Prx3 in protecting cells from hydrogen peroxide induced oxidative stress.

    PubMed

    Godahewa, G I; Kim, Yucheol; Dananjaya, S H S; Jayasooriya, R G P T; Noh, Jae Koo; Lee, Jehee; De Zoysa, Mahanama

    2015-03-01

    Pathogenic infections and environmental factors cause a variety of stresses in fish including oxidative stress by rapid elevation of reactive oxygen species (ROS) and reactive nitrogen species (RNS). Transcriptional activation and expression of antioxidant enzymes are essential for reducing the oxidative stress. In this study, we present the molecular characterization, immune responses and ROS scavenging activity of mitochondrial peroxiredoxin 3 from Oplegnathus fasciatus (RbPrx3). Coding sequence (CDS) of RbPrx3 contains 248 amino acids polypeptide which consists of highly conserved peroxiredoxin super family domain and two cysteine residues. Pairwise sequence comparison revealed that RbPrx3 has the greatest identity (94.8%) to Sparus aurata Prx3. Transcriptional analysis of RbPrx3 indicated the ubiquitously expressed mRNA in wide array of organs showing the highest expression in the liver of rock bream. Upon immune challenge of Edwardsiella tarda, Streptococcus iniae, rock bream iridovirus (RBIV) and lipopolysaccharide (LPS), RbPrx3 mRNA level was up-regulated in immunocompetent liver tissues compared to unchallenged fish. Purified recombinant RbPrx3 treated THP-1 cells showed higher survival rate against H(2)O(2) induced oxidative stress and significantly reduced the level of intracellular ROS. Overall results from our study suggest that RbPrx3 may be involved in broader functions such as regulating oxidative stresses by scavenging ROS and activating immune responses in rock bream. PMID:25542382

  11. Influenza virus-like particles produced by transient expression in Nicotiana benthamiana induce a protective immune response against a lethal viral challenge in mice.

    PubMed

    D'Aoust, Marc-André; Lavoie, Pierre-Olivier; Couture, Manon M-J; Trépanier, Sonia; Guay, Jean-Martin; Dargis, Michèle; Mongrand, Sébastien; Landry, Nathalie; Ward, Brian J; Vézina, Louis-P

    2008-12-01

    A strain-specific vaccine represents the best possible response to the threat of an influenza pandemic. Rapid delivery of such a vaccine to the world's population before the peak of the first infection wave seems to be an unattainable goal with the current influenza vaccine manufacturing capacity. Plant-based transient expression is one of the few production systems that can meet the anticipated surge requirement. To assess the capability of plant agroinfiltration to produce an influenza vaccine, we expressed haemagglutinin (HA) from strains A/Indonesia/5/05 (H5N1) and A/New Caledonia/20/99 (H1N1) by agroinfiltration of Nicotiana benthamiana plants. Size distribution analysis of protein content in infiltrated leaves revealed that HA was predominantly assembled into high-molecular-weight structures. H5-containing structures were purified and examination by transmission electron microscopy confirmed virus-like particle (VLP) assembly. High-performance thin layer chromatography analysis of VLP lipid composition highlighted polar and neutral lipid contents comparable with those of purified plasma membranes from tobacco plants. Electron microscopy of VLP-producing cells in N. benthamiana leaves confirmed that VLPs accumulated in apoplastic indentations of the plasma membrane. Finally, immunization of mice with two doses of as little as 0.1 microg of purified influenza H5-VLPs triggered a strong immune response against the homologous virus, whereas two doses of 0.5 microg of H5-VLPs conferred complete protection against a lethal challenge with the heterologous A/Vietnam/1194/04 (H5N1) strain. These results show, for the first time, that plants are capable of producing enveloped influenza VLPs budding from the plasma membrane; such VLPs represent very promising candidates for vaccination against influenza pandemic strains. PMID:19076615

  12. Heme oxygenase-1 exerts a protective role in ovalbumin-induced neutrophilic airway inflammation by inhibiting Th17 cell-mediated immune response.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yanjie; Zhang, Liya; Wu, Jinhong; Di, Caixia; Xia, Zhenwei

    2013-11-29

    Allergic asthma is conventionally considered as a Th2 immune response characterized by eosinophilic inflammation. Recent investigations revealed that Th17 cells play an important role in the pathogenesis of non-eosinophilic asthma (NEA), resulting in steroid-resistant neutrophilic airway inflammation. Heme oxygenase-1 (HO-1) has anti-inflammation, anti-oxidation, and anti-apoptosis functions. However, its role in NEA is still unclear. Here, we explore the role of HO-1 in a mouse model of NEA. HO-1 inducer hemin or HO-1 inhibitor tin protoporphyrin IX was injected intraperitoneally into ovalbumin-challenged DO11.10 mice. Small interfering RNA (siRNA) was delivered into mice to knock down HO-1 expression. The results show that induction of HO-1 by hemin attenuated airway inflammation and decreased neutrophil infiltration in bronchial alveolar lavage fluid and was accompanied by a lower proportion of Th17 cells in mediastinal lymph nodes and spleen. More importantly, induction of HO-1 down-regulated Th17-related transcription factor retinoic acid-related orphan receptor γt (RORγt) expression and decreased IL-17A levels, all of which correlated with a decrease in phosphorylated STAT3 (p-STAT3) level and inhibition of Th17 cell differentiation. Consistently, the above events could be reversed by tin protoporphyrin IX. Also, HO-1 siRNA transfection abolished the effect of hemin induced HO-1 in vivo. Meanwhile, the hemin treatment promoted the level of Foxp3 expression and enhanced the proportion of regulatory T cells (Tregs). Collectively, our findings indicate that HO-1 exhibits anti-inflammatory activity in the mouse model of NEA via inhibition of the p-STAT3-RORγt pathway, regulating kinetics of RORγt and Foxp3 expression, thus providing a possible novel therapeutic target in asthmatic patients. PMID:24097973

  13. The Surgically Induced Stress Response

    PubMed Central

    Finnerty, Celeste C.; Mabvuure, Nigel Tapiwa; Ali, Arham; Kozar, Rosemary A.; Herndon, David N.

    2013-01-01

    The stress response to surgery, critical illness, trauma, and burns encompasses derangements of metabolic and physiological processes which induce perturbations in the inflammatory, acute phase, hormonal, and genomic responses. Hypermetabolism and hypercatabolism result, leading to muscle wasting, impaired immune function and wound healing, organ failure, and death. The surgery-induced stress response is largely similar to that triggered by traumatic injuries; the duration of the stress response, however, varies according to the severity of injury (surgical or traumatic). This spectrum of injuries and insults ranges from small lacerations to severe insults such as large poly-traumatic and burn injuries. Although the stress response to acute trauma evolved to improve chances of survival following injury, in modern surgical practice the stress response can be detrimental. PMID:24009246

  14. DAP12 Stabilizes the C-terminal Fragment of the Triggering Receptor Expressed on Myeloid Cells-2 (TREM2) and Protects against LPS-induced Pro-inflammatory Response.

    PubMed

    Zhong, Li; Chen, Xiao-Fen; Zhang, Zhen-Lian; Wang, Zhe; Shi, Xin-Zhen; Xu, Kai; Zhang, Yun-Wu; Xu, Huaxi; Bu, Guojun

    2015-06-19

    Triggering receptor expressed on myeloid cells 2 (TREM2) is a DAP12-associated receptor expressed in microglia, macrophages, and other myeloid-derived cells. Previous studies have suggested that TREM2/DAP12 signaling pathway reduces inflammatory responses and promotes phagocytosis of apoptotic neurons. Recently, TREM2 has been identified as a risk gene for Alzheimer disease (AD). Here, we show that DAP12 stabilizes the C-terminal fragment of TREM2 (TREM2-CTF), a substrate for γ-secretase. Co-expression of DAP12 with TREM2 selectively increased the level of TREM2-CTF with little effects on that of full-length TREM2. The interaction between DAP12 and TREM2 is essential for TREM2-CTF stabilization as a mutant form of DAP12 with disrupted interaction with TREM2 failed to exhibit such an effect. Silencing of either Trem2 or Dap12 gene significantly exacerbated pro-inflammatory responses induced by lipopolysaccharides (LPS). Importantly, overexpression of either full-length TREM2 or TREM2-CTF reduced LPS-induced inflammatory responses. Taken together, our results support a role of DAP12 in stabilizing TREM2-CTF, thereby protecting against excessive pro-inflammatory responses. PMID:25957402

  15. Salmonella enterica serovar enteritidis ghosts carrying the Escherichia coli heat-labile enterotoxin B subunit are capable of inducing enhanced protective immune responses.

    PubMed

    Jawale, Chetan V; Lee, John Hwa

    2014-06-01

    The Escherichia coli heat-labile enterotoxin B subunit (LTB) is a potent vaccine adjuvant. Salmonella enterica serovar Enteritidis ghosts carrying LTB (S. Enteritidis-LTB ghosts) were genetically constructed using a novel plasmid, pJHL187-LTB, designed for the coexpression of the LTB and E lysis proteins. S. Enteritidis-LTB ghosts were characterized using scanning electron microscopy to visualize their transmembrane tunnel structures. The expression of LTB in S. Enteritidis-LTB ghost preparations was confirmed by immunoblot and enzyme-linked immunosorbent assays. The parenteral adjuvant activity of LTB was demonstrated by immunizing chickens with either S. Enteritidis-LTB ghosts or S. Enteritidis ghosts. Chickens were intramuscularly primed at 5 weeks of age and subsequently boosted at 8 weeks of age. In total, 60 chickens were equally divided into three groups (n = 20 for each): group A, nonvaccinated control; group B, immunized with S. Enteritidis-LTB ghosts; and group C, immunized with S. Enteritidis ghosts. Compared with the nonimmunized chickens (group A), the immunized chickens (groups B and C) exhibited increased titers of plasma IgG and intestinal secretory IgA antibodies. The CD3(+) CD4(+) subpopulation of T cells was also significantly increased in both immunized groups. Among the immunized chickens, those in group B exhibited significantly increased titers of specific plasma IgG and intestinal secretory IgA (sIgA) antibodies compared with those in group C, indicating the immunomodulatory effects of the LTB adjuvant. Furthermore, both immunized groups exhibited decreased bacterial loads in their feces and internal organs. These results indicate that parenteral immunization with S. Enteritidis-LTB ghosts can stimulate superior induction of systemic and mucosal immune responses compared to immunization with S. Enteritidis ghosts alone, thus conferring efficient protection against salmonellosis. PMID:24671556

  16. Lithium protects ethanol-induced neuronal apoptosis

    SciTech Connect

    Zhong Jin . E-mail: jizhong@iupui.edu; Yang Xianlin; Yao Weiguo; Lee Weihua

    2006-12-01

    Lithium is widely used for the treatment of bipolar disorder. Recent studies have demonstrated its neuroprotective effect. Ethanol is a potent neurotoxin that is particularly harmful to the developing nervous system. In this study, we evaluated lithium's neuroprotection against ethanol-induced apoptosis. Transient exposure of infant mice to ethanol caused apoptotic cell death in brain, which was prevented significantly by administering a low dose of lithium 15 min later. In cultured cerebellar granule neurons, ethanol-induced apoptosis and activation of caspase-3/9, both of which were prevented by lithium. However, lithium's protection is not mediated by its commonly known inhibition of glycogen synthase3{beta}, because neither ethanol nor lithium has significant effects on the phosphorylation of Akt (ser473) or GSK3{beta} (ser9). In addition, the selective GSK-3{beta} inhibitor SB-415286 was unable to prevent ethanol-induced apoptosis. These data suggest lithium may be used as a potential preventive measure for ethanol-induced neurological deficits.

  17. Intradermal Immunization of Leishmania donovani Centrin Knock-Out Parasites in Combination with Salivary Protein LJM19 from Sand Fly Vector Induces a Durable Protective Immune Response in Hamsters

    PubMed Central

    Fiuza, Jacqueline Araújo; Dey, Ranadhir; Davenport, Dwann; Abdeladhim, Maha; Meneses, Claudio; Oliveira, Fabiano; Kamhawi, Shaden; Valenzuela, Jesus G.; Gannavaram, Sreenivas; Nakhasi, Hira L.

    2016-01-01

    Background Visceral leishmaniasis (VL) is a neglected tropical disease and is fatal if untreated. There is no vaccine available against leishmaniasis. The majority of patients with cutaneous leishmaniasis (CL) or VL develop a long-term protective immunity after cure from infection, which indicates that development of an effective vaccine against leishmaniasis is possible. Such protection may also be achieved by immunization with live attenuated parasites that do not cause disease. We have previously reported a protective response in mice, hamsters and dogs with Leishmania donovani centrin gene knock-out parasites (LdCen-/-), a live attenuated parasite with a cell division specific centrin1 gene deletion. In this study we have explored the effects of salivary protein LJM19 as an adjuvant and intradermal (ID) route of immunization on the efficacy of LdCen-/- parasites as a vaccine against virulent L. donovani. Methodology/Principal Findings To explore the potential of a combination of LdCen-/- parasites and salivary protein LJM19 as vaccine antigens, LdCen-/- ID immunization followed by ID challenge with virulent L. donovani were performed in hamsters in a 9-month follow up study. We determined parasite burden (serial dilution), antibody production (ELISA) and cytokine expression (qPCR) in these animals. Compared to controls, animals immunized with LdCen-/- + LJM19 induced a strong antibody response, a reduction in spleen and liver parasite burden and a higher expression of pro-inflammatory cytokines after immunization and one month post-challenge. Additionally, a low parasite load in lymph nodes, spleen and liver, and a non-inflamed spleen was observed in immunized animals 9 months after the challenge infection. Conclusions Our results demonstrate that an ID vaccination using LdCen-/-parasites in combination with sand fly salivary protein LJM19 has the capability to confer long lasting protection against visceral leishmaniasis that is comparable to intravenous or

  18. Peptide-Induced Antiviral Protection by Cytotoxic T Cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schulz, Manfred; Zinkernagel, Rolf M.; Hengartner, Hans

    1991-02-01

    A specific antiviral cytotoxic immune response in vivo could be induced by the subcutaneous injection of the T-cell epitope of the lymphocytic choriomeningitis virus (LCMV) nucleoprotein as an unmodified free synthetic peptide (Arg-Pro-Gln-Ala-Ser-Gly-Val-Tyr-Met-Gly-Asn-Leu-Thr-Ala-Gln) emulsified in incomplete Freund's adjuvant. This immunization rendered mice into a LCMV-specific protective state as shown by the inhibition of LCMV replication in spleens of such mice. The protection level of these mice correlated with the ability to respond to the peptide challenge by CD8^+ virus-specific cytotoxic T cells. This is a direct demonstration that peptide vaccines can be antivirally protective in vivo, thus encouraging further search for appropriate mixtures of stable peptides that may be used as T-cell vaccines.

  19. In Vitro and In Vivo Studies for Assessing the Immune Response and Protection-Inducing Ability Conferred by Fasciola hepatica-Derived Synthetic Peptides Containing B- and T-Cell Epitopes

    PubMed Central

    Rojas-Caraballo, Jose; López-Abán, Julio; Pérez del Villar, Luis; Vizcaíno, Carolina; Vicente, Belén; Fernández-Soto, Pedro; del Olmo, Esther; Patarroyo, Manuel Alfonso; Muro, Antonio

    2014-01-01

    Fasciolosis is considered the most widespread trematode disease affecting grazing animals around the world; it is currently recognised by the World Health Organisation as an emergent human pathogen. Triclabendazole is still the most effective drug against this disease; however, resistant strains have appeared and developing an effective vaccine against this disease has increasingly become a priority. Several bioinformatics tools were here used for predicting B- and T-cell epitopes according to the available data for Fasciola hepatica protein amino acid sequences. BALB/c mice were immunised with the synthetic peptides by using the ADAD vaccination system and several immune response parameters were measured (antibody titres, cytokine levels, T-cell populations) to evaluate their ability to elicit an immune response. Based on the immunogenicity results so obtained, seven peptides were selected to assess their protection-inducing ability against experimental infection with F. hepatica metacercariae. Twenty-four B- or T-epitope-containing peptides were predicted and chemically synthesised. Immunisation of mice with peptides so-called B1, B2, B5, B6, T14, T15 and T16 induced high levels of total IgG, IgG1 and IgG2a (p<0.05) and a mixed Th1/Th2/Th17/Treg immune response, according to IFN-γ, IL-4, IL-17 and IL-10 levels, accompanied by increased CD62L+ T-cell populations. A high level of protection was obtained in mice vaccinated with peptides B2, B5, B6 and T15 formulated in the ADAD vaccination system with the AA0029 immunomodulator. The bioinformatics approach used in the present study led to the identification of seven peptides as vaccine candidates against the infection caused by Fasciola hepatica (a liver-fluke trematode). However, vaccine efficacy must be evaluated in other host species, including those having veterinary importance. PMID:25122166

  20. Report on the second WHO integrated meeting on development and clinical trials of influenza vaccines that induce broadly protective and long-lasting immune responses: Geneva, Switzerland, 5-7 May 2014.

    PubMed

    Cox, Nancy J; Hickling, Julian; Jones, Rebecca; Rimmelzwaan, Guus F; Lambert, Linda C; Boslego, John; Rudenko, Larisa; Yeolekar, Leena; Robertson, James S; Hombach, Joachim; Ortiz, Justin R

    2015-11-27

    On 5-7 May 2014, the World Health Organization (WHO) convened the second integrated meeting on "influenza vaccines that induce broadly protective and long-lasting immune responses". Around 100 invited experts from academia, the vaccine industry, research and development funders, and regulatory and public health agencies attended the meeting. Areas covered included mechanisms of protection in natural influenza-virus infection and vaccine-induced immunity, new approaches to influenza-vaccine design and production, and novel routes of vaccine administration. A timely focus was on how this knowledge could be applied to both seasonal influenza and emerging viruses with pandemic potential such as influenza A (H7N9), currently circulating in China. Special attention was given to the development of possible universal influenza vaccines, given that the Global Vaccine Action Plan calls for at least one licensed universal influenza vaccine by 2020. This report highlights some of the topics discussed and provides an update on studies published since the report of the previous meeting. PMID:26478203

  1. Sappanone A protects mice against cisplatin-induced kidney injury.

    PubMed

    Kang, Lin; Zhao, Huanfen; Chen, Chen; Zhang, Xiuzhi; Xu, Mingtang; Duan, Huijun

    2016-09-01

    Cisplatin (CP) is an anti-cancer drug that often causes nephrotoxicity due to enhanced inflammatory response and oxidative stress. Sappanone A (SA), a homoisoflavanone isolated from the heartwood of Caesalpinia sappan, has been known to have antioxidant and anti-inflammatory effects. In this study, we aimed to investigate the protective effects and mechanism of SA on CP-induced kidney injury in mice. The results showed that treatment of SA improved CP-induced histopathalogical injury and renal dysfunction. SA also inhibited CP-induced MPO, MDA, TNF-α and IL-1β production and up-regulated the activities of SOD and GSH-PX decreased by CP. SA significantly inhibited the apoptosis rate of kidney tissues induced by CP. Furthermore, SA was found to inhibit CP-induced NF-κB activation. Treatment of SA up-regulated the expression of Nrf2 and HO-1 in a dose-dependent manner. In vitro, SA dose-dependently inhibited CP-induced TNF-α and IL-1β production and NF-κB activation in HK-2 cells. In conclusion, these results suggested that SA inhibited CP-induced kidney injury through activating Nrf2 and inhibiting NF-κB activation. SA was a potential therapeutic drug for treating CP-induced kidney injury. PMID:27318179

  2. Antibody responses induced by recombinant ALV-A gp85 protein vaccine combining with CpG-ODN adjuvant in breeder hens and the protection for their offspring against early infection.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Dandan; Li, Hongmei; Zhang, Zhongsheng; Sun, Shuhong; Cheng, Ziqiang; Liu, Jianzhu; Zhao, Peng; Ren, Qingya; Guo, Huijun

    2015-04-01

    To observe the antibody responses induced by recombinant A subgroup avian leukosis virus (ALV-A) gp85 protein vaccine plus CpG-ODN adjuvant and the protection of maternal antibodies (MAbs) for the hatched chickens against early infection, the gp85 gene was amplified from the proviral cDNA of ALV-A-SDAU09C1 strain using PCR and the recombinant plasmid containing target gene was constructed and expressed in EscherichiaColi. The expressed product was confirmed using SDS-PAGE and western blot that it is about 46KD of recombinant protein. The purified recombinant proteins combining with CpG-ODN adjuvant or Freund's adjuvant were inoculated into the breeder hens, the ALV-A antibodies in serum and in egg-yolk were detected; the fertilized eggs from the vaccinated hens with different titers of egg-yolk antibody were hatched and then challenged with 10(4.2)/0.1mL TCID50 of ALV-A-SDAU09C1 strain, all the hatched chickens were weekly detected for the viremias and the cloacal swab P27 antigen and pathological lesions; the neutralizing test of antisera in vitro was conducted. The results showed that the recombinant gp85 proteins combining with CpG-ODN adjuvant could induce the breeder hens to produce better antibody responses than gp85 protein with Freund's adjuvant or without adjuvant; the MAbs with higher titers induced by CpG-ODN+gp85 proteins could obviously decrease the ratios of viremias (13% vs 33%), cloacal detoxification (20% vs 67%) and death (0% vs 22%) caused by ALV-A infection than those by gp85 protein without adjuvant. The results of the neutralizing test indicated that the antisera from the hatched chickens could neutralize the ALV-A-SDAU09C1 strain in vitro, but which depends on the antibody titers. The results of IFA confirmed that the serum antibody could combine with the ALV in DF1 cells. It can be concluded that the prepared ALV-A gp85 subunit vaccine combining with CpG-ODN adjuvant could induce the breeder hens to produce better neutralizing antibody

  3. Induced polarization response of microbial induced sulfideprecipitation

    SciTech Connect

    Ntarlagiannis, Dimitrios; Williams, Kenneth Hurst; Slater, Lee; Hubbard, Susan

    2004-06-04

    A laboratory scale experiment was conducted to examine the use of induced polarization and electrical conductivity to monitor microbial induced sulfide precipitation under anaerobic conditions in sand filled columns. Three columns were fabricated; one for electrical measurements, one for geochemical sampling and a third non-inoculated column was used as a control. A continual upward flow of nutrients and metals in solution was established in each column. Desulfovibrio vulgaris microbes were injected into the middle of the geochemical and electrical columns. Iron and zinc sulfides precipitated along a microbial action front as a result of sulfate reduction due by Desulfovibrio vulgaris. The precipitation front initially developed near the microbial injection location, and subsequently migrated towards the nutrient inlet, as a result of chemotaxis by Desulfovibrio vulgaris. Sampling during and subsequent to the experiment revealed spatiotemporal changes in the biogeochemical measurements associated with microbial sulfate reduction. Conductivity measurements were insensitive to all biogeochemical changes occurred within the column. Changes in the IP response (of up to 14 mrad)were observed to coincide in place and in time with the active microbe respiration/sulfide precipitation front as determined from geochemical sampling. The IP response is correlated with the lactate concentration gradient, an indirect measurement of microbial metabolism, suggesting the potential of IP as a method for monitoring microbial respiration/activity. Post experimental destructive sample analysis and SEM imaging verified the geochemical results and supported our hypothesis that microbe induced sulfide precipitation is directly detectable using electrical methods. Although the processes not fully understood, the IP response appears to be sensitive to this anaerobic microbial precipitation, suggesting a possible novel application for the IP method.

  4. A Recombinant Influenza A Virus Expressing Domain III of West Nile Virus Induces Protective Immune Responses against Influenza and West Nile Virus

    PubMed Central

    Martina, Byron E. E.; van den Doel, Petra; Koraka, Penelope; van Amerongen, Geert; Spohn, Gunther; Haagmans, Bart L.; Provacia, Lisette B. V.; Osterhaus, Albert D. M. E.; Rimmelzwaan, Guus F.

    2011-01-01

    West Nile virus (WNV) continues to circulate in the USA and forms a threat to the rest of the Western hemisphere. Since methods for the treatment of WNV infections are not available, there is a need for the development of safe and effective vaccines. Here, we describe the construction of a recombinant influenza virus expressing domain III of the WNV glycoprotein E (Flu-NA-DIII) and its evaluation as a WNV vaccine candidate in a mouse model. FLU-NA-DIII-vaccinated mice were protected from severe body weight loss and mortality caused by WNV infection, whereas control mice succumbed to the infection. In addition, it was shown that one subcutaneous immunization with 105 TCID50 Flu-NA-DIII provided 100% protection against challenge. Adoptive transfer experiments demonstrated that protection was mediated by antibodies and CD4+T cells. Furthermore, mice vaccinated with FLU-NA-DIII developed protective influenza virus-specific antibody titers. It was concluded that this vector system might be an attractive platform for the development of bivalent WNV-influenza vaccines. PMID:21541326

  5. Allergen-induced airway responses.

    PubMed

    Gauvreau, Gail M; El-Gammal, Amani I; O'Byrne, Paul M

    2015-09-01

    Environmental allergens are an important cause of asthma and can contribute to loss of asthma control and exacerbations. Allergen inhalation challenge has been a useful clinical model to examine the mechanisms of allergen-induced airway responses and inflammation. Allergen bronchoconstrictor responses are the early response, which reaches a maximum within 30 min and resolves by 1-3 h, and late responses, when bronchoconstriction recurs after 3-4 h and reaches a maximum over 6-12 h. Late responses are followed by an increase in airway hyperresponsiveness. These responses occur when IgE on mast cells is cross-linked by an allergen, causing degranulation and the release of histamine, neutral proteases and chemotactic factors, and the production of newly formed mediators, such as cysteinyl leukotrienes and prostaglandin D2. Allergen-induced airway inflammation consists of an increase in airway eosinophils, basophils and, less consistently, neutrophils. These responses are mediated by the trafficking and activation of myeloid dendritic cells into the airways, probably as a result of the release of epithelial cell-derived thymic stromal lymphopoietin, and the release of pro-inflammatory cytokines from type 2 helper T-cells. Allergen inhalation challenge has also been a widely used model to study potential new therapies for asthma and has an excellent negative predictive value for this purpose. PMID:26206871

  6. Protection against Radiotherapy-Induced Toxicity.

    PubMed

    Hall, Susan; Rudrawar, Santosh; Zunk, Matthew; Bernaitis, Nijole; Arora, Devinder; McDermott, Catherine M; Anoopkumar-Dukie, Shailendra

    2016-01-01

    Radiation therapy is a highly utilized therapy in the treatment of malignancies with up to 60% of cancer patients receiving radiation therapy as a part of their treatment regimen. Radiation therapy does, however, cause a wide range of adverse effects that can be severe and cause permanent damage to the patient. In an attempt to minimize these effects, a small number of compounds have been identified and are in use clinically for the prevention and treatment of radiation associated toxicities. Furthermore, there are a number of emerging therapies being developed for use as agents that protect against radiation-induced toxicities. The aim of this review was to evaluate and summarise the evidence that exists for both the known radioprotectant agents and the agents that show promise as future radioprotectant agents. PMID:27399787

  7. Estrogen Protects against Radiation-Induced Cataractogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Dynlacht, Joseph R.; Valluri, Shailaja; Lopez, Jennifer; Greer, Falon; DesRosiers, Colleen; Caperell-Grant, Andrea; Mendonca, Marc S.; Bigsby, Robert M.

    2008-01-01

    Cataractogenesis is a complication of radiotherapy when the eye is included in the treatment field. Low doses of densely ionizing space radiation may also result in an increased risk of cataracts in astronauts. We previously reported that estrogen (17-β-estradiol), when administered to ovariectomized rats commencing 1 week before γ irradiation of the eye and continuously thereafter, results in a significant increase in the rate and incidence of cataract formation and a decreased latent period compared to an ovariectomized control group. We therefore concluded that estrogen accelerates progression of radiation-induced opacification. We now show that estrogen, if administered continuously, but commencing after irradiation, protects against radiation cataractogenesis. Both the rate of progression and incidence of cataracts were greatly reduced in ovariectomized rats that received estrogen treatment after irradiation compared to ovariectomized rats. As in our previous study, estradiol administered 1 week prior to irradiation at the time of ovariectomy and throughout the period of observation produced an enhanced rate of cataract progression. Estrogen administered for only 1 week prior to irradiation had no effect on the rate of progression but resulted in a slight reduction in the incidence. We conclude that estrogen may enhance or protect against radiation cataractogenesis, depending on when it is administered relative to the time of irradiation, and may differentially modulate the initiation and progression phases of cataractogenesis. These data have important implications for astronauts and radiotherapy patients. PMID:19138041

  8. Immunostimulatory complexes containing Eimeria tenella antigens and low toxicity plant saponins induce antibody response and provide protection from challenge in broiler chickens.

    PubMed

    Berezin, V E; Bogoyavlenskyi, A P; Khudiakova, S S; Alexuk, P G; Omirtaeva, E S; Zaitceva, I A; Tustikbaeva, G B; Barfield, R C; Fetterer, R H

    2010-01-20

    Immunostimulating complexes (ISCOMs) are unique multimolecular structures formed by encapsulating antigens, lipids and triterpene saponins and are one of the most successful antigen delivery systems for microbial antigens. In the current study, both the route of administration and the antigen concentration of ISCOMs, containing Eimeria tenella antigens and saponins from native plants, were evaluated in their ability to stimulate humoral immunity and to protect chickens against a challenge infection with E. tenella. Broiler chickens were immunized with ISCOM preparations containing E. tenella antigens and the purified saponins Gg6, Ah6 and Gp7 isolated from Glycyrrhiza glabra, Aesculus hippocastanum and Gipsophila paniculata, respectively. The effects of the route of administration, dose of antigen and type of saponin used for construction of ISCOMs were evaluated for ability to stimulate serum IgG and IgM and to protect chickens against a homologous challenge. A single intranasal immunization was the most effective route for administering ISCOMs although the in ovo route was also quite effective. Dose titration experiments demonstrated efficacy after single immunization with various ISCOM doses but maximum effects were observed when ISCOMs contain 5-10mug antigen. Immunization of birds by any of the three routes with E. tenella antigens alone or antigens mixed with alum hydroxide adjuvant resulted in lower serum antibody and reduced protection to challenge relative to immunization with ISCOMs. Overall the results of this study confirm that significant immunostimulation and protection to challenge are achieved by immunization of chickens with ISCOMs containing purified saponins and native E. tenella antigens and suggest that ISCOMs may be successfully used to develop a safe and effective vaccine for prevention of avian coccidiosis. PMID:19879050

  9. Effect of Vitamin E and Omega-3 Fatty Acids on Protecting Ambient PM2.5-Induced Inflammatory Response and Oxidative Stress in Vascular Endothelial Cells

    PubMed Central

    Bo, Liang; Jiang, Shuo; Xie, Yuquan; Kan, Haidong; Song, Weimin; Zhao, Jinzhuo

    2016-01-01

    Although the mechanisms linking cardiopulmonary diseases to ambient fine particles (PM2.5) are still unclear, inflammation and oxidative stress play important roles in PM2.5-induced injury. It is well known that inflammation and oxidative stress could be restricted by vitamin E (Ve) or omega-3 fatty acids (Ω-3 FA) consumption. This study investigated the effects of Ve and Ω-3 FA on PM2.5-induced inflammation and oxidative stress in vascular endothelial cells. The underlying mechanisms linking PM2.5 to vascular endothelial injury were also explored. Human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs) were treated with 50 μg/mL PM2.5 in the presence or absence of different concentrations of Ve and Ω-3 FA. The inflammatory cytokines and oxidative stress markers were determined. The results showed that Ve induced a significant decrease in PM2.5-induced inflammation and oxidative stress. Malondialdehyde (MDA) in supernatant and reactive oxygen species (ROS) in cytoplasm decreased by Ve, while the superoxide dismutase (SOD) activity elevated. The inflammatory cytokines interleukin 6 (IL-6) and tumor necrosis factor α (TNF-α) also reduced by Ve. Moreover, Ω-3 FA played the same role on decreasing the inflammation and oxidative stress. IL-6 and TNF-α expressions were significantly lower in combined Ve with Ω-3 FA than treatment with Ve or Ω-3 FA alone. The Ve and Ω-3 FA intervention might abolish the PM2.5-induced oxidative stress and inflammation in vascular endothelial cells. There might be an additive effect of these two nutrients in mediating the PM2.5-induced injury in vascular endothelial cells. The results suggested that inflammation and oxidative stress might be parts of the mechanisms linking PM2.5 to vascular endothelial injury. PMID:27007186

  10. Tandem antioxidant enzymes confer synergistic protective responses in experimental filariasis.

    PubMed

    Prince, P R; Madhumathi, J; Anugraha, G; Jeyaprita, P J; Reddy, M V R; Kaliraj, P

    2014-12-01

    Helminth parasites use antioxidant defence strategies for survival during oxidative stress due to free radicals in the host. Accordingly, tissue-dwelling filarial parasites counteract host responses by releasing a number of antioxidants. Targeting these redox regulation proteins together, would facilitate effective parasite clearance. Here, we report the combined effect of protective immune responses trigged by recombinant Wuchereria bancrofti thioredoxin (WbTRX) and thioredoxin peroxidase (WbTPX) in an experimental filarial model. The expression of WbTRX and WbTPX in different stages of the parasite and their cross-reactivity were analysed by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA). The immunogenicity of recombinant proteins and their protective efficacy were studied in animal models when immunized in single or cocktail mode. The antigens showed cross-reactive epitopes and induced high humoral and cellular immune responses in mice. Further, parasite challenge against Brugia malayi L3 larvae in Mastomys coucha conferred significant protection of 57% and 62% against WbTRX and WbTPX respectively. The efficacy of L3 clearance was significantly higher (71%) (P <  0.001) when the antigens were immunized together, showing a synergistic effect in multiple-mode vaccination. Hence, the study suggests WbTRX and WbTPX to be attractive vaccine candidates when immunized together and provides a tandem block for parasite elimination in the control of lymphatic filariasis. PMID:23676147

  11. Suramin protects from cisplatin-induced acute kidney injury.

    PubMed

    Dupre, Tess V; Doll, Mark A; Shah, Parag P; Sharp, Cierra N; Kiefer, Alex; Scherzer, Michael T; Saurabh, Kumar; Saforo, Doug; Siow, Deanna; Casson, Lavona; Arteel, Gavin E; Jenson, Alfred Bennett; Megyesi, Judit; Schnellmann, Rick G; Beverly, Levi J; Siskind, Leah J

    2016-02-01

    Cisplatin, a commonly used cancer chemotherapeutic, has a dose-limiting side effect of nephrotoxicity. Approximately 30% of patients administered cisplatin suffer from kidney injury, and there are limited treatment options for the treatment of cisplatin-induced kidney injury. Suramin, which is Federal Drug Administration-approved for the treatment of trypanosomiasis, improves kidney function after various forms of kidney injury in rodent models. We hypothesized that suramin would attenuate cisplatin-induced kidney injury. Suramin treatment before cisplatin administration reduced cisplatin-induced decreases in kidney function and injury. Furthermore, suramin attenuated cisplatin-induced expression of inflammatory cytokines and chemokines, endoplasmic reticulum stress, and apoptosis in the kidney cortex. Treatment of mice with suramin 24 h after cisplatin also improved kidney function, suggesting that the mechanism of protection is not by inhibition of tubular cisplatin uptake or its metabolism to nephrotoxic species. If suramin is to be used in the context of cancer, then it cannot prevent cisplatin-induced cytotoxicity of cancer cells. Suramin did not alter the dose-response curve of cisplatin in lung adenocarcinoma cells in vitro. In addition, suramin pretreatment of mice harboring lung adenocarcinomas did not alter the initial cytotoxic effects of cisplatin (DNA damage and apoptosis) on tumor cells. These results provide evidence that suramin has potential as a renoprotective agent for the treatment/prevention of cisplatin-induced acute kidney injury and justify future long-term preclinical studies using cotreatment of suramin and cisplatin in mouse models of cancer. PMID:26661653

  12. An Adjuvanted, Tetravalent Dengue Virus Purified Inactivated Vaccine Candidate Induces Long-Lasting and Protective Antibody Responses Against Dengue Challenge in Rhesus Macaques

    PubMed Central

    Fernandez, Stefan; Thomas, Stephen J.; De La Barrera, Rafael; Im-erbsin, Rawiwan; Jarman, Richard G.; Baras, Benoît; Toussaint, Jean-François; Mossman, Sally; Innis, Bruce L.; Schmidt, Alexander; Malice, Marie-Pierre; Festraets, Pascale; Warter, Lucile; Putnak, J. Robert; Eckels, Kenneth H.

    2015-01-01

    The immunogenicity and protective efficacy of a candidate tetravalent dengue virus purified inactivated vaccine (TDENV PIV) formulated with alum or an Adjuvant System (AS01, AS03 tested at three different dose levels, or AS04) was evaluated in a 0, 1-month vaccination schedule in rhesus macaques. One month after dose 2, all adjuvanted formulations elicited robust and persisting neutralizing antibody titers against all four dengue virus serotypes. Most of the formulations tested prevented viremia after challenge, with the dengue serotype 1 and 2 virus strains administered at 40 and 32 weeks post-dose 2, respectively. This study shows that inactivated dengue vaccines, when formulated with alum or an Adjuvant System, are candidates for further development. PMID:25646261

  13. A rabies vaccine adjuvanted with saponins from leaves of the soap tree (Quillaja brasiliensis) induces specific immune responses and protects against lethal challenge.

    PubMed

    Yendo, Anna Carolina A; de Costa, Fernanda; Cibulski, Samuel P; Teixeira, Thais F; Colling, Luana C; Mastrogiovanni, Mauricio; Soulé, Silvia; Roehe, Paulo M; Gosmann, Grace; Ferreira, Fernando A; Fett-Neto, Arthur G

    2016-04-29

    Quillaja brasiliensis (Quillajaceae) is a saponin producing species native from southern Brazil and Uruguay. Its saponins are remarkably similar to those of Q. saponaria, which provides most of the saponins used as immunoadjuvants in vaccines. The immunostimulating capacities of aqueous extract (AE) and purified saponin fraction (QB-90) obtained from leaves of Q. brasiliensis were favorably comparable to those of a commercial saponin-based adjuvant preparation (Quil-A) in experimental vaccines against bovine herpesvirus type 1 and 5, poliovirus and bovine viral diarrhea virus in mice model. Herein, the immunogenicity and protection efficacy of rabies vaccines adjuvanted with Q. brasiliensis AE and its saponin fractions were compared with vaccines adjuvanted with either commercial Quil-A or Alum. Mice were vaccinated with one or two doses (on days 0 and 14) of one of the different vaccines and serum levels of total IgG, IgG1 and IgG2a were quantified over time. A challenge experiment with a lethal dose of rabies virus was carried out with the formulations. Viral RNA detection in the brain of mice was performed by qPCR, and RNA copy-numbers were quantified using a standard curve of in vitro transcribed RNA. All Q. brasiliensis saponin-adjuvanted vaccines significantly enhanced levels of specific IgG isotypes when compared with the no adjuvant group (P ≤ 0.05). Overall, one or two doses of saponin-based vaccine were efficient to protect against the lethal rabies exposure. Both AE and saponin fractions from Q. brasiliensis leaves proved potent immunological adjuvants in vaccines against a lethal challenge with a major livestock pathogen, hence confirming their value as competitive or complementary sustainable alternatives to saponins of Q. saponaria. PMID:27032516

  14. Induction of activation of the antioxidant response element and stabilization of Nrf2 by 3-(3-pyridylmethylidene)-2-indolinone (PMID) confers protection against oxidative stress-induced cell death

    SciTech Connect

    Yao, Jia-Wei; Liu, Jing; Kong, Xiang-Zhen; Zhang, Shou-Guo; Wang, Xiao-Hui; Yu, Miao; Zhan, Yi-Qun; Li, Wei; Xu, Wang-Xiang; Tang, Liu-Jun; Ge, Chang-Hui; Wang, Lin; Li, Chang-Yan; Yang, Xiao-Ming

    2012-03-01

    The antioxidant response elements (ARE) are a cis-acting enhancer sequence located in regulatory regions of antioxidant and detoxifying genes. Nuclear factor (erythroid-derived 2)-like 2 (Nrf2) is a member of the Cap ‘n’ Collar family of transcription factors that binds to the ARE and regulates the transcription of specific ARE-containing genes. Under oxidative stress, Nrf2/ARE induction is fundamental to defense against reactive oxygen species (ROS) and serves as a key factor in the protection against toxic xenobiotics. 3-(3-Pyridylmethylidene)-2-Indolinone (PMID) is a derivative of 2-indolinone compounds which act as protein kinase inhibitors and show anti-tumor activity. However, the role of PMID in the oxidative stress remains unknown. In the present study, we showed that PMID induced the activation of ARE-mediated transcription, increased the DNA-binding activity of Nrf2 and then up-regulated the expression of antioxidant genes such as HO-1, SOD, and NQO1. The level of Nrf2 protein was increased in cells treated with PMID by a post-transcriptional mechanism. Under CHX treatment, the stability of Nrf2 protein was enhanced by PMID with decreased turnover rate. We showed that PMID reduced the ubiquitination of Nrf2 and disrupted the Cullin3 (Cul3)-Keap1 interaction. Furthermore, cells treated with PMID showed resistance to cytotoxicity by H{sub 2}O{sub 2} and pro-oxidant 6-OHDA. PMID also up-regulated the antioxidant level in BALB/c mice. Taken together, the compound PMID induces the ARE-mediated gene expression through stabilization of Nrf2 protein and activation of Nrf2/ARE pathway and protects against oxidative stress-mediated cell death. -- Highlights: ► PMID up-regulates ARE-mediated antioxidant gene expression in vitro and in vivo. ► PMID enhances the stabilization of Nrf2 protein, decreasing Nrf2 turnover rate. ► PMID disrupted the Cullin3 (Cul3)-Keap1 interaction. ► PMID protects against cell death induced by H{sub 2}O{sub 2} and pro-oxidant 6

  15. Attenuation of high-glucose-induced inflammatory response by a novel curcumin derivative B06 contributes to its protection from diabetic pathogenic changes in rat kidney and heart.

    PubMed

    Pan, Yong; Zhu, Guanghui; Wang, Yi; Cai, Lu; Cai, Yuepiao; Hu, Jie; Li, Yilan; Yan, Yongbo; Wang, Zengshou; Li, Xiaokun; Wei, Tiemin; Liang, Guang

    2013-01-01

    There is increasing evidence indicating that inflammatory processes are involved in the development and progression of diabetic complications. However, effective anti-inflammatory treatments for patients who have diabetic complications have yet been practically identified. Curcumin is a main component of Curcuma longa with numerous pharmacological activities. Previously, we synthesized a novel curcumin analogue (B06) that exhibited an improved pharmacokinetic and enhanced anti-inflammatory activity compared to curcumin. The present study aimed to test the hypothesis that B06 may reduce high-glucose-induced inflammation and inflammation-mediated diabetic complications. In vitro, pretreatment with B06 at a concentration of 5 μM significantly reduced the high-glucose-induced overexpression of inflammatory cytokines in macrophages. This anti-inflammatory activity of B06 is associated with its inhibition of c-Jun N-terminal kinase/nuclear factor κB activation. In vivo, despite that B06 administration at 0.2 mg · kg(-1) · d(-1) for 6 weeks did not affect the blood glucose profile of diabetic rats, the B06-treated animals displayed significant decreases in inflammatory mediators in the serum, kidney, and heart and renal macrophage infiltration. This was accompanied with an attenuation of diabetes-induced structural and functional abnormalities in the kidney and heart. Taken together, these data suggest that the novel derivative B06 might be a potential therapeutic agent for diabetic complications via an anti-inflammatory mechanism and support the potential application in diabetic complication therapy via anti-inflammatory strategy. PMID:22819547

  16. Walnut consumption protects rats against cisplatin-induced neurotoxicity.

    PubMed

    Shabani, Mohammad; Nazeri, Masoud; Parsania, Shahrnaz; Razavinasab, Moazamehosadat; Zangiabadi, Nasser; Esmaeilpour, Khadije; Abareghi, Fatemeh

    2012-10-01

    Walnut is extensively used in traditional medicine for treatment of various ailments. It is described as an anticancer, anti-inflammatory, blood purifier and antioxidant agent. In this study, we investigated whether or not Walnut could protect neurons against cisplatin-induced neurotoxicity in rats. Dietary walnut (6%) was assessed for its neuroprotective effects through the alteration in performance of hippocampus- and cerebellum-related behaviors following chronic cisplatin treatment (5 mg/kg/week for 5 consecutive weeks) in male rats. We also evaluated the effect of cisplatin and walnut administration on nociception. We showed that exposure of adolescent rats to cisplatin resulted in significant decrease in explorative behaviors and memory retention. Walnut consumption improved memory and motor abilities in cisplatin treated rats, while walnut alone did not show any significant changes in these abilities compared to saline. Cisplatin increased latency of response to nociception, and walnut reversed this effect of cisplatin. We conclude that walnuts in the diet following anticancer drugs such as cisplatin might have a protective effect against cisplatin-induced disruptions in motor and cognitive function. However, further studies are needed to elucidate the exact mechanisms of this protective effect of walnut and to explore underlying mechanisms. PMID:22935099

  17. Bee Venom Phospholipase A2, a Novel Foxp3+ Regulatory T Cell Inducer, Protects Dopaminergic Neurons by Modulating Neuroinflammatory Responses in a Mouse Model of Parkinson's Disease.

    PubMed

    Chung, Eun Sook; Lee, Gihyun; Lee, Chanju; Ye, Minsook; Chung, Hwan-suck; Kim, Hyunseong; Bae, Sung-joo S; Hwang, Deok-Sang; Bae, Hyunsu

    2015-11-15

    Foxp3-expressing CD4(+) regulatory T cells (Tregs) are vital for maintaining immune tolerance in animal models of various immune diseases. In the present study, we demonstrated that bee venom phospholipase A2 (bvPLA2) is the major BV compound capable of inducing Treg expansion and promotes the survival of dopaminergic neurons in the 1-methyl-4-phenyl-1,2,3,6-tetrahydropyridine mouse model of Parkinson's disease. We associated this neuroprotective effect of bvPLA2 with microglial deactivation and reduction of CD4(+) T cell infiltration. Interestingly, bvPLA2 had no effect on mice depleted of Tregs by injecting anti-CD25 Ab. This finding indicated that Treg-mediated modulation of peripheral immune tolerance is strongly involved in the neuroprotective effects of bvPLA2. Furthermore, our results showed that bvPLA2 directly bound to CD206 on dendritic cells and consequently promoted the secretion of PGE2, which resulted in Treg differentiation via PGE2 (EP2) receptor signaling in Foxp3(-)CD4(+) T cells. These observations suggest that bvPLA2-CD206-PGE2-EP2 signaling promotes immune tolerance through Treg differentiation and contributes to the prevention of various neurodegenerative diseases, including Parkinson's disease. PMID:26453752

  18. Cell-mediated immune responses and protective efficacy against infection with Mycobacterium tuberculosis induced by Hsp65 and hIL-2 fusion protein in mice.

    PubMed

    Shi, C; Yuan, S; Zhang, H; Zhang, T; Wang, L; Xu, Z

    2009-02-01

    Heat shock protein 65 (Hsp65) is an important immunodominant antigen against tuberculosis (TB), and interleukin-2 (IL-2) plays an important role in the regulation of antimycobacteria immune responses. In order to further increase the immunogenicity of Hsp65 against infection caused by Mycobacterium tuberculosis (MTB), we expressed MTB Hsp65 and human IL-2 fusion protein, Hsp65-hIL-2, in Escherichia coli. The expression of Hsp65-hIL-2 was confirmed by Western blotting using anti-Hsp65 MoAb and anti-hIL-2 MoAb, respectively. Hsp65-IL-2 and Hsp65 were then purified by Ni-NTA affinity chromatography. Mice were immunized with purified Hsp65-hIL-2 or Hsp65 emulsified in the adjuvant combination dimethyl dioctadecylammonium bromide and monophosphoryl lipid A. Eight weeks after immunization, there was significant proliferation of spleen lymphocytes in response to both Hsp65 and Hsp65-hIL-2 proteins. Interestingly, Hsp65-hIL-2 fusion protein elicited significantly higher levels of IFN-gamma and IL-2 in the lymphocytes culture supernatant than that of the BCG (Denmark strain) immunized group and Hsp65 group (P < 0.05). After challenging the immunized mice with MTB, the bacteria loads in the spleens and lungs of mice immunized with the fusion protein were significantly lower than Hsp65 alone group, reaching an equivalent level as BCG immunization group. Our results suggest that the Hsp65 and hIL-2 fusion protein may serve as an alternative vaccine candidate against MTB infection. PMID:19144078

  19. A Single B-repeat of Staphylococcus epidermidis accumulation-associated protein induces protective immune responses in an experimental biomaterial-associated infection mouse model.

    PubMed

    Yan, Lin; Zhang, Lei; Ma, Hongyan; Chiu, David; Bryers, James D

    2014-09-01

    Nosocomial infections are the fourth leading cause of morbidity and mortality in the United States, resulting in 2 million infections and ∼100,000 deaths each year. More than 60% of these infections are associated with some type of biomedical device. Staphylococcus epidermidis is a commensal bacterium of the human skin and is the most common nosocomial pathogen infecting implanted medical devices, especially those in the cardiovasculature. S. epidermidis antibiotic resistance and biofilm formation on inert surfaces make these infections hard to treat. Accumulation-associated protein (Aap), a cell wall-anchored protein of S. epidermidis, is considered one of the most important proteins involved in the formation of S. epidermidis biofilm. A small recombinant protein vaccine comprising a single B-repeat domain (Brpt1.0) of S. epidermidis RP62A Aap was developed, and the vaccine's efficacy was evaluated in vitro with a biofilm inhibition assay and in vivo in a murine model of biomaterial-associated infection. A high IgG antibody response against S. epidermidis RP62A was detected in the sera of the mice after two subcutaneous immunizations with Brpt1.0 coadministered with Freund's adjuvant. Sera from Brpt1.0-immunized mice inhibited in vitro S. epidermidis RP62A biofilm formation in a dose-dependent pattern. After receiving two immunizations, each mouse was surgically implanted with a porous scaffold disk containing 5 × 10(6) CFU of S. epidermidis RP62A. Weight changes, inflammatory markers, and histological assay results after challenge with S. epidermidis indicated that the mice immunized with Brpt1.0 exhibited significantly higher resistance to S. epidermidis RP62A implant infection than the control mice. Day 8 postchallenge, there was a significantly lower number of bacteria in scaffold sections and surrounding tissues and a lower residual inflammatory response to the infected scaffold disks for the Brpt1.0-immunized mice than for of the ovalbumin (Ova

  20. Immunization with the Chlamydia trachomatis mouse pneumonitis major outer membrane protein by use of CpG oligodeoxynucleotides as an adjuvant induces a protective immune response against an intranasal chlamydial challenge.

    PubMed

    Pal, Sukumar; Davis, Heather L; Peterson, Ellena M; de la Maza, Luis M

    2002-09-01

    Recently, we have shown that a vaccine consisting of a purified preparation of the Chlamydia trachomatis mouse pneumonitis (MoPn) major outer membrane protein (MOMP) and Freund's adjuvant can protect mice against a genital challenge. Here, we wanted to determine if CpG motifs could be used as an immune modulator to the MOMP to induce protection in mice against an intranasal (i.n.) challenge. One-week-old BALB/c mice were immunized intramuscularly and subcutaneously either once or three times at 2-week intervals with MOMP and CpG suspended in aluminum hydroxide (alum). Negative controls received ovalbumin, CpG, and alum. Positive controls were immunized i.n. with C. trachomatis MoPn elementary bodies (EB). Six weeks after the last immunization, mice were challenged i.n. with 10(4) inclusion-forming units (IFU) of the C. trachomatis MoPn serovar. Mice that received MOMP, CpG, and alum had a strong immune response, as shown by a high titer of serum antibodies to Chlamydia and significant lymphoproliferation of T-cells following stimulation with C. trachomatis EB. After the i.n. challenge mice immunized with MOMP, CpG, and alum showed significantly less body weight loss than the corresponding control mice immunized with ovalbumin, CpG, and alum. Ten days after the challenge the animals were euthanized, their lungs were weighed, and the numbers of IFU in the lungs were determined. The average weight of the lungs of the mice immunized with MOMP, CpG, and alum was significantly less than average weight of the lungs of the mice immunized with ovalbumin, CpG, and alum. Also, the average number of IFU recovered per mouse immunized with MOMP, CpG, and alum was significantly less than the average number of IFU per mouse detected in the mice inoculated with ovalbumin, CpG, and alum. In conclusion, our data show that CpG sequences can be used as an effective adjuvant with the C. trachomatis MoPn MOMP to elicit a protective immune response in mice against a chlamydial respiratory

  1. Delivery of an inactivated avian influenza virus vaccine adjuvanted with poly(D,L-lactic-co-glycolic acid) encapsulated CpG ODN induces protective immune responses in chickens.

    PubMed

    Singh, Shirene M; Alkie, Tamiru N; Nagy, Éva; Kulkarni, Raveendra R; Hodgins, Douglas C; Sharif, Shayan

    2016-09-14

    In poultry, systemic administration of commercial vaccines consisting of inactivated avian influenza virus (AIV) requires the simultaneous delivery of an adjuvant (water-in-oil emulsion). These vaccines are often limited in their ability to induce quantitatively better local (mucosal) antibody responses capable of curtailing virus shedding. Therefore, more efficacious adjuvants with the ability to provide enhanced immunogenicity and protective anti-AIV immunity in chickens are needed. While the Toll-like receptor (TLR) 21 agonist, CpG oligodeoxynucleotides (ODNs) has been recognized as a potential vaccine adjuvant in chickens, poly(D,L-lactic-co-glycolic acid) (PLGA) nanoparticles, successfully tested as vaccine delivery systems in other species, have not been extensively explored. The present study, therefore, assessed both systemic and mucosal antibody-mediated responses following intramuscular vaccination (administered at 7 and 21days post-hatch) of chickens with PLGA encapsulated H9N2 AIV plus encapsulated CpG ODN 2007 (CpG 2007), and nonencapsulated AIV plus PLGA encapsulated CpG 2007 vaccine formulations. Virus challenge was performed at 2weeks post-secondary vaccination using the oculo-nasal route. Our results showed that chickens vaccinated with the nonencapsulated AIV vaccine plus PLGA encapsulated CpG 2007 developed significantly higher systemic IgY and local (mucosal) IgY antibodies as well as haemagglutination inhibition antibody titres compared to PLGA encapsulated AIV plus encapsulated CpG 2007 vaccinated chickens. Furthermore, chickens that received CpG 2007 as an adjuvant in the vaccine formulation had antibodies exhibiting higher avidity indicating that the TLR21-mediated pathway may enhance antibody affinity maturation qualitatively. Collectively, our data indicate that vaccination of chickens with nonencapsulated AIV plus PLGA encapsulated CpG 2007 results in qualitatively and quantitatively augmented antibody responses leading to a reduction in

  2. Lipopolysaccharide hyporesponsiveness: protective or damaging response to the brain?

    PubMed

    Pardon, Marie Christine

    2015-01-01

    Lipopolysaccharide (LPS) endotoxins are widely used as experimental models of systemic bacterial infection and trigger robust inflammation by potently activating toll-like receptors 4 (TLR4) expressed on innate immune cells. Their ability to trigger robust neuroinflammation despite poor brain penetration can prove useful for the understanding of how inflammation induced by viral infections contributes to the pathogenesis of neurodegenerative diseases. A single LPS challenge often result in a blunted inflammatory response to subsequent stimulation by LPS and other TLR ligands, but the extent to which endotoxin tolerance occur in the brain requires further clarification. LPS is also thought to render the brain transiently resistant to subsequent brain injuries by attenuating the concomitant pro-inflammatory response. While LPS hyporesponsiveness and preconditioning are classically seen as protective mechanisms limiting the toxic effects of sustained inflammation, recent research casts doubt as to whether they have beneficial or detrimental roles on the brain and in neurodegenerative disease. These observations suggest that spatio-temporal aspects of the immune responses to LPS and the disease status are determinant factors. Endotoxin tolerance may lead to a late pro-inflammatory response with potential harmful consequences. And while reduced TLR4 signaling reduces the risk of neurodegenerative diseases, up-regulation of anti-inflammatory cytokines associated with LPS hyporesponsiveness can have deleterious consequences to the brain by inhibiting the protective phenotype of microglia, aggravating the progression of some neurodegenerative conditions such as Alzheimer's disease. Beneficial effects of LPS preconditioning, however appear to require a stimulation of anti-inflammatory mediators rather than an attenuation of the pro-inflammatory response. PMID:26662122

  3. Novel influenza virus vectors expressing Brucella L7/L12 or Omp16 proteins in cattle induced a strong T-cell immune response, as well as high protectiveness against B. abortus infection.

    PubMed

    Tabynov, Kaissar; Kydyrbayev, Zhailaubay; Ryskeldinova, Sholpan; Yespembetov, Bolat; Zinina, Nadezhda; Assanzhanova, Nurika; Kozhamkulov, Yerken; Inkarbekov, Dulat; Gotskina, Tatyana; Sansyzbay, Abylai

    2014-04-11

    This paper presents the results of a study of the immunogenicity and protectiveness of new candidate vector vaccine against Brucella abortus - a bivalent vaccine formulation consisting of a mixture of recombinant influenza A subtype H5N1 or H1N1 (viral constructs vaccine formulation) viruses expressing Brucella ribosomal protein L7/L12 and Omp16, in cattle. To increase the effectiveness of the candidate vaccine, adjuvants such as Montanide Gel01 or chitosan were included in its composition. Immunization of cattle (heifers aged 1-1.5 years, 5 animals per group) with the viral constructs vaccine formulation only, or its combination with adjuvants Montanide Gel01 or chitosan, was conducted via the conjunctival method using cross prime (influenza virus subtype H5N1) and booster (influenza virus subtype H1N1) vaccination schedules at an interval of 28 days. Vaccine candidates were evaluated in comparison with the positive (B. abortus S19) and negative (PBS) controls. The viral constructs vaccine formulations, particularly in combination with Montanide Gel01 adjuvant promoted formation of IgG antibodies (with a predominance of antibodies of isotype IgG2a) against Brucella L7/L12 and Omp16 proteins in ELISA. Moreover, these vaccines in cattle induced a strong antigen-specific T-cell immune response, as indicated by a high number of CD4(+) and CD8(+) cells, as well as the concentration of IFN-γ, and most importantly provided a high level of protectiveness comparable to the commercial B. abortus S19 vaccine and superior to the B. abortus S19 vaccine in combination with Montanide Gel01 adjuvant. Based on these findings, we recommended the bivalent vaccine formulation containing the adjuvant Montanide Gel01 for practical use in cattle. PMID:24598723

  4. Enhancement of endocannabinoid signaling protects against cocaine-induced neurotoxicity

    SciTech Connect

    Vilela, Luciano R.; Gobira, Pedro H.; Viana, Thercia G.; Medeiros, Daniel C.; Ferreira-Vieira, Talita H.; Doria, Juliana G.; Rodrigues, Flávia; Aguiar, Daniele C.; Pereira, Grace S.; Massessini, André R.; Ribeiro, Fabíola M.; Oliveira, Antonio Carlos P. de; Moraes, Marcio F.D.; Moreira, Fabricio A.

    2015-08-01

    Cocaine is an addictive substance with a potential to cause deleterious effects in the brain. The strategies for treating its neurotoxicity, however, are limited. Evidence suggests that the endocannabinoid system exerts neuroprotective functions against various stimuli. Thus, we hypothesized that inhibition of fatty acid amide hydrolase (FAAH), the main enzyme responsible for terminating the actions of the endocannabinoid anandamide, reduces seizures and cell death in the hippocampus in a model of cocaine intoxication. Male Swiss mice received injections of endocannabinoid-related compounds followed by the lowest dose of cocaine that induces seizures, electroencephalographic activity and cell death in the hippocampus. The molecular mechanisms were studied in primary cell culture of this structure. The FAAH inhibitor, URB597, reduced cocaine-induced seizures and epileptiform electroencephalographic activity. The cannabinoid CB{sub 1} receptor selective agonist, ACEA, mimicked these effects, whereas the antagonist, AM251, prevented them. URB597 also inhibited cocaine-induced activation and death of hippocampal neurons, both in animals and in primary cell culture. Finally, we investigated if the PI3K/Akt/ERK intracellular pathway, a cell surviving mechanism coupled to CB{sub 1} receptor, mediated these neuroprotective effects. Accordingly, URB597 injection increased ERK and Akt phosphorylation in the hippocampus. Moreover, the neuroprotective effect of this compound was reversed by the PI3K inhibitor, LY294002. In conclusion, the pharmacological facilitation of the anandamide/CB1/PI3K signaling protects the brain against cocaine intoxication in experimental models. This strategy may be further explored in the development of treatments for drug-induced neurotoxicity. - Highlights: • Cocaine toxicity is characterized by seizures and hippocampal cell death. • The endocannabinoid anandamide acts as a brain protective mechanism. • Inhibition of anandamide hydrolysis

  5. Protection against methanol-induced retinal toxicity by LED photostimulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Whelan, Harry T.; Wong-Riley, Margaret T. T.; Eells, Janis T.

    2002-06-01

    We have initiated experiments designed to test the hypothesis that 670-nm Light-Emitting Diode (LED) exposure will attenuate formate-induced retinal dysfunction in a rodent model of methanol toxicity. Methanol intoxication produces toxic injury to the retina. The toxic metabolite formed in methanol intoxication is formic acid, a mitochondrial toxin known to inhibit cytochrome oxidase activity. 670-nm LED light has been hypothesized to act by stimulating cytochrome oxidase activity. To test this hypothesis, one group of animals was intoxicated with methanol, a second group was intoxicated with methanol and LED-treated and a third group was untreated. LED treatment (670 nm for 1 min 45 seconds equals 50 mW/cm2, 4 joules/cm2) was administered at 5, 25, and 50 hours after the initial dose of methanol. At 72 hours of methanol intoxication, retinal function was assessed by measurement of ERG responses and retinas were prepared for histologic analysis. ERG responses recorded in methanol-intoxicated animals revealed profound attenuation of both rod-dominated and UV-cone mediated responses. In contrast, methanol- intoxicated animals exposed to LED treatment exhibited a nearly complete recovery of rod-dominated ERG responses and a slight improvement of UV-cone mediated ERG responses. LED treatment also protected the retina against the histopathologic changes produced by formate in methanol intoxication. These data provide evidence that LED phototherapy protects the retina against the cytotoxic actions of formate and are consistent with the hypothesis that LED photostimulation improves mitochondrial respiratory chain function.

  6. Acidic chitinase primes the protective immune response to gastrointestinal nematodes.

    PubMed

    Vannella, Kevin M; Ramalingam, Thirumalai R; Hart, Kevin M; de Queiroz Prado, Rafael; Sciurba, Joshua; Barron, Luke; Borthwick, Lee A; Smith, Allen D; Mentink-Kane, Margaret; White, Sandra; Thompson, Robert W; Cheever, Allen W; Bock, Kevin; Moore, Ian; Fitz, Lori J; Urban, Joseph F; Wynn, Thomas A

    2016-05-01

    Acidic mammalian chitinase (AMCase) is known to be induced by allergens and helminths, yet its role in immunity is unclear. Using AMCase-deficient mice, we show that AMCase deficiency reduced the number of group 2 innate lymphoid cells during allergen challenge but was not required for establishment of type 2 inflammation in the lung in response to allergens or helminths. In contrast, AMCase-deficient mice showed a profound defect in type 2 immunity following infection with the chitin-containing gastrointestinal nematodes Nippostrongylus brasiliensis and Heligmosomoides polygyrus bakeri. The impaired immunity was associated with reduced mucus production and decreased intestinal expression of the signature type 2 response genes Il13, Chil3, Retnlb, and Clca1. CD103(+) dendritic cells, which regulate T cell homing, were also reduced in mesenteric lymph nodes of infected AMCase-deficient mice. Thus, AMCase functions as a critical initiator of protective type 2 responses to intestinal nematodes but is largely dispensable for allergic responses in the lung. PMID:27043413

  7. Flavokawains A and B from kava (Piper methysticum) activate heat shock and antioxidant responses and protect against hydrogen peroxide-induced cell death in HepG2 hepatocytes.

    PubMed

    Pinner, Keanu D; Wales, Christina T K; Gristock, Rachel A; Vo, Hoa T; So, Nadine; Jacobs, Aaron T

    2016-09-01

    Context Flavokawains are secondary metabolites from the kava plant (Piper methysticum Forst. f., Piperaceae) that have anticancer properties and demonstrated oral efficacy in murine cancer models. However, flavokawains also have suspected roles in rare cases of kava-induced hepatotoxicity. Objective To compare the toxicity flavokawains A and B (FKA, FKB) and monitor the resulting transcriptional responses and cellular adaptation in the human hepatocyte cell line, HepG2. Materials and methods HepG2 were treated with 2-100 μM FKA or FKB for 24-48 h. Cellular viability was measured with calcein-AM and changes in signalling and gene expression were monitored by luciferase reporter assay, real-time PCR and Western blot of both total and nuclear protein extracts. To test for subsequent resistance to oxidative stress, cells were pretreated with 50 μM FKA, 10 μM FKB or 10 μM sulphoraphane (SFN) for 24 h, followed by 0.4-2.8 mM H2O2 for 48 h, and then viability was assessed. Results FKA (≤100 μM) was not toxic to HepG2, whereas FKB caused significant cell death (IC50=23.2 ± 0.8 μM). Both flavokawains activated Nrf2, increasing HMOX1 and GCLC expression and enhancing total glutathione levels over 2-fold (p < 0.05). FKA and FKB also activated HSF1, increasing HSPA1A and DNAJA4 expression. Also, flavokawain pretreatment mitigated cell death after a subsequent challenge with H2O2, with FKA being more effective than FKB, and similar to SFN. Conclusions Flavokawains promote an adaptive cellular response that protects hepatocytes against oxidative stress. We propose that FKA has potential as a chemopreventative or chemotherapeutic agent. PMID:26789234

  8. Bisphenol A-Induced Ovotoxicity Involves DNA Damage Induction to Which the Ovary Mounts a Protective Response Indicated by Increased Expression of Proteins Involved in DNA Repair and Xenobiotic Biotransformation.

    PubMed

    Ganesan, Shanthi; Keating, Aileen F

    2016-07-01

    Bisphenol A (BPA) is an endocrine disrupting chemical with ubiquitous human exposure. BPA causes primordial follicle loss and DNA damage in germ cells, thus we hypothesized that BPA induces ovarian DNA damage, thereby precipitating follicle loss. We also anticipated that the ovary activates DNA repair and xenobiotic biotransformation to minimize oocyte damage and/or, activate cell death signaling to deplete follicles. Postnatal day 4 F344 rat ovaries were cultured in medium containing vehicle control (1% dimethylsulfoxide [DMSO]) ± BPA (440 µM) for 2-8 days. BPA reduced (P < 0.05) small primary, large primary and secondary follicle numbers after 2 days, followed by a reduction (P < .05) in primordial follicle numbers after 4 days. Phosphorylated H2AX (γH2AX) and Ataxia-telangiectasia mutated (ATM), markers of DNA double-strand breaks, were increased (P < .05) in abundance prior to observed follicle loss. DNA repair genes (Atm, Prkdc, Xrcc6, Brca1, Mre11a, Rad50, and Smc1a) were increased (P < .05) after 1 day of BPA exposure. mRNA encoding Meh, Gstm, c-kit, Kitlg, and Akt were increased (P < .05), as was MEH, AKT, pAKT, Jun N-terminal kinase, and P53 protein abundance, while GST isoforms pi and Nuclear factor erythroid-related factor 2 proteins were decreased (P < .05) by BPA exposure. These data demonstrate the dynamic ovarian response to BPA exposure, which indicates that BPA, via biotransformation, may be converted to a DNA alkylating agent, causing ovarian DNA damage, to which the ovary mounts a protective response and further our knowledge on the biological impacts of BPA on the female germline. PMID:27208089

  9. DNA-Protein Immunization Using Leishmania Peroxidoxin-1 Induces a Strong CD4+ T Cell Response and Partially Protects Mice from Cutaneous Leishmaniasis: Role of Fusion Murine Granulocyte-Macrophage Colony-Stimulating Factor DNA Adjuvant

    PubMed Central

    Bayih, Abebe Genetu; Daifalla, Nada S.; Gedamu, Lashitew

    2014-01-01

    Background To date, no universally effective and safe vaccine has been developed for general human use. Leishmania donovani Peroxidoxin-1 (LdPxn-1) is a member of the antioxidant family of proteins and is predominantly expressed in the amastigote stage of the parasite. The aim of this study was to evaluate the immunogenicity and protective efficacy of LdPxn-1 in BALB/c mice in heterologous DNA-Protein immunization regimen in the presence of fusion murine granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor (mGMCSF) DNA adjuvant. Methodology and Principal Findings A fusion DNA of LdPxn1 and mGMCSF was cloned into a modified pcDNA vector. To confirm the expression in mammalian system, Chinese hamster ovary cells were transfected with the plasmid vector containing LdPxn1 gene. BALB/c mice were immunized twice with pcDNA-mGMCSF-LdPxn-1 or pcDNA-LdPxn1 DNA and boosted once with recombinant LdPxn-1 protein. Three weeks after the last immunization, mice were infected with Leishmania major promastigotes. The result showed that immunization with pcDNA-mGMCSF-LdPxn1 elicited a mixed Th-1/Th-2 immune response with significantly higher production of IFN-γ than controls. Intracellular cytokine staining of antigen-stimulated spleen cells showed that immunization with this antigen elicited significantly higher proportion of CD4+ T cells that express IFN-γ, TNF-α, or IL-2. The antigen also induced significantly higher proportion of multipotent CD4+ cells that simultaneously express the three Th-1 cytokines. Moreover, a significant reduction in the footpad swelling was seen in mice immunized with pcDNA-mGMCSF-LdPxn1 antigen. Expression study in CHO cells demonstrated that pcDNA-mGMCSF-LdPxn-1 was expressed in mammalian system. Conclusion The result demonstrates that immunization of BALB/c mice with a plasmid expressing LdPxn1 in the presence of mGMCSF adjuvant elicits a strong specific immune response with high level induction of multipotent CD4+ cells that mediate protection of the

  10. Ascorbate in aqueous humor protects against myeloperoxidase-induced oxidation.

    PubMed Central

    Rosenbaum, J. T.; Howes, E. L.; English, D.

    1985-01-01

    Chemotactic factors can cause polymorphonuclear leukocytes to release the contents of azurophilic granules, including the enzymes beta-glucuronidase and myeloperoxidase. In the presence of aqueous humor from the anterior chamber of the rabbit eye, the supernatant from stimulated leukocytes contains beta-glucuronidase, but myeloperoxidase is not detectable. Studies with aqueous humor and partially purified human myeloperoxidase suggest that this phenomenon is not due to a failure of enzyme release. The factor responsible for the inability to detect MPO in the assay system is heat-labile, dialyzable, and reversed by ascorbate oxidase. Comparable assay inhibition is produced by ascorbic acid at a concentration present in either human or rabbit aqueous humor. The ability of aqueous humor to protect against myeloperoxidase-induced oxidation may contribute to several diverse phenomena, including the susceptibility of the eye to Candida infection and a prolonged half-life for several inflammatory mediators in the anterior chamber. PMID:2992283

  11. Endogenous epinephrine protects against obesity induced insulin resistance.

    PubMed

    Ziegler, Michael G; Milic, Milos; Sun, Ping; Tang, Chih-Min; Elayan, Hamzeh; Bao, Xuping; Cheung, Wai Wilson; O'Connor, Daniel T

    2011-07-01

    Epinephrine (E) is a hormone released from the adrenal medulla in response to low blood sugar and other stresses. E and related β2-adrenergic agonists are used to treat asthma, but a side effect is high blood sugar. C57BL/6 mice prone to overfeeding induced type II diabetes had the PNMT gene knocked out to prevent E synthesis. These E deficient mice were very similar to control animals on a 14% fat diet. On a 40.6% fat diet they gained 20 to 33% more weight than control animals and increased their blood glucose response to a glucose tolerance test because they became resistant to insulin. Although the short term effect of β2-agonists such as E is to raise blood glucose, some long acting β2-agonists improve muscle glucose uptake. Endogenous E protects against overfeeding induced diabetes. Since adrenal E release can be impaired with aging and diabetes, endogenous E may help prevent adult onset diabetes. PMID:21354376

  12. Potato tuber wounding induces responses associated with various healing processes

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Wounding induces an avalanche of biological responses involved in the healing and protection of internal tuber tissues exposed by mechanical damage and seed cutting. Collectively, our studies have framed a portrait of the mechanisms and regulation of potato tuber wound-healing, but much more is req...

  13. Protection of MPTP-induced neuroinflammation and neurodegeneration by Pycnogenol.

    PubMed

    Khan, Mohammad Moshahid; Kempuraj, Duraisamy; Thangavel, Ramasamy; Zaheer, Asgar

    2013-03-01

    Oxidative stress and inflammation play a crucial role in Parkinson's disease (PD) pathogenesis and may represent a target for treatment. Current PD drugs provide only symptomatic relief and have limitations in terms of adverse effects and inability to prevent neurodegeneration. Flavonoids have been suggested to exert human health benefits by its anti-oxidant and anti-inflammatory properties. Therefore, in the present study, using 1-methyl-4-phenyl-1,2,3,6-tetrahydro pyridine (MPTP)-induced mouse model of Parkinsonism, we investigated the neuroprotective potential of bioflavonoid compound Pycnogenol® (PYC), an extract of Pinus maritime bark. MPTP injected mice developed significantly severe oxidative stress and impaired motor coordination at day 1 and day 7 postinjection. This was associated with significantly increased inflammatory responses of astrocyte and microglia as assessed by ionized calcium binding adaptor molecule 1 (Iba 1) and glial fibrillary acidic protein (GFAP) immunohistochemistry, and nuclear transcription factor-κB (NF-κB), inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS) and cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2) expression in the striata by Western blot. Additionally, there was significant upregulation of tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-α) and interleukin-1 beta (IL-1β) expression in the striata of MPTP injected mice compared to saline controls. The MPTP-induced neuroinflammation, neurodegeneration and behavioral impairments were markedly repudiated by treatment with PYC. These results suggest that PYC protects dopaminergic neurons from MPTP-induced toxicity in the mouse model of PD. Thus, the present finding of PYC-induced adaptation to oxidative stress and inflammation could suggest a novel avenue for clinical intervention in neurodegenerative diseases including PD. PMID:23391521

  14. Heat shock protein-mediated protection against Cisplatin-induced hair cell death.

    PubMed

    Baker, Tiffany G; Roy, Soumen; Brandon, Carlene S; Kramarenko, Inga K; Francis, Shimon P; Taleb, Mona; Marshall, Keely M; Schwendener, Reto; Lee, Fu-Shing; Cunningham, Lisa L

    2015-02-01

    Cisplatin is a highly successful and widely used chemotherapy for the treatment of various solid malignancies in both adult and pediatric patients. Side effects of cisplatin treatment include nephrotoxicity and ototoxicity. Cisplatin ototoxicity results from damage to and death of cells in the inner ear, including sensory hair cells. We showed previously that heat shock inhibits cisplatin-induced hair cell death in whole-organ cultures of utricles from adult mice. Since heat shock protein 70 (HSP70) is the most upregulated HSP in response to heat shock, we investigated the role of HSP70 as a potential protectant against cisplatin-induced hair cell death. Our data using utricles from HSP70 (-/-) mice indicate that HSP70 is necessary for the protective effect of heat shock against cisplatin-induced hair cell death. In addition, constitutive expression of inducible HSP70 offered modest protection against cisplatin-induced hair cell death. We also examined a second heat-inducible protein, heme oxygenase-1 (HO-1, also called HSP32). HO-1 is an enzyme responsible for the catabolism of free heme. We previously showed that induction of HO-1 using cobalt protoporphyrin IX (CoPPIX) inhibits aminoglycoside-induced hair cell death. Here, we show that HO-1 also offers significant protection against cisplatin-induced hair cell death. HO-1 induction occurred primarily in resident macrophages, with no detectable expression in hair cells or supporting cells. Depletion of macrophages from utricles abolished the protective effect of HO-1 induction. Together, our data indicate that HSP induction protects against cisplatin-induced hair cell death, and they suggest that resident macrophages mediate the protective effect of HO-1 induction. PMID:25261194

  15. Suppression of Hyperactive Immune Responses Protects against Nitrogen Mustard Injury

    PubMed Central

    Au, Liemin; Meisch, Jeffrey P; Das, Lopa M; Binko, Amy M; Boxer, Rebecca S; Wen, Amy M; Steinmetz, Nicole F; Lu, Kurt Q

    2015-01-01

    DNA alkylating agents like nitrogen mustard (NM) are easily absorbed through the skin and exposure to such agents manifest not only in direct cellular death but also in triggering inflammation. We show that toxicity resulting from topical mustard exposure is mediated in part by initiating exaggerated host innate immune responses. Using an experimental model of skin exposure to NM we observe activation of inflammatory dermal macrophages that exacerbate local tissue damage in an inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS)-dependent manner. Subsequently these activated dermal macrophages reappear in the bone marrow to aid in disruption of hematopoiesis and contribute ultimately to mortality in an experimental mouse model of topical NM exposure. Intervention with a single dose of 25-hydroxyvitamin D3 (25(OH)D) is capable of suppressing macrophage-mediated iNOS production resulting in mitigation of local skin destruction, enhanced tissue repair, protection from marrow depletion, and rescue from severe precipitous wasting. These protective effects are recapitulated experimentally using pharmacological inhibitors of iNOS or by compounds that locally deplete skin macrophages. Taken together, these data highlight a critical unappreciated role of the host innate immune system in exacerbating injury following exposure to NM and support the translation of 25(OH)D in the therapeutic use against these chemical agents. PMID:26288355

  16. Matrix M H5N1 Vaccine Induces Cross-H5 Clade Humoral Immune Responses in a Randomized Clinical Trial and Provides Protection from Highly Pathogenic Influenza Challenge in Ferrets

    PubMed Central

    Cox, Rebecca J.; Major, Diane; Pedersen, Gabriel; Pathirana, Rishi D.; Hoschler, Katja; Guilfoyle, Kate; Roseby, Sarah; Bredholt, Geir; Assmus, Jörg; Breakwell, Lucy; Campitelli, Laura; Sjursen, Haakon

    2015-01-01

    Background and Methods Highly pathogenic avian influenza (HPAI) viruses constitute a pandemic threat and the development of effective vaccines is a global priority. Sixty adults were recruited into a randomized clinical trial and were intramuscularly immunized with two virosomal vaccine H5N1 (NIBRG-14) doses (21 days apart) of 30μg HA alone or 1.5, 7.5 or 30μg HA adjuvanted with Matrix M. The kinetics and longevity of the serological responses against NIBRG-14 were determined by haemagglutination inhibition (HI), single radial haemolysis (SRH), microneutralization (MN) and ELISA assays. The cross-H5 clade responses in sera were determined by HI and the antibody-secreting (ASC) cell ELISPOT assays. The protective efficacy of the vaccine against homologous HPAI challenge was evaluated in ferrets. Results The serological responses against the homologous and cross-reactive strains generally peaked one week after the second dose, and formulation with Matrix M augmented the responses. The NIBRG-14-specific seroprotection rates fell significantly by six months and were low against cross-reactive strains although the adjuvant appeared to prolong the longevity of the protective responses in some subjects. By 12 months post-vaccination, nearly all vaccinees had NIBRG-14-specific antibody titres below the protective thresholds. The Matrix M adjuvant was shown to greatly improve ASC and serum IgG responses following vaccination. In a HPAI ferret challenge model, the vaccine protected the animals from febrile responses, severe weight loss and local and systemic spread of the virus. Conclusion Our findings show that the Matrix M-adjuvanted virosomal H5N1 vaccine is a promising pre-pandemic vaccine candidate. Trial Registration ClinicalTrials.gov NCT00868218 PMID:26147369

  17. Adaptive Natural Killer Cell and Killer Cell Immunoglobulin-Like Receptor-Expressing T Cell Responses are Induced by Cytomegalovirus and Are Associated with Protection against Cytomegalovirus Reactivation after Allogeneic Donor Hematopoietic Cell Transplantation.

    PubMed

    Davis, Zachary B; Cooley, Sarah A; Cichocki, Frank; Felices, Martin; Wangen, Rose; Luo, Xianghua; DeFor, Todd E; Bryceson, Yenan T; Diamond, Don J; Brunstein, Claudio; Blazar, Bruce R; Wagner, John E; Weisdorf, Daniel J; Horowitz, Amir; Guethlein, Lisbeth A; Parham, Peter; Verneris, Michael R; Miller, Jeffrey S

    2015-09-01

    Cytomegalovirus (CMV) reactivates in >30% of CMV-seropositive patients after allogeneic hematopoietic cell transplantation (HCT). Previously, we reported an increase of natural killer (NK) cells expressing NKG2C, CD57, and inhibitory killer cell immunoglobulin-like receptors (KIRs) in response to CMV reactivation after HCT. These NK cells persist after the resolution of infection and display "adaptive" or memory properties. Despite these findings, the differential impact of persistent/inactive versus reactivated CMV on NK versus T cell maturation after HCT from different graft sources has not been defined. We compared the phenotype of NK and T cells from 292 recipients of allogeneic sibling (n = 118) or umbilical cord blood (UCB; n = 174) grafts based on recipient pretransplantation CMV serostatus and post-HCT CMV reactivation. This cohort was utilized to evaluate CMV-dependent increases in KIR-expressing NK cells exhibiting an adaptive phenotype (NKG2C(+)CD57(+)). Compared with CMV-seronegative recipients, those who reactivated CMV had the highest adaptive cell frequencies, whereas intermediate frequencies were observed in CMV-seropositive recipients harboring persistent/nonreplicating CMV. The same effect was observed in T cells and CD56(+) T cells. These adaptive lymphocyte subsets were increased in CMV-seropositive recipients of sibling but not UCB grafts and were correlated with lower rates of CMV reactivation (sibling 33% versus UCB 51%; P < .01). These data suggest that persistent/nonreplicating recipient CMV induces rapid production of adaptive NK and T cells from mature cells from sibling but not UCB grafts. These adaptive lymphocytes are associated with protection from CMV reactivation. PMID:26055301

  18. Dexamethazone protects against Escherichia coli induced sickness behavior in rats.

    PubMed

    Hanaa-Mansour, A; Hassan, Wedad A; Georgy, Gehan S

    2016-01-01

    Systemic bacterial infection results in systemic inflammatory response syndrome due to the release of lipopolysaccharide (LPS) in blood that can lead to multiple organ failure, shock, and potentially death. Other impact, LPS exposure produces robust increase in anxiety-like behavior, suppression of locomotor, exploratory activity, and reduced social behavior. The therapeutic use of glucocorticoids in septic shock remains one of the first-aid approaches for their anti-inflammatory properties. The aim of this study was to evaluate the possible protective effect of dexamethazone (DEX), the most commonly used corticosteroid, against Escherichia coli (E. coli) immunohistochemical changes and neurobehavioral dysfunction. To this end, male Sprague-Dawley rats were divided into four groups; (1) Control group (2) E. coli infected group, where animals received 0.2 ml of 24 h growth of E. coli suspension in nutrient broth containing approximately 1.8×10(8) cfu/ml i.p for once, 48 h before sacrificing (3) DEX (20 mg/kg, i.p, 3 days) treated group (4) DEX and E. coli treated group. The results revealed that DEX significantly protected animals against most E. coli-induced behavioral deficits, reduced signs of cognitive impairment. DEX also reduced the LPS-evoked rise in C-reactive protein (CRP), Interferon gamma (IFγ), as well as, expression of Caspase-3. In conclusion, DEX provides neuroprotection against E. coli-associated neurobehavioral and immunological changes via its anti-inflammatory and immunomodulatory effects. PMID:26541583

  19. Metformin Protects Skeletal Muscle from Cardiotoxin Induced Degeneration

    PubMed Central

    Langone, Francesca; Cannata, Stefano; Fuoco, Claudia; Lettieri Barbato, Daniele; Testa, Stefano; Nardozza, Aurelio Pio; Ciriolo, Maria Rosa; Castagnoli, Luisa; Gargioli, Cesare; Cesareni, Gianni

    2014-01-01

    The skeletal muscle tissue has a remarkable capacity to regenerate upon injury. Recent studies have suggested that this regenerative process is improved when AMPK is activated. In the muscle of young and old mice a low calorie diet, which activates AMPK, markedly enhances muscle regeneration. Remarkably, intraperitoneal injection of AICAR, an AMPK agonist, improves the structural integrity of muscles of dystrophin-deficient mdx mice. Building on these observations we asked whether metformin, a powerful anti-hyperglycemic drug, which indirectly activates AMPK, affects the response of skeletal muscle to damage. In our conditions, metformin treatment did not significantly influence muscle regeneration. On the other hand we observed that the muscles of metformin treated mice are more resilient to cardiotoxin injury displaying lesser muscle damage. Accordingly myotubes, originated in vitro from differentiated C2C12 myoblast cell line, become more resistant to cardiotoxin damage after pre-incubation with metformin. Our results indicate that metformin limits cardiotoxin damage by protecting myotubes from necrosis. Although the details of the molecular mechanisms underlying the protective effect remain to be elucidated, we report a correlation between the ability of metformin to promote resistance to damage and its capacity to counteract the increment of intracellular calcium levels induced by cardiotoxin treatment. Since increased cytoplasmic calcium concentrations characterize additional muscle pathological conditions, including dystrophies, metformin treatment could prove a valuable strategy to ameliorate the conditions of patients affected by dystrophies. PMID:25461598

  20. Maize Kauralexins: inducible diterpenoid phytoalexins protect against fungal pathogens

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Phytoalexins constitute a broad category of pathogen and insect-inducible biochemicals that locally protect plant tissues. In rice, a complex array of inducible diterpenoid phytoalexins constitute an important component of the plants anti-pathogen defenses. In contrast, despite the demonstration of ...

  1. Tlr4 Deficiency Protects against Cardiac Pressure Overload Induced Hyperinflammation

    PubMed Central

    Boehm, Olaf; El Aissati, Sakina; Foltz, Fabian; Goelz, Lina; Goertz, David; Kebir, Sied; Weisheit, Christina; Wolf, Michael; Meyer, Rainer; Baumgarten, Georg

    2015-01-01

    Transverse aortic constriction provokes a pro-inflammatory reaction and results in cardiac hypertrophy. Endogenous ligands contribute to cardiac hypertrophy via toll-like receptor (TLR)-4 binding. A lack of TLR4 signaling diminishes hypertrophy and inflammation. Wild type mice undergoing aortic constriction respond to a lipopolysaccharide second-hit stimulus with hyperinflammation. The objective of this study was to assess whether other second-hit challenges utilizing TLR ligands provoke a comparable inflammatory reaction, and to find out whether this response is absent in TLR4 deficient mice. Assuming that cardiac stress alters the expression of pattern recognition receptors we analyzed the effects of transverse aortic constriction and second-hit virulence factor treatment on TLR expression, as well as cytokine regulation. Wild type and Tlr4-/- mice were subjected to three days of TAC and subsequently confronted with gram-positive TLR2 ligand lipoteichoic acid (LTA, 15mg/g bodyweight) or synthetic CpG-oligodesoxynucleotide 1668 thioate (20 nmol/kg bodyweight, 30 min after D-galactosamin desensitization) signaling via TLR9. Hemodynamic measurements and organ preservation were performed 6 h after stimulation. Indeed, the study revealed a robust enhancement of LTA induced pattern recognition receptor and cytokine mRNA expression and a LTA-dependent reduction of hemodynamic pressure in TAC wild type mice. Second-Hit treatment with CpG-ODNs led to similar results. However, second-hit effects were abolished in Tlr4-/- mice. In total, these data indicate for the first time that cardiac stress increases the inflammatory response towards both, gram-negative and gram-positive, TLR ligands as well as bacterial DNA. The decrease of the inflammatory response upon TLR2 and -9 ligand challenge in TAC Tlr4-/- mice demonstrates that a lack of TLR4 signaling does not only prevent left ventricular hypertrophy but also protects the mice from a cardiac stress induced hyperinflammatory

  2. Glutathione peroxidase-1 protects from CD95-induced apoptosis.

    PubMed

    Gouaze, Valerie; Andrieu-Abadie, Nathalie; Cuvillier, Olivier; Malagarie-Cazenave, Sophie; Frisach, Marie-Francoise; Mirault, Marc-Edouard; Levade, Thierry

    2002-11-01

    Through the induction of apoptosis, CD95 plays a crucial role in the immune response and the elimination of cancer cells. Ligation of CD95 receptor activates a complex signaling network that appears to implicate the generation of reactive oxygen species (ROS). This study investigated the place of ROS production in CD95-mediated apoptosis and the role of the antioxidant enzyme glutathione peroxidase-1 (GPx1). Anti-CD95 antibodies triggered an early generation of ROS in human breast cancer T47D cells that was blocked by overexpression of GPx1 and inhibition of initiator caspase activation. Enforced expression of GPx1 also resulted in inhibition of CD95-induced effector caspase activation, DNA fragmentation, and apoptotic cell death. Resistance to CD95-mediated apoptosis was not due to an increased expression of anti-apoptotic molecules and could be reversed by glutathione-depleting agents. In addition, whereas the anti-apoptotic protein Bcl-xL prevented CD95-induced apoptosis in MCF-7 cells, it did not inhibit the early ROS production. Moreover, Bcl-xL but not GPx1 overexpression could suppress the staurosporine-induced late generation of ROS and subsequent cell death. Altogether, these findings suggest that GPx1 functions upstream of the mitochondrial events to inhibit the early ROS production and apoptosis induced by CD95 ligation. Finally, transgenic mice overexpressing GPx1 were partially protected from the lethal effect of anti-CD95, underlying the importance of peroxide formation (and GPx1) in CD95-triggered apoptosis. PMID:12221075

  3. A Federal Response: The President's Critical Infrastructure Protection Board.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schmidt, Howard

    2002-01-01

    Outlines the U.S. Critical Infrastructure Protection Board's purpose, budget, principles, and priorities. Describes the board's role in coordinating all federal activities related to protection of information systems and networks supporting critical infrastructures. Also discusses its responsibility in creating a policy and road map for government…

  4. Protective host immune responses to Salmonella infection

    PubMed Central

    Pham, Oanh H; McSorley, Stephen J.

    2015-01-01

    Salmonella enterica serovars Typhi and Paratyphi are the causative agents of human typhoid fever. Current typhoid vaccines are ineffective and are not widely used in endemic areas. Greater understanding of host–pathogen interactions during Salmonella infection should facilitate the development of improved vaccines to combat typhoid and nontyphoidal Salmonellosis. This review will focus on our current understanding of Salmonella pathogenesis and the major host immune components that participate in immunity to Salmonella infection. In addition, recent findings regarding host immune mechanisms in response to Salmonella infection will be also discussed, providing a new perspective on the utility of improved tools to study the immune response to Salmonella infections. PMID:25598340

  5. Minocycline Protection of Neomycin Induced Hearing Loss in Gerbils

    PubMed Central

    Robinson, Alan M.; Vujanovic, Irena; Richter, Claus-Peter

    2015-01-01

    This animal study was designed to determine if minocycline ameliorates cochlear damage is caused by intratympanic injection of the ototoxic aminoglycoside antibiotic neomycin. Baseline auditory-evoked brainstem responses were measured in gerbils that received 40 mM intratympanic neomycin either with 0, 1.2, or 1.5 mg/kg intraperitoneal minocycline. Four weeks later auditory-evoked brainstem responses were measured and compared to the baseline measurements. Minocycline treatments of 1.2 mg/kg and 1.5 mg/kg resulted in significantly lower threshold increases compared to 0 mg/kg, indicating protection of hearing loss between 6 kHz and 19 kHz. Cochleae were processed for histology and sectioned to allow quantification of the spiral ganglion neurons and histological evaluation of organ of Corti. Significant reduction of spiral ganglion neuron density was demonstrated in animals that did not receive minocycline, indicating that those receiving minocycline demonstrated enhanced survival of spiral ganglion neurons, enhanced survival of sensory hairs cells and spiral ganglion neurons, and reduced hearing threshold elevation correlates with minocycline treatment demonstrating that neomycin induced hearing loss can be reduced by the simultaneous application of minocycline. PMID:25950003

  6. Foot-and-mouth disease virus-like particles produced by a SUMO fusion protein system in Escherichia coli induce potent protective immune responses in guinea pigs, swine and cattle

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Foot-and-mouth disease virus (FMDV) causes a highly contagious infection in cloven-hoofed animals. The format of FMD virus-like particles (VLP) as a non-replicating particulate vaccine candidate is a promising alternative to conventional inactivated FMDV vaccines. In this study, we explored a prokaryotic system to express and assemble the FMD VLP and validated the potential of VLP as an FMDV vaccine candidate. VLP composed entirely of FMDV (Asia1/Jiangsu/China/2005) capsid proteins (VP0, VP1 and VP3) were simultaneously produced as SUMO fusion proteins by an improved SUMO fusion protein system in E. coli. Proteolytic removal of the SUMO moiety from the fusion proteins resulted in the assembly of VLP with size and shape resembling the authentic FMDV. Immunization of guinea pigs, swine and cattle with FMD VLP by intramuscular inoculation stimulated the FMDV-specific antibody response, neutralizing antibody response, T-cell proliferation response and secretion of cytokine IFN-γ. In addition, immunization with one dose of the VLP resulted in complete protection of these animals from homologous FMDV challenge. The 50% protection dose (PD50) of FMD VLP in cattle is up to 6.34. These results suggest that FMD VLP expressed in E. coli are an effective vaccine in guinea pigs, swine and cattle and support further development of these VLP as a vaccine candidate for protection against FMDV. PMID:23826638

  7. Alert cell strategy: mechanisms of inflammatory response and organ protection.

    PubMed

    Hatakeyama, Noboru; Matsuda, Naoyuki

    2014-01-01

    Systemic inflammatory response syndrome (SIRS) is triggered by various factors such as surgical operation, trauma, burn injury, ischemia, pancreatitis and bacterial translocation. Sepsis is a SIRS associated with bacterial infection. SIRS and sepsis tend to trigger excessive production of inflammatory cytokines and other inflammatory molecules and induce multiple organ failure, such as acute lung injury, acute kidney injury and inflammatory cardiac injury. Epithelial and endothelial cells in some major organs express inflammatory receptors on the plasma membrane and work as alert cells for inflammation, and regulation of these alert cells could have a relieving effect on the inflammatory response. In inflammatory conditions, initial cardiac dysfunction is mediated by decreased preload and adequate infusion therapy is required. Tachyarrhythmia is a complication of inflammatory conditions and early control of the inflammatory reaction would prevent the structural remodeling that is resistant to therapies. Furthermore, there seems to be crosstalk between major organs with a central focus on the kidneys in inflammatory conditions. As an alert cell strategy, volatile anesthetics, sevoflurane and isoflurane, seem to have anti-inflammatory effects, and both experimental and clinical studies have shown the beneficial effects of these drugs in various settings of inflammatory conditions. On the other hand, in terms of intravenous anesthetics, propofol and ketamine, their current status is still controversial as there is a lack of confirmatory evidence on whether they have an organ-protective effect in inflammatory conditions. The local anesthetic lidocaine suppressed inflammatory responses upon both systemic and local administration. For the control of inflammatory conditions, anesthetic agents may be a target of drug development in accordance with other treatments and drugs. PMID:25229471

  8. Response of surge protection devices to fast rising pulses

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mindel, I. N.

    1980-01-01

    Two types of lightning protection modules incorporating leadless (pill type) Zener like devices were evaluated with regard to their ability to suppress EMP induced transients. Two series of tests were performed to evaluate the ability of these modules to react to fast rate of rise ( 1Kv/ns) transients, and the attenuation introduced and the ability to limit damped sinusoid pulses which may be induced due to an EMP resulting from a nuclear detonation.

  9. Protective Properties of Vaccinia Virus-Based Vaccines: Skin Scarification Promotes a Nonspecific Immune Response That Protects against Orthopoxvirus Disease

    PubMed Central

    Rice, Amanda D.; Adams, Mathew M.; Lindsey, Scott F.; Swetnam, Daniele M.; Manning, Brandi R.; Smith, Andrew J.; Burrage, Andrew M.; Wallace, Greg; MacNeill, Amy L.

    2014-01-01

    ABSTRACT The process of vaccination introduced by Jenner generated immunity against smallpox and ultimately led to the eradication of the disease. Procedurally, in modern times, the virus is introduced into patients via a process called scarification, performed with a bifurcated needle containing a small amount of virus. What was unappreciated was the role that scarification itself plays in generating protective immunity. In rabbits, protection from lethal disease is induced by intradermal injection of vaccinia virus, whereas a protective response occurs within the first 2 min after scarification with or without virus, suggesting that the scarification process itself is a major contributor to immunoprotection. IMPORTANCE These results show the importance of local nonspecific immunity in controlling poxvirus infections and indicate that the process of scarification should be critically considered during the development of vaccination protocols for other infectious agents. PMID:24760885

  10. A Cholera Conjugate Vaccine Containing O-specific Polysaccharide (OSP) of V. cholerae O1 Inaba and Recombinant Fragment of Tetanus Toxin Heavy Chain (OSP:rTTHc) Induces Serum, Memory and Lamina Proprial Responses against OSP and Is Protective in Mice

    PubMed Central

    Eckhoff, Grace; Charles, Richelle C.; Alam, Mohammad Murshid; Sultana, Tania; Rashu, Md. Rasheduzzaman; Berger, Amanda; Gonzalez-Escobedo, Geoffrey; Mandlik, Anjali; Bhuiyan, Taufiqur Rahman; Leung, Daniel T.; LaRocque, Regina C.; Harris, Jason B.; Calderwood, Stephen B.; Qadri, Firdausi; Vann, W. F.; Kováč, Pavol; Ryan, Edward T.

    2015-01-01

    Background Vibrio cholerae is the cause of cholera, a severe watery diarrhea. Protection against cholera is serogroup specific. Serogroup specificity is defined by the O-specific polysaccharide (OSP) component of lipopolysaccharide (LPS). Methodology Here we describe a conjugate vaccine for cholera prepared via squaric acid chemistry from the OSP of V. cholerae O1 Inaba strain PIC018 and a recombinant heavy chain fragment of tetanus toxin (OSP:rTTHc). We assessed a range of vaccine doses based on the OSP content of the vaccine (10-50 μg), vaccine compositions varying by molar loading ratio of OSP to rTTHc (3:1, 5:1, 10:1), effect of an adjuvant, and route of immunization. Principle Findings Immunized mice developed prominent anti-OSP and anti-TT serum IgG responses, as well as vibriocidal antibody and memory B cell responses following intramuscular or intradermal vaccination. Mice did not develop anti-squarate responses. Intestinal lamina proprial IgA responses targeting OSP occurred following intradermal vaccination. In general, we found comparable immune responses in mice immunized with these variations, although memory B cell and vibriocidal responses were blunted in mice receiving the highest dose of vaccine (50 μg). We found no appreciable change in immune responses when the conjugate vaccine was administered in the presence or absence of immunoadjuvant alum. Administration of OSP:rTTHc resulted in 55% protective efficacy in a mouse survival cholera challenge model. Conclusion We report development of an Inaba OSP:rTTHc conjugate vaccine that induces memory responses and protection against cholera in mice. Development of an effective cholera conjugate vaccine that induces high level and long-term immune responses against OSP would be beneficial, especially in young children who respond poorly to polysaccharide antigens. PMID:26154421

  11. Tempol protects human lymphocytes from genotoxicity induced by cisplatin.

    PubMed

    Khabour, Omar F; Alzoubi, Karem H; Mfady, Doa'a S; Alasseiri, Mohammed; Hasheesh, Taghrid F

    2014-01-01

    The use of cisplatin in treatments of human malignancies is limited by its side effects that include DNA damage and the subsequent risk of developing secondary cancer. In this study, we examined the possible protective effect of Tempol against DNA damage induced by cisplatin in human lymphocytes using chromosomal aberrations (CAs) and sister chromatid exchanges (SCEs) assays. Cisplatin induced significant elevation in the frequencies of CAs and SCEs in cultured human lymphocytes (P < 0.01). Treatment of lymphocytes with Tempol significantly lowered CAs and SCEs induced by cisplatin. Tempol alone did not affect spontaneous levels of SCEs and CAs observed in the control group (P > 0.05). In conclusion, Tempol protects human lymphocytes against genotoxicity induced by the anticancer drug cisplatin. PMID:24955171

  12. Protective responses to sublytic complement in the retinal pigment epithelium.

    PubMed

    Tan, Li Xuan; Toops, Kimberly A; Lakkaraju, Aparna

    2016-08-01

    The retinal pigment epithelium (RPE) is a key site of injury in inherited and age-related macular degenerations. Abnormal activation of the complement system is a feature of these blinding diseases, yet how the RPE combats complement attack is poorly understood. The complement cascade terminates in the cell-surface assembly of membrane attack complexes (MACs), which promote inflammation by causing aberrant signal transduction. Here, we investigated mechanisms crucial for limiting MAC assembly and preserving cellular integrity in the RPE and asked how these are compromised in models of macular degeneration. Using polarized primary RPE and the pigmented Abca4(-/-) Stargardt disease mouse model, we provide evidence for two protective responses occurring within minutes of complement attack, which are essential for maintaining mitochondrial health in the RPE. First, accelerated recycling of the membrane-bound complement regulator CD59 to the RPE cell surface inhibits MAC formation. Second, fusion of lysosomes with the RPE plasma membrane immediately after complement attack limits sustained elevations in intracellular calcium and prevents mitochondrial injury. Cholesterol accumulation in the RPE, induced by vitamin A dimers or oxidized LDL, inhibits these defense mechanisms by activating acid sphingomyelinase (ASMase), which increases tubulin acetylation and derails organelle traffic. Defective CD59 recycling and lysosome exocytosis after complement attack lead to mitochondrial fragmentation and oxidative stress in the RPE. Drugs that stimulate cholesterol efflux or inhibit ASMase restore both these critical safeguards in the RPE and avert complement-induced mitochondrial injury in vitro and in Abca4(-/-) mice, indicating that they could be effective therapeutic approaches for macular degenerations. PMID:27432952

  13. Naphthazarin protects against glutamate-induced neuronal death via activation of the Nrf2/ARE pathway

    SciTech Connect

    Son, Tae Gen; Kawamoto, Elisa M.; Yu, Qian-Sheng; Greig, Nigel H.; Mattson, Mark P.; Camandola, Simonetta

    2013-04-19

    Highlights: •Naphthazarin activates the Nrf2/ARE pathway. •Naphthazarin induces Nrf2-driven genes in neurons and astrocytes. •Naphthazarin protects neurons against excitotoxicity. -- Abstract: Nuclear factor E2-related factor 2 (Nrf2)/antioxidant response element (ARE) pathway is an important cellular stress response pathway involved in neuroprotection. We previously screened several natural phytochemicals and identified plumbagin as a novel activator of the Nrf2/ARE pathway that can protect neurons against ischemic injury. Here we extended our studies to natural and synthetic derivatives of plumbagin. We found that 5,8-dimethoxy-1,4-naphthoquinone (naphthazarin) is a potent activator of the Nrf2/ARE pathway, up-regulates the expression of Nrf2-driven genes in primary neuronal and glial cultures, and protects neurons against glutamate-induced excitotoxicity.

  14. Protective Effect of Tetrandrine on Sodium Taurocholate-Induced Severe Acute Pancreatitis

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Xian-lin; Li, Jie-xing; Li, Zhen-dong; Liu, Da-sheng; Lu, Su-hong; Liu, Kang-li; Duan, Hong-yan; Luo, Yu-hong

    2015-01-01

    Tet is a type of alkaloid extracted from Stephania tetrandra, and it has recently been demonstrated that Tet can protect against inflammation and free radical injury and inhibit the release of inflammatory mediators. The present study was designed to observe the protective effect of Tet on sodium taurocholate-induced severe acute pancreatitis (SAP). The rat model of SAP was induced by retrograde bile duct injection of sodium taurocholate and then treated with Verapamil and Tet. The results showed that Tet can reduce NF-κB activation in pancreas issue, inhibit the SAP cascade, and improve SAP through inducing pancreas acinar cell apoptosis and stabilizing intracellular calcium in the pancreas, thus mitigating the damage to the pancreas. Our study revealed that Tet may reduce systemic inflammatory response syndrome (SIRS) and multiple organ dysfunction syndromes (MODS) to protect against damage, and these roles may be mediated through the NF-κB pathway to improve the proinflammatory/anti-inflammatory imbalance. PMID:26557854

  15. Protective Effect of Tetrandrine on Sodium Taurocholate-Induced Severe Acute Pancreatitis.

    PubMed

    Wu, Xian-Lin; Li, Jie-Xing; Li, Zhen-Dong; Liu, Da-Sheng; Lu, Su-Hong; Liu, Kang-Li; Duan, Hong-Yan; Luo, Yu-Hong

    2015-01-01

    Tet is a type of alkaloid extracted from Stephania tetrandra, and it has recently been demonstrated that Tet can protect against inflammation and free radical injury and inhibit the release of inflammatory mediators. The present study was designed to observe the protective effect of Tet on sodium taurocholate-induced severe acute pancreatitis (SAP). The rat model of SAP was induced by retrograde bile duct injection of sodium taurocholate and then treated with Verapamil and Tet. The results showed that Tet can reduce NF-κB activation in pancreas issue, inhibit the SAP cascade, and improve SAP through inducing pancreas acinar cell apoptosis and stabilizing intracellular calcium in the pancreas, thus mitigating the damage to the pancreas. Our study revealed that Tet may reduce systemic inflammatory response syndrome (SIRS) and multiple organ dysfunction syndromes (MODS) to protect against damage, and these roles may be mediated through the NF-κB pathway to improve the proinflammatory/anti-inflammatory imbalance. PMID:26557854

  16. Correlates of Vaccine-Induced Protection against Mycobacterium tuberculosis Revealed in Comparative Analyses of Lymphocyte Populations

    PubMed Central

    Kurtz, Sherry L.

    2015-01-01

    A critical hindrance to the development of a novel vaccine against Mycobacterium tuberculosis is a lack of understanding of protective correlates of immunity and of host factors involved in a successful adaptive immune response. Studies from our group and others have used a mouse-based in vitro model system to assess correlates of protection. Here, using this coculture system and a panel of whole-cell vaccines with varied efficacy, we developed a comprehensive approach to understand correlates of protection. We compared the gene and protein expression profiles of vaccine-generated immune peripheral blood lymphocytes (PBLs) to the profiles found in immune splenocytes. PBLs not only represent a clinically relevant cell population, but comparing the expression in these populations gave insight into compartmentally specific mechanisms of protection. Additionally, we performed a direct comparison of host responses induced when immune cells were cocultured with either the vaccine strain Mycobacterium bovis BCG or virulent M. tuberculosis. These comparisons revealed host-specific and bacterium-specific factors involved in protection against virulent M. tuberculosis. Most significantly, we identified a set of 13 core molecules induced in the most protective vaccines under all of the conditions tested. Further validation of this panel of mediators as a predictor of vaccine efficacy will facilitate vaccine development, and determining how each promotes adaptive immunity will advance our understanding of antimycobacterial immune responses. PMID:26269537

  17. Immunosuppressive treatment protects against angiotensin II-induced renal damage.

    PubMed

    Muller, Dominik N; Shagdarsuren, Erdenechimeg; Park, Joon-Keun; Dechend, Ralf; Mervaala, Eero; Hampich, Franziska; Fiebeler, Anette; Ju, Xinsheng; Finckenberg, Piet; Theuer, Jürgen; Viedt, Christiane; Kreuzer, Joerg; Heidecke, Harald; Haller, Hermann; Zenke, Martin; Luft, Friedrich C

    2002-11-01

    Angiotensin (Ang) II promotes renal infiltration by immunocompetent cells in double-transgenic rats (dTGRs) harboring both human renin and angiotensinogen genes. To elucidate disease mechanisms, we investigated whether or not dexamethasone (DEXA) immunosuppression ameliorates renal damage. Untreated dTGRs developed hypertension, renal damage, and 50% mortality at 7 weeks. DEXA reduced albuminuria, renal fibrosis, vascular reactive oxygen stress, and prevented mortality, independent of blood pressure. In dTGR kidneys, p22phox immunostaining co-localized with macrophages and partially with T cells. dTGR dendritic cells expressed major histocompatibility complex II and CD86, indicating maturation. DEXA suppressed major histocompatibility complex II+, CD86+, dendritic, and T-cell infiltration. In additional experiments, we treated dTGRs with mycophenolate mofetil to inhibit T- and B-cell proliferation. Reno-protective actions of mycophenolate mofetil and its effect on dendritic and T cells were similar to those obtained with DEXA. We next investigated whether or not Ang II directly promotes dendritic cell maturation in vitro. Ang II did not alter CD80, CD83, and MHC II expression, but increased CCR7 expression and cell migration. To explore the role of tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-alpha on dendritic cell maturation in vivo, we treated dTGRs with the soluble TNF-alpha receptor etanercept. This treatment had no effect on blood pressure, but decreased albuminuria, nuclear factor-kappaB activation, and infiltration of all immunocompetent cells. These data suggest that immunosuppression prevents dendritic cell maturation and T-cell infiltration in a nonimmune model of Ang II-induced renal damage. Ang II induces dendritic migration directly, whereas in vivo TNF-alpha is involved in dendritic cell infiltration and maturation. Thus, Ang II may initiate events leading to innate and acquired immune response. PMID:12414515

  18. Immunosuppressive Treatment Protects Against Angiotensin II-Induced Renal Damage

    PubMed Central

    Muller, Dominik N.; Shagdarsuren, Erdenechimeg; Park, Joon-Keun; Dechend, Ralf; Mervaala, Eero; Hampich, Franziska; Fiebeler, Anette; Ju, Xinsheng; Finckenberg, Piet; Theuer, Jürgen; Viedt, Christiane; Kreuzer, Joerg; Heidecke, Harald; Haller, Hermann; Zenke, Martin; Luft, Friedrich C.

    2002-01-01

    Angiotensin (Ang) II promotes renal infiltration by immunocompetent cells in double-transgenic rats (dTGRs) harboring both human renin and angiotensinogen genes. To elucidate disease mechanisms, we investigated whether or not dexamethasone (DEXA) immunosuppression ameliorates renal damage. Untreated dTGRs developed hypertension, renal damage, and 50% mortality at 7 weeks. DEXA reduced albuminuria, renal fibrosis, vascular reactive oxygen stress, and prevented mortality, independent of blood pressure. In dTGR kidneys, p22phox immunostaining co-localized with macrophages and partially with T cells. dTGR dendritic cells expressed major histocompatibility complex II and CD86, indicating maturation. DEXA suppressed major histocompatibility complex II+, CD86+, dendritic, and T-cell infiltration. In additional experiments, we treated dTGRs with mycophenolate mofetil to inhibit T- and B-cell proliferation. Reno-protective actions of mycophenolate mofetil and its effect on dendritic and T cells were similar to those obtained with DEXA. We next investigated whether or not Ang II directly promotes dendritic cell maturation in vitro. Ang II did not alter CD80, CD83, and MHC II expression, but increased CCR7 expression and cell migration. To explore the role of tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-α on dendritic cell maturation in vivo, we treated dTGRs with the soluble TNF-α receptor etanercept. This treatment had no effect on blood pressure, but decreased albuminuria, nuclear factor-κB activation, and infiltration of all immunocompetent cells. These data suggest that immunosuppression prevents dendritic cell maturation and T-cell infiltration in a nonimmune model of Ang II-induced renal damage. Ang II induces dendritic migration directly, whereas in vivo TNF-α is involved in dendritic cell infiltration and maturation. Thus, Ang II may initiate events leading to innate and acquired immune response. PMID:12414515

  19. Protective Effect of Dimethyl Fumarate on an Oxidative Stress Model Induced by Sodium Nitroprusside in Mice.

    PubMed

    Kume, Toshiaki; Suenaga, Aya; Izumi, Yasuhiko; Akaike, Akinori

    2016-01-01

    Recent reports have shown that dimethyl fumarate (DMF) prevents brain damage induced by intracerebral hemorrhage and this beneficial effect is mediated by the nuclear erythroid 2 p45-related factor-2-antioxidant response element (Nrf2-ARE) pathway. However, the downstream mechanism underlying the activation of the Nrf2-ARE pathway is unclear. Here, we investigated the protective effect of DMF using an in vivo model of oxidative stress induced by sodium nitroprusside (SNP) and rat primary striatal cultures. Oral administration of DMF prevented SNP-induced motor dysfunction. Pre-administration of DMF (60-200 mg/kg) for 24 h dose-dependently protected against brain damage induced by the striatal injection of SNP. Next, we investigated the protective effect and mechanism of DMF against oxidative stress using rat primary striatal cell cultures. Treatment of striatal cells with DMF (10 µM) markedly prevented hydrogen peroxide-induced cytotoxicity. The protective effect of DMF against oxidative stress in vitro was inhibited by zinc protoporphyrin IX, an inhibitor of heme oxygenase-1, but not by buthionine sulfoximine, an inhibitor of glutathione synthesis. These results suggest that the activation of heme oxygenase-1 plays an important role in the protective effect of DMF. PMID:27251510

  20. Reformulated meat products protect against ischemia-induced cardiac damage.

    PubMed

    Asensio-Lopez, M C; Lax, A; Sanchez-Mas, J; Avellaneda, A; Planes, J; Pascual-Figal, D A

    2016-02-17

    The protective effects of the antioxidants present in food are of great relevance for cardiovascular health. This study evaluates whether the extracts from reformulated meat products with a reduction in fat and/or sodium content exert a cardioprotective effect against ischemia-induced oxidative stress in cardiomyocytes, compared with non-meat foods. Ischemic damage caused loss of cell viability, increased reactive oxygen species and lipid peroxidation and decreased the antioxidant activity. Pretreatment for 24 h with digested or non-digested extracts from reformulated meat products led to protection against ischemia-induced oxidative damage: increased cell viability, reduced oxidative stress and restored the antioxidant activity. Similar results were obtained using extracts from tuna fish, but not with the extracts of green peas, salad or white beans. These results suggest that reformulated meat products have a beneficial impact in protecting cardiac cells against ischemia, and they may represent a source of natural antioxidants with benefits for cardiovascular health. PMID:26751429

  1. Protective role of tetrahydrocurcumin against erythromycin estolate-induced hepatotoxicity.

    PubMed

    Pari, L; Murugan, P

    2004-05-01

    Tetrahydrocurcumin (THC), one of the major metabolites of curcumin, was investigated for its possible hepatoprotective effect in Wistar rats against erythromycin estolate-induced toxicity. Oral administration of THC significantly prevented the occurrence of erythromycin estolate-induced liver damage. The increased level of serum enzymes (aspartate transaminase (AST), alanine transaminase (ALT), alkaline phosphatase (ALP)), bilirubin, cholesterol, triglycerides, phospholipids, free fatty acids and plasma thiobarbituric acid reactive substances (TBARS) and hydroperoxides observed in rats treated with erythromycin estolate were very much reduced in rats treated with THC and erythromycin estolate. This biochemical observation were supplemented by histopathological examination of liver section. Results of this study revealed that THC could afford a significant protection against erthromycin estolate-induced hepatocellular damage. Tetrahydrocurcumin had a better protective effect when compared with Silymarin, a reference drug. PMID:14998559

  2. Pigment Epithelium Derived Factor Peptide Protects Murine Hepatocytes from Carbon Tetrachloride-Induced Injury

    PubMed Central

    Shih, Shou-Chuan; Ho, Tsung-Chuan; Chen, Show-Li; Tsao, Yeou-Ping

    2016-01-01

    Fibrogenesis is induced by repeated injury to the liver and reactive regeneration and leads eventually to liver cirrhosis. Pigment epithelium derived factor (PEDF) has been shown to prevent liver fibrosis induced by carbon tetrachloride (CCl4). A 44 amino acid domain of PEDF (44-mer) was found to have a protective effect against various insults to several cell types. In this study, we investigated the capability of synthetic 44-mer to protect against liver injury in mice and in primary cultured hepatocytes. Acute liver injury, induced by CCl4, was evident from histological changes, such as cell necrosis, inflammation and apoptosis, and a concomitant reduction of glutathione (GSH) and GSH redox enzyme activities in the liver. Intraperitoneal injection of the 44-mer into CCl4-treated mice abolished the induction of AST and ALT and markedly reduced histological signs of liver injury. The 44-mer treatment can reduce hepatic oxidative stress as evident from lower levels of lipid hydroperoxide, and higher levels of GSH. CCl4 caused a reduction of Bcl-xL, PEDF and PPARγ, which was markedly restored by the 44-mer treatment. Consequently, the 44-mer suppressed liver fibrosis induced by repeated CCl4 injury. Furthermore, our observations in primary culture of rat hepatocytes showed that PEDF and the 44-mer protected primary rat hepatocytes against apoptosis induced by serum deprivation and TGF-β1. PEDF/44-mer induced cell protective STAT3 phosphorylation. Pharmacological STAT3 inhibition prevented the antiapoptotic action of PEDF/44-mer. Among several PEDF receptor candidates that may be responsible for hepatocyte protection, we demonstrated that PNPLA2 was essential for PEDF/44-mer-mediated STAT3 phosphorylation and antiapoptotic activity by using siRNA to selectively knockdown PNPLA2. In conclusion, the PEDF 44-mer protects hepatocytes from single and repeated CCl4 injury. This protective effect may stem from strengthening the counter oxidative stress capacity and

  3. Fructose Protects Murine Hepatocytes from Tumor Necrosis Factor-induced Apoptosis by Modulating JNK Signaling*

    PubMed Central

    Speicher, Tobias; Köhler, Ulrike A.; Choukèr, Alexander; Werner, Sabine; Weiland, Timo; Wendel, Albrecht

    2012-01-01

    Fructose-induced hepatic ATP depletion prevents TNF-induced apoptosis, whereas it contrarily enhances CD95-induced hepatocyte apoptosis in vitro and in vivo. By contrast, transformed liver cells are not protected against TNF due to metabolic alterations, allowing selective tumor targeting. We analyzed the molecular mechanisms by which fructose modulates cytokine-induced apoptosis. A release of adenosine after fructose-induced ATP depletion, followed by a cAMP response, was demonstrated. Likewise, cAMP and adenosine mimicked per se the modulation by fructose of CD95- and TNF-induced apoptosis. The effects of fructose on cytokine-induced apoptosis were sensitive to inhibition of protein kinase A. Fructose prevented the pro-apoptotic, sustained phase of TNF-induced JNK signaling and thereby blocked bid-mediated activation of the intrinsic mitochondrial apoptosis pathway in a PKA-dependent manner. We explain the dichotomal effects of fructose on CD95- and TNF-induced cell death by the selective requirement of JNK signaling for the latter. These findings provide a mechanistic rationale for the protection of hepatocytes from TNF-induced cell death by pharmacological doses of fructose. PMID:22086922

  4. Cross-protective immune responses between genotypically distinct lineages of infectious laryngotracheitis viruses.

    PubMed

    Lee, Sang-Won; Markham, Philip F; Coppo, Mauricio J C; Legione, Alistair R; Shil, Niraj K; Quinteros, José A; Noormohammadi, Amir H; Browning, Glenn F; Hartley, Carol A; Devlin, Joanne M

    2014-03-01

    Recent phylogenetic studies have identified different genotypic lineages of infectious laryngotracheitis virus (ILTV), and these lineages can recombine in the field. The emergence of virulent recombinant field strains of ILTV by natural recombination between commercial vaccines belonging to different genotypic lineages has been reported recently. Despite the use of attenuated ILTV vaccines, these recombinant viruses were able to spread and cause disease in commercial poultry flocks, raising the question of whether the different lineages of ILTV can induce cross-protective immune responses. This study examined the capacity of the Australian-origin A20 ILTV vaccine to protect against challenge with the class 8 ILTV recombinant virus, the genome of which is predominantly derived from a heterologous genotypic lineage. Following challenge, birds vaccinated via eyedrop were protected from clinical signs of disease and pathological changes in the tracheal mucosa, although they were not completely protected from viral infection or replication. In contrast, the challenge virus induced severe clinical signs and tracheal pathology in unvaccinated birds. This is the first study to examine the ability of a vaccine from the Australian lineage to protect against challenge with a virus from a heterologous lineage. These results suggest that the two distinct genotypic lineages of ILTV can both induce cross-protection, indicating that current commercial vaccines are still likely to assist in control of ILTV in the poultry industry, in spite of the emergence of novel recombinants derived from different genotypic lineages. PMID:24758128

  5. Inducible epithelial resistance protects mice against leukemia-associated pneumonia.

    PubMed

    Leiva-Juárez, Miguel M; Ware, Hayden H; Kulkarni, Vikram V; Zweidler-McKay, Patrick A; Tuvim, Michael J; Evans, Scott E

    2016-08-18

    Despite widespread infection prevention efforts, pneumonia remains the leading cause of death among patients with acute leukemia, due to complex disease- and treatment-dependent immune defects. We have reported that a single inhaled treatment with a synergistic combination of Toll-like receptor 2/6 (TLR 2/6) and TLR9 agonists (Pam2-ODN) induces protective mucosal defenses in mice against a broad range of pathogens. As Pam2-ODN-induced protection persists despite depletion of several leukocyte populations, we tested whether it could prevent pneumonia in a mouse model of acute myeloid leukemia (AML) remission induction therapy. Pam2-ODN prevented death due to pneumonia caused by Pseudomonas aeruginosa, Streptococcus pneumoniae, and Aspergillus fumigatus when mice were heavily engrafted with leukemia cells, had severe chemotherapy-induced neutropenia or both. Pam2-ODN also extended survival of pneumonia in NSG mice engrafted with primary human AML cells. Protection was associated with rapid pathogen killing in the lungs at the time of infection and with reduced pathogen burdens at distant sites at the end of observation. Pathogen killing was inducible directly from isolated lung epithelial cells and was not abrogated by the presence of leukemia cells or cytotoxic agents. Pam2-ODN had no discernible effect on replication rate, total tumor population, or killing by chemotherapy of mouse or human leukemia cells, either in vitro or in vivo. Taken together, we report that therapeutic stimulation of lung epithelial defenses robustly protects against otherwise lethal pneumonias despite the profound immune dysfunction associated with acute leukemia and its treatment. These findings may suggest an opportunity to protect this population during periods of peak vulnerability. PMID:27317793

  6. Protection induced by early stage vaccination with pandemic influenza virus-like particles.

    PubMed

    Lee, Gi-Ja; Quan, Fu-Shi

    2016-07-19

    The 2009 worldwide influenza pandemic emphasized the need for new approaches to develop emergency vaccines. In this study, a virus-like particle vaccine comprised of hemagglutinin (HA) and M1 from the pandemic influenza virus A/California/04/09 were used and its ability to induce protective immunity during the early stage of vaccination was assessed in a mouse model. A single intramuscular vaccination with virus-like particles (VLPs) provided protection on days 4 and 7 post-vaccination against lethal virus challenge with only moderate body weight loss. VLP vaccination induced significantly higher IgG antibody responses and high hemagglutinin inhibition (HAI) titers on day 4 post-vaccination. A predominant IgG2a antibody response and viral neutralizing antibodies were induced on day 7. These immune responses were closely correlated with protection. Lung virus titers decreased significantly on day 7 compared to those on day 4 post-vaccination. The lung virus titer on day 4 post-vaccination also decreased significantly compared to that of the naïve control. These results demonstrate that VLP vaccination confers effective protection during the early stage after vaccination in a mouse model. PMID:27317263

  7. Radiation-induced gene responses

    SciTech Connect

    Woloschak, G.E.; Paunesku, T.; Shearin-Jones, P.; Oryhon, J.

    1996-12-31

    In the process of identifying genes that are differentially regulated in cells exposed to ultraviolet radiation (UV), we identified a transcript that was repressed following the exposure of cells to a combination of UV and salicylate, a known inhibitor of NF-kappaB. Sequencing this band determined that it has identify to lactate dehydrogenase, and Northern blots confirmed the initial expression pattern. Analysis of the sequence of the LDH 5` region established the presence of NF-kappaB, Sp1, and two Ap-2 elements; two partial AP- 1; one partial RE, and two halves of E-UV elements were also found. Electromobility shift assays were then performed for the AP-1, NF- kappaB, and E-UV elements. These experiments revealed that binding to NF-kappaB was induced by UV but repressed with salicylic acid; UV did not affect AP-1 binding, but salicylic acid inhibited it alone or following UV exposure; and E-UV binding was repressed by UV, and salicylic acid had little effect. Since the binding of no single element correlated with the expression pattern of LDH, it is likely that multiple elements govern UV/salicylate-mediated expression.

  8. Glimepiride protects neurons against amyloid-β-induced synapse damage.

    PubMed

    Osborne, Craig; West, Ewan; Nolan, William; McHale-Owen, Harriet; Williams, Alun; Bate, Clive

    2016-02-01

    Alzheimer's disease is associated with the accumulation within the brain of amyloid-β (Aβ) peptides that damage synapses and affect memory acquisition. This process can be modelled by observing the effects of Aβ on synapses in cultured neurons. The addition of picomolar concentrations of soluble Aβ derived from brain extracts triggered the loss of synaptic proteins including synaptophysin, synapsin-1 and cysteine string protein from cultured neurons. Glimepiride, a sulphonylurea used for the treatment of diabetes, protected neurons against synapse damage induced by Aβ. The protective effects of glimepiride were multi-faceted. Glimepiride treatment was associated with altered synaptic membranes including the loss of specific glycosylphosphatidylinositol (GPI)-anchored proteins including the cellular prion protein (PrP(C)) that acts as a receptor for Aβ42, increased synaptic gangliosides and altered cell signalling. More specifically, glimepiride reduced the Aβ-induced increase in cholesterol and the Aβ-induced activation of cytoplasmic phospholipase A2 (cPLA2) in synapses that occurred within cholesterol-dense membrane rafts. Aβ42 binding to glimepiride-treated neurons was not targeted to membrane rafts and less Aβ42 accumulated within synapses. These studies indicate that glimepiride modified the membrane micro-environments in which Aβ-induced signalling leads to synapse damage. In addition, soluble PrP(C), released from neurons by glimepiride, neutralised Aβ-induced synapse damage. Such observations raise the possibility that glimepiride may reduce synapse damage and hence delay the progression of cognitive decline in Alzheimer's disease. PMID:26432105

  9. Protection from noise-induced hearing loss with Src inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Bielefeld, Eric C

    2015-06-01

    Noise-induced hearing loss is a major cause of acquired hearing loss around the world and pharmacological approaches to protecting the ear from noise are under investigation. Noise results in a combination of mechanical and metabolic damage pathways in the cochlea. The Src family of protein tyrosine kinases could be active in both pathways and Src inhibitors have successfully prevented noise-induced cochlear damage and hearing loss in animal models. The long-term goal is to optimize delivery methods into the cochlea to reduce invasiveness and limit side-effects before human clinical testing can be considered. At their current early stage of research investigation, Src inhibitors represent an exciting class of compounds for inclusion in a multifaceted pharmacological approach to protecting the ear from noise. PMID:25637168

  10. Sulforaphane protects the heart from doxorubicin-induced toxicity.

    PubMed

    Singh, Preeti; Sharma, Rajendra; McElhanon, Kevin; Allen, Charles D; Megyesi, Judit K; Beneš, Helen; Singh, Sharda P

    2015-09-01

    Cardiotoxicity is one of the major side effects encountered during cancer chemotherapy with doxorubicin (DOX) and other anthracyclines. Previous studies have shown that oxidative stress caused by DOX is one of the primary mechanisms for its toxic effects on the heart. Since the redox-sensitive transcription factor, Nrf2, plays a major role in protecting cells from the toxic metabolites generated during oxidative stress, we examined the effects of the phytochemical sulforaphane (SFN), a potent Nrf2-activating agent, on DOX-induced cardiotoxicity. These studies were carried out both in vitro and in vivo using rat H9c2 cardiomyoblast cells and wild type 129/sv mice, and involved SFN pretreatment followed by SFN administration during DOX exposure. SFN treatment protected H9c2 cells from DOX cytotoxicity and also resulted in restored cardiac function and a significant reduction in DOX-induced cardiomyopathy and mortality in mice. Specificity of SFN induction of Nrf2 and protection of H9c2 cells was demonstrated in Nrf2 knockdown experiments. Cardiac accumulation of 4-hydroxynonenal (4-HNE) protein adducts, due to lipid peroxidation following DOX-induced oxidative stress, was significantly attenuated by SFN treatment. The respiratory function of cardiac mitochondria isolated from mice exposed to DOX alone was repressed, while SFN treatment with DOX significantly elevated mitochondrial respiratory complex activities. Co-administration of SFN reversed the DOX-associated reduction in nuclear Nrf2 binding activity and restored cardiac expression of Nrf2-regulated genes at both the RNA and protein levels. Together, our results demonstrate for the first time that the Nrf2 inducer, SFN, has the potential to provide protection against DOX-mediated cardiotoxicity. PMID:26025579

  11. Antibodies Are Required for Complete Vaccine-Induced Protection against Herpes Simplex Virus 2

    PubMed Central

    Halford, William P.; Geltz, Joshua; Messer, Ronald J.; Hasenkrug, Kim J.

    2015-01-01

    Herpes simplex virus 2 (HSV-2) 0ΔNLS is a live HSV-2 ICP0- mutant vaccine strain that is profoundly attenuated in vivo due to its interferon-hypersensitivity. Recipients of the HSV-2 0ΔNLS vaccine are resistant to high-dose HSV-2 challenge as evidenced by profound reductions in challenge virus spread, shedding, disease and mortality. In the current study, we investigated the requirements for HSV-2 0ΔNLS vaccine-induced protection. Studies using (UV)-inactivated HSV-2 0ΔNLS revealed that self-limited replication of the attenuated virus was required for effective protection from vaginal or ocular HSV-2 challenge. Diminished antibody responses in recipients of the UV-killed HSV-2 vaccine suggested that antibodies might be playing a critical role in early protection. This hypothesis was investigated in B-cell-deficient μMT mice. Vaccination with live HSV-2 0ΔNLS induced equivalent CD8+ T cell responses in wild-type and μMT mice. Vaccinated μMT mice shed ~40-fold more infectious HSV-2 at 24 hours post-challenge relative to vaccinated wild-type (B-cell+) mice, and most vaccinated μMT mice eventually succumbed to a slowly progressing HSV-2 challenge. Importantly, passive transfer of HSV-2 antiserum restored full protection to HSV-2 0ΔNLS-vaccinated μMT mice. The results demonstrate that B cells are required for complete vaccine-induced protection against HSV-2, and indicate that virus-specific antibodies are the dominant mediators of early vaccine-induced protection against HSV-2. PMID:26670699

  12. Antibodies Are Required for Complete Vaccine-Induced Protection against Herpes Simplex Virus 2.

    PubMed

    Halford, William P; Geltz, Joshua; Messer, Ronald J; Hasenkrug, Kim J

    2015-01-01

    Herpes simplex virus 2 (HSV-2) 0ΔNLS is a live HSV-2 ICP0- mutant vaccine strain that is profoundly attenuated in vivo due to its interferon-hypersensitivity. Recipients of the HSV-2 0ΔNLS vaccine are resistant to high-dose HSV-2 challenge as evidenced by profound reductions in challenge virus spread, shedding, disease and mortality. In the current study, we investigated the requirements for HSV-2 0ΔNLS vaccine-induced protection. Studies using (UV)-inactivated HSV-2 0ΔNLS revealed that self-limited replication of the attenuated virus was required for effective protection from vaginal or ocular HSV-2 challenge. Diminished antibody responses in recipients of the UV-killed HSV-2 vaccine suggested that antibodies might be playing a critical role in early protection. This hypothesis was investigated in B-cell-deficient μMT mice. Vaccination with live HSV-2 0ΔNLS induced equivalent CD8+ T cell responses in wild-type and μMT mice. Vaccinated μMT mice shed ~40-fold more infectious HSV-2 at 24 hours post-challenge relative to vaccinated wild-type (B-cell+) mice, and most vaccinated μMT mice eventually succumbed to a slowly progressing HSV-2 challenge. Importantly, passive transfer of HSV-2 antiserum restored full protection to HSV-2 0ΔNLS-vaccinated μMT mice. The results demonstrate that B cells are required for complete vaccine-induced protection against HSV-2, and indicate that virus-specific antibodies are the dominant mediators of early vaccine-induced protection against HSV-2. PMID:26670699

  13. Protective effects of ginsenoside Re on lipopolysaccharide-induced cardiac dysfunction in mice.

    PubMed

    Chen, Rong-Chang; Wang, Jian; Yang, Longpo; Sun, Gui-Bo; Sun, Xiao-Bo

    2016-05-18

    The impaired cardiac function caused by reduced myocardial contractility is a typical manifestation of sepsis/septic shock. Ginsenoside Re (GS-Re) is one of the most abundant ingredients of ginseng. This study was designed to investigate the protective effects of GS-Re on lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-induced septic cardiac dysfunction and inflammatory response in mice. Mice were intragastrically administered with GS-Re (15 mg kg(-1)) for 1 week before the LPS challenge (10 mg kg(-1), i.p.). Cardiac function was evaluated 6 h after LPS induction. GS-Re pretreatment significantly protected against LPS-induced cardiac dysfunction. GS-Re ameliorated the imbalance between iNOS and eNOS, and prevented NF-κB activation and subsequent myocardial inflammatory responses in endotoxemic mice. The effects of GS-Re were closely associated with estrogen receptors (ERs), phosphatidylinositide 3-kinase (PI3K)/protein kinase B (AKT) signaling, and the mitogen-activated protein kinase signaling pathway, as characterized by the GS-Re-induced preservation of ERα, ERβ, and phospho-Akt and inhibition of phospho-ERK1/2, phospho-JNK, phospho-P38. However, GS-Re had no effect on LPS-induced activation of TLR-4. All these results showed that GS-Re pretreatment significantly attenuated LPS-induced cardiac dysfunction and inflammatory response. PMID:27074714

  14. Sulforaphane Protects the Liver against CdSe Quantum Dot-Induced Cytotoxicity

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Wei; He, Yan; Yu, Guodong; Li, Baolong; Sexton, Darren W.; Wileman, Thomas; Roberts, Alexandra A.; Hamilton, Chris J.; Liu, Ruoxi; Chao, Yimin; Shan, Yujuan; Bao, Yongping

    2015-01-01

    The potential cytotoxicity of cadmium selenide (CdSe) quantum dots (QDs) presents a barrier to their use in biomedical imaging or as diagnostic and therapeutic agents. Sulforaphane (SFN) is a chemoprotective compound derived from cruciferous vegetables which can up-regulate antioxidant enzymes and induce apoptosis and autophagy. This study reports the effects of SFN on CdSe QD-induced cytotoxicity in immortalised human hepatocytes and in the livers of mice. CdSe QDs induced dose-dependent cell death in hepatocytes with an IC50 = 20.4 μM. Pre-treatment with SFN (5 μM) increased cell viability in response to CdSe QDs (20 μM) from 49.5 to 89.3%. SFN induced a pro-oxidant effect characterized by depletion of intracellular reduced glutathione during short term exposure (3–6 h), followed by up-regulation of antioxidant enzymes and glutathione levels at 24 h. SFN also caused Nrf2 translocation into the nucleus, up-regulation of antioxidant enzymes and autophagy. siRNA knockdown of Nrf2 suggests that the Nrf2 pathway plays a role in the protection against CdSe QD-induced cell death. Wortmannin inhibition of SFN-induced autophagy significantly suppressed the protective effect of SFN on CdSe QD-induced cell death. Moreover, the role of autophagy in SFN protection against CdSe QD-induced cell death was confirmed using mouse embryonic fibroblasts lacking ATG5. CdSe QDs caused significant liver damage in mice, and this was decreased by SFN treatment. In conclusion, SFN attenuated the cytotoxicity of CdSe QDs in both human hepatocytes and in the mouse liver, and this protection was associated with the induction of Nrf2 pathway and autophagy. PMID:26402917

  15. Child protection and the conception of parental responsibility.

    PubMed

    Mass, Mili; van Nijnatten, Carolus

    2005-04-01

    The legal discourse on child protection that is characterized by the normalization-moralization paradigm focuses more on society's response to parental failure than on the predicament of the child. Findings from texts of legal discourse in Israel and in Holland portray an alliance between the respective legal systems and an epistemology of normality with regard to parenting that thereby turns normality into normalization. Both sets of texts are guided by an ontology of moral judgment that protects societal morale rather than the child. Morality is turned into moralization. To focus on the protection of the child, the article proposes a paradigm wherein the definition of morality is derived from concern for the other and relies on constructs that represent the evolving transaction between parent and child. PMID:15839759

  16. Aerosol Vaccination Induces Robust Protective Immunity to Homologous and Heterologous Influenza Infection in Mice

    PubMed Central

    Smith, Jennifer Humberd; Brooks, Paula; Johnson, Scott; Tompkins, S. Mark; Custer, Koren M.; Haas, Debra L.; Mair, Raydel; Papania, Mark; Tripp, Ralph A.

    2011-01-01

    Live-attenuated influenza vaccine (LAIV) delivered by large droplet intranasal spray is efficacious against infection. However, many of the large droplets are trapped in the external nares and do not reach the target nasal airway tissues. Smaller droplets might provide better distribution yielding similar protection with lower doses. We evaluated 20 and 30 micron aerosol delivery of influenza virus in mice. A 15 second aerosol exposure optimally protected against homologous and heterologous influenza infection and induced a robust immune response. These results demonstrate the feasibility of nasal vaccination using aerosolized particles, providing a strategy to improve vaccine efficacy and delivery. PMID:21300100

  17. Protection against Streptococcus pneumoniae lung infection after nasopharyngeal colonization requires both humoral and cellular immune responses

    PubMed Central

    Wilson, R; Cohen, J M; Jose, R J; de Vogel, C; Baxendale, H; Brown, J S

    2015-01-01

    Streptococcus pneumoniae is a common cause of pneumonia and infective exacerbations of chronic lung disease, yet there are few data on how adaptive immunity can specifically prevent S. pneumoniae lung infection. We have used a murine model of nasopharyngeal colonization by the serotype 19F S. pneumoniae strain EF3030 followed by lung infection to investigate whether colonization protects against subsequent lung infection and the mechanisms involved. EF3030 colonization induced systemic and local immunoglobulin G against a limited number of S. pneumoniae protein antigens rather than capsular polysaccharide. During lung infection, previously colonized mice had increased early cytokine responses and neutrophil recruitment and reduced bacterial colony-forming units in the lungs and bronchoalveolar lavage fluid compared with control mice. Colonization-induced protection was lost when experiments were repeated in B-cell- or neutrophil-deficient mice. Furthermore, the improved interleukin (IL)-17 response to infection in previously colonized mice was abolished by depletion of CD4+ cells, and prior colonization did not protect against lung infection in mice depleted of CD4+ cells or IL17. Together these data show that naturally acquired protective immunity to S. pneumoniae lung infection requires both humoral and cell-mediated immune responses, providing a template for the design of improved vaccines that can specifically prevent pneumonia or acute bronchitis. PMID:25354319

  18. Quercitrin protects skin from UVB-induced oxidative damage

    SciTech Connect

    Yin, Yuanqin; Li, Wenqi; Son, Young-Ok; Sun, Lijuan; Lu, Jian; Kim, Donghern; Wang, Xin; Yao, Hua; Wang, Lei; Pratheeshkumar, Poyil; Hitron, Andrew J.; Luo, Jia; Gao, Ning; Shi, Xianglin; Zhang, Zhuo

    2013-06-01

    Exposure of the skin to ultraviolet B (UVB) radiation causes oxidative damage to skin, resulting in sunburn, photoaging, and skin cancer. It is generally believed that the skin damage induced by UV irradiation is a consequence of generation of reactive oxygen species (ROS). Recently, there is an increased interest in the use of natural products as chemopreventive agents for non-melanoma skin cancer (NMSC) due to their antioxidants and anti-inflammatory properties. Quercitrin, glycosylated form of quercetin, is the most common flavonoid in nature with antioxidant properties. The present study investigated the possible beneficial effects of quercitrin to inhibit UVB irradiation-induced oxidative damage in vitro and in vivo. Our results showed that quercitrin decreased ROS generation induced by UVB irradiation in JB6 cells. Quercitrin restored catalase expression and GSH/GSSG ratio reduced by UVB exposure, two major antioxidant enzymes, leading to reductions of oxidative DNA damage and apoptosis and protection of the skin from inflammation caused by UVB exposure. The present study demonstrated that quercitrin functions as an antioxidant against UVB irradiation-induced oxidative damage to skin. - Highlights: • Oxidative stress plays a key role in UV-induced cell and tissue injuries. • Quercitrin decreases ROS generation and restores antioxidants irradiated by UVB. • Quercitrin reduces UVB-irradiated oxidative DNA damage, apoptosis, and inflammation. • Quercitrin functions as an antioxidant against UVB-induced skin injuries.

  19. Heat shock factor 1 induces crystallin-αB to protect against cisplatin nephrotoxicity.

    PubMed

    Lou, Qiang; Hu, Yanzhong; Ma, Yuanfang; Dong, Zheng

    2016-07-01

    Cisplatin, a wildly used chemotherapy drug, induces nephrotoxicity that is characterized by renal tubular cell apoptosis. In response to toxicity, tubular cells can activate cytoprotective mechanisms, such as the heat shock response. However, the role and regulation of the heat shock response in cisplatin-induced nephrotoxicity remain largely unclear. In the present study, we demonstrated the induction of heat shock factor (Hsf)1 and the small heat shock protein crystallin-αB (CryAB) during cisplatin nephrotoxicity in mice. Consistently, cisplatin induced Hsf1 and CryAB in a cultured renal proximal tubular cells (RPTCs). RPTCs underwent apoptosis during cisplatin treatment, which was increased when Hsf1 was knocked down. Transfection or restoration of Hsf1 into Hsf1 knockdown cells suppressed cisplatin-induced apoptosis, further supporting a cytoprotective role of Hsf1 and its associated heat shock response. Moreover, Hsf1 knockdown increased Bax translocation to mitochondria and cytochrome c release into the cytosol. In RPTCs, Hsf1 knockdown led to a specific downregulation of CryAB. Transfection of CryAB into Hsf1 knockdown cells diminished their sensitivity to cisplatin-induced apoptosis, suggesting that CryAB may be a key mediator of the cytoprotective effect of Hsf1. Taken together, these results demonstrate a heat shock response in cisplatin nephrotoxicity that is mediated by Hsf1 and CryAB to protect tubular cells against apoptosis. PMID:27194715

  20. Thermal response of integral multicomponent composite thermal protection systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stewart, D. A.; Leiser, D. B.; Smith, M.; Kolodziej, P.

    1985-01-01

    Integral-multicomponent thermal-protection materials are discussed in terms of their thermal response to an arc-jet airstream. In-depth temperature measurements are compared with predictions from a one-dimensional, finite-difference code using calculated thermal conductivity values derived from an engineering model. The effect of composition, as well as the optical properties of the bonding material between components, on thermal response is discussed. The performance of these integral-multicomponent composite materials is compared with baseline Space Shuttle insulation.

  1. Protective role of naringin against cisplatin induced oxidative stress, inflammatory response and apoptosis in rat striatum via suppressing ROS-mediated NF-κB and P53 signaling pathways.

    PubMed

    Chtourou, Yassine; Aouey, Bakhta; Kebieche, Mohammed; Fetoui, Hamadi

    2015-09-01

    Cisplatin (Cis) is an effective chemotherapeutic agent successfully used in the treatment of a wide range of malignancies while its usage is limited due to its dose-dependent toxicity. The present study was conducted to investigate the efficacy of naringin, an ubiquitous flavonoid, against Cis-induced striatum injury in Wistar aged rats. Briefly, the experimental procedures were divided in two sets of experiments. In the first, the animals were divided into 4 groups: control, Nar 25mg/kg, Nar 50mg/kg and Nar 100mg/kg. In the second, the animals were divided into 4 groups: Cis (5mg/kg/week for 5 consecutive weeks), Cis+Nar (25mg/kg), Cis+Nar (50mg/kg) and Cis+Nar (100mg/kg). The administration of Cis (5mg/kg/week for 5 consecutive weeks) resulted in a decline in the concentrations of reduced glutathione and ascorbic acid. The activity of membrane bound ATPases and glutathione peroxidase (GPx) were decreased while the activity of catalase (CAT) and superoxide dismutase (SOD) were increased. Further, in striatum tissue, Cis significantly enhance the mRNA gene expression of P53, nuclear factor κB pathway (NFκB) and tumor necrosis factor (TNF-α). Oxidative/nitrosative stress was evident in Cis group by increased malondialdehyde (MDA), protein carbonyls (PCO), reactive oxygen species (ROS) and nitrite concentration (NO). Naringin (25, 50 and 100mg/kg) administration was able to protect against deterioration in striatum tissue, abrogate the change in antioxidant enzyme activities and suppressed the increase in MDA, PCO, NO and TNF-α concentrations. Moreover, Nar inhibited P53, NFkB and TNF-α pathways mediated inflammation and apoptosis, and improved the histological changes induced by Cis. Thus, these findings demonstrated the neuroprotective nature of Nar by attenuating the pro-inflammatory and apoptotic mediators and improving antioxidant competence in striatum tissue. These results imply that Nar has perfect effect against Cis-induced striatum injury in aged rats

  2. A thrombospondin-dependent pathway for a protective ER stress response

    PubMed Central

    Lynch, Jeffrey M.; Maillet, Marjorie; Vanhoutte, Davy; Schloemer, Aryn; Sargent, Michelle A.; Blair, N. Scott; Lynch, Kaari A.; Okada, Tetsuya; Aronow, Bruce J.; Osinska, Hanna; Prywes, Ron; Lorenz, John N.; Mori, Kazutoshi; Lawler, Jack; Robbins, Jeffrey; Molkentin, Jeffery D.

    2012-01-01

    SUMMARY Thrombospondin (Thbs) proteins are induced in sites of tissue damage or active remodeling. The endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress response is also prominently induced with disease where it regulates protein production and resolution of misfolded proteins. Here we describe a novel function for Thbs’ as ER resident effectors of an adaptive ER stress response. Thbs4 cardiac-specific transgenic mice were protected from myocardial injury while Thbs4−/− mice were sensitized to cardiac maladaptation. Thbs induction produced a unique profile of adaptive ER stress response factors and expansion of the ER and downstream vesicles. The type-3 repeat domain in Thbs’ bind the ER luminal domain of activating transcription factor 6α (Atf6α) to promote its nuclear shuttling. Thbs4−/−mice failed to show activation of Atf6α and other ER stress response factors with injury, and Thbs4-mediated protection was lost when Atf6α was deleted. Hence, Thbs’ can function inside the cell during disease/remodeling to augment ER function and protect through a mechanism involving regulation of Atf6α. PMID:22682248

  3. Protective Efficacy Induced by Recombinant Clostridium difficile Toxin Fragments

    PubMed Central

    Leuzzi, Rosanna; Spencer, Janice; Buckley, Anthony; Brettoni, Cecilia; Martinelli, Manuele; Tulli, Lorenza; Marchi, Sara; Luzzi, Enrico; Irvine, June; Candlish, Denise; Veggi, Daniele; Pansegrau, Werner; Fiaschi, Luigi; Savino, Silvana; Swennen, Erwin; Cakici, Osman; Oviedo-Orta, Ernesto; Giraldi, Monica; Baudner, Barbara; D'Urzo, Nunzia; Maione, Domenico; Soriani, Marco; Rappuoli, Rino; Pizza, Mariagrazia

    2013-01-01

    Clostridium difficile is a spore-forming bacterium that can reside in animals and humans. C. difficile infection causes a variety of clinical symptoms, ranging from diarrhea to fulminant colitis. Disease is mediated by TcdA and TcdB, two large enterotoxins released by C. difficile during colonization of the gut. In this study, we evaluated the ability of recombinant toxin fragments to induce neutralizing antibodies in mice. The protective efficacies of the most promising candidates were then evaluated in a hamster model of disease. While limited protection was observed with some combinations, coadministration of a cell binding domain fragment of TcdA (TcdA-B1) and the glucosyltransferase moiety of TcdB (TcdB-GT) induced systemic IgGs which neutralized both toxins and protected vaccinated animals from death following challenge with two strains of C. difficile. Further characterization revealed that despite high concentrations of toxin in the gut lumens of vaccinated animals during the acute phase of the disease, pathological damage was minimized. Assessment of gut contents revealed the presence of TcdA and TcdB antibodies, suggesting that systemic vaccination with this pair of recombinant polypeptides can limit the disease caused by toxin production during C. difficile infection. PMID:23716610

  4. Pharmacological Protection From Radiation {+-} Cisplatin-Induced Oral Mucositis

    SciTech Connect

    Cotrim, Ana P.; Yoshikawa, Masanobu; Sunshine, Abraham N.; Zheng Changyu; Sowers, Anastasia L.; Thetford, Angela D.; Cook, John A.; Mitchell, James B.; Baum, Bruce J.

    2012-07-15

    Purpose: To evaluate if two pharmacological agents, Tempol and D-methionine (D-met), are able to prevent oral mucositis in mice after exposure to ionizing radiation {+-} cisplatin. Methods and Materials: Female C3H mice, {approx}8 weeks old, were irradiated with five fractionated doses {+-} cisplatin to induce oral mucositis (lingual ulcers). Just before irradiation and chemotherapy, mice were treated, either alone or in combination, with different doses of Tempol (by intraperitoneal [ip] injection or topically, as an oral gel) and D-met (by gavage). Thereafter, mice were sacrificed and tongues were harvested and stained with a solution of Toluidine Blue. Ulcer size and tongue epithelial thickness were measured. Results: Significant lingual ulcers resulted from 5 Multiplication-Sign 8 Gy radiation fractions, which were enhanced with cisplatin treatment. D-met provided stereospecific partial protection from lingual ulceration after radiation. Tempol, via both routes of administration, provided nearly complete protection from lingual ulceration. D-met plus a suboptimal ip dose of Tempol also provided complete protection. Conclusions: Two fairly simple pharmacological treatments were able to markedly reduce chemoradiation-induced oral mucositis in mice. This proof of concept study suggests that Tempol, alone or in combination with D-met, may be a useful and convenient way to prevent the severe oral mucositis that results from head-and-neck cancer therapy.

  5. 6-Gingerol induces autophagy to protect HUVECs survival from apoptosis.

    PubMed

    Wang, Shaopeng; Sun, Xiance; Jiang, Liping; Liu, Xiaofang; Chen, Min; Yao, Xiaofeng; Sun, Qinghua; Yang, Guang

    2016-08-25

    6-Gingerol, the major pharmacologically-active component of ginger, has the potential to prevent heart disease. However, the mechanisms are not well understood. In this study, the protective effect of 6-gingerol against hydrogen peroxide-induced apoptosis in human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs) was investigated. Apoptosis was detected by Hoechst 33342 and Flow cytometry analysis. To further elucidate the crosstalk between apoptosis and autophagy, we tested the expression of autophagy related proteins, LC3B, Bcl-2, Beclin1, AKT, p-AKT, mechanistic target of rapamycin (mTOR), and p-mTOR. Furthermore, mitochondrial membrane potential and the intracellular generation of reactive oxygen species (ROS) were also investigated. Our data revealed that 6-gingerol significantly reduced apoptosis by inducing autophagy. It has been demonstrated that 6-gingerol suppressed the phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase (PI3K)/AKT/mTOR signaling pathway, increased the expression of Beclin1 to promote autophagy, and increased Bcl-2 expression to inhibit apoptosis. In addition, the damage of mitochondrial was protected, and ROS level was decreased by 6-gingerol. These firmly indicate 6-gingerol has a strong protective ability against the apoptosis caused by oxidative stress in HUVECs, and the mechanism may relate to the induction of autophagy. Our data suggest 6-gingerol may be beneficial in the prevention of atherosclerosis. PMID:27451028

  6. Phosphorylation of tumor necrosis factor receptor 1 (p55) protects macrophages from silica-induced apoptosis.

    PubMed

    Gambelli, Federica; Di, Peter; Niu, Xiaomei; Friedman, Mitchell; Hammond, Timothy; Riches, David W H; Ortiz, Luis A

    2004-01-16

    Macrophages play a fundamental role in silicosis in part by removing silica particles and producing inflammatory mediators in response to silica. Tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNFalpha) is a prominent mediator in silicosis. Silica induction of apoptosis in macrophages might be mediated by TNFalpha. However, TNFalpha also activates signal transduction pathways (NF-kappaB and AP-1) that rescue cells from apoptosis. Therefore, we studied the TNFalpha-mediated mechanisms that confer macrophage protection against the pro-apoptotic effects of silica. We will show that exposure to silica induced TNFalpha production by RAW 264.7 cells, but not by IC-21. Silica-induced activation of NF-kappaB and AP-1 was only observed in RAW 264.7 macrophages. ERK activation in response to silica exposure was only observed in RAW 264.7 macrophages, whereas activation of p38 phosphorylation was predominantly observed in IC-21 macrophages. No changes in JNK activity were observed in either cell line in response to silica exposure. Silica induced apoptosis in both macrophage cell lines, but the induction of apoptosis was significantly larger in IC-21 cells. Protection against apoptosis in RAW 264.7 cells in response to silica was mediated by enhanced NF-kappaB activation and ERK-mediated phosphorylation of the p55 TNFalpha receptor. Inhibition of these two protective mechanisms by specific pharmacological inhibitors or transfection of dominant negative mutants that inhibit IkappaBalpha or ERK phosphorylation significantly increased silica-induced apoptosis in RAW 264.7 macrophages. These data suggest that NF-kappaB activation and ERK-mediated phosphorylation of the p55 TNF receptor are important cell survival mechanisms in the macrophage response to silica exposure. PMID:14570868

  7. Anti-inflammatory and protective properties of daphnetin in endotoxin-induced lung injury.

    PubMed

    Yu, Wen-wen; Lu, Zhe; Zhang, Hang; Kang, Yan-hua; Mao, Yun; Wang, Huan-huan; Ge, Wei-hong; Shi, Li-yun

    2014-12-24

    Uncontrolled inflammatory responses cause tissue injury and severe immunopathology. Pharmacological interference of intracellular pro-inflammatory signaling may confer a therapeutic benefit under these conditions. Daphnetin, a natural coumarin derivative, has been used to treat inflammatory diseases including bronchitis. However, the protective effect of daphnetin in inflammatory airway disorders has yet to be determined, and the molecular basis for its anti-inflammatory properties is unknown. This paper shows that daphnetin treatment conferred substantial protection from endotoxin-induced acute lung injury (ALI), in parallel with reductions in the production of inflammatory mediators, symptoms of airway response, and infiltration of inflammatory cells. Further studies indicate that activation of macrophage and human alveolar epithelial cells in response to lipopolysaccharide (LPS) was remarkably suppressed by daphnetin, which was related to the down-regulation of NF-κB-dependent signaling events. Importantly, this study demonstrates that TNF-α-induced protein 3 (TNFAIP3), also known as A20, was significantly induced by daphnetin, which appeared to be largely responsible for the down-regulation of NF-κB activity through modulation of nondegradative TRAF6 ubiquitination. Accordingly, the deletion of TNFAIP3 in primary macrophages reversed daphnetin-elicited inhibition of immune response, and the beneficial effect of daphnetin in the pathogenesis of ALI was, partially at least, abrogated by TNFAIP3 knockdown. These findings demonstrate the anti-inflammatory and protective functions of daphnetin in endotoxin-induced lung inflammation and injury and also reveal the key mechanism underlying its action in vitro as well as in vivo. PMID:25419854

  8. Protective Effect of Wheat Peptides against Indomethacin-Induced Oxidative Stress in IEC-6 Cells

    PubMed Central

    Yin, Hong; Pan, Xingchang; Song, Zhixiu; Wang, Shaokang; Yang, Ligang; Sun, Guiju

    2014-01-01

    Recent studies have demonstrated that wheat peptides protected rats against non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs-induced small intestinal epithelial cells damage, but the mechanism of action is unclear. In the present study, an indomethacin-induced oxidative stress model was used to investigate the effect of wheat peptides on the nuclear factor-κB(NF-κB)-inducible nitric oxide synthase-nitric oxide signal pathway in intestinal epithelial cells-6 cells. IEC-6 cells were treated with wheat peptides (0, 125, 500 and 2000 mg/L) for 24 h, followed by 90 mg/L indomethacin for 12 h. Wheat peptides significantly attenuated the indomethacin-induced decrease in superoxide dismutase and glutathione peroxidase activity. Wheat peptides at 2000 mg/L markedly decreased the expression of the NF-κB in response to indomethacin-induced oxidative stress. This study demonstrated that the addition of wheat peptides to a culture medium significantly inhibited the indomethacin-induced release of malondialdehyde and nitrogen monoxide, and increased antioxidant enzyme activity in IEC-6 cells, thereby providing a possible explanation for the protective effect proposed for wheat peptides in the prevention of indomethacin-induced oxidative stress in small intestinal epithelial cells. PMID:24481130

  9. Triplex-Induced DNA Damage Response

    PubMed Central

    Rogers, Faye A.; Tiwari, Meetu Kaushik

    2013-01-01

    Cellular DNA damage response is critical to preserving genomic integrity following exposure to genotoxic stress. A complex series of networks and signaling pathways become activated after DNA damage and trigger the appropriate cellular response, including cell cycle arrest, DNA repair, and apoptosis. The response elicited is dependent upon the type and extent of damage sustained, with the ultimate goal of preventing propagation of the damaged DNA. A major focus of our studies is to determine the cellular pathways involved in processing damage induced by altered helical structures, specifically triplexes. Our lab has demonstrated that the TFIIH factor XPD occupies a central role in triggering apoptosis in response to triplex-induced DNA strand breaks. We have shown that XPD co-localizes with γH2AX, and its presence is required for the phosphorylation of H2AX tyrosine142, which stimulates the signaling pathway to recruit pro-apoptotic factors to the damage site. Herein, we examine the cellular pathways activated in response to triplex formation and discuss our finding that suggests that XPD-dependent apoptosis plays a role in preserving genomic integrity in the presence of excessive structurally induced DNA damage. PMID:24348211

  10. Artesunate Protects Against Sepsis-Induced Lung Injury Via Heme Oxygenase-1 Modulation.

    PubMed

    Cao, Tian-Hui; Jin, Song-Gen; Fei, Dong-Sheng; Kang, Kai; Jiang, Lei; Lian, Zhi-Yuan; Pan, Shang-Ha; Zhao, Ming-Ran; Zhao, Ming-Yan

    2016-04-01

    Artesunate, a derivative of artemisinin, has anti-inflammatory properties and exerts protective roles in sepsis. Heme oxygense-1 (HO-1) inhibits the inflammatory response through reduction of proinflammatory cytokines and leukocyte influx into tissues. The present study investigated the effects of artesunate on HO-1 and septic lung injury. Cecal ligation and puncture (CLP) was employed to induce septic lung injury. Mice pretreated with artesunate (AS) (15 mg/kg) exhibited decreased sepsis-induced mortality and lung injury and alleviated lung pathological changes and neutrophil infiltration. In addition, AS lowered the levels of tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α) and interleukin-6 (IL-6) in the serum and bronchoalveolar lavage fluid (BALF) and inhibited cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2) and inducible nitric oxide synthase isoform (iNOS) expression and NF-κB activation in lung tissue. In addition, AS enhanced NF-E2-related factor-2 (Nrf2) activation and HO-1 expression and enzymatic activity in lung tissue. However, the protective effects of AS on sepsis-induced lung injury were eliminated by ZnPP IX, an HO-1 competitive inhibitor. Therefore, AS plays protective roles in septic lung injury related to the upregulation of HO-1. These findings suggest an effective and applicable treatment to sepsis-induced lung injury and provide new insights into the molecular mechanisms and actions of AS. PMID:26627481

  11. TLR 9 involvement in early protection induced by immunization with rPb27 against Paracoccidioidomycosis.

    PubMed

    Morais, Elis Araujo; Chame, Daniela Ferreira; Melo, Eliza Mathias; de Carvalho Oliveira, Junnia Alvarenga; de Paula, Ana Cláudia Chagas; Peixoto, Andiara Cardoso; da Silva Santos, Lílian; Gomes, Dawidson Assis; Russo, Remo Castro; de Goes, Alfredo Miranda

    2016-02-01

    Paracoccidioidomycosis is caused by fungi of the Paracoccidioides genus and constitutes the most prevalent deep mycosis in Latin America. Toll-like receptors promote immune response against infectious agents. Recently, it was reported that TLR9 is crucial for mice survival during the first 48 h of P. brasiliensis infection. In this study, we used CPG oligodeoxynucleotide motif as an adjuvant with and without rPb27 to immunize mice against Paracoccidioidomycosis. CPG adjuvant induced differential recruitment of lymphocytes in the inflammatory process and a lower recruitment of neutrophils. In addition, CPG induced the production of pro-inflammatory cytokines such as IL-1β, TNF-α, IL-6 and IL-12; increased phagocytic ability and microbicidal activity by macrophages; and induced differential production of lgG2a and lgG2b, subtypes of Ig. Knockout mice for TLR9 and IL-12 showed higher fungal loads and rates of mortality compared to control mice after 30 days of infection. The association between CPG and rPb27 induced a high level of protection against Paracoccidioidomycosis after the first 30 days of infection but not at 60 days. Our findings demonstrate that TLR 9 plays a role in the protection induced by immunization with rPb27 and confirms the importance of TLR9 in the initial protection against Paracoccidioidomycosis. PMID:26597327

  12. Nanoliposomes protect against human arteriole endothelial dysfunction induced by β-amyloid peptide.

    PubMed

    Truran, Seth; Weissig, Volkmar; Madine, Jillian; Davies, Hannah A; Guzman-Villanueva, Diana; Franco, Daniel A; Karamanova, Nina; Burciu, Camelia; Serrano, Geidy; Beach, Thomas G; Migrino, Raymond Q

    2016-02-01

    We tested whether nanoliposomes containing phosphatidylcholine, cholesterol and phosphatidic acid (NLPA) prevent β-amyloid 1-42 (Aβ42) fibrillation and Aβ42-induced human arteriole endothelial dysfunction. NLPA abolished Aβ42 fibril formation (thioflavin-T fluorescence/electron microscopy). In ex-vivo human adipose and leptomeningeal arterioles, Aβ42 impaired dilator response to acetylcholine that was reversed by NLPA; this protection was abolished by L-NG-nitroarginine methyl ester. Aβ42 reduced human umbilical vein endothelial cell NO production that was restored by NLPA. Nanoliposomes prevented Aβ42 amyloid formation, reversed Aβ42-induced human microvascular endothelial dysfunction and may be useful in Alzheimer's disease. PMID:26661197

  13. Physiological responses induced by pleasant stimuli.

    PubMed

    Watanuki, Shigeki; Kim, Yeon-Kyu

    2005-01-01

    The specific physiological responses induced by pleasant stimuli were investigated in this study. Various physiological responses of the brain (encephaloelectrogram; EEG), autonomic nervous system (ANS), immune system and endocrine system were monitored when pleasant stimuli such as odors, emotional pictures and rakugo, a typical Japanese comical story-telling, were presented to subjects. The results revealed that (i) EEG activities of the left frontal brain region were enhanced by a pleasant odor; (ii) emotional pictures related to primitive element such as nudes and erotic couples elevated vasomotor sympathetic nervous activity; and (iii) an increase in secretory immunoglobulin A (s-IgA) and a decrease in salivary cortisol (s-cortisol) were induced by rakugo-derived linguistic pleasant emotion. Pleasant emotion is complicated state. However, by considering the evolutionary history of human being, it is possible to assess and evaluate pleasant emotion from certain physiological responses by appropriately summating various physiological parameters. PMID:15684559

  14. Protective immune responses to biolistic DNA vaccination of Brugia malayi abundant larval transcript-2.

    PubMed

    Joseph, S K; Sambanthamoorthy, S; Dakshinamoorthy, G; Munirathinam, G; Ramaswamy, K

    2012-10-01

    Biolistic vaccination using gene gun is developed as a safer tool for delivery of DNA vaccines, a technique that combines high vaccine efficiency with lower antigen dosage and lower cost per vaccine dose. In this study, we compared the protective responses in mice after delivering the Brugia malayi abundant larval transcript-2 (BmALT-2) DNA vaccine using the conventional intradermal approach or with the needleless gene gun delivery approach. BmALT-2 is a leading vaccine candidate against B. malayi, a lymphatic filarial parasite of human. After optimizing the DNA dose and gene gun parameters for delivery into mouse skin, groups of mice were biolistically vaccinated with 5 μg of BmALT-2pVAX. Groups of mice vaccinated intradermally with 5 μg or 100 μg of BmALT-2pVAX was used for comparison of vaccine efficacy. Results demonstrated that gene gun vaccination with 5 μg of BmALT-2pVAX conferred significant protection against challenge infection that was comparable to the degree of protection conferred by intradermal vaccination with 100 μg of BmALT-2pVAX. This observation was further supported by an in vitro antibody dependent cellular cytotoxicity (ADCC) assay. Analysis of the immune response showed that the gene gun vaccination predominantly induced an IgG1 antibody response and significantly high Th2 cytokine response (IL-4) from spleen cells compared to intradermal BmALT-2 DNA delivery that induced predominantly an IgG2a and Th1 cytokine response (IFN-γ, IL-12 and TNF-α). These findings show that host protective responses could be achieved with 20 fold decrease in DNA dose using a gene gun and could prove to be an efficient delivery method in BmALT-2 DNA vaccination against lymphatic filariasis. PMID:22885273

  15. (+)-Catechin protects dermal fibroblasts against oxidative stress-induced apoptosis

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Oxidative stress has been suggested as a mechanism underlying skin aging, as it triggers apoptosis in various cell types, including fibroblasts, which play important roles in the preservation of healthy, youthful skin. Catechins, which are antioxidants contained in green tea, exert various actions such as anti-inflammatory, anti-bacterial, and anti-cancer actions. In this study, we investigated the effect of (+)-catechin on apoptosis induced by oxidative stress in fibroblasts. Methods Fibroblasts (NIH3T3) under oxidative stress induced by hydrogen peroxide (0.1 mM) were treated with either vehicle or (+)-catechin (0–100 μM). The effect of (+)-catechin on cell viability, apoptosis, phosphorylation of c-Jun terminal kinases (JNK) and p38, and activation of caspase-3 in fibroblasts under oxidative stress were evaluated. Results Hydrogen peroxide induced apoptotic cell death in fibroblasts, accompanied by induction of phosphorylation of JNK and p38 and activation of caspase-3. Pretreatment of the fibroblasts with (+)-catechin inhibited hydrogen peroxide-induced apoptosis and reduced phosphorylation of JNK and p38 and activation of caspase-3. Conclusion (+)-Catechin protects against oxidative stress-induced cell death in fibroblasts, possibly by inhibiting phosphorylation of p38 and JNK. These results suggest that (+)-catechin has potential as a therapeutic agent for the prevention of skin aging. PMID:24712558

  16. EP300 Protects from Light-Induced Retinopathy in Zebrafish

    PubMed Central

    Kawase, Reiko; Nishimura, Yuhei; Ashikawa, Yoshifumi; Sasagawa, Shota; Murakami, Soichiro; Yuge, Mizuki; Okabe, Shiko; Kawaguchi, Koki; Yamamoto, Hiroshi; Moriyuki, Kazumi; Yamane, Shinsaku; Tsuruma, Kazuhiro; Shimazawa, Masamitsu; Hara, Hideaki; Tanaka, Toshio

    2016-01-01

    Exposure of rhodopsin to bright white light can induce photoreceptor cell damage and degeneration. However, a comprehensive understanding of the mechanisms underlying light-induced retinopathy remains elusive. In this study, we performed comparative transcriptome analysis of three rodent models of light-induced retinopathy, and we identified 37 genes that are dysregulated in all three models. Gene ontology analysis revealed that this gene set is significantly associated with a cytokine signaling axis composed of signal transducer and activator of transcription 1 and 3 (STAT1/3), interleukin 6 signal transducer (IL6ST), and oncostatin M receptor (OSMR). Furthermore, the analysis suggested that the histone acetyltransferase EP300 may be a key upstream regulator of the STAT1/3–IL6ST/OSMR axis. To examine the role of EP300 directly, we developed a larval zebrafish model of light-induced retinopathy. Using this model, we demonstrated that pharmacological inhibition of EP300 significantly increased retinal cell apoptosis, decreased photoreceptor cell outer segments, and increased proliferation of putative Müller cells upon exposure to intense light. These results suggest that EP300 may protect photoreceptor cells from light-induced damage and that activation of EP300 may be a novel therapeutic approach for the treatment of retinal degenerative diseases. PMID:27242532

  17. Erythropoietin protects cardiac myocytes against anthracycline-induced apoptosis

    SciTech Connect

    Fu Ping; Arcasoy, Murat O. . E-mail: arcas001@mc.duke.edu

    2007-03-09

    The cardiotoxic adverse effects of anthracycline antibiotics limit their therapeutic utility as essential components of chemotherapy regimens for hematologic and solid malignancies. Here we show that the hematopoietic cytokine erythropoietin attenuates doxorubicin-induced apoptosis of primary neonatal rat ventricular cardiomyocytes in a dose-dependent manner. Erythropoietin treatment induced rapid, time-dependent phosphorylation of MAP kinases (MAPK) Erk1/2 and the phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase substrate Akt. Treatment of cardiomyocytes with inhibitors of phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase (LY294002) or Akt (Akti-1/2) abolished the protective effect of erythropoietin, whereas treatment with MAPK kinase (MEK1) inhibitor U0126 did not. Erythropoietin also induced the phosphorylation of GSK-3{beta}, a downstream target of PI3K-Akt. Because phosphorylation is known to inactivate GSK-3{beta}, we investigated whether GSK-3{beta} inhibition is cardioprotective. We found that GSK-3{beta} inhibitors SB216763 or lithium chloride blocked doxorubicin-induced cardiomyocyte apoptosis in a manner similar to erythropoietin, suggesting that GSK-3{beta} inhibition is involved in erythropoietin-mediated cardioprotection. Erythropoietin may serve as a novel cardioprotective agent against anthracycline-induced cardiotoxicity.

  18. Active Suppression Induced by Repetitive Self-Epitopes Protects against EAE Development

    PubMed Central

    Puentes, Fabiola; Dickhaut, Katharina; Hofstätter, Maria; Falk, Kirsten; Rötzschke, Olaf

    2013-01-01

    Background Autoimmune diseases result from a breakdown in self-tolerance to autoantigens. Self-tolerance is induced and sustained by central and peripheral mechanisms intended to deviate harmful immune responses and to maintain homeostasis, where regulatory T cells play a crucial role. The use of self-antigens in the study and treatment of a range of autoimmune diseases has been widely described; however, the mechanisms underlying the induced protection by these means are unclear. This study shows that protection of experimental autoimmune disease induced by T cell self-epitopes in a multimerized form (oligomers) is mediated by the induction of active suppression. Principal Findings The experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EAE) animal model for multiple sclerosis was used to study the mechanisms of protection induced by the treatment of oligomerized T cell epitope of myelin proteolipid protein (PLP139–151). Disease protection attained by the administration of oligomers was shown to be antigen specific and effective in both prevention and treatment of ongoing EAE. Oligomer mediated tolerance was actively transferred by cells from treated mice into adoptive hosts. The induction of active suppression was correlated with the recruitment of cells in the periphery associated with increased production of IL-10 and reduction of the pro-inflammatory cytokine TNF-α. The role of suppressive cytokines was demonstrated by the reversion of oligomer-induced protection after in vivo blocking of either IL-10 or TGF-β cytokines. Conclusions This study strongly supports an immunosuppressive role of repeat auto-antigens to control the development of EAE with potential applications in vaccination and antigen specific treatment of autoimmune diseases. PMID:23738007

  19. Immune Responses and Protection of Aotus Monkeys Immunized with Irradiated Plasmodium vivax Sporozoites

    PubMed Central

    Jordán-Villegas, Alejandro; Perdomo, Anilza Bonelo; Epstein, Judith E.; López, Jesús; Castellanos, Alejandro; Manzano, María R.; Hernández, Miguel A.; Soto, Liliana; Méndez, Fabián; Richie, Thomas L.; Hoffman, Stephen L.; Arévalo-Herrera, Myriam; Herrera, Sócrates

    2011-01-01

    A non-human primate model for the induction of protective immunity against the pre-erythrocytic stages of Plasmodium vivax malaria using radiation-attenuated P. vivax sporozoites may help to characterize protective immune mechanisms and identify novel malaria vaccine candidates. Immune responses and protective efficacy induced by vaccination with irradiated P. vivax sporozoites were evaluated in malaria-naive Aotus monkeys. Three groups of six monkeys received two, five, or ten intravenous inoculations, respectively, of 100,000 irradiated P. vivax sporozoites; control groups received either 10 doses of uninfected salivary gland extract or no inoculations. Immunization resulted in the production low levels of antibodies that specifically recognized P. vivax sporozoites and the circumsporozoite protein. Additionally, immunization induced low levels of antigen-specific IFN-γ responses. Intravenous challenge with viable sporozoites resulted in partial protection in a dose-dependent manner. These findings suggest that the Aotus monkey model may be able to play a role in preclinical development of P. vivax pre-erythrocytic stage vaccines. PMID:21292877

  20. IRX-2, a novel immunotherapeutic, protects human T cells from tumor-induced cell death

    PubMed Central

    Czystowska, M; Han, J; Szczepanski, MJ; Szajnik, M; Quadrini, K; Brandwein, H; Hadden, JW; Signorelli, K; Whiteside, TL

    2013-01-01

    IRX-2 is a cytokine-based biologic agent that has the potential to enhance antitumor immune responses. We investigated whether IRX-2 can protect T cells from tumor-induced apoptosis. Tumor-derived microvesicles (MV) expressing FasL were purified from supernatants of tumor cells and incubated with activated CD8+ T cells. MV induced significant CD8+ T-cell apoptosis, as evidenced by Annexin binding (64.4±6.4%), caspase activation (58.1±7.6%), a loss of mitochondrial membrane potential (82.9±3.9%) and DNA fragmentation. T-cell pretreatment with IRX-2 prevented apoptosis. IRX-2-mediated cytoprotection was dose and time dependent and was comparable to effects of IL-2, IL-7 or IL-15. IRX-2 prevented MV-induced downregulation of JAK3 and TCRζ chain and induced STAT5 activation in T cells. IRX-2 prevented MV-induced Bax and Bim upregulation (P<0.005–0.05), prevented cytochrome c release and Bid cleavage, and concurrently restored the expression of Bcl-2, Bcl-xL, FLIP and Mcl-1 (P<0.005–0.01) in T cells. In addition, IRX-2 reversed MV-induced inhibition of the PI3K/Akt pathway. An Akt inhibitor (Akti-1/2) abrogated protective effects of IRX-2, suggesting that Akt is a downstream target of IRX-2 signaling. Thus, ex vivo pretreatment of CD8+ T cells with IRX-2 provided potent protection from tumor-induced apoptosis. IRX-2 application to future cancer biotherapies could improve their effectiveness by bolstering T-cell resistance to tumor-induced immunosuppression. PMID:19180118

  1. CEACAM1 induces B-cell survival and is essential for protective antiviral antibody production

    PubMed Central

    Khairnar, Vishal; Duhan, Vikas; Maney, Sathish Kumar; Honke, Nadine; Shaabani, Namir; Pandyra, Aleksandra A.; Seifert, Marc; Pozdeev, Vitaly; Xu, Haifeng C.; Sharma, Piyush; Baldin, Fabian; Marquardsen, Florian; Merches, Katja; Lang, Elisabeth; Kirschning, Carsten; Westendorf, Astrid M.; Häussinger, Dieter; Lang, Florian; Dittmer, Ulf; Küppers, Ralf; Recher, Mike; Hardt, Cornelia; Scheffrahn, Inka; Beauchemin, Nicole; Göthert, Joachim R.; Singer, Bernhard B.; Lang, Philipp A.; Lang, Karl S.

    2015-01-01

    B cells are essential for antiviral immune defence because they produce neutralizing antibodies, present antigen and maintain the lymphoid architecture. Here we show that intrinsic signalling of CEACAM1 is essential for generating efficient B-cell responses. Although CEACAM1 exerts limited influence on the proliferation of B cells, expression of CEACAM1 induces survival of proliferating B cells via the BTK/Syk/NF-κB-axis. The absence of this signalling cascade in naive Ceacam1−/− mice limits the survival of B cells. During systemic infection with cytopathic vesicular stomatitis virus, Ceacam1−/− mice can barely induce neutralizing antibody responses and die early after infection. We find, therefore, that CEACAM1 is a crucial regulator of B-cell survival, influencing B-cell numbers and protective antiviral antibody responses. PMID:25692415

  2. CEACAM1 induces B-cell survival and is essential for protective antiviral antibody production.

    PubMed

    Khairnar, Vishal; Duhan, Vikas; Maney, Sathish Kumar; Honke, Nadine; Shaabani, Namir; Pandyra, Aleksandra A; Seifert, Marc; Pozdeev, Vitaly; Xu, Haifeng C; Sharma, Piyush; Baldin, Fabian; Marquardsen, Florian; Merches, Katja; Lang, Elisabeth; Kirschning, Carsten; Westendorf, Astrid M; Häussinger, Dieter; Lang, Florian; Dittmer, Ulf; Küppers, Ralf; Recher, Mike; Hardt, Cornelia; Scheffrahn, Inka; Beauchemin, Nicole; Göthert, Joachim R; Singer, Bernhard B; Lang, Philipp A; Lang, Karl S

    2015-01-01

    B cells are essential for antiviral immune defence because they produce neutralizing antibodies, present antigen and maintain the lymphoid architecture. Here we show that intrinsic signalling of CEACAM1 is essential for generating efficient B-cell responses. Although CEACAM1 exerts limited influence on the proliferation of B cells, expression of CEACAM1 induces survival of proliferating B cells via the BTK/Syk/NF-κB-axis. The absence of this signalling cascade in naive Ceacam1(-/-) mice limits the survival of B cells. During systemic infection with cytopathic vesicular stomatitis virus, Ceacam1(-/-) mice can barely induce neutralizing antibody responses and die early after infection. We find, therefore, that CEACAM1 is a crucial regulator of B-cell survival, influencing B-cell numbers and protective antiviral antibody responses. PMID:25692415

  3. Nrf2 protects against As(III)-induced damage in mouse liver and bladder

    PubMed Central

    Jiang, Tao; Huang, Zheping; Chan, Jefferson Y.; Zhang, Donna D.

    2009-01-01

    Arsenic compounds are classified as toxicants and human carcinogens. Environmental exposure to arsenic imposes a big health issue worldwide. Arsenic elicits its toxic efforts through many mechanisms, including generation of reactive oxygen species (ROS). Nrf2 is the primary transcription factor that controls expression of a main cellular antioxidant response, which is required for neutralizing ROS and thus defending cells from exogenous insults. Previously, we demonstrated a protective role of Nrf2 against arsenic-induced toxicity using a cell culture model. In this report, we present evidence that Nrf2 protects against liver and bladder injury in response to six-weeks of arsenic exposure in a mouse model. Nrf2−/− mice displayed more severe pathological changes in the liver and bladder, compared to Nrf2+/+ mice. Furthermore, Nrf2−/− mice were more sensitive to arsenic-induced DNA hypomethylation, oxidative DNA damage, and apoptotic cell death. These results indicate a protective role of Nrf2 against arsenic toxicity in vivo. Hence, this work demonstrates the feasibility of using dietary compounds that target activation of the Nrf2 signaling pathway to alleviate arsenic-induced damage. PMID:19538980

  4. [Protection for noise-induced hearing loss using active hearing protection systems].

    PubMed

    Matschke, R G; Lehnert, H; Veit, I; Andresen, U

    1991-11-01

    Though noise induced hearing loss is no longer the most frequent occupational disease in the Federal Republic of Germany, the environmental pollution by the product "noise" in our technical and industrialized world has not been reduced. On the contrary, the situation is worsened by the rising influence of leisure noise. To avoid occupational hearing loss, the "Noise Injury Prevention Code" issued by the insurers would demand wearing personal ear protection, e.g. ear plugs, if ambient noise levels are above 85 dB(A). But there are working places in which such equipment would have precisely the adverse effect, because one of the reasons for possible damage to hearing is radio communication. In military aircraft cockpits for example noise exposure measurements showed ambient noise levels above 90 dB(A) during regular flight service nearly all the time. To be able to understand radio traffic in spite of the noisy environment, the headphone volume must be raised above the noise of the engines. The use of ear plugs can only be of limited value. Whereas pilots with normal hearing show only little impairment of speech intelligibility, those with noise-induced hearing losses show substantial impairment that varies in proportion to their hearing loss. Communication abilities may be drastically reduced which may compromise the reliability of radio traffic. To avoid compromising air security one has to demand a noise protection system which allows to reduce ambient noise levels without disturbing speech intelligibility in the inevitable radio communication. Nowadays active noise cancelling (ANC) systems by electronic compensation in different ways provide effective protection against noise induced hearing loss.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:1755896

  5. HIV-specific Th2 and Th17 responses predict HIV vaccine protection efficacy

    PubMed Central

    Sauce, Delphine; Gorochov, Guy; Larsen, Martin

    2016-01-01

    Understanding the factors that delineate the efficacy of T-cell responses towards pathogens is crucial for our ability to develop potent therapies and vaccines against infectious diseases, such as HIV. Here we show that a recently developed analytical tool, the polyfunctionality index (PI), not only enables prediction of protection after vaccination against HIV, but also allows identification of the immunological pathways involved. Our data suggest that induction of a synergistic network of CD4+ T-cell subsets is implicated in HIV-protection. Accordingly, we provide evidence that vaccine-induced protection is associated with CD40L expressing Th2 cells and IL-2 secreting Th17 cells. In conclusion, we describe a novel approach that is widely applicable and readily interpretable in a biological and clinical context. This approach could greatly impact our fundamental understanding of T-cell immunity as well as the search for effective vaccines. PMID:27324186

  6. Quercitrin Protects Skin from UVB-induced Oxidative Damage

    PubMed Central

    Yin, Yuanqin; Li, Wenqi; Son, Yong-Ok; Sun, Lijuan; Lu, Jian; Kim, Donghern; Wang, Xin; Yao, Hua; Wang, Lei; Pratheeshkumar, Poyil; Hitron, Andrew J; Luo, Jia; Gao, Ning; Shi, Xianglin; Zhang, Zhuo

    2013-01-01

    Exposure of the skin to ultraviolet B (UVB) radiation causes oxidative damage to skin, resulting in sunburn, photoaging, and skin cancer. It is generally believed that the skin damage induced by UV irradiation is a consequence of generation of reactive oxygen species (ROS). Recently, there is an increased interest in the use of natural products as chemopreventive agents for non-melanoma skin cancer (NMSC) due to their antioxidants and anti-inflammatory properties. Quercitrin, glycosylated form of quercetin, is the most common flavonoid in nature with antioxidant properties. The present study investigated the possible beneficial effects of quercitrin to inhibit UVB irradiation-induced oxidative damage in vitro and in vivo. Our results showed that quercitrin decreased ROS generation induced by UVB irradiation in JB6 cells. Quercitrin restored catalase expression and GSH/GSSG ratio reduced by UVB exposure, two major antioxidant enzymes, leading to reductions of oxidative DNA damage and apoptosis and protection of the skin from inflammation caused by UVB exposure. The present study demonstrated that quercitrin functions as an antioxidant against UVB irradiation-induced oxidative damage to skin. PMID:23545178

  7. Lupeol Protects Against Cerulein-Induced Acute Pancreatitis in Mice.

    PubMed

    Kim, Min-Jun; Bae, Gi-Sang; Choi, Sun Bok; Jo, Il-Joo; Kim, Dong-Goo; Shin, Joon-Yeon; Lee, Sung-Kon; Kim, Myoung-Jin; Song, Ho-Joon; Park, Sung-Joo

    2015-10-01

    Lupeol is a triterpenoid commonly found in fruits and vegetables and is known to exhibit a wide range of biological activities, including antiinflammatory and anti-cancer effects. However, the effects of lupeol on acute pancreatitis specifically have not been well characterized. Here, we investigated the effects of lupeol on cerulein-induced acute pancreatitis in mice. Acute pancreatitis was induced via an intraperitoneal injection of cerulein (50 µg/kg). In the lupeol treatment group, lupeol was administered intraperitoneally (10, 25, or 50 mg/kg) 1 h before the first cerulein injection. Blood samples were taken to determine serum cytokine and amylase levels. The pancreas was rapidly removed for morphological examination and used in the myeloperoxidase assay, trypsin activity assay, and real-time reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction. In addition, we isolated pancreatic acinar cells using a collagenase method to examine the acinar cell viability. Lupeol administration significantly attenuated the severity of pancreatitis, as was shown by reduced pancreatic edema, and neutrophil infiltration. In addition, lupeol inhibited elevation of digestive enzymes and cytokine levels, such as tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-α, interleukin (IL)-1, and interleukin (IL)-6. Furthermore, lupeol inhibited the cerulein-induced acinar cell death. In conclusion, these results suggest that lupeol exhibits protective effects on cerulein-induced acute pancreatitis. PMID:26179197

  8. Nitroxides protect against peroxynitrite-induced nitration and oxidation.

    PubMed

    Sadowska-Bartosz, Izabela; Gajewska, Agnieszka; Skolimowski, Janusz; Szewczyk, Rafał; Bartosz, Grzegorz

    2015-12-01

    Nitroxides are promising compounds for prevention of undesired protein modifications. The aim of this study was to compare the efficiency of 11 nitroxides, derivatives of 2,2,6,6-tetramethylpiperidine-1-oxide (TEMPO) and 2,2,5,5-tetramethylpirrolidine-1-oxyl (PROXYL) in prevention of nitration and oxidation of model compounds and human serum albumin (HSA). Most nitroxides were very efficient in preventing loss of fluorescein fluorescence induced by peroxynitrite (PN) (IC50 in the nanomolar range) and preventing HSA nitration. The loss of fluorescein fluorescence was demonstrated to be due to nitration. Nitroxides were more effective in prevention nitration than oxidation reactions. They showed a concentration window for preventing dihydrorhodamine (DHR) 123 oxidation but exerted a prooxidant effect at both high and low concentrations. No prooxidant effect of nitroxides was seen in prevention of DHR123 oxidation induced by SIN-1. In all essays hydrophobic nitroxides (especially 4-nonylamido-TEMPO and 3-carbamolyl-dehydroPROXYL) showed the lowest efficiency. An exception was the prevention of thiol group oxidation by PN and SIN-1 where hydrophobic nitroxides were the most effective, apparently due to binding to the protein. Nitroxides showed low toxicity to MCF-7 cells. Most nitroxides, except for the most hydrophobic ones, protected cells from the cytotoxic action of SIN-1 and SIN-1-induced protein nitration. These results point to potential usefulness of nitroxides for prevention of PN-induced oxidation and, especially, nitration. PMID:26546694

  9. UV protection of euglenoids: computation of the electromagnetic response

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dolinko, Andrés.; Valencia, Claudio; Skigin, Diana C.; Inchaussandague, Marina E.; Tolivia, Analía.; Conforti, Visitación

    2015-06-01

    Euglenoids are a group of predominantly free-living unicellular microorganisms that mostly live in freshwater bodies but can also be found in marine and brackish waters. These organisms have a characteristic that distinguishes them form the other protists: they are covered by a surface pellicle formed by S-shaped overlapping bands which resemble a diffraction grating. These microorganisms have developed numerous protection mechanisms intended to avoid or reduce the damage produced by UV radiation, such as the production of pigments and the repair mechanisms in hours of darkness and during daylight. In a recent paper we have investigated the role played by the pellicle of Euglenoids in the protection of the cell against UV radiation, by means of an electromagnetic approach based on the approximation of the pellicle profile by a one-dimensional diffraction grating. This simplified model allowed us to confirm that under certain incidence conditions, the corrugation of the pellicle helps increase the UV reflection, and consequently, diminish the UV radiation that enters the cell. In order to analyze the electromagnetic response of the whole cell, we extend two different approaches to calculate the reflected response: a simulation method especially developed to deal with complex biological structures that permits the introduction of the scattering object via an electron microscopy image, and the integral method, which has been widely used to compute the electromagnetic response of finite structures. Numerical results of near and far fields are shown.

  10. Barrier protective effects of piperlonguminine in LPS-induced inflammation in vitro and in vivo.

    PubMed

    Lee, Wonhwa; Yoo, Hayoung; Kim, Jeong Ah; Lee, Sangkyu; Jee, Jun-Goo; Lee, Min Young; Lee, You-Mie; Bae, Jong-Sup

    2013-08-01

    Piperlonguminine (PL), an important component of Piper longum fruits, is well known to possess potent anti-hyperlipidemic, anti-platelet and anti-melanogenesis activities. In this study, we first investigated the possible barrier protective effects of piperlonguminine against proinflammatory responses induced by lipopolysaccharide (LPS) and the associated signaling pathways in vitro and in vivo. The barrier protective activities of PL were determined by measuring permeability, monocytes adhesion and migration, and activation of proinflammatory proteins in LPS-activated human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs) and in mice. We found that PL inhibited LPS-induced barrier disruption, expression of cell adhesion molecules (CAMs) and adhesion/transendothelial migration of monocytes to human endothelial cells. PL also suppressed LPS-induced hyperpermeability and leukocytes migration in vivo. Further studies revealed that PL suppressed the production of tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α) or Interleukin (IL)-6 and activation of nuclear factor-κB (NF-κB) or extracellular regulated kinases (ERK) 1/2 by LPS. Moreover, treatment with PL resulted in reduced LPS-induced septic mortality. Collectively, these results suggest that PL protects vascular barrier integrity by inhibiting hyperpermeability, expression of CAMs, adhesion and migration of leukocytes, thereby endorsing its usefulness as a therapy for vascular inflammatory diseases. PMID:23619565

  11. Protective effect of crocin on liver toxicity induced by morphine

    PubMed Central

    Salahshoor, Mohammad Reza; khashiadeh, Mojtaba; Roshankhah, Shiva; Kakabaraei, Seyran; Jalili, Cyrus

    2016-01-01

    Crocin, a bioactive molecule of saffron can be purely isolated from the saffron extract. It has different pharmacological effects such as antioxidant and anticancer activities. Morphine is an opioid analgesic drug. It is mainly metabolized in liver and causes devastating effects. It can increase the generation of free radicals. This study was designed to evaluate the protective role of crocin against morphine-induced toxicity in the mouse liver. In this study, various doses of crocin (12.5, 25 and 50 mg/kg) and crocin plus morphine were administered interaperitoneally once daily to 48 male mice for 20 consecutive days. These mice were randomly assigned to 8 groups of 6 each. The liver weight and histology, aspartate amino transferase, alanine aminotransferase, alkaline phosphatase (ALP) and serum nitric oxide levels were studied. The results indicated that morphine administration significantly decreased liver weight and increased the mean diameter of hepatocyte, central hepatic vein diameters, liver enzyme levels, and blood serum nitric oxide level compared to saline group (P<0.05). However, crocin administration significantly boosted liver weight and decreased the mean diameter of hepatocyte, central hepatic vein, liver enzymes and nitric oxide levels in all groups compared to the group received morphine alone (P<0.05). It seems that crocin administration could protect the liver damage induced by morphine. The antioxidant effect of crocin may be a major reason for its positive impact on liver parameters. PMID:27168751

  12. Protective effect of crocin on liver toxicity induced by morphine.

    PubMed

    Salahshoor, Mohammad Reza; Khashiadeh, Mojtaba; Roshankhah, Shiva; Kakabaraei, Seyran; Jalili, Cyrus

    2016-01-01

    Crocin, a bioactive molecule of saffron can be purely isolated from the saffron extract. It has different pharmacological effects such as antioxidant and anticancer activities. Morphine is an opioid analgesic drug. It is mainly metabolized in liver and causes devastating effects. It can increase the generation of free radicals. This study was designed to evaluate the protective role of crocin against morphine-induced toxicity in the mouse liver. In this study, various doses of crocin (12.5, 25 and 50 mg/kg) and crocin plus morphine were administered interaperitoneally once daily to 48 male mice for 20 consecutive days. These mice were randomly assigned to 8 groups of 6 each. The liver weight and histology, aspartate amino transferase, alanine aminotransferase, alkaline phosphatase (ALP) and serum nitric oxide levels were studied. The results indicated that morphine administration significantly decreased liver weight and increased the mean diameter of hepatocyte, central hepatic vein diameters, liver enzyme levels, and blood serum nitric oxide level compared to saline group (P<0.05). However, crocin administration significantly boosted liver weight and decreased the mean diameter of hepatocyte, central hepatic vein, liver enzymes and nitric oxide levels in all groups compared to the group received morphine alone (P<0.05). It seems that crocin administration could protect the liver damage induced by morphine. The antioxidant effect of crocin may be a major reason for its positive impact on liver parameters. PMID:27168751

  13. The protective effect of ketotifen in exercise-induced bronchospasm.

    PubMed

    Moreno, M V; Fernández, M; de la Cuesta, C G; Oehling, A

    1988-01-01

    The present study evaluates the protective action of ketotifen on exercise-induced bronchospasm in patients diagnosed with bronchial asthma of different aetiologies. The patients were classified in 2 groups. The first group with seasonal asthma was made up of patients with pollen hypersensitivity, while the second group with perennial asthma was made up of patients with bacterial aetiology or sensitivity to the Dermatophagoides mite. Spirometry and airway resistance measurements (in basal conditions, 5 to 10 minutes after a resistance test which consisted of 6 minutes' free running on a treadmill) was performed on each patient. Those patients in which significant spirometry or Raw alterations were detected received a 15-day treatment of ketotifen (a dose of 1 mg every 12 hours); after this time, the tests mentioned before were repeated. We found that in the seasonal asthma group, ketotifen was effective in protecting against exercise. However, we did not observe the same effect in the perennial asthma group. In the light of these results, we propose the possible existence of different mechanisms in triggering off exercise-induced bronchospasm, according to their aetiologies. PMID:3394595

  14. Protective effects of dioscin against alcohol-induced liver injury.

    PubMed

    Xu, Tingting; Zheng, Lingli; Xu, Lina; Yin, Lianhong; Qi, Yan; Xu, Youwei; Han, Xu; Peng, Jinyong

    2014-03-01

    Our previous studies have shown that dioscin has protective effect against liver injury. However, the action of the compound against ethanol-induced liver injury is still unknown. In the present paper, ethanol-induced acute and chronic liver damage rat models were used, and the results showed that dioscin significantly alleviated liver steatosis, reduced the levels of alanine aminotransferase, aspartate aminotransferase, total triglyceride (TG), total cholesterol and malondialdehyde, and increased the levels of high-density lipoprotein, superoxide dismutase, glutathione and glutathione peroxidase. Transmission electron microscopy and terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase-mediated dUTP nick-end labeling assays showed that dioscin prevented mitochondrial ultrastructural alterations and apoptosis caused by ethanol. In addition, dioscin significantly inhibited ethanol-induced cytochrome P450 2E1 activation, down-regulated the levels of mitogen-activated protein kinases phosphorylation, inhibited the expressions of nuclear factor kappa B, glucose regulated protein 78, activating transcription factor 6 and alpha subunit of translation initiation factor 2 to attenuate oxidative damage, decreased the expressions of tumor necrosis factor alpha and interleukin-6, and down-regulated the expressions of apoptosis-related proteins including p53, caspase-3, caspase-9, poly (ADP-ribose)-polymerase and cytokeratin-18. Further investigation indicated that dioscin markedly increased the expressions of peroxisome proliferators-activated receptor α and its target genes including medium-chain acyl-CoA dehydrogenase, carnitine palmitoyl-CoA transferase I and acyl-CoA oxidase to advance fatty acid β-oxidation, up-regulated the expressions of acyl-CoA synthetase long-chain family member 1, acyl-CoA synthetase long-chain family member 5, alpha-aminoadipic semialdehyde dehydrogenase and acyl-CoA dehydrogenase to promote fatty acid metabolism, and down-regulated the expressions of glycerol

  15. Strong protection induced by an experimental DIVA subunit vaccine against bluetongue virus serotype 8 in cattle.

    PubMed

    Anderson, Jenna; Hägglund, Sara; Bréard, Emmanuel; Riou, Mickaël; Zohari, Siamak; Comtet, Loic; Olofson, Ann-Sophie; Gélineau, Robert; Martin, Guillaume; Elvander, Marianne; Blomqvist, Gunilla; Zientara, Stéphan; Valarcher, Jean Francois

    2014-11-20

    Bluetongue virus (BTV) infections in ruminants pose a permanent agricultural threat since new serotypes are constantly emerging in new locations. Clinical disease is mainly observed in sheep, but cattle were unusually affected during an outbreak of BTV seroype 8 (BTV-8) in Europe. We previously developed an experimental vaccine based on recombinant viral protein 2 (VP2) of BTV-8 and non-structural proteins 1 (NS1) and NS2 of BTV-2, mixed with an immunostimulating complex (ISCOM)-matrix adjuvant. We demonstrated that bovine immune responses induced by this vaccine were as good or superior to those induced by a classic commercial inactivated vaccine. In this study, we evaluated the protective efficacy of the experimental vaccine in cattle and, based on the detection of VP7 antibodies, assessed its DIVA compliancy following virus challenge. Two groups of BTV-seronegative calves were subcutaneously immunized twice at a 3-week interval with the subunit vaccine (n=6) or with adjuvant alone (n=6). Following BTV-8 challenge 3 weeks after second immunization, controls developed viremia and fever associated with other mild clinical signs of bluetongue disease, whereas vaccinated animals were clinically and virologically protected. The vaccine-induced protection was likely mediated by high virus-neutralizing antibody titers directed against VP2 and perhaps by cellular responses to NS1 and NS2. T lymphocyte responses were cross-reactive between BTV-2 and BTV-8, suggesting that NS1 and NS2 may provide the basis of an adaptable vaccine that can be varied by using VP2 of different serotypes. The detection of different levels of VP7 antibodies in vaccinated animals and controls after challenge suggested a compliancy between the vaccine and the DIVA companion test. This BTV subunit vaccine is a promising candidate that should be further evaluated and developed to protect against different serotypes. PMID:25312275

  16. Dexamethasone and betamethasone protect against LPS-induced brain damage in the neonatal rats

    PubMed Central

    Pang, Yi; Fan, Lir-Wan; Zheng, Baoying; Campbell, Leigh R.; Cai, Zhengwei; Rhodes, Philip G.

    2013-01-01

    The aim of this study is to test whether dexamethasone (Dex) and betamethasone (Beta), two of the most commonly used corticosteroids, protect against lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-induced white matter damage and neurobehavioral dysfunction. LPS or sterile saline was injected into the brain white matter of rat pups at postnatal day 5 (P5) and Dex or Beta was given intraperitoneally to the rat pups 1 h before the LPS microinjection. Brain inflammatory response, brain damage, and myelination were examined at P6, P8 and P14. Neurobehavioral tests were performed from P3 through P22. Our results demonstrate that Dex and Beta markedly diminish the LPS-induced brain inflammatory response, restore myelin basic protein (MBP) expression and alleviate lateral ventricle dilation. Both corticosteroids demonstrate significant protection against most of LPS-induced behavioral deficits, including those in rearing, vibrissa-elicited forelimb-placing, beam walking, learning and elevated plus-maze test. Notably, only Beta improved the locomotion and stereotype dysfunction. In contrast to their beneficial effects, neither drug prevented LPS-induced delay in body weight gain from P6 through P21. Our study suggests that if their adverse effects are minimized, corticosteroids may be the potential candidate drugs to prevent brain damage in premature infants. PMID:22314662

  17. 75 FR 66385 - Protecting Tenants at Foreclosure Act: Guidance on Notification Responsibilities Under the Act...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-10-28

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF HOUSING AND URBAN DEVELOPMENT Protecting Tenants at Foreclosure Act: Guidance on Notification Responsibilities Under... the notice, entitled ``Protecting Tenants at Foreclosure: Notice of Responsibilities Placed...

  18. Probiotics Protect Mice from Ovariectomy-Induced Cortical Bone Loss

    PubMed Central

    Ohlsson, Claes; Engdahl, Cecilia; Fåk, Frida; Andersson, Annica; Windahl, Sara H.; Farman, Helen H.; Movérare-Skrtic, Sofia; Islander, Ulrika; Sjögren, Klara

    2014-01-01

    The gut microbiota (GM) modulates the hosts metabolism and immune system. Probiotic bacteria are defined as live microorganisms which when administered in adequate amounts confer a health benefit on the host and can alter the composition of the GM. Germ-free mice have increased bone mass associated with reduced bone resorption indicating that the GM also regulates bone mass. Ovariectomy (ovx) results in bone loss associated with altered immune status. The purpose of this study was to determine if probiotic treatment protects mice from ovx-induced bone loss. Mice were treated with either a single Lactobacillus (L) strain, L. paracasei DSM13434 (L. para) or a mixture of three strains, L. paracasei DSM13434, L. plantarum DSM 15312 and DSM 15313 (L. mix) given in the drinking water during 6 weeks, starting two weeks before ovx. Both the L. para and the L. mix treatment protected mice from ovx-induced cortical bone loss and bone resorption. Cortical bone mineral content was higher in both L. para and L. mix treated ovx mice compared to vehicle (veh) treated ovx mice. Serum levels of the resorption marker C-terminal telopeptides and the urinary fractional excretion of calcium were increased by ovx in the veh treated but not in the L. para or the L. mix treated mice. Probiotic treatment reduced the expression of the two inflammatory cytokines, TNFα and IL-1β, and increased the expression of OPG, a potent inhibitor of osteoclastogenesis, in cortical bone of ovx mice. In addition, ovx decreased the frequency of regulatory T cells in bone marrow of veh treated but not probiotic treated mice. In conclusion, treatment with L. para or the L. mix prevents ovx-induced cortical bone loss. Our findings indicate that these probiotic treatments alter the immune status in bone resulting in attenuated bone resorption in ovx mice. PMID:24637895

  19. p53 protects against LPS-induced lung endothelial barrier dysfunction

    PubMed Central

    Dimitropoulou, Christiana; Birmpas, Charalampos; Joshi, Atul; Thangjam, Gagan; Catravas, John D.

    2015-01-01

    New therapies toward heart and blood vessel disorders may emerge from the development of Hsp90 inhibitors. Several independent studies suggest potent anti-inflammatory activities of those agents in human tissues. The molecular mechanisms responsible for their protective effects in the vasculature remain unclear. The present study demonstrates that the transcription factor p53, an Hsp90 client protein, is crucial for the maintenance of vascular integrity, protects again LPS-induced endothelial barrier dysfunction, and is involved in the mediation of the anti-inflammatory activity of Hsp90 inhibitors in lung tissues. p53 silencing by siRNA decreased transendothelial resistance (a measure of endothelial barrier function). A similar effect was induced by the p53 inhibitor pifithrin, which also potentiated the LPS-induced hyperpermeability in human lung microvascular endothelial cells (HLMVEC). On the other hand, p53 induction by nutlin suppressed the LPS-induced vascular barrier dysfunction. LPS decreased p53 expression in lung tissues and that effect was blocked by pretreatment with Hsp90 inhibitors both in vivo and in vitro. Furthermore, the Hsp90 inhibitor 17-allyl-amino-demethoxy-geldanamycin suppressed the LPS-induced overexpression of the p53 negative regulator MDMX as well as p53 and MDM2 (another p53 negative regulator) phosphorylation in HLMVEC. Both negative p53 regulators were downregulated by LPS in vivo. Chemically induced p53 overexpression resulted in the suppression of LPS-induced RhoA activation and MLC2 phosphorylation, whereas p53 suppression caused the opposite effects. These observations reveal new mechanisms for the anti-inflammatory actions of Hsp90 inhibitors, i.e., the induction of the transcription factor p53, which in turn can orchestrate robust vascular anti-inflammatory responses both in vivo and in vitro. PMID:25713322

  20. Protective Effects of Quercetin Against HgCl₂-Induced Nephrotoxicity in Sprague-Dawley Rats.

    PubMed

    Shin, Yu Jin; Kim, Jeong Jun; Kim, Ye Ji; Kim, Won Hee; Park, Eun Young; Kim, In Young; Shin, Han-Seung; Kim, Kyeong Seok; Lee, Eui-Kyung; Chung, Kyu Hyuck; Lee, Byung Mu; Kim, Hyung Sik

    2015-05-01

    Mercury is a well-known environmental pollutant that can cause nephropathic diseases, including acute kidney injury (AKI). Although quercetin (QC), a natural flavonoid, has been reported to have medicinal properties, its potential protective effects against mercury-induced AKI have not been evaluated. In this study, the protective effect of QC against mercury-induced AKI was investigated using biochemical parameters, new protein-based urinary biomarkers, and a histopathological approach. A 250 mg/kg dose of QC was administered orally to Sprague-Dawley male rats for 3 days before administration of mercury chloride (HgCl2). All animals were sacrificed at 24 h after HgCl2 treatment, and biomarkers associated with nephrotoxicity were measured. Our data showed that QC absolutely prevented HgCl2-induced AKI, as indicated by biochemical parameters such as blood urea nitrogen (BUN) and serum creatinine (sCr). In particular, QC markedly decreased the accumulation of Hg in the kidney. Urinary excretion of protein-based biomarkers, including clusterin, kidney injury molecule-1 (KIM-1), neutrophil gelatinase-associated lipocalin (NGAL), monocyte chemoattractant protein-1 (MCP-1), tissue inhibitor of metalloproteinases 1 (TIMP-1), and vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) in response to HgCl2 administration were significantly decreased by QC pretreatment relative to that in the HgCl2-treated group. Furthermore, urinary excretion of metallothionein and Hg were significantly elevated by QC pretreatment. Histopathological examination indicated that QC protected against HgCl2-induced proximal tubular damage in the kidney. A TUNEL assay indicated that QC pretreatment significantly reduced apoptotic cell death in the kidney. The administration of QC provided significant protective effects against mercury-induced AKI. PMID:25692400

  1. Wnt activation protects against neomycin-induced hair cell damage in the mouse cochlea.

    PubMed

    Liu, L; Chen, Y; Qi, J; Zhang, Y; He, Y; Ni, W; Li, W; Zhang, S; Sun, S; Taketo, M M; Wang, L; Chai, R; Li, H

    2016-01-01

    Recent studies have reported the role of Wnt/β-catenin signaling in hair cell (HC) development, regeneration, and differentiation in the mouse cochlea; however, the role of Wnt/β-catenin signaling in HC protection remains unknown. In this study, we took advantage of transgenic mice to specifically knockout or overactivate the canonical Wnt signaling mediator β-catenin in HCs, which allowed us to investigate the role of Wnt/β-catenin signaling in protecting HCs against neomycin-induced damage. We first showed that loss of β-catenin in HCs made them more vulnerable to neomycin-induced injury, while constitutive activation of β-catenin in HCs reduced HC loss both in vivo and in vitro. We then showed that loss of β-catenin in HCs increased caspase-mediated apoptosis induced by neomycin injury, while β-catenin overexpression inhibited caspase-mediated apoptosis. Finally, we demonstrated that loss of β-catenin in HCs led to increased expression of forkhead box O3 transcription factor (Foxo3) and Bim along with decreased expression of antioxidant enzymes; thus, there were increased levels of reactive oxygen species (ROS) after neomycin treatment that might be responsible for the increased aminoglycoside sensitivity of HCs. In contrast, β-catenin overexpression reduced Foxo3 and Bim expression and ROS levels, suggesting that β-catenin is protective against neomycin-induced HC loss. Our findings demonstrate that Wnt/β-catenin signaling has an important role in protecting HCs against neomycin-induced HC loss and thus might be a new therapeutic target for the prevention of HC death. PMID:26962686

  2. Wnt activation protects against neomycin-induced hair cell damage in the mouse cochlea

    PubMed Central

    Liu, L; Chen, Y; Qi, J; Zhang, Y; He, Y; Ni, W; Li, W; Zhang, S; Sun, S; Taketo, M M; Wang, L; Chai, R; Li, H

    2016-01-01

    Recent studies have reported the role of Wnt/β-catenin signaling in hair cell (HC) development, regeneration, and differentiation in the mouse cochlea; however, the role of Wnt/β-catenin signaling in HC protection remains unknown. In this study, we took advantage of transgenic mice to specifically knockout or overactivate the canonical Wnt signaling mediator β-catenin in HCs, which allowed us to investigate the role of Wnt/β-catenin signaling in protecting HCs against neomycin-induced damage. We first showed that loss of β-catenin in HCs made them more vulnerable to neomycin-induced injury, while constitutive activation of β-catenin in HCs reduced HC loss both in vivo and in vitro. We then showed that loss of β-catenin in HCs increased caspase-mediated apoptosis induced by neomycin injury, while β-catenin overexpression inhibited caspase-mediated apoptosis. Finally, we demonstrated that loss of β-catenin in HCs led to increased expression of forkhead box O3 transcription factor (Foxo3) and Bim along with decreased expression of antioxidant enzymes; thus, there were increased levels of reactive oxygen species (ROS) after neomycin treatment that might be responsible for the increased aminoglycoside sensitivity of HCs. In contrast, β-catenin overexpression reduced Foxo3 and Bim expression and ROS levels, suggesting that β-catenin is protective against neomycin-induced HC loss. Our findings demonstrate that Wnt/β-catenin signaling has an important role in protecting HCs against neomycin-induced HC loss and thus might be a new therapeutic target for the prevention of HC death. PMID:26962686

  3. Peroxisome Proliferator-Activated Receptor-α Inhibition Protects Against Doxorubicin-Induced Cardiotoxicity in Mice.

    PubMed

    Rahmatollahi, Mahdieh; Baram, Somayeh Mahmoodi; Rahimian, Reza; Saeedi Saravi, Seyed Soheil; Dehpour, Ahmad Reza

    2016-07-01

    Doxorubicin is an effective chemotherapeutic drug against a considerable number of malignancies. However, its toxic effects on myocardium are confirmed as major limit of utilization. PPAR-α is highly expressed in the heart, and its activation leads to an increased cardiac fatty acid oxidation and cardiomyocyte necrosis. This study was performed to adjust the hypothesis that PPAR-α receptor inhibition protects against doxorubicin-induced cardiac dysfunction in mice. Male Balb/c mice were used in this study. Left atria were isolated, and their contractility was measured in response to electrical field stimulation in a standard organ bath. PPAR-α activity was measured using specific PPAR-α antibody in an ELISA-based system coated with double-strand DNA containing PPAR-α response element sequence. Moreover, cardiac MDA and TNF-α levels were measured by ELISA method. Following incubation with doxorubicin (35 µM), a significant reduction in atrial contractility was observed (P < 0.001). Pretreatment of animals with a selective PPAR-α antagonist, GW6471, significantly improved doxorubicin-induced atrial dysfunction (P < 0.001). Furthermore, pretreatment of the mice with a non-selective cannabinoid agonist, WIN55212-2, significantly decreased PPAR-α activity in cardiac tissue, subsequently leading to significant improvement in doxorubicin-induced atrial dysfunction (P < 0.001). Also, GW6471 and WIN significantly reduced cardiac MDA and TNF-α levels compared with animals receiving doxorubicin (P < 0.001). The study showed that inhibition of PPAR-α is associated with protection against doxorubicin-induced cardiotoxicity in mice, and cannabinoids can potentiate the protection by PPAR-α blockade. Moreover, PPAR-α may be considered as a target to prevent cardiotoxicity induced by doxorubicin in patients undergoing chemotherapy. PMID:26082188

  4. Graphene coatings for protection against microbiologically induced corrosion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krishnamurthy, Ajay

    Microbiologically induced corrosion (MIC) is a special form of electrochemical corrosion where micro-organisms affect the local environmental conditions at the metal-electrolyte interface by forming a stable biofilm. The biofilm introduces localized concentration cells, which accelerate the electrochemical corrosion rates. MIC has been found to affect many industrial systems such as sewage waste water pipes, heat exchangers, ships, underwater pipes etc. It has been traditionally eradicated by physical, biochemical and surface protection methods. The cleaning methods and the biocidal deliveries are required periodically and don't provide a permanent solution to the problem. Further, the use of biocides has been harshly criticized by environmentalists due to safety concerns associated with their usage. Surface based coatings have their own drawback of rapid degradation under harsh microbial environments. This has led to the exploration of thin, robust, inert, conformal passivation coatings for the protection of metallic surfaces from microbiologically induced corrosion. Graphene is a 2D arrangement of carbon atoms in a hexagonal honeycomb lattice. The carbon atoms are bonded to one another by sp2 hybridization and each layer of the carbon ring arrangement spans to a thickness of less than a nm. Due to its unique 2D arrangement of carbon atoms, graphene exhibits interesting in-plane and out of plane properties that have led to it being considered as the material for the future. Its excellent thermal, mechanical, electrical and optical properties are being explored in great depth to understand and realize potential applications in various technological realms. Early studies have shown the ability of bulk and monolayer graphene to protect metallic surfaces from air oxidation and solution based galvanic corrosion processes for short periods. However, the role of graphene in resisting MIC is yet to be determined, particularly over the long time spans characteristic of

  5. Evaluation of protective effect of amifostine on dacarbazine induced genotoxicity.

    PubMed

    Etebari, M; Jafarian-Dehkordi, A; Lame, V

    2015-01-01

    Anticancer therapy with alkylating agents has been used for many years. Dacarbazine (DTIC) as an alkylating agent is used alone or in combination with other chemotherapy drugs. In order to inhibit the formation of secondary cancers resulting from chemotherapy with DTIC, preventional strategies is necessary. The present study was undertaken to evaluate the genoprotective effect of amifostine on the genotoxic effects of DTIC in cell culture condition. To determine the optimum genotoxic concentration of DTIC, HepG2 cells were incubated with various DTIC concentrations including 5, 10 and 20 μg/ml for 2 h and the genotoxic effects were evaluated by the comet assay. The result of this part of the study showed that incubation of HepG2 cells with DTIC at 5 μg/ml was sufficient to produce genotoxic effect. In order to determine the protective effects of amifostine on genotoxicity induced by DTIC, HepG2 cells were incubated with different concentrations of amifostine (2, 3 and 5 mg/ml) for 1 h which was followed by incubation with DTIC at 5 μg/ml for 2 h. One hour incubation of cells with different concentrations of amifostine before incubation with DITC indicated that at least 5 mg/ml concentration of amifostine can prevent genotoxic effects induced by DTIC on HepG2 cells under described condition. In conclusion amifostine could prevent DNA damage induced by DTIC on HepG2 cells. PMID:26430459

  6. Sodium salicylate protects against rotenone-induced parkinsonism in rats.

    PubMed

    Madathil, Sindhu K; Karuppagounder, Saravanan S; Mohanakumar, Kochupurackal P

    2013-08-01

    Complex I deficiency culminating in oxidative stress is proposed as one of the upstream mechanisms of nigral neuronal death in Parkinson's disease. We investigated whether sodium salicylate, an active metabolite of aspirin, could afford protection against rotenone-induced oxidative stress, neuronal degeneration, and behavioral dysfunction in rats, because it has the potential to accept a molecule each of hydroxyl radical (•OH) at the third or fifth position of its benzyl ring. Rotenone caused dose-dependent increase in •OH in isolated mitochondria from the cerebral cortex and time- (24-48 h) and dose-dependent (0.1-100 µM) increase in the substantia nigra and the striatum, ipsilateral to the side of rotenone infusion. Administration of sodium salicylate at 12-h intervals for 4 days showed dose-dependent (50-100 mg/kg, i.p) reductions in the levels of •OH in the nigra on the fifth day. These animals showed significant attenuation in rotenone-induced loss in striatal dopamine levels, number of nigral dopaminergic neurons, reduced and oxidized glutathione levels, and complex I activity loss, but superoxide dismutase activity was increased further. Amphetamine- or apomorphine-induced ipsilateral rotations in rotenone-treated rats were significantly reduced in rats treated with sodium salicylate. Our results indicate a direct role of •OH in mediating nigral neuronal death by rotenone and confirm the neuroprotective potential of salicylate in a rodent model of parkinsonism. PMID:23447126

  7. Quercetin protects human peripheral blood mononuclear cells from OTA-induced oxidative stress, genotoxicity, and inflammation.

    PubMed

    Periasamy, Ramyaa; Kalal, Iravathy Goud; Krishnaswamy, Rajashree; Viswanadha, VijayaPadma

    2016-07-01

    Ochratoxin A (OTA) is one of the most abundant food-contaminating mycotoxins world wide, and is detrimental to human and animal health. This study evaluated the protective effect of quercetin against OTA-induced cytotoxicity, genotoxicity, and inflammatory response in lymphocytes. Cytotoxicity determined by MTT assay revealed IC20 value of OTA to be 20 µM, which was restored to near control values by pretreatment with quercetin. Oxidative stress parameters such as antioxidant enzymes, LPO and PCC levels indicated that quercetin exerted a protective effect on OTA-induced oxidative stress. Quercetin exerted an antigenotoxic effect on OTA-induced genotoxicity, by significantly reducing the number of structural aberrations in chromosomes and comet parameters like, % olive tail moment from 2.76 ± 0.02 to 0.56 ± 0.02 and % tail DNA from 56.23 ± 2.56 to 12.36 ± 0.56 as determined by comet assay. OTA-induced NO, TNF-α, IL-6, and IL-8 were significantly reduced in the quercetin pretreated samples indicating its anti-inflammatory role. Our results demonstrate for the first time that quercetin exerts a cytoprotective effect against OTA-induced oxidative stress, genotoxicity, and inflammation in lymphocytes. © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. Environ Toxicol 31: 855-865, 2016. PMID:25532488

  8. Injury-induced immune responses in Hydra.

    PubMed

    Wenger, Yvan; Buzgariu, Wanda; Reiter, Silke; Galliot, Brigitte

    2014-08-01

    The impact of injury-induced immune responses on animal regenerative processes is highly variable, positive or negative depending on the context. This likely reflects the complexity of the innate immune system that behaves as a sentinel in the transition from injury to regeneration. Early-branching invertebrates with high regenerative potential as Hydra provide a unique framework to dissect how injury-induced immune responses impact regeneration. A series of early cellular events likely require an efficient immune response after amputation, as antimicrobial defence, epithelial cell stretching for wound closure, migration of interstitial progenitors toward the wound, cell death, phagocytosis of cell debris, or reconstruction of the extracellular matrix. The analysis of the injury-induced transcriptomic modulations of 2636 genes annotated as immune genes in Hydra identified 43 genes showing an immediate/early pulse regulation in all regenerative contexts examined. These regulations point to an enhanced cytoprotection via ROS signaling (Nrf, C/EBP, p62/SQSMT1-l2), TNFR and TLR signaling (TNFR16-like, TRAF2l, TRAF5l, jun, fos-related, SIK2, ATF1/CREB, LRRC28, LRRC40, LRRK2), proteasomal activity (p62/SQSMT1-l1, Ced6/Gulf, NEDD8-conjugating enzyme Ubc12), stress proteins (CRYAB1, CRYAB2, HSP16.2, DnaJB9, HSP90a1), all potentially regulating NF-κB activity. Other genes encoding immune-annotated proteins such as NPYR4, GTPases, Swap70, the antiproliferative BTG1, enzymes involved in lipid metabolism (5-lipoxygenase, ACSF4), secreted clotting factors, secreted peptidases are also pulse regulated upon bisection. By contrast, metalloproteinases and antimicrobial peptide genes largely follow a context-dependent regulation, whereas the protease inhibitor α2macroglobulin gene exhibits a sustained up-regulation. Hence a complex immune response to injury is linked to wound healing and regeneration in Hydra. PMID:25086685

  9. Oxytocin facilitates protective responses to aversive social stimuli in males

    PubMed Central

    Striepens, Nadine; Scheele, Dirk; Kendrick, Keith M.; Becker, Benjamin; Schäfer, Lea; Schwalba, Knut; Reul, Jürgen; Maier, Wolfgang; Hurlemann, René

    2012-01-01

    The neuropeptide oxytocin (OXT) can enhance the impact of positive social cues but may reduce that of negative ones by inhibiting amygdala activation, although it is unclear whether the latter causes blunted emotional and mnemonic responses. In two independent double-blind placebo-controlled experiments, each involving over 70 healthy male subjects, we investigated whether OXT affects modulation of startle reactivity by aversive social stimuli as well as subsequent memory for them. Intranasal OXT potentiated acoustic startle responses to negative stimuli, without affecting behavioral valence or arousal judgments, and biased subsequent memory toward negative rather than neutral items. A functional MRI analysis of this mnemonic effect revealed that, whereas OXT inhibited amygdala responses to negative stimuli, it facilitated left insula responses for subsequently remembered items and increased functional coupling between the left amygdala, left anterior insula, and left inferior frontal gyrus. Our results therefore show that OXT can potentiate the protective and mnemonic impact of aversive social information despite reducing amygdala activity, and suggest that the insula may play a role in emotional modulation of memory. PMID:23074247

  10. Phenylbutyric acid protects against carbon tetrachloride-induced hepatic fibrogenesis in mice

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Jian-Qing; Chen, Xi; Zhang, Cheng; Tao, Li; Zhang, Zhi-Hui; Liu, Xiao-Qian; Xu, Yuan-Bao; Wang, Hua; Li, Jun; Xu, De-Xiang

    2013-01-15

    A recent report showed that the unfolded protein response (UPR) signaling was activated in the pathogenesis of carbon tetrachloride (CCl{sub 4})-induced hepatic fibrosis. Phenylbutyric acid (PBA) is a well-known chemical chaperone that inhibits endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress and unfolded protein response (UPR) signaling. In the present study, we investigated the effects of PBA on CCl{sub 4}-induced hepatic fibrosis in mice. All mice were intraperitoneally (i.p.) injected with CCl{sub 4} (0.15 ml/kg BW, twice per week) for 8 weeks. In CCl{sub 4} + PBA group, mice were i.p. injected with PBA (150 mg/kg, twice per day) from the beginning of CCl{sub 4} injection to the end. As expected, PBA significantly attenuated CCl{sub 4}-induced hepatic ER stress and UPR activation. Although PBA alleviated, only to a less extent, hepatic necrosis, it obviously inhibited CCl{sub 4}-induced tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-α) and transforming growth factor beta (TGF-β). Moreover, PBA inhibited CCl{sub 4}-induced hepatic nuclear factor kappa B (NF-κB) p65 translocation and extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK) and c-Jun N-terminal Kinase (JNK) phosphorylation. Interestingly, CCl{sub 4}-induced α-smooth muscle actin (α-SMA), a marker for the initiation phase of HSC activation, was significantly attenuated in mice pretreated with PBA. Correspondingly, CCl{sub 4}-induced hepatic collagen (Col)1α1 and Col1α2, markers for the perpetuation phase of HSC activation, were inhibited in PBA-treated mice. Importantly, CCl{sub 4}-induced hepatic fibrosis, as determined using Sirius red staining, was obviously attenuated by PBA. In conclusion, PBA prevents CCl{sub 4}-induced hepatic fibrosis through inhibiting hepatic inflammatory response and HSC activation. Highlights: ► CCl{sub 4} induces hepatic ER stress, inflammation, HSC activation and hepatic fibrosis. ► PBA alleviates CCl{sub 4}-induced hepatic ER stress and UPR signaling activation. ► PBA inhibits CCl{sub 4}-induced

  11. Stanniocalcin-1 inhibits thrombin-induced signaling and protects from bleomycin-induced lung injury

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Luping; Zhang, Lin; Ju, Huiming; Li, Qingtian; Pan, Jenny Szu-Chin; Al-Lawati, Zahraa; Sheikh-Hamad, David

    2015-01-01

    Thrombin-induced and proteinase-activated receptor 1 (PAR1)-mediated signaling increases ROS production, activates ERK, and promotes inflammation and fibroblast proliferation in bleomycin-induced lung injury. Stanniocalcin-1 (STC1) activates anti-oxidant pathways, inhibits inflammation and provides cytoprotection; hence, we hypothesized that STC1 will inhibit thrombin/PAR1 signaling and protect from bleomycin-induced pneumonitis. We determined thrombin level and activity, thrombin-induced PAR-1-mediated signaling, superoxide generation and lung pathology after intra-tracheal administration of bleomycin to WT and STC1 Tg mice. Lungs of bleomycin-treated WT mice display: severe pneumonitis; increased generation of superoxide; vascular leak; increased thrombin protein abundance and activity; activation of ERK; greater cytokine/chemokine release and infiltration with T-cells and macrophages. Lungs of STC1 Tg mice displayed none of the above changes. Mechanistic analysis in cultured pulmonary epithelial cells (A549) suggests that STC1 inhibits thrombin-induced and PAR1-mediated ERK activation through suppression of superoxide. In conclusion, STC1 blunts bleomycin-induced rise in thrombin protein and activity, diminishes thrombin-induced signaling through PAR1 to ERK, and inhibits bleomycin-induced pneumonitis. Moreover, our study identifies a new set of cytokines/chemokines, which play a role in the pathogenesis of bleomycin-induced lung injury. These findings broaden the array of potential therapeutic targets for the treatment of lung diseases characterized by thrombin activation, oxidant stress and inflammation. PMID:26640170

  12. Protective Role of Growth Hormone against Hyperhomocysteinemia Induced Glomerular Injury

    PubMed Central

    Li, Caixia; Xia, Min; Abais, Justine M.; Liu, Xiaocheng; Li, Ningjun; Boini, Krishna M.; Li, Pin-Lan

    2013-01-01

    The present study investigated the protective role of growth hormone (GH) against hyperhomocysteinemia (hHcys)-induced activations of reactive oxygen species (ROS)/hypoxia-inducible factor (HIF)-1α, epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT) and consequent glomerular injury. A hyperhomocysteinemia (hHcys) model was induced by folate free (FF) diet in mice. The urine protein excretion significantly increased while plasma GH levels dramatically decreased in hHcys. Real time RT-PCR showed that GH receptor (GHR) level increased in the cortex of hHcys mice, which mainly occurred in podocytes as shown by confocal microscopy. Recombinant mouse growth hormone (rmGH) treatment (0.02 mg/kg, once a day for 6 weeks) significantly restored the plasma GH, inhibited GHR up-regulation and attenuated proteinuria. Correspondingly, rmGH treatment also blocked hHcys-induced decrease in the expression of podocin, a podocyte slit diaphragm molecule, and inhibited the increases in the expression of desmin, a podocyte injury marker. It was also demonstrated that in hHcys the expression of epithelial markers, p-cadherin and ZO-1, decreased, while the expression of mesenchymal markers, FSP-1 and α-SMA, increased in podocytes, which together suggest the activation of EMT in podocytes. NADPH oxidase (Nox)-dependent superoxide anion (O2·−) and HIF-1α level in the hHcys mice cortex was markedly enhanced. These hHcys-induced EMT enhancement and Nox-dependant O2·−/HIF-1α activation were significantly attenuated by rmGH treatment. HIF-1α level increased in Hcys-treated cultured podocytes, which were blocked by rmGH treatment. Meanwhile, Hcys-induced EMT in cultured podocytes was significantly reversed by HIF-1α siRNA. All these results support the view that GH ameliorates hHcys-induced glomerular injury by reducing Nox-dependent O2·−/HIF-1α signal pathway and EMT. PMID:23529346

  13. Mycobacterium bovis BCG Vaccination Induces Divergent Proinflammatory or Regulatory T Cell Responses in Adults

    PubMed Central

    Boer, Mardi C.; Prins, Corine; van Meijgaarden, Krista E.; van Dissel, Jaap T.; Joosten, Simone A.

    2015-01-01

    Mycobacterium bovis bacillus Calmette-Guérin (BCG), the only currently available vaccine against tuberculosis, induces variable protection in adults. Immune correlates of protection are lacking, and analyses on cytokine-producing T cell subsets in protected versus unprotected cohorts have yielded inconsistent results. We studied the primary T cell response, both proinflammatory and regulatory T cell responses, induced by BCG vaccination in adults. Twelve healthy adult volunteers who were tuberculin skin test (TST) negative, QuantiFERON test (QFT) negative, and BCG naive were vaccinated with BCG and followed up prospectively. BCG vaccination induced an unexpectedly dichotomous immune response in this small, BCG-naive, young-adult cohort: BCG vaccination induced either gamma interferon-positive (IFN-γ+) interleukin 2-positive (IL-2+) tumor necrosis factor α-positive (TNF-α+) polyfunctional CD4+ T cells concurrent with CD4+ IL-17A+ and CD8+ IFN-γ+ T cells or, in contrast, virtually absent cytokine responses with induction of CD8+ regulatory T cells. Significant induction of polyfunctional CD4+ IFN-γ+ IL-2+ TNF-α+ T cells and IFN-γ production by peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) was confined to individuals with strong immunization-induced local skin inflammation and increased serum C-reactive protein (CRP). Conversely, in individuals with mild inflammation, regulatory-like CD8+ T cells were uniquely induced. Thus, BCG vaccination either induced a broad proinflammatory T cell response with local inflammatory reactogenicity or, in contrast, a predominant CD8+ regulatory T cell response with mild local inflammation, poor cytokine induction, and absent polyfunctional CD4+ T cells. Further detailed fine mapping of the heterogeneous host response to BCG vaccination using classical and nonclassical immune markers will enhance our understanding of the mechanisms and determinants that underlie the induction of apparently opposite immune responses and how these

  14. The protective effect of blueberry anthocyanins against perfluorooctanoic acid-induced disturbance in planarian (Dugesia japonica).

    PubMed

    Yuan, Zuoqing; Zhang, Jianyong; Tu, Changchao; Wang, Zhijing; Xin, Wenpeng

    2016-05-01

    The influence of blueberry anthocyanins on perfluorooctanoic acid (PFOA)-induced stress response in planarian mitochondria was investigated. PFOA at 15mg/L and anthocyanins at 10 or 20mg/L were individually and simultaneously administered to planarians for up to 10d. The results showed PFOA treatment induced an increase in mitochondrial permeability transition pore opening and a decrease antioxidant capacity and enzyme activities. In anthocyanin treated animals, the activity of succinate dehydrogenase, cytochrome oxidase and monoamine oxidase increased, but mitochondrial permeability transition pore opening decreased and total antioxidant capacity increased. An improvement in above-mentioned physiological and biochemical parameters was found in the combined PFOA and anthocyanin treated animals, in a dose-dependent manner. Anthocyanins attenuated the PFOA induced toxicity; antioxidant capacity and enzyme activities are involved in the protective mechanism of anthocyanins. PMID:26836138

  15. Plasmepsin 4-Deficient Plasmodium berghei Are Virulence Attenuated and Induce Protective Immunity against Experimental Malaria

    PubMed Central

    Spaccapelo, Roberta; Janse, Chris J.; Caterbi, Sara; Franke-Fayard, Blandine; Bonilla, J. Alfredo; Syphard, Luke M.; Di Cristina, Manlio; Dottorini, Tania; Savarino, Andrea; Cassone, Antonio; Bistoni, Francesco; Waters, Andrew P.; Dame, John B.; Crisanti, Andrea

    2010-01-01

    Plasmodium parasites lacking plasmepsin 4 (PM4), an aspartic protease that functions in the lysosomal compartment and contributes to hemoglobin digestion, have only a modest decrease in the asexual blood-stage growth rate; however, PM4 deficiency in the rodent malaria parasite Plasmodium berghei results in significantly less virulence than that for the parental parasite. P. berghei Δpm4 parasites failed to induce experimental cerebral malaria (ECM) in ECM-susceptible mice, and ECM-resistant mice were able to clear infections. Furthermore, after a single infection, all convalescent mice were protected against subsequent parasite challenge for at least 1 year. Real-time in vivo parasite imaging and splenectomy experiments demonstrated that protective immunity acted through antibody-mediated parasite clearance in the spleen. This work demonstrates, for the first time, that a single Plasmodium gene disruption can generate virulence-attenuated parasites that do not induce cerebral complications and, moreover, are able to stimulate strong protective immunity against subsequent challenge with wild-type parasites. Parasite blood-stage attenuation should help identify protective immune responses against malaria, unravel parasite-derived factors involved in malarial pathologies, such as cerebral malaria, and potentially pave the way for blood-stage whole organism vaccines. PMID:20019192

  16. Cross-protection induced by Japanese encephalitis vaccines against different genotypes of Dengue viruses in mice

    PubMed Central

    Li, Jieqiong; Gao, Na; Fan, Dongying; Chen, Hui; Sheng, Ziyang; Fu, Shihong; Liang, Guodong; An, Jing

    2016-01-01

    Dengue viruses (DENVs) and Japanese encephalitis virus (JEV) are closely related mosquito-borne flaviviruses that cause very high global disease burdens. Although cross-reactivity and cross-protection within flaviviruses have been demonstrated, the effect of JEV vaccination on susceptibility to DENV infection has not been well elucidated. In this study, we found that vaccination with the JEV inactivated vaccine (INV) and live attenuated vaccine (LAV) could induce cross-immune responses and cross-protection against DENV1-4 in mice. Despite the theoretical risk of immune enhancement, no increased mortality was observed in our mouse model. Additionally, low but consistently detectable cross-neutralizing antibodies against DENV2 and DENV3 were also observed in the sera of JEV vaccine-immunized human donors. The results suggested that both JEV-LAV and JEV-INV could elicit strong cross-immunity and protection against DENVs, indicating that inoculation with JEV vaccines may influence the distribution of DENVs in co-circulated areas and that the cross-protection induced by JEV vaccines against DENVs might provide important information in terms of DENV prevention. PMID:26818736

  17. Dietary cholesterol protects against alcohol-induced cerebral artery constriction

    PubMed Central

    Bukiya, Anna; Dopico, Alex; Leffler, Charles; Fedinec, Alexander

    2014-01-01

    rats on normal diet. Immunofluorescence staining of BK channel- forming and accessory, smooth muscle-specific β1 subunit in freshly isolated cerebral artery myocyte showed that high-cholesterol diet did not down-regulate surface presence of BK protein. However, paxilline-induced cerebral artery constriction was diminished in arteries from rats on high-cholesterol diet. Conclusions Our data indicate that dietary cholesterol protects against AICAC. This protection is caused by cholesterol buildup in the arterial tissue and diminished function (but not surface presence) of EtOH target – BK channel. PMID:24588122

  18. Vaccination of cattle with Mycobacterium bovis culture filtrate proteins and CpG oligodeoxynucleotides induces protection against bovine tuberculosis.

    PubMed

    Wedlock, D N; Skinner, M A; de Lisle, G W; Vordermeier, H M; Hewinson, R G; Hecker, R; van Drunen Littel-van den Hurk, S; Babiuk, L A; Buddle, B M

    2005-06-15

    Culture filtrate protein (CFP) vaccines have been shown to be effective in small animal models for protecting against tuberculosis while immunisation with these types of vaccines in cattle has been less successful. A study was conducted in cattle to evaluate the ability of selected adjuvants and immunomodulators to stimulate protective immune responses to tuberculosis in animals vaccinated with Mycobacterium bovis CFP. Seven groups of cattle (n=5) were vaccinated with M. bovis CFP formulated with either Emulsigen or Polygen adjuvant alone or in combination with a specific oligodeoxynucleotides (ODN), polyinosinic acid: polycytidylic acid (poly I:C) or poly I:C and recombinant granulocyte-macrophage colony stimulating factor. Two additional groups were vaccinated subcutaneously with BCG or non-vaccinated. In contrast to the strong interferon-gamma (IFN-gamma) responses induced by BCG, the CFP vaccines induced strong antibody responses but weak IFN-gamma responses. The addition of CpG ODN to CFP significantly enhanced cell-mediated responses and elevated antibody responses to mycobacterial antigens. Of the CFP vaccinated groups, the strongest IFN-gamma responses to CFP vaccines were measured in animals vaccinated with CFP/Emulsigen+CpG or CFP/Polygen+CpG. The animals in these two groups, together with those in the BCG and non-vaccinated groups were challenged intratracheally with virulent M. bovis at 13 weeks after the first vaccination and protection was assessed, by examination for presence of tuberculous lesions in the lungs and lymph nodes, 13 weeks later at postmortem. While BCG gave the best overall protection against tuberculosis, significant protection was also seen in animals vaccinated with CFP/Emulsigen+CpG. These results establish an important role for CpG ODN in stimulating protective Th1 responses to tuberculosis in cattle and indicate that a sub-unit protein vaccine can protect these animals against tuberculosis. PMID:15910992

  19. Thymosin Beta 4 Protects Mice from Monocrotaline-Induced Pulmonary Hypertension and Right Ventricular Hypertrophy

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Liling; Gupta, Sudhiranjan

    2014-01-01

    Pulmonary hypertension (PH) is a progressive vascular disease of pulmonary arteries that impedes ejection of blood by the right ventricle. As a result there is an increase in pulmonary vascular resistance and pulmonary arterial pressure causing right ventricular hypertrophy (RVH) and RV failure. The pathology of PAH involves vascular cell remodeling including pulmonary arterial endothelial cell (PAEC) dysfunction and pulmonary arterial smooth muscle cell (PASMC) proliferation. Current therapies are limited to reverse the vascular remodeling. Investigating a key molecule is required for development of new therapeutic intervention. Thymosin beta-4 (Tβ4) is a ubiquitous G-actin sequestering protein with diverse biological function and promotes wound healing and modulates inflammatory responses. However, it remains unknown whether Tβ4 has any protective role in PH. The purpose of this study is to evaluate the whether Tβ4 can be used as a vascular-protective agent. In monocrotaline (MCT)-induced PH mouse model, we showed that mice treated with Tβ4 significantly attenuated the systolic pressure and RVH, compared to the MCT treated mice. Our data revealed for the first time that Tβ4 selectively targets Notch3-Col 3A-CTGF gene axis in preventing MCT-induced PH and RVH. Our study may provide pre-clinical evidence for Tβ4 and may consider as vasculo-protective agent for the treatment of PH induced RVH. PMID:25412097

  20. CD40 ligand preferentially modulates immune response and enhances protection against influenza virus.

    PubMed

    Hashem, Anwar M; Gravel, Caroline; Chen, Ze; Yi, Yinglei; Tocchi, Monika; Jaentschke, Bozena; Fan, Xingliang; Li, Changgui; Rosu-Myles, Michael; Pereboev, Alexander; He, Runtao; Wang, Junzhi; Li, Xuguang

    2014-07-15

    CD40L, a key regulator of the immune system, was studied as both a targeting ligand and a molecular adjuvant in nucleoprotein (NP)-based host defense against influenza in mouse models with different genetic backgrounds. Adenoviral vectors secreting NP-CD40L fusion protein (denoted as rAd-SNP40L) afforded full protection of immunocompetent and immunocompromised mice (CD40L(-/-) and CD4(-/-)) against lethal influenza infection. Mechanistically, rAd-SNP40L preferentially induced early and persistent B cell germinal center formation, and accelerated Ig isotype-switching and Th1-skewed, NP-specific Ab response. Moreover, it drastically augmented primary and memory NP-specific CTL activity and polyfunctional CD8(+) T cells. The markedly enhanced nonneutralizing Abs and CTLs significantly reduced viral burdens in the lungs of mice upon lethal virus challenge. Data generated from CD40L(-/-) and CD4(-/-) mice revealed that the protection was indeed CD40L mediated but CD4(+) T cell independent, demonstrating the viability of the fusion Ags in protecting immunodeficient hosts. Notably, a single dose of rAd-SNP40L completely protected mice from lethal viral challenge 4 mo after immunization, representing the first report, to our knowledge, on NP in conjunction with a molecular adjuvant inducing a robust and long-lasting memory immune response against influenza. This platform is characterized by an increased in vivo load of CD40-targeted Ag upon the secretion of the fusion protein from adenovirus-infected cells and may represent a promising strategy to enhance the breadth, durability, and potency of Ag-specific immune responses. PMID:24928989

  1. Harnessing DNA-induced immune responses for improving cancer vaccines

    PubMed Central

    Herrada, Andrés A.; Rojas-Colonelli, Nicole; González-Figueroa, Paula; Roco, Jonathan; Oyarce, César; Ligtenberg, Maarten A.; Lladser, Alvaro

    2012-01-01

    DNA vaccines have emerged as an attractive strategy to promote protective cellular and humoral immunity against the encoded antigen. DNA vaccines are easy to generate, inexpensive to produce and purify at large-scale, highly stable and safe. In addition, plasmids used for DNA vaccines act as powerful “danger signals” by stimulating several DNA-sensing innate immune receptors that promote the induction of protective adaptive immunity. The induction of tumor-specific immune responses represents a major challenge for DNA vaccines because most of tumor-associated antigens are normal non-mutated self-antigens. As a consequence, induction of potentially self-reactive T cell responses against such poorly immunogenic antigens is controlled by mechanisms of central and peripheral tolerance as well as tumor-induced immunosuppression. Although several DNA vaccines against cancer have reached clinical testing, disappointing results have been observed. Therefore, the development of new adjuvants that strongly stimulate the induction of antitumor T cell immunity and counteract immune-suppressive regulation is an attractive approach to enhance the potency of DNA vaccines and overcome tumor-associated tolerance. Understanding the DNA-sensing signaling pathways of innate immunity that mediate the induction of T cell responses elicited by DNA vaccines represents a unique opportunity to develop novel adjuvants that enhance vaccine potency. The advance of DNA adjuvants needs to be complemented with the development of potent delivery systems, in order to step toward successful clinical application. Here, we briefly discuss recent evidence showing how to harness DNA-induced immune response to improve the potency of cancer vaccines and counteract tumor-associated tolerance. PMID:23111166

  2. Mucosal Immune Responses and Protection against Tetanus Toxin after Intranasal Immunization with Recombinant Lactobacillus plantarum

    PubMed Central

    Grangette, Corinne; Müller-Alouf, Heide; Goudercourt, Denise; Geoffroy, Marie-Claude; Turneer, Mireille; Mercenier, Annick

    2001-01-01

    The use of live microorganisms as an antigen delivery system is an effective means to elicit local immune responses and thus represents a promising strategy for mucosal vaccination. In this respect, lactic acid bacteria represent an original and attractive approach, as they are safe organisms that are used as food starters and probiotics. To determine whether an immune response could be elicited by intranasal delivery of recombinant lactobacilli, a Lactobacillus plantarum strain of human origin (NCIMB8826) was selected as the expression host. Cytoplasmic production of the 47-kDa fragment C of tetanus toxin (TTFC) was achieved at different levels depending on the plasmid construct. All recombinant strains proved to be immunogenic by the intranasal route in mice and able to elicit very high systemic immunoglobulin G (IgG1, IgG2b, and IgG2a) responses which correlated to the antigen dose. No significant differences in enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay IgG titers were observed when mice were immunized with live or mitomycin C-treated recombinant lactobacilli. Nevertheless, protection against the lethal effect of tetanus toxin was obtained only with the strains producing the highest dose of antigen and was greater following immunization with live bacteria. Significant TTFC-specific mucosal IgA responses were measured in bronchoalveolar lavage fluids, and antigen-specific T-cell responses were detected in cervical lymph nodes, both responses being higher in mice receiving a double dose of bacteria (at a 24-h interval) at each administration. These results demonstrate that recombinant lactobacilli can induce specific humoral (protective) and mucosal antibodies and cellular immune response against protective antigens upon nasal administration. PMID:11179325

  3. Carbon monoxide orchestrates a protective response through PPARgamma.

    PubMed

    Bilban, Martin; Bach, Fritz H; Otterbein, Sherrie L; Ifedigbo, Emeka; d'Avila, Joana de Costa; Esterbauer, Harald; Chin, Beek Yoke; Usheva, Anny; Robson, Simon C; Wagner, Oswald; Otterbein, Leo E

    2006-05-01

    Carbon monoxide (CO) suppresses proinflammatory responses in macrophages reacting to LPS. We hypothesize that CO acts by inducing a molecule(s) that suppresses the inflammatory response to subsequent stress. Exposure of macrophages to CO alone in vitro produced a brief burst of mitochondrial-derived ROS, which led to expression of PPARgamma. PPARgamma expression proved essential for mediating the anti-inflammatory effects of CO. Blocking the CO-mediated increase in ROS generation prevented PPARgamma induction, and blocking PPARgamma prevented CO's anti-inflammatory effects. In a model of acute lung injury in mice, CO blocked expression of Egr-1, a central mediator of inflammation, and decreased tissue damage; inhibition of PPARgamma abrogated both effects. These data identify the mitochondrial oxidases as an (perhaps the) initial cellular target of CO and demonstrate that CO upregulates expression of PPARgamma via the mitochondria, which assures that a subsequent stress stimulus will lead to a cytoprotective as opposed to a proinflammatory phenotype. PMID:16713977

  4. Prophylactic mRNA Vaccination against Allergy Confers Long-Term Memory Responses and Persistent Protection in Mice

    PubMed Central

    Hattinger, E.; Scheiblhofer, S.; Roesler, E.; Thalhamer, T.; Thalhamer, J.; Weiss, R.

    2015-01-01

    Recently, mRNA vaccines have been introduced as a safety-optimized alternative to plasmid DNA-based vaccines for protection against allergy. However, it remained unclear whether the short persistence of this vaccine type would limit memory responses and whether the protective immune response type would be maintained during recurrent exposure to allergen. We tested the duration of protective memory responses in mice vaccinated with mRNA encoding the grass pollen allergen Phl p 5 by challenging them with recombinant allergen, 3.5, 6, and 9 months after vaccination. In a second experiment, vaccinated mice were repeatedly challenged monthly with aerosolized allergen over a period of 7 months. Antibody and cytokine responses as well as lung inflammation and airway hyperresponsiveness were assessed. mRNA vaccination induced robust TH1 memory responses for at least 9 months. Vaccination efficiently suppressed TH2 cytokines, IgE responses, and lung eosinophilia. Protection was maintained after repeated exposure to aerosolized allergen and no TH1 associated pathology was observed. Lung function remained improved compared to nonvaccinated controls. Our data clearly indicate that mRNA vaccination against Phl p 5 induces robust, long-lived memory responses, which can be recalled by allergen exposure without side effects. mRNA vaccines fulfill the requirements for safe prophylactic vaccination without the need for booster immunizations. PMID:26557723

  5. Puerarin protects against CCl4-induced liver fibrosis in mice: possible role of PARP-1 inhibition.

    PubMed

    Wang, Shuai; Shi, Xiao-Lei; Feng, Min; Wang, Xun; Zhang, Zhi-Heng; Zhao, Xin; Han, Bing; Ma, Hu-Cheng; Dai, Bo; Ding, Yi-Tao

    2016-09-01

    Liver fibrosis, which is the pathophysiologic process of the liver due to sustained wound healing in response to chronic liver injury, will eventually progress to cirrhosis. Puerarin, a bioactive isoflavone glucoside derived from the traditional Chinese medicine pueraria, has been reported to have many anti-inflammatory and anti-fibrosis properties. However, the detailed mechanisms are not well studied yet. This study aimed to investigate the effects of puerarin on liver function and fibrosis process in mice induced by CCl4. C57BL/6J mice were intraperitoneally injected with 10% CCl4 in olive oil(2mL/kg) with or without puerarin co-administration (100 and 200mg/kg intraperitoneally once daily) for four consecutive weeks. As indicated by the ameliorative serum hepatic enzymes and the reduced histopathologic abnormalities, the data collected showed that puerarin can protect against CCl4-induced chronic liver injury. Moreover, CCl4-induced development of fibrosis, as evidenced by increasing expression of alpha smooth muscle actin(α-SMA), collagen-1, transforming growth factor (TGF)-β and connective tissue growth factor(CTGF) in liver, were suppressed by puerarin. Possible mechanisms related to these suppressive effects were realized by inhibition on NF-κB signaling pathway, reactive oxygen species(ROS) production and mitochondrial dysfunction in vivo. In addition, these protective inhibition mentioned above were driven by down-regulation of PARP-1 due to puerarin because puerarin can attenuate the PARP-1 expression in CCl4-damaged liver and PJ34, a kind of PARP-1 inhibitor, mimicked puerarin's protection. In conclusion, puerarin played a protective role in CCl4-induced liver fibrosis probably through inhibition of PARP-1 and subsequent attenuation of NF-κB, ROS production and mitochondrial dysfunction. PMID:27318789

  6. Dengue vaccine: hypotheses to understand CYD-TDV-induced protection.

    PubMed

    Guy, Bruno; Jackson, Nicholas

    2016-01-01

    Dengue virus (DENV) is a human pathogen with a large impact on public health. Although no vaccine against DENV is currently licensed, a recombinant vaccine - chimeric yellow fever virus-DENV tetravalent dengue vaccine (CYD-TDV) - has shown efficacy against symptomatic dengue disease in two recent Phase III clinical trials. Safety observations were also recently reported for these trials. In this Opinion article, we review the data from recent vaccine clinical trials and discuss the putative mechanisms behind the observed efficacy of the vaccine against different forms of the disease, focusing on the interactions between the infecting virus, pre-existing host immunity and vaccine-induced immune responses. PMID:26639777

  7. The Laminin Response in Inflammatory Bowel Disease: Protection or Malignancy?

    PubMed Central

    Spenlé, Caroline; Lefebvre, Olivier; Lacroute, Joël; Méchine-Neuville, Agnès; Barreau, Frédérick; Blottière, Hervé M.; Duclos, Bernard; Arnold, Christiane; Hussenet, Thomas; Hemmerlé, Joseph; Gullberg, Donald; Kedinger, Michèle; Sorokin, Lydia; Orend, Gertraud; Simon-Assmann, Patricia

    2014-01-01

    Laminins (LM), basement membrane molecules and mediators of epithelial-stromal communication, are crucial in tissue homeostasis. Inflammatory Bowel Diseases (IBD) are multifactorial pathologies where the microenvironment and in particular LM play an important yet poorly understood role in tissue maintenance, and in cancer progression which represents an inherent risk of IBD. Here we showed first that in human IBD colonic samples and in murine colitis the LMα1 and LMα5 chains are specifically and ectopically overexpressed with a concomitant nuclear p53 accumulation. Linked to this observation, we provided a mechanism showing that p53 induces LMα1 expression at the promoter level by ChIP analysis and this was confirmed by knockdown in cell transfection experiments. To mimic the human disease, we induced colitis and colitis-associated cancer by chemical treatment (DSS) combined or not with a carcinogen (AOM) in transgenic mice overexpressing LMα1 or LMα5 specifically in the intestine. We demonstrated that high LMα1 or LMα5 expression decreased susceptibility towards experimentally DSS-induced colon inflammation as assessed by histological scoring and decrease of pro-inflammatory cytokines. Yet in a pro-oncogenic context, we showed that LM would favor tumorigenesis as revealed by enhanced tumor lesion formation in both LM transgenic mice. Altogether, our results showed that nuclear p53 and associated overexpression of LMα1 and LMα5 protect tissue from inflammation. But in a mutation setting, the same LM molecules favor progression of IBD into colitis-associated cancer. Our transgenic mice represent attractive new models to acquire knowledge about the paradoxical effect of LM that mediate either tissue reparation or cancer according to the microenvironment. In the early phases of IBD, reinforcing basement membrane stability/organization could be a promising therapeutic approach. PMID:25347196

  8. Protective immunity spectrum induced by immunization with a vaccine from the TBEV strain Sofjin.

    PubMed

    Chernokhaeva, L L; Rogova, Yu V; Vorovitch, M F; Romanova, L Iu; Kozlovskaya, L I; Maikova, G B; Kholodilov, I S; Karganova, G G

    2016-04-29

    Tick-borne encephalitis (TBE) circulates widely in the territory of Eurasia with up to 10,000 cases registered annually. The TBE virus (TBEV) includes three main subtypes: European, Siberian and Far-Eastern, and two new Asiatic variants, phylogenetically distant from the others. The inactivated antigen of European or Far-Eastern strains is used in commercial TBE vaccines. A set of 14 TBEV strains, isolated in 1937-2008, with different passage histories, representing all subtypes and variants, was used in this work. The chosen set covers almost all the TBE area. Sera of mice, immunized with the TBE vaccine Moscow, prepared from the TBEV strain Sofjin, were studied in a plaque neutralization test against the set of TBEV strains. The vaccine induced antibodies at a protective titer against all TBEV strains and Omsk hemorrhagic fever virus (OHFV) with Е protein amino acid distances of 0.008-0.069, but not against Powassan virus. We showed that after a course of two immunizations, factors such as the period between vaccinations (1-4 weeks), the challenging virus dose (30-1000 LD50) and terms of challenge (1-4 weeks after the last immunization) did not significantly affect the assessment of protective efficacy of the vaccine in vivo. The protective effect of the TBE vaccine Moscow against the set of TBEV strains and the OHFV was demonstrated in in vivo experiments. TBE vaccine Moscow did not protect mice against 10 LD50 of the Powassan virus. We showed that this range of Е protein amino acid distances between the vaccine strain and challenging virus do not have a decisive impact on the TBE vaccine protective effect in vitro and in vivo. Moreover, the TBE vaccine Moscow induces an immune response protective against a wide range of TBEV variants. PMID:27013433

  9. The EP-4(0) shielding kits: a new approach to protection from induced voltage

    SciTech Connect

    Vorob'ev, A. Yu.; Otmorskii, S. G.; Smekalov, V. V.; Gorozhankina, E. N.; Sosunov, N. N.; Bol'shunov, A. M.

    2011-09-15

    Problems of safety in work on overhead power lines and the overhead railroad ac contact network under induced voltages are considered. The use of additional individual protection systems is proposed to provide protection from electric shock during such work.

  10. Endothelial PPAR-γ provides vascular protection from IL-1β-induced oxidative stress.

    PubMed

    Mukohda, Masashi; Stump, Madeliene; Ketsawatsomkron, Pimonrat; Hu, Chunyan; Quelle, Frederick W; Sigmund, Curt D

    2016-01-01

    Loss of peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor (PPAR)-γ function in the vascular endothelium enhances atherosclerosis and NF-κB target gene expression in high-fat diet-fed apolipoprotein E-deficient mice. The mechanisms by which endothelial PPAR-γ regulates inflammatory responses and protects against atherosclerosis remain unclear. To assess functional interactions between PPAR-γ and inflammation, we used a model of IL-1β-induced aortic dysfunction in transgenic mice with endothelium-specific overexpression of either wild-type (E-WT) or dominant negative PPAR-γ (E-V290M). IL-1β dose dependently decreased IκB-α, increased phospho-p65, and increased luciferase activity in the aorta of NF-κB-LUC transgenic mice. IL-1β also dose dependently reduced endothelial-dependent relaxation by ACh. The loss of ACh responsiveness was partially improved by pretreatment of the vessels with the PPAR-γ agonist rosiglitazone or in E-WT. Conversely, IL-1β-induced endothelial dysfunction was worsened in the aorta from E-V290M mice. Although IL-1β increased the expression of NF-κB target genes, NF-κB p65 inhibitor did not alleviate endothelial dysfunction induced by IL-1β. Tempol, a SOD mimetic, partially restored ACh responsiveness in the IL-1β-treated aorta. Notably, tempol only modestly improved protection in the E-WT aorta but had an increased protective effect in the E-V290M aorta compared with the aorta from nontransgenic mice, suggesting that PPAR-γ-mediated protection involves antioxidant effects. IL-1β increased ROS and decreased the phospho-endothelial nitric oxide synthase (Ser(1177))-to-endothelial nitric oxide synthase ratio in the nontransgenic aorta. These effects were completely abolished in the aorta with endothelial overexpression of WT PPAR-γ but were worsened in the aorta with E-V290M even in the absence of IL-1β. We conclude that PPAR-γ protects against IL-1β-mediated endothelial dysfunction through a reduction of oxidative stress

  11. Protection from radiation-induced damage to spermatogenesis by hormone treatment

    SciTech Connect

    Kurdoglu, B.; Wilson, G.; Parchuri, N.; Ye, W.; Meistrich, M.L.

    1994-07-01

    Infertility caused by killing of the spermatogonial stem cells occurs frequently in men treated for cancer with radiotherapy and chemotherapy. We investigated whether pretreatment of rats with testosterone plus estradiol, which reversibly inhibits the completion of spermatogenesis and protects spermatogonial stem cells from procarbazine-induced damage, would also protect these cells from radiation. Adult male LBNF rats were implanted for 6 weeks with capsules containing testosterone and estradiol and then irradiated with doses from 2.5-7.0 Gy. Controls were irradiated with 1.8-3.5 Gy. Implants were removed 1 day after irradiation, and all animals were killed 10 weeks later for assessment of stem cell survival by counting repopulating tubules in histological sections and by sperm head counts. At doses of 2.5 and 3.5 Gy the repopulation indices and sperm head counts were significantly higher (P < 0.001) in the rats treated with testosterone and estradiol than in the controls. Protection factors calculated from the dose-response curves were in the range of 1.5-2.2. Elucidation of the mechanism of protection is essential to apply it to clinical situations. The fact that the spermatogonia are protected against radiation as well as procarbazine indicates that the mechanism does not involve drug delivery or metabolism. 32 refs., 3 figs.

  12. Protective effects of exogenous gangliosides on ROS-induced changes in human spermatozoa.

    PubMed

    Gavella, Mirjana; Lipovac, Vaskresenija

    2013-05-01

    This article summarizes the available evidence on the efficacy of gangliosides to reduce the degree of reactive oxygen species (ROS)-mediated damage. The antioxidative efficacy of exogenous gangliosides in protecting different cells encouraged us to examine their ability to protect human spermatozoa. Gangliosides are sialic acid-containing glycosphingolipids with strong amphiphilic character due to the bulky headgroup made of several sugar rings with sialic acid residues and the double-tailed hydrophobic lipid moiety. The amphiphilicity of gangliosides allows them to exist as micelles in aqueous media when they are present at a concentration above their critical micellar concentration. The protective effect of ganglioside micelles on spermatozoa is believed to stem from their ability to scavenge free radicals and prevent their damaging effects. In our study, we particularly focused our attention on the protective effect of ganglioside micelles on DNA in human spermatozoa exposed to cryopreservation. The results indicate that ganglioside micelles can modulate the hydrophobic properties of the sperm membrane to increase tolerance to DNA fragmentation, thus protecting the DNA from cryopreservation-induced damage. Further actions of ganglioside micelles, which were documented by biochemical and biophysical studies, included (i) the modulation of superoxide anion generation by increasing the diffusion barrier for membrane events responsible for signal translocation to the interior of the cell; (ii) the inhibition of iron-catalysed hydroxyl radical formation due to the iron chelation potential of gangliosides; and (iii) inhibition of hydrogen peroxide diffusion across the sperm membrane. PMID:23503425

  13. Protection from impulse noise-induced hearing loss with novel Src-protein tyrosine kinase inhibitors

    PubMed Central

    Bielefeld, Eric C.; Hangauer, David; Henderson, Donald

    2011-01-01

    Apoptosis is a significant mechanism of cochlear hair cell loss from noise. Molecules that inhibit apoptotic intracellular signaling reduce cochlear damage and hearing loss from noise. The current study is an extension of a previous study of the protective value of Src-protein tyrosine kinase inhibitors against noise (Harris et al., 2005). The current study tested three Src-inhibitors: the indole-based KX1-141, the biaryl-based KX2-329, and the ATP-competitive KX2-328. Each of the three drugs was delivered into the chinchillas’ cochleae by allowing the solutions to diffuse across the round window membrane thirty minutes prior to exposure to impulse noise. Hearing thresholds were measured using auditory evoked responses from electrodes in the inferior colliculi. Ears treated with KX2-329 showed significantly lower threshold shifts and outer hair cell losses than the control group. The cochleae treated with KX1-141 and KX2-328 did not show statistically significant protection from the impulse noise. The finding of protection with KX2-329 demonstrates that a biaryl-based Src inhibitor has protective capacity against noise-induced hearing loss that is as good as that demonstrated by KX1-004, a Src inhibitor drug that has been studied extensively as an otoprotectant against noise, and suggests that KX2-329 could be useful for protection against noise. PMID:21840347

  14. Development of Cross-Protective Influenza A Vaccines Based on Cellular Responses

    PubMed Central

    Soema, Peter Christiaan; van Riet, Elly; Kersten, Gideon; Amorij, Jean-Pierre

    2015-01-01

    Seasonal influenza vaccines provide protection against matching influenza A virus (IAV) strains mainly through the induction of neutralizing serum IgG antibodies. However, these antibodies fail to confer a protective effect against mismatched IAV. This lack of efficacy against heterologous influenza strains has spurred the vaccine development community to look for other influenza vaccine concepts, which have the ability to elicit cross-protective immune responses. One of the concepts that is currently been worked on is that of influenza vaccines inducing influenza-specific T cell responses. T cells are able to lyse infected host cells, thereby clearing the virus. More interestingly, these T cells can recognize highly conserved epitopes of internal influenza proteins, making cellular responses less vulnerable to antigenic variability. T cells are therefore cross-reactive against many influenza strains, and thus are a promising concept for future influenza vaccines. Despite their potential, there are currently no T cell-based IAV vaccines on the market. Selection of the proper antigen, appropriate vaccine formulation and evaluation of the efficacy of T cell vaccines remains challenging, both in preclinical and clinical settings. In this review, we will discuss the current developments in influenza T cell vaccines, focusing on existing protein-based and novel peptide-based vaccine formulations. Furthermore, we will discuss the feasibility of influenza T cell vaccines and their possible use in the future. PMID:26029218

  15. SGK-1 protects kidney cells against apoptosis induced by ceramide and TNF-α

    PubMed Central

    Pastore, D; Della-Morte, D; Coppola, A; Capuani, B; Lombardo, M F; Pacifici, F; Ferrelli, F; Arriga, R; Mammi, C; Federici, M; Bellia, A; Di Daniele, N; Tesauro, M; Donadel, G; Noto, D; Sbraccia, P; Sconocchia, G; Lauro, D

    2015-01-01

    Ceramide regulates several different cellular responses including mechanisms leading to apoptosis. Serum- and glucocorticoid-inducible protein kinase (SGK)-1 is a serine threonine kinase, which activates survival pathways in response to stress stimuli. Recently, we demonstrated an anti-apoptotic role of SGK-1 in human umbilical endothelial cells treated with high glucose. In the present study, since ceramide induces apoptosis by multiple mechanisms in diabetes and its complication such as nephropathy, we aimed to investigate whether SGK-1 may protect even against apoptosis induced by ceramide in kidney cells. Human embryonic kidney (HEK)-293 cells stable transfected with SGK-1 wild type (SGK-1wt) and its dominant negative gene (SGK-1dn) have been used in this study. Apoptotic stimuli were induced by C2-ceramide and TNF-α to increase endogenous synthesis of ceramide. Upon activation with these stimuli, SGK-1wt transfected cells have a statistically significant reduction of apoptosis compared with SGK-1dn cells (P<0.001). This protection was dependent on activation of caspase-3 and Poly-ADP-ribose-polymerase-1 (PARP-1) cleavage. SGK-1 and AKT-1 two highly homologous kinases differently reacted to ceramide treatment, since SGK-1 increases in response to apoptotic stimulus while AKT-1 decreases. This enhancement of SGK-1 was dependent on p38-mitogen-activated-protein kinases (p38MAPK), cyclic-adenosine-monophosphate/protein kinase A (cAMP/PKA) and phosphoinositide-3-kinase (PI3K) pathways. Especially, by using selective LY294002 inhibitor, we demonstrated that the most involved pathway in the SGK-1 mediated process of protection was PI3K. Treatment with inhibitor of SGK-1 (GSK650394) significantly enhanced TNF-α-dependent apoptosis in HEK-293 cells overexpressing SGK-1wt. Caspase-3, -8 and -9 selective inhibitors confirmed that SGK-1 reduced the activation of caspase-dependent apoptosis, probably by both intrinsic and extrinsic pathways. In conclusion, we

  16. Induction of heme oxygenase is a rapid, protective response in rhabdomyolysis in the rat.

    PubMed Central

    Nath, K A; Balla, G; Vercellotti, G M; Balla, J; Jacob, H S; Levitt, M D; Rosenberg, M E

    1992-01-01

    Heme proteins such as myoglobin or hemoglobin, when released into the extracellular space, can instigate tissue toxicity. Myoglobin is directly implicated in the pathogenesis of renal failure in rhabdomyolysis. In the glycerol model of this syndrome, we demonstrate that the kidney responds to such inordinate amounts of heme proteins by inducing the heme-degradative enzyme, heme oxygenase, as well as increasing the synthesis of ferritin, the major cellular repository for iron. Prior recruitment of this response with a single preinfusion of hemoglobin prevents kidney failure and drastically reduces mortality (from 100% to 14%). Conversely, ablating this response with a competitive inhibitor of heme oxygenase exacerbates kidney dysfunction. We provide the first in vivo evidence that induction of heme oxygenase coupled to ferritin synthesis is a rapid, protective antioxidant response. Our findings suggest a therapeutic strategy for populations at a high risk for rhabdomyolysis. Images PMID:1634613

  17. Toxoplasma gondii GRA7-Induced TRAF6 Activation Contributes to Host Protective Immunity

    PubMed Central

    Yuk, Jae-Min; Lee, Young-Ha; Jo, Eun-Kyeong

    2015-01-01

    The intracellular parasite Toxoplasma gondii has unique dense granule antigens (GRAs) that are crucial for host infection. Emerging evidence suggests that GRA7 of T. gondii is a promising serodiagnostic marker and an effective toxoplasmosis vaccine candidate; however, little is known about the intracellular regulatory mechanisms involved in the GRA7-induced host responses. Here we show that GRA7-induced MyD88 signaling through the activation of TRAF6 and production of reactive oxygen species (ROS) is required for the induction of NF-κB-mediated proinflammatory responses by macrophages. GRA7 stimulation resulted in the rapid activation of mitogen-activated protein kinases and an early burst of ROS in macrophages in a MyD88-dependent manner. GRA7 induced a physical association between GRA7 and TRAF6 via MyD88. Remarkably, the C terminus of GRA7 (GRA7-V) was sufficient for interaction with and ubiquitination of the RING domain of TRAF6, which is capable of inflammatory cytokine production. Interestingly, the generation of ROS and TRAF6 activation are mutually dependent on GRA7/MyD88-mediated signaling in macrophages. Furthermore, mice immunized with GRA7-V showed markedly increased Th1 immune responses and protective efficacy against T. gondii infection. Collectively, these results provide novel insight into the crucial role of GRA7-TRAF6 signaling in innate immune responses. PMID:26553469

  18. Early Administration of Carvedilol Protected against Doxorubicin-Induced Cardiomyopathy.

    PubMed

    Chen, Yung-Lung; Chung, Sheng-Ying; Chai, Han-Tan; Chen, Chih-Hung; Liu, Chu-Feng; Chen, Yi-Ling; Huang, Tien-Hung; Zhen, Yen-Yi; Sung, Pei-Hsun; Sun, Cheuk-Kwan; Chua, Sarah; Lu, Hung-I; Lee, Fan-Yen; Sheu, Jiunn-Jye; Yip, Hon-Kan

    2015-12-01

    This study tested for the benefits of early administration of carvedilol as protection against doxorubicin (DOX)-induced cardiomyopathy. Thirty male, adult B6 mice were categorized into group 1 (untreated control), group 2 [DOX treatment (15 mg/every other day for 2 weeks, i.p.], and group 3 [carvedilol (15 mg/kg/d, from day 7 after DOX treatment for 28 days)], and euthanized by day 35 after DOX treatment. By day 35, the left ventricular ejection fraction (LVEF) was significantly lower in group 2 than in groups 1 and 3, and significantly lower in group 3 than in group 1, whereas the left ventricular (LV) end-diastolic and LV end-systolic dimensions showed an opposite pattern to the LVEF among the three groups. The protein expressions of fibrotic (Smad3, TGF-β), apoptotic (BAX, cleaved caspase 3, PARP), DNA damage (γ-H2AX), oxidative stress (oxidized protein), mitochondrial damage (cytosolic cytochrome-C), heart failure (brain natriuretic peptide), and hypertrophic (β-MHC) biomarkers of the LV myocardium showed an opposite pattern to the LVEF among the three groups. The protein expressions of antifibrotic (BMP-2, Smad1/5), α-MHC, and phosphorylated-Akt showed an identical pattern to the LVEF among the three groups. The microscopic findings of fibrotic and collagen-deposition areas and the numbers of γ-H2AX(+) and 53BP1(+) cells in the LV myocardium exhibited an opposite pattern, whereas the numbers of endothelial cell (CD31(+), vWF(+)) markers showed an identical pattern to the LVEF among the three groups. Cardiac stem cell markers (C-kit(+) and Sca-1(+) cells) were significantly and progressively increased from group 1 to group 3. Additionally, the in vitro study showed carvedilol treatment significantly inhibited DOX-induced cardiomyoblast DNA (CD90/XRCC1(+), CD90/53BP1(+), and r-H2AX(+) cells) damage. Early carvedilol therapy protected against DOX-induced DNA damage and cardiomyopathy. PMID:26511374

  19. Inactivation of Kupffer Cells by Gadolinium Chloride Protects Murine Liver From Radiation-Induced Apoptosis

    SciTech Connect

    Du Shisuo; Qiang Min; Zeng Zhaochong; Ke Aiwu; Ji Yuan; Zhang Zhengyu; Zeng Haiying; Liu Zhongshan

    2010-03-15

    Purpose: To determine whether the inhibition of Kupffer cells before radiotherapy (RT) would protect hepatocytes from radiation-induced apoptosis. Materials and Methods: A single 30-Gy fraction was administered to the upper abdomen of Sprague-Dawley rats. The Kupffer cell inhibitor gadolinium chloride (GdCl3; 10 mg/kg body weight) was intravenously injected 24 h before RT. The rats were divided into four groups: group 1, sham RT plus saline (control group); group 2, sham RT plus GdCl3; group 3, RT plus saline; and group 4, RT plus GdCl3. Liver tissue was collected for measurement of apoptotic cytokine expression and evaluation of radiation-induced liver toxicity by analysis of liver enzyme activities, hepatocyte micronucleus formation, apoptosis, and histologic staining. Results: The expression of interleukin-1beta, interleukin-6, and tumor necrosis factor-alpha was significantly attenuated in group 4 compared with group 3 at 2, 6, 24, and 48 h after injection (p <0.05). At early points after RT, the rats in group 4 exhibited significantly lower levels of liver enzyme activity, apoptotic response, and hepatocyte micronucleus formation compared with those in group 3. Conclusion: Selective inactivation of Kupffer cells with GdCl3 reduced radiation-induced cytokine production and protected the liver against acute radiation-induced damage.

  20. Intranasal Immunization with Nontypeable Haemophilus influenzae Outer Membrane Vesicles Induces Cross-Protective Immunity in Mice

    PubMed Central

    Roier, Sandro; Leitner, Deborah R.; Iwashkiw, Jeremy; Schild-Prüfert, Kristina; Feldman, Mario F.; Krohne, Georg; Reidl, Joachim; Schild, Stefan

    2012-01-01

    Abstract Haemophilus influenzae is a Gram-negative human-restricted bacterium that can act as a commensal and a pathogen of the respiratory tract. Especially nontypeable H. influenzae (NTHi) is a major threat to public health and is responsible for several infectious diseases in humans, such as pneumonia, sinusitis, and otitis media. Additionally, NTHi strains are highly associated with exacerbations in patients suffering from chronic obstructive pulmonary disease. Currently, there is no licensed vaccine against NTHi commercially available. Thus, this study investigated the utilization of outer membrane vesicles (OMVs) as a potential vaccine candidate against NTHi infections. We analyzed the immunogenic and protective properties of OMVs derived from various NTHi strains by means of nasopharyngeal immunization and colonization studies with BALB/c mice. The results presented herein demonstrate that an intranasal immunization with NTHi OMVs results in a robust and complex humoral and mucosal immune response. Immunoprecipitation revealed the most important immunogenic proteins, such as the heme utilization protein, protective surface antigen D15, heme binding protein A, and the outer membrane proteins P1, P2, P5 and P6. The induced immune response conferred not only protection against colonization with a homologous NTHi strain, which served as an OMV donor for the immunization mixtures, but also against a heterologous NTHi strain, whose OMVs were not part of the immunization mixtures. These findings indicate that OMVs derived from NTHi strains have a high potential to act as a vaccine against NTHi infections. PMID:22880074

  1. Immunological aspects of the immune response induced by mosquito allergens.

    PubMed

    Cantillo, José Fernando; Fernández-Caldas, Enrique; Puerta, Leonardo

    2014-01-01

    Allergies caused by mosquito bites may produce local or systemic reactions. The inhalation of mosquito allergens may also cause asthma and/or allergic rhinoconjunctivitis in sensitized individuals. The mechanisms implicated in the development of these immune responses involve IgE antibodies, different subtypes of IgG and proinflammatory cytokines as well as basophils, eosinophils and mast cells. Several allergenic components have been identified in the saliva and bodies of mosquitoes and some of these are present in different mosquito species. The most common species implicated in allergic reactions belong to the genera Aedes, Culex and Anopheles. Several Aedes aegypti allergens have been cloned and sequenced. The recombinant molecules show IgE reactivity similar to that of the native allergens, making them good candidates for the diagnosis of mosquito allergies. Allergen-specific immunotherapy with mosquito extracts induces a protective response characterized by a decreased production of IgE antibodies, increased IgG levels, a reduction in the severity of cutaneous and respiratory symptoms and the need for medication. The aims of this review are to summarize the progress made in the characterization of mosquito allergens and discuss the types of immune responses induced by mosquito bites and the inhalation of mosquito allergens in atopic individuals. PMID:25661054

  2. NK Cell-Mediated Regulation of Protective Memory Responses against Intracellular Ehrlichial Pathogens

    PubMed Central

    Habib, Samar; El Andaloussi, Abdeljabar; Hisham, Ahmed; Ismail, Nahed

    2016-01-01

    Ehrlichiae are gram-negative obligate intracellular bacteria that cause potentially fatal human monocytic ehrlichiosis. We previously showed that natural killer (NK) cells play a critical role in host defense against Ehrlichia during primary infection. However, the contribution of NK cells to the memory response against Ehrlichia remains elusive. Primary infection of C57BL/6 mice with Ehrlichia muris provides long-term protection against a second challenge with the highly virulent Ixodes ovatus Ehrlichia (IOE), which ordinarily causes fatal disease in naïve mice. Here, we show that the depletion of NK cells in E. muris-primed mice abrogates the protective memory response against IOE. Approximately, 80% of NK cell-depleted E. muris-primed mice succumbed to lethal IOE infection on days 8–10 after IOE infection, similar to naïve mice infected with the same dose of IOE. The lack of a recall response in NK cell-depleted mice correlated with an increased bacterial burden, extensive liver injury, decreased frequency of Ehrlichia-specific IFN-γ-producing memory CD4+ and CD8+ T-cells, and a low titer of Ehrlichia-specific antibodies. Intraperitoneal infection of mice with E. muris resulted in the production of IL-15, IL-12, and IFN-γ as well as an expansion of activated NKG2D+ NK cells. The adoptive transfer of purified E. muris-primed hepatic and splenic NK cells into Rag2-/-Il2rg-/- recipient mice provided protective immunity against challenge with E. muris. Together, these data suggest that E. muris-induced memory-like NK cells, which contribute to the protective, recall response against Ehrlichia. PMID:27092553

  3. Dengue-induced autophagy, virus replication and protection from cell death require ER stress (PERK) pathway activation

    PubMed Central

    Datan, E; Roy, S G; Germain, G; Zali, N; McLean, J E; Golshan, G; Harbajan, S; Lockshin, R A; Zakeri, Z

    2016-01-01

    A virus that reproduces in a host without killing cells can easily establish a successful infection. Previously, we showed that dengue-2, a virus that threatens 40% of the world, induces autophagy, enabling dengue to reproduce in cells without triggering cell death. Autophagy further protects the virus-laden cells from further insults. In this study, we evaluate how it does so; we show that dengue upregulates host pathways that increase autophagy, namely endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress and ataxia telangiectasia mutated (ATM) signaling followed by production of reactive oxygen species (ROS). Inhibition of ER stress or ATM signaling abrogates the dengue-conferred protection against other cell stressors. Direct inhibition of ER stress response in infected cells decreases autophagosome turnover, reduces ROS production and limits reproduction of dengue virus. Blocking ATM activation, which is an early response to infection, decreases transcription of ER stress response proteins, but ATM has limited impact on production of ROS and virus titers. Production of ROS determines only late-onset autophagy in infected cells and is not necessary for dengue-induced protection from stressors. Collectively, these results demonstrate that among the multiple autophagy-inducing pathways during infection, ER stress signaling is more important to viral replication and protection of cells than either ATM or ROS-mediated signaling. To limit virus production and survival of dengue-infected cells, one must address the earliest phase of autophagy, induced by ER stress. PMID:26938301

  4. Mucosally administered Lactobacillus surface-displayed influenza antigens (sM2 and HA2) with cholera toxin subunit A1 (CTA1) Induce broadly protective immune responses against divergent influenza subtypes.

    PubMed

    Li, Rui; Chowdhury, Mohammed Y E; Kim, Jae-Hoon; Kim, Tae-Hwan; Pathinayake, Prabuddha; Koo, Wan-Seo; Park, Min-Eun; Yoon, Ji-Eun; Roh, Jong-Bok; Hong, Seung-Pyo; Sung, Moon-Hee; Lee, Jong-Soo; Kim, Chul-Joong

    2015-09-30

    The development of a universal influenza vaccine that provides broad cross protection against existing and unforeseen influenza viruses is a critical challenge. In this study, we constructed and expressed conserved sM2 and HA2 influenza antigens with cholera toxin subunit A1 (CTA1) on the surface of Lactobacillus casei (pgsA-CTA1sM2HA2/L. casei). Oral and nasal administrations of recombinant L. casei into mice resulted in high levels of serum immunoglobulin G (IgG) and their isotypes (IgG1 & IgG2a) as well as mucosal IgA. The mucosal administration of pgsA-CTA1sM2HA2/L. casei may also significantly increase the levels of sM2- or HA2-specific cell-mediated immunity because increased release of both IFN-γ and IL-4 was observed. The recombinant pgsA-CTA1sM2HA2/L. casei provided better protection of BALB/c mice against 10 times the 50% mouse lethal doses (MLD50) of homologous A/EM/Korea/W149/06(H5N1) or A/Aquatic bird/Korea/W81/2005 (H5N2) and heterologous A/Puerto Rico/8/34(H1N1), or A/Chicken/Korea/116/2004(H9N2) or A/Philippines/2/08(H3N2) viruses, compared with L. casei harboring sM2HA2 and also the protection was maintained up to seven months after administration. These results indicate that recombinant L. casei expressing the highly conserved sM2, HA2 of influenza and CTA1 as a mucosal adjuvant could be a potential mucosal vaccine candidate or tool to protect against divergent influenza viruses for human and animal. PMID:26210951

  5. The co-chaperone CHIP is induced in various stresses and confers protection to cells.

    PubMed

    Dikshit, Priyanka; Jana, Nihar Ranjan

    2007-06-01

    The C-terminus of Hsp70 interacting protein (CHIP) is being considered to be a cellular quality control E3 ubiquitin ligase because of its ability to degrade misfolded proteins in association with heat shock chaperones. The neuroprotective role of CHIP also has been implicated in several familial neurodegenerative diseases including polyglutamine diseases. However, the regulation of the expression of CHIP under different stress conditions and its protective role thereon is unknown. Here we have shown that the mRNA level of CHIP is significantly increased in the cells exposed to oxidative, endoplasmic reticulum and proteasomal stress. CHIP also protected from various stress-induced cell death. Finally, we have demonstrated upregulation of CHIP mRNA levels in the expanded polyglutamine protein expressing cells. Our result suggests that the upregulation of CHIP under various stress environments is an adaptive response of the cells to deal with the excess burden of misfolded protein. PMID:17442270

  6. Molecular Mechanisms Responsible for Neuron-Derived Conditioned Medium (NCM)-Mediated Protection of Ischemic Brain.

    PubMed

    Lin, Chi-Hsin; Wang, Chen-Hsuan; Hsu, Shih-Lan; Liao, Li-Ya; Lin, Ting-An; Hsueh, Chi-Mei

    2016-01-01

    The protective value of neuron-derived conditioned medium (NCM) in cerebral ischemia and the underlying mechanism(s) responsible for NCM-mediated brain protection against cerebral ischemia were investigated in the study. NCM was first collected from the neuronal culture growing under the in vitro ischemic condition (glucose-, oxygen- and serum-deprivation or GOSD) for 2, 4 or 6 h. Through the focal cerebral ischemia (bilateral CCAO/unilateral MCAO) animal model, we discovered that ischemia/reperfusion (I/R)-induced brain infarction was significantly reduced by NCM, given directly into the cistern magna at the end of 90 min of CCAO/MCAO. Immunoblocking and chemical blocking strategies were applied in the in vitro ischemic studies to show that NCM supplement could protect microglia, astrocytes and neurons from GOSD-induced cell death, in a growth factor (TGFβ1, NT-3 and GDNF) and p-ERK dependent manner. Brain injection with TGFβ1, NT3, GDNF and ERK agonist (DADS) alone or in combination, therefore also significantly decreased the infarct volume of ischemic brain. Moreover, NCM could inhibit ROS but stimulate IL-1β release from GOSD-treated microglia and limit the infiltration of IL-β-positive microglia into the core area of ischemic brain, revealing the anti-oxidant and anti-inflammatory activities of NCM. In overall, NCM-mediated brain protection against cerebral ischemia has been demonstrated for the first time in S.D. rats, due to its anti-apoptotic, anti-oxidant and potentially anti-glutamate activities (NCM-induced IL-1β can inhibit the glutamate-mediated neurotoxicity) and restriction upon the infiltration of inflammatory microglia into the core area of ischemic brain. The therapeutic potentials of NCM, TGFβ1, GDNF, NT-3 and DADS in the control of cerebral ischemia in human therefore have been suggested and require further investigation. PMID:26745377

  7. Molecular Mechanisms Responsible for Neuron-Derived Conditioned Medium (NCM)-Mediated Protection of Ischemic Brain

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Chi-Hsin; Wang, Chen-Hsuan; Hsu, Shih-Lan; Liao, Li-Ya; Lin, Ting-An; Hsueh, Chi-Mei

    2016-01-01

    The protective value of neuron-derived conditioned medium (NCM) in cerebral ischemia and the underlying mechanism(s) responsible for NCM-mediated brain protection against cerebral ischemia were investigated in the study. NCM was first collected from the neuronal culture growing under the in vitro ischemic condition (glucose-, oxygen- and serum-deprivation or GOSD) for 2, 4 or 6 h. Through the focal cerebral ischemia (bilateral CCAO/unilateral MCAO) animal model, we discovered that ischemia/reperfusion (I/R)-induced brain infarction was significantly reduced by NCM, given directly into the cistern magna at the end of 90 min of CCAO/MCAO. Immunoblocking and chemical blocking strategies were applied in the in vitro ischemic studies to show that NCM supplement could protect microglia, astrocytes and neurons from GOSD-induced cell death, in a growth factor (TGFβ1, NT-3 and GDNF) and p-ERK dependent manner. Brain injection with TGFβ1, NT3, GDNF and ERK agonist (DADS) alone or in combination, therefore also significantly decreased the infarct volume of ischemic brain. Moreover, NCM could inhibit ROS but stimulate IL-1β release from GOSD-treated microglia and limit the infiltration of IL-β-positive microglia into the core area of ischemic brain, revealing the anti-oxidant and anti-inflammatory activities of NCM. In overall, NCM-mediated brain protection against cerebral ischemia has been demonstrated for the first time in S.D. rats, due to its anti-apoptotic, anti-oxidant and potentially anti-glutamate activities (NCM-induced IL-1β can inhibit the glutamate-mediated neurotoxicity) and restriction upon the infiltration of inflammatory microglia into the core area of ischemic brain. The therapeutic potentials of NCM, TGFβ1, GDNF, NT-3 and DADS in the control of cerebral ischemia in human therefore have been suggested and require further investigation. PMID:26745377

  8. Protective Efficacy in Sheep of Adenovirus-Vectored Vaccines against Bluetongue Virus Is Associated with Specific T Cell Responses

    PubMed Central

    Martín, Verónica; Pascual, Elena; Avia, Miguel; Peña, Lourdes; Valcárcel, Félix; Sevilla, Noemí

    2015-01-01

    Bluetongue virus (BTV) is an economically important Orbivirus of the Reoviridae family that causes a hemorrhagic disease in ruminants. Its control has been achieved by inactivated-vaccines that have proven to protect against homologous BTV challenge although unable to induce long-term immunity. Therefore, a more efficient control strategy needs to be developed. Recombinant adenovirus vectors are lead vaccine candidates for protection of several diseases, mainly because of their potency to induce potent T cell immunity. Here we report the induction of humoral and T-cell mediated responses able to protect animals against BTV challenge by recombinant replication-defective human adenovirus serotype 5 (Ad5) expressing either VP7, VP2 or NS3 BTV proteins. First we used the IFNAR(-/-) mouse model system to establish a proof of principle, and afterwards we assayed the protective efficacy in sheep, the natural host of BTV. Mice were completely protected against BTV challenge, developing humoral and BTV-specific CD8+- and CD4+-T cell responses by vaccination with the different rAd5. Sheep vaccinated with Ad5-BTV-VP2 and Ad5-BTV-VP7 or only with Ad5-BTV-VP7 and challenged with BTV showed mild disease symptoms and reduced viremia. This partial protection was achieved in the absence of neutralizing antibodies but strong BTV-specific CD8+ T cell responses in those sheep vaccinated with Ad5-BTV-VP7. These data indicate that rAd5 is a suitable vaccine vector to induce T cell immunity during BTV vaccination and provide new data regarding the relevance of T cell responses in protection during BTV infection. PMID:26619062

  9. Bradykinin in ischemic conditioning-induced tissue protection: Evidences and possible mechanisms.

    PubMed

    Sharma, Roohani; Randhawa, Puneet Kaur; Singh, Nirmal; Jaggi, Amteshwar Singh

    2015-12-01

    Ischemic conditioning is an intrinsic protective mechanism in which repeated short episodes of reversible ischemia protects the tissue and increases its tolerance against a subsequent longer period of ischemia (index ischemia). Bradykinin is a physiologically and pharmacologically active peptide of the kallikrein-kinin system. Besides the involvement of bradykinin in a variety of physiological and pathological responses such as pain, inflammation and in cardiovascular system as a potent vasodilator, it also acts as an endogenous cytoprotective mediator in the ischemic tissue. Pretreatment with various pharmacological modulators of bradykinin has confirmed the involvement of bradykinin in ischemic conditioning-induced protection. The protective actions of bradykinin in three major paradigms of ischemic conditioning i.e. ischemic preconditioning, ischemic postconditioning and remote ischemic preconditioning involves activation and regulation of various endogenous signaling cascades to render the heart resistant to infarction. In ischemic preconditioning, bradykinin exerts cardioprotective effect via activation of PI3K/Akt/eNOS signaling pathway and regulation of redox state via NO release. The role of bradykinin and its B2 receptors in ischemic-postconditioning induced neuroprotection has been described mainly due to its increased redox signaling cascade and activation of mitochondrial anti-apoptotic pathway. Furthermore, its cardioprotective role during remote ischemic preconditioning has been associated with activation of B2 receptors mediated neurogenic pathway and internalization of B2 receptors along with the formation of signalosomes that activates intracellular cytoprotective transduction pathways. The present review focuses on the potential role of bradykinin in mediating different forms of ischemic conditioning (pre/post/remote)-induced cardioprotection and neuroprotection along with the possible mechanisms. PMID:26499976

  10. Protective effect of L-theanine on carbon tetrachloride-induced acute liver injury in mice.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Wei; Gao, Min; Sun, Shuai; Bi, Aijing; Xin, Yinqiang; Han, Xiaodong; Wang, Liangbin; Yin, Zhimin; Luo, Lan

    2012-06-01

    We studied effects of L-theanine, a unique amino acid in tea, on carbon tetrachloride (CCl(4))-induced liver injury in mice. The mice were pre-treated orally with L-theanine (50, 100 or 200 mg/kg) once daily for seven days before CCl(4) (10 ml/kg of 0.2% CCl(4) solution in olive oil) injection. L-theanine dose-dependently suppressed the increase of serum activity of ALT and AST and bilirubin level as well as liver histopathological changes induced by CCl(4) in mice. L-theanine significantly prevented CCl(4)-induced production of lipid peroxidation and decrease of hepatic GSH content and antioxidant enzymes activities. Our further studies demonstrated that L-theanine inhibited metabolic activation of CCl(4) through down-regulating cytochrome P450 2E1 (CYP2E1). As a consequence, L-theanine inhibited oxidative stress-mediated inflammatory response which included the increase of TNF-α and IL-1β in sera, and expression of cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2) and inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS) in livers. CCl(4)-induced activation of apoptotic related proteins including caspase-3 and PARP in mouse livers was also prevented by L-theanine treatment. In summary, L-theanine protects mice against CCl(4)-induced acute liver injury through inhibiting metabolic activation of CCl(4) and preventing CCl(4)-induced reduction of anti-oxidant capacity in mouse livers to relieve inflammatory response and hepatocyte apoptosis. PMID:22583898

  11. Normal Cellular Prion Protein Protects against Manganese-induced Oxidative Stress and Apoptotic Cell Death

    PubMed Central

    Choi, Christopher J.; Anantharam, Vellareddy; Saetveit, Nathan J.; Houk, Robert. S.; Kanthasamy, Arthi; Kanthasamy, Anumantha G.

    2012-01-01

    The normal prion protein is abundantly expressed in the CNS, but its biological function remains unclear. The prion protein has octapeptide repeat regions that bind to several divalent metals, suggesting that the prion proteins may alter the toxic effect of environmental neurotoxic metals. In the present study, we systematically examined whether prion protein modifies the neurotoxicity of manganese (Mn) by comparing the effect of Mn on mouse neural cells expressing prion protein (PrPC -cells) and prion-knockout (PrPKO -cells). Exposure to Mn (10 μM-1 mM) for 24 hr produced a dose-dependent cytotoxic response in both PrPC -cells and PrPKO -cells. Interestingly, PrPC -cells (EC50 117.6μM) were more resistant to Mn-induced cytotoxicity, as compared to PrPKO -cells (EC50 59.9μM), suggesting a protective role for PrPC against Mn neurotoxicity. Analysis of intracellular Mn levels showed less Mn accumulation in PrPC -cells as compared to PrPKO -cells. Furthermore, Mn-induced mitochondrial depolarization and ROS generation were significantly attenuated in PrPC -cells as compared to PrPKO -cells. Measurement of antioxidant status revealed similar basal levels of glutathione (GSH) in PrPC -cells and PrPKO -cells; however, Mn treatment caused greater depletion of GSH in PrPKO -cells. Mn-induced mitochondrial depolarization and ROS production were followed by time- and dose-dependent activation of the apoptotic cell death cascade involving caspase-9 and -3. Notably, DNA fragmentation induced by both Mn treatment and oxidative stress-inducer hydrogen peroxide (100μM) was significantly suppressed in PrPC -cells as compared to PrPKO -cells. Together, these results demonstrate that prion protein interferes with divalent metal Mn uptake and protects against Mn-induced oxidative stress and apoptotic cell death. PMID:17483122

  12. Cyclic AMP can promote APL progression and protect myeloid leukemia cells against anthracycline-induced apoptosis

    PubMed Central

    Gausdal, G; Wergeland, A; Skavland, J; Nguyen, E; Pendino, F; Rouhee, N; McCormack, E; Herfindal, L; Kleppe, R; Havemann, U; Schwede, F; Bruserud, Ø; Gjertsen, B T; Lanotte, M; Ségal-Bendirdjian, E; Døskeland, S O

    2013-01-01

    We show that cyclic AMP (cAMP) elevating agents protect blasts from patients with acute promyelocytic leukemia (APL) against death induced by first-line anti-leukemic anthracyclines like daunorubicin (DNR). The cAMP effect was reproduced in NB4 APL cells, and shown to depend on activation of the generally cytoplasmic cAMP-kinase type I (PKA-I) rather than the perinuclear PKA-II. The protection of both NB4 cells and APL blasts was associated with (inactivating) phosphorylation of PKA site Ser118 of pro-apoptotic Bad and (activating) phosphorylation of PKA site Ser133 of the AML oncogene CREB. Either event would be expected to protect broadly against cell death, and we found cAMP elevation to protect also against 2-deoxyglucose, rotenone, proteasome inhibitor and a BH3-only mimetic. The in vitro findings were mirrored by the findings in NSG mice with orthotopic NB4 cell leukemia. The mice showed more rapid disease progression when given cAMP-increasing agents (prostaglandin E2 analog and theophylline), both with and without DNR chemotherapy. The all-trans retinoic acid (ATRA)-induced terminal APL cell differentiation is a cornerstone in current APL treatment and is enhanced by cAMP. We show also that ATRA-resistant APL cells, believed to be responsible for treatment failure with current ATRA-based treatment protocols, were protected by cAMP against death. This suggests that the beneficial pro-differentiating and non-beneficial pro-survival APL cell effects of cAMP should be weighed against each other. The results suggest also general awareness toward drugs that can affect bone marrow cAMP levels in leukemia patients. PMID:23449452

  13. Autophagy induced by p53-reactivating molecules protects pancreatic cancer cells from apoptosis.

    PubMed

    Fiorini, Claudia; Menegazzi, Marta; Padroni, Chiara; Dando, Ilaria; Dalla Pozza, Elisa; Gregorelli, Alex; Costanzo, Chiara; Palmieri, Marta; Donadelli, Massimo

    2013-03-01

    TP53 mutations compromising p53 transcriptional function occur in more than 50 % of human cancers, including pancreatic adenocarcinoma, and render cancer cells more resistant to conventional therapy. In the last few years, many efforts have been addressed to identify p53-reactivating molecules able to restore the wild-type transcriptionally competent conformation of the mutated proteins. Here, we show that two of these compounds, CP-31398 and RITA, induce cell growth inhibition, apoptosis, and autophagy by activating p53/DNA binding and p53 phosphorylation (Ser15), without affecting the total p53 amount. These effects occur in both wild-type and mutant p53 pancreatic adenocarcinoma cell lines, whereas they are much less pronounced in normal human primary fibroblasts. Furthermore, CP-31398 and RITA regulate the axis SESN1-2/AMPK/mTOR by inducing AMPK phosphorylation on Thr172, which has a crucial role in the autophagic response. The protective role of autophagy in cell growth inhibition by CP-31398 and RITA is supported by the finding that the AMPK inhibitor compound C or the autophagy inhibitors chloroquine or 3-methyladenine sensitize both pancreatic adenocarcinoma cell lines to the apoptotic response induced by p53-reactivating molecules. Our results demonstrate for the first time a survival role for autophagy induced by p53-reactivating molecules, supporting the development of an anti-cancer therapy based on autophagy inhibition associated to p53 activation. PMID:23238993

  14. Sirt1 protects against high-fat diet-induced metabolic damage

    PubMed Central

    Pfluger, Paul T.; Herranz, Daniel; Velasco-Miguel, Susana; Serrano, Manuel; Tschöp, Matthias H.

    2008-01-01

    The identification of new pharmacological approaches to effectively prevent, treat, and cure the metabolic syndrome is of crucial importance. Excessive exposure to dietary lipids causes inflammatory responses, deranges the homeostasis of cellular metabolism, and is believed to constitute a key initiator of the metabolic syndrome. Mammalian Sirt1 is a protein deacetylase that has been involved in resveratrol-mediated protection from high-fat diet-induced metabolic damage, but direct proof for the implication of Sirt1 has remained elusive. Here, we report that mice with moderate overexpression of Sirt1 under the control of its natural promoter exhibit fat mass gain similar to wild-type controls when exposed to a high-fat diet. Higher energy expenditure appears to be compensated by a parallel increase in food intake. Interestingly, transgenic Sirt1 mice under a high-fat diet show lower lipid-induced inflammation along with better glucose tolerance, and are almost entirely protected from hepatic steatosis. We present data indicating that such beneficial effects of Sirt1 are due to at least two mechanisms: induction of antioxidant proteins MnSOD and Nrf1, possibly via stimulation of PGC1α, and lower activation of proinflammatory cytokines, such as TNFα and IL-6, via down-modulation of NFκB activity. Together, these results provide direct proof of the protective potential of Sirt1 against the metabolic consequences of chronic exposure to a high-fat diet. PMID:18599449

  15. Can VHS Virus Bypass the Protective Immunity Induced by DNA Vaccination in Rainbow Trout?

    PubMed Central

    Sepúlveda, Dagoberto; Lorenzen, Niels

    2016-01-01

    DNA vaccines encoding viral glycoproteins have been very successful for induction of protective immunity against diseases caused by rhabdoviruses in cultured fish species. However, the vaccine concept is based on a single viral gene and since RNA viruses are known to possess high variability and adaptation capacity, this work aimed at evaluating whether viral haemorrhagic septicaemia virus (VHSV), an RNA virus and member of Rhabdoviridae family, was able to evade the protective immune response induced by the DNA vaccination of rainbow trout. The experiments comprised repeated passages of a highly pathogenic VHSV isolate in a fish cell line in the presence of neutralizing fish serum (in vitro approach), and in rainbow trout immunized with the VHS DNA vaccine (in vivo approach). For the in vitro approach, the virus collected from the last passage (passaged virus) was as sensitive as the parental virus to serum neutralization, suggesting that the passaging did not promote the selection of virus populations able to bypass the neutralization by serum antibodies. Also, in the in vivo approach, where virus was passaged several times in vaccinated fish, no increased virulence nor increased persistence in vaccinated fish was observed in comparison with the parental virus. However, some of the vaccinated fish did get infected and could transmit the infection to naïve cohabitant fish. The results demonstrated that the DNA vaccine induced a robust protection, but also that the immunity was non-sterile. It is consequently important not to consider vaccinated fish as virus free in veterinary terms. PMID:27054895

  16. Inflammatory and innate immune responses in dengue infection: protection versus disease induction.

    PubMed

    Costa, Vivian Vasconcelos; Fagundes, Caio Tavares; Souza, Danielle G; Teixeira, Mauro Martins

    2013-06-01

    Dengue disease is a mosquito-borne viral disease of expanding geographical range and incidence. Infection by one of the four serotypes of dengue virus induces a spectrum of disease manifestations, ranging from asymptomatic to life-threatening Dengue hemorrhagic fever/dengue shock syndrome. Many efforts have been made to elucidate several aspects of dengue virus-induced disease, but the pathogenesis of disease is complex and remains unclear. Understanding the mechanisms involved in the early stages of infection is crucial to determine and develop safe therapeutics to prevent the severe outcomes of disease without interfering with control of infection. In this review, we discuss the dual role of the innate and inflammatory pathways activated during dengue disease in mediating both protection and exacerbation of disease. We show that some mediators involved in each of these responses differ substantially, suggesting that interfering in disease-associated immune pathways may represent a potential therapeutic opportunity for the treatment of severe dengue. PMID:23567637

  17. Differential Immune Responses and Protective Effects in Avirulent Mycobacterial Strains Vaccinated BALB/c Mice.

    PubMed

    Liu, Laicheng; Fu, Ruiling; Yuan, Xuefeng; Shi, Chunwei; Wang, Shuling; Lu, Xianyu; Ma, Zhao; Zhang, Xiaoming; Qin, Weiyan; Fan, Xionglin

    2015-07-01

    Screening live mycobacterial vaccine candidates is the important strategy to develop new vaccines against adult tuberculosis (TB). In this study, the immunogenicity and protective efficacy of several avirulent mycobacterial strains including Mycobacterium smegmatis, M. vaccae, M. terrae, M. phlei, M. trivial, and M. tuberculosis H37Ra were compared with M. bovis BCG in BALB/c mice. Our results demonstrated that differential immune responses were induced in different mycobacterial species vaccinated mice. As BCG-vaccinated mice did, M. terrae immunization resulted in Th1-type responses in the lung, as well as splenocytes secreting IFN-γ against a highly conserved mycobacterial antigen Ag85A. M. smegmatis also induced the same splenocytes secreting IFN-γ as BCG and M. terrae did. In addition, M. terrae and M. smegmatis-immunized mice predominantly increased expression of IL-10 and TGF-β in the lung. Most importantly, mice vaccinated with H37Ra and M. vaccae could provide the same protection in the lung against virulent M. tuberculosis challenge as BCG. The result may have important implications in developing adult TB vaccine. PMID:25995039

  18. Effective antibody therapy induces host protective antitumor immunity that is augmented by TLR4 agonist treatment

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Shangzi; Astsaturov, Igor A.; Bingham, Catherine A.; McCarthy, Kenneth M.; von Mehren, Margaret; Xu, Wei; Alpaugh, R. Katherine; Tang, Yong; Littlefield, Bruce A.; Hawkins, Lynn D.; Ishizaka, Sally T.; Weiner, Louis M.

    2012-01-01

    Toll-like receptors are potent activators of the innate immune system and generate signals leading to the initiation of the adaptive immune response that can be utilized for therapeutic purposes. We tested the hypothesis that combined treatment with a toll-like receptor agonist and an anti-tumor monoclonal antibody is effective and induces host-protective anti-tumor immunity. C57BL/6 human mutated HER2 (hmHER2) transgenic mice that constitutively express kinase-deficient human HER2 under control of the CMV promoter were established. These mice demonstrate immunological tolerance to D5-HER2, a syngeneic human HER2-expressing melanoma cell line. This human HER2 tolerant model offers the potential to serve as a preclinical model to test both antibody therapy and the immunization potential of human HER2 targeted therapeutics. Here we show that E6020, a toll like receptor-4 (TLR4) agonist effectively boosted the antitumor efficacy of the monoclonal antibody trastuzumab in immunodeficient C57BL/6 SCID mice as well as in C57BL/6 hmHER2 transgenic mice. E6020 and trastuzumab co-treatment resulted in significantly greater inhibition of tumor growth than was observed with either agent individually. Furthermore, mice treated with the combination of trastuzumab and the TLR4 agonist were protected against re-challenge with human HER2 transfected tumor cells in hmHER2 transgenic mouse strains. These findings suggest that combined treatment with trastuzumab and a TLR4 agonist not only promotes direct anti-tumor effects but also induces a host-protective human HER2-directed adaptive immune response indicative of a memory response. These data provide an immunological rationale for testing TLR4 agonists in combination with antibody therapy in patients with cancer. PMID:21842208

  19. Cinnamon extract protects against acute alcohol-induced liver steatosis in mice.

    PubMed

    Kanuri, Giridhar; Weber, Synia; Volynets, Valentina; Spruss, Astrid; Bischoff, Stephan C; Bergheim, Ina

    2009-03-01

    Acute and chronic consumption of alcohol can cause increased intestinal permeability and bacterial overgrowth, thereby increasing portal endotoxin levels. This barrier impairment subsequently leads to an activation of hepatic Kupffer cells and increased release of reactive oxygen species as well as of tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNFalpha). Recent studies have suggested that cinnamon extract may have antiinflammatory effects. In the present study, the protective effects of an alcoholic extract of cinnamon bark was assessed in a mouse model of acute alcohol-induced steatosis and in RAW 264.7 macrophages, used here as a model of Kupffer cells. Acute alcohol ingestion caused a >20-fold increase in hepatic lipid accumulation. Pretreatment with cinnamon extract significantly reduced the hepatic lipid accumulation. This protective effect of cinnamon extract was associated with an inhibition of the induction of the myeloid differentiation primary response gene (MyD) 88, inducible nitric oxide (NO) synthase (iNOS), and plasminogen activator inhibitor 1 mRNA expression found in livers of alcohol-treated animals. In vitro prechallenge with cinnamon extract suppressed lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-induced MyD88, iNOS, and TNFalpha expression as well as NO formation almost completely. Furthermore, LPS treatment of RAW 264.7 macrophages further resulted in degradation of inhibitor kappaB; this effect was almost completely blocked by cinnamon extract. Taken together, our data show that an alcohol extract of cinnamon bark may protect the liver from acute alcohol-induced steatosis through mechanisms involving the inhibition of MyD88 expression. PMID:19126670

  20. Proteins of Leishmania (Viannia) shawi confer protection associated with Th1 immune response and memory generation

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Leishmania (Viannia) shawi parasite was first characterized in 1989. Recently the protective effects of soluble leishmanial antigen (SLA) from L. (V.) shawi promastigotes were demonstrated using BALB/c mice, the susceptibility model for this parasite. In order to identify protective fractions, SLA was fractionated by reverse phase HPLC and five antigenic fractions were obtained. Methods F1 fraction was purified from L. (V.) shawi parasite extract by reverse phase HPLC. BALB/c mice were immunized once a week for two consecutive weeks by subcutaneous routes in the rump, using 25 μg of F1. After 1 and 16 weeks of last immunization, groups were challenged in the footpad with L. (V.) shawi promastigotes. After 2 months, those same mice were sacrificed and parasite burden, cellular and humoral immune responses were evaluated. Results The F1 fraction induced a high degree of protection associated with an increase in IFN-γ, a decrease in IL-4, increased cell proliferation and activation of CD8+T lymphocytes. Long-term protection was acquired in F1-immunized mice, associated with increased CD4+ central memory T lymphocytes and activation of both CD4+ and CD8+ T cells. In addition, F1-immunized groups showed an increase in IgG2a levels. Conclusions The inductor capability of antigens to generate memory lymphocytes that can proliferate and secrete beneficial cytokines upon infection could be an important factor in the development of vaccine candidates against American Tegumentary Leishmaniasis. PMID:22463817

  1. Hydrolysates of citrus plants stimulate melanogenesis protecting against UV-induced dermal damage.

    PubMed

    Chiang, Hsiu-Mei; Lin, Jen-Wen; Hsiao, Pei-Ling; Tsai, Shang-Yuan; Wen, Kuo-Ching

    2011-04-01

    The sun-tanning process occurs as a spontaneous response to ultraviolet (UV) irradiation. UV will induce tanning and DNA damage, processes that can lead to photoaging and skin disorders such as hyperpigmentation and cancer. The pigment melanin protects skin from UV damage; therefore, an efficient melanin-promoting suntan lotion could be highly beneficial. In this study, a process was developed to increase the content of naringenin in citrus extracts and to determine whether a higher naringenin content of citrus would induce melanogenesis. Melanin content and tyrosinase expression in mouse B16 melanoma cells were assayed after treatment with citrus plant extracts and their hydrolysates. The results indicate that hydrolysis increased the naringenin content in citrus extracts and that citrus preparations stimulated cellular melanogenesis and tyrosinase expression. It is suggested that this method is applicable to the industrial production of melanin-promoting suntan lotions with antiphotocarcinogenic properties derived from citrus rind and citrus products. PMID:20857432

  2. Isorhamnetin Protects Human Keratinocytes against Ultraviolet B-Induced Cell Damage.

    PubMed

    Han, Xia; Piao, Mei Jing; Kim, Ki Cheon; Madduma Hewage, Susara Ruwan Kumara; Yoo, Eun Sook; Koh, Young Sang; Kang, Hee Kyoung; Shin, Jennifer H; Park, Yeunsoo; Yoo, Suk Jae; Chae, Sungwook; Hyun, Jin Won

    2015-07-01

    Isorhamnetin (3-methylquercetin) is a flavonoid derived from the fruits of certain medicinal plants. This study investigated the photoprotective properties of isorhamnetin against cell damage and apoptosis resulting from excessive ultraviolet (UV) B exposure in human HaCaT keratinocytes. Isorhamnetin eliminated UVB-induced intracellular reactive oxygen species (ROS) and attenuated the oxidative modification of DNA, lipids, and proteins in response to UVB radiation. Moreover, isorhamnetin repressed UVB-facilitated programmed cell death in the keratinocytes, as evidenced by a reduction in apoptotic body formation, and nuclear fragmentation. Additionally, isorhamnetin suppressed the ability of UVB light to trigger mitochondrial dysfunction. Taken together, these results indicate that isorhamnetin has the potential to protect human keratinocytes against UVB-induced cell damage and death. PMID:26157553

  3. Isorhamnetin Protects Human Keratinocytes against Ultraviolet B-Induced Cell Damage

    PubMed Central

    Han, Xia; Piao, Mei Jing; Kim, Ki Cheon; Madduma Hewage, Susara Ruwan Kumara; Yoo, Eun Sook; Koh, Young Sang; Kang, Hee Kyoung; Shin, Jennifer H; Park, Yeunsoo; Yoo, Suk Jae; Chae, Sungwook; Hyun, Jin Won

    2015-01-01

    Isorhamnetin (3-methylquercetin) is a flavonoid derived from the fruits of certain medicinal plants. This study investigated the photoprotective properties of isorhamnetin against cell damage and apoptosis resulting from excessive ultraviolet (UV) B exposure in human HaCaT keratinocytes. Isorhamnetin eliminated UVB-induced intracellular reactive oxygen species (ROS) and attenuated the oxidative modification of DNA, lipids, and proteins in response to UVB radiation. Moreover, isorhamnetin repressed UVB-facilitated programmed cell death in the keratinocytes, as evidenced by a reduction in apoptotic body formation, and nuclear fragmentation. Additionally, isorhamnetin suppressed the ability of UVB light to trigger mitochondrial dysfunction. Taken together, these results indicate that isorhamnetin has the potential to protect human keratinocytes against UVB-induced cell damage and death. PMID:26157553

  4. Retinoic acid induces homing of protective T and B cells to the gut after subcutaneous immunization in mice.

    PubMed

    Hammerschmidt, Swantje I; Friedrichsen, Michaela; Boelter, Jasmin; Lyszkiewicz, Marcin; Kremmer, Elisabeth; Pabst, Oliver; Förster, Reinhold

    2011-08-01

    Diarrheal diseases represent a major health burden in developing countries. Parenteral immunization typically does not induce efficient protection against enteropathogens because it does not stimulate migration of immune cells to the gut. Retinoic acid (RA) is critical for gut immunity, inducing upregulation of gut-homing receptors on activated T cells. In this study, we have demonstrated that RA can redirect immune responses elicited by s.c. vaccination of mice from skin-draining inguinal LNs (ingLNs) to the gut. When present during priming, RA induced robust upregulation of gut-homing receptors in ingLNs, imprinting gut-homing capacity on T cells. Concurrently, RA triggered the generation of gut-tropic IgA+ plasma cells in ingLNs and raised the levels of antigen-specific IgA in the intestinal lumen and blood. RA applied s.c. in vivo induced autonomous RA production in ingLN DCs, further driving efficient induction of gut-homing molecules on effector cells. Importantly, RA-supplemented s.c. immunization elicited a potent immune response in the small intestine that protected mice from cholera toxin–induced diarrhea and diminished bacterial loads in Peyer patches after oral infection with Salmonella. Thus, the use of RA as a gut-homing navigator represents a powerful tool to induce protective immunity in the intestine after s.c. immunization, offering what we believe to be a novel approach for vaccination against enteropathogens. PMID:21737878

  5. Chitohexaose protects against acetaminophen-induced hepatotoxicity in mice.

    PubMed

    Barman, P K; Mukherjee, R; Prusty, B K; Suklabaidya, S; Senapati, S; Ravindran, B

    2016-01-01

    Acetaminophen (N-acetyl-para-aminophenol (APAP)) toxicity causes acute liver failure by inducing centrilobular hepatic damage as a consequence of mitochondrial oxidative stress. Sterile inflammation, triggered by hepatic damage, facilitates gut bacterial translocation leading to systemic inflammation; TLR4-mediated activation by LPS has been shown to have a critical role in APAP-mediated hepatotoxicity. In this study, we demonstrate significant protection mediated by chitohexaose (Chtx) in mice challenged with a lethal dose of APAP (400 mg/kg b.w.). Decreased mortality by Chtx was associated with reduced hepatic damage, increased peritoneal migration of neutrophils, decreased mRNA expression of IL-1β as well as inhibition of inflammasome activation in liver. Further, an alternate mouse model of co-administration of a sublethal doses of APAP (200 mg/kg b.w.) and LPS (5 mg/kg b.w.) operating synergistically and mediating complete mortality was developed. Overwhelming inflammation, characterized by increased inflammatory cytokines (TNF-α, IL-1β and so on) in liver as well as in circulation and mortality was demonstrable in this model. Also, Chtx administration mediated significant reversal of mortality in APAP+LPS co-administered mice, which was associated with reduced IL-1β in liver and plasma cytokines in this model. In conclusion, Chtx being a small molecular weight linear carbohydrate offers promise for clinical management of liver failure associated with APAP overdose. PMID:27171266

  6. Chitohexaose protects against acetaminophen-induced hepatotoxicity in mice

    PubMed Central

    Barman, P K; Mukherjee, R; Prusty, B K; Suklabaidya, S; Senapati, S; Ravindran, B

    2016-01-01

    Acetaminophen (N-acetyl-para-aminophenol (APAP)) toxicity causes acute liver failure by inducing centrilobular hepatic damage as a consequence of mitochondrial oxidative stress. Sterile inflammation, triggered by hepatic damage, facilitates gut bacterial translocation leading to systemic inflammation; TLR4-mediated activation by LPS has been shown to have a critical role in APAP-mediated hepatotoxicity. In this study, we demonstrate significant protection mediated by chitohexaose (Chtx) in mice challenged with a lethal dose of APAP (400 mg/kg b.w.). Decreased mortality by Chtx was associated with reduced hepatic damage, increased peritoneal migration of neutrophils, decreased mRNA expression of IL-1β as well as inhibition of inflammasome activation in liver. Further, an alternate mouse model of co-administration of a sublethal doses of APAP (200 mg/kg b.w.) and LPS (5 mg/kg b.w.) operating synergistically and mediating complete mortality was developed. Overwhelming inflammation, characterized by increased inflammatory cytokines (TNF-α, IL-1β and so on) in liver as well as in circulation and mortality was demonstrable in this model. Also, Chtx administration mediated significant reversal of mortality in APAP+LPS co-administered mice, which was associated with reduced IL-1β in liver and plasma cytokines in this model. In conclusion, Chtx being a small molecular weight linear carbohydrate offers promise for clinical management of liver failure associated with APAP overdose. PMID:27171266

  7. Liposomal Antioxidants for Protection against Oxidant-Induced Damage

    PubMed Central

    Suntres, Zacharias E.

    2011-01-01

    Reactive oxygen species (ROS), including superoxide anion, hydrogen peroxide, and hydroxyl radical, can be formed as normal products of aerobic metabolism and can be produced at elevated rates under pathophysiological conditions. Overproduction and/or insufficient removal of ROS result in significant damage to cell structure and functions. In vitro studies showed that antioxidants, when applied directly and at relatively high concentrations to cellular systems, are effective in conferring protection against the damaging actions of ROS, but results from animal and human studies showed that several antioxidants provide only modest benefit and even possible harm. Antioxidants have yet to be rendered into reliable and safe therapies because of their poor solubility, inability to cross membrane barriers, extensive first-pass metabolism, and rapid clearance from cells. There is considerable interest towards the development of drug-delivery systems that would result in the selective delivery of antioxidants to tissues in sufficient concentrations to ameliorate oxidant-induced tissue injuries. Liposomes are biocompatible, biodegradable, and nontoxic artificial phospholipid vesicles that offer the possibility of carrying hydrophilic, hydrophobic, and amphiphilic molecules. This paper focus on the use of liposomes for the delivery of antioxidants in the prevention or treatment of pathological conditions related to oxidative stress. PMID:21876690

  8. Heme oxygenase-1 expression protects melanocytes from stress-induced cell death: implications for vitiligo

    PubMed Central

    Elassiuty, Yasser E.; Klarquist, Jared; Speiser, Jodi; Yousef, Randa M.; EL Refaee, Abdelaziz A.; Hunter, Nahla S.; Shaker, Olfat G.; Gundeti, Mohan; Nieuweboer-Krobotova, Ludmila; Le Poole, I. Caroline

    2013-01-01

    To study protection of melanocytes from stress-induced cell death by heme oxygenases during depigmentation and repigmentation in vitiligo, expression of isoforms 1 and 2 was studied in cultured control and patient melanocytes and normal skin explants exposed to UV or bleaching agent 4-TBP. Similarly, expression of heme oxygenases was followed in skin from vitiligo patients before and after PUVA treatment. Single and double immunostainings were used in combination with light and confocal microscopic analysis and Western blotting. Melanocyte expression of heme oxygenase 1 is upregulated, whereas heme oxygenase 2 is reduced in response to UV and 4-TBP. Upregulation of inducible heme oxygenase 1 was also observed in UV-treated explant cultures, in skin of successfully PUVA-treated patients and in melanocytes cultured from vitiligo non-lesional skin. Heme oxygenase encoding genes were subsequently cloned to study consequences of either gene product on cell viability, demonstrating that HO-1 but not HO-2 overexpression offers protection from stress-induced cell death in MTT assays. HO-1 expression by melanocytes may contribute to beneficial effects of UV treatment for vitiligo patients. PMID:21426408

  9. ZNF32 protects against oxidative stress-induced apoptosis by modulating C1QBP transcription

    PubMed Central

    Li, Yanyan; Wei, Yuyan; Gong, Di; Gao, Junping; Zhang, Jie; Tan, Weiwei; Wen, Tianfu; Zhang, Le; Huang, Lugang; Xiang, Rong; Lin, Ping; Wei, Yuquan

    2015-01-01

    Reactive oxygen species (ROS)-driven oxidative stress has been recognized as a critical inducer of cancer cell death in response to therapeutic agents. Our previous studies have demonstrated that zinc finger protein (ZNF)32 is key to cell survival upon oxidant stimulation. However, the mechanisms by which ZNF32 mediates cell death remain unclear. Here, we show that at moderate levels of ROS, Sp1 directly binds to two GC boxes within the ZNF32 promoter to activate ZNF32 transcription. Alternatively, at cytotoxic ROS concentrations, ZNF32 expression is repressed due to decreased binding activity of Sp1. ZNF32 overexpression maintains mitochondrial membrane potential and enhances the antioxidant capacity of cells to detoxify ROS, and these effects promote cell survival upon pro-oxidant agent treatment. Alternatively, ZNF32-deficient cells are more sensitive and vulnerable to oxidative stress-induced cell injury. Mechanistically, we demonstrate that complement 1q-binding protein (C1QBP) is a direct target gene of ZNF32 that inactivates the p38 MAPK pathway, thereby exerting the protective effects of ZNF32 on oxidative stress-induced apoptosis. Taken together, our findings indicate a novel mechanism by which the Sp1-ZNF32-C1QBP axis protects against oxidative stress and implicate a promising strategy that ZNF32 inhibition combined with pro-oxidant anticancer agents for hepatocellular carcinoma treatment. PMID:26497555

  10. The protective role of chelators and antioxidants on mancozeb-induced toxicity in rat hippocampal astrocytes.

    PubMed

    Tsang, M M; Trombetta, L D

    2007-09-01

    Mancozeb, manganese ethylene-bis-dithiocarbamate with zinc salts, is one of the most commonly used fungicides in the United States. Epidemiological and experimental data showed that mancozeb causes detrimental effects on various organ systems including the reproductive, endocrine, immune, and central nervous system. Increasing evidence has shown a strong association between pesticides and neurodegenerative diseases. In this study, we examined the neurotoxic potential of mancozeb in rat hippocampal astrocytes. The cytotoxicity of mancozeb was found to be dose dependent and recovery studies showed that cells exposed to mancozeb for 1 h did not recover from mancozeb-induced insult. Atomic absorption data showed a significant accumulation of manganese in astrocytes after 1 h of treatment. This study further investigated whether various chelators and antioxidants could prevent mancozeb-induced cytotoxicity. Our data reported that butylated hydroxytoluene (BHT) was the most effective agent in protecting against mancozeb insult. BHT also increased total cellular antioxidants of astrocytes after 1-h mancozeb exposure. In summary, this study reported for the first time that the manganese portion of mancozeb might be, at least in part, responsible for the toxicity. Mancozeb-induced cytotoxicity in astroyctes can be protected by BHT and that this antioxidant increased the total cellular antioxidant capacity. PMID:18669167

  11. Mcl-1 protects prostate cancer cells from cell death mediated by chemotherapy-induced DNA damage.

    PubMed

    Reiner, Teresita; de Las Pozas, Alicia; Parrondo, Ricardo; Palenzuela, Deanna; Cayuso, William; Rai, Priyamvada; Perez-Stable, Carlos

    2015-01-01

    The anti-apoptotic protein Mcl-1 is highly expressed in castration-resistant prostate cancer (CRPC), resulting in resistance to apoptosis and association with poor prognosis. Although predominantly localized in the cytoplasm, there is evidence that Mcl-1 exhibits nuclear localization where it is thought to protect against DNA damage-induced cell death. The role of Mcl-1 in mediating resistance to chemotherapy-induced DNA damage in prostate cancer (PCa) is not known. We show in human PCa cell lines and in TRAMP, a transgenic mouse model of PCa, that the combination of the antimitotic agent ENMD-1198 (analog of 2-methoxyestradiol) with betulinic acid (BA, increases proteotoxic stress) targets Mcl-1 by increasing its proteasomal degradation, resulting in increased γH2AX (DNA damage) and apoptotic/necrotic cell death. Knockdown of Mcl-1 in CRPC cells leads to elevated γH2AX, DNA strand breaks, and cell death after treatment with 1198 + BA- or doxorubicin. Additional knockdowns in PC3 cells suggests that cytoplasmic Mcl-1 protects against DNA damage by blocking the mitochondrial release of apoptosis-inducing factor and thereby preventing its nuclear translocation and subsequent interaction with the cyclophilin A endonuclease. Overall, our results suggest that chemotherapeutic agents that target Mcl-1 will promote cell death in response to DNA damage, particularly in CRPC. PMID:26425662

  12. Sucralose Induces Biochemical Responses in Daphnia magna

    PubMed Central

    Eriksson Wiklund, Ann-Kristin; Adolfsson-Erici, Margaretha; Liewenborg, Birgitta; Gorokhova, Elena

    2014-01-01

    The intense artificial sweetener sucralose has no bioconcentration properties, and no adverse acute toxic effects have been observed in standard ecotoxicity tests, suggesting negligible environmental risk. However, significant feeding and behavioural alterations have been reported in non-standard tests using aquatic crustaceans, indicating possible sublethal effects. We hypothesized that these effects are related to alterations in acetylcholinesterase (AChE) and oxidative status in the exposed animals and investigated changes in AChE and oxidative biomarkers (oxygen radical absorbing capacity, ORAC, and lipid peroxidation, TBARS) in the crustacean Daphnia magna exposed to sucralose (0.0001–5 mg L−1). The sucralose concentration was a significant positive predictor for ORAC, TBARS and AChE in the daphnids. Moreover, the AChE response was linked to both oxidative biomarkers, with positive and negative relationships for TBARS and ORAC, respectively. These joint responses support our hypothesis and suggest that exposure to sucralose may induce neurological and oxidative mechanisms with potentially important consequences for animal behaviour and physiology. PMID:24699280

  13. Intranasal Immunization with synthetic peptides corresponding to the E6 and E7 oncoproteins of Human Papillomavirus type 16 induces systemic and mucosal cellular immune responses and tumor protection

    PubMed Central

    Manuri, Pallavi R.; Nehete, Bharti; Nehete, Pramod N.; Reisenauer, Rose; Wardell, Seth; Courtney, Amy N.; Gambhira, Ratish; Lomada, Dakshyani; Chopra, Ashok K.; Sastry, K. Jagannadha

    2007-01-01

    The E6 and E7 oncoproteins of the high-risk HPV type16 represent ideal targets for HPV vaccine development, they being consistently expressed in cervical cancer lesions. Since HPV-16 is primarily transmitted through genital mucosal route, mucosal immune responses constitute an essential feature for vaccination strategies against HPV-associated lesions. We present here evidence showing that mucosal immunization of mice by the intranasal route with a mixture of peptides E744–62 and E643–57 from the E7 and E6 oncoproteins of HPV-16, respectively, using a mutant cholera toxin adjuvant (CT-2*), primed strong antigen-specific cellular immune responses in systemic and mucosal tissues. Significant levels of IFN-γ production by both CD4 and CD8 cells were observed along with CTL responses that were effective against both peptide-pulsed targets as well as syngeneic tumor cells (TC-1) expressing the cognate E6 and E7 proteins. Furthermore, mice immunized with the peptide mixture and CT-2* effectively resisted TC-1 tumor challenge. These results together with our earlier observations that T cell responses to these peptides correlate with recurrence-free survival in women after ablative treatment for HPV-associated cervical intraepithelial neoplasia, support the potential of these E6 and E7 peptides for inclusion in vaccine formulations. PMID:17291642

  14. Guanosine Protects Against Cortical Focal Ischemia. Involvement of Inflammatory Response.

    PubMed

    Hansel, Gisele; Tonon, André Comiran; Guella, Felipe Lhywinskh; Pettenuzzo, Letícia Ferreira; Duarte, Thiago; Duarte, Marta Maria Medeiros Frescura; Oses, Jean Pierre; Achaval, Matilde; Souza, Diogo Onofre

    2015-12-01

    Stroke is the major cause of death and the most frequent cause of disability in the adult population worldwide. Guanosine plays an important neuroprotective role in several cerebral ischemic models and is involved in the modulation of oxidative responses and glutamatergic parameters. Because the excessive reactive oxygen species produced during an ischemic event can trigger an inflammatory response, the purpose of this study was to evaluate the hypothesis that guanosine is neuroprotective against focal cerebral ischemia, inhibits microglia/macrophages activation, and mediates an inflammatory response ameliorating the neural damage. Permanent focal cerebral ischemia was induced in adult rats, and guanosine was administered immediately, 1, 3, and 6 h after surgery. Twenty-four hours after ischemia, the asymmetry scores were evaluated by the cylinder test; neuronal damage was evaluated by Fluoro-Jade C (FJC) staining and propidium iodide (PI) incorporation; microglia and immune cells were evaluated by anti-Iba-1 antibody; and inflammatory parameters such as interleukins (IL): IL-1, IL-6, IL-10; tumor necrosis factors alpha (TNF-α); and interferon-gamma (INF-γ) were evaluated in the brain tissue and cerebrospinal fluid. The ischemic event increased the levels of Iba-1-positive cells and pro-inflammatory cytokines and decreased IL-10 levels (an anti-inflammatory cytokine) in the lesion periphery. The guanosine treatment attenuated the changes in these inflammatory parameters and also reduced the infarct volume, PI incorporation, and number of FJC-positive cells, improving the functional recovery. Thus, guanosine may have been a promising therapeutic agent for the treatment of ischemic brain injury by reduction of inflammatory process triggered in an ischemic event. PMID:25394382

  15. Comprehensive analysis of dengue virus-specific responses supports an HLA-linked protective role for CD8+ T cells

    PubMed Central

    Weiskopf, Daniela; Angelo, Michael A.; de Azeredo, Elzinandes L.; Sidney, John; Greenbaum, Jason A.; Fernando, Anira N.; Broadwater, Anne; Kolla, Ravi V.; De Silva, Aruna D.; de Silva, Aravinda M.; Mattia, Kimberly A.; Doranz, Benjamin J.; Grey, Howard M.; Shresta, Sujan; Peters, Bjoern; Sette, Alessandro

    2013-01-01

    The role of CD8+ T cells in dengue virus infection and subsequent disease manifestations is not fully understood. According to the original antigenic sin theory, skewing of T-cell responses induced by primary infection with one serotype causes less effective response upon secondary infection with a different serotype, predisposing individuals to severe disease. A comprehensive analysis of CD8+ responses in the general population from the Sri Lankan hyperendemic area, involving the measurement of ex vivo IFNγ responses associated with more than 400 epitopes, challenges the original antigenic sin theory. Although skewing of responses toward primary infecting viruses was detected, this was not associated with impairment of responses either qualitatively or quantitatively. Furthermore, we demonstrate higher magnitude and more polyfunctional responses for HLA alleles associated with decreased susceptibility to severe disease, suggesting that a vigorous response by multifunctional CD8+ T cells is associated with protection from dengue virus disease. PMID:23580623

  16. Erythropoietin is a hypoxia inducible factor-induced protective molecule in experimental autoimmune neuritis.

    PubMed

    Luo, Bangwei; Jiang, Man; Yang, Xiaofeng; Zhang, Zhiyuan; Xiong, Jian; Schluesener, Hermann J; Zhang, Zhiren; Wu, Yuzhang

    2013-08-01

    Experimental autoimmune neuritis (EAN), an autoantigen-specific T-cell-mediated disease model for human demyelinating inflammatory disease of the peripheral nervous system, is characterized by self-limitation. Here we investigated the regulation and contribution of erythropoietin (EPO) in EAN self-limitation. In EAN sciatic nerves, hypoxia, and protein and mRNA levels of hypoxia-inducible factor 1α (HIF-1α), HIF-2α, EPO and EPO receptor (EPOR) were induced in parallel at disease peak phase but reduced at recovery periods. Further, the deactivation of HIF reduced EAN-induced EPO/EPOR upregulation in EAN, suggesting the central contribution of HIF to EPO/EPOR induction. The deactivation of EPOR signalling exacerbated EAN progression, implying that endogenous EPO contributed to EAN recovery. Exogenous EPO treatment greatly improved EAN recovery. In addition, EPO was shown to promote Schwann cell survival and myelin production. In EAN, EPO treatment inhibited lymphocyte proliferation and altered helper T cell differentiation by inducing increase of Foxp3(+)/CD4(+) regulatory T cells and decrease of IFN-γ(+)/CD4(+) Th1 cells. Furthermore, EPO inhibited inflammatory macrophage activation and promoted its phagocytic activity. In summary, our data demonstrated that EPO was induced in EAN by HIF and contributed to EAN recovery, and endogenous and exogenous EPO could effectively suppress EAN by attenuating inflammation and exerting direct cell protection, indicating that EPO contributes to the self-recovery of EAN and could be a potent candidate for treatment of autoimmune neuropathies. PMID:23603807

  17. TLR2 ligand-induced protection against bacterial endophthalmitis

    PubMed Central

    Kumar, Ashok; Singh, Christopher N; Glybina, Inna V; Mahmoud, Tamer H; Yu, Fu-Shin X.

    2009-01-01

    Background Activation of innate immunity plays a key role in determining the outcome of an infection. Here, we investigated whether Toll-like receptors (TLRs) are involved in retinal innate response and explored the prophylactic use of TLR2 ligand in preventing bacterial endophthalmitis. Methods C57BL/6 (B6) mice were given intravitreal injections of Pam3Cys, a synthetic ligand of TLR2, or vehicle (PBS) 24 h prior to S. aureus (SA) inoculation. The severity of endophthalmitis was graded by slit lamp, electroretinography (ERG), histological examinations and determination of bacterial load in the retina. The expression of cytokines/chemokines and cathelicidin-related antimicrobial peptide (CRAMP) was assessed by ELISA and Western blot respectively. Results Intravitreal injections of Pam3Cys up-regulated TLR2 expression in the B6 retina and Pam3Cys pretreatment significantly improved the outcome of SA endophthalmitis, preserved retinal structural integrity and maintained visual function assessed with ERG in B6 mice. Furthermore, Pam3Cys pretreatment activated retinal microglia cells, induced the expression of CRAMP, and remarkably reduced the bacterial load. Conclusions This is the first report that highlights the existence and role of TLR2 in retinal innate immune response to SA infection and suggests that modulation of TLR activation provides a novel prophylactic approach to prevent bacterial endophthalmitis. PMID:19995266

  18. Protection against malaria in mice is induced by blood stage-arresting histamine-releasing factor (HRF)-deficient parasites.

    PubMed

    Demarta-Gatsi, Claudia; Smith, Leanna; Thiberge, Sabine; Peronet, Roger; Commere, Pierre-Henri; Matondo, Mariette; Apetoh, Lionel; Bruhns, Pierre; Ménard, Robert; Mécheri, Salaheddine

    2016-07-25

    Although most vaccines against blood stage malaria in development today use subunit preparations, live attenuated parasites confer significantly broader and more lasting protection. In recent years, Plasmodium genetically attenuated parasites (GAPs) have been generated in rodent models that cause self-resolving blood stage infections and induce strong protection. All such GAPs generated so far bear mutations in housekeeping genes important for parasite development in red blood cells. In this study, using a Plasmodium berghei model compatible with tracking anti-blood stage immune responses over time, we report a novel blood stage GAP that lacks a secreted factor related to histamine-releasing factor (HRF). Lack of HRF causes an IL-6 increase, which boosts T and B cell responses to resolve infection and leave a cross-stage, cross-species, and lasting immunity. Mutant-induced protection involves a combination of antiparasite IgG2c antibodies and FcγR(+) CD11b(+) cell phagocytes, especially neutrophils, which are sufficient to confer protection. This immune-boosting GAP highlights an important role of opsonized parasite-mediated phagocytosis, which may be central to protection induced by all self-resolving blood stage GAP infections. PMID:27432939

  19. Sexually dimorphic myeloid inflammatory and metabolic responses to diet-induced obesity.

    PubMed

    Griffin, C; Lanzetta, N; Eter, L; Singer, K

    2016-08-01

    It is well known in clinical and animal studies that women and men have different disease risk as well as different disease physiology. Women of reproductive age are protected from metabolic and cardiovascular disease compared with postmenopausal women and men. Most murine studies are skewed toward the use of male mice to study obesity-induced metabolic dysfunction because of similar protection in female mice. We have investigated dietary obesity in a mouse model and have directly compared inflammatory responses in males and females. In this review we will summarize what is known about sex differences in diet-induced inflammation and will summarize our data on this topic. It is clear that sex differences in high-fat diet-induced inflammatory activation are due to cell intrinsic differences in hematopoietic responses to obesogenic cues, but further research is needed to understand what leads to sexually dimorphic responses. PMID:27252473

  20. Dietary Supplement Enriched in Antioxidants and Omega-3 Protects from Progressive Light-Induced Retinal Degeneration

    PubMed Central

    Ramchani-Ben Othman, Khaoula; Cercy, Christine; Amri, Mohamed; Doly, Michel; Ranchon-Cole, Isabelle

    2015-01-01

    In the present study, we have evaluated one of the dietary supplements enriched with antioxidants and fish oil used in clinical care for patient with age-related macular degeneration. Rats were orally fed by a gastric canula daily with 0.2 ml of water or dietary supplement until they were sacrificed. After one week of treatment, animals were either sacrificed for lipid analysis in plasma and retina, or used for evaluation of rod-response recovery by electroretinography (ERG) followed by their sacrifice to measure rhodopsin content, or used for progressive light-induced retinal degeneration (PLIRD). For PLIRD, animals were transferred to bright cyclic light for one week. Retinal damage was quantified by ERG, histology and detection of apoptotic nuclei. Animals kept in dim-cyclic-light were processed in parallel. PLIRD induced a thinning of the outer nuclear layer and a reduction of the b-wave amplitude of the ERG in the water group. Retinal structure and function were preserved in supplemented animals. Supplement induced a significant increase in omega-3 fatty acids in plasma by 168% for eicosapentaenoic acid (EPA), 142% for docosapentaenoic acid (DPA) and 19% for docosahexaenoic acid (DHA) and a decrease in the omega-6 fatty acids, DPA by 28%. In the retina, supplement induced significant reduction of linolenic acid by 67% and an increase in EPA and DPA by 80% and 72%, respectively, associated with significant decrease in omega-6 DPA by 42%. Supplement did not affect rhodopsin content or rod-response recovery. The present data indicate that supplement rapidly modified the fatty acid content and induced an accumulation of EPA in the retina without affecting rhodopsin content or recovery. In addition, it protected the retina from oxidative stress induced by light. Therefore, this supplement might be beneficial to slow down progression of certain retinal degeneration. PMID:26042773

  1. Pinacidil protects osteoblastic cells against antimycin A-induced oxidative damage.

    PubMed

    Choi, Eun Mi; Jung, Woon Won; Suh, Kwang Sik

    2015-01-01

    The present study aimed to investigate the protective effect of a non-selective mitochondrial adenosine triphosphate (ATP)-sensitive potassium channel (mito-KATP) opener, pinacidil, on antimycin A-induced oxidative damage in osteoblastic MC3T3-E1 cells. Antimycin A inhibits mitochondrial electron transport by binding to complex III. Osteoblastic MC3T3-E1 cells were treated with antimycin A in the presence or absence of pinacidil and markers of mitochondrial function and oxidative stress were subsequently examined. The effects of pinacidil on the activation of phosphoinositide 3-kinase (PI3K), Akt and cyclic adenosine monophosphate‑responsive element-binding protein (CREB) were also examined. In osteoblastic MC3T3-E1 cells exposed to antimycin A, pinacidil inhibited antimycin A-induced cell death. The protective effects of pinacidil on cell survival were prevented by the addition of LY294002 (a PI3K inhibitor), an Akt inhibitor or auranofin [a thioredoxin reductase (TrxR) inhibitor], but not by KATP channel inhibitor glibenclamide. Pinacidil inhibited antimycin A-induced inactivation of PI3K and Akt as well as phosphorylation of CREB and TrxR. Furthermore, pinacidil prevented antimycin A-induced mitochondrial superoxide release, mitochondrial membrane potential dissipation, reduced ATP synthesis and intracellular [Ca2+] elevation. In conclusion, these results suggested that pinacidil may rescue osteoblastic cells from antimycin A-induced cellular damage, potentially via antioxidant activity and restoration of mitochondrial function, which are mediated in part by the PI3K/Akt/CREB signaling pathway. PMID:25334089

  2. Protection from cyanide-induced brain injury by the Nrf2 transcriptional activator carnosic acid.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Dongxian; Lee, Brian; Nutter, Anthony; Song, Paul; Dolatabadi, Nima; Parker, James; Sanz-Blasco, Sara; Newmeyer, Traci; Ambasudhan, Rajesh; McKercher, Scott R; Masliah, Eliezer; Lipton, Stuart A

    2015-06-01

    Cyanide is a life-threatening, bioterrorist agent, preventing cellular respiration by inhibiting cytochrome c oxidase, resulting in cardiopulmonary failure, hypoxic brain injury, and death within minutes. However, even after treatment with various antidotes to protect cytochrome oxidase, cyanide intoxication in humans can induce a delayed-onset neurological syndrome that includes symptoms of Parkinsonism. Additional mechanisms are thought to underlie cyanide-induced neuronal damage, including generation of reactive oxygen species. This may account for the fact that antioxidants prevent some aspects of cyanide-induced neuronal damage. Here, as a potential preemptive countermeasure against a bioterrorist attack with cyanide, we tested the CNS protective effect of carnosic acid (CA), a pro-electrophilic compound found in the herb rosemary. CA crosses the blood-brain barrier to up-regulate endogenous antioxidant enzymes via activation of the Nrf2 transcriptional pathway. We demonstrate that CA exerts neuroprotective effects on cyanide-induced brain damage in cultured rodent and human-induced pluripotent stem cell-derived neurons in vitro, and in vivo in various brain areas of a non-Swiss albino mouse model of cyanide poisoning that simulates damage observed in the human brain. Cyanide, a potential bioterrorist agent, can produce a chronic delayed-onset neurological syndrome that includes symptoms of Parkinsonism. Here, cyanide poisoning treated with the proelectrophillic compound carnosic acid, results in reduced neuronal cell death in both in vitro and in vivo models through activation of the Nrf2/ARE transcriptional pathway. Carnosic acid is therefore a potential treatment for the toxic central nervous system (CNS) effects of cyanide poisoning. ARE, antioxidant responsive element; Nrf2 (NFE2L2, Nuclear factor (erythroid-derived 2)-like 2). PMID:25692407

  3. Characterization of the immune response induced by pertussis OMVs-based vaccine.

    PubMed

    Bottero, D; Gaillard, M E; Zurita, E; Moreno, G; Martinez, D Sabater; Bartel, E; Bravo, S; Carriquiriborde, F; Errea, A; Castuma, C; Rumbo, M; Hozbor, D

    2016-06-14

    For the development of a third generation of pertussis vaccine that could improve the control of the disease, it was proposed that the immune responses induced by the classic whole cell vaccine (wP) or after infection should be used as a reference point. We have recently identified a vaccine candidate based on outer membrane vesicles (OMVs) derived from the disease etiologic agent that have been shown to be safe and protective in mice model of infection. Here we characterized OMVs-mediated immunity and the safety of our new candidate. We also deepen the knowledge of the induced humoral response contribution in pertussis protection. Regarding the safety of the OMVs based vaccine (TdapOMVsBp,) the in vitro whole blood human assay here performed, showed that the low toxicity of OMVs-based vaccine previously detected in mice could be extended to human samples. Stimulation of splenocytes from immunized mice evidenced the presence of IFN-γ and IL-17-producing cells, indicated that OMVs induces both Th1 and Th17 response. Interestingly TdapOMVsBp-raised antibodies such as those induced by wP and commercial acellular vaccines (aP) which contribute to induce protection against Bordetella pertussis infection. As occurs with wP-induced antibodies, the TdapOMVsBp-induced serum antibodies efficiently opsonized B. pertussis. All the data here obtained shows that OMVs based vaccine is able to induce Th1/Th17 and Th2 mixed profile with robust humoral response involved in protection, positioning this candidate among the different possibilities to constitute the third generation of anti-pertussis vaccines. PMID:27151884

  4. Protective immune responses of recombinant VP2 subunit antigen of infectious bursal disease virus in chickens.

    PubMed

    Pradhan, Satya Narayan; Prince, Prabhu Rajaiah; Madhumathi, Jayaprakasam; Roy, Parimal; Narayanan, Rangarajan Badri; Antony, Usha

    2012-08-15

    Infectious bursal disease virus (IBDV) is the causative agent of Gumboro disease and poses a huge threat to poultry industry. The risks associated with conventional attenuated viral vaccines make it indispensable to probe into the development of novel and rationally designed subunit vaccines which are safer as well as effective. VP2 is the major host-protective antigen found in IBDV capsid. It encompasses different independent epitopes responsible for the induction of neutralizing antibody. Here, we report the efficacy of the immunodominant fragment of VP2 which induces both humoral and cellular immunity against infectious bursal disease. A 366 bp fragment (52-417 bp) of the VP2 gene from an IBDV field isolate was amplified and expressed in Escherichia coli as a 21 kDa recombinant protein. The efficacy of rVP2(52-417) antigen was compared with two commercial IBDV whole virus vaccine strains. The rVP2(52-417) induced significantly high antibody titres in chicken compared to commercial vaccines and the anti-rVP2(52-417) sera showed reactivity with viral antigens from both commercial strains (P<0.0001) and field isolates. Also, the chicken splenocytes from rVP2(52-417) immunized group showed a significantly high proliferation (P<0.01) compared to other groups, which implies that the rVP2(52-417) fragment contains immunogenic epitopes capable of eliciting both B and T cell responses. Further, rVP2(52-417) conferred 100% protection against vIBDV challenge in the immunized chickens which was significantly higher (P<0.001) compared to 55-60% protection by commercial vaccine strains. Hence, the study confirms the efficacy of the immunodominant VP2 fragment that could be used as a potent vaccine against IBDV infection in chicken. PMID:22795186

  5. The lipid lowering drug lovastatin protects against doxorubicin-induced hepatotoxicity

    SciTech Connect

    Henninger, Christian; Huelsenbeck, Johannes; Huelsenbeck, Stefanie; Grösch, Sabine; Lackner, Karl J.; Kaina, Bernd; Fritz, Gerhard

    2012-05-15

    Liver is the main detoxifying organ and therefore the target of high concentrations of genotoxic compounds, such as environmental carcinogens and anticancer drugs. Here, we investigated the usefulness of lovastatin, which is nowadays widely used for lipid lowering purpose, as a hepatoprotective drug following the administration of the anthracycline derivative doxorubicin in vivo. To this end, BALB/c mice were exposed to either a single high dose or three consecutive low doses of doxorubicin. Acute and subacute hepatotoxicities were analyzed with or without lovastatin co-treatment. Lovastatin protected the liver against doxorubicin-induced acute pro-inflammatory and pro-fibrotic stress responses as indicated by an attenuated mRNA expression of tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNFα) and connective tissue growth factor (CTGF), respectively. Hepatoprotection by lovastatin was due to a reduced induction of DNA damage following doxorubicin treatment. The statin also mitigated subacute anthracycline-provoked hepatotoxicity as shown on the level of doxorubicin- and epirubicin-stimulated CTGF mRNA expression as well as histopathologically detectable fibrosis and serum concentration of marker enzymes of hepatotoxicity (GPT/GLDH). Kidney damage following doxorubicin exposure was not detectable under our experimental conditions. Moreover, lovastatin showed multiple inhibitory effects on doxorubicin-triggered hepatic expression of genes involved in oxidative stress response, drug transport, DNA repair, cell cycle progression and cell death. Doxorubicin also stimulated the formation of ceramides. Ceramide production, however, was not blocked by lovastatin, indicating that hepatoprotection by lovastatin is independent of the sphingolipid metabolism. Overall, the data show that lovastatin is hepatoprotective following genotoxic stress induced by anthracyclines. Based on the data, we hypothesize that statins might be suitable to lower hepatic injury following anthracycline

  6. Intranasal Administration of Mycobacterium bovis BCG Induces Superior Protection against Aerosol Infection with Mycobacterium tuberculosis in Mice

    PubMed Central

    Kolibab, Kristopher; Yang, Amy; Morris, Sheldon L.

    2014-01-01

    Despite the widespread use of Mycobacterium bovis BCG, the only licensed vaccine against tuberculosis (TB), TB remains a global epidemic. To assess whether more direct targeting of the lung mucosa by respiratory immunization would enhance the potency and longevity of BCG-induced anti-TB protective immunity, the long-term impact of intranasal (i.n.) BCG vaccination was compared to conventional subcutaneous (s.c.) immunization by using a mouse model of pulmonary tuberculosis. Although significantly improved protection in the lung was seen at early time points (2 and 4 months postvaccination) in i.n. BCG-immunized mice, no differences in pulmonary protection were seen 8 and 10 months postvaccination. In contrast, in all of the study periods, i.n. BCG vaccination induced significantly elevated protective splenic responses relative to s.c. immunization. At five of nine time points, we observed a splenic protective response exceeding 1.9 log10 protection relative to the s.c. route. Furthermore, higher frequencies of CD4 T cells expressing gamma interferon (IFN-γ) and IFN-γ/tumor necrosis factor alpha, as well as CD8 T cells expressing IFN-γ, were detected in the spleens of i.n. vaccinated mice. Using PCR arrays, significantly elevated levels of IFN-γ, interleukin-9 (IL-9), IL-11, and IL-21 expression were also seen in the spleen at 8 months after respiratory BCG immunization. Overall, while i.n. BCG vaccination provided short-term enhancement of protection in the lung relative to s.c. immunization, potent and extremely persistent splenic protective responses were seen for at least 10 months following respiratory immunization. PMID:25143340

  7. Protective effect of hydrogen sulfide against cold restraint stress-induced gastric mucosal injury in rats.

    PubMed

    Aboubakr, Esam M; Taye, Ashraf; El-Moselhy, Mohamed A; Hassan, Magdy K

    2013-12-01

    Hydrogen sulfide (H2S) is an endogenous gaseous mediator plays a potential role in modulating gastric inflammatory responses. However, its putative protective role remains to be defined. The present study aimed to evaluate role of the exogenously released and endogenously synthesized H2S in cold restraint stress (CRS)-induced oxidative gastric damage in rats. Rats were restrained, and maintained at 4 °C for 3 h. The H2S donor, sodium hydrosulfide (NaHS) (60 μmol/kg) was injected intraperitoneally (i.p.) before CRS. Our results revealed that NaHS pretreatment significantly attenuated ulcer index, free and total acid output, and pepsin activity in gastric juice along with decreased gastric mucosal carbonyl content and reactive oxygen species production. This was accompanied by increased gastric juice pH and mucin concentration in addition to restoring the deficits in the gastric reduced glutathione, catalase as well as superoxide dismutase enzyme activities. NaHS pretreatment markedly reduced the serum level of tumor necrosis factor (TNF-α) and myeloperoxidase activity compared to CRS-non-treated. Moreover, NaHS preadministration significantly abrogated the inflammatory and the deleterious responses of gastric mucosa in CRS. The protective effects of H2S were confirmed by gastric histopathological examination. However, pretreatment with the H2S-synthesizing enzyme, cystathionine-gamma-lyase inhibitor, beta-cyano-L-alanine (50 mg/kg, i.p.) reversed the gastroprotection afforded by the endogenous H2S. Collectively, our results suggest that H2S can protect rat gastric mucosa against CRS-induced gastric ulceration possibly through mechanisms that involve anti-oxidant and anti-inflammatory actions alongside enhancement of gastric mucosal barrier and reduction in acid secretory parameters. PMID:23812778

  8. Aloin Protects Skin Fibroblasts from Heat Stress-Induced Oxidative Stress Damage by Regulating the Oxidative Defense System.

    PubMed

    Liu, Fu-Wei; Liu, Fu-Chao; Wang, Yu-Ren; Tsai, Hsin-I; Yu, Huang-Ping

    2015-01-01

    Oxidative stress is commonly involved in the pathogenesis of skin damage induced by environmental factors, such as heat stress. Skin fibroblasts are responsible for the connective tissue regeneration and the skin recovery from injury. Aloin, a bioactive compound in Aloe vera, has been reported to have various pharmacological activities, such as anti-inflammatory effects. The aim of this study was to investigate the protective effect of aloin against heat stress-mediated oxidative stress in human skin fibroblast Hs68 cells. Hs68 cells were first incubated at 43°C for 30 min to mimic heat stress. The study was further examined if aloin has any effect on heat stress-induced oxidative stress. We found that aloin protected Hs68 cells against heat stress-induced damage, as assessed by 3-(4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl)-2,5-diphenyltetrazolium bromide and lactate dehydrogenase assay. Aloin protected Hs68 cells by regulating reactive oxygen species production and increasing the levels of glutathione, cytosolic and mitochondrial superoxide dismutase. Aloin also prevented the elevation of thiobarbituric acid reactive substances and the reduction of 8-OH-dG induced by heat stress. These results indicated that aloin protected human skin fibroblasts from heat stress-induced oxidative stress damage by regulating the oxidative defense system. PMID:26637174

  9. Aloin Protects Skin Fibroblasts from Heat Stress-Induced Oxidative Stress Damage by Regulating the Oxidative Defense System

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Yu-Ren; Tsai, Hsin-I; Yu, Huang-Ping

    2015-01-01

    Oxidative stress is commonly involved in the pathogenesis of skin damage induced by environmental factors, such as heat stress. Skin fibroblasts are responsible for the connective tissue regeneration and the skin recovery from injury. Aloin, a bioactive compound in Aloe vera, has been reported to have various pharmacological activities, such as anti-inflammatory effects. The aim of this study was to investigate the protective effect of aloin against heat stress-mediated oxidative stress in human skin fibroblast Hs68 cells. Hs68 cells were first incubated at 43°C for 30 min to mimic heat stress. The study was further examined if aloin has any effect on heat stress-induced oxidative stress. We found that aloin protected Hs68 cells against heat stress-induced damage, as assessed by 3-(4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl)-2,5-diphenyltetrazolium bromide and lactate dehydrogenase assay. Aloin protected Hs68 cells by regulating reactive oxygen species production and increasing the levels of glutathione, cytosolic and mitochondrial superoxide dismutase. Aloin also prevented the elevation of thiobarbituric acid reactive substances and the reduction of 8-OH-dG induced by heat stress. These results indicated that aloin protected human skin fibroblasts from heat stress-induced oxidative stress damage by regulating the oxidative defense system. PMID:26637174

  10. A recombinant pseudotyped lentivirus expressing the envelope glycoprotein of Hantaan virus induced protective immunity in mice

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Hantaviruses cause acute hemorrhagic fever with renal syndrome (HFRS). Currently, several types of inactivated HFRS vaccines are widely used, however the limited ability of these immunogen to elicit neutralizing antibodies restricts vaccine efficacy. Development of an effective vaccine to overcome this weakness is must. Methods In the present study, a recombinant pseudotyped lentivirus bearing the hantaan virus (HTNV) envelope glycoproteins (GP), rLV-M, was constructed. C57BL/6 mice were immunized with the rLV-M and a series of immunological assays were conducted to determine the immunogenicity of the recombinant pseudotyped lentivirus. The humoral and cell-mediated immune responses induced by rLV-M were compared with those of the inactivated HFRS vaccine. Results Indirect immunofluorescence assay (IFA) showed the rLV-M expressed target proteins in HEK-293cells. In mice, the rLV-M efficiently induced GP-specific humoral responses and protection against HTNV infection. Furthermore, the rLV-M induced higher neutralizing antibody titers than the inactivated HFRS vaccine control. Conclusions The results indicated the potential of using a pseudotyped lentivirus as a delivery vector for a hantavirus vaccine immunogen. PMID:24093752

  11. Memantine protects rat cortical cultured neurons against beta-amyloid-induced toxicity by attenuating tau phosphorylation.

    PubMed

    Song, M S; Rauw, G; Baker, G B; Kar, S

    2008-11-01

    It has been suggested that accumulation of beta-amyloid (Abeta) peptide triggers neurodegeneration, at least in part, via glutamate-mediated excitotoxicity in Alzheimer's disease (AD) brain. This is supported by observations that toxicity induced by Abeta peptide in cultured neurons and in adult rat brain is known to be mediated by activation of glutamatergic N-methyl-d-aspartate (NMDA) receptors. Additionally, recent clinical studies have shown that memantine, a noncompetitive NMDA receptor antagonist, can significantly improve cognitive functions in some AD patients. However, very little is currently known about the potential role of memantine against Abeta-induced toxicity. In the present study, we have shown that Abeta(1-42)-induced toxicity in rat primary cortical cultured neurons is accompanied by increased extracellular and decreased intracellular glutamate levels. We subsequently demonstrated that Abeta toxicity is induced by increased phosphorylation of tau protein and activation of tau kinases, i.e. glycogen synthase kinase-3beta and extracellular signal-related kinase 1/2. Additionally, Abeta treatment induced cleavage of caspase-3 and decreased phosphorylation of cyclic AMP response element binding protein, which are critical in determining survival of neurons. Memantine treatment significantly protected cultured neurons against Abeta-induced toxicity by attenuating tau-phosphorylation and its associated signaling mechanisms. However, this drug did not alter either conformation or internalization of Abeta(1-42) and it was unable to attenuate Abeta-induced potentiation of extracellular glutamate levels. These results, taken together, provide new insights into the possible neuroprotective action of memantine in AD pathology. PMID:19046381

  12. Inhibition of Rac1 reduces store overload-induced calcium release and protects against ventricular arrhythmia.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Lili; Lu, Xiangru; Gui, Le; Wu, Yan; Sims, Stephen M; Wang, Guoping; Feng, Qingping

    2016-08-01

    Rac1 is a small GTPase and plays key roles in multiple cellular processes including the production of reactive oxygen species (ROS). However, whether Rac1 activation during myocardial ischaemia and reperfusion (I/R) contributes to arrhythmogenesis is not fully understood. We aimed to study the effects of Rac1 inhibition on store overload-induced Ca(2+) release (SOICR) and ventricular arrhythmia during myocardial I/R. Adult Rac1(f/f) and cardiac-specific Rac1 knockdown (Rac1(ckd) ) mice were subjected to myocardial I/R and their electrocardiograms (ECGs) were monitored for ventricular arrhythmia. Myocardial Rac1 activity was increased and ventricular arrhythmia was induced during I/R in Rac1(f/f) mice. Remarkably, I/R-induced ventricular arrhythmia was significantly decreased in Rac1(ckd) compared to Rac1(f/f) mice. Furthermore, treatment with Rac1 inhibitor NSC23766 decreased I/R-induced ventricular arrhythmia. Ca(2+) imaging analysis showed that in response to a 6 mM external Ca(2+) concentration challenge, SOICR was induced with characteristic spontaneous intracellular Ca(2+) waves in Rac1(f/f) cardiomyocytes. Notably, SOICR was diminished by pharmacological and genetic inhibition of Rac1 in adult cardiomyocytes. Moreover, I/R-induced ROS production and ryanodine receptor 2 (RyR2) oxidation were significantly inhibited in the myocardium of Rac1(ckd) mice. We conclude that Rac1 activation induces ventricular arrhythmia during myocardial I/R. Inhibition of Rac1 suppresses SOICR and protects against ventricular arrhythmia. Blockade of Rac1 activation may represent a new paradigm for the treatment of cardiac arrhythmia in ischaemic heart disease. PMID:27222313

  13. Uric acid protects erythrocytes from ozone-induced changes

    SciTech Connect

    Meadows, J.; Smith, R.C.

    1987-08-01

    Uric acid effectively reduced hemolysis and methemoglobin formation in bovine and swine erythrocytes bubbled with ozone in vitro. In bovine erythrocytes, formation of thiobarbituric acid-reactive material was inhibited by uric acid, but there was little immediate protection for the swine cells. Antioxidant protection was due to preferential degradation of the uric acid by ozone. These results provide evidence to support the hypothesis that in plasma, uric acid can provide antioxidant protection for erythrocytes.

  14. Interferon Response Factors 3 and 7 Protect against Chikungunya Virus Hemorrhagic Fever and Shock

    PubMed Central

    Rudd, Penny A.; Wilson, Jane; Gardner, Joy; Larcher, Thibaut; Babarit, Candice; Le, Thuy T.; Anraku, Itaru; Kumagai, Yutaro; Loo, Yueh-Ming; Gale, Michael; Akira, Shizuo; Khromykh, Alexander A.

    2012-01-01

    Chikungunya virus (CHIKV) infections can produce severe disease and mortality. Here we show that CHIKV infection of adult mice deficient in interferon response factors 3 and 7 (IRF3/7−/−) is lethal. Mortality was associated with undetectable levels of alpha/beta interferon (IFN-α/β) in serum, ∼50- and ∼10-fold increases in levels of IFN-γ and tumor necrosis factor (TNF), respectively, increased virus replication, edema, vasculitis, hemorrhage, fever followed by hypothermia, oliguria, thrombocytopenia, and raised hematocrits. These features are consistent with hemorrhagic shock and were also evident in infected IFN-α/β receptor-deficient mice. In situ hybridization suggested CHIKV infection of endothelium, fibroblasts, skeletal muscle, mononuclear cells, chondrocytes, and keratinocytes in IRF3/7−/− mice; all but the latter two stained positive in wild-type mice. Vaccination protected IRF3/7−/− mice, suggesting that defective antibody responses were not responsible for mortality. IPS-1- and TRIF-dependent pathways were primarily responsible for IFN-α/β induction, with IRF7 being upregulated >100-fold in infected wild-type mice. These studies suggest that inadequate IFN-α/β responses following virus infection can be sufficient to induce hemorrhagic fever and shock, a finding with implications for understanding severe CHIKV disease and dengue hemorrhagic fever/dengue shock syndrome. PMID:22761364

  15. Interferon response factors 3 and 7 protect against Chikungunya virus hemorrhagic fever and shock.

    PubMed

    Rudd, Penny A; Wilson, Jane; Gardner, Joy; Larcher, Thibaut; Babarit, Candice; Le, Thuy T; Anraku, Itaru; Kumagai, Yutaro; Loo, Yueh-Ming; Gale, Michael; Akira, Shizuo; Khromykh, Alexander A; Suhrbier, Andreas

    2012-09-01

    Chikungunya virus (CHIKV) infections can produce severe disease and mortality. Here we show that CHIKV infection of adult mice deficient in interferon response factors 3 and 7 (IRF3/7(-/-)) is lethal. Mortality was associated with undetectable levels of alpha/beta interferon (IFN-α/β) in serum, ∼50- and ∼10-fold increases in levels of IFN-γ and tumor necrosis factor (TNF), respectively, increased virus replication, edema, vasculitis, hemorrhage, fever followed by hypothermia, oliguria, thrombocytopenia, and raised hematocrits. These features are consistent with hemorrhagic shock and were also evident in infected IFN-α/β receptor-deficient mice. In situ hybridization suggested CHIKV infection of endothelium, fibroblasts, skeletal muscle, mononuclear cells, chondrocytes, and keratinocytes in IRF3/7(-/-) mice; all but the latter two stained positive in wild-type mice. Vaccination protected IRF3/7(-/-) mice, suggesting that defective antibody responses were not responsible for mortality. IPS-1- and TRIF-dependent pathways were primarily responsible for IFN-α/β induction, with IRF7 being upregulated >100-fold in infected wild-type mice. These studies suggest that inadequate IFN-α/β responses following virus infection can be sufficient to induce hemorrhagic fever and shock, a finding with implications for understanding severe CHIKV disease and dengue hemorrhagic fever/dengue shock syndrome. PMID:22761364

  16. Adenovirus vector-induced immune responses in nonhuman primates: responses to prime boost regimens1

    PubMed Central

    Tatsis, Nia; Lasaro, Marcio O.; Lin, Shih-Wen; Xiang, Zhi Q.; Zhou, Dongming; DiMenna, Lauren; Li, Hua; Bian, Ang; Abdulla, Sarah; Li, Yan; Giles-Davis, Wynetta; Engram, Jessica; Ratcliffe, Sarah J.; Silvestri, Guido; Ertl, Hildegund C.; Betts, Michael R.

    2009-01-01

    In the phase IIb STEP trial an HIV-1 vaccine based on adenovirus (Ad) vectors of the human serotype 5 (AdHu5) not only failed to induce protection but also increased susceptibility to HIV-1 infection in individuals with pre-existing neutralizing antibodies against AdHu5. The mechanisms underlying the increased HIV-1 acquisition rates have not yet been elucidated. Furthermore, it remains unclear if the lack of the vaccine's efficacy reflects a failure of the concept of T cell-mediated protection against HIV-1 or a product failure of the vaccine. Here we compared two vaccine regimens based on sequential use of AdHu5 vectors or two different chimpanzee derived Ad (AdC) vectors in rhesus macaques that were AdHu5 seropositive or seronegative at the onset of vaccination. Our results show that heterologous booster immunizations with the AdC vectors induced higher T and B cell responses than repeated immunizations with the AdHu5 vector especially in AdHu5-pre-exposed macaques. PMID:19414814

  17. Adenovirus vector-induced immune responses in nonhuman primates: responses to prime boost regimens.

    PubMed

    Tatsis, Nia; Lasaro, Marcio O; Lin, Shih-Wen; Haut, Larissa H; Xiang, Zhi Q; Zhou, Dongming; Dimenna, Lauren; Li, Hua; Bian, Ang; Abdulla, Sarah; Li, Yan; Giles-Davis, Wynetta; Engram, Jessica; Ratcliffe, Sarah J; Silvestri, Guido; Ertl, Hildegund C; Betts, Michael R

    2009-05-15

    In the phase IIb STEP trial an HIV-1 vaccine based on adenovirus (Ad) vectors of the human serotype 5 (AdHu5) not only failed to induce protection but also increased susceptibility to HIV-1 infection in individuals with preexisting neutralizing Abs against AdHu5. The mechanisms underlying the increased HIV-1 acquisition rates have not yet been elucidated. Furthermore, it remains unclear if the lack of the vaccine's efficacy reflects a failure of the concept of T cell-mediated protection against HIV-1 or a product failure of the vaccine. Here, we compared two vaccine regimens based on sequential use of AdHu5 vectors or two different chimpanzee-derived Ad vectors in rhesus macaques that were AdHu5 seropositive or seronegative at the onset of vaccination. Our results show that heterologous booster immunizations with the chimpanzee-derived Ad vectors induced higher T and B cell responses than did repeated immunizations with the AdHu5 vector, especially in AdHu5-preexposed macaques. PMID:19414814

  18. Pediatric Response to a Large-Scale Child Protection Intervention

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lukefahr, James L.; Kellogg, Nancy D.; Anderst, James D.; Gavril, Amy R.; Wehner, Karl K.

    2011-01-01

    Objective: In a rural area of the US state of Texas, in April 2008, the Texas Department of Family and Protective Services (DFPS) responded to evidence of widespread child abuse in an isolated religious compound by removing 463 individuals into state custody. This mass child protection intervention is the largest such action that has ever occurred…

  19. GLUTATHIONE PEROXIDASE-1 PLAYS A MAJOR ROLE IN PROTECTING AGAINST ANGIOTENSIN II-INDUCED VASCULAR DYSFUNCTION

    PubMed Central

    Chrissobolis, Sophocles; Didion, Sean P.; Kinzenbaw, Dale A.; Schrader, Laura I.; Dayal, Sanjana; Lentz, Steven R.; Faraci, Frank M.

    2011-01-01

    Levels of reactive oxygen species, including hydrogen peroxide (H2O2), increase in blood vessels during hypertension and in response to angiotensin II (Ang II). Although glutathione peroxidases (GPx) are known to metabolize H2O2, the role of GPx during hypertension is poorly defined. We tested the hypothesis that GPx-1 protects against Ang II-induced endothelial dysfunction. Responses of carotid arteries from Gpx1-deficient (Gpx1 +/− and Gpx1 −/−) and Gpx1 transgenic (Tg) mice, and their respective littermate controls, were examined in vitro following overnight incubation with either vehicle or Ang II. Under control conditions, relaxation to acetylcholine (ACh, an endothelium-dependent agonist) was similar in control, Gpx1 +/−, and Gpx1 Tg mice, whereas in Gpx1 −/− mice, responses to ACh were impaired. In control mice, ACh-induced vasorelaxation was not affected by 1 nmol/L Ang II. In contrast, relaxation to ACh in arteries from Gpx1 +/− mice was inhibited by ~60% following treatment with 1 nmol/L Ang II, indicating Gpx1 haploinsufficiency markedly enhances Ang II-induced endothelial dysfunction. A higher concentration of Ang II (10 nmol/L) selectively impaired relaxation to ACh in arteries from control mice, and this effect was prevented in arteries from Gpx1 Tg mice, or arteries from control mice treated with PEG-catalase (which degrades H2O2). Thus, genetic and pharmacological evidence suggests a major role for GPx-1 and H2O2 in Ang II-induced effects on vascular function. PMID:18299484

  20. Novel Strategy To Protect against Influenza Virus-Induced Pneumococcal Disease without Interfering with Commensal Colonization.

    PubMed

    Greene, Christopher J; Marks, Laura R; Hu, John C; Reddinger, Ryan; Mandell, Lorrie; Roche-Hakansson, Hazeline; King-Lyons, Natalie D; Connell, Terry D; Hakansson, Anders P

    2016-06-01

    Streptococcus pneumoniae commonly inhabits the nasopharynx as a member of the commensal biofilm. Infection with respiratory viruses, such as influenza A virus, induces commensal S. pneumoniae to disseminate beyond the nasopharynx and to elicit severe infections of the middle ears, lungs, and blood that are associated with high rates of morbidity and mortality. Current preventive strategies, including the polysaccharide conjugate vaccines, aim to eliminate asymptomatic carriage with vaccine-type pneumococci. However, this has resulted in serotype replacement with, so far, less fit pneumococcal strains, which has changed the nasopharyngeal flora, opening the niche for entry of other virulent pathogens (e.g., Streptococcus pyogenes, Staphylococcus aureus, and potentially Haemophilus influenzae). The long-term effects of these changes are unknown. Here, we present an attractive, alternative preventive approach where we subvert virus-induced pneumococcal disease without interfering with commensal colonization, thus specifically targeting disease-causing organisms. In that regard, pneumococcal surface protein A (PspA), a major surface protein of pneumococci, is a promising vaccine target. Intradermal (i.d.) immunization of mice with recombinant PspA in combination with LT-IIb(T13I), a novel i.d. adjuvant of the type II heat-labile enterotoxin family, elicited strong systemic PspA-specific IgG responses without inducing mucosal anti-PspA IgA responses. This response protected mice from otitis media, pneumonia, and septicemia and averted the cytokine storm associated with septic infection but had no effect on asymptomatic colonization. Our results firmly demonstrated that this immunization strategy against virally induced pneumococcal disease can be conferred without disturbing the desirable preexisting commensal colonization of the nasopharynx. PMID:27001538

  1. Inhibition of PKR protects against tunicamycin-induced apoptosis in neuroblastoma cells.

    PubMed

    Vaughn, Lauren S; Snee, Brittany; Patel, Rekha C

    2014-02-15

    Endoplasmic reticulum (ER) dysfunction is thought to play a significant role in several neurological disorders, including Alzheimer's disease, Parkinson's disease, Huntington's disease, multiple sclerosis, amyotrophic lateral sclerosis, cerebral ischemia, and the prion diseases. ER dysfunction can be mimicked by cellular stress signals such as disruption of calcium homeostasis, inhibition of protein glycosylation, and reduction of disulfide bonds, which results in accumulation of misfolded proteins in the ER and leads to cell death by apoptosis. Tunicamycin, which is an inhibitor of protein glycosylation, induces ER stress and apoptosis. In this study, we examined the involvement of double stranded (ds) RNA-activated protein kinase PKR in tunicamycin-induced apoptosis. We used overexpression of the trans-dominant negative, catalytically inactive mutant K296R to inhibit PKR activity in neuroblastoma cells. We demonstrate that inhibition of PKR activation in response to tunicamycin protects neuronal cells from undergoing apoptosis. Furthermore, K296R overexpressing cells show defective PKR activation, delayed eIF2α phosphorylation, dramatically delayed ATF4 expression. In addition, both caspase-3 activation and C/EBP homologous protein (CHOP, also known as GADD153) induction, which are markers of apoptotic cells, are absent from K296R overexpression cells in response to tunicamycin. These results establish that PKR activation plays a major regulatory role in induction of apoptosis in response to ER stress and indicates the potential of PKR as possible target for neuroprotective therapeutics. PMID:24334130

  2. Ascorbic acid protects against cadmium-induced endoplasmic reticulum stress and germ cell apoptosis in testes.

    PubMed

    Ji, Yan-Li; Wang, Zhen; Wang, Hua; Zhang, Cheng; Zhang, Ying; Zhao, Mei; Chen, Yuan-Hua; Meng, Xiu-Hong; Xu, De-Xiang

    2012-11-01

    Cadmium (Cd) is a testicular toxicant which induces endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress and germ cell apoptosis in testes. This study investigated the effects of ascorbic acid on Cd-evoked ER stress and germ cell apoptosis in testes. Male mice were intraperitoneally injected with CdCl(2) (2.0 mg/kg). As expected, a single dose of Cd induced testicular germ cell apoptosis. Interestingly, Cd-triggered testicular germ cell apoptosis was almost completely inhibited in mice treated with ascorbic acid. Interestingly, ascorbic acid significantly attenuated Cd-induced upregulation of GRP78 in testes. In addition, ascorbic acid significantly attenuated Cd-triggered testicular IRE1α and eIF2α phosphorylation and XBP-1 activation, indicating that this antioxidant counteracts Cd-induced unfolded protein response (UPR) in testes. Finally, ascorbic acid significantly attenuated Cd-evoked upregulation of CHOP and JNK phosphorylation, two components in ER stress-mediated apoptotic pathway. In conclusion, ascorbic acid protects mice from Cd-triggered germ cell apoptosis via inhibiting ER stress and UPR in testes. PMID:22569276

  3. Characterisation of the protective immune response following subcutaneous vaccination of susceptible mice against Trichuris muris.

    PubMed

    Dixon, Helen; Little, Matthew C; Else, Kathryn J

    2010-05-01

    Trichuris muris is a laboratory model for the human whipworm Trichuris trichiura which infects approximately 1 billion people in tropical and sub-tropical countries. The development of a vaccine would control trichuriasis by promoting the acquisition of immunity during childhood, thereby reducing faecal egg output by the community into their environment. Resistance to T. muris, defined as expulsion of the parasite prior to patency, requires the development of a T helper 2 (Th2) response during a primary infection. To our knowledge this is the first study to describe the protective immune response in the peripheral lymph nodes (PLN), mesenteric lymph nodes (MLN) and colonic mucosa following s.c. vaccination against T. muris. Susceptible AKR mice were either vaccinated with T. muris excretory-secretory product (ES) in incomplete Freund's adjuvant (IFA) (ES/IFA) or injected with PBS in IFA (PBS/IFA) and for protection experiments were infected with embryonated infective T. muris eggs 10 days later. The ES/IFA vaccine induced the proliferation of PLN cells and their production of Th2 cytokines and the Th1-associated cytokine IFN-gamma. Following a challenge infection, the ES/IFA vaccination offered susceptible mice complete protection. While MLN-derived IFN-gamma was produced by infected mice following either ES/IFA vaccination or PBS/IFA, the protection of susceptible mice by ES/IFA was characterised by the production of MLN-derived Th2 cytokines. Goblet cell hyperplasia and the influx and alternative activation of macrophages were observed locally in the gut post-challenge infection. The rate of epithelial turnover did not appear to be increased by vaccination, suggesting that there are differences in the mechanisms of expulsion between 'natural resistance' and 'vaccinated resistance'. High levels of serum IgG1 and cell-bound IgG1 in the colon of mice protected by the ES/IFA vaccine suggest that antibody may be involved in vaccination-induced worm expulsion. PMID

  4. Cytoplasmic PELP1 and ERRgamma Protect Human Mammary Epithelial Cells from Tam-Induced Cell Death

    PubMed Central

    Girard, Brian J.; Regan Anderson, Tarah M.; Welch, Siya Lem; Nicely, Julie; Seewaldt, Victoria L.; Ostrander, Julie H.

    2015-01-01

    Tamoxifen (Tam) is the only FDA-approved chemoprevention agent for pre-menopausal women at high risk for developing breast cancer. While Tam reduces a woman's risk of developing estrogen receptor positive (ER+) breast cancer, the molecular mechanisms associated with risk reduction are poorly understood. Prior studies have shown that cytoplasmic proline, glutamic acid and leucine rich protein 1 (PELP1) promotes Tam resistance in breast cancer cell lines. Herein, we tested for PELP1 localization in breast epithelial cells from women at high risk for developing breast cancer and found that PELP1 was localized to the cytoplasm in 36% of samples. In vitro, immortalized HMECs expressing a nuclear localization signal (NLS) mutant of PELP1 (PELP1-cyto) were resistant to Tam-induced death. Furthermore, PELP1-cyto signaling through estrogen-related receptor gamma (ERRγ) promoted cell survival in the presence of Tam. Overexpression of ERRγ in immortalized HMECs protected cells from Tam-induced death, while knockdown of ERRγ sensitized PELP1-cyto expressing HMECs to Tam. Moreover, Tam-induced HMEC cell death was independent of apoptosis and involved accumulation of the autophagy marker LC3-II. Expression of PELP1-cyto and ERRγ reduced Tam-induced LC3-II accumulation, and knockdown of ERRγ increased LC3-II levels in response to Tam. Additionally, PELP1-cyto expression led to the upregulation of MMP-3 and MAOB, known PELP1 and ERRγ target genes, respectively. Our data indicate that cytoplasmic PELP1 induces signaling pathways that converge on ERRγ to promote cell survival in the presence of Tam. These data suggest that PELP1 localization and/or ERRγ activation could be developed as tissue biomarkers for Tam responsiveness. PMID:25789479

  5. Cytoplasmic PELP1 and ERRgamma protect human mammary epithelial cells from Tam-induced cell death.

    PubMed

    Girard, Brian J; Regan Anderson, Tarah M; Welch, Siya Lem; Nicely, Julie; Seewaldt, Victoria L; Ostrander, Julie H

    2015-01-01

    Tamoxifen (Tam) is the only FDA-approved chemoprevention agent for pre-menopausal women at high risk for developing breast cancer. While Tam reduces a woman's risk of developing estrogen receptor positive (ER+) breast cancer, the molecular mechanisms associated with risk reduction are poorly understood. Prior studies have shown that cytoplasmic proline, glutamic acid and leucine rich protein 1 (PELP1) promotes Tam resistance in breast cancer cell lines. Herein, we tested for PELP1 localization in breast epithelial cells from women at high risk for developing breast cancer and found that PELP1 was localized to the cytoplasm in 36% of samples. In vitro, immortalized HMECs expressing a nuclear localization signal (NLS) mutant of PELP1 (PELP1-cyto) were resistant to Tam-induced death. Furthermore, PELP1-cyto signaling through estrogen-related receptor gamma (ERRγ) promoted cell survival in the presence of Tam. Overexpression of ERRγ in immortalized HMECs protected cells from Tam-induced death, while knockdown of ERRγ sensitized PELP1-cyto expressing HMECs to Tam. Moreover, Tam-induced HMEC cell death was independent of apoptosis and involved accumulation of the autophagy marker LC3-II. Expression of PELP1-cyto and ERRγ reduced Tam-induced LC3-II accumulation, and knockdown of ERRγ increased LC3-II levels in response to Tam. Additionally, PELP1-cyto expression led to the upregulation of MMP-3 and MAOB, known PELP1 and ERRγ target genes, respectively. Our data indicate that cytoplasmic PELP1 induces signaling pathways that converge on ERRγ to promote cell survival in the presence of Tam. These data suggest that PELP1 localization and/or ERRγ activation could be developed as tissue biomarkers for Tam responsiveness. PMID:25789479

  6. Immunization of cattle with recombinant Newcastle disease virus expressing bovine herpesvirus-1 (BHV-1) glycoprotein D induces mucosal and serum antibody responses and provides partial protection against BHV-1

    PubMed Central

    Khattar, Sunil K.; Collins, Peter L.; Samal, Siba K.

    2012-01-01

    Bovine herpesvirus-1 (BHV-1) is a major cause of respiratory tract diseases in cattle. Vaccination of cattle against BHV-1 is a high priority. A major concern of currently modified live BHV-1 vaccines is their ability to cause latent infection and subsequent reactivation resulting in many outbreaks. Thus, there is a need for alternative strategies. We generated two recombinant Newcastle disease viruses (NDVs) expressing the glycoprotein D (gD) of BHV-1 from an added gene. One recombinant, rLaSota/gDFL, expressed gD without any modification. The other recombinant, rLaSota/gDF, expressed a chimeric gD in which the ectodomain of gD was fused with the transmembrane domain and cytoplasmic tail of the NDV fusion F glycoprotein. Remarkably, the native gD expressed by rLaSota/gDFL virus was incorporated into the NDV virion 2.5-fold more efficiently than the native NDV proteins, whereas the chimeric gD was not detectably incorporated even though it was abundantly expressed on the infected cell surface. The expression of gD did not increase the virulence of the rNDV vectors in chickens. A single intranasal and intratracheal inoculation of calves with either recombinant NDV elicited mucosal and systemic antibodies specific to BHV-1, with the responses to rLaSota/gDFL being higher than those to rLaSota/gDF. Following challenge with BHV-1, calves immunized with the recombinant NDVs had lower titers and earlier clearance of challenge virus compared to the empty vector control, and reduced disease was observed with rLaSota/gDFL. Following challenge, the titers of serum antibodies specific to BHV-1 were higher in the animals immunized with the rNDV vaccines compared to the rNDV parent virus, indicating that the vaccines primed for secondary responses. Our data suggest that NDV can be used as a vaccine vector in bovines and that BHV-1 gD may be useful in mucosal vaccine against BHV-1 infection, but might require augmentation by a second dose or the inclusion of additional BHV-1

  7. Neuroprotective interventions targeting detrimental host immune responses protect mice from fatal alphavirus encephalitis.

    PubMed

    Irani, David N; Prow, Natalie A

    2007-06-01

    Systemic treatment with the tetracycline derivative, minocycline, attenuates neurologic deficits in animal models of amyotrophic lateral sclerosis, hypoxic-ischemic brain injury, and multiple sclerosis. Inhibition of microglial activation within the CNS is 1 mechanism proposed to underlie the beneficial effects of the drug in these systems. Given the widening scope of acute viral encephalitis caused by mosquito-borne pathogens, we investigated the therapeutic effects of minocycline in a murine model of fatal alphavirus encephalomyelitis in which widespread microglial activation is known to occur. We found that minocycline conferred significant protection against both paralysis and death, even when started after viral challenge and despite having no effect on CNS virus replication or spread. Further studies demonstrated that minocycline inhibited early virus-induced microglial activation and that diminished CNS production of the inflammatory mediator, interleukin (IL)-1beta, contributed to its protective effect. Therapeutic blockade of IL-1 receptors also conferred significant protection in our model, validating the importance of the IL-1 pathway in disease pathogenesis. We propose that interventions targeting detrimental host immune responses arising from activated microglia may be of benefit in humans with acute viral encephalitis caused by related mosquito-borne pathogens. Such treatments could conceivably act through neuroprotective rather than antiviral mechanisms to generate these clinical effects. PMID:17549013

  8. Tetanus vaccination with a dissolving microneedle patch confers protective immune responses in pregnancy.

    PubMed

    Esser, E Stein; Romanyuk, AndreyA; Vassilieva, Elena V; Jacob, Joshy; Prausnitz, Mark R; Compans, Richard W; Skountzou, Ioanna

    2016-08-28

    Maternal and neonatal tetanus claim tens of thousands lives every year in developing countries, but could be prevented by hygienic practices and improved immunization of pregnant women. This study tested the hypothesis that skin vaccination can overcome the immunologically transformed state of pregnancy and enhance protective immunity to tetanus in mothers and their newborns. To achieve this goal, we developed microneedle patches (MNPs) that efficiently delivered unadjuvanted tetanus toxoid to skin of pregnant mice and demonstrated that this route induced superior immune responses in female mice conferring 100% survival to tetanus toxin challenge when compared to intramuscular vaccination. Mice born to MNP-vaccinated mothers showed detectable tetanus-specific IgG antibodies up to 12weeks of age and complete protection to tetanus toxin challenge up at 6weeks of age. In contrast, none of the 6-week old mice born to intramuscularly vaccinated mothers survived challenge. Although pregnant mice vaccinated with unadjuvanted tetanus toxoid had 30% lower IgG and IgG1 titers than mice vaccinated intramuscularly with Alum®-adjuvanted tetanus toxoid vaccine, IgG2a titers and antibody affinity maturation were similar between these groups. We conclude that skin immunization with MNPs containing unadjuvanted tetanus toxoid can confer potent protective efficacy to mothers and their offspring using a delivery method well suited for expanding vaccination coverage in developing countries. PMID:27327766

  9. Tat-NOL3 protects against hippocampal neuronal cell death induced by oxidative stress through the regulation of apoptotic pathways.

    PubMed

    Sohn, Eun Jeong; Shin, Min Jea; Eum, Won Sik; Kim, Dae Won; Yong, Ji In; Ryu, Eun Ji; Park, Jung Hwan; Cho, Su Bin; Cha, Hyun Ju; Kim, Sang Jin; Yeo, Hyeon Ji; Yeo, Eun Ji; Choi, Yeon Joo; Im, Seung Kwon; Kweon, Hae Young; Kim, Duk-Soo; Yu, Yeon Hee; Cho, Sung-Woo; Park, Meeyoung; Park, Jinseu; Cho, Yong-Jun; Choi, Soo Young

    2016-07-01

    Oxidative stress-induced apoptosis is associated with neuronal cell death and ischemia. The NOL3 [nucleolar protein 3 (apoptosis repressor with CARD domain)] protein protects against oxidative stress-induced cell death. However, the protective mechanism responsible for this effect as well as the effects of NOL3 against oxidative stress in ischemia remain unclear. Thus, we examined the protective effects of NOL3 protein on hydrogen peroxide (H2O2)-induced oxidative stress and the mechanism responsible for these effects in hippocampal neuronal HT22 cells and in an animal model of forebrain ischemia using Tat-fused NOL3 protein (Tat-NOL3). Purified Tat-NOL3 protein transduced into the H2O2-exposed HT22 cells and inhibited the production of reactive oxygen species (ROS), DNA fragmentation and reduced mitochondrial membrane potential (ΔΨm). In addition, Tat-NOL3 prevented neuronal cell death through the regulation of apoptotic signaling pathways including Bax, Bcl-2, caspase-2, -3 and -8, PARP and p53. In addition, Tat-NOL3 protein transduced into the animal brains and significantly protected against neuronal cell death in the CA1 region of the hippocampus by regulating the activation of microglia and astrocytes. Taken together, these findings demonstrate that Tat-NOL3 protein protects against oxidative stress-induced neuronal cell death by regulating oxidative stress and by acting as an anti-apoptotic protein. Thus, we suggest that Tat-NOL3 represents a potential therapeutic agent for protection against ischemic brain injury. PMID:27221790

  10. Dietary antioxidants protect gut epithelial cells from oxidant-induced apoptosis

    PubMed Central

    Miller, Mark JS; Angeles, Fausto M; Reuter, Brian K; Bobrowski, Paul; Sandoval, Manuel

    2001-01-01

    Background The potential of ascorbic acid and two botanical decoctions, green tea and cat's claw, to limit cell death in response to oxidants were evaluated in vitro. Methods Cultured human gastric epithelial cells (AGS) or murine small intestinal epithelial cells (IEC-18) were exposed to oxidants – DPPH (3 μM), H2O2 (50 μM), peroxynitrite (300 μM) – followed by incubation for 24 hours, with antioxidants (10 μg/ml) administered as a 1 hour pretreatment. Cell number (MTT assay) and death via apoptosis or necrosis (ELISA, LDH release) was determined. The direct interactions between antioxidants and DPPH (100 μM) or H2O2 (50 μM) were evaluated by spectroscopy. Results The decoctions did not interact with H2O2, but quenched DPPH although less effectively than vitamin C. In contrast, vitamin C was significantly less effective in protecting human gastric epithelial cells (AGS) from apoptosis induced by DPPH, peroxynitrite and H2O2 (P < 0.001). Green tea and cat's claw were equally protective against peroxynitrite and H2O2, but green tea was more effective than cat's claw in reducing DPPH-induced apoptosis (P < 0.01). Necrotic cell death was marginally evident at these low concentrations of peroxynitrite and H2O2, and was attenuated both by cat's claw and green tea (P < 0.01). In IEC-18 cells, all antioxidants were equally effective as anti-apoptotic agents. Conclusions These results indicate that dietary antioxidants can limit epithelial cell death in response to oxidant stress. In the case of green tea and cat's claw, the cytoprotective response exceed their inherent ability to interact with the injurious oxidant, suggestive of actions on intracellular pathways regulating cell death. PMID:11749672

  11. Protective effects of ghrelin on cisplatin-induced nephrotoxicity in mice.

    PubMed

    Nojiri, Takashi; Hosoda, Hiroshi; Kimura, Toru; Tokudome, Takeshi; Miura, Koichi; Takabatake, Hiroyuki; Miyazato, Mikiya; Okumura, Meinoshin; Kangawa, Kenji

    2016-08-01

    Cisplatin is a potent chemotherapeutic agent that has activity against malignant tumors. However, cisplatin causes various adverse effects, such as nephrotoxicity, which are associated with high morbidity and mortality. Recent studies have revealed that the mechanism of cisplatin nephrotoxicity includes a robust inflammatory response. Since ghrelin has been shown to have anti-inflammatory properties, we hypothesized that ghrelin might have protective effects against cisplatin nephrotoxicity. Mice were randomly divided into three groups: control, cisplatin with vehicle, and cisplatin with ghrelin. Ghrelin (0.8μg/kg/min via osmotic-pump, subcutaneously) or vehicle administration was started one day before cisplatin injection. At 72h after cisplatin administration (20mg/kg, intraperitoneally), we measured serum blood urea nitrogen and creatinine, urine albumin/creatinine, renal mRNA levels of monocyte chemoattractant protein-1, interleukin-6, tumor necrosis factor-α, interleukin-1β, kidney injury molecule-1, and neutrophil gelatinase-associated lipocalin by real-time polymerase chain reaction, and histological changes. Ghrelin significantly attenuated the increase in serum blood urea nitrogen and creatinine induced by cisplatin. Ghrelin tended to attenuate the increase in urine albumin/creatinine, although not significantly. Cisplatin-induced renal tubular injury and apoptosis were significantly attenuated by ghrelin pretreatment. Consequently, ghrelin significantly attenuated renal mRNA levels of monocyte chemoattractant protein-1, interleukin-6, kidney injury molecule-1, and neutrophil gelatinase-associated lipocalin. In conclusion, ghrelin produces protective effects in cisplatin-induced nephrotoxicity through inhibition of inflammatory reactions. Pretreatment with ghrelin may become a new prophylactic candidate for cisplatin-induced nephrotoxicity. PMID:27298204

  12. Description of particle induced damage on protected silver coatings.

    PubMed

    Schwinde, Stefan; Schürmann, Mark; Jobst, Paul Johannes; Kaiser, Norbert; Tünnermann, Andreas

    2015-06-01

    In the visible to infrared spectral range, highly-reflective silver mirrors are applied in the manufacture of optical instruments such as telescopes. However, it is still difficult to combine high reflectivity and long-term stability of the protected silver coating. We show that the deposition of impervious protective layers is necessary but often not sufficient for long-term environmental stability. Hygroscopic air borne particles absorbed by the protections surface attract water molecules and form a solution. This solution first damages the protection, subsequently permeates the protection and finally damages the silver whereby the reflectivity is reduced. We demonstrate this particular damage mechanism with different experiments and describe this mechanism in detail. PMID:26192652

  13. Sublingual immunotherapy as an alternative to induce protection against acute respiratory infections.

    PubMed

    Muñoz-Wolf, Natalia; Rial, Analía; Saavedra, José M; Chabalgoity, José A

    2014-01-01

    Sublingual route has been widely used to deliver small molecules into the bloodstream and to modulate the immune response at different sites. It has been shown to effectively induce humoral and cellular responses at systemic and mucosal sites, namely the lungs and urogenital tract. Sublingual vaccination can promote protection against infections at the lower and upper respiratory tract; it can also promote tolerance to allergens and ameliorate asthma symptoms. Modulation of lung's immune response by sublingual immunotherapy (SLIT) is safer than direct administration of formulations by intranasal route because it does not require delivery of potentially harmful molecules directly into the airways. In contrast to intranasal delivery, side effects involving brain toxicity or facial paralysis are not promoted by SLIT. The immune mechanisms underlying SLIT remain elusive and its use for the treatment of acute lung infections has not yet been explored. Thus, development of appropriate animal models of SLIT is needed to further explore its potential advantages. This work shows how to perform sublingual administration of therapeutic agents in mice to evaluate their ability to protect against acute pneumococcal pneumonia. Technical aspects of mouse handling during sublingual inoculation, precise identification of sublingual mucosa, draining lymph nodes and isolation of tissues, bronchoalveolar lavage and lungs are illustrated. Protocols for single cell suspension preparation for FACS analysis are described in detail. Other downstream applications for the analysis of the immune response are discussed. Technical aspects of the preparation of Streptococcus pneumoniae inoculum and intranasal challenge of mice are also explained. SLIT is a simple technique that allows screening of candidate molecules to modulate lungs' immune response. Parameters affecting the success of SLIT are related to molecular size, susceptibility to degradation and stability of highly concentrated

  14. The protective effects of trace elements against side effects induced by ionizing radiation

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Trace elements play crucial role in the maintenance of genome stability in the cells. Many endogenous defense enzymes are containing trace elements such as superoxide dismutase and metalloproteins. These enzymes are contributing in the detoxification of reactive oxidative species (ROS) induced by ionizing radiation in the cells. Zinc, copper, manganese, and selenium are main trace elements that have protective roles against radiation-induced DNA damages. Trace elements in the free salt forms have protective effect against cell toxicity induced by oxidative stress, metal-complex are more active in the attenuation of ROS particularly through superoxide dismutase mimetic activity. Manganese-complexes in protection of normal cell against radiation without any protective effect on cancer cells are more interesting compounds in this topic. The aim of this paper to review the role of trace elements in protection cells against genotoxicity and side effects induced by ionizing radiation. PMID:26157675

  15. Bevacizumab reduced auto-phosphorylation of VEGFR2 to protect HDM-induced asthma mice.

    PubMed

    Huang, Chaowen; Dong, Hangming; Zou, Mengchen; Luo, Lishan; Hu, Yahui; Xie, Zhefan; Le, Yanqing; Liu, Laiyu; Zou, Fei; Cai, Shaoxi

    2016-09-01

    Vascular endothelial growth factor (VEFG) is a major angiogenic factor involved in both normal physiological processes, such as embryonic development and wound healing, and in diseases, like cancer. Recent studies have revealed the functions of VEGF in inflammation and immunoregulation. Asthma is a chronic inflammation of the airways characterized by airway epithelial barrier dysfunction and imbalance in T-helper (Th) 1/Th2 during immunoregulation. We hypothesized that VEGF plays an important role in asthma. Utilizing a house dust mite extract (HDM)-induced murine model of asthma, we investigated whether bevacizumab, a humanized anti-VEGF monoclonal antibody, could protect the epithelial barrier in murine airways. We found that bevacizumab reduced airway hyper-responsiveness (AHR) and airway inflammation induced by HDM. In addition, HDM exposure promoted expression of VEGF, and caused AHR, disruptions of the epithelial barrier, and airway inflammation. Bevacizumab ameliorated AHR and the release of Th2 cytokines, thereby protecting the epithelial barrier. Our data suggest that bevacizumab may be a new therapeutic strategy for asthma. PMID:27453339

  16. Protective Effect of Salicornia europaea Extracts on High Salt Intake-Induced Vascular Dysfunction and Hypertension

    PubMed Central

    Panth, Nisha; Park, Sin-Hee; Kim, Hyun Jung; Kim, Deuk-Hoi; Oak, Min-Ho

    2016-01-01

    High salt intake causes and aggravates arterial hypertension and vascular dysfunction. We investigated the effect of Salicornia europaea extracts (SE) on vascular function and blood pressure. SE constituents were analyzed using high performance liquid chromatography, and SE’s effect on vascular function was evaluated in isolated porcine coronary arteries. SE’s vascular protective effect was also evaluated in vivo using normotensive and spontaneous hypertensive rats (SHRs). SE mainly contained sodium chloride (55.6%), 5-(hydroxymethyl)furfural, p-coumaric acid, and trans-ferulic acid. High sodium (160 mmol/L) induced vascular dysfunction; however, SE containing the same quantity of sodium did not cause vascular dysfunction. Among the compounds in SE, trans-ferulic acid accounts for the vascular protective effect. Normotensive rats fed a high-salt diet showed significantly increased systolic blood pressure (SBP), diastolic blood pressure (DBP), and mean arterial pressure (MAP), which decreased significantly in the SE-treated groups. In SHRs, high edible salt intake significantly increased SBP, DBP, and MAP, but SE intake was associated with a significantly lower MAP. Thus, SE did not induce vascular dysfunction, and trans-ferulic acid might be at least partly responsible for the vasoprotective effect of SE. Taken together, SE could be used as an alternative to purified salt to prevent and ameliorate hypertension. PMID:27455235

  17. Recreation-induced changes in boreal bird communities in protected areas.

    PubMed

    Kangas, K; Luoto, M; Ihantola, A; Tomppo, E; Siikamäki, P

    2010-09-01

    The impacts of human-induced disturbance on birds have been studied in growing extent, but there are relatively few studies about the effects of recreation on forest bird communities in protected areas. In this paper, the relative importance of recreation as well as environmental variables on bird communities in Oulanka National Park, in northeastern Finland, was investigated using general additive models (GAM). Bird data collected using the line transect method along hiking trails and in undisturbed control areas were related to number of visits, area of tourism infrastructure, and habitat variables. We further examined the impact of spatial autocorrelation by calculating an autocovariate term for GAMs. Our results indicate that number of visits affects the occurrence and composition of bird communities, but it had no impact on total species richness. Open-cup nesters breeding on the ground showed strongest negative response to visitor pressure, whereas the open-cup nesters nesting in trees and shrubs were more tolerant. For cavity-nesting species, recreation had no significant impact. The contribution of the number of visits was generally low also in models in which it was selected, and the occurrence of birds was mainly determined by habitat characteristics of the area. However, our results show that the recreation-induced disturbance with relatively low visitor pressure can have negative impacts on some bird species and groups of species and should be considered in management of protected areas with recreational activities. PMID:20945775

  18. Protective Effect of Salicornia europaea Extracts on High Salt Intake-Induced Vascular Dysfunction and Hypertension.

    PubMed

    Panth, Nisha; Park, Sin-Hee; Kim, Hyun Jung; Kim, Deuk-Hoi; Oak, Min-Ho

    2016-01-01

    High salt intake causes and aggravates arterial hypertension and vascular dysfunction. We investigated the effect of Salicornia europaea extracts (SE) on vascular function and blood pressure. SE constituents were analyzed using high performance liquid chromatography, and SE's effect on vascular function was evaluated in isolated porcine coronary arteries. SE's vascular protective effect was also evaluated in vivo using normotensive and spontaneous hypertensive rats (SHRs). SE mainly contained sodium chloride (55.6%), 5-(hydroxymethyl)furfural, p-coumaric acid, and trans-ferulic acid. High sodium (160 mmol/L) induced vascular dysfunction; however, SE containing the same quantity of sodium did not cause vascular dysfunction. Among the compounds in SE, trans-ferulic acid accounts for the vascular protective effect. Normotensive rats fed a high-salt diet showed significantly increased systolic blood pressure (SBP), diastolic blood pressure (DBP), and mean arterial pressure (MAP), which decreased significantly in the SE-treated groups. In SHRs, high edible salt intake significantly increased SBP, DBP, and MAP, but SE intake was associated with a significantly lower MAP. Thus, SE did not induce vascular dysfunction, and trans-ferulic acid might be at least partly responsible for the vasoprotective effect of SE. Taken together, SE could be used as an alternative to purified salt to prevent and ameliorate hypertension. PMID:27455235

  19. Protective effects of Ocimum gratissimum polyphenol extract on carbon tetrachloride-induced liver fibrosis in rats.

    PubMed

    Chen, Yieng-How; Chiu, Yung-Wei; Shyu, Jyh-Cherng; Tsai, Chin-Chiu; Lee, Hsueh-Hui; Hung, Chuan-Chen; Hwang, Jin-Ming; Liu, Jer-Yuh; Wang, Wen-Hong

    2015-02-28

    Ocimum gratissimum found in tropical regions is a traditional herb commonly which prevents free radical damage and protects liver from oxidative stress and fibrosis. Ocimum gratissimum polyphenol extract (OGPE) was purified by resin tube to 33.24% polyphenol and 8.2% flavonoid, which were three-fold higher compared with the pre-purification concentrations. The abstract was used to determine if the antioxidant components in the O. gratissimum extract (OGE) were responsible for protective effects on liver fibrosis. High-performance liquid chromatography analysis revealed that the content levels of catechin, caffeic acid and epicatechin in OGPE also increased three-fold. Male Wistar rats were administered with carbon tetrachloride (CCl₄) and varying amounts of OGPE doses [0-12 mg/kg body weight (BW)] or OGE dose (40 mg/kg BW) for 8 weeks. Results showed that OGPE at 12 mg/kg BW, similar to OGE at 40 mg/kg BW, maintained the liver weight, significantly ameliorated CCl₄-induced steatosis, and mitigated other pathological changes. OGPE (12 mg/kg BW) also maintained the levels of serum alanine aminotransferase and aspartate aminotransferase, as well as the levels of malondialdehyde, catalase and α-smooth muscle actin in liver tissues from CCl₄-induced changes. These findings suggest that antioxidant components in OGPE were the major factors that prevented liver fibrosis. Moreover, higher polyphenol concentrations were necessary for higher effectiveness. PMID:25687492

  20. Human very low density lipoproteins and chylomicrons can protect against endotoxin-induced death in mice.

    PubMed Central

    Harris, H W; Grunfeld, C; Feingold, K R; Rapp, J H

    1990-01-01

    Endotoxemia stimulates many physiologic responses including disturbances in lipid metabolism. We hypothesized that this lipemia may be part of a defensive mechanism by which the body combats the toxic effects of circulating endotoxin. We tested the effects of mixtures of endotoxin, lipoproteins, and lipoprotein-free plasma and determined the ability of varying concentrations of human very low density lipoproteins (VLDL) and chylomicrons, as well as low density lipoproteins (LDL) and high density lipoproteins (HDL), and of the synthetic lipid emulsion SOYACAL to prevent endotoxin-induced death in mice. This study demonstrates that the triglyceride-rich VLDL and chylomicrons, as well as cholesterol-rich LDL and HDL, and cholesterol-free SOYACAL can protect against endotoxin-induced death. Protection required small amounts of lipoprotein-free plasma, and depended on the incubation time and the concentration of lipoprotein lipid. Despite stringent techniques to prevent exogenous endotoxin contamination eight of ten duplicate VLDL preparations contained endotoxin (5,755 +/- 3,514 ng endotoxin/mg triglyceride, mean +/- SEM) making the isolation of endotoxin-free VLDL difficult. In contrast, simultaneous preparations of LDL and HDL were relatively free of endotoxin contamination (3 +/- 3 and 320 +/- 319 ng/mg total cholesterol, respectively), suggesting that the contamination of VLDL occurs in vivo and not during the isolation procedure. These observations suggest a possible role for increased triglyceride-rich lipoproteins in the host's defense against endotoxemia and infection. Images PMID:2394827

  1. A recombinant Bacillus anthracis strain producing the Clostridium perfringens Ib component induces protection against iota toxins.

    PubMed Central

    Sirard, J C; Weber, M; Duflot, E; Popoff, M R; Mock, M

    1997-01-01

    The Bacillus anthracis toxinogenic Sterne strain is currently used as a live veterinary vaccine against anthrax. The capacity of a toxin-deficient derivative strain to produce a heterologous antigen by using the strong inducible promoter of the B. anthracis pag gene was investigated. The expression of the foreign gene ibp, encoding the Ib component of iota toxin from Clostridium perfringens, was analyzed. A pag-ibp fusion was introduced by allelic exchange into a toxin-deficient Sterne strain, thereby replacing the wild-type pag gene. This recombinant strain, called BAIB, was stable and secreted large quantities of Ib protein in induced culture conditions. Mice given injections of live BAIB spores developed an antibody response specific to the Ib protein. The pag-ibp fusion was therefore functional both in vitro and in vivo. Moreover, the immunized animals were protected against a challenge with C. perfringens iota toxin or with the homologous Clostridium spiroforme toxin. The protective immunity was mediated by neutralizing antibodies. In conclusion, B. anthracis is promising for the development of live veterinary vaccines. PMID:9169728

  2. Edwardsiella tarda Outer Membrane Protein C: An Immunogenic Protein Induces Highly Protective Effects in Flounder (Paralichthys olivaceus) against Edwardsiellosis.

    PubMed

    Liu, Fuguo; Tang, Xiaoqian; Sheng, Xiuzhen; Xing, Jing; Zhan, Wenbin

    2016-01-01

    Outer membrane protein C of Edwardsiella tarda is a major cell surface antigen and it was identified to be an immunogenic protein by Western blot using flounder (Paralichthys olivaceus) anti-recombinant OmpC (rOmpC), and anti-E. tarda antibodies. rOmpC tested the immune protective effect against E. tarda challenge in a flounder model and produced a relative percentage of survival rate of 85%. The immune response of flounder induced by rOmpC was investigated, and the results showed that: (1) the levels of specific serum antibodies induced by rOmpC were significantly higher than the control group after the second week after immunization, and the peak level occurred at week five after immunization; (2) rOmpC could induce the proliferation of sIg+ lymphocytes, and the peak levels of sIg+ lymphocytes in blood, spleen, and pronephros occurred at 4-5 weeks after immunization; and (3) the MHCIIα, CD4-1, IL-1β, IL-6 and TNF-α genes were significantly induced after being injected with rOmpC. Taken together, these results demonstrated that rOmpC could evoke highly protective effects against E. tarda challenge and induce strong innate immune response and humoral immune response of flounder, which indicated that OmpC was a promising vaccine candidate against E. tarda infection. PMID:27420049

  3. Edwardsiella tarda Outer Membrane Protein C: An Immunogenic Protein Induces Highly Protective Effects in Flounder (Paralichthys olivaceus) against Edwardsiellosis

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Fuguo; Tang, Xiaoqian; Sheng, Xiuzhen; Xing, Jing; Zhan, Wenbin

    2016-01-01

    Outer membrane protein C of Edwardsiella tarda is a major cell surface antigen and it was identified to be an immunogenic protein by Western blot using flounder (Paralichthys olivaceus) anti-recombinant OmpC (rOmpC), and anti-E. tarda antibodies. rOmpC tested the immune protective effect against E. tarda challenge in a flounder model and produced a relative percentage of survival rate of 85%. The immune response of flounder induced by rOmpC was investigated, and the results showed that: (1) the levels of specific serum antibodies induced by rOmpC were significantly higher than the control group after the second week after immunization, and the peak level occurred at week five after immunization; (2) rOmpC could induce the proliferation of sIg+ lymphocytes, and the peak levels of sIg+ lymphocytes in blood, spleen, and pronephros occurred at 4–5 weeks after immunization; and (3) the MHCIIα, CD4-1, IL-1β, IL-6 and TNF-α genes were significantly induced after being injected with rOmpC. Taken together, these results demonstrated that rOmpC could evoke highly protective effects against E. tarda challenge and induce strong innate immune response and humoral immune response of flounder, which indicated that OmpC was a promising vaccine candidate against E. tarda infection. PMID:27420049

  4. Multimerized T cell epitopes protect from experimental autoimmune diabetes by inducing dominant tolerance.

    PubMed

    Piaggio, Eliane; Mars, Lennart T; Cassan, Cécile; Cabarrocas, Julie; Hofstätter, Maria; Desbois, Sabine; Bergereau, Emilie; Rötzschke, Olaf; Falk, Kirsten; Liblau, Roland S

    2007-05-29

    Immunotherapy by using multimerized self-peptides has demonstrated a clear protective effect on experimental models of autoimmune diseases. However, the mechanisms involved remain ill-defined. Here we have evaluated the therapeutic efficacy of multimerized self-peptides at the effector phase of autoimmune diabetes and examined their mechanisms of action. Diabetes was induced in rat insulin promoter-hemagglutinin (HA) mice expressing HA in pancreatic beta-cells by adoptive transfer of HA(110-119)-specific T helper 1 cells. Complete protection was provided by low doses of the HA 4-mer consisting of four covalently linked linear HA(107-119) peptides. In vivo, the 4-mer appeared to act directly on the pathogenic HA-specific T helper 1 cells and indirectly by activation/recruitment of lymphocytes with regulatory properties so that mice became resistant to a second transfer of diabetogenic T cells. This effect was associated with a recruitment of Foxp3(+) CD4 T cells around islets. Moreover, we show that dominant protection from autoimmunity was transferable by spleen cells, and that development of this regulatory population was crucially dependent on the lymphocytes from treated rat insulin promoter-HA mice. Thus, immunotherapy using multimerized epitopes emerges as a promising strategy in view of the current identification of self-epitopes that are major targets of the pathogenic CD4 T cell response in autoimmune diseases. PMID:17517665

  5. Multimerized T cell epitopes protect from experimental autoimmune diabetes by inducing dominant tolerance

    PubMed Central

    Piaggio, Eliane; Mars, Lennart T.; Cassan, Cécile; Cabarrocas, Julie; Hofstätter, Maria; Desbois, Sabine; Bergereau, Emilie; Rötzschke, Olaf; Falk, Kirsten; Liblau, Roland S.

    2007-01-01

    Immunotherapy by using multimerized self-peptides has demonstrated a clear protective effect on experimental models of autoimmune diseases. However, the mechanisms involved remain ill-defined. Here we have evaluated the therapeutic efficacy of multimerized self-peptides at the effector phase of autoimmune diabetes and examined their mechanisms of action. Diabetes was induced in rat insulin promoter-hemagglutinin (HA) mice expressing HA in pancreatic β-cells by adoptive transfer of HA110–119-specific T helper 1 cells. Complete protection was provided by low doses of the HA 4-mer consisting of four covalently linked linear HA107–119 peptides. In vivo, the 4-mer appeared to act directly on the pathogenic HA-specific T helper 1 cells and indirectly by activation/recruitment of lymphocytes with regulatory properties so that mice became resistant to a second transfer of diabetogenic T cells. This effect was associated with a recruitment of Foxp3+ CD4 T cells around islets. Moreover, we show that dominant protection from autoimmunity was transferable by spleen cells, and that development of this regulatory population was crucially dependent on the lymphocytes from treated rat insulin promoter-HA mice. Thus, immunotherapy using multimerized epitopes emerges as a promising strategy in view of the current identification of self-epitopes that are major targets of the pathogenic CD4 T cell response in autoimmune diseases. PMID:17517665

  6. The mitochondrial protective mechanism of olfactory ensheathing cells conditioned medium protects against H2O2-induced injury in astrocytes.

    PubMed

    Liu, Jinbo; Qiu, Jing; Xiong, Yuyun; Liu, Zhiyuan; Gao, Jing

    2013-10-25

    Our previous studies showed that olfactory ensheathing cells conditioned medium (OECCM), has a positive effect against apoptosis in ASTs and prevents the morphology changes in the, mitochondria, but the accurate mechanism is still unknown. In this study, we examined the mitochondrial mechanism of OECCM which may protect against H2O2-induced injury in ASTs. It was, found that OECCM could protect ASTs from the injury of 500μmol/L H2O2, decrease the intracellular, ROS and Ca(2+) level, as well inhibit apoptosis and the expression of cleaved caspase-3. Further, investigations showed that OECCM could increase both the mitochondrial membrane potential and the, ATP level, as well enhance the cell respiratory function. In summary, OECCM could protect ASTs from, damages induced by H2O2. Its mechanism may be related to the decrease of ROS generation and the, overloading of Ca(2+), then stabilization of the mitochondrial function. PMID:24036462

  7. Neonatal Immunization with Respiratory Syncytial Virus Glycoprotein Fragment Induces Protective Immunity in the Presence of Maternal Antibodies in Mice

    PubMed Central

    Noh, Youran; Shim, Byoung-Shik; Cheon, In Su; Rho, Semi; Kim, Hee Joo; Choi, Youngjoo; Kang, Chang-Yuil; Chang, Jun

    2013-01-01

    Abstract Respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) is a major cause of severe lower respiratory tract infections in infants and the elderly worldwide. The significant morbidity and mortality associated with this infection underscores the urgent need for development of RSV vaccine. In this study, we first show that intranasal administration of RSV glycoprotein core fragment (Gcf) to neonatal mice can induce systemic humoral immune responses and protective immunity against RSV without causing lung eosinophilia, although antibody response was shifted to a Th2 response. Next, we examined whether the presence of maternal anti-RSV antibodies would affect the responsiveness and protection efficacy of Gcf in newborn mice, since infants can possess RSV-specific maternal antibodies due to frequent RSV re-infections to adults. Intranasal administration of Gcf induced antibody response and increased IFNγ secretion and protected mice against RSV challenge without severe lung eosinophilia, even in the presence of high levels of RSV-specific maternal antibodies. Thus, our findings suggest that Gcf may be an effective and safe RSV vaccine during the neonatal period. PMID:23869549

  8. Strain-Specific Protective Effect of the Immunity Induced by Live Malarial Sporozoites under Chloroquine Cover

    PubMed Central

    Wijayalath, Wathsala; Cheesman, Sandra; Tanabe, Kazuyuki; Handunnetti, Shiroma; Carter, Richard; Pathirana, Sisira

    2012-01-01

    The efficacy of a whole-sporozoite malaria vaccine would partly be determined by the strain-specificity of the protective responses against malarial sporozoites and liver-stage parasites. Evidence from previous reports were inconsistent, where some studies have shown that the protective immunity induced by irradiated or live sporozoites in rodents or humans were cross-protective and in others strain-specific. In the present work, we have studied the strain-specificity of live sporozoite-induced immunity using two genetically and immunologically different strains of Plasmodium cynomolgi, Pc746 and PcCeylon, in toque monkeys. Two groups of monkeys were immunized against live sporozoites of either the Pc746 (n = 5), or the PcCeylon (n = 4) strain, by the bites of 2–4 sporozoite-infected Anopheles tessellates mosquitoes per monkey under concurrent treatments with chloroquine and primaquine to abrogate detectable blood infections. Subsequently, a group of non-immunized monkeys (n = 4), and the two groups of immunized monkeys were challenged with a mixture of sporozoites of the two strains by the bites of 2–5 infective mosquitoes from each strain per monkey. In order to determine the strain-specificity of the protective immunity, the proportions of parasites of the two strains in the challenge infections were quantified using an allele quantification assay, Pyrosequencing™, based on a single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) in the parasites’ circumsporozoite protein gene. The Pyrosequencing™ data showed that a significant reduction of parasites of the immunizing strain in each group of strain-specifically immunized monkeys had occurred, indicating a stronger killing effect on parasites of the immunizing strain. Thus, the protective immunity developed following a single, live sporozoite/chloroquine immunization, acted specifically against the immunizing strain and was, therefore, strain-specific. As our experiment does not allow us to determine the

  9. Protective role of glutathione reductase in paraquat induced neurotoxicity.

    PubMed

    Djukic, Mirjana M; Jovanovic, Marina D; Ninkovic, Milica; Stevanovic, Ivana; Ilic, Katarina; Curcic, Marijana; Vekic, Jelena

    2012-08-30

    Paraquat (PQ), a widely used herbicide is a well-known free radical producing agent. The mechanistic pathways of PQ neurotoxicity were examined by assessing oxidative/nitrosative stress markers. Focus was on the role of glutathione (GSH) cycle and to examine whether the pre-treatment with enzyme glutathione reductase (GR) could protect the vulnerable brain regions (VBRs) against harmful oxidative effect of PQ. The study was conducted on Wistar rats, randomly divided in five groups: intact-control group, (n = 8) and four experimental groups (n = 24). All tested compounds were administered intrastriatally (i.s.) in one single dose. The following parameters of oxidative status were measured in the striatum, hippocampus and cortex, at 30 min, 24 h and 7 days post treatment: superoxide anion radical (O₂·⁻), nitrate (NO₃⁻), malondialdehyde (MDA), superoxide dismutase (SOD), total GSH (tGSH) and its oxidized, disulfide form (GSSG) and glutathione peroxidase (GPx). Results obtained from the intact and the sham operated groups were not statistically different, confirming that invasive i.s. route of administration would not influence the reliability of results. Also, similar pattern of changes were observed between ipsi- and contra- lateral side of examined VBRs, indicating rapid spatial spreading of oxidative stress. Mortality of the animals (10%), within 24h, along with symptoms of Parkinsonism, after awakening from anesthesia for 2-3 h, were observed in the PQ group, only. Increased levels of O₂·⁻, NO₃⁻ and MDA, increased ratio of GSSG/GSH and considerably high activity of GPx were measured at 30 min after the treatment. Cytotoxic effect of PQ was documented by drastic drop of all measured parameters and extremely high peak of the ratio GSSG/GSH at 24th hrs after the PQ i.s. injection. In the GR+PQ group, markedly low activity of GPx and low content of NO₃⁻ (in striatum and cortex) were measured during whole experiment, while increase value was

  10. Protective Immunity and Reduced Renal Colonization Induced by Vaccines Containing Recombinant Leptospira interrogans Outer Membrane Proteins and Flagellin Adjuvant

    PubMed Central

    Monaris, D.; Sbrogio-Almeida, M. E.; Dib, C. C.; Canhamero, T. A.; Souza, G. O.; Vasconcellos, S. A.; Ferreira, L. C. S.

    2015-01-01

    Leptospirosis is a global zoonotic disease caused by different Leptospira species, such as Leptospira interrogans, that colonize the renal tubules of wild and domestic animals. Thus far, attempts to develop effective leptospirosis vaccines, both for humans and animals, have failed to induce immune responses capable of conferring protection and simultaneously preventing renal colonization. In this study, we evaluated the protective immunity induced by subunit vaccines containing seven different recombinant Leptospira interrogans outer membrane proteins, including the carboxy-terminal portion of the immunoglobulinlike protein A (LigAC) and six novel antigens, combined with aluminum hydroxide (alum) or Salmonella flagellin (FliC) as adjuvants. Hamsters vaccinated with the different formulations elicited high antigen-specific antibody titers. Immunization with LigAC, either with alum or flagellin, conferred protective immunity but did not prevent renal colonization. Similarly, animals immunized with LigAC or LigAC coadministered with six leptospiral proteins with alum adjuvant conferred protection but did not reduce renal colonization. In contrast, immunizing animals with the pool of seven antigens in combination with flagellin conferred protection and significantly reduced renal colonization by the pathogen. The present study emphasizes the relevance of antigen composition and added adjuvant in the efficacy of antileptospirosis subunit vaccines and shows the complex relationship between immune responses and renal colonization by the pathogen. PMID:26108285

  11. Protective Immunity and Reduced Renal Colonization Induced by Vaccines Containing Recombinant Leptospira interrogans Outer Membrane Proteins and Flagellin Adjuvant.

    PubMed

    Monaris, D; Sbrogio-Almeida, M E; Dib, C C; Canhamero, T A; Souza, G O; Vasconcellos, S A; Ferreira, L C S; Abreu, P A E

    2015-08-01

    Leptospirosis is a global zoonotic disease caused by different Leptospira species, such as Leptospira interrogans, that colonize the renal tubules of wild and domestic animals. Thus far, attempts to develop effective leptospirosis vaccines, both for humans and animals, have failed to induce immune responses capable of conferring protection and simultaneously preventing renal colonization. In this study, we evaluated the protective immunity induced by subunit vaccines containing seven different recombinant Leptospira interrogans outer membrane proteins, including the carboxy-terminal portion of the immunoglobulinlike protein A (LigA(C)) and six novel antigens, combined with aluminum hydroxide (alum) or Salmonella flagellin (FliC) as adjuvants. Hamsters vaccinated with the different formulations elicited high antigen-specific antibody titers. Immunization with LigA(C), either with alum or flagellin, conferred protective immunity but did not prevent renal colonization. Similarly, animals immunized with LigA(C) or LigA(C) coadministered with six leptospiral proteins with alum adjuvant conferred protection but did not reduce renal colonization. In contrast, immunizing animals with the pool of seven antigens in combination with flagellin conferred protection and significantly reduced renal colonization by the pathogen. The present study emphasizes the relevance of antigen composition and added adjuvant in the efficacy of antileptospirosis subunit vaccines and shows the complex relationship between immune responses and renal colonization by the pathogen. PMID:26108285

  12. 10 CFR 35.24 - Authority and responsibilities for the radiation protection program.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 1 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Authority and responsibilities for the radiation protection program. 35.24 Section 35.24 Energy NUCLEAR REGULATORY COMMISSION MEDICAL USE OF BYPRODUCT MATERIAL General Administrative Requirements § 35.24 Authority and responsibilities for the radiation protection program. (a) In addition to the...

  13. 10 CFR 35.2024 - Records of authority and responsibilities for radiation protection programs.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 1 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Records of authority and responsibilities for radiation protection programs. 35.2024 Section 35.2024 Energy NUCLEAR REGULATORY COMMISSION MEDICAL USE OF BYPRODUCT MATERIAL Records § 35.2024 Records of authority and responsibilities for radiation protection programs. (a) A licensee shall retain a record...

  14. 10 CFR 35.24 - Authority and responsibilities for the radiation protection program.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Authority and responsibilities for the radiation... MATERIAL General Administrative Requirements § 35.24 Authority and responsibilities for the radiation protection program. (a) In addition to the radiation protection program requirements of § 20.1101 of...

  15. 10 CFR 35.24 - Authority and responsibilities for the radiation protection program.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 1 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Authority and responsibilities for the radiation... MATERIAL General Administrative Requirements § 35.24 Authority and responsibilities for the radiation protection program. (a) In addition to the radiation protection program requirements of § 20.1101 of...

  16. 10 CFR 35.24 - Authority and responsibilities for the radiation protection program.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 1 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Authority and responsibilities for the radiation... MATERIAL General Administrative Requirements § 35.24 Authority and responsibilities for the radiation protection program. (a) In addition to the radiation protection program requirements of § 20.1101 of...

  17. 10 CFR 35.24 - Authority and responsibilities for the radiation protection program.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 1 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Authority and responsibilities for the radiation... MATERIAL General Administrative Requirements § 35.24 Authority and responsibilities for the radiation protection program. (a) In addition to the radiation protection program requirements of § 20.1101 of...

  18. Protection against D-galactosamine-induced acute liver injury by oral administration of extracts from Lentinus edodes mycelia.

    PubMed

    Watanabe, Aiko; Kobayashi, Masakazu; Hayashi, Shinji; Kodama, Daisuke; Isoda, Katsuhiro; Kondoh, Masuo; Kawase, Masaya; Tamesada, Makoto; Yagi, Kiyohito

    2006-08-01

    The development of oral medications to help prevent liver injury is desirable, and some mushrooms contain chemicals that show promise as such a treatment. Here, we tested whether a hot-water extract (L.E.M.) of the cultured mycelia of an edible mushroom, Lentinus edodes, could protect primary cultured hepatocytes from D-galactosamine (GalN)-induced injury. GalN induced cell death in the hepatocytes, and this effect was completely suppressed by the addition of 0.5 mg/ml L.E.M. Polyphenolic compounds contained in the L.E.M. seemed to be responsible for the protective effect. We next examined the protective effect of L.E.M. in a GalN-induced liver injury model in rats. In rats that had been treated with L.E.M. given orally or intraperitoneally, GalN caused less leakage of aspartate aminotransferase and alanine aminotransferase, markers for liver injury, and a lower decrease in serum protein content, than in non-L.E.M.-treated rats. Histological analysis of the liver also showed a protective effect of L.E.M. Our findings indicate that L.E.M. administration is a promising treatment for protecting the liver from acute injury. PMID:16880621

  19. Conditioning-induced protection from impulse noise in female and male chinchillas.

    PubMed

    McFadden, S L; Zheng, X Y; Ding, D L

    2000-04-01

    Sound conditioning (pre-exposure to a moderate-level acoustic stimulus) can induce resistance to hearing loss from a subsequent traumatic exposure. Most sound conditioning experiments have utilized long-duration tones and noise at levels below 110 dB SPL as traumatic stimuli. It is important to know if sound conditioning can also provide protection from brief, high-level stimuli such as impulses produced by gunfire, and whether there are differences between females and males in the response of the ear to noise. In the present study, chinchillas were exposed to 95 dB SPL octave band noise centered at 0.5 kHz for 6 h/day for 5 days. After 5 days of recovery, they were exposed to simulated M16 rifle fire at a level of 150 dB peak SPL. Animals that were sound conditioned showed less hearing loss and smaller hair cell lesions than controls. Females showed significantly less hearing loss than males at low frequencies, but more hearing loss at 16 kHz. Cochleograms showed slightly less hair cell loss in females than in males. The results show that significant protection from impulse noise can be achieved with a 5-day conditioning regimen, and that there are consistent differences between female and male chinchillas in the response of the cochlea to impulse noise. PMID:10790042

  20. Aging changes agonist induced contractile responses in permeabilized rat bladder.

    PubMed

    Durlu-Kandilci, N Tugba; Denizalti, Merve; Sahin-Erdemli, Inci

    2015-08-01

    Aging alters bladder functions where a decrease in filling, storage and emptying is observed. These changes cause urinary incontinence, especially in women. The aim of this study is to examine how aging affects the intracellular calcium movements due to agonist-induced contractions in permeabilized female rat bladder. Urinary bladder isolated from young and old female Sprague-Dawley rats were used. Small detrusor strips were permeabilized with β-escin. The contractile responses induced with agonists were compared between young and old groups. Carbachol-induced contractions were decreased in permeabilized detrusor from old rats compared to young group. Heparin and ryanodine decreased carbachol-induced contractions in young rats where only heparin inhibited these contractions in olds. Caffeine-induced contractions but not inositol triphosphate (IP3)-induced contractions were decreased in old group compared to youngs. The cumulative calcium response curves (pCa 8-4) were also decreased in old rats. Carbachol-induced calcium sensitization responses did not alter by age where GTP-β-S and GF-109203X but not Y-27632 inhibited these responses. Carbachol-induced contractions decrease with aging in rat bladder detrusor. It can be postulated as IP3-induced calcium release (IICR) is primarily responsible for the contractions in older rats where the decrease in carbachol contractions in aging may be as a result of a decrease in calcium-induced calcium release (CICR), rather than carbachol-induced calcium sensitization. PMID:26153091

  1. DNA vaccination using expression vectors carrying FIV structural genes induces immune response against feline immunodeficiency virus.

    PubMed

    Cuisinier, A M; Mallet, V; Meyer, A; Caldora, C; Aubert, A

    1997-07-01

    Following inactivated virus vaccination trials, the surface glycoprotein gp120 of the feline immunodeficiency virus (FIV) was considered as one of the determinants for protection. However, several vaccination trials using recombinant Env protein or some peptides failed to induce protection. To understand the role of the gp120 protein in vivo, we vaccinated cats with naked DNA coding for FIV structural proteins gp120 and p10. We analyzed the ability of these vaccinations to induce immune protection and to influence the onset of infection. Injection in cat muscles of expression vectors coding for the FIV gp120 protein induced a humoral response. Cats immunized twice with the gp120 gene showed different patterns after challenge. Two cats were, like the control cats, infected from the second week after infection onwards. The two others maintained a low proviral load with no modification of their antibody pattern. The immune response induced by gp120 DNA injection could control the level of viral replication. This protective-like immune response was not correlated to the humoral response. All the cats immunized with the gp120 gene followed by the p10 gene were infected, like the control cats, from the second week but they developed a complete humoral response against viral proteins after challenge. Furthermore, they showed a sudden but transient drop of the proviral load at 4 weeks after infection. Under these conditions, one injection of the p10 gene after one injection of the gp120 gene was not sufficient to stimulate protection. On the contrary, after a period, it seems to facilitate virus replication. PMID:9269051

  2. Arctiin induces an UVB protective effect in human dermal fibroblast cells through microRNA expression changes.

    PubMed

    Lee, Ghang Tai; Cha, Hwa Jun; Lee, Kwang Sik; Lee, Kun Kook; Hong, Jin Tae; Ahn, Kyu Joong; An, In-Sook; An, Sungkwan; Bae, Seunghee

    2014-03-01

    Ultraviolet (UV) radiation induces severe alterations in the molecular and cellular components of normal human dermal fibroblast (NHDF) cells by disrupting many intracellular transduction cascades. Although UV responses have been well documented at the genome and proteome levels, UV protective effects have not been elucidated at these levels. The aim of the present study was to demonstrate that arctiin, a phytochemical isolated from the plant Arctium lappa, induced a protective effect against UVB radiation by changing microRNA (miRNA) expression profiles. Using flow cytometry, and water-soluble tetrazolium salt (WST-1)-based cell viability, wound healing, and DNA repair assays we showed that pretreatment with arctiin prior to UVB irradiation reduced UVB-induced apoptosis, cell migration defects, and DNA damage in NHDF cells. It was also found that arctiin‑induced UVB protection is associated with altered miRNA expression profiles. Bioinformatic analysis revealed that the deregulated miRNAs were functionally involved in mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) signaling and cancer signaling pathways. The results suggest that arctiin acts as a UVB protective agent by altering specific miRNA expression in NHDF cells. PMID:24398562

  3. Sestrin2 integrates Akt and mTOR signaling to protect cells against energetic stress-induced death.

    PubMed

    Ben-Sahra, I; Dirat, B; Laurent, K; Puissant, A; Auberger, P; Budanov, A; Tanti, J-F; Bost, F

    2013-04-01

    The phosphoinositide-3 kinase/Akt (PI3K/Akt) pathway has a central role in cancer cell metabolism and proliferation. More importantly, it is one of the cardinal pro-survival pathways mediating resistance to apoptosis. The role of Akt in response to an energetic stress is presently unclear. Here, we show that Sestrin2 (Sesn2), also known as Hi95, a p53 target gene that protects cells against oxidative and genotoxic stresses, participates in the protective role of Akt in response to an energetic stress induced by 2-deoxyglucose (2-DG). Sesn2 is upregulated in response to an energetic stress such as 2-DG and metformin, and mediates the inhibition of mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR), the major cellular regulator of energy metabolism. The increase of Sesn2 is independent of p53 but requires the anti-apoptotic pathway, PI3K/Akt. Inhibition of Akt, as well as loss of Sesn2, sensitizes cells to 2-DG-induced apoptosis. In addition, the rescue of Sesn2 partially reverses the pro-apoptotic effects of 2-DG. In conclusion, we identify Sesn2 as a new energetic stress sensor, which appears to be protective against energetic stress-induced apoptosis that integrates the pro-survival function of Akt and the negative regulation of mTOR. PMID:23238567

  4. Aerosolized Ebola vaccine protects primates and elicits lung-resident T cell responses.

    PubMed

    Meyer, Michelle; Garron, Tania; Lubaki, Ndongala M; Mire, Chad E; Fenton, Karla A; Klages, Curtis; Olinger, Gene G; Geisbert, Thomas W; Collins, Peter L; Bukreyev, Alexander

    2015-08-01

    Direct delivery of aerosolized vaccines to the respiratory mucosa elicits both systemic and mucosal responses. This vaccine strategy has not been tested for Ebola virus (EBOV) or other hemorrhagic fever viruses. Here, we examined the immunogenicity and protective efficacy of an aerosolized human parainfluenza virus type 3-vectored vaccine that expresses the glycoprotein (GP) of EBOV (HPIV3/EboGP) delivered to the respiratory tract. Rhesus macaques were vaccinated with aerosolized HPIV3/EboGP, liquid HPIV3/EboGP, or an unrelated, intramuscular, Venezuelan equine encephalitis replicon vaccine expressing EBOV GP. Serum and mucosal samples from aerosolized HPIV3/EboGP recipients exhibited high EBOV-specific IgG, IgA, and neutralizing antibody titers, which exceeded or equaled titers observed in liquid recipients. The HPIV3/EboGP vaccine induced an EBOV-specific cellular response that was greatest in the lungs and yielded polyfunctional CD8+ T cells, including a subset that expressed CD103 (αE integrin), and CD4+ T helper cells that were predominately type 1. The magnitude of the CD4+ T cell response was greater in aerosol vaccinees. The HPIV3/EboGP vaccine produced a more robust cell-mediated and humoral immune response than the systemic replicon vaccine. Moreover, 1 aerosol HPIV3/EboGP dose conferred 100% protection to macaques exposed to EBOV. Aerosol vaccination represents a useful and feasible vaccination mode that can be implemented with ease in a filovirus disease outbreak situation. PMID:26168222

  5. Aerosolized Ebola vaccine protects primates and elicits lung-resident T cell responses

    PubMed Central

    Meyer, Michelle; Garron, Tania; Lubaki, Ndongala M.; Mire, Chad E.; Fenton, Karla A.; Klages, Curtis; Olinger, Gene G.; Geisbert, Thomas W.; Collins, Peter L.; Bukreyev, Alexander

    2015-01-01

    Direct delivery of aerosolized vaccines to the respiratory mucosa elicits both systemic and mucosal responses. This vaccine strategy has not been tested for Ebola virus (EBOV) or other hemorrhagic fever viruses. Here, we examined the immunogenicity and protective efficacy of an aerosolized human parainfluenza virus type 3–vectored vaccine that expresses the glycoprotein (GP) of EBOV (HPIV3/EboGP) delivered to the respiratory tract. Rhesus macaques were vaccinated with aerosolized HPIV3/EboGP, liquid HPIV3/EboGP, or an unrelated, intramuscular, Venezuelan equine encephalitis replicon vaccine expressing EBOV GP. Serum and mucosal samples from aerosolized HPIV3/EboGP recipients exhibited high EBOV-specific IgG, IgA, and neutralizing antibody titers, which exceeded or equaled titers observed in liquid recipients. The HPIV3/EboGP vaccine induced an EBOV-specific cellular response that was greatest in the lungs and yielded polyfunctional CD8+ T cells, including a subset that expressed CD103 (αE integrin), and CD4+ T helper cells that were predominately type 1. The magnitude of the CD4+ T cell response was greater in aerosol vaccinees. The HPIV3/EboGP vaccine produced a more robust cell-mediated and humoral immune response than the systemic replicon vaccine. Moreover, 1 aerosol HPIV3/EboGP dose conferred 100% protection to macaques exposed to EBOV. Aerosol vaccination represents a useful and feasible vaccination mode that can be implemented with ease in a filovirus disease outbreak situation. PMID:26168222

  6. Protective effects of N-acetylcysteine on acetic acid-induced colitis in a porcine model

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Ulcerative colitis is a chronic inflammatory disease and involves multiple etiological factors. Acetic acid (AA)-induced colitis is a reproducible and simple model, sharing many characteristics with human colitis. N-acetylcysteine (NAC) has been widely used as an antioxidant in vivo and in vitro. NAC can affect several signaling pathways involving in apoptosis, angiogenesis, cell growth and arrest, redox-regulated gene expression, and inflammatory response. Therefore, NAC may not only protect against the direct injurious effects of oxidants, but also beneficially alter inflammatory events in colitis. This study was conducted to investigate whether NAC could alleviate the AA-induced colitis in a porcine model. Methods Weaned piglets were used to investigate the effects of NAC on AA-induced colitis. Severity of colitis was evaluated by colon histomorphology measurements, histopathology scores, tissue myeloperoxidase activity, as well as concentrations of malondialdehyde and pro-inflammatory mediators in the plasma and colon. The protective role of NAC was assessed by measurements of antioxidant status, growth modulator, cell apoptosis, and tight junction proteins. Abundances of caspase-3 and claudin-1 proteins in colonic mucosae were determined by the Western blot method. Epidermal growth factor receptor, amphiregulin, tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-α), and toll-like receptor 4 (TLR4) mRNA levels in colonic mucosae were quantified using the real-time fluorescent quantitative PCR. Results Compared with the control group, AA treatment increased (P < 0.05) the histopathology scores, intraepithelial lymphocyte (IEL) numbers and density in the colon, myeloperoxidase activity, the concentrations of malondialdehyde and pro-inflammatory mediators in the plasma and colon, while reducing (P < 0.05) goblet cell numbers and the protein/DNA ratio in the colonic mucosa. These adverse effects of AA were partially ameliorated (P < 0.05) by dietary

  7. Partially Protective Immunity Induced by a 20 kDa Protein Secreted by Trichinella spiralis Stichocytes