Science.gov

Sample records for induces selective time

  1. Selection of charge methods for lithium ion batteries by considering diffusion induced stress and charge time

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lu, Bo; Song, Yicheng; Zhang, Junqian

    2016-07-01

    This article demonstrates the design of charging strategies for lithium ion batteries with considering the balance between diffusion induced stress and total charge time for two- and three-stage charge methods. For the two-stage galvanostatic-potentiostatic charge method the low mechanical stress can be achieved without increasing total charge time by switching the galvanostatic to the potentiostatic at the time moment when the lithium concentration at the surface of particles reaches the limit cbarsurf = 0 . A three-stage method, which consists of an initial galvanostatic stage of high current, a galvanostatic stage of low current and a potentiostatic ending stage, is suggested. Employing the initial galvanostatic stage of high current is helpful not only in accelerating the charge process, but also in controlling the mechanical stress once the electrical current and time duration of the initial galvanostatic stage are properly designed.

  2. Dose and Time-Dependent Selective Neurotoxicity Induced by Mephedrone in Mice

    PubMed Central

    Martínez-Clemente, José; López-Arnau, Raúl; Abad, Sonia; Pubill, David; Escubedo, Elena; Camarasa, Jorge

    2014-01-01

    Mephedrone is a drug of abuse marketed as ‘bath salts". There are discrepancies concerning its long-term effects. We have investigated the neurotoxicity of mephedrone in mice following different exposition schedules. Schedule 1: four doses of 50 mg/kg. Schedule 2: four doses of 25 mg/kg. Schedule 3: three daily doses of 25 mg/kg, for two consecutive days. All schedules induced, in some animals, an aggressive behavior and hyperthermia as well as a decrease in weight gain. Mephedrone (schedule 1) induced dopaminergic and serotoninergic neurotoxicity that persisted 7 days after exposition. At a lower dose (schedule 2) only a transient dopaminergic injury was found. In the weekend consumption pattern (schedule 3), mephedrone induced dopamine and serotonin transporter loss that was accompanied by a decrease in tyrosine hydroxylase and tryptophan hydroxylase 2 expression one week after exposition. Also, mephedrone induced a depressive-like behavior, as well as a reduction in striatal D2 density, suggesting higher susceptibility to addictive drugs. In cultured cortical neurons, mephedrone induced a concentration-dependent cytotoxic effect. Using repeated doses for 2 days in an elevated ambient temperature we evidenced a loss of frontal cortex dopaminergic and hippocampal serotoninergic neuronal markers that suggest injuries at nerve endings. PMID:24892744

  3. Effects of polychlorinated biphenyls and nutritional restriction on barbituate-induced sleeping times and selected blood characteristics in raccoons (Procyon lotor)

    SciTech Connect

    Montz, W.E.; Card, W.C.; Kirkpatrick, R.L.

    1982-05-01

    Hepatic microsomal enzyme activity was induced in wild-trapped raccoons (Procyon lotor) and selected blood characteristics were measured in an effort to detect responses due to PCB ingestion, nutritional restriction, and their interactions. Barbiturate-induced sleeping times were used as an index of hepatic microsomal activity because they have been used reliably by other workers. Blood characteristics examined in the study were nonesterified fatty acids (NEFA), cholesterol, and three ketone bodies (D-(-)-3-hydroxybutyrate, acetoacetate, and acetone). Results show a reduction in sleeping times, elevated NEFA and D-(-)-3-hydroxybutyrate concentrations, and lower cholesterol concentrations in PCB-treated groups. A highly significant interaction between PCB treatment and nutritional restriction was observed in acetoacetate concentrations. (JMT)

  4. Minima Times of Selected Eclipsing Binaries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Parimucha, S.; Dubovsky, P.; Kudak, V.; Perig, V.

    2016-05-01

    We present 221 CCD minima times of the 76 selected eclipsing binaries obtained during 2013-2016 at Observatory at Kolonica Saddle in Slovakia and Observatory of Laboratory of Space Research, Uzhhorod National University in Ukraine

  5. Mammary tumors induce select cognitive impairments.

    PubMed

    Pyter, Leah M; Cochrane, Sally F; Ouwenga, Rebecca L; Patel, Priyesh N; Pineros, Vanessa; Prendergast, Brian J

    2010-08-01

    Cancer, in addition to many other chronic diseases, is associated with serious and problematic behavioral symptoms, including cognitive impairments. In humans, various factors likely contribute to cancer-associated cognitive deficits including disease awareness and chemotherapy; however, the endogenous biological factors arising from tumor development may also play a causal role. In the present study, rats with mammary tumors exhibited impaired spatial reference memory on a radial arm maze and amnesia for familiar objects in an object recognition memory test. In contrast, their performance in the Morris water maze and in fear conditioning tests was comparable to that of controls. These select cognitive impairments were accompanied by elevations in hippocampal interleukin-1beta mRNA expression, but were not associated with decreases in hippocampal brain-derived neurotrophic factor gene expression. Together the results indicate that peripheral tumors alone are sufficient to induce increases in hippocampal cytokine expression and select deficits in hippocampal-dependent memory tasks. PMID:20188817

  6. Time of travel of selected Arkansas streams

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Lamb, T.E.

    1982-01-01

    Between 1971 and 1981, time-of-travel and dispersion measurements were made in 15 streams in Arkansas. Most of the streams studied were at or near base flow. Graphs are presented for predicting traveltime of solutes in segments of the streams studied. The relationship of time of passage and peak unit concentration to traveltime is presented for two of the streams. Examples of use and application of the data are given. (USGS)

  7. Opposing selection and environmental variation modify optimal timing of breeding.

    PubMed

    Tarwater, Corey E; Beissinger, Steven R

    2013-09-17

    Studies of evolution in wild populations often find that the heritable phenotypic traits of individuals producing the most offspring do not increase proportionally in the population. This paradox may arise when phenotypic traits influence both fecundity and viability and when there is a tradeoff between these fitness components, leading to opposing selection. Such tradeoffs are the foundation of life history theory, but they are rarely investigated in selection studies. Timing of breeding is a classic example of a heritable trait under directional selection that does not result in an evolutionary response. Using a 22-y study of a tropical parrot, we show that opposing viability and fecundity selection on the timing of breeding is common and affects optimal breeding date, defined by maximization of fitness. After accounting for sampling error, the directions of viability (positive) and fecundity (negative) selection were consistent, but the magnitude of selection fluctuated among years. Environmental conditions (rainfall and breeding density) primarily and breeding experience secondarily modified selection, shifting optimal timing among individuals and years. In contrast to other studies, viability selection was as strong as fecundity selection, late-born juveniles had greater survival than early-born juveniles, and breeding later in the year increased fitness under opposing selection. Our findings provide support for life history tradeoffs influencing selection on phenotypic traits, highlight the need to unify selection and life history theory, and illustrate the importance of monitoring survival as well as reproduction for understanding phenological responses to climate change. PMID:24003118

  8. Selective fishing induces density-dependent growth.

    PubMed

    Svedäng, Henrik; Hornborg, Sara

    2014-01-01

    Over the last decades, views on fisheries management have oscillated between alarm and trust in management progress. The predominant policy for remedying the world fishing crisis aims at maximum sustainable yield (MSY) by adjusting gear selectivity and fishing effort. Here we report a case study on how striving for higher yields from the Eastern Baltic cod stock by increasing selectivity has become exceedingly detrimental for its productivity. Although there is a successive increase in numbers of undersized fish, growth potential is severely reduced, and fishing mortality in fishable size has increased. Once density-dependent growth is introduced, the process is self-enforcing as long as the recruitment remains stable. Our findings suggest that policies focusing on maximum yield while targeting greater sizes are risky and should instead prioritize catch rates over yield. Disregarding the underlying population structure may jeopardize stock productivity, with dire consequences for the fishing industry and ecosystem structure and function. PMID:24920387

  9. A novel “correlated ion and neutral time of flight” method: Event-by-event detection of neutral and charged fragments in collision induced dissociation of mass selected ions

    SciTech Connect

    Teyssier, C.; Fillol, R.; Abdoul-Carime, H.; Farizon, B.; Farizon, M.

    2014-01-15

    A new tandem mass spectrometry (MS/MS) method based on time of flight measurements performed on an event-by-event detection technique is presented. This “correlated ion and neutral time of flight” method allows to explore Collision Induced Dissociation (CID) fragmentation processes by directly identifying not only all ions and neutral fragments produced but also their arrival time correlations within each single fragmentation event from a dissociating molecular ion. This constitutes a new step in the characterization of molecular ions. The method will be illustrated here for a prototypical case involving CID of protonated water clusters H{sup +}(H{sub 2}O){sub n=1–5} upon collisions with argon atoms.

  10. Onboard Run-Time Goal Selection for Autonomous Operations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rabideau, Gregg; Chien, Steve; McLaren, David

    2010-01-01

    We describe an efficient, online goal selection algorithm for use onboard spacecraft and its use for selecting goals at runtime. Our focus is on the re-planning that must be performed in a timely manner on the embedded system where computational resources are limited. In particular, our algorithm generates near optimal solutions to problems with fully specified goal requests that oversubscribe available resources but have no temporal flexibility. By using a fast, incremental algorithm, goal selection can be postponed in a "just-in-time" fashion allowing requests to be changed or added at the last minute. This enables shorter response cycles and greater autonomy for the system under control.

  11. Utilizing Response Time Distributions for Item Selection in CAT

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fan, Zhewen; Wang, Chun; Chang, Hua-Hua; Douglas, Jeffrey

    2012-01-01

    Traditional methods for item selection in computerized adaptive testing only focus on item information without taking into consideration the time required to answer an item. As a result, some examinees may receive a set of items that take a very long time to finish, and information is not accrued as efficiently as possible. The authors propose two…

  12. Using Response Times for Item Selection in Adaptive Testing

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    van der Linden, Wim J.

    2008-01-01

    Response times on items can be used to improve item selection in adaptive testing provided that a probabilistic model for their distribution is available. In this research, the author used a hierarchical modeling framework with separate first-level models for the responses and response times and a second-level model for the distribution of the…

  13. Time resolved ion beam induced charge collection

    SciTech Connect

    SEXTON,FREDERICK W.; WALSH,DAVID S.; DOYLE,BARNEY L.; DODD,PAUL E.

    2000-04-01

    Under this effort, a new method for studying the single event upset (SEU) in microelectronics has been developed and demonstrated. Called TRIBICC, for Time Resolved Ion Beam Induced Charge Collection, this technique measures the transient charge-collection waveform from a single heavy-ion strike with a {minus}.03db bandwidth of 5 GHz. Bandwidth can be expanded up to 15 GHz (with 5 ps sampling windows) by using an FFT-based off-line waveform renormalization technique developed at Sandia. The theoretical time resolution of the digitized waveform is 24 ps with data re-normalization and 70 ps without re-normalization. To preserve the high bandwidth from IC to the digitizing oscilloscope, individual test structures are assembled in custom high-frequency fixtures. A leading-edge digitized waveform is stored with the corresponding ion beam position at each point in a two-dimensional raster scan. The resulting data cube contains a spatial charge distribution map of up to 4,096 traces of charge (Q) collected as a function of time. These two dimensional traces of Q(t) can cover a period as short as 5 ns with up to 1,024 points per trace. This tool overcomes limitations observed in previous multi-shot techniques due to the displacement damage effects of multiple ion strikes that changed the signal of interest during its measurement. This system is the first demonstration of a single-ion transient measurement capability coupled with spatial mapping of fast transients.

  14. Identification and real-time expression analysis of selected Toxoplasma gondii in-vivo induced antigens recognized by IgG and IgM in sera of acute toxoplasmosis patients

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Toxoplasma gondii is an obligate intracellular zoonotic parasite of the phylum Apicomplexa which infects a wide range of warm-blooded animals, including humans. In this study in-vivo induced antigens of this parasite was investigated using in-vivo induced antigen technology (IVIAT) and pooled sera from patients with serological evidence of acute infection. Methods The pooled sera was first pre-absorbed against three different preparations of antigens from in-vitro-grown cells of each T. gondii and E. coli XL1-Blue MRF’, subsequently it was used to screen T. gondii cDNA phage expression library. Positive clones from each group were subjected to quantitative real-time PCR expression analysis on mRNA of in-vivo and in-vitro grown parasites. Results A total of 29 reactive clones from each IgM and IgG immunoscreenings were found to have high homology to T. gondii genes. Quantitative real-time PCR expression analysis showed that 20 IgM-detected genes and 11 IgG-detected genes were up-regulated in-vivo relative to their expression levels in-vitro. These included genes encoding micronemes, sterol-regulatory element binding protein site, SRS34A, MIC2-associated protein M2AP, nucleoredoxin, protein phosphatase 2C and several hypothetical proteins. A hypothetical protein (GenBank accession no. 7899266) detected by IgG had the highest in-vivo over in-vitro fold change of 499.86; while another up-regulated hypothetical protein (GenBank accession no. 7898829) recognized by IgM showed high sensitivity (90%) and moderate specificity (70%) in detecting T. gondii antibodies when tested with 20 individual serum samples. Conclusion The highly up-regulated genes and the corresponding proteins, in particular the hypothetical proteins, may be useful in further studies on understanding the disease pathogenesis and as potential vaccine candidates. PMID:23800344

  15. Laser induced alignment of state-selected CH3I.

    PubMed

    He, Lanhai; Bulthuis, Jaap; Luo, Sizuo; Wang, Jia; Lu, Chunjing; Stolte, Steven; Ding, Dajun; Roeterdink, Wim G

    2015-10-01

    Hexapole state selection is used to prepare CH3I molecules in the |JKM〉 = |1±1∓1〉 state. The molecules are aligned in a strong 800 nm laser field, which is linearly polarised perpendicular to the weak static extraction field E of the time of flight setup. The molecules are subsequently ionised by a second time delayed probe laser pulse. It will be shown that in this geometry at high enough laser intensities the Newton sphere has sufficient symmetry to apply the inverse Abel transformation to reconstruct the three dimensional distribution from the projected ion image. The laser induced controllable alignment was found to have the upper and lower extreme values of 〈P2(cos θ)〉 = 0.7 for the aligned molecule and -0.1 for the anti-aligned molecule, coupled to 〈P4(cos θ)〉 between 0.3 and 0.0. The method to extract the alignment parameters 〈P2(cos θ)〉 and 〈P4(cos θ)〉 directly from the velocity map ion images will be discussed. PMID:26314900

  16. Chiral Selective Chemistry Induced by Natural Selection of Spin-Polarized Electrons.

    PubMed

    Rosenberg, Richard A; Mishra, Debabrata; Naaman, Ron

    2015-06-15

    The search to understand the origin of homochirality in nature has been ongoing since the time of Pasteur. Previous work has shown that DNA can act as a spin filter for low-energy electrons and that spin-polarized secondary electrons produced by X-ray irradiation of a magnetic substrate can induce chiral selective chemistry. In the present work it is demonstrated that secondary electrons from a substrate that are transmitted through a chiral overlayer cause enantiomeric selective chemistry in an adsorbed adlayer. We determine the quantum yields (QYs) for dissociation of (R)- or (S)-epichlorohydrin adsorbed on a chiral self-assembled layer of DNA on gold and on bare gold (for control). The results show that there is a significant difference in the QYs between the two enantiomers when adsorbed on DNA, but none when they are adsorbed on bare Au. We propose that the effect results from natural spin filtering effects cause by the chiral monolayer. PMID:25950284

  17. Selective attention to temporal features on nested time scales.

    PubMed

    Henry, Molly J; Herrmann, Björn; Obleser, Jonas

    2015-02-01

    Meaningful auditory stimuli such as speech and music often vary simultaneously along multiple time scales. Thus, listeners must selectively attend to, and selectively ignore, separate but intertwined temporal features. The current study aimed to identify and characterize the neural network specifically involved in this feature-selective attention to time. We used a novel paradigm where listeners judged either the duration or modulation rate of auditory stimuli, and in which the stimulation, working memory demands, response requirements, and task difficulty were held constant. A first analysis identified all brain regions where individual brain activation patterns were correlated with individual behavioral performance patterns, which thus supported temporal judgments generically. A second analysis then isolated those brain regions that specifically regulated selective attention to temporal features: Neural responses in a bilateral fronto-parietal network including insular cortex and basal ganglia decreased with degree of change of the attended temporal feature. Critically, response patterns in these regions were inverted when the task required selectively ignoring this feature. The results demonstrate how the neural analysis of complex acoustic stimuli with multiple temporal features depends on a fronto-parietal network that simultaneously regulates the selective gain for attended and ignored temporal features. PMID:23978652

  18. Method for production of sorghum hybrids with selected flowering times

    DOEpatents

    Mullet, John E.; Rooney, William L.

    2016-08-30

    Methods and composition for the production of sorghum hybrids with selected and different flowering times are provided. In accordance with the invention, a substantially continual and high-yield harvest of sorghum is provided. Improved methods of seed production are also provided.

  19. From Induced Seismicity to Direct Time-Dependent Seismic Hazard

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Convertito, V.; Maercklin, N.; Sharma, N.; Zollo, A.

    2012-12-01

    The growing installation of industrial facilities for subsurface exploration worldwide requires continuous refinements in understanding both the mechanisms by which seismicity is induced by field operations and the related seismic hazard. Particularly in proximity of densely populated areas, induced low-to-moderate magnitude seismicity characterized by high-frequency content can be clearly felt by the surrounding inhabitants and, in some cases, may produce damage. In this respect we propose a technique for time-dependent probabilistic seismic hazard analysis to be used in geothermal fields as a monitoring tool for the effects of on-going field operations. The technique integrates the observed features of the seismicity induced by fluid injection and extraction with a local ground-motion prediction equation. The result of the analysis is the time-evolving probability of exceedance of peak ground acceleration (PGA), which can be compared with selected critical values to manage field operations. To evaluate the reliability of the proposed technique, we applied it to data collected in The Geysers geothermal field in northern California between 1 September 2007 and 15 November 2010. We show that the period considered the seismic hazard at The Geysers was variable in time and space, which is a consequence of the field operations and the variation of both seismicity rate and b-value. We conclude that, for the exposure period taken into account (i.e., two months), as a conservative limit, PGA values corresponding to the lowest probability of exceedance (e.g., 30%) must not be exceeded to ensure safe field operations. We suggest testing the proposed technique at other geothermal areas or in regions where seismicity is induced, for example, by hydrocarbon exploitation or carbon dioxide storage.

  20. Resource Selection Using Execution and Queue Wait Time Predictions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Warren, Smith; Wong, Parkson; Biegel, Bryan A. (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    Computational grids provide users with many possible places to execute their applications. We wish to help users select where to run their applications by providing predictions of the execution times of applications on space shared parallel computers and predictions of when scheduling systems for such parallel computers will start applications. Our predictions are based on instance based learning techniques and simulations of scheduling algorithms. We find that our execution time prediction techniques have an average error of 37 percent of the execution times for trace data recorded from SGI Origins at NASA Ames Research Center and that this error is 67 percent lower than the error of user estimates. We also find that the error when predicting how long applications will wait in scheduling queues is 95 percent of mean queue wait times when using our execution time predictions and this is 57 percent lower than if we use user execution time estimates.

  1. Identifying Signatures of Selection in Genetic Time Series

    PubMed Central

    Feder, Alison F.; Kryazhimskiy, Sergey; Plotkin, Joshua B.

    2014-01-01

    Both genetic drift and natural selection cause the frequencies of alleles in a population to vary over time. Discriminating between these two evolutionary forces, based on a time series of samples from a population, remains an outstanding problem with increasing relevance to modern data sets. Even in the idealized situation when the sampled locus is independent of all other loci, this problem is difficult to solve, especially when the size of the population from which the samples are drawn is unknown. A standard χ2-based likelihood-ratio test was previously proposed to address this problem. Here we show that the χ2-test of selection substantially underestimates the probability of type I error, leading to more false positives than indicated by its P-value, especially at stringent P-values. We introduce two methods to correct this bias. The empirical likelihood-ratio test (ELRT) rejects neutrality when the likelihood-ratio statistic falls in the tail of the empirical distribution obtained under the most likely neutral population size. The frequency increment test (FIT) rejects neutrality if the distribution of normalized allele-frequency increments exhibits a mean that deviates significantly from zero. We characterize the statistical power of these two tests for selection, and we apply them to three experimental data sets. We demonstrate that both ELRT and FIT have power to detect selection in practical parameter regimes, such as those encountered in microbial evolution experiments. Our analysis applies to a single diallelic locus, assumed independent of all other loci, which is most relevant to full-genome selection scans in sexual organisms, and also to evolution experiments in asexual organisms as long as clonal interference is weak. Different techniques will be required to detect selection in time series of cosegregating linked loci. PMID:24318534

  2. THz-Pulse-Induced Selective Catalytic CO Oxidation on Ru.

    PubMed

    LaRue, Jerry L; Katayama, Tetsuo; Lindenberg, Aaron; Fisher, Alan S; Öström, Henrik; Nilsson, Anders; Ogasawara, Hirohito

    2015-07-17

    We demonstrate the use of intense, quasi-half-cycle THz pulses, with an associated electric field component comparable to intramolecular electric fields, to direct the reaction coordinate of a chemical reaction by stimulating the nuclear motions of the reactants. Using a strong electric field from a THz pulse generated via coherent transition radiation from an ultrashort electron bunch, we present evidence that CO oxidation on Ru(0001) is selectively induced, while not promoting the thermally induced CO desorption process. The reaction is initiated by the motion of the O atoms on the surface driven by the electric field component of the THz pulse, rather than thermal heating of the surface. PMID:26230806

  3. Real-time fiber selection using the Wii remote

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Klein, Jan; Scholl, Mike; Köhn, Alexander; Hahn, Horst K.

    2010-02-01

    In the last few years, fiber tracking tools have become popular in clinical contexts, e.g., for pre- and intraoperative neurosurgical planning. The efficient, intuitive, and reproducible selection of fiber bundles still constitutes one of the main issues. In this paper, we present a framework for a real-time selection of axonal fiber bundles using a Wii remote control, a wireless controller for Nintendo's gaming console. It enables the user to select fiber bundles without any other input devices. To achieve a smooth interaction, we propose a novel spacepartitioning data structure for efficient 3D range queries in a data set consisting of precomputed fibers. The data structure which is adapted to the special geometry of fiber tracts allows for queries that are many times faster compared with previous state-of-the-art approaches. In order to extract reliably fibers for further processing, e.g., for quantification purposes or comparisons with preoperatively tracked fibers, we developed an expectationmaximization clustering algorithm that can refine the range queries. Our initial experiments have shown that white matter fiber bundles can be reliably selected within a few seconds by the Wii, which has been placed in a sterile plastic bag to simulate usage under surgical conditions.

  4. GPS time transfer with implementation of selective availability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Allan, David W.; Granveaud, Michel P.; Klepczynski, William J.; Lewandowski, Wlodzimierz W.

    1990-05-01

    The international community of time metrology is facing a major challenge with the Selective Availability (SA) degradation of GPS satellite signals. At present there are 6 Block 1 satellites and 8 Block 2 satellites operating. According to the policy of the U.S. Department of Defence the Block 1 satellite signals will not be degraded, but these satellites are old with a finite life. The Block 2 satellites, which have all been launched since 1988, were subject to Selective Availability from March 25, 1990. The effect of SA should be to limit precision to about 100 meters for navigation and 167 ns for timing. A study was conducted in order to understand the nature of the actual introduced degradation, and to elaborate the means of removing the effects of this degradation on time transfer. This study concerns the time extraction from GPS satellites at NIST, USNO and Paris Observatory, and the comparison of atomic clocks between these laboratories by common view approach. The results show that when using the data taken over several days the time extraction can be achieved with uncertainty of a few tens of nanoseconds, while strict common-view has removed entirely the effects of SA during the periods under study.

  5. GPS time transfer with implementation of selective availability

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Allan, David W.; Granveaud, Michel P.; Klepczynski, William J.; Lewandowski, Wlodzimierz W.

    1990-01-01

    The international community of time metrology is facing a major challenge with the Selective Availability (SA) degradation of GPS satellite signals. At present there are 6 Block 1 satellites and 8 Block 2 satellites operating. According to the policy of the U.S. Department of Defence the Block 1 satellite signals will not be degraded, but these satellites are old with a finite life. The Block 2 satellites, which have all been launched since 1988, were subject to Selective Availability from March 25, 1990. The effect of SA should be to limit precision to about 100 meters for navigation and 167 ns for timing. A study was conducted in order to understand the nature of the actual introduced degradation, and to elaborate the means of removing the effects of this degradation on time transfer. This study concerns the time extraction from GPS satellites at NIST, USNO and Paris Observatory, and the comparison of atomic clocks between these laboratories by common view approach. The results show that when using the data taken over several days the time extraction can be achieved with uncertainty of a few tens of nanoseconds, while strict common-view has removed entirely the effects of SA during the periods under study.

  6. Cell selectivity to laser-induced photoacoustic injury of skin.

    PubMed

    Yashima, Y; McAuliffe, D J; Flotte, T J

    1990-01-01

    Cell selectivity to photoacoustic injury induced by argon-fluoride excimer laser (193 nm) was studied. Rats were irradiated through air or water and a 2.5 mm aperture. The laser was adjusted to deliver 150 mJ/cm2 at the skin surface with 12 and 24 pulses. Immediate damage was assessed by transmission electron microscopy. Cell selectivity was observed in dermis and epidermis. Fibroblasts showed alteration of nuclear chromatin and cytoplasmic organelles, while some of the migratory cells adjacent to fibroblasts did not. Similar difference of damage was observed between keratinocytes and Langerhans cells in epidermis. Considering the relationship between cells and their microenvironment in tissue, this selectivity may be due to the difference of acoustical coupling of propagation of acoustic waves rather than to differential sensitivity of the cells to damage. PMID:2345477

  7. Bayesian Inference of Natural Selection from Allele Frequency Time Series.

    PubMed

    Schraiber, Joshua G; Evans, Steven N; Slatkin, Montgomery

    2016-05-01

    The advent of accessible ancient DNA technology now allows the direct ascertainment of allele frequencies in ancestral populations, thereby enabling the use of allele frequency time series to detect and estimate natural selection. Such direct observations of allele frequency dynamics are expected to be more powerful than inferences made using patterns of linked neutral variation obtained from modern individuals. We developed a Bayesian method to make use of allele frequency time series data and infer the parameters of general diploid selection, along with allele age, in nonequilibrium populations. We introduce a novel path augmentation approach, in which we use Markov chain Monte Carlo to integrate over the space of allele frequency trajectories consistent with the observed data. Using simulations, we show that this approach has good power to estimate selection coefficients and allele age. Moreover, when applying our approach to data on horse coat color, we find that ignoring a relevant demographic history can significantly bias the results of inference. Our approach is made available in a C++ software package. PMID:27010022

  8. Laser-induced selective copper plating of polypropylene surface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ratautas, K.; Gedvilas, M.; Stankevičiene, I.; JagminienÄ--, A.; Norkus, E.; Li Pira, N.; Sinopoli, S.; Emanuele, U.; Račiukaitis, G.

    2016-03-01

    Laser writing for selective plating of electro-conductive lines for electronics has several significant advantages, compared to conventional printed circuit board technology. Firstly, this method is faster and cheaper at the prototyping stage. Secondly, material consumption is reduced, because it works selectively. However, the biggest merit of this method is potentiality to produce moulded interconnect device, enabling to create electronics on complex 3D surfaces, thus saving space, materials and cost of production. There are two basic techniques of laser writing for selective plating on plastics: the laser-induced selective activation (LISA) and laser direct structuring (LDS). In the LISA method, pure plastics without any dopant (filler) can be used. In the LDS method, special fillers are mixed in the polymer matrix. These fillers are activated during laser writing process, and, in the next processing step, the laser modified area can be selectively plated with metals. In this work, both methods of the laser writing for the selective plating of polymers were investigated and compared. For LDS approach, new material: polypropylene with carbon-based additives was tested using picosecond and nanosecond laser pulses. Different laser processing parameters (laser pulse energy, scanning speed, the number of scans, pulse durations, wavelength and overlapping of scanned lines) were applied in order to find out the optimal regime of activation. Areal selectivity tests showed a high plating resolution. The narrowest width of a copper-plated line was less than 23 μm. Finally, our material was applied to the prototype of the electronic circuit board on a 2D surface.

  9. Preimplantation Mouse Embryo Selection Guided by Light-Induced Dielectrophoresis

    PubMed Central

    Valley, Justin K.; Swinton, Paul; Boscardin, W. John; Lue, Tom F.; Rinaudo, Paolo F.; Wu, Ming C.; Garcia, Maurice M.

    2010-01-01

    Selection of optimal quality embryos for in vitro fertilization (IVF) transfer is critical to successful live birth outcomes. Currently, embryos are chosen based on subjective assessment of morphologic developmental maturity. A non-invasive means to quantitatively measure an embryo's developmental maturity would reduce the variability introduced by the current standard. We present a method that exploits the scaling electrical properties of pre-transfer embryos to quantitatively discern embryo developmental maturity using light-induced dielectrophoresis (DEP). We show that an embryo's DEP response is highly correlated with its developmental stage. Uniquely, this technique allows one to select, in sequence and under blinded conditions, the most developmentally mature embryos among a mixed cohort of morphologically indistinguishable embryos cultured in optimized and sub-optimal culture media. Following assay, embryos continue to develop normally in vitro. Light-induced dielectrophoresis provides a non-invasive, quantitative, and reproducible means to select embryos for applications including IVF transfer and embryonic stem cell harvest. PMID:20405021

  10. TRACING GALAXIES THROUGH COSMIC TIME WITH NUMBER DENSITY SELECTION

    SciTech Connect

    Leja, Joel; Van Dokkum, Pieter; Franx, Marijn

    2013-03-20

    A central challenge in observational studies of galaxy formation is how to associate progenitor galaxies with their descendants at lower redshifts. One promising approach is to link galaxies at fixed number density rather than fixed luminosity or mass. This method is effective if stellar mass rank order is broadly conserved through cosmic time. In this paper, we use the Guo et al. semi-analytical model to analyze under what circumstances this assumption is valid in the context of a cosmological simulation. Specifically, we select progenitor galaxies at a constant number density and compare the stellar mass evolution of their descendants to the evolution at a constant number density. The median stellar mass of the descendants increases by a factor of four (0.6 dex) from z = 3 to z = 0. Constant number density selection reproduces this to within 40% (0.15 dex) over a wide range of number densities. We show that the discrepancy primarily results from scatter in the stellar mass growth rates and merging. After applying simple, observationally based corrections for these processes, the discrepancy is reduced to 12% (0.05 dex). We conclude that number density selection can be used to predict the median descendant mass of high-redshift progenitor galaxies. The main uncertainty in this study is that semi-analytical models do not reproduce the observed mass evolution of galaxies, which makes the quantitative aggregate effects of star formation, merging, and quenching on the rank order of galaxies somewhat uncertain.

  11. Targeting Mitochondria with Avocatin B Induces Selective Leukemia Cell Death.

    PubMed

    Lee, Eric A; Angka, Leonard; Rota, Sarah-Grace; Hanlon, Thomas; Mitchell, Andrew; Hurren, Rose; Wang, Xiao Ming; Gronda, Marcela; Boyaci, Ezel; Bojko, Barbara; Minden, Mark; Sriskanthadevan, Shrivani; Datti, Alessandro; Wrana, Jeffery L; Edginton, Andrea; Pawliszyn, Janusz; Joseph, Jamie W; Quadrilatero, Joe; Schimmer, Aaron D; Spagnuolo, Paul A

    2015-06-15

    Treatment regimens for acute myeloid leukemia (AML) continue to offer weak clinical outcomes. Through a high-throughput cell-based screen, we identified avocatin B, a lipid derived from avocado fruit, as a novel compound with cytotoxic activity in AML. Avocatin B reduced human primary AML cell viability without effect on normal peripheral blood stem cells. Functional stem cell assays demonstrated selectivity toward AML progenitor and stem cells without effects on normal hematopoietic stem cells. Mechanistic investigations indicated that cytotoxicity relied on mitochondrial localization, as cells lacking functional mitochondria or CPT1, the enzyme that facilitates mitochondria lipid transport, were insensitive to avocatin B. Furthermore, avocatin B inhibited fatty acid oxidation and decreased NADPH levels, resulting in ROS-dependent leukemia cell death characterized by the release of mitochondrial proteins, apoptosis-inducing factor, and cytochrome c. This study reveals a novel strategy for selective leukemia cell eradication based on a specific difference in mitochondrial function. PMID:26077472

  12. Conformational selection or induced fit? 50 years of debate resolved

    PubMed Central

    Edelstein, Stuart

    2011-01-01

    Exactly 50 years ago, biochemists raised the question of the mechanism of the conformational change that mediates “allosteric” interactions between regulatory sites and biologically active sites in regulatory/receptor proteins. Do the different conformations involved already exist spontaneously in the absence of the regulatory ligands (Monod-Wyman-Changeux), such that the complementary protein conformation would be selected to mediate signal transduction, or do particular ligands induce the receptor to adopt the conformation best suited to them (Koshland-Nemethy-Filmer—induced fit)? This is not just a central question for biophysics, it also has enormous importance for drug design. Recent advances in techniques have allowed detailed experimental and theoretical comparisons with the formal models of both scenarios. Also, it has been shown that mutated receptors can adopt constitutively active confirmations in the absence of ligand. There have also been demonstrations that the atomic resolution structures of the same protein are essentially the same whether ligand is bound or not. These and other advances in past decades have produced a situation where the vast majority of the data using different categories of regulatory proteins (including regulatory enzymes, ligand-gated ion channels, G protein-coupled receptors, and nuclear receptors) support the conformational selection scheme of signal transduction. PMID:21941598

  13. Human-induced evolution caused by unnatural selection through harvest of wild animals

    PubMed Central

    Allendorf, Fred W.; Hard, Jeffrey J.

    2009-01-01

    Human harvest of phenotypically desirable animals from wild populations imposes selection that can reduce the frequencies of those desirable phenotypes. Hunting and fishing contrast with agricultural and aquacultural practices in which the most desirable animals are typically bred with the specific goal of increasing the frequency of desirable phenotypes. We consider the potential effects of harvest on the genetics and sustainability of wild populations. We also consider how harvesting could affect the mating system and thereby modify sexual selection in a way that might affect recruitment. Determining whether phenotypic changes in harvested populations are due to evolution, rather than phenotypic plasticity or environmental variation, has been problematic. Nevertheless, it is likely that some undesirable changes observed over time in exploited populations (e.g., reduced body size, earlier sexual maturity, reduced antler size, etc.) are due to selection against desirable phenotypes—a process we call “unnatural” selection. Evolution brought about by human harvest might greatly increase the time required for over-harvested populations to recover once harvest is curtailed because harvesting often creates strong selection differentials, whereas curtailing harvest will often result in less intense selection in the opposing direction. We strongly encourage those responsible for managing harvested wild populations to take into account possible selective effects of harvest management and to implement monitoring programs to detect exploitation-induced selection before it seriously impacts viability. PMID:19528656

  14. Real-time flavour tagging selection in ATLAS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bertella, Claudia

    2015-12-01

    In high-energy physics experiments, online selection is crucial to the identification of the few interesting collisions from the large data volume processed. In the overall ATLAS trigger strategy, b-jet triggers are designed to identify heavy-flavor content in real-time and, in particular, provide the only option to efficiently record events with fully hadronic final states containing b-jets. In doing so, two different, but related, challenges are faced. The physics goal is to optimise as far as possible the rejection for light jets from QCD processes, while retaining a high efficiency on selecting jets from beauty, while maintaining affordable trigger rates without raising jet energy thresholds. This poses a challenging computing task, as charged tracks and their corresponding vertices must be reconstructed and analysed for each jet above the desired threshold, regardless of the increasingly harsh pile-up conditions. The performance of b-jet triggers during the LHC Run I data-taking campaigns is presented, together with an overview of the new online b-tagging strategy and algorithms, designed to face the above mentioned challenges, which will be adopted during Run II.

  15. Non-gated laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy in bulk water by position-selective detection

    SciTech Connect

    Tian, Ye; Xue, Boyang; Song, Jiaojian; Lu, Yuan; Zheng, Ronger

    2015-09-14

    Temporal and spatial evolutions of the laser-induced plasma in bulk water are investigated using fast imaging and emission spectroscopic techniques. By tightly focusing a single-pulse nanosecond Nd: YAG laser beam into the bulk water, we generate a strongly expanded plasma with high reproducibility. Such a strong expanding plasma enables us to obtain well-resolved spectral lines by means of position-selective detection; hence, the time-gated detector becomes abdicable. The present results suggest not only a possible non-gated approach for underwater laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy but also give an insight into the plasma generation and expansion in bulk water.

  16. Four decades of opposing natural and human-induced artificial selection acting on Windermere pike (Esox lucius).

    PubMed

    Carlson, Stephanie M; Edeline, Eric; Asbjørn Vøllestad, L; Haugen, Thrond O; Winfield, Ian J; Fletcher, Janice M; Ben James, J; Stenseth, Nils Chr

    2007-06-01

    The ability of natural selection to drive local adaptation has been appreciated ever since Darwin. Whether human impacts can impede the adaptive process has received less attention. We tested this hypothesis by quantifying natural selection and harvest selection acting on a freshwater fish (pike) over four decades. Across the time series, directional natural selection tended to favour large individuals whereas the fishery targeted large individuals. Moreover, non-linear natural selection tended to favour intermediate sized fish whereas the fishery targeted intermediate sized fish because the smallest and largest individuals were often not captured. Thus, our results unequivocally demonstrate that natural selection and fishery selection often acted in opposite directions within this natural system. Moreover, the two selective factors combined to produce reduced fitness overall and stronger stabilizing selection relative to natural selection acting alone. The long-term ramifications of such human-induced modifications to adaptive landscapes are currently unknown and certainly warrant further investigation. PMID:17498150

  17. Polystyrene nanoparticle exposure induces ion-selective pores in lipid bilayers

    PubMed Central

    Negoda, Alexander; Kim, Kwang-Jin; Crandall, Edward D.; Worden, Robert M.

    2014-01-01

    A diverse range of molecular interactions can occur between engineered nanomaterials (ENM) and biomembranes, some of which could lead to toxic outcomes following human exposure to ENM. In this study, we adapted electrophysiology methods to investigate the ability of 20 nm polystyrene nanoparticles (PNP) to induce pores in model bilayer lipid membranes (BLM) that mimic biomembranes. PNP charge was varied using PNP decorated with either positive (amidine) groups or negative (carboxyl) groups, and BLM charge was varied using dioleoyl phospholipids having cationic (ethylphosphocholine), zwitterionic (phosphocholine), or anionic (phosphatidic acid) headgroups. Both positive and negative PNP induced BLM pores for all lipid compositions studied, as evidenced by current spikes and integral conductance. Stable PNP-induced pores exhibited ion selectivity, with the highest selectivity for K+ (PK/PCl ~ 8.3) observed when both the PNP and lipids were negatively charged, and the highest selectivity for Cl− (PK/PCl ~ 0.2) observed when both the PNP and lipids were positively charged. This trend is consistent with the finding that selectivity for an ion in channel proteins is imparted by oppositely charged functional groups within the channel’s filter region. The PK/PCl value was unaffected by the voltage-ramp method, the pore conductance, or the side of the BLM to which the PNP were applied. These results demonstrate for the first time that PNP can induce ion-selective pores in BLM, and that the degree of ion selectivity is influenced synergistically by the charges of both the lipid headgroups and functional groups on the PNP. PMID:23747366

  18. Metal intercalation-induced selective adatom mass transport on graphene

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Liu, Xiaojie; Wang, Cai -Zhuang; Hupalo, Myron; Lin, Hai -Qing; Ho, Kai -Ming; Thiel, Patricia A.; Tringides, Michael C.

    2016-03-29

    Recent experiments indicate that metal intercalation is a very effective method to manipulate the graphene-adatom interaction and control metal nanostructure formation on graphene. A key question is mass transport, i.e., how atoms deposited uniformly on graphene populate different areas depending on the local intercalation. Using first-principles calculations, we show that partially intercalated graphene, with a mixture of intercalated and pristine areas, can induce an alternating electric field because of the spatial variations in electron doping, and thus, an oscillatory electrostatic potential. As a result, this alternating field can change normal stochastic adatom diffusion to biased diffusion, leading to selective massmore » transport and consequent nucleation, on either the intercalated or pristine areas, depending on the charge state of the adatoms.« less

  19. Single molecule insights on conformational selection and induced fit mechanism.

    PubMed

    Hatzakis, Nikos S

    2014-02-01

    Biomolecular interactions regulate a plethora of vital cellular processes, including signal transduction, metabolism, catalysis and gene regulation. Regulation is encoded in the molecular properties of the constituent proteins; distinct conformations correspond to different functional outcomes. To describe the molecular basis of this behavior, two main mechanisms have been advanced: 'induced fit' and 'conformational selection'. Our understanding of these models relies primarily on NMR, computational studies and kinetic measurements. These techniques report the average behavior of a large ensemble of unsynchronized molecules, often masking intrinsic dynamic behavior of proteins and biologically significant transient intermediates. Single molecule measurements are emerging as a powerful tool for characterizing protein function. They offer the direct observation and quantification of the activity, abundance and lifetime of multiple states and transient intermediates in the energy landscape, that are typically averaged out in non-synchronized ensemble measurements. Here we survey new insights from single molecule studies that advance our understanding of the molecular mechanisms underlying biomolecular recognition. PMID:24342874

  20. Timing of induced resistance in a clonal plant network.

    PubMed

    Gómez, Sara; van Dijk, William; Stuefer, Josef F

    2010-05-01

    After local herbivory, plants can activate defense traits both at the damaged site and in undamaged plant parts such as in connected ramets of clonal plants. Since defense induction has costs, a mismatch in time and space between defense activation and herbivore feeding might result in negative consequences for plant fitness. A short time lag between attack and defense activation is important to ensure efficient protection of the plant. Additionally, the duration of induced defense production once the attack has stopped is also relevant in assessing the cost-benefit balance of inducible defenses, which will depend on the absence or presence of subsequent attacks. In this study we quantified the timing of induced responses in ramet networks of the stoloniferous herb Trifolium repens after local damage by Mamestra brassicae larvae. We studied the activation time of systemic defense induction in undamaged ramets and the decay time of the response after local attack. Undamaged ramets became defense-induced 38-51 h after the initial attack. Defense induction was measured as a reduction in leaf palatability. Defense induction lasted at least 28 days, and there was strong genotypic variation in the duration of this response. Ramets formed after the initial attack were also defense-induced, implying that induced defense can extend to new ramet generations, thereby contributing to protection of plant tissue that is both very vulnerable to herbivores and most valuable in terms of future plant growth and fitness. PMID:20522188

  1. On selection of the optimal data time interval for real-time hydrological forecasting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, J.; Han, D.

    2013-09-01

    With the advancement in modern telemetry and communication technologies, hydrological data can be collected with an increasingly higher sampling rate. An important issue deserving attention from the hydrological community is which suitable time interval of the model input data should be chosen in hydrological forecasting. Such a problem has long been recognised in the control engineering community but is a largely ignored topic in operational applications of hydrological forecasting. In this study, the intrinsic properties of rainfall-runoff data with different time intervals are first investigated from the perspectives of the sampling theorem and the information loss using the discrete wavelet transform tool. It is found that rainfall signals with very high sampling rates may not always improve the accuracy of rainfall-runoff modelling due to the catchment low-pass-filtering effect. To further investigate the impact of a data time interval in real-time forecasting, a real-time forecasting system is constructed by incorporating the probability distributed model (PDM) with a real-time updating scheme, the autoregressive moving-average (ARMA) model. Case studies are then carried out on four UK catchments with different concentration times for real-time flow forecasting using data with different time intervals of 15, 30, 45, 60, 90 and 120 min. A positive relation is found between the forecast lead time and the optimal choice of the data time interval, which is also highly dependent on the catchment concentration time. Finally, based on the conclusions from the case studies, a hypothetical pattern is proposed in three-dimensional coordinates to describe the general impact of the data time interval and to provide implications of the selection of the optimal time interval in real-time hydrological forecasting. Although nowadays most operational hydrological systems still have low data sampling rates (daily or hourly), the future is that higher sampling rates will become

  2. The nest site lottery: how selectively neutral density dependent growth suppression induces frequency dependent selection.

    PubMed

    Argasinski, K; Broom, M

    2013-12-01

    Modern developments in population dynamics emphasize the role of the turnover of individuals. In the new approaches stable population size is a dynamic equilibrium between different mortality and fecundity factors instead of an arbitrary fixed carrying capacity. The latest replicator dynamics models assume that regulation of the population size acts through feedback driven by density dependent juvenile mortality. Here, we consider a simplified model to extract the properties of this approach. We show that at the stable population size, the structure of the frequency dependent evolutionary game emerges. Turnover of individuals induces a lottery mechanism where for each nest site released by a dead adult individual a single newborn is drawn from the pool of newborn candidates. This frequency dependent selection leads towards the strategy maximizing the number of newborns per adult death. However, multiple strategies can maximize this value. Among them, the strategy with the greatest mortality (which implies the greatest instantaneous growth rate) is selected. This result is important for the discussion about universal fitness measures and which parameters are maximized by natural selection. This is related to the fitness measures R0 and r, because the number of newborns per single dead individual equals the lifetime production of newborn R0 in models without aging. We thus have a two-stage procedure, instead of a single fitness measure, which is a combination of R0 and r. According to the nest site lottery mechanism, at stable population size, selection favors strategies with the greatest r, i.e. those with the highest turnover, from those with the greatest R0. PMID:24071631

  3. Determining the Capacity of Time-Based Selection

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Watson, Derrick G.; Kunar, Melina A.

    2012-01-01

    In visual search, a set of distractor items can be suppressed from future selection if they are presented (previewed) before a second set of search items arrive. This "visual marking" mechanism provides a top-down way of prioritizing the selection of new stimuli, at the expense of old stimuli already in the field (Watson & Humphreys, 1997).…

  4. A time-gating scintillation detector for the measurement of laser-induced fast neutrons

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, Sungman; Park, Sangsoon; Yea, Kwon-hae; Cha, Hyungki

    2009-06-15

    A time-gating scintillation detector, in which a fast high voltage switch is used for gating a channel photomultiplier, was developed for a measurement of laser-induced fast neutrons. The x rays generated from the intense femtosecond laser and the solid target interactions were suppressed selectively and a time-of-flight signal of a laser-generated fast neutron was measured effectively. The detector was used successfully to measure the neutron yield of a femtosecond, deuterated, polystyrene plasma.

  5. A time-gating scintillation detector for the measurement of laser-induced fast neutrons.

    PubMed

    Lee, Sungman; Park, Sangsoon; Yea, Kwon-hae; Cha, Hyungki

    2009-06-01

    A time-gating scintillation detector, in which a fast high voltage switch is used for gating a channel photomultiplier, was developed for a measurement of laser-induced fast neutrons. The x rays generated from the intense femtosecond laser and the solid target interactions were suppressed selectively and a time-of-flight signal of a laser-generated fast neutron was measured effectively. The detector was used successfully to measure the neutron yield of a femtosecond, deuterated, polystyrene plasma. PMID:19566199

  6. Photo-SRM: laser-induced dissociation improves detection selectivity of Selected Reaction Monitoring mode.

    PubMed

    Enjalbert, Quentin; Simon, Romain; Salvador, Arnaud; Antoine, Rodolphe; Redon, Sébastien; Ayhan, Mehmet Menaf; Darbour, Florence; Chambert, Stéphane; Bretonnière, Yann; Dugourd, Philippe; Lemoine, Jérôme

    2011-11-30

    Selected Reaction Monitoring (SRM) carried out on triple-quadrupole mass spectrometers coupled to liquid chromatography has been a reference method to develop quantitative analysis of small molecules in biological or environmental matrices for years and is currently emerging as a promising tool in clinical proteomic. However, sensitive assays in complex matrices are often hampered by the presence of co-eluted compounds that share redundant transitions with the target species. On-the-fly better selection of the precursor ion by high-field asymmetric waveform ion mobility spectrometry (FAIMS) or increased quadrupole resolution is one way to escape from interferences. In the present work we document the potential interest of substituting classical gas-collision activation mode by laser-induced dissociation in the visible wavelength range to improve the specificity of the fragmentation step. Optimization of the laser beam pathway across the different quadrupoles to ensure high photo-dissociation yield in Q2 without detectable fragmentation in Q1 was assessed with sucrose tagged with a push-pull chromophore. Next, the proof of concept that photo-SRM ensures more specific detection than does conventional collision-induced dissociation (CID)-based SRM was carried out with oxytocin peptide. Oxytocin was derivatized by the thiol-reactive QSY® 7 C(5)-maleimide quencher on cysteine residues to shift its absorption property into the visible range. Photo-SRM chromatograms of tagged oxytocin spiked in whole human plasma digest showed better detection specificity and sensitivity than CID, that resulted in extended calibration curve linearity. We anticipate that photo-SRM might significantly improve the limit of quantification of classical SRM-based assays targeting cysteine-containing peptides. PMID:22002689

  7. Time-dependent induced potentials in convoy electron emission

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Acuña, G. P.; Miraglia, J. E.

    2006-11-01

    We study the time-dependent induced potentials at the convoy electron position due to the self-interaction with a metal surface and to the shock wave created by the positive hole (vacancy) left. The time evolution of these potentials are calculated using the linear response theory. Results obtained are fitted with simple functions. We find that those two potentials nearly cancel each other in the first ten atomic units of time.

  8. The timing of verb selection in Japanese sentence production.

    PubMed

    Momma, Shota; Slevc, L Robert; Phillips, Colin

    2016-05-01

    Many influential models of sentence production (e.g., Bock & Levelt, 1994; Kempen & Hoenkamp, 1987; Levelt, 1989) emphasize the central role of verbs in structural encoding, and thus predict that verbs should be selected early in sentence formulation, possibly even before the phonological encoding of the first constituent (Ferreira, 2000). However, the most direct experimental test of this hypothesis (Schriefers, Teruel, & Meinshausen, 1998) found no evidence for advance verb selection in verb-final (subject-verb and subject-object-verb) utterances in German. The current study, based on a multiword picture-word interference task (Meyer, 1996; Schriefers et al., 1998), demonstrates that in Japanese, a strongly verb-final language, verbs are indeed planned in advance, but selectively before object noun articulation and not before subject noun articulation. This contrasting pattern of advance verb selection may reconcile the motivation for advance verb selection in structural encoding while explaining the previous failures to demonstrate it. Potential mechanisms that might underlie this contrasting pattern of advance verb selection are discussed. (PsycINFO Database Record PMID:26569434

  9. Resource Selection Using Execution and Queue Wait Time Predictions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smith, Warren; Wong, Parkson; Biegel, Bryan (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    We developed techniques to predict application execution times for instance-based learning with an average error of 33% of average run time. We developed techniques to predict queue wait times that included a simulation of scheduling algorithms and execution time predictions. We implemented these techniques for the NAS Origin cluster.

  10. Long-time observation of meteor induced layers with ionosonde

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yusupov, Kamil; Akchurin, Adel

    2016-07-01

    It is considered that the main theory explaining appearance of sporadic E is the theory of wind shear, which means (includes) the presence and movement of nodes converging tidal wind through the height region of the most frequent occurrence Es (120-140km) [Mathew et. all, 1998]. However, the appearance of intense layers, following its name, are sporadic, and such variability cannot to explain by the influence of tidal waves only. Another indication inconsistency theory of wind shear is the appearance of so-called transient Es layers [Maruiama, 2003]. The distinctive feature of this trace is the high critical frequency (> 5 MHz), a constant height, weak amplitude, all trace semitransparent and short lifetime [Maruiama et. all, 2003 and 2008 and references there]. Because of duration, such layer is opposite to the traditional persistent Es layer, which we do not consider in this paper. Various researchers have used different terms for such spontaneous Es, it is meteor echo, meteor induced Es, spontaneously formed sporadic Es patches resulting of the Fresnel scattering from a region of enhanced plasma density along the meteor trail, transitory Es and transient Es. Since the term transient Es is unstable, to avoid confusion, we will stick to this term. Since meteor echo is not fully satisfy this term by some parameter, we will describe the properties of transient Es based on the ionogram properties and not from physics of its origin. We used data from our ionosonde with one-minute ionogram repetition rate for 2010-2014 years. For processing performed a method are using to select beatings and the ionosphere reflectivity of the layers by means A-, H-and AΣ-map [Akchurin, 2011; Yusupov, 2014]. This maps allow to collect transient Es appearance over a long-time. Such statistics comparison with meteor showers activity showed good agreement. It shows the presence of the transient Es formation mechanism, which coupling with meteors.

  11. Continuum model for chiral induced spin selectivity in helical molecules

    SciTech Connect

    Medina, Ernesto; González-Arraga, Luis A.; Finkelstein-Shapiro, Daniel; Mujica, Vladimiro; Berche, Bertrand

    2015-05-21

    A minimal model is exactly solved for electron spin transport on a helix. Electron transport is assumed to be supported by well oriented p{sub z} type orbitals on base molecules forming a staircase of definite chirality. In a tight binding interpretation, the spin-orbit coupling (SOC) opens up an effective π{sub z} − π{sub z} coupling via interbase p{sub x,y} − p{sub z} hopping, introducing spin coupled transport. The resulting continuum model spectrum shows two Kramers doublet transport channels with a gap proportional to the SOC. Each doubly degenerate channel satisfies time reversal symmetry; nevertheless, a bias chooses a transport direction and thus selects for spin orientation. The model predicts (i) which spin orientation is selected depending on chirality and bias, (ii) changes in spin preference as a function of input Fermi level and (iii) back-scattering suppression protected by the SO gap. We compute the spin current with a definite helicity and find it to be proportional to the torsion of the chiral structure and the non-adiabatic Aharonov-Anandan phase. To describe room temperature transport, we assume that the total transmission is the result of a product of coherent steps.

  12. Artificial selection on chill-coma recovery time in Drosophila melanogaster: Direct and correlated responses to selection.

    PubMed

    Gerken, Alison R; Mackay, Trudy F C; Morgan, Theodore J

    2016-07-01

    Artificial selection can be used to create populations with extreme phenotypic responses to environmental stressors. When artificial selection is applied to a single component of a stress response, this selection may result in correlated responses in other stress responses, a phenomenon called cross-tolerance, which is ultimately controlled by the genetic correlations among traits. We selected for extreme responses to cold tolerance by selecting for chill-coma recovery time from a single temperate population of Drosophila melanogaster. Chill-coma recovery time is a common metric of low, but non-lethal, cold temperature tolerance. Replicated divergent artificial selection was applied to a genetically variable base population for 31 generations, resulting in two cold resistant, two cold susceptible, and two unselected control lines. To quantify the relationship between selection on chill-coma recovery and other metrics of thermal performance, we also measured survivorship after acute cold exposure, survivorship after chronic cold exposure, survivorship after cold exposure following a pre-treatment period (rapid cold hardening), starvation tolerance, and heat tolerance. We find that chill-coma recovery time is heritable within this population and that there is an asymmetric response to increased and decreased chill-coma recovery time. Surprisingly, we found no cross-tolerances between selection on chill-coma recovery time and the other environmental stress response traits. These results suggest that although artificial selection has dramatically altered chill-coma recovery time, the correlated response to selection on other stress response phenotypes has been negligible. The lack of a correlated response suggests that chill-coma recovery time in these selection lines is likely genetically independent from measures of cold survivorship tested here. PMID:27264892

  13. Selective visual scaling of time-scale processes facilitates broadband learning of isometric force frequency tracking.

    PubMed

    King, Adam C; Newell, Karl M

    2015-10-01

    The experiment investigated the effect of selectively augmenting faster time scales of visual feedback information on the learning and transfer of continuous isometric force tracking tasks to test the generality of the self-organization of 1/f properties of force output. Three experimental groups tracked an irregular target pattern either under a standard fixed gain condition or with selectively enhancement in the visual feedback display of intermediate (4-8 Hz) or high (8-12 Hz) frequency components of the force output. All groups reduced tracking error over practice, with the error lowest in the intermediate scaling condition followed by the high scaling and fixed gain conditions, respectively. Selective visual scaling induced persistent changes across the frequency spectrum, with the strongest effect in the intermediate scaling condition and positive transfer to novel feedback displays. The findings reveal an interdependence of the timescales in the learning and transfer of isometric force output frequency structures consistent with 1/f process models of the time scales of motor output variability. PMID:26041272

  14. Effects of selective and non-selective endothelin receptor blockade on ET-1-induced pressor response in the hamster.

    PubMed

    Honoré, Jean-Claude; Fecteau, Marie-Hélène; Wessale, Jerry L; D'Orléans-Juste, Pedro

    2004-11-01

    In order to assess the physiological balance existing between vasoconstrictor and vasodilator endothelin-B receptor actions associated with their dual locations (i.e. on vascular smooth muscle and endothelial cells), we investigated the effects of selective and non-selective endothelin receptor antagonists on endothelin-1-induced increase in blood pressure. Atrasentan (a selective endothelin-A receptor antagonist; 6 mg/kg) and A-192621 (a selective endothelin-B receptor antagonist; 0.03, 0.3, or 30 mg/kg) were administered intravenously to anaesthetized Syrian Golden hamsters, alone or in combination, to induce respectively selective or non-selective receptor antagonism. Atrasentan partially blocked the blood pressure response induced by endothelin-1 (0.5 nmol/kg), whereas a selective endothelin-B receptor antagonism potentiated this response, independently of the dose of A-192621. Interestingly, combination of the very low dose of A-192621 (which selectively blocked putatively endothelium-located endothelin-B receptors) with atrasentan, suppressed the protective effect previously observed with atrasentan alone. Nevertheless, combination of atrasentan with the two highest doses of A-192621 tested, dose-dependently reduced the response triggered by endothelin-1. Our results suggest that endothelial endothelin-B receptors are important to control the vascular reactivity to endothelin-1. Furthermore, our data suggest that the efficacy of a non-selective endothelin-A/ endothelin-B receptor antagonist relies upon its potency to block endothelin-B receptors in the hamster. PMID:15838362

  15. Leisure-Time Activities in Selected Nursing Homes.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tague, Jean Ruth

    This study sought to identify leisure interests and participation patterns of residents over 65 in selected nursing homes in Los Angeles County, California, together with general and professional beliefs of nursing home administrators and authorities on aging as to leisure activities for aged nursing home patients. Interviews were held with 107…

  16. The Timing of Verb Selection in Japanese Sentence Production

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Momma, Shota; Slevc, L. Robert; Phillips, Colin

    2016-01-01

    Many influential models of sentence production (e.g., Bock & Levelt, 1994; Kempen & Hoenkamp, 1987; Levelt, 1989) emphasize the central role of verbs in structural encoding, and thus predict that verbs should be selected early in sentence formulation, possibly even before the phonological encoding of the first constituent (Ferreira, 2000).…

  17. Behavioral destabilization induced by the selective serotonin reuptake inhibitor fluoxetine

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors (SSRIs) are widely used to treat mood and anxiety disorders. However, neuronal bases for both beneficial and adverse effects of SSRIs remain poorly understood. We have recently shown that the SSRI fluoxetine can reverse the state of maturation of hippocampal granule cells in adult mice. The granule cell "dematuration" is induced in a large population of granule cells, and greatly changes functional and physiological properties of these cells. Here we show that this unique form of neuronal plasticity is correlated with a distinct change in behavior of mice. Results We chronically treated adult male mice with fluoxetine, and examined its effect on several forms of behavior of mice. During fluoxetine treatments, mice showed a marked increase in day-to-day fluctuations of home cage activity levels that was characterized by occasional switching between hypoactivity and hyperactivity within a few days. This destabilized cage activity was accompanied by increased anxiety-related behaviors and could be observed up to 4 weeks after withdrawal from fluoxetine. As reported previously, the granule cell dematuration by fluoxetine includes a reduction of synaptic facilitation at the granule cell output, mossy fiber, synapse to the juvenile level. Mossy fiber synaptic facilitation examined electrophysiologically in acute hippocampal slices also remained suppressed after fluoxetine withdrawal and significantly correlated with the fluctuation of cage activity levels in individual mice. Furthermore, in mice lacking the 5-HT4 receptor, in which the granule cell dematuration has been shown to be attenuated, fluoxetine had no significant effect on the fluctuation of cage activity levels. Conclusions Our results demonstrate that the SSRI fluoxetine can induce marked day-to-day changes in activity levels of mice in the familiar environment, and that the dematuration of the hippocampal granule cells is closely associated with the

  18. Time-resolved aluminium laser-induced plasma temperature measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Surmick, D. M.; Parigger, C. G.

    2014-11-01

    We seek to characterize the temperature decay of laser-induced plasma near the surface of an aluminium target from laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy measurements of aluminium alloy sample. Laser-induced plasma are initiated by tightly focussing 1064 nm, nanosecond pulsed Nd:YAG laser radiation. Temperatures are inferred from aluminium monoxide spectra viewed at systematically varied time delays by comparing experimental spectra to theoretical calculations with a Nelder Mead algorithm. The temperatures are found to decay from 5173 ± 270 to 3862 ± 46 Kelvin from 10 to 100 μs time delays following optical breakdown. The temperature profile along the plasma height is also inferred from spatially resolved spectral measurements and the electron number density is inferred from Stark broadened Hβ spectra.

  19. Surface-induced selection during in situ photoswitching at the solid/liquid interface.

    PubMed

    Bonacchi, Sara; El Garah, Mohamed; Ciesielski, Artur; Herder, Martin; Conti, Simone; Cecchini, Marco; Hecht, Stefan; Samorì, Paolo

    2015-04-13

    Here we report for the first time a submolecularly resolved scanning tunneling microscopy (STM) study at the solid/liquid interface of the in situ reversible interconversion between two isomers of a diarylethene photoswitch, that is, open and closed form, self-assembled on a graphite surface. Prolonged irradiation with UV light led to the in situ irreversible formation of another isomer as by-product of the reaction, which due to its preferential physisorption accumulates at the surface. By making use of a simple yet powerful thermodynamic model we provide a quantitative description for the observed surface-induced selection of one isomeric form. PMID:25728405

  20. [Billroth and his time; selected passages from his letters].

    PubMed

    Budernik, A

    1986-04-18

    Billroth's life and work are illustrated by selected excerpts from his letters written to outstanding personalities and colleagues. Not only his medical activities, but also his initiative in the planning of the Rudolfinerhaus hospital, and the reconstruction of his own department and the building of the Medical Association house in the Frankgasse are described. In addition, his love of music and his deep friendship with Johannes Brahms are demonstrated by these letters. PMID:3521104

  1. Systemically induced plant volatiles emitted at the time of "danger".

    PubMed

    Mattiacci, L; Rocca, B A; Scascighini, N; D'Alessandro, M; Hern, A; Dorn, S

    2001-11-01

    Feeding by Pieris brassicae caterpillars on the lower leaves of Brussels sprouts (Brassica oleracea var. gemmifera) plants triggers the release of volatiles from upper leaves. The volatiles are attractive for a natural antagonist of the herbivore, the parasitoid Cotesia glomerata. Parasitoids are attracted only if additional damage is inflicted on the systemically induced upper leaves and only after at least three days of herbivore feeding on the lower leaves. Upon termination of caterpillar feeding, the systemic signal is emitted for a maximum of one more day. Systemic induction did not occur at low levels of herbivore infestation. Systemically induced leaves emitted green leaf volatiles, cyclic monoterpenoids, and sesquiterpenes. GC-MS profiles of systemically induced and herbivore-infested leaves did not differ for most compounds, although herbivore infested plants did emit higher amounts of green leaf volatiles. Emission of systemically induced volatiles in Brussels sprouts might function as an induced defense that is activated only when needed, i.e., at the time of caterpillar attack. This way, plants may adopt a flexible management of inducible defensive resources to minimize costs of defense and to maximize fitness in response to unpredictable herbivore attack. PMID:11817078

  2. Manufacturing time operators: Covariance, selection criteria, and examples

    SciTech Connect

    Hegerfeldt, G. C.; Muga, J. G.; Munoz, J.

    2010-07-15

    We provide the most general forms of covariant and normalized time operators and their probability densities, with applications to quantum clocks, the time of arrival, and Lyapunov quantum operators. Examples are discussed of the profusion of possible operators and their physical meaning. Criteria to define unique, optimal operators for specific cases are given.

  3. Time-intensity trading functions for selected pure tones.

    PubMed

    Young, L L

    1976-03-01

    A substantial number of investigations have examined the ability of the auditory system to trade time for intensity on a lateralization task. Most of these investigations, however, have employed clicks and noise bursts as stimuli with interaural disparities between onset times. Consequently, there is a lack of quantitative data for time-intensity trades where pure tones that had identical onset times but disparate phase were employed as signals. For this reason we employed sinusoids ranging from 200 to 2000 Hz and determined the extent to which the intensity of one signal must be decreased to achieve a midline image when interaural phase disparities of 0 degrees to 360 degrees were imposed between the binaural signals in 30 degree increments. The time-intensity trading functions yielded in this experiment demonstrate that (1) not unexpectedly, the largest time-intensity trades were accomplished for the lower frequencies; (2) the maximum time-intensity trade for each frequency occurred at interaural phase disparities of 90 degrees and 270 degrees; and (3) when the low-frequency tones were 180 degrees out of phase, essentially the same intraaural intensity relationship was required to achieve midline as was needed for the 0 degree interaural phase condition. PMID:1271802

  4. Selective enhancement of topologically induced interface states in a dielectric resonator chain

    PubMed Central

    Poli, Charles; Bellec, Matthieu; Kuhl, Ulrich; Mortessagne, Fabrice; Schomerus, Henning

    2015-01-01

    The recent realization of topological phases in insulators and superconductors has advanced the search for robust quantum technologies. The prospect to implement the underlying topological features controllably has given incentive to explore optical platforms for analogous realizations. Here we realize a topologically induced defect state in a chain of dielectric microwave resonators and show that the functionality of the system can be enhanced by supplementing topological protection with non-hermitian symmetries that do not have an electronic counterpart. We draw on a characteristic topological feature of the defect state, namely, that it breaks a sublattice symmetry. This isolates the state from losses that respect parity-time symmetry, which enhances its visibility relative to all other states both in the frequency and in the time domain. This mode selection mechanism naturally carries over to a wide range of topological and parity-time symmetric optical platforms, including couplers, rectifiers and lasers. PMID:25833814

  5. Estimating selection through male fitness: three complementary methods illuminate the nature and causes of selection on flowering time.

    PubMed

    Austen, Emily J; Weis, Arthur E

    2016-02-24

    Our understanding of selection through male fitness is limited by the resource demands and indirect nature of the best available genetic techniques. Applying complementary, independent approaches to this problem can help clarify evolution through male function. We applied three methods to estimate selection on flowering time through male fitness in experimental populations of the annual plant Brassica rapa: (i) an analysis of mating opportunity based on flower production schedules, (ii) genetic paternity analysis, and (iii) a novel approach based on principles of experimental evolution. Selection differentials estimated by the first method disagreed with those estimated by the other two, indicating that mating opportunity was not the principal driver of selection on flowering time. The genetic and experimental evolution methods exhibited striking agreement overall, but a slight discrepancy between the two suggested that negative environmental covariance between age at flowering and male fitness may have contributed to phenotypic selection. Together, the three methods enriched our understanding of selection on flowering time, from mating opportunity to phenotypic selection to evolutionary response. The novel experimental evolution method may provide a means of examining selection through male fitness when genetic paternity analysis is not possible. PMID:26911957

  6. [Discrimination of Crude Oil Samples Using Laser-Induced Time-Resolved Fluorescence Spectroscopy].

    PubMed

    Han, Xiao-shuang; Liu, De-qing; Luan, Xiao-ning; Guo, Jin-jia; Liu, Yong-xin; Zheng, Rong-er

    2016-02-01

    The Laser-induced fluorescence spectra combined with pattern recognition method has been widely applied in discrimination of different spilled oil, such as diesel, gasoline, and crude oil. However, traditional three-dimension fluorescence analysis method, which is not adapted to requirement of field detection, is limited to laboratory investigatio ns. The development of oil identification method for field detection is significant to quick response and operation of oil spill. In this paper, a new method based on laser-induced time-resolved fluorescence combined with support vector machine (SVM) model was introduced to discriminate crude oil samples. In this method, time-resolved spectra data was descended into two dimensions with selecting appropriate range in time and wavelength domains respectively to form a SVM data base. It is found that the classification accurate rate increased with an appropriate selection. With a selected range from 54 to 74 ns in time domain, the classification accurate rate has been increased from 83.3% (without selection) to 88.1%. With a selected wavelength range of 387.00~608.87 nm, the classification accurate rate of suspect oil was improved from 84% (without selection) to 100%. Since the detection delay of fluorescence lidar fluctuates due to wave and platform swing, the identification method with optimizing in both time and wavelength domains could offer a better flexibility for field applications. It is hoped that the developed method could provide some useful reference with data reduction for classification of suspect crude oil in the future development. PMID:27209747

  7. Timing determines dexamethasone and rituximab induced synergistic cell death.

    PubMed

    Adem, Jemal; Eray, Mine; Eeva, Jonna; Nuutinen, Ulla; Pelkonen, Jukka

    2016-07-01

    Dysregulation of cell death signaling pathways in many cell types such as B lymphocytes (B-cells) can lead to cancer, for example to B-cell lymphomas. Rituximab (RTX) and glucocorticoids such as dexamethasone (Dex) are widely used to treat hematological malignancies including B-cell lymphomas. Although the combination of Dex and RTX improves the treatment outcome of lymphoma patients, most lymphomas remain incurable diseases. Therefore, a detailed investigation of Dex- and RTX-induced signaling might provide new insights into the therapeutic benefits of these drugs. In this paper, we describe Dex- and RTX-induced signaling pathways and their downstream target proteins/cells. In addition, we also overview how the signaling initiated by Dex and RTX modulate the outcome of Dex- and RTX-mediated cell death in lymphoma cells. The combination of Dex and RTX results in massive cell death in lymphoma cells. However, pretreatment of lymphoma cells or mononuclear cytotoxic cells with Dex followed by RTX leads to a decrease in apoptosis or it impairs antibody-dependent cellular cytotoxicity (ADCC). RTX-mediated ADCC is impaired by Dex-induced depletion of cytotoxic cells, whereas RTX-mediated short-term ERK1/2 activation decreases Dex-induced apoptosis. Therefore, the timing of the combination of Dex and RTX is a determining factor for the synergistic effect of these cell death inducing agents. PMID:27290654

  8. Real-Time PCR-Coupled CE-SELEX for DNA Aptamer Selection

    PubMed Central

    Ruff, Patrick; Pai, Rekha B.; Storici, Francesca

    2012-01-01

    Aptamers are short nucleic acid or peptide sequences capable of binding to a target molecule with high specificity and affinity. Also known as “artificial antibodies,” aptamers provide many advantages over antibodies. One of the major hurdles to aptamer isolation is the initial time and effort needed for selection. The systematic evolution of ligands by exponential enrichment (SELEX) is the traditional procedure for generating aptamers, but this process is lengthy and requires a large quantity of target and starting aptamer library. A relatively new procedure for generating aptamers using capillary electrophoresis (CE), known as CE-SELEX, is faster and more efficient than SELEX but requires laser-induced fluorescence (LIF) to detect the aptamer-target complexes. Here, we implemented an alternative system without LIF using real-time- (RT-) PCR to indirectly measure aptamer-target complexes. In three rounds of selection, as opposed to ten or more rounds common in SELEX protocols, a specific aptamer for bovine serum albumin (BSA) was obtained. The specificity of the aptamer to BSA was confirmed by electrophoretic mobility shift assays (EMSAs), an unlabeled competitor assay, and by a supershift assay. The system used here provides a cost effective and a highly efficient means of generating aptamers. PMID:27335672

  9. Selective Serotonin Reuptake Inhibitor-Induced Sexual Dysfunction in Adolescents: A Review.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Scharko, Alexander M.

    2004-01-01

    Objective: To review the existing literature on selective serotonin reuptake inhibitor (SSRI)-induced sexual dysfunction in adolescents. Method: A literature review of SSRI-induced adverse effects in adolescents focusing on sexual dysfunction was done. Nonsexual SSRI-induced adverse effects were compared in adult and pediatric populations.…

  10. Transfer and the Part-Time Student: The Gulf Separating Community Colleges and Selective Universities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Handel, Stephen J.

    2009-01-01

    When representatives from community colleges and selective four-year institutions gather, there is no greater flashpoint than the topic of part-time enrollment. This issue--that students coming from an institution comprising mostly part-time students should be enabled to transfer to selective four-year institutions in which full-time enrollment is…

  11. Time-Resolved Electron Diffraction from Selectively Aligned Molecules

    SciTech Connect

    Reckenthaeler, Peter; Krausz, Ferenc; Centurion, Martin; Fuss, Werner; Trushin, Sergei A.; Fill, Ernst E.

    2009-05-29

    We experimentally demonstrate ultrafast electron diffraction from transiently aligned molecules in the absence of external (aligning) fields. A sample of aligned molecules is generated through photodissociation with femtosecond laser pulses, and the diffraction pattern is captured by probing the sample with picosecond electron pulses shortly after dissociation - before molecular rotation causes the alignment to vanish. In our experiments the alignment decays with a time constant of 2.6{+-}1.2 ps.

  12. Time Adaptation Shows Duration Selectivity in the Human Parietal Cortex

    PubMed Central

    Hayashi, Masamichi J.; Ditye, Thomas; Harada, Tokiko; Hashiguchi, Maho; Sadato, Norihiro; Carlson, Synnöve; Walsh, Vincent; Kanai, Ryota

    2015-01-01

    Although psychological and computational models of time estimation have postulated the existence of neural representations tuned for specific durations, empirical evidence of this notion has been lacking. Here, using a functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) adaptation paradigm, we show that the inferior parietal lobule (IPL) (corresponding to the supramarginal gyrus) exhibited reduction in neural activity due to adaptation when a visual stimulus of the same duration was repeatedly presented. Adaptation was strongest when stimuli of identical durations were repeated, and it gradually decreased as the difference between the reference and test durations increased. This tuning property generalized across a broad range of durations, indicating the presence of general time-representation mechanisms in the IPL. Furthermore, adaptation was observed irrespective of the subject’s attention to time. Repetition of a nontemporal aspect of the stimulus (i.e., shape) did not produce neural adaptation in the IPL. These results provide neural evidence for duration-tuned representations in the human brain. PMID:26378440

  13. Real-time object tracking via online discriminative feature selection.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Kaihua; Zhang, Lei; Yang, Ming-Hsuan

    2013-12-01

    Most tracking-by-detection algorithms train discriminative classifiers to separate target objects from their surrounding background. In this setting, noisy samples are likely to be included when they are not properly sampled, thereby causing visual drift. The multiple instance learning (MIL) paradigm has been recently applied to alleviate this problem. However, important prior information of instance labels and the most correct positive instance (i.e., the tracking result in the current frame) can be exploited using a novel formulation much simpler than an MIL approach. In this paper, we show that integrating such prior information into a supervised learning algorithm can handle visual drift more effectively and efficiently than the existing MIL tracker. We present an online discriminative feature selection algorithm that optimizes the objective function in the steepest ascent direction with respect to the positive samples while in the steepest descent direction with respect to the negative ones. Therefore, the trained classifier directly couples its score with the importance of samples, leading to a more robust and efficient tracker. Numerous experimental evaluations with state-of-the-art algorithms on challenging sequences demonstrate the merits of the proposed algorithm. PMID:23955750

  14. Fluorescence spectroscopy in probing spontaneous and induced aggregation amongst size-selective gold nanoclusters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rahman, Dewan S.; Ghosh, Sujit Kumar

    2014-06-01

    Gold nanoparticles have been synthesized by borohydride reduction using poly(N-vinyl 2-pyrrolidone) as the stabilizing agent in aqueous medium in the size regime of 1-5 nm. Aggregation amongst these polymer-stabilized gold nanoparticles has been accomplished by the controlled addition of hydrazine or aggregation may occur spontaneously (devoid of any chemicals) that is ubiquitous to nanoparticulate systems. Now, fluorescencein isothiocyanate (FITC), a prototype molecular probe has been employed in understanding the physical principles of aggregation phenomenon of the size-selective gold nanoparticles undergoing spontaneous and induced-aggregation under stipulated conditions. It is seen that there is enhancement of fluorescence intensity of FITC in the presence of both spontaneously and induced-aggregated gold nanoclusters as compared to free FITC. Interestingly, it is observed that the fluorescence sensitivity is able to distinguish seven different sizes of the gold nanoparticles in the aggregates and maximum enhancement of intensity arises at higher concentration with increase in size of gold particles within the aggregates. With increase in concentration of gold nanoparticle aggregates, the intensity increases, initially, reaches a maximum at a threshold concentration and then, gradually decreases in the presence of both spontaneously and induced-aggregated gold particles. However, the salient feature of physical significance is that the maximum enhancement of intensity with time has remained almost same for induced-aggregated gold while decreases exponentially with spontaneously aggregated gold particles.

  15. Field site selection: getting it right first time around.

    PubMed

    Malcolm, Colin A; El Sayed, Badria; Babiker, Ahmed; Girod, Romain; Fontenille, Didier; Knols, Bart G J; Nugud, Abdel Hameed; Benedict, Mark Q

    2009-01-01

    The selection of suitable field sites for integrated control of Anopheles mosquitoes using the sterile insect technique (SIT) requires consideration of the full gamut of factors facing most proposed control strategies, but four criteria identify an ideal site: 1) a single malaria vector, 2) an unstructured, relatively low density target population, 3) isolation of the target population and 4) actual or potential malaria incidence. Such a site can exist in a diverse range of situations or can be created. Two contrasting SIT field sites are examined here: the desert-flanked Dongola Reach of the Nile River in Northern State, Sudan, where malaria is endemic, and the island of La Reunion, where autochthonous malaria is rare but risk is persistent. The single malaria-transmitting vector at both sites is Anopheles arabiensis. In Sudan, the target area is a narrow 500 km corridor stretching from the rocky terrain at the Fourth Cataract--just above the new Merowe Dam, to the northernmost edge of the species range, close to Egypt. Vector distribution and temporal changes in density depend on the Nile level, ambient temperature and human activities. On La Reunion, the An. arabiensis population is coastal, limited and divided into three areas by altitude and exposure to the trade winds on the east coast. Mosquito vectors for other diseases are an issue at both sites, but of primary importance on La Reunion due to the recent chikungunya epidemic. The similarities and differences between these two sites in terms of suitability are discussed in the context of area-wide integrated vector management incorporating the SIT. PMID:19917079

  16. Field site selection: getting it right first time around

    PubMed Central

    Malcolm, Colin A; El Sayed, Badria; Babiker, Ahmed; Girod, Romain; Fontenille, Didier; Knols, Bart GJ; Nugud, Abdel Hameed; Benedict, Mark Q

    2009-01-01

    The selection of suitable field sites for integrated control of Anopheles mosquitoes using the sterile insect technique (SIT) requires consideration of the full gamut of factors facing most proposed control strategies, but four criteria identify an ideal site: 1) a single malaria vector, 2) an unstructured, relatively low density target population, 3) isolation of the target population and 4) actual or potential malaria incidence. Such a site can exist in a diverse range of situations or can be created. Two contrasting SIT field sites are examined here: the desert-flanked Dongola Reach of the Nile River in Northern State, Sudan, where malaria is endemic, and the island of La Reunion, where autochthonous malaria is rare but risk is persistent. The single malaria-transmitting vector at both sites is Anopheles arabiensis. In Sudan, the target area is a narrow 500 km corridor stretching from the rocky terrain at the Fourth Cataract - just above the new Merowe Dam, to the northernmost edge of the species range, close to Egypt. Vector distribution and temporal changes in density depend on the Nile level, ambient temperature and human activities. On La Reunion, the An. arabiensis population is coastal, limited and divided into three areas by altitude and exposure to the trade winds on the east coast. Mosquito vectors for other diseases are an issue at both sites, but of primary importance on La Reunion due to the recent chikungunya epidemic. The similarities and differences between these two sites in terms of suitability are discussed in the context of area-wide integrated vector management incorporating the SIT. PMID:19917079

  17. Developmental trajectories of regulating attentional selection over time.

    PubMed

    Heim, Sabine; Keil, Andreas

    2012-01-01

    Adaptive behavior in learning environments requires both the maintenance of an attentional focus on a task-set and suppression of distracting stimuli. This may be especially difficult when the competing information is more appealing than the target event. The aptitude to "pay attention" and resist distraction has often been noted as an important prerequisite of successful acquisition of intellectual abilities in children. This focused review draws on research that highlights interindividual differences in the temporal dynamics of attentional engagement and disengagement under competition, and their relation with age and cognitive/academic skills. Although basic strategies of attention control are present in very young children, the more refined ability to manage attentional resources over time in an economic and adaptive fashion appears during early school years, dramatically improves until the early teen years, and continues to develop into late adolescence. Across studies, parameters of attention control over time predict specific aspects of academic performance, rather than general intellectual ability. We conclude that the ability to strategically regulate the dynamic allocation of attention at rapid rates may represent an important element of cognitive and academic development. PMID:22905028

  18. Developmental Trajectories of Regulating Attentional Selection Over Time

    PubMed Central

    Heim, Sabine; Keil, Andreas

    2012-01-01

    Adaptive behavior in learning environments requires both the maintenance of an attentional focus on a task-set and suppression of distracting stimuli. This may be especially difficult when the competing information is more appealing than the target event. The aptitude to “pay attention” and resist distraction has often been noted as an important prerequisite of successful acquisition of intellectual abilities in children. This focused review draws on research that highlights interindividual differences in the temporal dynamics of attentional engagement and disengagement under competition, and their relation with age and cognitive/academic skills. Although basic strategies of attention control are present in very young children, the more refined ability to manage attentional resources over time in an economic and adaptive fashion appears during early school years, dramatically improves until the early teen years, and continues to develop into late adolescence. Across studies, parameters of attention control over time predict specific aspects of academic performance, rather than general intellectual ability. We conclude that the ability to strategically regulate the dynamic allocation of attention at rapid rates may represent an important element of cognitive and academic development. PMID:22905028

  19. Study of selected phenotype switching strategies in time varying environment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Horvath, Denis; Brutovsky, Branislav

    2016-03-01

    Population heterogeneity plays an important role across many research, as well as the real-world, problems. The population heterogeneity relates to the ability of a population to cope with an environment change (or uncertainty) preventing its extinction. However, this ability is not always desirable as can be exemplified by an intratumor heterogeneity which positively correlates with the development of resistance to therapy. Causation of population heterogeneity is therefore in biology and medicine an intensively studied topic. In this paper the evolution of a specific strategy of population diversification, the phenotype switching, is studied at a conceptual level. The presented simulation model studies evolution of a large population of asexual organisms in a time-varying environment represented by a stochastic Markov process. Each organism disposes with a stochastic or nonlinear deterministic switching strategy realized by discrete-time models with evolvable parameters. We demonstrate that under rapidly varying exogenous conditions organisms operate in the vicinity of the bet-hedging strategy, while the deterministic patterns become relevant as the environmental variations are less frequent. Statistical characterization of the steady state regimes of the populations is done using the Hellinger and Kullback-Leibler functional distances and the Hamming distance.

  20. Dissecting protein-induced DNA looping dynamics in real time

    PubMed Central

    Laurens, Niels; Bellamy, Stuart R. W.; Harms, August F.; Kovacheva, Yana S.; Halford, Stephen E.; Wuite, Gijs J. L.

    2009-01-01

    Many proteins that interact with DNA perform or enhance their specific functions by binding simultaneously to multiple target sites, thereby inducing a loop in the DNA. The dynamics and energies involved in this loop formation influence the reaction mechanism. Tethered particle motion has proven a powerful technique to study in real time protein-induced DNA looping dynamics while minimally perturbing the DNA–protein interactions. In addition, it permits many single-molecule experiments to be performed in parallel. Using as a model system the tetrameric Type II restriction enzyme SfiI, that binds two copies of its recognition site, we show here that we can determine the DNA–protein association and dissociation steps as well as the actual process of protein-induced loop capture and release on a single DNA molecule. The result of these experiments is a quantitative reaction scheme for DNA looping by SfiI that is rigorously compared to detailed biochemical studies of SfiI looping dynamics. We also present novel methods for data analysis and compare and discuss these with existing methods. The general applicability of the introduced techniques will further enhance tethered particle motion as a tool to follow DNA–protein dynamics in real time. PMID:19586932

  1. Timing of Initiation of RRT and Modality Selection

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    There is no shortage of studies and registry data examining outcomes of patients on dialysis and those with a renal transplant. However, recently, there has been a greater focus on the events leading up to the institution of kidney replacement therapy. Associative data suggest that early and consistent predialysis care leads to better outcomes, including greater take-on to home-based therapy, diminished use of tunneled venous hemodialysis catheters, and improved early and even late survival. What transpires during predialysis visits is also important. Simple dissemination of facts to the unprepared patient is unlikely to be effective in moving the patient and family along in the process of the series of choices that have to be made around therapy. A more flexible and circumspect approach is needed, including recognizing when the patient is or is not ready for change. There seems to be no optimal timing of dialysis start that can be applied to the ESRD population as a whole, although the pendulum seems to be swinging back toward symptom-based rather than eGFR-based starts. PMID:25762523

  2. Timing of Initiation of RRT and Modality Selection.

    PubMed

    Bargman, Joanne M

    2015-06-01

    There is no shortage of studies and registry data examining outcomes of patients on dialysis and those with a renal transplant. However, recently, there has been a greater focus on the events leading up to the institution of kidney replacement therapy. Associative data suggest that early and consistent predialysis care leads to better outcomes, including greater take-on to home-based therapy, diminished use of tunneled venous hemodialysis catheters, and improved early and even late survival. What transpires during predialysis visits is also important. Simple dissemination of facts to the unprepared patient is unlikely to be effective in moving the patient and family along in the process of the series of choices that have to be made around therapy. A more flexible and circumspect approach is needed, including recognizing when the patient is or is not ready for change. There seems to be no optimal timing of dialysis start that can be applied to the ESRD population as a whole, although the pendulum seems to be swinging back toward symptom-based rather than eGFR-based starts. PMID:25762523

  3. SELECTIVE AND NON-SELECTIVE METALLOPROTEINASE INHIBITORS REDUCE IL-1-INDUCED CARTILAGE DEGRADATION AND LOSS OF MECHANICAL PROPERTIES

    PubMed Central

    Wilson, Christopher G.; Palmer, Ashley W.; Zuo, Fengrong; Eugui, Elsie; Wilson, Stacy; Mackenzie, Rebecca; Sandy, John D.; Levenston, Marc E.

    2015-01-01

    Articular cartilage undergoes matrix degradation and loss of mechanical properties when stimulated with proinflammatory cytokines such as interleukin-1 (IL-1). Aggrecanases and matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs) are thought to be principal downstream effectors of cytokine-induced matrix catabolism, and aggrecanase- or MMP-selective inhibitors reduce or block matrix destruction in several model systems. The objective of this study was to use metalloproteinase inhibitors to perturb IL-1-induced matrix catabolism in bovine cartilage explants and examine their effects on changes in tissue compression and shear properties. Explanted tissue was stimulated with IL-1 for up to 24 days in the absence or presence of inhibitors which were aggrecanase-selective, MMP-selective, or non-selective. Analysis of conditioned media and explant digests revealed that aggrecanase-mediated aggrecanolysis was delayed to varying extents with all inhibitor treatments, but that aggrecan release persisted. Collagen degradation was abrogated by MMP- and non-selective inhibitors and reduced by the aggrecanase inhibitor. The inhibitors delayed but did not reduce loss of the equilibrium compression modulus, whereas the loss of dynamic compression and shear moduli was delayed and reduced. The data suggest that non-metalloproteinase mechanisms participate in IL-1-induced matrix degradation and loss of tissue material properties. PMID:17174540

  4. Parity-time-symmetry enhanced optomechanically-induced-transparency

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Wenlin; Jiang, Yunfeng; Li, Chong; Song, Heshan

    2016-08-01

    We propose and analyze a scheme to enhance optomechanically-induced-transparency (OMIT) based on parity-time-symmetric optomechanical system. Our results predict that an OMIT window which does not exist originally can appear in weak optomechanical coupling and driving system via coupling an auxiliary active cavity with optical gain. This phenomenon is quite different from these reported in previous works in which the gain is considered just to damage OMIT phenomenon even leads to electromagnetically induced absorption or inverted-OMIT. Such enhanced OMIT effects are ascribed to the additional gain which can increase photon number in cavity without reducing effective decay. We also discuss the scheme feasibility by analyzing recent experiment parameters. Our work provide a promising platform for the coherent manipulation and slow light operation, which has potential applications for quantum information processing and quantum optical device.

  5. Parity-time-symmetry enhanced optomechanically-induced-transparency

    PubMed Central

    Li, Wenlin; Jiang, Yunfeng; Li, Chong; Song, Heshan

    2016-01-01

    We propose and analyze a scheme to enhance optomechanically-induced-transparency (OMIT) based on parity-time-symmetric optomechanical system. Our results predict that an OMIT window which does not exist originally can appear in weak optomechanical coupling and driving system via coupling an auxiliary active cavity with optical gain. This phenomenon is quite different from these reported in previous works in which the gain is considered just to damage OMIT phenomenon even leads to electromagnetically induced absorption or inverted-OMIT. Such enhanced OMIT effects are ascribed to the additional gain which can increase photon number in cavity without reducing effective decay. We also discuss the scheme feasibility by analyzing recent experiment parameters. Our work provide a promising platform for the coherent manipulation and slow light operation, which has potential applications for quantum information processing and quantum optical device. PMID:27489193

  6. Parity-time-symmetry enhanced optomechanically-induced-transparency.

    PubMed

    Li, Wenlin; Jiang, Yunfeng; Li, Chong; Song, Heshan

    2016-01-01

    We propose and analyze a scheme to enhance optomechanically-induced-transparency (OMIT) based on parity-time-symmetric optomechanical system. Our results predict that an OMIT window which does not exist originally can appear in weak optomechanical coupling and driving system via coupling an auxiliary active cavity with optical gain. This phenomenon is quite different from these reported in previous works in which the gain is considered just to damage OMIT phenomenon even leads to electromagnetically induced absorption or inverted-OMIT. Such enhanced OMIT effects are ascribed to the additional gain which can increase photon number in cavity without reducing effective decay. We also discuss the scheme feasibility by analyzing recent experiment parameters. Our work provide a promising platform for the coherent manipulation and slow light operation, which has potential applications for quantum information processing and quantum optical device. PMID:27489193

  7. Denoising time-domain induced polarisation data using wavelet techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Deo, Ravin N.; Cull, James P.

    2016-05-01

    Time-domain induced polarisation (TDIP) methods are routinely used for near-surface evaluations in quasi-urban environments harbouring networks of buried civil infrastructure. A conventional technique for improving signal to noise ratio in such environments is by using analogue or digital low-pass filtering followed by stacking and rectification. However, this induces large distortions in the processed data. In this study, we have conducted the first application of wavelet based denoising techniques for processing raw TDIP data. Our investigation included laboratory and field measurements to better understand the advantages and limitations of this technique. It was found that distortions arising from conventional filtering can be significantly avoided with the use of wavelet based denoising techniques. With recent advances in full-waveform acquisition and analysis, incorporation of wavelet denoising techniques can further enhance surveying capabilities. In this work, we present the rationale for utilising wavelet denoising methods and discuss some important implications, which can positively influence TDIP methods.

  8. Select forms of tumor cell apoptosis induce dendritic cell maturation.

    PubMed

    Demaria, Sandra; Santori, Fabio R; Ng, Bruce; Liebes, Leonard; Formenti, Silvia C; Vukmanovic, Stanislav

    2005-03-01

    Dendritic cells (DC) play a crucial role in initiating immune responses to tumors. DC can efficiently present antigens from apoptotic tumor cells, but apoptotic cells are thought to lack the inflammatory signals required to induce DC maturation. Here, we show that apoptosis of 67NR mouse carcinoma cells via the Fas (CD95) pathway or induced by the anticancer drug bortezomib (PS-341) but not by ultraviolet irradiation is associated with the production of maturation signals for DC. These data have important implications for the effects of chemotherapy on antitumor immunity in solid and hematologic malignancies. PMID:15569694

  9. CREB Selectively Controls Learning-Induced Structural Remodeling of Neurons

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Middei, Silvia; Spalloni, Alida; Longone, Patrizia; Pittenger, Christopher; O'Mara, Shane M.; Marie, Helene; Ammassari-Teule, Martine

    2012-01-01

    The modulation of synaptic strength associated with learning is post-synaptically regulated by changes in density and shape of dendritic spines. The transcription factor CREB (cAMP response element binding protein) is required for memory formation and in vitro dendritic spine rearrangements, but its role in learning-induced remodeling of neurons…

  10. Selective cytoprotective effect of histamine on doxorubicin-induced hepatic and cardiac toxicity in animal models

    PubMed Central

    Lamas, DJMartinel; Nicoud, MB; Sterle, HA; Carabajal, E; Tesan, F; Perazzo, JC; Cremaschi, GA; Rivera, ES; Medina, VA

    2015-01-01

    The aim of the present work was to evaluate the potential protective effect of histamine on Doxorubicin (Dox)-induced hepatic and cardiac toxicity in different rodent species and in a triple-negative breast tumor-bearing mice model. Male Sprague Dawley rats and Balb/c mice were divided into four groups: control (received saline), histamine (5 mg/kg for rats and 1 mg/kg for mice, daily subcutaneous injection starting 24 h before treatment with Dox), Dox (2 mg/kg, intraperitoneally injected three times a week for 2 weeks) and Dox+histamine (received both treatments). Tissue toxicity was evaluated by histopathological studies and oxidative stress and biochemical parameters. The combined effect of histamine and Dox was also investigated in vitro and in vivo in human MDA-MB-231 triple-negative breast cancer model. Heart and liver of Dox-treated animals displayed severe histological damage, loss of tissue weight, increased TBARS levels and DNA damage along with an augment in serum creatine kinase-myocardial band. Pretreatment with histamine prevented Dox-induced tissue events producing a significant preservation of the integrity of both rat and mouse myocardium and liver, through the reduction of Dox-induced oxidative stress and apoptosis. Histamine treatment preserved anti-tumor activity of Dox, exhibiting differential cytotoxicity and increasing the Dox-induced inhibition of breast tumor growth. Findings provide preclinical evidence indicating that histamine could be a promising candidate as a selective cytoprotective agent for the treatment of Dox-induced cardiac and hepatic toxicity, and encourage the translation to clinical practice. PMID:27551485

  11. Time-Resolved Aluminum Monoxide Emission Measurements in Laser-Induced Plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Surmick, David; Parigger, Christian

    2014-03-01

    Laser-induced plasmas are useful for diagnostic applications in a wide variety of fields. One application is the creation of laser-induced plasmas on the surface of an aluminum sample to simulate an aluminized flame. In this study, aluminum monoxide emissions are measured to characterize the temperature along the laser-induced plasma as a function of time delay following laser-induced optical breakdown. The breakdown event is achieved by focusing 1064 nanometer laser radiation from an Nd:YAG laser onto the surface of an aluminum sample. Light from the plasma is dispersed with the use of a Czerny-Turner spectrograph, and time resolved emission spectra are recorded with an intensified, gated detector. Temperatures are inferred from the diatomic molecular emissions by fitting the experimentally collected to theoretically calculated spectra using a Nelder-Mead algorithm. For computation of synthetic spectra we utilize accurate line strengths for selected AlO molecular bands. Atomic emissions from aluminum are also investigated in our study of laser-induced plasma.

  12. Selective inhibition of human inducible nitric oxide synthase by S-alkyl-L-isothiocitrulline-containing dipeptides.

    PubMed

    Park, J M; Higuchi, T; Kikuchi, K; Urano, Y; Hori, H; Nishino, T; Aoki, J; Inoue, K; Nagano, T

    2001-04-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the structure-activity relationship of S-alkyl-L-isothiocitrulline-containing dipeptides towards three partially purified recombinant human nitric oxide synthase (NOS) isozymes, as well as the effects of these compounds on cytokine-induced NO production by human DLD-1 cells. In an in vitro assay, S-methyl-L-isothiocitrulline (L-MIT) was slightly selective for human neuronal NOS (nNOS) over the inducible (iNOS) or endothelial (eNOS) isozyme, but the combination of a hydrophobic L-amino acid (L-Phe, L-Leu or L-Trp) with L-MIT dramatically altered the inhibition pattern to give selective iNOS inhibitors. Introduction of a hydroxy, nitro, amino or methoxy group at the para position of the aromatic ring of L-MIT-L-Phe (MILF) decreased the selectivity and inhibitory potency. A longer or larger S-alkyl group also decreased the selectivity and potency. Dixon analysis showed that all of the dipeptides were competitive inhibitors of the three isoforms of human NOS. The enzymatic time course curves indicated that MILF was a slow binding inhibitor of human iNOS. These results suggest that the human NOS isozymes have different-sized cavities in the binding site near the position to which the C-terminal of L-arginine binds, and the cavity of iNOS is hydrophobic. Interestingly, L-MIT-D-Phe (MIDF) showed little inhibitory activity or selectivity, suggesting that the cavity of human iNOS is located in a well-defined direction from the alpha carbon atom. NO production in cytokine-stimulated human DLD-1 cells was measured with a fluorescent indicator, DAF-FM. MILF, L-MIT-L-Trp(-CHO) (MILW) and L-MIT-L-Tyr (MILY) showed more potent activity than L-MIT in this whole-cell assay. Thus, S-alkyl-L-isothiocitrulline-containing dipeptides are selective inhibitors of human iNOS, and work efficiently in cell-based assay. PMID:11309260

  13. Selective inhibition of human inducible nitric oxide synthase by S-alkyl-L-isothiocitrulline-containing dipeptides

    PubMed Central

    Park, Jung-Min; Higuchi, Tsunehiko; Kikuchi, Kazuya; Urano, Yasuteru; Hori, Hiroyuki; Nishino, Takeshi; Aoki, Junken; Inoue, Keizo; Nagano, Tetsuo

    2001-01-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the structure-activity relationship of S-alkyl-L-isothiocitrulline-containing dipeptides towards three partially purified recombinant human nitric oxide synthase (NOS) isozymes, as well as the effects of these compounds on cytokine-induced NO production by human DLD-1 cells.In an in vitro assay, S-methyl-L-isothiocitrulline (L-MIT) was slightly selective for human neuronal NOS (nNOS) over the inducible (iNOS) or endothelial (eNOS) isozyme, but the combination of a hydrophobic L-amino acid (L-Phe, L-Leu or L-Trp) with L-MIT dramatically altered the inhibition pattern to give selective iNOS inhibitors. Introduction of a hydroxy, nitro, amino or methoxy group at the para position of the aromatic ring of L-MIT-L-Phe (MILF) decreased the selectivity and inhibitory potency. A longer or larger S-alkyl group also decreased the selectivity and potency. Dixon analysis showed that all of the dipeptides were competitive inhibitors of the three isoforms of human NOS. The enzymatic time course curves indicated that MILF was a slow binding inhibitor of human iNOS.These results suggest that the human NOS isozymes have different-sized cavities in the binding site near the position to which the C-terminal of L-arginine binds, and the cavity of iNOS is hydrophobic. Interestingly, L-MIT-D-Phe (MIDF) showed little inhibitory activity or selectivity, suggesting that the cavity of human iNOS is located in a well-defined direction from the α carbon atom.NO production in cytokine-stimulated human DLD-1 cells was measured with a fluorescent indicator, DAF-FM. MILF, L-MIT-L-Trp(-CHO) (MILW) and L-MIT-L-Tyr (MILY) showed more potent activity than L-MIT in this whole-cell assay.Thus, S-alkyl-L-isothiocitrulline-containing dipeptides are selective inhibitors of human iNOS, and work efficiently in cell-based assay. PMID:11309260

  14. Debye decomposition of time-lapse spectral induced polarisation data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weigand, M.; Kemna, A.

    2016-01-01

    Spectral induced polarisation (SIP) measurements capture the low-frequency electrical properties of soils and rocks and provide a non-invasive means to access lithological, hydrogeological, and geochemical properties of the subsurface. The Debye decomposition (DD) approach is now increasingly being used to analyse SIP signatures in terms of relaxation time distributions due to its flexibility regarding the shape of the spectra. Imaging and time-lapse (monitoring) SIP measurements, capturing SIP variations in space and time, respectively, are now more and more conducted and lead to a drastic increase in the number of spectra considered, which prompts the need for robust and reliable DD tools to extract quantitative parameters from such data. We here present an implementation of the DD method for the analysis of a series of SIP data sets which are expected to only smoothly change in terms of spectral behaviour, such as encountered in many time-lapse applications where measurement geometry does not change. The routine is based on a non-linear least-squares inversion scheme with smoothness constraints on the spectral variation and in addition from one spectrum of the series to the next to deal with the inherent ill-posedness and non-uniqueness of the problem. By means of synthetic examples with typical SIP characteristics we elucidate the influence of the number and range of considered relaxation times on the inversion results. The source code of the presented routines is provided under an open source licence as a basis for further applications and developments.

  15. Method for selectively orienting induced fractures in subterranean earth formations

    DOEpatents

    Shuck, Lowell Z.

    1977-02-01

    The orientation of hydraulically-induced fractures in relatively deep subterranean earth formations is normally confined to vertical projections along a plane parallel to the maximum naturally occurring (tectonic) compressive stress field. It was found that this plane of maximum compressive stress may be negated and, in effect, re-oriented in a plane projecting generally orthogonal to the original tectonic stress plane by injecting liquid at a sufficiently high pressure into a wellbore fracture oriented in a plane parallel to the plane of tectonic stress for the purpose of stressing the surrounding earth formation in a plane generally orthogonal to the plane of tectonic stress. With the plane of maximum compressive stress re-oriented due to the presence of the induced compressive stress, liquid under pressure is injected into a second wellbore disposed within the zone influenced by the induced compressive stress but at a location in the earth formation laterally spaced from the fracture in the first wellbore for effecting a fracture in the second wellbore along a plane generally orthogonal to the fracture in the first wellbore.

  16. Sequence selectivity of macrolide-induced translational attenuation

    PubMed Central

    Davis, Amber R.; Gohara, David W.; Yap, Mee-Ngan F.

    2014-01-01

    The prevailing “plug-in-the-bottle” model suggests that macrolide antibiotics inhibit translation by binding inside the ribosome tunnel and indiscriminately arresting the elongation of every nascent polypeptide after the synthesis of six to eight amino acids. To test this model, we performed a genome-wide analysis of translation in azithromycin-treated Staphylococcus aureus. In contrast to earlier predictions, we found that the macrolide does not preferentially induce ribosome stalling near the 5′ end of mRNAs, but rather acts at specific stalling sites that are scattered throughout the entire coding region. These sites are highly enriched in prolines and charged residues and are strikingly similar to other ligand-independent ribosome stalling motifs. Interestingly, the addition of structurally related macrolides had dramatically different effects on stalling efficiency. Our data suggest that ribosome stalling can occur at a surprisingly large number of low-complexity motifs in a fashion that depends only on a few arrest-inducing residues and the presence of a small molecule inducer. PMID:25313041

  17. Time-resolved electric-field-induced second harmonic

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meshulam, Guilia; Berkovic, Garry; Kotler, Zvi

    2001-12-01

    One limitation of using electric field induced second harmonic (EFISH) to determine the molecular first hyperpolarizability (beta) of nonlinear optical molecules lies in the fact that part of the second harmonic signal comes from the second hyperpolarizability (gamma) produced by mixing two optical fields with the DC field. In analyzing EFISH results, the second hyperpolarizability contribution of the studied molecules is generally neglected. We present a modified time resolved EFISH technique that allows us, in a single experiment, to determine separately the beta and the gamma contributions. We study para-nitro aniline dissolved in Glycerol, a highly viscous solvent, and apply the DC field via a high voltage pulse with a fast rise time of approximately 40 nsec. As a result, the orientation of the molecules under the applied electric field is slow relative to the build-up of the field, enabling us to directly measure only the DC induced second harmonic (gamma contribution), at the beginning of the HV pulse. The pure beta contribution is determined from the difference between this signal and the conventional EFISH signal at the plateau of the HV pulse. Our result confirm that the gamma contribution is indeed less than 10% of the total.

  18. A Small Molecule Inhibitor Selectively Induces Apoptosis in Cells Transformed by High Risk Human Papilloma Viruses

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Min S.; Qi, Huilin; Chaniewski, Susan; Zheng, Xiaofan; Farr, Glen A.; Esposito, Kim; Harden, David; Lei, Ming; Schweizer, Liang; Friborg, Jacques; Agler, Michele; McPhee, Fiona; Gentles, Robert; Beno, Brett R.; Chupak, Lou; Mason, Stephen

    2016-01-01

    A phenotypic high-throughput cell culture screen was performed to identify compounds that prevented proliferation of the human Papilloma virus type 16 (HPV-16) transformed cell line Ca Ski. A series of quinoxaline compounds exemplified by Compound 1 was identified. Testing against a panel of cell lines demonstrated that Compound 1 selectively inhibited replication of all HPV-16, HPV-18, and HPV-31 transformed cell lines tested with 50% Inhibitory Concentration (IC50) values of 2 to 8 μM relative to IC50 values of 28 to 73 μM in HPV-negative cell lines. Treatment with Compound 1 resulted in a cascade of multiple apoptotic events, including selective activation of effector caspases 3 and 7, fragmentation of cellular DNA, and PARP (poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase) cleavage in HPV-positive cells relative to HPV-negative cells. Unregulated proliferation of HPV transformed cells is dependent on the viral oncogenes, E6 and E7. Treatment with Compound 1 resulted in a decrease in HPV E7 protein in Ca Ski cells. However, the timing of this reduction relative to other effects of compound treatment suggests that this was a consequence, rather than a cause, of the apoptotic cascade. Likewise, compound treatment resulted in no obvious effects on the E6- and E7- mediated down regulation of p53 and Rb, or their downstream effectors, p21 or PCNA. Further investigation of apoptotic signals induced by Compound 1 revealed cleavage of Caspase-8 in HPV-positive cells as early as 2 hours post-treatment, suggesting the compound initiates apoptosis through the extrinsic, death receptor-mediated, pathway of cell death. These studies provide proof of concept that cells transformed by oncogenic Papillomaviruses can be selectively induced to undergo apoptosis by compound treatment. PMID:27280728

  19. A Small Molecule Inhibitor Selectively Induces Apoptosis in Cells Transformed by High Risk Human Papilloma Viruses.

    PubMed

    Sheaffer, Amy K; Lee, Min S; Qi, Huilin; Chaniewski, Susan; Zheng, Xiaofan; Farr, Glen A; Esposito, Kim; Harden, David; Lei, Ming; Schweizer, Liang; Friborg, Jacques; Agler, Michele; McPhee, Fiona; Gentles, Robert; Beno, Brett R; Chupak, Lou; Mason, Stephen

    2016-01-01

    A phenotypic high-throughput cell culture screen was performed to identify compounds that prevented proliferation of the human Papilloma virus type 16 (HPV-16) transformed cell line Ca Ski. A series of quinoxaline compounds exemplified by Compound 1 was identified. Testing against a panel of cell lines demonstrated that Compound 1 selectively inhibited replication of all HPV-16, HPV-18, and HPV-31 transformed cell lines tested with 50% Inhibitory Concentration (IC50) values of 2 to 8 μM relative to IC50 values of 28 to 73 μM in HPV-negative cell lines. Treatment with Compound 1 resulted in a cascade of multiple apoptotic events, including selective activation of effector caspases 3 and 7, fragmentation of cellular DNA, and PARP (poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase) cleavage in HPV-positive cells relative to HPV-negative cells. Unregulated proliferation of HPV transformed cells is dependent on the viral oncogenes, E6 and E7. Treatment with Compound 1 resulted in a decrease in HPV E7 protein in Ca Ski cells. However, the timing of this reduction relative to other effects of compound treatment suggests that this was a consequence, rather than a cause, of the apoptotic cascade. Likewise, compound treatment resulted in no obvious effects on the E6- and E7- mediated down regulation of p53 and Rb, or their downstream effectors, p21 or PCNA. Further investigation of apoptotic signals induced by Compound 1 revealed cleavage of Caspase-8 in HPV-positive cells as early as 2 hours post-treatment, suggesting the compound initiates apoptosis through the extrinsic, death receptor-mediated, pathway of cell death. These studies provide proof of concept that cells transformed by oncogenic Papillomaviruses can be selectively induced to undergo apoptosis by compound treatment. PMID:27280728

  20. Exploring the influential factors in incident clearance time: Disentangling causation from self-selection bias.

    PubMed

    Ding, Chuan; Ma, Xiaolei; Wang, Yinhai; Wang, Yunpeng

    2015-12-01

    Understanding the relationships between influential factors and incident clearance time is crucial to make effective countermeasures for incident management agencies. Although there have been a certain number of achievements on incident clearance time modeling, limited effort is made to investigate the relative role of incident response time and its self-selection in influencing the clearance time. To fill this gap, this study uses the endogenous switching model to explore the influential factors in incident clearance time, and aims to disentangle causation from self-selection bias caused by response process. Under the joint two-stage model framework, the binary probit model and switching regression model are formulated for both incident response time and clearance time, respectively. Based on the freeway incident data collected in Washington State, full information maximum likelihood (FIML) method is utilized to estimate the endogenous switching model parameters. Significant factors affecting incident response time and clearance time can be identified, including incident, temporal, geographical, environmental, traffic and operational attributes. The estimate results reveal the influential effects of incident, temporal, geographical, environmental, traffic and operational factors on incident response time and clearance time. In addition, the causality of incident response time itself and its self-selection correction on incident clearance time are found to be indispensable. These findings suggest that the causal effect of response time on incident clearance time will be overestimated if the self-selection bias is not considered. PMID:26373988

  1. A Locked Nucleic Acid Probe Based on Selective Salt-Induced Effect Detects Single Nucleotide Polymorphisms

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Jing; Wu, Huizhe; Chen, Qiuchen; Zhao, Pengfei; Zhao, Haishan; Yao, Weifan; Wei, Minjie

    2015-01-01

    Detection of single based genetic mutation by using oligonucleotide probes is one of the common methods of detecting single nucleotide polymorphisms at known loci. In this paper, we demonstrated a hybridization system which included a buffer solution that produced selective salt-induced effect and a locked nucleic acid modified 12 nt oligonucleotide probe. The hybridization system is suitable for hybridization under room temperature. By using magnetic nanoparticles as carriers for PCR products, the SNPs (MDR1 C3435T/A) from 45 volunteers were analyzed, and the results were consistent with the results from pyrophosphoric acid sequencing. The method presented in this paper differs from the traditional method of using molecular beacons to detect SNPs in that it is suitable for research institutions lacking real-time quantitative PCR detecting systems, to detect PCR products at room temperature. PMID:26347880

  2. Neuronal polarity selection by topography-induced focal adhesion control.

    PubMed

    Ferrari, Aldo; Cecchini, Marco; Serresi, Michela; Faraci, Paolo; Pisignano, Dario; Beltram, Fabio

    2010-06-01

    Interaction between differentiating neurons and the extracellular environment guides the establishment of cell polarity during nervous system development. Developing neurons read the physical properties of the local substrate in a contact-dependent manner and retrieve essential guidance cues. In previous works we demonstrated that PC12 cell interaction with nanogratings (alternating lines of ridges and grooves of submicron size) promotes bipolarity and alignment to the substrate topography. Here, we investigate the role of focal adhesions, cell contractility, and actin dynamics in this process. Exploiting nanoimprint lithography techniques and a cyclic olefin copolymer, we engineered biocompatible nanostructured substrates designed for high-resolution live-cell microscopy. Our results reveal that neuronal polarization and contact guidance are based on a geometrical constraint of focal adhesions resulting in an angular modulation of their maturation and persistence. We report on ROCK1/2-myosin-II pathway activity and demonstrate that ROCK-mediated contractility contributes to polarity selection during neuronal differentiation. Importantly, the selection process confined the generation of actin-supported membrane protrusions and the initiation of new neurites at the poles. Maintenance of the established polarity was independent from NGF stimulation. Altogether our results imply that focal adhesions and cell contractility stably link the topographical configuration of the extracellular environment to a corresponding neuronal polarity state. PMID:20304485

  3. An integrated analysis of phenotypic selection on insect body size and development time.

    PubMed

    Eck, Daniel J; Shaw, Ruth G; Geyer, Charles J; Kingsolver, Joel G

    2015-09-01

    Most studies of phenotypic selection do not estimate selection or fitness surfaces for multiple components of fitness within a unified statistical framework. This makes it difficult or impossible to assess how selection operates on traits through variation in multiple components of fitness. We describe a new generation of aster models that can evaluate phenotypic selection by accounting for timing of life-history transitions and their effect on population growth rate, in addition to survival and reproductive output. We use this approach to estimate selection on body size and development time for a field population of the herbivorous insect, Manduca sexta (Lepidoptera: Sphingidae). Estimated fitness surfaces revealed strong and significant directional selection favoring both larger adult size (via effects on egg counts) and more rapid rates of early larval development (via effects on larval survival). Incorporating the timing of reproduction and its influence on population growth rate into the analysis resulted in larger values for size in early larval development at which fitness is maximized, and weaker selection on size in early larval development. These results illustrate how the interplay of different components of fitness can influence selection on size and development time. This integrated modeling framework can be readily applied to studies of phenotypic selection via multiple fitness components in other systems. PMID:26257167

  4. Selective Serotonin–norepinephrine Reuptake Inhibitors-induced Takotsubo Cardiomyopathy

    PubMed Central

    Vasudev, Rahul; Rampal, Upamanyu; Patel, Hiten; Patel, Kunal; Bikkina, Mahesh; Shamoon, Fayez

    2016-01-01

    Context: Takotsubo translates to “octopus pot” in Japanese. Takotsubo cardiomyopathy (TTC) is characterized by a transient regional systolic dysfunction of the left ventricle. Catecholamine excess is the one most studied and favored theories explaining the pathophysiology of TTC. Case Report: We present the case of a 52-year-old Hispanic female admitted for venlafaxine-induced TTC with a review literature on all the cases of Serotonin–norepinephrine reuptake inhibitors (SNRI)-associated TTC published so far. Conclusion: SNRI inhibit the reuptake of catecholamines into the presynaptic neuron, resulting in a net gain in the concentration of epinephrine and serotonin in the neuronal synapses and causing iatrogenic catecholamine excess, ultimately leading to TTC. PMID:27583240

  5. Optimal Selection of Parameters for Nonuniform Embedding of Chaotic Time Series Using Ant Colony Optimization.

    PubMed

    Shen, Meie; Chen, Wei-Neng; Zhang, Jun; Chung, Henry Shu-Hung; Kaynak, Okyay

    2013-04-01

    The optimal selection of parameters for time-delay embedding is crucial to the analysis and the forecasting of chaotic time series. Although various parameter selection techniques have been developed for conventional uniform embedding methods, the study of parameter selection for nonuniform embedding is progressed at a slow pace. In nonuniform embedding, which enables different dimensions to have different time delays, the selection of time delays for different dimensions presents a difficult optimization problem with combinatorial explosion. To solve this problem efficiently, this paper proposes an ant colony optimization (ACO) approach. Taking advantage of the characteristic of incremental solution construction of the ACO, the proposed ACO for nonuniform embedding (ACO-NE) divides the solution construction procedure into two phases, i.e., selection of embedding dimension and selection of time delays. In this way, both the embedding dimension and the time delays can be optimized, along with the search process of the algorithm. To accelerate search speed, we extract useful information from the original time series to define heuristics to guide the search direction of ants. Three geometry- or model-based criteria are used to test the performance of the algorithm. The optimal embeddings found by the algorithm are also applied in time-series forecasting. Experimental results show that the ACO-NE is able to yield good embedding solutions from both the viewpoints of optimization performance and prediction accuracy. PMID:23144038

  6. Correlation-induced Time Delay in Atomic Photoionization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Keating, David A.; Manson, Steven T.; Deshmukh, Pranawa C.; Kheifets, Anatoli S.

    2016-05-01

    Interchannel coupling has been seen to result in structures in the photoionization cross sections of outer shell electrons in the vicinity of inner-shell thresholds, a result which leads us to ask if the same would be true for the time delay of outer shell electrons near inner-shell thresholds. Using the relativistic-random-phase approximation (RRPA) methodology, a theoretical study of neon, argon, krypton, and xenon were performed to search for these correlation-induced effects. Calculations were performed both with coupling and without coupling to verify that the structures found in the time delay were in fact due to interchannel coupling. Using this method to study the effects of interchannel coupling reveals how much of an impact the coupling has on the time delay, in some cases over a broad energy range. In cases where the spin-orbit doublets' respective thresholds are far enough apart, effects can be found in the j = l + 1/2channels due to interchannel coupling with the j = l-1/2 channels. These structures are purely a relativistic effect and are related to spin-obit activated interchannel coupling effects. Work supported by DOE, Office of Chemical Sciences, DST (India), and the Australian Research Council.

  7. Optomechanically-induced transparency in parity-time-symmetric microresonators.

    PubMed

    Jing, H; Özdemir, Şahin K; Geng, Z; Zhang, Jing; Lü, Xin-You; Peng, Bo; Yang, Lan; Nori, Franco

    2015-01-01

    Optomechanically-induced transparency (OMIT) and the associated slowing of light provide the basis for storing photons in nanoscale devices. Here we study OMIT in parity-time (PT)-symmetric microresonators with a tunable gain-to-loss ratio. This system features a sideband-reversed, non-amplifying transparency, i.e., an inverted-OMIT. When the gain-to-loss ratio is varied, the system exhibits a transition from a PT-symmetric phase to a broken-PT-symmetric phase. This PT-phase transition results in the reversal of the pump and gain dependence of the transmission rates. Moreover, we show that by tuning the pump power at a fixed gain-to-loss ratio, or the gain-to-loss ratio at a fixed pump power, one can switch from slow to fast light and vice versa. These findings provide new tools for controlling light propagation using nanofabricated phononic devices. PMID:26169253

  8. 76 FR 46840 - Time Extension To Accept Proposals, Select One Lessee, and Contract for Hydroelectric Power...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-08-03

    ... notice was originally published in the Federal Register on April 20, 2011 (76 FR 22143). The due date was... Bureau of Reclamation Time Extension To Accept Proposals, Select One Lessee, and Contract for... proposals detailed in the Notice of Intent to Accept Proposals, Select One Lessee, and Contract...

  9. Radiation-induced lung damage: dose-time-fractionation considerations.

    PubMed

    Van Dyk, J; Mah, K; Keane, T J

    1989-01-01

    The comparison of different dose-time-fractionation schedules requires the use of an isoeffect formula. In recent years, the NSD isoeffect formula has been heavily criticized. In this report, we consider an isoeffect formula which is specifically developed for radiation-induced lung damage. The formula is based on the linear-quadratic model and includes a factor for overall treatment time. The proposed procedures allow for the simultaneous derivation of an alpha/beta ratio and a gamma/beta time factor. From animal data in the literature, the derived alpha/beta and gamma/beta ratios for acute lung damage are 5.0 +/- 1.0 Gy and 2.7 +/- 1.4 Gy2/day respectively, while for late damage the suggested values are 2.0 Gy and 0.0 Gy2/day. Data from two clinical studies, one prospective and the other retrospective, were also analysed and corresponding alpha/beta and gamma/beta ratios were determined. For the prospective clinical study, with a limited range of doses per fraction, the resultant alpha/beta and gamma/beta ratios were 0.9 +/- 2.6 Gy and 2.6 +/- 2.5 Gy2/day. The combination of the retrospective and prospective data yielded alpha/beta and gamma/beta ratios of 3.3 +/- 1.5 Gy and 2.4 +/- 1.5 Gy2/day, respectively. One potential advantage of this isoeffect formalism is that it might possibly be applied to both acute and late lung damage. The results of this formulation for acute lung damage indicate that time-dependent effects such as slow repair or proliferation might be more important in determining isoeffect doses than previously predicted by the estimated single dose (ED) formula. Although we present this as an alternative approach, we would caution against its clinical use until its applicability has been confirmed by additional clinical data. PMID:2928557

  10. Role and Mechanism of Microglial Activation in Iron-Induced Selective and Progressive Dopaminergic Neurodegeneration

    PubMed Central

    Yan, Zhao-fen; Gao, Jun-hua; Sun, Li; Huang, Xi-yan; Liu, Zhuo; Yu, Shu-yang; Cao, Chen-Jie; Zuo, Li-jun; Chen, Ze-Jie; Hu, Yang; Wang, Fang; Hong, Jau-shyong; Wang, Xiao-min

    2016-01-01

    Parkinson’s disease (PD) patients have excessive iron depositions in substantia nigra (SN). Neuroinflammation characterized by microglial activation is pivotal for dopaminergic neurodegeneration in PD. However, the role and mechanism of microglial activation in iron-induced dopaminergic neurodegeneration in SN remain unclear yet. This study aimed to investigate the role and mechanism of microglial β-nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide phosphate oxidase 2 (NOX2) activation in iron-induced selective and progressive dopaminergic neurodegeneration. Multiple primary midbrain cultures from rat, NOX2+/+ and NOX2−/− mice were used. Dopaminergic neurons, total neurons, and microglia were visualized by immunostainings. Cell viability was measured by MTT assay. Superoxide (O2·−) and intracellular reactive oxygen species (iROS) were determined by measuring SOD-inhibitable reduction of tetrazolium salt WST-1 and DCFH-DA assay. mRNA and protein were detected by real-time PCR and Western blot. Iron induces selective and progressive dopaminergic neurotoxicity in rat neuron–microglia–astroglia cultures and microglial activation potentiates the neurotoxicity. Activated microglia produce a magnitude of O2·− and iROS, and display morphological alteration. NOX2 inhibitor diphenylene iodonium protects against iron-elicited dopaminergic neurotoxicity through decreasing microglial O2·− generation, and NOX2−/− mice are resistant to the neurotoxicity by reducing microglial O2·− production, indicating that iron-elicited dopaminergic neurotoxicity is dependent of NOX2, a O2·−-generating enzyme. NOX2 activation is indicated by the increased mRNA and protein levels of subunits P47 and gp91. Molecules relevant to NOX2 activation include PKC-σ, P38, ERK1/2, JNK, and NF-ΚBP65 as their mRNA and protein levels are enhanced by NOX2 activation. Iron causes selective and progressive dopaminergic neurodegeneration, and microglial NOX2 activation potentiates the

  11. Statistical Inference of Selection and Divergence from a Time-Dependent Poisson Random Field Model

    PubMed Central

    Amei, Amei; Sawyer, Stanley

    2012-01-01

    We apply a recently developed time-dependent Poisson random field model to aligned DNA sequences from two related biological species to estimate selection coefficients and divergence time. We use Markov chain Monte Carlo methods to estimate species divergence time and selection coefficients for each locus. The model assumes that the selective effects of non-synonymous mutations are normally distributed across genetic loci but constant within loci, and synonymous mutations are selectively neutral. In contrast with previous models, we do not assume that the individual species are at population equilibrium after divergence. Using a data set of 91 genes in two Drosophila species, D. melanogaster and D. simulans, we estimate the species divergence time (or 1.68 million years, assuming the haploid effective population size years) and a mean selection coefficient per generation . Although the average selection coefficient is positive, the magnitude of the selection is quite small. Results from numerical simulations are also presented as an accuracy check for the time-dependent model. PMID:22509300

  12. Harvest-induced phenotypic selection in an island population of moose, Alces alces.

    PubMed

    Kvalnes, Thomas; Saether, Bernt-Erik; Haanes, Hallvard; Røed, Knut H; Engen, Steinar; Solberg, Erling J

    2016-07-01

    Empirical evidence strongly indicates that human exploitation has frequently led to rapid evolutionary changes in wild populations, yet the mechanisms involved are often poorly understood. Here, we applied a recently developed demographic framework for analyzing selection to data from a 20-year study of a wild population of moose, Alces alces. In this population, a genetic pedigree has been established all the way back to founders. We demonstrate harvest-induced directional selection for delayed birth dates in males and reduced body mass as calf in females. During the study period, birth date was delayed by 0.81 days per year for both sexes, whereas no significant changes occurred in calf body mass. Quantitative genetic analyses indicated that both traits harbored significant additive genetic variance. These results show that selective harvesting can induce strong selection that oppose natural selection. This may cause evolution of less favorable phenotypes that become maladaptive once harvesting ceases. PMID:27174031

  13. Nondestructive nanofabrication on Si(100) surface by tribochemistry-induced selective etching

    PubMed Central

    Guo, Jian; Yu, Bingjun; Chen, Lei; Qian, Linmao

    2015-01-01

    A tribochemistry-induced selective etching approach is proposed for the first time to produce silicon nanostructures without lattice damage. With a ~1 nm thick SiOx film as etching mask grown on Si(100) surface (Si(100)/SiOx) by wet-oxidation technique, nano-trenches can be produced through the removal of local SiOx mask by a SiO2 tip in humid air and the post-etching of the exposed Si in potassium hydroxide (KOH) solution. The material removal of SiOx mask and Si under low load is dominated by the tribochemical reaction at the interface between SiO2 tip and Si/SiOx sample, where the contact pressure is much lower than the critical pressure for initial yield of Si. High resolution transmission electron microscope (HRTEM) observation indicates that neither the material removal induced by tribochemical reaction nor the wet etching in KOH solution leads to lattice damage of the fabricated nanostructures. The proposed approach points out a new route in nondestructive nanofabrication. PMID:26559014

  14. Nondestructive nanofabrication on Si(100) surface by tribochemistry-induced selective etching

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guo, Jian; Yu, Bingjun; Chen, Lei; Qian, Linmao

    2015-11-01

    A tribochemistry-induced selective etching approach is proposed for the first time to produce silicon nanostructures without lattice damage. With a ~1 nm thick SiOx film as etching mask grown on Si(100) surface (Si(100)/SiOx) by wet-oxidation technique, nano-trenches can be produced through the removal of local SiOx mask by a SiO2 tip in humid air and the post-etching of the exposed Si in potassium hydroxide (KOH) solution. The material removal of SiOx mask and Si under low load is dominated by the tribochemical reaction at the interface between SiO2 tip and Si/SiOx sample, where the contact pressure is much lower than the critical pressure for initial yield of Si. High resolution transmission electron microscope (HRTEM) observation indicates that neither the material removal induced by tribochemical reaction nor the wet etching in KOH solution leads to lattice damage of the fabricated nanostructures. The proposed approach points out a new route in nondestructive nanofabrication.

  15. Statin-induced muscle necrosis in the rat: distribution, development, and fibre selectivity.

    PubMed

    Westwood, F Russell; Bigley, Alison; Randall, Kevin; Marsden, Alan M; Scott, Robert C

    2005-01-01

    Simvastatin and cerivastatin have been used to investigate the development of statin-induced muscle necrosis in the rat. This was similar for both statins and was treatment-duration dependent, only occurring after 10 days had elapsed even if the dose was increased, and still occurring after this time when dosing was terminated earlier as a result of morbidity. It was then widespread and affected all areas of the muscular system. However, even when myotoxicity was severe, particular individual muscles and some types of fibres within affected muscles were spared consistently. Fibre typing of spared muscles and of acutely necrotic fibres within affected muscles indicated a differential fibre sensitivity to statin-induced muscle necrosis. The fibres showed a necrotic response to statin administration that matched their oxidative/glycolytic metabolic nature: Least sensitive --> I < - > IIA < - > IID < - > IIB <-- most sensitive. Type I and IIB fibres represent metabolic extremes of a continuum of metabolic properties through the fibre types with type I fibres most oxidative in metabolism and type IIB fibres most glycolytic. In addition, in some (nonnecrotic) glycolytic fibres from muscles showing early multifocal single fibre necrosis the only subcellular alterations present in isolation of any other changes were mitochondrial. These changes were characterised by an increased incidence of vacuolation and the formation of myelinoid vesicular bodies that accumulated in the subsarcolemmal areas. These findings suggest an important early involvement of mitochondria in selective glycolytic muscle fibre necrosis following inhibition of the enzyme HMG-CoA reductase. PMID:15902968

  16. A distant cis acting intronic element induces site-selective RNA editing.

    PubMed

    Daniel, Chammiran; Venø, Morten T; Ekdahl, Ylva; Kjems, Jørgen; Öhman, Marie

    2012-10-01

    Transcripts have been found to be site selectively edited from adenosine-to-inosine (A-to-I) in the mammalian brain, mostly in genes involved in neurotransmission. While A-to-I editing occurs at double-stranded structures, other structural requirements are largely unknown. We have investigated the requirements for editing at the I/M site in the Gabra-3 transcript of the GABA(A) receptor. We identify an evolutionarily conserved intronic duplex, 150 nt downstream of the exonic hairpin where the I/M site resides, which is required for its editing. This is the first time a distant RNA structure has been shown to be important for A-to-I editing. We demonstrate that the element also can induce editing in related but normally not edited RNA sequences. In human, thousands of genes are edited in duplexes formed by inverted repeats in non-coding regions. It is likely that numerous such duplexes can induce editing of coding regions throughout the transcriptome. PMID:22848101

  17. A distant cis acting intronic element induces site-selective RNA editing

    PubMed Central

    Daniel, Chammiran; Venø, Morten T.; Ekdahl, Ylva; Kjems, Jørgen; Öhman, Marie

    2012-01-01

    Transcripts have been found to be site selectively edited from adenosine-to-inosine (A-to-I) in the mammalian brain, mostly in genes involved in neurotransmission. While A-to-I editing occurs at double-stranded structures, other structural requirements are largely unknown. We have investigated the requirements for editing at the I/M site in the Gabra-3 transcript of the GABAA receptor. We identify an evolutionarily conserved intronic duplex, 150 nt downstream of the exonic hairpin where the I/M site resides, which is required for its editing. This is the first time a distant RNA structure has been shown to be important for A-to-I editing. We demonstrate that the element also can induce editing in related but normally not edited RNA sequences. In human, thousands of genes are edited in duplexes formed by inverted repeats in non-coding regions. It is likely that numerous such duplexes can induce editing of coding regions throughout the transcriptome. PMID:22848101

  18. Nondestructive nanofabrication on Si(100) surface by tribochemistry-induced selective etching.

    PubMed

    Guo, Jian; Yu, Bingjun; Chen, Lei; Qian, Linmao

    2015-01-01

    A tribochemistry-induced selective etching approach is proposed for the first time to produce silicon nanostructures without lattice damage. With a ~1 nm thick SiOx film as etching mask grown on Si(100) surface (Si(100)/SiOx) by wet-oxidation technique, nano-trenches can be produced through the removal of local SiOx mask by a SiO2 tip in humid air and the post-etching of the exposed Si in potassium hydroxide (KOH) solution. The material removal of SiOx mask and Si under low load is dominated by the tribochemical reaction at the interface between SiO2 tip and Si/SiOx sample, where the contact pressure is much lower than the critical pressure for initial yield of Si. High resolution transmission electron microscope (HRTEM) observation indicates that neither the material removal induced by tribochemical reaction nor the wet etching in KOH solution leads to lattice damage of the fabricated nanostructures. The proposed approach points out a new route in nondestructive nanofabrication. PMID:26559014

  19. Selective inhibition of inducible cyclooxygenase 2 in vivo is antiinflammatory and nonulcerogenic.

    PubMed Central

    Masferrer, J L; Zweifel, B S; Manning, P T; Hauser, S D; Leahy, K M; Smith, W G; Isakson, P C; Seibert, K

    1994-01-01

    We have examined the role of cyclooxygenase 2 (COX-2) in a model of inflammation in vivo. Carrageenan administration to the subcutaneous rat air pouch induces a rapid inflammatory response characterized by high levels of prostaglandins (PGs) and leukotrienes in the fluid exudate. The time course of the induction of COX-2 mRNA and protein coincided with the production of PGs in the pouch tissue and cellular infiltrate. Carrageenan-induced COX-2 immunoreactivity was localized to macrophages obtained from the fluid exudate as well as to the inner surface layer of cells within the pouch lining. Dexamethasone inhibited both COX-2 expression and PG synthesis in the fluid exudate but failed to inhibit PG synthesis in the stomach. Furthermore, NS-398, a selective COX-2 inhibitor, and indomethacin, a nonselective COX-1/COX-2 inhibitor, blocked proinflammatory PG synthesis in the air pouch. In contrast, only indomethacin blocked gastric PG and, additionally, produced gastric lesions. These results suggest that inhibitors of COX-2 are potent antiinflammatory agents which do not produce the typical side effects (e.g., gastric ulcers) associated with the nonselective, COX-1-directed antiinflammatory drugs. Images PMID:8159730

  20. Strain-induced time-reversal odd superconductivity in graphene

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Juricic, Vladimir; Roy, Bitan

    2014-03-01

    I will discuss the possibility of realizing a time-reversal-symmetry breaking superconducting state that exhibits an f + is pairing symmetry in strained graphene. Although the underlying attractive interactions need to be sufficiently strong and comparable in pristine graphene to support such pairing state, I will argue that strain can be conducive for its formation even for weak interactions. I will show that quantum-critical behavior near the transition is controlled by a fermionic multicritical point, characterized by various critical exponents computed in the framework of an ɛ-expansion near four spacetime dimensions. I will then discuss the scaling of the superconducting gap with the strain-induced axial pseudo-magnetic field. Furthermore, a vortex in this mixed superconducting state hosts a pair of Majorana fermions supporting a quartet of insulating and superconducting orders, among which quantum spin Hall topological insulator. Finally, I will mention some experimental signatures of this f + is time-reversal odd superconductor. These findings suggest that strained graphene could provide a platform for the realization of exotic superconducting states of Dirac fermions. VJ is supported by the Netherlands Organization for Scientific Research (NWO).

  1. Directional versus Stabilizing Selection for Developmental Time in Natural and Laboratory Populations of Flour Beetles.

    PubMed

    Dawson, P S

    1975-08-01

    Artificial selection for fast development is successful in long-established laboratory populations of Tribolium, but not in strains recently derived from natural populations. It is shown that selection against fast development in dense, synchronized cultures operates through cannibalism of early pupae by larvae. Since standard husbandry procedures for laboratory strains involve the periodic creation of dense, synchronized cultures, it is suggested that these populations are subjected to stabilizing selection for intermediate developmental time. Natural populations, on the other hand, are probably subjected to directional selection for rapid development. PMID:17248688

  2. SEASAT: A satellite scatterometer illumination times of selected in situ sites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schroeder, L. C.; Goodridge, D. R.; Boberly, J. C.; Hughes, J. K.; Sweet, J. L.

    1982-01-01

    A list of times that the SEASAT A Satellite Scatterometer (SASS) illuminated from directly above or directly abeam, selected surface sites where in situ winds were measured is provided. The list is ordered by the Greenwich Mean Time (GMT) of the midpoint of the illumination period (hit time) for a given surface site. The site identification, the orbit number and the direction from the subtrack in which the truth lies are provided. The accuracy of these times depends in part upon the ascending node times, which are estimated to be within +.1 sec, and on the illumination time relative to the ascending node, which is estimated to be within +6 seconds. The uncertainties in the times provided were judged to be sufficiently small to allow efficient and accurate extraction of SASS and in situ data at the selected surface sites. The list contains approximately six thousand hit times from 61 geographically dispersed sites.

  3. Computational design of a time-dependent histone deacetylase 2 selective inhibitor.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Jingwei; Li, Min; Chen, Nanhao; Wang, Shenglong; Luo, Hai-Bin; Zhang, Yingkai; Wu, Ruibo

    2015-03-20

    Development of isoform-selective histone deacetylase (HDAC) inhibitors is of great biological and medical interest. Among 11 zinc-dependent HDAC isoforms, it is particularly challenging to achieve isoform inhibition selectivity between HDAC1 and HDAC2 due to their very high structural similarities. In this work, by developing and applying a novel de novo reaction-mechanism-based inhibitor design strategy to exploit the reactivity difference, we have discovered the first HDAC2-selective inhibitor, β-hydroxymethyl chalcone. Our bioassay experiments show that this new compound has a unique time-dependent selective inhibition on HDAC2, leading to about 20-fold isoform-selectivity against HDAC1. Furthermore, our ab initio QM/MM molecular dynamics simulations, a state-of-the-art approach to study reactions in biological systems, have elucidated how the β-hydroxymethyl chalcone can achieve the distinct time-dependent inhibition toward HDAC2. PMID:25546141

  4. Vessel-selective, non-contrast enhanced, time-resolved MR angiography with vessel-selective arterial spin labeling technique (CINEMA-SELECT) in intracranial arteries.

    PubMed

    Nakamura, Masanobu; Yoneyama, Masami; Tabuchi, Takashi; Takemura, Atsushi; Obara, Makoto; Tatsuno, Satoshi; Sawano, Seishi

    2013-07-01

    We demonstrate the feasibility of the vessel-selective, non-contrast, time-resolved magnetic resonance angiography (MRA) technique, "contrast inherent inflow enhanced multi-phase angiography combining vessel-selective arterial spin labeling technique (CINEMA-SELECT)". This sequence consists of two major techniques: pulsed star labeling of arterial regions (PULSAR) and Look-Locker sampling. We hypothesize that this technique allows selective labeling of single intracranial arteries, consisting of high-resolution four-dimensional data with a wide coverage of the brain. In this study, a new vessel-selective, time-resolved angiographic technique is demonstrated that can produce individual angiograms non-invasively by labeling the principal arterial vessels proximal to the circle of Willis. Clear vessel delineation is achieved, and the separation of the three vessels is evident in healthy volunteers. This technique could play an important role in the assessment of the structure and hemodynamics of intracranial arteries without the use of contrast agents. PMID:23475783

  5. Acute Stress Induces Selective Alterations in Cost/Benefit Decision-Making

    PubMed Central

    Shafiei, Naghmeh; Gray, Megan; Viau, Victor; Floresco, Stan B

    2012-01-01

    Acute stress can exert beneficial or detrimental effects on different forms of cognition. In the present study, we assessed the effects of acute restraint stress on different forms of cost/benefit decision-making, and some of the hormonal and neurochemical mechanisms that may underlie these effects. Effort-based decision-making was assessed where rats chose between a low effort/reward (1 press=2 pellets) or high effort/reward option (4 pellets), with the effort requirement increasing over 4 blocks of trials (2, 5, 10, and 20 lever presses). Restraint stress for 1 h decreased preference for the more costly reward and induced longer choice latencies. Control experiments revealed that the effects on decision-making were not mediated by general reductions in motivation or preference for larger rewards. In contrast, acute stress did not affect delay-discounting, when rats chose between a small/immediate vs larger/delayed reward. The effects of stress on decision-making were not mimicked by treatment with physiological doses of corticosterone (1–3 mg/kg). Blockade of dopamine receptors with flupenthixol (0.25 mg/kg) before restraint did not attenuate stress-induced effects on effort-related choice, but abolished effects on choice latencies. These data suggest that acute stress interferes somewhat selectively with cost/benefit evaluations concerning effort costs. These effects do not appear to be mediated solely by enhanced glucocorticoid activity, whereas dopaminergic activation may contribute to increased deliberation times induced by stress. These findings may provide insight into impairments in decision-making and anergia associated with stress-related disorders, such as depression. PMID:22569506

  6. Model selection and change detection for a time-varying mean in process monitoring

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Burr, Tom; Hamada, Michael S.; Ticknor, Larry; Weaver, Brian

    2014-07-01

    Process monitoring (PM) for nuclear safeguards sometimes requires estimation of thresholds corresponding to small false alarm rates. Threshold estimation is an old topic; however, because possible new roles for PM are being evaluated in nuclear safeguards, it is timely to consider modern model selection options in the context of alarm threshold estimation. One of the possible new PM roles involves PM residuals, where a residual is defined as residual=data-prediction. This paper briefly reviews alarm threshold estimation, introduces model selection options, and considers several assumptions regarding the data-generating mechanism for PM residuals. Four PM examples from nuclear safeguards are included. One example involves frequent by-batch material balance closures where a dissolution vessel has time-varying efficiency, leading to time-varying material holdup. Another example involves periodic partial cleanout of in-process inventory, leading to challenging structure in the time series of PM residuals. Our main focus is model selection to select a defensible model for normal behavior with a time-varying mean in a PM residual stream. We use approximate Bayesian computation to perform the model selection and parameter estimation for normal behavior. We then describe a simple lag-one-differencing option similar to that used to monitor non-stationary times series to monitor for off-normal behavior.

  7. Stress-induced neuroinflammatory priming is time of day dependent.

    PubMed

    Fonken, Laura K; Weber, Michael D; Daut, Rachel A; Kitt, Meagan M; Frank, Matthew G; Watkins, Linda R; Maier, Steven F

    2016-04-01

    Circadian rhythms are endogenous cycles of physiology and behavior that align with the daily rotation of the planet and resulting light-dark cycle. The circadian system ensures homeostatic balance and regulates many aspects of physiology, including the stress response and susceptibility to and/or severity of stress-related sequelae. Both acute and chronic stressors amplify neuroinflammatory responses to a subsequent immune challenge, however it is not known whether circadian timing of the stressor regulates the priming response. Here, we test whether stress-induced neuroinflammatory priming is regulated by the circadian system. As has been previously shown, exposure to 100 inescapable tails shocks (IS) increased hippocampal cytokines following a subsequent inflammatory challenge. However, this effect was limited to animals that experienced the stressor during the light phase. Rats exposed to stress during the dark phase did not alter inflammatory potential following lipopolysaccharide (LPS) challenge. To determine whether microglia might be involved in diurnal differences in neuroinflammatory priming, microglia were isolated 24h after stress that occurred either during the middle of the light or dark phase. Only microglia isolated from animals stressed during the light phase demonstrated an exaggerated inflammatory response when treated ex vivo with LPS. To determine possible circadian dependency of microglia responsiveness to glucocorticoids - the likely proximal mediator for stress associated neuroinflammatory priming - microglia were isolated during the middle of the light or dark phase and treated ex vivo with corticosterone. Glucocorticoids treatment downregulated CX3CR1 and CD200R, two genes involved in microglial inflammatory "off" signaling; however, there was no effect of time of day on expression of either gene. Importantly, while absolute concentrations of corticosterone were comparable following IS during the light and dark phase, the magnitude of

  8. Spatial and Functional Selectivity of Peripheral Nerve Signal Recording With the Transversal Intrafascicular Multichannel Electrode (TIME).

    PubMed

    Badia, Jordi; Raspopovic, Stanisa; Carpaneto, Jacopo; Micera, Silvestro; Navarro, Xavier

    2016-01-01

    The selection of suitable peripheral nerve electrodes for biomedical applications implies a trade-off between invasiveness and selectivity. The optimal design should provide the highest selectivity for targeting a large number of nerve fascicles with the least invasiveness and potential damage to the nerve. The transverse intrafascicular multichannel electrode (TIME), transversally inserted in the peripheral nerve, has been shown to be useful for the selective activation of subsets of axons, both at inter- and intra-fascicular levels, in the small sciatic nerve of the rat. In this study we assessed the capabilities of TIME for the selective recording of neural activity, considering the topographical selectivity and the distinction of neural signals corresponding to different sensory types. Topographical recording selectivity was proved by the differential recording of CNAPs from different subsets of nerve fibers, such as those innervating toes 2 and 4 of the hindpaw of the rat. Neural signals elicited by sensory stimuli applied to the rat paw were successfully recorded. Signal processing allowed distinguishing three different types of sensory stimuli such as tactile, proprioceptive and nociceptive ones with high performance. These findings further support the suitability of TIMEs for neuroprosthetic applications, by exploiting the transversal topographical structure of the peripheral nerves. PMID:26087496

  9. The causes of selection on flowering time through male fitness in a hermaphroditic annual plant.

    PubMed

    Austen, Emily J; Weis, Arthur E

    2016-01-01

    Flowering is a key life-history event whose timing almost certainly affects both male and female fitness, but tests of selection on flowering time through male fitness are few. Such selection may arise from direct effects of flowering time, and indirect effects through covariance between flowering time and the environment experienced during reproduction. To isolate these intrinsically correlated associations, we staggered planting dates of Brassica rapa families with known flowering times, creating populations in which age at flowering (i.e., flowering time genotype) and Julian date of flowering (i.e., flowering time environment) were positively, negatively, or uncorrelated. Genetic paternity analysis revealed that male fitness was not strongly influenced by seasonal environmental changes. Instead, when age and date were uncorrelated, selection through male fitness strongly favored young age at flowering. Strategic sampling offspring for paternity analysis rejected covariance between sire age at flowering and dam quality as the cause of this selection. Results instead suggest a negative association between age at flowering and pollen competitive ability. The manipulation also revealed that, at least in B. rapa, the often-observed correlation between flowering time and flowering duration is environmental, not genetic, in origin. PMID:26596860

  10. Selective inhibition of the hypoxia-inducible factor prolyl hydroxylase PHD3 by Zn(II).

    PubMed

    Na, Yu-Ran; Woo, Dustin J; Choo, Hyunah; Chung, Hak Suk; Yang, Eun Gyeong

    2015-07-01

    We report herein that Zn(II) selectively inhibits the hypoxia-inducible factor prolyl hydroxylase PHD3 over PHD2, and does not compete with Fe(II). Independent of the oligomer formation induced by Zn(II), inhibition of the activity of PHD3 by Zn(II) involves Cys42 and Cys52 residues distantly located from the active site. PMID:26051901

  11. Conditioned taste aversion induced by motion is prevented by selective vagotomy in the rat

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fox, Robert A.; Mckenna, Susan

    1991-01-01

    The role of the vagus nerve in motion-induced conditioned taste aversion (CTA) was studied in hooded rats. Animals with complete, selective gastric vagotomy failed to form conditioned taste aversion after multiple conditioning sessions in which the conditioned stimulus (a cider vinegar solution) was drunk immediately before a 30-min exposure to vertical axis rotation at 150 deg/s. Results are discussed with reference to the use of CTA as a measure of motion-induced 'sickness' or gastrointestinal disturbance, and because motion-induced CTA requires that both the vagus nerve and the vestibular apparatus be intact, in light of the possible convergence of vegal and vestibular functions.

  12. Real time chemical detection using species selective thin films and waveguide Zeeman interferometry

    SciTech Connect

    Grace, K.M.; Shrouf, K.; Honkanen, S.

    1998-12-01

    The authors present a chemical sensor scheme based on selective sensing surfaces and highly sensitive integrated optical transduction methods. Using self-assembly techniques, species selective thin-films are covalently attached to the surface of Si{sub 3}N{sub 4} channel waveguides to produce robust sensor elements. Exposure to targeted analytes results in the selective absorption of these molecules onto the waveguide surface causing a change in the effective index of the guided modes. These relative changes in effective index between TE and TM modes are precisely measured using Zeeman interferometry. Measurements demonstrate reversible, real time sensing of volatile organic compounds at ppm levels.

  13. Observation of Doppler-free electromagnetically induced transparency in atoms selected optically with specific velocity

    SciTech Connect

    Yu, Hoon; Kim, Kwan Su; Kim, Jung Dong; Lee, Hyun Kyung; Kim, Jung Bog

    2011-11-15

    We observed an electromagnetically induced transparency signal in a four-level system with optically selected rubidium atoms at specific velocities in a room-temperature vaporized cell. Since the atoms behave like cold atoms in the selected atomic view, the observed signals coincide with a trapped atomic system. According to this result, we can observe Doppler-free signals, which correspond from 1.2 to 1.0 K in a Doppler-broadened medium. And the selected atoms have velocity components of {+-}(131 {+-} 3) MHz per wave number. Our experimental results can provide insight for research in cold media.

  14. Directional selection for flowering time leads to adaptive evolution in Raphanus raphanistrum (Wild radish).

    PubMed

    Ashworth, Michael B; Walsh, Michael J; Flower, Ken C; Vila-Aiub, Martin M; Powles, Stephen B

    2016-04-01

    Herbicides have been the primary tool for controlling large populations of yield depleting weeds from agro-ecosystems, resulting in the evolution of widespread herbicide resistance. In response, nonherbicidal techniques have been developed which intercept weed seeds at harvest before they enter the soil seed bank. However, the efficiency of these techniques allows an intense selection for any trait that enables weeds to evade collection, with early-flowering ecotypes considered likely to result in early seed shedding. Using a field-collected wild radish population, five recurrent generations were selected for early maturity and three generations for late maturity. Phenology associated with flowering time and growth traits were measured. Our results demonstrate the adaptive capacity of wild radish to halve its time to flowering following five generations of early-flowering selection. Early-maturing phenotypes had reduced height and biomass at maturity, leading to less competitive, more prostrate growth forms. Following three generations of late-flowering selection, wild radish doubled its time to flowering time leading to increased biomass and flowering height at maturity. This study demonstrates the potential for the rapid evolution in growth traits in response to highly effective seed collection techniques that imposed a selection on weed populations within agro-ecosystems at harvest. PMID:27099626

  15. Selective glucocorticoid receptor translational isoforms reveal glucocorticoid-induced apoptotic transcriptomes

    PubMed Central

    Wu, I; Shin, S C; Cao, Y; Bender, I K; Jafari, N; Feng, G; Lin, S; Cidlowski, J A; Schleimer, R P; Lu, N Z

    2013-01-01

    Induction of T-cell apoptosis contributes to the anti-inflammatory and antineoplastic benefits of glucocorticoids. The glucocorticoid receptor (GR) translational isoforms have distinct proapoptotic activities in osteosarcoma cells. Here we determined whether GR isoforms selectively induce apoptosis in Jurkat T lymphoblastic leukemia cells. Jurkat cells stably expressing individual GR isoforms were generated and treated with vehicle or dexamethasone (DEX). DEX induced apoptosis in cells expressing the GR-A, -B, or -C, but not the GR-D, isoform. cDNA microarray analyses of cells sensitive (GR-C3) and insensitive (GR-D3) to DEX revealed glucocorticoid-induced proapoptotic transcriptomes. Genes that were regulated by the proapoptotic GR-C3, but not by the GR-D3, isoform likely contributed to glucocorticoid-induced apoptosis. The identified genes include those that are directly involved in apoptosis and those that facilitate cell killing. Chromatin immunoprecipitation assays demonstrated that distinct chromatin modification abilities may underlie the distinct functions of GR isoforms. Interestingly, all GR isoforms, including the GR-D3 isoform, suppressed mitogen-stimulated cytokines. Furthermore, the GR-C isoforms were selectively upregulated in mitogen-activated primary T cells and DEX treatment induced GR-C target genes in activated T cells. Cell-specific expressions and functions of GR isoforms may help to explain the tissue- and individual-selective actions of glucocorticoids and may provide a basis for developing improved glucocorticoids. PMID:23303127

  16. Selective glucocorticoid receptor translational isoforms reveal glucocorticoid-induced apoptotic transcriptomes.

    PubMed

    Wu, I; Shin, S C; Cao, Y; Bender, I K; Jafari, N; Feng, G; Lin, S; Cidlowski, J A; Schleimer, R P; Lu, N Z

    2013-01-01

    Induction of T-cell apoptosis contributes to the anti-inflammatory and antineoplastic benefits of glucocorticoids. The glucocorticoid receptor (GR) translational isoforms have distinct proapoptotic activities in osteosarcoma cells. Here we determined whether GR isoforms selectively induce apoptosis in Jurkat T lymphoblastic leukemia cells. Jurkat cells stably expressing individual GR isoforms were generated and treated with vehicle or dexamethasone (DEX). DEX induced apoptosis in cells expressing the GR-A, -B, or -C, but not the GR-D, isoform. cDNA microarray analyses of cells sensitive (GR-C3) and insensitive (GR-D3) to DEX revealed glucocorticoid-induced proapoptotic transcriptomes. Genes that were regulated by the proapoptotic GR-C3, but not by the GR-D3, isoform likely contributed to glucocorticoid-induced apoptosis. The identified genes include those that are directly involved in apoptosis and those that facilitate cell killing. Chromatin immunoprecipitation assays demonstrated that distinct chromatin modification abilities may underlie the distinct functions of GR isoforms. Interestingly, all GR isoforms, including the GR-D3 isoform, suppressed mitogen-stimulated cytokines. Furthermore, the GR-C isoforms were selectively upregulated in mitogen-activated primary T cells and DEX treatment induced GR-C target genes in activated T cells. Cell-specific expressions and functions of GR isoforms may help to explain the tissue- and individual-selective actions of glucocorticoids and may provide a basis for developing improved glucocorticoids. PMID:23303127

  17. Influence of time and length size feature selections for human activity sequences recognition.

    PubMed

    Fang, Hongqing; Chen, Long; Srinivasan, Raghavendiran

    2014-01-01

    In this paper, Viterbi algorithm based on a hidden Markov model is applied to recognize activity sequences from observed sensors events. Alternative features selections of time feature values of sensors events and activity length size feature values are tested, respectively, and then the results of activity sequences recognition performances of Viterbi algorithm are evaluated. The results show that the selection of larger time feature values of sensor events and/or smaller activity length size feature values will generate relatively better results on the activity sequences recognition performances. PMID:24075148

  18. The detection and identification of selected lube base oil using terahertz time-domain spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lu, Tian; Zhou, Qing-li; Jin, Bin; Zhao, Kun; Zhao, Song-qing; Zhang, Cun-lin

    2009-07-01

    Using the terahertz time-domain spectroscopy (THz-TDS), the frequency-dependent absorption coefficient(s) and refractive index (indices) of selected lube base oil (LBO) were extracted in the spectral range of 0.3-1.6 THz. The selected LBO was also characterized by near-infrared spectrum. The experimental results reveal that LBO is more sensitive in the THz range than near-infrared, and the different viscosity index of LBO can be identified according to their different spectral features in THz range. Due to better repeatability, shorter testing time, and easy operation, THz- TDS can be used as a complementary for identifying the chemical composition of LBO.

  19. Selective thermal desorption of ultrathin aluminum oxide layers induced by electron beams

    SciTech Connect

    Kundu, Manisha; Miyata, Noriyuki; Ichikawa, Masakazu

    2001-08-06

    The mechanism of electron-beam-induced selective thermal desorption of ultrathin aluminum-oxide layer ({approx}0.4 nm) on Si(001) surface was investigated by using scanning reflection electron microscopy, reflection high-energy electron diffraction, and Auger electron spectroscopy. We found that the change in the aluminum-oxide layer composition induced by electron-stimulated oxygen desorption accounted for the selective thermal desorption of the oxide layer. A systematic increase in the vacuum-annealing temperature to 500{sup o}C, 600{sup o}C and 720{sup o}C resulted in the formation of three-dimensional metal aluminum clusters, desorption of these clusters, and creation of a nanometer-scale clean Si(001)-2 x 1 open window in the selected electron-beam-irradiated area. {copyright} 2001 American Institute of Physics.

  20. Resource competition induces heterogeneity and can increase cohort survivorship: selection-event duration matters.

    PubMed

    Gosselin, Jennifer L; Anderson, James J

    2013-12-01

    Determining when resource competition increases survivorship can reveal processes underlying population dynamics and reinforce the importance of heterogeneity among individuals in conservation. We ran an experiment mimicking the effects of competition in a growing season on survivorship during a selection event (e.g., overwinter starvation, drought). Using a model fish species (Poecilia reticulata), we studied how food availability and competition affect mass in a treatment stage, and subsequently survivorship in a challenge stage of increased temperature and starvation. The post-treatment mean mass was strongly related to the mean time to mortality and mass at mortality at all levels of competition. However, competition increased variance in mass and extended the right tail of the survivorship curve, resulting in a greater number of individuals alive beyond a critical temporal threshold ([Formula: see text]) than without competition. To realize the benefits from previously experienced competition, the duration of the challenge ([Formula: see text]) following the competition must exceed the critical threshold [Formula: see text] (i.e., competition increases survivorship when [Formula: see text]). Furthermore, this benefit was equivalent to increasing food availability by 20 % in a group without competition in our experiment. The relationship of [Formula: see text] to treatment and challenge conditions was modeled by characterizing mortality through mass loss in terms of the stochastic rate of loss of vitality (individual's survival capacity). In essence, when the duration of a selection event exceeds [Formula: see text], competition-induced heterogeneity buffers against mortality through overcompensation processes among individuals of a cohort. Overall, our study demonstrates an approach to quantify how early life stage heterogeneity affects survivorship. PMID:23912261

  1. Detecting and Quantifying Changing Selection Intensities from Time-Sampled Polymorphism Data

    PubMed Central

    Shim, Hyunjin; Laurent, Stefan; Matuszewski, Sebastian; Foll, Matthieu; Jensen, Jeffrey D.

    2016-01-01

    During his well-known debate with Fisher regarding the phenotypic dataset of Panaxia dominula, Wright suggested fluctuating selection as a potential explanation for the observed change in allele frequencies. This model has since been invoked in a number of analyses, with the focus of discussion centering mainly on random or oscillatory fluctuations of selection intensities. Here, we present a novel method to consider nonrandom changes in selection intensities using Wright-Fisher approximate Bayesian (ABC)-based approaches, in order to detect and evaluate a change in selection strength from time-sampled data. This novel method jointly estimates the position of a change point as well as the strength of both corresponding selection coefficients (and dominance for diploid cases) from the allele trajectory. The simulation studies of this method reveal the combinations of parameter ranges and input values that optimize performance, thus indicating optimal experimental design strategies. We apply this approach to both the historical dataset of P. dominula in order to shed light on this historical debate, as well as to whole-genome time-serial data from influenza virus in order to identify sites with changing selection intensities in response to drug treatment. PMID:26869618

  2. Detecting and Quantifying Changing Selection Intensities from Time-Sampled Polymorphism Data.

    PubMed

    Shim, Hyunjin; Laurent, Stefan; Matuszewski, Sebastian; Foll, Matthieu; Jensen, Jeffrey D

    2016-01-01

    During his well-known debate with Fisher regarding the phenotypic dataset of Panaxia dominula, Wright suggested fluctuating selection as a potential explanation for the observed change in allele frequencies. This model has since been invoked in a number of analyses, with the focus of discussion centering mainly on random or oscillatory fluctuations of selection intensities. Here, we present a novel method to consider nonrandom changes in selection intensities using Wright-Fisher approximate Bayesian (ABC)-based approaches, in order to detect and evaluate a change in selection strength from time-sampled data. This novel method jointly estimates the position of a change point as well as the strength of both corresponding selection coefficients (and dominance for diploid cases) from the allele trajectory. The simulation studies of this method reveal the combinations of parameter ranges and input values that optimize performance, thus indicating optimal experimental design strategies. We apply this approach to both the historical dataset of P. dominula in order to shed light on this historical debate, as well as to whole-genome time-serial data from influenza virus in order to identify sites with changing selection intensities in response to drug treatment. PMID:26869618

  3. Fabrication mechanism of friction-induced selective etching on Si(100) surface

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    As a maskless nanofabrication technique, friction-induced selective etching can easily produce nanopatterns on a Si(100) surface. Experimental results indicated that the height of the nanopatterns increased with the KOH etching time, while their width increased with the scratching load. It has also found that a contact pressure of 6.3 GPa is enough to fabricate a mask layer on the Si(100) surface. To understand the mechanism involved, the cross-sectional microstructure of a scratched area was examined, and the mask ability of the tip-disturbed silicon layer was studied. Transmission electron microscope observation and scanning Auger nanoprobe analysis suggested that the scratched area was covered by a thin superficial oxidation layer followed by a thick distorted (amorphous and deformed) layer in the subsurface. After the surface oxidation layer was removed by HF etching, the residual amorphous and deformed silicon layer on the scratched area can still serve as an etching mask in KOH solution. The results may help to develop a low-destructive, low-cost, and flexible nanofabrication technique suitable for machining of micro-mold and prototype fabrication in micro-systems. PMID:22356699

  4. Moving attention - Evidence for time-invariant shifts of visual selective attention

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Remington, R.; Pierce, L.

    1984-01-01

    Two experiments measured the time to shift spatial selective attention across the visual field to targets 2 or 10 deg from central fixation. A central arrow cued the most likely target location. The direction of attention was inferred from reaction times to expected, unexpected, and neutral locations. The development of a spatial attentional set with time was examined by presenting target probes at varying times after the cue. There were no effects of distance on the time course of the attentional set. Reaction times for far locations were slower than for near, but the effects of attention were evident by 150 msec in both cases. Spatial attention does not shift with a characteristic, fixed velocity. Rather, velocity is proportional to distance, resulting in a movement time that is invariant over the distances tested.

  5. Evaluation of select sensors for real-time monitoring of Escherichia coli in water distribution systems.

    PubMed

    Miles, Syreeta L; Sinclair, Ryan G; Riley, Mark R; Pepper, Ian L

    2011-04-01

    This study evaluated real-time sensing of Escherichia coli as a microbial contaminant in water distribution systems. Most sensors responded to increased E. coli concentrations, showing that select sensors can detect microbial water quality changes and be utilized as part of a contaminant warning system. PMID:21357435

  6. Evaluation of Select Sensors for Real-Time Monitoring of Escherichia coli in Water Distribution Systems▿

    PubMed Central

    Miles, Syreeta L.; Sinclair, Ryan G.; Riley, Mark R.; Pepper, Ian L.

    2011-01-01

    This study evaluated real-time sensing of Escherichia coli as a microbial contaminant in water distribution systems. Most sensors responded to increased E. coli concentrations, showing that select sensors can detect microbial water quality changes and be utilized as part of a contaminant warning system. PMID:21357435

  7. First successful pregnancies following embryo selection using Time-lapse technology in Iran: Case report

    PubMed Central

    Faramarzi, Azita; Khalili, Mohammad Ali; Soleimani, Mehrdad

    2015-01-01

    Background: Embryo selection is a vital part of in vitro fertilization (IVF) programs, with morphology-based grading systems having been widely used for decades. Time-lapse imaging combined with embryo morph kinetics may proffer a non-invasive means for improving embryo selection. We report the first ongoing and chemical pregnancies using Time-lapse embryo scope to select best embryos for transfer in Iran. Cases: A case with tubal factor infertility was admitted to IVF program with normozoospermia. After ovarian hyper stimulation, 6 COCs were retrieved and inseminated with 25,000 progressive sperms/ oocyte. Five zygotes were placed individually into the micro wells of equilibrated embryo scope dish for Time-lapse observation, and incubated at 37°C, 5% CO2. On day 3, single embryo transfer (SET) took place based on kinetic parameters of the embryos. Clinical pregnancy was confirmed 7 weeks after SET. The second case with history of previous ICSI failure was admitted with azoospermia. Nine MII oocytes underwent ICSI, and incubated in Time-lapse facilities. The rest of procedures were followed as described for case 1. Chemical pregnancy was confirmed 15 days after SET. Conclusion: This approach opens a way to select best embryo non-invasively for SET; thus, increasing implantation, while reducing multiple pregnancy complications. PMID:26131014

  8. Plant breeding with genomic selection: potential gain per unit time and cost

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Advancements in genotyping are rapidly decreasing marker costs and increasing genome coverage. This is facilitating the use of marker-assisted selection (MAS) in plant breeding. Commonly employed MAS strategies, however, are not well suited for complex traits, requiring extra time for field-based ph...

  9. Inducible nitric oxide synthase (NOS2) expressed in septic patients is nitrated on selected tyrosine residues: implications for enzymic activity.

    PubMed Central

    Lanone, Sophie; Manivet, Philippe; Callebert, Jacques; Launay, Jean-Marie; Payen, Didier; Aubier, Michel; Boczkowski, Jorge; Mebazaa, Alexandre

    2002-01-01

    Tyrosine nitration is a post-translational protein modification with potentially significant biological implications. In the present study we demonstrate, for the first time, that tyrosine residues of human inducible nitric oxide synthase (NOS2) can be nitrated by peroxynitrite in vitro, leading to a decreased activity. Moreover, we show that NOS2 expressed in a skeletal muscle from septic patients is nitrated on selective tyrosine residues belonging to a canonic sequence. This phenomenon could be an endogenous mechanism of in vivo modulation of NOS2 enzymic activity. PMID:12097137

  10. Length of time in tissue culture can affect the selected glyphosate resistance mechanism.

    PubMed

    Papanikou, Efstratia; Brotherton, Jeffrey E; Widholm, Jack M

    2004-02-01

    Usually, stepwise selection of plant suspension cultures with gradually increasing concentrations of the herbicide glyphosate results in the amplification of the target enzyme 5-enolpyruvylshikimate-3-phosphate synthase (EPSPS; EC 2.5.1.19) gene that leads to resistance by increasing EPSPS mRNA and enzyme activity. We show that glyphosate selection with newly initiated suspension cultures can produce resistant lines with resistance mechanisms other than gene amplification and that usually as the cultures age gene amplification becomes the predominant mechanism. Gene amplification did not occur in 3 lines selected from 5-month-old Datura innoxia Mill. cultures but did occur in all 10 lines selected after 52 months. Selection with Nicotiana tabacum L. (tobacco) less than 5 months old produced 2 lines out of 24 with no EPSPS amplification while all 17 lines selected from older cultures contained amplified genes. Lines selected from the oldest culture (35 years) also exhibited amplification of several different genes, indicating the expression of different EPSPS genes or an enhanced gene amplification incidence. None of the 15 lines selected from 2 different 5-month-old Daucus carota L. (carrot) lines exhibited amplification while amplification led to the resistance of all 7 lines selected from one of the original carrot lines (DHL) after 3 years. However, the other line (Car4) was exceptional and produced only non-amplified lines (9 of 9) after 8 years in culture. These results show that plant tissue cultures change with time in culture and that several different new mechanisms can result in glyphosate resistance. PMID:14566562

  11. Uranium and nitrate remote sensing in the nuclear fuel cycle by time-resolved laser-induced fluorescence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moulin, Christophe; Couston, Laurent; Decambox, Pierre; Mauchien, Patrick; Pouyat, Dominique

    1994-12-01

    Time-Resolved Laser-Induced Fluorescence has been used for uranium and nitrate remote sensing in the nuclear fuel cycle. Advantages of this technique are aside sensitivity and selectivity, its ability to perform remote measurements via fiber optics and optode. Uranium is usually determined by the standard addition method but by applying a fluorescence model taking into account complexation and absorption phenomena, it is possible to directly determine uranium concentration. Nitrate concentration is determined after spectral deconvolution of the uranium fluorescence spectrum.

  12. Selective Na+/Ca2+ exchanger inhibition prevents Ca2+ overload-induced triggered arrhythmias

    PubMed Central

    Nagy, Norbert; Kormos, Anita; Kohajda, Zsófia; Szebeni, Áron; Szepesi, Judit; Pollesello, Piero; Levijoki, Jouko; Acsai, Károly; Virág, László; Nánási, Péter P; Papp, Julius Gy; Varró, András; Tóth, András

    2014-01-01

    Background and Purpose Augmented Na+/Ca2+ exchanger (NCX) activity may play a crucial role in cardiac arrhythmogenesis; however, data regarding the anti-arrhythmic efficacy of NCX inhibition are debatable. Feasible explanations could be the unsatisfactory selectivity of NCX inhibitors and/or the dependence of the experimental model on the degree of Ca2+i overload. Hence, we used NCX inhibitors SEA0400 and the more selective ORM10103 to evaluate the efficacy of NCX inhibition against arrhythmogenic Ca2+i rise in conditions when [Ca2+]i was augmented via activation of the late sodium current (INaL) or inhibition of the Na+/K+ pump. Experimental Approach Action potentials (APs) were recorded from canine papillary muscles and Purkinje fibres by microelectrodes. NCX current (INCX) was determined in ventricular cardiomyocytes utilizing the whole-cell patch clamp technique. Ca2+i transients (CaTs) were monitored with a Ca2+-sensitive fluorescent dye, Fluo-4. Key Results Enhanced INaL increased the Ca2+ load and AP duration (APD). SEA0400 and ORM10103 suppressed INCX and prevented/reversed the anemone toxin II (ATX-II)-induced [Ca2+]i rise without influencing APD, CaT or cell shortening, or affecting the ATX-II-induced increased APD. ORM10103 significantly decreased the number of strophanthidin-induced spontaneous diastolic Ca2+ release events; however, SEA0400 failed to restrict the veratridine-induced augmentation in Purkinje-ventricle APD dispersion. Conclusions and Implications Selective NCX inhibition – presumably by blocking revINCX (reverse mode NCX current) – is effective against arrhythmogenesis caused by [Na+]i-induced [Ca2+]i elevation, without influencing the AP waveform. Therefore, selective INCX inhibition, by significantly reducing the arrhythmogenic trigger activity caused by the perturbed Ca2+i handling, should be considered as a promising anti-arrhythmic therapeutic strategy. PMID:25073832

  13. A method for real-time visual stimulus selection in the study of cortical object perception.

    PubMed

    Leeds, Daniel D; Tarr, Michael J

    2016-06-01

    The properties utilized by visual object perception in the mid- and high-level ventral visual pathway are poorly understood. To better establish and explore possible models of these properties, we adopt a data-driven approach in which we repeatedly interrogate neural units using functional Magnetic Resonance Imaging (fMRI) to establish each unit's image selectivity. This approach to imaging necessitates a search through a broad space of stimulus properties using a limited number of samples. To more quickly identify the complex visual features underlying human cortical object perception, we implemented a new functional magnetic resonance imaging protocol in which visual stimuli are selected in real-time based on BOLD responses to recently shown images. Two variations of this protocol were developed, one relying on natural object stimuli and a second based on synthetic object stimuli, both embedded in feature spaces based on the complex visual properties of the objects. During fMRI scanning, we continuously controlled stimulus selection in the context of a real-time search through these image spaces in order to maximize neural responses across pre-determined 1cm(3) rain regions. Elsewhere we have reported the patterns of cortical selectivity revealed by this approach (Leeds et al., 2014). In contrast, here our objective is to present more detailed methods and explore the technical and biological factors influencing the behavior of our real-time stimulus search. We observe that: 1) Searches converged more reliably when exploring a more precisely parameterized space of synthetic objects; 2) real-time estimation of cortical responses to stimuli is reasonably consistent; 3) search behavior was acceptably robust to delays in stimulus displays and subject motion effects. Overall, our results indicate that real-time fMRI methods may provide a valuable platform for continuing study of localized neural selectivity, both for visual object representation and beyond. PMID

  14. Temperature-induced labelling of Fluo-3 AM selectively yields brighter nucleus in adherent cells

    SciTech Connect

    Meng, Guixian; Pan, Leiting; Li, Cunbo; Hu, Fen; Shi, Xuechen; Lee, Imshik; Drevenšek-Olenik, Irena; Zhang, Xinzheng; Xu, Jingjun

    2014-01-17

    Highlights: •We detailedly examine temperature effects of Fluo-3 AM labelling in adherent cells. •4 °C Loading and 20 °C de-esterification of Fluo-3 AM yields brighter nuclei. •Brighter nuclei labelling by Fluo-3 AM also depends on cell adhesion quality. •A qualitative model of the brighter nucleus is proposed. -- Abstract: Fluo-3 is widely used to study cell calcium. Two traditional approaches: (1) direct injection and (2) Fluo-3 acetoxymethyl ester (AM) loading, often bring conflicting results in cytoplasmic calcium ([Ca{sup 2+}]{sub c}) and nuclear calcium ([Ca{sup 2+}]{sub n}) imaging. AM loading usually yields a darker nucleus than in cytoplasm, while direct injection always induces a brighter nucleus which is more responsive to [Ca{sup 2+}]{sub n} detection. In this work, we detailedly investigated the effects of loading and de-esterification temperatures on the fluorescence intensity of Fluo-3 in response to [Ca{sup 2+}]{sub n} and [Ca{sup 2+}]{sub c} in adherent cells, including osteoblast, HeLa and BV2 cells. Interestingly, it showed that fluorescence intensity of nucleus in osteoblast cells was about two times larger than that of cytoplasm when cells were loaded with Fluo-3 AM at 4 °C and allowed a subsequent step for de-esterification at 20 °C. Brighter nuclei were also acquired in HeLa and BV2 cells using the same experimental condition. Furthermore, loading time and adhesion quality of cells had effect on fluorescence intensity. Taken together, cold loading and room temperature de-esterification treatment of Fluo-3 AM selectively yielded brighter nucleus in adherent cells.

  15. Selective regulation of neurosteroid biosynthesis under ketamine-induced apoptosis of cortical neurons in vitro.

    PubMed

    Li, Jianli; Yu, Yang; Wang, Bei; Wu, Honghai; Xue, Gai; Hou, Yanning

    2016-02-01

    Numerous studies have suggested that ketamine administration can induce neuroapoptosis in primary cultured cortical neurons. Neurosteroids modulate neuronal function and serve important roles in the central nervous system, however the role of neurosteroids in neuroapoptosis induced by ketamine remains to be elucidated. The present study aimed to explore whether neurosteroidogenesis was a pivotal mechanism for neuroprotection against ketamine-induced neuroapoptosis, and whether it may be selectively regulated under ketamine-induced neuroapoptosis conditions in primary cultured cortical neurons. To study this hypothesis, the effect of ketamine exposure on neurosteroidogenesis in primary cultured cortical neurons was investigated. Cholesterol, a substrate involved in the synthesis of neurosteroids, was added to the culture medium, and neurosteroids were quantified using high-performance liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry analysis. The data demonstrated that cholesterol blocked ketamine-induced neuroapoptosis by promoting the synthesis of various neurosteroids, and the pathway of neurosteroid testosterone conversion into estradiol was inhibited by ketamine exposure. These data suggest that endogenous neurosteroids biosynthesis is critical for neuroprotection against ketamine-induced neuroapoptosis and inhibiting the biosynthesis of neuroprotective-neurosteroid estradiol is of notable importance for ketamine-induced neuroapoptosis. PMID:26709052

  16. Selective regulation of neurosteroid biosynthesis under ketamine-induced apoptosis of cortical neurons in vitro

    PubMed Central

    LI, JIANLI; YU, YANG; WANG, BEI; WU, HONGHAI; XUE, GAI; HOU, YANNING

    2016-01-01

    Numerous studies have suggested that ketamine administration can induce neuroapoptosis in primary cultured cortical neurons. Neurosteroids modulate neuronal function and serve important roles in the central nervous system, however the role of neurosteroids in neuroapoptosis induced by ketamine remains to be elucidated. The present study aimed to explore whether neurosteroidogenesis was a pivotal mechanism for neuroprotection against ketamine-induced neuroapoptosis, and whether it may be selectively regulated under ketamine-induced neuroapoptosis conditions in primary cultured cortical neurons. To study this hypothesis, the effect of ketamine exposure on neurosteroidogenesis in primary cultured cortical neurons was investigated. Cholesterol, a substrate involved in the synthesis of neurosteroids, was added to the culture medium, and neurosteroids were quantified using high-performance liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry analysis. The data demonstrated that cholesterol blocked ketamine-induced neuroapoptosis by promoting the synthesis of various neurosteroids, and the pathway of neurosteroid testosterone conversion into estradiol was inhibited by ketamine exposure. These data suggest that endogenous neurosteroids biosynthesis is critical for neuroprotection against ketamine-induced neuroapoptosis and inhibiting the biosynthesis of neuroprotective-neurosteroid estradiol is of notable importance for ketamine-induced neuroapoptosis. PMID:26709052

  17. Quantifying selection in evolving populations using time-resolved genetic data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Illingworth, Christopher J. R.; Mustonen, Ville

    2013-01-01

    Methods which uncover the molecular basis of the adaptive evolution of a population address some important biological questions. For example, the problem of identifying genetic variants which underlie drug resistance, a question of importance for the treatment of pathogens, and of cancer, can be understood as a matter of inferring selection. One difficulty in the inference of variants under positive selection is the potential complexity of the underlying evolutionary dynamics, which may involve an interplay between several contributing processes, including mutation, recombination and genetic drift. A source of progress may be found in modern sequencing technologies, which confer an increasing ability to gather information about evolving populations, granting a window into these complex processes. One particularly interesting development is the ability to follow evolution as it happens, by whole-genome sequencing of an evolving population at multiple time points. We here discuss how to use time-resolved sequence data to draw inferences about the evolutionary dynamics of a population under study. We begin by reviewing our earlier analysis of a yeast selection experiment, in which we used a deterministic evolutionary framework to identify alleles under selection for heat tolerance, and to quantify the selection acting upon them. Considering further the use of advanced intercross lines to measure selection, we here extend this framework to cover scenarios of simultaneous recombination and selection, and of two driver alleles with multiple linked neutral, or passenger, alleles, where the driver pair evolves under an epistatic fitness landscape. We conclude by discussing the limitations of the approach presented and outlining future challenges for such methodologies.

  18. EFFECT OF OZONE ON DRUG-INDUCED SLEEPING TIME IN MICE PRETREATED WITH MIXED-FUNCTION OXIDASE INDUCERS AND INHIBITORS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Studies were conducted to investigate the effect of ozone in prolonging pentobarbital (PEN)-induced sleeping time (S.T.). Since ozone is a common air pollutant, an ozone-induced alteration of mechanisms of drug action could have public health implications. It was shown that a 5-h...

  19. Coevolution of strategy-selection time scale and cooperation in spatial prisoner's dilemma game

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rong, Zhihai; Wu, Zhi-Xi; Chen, Guanrong

    2013-06-01

    In this paper, we investigate a networked prisoner's dilemma game where individuals' strategy-selection time scale evolves based on their historical learning information. We show that the more times the current strategy of an individual is learnt by his neighbors, the longer time he will stick on the successful behavior by adaptively adjusting the lifetime of the adopted strategy. Through characterizing the extent of success of the individuals with normalized payoffs, we show that properly using the learned information can form a positive feedback mechanism between cooperative behavior and its lifetime, which can boost cooperation on square lattices and scale-free networks.

  20. Continuous-Time Mean-Variance Portfolio Selection with Random Horizon

    SciTech Connect

    Yu, Zhiyong

    2013-12-15

    This paper examines the continuous-time mean-variance optimal portfolio selection problem with random market parameters and random time horizon. Treating this problem as a linearly constrained stochastic linear-quadratic optimal control problem, I explicitly derive the efficient portfolios and efficient frontier in closed forms based on the solutions of two backward stochastic differential equations. Some related issues such as a minimum variance portfolio and a mutual fund theorem are also addressed. All the results are markedly different from those in the problem with deterministic exit time. A key part of my analysis involves proving the global solvability of a stochastic Riccati equation, which is interesting in its own right.

  1. Temperature-Dependent Nanofabrication on Silicon by Friction-Induced Selective Etching.

    PubMed

    Jin, Chenning; Yu, Bingjun; Xiao, Chen; Chen, Lei; Qian, Linmao

    2016-12-01

    Friction-induced selective etching provides a convenient and practical way for fabricating protrusive nanostructures. A further understanding of this method is very important for establishing a controllable nanofabrication process. In this study, the effect of etching temperature on the formation of protrusive hillocks and surface properties of the etched silicon surface was investigated. It is found that the height of the hillock produced by selective etching increases with the etching temperature before the collapse of the hillock. The temperature-dependent selective etching rate can be fitted well by the Arrhenius equation. The etching at higher temperature can cause rougher silicon surface with a little lower elastic modulus and hardness. The contact angle of the etched silicon surface decreases with the etching temperature. It is also noted that no obvious contamination can be detected on silicon surface after etching at different temperatures. As a result, the optimized condition for the selective etching was addressed. The present study provides a new insight into the control and application of friction-induced selective nanofabrication. PMID:27119157

  2. Natural selection underlies apparent stress-induced mutagenesis in a bacteriophage infection model.

    PubMed

    Yosef, Ido; Edgar, Rotem; Levy, Asaf; Amitai, Gil; Sorek, Rotem; Munitz, Ariel; Qimron, Udi

    2016-01-01

    The emergence of mutations following growth-limiting conditions underlies bacterial drug resistance, viral escape from the immune system and fundamental evolution-driven events. Intriguingly, whether mutations are induced by growth limitation conditions or are randomly generated during growth and then selected by growth limitation conditions remains an open question(1). Here, we show that bacteriophage T7 undergoes apparent stress-induced mutagenesis when selected for improved recognition of its host's receptor. In our unique experimental set-up, the growth limitation condition is physically and temporally separated from mutagenesis: growth limitation occurs while phage DNA is outside the host, and spontaneous mutations occur during phage DNA replication inside the host. We show that the selected beneficial mutations are not pre-existing and that the initial slow phage growth is enabled by the phage particle's low-efficiency DNA injection into the host. Thus, the phage particle allows phage populations to initially extend their host range without mutagenesis by virtue of residual recognition of the host receptor. Mutations appear during non-selective intracellular replication, and the frequency of mutant phages increases by natural selection acting on free phages, which are not capable of mutagenesis. PMID:27572836

  3. Difference-NMR techniques for selection of components on the basis of relaxation times

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harris, Douglas J.; de Azevedo, Eduardo R.; Bonagamba, Tito J.

    2003-05-01

    This work describes a numerical methodology to obtain more efficient relaxation filters to selectively retain or remove components based on relaxation times. The procedure uses linear combinations of spectra with various recycle or filter delays to obtain components that are both quantitative and pure. Modulation profiles are calculated assuming exponential relaxation behavior. The method is general and can be applied to a wide range of solution or solid-state NMR experiments including direct-polarization (DP), or filtered cross-polarization (CP) spectra. 13C NMR experiments on isotactic poly(1-butene) and dimethyl sulfone showed the utility of the technique for selectively suppressing peaks.

  4. On Large Time Behavior and Selection Principle for a Diffusive Carr-Penrose Model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Conlon, Joseph G.; Dabkowski, Michael; Wu, Jingchen

    2016-04-01

    This paper is concerned with the study of a diffusive perturbation of the linear LSW model introduced by Carr and Penrose. A main subject of interest is to understand how the presence of diffusion acts as a selection principle, which singles out a particular self-similar solution of the linear LSW model as determining the large time behavior of the diffusive model. A selection principle is rigorously proven for a model which is a semiclassical approximation to the diffusive model. Upper bounds on the rate of coarsening are also obtained for the full diffusive model.

  5. EXTRAPULMONARY EFFECTS OF NO2 AS REFLECTED BY PENTOBARBITAL-INDUCED SLEEPING TIME IN MICE

    EPA Science Inventory

    The influence of nitrogen dioxide (NO2) on pentobarbital(PEN)-induced sleeping time (S.T.) was investigated in mice. Acute exposure to concentrations as low as 470 micrograms NO2/cu m (0.25 ppm) caused a significant increase in PEN-induced S.T. No significant effects on PEN-induc...

  6. Time dependent measurements of induced fission for SNM interrogation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beck, A.; Israelashvili, I.; Wengrowicz, U.; Caspi, E. N.; Yaar, I.; Osovizki, A.; Ocherashvili, A.; Rennhofer, H.; Pedersen, B.; Crochemore, J.-M.; Roesgen, E.

    2013-08-01

    Gammas from induced fissions were measured and separated into prompt and delayed particles. To this end, a dedicated detector was realized, based on a plastic scintillator, a wavelength shifter fiber and a silicon photomultiplier (SiPM). Results are presented from the interrogation of Special Nuclear Materials (SNM), employing a pulsed neutron generator in the PUNITA graphite moderator incorporating the above detector assembly. The detector response is presented, as well as the sensitivities for prompt and delayed processes within the same experimental setup.

  7. Aggregation-induced fabrication of fluorescent organic nanorings: selective biosensing of cysteine and application to molecular logic gate.

    PubMed

    Mati, Soumya Sundar; Chall, Sayantani; Bhattacharya, Subhash Chandra

    2015-05-12

    Self-aggregation behavior in aqueous medium of four naphthalimide derivatives has exhibited substitution-dependent, unusual, aggregation induced emission enhancement (AIEE) phenomena. Absorption, emission, and time-resolved study initially indicated the formation of J-type fluorescent organic nanoaggregates (FONs). Simultaneous applications of infrared spectroscopy, theoretical studies, and dynamic light scattering (DLS) measurements explored the underlying mechanism of such substitution-selective aggregation of a chloro-naphthalimide organic molecule. Furthermore, transmission electron microscopy (TEM) visually confirmed the formation of ring like FONs with average size of 7.5-9.5 nm. Additionally, naphthalimide FONs also exhibited selective and specific cysteine amino acid sensing property. The specific behavior of NPCl aggregation toward amino acids was also employed as a molecular logic gate in information technology (IT). PMID:25893428

  8. Site-selective nanoscale-polymerization of pyrrole on gold nanoparticles via plasmon induced charge separation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Takahashi, Y.; Furukawa, Y.; Ishida, T.; Yamada, S.

    2016-04-01

    We proposed a nanoscale oxidative polymerization method which enables site-selective deposition on the surface of gold nanoparticles (AuNPs) combined with TiO2 by using plasmon induced charge separation (PICS) under visible-to-near infrared (IR) light irradiation. The method also revealed that the anodic site of PICS was located at the surface of AuNPs.We proposed a nanoscale oxidative polymerization method which enables site-selective deposition on the surface of gold nanoparticles (AuNPs) combined with TiO2 by using plasmon induced charge separation (PICS) under visible-to-near infrared (IR) light irradiation. The method also revealed that the anodic site of PICS was located at the surface of AuNPs. Electronic supplementary information (ESI) available. See DOI: 10.1039/c6nr01531j

  9. Motor commands induce time compression for tactile stimuli.

    PubMed

    Tomassini, Alice; Gori, Monica; Baud-Bovy, Gabriel; Sandini, Giulio; Morrone, Maria Concetta

    2014-07-01

    Saccades cause compression of visual space around the saccadic target, and also a compression of time, both phenomena thought to be related to the problem of maintaining saccadic stability (Morrone et al., 2005; Burr and Morrone, 2011). Interestingly, similar phenomena occur at the time of hand movements, when tactile stimuli are systematically mislocalized in the direction of the movement (Dassonville, 1995; Watanabe et al., 2009). In this study, we measured whether hand movements also cause an alteration of the perceived timing of tactile signals. Human participants compared the temporal separation between two pairs of tactile taps while moving their right hand in response to an auditory cue. The first pair of tactile taps was presented at variable times with respect to movement with a fixed onset asynchrony of 150 ms. Two seconds after test presentation, when the hand was stationary, the second pair of taps was delivered with a variable temporal separation. Tactile stimuli could be delivered to either the right moving or left stationary hand. When the tactile stimuli were presented to the motor effector just before and during movement, their perceived temporal separation was reduced. The time compression was effector-specific, as perceived time was veridical for the left stationary hand. The results indicate that time intervals are compressed around the time of hand movements. As for vision, the mislocalizations of time and space for touch stimuli may be consequences of a mechanism attempting to achieve perceptual stability during tactile exploration of objects, suggesting common strategies within different sensorimotor systems. PMID:24990936

  10. Space-Time Areal Mixture Model: Relabeling Algorithm and Model Selection Issues.

    PubMed

    Hossain, M M; Lawson, A B; Cai, B; Choi, J; Liu, J; Kirby, R S

    2014-03-01

    With the growing popularity of spatial mixture models in cluster analysis, model selection criteria have become an established tool in the search for parsimony. However, the label-switching problem is often inherent in Bayesian implementation of mixture models and a variety of relabeling algorithms have been proposed. We use a space-time mixture of Poisson regression models with homogeneous covariate effects to illustrate that the best model selected by using model selection criteria does not always support the model that is chosen by the optimal relabeling algorithm. The results are illustrated for real and simulated datasets. The objective is to make the reader aware that if the purpose of statistical modeling is to identify clusters, applying a relabeling algorithm to the model with the best fit may not generate the optimal relabeling. PMID:25221430

  11. Forward-in-Time, Spatially Explicit Modeling Software to Simulate Genetic Lineages Under Selection

    PubMed Central

    Currat, Mathias; Gerbault, Pascale; Di, Da; Nunes, José M.; Sanchez-Mazas, Alicia

    2015-01-01

    SELECTOR is a software package for studying the evolution of multiallelic genes under balancing or positive selection while simulating complex evolutionary scenarios that integrate demographic growth and migration in a spatially explicit population framework. Parameters can be varied both in space and time to account for geographical, environmental, and cultural heterogeneity. SELECTOR can be used within an approximate Bayesian computation estimation framework. We first describe the principles of SELECTOR and validate the algorithms by comparing its outputs for simple models with theoretical expectations. Then, we show how it can be used to investigate genetic differentiation of loci under balancing selection in interconnected demes with spatially heterogeneous gene flow. We identify situations in which balancing selection reduces genetic differentiation between population groups compared with neutrality and explain conflicting outcomes observed for human leukocyte antigen loci. These results and three previously published applications demonstrate that SELECTOR is efficient and robust for building insight into human settlement history and evolution. PMID:26949332

  12. Space-Time Areal Mixture Model: Relabeling Algorithm and Model Selection Issues

    PubMed Central

    Hossain, M.M.; Lawson, A.B.; Cai, B.; Choi, J.; Liu, J.; Kirby, R. S.

    2014-01-01

    With the growing popularity of spatial mixture models in cluster analysis, model selection criteria have become an established tool in the search for parsimony. However, the label-switching problem is often inherent in Bayesian implementation of mixture models and a variety of relabeling algorithms have been proposed. We use a space-time mixture of Poisson regression models with homogeneous covariate effects to illustrate that the best model selected by using model selection criteria does not always support the model that is chosen by the optimal relabeling algorithm. The results are illustrated for real and simulated datasets. The objective is to make the reader aware that if the purpose of statistical modeling is to identify clusters, applying a relabeling algorithm to the model with the best fit may not generate the optimal relabeling. PMID:25221430

  13. Population dynamics under selection and mutation: Long-time behavior for differential equations in measure spaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ackleh, Azmy S.; Cleveland, John; Thieme, Horst R.

    2016-07-01

    We study the long-time behavior of solutions to a measure-valued selection-mutation model that we formulated in [14]. We establish permanence results for the full model, and we study the limiting behavior even when there is more than one strategy of a given fitness; a case that arises in applications. We show that for the pure selection case the solution of the dynamical system converges to a Dirac measure centered at the fittest strategy class provided that the support of the initial measure contains a fittest strategy; thus we term this Dirac measure an Asymptotically Stable Strategy. We also show that when the strategy space is discrete, the selection-mutation model with small mutation has a locally asymptotically stable equilibrium that attracts all initial conditions that are positive at the fittest strategy.

  14. Selective inducible nitric oxide synthase inhibition attenuates organ dysfunction and elevated endothelin levels in LPS-induced DIC model rats.

    PubMed

    Asakura, H; Asamura, R; Ontachi, Y; Hayashi, T; Yamazaki, M; Morishita, E; Miyamoto, K-I; Nakao, S

    2005-05-01

    We examined the role of nitric oxide (NO) produced by an inducible isoform of NO synthase (iNOS) using N[6]-(iminoethyl)-lysine (L-NIL), a selective iNOS inhibitor, in the rat model of lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-induced disseminated intravascular coagulation (DIC) and investigated changes in organ function, plasma levels of NOX (metabolites of NO) and endothelin. We induced experimental DIC by the sustained infusion of 30 mg kg(-1) LPS for 4 h via the tail vein. We then investigated the effect of L-NIL (6 mg kg(-1), from - 0.5 to 4 h) on LPS-induced DIC. Blood was withdrawn at 4 and 8 h, and all four groups (LPS with or without L-NIL at 4 and 8 h) consisted of eight rats. Three of the animals in the 8-h LPS group died, and we examined blood samples from five rats in this group. None of the other rats died. The LPS-induced elevation of creatinine, alanine aminotransferase, glomerular fibrin deposition and plasminogen activator inhibitor was significantly suppressed by L-NIL coadministration, although L-NIL did not affect the platelet count, fibrinogen concentration or the level of thrombin-antithrombin complex. Moreover, plasma levels of the D-dimer that reflect the lysis of cross-linked fibrin were significantly increased by L-NIL coadministration in the LPS-induced DIC model. Plasma levels of NOX and endothelin were obviously increased by LPS infusion. However, both levels were significantly suppressed in the LPS + L-NIL group, when compared with the LPS group. Although mean arterial pressure (MAP) was significantly decreased between 2 and 8 h compared with the control in the LPS group, this depression was significantly attenuated in the LPS + L-NIL group. Our results suggest that NO induced by iNOS contributes to hypotension (depressed MAP), the progression of hepatic and renal dysfunction, microthrombus deposition and elevated endothelin levels in the rat model of LPS-induced DIC. PMID:15869603

  15. Detecting Selection on Temporal and Spatial Scales: A Genomic Time-Series Assessment of Selective Responses to Devil Facial Tumor Disease.

    PubMed

    Brüniche-Olsen, Anna; Austin, Jeremy J; Jones, Menna E; Holland, Barbara R; Burridge, Christopher P

    2016-01-01

    Detecting loci under selection is an important task in evolutionary biology. In conservation genetics detecting selection is key to investigating adaptation to the spread of infectious disease. Loci under selection can be detected on a spatial scale, accounting for differences in demographic history among populations, or on a temporal scale, tracing changes in allele frequencies over time. Here we use these two approaches to investigate selective responses to the spread of an infectious cancer--devil facial tumor disease (DFTD)--that since 1996 has ravaged the Tasmanian devil (Sarcophilus harrisii). Using time-series 'restriction site associated DNA' (RAD) markers from populations pre- and post DFTD arrival, and DFTD free populations, we infer loci under selection due to DFTD and investigate signatures of selection that are incongruent among methods, populations, and times. The lack of congruence among populations influenced by DFTD with respect to inferred loci under selection, and the direction of that selection, fail to implicate a consistent selective role for DFTD. Instead genetic drift is more likely driving the observed allele frequency changes over time. Our study illustrates the importance of applying methods with different performance optima e.g. accounting for population structure and background selection, and assessing congruence of the results. PMID:26930198

  16. Detecting Selection on Temporal and Spatial Scales: A Genomic Time-Series Assessment of Selective Responses to Devil Facial Tumor Disease

    PubMed Central

    Brüniche-Olsen, Anna; Austin, Jeremy J.; Jones, Menna E.; Holland, Barbara R.; Burridge, Christopher P.

    2016-01-01

    Detecting loci under selection is an important task in evolutionary biology. In conservation genetics detecting selection is key to investigating adaptation to the spread of infectious disease. Loci under selection can be detected on a spatial scale, accounting for differences in demographic history among populations, or on a temporal scale, tracing changes in allele frequencies over time. Here we use these two approaches to investigate selective responses to the spread of an infectious cancer—devil facial tumor disease (DFTD)—that since 1996 has ravaged the Tasmanian devil (Sarcophilus harrisii). Using time-series ‘restriction site associated DNA’ (RAD) markers from populations pre- and post DFTD arrival, and DFTD free populations, we infer loci under selection due to DFTD and investigate signatures of selection that are incongruent among methods, populations, and times. The lack of congruence among populations influenced by DFTD with respect to inferred loci under selection, and the direction of that selection, fail to implicate a consistent selective role for DFTD. Instead genetic drift is more likely driving the observed allele frequency changes over time. Our study illustrates the importance of applying methods with different performance optima e.g. accounting for population structure and background selection, and assessing congruence of the results. PMID:26930198

  17. Myricetin Selectively Induces Apoptosis on Cancerous Hepatocytes by Directly Targeting Their Mitochondria.

    PubMed

    Seydi, Enayatollah; Rasekh, Hamid Reza; Salimi, Ahmad; Mohsenifar, Zhaleh; Pourahmad, Jalal

    2016-09-01

    Hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) is the third most common cause of cancer-related death. In patients for whom HCC could not be detected early, current treatments show poor tolerance and low efficacy. So, alternative therapies with good efficacy are urgently needed. The aim of this research was to evaluate the selective apoptotic effects of myricetin (MYR), a flavonoid compound, on hepatocytes and mitochondria obtained from the liver of HCC rats. In this study, HCC induced by diethylnitrosamine (DEN), as an initiator, and 2-acetylaminofluorene (2-AAF), as a promoter. To confirm the HCC induction, serum levels of alpha-fetoprotein (AFP), AST, AST and ALP and histopathological changes in the liver tissue were evaluated. Rat liver hepatocytes and mitochondria for evaluation of the selective cytotoxic effects of MYR were isolated, and mitochondrial and cellular parameters related to apoptosis signalling were then determined. Our results showed that MYR was able to induce cytotoxicity only in hepatocytes from the HCC but not from the untreated control group. Besides, MYR (12.5, 25 and 50 μM) induced a considerable increase in reactive oxygen species (ROS) level, mitochondrial swelling, mitochondrial membrane permeabilization (MMP) and cytochrome c release only in cancerous but not in untreated normal hepatocyte mitochondria. MYR selectively increased caspase-3 activation and apoptotic phenotypes in HCC, but not untreated normal hepatocytes. Finally, our finding underlines MYR as a promising therapeutic candidate against HCC and recommends the compound for further studies. PMID:26919160

  18. The Steppengrille (Gryllus spec./assimilis): selective filters and signal mismatch on two time scales.

    PubMed

    Rothbart, Matti Michael; Hennig, Ralf Matthias

    2012-01-01

    In Europe, several species of crickets are available commercially as pet food. Here we investigated the calling song and phonotactic selectivity for sound patterns on the short and long time scales for one such a cricket, Gryllus spec., available as "Gryllus assimilis", the Steppengrille, originally from Ecuador. The calling song consisted of short chirps (2-3 pulses, carrier frequency: 5.0 kHz) emitted with a pulse period of 30.2 ms and chirp rate of 0.43 per second. Females exhibited high selectivity on both time scales. The preference for pulse period peaked at 33 ms which was higher then the pulse period produced by males. Two consecutive pulses per chirp at the correct pulse period were already sufficient for positive phonotaxis. The preference for the chirp pattern was limited by selectivity for small chirp duty cycles and for chirp periods between 200 ms and 500 ms. The long chirp period of the songs of males was unattractive to females. On both time scales a mismatch between the song signal of the males and the preference of females was observed. The variability of song parameters as quantified by the coefficient of variation was below 50% for all temporal measures. Hence, there was not a strong indication for directional selection on song parameters by females which could account for the observed mismatch. The divergence of the chirp period and female preference may originate from a founder effect, when the Steppengrille was cultured. Alternatively the mismatch was a result of selection pressures exerted by commercial breeders on low singing activity, to satisfy customers with softly singing crickets. In the latter case the prominent divergence between male song and female preference was the result of domestication and may serve as an example of rapid evolution of song traits in acoustic communication systems. PMID:22970154

  19. The Steppengrille (Gryllus spec./assimilis): Selective Filters and Signal Mismatch on Two Time Scales

    PubMed Central

    Rothbart, Matti Michael; Hennig, Ralf Matthias

    2012-01-01

    In Europe, several species of crickets are available commercially as pet food. Here we investigated the calling song and phonotactic selectivity for sound patterns on the short and long time scales for one such a cricket, Gryllus spec., available as “Gryllus assimilis”, the Steppengrille, originally from Ecuador. The calling song consisted of short chirps (2–3 pulses, carrier frequency: 5.0 kHz) emitted with a pulse period of 30.2 ms and chirp rate of 0.43 per second. Females exhibited high selectivity on both time scales. The preference for pulse period peaked at 33 ms which was higher then the pulse period produced by males. Two consecutive pulses per chirp at the correct pulse period were already sufficient for positive phonotaxis. The preference for the chirp pattern was limited by selectivity for small chirp duty cycles and for chirp periods between 200 ms and 500 ms. The long chirp period of the songs of males was unattractive to females. On both time scales a mismatch between the song signal of the males and the preference of females was observed. The variability of song parameters as quantified by the coefficient of variation was below 50% for all temporal measures. Hence, there was not a strong indication for directional selection on song parameters by females which could account for the observed mismatch. The divergence of the chirp period and female preference may originate from a founder effect, when the Steppengrille was cultured. Alternatively the mismatch was a result of selection pressures exerted by commercial breeders on low singing activity, to satisfy customers with softly singing crickets. In the latter case the prominent divergence between male song and female preference was the result of domestication and may serve as an example of rapid evolution of song traits in acoustic communication systems. PMID:22970154

  20. Reference gene selection for gene expression studies in lily using quantitative real-time PCR.

    PubMed

    Zhang, M F; Liu, Q; Jia, G X

    2016-01-01

    Quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction (qRT-PCR) is an important technology used to analyze gene-expression levels. Reference genes, which are assumed to be expressed consistently across various developmental stages and in different tissues, were selected for expression level analysis. Using digital gene expression technology, we selected nine reference genes (18S, EF, CYCOL, SAND, GAPDH, ACTIN, BHLH, TIP, and Clathrin) as candidate reference genes for further study. Using three different analysis methods (GeNorm, NormFinder, and BestKeeper), a total of 144 lily (Lilium x formolongi "Raizan 3") samples were analyzed. The samples were collected from four different tissues under various developmental stages. In addition, leaves treated with different plant hormones were collected and analyzed. The data showed that the stability of the nine reference genes differed among samples, but TIP, EF, Clathrin, and BHLH could be identified as the most stable genes overall. In addition, the relative expression level of LfFT in different lily tissues with the competence to flower was also analyzed to verify the selected reference genes. This study constitutes an important source for selecting reference genes when analyzing the expression patterns of flowering time and floral development regulation genes in lily cultivars. PMID:27173307

  1. A NOVEL SPECTRAL METHOD FOR INFERRING GENERAL DIPLOID SELECTION FROM TIME SERIES GENETIC DATA

    PubMed Central

    Steinrücken, Matthias; Bhaskar, Anand; Song, Yun S.

    2014-01-01

    The increased availability of time series genetic variation data from experimental evolution studies and ancient DNA samples has created new opportunities to identify genomic regions under selective pressure and to estimate their associated fitness parameters. However, it is a challenging problem to compute the likelihood of non-neutral models for the population allele frequency dynamics, given the observed temporal DNA data. Here, we develop a novel spectral algorithm to analytically and efficiently integrate over all possible frequency trajectories between consecutive time points. This advance circumvents the limitations of existing methods which require fine-tuning the discretization of the population allele frequency space when numerically approximating requisite integrals. Furthermore, our method is flexible enough to handle general diploid models of selection where the heterozygote and homozygote fitness parameters can take any values, while previous methods focused on only a few restricted models of selection. We demonstrate the utility of our method on simulated data and also apply it to analyze ancient DNA data from genetic loci associated with coat coloration in horses. In contrast to previous studies, our exploration of the full fitness parameter space reveals that a heterozygote-advantage form of balancing selection may have been acting on these loci. PMID:25598858

  2. Time-shared experiments for efficient assignment of triple-selectively labeled proteins

    PubMed Central

    Löhr, Frank; Laguerre, Aisha; Bock, Christoph; Reckel, Sina; Connolly, Peter J.; Abdul-Manan, Norzehan; Tumulka, Franz; Abele, Rupert; Moore, Jonathan M.; Dötsch, Volker

    2014-01-01

    Combinatorial triple-selective labeling facilitates the NMR assignment process for proteins that are subject to signal overlap and insufficient signal-to-noise in standard triple-resonance experiments. Aiming at maximum amino-acid type and sequence-specific information, the method represents a trade-off between the number of selectively labeled samples that have to be prepared and the number of spectra to be recorded per sample. In order to address the demand of long measurement times, we here propose pulse sequences in which individual phase-shifted transients are stored separately and recombined later to produce several 2D HN(CX) type spectra that are usually acquired sequentially. Sign encoding by the phases of 13C 90° pulses allows to either select or discriminate against 13C’ or 13Cα spins coupled to 15N. As a result, 1H-15N correlation maps of the various isotopomeric species present in triple-selectively labeled proteins are deconvoluted which in turn reduces problems due to spectral overlap. The new methods are demonstrated with four different membrane proteins with rotational correlation times ranging from 18 to 52 ns. PMID:25442777

  3. Time course of shape and category selectivity revealed by EEG rapid adaptation.

    PubMed

    Scholl, Clara A; Jiang, Xiong; Martin, Jacob G; Riesenhuber, Maximilian

    2014-02-01

    A hallmark of human cognition is the ability to rapidly assign meaning to sensory stimuli. It has been suggested that this fast visual object categorization ability is accomplished by a feedforward processing hierarchy consisting of shape-selective neurons in occipito-temporal cortex that feed into task circuits in frontal cortex computing conceptual category membership. We performed an EEG rapid adaptation study to test this hypothesis. Participants were trained to categorize novel stimuli generated with a morphing system that precisely controlled both stimulus shape and category membership. We subsequently performed EEG recordings while participants performed a category matching task on pairs of successively presented stimuli. We used space-time cluster analysis to identify channels and latencies exhibiting selective neural responses. Neural signals before 200 msec on posterior channels demonstrated a release from adaptation for shape changes, irrespective of category membership, compatible with a shape- but not explicitly category-selective neural representation. A subsequent cluster with anterior topography appeared after 200 msec and exhibited release from adaptation consistent with explicit categorization. These signals were subsequently modulated by perceptual uncertainty starting around 300 msec. The degree of category selectivity of the anterior signals was strongly predictive of behavioral performance. We also observed a posterior category-selective signal after 300 msec exhibiting significant functional connectivity with the initial anterior category-selective signal. In summary, our study supports the proposition that perceptual categorization is accomplished by the brain within a quarter second through a largely feedforward process culminating in frontal areas, followed by later category-selective signals in posterior regions. PMID:24001003

  4. Imaging multicellular specimens with real-time optimized tiling light-sheet selective plane illumination microscopy

    PubMed Central

    Fu, Qinyi; Martin, Benjamin L.; Matus, David Q.; Gao, Liang

    2016-01-01

    Despite the progress made in selective plane illumination microscopy, high-resolution 3D live imaging of multicellular specimens remains challenging. Tiling light-sheet selective plane illumination microscopy (TLS-SPIM) with real-time light-sheet optimization was developed to respond to the challenge. It improves the 3D imaging ability of SPIM in resolving complex structures and optimizes SPIM live imaging performance by using a real-time adjustable tiling light sheet and creating a flexible compromise between spatial and temporal resolution. We demonstrate the 3D live imaging ability of TLS-SPIM by imaging cellular and subcellular behaviours in live C. elegans and zebrafish embryos, and show how TLS-SPIM can facilitate cell biology research in multicellular specimens by studying left-right symmetry breaking behaviour of C. elegans embryos. PMID:27004937

  5. Resveratrol prevents rapamycin-induced upregulation of autophagy and selectively induces apoptosis in TSC2-deficient cells

    PubMed Central

    Alayev, Anya; Sun, Yang; Snyder, Rose B; Berger, Sara Malka; Yu, Jane J; Holz, Marina K

    2014-01-01

    The mammalian/mechanistic target of rapamycin complex 1 (mTORC1) signaling pathway is hyperactivated in a variety of cancers and disorders, including lymphangioleiomyomatosis (LAM) and tuberous sclerosis complex (TSC), which are characterized by mutations in tumor suppressors TSC1 or TSC2. The concern with the use of mTORC1 inhibitors, such as rapamycin or its analogs (rapalogs), is that they cause upregulation of autophagy and suppress the negative feedback loop to Akt, which promotes cell survival, causing the therapy to be only partially effective, and relapse occurs upon cessation of treatment. In this study, we investigate the use of rapamycin in combination with resveratrol, a naturally occurring polyphenol, in TSC2-deficient cells. We tested whether such combination would prevent rapamycin-induced upregulation of autophagy and shift the cell fate toward apoptosis. We found that this combination treatment blocked rapamycin-induced upregulation of autophagy and restored inhibition of Akt. Interestingly, the combination of rapamycin and resveratrol selectively promoted apoptosis of TSC2-deficient cells. Thus, the addition of resveratrol to rapamycin treatment may be a promising option for selective and targeted therapy for diseases with TSC loss and mTORC1 hyperactivation. PMID:24304514

  6. Health-Care Waste Treatment Technology Selection Using the Interval 2-Tuple Induced TOPSIS Method.

    PubMed

    Lu, Chao; You, Jian-Xin; Liu, Hu-Chen; Li, Ping

    2016-01-01

    Health-care waste (HCW) management is a major challenge for municipalities, particularly in the cities of developing nations. Selecting the best treatment technology for HCW can be regarded as a complex multi-criteria decision making (MCDM) issue involving a number of alternatives and multiple evaluation criteria. In addition, decision makers tend to express their personal assessments via multi-granularity linguistic term sets because of different backgrounds and knowledge, some of which may be imprecise, uncertain and incomplete. Therefore, the main objective of this study is to propose a new hybrid decision making approach combining interval 2-tuple induced distance operators with the technique for order preference by similarity to an ideal solution (TOPSIS) for tackling HCW treatment technology selection problems with linguistic information. The proposed interval 2-tuple induced TOPSIS (ITI-TOPSIS) can not only model the uncertainty and diversity of the assessment information given by decision makers, but also reflect the complex attitudinal characters of decision makers and provide much more complete information for the selection of the optimum disposal alternative. Finally, an empirical example in Shanghai, China is provided to illustrate the proposed decision making method, and results show that the ITI-TOPSIS proposed in this paper can solve the problem of HCW treatment technology selection effectively. PMID:27271652

  7. Selective Sirt2 inhibition by ligand-induced rearrangement of the active site

    PubMed Central

    Rumpf, Tobias; Schiedel, Matthias; Karaman, Berin; Roessler, Claudia; North, Brian J.; Lehotzky, Attila; Oláh, Judit; Ladwein, Kathrin I.; Schmidtkunz, Karin; Gajer, Markus; Pannek, Martin; Steegborn, Clemens; Sinclair, David A.; Gerhardt, Stefan; Ovádi, Judit; Schutkowski, Mike; Sippl, Wolfgang; Einsle, Oliver; Jung, Manfred

    2015-01-01

    Sirtuins are a highly conserved class of NAD+-dependent lysine deacylases. The human isotype Sirt2 has been implicated in the pathogenesis of cancer, inflammation and neurodegeneration, which makes the modulation of Sirt2 activity a promising strategy for pharmaceutical intervention. A rational basis for the development of optimized Sirt2 inhibitors is lacking so far. Here we present high-resolution structures of human Sirt2 in complex with highly selective drug-like inhibitors that show a unique inhibitory mechanism. Potency and the unprecedented Sirt2 selectivity are based on a ligand-induced structural rearrangement of the active site unveiling a yet-unexploited binding pocket. Application of the most potent Sirtuin-rearranging ligand, termed SirReal2, leads to tubulin hyperacetylation in HeLa cells and induces destabilization of the checkpoint protein BubR1, consistent with Sirt2 inhibition in vivo. Our structural insights into this unique mechanism of selective sirtuin inhibition provide the basis for further inhibitor development and selective tools for sirtuin biology. PMID:25672491

  8. The response of correlated traits following cessation of fishery-induced selection

    PubMed Central

    Salinas, Santiago; Perez, Kestrel O; Duffy, Tara A; Sabatino, Stephen J; Hice, Lyndie A; Munch, Stephan B; Conover, David O

    2012-01-01

    The application of evolutionary principles to the management of fisheries has gained considerable attention recently. Harvesting of fish may apply directional or disruptive selection to key life-history traits, and evidence for fishery-induced evolution is growing. The traits that are directly selected upon are often correlated (genetically or phenotypically) with a suite of interrelated physiological, behavioral, and morphological characters. A question that has received comparatively little attention is whether or not, after cessation of fishery-induced selection, these correlated traits revert back to previous states. Here, we empirically examine this question. In experiments with the Atlantic silverside, Menidia menidia, we applied size-selective culling for five generations and then maintained the lines a further five generations under random harvesting. We found that some traits do return to preharvesting levels (e.g., larval viability), some partially recover (e.g., egg volume, size-at-hatch), and others show no sign of change (e.g., food consumption rate, vertebral number). Such correlations among characters could, in theory, greatly accelerate or decelerate the recovery of fish populations. These results may explain why some fish stocks fail to recover after fishing pressure is relaxed. PMID:23144653

  9. Health-Care Waste Treatment Technology Selection Using the Interval 2-Tuple Induced TOPSIS Method

    PubMed Central

    Lu, Chao; You, Jian-Xin; Liu, Hu-Chen; Li, Ping

    2016-01-01

    Health-care waste (HCW) management is a major challenge for municipalities, particularly in the cities of developing nations. Selecting the best treatment technology for HCW can be regarded as a complex multi-criteria decision making (MCDM) issue involving a number of alternatives and multiple evaluation criteria. In addition, decision makers tend to express their personal assessments via multi-granularity linguistic term sets because of different backgrounds and knowledge, some of which may be imprecise, uncertain and incomplete. Therefore, the main objective of this study is to propose a new hybrid decision making approach combining interval 2-tuple induced distance operators with the technique for order preference by similarity to an ideal solution (TOPSIS) for tackling HCW treatment technology selection problems with linguistic information. The proposed interval 2-tuple induced TOPSIS (ITI-TOPSIS) can not only model the uncertainty and diversity of the assessment information given by decision makers, but also reflect the complex attitudinal characters of decision makers and provide much more complete information for the selection of the optimum disposal alternative. Finally, an empirical example in Shanghai, China is provided to illustrate the proposed decision making method, and results show that the ITI-TOPSIS proposed in this paper can solve the problem of HCW treatment technology selection effectively. PMID:27271652

  10. Magnetic-field-induced diameter-selective synthesis of single-walled carbon nanotubes.

    PubMed

    Su, Yanjie; Zhang, Yaozhong; Wei, Hao; Zhang, Liling; Zhao, Jiang; Yang, Zhi; Zhang, Yafei

    2012-03-01

    We report a facile and scalable approach to synthesize single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWNTs) with selected diameter distribution by applying a magnetic field perpendicular to the electric field in the arc plasma region. It is found that this magnetic field-induced diameter-selectivity strategy enables the control of the SWNTs with different diameter distributions in different regions, and the diameter-selective efficiency could be enhanced by modifying the direction of magnetic field. Our results indicate that the motions of the catalysts with different particle sizes, positive carbon ions and electrons are significantly influenced by the magnetic field and electromagnetic force, resulting in the different nucleation and growth processes of SWNTs due to the collective interactions between the magnetic field and arc plasma. This approach would enable a viable route towards the synthesis of SWNTs with desired diameter through the tuning of arc parameters in the arc discharge process. PMID:22301844

  11. Highly selective fluorogenic multianalyte biosensors constructed via enzyme-catalyzed coupling and aggregation-induced emission.

    PubMed

    Wang, Xiaorui; Hu, Jinming; Zhang, Guoying; Liu, Shiyong

    2014-07-16

    The development of a highly selective and fast responsive fluorogenic biosensor for diverse analytes ranging from bioactive small molecules to specific antigens is highly desirable but remains a considerable challenge. We herein propose a new approach by integrating substrate-selective enzymatic reactions with fluorogens exhibiting aggregation-induced emission feature. Tyrosine-functionalized tetraphenylethene, TPE-Tyr, molecularly dissolves in aqueous media with negligible fluorescence emission; upon addition of horseradish peroxidase (HRP) and H2O2, effective cross-linking occurs due to HRP-catalyzed oxidative coupling of tyrosine moieties in TPE-Tyr. This leads to fluorescence emission turn-on and fast detection of H2O2 with high sensitivity and selectivity. As a validation of the new strategy's generality, we further configure it into the biosensor design for glucose through cascade enzymatic reactions and for pathologically relevant antigens (e.g., human carcinoembryonic antigen) by combining with the ELISA kit. PMID:24983204

  12. Pyrithione Zn selectively inhibits hypoxia-inducible factor prolyl hydroxylase PHD3.

    PubMed

    Na, Yu-Ran; Woo, Dustin J; Kim, So Yeon; Yang, Eun Gyeong

    2016-04-01

    Increasing evidence emphasizes the role of the hypoxia-inducible factor (HIF) prolyl hydroxylase (PHD) isoforms in regulating non-HIF substrates, but isoform selective PHD inhibitors under physiological conditions have not yet been reported. Here we have identified pyrithione Zn (PZ) as a potent, isoform-selective PHD3 inhibitor. The IC50 value of PZ was determined as 0.98 μM for PHD3, while it did not show any inhibitory activity toward full length and truncated PHD2 up to 1 mM. The selective efficacy of PZ was further demonstrated at the cellular level by observing inhibition of the PHD3-dependent DNA damage response pathway without stabilization of HIF-1α. PMID:26940742

  13. Time-dependent ion selectivity in capacitive charging of porous electrodes.

    PubMed

    Zhao, R; van Soestbergen, M; Rijnaarts, H H M; van der Wal, A; Bazant, M Z; Biesheuvel, P M

    2012-10-15

    In a combined experimental and theoretical study, we show that capacitive charging of porous electrodes in multicomponent electrolytes may lead to the phenomenon of time-dependent ion selectivity of the electrical double layers (EDLs) in the electrodes. This effect is found in experiments on capacitive deionization of water containing NaCl/CaCl(2) mixtures, when the concentration of Na(+) ions in the water is five times the Ca(2+)-ion concentration. In this experiment, after applying a voltage difference between two porous carbon electrodes, first the majority monovalent Na(+) cations are preferentially adsorbed in the EDLs, and later, they are gradually replaced by the minority, divalent Ca(2+) cations. In a process where this ion adsorption step is followed by washing the electrode with freshwater under open-circuit conditions, and subsequent release of the ions while the cell is short-circuited, a product stream is obtained which is significantly enriched in divalent ions. Repeating this process three times by taking the product concentrations of one run as the feed concentrations for the next, a final increase in the Ca(2+)/Na(+)-ratio of a factor of 300 is achieved. The phenomenon of time-dependent ion selectivity of EDLs cannot be explained by linear response theory. Therefore, a nonlinear time-dependent analysis of capacitive charging is performed for both porous and flat electrodes. Both models attribute time-dependent ion selectivity to the interplay between the transport resistance for the ions in the aqueous solution outside the EDL, and the voltage-dependent ion adsorption capacity of the EDLs. Exact analytical expressions are presented for the excess ion adsorption in planar EDLs (Gouy-Chapman theory) for mixtures containing both monovalent and divalent cations. PMID:22819395

  14. INFLUENCE OF OZONE ON PENTOBARBITAL-INDUCED SLEEPING TIME IN MICE, RATS, AND HAMSTERS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Prior studies have shown that ozone (O3) increases pentobarbital (PEN)-induced sleeping time (S.T.) in female mice, rats, and hamsters. To investigate some potential mechanisms producing these effects, the authors measured zoxazolamine-induced paralysis time and thiopental- and h...

  15. Survivin selective inhibitor YM155 promotes cisplatin‑induced apoptosis in embryonal rhabdomyosarcoma.

    PubMed

    Ueno, Takehisa; Uehara, Shuichiro; Nakahata, Kengo; Okuyama, Hiroomi

    2016-05-01

    Survivin, a member of the inhibitor of apoptosis protein family, functions as a key regulator of programmed cell death. YM155 is a small molecule that selectively inhibits survivin. We investigated the effect of YM155 on survivin suppression in the human rhabdomyosarcoma (RMS) cell line RD. The efficacy of YM155 in combination with cisplatin was also determined in a xenograft model. The effect of YM155 on survivin expression in the RD cell line was examined at both mRNA and protein levels using real-time PCR and western blot analysis. RD cells were cultured with various concentrations of YM155, then cisplatin was added to the medium and the anti-proliferation response was determined. Cell growth was evaluated by WST-8 assay. Finally, the efficacy of YM155 combined with cisplatin was examined in an established xenograft model. Survivin mRNA levels in the RD cell line were decreased to 72 and 24% at 24 and 48 h, respectively, after 10 nM of YM155 was added. YM155 also decreased the levels of survivin protein. YM155 treatment (10 nM) inhibited cell proliferation of RD in a dose-dependent manner in vitro, with 58% of cells viable at 48 h. When cultured with 10 nM of YM155 and 10 µM cisplatin, RD cells demonstrated only 25% of the growth observed when cultured with cisplatin alone. YM155 in combination with cisplatin significantly inhibited tumor growth by 13% compared with control (P<0.0001) in RD xenograft tumors. YM155 increased the sensitivity of cisplatin by suppressing survivin in the embryonal RMS cell line RD. Further studies should investigate the use of YM155 as an apoptosis inducer, either alone or in combination with cisplatin, for the treatment of malignant RMS. PMID:26983495

  16. Reusable light-emitting-diode induced chemiluminescence aptasensor for highly sensitive and selective detection of riboflavin.

    PubMed

    Xu, Shuxia; Zhang, Xinfeng; Liu, Weiwei; Sun, Yonghua; Zhang, Heliang

    2013-05-15

    A novel reusable chemiluminescence aptasensor was developed based on aptamer recognition coupled with light-emitting-diode induced chemiluminescence (LED-CL) detection. The sensing approach was based on the design that the model analyte riboflavin (Rf) in sample solutions was captured by the immobilized aptamers and then eluted simply with alkaline luminol solution to catalyze the CL reaction between luminol and dissolved oxygen under high power LED irradiation. This design allowed a very simple (branch-free) flow way for the CL sensing system. The CL intensity versus the Rf concentration was linear in the range from 0.03 to 5ngmL(-1) with a limit of detection (LOD) down low to 8pgmL(-1). Without renewing the aptamer, the relative standard deviation (RSD) for seven consecutive detections is 2.33%; the sensor also showed good stability without performance deterioration after >100 times use. Up to 10000-fold of K(+), Na(+), Ca(2+), Mg(2+), and Fe(3+), 5000-fold for glucose and bovine serum albumin, 1000-fold of uric acid, 1500-fold of ascorbic acid (added with Fe(3+)), 100-fold of flavin mononucleotide and 200-fold of flavin adenine dinucleotide caused no significant interference with the determination of 0.5ngmL(-1) Rf. The sensor was applied for analysis of Rf in urine and food samples with the recovery of 94-103%. The advantages of reusability, simplicity, high sensitivity and selectivity provided by the LED-CL aptasensor will make it a good alternative tool for biological and food analysis. PMID:23298628

  17. Gallic acid as a selective anticancer agent that induces apoptosis in SMMC-7721 human hepatocellular carcinoma cells

    PubMed Central

    SUN, GUOJUN; ZHANG, SHUQIN; XIE, YANRU; ZHANG, ZIYU; ZHAO, WENJING

    2016-01-01

    Gallic acid (3,4,5-trihydroxybenzoic acid; GA) is a naturally occurring plant polyphenol, isolated from water caltrop, which has been reported to exert anticancer effects. The present study investigated the antiproliferative effects of GA on the HepG2 and SMMC-7721 human hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) cell lines using MTT and colony formation assays. In particular, the underlying mechanism of GA-induced apoptosis in SMMC-7721 cells was studied in vitro by flow cytometry and western blotting. The results of the present study indicated that GA was capable of inhibiting the proliferation of HepG2 and SMMC-7721 cells in a time- and dose-dependent manner, as well as inducing the apoptosis of SMMC-7721 cells. GA induced caspase-3, caspase-9 and reactive oxygen species activity, elevated the expression of apoptosis regulator Bcl-2-like protein 4 and reduced the mitochondrial membrane potential in SMMC-7721 cells. When compared with HL-7702 normal human hepatocytes, GA demonstrated selective toxicity for HCC cells. In conclusion, GA is able to induce apoptosis in SMMC-7721 cells in vitro via mitochondrial-mediated pathways, and may possess the potential to be a novel therapeutic compound for use in the treatment of HCC. PMID:26870182

  18. Exercise induced sympathetic influences do not change interatrial conduction times in VDD and DDD pacing.

    PubMed

    Ismer, B; Von Knorre, G H; Voss, W; Grille, W; Klenke, G; Pulya, K; Koglek, W; Suntinger, A; Luessow, H

    1996-11-01

    Using telemetry, right atrial electrogram (RA), and marker channel of atrial sense events (MA) in combination with the left atrial electrogram (LA), recorded by a filtered bipolar esophageal lead, interatrial conduction during submaximal exercise and at rest was examined in 46 DDD pacemaker patients. The RA-LA and MA-LA conduction times measured in the presence of atrial sensing (VDD) as well as the conduction time SA-LA from atrial stimulus (SA) to LA, determined during atrial pacing (DDD) were found to be individual constants independent of exercise induced sympathetic influences. Thus, having determined an optimal mechanical interval (LA-LV)mech/opt from left atrium to ventricle by other methods, the optimal AV delay for DDD as well as for VDD operation can be calculated by the sum of the appropriate interatrial conduction time (SA-LA, respectively MA-LA) and the (LA-LV)mech/opt interval. Due to the constant SA-LA and MA-LA, the difference between these two values (AV delay correction interval) is a constant as well, which remains unchanged during exercise. Therefore, in selecting the rate responsive AV delay, only hemodynamic and not electrophysiological measurements need to be considered. PMID:8945041

  19. Hesperetin, a Selective Phosphodiesterase 4 Inhibitor, Effectively Suppresses Ovalbumin-Induced Airway Hyperresponsiveness without Influencing Xylazine/Ketamine-Induced Anesthesia

    PubMed Central

    Shih, Chung-Hung; Lin, Ling-Hung; Hsu, Hsin-Te; Wang, Kuo-Hsien; Lai, Chi-Yin; Chen, Chien-Ming; Ko, Wun-Chang

    2012-01-01

    Hesperetin, a selective phosphodiesterase (PDE)4 inhibitor, is present in the traditional Chinese medicine, “Chen Pi.” Therefore, we were interested in investigating its effects on ovalbumin- (OVA-) induced airway hyperresponsiveness, and clarifying its rationale for ameliorating asthma and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD). Hesperetin was revealed to have a therapeutic (PDE4H/PDE4L) ratio of >11. Hesperetin (10 ~ 30 μmol/kg, intraperitoneally (i.p.)) dose-dependently and significantly attenuated the airway hyperresponsiveness induced by methacholine. It also significantly suppressed the increases in total inflammatory cells, macrophages, lymphocytes, neutrophils, and eosinophils, and levels of cytokines, including interleukin (IL)-2, IL-4, IL-5, interferon-γ, and tumor necrosis factor-α in bronchoalveolar lavage fluid (BALF). It dose-dependently and significantly suppressed total and OVA-specific immunoglobulin E levels in the BALF and serum. However, hesperetin did not influence xylazine/ketamine-induced anesthesia, suggesting that hesperetin has few or no emetic effects. In conclusion, the rationales for ameliorating allergic asthma and COPD by hesperetin are anti-inflammation, immunoregulation, and bronchodilation. PMID:22454667

  20. Time-resolved photoluminescence for evaluating laser-induced damage during dielectric stack ablation in silicon solar cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Parola, Stéphanie; Blanc-Pélissier, Danièle; Barbos, Corina; Le Coz, Marine; Poulain, Gilles; Lemiti, Mustapha

    2016-06-01

    Selective laser ablation of dielectric layers on crystalline silicon wafers was investigated for solar cell fabrication. Laser processing was performed on Al2O3, and bi-layers Al2O3/SiNX:H with a nanosecond UV laser at various energy densities ranging from 0.4 to 2 J cm-2. Ablation threshold was correlated to the simulated temperature at the interface between the dielectric coatings and the silicon substrate. Laser-induced damage to the silicon substrate was evaluated by time-resolved photoluminescence. The minority carrier lifetime deduced from time-resolved photoluminescence was related to the depth of the heat affected zone in the substrate.

  1. Recirculating photonic filter: a wavelength-selective time delay for optically controlled phased-array antenna

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yegnanarayanan, Siva; Trinh, Paul D.; Jalali, Bahram

    1996-11-01

    A wavelength-selective photonic time delay filter is proposed and demonstrated. The device consists of an optical phased-array waveguide grating in a recirculating feedback configuration. It can function as a true-time-delay generator for squint-free beam steering in optically- controlled phased-array antennas. As the photonic filter uses the optical carrier wavelength to select the desired time delay, a one-to-one map is established between the optical carrier wavelength and the desired antenna direction, thus eliminating complex switching networks required to select the appropriate delay line. The proposed device can also function as the encoder/decoder in wavelength-CDMA. The concept uses a waveguide prism in a symmetric feedback (recirculating) configuration. The modulated optical carrier is steered by the waveguide prism to the appropriate integrated delay line depending on the carrier wavelength. The signal is delayed and is fed back into the symmetric input port. The prism then focuses the delayed beam into the common output port. Thus three sequential operations are performed: (1) wavelength demultiplexing, (2) time delay, and (3) wavelength multiplexing. It is important to note that the recirculating photonic filter has no 1/N loss; all the power at a given wavelength is diffracted into the output port. Furthermore, high resolution (6 - 8 bits) can be obtained in a compact integrated device. A prototype regular recirculating photonic filter true-time delay device was realized using a 8-channel arrayed-waveguide grating demultiplexer and external (off-chip) fiber delay lines. The grating was fabricated in the silica waveguide technology with 0.8 nm channel spacing (FSR equals 6.4 nm) and operating in the 1.5 micrometers wavelength range. Light from an external cavity tunable laser was rf modulated at 10 - 40 MHz and was coupled into the arrayed waveguide grating chip and time/phase measurements were performed sing a digital oscilloscope. Feedback delay

  2. Living with limited time: Socioemotional selectivity theory in the context of health adversity.

    PubMed

    Sullivan-Singh, Sarah J; Stanton, Annette L; Low, Carissa A

    2015-06-01

    The current research was designed to test the applicability of socioemotional selectivity theory (SST; Carstensen, 2006), a life span theory that posits that perceived time remaining in life (time perspective) is a critical determinant of motivation, to individuals who face foreshortened futures (limited time perspective) due to life-limiting medical illness. In Study 1, we investigated whether life goals and biases in attention and memory for valenced emotional stimuli differed between women living with metastatic breast cancer (n = 113; theoretically living under greater limited time perspective than peers without cancer) and similarly aged women without a cancer diagnosis (n = 50; theoretically living under greater expansive time perspective than peers with cancer) in accordance with SST. As hypothesized, metastatic group goals reflected greater emphasis on limited versus expansive time perspective relative to comparison group goals. Hypotheses regarding biases in attention and memory were not supported. Study 2 followed metastatic group participants over 3 months and revealed that, consistent with hypotheses, whereas limited time perspective goals predicted decreased intrusive thoughts about cancer, expansive time perspective goals predicted decreased perceived cancer-related benefits. Together, these studies suggest that SST is a useful lens through which to view some components of motivation and psychological adjustment among individuals confronting medically foreshortened futures. PMID:25984789

  3. Living With Limited Time: Socioemotional Selectivity Theory in the Context of Health Adversity

    PubMed Central

    Sullivan-Singh, Sarah J.; Stanton, Annette L.; Low, Carissa A.

    2016-01-01

    The current research was designed to test the applicability of socioemotional selectivity theory (SST; Carstensen, 2006), a life span theory that posits that perceived time remaining in life (time perspective) is a critical determinant of motivation, to individuals who face foreshortened futures (limited time perspective) due to life-limiting medical illness. In Study 1, we investigated whether life goals and biases in attention and memory for valenced emotional stimuli differed between women living with metastatic breast cancer (n = 113; theoretically living under greater limited time perspective than peers without cancer) and similarly aged women without a cancer diagnosis (n = 50; theoretically living under greater expansive time perspective than peers with cancer) in accordance with SST. As hypothesized, metastatic group goals reflected greater emphasis on limited versus expansive time perspective relative to comparison group goals. Hypotheses regarding biases in attention and memory were not supported. Study 2 followed metastatic group participants over 3 months and revealed that, consistent with hypotheses, whereas limited time perspective goals predicted decreased intrusive thoughts about cancer, expansive time perspective goals predicted decreased perceived cancer-related benefits. Together, these studies suggest that SST is a useful lens through which to view some components of motivation and psychological adjustment among individuals confronting medically foreshortened futures. PMID:25984789

  4. Salinomycin induces selective cytotoxicity to MCF-7 mammosphere cells through targeting the Hedgehog signaling pathway.

    PubMed

    Fu, Ying-Zi; Yan, Yuan-Yuan; He, Miao; Xiao, Qing-Huan; Yao, Wei-Fan; Zhao, Lin; Wu, Hui-Zhe; Yu, Zhao-Jin; Zhou, Ming-Yi; Lv, Mu-Tian; Zhang, Shan-Shan; Chen, Jian-Jun; Wei, Min-Jie

    2016-02-01

    Breast cancer stem cells (BCSCs) are believed to be responsible for tumor chemoresistance, recurrence, and metastasis formation. Salinomycin (SAL), a carboxylic polyether ionophore, has been reported to act as a selective breast CSC inhibitor. However, the molecular mechanisms underlying SAL-induced cytotoxicity on BCSCs remain unclear. The Hedgehog (Hh) signaling pathway plays an important role in CSC maintenance and carcinogenesis. Here, we investigated whether SAL induces cytotoxicity on BCSCs through targeting Hh pathway. In the present study, we cultured breast cancer MCF-7 cells in suspension in serum-free medium to obtain breast CSC-enriched MCF-7 mammospheres (MCF-7 MS). MCF-7 MS cells possessed typical BCSC properties, such as CD44+CD24-/low phenotype, high expression of OCT4 (a stem cell marker), increased colony-forming ability, strong migration and invasion capabilities, differentiation potential, and strong tumorigenicity in xenografted mice. SAL exhibited selective cytotoxicity to MCF-7 MS cells relative to MCF-7 cells. The Hh pathway was highly activated in BCSC-enriched MCF-7 MS cells and SAL inhibited Hh signaling activation by downregulating the expression of critical components of the Hh pathway such as PTCH, SMO, Gli1, and Gli2, and subsequently repressing the expression of their essential downstream targets including C-myc, Bcl-2, and Snail (but not cyclin D1). Conversely, Shh-induced Hh signaling activation could largely reverse SAL-mediated inhibitory effects. These findings suggest that SAL-induced selective cytotoxicity against MCF-7 MS cells is associated with the inhibition of Hh signaling activation and the expression of downstream targets and the Hh pathway is an important player and a possible drug target in the pathogenesis of BCSCs. PMID:26718029

  5. Space-time metrical fluctuations induced by cosmic turbulence

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rosen, G.

    1980-01-01

    For a stochastic stress-energy tensor associated with cosmic turbulence, it is observed that Einstein's equations imply fluctuations in the space-time metric tensor. Such metrical fluctuations are shown to engender modified values for the average effective proper density and total pressure and thus to alter the solutions to the Friedman equations.

  6. Selection of Spectral Data for Classification of Steels Using Laser-Induced Breakdown Spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kong, Haiyang; Sun, Lanxiang; Hu, Jingtao; Xin, Yong; Cong, Zhibo

    2015-11-01

    Principal component analysis (PCA) combined with artificial neural networks was used to classify the spectra of 27 steel samples acquired using laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy. Three methods of spectral data selection, selecting all the peak lines of the spectra, selecting intensive spectral partitions and the whole spectra, were utilized to compare the influence of different inputs of PCA on the classification of steels. Three intensive partitions were selected based on experience and prior knowledge to compare the classification, as the partitions can obtain the best results compared to all peak lines and the whole spectra. We also used two test data sets, mean spectra after being averaged and raw spectra without any pretreatment, to verify the results of the classification. The results of this comprehensive comparison show that a back propagation network trained using the principal components of appropriate, carefully selected spectral partitions can obtain the best results. A perfect result with 100% classification accuracy can be achieved using the intensive spectral partitions ranging of 357-367 nm. supported by the National High Technology Research and Development Program of China (863 Program) (No. 2012AA040608), National Natural Science Foundation of China (Nos. 61473279, 61004131) and the Development of Scientific Research Equipment Program of Chinese Academy of Sciences (No. YZ201247)

  7. Initial tsunami source estimation by inversion with an intelligent selection of model parameters and time delays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mulia, Iyan E.; Asano, Toshiyuki

    2016-01-01

    We propose a method for accurately estimating the initial tsunami source. Our technique is independent of the earthquake parameters, because we only use recorded tsunami waveforms and an auxiliary basis function, instead of a fault model. We first use the measured waveforms to roughly identify the source area using backward propagated travel times, and then infer the initial sea surface deformation through inversion analysis. A computational intelligence approach based on a genetic algorithm combined with a pattern search was used to select appropriate least squares model parameters and time delays. The proposed method significantly reduced the number of parameters and suppressed the negative effect of regularization schemes that decreased the plausibility of the model. Furthermore, the stochastic approach for deriving the time delays is a more flexible strategy for simulating actual phenomena that occur in nature. The selected parameters and time delays increased the accuracy, and the model's ability to reveal the underlying physics associated with the tsunami-generating processes. In this paper, we applied the method to the 2011 Tohoku-Oki tsunami event and examined its effectiveness by comparing the results to those using the conventional method.

  8. Genome-wide Selective Sweeps in Natural Bacterial Populations Revealed by Time-series Metagenomics

    SciTech Connect

    Chan, Leong-Keat; Bendall, Matthew L.; Malfatti, Stephanie; Schwientek, Patrick; Tremblay, Julien; Schackwitz, Wendy; Martin, Joel; Pati, Amrita; Bushnell, Brian; Foster, Brian; Kang, Dongwan; Tringe, Susannah G.; Bertilsson, Stefan; Moran, Mary Ann; Shade, Ashley; Newton, Ryan J.; Stevens, Sarah; McMahon, Katherine D.; Malmstrom, Rex R.

    2014-06-18

    Multiple evolutionary models have been proposed to explain the formation of genetically and ecologically distinct bacterial groups. Time-series metagenomics enables direct observation of evolutionary processes in natural populations, and if applied over a sufficiently long time frame, this approach could capture events such as gene-specific or genome-wide selective sweeps. Direct observations of either process could help resolve how distinct groups form in natural microbial assemblages. Here, from a three-year metagenomic study of a freshwater lake, we explore changes in single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) frequencies and patterns of gene gain and loss in populations of Chlorobiaceae and Methylophilaceae. SNP analyses revealed substantial genetic heterogeneity within these populations, although the degree of heterogeneity varied considerably among closely related, co-occurring Methylophilaceae populations. SNP allele frequencies, as well as the relative abundance of certain genes, changed dramatically over time in each population. Interestingly, SNP diversity was purged at nearly every genome position in one of the Chlorobiaceae populations over the course of three years, while at the same time multiple genes either swept through or were swept from this population. These patterns were consistent with a genome-wide selective sweep, a process predicted by the ‘ecotype model’ of diversification, but not previously observed in natural populations.

  9. Genome-wide Selective Sweeps in Natural Bacterial Populations Revealed by Time-series Metagenomics

    SciTech Connect

    Chan, Leong-Keat; Bendall, Matthew L.; Malfatti, Stephanie; Schwientek, Patrick; Tremblay, Julien; Schackwitz, Wendy; Martin, Joel; Pati, Amrita; Bushnell, Brian; Foster, Brian; Kang, Dongwan; Tringe, Susannah G.; Bertilsson, Stefan; Moran, Mary Ann; Shade, Ashley; Newton, Ryan J.; Stevens, Sarah; McMcahon, Katherine D.; Mamlstrom, Rex R.

    2014-05-12

    Multiple evolutionary models have been proposed to explain the formation of genetically and ecologically distinct bacterial groups. Time-series metagenomics enables direct observation of evolutionary processes in natural populations, and if applied over a sufficiently long time frame, this approach could capture events such as gene-specific or genome-wide selective sweeps. Direct observations of either process could help resolve how distinct groups form in natural microbial assemblages. Here, from a three-year metagenomic study of a freshwater lake, we explore changes in single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) frequencies and patterns of gene gain and loss in populations of Chlorobiaceae and Methylophilaceae. SNP analyses revealed substantial genetic heterogeneity within these populations, although the degree of heterogeneity varied considerably among closely related, co-occurring Methylophilaceae populations. SNP allele frequencies, as well as the relative abundance of certain genes, changed dramatically over time in each population. Interestingly, SNP diversity was purged at nearly every genome position in one of the Chlorobiaceae populations over the course of three years, while at the same time multiple genes either swept through or were swept from this population. These patterns were consistent with a genome-wide selective sweep, a process predicted by the ecotype model? of diversification, but not previously observed in natural populations.

  10. Autostereoscopic display concept with time-sequential wavelength-selective filter-barrier

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jurk, Silvio; Kuhlmey, Mathias; Bartmann, Roland; Duckstein, Bernd; de la Barré, René

    2016-03-01

    A spatially multiplexed autostereoscopic 3D display design with a strip barrier consisting of RGB-color filters is presented. The wavelength selective filter barrier emits the light from a display area larger than that of common autostereoscopic barrier displays. However, such construction is still used rather rarely. The time sequential operation mode is a supplemental option. Wavelength selective filter barrier arrangements exhibit characteristics different from common barrier displays with similar barrier pitch and ascent. In particular these constructions show strong angular luminance dependency under barrier inclination specified by correspondent slant angle. In time sequential implementation it is important to avoid that quick eye or eyelid movement lead to visible color artifacts. Those circumstances limit the possibility to find well working and usable display designs superior to usual barrier displays. The newly introduced design is usable as a multi user display as well as a single user system with user adaptive control. In case of tracked single user mode the adaption in x-z-direction is continuously. The design has been modelled with simulation software developed for that purpose. The modelling of wavelength-selective barriers was used to calculate the light ray distribution properties of that arrangement. For the experimental verification of the image separation and evaluation of image quality, commercially available display components were combined for a display demonstrator.

  11. Action recognition based on a selective sampling strategy for real-time video surveillance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Bo; Zhang, Hong; Yuan, Ding

    2015-12-01

    Action recognition is a very challenging task in the field of real-time video surveillance. The traditional models on action recognition are constructed of Spatial-temporal features and Bag-of-Feature representations. Based on this model, current research work tends to introduce dense sampling to achieve better performance. However, such approaches are computationally intractable when dealing with large video dataset. Hence, there are some recent works focused on feature reduction to speed up the algorithm without reducing accuracy. In this paper, we proposed a novel selective feature sampling strategy on action recognition. Firstly, the optical flow field is estimated throughout the input video. And then the sparse FAST (Features from Accelerated Segment Test) points are selected within the motion regions detected by using the optical flows on the temporally down-sampled image sequences. The selective features, sparse FAST points, are the seeds to generate the 3D patches. Consequently, the simplified LPM (Local Part Model) which greatly speeds up the model is formed via 3D patches. Moreover, MBHs (Motion Boundary Histograms) calculated by optical flows are also adopted in the framework to further improve the efficiency. Experimental results on UCF50 dataset and our artificial dataset show that our method could reach more real-time effect and achieve a higher accuracy compared with the other competitive methods published recently.

  12. Control of laser induced reactions in solids using selected photon energies and pulse pairs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hess, Wayne; Joly, Alan; Beck, Kenneth; Gerrity, Daniel; Dickinson, J. Thomas; Sushko, Peter; Shluger, Alexander

    2002-03-01

    Laser control of reaction dynamics is an intensely studied area of chemical physics. Sophisticated quantum and optimal control schemes have been developed to overcome difficulties associated with rapid energy redistribution from laser-prepared initial states. Experiment and theory have demonstrated how specific product pathways can be selected by irradiation with one or more laser beams. Although most laser control research has focused on small gas-phase molecules, product and quantum state control of laser desorption from solids is possible using delayed pulse pairs, selected pulse duration or by judicious choice of laser wavelength. Theory indicates that it is possible to excite the surface of ionic crystals, over the bulk, using tunable laser sources.[1] We recently demonstrated control of ion emission from MgO surfaces[2] using femtosecond pulse pairs and nearly exclusive emission of hyperthermal Br (2P3/2) from laser excited KBr.[3] Here, we explore the mechanism of laser desorption in experiments using delayed pulse pairs and tunable single pulses. The first laser pulse induces formation of transient species and the second pulse then excites the intermediate state to induce desorption of selected species or quantum states. Selective desorption raises the intriguing prospect of selective surface modification. The principles described here should be extendable to other alkali halides and metal oxides. References: [1] A.L. Shluger, P.V. Sushko, and L.N. Kantorovich, Phys. Rev. B. 59, (1999) 2417. [2] K.M. Beck, A.G. Joly, and W.P. Hess, Sur. Sci. 451, 166 (2000). [3] W. P. Hess, A. G. Joly, K. M. Beck, D. P. Gerrity, P. V. Sushko, and A. L. Shluger, J. Chem. Phys. 115, 9463 (2001).

  13. Meditation-induced states predict attentional control over time.

    PubMed

    Colzato, Lorenza S; Sellaro, Roberta; Samara, Iliana; Baas, Matthijs; Hommel, Bernhard

    2015-12-01

    Meditation is becoming an increasingly popular topic for scientific research and various effects of extensive meditation practice (ranging from weeks to several years) on cognitive processes have been demonstrated. Here we show that extensive practice may not be necessary to achieve those effects. Healthy adult non-meditators underwent a brief single session of either focused attention meditation (FAM), which is assumed to increase top-down control, or open monitoring meditation (OMM), which is assumed to weaken top-down control, before performing an Attentional Blink (AB) task - which assesses the efficiency of allocating attention over time. The size of the AB was considerably smaller after OMM than after FAM, which suggests that engaging in meditation immediately creates a cognitive-control state that has a specific impact on how people allocate their attention over time. PMID:26320866

  14. Inducing and Probing Attosecond-Time-Scale Electronic Wavefunction Beating

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ott, Christian; Raith, Philipp; Pfeifer, Thomas

    2010-03-01

    Much of the current interest in the field of ultrafast science focuses on the observation of attosecond dynamics of electronic wavepackets. These experiments typically require attosecond pulses either for pumping or probing such dynamics and/or are limited to observing electronic states embedded in the ionization continuum of atoms. Here, we present numerical evidence---based on solutions of the time-dependent Schr"odinger equation for a 1-dimensional model atom---that a pump--probe scheme with two few-cycle femtosecond laser pulses provides interferometric access to sub-femtosecond electron wavepacket dynamics. Both continuum- and bound-state electronic wavepacket interference can be simultaneously observed by recording and analyzing time-delay dependent interferences in the ATI spectrum of an atom. Both dipole-allowed and forbidden electronic transition information can be extracted from the data, making this approach a versatile and comprehensive spectroscopic method for probing the bound electronic level structure of an atom.

  15. Nest site selection and induced response in a dominant arboreal ant species

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dejean, Alain; Grangier, Julien; Leroy, Céline; Orivel, Jerôme; Gibernau, Marc

    2008-09-01

    It is well known that arboreal ants, both territorially dominant species and plant ants (e.g., species associated with myrmecophytes or plants housing them in hollow structures), protect their host trees from defoliators. Nevertheless, the presence of an induced defense, suggested by the fact that the workers discovering a leaf wound recruit nestmates, is only known for plant ants. Based on the results from a field study, we show here (1) that colonies of Azteca chartifex, a territorially dominant, neotropical arboreal ant species, mostly selected Goupia glabra (Goupiaceae) trees in which to build their principal carton nests and (2) that plant signals induced workers to recruit nestmates, which patrol the leaves, likely providing the plant with a biotic defense. Furthermore, the number of recruited workers was clearly higher on G. glabra, their most frequently selected host tree species, than on other tree species. These results show that contrary to what was previously believed, induced responses are also found in territorially dominant arboreal ants and so are not limited to the specific associations between myrmecophytes and plant ants.

  16. Space-time wiring specificity supports direction selectivity in the retina

    PubMed Central

    Zlateski, Aleksandar; Lee, Kisuk; Richardson, Mark; Turaga, Srinivas C.; Purcaro, Michael; Balkam, Matthew; Robinson, Amy; Behabadi, Bardia F.; Campos, Michael; Denk, Winfried; Seung, H. Sebastian

    2014-01-01

    How does the mammalian retina detect motion? This classic problem in visual neuroscience has remained unsolved for 50 years. In search of clues, we reconstructed Off-type starburst amacrine cells (SACs) and bipolar cells (BCs) in serial electron microscopic images with help from EyeWire, an online community of “citizen neuroscientists.” Based on quantitative analyses of contact area and branch depth in the retina, we found evidence that one BC type prefers to wire with a SAC dendrite near the SAC soma, while another BC type prefers to wire far from the soma. The near type is known to lag the far type in time of visual response. A mathematical model shows how such “space-time wiring specificity” could endow SAC dendrites with receptive fields that are oriented in space-time and therefore respond selectively to stimuli that move in the outward direction from the soma. PMID:24805243

  17. Electromagnetic field redistribution induced selective plasmon driven surface catalysis in metal nanowire-film systems

    PubMed Central

    Pan, Liang; Huang, Yingzhou; Yang, Yanna; Xiong, Wen; Chen, Guo; Su, Xun; Wei, Hua; Wang, Shuxia; Wen, Weijia

    2015-01-01

    For the novel interpretation of Raman spectrum from molecule at metal surface, the plasmon driven surface catalysis (PDSC) reactions have become an interesting topic in the research field of surface enhanced Raman scattering (SERS). In this work, the selective PDSC reactions of p,p’-dimercaptoazobenzene (DMAB) produced from para-aminothiophenol (PATP) or 4-nitrobenzenethiol (4NBT) were demonstrated in the Ag nanowires dimer-Au film systems. The different SERS spectra collected at individual part and adjacent part of the same nanowire-film system pointed out the importance of the electromagnetic field redistribution induced by image charge on film in this selective surface catalysis, which was confirmed by the simulated electromagnetic simulated electro- magnetic field distributions. Our result indicated this electromagnetic field redistribution induced selective surface catalysis was largely affected by the polarization and wavelength of incident light but slightly by the difference in diameters between two nanowires. Our work provides a further understanding of PDSC reaction in metal nanostructure and could be a deep support for the researches on surface catalysis and surface analysis. PMID:26601698

  18. Nanofabrication on monocrystalline silicon through friction-induced selective etching of Si3N4 mask

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    A new fabrication method is proposed to produce nanostructures on monocrystalline silicon based on the friction-induced selective etching of its Si3N4 mask. With low-pressure chemical vapor deposition (LPCVD) Si3N4 film as etching mask on Si(100) surface, the fabrication can be realized by nanoscratching on the Si3N4 mask and post-etching in hydrofluoric acid (HF) and potassium hydroxide (KOH) solution in sequence. Scanning Auger nanoprobe analysis indicated that the HF solution could selectively etch the scratched Si3N4 mask and then provide the gap for post-etching of silicon substrate in KOH solution. Experimental results suggested that the fabrication depth increased with the increase of the scratching load or KOH etching period. Because of the excellent masking ability of the Si3N4 film, the maximum fabrication depth of nanostructure on silicon can reach several microns. Compared to the traditional friction-induced selective etching technique, the present method can fabricate structures with lesser damage and deeper depths. Since the proposed method has been demonstrated to be a less destructive and flexible way to fabricate a large-area texture structure, it will provide new opportunities for Si-based nanofabrication. PMID:24940174

  19. Selective flow-induced vesicle rupture to sort by membrane mechanical properties

    PubMed Central

    Pommella, Angelo; Brooks, Nicholas J.; Seddon, John M.; Garbin, Valeria

    2015-01-01

    Vesicle and cell rupture caused by large viscous stresses in ultrasonication is central to biomedical and bioprocessing applications. The flow-induced opening of lipid membranes can be exploited to deliver drugs into cells, or to recover products from cells, provided that it can be obtained in a controlled fashion. Here we demonstrate that differences in lipid membrane and vesicle properties can enable selective flow-induced vesicle break-up. We obtained vesicle populations with different membrane properties by using different lipids (SOPC, DOPC, or POPC) and lipid:cholesterol mixtures (SOPC:chol and DOPC:chol). We subjected vesicles to large deformations in the acoustic microstreaming flow generated by ultrasound-driven microbubbles. By simultaneously deforming vesicles with different properties in the same flow, we determined the conditions in which rupture is selective with respect to the membrane stretching elasticity. We also investigated the effect of vesicle radius and excess area on the threshold for rupture, and identified conditions for robust selectivity based solely on the mechanical properties of the membrane. Our work should enable new sorting mechanisms based on the difference in membrane composition and mechanical properties between different vesicles, capsules, or cells. PMID:26302783

  20. Electromagnetic field redistribution induced selective plasmon driven surface catalysis in metal nanowire-film systems.

    PubMed

    Pan, Liang; Huang, Yingzhou; Yang, Yanna; Xiong, Wen; Chen, Guo; Su, Xun; Wei, Hua; Wang, Shuxia; Wen, Weijia

    2015-01-01

    For the novel interpretation of Raman spectrum from molecule at metal surface, the plasmon driven surface catalysis (PDSC) reactions have become an interesting topic in the research field of surface enhanced Raman scattering (SERS). In this work, the selective PDSC reactions of p,p'-dimercaptoazobenzene (DMAB) produced from para-aminothiophenol (PATP) or 4-nitrobenzenethiol (4NBT) were demonstrated in the Ag nanowires dimer-Au film systems. The different SERS spectra collected at individual part and adjacent part of the same nanowire-film system pointed out the importance of the electromagnetic field redistribution induced by image charge on film in this selective surface catalysis, which was confirmed by the simulated electromagnetic simulated electro- magnetic field distributions. Our result indicated this electromagnetic field redistribution induced selective surface catalysis was largely affected by the polarization and wavelength of incident light but slightly by the difference in diameters between two nanowires. Our work provides a further understanding of PDSC reaction in metal nanostructure and could be a deep support for the researches on surface catalysis and surface analysis. PMID:26601698

  1. Methods to characterize selective sweeps using time serial samples: an ancient DNA perspective.

    PubMed

    Malaspinas, Anna-Sapfo

    2016-01-01

    With hundreds of ancient genomes becoming available this year, ancient DNA research has now entered the genomics era. Utilizing the temporal aspect of these new data, we can now address fundamental evolutionary questions such as the characterization of selection processes shaping the genomes. The temporal dimension in the data has spurred the development in the last 10 years of new methods allowing the detection of loci evolving non-neutrally but also the inference of selection coefficients across genomes capitalizing on these time serial data. To guide empirically oriented researchers towards the statistical approach most appropriate for their data, this article reviews several of those methods, discussing their underlying assumptions and the parameter ranges for which they have been developed. While I discuss some methods developed for experimental evolution, the main focus is ancient DNA. PMID:26613371

  2. Approach for Selection of Rayleigh Damping Parameters Used for Time History Analysis

    SciTech Connect

    R. E. Spears; S. R. Jensen

    2012-12-01

    Nonlinearities, whether geometric or material, need to be addressed in seismic analysis. One good analysis method that can address these nonlinearities is direct time integration with Rayleigh damping. Modal damping is the damping typically specified in seismic analysis Codes and Standards. Modal damping is constant for all frequencies where Rayleigh damping varies with frequency. An approach is proposed here for selection of Rayleigh damping coefficients to be used in seismic analyses that is consistent with given Modal damping. The approach uses the difference between the modal damping response and the Rayleigh damping response along with effective mass properties of the model being evaluated to match overall system response levels. This paper provides a simple example problem to demonstrate the approach. It also provides results for a finite element model representing an existing piping system. Displacement, acceleration, and stress results are compared from model runs using modal damping and model runs using Rayleigh damping with coefficients selected using the proposed method.

  3. Developing and Selecting Auditory Warnings for a Real-Time Behavioral Intervention

    PubMed Central

    Bellettiere, John; Hughes, Suzanne C.; Liles, Sandy; Boman-Davis, Marie; Klepeis, Neil; Blumberg, Elaine; Mills, Jeff; Berardi, Vincent; Obayashi, Saori; Allen, T. Tracy; Hovell, Melbourne F.

    2015-01-01

    Real-time sensing and computing technologies are increasingly used in the delivery of real-time health behavior interventions. Auditory signals play a critical role in many of these interventions, impacting not only behavioral response but also treatment adherence and participant retention. Yet, few behavioral interventions that employ auditory feedback report the characteristics of sounds used and even fewer design signals specifically for their intervention. This paper describes a four-step process used in developing and selecting auditory warnings for a behavioral trial designed to reduce indoor secondhand smoke exposure. In step one, relevant information was gathered from ergonomic and behavioral science literature to assist a panel of research assistants in developing criteria for intervention-specific auditory feedback. In step two, multiple sounds were identified through internet searches and modified in accordance with the developed criteria, and two sounds were selected that best met those criteria. In step three, a survey was conducted among 64 persons from the primary sampling frame of the larger behavioral trial to compare the relative aversiveness of sounds, determine respondents' reported behavioral reactions to those signals, and assess participant's preference between sounds. In the final step, survey results were used to select the appropriate sound for auditory warnings. Ultimately, a single-tone pulse, 500 milliseconds (ms) in length that repeats every 270 ms for 3 cycles was chosen for the behavioral trial. The methods described herein represent one example of steps that can be followed to develop and select auditory feedback tailored for a given behavioral intervention. PMID:25745633

  4. Selective activation of a putative reinforcement signal conditions cued interval timing in primary visual cortex

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Cheng-Hang; Coleman, Jason E.; Davoudi, Heydar; Zhang, Kechen; Hussain Shuler, Marshall G.

    2015-01-01

    Summary As a consequence of conditioning visual cues with delayed reward, cue-evoked neural activity that predicts the time of expected future reward emerges in the primary visual cortex (V1). We hypothesized that this reward timing activity is engendered by a reinforcement signal conveying reward acquisition to V1. In lieu of behavioral conditioning, we assessed in vivo whether selective activation of either basal forebrain (BF) or cholinergic innervation is sufficient to condition cued interval timing activity. Substituting for actual reward, optogenetic activation of BF or cholinergic input within V1 at fixed delays following visual stimulation entrains neural responses that mimic behaviorally-conditioned reward timing activity. Optogenetically-conditioned neural responses express cue-evoked temporal intervals that correspond to the conditioning intervals, are bidirectionally modifiable, display experience-dependent refinement, and exhibit a scale invariance to the encoded delay. Our results demonstrate that the activation of BF or cholinergic input within V1is sufficient to encode cued interval timing activity, and indicate that V1 itself is a substrate for associative learning that may inform the timing of visually-cued behaviors. PMID:26004763

  5. Effect of selected water temperatures used in Mycoplasma gallisepticum vaccine reconstitution on titer at selected time intervals

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Numerous methods are currently used throughout the poultry industry for the administration of vaccines. Each utilizes water for vaccine reconstitution and/or administration, including two of the three commercially available live Mycoplasma gallisepticum (MG) vaccines. Selected water temperatures w...

  6. Size-selective sorting in bubble streaming flows: Particle migration on fast time scales

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thameem, Raqeeb; Rallabandi, Bhargav; Hilgenfeldt, Sascha

    2015-11-01

    Steady streaming from ultrasonically driven microbubbles is an increasingly popular technique in microfluidics because such devices are easily manufactured and generate powerful and highly controllable flows. Combining streaming and Poiseuille transport flows allows for passive size-sensitive sorting at particle sizes and selectivities much smaller than the bubble radius. The crucial particle deflection and separation takes place over very small times (milliseconds) and length scales (20-30 microns) and can be rationalized using a simplified geometric mechanism. A quantitative theoretical description is achieved through the application of recent results on three-dimensional streaming flow field contributions. To develop a more fundamental understanding of the particle dynamics, we use high-speed photography of trajectories in polydisperse particle suspensions, recording the particle motion on the time scale of the bubble oscillation. Our data reveal the dependence of particle displacement on driving phase, particle size, oscillatory flow speed, and streaming speed. With this information, the effective repulsive force exerted by the bubble on the particle can be quantified, showing for the first time how fast, selective particle migration is effected in a streaming flow. We acknowledge support by the National Science Foundation under grant number CBET-1236141.

  7. Subtype selective NMDA receptor antagonists induce recovery of synapses lost following exposure to HIV-1 Tat

    PubMed Central

    Shin, AH; Kim, HJ; Thayer, SA

    2012-01-01

    BACKGROUND AND PURPOSE Neurocognitive disorders afflict approximately 20% of HIV-infected patients. HIV-1-infected cells in the brain shed viral proteins such as transactivator of transcription (Tat). Tat elicits cell death and synapse loss via processes initiated by NMDA receptor activation but mediated by separate downstream signalling pathways. Subunit selective NMDA receptor antagonists may differentially modulate survival relative to synaptic changes. EXPERIMENTAL APPROACH Tat-evoked cell death was quantified by measuring propidium iodide uptake into rat hippocampal neurons in culture. The effects of Tat on synaptic changes were measured using an imaging-based assay that quantified clusters of the scaffolding protein postsynaptic density 95 fused to green fluorescent protein. KEY RESULTS Dizocilpine, a non-competitive NMDA receptor antagonist, inhibited Tat-induced synapse loss, subsequent synapse recovery and Tat-induced cell death with comparable potencies. Memantine (10 µM) and ifenprodil (10 µM), which preferentially inhibit GluN2B-containing NMDA receptors, protected from Tat-induced cell death with no effect on synapse loss. Surprisingly, memantine and ifenprodil induced synapse recovery in the presence of Tat. In contrast, the GluN2A-prefering antagonist TCN201 prevented synapse loss and recovery with no effect on cell death. CONCLUSIONS AND IMPLICATIONS Synapse loss is a protective mechanism that enables the cell to cope with excess excitatory input. Thus, memantine and ifenprodil are promising neuroprotective drugs because they spare synaptic changes and promote survival. These GluN2B-preferring drugs induced recovery from Tat-evoked synapse loss, suggesting that synaptic pharmacology changed during the neurotoxic process. NMDA receptor subtypes differentially participate in the adaptation and death induced by excitotoxic insult. PMID:22142193

  8. Laser-Induced Selectivity for Dimerization Versus Polymerization of Butadiene Under Pressure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Citroni, Margherita; Ceppatelli, Matteo; Bini, Roberto; Schettino, Vincenzo

    2002-03-01

    The pressure-induced chemical reaction of liquid butadiene was studied by Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy in a diamond anvil cell. Dimerization was found to occur above 0.7 gigapascal, giving vinylcyclohexene according to a cyclo-addiction reaction and only a trace amount of polybutadiene forms. By irradiating the high-pressure sample with a few milliwatts of the 488-nanometer argon+ laser line, the dimerization was completely inhibited, and the rapid formation of pure trans-polybutadiene was observed. The use of different excitation wavelength allows us to emphasize the selectivity of the process and to identify the active role of the 21Ag state in this pressure- and laser-induced chemical reaction.

  9. In vivo selective cytoskeleton dynamics quantification in interphase cells induced by pulsed ultraviolet laser nanosurgery.

    PubMed

    Colombelli, Julien; Reynaud, Emmanuel G; Rietdorf, Jens; Pepperkok, Rainer; Stelzer, Ernst H K

    2005-12-01

    We report on the manipulation of intracellular filaments using a nanosurgery system based on a subnanosecond pulsed UV laser optimized for the localized severing of biological polymers. By inducing artificial catastrophe of selected microtubules (MTs), we perform shrinkage-rate measurements in interphase Ptk-2 cells throughout the entire cell. We quantify the impact of two labeling methods and three fluorescent markers, showing a 25% faster depolymerization with Alexa-488 tubulin compared with Rhodamine and yellow fluorescent protein (YFP) tubulins and a 20% higher variability induced by microinjection compared with stable transfection. Using EB3-GFP as a tip marker, we establish a new protocol to measure shrinkage rate, growth rate and rescue frequency simultaneously with high temporal and spatial specificity in live cells. As our analysis shows, laser-induced MT dynamics are physiologically relevant. The high statistical efficiency that the method offers in terms of numbers of measured events and therefore reduced standard deviations represents an important quantitative improvement in the measurement of dynamic instability parameters in vivo. We extend the application of the method by demonstrating induced dynamic behavior of actin-stress fibers after severing. This new method enables the quantitative investigation of cytoskeleton dynamics in a local confinement. PMID:16262721

  10. Ultrafast nuclear dynamics in halomethanes studied with time-resolved Coulomb explosion imaging and channel-selective Fourier spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Malakar, Y.; Kaderiya, B.; Pearson, W. L.; Ziaee, F.; Kanaka Raju, P.; Zohrabi, M.; Jensen, K.; Rajput, J.; Ben-Itzhak, I.; Rolles, D.; Rudenko, A.

    2016-05-01

    Halomethanes have recently attracted considerable attention since they often serve as prototype systems for laser-controlled chemistry (e.g., selective bond breaking or concerted elimination reactions), and are important molecules in atmospheric chemistry. Here we combine a femtosecond laser pump-probe setup with coincident 3D ion momentum imaging apparatus to study strong-field induced nuclear dynamics in methane and several of its halogenated derivatives (CH3 I, CH2 I2, CH2 ICl). We apply a time-resolved Coulomb explosion imaging technique to map the nuclear motion on both, bound and continuum potential surfaces, disentangle different fragmentation pathways and, for halogenated molecules, observe clear signatures of vibrational wave packets in neutral or ionized states. Channel-selective and kinetic-energy resolved Fourier analysis of these data allows for unique identification of different electronic states and vibrational modes responsible for a particular structure. Supported by the Chemical Sciences, Geosciences, and Biosciences Division, Office of Basic Energy Sciences, Office of Science, U. S. DOE. K. R. P. and W. L. P. supported by NSF Award No. IIA-143049. K.J. supported by the NSF-REU Grant No. PHYS-1461251.

  11. Time of travel of solutes in selected reaches of the Sandusky River Basin, Ohio, 1972 and 1973

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Westfall, Arthur O.

    1976-01-01

    A time of travel study of a 106-mile (171-kilometer) reach of the Sandusky River and a 39-mile (63-kilometer) reach of Tymochtee Creek was made to determine the time required for water released from Killdeer Reservoir on Tymochtee Creek to reach selected downstream points. In general, two dye sample runs were made through each subreach to define the time-discharge relation for approximating travel times at selected discharges within the measured range, and time-discharge graphs are presented for 38 subreaches. Graphs of dye dispersion and variation in relation to time are given for three selected sampling sites. For estimating travel time and velocities between points in the study reach, tables for selected flow durations are given. Duration curves of daily discharge for four index stations are presented to indicate the lo-flow characteristics and for use in shaping downward extensions of the time-discharge curves.

  12. Spin-orbit torque induced spike-timing dependent plasticity

    SciTech Connect

    Sengupta, Abhronil Al Azim, Zubair; Fong, Xuanyao; Roy, Kaushik

    2015-03-02

    Nanoelectronic devices that mimic the functionality of synapses are a crucial requirement for performing cortical simulations of the brain. In this work, we propose a ferromagnet-heavy metal heterostructure that employs spin-orbit torque to implement spike-timing dependent plasticity. The proposed device offers the advantage of decoupled spike transmission and programming current paths, thereby leading to reliable operation during online learning. Possible arrangement of such devices in a crosspoint architecture can pave the way for ultra-dense neural networks. Simulation studies indicate that the device has the potential of achieving pico-Joule level energy consumption (maximum 2 pJ per synaptic event) which is comparable to the energy consumption for synaptic events in biological synapses.

  13. Spin-orbit torque induced spike-timing dependent plasticity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sengupta, Abhronil; Al Azim, Zubair; Fong, Xuanyao; Roy, Kaushik

    2015-03-01

    Nanoelectronic devices that mimic the functionality of synapses are a crucial requirement for performing cortical simulations of the brain. In this work, we propose a ferromagnet-heavy metal heterostructure that employs spin-orbit torque to implement spike-timing dependent plasticity. The proposed device offers the advantage of decoupled spike transmission and programming current paths, thereby leading to reliable operation during online learning. Possible arrangement of such devices in a crosspoint architecture can pave the way for ultra-dense neural networks. Simulation studies indicate that the device has the potential of achieving pico-Joule level energy consumption (maximum 2 pJ per synaptic event) which is comparable to the energy consumption for synaptic events in biological synapses.

  14. Valproic Acid Induced Hyperammonemia in a Long Time Treated Patient

    PubMed Central

    Seide, Margaret; Stern, Robert G.

    2016-01-01

    We report a case of a patient who had been on long time valproic acid for treatment of bipolar affective disorder. While being an inpatient, serology ammonia level testing revealed a very high ammonia level despite being asymptomatic. Dual therapy of carnitine and lactulose was provided to the patient for treatment of the hyperammonemia. It should also be noted that, during this treatment, valproic acid was not stopped. Consequently, this case illustrates that patients can present asymptomatically despite very high ammonia levels and hyperammonemia can occur in chronic valproic acid despite not increasing the dose of the medication and psychiatrists do not need to discontinue valproic acid in the presence of elevated levels of ammonia if the patient shows no signs of encephalopathy or delirium. PMID:27516916

  15. Valproic Acid Induced Hyperammonemia in a Long Time Treated Patient.

    PubMed

    Aiyer, Rohit; Seide, Margaret; Stern, Robert G

    2016-01-01

    We report a case of a patient who had been on long time valproic acid for treatment of bipolar affective disorder. While being an inpatient, serology ammonia level testing revealed a very high ammonia level despite being asymptomatic. Dual therapy of carnitine and lactulose was provided to the patient for treatment of the hyperammonemia. It should also be noted that, during this treatment, valproic acid was not stopped. Consequently, this case illustrates that patients can present asymptomatically despite very high ammonia levels and hyperammonemia can occur in chronic valproic acid despite not increasing the dose of the medication and psychiatrists do not need to discontinue valproic acid in the presence of elevated levels of ammonia if the patient shows no signs of encephalopathy or delirium. PMID:27516916

  16. UV-induced changes in antioxidant capacities of selected carotenoids toward lecithin in aqueous solution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cvetkovic, Dragan; Markovic, Dejan

    2008-01-01

    Antioxidant action of four selected carotenoids (two carotenes, β-carotene and lycopene, and two xanthophylls, lutein and neoxanthin) on UV-induced lecithin lipid peroxidation in aqueous solution has been studied by thiobarbituric acid (TBA) test. TBA test is based on absorbance measurements of complex formed between malondialdehyde, secondary product of lipid peroxidation and thiobarbituric acid, at 532 nm. The antioxidant capacities of investigated carotenoids appeared to be strongly affected by UV-action. High energy input of the involved UV-photons plays major governing role, though a certain impact of the carotenoid structures cannot be neglected. The results suggest a minor remained contribution of selected carotenoids to prevention of lecithin peroxidation in the studied system as a result of UV-irradiation.

  17. Induced fit, conformational selection and independent dynamic segments: an extended view of binding events

    PubMed Central

    Csermely, Peter; Palotai, Robin; Nussinov, Ruth

    2010-01-01

    Single molecule and NMR measurements of protein dynamics increasingly uncover the complexity of binding scenarios. Here we describe an extended conformational selection model which embraces a repertoire of selection and adjustment processes. Induced fit can be viewed as a subset of this repertoire, whose contribution is affected by the bond-types stabilizing the interaction and the differences between the interacting partners. We argue that protein segments whose dynamics are distinct from the rest of the protein (‘discrete breathers’) can govern conformational transitions and allosteric propagation that accompany binding processes, and as such might be more sensitive to mutational events. Additionally, we highlight the dynamic complexity of binding scenarios as they relate to events such as aggregation and signalling, and the crowded cellular environment. PMID:20541943

  18. Deuterium enrichment by selective photo-induced dissociation of an organic carbonyl compound

    DOEpatents

    Marling, John B.

    1981-01-01

    A method for producing a deuterium enriched material by photoinduced dissociation which uses as the working material a gas phase photolytically dissociable organic carbonyl compound containing at least one hydrogen atom bonded to an atom which is adjacent to a carbonyl group and consisting of molecules wherein said hydrogen atom is present as deuterium and molecules wherein said hydrogen atom is present as another isotope of hydrogen. The organic carbonyl compound is subjected to intense infrared radiation at a preselected wavelength to selectively excite and thereby induce dissociation of the deuterium containing species to yield a deuterium enriched stable molecular product. Undissociated carbonyl compound, depleted in deuterium, is preferably redeuterated for reuse.

  19. Photoactivatable aggregation-induced emission fluorophores with multiple-color fluorescence and wavelength-selective activation.

    PubMed

    Peng, Lu; Zheng, Yue; Wang, Xiaoyan; Tong, Aijun; Xiang, Yu

    2015-03-01

    Photoactivatable (caged) fluorophores are widely used in chemistry, materials, and biology. However, the development of such molecules exhibiting photoactivable solid-state fluorescence is still challenging due to the aggregation-caused quenching (ACQ) effect of most fluorophores in their aggregate or solid states. In this work, we developed caged salicylaldehyde hydrazone derivatives, which are of aggregation-induced emission (AIE) characteristics upon light irradiation, as efficient photoactivatable solid-state fluorophores. These compounds displayed multiple-color emissions and ratiometric (photochromic) fluorescence switches upon wavelength-selective photoactivation, and were successfully applied for photopatterning and photoactivatable cell imaging in a multiple-color and stepwise manner. PMID:25644036

  20. Temperature-induced shifts in selective pressure at a critical developmental transition.

    PubMed

    Gagliano, Monica; McCormick, Mark I; Meekan, Mark G

    2007-05-01

    Selective mortality within a population, based on the phenotype of individuals, is the foundation of the theory of natural selection. We examined temperature-induced shifts in the relationships among early life history traits and survivorship over the embryonic and larval stages of a tropical damselfish, Pomacentrus amboinensis. Our experiments show that temperature determines the intensity of selective mortality, and that this changes with ontogeny. The size of energy stores determined survival through to hatching, after which egg size became a good indicator of fitness as predicted by theoretical models. Yet, the benefits associated with egg size were not uniform among test temperatures. Initial egg size positively influenced larval survival at control temperature (29 degrees C). However, this embryonic trait had no effect on post-hatching longevity of individuals reared at the higher (31 degrees C) and lower (25 degrees C) end of the temperature range. Overall, our findings indicate that the outcome of selective mortality is strongly dependent on the interaction between environment conditions and intrinsic developmental schedules. PMID:17242907

  1. Direct numerical simulation of current-induced convection near an ion-selective surface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Druzgalski, Clara; Andersen, Mathias B.; Mani, Ali

    2012-11-01

    Understanding fundamentals of electrokinetic transport and fluid flow phenomena near ion-selective surfaces provides insight to improve systems such as electrodialysis for water deionization. The work of Rubinstein and Zaltzman [e.g. Phys Rev E 62, 2238 (2000)] have clarified qualitative aspects of how development of current-induced space-charge layers near ion-selective surfaces can lead to the onset of electro-osmotic instabilities. We expand on this work through multidimensional numerical simulation of the full nonlinear Poisson-Nernst-Planck and Navier-Stokes equations with ideally selective membrane boundary conditions. Our numerical scheme is optimized by exploiting the periodicity in the system parallel to the ion-selective surface, using a spectral method in these coordinates. In the wall normal direction a finite difference approach accurately captures the strongly nonlinear nested boundary layer structure. Our numerical scheme fully resolves the concentration profiles throughout the system including the numerically stiff electric double layer and extended space charge layer. Our simulations enable prediction of the full continuous current versus voltage curves showing overlimiting current without resorting to any adjustable parameter.

  2. Selective translocation of protein kinase C-delta in PC12 cells during nerve growth factor-induced neuritogenesis.

    PubMed Central

    O'Driscoll, K R; Teng, K K; Fabbro, D; Greene, L A; Weinstein, I B

    1995-01-01

    The specific intracellular signals initiated by nerve growth factor (NGF) that lead to neurite formation in PC12 rat pheochromocytoma cells are as of yet unclear. Protein kinase C-delta (PKC delta) is translocated from the soluble to the particulate subcellular fraction during NGF-induced-neuritogenesis; however, this does not occur after treatment with the epidermal growth factor, which is mitogenic but does not induce neurite formation. PC12 cells also contain both Ca(2+)-sensitive and Ca(2+)-independent PKC enzymatic activities, and express mRNA and immunoreactive proteins corresponding to the PKC isoforms alpha, beta, delta, epsilon, and zeta. There are transient decreases in the levels of immunoreactive PKCs alpha, beta, and epsilon after 1-3 days of NGF treatment, and after 7 days there is a 2.5-fold increase in the level of PKC alpha, and a 1.8-fold increase in total cellular PKC activity. NGF-induced PC12 cell neuritogenesis is enhanced by 12-O-tetradecanoyl phorbol-13-acetate (TPA) in a TPA dose- and time-dependent manner, and this differentiation coincides with abrogation of the down-regulation of PKC delta and other PKC isoforms, when the cells are treated with TPA. Thus a selective activation of PKC delta may play a role in neuritogenic signals in PC12 cells. Images PMID:7626808

  3. Born at the Wrong Time: Selection Bias in the NHL Draft

    PubMed Central

    Deaner, Robert O.; Lowen, Aaron; Cobley, Stephen

    2013-01-01

    Relative age effects (RAEs) occur when those who are relatively older for their age group are more likely to succeed. RAEs occur reliably in some educational and athletic contexts, yet the causal mechanisms remain unclear. Here we provide the first direct test of one mechanism, selection bias, which can be defined as evaluators granting fewer opportunities to relatively younger individuals than is warranted by their latent ability. Because RAEs are well-established in hockey, we analyzed National Hockey League (NHL) drafts from 1980 to 2006. Compared to those born in the first quarter (i.e., January–March), those born in the third and fourth quarters were drafted more than 40 slots later than their productivity warranted, and they were roughly twice as likely to reach career benchmarks, such as 400 games played or 200 points scored. This selection bias in drafting did not decrease over time, apparently continues to occur, and reduces the playing opportunities of relatively younger players. This bias is remarkable because it is exhibited by professional decision makers evaluating adults in a context where RAEs have been widely publicized. Thus, selection bias based on relative age may be pervasive. PMID:23460902

  4. Recognition of Time-Compressed and Natural Speech with Selective Temporal Enhancements by Young and Elderly Listeners

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gordon-Salant, Sandra; Fitzgibbons, Peter J.; Friedman, Sarah A.

    2007-01-01

    Purpose: The goal of this experiment was to determine whether selective slowing of speech segments improves recognition performance by young and elderly listeners. The hypotheses were (a) the benefits of time expansion occur for rapid speech but not for natural-rate speech, (b) selective time expansion of consonants produces greater score…

  5. Neighbourhood selection for local modelling and prediction of hydrological time series

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jayawardena, A. W.; Li, W. K.; Xu, P.

    2002-02-01

    The prediction of a time series using the dynamical systems approach requires the knowledge of three parameters; the time delay, the embedding dimension and the number of nearest neighbours. In this paper, a new criterion, based on the generalized degrees of freedom, for the selection of the number of nearest neighbours needed for a better local model for time series prediction is presented. The validity of the proposed method is examined using time series, which are known to be chaotic under certain initial conditions (Lorenz map, Henon map and Logistic map), and real hydro meteorological time series (discharge data from Chao Phraya river in Thailand, Mekong river in Thailand and Laos, and sea surface temperature anomaly data). The predicted results are compared with observations, and with similar predictions obtained by using arbitrarily fixed numbers of neighbours. The results indicate superior predictive capability as measured by the mean square errors and coefficients of variation by the proposed approach when compared with the traditional approach of using a fixed number of neighbours.

  6. Ultra-small time-delay estimation via a weak measurement technique with post-selection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fang, Chen; Huang, Jing-Zheng; Yu, Yang; Li, Qinzheng; Zeng, Guihua

    2016-09-01

    Weak measurement is a novel technique for parameter estimation with higher precision. In this paper we develop a general theory for the parameter estimation based on a weak measurement technique with arbitrary post-selection. The weak-value amplification model and the joint weak measurement model are two special cases in our theory. Applying the developed theory, time-delay estimation is investigated in both theory and experiments. The experimental results show that when the time delay is ultra-small, the joint weak measurement scheme outperforms the weak-value amplification scheme, and is robust against not only misalignment errors but also the wavelength dependence of the optical components. These results are consistent with theoretical predictions that have not been previously verified by any experiment.

  7. Dependence of the Crossing Time on the Sequence Length in a Diploid Discrete-Time Mutation-Selection Model for a Finite Population

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gill, Wonpyong

    This study examined the crossing time in the diploid discrete-time mutation-selection model in a finite population for a range of dominance parameters and selective advantages by switching on a diploid, asymmetric, bridged landscape, from an initial state, a steady state in a diploid, bridged landscape. The dependence of the crossing time on the sequence length was examined for a fixed extension parameter, which was defined as the mean Hamming distance from the optimal allele of the initial steady state divided by the sequence length. The boundary between the deterministic and stochastic regions in the diploid discrete-time mutation-selection model was characterized using the same formula as that in the haploid discrete-time mutation-selection model. The crossing time in a finite population with various population sizes, dominance parameters and selective advantages began to deviate from the crossing time for an infinite population at the critical sequence length. The crossing time for a finite population in the stochastic region was found to be an exponentially increasing function of the sequence length, whose rate was unchanged, regardless of changes in the population size, dominance parameter and selective advantage with a fixed extension parameter. This work was supported by a 2-Year Research Grant of Pusan National University.

  8. Source Selection for Real-time User Intent Recognition towards Volitional Control of Artificial Legs

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Fan; Huang, He

    2013-01-01

    Various types of data sources have been used to recognize user intent for volitional control of powered artificial legs. However, there is still a debate on what exact data sources are necessary for accurately and responsively recognizing the user's intended tasks. Motivated by this widely interested question, in this study we aimed to (1) investigate the usefulness of different data sources commonly suggested for user intent recognition and (2) determine an informative set of data sources for volitional control of prosthetic legs. The studied data sources included eight surface electromyography (EMG) signals from the residual thigh muscles of transfemoral (TF) amputees, ground reaction forces/moments from a prosthetic pylon, and kinematic measurements from the residual thigh and prosthetic knee. We then ranked included data sources based on the usefulness for user intent recognition and selected a reduced number of data sources that ensured accurate recognition of the user's intended task by using three source selection algorithms. The results showed that EMG signals and ground reaction forces/moments were more informative than prosthesis kinematics. Nine to eleven of all the initial data sources were sufficient to maintain 95% accuracy for recognizing the studied seven tasks without missing additional task transitions in real time. The selected data sources produced consistent system performance across two experimental days for four recruited TF amputee subjects, indicating the potential robustness of the selected data sources. Finally, based on the study results, we suggested a protocol for determining the informative data sources and sensor configurations for future development of volitional control of powered artificial legs. PMID:25055369

  9. Trichostatin A selectively suppresses the cold-induced transcription of the ZmDREB1 gene in maize.

    PubMed

    Hu, Yong; Zhang, Lu; Zhao, Lin; Li, Jun; He, Shibin; Zhou, Kun; Yang, Fei; Huang, Min; Jiang, Li; Li, Lijia

    2011-01-01

    Post-translational modifications of histone proteins play a crucial role in responding to environmental stresses. Histone deacetylases (HDACs) catalyze the removal of an acetyl group from histones and are generally believed to be a transcriptional repressor. In this paper, we report that cold treatment highly induces the up-regulation of HDACs, leading to global deacetylation of histones H3 and H4. Treatment of maize with the HDAC inhibitor trichostatin A (TSA) under cold stress conditions strongly inhibits induction of the maize cold-responsive genes ZmDREB1 and ZmCOR413. However, up-regulation of the ZmICE1 gene in response to cold stress is less affected. The expression of drought and salt induced genes, ZmDBF1 and rab17, is almost unaffected by TSA treatment. Thus, these observations show that HDACs may selectively activate transcription. The time course of TSA effects on the expression of ZmDREB1 and ZmCOR413 genes indicates that HDACs appear to directly activate the ZmDREB1 gene, which in turn modulates ZmCOR413 expression. After cold treatment, histone hyperacetylation and DNA demethylation occurs in the ICE1 binding region, accompanied by an increase in accessibility to micrococcal nuclease (MNase). The two regions adjacent to the ICE1 binding site remain hypoacetylated and methylated. However, during cold acclimation, TSA treatment increases the acetylation status and accessibility of MNase and decreases DNA methylation at these two regions. However, TSA treatment does not affect histone hyperacetylation and DNA methylation levels at the ICE1 binding regions of the ZmDREB1 gene. Altogether, our findings indicate that HDACs positively regulate the expression of the cold-induced ZmDREB1 gene through histone modification and chromatin conformational changes and that this activation is both gene and site selective. PMID:21811564

  10. Quantum Mode Selectivity of Plasmon-Induced Water Splitting on Gold Nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Yan, Lei; Wang, Fangwei; Meng, Sheng

    2016-05-24

    Plasmon induced water splitting is a promising research area with the potential for efficient conversion of solar to chemical energy, yet its atomic mechanism is not well understood. Here, ultrafast electron-nuclear dynamics of water splitting on gold nanoparticles upon exposure to femtosecond laser pulses was directly simulated using real time time-dependent density functional theory (TDDFT). Strong correlation between laser intensity, hot electron transfer, and reaction rates has been identified. The rate of water splitting is dependent not only on respective optical absorption strength, but also on the quantum oscillation mode of plasmonic excitation. Odd modes are more efficient than even modes, owing to faster decaying into hot electrons whose energy matches well the antibonding orbital of water. This finding suggests photocatalytic activity can be manipulated by adjusting the energy level of plasmon-induced hot carriers, through altering the cluster size and laser parameter, to better overlap adsorbate unoccupied level in plasmon-assisted photochemistry. PMID:27127849