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Sample records for induces sulfur amino

  1. A Xanthomonas Pathogenicity Locus Is Induced by Sucrose and Sulfur-Containing Amino Acids.

    PubMed Central

    Schulte, R; Bonas, U

    1992-01-01

    Expression of hrp (hypersensitive reaction and pathogenicity) genes from Xanthomonas campestris pv vesicatoria is suppressed in complex media but induced in the plant. We examined the effects of macronutrients on transcription of hrp-gusA ([beta]-glucuronidase) fusions by growth of the bacteria in defined medium. Modified MM1 minimal medium, supplemented with casamino acids, was able to induce hrpF strongly when sucrose or fructose was added as a carbon source. However, high concentrations of casamino acids suppressed hrpF induction. Sulfur-containing amino acids were required for induction, with methionine induction being comparable to induction in plants. Both sucrose and methionine were required for induction. Induction in medium optimal for hrpF induction, designated XVM1, occurred at pH 5.5 to pH 7.5. High concentrations of phosphate or sodium chloride suppressed gene activation. Gene induction was inhibited by succinate, citrate, pyruvate, and glutamine. Expression levels of different hrp loci from X. c. vesicatoria in XVM1 varied, dependent on the genetic background of the Xanthomonas strain used. The results suggest that several control mechanisms might be involved in the expression of hrp genes. PMID:12297631

  2. Hepatic Oxidative Stress in Fructose-Induced Fatty Liver Is Not Caused by Sulfur Amino Acid Insufficiency

    PubMed Central

    Kunde, Sachin S.; Roede, James R.; Vos, Miriam B.; Orr, Michael L.; Go, Young-Mi; Park, Youngja; Ziegler, Thomas R.; Jones, Dean P.

    2011-01-01

    Fructose-sweetened liquid consumption is associated with fatty liver and oxidative stress. In rodent models of fructose-mediated fatty liver, protein consumption is decreased. Additionally, decreased sulfur amino acid intake is known to cause oxidative stress. Studies were designed to test whether oxidative stress in fructose-sweetened liquid-induced fatty liver is caused by decreased ad libitum solid food intake with associated inadequate sulfur amino acid intake. C57BL6 mice were grouped as: control (ad libitum water), fructose (ad libitum 30% fructose-sweetened liquid), glucose (ad libitum 30% glucose-sweetened water) and pair-fed (ad libitum water and sulfur amino acid intake same as the fructose group). Hepatic and plasma thiol-disulfide antioxidant status were analyzed after five weeks. Fructose- and glucose-fed mice developed fatty liver. The mitochondrial antioxidant protein, thioredoxin-2, displayed decreased abundance in the liver of fructose and glucose-fed mice compared to controls. Glutathione/glutathione disulfide redox potential (EhGSSG) and abundance of the cytoplasmic antioxidant protein, peroxiredoxin-2, were similar among groups. We conclude that both fructose and glucose-sweetened liquid consumption results in fatty liver and upregulated thioredoxin-2 expression, consistent with mitochondrial oxidative stress; however, inadequate sulfur amino acid intake was not the cause of this oxidative stress. PMID:22254090

  3. Hydrogelation Induced by Change in Hydrophobicity of Amino Acid Side Chain in Fmoc-Functionalised Amino Acid: Significance of Sulfur on Hydrogelation.

    PubMed

    Reddy, Samala Murali Mohan; Dorishetty, Pramod; Deshpande, Abhijit P; Shanmugam, Ganesh

    2016-07-18

    Although a few Fmoc-functionalised amino acids (Fmoc-AA) are capable of forming hydrogels, the exact levels of hydrophobicity, hydrogen bonding, and ionic nature of the Fmoc-AA gelator required for hydrogel formation remains uncertain. Here, the role of hydrophobicity of amino acid side chain, particularly in the formation of hydrogel, was studied by using Fmoc-norleucine (Fmoc-Nle) and its simple sulfur analogues such as Fmoc-methionine (Fmoc-M) in which the γCH2 of Fmoc-Nle is replaced by sulfur. Results indicate that Fmoc-M forms thermally reversible hydrogels in water (pH ca. 6.8), whereas Fmoc-Nle fails to display any gelation under similar conditions. The result suggests that substitution of the sulfur atom likely reduces the hydrophobicity of the alkyl side chain in Fmoc-Nle to the optimum level, which is sufficient to induce supramolecular hydrogelation in Fmoc-M. The difference in the self-association behaviour of Fmoc-M and Fmoc-Nle emphasise the importance of weak noncovalent interaction between side chains (in addition to the hydrogen-bond and aromatic interactions) to stabilise supramolecular self-assembly of Fmoc-functionalised compounds. The current observations provide a lead to the design of new sulfur-based low molecular weight gelators for various potential applications. PMID:27017582

  4. Intestinal metabolism of sulfur amino acids

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The gastrointestinal tract (GIT) is a metabolically significant site of sulfur amino acid (SAA) metabolism in the body and metabolizes approx. 20% of the dietary methionine intake that is mainly transmethylated to homocysteine and transsulfurated to cysteine. The GIT accounts for approx. 25% of the ...

  5. Intestinal metabolism of sulfur amino acids

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The gastrointestinal tract (GIT) serves a key function in the digestion of dietary protein and absorption of amino acids. However, the GIT is also an important site of amino acid metabolism in the body. Methionine is an indispensable amino acid and must be supplied in the diet. In addition, consider...

  6. Emerging aspects of gut sulfur amino acid metabolism

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    This review discusses the recent evidence indicating that sulfur amino acid metabolism in gastrointestinal tissues may be linked to human health and gut disease. Studies indicate that the gastrointestinal tract metabolizes 20% of dietary methionine and that its main metabolic fate is transmethylatio...

  7. Metabolism of sulfur amino acids in Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    PubMed Central

    Thomas, D; Surdin-Kerjan, Y

    1997-01-01

    Sulfur amino acid biosynthesis in Saccharomyces cerevisiae involves a large number of enzymes required for the de novo biosynthesis of methionine and cysteine and the recycling of organic sulfur metabolites. This review summarizes the details of these processes and analyzes the molecular data which have been acquired in this metabolic area. Sulfur biochemistry appears not to be unique through terrestrial life, and S. cerevisiae is one of the species of sulfate-assimilatory organisms possessing a larger set of enzymes for sulfur metabolism. The review also deals with several enzyme deficiencies that lead to a nutritional requirement for organic sulfur, although they do not correspond to defects within the biosynthetic pathway. In S. cerevisiae, the sulfur amino acid biosynthetic pathway is tightly controlled: in response to an increase in the amount of intracellular S-adenosylmethionine (AdoMet), transcription of the coregulated genes is turned off. The second part of the review is devoted to the molecular mechanisms underlying this regulation. The coordinated response to AdoMet requires two cis-acting promoter elements. One centers on the sequence TCACGTG, which also constitutes a component of all S. cerevisiae centromeres. Situated upstream of the sulfur genes, this element is the binding site of a transcription activation complex consisting of a basic helix-loop-helix factor, Cbf1p, and two basic leucine zipper factors, Met4p and Met28p. Molecular studies have unraveled the specific functions for each subunit of the Cbf1p-Met4p-Met28p complex as well as the modalities of its assembly on the DNA. The Cbf1p-Met4p-Met28p complex contains only one transcription activation module, the Met4p subunit. Detailed mutational analysis of Met4p has elucidated its functional organization. In addition to its activation and bZIP domains, Met4p contains two regulatory domains, called the inhibitory region and the auxiliary domain. When the level of intracellular AdoMet increases

  8. Sulfur amino acid metabolism in doxorubicin-resistant breast cancer cells

    SciTech Connect

    Ryu, Chang Seon; Kwak, Hui Chan; Lee, Kye Sook; Kang, Keon Wook; Oh, Soo Jin; Lee, Ki Ho; Kim, Hwan Mook; Ma, Jin Yeul; Kim, Sang Kyum

    2011-08-15

    Although methionine dependency is a phenotypic characteristic of tumor cells, it remains to be determined whether changes in sulfur amino acid metabolism occur in cancer cells resistant to chemotherapeutic medications. We compared expression/activity of sulfur amino acid metabolizing enzymes and cellular levels of sulfur amino acids and their metabolites between normal MCF-7 cells and doxorubicin-resistant MCF-7 (MCF-7/Adr) cells. The S-adenosylmethionine/S-adenosylhomocysteine ratio, an index of transmethylation potential, in MCF-7/Adr cells decreased to {approx} 10% relative to that in MCF-7 cells, which may have resulted from down-regulation of S-adenosylhomocysteine hydrolase. Expression of homocysteine-clearing enzymes, such as cystathionine beta-synthase, methionine synthase/methylene tetrahydrofolate reductase, and betaine homocysteine methyltransferase, was up-regulated in MCF-7/Adr cells, suggesting that acquiring doxorubicin resistance attenuated methionine-dependence and activated transsulfuration from methionine to cysteine. Homocysteine was similar, which is associated with a balance between the increased expressions of homocysteine-clearing enzymes and decreased extracellular homocysteine. Despite an elevation in cysteine, cellular GSH decreased in MCF-7/Adr cells, which was attributed to over-efflux of GSH into the medium and down-regulation of the GSH synthesis enzyme. Consequently, MCF-7/Adr cells were more sensitive to the oxidative stress induced by bleomycin and menadione than MCF-7 cells. In conclusion, our results suggest that regulating sulfur amino acid metabolism may be a possible therapeutic target for chemoresistant cancer cells. These results warrant further investigations to determine the role of sulfur amino acid metabolism in acquiring anticancer drug resistance in cancer cells using chemical and biological regulators involved in sulfur amino acid metabolism. - Research Highlights: > MCF-7/Adr cells showed decreases in cellular GSH

  9. Mechanisms of volatile production from non-sulfur amino acids by irradiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ahn, Dong Uk; Lee, Eun Joo; Feng, Xi; Zhang, Wangang; Lee, Ji Hwan; Jo, Cheorun; Nam, Kichang

    2016-02-01

    Non-sulfur amino acid monomers were used to study the mechanisms of volatile production in meat by irradiation. Irradiation not only produced many volatiles but also increased the amounts of volatiles from non-sulfur amino acid monomers. The major reaction mechanisms involved in volatile production from each group of the amino acids by irradiation differ significantly. However, we speculate that the radiolysis of amino acid side chains were the major mechanism. In addition, Strecker degradation, especially the production of aldehydes from aliphatic group amino acids, and deamination, isomerization, decarboxylation, cyclic reaction and dehydrogenation of the initial radiolytic products were also contributed to the production of volatile compounds. Each amino acid monomers produced different odor characteristics, but the intensities of odor from all non-sulfur amino acid groups were very weak. This indicated that the contribution of volatiles produced from non-sulfur amino acids was minor. If the volatile compounds from non-sulfur amino acids, especially aldehydes, interact with other volatiles compounds such as sulfur compounds, however, they can contribute to the off-odor of irradiated meat significantly.

  10. Multiple inputs control sulfur-containing amino acid synthesis in Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    PubMed Central

    Sadhu, Meru J.; Moresco, James J.; Zimmer, Anjali D.; Yates, John R.; Rine, Jasper

    2014-01-01

    In Saccharomyces cerevisiae, transcription of the MET regulon, which encodes the proteins involved in the synthesis of the sulfur-containing amino acids methionine and cysteine, is repressed by the presence of either methionine or cysteine in the environment. This repression is accomplished by ubiquitination of the transcription factor Met4, which is carried out by the SCF(Met30) E3 ubiquitin ligase. Mutants defective in MET regulon repression reveal that loss of Cho2, which is required for the methylation of phosphatidylethanolamine to produce phosphatidylcholine, leads to induction of the MET regulon. This induction is due to reduced cysteine synthesis caused by the Cho2 defects, uncovering an important link between phospholipid synthesis and cysteine synthesis. Antimorphic mutants in S-adenosyl-methionine (SAM) synthetase genes also induce the MET regulon. This effect is due, at least in part, to SAM deficiency controlling the MET regulon independently of SAM's contribution to cysteine synthesis. Finally, the Met30 protein is found in two distinct forms whose relative abundance is controlled by the availability of sulfur-containing amino acids. This modification could be involved in the nutritional control of SCF(Met30) activity toward Met4. PMID:24648496

  11. New insights into sulfur amino acids function in gut health and disease

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The gastrointestinal tract (GIT) is a metabolically significant site of sulfur amino acids (SAAs) metabolism in the body. Aside from their role in protein synthesis, methionine and cysteine are involved in many biological functions and diseases. Methionine (MET) is an indispensable amino acid and is...

  12. Parenteral sulfur amino acid requirements in septic infants

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    To investigate parenteral methionine requirements of critically ill, septic infants, we conducted an investigation involving 12 infants (age 2+/-1 years; weight 13+/-2kg) using the intravenous indicator amino acid oxidation and balance technique. They received a balanced parenteral amino acid formul...

  13. Changes in the levels of major sulfur metabolites and free amino acids in pea cotyledons recovering from sulfur deficiency

    SciTech Connect

    Macnicol, P.K.; Randall, P.J.

    1987-02-01

    Changes in levels of sulfur metabolites and free amino acids were followed in cotyledons of sulfur-deficient, developing pea seeds (Pisum sativum L.) for 24 hours after resupply of sulfate, during which time the legumin mRNA levels returned almost to normal. Two recovery situations were studied: cultured seeds, with sulfate added to the medium, and seeds attached to the intact plant, with sulfate added to the roots. In both situations the levels of cysteine, glutathione, and methionine rose rapidly, glutathione exhibiting an initial lag. In attached but not cultured seeds methionine markedly overshot the level normally found in sulfur-sufficient seeds. In the cultured seed S-adenosylmethionine (AdoMet), but not S-methylmethionine, showed a sustained rise; in the attached seed the changes were slight. The composition of the free amino acid pool did not change substantially in either recovery situation. In the cultured seed the large rise in AdoMet level occurred equally in nonrecovering seeds. It was accompanied by 6-fold and 10-fold increases in ..gamma..-aminobutyrate and alanine, respectively. These effects are attributed to wounding resulting from excision of the seed. /sup 35/S-labeling experiments showed that there was no significant accumulation of label in unidentified sulfur-containing amino compounds in either recovery situation. It was concluded from these results and those of other workers that, at the present level of knowledge, the most probable candidate for a signal compound, eliciting recovery of legumin mRNA level in response to sulfur-feeding, is cysteine.

  14. Mechanisms of volatile production from sulfur-containing amino acids by irradiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Uk Ahn, Dong; Joo Lee, Eun; Feng, Xi; Zhang, Wangang; Lee, Ji Hwan; Jo, Cheorun; Nam, Kichang

    2016-02-01

    Sulfur-containing amino acids were used to study the mechanisms of off-odor production in meat by irradiation. Irradiation not only increased the amounts of volatiles but also produced many new volatiles from sulfur-containing amino acid monomers. We speculate that the majority of the volatiles were the direct radiolytic products of the side chains, but Strecker degradation as well as deamination and decarboxylation of radiolytic products were also involved in the production of volatile compounds from sulfur amino acids. The volatile compounds produced in amino acids were not only the primary products of irradiation, but also the products of secondary chemical reactions after the primary compounds were produced. Cysteine and methionine produced odor characteristics similar to that of the irradiated meat, but the amounts of sulfur volatiles from methionine were far greater than that of cysteine. Although the present study was carried out using an amino acid model system, the information can be applied to the quality indexes of irradiated meats as well as other food products.

  15. Toxicity of nickel and silver to Nostoc muscorum: interaction with ascorbic acid, glutathione, and sulfur-containing amino acids

    SciTech Connect

    Rai, L.C.; Raizada, M.

    1987-08-01

    Exposure of Nostoc muscorum to different concentrations of Ni and Ag brought about reduction in growth, carbon fixation, heterocyst production, and nitrogenase activity and increase in the loss of ions (K+, Na+). In an attempt to ameliorate the toxicity of test metals by ascorbic acid, glutathione, and sulfur-containing amino acids (L-cysteine and L-methionine), it was found that the level of protection by ascorbic acid and glutathione was more for Ag than Ni. However, metal-induced inhibition of growth and carbon fixation was equally ameliorated by methionine. But the level of protection by cysteine was quite different, i.e., 27% for Ni and 22% for Ag. Protection of metal toxicity in N. muscorum by amino acids lends further support to self-detoxifying ability of cyanobacteria because they are known to synthesize all essential amino acids.

  16. Sulfur amino acids are necessary for normal intestinal mucosal growth in neonatal piglets

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Sulfur amino acids (SAAs) methionine and cysteine play important metabolic and functional role in human health and disease. Gastrointestinal tract is an important site of transmethylation and transsulfuration of methionine and metabolizes approx. 20% of the dietary methionine intake (Riedijk et al. ...

  17. Sulfur amino acid deficiency upregulates intestinal methionine cycle activity and suppresses epithelial growth in neonatal pigs.

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    We recently showed that the developing gut is a significant site of methionine transmethylation to homocysteine and transsulfuration to cysteine. We hypothesized that sulfur amino acid (SAA) deficiency would preferentially reduce mucosal growth and antioxidant function in neonatal pigs. Neonatal pi...

  18. New insights into sulfur amino acid function in gut health and disease

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The gastrointestinal tract (GIT) is a metabolically significant site of sulfur amino acids (SAA) metabolism in the body. Aside from their role in protein synthesis, methionine and cysteine are involved in many biological functions and diseases. Methionine (MET) is an indispensable AA and is transmet...

  19. Mass independent fractionation of sulfur isotopes during thermochemical reduction of native sulfur, sulfite and sulfate by amino acids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Watanabe, Y.; Naraoka, H.; Ohmoto, H.

    2006-05-01

    Mass independent fractionation of sulfur isotopes (MIF-S) is recognized when the Δ33S value (= δ33S-0.515xδ34S) of a sample falls outside the range of 0±0.2 permil and the 33-34θ value (= ln33α/ ln34α) lies outside the range of 0.515±.005 (Farquhar and Wing, 2003). Previous investigators have concluded that the only mechanisms to create MIF-S are photochemical reactions between sulfur-bearing gases (SO2, H2S) and UV. Based on comparisons of the geochemical characteristics of Archean sedimentary rocks between those with large MIF-S values (e.g., the 2.5 Ga McRae and 2.7 Ga Jeerinah shales) and those with no (or very small) MIF- S values (e.g., 2.76 Ga Hardey shales and 2.92 Ga Mosquito Creek shales), we have developed a hypothesis that MIF-S in sedimentary rocks may have been created by reactions among organic-rich sediments, sulfur- bearing solid compounds, and sulfur-bearing hydrothermal fluids at T = 100-200°C during the early diagenetic stage of sediments. Most abundant organic compounds in immature sediments are amino acids. For these reasons, we have conducted series of laboratory experiments to investigate sulfur isotope fractionations during reactions between a variety of amino acids (alanine, glycine, hystidine, etc.) and native sulfur, sodium sulfite or sodium sulfate at 150-200°C. Previous researchers used a variety of organic compounds (sugars, methane, xylene, etc) and/or ferrous- bearing minerals to investigate non-bacterial sulfate reduction, but they failed to demonstrate thermochemical sulfate reduction at temperatures below 230°C. However, we were able to reduce sulfate (S6+), as well as sulfite (S4+) and native sulfur (S0), to hydrogen sulfide (S2-) even at 150°C using simple and common amino acids (e.g., alanine and glycine). The reduction rates generally decreased: (a) from native sulfur, to sulfite, and to sulfate; (b) from simple amino acids to more complex amino acids (e.g., histidine); and (c) with decreasing temperatures. The

  20. The Mitochondrial Sulfur Dioxygenase ETHYLMALONIC ENCEPHALOPATHY PROTEIN1 Is Required for Amino Acid Catabolism during Carbohydrate Starvation and Embryo Development in Arabidopsis1[C][W

    PubMed Central

    Krüßel, Lena; Junemann, Johannes; Wirtz, Markus; Birke, Hannah; Thornton, Jeremy D.; Browning, Luke W.; Poschet, Gernot; Hell, Rüdiger; Balk, Janneke; Braun, Hans-Peter; Hildebrandt, Tatjana M.

    2014-01-01

    The sulfur dioxygenase ETHYLMALONIC ENCEPHALOPATHY PROTEIN1 (ETHE1) catalyzes the oxidation of persulfides in the mitochondrial matrix and is essential for early embryo development in Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana). We investigated the biochemical and physiological functions of ETHE1 in plant metabolism using recombinant Arabidopsis ETHE1 and three transfer DNA insertion lines with 50% to 99% decreased sulfur dioxygenase activity. Our results identified a new mitochondrial pathway catalyzing the detoxification of reduced sulfur species derived from cysteine catabolism by oxidation to thiosulfate. Knockdown of the sulfur dioxygenase impaired embryo development and produced phenotypes of starvation-induced chlorosis during short-day growth conditions and extended darkness, indicating that ETHE1 has a key function in situations of high protein turnover, such as seed production and the use of amino acids as alternative respiratory substrates during carbohydrate starvation. The amino acid profile of mutant plants was similar to that caused by defects in the electron-transfer flavoprotein/electron-transfer flavoprotein:ubiquinone oxidoreductase complex and associated dehydrogenases. Thus, in addition to sulfur amino acid catabolism, ETHE1 also affects the oxidation of branched-chain amino acids and lysine. PMID:24692429

  1. Analysis of the interactions of sulfur-containing amino acids in membrane proteins.

    PubMed

    Gómez-Tamayo, José C; Cordomí, Arnau; Olivella, Mireia; Mayol, Eduardo; Fourmy, Daniel; Pardo, Leonardo

    2016-08-01

    The interactions of Met and Cys with other amino acid side chains have received little attention, in contrast to aromatic-aromatic, aromatic-aliphatic or/and aliphatic-aliphatic interactions. Precisely, these are the only amino acids that contain a sulfur atom, which is highly polarizable and, thus, likely to participate in strong Van der Waals interactions. Analysis of the interactions present in membrane protein crystal structures, together with the characterization of their strength in small-molecule model systems at the ab-initio level, predicts that Met-Met interactions are stronger than Met-Cys ≈ Met-Phe ≈ Cys-Phe interactions, stronger than Phe-Phe ≈ Phe-Leu interactions, stronger than the Met-Leu interaction, and stronger than Leu-Leu ≈ Cys-Leu interactions. These results show that sulfur-containing amino acids form stronger interactions than aromatic or aliphatic amino acids. Thus, these amino acids may provide additional driving forces for maintaining the 3D structure of membrane proteins and may provide functional specificity. PMID:27240306

  2. Seed storage protein deficiency improves sulfur amino acid content in common bean (Phaseolus vulgaris L.): redirection of sulfur from gamma-glutamyl-S-methyl-cysteine.

    PubMed

    Taylor, Meghan; Chapman, Ralph; Beyaert, Ronald; Hernández-Sebastià, Cinta; Marsolais, Frédéric

    2008-07-23

    The contents of sulfur amino acids in seeds of common bean ( Phaseolus vulgaris L.) are suboptimal for nutrition. They accumulate large amounts of a gamma-glutamyl dipeptide of S-methyl-cysteine, a nonprotein amino acid that cannot substitute for methionine or cysteine in the diet. Protein accumulation and amino acid composition were characterized in three genetically related lines integrating a progressive deficiency in major seed storage proteins, phaseolin, phytohemagglutinin, and arcelin. Nitrogen, carbon, and sulfur contents were comparable among the three lines. The contents of S-methyl-cysteine and gamma-glutamyl-S-methyl-cysteine were progressively reduced in the mutants. Sulfur was shifted predominantly to the protein cysteine pool, while total methionine was only slightly elevated. Methionine and cystine contents (mg per g protein) were increased by up to ca. 40%, to levels slightly above FAO guidelines on amino acid requirements for human nutrition. These findings may be useful to improve the nutritional quality of common bean. PMID:18588315

  3. Effects of dietary sulfur amino acids on lead toxicity in chicks

    SciTech Connect

    Latta, D.M.

    1986-01-01

    Factorial experiments were conducted to examine the interactions of dietary methionine with cystine, choline and glycine in lead (Pb) intoxicated chicks. In Experiment 1, chicks were fed a basal diet deficient in methionine and total sulfur-containing amino acids (SAA) with 0 or 1000 ppm added Pb. Methionine or methionine plus cystine improved growth regardless of Pb level; cystine addition alone improved growth only when Pb was present. Dietary methionine appeared to counteract Pb toxicity more effectively than cystine. In Experiments 2 and 3 dietary variables were 0 or 1000 ppm Pb, adequate or inadequate methionine and marginal or excess (Experiment 2) or adequate or inadequate (Experiment 3) choline. In Experiment 2 growth depression by Pb was less with methionine-adequate compared to methionine-inadequate diets; there were no differences in growth with choline-marginal or choline-excess diets. In Experiment 3, the Pb-induced growth depression was exacerbated by adequate choline when methionine-inadequate diets were fed. It appears that Pb lowers the chick's choline requirement and that the methyl moiety of methionine does not participate directly in Pb detoxification. In Experiment 4 effects of adequate or deficient methionine, adequate or excess glycine and 0 or 1000 ppm Pb in choline-deficient chicks were studied. Methionine stimulated growth and the response was greater when excess glycine was present. Excess glycine stimulated growth only in the presence of adequate methionine suggesting glycine is limiting for growth in choline-deficient, methionine-adequate diets. These studies indicate that adequate methionine ameliorates Pb-induced growth depression in growing chicks but that the methionine effect is greater with choline-adequate than with choline-deficient diets. The amelioration of Pb toxicity by methionine may be partly related to increased excretion of Pb.

  4. Exploration of Sulfur Assimilation of Aspergillus fumigatus Reveals Biosynthesis of Sulfur-Containing Amino Acids as a Virulence Determinant.

    PubMed

    Amich, Jorge; Dümig, Michaela; O'Keeffe, Gráinne; Binder, Jasmin; Doyle, Sean; Beilhack, Andreas; Krappmann, Sven

    2016-04-01

    Fungal infections are of major relevance due to the increased numbers of immunocompromised patients, frequently delayed diagnosis, and limited therapeutics. To date, the growth and nutritional requirements of fungi during infection, which are relevant for invasion of the host, are poorly understood. This is particularly true for invasive pulmonary aspergillosis, as so far, sources of (macro)elements that are exploited during infection have been identified to only a limited extent. Here, we have investigated sulfur (S) utilization by the human-pathogenic mold Aspergillus fumigatus during invasive growth. Our data reveal that inorganic S compounds or taurine is unlikely to serve as an S source during invasive pulmonary aspergillosis since a sulfate transporter mutant strain and a sulfite reductase mutant strain are fully virulent. In contrast, the S-containing amino acid cysteine is limiting for fungal growth, as proven by the reduced virulence of a cysteine auxotroph. Moreover, phenotypic characterization of this strain further revealed the robustness of the subordinate glutathione redox system. Interestingly, we demonstrate that methionine synthase is essential for A. fumigatus virulence, defining the biosynthetic route of this proteinogenic amino acid as a potential antifungal target. In conclusion, we provide novel insights into the nutritional requirements ofA. fumigatus during pathogenesis, a prerequisite to understanding and fighting infection. PMID:26787716

  5. The cysteine, total sulfur amino acid, tyrosine, phenylalanine + tyrosine, and non-essential amino acid maintenance requirements of broiler breeders.

    PubMed

    Ekmay, R D; Mei, S J; Sakomura, N K; Coon, C N

    2016-06-01

    Two hundred and fifty Cobb-Vantress broiler breeders were used to determine the maintenance requirement and efficiency of utilization of dietary Cys, Tyr, and non-essential amino acids (AA) in a 21-day experiment. The breeders were fed crystalline amino acid diets containing graded levels of Cys or Tyr representing 0, 10, 20, 30, and 40% of their suggested requirement level with all other amino acids maintained at 40% of their suggested requirement level. To determine the non-essential AA maintenance requirement, graded levels of non-essential AA were provided by glutamic acid to represent 12, 19, 26, 33, and 40% of the ideal level of glutamic acid with all other amino acids maintained at their maintenance requirement level. The total sulfur amino acid (TSAA) and Phe + Tyr requirements were calculated by combining Cys and Tyr results, respectively, with previously determined Met and Phe, respectively. The slope of Cys, Tyr, and non-essential AA accretion regression line indicated that 29% Cys, 24% TSAA, 21% Tyr, 20% Phe + Tyr, and 9% non-essential AA of crystalline amino acids were retained. The Cys requirement for zero protein accretion was calculated to be 30.48 mg/d or 17.006 mg/ kgBW(0.75)/d or 75.426 mg/kgCP/d. The TSAA requirement for zero accretion was calculated to be 132.25 mg/b/d, 71.48 mg/kgBW(0.75)/d, and 307.55 mg/kgCP/d. The Tyr requirement for zero protein accretion was calculated to be 65.907 mg/d or 37.233 mg/ kgBW(0.75)/d or 175.566 mg/kgCP/d. The Phe + Tyr requirement for zero protein accretion was calculated to be 352.18 mg/b/d, 190.37 mg/kgBW(0.75)/d, and 749.33 mg/kgCP/d. The non-essential AA requirement for zero protein accretion was calculated to be 3715.194 mg/d or 2003.155 mg/kgBW(0.75)/d or 9452.954 mg/kgCP/d. PMID:26994191

  6. Co-oxidation of the sulfur-containing amino acids in an autoxidizing lipid system

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Wedemeyer, G.A.; Dollar, A.M.

    1963-01-01

    Oxidation of the sulfur amino acids by autoxidizing lipids was studied in a model system consisting of an amino acid dispersed in cold-pressed, molecularly distilled menhaden oil (20–80% w/w). Under all conditions investigated, cysteine was oxidized completely to cystine. Preliminary results suggest that at 110°C the oxidation follows first-order kinetics for at least the first 8 hr. A specific reaction rate constant of 0.25 per hour was calculated. When fatty acids were added to the system, cystine was oxidized to its thiosulfinate ester. When the fatty acid-cystine ratio was 1:2, oxidation of cystine was a maximum. No oxidation of cystine occurred unless either a fatty acid, volatile organic acid, or ethanol was added. Under the conditions investigated, methionine was not oxidized to either its sulfoxide or its sulfone.

  7. Sulfur-induced structural motifs on copper and gold surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Walen, Holly

    The interaction of sulfur with copper and gold surfaces plays a fundamental role in important phenomena that include coarsening of surface nanostructures, and self-assembly of alkanethiols. Here, we identify and analyze unique sulfur-induced structural motifs observed on the low-index surfaces of these two metals. We seek out these structures in an effort to better understand the fundamental interactions between these metals and sulfur that lends to the stability and favorability of metal-sulfur complexes vs. chemisorbed atomic sulfur. We choose very specific conditions: very low temperature (5 K), and very low sulfur coverage (≤ 0.1 monolayer). In this region of temperature-coverage space, which has not been examined previously for these adsorbate-metal systems, the effects of individual interactions between metals and sulfur are most apparent and can be assessed extensively with the aid of theory and modeling. Furthermore, at this temperature diffusion is minimal and relatively-mobile species can be isolated, and at low coverage the structures observed are not consumed by an extended reconstruction. The primary experimental technique is scanning tunneling microscopy (STM). The experimental observations presented here---made under identical conditions---together with extensive DFT analyses, allow comparisons and insights into factors that favor the existence of metal-sulfur complexes, vs. chemisorbed atomic sulfur, on metal terraces. We believe this data will be instrumental in better understanding the complex phenomena occurring between the surfaces of coinage metals and sulfur.

  8. Studies on the protein and sulfur amino acid requirements of young bobwhite quail

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Serafin, J.A.

    1977-01-01

    Four experiments were conducted with purified diets to examine the influence of protein level and to estimate the sulfur amino acid (S.A.A.) requirement of young Bobwhite quail (Colinus virginianus). These studies demonstrated (I) that 26% protein was sufficient for rapid growth when the diet was supplemented with methionine; (2) that diets containing higher levels of protein (29.3% and 31.3%) failed to support satisfactory growth unless they contained supplemental methionine; and (3) that young Bobwhite quail require no more than 1.0% sulfur-containing amino acids for optimal growth and efficiency of feed utilization. A fifth experiment was conducted to examine the protein and S.A.A. requirements of young Bobwhite quail using practical rations and to compare results with those obtained with purified diets. Diets containing 24%, 26% and 28% protein were supplied with and without supplemental methionine in a five week study. Results showed significant growth responses to protein and supplemental methionine. Responses showed that Bobwhite quail require no more than 26% protein for maximum growth and efficiency of feed utilization when the S.A.A. level of the diet was approximately 1.0%. The results were in close agreement with those obtained with purified diets. These findings define more precisely than had been known the quantitative requirements of young Bobwhite quail for protein and for the S.A.A. necessary for optimal growth.

  9. Preparation and characterization of silver loaded montmorillonite modified with sulfur amino acid

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Tian; Lin, Oulian; Lu, Zhiyuan; He, Liuimei; Wang, Xiaosheng

    2014-06-01

    The Na+ montmorillonite (MMT) was modified with sulfur containing amino acid (L-cystine, L-cysteine or L-methionine) and characterized by energy dispersive spectrometer (EDS), X-ray diffraction (XRD) and Fourier transform infrared spectrum (FT-IR). The results showed the modification was smooth and the surface condition of MMT was changed with sulfur containing groups. Then silver was loaded on the modified MMTs via ion-exchange reaction under microwave irradiation, the spectra of X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), EDS and FT-IR confirmed the successful loading of massive silver and the strong interaction between sulfur and silver, the silver loaded L-cystine modified MMT (Ag@AA-MMT-3) with a silver content of 10.93 wt% was the highest of all. Further more, the Ag@AA-MMT-3 was under the irradiation of a UV lamp to turn silver ions to silver nano particles (Ag NPs). The XPS, specific surface area (SSA), transmission electron microscopy (TEM), XRD patterns and UV-vis spectra proved the existence of uniform nano scaled metallic Ag NPs. By contrast, the UV irradiated Ag@AA-MMT-3 (Ag@AA-MMT-UV) showed a much better slow release property than Ag@AA-MMT-3 or Ag@MMT. The Ag@AA-MMT-UV showing a large inhibition zone and high inhibition ratio presented very good antibacterial property.

  10. A Branch Point of Streptomyces Sulfur Amino Acid Metabolism Controls the Production of Albomycin

    PubMed Central

    Kulkarni, Aditya; Zeng, Yu; Zhou, Wei; Van Lanen, Steven; Zhang, Weiwen

    2015-01-01

    Albomycin (ABM), also known as grisein, is a sulfur-containing metabolite produced by Streptomyces griseus ATCC 700974. Genes predicted to be involved in the biosynthesis of ABM and ABM-like molecules are found in the genomes of other actinomycetes. ABM has potent antibacterial activity, and as a result, many attempts have been made to develop ABM into a drug since the last century. Although the productivity of S. griseus can be increased with random mutagenesis methods, understanding of Streptomyces sulfur amino acid (SAA) metabolism, which supplies a precursor for ABM biosynthesis, could lead to improved and stable production. We previously characterized the gene cluster (abm) in the genome-sequenced S. griseus strain and proposed that the sulfur atom of ABM is derived from either cysteine (Cys) or homocysteine (Hcy). The gene product, AbmD, appears to be an important link between primary and secondary sulfur metabolic pathways. Here, we show that propargylglycine or iron supplementation in growth media increased ABM production by significantly changing the relative concentrations of intracellular Cys and Hcy. An SAA metabolic network of S. griseus was constructed. Pathways toward increasing Hcy were shown to positively impact ABM production. The abmD gene and five genes that increased the Hcy/Cys ratio were assembled downstream of hrdBp promoter sequences and integrated into the chromosome for overexpression. The ABM titer of one engineered strain, SCAK3, in a chemically defined medium was consistently improved to levels ∼400% of the wild type. Finally, we analyzed the production and growth of SCAK3 in shake flasks for further process development. PMID:26519385

  11. A Branch Point of Streptomyces Sulfur Amino Acid Metabolism Controls the Production of Albomycin.

    PubMed

    Kulkarni, Aditya; Zeng, Yu; Zhou, Wei; Van Lanen, Steven; Zhang, Weiwen; Chen, Shawn

    2016-01-01

    Albomycin (ABM), also known as grisein, is a sulfur-containing metabolite produced by Streptomyces griseus ATCC 700974. Genes predicted to be involved in the biosynthesis of ABM and ABM-like molecules are found in the genomes of other actinomycetes. ABM has potent antibacterial activity, and as a result, many attempts have been made to develop ABM into a drug since the last century. Although the productivity of S. griseus can be increased with random mutagenesis methods, understanding of Streptomyces sulfur amino acid (SAA) metabolism, which supplies a precursor for ABM biosynthesis, could lead to improved and stable production. We previously characterized the gene cluster (abm) in the genome-sequenced S. griseus strain and proposed that the sulfur atom of ABM is derived from either cysteine (Cys) or homocysteine (Hcy). The gene product, AbmD, appears to be an important link between primary and secondary sulfur metabolic pathways. Here, we show that propargylglycine or iron supplementation in growth media increased ABM production by significantly changing the relative concentrations of intracellular Cys and Hcy. An SAA metabolic network of S. griseus was constructed. Pathways toward increasing Hcy were shown to positively impact ABM production. The abmD gene and five genes that increased the Hcy/Cys ratio were assembled downstream of hrdBp promoter sequences and integrated into the chromosome for overexpression. The ABM titer of one engineered strain, SCAK3, in a chemically defined medium was consistently improved to levels ∼400% of the wild type. Finally, we analyzed the production and growth of SCAK3 in shake flasks for further process development. PMID:26519385

  12. Radiolytic Modification of Sulfur Containing Acidic Amino Residues in Model Peptides: Fundamental Studies for Protein Footprinting

    SciTech Connect

    Xu,G.; Chance, M.

    2005-01-01

    Protein footprinting based on hydroxyl radical-mediated modification and quantitative mass spectroscopic analysis is a proven technique for examining protein structure, protein-ligand interactions, and structural allostery upon protein complex formation. The reactive and solvent-accessible amino acid side chains function as structural probes; however, correct structural analysis depends on the identification and quantification of all the relevant oxidative modifications within the protein sequence. Sulfur-containing amino acids are oxidized readily and the mechanisms of oxidation are particularly complex, although they have been extensively investigated by EPR and other spectroscopic methods. Here we have undertaken a detailed mass spectrometry study (using electrospray ionization mass spectrometry and tandem mass spectrometry) of model peptides containing cysteine (Cys-SH), cystine (disulfide bonded Cys), and methionine after oxidation using {gamma}-rays or synchrotron X-rays and have compared these results to those expected from oxidation mechanisms proposed in the literature. Radiolysis of cysteine leads to cysteine sulfonic acid (+48 Da mass shift) and cystine as the major products; other minor products including cysteine sulfinic acid (+32 Da mass shift) and serine (-16 Da mass shift) are observed. Radiolysis of cystine results in the oxidative opening of the disulfide bond and generation of cysteine sulfonic acid and sulfinic acid; however, the rate of oxidation is significantly less than that for cysteine. Radiolysis of methionine gives rise primarily to methionine sulfoxide (+16 Da mass shift); this can be further oxidized to methionine sulfone (+32 Da mass shift) or another product with a -32 Da mass shift likely due to aldehyde formation at the {gamma}-carbon. Due to the high reactivity of sulfur-containing amino acids, the extent of oxidation is easily influenced by secondary oxidation events or the presence of redox reagents used in standard proteolytic

  13. In vivo contribution of amino acid sulfur to cartilage proteoglycan sulfation

    PubMed Central

    Pecora, Fabio; Gualeni, Benedetta; Forlino, Antonella; Superti-Furga, Andrea; Tenni, Ruggero; Cetta, Giuseppe; Rossi, Antonio

    2006-01-01

    Cytoplasmic sulfate for sulfation reactions may be derived either from extracellular fluids or from catabolism of sulfur-containing amino acids and other thiols. In vitro studies have pointed out the potential relevance of sulfur-containing amino acids as sources for sulfation when extracellular sulfate concentration is low or when its transport is impaired such as in DTDST [DTD (diastrophic dysplasia) sulfate transporter] chondrodysplasias. In the present study, we have considered the contribution of cysteine and cysteine derivatives to in vivo macromolecular sulfation of cartilage by using the mouse model of DTD we have recently generated [Forlino, Piazza, Tiveron, Della Torre, Tatangelo, Bonafe, Gualeni, Romano, Pecora, Superti-Furga et al. (2005) Hum. Mol. Genet. 14, 859–871]. By intraperitoneal injection of [35S]cysteine in wild-type and mutant mice and determination of the specific activity of the chondroitin 4-sulfated disaccharide in cartilage, we demonstrated that the pathway by which sulfate is recruited from the intracellular oxidation of thiols is active in vivo. To check whether cysteine derivatives play a role, sulfation of cartilage proteoglycans was measured after treatment for 1 week of newborn mutant and wild-type mice with hypodermic NAC (N-acetyl-L-cysteine). The relative amount of sulfated disaccharides increased in mutant mice treated with NAC compared with the placebo group, indicating an increase in proteoglycan sulfation due to NAC catabolism, although pharmacokinetic studies demonstrated that the drug was rapidly removed from the bloodstream. In conclusion, cysteine contribution to cartilage proteoglycan sulfation in vivo is minimal under physiological conditions even if extracellular sulfate availability is low; however, the contribution of thiols to sulfation becomes significant by increasing their plasma concentration. PMID:16719839

  14. Quantitative trait locus analysis of seed sulfur containing amino acids in two recombinant inbred line populations of soybean

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Soybean (Glycine max (L.) Merr.) is a major source of plant protein for humans and livestock. Low levels of sulfur containing amino acids (cysteine and methionine) in soybean protein is the main limitation of soybean meal as animal food. The objectives of this study were to identify and validate Q...

  15. Stearoyl-CoA Desaturase-1: Is It the Link between Sulfur Amino Acids and Lipid Metabolism?

    PubMed Central

    Poloni, Soraia; Blom, Henk J.; Schwartz, Ida V. D.

    2015-01-01

    An association between sulfur amino acids (methionine, cysteine, homocysteine and taurine) and lipid metabolism has been described in several experimental and population-based studies. Changes in the metabolism of these amino acids influence serum lipoprotein concentrations, although the underlying mechanisms are still poorly understood. However, recent evidence has suggested that the enzyme stearoyl-CoA desaturase-1 (SCD-1) may be the link between these two metabolic pathways. SCD-1 is a key enzyme for the synthesis of monounsaturated fatty acids. Its main substrates C16:0 and C18:0 and products palmitoleic acid (C16:1) and oleic acid (C18:1) are the most abundant fatty acids in triglycerides, cholesterol esters and membrane phospholipids. A significant suppression of SCD-1 has been observed in several animal models with disrupted sulfur amino acid metabolism, and the activity of SCD-1 is also associated with the levels of these amino acids in humans. This enzyme also appears to be involved in the etiology of metabolic syndromes because its suppression results in decreased fat deposits (regardless of food intake), improved insulin sensitivity and higher basal energy expenditure. Interestingly, this anti-obesogenic phenotype has also been described in humans and animals with sulfur amino acid disorders, which is consistent with the hypothesis that SCD-1 activity is influenced by these amino acids, in particularly cysteine, which is a strong and independent predictor of SCD-1 activity and fat storage. In this narrative review, we discuss the evidence linking sulfur amino acids, SCD-1 and lipid metabolism. PMID:26046927

  16. Renal cortex taurine content regulates renal adaptive response to altered dietary intake of sulfur amino acids.

    PubMed Central

    Chesney, R W; Gusowski, N; Dabbagh, S

    1985-01-01

    Rats fed a reduced sulfur amino acid diet (LTD) or a high-taurine diet (HTD) demonstrate a renal adaptive response. The LTD results in hypotaurinuria and enhanced brush border membrane vesicle (BBMV) accumulation of taurine. The HTD causes hypertaurinuria and reduced BBMV uptake. This adaptation may relate to changes in plasma or renal cortex taurine concentration. Rats were fed a normal-taurine diet (NTD), LTD, or HTD for 14 d or they underwent: (a) 3% beta-alanine for the last 8 d of each diet; (b) 3 d of fasting; or (c) a combination of 3% beta-alanine added for 8 d and 3 d of fasting. Each maneuver lowered the cortex taurine concentration, but did not significantly lower plasma taurine values compared with controls. Increased BBMV taurine uptake occurred after each manipulation. Feeding 3% glycine did not alter the plasma, renal cortex, or urinary taurine concentrations, or BBMV uptake of taurine. Feeding 3% methionine raised plasma and urinary taurine excretion but renal tissue taurine was unchanged, as was initial BBMV uptake. Hence, nonsulfur-containing alpha-amino acids did not change beta-amino acid transport. The increase in BBMV uptake correlates with the decline in renal cortex and plasma taurine content. However, since 3% methionine changed plasma taurine without altering BBMV uptake, it is more likely that the change in BBMV uptake and the adaptive response expressed at the brush border surface relate to changes in renal cortex taurine concentrations. Finally, despite changes in urine and renal cortex taurine content, brain taurine values were unchanged, which suggests that this renal adaptive response maintains stable taurine concentrations where taurine serves as a neuromodulator. PMID:3935668

  17. A Sulfur Amino Acid–Free Meal Increases Plasma Lipids in Humans123

    PubMed Central

    Park, Youngja; Le, Ngoc-Anh; Yu, Tianwei; Strobel, Fred; Gletsu-Miller, Nana; Accardi, Carolyn J.; Lee, Kichun S.; Wu, Shaoxiong; Ziegler, Thomas R.; Jones, Dean P.

    2011-01-01

    The content of sulfur amino acid (SAA) in a meal affects postprandial plasma cysteine concentrations and the redox potential of cysteine/cystine. Because such changes can affect enzyme, transporter, and receptor activities, meal content of SAA could have unrecognized effects on metabolism during the postprandial period. This pilot study used proton NMR (1H-NMR) spectroscopy of human plasma to test the hypothesis that dietary SAA content changes macronutrient metabolism. Healthy participants (18–36 y, 5 males and 3 females) were equilibrated for 3 d to adequate SAA, fed chemically defined meals without SAA for 5 d (depletion), and then fed isoenergetic, isonitrogenous meals containing 56 mg·kg−1·d−1 SAA for 4.5 d (repletion). On the first and last day of consuming the chemically defined meals, a morning meal containing 60% of the daily food intake was given and plasma samples were collected over an 8-h postprandial time course for characterization of metabolic changes by 1H-NMR spectroscopy. SAA-free food increased peak intensity in the plasma 1H-NMR spectra in the postprandial period. Orthogonal signal correction/partial least squares-discriminant analysis showed changes in signals associated with lipids, some amino acids, and lactate, with notable increases in plasma lipid signals (TG, unsaturated lipid, cholesterol). Conventional lipid analyses confirmed higher plasma TG and showed an increase in plasma concentration of the lipoprotein lipase inhibitor, apoC-III. The results show that plasma 1H-NMR spectra can provide useful macronutrient profiling following a meal challenge protocol and that a single meal with imbalanced SAA content alters postprandial lipid metabolism. PMID:21677075

  18. Macroporous chitosan hydrogels: Effects of sulfur on the loading and release behaviour of amino acid-based compounds.

    PubMed

    Elviri, Lisa; Asadzadeh, Maliheh; Cucinelli, Roberta; Bianchera, Annalisa; Bettini, Ruggero

    2015-11-01

    Chitosan is a biodegradable, biocompatible polymer of natural origin widely applied to the preparation of functional hydrogels suitable for controlled release of drugs, peptides and proteins. Non-covalent interactions, expecially ionic interactions, are the main driver of the loading and release behaviour of amino acids or peptides from chitosan hydrogels. With the aim to improve the understanding of the mechanisms governing the behaviour of chitosan hydrogels on peptide uptake and delivery, in this paper the attention was focused on the role played by sulfur on the interactions of chitosan hydrogels with sulfur-containing amino acids (AA) and peptides. Hence, loading and release experiments on cysteine, cystine and glutathione (SH containing amino acid, dipeptide and tripeptide, respectively) as well as on glycine and valine as apolar amino acids were carried out. For these puroses, chitosan hydrogels were prepared in an easy and reproducible manner by a freeze-gelation process on a poly-L-lysine coated support. The hydrogel surface pore size, uniformity and distribution were tested. Optimal results (D50 = 26 ± 4 μm) were obtained by using the poly-L-lysine positively-charged surface. The loading results gathered evidenced that the sulfur-containing molecules presented an increased absorption both in terms of rate and extent by chitosan hydrogels with respect to nonpolar amino acids, mainly due to ionic and hydrogen bond interactions. ATR-FTIR analysis carried out on chitosan hydrogels, with and without the AA related compounds to study putative interactions, supported these apparent sulfur-dependent results. Finally, chitosan hydrogels displayed excellent retention capabilities (AA release <5%) for all AA, strongly supporting the use of chitosan hydrogels as matrix for controlled drug release. PMID:26256323

  19. Sulfur deficiency changes mycosporine-like amino acid (MAA) composition of Anabaena variabilis PCC 7937: a possible role of sulfur in MAA bioconversion.

    PubMed

    Singh, Shailendra P; Klisch, Manfred; Sinha, Rajeshwar P; Häder, Donat-Peter

    2010-01-01

    In the present investigation we show for the first time that bioconversion of a primary mycosporine-like amino acid (MAA) into a secondary MAA is regulated by sulfur deficiency in the cyanobacterium Anabaena variabilis PCC 7937. This cyanobacterium synthesizes the primary MAA shinorine (RT = 2.2 min, lambda(max) = 334 nm) under normal conditions (PAR + UV-A + UV-B); however, under sulfur deficiency, a secondary MAA palythine-serine (RT = 3.9 min, lambda(max) = 320 nm) appears. Addition of methionine to sulfur-deficient cultures resulted in the disappearance of palythine-serine, suggesting the role of primary MAAs under sulfur deficiency in recycling of methionine by donating the methyl group from the glycine subunit of shinorine to tetrahydrofolate to regenerate the methionine from homocysteine. This is also the first report for the synthesis of palythine-serine by cyanobacteria which has so far been reported only from corals. Addition of methionine also affected the conversion of mycosporine-glycine into shinorine, consequently, resulted in the appearance of mycosporine-glycine (RT = 3.6 min, lambda(max) = 310 nm). Our results also suggest that palythine-serine is synthesized from shinorine. Based on these results we propose that glycine decarboxylase is the potential enzyme that catalyzes the bioconversion of shinorine to palythine-serine by decarboxylation and demethylation of the glycine unit of shinorine. PMID:20456655

  20. Taurine supplementation improves the utilization of sulfur-containing amino acids in rats continually administrated alcohol.

    PubMed

    Yang, Hui-Ting; Chien, Yi-Wen; Tsen, Jen-Horng; Chang, Ching-Chien; Chang, Jer-Hwa; Huang, Shih-Yi

    2009-02-01

    The main purpose of this study was to evaluate changes in brain sulfur-containing amino acid (SCAA) metabolism to determine whether taurine intervened under continuous alcohol intake. We fed 80 male Sprague-Dawley rats 30% alcohol-containing water for 4 weeks. Eighty animals were divided into two groups (with or without 2 g/kg body weight taurine supplementation), and five were killed every week in each group for monitoring SCAA changes in the brain, liver, kidneys and heart. Results indicated that the plasma alcohol concentration increased from Weeks 1-4; however, animals with taurine supplementation showed a lower plasma concentration of ethanol in Week 2. As to SCAA concentrations, cysteine and taurine were both lower after a week of alcohol ingestion in the brain and plasma; the same declining trend was shown in the liver in Week 2. In contrast, plasma and hepatic concentrations of homocysteine were elevated in Week 2, and the plasma S-adenosylmethionine (SAM)/S-adenosylhomocysteine (SAH) ratio also decreased in Week 1. Furthermore, the key cofactor of transsulfuration, pyridoxal-5'-phosphate, significantly declined in the plasma after a week of the ethanol intervention, whereas an increase was observed in brain tissue. Under taurine supplementation, some recoveries were shown by delaying taurine depletion to Week 2, increasing the SAM/SAH ratio and elevating plasma and brain levels of vitamin B6 in Week 2. In conclusion, daily consumption of 30% alcohol interfered with SCAA metabolism, thus decreasing taurine's role in neurotransmission. The possible mechanism involved might be that ethanol interrupts the production of cysteine, which is the upstream SCAA of taurine, thus decreasing the homocysteine level. Additionally, taurine supplementation delayed this process. PMID:18547794

  1. Dietary Sulfur Amino Acid Effects on Fasting Plasma Cysteine/Cystine Redox Potential in Humans

    PubMed Central

    Jones, Dean P.; Park, Youngja; Gletsu-Miller, Nana; Liang, Yongliang; Yu, Tianwei; Accardi, Carolyn Jonas; Ziegler, Thomas R.

    2010-01-01

    Objective Oxidation of plasma cysteine/cystine (Cys/CySS) redox potential (EhCySS) has been associated with risk factors for cardiovascular disease in humans. Cys and CySS are derived from dietary sulfur amino acids (SAA), but the specific effects of SAA depletion and repletion on Cys/CySS redox indices are unknown. The present study examined the effect of dietary SAA intake level on free Cys, free CySS and EhCySS in human plasma under fasting conditions. Research Methods and Procedures Healthy individuals aged 18–36 y (n=13) were equilibrated to foods providing the RDA for SAA and then fed chemically defined diets without SAA (0 mg·kg−1·d−1; n=13) followed by SAA at levels approximating the mean (56 mg·kg−1·d−1; n=8) or 99th percentile (117 mg·kg−1·d−1; n=5) intake levels of Americans. Fasting plasma samples were collected daily during 4-d study periods and analyzed for free Cys, free CySS and the EhCySS. Results The SAA-free diet significantly (p<0.05) decreased plasma free Cys concentrations and oxidized EhCySS values after 4 days of SAA depletion. With SAA repletion at 56 mg·kg−1·d− 1, plasma free Cys increased significantly and values for EhCySS became more reducing. Administration of a diet providing a higher dose of SAA (117 mg·kg−1·d−1) resulted in a significantly higher level of free Cys and a more reducing EhCySS. Conclusions These results show that free Cys and Cys/CySS redox potential (EhCySS) in fasting plasma are affected by dietary SAA intake level in humans. Significant changes occur slowly over 4 days with insufficient SAA intake, but rapidly (after 1 day) with repletion. PMID:20471805

  2. Sulfur-containing amino acids block stretch-dependent K+ channels and nitrergic responses in the murine colon.

    PubMed

    Park, Kyu Joo; Baker, Salah A; Cho, Sang Yun; Sanders, Kenton M; Koh, Sang Don

    2005-04-01

    1. Efforts to determine the role of stretch-dependent K(+) (SDK) channels in enteric inhibitory neural responses in gastrointestinal muscles are difficult due to a lack of blocking drugs for SDK channels. 2. SDK channels are blocked by sulfur-containing amino acids. These compounds reduced the open probability of SDK channels in on and off-cell patches of murine colonic myocytes. L-Methionine was the most selective and had little or no effect on other known K(+) conductances in colonic myocytes. 3. Application of L-cysteine, L-methionine or DL-homocysteine depolarized intact muscles and enhanced spontaneous contractions. D-Stereoisomers of these amino acids were less effective than L-stereoisomers. 4. Pretreatment of muscles with tetrodotoxin, N(W)-nitro-L-arginine or 1H-[1,2,4] oxadiazolo [4,3-a] quinoxalin-1-one reduced the depolarization responses to these compounds, suggesting that spontaneous neural activity and release of NO tonically activates SDK channels. 5. Nitrergic responses to nerve stimulation were reduced by sulfur-containing amino acids. 6. These data suggest that nitrergic inhibitory junction potentials are mediated, in part, by activation of SDK channels in murine colonic muscles. PMID:15700022

  3. Intrauterine growth restriction leads to changes in sulfur amino acid metabolism, but not global DNA methylation, in Yucatan miniature piglets.

    PubMed

    MacKay, Dylan S; Brophy, Julie D; McBreairty, Laura E; McGowan, Ross A; Bertolo, Robert F

    2012-09-01

    Intrauterine growth restriction (IUGR), in both animals and humans, has been linked to metabolic syndrome later in life. There has been recent evidence that perturbations in sulfur amino acid metabolism may be involved in this early programming phenomenon. Methionine is the precursor for cellular methylation reactions and for the synthesis of cysteine. It has been suggested that the mechanism behind the "fetal origins" of adult diseases may be epigenetic, involving DNA methylation. Because we have recently demonstrated the fetal origins phenomenon in Yucatan miniature swine, we hypothesized that sulfur amino acid metabolism is altered in IUGR piglets. In this study, metabolites and the activities of sulfur amino acid cycle enzymes were analyzed in liver samples of 3- to 5-day-old runt (IUGR: 0.85±0.13 kg) and large (1.36±0.21 kg) Yucatan miniature pig littermates (n=6 pairs). The IUGR piglets had significantly lower specific and total activities of betaine-homocysteine methyltransferase (BHMT) and cystathionine γ-lyase (CGL) than larger littermates (P<.05). Expression of CGL (but not BHMT) mRNA was also lower in IUGR piglets (P<.05). This low CGL reduced cysteine and taurine concentrations in IUGR pigs and led to an accumulation of hepatic cystathionine, with lower homocysteine concentrations. Methylation index and liver global DNA methylation were unaltered. Reduced prenatal growth in Yucatan miniature piglets impairs their remethylation capacity as well as their ability to remove cystathionine and synthesize cysteine and taurine, which could have important implications on long-term health outcomes of IUGR neonates. PMID:22137257

  4. Effects of nitrogen and sulfur fertilization on free amino acids, sugars, and acrylamide-forming potential in potato.

    PubMed

    Muttucumaru, Nira; Powers, Stephen J; Elmore, J Stephen; Mottram, Donald S; Halford, Nigel G

    2013-07-10

    Nitrogen (N) fertilizer is used routinely in potato (Solanum tuberosum) cultivation to maximize yield. However, it also affects sugar and free amino acid concentrations in potato tubers, and this has potential implications for food quality and safety because free amino acids and reducing sugars participate in the Maillard reaction during high-temperature cooking and processing. This results in the formation of color, aroma, and flavor compounds, but also some undesirable contaminants, including acrylamide, which forms when the amino acid that participates in the final stages of the reaction is asparagine. Another mineral, sulfur (S), also has profound effects on tuber composition. In this study, 13 varieties of potato were grown in a field trial in 2010 and treated with different combinations of N and S. Potatoes were analyzed immediately after harvest to show the effect of N and S fertilization on concentrations of free asparagine, other free amino acids, sugars, and acrylamide-forming potential. The study showed that N application can affect acrylamide-forming potential in potatoes but that the effect is type- (French fry, chipping, and boiling) and variety-dependent, with most varieties showing an increase in acrylamide formation in response to increased N but two showing a decrease. S application reduced glucose concentrations and mitigated the effect of high N application on the acrylamide-forming potential of some of the French fry-type potatoes. PMID:23768004

  5. Effects of Nitrogen and Sulfur Fertilization on Free Amino Acids, Sugars, and Acrylamide-Forming Potential in Potato

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Nitrogen (N) fertilizer is used routinely in potato (Solanum tuberosum) cultivation to maximize yield. However, it also affects sugar and free amino acid concentrations in potato tubers, and this has potential implications for food quality and safety because free amino acids and reducing sugars participate in the Maillard reaction during high-temperature cooking and processing. This results in the formation of color, aroma, and flavor compounds, but also some undesirable contaminants, including acrylamide, which forms when the amino acid that participates in the final stages of the reaction is asparagine. Another mineral, sulfur (S), also has profound effects on tuber composition. In this study, 13 varieties of potato were grown in a field trial in 2010 and treated with different combinations of N and S. Potatoes were analyzed immediately after harvest to show the effect of N and S fertilization on concentrations of free asparagine, other free amino acids, sugars, and acrylamide-forming potential. The study showed that N application can affect acrylamide-forming potential in potatoes but that the effect is type- (French fry, chipping, and boiling) and variety-dependent, with most varieties showing an increase in acrylamide formation in response to increased N but two showing a decrease. S application reduced glucose concentrations and mitigated the effect of high N application on the acrylamide-forming potential of some of the French fry-type potatoes. PMID:23768004

  6. Mechanisms of sulfur mustard-induced metabolic injury

    SciTech Connect

    Martens, M.E.; Smith, W.J.

    1993-05-13

    Studies on the mechanism of metabolic injury induced by sulfur mustard (2, 2'- dichlorodiethyl sulfide, HD) have demonstrated that exposure of human epidermal keratinocytes in culture to HD induces time- and dose-dependent NAD+ depletion and inhibition of glucose metabolism (Martens, Biochem. Pharmacol., in press). Both occurred relatively early after alkylation, preceding the loss of membrane integrity that is indicative of metabolic cell death. The inhibition of glycolysis induced by HD was only partially correlated with the depletion of NAD+ and, thus, was not simply of changes in the NAD+ level. Rather, HD appeared to induce complex shifts in the pattern of glucose metabolism that paralleled both the timing and degree of injury. In line with these findings, recent experiments have shown that partial protection against HD-induced NAD+ depletion by 1 mM niacinamide did not protect against the inhibition of glycolysis. In preliminary experiments examining the effect of HD-induced metabolic changes on the cellular energy state, dose-dependent depletion of ATP was seen at 24 hours after exposure, but not at 4 or 8 hours. As seen for glucose metabolism, 1 mM niacinamide did not prevent the loss of high-energy intermediate (ATP). We conclude from these studies that relationships among HD exposure, glucose metabolism, and intracellular NAD and ATP are more complex than originally proposed (Papirmeister et al, Fund. Appl. Toxicol. 5:S134, 1985).

  7. Milestones in plant sulfur research on sulfur-induced-resistance (SIR) in Europe.

    PubMed

    Bloem, Elke; Haneklaus, Silvia; Schnug, Ewald

    2014-01-01

    Until the 1970's of the last century sulfur (S) was mainly regarded as a pollutant being the main contributor of acid rain, causing forest dieback in central Europe. When Clean Air Acts came into force at the start of the 1980's SO2 contaminations in the air were consequently reduced within the next years. S changed from an unwanted pollutant into a lacking plant nutrient in agriculture since agricultural fields were no longer "fertilized" indirectly by industrial pollution. S deficiency was first noticed in Brassica crops that display an especially high S demand because of its content of S-containing secondary metabolites, the glucosinolates. In Scotland, where S depositions decreased even faster than in continental Europe, an increasing disease incidence with Pyrenopeziza brassicae was observed in oilseed rape in the beginning 1990's and the concept of sulfur-induced-resistance (SIR) was developed after a relationship between the S status and the disease incidence was uncovered. Since then a lot of research was carried out to unravel the background of SIR in the metabolism of agricultural crops and to identify metabolites, enzymes and reactions, which are potentially activated by the S metabolism to combat fungal pathogens. The S status of the crop is affecting many different plant features such as color and scent of flowers, pigments in leaves, metabolite concentrations and the release of gaseous S compounds which are directly influencing the desirability of a crop for a variety of different organisms from microorganisms, over insects and slugs to the point of grazing animals. The present paper is an attempt to sum up the knowledge about the effect of the S nutritional status of agricultural crops on parameters that are directly related to their health status and by this to SIR. Milestones in SIR research are compiled, open questions are addressed and future projections were developed. PMID:25642233

  8. Milestones in plant sulfur research on sulfur-induced-resistance (SIR) in Europe

    PubMed Central

    Bloem, Elke; Haneklaus, Silvia; Schnug, Ewald

    2015-01-01

    Until the 1970's of the last century sulfur (S) was mainly regarded as a pollutant being the main contributor of acid rain, causing forest dieback in central Europe. When Clean Air Acts came into force at the start of the 1980's SO2 contaminations in the air were consequently reduced within the next years. S changed from an unwanted pollutant into a lacking plant nutrient in agriculture since agricultural fields were no longer “fertilized” indirectly by industrial pollution. S deficiency was first noticed in Brassica crops that display an especially high S demand because of its content of S-containing secondary metabolites, the glucosinolates. In Scotland, where S depositions decreased even faster than in continental Europe, an increasing disease incidence with Pyrenopeziza brassicae was observed in oilseed rape in the beginning 1990's and the concept of sulfur-induced-resistance (SIR) was developed after a relationship between the S status and the disease incidence was uncovered. Since then a lot of research was carried out to unravel the background of SIR in the metabolism of agricultural crops and to identify metabolites, enzymes and reactions, which are potentially activated by the S metabolism to combat fungal pathogens. The S status of the crop is affecting many different plant features such as color and scent of flowers, pigments in leaves, metabolite concentrations and the release of gaseous S compounds which are directly influencing the desirability of a crop for a variety of different organisms from microorganisms, over insects and slugs to the point of grazing animals. The present paper is an attempt to sum up the knowledge about the effect of the S nutritional status of agricultural crops on parameters that are directly related to their health status and by this to SIR. Milestones in SIR research are compiled, open questions are addressed and future projections were developed. PMID:25642233

  9. Sulfur mustard-induced poikiloderma: a case report.

    PubMed

    Emadi, Seyed Naser; Kaffashi, Mohammad; Poursaleh, Zohreh; Akhavan-Moghaddam, Jamal; Soroush, Mohammad Reza; Emadi, Seyed Emad; Taghavi, Nez'hat-o-Sadat

    2011-06-01

    Sulfur mustard (SM) is a potent chemical warfare agent that was widely used during the First World War and the Iran-Iraq conflict. This vesicant agent causes several acute and chronic effects on the skin, eye, and respiratory system. We report the case of a 41-year-old man who was injured with SM in Iraq chemical attack in 1988. After exposure, he developed severe skin blisters on his upper trunk, dorsum of hands, and genitalia. Based on several clinical observations, such as atrophy, pigmentation, and vascular changes on genitalia with relevant findings in histopathological studies, persistent pigmentation, and damaged skin appendix in hand lesions, a diagnosis of "SM-induced poikiloderma" was postulated. The absence of any complication on the palmar aspect of hands is another remarkable finding in presented case, which suggests a plausible role of the palms as a vector for transporting SM to other sites of the skin. PMID:21142708

  10. Determination of sulfur and nitrogen compounds during the processing of dry fermented sausages and their relation to amino acid generation.

    PubMed

    Corral, Sara; Leitner, Erich; Siegmund, Barbara; Flores, Mónica

    2016-01-01

    The identification of odor-active sulfur and nitrogen compounds formed during the processing of dry fermented sausages was the objective of this study. In order to elucidate their possible origin, free amino acids (FAAs) were also determined. The volatile compounds present in the dry sausages were extracted using solvent assisted flavor evaporation (SAFE) and monitored by one and two-dimensional gas chromatography with different detectors: mass spectrometry (MS), nitrogen phosphorous (NPD), flame photometric (FPD) detectors, as well as gas chromatography-olfactometry. A total of seventeen sulfur and nitrogen compounds were identified and quantified. Among them, 2-acetyl-1-pyrroline was the most potent odor active compound, followed by methional, ethylpyrazine and 2,3-dihydrothiophene characterized by toasted, cooked potato, and nutty notes. The degradation of FAAs, generated during processing, was related to the production of aroma compounds, such as methionine forming methional and benzothiazole while ornithine was the precursor compound for 2-acetyl-1-pyrroline and glycine for ethylpyrazine. PMID:26213023

  11. Sulfur, Protein Size Distribution, and Free Amino Acids in Flour Mill Streams and Their Relationship to Dough Rheology and Breadmaking Traits

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The aim of this study was to evaluate differences in sulfur content, protein size distribution, and free amino acids among flour mill streams (FMS) and their relationships to dough rheology and breadmaking traits. Information from this study would likely lead to more precise blending of FMS in comme...

  12. Quenching of triplet states of aromatic ketones by sulfur-containing amino acids in solution. Evidence for electron transfer

    SciTech Connect

    Marciniak, B.; Bobrowski, K.; Hug, G.L. )

    1993-11-18

    The mechanism for quenching triplet states of benzophenones by sulfur-containing amino acids in water/acetonitrile solution was investigated by laser flash photolysis. The amino acids in the study were methionine, S-methylcysteine, and S-carboxymethylcysteine, and the eight aromatic triplets were those of benzophenone and its derivatives possessing electron-withdrawing or electron-donating groups. The presence of radical ions in the transient spectra and correlations of the quenching rate constants with the free energy change for electron transfer are strong indications that the process involves an electron transfer. These correlations were displayed as Rehm-Weller plots (logarithm of quenching rate vs free energy). Classical theoretical formulations of the Rehm-Weller correlations were used to estimate the intrinsic barriers and the transmission coefficients for the electron-transfer processes. Applying both [open quotes]quadratic[close quotes] Marcus and [open quotes]asymptotic[close quotes] Agmon-Levine free energy relationships led to the values of intrinsic barriers lower than the solvent reorganization energy calculated within the framework of the dielectric continuum model. These relationships also led to low electronic transmission coefficients. The low values of the intrinsic barriers for electron transfer were also obtained using the recently developed Tachiya approach. 58 refs., 5 figs., 2 tabs.

  13. Current Therapeutics, Their Problems, and Sulfur-Containing-Amino-Acid Metabolism as a Novel Target against Infections by “Amitochondriate” Protozoan Parasites

    PubMed Central

    Ali, Vahab; Nozaki, Tomoyoshi

    2007-01-01

    The “amitochondriate” protozoan parasites of humans Entamoeba histolytica, Giardia intestinalis, and Trichomonas vaginalis share many biochemical features, e.g., energy and amino acid metabolism, a spectrum of drugs for their treatment, and the occurrence of drug resistance. These parasites possess metabolic pathways that are divergent from those of their mammalian hosts and are often considered to be good targets for drug development. Sulfur-containing-amino-acid metabolism represents one such divergent metabolic pathway, namely, the cysteine biosynthetic pathway and methionine γ-lyase-mediated catabolism of sulfur-containing amino acids, which are present in T. vaginalis and E. histolytica but absent in G. intestinalis. These pathways are potentially exploitable for development of drugs against amoebiasis and trichomoniasis. For instance, l-trifluoromethionine, which is catalyzed by methionine γ-lyase and produces a toxic product, is effective against T. vaginalis and E. histolytica parasites in vitro and in vivo and may represent a good lead compound. In this review, we summarize the biology of these microaerophilic parasites, their clinical manifestation and epidemiology of disease, chemotherapeutics, the modes of action of representative drugs, and problems related to these drugs, including drug resistance. We further discuss our approach to exploit unique sulfur-containing-amino-acid metabolism, focusing on development of drugs against E. histolytica. PMID:17223627

  14. Sulfur alleviates arsenic toxicity by reducing its accumulation and modulating proteome, amino acids and thiol metabolism in rice leaves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dixit, Garima; Singh, Amit Pal; Kumar, Amit; Dwivedi, Sanjay; Deeba, Farah; Kumar, Smita; Suman, Shankar; Adhikari, Bijan; Shukla, Yogeshwar; Trivedi, Prabodh Kumar; Pandey, Vivek; Tripathi, Rudra Deo

    2015-11-01

    Arsenic (As) contamination of water is a global concern and rice consumption is the biggest dietary exposure to human posing carcinogenic risks, predominantly in Asia. Sulfur (S) is involved in di-sulfide linkage in many proteins and plays crucial role in As detoxification. Present study explores role of variable S supply on rice leaf proteome, its inclination towards amino acids (AA) profile and non protein thiols under arsenite exposure. Analysis of 282 detected proteins on 2-DE gel revealed 113 differentially expressed proteins, out of which 80 were identified by MALDI-TOF-TOF. The identified proteins were mostly involved in glycolysis, TCA cycle, AA biosynthesis, photosynthesis, protein metabolism, stress and energy metabolism. Among these, glycolytic enzymes play a major role in AA biosynthesis that leads to change in AAs profiling. Proteins of glycolytic pathway, photosynthesis and energy metabolism were also validated by western blot analysis. Conclusively S supplementation reduced the As accumulation in shoot positively skewed thiol metabolism and glycolysis towards AA accumulation under AsIII stress.

  15. Sulfur alleviates arsenic toxicity by reducing its accumulation and modulating proteome, amino acids and thiol metabolism in rice leaves

    PubMed Central

    Dixit, Garima; Singh, Amit Pal; Kumar, Amit; Dwivedi, Sanjay; Deeba, Farah; Kumar, Smita; Suman, Shankar; Adhikari, Bijan; Shukla, Yogeshwar; Trivedi, Prabodh Kumar; Pandey, Vivek; Tripathi, Rudra Deo

    2015-01-01

    Arsenic (As) contamination of water is a global concern and rice consumption is the biggest dietary exposure to human posing carcinogenic risks, predominantly in Asia. Sulfur (S) is involved in di-sulfide linkage in many proteins and plays crucial role in As detoxification. Present study explores role of variable S supply on rice leaf proteome, its inclination towards amino acids (AA) profile and non protein thiols under arsenite exposure. Analysis of 282 detected proteins on 2-DE gel revealed 113 differentially expressed proteins, out of which 80 were identified by MALDI-TOF-TOF. The identified proteins were mostly involved in glycolysis, TCA cycle, AA biosynthesis, photosynthesis, protein metabolism, stress and energy metabolism. Among these, glycolytic enzymes play a major role in AA biosynthesis that leads to change in AAs profiling. Proteins of glycolytic pathway, photosynthesis and energy metabolism were also validated by western blot analysis. Conclusively S supplementation reduced the As accumulation in shoot positively skewed thiol metabolism and glycolysis towards AA accumulation under AsIII stress. PMID:26552588

  16. A dielectric barrier discharge terminally inactivates RNase A by oxidizing sulfur-containing amino acids and breaking structural disulfide bonds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lackmann, J.-W.; Baldus, S.; Steinborn, E.; Edengeiser, E.; Kogelheide, F.; Langklotz, S.; Schneider, S.; Leichert, L. I. O.; Benedikt, J.; Awakowicz, P.; Bandow, J. E.

    2015-12-01

    RNases are among the most stable proteins in nature. They even refold spontaneously after heat inactivation, regaining full activity. Due to their stability and universal presence, they often pose a problem when experimenting with RNA. We investigated the capabilities of nonthermal atmospheric-pressure plasmas to inactivate RNase A and studied the inactivation mechanism on a molecular level. While prolonged heating above 90 °C is required for heat inactivating RNase A, direct plasma treatment with a dielectric barrier discharge (DBD) source caused permanent inactivation within minutes. Circular dichroism spectroscopy showed that DBD-treated RNase A unfolds rapidly. Raman spectroscopy indicated methionine modifications and formation of sulfonic acid. A mass spectrometry-based analysis of the protein modifications that occur during plasma treatment over time revealed that methionine sulfoxide formation coincides with protein inactivation. Chemical reduction of methionine sulfoxides partially restored RNase A activity confirming that sulfoxidation is causal and sufficient for RNase A inactivation. Continued plasma exposure led to over-oxidation of structural disulfide bonds. Using antibodies, disulfide bond over-oxidation was shown to be a general protein inactivation mechanism of the DBD. The antibody’s heavy and light chains linked by disulfide bonds dissociated after plasma exposure. Based on their ability to inactivate proteins by oxidation of sulfur-containing amino acids and over-oxidation of disulfide bonds, DBD devices present a viable option for inactivating undesired or hazardous proteins on heat or solvent-sensitive surfaces.

  17. Treatment of sulfur mustard (HD)-induced lung injury.

    PubMed

    Anderson, D R; Byers, S L; Vesely, K R

    2000-12-01

    An in vivo sulfur mustard (HD) vapor exposure model followed by bronchoalveolar lavage was developed previously in this laboratory to study biochemical indicators of HD-induced lung injury. This model was used to test two treatment compounds--niacinamide (NIA) and N-acetyl cysteine (NAC)--for their ability to ameliorate HD-induced biochemical changes. Anesthetized rats were intratracheally intubated and exposed to 0.35 mg of HD in 0.1 ml of ethanol or ethanol alone for 50 min. At the beginning of the exposure (t = 0), the rats were treated with either NIA (750 mg kg(-1)) or NAC (816 mg kg(-1)), i.p. At 24 h post-exposure, rats were euthanized and the lungs were lavaged with saline (three 5-ml washes). One milliliter of the recovered lavage fluid was analyzed for cellular components. The remaining fluid was centrifuged (10 min at 300 g) and the supernatant was assayed on a Cobas FARA clinical analyzer for lactate dehydrogenase (LDH), gamma-glutamyltransferase (GGT), albumin (ALB), total protein (TP) and glutathione peroxidase (GP). The HD alone and HD+NIA treatment caused significant increases in all of the biochemical parameters compared with control levels. The NAC treatment yielded LDH, ALB and TP values that, although elevated, were not significantly different from the control. The GP levels were significantly higher than the control but significantly lower than the HD alone levels, indicating some protection compared with the HD alone group. The GGT levels were unaffected by NAC compared with HD alone. Cytological analysis of lavage fluid showed that the percentages of neutrophils were 5.3 +/- 1.0 (mean +/- SEM) for control, 46.6 +/- 4.5 for HD, 31.4 +/- 4.7 for HD + NIA and 21.6 +/- 4.7 for HD + NAC, respectively. The neutrophil counts were significantly higher for the three HD-exposed groups vs controls; however, the NAC-treated group had neutrophil counts lower than HD alone, indicating decreased inflammatory response. These results show that NAC may be

  18. Pressure-induced solidifications of liquid sulfur below and above λ-transition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fei, Tang; Lin-Ji, Zhang; Feng-Liang, Liu; Fei, Sun; Wen-Ge, Yang; Jun-Long, Wang; Xiu-Ru, Liu; Ru, Shen

    2016-04-01

    Two kinds of glassy sulfurs are synthesized by the rapid compression method from liquid sulfur at temperatures below and above the λ -transition point. The glassy sulfur has different colors and transparencies, depending on temperature, which may inherit some structural information from the λ -transition. Raman spectrum studies of these samples show that a large fraction of polymeric chains exist in the glassy sulfur, even in the one solidified from T < T λ . We find that a higher compression rate instead of a higher temperature of the parent liquid captures more polymeric chains. Pressure-induced glassy sulfur presents high thermal stability compared with temperature quenched glassy sulfur and could transform into liquid sulfur directly without crystallization through an abnormal exothermic melting course. High energy x-ray diffraction is utilized to study the local order of the pressure-induced glassy sulfur. Project supported by the Joint Funds of the National Natural Science Foundation of China (Grant No. U1530402), the National Natural Science Foundation of China (Grant No. 11004163), the Fundamental Research Funds for the Central Universities, China (Grant No. 2682014ZT31), the Department of Energy National Nuclear Security Administration (Grant No. DE-NA0001974), and the Department of Energy Basic Energy Sciences (Grant Nos. DE-FG02-99ER45775 and DE-AC02-06CH11357).

  19. Proteolytic Pathways Induced by Herbicides That Inhibit Amino Acid Biosynthesis

    PubMed Central

    Zulet, Amaia; Gil-Monreal, Miriam; Villamor, Joji Grace; Zabalza, Ana; van der Hoorn, Renier A. L.; Royuela, Mercedes

    2013-01-01

    Background The herbicides glyphosate (Gly) and imazamox (Imx) inhibit the biosynthesis of aromatic and branched-chain amino acids, respectively. Although these herbicides inhibit different pathways, they have been reported to show several common physiological effects in their modes of action, such as increasing free amino acid contents and decreasing soluble protein contents. To investigate proteolytic activities upon treatment with Gly and Imx, pea plants grown in hydroponic culture were treated with Imx or Gly, and the proteolytic profile of the roots was evaluated through fluorogenic kinetic assays and activity-based protein profiling. Results Several common changes in proteolytic activity were detected following Gly and Imx treatment. Both herbicides induced the ubiquitin-26 S proteasome system and papain-like cysteine proteases. In contrast, the activities of vacuolar processing enzymes, cysteine proteases and metacaspase 9 were reduced following treatment with both herbicides. Moreover, the activities of several putative serine protease were similarly increased or decreased following treatment with both herbicides. In contrast, an increase in YVADase activity was observed under Imx treatment versus a decrease under Gly treatment. Conclusion These results suggest that several proteolytic pathways are responsible for protein degradation upon herbicide treatment, although the specific role of each proteolytic activity remains to be determined. PMID:24040092

  20. Cytometric analysis of DNA changes induced by sulfur mustard

    SciTech Connect

    Smith, W.J.; Sanders, K.M.; Ruddle, S.E.; Gross, C.L.

    1993-05-13

    Sulfur mustard is an alkylating agent which causes severe, potentially debilitating blisters following cutaneous exposure. Its mechanism of pathogenesis is unknown and no antidote exists to prevent its pathology. The biochemical basis of sulfur mustard's vesicating activity has been hypothesized to be a cascade of events beginning with alkylation of DNA. Using human cells in culture, we have assessed the effects of sulfur mustard on cell cycle activity using flow cytometry with propidium iodide. Two distinct patterns emerged, a Gl/S interface block at concentrations equivalent to vesicating doses (>50-micronM) and a G2 block at 10-fold lower concentrations. In addition, noticeable increases in amount of dye uptake were observed at 4 and 24 hours after sulfur mustard exposure. These increases are believed to be related to DNA repair activities and can be prevented by treatment of the cells with niacinamide, which inhibits DNA repair. Other drugs which provide alternate alkylating sites or inhibit cell cycle progression were shown to lower the cytotoxicity of sulfur mustard and to protect against its direct DNA damaging effects.

  1. Ferromagnetism: Sulfur Doping Induces Strong Ferromagnetic Ordering in Graphene: Effect of Concentration and Substitution Mechanism (Adv. Mater. 25/2016).

    PubMed

    Tuček, Jiří; Błoński, Piotr; Sofer, Zdeněk; Šimek, Petr; Petr, Martin; Pumera, Martin; Otyepka, Michal; Zbořil, Radek

    2016-07-01

    R. Zbořil and co-workers show that doping a graphene lattice with sulfur induces magnetic centers which display ferromagnetic order below ≈62 K. As described on page 5045, sulfur doping promotes magnetically active configurations resembling the gamma-thiothiapyrone motif. Enhanced magnetic properties of sulfur-doped graphene are attributed to two unpaired electrons from each sulfur atom injected into the graphene conducting band where they are delocalized between the S and C atoms. PMID:27372723

  2. Sulfur mustard induces the formation of keratin aggregates in human epidermal keratinocytes.

    PubMed

    Dillman, James F; McGary, Kriston L; Schlager, John J

    2003-12-01

    The vesicant sulfur mustard is an alkylating agent that has the capacity to cross-link biological molecules. We are interested in identifying specific proteins that are altered upon sulfur mustard exposure. Keratins are particularly important for the structural integrity of skin, and several genetically inherited blistering diseases have been linked to mutations in keratin 5 and keratin 14. We examined whether sulfur mustard exposure alters keratin biochemistry in cultured human epidermal keratinocytes. Western blotting with specific monoclonal antibodies revealed the formation of stable high-molecular-weight "aggregates" containing keratin 14 and/or keratin 5. These aggregates begin to form within 15 min after sulfur mustard exposure. These aggregates display a complex gel electrophoresis pattern between approximately 100 and approximately 200 kDa. Purification and analysis of these aggregates by one- and two-dimensional gel electrophoresis and mass spectrometry confirmed the presence of keratin 14 and keratin 5 and indicate that at least some of the aggregates are composed of keratin 14-keratin 14, keratin 14-keratin 5, or keratin 5-keratin 5 dimers. These studies demonstrate that sulfur mustard induces keratin aggregation in keratinocytes and support further investigation into the role of keratin aggregation in sulfur mustard-induced vesication. PMID:14644625

  3. Electrogenic responses induced by neutral amino acids in endoderm cells from Xenopus embryo.

    PubMed Central

    Bergman, C; Bergman, J

    1981-01-01

    1. Membrane potential measurements were carried out on endoderm cells from early Xenopus embryos in order to study neutral amino acid transport in non-excitable cells. 2. The electrical properties of the cell membrane were studied under normal conditions, then in the presence of various Na/K-pump inhibitors and at different Na, K and Cl concentrations in Ringer solution. Blockade of the Na/K-pump by ouabain, Li, cooling to 10 degrees C or low [Na]0 induces similar depolarizations of about 40 mV. 3. External application of various neutral L-amino acids induces reversible membrane depolarizations. The D-isomeric forms are found to be ineffective. The amino acid induced depolarizations are not accompanied by changes in membrane resistance. They do not show voltage dependence for potential changes of less than 40 mV. 4. The amino acid depolarization increases with increasing concentration and follows first order Michaëlian kinetics. Both the size and the time course of the amino acid depolarization depend on [Na]0. Increasing [Na]0 markedly increases the apparent affinity of the membrane receptor for amino acid. 5. Increasing [k]0 reduces the size of the amino acid response. Short exposures to either ouabain or Li do not alter the amino acid depolarization. However, p time course of the amino acid depolarization depend on [Na]0. Increasing [Na]0 markedly increases the apparent affinity of the membrane receptor for amino acid. 5. Increasing [k]0 reduces the size of the amino acid response. Short exposures to either ouabain or Li do not alter the amino acid depolarization. However, p time course of the amino acid depolarization depend on [Na]0. Increasing [Na]0 markedly increases the apparent affinity of the membrane receptor for amino acid. 5. Increasing [k]0 reduces the size of the amino acid response. Short exposures to either ouabain or Li do not alter the amino acid depolarization. However, prolonged exposure to pump inhibitors or marked alteration of the Na

  4. Population density and phenology of Tetranychus urticae Koch (Acari: Tetranychidae) is linked to sulfur-induced outbreaks of this pest

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The twospotted spider mite, Tetranychus urticae Koch, is a worldwide pest of numerous agronomic and horticultural plants. Sulfur fungicides are known to induce outbreaks of this pest on several crops, although mechanisms associated with sulfur-induced mite outbreaks are largely unknown. Studies were...

  5. Growth requirements of hyperthermophilic sulfur-dependent heterotrophic archaea isolated from a shallow submarine geothermal system with reference to their essential amino acids.

    PubMed Central

    Hoaki, T; Nishijima, M; Kato, M; Adachi, K; Mizobuchi, S; Hanzawa, N; Maruyama, T

    1994-01-01

    Three hyperthermophilic sulfur-dependent heterotrophs were isolated from a shallow submarine hydrothermal system at an inlet of Kodakara-jima island, Kagoshima, Japan. The isolates grew at 60 to 97 degrees C, with the optimum temperatures at 85 to 90 degrees C. Sensitivity to rifampin and the existence of ether lipids indicated that the isolates are hyperthermophilic archaea. Partial sequencing of the genes coding for 16S rRNA showed that the three isolates are closely related to the genus Thermococcus. They grew on proteinaceous mixtures, such as yeast extract, Casamino Acids, and purified proteins (e.g., casein and gelatin), but not on carbohydrates or organic acids as sole carbon and energy sources. Nine amino acids were essential for growth of isolate KS-1 (Thr, Leu, Ile, Val, Met, Phe, His, Tyr, and Arg). Isolate KS-2 required Lys in addition to the nine amino acids, and KS-8 required Lys instead of Tyr. In comparative studies, it was shown that Thermococcus celer DSM 2476 required 10 amino acids (Thr, Leu, Ile, Val, Met, Phe, Tyr, Trp, Lys, and Arg) while Pyrococcus furiosus DSM 3638 required only Ile and Val. The hyperthermophilic fermentative eubacterium Thermotoga neapolitana DSM 4359 did not require any amino acids for growth. Images PMID:8085828

  6. SPONTANEOUSLY HYPERTENSIVE RATS ARE SUSCEPTIBLE TO AIRWAY DISEASE INDUCED BY SULFUR DIOXIDE

    EPA Science Inventory

    Rodent models of chronic pulmonary diseases induced by sulfur dioxide (SO2), elastase or tobacco smoke have limited utility because of their lack of chronicity of inflammation, and they demonstrate limited sensitivity to a given experimental manipulation. We hypothesized that dis...

  7. RELATIONSHIP BETWEEN EXPOSURE DURATION AND SULFUR DIOXIDE-INDUCED BRONCHOCONSTRICTION IN ASTHMATIC SUBJECTS

    EPA Science Inventory

    The purpose of the study was to determine the shortest duration of exposure to 1.0 ppm sulfur dioxide (SO2) sufficient to induce bronchoconstriction significantly greater than that observed with exposure to clean air (CA) in exercising SO2 sensitive asthmatics. Asymptomatic, nonm...

  8. Changes in Free Amino Acid Concentration in Rye Grain in Response to Nitrogen and Sulfur Availability, and Expression Analysis of Genes Involved in Asparagine Metabolism.

    PubMed

    Postles, Jennifer; Curtis, Tanya Y; Powers, Stephen J; Elmore, J S; Mottram, Donald S; Halford, Nigel G

    2016-01-01

    Free asparagine plays a central role in nitrogen storage and transport in many plant species due to its relatively high ratio of nitrogen to carbon. However, it is also a precursor for acrylamide, a Class 2a carcinogen that forms during high-temperature processing and cooking. The concentration of free asparagine was shown to increase by approximately 70% in rye grain in response to severe sulfur deficiency (F-test, p = 0.004), while the concentration of both free asparagine and free glutamine increased (by almost threefold and approximately 62%, respectively) in response to nitrogen application (F-test, p < 0.001 for free asparagine; p = 0.004 for free glutamine). There were also effects of nutrient supply on other free amino acids: The concentration of free proline, for example, showed a significant (F-test, p = 0.019) effect of nitrogen interacting with sulfur, with the highest concentration occurring when the plants were deprived of both nitrogen and sulfur. Polymerase chain reaction products for several genes involved in asparagine metabolism and its regulation were amplified from rye grain cDNA. These genes were asparagine synthetase-1 (ScASN1), glutamine synthetase-1 (ScGS1), potassium-dependent asparaginase (ScASP), aspartate kinase (ScASK), and general control non-derepressible-2 (ScGCN2). The expression of these genes and of a previously described sucrose non-fermenting-1-related protein kinase-1 gene (ScSnRK1) was analyzed in flag leaf and developing grain in response to nitrogen and sulfur supply, revealing a significant (F-test, p < 0.05) effect of nitrogen supply on ScGS1 expression in the grain at 21 days post-anthesis. There was also evidence of an effect of sulfur deficiency on ScASN1 gene expression. However, although this effect was large (almost 10-fold) it was only marginally statistically significant (F-test, 0.05 < p < 0.10). The study reinforced the conclusion that nutrient availability can have a profound impact on the concentrations of

  9. Changes in Free Amino Acid Concentration in Rye Grain in Response to Nitrogen and Sulfur Availability, and Expression Analysis of Genes Involved in Asparagine Metabolism

    PubMed Central

    Postles, Jennifer; Curtis, Tanya Y.; Powers, Stephen J.; Elmore, J. S.; Mottram, Donald S.; Halford, Nigel G.

    2016-01-01

    Free asparagine plays a central role in nitrogen storage and transport in many plant species due to its relatively high ratio of nitrogen to carbon. However, it is also a precursor for acrylamide, a Class 2a carcinogen that forms during high-temperature processing and cooking. The concentration of free asparagine was shown to increase by approximately 70% in rye grain in response to severe sulfur deficiency (F-test, p = 0.004), while the concentration of both free asparagine and free glutamine increased (by almost threefold and approximately 62%, respectively) in response to nitrogen application (F-test, p < 0.001 for free asparagine; p = 0.004 for free glutamine). There were also effects of nutrient supply on other free amino acids: The concentration of free proline, for example, showed a significant (F-test, p = 0.019) effect of nitrogen interacting with sulfur, with the highest concentration occurring when the plants were deprived of both nitrogen and sulfur. Polymerase chain reaction products for several genes involved in asparagine metabolism and its regulation were amplified from rye grain cDNA. These genes were asparagine synthetase-1 (ScASN1), glutamine synthetase-1 (ScGS1), potassium-dependent asparaginase (ScASP), aspartate kinase (ScASK), and general control non-derepressible-2 (ScGCN2). The expression of these genes and of a previously described sucrose non-fermenting-1-related protein kinase-1 gene (ScSnRK1) was analyzed in flag leaf and developing grain in response to nitrogen and sulfur supply, revealing a significant (F-test, p < 0.05) effect of nitrogen supply on ScGS1 expression in the grain at 21 days post-anthesis. There was also evidence of an effect of sulfur deficiency on ScASN1 gene expression. However, although this effect was large (almost 10-fold) it was only marginally statistically significant (F-test, 0.05 < p < 0.10). The study reinforced the conclusion that nutrient availability can have a profound impact on the concentrations of

  10. Amino acid limitation induces down-regulation of WNT5a at transcriptional level

    SciTech Connect

    Wang Zuguang; Chen Hong

    2009-01-23

    An aberrant WNT signaling contributes to the development and progression of multiple cancers. WNT5a is one of the WNT signaling molecules. This study was designed to test the hypothesis that amino acid deprivation induces changes in the WNT signaling pathway in colon cancer cells. Results showed that targets of the amino acid response pathway, ATF3 and p21, were induced in the human colon cancer cell line SW480 during amino acid limitation. There was a significant decrease in the WNT5a mRNA level following amino acid deprivation. The down-regulation of WNT5a mRNA by amino acid deprivation is not due to mRNA destabilization. There is a reduction of nuclear {beta}-catenin protein level by amino acid limitation. Under amino acid limitation, phosphorylation of ERK1/2 was increased and the blockage of ERK1/2 by the inhibitor U0126 partially restored WNT5a mRNA level. In conclusion, amino acid limitation in colon cancer cells induces phosphorylation of ERK1/2, which then down-regulates WNT5a expression.

  11. Sulfur dioxide-induced chronic bronchitis in beagle dogs

    SciTech Connect

    Greene, S.A.; Wolff, R.K.; Hahn, F.F.; Henderson, R.F.; Mauderly, J.L.; Lundgren, D.L.

    1984-01-01

    This study was done to produce a model of chronic bronchitis. Twelve beagle dogs were exposed to 500 ppm sulfur dioxide (SO/sub 2/) for 2 h/d, 5d/wk for 21 wk and 4 dogs were sham-exposed to filtered ambient air for the same period. Exposure effects were evaluated by periodically examining the dogs using chest radiographs, pulmonary function, tracheal mucous clearance, and the cellular and soluble components of bronchopulmonary lavage fluids. Dogs were serially sacrificed after 13 and 21 wk of exposure and after 6 and 14 wk of recovery. Clinical signs produced in the SO/sub 2/-exposed dogs included mucoid nasal discharge, productive cough, moist rales on auscultation, tonsilitis, and conjunctivitis. Chest radiographs revealed mild peribronchiolar thickening. Histopathology, tracheal mucous clearance measurements, and lavage cytology were consistent with a diagnosis of chronic bronchitis. It is concluded that repeated exposure to 500 ppm SO/sub 2/ for 21 wk produced chronic bronchitis in the beagle dog. Complete recovery occurred within 5 wk following cessation of SO/sub 2/ exposure. 43 references, 2 figures, 2 tables.

  12. Cleft Palate induced by Sulfur Mustard in mice fetus

    PubMed Central

    Hassanzadeh-Nazarabadi, Mohammad; Sanjarmoosavi, Nasrin; Sanjarmoosavi, Naser; Shekouhi, Sahar

    2012-01-01

    Sulfur Mustard (SM) is a chemical warfare agent which was widely used in the World War I and more recently during Gulf war in the early 1980s'. SM is a strong alkylating agent with known mutagenic and carcinogenic effects; but only few studies have been published on its teratogenicity. Since SM has been widely used as a chemical weapon by the Iraqi regime against the Iranian soldiers as well as the civilian population particularly pregnant women in the border area; therefore, the investigation of SM adverse effects on cleft malformations which is one of the most frequent congenital anomalies is considered in this study. An experimental work has been carried out in embryopathy in mouse with intraperitoneal injection of 0.75 and 1.5 mg/kg SM at different periods of gestation. Cleft lip and palate were examined by stereomicroscopy. Current data demonstrate that exposure with SM on the 11th day of gestation can increase the incidence of cleft defects in comparison with control group (P<0.001). These results also show that SM treatment in GD 11 and 13 can lead to more anomalies compared with GD 14 (P<0.001). They also show that the teratogenic effects of SM are restrictively under the influence of the threshold dose and time of gestation. The present results suggest that exposure to sufficient doses of SM on critical days of gestation may increase the risk of congenital cleft malformations. PMID:24551757

  13. Sulfur dioxide-induced chronic bronchitis in beagle dogs.

    PubMed

    Greene, S A; Wolff, R K; Hahn, F F; Henderson, R F; Mauderly, J L; Lundgren, D L

    1984-01-01

    This study was done to produce a model of chronic bronchitis. Twelve beagle dogs were exposed to 500 ppm sulfur dioxide (SO2) for 2 h/d, 5 d/wk for 21 wk and 4 dogs were sham-exposed to filtered ambient air for the same period. Exposure effects were evaluated by periodically examining the dogs using chest radiographs, pulmonary function, tracheal mucous clearance; and the cellular and soluble components of bronchopulmonary lavage fluids. Dogs were serially sacrificed after 13 and 21 wk of exposure and after 6 and 14 wk of recovery. Clinical signs produced in the SO2-exposed dogs included mucoid nasal discharge, productive cough, moist rales on auscultation, tonsilitis, and conjunctivitis. Chest radiographs revealed mild peribronchiolar thickening. Histopathology, tracheal mucous clearance measurements, and lavage cytology were consistent with a diagnosis of chronic bronchitis. It is concluded that repeated exposure to 500 ppm SO2 for 21 wk produced chronic bronchitis in the beagle dog. Complete recovery occurred within 5 wk following cessation of SO2 exposure. PMID:6492210

  14. Theoretical study of ultraviolet induced photodissociation dynamics of sulfuric acid

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Murakami, Tatsuhiro; Ohta, Ayumi; Suzuki, Tomoya; Ikeda, Kumiko; Danielache, Sebastian O.; Nanbu, Shinkoh

    2015-05-01

    Photodissociation dynamics of sulfuric acid after excitation to the first and second excited states (S1 and S2) were studied by an on-the-fly ab initio molecular dynamics simulations based on the Zhu-Nakamura version of the trajectory surface hopping (ZN-TSH). Forces acting on the nuclear motion were computed on-the-fly by CASSCF method with Dunning's augmented cc-pVDZ basis set. It was newly found that the parent molecule dissociated into two reaction-channels (i) HSO4(12A″) + H(2S) by S1-excitation, and (ii) HSO4(22A″) + H(2S) by S2-excitation. The direct dissociation dynamics yield products different from the SO2 + 2OH fragments often presented in the literature. Both channels result in the same product and differs only in the electronic state of the HSO4 fragment. The trajectories running on S2 do not hop with S0 and a nonadiabatic transition happens at the S2-S1 conical intersection located at a longer OH bond-length than the S1-S0 intersection producing an electronic excited state (22A″) of HSO4 product.

  15. Quantitative determination of sulfur content in concrete with laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weritz, F.; Ryahi, S.; Schaurich, D.; Taffe, A.; Wilsch, G.

    2005-08-01

    Laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy has been employed for the investigation of the sulfur content of concrete. Sulfur compounds are a natural but minor component in building materials. The ingress of sulfates or sulfuric acid constitutes a major risk of chemical aggression for concrete. There is a need for a fast method, which can be used on-site and is able to investigate a wide range of different measuring points, so that damages can be characterized. For quantitative determination the sulfur spectral line at 921.3 nm is used. The optimum ambient atmosphere has been determined by comparison of measurements accomplished under air, argon and helium atmosphere. Reference samples have been produced and calibration curves have been determined, the results of LIBS measurements are compared with results from chemical analysis. Defining a limit for the intensity ratio of a calcium and a oxygen spectral line can reduce the influence of the heterogeneity of the material, so that only spectra with a high amount of cementitious material are evaluated. Depth profiles and spatial resolved sulfur distributions are presented measured on concrete cores originating from a highly sulfate contaminated clarifier.

  16. Sulfidation behavior of ZnFe2O4 roasted with pyrite: Sulfur inducing and sulfur-oxygen interface exchange mechanism

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Min, Xiaobo; Zhou, Bosheng; Ke, Yong; Chai, Liyuan; Xue, Ke; Zhang, Chun; Zhao, Zongwen; Shen, Chen

    2016-05-01

    The sulfidation roasting behavior was analyzed in detail to reveal the reaction mechanism. Information about the sulfidation reaction, including phase transformation, ionic migration behavior and morphological change, were obtained by XRD, 57Fe Mossbauer spectroscopy, XPS and SEM analysis. The results showed that the sulfidation of zinc ferrite is a process of sulfur inducing and sulfur-oxygen interface exchange. This process can be divided into six stages: decomposition of FeS2, formation of the oxygen-deficient environment, migration of O2- induced by S2(g), formation of ZnFe2O4-δ, migration of Fe2+ accompanied by the precipitation of ZnO, and the sulfur-oxygen interface exchange reaction. The sulfidation products were zinc blende, wurtzite, magnetite and a fraction of zinc-bearing magnetite. These findings can provide theoretical support for controlling the process during which the recovery of Zn and Fe is achieved through the combined flotation-magnetic separation process.

  17. Dietary amino acid-induced systemic lupus erythematosus.

    PubMed

    Montanaro, A; Bardana, E J

    1991-05-01

    The effects of dietary manipulations on autoimmune disease are understood poorly. In this article, we detail our experience with a human subject who developed autoimmune hemolytic anemia while participating in a research study that required the ingestion of alfalfa seeds. Subsequent experimental studies in primates ingesting alfalfa sprout seeds and L-canavanine (a prominent amino acid constituent of alfalfa) is presented. The results of these studies indicate a potential toxic and immunoregulatory role of L-canavanine in the induction of a systemic lupus-like disease in primates. PMID:1862241

  18. Recalculation of data on 32P activity induced in sulfur in Hiroshima.

    PubMed

    Hamada, T

    1991-03-01

    Historical data for 32P activity induced in sulfur by fast neutrons have been corrected for decay with a recent half-life value of 32P and recalculated with an experimentally determined efficiency ratio of the electroscope for beta rays from 32P and natural uranium used as a standard. Most samples would have been pure enough so that no correction for the weight of sulfur has been made. The possibility of interference with 32P activity measurements due to induced activity of other elements in the samples could also be excluded. The revised data show little difference from the original ones except for one sample which contained much impurity. Uncertainty of the data was also discussed. PMID:1762095

  19. Antitussive activity of ethanolic extract of Curcuma aromatica rhizomes on sulfur dioxide induced cough in mice

    PubMed Central

    Marina, G.D.; Kekuda, T.R Prashith; Sudarshan, S.J

    2008-01-01

    Ethanolic extract of rhizomes of Curcuma aromatica (Zingiberaceae) was investigated for its antitussive effect on Sulfur dioxide induced cough model in mice. The extract exhibited significant antitussive activity in a dose dependant manner. The activity was compared with the prototype antitussive agent codeine phosphate. The ethanolic extract at the dose of lOOmg. 200mg and 400mg/kg body weight, po, showed 68%, 74% and 79% of inhibition of cough with respect to control group. PMID:22557276

  20. Focused electron beam induced etching of copper in sulfuric acid solutions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boehme, Lindsay; Bresin, Matthew; Botman, Aurélien; Ranney, James; Hastings, J. Todd

    2015-12-01

    We show here that copper can be locally etched by an electron-beam induced reaction in a liquid. Aqueous sulfuric acid (H2SO4) is utilized as the etchant and all experiments are conducted in an environmental scanning electron microscope. The extent of etch increases with liquid thickness and dose, and etch resolution improves with H2SO4 concentration. This approach shows the feasibility of liquid phase etching for material selectivity and has the potential for circuit editing.

  1. Light induced suppression of sulfur in a cesium sputter ion source.

    PubMed

    Martschini, Martin; Rohlén, Johan; Andersson, Pontus; Golser, Robin; Hanstorp, Dag; Lindahl, Anton O; Priller, Alfred; Steier, Peter; Forstner, Oliver

    2012-04-01

    New techniques for suppression of atomic isobars in negative ion beams are of great interest for accelerator mass spectrometry (AMS). Especially small and medium-sized facilities can significantly extend their measurement capabilities to new interesting isotopes with a technique independent of terminal voltage. In a new approach, the effect of continuous wave laser light directed towards the cathode surface in a cesium sputter ion source of the Middleton type was studied. The laser light induced a significant change in oxygen, sulfur and chlorine negative ion production from a AgCl target. Approximately 100 mW of laser light reduced the sulfur to chlorine ratio by one order of magnitude. The effect was found to depend on laser power and ion source parameters but not on the laser wavelength. The time constant of the effect varied from a few seconds up to several minutes. Experiments were first performed at the ion beam facility GUNILLA at University of Gothenburg with macroscopic amounts of sulfur. The results were then reproduced at the VERA AMS facility with chemically cleaned AgCl targets containing ∼1 ppm sulfur. The physical explanation behind the effect is still unclear. Nevertheless, the technique has been successfully applied during a regular AMS measurement of (36)Cl. PMID:23576897

  2. Light induced suppression of sulfur in a cesium sputter ion source

    PubMed Central

    Martschini, Martin; Rohlén, Johan; Andersson, Pontus; Golser, Robin; Hanstorp, Dag; Lindahl, Anton O.; Priller, Alfred; Steier, Peter; Forstner, Oliver

    2012-01-01

    New techniques for suppression of atomic isobars in negative ion beams are of great interest for accelerator mass spectrometry (AMS). Especially small and medium-sized facilities can significantly extend their measurement capabilities to new interesting isotopes with a technique independent of terminal voltage. In a new approach, the effect of continuous wave laser light directed towards the cathode surface in a cesium sputter ion source of the Middleton type was studied. The laser light induced a significant change in oxygen, sulfur and chlorine negative ion production from a AgCl target. Approximately 100 mW of laser light reduced the sulfur to chlorine ratio by one order of magnitude. The effect was found to depend on laser power and ion source parameters but not on the laser wavelength. The time constant of the effect varied from a few seconds up to several minutes. Experiments were first performed at the ion beam facility GUNILLA at University of Gothenburg with macroscopic amounts of sulfur. The results were then reproduced at the VERA AMS facility with chemically cleaned AgCl targets containing ∼1 ppm sulfur. The physical explanation behind the effect is still unclear. Nevertheless, the technique has been successfully applied during a regular AMS measurement of 36Cl. PMID:23576897

  3. Sulfur antisite-induced intrinsic high-temperature ferromagnetism in Ag2S:Y nanocrystals.

    PubMed

    Wang, Pan; Yang, Tianye; Zhao, Rui; Zhang, Mingzhe

    2016-04-21

    There is an urgent need for a complete understanding of intrinsic ferromagnetism, due to the necessity for application of ferromagnetic semiconductors. Here, further insight into the magnetic mechanism of sulfur antisite-induced intrinsic high-temperature ferromagnetism is investigated in Ag2S:Y nanocrystals. The gas-liquid phase chemical deposition method is adopted to obtain the monoclinic Ag2S:Y nanocrystals. The field and temperature-dependent magnetization measurements demonstrate the robust high-temperature ferromagnetism of Ag2S:Y nanocrystals. As revealed in the magnetic origin study from first-principles calculations, the intrinsic sulfur antisite defect is only responsible for the creation of a magnetic moment which mainly comes from the S 3p and Ag 4d orbitals. Such a mechanism, which is essentially different from those of dopants and other native defects, provides new insight into the origin of the magnetism. PMID:27009760

  4. GCN2 sustains mTORC1 suppression upon amino acid deprivation by inducing Sestrin2

    PubMed Central

    Ye, Jiangbin; Palm, Wilhelm; Peng, Min; King, Bryan; Lindsten, Tullia; Li, Ming O.; Koumenis, Constantinos; Thompson, Craig B.

    2015-01-01

    Mammalian cells possess two amino acid-sensing kinases: general control nonderepressible 2 (GCN2) and mechanistic target of rapamycin complex 1 (mTORC1). Their combined effects orchestrate cellular adaptation to amino acid levels, but how their activities are coordinated remains poorly understood. Here, we demonstrate an important link between GCN2 and mTORC1 signaling. Upon deprivation of various amino acids, activated GCN2 up-regulates ATF4 to induce expression of the stress response protein Sestrin2, which is required to sustain repression of mTORC1 by blocking its lysosomal localization. Moreover, Sestrin2 induction is necessary for cell survival during glutamine deprivation, indicating that Sestrin2 is a critical effector of GCN2 signaling that regulates amino acid homeostasis through mTORC1 suppression. PMID:26543160

  5. GCN2 sustains mTORC1 suppression upon amino acid deprivation by inducing Sestrin2.

    PubMed

    Ye, Jiangbin; Palm, Wilhelm; Peng, Min; King, Bryan; Lindsten, Tullia; Li, Ming O; Koumenis, Constantinos; Thompson, Craig B

    2015-11-15

    Mammalian cells possess two amino acid-sensing kinases: general control nonderepressible 2 (GCN2) and mechanistic target of rapamycin complex 1 (mTORC1). Their combined effects orchestrate cellular adaptation to amino acid levels, but how their activities are coordinated remains poorly understood. Here, we demonstrate an important link between GCN2 and mTORC1 signaling. Upon deprivation of various amino acids, activated GCN2 up-regulates ATF4 to induce expression of the stress response protein Sestrin2, which is required to sustain repression of mTORC1 by blocking its lysosomal localization. Moreover, Sestrin2 induction is necessary for cell survival during glutamine deprivation, indicating that Sestrin2 is a critical effector of GCN2 signaling that regulates amino acid homeostasis through mTORC1 suppression. PMID:26543160

  6. Taxol induced apoptosis regulates amino acid transport in breast cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Wu, Yanyuan; Shen, Dejun; Chen, Zujian; Clayton, Sheila; Vadgama, Jaydutt V

    2007-03-01

    A major outcome from Taxol treatment is induction of tumor cell apoptosis. However, metabolic responses to Taxol-induced apoptosis are poorly understood. In this study, we hypothesize that alterations in specific amino acid transporters may affect the Taxol-induced apoptosis in breast cancer cells. In this case, the activity of the given transporter may serve as a biomarker that could provide a biological assessment of response to drug treatment. We have examined the mechanisms responsible for Taxol-induced neutral amino acid uptake by breast cancer cells, such as MCF-7, BT474, MDAMB231 and T47D. The biochemical and molecular studies include: (1) growth-inhibition (MTT); (2) transport kinetics: (3) substrate-specific inhibition; (4) effect of thiol-modifying agents NEM and NPM; (5) gene expression of amino acid transporters; and (6) apoptotic assays. Our data show that Taxol treatment of MCF-7 cells induced a transient increase in Na(+)-dependent transport of the neutral amino acid transporter B0 at both gene and protein level. This increase was attenuated by blocking the transporter in the presence of high concentrations of the substrate amino acid. Other neutral amino acid transporters such as ATA2 (System A) and ASC were not altered. Amino acid starvation resulted in the expected up-regulation of System A (ATA2) gene, but not for B0 and ASC. B0 was significantly down regulated. Taxol treatment had no significant effect on the uptake of arginine and glutamate as measured by System y(+) and X(-) (GC) respectively. Tunel assays and FACS cell cycle analysis demonstrated that both Taxol- and doxorubicin-induced upregulation of B0 transporter gene with accompanying increase in cell apoptosis, could be reversed partially by blocking the B0 transporter with high concentration of alanine, and/or by inhibiting the caspase pathway. Both Taxol and doxorubicin treatment caused a significant decrease in S-phase of the cell cycle. However, Taxol-induced an increase primarily

  7. Smad molecules expression pattern in human bronchial airway induced by sulfur mustard.

    PubMed

    Adelipour, Maryam; Imani Fooladi, Abbas Ali; Yazdani, Samaneh; Vahedi, Ensieh; Ghanei, Mostafa; Nourani, Mohammad Reza

    2011-09-01

    Airway remodelling is characterized by the thickening and reorganization of the airways seen in mustard lung patients. Mustard lung is the general description for the chronic obstructive pulmonary disease induced by sulfur mustard(SM). Pulmonary disease was diagnosed as the most important disorder in individuals that had been exposed to sulfur mustard. Sulfur mustard is a chemical warfare agent developed during Wars. Iraqi forces frequently used it against Iranian during Iran -Iraq in the 1980-1988. Peribronchial fibrosis result from airway remodeling that include excess of collagen of extracellular matrix deposition in the airway wall. Some of Smads families in association with TGF-β are involved in airway remodeling due to lung fibrosis. In the present study we compared the mRNA expression of Smad2, Smad3, and Smad4 and Smad7 genes in airway wall biopsies of chemical-injured patients with non-injured patients as control. We used airway wall biopsies of ten unexposed patients and fifteen SM-induced patients. Smads expression was evaluated by RT-PCR followed by bands densitometry. Expression levels of Smad3 and Smad4 in SM exposed patients were upregulated but Smad2 and Smad7 was not significantly altered. Our results revealed that Smad3, and 4 may be involved in airway remodeling process in SM induced patients by activation of TGF-β. Smad pathway is the most represented signaling mechanism for airway remodeling and peribronchial fibrosis. The complex of Smads in the nucleus affects a series of genes that results in peribronchial fibrosis in SM-induced patients. PMID:21891820

  8. Dietary Deficiency of Essential Amino Acids Rapidly Induces Cessation of the Rat Estrous Cycle

    PubMed Central

    Bannai, Makoto; Ichimaru, Toru; Nakano, Sayako; Murata, Takuya; Higuchi, Takashi; Takahashi, Michio

    2011-01-01

    Reproductive functions are regulated by the sophisticated coordination between the neuronal and endocrine systems and are sustained by a proper nutritional environment. Female reproductive function is vulnerable to effects from dietary restrictions, suggesting a transient adaptation that prioritizes individual survival over reproduction until a possible future opportunity for satiation. This adaptation could also partially explain the existence of amenorrhea in women with anorexia nervosa. Because amino acid nutritional conditions other than caloric restriction uniquely alters amino acid metabolism and affect the hormonal levels of organisms, we hypothesized that the supply of essential amino acids in the diet plays a pivotal role in the maintenance of the female reproductive system. To test this hypothesis, we examined ovulatory cyclicity in female rats under diets that were deficient in threonine, lysine, tryptophan, methionine or valine. Ovulatory cyclicity was monitored by daily cytological evaluations of vaginal smears. After continuous feeding of the deficient diet, a persistent diestrus or anovulatory state was induced most quickly by the valine-deficient diet and most slowly by the lysine-deficient diet. A decline in the systemic insulin-like growth factor 1 level was associated with a dietary amino acid deficiency. Furthermore, a paired group of rats that were fed an isocaloric diet with balanced amino acids maintained normal estrous cyclicity. These disturbances of the estrous cycle by amino acid deficiency were quickly reversed by the consumption of a normal diet. The continuous anovulatory state in this study is not attributable to a decrease in caloric intake but to an imbalance in the dietary amino acid composition. With a shortage of well-balanced amino acid sources, reproduction becomes risky for both the mother and the fetus. It could be viewed as an adaptation to the diet, diverting resources away from reproduction and reallocating them to

  9. Influence of sulfur addition and S-induced wall catalytic effect on C-C bond cleavage and aromatics hydrogenation

    SciTech Connect

    Schmidt, E.; Song, C.; Schobert, H.H.

    1995-12-31

    Catalytic hydrocracking of 4-(-1-naphthylmethyl)bibenzyl NMBB predominately yielded naphthalene and 4-methylbibenzyl. Sulfur addition to most catalyst precursors lead to substantially higher catalyst activity and subsequently higher conversion. In order to clarify the effect of sulfur alone on model compound conversion, NMBB was treated with sulfur in concentrations of 1.2 to 3.4 wt%, corresponding to conditions present in catalytic runs with sulfur. It was found that increasing sulfur concentrations leads to higher NMBB conversion. Furthermore, sulfur had a permanent influence on the reactor walls. It reacted with the transition metals in the steel to form a microscopic black iron sulfide layer on the surface, which could not be removed mechanically. The {open_quotes}non catalytic{close_quotes} runs after experiments with added sulfur yielded higher conversion than normal runs with new reactors. This {open_quotes}wall catalytic effect{close_quotes} can be reduced by treating sulfided reactors with hydrochloric acid for a short period of time and subsequent immersing into a base bath over night. These results demonstrate the significant influence of sulfur addition and S-induced residual wall-effect on C-C bond cleavage and hydrogenation of aromatics in batch reactors.

  10. Hypochlorite-induced oxidation of amino acids, peptides and proteins.

    PubMed

    Hawkins, C L; Pattison, D I; Davies, M J

    2003-12-01

    Activated phagocytes generate the potent oxidant hypochlorite (HOCl) via the release of the enzyme myeloperoxidase and hydrogen peroxide. HOCl is known to react with a number of biological targets including proteins, DNA, lipids and cholesterol. Proteins are likely to be major targets for reaction with HOCl within a cell due to their abundance and high reactivity with HOCl. This review summarizes information on the rate of reaction of HOCl with proteins, the nature of the intermediates formed, the mechanisms involved in protein oxidation and the products of these reactions. The predicted targets for reaction with HOCl from kinetic modeling studies and the consequences of HOCl-induced protein oxidation are also discussed. PMID:14661089

  11. Excited triplet state of N-(9-methylpurin-6-yl)pyridinium cation as an efficient photosensitizer in the oxidation of sulfur-containing amino acids. Laser flash and steady-state photolysis studies

    SciTech Connect

    Marciniak, B. Univ. of Notre Dame, IN ); Hug, G.L.; Bobrowski, K. ); Rozwadowski, J. )

    1995-01-11

    In this paper, we present and discuss the results of a detailed mechanistic study of the photosensitized oxidation of sulfur-containing amino acids by N-(9-methylpurin-6-yl)pyridinium cations in aqueous solution. The results provide data on the photoreactivity of the pyridinium salts (derived from the purine bases) in the presence of the electron donors such as sulfur-containing organic compounds and give new experimental evidence for the general mechanism of the sensitized photooxidation of thioethers proposed previously. 39 refs., 6 figs., 2 tabs.

  12. Inducible Arginase 1 Deficiency in Mice Leads to Hyperargininemia and Altered Amino Acid Metabolism

    PubMed Central

    St. Amand, Tim; Kyriakopoulou, Lianna; Schulze, Andreas; Funk, Colin D.

    2013-01-01

    Arginase deficiency is a rare autosomal recessive disorder resulting from a loss of the liver arginase isoform, arginase 1 (ARG1), which is the final step in the urea cycle for detoxifying ammonia. ARG1 deficiency leads to hyperargininemia, characterized by progressive neurological impairment, persistent growth retardation and infrequent episodes of hyperammonemia. Using the Cre/loxP-directed conditional gene knockout system, we generated an inducible Arg1-deficient mouse model by crossing “floxed” Arg1 mice with CreERT2 mice. The resulting mice (Arg-Cre) die about two weeks after tamoxifen administration regardless of the starting age of inducing the knockout. These treated mice were nearly devoid of Arg1 mRNA, protein and liver arginase activity, and exhibited symptoms of hyperammonemia. Plasma amino acid analysis revealed pronounced hyperargininemia and significant alterations in amino acid and guanidino compound metabolism, including increased citrulline and guanidinoacetic acid. Despite no alteration in ornithine levels, concentrations of other amino acids such as proline and the branched-chain amino acids were reduced. In summary, we have generated and characterized an inducible Arg1-deficient mouse model exhibiting several pathologic manifestations of hyperargininemia. This model should prove useful for exploring potential treatment options of ARG1 deficiency. PMID:24224027

  13. Inducible arginase 1 deficiency in mice leads to hyperargininemia and altered amino acid metabolism.

    PubMed

    Sin, Yuan Yan; Ballantyne, Laurel L; Mukherjee, Kamalika; St Amand, Tim; Kyriakopoulou, Lianna; Schulze, Andreas; Funk, Colin D

    2013-01-01

    Arginase deficiency is a rare autosomal recessive disorder resulting from a loss of the liver arginase isoform, arginase 1 (ARG1), which is the final step in the urea cycle for detoxifying ammonia. ARG1 deficiency leads to hyperargininemia, characterized by progressive neurological impairment, persistent growth retardation and infrequent episodes of hyperammonemia. Using the Cre/loxP-directed conditional gene knockout system, we generated an inducible Arg1-deficient mouse model by crossing "floxed" Arg1 mice with CreER(T2) mice. The resulting mice (Arg-Cre) die about two weeks after tamoxifen administration regardless of the starting age of inducing the knockout. These treated mice were nearly devoid of Arg1 mRNA, protein and liver arginase activity, and exhibited symptoms of hyperammonemia. Plasma amino acid analysis revealed pronounced hyperargininemia and significant alterations in amino acid and guanidino compound metabolism, including increased citrulline and guanidinoacetic acid. Despite no alteration in ornithine levels, concentrations of other amino acids such as proline and the branched-chain amino acids were reduced. In summary, we have generated and characterized an inducible Arg1-deficient mouse model exhibiting several pathologic manifestations of hyperargininemia. This model should prove useful for exploring potential treatment options of ARG1 deficiency. PMID:24224027

  14. Influence of sulfur addition and S-induced wall catalytic effects on C-C bond cleavage and aromatics hydrogenation

    SciTech Connect

    Schmidt, E.; Song, Chunshan; Schobert, H.H.

    1995-12-31

    Catalytic hydrocracking of 4-(1-naphthylmethyl)bibenzyl, designated as NMBB, predominately yielded naphthalene and 4-methylbibenzyl. Sulfur addition to most catalyst precursors lead to substantially higher catalyst activity and subsequently higher conversion. NMBB was also treated with sulfur alone in the absence of catalysts in concentrations of 1.2 to 3.4 wt, corresponding to conditions present in catalytic runs with added sulfur to precursors. It was found that increasing sulfur concentrations lead to higher NMBB conversion. Furthermore, sulfur had a permanent influence on the reactor walls. It reacted with the transition metals in the stainless steel to form a microscopic black iron sulfide layer on the surface, which could not be removed mechanically. The {open_quotes}non-catalytic{close_quotes} runs which were done after experiments with added sulfur yielded higher conversions than normal runs done in new reactors. This {open_quotes}wall catalytic effect{close_quotes} can be reduced by treating sulfided reactors with hydrochloric acid for a short period of time and subsequent immersing into a base bath overnight. These results demonstrate the significant influence of sulfur addition and S-induced residual wall-effect on C-C bond cleavage and hydrogenation of aromatics in batch reactors.

  15. Light induced effects in a-Si:H films alloyed with sulfur

    SciTech Connect

    Yoon, J.H.; Taylor, P.C.; Yan, B.; Lee, C.H.

    1997-07-01

    Light-induced effects are studied in hydrogenated amorphous silicon-sulfur alloys (a-SiS{sub x}:H) and compared to those that exist in a-Si:H. The A-SiS{sub x}:H films were grown by decomposition of pre-mixtures of SiH{sub 4} and H{sub 2}S. The light-induced effects were monitored using electrical (dark conductivity and photoconductivity, including the constant photocurrent method [CPM]) and optical (photoluminescence) measurements and electron spin resonance. It is found that sulfur alloying results in a significant reduction in the degradation in the dark- and photo-conductivity. For an a-SiS{sub x}:H film grown with a gas mixture of H{sub 2}S/SiH{sub 4} = 0.02, there is an increase of over an order of magnitude in the dark conductivity and a small decrease in the photoconductivity after 50 hours of light soaking. The subgap deep defect density as measured by CPM increases with illumination time, following a stretched exponential to saturation. The saturated defect density is an order of magnitude higher than that observed in the annealed state.

  16. Amino acid composition of cadmium-binding protein induced in a marine diatom

    SciTech Connect

    Maita, Y.; Kawaguchi, S. )

    1989-09-01

    Organisms living in environments polluted with heavy metals develop tolerance against these contaminants. The tolerance has been attributed to the ability to synthesize metal binding substances. These recent findings imply metal binding complexes from animals and plants, although having very similar functional properties, may have entirely different amino acid compositions. Researchers reported that cadystin from fission yeast, Schizosaccharomyces pombe was composed of only glutamic acid, cysteine, and glycine. A year later, a heavy metal binding substance was isolated from Rauwolfia serpetina which contains only Glu, Cys, and Gly. Heavy metal binding complexes isolated from the water hyacinth and morning glory Datura innoxia also showed an amino acid composition similar to cadystin or phytochelatin. In this study, the cadmium binding protein induced in the marine diatom, Phaeodactylum tricornutum, was isolated and purified and its amino acid composition determined.

  17. 40 CFR 721.9672 - Amides, tall-oil fatty, N-[2-[2-hydroxyethyl)amino]ethyl], reaction products with sulfur dioxide...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... Specific Chemical Substances § 721.9672 Amides, tall-oil fatty, N- ethyl], reaction products with sulfur... acids, tall-oil reaction products with sulfur dioxide and triethylenetetramine. (a) Chemical substance...], reaction products with sulfur dioxide; fatty acids, tall-oil, reaction products with...

  18. 40 CFR 721.9672 - Amides, tall-oil fatty, N-[2-[2-hydroxyethyl)amino]ethyl], reaction products with sulfur dioxide...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... Specific Chemical Substances § 721.9672 Amides, tall-oil fatty, N- ethyl], reaction products with sulfur... acids, tall-oil reaction products with sulfur dioxide and triethylenetetramine. (a) Chemical substance...], reaction products with sulfur dioxide; fatty acids, tall-oil, reaction products with...

  19. 40 CFR 721.9672 - Amides, tall-oil fatty, N-[2-[2-hydroxyethyl)amino]ethyl], reaction products with sulfur dioxide...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... Specific Chemical Substances § 721.9672 Amides, tall-oil fatty, N- ethyl], reaction products with sulfur... acids, tall-oil reaction products with sulfur dioxide and triethylenetetramine. (a) Chemical substance...], reaction products with sulfur dioxide; fatty acids, tall-oil, reaction products with...

  20. 40 CFR 721.9672 - Amides, tall-oil fatty, N-[2-[2-hydroxyethyl)amino]ethyl], reaction products with sulfur dioxide...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... Specific Chemical Substances § 721.9672 Amides, tall-oil fatty, N- ethyl], reaction products with sulfur... acids, tall-oil reaction products with sulfur dioxide and triethylenetetramine. (a) Chemical substance...], reaction products with sulfur dioxide; fatty acids, tall-oil, reaction products with...

  1. 40 CFR 721.9672 - Amides, tall-oil fatty, N-[2-[2-hydroxyethyl)amino]ethyl], reaction products with sulfur dioxide...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... Specific Chemical Substances § 721.9672 Amides, tall-oil fatty, N- ethyl], reaction products with sulfur... acids, tall-oil reaction products with sulfur dioxide and triethylenetetramine. (a) Chemical substance...], reaction products with sulfur dioxide; fatty acids, tall-oil, reaction products with...

  2. Radiation-induced destruction of hydroxyl-containing amino acids and dipeptides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sladkova, А. А.; Sosnovskaya, А. А.; Edimecheva, I. P.; Shadyro, О. I.

    2012-12-01

    The yields of molecular products resulting from radiolysis of hydroxyl-containing amino acids and dipeptides under various conditions were determined. The possibility of a new radiation-induced destruction pathway has been shown for serine and threonine, as well as for the dipeptides having residues of these amino acids at the N-terminal part of the respective molecule. This process includes formation of N-centered radicals from the starting molecules followed by their decomposition with elimination of side substituents. On radiolysis, serine and threonine were also shown to undergo free-radical destruction to form acetaldehyde and acetone, respectively. A mechanism has been proposed including consecutive stages of fragmentation of α-hydroxyl-containing carbon-centered radicals with elimination of ammonia and decomposition of the secondary radicals with elimination of CO2. The yields of CO2 obtained on radiolysis of serine and threonine were significantly higher (except for solutions at pH 12) than those for alanine and valine, which have no hydroxyl groups in their structures. The obtained data indicate that the hydroxyl-containing amino acids occupy a special place among other amino acids as regards the variety of radiation-induced reactions which they may undergo due to their structural features.

  3. Amino acids suppress apoptosis induced by sodium laurate, an absorption enhancer.

    PubMed

    Takayama, Chie; Mukaizawa, Fuyuki; Fujita, Takuya; Ogawara, Ken-ichi; Higaki, Kazutaka; Kimura, Toshikiro

    2009-12-01

    The formulation containing sodium laurate (C12), an absorption enhancer, and several amino acids such as taurine (Tau) and L-glutamine (L-Gln) is a promising preparation that can safely improve the intestinal absorption of poorly absorbable drugs. The safety for intestinal mucosa is achieved because the amino acids prevent C12 from causing mucosal damages via several mechanisms. In the present study, the possible involvement of apoptosis, programmed cell death, in mucosal damages caused by C12 and cytoprotection by amino acids was examined. C12 induced DNA fragmentation, a typical phenomenon of apoptosis, in rat large-intestinal epithelial cells while the addition of amino acids significantly attenuated it. C12 alone significantly increased the release of cytochrome C, an apoptosis-inducing factor, from mitochondria, which could be via the decrease in the level of Bcl-2, an inhibiting factor of cytochrome C release. The enhancement of cytochrome C release by C12 led to the activation of caspase 9, an initiator enzyme, and the subsequent activation of caspase 3, an effector enzyme. On the other hand, Tau or L-Gln significantly suppressed the release of cytochrome C from mitochondria and attenuated the activities of both caspases, which could be attributed to the maintenance of Bcl-2 expression. PMID:19630065

  4. Activation of Aro80 transcription factor by heat-induced aromatic amino acid influx in Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    PubMed

    Lee, Kyusung; Sung, Changmin; Kim, Byung-Gee; Hahn, Ji-Sook

    2013-08-16

    In Saccharomyces cerevisiae, transcription of ARO9 and ARO10 genes, involved in the catabolism of aromatic amino acids, is activated by Aro80 transcription factor in response to aromatic amino acids. Here we show that the transcription of ARO9 and ARO10 is also induced by heat shock in an Aro80-dependent manner. However, heat shock-related signaling pathways including PKA, PKC, and HOG pathways are not involved in the heat shock activation of Aro80. We elucidate that heat-induced increase in aromatic amino acid influx can lead to the inducer-dependent activation of Aro80 upon heat shock. Known aromatic amino acid permeases play an insignificant role in the heat-induced expression of ARO9 and ARO10, suggesting that an increase in plasma membrane fluidity might be responsible for the influx of aromatic amino acids during heat shock stress. PMID:23860270

  5. Laser-induced pattern formation in liquid sulfur. An indication of laser-induced phase transition to ordered polymer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sakaguchi, Y.; Tamura, K.

    2007-04-01

    Liquid sulfur is a well-known liquid which exhibits a polymerization transition at T_p=159 °C. Recently, it was found from our experiments that such a transition can be induced below Tp through laser illumination and that an iridescent pattern appears under strong illumination with a pulsed laser of more than 60 mJ/cm2 pulse. It is proposed that the visible change in iridescence is due to a macroscopic reconstruction of laser-generated polymers and that a laser-induced phase transition takes place from a freely expanded polymer phase to an ordered polymer phase when increasing the laser illumination. To further examine this possibility, the time variation of the iridescent pattern has been fully investigated using a macro lens, a polarized microscope and an optical microscope. In an analysis of the iridescent pattern, a rapid decrease in the area was observed after an initial slow decrease, suggesting a type of phase transition. Results from the observation of a quenched sulfur sample with a polarized microscope gave evidence that the iridescent region consists of polymers. Through observation of the liquid with a microscope, a striped pattern with micrometer sized spacing was noted in the iridescent pattern. A drastic color change was observed in the pattern from its generation to its disappearance. Sample thickness dependence of the pattern was also observed. These results were well explained by assuming the self-arrangement of laser-generated colloidal polymers.

  6. Prevention and Treatment of Respiratory Consequences Induced by Sulfur Mustard in Iranian Casualties

    PubMed Central

    Razavi, Seyed M.; Salamati, Payman; Harandi, Ali Amini; Ghanei, Mostafa

    2013-01-01

    Background: About 100,000 Iranian have been exposed to chemical weapons during Iraq-Iran conflict (1980-88). After being spent of more than two decades, still about 30,000 of them are under follow-up treatment. The main aim of this study was to review various preventive and therapeutic methods for injured patients with sulfur mustard in different phases. Methods: For gathering information, we have used the electronic databases including Scopus, Medline, ISI, IranMedex, Irandoc sites. According to this search strategy, 104 published articles associated to respiratory problems and among them 50 articles related to prevention and treatment of respiratory problems were found and reviewed. Results: There is not any curative treatment for sulfur mustard induced lung injuries, but some valuable experienced measures for prevention and palliative treatments are available. Some useful measures in acute phase include: Symptomatic management, oxygen supplementation, tracheostomy in laryngospasm, use of moist air, respiratory physical therapy, mucolytic agents and bronchodilators. In the chronic phases, these measures include: Periodic clinical examinations, administration of inhaled corticosteroids alone or with long-acting beta 2 agonists, use of antioxidants, magnesium ions, long term oxygen supplement, therapeutic bronchoscopy, laser therapy, and use of respiratory tract stents. Conclusions: Most treatments are symptomatic but using preventive points immediately after exposure could improve following outcomes. PMID:23671768

  7. Sulfur mustard induced nuclear translocation of glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate-dehydrogenase (GAPDH).

    PubMed

    Steinritz, Dirk; Weber, Jana; Balszuweit, Frank; Thiermann, Horst; Schmidt, Annette

    2013-12-01

    Sulfur Mustard (SM) is a vesicant chemical warfare agent, which is acutely toxic to a variety of organ systems including skin, eyes, respiratory system and bone marrow. The underlying molecular pathomechanism was mainly attributed to the alkylating properties of SM. However, recent studies have revealed that cellular responses to SM exposure are of more complex nature and include increased protein expression and protein modifications that can be used as biomarkers. In order to confirm already known biomarkers, to detect potential new ones and to further elucidate the pathomechanism of SM, we conducted large-scale proteomic experiments based on a human keratinocyte cell line (HaCaT) exposed to SM. Surprisingly, our analysis identified glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate-dehydrogenase (GAPDH) as one of the up-regulated proteins after exposure of HaCaT cells to SM. In this paper we demonstrate the sulfur mustard induced nuclear translocation of GAPDH in HaCaT cells by 2D gel-electrophoresis (2D GE), immunocytochemistry (ICC), Western Blot (WB) and a combination thereof. 2D GE in combination with MALDI-TOF MS/MS analysis identified GAPDH as an up-regulated protein after SM exposure. Immunocytochemistry revealed a distinct nuclear translocation of GAPDH after exposure to 300μM SM. This finding was confirmed by fractionated WB analysis. 2D GE and subsequent immunoblot staining of GAPDH demonstrated two different spot locations of GAPH (pI 7.0 and pI 8.5) that are related to cytosolic or nuclear GAPDH respectively. After exposure to 300μM SM a significant increase of nuclear GAPDH at pI 8.5 occurred. Nuclear GAPDH has been associated with apoptosis, detection of structural DNA alterations, DNA repair and regulation of genomic integrity and telomere structure. The results of our study add new aspects to the pathophysiology of sulfur mustard toxicity, yet further studies will be necessary to reveal the specific function of nuclear GAPDH in the pathomechanism of sulfur mustard

  8. Sulfur mustard-induced neutropenia: treatment with granulocyte colony-stimulating factor.

    PubMed

    Anderson, Dana R; Holmes, Wesley W; Lee, Robyn B; Dalal, Stephen J; Hurst, Charles G; Maliner, Beverly I; Newmark, Jonathan; Smith, William J

    2006-05-01

    Although best known as a blistering agent, sulfur mustard (HD) can also induce neutropenia in exposed individuals, increasing their susceptibility to infection. Granulocyte colony-stimulating factor (G-CSF) and pegylated G-CSF (peg-G-CSF) have been approved by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration as hematopoietic growth factors to treat chemotherapy-induced neutropenia. The goal of this study was to determine the effectiveness of G-CSF and peg-G-CSF in ameliorating HD-induced neutropenia. African green monkeys (Chlorocebus aethiops) were challenged with HD and, at 1, 3, 5, or 7 days after exposure, G-CSF therapy (10 microg/kg per day for 21 days) was initiated. Peg-G-CSF (300 microg/kg, single treatment) was similarly tested, with treatment given at 3 days after exposure. Untreated HD-exposed animals recovered from neutropenia 28 days after exposure, whereas G-CSF- or peg-G-CSF-treated animals recovered 8 to 19 days after exposure (p < 0.05). These results indicate that G-CSF or peg-G-CSF may provide Food and Drug Administration-approved treatments that will reduce the duration of HD-induced neutropenia. PMID:16761898

  9. Undersulfation of cartilage proteoglycans ex vivo and increased contribution of amino acid sulfur to sulfation in vitro in McAlister dysplasia/atelosteogenesis type 2.

    PubMed

    Rossi, A; Bonaventure, J; Delezoide, A L; Superti-Furga, A; Cetta, G

    1997-09-15

    Mutations in the diastrophic dysplasia sulfate transporter gene cause a family of chondrodysplasias including, in order of increasing severity, diastrophic dysplasia, atelosteogenesis type 2 and achondrogenesis type 1B. McAlister dysplasia is a lethal chondrodysplasia considered on the basis of minor radiographic features to be a disorder different from atelosteogenesis type 2. Here, we demonstrate that McAlister dysplasia arises from mutations in the diastrophic dysplasia sulfate transporter gene and that this disorder essentially coincides on molecular and biochemical grounds with atelosteogenesis type 2. The fetus affected by McAlister dysplasia we have studied is a compound heterozygote for mutations leading to R279W and N425D substitutions in the diastrophic dysplasia sulfate transporter. Proteoglycan sulfation was studied in epiphyseal cartilage and in chondrocyte cultures of the patient by high performance liquid chromatography of chondrotinase digested proteoglycans; a high amount of non-sulfated disaccharide was observed as a consequence of the alteration of the transporter function caused by the mutations. However, sulfated disaccharides were detectable even if in low amounts, both in cultured cells and tissue. Functional impairment of the sulfate transporter was demonstrated in vitro by reduced incorporation of [35S]sulfate relative to [3H]glucosamine in proteoglycans synthesized by chondrocytes and by sulfate-uptake assays in fibroblasts. Parallel in vitro studies in a patient with achondrogenesis 1B indicated that the severity of the clinical phenotype seems to be correlated to the residual activity of the sulfate transporter. The capacity of fibroblasts to use cysteine as an alternative source of sulfate was evaluated by double-labeling experiments. Relative incorporation of [35S]cysteine-derived sulfate in the glycosaminoglycan chains was increased in the patient's cells, indicating that, in vitro, the catabolism of sulfur-containing amino acids can

  10. Oxidation of plasma cysteine/cystine and GSH/GSSG redox potentials by acetaminophen and sulfur amino acid insufficiency in humans.

    PubMed

    Mannery, Yanci O; Ziegler, Thomas R; Park, Youngja; Jones, Dean P

    2010-06-01

    Variations in plasma sulfur amino acid (SAA) pools are associated with disease risks, but little information is available about the factors affecting plasma SAA pools. Drug metabolism by glutathione (GSH) and sulfate conjugation can, in principle, represent a quantitatively important burden on SAA supply. The present study was designed to determine whether therapeutic doses of acetaminophen (APAP) alter SAA metabolism in healthy human adults. A double-blind, crossover design incorporating four treatment periods with diets providing 100% of the recommended dietary allowance (RDA) for SAA without or with APAP (15 mg/kg) and 0% RDA for SAA without or with APAP, in randomized order. After a 3-day equilibration period, chemically defined diets with 100 or 0% RDA for SAA were given for 2 complete days. On day 3, APAP or placebo was given in two successive doses (6-h interval), and timed plasma samples were collected. With SAA intake at 100% RDA, APAP administration oxidized the plasma cysteine/cystine redox potential (E(h)CySS) but not the plasma GSH/GSSG redox potential (E(h)GSSG). The extent of oxidation caused by APAP was similar to that seen with 0% SAA and no APAP. However, APAP administration with 0% SAA did not cause further oxidation beyond APAP or 0% SAA alone. In contrast, an oxidation of the plasma E(h)GSSG was apparent for SAA insufficiency only with APAP. The results suggest a need to evaluate possible effects of APAP in association with SAA insufficiency as a contributing factor in disease risk. PMID:20207721

  11. Oxidation of Plasma Cysteine/Cystine and GSH/GSSG Redox Potentials by Acetaminophen and Sulfur Amino Acid Insufficiency in Humans

    PubMed Central

    Mannery, Yanci O.; Ziegler, Thomas R.; Park, Youngja

    2010-01-01

    Variations in plasma sulfur amino acid (SAA) pools are associated with disease risks, but little information is available about the factors affecting plasma SAA pools. Drug metabolism by glutathione (GSH) and sulfate conjugation can, in principle, represent a quantitatively important burden on SAA supply. The present study was designed to determine whether therapeutic doses of acetaminophen (APAP) alter SAA metabolism in healthy human adults. A double-blind, crossover design incorporating four treatment periods with diets providing 100% of the recommended dietary allowance (RDA) for SAA without or with APAP (15 mg/kg) and 0% RDA for SAA without or with APAP, in randomized order. After a 3-day equilibration period, chemically defined diets with 100 or 0% RDA for SAA were given for 2 complete days. On day 3, APAP or placebo was given in two successive doses (6-h interval), and timed plasma samples were collected. With SAA intake at 100% RDA, APAP administration oxidized the plasma cysteine/cystine redox potential (EhCySS) but not the plasma GSH/GSSG redox potential (EhGSSG). The extent of oxidation caused by APAP was similar to that seen with 0% SAA and no APAP. However, APAP administration with 0% SAA did not cause further oxidation beyond APAP or 0% SAA alone. In contrast, an oxidation of the plasma EhGSSG was apparent for SAA insufficiency only with APAP. The results suggest a need to evaluate possible effects of APAP in association with SAA insufficiency as a contributing factor in disease risk. PMID:20207721

  12. Sulfuric acid induces airway hyperresponsiveness to substance P in the guinea pig.

    PubMed

    Stengel, P W; Bendele, A M; Cockerham, S L; Silbaugh, S A

    1993-01-01

    We investigated whether sulfuric acid inhalation would cause hyperresponsiveness to substance P. Guinea pigs became dyspneic during a 1 h sulfuric acid exposure, but recovered by 24 h when they were challenged with substance P or histamine aerosols. Eight minutes after the start of challenge, animals were killed and excised lung gas volumes measured. Sulfuric acid slightly increased histamine responsiveness compared to controls. However, sulfuric acid caused a much more pronounced leftward shift in the dose response to substance P. Coadministration of the neutral endopeptidase (NEP) inhibitor, thiorphan, did not reduce sulfuric acid-related hyperresponsiveness to substance P. By 72 h, sensitization to substance P was absent. Histological evaluation of sulfuric acid-treated lungs revealed mild alveolitis at 24 h, but not at 72 h. We conclude that sulfuric acid produces a marked sensitization to substance P. Inactivation of NEP does not appear to account for this effect. PMID:7505997

  13. Performance of computational tools in evaluating the functional impact of laboratory-induced amino acid mutations.

    PubMed

    Gray, Vanessa E; Kukurba, Kimberly R; Kumar, Sudhir

    2012-08-15

    Site-directed mutagenesis is frequently used by scientists to investigate the functional impact of amino acid mutations in the laboratory. Over 10,000 such laboratory-induced mutations have been reported in the UniProt database along with the outcomes of functional assays. Here, we explore the performance of state-of-the-art computational tools (Condel, PolyPhen-2 and SIFT) in correctly annotating the function-altering potential of 10,913 laboratory-induced mutations from 2372 proteins. We find that computational tools are very successful in diagnosing laboratory-induced mutations that elicit significant functional change in the laboratory (up to 92% accuracy). But, these tools consistently fail in correctly annotating laboratory-induced mutations that show no functional impact in the laboratory assays. Therefore, the overall accuracy of computational tools for laboratory-induced mutations is much lower than that observed for the naturally occurring human variants. We tested and rejected the possibilities that the preponderance of changes to alanine and the presence of multiple base-pair mutations in the laboratory were the reasons for the observed discordance between the performance of computational tools for natural and laboratory mutations. Instead, we discover that the laboratory-induced mutations occur predominately at the highly conserved positions in proteins, where the computational tools have the lowest accuracy of correct prediction for variants that do not impact function (neutral). Therefore, the comparisons of experimental-profiling results with those from computational predictions need to be sensitive to the evolutionary conservation of the positions harboring the amino acid change. PMID:22685075

  14. Time course of exercise-induced bronchoconstriction in asthmatics exposed to sulfur dioxide

    SciTech Connect

    Hackney, J.D.; Linn, W.S.; Bailey, R.M.; Spier, C.E.; Valencia, L.M.

    1984-08-01

    Young adult asthmatic volunteers (N = 17) were exposed to 0.75 ppM sulfur dioxide (SO/sub 2/) for 3-hr periods, exercising vigorously for the first 10 min and resting thereafter. Specific airway resistance (SR/sub aw/) and symptoms were recorded preexposure, immediately postexercise, and after 1, 2, and 3 hr of exposure. Symptoms and SR/sub aw/ were significantly increased after exercise, relative to preexposure measurements. Group mean SR/sub aw/ and symptom increases were no longer significant at 1 hr. In a few individuals, effects may have persisted for 2 hr or more. On separate occasions, comparable exposures were conducted, and forced expiratory spirometry was performed preexposure and postexercise, in addition to the other tests. Inclusion of spirometry did no significantly affect the other results. Spirometry and SR/sub aw/ showed nearly equal significance in changes postexercise. Thus, in general, asthmatics bronchoconstriction induced by exercise in SO/sub 2/ seems to reverse quickly with rest, even if SO/sub 2/ exposure continues. Spirometry may be useful for studying pollution-induced bronchoconstriction when SR/sub aw/ measurements are impractical.

  15. Comparative Proteomic Study Reveals the Molecular Aspects of Delayed Ocular Symptoms Induced by Sulfur Mustard

    PubMed Central

    Pashandi, Zaiddodine; Saraygord-Afshari, Neda; Naderi-Manesh, Hossein; Naderi, Mostafa

    2015-01-01

    Objective. Sulfur mustard (SM) is a highly reactive alkylating agent which produces ocular, respiratory, and skin damages. Eyes are the most sensitive organ to SM due to high intrinsic metabolic and rapid turnover rate of corneal epithelium and aqueous-mucous interfaces of the cornea and conjunctiva. Here we investigate underlying molecular mechanism of SM exposure delayed effects which is still a controversial issue after about 30 years. Materials and Methods. Following ethical approval, we have analyzed serum proteome of ten severe SM exposed male patients with delayed eye symptoms with two-dimensional electrophoresis followed by matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization time-of-flight/time-of-flight mass spectrometry. The western blotting was used to confirm the proteins that have been identified. Results. We have identified thirteen proteins including albumin, haptoglobin, and keratin isoforms as well as immunoglobulin kappa chain which showed upregulation while transferrin and alpha 1 antitrypsin revealed downregulation in these patients in comparison with healthy control group. Conclusions. Our results elevated participation of free iron circulatory imbalance and local matrix-metalloproteinase activity in development of delayed ocular symptoms induced by SM. It demonstrates that SM induced systemic toxicity leads to some serum protein changes that continually and gradually exacerbate the ocular surface injuries. PMID:25685557

  16. Sulfur mustard induces an endoplasmic reticulum stress response in the mouse ear vesicant model

    PubMed Central

    Chang, Yoke-Chen; Wang, James D.; Svoboda, Kathy K.; Casillas, Robert P.; Laskin, Jeffrey D.; Gordon, Marion K.; Gerecke, Donald R.

    2013-01-01

    The endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress response is a cell survival pathway upregulated when cells are under severe stress. Severely damaged mouse ear skin exposed to the vesicant, sulfur mustard (bis-2-chloroethyl sulfide, SM), resulted in increased expression of ER chaperone proteins that accompany misfolded and incorrectly made proteins targeted for degradation. Time course studies with SM using the mouse ear vesicant model (MEVM) showed progressive histopathologic changes including edema, separation of the epidermis from the dermis, persistent inflammation, upregulation of laminin γ2 (one of the chains of laminin-332, a heterotrimeric skin glycoprotein required for wound repair), and delayed wound healing from 24 h to 168 h post exposure. This was associated with time related increased expression of the cell survival ER stress marker, GRP78/BiP, and the ER stress apoptosis marker, GADD153/CHOP, suggesting simultaneous activation of both cell survival and non-mitochondrial apoptosis pathways. Dual immunofluorescence labeling of a keratinocyte migration promoting protein, laminin γ2 and GRP78/BIP, showed colocalization of the two molecules 72 h post exposure indicating that the laminin γ2 was misfolded after SM exposure and trapped within the ER. Taken together, these data show that ER stress is induced in mouse skin within 24 h of vesicant exposure in a defensive response to promote cell survival; however, it appears that this response is rapidly overwhelmed by the apoptotic pathway as a consequence of severe SM-induced injury. PMID:23357548

  17. Depolarization-induced release of amino acids from the vestibular nuclear complex.

    PubMed

    Godfrey, Donald A; Sun, Yizhe; Frisch, Christopher; Godfrey, Matthew A; Rubin, Allan M

    2012-04-01

    There is evidence from immunohistochemistry, quantitative microchemistry, and pharmacology for several amino acids as neurotransmitters in the vestibular nuclear complex (VNC), including glutamate, γ-aminobutyrate (GABA), and glycine. However, evidence from measurements of release has been limited. The purpose of this study was to measure depolarization-stimulated calcium-dependent release of amino acids from the VNC in brain slices. Coronal slices containing predominantly the VNC were prepared from rats and perfused with artificial cerebrospinal fluid (ACSF) in an interface chamber. Fluid was collected from the chamber just downstream from the VNC using a microsiphon. Depolarization was induced by 50 mM potassium in either control calcium and magnesium concentrations or reduced calcium and elevated magnesium. Amino acid concentrations in effluent fluid were measured by high performance liquid chromatography. Glutamate release increased fivefold during depolarization in control calcium concentration and twofold in low calcium/high magnesium. These same ratios were 6 and 1.5 for GABA, 2 and 1.3 for glycine, and 2 and 1.5 for aspartate. Differences between release in control and low calcium/high magnesium ACSF were statistically significant for glutamate, GABA, and glycine. Glutamine release decreased during and after depolarization, and taurine release slowly increased. No evidence for calcium-dependent release was found for serine, glutamine, alanine, threonine, arginine, taurine, or tyrosine. Our results support glutamate and GABA as major neurotransmitters in the VNC. They also support glycine as a neurotransmitter and some function for taurine. PMID:22147284

  18. Insulin-induced phospho-oligosaccharide stimulates amino acid transport in isolated rat hepatocytes.

    PubMed Central

    Varela, I; Avila, M; Mato, J M; Hue, L

    1990-01-01

    The ability of the insulin-induced phospho-oligosaccharide to stimulate amino acid transport was studied in isolated rat hepatocytes. At low alpha-aminoisobutyric acid concentrations (0.1 mM), both 100 nM-insulin and 10 microM-phospho-oligosaccharide doubled amino acid uptake after 2 h of incubation. This stimulation was prevented by 0.1 mM-cycloheximide or 5 micrograms of actinomycin D/ml, indicating that the phospho-oligosaccharide, like insulin, was acting via the synthesis of a high-affinity transport component. The effects of the phospho-oligosaccharide and of insulin were blocked by Ins2P (2.5 mM), but not by myo-inositol, inositol hexaphosphoric acid or several monosaccharides such as mannose, glucosamine and galactose. Both the temporal effect on amino acid entry and the extent of stimulation of this process by the phospho-oligosaccharide indicate that this molecule mimics, and may mediate, some of the long-term actions of insulin. However, the effects of phospho-oligosaccharide and insulin were not exactly the same, since the effect of insulin, but not of the phospho-oligosaccharide, was additive with that of glucagon. PMID:2185744

  19. Amino acid deprivation induces CREBZF/Zhangfei expression via an AARE-like element in the promoter.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yani; Jin, Yaping; Williams, Tegan A; Burtenshaw, Sally M; Martyn, Amanda C; Lu, Rui

    2010-01-15

    CREBZF (also called ZF or Zhangfei) is a basic region-leucine zipper transcription factor that has been implicated in the herpesvirus infection cycle and related cellular processes. Since ATF4 is known to play a key role in cellular responses to various ER stresses as well as amino acid deprivation, we sought to examine the potential involvement of CREBZF in the amino acid response (AAR). We found that the CREBZF protein was induced by amino acid deprivation in the canine MDCK cells. We subsequently cloned a canine CREBZF promoter region (-1767bp to +1bp) that responds to amino acid limitation. Using deletion mapping and site-directed mutagenesis, we identified a 9-bp sequence 5'-ATTCACTCA-3' in the promoter (-1227 to -1219), deletion of which resulted in a complete loss of inducibility by amino acid deprivation. This sequence is similar to the known amino acid response elements (AAREs) found in other AAR-inducible genes, such as CHOP (C/EBP homologous protein, also known as GADD153). These results suggest that CREBZF may be an amino acid stress sensor. Considering the AARE-like sequence found in CREBZF and other similarities between CREBZF and CHOP, we postulate that CREBZF and CHOP may be two sensors that regulate different yet related signaling pathways governing the AAR. PMID:20026304

  20. Sequential accumulation of starch and lipid induced by sulfur deficiency in Chlorella and Parachlorella species.

    PubMed

    Mizuno, Yusuke; Sato, Atsushi; Watanabe, Koichi; Hirata, Aiko; Takeshita, Tsuyoshi; Ota, Shuhei; Sato, Norihiro; Zachleder, Vilém; Tsuzuki, Mikio; Kawano, Shigeyuki

    2013-02-01

    The influence of sulfur deficiency on biomass production was analyzed in the four Chlorellaceae species, Chlorella vulgaris, Chlorella sorokiniana, Chlorella lobophora, and Parachlorella kessleri. Culturing under sulfur-deficient conditions promoted transient accumulation of starch followed by a steady increase in lipid storage. Transmission electron microscopy indicated an increase and decrease in starch granules and subsequent enlargement of lipid droplets under sulfur-deficient conditions. Chlorellaceae spp. accumulated 1.5-2.7-fold higher amounts of starch and 1.5-2.4-fold higher amounts of lipid under sulfur-deficient conditions than under sulfur-sufficient conditions. More than 75% of the fatty acids that accumulated in Chlorellaceae spp. under the sulfur-sufficient condition were unsaturated and culturing under sulfur-deficient conditions increased the saturated fatty acid content from 24.3% to 59.7% only in P. kessleri. These results indicate that the sequential accumulation of starch and lipid is a response to the sulfur depletion that commonly occurs in Chlorellaceae spp. PMID:23238344

  1. Fragmentation and dimerization of aliphatic amino acid films induced by vacuum ultraviolet irradiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tanaka, Masahito; Kaneko, Fusae; Koketsu, Toshiyuki; Nakagawa, Kazumichi; Yamada, Toru

    2008-10-01

    The chemical reaction of aliphatic amino acid, such as alanine (Ala) and leucine (Leu), in the solid phase induced by vacuum ultraviolet (VUV) irradiation was studied by high-performance liquid chromatography technique and mass spectroscopic method. Quantum efficiencies of dimerization of Ala in the solid phase obviously showed irradiated VUV wavelength dependence. The values of quantum efficiencies of formation of Ala dimer were determined to be 5.7×10-5, 1.3×10-3, and 2.4×10-4 for 208, 183, and 87 nm irradiation, respectively. VUV-induced fragment desorption from Ala and Leu films has also been examined by mass spectroscopic method. Observed mass spectra clearly indicated that both the deamination and decarboxylation reactions were common in both Ala and Leu films, and the dissociation of side chain occurred only in Leu film.

  2. Fast analysis of amino acids in wine by capillary electrophoresis with laser-induced fluorescence detection.

    PubMed

    Mandrioli, Roberto; Morganti, Emanuele; Mercolini, Laura; Kenndler, Ernst; Raggi, Maria A

    2011-10-01

    A fast analytical method has been developed for the determination of nine amino acids, together with serotonin, in wine samples of different origin and vintage. The method is based on capillary electrophoresis coupled to laser-induced fluorescence detection. Separation was obtained by using a fused-silica capillary (75 μm id, 74.0 cm total length, 60.0 cm length to detector) and a background electrolyte composed of carbonate buffer (20 mM, pH 9.2), applying a 20 kV voltage. Direct hydrodynamic injection of wine samples was made after an original microwave-assisted derivatisation step with 5-(4,6-dichlorotriazinyl)aminofluorescein. Fluorescence was induced by an Ar-Ion laser, exciting at 488 nm. Good linearity (r(2) >0.9990) was obtained for all considered analytes and sensitivity was also good, with limits of detection in the 7-50 ng/mL range. The method was successfully applied for the analysis of commercial Italian wines and thus seems to be suitable for the determination of the relevant amino acids and serotonin, providing good results in terms of accuracy and precision, together with the advantage of a very fast, microwave-assisted derivatisation procedure. Future applications of the method are planned to check for wine adulterations and commercial frauds. PMID:21922500

  3. Jasmonate-inducible plant enzymes degrade essential amino acids in the herbivore midgut

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Hui; Wilkerson, Curtis G.; Kuchar, Jason A.; Phinney, Brett S.; Howe, Gregg A.

    2005-01-01

    The plant hormone jasmonic acid (JA) activates host defense responses against a broad spectrum of herbivores. Although it is well established that JA controls the expression of a large set of target genes in response to tissue damage, very few gene products have been shown to play a direct role in reducing herbivore performance. To test the hypothesis that JA-inducible proteins (JIPs) thwart attack by disrupting digestive processes in the insect gut, we used a MS-based approach to identify host proteins that accumulate in the midgut of Manduca sexta larvae reared on tomato (Solanum lycopersicum) plants. We show that two JIPs, arginase and threonine deaminase (TD), act in the M. sexta midgut to catabolize the essential amino acids Arg and Thr, respectively. Transgenic plants that overexpress arginase were more resistant to M. sexta larvae, and this effect was correlated with reduced levels of midgut Arg. We present evidence indicating that the ability of TD to degrade Thr in the midgut is enhanced by herbivore-induced proteolytic removal of the enzyme's C-terminal regulatory domain, which confers negative feedback regulation by isoleucine in planta. Our results demonstrate that the JA signaling pathway strongly influences the midgut protein content of phytophagous insects and support the hypothesis that catabolism of amino acids in the insect digestive tract by host enzymes plays a role in plant protection against herbivores. PMID:16357201

  4. Tip-induced domain structures and polarization switching in ferroelectric amino acid glycine

    SciTech Connect

    Seyedhosseini, E. Ivanov, M.; Bdikin, I.; Vasileva, D.; Kudryavtsev, A.; Rodriguez, B. J.; Kholkin, A. L.

    2015-08-21

    Bioorganic ferroelectrics and piezoelectrics are becoming increasingly important in view of their intrinsic compatibility with biological environment and biofunctionality combined with strong piezoelectric effect and a switchable polarization at room temperature. Here, we study tip-induced domain structures and polarization switching in the smallest amino acid β-glycine, representing a broad class of non-centrosymmetric amino acids. We show that β-glycine is indeed a room-temperature ferroelectric and polarization can be switched by applying a bias to non-polar cuts via a conducting tip of atomic force microscope (AFM). Dynamics of these in-plane domains is studied as a function of an applied voltage and pulse duration. The domain shape is dictated by polarization screening at the domain boundaries and mediated by growth defects. Thermodynamic theory is applied to explain the domain propagation induced by the AFM tip. Our findings suggest that the properties of β-glycine are controlled by the charged domain walls which in turn can be manipulated by an external bias.

  5. Tip-induced domain structures and polarization switching in ferroelectric amino acid glycine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seyedhosseini, E.; Bdikin, I.; Ivanov, M.; Vasileva, D.; Kudryavtsev, A.; Rodriguez, B. J.; Kholkin, A. L.

    2015-08-01

    Bioorganic ferroelectrics and piezoelectrics are becoming increasingly important in view of their intrinsic compatibility with biological environment and biofunctionality combined with strong piezoelectric effect and a switchable polarization at room temperature. Here, we study tip-induced domain structures and polarization switching in the smallest amino acid β-glycine, representing a broad class of non-centrosymmetric amino acids. We show that β-glycine is indeed a room-temperature ferroelectric and polarization can be switched by applying a bias to non-polar cuts via a conducting tip of atomic force microscope (AFM). Dynamics of these in-plane domains is studied as a function of an applied voltage and pulse duration. The domain shape is dictated by polarization screening at the domain boundaries and mediated by growth defects. Thermodynamic theory is applied to explain the domain propagation induced by the AFM tip. Our findings suggest that the properties of β-glycine are controlled by the charged domain walls which in turn can be manipulated by an external bias.

  6. Analysis of airway secretions in a model of sulfur dioxide induced chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD)

    PubMed Central

    Wagner, Ulrich; Staats, Petra; Fehmann, Hans-Christoph; Fischer, Axel; Welte, Tobias; Groneberg, David A

    2006-01-01

    Hypersecretion and chronic phlegm are major symptoms of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) but animal models of COPD with a defined functional hypersecretion have not been established so far. To identify an animal model of combined morphological signs of airway inflammation and functional hypersecretion, rats were continuously exposed to different levels of sulfur dioxide (SO2, 5 ppm, 10 ppm, 20 ppm, 40 ppm, 80 ppm) for 3 (short-term) or 20–25 (long-term) days. Histology revealed a dose-dependent increase in edema formation and inflammatory cell infiltration in short-term-exposed animals. The submucosal edema was replaced by fibrosis after long-term-exposure. The basal secretory activity was only significantly increased in the 20 ppm group. Also, stimulated secretion was significantly increased only after exposure to 20 ppm. BrdU-assays and AgNOR-analysis demonstrated cellular metaplasia and glandular hypertrophy rather than hyperplasia as the underlying morphological correlate of the hypersecretion. In summary, SO2-exposure can lead to characteristic airway remodeling and changes in mucus secretion in rats. As only long-term exposure to 20 ppm leads to a combination of hypersecretion and airway inflammation, only this mode of exposure should be used to mimic human COPD. Concentrations less or higher than 20 ppm or short term exposure do not induce the respiratory symptom of hypersecretion. The present model may be used to characterize the effects of new compounds on mucus secretion in the background of experimental COPD. PMID:16759388

  7. Acute and chronic respiratory lesions induced by sulfur mustard in guinea pigs: Role of tachykinins

    SciTech Connect

    Calvet, J.H.; Trouiller, G.; Harf, A.

    1993-05-13

    We investigated in anesthetized guinea pigs the involvement of tachykinins in respiratory alterations after an airway intoxication by sulfur mustard (SM). Early lesions were evaluated after 5h. Respiratory system resistance (R) and compliance were measured by the occlusion method and airway microvascular permeability by measuring the Evans Blue dye concentration in the trachea and main bronchi. Two groups of animals were studied treated with capsaicin (which induces a tachykinin depletion) or by its vehicle. Capsaicin pretreatment had no effect on the measured parameters. We also measured 14 J after the intoxication tracheal epithelium neutral endopeptidase (NEP) (the main enzyme which degrades tachykinins). In addition bronchial responsiveness to exogenous substance P was studied in two groups of animals intoxicated with SM or not. Tracheal epithelium NEP activity was decreased from 0.448 + or 0.027 nmol.min- 1.mg protein- 1 in controls to 0. 182 + or 0.038 in intoxicated animals. Response to substance P was greater in intoxicated animals with R=2.98 + or - 1.57 cmH20.MI-1.s versus 0.35 + or 0.02 in controls, after 5.10-5 M aerosolized substance P These results suggest tachykinins are not preponderant in the early stage lesions but that bronchial hyperactivity is present at recovery, related to epithelium NEP depletion.

  8. Transcriptional and Proteomic Profiling of Aspergillus flavipes in Response to Sulfur Starvation

    PubMed Central

    El-Sayed, Ashraf S. A.; Yassin, Marwa A.; Ali, Gul Shad

    2015-01-01

    Aspergillus flavipes has received considerable interest due to its potential to produce therapeutic enzymes involved in sulfur amino acid metabolism. In natural habitats, A. flavipes survives under sulfur limitations by mobilizing endogenous and exogenous sulfur to operate diverse cellular processes. Sulfur limitation affects virulence and pathogenicity, and modulates proteome of sulfur assimilating enzymes of several fungi. However, there are no previous reports aimed at exploring effects of sulfur limitation on the regulation of A. flavipes sulfur metabolism enzymes at the transcriptional, post-transcriptional and proteomic levels. In this report, we show that sulfur limitation affects morphological and physiological responses of A. flavipes. Transcription and enzymatic activities of several key sulfur metabolism genes, ATP-sulfurylase, sulfite reductase, methionine permease, cysteine synthase, cystathionine β- and γ-lyase, glutathione reductase and glutathione peroxidase were increased under sulfur starvation conditions. A 50 kDa protein band was strongly induced by sulfur starvation, and the proteomic analyses of this protein band using LC-MS/MS revealed similarity to many proteins involved in the sulfur metabolism pathway. PMID:26633307

  9. Quantitative Sulfur Analysis using Stand-off Laser-Induced Breakdown Spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dyar, M. D.; Tucker, J. M.; Clegg, S. M.; Barefield, J. E.; Wiens, R. C.

    2008-12-01

    The laser-induced breakdown spectrometer (LIBS) in the ChemCam instrument on Mars Science Laboratory has the capability to produce robust, quantitative analyses not only for major elements, but also for a large range of light elements and trace elements that are of great interest to geochemists. However, sulfur presents a particular challenge because it reacts easily with oxygen in the plasma and because the brightest S emission lines lie outside ChemCam's spectral range. This work was undertaken within the context of our larger effort to identify and compensate for matrix effects, which are chemical properties of the material that influence the ratio of a given emission line to the abundance of the element producing that line. Samples for this study include two suites of rocks: a suite of 12 samples that are mixtures of sulfate minerals and host rocks, generally with high S contents (0.1-26.0 wt% S), and a large suite of 118 igneous rocks from varying parageneses with S contents in the 0-2 wt% range. These compositions provide several different types of matrices to challenge our calibration procedures. Samples were analyzed under ChemCam-like conditions: a Nd:YAG laser producing 17 mJ per 10ns pulse was directed onto samples positioned 5-9 m away from the laser and tele­scope. The samples were placed in a vacuum chamber filled with 7 Torr CO2 to replicate the Martian surface pressure as the atmospheric pressure influences the LIBS plasma. Some of the LIBS plasma emission is collected with a telescope and transmitted through a 1 m, 300 um, 0.22NA optical fiber connected to a commercial Ocean Optics spectrometer. We are testing and comparing three different strategies to evaluate sulfur contents. 1) We have calculated regression lines comparing the intensity at each channel to the S content. This analysis shows that there are dozens of S emission lines in the ChemCam wavelength range that are suitable for use in quantitative analysis, even in the presence of Fe. 2

  10. Sulfur mustard induces an endoplasmic reticulum stress response in the mouse ear vesicant model

    SciTech Connect

    Chang, Yoke-Chen; Wang, James D.; Svoboda, Kathy K.; Casillas, Robert P.; Laskin, Jeffrey D.; Gordon, Marion K.; Gerecke, Donald R.

    2013-04-15

    The endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress response is a cell survival pathway upregulated when cells are under severe stress. Severely damaged mouse ear skin exposed to the vesicant, sulfur mustard (bis-2-chloroethyl sulfide, SM), resulted in increased expression of ER chaperone proteins that accompany misfolded and incorrectly made proteins targeted for degradation. Time course studies with SM using the mouse ear vesicant model (MEVM) showed progressive histopathologic changes including edema, separation of the epidermis from the dermis, persistent inflammation, upregulation of laminin γ2 (one of the chains of laminin-332, a heterotrimeric skin glycoprotein required for wound repair), and delayed wound healing from 24 h to 168 h post exposure. This was associated with time related increased expression of the cell survival ER stress marker, GRP78/BiP, and the ER stress apoptosis marker, GADD153/CHOP, suggesting simultaneous activation of both cell survival and non-mitochondrial apoptosis pathways. Dual immunofluorescence labeling of a keratinocyte migration promoting protein, laminin γ2 and GRP78/BIP, showed colocalization of the two molecules 72 h post exposure indicating that the laminin γ2 was misfolded after SM exposure and trapped within the ER. Taken together, these data show that ER stress is induced in mouse skin within 24 h of vesicant exposure in a defensive response to promote cell survival; however, it appears that this response is rapidly overwhelmed by the apoptotic pathway as a consequence of severe SM-induced injury. - Highlights: ► We demonstrated ER stress response in the mouse ear vesicant model. ► We described the asymmetrical nature of wound repair in the MEVM. ► We identified the distribution of various ER stress markers in the MEVM.

  11. Mechanistic insights of sulfur mustard-induced acute tracheal injury in rats.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Xiao-Ji; Xu, Rui; Meng, Xiao; Chu, Hai-Bo; Zhao, Chao; Lian, Cheng-Jin; Wang, Tao; Guo, Wen-Jun; Zhang, Sheng-Ming

    2014-01-01

    Sulfur mustard (SM) is believed to be a major threat to civilian populations because of the persistent asymmetric threat by nonstate actors, such as terrorist groups, the ease of synthesis and handling, and the risk of theft from stockpiles. The purpose of this study was to establish mechanisms of acute tracheal injury in rats induced by SM using histopathologic, immunohistochemical, and biochemical parameters. Male rats (Sprague-Dawley) were anesthetized, intratracheally intubated, and exposed to 2 mg/kg of SM. Animals were euthanized 6-, 24-, 48-, and 72-hour postexposure, and intracavitary blood samples from the heart and tracheal tissues were collected. Exposure of rats to SM resulted in rapid tracheal injury, including tracheal epithelial cell shedding, focal ulceration, and abundant lymphocyte invasion of the submucosa. There was also evidence of a large number of apoptotic cells in the epithelium and submucosa, the serum levels of tumor necrosis factor α, interleukin 1β (IL) 1β, IL-6, and γ-glutamyl transferase peaked at 24 hours, and the serum levels of lactate dehydrogenase, glutathione peroxidase, and thiobarbituric acid reactive substance peaked at 6 hours. The SM exposure also resulted in a loss of the cellular membrane, leakage of cytoplasm, fuzzy mitochondrial cristae, medullary changes in ciliated and goblet cells, and the nuclear chromatin appeared marginated in basal cells and fibroblasts. The results in the propylene glycol group were the same as the control group. These data demonstrated the histologic changes, inflammatory reactions, apoptosis, oxidative stress, and DNA damage following SM (2 mg/kg)-induced acute tracheal injury; the severity of changes was time dependent. PMID:25163474

  12. Sulfur dioxide oxidation induced mechanistic branching and particle formation during the ozonolysis of β-pinene and 2-butene.

    PubMed

    Carlsson, Philip T M; Keunecke, Claudia; Krüger, Bastian C; Maaß, Mona-C; Zeuch, Thomas

    2012-12-01

    Recent studies have suggested that the reaction of stabilised Criegee Intermediates (CIs) with sulfur dioxide (SO(2)), leading to the formation of a carbonyl compound and sulfur trioxide, is a relevant atmospheric source of sulfuric acid. Here, the significance of this pathway has been examined by studying the formation of gas phase products and aerosol during the ozonolysis of β-pinene and 2-butene in the presence of SO(2) in the pressure range of 10 to 1000 mbar. For β-pinene at atmospheric pressure, the addition of SO(2) suppresses the formation of the secondary ozonide and leads to highly increased nopinone yields. A complete consumption of SO(2) is observed at initial SO(2) concentrations below the yield of stabilised CIs. In experiments using 2-butene a significant consumption of SO(2) and additional formation of acetaldehyde are observed at 1 bar. A consistent kinetic simulation of the experimental findings is possible when a fast CI + SO(2) reaction rate in the range of recent direct measurements [Welz et al., Science, 2012, 335, 204] is used. For 2-butene the addition of SO(2) drastically increases the observed aerosol yields at higher pressures. Below 60 mbar the SO(2) oxidation induced particle formation becomes inefficient pointing to the critical role of collisional stabilisation for sulfuric acid controlled nucleation at low pressures. PMID:23090096

  13. Amino acid metabolism inhibits antibody-driven kidney injury by inducing autophagy.

    PubMed

    Chaudhary, Kapil; Shinde, Rahul; Liu, Haiyun; Gnana-Prakasam, Jaya P; Veeranan-Karmegam, Rajalakshmi; Huang, Lei; Ravishankar, Buvana; Bradley, Jillian; Kvirkvelia, Nino; McMenamin, Malgorzata; Xiao, Wei; Kleven, Daniel; Mellor, Andrew L; Madaio, Michael P; McGaha, Tracy L

    2015-06-15

    Inflammatory kidney disease is a major clinical problem that can result in end-stage renal failure. In this article, we show that Ab-mediated inflammatory kidney injury and renal disease in a mouse nephrotoxic serum nephritis model was inhibited by amino acid metabolism and a protective autophagic response. The metabolic signal was driven by IFN-γ-mediated induction of indoleamine 2,3-dioxygenase 1 (IDO1) enzyme activity with subsequent activation of a stress response dependent on the eIF2α kinase general control nonderepressible 2 (GCN2). Activation of GCN2 suppressed proinflammatory cytokine production in glomeruli and reduced macrophage recruitment to the kidney during the incipient stage of Ab-induced glomerular inflammation. Further, inhibition of autophagy or genetic ablation of Ido1 or Gcn2 converted Ab-induced, self-limiting nephritis to fatal end-stage renal disease. Conversely, increasing kidney IDO1 activity or treating mice with a GCN2 agonist induced autophagy and protected mice from nephritic kidney damage. Finally, kidney tissue from patients with Ab-driven nephropathy showed increased IDO1 abundance and stress gene expression. Thus, these findings support the hypothesis that the IDO-GCN2 pathway in glomerular stromal cells is a critical negative feedback mechanism that limits inflammatory renal pathologic changes by inducing autophagy. PMID:25980011

  14. The surface sulfur doping induced enhanced performance of cobalt catalysts in oxygen evolution reactions.

    PubMed

    Al-Mamun, Mohammad; Zhu, Zhengju; Yin, Huajie; Su, Xintai; Zhang, Haimin; Liu, Porun; Yang, Huagui; Wang, Dan; Tang, Zhiyong; Wang, Yun; Zhao, Huijun

    2016-08-01

    A novel surface sulfur (S) doped cobalt (Co) catalyst for the oxygen evolution reaction (OER) is theoretically designed through the optimisation of the electronic structure of highly reactive surface atoms which is also validated by electrocatalytic OER experiments. PMID:27377872

  15. Sulfur Doping Induces Strong Ferromagnetic Ordering in Graphene: Effect of Concentration and Substitution Mechanism.

    PubMed

    Tuček, Jiří; Błoński, Piotr; Sofer, Zdeněk; Šimek, Petr; Petr, Martin; Pumera, Martin; Otyepka, Michal; Zbořil, Radek

    2016-07-01

    Imprinting ferromagnetism to a graphene structure by substitution of carbon atoms with sulfur is reported. S-doped graphene (4.2 at%) shows strong ferromagnetic properties with saturation magnetization exceeding 5.5 emu g(-1) at 2 K, which is among the highest values reported for any sp-based system. The remarkable magnetic response is attributed to delocalization of electrons from sulfur injected into the graphene conduction band. PMID:27135692

  16. Tissue Plasminogen Activator Prevents Mortality from Sulfur Mustard Analog–Induced Airway Obstruction

    PubMed Central

    Hendry-Hofer, Tara B.; Loader, Joan E.; Rioux, Jacqueline S.; Garlick, Rhonda B.; White, Carl W.

    2013-01-01

    Sulfur mustard (SM) inhalation causes the rare but life-threatening disorder of plastic bronchitis, characterized by bronchial cast formation, resulting in severe airway obstruction that can lead to respiratory failure and death. Mortality in those requiring intubation is greater than 80%. To date, no antidote exists for SM toxicity. In addition, therapies for plastic bronchitis are solely anecdotal, due to lack of systematic research available to assess drug efficacy in improving mortality and/or morbidity. Adult rats exposed to SM analog were treated with intratracheal tissue plasminogen activator (tPA) (0.15–0.7 mg/kg, 5.5 and 6.5 h), compared with controls (no treatment, isoflurane, and placebo). Respiratory distress and pulse oximetry were assessed (for 12 or 48 h), and arterial blood gases were obtained at study termination (12 h). Microdissection of fixed lungs was done to assess airway obstruction by casts. Optimal intratracheal tPA treatment (0.7 mg/kg) completely eliminated mortality (0% at 48 h), and greatly improved morbidity in this nearly uniformly fatal disease model (90–100% mortality at 48 h). tPA normalized plastic bronchitis–associated hypoxemia, hypercarbia, and lactic acidosis, and improved respiratory distress (i.e., clinical scores) while decreasing airway fibrin casts. Intratracheal tPA diminished airway-obstructive fibrin–containing casts while improving clinical respiratory distress, pulmonary gas exchange, tissue oxygenation, and oxygen utilization in our model of severe chemically induced plastic bronchitis. Most importantly, mortality, which was associated with hypoxemia and clinical respiratory distress, was eliminated. PMID:23258228

  17. Expression Profile of Cationic Amino Acid Transporters in Rats with Endotoxin-Induced Uveitis

    PubMed Central

    Chang, Shu-Wen; Lee, Yi-An; Kao, Tzu-Yun

    2016-01-01

    Purpose. The transcellular arginine transportation via cationic amino acid transporter (CAT) is the rate-limiting step in nitric oxide (NO) synthesis, which is crucial in intraocular inflammation. In this study, CAT isoforms and inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS) expression was investigated in endotoxin-induced uveitis (EIU). Methods. EIU was induced in Lewis rats by lipopolysaccharide (LPS) injection. In the treatment group, the rats were injected intraperitoneally with the proteasome inhibitor bortezomib before EIU induction. After 24 hours, leukocyte quantification, NO measurement of the aqueous humor, and histopathological examination were evaluated. The expression of CAT isoforms and iNOS was determined by reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction, western blotting, and immunofluorescence staining. Nuclear factor-kappa B (NF-κB) binding activity was evaluated by electrophoretic mobility shift assay. The mouse macrophage cell line RAW 264.7 was used to validate the in vivo findings. Results. LPS significantly stimulated iNOS, CAT-2A, and CAT-2B mRNA and protein expression but did not affect CAT-1 in EIU rats and RAW 264.7 cells. Bortezomib attenuated inflammation and inhibited iNOS, CAT-2A, and CAT-2B expression through NF-κB inhibition. Conclusions. CAT-2 and iNOS, but not CAT-1, are specifically involved in EIU. NF-κB is essential in the induction of CAT-2 and iNOS in EIU. PMID:27413255

  18. Electrodialysis of Sulfuric Acid with Cation-Exchange Membranes Prepared by Electron-Beam-Induced Graft Polymerization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Asari, Yuki; Shoji, Nobuyoshi; Miyoshi, Kazuyoshi; Umeno, Daisuke; Saito, Kyoichi

    Strongly acidic cation-exchange membranes were prepared by the electron-beam-induced graft polymerization of glycidyl methacrylate onto a high-density polyethylene film with a thickness of 35 μm and the subsequent conversion of the resulting epoxy group into a sulfonic acid group. The resulting cation-exchange membranes with various ion-exchange capacities or sulfonic acid group densities ranging from 1.9 to 2.7 mmol/g were applied to the enrichment of 0.50 mol/L sulfuric acid by electrodialysis. Concentrated sulfuric acids at concentrations of 1.4 to 2.9 mol/L were obtained in the concentrate chamber during the electrodialysis operated at 30 mA/cm2 and 298 K, using a pair of this cation-exchange membrane and a commercially available anion-exchange membrane.

  19. Detection and quantification of sulfur in oil products by laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy for on-line analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Trichard, F.; Forquet, V.; Gilon, N.; Lienemann, C.-P.; Baco-Antoniali, F.

    2016-04-01

    Determination of sulfur in petroleum products is described using Laser Induced breakdown spectroscopy (LIBS). A study of buffer gases employed to improve sulfur IR line detection is presented. Optimisation of the flow rate led to a 1.4 L/min optimal helium flow rate. An adaptation between a typical laboratory setup to a compact system allowed to obtain detection limits in the 0.2% w/w range. Calibration is made under the process conditions (70 °C) and at room temperature. Normalization with a helium emission line compensates for liquid level variations and for the temperature variations. The analysis of a sample over the course of 2 days under the conditions of the industrial process was tested and gave a good repeatability.

  20. Sulfur and Sulfuric Acid

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    D'Aquin, Gerard E.; Fell, Robert C.

    Sulfur is one of the few elements that is found in its elemental form in nature. Typical sulfur deposits occur in sedimentary limestone/gypsum formations, in limestone/anhydrite formations associated with salt domes, or in volcanic rock.1 A yellow solid at normal temperatures, sulfur becomes progressively lighter in color at lower temperatures and is almost white at the temperature of liquid air. It melts at 114-119°C (depending on crystalline form) to a transparent light yellow liquid as the temperature is increased. The low viscosity of the liquid begins to rise sharply above 160°C, peaking at 93 Pa·s at 188°C, and then falling as the temperature continues to rise to its boiling point of 445°C. This and other anomalous properties of the liquid state are due to equilibria between the various molecular species of sulfur, which includes small chains and rings.

  1. Induction and repair of DNA cross-links induced by sulfur mustard in the A-549 cell line followed by a comet assay.

    PubMed

    Jost, Petr; Svobodova, Hana; Stetina, Rudolf

    2015-07-25

    Sulfur mustard is a highly toxic chemical warfare agent with devastating impact on intoxicated tissues. DNA cross-links are probably the most toxic DNA lesions induced in the cell by sulfur mustard. The comet assay is a very sensitive method for measuring DNA damage. In the present study using the A-549 lung cell line, the comet assay protocol was optimized for indirect detection of DNA cross-links induced by sulfur mustard. The method is based on the additional treatment of the assayed cells containing cross-links with the chemical mutagen, styrene oxide. Alkali-labile adducts of styrene oxide cause DNA breaks leading to the formation of comets. A significant dose-dependent reduction of DNA migration of the comet's tail was found after exposing cells to sulfur mustard, indicative of the amount of sulfur mustard induced cross-links. The remarkable decrease of % tail DNA could be observed as early as 5min following exposure to sulfur mustard and the maximal effect was found after 30min, when DNA migration was reduced to the minimum. Sulfur mustard preincubated in culture medium without cells lost its ability to induce cross-links and had a half-life of about 15min. Pre-incubation longer than 30min does not lead to a significant increase in cross-links when applied to cells. However, the amount of cross-links is decreased during further incubation due to repair. The current modification of the comet assay provides a useful tool for detecting DNA cross-links induced by sulfur mustard and could be used for detection of other DNA cross-linking agents such as chemotherapeutic drugs. PMID:25986970

  2. Protection against radiation-induced DNA damage by amino acids: a DFT study.

    PubMed

    Jena, N R; Mishra, P C; Suhai, S

    2009-04-23

    Direct and indirect radiation-induced DNA damage is associated with the formation of radical cations (G(+)) and radical anions (G(-)) of guanine, respectively. Deprotonation of G(+) and dehydrogenation of G(-) generate guanine neutral radical [G(-H)] and guanine anion [G(-H)(-)], respectively. These products are of worrisome concern, as they are involved in reactions that are related to certain lethal diseases. It has been observed that guanyl radicals can be repaired by amino acids having strong reducing properties that are believed to be the residues of DNA-bound proteins such as histones. As a result, repair of G(-H) and G(-H)(-) by the amino acids cysteine and tyrosine has been studied here in detail by density functional theory in both the gas phase and aqueous medium using the polarized continuum and Onsager solvation models of self-consistent reaction field theory. Solvation in aqueous medium using three explicit water molecules was also studied. Four equivalent tautomers of each the above radical and anion that will be formed through proton and hydrogen loss from all of the nitrogen centers of guanine radical cation and guanine radical anion, respectively, were considered in the present study. It was found that in both the gas phase and aqueous medium, normal guanine can be retrieved from its radical-damaged form by a hydrogen-atom-transfer (HT) mechanism. Normal guanine can also be retrieved from its anionic damaged form in both the gas phase and aqueous medium through a two-electron-coupled proton-transfer (TECPT) mechanism or a one-step hydrogen-atom- and electron-transfer (OSHET) mechanism. The present results are discussed in light of the experimental findings. PMID:19334703

  3. Glycinergic-Fipronil Uptake Is Mediated by an Amino Acid Carrier System and Induces the Expression of Amino Acid Transporter Genes in Ricinus communis Seedlings.

    PubMed

    Xie, Yun; Zhao, Jun-Long; Wang, Chuan-Wei; Yu, Ai-Xin; Liu, Niu; Chen, Li; Lin, Fei; Xu, Han-Hong

    2016-05-18

    Phloem-mobile insecticides are efficient for piercing and sucking insect control. Introduction of sugar or amino acid groups to the parent compound can improve the phloem mobility of insecticides, so a glycinergic-fipronil conjugate (GlyF), 2-(3-(3-cyano-1-(2,6-dichloro-4-(trifluoromethyl)phenyl)-4-((trifluoromethyl)sulfinyl)-1H-pyrazole-5-yl)ureido) acetic acid, was designed and synthesized. Although the "Kleier model" predicted that this conjugate is not phloem mobile, GlyF can be continually detected during a 5 h collection of Ricinus communis phloem sap. Furthermore, an R. communis seedling cotyledon disk uptake experiment demonstrates that the uptake of GlyF is sensitive to pH, carbonyl cyanide m-chlorophenylhydrazone (CCCP), temperature, and p-chloromercuribenzenesulfonic acid (pCMBS) and is likely mediated by amino acid carrier system. To explore the roles of amino acid transporters (AATs) in GlyF uptake, a total of 62 AAT genes were identified from the R. communis genome in silico. Phylogenetic analysis revealed that AATs in R. communis were organized into the ATF (amino acid transporter) and APC (amino acid, polyaminem and choline transporter) superfamilies, with five subfamilies in ATF and two in APC. Furthermore, the expression profiles of 20 abundantly expressed AATs (cycle threshold (Ct) values <27) were analyzed at 1, 3, and 6 h after GlyF treatment by RT-qPCR. The results demonstrated that expression levels of four AAT genes, RcLHT6, RcANT15, RcProT2, and RcCAT2, were induced by the GlyF treatment in R. communis seedlings. On the basis of the observation that the expression profile of the four candidate genes is similar to the time course observation for GlyF foliar disk uptake, it is suggested that those four genes are possible candidates involved in the uptake of GlyF. These results contribute to a better understanding of the mechanism of GlyF uptake as well as phloem loading from a molecular biology perspective and facilitate functional

  4. Fed levels of amino acids are required for the somatotropin-induced increase in muscle protein synthesis

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Chronic somatotropin (pST) treatment in pigs increases muscle protein synthesis and circulating insulin, a known promoter of protein synthesis. Previously, we showed that the pST-mediated rise in insulin could not account for the pST-induced increase in muscle protein synthesis when amino acids were...

  5. PROTON INDUCED GAMMA-RAY ANALYSIS OF ATMOSPHERIC AEROSOLS FOR CARBON, NITROGEN, AND SULFUR COMPOSITION

    EPA Science Inventory

    A technique for the simultaneous quantitative analysis of carbon, nitrogen, and sulfur using in-beam gamma-ray spectrometry has been developed for use with atmospheric aerosol samples. Samples are collected on quartz filters, and the aerosol composition is determined by analyzing...

  6. Involvement of ethylene in gibberellic acid-induced sulfur assimilation, photosynthetic responses, and alleviation of cadmium stress in mustard.

    PubMed

    Masood, Asim; Khan, M Iqbal R; Fatma, Mehar; Asgher, Mohd; Per, Tasir S; Khan, Nafees A

    2016-07-01

    The role of gibberellic acid (GA) or sulfur (S) in stimulation of photosynthesis is known. However, information on the involvement of ethylene in GA-induced photosynthetic responses and cadmium (Cd) tolerance is lacking. This work shows that ethylene is involved in S-assimilation, photosynthetic responses and alleviation of Cd stress by GA in mustard (Brassica juncea L.). Plants grown with 200 mg Cd kg(-1) soil were less responsive to ethylene despite high ethylene evolution and showed photosynthetic inhibition. Plants receiving 10 μM GA spraying plus 100 mg S kg(-1) soil supplementation exhibited increased S-assimilation and photosynthetic responses under Cd stress. Application of GA plus S decreased oxidative stress of plants grown with Cd and limited stress ethylene formation to the range suitable for promoting sulfur use efficiency (SUE), glutathione (GSH) production and photosynthesis. The role of ethylene in GA-induced S-assimilation and reversal of photosynthetic inhibition by Cd was substantiated by inhibiting ethylene biosynthesis with the use of aminoethoxyvinylglycine (AVG). The suppression of S-assimilation and photosynthetic responses by inhibiting ethylene in GA plus S treated plants under Cd stress indicated the involvement of ethylene in GA-induced S-assimilation and Cd stress alleviation. The outcome of the study is important to unravel the interaction between GA and ethylene and their role in Cd tolerance in plants. PMID:26998941

  7. Protective effect of ipratropium bromide on bronchoconstriction induced by sulfur dioxide exposure during apricot sufurization processes that causes asthma-like syndrome in agricultural environment.

    PubMed

    Yildirim, Zeki; Kilic, Talat; Koksal, Nurhan; Kotuk, Mahir

    2005-05-01

    We previously showed that apricot sulfurization workers are exposed to high concentrations of sulfur dioxide (SO2), resulting in an asthma-like syndrome. The aim of this study was to investigate whether pre-treatment of ipratropium bromide protects bronchoconstriction induced by SO2 exposure during apricot sulfurization processes that causes asthma-like syndrome. Firstly, pulmonary function tests were measured before and immediately after SO2 exposure due to processes of apricot sulfurization in 21 healthy volunteer apricot sulfurization workers who did not use any medication in apricot farms. One week later, same measurements were repeated in the same workers when they were working in same farm but they were administered two puffs of ipratropium bromide (20 microg per dose) before 30 min second SO2 exposure for protection of SO2-induced bronchoconstriction. Occupational SO2 exposure caused significant decrement in forced vital capacity (FVC), forced expiratory volume (FEV1) and forced mid-expiratory flow rate (FEF25-75%) in the worker and these decrements were prevented by ipratropium bromide given 30 min before SO2 exposure. This result suggests that pre-treatment of ipratropium bromide protects SO2-induced bronchoconstriction in healthy worker during apricot sulfurization processes that causes asthma-like syndrome in agricultural environment. PMID:15749463

  8. Continuous-flow determination of aqueous sulfur by atmospheric-pressure helium microwave-induced plasma atomic emission spectrometry with gas-phase sample introduction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nakahara, Taketoshi; Mori, Toshio; Morimoto, Satoru; Ishikawa, Hiroshi

    1995-06-01

    A simple continuous-flow generation of volatile hydrogen sulfide and sulfur dioxide by acidification of aqueous sulfide and sulfite ions, respectively, is described for the determination of low concentrations of sulfur by atmospheric-pressure helium microwave-induced plasma atomic emission spectrometry (MIP-AES) in the normal ultraviolet (UV) and vacuum ultraviolet (VUV) regions of the spectrum. For measuring spectral lines in the VUV region, the monochromator and the enclosed external optical path between the MIP source and the entrance slit of the monochromator have both been purged with nitrogen to minimize oxygen absorption below 190 nm. Sulfur atomic emission lines at 180.73, 182.04 and 217.05 nm have been selected as the analytical lines. Of the various acids examined, 1.0 M hydrochloric acid is the most favorable for both the generation of hydrogen sulfide from sulfide ions and sulfur dioxide from sulfite ions. Either generated hydrogen sulfide or sulfur dioxide is separated from the solution in a simple gas-liquid separator and swept into the helium stream of a microwave-induced plasma for analysis. The best attainable detection limits (3 σ criterion) for sulfur at 180.73 nm were 0.13 and 1.28 ng ml -1 for the generation of hydrogen sulfide and sulfur dioxide, respectively, with the corresponding background equivalent concentrations of 20.9 and 62.2 ng ml -1 in sulfur concentration. The typical analytical working graphs obtained under the optimized experimental conditions were rectilinear over approximately four orders of magnitude in sulfur concentration. The present method has been successfully applied to the recovery test of the sulfide spiked to waste water samples and to the determination of sulfite in some samples of commercially available wine.

  9. Comparative study of the oxidation behavior of sulfur-containing amino acids and glutathione by electrochemistry-mass spectrometry in the presence and absence of cisplatin.

    PubMed

    Zabel, Robert; Weber, Günther

    2016-02-01

    Small sulfur-containing compounds are involved in several important biochemical processes, including-but not limited to-redox regulation and drug conjugation/detoxification. While methods for stable redox pairs of such compounds (thiols/disulfides) are available, analytical data on more labile and short-lived redox intermediates are scarce, due to highly challenging analytical requirements. In this study, we employ the direct combination of reagentless electrochemical oxidation and mass spectrometric (EC-MS) identification for monitoring oxidation reactions of cysteine, N-acetylcysteine, methionine, and glutathione under simulated physiological conditions (pH 7.4, 37 °C). For the first time, all theoretically expected redox intermediates-with only one exception-are detected simultaneously and in situ, including sulfenic, sulfinic, and sulfonic acids, disulfides, thiosulfinates, thiosulfonates, and sulfoxides. By monitoring the time/potential-dependent interconversion of sulfur species, mechanistic oxidation routes are confirmed and new reactions detected, e.g., sulfenamide formation due to reaction with ammonia from the buffer. Furthermore, our results demonstrate a highly significant impact of cisplatin on the redox reactivity of sulfur species. Namely, the amount of thiol oxidation to sulfonic acid via sulfenic and sulfinic acid intermediates is diminished for glutathione in the presence of cisplatin in favor of the disulfide formation, while for N-acetylcysteine the contrary applies. N-acetylcysteine is the only ligand which displays enhanced oxidation currents upon cisplatin addition, accompanied by increased levels of thiosulfinate and thiosulfonate species. This is traced back to thiol reactivity and highlights the important role of sulfenic acid intermediates, which may function as a switch between different oxidation routes. PMID:26670772

  10. Surface-enhanced fluorescence and surface-enhanced Raman scattering of push-pull molecules: sulfur-functionalized 4-amino-7-nitrobenzofurazan adsorbed on Ag and Au nanostructured substrates.

    PubMed

    Muniz-Miranda, Maurizio; Del Rosso, Tommaso; Giorgetti, Emilia; Margheri, Giancarlo; Ghini, Giacomo; Cicchi, Stefano

    2011-04-01

    We investigated the chemisorption of self-assembled monolayers of sulfur-functionalized 4-amino-7-nitrobenzofurazan on gold and silver nanoisland films (NIFs) by means of surface-enhanced fluorescence (SEF) and surface-enhanced Raman scattering (SERS). The ligand is a push-pull molecule, where an intramolecular charge transfer occurs between an electron-donor and an electron-acceptor group, thus exhibiting nonlinear optical properties that are related to both SERS and SEF effects. The presence of different heteroatoms in the molecule ensures the possibility of chemical interaction with both silver and gold substrates. The SERS spectra suggest that furazan is bound to silver via lone pairs of the nitrogen atoms, whereas the ligand is linked to gold via a sulfur atom. Silver NIFs provide more efficient enhancement of both fluorescence and Raman scattering in comparison with gold NIFs. The present SEF and SERS investigation could provide useful information for foreseeing changes in the nonlinear responses of this push-pull molecule. PMID:21331491

  11. The dual role of sulfur-containing amino acids in the synthesis of IV-VI semiconductor nanocrystals: a mechanochemical approach.

    PubMed

    Baláž, Peter; Baláž, Matej; Caplovičová, Mária; Zorkovská, Anna; Caplovič, Lubomír; Psotka, Miroslav

    2014-01-01

    PbS@cystine nanocrystals were synthesized mechanochemically, with lead acetate and L-cystine being used as the lead and sulfur precursors, respectively. The resulting nanocrystals are 22-34 nm in size, well-faceted and octahedral in shape. Characterization by XRD, FT-IR, NMR, FE-SEM, EDS, TEM (HRTEM) and surface area measurement methods showed that the particles are single, defect-free crystals with a high crystallinity. Furthermore, the crystals were prepared using a solvent-free procedure that was performed under ambient temperature and atmospheric pressure. PMID:25406478

  12. Desorption-induced recombination-cationization of metal-adsorbate adducts from sulfur precovered Ru(0001)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cocco, R. A.; Tatarchuk, B. J.

    1990-03-01

    Temperature programmed static secondary ion mass spectrometry (TPSS) studies of pyrrole, furan and water on sulfur precovered Ru(0001) reveal significant increases in the coverage corrected adduct yield when these species desorb from the surface in an autocatalytic fashion. This effect has been attributed to an enhancement in the recombination-cationization rate which occurs when sputtered-ruthenium species contact desorbed organics just after leaving the surface. Adsorbates which do not undergo autocatalytic/explosive desorption do not exhibit this effect.

  13. Mutation-induced perturbation of the special pair P840 in the homodimeric reaction center in green sulfur bacteria

    PubMed Central

    Azai, Chihiro; Sano, Yuko; Kato, Yuki; Noguchi, Takumi; Oh-oka, Hirozo

    2016-01-01

    Homodimeric photosynthetic reaction centers (RCs) in green sulfur bacteria and heliobacteria are functional homologs of Photosystem (PS) I in oxygenic phototrophs. They show unique features in their electron transfer reactions; however, detailed structural information has not been available so far. We mutated PscA-Leu688 and PscA-Val689 to cysteine residues in the green sulfur bacterium Chlorobaculum tepidum; these residues were predicted to interact with the special pair P840, based on sequence comparison with PS I. Spectroelectrochemical measurements showed that the L688C and V689C mutations altered a near-infrared difference spectrum upon P840 oxidation, as well as the redox potential of P840. Light-induced Fourier transform infrared difference measurements showed that the L688C mutation induced a differential signal of the S-H stretching vibration in the P840+/P840 spectrum, as reported in P800+/P800 difference spectrum in a heliobacterial RC. Spectral changes in the 131-keto C=O region, caused by both mutations, revealed corresponding changes in the electronic structure of P840 and in the hydrogen-bonding interaction at the 131-keto C=O group. These results suggest that there is a common spatial configuration around the special pair sites among type 1 RCs. The data also provided evidence that P840 has a symmetric electronic structure, as expected from a homodimeric RC. PMID:26804137

  14. Thermally-Induced Chemistry and the Jovian Icy Satellites: A Laboratory Study of the Formation of Sulfur Oxyanions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Loeffler, Mark J.; Hudson, Reggie L.

    2011-01-01

    Laboratory experiments have demonstrated that magnetospheric radiation in the Jovian system drives reaction chemistry in ices at temperatures relevant to Europa and other icy satellites. Here we present new results on thermally-induced reactions at 50-100 K in solid H2O-SO2 mixtures, reactions that take place without the need for a high-radiation environment. We find that H2O and SO2 react to produce sulfur Oxyanions, such as bisulfite, that as much as 30% of the SO2 can be consumed through this reaction, and that the products remain in the ice when the temperature is lowered, indicating that these reactions are irreversible. Our results suggest that thermally-induced reactions can alter the chemistry at temperatures relevant to the icy satellites in the Jovian system.

  15. Valine entry into rat brain after diet-induced changes in plasma amino acids

    SciTech Connect

    Tews, J.K.; Greenwood, J.; Pratt, O.E.; Harper, A.E.

    1987-01-01

    Passage of amino acids across the blood-brain barrier is assumed to be modified by amino acid composition of the blood. To gain a better understanding of the effects of protein intake on brain amino acid uptake, the authors examined associations among diet, plasma amino acid patterns, and the rate of entry of valine into the brain. Rats were fed diets containing 6, 18, or 50% casein before receiving one meal of a diet containing 0, 6, 18, or 50% casein. After 4-7 h, they were anesthetized and infused intravenously with (/sup 14/C)valine for 5 min before plasma and brain samples were taken for determination of radioactivity and content of individual amino acids. As protein content of the meal was increased from 0 to 50% casein, plasma and brain concentrations of valine and most other large neutral amino acid (LNAA) increased severalfold; also the ratio of (/sup 14/C)valine in brain to that in plasma decreased by >50%, and the rate of valine entry into the brain increased 3.5-fold. The increase in valine flux slowed as plasma levels of LNAA, competitors for valine transport, increased. The results were far more dependent on protein content of the final meal than on that of the adaptation diet; thus changes in protein intake, as reflected in altered plasma amino acid patterns, markedly altered valine entry into the brain.

  16. Suppression of phase separation in solutions of bovine gamma IV-crystallin by polar modification of the sulfur-containing amino acids.

    PubMed Central

    Pande, J; Berland, C; Broide, M; Ogun, O; Melhuish, J; Benedek, G

    1991-01-01

    The calf lens protein gamma IV-crystallin, a strong determinant of the net phase-separation temperature of the lens, was chemically modified with N-bromoacetylethanolamine phosphate. The phase-separation temperatures of solutions of the modified protein were measured and found to be dramatically reduced with respect to those of the native protein. At neutral pH the reagent alkylates only the cysteine and methionine residues and introduces a doubly charged phosphate anion at a maximum distance of 10-12 A from the sulfur atoms. At a protein concentration of 38 g/liter, and with 30% of the cysteines and 40% of the methionines alkylated, the phase-separation temperature is lowered from approximately 25 +/- 2 degrees C to approximately 12 +/- 2 degrees C. The ascending limbs of the coexistence curves for the native and modified proteins were determined at two different degrees of modification. The coexistence curve of the protein with 35% of the cysteines and 40% of the methionines modified shows that as protein concentration approaches the critical concentration of 289 g/liter, there is a much larger suppression of the critical temperature, from approximately 38 +/- 2 degrees C in the native protein to approximately 16 +/- 2 degrees C. Incubation of intact calf lenses in vitro with the reagent results in the suppression of the phase-separation temperature by 3-9 degrees C. These results are consistent with the view that the observed suppression in the critical temperature is due to an increase in the hydrophilicity of the protein in the vicinity of the sulfur-containing residues. PMID:2052573

  17. Radiation-induced reactions of amino acids adsorbed on solid surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    López-Esquivel Kranksith, L.; Negrón-Mendoza, A.; Mosqueira, F. G.; Ramos-Bernal, Sergio

    2010-07-01

    The purpose of this work is to study the adsorption of compounds such as amino acids on clays and carbon nanotubes (CNTs) as a possible phase in the chemical evolution that may have occurred on the primitive Earth or in extraterrestrial environments. We further study the behavior of amino acids adsorbed on these solid surfaces at different conditions of pH and levels of irradiation, simulating a high-radiation field at early Earth conditions. The relevance of this work is to explain the possible contribution of solids (clays and CNTs) as promoters of polymerization and as shields for the adsorbed organic compounds against external sources of energy. To this end, tryptophan, aspartic acid, and glutamic acid were adsorbed on fixed amounts of solid surfaces and were irradiated by a 60Co source for different periods of time at fixed dose rates. After irradiation, the amino acids were extracted from the solid and analyzed with UV and IR spectroscopes and high-performance liquid chromatography. The most efficient surface for adsorption of amino acids was clay, followed by CNTs. Studies of the gamma irradiation of amino acids adsorbed on clay (in the solid phase) show a low yield of recovery of the amino acid.

  18. Dose-dependent effect of sulfur dioxide on brain damage induced by recurrent febrile seizures in rats.

    PubMed

    Han, Ying; Yi, Wenxia; Qin, Jiong; Zhao, Yang; Zhang, Jing; Chang, Xingzhi

    2014-03-20

    Sulfur dioxide (SO2) regulates many physiological processes. Little is known about its roles in neurological disorders. In this study, we investigated the role of endogenous SO2 in the development of febrile seizures (FS) and related brain damages. In the rat model of recurrent FS, we found that endogenous SO2 in the plasma and hippocampus was increased, accompanied by upregulation of aspartate amino-transferase 1 (AAT1) and AAT2, and neuronal apoptosis and mossy fiber sprouting (MFS) in the hippocampus. Preconditioning with low concentration of SO2 (1-10 μmol/kg) alleviated the neuronal damage, and attenuated neuronal apoptosis and MFS, whereas preconditioning with high concentration of SO2 (100 μmol/kg) or inhibition of AAT aggravated the neuronal damage, and promoted neuronal apoptosis and MFS in hippocampus of rats with recurrent FS. These data indicate that endogenous SO2 is involved in the development of FS and related brain damage. Preconditioning with low concentration of SO2 may protect neurons from toxicity caused by FS. PMID:24373994

  19. Promoters inducible by aromatic amino acids and γ-aminobutyrate (GABA) for metabolic engineering applications in Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    PubMed

    Kim, Sujin; Lee, Kyusung; Bae, Sang-Jeong; Hahn, Ji-Sook

    2015-03-01

    A wide range of promoters with different strengths and regulatory mechanisms are valuable tools in metabolic engineering and synthetic biology. While there are many constitutive promoters available, the number of inducible promoters is still limited for pathway engineering in Saccharomyces cerevisiae. Here, we constructed aromatic amino-acid-inducible promoters based on the binding sites of Aro80 transcription factor, which is involved in the catabolism of aromatic amino acids through transcriptional activation of ARO9 and ARO10 genes in response to aromatic amino acids. A dynamic range of tryptophan-inducible promoter strengths can be obtained by modulating the number of Aro80 binding sites, plasmid copy numbers, and tryptophan concentrations. Using low and high copy number plasmid vectors and different tryptophan concentrations, a 29-fold range of fluorescence intensities of enhanced green fluorescent protein (EGFP) reporter could be achieved from a synthetic U4C ARO9 promoter, which is composed of four repeats of Aro80 binding half site (CCG) and ARO9 core promoter element. The U4C ARO9 promoter was applied to express alsS and alsD genes from Bacillus subtilis for acetoin production in S. cerevisiae, resulting in a gradual increase in acetoin titers depending on tryptophan concentrations. Furthermore, we demonstrated that γ-aminobutyrate (GABA)-inducible UGA4 promoter, regulated by Uga3, can also be used in metabolic engineering as a dose-dependent inducible promoter. The wide range of controllable expression levels provided by these tryptophan- and GABA-inducible promoters might contribute to fine-tuning gene expression levels and timing for the optimization of pathways in metabolic engineering. PMID:25573467

  20. Tn5-induced mutations affecting sulfur-oxidizing ability (Sox) of Thiosphaera pantotropha.

    PubMed Central

    Chandra, T S; Friedrich, C G

    1986-01-01

    Mutants of Thiosphaera pantotropha defective in chemolithoautotrophic growth were obtained by transpositional mutagenesis with Tn5 coding for kanamycin resistance. The suicide vehicle for introducing Tn5 to T. pantotropha was pSUP5011 harbored by Escherichia coli. Kanamycin-resistant isolates were screened for the inability to grow with reduced sulfur compounds (Sox-). Four classes of Sox- mutants were obtained. Three were of different pleiotropic phenotypes: (i) unable to grow with formate, nitrate, and xanthine; (this class strongly suggested the involvement of a molybdenum cofactor in inorganic sulfur-oxidizing ability); (ii) no growth with hydrogen; (iii) slight growth with hydrogen and formate. Two plasmids, pHG41 (about 450 kilobase pairs) and pHG42 (110 kilobases), were identified in lysates of T. pantotropha. In one Sox- mutant pHG41 could not be detected. Revertant analysis suggested that pHG41 and pHG42 were not involved in the Sox character. Images PMID:3009400

  1. Tn5-induced mutations affecting sulfur-oxidizing ability (Sox) of Thiosphaera pantotropha

    SciTech Connect

    Chandra, T.S.; Friedrich, C.G.

    1986-05-01

    Mutants of Thiosphaera pantotropha defective in chemolithoautotrophic growth were obtained by transpositional mutagenesis with Tn5 coding for kanamycin resistance. The suicide vehicle for introducing Tn5 to T. pantotropha was pSUP5011 harbored by Escherichia coli. Kanamycin-resistant isolates were screened for the inability to grow with reduced sulfur compounds (Sox/sup -/). Four classes of Sox/sup -/ mutants were obtained. Three were of different pleiotropic phenotypes: (i) unable to grow with formate, nitrate, and xanthine; (this class strongly suggested the involvement of a molybdenum cofactor in inorganic sulfur-oxidizing ability); (ii) no growth with hydrogen; (iii) slight growth with hydrogen and formate. Two plasmids, pHG41 (about 450 kilobase pairs) and pHG42 (110 kilobases), were identified in lysates of T. pantotropha. In one Sox/sup -/ mutant pHG41 could not be detected. Revertant analysis suggested that pHG41 and pHG42 were not involved in the Sox character.

  2. Prey-induced changes in the accumulation of amino acids and phenolic metabolites in the leaves of Drosera capensis L.

    PubMed

    Kováčik, Jozef; Klejdus, Bořivoj; Stork, František; Hedbavny, Josef

    2012-04-01

    Effect of prey feeding (ants Formica fusca) on the quantitative changes in the accumulation of free amino acids, soluble proteins, phenolic metabolites and mineral nutrients in the leaves of carnivorous plant Drosera capensis was studied. Arginine was the most abundant compound in Drosera leaves, while proline was abundant in ants. The amount of the majority of amino acids and their sum were elevated in the fed leaves after 3 and 21 days, and the same, but with further enhancement after 21 days, was observed in ants. Accumulation of amino acids also increased in young non-fed leaves of fed plants. Soluble proteins decreased in ants, but were not enhanced in fed leaves. This confirms the effectiveness of sundew's enzymatic machinery in digestion of prey and suggests that amino acids are not in situ deposited, but rather are allocated within the plant. The content of total soluble phenols, flavonoids and two selected flavonols (quercetin and kaempferol) was not affected by feeding in Drosera leaves, indicating that their high basal level was sufficient for the plant's metabolism and prey-induced changes were mainly N based. The prey also showed to be an important source of other nutrients besides N, and a stimulation of root uptake of some mineral nutrients is assumed (Mg, Cu, Zn). Accumulation of Ca and Na was not affected by feeding. PMID:21140278

  3. Simultaneous determination of amino acids in tea leaves by micellar electrokinetic chromatography with laser-induced fluorescence detection.

    PubMed

    Yan, Jin; Cai, Yuanli; Wang, Yufei; Lin, Xia; Li, Hui

    2014-01-15

    A rapid and effective method of micellar electrokinetic chromatography with laser-induced fluorescence detection was developed for the simultaneous determination of amino acids in tea leaves. Pre-column derivatization of the analytes used 4-chloro-7-nitrobenzofurazan (NDB-Cl). Optimal separation was achieved at +20kV using an uncoated fused silica capillary (40.0cm effective length, 50.2cm total length, 75μm internal diameter), as well as 20mM sodium borate (pH 8.5), 20mM Brij 35, and acetonitrile 10% (v/v) as running buffers. Within 11min, 15 amino acids were separated completely. The optimized method demonstrated good linearity (r(2)⩾0.9990), precision (⩽6.65%), accuracy (85.50-112.74%), and sensitivity (0.1ng/mL-100ng/mL). The method successfully determined the quantity of amino acids in five different tea leaves; furthermore, theanine was identified as the most abundant amino acid in teas. The proposed method showed great potential in further investigations on the biofunctions of different tea samples. PMID:24054216

  4. Sulfur Mustard

    MedlinePlus

    ... the environment. Sulfur mustard was introduced in World War I as a chemical warfare agent. Historically it ... fatal. When sulfur mustard was used during World War I, it killed fewer than 5% of the ...

  5. Strategies for the allocation of resources under sulfur limitation in the green alga Dunaliella salina.

    PubMed

    Giordano, M; Pezzoni, V; Hell, R

    2000-10-01

    The effect of sulfur limitation on the partitioning of carbon, nitrogen, and sulfur was investigated in Dunaliella salina. D. salina was able to adapt to 6 microM sulfate; under these conditions, the cells showed reduced growth and photosynthetic rates. Whereas intracellular sulfate was depleted, phosphate, nitrate, and ammonium increased. Amino acids showed a general increase, and alanine became the most abundant amino acid. The activities of four key enzymes of carbon, sulfur, and nitrogen metabolism were differentially regulated: Adenosine 5' triphosphate sulfurylase activity increased 4-fold, nitrate reductase and phosphoenolpyruvate (PEP) carboxylase activities decreased 4- and 11-fold, respectively, whereas carbonic anhydrase activity remained unchanged. Sulfur limitation elicited specific increase or decrease of the abundance of several proteins, such us Rubisco, PEP carboxylase, and a light harvesting complex protein. The accumulation of potentially toxic ammonium indicates an insufficient availability of carbon skeletons. Sulfur deficiency thus induces an imbalance between carbon and nitrogen. The dramatic reduction in PEP carboxylase activity suggests that carbon was diverted away from anaplerosis and possibly channeled into C3 metabolism. These results indicate that it is the coordination of key steps and components of carbon, nitrogen, and sulfur metabolism that allows D. salina to adapt to prolonged sulfur limitation. PMID:11027733

  6. Massive impact-induced release of carbon and sulfur gases in the early Earth's atmosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marchi, S.; Black, B. A.; Elkins-Tanton, L. T.; Bottke, W. F.

    2016-09-01

    Recent revisions to our understanding of the collisional history of the Hadean and early-Archean Earth indicate that large collisions may have been an important geophysical process. In this work we show that the early bombardment flux of large impactors (>100 km) facilitated the atmospheric release of greenhouse gases (particularly CO2) from Earth's mantle. Depending on the timescale for the drawdown of atmospheric CO2, the Earth's surface could have been subject to prolonged clement surface conditions or multiple freeze-thaw cycles. The bombardment also delivered and redistributed to the surface large quantities of sulfur, one of the most important elements for life. The stochastic occurrence of large collisions could provide insights on why the Earth and Venus, considered Earth's twin planet, exhibit radically different atmospheres.

  7. Regional river sulfur runoff

    SciTech Connect

    Husar, R.B.; Husar, J.D.

    1985-01-20

    The water and sulfur runoff data for 54 large river basins were assembled, covering 65% of the nondesert land area of the world. The sulfur concentration ranges from 0.5 mg S/L for the West African rivers Niger and Volta to 100 mg S/L in the Colorado River; the world average is 3.2 mg S/L. The concentrations in central and eastern Europe as well as central and eastern North America exceed 8 mg S/L. The sulfur runoff density is also highest in the river basins over these industrialized regions, exceeding 2 g S/m/sup 2//yr. However, high sulfur runoff density in excess of 3 g S/m/sup 2//yr is also measured over the Pacific islands New Zealand and New Guinea and the archipelagos of Indonesia and the Philippines. The natural background sulfur runoff was estimated by assuming that South America, Africa, Australia, and the Pacific Islands are unperturbed by man and that the average river sulfur concentration is in the range 1--3 mg S/L. Taking these background concentration values, the man-induced sulfur runoff for Europe ranges between 2 and 8 times the natural flow, and over North America, man's contribution ranges between 1 and 5 times the natural runoff. The global sulfur flow from nondesert land to the oceans and the Caspian Sea is estimated as 131 Tg S/yr, of which 46--85 Tg S/yr is attributed to natural causes. The regional river sulfur runoff pattern discussed in this paper does not have enough spatial resolution to be directly applicable to studies of the environmental effects of man-induced sulfur flows. However, it points to the continental-size regions where those perturbations are most evident and to the magnitude of the perturbations as expressed in units of the natural flows.

  8. Regional river sulfur runoff

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Husar, Rudolf B.; Husar, Janja Djukic

    1985-01-01

    The water and sulfur runoff data for 54 large river basins were assembled, covering 65% of the nondesert land area of the world. The sulfur concentration ranges from 0.5 mg S/L for the West African rivers Niger and Volta to 100 mg S/L in the Colorado River; the world average is 3.2 mg S/L. The concentrations in central and eastern Europe as well as central and eastern North America exceed 8 mg S/L. The sulfur runoff density is also highest in the river basins over these industrialized regions, exceeding 2 g S/m2/yr. However, high sulfur runoff density in excess of 3 g S/m2/yr is also measured over the Pacific islands New Zealand and New Guinea and the archipelagos of Indonesia and the Philippines. The natural background sulfur runoff was estimated by assuming that South America, Africa, Australia, and the Pacific Islands are unperturbed by man and that the average river sulfur concentration is in the range 1-3 mg S/L. Taking these background concentration values, the man-induced sulfur runoff for Europe ranges between 2 and 8 times the natural flow, and over North America, man's contribution ranges between 1 and 5 times the natural runoff. The global sulfur flow from nondesert land to the oceans and the Caspian Sea is estimated as 131 Tg S/yr, of which 46-85 Tg S/yr is attributed to natural causes. The regional river sulfur runoff pattern discussed in this paper does not have enough spatial resolution to be directly applicable to studies of the environmental effects of man-induced sulfur flows. However, it points to the continental-size regions where those perturbations are most evident and to the magnitude of the perturbations as expressed in units of the natural flows.

  9. Requirement for alanine in the amino acid control of deprivation-induced protein degradation in liver.

    PubMed Central

    Pösö, A R; Mortimore, G E

    1984-01-01

    Protein degradation in liver is actively controlled by a small group of inhibitory amino acids--leucine, tyrosine (or phenylalanine), glutamine, proline, histidine, tryptophan, and methionine. Other evidence, however, suggests that one or more of the remaining 12 noninhibitory amino acids is also required for suppression of proteolysis at normal concentrations. This question was investigated in livers of fed rats perfused in the single-pass mode. The deletion of alanine at normal (1x), but not at 4x or 10x normal, plasma amino acid concentrations evoked a near-maximal acceleration of protein degradation. No other noninhibitory amino acid was effective. Because alanine alone was not directly inhibitory and its omission was not associated with a decrease in inhibitory amino acid pools, alanine was presumed to act as a coregulator in the expression of inhibitory activity. When tested alone, the inhibitory group was as effective as the complete mixture at 0.5x and 4x levels, but it lost its suppressive ability within a narrow zone of concentration centered slightly above 1x. The addition of 1x (0.48 mM) alanine completely restored the inhibition. Pyruvate and lactate could be effectively substituted, but only at concentrations 10-20 times greater than that of alanine. These, together with earlier findings, indicate the existence of a regulatory complex that recognizes specific amino acids and transmits positive and negative signals to proteolytic sites. The results also suggest that alanine can provide an important regulatory link between energy demands and protein degradation. PMID:6589593

  10. [Amino acids in saliva].

    PubMed

    Klinger, G; Gruhn, K

    1984-01-01

    Total amino acids in saliva and free and peptide-bound amino acids from 21 saliva samples were determined. The contents of amino acids was 25 mmol/1; total nitrogen content was 78-80 mmol/1. Amino acids consist of Prolin in 25%. Some patients were examined before and after application of the depot estrogen ethinyl estradiosulfonat, which stimulates the assimilation of protein. After application, amino acids increased and the authors found a shift between the single amino acids. Estrogen medication induced an increase in proteins with the character of collagens. Clinical effects are discussed. (author's modified) PMID:6240853

  11. Beyond the role of dietary protein and amino acids in the prevention of diet-induced obesity.

    PubMed

    Petzke, Klaus J; Freudenberg, Anne; Klaus, Susanne

    2014-01-01

    High-protein diets have been shown to prevent the development of diet-induced obesity and can improve associated metabolic disorders in mice. Dietary leucine supplementation can partially mimic this effect. However, the molecular mechanisms triggering these preventive effects remain to be satisfactorily explained. Here we review studies showing a connection between high protein or total amino nitrogen intake and obligatory water intake. High amino nitrogen intake may possibly lower lipid storage, and prevent insulin resistance. Suggestions are made for further systematical studies to explore the relationship between water consumption, satiety, and energy expenditure. Moreover, these examinations should better distinguish between leucine-specific and unspecific effects. Research in this field can provide important information to justify dietary recommendations and strategies in promoting long-term weight loss and may help to reduce health problems associated with the comorbidities of obesity. PMID:24447927

  12. Oxalicumone A, a new dihydrothiophene-condensed sulfur chromone induces apoptosis in leukemia cells through endoplasmic reticulum stress pathway.

    PubMed

    Wang, Jie; Wang, Qiao-Li; Nong, Xu-Hua; Zhang, Xiao-Yong; Xu, Xin-Ya; Qi, Shu-Hua; Wang, Yi-Fei

    2016-07-15

    Oxalicumone A (POA1), a novel dihydrothiophene-condensed sulfur chromone isolated from the marine fungus Penicillium oxalicum SCSGAF 0023, showed cytotoxicity against several cancer cells previously. In this study, its anti-cancer activity and underlying mechanism of this action were investigated in leukemia cells like KG-1a, HL60, U937, and K562. The results showed that POA1 inhibited dose-/time-dependently cell growth and induced apoptosis in leukemia cells. Also, POA1 caused cleavages of caspase-3, 8, 9 and PARP1, loss of mitochondrial membrane potential, up-regulations of phosphorylated p38 and JNK, and activation of endoplasmic reticulum stress (ER stress). Furthermore, 4-PBA (an ER stress inhibitor) but not SP600125 and SB203580 (JNK and p38 inhibitor, respectively) could largely inhibit POA1-induced growth suppression. Additionally, 4-PBA obstructed mitochondrial depolarization and cleavage of PARP1. These data suggested that ER stress pathway might be an important mediator in POA1-induced apoptosis. In conclusion, POA1 may have antitumor effects in leukemia cells through the induction of ER stress pathway. PMID:27132813

  13. Protective effects of salicylic acid and vitamin C on sulfur dioxide-induced lipid peroxidation in mice.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Huiping; Xu, Xin; Na, Jie; Hao, Lin; Huang, Linli; Li, Guangzhe; Xu, Qiang

    2008-07-01

    The antioxidant effects of exogenous salicylic acid (SA) and vitamin C (Vit C) on the oxidative stress induced by 56 mg/m(3) of sulfur dioxide (SO2) in mouse livers and brains were investigated. The exposure of SO2 caused significant elevation of thiobarbituric acid-reactive substance (TBARS) levels and reduction of enzyme activities of superoxide dismutase (SOD), peroxidase (POD), and catalase (CAT) in brain and liver, accompanied by a decrease in relative growth rate, when compared with controls. Application of moderate concentrations of SA and Vit C markedly reduced the SO2-induced elevation of TBARS levels, with 5.5 mg/kg SA or 200 mg/kg Vit C being most effective. In contrast to the decrease of TBARS levels, the levels of SOD, POD, and CAT in liver and brain were significantly increased in comparison with controls. The polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (PAGE) of total liver proteins showed that the SO2 inhalation caused a 30-kD protein band disappearance compared with the control. However, the band remained unchanged in the samples treated with 5.5 and 8.25 mg/kg SA or 100, 200, and 400 mg/kg Vit C. Therefore, this protein band may serve as a marker for the damage induced by SO2 and an additional basis for drug screening and selection. PMID:18645726

  14. Long-term leucine induced stimulation of muscle protein synthesis is amino acid dependent

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Infusing leucine for 1 h increases skeletal muscle protein synthesis in the neonate, but this is not sustained for 2 h unless the corresponding fall in amino acids is prevented. This study aimed to determine whether a continuous leucine infusion can stimulate protein synthesis for a prolonged period...

  15. Ligand binding induces an ammonia channel in 2-amino-2-desoxyisochorismate (ADIC) synthase PhzE

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    PhzE utilizes chorismate and glutamine to synthesize 2-amino-2-desoxyisochorismate (ADIC) in the first step of phenazine biosynthesis. At variance with the related anthranilate synthase, the monomer of PhzE consists of a single chain that contains both a chorismate-converting domain of the menaquino...

  16. Amino acids

    MedlinePlus

    Amino acids are organic compounds that combine to form proteins . Amino acids and proteins are the building blocks of life. When proteins are digested or broken down, amino acids are left. The human body uses amino acids ...

  17. Awake craniotomy induces fewer changes in the plasma amino acid profile than craniotomy under general anesthesia.

    PubMed

    Hol, Jaap W; Klimek, Markus; van der Heide-Mulder, Marieke; Stronks, Dirk; Vincent, Arnoud J; Klein, Jan; Zijlstra, Freek J; Fekkes, Durk

    2009-04-01

    In this prospective, observational, 2-armed study, we compared the plasma amino acid profiles of patients undergoing awake craniotomy to those undergoing craniotomy under general anesthesia. Both experimental groups were also compared with a healthy, age-matched and sex-matched reference group not undergoing surgery. It is our intention to investigate whether plasma amino acid levels provide information about physical and emotional stress, as well as pain during awake craniotomy versus craniotomy under general anesthesia. Both experimental groups received preoperative, perioperative, and postoperative dexamethasone. The plasma levels of 20 amino acids were determined preoperative, perioperative, and postoperatively in all groups and were correlated with subjective markers for pain, stress, and anxiety. In both craniotomy groups, preoperative levels of tryptophan and valine were significantly decreased whereas glutamate, alanine, and arginine were significantly increased relative to the reference group. Throughout time, tryptophan levels were significantly lower in the general anesthesia group versus the awake craniotomy group. The general anesthesia group had a significantly higher phenylalanine/tyrosine ratio, which may suggest higher oxidative stress, than the awake group throughout time. Between experimental groups, a significant increase in large neutral amino acids was found postoperatively in awake craniotomy patients, pain was also less and recovery was faster. A significant difference in mean hospitalization time was also found, with awake craniotomy patients leaving after 4.53+/-2.12 days and general anesthesia patients after 6.17+/-1.62 days; P=0.012. This study demonstrates that awake craniotomy is likely to be physically and emotionally less stressful than general anesthesia and that amino acid profiling holds promise for monitoring postoperative pain and recovery. PMID:19295387

  18. p38 MAPK is involved in human neutrophil chemotaxis induced by L-amino acid oxidase from Calloselasma rhodosthoma.

    PubMed

    Pontes, Adriana S; Setúbal, Sulamita da S; Nery, Neriane Monteiro; da Silva, Francisquinha Souza; da Silva, Silvana D; Fernandes, Carla F C; Stábeli, Rodrigo G; Soares, Andreimar M; Zuliani, Juliana P

    2016-09-01

    The action of LAAO, an L-amino acid oxidase isolated from Calloselasma rhodosthoma snake venom, on isolated human neutrophil function was investigated. Cr-LAAO showed no toxicity on neutrophils. Cr-LAAO in its native form induced the neutrophil chemotaxis, suggesting that its primary structure is essential for stimulation the cell. p38 MAPK and PI3K have a role as signaling pathways of CR-LAAO induced chemotaxis. This toxin also induced the production of hydrogen peroxide and stimulated phagocytosis in neutrophils. Furthermore, Cr-LAAO was able to stimulate neutrophils to release IL-6, IL-8, MPO, LTB4 and PGE2. Together, the data showed that the Cr-LAAO triggers relevant proinflammatory events. PMID:27242041

  19. Evaluation of protein content, lysine and sulfur-containing amino acids content and electrophoretic patterns of soluble proteins for gamma-irradiated semolina before and after milling of durum wheat

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Azzeh, F. S.; Amr, A. S.

    2009-11-01

    Influenced of gamma irradiation (0, 0.25, 1, 2.5, 5 and 10 kGy) on total nitrogen, lysine and sulfur-containing amino acids content and electrophoretic patterns of soluble proteins of semolina was studied. The effect of irradiation before and after milling on previous parameters was also investigated. Protein content of semolina was not affected with gamma irradiation before and after milling. Up to 10 kGy dose, cystine and methionine were not significantly changed, although they increased slightly with increasing irradiation dose. Lysine content decreased significantly ( P≤0.05) at irradiation dose higher than 5 kGy. At 10 kGy dose, lysine decreased 5% and 14% for irradiated semolina and that obtained from irradiated wheat grains, respectively. The bands number and intensity of soluble proteins decreased with increasing irradiation dose higher than 5 kGy, as shown on SDS-PAGE electrophoresis. Irradiated semolina and semolina obtained from irradiated wheat grains at 10 kGy showed 13 and 15 bands, respectively. Unirradiated sample showed 19 bands.

  20. Inhalation Exposure Systems for the Development of Rodent Models of Sulfur Mustard-Induced Pulmonary Injury

    PubMed Central

    Weber, Waylon M.; Kracko, Dean A.; Lehman, Mericka R.; Irvin, Clinton M.; Blair, Lee F.; White, Richard K.; Benson, Janet M.; Grotendorst, Gary R.; Cheng, Yung-Sung; McDonald, Jacob D.

    2011-01-01

    Sulfur mustard (SM) is a chemical threat agent for which its effects have no current treatment. Due to the ease of synthesis and dispersal of this material, the need to develop therapeutics is evident. The present manuscript details the techniques used to develop SM laboratory exposure systems for the development of animal models of pulmonary injury. These models are critical for evaluating SM injury and developing therapeutics against that injury. Iterative trials were conducted to optimize a lung injury model. The resulting pathology was used as a guide, with a goal of effecting homogeneous and diffuse lung injury comparable to that of human injury. Inhalation exposures were conducted by either nose-only inhalation or intubated inhalation. The exposures were conducted to either directly vaporized SM or SM that was nebulized from an ethanol solution. Inhalation of SM by nose-only inhalation resulted in severe nasal epithelial degeneration and minimal lung injury. The reactivity of SM did not permit it to transit past the upper airways to promote lower airway injury. Intratracheal inhalation of SM vapors at a concentration of 5400 mg · min/m3 resulted in homogeneous lung injury with no nasal degeneration. PMID:20025432

  1. Sulfur mustard inhalation induced respiratory lesions in guinea pigs: Physiological, biochemical, and histological study

    SciTech Connect

    Allon, N.; Gilat, E.; Amir, A.; Fishbine, E.; Liani, H.

    1993-05-13

    Inhalation exposure to sulfur mustard (SM) vapor causes long term damage to the respiratory system. The lesions were characterized by specific physiological, biochemical and histopathological methods. Awake 128 guinea-pigs (GP) were exposed for 10 min to SM (1200-1700 microns x min/1). Respiratory parameters were monitored per animal before, during and after the exposure using plethysmography. Biochemical and histological evaluations were performed at different time intervals for up to 7 days post exposure. SM inhalation resulted in a decrease in both respiratory rate and minute volume, and in an increase in tidal volume. These changes occurred immediately after the onset of exposure and lasted for up to 7 days. The changes in the respiratory parameters were accompanied by a massive reduction in O2 diffusion capacity. Evaluation of bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL) fluid indicated neutrophil infiltration, an increase in the protein content, and in the activity of both lysosomal enzymes and lactic dehydrogenase (LDH) in the alveolar space. In addition, a decrease in glutathione content was observed one day post exposure in the BAL fluid and the lung whereas an increase in lung glutathione content was observed 6 days later. Histological evaluation of the lungs and trachea revealed severe lesions in both tissues. Recovery was incomplete 7 days post exposure. The detailed characterization of the effect of SM inhalation offers a reliable model for the evaluation of potential therapies against SM exposure.

  2. Application of Microwave-Induced Combustion and Isotope Dilution Strategies for Quantification of Sulfur in Coals via Sector-Field Inductively Coupled Plasma Mass Spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Christopher, Steven J; Vetter, Thomas W

    2016-05-01

    In recent years, microwave-induced combustion (MIC) has proved to be a robust sample preparation technique for difficult-to-digest samples containing high carbon content, especially for determination of halogens and sulfur. National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST) has applied the MIC methodology in combination with isotope dilution analysis for sulfur determinations, representing the first-reported combination of this robust sample preparation methodology and high-accuracy quantification approach. Medium-resolution mode sector-field inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry was invoked to avoid spectral interferences on the sulfur isotopes. The sample preparation and instrumental analysis scheme was used for the value assignment of total sulfur in Standard Reference Material (SRM) 2682c Subbituminous Coal (nominal mass fraction 0.5% sulfur). A description of the analytical procedures required is provided, along with metrological results, including an estimation of the overall method uncertainty (<1.5% relative expanded uncertainty) calculated using the IDMS measurement function and a Kragten spreadsheet approach. PMID:27032706

  3. The Mixture of Salvianolic Acids from Salvia miltiorrhiza and Total Flavonoids from Anemarrhena asphodeloides Attenuate Sulfur Mustard-Induced Injury

    PubMed Central

    Li, Jianzhong; Chen, Linlin; Wu, Hongyuan; Lu, Yiming; Hu, Zhenlin; Lu, Bin; Zhang, Liming; Chai, Yifeng; Zhang, Junping

    2015-01-01

    Sulfur mustard (SM) is a vesicating chemical warfare agent used in numerous military conflicts and remains a potential chemical threat to the present day. Exposure to SM causes the depletion of cellular antioxidant thiols, mainly glutathione (GSH), which may lead to a series of SM-associated toxic responses. MSTF is the mixture of salvianolic acids (SA) of Salvia miltiorrhiza and total flavonoids (TFA) of Anemarrhena asphodeloides. SA is the main water-soluble phenolic compound in Salvia miltiorrhiza. TFA mainly includes mangiferin, isomangiferin and neomangiferin. SA and TFA possess diverse activities, including antioxidant and anti-inflammation activities. In this study, we mainly investigated the therapeutic effects of MSTF on SM toxicity in Sprague Dawley rats. Treatment with MSTF 1 h after subcutaneous injection with 3.5 mg/kg (equivalent to 0.7 LD50) SM significantly increased the survival levels of rats and attenuated the SM-induced morphological changes in the testis, small intestine and liver tissues. Treatment with MSTF at doses of 60 and 120 mg/kg caused a significant (p < 0.05) reversal in SM-induced GSH depletion. Gene expression profiles revealed that treatment with MSTF had a dramatic effect on gene expression changes caused by SM. Treatment with MSTF prevented SM-induced differential expression of 93.8% (973 genes) of 1037 genes. Pathway enrichment analysis indicated that these genes were mainly involved in a total of 36 pathways, such as the MAPK signaling pathway, pathways in cancer, antigen processing and presentation. These data suggest that MSTF attenuates SM-induced injury by increasing GSH and targeting multiple pathways, including the MAPK signaling pathway, as well as antigen processing and presentation. These results suggest that MSTF has the potential to be used as a potential therapeutic agent against SM injuries. PMID:26501264

  4. The Mixture of Salvianolic Acids from Salvia miltiorrhiza and Total Flavonoids from Anemarrhena asphodeloides Attenuate Sulfur Mustard-Induced Injury.

    PubMed

    Li, Jianzhong; Chen, Linlin; Wu, Hongyuan; Lu, Yiming; Hu, Zhenlin; Lu, Bin; Zhang, Liming; Chai, Yifeng; Zhang, Junping

    2015-01-01

    Sulfur mustard (SM) is a vesicating chemical warfare agent used in numerous military conflicts and remains a potential chemical threat to the present day. Exposure to SM causes the depletion of cellular antioxidant thiols, mainly glutathione (GSH), which may lead to a series of SM-associated toxic responses. MSTF is the mixture of salvianolic acids (SA) of Salvia miltiorrhiza and total flavonoids (TFA) of Anemarrhena asphodeloides. SA is the main water-soluble phenolic compound in Salvia miltiorrhiza. TFA mainly includes mangiferin, isomangiferin and neomangiferin. SA and TFA possess diverse activities, including antioxidant and anti-inflammation activities. In this study, we mainly investigated the therapeutic effects of MSTF on SM toxicity in Sprague Dawley rats. Treatment with MSTF 1 h after subcutaneous injection with 3.5 mg/kg (equivalent to 0.7 LD50) SM significantly increased the survival levels of rats and attenuated the SM-induced morphological changes in the testis, small intestine and liver tissues. Treatment with MSTF at doses of 60 and 120 mg/kg caused a significant (p<0.05) reversal in SM-induced GSH depletion. Gene expression profiles revealed that treatment with MSTF had a dramatic effect on gene expression changes caused by SM. Treatment with MSTF prevented SM-induced differential expression of 93.8% (973 genes) of 1037 genes. Pathway enrichment analysis indicated that these genes were mainly involved in a total of 36 pathways, such as the MAPK signaling pathway, pathways in cancer, antigen processing and presentation. These data suggest that MSTF attenuates SM-induced injury by increasing GSH and targeting multiple pathways, including the MAPK signaling pathway, as well as antigen processing and presentation. These results suggest that MSTF has the potential to be used as a potential therapeutic agent against SM injuries. PMID:26501264

  5. Soft X-ray-induced decomposition of amino acids: An XPS, massspectrometry, and NEXAFS study

    SciTech Connect

    Zubavichus, Y.; Fuchs, O.; Weinhardt, L.; Heske, C.; Umbach, E.; Denlinger, J.D.; Grunze, M.

    2003-02-26

    Decomposition of five amino acids, viz. alanine, serine,cysteine, aspartic acid, and asparagine under soft X-ray irradiation (MgKα X-ray source) in ultra-high vacuum has been studied by meansof XPS and mass-spectrometry. A comparative analysis of changes in XPSline shapes, stoichiometry, and residual gas composition indicates thatthe molecules decompose via severalpathways. Dehydration,decarboxylation, decarbonylation, deamination, and desulfurization ofpristine molecules accompanied by desorption of H2, H2O, CO2, CO, NH3,H2S are observed with rates depending on the specific amino acid. NEXAFSspectra of cysteine at the C, O, N K- and S L2,3-edges complement the XPSand mass-spectrometry data and show that exposure of the sample to anintense soft X-ray synchrotron beam results in a formation of C-C and C-Ndouble and triple bonds. Qualitatively, the studied amino acids can bearranged in the following ascending order for radiation stability: serine

  6. Amino acid induced fractal aggregation of gold nanoparticles: Why and how.

    PubMed

    Doyen, Matthieu; Goole, Jonathan; Bartik, Kristin; Bruylants, Gilles

    2016-02-15

    Gold colloids are the object of many studies as they are reported to have potential biological sensing, imaging and drug delivery applications. In the presence of certain amino acids the aggregation of the gold nanoparticles into linear structures is observed, as highlighted by the appearance of a second plasmon band in the UV-Vis spectra of the colloid. The mechanism behind this phenomenon is still under debate. In order to help elucidate this issue, the interaction between gold colloids and different amino acids, modified amino acids and molecules mimicking their side-chain was monitored by UV-Vis absorption, DLS and TEM. The results show that phenomenon can be rationalized in terms of the Diffusion Limited Colloid Aggregation (DLCA) model which gives rise to the fractal aggregation colloids. The global charge of the compound, which influences the ionic strength of the solution, and the ease with which the compound can interact with the GNPs and affect their surface potential, are, the two parameters which control the DLCA regime. Calculations based on the Derjaguin, Landau, Verwey and Overbeek (DLVO) theory confirm all the experimental observations. PMID:26613335

  7. Sulfur mustard-induced increase in intracellular calcium: A mechanism of mustard toxicity

    SciTech Connect

    Ray, R.; Majerus, B.J.; Munavalli, G.S.; Petrali, J.P.

    1993-05-13

    The effect of sulfur mustard SM, bis-(2-chloroethyl) sulfide on intracellular free Ca2+ concentration (Ca2+)i was studied in vitro using the clonal mouse neuroblastoma-rat glioma hybrid NG108-15 and primary normal human epidermal keratinocyte (NHEK) cell culture models. SM depletes cellular glutathione (GSH) and thus may inhibit GSH-dependent Ca2+-ATPase (Ca2+ pump), leading to a high (Ca2+) and consequent cellular toxicity. Following 0.3 mM SM exposure, GSH levels decreased 20-34% between 1-6 hr in NG108-15 cells. SM increased (Ca2+)i, measured using the Ca2+-specific fluorescent probe Fluo-3 AM, in both NG108-15 cells (1030% between 2-6 hr) and NHEK (23-30% between 0.5-3 hr) . Depletion of cellular GSH by buthionine sulfoximine (1 mM), a specific GSH biosynthesis inhibitor, also increased Ca2+, (88% at 1 hr) in NHEK, suggesting that GSH depletion may lead to increased (Ca2+)i. Calcium, localized cytochemically with antimony, accumulated in increased amounts around mitochondria and endoplasmic reticula, in the cytosol, and in particular in the euchromatin regions of the nucleus beginning at 6 hr after 0.3 mM SM exposure of NG108-15 cells. Cell membrane integrity examined with the fluorescent membrane probe calcein AM was unaffected through 6 hr following 1 mM SM exposure; and cell viability (NG108-15 cells) measured by trypan blue exclusion was >80% of control through 9 hr following 0.3 mM SM exposure.

  8. Influence of Sulfur Induced Stress on Oxidative Status and Antioxidative Machinery in Leaves of Allium cepa L.

    PubMed

    Chandra, Neelam; Pandey, Nalini

    2014-01-01

    A pot culture experiment was carried out to assess the effect of sulfur stress on growth, oxidative status, and antioxidative metabolism. Onion plants were treated with three different levels of sulfur, namely, 1.0, 4.0, and 8.0 mM S L(-1). Plants raised with 4.0 mM S L(-1) represent sufficient growth for the best vegetative yield. Plants supplied with 1.0 and 8.0 mM S L(-1) showed retarded growth, chlorosis, and reduction in biomass and photoassimilatory pigments. Tissue sulfur concentration and cysteine were increased with increasing sulfur supply. Carbohydrates (sugars and starch) were accumulated in sulfur stressed plants. Hydrogen peroxide levels were increased in sulfur stressed plants. Thiobarbituric acid reactive substances levels were also increased which was an indicator of lipid peroxidation. Enzymatic (superoxide dismutase, catalase, peroxidase, ascorbate peroxidase, and glutathione reductase) and nonenzymatic (asorbate) antioxidative components were enhanced in sulfur stressed plants. Glutathione was increased with increasing sulfur supply. The present study showed that the adverse effects of inadequate sulfur supply result in irregular metabolic activities and antioxidant machinery. PMID:27379315

  9. Sulfur Cycle

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hariss, R.; Niki, H.

    1985-01-01

    Among the general categories of tropospheric sulfur sources, anthropogenic sources have been quantified the most accurately. Research on fluxes of sulfur compounds from volcanic sources is now in progress. Natural sources of reduced sulfur compounds are highly variable in both space and time. Variables, such as soil temperature, hydrology (tidal and water table), and organic flux into the soil, all interact to determine microbial production and subsequent emissions of reduced sulfur compounds from anaerobic soils and sediments. Available information on sources of COS, CS2, DMS, and H2S to the troposphere in the following paragraphs are summarized; these are the major biogenic sulfur species with a clearly identified role in tropospheric chemistry. The oxidation of SO2 to H2SO4 can often have a significant impact on the acidity of precipitation. A schematic representation of some important transformations and sinks for selected sulfur species is illustrated.

  10. Cytotoxic L-amino-acid oxidases from Amanita phalloides and Clitocybe geotropa induce caspase-dependent apoptosis

    PubMed Central

    Pišlar, A; Sabotič, J; Šlenc, J; Brzin, J; Kos, J

    2016-01-01

    L-amino-acid oxidases (LAO) purified from fungi induce cell death in various mammalian cells including human tumor cell lines. The mechanism, however, remains poorly understood. In this study, we aimed to define a precise mechanism of cell death induced in Jurkat and MCF7 cancer cell lines by ApLAO and CgLAO, LAOs isolated from Amanita phalloides and Clitocybe geotropa, respectively. Cell death induced by both LAOs is shown to be concentration- and time-dependent, with higher toxic effects in Jurkat cells. LAO activity is required for the cytotoxicity. Detailed study on Jurkat cells further demonstrated that ApLAO and CgLAO both induce the intrinsic mitochondrial pathway of apoptosis, accompanied by a time-dependent depolarization of the mitochondrial membrane through the generation of reactive oxygen species. Treatment with the LAOs resulted in an increased ratio of the expression of proapoptotic Bax to that of antiapoptotic Bcl-2, subsequently leading to the activation of caspase-9 and -3. However, the pancaspase inhibitor, Z-VAD-FMK, did not completely abolish the cell death induced by either ApLAO or CgLAO, suggesting an alternative pathway for LAO-induced apoptosis. Indeed, caspase-8 activity in ApLAO- and CgLAO-treated cells was increased. Further, Fas/FasL (Fas ligand) antagonist caused a slight reduction in toxin-induced cell death, supporting the involvement of ApLAO and CgLAO in death-receptor-mediated apoptosis. These results thus provide new evidence that ApLAO and CgLAO induce apoptosis in Jurkat cells via both the intrinsic and extrinsic pathways, although the significantly higher increase of caspase-9 over caspase-8 activity suggests that it is the intrinsic pathway that is the predominant mode of ApLAO- and CgLAO-induced apoptosis. PMID:27551514

  11. Cytotoxic L-amino-acid oxidases from Amanita phalloides and Clitocybe geotropa induce caspase-dependent apoptosis.

    PubMed

    Pišlar, A; Sabotič, J; Šlenc, J; Brzin, J; Kos, J

    2016-01-01

    L-amino-acid oxidases (LAO) purified from fungi induce cell death in various mammalian cells including human tumor cell lines. The mechanism, however, remains poorly understood. In this study, we aimed to define a precise mechanism of cell death induced in Jurkat and MCF7 cancer cell lines by ApLAO and CgLAO, LAOs isolated from Amanita phalloides and Clitocybe geotropa, respectively. Cell death induced by both LAOs is shown to be concentration- and time-dependent, with higher toxic effects in Jurkat cells. LAO activity is required for the cytotoxicity. Detailed study on Jurkat cells further demonstrated that ApLAO and CgLAO both induce the intrinsic mitochondrial pathway of apoptosis, accompanied by a time-dependent depolarization of the mitochondrial membrane through the generation of reactive oxygen species. Treatment with the LAOs resulted in an increased ratio of the expression of proapoptotic Bax to that of antiapoptotic Bcl-2, subsequently leading to the activation of caspase-9 and -3. However, the pancaspase inhibitor, Z-VAD-FMK, did not completely abolish the cell death induced by either ApLAO or CgLAO, suggesting an alternative pathway for LAO-induced apoptosis. Indeed, caspase-8 activity in ApLAO- and CgLAO-treated cells was increased. Further, Fas/FasL (Fas ligand) antagonist caused a slight reduction in toxin-induced cell death, supporting the involvement of ApLAO and CgLAO in death-receptor-mediated apoptosis. These results thus provide new evidence that ApLAO and CgLAO induce apoptosis in Jurkat cells via both the intrinsic and extrinsic pathways, although the significantly higher increase of caspase-9 over caspase-8 activity suggests that it is the intrinsic pathway that is the predominant mode of ApLAO- and CgLAO-induced apoptosis. PMID:27551514

  12. Induced europium CPL for the selective signalling of phosphorylated amino-acids and O-phosphorylated hexapeptides.

    PubMed

    Neil, Emily R; Fox, Mark A; Pal, Robert; Parker, David

    2016-05-17

    Two bright, europium(iii) complexes based on an achiral heptadentate triazacyclononane ligand bearing two strongly absorbing chromophores have been evaluated for the selective emission and CPL signalling of various chiral O-phosphono-anions. Binding of O-phosphono-Ser and Thr gives rise to a strong induced CPL signature and a favoured Δ complex configuration is adopted. A similarly large induced CPL signal arises when [Eu·](2+) binds to lysophosphatidic acid (LPA), where the strong binding (log K 5.25 (295 K)) in methanol allowed its detection over the range 5 to 40 μM. Strong and chemoselective binding to the phosphorylated amino-acid residues was also observed with a set of four structurally related hexapeptides: in one case, the sign of the gem value in the ΔJ = 1 transition allowed differentiation between the binding to O-P-Ser and O-P-Tyr residues. PMID:27109001

  13. Role of excitatory amino acid input in rostral ventrolateral medulla neurons in rats with obesity-induced hypertension.

    PubMed

    Suhaimi, Farah Wahida; Yusoff, Nurul Hasnida Mohammad; Dewa, Aidiahmad; Yusof, Ahmad Pauzi M D

    2010-03-01

    Obesity is intimately associated with hypertension; increases in blood pressure are closely related to the magnitude of weight gain. The present study aims to determine whether the excitatory amino acid input to rostral ventrolateral medulla (RVLM) contributes to elevated blood pressure in rats with diet-induced obesity. Male Sprague-Dawley rats weighing 280 to 300 grams were fed with a low-fat diet (10% kcal from fat) or moderately high-fat diet (32% kcal from fat) for 16 weeks. At week 16, rats on the moderate high-fat diet were segregated into obesity-prone and obesity-resistant rats based on body weight distribution. Baseline mean arterial pressure (MAP) was significantly higher in obesity-prone rats as compared to obesity-resistant and rats on a low-fat diet. Bilateral injection of kynurenic acid (KYN) (40 nM) into the RVLM of the obesity-prone rats reduced MAP to levels significantly different from those observed in rats on a low-fat diet and obesity-resistant rats (no change in MAP). At a lower concentration (4 nM), KYN injection did not produce any change in MAP in any group. The results obtained suggest that excitatory amino acid input to the RVLM does contribute to the development of hypertension in rats with diet-induced obesity. PMID:20514927

  14. Fragmentation of amino acids induced by collisions with low-energy highly charged ions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Piekarski, D. G.; Maclot, S.; Domaracka, A.; Adoui, L.; Alcamí, M.; Rousseau, P.; Díaz-Tendero, S.; Huber, B. A.; Martín, F.

    2014-04-01

    Fragmentation of amino acids NH2-(CH2)n-COOH (n=1 glycine; n=2 β-alanine and n=3 γ-aminobutyric acid GABA) following collisions with slow highly charged ions has been studied in the gas phase by a combined experimental and theoretical approach. In the experiments, a multi-coincidence detection method was used to deduce the charge state of the molecules before fragmentation. Quantum chemistry calculations have been carried out in the basis of the density functional theory and ab initio molecular dynamics. The combination of both methodologies is essential to unambiguously unravel the different fragmentation pathways.

  15. System A amino acid transporter SNAT2 shows subtype-specific affinity for betaine and hyperosmotic inducibility in placental trophoblasts.

    PubMed

    Nishimura, Tomohiro; Yagi, Risa; Usuda, Mariko; Oda, Kenji; Yamazaki, Mai; Suda, Sayaka; Takahashi, Yu; Okazaki, Fumiyasu; Sai, Yoshimichi; Higuchi, Kei; Maruyama, Tetsuo; Tomi, Masatoshi; Nakashima, Emi

    2014-05-01

    Betaine uptake is induced by hypertonic stress in a placental trophoblast cell line, and involvement of amino acid transport system A was proposed. Here, we aimed to identify the subtype(s) of system A that mediates hypertonicity-induced betaine uptake. Measurement of [(14)C]betaine uptake by HEK293 cells transiently transfected with human or rat sodium-coupled neutral amino acid transporters (SNATs), SNAT1, SNAT2 and SNAT4 revealed that only human and rat SNAT2 have betaine uptake activity. The Michaelis constants (Km) of betaine uptake by human and rat SNAT2 were estimated to be 5.3 mM and 4.6 mM, respectively. Betaine exclusively inhibited the uptake activity of SNAT2 among the rat system A subtypes. We found that rat SNAT1, SNAT2 and SNAT4 were expressed at the mRNA level under isotonic conditions, while expression of SNAT2 and SNAT4 was induced by hypertonicity in TR-TBT 18d-1 cells. Western blot analyses revealed that SNAT2 expression on plasma membrane of TR-TBT 18d-1 cells was more potently induced by hypertonicity than that in total cell lysate. Immunocytochemistry confirmed the induction of SNAT2 expression in TR-TBT 18d-1 cells exposed to hypertonic conditions and indicated that SNAT2 was localized on the plasma membrane in these cells. Our results indicate that SNAT2 transports betaine, and that tonicity-sensitive SNAT2 expression may be involved in regulation of betaine concentration in placental trophoblasts. PMID:24434061

  16. Apoxin I, a novel apoptosis-inducing factor with L-amino acid oxidase activity purified from Western diamondback rattlesnake venom.

    PubMed

    Torii, S; Naito, M; Tsuruo, T

    1997-04-01

    Venom of the western diamondback rattlesnake (Crotalus atrox) induces apoptosis in human umbilical vein endothelial cells, which could result in hemorrhage in tissues bitten by the snake. To identify the hemorrhagic factor, we purified a novel protein, apoxin I, from rattlesnake venom. Apoxin I induced apoptosis in human umbilical vein endothelial, human promyelocytic leukemia HL-60, human ovarian carcinoma A2780, and mouse endothelial KN-3 cells. Amino acid sequence analysis of the apoxin I showed close similarity to L-amino acid oxidase from the Malayan pit viper (Calloselasma rhodostoma). The purified apoxin I oxidized L-leucine but not D-leucine to produce H2O2. The apoxin I-induced apoptosis was inhibited by catalase, a H2O2 scavenger. These results indicate that the H2O2 produced by L-amino acid oxidation by apoxin I is involved in the apoxin I-induced apoptosis and in hemorrhage caused by rattlesnake venom. PMID:9083096

  17. Influence of amino acids, buffers, and ph on the γ-irradiation-induced degradation of alginates.

    PubMed

    Ulset, Ann-Sissel T; Mori, Hideki; Dalheim, Marianne Ø; Hara, Masayuki; Christensen, Bjørn E

    2014-12-01

    Alginate-based biomaterials and medical devices are commonly subjected to γ-irradiation as a means of sterilization, either in the dry state or the gel (hydrated) state. In this process the alginate chains degrade randomly in a dose-dependent manner, altering alginates' material properties. The addition of free radical scavenging amino acids such as histidine and phenylalanine protects the alginate significantly against degradation, as shown by monitoring changes in the molecular weight distributions using SEC-MALLS and determining the pseudo first order rate constants of degradation. Tris buffer (0.5 M), but not acetate, citrate, or phosphate buffers had a similar effect on the degradation rate. Changes in pH itself had only marginal effects on the rate of alginate degradation and on the protective effect of amino acids. Contrary to previous reports, the chemical composition (M/G profile) of the alginates, including homopolymeric mannuronan, was unaltered following irradiation up to 10 kGy. PMID:25412478

  18. Sulfur in Distillers Grains for Dairy Cattle

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Sulfur is an essential element needed by animals for many functions. About 0.15% of the body weight is sulfur. It is found in the amino acids methionine, cysteine, cystine, homocysteine, and taurine; in chondroitin sulfate of cartilage; and in the B-vitamins, thiamin and biotin. Methionine, thiam...

  19. Molecular mechanism of cell death induced by king cobra (Ophiophagus hannah) venom l-amino acid oxidase.

    PubMed

    Fung, Shin Yee; Lee, Mui Li; Tan, Nget Hong

    2015-03-01

    Snake venom LAAOs have been reported to exhibit a wide range of pharmacological activities, including cytotoxic, edema-inducing, platelet aggregation-inducing/platelet aggregation-inhibiting, bactericidal and antiviral activities. A heat-stable form of l-amino acid oxidase isolated from king cobra (Ophiophagus hannah) venom (OH-LAAO) has been shown to exhibit very potent cytotoxicity against human tumorigenic cells but not in their non-tumorigenic counterparts, and the cytotoxicity was due to the apoptosis-inducing effect of the enzyme. In this work, the molecular mechanism of cell death induced by OH-LAAO was investigated. The enzyme exerts its apoptosis-inducing effect presumably via both intrinsic and extrinsic pathways as suggested by the increase in caspase-8 and -9 activities. Oligonucleotide microarray analysis showed that the expression of a total of 178 genes was significantly altered as a result of oxidative stress induced by the hydrogen peroxide generated by the enzyme. Of the 178 genes, at least 27 genes are involved in apoptosis and cell death. These alterations of gene expression was presumably caused by the direct cytotoxic effect of H2O2 generated during the enzymatic reaction, as well as the non-specific oxidative modifications of signaling molecules that eventually lead to apoptosis and cell death. The very substantial up-regulation of cytochrome P450 genes may also contribute to the potent cytotoxic action of OH-LAAO by producing excessive reactive oxygen species (ROS). In conclusion, the potent apoptosis inducing activity of OH-LAAO was likely due to the direct cytotoxic effect of H2O2 generated during the enzymatic reaction, as well as the non-specific oxidation of signalling molecules. PMID:25615711

  20. Are we getting enough sulfur in our diet?

    PubMed Central

    Nimni, Marcel E; Han, Bo; Cordoba, Fabiola

    2007-01-01

    Sulfur, after calcium and phosphorus, is the most abundant mineral element found in our body. It is available to us in our diets, derived almost exclusively from proteins, and yet only 2 of the 20 amino acids normally present in proteins contains sulfur. One of these amino acids, methionine, cannot be synthesized by our bodies and therefore has to be supplied by the diet. Cysteine, another sulfur containing amino acid, and a large number of key metabolic intermediates essential for life, are synthesized by us, but the process requires a steady supply of sulfur. Proteins contain between 3 and 6% of sulfur amino acids. A very small percentage of sulfur comes in the form of inorganic sulfates and other forms of organic sulfur present in foods such as garlic, onion, broccoli, etc. The minimal requirements (RDA) for all the essential amino acids have always been estimated in terms of their ability to maintain a nitrogen balance. This method asses amino acid requirements for protein synthesis, only one of the pathways that methionine follows after ingestion. To adequately evaluate the RDA for methionine, one should perform, together with a nitrogen balance a sulfur balance, something never done, neither in humans nor animals. With this in mind we decided to evaluate the dietary intake of sulfur (as sulfur amino acids) in a random population and perform sulfur balance studies in a limited number of human volunteers. Initially this was done to try and gain some information on the possible mode of action of a variety of sulfur containing compounds (chondroitin sulfate, glucosamine sulfate, and others, ) used as dietary supplements to treat diseases of the joints. Out of this study came information that suggested that a significant proportion of the population that included disproportionally the aged, may not be receiving sufficient sulfur and that these dietary supplements, were very likely exhibiting their pharmacological actions by supplying inorganic sulfur. PMID

  1. Analytical laser induced liquid beam desorption mass spectrometry of protonated amino acids and their non-covalently bound aggregates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Charvat, A.; Lugovoj, E.; Faubel, M.; Abel, B.

    2002-09-01

    We have used analytical laser induced liquid beam desorption in combination with high resolution mass spectrometry (m/Δ mgeq 1 000) for the study of protonated amino acids (ornithine, citrulline, lysine, arginine) and their non-covalently bound complexes in the gas phase desorbed from water solutions. We report studies in which the desorption mechanism has been investigated. The results imply that biomolecule desorption at our conditions is a single step process involving laser heating of the solvent above its supercritical temperature, a rapid expansion, ion recombination and finally isolation and desorption of only a small fraction of preformed ions and charged aggregates. In addition, we report an investigation of the aqueous solution concentration and pH-dependence of the laser induced desorption of protonated species (monomers and dimers). The experimental findings suggest that the desorption process depends critically upon the proton affinity of the molecules, the concentration of other ions, and of the pH value of the solution. Therefore the ion concentrations measured in the gas phase very likely reflect solution properties (equilibrium concentrations). Arginine self-assembles large non-covalent singly protonated multimers (n=1...8) when sampled by IR laser induced water beam desorption mass spectrometry. The structures of these aggregates may resemble those of the solid state and may be preformed in solution prior to desorption. A desorption of mixtures of amino acids in water solution enabled us to study (mixed) protonated dimers, one of the various applications of the present technique. Reasons for preferred dimerization leading to simple cases of molecular recognition as well as less preferred binding is discussed in terms of the number of specific H-bonds that can be established in the clusters.

  2. Monoclinic sulfur cathode utilizing carbon for high-performance lithium-sulfur batteries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jung, Sung Chul; Han, Young-Kyu

    2016-09-01

    Sulfur cathodes for lithium-sulfur batteries have been designed to be combined with conductive carbon because the insulating nature of sulfur causes low active material utilization and poor rate capability. This paper is the first to report that carbon can induce a phase transition in a sulfur cathode. The stable form of a sulfur crystal at ambient temperature is orthorhombic sulfur. We found that monoclinic sulfur becomes more stable than orthorhombic sulfur if carbon atoms penetrate into the sulfur at elevated temperatures and the carbon density exceeds a threshold of C0.3S8. The high stability of the carbon-containing monoclinic sulfur persists during lithiation and is attributed to locally formed linear SC3S chains with marked stability. This study provides a novel perspective on the role of carbon in the sulfur cathode and suggests control of the crystal phase of electrodes by composite elements as a new way of designing efficient electrode materials.

  3. Changes of amino acid gradients in brain tissues induced by microwave irradiation and other means

    SciTech Connect

    Baxter, C.F.; Parsons, J.E.; Oh, C.C.; Wasterlain, C.G.; Baldwin, R.A. )

    1989-09-01

    Focused microwave irradiation to the head (FMI) has been used extensively by neurochemists for rapid inactivation of enzymatic activity in brain tissues and the preservation, for in vitro analysis, of in vivo substrate concentrations. Periodically the suitability of this technique for regional studies has been questioned. Evidence has now been obtained, on the basis of altered concentration gradients for GABA and taurine from the Substantia Nigra (SN) to an Adjacent Dorsal Area (ADJ), that FMI not only inactivates enzymes, but also facilitates rapid diffusion of small molecules from areas of high concentrations to adjacent areas of lower concentration. To a lesser extent, the implantation of plastic injection cannulas also decreased these concentration gradients. These results offer clear evidence that FMI is ill suited and unreliable for studies designed to map and compare the in vivo regional concentrations of diffusible organic molecules (such as amino acids) in brain tissues. Any invasive technique that compromises membrane barriers is likely to produce smaller similar effects.

  4. Inhibitory effect of fangchinoline on excitatory amino acids-induced neurotoxicity in cultured rat cerebellar granule cells.

    PubMed

    Kim, S D; Oh, S K; Kim, H S; Seong, Y H

    2001-04-01

    Glutamate receptors-mediated excitotoxicity is believed to play a role in the pathophysiology of neurodegenerative diseases. The present study was performed to evaluate the inhibitory effect of fangchinoline, a bis-benzylisoquinoline alkaloid, which has a characteristic as a Ca2+ channel blocker, on excitatory amino acids (EAAs)-induced neurotoxicity in cultured rat cerebellar granule neuron. Fangchinoline (1 and 5 microM) inhibited glutamate (1 mM), N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA; 1 mM) and kainate (100 microM)-induced neuronal cell death which was measured by trypan blue exclusion test. Fangchinoline (1 and 5 microM) inhibited glutamate release into medium induced by NMDA (1 mM) and kainate (100 microM), which was measured by HPLC. And fangchinoline (5 microM) inhibited glutamate (1 mM)-induced elevation of intracellular calcium concentration. These results suggest that inhibition of Ca2+ influx by fangchinoline may contribute to the beneficial effects on neurodegenerative effect of glutamate in pathophysiological conditions. PMID:11339637

  5. Metabolomics revealed diurnal heat stress and zinc supplementation-induced changes in amino acid, lipid, and microbial metabolism.

    PubMed

    Wang, Lei; Urriola, Pedro E; Luo, Zhao-Hui; Rambo, Zachary J; Wilson, Mark E; Torrison, Jerry L; Shurson, Gerald C; Chen, Chi

    2016-01-01

    Heat stress (HS) dramatically disrupts the events in energy and nutrient metabolism, many of which requires zinc (Zn) as a cofactor. In this study, metabolic effects of HS and Zn supplementation were evaluated by examining growth performance, blood chemistry, and metabolomes of crossbred gilts fed with ZnNeg (no Zn supplementation), ZnIO (120 ppm ZnSO4), or ZnAA (60 ppm ZnSO4 + 60 ppm zinc amino acid complex) diets under diurnal HS or thermal-neutral (TN) condition. The results showed that growth performance was reduced by HS but not by Zn supplementation. Among measured serum biochemicals, HS was found to increase creatinine but decrease blood urea nitrogen (BUN) level. Metabolomic analysis indicated that HS greatly affected diverse metabolites associated with amino acid, lipid, and microbial metabolism, including urea cycle metabolites, essential amino acids, phospholipids, medium-chain dicarboxylic acids, fatty acid amides, and secondary bile acids. More importantly, many changes in these metabolite markers were correlated with both acute and adaptive responses to HS. Relative to HS-induced metabolic effects, Zn supplementation-associated effects were much more limited. A prominent observation was that ZnIO diet, potentially through its influences on microbial metabolism, yielded different responses to HS compared with two other diets, which included higher levels of short-chain fatty acids (SCFAs) in cecal fluid and higher levels of lysine in the liver and feces. Overall, comprehensive metabolomic analysis identified novel metabolite markers associated with HS and Zn supplementation, which could guide further investigation on the mechanisms of these metabolic effects. PMID:26755737

  6. Amino acid substitutions in the thymidine kinase gene of induced acyclovir-resistant herpes simplex virus type 1

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hussin, Ainulkhir; Nor, Norefrina Shafinaz Md; Ibrahim, Nazlina

    2013-11-01

    Acyclovir (ACV) is an antiviral drug of choice in healthcare setting to treat infections caused by herpes viruses, including, but not limited to genital herpes, cold sores, shingles and chicken pox. Acyclovir resistance has emerged significantly due to extensive use and misuse of this antiviral in human, especially in immunocompromised patients. However, it remains unclear about the amino acid substitutions in thymidine (TK) gene, which specifically confer the resistance-associated mutation in herpes simplex virus. Hence, acyclovir-resistant HSV-1 was selected at high concentration (2.0 - 4.5 μg/mL), and the TK-gene was subjected to sequencing and genotypic characterization. Genotypic sequences comparison was done using HSV-1 17 (GenBank Accesion no. X14112) for resistance-associated mutation determination whereas HSV-1 KOS, HSV-1 473/08 and HSV clinical isolates sequences were used for polymorphism-associated mutation. The result showed that amino acid substitutions at the non-conserved region (UKM-1: Gln34Lys, UKM-2: Arg32Ser & UKM-5: Arg32Cys) and ATP-binding site (UKM-3: Tyr53End & UKM-4: Ile54Leu) of the TK-gene. These discoveries play an important role to extend another dimension to the evolution of acyclovir-resistant HSV-1 and suggest that selection at high ACV concentration induced ACV-resistant HSV-1 evolution. These findings also expand the knowledge on the type of mutations among acyclovir-resistant HSV-1. In conclusion, HSV-1 showed multiple strategies to exhibit acyclovir resistance, including amino acid substitutions in the TK gene.

  7. Experimental sink removal induces stress responses, including shifts in amino acid and phenylpropanoid metabolism, in soybean leaves

    PubMed Central

    Turner, Glenn W.; Cuthbertson, Daniel J.; Voo, Siau Sie; Settles, Matthew L.; Grimes, Howard D.

    2012-01-01

    The repeated removal of flower, fruit, or vegetative buds is a common treatment to simulate sink limitation. These experiments usually lead to the accumulation of specific proteins, which are degraded during later stages of seed development, and have thus been designated as vegetative storage proteins. We used oligonucleotide microarrays to assess global effects of sink removal on gene expression patterns in soybean leaves and found an induction of the transcript levels of hundreds of genes with putative roles in the responses to biotic and abiotic stresses. In addition, these data sets indicated potential changes in amino acid and phenylpropanoid metabolism. As a response to sink removal we detected an induced accumulation of γ-aminobutyric acid, while proteinogenic amino acid levels decreased. We also observed a shift in phenylpropanoid metabolism with an increase in isoflavone levels, concomitant with a decrease in flavones and flavonols. Taken together, we provide evidence that sink removal leads to an up-regulation of stress responses in distant leaves, which needs to be considered as an unintended consequence of this experimental treatment. PMID:22109846

  8. Doxycycline protects against pilocarpine-induced convulsions in rats, through its antioxidant effect and modulation of brain amino acids.

    PubMed

    Nogueira, Carlos Renato Alves; Damasceno, Flávio Maia; de Aquino-Neto, Manuel Rufino; de Andrade, Geanne Matos; Fontenele, Juvênia Bezerra; de Medeiros, Thales Augusto; Viana, Glauce Socorro de Barros

    2011-06-01

    This work evaluated doxycycline (2nd generation tetracycline) protection against pilocarpine-induced convulsions in rats. The animals were treated with doxycycline (Dox: 10 to100 mg/kg, i.p., 7days), 30min before the pilocarpine injection (P: 300mg/kg, i.p.) and observed for cholinergic signs, latencies to the first convulsion and death. Amino acid concentrations, lipid peroxidation and nitrite levels in temporal cortices were determined as well as the radical scavenging activity. Doxycycline increased latencies to the first convulsion and death as compared to the untreated P300 group. It also decreased glutamate and aspartate, increased GABA, blocked nitrite formation, reduced TBARS contents and showed a radical scavenging activity. Finally, doxycycline decreased the number of degenerating neurons (evaluated by fluoro-jade staining) and increased the number of viable neurons (assessed by cresyl violet staining) as compared do the P300 group. The antioxidant effect associated with decreased levels of excitatory and increased levels of inhibitory amino acids could explain the neuroprotective effect of doxycycline. PMID:21382396

  9. Sulfur-induced embrittlement of nickel: a first-principles study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schusteritsch, Georg; Kaxiras, Efthimios

    2012-09-01

    We study the embrittlement of Ni due to the presence of S impurities, considering their effect in the bulk and at grain boundaries (GBs). For bulk Ni, we employ Rice's theory based on generalized-stacking-fault energetics and the unstable stacking energy criterion. We use first-principles density-functional-theory calculations to determine the ductility parameter D = γs/γus, the ratio of the surface energy γs to the unstable stacking energy γus, for bulk Ni with substitutional S impurities. Similar arguments based on Rice's theory for the mechanical properties of GBs are invoked. We study the Σ5(0 1 2) GB with interstitial S impurities, in which case D is defined as the ratio of the work of separation Ws and the unstable stacking energy γus, to model the competition between grain decohesion and shear-induced plastic deformation due to grain boundary sliding (GBS). The presence of S impurities is found to increase the value of D by ˜40% in bulk Ni, but reduces it by over 80% for the GB. These results support earlier suggestions that embrittlement of Ni by S impurities is related to their effect on GBs. We further calculate relevant tensile and shear stresses to study the expected fracture mode and find that intergranular crack propagation accommodated by GBS is inhibited in the system considered here.

  10. Lunar sulfur

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kuck, David L.

    1991-01-01

    Ideas introduced by Vaniman, Pettit and Heiken in their 1988 Uses of Lunar Sulfur are expanded. Particular attention is given to uses of SO2 as a mineral-dressing fluid. Also introduced is the concept of using sulfide-based concrete as an alternative to the sulfur-based concretes proposed by Leonard and Johnson. Sulfur is abundant in high-Ti mare basalts, which range from 0.16 to 0.27 pct. by weight. Terrestrial basalts with 0.15 pct. S are rare. For oxygen recovery, sulfur must be driven off with other volatiles from ilmenite concentrates, before reduction. Troilite (FeS) may be oxidized to magnetite (Fe3O4) and SO2 gas, by burning concentrates in oxygen within a magnetic field, to further oxidize ilmenite before regrinding the magnetic reconcentration. SO2 is liquid at -20 C, the mean temperature underground on the Moon, at a minimum of 0.6 atm pressure. By using liquid SO2 as a mineral dressing fluid, all the techniques of terrestrial mineral separation become available for lunar ores and concentrates. Combination of sulfur and iron in an exothermic reaction, to form iron sulfides, may be used to cement grains of other minerals into an anhydrous iron-sulfide concrete. A sulfur-iron-aggregate mixture may be heated to the ignition temperature of iron with sulfur to make a concrete shape. The best iron, sulfur, and aggregate ratios need to be experimentally established. The iron and sulfur will be by-products of oxygen production from lunar minerals.

  11. Inhibition of sulfur mustard-induced cytotoxicity and inflammation by the macrolide antibiotic roxithromycin in human respiratory epithelial cells

    PubMed Central

    Gao, Xiugong; Ray, Radharaman; Xiao, Yan; Barker, Peter E; Ray, Prabhati

    2007-01-01

    Background Sulfur mustard (SM) is a potent chemical vesicant warfare agent that remains a significant military and civilian threat. Inhalation of SM gas causes airway inflammation and injury. In recent years, there has been increasing evidence of the effectiveness of macrolide antibiotics in treating chronic airway inflammatory diseases. In this study, the anti-cytotoxic and anti-inflammatory effects of a representative macrolide antibiotic, roxithromycin, were tested in vitro using SM-exposed normal human small airway epithelial (SAE) cells and bronchial/tracheal epithelial (BTE) cells. Cell viability, expression of proinflammatory cytokines including interleukin (IL)-1β, IL-6, IL-8 and tumor necrosis factor (TNF), and expression of inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS) were examined, since these proinflammatory cytokines/mediators are import indicators of tissue inflammatory responses. We suggest that the influence of roxithromycin on SM-induced inflammatory reaction could play an important therapeutic role in the cytotoxicity exerted by this toxicant. Results MTS assay and Calcein AM/ethidium homodimer (EthD-1) fluorescence staining showed that roxithromycin decreased SM cytotoxicity in both SAE and BTE cells. Also, roxithromycin inhibited the SM-stimulated overproduction of the proinflammatory cytokines IL-1β, IL-6, IL-8 and TNF at both the protein level and the mRNA level, as measured by either enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) or real-time RT-PCR. In addition, roxithromycin inhibited the SM-induced overexpression of iNOS, as revealed by immunocytochemical analysis using quantum dots as the fluorophore. Conclusion The present study demonstrates that roxithromycin has inhibitory effects on the cytotoxicity and inflammation provoked by SM in human respiratory epithelial cells. The decreased cytotoxicity in roxithromycin-treated cells likely depends on the ability of the macrolide to down-regulate the production of proinflammatory cytokines and

  12. The delta EEG (sleep)-inducing peptide (DSIP). XI. Amino-acid analysis, sequence, synthesis and activity of the nonapeptide.

    PubMed

    Schoenenberger, G A; Maier, P F; Tobler, H J; Wilson, K; Monnier, M

    1978-09-01

    A peptide which induces slow-wave EEG (sleep) after intraventricular infusion into the brain has been isolated from the extracorporeal dialysate of cerebral venous blood in rabbits submitted to hypnogenic electrical stimulation of the intralaminar thalamic area. It was shown by amino-acid analysis and sequence determination to be Trp-Ala-Gly-Gly-Asp-Ala-Ser-Gly-Glu and named "Delta Sleep-Inducing Peptide" (DSIP). This compound was synthesized as well as 5 possible metabolic products (1--8, 2--9, 2--8, 1--4 and 5--9), 2 nonapeptide analogues (with one and two amino-acids exchanged) and a related tripeptide (Trp-Ser-Glu). All 9 synthetic peptides were infused intraventricularly in rabbits (6 nmol/kg in 0.05 ml of CSF-like solution over 3.5 min) and tested under double-blind conditions. A total of 61 rabbits including controls were used. The EEG from the frontal neocortex and the limbic archicortex were subjected to direct fast-Fourier transformation and analyzed by an 1108 computer system. A highly specific delta and spindle EEG-enhancing effect of the synthetic DSIP could be demonstrated. The mean increase of EEG delta activity reached 35% in the neocortex and limbic cortex as compared to control animals receiving CSF-like solution or any of the other 8 peptides. The final chemical characterization of the synthetic DSIP revealed that only the pure alpha-aspartyl peptide is highly active in contrast to its beta-Asp isomer. A neurohumoral modulating and programming activity was suggested. PMID:568769

  13. D-Amino acid oxidase-induced oxidative stress, 3-bromopyruvate and citrate inhibit angiogenesis, exhibiting potent anticancer effects.

    PubMed

    El Sayed, S M; El-Magd, R M Abou; Shishido, Y; Yorita, K; Chung, S P; Tran, D H; Sakai, T; Watanabe, H; Kagami, S; Fukui, K

    2012-10-01

    Angiogenesis is critical for cancer growth and metastasis. Steps of angiogenesis are energy consuming, while vascular endothelial cells are highly glycolytic. Glioblastoma multiforme (GBM) is a highly vascular tumor and this enhances its aggressiveness. D-amino acid oxidase (DAO) is a promising therapeutic protein that induces oxidative stress upon acting on its substrates. Oxidative stress-energy depletion (OSED) therapy was recently reported (El Sayed et al., Cancer Gene Ther, 19, 1-18, 2012). OSED combines DAO-induced oxidative stress with energy depletion caused by glycolytic inhibitors such as 3-bromopyruvate (3BP), a hexokinase II inhibitor that depleted ATP in cancer cells and induced production of hydrogen peroxide. 3BP disturbs the Warburg effect and antagonizes effects of lactate and pyruvate (El Sayed et al., J Bioenerg Biomembr, 44, 61-79, 2012). Citrate is a natural organic acid capable of inhibiting glycolysis by targeting phosphofructokinase. Here, we report that DAO, 3BP and citrate significantly inhibited angiogenesis, decreased the number of vascular branching points and shortened the length of vascular tubules. OSED delayed the growth of C6/DAO glioma cells. 3BP combined with citrate delayed the growth of C6 glioma cells and decreased significantly the number and size of C6 glioma colonies in soft agar. Human GBM cells (U373MG) were resistant to chemotherapy e.g. cisplatin and cytosine arabinoside, while 3BP was effective in decreasing the viability and disturbing the morphology of U373MG cells. PMID:22802136

  14. Presence of dopa and amino acid hydroperoxides in proteins modified with advanced glycation end products (AGEs): amino acid oxidation products as a possible source of oxidative stress induced by AGE proteins.

    PubMed

    Fu, S; Fu, M X; Baynes, J W; Thorpe, S R; Dean, R T

    1998-02-15

    Glycation and subsequent Maillard or browning reactions of glycated proteins, leading to the formation of advanced glycation end products (AGEs), are involved in the chemical modification of proteins during normal aging and have been implicated in the pathogenesis of diabetic complications. Oxidative conditions accelerate the browning of proteins by glucose, and AGE proteins also induce oxidative stress responses in cells bearing AGE receptors. These observations have led to the hypothesis that glycation-induced pathology results from a cycle of oxidative stress, increased chemical modification of proteins via the Maillard reaction, and further AGE-dependent oxidative stress. Here we show that the preparation of AGE-collagen by incubation with glucose under oxidative conditions in vitro leads not only to glycation and formation of the glycoxidation product Nepsilon-(carboxymethyl)lysine (CML), but also to the formation of amino acid oxidation products on protein, including m-tyrosine, dityrosine, dopa, and valine and leucine hydroperoxides. The formation of both CML and amino acid oxidation products was prevented by anaerobic, anti-oxidative conditions. Amino acid oxidation products were also formed when glycated collagen, prepared under anti-oxidative conditions, was allowed to incubate under aerobic conditions that led to the formation of CML. These experiments demonstrate that amino acid oxidation products are formed in proteins during glycoxidation reactions and suggest that reactive oxygen species formed by redox cycling of dopa or by the metal-catalysed decomposition of amino acid hydroperoxides, rather than by redox activity or reactive oxygen production by AGEs on protein, might contribute to the induction of oxidative stress by AGE proteins. PMID:9461515

  15. Amino acid substitutions in the FXYD motif enhance phospholemman-induced modulation of cardiac L-type calcium channels.

    PubMed

    Guo, Kai; Wang, Xianming; Gao, Guofeng; Huang, Congxin; Elmslie, Keith S; Peterson, Blaise Z

    2010-11-01

    We have found that phospholemman (PLM) associates with and modulates the gating of cardiac L-type calcium channels (Wang et al., Biophys J 98: 1149-1159, 2010). The short 17 amino acid extracellular NH(2)-terminal domain of PLM contains a highly conserved PFTYD sequence that defines it as a member of the FXYD family of ion transport regulators. Although we have learned a great deal about PLM-dependent changes in calcium channel gating, little is known regarding the molecular mechanisms underlying the observed changes. Therefore, we investigated the role of the PFTYD segment in the modulation of cardiac calcium channels by individually replacing Pro-8, Phe-9, Thr-10, Tyr-11, and Asp-12 with alanine (P8A, F9A, T10A, Y11A, D12A). In addition, Asp-12 was changed to lysine (D12K) and cysteine (D12C). As expected, wild-type PLM significantly slows channel activation and deactivation and enhances voltage-dependent inactivation (VDI). We were surprised to find that amino acid substitutions at Thr-10 and Asp-12 significantly enhanced the ability of PLM to modulate Ca(V)1.2 gating. T10A exhibited a twofold enhancement of PLM-induced slowing of activation, whereas D12K and D12C dramatically enhanced PLM-induced increase of VDI. The PLM-induced slowing of channel closing was abrogated by D12A and D12C, whereas D12K and T10A failed to impact this effect. These studies demonstrate that the PFXYD motif is not necessary for the association of PLM with Ca(V)1.2. Instead, since altering the chemical and/or physical properties of the PFXYD segment alters the relative magnitudes of opposing PLM-induced effects on Ca(V)1.2 channel gating, PLM appears to play an important role in fine tuning the gating kinetics of cardiac calcium channels and likely plays an important role in shaping the cardiac action potential and regulating Ca(2+) dynamics in the heart. PMID:20720179

  16. Threonine entry into brain after diet-induced changes in plasma amino acids

    SciTech Connect

    Tews, J.K.; Greenwood, J.; Pratt, O.E.; Harper, A.E.

    1986-03-05

    Passage of amino acids (AA) across the blood-brain barrier is thought to be influenced by AA composition of the blood. To improve their understanding of effects of dietary protein on AA entry into brain they examined associations among diet, plasma (AA) and Thr transport into brain. Rats were adapted for 7-10 d to 8-hr meals of diets containing 6 (LP), 18 or 50% (HP) casein before receiving a meal of a diet containing 0 (NP), 6, 18 or 50% casein. After 4-7 hr the rats were anesthetized and infused i.v. with L-(U-/sup 14/C)-Thr for 5 min before plasma and brain were taken for analysis of radioactivity and AA. Infusions were programmed to maintain constant plasma /sup 14/C. Plasma and brain (Thr) declined as protein content of pretreatment diets was raised. Plasma (Thr) was 2 or 5 fold higher in rats adapted to LP or HP, respectively, and fed a final meal of HP rather than NP; brain (Thr) did not rise. Brain /sup 14/C/plasma /sup 14/C ratios were 0.04 and 0.13, respectively, in rats adapted to LP or HP and fed an NP meal, but only 0.02 and 0.05 in such rats fed an HP meal. Highest and lowest /sup 14/C-Thr fluxes into brain occurred in rats adapted to LP and HP, respectively (about 9-13 and 3-7 nmoles Thr/g brain/min). Changes in plasma (Thr), radioactivity ratios and Thr flux into brain reflected protein content of both pretreatment and final meals.

  17. Ultraviolet-induced effects on chloramine and cyanogen chloride formation from chlorination of amino acids.

    PubMed

    Weng, ShihChi; Blatchley, Ernest R

    2013-05-01

    Ultraviolet (UV)-based treatment is commonly used to augment chlorination in swimming pools. However, the effects of combined application of UV254/chlorine on disinfection byproduct (DBP) formation are incompletely defined. To examine this issue, experiments were conducted with amino acids (l-arginine, l-histidine, and glycine) that are representative of those introduced to swimming pools via human body fluids. For each precursor, stepwise experiments were conducted with chlorination and UV254 exposure, with/without post-chlorination. Net formation and decomposition of chloramines and cyanogen chloride (CNCl) were measured for a range of chlorine/precursor (Cl/P) molar ratios and UV254 doses. Substantial production of NH2Cl from l-arginine and l-histidine was observed at Cl/P = 1.0 and 2.0 when post-chlorination was applied to UV254-irradiated samples. These results suggested a mechanism of rapid N-chlorination, followed by cleavage of NH3 by UV254 irradiation. CNCl formation was observed from UV254-irradiated samples of l-arginine and l-histidine when Cl/P = 2.0 and 3.0, as well as from glycine for Cl/P ≤ 1. Structurally related precursor compounds were examined for CNCl formation potential in chlorination/UV experiments. CNCl formation was promoted by UV254 exposure of chlorinated imidazole and guanidine compounds, which suggested that these groups contributed to CNCl formation. The results have implications with respect to the application of chlorine and UV for water treatment in swimming pools and other settings, such as water reuse and advanced oxidation processes. PMID:23560482

  18. A Self-defeating Anabolic Program Leads to β-Cell Apoptosis in Endoplasmic Reticulum Stress-induced Diabetes via Regulation of Amino Acid Flux*

    PubMed Central

    Krokowski, Dawid; Han, Jaeseok; Saikia, Mridusmita; Majumder, Mithu; Yuan, Celvie L.; Guan, Bo-Jhih; Bevilacqua, Elena; Bussolati, Ovidio; Bröer, Stefan; Arvan, Peter; Tchórzewski, Marek; Snider, Martin D.; Puchowicz, Michelle; Croniger, Colleen M.; Kimball, Scot R.; Pan, Tao; Koromilas, Antonis E.; Kaufman, Randal J.; Hatzoglou, Maria

    2013-01-01

    Endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress-induced responses are associated with the loss of insulin-producing β-cells in type 2 diabetes mellitus. β-Cell survival during ER stress is believed to depend on decreased protein synthesis rates that are mediated via phosphorylation of the translation initiation factor eIF2α. It is reported here that chronic ER stress correlated with increased islet protein synthesis and apoptosis in β-cells in vivo. Paradoxically, chronic ER stress in β-cells induced an anabolic transcription program to overcome translational repression by eIF2α phosphorylation. This program included expression of amino acid transporter and aminoacyl-tRNA synthetase genes downstream of the stress-induced ATF4-mediated transcription program. The anabolic response was associated with increased amino acid flux and charging of tRNAs for branched chain and aromatic amino acids (e.g. leucine and tryptophan), the levels of which are early serum indicators of diabetes. We conclude that regulation of amino acid transport in β-cells during ER stress involves responses leading to increased protein synthesis, which can be protective during acute stress but can lead to apoptosis during chronic stress. These studies suggest that the increased expression of amino acid transporters in islets can serve as early diagnostic biomarkers for the development of diabetes. PMID:23645676

  19. Ethyl 2-((4-Chlorophenyl)amino)thiazole-4-carboxylate and Derivatives Are Potent Inducers of Oct3/4.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Xinlai; Yoshida, Hiroki; Raoofi, Dena; Saleh, Sawsan; Alborzinia, Hamed; Wenke, Frank; Göhring, Axel; Reuter, Stefanie; Mah, Nancy; Fuchs, Heiko; Andrade-Navarro, Miguel A; Adjaye, James; Gul, Sheraz; Utikal, Jochen; Mrowka, Ralf; Wölfl, Stefan

    2015-08-13

    The octamer-binding transcription factor 4 (Oct3/4) is a master gene in the transcriptional regulatory network of pluripotent cells. Repression of Oct3/4 in embryonic stem cells (ESCs) is associated with cell differentiation and loss of pluripotency, whereas forced overexpression in cooperation with other transcriptional factors, such as Nanog, Sox2, and Lin28, can reprogram somatic cells back into pluripotent cells, termed induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs). However, random integration and potential tumorigenic transformation caused by viral transduction limit the clinical application of iPSCs. By performing a cell-based high throughput screening (HTS) campaign, we identified several potential small molecules as inducers of Oct3/4 expression. Here we report a lead structure ethyl 2-((4-chlorophenyl)amino)-thiazole-4-carboxylate, termed O4I2, showing high activity in enforcing Oct3/4 expression. On the basis of chemical expansion, we further identified derivatives having increased activities toward Oct3/4 induction. Thus, O4I2 and its derivatives should provide a new class of small molecules suitable for iPSC generation. PMID:26143659

  20. Effects of Dimethylaminoethanol and Compound Amino Acid on D-Galactose Induced Skin Aging Model of Rat

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Su; Chen, Zhenyu; Cai, Xia; Sun, Ying; Zhao, Cailing

    2014-01-01

    A lasting dream of human beings is to reverse or postpone aging. In this study, dimethylaminoethanol (DMAE) and compound amino acid (AA) in Mesotherapy were investigated for their potential antiaging effects on D-galactose induced aging skin. At 18 days after D-gal induction, each rat was treated with intradermal microinjection of saline, AA, 0.1% DMAE, 0.2% DMAE, 0.1% DMAE + AA, or 0.2% DMAE + AA, respectively. At 42 days after treatment, the skin wound was harvested and assayed. Measurement of epidermal and dermal thickness in 0.1% DMAE + AA and 0.2% DMAE + AA groups appeared significantly thicker than aging control rats. No differences were found in tissue water content among groups. Hydroxyproline in 0.1% DMAE + AA, 0.2% DMAE + AA, and sham control groups was much higher than all other groups. Collagen type I, type III, and MMP-1 expression was highly upregulated in both 0.1% DMAE + AA and 0.2% DMAE + AA groups compared with aging control. In contrast, TIMP-1 expression levels of various aging groups were significantly reduced when compared to sham control. Coinjection of DMAE and AA into target tissue has marked antiaging effects on D-galactose induced skin aging model of rat. PMID:25133239

  1. Effects of dimethylaminoethanol and compound amino acid on D-galactose induced skin aging model of rat.

    PubMed

    Liu, Su; Chen, Zhenyu; Cai, Xia; Sun, Ying; Zhao, Cailing; Liu, Fangjun; Liu, Dalie

    2014-01-01

    A lasting dream of human beings is to reverse or postpone aging. In this study, dimethylaminoethanol (DMAE) and compound amino acid (AA) in Mesotherapy were investigated for their potential antiaging effects on D-galactose induced aging skin. At 18 days after D-gal induction, each rat was treated with intradermal microinjection of saline, AA, 0.1% DMAE, 0.2% DMAE, 0.1% DMAE + AA, or 0.2% DMAE + AA, respectively. At 42 days after treatment, the skin wound was harvested and assayed. Measurement of epidermal and dermal thickness in 0.1% DMAE + AA and 0.2% DMAE + AA groups appeared significantly thicker than aging control rats. No differences were found in tissue water content among groups. Hydroxyproline in 0.1% DMAE + AA, 0.2% DMAE + AA, and sham control groups was much higher than all other groups. Collagen type I, type III, and MMP-1 expression was highly upregulated in both 0.1% DMAE + AA and 0.2% DMAE + AA groups compared with aging control. In contrast, TIMP-1 expression levels of various aging groups were significantly reduced when compared to sham control. Coinjection of DMAE and AA into target tissue has marked antiaging effects on D-galactose induced skin aging model of rat. PMID:25133239

  2. Evaluating the potential of poly(beta-amino ester) nanoparticles for reprogramming human fibroblasts to become induced pluripotent stem cells

    PubMed Central

    Bhise, Nupura S; Wahlin, Karl J; Zack, Donald J; Green, Jordan J

    2013-01-01

    Background Gene delivery can potentially be used as a therapeutic for treating genetic diseases, including neurodegenerative diseases, as well as an enabling technology for regenerative medicine. A central challenge in many gene delivery applications is having a safe and effective delivery method. We evaluated the use of a biodegradable poly(beta-amino ester) nanoparticle-based nonviral protocol and compared this with an electroporation-based approach to deliver episomal plasmids encoding reprogramming factors for generation of human induced pluripotent stem cells (hiPSCs) from human fibroblasts. Methods A polymer library was screened to identify the polymers most promising for gene delivery to human fibroblasts. Feeder-independent culturing protocols were developed for nanoparticle-based and electroporation-based reprogramming. The cells reprogrammed by both polymeric nanoparticle-based and electroporation-based nonviral methods were characterized by analysis of pluripotency markers and karyotypic stability. The hiPSC-like cells were further differentiated toward the neural lineage to test their potential for neurodegenerative retinal disease modeling. Results 1-(3-aminopropyl)-4-methylpiperazine end-terminated poly(1,4-butanediol diacry-late-co-4-amino-1-butanol) polymer (B4S4E7) self-assembled with plasmid DNA to form nanoparticles that were more effective than leading commercially available reagents, including Lipofectamine® 2000, FuGENE® HD, and 25 kDa branched polyethylenimine, for nonviral gene transfer. B4S4E7 nanoparticles showed effective gene delivery to IMR-90 human primary fibroblasts and to dermal fibroblasts derived from a patient with retinitis pigmentosa, and enabled coexpression of exogenously delivered genes, as is needed for reprogramming. The karyotypically normal hiPSC-like cells generated by conventional electroporation, but not by poly(beta-amino ester) reprogramming, could be differentiated toward the neuronal lineage, specifically

  3. Transport in Halobacterium Halobium: Light-Induced Cation-Gradients, Amino Acid Transport Kinetics, and Properties of Transport Carriers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lanyi, Janos K.

    1977-01-01

    Cell envelope vesicles prepared from H. halobium contain bacteriorhodopsin and upon illumination protons are ejected. Coupled to the proton motive force is the efflux of Na(+). Measurements of Na-22 flux, exterior pH change, and membrane potential, Delta(psi) (with the dye 3,3'-dipentyloxadicarbocyanine) indicate that the means of Na(+) transport is sodium/proton exchange. The kinetics of the pH changes and other evidence suggests that the antiport is electrogenic (H(+)/Na(++ greater than 1). The resulting large chemical gradient for Na(+) (outside much greater than inside), as well as the membrane potential, will drive the transport of 18 amino acids. The I9th, glutamate, is unique in that its accumulation is indifferent to Delta(psi): this amino acid is transported only when a chemical gradient for Na(+) is present. Thus, when more and more NaCl is included in the vesicles glutamate transport proceeds with longer and longer lags. After illumination the gradient of H+() collapses within 1 min, while the large Na(+) gradient and glutamate transporting activity persists for 10- 15 min, indicating that proton motive force is not necessary for transport. A chemical gradient of Na(+), arranged by suspending vesicles loaded with KCl in NaCl, drives glutamate transport in the dark without other sources of energy, with V(sub max) and K(sub m) comparable to light-induced transport. These and other lines of evidence suggest that the transport of glutamate is facilitated by symport with Na(+), in an electrically neutral fashion, so that only the chemical component of the Na(+) gradient is a driving force.

  4. Arsenic induces structural and compositional colonic microbiome change and promotes host nitrogen and amino acid metabolism.

    PubMed

    Dheer, Rishu; Patterson, Jena; Dudash, Mark; Stachler, Elyse N; Bibby, Kyle J; Stolz, Donna B; Shiva, Sruti; Wang, Zeneng; Hazen, Stanley L; Barchowsky, Aaron; Stolz, John F

    2015-12-15

    Chronic exposure to arsenic in drinking water causes cancer and non-cancer diseases. However, mechanisms for chronic arsenic-induced pathogenesis, especially in response to lower exposure levels, are unclear. In addition, the importance of health impacts from xeniobiotic-promoted microbiome changes is just being realized and effects of arsenic on the microbiome with relation to disease promotion are unknown. To investigate impact of arsenic exposure on both microbiome and host metabolism, the stucture and composition of colonic microbiota, their metabolic phenotype, and host tissue and plasma metabolite levels were compared in mice exposed for 2, 5, or 10weeks to 0, 10 (low) or 250 (high) ppb arsenite (As(III)). Genotyping of colonic bacteria revealed time and arsenic concentration dependent shifts in community composition, particularly the Bacteroidetes and Firmicutes, relative to those seen in the time-matched controls. Arsenic-induced erosion of bacterial biofilms adjacent to the mucosal lining and changes in the diversity and abundance of morphologically distinct species indicated changes in microbial community structure. Bacterical spores increased in abundance and intracellular inclusions decreased with high dose arsenic. Interestingly, expression of arsenate reductase (arsA) and the As(III) exporter arsB, remained unchanged, while the dissimilatory nitrite reductase (nrfA) gene expression increased. In keeping with the change in nitrogen metabolism, colonic and liver nitrite and nitrate levels and ratios changed with time. In addition, there was a concomitant increase in pathogenic arginine metabolites in the mouse circulation. These data suggest that arsenic exposure impacts the microbiome and microbiome/host nitrogen metabolism to support disease enhancing pathogenic phenotypes. PMID:26529668

  5. Electrically induced release of amino acids formed from (U14C) glucose in rat brain cortex slices, studied by a simplified dansylation procedure.

    PubMed

    Orrego, F; Doria de Lorenzo, M C

    1980-05-01

    The nonessential amino acids glutamate, aspartate, glutamine, gamma-aminobutyrate (GABA), alanine, glycine, and proline present in rat thin brain cortex slices were labeled by in vitro incubation of these with [U-14C]glucose, and the efflux of such endogenous radioactive amino acids and of lactate was studied in a superfused system, under control conditions or when the slices were depolarized by varous procedures. When electrical stimuli known to induce selective neurotransmitter release (1 or 1.5 volt, sine wave 60 Hz) were applied for 10 sec to the slices, no significant increase in amino acid efflux was found. When more intense stimuli (4 volt, 60 Hz) were applied for 60 sec, or extracellular potassium was raised to 56 mM, both conditions being known to induce nonselective substance release, the efflux of essentially all amino acids and of lactate was markedly increased. Increases in efflux were proportionately larger for glutamate, aspartate, and gamma-aminobutyrate, and this could be accounted for by their greater intracellular chemical (or electrochemical) potentials, but not because of a selective release mechanism for them. Amino acids were analyzed as their 1-dimethylaminoaphthalene-5-sulfonyl (dansyl) derivatives, by a modification of existing procedures in which the dansyl (DNS) derivatives were efficiently extracted from acidified incubation fluid into an organic phase. This rapidly desalted the derivatives and allowed their concentration and chromatographic separation on thin-layer silica gel sheets with little loss. PMID:7393382

  6. Reuse of fly ash from a fluidized bed combustor for sulfur uptake: the role of ettringite in hydration-induced reactivation

    SciTech Connect

    Fabio Montagnaro; Piero Salatino; Graziella Bernardo; Antonio Telesca; Gian Lorenzo Valenti

    2005-10-01

    This study addresses the effectiveness of hydration-induced reactivation of fly ash from an industrial FBC to produce a sorbent suitable for further SO{sub 2} uptake during fluidized bed combustion. Ash reactivation was accomplished by water hydration at 70{sup o}C for 48 h. Maximum extent and rate of SO{sub 2} sorption as well as attrition/fragmentation behavior of the reactivated ash were assessed. Testing of sulfur sorption capacity was carried out at 850{sup o}C for 100 min in a laboratory-scale fluidized bed reactor under simulated combustion/desulfurization conditions. Characterization of the tested materials was based on X-ray diffraction and simultaneous differential thermal/thermogravimetric analyses. It was found that ettringite was extensively produced during water hydration and that effective enhancement of the sulfur uptake ability of the fly ash was achieved. The conversion degree of calcium to CaSO{sub 4} of the reactivated ash was as high as 92%. The very favorable performance of reactivated ash as a sulfur sorbent was mostly related to the large amount of free lime formed during thermal decomposition of ettringite. Compared with other sorbent materials, the reactivated ash material was characterized by a rather large attrition rate. 25 refs., 8 figs., 2 tabs.

  7. Amino acids

    MedlinePlus

    ... this page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/article/002222.htm Amino acids To use the sharing features on this page, please enable JavaScript. Amino acids are organic compounds that combine to form proteins . ...

  8. Selection of non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drug and treatment regimen for sulfur mustard-induced cutaneous lesions.

    PubMed

    Plahovinsak, Jennifer L; Buccellato, Matthew A; Reid, Frances M; Graham, John S

    2016-09-01

    The inflammatory process plays an important role in sulfur mustard (HD) injury and HD pathogenesis, suggesting that anti-inflammatory treatments applied as soon as possible following HD injury may reduce tissue damage and accelerate healing. This study used the HD dermal weanling swine model to investigate the efficacy of two non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs, capsaicin and diclofenac, when applied in combination with the steroid, clobetasol. The therapeutic regimen was also investigated with respect to initiation of treatment post-exposure, frequency and duration. Yorkshire-cross pigs were randomly assigned to experimental groups, corresponding to all combinations of treatment (capsaicin with clobetasol or diclofenac with clobetasol), onset time (1, 2 or 4 h post-exposure), treatment duration (1, 3 or 5 days) and frequency of applications (2, 3 or 4 per day). For each animal, two sites on the ventral abdomen were exposed to 400 μL of neat HD for 8 min to achieve superficial dermal (SD) lesions and two sites were exposed to 400 μL neat HD for 30 min to achieve deep dermal (DD) lesions. Each treatment regimen was tested against a SD and a DD injury. Untreated SD and DD lesion sites served as within-animal controls. Assessments, up to one week post-challenge, included digital photographs, clinical assessments (lesion size measurements and modified Draize scoring), transepidermal water loss (TEWL), reflectance colorimetry and histopathologic evaluations that included an estimate for depth of injury and wound healing parameters. Diclofenac plus clobetasol treatment resulted in significant reductions in lesion contracture and modified Draize scores, increased barrier function (decreased TEWL), and increased healing as determined by histopathology for both SD and DD injury when compared with untreated sites and sites treated with capsaicin plus clobetasol. An increased duration of treatment from 1 to 5 days was most commonly associated with decreased

  9. Osmotically inducible uptake of betaine via amino acid transport system A in SV-3T3 cells.

    PubMed

    Petronini, P G; De Angelis, E; Borghetti, A F; Wheeler, K P

    1994-05-15

    The osmotically inducible uptake of betaine (NNN-trimethylglycine) by SV-3T3 cells has been studied and compared with the similar process in MDCK cells. Betaine uptake by SV-3T3 cells could be described in terms of a saturable, Na(+)-dependent, component plus a small non-saturable, Na(+)-independent, component. Transport was active, producing considerable accumulation of betaine in the cells. After exposure of the cells to hypertonic conditions for 6 h, there was a marked increase in betaine uptake. Kinetic analysis indicated that this increase resulted from an increase in the Vmax. value of the saturable component, from about 88 to 185 nmol of betaine/5 min per mg of protein, the corresponding Km values of about 15 and 10 mM not being significantly different. This induction of transport activity was detectable only after about 2 h exposure of the cells to hypertonic medium, closely paralleling an induction of influx of N-methylaminoisobutyric acid, and was prevented by the presence of cycloheximide. Betaine influx was markedly inhibited by several neutral amino acids, particularly those transported by system A, such as N-methylaminoisobutyric acid and the imino acid proline. A high concentration (25 mM) of betaine also significantly inhibited the uptake of proline by SV-3T3 cells. Although very similar results were obtained with MDCK cells, prolonged exposure of cells to hypertonic conditions revealed distinct differences. When the hypertonic incubation was extended from 6 h to 24 h, betaine transport in SV-3T3 cells either remained the same or decreased, whereas it showed a further marked increase in MDCK cells, and also became sensitive to inhibition by gamma-aminobutyric acid. mRNA for the betaine transporter BGT-1 [Yamauchi, Uchida, Kwon, Preston, Brooks Robey, Garcia-Perez, Burg and Handler (1992) J. Biol. Chem. 267, 649-652] was detectable in MDCK cells exposed to hypertonic medium for 24 h, but not in SV-3T3 cells under any conditions. It is concluded that

  10. Mathematical modeling of microbially induced crown corrosion in wastewater collection systems and laboratory investigation and modeling of sulfuric acid corrosion of concrete

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jahani, Fereidoun

    In the model for microbially induced crown corrosion, the diffusion of sulfide inside the concrete pores, its biological conversion to sulfuric acid, and the corrosion of calcium carbonate aggregates are represented. The corrosion front is modeled as a moving boundary. The location of the interface between the corrosion layer and the concrete is determined as part of the solution to the model equations. This model consisted of a system of one dimensional reaction-diffusion equations coupled to an equation describing the movement of the corrosion front. The equations were solved numerically using finite element Galerkin approximation. The concentration profiles of sulfide in the air and the liquid phases, the pH as a function of concrete depth, and the position of the corrosion front. A new equation for the corrosion rate was also derived. A more specific model for the degradation of a concrete specimen exposed to a sulfuric acid solution was also studied. In this model, diffusion of hydrogen ions and their reaction with alkaline components of concrete were expressed using Fick's Law of diffusion. The model equations described the moving boundary, the dissolution rate of alkaline components in the concrete, volume increase of sulfuric acid solution over the concrete specimen, and the boundary conditions on the surface of the concrete. An apparatus was designed and experiments were performed to measure pH changes on the surface of concrete. The data were used to calculate the dissolution rate of the concrete and, with the model, to determine the diffusion rate of sulfuric acid in the corrosion layer and corrosion layer thickness. Electrochemical Impedance Spectroscopy (EIS) was used to study the corrosion rate of iron pins embedded in the concrete sample. The open circuit potential (OCP) determined the onset of corrosion on the surface of the pins. Visual observation of the corrosion layer thickness was in good agreement with the simulation results.

  11. Dipeptidyl peptidase IV inhibition potentiates amino acid- and bile acid-induced bicarbonate secretion in rat duodenum.

    PubMed

    Inoue, Takuya; Wang, Joon-Ho; Higashiyama, Masaaki; Rudenkyy, Sergiy; Higuchi, Kazuhide; Guth, Paul H; Engel, Eli; Kaunitz, Jonathan D; Akiba, Yasutada

    2012-10-01

    Intestinal endocrine cells release gut hormones, including glucagon-like peptides (GLPs), in response to luminal nutrients. Luminal L-glutamate (L-Glu) and 5'-inosine monophosphate (IMP) synergistically increases duodenal HCO3- secretion via GLP-2 release. Since L cells express the bile acid receptor TGR5 and dipeptidyl peptidase (DPP) IV rapidly degrades GLPs, we hypothesized that luminal amino acids or bile acids stimulate duodenal HCO3- secretion via GLP-2 release, which is enhanced by DPPIV inhibition. We measured HCO3- secretion with pH and CO2 electrodes using a perfused rat duodenal loop under isoflurane anesthesia. L-Glu (10 mM) and IMP (0.1 mM) were luminally coperfused with or without luminal perfusion (0.1 mM) or intravenous (iv) injection (3 μmol/kg) of the DPPIV inhibitor NVP728. The loop was also perfused with a selective TGR5 agonist betulinic acid (BTA, 10 μM) or the non-bile acid type TGR5 agonist 3-(2-chlorophenyl)-N-(4-chlorophenyl)-N,5-dimethylisoxazole-4-carboxamide (CCDC; 10 μM). DPPIV activity visualized by use of the fluorogenic substrate was present on the duodenal brush border and submucosal layer, both abolished by the incubation with NVP728 (0.1 mM). An iv injection of NVP728 enhanced L-Glu/IMP-induced HCO3- secretion, whereas luminal perfusion of NVP728 had no effect. BTA or CCDC had little effect on HCO3- secretion, whereas NVP728 iv markedly enhanced BTA- or CCDC-induced HCO3- secretion, the effects inhibited by a GLP-2 receptor antagonist. Coperfusion of the TGR5 agonist enhanced L-Glu/IMP-induced HCO3- secretion with the enhanced GLP-2 release, suggesting that TGR5 activation amplifies nutrient sensing signals. DPPIV inhibition potentiated luminal L-Glu/IMP-induced and TGR5 agonist-induced HCO3- secretion via a GLP-2 pathway, suggesting that the modulation of the local concentration of the endogenous secretagogue GLP-2 by luminal compounds and DPPIV inhibition helps regulate protective duodenal HCO3- secretion. PMID:22821947

  12. SULFUR DIOXIDE-INDUCED BRONCHOCONSTRICTION IN ASTHMATICS EXPOSED FOR SHORT DURATIONS UNDER CONTROLLED CONDITIONS: A SELECTED REVIEW

    EPA Science Inventory

    Prior to 1980, essentially no health related effects had been observed for short-term ( < 1 hr) exposures to sulfur dioxide (SO2) levels similar to those found in the ambient environment (= or < 1 ppm). In 1980 and 81, the results from several studies indicated that asthmatics' a...

  13. Sulfur Earth

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Jong, B. H.

    2007-12-01

    Variations in surface tension affect the buoyancy of objects floating in a liquid. Thus an object floating in water will sink deeper in the presence of dishwater fluid. This is a very minor but measurable effect. It causes for instance ducks to drown in aqueous solutions with added surfactant. The surface tension of liquid iron is very strongly affected by the presence of sulfur which acts as a surfactant in this system varying between 1.9 and 0.4 N/m at 10 mass percent Sulfur (Lee & Morita (2002), This last value is inferred to be the maximum value for Sulfur inferred to be present in the liquid outer core. Venting of Sulfur from the liquid core manifests itself on the Earth surface by the 105 to 106 ton of sulfur vented into the atmosphere annually (Wedepohl, 1984). Inspection of surface Sulfur emission indicates that venting is non-homogeneously distributed over the Earth's surface. The implication of such large variation in surface tension in the liquid outer core are that at locally low Sulfur concentration, the liquid outer core does not wet the predominantly MgSiO3 matrix with which it is in contact. However at a local high in Sulfur, the liquid outer core wets this matrix which in the fluid state has a surface tension of 0.4 N/m (Bansal & Doremus, 1986), couples with it, and causes it to sink. This differential and diapiric movement is transmitted through the essentially brittle mantle (1024 Pa.s, Lambeck & Johnson, 1998; the maximum value for ice being about 1030 Pa.s at 0 K, in all likely hood representing an upper bound of viscosity for all materials) and manifests itself on the surface by the roughly 20 km differentiation, about 0.1 % of the total mantle thickness, between topographical heights and lows with concomitant lateral movement in the crust and upper mantle resulting in thin skin tectonics. The brittle nature of the medium though which this movement is transmitted suggests that the extremes in topography of the D" layer are similar in range to

  14. The role of amino acid-induced mammalian target of rapamycin complex 1(mTORC1) signaling in insulin resistance

    PubMed Central

    Yoon, Mee-Sup; Choi, Cheol Soo

    2016-01-01

    Mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) controls cell growth and metabolism in response to nutrients, energy, and growth factors. Recent findings have placed the lysosome at the core of mTOR complex 1 (mTORC1) regulation by amino acids. Two parallel pathways, Rag GTPase-Ragulator and Vps34-phospholipase D1 (PLD1), regulate mTOR activation on the lysosome. This review describes the recent advances in understanding amino acid-induced mTOR signaling with a particular focus on the role of mTOR in insulin resistance. PMID:27534530

  15. The role of amino acid-induced mammalian target of rapamycin complex 1(mTORC1) signaling in insulin resistance.

    PubMed

    Yoon, Mee-Sup; Choi, Cheol Soo

    2016-01-01

    Mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) controls cell growth and metabolism in response to nutrients, energy, and growth factors. Recent findings have placed the lysosome at the core of mTOR complex 1 (mTORC1) regulation by amino acids. Two parallel pathways, Rag GTPase-Ragulator and Vps34-phospholipase D1 (PLD1), regulate mTOR activation on the lysosome. This review describes the recent advances in understanding amino acid-induced mTOR signaling with a particular focus on the role of mTOR in insulin resistance. PMID:27534530

  16. Determination and prevention of cytotoxic effects induced in human lymphocytes by the alkylating agent 2,2`-dichlorodiethyl sulfide (sulfur mustard, HD). (Reannouncement with new availability information)

    SciTech Connect

    Meier, H.L.; Johnson, J.B.

    1992-12-31

    2,2`-Dichlorodiethyl sulfide (sulfur mustard), HD, 1,1`thiobis(2-chloroethane) is a potent vesicant which can cause severe lesions to skin, lung, and eyes. There is no convenient in vitro or in vivo method(s) to objectively measure the damage induced by HD; therefore, a simple in vitro method was developed using human peripheral lymphocytes to study HD-induced cytotoxicity. The cytotoxicity of HD was measured using dye exclusion as an indicator of human lymphocyte viability. Exposure to HD resulted in both a time- and a concentration-dependent cytotoxic effect on human lymphocytes. Using this in vitro assay, the effectiveness of various therapeutics (niacin, niacinamide, and 3-aminobenzamide) in preventing HD-induced cytotoxicity was studied. Niacinamide and 3-aminobenzamide prevented the cytotoxic effects of HD for up to 2 days.

  17. Role of TNFR1 in lung injury and altered lung function induced by the model sulfur mustard vesicant, 2-chloroethyl ethyl sulfide

    SciTech Connect

    Sunil, Vasanthi R.; Patel-Vayas, Kinal; Shen, Jianliang; Gow, Andrew J.; Laskin, Jeffrey D.; Laskin, Debra L.

    2011-02-01

    Lung toxicity induced by sulfur mustard is associated with inflammation and oxidative stress. To elucidate mechanisms mediating pulmonary damage, we used 2-chloroethyl ethyl sulfide (CEES), a model sulfur mustard vesicant. Male mice (B6129) were treated intratracheally with CEES (3 or 6 mg/kg) or control. Animals were sacrificed 3, 7 or 14 days later and bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL) fluid and lung tissue collected. Treatment of mice with CEES resulted in an increase in BAL protein, an indication of alveolar epithelial damage, within 3 days. Expression of Ym1, an oxidative stress marker also increased in the lung, along with inducible nitric oxide synthase, and at 14 days, cyclooxygenase-2 and monocyte chemotactic protein-1, inflammatory proteins implicated in tissue injury. These responses were attenuated in mice lacking the p55 receptor for TNF{alpha} (TNFR1-/-), demonstrating that signaling via TNFR1 is key to CEES-induced injury, oxidative stress, and inflammation. CEES-induced upregulation of CuZn-superoxide dismutase (SOD) and MnSOD was delayed or absent in TNFR1-/- mice, relative to WT mice, suggesting that TNF{alpha} mediates early antioxidant responses to lung toxicants. Treatment of WT mice with CEES also resulted in functional alterations in the lung including decreases in compliance and increases in elastance. Additionally, methacholine-induced alterations in total lung resistance and central airway resistance were dampened by CEES. Loss of TNFR1 resulted in blunted functional responses to CEES. These effects were most notable in the airways. These data suggest that targeting TNF{alpha} signaling may be useful in mitigating lung injury, inflammation and functional alterations induced by vesicants.

  18. Identification of amino acids controlling the low-pH-induced conformational change of rabies virus glycoprotein.

    PubMed Central

    Gaudin, Y; Raux, H; Flamand, A; Ruigrok, R W

    1996-01-01

    The glycoprotein (G) of rabies virus assumes at least three different conformations: the native state detected at the viral surface above pH 7, the activated state involved in the first step of the fusion process, and the fusion-inactive conformation (I). A new category of monoclonal antibodies (MAbs) which recognized specifically the I conformation at the viral surface has recently been described. These MAbs (17A4 and 29EC2) became neutralizing when the virus was preincubated at acidic pH to induce the conformational change toward the I state of G. Mutants escaping neutralization were then selected. In this study, we have investigated the fusion and the low-pH-induced fusion inactivation properties of these mutants. All of these mutants have fusion properties similar to those of the CVS parental strain, but five mutants (E282K, M44I, M44V, V392G, and M396T) were considerably slowed in their conformational change leading to the I state. These mutants allow us to define regions that control this conformational change. These results also reinforce the idea that structural transition toward the I state is irrelevant to the fusion process. Other mutations in amino acids 10, 13, and 15 are probably located in the epitopes of selecting MAbs. Furthermore, in electron microscopy, we observed a hexagonal lattice of glycoproteins at the viral surface of mutants M44I and V392G as well as strong cooperativity in the conformational change toward the I state. This finding demonstrates the existence of lateral interactions between the spikes of a rhabdovirus. PMID:8892855

  19. [Effect of excitant amino acid antagonists on glutamate receptors in the locust and on convulsions induced by glutamate, aspartate, kynurenine and quinolinic acid in mice].

    PubMed

    Ryzhov, I V; Slepokurov, M V; Lapin, I P; Mandel'shtam, Iu E; Aleksandrov, V G

    1986-03-01

    All excitatory amino acid antagonists studied: diethyl esters of aspartic (DEEA) and glutamic (DEEG) acids, 2-amino-3-phosphono-propionic acid (APPA) and 2-amino-4-phosphono-butanoic acid (APBA), diminished the amplitude of excitatory postsynaptic potentials (EPP) of the locust (Locusta migratoria migratorioides) muscle fibers and arbitrary blocked glutamate (GLU) and aspartate (ASP) responses. Kynurenine (KYN) and quinolinic (QUI) acid had no effect on EPP even at a concentration of 2 X 10(-2) M. The antagonists were not strictly selective against intracerebroventricularly administered endogenous convulsants: GLU, ASP, KYN and QUI and in simulation of experimental seizures in mice. The antagonists structurally similar to ASP prevented ASP- and KYN-induced seizures in lower doses than GLU derivatives. Anti-KYN, but not anti-QUI DEEA, DEEG, APPA and APBA efficacy suggests that KYN and QUI act on different structures or binding sites. PMID:2869799

  20. Enantioseparation of N-derivatized amino acids by micro-liquid chromatography/laser induced fluorescence detection using quinidine-based monolithic columns.

    PubMed

    Wu, Huihui; Wang, Qiqin; Ruan, Meng; Peng, Kun; Zhu, Peijie; Crommen, Jacques; Han, Hai; Jiang, Zhengjin

    2016-03-20

    A novel carbamoylated quinidine based monolith, namely poly(O-9-[2-(methacryloyloxy)-ethylcarbamoyl]-10,11-dihydroquinidine-co-ethylene dimethacrylate (poly(MQD-co-EDMA)), was prepared for the micro-LC enantioseparation of N-derivatized amino acids. The influence of the mobile phase composition, including the organic modifier proportion, the apparent pH and the buffer concentration, on the enantioresolution of N-derivatized amino acids was systematically investigated. Satisfactory column performance in terms of permeability, efficiency and reproducibility was obtained in most cases. The majority of the enantiomers of the tested N-protected amino acids, including 3,5-DNB, 3,5-DClB, FMOC, 3,5-DMB, p-NB, m-ClB, p-ClB and B derivatives, could be baseline separated on the poly(MQD-co-EDMA) monolithic column within 25min. A self-assembled laser induced fluorescence (LIF) detector was employed to improve sensitivity when analyzing 7-nitro-2,1,3-benzoxadiazole (NBD) derivatives of amino acids. Ten NBD-derivatized amino acids, including arginine and histidine whose enantioseparation on quinidine carbamate based CSPs has not been reported so far, were enantioresolved on the poly(MQD-co-EDMA) monolith column. It is worth noting that the d-enantiomers of NBD-derivatized amino acids eluted first, except in the case of glutamic acid. The LOD values obtained with the LIF detector were comparable to those reported using conventional LC-FL methods. The prepared poly(MQD-co-EDMA) monolithic column coupled with the LIF detector opens up interesting perspectives to the determination of trace D-amino acids in biological samples. PMID:26732881

  1. L-DOPA Reverses the Increased Free Amino Acids Tissue Levels Induced by Dopamine Depletion and Rises GABA and Tyrosine in the Striatum.

    PubMed

    Solís, Oscar; García-Sanz, Patricia; Herranz, Antonio S; Asensio, María-José; Moratalla, Rosario

    2016-07-01

    Perturbations in the cerebral levels of various amino acids are associated with neurological disorders, and previous studies have suggested that such alterations have a role in the motor and non-motor symptoms of Parkinson's disease. However, the direct effects of chronic L-DOPA treatment, that produces dyskinesia, on neural tissue amino acid concentrations have not been explored in detail. To evaluate whether striatal amino acid concentrations are altered in peak dose dyskinesia, 6-hydroxydopamine (6-OHDA)-lesioned hemiparkinsonian mice were treated chronically with L-DOPA and tissue amino acid concentrations were assessed by HPLC analysis. These experiments revealed that neither 6-OHDA nor L-DOPA treatment are able to alter glutamate in the striatum. However, glutamine increases after 6-OHDA and returns back to normal levels with L-DOPA treatment, suggesting increased striatal glutamatergic transmission with lack of dopamine. In addition, glycine and taurine levels are increased following dopamine denervation and restored to normal levels by L-DOPA. Interestingly, dyskinetic animals showed increased levels of GABA and tyrosine, while aspartate striatal tissue levels are not altered. Overall, our results indicate that chronic L-DOPA treatment, besides normalizing the altered levels of some amino acids after 6-OHDA, robustly increases striatal GABA and tyrosine levels which may in turn contribute to the development of L-DOPA-induced dyskinesia. PMID:26966009

  2. Water Deficit-Induced Changes in Concentrations in Proline and Some Other Amino Acids in the Phloem Sap of Alfalfa.

    PubMed Central

    Girousse, C.; Bournoville, R.; Bonnemain, J. L.

    1996-01-01

    Changes in amino acid composition of alfalfa (Medicago sativa L.) phloem sap were studies in response to a water deficit. Sap was collected by stylectomy. As the leaf water potential ([psi]) decreased from -0.4 to -2.0 MPa, there was significant increase of the total amino acid concentration, due to that of some amino acids: proline, valine, isoleucine, leucine, glutamic acid, aspartic acid, and threonine. Asparagine concentration, which is the main amino acid assayed in the phloem sap of alfalfa (it accounts for 70% of the total content), did not vary with the plant water status. The other amino acid concentrations remained stable as [psi] varied; in particular, [gamma]-amino butyric acid concentration remained unchanged, whereas it varied in response to wounding. The more striking change in the sieve tubes was the accumulation of proline, which was observed below a [psi] threshold value of about -0.9 MPa (concentration x60 for a decrease of [psi] from -0.9 to -2.0 MPa). The role of such changes in phloem sap amino acid concentration in osmotic adjustment of growing tissues is discussed. PMID:12226278

  3. Cardiac damage induced by 2-amino-3-methyl-imidazo[4,5-f]quinoline in nonhuman primates.

    PubMed Central

    Thorgeirsson, U P; Farb, A; Virmani, R; Adamson, R H

    1994-01-01

    The heterocyclic aromatic amine 2-amino-3-methylimidazo[4,5-f]quinoline (IQ) is a potent hepatocarcinogen in cynomolgus and rhesus monkeys. The finding of high cardiac IQ-DNA adduct levels prompted a histopathological study of perfusion-fixed hearts from 10 tumor-bearing monkeys chronically dosed with IQ at 10 mg/kg or 20 mg/kg 5 days per week for 48-80 months. Two monkeys dosed only with the vehicle for IQ, hydroxypropylcellulose, served as controls. All the monkeys had normal heart weights, and no abnormalities were observed upon gross inspection of the hearts. Microscopically, focal myocardial lesions were observed in 8 of 10 monkeys dosed with IQ. Light microscopic abnormalities included myocyte necrosis with or without chronic inflammatory infiltrates, interstitial fibrosis with myocyte hypertrophy or atrophy, and vasculitis. Electron microscopic findings included disruption of the mitochondrial architecture (i.e., mitochondrial swelling and clearing of matrix densities), myofibrillar loss, disorganization of the normal alignment of sarcomeres, and occasional myocytes showing nuclear hypertrophy or peripheral clumping of the nuclear chromatin. There was some correlation between the cumulative dose of IQ and the extent of the myocardial abnormalities. These findings suggest that chronic exposure to IQ can lead to myocardial damage in monkeys. Although focal and not associated with clinical evidence of heart failure, these abnormalities may represent the initial stages of IQ-induced toxic cardiomyopathy. Images Figure 1. A Figure 1. B Figure 1. C Figure 1. D Figure 2. A Figure 2. B Figure 3. A Figure 3. B Figure 3. C Figure 3. D Figure 4. A Figure 4. B Figure 5. A Figure 5. B PMID:8033851

  4. Photosensitized 2-amino-3-hydroxypyridine-induced mitochondrial apoptosis via Smac/DIABLO in human skin cells.

    PubMed

    Goyal, Shruti; Amar, Saroj Kumar; Dwivedi, Ashish; Mujtaba, Syed Faiz; Kushwaha, Hari Narayan; Chopra, Deepti; Pal, Manish Kumar; Singh, Dhirendra; Chaturvedi, Rajnish Kumar; Ray, Ratan Singh

    2016-04-15

    The popularity of hair dyes use has been increasing regularly throughout the world as per the demand of hair coloring fashion trends and other cosmetic products. 2-Amino-3-hydroxypyridine (A132) is widely used as a hair dye ingredient around the world. We are reporting first time the phototoxicity mechanism of A132 under ambient environmental UV-B radiation. It showed maximum absorption in UV-B region (317 nm) and forms a photoproduct within an hour exposure of UV-B irradiation. Photocytotoxicity of A132 in human keratinocytes (HaCaT) was measured by mitochondrial (MTT), lysosomal (NRU) and LDH assays which illustrated the significant reduction in cell viability. The role of reactive oxygen species (ROS) generation for A132 phototoxicity was established photo- chemically as well as intracellularly. Noteworthy, formation of tail DNA (comet assay), micronuclei and cyclobutane pyrimidine dimers (CPDs) (immunocytochemistry) formation confirmed the photogenotoxic potential of dye. Cell cycle study (sub-G1peak) and staining with EB/AO revealed the cell cycle arrest and apoptosis. Further, mitochondrial mediated apoptosis was corroborated by reduced MMP, release of cytochrome c and upregulation of caspase-3. Release of mitochondrial Smac/DIABLO in cytoplasm demonstrated the caspase dependent apoptotic cell death by photolabile A132 dye. In-addition increased Bax/Bcl2 ratio again proved the apoptosis. Thus, study suggests that A132 induces photogenotoxicity, phototoxicity and apoptotic cell death through the involvement of Smac/DIABLO in mitochondrial apoptosis via caspase dependent manner. Therefore, the long term use of A132 dye and sunlight exposure jointly increased the oxidative stress in skin which causes premature hair loss, damage to progenitor cells of hair follicles. PMID:26933830

  5. The Biogeochemistry of Sulfur in Hydrothermal Systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schulte, Mitchell; Rogers, K. L.; DeVincenzi, Donald L. (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    The incorporation of sulfur into many biomolecules likely dates back to the development of the earliest metabolic strategies. Sulfur is common in enzymes and co-enzymes and is an indispensable structural component in many peptides and proteins. Early metabolism may have been heavily influenced by the abundance of sulfide minerals in hydrothermal systems. The incorporation of sulfur into many biomolecules likely dates back to the development of the earliest metabolic strategies. Sulfur is common in enzymes and co-enzymes and is an indispensable structural component in many peptides and proteins. Early metabolism may have been heavily influenced by the abundance of sulfide minerals in hydrothermal systems. Understanding how sulfur became prevalent in biochemical processes and many biomolecules requires knowledge of the reaction properties of sulfur-bearing compounds. We have previously estimated thermodynamic data for thiols, the simplest organic sulfur compounds, at elevated temperatures and pressures. If life began in hydrothermal environments, it is especially important to understand reactions at elevated temperatures among sulfur-bearing compounds and other organic molecules essential for the origin and persistence of life. Here we examine reactions that may have formed amino acids with thiols as reaction intermediates in hypothetical early Earth hydrothermal environments. (There are two amino acids, cysteine and methionine, that contain sulfur.) Our calculations suggest that significant amounts of some amino acids were produced in early Earth hydrothermal fluids, given reasonable concentrations H2, NH3, H2S and CO. For example, preliminary results indicate that glycine activities as high as 1 mmol can be reached in these systems at 100 C. Alanine formation from propanethiol is also a favorable reaction. On the other hand, the calculated equilibrium log activities of cysteine and serine from propanethiol are -21 and -19, respectively, at 100 C. These results

  6. Interaction of Atmospheric-Pressure Air Microplasmas with Amino Acids as Fundamental Processes in Aqueous Solution

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Renwu; Zhou, Rusen; Zhuang, Jinxing; Zong, Zichao; Zhang, Xianhui; Liu, Dongping; Bazaka, Kateryna; Ostrikov, Kostya

    2016-01-01

    Plasma medicine is a relatively new field that investigates potential applications of cold atmospheric-pressure plasmas in bioengineering, such as for bacterial inactivation and degradation of organic molecules in water. In order to enunciate mechanisms of bacterial inactivation at molecular or atomic levels, we investigated the interaction of atmospheric-pressure air microplasmas with amino acids in aqueous solution by using high-resolution mass spectrometry (HRMS). Results show that the oxidation effect of plasma-induced species on the side chains of the amino acids can be categorized into four types, namely hydroxylation, nitration, dehydrogenation and dimerization. In addition, relative activities of amino acids resulting from plasma treatment come in descending order as follows: sulfur-containing carbon-chain amino acids > aromatic amino acids > five-membered ring amino acids > basic carbon-chain amino acids. Since amino acids are building blocks of proteins vital to the growth and reproduction of bacteria, these results provide an insight into the mechanism of bacterial inactivation by plasma. PMID:27183129

  7. Interaction of Atmospheric-Pressure Air Microplasmas with Amino Acids as Fundamental Processes in Aqueous Solution.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Renwu; Zhou, Rusen; Zhuang, Jinxing; Zong, Zichao; Zhang, Xianhui; Liu, Dongping; Bazaka, Kateryna; Ostrikov, Kostya

    2016-01-01

    Plasma medicine is a relatively new field that investigates potential applications of cold atmospheric-pressure plasmas in bioengineering, such as for bacterial inactivation and degradation of organic molecules in water. In order to enunciate mechanisms of bacterial inactivation at molecular or atomic levels, we investigated the interaction of atmospheric-pressure air microplasmas with amino acids in aqueous solution by using high-resolution mass spectrometry (HRMS). Results show that the oxidation effect of plasma-induced species on the side chains of the amino acids can be categorized into four types, namely hydroxylation, nitration, dehydrogenation and dimerization. In addition, relative activities of amino acids resulting from plasma treatment come in descending order as follows: sulfur-containing carbon-chain amino acids > aromatic amino acids > five-membered ring amino acids > basic carbon-chain amino acids. Since amino acids are building blocks of proteins vital to the growth and reproduction of bacteria, these results provide an insight into the mechanism of bacterial inactivation by plasma. PMID:27183129

  8. Enantiomeric Excesses Induced in Amino Acids by Ultraviolet Circularly Polarized Light Irradiation of Extraterrestrial Ice Analogs: A Possible Source of Asymmetry for Prebiotic Chemistry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Modica, Paola; Meinert, Cornelia; de Marcellus, Pierre; Nahon, Laurent; Meierhenrich, Uwe J.; Le Sergeant d'Hendecourt, Louis

    2014-06-01

    The discovery of meteoritic amino acids with enantiomeric excesses of the L-form (ee L) has suggested that extraterrestrial organic materials may have contributed to prebiotic chemistry and directed the initial occurrence of the ee L that further led to homochirality of amino acids on Earth. A proposed mechanism for the origin of ee L in meteorites involves an asymmetric photochemistry of extraterrestrial ices by UV circularly polarized light (CPL). We have performed the asymmetric synthesis of amino acids on achiral extraterrestrial ice analogs by VUV CPL, investigating the chiral asymmetry transfer at two different evolutionary stages at which the analogs were irradiated (regular ices and/or organic residues) and at two different photon energies (6.6 and 10.2 eV). We identify 16 distinct amino acids and precisely measure the L-enantiomeric excesses using the enantioselective GC × GC-TOFMS technique in five of them: α-alanine, 2,3-diaminopropionic acid, 2-aminobutyric acid, valine, and norvaline, with values ranging from ee L = -0.20% ± 0.14% to ee L = -2.54% ± 0.28%. The sign of the induced ee L depends on the helicity and the energy of CPL, but not on the evolutionary stage of the samples, and is the same for all five considered amino acids. Our results support an astrophysical scenario in which the solar system was formed in a high-mass star-forming region where icy grains were irradiated during the protoplanetary phase by an external source of CPL of a given helicity and a dominant energy, inducing a stereo-specific photochemistry.

  9. Enantiomeric excesses induced in amino acids by ultraviolet circularly polarized light irradiation of extraterrestrial ice analogs: A possible source of asymmetry for prebiotic chemistry

    SciTech Connect

    Modica, Paola; De Marcellus, Pierre; D'Hendecourt, Louis Le Sergeant; Meinert, Cornelia; Meierhenrich, Uwe J.; Nahon, Laurent E-mail: ldh@ias.u-psud.fr

    2014-06-10

    The discovery of meteoritic amino acids with enantiomeric excesses of the L-form (ee {sub L}) has suggested that extraterrestrial organic materials may have contributed to prebiotic chemistry and directed the initial occurrence of the ee {sub L} that further led to homochirality of amino acids on Earth. A proposed mechanism for the origin of ee {sub L} in meteorites involves an asymmetric photochemistry of extraterrestrial ices by UV circularly polarized light (CPL). We have performed the asymmetric synthesis of amino acids on achiral extraterrestrial ice analogs by VUV CPL, investigating the chiral asymmetry transfer at two different evolutionary stages at which the analogs were irradiated (regular ices and/or organic residues) and at two different photon energies (6.6 and 10.2 eV). We identify 16 distinct amino acids and precisely measure the L-enantiomeric excesses using the enantioselective GC × GC-TOFMS technique in five of them: α-alanine, 2,3-diaminopropionic acid, 2-aminobutyric acid, valine, and norvaline, with values ranging from ee {sub L} = –0.20% ± 0.14% to ee {sub L} = –2.54% ± 0.28%. The sign of the induced ee {sub L} depends on the helicity and the energy of CPL, but not on the evolutionary stage of the samples, and is the same for all five considered amino acids. Our results support an astrophysical scenario in which the solar system was formed in a high-mass star-forming region where icy grains were irradiated during the protoplanetary phase by an external source of CPL of a given helicity and a dominant energy, inducing a stereo-specific photochemistry.

  10. Aboveground and Belowground Herbivores Synergistically Induce Volatile Organic Sulfur Compound Emissions from Shoots but Not from Roots.

    PubMed

    Danner, Holger; Brown, Phil; Cator, Eric A; Harren, Frans J M; van Dam, Nicole M; Cristescu, Simona M

    2015-07-01

    Studies on aboveground (AG) plant organs have shown that volatile organic compound (VOC) emissions differ between simultaneous attack by herbivores and single herbivore attack. There is growing evidence that interactive effects of simultaneous herbivory also occur across the root-shoot interface. In our study, Brassica rapa roots were infested with root fly larvae (Delia radicum) and the shoots infested with Pieris brassicae, either singly or simultaneously, to study these root-shoot interactions. As an analytical platform, we used Proton Transfer Reaction Mass Spectrometry (PTR-MS) to investigate VOCs over a 3 day time period. Our set-up allowed us to monitor root and shoot emissions concurrently on the same plant. Focus was placed on the sulfur-containing compounds; methanethiol, dimethylsulfide (DMS), and dimethyldisulfide (DMDS), because these compounds previously have been shown to be biologically active in the interactions of Brassica plants, herbivores, parasitoids, and predators, yet have received relatively little attention. The shoots of plants simultaneously infested with AG and belowground (BG) herbivores emitted higher levels of sulfur-containing compounds than plants with a single herbivore species present. In contrast, the emission of sulfur VOCs from the plant roots increased as a consequence of root herbivory, independent of the presence of an AG herbivore. The onset of root emissions was more rapid after damage than the onset of shoot emissions. The shoots of double infested plants also emitted higher levels of methanol. Thus, interactive effects of root and shoot herbivores exhibit more strongly in the VOC emissions from the shoots than from the roots, implying the involvement of specific signaling interactions. PMID:26195194

  11. Amino acid imbalance in cystinuria

    PubMed Central

    Asatoor, A. M.; Freedman, P. S.; Gabriel, J. R. T.; Milne, M. D.; Prosser, D. I.; Roberts, J. T.; Willoughby, C. P.

    1974-01-01

    After oral ingestion of a free amino acid mixture by three cystinuric patients, plasma increments of lysine and arginine were lower and those of many other amino acids were significantly higher than those found in control subjects. Similar results were obtained in control subjects after amino acid imbalance had been artificially induced by the omission of cystine, lysine, and arginine from the amino acid mixture. Especially high increments of alanine and proline provided the best evidence of amino acid imbalance caused by a temporary lysine and, to a lesser extent, arginine and cystine deficit. No such amino acid imbalance was found to occur in the cystinuric patients after ingestion of whole protein, indicating that absorption of oligopeptides produced by protein digestion provided a balanced physiological serum amino acid increment. This is considered to explain the lack of any unequivocal nutritional deficit in cystinuric patients despite poor absorption of the essential free amino acid, lysine. PMID:4411931

  12. Determination of free amino acids in African gourd seed milks by capillary electrophoresis with light-emitting diode induced fluorescence and laser-induced fluorescence detection.

    PubMed

    Enzonga, Josiane; Ong-Meang, Varravaddheay; Couderc, François; Boutonnet, Audrey; Poinsot, Véréna; Tsieri, Michel Mvoula; Silou, Thomas; Bouajila, Jalloul

    2013-09-01

    A CE technique coupled to LIF detection (488 nm) or LED-induced fluorescence detection (470 nm) has been evaluated to acquire a cheap way to analyze amino acids (AAs) whilst maintaining the best sensitivity. To quantitate AAs in milk of Cucurbitaceae of Sub-Saharan Africa, they were labeled with FITC. We used an optimized separation buffer composed of 30 mM boric acid buffer adjusted to pH 9.3 with NaOH (1 M) containing 12 mM SDS and 5% ethylene glycol v/v; prior to the injections, the derivatized samples are diluted 100 times. The LOQs in the sample are Arg: 1.1 μM, Ala: 3.5 μM, and Glu 8.9 μM. Cucumeropsis mannii (CM) Naudin and Citrullus lanatus (CL) are vegetable sources rich in proteins and AAs of high quality. Our analyses have led to the identification of 11 AAs in CL and CM milks. Phe, Trp, and Ala are predominant in the two types of lyophilized milks, while Asp and Val demonstrate very low contents. Six essential AAs (Phe, Thr, Val, Trp, Ile, and Leu) are present in both types of extracts, but lysine was not detected, indicating that this AA is missing in gourd milk. These results should be useful in efforts to complement or replace very expensive cow milk or the less-appreciated soya milk with milk from available local agroressources. PMID:23857426

  13. Use of technetium-99m sulfur colloid to evaluate changes in reticuloendothelial function in dogs with experimentally induced chronic biliary cirrhosis and portosystemic shunting.

    PubMed

    Koblik, P D; Hornof, W J; Yen, C K; Fisher, P E; Komtebedde, J

    1995-05-01

    Technetium-99m sulfur colloid scintigraphy was used to study alterations of reticuloendothelial function in 7 dogs with experimentally induced biliary cirrhosis and portosystemic shunting. Scintigraphic studies were performed before and 6 weeks after common bile duct ligation. Radiocolloid plasma clearance rate was determined by measuring activity in plasma samples and by analyzing the rate of liver uptake on dynamic scintigraphic image sequences. Percentage of uptake in the liver, spleen, and lungs, as well as the ratio of hepatic-to-extrahepatic uptake, was determined from static equilibrium images. Relative to preoperative values, there were significant decreases in plasma clearance rate, percentage of liver uptake, and ratio of hepatic-to-extrahepatic uptake and significant increases in percentage of spleen and lung uptake on postoperative studies. The mechanism of technetium-99m-labeled sulfur colloid extraction by the liver is different from that of other radiocolloids; it does not require active phagocytosis or pinocytosis. Thus, liver uptake of this tracer principally reflects effective liver blood flow. Portosystemic shunting was documented in these dogs at the time of the postoperative radiocolloid scans, and we believed was responsible for the decrease in liver reticuloendothelial activity. Possible mechanisms for the increased splenic and pulmonary reticuloendothelial activities are discussed. PMID:7661466

  14. The effect of viscosity, applied frequency and driven pressure on the laser induced bubble luminescence in water-sulfuric acid mixtures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sadighi-Bonabi, Rasoul; Alijan Farzad Lahiji, Faezeh; Razeghi, Fatemeh

    2016-06-01

    Production and oscillation of sonoluminescence bubbles by laser pulse in the presence of acoustic field in water and different concentrations of sulfuric acid are investigated. In the presence of acoustic field, the laser causes variable speed of sound, surface tension and density; and the host liquid acts as a compressible one and strongly affects the bubble's dynamics equations. The effect of various concentrations of sulfuric acid as a host liquid on the oscillation of bubble radius, bubble wall velocity and bubble interior temperature is studied. Furthermore, the effect of applied frequency on LI-SCBL in the presence of the acoustic field is investigated and an optimum sound wave frequency for the bubble oscillation and bubble interior temperature in pure water and SA is introduced. Based on the modification of RP equation, by applying the optimum frequency, the results indicate that the maximum bubble radius for LI-SCBL in the presence of the acoustic field is increased up to 7 ×10-4 m as this article presents, which is more than 40% improvement. This amount results in interior temperature of more than three times, from almost 5000 K in the previous works to almost 16 000 K in the present report. This is very similar to the experimental measurements for bubble radius induced by laser. Furthermore, the effects of driving pressure amplitudes on the bubble radius, the bubble interior temperature and the bubble wall velocity in different host liquids and in optimum frequency are investigated.

  15. Analysis of common bean expressed sequence tags identifies sulfur metabolic pathways active in seed and sulfur-rich proteins highly expressed in the absence of phaseolin and major lectins

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background A deficiency in phaseolin and phytohemagglutinin is associated with a near doubling of sulfur amino acid content in genetically related lines of common bean (Phaseolus vulgaris), particularly cysteine, elevated by 70%, and methionine, elevated by 10%. This mostly takes place at the expense of an abundant non-protein amino acid, S-methyl-cysteine. The deficiency in phaseolin and phytohemagglutinin is mainly compensated by increased levels of the 11S globulin legumin and residual lectins. Legumin, albumin-2, defensin and albumin-1 were previously identified as contributing to the increased sulfur amino acid content in the mutant line, on the basis of similarity to proteins from other legumes. Results Profiling of free amino acid in developing seeds of the BAT93 reference genotype revealed a biphasic accumulation of gamma-glutamyl-S-methyl-cysteine, the main soluble form of S-methyl-cysteine, with a lag phase occurring during storage protein accumulation. A collection of 30,147 expressed sequence tags (ESTs) was generated from four developmental stages, corresponding to distinct phases of gamma-glutamyl-S-methyl-cysteine accumulation, and covering the transitions to reserve accumulation and dessication. Analysis of gene ontology categories indicated the occurrence of multiple sulfur metabolic pathways, including all enzymatic activities responsible for sulfate assimilation, de novo cysteine and methionine biosynthesis. Integration of genomic and proteomic data enabled the identification and isolation of cDNAs coding for legumin, albumin-2, defensin D1 and albumin-1A and -B induced in the absence of phaseolin and phytohemagglutinin. Their deduced amino acid sequences have a higher content of cysteine than methionine, providing an explanation for the preferential increase of cysteine in the mutant line. Conclusion The EST collection provides a foundation to further investigate sulfur metabolism and the differential accumulation of sulfur amino acids in seed

  16. Identification of sulfur heterocycles in coal liquids and shale oils. Technical progress report, August 1, 1980-May 1, 1981

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, M. L.; Castle, R. N.

    1981-01-01

    The sulfur heterocycle separation scheme which was described in the last progress report was evaluated for quantitative recovery of individual components. The results indicate that recoveries can range from 10% to approx. 30% depending on the structure of the compound. During this period, 23 unsubstituted sulfur-containing heterocyclic ring systems were synthesized in oder to confirm GC/MS identifications and for biological testing. The four possible 3-ring heterocycles and the thirteen possible 4-ring heterocycles were tested for mutagenic activity in the histidine reversion (Ames assay) system. One of the 3-ring isomers, naphtho(1,2-b)-thiophene, and six of the 4-ring isomers induced mutations in Salmonella test strains. One of these compounds, phenanthro(3,4-b)thiophene, displayed approximately the same mutagenic activity as benzo(a)pyrene. A two-step adsorption chromatographic procedure was developed in order to fractionate synthetic fuels into various chemical-type classes for studying the relative concentrations and mutagenic activities of the various types. An SRC-II Heavy Distillate was fractionated into aliphatic hydrocarbons, polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons, sulfur heterocycles, indoles and carbazoles, azaarenes, and amino polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons. It was found that the amino-PAH fraction contained most of the mutagenic activity. A survey was made for compounds containing both nitrogen and sulfur heteroatoms in their structures. A number of these compounds were detected by GC using nitrogen- and sulfur-selective detection.

  17. Highly sensitive chiral analysis of amino acids by in-line single drop microextraction and capillary electrophoresis with laser-induced fluorescence detection.

    PubMed

    Liang, Guodong; Choi, Kihwan; Badjah Hadj Ahmed, Ahmed Yacine; ALOthman, Zeid A; Chung, Doo Soo

    2010-09-10

    A highly sensitive method for chiral analysis of amino acids by in-line single drop microextraction (SDME) and chiral capillary electrophoresis (CE) with laser-induced fluorescence (LIF) detection was developed. In SDME, a drop of a basic aqueous acceptor phase covered with a thin organic layer was formed at the tip of a capillary by simple combination of sample-handling sequences of a CE apparatus. Then fluorescein isothiocyanate (FITC)-derivatized amino acids in an acidic donor solution were enriched into the drop through the organic layer. The enriched enantiomers were then resolved using a dual chiral selector of β-cyclodextrin (β-CD) and sodium taurodeoxycholate (STC). Here, in addition to serving as a labeling reagent providing high fluorescence signal, hydrophobic FITC was primarily used as a modifier aiding the extraction of zwitterionic amino acids by blocking the amino groups and increasing the hydrophobicity, yielding 220 times increase in extraction efficiency. Several hundred-fold enrichments were achieved with 10 min SDME, yielding LODs of 30-60 pM and enabling direct analysis of d-AAs in a 99% enantiomeric excess mixture. In view of no additional modification of the existing commercial CE instrument, this method without stirring can be easily realized using known operations. When a microstirrer was customized to the CE instrument several thousand-fold enrichments could be obtained with LODs in the low picomolar range of 1-3 pM. PMID:20850587

  18. Dietary Glutamate Supplementation Ameliorates Mycotoxin-Induced Abnormalities in the Intestinal Structure and Expression of Amino Acid Transporters in Young Pigs

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Miaomiao; Liao, Peng; Deng, Dun; Liu, Gang; Wen, Qingqi; Wang, Yongfei; Qiu, Wei; Liu, Yan; Wu, Xingli; Ren, Wenkai; Tan, Bie; Chen, Minghong; Xiao, Hao; Wu, Li; Li, Tiejun; Nyachoti, Charles M.; Adeola, Olayiwola; Yin, Yulong

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the hypothesis that dietary supplementation with glutamic acid has beneficial effects on growth performance, antioxidant system, intestinal morphology, serum amino acid profile and the gene expression of intestinal amino acid transporters in growing swine fed mold-contaminated feed. Fifteen pigs (Landrace×Large White) with a mean body weight (BW) of 55 kg were randomly divided into control group (basal feed), mycotoxin group (contaminated feed) and glutamate group (2% glutamate+contaminated feed). Compared with control group, mold-contaminated feed decreased average daily gain (ADG) and increased feed conversion rate (FCR). Meanwhile, fed mold-contaminated feed impaired anti-oxidative system and intestinal morphology, as well as modified the serum amino acid profile in growing pigs. However, supplementation with glutamate exhibited potential positive effects on growth performance of pigs fed mold-contaminated feed, ameliorated the imbalance antioxidant system and abnormalities of intestinal structure caused by mycotoxins. In addition, dietary glutamate supplementation to some extent restored changed serum amino acid profile caused by mold-contaminated feed. In conclusion, glutamic acid may be act as a nutritional regulating factor to ameliorate the adverse effects induced by mycotoxins. PMID:25405987

  19. Yuanhuapine-induced intestinal and hepatotoxicity were correlated with disturbance of amino acids, lipids, carbohydrate metabolism and gut microflora function: A rat urine metabonomic study.

    PubMed

    Chen, Yanyan; Duan, Jin-Ao; Guo, Jianming; Shang, Erxin; Tang, Yuping; Qian, Yefei; Tao, Weiwei; Liu, Pei

    2016-07-15

    This research was designed to study metabonomic characteristics of the toxicity induced by yuanhuapine, a major bioactive diterpenoid in a well-known traditional Chinese medicine-Genkwa Flos. General observation, blood biochemistry and histopathological examination were used to reflect yuanhuapine-induced toxicity. Urine samples from rats in control and yuanhuapine treated rats were analyzed by ultra-performance liquid chromatography tandem quadrupole time-of-flight mass spectrometry (UPLC-Q-TOF/MS). Pattern recognition methods including principal components analysis (PCA), partial least-squared discriminant analysis (PLS-DA), orthogonal partial least-squared discriminant analysis (OPLS-DA) and computational system analysis were integrated to obtain comprehensive metabonomic profiling and pathways of the biological data sets. The results suggested that yuanhuapine could induce intestinal and liver damage. And 14 endogenous metabolites as biomarkers related to the amino acids metabolism, lipids metabolism, carbohydrate metabolism and gut microflora were significantly changed in the urine of yuanhuapine treated rats, which were firstly constructed the metabolomic feature profiling and metabolite interaction network of yuanhuapine-induced injury using pattern recognition methods and Ingenuity Pathway Analysis (IPA) approach. The present study showed that yuanhuapine-induced intestinal and hepatic toxicity were correlated with disturbance of amino acids metabolism, lipids metabolism, carbohydrate metabolism and gut microflora. PMID:26341729

  20. Therapeutic potential of a non-steroidal bifunctional anti-inflammatory and anti-cholinergic agent against skin injury induced by sulfur mustard

    SciTech Connect

    Chang, Yoke-Chen; Wang, James D.; Hahn, Rita A.; Gordon, Marion K.; Joseph, Laurie B.; Heck, Diane E.; Heindel, Ned D.; Young, Sherri C.; Sinko, Patrick J.; Casillas, Robert P.; Laskin, Jeffrey D.; Laskin, Debra L.; Gerecke, Donald R.

    2014-10-15

    Sulfur mustard (bis(2-chloroethyl) sulfide, SM) is a highly reactive bifunctional alkylating agent inducing edema, inflammation, and the formation of fluid-filled blisters in the skin. Medical countermeasures against SM-induced cutaneous injury have yet to be established. In the present studies, we tested a novel, bifunctional anti-inflammatory prodrug (NDH 4338) designed to target cyclooxygenase 2 (COX2), an enzyme that generates inflammatory eicosanoids, and acetylcholinesterase, an enzyme mediating activation of cholinergic inflammatory pathways in a model of SM-induced skin injury. Adult SKH-1 hairless male mice were exposed to SM using a dorsal skin vapor cup model. NDH 4338 was applied topically to the skin 24, 48, and 72 h post-SM exposure. After 96 h, SM was found to induce skin injury characterized by edema, epidermal hyperplasia, loss of the differentiation marker, keratin 10 (K10), upregulation of the skin wound marker keratin 6 (K6), disruption of the basement membrane anchoring protein laminin 322, and increased expression of epidermal COX2. NDH 4338 post-treatment reduced SM-induced dermal edema and enhanced skin re-epithelialization. This was associated with a reduction in COX2 expression, increased K10 expression in the suprabasal epidermis, and reduced expression of K6. NDH 4338 also restored basement membrane integrity, as evidenced by continuous expression of laminin 332 at the dermal–epidermal junction. Taken together, these data indicate that a bifunctional anti-inflammatory prodrug stimulates repair of SM induced skin injury and may be useful as a medical countermeasure. - Highlights: • Bifunctional anti-inflammatory prodrug (NDH4338) tested on SM exposed mouse skin • The prodrug NDH4338 was designed to target COX2 and acetylcholinesterase. • The application of NDH4338 improved cutaneous wound repair after SM induced injury. • NDH4338 treatment demonstrated a reduction in COX2 expression on SM injured skin. • Changes of skin repair

  1. DNA damage and repair induced by diazoacetyl derivatives of amino acids with different mechanism of cytotoxicity. Correlations with mutagenicity and carcinogenicity.

    PubMed

    Brambilla, G; Cavanna, M; Carlo, P; Finollo, R; Sciaba, L; Parodi, S; Bolognesi, C

    1979-05-14

    Eight synthetic N-diazoacetyl amino acids, prepared by inserting a diazoacetyl group onto the alpha-nitrogen of a natural amino acid, and two natural diazoazetyl amino acids, azaserine (9-diazoacetyl-L-serine) and DON (6-diazo-5-oxo-L-norleucine), have been studied by autoradiography for their capacity to induce DNA repair synthesis in mouse cells cultivated "in vitro". Dose-dependent unscheduled DNA synthesis was present in cells treated with the eight N-diazoacetyl derivatives, and was absent in cells exposed to approximately equitoxic concentrations of azaserine and DON. Azaserine and DON, unlike N-diazoacetyl derivatives, did not alkylate gamma-(4-nitrobenzyl) pyridine at an appreciable extent. When DNA damage (single stranded breaks or weak points in alkali) was measured by the sensitive technique of alkaline elution, DGA was found about 4 times as potent as azaserine and about 12 times as DON on a molar basis, but about 800 and 17,000 times as potent as azaserine and DON respectively by extrapolating to equitoxic concentrations. Carcinogenicity and mutagenicity seem to follow mainly the capability of inducing DNA damage. PMID:468901

  2. From sulfur to homoglutathione: Thiol metabolism in soybean

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Sulfur is an essential plant nutrient and is metabolized into the sulfur-containing amino acids (cysteine and methionine) and into molecules that protect plants against oxidative and environmental stresses. Although studies of thiol metabolism in the model plant Arabidopsis thaliana (thale cress) h...

  3. Sulfur mustard-induced microvesication in hairless guinea pigs: Effect of short-term niacinamide administration. (Reannouncement with new availability information)

    SciTech Connect

    Yourick, J.J.; Dawson, J.S.; Mitcheltree, L.W.

    1992-12-31

    It has been postulated that sulfur mustard (HD) damage may activate poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase (PADPRP), resulting in depletion of cellular NAD+. This biochemical alteration is postulated to result in blister (vesicle) formation. It has been previously demonstrated that niacinamide (NAM), an inhibitor of PADPRP and a precursor for NAD+ synthesis, may be useful as a pretreatment compound to reduce HD-induced microvesication. The present study was undertaken to determine whether niacinamide`s protective action could be extended beyond 24 hr and if the degree of microvesication is related to changes in skin NAD+ content. HD exposures were made by vapor cup to hairless guinea pigs. Niacinamide (750 mg/kg, ip) given as a 30-min pretreatment did not reduce the degree of microvesication 72 hr after HD compared to saline controls. However, niacinamide given as a 30-min pretreatment and at 6-, 24-, and 48-hr after HD, exhibited a 28% reduction in microvesication 72 hr after HD. Skin NAD+ content at 72 hr after HD was depleted by approximately 53% in the saline and NAM-treated groups. Skin NAD+ content was depleted despite NAM administration. Niacinamide did not reduce the degree of erythema at 48 or 72 hr. These results suggest that niacinamide`s protective effect against HD-induced microvesication may be extended for at least 72 hr, but NAM levels must be sustained during the post-HD period. The link between maintenance of skin NAD+ and reductions in microvesication is still uncertain.... Pretreatment, Niacinamide, Hairless guinea pig, Sulfur mustard microvesication.

  4. Determination of chlorine, sulfur and carbon in reinforced concrete structures by double-pulse laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Labutin, Timur A.; Popov, Andrey M.; Zaytsev, Sergey M.; Zorov, Nikita B.; Belkov, Mikhail V.; Kiris, Vasilii V.; Raikov, Sergey N.

    2014-09-01

    Accurate and reliable quantitative determination of non-metal corrosion agents in concrete is still an actual task of analytical use of LIBS. Two double-pulse LIBS systems were tested as a tool for the determination of chlorine, sulfur and carbon in concretes. Both systems had collinear configuration; a laboratory setup was equipped with an ICCD and two lasers (355/532 nm + 540 nm), but a CCD was a detector for a mobile system with one laser (1064 nm). Analytical lines of Cl I at 837.59 nm, S I at 921 nm and C I at 247.86 nm were used to plot calibration curves. Optimal interpulse delays for the laboratory setup were 4 μs for chlorine and 2.8 μs for carbon, while an interpulse delay of 2 μs was optimal for chlorine and sulfur determination with the mobile system. We suggested the normalization of the Cl I line at 837.59 nm to the Mg II line at 279.08 nm (visible at 837.23 nm in the third order) to compensate for pulse-to-pulse fluctuations of chlorine lines. It provided the decrease of the detection limit of chlorine from 400 ppm to 50 ppm. Therefore, we reported that LIBS can be used to determine main corrosive active substances under ambient conditions in concrete below critical threshold values. Moreover, the application of the mobile system for in-situ qualitative assessment of corrosion way of a steel cage of a swimming pool dome was also demonstrated. It was found that chloride corrosion due to the disinfection of water was the main way for corrosion of the open part steel and the steel rebar inside the concrete.

  5. Therapeutic Potential of a Non-Steroidal Bifunctional Anti-Inflammatory and Anti-Cholinergic Agent against Skin Injury Induced by Sulfur Mustard

    PubMed Central

    Chang, Yoke-Chen; Wang, James D.; Hahn, Rita A.; Gordon, Marion K.; Joseph, Laurie B.; Heck, Diane E.; Heindel, Ned D.; Young, Sherri C.; Sinko, Patrick J.; Casillas, Robert P.; Laskin, Jeffrey D.; Laskin, Debra L.; Gerecke, Donald R.

    2014-01-01

    Sulfur mustard (bis(2-chloroethyl) sulfide, SM) is a highly reactive bifunctional alkylating agent inducing edema, inflammation, and the formation of fluid-filled blisters in the skin. Medical countermeasures against SM-induced cutaneous injury have yet to be established. In the present studies, we tested a novel, bifunctional anti-inflammatory prodrug (NDH 4338) designed to target cyclooxygenase 2 (COX2), an enzyme that generates inflammatory eicosanoids, and acetylcholinesterase, an enzyme mediating activation of cholinergic inflammatory pathways in a model of SM-induced skin injury. Adult SKH-1 hairless male mice were exposed to SM using a dorsal skin vapor cup model. NDH 4338 was applied topically to the skin 24, 48, and 72 hr post-SM exposure. After 96 hr, SM was found to induce skin injury characterized by edema, epidermal hyperplasia, loss of the differentiation marker, keratin 10 (K10), upregulation of the skin wound marker keratin 6 (K6), disruption of the basement membrane anchoring protein laminin 322, and increased expression of epidermal COX2. NDH 4338 post-treatment reduced SM-induced dermal edema and enhanced skin re-epithelialization. This was associated with a reduction in COX2 expression, increased K10 expression in the suprabasal epidermis, and reduced expression of K6. NDH 4338 also restored basement membrane integrity, as evidenced by continuous expression of laminin 332 at the dermalepidermal junction. Taken together, these data indicate that a bifunctional anti-inflammatory prodrug stimulates repair of SM induced skin injury and may be useful as a medical countermeasure. PMID:25127551

  6. Two Distinct Modes of Hypoosmotic Medium-Induced Release of Excitatory Amino Acids and Taurine in the Rat Brain In Vivo

    PubMed Central

    Haskew-Layton, Renée E.; Rudkouskaya, Alena; Jin, Yiqiang; Feustel, Paul J.; Kimelberg, Harold K.; Mongin, Alexander A.

    2008-01-01

    A variety of physiological and pathological factors induce cellular swelling in the brain. Changes in cell volume activate several types of ion channels, which mediate the release of inorganic and organic osmolytes and allow for compensatory cell volume decrease. Volume-regulated anion channels (VRAC) are thought to be responsible for the release of some of organic osmolytes, including the excitatory neurotransmitters glutamate and aspartate. In the present study, we compared the in vivo properties of the swelling-activated release of glutamate, aspartate, and another major brain osmolyte taurine. Cell swelling was induced by perfusion of hypoosmotic (low [NaCl]) medium via a microdialysis probe placed in the rat cortex. The hypoosmotic medium produced several-fold increases in the extracellular levels of glutamate, aspartate and taurine. However, the release of the excitatory amino acids differed from the release of taurine in several respects including: (i) kinetic properties, (ii) sensitivity to isoosmotic changes in [NaCl], and (iii) sensitivity to hydrogen peroxide, which is known to modulate VRAC. Consistent with the involvement of VRAC, hypoosmotic medium-induced release of the excitatory amino acids was inhibited by the anion channel blocker DNDS, but not by the glutamate transporter inhibitor TBOA or Cd2+, which inhibits exocytosis. In order to elucidate the mechanisms contributing to taurine release, we studied its release properties in cultured astrocytes and cortical synaptosomes. Similarities between the results obtained in vivo and in synaptosomes suggest that the swelling-activated release of taurine in vivo may be of neuronal origin. Taken together, our findings indicate that different transport mechanisms and/or distinct cellular sources mediate hypoosmotic medium-induced release of the excitatory amino acids and taurine in vivo. PMID:18958155

  7. Uses of lunar sulfur

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vaniman, D.; Pettit, D.; Heiken, G.

    1992-01-01

    Sulfur and sulfur compounds have a wide range of applications for their fluid, electrical, chemical, and biochemical properties. Although known abundances on the Moon are limited (approximately 0.1 percent in mare soils), sulfur is relatively extractable by heating. Coproduction of sulfur during oxygen extraction from ilmenite-rich mare soils could yield sulfur in masses up to 10 percent of the mass of oxygen produced. Sulfur deserves serious consideration as a lunar resource.

  8. d-Amino acid oxidase-mediated increase in spinal hydrogen peroxide is mainly responsible for formalin-induced tonic pain

    PubMed Central

    Lu, Jin-Miao; Gong, Nian; Wang, Yan-Chao; Wang, Yong-Xiang

    2012-01-01

    BACKGROUND AND PURPOSE Spinal reactive oxygen species (ROS) are critically involved in chronic pain. d-Amino acid oxidase (DAAO) oxidizes d-amino acids such as d-serine to form the byproduct hydrogen peroxide without producing other ROS. DAAO inhibitors are specifically analgesic in tonic pain, neuropathic pain and cancer pain. This study examined the role of spinal hydrogen peroxide in pain and the mechanism of the analgesic effects of DAAO inhibitors. EXPERIMENTAL APPROACH Formalin-induced pain behaviours and spinal hydrogen peroxide levels were measured in rodents. KEY RESULTS Formalin injected into the paw increased spinal hydrogen peroxide synchronously with enhanced tonic pain; both were effectively prevented by i.t. fluorocitrate, a selective astrocyte metabolic inhibitor. Given systemically, the potent DAAO inhibitor CBIO (5-chloro-benzo[d]isoxazol-3-ol) blocked spinal DAAO enzymatic activity and specifically prevented formalin-induced tonic pain in a dose-dependent manner. Although CBIO maximally inhibited tonic pain by 62%, it completely prevented the increase in spinal hydrogen peroxide. I.t. catalase, an enzyme specific for decomposition of hydrogen peroxide, completely depleted spinal hydrogen peroxide and prevented formalin-induced tonic pain by 65%. Given systemically, the ROS scavenger PBN (phenyl-N-tert-butylnitrone) also inhibited formalin-induced tonic pain and increase in spinal hydrogen peroxide. Formalin-induced tonic pain was potentiated by i.t. exogenous hydrogen peroxide. CBIO did not increase spinal d-serine level, and i.t. d-serine did not alter either formalin-induced tonic pain or CBIO's analgesic effect. CONCLUSIONS AND IMPLICATIONS Spinal hydrogen peroxide is specifically and largely responsible for formalin-induced pain, and DAAO inhibitors produce analgesia by blocking spinal hydrogen peroxide production rather than interacting with spinal d-serine. PMID:21950354

  9. A beta-amino acid pyrokinin analog induces irregular pupariation behavior in larvae of the flesh fly Sarcophaga bullata

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The developmental process of pupariation is accelerated by members of the pyrokinin class of neuropeptides in larvae of the flesh fly Sarcophaga bullata. A pyrokinin analog (Ac-Y[beta-3-Phe]TPRLamide), in which a Phe residue is replaced with a beta-amino acid, accelerates pupariation in this fly at...

  10. Impairment of hypoxia-induced HIF-1α signaling in keratinocytes and fibroblasts by sulfur mustard is counteracted by a selective PHD-2 inhibitor.

    PubMed

    Deppe, Janina; Popp, Tanja; Egea, Virginia; Steinritz, Dirk; Schmidt, Annette; Thiermann, Horst; Weber, Christian; Ries, Christian

    2016-05-01

    Skin exposure to sulfur mustard (SM) provokes long-term complications in wound healing. Similar to chronic wounds, SM-induced skin lesions are associated with low levels of oxygen in the wound tissue. Normally, skin cells respond to hypoxia by stabilization of the transcription factor hypoxia-inducible factor 1 alpha (HIF-1α). HIF-1α modulates expression of genes including VEGFA, BNIP3, and MMP2 that control processes such as angiogenesis, growth, and extracellular proteolysis essential for proper wound healing. The results of our studies revealed that exposure of primary normal human epidermal keratinocytes (NHEK) and primary normal human dermal fibroblasts (NHDF) to SM significantly impaired hypoxia-induced HIF-1α stabilization and target gene expression in these cells. Addition of a selective inhibitor of the oxygen-sensitive prolyl hydroxylase domain-containing protein 2 (PHD-2), IOX2, fully recovered HIF-1α stability, nuclear translocation, and target gene expression in NHEK and NHDF. Moreover, functional studies using a scratch wound assay demonstrated that the application of IOX2 efficiently counteracted SM-mediated deficiencies in monolayer regeneration under hypoxic conditions in NHEK and NHDF. Our findings describe a pathomechanism by which SM negatively affects hypoxia-stimulated HIF-1α signaling in keratinocytes and fibroblasts and thus possibly contributes to delayed wound healing in SM-injured patients that could be treated with PHD-2 inhibitors. PMID:26082309

  11. Sulfuric acid-sulfur heat storage cycle

    DOEpatents

    Norman, John H.

    1983-12-20

    A method of storing heat is provided utilizing a chemical cycle which interconverts sulfuric acid and sulfur. The method can be used to levelize the energy obtained from intermittent heat sources, such as solar collectors. Dilute sulfuric acid is concentrated by evaporation of water, and the concentrated sulfuric acid is boiled and decomposed using intense heat from the heat source, forming sulfur dioxide and oxygen. The sulfur dioxide is reacted with water in a disproportionation reaction yielding dilute sulfuric acid, which is recycled, and elemental sulfur. The sulfur has substantial potential chemical energy and represents the storage of a significant portion of the energy obtained from the heat source. The sulfur is burned whenever required to release the stored energy. A particularly advantageous use of the heat storage method is in conjunction with a solar-powered facility which uses the Bunsen reaction in a water-splitting process. The energy storage method is used to levelize the availability of solar energy while some of the sulfur dioxide produced in the heat storage reactions is converted to sulfuric acid in the Bunsen reaction.

  12. Induction of aromatic amino acids and phenylpropanoid compounds in Scrophularia striata Boiss. cell culture in response to chitosan-induced oxidative stress.

    PubMed

    Kamalipourazad, Maryam; Sharifi, Mohsen; Maivan, Hassan Zare; Behmanesh, Mehrdad; Chashmi, Najmeh Ahmadian

    2016-10-01

    Manipulation of cell culture media by elicitors is one of most important strategies to inducing secondary metabolism for the production of valuable metabolites. In this investigation, inducing effect of chitosan on physiological, biochemical, and molecular parameters were investigated in cell suspension cultures of Scrophularia striata Boiss. The results showed that chitosan concentration and time of elicitation are determinants of the effectiveness of the elicitor. Accumulation of aromatic amino acids (phenylalanine [Phe] and tyrosine [Tyr]), phenylpropanoid compounds (phenolic acids [PAs] and echinacoside [ECH]), hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) production, phenylalanine ammonia-lyase (PAL) activity and gene expression, and antioxidant enzymes (superoxide dismutase [SOD], peroxidase [POX], catalase [CAT]) activities were altered by changing the exposure time of elicitation. Results showed that, upon elicitation with chitosan, oxidative events were induced, antioxidant responses of S. striata cells were boosted through enhanced activity of an effective series of scavenging enzymes (SOD, CAT, and POX), and biosynthesis of non-enzymatic antioxidants (ECH and PAs [cinnamic, p-coumaric and, caffeic acids]). The increase in amino acid content and PAL activity at early days of exposure to chitosan was related with rises in phenolic compounds. These results provide evidence that chitosan by up-regulation of PAL gene differentially improves the production of phenylpropanoid compounds, which are of medical commercial value with good biotechnological prospects. PMID:27392152

  13. Intermediaries of branched chain amino acid metabolism induce fetal hemoglobin, and repress SOX6 and BCL11A, in definitive erythroid cells.

    PubMed

    Karkashon, Shay; Raghupathy, Radha; Bhatia, Himanshu; Dutta, Amrita; Hess, Sonja; Higgs, Jaimie; Tifft, Cynthia J; Little, Jane A

    2015-08-01

    High levels of fetal hemoglobin (HbF) can ameliorate human β-globin gene disorders. The short chain fatty acid butyrate is the paradigmatic metabolic intermediary that induces HbF. Inherited disorders of branched-chain amino acid (BCAA) metabolism have been associated with supranormal HbF levels beyond infancy, e.g., propionic acidemia (PA) and methylmalonic acidemia (MMA). We tested intermediaries of BCAA metabolism for their effects on definitive erythropoiesis. Like butyrate, the elevated BCAA intermediaries isovalerate, isobutyrate, and propionate, induce fetal globin gene expression in murine EryD in vitro, are associated with bulk histone H3 hyperacylation, and repress the transcription of key gamma globin regulatory factors, notably BCL11A and SOX6. Metabolic intermediaries that are elevated in Maple Syrup Urine Disease (MSUD) affect none of these processes. Percent HbF and gamma (γ) chain isoforms were also measured in non-anemic, therapeutically optimized subjects with MSUD (Group I, n=6) or with Isovaleric Acidemia (IVA), MMA, or PA (Group II, n=5). Mean HbF was 0.24 ± 0.15% in Group I and 0.87 ± 0.13% in Group II (p=.01); only the Gγ isoform was detected. We conclude that a family of biochemically related intermediaries of branched chain amino acid metabolism induces fetal hemoglobin during definitive erythropoiesis, with mechanisms that mirror those so far identified for butyrate. PMID:26142333

  14. Downregulation of super oxide dismutase level in protein might be due to sulfur mustard induced toxicity in lung.

    PubMed

    Mirbagheri, Leila; Habibi Roudkenar, Mehryar; Imani Fooladi, Abbas Ali; Ghanei, Mostafa; Nourani, Mohammad Reza

    2013-06-01

    Sulfur mustard (SM) has been identified as an important chemical weapon. During the Iran-Iraq war of 1980-88, the extensive usage of SM against Iranian civilians and military forces was proven. This agent has been shown to cause severe damage mainly in the skin, eyes, lungs, and respiratory tract in Iranian veterans. The most common disease is bronchiolitis obliterans (BO)). SM increases the endogenous production of reactive oxygen species (ROS). Superoxide dismutases (SODs) are known as protective antioxidants against the harmful effects of ROS. Twenty exposed SM individuals (43.2±6.4 years), and 10 normal controls (41.3±2.5 years) were enrolled in this study. Evaluation of SODs was performed by semiquantitative RT-PCR and immunohistochemistry. Our results demonstrated that CuZnSOD and MnSOD mRNA were up-regulated 2.79±1.09 and 2.49±1.11 folds, respectively in SM-injured patients in comparison with control levels. In contrast, Immunohistochemistry results showed downregulation of CuZnSOD protein expression in SM injured patients. Our results revealed that SODs may play an important role in cellular protection against oxidative stress due to mustard gas toxicity in airway wall of SM exposed patients. PMID:23754354

  15. Proteomic assessment of sulfur mustard-induced protein adducts and other protein modifications in human epidermal keratinocytes

    SciTech Connect

    Mol, Marijke A.E. Berg, Roland M. van den; Benschop, Henk P.

    2008-07-01

    Although some toxicological mechanisms of sulfur mustard (HD) have been uncovered, new knowledge will allow for advanced insight in the pathways that lead towards epidermal-dermal separation in skin. In the present investigation, we aimed to survey events that occur at the protein level in human epidermal keratinocytes (HEK) during 24 h after exposure to HD. By using radiolabeled {sup 14}C-HD, it was found that proteins in cultured HEK are significant targets for alkylation by HD. HD-adducted proteins were visualized by two-dimensional gel electrophoresis and analyzed by mass spectrometry. Several type I and II cytokeratins, actin, stratifin (14-3-3{sigma}) and galectin-7 were identified. These proteins are involved in the maintenance of the cellular cytoskeleton. Their alkylation may cause changes in the cellular architecture and, in direct line with that, be determinative for the onset of vesication. Furthermore, differential proteomic analysis was applied to search for novel features of the cellular response to HD. Partial breakdown of type I cytokeratins K14, K16 and K17 as well as the emergence of new charge variants of the proteins heat shock protein 27 and ribosomal protein P0 were observed. Studies with caspase inhibitors showed that caspase-6 is probably responsible for the breakdown of type I cytokeratins in HEK. The significance of the results is discussed in terms of toxicological relevance and possible clues for therapeutic intervention.

  16. Amino acid supplementation alters bone metabolism during simulated weightlessness

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zwart, S. R.; Davis-Street, J. E.; Paddon-Jones, D.; Ferrando, A. A.; Wolfe, R. R.; Smith, S. M.

    2005-01-01

    High-protein and acidogenic diets induce hypercalciuria. Foods or supplements with excess sulfur-containing amino acids increase endogenous sulfuric acid production and therefore have the potential to increase calcium excretion and alter bone metabolism. In this study, effects of an amino acid/carbohydrate supplement on bone resorption were examined during bed rest. Thirteen subjects were divided at random into two groups: a control group (Con, n = 6) and an amino acid-supplemented group (AA, n = 7) who consumed an extra 49.5 g essential amino acids and 90 g carbohydrate per day for 28 days. Urine was collected for n-telopeptide (NTX), deoxypyridinoline (DPD), calcium, and pH determinations. Bone mineral content was determined and potential renal acid load was calculated. Bone-specific alkaline phosphatase was measured in serum samples collected on day 1 (immediately before bed rest) and on day 28. Potential renal acid load was higher in the AA group than in the Con group during bed rest (P < 0.05). For all subjects, during bed rest urinary NTX and DPD concentrations were greater than pre-bed rest levels (P < 0.05). Urinary NTX and DPD tended to be higher in the AA group (P = 0.073 and P = 0.056, respectively). During bed rest, urinary calcium was greater than baseline levels (P < 0.05) in the AA group but not the Con group. Total bone mineral content was lower after bed rest than before bed rest in the AA group but not the Con group (P < 0.05). During bed rest, urinary pH decreased (P < 0.05), and it was lower in the AA group than the Con group. These data suggest that bone resorption increased, without changes in bone formation, in the AA group.

  17. Atomic evidence that modification of H-bonds established with amino acids critical for host-cell binding induces sterile immunity against malaria

    SciTech Connect

    Patarroyo, Manuel E.; Cifuentes, Gladys; Pirajan, Camilo; Moreno-Vranich, Armando; Vanegas, Magnolia

    2010-04-09

    Based on the 3D X-ray crystallographic structures of relevant proteins of the malaria parasite involved in invasion to host cells and 3D NMR structures of High Activity Binding Peptides (HABPs) and their respective analogues, it was found that HABPs are rendered into highly immunogenic and sterile immunity inducers in the Aotus experimental model by modifying those amino acids that establish H-bonds with other HABPs or binding to host's cells. This finding adds striking and novel physicochemical principles, at the atomic level, for a logical and rational vaccine development methodology against infectious disease, among them malaria.

  18. Differential effects of insulin-induced hypoglycaemia on the plasma branched-chain and non-branched-chain amino acid concentrations in humans.

    PubMed

    De Feo, P; Perriello, G; Santeusanio, F; Brunetti, P; Bolli, G; Haymond, M W

    1992-01-01

    In order to determine plasma amino acid concentrations during a prolonged but moderate insulin-induced hypoglycaemia, six healthy volunteers received a constant subcutaneous insulin infusion (15 mU.m-2.min-1) over a 12 hour period. The plasma glucose concentrations decreased from 4.72 +/- 0.11 to 2.83 +/- 0.07 mM at 600 minutes and then remained stable over the last 120 minutes. Plasma counterregulatory hormones (glucagon, epinephrine, growth hormone and cortisol) increased significantly between 120 and 180 minutes. The plasma concentration of all the amino acids paralleled the decrease in plasma glucose. The branched chain amino acids decreased to a greater extent in the first part of the study (0-360 min) in comparison to the essential non-branched chain aminoacids (p < 0.01), then increased significantly with a peak at 600 minutes (p < 0.05 vs 360 min) despite stable hyperinsulinaemia. These results suggests that during prolonged but moderate hypoglycaemia the counterregulatory hormones are able to antagonize partially the effects of insulin on protein metabolism, analogous to their well-known anti-insulin effects on glucose and fatty acid metabolism. PMID:1459315

  19. Both foliar and residual applications of herbicides that inhibit amino acid biosynthesis induce alternative respiration and aerobic fermentation in pea roots.

    PubMed

    Armendáriz, O; Gil-Monreal, M; Zulet, A; Zabalza, A; Royuela, M

    2016-05-01

    The objective of this work was to ascertain whether there is a general pattern of carbon allocation and utilisation in plants following herbicide supply, independent of the site of application: sprayed on leaves or supplied to nutrient solution. The herbicides studied were the amino acid biosynthesis-inhibiting herbicides (ABIH): glyphosate, an inhibitor of aromatic amino acid biosynthesis, and imazamox, an inhibitor of branched-chain amino acid biosynthesis. All treated plants showed impaired carbon metabolism; carbohydrate accumulation was detected in both leaves and roots of the treated plants. The accumulation in roots was due to lack of use of available sugars as growth was arrested, which elicited soluble carbohydrate accumulation in the leaves due to a decrease in sink strength. Under aerobic conditions, ethanol fermentative metabolism was enhanced in roots of the treated plants. This fermentative response was not related to a change in total respiration rates or cytochrome respiratory capacity, but an increase in alternative oxidase capacity was detected. Pyruvate accumulation was detected after most of the herbicide treatments. These results demonstrate that both ABIH induce the less-efficient, ATP-producing pathways, namely fermentation and alternative respiration, by increasing the key metabolite, pyruvate. The plant response was similar not only for the two ABIH but also after foliar or residual application. PMID:26560850

  20. Metabolite profiling of barley grain subjected to induced drought stress: responses of free amino acids in differently adapted cultivars.

    PubMed

    Lanzinger, Alexandra; Frank, Thomas; Reichenberger, Gabriela; Herz, Markus; Engel, Karl-Heinz

    2015-04-29

    To investigate cultivar-specific metabolite changes upon drought stress in barley grain, differently adapted cultivars were field-grown under drought conditions using a rain-out shelter and under normal weather conditions (2010-2012). The grain was subjected to a gas chromatography-mass spectrometry-based metabolite profiling approach allowing the analyses of a broad spectrum of lipophilic and hydrophilic low molecular weight constituents. Multi- and univariate analyses demonstrated that there are grain metabolites which were significantly changed upon drought stress, either decreased or increased in all cultivars. On the other hand, for proteinogenic free amino acids increased concentrations were consistently observed in all seasons only in cultivars for which no drought resistance/tolerance had been described. Consistent decreases were seen only in the group of stress tolerant/resistant cultivars. These cultivar-specific correlations were particularly pronounced for branched-chain amino acids. The results indicate that free amino acids may serve as potential markers for cultivars differently adapted to drought stress. PMID:25867895

  1. Single substitutions to closely related amino acids contribute to the functional diversification of an insect-inducible, positively selected plant cystatin.

    PubMed

    Rasoolizadeh, Asieh; Goulet, Marie-Claire; Sainsbury, Frank; Cloutier, Conrad; Michaud, Dominique

    2016-04-01

    A causal link has been reported between positively selected amino acids in plant cystatins and the inhibitory range of these proteins against insect digestive cysteine (Cys) proteases. Here we assessed the impact of single substitutions to closely related amino acids on the contribution of positive selection to cystatin diversification. Cystatin sequence alignments, while confirming hypervariability, indicated a preference for related amino acids at positively selected sites. For example, the non-polar residues leucine (Leu), isoleucine (Ile) and valine (Val) were shown to predominate at positively selected site 2 in the N-terminal region, unlike selected sites 6 and 10, where polar residues are preferred. The model cystatin SlCYS8 and single variants with Leu, Ile or Val at position 2 were compared with regard to their ability to bind digestive proteases of the coleopteran pest Leptinotarsa decemlineata and to induce compensatory responses in this insect. A functional proteomics procedure to capture target Cys proteases in midgut extracts allowed confirmation of distinct binding profiles for the cystatin variants. A shotgun proteomics procedure to monitor whole Cys protease complements revealed protease family specific compensatory responses in the insect, dependent on the variant ingested. Our data confirm the contribution of closely related amino acids to the functional diversity of positively selected plant cystatins in a broader structure/function context imposing physicochemical constraints to primary structure alterations. They also underline the complexity of protease/inhibitor interactions in plant-insect systems, and the challenges still to be met in order to harness the full potential of ectopically expressed protease inhibitors in crop protection. PMID:26833679

  2. New Inducible Nitric Oxide Synthase and Cyclooxygenase-2 Inhibitors, Nalidixic Acid Linked to Isatin Schiff Bases via Certain l-Amino Acid Bridges.

    PubMed

    Naglah, Ahmed M; Ahmed, Atallah F; Wen, Zhi-Hong; Al-Omar, Mohamed A; Amr, Abd El-Galil E; Kalmouch, Atef

    2016-01-01

    A series of new Schiff bases were synthesized by condensation of isatins with the nalidixic acid-l-amino acid hydrazides. Prior to hydrazide formation, a peptide linkage has been prepared via coupling of nalidixic acid with appropriate l-amino acid methyl esters to yield 3a-c. The chemical structures of the new Schiff bases (5b and 5d-h) were confirmed by means of IR, NMR, mass spectroscopic, and elemental analyses. The anti-inflammatory activity of these Schiff bases was evaluated via measurement of the expressed inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS) and cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2) in the lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-stimulated RAW264.7 macrophage cells model. The Schiff bases exhibited significant dual inhibitory effect against the induction of the pro-inflammatory iNOS and COX-2 proteins with variable potencies. However, they strongly down-regulated the iNOS expression to the level of 16.5% ± 7.4%-42.2% ± 19.6% compared to the effect on COX-2 expression (<56.4% ± 3.1% inhibition) at the same concentration (10 μM). The higher iNOS inhibition activity of the tested Schiff bases, relative to that of COX-2, seems to be a reflection of the combined suppressive effects exerted by their nalidixic acid, isatins (4a-c), and l-amino acid moieties against iNOS expression. These synthesized nalidixic acid-l-amino acid-isatin conjugates can be regarded as a novel class of anti-inflammatory antibacterial agents. PMID:27092477

  3. Complete amino acid sequence and characterization of the reaction mechanism of a glucosamine-induced novel alcohol dehydrogenase from Agrobacterium radiobacter (tumefaciens).

    PubMed

    Iwamoto, Ryoko; Kubota, Humie; Hosoki, Tomoko; Ikehara, Kenji; Tanaka, Mieko

    2002-02-15

    A glucosamine-induced novel alcohol dehydrogenase has been isolated from Agrobacterium radiobacter (tumefaciens) and its fundamental properties have been characterized. The enzyme catalyzes NAD-dependent dehydrogenation of aliphatic alcohols and amino alcohols. In this work, the complete amino acid sequence of the alcohol dehydrogenase was determined by PCR method using genomic DNA of A. radiobacter as template. The enzyme comprises 336 amino acids and has a molecular mass of 36 kDa. The primary structure of the enzyme demonstrates a high homology to structures of alcohol dehydrogenases from Shinorhizobium meliloti (83% identity, 90% positive) and Pseudomonas aeruginosa (65% identity, 76% positive). The two Zn(2+) ion binding sites, both the active site and another site that contributed to stabilization of the enzyme, are conserved in those enzymes. Sequences analysis of the NAD-dependent dehydrogenase family using a hypothetical phylogenetic tree indicates that these three enzymes form a new group distinct from other members of the Zn-containing long-chain alcohol dehydrogenase family. The physicochemical properties of alcohol dehydrogenase from A. radiobacter were characterized as follows. (1) Stereospecificity of the hydride transfer from ethanol to NADH was categorized as pro-R type by NMR spectra of NADH formed in the enzymatic reaction using ethanol-D(6) was used as substrate. (2) Optimal pH for all alcohols with no amino group examined was pH 8.5 (of the C(2)-C(6) alcohols, n-amyl alcohol demonstrated the highest activity). Conversely, glucosaminitol was optimally dehydrogenated at pH 10.0. (3) The rate-determining step of the dehydrogenase for ethanol is deprotonation of the enzyme-NAD-Zn-OHCH(2)CH(3) complex to enzyme-NAD-Zn-O(-)CH(2)CH(3) complex and that for glucosaminitol is H(2)O addition to enzyme-Zn-NADH complex. PMID:11831851

  4. A Vibrio cholerae Classical TcpA Amino Acid Sequence Induces Protective Antibody That Binds an Area Hypothesized To Be Important for Toxin-Coregulated Pilus Structure

    PubMed Central

    Taylor, Ronald K.; Kirn, Thomas J.; Meeks, Michael D.; Wade, Terri K.; Wade, William F.

    2004-01-01

    Vibrio cholerae is a gram-negative bacterium that has been associated with cholera pandemics since the early 1800s. Whole-cell, killed, and live-attenuated oral cholera vaccines are in use. We and others have focused on the development of a subunit cholera vaccine that features standardized epitopes from various V. cholerae macromolecules that are known to induce protective antibody responses. TcpA protein is assembled into toxin-coregulated pilus (TCP), a type IVb pilus required for V. cholerae colonization, and thus is a strong candidate for a cholera subunit vaccine. Polypeptides (24 to 26 amino acids) in TcpA that can induce protective antibody responses have been reported, but further characterization of their amino acid targets relative to tertiary or quaternary TCP structures has not been done. We report a refinement of the TcpA sequences that can induce protective antibody. One sequence, TcpA 15 (residues 170 to 183), induces antibodies that bind linear TcpA in a Western blot as well as weakly bind soluble TcpA in solution. These antibodies bind assembled pili at high density and provide 80 to 100% protection in the infant mouse protection assay. This is in sharp contrast to other anti-TcpA peptide sera (TcpA 11, TcpA 13, and TcpA 17) that bind very strongly in Western blot and solution assays yet do not provide protection or effectively bind TCP, as evidenced by immunoelectron microscopy. The sequences of TcpA 15 that induce protective antibody were localized on a model of assembled TCP. These sequences are centered on a site that is predicted to be important for TCP structure. PMID:15385509

  5. Sulfur mustard-induced increase in intracellular free calcium level and arachidonic acid release from cell membrane

    SciTech Connect

    Ray, R.; Legere, R.H.; Majerus, B.J.; Petrali, J.P.

    1995-12-31

    The mechanism of action of the alkylating agent bis-(2-chloroethyl)sulfide (sulfur mustard, SM) was studied using the in thai vitro mouse neuroblastoma-rat glioma hybrid NG 108-1 S clonal p cell line model. Following 0.3 mM SM exposure, cell viability remained high (>80% of untreated control) up to 9 hr and then declined steadily to about 40% of control after 20-24 hr. During the early period of SM exposure, when there was no significant cell viability loss, the following effects were observed. The cellular glutathione level decreased 20% after 1 hr and 34% after 6 hr. Between 2 and 6 hr, there was a time-dependent increase (about 10 to 30%) in intracellular free calcium (Ca2+), which was localized to the limiting membrane of swollen endoplasmic reticula and mitochondria, to euchromatin areas of the nucleus, and to areas of the cytosol and plasma membrane. Moreover,there was also a time-dependent increase in the release of isotopically labeled arachidonic acid ((3H)AA) from cellular membranes. Increase in (3H)AA release was 28% at 3 hr and about 60-80% between 6 and 9 hr. This increase in I3HIAA release was inhibited by quinacrine (20 uM), which is a phospholipase (PLA2) inhibitor. At 16 hr after SM exposure, there was a large increase (about 200% of control) in I3HIAA release, which was coincident with a 50% loss of cell viability. These results suggest a Ca2+-mediated toxic mechanism of SM via PLA2 activation and arachidonate release.

  6. Brain amino acid sensing.

    PubMed

    Tsurugizawa, T; Uneyama, H; Torii, K

    2014-09-01

    The 20 different amino acids, in blood as well as in the brain, are strictly maintained at the same levels throughout the day, regardless of food intake. Gastric vagal afferents only respond to free glutamate and sugars, providing recognition of food intake and initiating digestion. Metabolic control of amino acid homeostasis and diet-induced thermogenesis is triggered by this glutamate signalling in the stomach through the gut-brain axis. Rats chronically fed high-sugar and high-fat diets do not develop obesity when a 1% (w/v) monosodium glutamate (MSG) solution is available in a choice paradigm. Deficiency of the essential amino acid lysine (Lys) induced a plasticity in rats in response to Lys. This result shows how the body is able to identify deficient nutrients to maintain homeostasis. This plastic effect is induced by activin A activity in the brain, particularly in certain neurons in the lateral hypothalamic area (LHA) which is the centre for amino acid homeostasis and appetite. These neurons respond to glutamate signalling in the oral cavity by which umami taste is perceived. They play a quantitative role in regulating ingestion of deficient nutrients, thereby leading to a healthier life. After recovery from malnutrition, rats prefer MSG solutions, which serve as biomarkers for protein nutrition. PMID:25200295

  7. Volcanic sulfur

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hobbs, Peter V.

    Although I may be overly demanding in expecting a member of the Eos staff to be familiar with recent articles in AGU journals, I am moved to make a mild protest concerning attribution in the “Volcanic Sulfur Dynamics” news item by Mario E. Godinez (Eos, June 14, 1983, p. 411).Since the news story stated that an important result of the RAVE experiment was to estimate the SO2 flux from Mount St. Helens on just one day, I must point out that both my research group and USGS scientists have monitored the emissions from Mount St. Helens and estimated SO2 (and other) fluxes over extended periods of time. Our results, which were based on in situ airborne measurements carried out over a period of a year, include estimates of the flux rates of SO2, H2S, H2O, sulfates, halides, and various other particles, prior to, during, and after the explosive eruption of Mount St. Helens on May 18, 1980 [Hobbs et al., 1983]. The USGS measurements, which are made remotely through use of an airborne correlation spectrometer, also commenced in 1980 a n d have provided data several times a week since that time [Casadevall et al., 1981]. We have also estimated the fluxes of various materials (including SO2) from eight other volcanos [Radke et al.., 1976; Stith et al.., 1978; Radke, 1982].

  8. The Cytolytic Amphipathic β(2,2)-Amino Acid LTX-401 Induces DAMP Release in Melanoma Cells and Causes Complete Regression of B16 Melanoma

    PubMed Central

    Eike, Liv-Marie; Mauseth, Brynjar; Camilio, Ketil André; Rekdal, Øystein; Sveinbjørnsson, Baldur

    2016-01-01

    In the present study we examined the ability of the amino acid derivative LTX-401 to induce cell death in cancer cell lines, as well as the capacity to induce regression in a murine melanoma model. Mode of action studies in vitro revealed lytic cell death and release of danger-associated molecular pattern molecules, preceded by massive cytoplasmic vacuolization and compromised lysosomes in treated cells. The use of a murine melanoma model demonstrated that the majority of animals treated with intratumoural injections of LTX-401 showed complete and long-lasting remission. Taken together, these results demonstrate the potential of LTX-401 as an immunotherapeutic agent for the treatment of solid tumors. PMID:26881822

  9. Telmisartan prevents hepatic fibrosis and enzyme-altered lesions in liver cirrhosis rat induced by a choline-deficient L-amino acid-defined diet

    SciTech Connect

    Jin Haiyan; Yamamoto, Naoki; Uchida, Koichi; Terai, Shuji; Sakaida, Isao

    2007-12-28

    Rennin-angiotensin system is involved in liver fibrogenesis through activating hepatic stellate cells (HSCs). Telmisartan (Tel) is an angiotensin II type 1 receptor antagonist, could function as a selective peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor {gamma} activator. Here we studied the effect of Tel on liver fibrosis, pre-neoplastic lesions in vivo and primary HSCs in vitro. In vivo study, we used the choline-deficient L-amino acid-defined (CDAA)-diet induced rat NASH model. The rats were fed the CDAA diet for 8 weeks to induce liver fibrosis and pre-neoplastic lesions, and then co-administrated with Tel for another 10 weeks. Tel prevented liver fibrogenesis and pre-neoplastic lesions by down-regulating TGF{beta}1 and TIMP-1, 2 and increasing MMP-13 expression. Tel inhibited HSCs activation and proliferation. These results suggested that Tel could be a promising drug for NASH related liver fibrosis.

  10. An Amino Acid Substitution Inhibits Specialist Herbivore Production of an Antagonist Effector and Recovers Insect-Induced Plant Defenses1[W][OA

    PubMed Central

    Schmelz, Eric A.; Huffaker, Alisa; Carroll, Mark J.; Alborn, Hans T.; Ali, Jared G.; Teal, Peter E.A.

    2012-01-01

    Plants respond to insect herbivory through the production of biochemicals that function as either direct defenses or indirect defenses via the attraction of natural enemies. While attack by closely related insect pests can result in distinctive levels of induced plant defenses, precise biochemical mechanisms responsible for differing responses remain largely unknown. Cowpea (Vigna unguiculata) responds to Fall armyworm (Spodoptera frugiperda) herbivory through the detection of fragments of chloroplastic ATP synthase γ-subunit proteins, termed inceptin-related peptides, present in larval oral secretions (OS). In contrast to generalists like Fall armyworm, OS of the legume-specializing velvetbean caterpillar (VBC; Anticarsia gemmatalis) do not elicit ethylene production and demonstrate significantly lower induced volatile emission in direct herbivory comparisons. Unlike all other Lepidoptera OS examined, which preferentially contain inceptin (Vu-In; +ICDINGVCVDA−), VBC OS contain predominantly a C-terminal truncated peptide, Vu-In−A (+ICDINGVCVD−). Vu-In−A is both inactive and functions as a potent naturally occurring antagonist of Vu-In-induced responses. To block antagonist production, amino acid substitutions at the C terminus were screened for differences in VBC gut proteolysis. A valine-substituted peptide (Vu-InΔV; +ICDINGVCVDV−) retaining full elicitor activity was found to accumulate in VBC OS. Compared with the native polypeptide, VBC that previously ingested 500 pmol of the valine-modified chloroplastic ATP synthase γ-subunit precursor elicited significantly stronger plant responses in herbivory assays. We demonstrate that a specialist herbivore minimizes the activation of defenses by converting an elicitor into an antagonist effector and identify an amino acid substitution that recovers these induced plant defenses to a level observed with generalist herbivores. PMID:23008466

  11. Protein tyrosine kinase regulates α-amino-3-hydroxy-5-methyl-4-isoxazolepropionic acid (AMPA) receptor trafficking induced by acute hypoxia in cultured brainstem neurons.

    PubMed

    Wang, H; Yu, L C; Li, Y C

    2016-01-01

    This study was performed to investigate the modulation effect of protein tyrosine kinase on postsynaptic a-amino-3-hydroxy-5-methyl-4-isoxazolepropionic acid (AMPA) receptor trafficking induced by acute hypoxia in cultured brainstem neurons. The cultured neurons were exposed to 1% O2 and the expression of AMPA receptor subunit GluR2 on the cell surface was significantly increased, while total GluR2 was not markedly changed. Furthermore, the hypoxia-induced increase in GluR2 expression on the cell surface was partially blocked by the protein tyrosine kinase membrane-permeable inhibitor genistein. In contrast, both the protein tyrosine kinase agonist nerve growth factor and protein tyrosine phosphatase inhibitor vanadate promoted the hypoxia-induced increase of GluR2 expression on cell surface. Moreover, GluR2 could be phosphorylated by tyrosine under normoxia and hypoxia conditions in vitro on brainstem neurons, and tyrosine phosphorylation of GluR2 was significantly stronger under hypoxia conditions. Our results indicate that acute hypoxia induces the AMPA receptor subunit GluR2 to rapidly migrate to the cell membrane to modify the strength of the synapse. This study indicates that tyrosine phosphorylation of the receptor is an important pathway regulating the rapid migration of GluR2 in the postsynaptic domain induced by hypoxia. PMID:27525851

  12. Effects of poly (ADP-ribose) polymerase-1 (PARP-1) inhibition on sulfur mustard-induced cutaneous injuries in vitro and in vivo

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Feng; Jiang, Ning; Xiao, Zhi-yong; Cheng, Jun-ping; Mei, Yi-zhou; Zheng, Pan; Wang, Li; Zhang, Xiao-rui; Zhou, Xin-bo

    2016-01-01

    Early studies with first-generation poly (ADP-ribose) polymerase (PARP) inhibitors have already indicated some therapeutic potential for sulfur mustard (SM) injuries. The available novel and more potential PARP inhibitors, which are undergoing clinical trials as drugs for cancer treatment, bring it back to the centre of interest. However, the role of PARP-1 in SM-induced injury is not fully understood. In this study, we selected a high potent specific PARP inhibitor ABT-888 as an example to investigate the effect of PARP inhibitor in SM injury. The results showed that in both the mouse ear vesicant model (MEVM) and HaCaT cell model, PARP inhibitor ABT-888 can reduce cell damage induced by severe SM injury. ABT-888 significantly reduced SM induced edema and epidermal necrosis in MEVM. In the HaCaT cell model, ABT-888 can reduce SM-induced NAD+/ATP depletion and apoptosis/necrosis. Then, we studied the mechanism of PARP-1 in SM injury by knockdown of PARP-1 in HaCaT cells. Knockdown of PARP-1 protected cell viability and downregulated the apoptosis checkpoints, including p-JNK, p-p53, Caspase 9, Caspase 8, c-PARP and Caspase 3 following SM-induced injury. Furthermore, the activation of AKT can inhibit autophagy via the regulation of mTOR. Our results showed that SM exposure could significantly inhibit the activation of Akt/mTOR pathway. Knockdown of PARP-1 reversed the SM-induced suppression of the Akt/mTOR pathway. In summary, the results of our study indicated that the protective effects of downregulation of PARP-1 in SM injury may be due to the regulation of apoptosis, necrosis, energy crisis and autophagy. However, it should be noticed that PARP inhibitor ABT-888 further enhanced the phosphorylation of H2AX (S139) after SM exposure, which indicated that we should be very careful in the application of PARP inhibitors in SM injury treatment because of the enhancement of DNA damage. PMID:27077006

  13. BJ-1108, a 6-Amino-2,4,5-Trimethylpyridin-3-ol Analog, Inhibits Serotonin-Induced Angiogenesis and Tumor Growth through PI3K/NOX Pathway

    PubMed Central

    Banskota, Suhrid; Gautam, Jaya; Regmi, Sushil C.; Gurung, Pallavi; Park, Myo-Hyeon; Kim, Seung Joo; Nam, Tae-gyu; Jeong, Byeong-Seon; Kim, Jung-Ae

    2016-01-01

    5-Hydroxytryptamine (5-HT) induces proliferation of cancer cells and vascular cells. In addition to 5-HT production by several cancer cells including gastrointestinal and breast cancer, a significant level of 5-HT is released from activated platelets in the thrombotic environment of tumors, suggesting that inhibition of 5-HT signaling may constitute a new target for antiangiogenic anticancer drug discovery. In the current study we clearly demonstrate that 5-HT-induced angiogenesis was mediated through the 5-HT1 receptor-linked Gβγ/Src/PI3K pathway, but not through the MAPK/ERK/p38 pathway. In addition, 5-HT induced production of NADPH oxidase (NOX)-derived reactive oxygen species (ROS). In an effort to develop new molecularly targeted anticancer agents against 5-HT action in tumor growth, we demonstrate that BJ-1108, a derivative of 6-amino-2,4,5-trimethylpyridin-3-ol, significantly inhibited 5-HT-induced angiogenesis. In addition, BJ-1108 induced a significant reduction in the size and weight of excised tumors in breast cancer cell-inoculated CAM assay, showing proportionate suppression of tumor growth along with inhibition of angiogenesis. In human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs), BJ-1108 significantly suppressed 5-HT-induced ROS generation and phosphorylation of PI3K/Akt but not of Src. Unlike NOX inhibitors, BJ-1108, which showed better antioxidant activity than vitamin C, barely suppressed superoxide anion induced by mevalonate or geranylgeranyl pyrophosphate which directly activates NOX without help from other signaling molecules in HUVECs, implying that the anti-angiogenic action of BJ-1108 was not mediated through direct action on NOX activation, or free radical scavenging activity. In conclusion, BJ-1108 inhibited 5-HT-induced angiogenesis through PI3K/NOX signaling but not through Src, ERK, or p38. PMID:26824764

  14. Solvent-induced multicolour fluorescence of amino-substituted 2,3-naphthalimides studied by fluorescence and transient absorption measurements.

    PubMed

    Fujii, Mayu; Namba, Misa; Yamaji, Minoru; Okamoto, Hideki

    2016-07-01

    A series of amino-2,3-naphthalimide derivatives having the amino functionality at 1-, 5- and 6-positions (, and , respectively) were prepared, and their photophysical properties were systematically investigated based on the measurements of steady-state absorption and fluorescence spectra, fluorescence lifetimes as well as transient absorption spectra. The s efficiently fluoresced in solution, and the emission spectra appreciably shifted depending on the solvent polarity. displayed only a slight fluorescence red-shift upon increasing the solvent polarity. In contrast, and showed marked positive solvatofluorochromism with large Stokes shifts displaying multicolour fluorescence; the fluorescence colours of and varied from violet-blue in hexane to orange-red in methanol. and , thus, serve as micro-environment responding fluorophores. In methanol, the intensity of the fluorescence emission band of and significantly reduced. Based on the fluorescence quantum yields and lifetimes, and transient absorption measurements, it has been revealed that internal conversion from the S1 state of s to the ground state was accelerated by the protic medium, resulting in a reduction in their fluorescence efficiency, while intersystem crossing from the S1 state to a triplet state was not responsible for the decrease of fluorescence intensity. PMID:27251860

  15. Endogenous Sulfur Dioxide: A New Member of Gasotransmitter Family in the Cardiovascular System.

    PubMed

    Huang, Yaqian; Tang, Chaoshu; Du, Junbao; Jin, Hongfang

    2016-01-01

    Sulfur dioxide (SO2) was previously regarded as a toxic gas in atmospheric pollutants. But it has been found to be endogenously generated from metabolism of sulfur-containing amino acids in mammals through transamination by aspartate aminotransferase (AAT). SO2 could be produced in cardiovascular tissues catalyzed by its synthase AAT. In recent years, studies revealed that SO2 had physiological effects on the cardiovascular system, including vasorelaxation and cardiac function regulation. In addition, the pathophysiological effects of SO2 were also determined. For example, SO2 ameliorated systemic hypertension and pulmonary hypertension, prevented the development of atherosclerosis, and protected against myocardial ischemia-reperfusion (I/R) injury and isoproterenol-induced myocardial injury. These findings suggested that endogenous SO2 was a novel gasotransmitter in the cardiovascular system and provided a new therapy target for cardiovascular diseases. PMID:26839635

  16. Endogenous Sulfur Dioxide: A New Member of Gasotransmitter Family in the Cardiovascular System

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Yaqian; Tang, Chaoshu; Du, Junbao; Jin, Hongfang

    2016-01-01

    Sulfur dioxide (SO2) was previously regarded as a toxic gas in atmospheric pollutants. But it has been found to be endogenously generated from metabolism of sulfur-containing amino acids in mammals through transamination by aspartate aminotransferase (AAT). SO2 could be produced in cardiovascular tissues catalyzed by its synthase AAT. In recent years, studies revealed that SO2 had physiological effects on the cardiovascular system, including vasorelaxation and cardiac function regulation. In addition, the pathophysiological effects of SO2 were also determined. For example, SO2 ameliorated systemic hypertension and pulmonary hypertension, prevented the development of atherosclerosis, and protected against myocardial ischemia-reperfusion (I/R) injury and isoproterenol-induced myocardial injury. These findings suggested that endogenous SO2 was a novel gasotransmitter in the cardiovascular system and provided a new therapy target for cardiovascular diseases. PMID:26839635

  17. Solubility of Sulfur Dioxide in Sulfuric Acid

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chang, K. K.; Compton, L. E.; Lawson, D. D.

    1982-01-01

    The solubility of sulfur dioxide in 50% (wt./wt.) sulfuric acid was evaluated by regular solution theory, and the results verified by experimental measurements in the temperature range of 25 C to 70 C at pressures of 60 to 200 PSIA. The percent (wt./wt.) of sulfur dioxide in 50% (wt./wt.) sulfuric acid is given by the equation %SO2 = 2.2350 + 0.0903P - 0.00026P 10 to the 2nd power with P in PSIA.

  18. Incorporation of a Doubly Functionalized Synthetic Amino Acid into Proteins for Creating Chemical and Light-Induced Conjugates.

    PubMed

    Yamaguchi, Atsushi; Matsuda, Takayoshi; Ohtake, Kazumasa; Yanagisawa, Tatsuo; Yokoyama, Shigeyuki; Fujiwara, Yoshihisa; Watanabe, Takayoshi; Hohsaka, Takahiro; Sakamoto, Kensaku

    2016-01-20

    Z-Lysine (ZLys) is a lysine derivative with a benzyloxycarbonyl group linked to the ε-nitrogen. It has been genetically encoded with the UAG stop codon, using the pair of an engineered variant of pyrrolysyl-tRNA synthetase (PylRS) and tRNA(Pyl). In the present study, we designed a novel Z-lysine derivative (AmAzZLys), which is doubly functionalized with amino and azido substituents at the meta positions of the benzyl moiety, and demonstrated its applicability for creating protein conjugates. AmAzZLys was incorporated into proteins in Escherichia coli, by using the ZLys-specific PylRS variant. AmAzZLys was then site-specifically incorporated into a camelid single-domain antibody specific to the epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR). A one-pot reaction demonstrated that the phenyl amine and azide were efficiently linked to the 5 kDa polyethylene glycol and a fluorescent probe, respectively, through specific bio-orthogonal chemistry. The antibody was then tested for the ability to form a photo-cross-link between its phenylazide moiety and the antigen, while the amino group on the same ring was used for chemical labeling. When incorporated at a selected position in the antibody and exposed to 365 nm light, AmAzZLys formed a covalent bond with the EGFR ectodomain, with the phenylamine moiety labeled fluorescently prior to the reaction. The present results illuminated the versatility of the ZLys scaffold, which can accommodate multiple reactive groups useful for protein conjugation. PMID:26625213

  19. Evidence that the branched-chain amino acid L-valine prevents exercise-induced release of 5-HT in rat hippocampus.

    PubMed

    Gomez-Merino, D; Béquet, F; Berthelot, M; Riverain, S; Chennaoui, M; Guezennec, C Y

    2001-07-01

    The branched-chain amino acid L-valine competes with tryptophan for transport into the brain and has previously been shown to decrease brain 5-HT synthesis. The purpose of this study was to assess, using a combined venous catheterization and in vivo microdialysis method, the effect of pre-exercise L-valine administration on 5-hydroxytryptamine (5-HT) metabolism in the ventral hippocampus of rats submitted to an acute intensive treadmill running (120 min at 25 m x min(-1) followed by 150 min of recovery). The presented results include measurement of extracellular tryptophan (TRP), the 5-HT precursor, and extracellular 5-hydroxyindoleacetic acid (5-HIAA), the 5-HT metabolite. The data clearly demonstrate that exercise induces 5-HT release in the rat hippocampus: in control group, hippocampal 5-HT levels increase from 123.7 +/- 6.4% at the end of exercise to 133.9 +/- 6.4% after 60 min of recovery. Moreover, two hours of intensive running induced significant increases both in extracellular TRP levels (from 120 min of exercise to 30 min of recovery) and 5-HIAA levels (from 90 min of exercise to 90 min of recovery). Pre-exercise administration of L-valine prevents significantly the exercise-induced 5-HT release: 5-HT levels are maintained to baseline during exercise and recovery. With regard to the competitive effect of L-valine with TRP, we could observe a treatment-induced decrease in brain TRP levels (from 120 min of exercise to the end of recovery). Besides, L-valine does not prevent exercise-induced increase in 5-HIAA levels. The present study evidences that an acute intensive exercise stimulates 5-HT metabolism in the rat hippocampus, and that a pre-exercise administration of L-valine prevents, via a limiting effect on 5-HT synthesis, exercise-induced 5-HT release. This study provides some anwers to previous human and animal investigations, showing physiological and psychological benefits of branched-chain amino acids supplementation on performance. PMID:11510866

  20. In vitro transcriptional studies of the bkd operon of Pseudomonas putida: L-branched-chain amino acids and D-leucine are the inducers.

    PubMed

    Madhusudhan, K T; Luo, J; Sokatch, J R

    1999-05-01

    BkdR is the transcriptional activator of the bkd operon, which encodes the four proteins of the branched-chain keto acid dehydrogenase multienzyme complex of Pseudomonas putida. In this study, hydroxyl radical footprinting revealed that BkdR bound to only one face of DNA over the same region identified in DNase I protection assays. Deletions of even a few bases in the 5' region of the BkdR-binding site greatly reduced transcription, confirming that the entire protected region is necessary for transcription. In vitro transcription of the bkd operon was obtained by using a vector containing the bkdR-bkdA1 intergenic region plus the putative rho-independent terminator of the bkd operon. Substrate DNA, BkdR, and any of the L-branched-chain amino acids or D-leucine was required for transcription. Branched-chain keto acids, D-valine, and D-isoleucine did not promote transcription. Therefore, the L-branched-chain amino acids and D-leucine are the inducers of the bkd operon. The concentration of L-valine required for half-maximal transcription was 2.8 mM, which is similar to that needed to cause half-maximal proteolysis due to a conformational change in BkdR. A model for transcriptional activation of the bkd operon by BkdR during enzyme induction which incorporates these results is presented. PMID:10217783

  1. Disruption of behavioral circadian rhythms induced by psychophysiological stress affects plasma free amino acid profiles without affecting peripheral clock gene expression in mice.

    PubMed

    Oishi, Katsutaka; Yamamoto, Saori; Itoh, Nanako; Miyazaki, Koyomi; Nemoto, Tadashi; Nakakita, Yasukazu; Kaneda, Hirotaka

    2014-07-18

    Disordered circadian rhythms are associated with various psychiatric conditions and metabolic diseases. We recently established a mouse model of a psychophysiological stress-induced chronic sleep disorder (CSD) characterized by reduced amplitude of circadian wheel-running activity and sleep-wake cycles, sleep fragmentation and hyperphagia. Here, we evaluate day-night fluctuations in plasma concentrations of free amino acids (FAA), appetite hormones and prolactin as well as the hepatic expression of circadian clock-related genes in mice with CSD (CSD mice). Nocturnal increases in wheel-running activity and circadian rhythms of plasma prolactin concentrations were significantly disrupted in CSD mice. Hyperphagia with a decreased leptin/ghrelin ratio was found in CSD mice. Day-night fluctuations in plasma FAA contents were severely disrupted without affecting total FAA levels in CSD mice. Nocturnal increases in branched-chain amino acids such as Ile, Leu, and Val were further augmented in CSD mice, while daytime increases in Gly, Ala, Ser, Thr, Lys, Arg, His, Tyr, Met, Cys, Glu, and Asn were significantly attenuated. Importantly, the circadian expression of hepatic clock genes was completely unaffected in CSD mice. These findings suggest that circadian clock gene expression does not always reflect disordered behavior and sleep rhythms and that plasma FFA profiles could serve as a potential biomarker of circadian rhythm disorders. PMID:24971530

  2. NIR Laser Radiation Induced Conformational Changes and Tunneling Lifetimes of High-Energy Conformers of Amino Acids in Low-Temperature Matrices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bazso, Gabor; Najbauer, Eszter E.; Magyarfalvi, Gabor; Tarczay, Gyorgy

    2013-06-01

    We review our recent results on combined matrix isolation FT-IR and NIR laser irradiation studies on glycine alanine, and cysteine. The OH and the NH stretching overtones of the low-energy conformers of these amino acids deposited in Ar, Kr, Xe, and N_{2} matrices were irradiated. At the expense of the irradiated conformer, other conformers were enriched and new, high-energy, formerly unobserved conformers were formed in the matrices. This enabled the separation and unambiguous assignment of the vibrational transitions of the different conformers. The main conversion paths and their efficiencies are described qualitatively showing that there are significant differences in different matrices. It was shown that the high-energy conformer decays in the matrix by H-atom tunneling. The lifetimes of the high-energy conformers in different matrices were measured. Based on our results we conclude that some theoretically predicted low-energy conformers of amino acids are likely even absent in low-energy matrices due to fast H-atom tunneling. G. Bazso, G. Magyarfalvi, G. Tarczay J. Mol. Struct. 1025 (Light-Induced Processes in Cryogenic Matrices Special Issue) 33-42 (2012). G. Bazso, G. Magyarfalvi, G. Tarczay J. Phys. Chem. A 116 (43) 10539-10547 (2012). G. Bazso, E. E. Najbauer, G. Magyarfalvi, G. Tarczay J. Phys. Chem. A in press, DOI: 10.1021/jp400196b. E. E. Najbauer, G. Bazso, G. Magyarfalvi, G. Tarczay in preparation.

  3. The Sulfur Cycle

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kellogg, W. W.; And Others

    1972-01-01

    A model estimating the contributions of sulfur compounds by natural and human activities, and the rate of removal of sulfur from the atmosphere, is based on a review of the existing literature. Areas requiring additional research are identified. (AL)

  4. Plasma Acylcarnitines and Amino Acid Levels As an Early Complex Biomarker of Propensity to High-Fat Diet-Induced Obesity in Mice.

    PubMed

    Horakova, Olga; Hansikova, Jana; Bardova, Kristina; Gardlo, Alzbeta; Rombaldova, Martina; Kuda, Ondrej; Rossmeisl, Martin; Kopecky, Jan

    2016-01-01

    Obesity is associated with insulin resistance and impaired glucose tolerance, which represent characteristic features of the metabolic syndrome. Development of obesity is also linked to changes in fatty acid and amino acid metabolism observed in animal models of obesity as well as in humans. The aim of this study was to explore whether plasma metabolome, namely the levels of various acylcarnitines and amino acids, could serve as a biomarker of propensity to obesity and impaired glucose metabolism. Taking advantage of a high phenotypic variation in diet-induced obesity in C57BL/6J mice, 12-week-old male and female mice (n = 155) were fed a high-fat diet (lipids ~32 wt%) for a period of 10 weeks, while body weight gain (BWG) and changes in insulin sensitivity (ΔHOMA-IR) were assessed. Plasma samples were collected before (week 4) and after (week 22) high-fat feeding. Both univariate and multivariate statistical analyses were then used to examine the relationships between plasma metabolome and selected phenotypes including BWG and ΔHOMA-IR. Partial least squares-discrimination analysis was able to distinguish between animals selected either for their low or high BWG (or ΔHOMA-IR) in male but not female mice. Among the metabolites that differentiated male mice with low and high BWG, and which also belonged to the major discriminating metabolites when analyzed in plasma collected before and after high-fat feeding, were amino acids Tyr and Orn, as well as acylcarnitines C16-DC and C18:1-OH. In general, the separation of groups selected for their low or high ΔHOMA-IR was less evident and the outcomes of a corresponding multivariate analysis were much weaker than in case of BWG. Thus, our results document that plasma acylcarnitines and amino acids could serve as a gender-specific complex biomarker of propensity to obesity, however with a limited predictive value in case of the associated impairment of insulin sensitivity. PMID:27183228

  5. Plasma Acylcarnitines and Amino Acid Levels As an Early Complex Biomarker of Propensity to High-Fat Diet-Induced Obesity in Mice

    PubMed Central

    Bardova, Kristina; Gardlo, Alzbeta; Rombaldova, Martina; Kuda, Ondrej; Rossmeisl, Martin; Kopecky, Jan

    2016-01-01

    Obesity is associated with insulin resistance and impaired glucose tolerance, which represent characteristic features of the metabolic syndrome. Development of obesity is also linked to changes in fatty acid and amino acid metabolism observed in animal models of obesity as well as in humans. The aim of this study was to explore whether plasma metabolome, namely the levels of various acylcarnitines and amino acids, could serve as a biomarker of propensity to obesity and impaired glucose metabolism. Taking advantage of a high phenotypic variation in diet-induced obesity in C57BL/6J mice, 12-week-old male and female mice (n = 155) were fed a high-fat diet (lipids ~32 wt%) for a period of 10 weeks, while body weight gain (BWG) and changes in insulin sensitivity (ΔHOMA-IR) were assessed. Plasma samples were collected before (week 4) and after (week 22) high-fat feeding. Both univariate and multivariate statistical analyses were then used to examine the relationships between plasma metabolome and selected phenotypes including BWG and ΔHOMA-IR. Partial least squares-discrimination analysis was able to distinguish between animals selected either for their low or high BWG (or ΔHOMA-IR) in male but not female mice. Among the metabolites that differentiated male mice with low and high BWG, and which also belonged to the major discriminating metabolites when analyzed in plasma collected before and after high-fat feeding, were amino acids Tyr and Orn, as well as acylcarnitines C16-DC and C18:1-OH. In general, the separation of groups selected for their low or high ΔHOMA-IR was less evident and the outcomes of a corresponding multivariate analysis were much weaker than in case of BWG. Thus, our results document that plasma acylcarnitines and amino acids could serve as a gender-specific complex biomarker of propensity to obesity, however with a limited predictive value in case of the associated impairment of insulin sensitivity. PMID:27183228

  6. Branched Chain Amino Acids Induce Apoptosis in Neural Cells without Mitochondrial Membrane Depolarization or Cytochrome c Release: Implications for Neurological Impairment Associated with Maple Syrup Urine Disease

    PubMed Central

    Jouvet, Philippe; Rustin, Pierre; Taylor, Deanna L.; Pocock, Jennifer M.; Felderhoff-Mueser, Ursula; Mazarakis, Nicholas D.; Sarraf, Catherine; Joashi, Umesh; Kozma, Mary; Greenwood, Kirsty; Edwards, A. David; Mehmet, Huseyin

    2000-01-01

    Maple syrup urine disease (MSUD) is an inborn error of metabolism caused by a deficiency in branched chain α-keto acid dehydrogenase that can result in neurodegenerative sequelae in human infants. In the present study, increased concentrations of MSUD metabolites, in particular α-keto isocaproic acid, specifically induced apoptosis in glial and neuronal cells in culture. Apoptosis was associated with a reduction in cell respiration but without impairment of respiratory chain function, without early changes in mitochondrial membrane potential and without cytochrome c release into the cytosol. Significantly, α-keto isocaproic acid also triggered neuronal apoptosis in vivo after intracerebral injection into the developing rat brain. These findings suggest that MSUD neurodegeneration may result, at least in part, from an accumulation of branched chain amino acids and their α-keto acid derivatives that trigger apoptosis through a cytochrome c-independent pathway. PMID:10793161

  7. LRRC8A protein is indispensable for swelling-activated and ATP-induced release of excitatory amino acids in rat astrocytes

    PubMed Central

    Hyzinski-García, María C; Rudkouskaya, Alena; Mongin, Alexander A

    2014-01-01

    In mammals, cellular swelling activates release of small organic osmolytes, including the excitatory amino acids (EAA) glutamate and aspartate, via a ubiquitously expressed volume-regulated chloride/anion channel (VRAC). Pharmacological evidence suggests that VRAC plays plural physiological and pathological roles, including excitotoxic release of glutamate in stroke. However, the molecular identity of this pathway was unknown. Two recent studies discovered that LRRC8 gene family members encode heteromeric VRAC composed of LRRC8A plus LRRC8B-E, which mediate swelling-activated Cl− currents and taurine release in human non-neural cells (Z. Qiu et al. Cell 157: 447, 2014; F.K. Voss et al. Science 344: 634, 2014). Here, we tested the contribution of LRRC8A to the EAA release in brain glia. We detected and quantified expression levels of LRRC8A-E in primary rat astrocytes with quantitative RT-PCR and then downregulated LRRC8A with gene-specific siRNAs. In astrocytes exposed to hypo-osmotic media, LRRC8A knockdown dramatically reduced swelling-activated release of the EAA tracer d-[3H]aspartate. In parallel HPLC assays, LRRC8A siRNA prevented hypo-osmotic media-induced loss of the endogenous intracellular l-glutamate and taurine. Furthermore, downregulation of LRRC8A completely ablated the ATP-stimulated release of d-[3H]aspartate and [14C]taurine from non-swollen astrocytes. Overall, these data indicate that LRRC8A is an indispensable component of a permeability pathway that mediates both swelling-activated and agonist-induced amino acid release in brain glial cells. PMID:25172945

  8. Amino acid concentrations in hypothalamic and caudate nuclei during microwave-induced thermal stress: Analysis by microdialysis

    SciTech Connect

    Mason, P.A.; Doyle, J.M.; Escarciga, R.; Romano, W.F.; Donnellan, J.P.; Berger, R.E.

    1997-05-01

    Exposure to radiofrequency radiation (RFR) may produce thermal responses. Extracellular amino acid concentrations in the hypothalamus (Hyp) and caudate nucleus (CN) were measured by using in vivo microdialysis before and during exposure to RFR. Under urethane anesthetic, each rat was implanted stereotaxically with a nonmetallic microdialysis probe and temperature probe guides and then placed in the exposure chamber. The rat laid on its right side with its head and neck placed directly under the wave guide. Temperature probes were placed in the lift brain, right brain, face, left tympanum, and rectum. Each microdialysis sample was collected over a 20 min period. The microdialysis probe was perfused for 2 h before the rat was exposed to 5.02 GHz radiation. The right and left sides of the brain were maintained at approximately 41.2 and 41.7 C, respectively, throughout a 40 min exposure period. Initially when the brain was being heated to these temperatures, the time-averaged specific absorption rates (SARs) for the right and left sides of the brain were 29 and 40 W/kg, respectively. Concentrations of aspartic acid, glutamic acid, serine, glutamine, and glycine in dialysate were determined by using high-pressure liquid chromatography with electrochemical detection. In the Hyp and CN, the concentrations of aspartic acid, serine, and glycine increased significantly during RFR exposure.

  9. T-shaped monopyridazinotetrathiafulvalene-amino acid diad based chiral organogels with aggregation-induced fluorescence emission.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yuan; Liu, Yucun; Jin, Longyi; Yin, Bingzhu

    2016-08-14

    A series of pyridazine coupled tetrathiafulvalene T-shaped derivatives with varying amino acid moieties have been synthesized and their gelation properties were studied in various organic solvents. Among these derivatives, two gelators bearing glycine or phenylalanine units display efficient gelation in aromatic and polar solvents. Interestingly, these gelators, except for the gelator containing two tryptophan units, are able to gel DMF via a solution-to-gel transformation when triggered with sonication for less than 20 s or cooled below zero. A number of experiments revealed that these gelator molecules self-assembled into elastically interpenetrating three-dimensional chiral fibrillar aggregates. Importantly, all of the resulting gels result in a dramatic enhancement of the fluorescence intensity compared with their hot solution in spite of the absence of a conventional fluorophore unit and the fluorescence was effectively quenched by the introduction of C60. Moreover, the gelators can be utilized for the removal of different types of toxic molecules, such as aromatic solvents and cationic dyes, from wastewater. PMID:27418524

  10. The effect of 2-[(aminopropyl)amino] ethanethiol (WR-1065) on radiation induced DNA double strand damage and repair in V79 cells.

    PubMed Central

    Sigdestad, C. P.; Treacy, S. H.; Knapp, L. A.; Grdina, D. J.

    1987-01-01

    Radiation induced DNA double strand breaks are believed to be important lesions involved in processes related to cell killing, induction of chromosome aberrations and carcinogenesis. This paper reports the effects of the radioprotector 2-[(aminopropyl)amino]ethanethiol (WR-1065) on radiation-induced DNA damage and repair in V79 cells using the neutral elution method performed at pH 7.2 or pH 9.6. WR-1065 (4 mM) was added to the culture medium either 30 minutes prior to and during irradiation with Cobalt-60 gamma rays (for dose response experiments) or during the repair times tested (for DNA rejoining experiments). The results indicate that WR-1065 is an effective protector against the formation of radiation-induced double-strand breaks in DNA as measured using a neutral elution technique at either pH. The protector reduced the strand scission factors by 1.44 and 1.77 in experiments run at pH 9.6 and pH 7.2, respectively. The kinetics of DNA double-strand rejoining were dependent upon the pH at which the neutral elution procedure was performed. Unlike the results obtained with alkaline elution, rejoining of DNA breaks was unaffected by the presence of WR-1065 at either pH. PMID:3606941

  11. Sensitivity of ginseng to ozone and sulfur dioxide

    SciTech Connect

    Proctor, J.T.A.; Ormrod, D.P.

    1981-10-01

    American ginseng (Panax quinquefolius L.), was injured by exposure to 20 pphm ozone and/or 50 pphm (v/v) sulfur dioxide for 6 hr daily for 4 days. Ozone induced upper surface leaflet stippling along the veins and interveinally, and sulfur dioxide induced mild chlorosis to irregular necrotic areas. Ginseng was less sensitive to ozone and as sensitive to sulfur dioxide as 'Cherry Belle' radish (Raphanus sativus L.) and 'Bel W-3' tobacco (Nicotiana tabacum L.).

  12. Sulfur and nitrogen mustards induce characteristic poly(ADP-ribosyl)ation responses in HaCaT keratinocytes with distinctive cellular consequences.

    PubMed

    Mangerich, Aswin; Debiak, Malgorzata; Birtel, Matthias; Ponath, Viviane; Balszuweit, Frank; Lex, Kirsten; Martello, Rita; Burckhardt-Boer, Waltraud; Strobelt, Romano; Siegert, Markus; Thiermann, Horst; Steinritz, Dirk; Schmidt, Annette; Bürkle, Alexander

    2016-02-26

    Mustard agents are potent DNA alkylating agents with mutagenic, cytotoxic and vesicant properties. They include bi-functional agents, such as sulfur mustard (SM) or nitrogen mustard (mustine, HN2), as well as mono-functional agents, such as "half mustard" (CEES). Whereas SM has been used as a chemical warfare agent, several nitrogen mustard derivatives, such as chlorambucil and cyclophosphamide, are being used as established chemotherapeutics. Upon induction of specific forms of genotoxic stimuli, several poly(ADP-ribose) polymerases (PARPs) synthesize the nucleic acid-like biopolymer poly(ADP-ribose) (PAR) by using NAD(+) as a substrate. Previously, it was shown that SM triggers cellular poly(ADP-ribosyl) ation (PARylation), but so far this phenomenon is poorly characterized. In view of the protective effects of PARP inhibitors, the latter have been proposed as a treatment option of SM-exposed victims. In an accompanying article (Debiak et al., 2016), we have provided an optimized protocol for the analysis of the CEES-induced PARylation response in HaCaT keratinocytes, which forms an experimental basis to further analyze mustard-induced PARylation and its functional consequences, in general. Thus, in the present study, we performed a comprehensive characterization of the PARylation response in HaCaT cells after treatment with four different mustard agents, i.e., SM, CEES, HN2, and chlorambucil, on a qualitative, quantitative and functional level. In particular, we recorded substance-specific as well as dose- and time-dependent PARylation responses using independent bioanalytical methods based on single-cell immuno-fluorescence microscopy and quantitative isotope dilution mass spectrometry. Furthermore, we analyzed if and how PARylation contributes to mustard-induced toxicity by treating HaCaT cells with CEES, SM, and HN2 in combination with the clinically relevant PARP inhibitor ABT888. As evaluated by a novel immunofluorescence-based protocol for the detection of

  13. An amino acid substitution inhibits specialist herbivore production of a competitive antagonist effector and recovers insect-induced plant defenses

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Plants respond to insect herbivory through the production of biochemicals that function as either direct defenses or indirect defenses via the attraction of natural enemies. Curiously, attack by even closely related insect pests can result in distinctive levels of induced plant defenses. Despite the...

  14. An amino acid substitution inhibits specialist herbivore production of an antagonist effector and recovers insect-induced plant defenses

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Plants respond to insect herbivory through the production of biochemicals that function as either direct defenses or indirect defenses via the attraction of natural enemies. Curiously, attack by even closely related insect pests can result in distinctive levels of induced plant defenses. Despite the...

  15. Role of miR-155 at early stages of hepatocarcinogenesis induced by choline-deficient and amino acid defined diet in C57BL/6 mice

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Bo; Majumder, Sarmila; Nuovo, Gerard; Kutay, Huban; Volinia, Stefano; Patel, Tushar; Schmittgen, Thomas D.; Croce, Carlo; Ghoshal, Kalpana; Jacob, Samson T.

    2009-01-01

    MicroRNAs are conserved, small (20–25 nucleotide) noncoding RNAs that negatively regulate expression of mRNAs at the post-transcriptional level. Aberrant expression of certain microRNAs plays a causal role in tumorigenesis. Here, we report identification of hepatic microRNAs that are dysregulated at early stages of feeding C57BL/6 mice choline deficient and amino acid defined (CDAA) diet that is known to promote nonalcoholic steatohepatitis (NASH)-induced hepatocarcinogenesis after 84 weeks. Microarray analysis identified 30 hepatic microRNAs that are significantly (P≤0.01) altered in mice fed CDAA diet for 6, 18, 32 and 65 weeks compared to those fed choline sufficient and amino acid defined diet. Real-time RT-PCR analysis demonstrated upregulation of oncogenic miR-155, miR-221/222 and miR-21 and downregulation of the most abundant liver specific miR-122 at early stages of hepatocarcinogenesis. Western blot analysis showed reduced expression of hepatic PTEN and C/EBPβ respective targets of miR-21 and miR-155, in these mice at early stages. DNA binding activity of NF-kB that transactivates miR-155 gene was significantly (P=0.002) elevated in the liver nuclear extract of mice fed CDAA diet. Further, the expression of miR-155, as measured by in situ hybridization and real-time RT-PCR, correlated with diet-induced histopathological changes in the liver. Ectopic expression of miR-155 promoted growth of HCC cells whereas its depletion inhibited cell growth. Notably, miR-155 was significantly (P=0.0004) upregulated in primary human HCCs with concomitant decrease (P=0.02) in C/EBPβ level compared to matching liver tissues. Conclusion Temporal changes in microRNA profile occur at early stages of CDAA diet-induced hepatocarcinogenesis. Reciprocal regulation of specific oncomirs and their tumor suppressor targets implicate their role in NASH-induced hepatocarcinogenesis and suggest their use in the diagnosis, prognosis and therapy of liver cancer. PMID:19711427

  16. Cellular Plasticity Induced by Anti–α-Amino-3-Hydroxy-5-Methyl-4-Isoxazolepropionic Acid (AMPA) Receptor Encephalitis Antibodies

    PubMed Central

    Peng, Xiaoyu; Hughes, Ethan G; Moscato, Emilia H; Parsons, Thomas D; Dalmau, Josep; Balice-Gordon, Rita J

    2015-01-01

    Objective Autoimmune-mediated anti–α-amino-3-hydroxy-5-methyl-4-isoxazolepropionic acid receptor (AMPAR) encephalitis is a severe but treatment-responsive disorder with prominent short-term memory loss and seizures. The mechanisms by which patient antibodies affect synapses and neurons leading to symptoms are poorly understood. Methods The effects of patient antibodies on cultures of live rat hippocampal neurons were determined with immunostaining, Western blot, and electrophysiological analyses. Results We show that patient antibodies cause a selective decrease in the total surface amount and synaptic localization of GluA1- and GluA2-containing AMPARs, regardless of receptor subunit binding specificity, through increased internalization and degradation of surface AMPAR clusters. In contrast, patient antibodies do not alter the density of excitatory synapses, N-methyl-D-aspartate receptor (NMDAR) clusters, or cell viability. Commercially available AMPAR antibodies directed against extracellular epitopes do not result in a loss of surface and synaptic receptor clusters, suggesting specific effects of patient antibodies. Whole-cell patch clamp recordings of spontaneous miniature postsynaptic currents show that patient antibodies decrease AMPAR-mediated currents, but not NMDAR-mediated currents. Interestingly, several functional properties of neurons are also altered: inhibitory synaptic currents and vesicular γ-aminobutyric acid transporter (vGAT) staining intensity decrease, whereas the intrinsic excitability of neurons and short-interval firing increase. Interpretation These results establish that antibodies from patients with anti-AMPAR encephalitis selectively eliminate surface and synaptic AMPARs, resulting in a homeostatic decrease in inhibitory synaptic transmission and increased intrinsic excitability, which may contribute to the memory deficits and epilepsy that are prominent in patients with this disorder. PMID:25369168

  17. Ferrocenyl-L-amino acid copper(II) complexes showing remarkable photo-induced anticancer activity in visible light.

    PubMed

    Goswami, Tridib K; Gadadhar, Sudarshan; Balaji, Babu; Gole, Bappaditya; Karande, Anjali A; Chakravarty, Akhil R

    2014-08-21

    Ferrocene-conjugated copper(ii) complexes [Cu(Fc-aa)(aip)](ClO4) () and [Cu(Fc-aa)(pyip)](ClO4) () of l-amino acid reduced Schiff bases (Fc-aa), 2-(9-anthryl)-1H-imidazo[4,5-f][1,10]phenanthroline (aip) and 2-(1-pyrenyl)-1H-imidazo[4,5-f][1,10]phenanthroline (pyip), where Fc-aa is ferrocenylmethyl-l-tyrosine (Fc-Tyr in , ), ferrocenylmethyl-l-tryptophan (Fc-Trp in , ) and ferrocenylmethyl-l-methionine (Fc-Met in , ), were prepared and characterized, and their photocytotoxicity was studied (Fc = ferrocenyl moiety). Phenyl analogues, viz. [Cu(Ph-Met)(aip)](ClO4) () and [Cu(Ph-Met)(pyip)](ClO4) (), were prepared and used as control compounds. The bis-imidazophenanthroline copper(ii) complexes, viz. [Cu(aip)2(NO3)](NO3) () and [Cu(pyip)2(NO3)](NO3) (), were also prepared and used as controls. Complexes having a redox inactive cooper(ii) center showed the Fc(+)-Fc redox couple at ∼0.5 V vs. SCE in DMF-0.1 mol [Bu(n)4N](ClO4). The copper(ii)-based d-d band was observed near 600 nm in DMF-Tris-HCl buffer (1 : 1 v/v). The ferrocenyl complexes showed low dark toxicity, but remarkably high photocytotoxicity in human cervical HeLa and human breast adenocarcinoma MCF-7 cancer cells giving an excellent photo-dynamic effect while their phenyl analogues were inactive. The photo-exposure caused significant morphological changes in the cancer cells when compared to the non-irradiated ones. The photophysical processes were rationalized from the theoretical studies. Fluorescence microscopic images showed and localizing predominantly in the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) of the cancer cells, thus minimizing any undesirable effects involving nuclear DNA. PMID:24971754

  18. Sulfuric acid on Europa and the radiolytic sulfur cycle

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Carlson, R. W.; Johnson, R. E.; Anderson, M. S.

    1999-01-01

    A comparison of laboratory spectra with Galileo data indicates that hydrated sulfuric acid is present and is a major component of Europa's surface. In addition, this moon's visually dark surface material, which spatially correlates with the sulfuric acid concentration, is identified as radiolytically altered sulfur polymers. Radiolysis of the surface by magnetospheric plasma bombardment continuously cycles sulfur between three forms: sulfuric acid, sulfur dioxide, and sulfur polymers, with sulfuric acid being about 50 times as abundant as the other forms. Enhanced sulfuric acid concentrations are found in Europa's geologically young terrains, suggesting that low-temperature, liquid sulfuric acid may influence geological processes.

  19. Chlorine and sulfur determination in extra-heavy crude oil by inductively coupled plasma optical emission spectrometry after microwave-induced combustion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pereira, Juliana S. F.; Mello, Paola A.; Moraes, Diogo P.; Duarte, Fábio A.; Dressler, Valderi L.; Knapp, Guenter; Flores, Érico M. M.

    2009-06-01

    In this study, microwave-induced combustion (MIC) of extra-heavy crude oil is proposed for further chlorine and sulfur determination by inductively coupled plasma optical emission spectrometry (ICP OES). Combustion was carried out under oxygen pressure (20 bar) in quartz vessels using ammonium nitrate (50 µl of 6 mol l - 1 solution) as ignition aid. Samples were wrapped with polyethylene film and placed on a quartz holder positioned inside the quartz vessels. The need for an additional reflux step after combustion and the type and concentration of absorbing solution (water, 0.02 to 0.9 mmol l - 1 H 2O 2, 10 to 100 mmol l - 1 (NH 4) 2CO 3 or 0.1 to 14 mol l - 1 HNO 3) were studied. The influence of sample mass, O 2 pressure and maximum pressure attained during the combustion process were investigated. Recoveries from 92 to 102% were obtained for Cl and S for all absorbing solutions. For comparison, Cl and S determination was also performed by ion chromatography (IC) using 25 mmol l - 1 (NH 4) 2CO 3 as absorbing solution. Using MIC with a reflux step the agreement was better than 95% for certified reference materials of similar composition (crude oil, petroleum coke, coal and residual fuel oil). Microwave-assisted digestion and water extraction in high pressure closed vessels were also evaluated. Using these procedures the maximum recoveries were 30 and 98% for Cl and S, respectively, using microwave-assisted digestion and 70% for Cl and less than 1% for S by water extraction procedure. Limits of detection by ICP OES were 12 and 5 µg g - 1 for Cl and S, respectively, and the corresponding values by IC were 1.2 and 8 µg g - 1 . Using MIC it was possible to digest simultaneously up to eight samples resulting in a solution suitable for the determination of both analytes with a single combustion step.

  20. Sulfur tolerant anode materials

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1987-02-01

    The goal of this program is the development of a molten carbonate fuel cell (MCFC) anode which is more tolerant of sulfur contaminants in the fuel than the current state-of-the-art nickel-based anode structures. This program addresses two different but related aspects of the sulfur contamination problem. The primary aspect is concerned with the development of a sulfur tolerant electrocatalyst for the fuel oxidation reaction. A secondary issue is the development of a sulfur tolerant water-gas-shift reaction catalyst and an investigation of potential steam reforming catalysts which also have some sulfur tolerant capabilities. These two aspects are being addressed as two separate tasks.

  1. Protective Effects of Epigallocatechin Gallate on Colon Preneoplastic Lesions Induced by 2-Amino-3-Methylimidazo[4,5-f ] Quinoline in Mice

    PubMed Central

    Yuan, Jun-Hua; Li, Yan-Qing; Yang, Xiao-Yun

    2008-01-01

    Epigallocatechin gallate (EGCG), a key active ingredient in green tea, has multiple anticarcinogenic effects. The aim of the present study was to investigate if EGCG could prevent the formation of colon aberrant crypt foci (ACF) induced by 2-amino-3-methylimidazo[4,5-f ]quinoline (IQ) and to explore possible mechanisms for resultant effects. Sixty male BALB/cA nude, immunodeficient mice were divided into six groups including a normal unexposed control, mice induced with IQ alone, three groups treated with varying doses of EGCG post–IQ induction, and a EGCG-treated control population. Six weeks later, the mice were killed, and tissues subjected to hematoxylin-eosin (H&E) and 0.2% methylene blue staining to observe histopathological alterations of colon mucus and the formation of ACF, respectively. Protein expression of NF-E2–related factor 2 (Nrf2) was assessed via immunohistochemistry (IHC) and Western analysis, and mRNA levels of Nrf2 and uridine 5′-diphosphate-glucuronosyltransferase (UGT)1A10 were determined in colon tissues. Our results demonstrate that, compared with IQ-induced controls, the degree of atypical hyperplasia decreased and the number of total ACF and total AC also decreased significantly (P < 0.05 and P < 0.01, respectively) in mice belonging to all EGCG dosing groups. At the same time, the protein levels of Nrf2 detected by IHC and Western blotting increased (both P < 0.01 compared with IQ group), and the mRNA levels of Nrf2 and UGT1A10 increased (both P < 0.01 compared with IQ group). In conclusion, EGCG had preventive effects on preneoplastic lesions induced by IQ. Our observations suggest that this effect may be the result of activation of the Nrf2-UGT1A10 signaling pathway. PMID:18596869

  2. Role of Ingested Amino Acids and Protein in the Promotion of Resistance Exercise-Induced Muscle Protein Anabolism.

    PubMed

    Reidy, Paul T; Rasmussen, Blake B

    2016-02-01

    The goal of this critical review is to comprehensively assess the evidence for the molecular, physiologic, and phenotypic skeletal muscle responses to resistance exercise (RE) combined with the nutritional intervention of protein and/or amino acid (AA) ingestion in young adults. We gathered the literature regarding the translational response in human skeletal muscle to acute exposure to RE and protein/AA supplements and the literature describing the phenotypic skeletal muscle adaptation to RE and nutritional interventions. Supplementation of protein/AAs with RE exhibited clear protein dose-dependent effects on translational regulation (protein synthesis) through mammalian target of rapamycin complex 1 (mTORC1) signaling, which was most apparent through increases in p70 ribosomal protein S6 kinase 1 (S6K1) phosphorylation, compared with postexercise recovery in the fasted or carbohydrate-fed state. These acute findings were critically tested via long-term exposure to RE training (RET) and protein/AA supplementation, and it was determined that a diminishing protein/AA supplement effect occurs over a prolonged exposure stimulus after exercise training. Furthermore, we found that protein/AA supplements, combined with RET, produced a positive, albeit minor, effect on the promotion of lean mass growth (when assessed in >20 participants/treatment); a negligible effect on muscle mass; and a negligible to no additional effect on strength. A potential concern we discovered was that the majority of the exercise training studies were underpowered in their ability to discern effects of protein/AA supplementation. Regardless, even when using optimal methodology and large sample sizes, it is clear that the effect size for protein/AA supplementation is low and likely limited to a subset of individuals because the individual variability is high. With regard to nutritional intakes, total protein intake per day, rather than protein timing or quality, appears to be more of a factor on

  3. Lack of excitatory amino acid-induced effects on calcium fluxes measured with sup 45 Ca sup 2+ in rat cerebral cortex synaptosomes

    SciTech Connect

    Simonato, M.; Jope, R.S.; Bianchi, C.; Beani, L. )

    1989-07-01

    Ca{sup 2+} uptake was measured in purified rat cerebral cortex synaptosomes (P3 pellets) using {sup 45}Ca{sup 2+} as a tracer. Ca{sup 2+} influx increased in time, and with an increase in external K+ concentration and temperature. The net (external K+-induced, depolarization-dependent) uptake follows a two-component course. The exponential term, due to the opening of voltage-operated calcium channels (VOC), has a rate constant which increases with an increase in the depolarization level (1.04 versus 0.54 nmol/s/mg protein for 50 mM - versus 15 mM (K+)-dependent net influx). The linear term, due to the Na{sup +}/Ca{sup 2+} exchange system, has a similar rate constant at all depolarization levels (0.16 +/- 0.05 and 0.11 +/- 0.02 nmol/s/mg protein). Excitatory amino acids (glutamate, kainate and n-methyl-d-aspartate-NMDA-) were tested on this preparation at doses ranging between 5 x 10(-5) M and 5 x 10(-3) M and at multiple incubation times, under resting conditions and under two depolarizing conditions (partial depolarization: 15 mM external K{sup +} and maximal depolarization: 50 mM external K+). NMDA was also tested in the absence of Mg{sup 2+}. No effect was detectable under any of these experimental conditions. Hypotheses to interpret these data are discussed. Further studies on other preparations are needed in order to directly investigate the presynaptic effects of excitatory amino acids.

  4. Relationship between airway reactivity induced by methacholine or ultrasonically nebulized distilled cold water and BAL fluid cellular constituents in patients with sulfur mustard gas-induced asthma.

    PubMed

    Emad, Ali; Emad, Yasaman

    2007-01-01

    The objective of this article was to evaluate the relationship between the bronchial reactivity to methacholine and distilled cold water and inflammatory bronchial alveolar lavage (BAL) cells in mustard gas-induced asthma. This was a randomized, crossover clinical study set in a university hospital. The patients were 17 veterans with mustard gas-induced asthma and 17 normal veterans as a control group. Inhalation challenges with ultrasonically nebulized distilled water and methacholine and BAL via bronchoscopy and were performed in all patients and subjects. All patients did sustain a 20% fall in FEV(1) after methacholine, whereas two of them did not with distilled cold water. The patients were sensitive to distilled cold water with a median PD20 of 8.44 +/- 6.55 mL and sensitive to methacholine with the median PC20 of 4.88 +/- 4.22 mg/mL. Significant correlation was found between PC20 of methacholine and PD20 of distilled cold water (r = -0.74, p = 0.005). The proportion of BAL macrophages was significantly lower in patients with asthma than in the control group (p = 0.001). The proportions of lymphocytes and neutrophils were similar in the two groups. The percentage of eosinophils was higher in BAL fluid from the asthmatics compared with that in BAL fluid from the control group (p < 0.001). The percentage of the BAL eosinophils significantly correlated with both PC20 of methacholine (r = - 0.58, p = 0.01) and PD20 of distilled cold water (r = -0.81, p = 0.002). No relationship between PC20 of methacholine or PD20 of distilled cold water was found for other inflammatory BAL cells. This study showed that in patients with mustard gas-induced asthma, the degree of airway responsiveness to both methacholine and distilled water was associated with the percentage of BAL eosinophils. PMID:17894540

  5. Sulfur in human nutrition and applications in medicine.

    PubMed

    Parcell, Stephen

    2002-02-01

    Because the role of elemental sulfur in human nutrition has not been studied extensively, it is the purpose of this article to emphasize the importance of this element in humans and discuss the therapeutic applications of sulfur compounds in medicine. Sulfur is the sixth most abundant macromineral in breast milk and the third most abundant mineral based on percentage of total body weight. The sulfur-containing amino acids (SAAs) are methionine, cysteine, cystine, homocysteine, homocystine, and taurine. Dietary SAA analysis and protein supplementation may be indicated for vegan athletes, children, or patients with HIV, because of an increased risk for SAA deficiency in these groups. Methylsulfonylmethane (MSM), a volatile component in the sulfur cycle, is another source of sulfur found in the human diet. Increases in serum sulfate may explain some of the therapeutic effects of MSM, DMSO, and glucosamine sulfate. Organic sulfur, as SAAs, can be used to increase synthesis of S-adenosylmethionine (SAMe), glutathione (GSH), taurine, and N-acetylcysteine (NAC). MSM may be effective for the treatment of allergy, pain syndromes, athletic injuries, and bladder disorders. Other sulfur compounds such as SAMe, dimethylsulfoxide (DMSO), taurine, glucosamine or chondroitin sulfate, and reduced glutathione may also have clinical applications in the treatment of a number of conditions such as depression, fibromyalgia, arthritis, interstitial cystitis, athletic injuries, congestive heart failure, diabetes, cancer, and AIDS. Dosages, mechanisms of action, and rationales for use are discussed. The low toxicological profiles of these sulfur compounds, combined with promising therapeutic effects, warrant continued human clinical trails. PMID:11896744

  6. Three-Dimensional Microstructural Imaging of Sulfur Poisoning-Induced Degradation in a Ni-YSZ Anode of Solid Oxide Fuel Cells

    PubMed Central

    Harris, William M.; Lombardo, Jeffrey J.; Nelson, George J.; Lai, Barry; Wang, Steve; Vila-Comamala, Joan; Liu, Mingfei; Liu, Meilin; Chiu, Wilson K. S.

    2014-01-01

    Following exposure to ppm-level hydrogen sulfide at elevated temperatures, a section of a solid oxide fuel cell (SOFC) Ni-YSZ anode was examined using a combination of synchrotron-based x-ray nanotomography and x-ray fluorescence techniques. While fluorescence measurements provided elemental identification and coarse spatial mapping, x-ray nanotomography was used to map the detailed 3-D spatial distribution of Ni, YSZ, and a nickel-sulfur poisoning phase. The nickel-sulfur layer was found to form a scale covering most of the exposed nickel surface, blocking most fuel reformation and hydrogen oxidation reaction sites. Although the exposure conditions precluded the ability to develop a detailed kinetic description of the nickel-sulfur phase formation, the results provide strong evidence of the detrimental effects of 100 ppm hydrogen sulfide on typical Ni-YSZ anode materials. PMID:24912978

  7. [Utilization and transformation of sulfur-containing compounds by hens].

    PubMed

    Lagodiuk, P Z; Ratych, I B; Skvaruk, V I; Strazhnyk, Z Ia; Nazarevich, L E

    1984-01-01

    In the experiments with 35S-labelled sodium sulfate, sulfate sulfur was found to be used for cysteine synthesis in hens. The 35S label was detected in hen's eggs as well, the subshell membranes possessing the highest specific radioactivity. A dependence of 35S incorporation on the ovule developmental stage was revealed. It was established that a shortage of sulfur-containing amino acids in hens' diet can be partially compensated by sodium sulfate sulfur, which influences the concentration of some metabolites. PMID:6718330

  8. Treatment of Staphylococcus aureus-induced chronic osteomyelitis with bone-like hydroxyapatite/poly amino acid loaded with rifapentine microspheres

    PubMed Central

    Yan, Ling; Jiang, Dian-Ming; Cao, Zhi-Dong; Wu, Jun; Wang, Xin; Wang, Zheng-Long; Li, Ya-Jun; Yi, Yong-Fen

    2015-01-01

    Purpose The purpose of this study was to investigate the curative effect of bone-like hydroxyapatite/poly amino acid (BHA/PAA) as a carrier for poly(lactic-co-glycolic acid)-coated rifapentine microsphere (RPM) in the treatment of rabbit chronic osteomyelitis induced by Staphylococcus aureus. Methods RPM was prepared through an oil-in-water emulsion solvent evaporation method, and RPM was combined with BHA/PAA to obtain drug-loaded, slow-releasing materials. Twenty-six New Zealand white rabbits were induced to establish the animal model of chronic osteomyelitis. After debridement, the animals were randomly divided into three groups (n=8): the experimental group (with RPM-loaded BHA/PAA), the control group (with BHA/PAA), and the blank group. The RPM-loaded BHA/PAA was evaluated for antibacterial activity, dynamics of drug release, and osteogenic ability through in vitro and in vivo experiments. Results In vitro, RPM-loaded BHA/PAA released the antibiotics slowly, inhibiting the bacterial growth of S. aureus for up to 5 weeks. In vivo, at week 4, the bacterial colony count was significantly lower in the experimental group than in the control and blank groups (P<0.01). At week 12, the chronic osteomyelitis was cured and the bone defect was repaired in the experimental group, whereas the infection and bone defect persisted in the control and blank groups. Conclusion In vitro and in vivo experiments demonstrated that RPM-loaded BHA/PAA effectively cured S. aureus-induced chronic osteomyelitis. Therefore, BHA/PAA has potential value as a slow-releasing material in clinical setting. Further investigation is needed to determine the optimal dosage for loading rifapentine. PMID:26213463

  9. Transcranial focal electrical stimulation reduces the convulsive expression and amino acid release in the hippocampus during pilocarpine-induced status epilepticus in rats.

    PubMed

    Santana-Gómez, César E; Alcántara-González, David; Luna-Munguía, Hiram; Bañuelos-Cabrera, Ivette; Magdaleno-Madrigal, Víctor; Fernández-Mas, Rodrigo; Besio, Walter; Rocha, Luisa

    2015-08-01

    The aim of the present study was to evaluate the effects of transcranial focal electrical stimulation (TFS) on γ-aminobutyric acid (GABA) and glutamate release in the hippocampus under basal conditions and during pilocarpine-induced status epilepticus (SE). Animals were previously implanted with a guide cannula attached to a bipolar electrode into the right ventral hippocampus and a concentric ring electrode placed on the skull surface. The first microdialysis experiment was designed to determine, under basal conditions, the effects of TFS (300 Hz, 200 μs biphasic square pulses, for 30 min) on afterdischarge threshold (ADT) and the release of GABA and glutamate in the hippocampus. The results obtained indicate that at low current intensities (<2800 μA), TFS enhances and decreases the basal extracellular levels of GABA and glutamate, respectively. However, TFS did not modify the ADT. During the second microdialysis experiment, a group of animals was subjected to SE induced by pilocarpine administration (300 mg/kg, i.p.; SE group). The SE was associated with a significant rise of GABA and glutamate release (up to 120 and 182% respectively, 5h after pilocarpine injection) and the prevalence of high-voltage rhythmic spikes and increased spectral potency of delta, gamma, and theta bands. A group of animals (SE-TFS group) received TFS continuously during 2h at 100 μA, 5 min after the establishment of SE. This group showed a significant decrease in the expression of the convulsive activity and spectral potency in gamma and theta bands. The extracellular levels of GABA and glutamate in the hippocampus remained at basal conditions. These results suggest that TFS induces anticonvulsant effects when applied during the SE, an effect associated with lower amino acid release. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled "Status Epilepticus". PMID:26006058

  10. The global sulfur cycle

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sagan, D. (Editor)

    1985-01-01

    The results of the planetary biology microbial ecology's 1984 Summer Research Program, which examined various aspects of the global sulfur cycle are summarized. Ways in which sulfur flows through the many living and chemical species that inhabit the surface of the Earth were investigated. Major topics studied include: (1) sulfur cycling and metabolism of phototropic and filamentous sulfur bacteria; (2) sulfur reduction in sediments of marine and evaporite environments; (3) recent cyanobacterial mats; (4) microanalysis of community metabolism in proximity to the photic zone in potential stromatolites; and (5) formation and activity of microbial biofilms on metal sulfides and other mineral surfaces. Relationships between the global sulfur cycle and the understanding of the early evolution of the Earth and biosphere and current processes that affect global habitability are stressed.

  11. DSRP, Direct Sulfur Production

    SciTech Connect

    Gangwal, S.K.; McMichael, W.J.; Agarwal, S.K.; Jang, B.L.; Howe, G.B.; Chen, D.H.; Hopper, J.R.

    1993-08-01

    Hot-gas desulfurization processes for IGCC and other advanced power applications utilize regenerable mixed-metal oxide sorbents to remove hydrogen sulfide (H{sub 2}S) from raw coal gas. Regeneration of these sorbents produces an off-gas typically containing I to 3 percent sulfur dioxide (SO{sub 2}). Production of elemental sulfur is a highly desirable option for the ultimate disposal of the SO{sub 2} content of this off-gas. Elemental sulfur, an essential industrial commodity, is easily stored and transported. As shown in Figure 1, the DSRP consists of two catalytic reactors, each followed by a sulfur condenser. Hot regenerator off-gas is mixed with a hot coal-gas slip stream and fed to the first DSRP reactor. Approximately 95 percent of the sulfur gas in the inlet stream of the first reactor is converted to elemental sulfur. The outlet gas of the first DSRP reactor is cooled, condensing out sulfur. The gas could be recycled after the Stage I condenser. Alteratively, by adjusting the proportion of coal gas to regenerator off-gas, the effluent composition of the first reactor can be controlled to produce an H{sub 2}S-to-SO{sub 2} ratio of 2 to 1 at 95 percent sulfur conversion. The cooled gas stream is then passed to the second DSRP reactor where 80 to 90 percent of the remaining sulfur compounds are converted to elemental sulfur via the modified Claus reaction at high pressure. The total efficiency of the two reactors for the conversion of sulfur compounds to elemental sulfur is projected to be about 99.5 percent.

  12. Dealing with the sulfur part of cysteine: four enzymatic steps degrade l-cysteine to pyruvate and thiosulfate in Arabidopsis mitochondria.

    PubMed

    Höfler, Saskia; Lorenz, Christin; Busch, Tjorven; Brinkkötter, Mascha; Tohge, Takayuki; Fernie, Alisdair R; Braun, Hans-Peter; Hildebrandt, Tatjana M

    2016-07-01

    Amino acid catabolism is essential for adjusting pool sizes of free amino acids and takes part in energy production as well as nutrient remobilization. The carbon skeletons are generally converted to precursors or intermediates of the tricarboxylic acid cycle. In the case of cysteine, the reduced sulfur derived from the thiol group also has to be oxidized in order to prevent accumulation to toxic concentrations. Here we present a mitochondrial sulfur catabolic pathway catalyzing the complete oxidation of l-cysteine to pyruvate and thiosulfate. After transamination to 3-mercaptopyruvate, the sulfhydryl group from l-cysteine is transferred to glutathione by sulfurtransferase 1 and oxidized to sulfite by the sulfur dioxygenase ETHE1. Sulfite is then converted to thiosulfate by addition of a second persulfide group by sulfurtransferase 1. This pathway is most relevant during early embryo development and for vegetative growth under light-limiting conditions. Characterization of a double mutant produced from Arabidopsis thaliana T-DNA insertion lines for ETHE1 and sulfurtransferase 1 revealed that an intermediate of the ETHE1 dependent pathway, most likely a persulfide, interferes with amino acid catabolism and induces early senescence. PMID:27105581

  13. Induced Changes in the Amino Acid Profile of Biomphalaria alexandrina Molluscan Host to Schistosoma mansoni Using Sublethal Concentrations of Selected Plant Molluscicides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sanad Soliman, Mahmoud; El-Ansary, Afaf

    Amino acid profiles of control and Solanum nigrum, Ambrosia maritima, Thymelaea hirsute, Sinapis arvensis, Peganum haramala and Callistemon lanceolatus-treated Biomphalaria alexandrina snails were investigated in a trial to correlate the amino acid profile of treated snails to their previously reported molluscicidal and biological effects. Amino acid profiles of the snails were greatly manipulated with the treatment of dry powdered sublethal concentrations of the six studied plant molluscicides. The disturbed amino acid profiles of treated snails were discussed in relation to the decrease in snail's egg laying capacity, reduction of their compatibility for the development of the schistosome larvae and cercarial penetration of mammalian skin.

  14. The G Protein-coupled Receptor Family C Group 6 Subtype A (GPRC6A) Receptor Is Involved in Amino Acid-induced Glucagon-like Peptide-1 Secretion from GLUTag Cells*

    PubMed Central

    Oya, Manami; Kitaguchi, Tetsuya; Pais, Ramona; Reimann, Frank; Gribble, Fiona; Tsuboi, Takashi

    2013-01-01

    Although amino acids are dietary nutrients that evoke the secretion of glucagon-like peptide 1 (GLP-1) from intestinal L cells, the precise molecular mechanism(s) by which amino acids regulate GLP-1 secretion from intestinal L cells remains unknown. Here, we show that the G protein-coupled receptor (GPCR), family C group 6 subtype A (GPRC6A), is involved in amino acid-induced GLP-1 secretion from the intestinal L cell line GLUTag. Application of l-ornithine caused an increase in intracellular Ca2+ concentration ([Ca2+]i) in GLUTag cells. Application of a GPRC6A receptor antagonist, a phospholipase C inhibitor, or an IP3 receptor antagonist significantly suppressed the l-ornithine-induced [Ca2+]i increase. We found that the increase in [Ca2+]i stimulated by l-ornithine correlated with GLP-1 secretion and that l-ornithine stimulation increased exocytosis in a dose-dependent manner. Furthermore, depletion of endogenous GPRC6A by a specific small interfering RNA (siRNA) inhibited the l-ornithine-induced [Ca2+]i increase and GLP-1 secretion. Taken together, these findings suggest that the GPRC6A receptor functions as an amino acid sensor in GLUTag cells that promotes GLP-1 secretion. PMID:23269670

  15. Amino Acid Metabolism Disorders

    MedlinePlus

    ... defects & other health conditions > Amino acid metabolism disorders Amino acid metabolism disorders E-mail to a friend Please ... baby’s newborn screening may include testing for certain amino acid metabolism disorders. These are rare health conditions that ...

  16. Plasma amino acids

    MedlinePlus

    Amino acids blood test ... types of methods used to determine the individual amino acid levels in the blood. ... test is done to measure the level of amino acids in the blood. An increased level of a ...

  17. Corrosion Enhanced Enrichment of Sulfur and Implications for Alloy 22

    SciTech Connect

    Jones, R H; Baer, D R; Windisch Jr., C F; Rebak, R B

    2005-11-15

    The uniform corrosion rate of Alloy 22 will define the lifetime of a component such as a waste container if all other degradation modes are not operative. This represents the best-case scenario because the experimentally determined uniform corrosion rates from multi-year tests is 0.01 {micro}m/yr or 0.1 mm in 10,000 years. This lifetime depends on the stability of the passive film over the lifetime of the container; however, this stability is unknown. One potential breakdown mechanism is corrosion-enhanced enrichment of sulfur to the surface leading to sulfur induced breakdown of the passive film. There are numerous studies that confirm that sulfur causes passive film breakdown in nickel based alloys and evidence exists for corrosion enhanced enrichment of sulfur in nickel and nickel alloys. However, neither sulfur enrichment nor sulfur induced breakdown of the passive film on Alloy 22 has been demonstrated. The results of preliminary studies suggest sulfur enrichment does occur at the alloy surface and that sulfur shifts the corrosion potential to more active potentials. No clear affect of sulfur was noted on the corrosion rate but the sulfur concentrations were about only 2-3% of a monolayer, well below the concentrations that are possible.

  18. Origin of Helical Screw Sense Selectivity Induced by Chiral Constrained Cα-Tetrasubstituted α-Amino Acids in Aib-based Peptides.

    PubMed

    Maffucci, Irene; Clayden, Jonathan; Contini, Alessandro

    2015-11-01

    The mechanisms behind the propensity of chiral constrained Cα-tetrasubstituted amino acids (cCTAAs) to induce one particular helical screw sense, when included in the Ac-Aib2-cCTAA-Aib2-NHMe peptide model, were studied through replica exchange molecular dynamics, potential of mean force, and quantum theory of atoms in molecules calculations. We observed that cCTAAs exert their effect on helical screw sense selectivity through the positioning of the side chain to generate steric hindrance in either the (-x, +y, +z) or (+x, +y, -z) sectors of a right-handed 3D Cartesian space, where the z axis corresponds to the axis of the helix and the Cα lies on the +y semiaxis (0, +y, 0). The different strengthening of the noncovalent interactions, also comprising C-H···O interactions, exerted by the cCTAA in the right-handed or left-handed helix was also found important to define the preference of a cCTAA for a particular helix screw sense. PMID:26457452

  19. Morphine Induces Redox-Based Changes in Global DNA Methylation and Retrotransposon Transcription by Inhibition of Excitatory Amino Acid Transporter Type 3–Mediated Cysteine Uptake

    PubMed Central

    Trivedi, Malav; Shah, Jayni; Hodgson, Nathaniel; Byun, Hyang-Min

    2014-01-01

    Canonically, opioids influence cells by binding to a G protein–coupled opioid receptor, initiating intracellular signaling cascades, such as protein kinase, phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase, and extracellular receptor kinase pathways. This results in several downstream effects, including decreased levels of the reduced form of glutathione (GSH) and elevated oxidative stress, as well as epigenetic changes, especially in retrotransposons and heterochromatin, although the mechanism and consequences of these actions are unclear. We characterized the acute and long-term influence of morphine on redox and methylation status (including DNA methylation levels) in cultured neuronal SH-SY5Y cells. Acting via μ-opioid receptors, morphine inhibits excitatory amino acid transporter type 3–mediated cysteine uptake via multiple signaling pathways, involving different G proteins and protein kinases in a temporal manner. Decreased cysteine uptake was associated with decreases in both the redox and methylation status of neuronal cells, as defined by the ratios of GSH to oxidized forms of glutathione and S-adenosylmethionine to S-adenosylhomocysteine levels, respectively. Further, morphine induced global DNA methylation changes, including CpG sites in long interspersed nuclear elements (LINE-1) retrotransposons, resulting in increased LINE-1 mRNA. Together, these findings illuminate the mechanism by which morphine, and potentially other opioids, can influence neuronal-cell redox and methylation status including DNA methylation. Since epigenetic changes are implicated in drug addiction and tolerance phenomenon, this study could potentially extrapolate to elucidate a novel mechanism of action for other drugs of abuse. PMID:24569088

  20. Dietary Carcinogen 2-Amino-1-Methyl-6-Phenylimidazo[4,5-b]Pyridine Induced Prostate Carcinogenesis in CYP1A-humanized Mice

    PubMed Central

    Li, Guangxun; Wang, Hong; Liu, Anna B.; Cheung, Connie; Reuhl, Kenneth R.; Bosland, Maarten C.; Yang, Chung S.

    2014-01-01

    To develop a relevant mouse model for prostate cancer prevention research, we administered a dietary carcinogen, 2-amino-1-methyl-6-phenylimidazo[4,5-b]pyridine (PhIP), to CYP1A-humanized mice. In comparison to mouse Cyp1a2, human CYP1A2 preferentially activates PhIP to a proximate carcinogen. Following a single oral dose of PhIP (200 mg/kg body weight), we observed inflammation, atrophy of acini, low-grade prostatic intraepithelial neoplasia (PIN) (after 20 weeks) and high-grade PIN (HgPIN) (after 30 to 50 weeks) in dorso-lateral, ventral and coagulating anterior prostate glands of these mice. These lesions were androgen receptor positive and featured the loss of expression of the basal cell marker p63 and the tumor suppressor PTEN. Similar to human prostate carcinogenesis, glutathione-S-transferase P1 (GSTP1) expression was lost or partially lost in HgPIN. E-Cadherin expression was also lost in HgPIN. The expression of DNA methyltransferase 1 was elevated, possibly to enhance promoter hypermethylation for the silencing of GSTP1 and E-cadherin. Prostate carcinogenesis was promoted by a high-fat stress diet, resulting in HgPIN that developed earlier and in advanced lesions displayed features consistent with carcinoma in situ. This dietary carcinogen-induced prostate cancer model, recapitulating important features of early human prostate carcinogenesis, constitutes a new experimental system for prostate cancer research. PMID:22581815

  1. Influence of aminophylline and strychnine on the protective activity of excitatory amino acid antagonists against maximal electroshock-induced convulsions in mice.

    PubMed

    Tutka, P; Turski, W A; Kleinrok, Z; Czuczwar, S J

    1996-01-01

    Aminophylline reversed the protective action of both, D-3-(2-carboxypiperazine-4-yl)-1-propenyl-1-phosphonic acid (D-CPP-ene-a competitive NMDA antagonist) and valproate (used as a conventional antiepileptic drug for comparative purposes) against maximal electroshock-induced seizures. The respective ED50 values of aminophylline were 55.7 and 98.4 mg/kg i.p. However, aminophylline (up to 100 mg/kg i.p.) did not influence the protective efficacy of 1-(4-aminophenyl)-4-methyl-7,8-methyl- enedioxy-5H-2,3-benzodiazepine (GYKI 52466-a non-NMDA antagonist). Strychnine affected the protection provided by D-CPP-ene, GYKI 52466, and valproate against maximal electroshock-the ED50 values of strychnine for the reversal of the anticonvulsive effects of D-CPP-ene, GYKI 52466 or valproate were 0.082, 0.35 and 0.28 mg/kg s.c., respectively. An involvement of strychnine sensitive glycinergic receptor-mediated events in the mechanism of the anticonvulsive activity of excitatory amino acid antagonists and valproate may be postulated. The ineffectiveness of aminophylline to reduce the anticonvulsive effects of GYKI 52466 may distinguish a new class of antiepileptic drugs offering an advantage over conventional antiepileptics in patients with epilepsy, requiring aminophylline for pulmonary reasons. PMID:8739842

  2. Effect of 3 amino 1,2,4 triazole administration on the early CCl4-induced ultrastructural alterations in rat liver.

    PubMed Central

    Bernacchi, A. S.; de Castro, C. R.; de Ferreyra, E. C.; de Fenos, O. M.; Castro, J. A.

    1982-01-01

    CCl4 administration to rats caused at 3 and 6 h intense effects on the liver-cell endoplasmic reticulum such as dilatation, disorganization, detachment of ribosomes, development of extensive areas of smooth component (SER) and formation of myelin figures. 3 Amino 1,2,4 triazole administration (AT) at 3 and 6 h led to the formation of round small vesicles from the rough endoplasmic reticulum (RER), detachment of ribosomes, appearance of extensive areas of SER, appearance of elongated and distorted mitochondria with an increase in the number of peroxisomes. The administration of CCl4 to AT-pretreated animals led to a mutual cancellation of the effects on the RER, particularly remarkable at 3 h but still evident at 6 h; also, the formation of myelin figures was prevented. The other effects on cell ultrastructure exerted either by CCl4 or by AT were also observed with the combination of both chemicals. These observations reinforce the hypothesis about the need of either covalent binding of CCl4 metabolites to cellular constituents or lipid peroxidation, or both, in the origin of CCl4-induced alterations. Images Fig. 1 Fig. 2 Fig. 3 Fig. 4 Fig. 5 Fig. 6 Fig. 7 Fig. 8 Fig. 9 Fig. 10 PMID:7066182

  3. 6-amino-4-oxo-1,3-diphenyl-2-thioxo-1,2,3,4-tetrahydropyrimidine-5-carbonyl derivatives as a new class of potent inhibitors of Interleukin-8-induced neutrophil chemotaxis.

    PubMed

    Cesarini, Sara; Spallarossa, Andrea; Ranise, Angelo; Bruno, Olga; Arduino, Nicoletta; Bertolotto, Maria; Dallegri, Franco; Tognolini, Massimiliano; Gobbetti, Thomas; Barocelli, Elisabetta

    2009-05-15

    A series of 6-amino-4-oxo-1,3-diphenyl-2-thioxo-1,2,3,4-tetrahydropyrimidine-5-carbonyl derivatives was synthesized. The compounds demonstrated to be novel, potent and selective inhibitors of Interleukin-8-induced human neutrophil chemotaxis. A SAR study was performed by varying the carbonyl function at position 5 and the chain linked to the amino group at position 6 of the scaffold. All the compounds of the series displayed inhibitory activity at nano- or picomolar concentrations against Interleukin-8-driven migration and no activity against fMLP- and C5a-induced chemotaxis. The binding tests of selected compounds on CXCR1 and CXCR2 receptors were negative. The most potent derivative showed in vivo efficacy in a mouse model of Zymosan-induced peritonitis. PMID:19394230

  4. Future Sulfur Dioxide Emissions

    SciTech Connect

    Smith, Steven J.; Pitcher, Hugh M.; Wigley, Tom M.

    2005-12-01

    The importance of sulfur dioxide emissions for climate change is now established, although substantial uncertainties remain. This paper presents projections for future sulfur dioxide emissions using the MiniCAM integrated assessment model. A new income-based parameterization for future sulfur dioxide emissions controls is developed based on purchasing power parity (PPP) income estimates and historical trends related to the implementation of sulfur emissions limitations. This parameterization is then used to produce sulfur dioxide emissions trajectories for the set of scenarios developed for the Special Report on Emission Scenarios (SRES). We use the SRES methodology to produce harmonized SRES scenarios using the latest version of the MiniCAM model. The implications, and requirements, for IA modeling of sulfur dioxide emissions are discussed. We find that sulfur emissions eventually decline over the next century under a wide set of assumptions. These emission reductions result from a combination of emission controls, the adoption of advanced electric technologies, and a shift away from the direct end use of coal with increasing income levels. Only under a scenario where incomes in developing regions increase slowly do global emission levels remain at close to present levels over the next century. Under a climate policy that limits emissions of carbon dioxide, sulfur dioxide emissions fall in a relatively narrow range. In all cases, the relative climatic effect of sulfur dioxide emissions decreases dramatically to a point where sulfur dioxide is only a minor component of climate forcing by the end of the century. Ecological effects of sulfur dioxide, however, could be significant in some developing regions for many decades to come.

  5. ADVANCED SULFUR CONTROL CONCEPTS

    SciTech Connect

    Apostolos A. Nikolopoulos; Santosh K. Gangwal; William J. McMichael; Jeffrey W. Portzer

    2003-01-01

    Conventional sulfur removal in integrated gasification combined cycle (IGCC) power plants involves numerous steps: COS (carbonyl sulfide) hydrolysis, amine scrubbing/regeneration, Claus process, and tail-gas treatment. Advanced sulfur removal in IGCC systems involves typically the use of zinc oxide-based sorbents. The sulfides sorbent is regenerated using dilute air to produce a dilute SO{sub 2} (sulfur dioxide) tail gas. Under previous contracts the highly effective first generation Direct Sulfur Recovery Process (DSRP) for catalytic reduction of this SO{sub 2} tail gas to elemental sulfur was developed. This process is currently undergoing field-testing. In this project, advanced concepts were evaluated to reduce the number of unit operations in sulfur removal and recovery. Substantial effort was directed towards developing sorbents that could be directly regenerated to elemental sulfur in an Advanced Hot Gas Process (AHGP). Development of this process has been described in detail in Appendices A-F. RTI began the development of the Single-step Sulfur Recovery Process (SSRP) to eliminate the use of sorbents and multiple reactors in sulfur removal and recovery. This process showed promising preliminary results and thus further process development of AHGP was abandoned in favor of SSRP. The SSRP is a direct Claus process that consists of injecting SO{sub 2} directly into the quenched coal gas from a coal gasifier, and reacting the H{sub 2}S-SO{sub 2} mixture over a selective catalyst to both remove and recover sulfur in a single step. The process is conducted at gasifier pressure and 125 to 160 C. The proposed commercial embodiment of the SSRP involves a liquid phase of molten sulfur with dispersed catalyst in a slurry bubble-column reactor (SBCR).

  6. The Phases of Sulfur.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Birdwhistell, Kurt R.

    1995-01-01

    Presents a demonstration that illustrates the dramatic changes that sulfur undergoes upon heating to 200 degrees centigrade and then cooling to room temperature. Supplements the demonstration of the rubberlike properties of catenasulfur made by rapid cooling of the sulfur melt in ice water. (JRH)

  7. Sulfur isotopic data

    SciTech Connect

    Rye, R.O.

    1987-01-01

    Preliminary sulfur isotope data have been determined for samples of the Vermillion Creek coal bed and associated rocks in the Vermillion Creek basin and for samples of evaporites collected from Jurassic and Triassic formations that crop out in the nearby Uinta Mountains. The data are inconclusive, but it is likely that the sulfur in the coal was derived from the evaporites.

  8. Origin, Microbiology, Nutrition, and Pharmacology of D-Amino Acids

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Exposure of food proteins to certain processing conditions induces two major chemical changes: racemization of all L-amino acids (LAA) to D-amino acids (DAA) and concurrent formation of crosslinked amino acids such as lysinoalanine (LAL). The diet contains both processing-induced and naturally-form...

  9. Advanced Sulfur Cathode Enabled by Highly Crumpled Nitrogen-Doped Graphene Sheets for High-Energy-Density Lithium-Sulfur Batteries.

    PubMed

    Song, Jiangxuan; Yu, Zhaoxin; Gordin, Mikhail L; Wang, Donghai

    2016-02-10

    Herein, we report a synthesis of highly crumpled nitrogen-doped graphene sheets with ultrahigh pore volume (5.4 cm(3)/g) via a simple thermally induced expansion strategy in absence of any templates. The wrinkled graphene sheets are interwoven rather than stacked, enabling rich nitrogen-containing active sites. Benefiting from the unique pore structure and nitrogen-doping induced strong polysulfide adsorption ability, lithium-sulfur battery cells using these wrinkled graphene sheets as both sulfur host and interlayer achieved a high capacity of ∼1000 mAh/g and exceptional cycling stability even at high sulfur content (≥80 wt %) and sulfur loading (5 mg sulfur/cm(2)). The high specific capacity together with the high sulfur loading push the areal capacity of sulfur cathodes to ∼5 mAh/cm(2), which is outstanding compared to other recently developed sulfur cathodes and ideal for practical applications. PMID:26709841

  10. Elemental sulfur recovery process

    DOEpatents

    Flytzani-Stephanopoulos, Maria; Hu, Zhicheng

    1993-01-01

    An improved catalytic reduction process for the direct recovery of elemental sulfur from various SO.sub.2 -containing industrial gas streams. The catalytic process provides combined high activity and selectivity for the reduction of SO.sub.2 to elemental sulfur product with carbon monoxide or other reducing gases. The reaction of sulfur dioxide and reducing gas takes place over certain catalyst formulations based on cerium oxide. The process is a single-stage, catalytic sulfur recovery process in conjunction with regenerators, such as those used in dry, regenerative flue gas desulfurization or other processes, involving direct reduction of the SO.sub.2 in the regenerator off gas stream to elemental sulfur in the presence of a catalyst.

  11. Elemental sulfur recovery process

    DOEpatents

    Flytzani-Stephanopoulos, M.; Zhicheng Hu.

    1993-09-07

    An improved catalytic reduction process for the direct recovery of elemental sulfur from various SO[sub 2]-containing industrial gas streams. The catalytic process provides combined high activity and selectivity for the reduction of SO[sub 2] to elemental sulfur product with carbon monoxide or other reducing gases. The reaction of sulfur dioxide and reducing gas takes place over certain catalyst formulations based on cerium oxide. The process is a single-stage, catalytic sulfur recovery process in conjunction with regenerators, such as those used in dry, regenerative flue gas desulfurization or other processes, involving direct reduction of the SO[sub 2] in the regenerator off gas stream to elemental sulfur in the presence of a catalyst. 4 figures.

  12. Nanostructured sulfur cathodes.

    PubMed

    Yang, Yuan; Zheng, Guangyuan; Cui, Yi

    2013-04-01

    Rechargeable Li/S batteries have attracted significant attention lately due to their high specific energy and low cost. They are promising candidates for applications, including portable electronics, electric vehicles and grid-level energy storage. However, poor cycle life and low power capability are major technical obstacles. Various nanostructured sulfur cathodes have been developed to address these issues, as they provide greater resistance to pulverization, faster reaction kinetics and better trapping of soluble polysulfides. In this review, recent developments on nanostructured sulfur cathodes and mechanisms behind their operation are presented and discussed. Moreover, progress on novel characterization of sulfur cathodes is also summarized, as it has deepened the understanding of sulfur cathodes and will guide further rational design of sulfur electrodes. PMID:23325336

  13. Aircraft exhaust sulfur emissions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brown, R. C.; Anderson, M. R.; Miake-Lye, R. C.; Kolb, C. E.; Sorokin, A. A.; Buriko, Y. Y.

    The conversion of fuel sulfur to S(VI) (SO3 + H2SO4) in supersonic and subsonic aircraft engines is estimated numerically. Model results indicate between 2% and 10% of the fuel sulfur is emitted as S(VI). It is also shown that, for a high sulfur mass loading, conversion in the turbine is kinetically limited by the level of atomic oxygen. This results in a higher oxidation efficiency at lower sulfur loadings. SO3 is the primary S(VI) oxidation product and calculated H2SO4 emission levels were less than 1% of the total fuel sulfur. This source of S(VI) can exceed the S(VI) source due to gas phase oxidation in the exhaust wake.

  14. The metabolome of Chlamydomonas reinhardtii following induction of anaerobic H2 production by sulfur depletion.

    PubMed

    Matthew, Timmins; Zhou, Wenxu; Rupprecht, Jens; Lim, Lysha; Thomas-Hall, Skye R; Doebbe, Anja; Kruse, Olaf; Hankamer, Ben; Marx, Ute C; Smith, Steven M; Schenk, Peer M

    2009-08-28

    The metabolome of the model species Chlamydomonas reinhardtii has been analyzed during 120 h of sulfur depletion to induce anaerobic hydrogen (H(2)) production, using NMR spectroscopy, gas chromatography coupled to mass spectrometry, and TLC. The results indicate that these unicellular green algae consume freshly supplied acetate in the medium to accumulate energy reserves during the first 24 h of sulfur depletion. In addition to the previously reported accumulation of starch, large amounts of triacylglycerides were deposited in the cells. During the early 24- to 72-h time period fermentative energy metabolism lowered the pH, H(2) was produced, and amino acid levels generally increased. In the final phase from 72 to 120 h, metabolism slowed down leading to a stabilization of pH, even though some starch and most triacylglycerides remained. We conclude that H(2) production does not slow down due to depletion of energy reserves but rather due to loss of essential functions resulting from sulfur depletion or due to a build-up of the toxic fermentative products formate and ethanol. PMID:19478077

  15. Sulfur and sulfides in chondrules

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marrocchi, Yves; Libourel, Guy

    2013-10-01

    The nature and distribution of sulfides within type I PO, POP and PP chondrules of the carbonaceous chondrite Vigarano (CV3) have been studied by secondary electron microscopy and electron microprobe. They occur predominantly as spheroidal blebs composed entirely of low-Ni iron sulfide (troilite, FeS) or troilite + magnetite but in less abundance in association with metallic Fe-Ni beads in opaque assemblages. Troilites are mainly located within the low-Ca pyroxene outer zone and their amounts increase with the abundance of low-Ca pyroxene within chondrules, suggesting co-crystallization of troilite and low-Ca pyroxene during high-temperature events. We show that sulfur concentration and sulfide occurrence in chondrules obey high temperature sulfur solubility and saturation laws. Depending on the fS2 and fO2 of the surrounding gas and on the melt composition, mainly the FeO content, sulfur dissolved in chondrule melts may eventually reach a concentration limit, the sulfur content at sulfide saturation (SCSS), at which an immiscible iron sulfide liquid separates from the silicate melt. The occurrence of both a silicate melt and an immiscible iron sulfide liquid is further supported by the non-wetting behavior of sulfides on silicate phases in chondrules due to the high interfacial tension between their precursor iron-sulfide liquid droplets and the surrounding silicate melt during the high temperature chondrule-forming event. The evolution of chondrule melts from PO to PP towards more silicic compositions, very likely due to high PSiO(g) of the surrounding nebular gas, induces saturation of FeS at much lower S content in PP than in PO chondrules, leading to the co-crystallization of iron sulfides and low-Ca pyroxenes. Conditions of co-saturation of low-Ca pyroxene and FeS are only achieved in non canonical environments characterized by high partial pressures of sulfur and SiO and redox conditions more oxidizing than IW-3. Fe and S mass balance calculations also

  16. Amount of organic matter required to induce sulfate reduction in sulfuric material after re-flooding is affected by soil nitrate concentration.

    PubMed

    Yuan, Chaolei; Mosley, Luke M; Fitzpatrick, Rob; Marschner, Petra

    2015-03-15

    Acid sulfate soils (ASS) with sulfuric material can be remediated through microbial sulfate reduction stimulated by adding organic matter (OM) and increasing the soil pH to >4.5, but the effectiveness of this treatment is influenced by soil properties. Two experiments were conducted using ASS with sulfuric material. In the first experiment with four ASS, OM (finely ground mature wheat straw) was added at 2-6% (w/w) and the pH adjusted to 5.5. After 36 weeks under flooded conditions, the concentration of reduced inorganic sulfur (RIS) and pore water pH were greater in all treatments with added OM than in the control without OM addition. The RIS concentration increased with OM addition rate. The increase in RIS concentration between 4% and 6% OM was significant but smaller than that between 2% and 4%, suggesting other factors limited sulfate reduction. In the second experiment, the effect of nitrate addition on sulfate reduction at different OM addition rates was investigated in one ASS. Organic matter was added at 2 and 4% and nitrate at 0, 100, and 200 mg nitrate-N kg(-1). After 2 weeks under flooded conditions, soil pH and the concentration of FeS measured as acid volatile sulfur (AVS) were lower with nitrate added at both OM addition rates. At a given nitrate addition rate, pH and AVS concentration were higher at 4% OM than at 2%. It can be concluded that sulfate reduction in ASS at pH 5.5 can be limited by low OM availability and high nitrate concentrations. Further, the inhibitory effect of nitrate can be overcome by high OM addition rates. PMID:25600239

  17. Sulfur Use Efficiency Is a Significant Determinant of Drought Stress Tolerance in Relation to Photosynthetic Activity in Brassica napus Cultivars.

    PubMed

    Lee, Bok-Rye; Zaman, Rashed; Avice, Jean-Christophe; Ourry, Alain; Kim, Tae-Hwan

    2016-01-01

    To investigate the varietal difference in sulfur use efficiency (SUE) and drought stress tolerance, Brassica napus 'Mosa' and 'Saturnin' were exposed to polyethylene glycol (PEG)-induced drought stress for 72 h. Direct quantification of S uptake, de novo synthesis of amino acids and proteins was performed by tracing (34)S. The responses of photosynthetic activity in relation to SUE were also examined. The total amount of newly absorbed S decreased with drought stress in both cultivars but the decrease rate was significantly higher in Mosa (-64%) than in Saturnin (-41%). Drought stress also decreased the amount of S assimilated into amino acids ((34)S-amino acids) and proteins ((34)S-proteins). The total amount of S incorporated into amino acids and proteins was generally higher in Saturnin (663.7 μg S per plant) than in Mosa (337.3 μg S per plant). The estimation of SUE based on S uptake (SUpE) and S assimilation (SUaE) showed that SUE was much higher in Saturnin than in Mosa. The inhibition of photosynthetic activity including Rubisco protein degradation caused by drought stress was much lower in the cultivar with higher SUE (Saturnin). The present study clearly indicates that the genotype with higher SUE is more tolerant to PEG-induced drought stress. PMID:27092167

  18. Sulfur Use Efficiency Is a Significant Determinant of Drought Stress Tolerance in Relation to Photosynthetic Activity in Brassica napus Cultivars

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Bok-Rye; Zaman, Rashed; Avice, Jean-Christophe; Ourry, Alain; Kim, Tae-Hwan

    2016-01-01

    To investigate the varietal difference in sulfur use efficiency (SUE) and drought stress tolerance, Brassica napus ‘Mosa’ and ‘Saturnin’ were exposed to polyethylene glycol (PEG)-induced drought stress for 72 h. Direct quantification of S uptake, de novo synthesis of amino acids and proteins was performed by tracing 34S. The responses of photosynthetic activity in relation to SUE were also examined. The total amount of newly absorbed S decreased with drought stress in both cultivars but the decrease rate was significantly higher in Mosa (-64%) than in Saturnin (-41%). Drought stress also decreased the amount of S assimilated into amino acids (34S-amino acids) and proteins (34S-proteins). The total amount of S incorporated into amino acids and proteins was generally higher in Saturnin (663.7 μg S per plant) than in Mosa (337.3 μg S per plant). The estimation of SUE based on S uptake (SUpE) and S assimilation (SUaE) showed that SUE was much higher in Saturnin than in Mosa. The inhibition of photosynthetic activity including Rubisco protein degradation caused by drought stress was much lower in the cultivar with higher SUE (Saturnin). The present study clearly indicates that the genotype with higher SUE is more tolerant to PEG-induced drought stress. PMID:27092167

  19. Sulfuric Acid on Europa

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1999-01-01

    Frozen sulfuric acid on Jupiter's moon Europa is depicted in this image produced from data gathered by NASA's Galileo spacecraft. The brightest areas, where the yellow is most intense, represent regions of high frozen sulfuric acid concentration. Sulfuric acid is found in battery acid and in Earth's acid rain.

    This image is based on data gathered by Galileo's near infrared mapping spectrometer.

    Europa's leading hemisphere is toward the bottom right, and there are enhanced concentrations of sulfuric acid in the trailing side of Europa (the upper left side of the image). This is the face of Europa that is struck by sulfur ions coming from Jupiter's innermost moon, Io. The long, narrow features that crisscross Europa also show sulfuric acid that may be from sulfurous material extruded in cracks.

    Galileo, launched in 1989, has been orbiting Jupiter and its moons since December 1995. JPL manages the Galileo mission for NASA's Office of Space Science, Washington DC. JPL is a division of the California Institute of Technology, Pasadena, CA.

  20. Design, synthesis and apoptosis inducing effect of novel (Z)-3-(3'-methoxy-4'-(2-amino-2-oxoethoxy)-benzylidene)indolin-2-ones as potential antitumour agents.

    PubMed

    Senwar, Kishna Ram; Reddy, T Srinivasa; Thummuri, Dinesh; Sharma, Pankaj; Naidu, V G M; Srinivasulu, Gannoju; Shankaraiah, Nagula

    2016-08-01

    A series of new (Z)-3-(3'-methoxy-4'-(2-amino-2-oxoethoxy)benzylidene)indolin-2-one derivatives has been synthesized and evaluated for their cytotoxic activity against selected human cancer cell lines of prostate (PC-3 and DU-145), breast (BT-549 and MDA-MB-231) and non-tumorigenic prostate epithelial cells (RWPE-1). Among the tested, one of the compounds 4p exhibited potent cytotoxicity selectively on prostate cancer cell lines (PC-3 and DU-145; IC50: 1.89 ± 0.6 and 1.94 ± 0.2 μM, respectively). Further experiments were conducted with 4p on PC-3 cancer cells to study the mechanisms of growth inhibition and apoptosis inducing effect. Treatment of PC-3 cells with test compound 4p resulted in inhibition of cell migration through disorganization of F-actin protein. The flow-cytometry analysis results showed that the compound arrested PC-3 cancer cells in the G2/M phase of cell cycle in a dose dependent manner. Hoechst staining and annexin-V binding assay revealed that the compound 4p inhibited tumor cell proliferation through induction of apoptosis. Western blot studies demonstrated that the compound 4p treatment led to activation of caspase-3, increased expression of pro-apoptotic Bax and significantly decreased expression of anti-apoptotic Bcl-2 in human prostate cancer PC-3 cells. In addition, the mitochondrial membrane potential (ΔΨm) was also affected and the levels of intracellular Ca(2+) were raised. PMID:27128173

  1. Minimal sulfur requirement for growth and sulfur-dependent metabolism of the hyperthermophilic archaeon Staphylothermus marinus

    PubMed Central

    Hao, Xiaolei; Ma, Kesen

    2003-01-01

    Staphylothermus marinus is an anaerobic hyperthermophilic archaeon that uses peptides as carbon and energy sources. Elemental sulfur (S°) is obligately required for its growth and is reduced to H2S. The metabolic functions and mechanisms of S° reduction were explored by examining S°-dependent growth and activities of key enzymes present in this organism. All three forms of S° tested—sublimed S°, colloidal S° and polysulfide—were used by S. marinus, and no other sulfur-containing compounds could replace S°. Elemental sulfur did not serve as physical support but appeared to function as an electron acceptor. The minimal S° concentration required for optimal growth was 0.05% (w/v). At this concentration, there appeared to be a metabolic transition from H2 production to S° reduction. Some enzymatic activities related to S°-dependent metabolism, including sulfur reductase, hydrogenase, glutamate dehydrogenase and electron transfer activities, were detected in cell-free extracts of S. marinus. These results indicate that S° plays an essential role in the heterotrophic metabolism of S. marinus. Reducing equivalents generated by the oxidation of amino acids from peptidolysis may be transferred to sulfur reductase and hydrogenase, which then catalyze the production of H2S and H2, respectively. PMID:15803665

  2. Radiolysis of Sulfuric Acid, Sulfuric Acid Monohydrate, and Sulfuric Acid Tetrahydrate and Its Relevance to Europa

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Loeffler, M. J.; Hudson, R. L.; Moore, M. H.; Carlson, R. W.

    2011-01-01

    We report laboratory studies on the 0.8 MeV proton irradiation of ices composed of sulfuric acid (H2SO4), sulfuric acid monohydrate (H2SO4 H2O), and sulfuric acid tetrahydrate (H2SO4 4H2O) between 10 and 180 K. Using infrared spectroscopy, we identify the main radiation products as H2O, SO2, (S2O3)x, H3O+, HSO4(exp -), and SO4(exp 2-). At high radiation doses, we find that H2SO4 molecules are destroyed completely and that H2SO4 H2O is formed on subsequent warming. This hydrate is significantly more stable to radiolytic destruction than pure H2SO4, falling to an equilibrium relative abundance of 50% of its original value on prolonged irradiation. Unlike either pure H2SO4 or H2SO4 H2O, the loss of H2SO4 4H2O exhibits a strong temperature dependence, as the tetrahydrate is essentially unchanged at the highest irradiation temperatures and completely destroyed at the lowest ones, which we speculate is due to a combination of radiolytic destruction and amorphization. Furthermore, at the lower temperatures it is clear that irradiation causes the tetrahydrate spectrum to transition to one that closely resembles the monohydrate spectrum. Extrapolating our results to Europa s surface, we speculate that the variations in SO2 concentrations observed in the chaotic terrains are a result of radiation processing of lower hydration states of sulfuric acid and that the monohydrate will remain stable on the surface over geological times, while the tetrahydrate will remain stable in the warmer regions but be destroyed in the colder regions, unless it can be reformed by other processes, such as thermal reactions induced by diurnal cycling.

  3. In vitro ¹⁴C-labeled amino acid uptake changes and surface abnormalities in the colon after 1,2-dimethylhydrazine-induced experimental carcinogenesis: protection by zinc.

    PubMed

    Chadha, Vijayta Dani; Dhawan, Devinder K

    2011-01-01

    The present study explored the regulatory role of zinc on the in vitro uptake of ¹⁴C-glucose and ¹⁴C-labeled amino acids and on colonic surface abnormalities after 1,2-dimethylhydrazine (DMH)-induced colon carcinogenesis. Rats were segregated into four groups: control, DMH-treated, zinc-treated, and DMH + zinc-treated. Colon carcinogenesis was induced through weekly subcutaneous injections of DMH (30 mg/kg body weight) for 16 weeks. Zinc (in the form of zinc sulfate) was given to rats at a dose level of 227 mg/L in their drinking water. DMH treatment caused a significant decrease in the activities of disaccharidases (sucrase, lactase, and maltase), but a significant increase in the activity of alkaline phosphatase. In vitro uptake of ¹⁴C-D-glucose and the amino acids ¹⁴C-glycine, ¹⁴C-alanine, ¹⁴C-lysine, and ¹⁴C-leucine were significantly higher in the colons of DMH-treated rats. Zinc supplementation of DMH-treated rats resulted in regulating the altered intestinal enzyme activities and in vitro uptake of ¹⁴C-amino acids and ¹⁴C-glucose. Scanning electron microscopy revealed drastic alterations in the colon surface morphology after DMH treatment, which were restored after zinc supplementation. Our results confirm a beneficial effect of zinc against DMH-induced alterations in the colons of rats. PMID:21967455

  4. Sulfur compounds in coal

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Attar, A.; Corcoran, W. H.

    1977-01-01

    The literature on the chemical structure of the organic sulfur compounds (or functional groups) in coal is reviewed. Four methods were applied in the literature to study the sulfur compounds in coal: direct spectrometric and chemical analysis, depolymerization in drastic conditions, depolymerization in mild conditions, and studies on simulated coal. The data suggest that most of the organic sulfur in coal is in the form of thiophenic structures and aromatic and aliphatic sulfides. The relative abundance of the sulfur groups in bituminous coal is estimated as 50:30:20%, respectively. The ratio changes during processing and during the chemical analysis. The main effects are the transformation during processing of sulfides to the more stable thiophenic compounds and the elimination of hydrogen sulfide.

  5. Separation of sulfur isotopes

    DOEpatents

    DeWitt, Robert; Jepson, Bernhart E.; Schwind, Roger A.

    1976-06-22

    Sulfur isotopes are continuously separated and enriched using a closed loop reflux system wherein sulfur dioxide (SO.sub.2) is reacted with sodium hydroxide (NaOH) or the like to form sodium hydrogen sulfite (NaHSO.sub.3). Heavier sulfur isotopes are preferentially attracted to the NaHSO.sub.3, and subsequently reacted with sulfuric acid (H.sub.2 SO.sub.4) forming sodium hydrogen sulfate (NaHSO.sub.4) and SO.sub.2 gas which contains increased concentrations of the heavier sulfur isotopes. This heavy isotope enriched SO.sub.2 gas is subsequently separated and the NaHSO.sub.4 is reacted with NaOH to form sodium sulfate (Na.sub.2 SO.sub.4) which is subsequently decomposed in an electrodialysis unit to form the NaOH and H.sub.2 SO.sub.4 components which are used in the aforesaid reactions thereby effecting sulfur isotope separation and enrichment without objectionable loss of feed materials.

  6. Sulfur cycling in freshwater sediments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Klug, M. J.

    1985-01-01

    Organic sulfur containing compounds represent greater than 80% of the total sulfur in sediments of eutrophic freshwater lakes. Although sedimentary sulfur is predominantly in the form of organic compounds, more sulfur is transformed by sulfate reduction than by any other process. Rates of sulfate reduction in these sediments average 7 mmol/sq m/day. This rate is 19 times greater than the net rate of production of inorganic sulfur from organic compounds on an annual basis.

  7. GC-MS/MS survey of collision-induced dissociation of tert-butyldimethylsilyl-derivatized amino acids and its application to (13)C-metabolic flux analysis of Escherichia coli central metabolism.

    PubMed

    Okahashi, Nobuyuki; Kawana, Shuichi; Iida, Junko; Shimizu, Hiroshi; Matsuda, Fumio

    2016-09-01

    Stable isotope labeling experiments using mass spectrometry have been employed to investigate carbon flow levels (metabolic flux) in mammalian, plant, and microbial cells. To achieve a more precise (13)C-metabolic flux analysis ((13)C-MFA), novel fragmentations of tert-butyldimethylsilyl (TBDMS)-amino acids were investigated by gas chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry (GC-MS/MS). The product ion scan analyses of 15 TBDMS-amino acids revealed 24 novel fragment ions. The amino acid-derived carbons included in the five fragment ions were identified by the analyses of (13)C-labeled authentic standards. The identification of the fragment ion at m/z 170 indicated that the isotopic abundance of S-methyl carbon in methionine could be determined from the cleavage of C5 in the precursor of [M-159](+) (m/z 218). It was also confirmed that the precision of (13)C-MFA in Escherichia coli central carbon metabolism could be improved by introducing (13)C-labeling data derived from novel fragmentations. Graphical Abstract Novel collision-induced dissociation fragmentations of tert-butyldimethylsilyl amino acids were investigated and identified by GC-MS/MS. PMID:27342798

  8. Dealing with methionine/homocysteine sulfur: cysteine metabolism to taurine and inorganic sulfur

    PubMed Central

    Ueki, Iori

    2010-01-01

    Synthesis of cysteine as a product of the transsulfuration pathway can be viewed as part of methionine or homocysteine degradation, with cysteine being the vehicle for sulfur conversion to end products (sulfate, taurine) that can be excreted in the urine. Transsulfuration is regulated by stimulation of cystathionine β-synthase and inhibition of methylene tetrahydrofolate reductase in response to changes in the level of S-adenosylmethionine, and this promotes homocysteine degradation when methionine availability is high. Cysteine is catabolized by several desulfuration reactions that release sulfur in a reduced oxidation state, generating sulfane sulfur or hydrogen sulfide (H2S), which can be further oxidized to sulfate. Cysteine desulfuration is accomplished by alternate reactions catalyzed by cystathionine β-synthase and cystathionine γ-lyase. Cysteine is also catabolized by pathways that require the initial oxidation of the cysteine thiol by cysteine dioxygenase to form cysteinesulfinate. The oxidative pathway leads to production of taurine and sulfate in a ratio of approximately 2:1. Relative metabolism of cysteine by desulfuration versus oxidative pathways is influenced by cysteine dioxygenase activity, which is low in animals fed low-protein diets and high in animals fed excess sulfur amino acids. Thus, desulfuration reactions dominate when cysteine is deficient, whereas oxidative catabolism dominates when cysteine is in excess. In rats consuming a diet with an adequate level of sulfur amino acids, about two thirds of cysteine catabolism occurs by oxidative pathways and one third by desulfuration pathways. Cysteine dioxygenase is robustly regulated in response to cysteine availability and may function to provide a pathway to siphon cysteine to less toxic metabolites than those produced by cysteine desulfuration reactions. PMID:20162368

  9. Sulfurization induced surface constitution and its correlation to the performance of solution-processed Cu2ZnSn(S,Se)4 solar cells.

    PubMed

    Zhong, Jie; Xia, Zhe; Luo, Miao; Zhao, Juan; Chen, Jie; Wang, Liang; Liu, Xinsheng; Xue, Ding-Jiang; Cheng, Yi-Bing; Song, Haisheng; Tang, Jiang

    2014-01-01

    To obtain high photovoltaic performances for the emerging copper zinc tin sulfide/selenide (CZTSSe) thin film solar cells, much effort has deservedly been placed on CZTSSe phase purification and CZTSSe grain size enhancement. Another highly crucial but less explored factor for device performance is the elemental constitution of CZTSSe surface, which is at the heart of p-n junction where major photogenerated carriers generate and separate. In this work we demonstrate that, despite the well-built phase and large grained films are observed by common phases and morphology characterization (XRD, Raman and SEM), prominent device efficiency variations from short circuited to 6.4% are obtained. Insight study highlights that the surface (0-250 nm) compositions variation results in different bulk defect depths and doping densities in the depletion zone. We propose that suitable sulfurization (at ~ 10 kPa sulfur pressure) drives optimization of surface constitution by managing the Cu, Zn and Sn diffusion and surface reaction. Therefore, our study reveals that the balance of elemental diffusion and interface reactions is the key to tuning the surface quality CZTSSe film and thus the performance of as resulted devices. PMID:25190491

  10. Sulfurization induced surface constitution and its correlation to the performance of solution-processed Cu2ZnSn(S,Se)4 solar cells

    PubMed Central

    Zhong, Jie; Xia, Zhe; Luo, Miao; Zhao, Juan; Chen, Jie; Wang, Liang; Liu, Xinsheng; Xue, Ding-Jiang; Cheng, Yi-Bing; Song, Haisheng; Tang, Jiang

    2014-01-01

    To obtain high photovoltaic performances for the emerging copper zinc tin sulfide/selenide (CZTSSe) thin film solar cells, much effort has deservedly been placed on CZTSSe phase purification and CZTSSe grain size enhancement. Another highly crucial but less explored factor for device performance is the elemental constitution of CZTSSe surface, which is at the heart of p-n junction where major photogenerated carriers generate and separate. In this work we demonstrate that, despite the well-built phase and large grained films are observed by common phases and morphology characterization (XRD, Raman and SEM), prominent device efficiency variations from short circuited to 6.4% are obtained. Insight study highlights that the surface (0–250 nm) compositions variation results in different bulk defect depths and doping densities in the depletion zone. We propose that suitable sulfurization (at ~10 kPa sulfur pressure) drives optimization of surface constitution by managing the Cu, Zn and Sn diffusion and surface reaction. Therefore, our study reveals that the balance of elemental diffusion and interface reactions is the key to tuning the surface quality CZTSSe film and thus the performance of as resulted devices. PMID:25190491

  11. Hydrogen peroxide inactivates the Escherichia coli Isc iron-sulfur assembly system, and OxyR induces the Suf system to compensate

    PubMed Central

    Jang, Soojin; Imlay, James A.

    2011-01-01

    Environmental H2O2 creates several injuries in Escherichia coli, including the oxidative conversion of dehydratase [4Fe-4S] clusters to an inactive [3Fe-4S] form. To protect itself, H2O2-stressed E. coli activates the OxyR regulon. This regulon includes the suf operon, which encodes an alternative to the housekeeping Isc iron-sulfur-cluster assembly system. Previously studied [3Fe-4S] clusters are repaired by an Isc/Suf-independent pathway, so the rationale for Suf induction was not obvious. Using strains that cannot scavenge H2O2, we imposed chronic low-grade stress and found that suf mutants could not maintain the activity of isopropylmalate isomerase, a key iron-sulfur dehydratase. Experiments showed that its damaged cluster was degraded in vivo beyond the [3Fe-4S] state, presumably to an apoprotein form, and thus required a de novo assembly system for reactivation. Surprisingly, sub-micromolar H2O2 poisoned the Isc machinery, thereby creating a requirement for Suf both to repair the isomerase and to activate nascent Fe-S enzymes in general. The IscS and IscA components of the Isc system are H2O2-resistant, suggesting that oxidants disrupt Isc by oxidizing clusters as they are assembled on or transferred from the IscU scaffold. Consistent with these results, organisms that are routinely exposed to oxidants rely upon Suf rather than Isc for cluster assembly. PMID:21143317

  12. Gastroprotective Activity of Ethyl-4-[(3,5-di-tert-butyl-2-hydroxybenzylidene) Amino]benzoate against Ethanol-Induced Gastric Mucosal Ulcer in Rats

    PubMed Central

    Halabi, Mohammed Farouq; Shakir, Raied Mustafa; Bardi, Daleya Abdulaziz; Al-Wajeeh, Nahla Saeed; Ablat, Abdulwali; Hassandarvish, Pouya; Hajrezaie, Maryam; Norazit, Anwar; Abdulla, Mahmood Ameen

    2014-01-01

    Background The study was carried out to determine the cytotoxic, antioxidant and gastro-protective effect of ethyl-4-[(3,5-di-tert-butyl-2-hydroxybenzylid ene)amino] benzoate (ETHAB) in rats. Methodology/Principal Findings The cytotoxic effect of ETHAB was assessed using a MTT cleavage assay on a WRL68 cell line, while its antioxidant activity was evaluated in vitro. In the anti-ulcer study, rats were divided into six groups. Group 1 and group 2 received 10% Tween 20 (vehicle). Group 3 received 20 mg/kg Omeprazole. Groups 4, 5 and 6 received ETHAB at doses of 5, 10, and 20 mg/kg, respectively. After an hour, group 1 received the vehicle. Groups 2–6 received absolute ethanol to induce gastric mucosal lesions. In the WRL68 cell line, an IC50 of more than 100 µg/mL was observed. ETHAB results showed antioxidant activity in the DPPH, FRAP, nitric oxide and metal chelating assays. There was no acute toxicity even at the highest dosage (1000 mg/kg). Microscopy showed that rats pretreated with ETHAB revealed protection of gastric mucosa as ascertained by significant increases in superoxide dismutase (SOD), pH level, mucus secretion, reduced gastric lesions, malondialdehyde (MDA) level and remarkable flattened gastric mucosa. Histologically, pretreatment with ETHAB resulted in comparatively better gastric protection, due to reduction of submucosal edema with leucocyte infiltration. PAS staining showed increased intensity in uptake of Alcian blue. In terms of immunohistochemistry, ETHAB showed down-expression of Bax proteins and over-expression of Hsp70 proteins. Conclusion/Significance The gastroprotective effect of ETHAB may be attributed to antioxidant activity, increased gastric wall mucus, pH level of gastric contents, SOD activity, decrease in MDA level, ulcer area, flattening of gastric mucosa, reduction of edema and leucocyte infiltration of the submucosal layer, increased PAS staining, up-regulation of Hsp70 protein and suppressed expression of Bax. Key words

  13. Sulfite Oxidase Activity Is Essential for Normal Sulfur, Nitrogen and Carbon Metabolism in Tomato Leaves

    PubMed Central

    Brychkova, Galina; Yarmolinsky, Dmitry; Batushansky, Albert; Grishkevich, Vladislav; Khozin-Goldberg, Inna; Fait, Aaron; Amir, Rachel; Fluhr, Robert; Sagi, Moshe

    2015-01-01

    Plant sulfite oxidase [SO; E.C.1.8.3.1] has been shown to be a key player in protecting plants against exogenous toxic sulfite. Recently we showed that SO activity is essential to cope with rising dark-induced endogenous sulfite levels in tomato plants (Lycopersicon esculentum/Solanum lycopersicum Mill. cv. Rheinlands Ruhm). Here we uncover the ramifications of SO impairment on carbon, nitrogen and sulfur (S) metabolites. Current analysis of the wild-type and SO-impaired plants revealed that under controlled conditions, the imbalanced sulfite level resulting from SO impairment conferred a metabolic shift towards elevated reduced S-compounds, namely sulfide, S-amino acids (S-AA), Co-A and acetyl-CoA, followed by non-S-AA, nitrogen and carbon metabolite enhancement, including polar lipids. Exposing plants to dark-induced carbon starvation resulted in a higher degradation of S-compounds, total AA, carbohydrates, polar lipids and total RNA in the mutant plants. Significantly, a failure to balance the carbon backbones was evident in the mutants, indicated by an increase in tricarboxylic acid cycle (TCA) cycle intermediates, whereas a decrease was shown in stressed wild-type plants. These results indicate that the role of SO is not limited to a rescue reaction under elevated sulfite, but SO is a key player in maintaining optimal carbon, nitrogen and sulfur metabolism in tomato plants. PMID:27135342

  14. Proteins and Amino Acids

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Proteins are the most abundant substances in living organisms and cells. All proteins are constructed from the same twenty amino acids that are linked together by covalent bonds. Shorter chains of two or more amino acids can be linked by covalent bonds to form polypeptides. There are twenty amino...

  15. Amino acid synthesis in Europa's subsurface environment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abbas, Sam H.; Schulze-Makuch, Dirk

    2008-10-01

    It has been suggested that Europa's subsurface environment may provide a haven for prebiotic evolution and the development of exotic biotic systems. The detection of hydrogen peroxide, sulfuric acid, water, hydrates and related species on the surface, coupled with observed mobility of icebergs, suggests the presence of a substantial subsurface liquid reservoir that actively exchanges materials with the surface environment. The atmospheric, surface and subsurface environments are described with their known chemistry. Three synthetic schemes using hydrogen peroxide, sulfuric acid and hydrocyanic acid leading to the production of larger biologically important molecules such as amino acids are described. Metabolic pathways based on properties of the subsurface ocean environment are detailed. Tidal heating, osmotic gradients, chemical cycling, as well as hydrothermal vents, provide energy and materials that may support a course of prebiotic evolution leading to the development or sustenance of simple biotic systems. Putative organisms may employ metabolic pathways based on chemical oxidation reduction cycles occurring in the putative subsurface ocean environment.

  16. Advanced sulfur control concepts

    SciTech Connect

    Harrison, D.P.; Lopez-Ortiz, A.; White, J.D.; Groves, F.R. Jr.

    1995-11-01

    The primary objective of this study is the direct production of elemental sulfur during the regeneration of high temperature desulfurization sorbents. Three possible regeneration concepts were identified as a result of a literature search. The potential for elemental sulfur production from a number of candidate metal oxide sorbents using each regeneration concept was evaluated on the basis of a thermodynamic analysis. Two candidate sorbents, Fe{sub 2}O{sub 3} and CeO{sub 2} were chosen for experimental testing. The experimental test program using both electrobalance and fixed-bed reactor sis now getting underway. The objective is to determine reaction conditions--temperature, pressure, space velocity, and regeneration feed gas composition--which will maximize the yield of elemental sulfur in the regeneration product gas. Experimental results are to be used to define a conceptual desulfurization-regeneration process and to provide a preliminary economic evaluation.

  17. Interstellar sulfur chemistry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Prasad, S. S.; Huntress, W. T., Jr.

    1980-01-01

    The results of a chemical model of SO, CS, and OCS chemistry in dense clouds are summarized. The results are obtained from a theoretical study of sulfur chemistry in dense interstellar clouds using a large-scale time-dependent model of gas-phase chemistry. Among the results are the following: (1) owing to activation energy, the reaction of CS with O atoms is efficient as a loss mechanism of CS during the early phases of cloud evolution or in hot and oxygen-rich sources such as the KL nebula; (2) if sulfur is not abnormally depleted in dense clouds, then the observed abundances of SO, SO2, H2S, CS, OCS, H2CS, and SiS indicate that sulfur is mostly atomic in dense clouds; and (3) OCS is stable against reactions with neutral atoms and radicals in dense clouds.

  18. Sodium sulfur battery seal

    DOEpatents

    Mikkor, Mati

    1981-01-01

    This disclosure is directed to an improvement in a sodium sulfur battery construction in which a seal between various battery compartments is made by a structure in which a soft metal seal member is held in a sealing position by holding structure. A pressure applying structure is used to apply pressure on the soft metal seal member when it is being held in sealing relationship to a surface of a container member of the sodium sulfur battery by the holding structure. The improvement comprises including a thin, well-adhered, soft metal layer on the surface of the container member of the sodium sulfur battery to which the soft metal seal member is to be bonded.

  19. The role of 5'-adenylylsulfate reductase in the sulfur assimilation pathway of soybean: molecular cloning, kinetic characterization, and gene expression

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Soybean seeds are a major source of protein, but contain low levels of sulfur-containing amino acids. With the objective of studying the sulfur assimilation pathway of soybean, a full-length cDNA clone for 5’-adenylylsulfate reductase (APS reductase) was isolated and characterized. The cDNA clone ...

  20. Catalyst for the reduction of sulfur dioxide to elemental sulfur

    DOEpatents

    Jin, Yun; Yu, Qiquan; Chang, Shih-Ger

    1996-01-01

    The inventive catalysts allow for the reduction of sulfur dioxide to elemental sulfur in smokestack scrubber environments. The catalysts have a very high sulfur yield of over 90% and space velocity of 10,000 h.sup.-1. They also have the capacity to convert waste gases generated during the initial conversion into elemental sulfur. The catalysts have inexpensive components, and are inexpensive to produce. The net impact of the invention is to make this technology practically available to industrial applications.

  1. Visible-Light-Induced Specific Desulfurization of Cysteinyl Peptide and Glycopeptide in Aqueous Solution.

    PubMed

    Gao, Xiao-Fei; Du, Jing-Jing; Liu, Zheng; Guo, Jun

    2016-03-01

    Visible-light-induced specific desulfurization of cysteinyl peptides has been explored. The photocatalytic desulfurization catalyzed by Ru(bpy)3(2+) can proceed efficiently at room temperature in aqueous solution or in binary mixtures of aqueous/organic solvent and be compatible with the presence of residues of amino acids, carbohydrates, and various sulfur-containing functional groups. This approach was successfully applied to synthesize linear and cyclic peptides through the ligation-desulfurization protocol. PMID:26892036

  2. Sulfur in achondritic meteorites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gibson, E. K.; Moore, C. B.; Primus, T. M.; Lewis, C. F.

    1985-01-01

    The sulfur abundances of samples of nearly 50 achondrites were examined to enlarge the database on the sulfur contents of various categories of achondrites. The study covered eucrites, howardites, diogenites, shergottites, chassignites, nakhilites, aubrites and three unique specimens. The study was spurred by the possibility that the S abundances could help identify the meteorites as originating on Mars or Venus. The S abundances and distributions varied widely, but confirmed that the data were valid indicators of the brecciation and thermal metamorphic history of each meteorite.

  3. Method for preventing sulfur emissions from vessels containing molten sulfur

    SciTech Connect

    Hass, R. H.

    1984-10-23

    Emissions from sulfur pits or other vessels containing molten sulfur are prevented or minimized by use of an air purge drawn into the vessel from the atmosphere and subsequently utilized as a portion of the oxidant required in a process for oxidizing hydrogen sulfide to elemental sulfur.

  4. Sac3, an Snf1-like serine/threonine kinase that positively and negatively regulates the responses of Chlamydomonas to sulfur limitation.

    PubMed Central

    Davies, J P; Yildiz, F H; Grossman, A R

    1999-01-01

    The Sac3 gene product of Chlamydomonas positively and negatively regulates the responses of the cell to sulfur limitation. In wild-type cells, arylsulfatase activity is detected only during sulfur limitation. The sac3 mutant expresses arylsulfatase activity even when grown in nutrient-replete medium, which suggests that the Sac3 protein has a negative effect on the induction of arylsulfatase activity. In contrast to its effect on arylsulfatase activity, Sac3 positively regulates the high-affinity sulfate transport system-the sac3 mutant is unable to fully induce high-affinity sulfate transport during sulfur limitation. We have complemented the sac3 mutant and cloned a cDNA copy of the Sac3 gene. The deduced amino acid sequence of the Sac3 gene product is similar to the catalytic domain of the yeast Snf1 family of serine/threonine kinases and is therefore classified as a Snf1-related kinase (SnRK). Specifically, Sac3 falls within the SnRK2 subfamily of kinases from vascular plants. In addition to the 11 subdomains common to Snf1-like serine/threonine kinases, Sac3 and the plant kinases have two additional subdomains and a highly acidic C-terminal region. The role of Sac3 in the signal transduction system that regulates the responses of Chlamydomonas to sulfur limitation is discussed. PMID:10368187

  5. Integrated evaluation of malonyl ginsenosides, amino acids and polysaccharides in fresh and processed ginseng.

    PubMed

    Wan, Jin-Yi; Fan, Yong; Yu, Qing-Tao; Ge, Ya-Zhong; Yan, Chen-Pu; Alolga, Raphael N; Li, Ping; Ma, Zhong-Hua; Qi, Lian-Wen

    2015-03-25

    Many analytical methods have been developed to characterize ginsenosides in ginseng. Relatively less attention has been paid to the malonyl ginsenosides, amino acids and polysaccharides in various processing ginsengs. In this study, malonyl ginsenosides were characterized by LC-Q-TOF/MS. In positive mode, the most abundant ions at m/z 425.38 were observed corresponding to the protopanoxadiol-type ginsenosides. A rich diagnostic ion at 835.48 was shown representing the malonyl ginsenosides with at least two glucosides. Twelve malonyl ginsenosides were rapidly screened using 835.48-835.49 to restructure ion chromatograms. In negative mode, besides the high deprotonated ion, a neutral loss of 44 Da (CO2) was found. High-energy collision-induced dissociation at 50 V produced the most abundant product ion [M-H-malonyl](-) by a neutral loss of 86 Da. Determination of 17 common amino acids was performed on an automatic amino acid analyzer. Arginine, glutamic acid, and aspartic acid were abundant. The contents of amino acids were 9.1% in fresh ginseng and 3.1% in black ginseng. Phenol-sulfuric acid method was applied to analysis of polysaccharides. The contents of polysaccharides were 29.1% in fresh ginseng and 11.1% in black ginseng. The optimal growth age for the accumulation of constituents was supposed to be 5-6 years. In conclusion, the contents of malonyl ginsenosides, amino acids, and polysaccharides, based on decreasing order, ranked as follows: fresh ginseng>frozen ginseng>white ginseng>stoved ginseng>red ginseng>black ginseng. Processing should be paid more attention for the quality control of ginseng products. PMID:25575174

  6. Zeolites Remove Sulfur From Fuels

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Voecks, Gerald E.; Sharma, Pramod K.

    1991-01-01

    Zeolites remove substantial amounts of sulfur compounds from diesel fuel under relatively mild conditions - atmospheric pressure below 300 degrees C. Extracts up to 60 percent of sulfur content of high-sulfur fuel. Applicable to petroleum refineries, natural-gas processors, electric powerplants, and chemical-processing plants. Method simpler and uses considerably lower pressure than current industrial method, hydro-desulfurization. Yields cleaner emissions from combustion of petroleum fuels, and protects catalysts from poisoning by sulfur.

  7. COAL SULFUR MEASUREMENTS

    EPA Science Inventory

    The report describes a new technique for sulfur forms analysis based on low-temperature oxygen plasma ashing. The technique involves analyzing the low-temperature plasma ash by modified ASTM techniques after selectively removing the organic material. The procedure has been tested...

  8. Sulfur Dioxide Pollution Monitor.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    National Bureau of Standards (DOC), Washington, DC.

    The sulfur dioxide pollution monitor described in this document is a government-owed invention that is available for licensing. The background of the invention is outlined, and drawings of the monitor together with a detailed description of its function are provided. A sample stream of air, smokestack gas or the like is flowed through a…

  9. Sodium sulfur battery seal

    DOEpatents

    Topouzian, Armenag

    1980-01-01

    This invention is directed to a seal for a sodium sulfur battery in which a flexible diaphragm sealing elements respectively engage opposite sides of a ceramic component of the battery which separates an anode compartment from a cathode compartment of the battery.

  10. Post-exercise whey protein hydrolysate supplementation induces a greater increase in muscle protein synthesis than its constituent amino acid content.

    PubMed

    Kanda, Atsushi; Nakayama, Kyosuke; Fukasawa, Tomoyuki; Koga, Jinichiro; Kanegae, Minoru; Kawanaka, Kentaro; Higuchi, Mitsuru

    2013-09-28

    It is well known that ingestion of a protein source is effective in stimulating muscle protein synthesis after exercise. In addition, there are numerous reports on the impact of leucine and leucine-rich whey protein on muscle protein synthesis and mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) signalling. However, there is only limited information on the effects of whey protein hydrolysates (WPH) on muscle protein synthesis and mTOR signalling. The aim of the present study was to compare the effects of WPH and amino acids on muscle protein synthesis and the initiation of translation in skeletal muscle during the post-exercise phase. Male Sprague–Dawley rats swam for 2 h to depress muscle protein synthesis. Immediately after exercise, the animals were administered either carbohydrate (CHO), CHO plus an amino acid mixture (AA) or CHO plus WPH. At 1 h after exercise, the supplements containing whey-based protein (AA and WPH) caused a significant increase in the fractional rate of protein synthesis (FSR) compared with CHO. WPH also caused a significant increase in FSR compared with AA. Post-exercise ingestion of WPH caused a significant increase in the phosphorylation of mTOR levels compared with AA or CHO. In addition, WPH caused greater phosphorylation of ribosomal protein S6 kinase and eukaryotic initiation factor 4E-binding protein 1 than AA and CHO. In contrast, there was no difference in plasma amino acid levels following supplementation with either AA or WPH. These results indicate that WPH may include active components that are superior to amino acids for stimulating muscle protein synthesis and initiating translation. PMID:23388415

  11. Process for forming sulfuric acid

    DOEpatents

    Lu, Wen-Tong P.

    1981-01-01

    An improved electrode is disclosed for the anode in a sulfur cycle hydrogen generation process where sulfur dioxie is oxidized to form sulfuric acid at the anode. The active compound in the electrode is palladium, palladium oxide, an alloy of palladium, or a mixture thereof. The active compound may be deposited on a porous, stable, conductive substrate.

  12. SULFUR POLYMER ENCAPSULATION.

    SciTech Connect

    KALB, P.

    2001-08-22

    Sulfur polymer cement (SPC) is a thermoplastic polymer consisting of 95 wt% elemental sulfur and 5 wt% organic modifiers to enhance long-term durability. SPC was originally developed by the U.S. Bureau of Mines as an alternative to hydraulic cement for construction applications. Previous attempts to use elemental sulfur as a construction material in the chemical industry failed due to premature degradation. These failures were caused by the internal stresses that result from changes in crystalline structure upon cooling of the material. By reacting elemental sulfur with organic polymers, the Bureau of Mines developed a product that successfully suppresses the solid phase transition and significantly improves the stability of the product. SPC, originally named modified sulfur cement, is produced from readily available, inexpensive waste sulfur derived from desulfurization of both flue gases and petroleum. The commercial production of SPC is licensed in the United States by Martin Resources (Odessa, Texas) and is marketed under the trade name Chement 2000. It is sold in granular form and is relatively inexpensive ({approx}$0.10 to 0.12/lb). Application of SPC for the treatment of radioactive, hazardous, and mixed wastes was initially developed and patented by Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL) in the mid-1980s (Kalb and Colombo, 1985; Colombo et al., 1997). The process was subsequently investigated by the Commission of the European Communities (Van Dalen and Rijpkema, 1989), Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (Darnell, 1991), and Oak Ridge National Laboratory (Mattus and Mattus, 1994). SPC has been used primarily in microencapsulation applications but can also be used for macroencapsulation of waste. SPC microencapsulation has been demonstrated to be an effective treatment for a wide variety of wastes, including incinerator hearth and fly ash; aqueous concentrates such as sulfates, borates, and chlorides; blowdown solutions; soils; and sludges. It is not

  13. Alteration of brain levels of neurotransmitters and amino acids in male F344 rats induced by three-week repeated inhalation exposure to 1-bromopropane.

    PubMed

    Suda, Megumi; Honma, Takeshi; Miyagawa, Muneyuki; Wang, Rui-Sheng

    2008-08-01

    The present study investigated the effects of 1-bromopropane (1BP) on brain neuroactive substances of rats to determine the extent of its toxicity to the central nervous system (CNS). We measured the changes in neurotransmitters (acetylcholine, catecholamine, serotonin and amino acids) and their metabolites or precursors in eight brain regions after inhalation exposure to 1BP at 50 to 1,000 ppm for 8 h per day for 7 d per week for 3 wk. Rats were sacrificed at 2 h (Case 1), or at 19 h (Case 2) after the end of exposure. In Case 1, the level of 5-hydroxyindoleacetic acid (5HIAA) was lowered in some brain regions by 1BP exposure. The decrease of 5HIAA in the frontal cortex was statistically significant at 50 ppm 1BP exposure. In Case 2, gamma-amino butyric acid (GABA) and taurine were decreased in many brain regions of exposed rats, and a significant decrease of taurine in the midbrain occurred at 50 ppm 1BP exposure. In both cases of 2-h and 19-h intervals from the end of exposure to sacrifice, aspartate and glutamine levels were elevated in many brain regions, but the acetylcholine level did not change in any brain region. Three-week repeated exposure to 1BP produced significantly changes in amino acid contents of rat brains, particularly at 1,000 ppm. PMID:18716383

  14. Sulfur isotope homogeneity of lunar mare basalts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wing, Boswell A.; Farquhar, James

    2015-12-01

    We present a new set of high precision measurements of relative 33S/32S, 34S/32S, and 36S/32S values in lunar mare basalts. The measurements are referenced to the Vienna-Canyon Diablo Troilite (V-CDT) scale, on which the international reference material, IAEA-S-1, is characterized by δ33S = -0.061‰, δ34S ≡ -0.3‰ and δ36S = -1.27‰. The present dataset confirms that lunar mare basalts are characterized by a remarkable degree of sulfur isotopic homogeneity, with most new and published SF6-based sulfur isotope measurements consistent with a single mass-dependent mean isotopic composition of δ34S = 0.58 ± 0.05‰, Δ33S = 0.008 ± 0.006‰, and Δ36S = 0.2 ± 0.2‰, relative to V-CDT, where the uncertainties are quoted as 99% confidence intervals on the mean. This homogeneity allows identification of a single sample (12022, 281) with an apparent 33S enrichment, possibly reflecting cosmic-ray-induced spallation reactions. It also reveals that some mare basalts have slightly lower δ34S values than the population mean, which is consistent with sulfur loss from a reduced basaltic melt prior to eruption at the lunar surface. Both the sulfur isotope homogeneity of the lunar mare basalts and the predicted sensitivity of sulfur isotopes to vaporization-driven fractionation suggest that less than ≈1-10% of lunar sulfur was lost after a potential moon-forming impact event.

  15. Effects of Reduced Sulfur Compounds on Pd-catalytic Hydrodechlorination of TCE in Groundwater by Cathodic H2 under Electrochemically-induced Oxidizing Conditions

    PubMed Central

    Yuan, Songhu; Chen, Mingjie; Mao, Xuhui; Alshawabkeh, Akram N.

    2014-01-01

    Reduced sulfur compounds (RSCs) poison Pd catalysts for catalytic hydrodechlorination of contaminants in anoxic groundwater. This study investigates the effects of RSCs on Pd-catalytic hydrodechlorination of trichloroethylene (TCE) in oxic groundwater. Water electrolysis in an undivided electrolytic cell is used to produce H2 for TCE hydrodechlorination under oxidizing conditions. TCE is efficiently hydrodechlorinated to ethane, with significant accumulation of H2O2 under acidic conditions. Presence of sulfide at concentrations less than 93.8 μM moderately inhibits TCE hydrodechlorination and H2O2 production. Presence of sulfite at low concentrations (≤ 1 mM) significantly enhances TCE decay, while at high concentration (3 mM) inhibits initially and enhances afterwards when sulfite concentration declines to less than 1 mM. Using radical scavenging experiments and electron spin resonance assay, SO3•− which is generated from sulfite under oxidizing conditions is validated as the new reactive species contributing to the enhancement. This study reveals a distinct mechanism of effect of sulfite on TCE hydrodechlorination by Pd and H2 in oxic groundwater and presents an alternative approach to increasing resistance of Pd to RSCs poisoning. PMID:23962132

  16. The immunogenicity of dinitrophenyl amino acids.

    PubMed

    Frey, J R; de Weck, A L; Geleick, H; Lergier, W

    1969-11-01

    Numerous dinitrophenyl amino acid preparations injected intradermally induced contact hypersensitivity to dinitrochlorobenzene, delayed type skin reactions to DNP-amino acids, and anti-DNP antibodies in guinea pigs. Some DNP-amino adds induced precipitating anti-DNP antibodies in rabbits as well. Some of the DNP-ammo acids studied were regularly immunogenic, possible immunogenic impurities having been excluded by extensive purification procedures. Others were either constantly nonimmunogenic or irregularly immunogenic, e.g., their immunogenicity varying from one preparation lot to another. By means of extensive chemical analyses and the establishment of dose-response curves, we were able to demonstrate in most cases that the immunogenicity was not due to contamination with unreacted dinitrofluorobenzene or other DNP derivatives, to photodecomposition or other degradation products, or to DNP-protein contaminants. Nevertheless, the irregular immunogenicity of several DNP-amino acid preparations can only be explained by a highly immunogenic impurity (or impurities) which we were unable to detect analytically. The regular immunogenicity of some other DNP-amino acids (e.g. di-DNP-L-histidine) appears to be based on a "transconjugation" phenomenon, the DNP group being able to split off from its amino acid carrier and to conjugate secondarily with proteins in vivo and in vitro. Accordingly, the interpretation of some recent data concerning the immunogenicity of low molecular weight hapten-amino acids may have to be reevaluated. PMID:4981513

  17. Amino acid analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Winitz, M.; Graff, J. (Inventor)

    1974-01-01

    The process and apparatus for qualitative and quantitative analysis of the amino acid content of a biological sample are presented. The sample is deposited on a cation exchange resin and then is washed with suitable solvents. The amino acids and various cations and organic material with a basic function remain on the resin. The resin is eluted with an acid eluant, and the eluate containing the amino acids is transferred to a reaction vessel where the eluant is removed. Final analysis of the purified acylated amino acid esters is accomplished by gas-liquid chromatographic techniques.

  18. An Aerosol Condensation Model for Sulfur Trioxide

    SciTech Connect

    Grant, K E

    2008-02-07

    . Sulfate aerosols and mist may form in the atmosphere on tank rupture. From chemical spill data from 1990-1996, Lawuyi02 and Fingas [7] prioritize sulfuric acid as sixth most serious. During this period, they note 155 spills totaling 13 Mt, out of a supply volume of 3700 Mt. Lawuyi and Fingas [7] summarize information on three major sulfuric acid spills. On 12 February 1984, 93 tons of sulfuric acid were spilled when 14 railroad cars derailed near MacTier, Parry Sound, Ontario. On 13 December 1978, 51 railroad cars derailed near Springhill, Nova Scotia. One car, containing 93% sulfuric acid, ruptured, spilling nearly its entire contents. In July 1993, 20 to 50 tons of fuming sulfuric acid spilled at the General Chemical Corp. plant in Richmond, California, a major industrial center near San Francisco. The release occurred when oleum was being loaded into a nonfuming acid railroad tank car that contained only a rupture disk as a safety device. The tank car was overheated and this rupture disk blew. The resulting cloud of sulfuric acid drifted northeast with prevailing winds over a number of populated areas. More than 3,000 people subsequently sought medical attention for burning eyes, coughing, headaches, and nausea. Almost all were treated and released on the day of the spill. By the day after the release, another 5,000 people had sought medical attention. The spill forced the closure of five freeways in the region as well as some Bay Area Rapid Transit System stations. Apart from corrosive toxicity, there is the additional hazard that the reactions of sulfur trioxide and sulfuric acid vapors with water are extremely exothermic [10, 11]. While the vapors are intrinsically denser than air, there is thus the likelihood of strong, warming-induced buoyancy from reactions with ambient water vapor, water-containing aerosol droplets, and wet environmental surface. Nordin [12] relates just such an occurrence following the Richmond, CA spill, with the plume observed to rise to 300

  19. Influence of sulfurization pressure on Cu2ZnSnS4 thin films and solar cells prepared by sulfurization of metallic precursors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    He, Jun; Sun, Lin; Chen, Ye; Jiang, Jinchun; Yang, Pingxiong; Chu, Junhao

    2015-01-01

    Effects of sulfurization pressure on composition, morphology and microstructure of kesterite Cu2ZnSnS4 (CZTS) thin films obtained by sulfurization of the metallic layers have been investigated in detail. It is found that the S content in the CZTS thin films is strongly dependent on the sulfurization pressure. The CZTS thin films sulfurized under low sulfurization pressure have S-poor state with a bilayer structure, while it exhibits sufficient amounts of sulfur under high sulfurization pressure with grain growth throughout the entire absorber film. X-ray diffraction data indicate lower sulfurization pressure during the CZTS grain growth process can induce the formation of more structural defects in the CZTS lattice and the CZTS thin films sulfurized under high sulfurization pressure have more random orientation. Furthermore, ZnS and MoS2 phase exist in all samples determined by Fourier transform infrared reflectance spectroscopy as complementary to Raman spectroscopy. The solar cell fabricated with the CZTS thin film under 10 Torr sulfurization pressure shows the best conversion efficiency of 3.52% (VOC = 484 mV, JSC = 14.56 mA cm-2, FF = 50.1%).

  20. Sulfur mustard and respiratory diseases.

    PubMed

    Tang, Feng Ru; Loke, Weng Keong

    2012-09-01

    Victims exposed to sulfur mustard (HD) in World War I and Iran-Iraq war, and those suffered occupational or accidental exposure have endured discomfort in the respiratory system at early stages after exposure, and marked general physical deterioration at late stages due to pulmonary fibrosis, bronchiolitis obliterans or lung cancer. At molecule levels, significant changes of cytokines and chemokines in bronchoalveolar lavage and serum, and of selectins (in particular sE-selectin) and soluble Fas ligand in the serum have been reported in recent studies of patients exposed to HD in Iran-Iraq war, suggesting that these molecules may be associated with the pathophysiological development of pulmonary diseases. Experimental studies in rodents have revealed that reactive oxygen and nitrogen species, their product peroxynitrite (ONOO(-)), nitric oxide synthase, glutathione, poly (adenosine diphosphate-ribose) polymerase, activating protein-1 signaling pathway are promising drug targets for preventing HD-induced toxicity, whereas N-acetyl cysteine, tocopherols, melatonin, aprotinin and many other molecules have been proved to be effective in prevention of HD-induced damage to the respiratory system in different animal models. In this paper, we will systemically review clinical and pathophysiological changes of respiratory system in victims exposed to HD in the last century, update clinicians and researchers on the mechanism of HD-induced acute and chronic lung damages, and on the relevant drug targets for future development of antidotes for HD. Further research directions will also be proposed. PMID:22742653

  1. Close Interspecies Interactions between Prokaryotes from Sulfureous Environments

    PubMed Central

    Müller, Johannes; Overmann, Jörg

    2011-01-01

    Green sulfur bacteria are obligate photolithoautotrophs that require highly reducing conditions for growth and can utilize only a very limited number of carbon substrates. These bacteria thus inhabit a very narrow ecologic niche. However, several green sulfur bacteria have overcome the limits of immobility by entering into a symbiosis with motile Betaproteobacteria in a type of multicellular association termed phototrophic consortia. One of these consortia, “Chlorochromatium aggregatum,” has recently been established as the first culturable model system to elucidate the molecular basis of this symbiotic interaction. It consists of 12–20 green sulfur bacteria epibionts surrounding a central, chemoheterotrophic betaproteobacterium in a highly ordered fashion. Recent genomic, transcriptomic, and proteomic studies of “C. aggregatum” and its epibiont provide insights into the molecular basis and the origin of the stable association between the two very distantly related bacteria. While numerous genes of central metabolic pathways are upregulated during the specific symbiosis and hence involved in the interaction, only a limited number of unique putative symbiosis genes have been detected in the epibiont. Green sulfur bacteria therefore are preadapted to a symbiotic lifestyle. The metabolic coupling between the bacterial partners appears to involve amino acids and highly specific ultrastructures at the contact sites between the cells. Similarly, the interaction in the equally well studied archaeal consortia consisting of Nanoarchaeum equitans and its host Ignicoccus hospitalis is based on the transfer of amino acids while lacking the highly specialized contact sites observed in phototrophic consortia. PMID:21779277

  2. PROCEEDINGS ON SYNCHROTRON RADIATION: Transfer characterization of sulfur from coal-burning emission to plant leaves by PIXE and XANES

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bao, Liang-Man; Zhang, Gui-Lin; Zhang, Yuan-Xim; Li, Yan; Lin, Jun; Liu, Wei; Cao, Qing-Chen; Zhao, Yi-Dong; Ma, Chen-Yan; Han, Yong

    2009-11-01

    The impact of coal-burning emission on sulfur in camphor leaves was investigated using Proton Induced X-ray Emission (PIXE) and synchrotron radiation technique X-ray Absorption Near-Edge Structure (XANES) spectroscopy. The PIXE results show that the sulfur concentrations in the leaves collected at the polluted site are significantly higher than those in controls. The Sulfur XANES spectra show the presence of organic (disulfides, thiols, thioethers, sulfonates and sulfoxides) and inorganic sulfur (sulfates) in the leaves. The inorganic sulfur in the leaves of camphor tree polluted by coal combustion is 15% more than that of the control site. The results suggest that the long-term coal-burning pollution resulted in an enhanced content of the total sulfur and sulfate in the leaves, and the uptake of sulfur by leaves had exceeded the metabolic requirement of plants and the excess of sulfur was stored as SO2-4. It can monitor the sulfur pollution in atmosphere.

  3. Mutagenicity and antimutagenicity studies of DRDE-07 and its analogs against sulfur mustard in the in vitro Ames Salmonella/microsome assay.

    PubMed

    Vijayan, Vinod; Pathak, Uma; Meshram, Ghansham Pundilikji

    2014-10-01

    Sulfur mustard (bis(2-chloroethyl) sulfide, SM), a chemical warfare agent, is classified as a class I human carcinogen by IARC. No effective antidote against this agent is available. The synthetic aminothiol, amifostine, earlier known as WR-2721, has been extensively used as a chemical radioprotector for normal tissues in cancer radiotherapy and chemotherapy. SM is a radiomimetic agent; this prompted us to evaluate the protective efficacy of amifostine and three of its analogs, DRDE-07 [S-2(2-aminoethylamino) ethyl phenyl sulphide], DRDE-30 [S-2(2-aminoethyl amino) ethyl propyl sulphide] and DRDE-35 [S-2(2-aminoethyl amino) ethyl butyl sulphide], against sulfur mustard-induced mutagenicity in the Ames Salmonella/microsome assay. The antidotes were also evaluated for possible mutagenic activity. DRDE-07 was mutagenic in strain TA104 in the absence of S9; DRDE-30 was mutagenic in strain TA100; amifostine and DRDE-35 did not show mutagenic activity in any of the five tester strains used. SM is mutagenic in strains TA97a and TA102, with or without S9 activation. In the antimutagenicity studies, DRDE-07 and DRDE-35 showed promising antimutagenic activity against SM in the absence of S9, in comparison to amifostine. DRDE-07 and DRDE-35 are promising protective agents against SM-induced mutagenicity. PMID:25308705

  4. Amino Acid Crossword Puzzle

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sims, Paul A.

    2011-01-01

    Learning the 20 standard amino acids is an essential component of an introductory course in biochemistry. Later in the course, the students study metabolism and learn about various catabolic and anabolic pathways involving amino acids. Learning new material or concepts often is easier if one can connect the new material to what one already knows;…

  5. Acidophilic sulfur disproportionation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hardisty, Dalton S.; Olyphant, Greg A.; Bell, Jonathan B.; Johnson, Adam P.; Pratt, Lisa M.

    2013-07-01

    Bacterial disproportionation of elemental sulfur (S0) is a well-studied metabolism and is not previously reported to occur at pH values less than 4.5. In this study, a sediment core from an abandoned-coal-mine-waste deposit in Southwest Indiana revealed sulfur isotope fractionations between S0 and pyrite (Δ34Ses-py) of up to -35‰, inferred to indicate intense recycling of S0 via bacterial disproportionation and sulfide oxidation. Additionally, the chemistry of seasonally collected pore-water profiles were found to vary, with pore-water pH ranging from 2.2 to 3.8 and observed seasonal redox shifts expressed as abrupt transitions from Fe(III) to Fe(II) dominated conditions, often controlled by fluctuating water table depths. S0 is a common product during the oxidation of pyrite, a process known to generate acidic waters during weathering and production of acid mine drainage. The H2S product of S0 disproportionation, fractionated by up to -8.6‰, is rapidly oxidized to S0 near redox gradients via reaction with Fe(III) allowing for the accumulation of isotopically light S0 that can then become subject to further sulfur disproportionation. A mass-balance model for S0 incorporating pyrite oxidation, S0 disproportionation, and S0 oxidation readily explains the range of observed Δ34Ses-py and emphasizes the necessity of seasonally varying pyrite weathering and metabolic rates, as indicated by the pore water chemistry. The findings of this research suggest that S0 disproportionation is potentially a common microbial process at a pH < 4.5 and can create large sulfur isotope fractionations, even in the absence of sulfate reduction.

  6. Sulfur plumes off Namibia

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2002-01-01

    Sulfur plumes rising up from the bottom of the ocean floor produce colorful swirls in the waters off the coast of Namibia in southern Africa. The plumes come from the breakdown of marine plant matter by anaerobic bacteria that do not need oxygen to live. This image was acquired by the Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) on the Terra satellite on April 24, 2002 Credit: Jacques Descloitres, MODIS Land Rapid Response Team, NASA/GSFC

  7. Differential response to sulfur nutrition of two common bean genotypes differing in storage protein composition

    PubMed Central

    Pandurangan, Sudhakar; Sandercock, Mark; Beyaert, Ronald; Conn, Kenneth L.; Hou, Anfu; Marsolais, Frédéric

    2015-01-01

    It has been hypothesized that the relatively low concentration of sulfur amino acids in legume seeds might be an ecological adaptation to nutrient poor, marginal soils. SARC1 and SMARC1N-PN1 are genetically related lines of common bean (dry bean, Phaseolus vulgaris) differing in seed storage protein composition. In SMARC1N-PN1, the lack of phaseolin and major lectins is compensated by increased levels of sulfur-rich proteins, resulting in an enhanced concentration of cysteine and methionine, mostly at the expense of the abundant non-protein amino acid, S-methylcysteine. To identify potential effects associated with an increased concentration of sulfur amino acids in the protein pool, the response of the two genotypes to low and high sulfur nutrition was evaluated under controlled conditions. Seed yield was increased by the high sulfate treatment in SMARC1N-PN1. The seed concentrations of sulfur, sulfate, and S-methylcysteine were altered by the sulfur treatment in both genotypes. The concentration of total cysteine and extractible globulins was increased specifically in SMARC1N-PN1. Proteomic analysis identified arcelin-like protein 4, lipoxygenase-3, albumin-2, and alpha amylase inhibitor beta chain as having increased levels under high sulfur conditions. Lipoxygenase-3 accumulation was sensitive to sulfur nutrition only in SMARC1N-PN1. Under field conditions, both SARC1 and SMARC1N-PN1 exhibited a slight increase in yield in response to sulfur treatment, typical for common bean. PMID:25750649

  8. Differential response to sulfur nutrition of two common bean genotypes differing in storage protein composition.

    PubMed

    Pandurangan, Sudhakar; Sandercock, Mark; Beyaert, Ronald; Conn, Kenneth L; Hou, Anfu; Marsolais, Frédéric

    2015-01-01

    It has been hypothesized that the relatively low concentration of sulfur amino acids in legume seeds might be an ecological adaptation to nutrient poor, marginal soils. SARC1 and SMARC1N-PN1 are genetically related lines of common bean (dry bean, Phaseolus vulgaris) differing in seed storage protein composition. In SMARC1N-PN1, the lack of phaseolin and major lectins is compensated by increased levels of sulfur-rich proteins, resulting in an enhanced concentration of cysteine and methionine, mostly at the expense of the abundant non-protein amino acid, S-methylcysteine. To identify potential effects associated with an increased concentration of sulfur amino acids in the protein pool, the response of the two genotypes to low and high sulfur nutrition was evaluated under controlled conditions. Seed yield was increased by the high sulfate treatment in SMARC1N-PN1. The seed concentrations of sulfur, sulfate, and S-methylcysteine were altered by the sulfur treatment in both genotypes. The concentration of total cysteine and extractible globulins was increased specifically in SMARC1N-PN1. Proteomic analysis identified arcelin-like protein 4, lipoxygenase-3, albumin-2, and alpha amylase inhibitor beta chain as having increased levels under high sulfur conditions. Lipoxygenase-3 accumulation was sensitive to sulfur nutrition only in SMARC1N-PN1. Under field conditions, both SARC1 and SMARC1N-PN1 exhibited a slight increase in yield in response to sulfur treatment, typical for common bean. PMID:25750649

  9. Lunar Sulfur Capture System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Berggren, Mark; Zubrin, Robert; Bostwick-White, Emily

    2013-01-01

    The Lunar Sulfur Capture System (LSCS) protects in situ resource utilization (ISRU) hardware from corrosion, and reduces contaminant levels in water condensed for electrolysis. The LSCS uses a lunar soil sorbent to trap over 98 percent of sulfur gases and about two-thirds of halide gases evolved during hydrogen reduction of lunar soils. LSCS soil sorbent is based on lunar minerals containing iron and calcium compounds that trap sulfur and halide gas contaminants in a fixed-bed reactor held at temperatures between 250 and 400 C, allowing moisture produced during reduction to pass through in vapor phase. Small amounts of Earth-based polishing sorbents consisting of zinc oxide and sodium aluminate are used to reduce contaminant concentrations to one ppm or less. The preferred LSCS configuration employs lunar soil beneficiation to boost concentrations of reactive sorbent minerals. Lunar soils contain sulfur in concentrations of about 0.1 percent, and halogen compounds including chlorine and fluorine in concentrations of about 0.01 percent. These contaminants are released as gases such as H2S, COS, CS2,HCl, and HF during thermal ISRU processing with hydrogen or other reducing gases. Removal of contaminant gases is required during ISRU processing to prevent hardware corrosion, electrolyzer damage, and catalyst poisoning. The use of Earth-supplied, single-use consumables to entirely remove contaminants at the levels existing in lunar soils would make many ISRU processes unattractive due to the large mass of consumables relative to the mass of oxygen produced. The LSCS concept of using a primary sorbent prepared from lunar soil was identified as a method by which the majority of contaminants could be removed from process gas streams, thereby substantially reducing the required mass of Earth-supplied consumables. The LSCS takes advantage of minerals containing iron and calcium compounds that are present in lunar soil to trap sulfur and halide gases in a fixedbed reactor

  10. Immobilization of sulfur in microgels for lithium-sulfur battery.

    PubMed

    Chang, Aiping; Wu, Qingshi; Du, Xue; Chen, Shoumin; Shen, Jing; Song, Qiuyi; Xie, Jianda; Wu, Weitai

    2016-03-25

    Immobilization of sulfur in microgels is achieved via free radical polymerization of commercial poly(ethylene glycol) dimethacrylate in the solution of sulfur-terminated poly(3-oligo(ethylene oxide)4-thiophene), a copolymer prepared by the inverse vulcanization of S8 with allyl-terminated poly(3-oligo(ethylene oxide)4-thiophene). This microgelation leads to enhanced Li-S battery performance over the sulfur-terminated polymer. PMID:26936016

  11. Kinetics of sulfonation of amines of the benzene series with sulfur trioxide

    SciTech Connect

    Khelevin, R.N.

    1988-08-20

    The sulfonation of amines of the benzene series with sulfur trioxide in dichloroethane is described by a third-order kinetic equation for an irreversible process, and first order is observed with respect to the compound being sulfonated and second with respect to the sulfur trioxide. The unprotonated molecules of the amines undergo sulfonation, and this leads to the production of the para-aminosulfonic acids with small amounts of the ortho isomers. The reaction mechanism involves electrophilic reaction of the unprotonated amine molecule with the sulfur trioxide dimer S/sub 2/O/sub 6/ and subsequent dissociation of the obtained pyrosulfonate with the production of the amino sulfonic acid and sulfur trioxide. Sulfonation with sulfur trioxide is of interest in connection with the high rate and degree of completion of the reaction and the absence of energy expenditures.

  12. Insight into insulator-to-metal transition of sulfur-doped silicon by DFT calculations.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Zong-Yan; Yang, Pei-Zhi

    2014-09-01

    Using density functional theory calculations, the mechanism of insulator-to-metal transition of S-doped Si has been systematically investigated. The calculated crystal structure indicates that the gentle lattice distortion is caused by sulfur doping, and this doping effect is gradually weakened with the increase of sulfur concentration. Two distinct impurity energy levels in the band gap are induced by sulfur doping, and their position and width are linearly varying along with the increase of sulfur concentration. Owing to the overlap and dispersion of these impurity energy levels, the insulator-to-metal transition occurs at the sulfur concentration of 2.095 × 10(20) cm(-3), which is consistent with the experimental measurement. Moreover, the defect states related with sulfur doping show delocalization features and are more outstanding at the higher sulfur concentration. The calculated results suggest that S-hyperdoped Si is a suitable candidate for intermediate band solar cells. PMID:25019287

  13. Catalyst for the reduction of sulfur dioxide to elemental sulfur

    DOEpatents

    Jin, Y.; Yu, Q.; Chang, S.G.

    1996-02-27

    The inventive catalysts allow for the reduction of sulfur dioxide to elemental sulfur in smokestack scrubber environments. The catalysts have a very high sulfur yield of over 90% and space velocity of 10,000 h{sup {minus}1}. They also have the capacity to convert waste gases generated during the initial conversion into elemental sulfur. The catalysts have inexpensive components, and are inexpensive to produce. The net impact of the invention is to make this technology practically available to industrial applications. 21 figs.

  14. Ametryne and Prometryne as Sulfur Sources for Bacteria

    PubMed Central

    Cook, Alasdair M.; Hütter, Ralf

    1982-01-01

    Bacteria were isolated that could utilize quantitatively the s-triazine herbicide prometryne [N,N′ -bis(1-methylethyl)-6-(methylthio)-1,3,5-triazine-2,4-diamine] or ametryne [N-ethyl-N′-(1-methylethyl)-6-(methylthio)-1,3,5-triazine- 2,4-diamine], or both, as a sole source of sulfur for growth. The success of enrichments depended on previous exposure of the soil inoculum to s-triazine herbicides. Deaminoethylametryne [4-(1-methylethyl)amino-6-(methylthio)-1,3,5-triazine-2-(1H)-one], methylsulfonic acid, and sodium sulfate could also be used as sulfur sources. Utilization of a compound was quantified as the growth yield per mole of sulfur supplied. Yields were about 6 kg of protein per mol of sulfur. The product of the desulfuration of an s-triazine was identified as the corresponding hydroxy-derivative. This is the first substantiated report of the utilization of these s-triazines as sulfur sources by bacteria. PMID:16345988

  15. Synthesis, characterization of α-amino acid Schiff base derived Ru/Pt complexes: Induces cytotoxicity in HepG2 cell via protein binding and ROS generation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alsalme, Ali; Laeeq, Sameen; Dwivedi, Sourabh; Khan, Mohd. Shahnawaz; Al Farhan, Khalid; Musarrat, Javed; Khan, Rais Ahmad

    2016-06-01

    We have synthesized two new complexes of platinum (1) and ruthenium (2) with α-amino acid, L-alanine, and 2,3-dihydroxybenzaldehyde derived Schiff base (L). The ligand and both complexes were characterized by using elemental analysis and several other spectroscopic techniques viz; IR, 1H, 13C NMR, EPR, and ESI-MS. Furthermore, the protein-binding ability of synthesized complexes was monitored by UV-visible, fluorescence and circular dichroism techniques with a model protein, human serum albumin (HSA). Both the PtL2 and RuL2 complexes displayed significant binding towards HSA. Also, in vitro cytotoxicity assay for both complexes was carried out on human hepatocellular carcinoma cancer (HepG2) cell line. The results showed concentration-dependent inhibition of cell viability. Moreover, the generation of reactive oxygen species was also evaluated, and results exhibited substantial role in cytotoxicity.

  16. Synthesis, characterization of α-amino acid Schiff base derived Ru/Pt complexes: Induces cytotoxicity in HepG2 cell via protein binding and ROS generation.

    PubMed

    Alsalme, Ali; Laeeq, Sameen; Dwivedi, Sourabh; Khan, Mohd Shahnawaz; Al Farhan, Khalid; Musarrat, Javed; Khan, Rais Ahmad

    2016-06-15

    We have synthesized two new complexes of platinum (1) and ruthenium (2) with α-amino acid, l-alanine, and 2,3-dihydroxybenzaldehyde derived Schiff base (L). The ligand and both complexes were characterized by using elemental analysis and several other spectroscopic techniques viz; IR, (1)H, (13)C NMR, EPR, and ESI-MS. Furthermore, the protein-binding ability of synthesized complexes was monitored by UV-visible, fluorescence and circular dichroism techniques with a model protein, human serum albumin (HSA). Both the PtL2 and RuL2 complexes displayed significant binding towards HSA. Also, in vitro cytotoxicity assay for both complexes was carried out on human hepatocellular carcinoma cancer (HepG2) cell line. The results showed concentration-dependent inhibition of cell viability. Moreover, the generation of reactive oxygen species was also evaluated, and results exhibited substantial role in cytotoxicity. PMID:27002605

  17. Disorders of Amino Acid Metabolism

    MedlinePlus

    ... Aspiration Syndrome Additional Content Medical News Disorders of Amino Acid Metabolism By Lee M. Sanders, MD, MPH NOTE: ... Metabolic Disorders Disorders of Carbohydrate Metabolism Disorders of Amino Acid Metabolism Disorders of Lipid Metabolism Amino acids are ...

  18. Rethinking the Ancient Sulfur Cycle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fike, David A.; Bradley, Alexander S.; Rose, Catherine V.

    2015-05-01

    The sulfur biogeochemical cycle integrates the metabolic activity of multiple microbial pathways (e.g., sulfate reduction, disproportionation, and sulfide oxidation) along with abiotic reactions and geological processes that cycle sulfur through various reservoirs. The sulfur cycle impacts the global carbon cycle and climate primarily through the remineralization of organic carbon. Over geological timescales, cycling of sulfur is closely tied to the redox state of Earth's exosphere through the burial of oxidized (sulfate) and reduced (sulfide) sulfur species in marine sediments. Biological sulfur cycling is associated with isotopic fractionations that can be used to trace the fluxes through various metabolic pathways. The resulting isotopic data provide insights into sulfur cycling in both modern and ancient environments via isotopic signatures in sedimentary sulfate and sulfide phases. Here, we review the deep-time δ34S record of marine sulfates and sulfides in light of recent advances in understanding how isotopic signatures are generated by microbial activity, how these signatures are encoded in marine sediments, and how they may be altered following deposition. The resulting picture shows a sulfur cycle intimately coupled to ambient carbon cycling, where sulfur isotopic records preserved in sedimentary rocks are critically dependent on sedimentological and geochemical conditions (e.g., iron availability) during deposition.

  19. Amino Acids and Chirality

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cook, Jamie E.

    2012-01-01

    Amino acids are among the most heavily studied organic compound class in carbonaceous chondrites. The abundance, distributions, enantiomeric compositions, and stable isotopic ratios of amino acids have been determined in carbonaceous chondrites fi'om a range of classes and petrographic types, with interesting correlations observed between these properties and the class and typc of the chondritcs. In particular, isomeric distributions appear to correlate with parent bodies (chondrite class). In addition, certain chiral amino acids are found in enantiomeric excess in some chondrites. The delivery of these enantiomeric excesses to the early Earth may have contributed to the origin of the homochirality that is central to life on Earth today. This talk will explore the amino acids in carbonaceous chondritcs and their relevance to the origin of life.

  20. Amino Acid Metabolism Disorders

    MedlinePlus

    Metabolism is the process your body uses to make energy from the food you eat. Food is ... One group of these disorders is amino acid metabolism disorders. They include phenylketonuria (PKU) and maple syrup ...

  1. In vitro evaluation of candidate pretreatment and treatment compounds against sulfur mustard (HD) -induced human mononuclear leukocyte toxicity using a dye exclusion cell viability assay

    SciTech Connect

    Starner, R.A.; Blank, J.A.; Hobson, D.W.; Menton, R.G.; Meier, H.L.

    1993-05-13

    An assay measuring propidium iodide (PI) incorporation into nonviable human peripheral blood mononuclear leukocytes (PBML) was established at the U.S. Army Medical Research Institute of Chemical Defense (USAMRICD), and the technology transferred and implemented at Battelle's Medical Research and Evaluation Facility (MREF) for use as a screen to evaluate candidate compounds for direct cytotoxicity as well as for efficacy in preventing HD-induced cytotoxicity. For assay transition, studies were performed to establish a fixed HD challenge concentration; to develop a positive and negative control dataset; and to establish the reproducibility in obtaining an EC50 (concentration of candidate compound required to provide 50 percent protection against the fixed HD concentration) for niacinamide (NM). Various concentrations of candidate compounds were preincubated for 15 to 30 min with PBML prior to adding the fixed HD challenge. At 24 hr after exposure, PI was added to the cultures and the number of nonviable (PI positive) cells was determined by flow cytometry. Positive (NM pretreated) and negative (HD only) controls were examined concurrently and used to maintain data quality. From this dataset, candidate compounds were evaluated for direct cytotoxic effects and for efficacy in preventing HD-induced cytotoxicity. EC50 values for effective candidate compounds were estimated and reported for ranking compound effectiveness. Results from these studies demonstrate assay function and reproducibility during routine screening operations.

  2. Method of removing and recovering elemental sulfur from highly reducing gas streams containing sulfur gases

    DOEpatents

    Gangwal, Santosh K.; Nikolopoulos, Apostolos A.; Dorchak, Thomas P.; Dorchak, Mary Anne

    2005-11-08

    A method is provided for removal of sulfur gases and recovery of elemental sulfur from sulfur gas containing supply streams, such as syngas or coal gas, by contacting the supply stream with a catalyst, that is either an activated carbon or an oxide based catalyst, and an oxidant, such as sulfur dioxide, in a reaction medium such as molten sulfur, to convert the sulfur gases in the supply stream to elemental sulfur, and recovering the elemental sulfur by separation from the reaction medium.

  3. Process for removing sulfur from sulfur-containing gases

    DOEpatents

    Rochelle, Gary T.; Jozewicz, Wojciech

    1989-01-01

    The present disclosure relates to improved processes for treating hot sulfur-containing flue gas to remove sulfur therefrom. Processes in accorda The government may own certain rights in the present invention pursuant to EPA Cooperative Agreement CR 81-1531.

  4. Amino acid side chain induced selectivity in the hydrolysis of peptides catalyzed by a Zr(IV)-substituted Wells-Dawson type polyoxometalate.

    PubMed

    Vanhaecht, Stef; Absillis, Gregory; Parac-Vogt, Tatjana N

    2013-11-21

    In this paper the reactivity of K15H[Zr(α2-P2W17O61)2]·25H2O (1), a Zr(IV)-substituted Wells-Dawson polyoxometalate, is examined towards a series of Gly-Aa, Aa-Gly or Aa-Ser dipeptides, in which the nature and the size of the Aa amino acid side chain were varied. The rate of peptide bond hydrolysis, determined by (1)H NMR experiments, in Gly-Aa dipeptides is strongly dependent on the molecular volume and the chemical structure of the Aa side chain. When the volume of the aliphatic side chain of the Aa residue in Gly-Aa increased, a clear decrease in the hydrolysis rate was observed. Replacing one α-H in the C-terminal Gly residue of Gly-Gly by a methyl group (Gly-Ala) resulted in a 6-fold reactivity decrease, pointing towards the importance of steric factors for efficient peptide bond hydrolysis. The rate constants for peptide bond hydrolysis in Gly-Aa dipeptides at pD 5.0 and 60 °C ranged from 208.0 ± 15.6 × 10(-6) min(-1) for Gly-Ser to 5.0 ± 1.0 × 10(-6) min(-1) for Gly-Glu, reflecting the influence of the different nature of the amino acid side chains on the hydrolysis rate. Faster hydrolysis was observed for peptides containing Ser and Thr since the hydroxyl group in their side chain is able to facilitate amide bond hydrolysis by promoting an N→O acyl rearrangement. Peptides containing positively charged side chains at pD 5.0 show enhanced hydrolysis rates as a result of the secondary electrostatic interactions with the negatively charged surface of the polyoxometalate, which stabilize the peptide-polyoxometalate complex. A slow hydrolysis rate was observed for Gly-Glu, because of the preferential coordination of the carboxylate group in the side chain of Glu to Zr(IV), which prevents coordination of the peptide carbonyl group and its activation towards hydrolysis. PMID:24018583

  5. A Combined Proteomic and Transcriptomic Analysis on Sulfur Metabolism Pathways of Arabidopsis thaliana under Simulated Acid Rain

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Wenhua; Simon, Martin; Wu, Feihua; Hu, Wenjun; Chen, Juan B.; Zheng, Hailei

    2014-01-01

    With rapid economic development, most regions in southern China have suffered acid rain (AR) pollution. In our study, we analyzed the changes in sulfur metabolism in Arabidopsis under simulated AR stress which provide one of the first case studies, in which the systematic responses in sulfur metabolism were characterized by high-throughput methods at different levels including proteomic, genomic and physiological approaches. Generally, we found that all of the processes related to sulfur metabolism responded to AR stress, including sulfur uptake, activation and also synthesis of sulfur-containing amino acid and other secondary metabolites. Finally, we provided a catalogue of the detected sulfur metabolic changes and reconstructed the coordinating network of their mutual influences. This study can help us to understand the mechanisms of plants to adapt to AR stress. PMID:24595051

  6. Biological and molecular mechanisms of sulfur mustard analogue-induced toxicity in JB6 and HaCaT cells: possible role of ataxia telangiectasia-mutated/ataxia telangiectasia-Rad3-related cell cycle checkpoint pathway.

    PubMed

    Tewari-Singh, Neera; Gu, Mallikarjuna; Agarwal, Chapla; White, Carl W; Agarwal, Rajesh

    2010-06-21

    Effective medical treatment and preventive measures for chemical warfare agent sulfur mustard (HD)-caused incapacitating skin toxicity are lacking, because of limited knowledge of its mechanism of action. The proliferating basal epidermal cells are primary major sites of attack during HD-caused skin injury. Therefore, employing mouse JB6 and human HaCaT epidermal cells, here, we investigated the molecular mechanism of HD analogue 2-chloroethyl ethyl sulfide (CEES)-induced skin cytotoxicity. As compared to the control, up to 1 mM CEES treatment of these cells for 2, 4, and 24 h caused dose-dependent decreases in cell viability and proliferation as measured by DNA synthesis, together with S and G2-M phase arrest in cell cycle progression. Mechanistic studies showed phosphorylation of DNA damage sensors and checkpoint kinases, ataxia telangiectasia-mutated (ATM) at ser1981 and ataxia telangiectasia-Rad3-related (ATR) at ser428 within 30 min of CEES exposure, and modulation of S and G2-M phase-associated cell cycle regulatory proteins, which are downstream targets of ATM and ATR kinases. Hoechst-propidium iodide staining demonstrated that CEES-induced cell death was both necrotic and apoptotic in nature, and the latter was induced at 4 and 24 h of CEES treatment in HaCaT and JB6 cells, respectively. An increase in caspase-3 activity and both caspase-3 and poly(ADP-ribose)polymerase (PARP) cleavage coinciding with CEES-caused apoptosis in both cell lines suggested the involvement of the caspase pathway. Together, our findings suggest a DNA-damaging effect of CEES that activates ATM/ATR cell cycle checkpoint signaling as well as caspase-PARP pathways, leading to cell cycle arrest and apoptosis/necrosis in both JB6 and HaCaT cells. The identified molecular targets, quantitative biomarkers, and epidermal cell models in this study have the potential and usefulness in rapid development of effective prophylactic and therapeutic interventions against HD-induced skin toxicity

  7. Desulfonation of amino sulfonic acids of the benzene series in proton-donor media

    SciTech Connect

    Khelevin, R.N.

    1986-11-10

    In this work the desulfonation of amino sulfonic acids was studied by the determination of the kinetics of homogeneous isotopic exchange in radioactive sulfuric acid labeled with the isotope /sup 35/S, either containing HB(HSO/sub 4/)/sub 4/, or not containing it. The radioactive sulfuric acid was taken in an amount of 20 moles per mole of the amino sulfonic acid. Preliminary experiments showed that under these conditions neither the formation of disulfonic acids, nor the accumulation of desulfonated products occurs.

  8. 40 CFR 50.4 - National primary ambient air quality standards for sulfur oxides (sulfur dioxide).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... standards for sulfur oxides (sulfur dioxide). 50.4 Section 50.4 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL....4 National primary ambient air quality standards for sulfur oxides (sulfur dioxide). (a) The level...). (c) Sulfur oxides shall be measured in the ambient air as sulfur dioxide by the reference...

  9. 40 CFR 50.4 - National primary ambient air quality standards for sulfur oxides (sulfur dioxide).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... standards for sulfur oxides (sulfur dioxide). 50.4 Section 50.4 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL....4 National primary ambient air quality standards for sulfur oxides (sulfur dioxide). (a) The level...). (c) Sulfur oxides shall be measured in the ambient air as sulfur dioxide by the reference...

  10. 40 CFR 50.4 - National primary ambient air quality standards for sulfur oxides (sulfur dioxide).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... standards for sulfur oxides (sulfur dioxide). 50.4 Section 50.4 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL....4 National primary ambient air quality standards for sulfur oxides (sulfur dioxide). (a) The level...). (c) Sulfur oxides shall be measured in the ambient air as sulfur dioxide by the reference...

  11. 40 CFR 50.4 - National primary ambient air quality standards for sulfur oxides (sulfur dioxide).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... standards for sulfur oxides (sulfur dioxide). 50.4 Section 50.4 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL....4 National primary ambient air quality standards for sulfur oxides (sulfur dioxide). (a) The level...). (c) Sulfur oxides shall be measured in the ambient air as sulfur dioxide by the reference...

  12. Liquid sulfur mustard exposure.

    PubMed

    Newmark, Jonathan; Langer, Janice M; Capacio, Benedict; Barr, John; McIntosh, Roger G

    2007-02-01

    A 35-year-old active duty service member sustained a 6.5% body surface area burn as a result of exposure to the chemical warfare agent sulfur mustard, which is the most severe mustard exposure of a U.S. military member since World War II that is known to us. New techniques were used to demonstrate the detectable persistence of mustard metabolites in the patient's blood for at least 41 days after exposure, validating these techniques for the first time for a human mustard patient; they were also used for the first time with human mustard blister fluid. The techniques extend eightfold the period of time that mustard exposure can be definitively diagnosed, compared with previous techniques. Although this patient's lesions were never life-threatening, he required 2 weeks of intensive burn care. He has been left with ongoing posttraumatic stress disorder and has had an incomplete dermatological recovery. In a major terrorist attack involving many patients exposed to sulfur mustard, care resources would be depleted quickly. PMID:17357776

  13. Sulfur in Cometary Dust

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fomenkova, M. N.

    1997-01-01

    The computer-intensive project consisted of the analysis and synthesis of existing data on composition of comet Halley dust particles. The main objective was to obtain a complete inventory of sulfur containing compounds in the comet Halley dust by building upon the existing classification of organic and inorganic compounds and applying a variety of statistical techniques for cluster and cross-correlational analyses. A student hired for this project wrote and tested the software to perform cluster analysis. The following tasks were carried out: (1) selecting the data from existing database for the proposed project; (2) finding access to a standard library of statistical routines for cluster analysis; (3) reformatting the data as necessary for input into the library routines; (4) performing cluster analysis and constructing hierarchical cluster trees using three methods to define the proximity of clusters; (5) presenting the output results in different formats to facilitate the interpretation of the obtained cluster trees; (6) selecting groups of data points common for all three trees as stable clusters. We have also considered the chemistry of sulfur in inorganic compounds.

  14. Amino acid composition and amino acid-metabolic network in supragingival plaque.

    PubMed

    Washio, Jumpei; Ogawa, Tamaki; Suzuki, Keisuke; Tsukiboshi, Yosuke; Watanabe, Motohiro; Takahashi, Nobuhiro

    2016-01-01

    Dental plaque metabolizes both carbohydrates and amino acids. The former can be degraded to acids mainly, while the latter can be degraded to various metabolites, including ammonia, acids and amines, and associated with acid-neutralization, oral malodor and tissue inflammation. However, amino acid metabolism in dental plaque is still unclear. This study aimed to elucidate what kinds of amino acids are available as metabolic substrates and how the amino acids are metabolized in supragingival plaque, by a metabolome analysis. Amino acids and the related metabolites in supragingival plaque were extracted and quantified comprehensively by CE-TOFMS. Plaque samples were also incubated with amino acids, and the amounts of ammonia and amino acid-related metabolites were measured. The concentration of glutamate was the highest in supragingival plaque, while the ammonia-production was the highest from glutamine. The obtained metabolome profile revealed that amino acids are degraded through various metabolic pathways, including deamination, decarboxylation and transamination and that these metabolic systems may link each other, as well as with carbohydrate metabolic pathways in dental plaque ecosystem. Moreover, glutamine and glutamate might be the main source of ammonia production, as well as arginine, and contribute to pH-homeostasis and counteraction to acid-induced demineralization in supragingival plaque. PMID:27545001

  15. Inhibition of myeloid differentiation factor 88 signaling mediated by histidine-grafted poly(β-amino ester) ester nanovector induces donor-specific liver allograft tolerance.

    PubMed

    Hu, Fanguo; Wang, Hanjie; Zhang, Shuangnan; Peng, Yao; Su, Lin; Chang, Jin; Liu, Gang

    2015-01-01

    Toll-like receptors (TLRs) activate biochemical pathways that evoke activation of innate immunity, which leads to dendritic cell maturation and initiation of adaptive immune responses that provoke allograft rejection. We aimed to prolong allograft survival by selectively inhibiting expression of myeloid differentiation factor 88 (MyD88), which is an essential adaptor in TLR signaling. We designed and synthesized a novel histidine-grafted poly(β-amino ester) (HGPAE) nanovector, which was shown to be safe and efficient both in vitro and in vivo for the delivery of a plasmid containing shRNA targeting MyD88 (pMyD88). We also demonstrated that the pMyD88/HGPAE complex mediated remarkable inhibition of MyD88 expression in rat liver in vivo. We transplanted Dark Agouti rat livers lacking MyD88 as result of transfection with the pMyD88/HGPAE complex into Lewis rats. The recipients survived longer and graft rejection of the donor liver as well as serum levels of IL-2 and IFN-γ in the recipient were significantly reduced. PMID:26185440

  16. Inhibition or enhancement by 4 Pacific Island food plants against cancers induced by 2 amino-3-methylimidazo[4,5-f]quinoline in male Fischer 344 rats.

    PubMed

    Ferguson, Lynnette R; Zhu, Shuotun; Han, Dug Yeo; Harris, Philip J

    2012-01-01

    A 1-yr carcinogenicity bioassay was conducted in rats fed 2-amino-3-methylimidazo[4,5-f]quinoline (IQ), simultaneously with AIN-76/ high-fat (HF) diet alone, or with 10% starch replaced with kumara, pineapple, coconut, or taro, prepared as for a human diet. All of the non-IQ treated control, kumara, pineapple, or taro but not coconut-fed rats survived to 1 yr. None of the IQ-fed animals survived to 1 yr and although there were minor survival time differences among the groups, none was statistically significant. At sacrifice, IQ/HF controls had tumors in the skin, Zymbal's gland, ear canal, oral cavity, liver, and small intestine, totaling 32 among 20 animals. Kumara-fed rats had a similar tumor distribution but no tumors in the ear or oral cavity, and a total of 27 tumors among 20 animals, whereas pineapple-fed rats showed a somewhat lower tumor incidence (23/20 animals), including no small intestine lesions. Unexpectedly, a higher tumor incidence, especially of skin tumors, was seen in coconut and taro-fed animals (35/20 and 41/20 animals, respectively). In particular, the incidence of malignant liver tumors and gastrointestinal tumors were significantly increased in the taro-fed group in comparison with the kumara group. PMID:22211787

  17. Hyperosmotic stress induces aquaporin-dependent cell shrinkage, polyphosphate synthesis, amino acid accumulation, and global gene expression changes in Trypanosoma cruzi.

    PubMed

    Li, Zhu-Hong; Alvarez, Vanina E; De Gaudenzi, Javier G; Sant'Anna, Celso; Frasch, Alberto C C; Cazzulo, Juan J; Docampo, Roberto

    2011-12-23

    The protist parasite Trypanosoma cruzi has evolved the ability to transit between completely different hosts and to replicate in adverse environments. In particular, the epimastigote form, the replicative stage inside the vector, is subjected to nutritional and osmotic stresses during its development. In this work, we describe the biochemical and global gene expression changes of epimastigotes under hyperosmotic conditions. Hyperosmotic stress resulted in cell shrinking within a few minutes. Depending on the medium osmolarity, this was followed by lack of volume recovery for at least 2 h or by slow recovery. Experiments with inhibitors, or with cells in which an aquaporin gene (TcAQP1) was knocked down or overexpressed, revealed its importance for the cellular response to hyperosmotic stress. Furthermore, the adaptation to this new environment was shown to involve the regulation of the polyphosphate polymerization state as well as changes in amino acid catabolism to generate compatible osmolytes. A genome-wide transcriptional analysis of stressed parasites revealed down-regulation of genes belonging to diverse functional categories and up-regulation of genes encoding trans-sialidase-like and ribosomal proteins. Several of these changes were confirmed by Northern blot analyses. Sequence analysis of the 3'UTRs of up- and down-regulated genes allowed the identification of conserved structural RNA motifs enriched in each group, suggesting that specific ribonucleoprotein complexes could be of great importance in the adaptation of this parasite to different environments through regulation of transcript abundance. PMID:22039054

  18. Administration of an amino Acid-based regimen for the management of autonomic nervous system dysfunction related to combat-induced illness.

    PubMed

    Shell, William E; Charuvastra, Marcus; Breitstein, Mira; Pavlik, Stephanie L; Charuvastra, Anthony; May, Lawrence; Silver, David S

    2014-01-01

    The etiology and pathophysiology of posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) remains poorly understood. The nutritional deficiencies associated with the altered metabolic processes of PTSD have not previously been studied in detail. This pilot study measured the reduction in symptoms in 21 military veterans reporting moderate to severe symptoms associated with PTSD. Two amino acid-based medical foods specifically formulated with biogenic amines and other nutrients were administered to study subjects targeting specific neurotransmitter deficiencies resulting from altered metabolic activity associated with PTSD. This study included the Physician Checklist - Military (PCL-M), Short Form General Health Survey (SF-36), and Epworth Sleepiness Scale to measure the change in each subject's score after 30 days of administration. An average decrease of 17 points was seen in the PCL-M, indicating a reduction in PTSD symptoms (P < 0.001). The mental health component of the SF-36 showed an average 57% increase in the subjects' mental health rating (P < 0.001). The results of this initial study demonstrate that addressing the increased dietary requirements of PTSD can improve symptoms of the disease while eliminating significant side effects. A larger, double-blind, randomized, placebo-controlled trial is warranted. PMID:25336998

  19. Administration of an Amino Acid–Based Regimen for the Management of Autonomic Nervous System Dysfunction Related to Combat-Induced Illness

    PubMed Central

    Shell, William E; Charuvastra, Marcus; Breitstein, Mira; Pavlik, Stephanie L; Charuvastra, Anthony; May, Lawrence; Silver, David S

    2014-01-01

    The etiology and pathophysiology of posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) remains poorly understood. The nutritional deficiencies associated with the altered metabolic processes of PTSD have not previously been studied in detail. This pilot study measured the reduction in symptoms in 21 military veterans reporting moderate to severe symptoms associated with PTSD. Two amino acid–based medical foods specifically formulated with biogenic amines and other nutrients were administered to study subjects targeting specific neurotransmitter deficiencies resulting from altered metabolic activity associated with PTSD. This study included the Physician Checklist – Military (PCL-M), Short Form General Health Survey (SF-36), and Epworth Sleepiness Scale to measure the change in each subject’s score after 30 days of administration. An average decrease of 17 points was seen in the PCL-M, indicating a reduction in PTSD symptoms (P < 0.001). The mental health component of the SF-36 showed an average 57% increase in the subjects’ mental health rating (P < 0.001). The results of this initial study demonstrate that addressing the increased dietary requirements of PTSD can improve symptoms of the disease while eliminating significant side effects. A larger, double-blind, randomized, placebo-controlled trial is warranted. PMID:25336998

  20. Demonstrating Allotropic Modifications of Sulfur.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McCarty, Jillian L.; Dragojlovic, Veljko

    2002-01-01

    Shows how a common demonstration that consists of slowly heating sulfur powder in a test tube to illustrate sulfur's allotropic modifications can convince students of conclusions about the moon Io which they often find surprising. Describes the demonstration in full. (Author/MM)

  1. Volume efficient sodium sulfur battery

    DOEpatents

    Mikkor, Mati

    1980-01-01

    In accordance with the teachings of this specification, a sodium sulfur battery is formed as follows. A plurality of box shaped sulfur electrodes are provided, the outer surfaces of which are defined by an electrolyte material. Each of the electrodes have length and width dimensions substantially greater than the thicknesses thereof as well as upwardly facing surface and a downwardly facing surface. An electrode structure is contained in each of the sulfur electrodes. A holding structure is provided for holding the plurality of sulfur electrodes in a stacked condition with the upwardly facing surface of one sulfur electrode in facing relationship to the downwardly facing surface of another sulfur electrode thereabove. A small thickness dimension separates each of the stacked electrodes thereby defining between each pair of sulfur electrodes a volume which receives the sodium reactant. A reservoir is provided for containing sodium. A manifold structure interconnects the volumes between the sulfur electrodes and the reservoir. A metering structure controls the flow of sodium between the reservoir and the manifold structure.

  2. SULFUR RETENTION IN COAL ASH

    EPA Science Inventory

    The report gives results of an analytical study to assess the potential for sulfur retention in various types of coal-fired boilers. Results of a field test of 10 industrial coal-fired boilers were used to evaluate the impact on sulfur retention of the operating variables (load a...

  3. Tc52 Amino-Terminal-Domain DNA Carried by Attenuated Salmonella enterica Serovar Typhimurium Induces Protection against a Trypanosoma cruzi Lethal Challenge

    PubMed Central

    Matos, Marina N.; Cazorla, Silvia I.; Bivona, Augusto E.; Morales, Celina; Guzmán, Carlos A.

    2014-01-01

    In this work we immunized mice with DNA encoding full-length Tc52 or its amino- or carboxy-terminal (N- and C-term, respectively) domain carried by attenuated Salmonella as a DNA delivery system. As expected, Salmonella-mediated DNA delivery resulted in low antibody titers and a predominantly Th1 response, as shown by the ratio of IgG2a/IgG1-specific antibodies. Despite modest expression of Tc52 in trypomastigotes, the antibodies elicited by vaccination were able to mediate lysis of the trypomastigotes in the presence of complement and inhibit their invasion of mammal cells in vitro. The strongest functional activity was observed with sera from mice immunized with Salmonella carrying the N-term domain (SN-term), followed by Tc52 (STc52), and the C-term domain (SC-term). All immunized groups developed strong cellular responses, with predominant activation of Th1 cells. However, mice immunized with SN-term showed higher levels of interleukin-10 (IL-10), counterbalancing the inflammatory reaction, and also strong activation of Tc52-specific gamma interferon-positive (IFN-γ+) CD8+ T cells. In agreement with this, although all prototypes conferred protection against infection, immunization with SN-term promoted greater protection than that with SC-term for all parameters tested and slightly better protection than that with STc52, especially in the acute stage of infection. We conclude that the N-terminal domain of Tc52 is the section of the protein that confers maximal protection against infection and propose it as a promising candidate for vaccine development. PMID:25069980

  4. Rapid and sensitive determination of phosphorus-containing amino acid herbicides in soil samples by capillary zone electrophoresis with diode laser-induced fluorescence detection.

    PubMed

    Orejuela, Eva; Silva, Manuel

    2005-12-01

    A straightforward and sensitive method has been developed for the analysis of phosphorus-containing amino acid herbicides (glufosinate and aminomethylphosphonic acid, the major metabolite of glyphosate) in soil samples. For this purpose, the analytical features of two indocyanine fluorescent dyes, sulfoindocyanine succinimidyl ester (Cy5) and 1-ethyl-1-[5-(N-succinimidyl-oxycarbonyl)pentyl]-3,3,3,3-tetramethyl-indodicarbocyanine chloride, as labeling reagents for the determination of these herbicides by CZE with diode LIF detection were investigated. Practical aspects related to the labeling chemistry and CZE separation showed that the two probes behave similarly, Cy5 being the best choice for the determination of these herbicides on account of its higher sensitivity. The optimum procedure includes a derivatization step of the pesticides at 25 degrees C for 30 min and direct injection to CZE analysis, which is conducted within about 14 min using ACN in the running buffer. The lowest detectable analyte concentration ranged from 0.025 to 0.18 microg/L with a precision of 3.6-5.4%. These results indicate that indocyanine fluorescence dyes are useful as rapid and sensitive labels for the determination of these herbicides when compared with typical fluorescein dyes such as FITC and 5-(4,6-dichloro-s-triazin-2-ylamino) fluorescein, because they provide faster labeling reactions even at room temperature and the excess of reagent practically does not interfere the determination. Finally, the Cy5 method was successfully applied to soil samples without a preliminary clean-up procedure, and the herbicides were measured without any interference from coexisting substances. The recoveries of these compounds in these samples at fortification levels of 100-500 ng/g were 90-93%. PMID:16259012

  5. Vibrational analysis of amino acids and short peptides in hydrated media. II. Role of KLLL repeats to induce helical conformations in minimalist LK-peptides.

    PubMed

    Guiffo-Soh, Guy; Hernandez, Belén; Coïc, Yves-Marie; Boukhalfa-Heniche, Fatima-Zohra; Ghomi, Mahmoud

    2007-11-01

    Aqueous solution secondary structures of minimalist LK-peptides, with the generic sequence defined as KLL(KLLL)nKLLK, have been analyzed by means of circular dichroism (CD) and Raman scattering techniques. Our discussion in the present paper is mainly focused on four synthetic peptides (from 5 to 19 amino acids), KLLLK, KLLKLLLKLLK, KLLKLLLKLLLKLLK, and KLLKLLLKLLLKLLLKLLK, corresponding to the repeat unit, and to the peptide chains with the values of n = 1-3, respectively. CD and Raman spectra were analyzed in order to study both structural features of the peptide chains and their capability to form aggregates. On the basis of the obtained results it was concluded that the conformational flexibility of the shortest peptides (5-mer and 11-mer) is high enough to adopt random, beta-type, and helical chains in aqueous solution. However, the 11-mer shows a clear tendency to form beta-strands in phosphate buffer. The conformational equilibrium can be completely shifted to beta-type structures upon increasing ionic strength, i.e., in PBS and tris buffers. This equilibrium can also be shifted toward helical chains in the presence of methanol. Finally, the longest peptides (15-mer and 19-mer) are shown to form alpha-helical chains with an amphipathic character in aqueous solution. The possibility of bundle formation between helical chains is discussed over the temperature-dependent H-D exchange on labile hydrogens and particularly by considering the particular behavior of an intense Raman mode at 1127 cm-1 originating from the leucine residue side chain. The conformational dependence of this mode observed upon selective deuteration has never been documented up to now. PMID:17918991

  6. Sulfur recirculation for increased electricity production in Waste-to-Energy plants.

    PubMed

    Andersson, Sven; Blomqvist, Evalena W; Bäfver, Linda; Jones, Frida; Davidsson, Kent; Froitzheim, Jan; Karlsson, Martin; Larsson, Erik; Liske, Jesper

    2014-01-01

    Sulfur recirculation is a new technology for reducing boiler corrosion and dioxin formation. It was demonstrated in full-scale tests at a Waste to Energy plant in Göteborg (Sweden) during nearly two months of operation. Sulfur was recirculated as sulfuric acid from the flue gas cleaning back to the boiler, thus creating a sulfur loop. The new technology was evaluated by extensive measurement campaigns during operation under normal conditions (reference case) and operation with sulfur recirculation. The chlorine content of both fly ash and boiler ash decreased and the sulfur content increased during the sulfur recirculation tests. The deposit growth and the particle concentration decreased with sulfur recirculation and the dioxin concentration (I-TEQ) of the flue gas was reduced by approximately 25%. Sulfuric acid dew point measurements showed that the sulfuric acid dosage did not lead to elevated SO3 concentrations, which may otherwise induce low temperature corrosion. In the sulfur recirculation corrosion probe exposures, the corrosion rate decreased for all tested materials (16Mo3, Sanicro 28 and Inconel 625) and material temperatures (450 °C and 525 °C) compared to the reference exposure. The corrosion rates were reduced by 60-90%. Sulfur recirculation prevented the formation of transition metal chlorides at the metal/oxide interface, formation of chromate and reduced the presence of zinc in the corrosion products. Furthermore, measured corrosion rates at 525 °C with sulfur recirculation in operation were similar or lower compared to those measured at 450 °C material temperature in reference conditions, which corresponds to normal operation at normal steam temperatures. This implies that sulfur recirculation allows for higher steam data and electricity production without increasing corrosion. PMID:24140194

  7. Assessing Potential Acidification of Marine Archaeological Wood Based on Concentration of Sulfur Species

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    2011-06-22

    The presence of sulfur in marine archaeological wood presents a challenge to conservation. Upon exposure to oxygen, sulfur compounds in waterlogged wooden artifacts are being oxidized, producing sulfuric acid. This speeds the degradation of the wood, potentially damaging specimens beyond repair. Sulfur K-edge x-ray absorption spectroscopy was used to identify the species of sulfur present in samples from the timbers of the Mary Rose, a preserved 16th century warship known to undergo degradation through acidification. The results presented here show that sulfur content varied significantly on a local scale. Only certain species of sulfur have the potential to produce sulfuric acid by contact with oxygen and seawater in situ, such as iron sulfides and elemental sulfur. Organic sulfurs, such as the amino acids cysteine and methionine, may produce acid but are integral parts of the wood's structure and may not be released from the organic matrix. The sulfur species contained in the sample reflect the exposure to oxygen while submerged, and this exposure can differ greatly over time and position. A better understanding of the species pathway to acidifications required, along with its location, in order to suggest a more customized and effective preservation strategy. Waterlogged archaeological wood, frequently in the form of shipwrecks, is being excavated for historical purposes in many countries around the world. Even after extensive efforts towards preservation, scientists are discovering that accumulation of sulfate salts results in acidic conditions on the surfaces of the artifacts. Sulfuric acid degrades structural fibers in the wood by acid hydrolysis of cellulose, accelerating the decomposition of the ship timbers. Determining the sulfur content of waterlogged wood is now of great importance in maritime archaeology. Artifact preservation is often more time consuming and expensive than the original excavation; but it is key to the availability of objects for

  8. 4-Amino-2-arylamino-5-indoloyl/cinnamoythiazoles, analogs of topsentin-class of marine alkaloids, induce apoptosis in HeLa cells.

    PubMed

    Juneja, Manisha; Vanam, Uma; Paranthaman, Sripriya; Bharathan, Asha; Keerthi, Venugopal S; Reena, Justus K; Rajaram, Rama; Rajasekharan, Kallikat N; Karunagaran, Devarajan

    2013-05-01

    Marine organisms provide several biologically active compounds that include alkaloids with high cytotoxic activity but only a few of them have so far reached clinical stage, due partly to their limited supply and complex structural features. In an attempt to develop novel anticancer compounds, we have now synthesized diaminoindoloylthiazoles (4a-c; DIT1-3) and diaminocinnamoylthiazoles (5a,b; DCT1-2) as analogs based on a topsentin scaffold and investigated the cytotoxic and apoptotic activities of these compounds in HeLa cells. The results suggest that diaminoindoloylthiazoles (DIT1-3) inhibit cell growth and among these, DIT3 is the most cytotoxic against HeLa cells (IC50 1 μM). The diaminocinnamoylthiazoles DCT1 and DCT2, which can be viewed as curcumin-diaminothiazole hybrids, also inhibited cell growth but at relatively higher concentrations with IC50 values of 60 and 30 μM, respectively. These compounds induced apoptosis through the intrinsic pathway by reducing the mitochondrial membrane potential and activating caspases, 9 and 3, but not caspase 8. Among the marine alkaloid analogs tested in this study, DIT1-3 are very effective in inducing apoptosis of HeLa cells followed by DCT2 and DCT1. The treated cells were arrested in G2/M phase followed by accumulation of the cells in the Sub G0 phase. The curcumin-diaminothiazole hybrid DCT1 had the maximum effect in downregulating TNF-induced NF-κB activation among the compounds tested in this study. Thus, we demonstrate that diaminoindoloylthiazoles and diaminocinnamoylthiazoles induce apoptosis, regulate cell cycle and NF-κB signaling and thus show promising anticancer effects that warrant further investigation. PMID:23524113

  9. [Amino acid composition evaluation of Pleurotus spp. cultivated in banana leaves].

    PubMed

    Ranzani, M R; Sturion, G L

    1998-12-01

    The protein quality of edible mushrooms besides being species/strain specific, could also vary with the growth substrate. The aim of this work was to determine the amino acid composition of the protein from edible mushrooms--Pleurotus sp. "Florida" (L1), P. ostreatoroseus (L2) and P. sajor-caju (L3), cultivated on banana leaves (BL) single and, mixed with sugar cane bagasse (BLSCB). Total amino acids, cystine and tryptophan were evaluated; the chemical score index and PDCAAS--"protein digestibility-correct amino acid scoring" were calculated. From both substrates, the studied species contain all essential amino acids; in decreasing order, the amino acids in great amounts were glutamic acid, aspartic acid, leucine and lysine. The L1 chemical score was 90.4, with limitation in sulfur and aromatic amino acids when from BL substrate; and, from BLSC substrate the chemical score was 88.7 with limitation in aromatics only. The L2 and L3 was 100, 0, independent of cultivation substrate. The calculated PDCAAS value, considering 90% of recommended digestibility, varied between 80.0-96%. The L1 proteins were limiting in sulfur and aromatic amino acids and had the lowest value of PDCAAS (approximately 80.0) in both substrates; the L3 proteins were limiting in aromatic, sulfur and tryptophan, dependent of cultivation substrate; the L2 proteins had the greatest value of PDCAAS (approximately 96%) and were limiting in aromatic and/or sulfur amino acids, dependent of cultivation substrate. Considering the conditions of this study, the protein of the studied species is incomplete, although of high biological value, comparable to meet. PMID:10347700

  10. Modulation by APGW-amide, an Achatina endogenous inhibitory tetrapeptide, of currents induced by neuroactive compounds on Achatina neurons: amines and amino acids.

    PubMed

    Han, X Y; Salunga, T L; Zhang, W; Takeuchi, H; Matsunami, K

    1997-10-01

    1. Modulatory effects of APGW-amide (Ala-Pro-Gly-Trp-NH2), proposed as an inhibitory neurotransmitter of Achatina neurons, perfused at 3 x 10(-6) M on the currents induced by small-molecule putative neurotransmitters were examined by using Achatina giant neuron types, v-RCDN (ventral-right cerebral distinct neuron), TAN (tonically autoactive neuron) and RAPN (right anterior pallial nerve neuron), under voltage clamp. These putative neurotransmitters were ejected locally to the neuron by brief pneumatic pressure. 2. Outward current (Iout) induced by erythro-beta-hydroxy-L-glutamic acid (erythro-L-BHGA) on v-RCDN, which was probably K+ dependent, was enhanced with membrane conductance (g) increase under APGW-amide. From dose (pressure duration)-response curves of erythro-L-BHGA measured in physiological solution (control curve) and with APGW-amide (drug curve), ED50 values of the two curves were nearly comparable, whereas Emax of the drug curve was significantly larger than that of the other. From a Lineweaver-Burk plot of these data, the cross point of the control line and the drug line was on the abscissa. 3. K(+)-dependent Iout caused by dopamine (DA) on v-RCDN was inhibited with a g increase by APGW-amide. The inhibition of this current caused by APGW-amide was mainly in a noncompetitive and partly uncompetitive manner. 4. 5-Hydroxytryptamine (5-HT) produced an inward current (Iin) with two (fast and slow) components on TAN, which was probably Na+ dependent. The fast component of the Iin was inhibited by APGW-amide. The inhibition was mainly in a noncompetitive manner. 5. The currents induced by acetylcholine, gamma-aminobutyric acid and L-glutamic acid on Achatina neuron types were not affected by APGW-amide. 6. The inhibitory effects of APGW-amide on the Iin (fast component) induced by 5-HT were nearly equipotent or a bit stronger than those on the Iout caused by DA. 7. The g increase produced by APGW-amide would be a cause for inhibiting the Iout induced by DA

  11. The beauty of frost: nano-sulfur assembly via low pressure vapour deposition.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yu; Chen, Lu; Scudiero, Louis; Zhong, Wei-Hong

    2015-11-14

    A low pressure vapour deposition (LPVD) technique is proposed as an environmentally friendly, cost-effective and versatile strategy for fabrication of sulfur nanomaterials. By controlling the characteristics of the deposit substrate for the LPVD, various sulfur-based nanomaterials have been obtained through a substrate-induced self-assembly process. PMID:26383233

  12. Role of endotoxin in acute inflammation induced by gram-negative bacteria: specific inhibition of lipopolysaccharide-mediated responses with an amino-terminal fragment of bactericidal/permeability-increasing protein.

    PubMed Central

    Kohn, F R; Kung, A H

    1995-01-01

    A recombinant 23-kDa amino-terminal fragment of human bactericidal/permeability-increasing protein (rBPI23), a potent lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-binding/neutralizing protein, was used as a probe to assess the role of endotoxin in the acute inflammatory responses elicited by gram-negative bacteria in rat subcutaneous air pouches. In initial experiments, rBPI23 prevented the Escherichia coli O111:B4 LPS-induced accumulation of polymorphonuclear leukocytes (PMN), tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-alpha), and nitrite (a stable end product of nitric oxide formation) in exudate fluids. Significant inhibition of TNF-alpha production was still evident when rBPI23 treatment was delayed for 30 min after LPS instillation. In subsequent experiments, rBPI23 also prevented the nitrite and early (2-h) TNF-alpha accumulation induced by three different strains of formaldehyde-killed gram-negative bacteria (E. coli O7:K1, E. coli O111:B4, and Pseudomonas aeruginosa 12.4.4) but did not inhibit the PMN or late (6-h) TNF-alpha accumulation induced by these bacteria. As with LPS challenge, a significant inhibition of early TNF-alpha production was still evident when rBPI23 treatment was delayed for 30 to 60 min after instillation of killed bacteria. The results indicate that in this experimental model the NO and early TNF-alpha responses to gram-negative bacterial challenge are mediated predominantly by endotoxin, whereas the PMN and late TNF-alpha responses may be mediated by other bacterial components. Moreover, the results indicate that rBPI23 can inhibit the bacterially induced production of certain potentially harmful mediators (TNF-alpha and NO) without entirely blocking the host defense, i.e., PMN response, against the bacteria. PMID:7806373

  13. Photochemical oxidants potentiate yield losses in snap beans attributable to sulfur dioxide

    SciTech Connect

    Heggestad, H.E.; Bennett, J.H.

    1981-08-28

    Field-grown snap beans (Phaseolus vulgaris) were given recurring midday exposures to sulfur dioxide in open-top field chambers containing ambient photochemical oxidants. There was a linear correlation (correlation coefficient = -.99) between increasing concentrations of sulfur dioxide and the yields of snap beans. Synergism was indicated for the mixtures of ambient ozone plus sulfur dioxide, leading to threefold greater yield losses in nonfiltered air than in charcoal-filtered air (to remove the ozone). Even the lowest sulfur dioxide dose in nonfiltered air reduced the yields of Astro, a cultivar that exhibited no visible pollutant-induced foliar injury. 16 referances, 1 figure, 1 table.

  14. Comparative nutrition and metabolism: Explication of open questions with emphasis on protein and amino acids

    PubMed Central

    Baker, David H.

    2005-01-01

    The 20th century saw numerous important discoveries in the nutritional sciences. Nonetheless, many unresolved questions still remain. Fifteen questions dealing with amino acid nutrition and metabolism are posed in this review. The first six deal with the functionality of sulfur amino acids (methionine and cysteine) and related compounds. Other unresolved problems that are discussed include priorities of use for amino acids having multiple functions; interactions among lysine, niacin and tryptophan; amino acid contributions to requirements from gut biosynthesis; the potential for gluconeogenesis to divert amino acids away from protein synthesis; the unique nutritional and metabolic idiosyncrasies of feline species, with emphasis on arginine; controversies surrounding human amino acid requirements; and the potential for maternal diet to influence sex ratio of offspring. PMID:16326801

  15. A propionate-inducible expression system based on the Corynebacterium glutamicum prpD2 promoter and PrpR activator and its application for the redirection of amino acid biosynthesis pathways.

    PubMed

    Plassmeier, Jens K; Busche, Tobias; Molck, Stella; Persicke, Marcus; Pühler, Alfred; Rückert, Christian; Kalinowski, Jörn

    2013-01-20

    A novel expression system for Corynebacterium glutamicum, based on the transcriptional activator of propionate metabolism genes PrpR and its target promoter/operator sequence, was developed and tested. The activator PrpR is co-activated by propionate added to the growth medium. In a minimal medium a propionate concentration of only 1 mg l⁻¹ was found to be sufficient for full induction (up to 120-fold) of its native target, the propionate metabolism operon prpDBC2. Then, an artificial transcription and translation reporter system, using the cat gene encoding chloramphenicol acetyl transferase was constructed and tested. The induction was found to be as fast and as high as in the natural system, reaching its maximal transcriptional induction rate within 2 min and a significant accumulation of Cat protein at around 30 min. The duration of the induced transcription was found to be controllable by the propionate concentration applied. The prpD2 promoter and PrpR activator based expression system revealed very similar characteristics in minimal and complex media, making it ideal for applications in large scale industrial fermentations. As a proof-of-principle, the expression system was employed for the propionate-inducible redirection of metabolites in a lysine-production C. glutamicum strain at the homoserine dehydrogenase (hom) branching point, which resulted in an up to 2.5-fold increase of the concentrations of the three amino acids (threonine, homoserine and isoleucine) in the supernatant. PMID:22982516

  16. Lack of significant inhibitory effects of a plant lignan tracheloside on 2-amino-1-methyl-6-phenylimidazo[4,5-b]pyridine (PhIP)-induced mammary carcinogenesis in female Sprague-Dawley rats.

    PubMed

    Kitamura, Yasuki; Yamagishi, Megumi; Okazaki, Kazushi; Son, Hwa-Young; Imazawa, Takayoshi; Nishikawa, Akiyoshi; Iwata, Toshio; Yamauchi, Yoshie; Kasai, Masaaki; Tsutsumi, Kentaro; Hirose, Masao

    2003-10-28

    Tracheloside, one of the plant lignans which can be extracted from the debris after safflower oil is produced from the seeds of Carthamus tinctorious, is an analogue of another plant lignan, arctiin, the side-chain C-2 of the five-membered ring being changed from a hydrogen to a hydroxyl group. We have already demonstrated that arctiin has chemopreventive effect on mammary carcinogenesis. Therefore, chemopreventive effects of tracheloside on the initiation or post-initiation period of 2-amino-1-methyl-6-phenylimidazo[4,5-b]pyridine (PhIP)-induced mammary carcinogenesis in female rats were examined. For initiation, female Sprague-Dawley (SD) rats at the 6 weeks of age were given intragastric administrations of 100 mg/kg body weight of PhIP once a week for 8 weeks. The animals were treated with 0.2 or 0.02% tracheloside during or after this carcinogen exposure. Control rats were fed basal diet with PhIP initiation or 0.2% tracheloside or basal diet alone without initiation throughout the experimental period. All surviving animals were necropsied at the week 52 of administration. There were no clear treatment-related changes with statistical significance in all parameters for mammary carcinomas measured in this experiment. These results indicate that tracheloside may not exert significant effects on PhIP-induced mammary carcinogenesis at least under the present experiment condition. PMID:14568166

  17. Auxiliary iron-sulfur cofactors in radical SAM enzymes.

    PubMed

    Lanz, Nicholas D; Booker, Squire J

    2015-06-01

    A vast number of enzymes are now known to belong to a superfamily known as radical SAM, which all contain a [4Fe-4S] cluster ligated by three cysteine residues. The remaining, unligated, iron ion of the cluster binds in contact with the α-amino and α-carboxylate groups of S-adenosyl-l-methionine (SAM). This binding mode facilitates inner-sphere electron transfer from the reduced form of the cluster into the sulfur atom of SAM, resulting in a reductive cleavage of SAM to methionine and a 5'-deoxyadenosyl radical. The 5'-deoxyadenosyl radical then abstracts a target substrate hydrogen atom, initiating a wide variety of radical-based transformations. A subset of radical SAM enzymes contains one or more additional iron-sulfur clusters that are required for the reactions they catalyze. However, outside of a subset of sulfur insertion reactions, very little is known about the roles of these additional clusters. This review will highlight the most recent advances in the identification and characterization of radical SAM enzymes that harbor auxiliary iron-sulfur clusters. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled: Fe/S proteins: Analysis, structure, function, biogenesis and diseases. PMID:25597998

  18. Persistent fibrosis in the liver of choline-deficient and iron-supplemented L-amino acid-defined diet-induced nonalcoholic steatohepatitis rat due to continuing oxidative stress after choline supplementation

    SciTech Connect

    Takeuchi-Yorimoto, Ayano; Noto, Takahisa; Yamada, Atsushi; Miyamae, Yoichi; Oishi, Yuji; Matsumoto, Masahiro

    2013-05-01

    Nonalcoholic steatohepatitis (NASH) is characterized by combined pathology of steatosis, lobular inflammation, fibrosis, and hepatocellular degeneration, with systemic symptoms of diabetes or hyperlipidemia, all in the absence of alcohol abuse. Given the therapeutic importance and conflicting findings regarding the potential for healing the histopathologic features of NASH in humans, particularly fibrosis, we investigated the reversibility of NASH-related findings in Wistar rats fed a choline-deficient and iron-supplemented L-amino acid-defined (CDAA) diet for 12 weeks, with a recovery period of 7 weeks, during which the diets were switched to a choline-sufficient and iron-supplemented L-amino acid-defined (CSAA) one. Analysis showed that steatosis and inflammation were significantly resolved by the end of the recovery period, along with decreases in AST and ALT activities within 4 weeks. In contrast, fibrosis remained even after the recovery period, to an extent similar to that in continuously CDAA-fed animals. Real-time reverse transcriptase-polymerase chain reaction, Western blot, and immunohistochemical investigations revealed that expression of some factors indicating oxidative stress (CYP2E1, 4-HNE, and iNOS) were elevated, whereas catalase and SOD1 were decreased, and a hypoxic state and CD34-positive neovascularization were evident even after the recovery period, although the fibrogenesis pathway by activated α-SMA-positive hepatic stellate cells via TGF-β and TIMPs decreased to the CSAA group level. In conclusion, persistent fibrosis was noted after the recovery period of 7 weeks, possibly due to sustained hypoxia and oxidative stress supposedly caused by capillarization. Otherwise, histopathological features of steatosis and inflammation, as well as serum AST and ALT activities, were recovered. - Highlights: ► NASH-like liver lesions are induced in rats by feeding a CDAA diet. ► Steatosis and lobular inflammation are resolved after switching to a

  19. Large Cellular Inclusions Accumulate in Arabidopsis Roots Exposed to Low-Sulfur Conditions1[OPEN

    PubMed Central

    Jackson, Terry L.; Baker, Ginger W.; Wilks, Floyd R.; Popov, Vladimir A.; Mathur, Jaideep; Benfey, Philip N.

    2015-01-01

    Sulfur is vital for primary and secondary metabolism in plant roots. To understand the molecular and morphogenetic changes associated with loss of this key macronutrient, we grew Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) seedlings in low-sulfur conditions. These conditions induced a cascade of cellular events that converged to produce a profound intracellular phenotype defined by large cytoplasmic inclusions. The inclusions, termed low-sulfur Pox, show cell type- and developmental zone-specific localization. Transcriptome analysis suggested that low sulfur causes dysfunction of the glutathione/ascorbate cycle, which reduces flavonoids. Genetic and biochemical evidence indicated that low-sulfur Pox are the result of peroxidase-catalyzed oxidation of quercetin in roots grown under sulfur-depleted conditions. PMID:26099270

  20. The amino acid 419 in HC-Pro is involved in the ability of PVY isolate N605 to induce necrotic symptoms on potato tubers.

    PubMed

    Glais, Laurent; Faurez, Florence; Tribodet, Michel; Boulard, Frédéric; Jacquot, Emmanuel

    2015-10-01

    The ability to induce the potato tuber necrosis ringspot disease (PTNRD) is a property shared by PVY isolates belonging to different groups (e.g. PVY(N) and PVY(O)) and variants (e.g. PVY(NTN) and PVY(N)-W). The identification of viral molecular determinant(s) involved in the expression of PTNRD symptoms is essential for (i) an easier detection of tuber necrosis isolates and (ii) an improvement of our knowledge on the epidemiology of this potato disease. A reverse genetic approach associated with a biological typing of a collection of PVY chimeras and mutants indicated that residue E419 of the HC-Pro protein is linked to the ability of PVY to induce tuber necrosis on four PTNRD-susceptible potato cultivars. Indeed, the substitution of the N-type glutamic acid (E) in O-type aspartic acid (D) at position 419 in the HC-Pro cistron prevents the expression of tuber necrosis on infected tubers without reducing the virulence of the corresponding E/D419 mutant. This result opens opportunities for the future studies on potato/PVY interactions. PMID:26071382

  1. Sulfur cycling and metabolism of phototrophic and filamentous sulfur bacteria

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Guerrero, R.; Brune, D.; Poplawski, R.; Schmidt, T. M.

    1985-01-01

    Phototrophic sulfur bacteria taken from different habitate (Alum Rock State Park, Palo Alto salt marsh, and Big Soda Lake) were grown on selective media, characterized by morphological and pigment analysis, and compared with bacteria maintained in pure culture. A study was made of the anaerobic reduction of intracellular sulfur globules by a phototrophic sulfur bacterium (Chromatium vinosum) and a filamentous aerobic sulfur bacterium (Beggiatoa alba). Buoyant densities of different bacteria were measured in Percoll gradients. This method was also used to separate different chlorobia in mixed cultures and to assess the relative homogeneity of cultures taken directly or enriched from natural samples (including the purple bacterial layer found at a depth of 20 meters at Big Soda Lake.) Interactions between sulfide oxidizing bacteria were studied.

  2. Sulfur condensation in Claus catalyst

    SciTech Connect

    Schoffs, G.R.

    1985-02-01

    The heterogeneous reactions in which catalyst deactivation by pore plugging occur are listed and include: coke formation in petroleum processing, especially hydrocracking and hydrodesulfurization catalysts; steam reforming and methnation catalysts; ammonia synthesis catalyst; and automobile exhause catalysts. The authors explain how the Claus process converts hydrogen sulfide produced by petroleum desulfurization units and gas treatment processes into elemental sulfur and water. More than 15 million tons of sulfur are recovered annually by this process. Commercial Claus plants appear to operate at thermodynamic equilibrium. Depending on the H2S content of the feed and the number of reactors, total H2S conversion to elemental sulfur can exceed 95%.

  3. Deep sulfur cycle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shimizu, N.; Mandeville, C. W.

    2009-12-01

    Geochemical cycle of sulfur in near-surface reservoirs has been a subject of intense studies for decades. It has been shown that sulfur isotopic compositions of sedimentary sulfides and sulfates record interactions of the atmosphere, hydrosphere, biosphere and lithosphere, with δ34S of sedimentary sulfides continuously decreasing from 0‰ toward present-day values of ~-30 to -40‰ over the Phanerozoic (e.g., Canfield, 2004). It has also been shown that microbial reduction of the present-day seawater sulfate (δ34S=+21‰) results in large shifts in isotopic compositions of secondary pyrites in altered oceanic crust (to δ34S=-70‰: Rouxel et al., 2009). How much of these near surface isotopic variations survive during deep geochemical cycle of sulfur interacting with the mantle infinite reservoir with δ34S=0‰? Could extent of their survival be used as a tracer of processes and dynamics involved in deep geochemical cycle? As a first step toward answering these questions, δ34S was determined in-situ using a Cameca IMS 1280 ion microprobe at Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution in materials representing various domains of deep geochemical cycle. They include pyrites in altered MORB as potential subducting materials and pyrites in UHP eclogites as samples that have experienced subduction zone processes, and mantle-derived melts are represented by olivine-hosted melt inclusions in MORB and those in IAB, and undegassed submarine OIB glasses. Salient features of the results include: (1) pyrites in altered MORB (with O. Rouxel; from ODP site 801 and ODP Hole 1301B) range from -70 to +19‰, (2) pyrites in UHP eclogites from the Western Gneiss Region, Norway (with B. Hacker and A. Kylander-Clark) show a limited overall range from -3.4 to + 2.8‰ among five samples, with one of them covering almost the entire range, indicating limited scale lengths of isotopic equilibration during subduction, (3) olivine-hosted melt inclusions in arc basalts from Galunggung (-2

  4. Production of sulfur from sulfur dioxide obtained from flue gas

    SciTech Connect

    Miller, R.

    1989-06-06

    This patent describes a regenerable process for recovery of elemental sulfur from a gas containing sulfur dioxide comprising the steps of: contacting the gas with an aqueous, alkaline reaction medium containing sodium sulfite in concentration sufficient so that a slurry containing solid sodium sulfide is formed to react sulfur dioxide with sodium sulfite to form a solution containing dissolved sodium pyrosulfite and sodium sulfite; separating sulfur dioxide from the solution produced to leave a residual mixture containing water, sodium sulfite and a sodium pyrosulfite, the amount of sulfur dioxide separated being equal to about one-third the amount of sulfur dioxide which reacted with sodium sulfite; adding, in substantial absence of air, sufficient water and sodium bicarbonate to the residual mixture to react with the dissolved sodium pyrsulfide and form a slurry of solid sodium sulfite suspended in the resulting aqueous, alkaline reaction medium and gaseous carbon dioxide; separating the gaseous carbon dioxide; separating the solid sodium sulfite from the aqueous alkaline reaction medium and recycling the separated reaction medium; reducing the separated sodium sulfite to sodium sulfide; adding the sodium sulfide to an aqueous reaction medium containing sodium bicarbonate and, in the substantial absence of air, carbonating the resulting mixture with the gaseous carbon dioxide to form a slurry of solid particles of sodium bicarbonate dispersed in an aqueous reactor medium containing sodium bicarbonate, along with a gas composed primarily of hydrogen sulfide.

  5. [Changes in the content of neuromediator amino acids in the brain of mice with a convulsive syndrome induced by the hyperactivation of CNS cholinergic structures].

    PubMed

    Astrov, V V; Kutsenko, S A

    1990-03-01

    Methods of thin-layer chromatography with the following elution and photometry were used to determine the amount of taurin, glycin and glutamate in mouse brain 20 and 60 min after injections of arecolin (10 mg/kg), nicotin (9 mg/kg), fluorostigmin (3 mg/kg) and picrotoxin (8 mg/kg). It was determined that seizures induced by these drugs are followed by raising of the levels of taurin (on 20-70%), glycin (after 60 min on 30-70%), glutamate (after 20 min--on 70-60%). The level of glutamate was lowered (by 40-80%) to 60 min after injections of nicotin, fluorostigmin and picrotoxin. PMID:1973059

  6. Sulfuric Acid in the Venus Clouds

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sill, G. T.

    1972-01-01

    The visible and ultraviolet transmission features of a thin layer of elemental bromine and hydrobromic acid dissolved in sulfuric acid somewhat resemble the Venus spectrum, up to 14 microns. The chemical process postulated for forming sulfuric acid involves the oxidation of sulfur and its compounds to sulfuric acid through the agency of elemental bromine, produced by the photolytic decomposition of hydrogen bromide.

  7. RNA-Seq Analysis of Sulfur-Deprived Chlamydomonas Cells Reveals Aspects of Acclimation Critical for Cell Survival[W

    PubMed Central

    González-Ballester, David; Casero, David; Cokus, Shawn; Pellegrini, Matteo; Merchant, Sabeeha S.; Grossman, Arthur R.

    2010-01-01

    The Chlamydomonas reinhardtii transcriptome was characterized from nutrient-replete and sulfur-depleted wild-type and snrk2.1 mutant cells. This mutant is null for the regulatory Ser-Thr kinase SNRK2.1, which is required for acclimation of the alga to sulfur deprivation. The transcriptome analyses used microarray hybridization and RNA-seq technology. Quantitative RT-PCR evaluation of the results obtained by these techniques showed that RNA-seq reports a larger dynamic range of expression levels than do microarray hybridizations. Transcripts responsive to sulfur deprivation included those encoding proteins involved in sulfur acquisition and assimilation, synthesis of sulfur-containing metabolites, Cys degradation, and sulfur recycling. Furthermore, we noted potential modifications of cellular structures during sulfur deprivation, including the cell wall and complexes associated with the photosynthetic apparatus. Moreover, the data suggest that sulfur-deprived cells accumulate proteins with fewer sulfur-containing amino acids. Most of the sulfur deprivation responses are controlled by the SNRK2.1 protein kinase. The snrk2.1 mutant exhibits a set of unique responses during both sulfur-replete and sulfur-depleted conditions that are not observed in wild-type cells; the inability of this mutant to acclimate to S deprivation probably leads to elevated levels of singlet oxygen and severe oxidative stress, which ultimately causes cell death. The transcriptome results for wild-type and mutant cells strongly suggest the occurrence of massive changes in cellular physiology and metabolism as cells become depleted for sulfur and reveal aspects of acclimation that are likely critical for cell survival. PMID:20587772

  8. Method of preparing graphene-sulfur nanocomposites for rechargeable lithium-sulfur battery electrodes

    DOEpatents

    Liu, Jun; Lemmon, John P; Yang, Zhenguo; Cao, Yuliang; Li, Xiaolin

    2015-04-07

    A method of preparing a graphene-sulfur nanocomposite for a cathode in a rechargeable lithium-sulfur battery comprising thermally expanding graphite oxide to yield graphene layers, mixing the graphene layers with a first solution comprising sulfur and carbon disulfide, evaporating the carbon disulfide to yield a solid nanocomposite, and grinding the solid nanocomposite to yield the graphene-sulfur nanocomposite. Rechargeable-lithium-sulfur batteries having a cathode that includes a graphene-sulfur nanocomposite can exhibit improved characteristics. The graphene-sulfur nanocomposite can be characterized by graphene sheets with particles of sulfur adsorbed to the graphene sheets. The sulfur particles have an average diameter of less than 50 nm.

  9. Terahertz broadband spectroscopic investigations of amino acid

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, De-chong; Zhang, Liang-liang; Zhong, Hua; Zhang, Cun-lin

    2011-08-01

    We present an experimental terahertz (THz) spectroscopic investigation of amino acid using an air-breakdown-coherent detection (ABCD) system. The strong and ultra-broadband (0.1 to 10THz) terahertz radiations generated by two-color laser induced air plasma and measured by coherent heterodyne detection. The broadband THz reflection spectra of L-Lysine (C6H14N2O2) and L-Arginine (C6H14N2O2) are obtained. To solve the phase-retrieval problem in RTDS, the absorption signatures of the materials are extracted directly from the first derivative of the relative reflectance with respect to frequency. The absorption features of the two amino acids are characterized in the 0.5~6 THz region. It is found that both the two amino acids have an absorption peak at 1.10 THz.

  10. Microphysical simulations of sulfur burdens from stratospheric sulfur geoengineering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    English, J. M.; Toon, O. B.; Mills, M. J.

    2012-01-01

    Recent microphysical studies suggest that geoengineering by continuous stratospheric injection of SO2 gas may be limited by the growth of the aerosols. We study the efficacy of SO2, H2SO4 and aerosol injections on aerosol mass and optical depth using a three-dimensional general circulation model with sulfur chemistry and sectional aerosol microphysics (WACCM/CARMA). We find increasing injection rates of SO2 in a narrow band around the equator to have limited efficacy while broadening the injecting zone as well as injecting particles instead of SO2 gas increases the sulfate burden for a given injection rate, in agreement with previous work. We find that injecting H2SO4 gas instead of SO2 does not discernibly alter sulfate size or mass, in contrast with a previous study using a plume model with a microphysical model. However, the physics and chemistry in aircraft plumes, which are smaller than climate model grid cells, need to be more carefully considered. We find equatorial injections increase aerosol optical depth in the Northern Hemisphere more than the Southern Hemisphere, potentially inducing regional climate changes. We also find significant perturbations to tropospheric aerosol for all injections studied, particularly in the upper troposphere and near the poles, where sulfate burden increases by up to 100 times. This enhanced burden could have implications for tropospheric radiative forcing and chemistry. These results highlight the need to mitigate greenhouse gas emissions through means other than geoengineering, and to further study geoengineering before it can be seriously considered as a climate intervention option.

  11. Toxicology of sulfur in ruminants: review

    SciTech Connect

    Kandylis, K.

    1984-10-01

    This review deals with the toxicology of sulfur in ruminants including toxicity, neurotoxic effects, and mechanism of toxic action of hydrogen sulfide, clinical signs, and treatment. It will report effects of excessive intake of sulfur by ruminants on feed intake, animal performance, ruminal digestion and motility, rumination, and other physiological functions. Poisoning of animals with sulfur from industrial emissions (sulfur dioxide) also is discussed. Excessive quantities of dietary sulfur (above .3 to .4%) as sulfate or elemental sulfur may cause toxic effects and in extreme cases can be fatal. The means is discussed whereby consumption of excessive amounts of sulfur leads to toxic effects. 53 references, 1 table.

  12. Graphene-sulfur nanocomposites for rechargeable lithium-sulfur battery electrodes

    DOEpatents

    Liu, Jun; Lemmon, John P; Yang, Zhenguo; Cao, Yuiliang; Li, Xiaolin

    2014-06-17

    Rechargeable lithium-sulfur batteries having a cathode that includes a graphene-sulfur nanocomposite can exhibit improved characteristics. The graphene-sulfur nanocomposite can be characterized by graphene sheets with particles of sulfur adsorbed to the graphene sheets. The sulfur particles have an average diameter less than 50 nm..

  13. 40 CFR 50.17 - National primary ambient air quality standards for sulfur oxides (sulfur dioxide).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... standards for sulfur oxides (sulfur dioxide). 50.17 Section 50.17 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL....17 National primary ambient air quality standards for sulfur oxides (sulfur dioxide). (a) The level of the national primary 1-hour annual ambient air quality standard for oxides of sulfur is 75...

  14. 40 CFR 50.5 - National secondary ambient air quality standard for sulfur oxides (sulfur dioxide).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... standard for sulfur oxides (sulfur dioxide). 50.5 Section 50.5 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL....5 National secondary ambient air quality standard for sulfur oxides (sulfur dioxide). (a) The level... than 0.05 ppm shall be rounded up). (b) Sulfur oxides shall be measured in the ambient air as...

  15. 40 CFR 50.17 - National primary ambient air quality standards for sulfur oxides (sulfur dioxide).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... standards for sulfur oxides (sulfur dioxide). 50.17 Section 50.17 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL....17 National primary ambient air quality standards for sulfur oxides (sulfur dioxide). (a) The level of the national primary 1-hour annual ambient air quality standard for oxides of sulfur is 75...

  16. 40 CFR 50.17 - National primary ambient air quality standards for sulfur oxides (sulfur dioxide).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... standards for sulfur oxides (sulfur dioxide). 50.17 Section 50.17 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL....17 National primary ambient air quality standards for sulfur oxides (sulfur dioxide). (a) The level of the national primary 1-hour annual ambient air quality standard for oxides of sulfur is 75...

  17. 40 CFR 50.17 - National primary ambient air quality standards for sulfur oxides (sulfur dioxide).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... standards for sulfur oxides (sulfur dioxide). 50.17 Section 50.17 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL....17 National primary ambient air quality standards for sulfur oxides (sulfur dioxide). (a) The level of the national primary 1-hour annual ambient air quality standard for oxides of sulfur is 75...

  18. 40 CFR 50.5 - National secondary ambient air quality standard for sulfur oxides (sulfur dioxide).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... standard for sulfur oxides (sulfur dioxide). 50.5 Section 50.5 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL....5 National secondary ambient air quality standard for sulfur oxides (sulfur dioxide). (a) The level... than 0.05 ppm shall be rounded up). (b) Sulfur oxides shall be measured in the ambient air as...

  19. 40 CFR 50.5 - National secondary ambient air quality standard for sulfur oxides (sulfur dioxide).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... standard for sulfur oxides (sulfur dioxide). 50.5 Section 50.5 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL....5 National secondary ambient air quality standard for sulfur oxides (sulfur dioxide). (a) The level... than 0.05 ppm shall be rounded up). (b) Sulfur oxides shall be measured in the ambient air as...

  20. 40 CFR 50.17 - National primary ambient air quality standards for sulfur oxides (sulfur dioxide).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... standards for sulfur oxides (sulfur dioxide). 50.17 Section 50.17 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL....17 National primary ambient air quality standards for sulfur oxides (sulfur dioxide). (a) The level of the national primary 1-hour annual ambient air quality standard for oxides of sulfur is 75...

  1. 40 CFR 50.5 - National secondary ambient air quality standard for sulfur oxides (sulfur dioxide).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... standard for sulfur oxides (sulfur dioxide). 50.5 Section 50.5 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL....5 National secondary ambient air quality standard for sulfur oxides (sulfur dioxide). (a) The level... than 0.05 ppm shall be rounded up). (b) Sulfur oxides shall be measured in the ambient air as...

  2. Occurrence of Purple Sulfur Bacteria in a Sewage Treatment Lagoon 1

    PubMed Central

    Holm, H. W.; Vennes, J. W.

    1970-01-01

    The ecology of purple sulfur bacteria in a sewage oxidation lagoon was investigated. Chemical changes in the lagoon were investigated by monitoring biochemical oxygen demand (BOD5), sulfide, sulfate, phosphate, total carbohydrates, volatile acids, alkalinity, and pH. Lagoon water temperatures were observed daily. Microbial ecological relationships were deduced by enumerating coliforms, total bacteria other than anaerobes [Tryptone Glucose Extract (TGE) agar], methane formers such as Methanobacterium formicicum, sulfate reducers, purple sulfur bacteria, and algae. Finally, two strains of purple sulfur bacteria were characterized. Two populations, purple sulfur bacteria and total bacteria (TGE agar), reached maximal concentrations in the warmest part of the 1967 summer. Purple sulfur bacteria reached maximal numbers as concentrations of sulfide and volatile acids were depleted, whereas carbohydrates and alkalinity remained unchanged. Low sulfate levels, which were not limiting for sulfate reducers, may be attributable to storage of sulfur within purple sulfur bacteria. No biological, chemical, or physical agent was linked to the removal of coliforms. The increase of algae in the late summer of 1967 may have been related to the low organic content of the lagoon during this period. Although lagoon pH (7.7 to 8.2) was favorable for purple sulfur bacterial growth, temperatures and sulfides were not optimal in the lagoon for these organisms. Chromatium vinosum and Thiocapsa floridana (the predominant lagoon purple sulfur organism in 1967 and 1968) utilized certain carbohydrates, amino acids, volatile acids, and Krebs cycle intermediates. Also purple sulfur bacteria lowered BOD levels as demonstrated by the growth of T. floridana in sterilized sewage. PMID:4917194

  3. Sulfur diagenesis in marine sediments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Goldhaber, M.

    1985-01-01

    Bacterial sulfate reduction occurs in all marine sediments that contain organic matter. Aqueous sulfide (HS-, H2S), one of the initial products of bacterial sulfide reduction, is extremely reactive with iron bearing minerals: sulfur is fixed into sediments as iron sulfide (first FeS and then Fe2S2). A working definition is given of sulfur diagenesis in marine sediments. Controls and consequences of sulfate reduction rates in marine sediments are examined.

  4. Alkali metal/sulfur battery

    DOEpatents

    Anand, Joginder N.

    1978-01-01

    Alkali metal/sulfur batteries in which the electrolyte-separator is a relatively fragile membrane are improved by providing means for separating the molten sulfur/sulfide catholyte from contact with the membrane prior to cooling the cell to temperatures at which the catholyte will solidify. If the catholyte is permitted to solidify while in contact with the membrane, the latter may be damaged. The improvement permits such batteries to be prefilled with catholyte and shipped, at ordinary temperatures.

  5. Site specific oxidation of amino acid residues in rat lens γ-crystallin induced by low-dose γ-irradiation.

    PubMed

    Kim, Ingu; Saito, Takeshi; Fujii, Norihiko; Kanamoto, Takashi; Chatake, Toshiyuki; Fujii, Noriko

    2015-10-30

    Although cataracts are a well-known age-related disease, the mechanism of their formation is not well understood. It is currently thought that eye lens proteins become abnormally aggregated, initially causing clumping that scatters the light and interferes with focusing on the retina, and ultimately resulting in a cataract. The abnormal aggregation of lens proteins is considered to be triggered by various post-translational modifications, such as oxidation, deamidation, truncation and isomerization, that occur during the aging process. Such modifications, which are also generated by free radical and reactive oxygen species derived from γ-irradiation, decrease crystallin solubility and lens transparency, and ultimately lead to the development of a cataract. In this study, we irradiated young rat lenses with low-dose γ-rays and extracted the water-soluble and insoluble protein fractions. The water-soluble and water-insoluble lens proteins were digested with trypsin, and the resulting peptides were analyzed by LC-MS. Specific oxidation sites of methionine, cysteine and tryptophan in rat water-soluble and -insoluble γE and γF-crystallin were determined by one-shot analysis. The oxidation sites in rat γE and γF-crystallin resemble those previously identified in γC and γD-crystallin from human age-related cataracts. Our study on modifications of crystallins induced by ionizing irradiation may provide useful information relevant to human senile cataract formation. PMID:26385181

  6. Sulfur minimization in bacterial leaching

    SciTech Connect

    Seth, R.; Prasad, D.; Henry, J.G.

    1996-11-01

    The production of sewage biosolids in Ontario in 1989 was estimated to be 7 million m{sup 3} of wet sludge per year. Of this amount, land application accounts for between 20 and 30% of the total. Unfortunately, the use of sewage biosolids on agricultural land is often prohibited because of heavy metal contamination of the biosolids. High cost and operational problems have made chemical methods of metal extraction unattractive. Consequently, microbiological methods of leaching of heavy metals have been studied for over a decade. A relatively simple microbiological process has been investigated in recent years in flask level experiments and recently in a semicontinuous system. The process exploits nonacidophilic and acidophilic indigenous thiobacilli to extract heavy metals from sewage biosolids. These thiobacilli use elemental sulfur as the energy source, producing sulfuric acid. However, the resulting decontaminated biosolids can cause environmental problems like acidification of the soil, when acid is generated from the residual sulfur in the biosolids. The present study examines the possibility of reducing the amount of sulfur added in batch and semicontinuous bacterial leaching systems, and maximizing sulfur oxidation efficiency, thereby reducing the residual sulfur in leached biosolids.

  7. Plant sulfur and Big Data.

    PubMed

    Kopriva, Stanislav; Calderwood, Alexander; Weckopp, Silke C; Koprivova, Anna

    2015-12-01

    Sulfur is an essential mineral nutrient for plants, therefore, the pathways of its uptake and assimilation have been extensively studied. Great progress has been made in elucidation of the individual genes and enzymes and their regulation. Sulfur assimilation has been intensively investigated by -omics technologies and has been target of several genome wide genetic approaches. This brought a significant step in our understanding of the regulation of the pathway and its integration in cellular metabolism. However, the large amount of information derived from other experiments not directly targeting sulfur has also brought new and exciting insights into processes affecting sulfur homeostasis. In this review we will integrate the findings of the targeted experiments with those that brought unintentional progress in sulfur research, and will discuss how to synthesize the large amount of information available in various repositories into a meaningful dissection of the regulation of a specific metabolic pathway. We then speculate how this might be used to further advance knowledge on control of sulfur metabolism and what are the main questions to be answered. PMID:26706053

  8. 2-Amino-N6-hydroxyadenine induces gene/point mutations and multiple-locus mutations, but not multilocus deletion mutations, in the ad-3 region of a two-component heterokaryon of Neurospora crassa.

    PubMed

    de Serres, F J; Brockman, H E; Overton, L K

    1991-08-01

    The mutagenicity of 2-amino-N6-hydroxyadenine (AHA) has been studied in Neurospora crassa by treating a two-component heterokaryon (H-12) and recovering specific-locus mutations induced in the ad-3 region. This assay system permits the identification of ad-3A and/or ad-3B mutants resulting from gene/point mutations, multilocus deletion mutations, and multiple-locus mutations of various genotypes, involving one or both loci. Genetic characterization of the ad-3 mutants recovered from experiments with AHA in H-12 shows that 98.9% (270/273) of the ad-3 mutants are gene/point mutations (ad-3R), 1.1% (3/270) are unknowns, and none is a multilocus deletion mutation (ad-3IR). Among the gene/point mutations, 3.3% (9/273) are multiple-locus mutations (gene/point mutations with a closely-linked recessive lethal mutation [ad-3R + RLCL]). Another 25.3% (69/273) are multiple-locus mutations with a recessive lethal mutation located elsewhere in the genome [ad-3R + RL]. Heterokaryon tests for allelic complementation among the ad-3BR mutants showed that 90.8% (139/153) of the mutants were complementing, and 20.3% (31/153) were leaky. In addition, 32.5% (38/117) of the ad-3AR mutants were leaky. These data are consistent with the hypothesis that AHA produces specific-locus mutations in the ad-3 region of N. crassa by base-pair substitution. The data from the present experiments are compared with the data for 2-aminopurine (2AP)-induced ad-3 mutants in H-12 (de Serres and Brockman, 1991). Whereas, 2AP is a weak mutagen in H-12, AHA is extremely potent (Brockman et al., 1987). In contrast with 2AP, AHA induces ad-3 mutants exclusively by gene/point mutation in H-12. We conclude that whereas AHA induces ad-3 mutants predominantly by AT to GC base-pair transitions, 2AP induces ad-3 mutants by a wide variety of mechanisms including: (1) AT to GC and GC to AT base-pair transitions, (2) frameshift mutations, (3) other, as yet unidentified, intragenic alterations, (4) small multilocus

  9. Accumulation of seleno-amino acids in legume and grass plant species grown in selenium-laden soils

    SciTech Connect

    Wu, L.; Guo, X.; Banuelos, G.S.

    1997-03-01

    Seleno-amino acid accumulation was studied for two legume and two grass species grown in Selenium (Se)-laden soils. An antagonistic relationship was found between the tissue Se-amino acid concentration and the corresponding sulfur-amino acid concentration. This relationship demonstrates a competitive interaction between Se and sulfate at the amino acid synthesis level. The nonsulfur-containing amino acids were not substantially affected by the increase of tissue Se concentration. Sour clover (Melilotus indica L.) was able to accumulate much greater tissue Se concentration than the other three species. Tissue methionine concentration of sour clover, rabbitfoot grass (Polypogon monspeliensis L.), and tall fescue (Festuca arundinacea Schreb.) was not significantly affected by the increase of tissue selenomethionine concentration, but a highly significant negative correlation was found in alfalfa (Medicago sativa L.). This discrepancy suggests that a less antagonistic effect on sulfur-amino acids under the increase of Se-amino acid analogues in the tissue might be able to minimize Se toxicity to the plant. Both Se-methylselenocysteine (nonprotein amino acid) and selenomethionine (protein amino acid) accumulated in the plants when grown in Se-laden soils. Possible effects of these Se-amino acids accumulated by plants on animal health should be tested before the plants are used for forage supplementation.

  10. Microbial pathways in colonic sulfur metabolism and links with health and disease

    PubMed Central

    Carbonero, Franck; Benefiel, Ann C.; Alizadeh-Ghamsari, Amir H.; Gaskins, H. Rex

    2012-01-01

    Sulfur is both crucial to life and a potential threat to health. While colonic sulfur metabolism mediated by eukaryotic cells is relatively well studied, much less is known about sulfur metabolism within gastrointestinal microbes. Sulfated compounds in the colon are either of inorganic (e.g., sulfates, sulfites) or organic (e.g., dietary amino acids and host mucins) origin. The most extensively studied of the microbes involved in colonic sulfur metabolism are the sulfate-reducing bacteria (SRB), which are common colonic inhabitants. Many other microbial pathways are likely to shape colonic sulfur metabolism as well as the composition and availability of sulfated compounds, and these interactions need to be examined in more detail. Hydrogen sulfide is the sulfur derivative that has attracted the most attention in the context of colonic health, and the extent to which it is detrimental or beneficial remains in debate. Several lines of evidence point to SRB or exogenous hydrogen sulfide as potential players in the etiology of intestinal disorders, inflammatory bowel diseases (IBDs) and colorectal cancer in particular. Generation of hydrogen sulfide via pathways other than dissimilatory sulfate reduction may be as, or more, important than those involving the SRB. We suggest here that a novel axis of research is to assess the effects of hydrogen sulfide in shaping colonic microbiome structure. Clearly, in-depth characterization of the microbial pathways involved in colonic sulfur metabolism is necessary for a better understanding of its contribution to colonic disorders and development of therapeutic strategies. PMID:23226130

  11. Production of sulfur trioxide, sulfuric acid and oleum

    SciTech Connect

    Daley, W.D.; Jaffe, J.

    1987-02-17

    A process is described for the production of sulfur trioxide which comprises the steps: (a) feeding a gas mixture having a sulfur dioxide partial pressure of at least about 0.5 atmosphere, an oxygen partial pressure of at least about 0.37 atmosphere, an oxygen:-sulfur dioxide mole ratio of between about 0.7:1 and about 1:1. It also has a total pressure between about 1 atmosphere and about 10 atmospheres in plug flow through a bed of a conversion catalyst selected from the group consisting of vanadium oxide conversion catalysts and platinum conversion catalysts; (b) cooling the catalyst bed to produce a first zone wherein the gas mixture increases in temperature from the inlet temperature to a temperature between about 475/sup 0/C. and about 575/sup 0/C., a second zone wherein the temperature is substantially constant at a temperature between about 450/sup 0/C. and about 575/sup 0/C. and a third zone wherein the temperature is declining from a temperature between about 450/sup 0/C. and about 575/sup 0/C. to a temperature between about 325/sup 0/C. and about 400/sup 0/C., (c) passing the gas mixture successively through the first, second and third zones with sufficient contact times in the second and third zones to produce a product gas mixture with a sulfur trioxide to sulfur dioxide mole ratio of at least about 99:1, (d) cooling the product gas mixture to a temperature between about 35/sup 0/C. and about 45/sup 0/C. to produce liquid sulfur trioxide, and (e) separating the liquid sulfur trioxide from the remaining gas stream.

  12. Amino acid analysis.

    PubMed

    Crabb, J W; West, K A; Dodson, W S; Hulmes, J D

    2001-05-01

    Amino acid analysis (AAA) is one of the best methods to quantify peptides and proteins. Two general approaches to quantitative AAA exist, namely, classical postcolumn derivatization following ion-exchange chromatography and precolumn derivatization followed by reversed-phase HPLC (RP-HPLC). Excellent instrumentation and several specific methodologies are available for both approaches, and both have advantages and disadvantages. This unit focuses on picomole-level AAA of peptides and proteins using the most popular precolumn-derivatization method, namely, phenylthiocarbamyl amino acid analysis (PTC-AAA). It is directed primarily toward those interested in establishing the technology with a modest budget. PTC derivatization and analysis conditions are described, and support and alternate protocols describe additional techniques necessary or useful for most any AAA method--e.g., sample preparation, hydrolysis, instrument calibration, data interpretation, and analysis of difficult or unusual residues such as cysteine, tryptophan, phosphoamino acids, and hydroxyproline. PMID:18429107

  13. Process for removing sulfur and sulfur compounds from the effluent of industrial processes

    SciTech Connect

    Sims, A.V.

    1981-03-10

    Sulfur dioxide in the stack gas from an industrial process is converted to elemental sulfur in a claus reactor at low temperature to produce sulfur fume. The sulfur is condensed by direct heat transfer with a continuously flowing countercurrent recirculating catalyst and a substantially sulfur dioxide-free gas is discharged. Catalyst and condensed sulfur are fed into the top of a sulfur recovery column and heated in the top of the column by direct heat transfer with a countercurrent stream of recycle gas. The sulfur and catalyst descend into a vaporization zone of the column where sulfur is vaporized. The vaporized sulfur is carried by the recycle gas back towards the top of the column and condensed to a fume by incoming sulfur bearing catalyst. The sulfur fume is carried from the top of the column in cold recycle gas. Hot catalyst from the vaporization section of the column is cooled by recycle gas entering the bottom of the column. Sulfur fume is recovered conventionally. Regenerated catalyst from the column is returned to the sulfur dioxide reactor. Claus plant tail gas with air passes into the base of an incinerator and passes countercurrent to recycled heat transfer solids and is oxidized to convert sulfur and sulfur bearing compounds to sulfur dioxide. The sulfur dioxide is then converted to sulfur in the process just described.

  14. Optimizing stratospheric sulfur geoengineering by seasonally changing sulfur injections

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Laakso, Anton; Partanen, Antti-Ilari; Kokkola, Harri; Lehtinen, Kari; Korhonen, Hannele

    2015-04-01

    Solar radiation management (SRM) by stratospheric sulfur injection has been shown to have potential in counteracting global warming if reducing of greenhouse gases has not been achieved fast enough and if climate warming will continue. Injecting large amounts of sulfate particles to the stratosphere would increase the reflectivity of the atmosphere and less sunlight would reach the surface. However, the effectivity (per injected sulphur mass unit) of this kind of geoengineering would decrease when amount of injected sulfur is increased. When sulfur concentration increases, stratospheric particles would grow to larger sizes which have larger gravitational settling velocity and which do not reflect radiation as efficiently as smaller particles. In many previous studies, sulfur has been assumed to be injected along the equator where yearly mean solar intensity is the highest and from where sulfur is spread equally to both hemispheres. However, the solar intensity will change locally during the year and sulfate has been assumed to be injected and spread to the hemisphere also during winter time, when the solar intensity is low. Thus sulfate injection could be expected to be more effective, if sulfur injection area is changed seasonally. Here we study effects of the different SRM injection scenarios by using two versions of the MPI climate models. First, aerosol spatial and temporal distributions as well as the resulting radiative properties from the SRM are defined by using the global aerosol-climate model ECHAM6.1-HAM2.2-SALSA. After that, the global and regional climate effects from different injection scenarios are predicted by using the Max Planck Institute's Earth System Model (MPI-ESM). We carried out simulations, where 8 Tg of sulfur is injected as SO2 to the stratosphere at height of 20-22 km in an area ranging over a 20 degree wide latitude band. Results show that changing the sulfur injection area seasonally would lead to similar global mean shortwave

  15. Selective catalytic reduction of sulfur dioxide to elemental sulfur

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, Wei; Flytzani-Stephanopoulos, M.; Sarofim, A.F.

    1992-01-01

    Elemental sulfur recovery from SO[sub 2]-containing gas streams is highly attractive as it produces a saleable. Product and no waste to dispose of. However, commercially available schemes are complex and involve multi-stage reactors, such as, most notably in the Resox (reduction of SO[sub 2] with coke) and Claus plants(reaction of SO[sub 2] with H[sub 2]S over catalyst). This project win investigate a cerium oxide catalyst for the single-stage selective reduction SO[sub 2] to elemental sulfur by a reductant, such as carbon monoxide. Cerium oxide has been identified as a superior catalyst for SO[sub 2] reduction by CO to elemental sulfur because of its high activity and high selectivity to sulfur over COS over a wide temperature range(400--650C). Kinetic and parametric studies of SO[sub 2] reduction planned over various CeO[sub 2]-formulations will provide the necessary basis for development of a simplified process, a single-stage elemental sulfur recovery scheme from variable concentration gas streams. A first apparent application is treatment of regenerator off-gases in power plants using regenerative flue gas desulfurization. Such a simple catalytic converter may offer the long-sought Claus-alternative'' for coal-fired power plant applications.

  16. Smaller sulfur molecules promise better lithium-sulfur batteries.

    PubMed

    Xin, Sen; Gu, Lin; Zhao, Na-Hong; Yin, Ya-Xia; Zhou, Long-Jie; Guo, Yu-Guo; Wan, Li-Jun

    2012-11-14

    The lithium-sulfur battery holds a high theoretical energy density, 4-5 times that of today's lithium-ion batteries, yet its applications have been hindered by poor electronic conductivity of the sulfur cathode and, most importantly, the rapid fading of its capacity due to the formation of soluble polysulfide intermediates (Li(2)S(n), n = 4-8). Despite numerous efforts concerning this issue, combatting sulfur loss remains one of the greatest challenges. Here we show that this problem can be effectively diminished by controlling the sulfur as smaller allotropes. Metastable small sulfur molecules of S(2-4) were synthesized in the confined space of a conductive microporous carbon matrix. The confined S(2-4) as a new cathode material can totally avoid the unfavorable transition between the commonly used large S(8) and S(4)(2-). Li-S batteries based on this concept exhibit unprecedented electrochemical behavior with high specific capacity, good cycling stability, and superior rate capability, which promise a practicable battery with high energy density for applications in portable electronics, electric vehicles, and large-scale energy storage systems. PMID:23101502

  17. Multicistronic lentiviral vector-mediated striatal gene transfer of aromatic L-amino acid decarboxylase, tyrosine hydroxylase, and GTP cyclohydrolase I induces sustained transgene expression, dopamine production, and functional improvement in a rat model of Parkinson's disease.

    PubMed

    Azzouz, Mimoun; Martin-Rendon, Enca; Barber, Robert D; Mitrophanous, Kyriacos A; Carter, Emma E; Rohll, Jonathan B; Kingsman, Susan M; Kingsman, Alan J; Mazarakis, Nicholas D

    2002-12-01

    Parkinson's disease (PD) is a neurodegenerative disorder characterized by the selective loss of dopaminergic neurons in the substantia nigra. This loss leads to complete dopamine depletion in the striatum and severe motor impairment. It has been demonstrated previously that a lentiviral vector system based on equine infectious anemia virus (EIAV) gives rise to highly efficient and sustained transduction of neurons in the rat brain. Therefore, a dopamine replacement strategy using EIAV has been investigated as a treatment in the 6-hydroxydopamine (6-OHDA) animal model of PD. A self-inactivating EIAV minimal lentiviral vector that expresses tyrosine hydroxylase (TH), aromatic amino acid dopa decarboxylase (AADC), and GTP cyclohydrolase 1 (CH1) in a single transcription unit has been generated. In cultured striatal neurons transduced with this vector, TH, AADC, and CH1 proteins can all be detected. After stereotactic delivery into the dopamine-denervated striatum of the 6-OHDA-lesioned rat, sustained expression of each enzyme and effective production of catecholamines were detected, resulting in significant reduction of apomorphine-induced motor asymmetry compared with control animals (p < 0.003). Expression of each enzyme in the striatum was observed for up to 5 months after injection. These data indicate that the delivery of three catecholaminergic synthetic enzymes by a single lentiviral vector can achieve functional improvement and thus open the potential for the use of this vector for gene therapy of late-stage PD patients. PMID:12451130

  18. The C2 protein of tomato yellow leaf curl Sardinia virus acts as a pathogenicity determinant and a 16-amino acid domain is responsible for inducing a hypersensitive response in plants.

    PubMed

    Matić, Slavica; Pegoraro, Mattia; Noris, Emanuela

    2016-04-01

    The role of the C2 protein in the pathogenicity of tomato yellow leaf curl Sardinia virus (TYLCSV) was investigated. Here we report that Agrobacterium-mediated transient expression of TYLCSV C2 resulted in a strong hypersensitive response (HR) in Nicotiana benthamiana, N. tabacum, and Arabidopsis thaliana, with induction of plant cell death and production of H2O2. Since HR is not evident in plants infected by TYLCSV, it is expected that TYLCSV encodes a gene (or genes) that counters this response. HR was partially counteracted by co-agroinfiltration of TYLCSV V2 and Rep, leading to chlorotic reaction, with no HR development. Considering that the corresponding C2 protein of the closely related tomato yellow leaf curl virus (TYLCV) did not induce HR, alignment of the C2 proteins of TYLCSV and TYLCV were carried out and a hypervariable region of 16 amino acids was identified. Its role in the induction of HR was demonstrated using TYLCSV-TYLCV C2 chimeric genes, encoding two TYLCSV C2 variants with a complete (16 aa) or a partial (10 aa only) swap of the corresponding sequence of TYLCV C2. Furthermore, using NahG transgenic N. benthamiana lines compromised in the accumulation of salicylic acid (SA), a key regulator of HR, only a chlorotic response occurred in TYLCSV C2-infiltrated tissue, indicating that SA participates in such plant defense process. These findings demonstrate that TYLCSV C2 acts as a pathogenicity determinant and induces host defense responses controlled by the SA pathway. PMID:26826600

  19. The amino-terminal portion of CD1 of the adenovirus E1A proteins is required to induce susceptibility to tumor necrosis factor cytolysis in adenovirus-infected mouse cells.

    PubMed

    Duerksen-Hughes, P J; Hermiston, T W; Wold, W S; Gooding, L R

    1991-03-01

    Previous work by our laboratory and others has shown that mouse cells normally resistant to tumor necrosis factor can be made sensitive to the cytokine by the expression of adenovirus E1A. The E1A gene can be introduced by either infection or transfection, and either of the two major E1A proteins, 289R or 243R, can induce this sensitivity. The E1A proteins are multifunctional and modular, with specific domains associated with specific functions. Here, we report that the CD1 domain of E1A is required to induce susceptibility to tumor necrosis factor cytolysis in adenovirus-infected mouse C3HA fibroblasts. Amino acids C terminal to residue 60 and N terminal to residue 36 are not necessary for this function. This conclusion is based on 51Cr-release assays for cytolysis in cells infected with adenovirus mutants with deletions in various portions of E1A. These E1A mutants are all in an H5dl309 background and therefore they lack the tumor necrosis factor protection function provided by the 14.7-kilodalton (14.7K) protein encoded by region E3. Western blot (immunoblot) analysis indicated that most of the mutant E1A proteins were stable in infected C3HA cells, although with certain large deletions the E1A proteins were unstable. The region between residues 36 and 60 is included within but does not precisely correlate with domains in E1A that have been implicated in nuclear localization, enhancer repression, cellular immortalization, cell transformation in cooperation with ras, induction of cellular DNA synthesis and proliferation, induction of DNA degradation, and binding to the 300K protein and the 105K retinoblastoma protein. PMID:1825340

  20. Mutagenicity, Stable DNA Adducts, and Abasic Sites Induced in Salmonella by Phananthro[3,4-b]- and Phenanthro[4,3-b]thiophenes, Sulfur Analogs of Benzo[c]phenanthrene

    EPA Science Inventory

    Sulfur-containing polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (thia-PAHs or thiaarenes) are common constituents of air pollution and cigarette smoke, yet little is known of the biological significance of exposure to these compounds. Some are mutagenic and carcinogenic, but only a few have ...