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Sample records for inducible stat1 binding

  1. Histone deacetylase inhibitors block IFNγ-induced STAT1 phosphorylation.

    PubMed

    Ginter, Torsten; Bier, Carolin; Knauer, Shirley K; Sughra, Kalsoom; Hildebrand, Dagmar; Münz, Tobias; Liebe, Theresa; Heller, Regine; Henke, Andreas; Stauber, Roland H; Reichardt, Werner; Schmid, Johannes A; Kubatzky, Katharina F; Heinzel, Thorsten; Krämer, Oliver H

    2012-07-01

    Signal transducer and activator of transcription 1 (STAT1) is important for innate and adaptive immunity. Histone deacetylase inhibitors (HDACi) antagonize unbalanced immune functions causing chronic inflammation and cancer. Phosphorylation and acetylation regulate STAT1 and different IFNs induce phosphorylated STAT1 homo-/heterodimers, e.g. IFNα activates several STATs whereas IFNγ only induces phosphorylated STAT1 homodimers. In transformed cells HDACi trigger STAT1 acetylation linked to dephosphorylation by the phosphatase TCP45. It is unclear whether acetylation differentially affects STAT1 activated by IFNα or IFNγ, and if cellular responses to both cytokines depend on a phosphatase-dependent inactivation of acetylated STAT1. Here, we report that HDACi counteract IFN-induced phosphorylation of a critical tyrosine residue in the STAT1 C-terminus in primary cells and hematopoietic cells. STAT1 mutants mimicking a functionally inactive DNA binding domain (DBD) reveal that the number of acetylation-mimicking sites in STAT1 determines whether STAT1 is recruited to response elements after stimulation with IFNγ. Furthermore, we show that IFNα-induced STAT1 heterodimers carrying STAT1 molecules mimicking acetylation bind cognate DNA and provide innate anti-viral immunity. IFNγ-induced acetylated STAT1 homodimers are though inactive, suggesting that heterodimerization and complex formation can rescue STAT1 lacking a functional DBD. Apparently, the type of cytokine determines how acetylation affects the nuclear entry and DNA binding of STAT1. Our data contribute to a better understanding of STAT1 regulation by acetylation. PMID:22425562

  2. Constitutive and IFN-gamma-induced nuclear import of STAT1 proceed through independent pathways.

    PubMed

    Meyer, Thomas; Begitt, Andreas; Lödige, Inga; van Rossum, Marleen; Vinkemeier, Uwe

    2002-02-01

    STAT1 functions as both a constitutive transcriptional regulator and, in response to cytokine stimulation of cells, as an inducible tyrosine-phosphorylated transcription factor. Here, we identify and characterize a non-transferable nuclear targeting sequence in the STAT1 DNA-binding domain. This conserved signal is critical for the interferon-gamma (IFN-gamma)-induced nuclear import of phosphorylated STAT1 dimers and requires adjacent positively charged and hydrophobic residues for functioning. Additionally, the constitutive nucleocytoplasmic shuttling of STAT1 in the absence of IFN-gamma stimulation is revealed. Nuclear import and export of unphosphorylated STAT1 are demonstrated to be sensitive towards wheat germ agglutinin and to occur independently of the import receptor p97. Loss-of-function mutations of the dimer-specific import signal block nuclear entry of tyrosine-phosphorylated STAT1, which in turn also prevents induction of cytokine-inducible target genes. Nevertheless, nuclear import of unphosphorylated STAT1 continues and the STAT1-dependent constitutive expression of caspases and the tumor necrosis factor-alpha-mediated induction of apoptosis proceed unaltered. Thus, tyrosine-phosphorylated and unphosphorylated STAT1 molecules shuttle via independent pathways to distinct sets of target genes. PMID:11823427

  3. IFN-γ induces lipogenesis in mouse mesangial cells via the JAK2/STAT1 pathway.

    PubMed

    Hao, Jun; Zhang, Yu-jun; Lv, Xin; Xu, Ning; Liu, Qin-juan; Zhao, Song; Feng, Xiao-juan; Xing, Ling-ling; Kang, Peng-peng; Li, Gui-ying; Liu, Shu-xia

    2013-04-15

    The objective is to investigate the effect of high mobility group box-1 (HMGB1) on lipid deposition in γ-interferon (IFN-γ)-stimulated mouse mesangial cell line (MMC) and to determine whether the Janus kinase 2 and signal transducer and activator of transcription 1 (JAK2/STAT1) signaling pathway plays an important role in this process. We employed a control group, an IFN-γ stimulation group, and an IFN-γ + AG490 (JAK2 inhibitor) group. RNA interference aimed at sterol regulatory element-binding protein-1 (SREBP-1) or HMGB1 was used to investigate the effect of these proteins on IFN-γ-induced lipid deposition. Western blotting was used to detect phospho (p)-JAK2, JAK2, p-STAT1, STAT1, SREBP-1, fatty acid synthase (FAS), and HMGB1 protein expression. RT-PCR was used to detect SREBP-1, FAS, and HMGB1 mRNA. Oil Red O staining and the triglyceride assay were used to detect lipid deposition and triglyceride content. Results were as follows: 1) IFN-γ increased MMC cell lipid deposition, triglyceride content, and p-JAK2, p-STAT1, SREBP-1, and FAS expression; 2) SREBP-1 inhibition prevented FAS upregulation and attenuated IFN-γ-induced MMC cell lipid deposition and triglyceride content; 3) HMGB1 upregulated SREBP-1 and FAS mRNA and protein levels, which increased lipid deposition in MMC cells. Small interfering RNA-mediated inhibition of HMGB1 decreased SREBP-1 and FAS expression and lipid accumulation; 4) AG490 decreased upregulation of HMGB1 and p-JAK2/p-STAT1, as well as IFN-γ-induced lipogenesis. In conclusion, the JAK2/STAT1 pathway mediates IFN-γ-induced lipogenesis in MMC cells through regulation of HMGB1/SREBP-1/FAS. PMID:23407880

  4. Inducible, Dose-Adjustable and Time-Restricted Reconstitution of Stat1 Deficiency In Vivo

    PubMed Central

    Leitner, Nicole R.; Lassnig, Caroline; Rom, Rita; Heider, Susanne; Bago-Horvath, Zsuzsanna; Eferl, Robert; Müller, Simone; Kolbe, Thomas; Kenner, Lukas; Rülicke, Thomas; Strobl, Birgit; Müller, Mathias

    2014-01-01

    Signal transducer and activator of transcription (STAT) 1 is a key player in interferon (IFN) signaling, essential in mediating host defense against viruses and other pathogens. STAT1 levels are tightly regulated and loss- or gain-of-function mutations in mice and men lead to severe diseases. We have generated a doxycycline (dox) -inducible, FLAG-tagged Stat1 expression system in mice lacking endogenous STAT1 (i.e. Stat1ind mice). We show that STAT1 expression depends on the time and dose of dox treatment in primary cells and a variety of organs isolated from Stat1ind mice. In bone marrow-derived macrophages, a fraction of the amount of STAT1 present in WT cells is sufficient for full expression of IFN-induced genes. Dox-induced STAT1 established protection against virus infections in primary cells and mice. The availability of the Stat1ind mouse model will enable an examination of the consequences of variable amounts of STAT1. The model will also permit the study of STAT1 dose-dependent and reversible functions as well as of STAT1's contributions to the development, progression and resolution of disease. PMID:24489749

  5. Lupus Risk Variant Increases pSTAT1 Binding and Decreases ETS1 Expression

    PubMed Central

    Lu, Xiaoming; Zoller, Erin E.; Weirauch, Matthew T.; Wu, Zhiguo; Namjou, Bahram; Williams, Adrienne H.; Ziegler, Julie T.; Comeau, Mary E.; Marion, Miranda C.; Glenn, Stuart B.; Adler, Adam; Shen, Nan; Nath, Swapan K.; Stevens, Anne M.; Freedman, Barry I.; Tsao, Betty P.; Jacob, Chaim O.; Kamen, Diane L.; Brown, Elizabeth E.; Gilkeson, Gary S.; Alarcón, Graciela S.; Reveille, John D.; Anaya, Juan-Manuel; James, Judith A.; Sivils, Kathy L.; Criswell, Lindsey A.; Vilá, Luis M.; Alarcón-Riquelme, Marta E.; Petri, Michelle; Scofield, R. Hal; Kimberly, Robert P.; Ramsey-Goldman, Rosalind; Joo, Young Bin; Choi, Jeongim; Bae, Sang-Cheol; Boackle, Susan A.; Graham, Deborah Cunninghame; Vyse, Timothy J.; Guthridge, Joel M.; Gaffney, Patrick M.; Langefeld, Carl D.; Kelly, Jennifer A.; Greis, Kenneth D.; Kaufman, Kenneth M.; Harley, John B.; Kottyan, Leah C.

    2015-01-01

    Genetic variants at chromosomal region 11q23.3, near the gene ETS1, have been associated with systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE), or lupus, in independent cohorts of Asian ancestry. Several recent studies have implicated ETS1 as a critical driver of immune cell function and differentiation, and mice deficient in ETS1 develop an SLE-like autoimmunity. We performed a fine-mapping study of 14,551 subjects from multi-ancestral cohorts by starting with genotyped variants and imputing to all common variants spanning ETS1. By constructing genetic models via frequentist and Bayesian association methods, we identified 16 variants that are statistically likely to be causal. We functionally assessed each of these variants on the basis of their likelihood of affecting transcription factor binding, miRNA binding, or chromatin state. Of the four variants that we experimentally examined, only rs6590330 differentially binds lysate from B cells. Using mass spectrometry, we found more binding of the transcription factor signal transducer and activator of transcription 1 (STAT1) to DNA near the risk allele of rs6590330 than near the non-risk allele. Immunoblot analysis and chromatin immunoprecipitation of pSTAT1 in B cells heterozygous for rs6590330 confirmed that the risk allele increased binding to the active form of STAT1. Analysis with expression quantitative trait loci indicated that the risk allele of rs6590330 is associated with decreased ETS1 expression in Han Chinese, but not other ancestral cohorts. We propose a model in which the risk allele of rs6590330 is associated with decreased ETS1 expression and increases SLE risk by enhancing the binding of pSTAT1. PMID:25865496

  6. Ebola Virus VP24 Binds Karyopherin α1 and Blocks STAT1 Nuclear Accumulation

    PubMed Central

    Reid, St. Patrick; Leung, Lawrence W.; Hartman, Amy L.; Martinez, Osvaldo; Shaw, Megan L.; Carbonnelle, Caroline; Volchkov, Viktor E.; Nichol, Stuart T.; Basler, Christopher F.

    2006-01-01

    Ebola virus (EBOV) infection blocks cellular production of alpha/beta interferon (IFN-α/β) and the ability of cells to respond to IFN-α/β or IFN-γ. The EBOV VP35 protein has previously been identified as an EBOV-encoded inhibitor of IFN-α/β production. However, the mechanism by which EBOV infection inhibits responses to IFNs has not previously been defined. Here we demonstrate that the EBOV VP24 protein functions as an inhibitor of IFN-α/β and IFN-γ signaling. Expression of VP24 results in an inhibition of IFN-induced gene expression and an inability of IFNs to induce an antiviral state. The VP24-mediated inhibition of cellular responses to IFNs correlates with the impaired nuclear accumulation of tyrosine-phosphorylated STAT1 (PY-STAT1), a key step in both IFN-α/β and IFN-γ signaling. Consistent with this proposed function for VP24, infection of cells with EBOV also confers a block to the IFN-induced nuclear accumulation of PY-STAT1. Further, VP24 is found to specifically interact with karyopherin α1, the nuclear localization signal receptor for PY-STAT1, but not with karyopherin α2, α3, or α4. Overexpression of VP24 results in a loss of karyopherin α1-PY-STAT1 interaction, indicating that the VP24-karyopherin α1 interaction contributes to the block to IFN signaling. These data suggest that VP24 is likely to be an important virulence determinant that allows EBOV to evade the antiviral effects of IFNs. PMID:16698996

  7. Fludarabine-induced immunosuppression is associated with inhibition of STAT1 signaling.

    PubMed

    Frank, D A; Mahajan, S; Ritz, J

    1999-04-01

    Fludarabine is a nucleoside analog used in the treatment of hematologic malignancies that can induce severe and prolonged immunosuppression. Although it can be incorporated into the DNA of dividing cells, fludarabine is also a potent inhibitor of cells with a low growth fraction, thus it must have other mechanisms of action. STAT1, which is activated in response to many lymphocyte-activating cytokines including the interferons, is essential for cell-mediated immunity, as the absence of this protein is associated with prominent defects in the ability to control viral infections. Here we show that fludarabine, but not the immunosuppressant cyclosporine A, inhibits the cytokine-induced activation of STAT1 and STAT1-dependent gene transcription in normal resting or activated lymphocytes. Fludarabine caused a specific depletion of STAT1 protein (and mRNA) but not of other STATs. This loss of STAT1 was also seen in cells from patients treated with fludarabine in vivo. Brief exposure to fludarabine led to a sustained loss of STAT1, analogous to the prolonged period of immunosuppression induced by exposure to the drug in vivo. Thus, STAT1 may be a useful target in the development of new immunosuppressive and antineoplastic agents. PMID:10202937

  8. STAT1:DNA sequence-dependent binding modulation by phosphorylation, protein:protein interactions and small-molecule inhibition

    PubMed Central

    Bonham, Andrew J.; Wenta, Nikola; Osslund, Leah M.; Prussin, Aaron J.; Vinkemeier, Uwe; Reich, Norbert O.

    2013-01-01

    The DNA-binding specificity and affinity of the dimeric human transcription factor (TF) STAT1, were assessed by total internal reflectance fluorescence protein-binding microarrays (TIRF-PBM) to evaluate the effects of protein phosphorylation, higher-order polymerization and small-molecule inhibition. Active, phosphorylated STAT1 showed binding preferences consistent with prior characterization, whereas unphosphorylated STAT1 showed a weak-binding preference for one-half of the GAS consensus site, consistent with recent models of STAT1 structure and function in response to phosphorylation. This altered-binding preference was further tested by use of the inhibitor LLL3, which we show to disrupt STAT1 binding in a sequence-dependent fashion. To determine if this sequence-dependence is specific to STAT1 and not a general feature of human TF biology, the TF Myc/Max was analysed and tested with the inhibitor Mycro3. Myc/Max inhibition by Mycro3 is sequence independent, suggesting that the sequence-dependent inhibition of STAT1 may be specific to this system and a useful target for future inhibitor design. PMID:23180800

  9. Potential role of 8-oxoguanine DNA glycosylase 1 as a STAT1 coactivator in endotoxin-induced inflammatory response.

    PubMed

    Kim, Hong Sook; Kim, Byung-Hak; Jung, Joo Eun; Lee, Chang Seok; Lee, Hyun Gyu; Lee, Jung Weon; Lee, Kun Ho; You, Ho Jin; Chung, Myung-Hee; Ye, Sang-Kyu

    2016-04-01

    Human 8-oxoguanine DNA glycosylase 1 (OGG1) is the major DNA repair enzyme that plays a key role in excision of oxidative damaged DNA bases such as 8-oxoguainine (8-oxoG). Recent studies suggest another function of OGG1, namely that it may be involved in the endotoxin- or oxidative stress-induced inflammatory response. In this study, we investigated the role of OGG1 in the inflammatory response. OGG1 expression is increased in the organs of endotoxin-induced or myelin oligodendrocyte glycoprotein (MOG)-immunized mice and immune cells, resulting in induction of the expression of pro-inflammatory mediators at the transcriptional levels. Biochemical studies showed that signal transducer and activator of transcription 1 (STAT1) plays a key role in endotoxin-induced OGG1 expression and inflammatory response. STAT1 regulates the transcriptional activity of OGG1 through recruiting and binding to the gamma-interferon activation site (GAS) motif of the OGG1 promoter region, and chromatin remodeling by acetylation and dimethylation of lysine-14 and -4 residues of histone H3. In addition, OGG1 acts as a STAT1 coactivator and has transcriptional activity in the presence of endotoxin. The data presented here identifies a novel mechanism, and may provide new therapeutic strategies for the treatment of endotoxin-mediated inflammatory diseases. PMID:26496208

  10. Leishmania donovani amastigotes impair gamma interferon-induced STAT1alpha nuclear translocation by blocking the interaction between STAT1alpha and importin-alpha5.

    PubMed

    Matte, Christine; Descoteaux, Albert

    2010-09-01

    The protozoan parasite Leishmania donovani, the etiological agent of visceral leishmaniasis, is renowned for its capacity to sabotage macrophage functions and signaling pathways stimulated by activators such as gamma interferon (IFN-gamma). Our knowledge of the strategies utilized by L. donovani to impair macrophage responsiveness to IFN-gamma remains fragmentary. In the present study, we investigated the impact of an infection by the amastigote stage of L. donovani on IFN-gamma responses and signaling via the Janus kinase (JAK)-signal transducer and activator of transcription (STAT) pathway in mouse bone marrow-derived macrophages. The levels of IFN-gamma-induced expression of major histocompatibility complex class II and inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS) were strongly reduced in L. donovani amastigote-infected macrophages. As the expression of those genes is mediated by the transcription factors STAT1alpha and IFN regulatory factor 1 (IRF-1), we investigated their activation in amastigote-infected macrophages treated with IFN-gamma. We found that whereas STAT1alpha protein levels and the levels of phosphorylation on Tyr701 and Ser727 were normal, IRF-1 expression was inhibited in infected macrophages. This inhibition of IRF-1 expression correlated with a defective nuclear translocation of STAT1alpha, and further analyses revealed that the IFN-gamma-induced STAT1alpha association with the nuclear transport adaptor importin-alpha5 was compromised in L. donovani amastigote-infected macrophages. Taken together, our results provide evidence for a novel mechanism used by L. donovani amastigotes to interfere with IFN-gamma-activated macrophage functions and provide a better understanding of the strategies deployed by this parasite to ensure its intracellular survival. PMID:20566692

  11. STAT1β Is Not Dominant Negative and Is Capable of Contributing to Gamma Interferon-Dependent Innate Immunity

    PubMed Central

    Semper, Christian; Leitner, Nicole R.; Lassnig, Caroline; Parrini, Matthias; Mahlakõiv, Tanel; Rammerstorfer, Michael; Lorenz, Karin; Rigler, Doris; Müller, Simone; Kolbe, Thomas; Vogl, Claus; Rülicke, Thomas; Staeheli, Peter; Decker, Thomas; Müller, Mathias

    2014-01-01

    The transcription factor STAT1 is essential for interferon (IFN)-mediated immunity in humans and mice. STAT1 function is tightly regulated, and both loss- and gain-of-function mutations result in severe immune diseases. The two alternatively spliced isoforms, STAT1α and STAT1β, differ with regard to a C-terminal transactivation domain, which is absent in STAT1β. STAT1β is considered to be transcriptionally inactive and to be a competitive inhibitor of STAT1α. To investigate the functions of the STAT1 isoforms in vivo, we generated mice deficient for either STAT1α or STAT1β. As expected, the functions of STAT1α and STAT1β in IFN-α/β- and IFN-λ-dependent antiviral activity are largely redundant. In contrast to the current dogma, however, we found that STAT1β is transcriptionally active in response to IFN-γ. In the absence of STAT1α, STAT1β shows more prolonged IFN-γ-induced phosphorylation and promoter binding. Both isoforms mediate protective, IFN-γ-dependent immunity against the bacterium Listeria monocytogenes, although with remarkably different efficiencies. Our data shed new light on the potential contributions of the individual STAT1 isoforms to STAT1-dependent immune responses. Knowledge of STAT1β's function will help fine-tune diagnostic approaches and help design more specific strategies to interfere with STAT1 activity. PMID:24710278

  12. The Ebola Virus Interferon Antagonist VP24 Directly Binds STAT1 and Has a Novel, Pyramidal Fold

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Adrianna P. P.; Bornholdt, Zachary A.; Liu, Tong; Abelson, Dafna M.; Lee, David E.; Li, Sheng; Woods, Virgil L.; Saphire, Erica Ollmann

    2012-01-01

    Ebolaviruses cause hemorrhagic fever with up to 90% lethality and in fatal cases, are characterized by early suppression of the host innate immune system. One of the proteins likely responsible for this effect is VP24. VP24 is known to antagonize interferon signaling by binding host karyopherin α proteins, thereby preventing them from transporting the tyrosine-phosphorylated transcription factor STAT1 to the nucleus. Here, we report that VP24 binds STAT1 directly, suggesting that VP24 can suppress at least two distinct branches of the interferon pathway. Here, we also report the first crystal structures of VP24, derived from different species of ebolavirus that are pathogenic (Sudan) and nonpathogenic to humans (Reston). These structures reveal that VP24 has a novel, pyramidal fold. A site on a particular face of the pyramid exhibits reduced solvent exchange when in complex with STAT1. This site is above two highly conserved pockets in VP24 that contain key residues previously implicated in virulence. These crystal structures and accompanying biochemical analysis map differences between pathogenic and nonpathogenic viruses, offer templates for drug design, and provide the three-dimensional framework necessary for biological dissection of the many functions of VP24 in the virus life cycle. PMID:22383882

  13. The HIV Matrix Protein p17 Subverts Nuclear Receptors Expression and Induces a STAT1-Dependent Proinflammatory Phenotype in Monocytes

    PubMed Central

    Renga, Barbara; Francisci, Daniela; D'Amore, Claudio; Schiaroli, Elisabetta; Mencarelli, Andrea; Cipriani, Sabrina

    2012-01-01

    Background Long-term remission of HIV-1 disease can be readily achieved by combinations of highly effective antiretroviral therapy (HAART). However, a residual persistent immune activation caused by circulating non infectious particles or viral proteins is observed under HAART and might contribute to an higher risk of non-AIDS pathologies and death in HIV infected persons. A sustained immune activation supports lipid dysmetabolism and increased risk for development of accelerated atehrosclerosis and ischemic complication in virologically suppressed HIV-infected persons receiving HAART. Aim While several HIV proteins have been identified and characterized for their ability to maintain immune activation, the role of HIV-p17, a matrix protein involved in the viral replication, is still undefined. Results Here, we report that exposure of macrophages to recombinant human p17 induces the expression of proinflammatory and proatherogenic genes (MCP-1, ICAM-1, CD40, CD86 and CD36) while downregulating the expression of nuclear receptors (FXR and PPARγ) that counter-regulate the proinflammatory response and modulate lipid metabolism in these cells. Exposure of macrophage cell lines to p17 activates a signaling pathway mediated by Rack-1/Jak-1/STAT-1 and causes a promoter-dependent regulation of STAT-1 target genes. These effects are abrogated by sera obtained from HIV-infected persons vaccinated with a p17 peptide. Ligands for FXR and PPARγ counteract the effects of p17. Conclusions The results of this study show that HIV p17 highjacks a Rack-1/Jak-1/STAT-1 pathway in macrophages, and that the activation of this pathway leads to a simultaneous dysregulation of immune and metabolic functions. The binding of STAT-1 to specific responsive elements in the promoter of PPARγ and FXR and MCP-1 shifts macrophages toward a pro-atherogenetic phenotype characterized by high levels of expression of the scavenger receptor CD36. The present work identifies p17 as a novel target in HIV

  14. STAT1 signaling modulates HIV-1-induced inflammatory responses and leukocyte transmigration across the blood-brain barrier.

    PubMed

    Chaudhuri, Anathbandhu; Yang, Bo; Gendelman, Howard E; Persidsky, Yuri; Kanmogne, Georgette D

    2008-02-15

    The relationship among neuroinflammation, blood-brain barrier (BBB) dysfunction, and progressive HIV-1 infection as they affect the onset and development of neuroAIDS is incompletely understood. One possible link is signal transducers and activators of transcription (STATs) pathways. These respond to proinflammatory and regulatory factors and could affect neuroinflammatory responses induced from infected cells and disease-affected brain tissue. Our previous works demonstrated that HIV-1 activates pro-inflammatory and interferon-alpha-inducible genes in human brain microvascular endothelial cells (HBMECs) and that these genes are linked to the Janus kinase (JAK)/STAT pathway. We now demonstrate that HIV-1 activates STAT1, induces IL-6 expression, and diminishes expression of claudin-5, ZO-1, and ZO-2 in HBMECs. The STAT1 inhibitor, fludarabine, blocked HIV-1-induced IL-6, diminished HIV-1-induced claudin-5 and ZO-1 down-regulation, and blocked HIV-1- and IL-6-induced monocyte migration across a BBB model. Enhanced expression and activation of STAT1 and decreased claudin-5 were observed in microvessels from autopsied brains of patients with HIV-1-associated dementia. These data support the notion that STAT1 plays an integral role in HIV-1-induced BBB damage and is relevant to viral neuropathogenesis. Inhibition of STAT1 activation could provide a unique therapeutic strategy to attenuate HIV-1-induced BBB compromise and as such improve clinical outcomes. PMID:18003888

  15. Short interfering RNA against STAT1 attenuates cisplatin-induced ototoxicity in the rat by suppressing inflammation

    PubMed Central

    Kaur, T; Mukherjea, D; Sheehan, K; Jajoo, S; Rybak, L P; Ramkumar, V

    2011-01-01

    Cisplatin is widely used for treating various solid tumors. However, this drug produces dose-limiting ototoxicity and nephrotoxicity, which significantly reduce the quality of life of cancer patients. While nephrotoxicity could be alleviated by diuresis, there is currently no approved treatment for hearing loss. Previous studies show that the ROS and inflammation are major contributors to cisplatin-induced hearing loss. In this study, we show that ROS trigger the inflammatory process in the cochlea by activating signal transducer and activator of transcription-1 (STAT1). Activation of STAT1 activation was dependent on ROS generation through NOX3 NADPH oxidase, knockdown of which by siRNA reduced STAT1 activation. Moreover, STAT1 siRNA protected against activation of p53, reduced apoptosis, reduced damage to OHCs and preserved hearing in rats. STAT1 siRNA attenuated the increase in inflammatory mediators, such as TNF-α, inhibition of which protected cells from cisplatin-mediated apoptosis. Finally, we showed that trans-tympanic administration of etanercept, a TNF-α antagonist, protected against OHC damage and cisplatin-induced hearing loss. These studies suggest that controlling inflammation by inhibition of STAT1-dependent pathways in the cochlea could serve as an effective approach to treat cisplatin ototoxicity and improve the overall quality of life for cancer patients. PMID:21776018

  16. STS-1 promotes IFN-α induced autophagy by activating the JAK1-STAT1 signaling pathway in B cells.

    PubMed

    Dong, Guanjun; You, Ming; Fan, Hongye; Ding, Liang; Sun, Lingyun; Hou, Yayi

    2015-08-01

    Systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) is an autoimmune disease characterized by the overexpression of IFN-α. IFN-α induces autophagy via the JAK1-STAT1 signaling pathway, contributing to the pathogenesis of SLE. Recent studies reported that B cells from patients with SLE and NZB/W F1 mice had enhanced autophagy activity; however, the mechanism still remains unknown. Here, we show that the protein tyrosine phosphatase STS-1 (suppressor of T-cell receptor signaling 1) was significantly overexpressed in B cells from patients with SLE and MRL/lpr mice. Notably, STS-1 promoted IFN-α-induced autophagy in B cells by enhancing the JAK1-STAT1 signaling activation. STS-1 inhibited the phosphorylation of the E3 ubiquitin protein ligase c-cbl, and subsequently promoted IFN-α-induced phosphorylation of tyrosine kinase 2, leading to JAK1-STAT1 signaling activation. Furthermore, STAT1 and JAK1 inhibitors blocked the IFN-α-induced autophagy promoted by STS-1, indicating that STS-1 promotes IFN-α-induced autophagy via the JAK1-STAT1 signaling. Our results demonstrate the importance of STS-1 in regulating IFN-α-induced autophagy in B cells, and this could be used as a therapeutic approach to treat SLE. PMID:25959715

  17. Pretreatment of LPS inhibits IFN-β-induced STAT1 phosphorylation through SOCS3 induced by LPS.

    PubMed

    Ando, Takashi; Komatsu, Takayuki; Naiki, Yoshikazu; Yokochi, Takashi; Watanabe, Daisuke; Koide, Naoki

    2015-12-01

    It has been known that LPS activates macrophages and induces IFN-β production from macrophages. The endogenous IFN-β produced by LPS stimulates the cells, which plays a role in innate immune. However, it was not elucidated yet if the signaling by exogenous IFN-β was influenced by LPS stimulation. In this study, it was found pretreatment of LPS interrupted IFN-β-induced JAK1/STAT1 phosphorylation. LPS pretreatment also reduced IFN-β-induced ISG54, one of IFN-β-inducible genes. Pretreatment with LPS for more than 2h shows inhibitory effect on IFN-β-induced STAT1 phosphorylation but simultaneous treatment or post-treatment of LPS with IFN-β did not show the inhibitory effect. The study using a neutralizing antibody to IFN-β indicated that IFN-β produced by LPS does not take part in the inhibitory effect of LPS. Furthermore, LPS did not affect the expression of IFN αβ receptor. A previous report has shown that LPS-induced SOCS3 inhibited IFN-γ-induced STAT1 phosphorylation, likewise, it was also shown in this study that LPS induced SOCS3 expression and its expression inhibited IFN-β-induced STAT1 phosphorylation which was confirmed by the knockdown study by the siRNA of SOCS3. The real-time PCR and immune-blot studies of SOCS3 indicated that LPS induced SOCS3 is independent of IL-6, IL-10, TNF-α and STAT3, and might depend on p38 activation by LPS. It was suggested that bacterial LPS rather interfere with IFN-β actions, dependent on the timing of LPS stimulation. PMID:26653542

  18. Deubiquitinase USP2a Sustains Interferons Antiviral Activity by Restricting Ubiquitination of Activated STAT1 in the Nucleus

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Jin; Yuan, Yukang; Cheng, Qiao; Zuo, Yibo; Qian, Liping; Guo, Tingting; Qian, Guanghui; Li, Lemin; Ge, Jun; Dai, Jianfeng; Xiong, Sidong; Zheng, Hui

    2016-01-01

    STAT1 is a critical transcription factor for regulating host antiviral defenses. STAT1 activation is largely dependent on phosphorylation at tyrosine 701 site of STAT1 (pY701-STAT1). Understanding how pY701-STAT1 is regulated by intracellular signaling remains a major challenge. Here we find that pY701-STAT1 is the major form of ubiquitinated-STAT1 induced by interferons (IFNs). While total STAT1 remains relatively stable during the early stages of IFNs signaling, pY701-STAT1 can be rapidly downregulated by the ubiquitin-proteasome system. Moreover, ubiquitinated pY701-STAT1 is located predominantly in the nucleus, and inhibiting nuclear import of pY701-STAT1 significantly blocks ubiquitination and downregulation of pY701-STAT1. Furthermore, we reveal that the deubiquitinase USP2a translocates into the nucleus and binds to pY701-STAT1, and inhibits K48-linked ubiquitination and degradation of pY701-STAT1. Importantly, USP2a sustains IFNs-induced pY701-STAT1 levels, and enhances all three classes of IFNs- mediated signaling and antiviral activity. To our knowledge, this is the first identified deubiquitinase that targets activated pY701-STAT1. These findings uncover a positive mechanism by which IFNs execute efficient antiviral signaling and function, and may provide potential targets for improving IFNs-based antiviral therapy. PMID:27434509

  19. The Fanconi Anemia Protein FANCC Binds to and Facilitates the Activation of STAT1 by Gamma Interferon and Hematopoietic Growth Factors

    PubMed Central

    Pang, Qishen; Fagerlie, Sara; Christianson, Tracy A.; Keeble, Winifred; Faulkner, Greg; Diaz, Jane; Rathbun, R. Keaney; Bagby, Grover C.

    2000-01-01

    Hematopoietic progenitor cells from Fanconi anemia (FA) group C (FA-C) patients display hypersensitivity to the apoptotic effects of gamma interferon (IFN-γ) and constitutively express a variety of IFN-dependent genes. Paradoxically, however, STAT1 activation is suppressed in IFN-stimulated FA cells, an abnormality corrected by transduction of normal FANCC cDNA. We therefore sought to define the specific role of FANCC protein in signal transduction through receptors that activate STAT1. Expression and phosphorylation of IFN-γ receptor α chain (IFN-γRα) and JAK1 and JAK2 tyrosine kinases were equivalent in both normal and FA-C cells. However, in coimmunoprecipitation experiments STAT1 did not dock at the IFN-γR of FA-C cells, an abnormality corrected by transduction of the FANCC gene. In addition, glutathione S-transferase fusion genes encoding normal FANCC but not a mutant FANCC bearing an inactivating point mutation (L554P) bound to STAT1 in lysates of IFN-γ-stimulated B cells and IFN-, granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor- and stem cell factor-stimulated MO7e cells. Kinetic studies revealed that the initial binding of FANCC was to nonphosphorylated STAT1 but that subsequently the complex moved to the receptor docking site, at which point STAT1 became phosphorylated. The STAT1 phosphorylation defect in FA-C cells was functionally significant in that IFN induction of IFN response factor 1 was suppressed and STAT1-DNA complexes were not detected in nuclear extracts of FA-C cells. We also determined that the IFN-γ hypersensitivity of FA-C hematopoietic progenitor cells does not derive from STAT1 activation defects because granulocyte-macrophage CFU and erythroid burst-forming units from STAT1−/− mice were resistant to IFN-γ. However, BFU-E responses to SCF and erythropoietin were suppressed in STAT−/− mice. Consequently, because the FANCC protein is involved in the activation of STAT1 through receptors for at least three hematopoietic

  20. Genkwadaphnin Induces IFN-γ via PKD1/NF-κB/STAT1 Dependent Pathway in NK-92 Cells

    PubMed Central

    Kang, Ho-Bum; Ahn, Kyung-Seop; Oh, Sei-Ryang; Kim, Jae Wha

    2014-01-01

    The flower buds of Daphne genkwa Sieb. et Zucc. have been used as a traditional Chinese medicine although their functional mechanisms have not been discovered yet. We have studied the potential effects of the plant extracts on natural killer (NK) cell activation, and isolated an active fraction. Genkwadaphnin (GD-1) displayed a potent efficacy to induce IFN-γ transcription in NK cells with concentration- and time-dependent manners. GD-1 treatment triggered the phosphorylation of PKD1, a member of PKC family, MEK and ERK, resulting in IKK activation to induce IκB degradation, and the nuclear localization of p65, an NF-κB subunit, which regulates IFN-γ transcription. GD-1 effect on IFN-γ production was blocked by the addition of Rottlerin, a PKC inhibitor, CID 755673, a PKD inhibitor, or Bay11-7082, an IKKα inhibitor. The nuclear localization of p65 was also inhibited by the kinase inhibitors. Secreted IFN-γ activates STAT1 phosphorylation as autocrine-loops to sustain its secretion. GD-1 induced the phosphorylation of STAT1 probably through the increase of IFN-γ. STAT1 inhibitor also abrogated the sustained IFN-γ secretion. These results suggest that GD-1 is involved in the activation of PKD1 and/or ERK pathway, which activate NK-κB triggering IFN-γ production. As positive feedback loops, secreted IFN-γ activates STAT1 and elongates its production in NK-92 cells. PMID:25517939

  1. HIV-1 gp120 induces cytokine expression, leukocyte adhesion, and transmigration across the blood-brain barrier: modulatory effects of STAT1 signaling.

    PubMed

    Yang, Bo; Akhter, Sidra; Chaudhuri, Anathbandhu; Kanmogne, Georgette D

    2009-03-01

    How neuroinflammatory activities affect signaling pathways leading to blood-brain barrier (BBB) injury during HIV/AIDS are currently unknown. Our previous work demonstrated that HIV-1 exposure activates pro-inflammatory genes in human brain microvascular endothelial cells (HBMEC) and showed that these genes are linked to the janus kinase (JAK)/signal transducers and activators of transcription (STAT) pathway. Here, we report that HIV-1 gp120 protein activated STAT1 and induced interleukin (IL)-6 and IL-8 secretion in HBMEC. IL-6, IL-8, and gp120 increased monocyte adhesion and migration across in vitro BBB models. The STAT1 inhibitor, fludarabine, prevented gp120-induced IL-6 and IL-8 secretion. Inhibitors of STAT1, mitogen activated protein kinase kinase (MEK) (PD98059), and phosphatidyl inositol 3 kinase (PI3K) (LY294002), blocked gp120-induced STAT1 activation and significantly diminished IL-8-, IL-6-, and gp120-induced monocyte adhesion and migration across in vitro BBB models. These data support the notion that STAT1 plays an important role in gp120-induced inflammation and BBB dysfunction associated with viral infection. Results also suggest crosstalk between STAT1, MEK, and PI3K pathways in gp120-induced BBB dysfunction. Inhibition of STAT1 activation could provide a unique therapeutic strategy to decrease neuroinflammation and BBB dysfunction in HIV/AIDS. PMID:19103208

  2. Liver X receptor and STAT1 cooperate downstream of Gas6/Mer to induce anti-inflammatory arginase 2 expression in macrophages

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Si-Yoon; Lim, Eun-Jin; Yoon, Young-So; Ahn, Young-Ho; Park, Eun-Mi; Kim, Hee-Sun; Kang, Jihee Lee

    2016-01-01

    Mer signaling increases the transcriptional activity of liver X receptor (LXR) to promote the resolution of acute sterile inflammation. Here, we aimed to understand the pathway downstream of Mer signaling after growth arrest-specific protein 6 (Gas6) treatment that leads to LXR expression and transcriptional activity in mouse bone-marrow derived macrophages (BMDM). Gas6-induced increases in LXRα and LXRβ and expression of their target genes were inhibited in BMDM from STAT1−/− mice or by the STAT1-specific inhibitor fludarabine. Gas6-induced STAT1 phosphorylation, LXR activation, and LXR target gene expression were inhibited in BMDM from Mer−/− mice or by inhibition of PI3K or Akt. Gas6-induced Akt phosphorylation was inhibited in BMDM from STAT1−/− mice or in the presence of fludarabine. Gas6-induced LXR activity was enhanced through an interaction between LXRα and STAT1 on the DNA promoter of Arg2. Additionally, we found that Gas6 inhibited lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-induced nitrite production in a STAT1 and LXR pathway-dependent manner in BMDM. Additionally, Mer-neutralizing antibody reduced LXR and Arg2 expression in lung tissue and enhanced NO production in bronchoalveolar lavage fluid in LPS-induced acute lung injury. Our data suggest the possibility that the Gas6-Mer-PI3K/Akt-STAT1-LXR-Arg2 pathway plays an essential role for resolving inflammatory response in acute lung injury. PMID:27406916

  3. Interferons Induce STAT1-Dependent Expression of Tissue Plasminogen Activator, a Pathogenicity Factor in Puumala Hantavirus Disease.

    PubMed

    Strandin, Tomas; Hepojoki, Jussi; Laine, Outi; Mäkelä, Satu; Klingström, Jonas; Lundkvist, Åke; Julkunen, Ilkka; Mustonen, Jukka; Vaheri, Antti

    2016-05-15

    Hantaviruses are zoonotic viruses that show various degrees of vasculopathy in humans. In this study, we analyzed the regulation of 2 fibrinolytic parameters, tissue plasminogen activator (tPA) and its physiological inhibitor, plasminogen activator inhibitor 1 (PAI-1), in Puumala hantavirus (PUUV)-infected patients and in human microvascular endothelial cells. We detected strong upregulation of tPA in the acute phase of illness and in PUUV-infected macaques and found the tPA level to positively correlate with disease severity. The median levels of PAI-1 during the acute stage did not differ from those during the recovery phase. In concordance, hantaviruses induced tPA but not PAI-1 in microvascular endothelial cells, and the induction was demonstrated to be dependent on type I interferon. Importantly, type I and II interferons directly upregulated tPA through signal transducer and activator of transcription 1 (STAT1), which regulated tPA gene expression via a STAT1-responsive enhancer element. These results suggest that tPA may be a general factor in the immunological response to viruses. PMID:26704613

  4. IFNγ Induces DNA Methylation-Silenced GPR109A Expression via pSTAT1/p300 and H3K18 Acetylation in Colon Cancer.

    PubMed

    Bardhan, Kankana; Paschall, Amy V; Yang, Dafeng; Chen, May R; Simon, Priscilla S; Bhutia, Yangzom D; Martin, Pamela M; Thangaraju, Muthusamy; Browning, Darren D; Ganapathy, Vadivel; Heaton, Christopher M; Gu, Keni; Lee, Jeffrey R; Liu, Kebin

    2015-07-01

    Short-chain fatty acids, metabolites produced by colonic microbiota from fermentation of dietary fiber, act as anti-inflammatory agents in the intestinal tract to suppress proinflammatory diseases. GPR109A is the receptor for short-chain fatty acids. The functions of GPR109A have been the subject of extensive studies; however, the molecular mechanisms underlying GPR109A expression is largely unknown. We show that GPR109A is highly expressed in normal human colon tissues, but is silenced in human colon carcinoma cells. The GPR109A promoter DNA is methylated in human colon carcinoma. Strikingly, we observed that IFNγ, a cytokine secreted by activated T cells, activates GPR109A transcription without altering its promoter DNA methylation. Colon carcinoma grows significantly faster in IFNγ-deficient mice than in wild-type mice in an orthotopic colon cancer mouse model. A positive correlation was observed between GPR109A protein level and tumor-infiltrating T cells in human colon carcinoma specimens, and IFNγ expression level is higher in human colon carcinoma tissues than in normal colon tissues. We further demonstrated that IFNγ rapidly activates pSTAT1 that binds to the promoter of p300 to activate its transcription. p300 then binds to the GPR109A promoter to induce H3K18 hyperacetylation, resulting in chromatin remodeling in the methylated GPR109A promoter. The IFNγ-activated pSTAT1 then directly binds to the methylated but hyperacetylated GPR109 promoter to activate its transcription. Overall, our data indicate that GPR109A acts as a tumor suppressor in colon cancer, and the host immune system might use IFNγ to counteract DNA methylation-mediated GPR109A silencing as a mechanism to suppress tumor development. PMID:25735954

  5. Analysis of STAT1 expression and biological activity reveals interferon-tau-dependent STAT1-regulated SOCS genes in the bovine endometrium.

    PubMed

    Vitorino Carvalho, A; Eozenou, C; Healey, G D; Forde, N; Reinaud, P; Chebrout, M; Gall, L; Rodde, N; Padilla, A Lesage; Delville, C Giraud; Leveugle, M; Richard, C; Sheldon, I M; Lonergan, P; Jolivet, G; Sandra, O

    2016-03-01

    Signal transducer and activator of transcription (STAT) proteins are critical for the regulation of numerous biological processes. In cattle, microarray analyses identified STAT1 as a differentially expressed gene in the endometrium during the peri-implantation period. To gain new insights about STAT1 during the oestrous cycle and early pregnancy, we investigated STAT1 transcript and protein expression, as well as its biological activity in bovine tissue and cells of endometrial origin. Pregnancy increased STAT1 expression on Day 16, and protein and phosphorylation levels on Day 20. In cyclic and pregnant females, STAT1 was located in endometrial cells but not in the luminal epithelium at Day 20 of pregnancy. The expression of STAT1 during the oestrous cycle was not affected by progesterone supplementation. In vivo and in vitro, interferon-tau (IFNT) stimulated STAT1 mRNA expression, protein tyrosine phosphorylation and nuclear translocation. Using chromatin immunoprecipitation in IFNT-stimulated endometrial cells, we demonstrated an increase of STAT1 binding on interferon regulatory factor 1 (IRF1), cytokine-inducible SH2-containing protein (CISH), suppressor of cytokine signaling 1 and 3 (SOCS1, SOCS3) gene promoters consistent with the induction of their transcripts. Our data provide novel molecular insights into the biological functions of STAT1 in the various cells composing the endometrium during maternal pregnancy recognition and implantation. PMID:25116692

  6. Lead ions abrogate lipopolysaccharide-induced nitric monoxide toxicity by reducing the expression of STAT1 and iNOS.

    PubMed

    Dörpinghaus, Michael; Brieger, Anne; Panichkina, Olga; Rink, Lothar; Haase, Hajo

    2016-09-01

    Lead is a widespread environmental pollutant and the highly poisonous metal compromises multiple organs in the body. Among other tissues and cells, lead ions (Pb(2+)) can affect macrophages and microglia cells. The present study observed a concentration-dependent protection of BV-2 microglia and RAW 264.7 macrophages by Pb(2+) against lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-induced toxicity. Both cell lines are potent producers of two substances that have previously been shown to mediate cytotoxic effects of LPS. These are the pro-inflammatory cytokine tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-α and nitric monoxide (NO), which creates nitrosative stress, hampering the distribution of invading pathogens and tumor cells. While the expression of TNF-α was unaffected by Pb(2+), the production of NO was significantly inhibited. Moreover, blocking NO synthesis by low molecular weight inhibitors prevented LPS-mediated toxicity, confirming the role of NO in these events. Pb(2+) exposure led to a downregulation of LPS-induced expression of the transcription factor STAT1, which is involved in iNOS transcription. Moreover, iNOS mRNA and protein levels were reduced in the presence of Pb(2+), explaining the reduced formation of NO and a subsequent increase of cellular viability in vitro. In vivo, the effect might limit collateral damage caused by excessive NO production, but also impair the efficiency of NO as a central mediator of the defense against various pathogens. PMID:27134082

  7. A time- and dose-dependent STAT1 expression system

    PubMed Central

    Leitner, Nicole R; Strobl, Birgit; Bokor, Marion; Painz, Ronald; Kolbe, Thomas; Rülicke, Thomas; Müller, Mathias; Karaghiosoff, Marina

    2006-01-01

    Background The signal transducer and activator of transcription (STAT) family of transcription factors mediates a variety of cytokine dependent gene regulations. STAT1 has been mainly characterized by its role in interferon (IFN) type I and II signaling and STAT1 deficiency leads to high susceptibility to several pathogens. For fine-tuned analysis of STAT1 function we established a dimerizer-inducible system for STAT1 expression in vitro and in vivo. Results The functionality of the dimerizer-induced STAT1 system is demonstrated in vitro in mouse embryonic fibroblasts and embryonic stem cells. We show that this two-vector based system is highly inducible and does not show any STAT1 expression in the absence of the inducer. Reconstitution of STAT1 deficient cells with inducible STAT1 restores IFNγ-mediated gene induction, antiviral responses and STAT1 activation remains dependent on cytokine stimulation. STAT1 expression is induced rapidly upon addition of dimerizer and expression levels can be regulated in a dose-dependent manner. Furthermore we show that in transgenic mice STAT1 can be induced upon stimulation with the dimerizer, although only at low levels. Conclusion These results prove that the dimerizer-induced system is a powerful tool for STAT1 analysis in vitro and provide evidence that the system is suitable for the use in transgenic mice. To our knowledge this is the first report for inducible STAT1 expression in a time- and dose-dependent manner. PMID:17184522

  8. ROS-dependent Syk and Pyk2-mediated STAT1 activation is required for 15(S)-Hydroxyeicosatetraenoic acid-induced CD36 expression and foam cell formation

    PubMed Central

    Kotla, Sivareddy; Singh, Nikhlesh K.; Traylor, James G.; Orr, A. Wayne; Rao, Gadiparthi N.

    2014-01-01

    15(S)-Hydroxyeicosatetraenoic acid (15(S)-HETE), the major 15-lipoxygenase 1/2 (15-LO1/2) metabolite of arachidonic acid (AA), induces CD36 expression through xanthine oxidase and NADPH oxidase-dependent ROS production and Syk and Pyk2-dependent STAT1 activation. In line with these observations, 15(S)-HETE also induced foam cell formation involving ROS, Syk, Pyk2 and STAT1-mediated CD36 expression. In addition, peritoneal macrophages from Western diet-fed ApoE−/− mice exhibited elevated levels of xanthine oxidase and NADPH oxidase activities, ROS production, Syk, Pyk2, and STAT1 phosphorylation and CD36 expression compared to those from ApoE−/−:12/15-LO−/− mice and these events correlated with increased lipid deposits, macrophage content and lesion progression in the aortic roots. Human atherosclerotic arteries also showed increased 15-LO1 expression, STAT1 phosphorylation and CD36 levels as compared to normal arteries. Together, these findings suggest that 12/15-LO metabolites of AA, particularly 12/15(S)-HETE might play a crucial role in atherogenesis by enhancing foam cell formation. PMID:25152235

  9. STAT1, STAT3 and p38MAPK are involved in the apoptotic effect induced by a chimeric cyclic interferon-{alpha}2b peptide

    SciTech Connect

    Blank, Viviana C.; Pena, Clara; Roguin, Leonor P.

    2010-02-15

    In the search of mimetic peptides of the interferon-{alpha}2b molecule (IFN-{alpha}2b), we have previously designed and synthesized a chimeric cyclic peptide of the IFN-{alpha}2b that inhibits WISH cell proliferation by inducing an apoptotic response. Here, we first studied the ability of this peptide to activate intracellular signaling pathways and then evaluated the participation of some signals in the induction of apoptosis. Stimulation of WISH cells with the cyclic peptide showed tyrosine phosphorylation of Jak1 and Tyk2 kinases, tyrosine and serine phosphorylation of STAT1 and STAT3 transcription factors and activation of p38 MAPK pathway, although phosphorylation levels or kinetics were in some conditions different to those obtained under IFN-{alpha}2b stimulus. JNK and p44/42 pathways were not activated by the peptide in WISH cells. We also showed that STAT1 and STAT3 downregulation by RNA interference decreased the antiproliferative activity and the amount of apoptotic cells induced by the peptide. Pharmacological inhibition of p38 MAPK also reduced the peptide growth inhibitory activity and the apoptotic effect. Thus, we demonstrated that the cyclic peptide regulates WISH cell proliferation through the activation of Jak/STAT signaling pathway. In addition, our results indicate that p38 MAPK may also be involved in cell growth regulation. This study suggests that STAT1, STAT3 and p38 MAPK would be mediating the antitumor and apoptotic response triggered by the cyclic peptide in WISH cells.

  10. STAT1-Induced HLA class I Upregulation Enhances Immunogenicity and Clinical Response to anti-EGFR mAb Cetuximab Therapy in HNC Patients

    PubMed Central

    Srivastava, Raghvendra M.; Trivedi, Sumita; Concha-Benavente, Fernando; Hyun-bae, Jie; Wang, Lin; Seethala, Raja R.; Branstetter, Barton F.; Ferrone, Soldano; Ferris, Robert L.

    2015-01-01

    The goal of this study was to characterize the molecular mechanisms underlying cetuximab-mediated upregulation of HLA class I antigen-processing machinery components in head and neck cancer (HNC) cells and to determine the clinical significance of these changes in cetuximab-treated HNC patients. Flow cytometry, signaling studies and chromatin immunoprecipitation (ChIP) assays were performed using HNC cells treated with cetuximab alone or with Fcγ receptor (FcγR)-bearing lymphocytes to establish the mechanism of EGFR-dependent regulation of HLA APM expression. A prospective phase II clinical trial of neoadjuvant cetuximab was utilized to correlate HLA class I expression with clinical response in HNC patients. EGFR blockade triggered STAT1 activation and HLA upregulation, in a src homology-containing protein (SHP)-2-dependent fashion, more prominently in HLA-B/C than in HLA-A alleles. EGFR signaling blockade also enhanced IFNγ receptor 1 (IFNAR) expression, augmenting induction of HLA class I and TAP1/2 expression by IFNγ, which was abrogated in STAT1−/− cells. Cetuximab enhanced HNC cell recognition by EGFR853–861-specific CTLs, and notably enhanced surface presentation of a non-EGFR peptide (MAGE-3271–279). HLA class I upregulation was significantly associated with clinical response in cetuximab-treated HNC patients. EGFR induces HLA downregulation through SHP-2/STAT1 suppression. Reversal of HLA class I downregulation was more prominent in clinical responders to cetuximab therapy, supporting an important role for adaptive immunity in cetuximab antitumor activity. Abrogating EGFR-induced immune escape mechanisms and restoring STAT1 signaling to reverse HLA downregulation using cetuximab should be combined with strategies to enhance adaptive cellular immunity. PMID:25972070

  11. Structural Basis of the Inhibition of STAT1 Activity by Sendai Virus C Protein

    PubMed Central

    Oda, Kosuke; Matoba, Yasuyuki; Irie, Takashi; Kawabata, Ryoko; Fukushi, Masaya; Sugiyama, Masanori

    2015-01-01

    inert. Here, we determined the crystal structure of the N-terminal domain of STAT1 associated with the C-terminal half of the C protein. Molecular modeling and experiments suggested that the two C proteins bind to and stabilize the parallel form of the STAT1 dimer, which are likely to be phosphorylated at Tyr701, further inducing high-molecular-weight complex formation and inhibition of transcription by IFN-γ. We also discuss the possible mechanism of inhibition of the IFN-α/β pathways by the C protein. This is the first structural report of the C protein, suggesting a mechanism of evasion of the paramyxovirus from innate immunity. PMID:26339056

  12. Biflorin, Isolated from the Flower Buds of Syzygium aromaticum L., Suppresses LPS-Induced Inflammatory Mediators via STAT1 Inactivation in Macrophages and Protects Mice from Endotoxin Shock.

    PubMed

    Lee, Hwi-Ho; Shin, Ji-Sun; Lee, Woo-Seok; Ryu, Byeol; Jang, Dae Sik; Lee, Kyung-Tae

    2016-04-22

    Two chromone C-glucosides, biflorin (1) and isobiflorin (2), were isolated from the flower buds of Syzygium aromaticum L. (Myrtaceae). Here, inhibitory effects of 1 and 2 on lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-induced production of nitric oxide (NO) and prostaglandin E2 (PGE2) in RAW 264.7 macrophages were evaluated, and 1 (IC50 = 51.7 and 37.1 μM, respectively) was more potent than 2 (IC50 > 60 and 46.0 μM). The suppression of NO and PGE2 production by 1 correlated with inhibition of iNOS and COX-2 protein expression. Compound 1 reduced inducible NO synthase (iNOS) and cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2) mRNA expression via inhibition of their promoter activities. Compound 1 inhibited the LPS-induced production and mRNA expression of tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α) and interleukin (IL)-6. Furthermore, 1 reduced p-STAT1 and p-p38 expression but did not affect the activity of nuclear factor κ light-chain enhancer of activated B cells (NF-κB) or activator protein 1 (AP-1). In a mouse model of LPS-induced endotoxemia, 1 reduced the mRNA levels of iNOS, COX-2, and TNF-α, and the phosphorylation-mediated activation of the signal transducer and activator of transcription 1 (STAT1), consequently improving the survival rates of mice. Compound 1 showed a significant anti-inflammatory effect on carrageenan-induced paw edema and croton-oil-induced ear edema in rats. The collective data indicate that the suppression of pro-inflammatory gene expression via p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase and STAT1 inactivation may be a mechanism for the anti-inflammatory activity of 1. PMID:26977531

  13. KAP1 regulates type I interferon/STAT1-mediated IRF-1 gene expression

    SciTech Connect

    Kamitani, Shinya; Ohbayashi, Norihiko; Ikeda, Osamu; Togi, Sumihito; Muromoto, Ryuta; Sekine, Yuichi; Ohta, Kazuhide; Ishiyama, Hironobu; Matsuda, Tadashi

    2008-05-30

    Signal transducers and activators of transcription (STATs) mediate cell proliferation, differentiation, and survival in immune responses, hematopoiesis, neurogenesis, and other biological processes. Recently, we showed that KAP1 is a novel STAT-binding partner that regulates STAT3-mediated transactivation. KAP1 is a universal co-repressor protein for the KRAB zinc finger protein superfamily of transcriptional repressors. In this study, we found KAP1-dependent repression of interferon (IFN)/STAT1-mediated signaling. We also demonstrated that endogenous KAP1 associates with endogenous STAT1 in vivo. Importantly, a small-interfering RNA-mediated reduction in KAP1 expression enhanced IFN-induced STAT1-dependent IRF-1 gene expression. These results indicate that KAP1 may act as an endogenous regulator of the IFN/STAT1 signaling pathway.

  14. Phagosomes induced by cytokines function as anti-Listeria vaccines: novel role for functional compartmentalization of STAT-1 protein and cathepsin-D.

    PubMed

    Carrasco-Marín, Eugenio; Rodriguez-Del Rio, Estela; Frande-Cabanes, Elisabet; Tobes, Raquel; Pareja, Eduardo; Lecea-Cuello, M Jesús; Ruiz-Sáez, Marta; Madrazo-Toca, Fidel; Hölscher, Christoph; Alvarez-Dominguez, Carmen

    2012-04-27

    Phagosomes are critical compartments for innate immunity. However, their role in the protection against murine listeriosis has not been examined. We describe here that listericidal phago-receptosomes are induced by the function of IFN-γ or IL-6 as centralized compartments for innate and adaptive immunity because they are able to confer protection against murine listeriosis. These phago-receptosomes elicited LLO(91-99)/CD8(+)- and LLO(189-201)/CD4(+)-specific immune responses and recruited mature dendritic cells to the vaccination sites controlled by T cells. Moreover, they present exceptional features as efficient vaccine vectors. First, they compartmentalize a novel listericidal STAT-1-mediated signaling pathway that confines multiple innate immune components to the same environment. Second, they show features of MHC class II antigen-loading competent compartments for cathepsin-D-mediated LLO processing. Third, murine cathepsin-D deficiencies fail to develop protective immunity after vaccination with listericidal phago-receptosomes induced by IFN-γ or IL-6. Therefore, it appears that the connection of STAT-1 and cathepsin-D in a single compartment is relevant for protection against listeriosis. PMID:22337873

  15. Shp-2 contributes to anti-RSV activity in human pulmonary alveolar epithelial cells by interfering with the IFN-α-induced Jak/Stat1 pathway

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Saisai; Zheng, Gang; Zhao, Lifang; Xu, Feng; Qian, Jing

    2015-01-01

    Src homology phosphotyrosyl phosphatase 2 (Shp-2) is a ubiquitously expressed protein that is involved in a variety of cellular processes, including antiviral interferon signalling pathways. In this study, we investigated the role of Shp-2 in the host cell interactions of human respiratory syncytial virus (RSV). We report significant changes in the expression of Shp-2 in human pulmonary alveolar epithelial cells (A549) upon RSV infection. We also report that blocking Shp-2 does not affect viral replication or virus-induced interferon-alpha (IFN-α) production. Interestingly, whereas A549 cells were activated by IFN-α, the blocking of Shp-2 resulted in increased viral replication that was associated with the reduced expression of the IFN-stimulated genes of 2′,5′-oligoadenylate synthetases and Mx1, and the concomitant inhibition of Stat1 tyrosine phosphorylation. Our findings suggest that Shp-2 contributes to the control of RSV replication and progeny production in pulmonary alveolar epithelial cells by interfering with IFN-α-induced Jak/Stat1 pathway activation rather than by affecting the production of IFN-α itself. PMID:26119280

  16. Novel role and mechanism of protein inhibitor of activated STAT1 in spatial learning

    PubMed Central

    Tai, Derek J C; Hsu, Wei L; Liu, Yen C; Ma, Yun L; Lee, Eminy H Y

    2011-01-01

    By using differential display PCR, we have previously identified 98 cDNA fragments from rat dorsal hippocampus, which are expressed differentially between the fast learners and slow learners from water-maze learning task. One cDNA fragment, which showed a higher expression level in fast learners, encodes the rat protein inhibitor of activated STAT1 (pias1) gene. Spatial training induced a significant increase in PIAS1 expression in rat hippocampus. Transient transfection of the wild-type (WT) PIAS1 plasmid to CA1 neurons facilitated, whereas transfection of PIAS1 siRNA impaired spatial learning in rats. Meanwhile, PIAS1WT increased STAT1 sumoylation, decreased STAT1 DNA binding and decreased STAT1 phosphorylation at Tyr-701 associated with spatial learning facilitation. But PIAS1 siRNA transfection produced an opposite effect on these measures associated with spatial learning impairment. Further, transfection of STAT1 sumoylation mutant impaired spatial acquisition, whereas transfection of STAT1 phosphorylation mutant blocked the impairing effect of PIAS1 siRNA on spatial learning. In this study, we first demonstrate the role of PIAS1 in spatial learning. Both posttranslational modifications (increased sumoylation and decreased phosphorylation) mediate the effect of PIAS1 on spatial learning facilitation. PMID:21102409

  17. IL-7 Promotes CD95-Induced Apoptosis in B Cells via the IFN-γ/STAT1 Pathway

    PubMed Central

    Sammicheli, Stefano; Dang Vu Phuong, Linh; Ruffin, Nicolas; Pham Hong, Thang; Lantto, Rebecka; Vivar, Nancy; Chiodi, Francesca; Rethi, Bence

    2011-01-01

    Interleukin-7 (IL-7) concentrations are increased in the blood of CD4+ T cell depleted individuals, including HIV-1 infected patients. High IL-7 levels might stimulate T cell activation and, as we have shown earlier, IL-7 can prime resting T cell to CD95 induced apoptosis as well. HIV-1 infection leads to B cell abnormalities including increased apoptosis via the CD95 (Fas) death receptor pathway and loss of memory B cells. Peripheral B cells are not sensitive for IL-7, due to the lack of IL-7Ra expression on their surface; however, here we demonstrate that high IL-7 concentration can prime resting B cells to CD95-mediated apoptosis via an indirect mechanism. T cells cultured with IL-7 induced high CD95 expression on resting B cells together with an increased sensitivity to CD95 mediated apoptosis. As the mediator molecule responsible for B cell priming to CD95 mediated apoptosis we identified the cytokine IFN-γ that T cells secreted in high amounts in response to IL-7. These results suggest that the lymphopenia induced cytokine IL-7 can contribute to the increased B cell apoptosis observed in HIV-1 infected individuals. PMID:22194871

  18. Radiosensitization by Inhibiting STAT1 in Renal Cell Carcinoma

    SciTech Connect

    Hui Zhouguang; Tretiakova, Maria; Zhang Zhongfa; Li Yan; Wang Xiaozhen; Zhu, Julie Xiaohong; Gao Yuanhong; Mai Weiyuan; Furge, Kyle; Qian Chaonan; Amato, Robert; Butler, E. Brian

    2009-01-01

    Purpose: Renal cell carcinoma (RCC) has been historically regarded as a radioresistant malignancy, but the molecular mechanism underlying its radioresistance is not understood. This study investigated the role of signal transducer and activator of transcription 1 (STAT1), a transcription factor downstream of the interferon-signaling pathway, in radioresistant RCC. Methods and Materials: The expressions of STAT1 and STAT3 in 164 human clear cell RCC samples, 47 papillary RCC samples, and 15 normal kidney tissue samples were examined by microarray expression profiling and immunohistochemistry. Western blotting was performed to evaluate the total and phosphorylated STAT1 expression in CRL-1932 (786-O) (human clear cell RCC), SKRC-39 (human papillary RCC), CCL-116 (human fibroblast), and CRL-1441 (G-401) (human Wilms tumor). STAT1 was reduced or inhibited by fludarabine and siRNA, respectively, and the effects on radiation-induced cell death were investigated using clonogenic assays. Results: STAT1 expression, but not STAT3 expression, was significantly greater in human RCC samples (p = 1.5 x 10{sup -8} for clear cell; and p = 3.6 x 10{sup -4} for papillary). Similarly, the expression of STAT1 was relatively greater in the two RCC cell lines. STAT1 expression was reduced by both fludarabine and siRNA, significantly increasing the radiosensitivity in both RCC cell lines. Conclusion: This is the first study reporting the overexpression of STAT1 in human clear cell and papillary RCC tissues. Radiosensitization in RCC cell lines was observed by a reduction or inhibition of STAT1 signaling, using fludarabine or siRNA. Our data suggest that STAT1 may play a key role in RCC radioresistance and manipulation of this pathway may enhance the efficacy of radiotherapy.

  19. Induced eosinophilia and proliferation in Angiostrongylus cantonensis-infected mouse brain are associated with the induction of JAK/STAT1, IAP/NF-kappaB and MEKK1/JNK signals.

    PubMed

    Lan, K P; Wang, C J; Hsu, J D; Chen, K M; Lai, S C; Lee, H H

    2004-12-01

    Eosinophilic meningitis or meningoencephalitis caused by Angiostrongylus cantonensis is endemic to the Pacific area of Asia, especially Taiwan, Thailand, and Japan. Although eosinophilia is an important clinical manifestation of A. cantonensis infection, the role of eosinophils in the progress of the infection remains to be elucidated. In this experiment, we show that A. cantonensis-induced eosinophilia and inflammation might lead to the induction of IAP/NF-kappaB, JAK/STAT1 and MEKK1/JNK signals. The phosphorylation levels of JAK and JNK, STAT1, IAP, NF-kappaB and MEKK1 protein products were significantly increased after 12 days or 15 days of A. cantonensis infection. However, no significant differences in MAPKs such as Raf, MEK-1, ERK1/2 and p38 expression were found between control and infected mice. The activation potency of JAK/STAT1, IAP/NF-kappaB and MEKK1/JNK started increasing on day 3, with significant induction on day 12 or day 15 after A. cantonensis infection. Consistent results were noted in the pathological observations, including eosinophilia, leukocyte infiltration, granulomatous reactions, and time responses in the brain tissues of infected mice. These data suggest that the development of brain injury by eosinophilia of A. cantonensis infection is associated with activation of JAK/STAT1 signals by cytokines, and/or activation of MEKK1/JNK by oxidant stress, and/or activation of NF-kappaB by increasing IAP expression. PMID:15575987

  20. Stat1 Nuclear Translocation by Nucleolin upon Monocyte Differentiation

    PubMed Central

    Jerke, Uwe; Tkachuk, Sergey; Kiyan, Julia; Stepanova, Victoria; Kusch, Angelika; Hinz, Michael; Dietz, Rainer; Haller, Hermann; Fuhrman, Bianca; Dumler, Inna

    2009-01-01

    Background Members of the signal transducer and activator of transcription (Stat) family of transcription factors traverse the nuclear membrane through a specialized structure, called the nuclear pore complex (NPC), which represents a selective filter for the import of proteins. Karyophilic molecules can bind directly to a subset of proteins of the NPC, collectively called nucleoporins. Alternatively, the transport is mediated via a carrier molecule belonging to the importin/karyopherin superfamily, which transmits the import into the nucleus through the NPC. Methodology/Principal Findings In this study, we provide evidence for an alternative Stat1 nuclear import mechanism, which is mediated by the shuttle protein nucleolin. We observed Stat1-nucleolin association, nuclear translocation and specific binding to the regulatory DNA element GAS. Using expression of nucleolin transgenes, we found that the nuclear localization signal (NLS) of nucleolin is responsible for Stat1 nuclear translocation. We show that this mechanism is utilized upon differentiation of myeloid cells and is specific for the differentiation step from monocytes to macrophages. Conclusions/Significance Our data add the nucleolin-Stat1 complex as a novel functional partner for the cell differentiation program, which is uniquely poised to regulate the transcription machinery via Stat1 and nuclear metabolism via nucleolin. PMID:20011528

  1. GYF-17, a chloride substituted 2-(2-phenethyl)-chromone, suppresses LPS-induced inflammatory mediator production in RAW264.7 cells by inhibiting STAT1/3 and ERK1/2 signaling pathways.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Zhixiang; Gu, Yufan; Zhao, Yunfang; Song, Yuelin; Li, Jun; Tu, Pengfei

    2016-06-01

    GYF-17, a 2-(2-phenethyl)-chromone derivative, was isolated from agarwood and showed superior activity of inhibiting NO production of RAW264.7 cells induced by LPS in our preliminary pharmacodynamic screening. In order to develop novel therapeutic drug for acute and chronic inflammatory disorders, the anti-inflammatory activity and underlying mechanism of GYF-17 were investigated in LPS-induced RAW264.7 cells. The results showed that GYF-17 could reduce LPS-induced expression of iNOS and then result in the decrement of NO production. More meaningful, the expression and secretion of key pro-inflammatory factors, including TNF-α, IL-6 and IL-1β, were intensively inhibited by GYF-17. Furthermore, GYF-17 also down regulated the expression of COX2 and the production of PGE2 which plays important role in causing algesthesia during inflammatory response. In mechanism study, GYF-17 selectively suppressed phosphorylation of STAT1/3 and ERK1/2 during the activation of NF-κB, MAPK and STAT signaling pathways induced by LPS. Collectively, GYF-17 can intensively suppress the production of LPS-induced inflammatory mediators in RAW264.7 cells by inhibiting STAT1/3 and ERK1/2 signaling pathways and thereby shows great potential to be developed into therapeutic drug for inflammatory diseases. PMID:27064545

  2. The HER2 inhibitor TAK165 Sensitizes Human Acute Myeloid Leukemia Cells to Retinoic Acid-Induced Myeloid Differentiation by activating MEK/ERK mediated RARα/STAT1 axis.

    PubMed

    Shao, Xuejing; Liu, Yujia; Li, Yangling; Xian, Miao; Zhou, Qian; Yang, Bo; Ying, Meidan; He, Qiaojun

    2016-01-01

    The success of all-trans retinoic acid (ATRA) in differentiation therapy for patients with acute promyelocytic leukemia (APL) highly encourages researches to apply this therapy to other types of acute myeloid leukemia (AML). However, AML, with the exception of APL, fails to respond to differentiation therapy. Therefore, research strategies to further sensitize cells to retinoids and to extend the range of AMLs that respond to retinoids beyond APLs are urgently needed. In this study, we showed that TAK165, a HER2 inhibitor, exhibited a strong synergy with ATRA to promote AML cell differentiation. We observed that TAK165 sensitized the AML cells to ATRA-induced cell growth inhibition, G0/G1 phase arrest, CD11b expression, mature morphologic changes, NBT reduction and myeloid regulator expression. Unexpectedly, HER2 pathway might not be essential for TAK165-enhanced differentiation when combined with ATRA, while the enhanced differentiation was dependent on the activation of the RARα/STAT1 axis. Furthermore, the MEK/ERK cascade regulated the activation of STAT1. Taken together, our study is the first to evaluate the synergy of TAK165 and ATRA in AML cell differentiation and to assess new opportunities for the combination of TAK165 and ATRA as a promising approach for future differentiation therapy. PMID:27074819

  3. The HER2 inhibitor TAK165 Sensitizes Human Acute Myeloid Leukemia Cells to Retinoic Acid-Induced Myeloid Differentiation by activating MEK/ERK mediated RARα/STAT1 axis

    PubMed Central

    Shao, Xuejing; Liu, Yujia; Li, Yangling; Xian, Miao; Zhou, Qian; Yang, Bo; Ying, Meidan; He, Qiaojun

    2016-01-01

    The success of all-trans retinoic acid (ATRA) in differentiation therapy for patients with acute promyelocytic leukemia (APL) highly encourages researches to apply this therapy to other types of acute myeloid leukemia (AML). However, AML, with the exception of APL, fails to respond to differentiation therapy. Therefore, research strategies to further sensitize cells to retinoids and to extend the range of AMLs that respond to retinoids beyond APLs are urgently needed. In this study, we showed that TAK165, a HER2 inhibitor, exhibited a strong synergy with ATRA to promote AML cell differentiation. We observed that TAK165 sensitized the AML cells to ATRA-induced cell growth inhibition, G0/G1 phase arrest, CD11b expression, mature morphologic changes, NBT reduction and myeloid regulator expression. Unexpectedly, HER2 pathway might not be essential for TAK165-enhanced differentiation when combined with ATRA, while the enhanced differentiation was dependent on the activation of the RARα/STAT1 axis. Furthermore, the MEK/ERK cascade regulated the activation of STAT1. Taken together, our study is the first to evaluate the synergy of TAK165 and ATRA in AML cell differentiation and to assess new opportunities for the combination of TAK165 and ATRA as a promising approach for future differentiation therapy. PMID:27074819

  4. Reactive Oxygen Species (ROS) Mediate p300-dependent STAT1 Protein Interaction with Peroxisome Proliferator-activated Receptor (PPAR)-γ in CD36 Protein Expression and Foam Cell Formation.

    PubMed

    Kotla, Sivareddy; Rao, Gadiparthi N

    2015-12-18

    Previously, we have demonstrated that 15(S)-hydroxyeicosatetranoic acid (15(S)-HETE) induces CD36 expression involving STAT1. Many studies have shown that peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor (PPAR)-γ mediates CD36 expression. Therefore, we asked the question whether these transcriptional factors interact with each other in the regulation of CD36 expression by 15(S)-HETE. Here, we show that STAT1 interacts with PPARγ in the induction of CD36 expression and foam cell formation by 15(S)-HETE. In addition, using molecular biological approaches such as EMSA, supershift EMSA, ChIP, re-ChIP, and promoter-reporter gene assays, we demonstrate that the STAT1 and PPARγ complex binds to the STAT-binding site at -107 nucleotides in the CD36 promoter and enhances its activity. Furthermore, the interaction of STAT1 with PPARγ depends on STAT1 acetylation, which is mediated by p300. In addition, our findings show that reactive oxygen species-dependent Syk and Pyk2 stimulation is required for p300 tyrosine phosphorylation and activation. Together, these results demonstrate that an interaction between STAT1, p300, and peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor-γ is required for 15(S)-HETE-induced CD36 expression, oxidized low density lipoprotein uptake, and foam cell formation, critical events underlying the pathogenesis of atherosclerosis. PMID:26504087

  5. LIM-domain protein cysteine- and glycine-rich protein 2 (CRP2) is a novel marker of hepatic stellate cells and binding partner of the protein inhibitor of activated STAT1.

    PubMed Central

    Weiskirchen, R; Moser, M; Weiskirchen, S; Erdel, M; Dahmen, S; Buettner, R; Gressner, A M

    2001-01-01

    Activation of hepatic stellate cells is considered to be the main step in the development of liver fibrosis, which is characterized by the transition of quiescent vitamin-A-rich cells to proliferative, fibrogenic and contractile myofibroblasts. The identification of regulatory genes during early cell activation and transdifferentiation is essential to extend our knowledge of hepatic fibrogenesis. In liver, the gene CSRP2 is exclusively expressed by stellate cells, whereas no transcripts are detectable in hepatocytes, sinusoidal endothelial cells or Kupffer cells. The early activation of stellate cells induced by platelet-derived growth factor is accompanied by an enhanced expression of CSRP2. During later stages of transdifferentiation, the expression of CSRP2 in these cells is suppressed in vitro and in vivo. The CSRP2-encoded cysteine- and glycine-rich double-LIM-domain protein (CRP)2 is proposed to function as a molecular adapter, arranging two or more as yet unidentified protein constituents into a macromolecular complex. To identify these proteins and assign a cellular function to CRP2, a human cDNA library was screened with full-length CRP2 as bait in a yeast two-hybrid screen. The protein inhibitor of activated STAT1 ('PIAS1') was shown to associate selectively with the C-terminal LIM domain of CRP2. Physical interaction of both proteins in the cellular environment was confirmed by co-localization experiments with confocal laser scanning microscopy and co-immunoprecipitation analysis. These results establish CRP2 as a potential new factor in the JAK/STAT-signalling pathway and suggest that the suppression of CSRP2 might be a prerequisite for the myofibroblastic transition of hepatic stellate cells. PMID:11672422

  6. The role of stat1b in zebrafish hematopoiesis

    PubMed Central

    Song, Hao; Yan, Yi-lin; Titus, Tom; He, Xinjun; Postlethwait, John H.

    2011-01-01

    STAT1 mediates response to interferons and regulates immunity, cell proliferation, apoptosis, and sensitivity of Fanconi Anemia cells to apoptosis after interferon signaling; the roles of STAT1 in embryos, however, are not understood. To explore embryonic functions of STAT1, we investigated stat1b, an unstudied zebrafish co-ortholog of human STAT1. Zebrafish stat1a encodes all five domains of the human STAT1-alpha splice form but, like the human STAT1-beta splice variant, stat1b lacks a complete transactivation domain; thus, two unlinked zebrafish paralogs encode protein forms translated from two splice variants of a single human gene, as expected by subfunctionalization after genome duplication. Phylogenetic and conserved synteny studies showed that stat1b and stat1a arose as duplicates in the teleost genome duplication (TGD) and clarified the evolutionary origin of STAT1, STAT2, STAT3, STAT4, STAT5A, STAT5B and STAT6 by tandem and genome duplication. RT-PCR revealed maternal expression of stat1a and stat1b. In situ hybridization detected stat1b but not stat1a expression in embryonic hematopoietic tissues. Morpholino knockdown of stat1b, but not stat1a, decreased expression of the myeloid and granulocyte markers spi and mpo and increased expression of the hematopoietic progenitor marker scl, the erythrocyte marker gata1, and hemoglobin. These results suggest that zebrafish Stat1b promotes myeloid development at the expense of erythroid development. PMID:21914475

  7. Luteolin inhibits viral-induced inflammatory response in RAW264.7 cells via suppression of STAT1/3 dependent NF-κB and activation of HO-1.

    PubMed

    Liu, Cheng-Wei; Lin, Hui-Wen; Yang, Deng-Jye; Chen, Shih-Yin; Tseng, Jung-Kai; Chang, Tien-Jye; Chang, Yuan-Yen

    2016-06-01

    Luteolin is a common dietary flavonoid present in Chinese herbal medicines that has been reported to have important anti-inflammatory properties. Previous studies have shown that luteolin is an anti-inflammatory and anti-oxidative agent. In this study, the anti-virus inflammatory capacity of luteolin and its molecular mechanisms of action were analyzed. The cytotoxic effects of luteolin were assessed in the presence or absence of pseudorabies virus (PRV) via LDH and MTT assays. The results showed that luteolin (<10μM) had no toxic effects and there were tendencies toward higher cell survival. In PRV-infected RAW264.7 cells, luteolin potently inhibited the production of NO, iNOS, COX-2 and inflammatory cytokine production. Luteolin did not inhibit the phosphorylation of ERK 1/2, p38, and JNK 1/2 either. We found that PRV-induced NF-κB activation is regulated through inhibition of STAT1and STAT3 phosphorylation in response to luteolin. Additionally, luteolin caused the induction of HO-1 via upregulation of Nrf2, both of which are involved in the secretion of proinflammatory mediators. The blockade of HO-1 expression with SnPP, a HO-1 inhibitor, attenuated HO-1 induction by luteolin and thus mitigated its anti-inflammatory effects during PRV-infected RAW264.7 cells. Taken together, our data indicate that luteolin diminishes the proinflammatory mediators NO, inflammatory cytokines and the expression of their regulatory genes, iNOS and COX-2, in PRV-infected RAW264.7 cells by inhibiting STAT1/3 dependent NF-κB activation and inducing Nrf2mediated HO-1 expression. PMID:27016074

  8. Signal Transducer and Activator of Transcription 1 (STAT1) is Essential for Chromium Silencing of Gene Induction in Human Airway Epithelial Cells

    PubMed Central

    Nemec, Antonia A.; Barchowsky, Aaron

    2009-01-01

    Hexavalent chromium (Cr(VI)) promotes lung injury and pulmonary diseases through poorly defined mechanisms that may involve the silencing of inducible protective genes. The current study investigated the hypothesis that Cr(VI) actively signals through a signal transducer and activator of transcription 1 (STAT1)–dependent pathway to silence nickel (Ni)–induced expression of vascular endothelial cell growth factor A (VEGFA), an important mediator of lung injury and repair. In human bronchial airway epithelial (BEAS-2B) cells, Ni-induced VEGFA transcription by stimulating an extracellular regulated kinase (ERK) signaling cascade that involved Src kinase–activated Sp1 transactivation, as well as increased hypoxia-inducible factor-1α (HIF-1α) stabilization and DNA binding. Ni-stimulated ERK, Src, and HIF-1α activities, as well as Ni-induced VEGFA transcript levels were inhibited in Cr(VI)-exposed cells. We previously demonstrated that Cr(VI) stimulates STAT1 to suppress VEGFA expression. In BEAS-2B cells stably expressing STAT1 short hairpin RNA, Cr(VI) increased VEGFA transcript levels and Sp1 transactivation. Moreover, in the absence of STAT1, Cr(VI), and Ni coexposures positively interacted to further increase VEGFA transcripts. This study demonstrates that metal-stimulated signaling cascades interact to regulate transcription and induction of adaptive or repair responses in airway cells. In addition, the data implicate STAT1 as a rate limiting mediator of Cr(VI)-stimulated gene regulation and suggest that cells lacking STAT1, such as many tumor cell lines, have opposite responses to Cr(VI) relative to normal cells. PMID:19403854

  9. Altered interleukin-12 responsiveness in Th1 and Th2 cells is associated with the differential activation of STAT5 and STAT1.

    PubMed

    Gollob, J A; Murphy, E A; Mahajan, S; Schnipper, C P; Ritz, J; Frank, D A

    1998-02-15

    T-cell activation in response to interleukin-12 (IL-12) is mediated through signaling events that include the tyrosine phosphorylation of STAT4. IL-12 responsiveness and the ability of IL-12 to activate STAT4 is different in T cells induced to differentiate into a Th1 or Th2 phenotype. In this report, we show that STAT5, STAT1alpha, and STAT1beta, in addition to STAT4, are tyrosine phosphorylated in response to IL-12 in phytohemagglutinin (PHA)-activated human T cells. To understand how the activation of these STATs contributes to T-cell IL-12 responsiveness, we analyzed the IL-12-induced activation of STAT5 and STAT1 in T cells stimulated to undergo Th1 or Th2 differentiation. The IL-12-induced tyrosine phosphorylation of STAT5 and STAT1, but not STAT4, is augmented in T cells activated into Th1 cells with PHA + interferon-gamma (IFN-gamma) compared with T cells activated with PHA alone. STAT5 DNA binding induced by IL-12 is also augmented in T cells activated with PHA + IFN-gamma compared with T cells activated with PHA alone, whereas STAT4 DNA binding is not increased. In contrast, the IL-12-induced activation of these STATs is inhibited in T cells activated into Th2 cells with PHA + IL-4. The enhancement of IL-12 signaling by IFN-gamma is not a direct effect of IFN-gamma on T cells, but rather is mediated by IL-12 that is produced by antigen-presenting cells in response to IFN-gamma. This positive autoregulatory effect of IL-12 on the activation of select STATs correlates with an increase in T-cell IFN-gamma production in response to IL-12. These findings suggest that the activation of STAT5 and STAT1 may augment select STAT4-dependent functional responses to IL-12 in Th1 cells. PMID:9454765

  10. New and recurrent gain-of-function STAT1 mutations in patients with chronic mucocutaneous candidiasis from Eastern and Central Europe

    PubMed Central

    Soltész, Beáta; Tóth, Beáta; Shabashova, Nadejda; Bondarenko, Anastasia; Okada, Satoshi; Cypowyj, Sophie; Abhyankar, Avinash; Csorba, Gabriella; Taskó, Szilvia; Sarkadi, Adrien Katalin; Méhes, Leonóra; Rozsíval, Pavel; Neumann, David; Chernyshova, Liudmyla; Tulassay, Zsolt; Puel, Anne; Casanova, Jean-Laurent; Sediva, Anna; Litzman, Jiri; Maródi, László

    2013-01-01

    Background Chronic mucocutaneous candidiasis disease (CMCD) may result from various inborn errors of interleukin (IL)-17-mediated immunity. Twelve of the 13 causal mutations described to date affect the coiled-coil domain (CCD) of STAT1. Several mutations, including R274W in particular, are recurrent, but the underlying mechanism is unclear. Objective To investigate and describe nine patients with CMCD in Eastern and Central Europe, to assess the biochemical impact of STAT1 mutations, to determine cytokines in supernatants of Candida-exposed blood cells, to determine IL-17-producing T cell subsets and to determine STAT1 haplotypes in a family with the c.820C>T (R274W) mutation. Results The novel c.537C>A (N179K) STAT1 mutation was gain-of-function (GOF) for γ-activated factor (GAF)-dependent cellular responses. In a Russian patient, the cause of CMCD was the newly identified c.854 A>G (Q285R) STAT1 mutation, which was also GOF for GAF-dependent responses. The c.1154C>T (T385M) mutation affecting the DNA-binding domain (DBD) resulted in a gain of STAT1 phosphorylation in a Ukrainian patient. Impaired Candida-induced IL-17A and IL-22 secretion by leucocytes and lower levels of intracellular IL-17 and IL-22 production by T cells were found in several patients. Haplotype studies indicated that the c.820C>T (R274W) mutation was recurrent due to a hotspot rather than a founder effect. Severe clinical phenotypes, including intracranial aneurysm, are presented. Conclusions The c.537C>A and c.854A>G mutations affecting the CCD and the c.1154C>T mutation affecting the DBD of STAT1 are GOF. The c.820C>T mutation of STAT1 in patients with CMCD is recurrent due to a hotspot. Patients carrying GOF mutations of STAT1 may develop multiple intracranial aneurysms by hitherto unknown mechanisms. PMID:23709754

  11. Identification of STAT1 and STAT3 Specific Inhibitors Using Comparative Virtual Screening and Docking Validation

    PubMed Central

    Szelag, Malgorzata; Czerwoniec, Anna; Wesoly, Joanna; Bluyssen, Hans A. R.

    2015-01-01

    Signal transducers and activators of transcription (STATs) facilitate action of cytokines, growth factors and pathogens. STAT activation is mediated by a highly conserved SH2 domain, which interacts with phosphotyrosine motifs for specific STAT-receptor contacts and STAT dimerization. The active dimers induce gene transcription in the nucleus by binding to a specific DNA-response element in the promoter of target genes. Abnormal activation of STAT signaling pathways is implicated in many human diseases, like cancer, inflammation and auto-immunity. Searches for STAT-targeting compounds, exploring the phosphotyrosine (pTyr)-SH2 interaction site, yielded many small molecules for STAT3 but sparsely for other STATs. However, many of these inhibitors seem not STAT3-specific, thereby questioning the present modeling and selection strategies of SH2 domain-based STAT inhibitors. We generated new 3D structure models for all human (h)STATs and developed a comparative in silico docking strategy to obtain further insight into STAT-SH2 cross-binding specificity of a selection of previously identified STAT3 inhibitors. Indeed, by primarily targeting the highly conserved pTyr-SH2 binding pocket the majority of these compounds exhibited similar binding affinity and tendency scores for all STATs. By comparative screening of a natural product library we provided initial proof for the possibility to identify STAT1 as well as STAT3-specific inhibitors, introducing the ‘STAT-comparative binding affinity value’ and ‘ligand binding pose variation’ as selection criteria. In silico screening of a multi-million clean leads (CL) compound library for binding of all STATs, likewise identified potential specific inhibitors for STAT1 and STAT3 after docking validation. Based on comparative virtual screening and docking validation, we developed a novel STAT inhibitor screening tool that allows identification of specific STAT1 and STAT3 inhibitory compounds. This could increase our

  12. Stat1 negatively regulates immune-mediated injury with Anaplasma phagocytophilum infection.

    PubMed

    Choi, Kyoung-Seong; Scorpio, Diana G; Dumler, J Stephen

    2014-11-15

    Human granulocytic anaplasmosis (HGA) is caused by the obligate intracellular bacterium Anaplasma phagocytophilum. Our data previously demonstrated that A. phagocytophilum induces an immunopathologic response by activating IFN-γ production through the Stat1 signaling pathway. In this study, we investigated the broader role of Stat1 signaling in the host response to infection with A. phagocytophilum. In Stat1 knockout (KO) compared with wild-type mice, A. phagocytophilum infection was more highly pathogenic as characterized by the unanticipated development of clinical signs in mice including markedly increased splenomegaly, more severe inflammatory splenic and hepatic histopathology, >100-fold higher blood and splenic bacterial loads, and more elevated proinflammatory cytokine/chemokine responses in serum. CD4(+) and CD8(+) T lymphocyte populations were significantly expanded in spleens of A. phagocytophilum-infected Stat1 KO mice compared with wild-type mice. The leukocyte infiltrates in the livers and spleens of A. phagocytophilum-infected Stat1 KO mice also contained expansions in neutrophil and monocyte/macrophage populations. Importantly, A. phagocytophilum-infected Stat1 KO mice did not demonstrate induction of inducible NO synthase in splenocytes. These results show that Stat1 plays an important role in controlling bacterial loads but also by unexpectedly providing an undefined mechanism for dampening of the immunopathologic response observed with A. phagocytophilum infection. PMID:25305312

  13. Opposing roles of STAT1 and STAT3 in IL-21 function in CD4+ T cells.

    PubMed

    Wan, Chi-Keung; Andraski, Allison B; Spolski, Rosanne; Li, Peng; Kazemian, Majid; Oh, Jangsuk; Samsel, Leigh; Swanson, Phillip A; McGavern, Dorian B; Sampaio, Elizabeth P; Freeman, Alexandra F; Milner, Joshua D; Holland, Steven M; Leonard, Warren J

    2015-07-28

    IL-21 is a type I cytokine essential for immune cell differentiation and function. Although IL-21 can activate several STAT family transcription factors, previous studies focused mainly on the role of STAT3 in IL-21 signaling. Here, we investigated the role of STAT1 and show that STAT1 and STAT3 have at least partially opposing roles in IL-21 signaling in CD4(+) T cells. IL-21 induced STAT1 phosphorylation, and this was augmented in Stat3-deficient CD4(+) T cells. RNA-Seq analysis of CD4(+) T cells from Stat1- and Stat3-deficient mice revealed that both STAT1 and STAT3 are critical for IL-21-mediated gene regulation. Expression of some genes, including Tbx21 and Ifng, was differentially regulated by STAT1 and STAT3. Moreover, opposing actions of STAT1 and STAT3 on IFN-γ expression in CD4(+) T cells were demonstrated in vivo during chronic lymphocytic choriomeningitis infection. Finally, IL-21-mediated induction of STAT1 phosphorylation, as well as IFNG and TBX21 expression, were higher in CD4(+) T cells from patients with autosomal dominant hyper-IgE syndrome, which is caused by STAT3 deficiency, as well as in cells from STAT1 gain-of-function patients. These data indicate an interplay between STAT1 and STAT3 in fine-tuning IL-21 actions. PMID:26170288

  14. Stat1 negatively regulates immune-mediated injury with Anaplasma phagocytophilum infection1

    PubMed Central

    Choi, Kyoung-Seong; Scorpio, Diana G.; Dumler, J. Stephen

    2014-01-01

    Human granulocytic anaplasmosis (HGA) is caused by the obligate intracellular bacterium, Anaplasma phagocytophilum. Our data previously demonstrated that A. phagocytophilum induces an immunopathologic response by activating IFNγ production through the signal transducer and activation of transcription 1 (Stat1) signaling pathway. In this study, we investigated the broader role of Stat1 signaling in the host response to infection with A. phagocytophilum. In Stat1 knock out (KO) compared to wild type mice, A. phagocytophilum infection was more highly pathogenic as characterized by the unanticipated development of clinical signs in mice including markedly increased splenomegaly, more severe inflammatory splenic and hepatic histopathology, >100-fold higher blood and splenic bacterial loads, and more elevated pro-inflammatory cytokine/chemokine responses in serum. CD4+ and CD8+ T lymphocyte populations were significantly expanded in spleens of A. phagocytophilum-infected Stat1 KO mice compared with wild-type (WT) mice. The leukocyte infiltrates in the livers and spleens of A. phagocytophilum-infected Stat1 KO mice also contained expansions in neutrophil and monocytes/macrophage populations. Importantly, A. phagocytophilum-infected Stat1 KO mice did not demonstrate induction of iNOS in splenocytes. These results show that Stat1 plays an important role in controlling bacterial loads but also by unexpectedly providing an undefined mechanism for dampening of the immunopathologic response observed with A. phagocytophilum infection. PMID:25305312

  15. Flavanocoumarins from Guazuma ulmifolia bark and evaluation of their affinity for STAT1.

    PubMed

    Maldini, Mariateresa; Di Micco, Simone; Montoro, Paola; Darra, Elena; Mariotto, Sofia; Bifulco, Giuseppe; Pizza, Cosimo; Piacente, Sonia

    2013-02-01

    From the bark of Guazuma ulmifolia, a plant used as anti-inflammatory remedy, the flavanocoumarin epiphyllocoumarin (1) along with epiphyllocoumarin-[4β→8]-(-)-epicatechin (2) and epiphyllocoumarin-[4β→8]-(-)-epicatechin-[4β→8]-(-)-epicatechin (3), never reported before, have been isolated. The structures of the proantocyanidins 2-3 have been elucidated by extensive NMR and ESI-MS analysis. On the basis of the flavane nature of the isolated compounds and considering the strong anti-STAT1 activity reported for epigallocatechin 3-O-gallate (EGCG), the affinity of compounds 1-3 for STAT1 has been evaluated by Surface Plasmon Resonance. Compounds 1-2 showed affinity for STAT1 comparable to that exerted by EGCG. In order to confirm this result, molecular docking studies to evaluate the interactions of compounds 1-3, phyllocoumarin (4), the reference compound EGCG (5), and its related compound (+)-gallocatechin 3-O-gallate (6) with STAT1 have been carried out. Furthermore the ability of compounds 1-3 to inhibit STAT1 activation has been evaluated using a nuclear extract obtained from the human monocytic leukemia cell line TPH-1. Flavanocoumarins 1-2 inhibited STAT1-DNA binding. PMID:23158905

  16. Impaired activation of Stat1 and c-Jun as a possible defect in macrophages of patients with active tuberculosis.

    PubMed

    Esquivel-Solís, H; Quiñones-Falconi, F; Zarain-Herzberg, A; Amieva-Fernández, R I; López-Vidal, Y

    2009-10-01

    Studies of patients with active tuberculosis (TB) and infected healthy individuals have shown that interferon (IFN)-gamma is present in sites of Mycobacterium tuberculosis infection in comparable levels. This suggests that there is a deficiency in the macrophage response to IFN-gamma in TB patients. We used recombinant human IFN-gamma to stimulate adherent monocyte-derived macrophages from three groups of people: patients with active tuberculosis (TBP), their healthy household contacts (HHC) and healthy uninfected controls from the community (CC). We then evaluated the ability of the macrophages to inhibit the growth of M. tuberculosis H37Rv as well as their cytokine profile at early in infection (48 h). After IFN-gamma treatment, macrophages of healthy individuals (HHC and CC) controlled M. tuberculosis growth and produced mainly nitric oxide (NO) and interleukin (IL)-12p70, whereas TBP macrophages did not kill M. tuberculosis. Additionally, TBP macrophages produced low levels of NO and IL-12p70 and high levels of tumour necrosis factor (TNF)-alpha and IL-10. Transforming growth factor (TGF)-beta levels were similar among all three groups. M. tuberculosis infection had little effect on the cytokine response after IFN-gamma stimulus, but infection alone induced more IL-10 and TGF-beta in TBP macrophages. There were no differences in Stat1 nuclear translocation and DNA binding between the groups. However, the phosphorylated Stat1 and c-Jun (AP-1) in nuclear protein extracts was diminished in TBP macrophages compared to macrophages of healthy individuals. These results indicate an impairment of Stat1-dependent and Stat1-independent IFN-gamma signalling in macrophages of people with active tuberculosis, suggesting a different molecular regulation that could impact macrophage functionality and disease outcome. PMID:19737230

  17. Gain-of-function human STAT1 mutations impair IL-17 immunity and underlie chronic mucocutaneous candidiasis

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Luyan; Okada, Satoshi; Kong, Xiao-Fei; Kreins, Alexandra Y.; Cypowyj, Sophie; Abhyankar, Avinash; Toubiana, Julie; Itan, Yuval; Audry, Magali; Nitschke, Patrick; Masson, Cécile; Toth, Beata; Flatot, Jérome; Migaud, Mélanie; Chrabieh, Maya; Kochetkov, Tatiana; Bolze, Alexandre; Borghesi, Alessandro; Toulon, Antoine; Hiller, Julia; Eyerich, Stefanie; Eyerich, Kilian; Gulácsy, Vera; Chernyshova, Ludmyla; Chernyshov, Viktor; Bondarenko, Anastasia; María Cortés Grimaldo, Rosa; Blancas-Galicia, Lizbeth; Madrigal Beas, Ileana Maria; Roesler, Joachim; Magdorf, Klaus; Engelhard, Dan; Thumerelle, Caroline; Burgel, Pierre-Régis; Hoernes, Miriam; Drexel, Barbara; Seger, Reinhard; Kusuma, Theresia; Jansson, Annette F.; Sawalle-Belohradsky, Julie; Belohradsky, Bernd; Jouanguy, Emmanuelle; Bustamante, Jacinta; Bué, Mélanie; Karin, Nathan; Wildbaum, Gizi; Bodemer, Christine; Lortholary, Olivier; Fischer, Alain; Blanche, Stéphane; Al-Muhsen, Saleh; Reichenbach, Janine; Kobayashi, Masao; Rosales, Francisco Espinosa; Lozano, Carlos Torres; Kilic, Sara Sebnem; Oleastro, Matias; Etzioni, Amos; Traidl-Hoffmann, Claudia; Renner, Ellen D.; Abel, Laurent; Picard, Capucine; Maródi, László; Boisson-Dupuis, Stéphanie

    2011-01-01

    Chronic mucocutaneous candidiasis disease (CMCD) may be caused by autosomal dominant (AD) IL-17F deficiency or autosomal recessive (AR) IL-17RA deficiency. Here, using whole-exome sequencing, we identified heterozygous germline mutations in STAT1 in 47 patients from 20 kindreds with AD CMCD. Previously described heterozygous STAT1 mutant alleles are loss-of-function and cause AD predisposition to mycobacterial disease caused by impaired STAT1-dependent cellular responses to IFN-γ. Other loss-of-function STAT1 alleles cause AR predisposition to intracellular bacterial and viral diseases, caused by impaired STAT1-dependent responses to IFN-α/β, IFN-γ, IFN-λ, and IL-27. In contrast, the 12 AD CMCD-inducing STAT1 mutant alleles described here are gain-of-function and increase STAT1-dependent cellular responses to these cytokines, and to cytokines that predominantly activate STAT3, such as IL-6 and IL-21. All of these mutations affect the coiled-coil domain and impair the nuclear dephosphorylation of activated STAT1, accounting for their gain-of-function and dominance. Stronger cellular responses to the STAT1-dependent IL-17 inhibitors IFN-α/β, IFN-γ, and IL-27, and stronger STAT1 activation in response to the STAT3-dependent IL-17 inducers IL-6 and IL-21, hinder the development of T cells producing IL-17A, IL-17F, and IL-22. Gain-of-function STAT1 alleles therefore cause AD CMCD by impairing IL-17 immunity. PMID:21727188

  18. HDAC4-regulated STAT1 activation mediates platinum resistance in ovarian cancer.

    PubMed

    Stronach, Euan A; Alfraidi, Albandri; Rama, Nona; Datler, Christoph; Studd, James B; Agarwal, Roshan; Guney, Tankut G; Gourley, Charlie; Hennessy, Bryan T; Mills, Gordon B; Mai, Antonello; Brown, Robert; Dina, Roberto; Gabra, Hani

    2011-07-01

    Ovarian cancer frequently acquires resistance to platinum chemotherapy, representing a major challenge for improving patient survival. Recent work suggests that resistant clones exist within a larger drug-sensitive cell population prior to chemotherapy, implying that resistance is selected for rather than generated by treatment. We sought to compare clinically derived, intrapatient paired models of initial platinum response and subsequent resistant relapse to define molecular determinants of evolved resistance. Transcriptional analysis of a matched cell line series from three patients with high-grade serous ovarian cancer before and after development of clinical platinum resistance (PEO1/PEO4/PEO6, PEA1/PEA2, PEO14/PEO23) identified 91 up- and 126 downregulated genes common to acquired resistance. Significantly enhanced apoptotic response to platinum treatment in resistant cells was observed following knockdown of histone deacetylase (HDAC) 4, FOLR2, PIK3R1, or STAT1 (P < 0.05). Interestingly, HDAC4 and STAT1 were found to physically interact. Acetyl-STAT1 was detected in platinum-sensitive cells but not in HDAC4 overexpressing platinum-resistant cells from the same patient. In resistant cells, STAT1 phosphorylation/nuclear translocation was seen following platinum exposure, whereas silencing of HDAC4 increased acetyl-STAT1 levels, prevented platinum-induced STAT1 activation, and restored cisplatin sensitivity. Conversely, matched sensitive cells were refractory to STAT1 phosphorylation on platinum treatment. Analysis of 16 paired tumor biopsies taken before and after development of clinical platinum resistance showed significantly increased HDAC4 expression in resistant tumors [n = 7 of 16 (44%); P = 0.04]. Therefore, clinical selection of HDAC4-overexpressing tumor cells upon exposure to chemotherapy promotes STAT1 deacetylation and cancer cell survival. Together, our findings identify HDAC4 as a novel, therapeutically tractable target to counter platinum

  19. HDAC4-regulated STAT1 activation mediates platinum resistance in ovarian cancer

    PubMed Central

    Stronach, Euan A; Alfraidi, Albandri; Rama, Nona; Datler, Christoph; Studd, Jamie; Agarwal, Roshan; Guney, Tankut G; Gourley, Charlie; Hennessy, Bryan T; Mills, Gordon B; Mai, Antonello; Brown, Robert; Dina, Roberto; Gabra, Hani

    2011-01-01

    Ovarian cancer frequently acquires resistance to platinum chemotherapy, representing a major challenge for improving patient survival. Recent work suggests resistant clones exist within a larger drug sensitive cell-population prior to chemotherapy, implying that resistance is selected for rather than generated by treatment. We sought to compare clinically-derived, intra-patient paired models of initial platinum response and subsequent resistant relapse to define molecular determinants of evolved resistance. Transcriptional analysis of a matched cell-line series from three patients with high-grade serous ovarian cancer before and after development of clinical platinum resistance (PEO1/PEO4/PEO6, PEA1/PEA2, PEO14/PEO23) identified 91 up- and 126 down-regulated genes common to acquired resistance. Significantly enhanced apoptotic response to platinum treatment in resistant cells was observed following knockdown of HDAC4, FOLR2, PIK3R1 or STAT1 (p<0.05). Interestingly, HDAC4 and STAT1 were found to physically interact. Acetyl-STAT1 was detected in platinum sensitive but not HDAC4 over-expressing platinum resistant cells from the same patient. In resistant cells, STAT1 phosphorylation/nuclear translocation was seen following platinum exposure, whereas silencing of HDAC4 increased acetyl-STAT1 levels, prevented platinum induced STAT1 activation and restored cisplatin sensitivity. Conversely, matched sensitive cells were refractory to STAT1 phosphorylation on platinum treatment. Analysis of 16 paired tumor biopsies taken before and after development of clinical platinum resistance showed significantly increased HDAC4 expression in resistant tumors (n=7/16[44%]; p=0.04). Therefore, clinical selection of HDAC4 overexpressing tumor cells upon exposure to chemotherapy promotes STAT1 deacetylation and cancer cell survival. Together, our findings identify HDAC4 as a novel, therapeutically tractable target to counter platinum resistance in ovarian cancer. PMID:21571862

  20. The DNA replication factor MCM5 is essential for Stat1-mediated transcriptional activation

    PubMed Central

    Snyder, Marylynn; He, Wei; Zhang, J. Jillian

    2005-01-01

    The eukaryotic minichromosome maintenance (MCM) family of proteins (MCM2–MCM7) is evolutionarily conserved from yeast to human. These proteins are essential for DNA replication. The signal transducer and activator of transcription proteins are critical for the signal transduction of a multitude of cytokines and growth factors leading to the regulation of gene expression. We previously identified a strong interaction between Stat1 and MCM5. However, the physiological significance of this interaction was not clear. We show here by chromatin immunoprecipitation (ChIP) analyses that the MCM5 protein, as well as other members of the MCM family, is inducibly recruited to Stat1 target gene promoters in response to cytokine stimulation. Furthermore, the MCM proteins are shown to move along with the RNA polymerase II during transcription elongation. We have also identified an independent domain in MCM5 that mediates the interaction between Stat1 and MCM5; overexpression of this domain can disrupt the interaction between Stat1 and MCM5 and inhibit Stat1 transcriptional activity. Finally, we used the RNA interference technique to show that MCM5 is essential for transcription activation of Stat1 target genes. Together, these results demonstrate that, in addition to their roles in DNA replication, the MCM proteins are also necessary for transcription activation. PMID:16199513

  1. Newcastle Disease Virus V Protein Targets Phosphorylated STAT1 to Block IFN-I Signaling

    PubMed Central

    Qiu, Xusheng; Fu, Qiang; Meng, Chunchun; Yu, Shengqing; Zhan, Yuan; Dong, Luna; Song, Cuiping; Sun, Yingjie; Tan, Lei; Hu, Shunlin; Wang, Xiaoquan; Liu, Xiaowen; Peng, Daxin; Liu, Xiufan; Ding, Chan

    2016-01-01

    Newcastle disease virus (NDV) V protein is considered as an effector for IFN antagonism, however, the mechanism remains unknown. In this study, the expression of STAT1 and phospho-STAT1 in cells infected with NDV or transfected with V protein-expressing plasmids were analyzed. Our results showed that NDV V protein targets phospho-STAT1 reduction in the cells depends on the stimulation of IFN-α. In addition, a V-deficient genotype VII recombinant NDV strain rZJ1-VS was constructed using reverse genetic technique to confirm the results. The rZJ1-VS lost the ability to reduce phospho-STAT1 and induced higher expression of IFN-responsive genes in infected cells. Furthermore, treatment with an ubiquitin E1 inhibitor PYR-41 demonstrated that phospho-STAT1 reduction was caused by degradation, but not de-phosphorylation. We conclude that NDV V protein targets phospho-STAT1 degradation to block IFN-α signaling, which adds novel knowledge to the strategies used by paramyxoviruses to evade IFN. PMID:26859759

  2. STAT2 Mediates Innate Immunity to Dengue Virus in the Absence of STAT1 via the Type I Interferon Receptor

    PubMed Central

    Perry, Stuart T.; Buck, Michael D.; Lada, Steven M.; Schindler, Christian; Shresta, Sujan

    2011-01-01

    Dengue virus (DENV) is a mosquito-borne flavivirus, and symptoms of infection range from asymptomatic to the severe dengue hemorrhagic fever/dengue shock syndrome (DHF/DSS). High viral loads correlate with disease severity, and both type I & II interferons (IFNs) are crucial for controlling viral replication. We have previously reported that signal transducer and activator of transcription (STAT) 1-deficient mice are resistant to DENV-induced disease, but little is known about this STAT1-independent mechanism of protection. To determine the molecular basis of the STAT1-independent pathway, mice lacking STAT1, STAT2, or both STAT1 and STAT2 were infected with a virulent mouse-adapted strain of DENV2. In the first 72 hours of infection, the single-deficient mice lacking STAT1 or STAT2 possessed 50–100 fold higher levels of viral RNA than wild type mice in the serum, spleen, and other visceral tissues, but remained resistant to DENV-induced death. In contrast, the double-deficient mice exhibited the early death phenotype previously observed in type I and II IFN receptor knockout mice (AG129), indicating that STAT2 is the mediator of the STAT1-independent host defense mechanism. Further studies demonstrated that this STAT2-dependent STAT1-independent mechanism requires the type I IFN receptor, and contributes to the autocrine amplification of type I IFN expression. Examination of gene expression in the spleen and bone marrow-derived macrophages following DENV infection revealed STAT2-dependent pathways can induce the transcription of a subset of interferon stimulated genes even in the absence of STAT1. Collectively, these results help elucidate the nature of the poorly understood STAT1-independent host defense mechanism against viruses by identifying a functional type I IFN/STAT2 signaling pathway following DENV infection in vivo. PMID:21379341

  3. Human Cytomegalovirus Immediate-Early 1 Protein Rewires Upstream STAT3 to Downstream STAT1 Signaling Switching an IL6-Type to an IFNγ-Like Response

    PubMed Central

    Lukas, Simone; Zenger, Marion; Reitberger, Tobias; Danzer, Daniela; Übner, Theresa; Munday, Diane C.; Paulus, Christina

    2016-01-01

    The human cytomegalovirus (hCMV) major immediate-early 1 protein (IE1) is best known for activating transcription to facilitate viral replication. Here we present transcriptome data indicating that IE1 is as significant a repressor as it is an activator of host gene expression. Human cells induced to express IE1 exhibit global repression of IL6- and oncostatin M-responsive STAT3 target genes. This repression is followed by STAT1 phosphorylation and activation of STAT1 target genes normally induced by IFNγ. The observed repression and subsequent activation are both mediated through the same region (amino acids 410 to 445) in the C-terminal domain of IE1, and this region serves as a binding site for STAT3. Depletion of STAT3 phenocopies the STAT1-dependent IFNγ-like response to IE1. In contrast, depletion of the IL6 receptor (IL6ST) or the STAT kinase JAK1 prevents this response. Accordingly, treatment with IL6 leads to prolonged STAT1 instead of STAT3 activation in wild-type IE1 expressing cells, but not in cells expressing a mutant protein (IE1dl410-420) deficient for STAT3 binding. A very similar STAT1-directed response to IL6 is also present in cells infected with a wild-type or revertant hCMV, but not an IE1dl410-420 mutant virus, and this response results in restricted viral replication. We conclude that IE1 is sufficient and necessary to rewire upstream IL6-type to downstream IFNγ-like signaling, two pathways linked to opposing actions, resulting in repressed STAT3- and activated STAT1-responsive genes. These findings relate transcriptional repressor and activator functions of IE1 and suggest unexpected outcomes relevant to viral pathogenesis in response to cytokines or growth factors that signal through the IL6ST-JAK1-STAT3 axis in hCMV-infected cells. Our results also reveal that IE1, a protein considered to be a key activator of the hCMV productive cycle, has an unanticipated role in tempering viral replication. PMID:27387064

  4. Human Cytomegalovirus Immediate-Early 1 Protein Rewires Upstream STAT3 to Downstream STAT1 Signaling Switching an IL6-Type to an IFNγ-Like Response.

    PubMed

    Harwardt, Thomas; Lukas, Simone; Zenger, Marion; Reitberger, Tobias; Danzer, Daniela; Übner, Theresa; Munday, Diane C; Nevels, Michael; Paulus, Christina

    2016-07-01

    The human cytomegalovirus (hCMV) major immediate-early 1 protein (IE1) is best known for activating transcription to facilitate viral replication. Here we present transcriptome data indicating that IE1 is as significant a repressor as it is an activator of host gene expression. Human cells induced to express IE1 exhibit global repression of IL6- and oncostatin M-responsive STAT3 target genes. This repression is followed by STAT1 phosphorylation and activation of STAT1 target genes normally induced by IFNγ. The observed repression and subsequent activation are both mediated through the same region (amino acids 410 to 445) in the C-terminal domain of IE1, and this region serves as a binding site for STAT3. Depletion of STAT3 phenocopies the STAT1-dependent IFNγ-like response to IE1. In contrast, depletion of the IL6 receptor (IL6ST) or the STAT kinase JAK1 prevents this response. Accordingly, treatment with IL6 leads to prolonged STAT1 instead of STAT3 activation in wild-type IE1 expressing cells, but not in cells expressing a mutant protein (IE1dl410-420) deficient for STAT3 binding. A very similar STAT1-directed response to IL6 is also present in cells infected with a wild-type or revertant hCMV, but not an IE1dl410-420 mutant virus, and this response results in restricted viral replication. We conclude that IE1 is sufficient and necessary to rewire upstream IL6-type to downstream IFNγ-like signaling, two pathways linked to opposing actions, resulting in repressed STAT3- and activated STAT1-responsive genes. These findings relate transcriptional repressor and activator functions of IE1 and suggest unexpected outcomes relevant to viral pathogenesis in response to cytokines or growth factors that signal through the IL6ST-JAK1-STAT3 axis in hCMV-infected cells. Our results also reveal that IE1, a protein considered to be a key activator of the hCMV productive cycle, has an unanticipated role in tempering viral replication. PMID:27387064

  5. Two Domains of the V Protein of Virulent Canine Distemper Virus Selectively Inhibit STAT1 and STAT2 Nuclear Import▿

    PubMed Central

    Röthlisberger, Anne; Wiener, Dominique; Schweizer, Matthias; Peterhans, Ernst; Zurbriggen, Andreas; Plattet, Philippe

    2010-01-01

    Canine distemper virus (CDV) causes in dogs a severe systemic infection, with a high frequency of demyelinating encephalitis. Among the six genes transcribed by CDV, the P gene encodes the polymerase cofactor protein (P) as well as two additional nonstructural proteins, C and V; of these V was shown to act as a virulence factor. We investigated the molecular mechanisms by which the P gene products of the neurovirulent CDV A75/17 strain disrupt type I interferon (IFN-α/β)-induced signaling that results in the establishment of the antiviral state. Using recombinant knockout A75/17 viruses, the V protein was identified as the main antagonist of IFN-α/β-mediated signaling. Importantly, immunofluorescence analysis illustrated that the inhibition of IFN-α/β-mediated signaling correlated with impaired STAT1/STAT2 nuclear import, whereas the phosphorylation state of these proteins was not affected. Coimmunoprecipitation assays identified the N-terminal region of V (VNT) responsible for STAT1 targeting, which correlated with its ability to inhibit the activity of the IFN-α/β-mediated antiviral state. Conversely, while the C-terminal domain of V (VCT) could not function autonomously, when fused to VNT it optimally interacted with STAT2 and subsequently efficiently suppressed the IFN-α/β-mediated signaling pathway. The latter result was further supported by a single mutation at position 110 within the VNT domain of CDV V protein, resulting in a mutant that lost STAT1 binding while retaining a partial STAT2 association. Taken together, our results identified the CDV VNT and VCT as two essential modules that complement each other to interfere with the antiviral state induced by IFN-α/β-mediated signaling. Hence, our experiments reveal a novel mechanism of IFN-α/β evasion among the morbilliviruses. PMID:20427537

  6. Modulation of Stat-1 in Human Macrophages Infected with Different Species of Intracellular Pathogenic Bacteria

    PubMed Central

    Dominici, Sabrina; Rinaldi, Laura; Cangiano, Alfonsina Mariarosaria; Brandi, Giorgio; Magnani, Mauro

    2016-01-01

    The infection of human macrophages by pathogenic bacteria induces different signaling pathways depending on the type of cellular receptors involved in the microorganism entry and on their mechanism(s) of survival and replication in the host cell. It was reported that Stat proteins play an important role in this process. In the present study, we investigate the changes in Stat-1 activation (phosphorylation in p-tyr701) after uptake of two Gram-positive (Listeria monocytogenes and Staphylococcus aureus) and two Gram-negative bacteria (Salmonella typhimurium and Legionella pneumophila) characterized by their varying abilities to enter, survive, and replicate in human macrophages. Comparing the results obtained with Gram-negative and Gram-positive bacteria, Stat-1 activation in macrophages does not seem to be related to LPS content. The p-tyr701Stat-1 expression levels were found to be independent of the internalized bacterial number and IFN-γ release. On the contrary, Jak/Stat-1 pathway activation only occurs when an active infection has been established in the host macrophage, and it is plausible that the differences in the expression levels of p-tyr701Stat-1 could be due to different survival mechanisms or to differences in bacteria life cycles within macrophages. PMID:27437406

  7. STAT1 signaling within macrophages is required for antifungal activity against Cryptococcus neoformans.

    PubMed

    Leopold Wager, Chrissy M; Hole, Camaron R; Wozniak, Karen L; Olszewski, Michal A; Mueller, Mathias; Wormley, Floyd L

    2015-12-01

    Cryptococcus neoformans, the predominant etiological agent of cryptococcosis, is an opportunistic fungal pathogen that primarily affects AIDS patients and patients undergoing immunosuppressive therapy. In immunocompromised individuals, C. neoformans can lead to life-threatening meningoencephalitis. Studies using a virulent strain of C. neoformans engineered to produce gamma interferon (IFN-γ), denoted H99γ, demonstrated that protection against pulmonary C. neoformans infection is associated with the generation of a T helper 1 (Th1)-type immune response and signal transducer and activator of transcription 1 (STAT1)-mediated classical (M1) macrophage activation. However, the critical mechanism by which M1 macrophages mediate their anti-C. neoformans activity remains unknown. The current studies demonstrate that infection with C. neoformans strain H99γ in mice with macrophage-specific STAT1 ablation resulted in severely increased inflammation of the pulmonary tissue, a dysregulated Th1/Th2-type immune response, increased fungal burden, deficient M1 macrophage activation, and loss of protection. STAT1-deficient macrophages produced significantly less nitric oxide (NO) than STAT1-sufficient macrophages, correlating with an inability to control intracellular cryptococcal proliferation, even in the presence of reactive oxygen species (ROS). Furthermore, macrophages from inducible nitric oxide synthase knockout mice, which had intact ROS production, were deficient in anticryptococcal activity. These data indicate that STAT1 activation within macrophages is required for M1 macrophage activation and anti-C. neoformans activity via the production of NO. PMID:26351277

  8. STAT1 deficiency redirects IFN signalling toward suppression of TLR response through a feedback activation of STAT3

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Hun Sik; Kim, Dong Chan; Kim, Hong-Mi; Kwon, Hyung-Joon; Kwon, Soon Jae; Kang, Suk-Jo; Kim, Sun Chang; Choi, Go-Eun

    2015-01-01

    Interferons (IFNs) potentiate macrophage activation typically via a STAT1-dependent pathway. Recent studies suggest a functioning of STAT1-independent pathway in the regulation of gene expression by IFN-γ, thus pointing to the diversity in cellular responses to IFNs. Many functions of IFNs rely on cross-regulation of the responses to exogenous inflammatory mediators such as TLR ligands. Here we investigated the contribution of STAT1-independent pathway to macrophage activation and its underlying mechanism in the context of combined stimulation of IFN and TLR. We found that TLR-induced production of inflammatory cytokines (TNF-α, IL-12) was not simply nullified but was significantly suppressed by signaling common to IFN-γ and IFN-β in STAT1-null macrophages. Such a shift in the suppression of TLR response correlated with a sustained STAT3 activation and attenuation of NF-κB signaling. Using a JAK2/STAT3 pathway inhibitor or STAT3-specific siRNA, blocking STAT3 in that context restored TNF-α production and NF-κB signaling, thus indicating a functional cross-regulation among STAT1, STAT3, and NF-κB. Our results suggest that STAT1 deficiency reprograms IFN signaling from priming toward suppression of TLR response via feedback regulation of STAT3, which may provide a new insight into the host defense response against microbial pathogens in a situation of STAT1 deficiency. PMID:26299368

  9. PI3Kα and STAT1 Interplay Regulates Human Mesenchymal Stem Cell Immune Polarization

    PubMed Central

    Mounayar, Marwan; Kefaloyianni, Eirini; Smith, Brian; Solhjou, Zhabiz; Maarouf, Omar H.; Azzi, Jamil; Chabtini, Lola; Fiorina, Paolo; Kraus, Morey; Briddell, Robert; Fodor, William; Herrlich, Andreas; Abdi, Reza

    2016-01-01

    The immunomodulatory capacity of mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) is critical for their use in therapeutic applications. MSC response to specific inflammatory cues allows them to switch between a proinflammatory (MSC1) or anti-inflammatory (MSC2) phenotype. Regulatory mechanisms controlling this switch remain to be defined. One characteristic feature of MSC2 is their ability to respond to IFNγ with induction of indoleamine 2,3-dioxygenase (IDO), representing the key immunoregulatory molecule released by human MSC. Here, we show that STAT1 and PI3Kα pathways interplay regulates IFNγ-induced IDO production in MSC. Chemical phosphoinositide 3-kinase (PI3K) pan-inhibition, PI3Kα-specific inhibition or shRNA knockdown diminished IFNγ-induced IDO production. This effect involved PI3Kα-mediated upregulation of STAT1 protein levels and phosphorylation at Ser727. Overexpression of STAT1 or of a constitutively active PI3Kα mutant failed to induce basal IDO production, but shifted MSC into an MSC2-like phenotype by strongly enhancing IDO production in response to IFNγ as compared to controls. STAT1 overexpression strongly enhanced MSC-mediated T-cell suppression. The same effect could be induced using short-term pretreatment of MSC with a chemical inhibitor of the counter player of PI3K, phosphatase and tensin homolog. Finally, downregulation of STAT1 abrogated the immunosuppressive capacity of MSC. Our results for the first time identify critical upstream signals for the induced production of IDO in MSCs that could be manipulated therapeutically to enhance their immunosuppressive phenotype. PMID:25753288

  10. Rotavirus NSP1 Protein Inhibits Interferon-Mediated STAT1 Activation

    PubMed Central

    Sen, Adrish; Rott, Lusijah; Phan, Nguyen; Mukherjee, Gourab

    2014-01-01

    Rotavirus (RV) replicates efficiently in intestinal epithelial cells (IECs) in vivo despite the activation of a local host interferon (IFN) response. Previously, we demonstrated that homologous RV efficiently inhibits IFN induction in single infected and bystander villous IECs in vivo. Paradoxically, RV also induces significant type I IFN expression in the intestinal hematopoietic cell compartment in a relatively replication-independent manner. This suggests that RV replication and spread in IECs must occur despite exogenous stimulation of the STAT1-mediated IFN signaling pathway. Here we report that RV inhibits IFN-mediated STAT1 tyrosine 701 phosphorylation in human IECs in vitro and identify RV NSP1 as a direct inhibitor of the pathway. Infection of human HT29 IECs with simian (RRV) or porcine (SB1A or OSU) RV strains, which inhibit IFN induction by targeting either IFN regulatory factor 3 (IRF3) or NF-κB, respectively, resulted in similar regulation of IFN secretion. By flow cytometric analysis at early times during infection, neither RRV nor SB1A effectively inhibited the activation of Y701-STAT1 in response to exogenously added IFN. However, at later times during infection, both RV strains efficiently inhibited IFN-mediated STAT1 activation within virus-infected cells, indicating that RV encodes inhibitors of IFN signaling targeting STAT1 phosphorylation. Expression of RV NSP1 in the absence of other viral proteins resulted in blockage of exogenous IFN-mediated STAT1 phosphorylation, and this function was conserved in NSP1 from simian, bovine, and murine RV strains. Analysis of NSP1 determinants responsible for the inhibition of IFN induction and signaling pathways revealed that these determinants are encoded on discrete domains of NSP1. Finally, we observed that at later times during infection with SB1A, there was almost complete inhibition of IFN-mediated Y701-STAT1 in bystander cells staining negative for viral antigen. This property segregated with the

  11. Rotavirus NSP1 protein inhibits interferon-mediated STAT1 activation.

    PubMed

    Sen, Adrish; Rott, Lusijah; Phan, Nguyen; Mukherjee, Gourab; Greenberg, Harry B

    2014-01-01

    Rotavirus (RV) replicates efficiently in intestinal epithelial cells (IECs) in vivo despite the activation of a local host interferon (IFN) response. Previously, we demonstrated that homologous RV efficiently inhibits IFN induction in single infected and bystander villous IECs in vivo. Paradoxically, RV also induces significant type I IFN expression in the intestinal hematopoietic cell compartment in a relatively replication-independent manner. This suggests that RV replication and spread in IECs must occur despite exogenous stimulation of the STAT1-mediated IFN signaling pathway. Here we report that RV inhibits IFN-mediated STAT1 tyrosine 701 phosphorylation in human IECs in vitro and identify RV NSP1 as a direct inhibitor of the pathway. Infection of human HT29 IECs with simian (RRV) or porcine (SB1A or OSU) RV strains, which inhibit IFN induction by targeting either IFN regulatory factor 3 (IRF3) or NF-κB, respectively, resulted in similar regulation of IFN secretion. By flow cytometric analysis at early times during infection, neither RRV nor SB1A effectively inhibited the activation of Y701-STAT1 in response to exogenously added IFN. However, at later times during infection, both RV strains efficiently inhibited IFN-mediated STAT1 activation within virus-infected cells, indicating that RV encodes inhibitors of IFN signaling targeting STAT1 phosphorylation. Expression of RV NSP1 in the absence of other viral proteins resulted in blockage of exogenous IFN-mediated STAT1 phosphorylation, and this function was conserved in NSP1 from simian, bovine, and murine RV strains. Analysis of NSP1 determinants responsible for the inhibition of IFN induction and signaling pathways revealed that these determinants are encoded on discrete domains of NSP1. Finally, we observed that at later times during infection with SB1A, there was almost complete inhibition of IFN-mediated Y701-STAT1 in bystander cells staining negative for viral antigen. This property segregated with the

  12. Bcl6 promotes osteoblastogenesis through Stat1 inhibition

    SciTech Connect

    Fujie, Atsuhiro; Funayama, Atsushi; Miyauchi, Yoshiteru; Sato, Yuiko; Kobayashi, Tami; Kanagawa, Hiroya; Katsuyama, Eri; Hao, Wu; Tando, Toshimi; Watanabe, Ryuichi; Morita, Mayu; Miyamoto, Kana; Kanaji, Arihiko; Morioka, Hideo; Matsumoto, Morio; Toyama, Yoshiaki; Miyamoto, Takeshi

    2015-02-13

    Bone mass is tightly controlled by a balance between osteoclast and osteoblast activities. Although these cell types mature via different pathways, some factors reportedly regulate differentiation of both. Here, in a search for factors governing osteoblastogenesis but also expressed in osteoclasts to control both cell types by one molecule, we identified B cell lymphoma 6 (Bcl6) as one of those factors and show that it promotes osteoblast differentiation. Bcl6 was previously shown to negatively regulate osteoclastogenesis. We report that lack of Bcl6 results in significant inhibition of osteoblastogensis in vivo and in vitro and in defects in secondary ossification center formation in vivo. Signal transducer and activator of transcription 1 (Stat1) reportedly attenuates osteoblast differentiation by inhibiting nuclear translocation of runt-related transcription factor 2 (Runx2), which is essential for osteoblast differentiation. We found that lack of Bcl6 resulted in significant elevation of Stat1 mRNA and protein expression in osteoblasts and showed that Stat1 is a direct target of Bcl6 using a chromatin immune-precipitation assay. Mice lacking both Bcl6 and Stat1 (DKO) exhibited significant rescue of bone mass and osteoblastic parameters as well as partial rescue of secondary ossification center formation compared with Bcl6-deficient mice in vivo. Altered osteoblastogenesis in Bcl6-deficient cells was also restored in DKO in vitro. Thus, Bcl6 plays crucial roles in regulating both osteoblast activation and osteoclast inhibition. - Highlights: • Bcl6 is required for osteoblast differentiation. • Bcl6{sup −/−} mice exhibited altered osteoblastogenesis and reduced bone mass in vivo and in vitro. • We identified Stat1 as a direct target of Bcl6 in osteoblasts. • Bcl6 and Stat1 doubly deficient mice exhibited rescued bone phenotypes compared with Bcl6{sup −/−} mice.

  13. Exploring dual inhibitors for STAT1 and STAT5 receptors utilizing virtual screening and dynamics simulation validation.

    PubMed

    Raj, Utkarsh; Kumar, Himansu; Gupta, Saurabh; Varadwaj, Pritish Kumar

    2016-10-01

    Signal transducer and activator of transcription (STAT) proteins are latent cytoplasmic transcription factors that transduce signals from cytokines and growth factors to the nucleus and thereby regulate the expression of a variety of target genes. Although mutations of STATs have not been reported in human tumors but the activity of several members of the family, such as STAT1 and STAT5, is deregulated in a variety of human carcinoma. STAT1 and STAT5 share a structural similarity with a highly conserved SH2 domain which is responsible for the activation of STAT proteins on interaction with phosphotyrosine motifs for specific STAT-receptor contacts and STAT dimerization. The purpose of this study is to identify domain-specific dual inhibitors for both STAT1 and STAT5 proteins from a database of natural products and natural product-like compounds comprising of over 90,000 compounds. Virtual screening-based molecular docking was performed in order to find novel natural dual inhibitors. Further, the study was supported by the 50-ns molecular dynamics simulation for receptor-ligand complexes (STAT1-STOCK-1N-69677 and STAT5-STOCK-1N-69677). Analysis of molecular interactions in the SH2 domains of both STAT1 and STAT5 proteins with the ligand revealed few conserved amino acid residues which are responsible to stabilize the ligands within the binding pocket through bonded and non-bonded interactions. This study suggested that compound STOCK-1N-69677 might putatively act as a dual inhibitor of STAT1 and STAT5 receptors, through its binding to the SH2 domain. PMID:26471877

  14. STAT1-S727 - the license to kill

    PubMed Central

    Putz, Eva M.; Gotthardt, Dagmar; Sexl, Veronika

    2014-01-01

    Serine phosphorylation has generally been considered indispensable for full transcriptional activity of STAT proteins. Recent data indicate that CDK8-mediated phosphorylation of signal transducer and activator of transcription 1 (STAT1) on S727 inhibits natural killer (NK) cell cytotoxicity and restrains tumor surveillance. These findings implicate CDK8 as a promising target for immunotherapy. PMID:25941617

  15. Impaired Chromatin Remodelling at STAT1-Regulated Promoters Leads to Global Unresponsiveness of Toxoplasma gondii-Infected Macrophages to IFN-γ

    PubMed Central

    Lang, Christine; Hildebrandt, Anke; Brand, Franziska; Opitz, Lennart; Dihazi, Hassan; Lüder, Carsten G. K.

    2012-01-01

    Intracellular pathogens including the apicomplexan and opportunistic parasite Toxoplasma gondii profoundly modify their host cells in order to establish infection. We have shown previously that intracellular T. gondii inhibit up-regulation of regulatory and effector functions in murine macrophages (MΦ) stimulated with interferon (IFN)-γ, which is the cytokine crucial for controlling the parasites' replication. Using genome-wide transcriptome analysis we show herein that infection with T. gondii leads to global unresponsiveness of murine macrophages to IFN-γ. More than 61% and 89% of the transcripts, which were induced or repressed by IFN-γ in non-infected MΦ, respectively, were not altered after stimulation of T. gondii-infected cells with IFN-γ. These genes are involved in a variety of biological processes, which are mostly but not exclusively related to immune responses. Analyses of the underlying mechanisms revealed that IFN-γ-triggered nuclear translocation of STAT1 still occurred in Toxoplasma-infected MΦ. However, STAT1 bound aberrantly to oligonucleotides containing the IFN-γ-responsive gamma-activated site (GAS) consensus sequence. Conversely, IFN-γ did not induce formation of active GAS-STAT1 complexes in nuclear extracts from infected MΦ. Mass spectrometry of protein complexes bound to GAS oligonucleotides showed that T. gondii-infected MΦ are unable to recruit non-muscle actin to IFN-γ-responsive DNA sequences, which appeared to be independent of stimulation with IFN-γ and of STAT1 binding. IFN-γ-induced recruitment of BRG-1 and acetylation of core histones at the IFN-γ-regulated CIITA promoter IV, but not β-actin was diminished by >90% in Toxoplasma-infected MΦ as compared to non-infected control cells. Remarkably, treatment with histone deacetylase inhibitors restored the ability of infected macrophages to express the IFN-γ regulated genes H2-A/E and CIITA. Taken together, these results indicate that Toxoplasma-infected MΦ are

  16. TYK2-STAT1-BCL2 Pathway Dependence in T-Cell Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia

    PubMed Central

    Sanda, Takaomi; Tyner, Jeffrey W.; Gutierrez, Alejandro; Ngo, Vu N.; Glover, Jason; Chang, Bill H.; Yost, Arla; Ma, Wenxue; Fleischman, Angela G.; Zhou, Wenjun; Yang, Yandan; Kleppe, Maria; Ahn, Yebin; Tatarek, Jessica; Kelliher, Michelle A.; Neuberg, Donna S.; Levine, Ross L.; Moriggl, Richard; Müller, Mathias; Gray, Nathanael S.; Jamieson, Catriona H. M.; Weng, Andrew P.; Staudt, Louis M.; Druker, Brian J.; Look, A. Thomas

    2013-01-01

    Targeted molecular therapy has yielded remarkable outcomes in certain cancers, but specific therapeutic targets remain elusive for many others. As a result of two independent RNA interference (RNAi) screens, we identified pathway dependence on a member of the JAK tyrosine kinase family, TYK2, and its downstream effector STAT1 in T-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia (T-ALL). Gene knockdown experiments consistently demonstrated TYK2 dependence in both T-ALL primary specimens and cell lines, and a small-molecule inhibitor of JAK kinase activity induced T-ALL cell death. Activation of this TYK2-STAT1 pathway i n T-ALL cell lines occurs by gain-of-function TYK2 mutations or activation of IL-10 receptor signaling, and this pathway mediates T-ALL cell survival through upregulation of the anti-apoptotic protein BCL2. These findings indicate that in many T-ALL cases, the leukemic cells are dependent upon the TYK2-STAT1-BCL2 pathway for continued survival, supporting the development of molecular therapies targeting TYK2 and other components of this pathway. PMID:23471820

  17. Molecular characterization of RIG-I, STAT-1 and IFN-beta in the horseshoe bat.

    PubMed

    Li, Jinju; Zhang, Guangxu; Cheng, Dalong; Ren, Hua; Qian, Min; Du, Bing

    2015-04-25

    Wild Chinese horseshoe bats have been proven to be natural reservoirs of SARS-like coronaviruses. However, the molecular characterization of key proteins in bats still needs to be explored further. In this study, we used cloning and bioinformatics to analyze the sequence of RIG-I, STAT-1 and IFN-β in the immortalized cell lines from Rhinolophus affinis and Rhinolophus sinicus. Then, we treated different bat cells, mouse embryonic fibroblasts (MEF) and splenocytes with polyinosinic-polycytidylic acid (polyI:C) and vesicular stomatitis virus (VSV) to assess and compare antiviral immune responses between bats and mice. Our results demonstrated that bat RIG-I, STAT-1 and IFN-β showed close homology with human, mouse, pig and rhesus monkey. RIG-I and STAT-1 were both highly expressed in bat spleen. Furthermore, IFN-β was induced by polyI:C and VSV in both bat and mouse cells. These findings have provided new insight into the potential characteristics of the bat innate immune system against viral infection. PMID:25680291

  18. Radiation abolishes inducer binding to lactose repressor.

    PubMed

    Gillard, Nathalie; Spotheim-Maurizot, Mélanie; Charlier, Michel

    2005-04-01

    The lactose operon functions under the control of the repressor-operator system. Binding of the repressor to the operator prevents the expression of the structural genes. This interaction can be destroyed by the binding of an inducer to the repressor. If ionizing radiations damage the partners, a dramatic dysfunction of the regulation system may be expected. We showed previously that gamma irradiation hinders repressor-operator binding through protein damage. Here we show that irradiation of the repressor abolishes the binding of the gratuitous inducer isopropyl-1-beta-D-thiogalactoside (IPTG) to the repressor. The observed lack of release of the repressor from the complex results from the loss of the ability of the inducer to bind to the repressor due to the destruction of the IPTG binding site. Fluorescence measurements show that both tryptophan residues located in or near the IPTG binding site are damaged. Since tryptophan damage is strongly correlated with the loss of IPTG binding ability, we conclude that it plays a critical role in the effect. A model was built that takes into account the kinetic analysis of damage production and the observed protection of its binding site by IPTG. This model satisfactorily accounts for the experimental results and allows us to understand the radiation-induced effects. PMID:15799700

  19. Interaction of mumps virus V protein variants with STAT1-STAT2 heterodimer: experimental and theoretical studies

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Mumps virus V protein has the ability to inhibit the interferon-mediated antiviral response by inducing degradation of STAT proteins. Two virus variants purified from Urabe AM9 mumps virus vaccine differ in their replication and transcription efficiency in cells primed with interferon. Virus susceptibility to IFN was associated with insertion of a non-coded glycine at position 156 in the V protein (VGly) of one virus variant, whereas resistance to IFN was associated with preservation of wild-type phenotype in the V protein (VWT) of the other variant. Results VWT and VGly variants of mumps virus were cloned and sequenced from Urabe AM9 vaccine strain. VGly differs from VWT protein because it possesses an amino acid change Gln103Pro (Pro103) and the Gly156 insertion. The effect of V protein variants on components of the interferon-stimulated gene factor 3 (ISGF3), STAT1 and STAT2 proteins were experimentally tested in cervical carcinoma cell lines. Expression of VWT protein decreased STAT1 phosphorylation, whereas VGly had no inhibitory effect on either STAT1 or STAT2 phosphorylation. For theoretical analysis of the interaction between V proteins and STAT proteins, 3D structural models of VWT and VGly were predicted by comparing with simian virus 5 (SV5) V protein structure in complex with STAT1-STAT2 heterodimer. In silico analysis showed that VWT-STAT1-STAT2 complex occurs through the V protein Trp-motif (W174, W178, W189) and Glu95 residue close to the Arg409 and Lys415 of the nuclear localization signal (NLS) of STAT2, leaving exposed STAT1 Lys residues (K85, K87, K296, K413, K525, K679, K685), which are susceptible to proteasome degradation. In contrast, the interaction between VGly and STAT1-STAT2 heterodimer occurs in a region far from the NLS of STAT2 without blocking of Lys residues in both STAT1 and STAT2. Conclusions Our results suggest that VWT protein of Urabe AM9 strain of mumps virus may be more efficient than VGly to inactivate both the IFN

  20. Inborn errors of human STAT1: allelic heterogeneity governs the diversity of immunological and infectious phenotypes

    PubMed Central

    Boisson-Dupuis, Stephanie; Kong, Xiao-Fei; Okada, Satoshi; Cypowyj, Sophie; Puel, Anne; Abel, Laurent; Casanova, Jean-Laurent

    2012-01-01

    The genetic dissection of various human infectious diseases has led to the definition of inborn errors of human STAT1 immunity of four types, including (i) autosomal recessive (AR) complete STAT1 deficiency, (ii) AR partial STAT1 deficiency, (iii) autosomal dominant (AD) STAT1 deficiency, and (iv) AD gain of STAT1 activity. The two types of AR STAT1 defect give rise to a broad infectious phenotype with susceptibility to intramacrophagic bacteria (mostly mycobacteria) and viruses (herpes viruses at least), due principally to the impairment of IFN-γ-mediated and IFN-α/β-mediated immunity, respectively. Clinical outcome depends on the extent to which the STAT1 defect decreases responsiveness to these cytokines. AD STAT1 deficiency selectively predisposes individuals to mycobacterial disease, owing to the impairment of IFN-γ-mediated immunity, as IFN-α/β-mediated immunity is maintained. Finally, AD gain of STAT1 activity is associated with autoimmunity, probably owing to an enhancement of IFN-α/β-mediated immunity. More surprisingly, it is also associated with chronic mucocutaneous candidiasis, through as yet undetermined mechanisms involving an inhibition of the development of IL-17-producing T cells. Thus, germline mutations in human STAT1 define four distinct clinical disorders. Various combinations of viral, mycobacterial and fungal infections are therefore allelic at the human STAT1 locus. These experiments of Nature neatly highlight the clinical and immunological impact of the human genetic dissection of infectious phenotypes. PMID:22651901

  1. STAT1 Pathway Mediates Amplification of Metastatic Potential and Resistance to Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Pitroda, Sean P.; Golden, Daniel W.; Bhayani, Mihir; Shao, Michael Y.; Darga, Thomas E.; Beveridge, Mara G.; Sood, Ravi F.; Sutton, Harold G.; Beckett, Michael A.; Mauceri, Helena J.; Posner, Mitchell C.; Weichselbaum, Ralph R.

    2009-01-01

    Background Traditionally IFN/STAT1 signaling is connected with an anti-viral response and pro-apoptotic tumor-suppressor functions. Emerging functions of a constitutively activated IFN/STAT1 pathway suggest an association with an aggressive tumor phenotype. We hypothesized that tumor clones that constitutively overexpress this pathway are preferentially selected by the host microenvironment due to a resistance to STAT1-dependent cytotoxicity and demonstrate increased metastatic ability combined with increased resistance to genotoxic stress. Methodology/Principal Findings Here we report that clones of B16F1 tumors grown in the lungs of syngeneic C57BL/6 mice demonstrate variable transcriptional levels of IFN/STAT1 pathway expression. Tumor cells that constitutively overexpress the IFN/STAT1 pathway (STAT1H genotype) are selected by the lung microenvironment. STAT1H tumor cells also demonstrate resistance to IFN-gamma (IFNγ), ionizing radiation (IR), and doxorubicin relative to parental B16F1 and low expressors of the IFN/STAT1 pathway (STAT1L genotype). Stable knockdown of STAT1 reversed the aggressive phenotype and decreased both lung colonization and resistance to genotoxic stress. Conclusions Our results identify a pathway activated by tumor-stromal interactions thereby selecting for pro-metastatic and therapy-resistant tumor clones. New therapies targeted against the IFN/STAT1 signaling pathway may provide an effective strategy to treat or sensitize aggressive tumor clones to conventional cancer therapies and potentially prevent distant organ colonization. PMID:19503789

  2. Activation of transcription factors STAT1 and STAT5 in the mouse median eminence after systemic ciliary neurotrophic factor administration.

    PubMed

    Severi, Ilenia; Senzacqua, Martina; Mondini, Eleonora; Fazioli, Francesca; Cinti, Saverio; Giordano, Antonio

    2015-10-01

    Exogenously administered ciliary neurotrophic factor (CNTF) causes weight loss in obese rodents and humans through leptin-like activation of the Jak-STAT3 signaling pathway in hypothalamic arcuate neurons. Here we report for the first time that 40min after acute systemic treatment, rat recombinant CNTF (intraperitoneal injection of 0.3mg/kg of body weight) induced nuclear translocation of the tyrosine-phosphorylated forms of STAT1 and STAT5 in the mouse median eminence and other circumventricular organs, including the vascular organ of the lamina terminalis and the subfornical organ. In the tuberal hypothalamus of treated mice, specific nuclear immunostaining for phospo-STAT1 and phospho-STAT5 was detected in ependymal cells bordering the third ventricle floor and lateral recesses, and in median eminence cells. Co-localization studies documented STAT1 and STAT5 activation in median eminence β-tanycytes and underlying radial glia-like cells. A few astrocytes in the arcuate nucleus responded to CNTF by STAT5 activation. The vast majority of median eminence tanycytes and radial glia-like cells showing phospho-STAT1 and phospho-STAT5 immunoreactivity were also positive for phospho-STAT3. In contrast, STAT3 was the sole STAT isoform activated by CNTF in arcuate nucleus and median eminence neurons. Finally, immunohistochemical evaluation of STAT activation 20, 40, 80, and 120min from the injection demonstrated that cell activation was accompanied by c-Fos expression. Collectively, our findings show that CNTF activates STAT3, STAT1, and STAT5 in vivo. The distinctive activation pattern of these STAT isoforms in the median eminence may disclose novel targets and pathways through which CNTF regulates food intake. PMID:26133794

  3. STAT1: A Novel Target of miR-150 and miR-223 Is Involved in the Proliferation of HTLV-I–Transformed and ATL Cells1

    PubMed Central

    Moles, Ramona; Bellon, Marcia; Nicot, Christophe

    2015-01-01

    We have previously reported on the deregulation of cellular microRNAs involved in hematopoiesis and inflammation in human T-cell lymphotropic virus type 1 (HTLV-I)–transformed cells. In this study, we demonstrate that miR-150 and miR-223 specifically target the signal transducer and activator of transcription 1 (STAT1) 3′ untranslated region, reducing STAT1 expression and dampening STAT1-dependent signaling in human T cells. The effects of miR-150 and miR-223 on endogenous STAT1 were confirmed using inducible cell lines. Our studies also showed that miR-150 expression is upregulated by interleukin-2 signaling in adult T cell leukemia/lymphoma (ATL) cells. HTLV-I–transformed and ATL-derived cells have reduced levels of miR150 and miR223 expression, which coincide with increased STAT1 expression and STAT1-dependent signaling. Knockdown of STAT1 by short hairpin RNA demonstrated that the constitutive activation of STAT1 is required for the continuous proliferation of HTLV-I–transformed cells. Our studies further demonstrate that increased expression of STAT1 in ATL cells is associated with higher levels of major histocompatibility complex class I expression. Previous studies have demonstrated that the pressure exerted by natural killer (NK) cells in vivo can edit leukemic tumor cells by forcing an increased expression of major histocompatibility complex class I to escape immune clearance. STAT1-expressing tumor cells produce more aggressive tumors because they cannot be eliminated by NK cells. Our results suggest that therapeutic approaches using combined targeting of STAT1 and MHC class I may be an effective approach to activate NK cell–mediated clearance of ATL tumor cells. PMID:26025667

  4. Structural basis for recruitment of CBP/p300 coactivators by STAT1 and STAT2 transactivation domains

    PubMed Central

    Wojciak, Jonathan M; Martinez-Yamout, Maria A; Dyson, H Jane; Wright, Peter E

    2009-01-01

    CBP/p300 transcriptional coactivators mediate gene expression by integrating cellular signals through interactions with multiple transcription factors. To elucidate the molecular and structural basis for CBP-dependent gene expression, we determined structures of the CBP TAZ1 and TAZ2 domains in complex with the transactivation domains (TADs) of signal transducer and activator of transcription 2 (STAT2) and STAT1, respectively. Despite the topological similarity of the TAZ1 and TAZ2 domains, subtle differences in helix packing and surface grooves constitute major determinants of target selectivity. Our results suggest that TAZ1 preferentially binds long TADs capable of contacting multiple surface grooves simultaneously, whereas smaller TADs that are restricted to a single contiguous binding surface form complexes with TAZ2. Complex formation for both STAT TADs involves coupled folding and binding, driven by intermolecular hydrophobic and electrostatic interactions. Phosphorylation of S727, required for maximal transcriptional activity of STAT1, does not enhance binding to any of the CBP domains. Because the different STAT TADs recognize different regions of CBP/p300, there is a potential for multivalent binding by STAT heterodimers that could enhance the recruitment of the coactivators to promoters. PMID:19214187

  5. Hyaluronan-Mediated Leukocyte Adhesion and Dextran Sulfate Sodium-Induced Colitis Are Attenuated in the Absence of Signal Transducer and Activator of Transcription 1

    PubMed Central

    Bandyopadhyay, Sudip K.; de la Motte, Carol A.; Kessler, Sean P.; Hascall, Vincent C.; Hill, David R.; Strong, Scott A.

    2008-01-01

    Inflammatory bowel disease is a chronic inflammatory condition of the intestinal mucosa whose etiology is unclear but is likely to be multifactorial. We have shown previously that an increased amount of hyaluronan (HA) is present both in the inflamed mucosa of inflammatory bowel disease patients and in isolated human cells after polyI:C treatment. The signal transducer and activator of transcription (STAT)1 protein plays an important role in many signaling pathways that are associated with inflammation. We therefore investigated the role of STAT1 in adhesive interactions that occur between leukocytes and polyI:C-induced mucosal smooth muscle cells (M-SMCs). Activation of STAT1 was observed after the polyI:C treatment of M-SMCs. Specific phosphorylation of tyrosine and serine residues of STAT1 was observed in polyI:C-treated, but not untreated, M-SMC cultures. To evaluate further the role of STAT1, a corresponding STAT-1-null mouse was used. PolyI:C-induced, HA-mediated leukocyte adhesion to colon SMCs from STAT1-null mice was significantly decreased compared with that from wild-type control mice. In vivo, using the dextran sulfate sodium-induced model of colon inflammation, both tissue damage and HA deposition were attenuated in STAT1-null mice compared with that in wild-type control mice. Additionally, the inter-α-trypsin inhibitor (IαI), a proteoglycan essential for facilitating leukocyte binding to the HA matrix, was reduced in STAT1-null mice. Together, these results demonstrate that STAT1 plays an important role in HA-mediated inflammatory processes. PMID:18818378

  6. Glucolipotoxicity initiates pancreatic β-cell death through TNFR5/CD40-mediated STAT1 and NF-κB activation.

    PubMed

    Bagnati, Marta; Ogunkolade, Babatunji W; Marshall, Catriona; Tucci, Carmen; Hanna, Katie; Jones, Tania A; Bugliani, Marco; Nedjai, Belinda; Caton, Paul W; Kieswich, Julius; Yaqoob, Muhammed M; Ball, Graham R; Marchetti, Piero; Hitman, Graham A; Turner, Mark D

    2016-01-01

    Type 2 diabetes is a chronic metabolic disorder, where failure to maintain normal glucose homoeostasis is associated with, and exacerbated by, obesity and the concomitant-elevated free fatty acid concentrations typically found in these patients. Hyperglycaemia and hyperlipidaemia together contribute to a decline in insulin-producing β-cell mass through activation of the transcription factors nuclear factor kappa-light-chain-enhancer of activated B cells (NF-κB) and signal transducer and activator of transcription (STAT)-1. There are however a large number of molecules potentially able to modulate NF-κB and STAT1 activity, and the mechanism(s) by which glucolipotoxicity initially induces NF-κB and STAT1 activation is currently poorly defined. Using high-density microarray analysis of the β-cell transcritptome, we have identified those genes and proteins most sensitive to glucose and fatty acid environment. Our data show that of those potentially able to activate STAT1 or NF-κB pathways, tumour necrosis factor receptor (TNFR)-5 is the most highly upregulated by glucolipotoxicity. Importantly, our data also show that the physiological ligand for TNFR5, CD40L, elicits NF-κB activity in β-cells, whereas selective knockdown of TNFR5 ameliorates glucolipotoxic induction of STAT1 expression and NF-κB activity. This data indicate for the first time that TNFR5 signalling has a major role in triggering glucolipotoxic islet cell death. PMID:27512950

  7. N-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids inhibit IFN-γ-induced IL-18 binding protein production by prostate cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Wang, Xiaofeng; Breeze, Andrew; Kulka, Marianna

    2015-02-01

    Prostate cancer cells can produce IL-18 binding protein (IL-18BP) in response to interferon-γ (IFN-γ), which may function to neutralize IL-18, an anti-tumor factor formerly known as IFN-γ inducing factor. The consumption of n-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFAs) has been associated with a lower risk of certain types of cancer including prostate cancer, although the precise mechanisms of this effect are poorly understood. We hypothesized that n-3 PUFAs could modify IL-18BP production by prostate cancer cells by altering IFN-γ receptor-mediated signal transduction. Here, we demonstrate that n-3 PUFA treatment significantly reduced IFN-γ-induced IL-18BP production by DU-145 and PC-3 prostate cancer cells by inhibiting IL-18BP mRNA expression and was associated with a reduction in IFN-γ receptor expression. Furthermore, IFN-γ-induced phosphorylation of Janus kinase 1 (JAK1), signal transducers and activators of transcription 1 (STAT1), extracellular signal-regulated kinases 1/2 (ERK1/2), and P38 were suppressed by n-3 PUFA treatment. By contrast, n-6 PUFA had no effect on IFN-γ receptor expression, but decreased IFN-γ-induced IL-18BP production and IFN-γ stimulation of JAK1, STAT1, ERK1/2, and JNK phosphorylation. These data indicate that both n-3 and n-6 PUFAs may be beneficial in prostate cancer by altering IFN-γ signaling, thus inhibiting IL-18BP production and thereby rendering prostate cancer cells more sensitive to IL-18-mediated immune responses. PMID:25351720

  8. The non-pathogenic Henipavirus Cedar paramyxovirus phosphoprotein has a compromised ability to target STAT1 and STAT2.

    PubMed

    Lieu, Kim G; Marsh, Glenn A; Wang, Lin-Fa; Netter, Hans J

    2015-12-01

    Immune evasion by the lethal henipaviruses, Hendra (HeV) and Nipah virus, is mediated by its interferon (IFN) antagonist P gene products, phosphoprotein (P), and the related V and W proteins, which can target the signal transducer and activator of transcription 1 (STAT1) and STAT2 proteins to inhibit IFN/STAT signaling. However, it is not clear if the recently identified non-pathogenic Henipavirus, Cedar paramyxovirus (CedPV), is also able to antagonize the STAT proteins. We performed comparative studies between the HeV P gene products (P/V/W) and CedPV-P (CedPV does not encode V or W) and demonstrate that differences exist in their ability to engage the STAT proteins using immunoprecipitation and quantitative confocal microscopic analysis. In contrast to HeV-P gene encoded proteins, the ability of CedPV-P to interact with and relocalize STAT1 or STAT2 is compromised, correlating with a reduced capacity to inhibit the mRNA synthesis of IFN-inducible gene MxA. Furthermore, infection studies with HeV and CedPV demonstrate that HeV is more potent than CedPV in inhibiting the IFN-α-mediated nuclear accumulation of STAT1. These results strongly suggest that the ability of CedPV to counteract the IFN/STAT response is compromised compared to HeV. PMID:26526590

  9. The measles virus phosphoprotein interacts with the linker domain of STAT1

    SciTech Connect

    Devaux, Patricia Priniski, Lauren; Cattaneo, Roberto

    2013-09-15

    The measles virus (MV) phosphoprotein (P) and V proteins block the interferon (IFN) response by impeding phosphorylation of the signal transducer and activator of transcription 1 (STAT1) by the Janus kinase 1 (JAK1). We characterized how STAT1 mutants interact with P and JAK1 phosphorylation. Certain mutants of the linker, the Src-homology 2 domain (SH2), or the transactivation domain had reduced or abolished phosphorylation through JAK1 after IFN treatment. Other mutants, mainly localized in the linker, failed to interact with P as documented by the lack of interference with nuclear translocation. Thus the functional footprint of P on STAT1 localizes mainly to the linker domain; there is also some overlap with the STAT1 phosphorylation functional footprint on the SH2 domain. Based on these observations, we discuss how the MV-P might operate to inhibit the JAK/STAT pathway. - Highlights: • Residue in the linker and SH2 domains of STAT1 are important for MV-P interaction. • Residue in the linker and SH2 domains of STAT1 are important for STAT1 phosphorylation. • Residues interferring with both functions have similar location on STAT1. • The viral P and V proteins may operate in concert to inhibit the JAK/STAT pathway.

  10. A novel gain-of-function STAT1 mutation resulting in basal phosphorylation of STAT1 and increased distal IFN-γ-mediated responses in chronic mucocutaneous candidiasis.

    PubMed

    Martinez-Martinez, Laura; Martinez-Saavedra, Maria Teresa; Fuentes-Prior, Pablo; Barnadas, Maria; Rubiales, Maria Victoria; Noda, Judith; Badell, Isabel; Rodríguez-Gallego, Carlos; de la Calle-Martin, Oscar

    2015-12-01

    Gain-of-function STAT1 mutations have recently been associated with autosomal dominant chronic mucocutaneous candidiasis (CMC). The purpose of this study was to characterize the three members of a non-consanguineous family, the father and his two sons, who presented with recurrent oral thrush and ocular candidiasis since early childhood. The three patients had reduced levels of IL-17-producing T cells. This reduction affected specifically IL-17(+)IFN-γ(-) T cells, because the levels of IL-17(+)IFN-γ(+) T cells were similar to controls. We found that PBMC (peripheral blood mononuclear cells) from the patients did not respond to Candida albicans ex vivo. Moreover, after polyclonal activation, patients' PBMC produced lower levels of IL-17 and IL-6 and higher levels of IL-4 than healthy controls. Genetic analyses showed that the three patients were heterozygous for a new mutation in STAT1 (c.894A>C, p.K298N) that affects a highly conserved residue of the coiled-coil domain of STAT1. STAT1 phosphorylation levels were significantly higher in patients' cells than in healthy controls, both in basal conditions and after IFN-γ stimulation, suggesting a permanent activation of STAT1. Cells from the patients also presented increased IFN-γ-mediated responses measured as MIG and IP-10 production. In conclusion, we report a novel gain-of-function mutation in the coiled-coil domain of STAT1, which increases STAT1 phosphorylation and impairs IL-17-mediated immunity. The mutation is responsible for CMC in this family with autosomal dominant inheritance of the disease. PMID:26514428

  11. Simple diagnosis of STAT1 gain-of-function alleles in patients with chronic mucocutaneous candidiasis

    PubMed Central

    Mizoguchi, Yoko; Tsumura, Miyuki; Okada, Satoshi; Hirata, Osamu; Minegishi, Shizuko; Imai, Kohsuke; Hyakuna, Nobuyuki; Muramatsu, Hideki; Kojima, Seiji; Ozaki, Yusuke; Imai, Takehide; Takeda, Sachiyo; Okazaki, Tetsuya; Ito, Tsuyoshi; Yasunaga, Shin'ichiro; Takihara, Yoshihiro; Bryant, Vanessa L.; Kong, Xiao-Fei; Cypowyj, Sophie; Boisson-Dupuis, Stéphanie; Puel, Anne; Casanova, Jean-Laurent; Morio, Tomohiro; Kobayashi, Masao

    2014-01-01

    CMCD is a rare congenital disorder characterized by persistent or recurrent skin, nail, and mucosal membrane infections caused by Candida albicans. Heterozygous GOF STAT1 mutations have been shown to confer AD CMCD as a result of impaired dephosphorylation of STAT1. We aimed to identify and characterize STAT1 mutations in CMCD patients and to develop a simple diagnostic assay of CMCD. Genetic analysis of STAT1 was performed in patients and their relatives. The mutations identified were characterized by immunoblot and reporter assay using transient gene expression experiments. Patients' leukocytes are investigated by flow cytometry and immunoblot. Six GOF mutations were identified, three of which are reported for the first time, that affect the CCD and DBD of STAT1 in two sporadic and four multiplex cases in 10 CMCD patients from Japan. Two of the 10 patients presented with clinical symptoms atypical to CMCD, including other fungal and viral infections, and three patients developed bronchiectasis. Immunoblot analyses of patients' leukocytes showed abnormally high levels of pSTAT1 following IFN-γ stimulation. Based on this finding, we performed a flow cytometry-based functional analysis of STAT1 GOF alleles using IFN-γ stimulation and the tyrosine kinase inhibitor, staurosporine. The higher levels of pSTAT1 observed in primary CD14+ cells from patients compared with control cells persisted and were amplified by the presence of staurosporine. We developed a flow cytometry-based STAT1 functional screening method that would greatly facilitate the diagnosis of CMCD patients with GOF STAT1 mutations. PMID:24343863

  12. Molecular cloning and expression analysis of the STAT1 gene from olive flounder, Paralichthys olivaceus

    PubMed Central

    Park, Eun-Mi; Kang, Jung-Ha; Seo, Jung Soo; Kim, GunDo; Chung, Jongkyeong; Choi, Tae-Jin

    2008-01-01

    Background Signal transducer and activator of transcription 1 (STAT1) is a critical component of interferon (IFN)-alpha/beta and IFN-gamma signaling. Although seven isoforms of STAT proteins have been reported from mammals, limited information is available for the STAT genes in fish. We isolated complementary DNA with high similarity to mammalian STAT1 from the olive flounder, Paralichthys olivaceus. Results A DNA fragment containing the conserved SH2 domain was amplified by RT-PCR using degenerate primers designed based on the highly conserved sequences in the SH2 domains of the zebrafish and mammalian STAT1. The complete cDNA sequence was obtained by 5' and 3' RACE. The flounder STAT1 transcript consisted of 2,909 bp that encoded a polypeptide of 749 amino acids. The overall similarity between flounder STAT1 and other STATs was very high, with the highest amino acid sequence identity to snakehead (89%). Phylogenetic analyses reveal that flounder STAT1 is in the same monophyletic group with snakehead STAT1. Quantitative real time RT-PCR and in situ hybridization revealed that STAT1 was expressed in almost all examined organs and tissues, with high expression in gill, spleen, kidney, and heart. The accumulation of STAT1 mRNA in different developmental stages, as determined by real time RT-PCR, increased with development. Conclusion Recent cloning of various cytokine genes and the STAT1 gene of olive flounder here suggest that fish also use the highly specialized JAK-STAT pathway for cytokine signaling. Identification of other STAT genes will elucidate in detail the signal transduction system in this fish. PMID:18578892

  13. Revealing the cellular localization of STAT1 during the cell cycle by super-resolution imaging.

    PubMed

    Gao, Jing; Wang, Feng; Liu, Yanhou; Cai, Mingjun; Xu, Haijiao; Jiang, Junguang; Wang, Hongda

    2015-01-01

    Signal transducers and activators of transcription (STATs) can transduce cytokine signals and regulate gene expression. The cellular localization and nuclear trafficking of STAT1, a representative of the STAT family with multiple transcriptional functions, is tightly related with transcription process, which usually happens in the interphase of the cell cycle. However, these priority questions regarding STAT1 distribution and localization at the different cell-cycle stages remain unclear. By using direct stochastic optical reconstruction microscopy (dSTORM), we found that the nuclear expression level of STAT1 increased gradually as the cell cycle carried out, especially after EGF stimulation. Furthermore, STAT1 formed clusters in the whole cell during the cell cycle, with the size and the number of clusters also increasing significantly from G1 to G2 phase, suggesting that transcription and other cell-cycle related activities can promote STAT1 to form more and larger clusters for fast response to signals. Our work reveals that the cellular localization and clustering distribution of STAT1 are associated with the cell cycle, and further provides an insight into the mechanism of cell-cycle regulated STAT1 signal transduction. PMID:25762114

  14. Revealing the cellular localization of STAT1 during the cell cycle by super-resolution imaging

    PubMed Central

    Gao, Jing; Wang, Feng; Liu, Yanhou; Cai, Mingjun; Xu, Haijiao; Jiang, Junguang; Wang, Hongda

    2015-01-01

    Signal transducers and activators of transcription (STATs) can transduce cytokine signals and regulate gene expression. The cellular localization and nuclear trafficking of STAT1, a representative of the STAT family with multiple transcriptional functions, is tightly related with transcription process, which usually happens in the interphase of the cell cycle. However, these priority questions regarding STAT1 distribution and localization at the different cell-cycle stages remain unclear. By using direct stochastic optical reconstruction microscopy (dSTORM), we found that the nuclear expression level of STAT1 increased gradually as the cell cycle carried out, especially after EGF stimulation. Furthermore, STAT1 formed clusters in the whole cell during the cell cycle, with the size and the number of clusters also increasing significantly from G1 to G2 phase, suggesting that transcription and other cell-cycle related activities can promote STAT1 to form more and larger clusters for fast response to signals. Our work reveals that the cellular localization and clustering distribution of STAT1 are associated with the cell cycle, and further provides an insight into the mechanism of cell-cycle regulated STAT1 signal transduction. PMID:25762114

  15. Revealing the cellular localization of STAT1 during the cell cycle by super-resolution imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gao, Jing; Wang, Feng; Liu, Yanhou; Cai, Mingjun; Xu, Haijiao; Jiang, Junguang; Wang, Hongda

    2015-03-01

    Signal transducers and activators of transcription (STATs) can transduce cytokine signals and regulate gene expression. The cellular localization and nuclear trafficking of STAT1, a representative of the STAT family with multiple transcriptional functions, is tightly related with transcription process, which usually happens in the interphase of the cell cycle. However, these priority questions regarding STAT1 distribution and localization at the different cell-cycle stages remain unclear. By using direct stochastic optical reconstruction microscopy (dSTORM), we found that the nuclear expression level of STAT1 increased gradually as the cell cycle carried out, especially after EGF stimulation. Furthermore, STAT1 formed clusters in the whole cell during the cell cycle, with the size and the number of clusters also increasing significantly from G1 to G2 phase, suggesting that transcription and other cell-cycle related activities can promote STAT1 to form more and larger clusters for fast response to signals. Our work reveals that the cellular localization and clustering distribution of STAT1 are associated with the cell cycle, and further provides an insight into the mechanism of cell-cycle regulated STAT1 signal transduction.

  16. Anti-inflammatory activity of myricetin from Diospyros lotus through suppression of NF-κB and STAT1 activation and Nrf2-mediated HO-1 induction in lipopolysaccharide-stimulated RAW264.7 macrophages.

    PubMed

    Cho, Byoung Ok; Yin, Hong Hua; Park, Sang Hyun; Byun, Eui Baek; Ha, Hun Yong; Jang, Seon Il

    2016-08-01

    Diospyros lotus is traditionally used for the treatment of diabetes, diarrhea, tumor, and hypertension. The purpose of this study was to investigate the anti-inflammatory effect and underlying molecular mechanisms of myricetin in lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-stimulated RAW264.7 macrophages. Myricetin dose-dependently suppressed the production of pro-inflammatory mediators (NO, iNOS, PGE2, and COX-2) in LPS-stimulated RAW264.7 macrophages. Myricetin administration decreased the production of NO, iNOS, TNF-α, IL-6, and IL-12 in mice. Myricetin decreased NF-κB activation by suppressing the degradation of IκBα, nuclear translocation of p65 subunit of NF-κB, and NF-κB DNA binding activity in LPS-stimulated RAW264.7 macrophages. Moreover, myricetin attenuated the phosphorylation of STAT1 and the production of IFN-β in LPS-stimulated RAW264.7 macrophages. Furthermore, myricetin induced the expression of HO-1 through Nrf2 translocation. In conclusion, these results suggest that myricetin inhibits the production of pro-inflammatory mediators through the suppression of NF-κB and STAT1 activation and induction of Nrf2-mediated HO-1 expression in LPS-stimulated RAW264.7 macrophages. PMID:27068250

  17. Active components with inhibitory activities on IFN-γ/STAT1 and IL-6/STAT3 signaling pathways from Caulis Trachelospermi.

    PubMed

    Liu, Xiao-Ting; Wang, Zhe-Xing; Yang, Yu; Wang, Lin; Sun, Ruo-Feng; Zhao, Yi-Min; Yu, Neng-Jiang

    2014-01-01

    Initial investigation for new active herbal extract with inhibiting activity on JAK/STAT signaling pathway revealed that the extract of Caulis Trachelospermi, which was separated by 80% alcohol extraction and subsequent HP-20 macroporous resin column chromatography, was founded to strongly inhibit IFN-γ-induced STAT1-responsive luciferase activity (IFN-γ/STAT1) with IC50 value of 2.43 μg/mL as well as inhibiting IL-6-induced STAT3-responsive luciferase activity (IL-6/STAT3) with IC50 value of 1.38 μg/mL. Subsequent study on its active components led to the isolation and identification of two new dibenzylbutyrolactone lignans named 4-demethyltraxillaside (1) and nortrachelogenin 4-O-β-D-glucopyranoside (2), together with six known compounds. The lignan compounds 1-4 together with other lignan compounds isolated in previous study were tested the activities on IFN-γ/STAT1 and IL-6/STAT3 pathways. The following result showed that the main components trachelogenin and arctigenin had corresponding activities on IFN-γ/STAT1 pathway with IC50 values of 3.14 μM and 9.46 μM as well as trachelogenin, arctigenin and matairesinol strongly inhibiting IL-6/STAT3 pathway with IC50 values of 3.63 μM, 6.47 μM and 2.92 μM, respectively. PMID:25100250

  18. CDK8-Mediated STAT1-S727 Phosphorylation Restrains NK Cell Cytotoxicity and Tumor Surveillance

    PubMed Central

    Putz, Eva Maria; Gotthardt, Dagmar; Hoermann, Gregor; Csiszar, Agnes; Wirth, Silvia; Berger, Angelika; Straka, Elisabeth; Rigler, Doris; Wallner, Barbara; Jamieson, Amanda M.; Pickl, Winfried F.; Zebedin-Brandl, Eva Maria; Müller, Mathias; Decker, Thomas; Sexl, Veronika

    2013-01-01

    Summary The transcription factor STAT1 is important in natural killer (NK) cells, which provide immediate defense against tumor and virally infected cells. We show that mutation of a single phosphorylation site (Stat1-S727A) enhances NK cell cytotoxicity against a range of tumor cells, accompanied by increased expression of perforin and granzyme B. Stat1-S727A mice display significantly delayed disease onset in NK cell-surveilled tumor models including melanoma, leukemia, and metastasizing breast cancer. Constitutive phosphorylation of S727 depends on cyclin-dependent kinase 8 (CDK8). Inhibition of CDK8-mediated STAT1-S727 phosphorylation may thus represent a therapeutic strategy for stimulating NK cell-mediated tumor surveillance. PMID:23933255

  19. MicroRNA-194 promotes osteoblast differentiation via downregulating STAT1

    SciTech Connect

    Li, Jun; He, Xijing; Wei, Wenzhi; Zhou, Xiaobo

    2015-05-01

    Osteoblast differentiation is a vital process in maintaining bone homeostasis in which various transcriptional factors, signaling molecules, and microRNAs (miRNAs) are involved. Recently, signal transducer and activator of transcription 1 (STAT1) has been found to play an important role in regulating osteoblast differentiation. Here, we identified that STAT1 expression was regulated by miR-194. Using mouse bone mesenchymal stem cells (BMSCs), we found that miR-194 expression was significantly increased following osteoblast differentiation induction. Overexpression of miR-194 by lentivirus-mediated gene transfer markedly increased osteoblast differentiation, whereas inhibition of miR-194 significantly suppressed osteoblast differentiation of BMSCs. Using a dual-luciferase reporter assay, a direct interaction between miR-194 and the 3′-untranslated region (UTR) of STAT1 was confirmed. Additionally, miR-194 regulated mRNA and protein expression of STAT1 in BMSCs. Further analysis showed that miR-194 overexpression promoted the nuclear translocation of runt-related transcription factor 2 (Runx2), which is critical for osteoblast differentiation. In contrast, inhibition of miR-194 blocked the nuclear translocation of Runx2. Moreover, overexpression of STAT1 significantly blocked Runx2 nuclear translocation and osteoblast differentiation mediated by miR-194 overexpression. Taken together, our data suggest that miR-194 regulates osteoblast differentiation through modulating STAT1-mediated Runx2 nuclear translocation. - Highlights: • Overexpression of miR-194 significantly increased osteoblast differentiation. • miR-194 directly targeted the 3′- UTR of STAT1. • miR-194 regulated the expression of STAT1. • Overexpression of miR-194 promoted the nuclear translocation of Runx2.

  20. STAT1 and STAT3 do not participate in FGF-mediated growth arrest in chondrocytes.

    PubMed

    Krejci, Pavel; Salazar, Lisa; Goodridge, Helen S; Kashiwada, Tamara A; Schibler, Matthew J; Jelinkova, Petra; Thompson, Leslie Michels; Wilcox, William R

    2008-02-01

    Activating mutations in fibroblast growth factor receptor 3 (FGFR3) cause several human skeletal dysplasias as a result of attenuation of cartilage growth. It is believed that FGFR3 inhibits chondrocyte proliferation via activation of signal transducers and activators of transcription (STAT) proteins, although the exact mechanism of both STAT activation and STAT-mediated inhibition of chondrocyte growth is unclear. We show that FGFR3 interacts with STAT1 in cells and is capable of activating phosphorylation of STAT1 in a kinase assay, thus potentially serving as a STAT1 kinase in chondrocytes. However, as demonstrated by western blotting with phosphorylation-specific antibodies, imaging of STAT nuclear translocation, STAT transcription factor assays and STAT luciferase reporter assays, FGF does not activate STAT1 or STAT3 in RCS chondrocytes, which nevertheless respond to a FGF stimulus with potent growth arrest. Moreover, addition of active STAT1 and STAT3 to the FGF signal, by means of cytokine treatment, SRC-mediated STAT activation or expression of constitutively active STAT mutants does not sensitize RCS chondrocytes to FGF-mediated growth arrest. Since FGF-mediated growth arrest is rescued by siRNA-mediated downregulation of the MAP kinase ERK1/2 but not STAT1 or STAT3, our data support a model whereby the ERK arm but not STAT arm of FGF signaling in chondrocytes accounts for the growth arrest phenotype. PMID:18198189

  1. Activated STAT1 Transcription Factors Conduct Distinct Saltatory Movements in the Cell Nucleus

    PubMed Central

    Speil, Jasmin; Baumgart, Eugen; Siebrasse, Jan-Peter; Veith, Roman; Vinkemeier, Uwe; Kubitscheck, Ulrich

    2011-01-01

    The activation of STAT transcription factors is a critical determinant of their subcellular distribution and their ability to regulate gene expression. Yet, it is not known how activation affects the behavior of individual STAT molecules in the cytoplasm and nucleus. To investigate this issue, we injected fluorescently labeled STAT1 in living HeLa cells and traced them by single-molecule microscopy. We determined that STAT1 moved stochastically in the cytoplasm and nucleus with very short residence times (<0.03 s) before activation. Upon activation, STAT1 mobility in the cytoplasm decreased ∼2.5-fold, indicating reduced movement of STAT1/importinα/β complexes to the nucleus. In the nucleus, activated STAT1 displayed a distinct saltatory mobility, with residence times of up to 5 s and intermittent diffusive motion. In this manner, activated STAT1 factors can occupy their putative chromatin target sites within ∼2 s. These results provide a better understanding of the timescales on which cellular signaling and regulated gene transcription operate at the single-molecule level. PMID:22261046

  2. Lactation-induced cadmium-binding proteins

    SciTech Connect

    Bhattacharyya, M.H.; Solaiman, D.; Garvey, J.S.; Miyazaki, W.Y.

    1987-01-01

    Previously we have demonstrated an increase during midlactation in /sup 109/Cd adsorption and increased retention by the duodenum, kidney, and mammary tissue of mouse dams receiving environmental levels of cadmium//sup 109/Cd via drinking water, with little change in /sup 109/Cd retention in liver and jejunum compared to nonpregnant controls. Results are reported here of a study of cadmium deposition during midlactation as associated with induction of metallothionein (MT). A cadmium/hemoglobin (Cd/Hb) assay and radioimmunoassay for MT which measures heat-stable cadmium binding capacity in tissues was used to determine MT concentrations in fractions of kidney, liver, duodenum, and jejunum from female mice. Both assays demonstrated clear lactation-induced increases in MT concentrations in liver, kidney, and duodenum, with MT concentrations falling rapidly to control levels after weaning. 4 refs., 1 tab.

  3. The TATA-containing core promoter of the type II collagen gene (COL2A1) is the target of interferon-gamma-mediated inhibition in human chondrocytes: requirement for Stat1 alpha, Jak1 and Jak2.

    PubMed Central

    Osaki, Makoto; Tan, Lujian; Choy, Bob K; Yoshida, Yasuhiro; Cheah, Kathryn S E; Auron, Philip E; Goldring, Mary B

    2003-01-01

    Interferon-gamma (IFN-gamma) inhibits the synthesis of the cartilage-specific extracellular matrix protein type II collagen, and suppresses the expression of the type II collagen gene ( COL2A1 ) at the transcriptional level. To further examine this mechanism, the responses of COL2A1 regulatory sequences to IFN-gamma and the role of components of the Janus kinase/signal transducer and activators of transcription (JAK/STAT) pathway were examined in the immortalized human chondrocyte cell line, C-28/I2. IFN-gamma inhibited the mRNA levels of COL2A1 and aggrecan, but not Sox9, L-Sox5 and Sox6, all of which were expressed by these cells as markers of the differentiated phenotype. IFN-gamma suppressed the expression of luciferase reporter constructs containing sequences of the COL2A1 promoter spanning -6368 to +125 bp in the absence and presence of the intronic enhancer and stimulated activity of the gamma-interferon-activated site (GAS) luciferase reporter vector, associated with induction of Stat1 alpha-binding activity in nuclear extracts. These responses to IFN-gamma were blocked by overexpression of the JAK inhibitor, JAK-binding protein (JAB), or reversed by dominant-negative Stat1 alpha Y701F containing a mutation at Tyr-701, the JAK phosphorylation site. IFN-gamma had no effect on COL2A1 promoter expression in Jak1 (U4A)-, Jak2 (gamma 2A)- and Stat1 alpha (U3A)-deficient cell lines. In the U3A cell line, the response to IFN-gamma was rescued by overexpression of Stat1 alpha, but not by either Stat1 alpha Y701F or Stat1 beta. Functional analysis using deletion constructs showed that the IFN-gamma response was retained in the COL2A1 core promoter region spanning -45 to +11 bp, containing the TATA-box and GC-rich sequences but no Stat1-binding elements. Inhibition of COL2A1 promoter activity by IFN-gamma persisted in the presence of multiple deletions within the -45/+11 bp region. Our results indicate that repression of COL2A1 gene transcription by IFN

  4. ICP0 antagonizes Stat 1-dependent repression of herpes simplex virus: implications for the regulation of viral latency

    PubMed Central

    Halford, William P; Weisend, Carla; Grace, Jennifer; Soboleski, Mark; Carr, Daniel JJ; Balliet, John W; Imai, Yumi; Margolis, Todd P; Gebhardt, Bryan M

    2006-01-01

    Background The herpes simplex virus type 1 (HSV-1) ICP0 protein is an E3 ubiquitin ligase, which is encoded within the HSV-1 latency-associated locus. When ICP0 is not synthesized, the HSV-1 genome is acutely susceptible to cellular repression. Reciprocally, when ICP0 is synthesized, viral replication is efficiently initiated from virions or latent HSV-1 genomes. The current study was initiated to determine if ICP0's putative role as a viral interferon (IFN) antagonist may be relevant to the process by which ICP0 influences the balance between productive replication versus cellular repression of HSV-1. Results Wild-type (ICP0+) strains of HSV-1 produced lethal infections in scid or rag2-/- mice. The replication of ICP0- null viruses was rapidly repressed by the innate host response of scid or rag2-/- mice, and the infected animals remained healthy for months. In contrast, rag2-/- mice that lacked the IFN-α/β receptor (rag2-/- ifnar-/-) or Stat 1 (rag2-/- stat1-/-) failed to repress ICP0- viral replication, resulting in uncontrolled viral spread and death. Thus, the replication of ICP0- viruses is potently repressed in vivo by an innate immune response that is dependent on the IFN-α/β receptor and the downstream transcription factor, Stat 1. Conclusion ICP0's function as a viral IFN antagonist is necessary in vivo to prevent an innate, Stat 1-dependent host response from rapidly repressing productive HSV-1 replication. This antagonistic relationship between ICP0 and the host IFN response may be relevant in regulating whether the HSV-1 genome is expressed, or silenced, in virus-infected cells in vivo. These results may also be clinically relevant. IFN-sensitive ICP0- viruses are avirulent, establish long-term latent infections, and induce an adaptive immune response that is highly protective against lethal challenge with HSV-1. Therefore, ICP0- viruses appear to possess the desired safety and efficacy profile of a live vaccine against herpetic disease. PMID

  5. Absent in Melanoma 2 (AIM2) limits pro-inflammatory cytokine transcription in cardiomyocytes by inhibiting STAT1 phosphorylation.

    PubMed

    Furrer, Antonia; Hottiger, Michael O; Valaperti, Alan

    2016-06-01

    Interferon (IFN)-γ is highly upregulated during heart inflammation and enhances the production of pro-inflammatory cytokines. Absent in Melanoma 2 (AIM2) is an IFN-inducible protein implicated as a component of the inflammasome. Here we seek to determine the role of AIM2 during inflammation in cardiac cells. We found that the presence of AIM2, but not of the other inflammasome components Nod-like receptor (NLR) NLRP3 or NLRC4, specifically limited the transcription of the pro-inflammatory cytokines interleukin (IL)-6, IP-10, and tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-α in HL-1 mouse cardiomyocytes stimulated with IFN-γ and lipopolysaccharides (LPS). Similarly, AIM2 reduced pro-inflammatory cytokine transcription in primary mouse neonatal cardiomyocytes (MNC), but not in primary mouse neonatal cardiac fibroblasts (MNF). Interestingly, AIM2-dependent reduction of pro-inflammatory cytokines in cardiomyocytes was independent of Caspase-1. Mechanistically, AIM2 reduced pro-inflammatory cytokine transcription in cardiomyocytes by interacting with and inhibiting the phosphorylation of STAT1. In AIM2-depleted cardiomyocytes, increased STAT1 phosphorylation enhanced the NF-κB pathway by promoting NF-κB p65 phosphorylation and acetylation. These results show for the first time that AIM2 plays an important anti-inflammatory, yet inflammasome-independent function in cardiomyocytes. Our findings will help to further understand how the various heart cell types differently react to inflammatory stimuli. PMID:27148820

  6. Murine Norovirus 1 Infection Is Associated with Histopathological Changes in Immunocompetent Hosts, but Clinical Disease Is Prevented by STAT1-Dependent Interferon Responses▿

    PubMed Central

    Mumphrey, Shannon M.; Changotra, Harish; Moore, Tara N.; Heimann-Nichols, Ellen R.; Wobus, Christiane E.; Reilly, Michael J.; Moghadamfalahi, Mana; Shukla, Deepti; Karst, Stephanie M.

    2007-01-01

    Human noroviruses are the major cause of nonbacterial epidemic gastroenteritis worldwide. However, little is known regarding their pathogenesis or the immune responses that control them because until recently there has been no small animal model or cell culture system of norovirus infection. We recently reported the discovery of the first murine norovirus, murine norovirus 1 (MNV-1), and its cultivation in macrophages and dendritic cells in vitro. We further defined interferon receptors and the STAT-1 molecule as critical in both resistance to MNV-1-induced disease in vivo and control of virus growth in vitro. To date, neither histopathological changes upon infection nor viral replication in wild-type mice has been shown. Here we extend our studies to demonstrate that MNV-1 replicates and rapidly disseminates to various tissues in immunocompetent mice and that infection is restricted by STAT1-dependent interferon responses at the levels of viral replication and virus dissemination. Infection of wild-type mice is associated with histopathological alterations in the intestine (mild inflammation) and the spleen (red pulp hypertrophy and white pulp activation); viral dissemination to the spleen, liver, lung, and lymph nodes; and low-level persistent infection in the spleen. STAT-1 inhibits viral replication in the intestine, prevents virus-induced apoptosis of intestinal cells and splenocytes, and limits viral dissemination to peripheral tissues. These findings demonstrate that murine norovirus infection of wild-type mice is associated with initial enteric seeding and subsequent extraintestinal spread, and they provide mechanistic evidence of the role of STAT-1 in controlling clinical norovirus-induced disease. PMID:17229692

  7. Identification of the Nuclear Export Signal and STAT-Binding Domains of the Nipah Virus V Protein Reveals Mechanisms Underlying Interferon Evasion

    PubMed Central

    Rodriguez, Jason J.; Cruz, Cristian D.; Horvath, Curt M.

    2004-01-01

    The V proteins of Nipah virus and Hendra virus have been demonstrated to bind to cellular STAT1 and STAT2 proteins to form high-molecular-weight complexes that inhibit interferon (IFN)-induced antiviral transcription by preventing STAT nuclear accumulation. Analysis of the Nipah virus V protein has revealed a region between amino acids 174 and 192 that functions as a CRM1-dependent nuclear export signal (NES). This peptide is sufficient to complement an export-defective human immunodeficiency virus Rev protein, and deletion and substitution mutagenesis revealed that this peptide is necessary for both V protein shuttling and cytoplasmic retention of STAT1 and STAT2 proteins. However, the NES is not required for V-dependent IFN signaling inhibition. IFN signaling is blocked primarily by interaction between Nipah virus V residues 100 to 160 and STAT1 residues 509 to 712. Interaction with STAT2 requires a larger Nipah virus V segment between amino acids 100 and 300, but deletion of residues 230 to 237 greatly reduced STAT2 coprecipitation. Further, V protein interactions with cellular STAT1 is a prerequisite for STAT2 binding, and sequential immunoprecipitations demonstrate that V, STAT1, and STAT2 can form a tripartite complex. These findings characterize essential regions for Henipavirus V proteins that represent potential targets for therapeutic intervention. PMID:15113915

  8. Fucose-binding Lotus tetragonolobus lectin binds to human polymorphonuclear leukocytes and induces a chemotactic response.

    PubMed

    VanEpps, D E; Tung, K S

    1977-09-01

    Fucose-binding L. tetragonolobus lectin to the surface of human polymorphonuclear leukocytes (PMN) and induces a chemotactic response. Both surface binding and chemotaxis are inhibited by free fucose but not by fructose, mannose, or galactose. The lectin-binding sites on PMN are unrelated to the A, B, or O blood group antigen. Utilization of this lectin should be a useful tool in isolating PMN membrane components and in analyzing the mechanism of neutrophil chemotaxis. PMID:330752

  9. Selective inhibition of JAK2/STAT1 signaling and iNOS expression mediates the anti-inflammatory effects of coniferyl aldehyde.

    PubMed

    Akram, Muhammad; Kim, Kyeong-A; Kim, Eun-Sun; Shin, Young-Jun; Noh, Dabi; Kim, Eunji; Kim, Jeong-Hyeon; Majid, Arshad; Chang, Sun-Young; Kim, Jin-Ki; Bae, Ok-Nam

    2016-08-25

    Urgent needs still exist for selective control of excessive inflammation. Despite the therapeutic potential of natural compounds against inflammation-associated chronic conditions, lack of specific molecular targets renders these bioactive compounds difficult for further development. Here we examined the bioactivity of coniferyl aldehyde (CA), a natural phenolic compound found in several dietary substances and medicinal plants, elucidating its efficacy both in vivo and in vitro with underlying molecular mechanisms. IFN-γ/TNF-α-stimulated human keratinocytes and lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-stimulated murine macrophages were used to examine the effect of CA in vitro and to elucidate the underlying mechanisms. In vivo models of phorbol 12-myristate 13-acetate (TPA)-induced ear edema and carrageenan (CRG)-induced paw edema were employed to investigate the topical and systemic anti-inflammatory effects of CA, respectively. CA significantly reduced nitric oxide (NO) production and inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS) expression in LPS-stimulated macrophages. While nuclear factor-κB (NF-κB) and mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPKs) pathways, the representative cellular pathways for iNOS induction, were not affected by CA, phosphorylation of Janus kinase 2 (JAK2) and signal Transducers and Activators of Transcription 1 (STAT1) and subsequent nuclear translocation of p-STAT1 were significantly decreased by CA. The effect of CA on JAK2-STAT1-iNOS axis was also observed in human keratinocytes stimulated with IFN-γ/TNF-α. Topical application of CA to mice produced significant protection against TPA-induced ear edema along with suppressed epidermal hyperproliferation and leucocyte infiltration. Systemic administration of CA significantly reduced CRG-induced paw edema in rats, where CRG-induced iNOS expression and STAT1 phosphorylation were decreased by CA. In summary, CA has significant anti-inflammatory properties both in vitro and in vivo, mediated by

  10. Transcriptional Regulation of Oncogenic Protein Kinase Cϵ (PKCϵ) by STAT1 and Sp1 Proteins*

    PubMed Central

    Wang, HongBin; Gutierrez-Uzquiza, Alvaro; Garg, Rachana; Barrio-Real, Laura; Abera, Mahlet B.; Lopez-Haber, Cynthia; Rosemblit, Cinthia; Lu, Huaisheng; Abba, Martin; Kazanietz, Marcelo G.

    2014-01-01

    Overexpression of PKCϵ, a kinase associated with tumor aggressiveness and widely implicated in malignant transformation and metastasis, is a hallmark of multiple cancers, including mammary, prostate, and lung cancer. To characterize the mechanisms that control PKCϵ expression and its up-regulation in cancer, we cloned an ∼1.6-kb promoter segment of the human PKCϵ gene (PRKCE) that displays elevated transcriptional activity in cancer cells. A comprehensive deletional analysis established two regions rich in Sp1 and STAT1 sites located between −777 and −105 bp (region A) and −921 and −796 bp (region B), respectively, as responsible for the high transcriptional activity observed in cancer cells. A more detailed mutagenesis analysis followed by EMSA and ChIP identified Sp1 sites in positions −668/−659 and −269/−247 as well as STAT1 sites in positions −880/−869 and −793/−782 as the elements responsible for elevated promoter activity in breast cancer cells relative to normal mammary epithelial cells. RNAi silencing of Sp1 and STAT1 in breast cancer cells reduced PKCϵ mRNA and protein expression, as well as PRKCE promoter activity. Moreover, a strong correlation was found between PKCϵ and phospho-Ser-727 (active) STAT1 levels in breast cancer cells. Our results may have significant implications for the development of approaches to target PKCϵ and its effectors in cancer therapeutics. PMID:24825907

  11. Profibrogenic phenotype in caveolin-1 deficiency via differential regulation of STAT-1/3 proteins.

    PubMed

    Ryter, Stefan W; Choi, Augustine M K; Kim, Hong Pyo

    2014-10-01

    Fibrosis underlies the pathogenesis of several human diseases, which can lead to severe injury of vital organs. We previously demonstrated that caveolin-1 expression is reduced in experimental fibrosis and that caveolin-1 exerts antiproliferative and antifibrotic effects in lung fibrosis models. The signal transducers and activators of transcription (STAT) proteins, STAT1 and STAT3, can be activated simultaneously. STAT1 can inhibit cell growth and promote apoptosis while STAT3 inhibits apoptosis. Here, we show that caveolin-1-deficient (cav-1(-/-)) lung fibroblasts display dramatically upregulated STAT3 activation in response to platelet-derived growth factor-BB and transforming growth factor-β stimuli, whereas STAT1 activation is undetectable. Downregulation of protein tyrosine phosphatase-1B played a role in the preferential activation of STAT3 in cav-1(-/-) fibroblasts. Genetic deletion of STAT3 by siRNA modulated the expression of genes involved in cell proliferation and fibrogenesis. Basal expression of α-smooth muscle actin was prominent in cav-1(-/-) liver and kidney, consistent with deposition of collagen in these organs. Collectively, we demonstrate that the antiproliferative and antifibrogenic properties of caveolin-1 in vitro are mediated by the balance between STAT1 and STAT3 activation. Deregulated STAT signaling associated with caveolin-1 deficiency may be relevant to proliferative disorders such as tissue fibrosis. PMID:25263949

  12. GAIN OF FUNCTION STAT1 MUTATION-RELATED PRIMARY IMMUNODEFICIENCY IS ASSOCIATED WITH DISSEMINATED MUCORMYCOSIS

    PubMed Central

    Kumar, Nilay; Hanks, Mary E.; Chandrasekaran, Prabha; Davis, Brian C.; Hsu, Amy P.; Van Wagoner, Nicholas J.; Merlin, Jessica S.; Spalding, Christine; La Hoz, Ricardo M.; Holland, Steven M.; Zerbe, Christa S.; Sampaio, Elizabeth P.

    2014-01-01

    SUMMARY We identified a novel gain of function mutation in STAT1 in a patient with disseminated Apophysomyces trapeziformis infection who had never had mucocutaneous candidiasis or autoimmunity. To our knowledge this is the first report of a genetic predisposition associated with mucormycosis. PMID:24709374

  13. IRF9 and STAT1 are required for IgG autoantibody production and B cell expression of TLR7 in mice.

    PubMed

    Thibault, Donna L; Chu, Alvina D; Graham, Kareem L; Balboni, Imelda; Lee, Lowen Y; Kohlmoos, Cassidy; Landrigan, Angela; Higgins, John P; Tibshirani, Robert; Utz, Paul J

    2008-04-01

    A hallmark of SLE is the production of high-titer, high-affinity, isotype-switched IgG autoantibodies directed against nucleic acid-associated antigens. Several studies have established a role for both type I IFN (IFN-I) and the activation of TLRs by nucleic acid-associated autoantigens in the pathogenesis of this disease. Here, we demonstrate that 2 IFN-I signaling molecules, IFN regulatory factor 9 (IRF9) and STAT1, were required for the production of IgG autoantibodies in the pristane-induced mouse model of SLE. In addition, levels of IgM autoantibodies were increased in pristane-treated Irf9 -/- mice, suggesting that IRF9 plays a role in isotype switching in response to self antigens. Upregulation of TLR7 by IFN-alpha was greatly reduced in Irf9 -/- and Stat1 -/- B cells. Irf9 -/- B cells were incapable of being activated through TLR7, and Stat1 -/- B cells were impaired in activation through both TLR7 and TLR9. These data may reveal a novel role for IFN-I signaling molecules in both TLR-specific B cell responses and production of IgG autoantibodies directed against nucleic acid-associated autoantigens. Our results suggest that IFN-I is upstream of TLR signaling in the activation of autoreactive B cells in SLE. PMID:18340381

  14. EphrinB2 controls vessel pruning through STAT1-JNK3 signaling

    PubMed Central

    Salvucci, Ombretta; Ohnuki, Hidetaka; Maric, Dragan; Hou, Xu; Li, Xuri; Yoon, Sung Ok; Segarra, Marta; Eberhart, Charles G.; Acker-Palmer, Amparo; Tosato, Giovanna

    2015-01-01

    Angiogenesis produces primitive vascular networks that need pruning to yield hierarchically organized and functional vessels. Despite the critical importance of vessel pruning to vessel patterning and function, the mechanisms regulating this process are not clear. Here we show that EphrinB2, a well-known player in angiogenesis, is an essential regulator of endothelial cell death and vessel pruning. This regulation depends upon phosphotyrosine-EphrinB2 signaling repressing JNK3 activity via STAT1. JNK3 activation causes endothelial cell death. In the absence of JNK3, hyaloid vessel physiological pruning is impaired, associated with abnormal persistence of hyaloid vessels, defective retinal vasculature and microphthalmia. This syndrome closely resembles human persistent hyperplastic primary vitreus (PHPV), attributed to failed involution of hyaloid vessels. Our results provide evidence that EphrinB2/STAT1/JNK3 signaling is essential for vessel pruning, and that defects in this pathway may contribute to PHPV. PMID:25807892

  15. Post-transcriptional regulation of the human inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS) expression by the cytosolic poly(A)-binding protein (PABP).

    PubMed

    Casper, Ingrid; Nowag, Sebastian; Koch, Kathrin; Hubrich, Thomas; Bollmann, Franziska; Henke, Jenny; Schmitz, Katja; Kleinert, Hartmut; Pautz, Andrea

    2013-09-01

    Affinity purification using the 3'-untranslated region (3'-UTR) of the human inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS) mRNA identified the cytosolic poly(A)-binding protein (PABP) as a protein interacting with the human iNOS 3'-UTR. Downregulation of PABP expression by RNA interference resulted in a marked reduction of cytokine-induced iNOS mRNA expression without changes in the expression of mRNAs coding for the major subunit of the RNA polymerase II (Pol 2A) or β2-microglobuline (β2M). Along with the mRNA also iNOS protein expression was reduced by siPABP-treatment, whereas in the same cells protein expression of STAT-1α, NF-κB p65, or GAPDH was not altered. Reporter gene analyses showed no change of the inducibility of the human 16kb iNOS promoter in siPABP cells. In contrast, the siPABP-mediated decline of iNOS expression correlated with a reduction in the stability of the iNOS mRNA. As the stability of the Pol 2A and β2M mRNA was not changed, siPABP-treatment seems to have a specific effect on iNOS mRNA decay. UV-crosslinking experiments revealed that PABP interacts with one binding site in the 5'-UTR and two different binding sites in the 3'-UTR of the human iNOS mRNA. Mutation or deletion of the binding site in the 5'-UTR but not in the 3'-UTR reduced luciferase expression in DLD-1 cells transfected with iNOS-5'-UTR or iNOS-3'-UTR luciferase reporter constructs. In summary, our data demonstrate that PABP by binding to specific sequence elements in the 5'-UTR post-transcriptionally enhances human iNOS mRNA stability and thereby iNOS expression. PMID:23711718

  16. Parainfluenza Virus 3 Blocks Antiviral Mediators Downstream of the Interferon Lambda Receptor by Modulating Stat1 Phosphorylation

    PubMed Central

    Eberle, Kirsten C.; McGill, Jodi L.; Reinhardt, Timothy A.

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT Parainfluenza viruses are known to inhibit type I interferon (IFN) production; however, there is a lack of information regarding the type III IFN response during infection. Type III IFNs signal through a unique heterodimeric receptor, IFN-λR1/interleukin-10R2 (IL-10R2), which is primarily expressed by epithelial cells. Parainfluenza virus 3 (PIV-3) infection is highly restricted to the airway epithelium. We therefore sought to examine type III IFN signaling pathways during PIV-3 infection of epithelial cells. We used three strains of PIV-3: human PIV-3 (HPIV-3), bovine PIV-3 (BPIV-3), and dolphin PIV-1 (Tursiops truncatus PIV-1, or TtPIV-1). Here, we show that message levels of IL-29 are significantly increased during PIV-3 infection, yet downstream antiviral signaling molecules are not upregulated to levels similar to those of the positive control. Furthermore, in Vero cells infected with PIV-3, stimulation with recombinant IL-29/-28A/-28B does not cause upregulation of downstream antiviral molecules, suggesting that PIV-3 interferes with the JAK/STAT pathway downstream of the IFN-λR1/IL-10R2 receptor. We used Western blotting to examine the phosphorylation of Stat1 and Stat2 in Vero cells and the bronchial epithelial cell line BEAS-2B. In Vero cells, we observed reduced phosphorylation of the serine 727 (S727) site on Stat1, while in BEAS-2B cells Stat1 phosphorylation was decreased at the tyrosine 701 (Y701) site during PIV-3 infection. PIV-3 therefore interferes with the phosphorylation of Stat1 downstream of the type III IFN receptor. These data provide new evidence regarding strategies employed by parainfluenza viruses to effectively circumvent respiratory epithelial cell-specific antiviral immunity. IMPORTANCE Parainfluenza virus (PIV) in humans is associated with bronchiolitis and pneumonia and can be especially problematic in infants and the elderly. Also seen in cattle, bovine PIV-3 causes respiratory infections in young calves. In addition

  17. Tagging of Genomic STAT3 and STAT1 with Fluorescent Proteins and Insertion of a Luciferase Reporter in the Cyclin D1 Gene Provides a Modified A549 Cell Line to Screen for Selective STAT3 Inhibitors

    PubMed Central

    Samsonov, Andrey; Zenser, Nathan; Zhang, Fan; Zhang, Hongyi; Fetter, John; Malkov, Dmitry

    2013-01-01

    Signal transducer and activator of transcription 3 (STAT3) is an oncogenic protein that is constitutively activated in numerous cancer cell lines and human cancers. Another STAT family member, STAT1, possesses cancer-inhibitory properties and can promote apoptosis in tumor cells upon activation. To better characterize these important cancer related genes, we tagged STAT3 and STAT1 loci with fluorescent protein (FP) sequences (RFP and GFP respectively) by targeted integration via zinc finger nuclease (ZFN) - mediated homologous recombination in A549 cells that express aberrantly activated STAT3. We inserted the FP transgenes at the N-terminus of the STAT3 locus and at the C-terminus of the STAT1 locus. The integration resulted in endogenous expression of fluorescent STAT3 and STAT1 chimeric fusion proteins. When stimulated with IL-6 or IFN-γ, the cells showed robust nuclear translocation of RFP-STAT3 or STAT1-GFP, respectively. Pre-incubation of cells with a known specific STAT3 inhibitor showed that IFN-γ-induced translocation of STAT1-GFP was not impaired. STAT3 activates multiple downstream targets such as genes involved in cell cycle progression - e.g. cyclin D1. To detect changes in expression of endogenous cyclin D1, we used ZFN technology to insert a secreted luciferase reporter behind the cyclin D1 promoter and separated the luciferase and cyclin D1 coding regions by a 2A sequence to induce a translational skip. The luciferase insertion was made in the RFP-STAT3/STAT1-GFP cell line to have all three reporters in a single cell line. Addition of a STAT3 inhibitor led to suppression of cyclin D1 promoter activity and cell growth arrest. The triple-modified cell line provides a simple and convenient method for high-content screening and pre-clinical testing of potential STAT3 inhibitors in live cells while ensuring that the STAT1 pathway is not affected. This approach of reporting endogenous gene activities using ZFN technology could be applied to other cancer

  18. Nicotine-Mediated Regulation of Nicotinic Acetylcholine Receptors in Non-Small Cell Lung Adenocarcinoma by E2F1 and STAT1 Transcription Factors

    PubMed Central

    Schaal, Courtney; Chellappan, Srikumar

    2016-01-01

    Cigarette smoking is the major risk factor for non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC), which accounts for 80% of all lung cancers. Nicotine, the addictive component of tobacco smoke, can induce proliferation, migration, invasion, epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT), angiogenesis, and survival in NSCLC cell lines, as well as growth and metastasis of NSCLC in mice. This nicotine-mediated tumor progression is facilitated through activation of nicotinic acetylcholine receptors (nAChRs), specifically the α7 subunit; however, how the α7 nAChR gene is regulated in lung adenocarcinoma is not fully clear. Here we demonstrate that the α7 nAChR gene promoter is differentially regulated by E2F and STAT transcription factors through a competitive interplay; E2F1 induces the promoter, while STAT transcription factors repress it by binding to an overlapping site at a region -294 through -463bp upstream of the transcription start site. Treatment of cells with nicotine induced the mRNA and protein levels of α7 nAChR; this could be abrogated by treatment with inhibitors targeting Src, PI3K, MEK, α7 nAChR, CDK4/6 or a disruptor of the Rb-Raf-1 interaction. Further, nicotine–mediated induction of α7 nAChR was reduced when E2F1 was depleted and in contrast elevated when STAT1 was depleted by siRNAs. Interestingly, extracts from e-cigarettes, which have recently emerged as healthier alternatives to traditional cigarette smoking, can also induce α7 nAChR expression in a manner similar to nicotine. These results suggest an autoregulatory feed-forward loop that induces the levels of α7 nAChR upon exposure to nicotine, which enhances the strength of the signal. It can be imagined that such an induction of α7 nAChR contributes to the tumor-promoting functions of nicotine. PMID:27228072

  19. Human metapneumovirus small hydrophobic (SH) protein downregulates type I IFN pathway signaling by affecting STAT1 expression and phosphorylation.

    PubMed

    Hastings, Andrew K; Amato, Katherine R; Wen, Sherry C; Peterson, Laura S; Williams, John V

    2016-07-01

    Type I interferon (IFN) is a key mediator of antiviral immunity. Human metapneumovirus (HMPV) inhibits IFN signaling, but does not encode homologues of known IFN antagonists. We tested the hypothesis that a specific viral protein prevents type I IFN signaling by targeting signal transducer and activator of transcription-1 (STAT1). We found that human airway epithelial cells (capable of expressing IFNs) became impaired for STAT1 phosphorylation even without direct infection due to intrinsic negative feedback. HMPV-infected Vero cells (incapable of expressing IFN) displayed lower STAT1 expression and impaired STAT1 phosphorylation in response to type I IFN treatment compared to mock-infected cells. Transient overexpression of HMPV small hydrophobic (SH) protein significantly inhibited STAT1 phosphorylation and signaling, and recombinant virus lacking SH protein was unable to inhibit STAT1 phosphorylation. Our results indicate a role for the SH protein of HMPV in the downregulation of type I IFN signaling through the targeting of STAT1. PMID:27131212

  20. The Ets-1 transcription factor is required for Stat1-mediated T-bet expression and IgG2a class switching in mouse B cells.

    PubMed

    Nguyen, Hai Vu; Mouly, Enguerran; Chemin, Karine; Luinaud, Romain; Despres, Raymonde; Fermand, Jean-Paul; Arnulf, Bertrand; Bories, Jean-Christophe

    2012-05-01

    In response to antigens and cytokines, mouse B cells undergo class-switch recombination (CSR) and differentiate into Ig-secreting cells. T-bet, a T-box transcription factor that is up-regulated in lymphocytes by IFN-γ or IL-27, was shown to regulate CSR to IgG2a after T cell-independent B-cell stimulations. However, the molecular mechanisms controlling this process remain unclear. In the present study, we show that inactivation of the Ets-1 transcription factor results in a severe decrease in IgG2a secretion in vivo and in vitro. No T-bet expression was observed in Ets-1-deficient (Ets-1(-/-)) B cells stimulated with IFN-γ and lipopolysaccharide, and forced expression of T-bet in these cells rescued IgG2a secretion. Furthermore, we identified a transcriptional enhancer in the T-bet locus with an activity in B cells that relies on ETS-binding sites. After IFN-γ stimulation of Ets-1(-/-) B cells, activated Stat1, which forms a complex with Ets-1 in wild-type cells, no longer binds to the T-bet enhancer or promotes histone modifications at this site. These results demonstrate that Ets-1 is critical for IgG2a CSR and acts as an essential cofactor for Stat1 in the regulation of T-bet expression in B cells. PMID:22438254

  1. 17β-estradiol ameliorates age-associated loss of fibroblast function by attenuating IFN-γ/STAT1-dependent miR-7 upregulation.

    PubMed

    Midgley, Adam C; Morris, Glyn; Phillips, Aled O; Steadman, Robert

    2016-06-01

    Age-related defects in fibroblast differentiation and functionality were previously shown to be associated with impaired hyaluronan (HA) synthase 2 (HAS2) and epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) function, as a result of upregulated microRNA-7 (miR-7) expression. In aging fibroblasts, inhibiting miR-7 prevented the dysregulation of the HA-mediated CD44/EGFR signaling pathway. Here, we investigated transcriptional upregulation of miR-7 and implicated the age-associated over-activation of JAK/STAT1 as a primary candidate. STAT1 binding sites were identified on the putative miR-7 promoter and stimulation of fibroblasts with the inflammatory cytokine, interferon-γ (IFN-γ), significantly increased miR-7 transcriptional activity and resulted in upregulated miR-7 and loss of EGFR. Additionally, we demonstrated a role for the anti-inflammatory steroid, 17β-estradiol (E2), in the attenuation of miR-7 expression. E2 stimulation promoted estrogen receptor (ER) interactions with the miR-7 putative promoter and suppressed miR-7 expression. E2 also attenuated STAT1 expression and activity. Furthermore, treatments with E2 restored fibroblast functionality, including proliferation, migration and differentiation, key events in effective wound healing. In light of our findings, we propose that the regulation of miR-7 by pro- and anti-inflammatory mediators plays a wider role than previously thought. The modulation of fibroblast functions and ultimately wound healing by miR-7 activators or inhibitors could provide realistic targets for the restoration of chronic wound healing capabilities in the elderly. PMID:26931423

  2. Activation of the JAK/STAT-1 Signaling Pathway by IFN-γ Can Down-Regulate Functional Expression of the MHC Class I-Related Neonatal Fc Receptor for IgG1

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Xindong; Ye, Lilin; Bai, Yu; Mojidi, Habi; Simister, Neil E.; Zhu, Xiaoping

    2009-01-01

    Expression of many MHC genes is enhanced at the transcriptional or posttranscriptional level following exposure to the cytokine IFN-γ. However, in this study we found that IFN-γ down-regulated the constitutive expression of the neonatal Fc receptor (FcRn), an MHC class I-related molecule that functions to transport maternal IgG and protect IgG and albumin from degradation. Epithelial cell, macrophage-like THP-1 cell, and freshly isolated human PBMC exposure to IFN-γ resulted in a significant decrease of FcRn expression as assessed by real-time RT-PCR and Western blotting. The down-regulation of FcRn was not caused by apoptosis or the instability of FcRn mRNA. Chromatin immunoprecipitation and gel mobility shift assays showed that STAT-1 bound to an IFN-γ activation site in the human FcRn promoter region. Luciferase expression from an FcRn promoter-luciferase reporter gene construct was not altered in JAK1- and STAT-1-deficient cells following exposure to IFN-γ, whereas expression of JAK1 or STAT-1 protein restored the IFN-γ inhibitory effect on luciferase activity. The repressive effect of IFN-γ on the FcRn promoter was selectively reversed or blocked by mutations of the core nucleotides in the IFN-γ activation site sequence and by over-expression of the STAT-1 inhibitor PIAS1 or the dominant negative phospho-STAT-1 mutations at Tyr-701 and/or Ser-727 residues. Furthermore, STAT-1 might down-regulate FcRn transcription through sequestering the transcriptional coactivator CREB binding protein/p300. Functionally, IFN-γ stimulation dampened bidirectional transport of IgG across a polarized Calu-3 lung epithelial monolayer. Taken together, our results indicate that the JAK/STAT-1 signaling pathway was necessary and sufficient to mediate the down-regulation of FcRn gene expression by IFN-γ. PMID:18566411

  3. Age-Related Differences in Percentages of Regulatory and Effector T Lymphocytes and Their Subsets in Healthy Individuals and Characteristic STAT1/STAT5 Signalling Response in Helper T Lymphocytes

    PubMed Central

    Holcar, Marija; Goropevšek, Aleš; Ihan, Alojz; Avčin, Tadej

    2015-01-01

    The dynamic process of the development of the immune system can in itself result in age-related immune malfunctions. In this study, we analysed lymphocyte subsets in the peripheral blood of 60 healthy donors, divided into groups of children, adolescents, and adults, focusing on effector (Teff) and regulatory (Treg) T lymphocytes and STAT1/STAT5 signalling response in helper T lymphocytes (Th) in adults, using flow cytometry. Our results demonstrate a decrease in the percentage of total Tregs and an increase in the percentage of total Teffs with age and a consequential immense increase in the Teff/Treg ratio. The increase of Teffs was most apparent in Th1, Th1Th17, and Th17CD161− subsets. Significant Th lymphocyte STAT1 expression differences were observed between children and adolescents, which were associated with the decrease in activated Tregs. Higher expression of STAT1 was found in FoxP3hi than in FoxP3low Th lymphocytes, while significant IL-2 induced STAT5 phosphorylation differences were found among the subsets of Th lymphocytes in adults. Our study demonstrates age-related changes in circulating Teff and Treg, as well as significant differences in STAT5/STAT1 signalling among FoxP3+ Th lymphocytes, providing new advances in the understanding of immunosenescence. PMID:26525134

  4. Age-Related Differences in Percentages of Regulatory and Effector T Lymphocytes and Their Subsets in Healthy Individuals and Characteristic STAT1/STAT5 Signalling Response in Helper T Lymphocytes.

    PubMed

    Holcar, Marija; Goropevšek, Aleš; Ihan, Alojz; Avčin, Tadej

    2015-01-01

    The dynamic process of the development of the immune system can in itself result in age-related immune malfunctions. In this study, we analysed lymphocyte subsets in the peripheral blood of 60 healthy donors, divided into groups of children, adolescents, and adults, focusing on effector (Teff) and regulatory (Treg) T lymphocytes and STAT1/STAT5 signalling response in helper T lymphocytes (Th) in adults, using flow cytometry. Our results demonstrate a decrease in the percentage of total Tregs and an increase in the percentage of total Teffs with age and a consequential immense increase in the Teff/Treg ratio. The increase of Teffs was most apparent in Th1, Th1Th17, and Th17CD161- subsets. Significant Th lymphocyte STAT1 expression differences were observed between children and adolescents, which were associated with the decrease in activated Tregs. Higher expression of STAT1 was found in FoxP3hi than in FoxP3low Th lymphocytes, while significant IL-2 induced STAT5 phosphorylation differences were found among the subsets of Th lymphocytes in adults. Our study demonstrates age-related changes in circulating Teff and Treg, as well as significant differences in STAT5/STAT1 signalling among FoxP3+ Th lymphocytes, providing new advances in the understanding of immunosenescence. PMID:26525134

  5. Calreticulin binds to gentamicin and reduces drug-induced ototoxicity.

    PubMed

    Karasawa, Takatoshi; Wang, Qi; David, Larry L; Steyger, Peter S

    2011-12-01

    Aminoglycosides like gentamicin are among the most commonly used antibiotics in clinical practice and are essential for treating life-threatening tuberculosis and Gram-negative bacterial infections. However, aminoglycosides are also nephrotoxic and ototoxic. Although a number of mechanisms have been proposed, it is still unclear how aminoglycosides induce cell death in auditory sensory epithelia and subsequent deafness. Aminoglycosides bind to various intracellular molecules, such as RNA and phosphoinositides. We hypothesized that aminoglycosides, based on their tissue-specific susceptibility, also bind to intracellular proteins that play a role in drug-induced ototoxicity. By conjugating an aminoglycoside, gentamicin, to agarose beads and conducting a gentamicin-agarose pull-down assay, we have isolated gentamicin-binding proteins (GBPs) from immortalized cells of mouse organ of Corti, HEI-OC1. Mass spectrometry identified calreticulin (CRT) as a GBP. Immunofluorescence revealed that CRT expression is concentrated in strial marginal cells and hair cell stereocilia, primary locations of drug uptake and cytotoxicity in the cochlea. In HEI-OC1 cells treated with gentamicin, reduction of CRT expression using small interfering RNA (siRNA) reduced intracellular drug levels. CRT-deficient mouse embryonic fibroblast (MEF) cells as well as CRT siRNA-transfected wild-type MEFs also had reduced cell viability after gentamicin treatment. A pull-down assay using deletion mutants of CRT determined that the carboxyl C-domain of CRT binds to gentamicin. HeLa cells transfected with CRT C-domain deletion mutant construct were more susceptible to gentamicin-induced cytotoxicity compared with cells transfected with full-length CRT or other deletion mutants. Therefore, we conclude that CRT binding to gentamicin is protective against gentamicin-induced cytotoxicity. PMID:21785162

  6. Cell-intrinsic role for IFN-α–STAT1 signals in regulating murine Peyer patch plasmacytoid dendritic cells and conditioning an inflammatory response

    PubMed Central

    Li, Haiyan S.; Gelbard, Alexander; Martinez, Gustavo J.; Esashi, Eiji; Zhang, Huiyuan; Nguyen-Jackson, Hoainam; Liu, Yong-Jun; Overwijk, Willem W.

    2011-01-01

    Plasmacytoid dendritic cells (pDCs) reside in bone marrrow and lymphoid organs in homeostatic conditions and typically secrete abundant quantities of type I interferons (IFNs) on Toll-like receptor triggering. Recently, a pDC population was identified within Peyer patches (PPs) of the gut that is distinguished by its lack of IFN production; however, the relationship of PP pDCs to pDCs in other organs has been unclear. We report that PP pDCs are derived from common DC progenitors and accumulate in response to Fms-like tyrosine kinase 3 ligand, yet appear divergent in transcription factor profile and surface marker phenotype, including reduced E2-2 and CCR9 expression. Type I IFN signaling via STAT1 has a cell-autonomous role in accrual of PP pDCs in vivo. Moreover, IFN-α enhances pDC generation from DC progenitors by a STAT1-dependent mechanism. pDCs that have been developed in the presence of IFN-α resemble PP pDCs, produce inflammatory cytokines, stimulate Th17 cell generation, and fail to secrete IFN-α on Toll-like receptor engagement. These results indicate that IFN-α influences the development and function of pDCs by inducing emergence of an inflammatory (Th17-inducing) antigen-presenting subset, and simultaneously regulating accumulation of pDCs in the intestinal microenvironment. PMID:21828128

  7. Rotavirus antagonizes cellular antiviral responses by inhibiting the nuclear accumulation of STAT1, STAT2, and NF-kappaB.

    PubMed

    Holloway, Gavan; Truong, Thanhmai T; Coulson, Barbara S

    2009-05-01

    A vital arm of the innate immune response to viral infection is the induction and subsequent antiviral effects of interferon (IFN). Rotavirus reduces type I IFN induction in infected cells by the degradation of IFN regulatory factors. Here, we show that the monkey rotavirus RRV and human rotavirus Wa also block gene expression induced by type I and II IFNs through a mechanism allowing signal transducer and activator of transcription 1 (STAT1) and STAT2 activation but preventing their nuclear accumulation. In infected cells, this may allow rotavirus to block the antiviral actions of IFN produced early in infection or by activated immune cells. As the intracellular expression of rotavirus nonstructural proteins NSP1, NSP3, and NSP4 individually did not inhibit IFN-stimulated gene expression, their involvement in this process is unlikely. RRV and Wa rotaviruses also prevented the tumor necrosis factor alpha-stimulated nuclear accumulation of NF-kappaB and NF-kappaB-driven gene expression. In addition, NF-kappaB was activated by rotavirus infection, confirming earlier findings by others. As NF-kappaB is important for the induction of IFN and other cytokines during viral infection, this suggests that rotavirus prevents cellular transcription as a means to evade host responses. To our knowledge, this is the first report of the use of this strategy by a double-stranded RNA virus. PMID:19244315

  8. Interferon-stimulated gene (ISG) 60, as well as ISG56 and ISG54, positively regulates TLR3/IFN-β/STAT1 axis in U373MG human astrocytoma cells.

    PubMed

    Imaizumi, Tadaatsu; Yoshida, Hidemi; Hayakari, Ryo; Xing, Fei; Wang, Lian; Matsumiya, Tomoh; Tanji, Kunikazu; Kawaguchi, Shogo; Murakami, Manabu; Tanaka, Hiroshi

    2016-04-01

    Treatment of cells with interferons (IFNs) induces the phosphorylation of signal transducer and activator of transcription 1 (STAT1), leading to the expression of hundreds of IFN-stimulated genes (ISGs). ISGs exert various antiviral and pro-inflammatory reactions. We have previously reported that ISG56 and ISG54 are induced by polyinosinic-polycytidylic acid (poly IC), an authentic agonist for Toll-like receptor 3 (TLR3), in U373MG human astrocytoma cells. ISG56 and ISG54 are also named as IFN-induced proteins with tetratricopeptide repeats (IFIT) 1 and IFIT2, respectively. In the present study, we demonstrated that poly IC induces the expression of ISG60, also named as IFIT3, in U373MG cells. RNA interference experiments showed that the induction of ISG60 by poly IC was mediated by TLR3, IFN-β, ISG56 and ISG54, whereas ISG60 is involved in poly IC-induced expression of ISG56, ISG54 and a chemokine CXCL10. The level of phosphorylated STAT1 was enhanced by poly IC, and it was inhibited by knockdown of ISG56, ISG54 or ISG60. These results suggest that there is a positive feedback loop between phosphorylated STAT1 and these ISGs. PMID:26423178

  9. Disruption of Type I Interferon Signaling by the Nonstructural Protein of Severe Fever with Thrombocytopenia Syndrome Virus via the Hijacking of STAT2 and STAT1 into Inclusion Bodies

    PubMed Central

    Ning, Yun-Jia; Feng, Kuan; Min, Yuan-Qin; Cao, Wu-Chun; Wang, Manli; Deng, Fei; Hu, Zhihong

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT The type I interferon (IFN) system, including IFN induction and signaling, is the critical component of the host defense line against viral infection, which, in turn, is also a vulnerable target for viral immune evasion. Severe fever with thrombocytopenia syndrome virus (SFTSV) is an emerging bunyavirus. Previous data have shown that SFTSV can interfere with the early induction of type I IFNs through targeting host kinases TBK1/IKKε. In this study, we demonstrated that SFTSV also can suppress type I IFN-triggered signaling and interferon-stimulated gene (ISG) expression. Interestingly, we observed the significant inhibition of IFN signaling in cells transfected with the plasmids encoding the nonstructural protein (NSs) but not the nucleocapsid protein (NP), indicating the role of NSs as an antagonist of IFN signaling. Furthermore, coimmunoprecipitation (Co-IP) and pulldown assays indicated that NSs interacts with the cellular signal transducer and activator of transcription 2 (STAT2), and the DNA-binding domain of STAT2 may contribute to the NSs-STAT2 interaction. Combined with confocal microscopy analyses, we demonstrated that NSs sequesters STAT2 and STAT1 into viral inclusion bodies (IBs) and impairs IFN-induced STAT2 phosphorylation and nuclear translocation of both STATs, resulting in the inhibition of IFN signaling and ISG expression. SFTSV NSs-mediated hijacking of STATs in IBs represents a novel mechanism of viral suppression of IFN signaling, highlighting the role of viral IBs as the virus-built “jail” sequestering some crucial host factors and interfering with the corresponding cellular processes. IMPORTANCE SFTSV is an emerging bunyavirus which can cause a severe hemorrhagic fever-like disease with high case fatality rates in humans, posing a serious health threat. However, there are no specific antivirals available, and the pathogenesis and virus-host interactions are largely unclear. Here, we demonstrated that SFTSV can inhibit type I IFN

  10. Tyrosine 110 in the measles virus phosphoprotein is required to block STAT1 phosphorylation

    SciTech Connect

    Devaux, Patricia; Messling, Veronika von; Songsungthong, Warangkhana; Springfeld, Christoph; Cattaneo, Roberto . E-mail: cattaneo.roberto@mayo.edu

    2007-03-30

    The measles virus (MV) P gene encodes three proteins: P, an essential polymerase cofactor, and C and V, which have multiple functions including immune evasion. We show here that the MV P protein also contributes to immune evasion, and that tyrosine 110 is required to block nuclear translocation of the signal transducer and activator of transcription factors (STAT) after interferon type I treatment. In particular, MV P inhibits STAT1 phosphorylation. This is shown not only by transient expression but also by reverse genetic analyses based on a new functional infectious cDNA derived from a MV vaccine vial (Moraten strain). Our study also identifies a conserved sequence around P protein tyrosine 110 as a candidate interaction site with a cellular protein.

  11. AG490 and PF431396 Sensitive Tyrosine Kinase Control the Population Heterogeneity of Basal STAT1 Activity in Ube1l Deficient Cells

    PubMed Central

    Now, Hesung; Yoo, Joo-Yeon

    2016-01-01

    A population often contains distinct sub-populations, thereby increasing the complexity of the overall heterogeneity. However, the cellular origin and biological relevance of sub-populations in cell population have not been clearly identified. Here we demonstrated the novel roles of ISGylation, which is an IFN-induced post-translational modification, controlling heterogeneity at the population level in cultured adherent cells. Without UBE1L, an E1 enzyme of ISGylation, mouse embryonic fibroblasts (MEF) exhibited low viral resistance despite high STAT1 and ISG expression compared with the wild-type MEF. We observe that Ube1l−/− MEF populations consist of two behaviorally distinguishable sub-populations with distinct basal STAT1 activity, while wild-type MEF populations are unimodal. This population heterogeneity in Ube1l knock-out cells was perturbed by tyrosine kinase inhibitors, AG490 and PF431396. In contrast, the neutralization of type I IFN did not affect population heterogeneity. Based on these results, we concluded that UBE1L functions to adjust basal immunological states with the regulation of population heterogeneity. PMID:27427993

  12. STAT1-regulated lung MDSC-like cells produce IL-10 and efferocytose apoptotic neutrophils with relevance in resolution of bacterial pneumonia.

    PubMed

    Poe, S L; Arora, M; Oriss, T B; Yarlagadda, M; Isse, K; Khare, A; Levy, D E; Lee, J S; Mallampalli, R K; Chan, Y R; Ray, A; Ray, P

    2013-01-01

    Bacterial pneumonia remains a significant burden worldwide. Although an inflammatory response in the lung is required to fight the causative agent, persistent tissue-resident neutrophils in non-resolving pneumonia can induce collateral tissue damage and precipitate acute lung injury. However, little is known about mechanisms orchestrated in the lung tissue that remove apoptotic neutrophils to restore tissue homeostasis. In mice infected with Klebsiella pneumoniae, a bacterium commonly associated with hospital-acquired pneumonia, we show that interleukin (IL)-10 is essential for resolution of lung inflammation and recovery of mice after infection. Although IL-10(-/-) mice cleared bacteria, they displayed increased morbidity with progressive weight loss and persistent lung inflammation in the later phase after infection. A source of tissue IL-10 was found to be resident CD11b(+)Gr1(int)F4/80(+) cells resembling myeloid-derived suppressor cells (MDSCs) that appeared with a delayed kinetics after infection. These cells efficiently efferocytosed apoptotic neutrophils, which was aided by IL-10. The lung neutrophil burden was attenuated in infected signal transducer and activator of transcription 1 (STAT1)(-/-) mice with concomitant increase in the frequency of the MDSC-like cells and lung IL-10 levels. Thus, inhibiting STAT1 in combination with antibiotics may be a novel therapeutic strategy to address inefficient resolution of bacterial pneumonia. PMID:22785228

  13. Heterozygous STAT1 gain-of-function mutations underlie an unexpectedly broad clinical phenotype.

    PubMed

    Toubiana, Julie; Okada, Satoshi; Hiller, Julia; Oleastro, Matias; Lagos Gomez, Macarena; Aldave Becerra, Juan Carlos; Ouachée-Chardin, Marie; Fouyssac, Fanny; Girisha, Katta Mohan; Etzioni, Amos; Van Montfrans, Joris; Camcioglu, Yildiz; Kerns, Leigh Ann; Belohradsky, Bernd; Blanche, Stéphane; Bousfiha, Aziz; Rodriguez-Gallego, Carlos; Meyts, Isabelle; Kisand, Kai; Reichenbach, Janine; Renner, Ellen D; Rosenzweig, Sergio; Grimbacher, Bodo; van de Veerdonk, Frank L; Traidl-Hoffmann, Claudia; Picard, Capucine; Marodi, Laszlo; Morio, Tomohiro; Kobayashi, Masao; Lilic, Desa; Milner, Joshua D; Holland, Steven; Casanova, Jean-Laurent; Puel, Anne

    2016-06-23

    Since their discovery in patients with autosomal dominant (AD) chronic mucocutaneous candidiasis (CMC) in 2011, heterozygous STAT1 gain-of-function (GOF) mutations have increasingly been identified worldwide. The clinical spectrum associated with them needed to be delineated. We enrolled 274 patients from 167 kindreds originating from 40 countries from 5 continents. Demographic data, clinical features, immunological parameters, treatment, and outcome were recorded. The median age of the 274 patients was 22 years (range, 1-71 years); 98% of them had CMC, with a median age at onset of 1 year (range, 0-24 years). Patients often displayed bacterial (74%) infections, mostly because of Staphylococcus aureus (36%), including the respiratory tract and the skin in 47% and 28% of patients, respectively, and viral (38%) infections, mostly because of Herpesviridae (83%) and affecting the skin in 32% of patients. Invasive fungal infections (10%), mostly caused by Candida spp. (29%), and mycobacterial disease (6%) caused by Mycobacterium tuberculosis, environmental mycobacteria, or Bacille Calmette-Guérin vaccines were less common. Many patients had autoimmune manifestations (37%), including hypothyroidism (22%), type 1 diabetes (4%), blood cytopenia (4%), and systemic lupus erythematosus (2%). Invasive infections (25%), cerebral aneurysms (6%), and cancers (6%) were the strongest predictors of poor outcome. CMC persisted in 39% of the 202 patients receiving prolonged antifungal treatment. Circulating interleukin-17A-producing T-cell count was low for most (82%) but not all of the patients tested. STAT1 GOF mutations underlie AD CMC, as well as an unexpectedly wide range of other clinical features, including not only a variety of infectious and autoimmune diseases, but also cerebral aneurysms and carcinomas that confer a poor prognosis. PMID:27114460

  14. Heterozygous STAT1 gain-of-function mutations underlie an unexpectedly broad clinical phenotype

    PubMed Central

    Toubiana, Julie; Okada, Satoshi; Hiller, Julia; Oleastro, Matias; Lagos Gomez, Macarena; Aldave Becerra, Juan Carlos; Ouachée-Chardin, Marie; Fouyssac, Fanny; Girisha, Katta Mohan; Etzioni, Amos; Van Montfrans, Joris; Camcioglu, Yildiz; Kerns, Leigh Ann; Belohradsky, Bernd; Blanche, Stéphane; Bousfiha, Aziz; Rodriguez-Gallego, Carlos; Meyts, Isabelle; Kisand, Kai; Reichenbach, Janine; Renner, Ellen D.; Rosenzweig, Sergio; Grimbacher, Bodo; van de Veerdonk, Frank L.; Traidl-Hoffmann, Claudia; Picard, Capucine; Marodi, Laszlo; Morio, Tomohiro; Kobayashi, Masao; Lilic, Desa; Milner, Joshua D.; Holland, Steven; Casanova, Jean-Laurent

    2016-01-01

    Since their discovery in patients with autosomal dominant (AD) chronic mucocutaneous candidiasis (CMC) in 2011, heterozygous STAT1 gain-of-function (GOF) mutations have increasingly been identified worldwide. The clinical spectrum associated with them needed to be delineated. We enrolled 274 patients from 167 kindreds originating from 40 countries from 5 continents. Demographic data, clinical features, immunological parameters, treatment, and outcome were recorded. The median age of the 274 patients was 22 years (range, 1-71 years); 98% of them had CMC, with a median age at onset of 1 year (range, 0-24 years). Patients often displayed bacterial (74%) infections, mostly because of Staphylococcus aureus (36%), including the respiratory tract and the skin in 47% and 28% of patients, respectively, and viral (38%) infections, mostly because of Herpesviridae (83%) and affecting the skin in 32% of patients. Invasive fungal infections (10%), mostly caused by Candida spp. (29%), and mycobacterial disease (6%) caused by Mycobacterium tuberculosis, environmental mycobacteria, or Bacille Calmette-Guérin vaccines were less common. Many patients had autoimmune manifestations (37%), including hypothyroidism (22%), type 1 diabetes (4%), blood cytopenia (4%), and systemic lupus erythematosus (2%). Invasive infections (25%), cerebral aneurysms (6%), and cancers (6%) were the strongest predictors of poor outcome. CMC persisted in 39% of the 202 patients receiving prolonged antifungal treatment. Circulating interleukin-17A–producing T-cell count was low for most (82%) but not all of the patients tested. STAT1 GOF mutations underlie AD CMC, as well as an unexpectedly wide range of other clinical features, including not only a variety of infectious and autoimmune diseases, but also cerebral aneurysms and carcinomas that confer a poor prognosis. PMID:27114460

  15. Infectious Bronchitis Coronavirus Inhibits STAT1 Signaling and Requires Accessory Proteins for Resistance to Type I Interferon Activity

    PubMed Central

    Kint, Joeri; Dickhout, Annemiek; Kutter, Jasmin; Maier, Helena J.; Britton, Paul; Koumans, Joseph; Pijlman, Gorben P.; Fros, Jelke J.; Wiegertjes, Geert F.

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT The innate immune response is the first line of defense against viruses, and type I interferon (IFN) is a critical component of this response. Similar to other viruses, the gammacoronavirus infectious bronchitis virus (IBV) has evolved under evolutionary pressure to evade and counteract the IFN response to enable its survival. Previously, we reported that IBV induces a delayed activation of the IFN response. In the present work, we describe the resistance of IBV to IFN and the potential role of accessory proteins herein. We show that IBV is fairly resistant to the antiviral state induced by IFN and identify that viral accessory protein 3a is involved in resistance to IFN, as its absence renders IBV less resistant to IFN treatment. In addition to this, we found that independently of its accessory proteins, IBV inhibits IFN-mediated phosphorylation and translocation of STAT1. In summary, we show that IBV uses multiple strategies to counteract the IFN response. IMPORTANCE In the present study, we show that infectious bronchitis virus (IBV) is resistant to IFN treatment and identify a role for accessory protein 3a in the resistance against the type I IFN response. We also demonstrate that, in a time-dependent manner, IBV effectively interferes with IFN signaling and that its accessory proteins are dispensable for this activity. This study demonstrates that the gammacoronavirus IBV, similar to its mammalian counterparts, has evolved multiple strategies to efficiently counteract the IFN response of its avian host, and it identifies accessory protein 3a as multifaceted antagonist of the avian IFN system. PMID:26401035

  16. microRNA let-7c is essential for the anisomycin-elicited apoptosis in Jurkat T cells by linking JNK1/2 to AP-1/STAT1/STAT3 signaling.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Zhiwei; Lu, Xijian; Wang, Jin; Xiao, Jia; Liu, Jing; Xing, Feiyue

    2016-01-01

    Anisomycin, an antibiotic produced by Streptomyces griseolus, strongly induces apoptosis in various tumor cells in vitro, superior dramatically to adriamycin. The present study aims to elucidate its detailed mechanistic process. The results showed that anisomycin sufficiently promoted the apoptosis in human leukemic Jurkat T cells at a quite low dose. microRNA let-7c (let-7c) contributed to the anisomycin-induced apoptosis, which could be abrogated by the inactivation of JNK signaling. The let-7c over-expression and the addition of its mimics facilitated the activation of AP-1, STAT1 and Bim by linking JNK1/2 to AP-1/STAT1, but rather inhibited the activation of STAT3 and Bcl-xL by connecting JNK1/2 to STAT3, followed by the augmented apoptosis in the cells. The let-7c deficiency reduced the AP-1, STAT1 and Bim activities, and enhanced the STAT3 and Bcl-xL, alleviating the anisomycin-induced apoptosis. The knockdown of the bim gene repressed the anisomycin-boosted apoptosis through the attenuation of the active Bak and Bax. The findings indicate for the first time that miR let-7c is essential for the anisomycin-triggered apoptosis by linking JNK1/2 to AP-1/STAT1/STAT3/Bim/Bcl-xL/Bax/Bak signaling. This provides a novel insight into the mechanism by which anisomycin leads to the tumor cell apoptosis, potentially laying the foundations for its development and clinical application. PMID:27087117

  17. microRNA let-7c is essential for the anisomycin-elicited apoptosis in Jurkat T cells by linking JNK1/2 to AP-1/STAT1/STAT3 signaling

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Zhiwei; Lu, Xijian; Wang, Jin; Xiao, Jia; Liu, Jing; Xing, Feiyue

    2016-01-01

    Anisomycin, an antibiotic produced by Streptomyces griseolus, strongly induces apoptosis in various tumor cells in vitro, superior dramatically to adriamycin. The present study aims to elucidate its detailed mechanistic process. The results showed that anisomycin sufficiently promoted the apoptosis in human leukemic Jurkat T cells at a quite low dose. microRNA let-7c (let-7c) contributed to the anisomycin-induced apoptosis, which could be abrogated by the inactivation of JNK signaling. The let-7c over-expression and the addition of its mimics facilitated the activation of AP-1, STAT1 and Bim by linking JNK1/2 to AP-1/STAT1, but rather inhibited the activation of STAT3 and Bcl-xL by connecting JNK1/2 to STAT3, followed by the augmented apoptosis in the cells. The let-7c deficiency reduced the AP-1, STAT1 and Bim activities, and enhanced the STAT3 and Bcl-xL, alleviating the anisomycin-induced apoptosis. The knockdown of the bim gene repressed the anisomycin-boosted apoptosis through the attenuation of the active Bak and Bax. The findings indicate for the first time that miR let-7c is essential for the anisomycin-triggered apoptosis by linking JNK1/2 to AP-1/STAT1/STAT3/Bim/Bcl-xL/Bax/Bak signaling. This provides a novel insight into the mechanism by which anisomycin leads to the tumor cell apoptosis, potentially laying the foundations for its development and clinical application. PMID:27087117

  18. Interferon-gamma regulates nucleoside transport systems in macrophages through signal transduction and activator of transduction factor 1 (STAT1)-dependent and -independent signalling pathways.

    PubMed

    Soler, Concepció; Felipe, Antonio; García-Manteiga, José; Serra, Maria; Guillén-Gómez, Elena; Casado, F Javier; MacLeod, Carol; Modolell, Manuel; Pastor-Anglada, Marçal; Celada, Antonio

    2003-11-01

    The expressions of CNT and ENT (concentrative and equilibrative nucleoside transporters) in macrophages are differentially regulated by IFN-gamma (interferon-gamma). This cytokine controls gene expression through STAT1-dependent and/or -independent pathways (where STAT1 stands for signal transduction and activator of transcription 1). In the present study, the role of STAT1 in the response of nucleoside transporters to IFN-gamma was studied using macrophages from STAT1 knockout mice. IFN-gamma triggered an inhibition of ENT1-related nucleoside transport activity through STAT1-dependent mechanisms. Such inhibition of macrophage growth and ENT1 activity by IFN-gamma is required for DNA synthesis. Interestingly, IFN-gamma led to an induction of the CNT1- and CNT2-related nucleoside transport activities independent of STAT1, thus ensuring the supply of extracellular nucleosides for the STAT1-independent RNA synthesis. IFN-gamma up-regulated CNT2 mRNA and CNT1 protein levels and down-regulated ENT1 mRNA in both wild-type and STAT1 knockout macrophages. This is consistent with a STAT1-independent, long-term-mediated, probably transcription-dependent, regulation of nucleoside transporter genes. Moreover, STAT1-dependent post-transcriptional mechanisms are implicated in the regulation of ENT1 activity. Although nitric oxide is involved in the regulation of ENT1 activity in B-cells at a post-transcriptional level, our results show that STAT1-dependent induction of nitric oxide by IFN-gamma is not implicated in the regulation of ENT1 activity in macrophages. Our results indicate that both STAT1-dependent and -independent pathways are involved in the regulation of nucleoside transporters by IFN-gamma in macrophages. PMID:12868960

  19. Induction of an Inflammatory Loop by Interleukin-1β and Tumor Necrosis Factor-α Involves NF-kB and STAT-1 in Differentiated Human Neuroprogenitor Cells

    PubMed Central

    Pugazhenthi, Subbiah; Zhang, Yuji; Bouchard, Ron; Mahaffey, Gregory

    2013-01-01

    Proinflammatory cytokines secreted from microglia are known to induce a secondary immune response in astrocytes leading to an inflammatory loop. Cytokines also interfere with neurogenesis during aging and in neurodegenerative diseases. The present study examined the mechanism of induction of inflammatory mediators at the transcriptional level in human differentiated neuroprogenitor cells (NPCs). Interleukin-1β (IL-1β) and tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α) induced the expression of cytokines and chemokines in differentiated human NPCs as shown by an immune pathway-specific array. Network motif (NM) analysis of these genes revealed 118 three-node NMs, suggesting complex interactions between inflammatory mediators and transcription factors. Immunofluorescent staining showed increases in the levels of IL-8 and CXCL10 proteins in neurons and glial cells. Findings from Taqman low density array suggested the synergistic actions of IL-1β and TNF-α in the induction of a majority of inflammatory genes by a mechanism involving NF-kB and STAT-1. Nuclear localization of these transcription factors in differentiated NPCs was observed following exposure to IL-1α and TNF-α. Further studies on CXCL10, a chemokine known to be elevated in the Alzheimer's brain, showed that TNF-α is a stronger inducer of CXCL10 promoter when compared to IL-1β. The synergy between these cytokines was lost when ISRE or kB elements in CXCL10 promoter were mutated. Our findings suggest that the activation of inflammatory pathways in neurons and astrocytes through transcription factors including NF-kB and STAT-1 play important roles in neuroglial interactions and in sustaining the vicious cycle of inflammatory response. PMID:23922745

  20. CD24 suppresses malignant phenotype by downregulation of SHH transcription through STAT1 inhibition in breast cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Suyama, Kumi; Onishi, Hideya; Imaizumi, Akira; Shinkai, Kentaro; Umebayashi, Masayo; Kubo, Makoto; Mizuuchi, Yusuke; Oda, Yoshinao; Tanaka, Masao; Nakamura, Masafumi; Katano, Mitsuo

    2016-04-28

    Hedgehog (Hh) signaling has been found to be activated in breast cancer stem cells (BCSCs). However, the precise role of the BCSCs marker, CD24, remains unclear. Here, we describe a relationship between CD24 and Sonic Hedgehog (SHH), and reveal a role for this relationship in the induction of a malignant phenotype of breast cancer. CD24 siRNA-transfected breast cancer cells (BCCs) demonstrated higher expression of SHH and GLI1, increased anchorage-independent proliferation, and enhanced invasiveness and superior tumorigenicity compared with control. Conversely, CD24 forced-expressing BCCs possessed decreased SHH and GLI1 expression, anchorage-independent proliferation, and invasiveness. Suppression of SHH decreased invasiveness through inhibition of matrix metalloproteinase (MMP)-2 expression, GLI1 expression, anchorage-independent proliferation, tumorigenicity, and tumor volume in vivo in CD24 siRNA transfected BCCs. DNA microarray analysis identified STAT1 as a relationship between CD24 and SHH. CD24 siRNA-transfected BCCs with concurrent STAT1 inhibition exhibited decreased SHH expression, invasiveness, anchorage-independent proliferation, tumorigenicity, and tumor volume in vivo. These results suggest that CD24 suppresses development of a malignant phenotype by down-regulating SHH transcription through STAT1 inhibition. CD24 gene transfer or STAT1 inhibition may represent new effective therapeutic strategies to target refractory breast cancer. PMID:26797459

  1. Measles virus V protein blocks Jak1-mediated phosphorylation of STAT1 to escape IFN-{alpha}/{beta} signaling

    SciTech Connect

    Caignard, Gregory; Guerbois, Mathilde; Labernardiere, Jean-Louis; Jacob, Yves; Jones, Louis M.; Wild, Fabian; Tangy, Frederic Vidalain, Pierre-Olivier

    2007-11-25

    Viruses have evolved various strategies to escape the antiviral activity of type I interferons (IFN-{alpha}/{beta}). For measles virus, this function is carried by the polycistronic gene P that encodes, by an unusual editing strategy, for the phosphoprotein P and the virulence factor V (MV-V). MV-V prevents STAT1 nuclear translocation by either sequestration or phosphorylation inhibition, thereby blocking IFN-{alpha}/{beta} pathway. We show that both the N- and C-terminal domains of MV-V (PNT and VCT) contribute to the inhibition of IFN-{alpha}/{beta} signaling. Using the two-hybrid system and co-affinity purification experiments, we identified STAT1 and Jak1 as interactors of MV-V and demonstrate that MV-V can block the direct phosphorylation of STAT1 by Jak1. A deleterious mutation within the PNT domain of MV-V (Y110H) impaired its ability to interact and block STAT1 phosphorylation. Thus, MV-V interacts with at least two components of IFN-{alpha}/{beta} receptor complex to block downstream signaling.

  2. Superlattices assembled through shape-induced directional binding.

    PubMed

    Lu, Fang; Yager, Kevin G; Zhang, Yugang; Xin, Huolin; Gang, Oleg

    2015-01-01

    Organization of spherical particles into lattices is typically driven by packing considerations. Although the addition of directional binding can significantly broaden structural diversity, nanoscale implementation remains challenging. Here we investigate the assembly of clusters and lattices in which anisotropic polyhedral blocks coordinate isotropic spherical nanoparticles via shape-induced directional interactions facilitated by DNA recognition. We show that these polyhedral blocks--cubes and octahedrons--when mixed with spheres, promote the assembly of clusters with architecture determined by polyhedron symmetry. Moreover, three-dimensional binary superlattices are formed when DNA shells accommodate the shape disparity between nanoparticle interfaces. The crystallographic symmetry of assembled lattices is determined by the spatial symmetry of the block's facets, while structural order depends on DNA-tuned interactions and particle size ratio. The presented lattice assembly strategy, exploiting shape for defining the global structure and DNA-mediation locally, opens novel possibilities for by-design fabrication of binary lattices. PMID:25903309

  3. Superlattices assembled through shape-induced directional binding

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lu, Fang; Yager, Kevin G.; Zhang, Yugang; Xin, Huolin; Gang, Oleg

    2015-04-01

    Organization of spherical particles into lattices is typically driven by packing considerations. Although the addition of directional binding can significantly broaden structural diversity, nanoscale implementation remains challenging. Here we investigate the assembly of clusters and lattices in which anisotropic polyhedral blocks coordinate isotropic spherical nanoparticles via shape-induced directional interactions facilitated by DNA recognition. We show that these polyhedral blocks--cubes and octahedrons--when mixed with spheres, promote the assembly of clusters with architecture determined by polyhedron symmetry. Moreover, three-dimensional binary superlattices are formed when DNA shells accommodate the shape disparity between nanoparticle interfaces. The crystallographic symmetry of assembled lattices is determined by the spatial symmetry of the block's facets, while structural order depends on DNA-tuned interactions and particle size ratio. The presented lattice assembly strategy, exploiting shape for defining the global structure and DNA-mediation locally, opens novel possibilities for by-design fabrication of binary lattices.

  4. Dynamical DNA accessibility induced by chromatin remodeling and protein binding

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Montel, F.; Faivre-Moskalenko, C.; Castelnovo, M.

    2014-11-01

    Chromatin remodeling factors are enzymes being able to alter locally chromatin structure at the nucleosomal level and they actively participate in the regulation of gene expression. Using simple rules for individual nucleosome motion induced by a remodeling factor, we designed simulations of the remodeling of oligomeric chromatin, in order to address quantitatively collective effects in DNA accessibility upon nucleosome mobilization. Our results suggest that accessibility profiles are inhomogeneous thanks to borders effects like protein binding. Remarkably, we show that the accessibility lifetime of DNA sequence is roughly doubled in the vicinity of borders as compared to its value in bulk regions far from the borders. These results are quantitatively interpreted as resulting from the confined diffusion of a large nucleosome depleted region.

  5. Superlattices assembled through shape-induced directional binding

    PubMed Central

    Lu, Fang; Yager, Kevin G.; Zhang, Yugang; Xin, Huolin; Gang, Oleg

    2015-01-01

    Organization of spherical particles into lattices is typically driven by packing considerations. Although the addition of directional binding can significantly broaden structural diversity, nanoscale implementation remains challenging. Here we investigate the assembly of clusters and lattices in which anisotropic polyhedral blocks coordinate isotropic spherical nanoparticles via shape-induced directional interactions facilitated by DNA recognition. We show that these polyhedral blocks—cubes and octahedrons—when mixed with spheres, promote the assembly of clusters with architecture determined by polyhedron symmetry. Moreover, three-dimensional binary superlattices are formed when DNA shells accommodate the shape disparity between nanoparticle interfaces. The crystallographic symmetry of assembled lattices is determined by the spatial symmetry of the block's facets, while structural order depends on DNA-tuned interactions and particle size ratio. The presented lattice assembly strategy, exploiting shape for defining the global structure and DNA-mediation locally, opens novel possibilities for by-design fabrication of binary lattices. PMID:25903309

  6. Superlattices assembled through shape-induced directional binding

    SciTech Connect

    Lu, Fang; Yager, Kevin G.; Zhang, Yugang; Xin, Huolin; Gang, Oleg

    2015-04-23

    Organization of spherical particles into lattices is typically driven by packing considerations. Although the addition of directional binding can significantly broaden structural diversity, nanoscale implementation remains challenging. Here we investigate the assembly of clusters and lattices in which anisotropic polyhedral blocks coordinate isotropic spherical nanoparticles via shape-induced directional interactions facilitated by DNA recognition. We show that these polyhedral blocks—cubes and octahedrons—when mixed with spheres, promote the assembly of clusters with architecture determined by polyhedron symmetry. Moreover, three-dimensional binary superlattices are formed when DNA shells accommodate the shape disparity between nanoparticle interfaces. The crystallographic symmetry of assembled lattices is determined by the spatial symmetry of the block’s facets, while structural order depends on DNA-tuned interactions and particle size ratio. Lastly, the presented lattice assembly strategy, exploiting shape for defining the global structure and DNA-mediation locally, opens novel possibilities for by-design fabrication of binary lattices.

  7. Dieckol, a Component of Ecklonia cava, Suppresses the Production of MDC/CCL22 via Down-Regulating STAT1 Pathway in Interferon-γ Stimulated HaCaT Human Keratinocytes

    PubMed Central

    Kang, Na-Jin; Koo, Dong-Hwan; Kang, Gyeoung-Jin; Han, Sang-Chul; Lee, Bang-Won; Koh, Young-Sang; Hyun, Jin-Won; Lee, Nam-Ho; Ko, Mi-Hee; Kang, Hee-Kyoung; Yoo, Eun-Sook

    2015-01-01

    Macrophage-derived chemokine, C-C motif chemokine 22 (MDC/CCL22), is one of the inflammatory chemokines that controls the movement of monocytes, monocyte-derived dendritic cells, and natural killer cells. Serum and skin MDC/CCL22 levels are elevated in atopic dermatitis, which suggests that the chemokines produced from keratinocytes are responsible for attracting inflammatory lymphocytes to the skin. A major signaling pathway in the interferon-γ (IFN-γ)-stimulated inflammation response involves the signal transducers and activators of transcription 1 (STAT1). In the present study, we investigated the anti-inflammatory effect of dieckol and its possible action mechanisms in the category of skin inflammation including atopic dermatitis. Dieckol inhibited MDC/CCL22 production induced by IFN-γ (10 ng/mL) in a dose dependent manner. Dieckol (5 and 10 μM) suppressed the phosphorylation and the nuclear translocation of STAT1. These results suggest that dieckol exhibits anti-inflammatory effect via the down-regulation of STAT1 activation. PMID:25995822

  8. Dieckol, a Component of Ecklonia cava, Suppresses the Production of MDC/CCL22 via Down-Regulating STAT1 Pathway in Interferon-γ Stimulated HaCaT Human Keratinocytes.

    PubMed

    Kang, Na-Jin; Koo, Dong-Hwan; Kang, Gyeoung-Jin; Han, Sang-Chul; Lee, Bang-Won; Koh, Young-Sang; Hyun, Jin-Won; Lee, Nam-Ho; Ko, Mi-Hee; Kang, Hee-Kyoung; Yoo, Eun-Sook

    2015-05-01

    Macrophage-derived chemokine, C-C motif chemokine 22 (MDC/CCL22), is one of the inflammatory chemokines that controls the movement of monocytes, monocyte-derived dendritic cells, and natural killer cells. Serum and skin MDC/CCL22 levels are elevated in atopic dermatitis, which suggests that the chemokines produced from keratinocytes are responsible for attracting inflammatory lymphocytes to the skin. A major signaling pathway in the interferon-γ (IFN-γ)-stimulated inflammation response involves the signal transducers and activators of transcription 1 (STAT1). In the present study, we investigated the anti-inflammatory effect of dieckol and its possible action mechanisms in the category of skin inflammation including atopic dermatitis. Dieckol inhibited MDC/CCL22 production induced by IFN-γ (10 ng/mL) in a dose dependent manner. Dieckol (5 and 10 μM) suppressed the phosphorylation and the nuclear translocation of STAT1. These results suggest that dieckol exhibits anti-inflammatory effect via the down-regulation of STAT1 activation. PMID:25995822

  9. Isorhapontigenin (ISO) Inhibits Invasive Bladder Cancer Formation In Vivo and Human Bladder Cancer Invasion In Vitro by Targeting STAT1/FOXO1 Axis.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Guosong; Wu, Amy D; Huang, Chao; Gu, Jiayan; Zhang, Liping; Huang, Haishan; Liao, Xin; Li, Jingxia; Zhang, Dongyun; Zeng, Xingruo; Jin, Honglei; Huang, Haojie; Huang, Chuanshu

    2016-07-01

    Although our most recent studies have identified Isorhapontigenin (ISO), a novel derivative of stilbene that isolated from a Chinese herb Gnetum cleistostachyum, for its inhibition of human bladder cancer growth, nothing is known whether ISO possesses an inhibitory effect on bladder cancer invasion. Thus, we addressed this important question in current study and discovered that ISO treatment could inhibit mouse-invasive bladder cancer development following bladder carcinogen N-butyl-N-(4-hydroxybutyl) nitrosamine (BBN) exposure in vivo We also found that ISO suppressed human bladder cancer cell invasion accompanied by upregulation of the forkhead box class O 1 (FOXO1) mRNA transcription in vitro Accordingly, FOXO1 was profoundly downregulated in human bladder cancer tissues and was negatively correlated with bladder cancer invasion. Forced expression of FOXO1 specifically suppressed high-grade human bladder cancer cell invasion, whereas knockdown of FOXO1 promoted noninvasive bladder cancer cells becoming invasive bladder cancer cells. Moreover, knockout of FOXO1 significantly increased bladder cancer cell invasion and abolished the ISO inhibition of invasion in human bladder cancer cells. Further studies showed that the inhibition of Signal transducer and activator of transcription 1 (STAT1) phosphorylation at Tyr701 was crucial for ISO upregulation of FOXO1 transcription. Furthermore, this study revealed that metalloproteinase-2 (MMP-2) was a FOXO1 downstream effector, which was also supported by data obtained from mouse model of ISO inhibition BBN-induced mouse-invasive bladder cancer formation. These findings not only provide a novel insight into the understanding of mechanism of bladder cancer's propensity to invasion, but also identify a new role and mechanisms underlying the natural compound ISO that specifically suppresses such bladder cancer invasion through targeting the STAT1-FOXO1-MMP-2 axis. Cancer Prev Res; 9(7); 567-80. ©2016 AACR. PMID:27080594

  10. Comparative proteomic analyses demonstrate enhanced interferon and STAT-1 activation in reovirus T3D-infected HeLa cells

    PubMed Central

    Ezzati, Peyman; Komher, Krysten; Severini, Giulia; Coombs, Kevin M.

    2015-01-01

    As obligate intracellular parasites, viruses are exclusively and intimately dependent upon their host cells for replication. During replication viruses induce profound changes within cells, including: induction of signaling pathways, morphological changes, and cell death. Many such cellular perturbations have been analyzed at the transcriptomic level by gene arrays and recent efforts have begun to analyze cellular proteomic responses. We recently described comparative stable isotopic (SILAC) analyses of reovirus, strain type 3 Dearing (T3D)-infected HeLa cells. For the present study we employed the complementary labeling strategy of iTRAQ (isobaric tags for relative and absolute quantitation) to examine HeLa cell changes induced by T3D, another reovirus strain, type 1 Lang, and UV-inactivated T3D (UV-T3D). Triplicate replicates of cytosolic and nuclear fractions identified a total of 2375 proteins, of which 50, 57, and 46 were significantly up-regulated, and 37, 26, and 44 were significantly down-regulated by T1L, T3D, and UV-T3D, respectively. Several pathways, most notably the Interferon signaling pathway and the EIF2 and ILK signaling pathways, were induced by virus infection. Western blots confirmed that cells were more strongly activated by live T3D as demonstrated by elevated levels of key proteins like STAT-1, ISG-15, IFIT-1, IFIT-3, and Mx1. This study expands our understanding of reovirus-induced host responses. PMID:25905045

  11. Acute hantavirus infection induces galectin-3-binding protein.

    PubMed

    Hepojoki, Jussi; Strandin, Tomas; Hetzel, Udo; Sironen, Tarja; Klingström, Jonas; Sane, Jussi; Mäkelä, Satu; Mustonen, Jukka; Meri, Seppo; Lundkvist, Ake; Vapalahti, Olli; Lankinen, Hilkka; Vaheri, Antti

    2014-11-01

    Hantaviruses are zoonotic viruses that cause life-threatening diseases when transmitted to humans. Severe hantavirus infection is manifested by impairment of renal function, pulmonary oedema and capillary leakage. Both innate and adaptive immune responses contribute to the pathogenesis, but the underlying mechanisms are not fully understood. Here, we showed that galectin-3-binding protein (Gal-3BP) was upregulated as a result of hantavirus infection both in vitro and in vivo. Gal-3BP is a secreted glycoprotein found in human serum, and increased Gal-3BP levels have been reported in chronic viral infections and in several types of cancer. Our in vitro experiments showed that, whilst Vero E6 cells (an African green monkey kidney cell line) constitutively expressed and secreted Gal-3BP, this protein was detected in primary human cells only as a result of hantavirus infection. Analysis of Gal-3BP levels in serum samples of cynomolgus macaques infected experimentally with hantavirus indicated that hantavirus infection induced Gal-3BP also in vivo. Finally, analysis of plasma samples collected from patients hospitalized because of acute hantavirus infection showed higher Gal-3BP levels during the acute than the convalescent phase. Furthermore, the Gal-3BP levels in patients with haemorrhagic fever with renal syndrome correlated with increased complement activation and with clinical variables reflecting the severity of acute hantavirus infection. PMID:25013204

  12. Inducible cadmium binding complexes of cabbage and tobacco

    SciTech Connect

    Wagner, G.J.; Trotter, M.M.

    1982-01-01

    Cadmium complexes with apparent molecular weights of 10,000 were observed in aqueous extracts of Cd-treated cabbage (Brassica capitata L., cv. red danish) and tobacco (hybrid of Nicotiana glauca and N. langsdorffii) plants. The amount of complex (as Cd) recovered was found to be dependent on the concentration of the metal in the growth medium and the total time of exposure of plants to the metal. Induction of the complex at moderate levels of /sup 112/Cd exposure was monitored after labeling the complex with /sup 109/Cd in vitro. The constitutive nature of the ligand of the complex in cabbage and tobacco leaves was suggested when control plant extracts were exposed to /sup 109/Cd. Such extracts contained /sup 109/Cd, which eluted froom Sephadex G-50 in the region of Cd complex. Simultaneous labeling with /sup 112/Cd and /sup 35/S or /sup 32/P indicated that the complex contained sulfur but probably not phosphorus. The amount of /sup 35/S which eluted coincident with /sup 112/Cd complex increased during complex induction. No evidence was found for the presence of 10,000 molecular weight Cd complex in stem exudates (vascular sap) of Cd-treated plants. The results obtained are consistent with the presence in these tissues of a ligand which is both inducible and consitutive and binds Cd in mercaptide bonds. All of these properties and oters reported earlier, are characteristic of Cd-metallothionein formed in animals.

  13. Superlattices assembled through shape-induced directional binding

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Lu, Fang; Yager, Kevin G.; Zhang, Yugang; Xin, Huolin; Gang, Oleg

    2015-04-23

    Organization of spherical particles into lattices is typically driven by packing considerations. Although the addition of directional binding can significantly broaden structural diversity, nanoscale implementation remains challenging. Here we investigate the assembly of clusters and lattices in which anisotropic polyhedral blocks coordinate isotropic spherical nanoparticles via shape-induced directional interactions facilitated by DNA recognition. We show that these polyhedral blocks—cubes and octahedrons—when mixed with spheres, promote the assembly of clusters with architecture determined by polyhedron symmetry. Moreover, three-dimensional binary superlattices are formed when DNA shells accommodate the shape disparity between nanoparticle interfaces. The crystallographic symmetry of assembled lattices is determined bymore » the spatial symmetry of the block’s facets, while structural order depends on DNA-tuned interactions and particle size ratio. Lastly, the presented lattice assembly strategy, exploiting shape for defining the global structure and DNA-mediation locally, opens novel possibilities for by-design fabrication of binary lattices.« less

  14. The activating effect of IFN-γ on monocytes/macrophages is regulated by the LIF–trophoblast–IL-10 axis via Stat1 inhibition and Stat3 activation

    PubMed Central

    Dallagi, Angham; Girouard, Julie; Hamelin-Morrissette, Jovane; Dadzie, Rachel; Laurent, Laetitia; Vaillancourt, Cathy; Lafond, Julie; Carrier, Christian; Reyes-Moreno, Carlos

    2015-01-01

    Interferon gamma (IFN-γ) and leukemia inhibitory factor (LIF) are key gestational factors that may differentially affect leukocyte function during gestation. Because IFN-γ induces a pro-inflammatory phenotype in macrophages and because trophoblast cells are principal targets of LIF in the placenta, we investigated whether and how soluble factors from trophoblast cells regulate the effects of IFN-γ on macrophage activation. IFN-γ reduces macrophage motility, but enhances Stat1 activation, pro-inflammatory gene expression and cytotoxic functions. Soluble factors from villous cytotrophoblasts (vCT+LIF cells) and BeWo cells (BW/ST+LIF cells) that were differentiated in the presence of LIF inhibit macrophage Stat1 activation but inversely sustain Stat3 activation in response to IFN-γ. vCT+LIF cells produce soluble factors that induce Stat3 activation; this effect is partially abrogated in the presence of neutralizing anti-interleukin 10 (IL-10) antibodies. Moreover, soluble factors from BW/ST+LIF cells reduce cell proliferation but enhance the migratory responses of monocytes. In addition, these factors reverse the inhibitory effect of IFN-γ on monocyte/macrophage motility. BW/ST+LIF cells also generate IFN-γ-activated macrophages with enhanced IL-10 expression, but reduced tumor-necrosis factor alpha (TNF-α), CD14 and CD40 expression as well as impaired cytotoxic function. Additional assays performed in the presence of neutralizing anti-IL-10 antibodies and exogenous IL-10 demonstrate that reduced macrophage cytotoxicity and proliferation, but increased cell motility result from the ability of trophoblast IL-10 to sustain Stat3 activation and suppress IFN-γ-induced Stat1 activation. These in vitro studies are the first to describe the regulatory role of the LIF–trophoblast–IL-10 axis in the process of macrophage activation in response to pro-inflammatory cytokines. PMID:25027966

  15. The activating effect of IFN-γ on monocytes/macrophages is regulated by the LIF-trophoblast-IL-10 axis via Stat1 inhibition and Stat3 activation.

    PubMed

    Dallagi, Angham; Girouard, Julie; Hamelin-Morrissette, Jovane; Dadzie, Rachel; Laurent, Laetitia; Vaillancourt, Cathy; Lafond, Julie; Carrier, Christian; Reyes-Moreno, Carlos

    2015-05-01

    Interferon gamma (IFN-γ) and leukemia inhibitory factor (LIF) are key gestational factors that may differentially affect leukocyte function during gestation. Because IFN-γ induces a pro-inflammatory phenotype in macrophages and because trophoblast cells are principal targets of LIF in the placenta, we investigated whether and how soluble factors from trophoblast cells regulate the effects of IFN-γ on macrophage activation. IFN-γ reduces macrophage motility, but enhances Stat1 activation, pro-inflammatory gene expression and cytotoxic functions. Soluble factors from villous cytotrophoblasts (vCT+LIF cells) and BeWo cells (BW/ST+LIF cells) that were differentiated in the presence of LIF inhibit macrophage Stat1 activation but inversely sustain Stat3 activation in response to IFN-γ. vCT+LIF cells produce soluble factors that induce Stat3 activation; this effect is partially abrogated in the presence of neutralizing anti-interleukin 10 (IL-10) antibodies. Moreover, soluble factors from BW/ST+LIF cells reduce cell proliferation but enhance the migratory responses of monocytes. In addition, these factors reverse the inhibitory effect of IFN-γ on monocyte/macrophage motility. BW/ST+LIF cells also generate IFN-γ-activated macrophages with enhanced IL-10 expression, but reduced tumor-necrosis factor alpha (TNF-α), CD14 and CD40 expression as well as impaired cytotoxic function. Additional assays performed in the presence of neutralizing anti-IL-10 antibodies and exogenous IL-10 demonstrate that reduced macrophage cytotoxicity and proliferation, but increased cell motility result from the ability of trophoblast IL-10 to sustain Stat3 activation and suppress IFN-γ-induced Stat1 activation. These in vitro studies are the first to describe the regulatory role of the LIF-trophoblast-IL-10 axis in the process of macrophage activation in response to pro-inflammatory cytokines. PMID:25027966

  16. Binding profiles and cytokine-inducing effects of fish rhamnose-binding lectins on Burkitt's lymphoma Raji cells.

    PubMed

    Hosono, Masahiro; Sugawara, Shigeki; Matsuda, Atsushi; Tatsuta, Takeo; Koide, Yasuhiro; Hasan, Imtiaj; Hasan, Imtiaji; Ozeki, Yasuhiro; Nitta, Kazuo

    2014-10-01

    Rhamnose-binding lectin (RBL) is one of the animal lectin categories which take part in the innate immune responses of fish. Osmerus lanceolatus lectin (OLL) from shishamo smelt eggs is an RBL composed of two tandem-repeated domains, both of which are considered to be a carbohydrate-recognition domain. SAL, catfish (Silurus asotus) egg RBL composed of three domains, binds to Burkitt's lymphoma Raji cells through globotriaosylceramide (Gb3) carbohydrate chain and to reduce cell size and growth by altering membrane composition without causing cell death. In this experiment, we tried to compare the binding effects of these two RBLs on Raji cells. Flow cytometric and fluorescence microscopic analyses revealed that OLL also directly bound to and shrunk Raji cells with ten times less reactivity than SAL but reduced cell growth with decreasing cell viability. Anti-Gb3 antibody completely blocked the binding of SAL to Raji cells but not that of OLL. In addition, the direct bindings of OLL and SAL to Raji cells were comparably inhibited by melibiose, but lactose was more effective inhibitor for the binding of OLL than that of SAL. These results suggest that OLL has slightly different cell-binding property compared with SAL and binds not only to Gb3 but also to the other carbohydrate receptor-bearing β-galactoside chains. The quantitative RT-PCR analysis revealed that SAL induced the expression of TNF-α but not of IFN-γ, IL-1β, and IL-10. Thus, SAL-induced cytostatic effect on Raji cells might be partially caused by TNF-α-mediated signaling pathway. PMID:24861899

  17. DNA linking number change induced by sequence-specific DNA-binding proteins

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Bo; Xiao, Yazhong; Liu, Chang; Li, Chenzhong; Leng, Fenfei

    2010-01-01

    Sequence-specific DNA-binding proteins play a key role in many fundamental biological processes, such as transcription, DNA replication and recombination. Very often, these DNA-binding proteins introduce structural changes to the target DNA-binding sites including DNA bending, twisting or untwisting and wrapping, which in many cases induce a linking number change (ΔLk) to the DNA-binding site. Due to the lack of a feasible approach, ΔLk induced by sequence-specific DNA-binding proteins has not been fully explored. In this paper we successfully constructed a series of DNA plasmids that carry many tandem copies of a DNA-binding site for one sequence-specific DNA-binding protein, such as λ O, LacI, GalR, CRP and AraC. In this case, the protein-induced ΔLk was greatly amplified and can be measured experimentally. Indeed, not only were we able to simultaneously determine the protein-induced ΔLk and the DNA-binding constant for λ O and GalR, but also we demonstrated that the protein-induced ΔLk is an intrinsic property for these sequence-specific DNA-binding proteins. Our results also showed that protein-mediated DNA looping by AraC and LacI can induce a ΔLk to the plasmid DNA templates. Furthermore, we demonstrated that the protein-induced ΔLk does not correlate with the protein-induced DNA bending by the DNA-binding proteins. PMID:20185570

  18. PUMA Binding Induces Partial Unfolding within BCL-xL to Disrupt p53 Binding and Promote Apoptosis

    PubMed Central

    Follis, Ariele Viacava; Chipuk, Jerry E.; Fisher, John C.; Yun, Mi-Kyung; Grace, Christy R.; Nourse, Amanda; Baran, Katherine; Ou, Li; Min, Lie; White, Stephen W.; Green, Douglas R.; Kriwacki, Richard W.

    2012-01-01

    Following DNA damage, nuclear p53 induces the expression of PUMA, a BH3-only protein that binds and inhibits the anti-apoptotic BCL-2 repertoire, including BCL-xL. PUMA, unique amongst BH3-only proteins, disrupts the interaction between cytosolic p53 and BCL-xL, allowing p53 to promote apoptosis via direct activation of the BCL-2 effector molecules, BAX and BAK. Structural investigations using nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy and X-ray crystallography revealed that PUMA binding induced partial unfolding of two α-helices within BCL-xL. Wild-type PUMA or a PUMA mutant incapable of causing binding-induced unfolding of BCL-xL equivalently inhibited the anti-apoptotic BCL-2 repertoire to sensitize for death receptor (DR)-activated apoptosis, but only wild-type PUMA promoted p53-dependent, DNA damage-induced apoptosis. Our data suggest that PUMA-induced partial unfolding of BCL-xL disrupts interactions between cytosolic p53 and BCL-xL, releasing the bound p53 to initiate apoptosis. We propose that regulated unfolding of BCL-xL provides a mechanism to promote PUMA-dependent signaling within the apoptotic pathways. PMID:23340338

  19. STAT1 Hyperphosphorylation and Defective IL12R/IL23R Signaling Underlie Defective Immunity in Autosomal Dominant Chronic Mucocutaneous Candidiasis

    PubMed Central

    Heinhuis, Bas; Hoischen, Alexander; Joosten, Leo A. B.; Arkwright, Peter D.; Gennery, Andrew; Kullberg, Bart Jan; Veltman, Joris A.; Lilic, Desa; van der Meer, Jos W. M.; Netea, Mihai G.

    2011-01-01

    We recently reported the genetic cause of autosomal dominant chronic mucocutaneous candidiasis (AD-CMC) as a mutation in the STAT1 gene. In the present study we show that STAT1 Arg274Trp mutations in the coiled-coil (CC) domain is the genetic cause of AD-CMC in three families of patients. Cloning and transfection experiments demonstrate that mutated STAT1 inhibits IL12R/IL-23R signaling, with hyperphosphorylation of STAT1 as the likely underlying molecular mechanism. Inhibition of signaling through the receptors for IL-12 and IL-23 leads to strongly diminished Th1/Th17 responses and hence to increased susceptibility to fungal infections. The challenge for the future is to translate this knowledge into novel strategies for the treatment of this severe immunodeficiency. PMID:22195034

  20. A calmodulin binding protein from Arabidopsis is induced by ethylene and contains a DNA-binding motif

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Reddy, A. S.; Reddy, V. S.; Golovkin, M.

    2000-01-01

    Calmodulin (CaM), a key calcium sensor in all eukaryotes, regulates diverse cellular processes by interacting with other proteins. To isolate CaM binding proteins involved in ethylene signal transduction, we screened an expression library prepared from ethylene-treated Arabidopsis seedlings with 35S-labeled CaM. A cDNA clone, EICBP (Ethylene-Induced CaM Binding Protein), encoding a protein that interacts with activated CaM was isolated in this screening. The CaM binding domain in EICBP was mapped to the C-terminus of the protein. These results indicate that calcium, through CaM, could regulate the activity of EICBP. The EICBP is expressed in different tissues and its expression in seedlings is induced by ethylene. The EICBP contains, in addition to a CaM binding domain, several features that are typical of transcription factors. These include a DNA-binding domain at the N terminus, an acidic region at the C terminus, and nuclear localization signals. In database searches a partial cDNA (CG-1) encoding a DNA-binding motif from parsley and an ethylene up-regulated partial cDNA from tomato (ER66) showed significant similarity to EICBP. In addition, five hypothetical proteins in the Arabidopsis genome also showed a very high sequence similarity with EICBP, indicating that there are several EICBP-related proteins in Arabidopsis. The structural features of EICBP are conserved in all EICBP-related proteins in Arabidopsis, suggesting that they may constitute a new family of DNA binding proteins and are likely to be involved in modulating gene expression in the presence of ethylene.

  1. BANK1 Regulates IgG Production in a Lupus Model by Controlling TLR7-Dependent STAT1 Activation

    PubMed Central

    Iida, Ryuji; Bagavant, Harini; Alarcón-Riquelme, Marta E.

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of our study was to investigate the effects of the adaptor Bank1 in TLR7 signaling using the B6.Sle1.yaa mouse, a lupus model that develops disease through exacerbated TLR7 expression. Crosses of B6.Sle1.yaa with Bank1-/- mice maintained several B and myeloid cell phenotypes close to normal wild-type levels. Most striking was the reduction in total serum IgG antibodies, but not of IgM, and reduced serum levels of autoantibodies, IL-6, and BAFF. Bank1 deficiency did modify numbers of MZ B cells and total B cell numbers, as well as expression of CXCR4 by follicular helper T cells. Other T cell changes were not observed. Bank1 deficiency did not modify numbers of germinal center B cells or plasma cells or clinical disease outcomes. Purified B cells from Bank1 deficient mice had strongly reduced Ifnb, Ifna4, Irf7, Aicda and Stat1 gene expression following TLR7 agonist stimulation. Interestingly, phosphorylation of Tyr701, but not of Ser727 of STAT1, was impaired in splenic B cells from B6.Sle1.yaa.Bank1-/- mice, as was the nuclear translocation of IRF7 in response to TLR7 agonist stimulation. Further, Bank1 deficiency in B6.Sle1.yaa mice reduced the production of IgG2c after in vitro TLR7 agonist stimulation. Our results demonstrate that Bank1 controls TLR7-mediated type I interferon production. Combined with the control of the nuclear translocation of IRF7, the modulation of STAT1 transcription and phosphorylation, Bank1 contributes to IgG production during development of autoimmune disease. PMID:27228057

  2. Elevated interleukin-27 levels in human neonatal macrophages regulate indoleamine dioxygenase in a STAT-1 and STAT-3-dependent manner.

    PubMed

    Jung, Joo-Yong; Gleave Parson, Madeline; Kraft, Jennifer D; Lyda, Logan; Kobe, Brianna; Davis, Celestia; Robinson, Jembber; Peña, Maria Marjorette O; Robinson, Cory M

    2016-09-01

    Microbial infections are a major cause of infant mortality as a result of limitations in immune defences. Interleukin-27 (IL-27) is a heterodimeric cytokine produced primarily by leucocytes and is immunosuppressive toward lymphocytes and leucocytes. Our laboratory demonstrated that human neonatal macrophages express IL-27 more abundantly than adult macrophages. Similarly in mice, IL-27 expression is elevated early in life and maintained through infancy. To determine IL-27-regulated mechanisms that may limit immunity, we evaluated the expression of a number of genes in response to this cytokine in primary human neonatal macrophages. Indoleamine 2,3-dioxygenase (IDO) gene expression was increased dose-responsively by IL-27. We have previously demonstrated inhibition of T-cell proliferation and cytokine production by neonatal macrophage-generated IL-27, and IDO is often implicated in this negative regulation. An increase in IDO protein was demonstrated by immunofluorescence microscopy and was consistent with increased enzyme activity following treatment with IL-27. Inclusion of a soluble receptor to neutralize endogenous IL-27, decreased IDO expression and activity compared with untreated macrophages. In response to IL-27, neonatal macrophages phosphorylate signal transdcuer and activator of transcription 1 (STAT-1) and STAT-3. Both transcription factors are recruited to the IDO regulatory region. STAT-3 dominates during steady-state regulation by lower levels of endogenous IL-27 production. A shift to enhanced STAT-1 recruitment occurs during increased levels of exogenously supplied IL-27. These data suggest an interesting interplay of STAT-1 and STAT-3 to regulate IDO activity and immunosuppression in response to different levels of IL-27 in the microenvironment of the immune response that may further our understanding of this interesting cytokine. PMID:27238498

  3. A crosstalk triggered by hypoxia and maintained by MCP-1/miR-98/IL-6/p38 regulatory loop between human aortic smooth muscle cells and macrophages leads to aortic smooth muscle cells apoptosis via Stat1 activation.

    PubMed

    Wang, Qing; Shu, Chang; Su, Jing; Li, Xin

    2015-01-01

    Hypoxia and inflammation are central characteristics of the abdominal aortic aneurysm (AAA), but the mechanisms for their relationship and actual role remain far from full understood. Here, we showed MCP-1 (monocyte chemotactic protein-1) induced by hypoxia in primary human Aortic Smooth Muscle Cells (hASMCs) increased the chemotaxis of THP-1 macrophages and MCP-1 induced IL-6 expression in THP-1 cells via downregulating miR-98 which directly targets IL-6. In addition, IL-6 positively feedback regulated MCP-1 expression in hASMCs via p38 signal that is independent on hypoxia, and inhibition of p38 signal blocked the effect of IL-6 on MCP-1 expression regulation. Moreover, IL-6 exposure time-dependently induces phASMCs apoptosis via Stat1 activation. Collectively, our data provide compelling evidence on the association between hypoxia and inflammation triggered by hypoxia and then mediated by MCP-1/miR-98/IL-6/p38 regulatory loop, which leads to hASMCs apoptosis via Stat1 activation to contribute to AAA formation and progression. PMID:26045772

  4. Nonspecific bridging-induced attraction drives clustering of DNA-binding proteins and genome organization

    PubMed Central

    Brackley, Chris A.; Taylor, Stephen; Papantonis, Argyris; Cook, Peter R.; Marenduzzo, Davide

    2013-01-01

    Molecular dynamics simulations are used to model proteins that diffuse to DNA, bind, and dissociate; in the absence of any explicit interaction between proteins, or between templates, binding spontaneously induces local DNA compaction and protein aggregation. Small bivalent proteins form into rows [as on binding of the bacterial histone-like nucleoid-structuring protein (H-NS)], large proteins into quasi-spherical aggregates (as on nanoparticle binding), and cylinders with eight binding sites (representing octameric nucleosomal cores) into irregularly folded clusters (like those seen in nucleosomal strings). Binding of RNA polymerase II and a transcription factor (NFκB) to the appropriate sites on four human chromosomes generates protein clusters analogous to transcription factories, multiscale loops, and intrachromosomal contacts that mimic those found in vivo. We suggest that this emergent behavior of clustering is driven by an entropic bridging-induced attraction that minimizes bending and looping penalties in the template. PMID:24003126

  5. Despite Increased Type 1 IFN, Autoimmune Nonobese Diabetic Mice Display Impaired Dendritic Cell Response to CpG and Decreased Nuclear Localization of IFN-Activated STAT1.

    PubMed

    Rahman, M Jubayer; Rahir, Gwendoline; Dong, Matthew B; Zhao, Yongge; Rodrigues, Kameron B; Hotta-Iwamura, Chie; Chen, Ye; Guerrero, Alan; Tarbell, Kristin V

    2016-03-01

    Innate immune signals help break self-tolerance to initiate autoimmune diseases such as type 1 diabetes, but innate contributions to subsequent regulation of disease progression are less clear. Most studies have measured in vitro innate responses of GM-CSF dendritic cells (DCs) that are functionally distinct from conventional DCs (cDCs) and do not reflect in vivo DC subsets. To determine whether autoimmune NOD mice have alterations in type 1 IFN innate responsiveness, we compared cDCs from prediabetic NOD and control C57BL/6 (B6) mice stimulated in vivo with the TLR9 ligand CpG, a strong type 1 IFN inducer. In response to CpG, NOD mice produce more type 1 IFN and express higher levels of CD40, and NOD monocyte DCs make more TNF. However, the overall CpG-induced transcriptional response is muted in NOD cDCs. Of relevance the costimulatory proteins CD80/CD86, signals needed for regulatory T cell homeostasis, are upregulated less on NOD cDCs. Interestingly, NOD Rag1(-/-) mice also display a defect in CpG-induced CD86 upregulation compared with B6 Rag1(-/-), indicating this particular innate alteration precedes adaptive autoimmunity. The impaired response in NOD DCs is likely downstream of the IFN-α/β receptor because DCs from NOD and B6 mice show similar CpG-induced CD86 levels when anti-IFN-α/β receptor Ab is added. IFN-α-induced nuclear localization of activated STAT1 is markedly reduced in NOD CD11c(+) cells, consistent with lower type 1 IFN responsiveness. In conclusion, NOD DCs display altered innate responses characterized by enhanced type 1 IFN and activation of monocyte-derived DCs but diminished cDC type 1 IFN response. PMID:26826238

  6. Combination Treatment with Apricoxib and IL-27 Enhances Inhibition of Epithelial-Mesenchymal Transition in Human Lung Cancer Cells through a STAT1 Dominant Pathway

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Mi-Heon; Kachroo, Puja; Pagano, Paul C; Yanagawa, Jane; Wang, Gerald; Walser, Tonya C; Krysan, Kostyantyn; Sharma, Sherven; John, Maie St.; Dubinett, Steven M; Lee, Jay M

    2015-01-01

    Background The cyclooxygenase 2 (COX-2) pathway has been implicated in the molecular pathogenesis of many malignancies, including lung cancer. Apricoxib, a selective COX-2 inhibitor, has been described to inhibit epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT) in human malignancies. The mechanism by which apricoxib may alter the tumor microenvironment by affecting EMT through other important signaling pathways is poorly defined. IL-27 has been shown to have anti-tumor activity and our recent study showed that IL-27 inhibited EMT through a STAT1 dominant pathway. Objective The purpose of this study is to investigate the role of apricoxib combined with IL-27 in inhibiting lung carcinogenesis by modulation of EMT through STAT signaling. Methods and Results Western blot analysis revealed that IL-27 stimulation of human non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) cell lines results in STAT1 and STAT3 activation, decreased Snail protein and mesenchymal markers (N-cadherin and vimentin) and a concomitant increase in expression of epithelial markers (E-cadherin, β-and γ-catenins), and inhibition of cell migration. The combination of apricoxib and IL-27 resulted in augmentation of STAT1 activation. However, IL-27 mediated STAT3 activation was decreased by the addition of apricoxib. STAT1 siRNA was used to determine the involvement of STAT1 pathway in the enhanced inhibition of EMT and cell migration by the combined IL-27 and apricoxib treatment. Pretreatment of cells with STAT1 siRNA inhibited the effect of combined IL-27 and apricoxib in the activation of STAT1 and STAT3. In addition, the augmented expression of epithelial markers, decreased expression mesenchymal markers, and inhibited cell migration by the combination treatment were also inhibited by STAT1 siRNA, suggesting that the STAT1 pathway is important in the enhanced effect from the combination treatment. Conclusion Combined apricoxib and IL-27 has an enhanced effect in inhibition of epithelial-mesenchymal transition and cell

  7. A new animal model containing human SCARB2 and lacking stat-1 is highly susceptible to EV71.

    PubMed

    Liou, An-Ting; Wu, Szu-Yao; Liao, Chun-Che; Chang, Ya-Shu; Chang, Chih-Shin; Shih, Chiaho

    2016-01-01

    Enterovirus 71 (EV71) is a major threat to children worldwide. Children infected with EV71 could develop subclinical infection and hand-foot-and -mouth disease (HFMD). In severe cases, patients could develop encephalitis, paralysis, pulmonary edema, and death. A more user-friendly and robust animal model is essential to investigating EV71 pathogenesis. Here, we established a hybrid (hSCARB2(+/+)/stat-1(-/-)) mouse strain from crossbreeding SCARB2 transgenic and stat-1 KO mice, and compared the susceptibilities to EV71 infection and pathogenesis between parental and hybrid mice. Virus-encoded VP1 protein can be detected in the streaking nerve fibers in brain and spinal cord. This hybrid mouse strain at 2-week-old age can still be infected with different genotypes of EV71 at 1000-fold lower titer via an ip route. Infected hybrid mice developed earlier onset of CNS disease, paralysis, and death at a higher incidence. These advantages of this novel model meet the urgent need from the scientific community in basic and preclinical research in therapeutics and pathogenesis. PMID:27499235

  8. A new animal model containing human SCARB2 and lacking stat-1 is highly susceptible to EV71

    PubMed Central

    Liou, An-Ting; Wu, Szu-Yao; Liao, Chun-Che; Chang, Ya-Shu; Chang, Chih-Shin; Shih, Chiaho

    2016-01-01

    Enterovirus 71 (EV71) is a major threat to children worldwide. Children infected with EV71 could develop subclinical infection and hand-foot-and -mouth disease (HFMD). In severe cases, patients could develop encephalitis, paralysis, pulmonary edema, and death. A more user-friendly and robust animal model is essential to investigating EV71 pathogenesis. Here, we established a hybrid (hSCARB2+/+/stat-1−/−) mouse strain from crossbreeding SCARB2 transgenic and stat-1 KO mice, and compared the susceptibilities to EV71 infection and pathogenesis between parental and hybrid mice. Virus-encoded VP1 protein can be detected in the streaking nerve fibers in brain and spinal cord. This hybrid mouse strain at 2-week-old age can still be infected with different genotypes of EV71 at 1000-fold lower titer via an ip route. Infected hybrid mice developed earlier onset of CNS disease, paralysis, and death at a higher incidence. These advantages of this novel model meet the urgent need from the scientific community in basic and preclinical research in therapeutics and pathogenesis. PMID:27499235

  9. Upregulation of the Suppressors of Cytokine Signaling 1 and 3 Is Associated with Arrest of Phosphorylated-STAT1 Nuclear Importation and Reduced Innate Response in Denguevirus-Infected Macrophages.

    PubMed

    Estrada-Jiménez, Tania; Millán-Pérez Peña, Lourdes; Flores-Mendoza, Lilian; Sedeño-Monge, Virginia; Santos-López, Gerardo; Rosas-Murrieta, Nora; Reyes-Carmona, Sandra; Terán-Cabanillas, Eli; Hernández, Jesus; Herrera-Camacho, Irma; Vallejo-Ruiz, Verónica; Reyes-Leyva, Julio

    2016-03-01

    To clarify whether the suppressors of cytokine signaling (SOCS) are associated with denguevirus (DENV) evasion of the antiviral response, we analyzed the expression kinetics of SOCS1 and SOCS3 and of the antiviral genes MxA and OAS during DENV infection of U937 macrophages that were or not treated with interferon (IFN)-α. DENV infection produced a viral titer three times higher in untreated than in IFN-α-treated cells (p < 0.001 at 72 h postinfection [p.i.]). Partial inhibition of DENV replication was associated with reduced expression of MxA and OAS antiviral genes as well as higher SOCS1 and SOCS3 expression in DENV-infected cells than in cells treated only with IFN-α. Complete loss of phosphorylated-signal transducer and activator of transcription (p-STAT)2 and reduced nuclear importation of p-STAT1 were observed in DENV-infected cells compared to IFN-α treatment that induced p-STAT1 and p-STAT2. Our data thus suggest that overexpression of SOCS1 and SOCS3 induced by DENV infection leads to impairment of antiviral response through the inhibition of STAT functionality. PMID:26709547

  10. Induced circularly polarized luminescence arising from anion or protein binding to racemic emissive lanthanide complexes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carr, Rachel; Puckrin, Robert; McMahon, Brian K.; Pal, Robert; Parker, David; Pålsson, Lars-Olof

    2014-06-01

    A circularly polarized luminescence (CPL) spectrometer has been built and used to study the binding interaction of lactate and four different proteins with racemic EuIII and TbIII complexes in aqueous solution. Lactate binding gives rise to strong induced CPL spectra, and the observed emission dissymmetry factors vary linearly with enantiomeric composition. Particularly strong induced TbIII CPL also characterizes the binding interaction of alpha-1-acid glycoprotein with a dissociation constant, Kd, of 2.5 μM.

  11. Fragment growing induces conformational changes in acetylcholine-binding protein: a structural and thermodynamic analysis.

    PubMed

    Edink, Ewald; Rucktooa, Prakash; Retra, Kim; Akdemir, Atilla; Nahar, Tariq; Zuiderveld, Obbe; van Elk, René; Janssen, Elwin; van Nierop, Pim; van Muijlwijk-Koezen, Jacqueline; Smit, August B; Sixma, Titia K; Leurs, Rob; de Esch, Iwan J P

    2011-04-13

    Optimization of fragment hits toward high-affinity lead compounds is a crucial aspect of fragment-based drug discovery (FBDD). In the current study, we have successfully optimized a fragment by growing into a ligand-inducible subpocket of the binding site of acetylcholine-binding protein (AChBP). This protein is a soluble homologue of the ligand binding domain (LBD) of Cys-loop receptors. The fragment optimization was monitored with X-ray structures of ligand complexes and systematic thermodynamic analyses using surface plasmon resonance (SPR) biosensor analysis and isothermal titration calorimetry (ITC). Using site-directed mutagenesis and AChBP from different species, we find that specific changes in thermodynamic binding profiles, are indicative of interactions with the ligand-inducible subpocket of AChBP. This study illustrates that thermodynamic analysis provides valuable information on ligand binding modes and is complementary to affinity data when guiding rational structure- and fragment-based discovery approaches. PMID:21322593

  12. Bilirubin binding with liver cystatin induced structural and functional changes.

    PubMed

    Mustafa, Mir Faisal; Bano, Bilqees

    2014-05-01

    Cysteine proteinases and their inhibitors play a significant role in the proteolytic environment of the cells. Inhibitors of cysteine proteinases regulate the activity of these enzymes helping in checking the degdration activity of cathepsins. The bilirubin secreated by liver cells can bind to cystatin present in the liver resulting in its functional inactivation, which may further lead to the increase in cathepsins level causing liver cirrhosis. In case of some pathophysiological conditions excess bilirubin gets accumulated e.g. in presence of Fasciola hepatica (liver fluke) in mammals and humans, leading to liver cirrhosis and possibly jaundice or normal blockade of bile duct causing increased level of bilirubin in blood. Protease-cystatin imbalance causes disease progression. In the present study, Bilirubin (BR) and liver cystatin interaction was studied to explore the cystatin inactivation and structural alteration. The binding interaction was studied by UV-absorption, FT-IR and fluorescence spectroscopy. The quenching of protein fluorescence confirmed the binding of BR with buffalo liver cystatin (BLC). Stern-Volmer analysis of BR-BLC system indicates the presence of static component in the quenching mechanism and the number of binding sites to be close to 1. The fluorescence data proved that the fluorescence quenching of liver cystatin by BR was the result of BR-cystatin complex formation. FTIR analysis of BR-Cystatin complex revealed change in the secondary structure due to perturbation in the microenvironment further confirmed by the decreased caseinolytic activity of BLC against papain. Fluorescence measurements also revealed quenching of fluorescence and shift in peak at different time intervals and at varying pH values. Photo-illumination of BR-cystatin complex causes change in the surrounding environment of liver cystatin as indicated by red-shift. The binding constant for BR-BLC complex was found to be 9.279 × 10(4) M(-1). The cystatin binding with

  13. Structural basis for induced-fit binding of Rho-kinase to the inhibitor Y-27632.

    PubMed

    Yamaguchi, Hiroto; Miwa, Yukiko; Kasa, Miyuki; Kitano, Ken; Amano, Mutsuki; Kaibuchi, Kozo; Hakoshima, Toshio

    2006-09-01

    Rho-kinase is a main player in the regulation of cytoskeletal events and a promising drug target in the treatment of both vascular and neurological disorders. Here we report the crystal structure of the Rho-kinase catalytic domain in complex with the specific inhibitor Y-27632. Comparison with the structure of PKA bound to this inhibitor revealed a potential induced-fit binding mode that can be accommodated by the phosphate binding loop. This binding mode resembles to that observed in the Rho-kinase-fasudil complex. A structural database search indicated that a pocket underneath the phosphate-binding loop is present that favors binding to a small aromatic ring. Introduction of such a ring group might spawn a new modification scheme of pre-existing protein kinase inhibitors for improved binding capability. PMID:16891330

  14. Development of Th17-associated interstitial kidney inflammation in lupus-prone mice lacking the gene encoding Signal Transduction and Activator of Transcription-1 (STAT-1)

    PubMed Central

    Yiu, Gloria; Rasmussen, Tue Kruse; Ajami, Bahareh; Haddon, David J.; Chu, Alvina D.; Tangsombatvisit, Stephanie; Haynes, Winston A.; Diep, Vivian; Steinman, Larry; Faix, James; Utz, Paul J.

    2016-01-01

    Type I interferon (IFN-I) signaling is a central pathogenic pathway in Systemic Lupus Erythematosus (SLE), and therapeutics targeting IFN-I signaling are in development. Multiple proteins with overlapping function participate in IFN signaling, but the signaling events downstream of receptor engagement are unclear. We employed highly-multiplexed assays to characterize autoantibody production, cytokine/chemokine profiles, and Signal Transduction and Activators of Transcription (STAT) phosphorylation to investigate the individual roles of IFNAR2, IRF9 and STAT1 in MRL/lpr (lpr) mice. Surprisingly, we found that Stat1−/−, but not Irf9−/− or Ifnar2−/− mice, developed interstitial nephritis characterized by infiltration with RORγT+ lymphocytes, macrophages and eosinophils. Despite pronounced interstitial kidney disease and abnormal kidney function, Stat1−/− mice had decreased proteinuria, glomerulonephritis and autoantibody production. Phospho-specific flow cytometry (phosphoflow) revealed shunting of STAT phosphorylation from STAT1 to STAT3/4. In summary, we describe unique contributions of STAT1 to pathology in different kidney compartments, and provide novel insight into tubulointerstitial nephritis (TIN) a poorly understood complication that predicts end-stage kidney disease in SLE patients. PMID:26636548

  15. B lymphocytes from patients with chronic lymphocytic leukemia contain signal transducer and activator of transcription (STAT) 1 and STAT3 constitutively phosphorylated on serine residues.

    PubMed

    Frank, D A; Mahajan, S; Ritz, J

    1997-12-15

    To explore the pathogenesis of chronic lymphocytic leukemia (CLL), we examined whether phosphorylation of one or more signal transducer and activator of transcription (STAT) factors was abnormal in cells from CLL patients. No constitutive tyrosine phosphorylation was detected on any STAT in CLL cells. To assess the phosphorylation of serine residues of STAT1 and STAT3 in CLL cells, we raised antibodies that specifically recognize the form of STAT1 phosphorylated on ser-727 and the form of STAT3 phosphorylated on ser-727. We found that in 100% of patients with CLL (n = 32), STAT1 and STAT3 were constitutively phosphorylated on serine. This was in contrast to normal peripheral blood B lymphocytes or CD5+) B cells isolated from tonsils, in which this phosphorylation was absent. Serine phosphorylation of STAT1 and STAT3 was seen occasionally in other leukemias, but it was a universal finding only in CLL. The serine phosphorylation of these STATs was a continuous process, as incubation of CLL cells with the kinase inhibitor H7 led to the dephosphorylation of these serine residues. The STAT serine kinase in CLL cells has not been identified, and appears to be neither mitogen-activated protein kinase nor pp70(s6k). In summary, the constitutive serine phosphorylation of STAT1 and STAT3 is present in all CLL samples tested to date, although the physiologic significance of this modification remains to be determined. PMID:9399961

  16. CHEMOSENSITIZATION BY A NON-APOPTOGENIC HEAT SHOCK PROTEIN 70-BINDING APOPTOSIS INDUCING FACTOR MUTANT

    EPA Science Inventory

    Chemosensitization by a non-apoptogenic heat shock protein 70-binding apoptosis inducing factor mutant

    Abstract
    HSP70 inhibits apoptosis by neutralizing the caspase activator Apaf-1 and by interacting with apoptosis inducing factor (AIF), a mitochondrial flavoprotein wh...

  17. Cigarette smoke induces alterations in the drug-binding properties of human serum albumin.

    PubMed

    Clerici, Marco; Colombo, Graziano; Secundo, Francesco; Gagliano, Nicoletta; Colombo, Roberto; Portinaro, Nicola; Giustarini, Daniela; Milzani, Aldo; Rossi, Ranieri; Dalle-Donne, Isabella

    2014-04-01

    Albumin is the most abundant plasma protein and serves as a transport and depot protein for numerous endogenous and exogenous compounds. Earlier we had shown that cigarette smoke induces carbonylation of human serum albumin (HSA) and alters its redox state. Here, the effect of whole-phase cigarette smoke on HSA ligand-binding properties was evaluated by equilibrium dialysis and size-exclusion HPLC or tryptophan fluorescence. The binding of salicylic acid and naproxen to cigarette smoke-oxidized HSA resulted to be impaired, unlike that of curcumin and genistein, chosen as representative ligands. Binding of the hydrophobic fluorescent probe 4,4'-bis(1-anilino-8-naphtalenesulfonic acid) (bis-ANS), intrinsic tryptophan fluorescence, and susceptibility to enzymatic proteolysis revealed slight changes in albumin conformation. These findings suggest that cigarette smoke-induced modifications of HSA may affect the binding, transport and bioavailability of specific ligands in smokers. PMID:24388826

  18. Amino acid composition of cadmium-binding protein induced in a marine diatom

    SciTech Connect

    Maita, Y.; Kawaguchi, S. )

    1989-09-01

    Organisms living in environments polluted with heavy metals develop tolerance against these contaminants. The tolerance has been attributed to the ability to synthesize metal binding substances. These recent findings imply metal binding complexes from animals and plants, although having very similar functional properties, may have entirely different amino acid compositions. Researchers reported that cadystin from fission yeast, Schizosaccharomyces pombe was composed of only glutamic acid, cysteine, and glycine. A year later, a heavy metal binding substance was isolated from Rauwolfia serpetina which contains only Glu, Cys, and Gly. Heavy metal binding complexes isolated from the water hyacinth and morning glory Datura innoxia also showed an amino acid composition similar to cadystin or phytochelatin. In this study, the cadmium binding protein induced in the marine diatom, Phaeodactylum tricornutum, was isolated and purified and its amino acid composition determined.

  19. Identifying intrinsically disordered protein regions likely to undergo binding-induced helical transitions.

    PubMed

    Glover, Karen; Mei, Yang; Sinha, Sangita C

    2016-10-01

    Many proteins contain intrinsically disordered regions (IDRs) lacking stable secondary and ordered tertiary structure. IDRs are often implicated in macromolecular interactions, and may undergo structural transitions upon binding to interaction partners. However, as binding partners of many protein IDRs are unknown, these structural transitions are difficult to verify and often are poorly understood. In this study we describe a method to identify IDRs that are likely to undergo helical transitions upon binding. This method combines bioinformatics analyses followed by circular dichroism spectroscopy to monitor 2,2,2-trifluoroethanol (TFE)-induced changes in secondary structure content of these IDRs. Our results demonstrate that there is no significant change in the helicity of IDRs that are not predicted to fold upon binding. IDRs that are predicted to fold fall into two groups: one group does not become helical in the presence of TFE and includes examples of IDRs that form β-strands upon binding, while the other group becomes more helical and includes examples that are known to fold into helices upon binding. Therefore, we propose that bioinformatics analyses combined with experimental evaluation using TFE may provide a general method to identify IDRs that undergo binding-induced disorder-to-helix transitions. PMID:27179590

  20. Flexibility in the inducer binding region is crucial for allostery in the Escherichia coli lactose repressor.

    PubMed

    Xu, Jia; Matthews, Kathleen S

    2009-06-01

    Lactose repressor protein (LacI) utilizes an allosteric mechanism to regulate transcription in Escherichia coli, and the transition between inducer- and operator-bound states has been simulated by targeted molecular dynamics (TMD). The side chains of amino acids 149 and 193 interact and were predicted by TMD simulation to play a critical role in the early stages of the LacI conformational change. D149 contacts IPTG directly, and variations at this site provide the opportunity to dissect its role in inducer binding and signal transduction. Single mutants at D149 or S193 exhibit a minimal change in operator binding, and alterations in inducer binding parallel changes in operator release, indicating normal allosteric response. The observation that the double mutant D149A/S193A exhibits wild-type properties excludes the requirement for inter-residue hydrogen bond formation in the allosteric response. The double mutant D149C/S193C purified from cell extracts shows decreased sensitivity to inducer binding while retaining wild-type binding affinities and kinetic constants for both operator and inducer. By manipulating cysteine oxidation, we show that the more reduced state of D149C/S193C responds to inducer more like the wild-type protein, whereas the more oxidized state displays diminished inducer sensitivity. These features of D149C/S193C indicate that the novel disulfide bond formed in this mutant impedes the allosteric transition, consistent with the role of this region predicted by TMD simulation. Together, these results establish the requirement for flexibility in the spatial relationship between D149 and S193 rather than a specific D149-S193 interaction in the LacI allosteric response to inducer. PMID:19368358

  1. IFN-γ Directly Controls IL-33 Protein Level through a STAT1- and LMP2-dependent Mechanism*

    PubMed Central

    Kopach, Pavel; Lockatell, Virginia; Pickering, Edward M.; Haskell, Ronald E.; Anderson, Richard D.; Hasday, Jeffrey D.; Todd, Nevins W.; Luzina, Irina G.; Atamas, Sergei P.

    2014-01-01

    IL-33 contributes to disease processes in association with Th1 and Th2 phenotypes. IL-33 mRNA is rapidly regulated, but the fate of synthesized IL-33 protein is unknown. To understand the interplay among IL-33, IFN-γ, and IL-4 proteins, recombinant replication-deficient adenoviruses were produced and used for dual expression of IL-33 and IFN-γ or IL-33 and IL-4. The effects of such dual gene delivery were compared with the effects of similar expression of each of these cytokines alone. In lung fibroblast culture, co-expression of IL-33 and IFN-γ resulted in suppression of the levels of both proteins, whereas co-expression of IL-33 and IL-4 led to mutual elevation. In vivo, co-expression of IL-33 and IFN-γ in the lungs led to attenuation of IL-33 protein levels. Purified IFN-γ also attenuated IL-33 protein in fibroblast culture, suggesting that IFN-γ controls IL-33 protein degradation. Specific inhibition of caspase-1, -3, and -8 had minimal effect on IFN-γ-driven IL-33 protein down-regulation. Pharmacological inhibition, siRNA-mediated silencing, or gene deficiency of STAT1 potently up-regulated IL-33 protein expression levels and attenuated the down-regulating effect of IFN-γ on IL-33. Stimulation with IFN-γ strongly elevated the levels of the LMP2 proteasome subunit, known for its role in IFN-γ-regulated antigen processing. siRNA-mediated silencing of LMP2 expression abrogated the effect of IFN-γ on IL-33. Thus, IFN-γ, IL-4, and IL-33 are engaged in a complex interplay. The down-regulation of IL-33 protein levels by IFN-γ in pulmonary fibroblasts and in the lungs in vivo occurs through STAT1 and non-canonical use of the LMP2 proteasome subunit in a caspase-independent fashion. PMID:24619410

  2. BoHV-4-Based Vector Single Heterologous Antigen Delivery Protects STAT1(-/-) Mice from Monkeypoxvirus Lethal Challenge

    PubMed Central

    Crump, Ryan W.; Doronin, Konstantin; Hembrador, Edguardo; Pompilio, Daniela; Tebaldi, Giulia; Estep, Ryan D.; Wong, Scott W.; Buller, Mark R.; Donofrio, Gaetano

    2015-01-01

    Monkeypox virus (MPXV) is the etiological agent of human (MPX). It is an emerging orthopoxvirus zoonosis in the tropical rain forest of Africa and is endemic in the Congo-basin and sporadic in West Africa; it remains a tropical neglected disease of persons in impoverished rural areas. Interaction of the human population with wildlife increases human infection with MPX virus (MPXV), and infection from human to human is possible. Smallpox vaccination provides good cross-protection against MPX; however, the vaccination campaign ended in Africa in 1980, meaning that a large proportion of the population is currently unprotected against MPXV infection. Disease control hinges on deterring zoonotic exposure to the virus and, barring that, interrupting person-to-person spread. However, there are no FDA-approved therapies against MPX, and current vaccines are limited due to safety concerns. For this reason, new studies on pathogenesis, prophylaxis and therapeutics are still of great interest, not only for the scientific community but also for the governments concerned that MPXV could be used as a bioterror agent. In the present study, a new vaccination strategy approach based on three recombinant bovine herpesvirus 4 (BoHV-4) vectors, each expressing different MPXV glycoproteins, A29L, M1R and B6R were investigated in terms of protection from a lethal MPXV challenge in STAT1 knockout mice. BoHV-4-A-CMV-A29LgD106ΔTK, BoHV-4-A-EF1α-M1RgD106ΔTK and BoHV-4-A-EF1α-B6RgD106ΔTK were successfully constructed by recombineering, and their capacity to express their transgene was demonstrated. A small challenge study was performed, and all three recombinant BoHV-4 appeared safe (no weight-loss or obvious adverse events) following intraperitoneal administration. Further, BoHV-4-A-EF1α-M1RgD106ΔTK alone or in combination with BoHV-4-A-CMV-A29LgD106ΔTK and BoHV-4-A-EF1α-B6RgD106ΔTK, was shown to be able to protect, 100% alone and 80% in combination, STAT1(-/-) mice against

  3. BoHV-4-Based Vector Single Heterologous Antigen Delivery Protects STAT1(-/-) Mice from Monkeypoxvirus Lethal Challenge.

    PubMed

    Franceschi, Valentina; Parker, Scott; Jacca, Sarah; Crump, Ryan W; Doronin, Konstantin; Hembrador, Edguardo; Pompilio, Daniela; Tebaldi, Giulia; Estep, Ryan D; Wong, Scott W; Buller, Mark R; Donofrio, Gaetano

    2015-06-01

    Monkeypox virus (MPXV) is the etiological agent of human (MPX). It is an emerging orthopoxvirus zoonosis in the tropical rain forest of Africa and is endemic in the Congo-basin and sporadic in West Africa; it remains a tropical neglected disease of persons in impoverished rural areas. Interaction of the human population with wildlife increases human infection with MPX virus (MPXV), and infection from human to human is possible. Smallpox vaccination provides good cross-protection against MPX; however, the vaccination campaign ended in Africa in 1980, meaning that a large proportion of the population is currently unprotected against MPXV infection. Disease control hinges on deterring zoonotic exposure to the virus and, barring that, interrupting person-to-person spread. However, there are no FDA-approved therapies against MPX, and current vaccines are limited due to safety concerns. For this reason, new studies on pathogenesis, prophylaxis and therapeutics are still of great interest, not only for the scientific community but also for the governments concerned that MPXV could be used as a bioterror agent. In the present study, a new vaccination strategy approach based on three recombinant bovine herpesvirus 4 (BoHV-4) vectors, each expressing different MPXV glycoproteins, A29L, M1R and B6R were investigated in terms of protection from a lethal MPXV challenge in STAT1 knockout mice. BoHV-4-A-CMV-A29LgD106ΔTK, BoHV-4-A-EF1α-M1RgD106ΔTK and BoHV-4-A-EF1α-B6RgD106ΔTK were successfully constructed by recombineering, and their capacity to express their transgene was demonstrated. A small challenge study was performed, and all three recombinant BoHV-4 appeared safe (no weight-loss or obvious adverse events) following intraperitoneal administration. Further, BoHV-4-A-EF1α-M1RgD106ΔTK alone or in combination with BoHV-4-A-CMV-A29LgD106ΔTK and BoHV-4-A-EF1α-B6RgD106ΔTK, was shown to be able to protect, 100% alone and 80% in combination, STAT1(-/-) mice against

  4. Enhancement of binding kinetics on affinity substrates by laser point heating induced transport.

    PubMed

    Wang, Bu; Cheng, Xuanhong

    2016-03-01

    Enhancing the time response and detection limit of affinity-binding based biosensors is an area of active research. For diffusion limited reactions, introducing active mass transport is an effective strategy to reduce the equilibration time and improve surface binding. Here, a laser is focused on the ceiling of a microchamber to generate point heating, which introduces natural advection and thermophoresis to promote mass transport to the reactive floor. We first used the COMSOL simulation to study how the kinetics of ligand binding is influenced by the optothermal effect. Afterwards, binding of biotinylated nanoparticles to NeutrAvidin-treated substrates is quantitatively measured with and without laser heating. It is discovered that laser induced point heating reduces the reaction half-life locally, and the reduction improves with the natural advection velocity. In addition, non-uniform ligand binding on the substrate is induced by the laser with predictable binding patterns. This optothermal strategy holds promise to improve the time-response and sensitivity of biosensors and microarrays. PMID:26898559

  5. Toxoplasma Effector Recruits the Mi-2/NuRD Complex to Repress STAT1 Transcription and Block IFN-γ-Dependent Gene Expression.

    PubMed

    Olias, Philipp; Etheridge, Ronald D; Zhang, Yong; Holtzman, Michael J; Sibley, L David

    2016-07-13

    Interferon gamma (IFN-γ) is an essential mediator of host defense against intracellular pathogens, including the protozoan parasite Toxoplasma gondii. However, prior T. gondii infection blocks IFN-γ-dependent gene transcription, despite the downstream transcriptional activator STAT1 being activated and bound to cognate nuclear promoters. We identify the parasite effector that blocks STAT1-dependent transcription and show it is associated with recruitment of the Mi-2 nucleosome remodeling and deacetylase (NuRD) complex, a chromatin-modifying repressor. This secreted effector, toxoplasma inhibitor of STAT1-dependent transcription (TgIST), translocates to the host cell nucleus, where it recruits Mi-2/NuRD to STAT1-dependent promoters, resulting in altered chromatin and blocked transcription. TgIST is conserved across strains, underlying their shared ability to block IFN-γ-dependent transcription. TgIST deletion results in increased parasite clearance in IFN-γ-activated cells and reduced mouse virulence, which is restored in IFN-γ-receptor-deficient mice. These findings demonstrate the importance of both IFN-γ responses and the ability of pathogens to counteract these defenses. PMID:27414498

  6. Luteolin Induces Carcinoma Cell Apoptosis through Binding Hsp90 to Suppress Constitutive Activation of STAT3

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Bo; Zhao, Zhihui; Zhou, Jiahong; Xu, Yimiao; Xin, Yinqiang; Liu, Chang; Luo, Lan; Yin, Zhimin

    2012-01-01

    Background Abnormal activity of STAT3 is associated with a number of human malignancies. Hsp90 plays a central role in stabilizing newly synthesized proteins and participates in maintaining the functional competency of a number of signaling transducers involved in cell growth, survival and oncogenesis, such as STAT3. Hsp90 interacts with STAT3 and stabilizes Tyr-phosphorylated STAT3. It has been reported that luteolin possesses anticancer activity through degradation of Tyr705-phosphorylated STAT3. Methodology/Principal Findings We found that overexpression of Hsp90 inhibited luteolin-induced degradation of Tyr705-phosphorylated STAT3 and luteolin also reduced the levels of some other Hsp90 interacting proteins. Results from co-immunoprecipitation and immunoblot analysis demonstrated that luteolin prevented the association between Hsp90 and STAT3 and induced both Tyr705- and Ser727-phosphorylated STAT3 degradation through proteasome-dependent pathway. The molecular modeling analysis with CHARMm–Discovery Studio 2.1(DS 2.1) indicated that luteolin could bind to the ATP-binding pocket of Hsp90. SPR technology-based binding assay confirmed the association between luteolin and Hsp90. ATP-sepharose binding assay displayed that luteolin inhibited Hsp90-ATP binding. Conclusions/Significance Luteolin promoted the degradation of Tyr705- and Ser727-phosphorylated STAT3 through interacting with Hsp90 and induced apoptosis of cancer cells. This study indicated that luteolin may act as a potent HSP90 inhibitor in antitumor strategies. PMID:23145121

  7. Platelet-collagen adhesion enhances platelet aggregation induced by binding of VWF to platelets

    SciTech Connect

    Laduca, F.M.; Bell, W.R.; Bettigole, R.E. State Univ. of New York, Buffalo )

    1987-11-01

    Ristocetin-induced platelet aggregation (RIPA) was evaluated in the presence of platelet-collagen adhesion. RIPA of normal donor platelet-rich plasma (PRP) demonstrated a primary wave of aggregation mediated by the binding of von Willebrand factor (VWF) to platelets and a secondary aggregation wave, due to a platelet-release reaction, initiated by VWF-platelet binding and inhibitable by acetylsalicylic acid (ASA). An enhanced RIPA was observed in PRP samples to which collagen had been previously added. These subthreshold concentrations of collagen, which by themselves were insufficient to induce aggregation, caused measurable platelet-collagen adhesion. Subthreshold collagen did not cause microplatelet aggregation, platelet release of ({sup 3}H)serotonin, or alter the dose-responsive binding of {sup 125}I-labeled VWF to platelets, which occurred with increasing ristocetin concentrations. However, ASA inhibition of the platelet release reaction prevented collagen-enhanced RIPA. These results demonstrate that platelet-collagen adhesion altered the platelet-release reaction induced by the binding of VWF to platelets causing a platelet-release reaction at a level of VWF-platelet binding not normally initiating a secondary aggregation. These findings suggest that platelet-collagen adhesion enhances platelet function mediated by VWF.

  8. Overlapping sites for constitutive and induced DNA binding factors involved in interferon-stimulated transcription.

    PubMed Central

    Dale, T C; Rosen, J M; Guille, M J; Lewin, A R; Porter, A G; Kerr, I M; Stark, G R

    1989-01-01

    A 14 bp interferon (IFN)-stimulated response element (ISRE) from 6-16, a human gene regulated by alpha-IFN, confers IFN inducibility on a heterologous thymidine kinase promoter. A 39 bp double-stranded oligonucleotide corresponding to a 5' region of 6-16 which includes the ISRE competes for factors required for gene expression by alpha-IFN in transfected cells and a single base change (A-11 to C) within the ISRE (GGGAAAATGAAACT) abolishes this competition. Band-shift assays performed with whole-cell extracts and the 39 bp oligonucleotide reveal specific complexes formed by rapidly induced and constitutive factors, both of which fail to bind to the A-11 to C oligonucleotide. A detailed footprinting analysis reveals that these two types of factors bind to overlapping sites within the ISRE, but in very different ways. These data were used to design oligonucleotides which decreased the formation of the inducible complex without affecting the constitutive one. Changes at the 5' margin of the ISRE and upstream of it markedly decrease formation of the induced but not the constitutive complex and also abolish the ability of the 39 bp sequence to function as an inducible enhancer with the thymidine kinase promoter. Thus, induction of 6-16 transcription in IFN-treated cells is likely to be stimulated by binding of the induced factor to the ISRE and upstream sequences, while the subsequent suppression of transcription may involve competition for the ISRE by the other class of factors. Images PMID:2721502

  9. Aging-induced changes in brain regional serotonin receptor binding: Effect of Carnosine.

    PubMed

    Banerjee, S; Poddar, M K

    2016-04-01

    Monoamine neurotransmitter, serotonin (5-HT) has its own specific receptors in both pre- and post-synapse. In the present study the role of carnosine on aging-induced changes of [(3)H]-5-HT receptor binding in different brain regions in a rat model was studied. The results showed that during aging (18 and 24 months) the [(3)H]-5-HT receptor binding was reduced in hippocampus, hypothalamus and pons-medulla with a decrease in their both Bmax and KD but in cerebral cortex the [(3)H]-5-HT binding was increased with the increase of its only Bmax. The aging-induced changes in [(3)H]-5-HT receptor binding with carnosine (2.0 μg/kg/day, intrathecally, for 21 consecutive days) attenuated in (a) 24-month-aged rats irrespective of the brain regions with the attenuation of its Bmax except hypothalamus where both Bmax and KD were significantly attenuated, (b) hippocampus and hypothalamus of 18-month-aged rats with the attenuation of its Bmax, and restored toward the [(3)H]-5-HT receptor binding that observed in 4-month-young rats. The decrease in pons-medullary [(3)H]-5-HT binding including its Bmax of 18-month-aged rats was promoted with carnosine without any significant change in its cerebral cortex. The [(3)H]-5-HT receptor binding with the same dosages of carnosine in 4-month-young rats (a) increased in the cerebral cortex and hippocampus with the increase in their only Bmax whereas (b) decreased in hypothalamus and pons-medulla with a decrease in their both Bmax and KD. These results suggest that carnosine treatment may (a) play a preventive role in aging-induced brain region-specific changes in serotonergic activity (b) not be worthy in 4-month-young rats in relation to the brain regional serotonergic activity. PMID:26808776

  10. Ligand-induced conformational changes in a thermophilic ribose-binding protein

    SciTech Connect

    Cuneo, Matthew J.; Beese, Lorena S.; Hellinga, Homme W.

    2009-05-21

    Members of the periplasmic binding protein (PBP) superfamily are involved in transport and signaling processes in both prokaryotes and eukaryotes. Biological responses are typically mediated by ligand-induced conformational changes in which the binding event is coupled to a hinge-bending motion that brings together two domains in a closed form. In all PBP-mediated biological processes, downstream partners recognize the closed form of the protein. This motion has also been exploited in protein engineering experiments to construct biosensors that transduce ligand binding to a variety of physical signals. Understanding the mechanistic details of PBP conformational changes, both global (hinge bending, twisting, shear movements) and local (rotamer changes, backbone motion), therefore is not only important for understanding their biological function but also for protein engineering experiments. Here we present biochemical characterization and crystal structure determination of the periplasmic ribose-binding protein (RBP) from the hyperthermophile Thermotoga maritima in its ribose-bound and unliganded state. The T. maritima RBP (tmRBP) has 39% sequence identity and is considerably more resistant to thermal denaturation (appTm value is 108 C) than the mesophilic Escherichia coli homolog (ecRBP) (appTm value is 56 C). Polar ligand interactions and ligand-induced global conformational changes are conserved among ecRBP and tmRBP; however local structural rearrangements involving side-chain motions in the ligand-binding site are not conserved. Although the large-scale ligand-induced changes are mediated through similar regions, and are produced by similar backbone movements in tmRBP and ecRBP, the small-scale ligand-induced structural rearrangements differentiate the mesophile and thermophile. This suggests there are mechanistic differences in the manner by which these two proteins bind their ligands and are an example of how two structurally similar proteins utilize different

  11. A STAT1-gain-of-function mutation causing Th17 deficiency with chronic mucocutaneous candidiasis, psoriasiform hyperkeratosis and dermatophytosis.

    PubMed

    Nielsen, Jakob; Kofod-Olsen, Emil; Spaun, Eva; Larsen, Carsten S; Christiansen, Mette; Mogensen, Trine Hyrup

    2015-01-01

    During recent years, inborn errors of human IL-17 immunity have been demonstrated to underlie primary immunodeficiencies with chronic mucocutaneous candidiasis (CMC). Various defects in receptors responsible for sensing of Candida albicans or downstream signalling to IL-17 may lead to susceptibility to Candida infection. While CMC is common in patients with profound T cell immunodeficiencies, CMC is also recognised as part of other immunodeficiencies in syndromic CMC, or as relatively isolated CMC disease. We describe a 40-year-old woman with a clinical picture involving cutaneous bacterial abscesses, chronic oral candidiasis and extensive dermatophytic infection of the feet. By whole exome sequencing, we identified a STAT1-gain-of-function mutation. Moreover, the patient's peripheral blood mononuclear cells displayed severely impaired Th17 responses. The patient was treated with antifungals and prophylactic antibiotics, which led to resolution of the infection. We discuss the current knowledge within the field of Th17 deficiency and the pathogenesis and treatment of CMC. PMID:26494717

  12. DNA damage–inducible SUMOylation of HERC2 promotes RNF8 binding via a novel SUMO-binding Zinc finger

    PubMed Central

    Danielsen, Jannie Rendtlew; Povlsen, Lou Klitgaard; Villumsen, Bine Hare; Streicher, Werner; Nilsson, Jakob; Wikström, Mats; Bekker-Jensen, Simon

    2012-01-01

    Nonproteolytic ubiquitylation of chromatin surrounding deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA) double-strand breaks (DSBs) by the RNF8/RNF168/HERC2 ubiquitin ligases facilitates restoration of genome integrity by licensing chromatin to concentrate genome caretaker proteins near the lesions. In parallel, SUMOylation of so-far elusive upstream DSB regulators is also required for execution of this ubiquitin-dependent chromatin response. We show that HERC2 and RNF168 are novel DNA damage–dependent SUMOylation targets in human cells. In response to DSBs, both HERC2 and RNF168 were specifically modified with SUMO1 at DSB sites in a manner dependent on the SUMO E3 ligase PIAS4. SUMOylation of HERC2 was required for its DSB-induced association with RNF8 and for stabilizing the RNF8–Ubc13 complex. We also demonstrate that the ZZ Zinc finger in HERC2 defined a novel SUMO-specific binding module, which together with its concomitant SUMOylation and T4827 phosphorylation promoted binding to RNF8. Our findings provide novel insight into the regulatory complexity of how ubiquitylation and SUMOylation cooperate to orchestrate protein interactions with DSB repair foci. PMID:22508508

  13. DNA damage-inducible SUMOylation of HERC2 promotes RNF8 binding via a novel SUMO-binding Zinc finger.

    PubMed

    Danielsen, Jannie Rendtlew; Povlsen, Lou Klitgaard; Villumsen, Bine Hare; Streicher, Werner; Nilsson, Jakob; Wikström, Mats; Bekker-Jensen, Simon; Mailand, Niels

    2012-04-16

    Nonproteolytic ubiquitylation of chromatin surrounding deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA) double-strand breaks (DSBs) by the RNF8/RNF168/HERC2 ubiquitin ligases facilitates restoration of genome integrity by licensing chromatin to concentrate genome caretaker proteins near the lesions. In parallel, SUMOylation of so-far elusive upstream DSB regulators is also required for execution of this ubiquitin-dependent chromatin response. We show that HERC2 and RNF168 are novel DNA damage-dependent SUMOylation targets in human cells. In response to DSBs, both HERC2 and RNF168 were specifically modified with SUMO1 at DSB sites in a manner dependent on the SUMO E3 ligase PIAS4. SUMOylation of HERC2 was required for its DSB-induced association with RNF8 and for stabilizing the RNF8-Ubc13 complex. We also demonstrate that the ZZ Zinc finger in HERC2 defined a novel SUMO-specific binding module, which together with its concomitant SUMOylation and T4827 phosphorylation promoted binding to RNF8. Our findings provide novel insight into the regulatory complexity of how ubiquitylation and SUMOylation cooperate to orchestrate protein interactions with DSB repair foci. PMID:22508508

  14. Binding and accumulation of hemin in Porphyromonas gingivalis are induced by hemin.

    PubMed Central

    Genco, C A; Odusanya, B M; Brown, G

    1994-01-01

    Although hemin is an essential nutrient for the black-pigmented oral bacterium Porphyromonas gingivalis, the mechanisms involved in hemin binding and uptake are poorly defined. In this study, we have examined the binding of hemin and Congo red (CR) to P. gingivalis whole cells and have defined the conditions for maximal binding. Additionally, the accumulation of hemin by P. gingivalis under growing conditions has been characterized. P. gingivalis A7436 was grown under hemin- or iron-deplete conditions (basal medium [BM] or Schaedler broth with dipyridyl [SBD]) or under hemin- or iron-replete conditions (BM with hemin [BMH] or Schaedler broth [SB]), and hemin and CR binding were assessed spectrophotometrically. Binding of hemin by P. gingivalis whole cells was rapid and was observed in samples obtained from cells grown under hemin- and iron-replete and hemin-deplete conditions but was not observed in cells grown under iron limitation. We also found that P. gingivalis whole cells bound more hemin when grown in BMH or SB than cells grown in BM or SBD. Binding of CR by P. gingivalis A7436 was also enhanced when cells were grown in the presence of hemin or when cells were incubated with hemin prior to CR binding. Hemin binding and accumulation were also assessed using [14C]hemin and [59Fe]hemin under growing conditions. Both [14C]hemin and [59Fe]hemin were accumulated by P. gingivalis, indicating that iron and the porphyrin ring were taken into the cell. Binding and accumulation of hemin under growing conditions were also induced by growth of P. gingivalis in hemin-replete media. Hemin accumulation was inhibited by the addition of KCN to P. gingivalis cultures, indicating that active transport was required for hemin uptake. [14C]hemin binding and accumulation were also inhibited by the addition of either cold hemin or protoporphyrin IX. Taken together, these results indicate that P. gingivalis transports the entire hemin moiety into the cell and that the binding and

  15. Glycosaminoglycan and DNA Binding Induced Intra- and Intermolecular Exciton Coupling of the bis-4-Aminoquinoline Surfen.

    PubMed

    Zsila, Ferenc

    2015-09-01

    Despite the diverse biological activities of the glycosaminoglycan (GAG) antagonist surfen, the molecular details of its interaction with biomacromolecules remain poorly understood. Therefore, heparin and DNA binding properties of surfen were studied by circular dichroism (CD) and UV absorption spectroscopy methods. High-affinity (Ka  ~ 10(7)  M(-1)) association of surfen to the chiral heparin chain gives rise to a characteristic biphasic CD pattern due to the conformational twist of the aminoquinoline moieties around the central urea bridge. At higher drug loading, intermolecular stacking of surfen molecules alters the induced CD profile and also provokes strong UV hypochromism. In contrast to the right-handed heparin template, binding of surfen to the left-helicity chondroitin sulfate chains produces inverted CD pattern. Large UV hypochromism as well as polyphasic induced ellipticity bands indicate that surfen intercalates between the base pairs of calf-thymus DNA. Extensive CD spectroscopic changes observed at higher drug binding ratios refer to cooperative binding interactions between the intercalated drug molecules. The inherent conformational flexibility of surfen demonstrated here for the first time is important in its binding to distinct macromolecular targets and should be considered for rational drug design of novel GAG antagonists. PMID:26096963

  16. Environmentally Induced Epigenetic Transgenerational Inheritance of Altered SRY Genomic Binding During Gonadal Sex Determination

    PubMed Central

    Skinner, Michael K.; Bhandari, Ramji K.; Haque, M. Muksitul; Nilsson, Eric E.

    2016-01-01

    A critical transcription factor required for mammalian male sex determination is SRY (sex determining region on the Y chromosome). The expression of SRY in precursor Sertoli cells is one of the initial events in testis development. The current study was designed to determine the impact of environmentally induced epigenetic transgenerational inheritance on SRY binding during gonadal sex determination in the male. The agricultural fungicide vinclozolin and vehicle control (DMSO) exposed gestating females (F0 generation) during gonadal sex determination promoted the transgenerational inheritance of differential DNA methylation in sperm of the F3 generation (great grand-offspring). The fetal gonads in F3 generation males were used to identify potential alterations in SRY binding sites in the developing Sertoli cells. Chromatin immunoprecipitation with an SRY antibody followed by genome-wide promoter tiling array (ChIP-Chip) was used to identify alterations in SRY binding. A total of 81 adjacent oligonucleotide sites and 173 single oligo SRY binding sites were identified to be altered transgenerationally in the Sertoli cell vinclozolin lineage F3 generation males. Observations demonstrate the majority of the previously identified normal SRY binding sites were not altered and the altered SRY binding sites were novel and new additional sites. The chromosomal locations, gene associations and potentially modified cellular pathways were investigated. In summary, environmentally induced epigenetic transgenerational inheritance of germline epimutations appears to alter the cellular differentiation and development of the precursor Sertoli cell SRY binding during gonadal sex determination that influence the developmental origins of adult onset testis disease. PMID:27175298

  17. Ethanol-induced loss of brain cyclic AMP binding proteins: correlation with growth suppression

    SciTech Connect

    Pennington, S.; Kalmus, G.

    1987-05-01

    Brain hypoplasia secondary to maternal ethanol consumption is a common fetal defect observed in all models of fetal alcohol syndrome. The molecular mechanism by which ethanol inhibits growth is unknown but has been hypothesized to involve ethanol-induced changes in the activity of cyclic-AMP stimulated protein kinase. Acute and chronic alcohol exposure elevate cyclic AMP level in many tissues, including brain. This increase in cyclic AMP should increase the phosphorylating activity of kinase by increasing the amount of dissociated (active) kinase catalytic subunit. In 7-day embryonic chick brains, ethanol-induced growth suppression was correlated with increased brain cyclic AMP content but neither basal nor cyclic AMP stimulated kinase catalytic activity was increased. However, the levels of cyclic AMP binding protein (kinase regulatory subunit) were significantly lowered by ethanol exposure. Measured as either /sup 3/H cyclic AMP binding or as 8-azido cyclic AM/sup 32/P labeling, ethanol-exposed brains had significantly less cyclic AMP binding activity (51 +/- 14 versus 29 +/- 10 units/..mu..g protein for 8-azido cyclic AMP binding). These findings suggest that ethanol's effect on kinase activity may involve more than ethanol-induced activation of adenylate cyclase.

  18. Hes-1 SUMOylation by protein inhibitor of activated STAT1 enhances the suppressing effect of Hes-1 on GADD45α expression to increase cell survival

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Hairy and Enhancer of split 1 (Hes-1) is a transcriptional repressor that plays an important role in neuronal differentiation and development, but post-translational modifications of Hes-1 are much less known. In the present study, we aimed to investigate whether Hes-1 could be SUMO-modified and identify the candidate SUMO acceptors on Hes-1. We also wished to examine the role of the SUMO E3 ligase protein inhibitor of activated STAT1 (PIAS1) in SUMOylation of Hes-1 and the molecular mechanism of Hes-1 SUMOylation. Further, we aimed to identify the molecular target of Hes-1 and examine how Hes-1 SUMOylation affects its molecular target to affect cell survival. Results In this study, by using HEK293T cells, we have found that Hes-1 could be SUMO-modified and Hes-1 SUMOylation was greatly enhanced by the SUMO E3 ligase PIAS1 at Lys8, Lys27 and Lys39. Furthermore, Hes-1 SUMOylation stabilized the Hes-1 protein and increased the transcriptional suppressing activity of Hes-1 on growth arrest and DNA damage-inducible protein alpha (GADD45α) expression. Overexpression of GADD45α increased, whereas knockdown of GADD45αα expression decreased cell apoptosis. In addition, H2O2 treatment increased the association between PIAS1 and Hes-1 and enhanced the SUMOylation of Hes-1 for endogenous protection. Overexpression of Hes-1 decreased H2O2-induced cell death, but this effect was blocked by transfection of the Hes-1 triple sumo-mutant (Hes-1 3KR). Overexpression of PIAS1 further facilitated the anti-apoptotic effect of Hes-1. Moreover, Hes-1 SUMOylation was independent of Hes-1 phosphorylation and vice versa. Conclusions The present results revealed, for the first time, that Hes-1 could be SUMO-modified by PIAS1 and GADD45α is a novel target of Hes-1. Further, Hes-1 SUMOylation mediates cell survival through enhanced suppression of GADD45α expression. These results revealed a novel role of Hes-1 in addition to its involvement in Notch signaling. They also

  19. Proposed Standards for Variable Harmonization Documentation and Referencing: A Case Study Using QuickCharmStats 1.1.

    PubMed

    Winters, Kristi; Netscher, Sebastian

    2016-01-01

    Comparative statistical analyses often require data harmonization, yet the social sciences do not have clear operationalization frameworks that guide and homogenize variable coding decisions across disciplines. When faced with a need to harmonize variables researchers often look for guidance from various international studies that employ output harmonization, such as the Comparative Survey of Election Studies, which offer recoding structures for the same variable (e.g. marital status). More problematically there are no agreed documentation standards or journal requirements for reporting variable harmonization to facilitate a transparent replication process. We propose a conceptual and data-driven digital solution that creates harmonization documentation standards for publication and scholarly citation: QuickCharmStats 1.1. It is free and open-source software that allows for the organizing, documenting and publishing of data harmonization projects. QuickCharmStats starts at the conceptual level and its workflow ends with a variable recording syntax. It is therefore flexible enough to reflect a variety of theoretical justifications for variable harmonization. Using the socio-demographic variable 'marital status', we demonstrate how the CharmStats workflow collates metadata while being guided by the scientific standards of transparency and replication. It encourages researchers to publish their harmonization work by providing researchers who complete the peer review process a permanent identifier. Those who contribute original data harmonization work to their discipline can now be credited through citations. Finally, we propose peer-review standards for harmonization documentation, describe a route to online publishing, and provide a referencing format to cite harmonization projects. Although CharmStats products are designed for social scientists our adherence to the scientific method ensures our products can be used by researchers across the sciences. PMID:26859494

  20. Proposed Standards for Variable Harmonization Documentation and Referencing: A Case Study Using QuickCharmStats 1.1

    PubMed Central

    Winters, Kristi; Netscher, Sebastian

    2016-01-01

    Comparative statistical analyses often require data harmonization, yet the social sciences do not have clear operationalization frameworks that guide and homogenize variable coding decisions across disciplines. When faced with a need to harmonize variables researchers often look for guidance from various international studies that employ output harmonization, such as the Comparative Survey of Election Studies, which offer recoding structures for the same variable (e.g. marital status). More problematically there are no agreed documentation standards or journal requirements for reporting variable harmonization to facilitate a transparent replication process. We propose a conceptual and data-driven digital solution that creates harmonization documentation standards for publication and scholarly citation: QuickCharmStats 1.1. It is free and open-source software that allows for the organizing, documenting and publishing of data harmonization projects. QuickCharmStats starts at the conceptual level and its workflow ends with a variable recording syntax. It is therefore flexible enough to reflect a variety of theoretical justifications for variable harmonization. Using the socio-demographic variable ‘marital status’, we demonstrate how the CharmStats workflow collates metadata while being guided by the scientific standards of transparency and replication. It encourages researchers to publish their harmonization work by providing researchers who complete the peer review process a permanent identifier. Those who contribute original data harmonization work to their discipline can now be credited through citations. Finally, we propose peer-review standards for harmonization documentation, describe a route to online publishing, and provide a referencing format to cite harmonization projects. Although CharmStats products are designed for social scientists our adherence to the scientific method ensures our products can be used by researchers across the sciences. PMID

  1. Induced fit, conformational selection and independent dynamic segments: an extended view of binding events

    PubMed Central

    Csermely, Peter; Palotai, Robin; Nussinov, Ruth

    2010-01-01

    Single molecule and NMR measurements of protein dynamics increasingly uncover the complexity of binding scenarios. Here we describe an extended conformational selection model which embraces a repertoire of selection and adjustment processes. Induced fit can be viewed as a subset of this repertoire, whose contribution is affected by the bond-types stabilizing the interaction and the differences between the interacting partners. We argue that protein segments whose dynamics are distinct from the rest of the protein (‘discrete breathers’) can govern conformational transitions and allosteric propagation that accompany binding processes, and as such might be more sensitive to mutational events. Additionally, we highlight the dynamic complexity of binding scenarios as they relate to events such as aggregation and signalling, and the crowded cellular environment. PMID:20541943

  2. Integrin binding and mechanical tension induce movement of mRNA and ribosomes to focal adhesions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chicurel, M. E.; Singer, R. H.; Meyer, C. J.; Ingber, D. E.

    1998-01-01

    The extracellular matrix (ECM) activates signalling pathways that control cell behaviour by binding to cell-surface integrin receptors and inducing the formation of focal adhesion complexes (FACs). In addition to clustered integrins, FACs contain proteins that mechanically couple the integrins to the cytoskeleton and to immobilized signal-transducing molecules. Cell adhesion to the ECM also induces a rapid increase in the translation of preexisting messenger RNAs. Gene expression can be controlled locally by targeting mRNAs to specialized cytoskeletal domains. Here we investigate whether cell binding to the ECM promotes formation of a cytoskeletal microcompartment specialized for translational control at the site of integrin binding. High-resolution in situ hybridization revealed that mRNA and ribosomes rapidly and specifically localized to FACs that form when cells bind to ECM-coated microbeads. Relocation of these protein synthesis components to the FAC depended on the ability of integrins to mechanically couple the ECM to the contractile cytoskeleton and on associated tension-moulding of the actin lattice. Our results suggest a new type of gene regulation by integrins and by mechanical stress which may involve translation of mRNAs into proteins near the sites of signal reception.

  3. Functional analysis of an auxin-inducible DNA-binding protein gene.

    PubMed

    Bernstein, Any; Mangeon, Amanda; Almeida-Engler, Janice; Engler, Gilbert; Van Montagu, Marc; Sachetto-Martins, Gilberto; de Oliveira, Dulce Eleonora

    2015-01-01

    Over the past decades, several studies indicate a correlation between the phytohormone auxin and cell division. The molecular players of this signaling pathway are now being uncovered. DNA Binding Protein1 from Arabidopsis (AtDBP1) is an auxin-inducible gene able to bind DNA non-specifically. In this work the tissue-expression pattern of this gene was investigated. Promoter-GUS analysis demonstrated that the AtDBP1 promoter is active in regions exhibiting intense cell division such as meristems and nematode feeding sites. Also, the promoter expression was modulated upon incubation with cell cycle blockers, indicating a potential role in cell division for this gene. Lastly, AtDBP1 antisense plants presented a higher insensitivity to auxin, and interfered negatively with auxin-induced callus formation and reduced apical dominance. PMID:25482757

  4. Functional analysis of an auxin-inducible DNA-binding protein gene

    PubMed Central

    Bernstein, Any; Mangeon, Amanda; Almeida-Engler, Janice; Engler, Gilbert; Montagu, Marc Van; Sachetto-Martins, Gilberto; de Oliveira, Dulce Eleonora

    2015-01-01

    Over the past decades, several studies indicate a correlation between the phytohormone auxin and cell division. The molecular players of this signaling pathway are now being uncovered. DNA Binding Protein1 from Arabidopsis (AtDBP1) is an auxin-inducible gene able to bind DNA non-specifically. In this work the tissue-expression pattern of this gene was investigated. Promoter-GUS analysis demonstrated that the AtDBP1 promoter is active in regions exhibiting intense cell division such as meristems and nematode feeding sites. Also, the promoter expression was modulated upon incubation with cell cycle blockers, indicating a potential role in cell division for this gene. Lastly, AtDBP1 antisense plants presented a higher insensitivity to auxin, and interfered negatively with auxin–induced callus formation and reduced apical dominance. PMID:25482757

  5. Carboxy-Terminus Recruitment Induced by Substrate Binding in Eukaryotic Fructose Bis-phosphate Aldolases

    SciTech Connect

    Lafrance-Vanasse,J.; Sygusch, J.

    2007-01-01

    The crystal structures of Leishmania mexicana fructose-1,6-bis(phosphate) aldolase in complex with substrate and competitive inhibitor, mannitol-1,6-bis(phosphate), were solved to 2.2 {angstrom} resolution. Crystallographic analysis revealed a Schiff base intermediate trapped in the native structure complexed with substrate while the inhibitor was trapped in a conformation mimicking the carbinolamine intermediate. Binding modes corroborated previous structures reported for rabbit muscle aldolase. Amino acid substitution of Gly-312 to Ala, adjacent to the P{sub 1}-phosphate binding site and unique to trypanosomatids, did not perturb ligand binding in the active site. Ligand attachment ordered amino acid residues 359-367 of the C-terminal region (353-373) that was disordered beyond Asp-358 in the unbound structure, revealing a novel recruitment mechanism of this region by aldolases. C-Terminal peptide ordering is triggered by P{sub 1}-phosphate binding that induces conformational changes whereby C-terminal Leu-364 contacts P{sub 1}-phosphate binding residue Arg-313. C-Terminal region capture synergizes additional interactions with subunit surface residues, not perturbed by P1-phosphate binding, and stabilizes C-terminal attachment. Amino acid residues that participate in the capturing interaction are conserved among class I aldolases, indicating a general recruitment mechanism whereby C-terminal capture facilitates active site interactions in subsequent catalytic steps. Recruitment accelerates the enzymatic reaction by using binding energy to reduce configurational entropy during catalysis thereby localizing the conserved C-terminus tyrosine, which mediates proton transfer, proximal to the active site enamine.

  6. Carboxy-terminus recruitment induced by substrate binding in eukaryotic fructose bis-phosphate aldolases.

    PubMed

    Lafrance-Vanasse, Julien; Sygusch, Jurgen

    2007-08-21

    The crystal structures of Leishmania mexicana fructose-1,6-bis(phosphate) aldolase in complex with substrate and competitive inhibitor, mannitol-1,6-bis(phosphate), were solved to 2.2 A resolution. Crystallographic analysis revealed a Schiff base intermediate trapped in the native structure complexed with substrate while the inhibitor was trapped in a conformation mimicking the carbinolamine intermediate. Binding modes corroborated previous structures reported for rabbit muscle aldolase. Amino acid substitution of Gly-312 to Ala, adjacent to the P1-phosphate binding site and unique to trypanosomatids, did not perturb ligand binding in the active site. Ligand attachment ordered amino acid residues 359-367 of the C-terminal region (353-373) that was disordered beyond Asp-358 in the unbound structure, revealing a novel recruitment mechanism of this region by aldolases. C-Terminal peptide ordering is triggered by P1-phosphate binding that induces conformational changes whereby C-terminal Leu-364 contacts P1-phosphate binding residue Arg-313. C-Terminal region capture synergizes additional interactions with subunit surface residues, not perturbed by P1-phosphate binding, and stabilizes C-terminal attachment. Amino acid residues that participate in the capturing interaction are conserved among class I aldolases, indicating a general recruitment mechanism whereby C-terminal capture facilitates active site interactions in subsequent catalytic steps. Recruitment accelerates the enzymatic reaction by using binding energy to reduce configurational entropy during catalysis thereby localizing the conserved C-terminus tyrosine, which mediates proton transfer, proximal to the active site enamine. PMID:17661446

  7. Nonspecific Binding Domains in Lipid Membranes Induced by Phospholipase A2.

    PubMed

    Hong, Chia Yee; Han, Chung-Ta; Chao, Ling

    2016-07-12

    Phospholipase A2 (PLA2) is a peripheral membrane protein that can hydrolyze phospholipids to produce lysolipids and fatty acids. It has been found to play crucial roles in various cellular processes and is thought as a potential candidate for triggering drug release from liposomes for medical treatment. Here, we directly observed that PLA2 hydrolysis reaction can induce the formation of PLA2-binding domains at lipid bilayer interface and found that the formation was significantly influenced by the fluidity of the lipid bilayer. We prepared supported lipid bilayers (SLBs) with various molar ratios of 1,2-dipalmitoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphocholine (DPPC) and 1,2-dioleoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphocholine (DOPC) to adjust the reactivity and fluidity of the lipid bilayers. A significant amount of the PLA2-induced domains was observed in mixtures of DPPC and DOPC (1,2-dioleoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphocholine) but not in either pure DPPC or pure DOPC bilayer, which might be the reason that previous studies rarely observed these domains in lipid bilayer systems. The fluorescently labeled PLA2 experiment showed that newly formed domains acted as binding templates for PLA2. The AFM result showed that the induced domain has stepwise plateau structure, suggesting that PLA2 hydrolysis products may align as bilayers and accumulate layer by layer on the support, and the hydrophobic acyl chains at the side of the layer structure may be exposed to the outside aqueous environment. The introduced hydrophobic region could have hydrophobic interactions with proteins and therefore can attract the binding of not only PLA2 but also other types of proteins such as proteoglycans and streptavidin. The results suggest that the formation of PLA2-induced domains may convert part of a zwitterionic nonsticky lipid membrane to a site where biomolecules can nonspecifically bind. PMID:27218880

  8. Laser-Induced Fluorescence Analysis of Protein-Based Binding Media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nevin, A.; Cather, S.; Anglos, D.; Fotakis, Costas

    Laser-induced fluorescence of intrinsic fluorophores of organic media found in paintings (casein, animal glue and egg proteins) provides a means of characterising general classes of media depending on the amino acid composition and presence of degradation cross-linkages. Wavelength dependence of spectra is investigated for non-destructive and non-invasive analyses of thin films of protein-based binding media.

  9. Induced Long-Range Attractive Potentials of Human Serum Albumin by Ligand Binding

    SciTech Connect

    Sato, Takaaki; Komatsu, Teruyuki; Nakagawa, Akito; Tsuchida, Eishun

    2007-05-18

    Small-angle x-ray scattering and dielectric spectroscopy investigation on the solutions of recombinant human serum albumin and its heme hybrid revealed that heme incorporation induces a specific long-range attractive potential between protein molecules. This is evidenced by the enhanced forward intensity upon heme binding, despite no hindrance to rotatory Brownian motion, unbiased colloid osmotic pressure, and discontiguous nearest-neighbor distance, confirming monodispersity of the proteins. The heme-induced potential may play a trigger role in recognition of the ligand-filled human serum albumins in the circulatory system.

  10. PUMA promotes Bax translocation by competitive binding to Bcl-Xl during UV-induced apoptosis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Yingjie; Xing, Da; Wu, Yinyuan; Liu, Lei

    2008-02-01

    Ultraviolet (UV) irradiation can induce apoptosis through both the membrane death receptor and the intrinsic apoptotic signaling pathways as DNA-damaging agents. PUMA, a BH3-only Bcl-2 family protein, plays an essential role in DNA damage-induced apoptosis. Bax, also a Bcl-2 family member, translocates from the cytosol to the mitochondrial membrane during UV-induced apoptosis. However, the regulation of Bax activation induced by UV irradiation remains poorly understood. In this study, the FRET (fluorescence resonance energy transfer) technique was used to study the interactions of Bax, Bcl-Xl, and PUMA in ASTC-a-1 cells. The results show that Bax translocated from the cytosol to the mitochondrial membrane at about 7 h after UV irradiation, and the translocation can not be blocked completely when overexpressed Bcl-xl. Moreover, The interaction of Bax and Bcl-Xl weakened markedly. In addition, Co-immunoprecipitation shows that PUMA released Bax by directly binding to Bcl-XL after UV irradiation in ASTC-a-1 cells. Taken together, these results indicated that PUMA can promote Bax translocation by binding to Bcl-Xl during UV-induced apoptosis.

  11. The Inflammatory Transcription Factors NFκB, STAT1 and STAT3 Drive Age-Associated Transcriptional Changes in the Human Kidney

    PubMed Central

    O’Brown, Zach K.; Van Nostrand, Eric L.; Higgins, John P.; Kim, Stuart K.

    2015-01-01

    Human kidney function declines with age, accompanied by stereotyped changes in gene expression and histopathology, but the mechanisms underlying these changes are largely unknown. To identify potential regulators of kidney aging, we compared age-associated transcriptional changes in the human kidney with genome-wide maps of transcription factor occupancy from ChIP-seq datasets in human cells. The strongest candidates were the inflammation-associated transcription factors NFκB, STAT1 and STAT3, the activities of which increase with age in epithelial compartments of the renal cortex. Stimulation of renal tubular epithelial cells with the inflammatory cytokines IL-6 (a STAT3 activator), IFNγ (a STAT1 activator), or TNFα (an NFκB activator) recapitulated age-associated gene expression changes. We show that common DNA variants in RELA and NFKB1, the two genes encoding subunits of the NFκB transcription factor, associate with kidney function and chronic kidney disease in gene association studies, providing the first evidence that genetic variation in NFκB contributes to renal aging phenotypes. Our results suggest that NFκB, STAT1 and STAT3 underlie transcriptional changes and chronic inflammation in the aging human kidney. PMID:26678048

  12. Extracellular Vesicles from Neural Stem Cells Transfer IFN-γ via Ifngr1 to Activate Stat1 Signaling in Target Cells

    PubMed Central

    Cossetti, Chiara; Iraci, Nunzio; Mercer, Tim R.; Leonardi, Tommaso; Alpi, Emanuele; Drago, Denise; Alfaro-Cervello, Clara; Saini, Harpreet K.; Davis, Matthew P.; Schaeffer, Julia; Vega, Beatriz; Stefanini, Matilde; Zhao, CongJian; Muller, Werner; Garcia-Verdugo, Jose Manuel; Mathivanan, Suresh; Bachi, Angela; Enright, Anton J.; Mattick, John S.; Pluchino, Stefano

    2015-01-01

    SUMMARY The idea that stem cell therapies work only via cell replacement is challenged by the observation of consistent intercellular molecule exchange between the graft and the host. Here we defined a mechanism of cellular signaling by which neural stem/precursor cells (NPCs) communicate with the microenvironment via extracellular vesicles (EVs), and we elucidated its molecular signature and function. We observed cytokine-regulated pathways that sort proteins and mRNAs into EVs. We described induction of interferon gamma (IFN-γ) pathway in NPCs exposed to proinflammatory cytokines that is mirrored in EVs. We showed that IFN-γ bound to EVs through Ifngr1 activates Stat1 in target cells. Finally, we demonstrated that endogenous Stat1 and Ifngr1 in target cells are indispensable to sustain the activation of Stat1 signaling by EV-associated IFN-γ/Ifngr1 complexes. Our study identifies a mechanism of cellular signaling regulated by EV-associated IFN-γ/Ifngr1 complexes, which grafted stem cells may use to communicate with the host immune system. PMID:25242146

  13. Inhibition of integrin β1 decreases the malignancy of ovarian cancer cells and potentiates anticancer therapy via the FAK/STAT1 signaling pathway

    PubMed Central

    ZHANG, LEI; ZOU, WEN

    2015-01-01

    Integrin β1 (ITGB1) is frequently upregulated in ovarian cancer, and promotes ovarian tumorigenesis and cancer progression. However, the effects of ITGB1 inhibition on ovarian cancer progression and anticancer therapy remain to be elucidated. The results of the present study indicated that ITGB1 was upregulated in HO-8910 and HO-8910PM ovarian cancer cell lines, and knockdown of ITGB1 using short hairpin RNA markedly increased tumor cell apoptosis, decreased tumor cell adhesion and migration, and reduced tumor cell invasion by suppressing matrix metalloproteinase (MMP)-2 and MMP-9 expression. Furthermore, the results of the present study provided evidence regarding the role of ITGB1 inhibition in bevacizumab anticancer therapy. The activation of signal transducer and activator of transcription 1 (STAT1) by focal adhesion kinase (FAK) is involved in integrin-mediated cell migration and adhesion. In the present study, the expression levels of FAK were markedly upregulated in ovarian cancer. The adherence and migratory potentials of ovarian cancer cells were significantly reduced when the FAK/STAT1 signaling pathway was inhibited by fludarabine. The results of the present study demonstrated that ITGB1 inhibition effectively reduced tumorigenesis and disease exacerbation, and contributed to bevacizumab anticancer therapy via the FAK/STAT1 signaling pathway, suggesting that inhibition of ITGB1 is a potential novel therapeutic strategy for ovarian carcinogenesis. PMID:26497667

  14. Toxoplasma gondii TgIST co-opts host chromatin repressors dampening STAT1-dependent gene regulation and IFN-γ-mediated host defenses.

    PubMed

    Gay, Gabrielle; Braun, Laurence; Brenier-Pinchart, Marie-Pierre; Vollaire, Julien; Josserand, Véronique; Bertini, Rose-Laurence; Varesano, Aurélie; Touquet, Bastien; De Bock, Pieter-Jan; Coute, Yohann; Tardieux, Isabelle; Bougdour, Alexandre; Hakimi, Mohamed-Ali

    2016-08-22

    An early hallmark of Toxoplasma gondii infection is the rapid control of the parasite population by a potent multifaceted innate immune response that engages resident and homing immune cells along with pro- and counter-inflammatory cytokines. In this context, IFN-γ activates a variety of T. gondii-targeting activities in immune and nonimmune cells but can also contribute to host immune pathology. T. gondii has evolved mechanisms to timely counteract the host IFN-γ defenses by interfering with the transcription of IFN-γ-stimulated genes. We now have identified TgIST (T. gondii inhibitor of STAT1 transcriptional activity) as a critical molecular switch that is secreted by intracellular parasites and traffics to the host cell nucleus where it inhibits STAT1-dependent proinflammatory gene expression. We show that TgIST not only sequesters STAT1 on dedicated loci but also promotes shaping of a nonpermissive chromatin through its capacity to recruit the nucleosome remodeling deacetylase (NuRD) transcriptional repressor. We found that during mice acute infection, TgIST-deficient parasites are rapidly eliminated by the homing Gr1(+) inflammatory monocytes, thus highlighting the protective role of TgIST against IFN-γ-mediated killing. By uncovering TgIST functions, this study brings novel evidence on how T. gondii has devised a molecular weapon of choice to take control over a ubiquitous immune gene expression mechanism in metazoans, as a way to promote long-term parasitism. PMID:27503074

  15. Binding Mode and Induced Fit Predictions for Prospective Computational Drug Design.

    PubMed

    Grebner, Christoph; Iegre, Jessica; Ulander, Johan; Edman, Karl; Hogner, Anders; Tyrchan, Christian

    2016-04-25

    Computer-aided drug design plays an important role in medicinal chemistry to obtain insights into molecular mechanisms and to prioritize design strategies. Although significant improvement has been made in structure based design, it still remains a key challenge to accurately model and predict induced fit mechanisms. Most of the current available techniques either do not provide sufficient protein conformational sampling or are too computationally demanding to fit an industrial setting. The current study presents a systematic and exhaustive investigation of predicting binding modes for a range of systems using PELE (Protein Energy Landscape Exploration), an efficient and fast protein-ligand sampling algorithm. The systems analyzed (cytochrome P, kinase, protease, and nuclear hormone receptor) exhibit different complexities of ligand induced fit mechanisms and protein dynamics. The results are compared with results from classical molecular dynamics simulations and (induced fit) docking. This study shows that ligand induced side chain rearrangements and smaller to medium backbone movements are captured well in PELE. Large secondary structure rearrangements, however, remain challenging for all employed techniques. Relevant binding modes (ligand heavy atom RMSD < 1.0 Å) can be obtained by the PELE method within a few hours of simulation, positioning PELE as a tool applicable for rapid drug design cycles. PMID:26974351

  16. Copper-induced production of copper-binding supernatant proteins by the marine bacterium Vibrio alginolyticus

    SciTech Connect

    Harwood-Sears, V.; Gordon, A.S. )

    1990-05-01

    Growth of the marine bacterium Vibrio alginolyticus is temporarily inhibited by micromolar levels of copper. During the copper-induced lag phase, supernatant compounds and detoxify copper are produced. In this study two copper-inducible supernatant proteins having molecular masses of ca. 21 and 19 kilodaltons (CuBP1 and CuPB2) were identified; these proteins were, respectively, 25 and 46 times amplified in supernatants of copper-challenged cultures compared with controls. Experiments in which chloramphenicol was added to cultures indicated that there was de novo synthesis of these proteins in response to copper. When supernatants were separated by gel permeation chromatography, CuBP1 and CuPB2 coeluted with a copper-induced peak in copper-binding activity. CuBP1 and CuBP2 from whole supernatants were concentrated and partially purified by using a copper-charged immobilized metal ion affinity chromatography column, confirming the affinity of these proteins for copper. A comparison of cell pellets and supernatants demonstrated that CuBP1 was more concentrated in supernatants than in cells. Our data are consistent with a model for a novel mechanism of copper detoxification in which excretion of copper-binding protein is induced by copper.

  17. Involvement of a Stat3 binding site in inflammation-induced enteric apelin expression.

    PubMed

    Han, Song; Wang, Guiyun; Qi, Xiang; Englander, Ella W; Greeley, George H

    2008-11-01

    Apelin is the endogenous ligand for the APJ receptor; both are expressed in the gastrointestinal tract. Experimental colitis in rodents and inflammatory bowel disease in humans are associated with increased intestinal apelin production. Our aim was to use LPS and proinflammatory cytokine-treated (IL-6 and IFN-gamma) rodents or enteric cells to identify signaling mechanisms underlying inflammation-induced enteric apelin expression. LPS, IL-6, or IFN-gamma treatment of rodents increased enteric apelin expression. Pharmacological blockade of Jak/Stat signaling or IL-6 antibody administration inhibited elevations in enteric apelin expression. Transient transfection experiments showed that LPS, IL-6, or IFN-gamma increased apelin expression by stimulation of apelin promoter activity, and blockade of Jak/Stat signaling abolished elevations in apelin promoter activity. A chromatin immunoprecipitation assay showed that IL-6 induced binding of phospho-Stat3 to a putative Stat3 site in the apelin promoter; mutation of this site abrogated the LPS-induced elevation in apelin promoter activity. Together, our findings indicate that binding of phospho-Stat3 to the apelin promoter is the final step underlying proinflammatory cytokine-induced enteric apelin expression during intestinal inflammation. PMID:18818315

  18. Ligand Binding Induces Conformational Changes in Human Cellular Retinol-binding Protein 1 (CRBP1) Revealed by Atomic Resolution Crystal Structures.

    PubMed

    Silvaroli, Josie A; Arne, Jason M; Chelstowska, Sylwia; Kiser, Philip D; Banerjee, Surajit; Golczak, Marcin

    2016-04-15

    Important in regulating the uptake, storage, and metabolism of retinoids, cellular retinol-binding protein 1 (CRBP1) is essential for trafficking vitamin A through the cytoplasm. However, the molecular details of ligand uptake and targeted release by CRBP1 remain unclear. Here we report the first structure of CRBP1 in a ligand-free form as well as ultra-high resolution structures of this protein bound to either all-trans-retinol or retinylamine, the latter a therapeutic retinoid that prevents light-induced retinal degeneration. Superpositioning of human apo- and holo-CRBP1 revealed major differences within segments surrounding the entrance to the retinoid-binding site. These included α-helix II and hairpin turns between β-strands βC-βD and βE-βF as well as several side chains, such as Phe-57, Tyr-60, and Ile-77, that change their orientations to accommodate the ligand. Additionally, we mapped hydrogen bond networks inside the retinoid-binding cavity and demonstrated their significance for the ligand affinity. Analyses of the crystallographic B-factors indicated several regions with higher backbone mobility in the apoprotein that became more rigid upon retinoid binding. This conformational flexibility of human apo-CRBP1 facilitates interaction with the ligands, whereas the more rigid holoprotein structure protects the labile retinoid moiety during vitamin A transport. These findings suggest a mechanism of induced fit upon ligand binding by mammalian cellular retinol-binding proteins. PMID:26900151

  19. Binding of (-)-epigallocatechin-3-gallate with thermally-induced bovine serum albumin/ι-carrageenan particles.

    PubMed

    Li, Jinbing; Wang, Xiaoyong

    2015-02-01

    Novel thermally-induced BSA/ι-carrageenan particles are used as a protective carrier for (-)-epigallocatechin-3-gallate (EGCG). The addition of EGCG to BSA/ι-carrageenan particles can highly quench the intrinsic fluorescence of BSA, which is explained in terms of the binding of EGCG to the hydrophobic pockets of BSA mainly through the hydrophobic force. According to the double logarithm equation, the binding constant is determined as 1.1×10(8)M(-1) for the binding of EGCG with BSA/ι-carrageenan particles. The high binding affinity is ascribed to both the molecular structure of EGCG and the partial unfolding state of BSA in BSA/ι-carrageenan particles. The circular dichroism spectra and calculated α-helix of BSA suggest that the bound EGCG leads to a more random secondary structure of BSA. Furthermore, BSA/ι-carrageenan particles are found to be superior to native BSA and pure BSA particles for improving the stability and radical scavenging activity of EGCG. PMID:25172749

  20. DNA-binding activity of TNF-{alpha} inducing protein from Helicobacter pylori

    SciTech Connect

    Kuzuhara, T. Suganuma, M.; Oka, K.; Fujiki, H.

    2007-11-03

    Tumor necrosis factor-{alpha} (TNF-{alpha}) inducing protein (Tip{alpha}) is a carcinogenic factor secreted from Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori), mediated through both enhanced expression of TNF-{alpha} and chemokine genes and activation of nuclear factor-{kappa}B. Since Tip{alpha} enters gastric cancer cells, the Tip{alpha} binding molecules in the cells should be investigated. The direct DNA-binding activity of Tip{alpha} was observed by pull down assay using single- and double-stranded genomic DNA cellulose. The surface plasmon resonance assay, indicating an association between Tip{alpha} and DNA, revealed that the affinity of Tip{alpha} for (dGdC)10 is 2400 times stronger than that of del-Tip{alpha}, an inactive Tip{alpha}. This suggests a strong correlation between DNA-binding activity and carcinogenic activity of Tip{alpha}. And the DNA-binding activity of Tip{alpha} was first demonstrated with a molecule secreted from H. pylori.

  1. Staphylococcal enterotoxin induced mitogenesis: toxin binding and cell-cell interactions.

    PubMed

    Buxser, E S; Bonventre, P F; Archer, D L

    1983-07-01

    The binding characteristics of 125I-labelled staphylococcal enterotoxin A (125I-SEA), a T-cell mitogen, to murine lymphoid cell subpopulations were analyzed. Both T- and B-lymphocytes from murine spleens possess specific binding sites for SEA, as do T-lymphocytes from thymus. B-lymphocytes appear to have a greater capacity for binding of 125-SEA than do T-lymphocytes from either thymus or spleen. Enterotoxin did not specifically bind to thioglycollate-induced peritoneal exudate cells (PECs), used as a source of macrophages. Adherent PECs however, incorporated 125-ISEA by fluid phase endocytosis. When exposed to SEA and thoroughly washed, macrophages stimulate lymphocyte mitogenesis in spleen or thymus cell cultures not directly exposed to toxin. Maximum mitogenic stimulation took place only when both PECs and lymphocytes were exposed to SEA. The presence of splenic B-lymphocytes enhanced the mitogenic response of thymus derived T-cells to SEA. Thus, B-lymphocytes appear to contribute to SEA mitogenesis. These data suggest that mitogenic stimulation and possibly other immunological phenomena associated with SEA occur as a result of complex interactions between cellular components of the immune system. PMID:6605472

  2. Binding-Induced DNA Nanomachines Triggered by Proteins and Nucleic Acids.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Hongquan; Lai, Maode; Zuehlke, Albert; Peng, Hanyong; Li, Xing-Fang; Le, X Chris

    2015-11-23

    We introduce the concept and operation of a binding-induced DNA nanomachine that can be activated by proteins and nucleic acids. This new type of nanomachine harnesses specific target binding to trigger assembly of separate DNA components that are otherwise unable to spontaneously assemble. Three-dimensional DNA tracks of high density are constructed on gold nanoparticles functionalized with hundreds of single-stranded oligonucleotides and tens of an affinity ligand. A DNA swing arm, free in solution, is linked to a second affinity ligand. Binding of a target molecule to the two ligands brings the swing arm to AuNP and initiates autonomous, stepwise movement of the swing arm around the AuNP surface. The movement of the swing arm, powered by enzymatic cleavage of conjugated oligonucleotides, cleaves hundreds of oligonucleotides in response to a single binding event. We demonstrate three nanomachines that are specifically activated by streptavidin, platelet-derived growth factor, and the Smallpox gene. Substituting the ligands enables the nanomachine to respond to other molecules. The new nanomachines have several unique and advantageous features over DNA nanomachines that rely on DNA self-assembly. PMID:26457803

  3. Specific binding of acrosome-reaction-inducing substance to the head of starfish spermatozoa.

    PubMed

    Ushiyama, A; Araki, T; Chiba, K; Hoshi, M

    1993-05-01

    In the starfish, spermatozoa undergo the acrosome reaction upon encountering the jelly coat of eggs. A highly sulphated glycoprotein in the jelly coat is called acrosome-reaction-inducing substance (ARIS) because it is the key signal molecule to trigger the acrosome reaction. The activity of ARIS is mainly attributed to its sulphate and saccharide residues. The extremely large molecular size and species-specific action of ARIS suggest the presence of a specific ARIS receptor on the sperm surface, but no experimental evidence for the receptor has been presented. We therefore measured specific binding of ARIS and its pronase digest (P-ARIS), which retains the full activity of ARIS, to homologous spermatozoa by using fluorescein-isothiocyanate-labelled ARIS and 125I-labelled P-ARIS, respectively. The spermatozoa had the ability to bind ARIS, as well as P-ARIS, specifically. The binding was species-specific and mostly localised to the head region of spermatozoa. Scatchard plot analysis indicated the presence of one class of ARIS receptor on the surface of acrosome-intact spermatozoa. Furthermore, the specific binding of P-ARIS to the anterior region of sperm heads was microscopically confirmed by using P-ARIS conjugated to polystyrene latex beads with intense fluorescence. It is concluded that starfish spermatozoa have a specific receptor for ARIS on the surface of the anterior region of heads. PMID:8081808

  4. Aptamer/target binding-induced triple helix forming for signal-on electrochemical biosensing.

    PubMed

    Mao, Yinfei; Liu, Jinquan; He, Dinggen; He, Xiaoxiao; Wang, Kemin; Shi, Hui; Wen, Li

    2015-10-01

    Owing to its diversified structures, high affinity, and specificity for binding a wide range of non-nucleic acid targets, aptamer is a useful molecular recognition tool for the design of various biosensors. Herein, we report a new signal-on electrochemical biosensing platform which is based on an aptamer/target binding-induced strand displacement and triple-helix forming. The biosensing platform is composed of a signal transduction probe (STP) modified with a methylene blue (MB) and a sulfhydryl group, a triplex-forming oligonucleotides probe (TFO) and a target specific aptamer probe (Apt). Through hybridization with the TFO probe and the Apt probe, the self-assembled STP on Au electrode via Au-S bonding keeps its rigid structure. The MB on the STP is distal to the Au electrode surface. It is eT off state. Target binding releases the Apt probe and liberates the end of the MB tagged STP to fold back and form a triplex-helix structure with TFO (STP/TFO/STP), allowing MB to approach the Au electrode surface and generating measurable electrochemical signals (eT ON). As test for the feasibility and universality of this signal-on electrochemical biosensing platform, two aptamers which bind to adenosine triphosphate (ATP) and human α-thrombin (Tmb), respectively, are selected as models. The detection limit of ATP was 7.2 nM, whereas the detection limit of Tmb was 0.86 nM. PMID:26078174

  5. Identification of an Aptamer Binding to Human Osteogenic-Induced Progenitor Cells

    PubMed Central

    Niederlaender, Jan; Aicher, Wilhelm K.; Reinert, Siegmar; Schweizer, Ernst; Wendel, Hans-Peter; Alexander, Dorothea

    2013-01-01

    The aim of this study was to generate a specific aptamer against human jaw periosteal cells (JPCs) for tissue engineering applications in oral and maxillofacial surgery. This aptamer should serve as a capture molecule to enrich or even purify osteogenic progenitor cells from JPCs or from adult stem cells of other sources. Using systematic evolution of ligands by exponential enrichment (SELEX), we generated the first aptamer to specifically bind to human osteogenically induced JPCs. We did not detect any binding of the aptamer to undifferentiated JPCs, adipogenically and chondrogenically induced JPCs, or to any other cell line tested. However, similar binding patterns of the identified aptamer 74 were detected with mesenchymal stromal cells (MSCs) derived from placental tissue and bone marrow. After cell sorting, we analyzed the expression of osteogenic marker genes in the aptamer 74-positive and aptamer 74-negative fractions and detected no significant differences. Additionally, the analysis of the mineralization capacity revealed a slight tendency for the aptamer positive fraction to have a higher osteogenic potential. In terms of proliferation, JPCs growing in aptamer-coated wells showed increased proliferation rates compared with the controls. Herein, we report the development of an innovative approach for tissue engineering applications. Further studies should be conducted to modify and improve the specificity of the generated aptamer. PMID:23289534

  6. Kindlin-2 cooperates with talin to activate integrins and induces cell spreading by directly binding paxillin

    PubMed Central

    Theodosiou, Marina; Widmaier, Moritz; Böttcher, Ralph T; Rognoni, Emanuel; Veelders, Maik; Bharadwaj, Mitasha; Lambacher, Armin; Austen, Katharina; Müller, Daniel J; Zent, Roy; Fässler, Reinhard

    2016-01-01

    Integrins require an activation step prior to ligand binding and signaling. How talin and kindlin contribute to these events in non-hematopoietic cells is poorly understood. Here we report that fibroblasts lacking either talin or kindlin failed to activate β1 integrins, adhere to fibronectin (FN) or maintain their integrins in a high affinity conformation induced by Mn2+. Despite compromised integrin activation and adhesion, Mn2+ enabled talin- but not kindlin-deficient cells to initiate spreading on FN. This isotropic spreading was induced by the ability of kindlin to directly bind paxillin, which in turn bound focal adhesion kinase (FAK) resulting in FAK activation and the formation of lamellipodia. Our findings show that talin and kindlin cooperatively activate integrins leading to FN binding and adhesion, and that kindlin subsequently assembles an essential signaling node at newly formed adhesion sites in a talin-independent manner. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.10130.001 PMID:26821125

  7. Peptidyl Prolyl Isomerase PIN1 Directly Binds to and Stabilizes Hypoxia-Inducible Factor-1α.

    PubMed

    Han, Hyeong-Jun; Kwon, Nayoung; Choi, Min-A; Jung, Kyung Oh; Piao, Juan-Yu; Ngo, Hoang Kieu Chi; Kim, Su-Jung; Kim, Do-Hee; Chung, June-Key; Cha, Young-Nam; Youn, Hyewon; Choi, Bu Young; Min, Sang-Hyun; Surh, Young-Joon

    2016-01-01

    Peptidyl prolyl isomerase (PIN1) regulates the functional activity of a subset of phosphoproteins through binding to phosphorylated Ser/Thr-Pro motifs and subsequently isomerization of the phosphorylated bonds. Interestingly, PIN1 is overexpressed in many types of malignancies including breast, prostate, lung and colon cancers. However, its oncogenic functions have not been fully elucidated. Here, we report that PIN1 directly interacts with hypoxia-inducible factor (HIF)-1α in human colon cancer (HCT116) cells. PIN1 binding to HIF-1α occurred in a phosphorylation-dependent manner. We also found that PIN1 interacted with HIF-1α at both exogenous and endogenous levels. Notably, PIN1 binding stabilized the HIF-1α protein, given that their levels were significantly increased under hypoxic conditions. The stabilization of HIF-1α resulted in increased transcriptional activity, consequently upregulating expression of vascular endothelial growth factor, a major contributor to angiogenesis. Silencing of PIN1 or pharmacologic inhibition of its activity abrogated the angiogenesis. By utilizing a bioluminescence imaging technique, we were able to demonstrate that PIN1 inhibition dramatically reduced the tumor volume in a subcutaneous mouse xenograft model and angiogenesis as well as hypoxia-induced transcriptional activity of HIF-1α. These results suggest that PIN1 interacting with HIF-1α is a potential cancer chemopreventive and therapeutic target. PMID:26784107

  8. Peptidyl Prolyl Isomerase PIN1 Directly Binds to and Stabilizes Hypoxia-Inducible Factor-1α

    PubMed Central

    Han, Hyeong-jun; Kwon, Nayoung; Choi, Min-A; Jung, Kyung Oh; Piao, Juan-Yu; Ngo, Hoang Kieu Chi; Kim, Su-Jung; Kim, Do-Hee; Chung, June-Key; Cha, Young-Nam; Youn, Hyewon; Choi, Bu Young; Min, Sang-Hyun; Surh, Young-Joon

    2016-01-01

    Peptidyl prolyl isomerase (PIN1) regulates the functional activity of a subset of phosphoproteins through binding to phosphorylated Ser/Thr-Pro motifs and subsequently isomerization of the phosphorylated bonds. Interestingly, PIN1 is overexpressed in many types of malignancies including breast, prostate, lung and colon cancers. However, its oncogenic functions have not been fully elucidated. Here, we report that PIN1 directly interacts with hypoxia-inducible factor (HIF)-1α in human colon cancer (HCT116) cells. PIN1 binding to HIF-1α occurred in a phosphorylation-dependent manner. We also found that PIN1 interacted with HIF-1α at both exogenous and endogenous levels. Notably, PIN1 binding stabilized the HIF-1α protein, given that their levels were significantly increased under hypoxic conditions. The stabilization of HIF-1α resulted in increased transcriptional activity, consequently upregulating expression of vascular endothelial growth factor, a major contributor to angiogenesis. Silencing of PIN1 or pharmacologic inhibition of its activity abrogated the angiogenesis. By utilizing a bioluminescence imaging technique, we were able to demonstrate that PIN1 inhibition dramatically reduced the tumor volume in a subcutaneous mouse xenograft model and angiogenesis as well as hypoxia-induced transcriptional activity of HIF-1α. These results suggest that PIN1 interacting with HIF-1α is a potential cancer chemopreventive and therapeutic target. PMID:26784107

  9. BINDING OF POLYCHLORINATED BIPHENYLS CLASSIFIED AS EITHER PHENOBARBITONE-, 3-METHYLCHOLANTHRENE- OR MIXED-TYPE INDUCERS TO CYTOSOLIC AH RECEPTOR

    EPA Science Inventory

    It has been postulated that reversible, high-affinity binding of 3-methyl-cholanthrene (MC)-type inducers to a receptor protein (the Ah receptor) in hepatic cytosol is essential for induction of aryl hydrocarbon hydroxylase (AHH) enzymic activity. To test this postulate, the bind...

  10. IFN-induced Guanylate Binding Proteins in Inflammasome Activation and Host Defense

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Bae-Hoon; Chee, Jonathan D.; Bradfield, Clinton J.; Park, Eui-Soon; Kumar, Pradeep; MacMicking, John D.

    2016-01-01

    Traditional views of the inflammasome highlight pre-existing core components being assembled under basal conditions shortly after infection or tissue damage. Recent work, however, suggests the inflammasome machinery is also subject to tunable or inducible signals that may accelerate its autocatalytic properties and dictate where inflammasome assembly takes place in the cell. Many of these immune signals operate downstream of interferon (IFN) receptors to elicit inflammasome regulators, including a new family of IFN-induced GTPases termed guanylate binding proteins (GBPs). Here, we examine the critical roles for IFN-induced GBPs in directing inflammasome subtype-specific responses and their consequences for cell-autonomous immunity against a wide variety of microbial pathogens. We discuss emerging mechanisms of action and the potential impact of these GBPs on predisposition to sepsis and other infectious or inflammatory diseases. PMID:27092805

  11. Inhibition of peptide binding to DR molecules by a leupeptin-induced invariant chain fragment.

    PubMed

    Demotz, S; Danieli, C; Wallny, H J; Majdic, O

    1994-08-01

    Loading of peptides onto DR molecules was studied by characterizing precursors of the mature peptide-DR complexes expressed at the surface of B cells. Since invariant chain (Ii) prevents binding of peptides by DR molecules, it was speculated that analysis of complexes between DR heterodimers and proteolytic fragments of Ii offers the possibility to examine how DR molecules and peptides assemble. Using a procedure combining a two-step affinity chromatography and gel filtration, we isolated from leupeptin-treated B cells complexes between DR molecules and N-terminal Ii fragments previously called "leupeptin-induced polypeptides" (LIP; Blum and Cresswell, 1988, Proc. natn. Acad. Sci. U.S.A. 85, 3975-3979). It was observed that the most prominent LIP fragment has a relative molecular mass (M(r)) of 16 kDa. In addition, we show that this polypeptide species does not bear N-linked glycans, indicating that this fragment does not extend beyond residue 129 of Ii. Similarly to DR alpha beta heterodimers associated with the full length 33 and 35 kDa Ii forms, DR alpha beta heterodimers associated with LIP fragments are unstable in sodium dodecyl sulfate (SDS) at ambient temperature, whereas mature DR alpha beta heterodimers are resistant to dissociation with SDS. These results are indirect evidence that LIP-DR complexes are devoid of bound peptides. This possibility was supported by showing that LIP-DR complexes fail to bind a radioiodinated tetanus toxin peptide (125I-p2), while DR molecules, which are spontaneously released from complexes with LIP fragments, bind the labeled peptide. These results demonstrate that association with LIP fragments is sufficient to prevent binding of peptides by DR molecules. This notion was further documented by showing that binding of 125I-p2 on DR heterodimers is inhibited by preparations of LIP fragment. By contrast, a soluble recombinant fragment corresponding to the extracytoplasmic region of Ii did not block 125I-p2 binding. The results

  12. Morphological damage induced by Escherichia coli lipopolysaccharide in cultured hepatocytes: localization and binding properties.

    PubMed Central

    Pagani, R.; Portolés, M. T.; Díaz-Laviada, I.; Municio, A. M.

    1988-01-01

    Lipopolysaccharides (LPS) from Gram-negative bacteria are considered to be the responsible agents for the induction of endotoxic shock, affecting the liver as a target organ. In this study, the cell morphology and some biochemical properties of 24 h-culture-hepatocyte monolayers treated with Escherichia coli 0111:B4 lipopolysaccharide, were observed. Cell morphology was observed by scanning electron microscopy and immunofluorescence methods. LPS interaction induced an increase in rounded cells with diminished adhesion capacity. As biochemical parameters, albumin synthesis and 2-deoxyglucose uptake were measured. LPS decreased the hexose uptake in a dose-dependent manner. Binding of (14C)LPS to cultured hepatocytes showed that LPS binds to non-specific constituents of the membrane bilayer. Images Fig. 1 Fig. 2 Fig. 3 Fig. 7 PMID:3052562

  13. Binding of biological effectors on magnetic nanoparticles measured by a magnetically induced transient birefringence experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wilhelm, C.; Gazeau, F.; Roger, J.; Pons, J. N.; Salis, M. F.; Perzynski, R.; Bacri, J. C.

    2002-03-01

    We have investigated the relaxation of the magnetically induced birefringence in a suspension of magnetic nanoparticles in order to detect the binding reaction of polyclonal antibodies on the particle surface. The birefringence relaxation is driven by the rotational diffusion of the complex formed by the magnetic nanoparticles bound to the antibody and thus is directly related to the hydrodynamic size of this complex. Birefringence relaxations are well described by stretched exponential laws revealing a polydisperse distribution of hydrodynamic diameters. Comparing the size distribution of samples with different initial ratios of immunoglobuline added per magnetic nanoparticles, we evidence the graft of an antibody on particle and eventually the onset of particles agregation. Measurements on samples separated in size by gel filtration demonstrate the robustness of our experiment for the determination of size distribution and its modification due to the adsorption of a macromolecule. The immunoglobuline binding assay is performed comparatively for ionic magnetic nanoparticles with different coatings.

  14. Cold inducible RNA binding protein upregulation in pituitary corticotroph adenoma induces corticotroph cell proliferation via Erk signaling pathway

    PubMed Central

    Fu, Wei; Tang, Hao; Chen, Xiao; Zhao, Yao; Zheng, Lili; Pan, Sijian; Wang, Weiqing; Bian, Liuguan; Sun, Qingfang

    2016-01-01

    Cushing's disease is caused by pituitary corticotroph adenoma, and the pathogenesis of it has remained obscure. Here, we showed that cold inducible RNA binding protein (CIRP) was markedly elevated in corticotroph tumors. Forced overexpression of CIRP in murine AtT20 pituitary corticotroph cell line increased corticotroph precursor hormone proopiomelanocortin (POMC) transcription, ACTH secretion and cellular proliferation. In vivo, CIRP overexpression promotes murine corticotroph tumor growth and enhances ACTH production. Mechanistically, we show that CIRP could promote AtT20 cells proliferation by inducing cyclinD1 and decreasing p27 expression via Erk1/2 signaling pathway. Clinically, CIRP overexpression is significantly correlated with Cushing's disease recurrence. CIRP appears to play a critical tumorigenesis function in Cushing's disease and its expression might be a useful biomarker for tumor recurrence. PMID:26824322

  15. Binding Component of Clostridium perfringens Iota-Toxin Induces Endocytosis in Vero Cells

    PubMed Central

    Nagahama, Masahiro; Nagayasu, Koichi; Kobayashi, Keiko; Sakurai, Jun

    2002-01-01

    Clostridium perfringens iota-toxin is a binary toxin consisting of two individual proteins, the binding component (Ib) and the enzyme component (Ia). Wild-type Ib bound to Vero cells at 4 and 37°C and formed oligomers at 37°C but not at 4°C. The Ib-induced K+ release from the cells was dependent on the oligomer formation of Ib in the cells, but the oligomer formation did not induce rounding activity or cytotoxicity. After incubation of the cells with recombinant Ib (rIb) at 37°C, the Ib oligomer in the cell became resistant to pronase treatment with time, but the Ib monomer was sensitive to the treatment. Furthermore, treatment of Vero cells with rIb in the presence of bafilomycin, methylamine, or ethylamine resulted in accumulation of the oligomer in the cells but had no effect on K+ release. Moreover, incubation with Ib plus Ia in the presence of these agents caused no rounding in the cells. These observations suggest that Ib binds to Vero cells, itself oligomerizing to form ion-permeable channels and that the formation of oligomer then induces endocytosis. PMID:11895954

  16. Induced circular dichroism as a tool to investigate the binding of drugs to carrier proteins: Classic approaches and new trends.

    PubMed

    Tedesco, Daniele; Bertucci, Carlo

    2015-09-10

    Induced circular dichroism (ICD) is a spectroscopic phenomenon that provides versatile and useful methods for characterizing the structural and dynamic properties of the binding of drugs to target proteins. The understanding of biorecognition processes at the molecular level is essential to discover and validate new pharmacological targets, and to design and develop new potent and selective drugs. The present article reviews the main applications of ICD to drug binding studies on serum carrier proteins, going from the classic approaches for the derivation of drug binding parameters and the identification of binding sites, to an overview of the emerging trends for the characterization of binding modes by means of quantum chemical (QC) techniques. The advantages and limits of the ICD methods for the determination of binding parameters are critically reviewed; the capability to investigate the binding interactions of drugs and metabolites to their target proteins is also underlined, as well as the possibility of characterizing the binding sites to obtain a complete picture of the binding mechanism and dynamics. The new applications of ICD methods to identify stereoselective binding modes of drug/protein complexes are then reviewed with relevant examples. The combined application of experimental ICD spectroscopy and QC calculations is shown to identify qualitatively the bound conformations of ligands to target proteins even in the absence of a detailed structure of the binding sites, either obtained from experimental X-ray crystallography and NMR measurements or from computational models of the complex. PMID:25769668

  17. Effect of fullerenol surface chemistry on nanoparticle binding-induced protein misfolding

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Radic, Slaven; Nedumpully-Govindan, Praveen; Chen, Ran; Salonen, Emppu; Brown, Jared M.; Ke, Pu Chun; Ding, Feng

    2014-06-01

    Fullerene and its derivatives with different surface chemistry have great potential in biomedical applications. Accordingly, it is important to delineate the impact of these carbon-based nanoparticles on protein structure, dynamics, and subsequently function. Here, we focused on the effect of hydroxylation -- a common strategy for solubilizing and functionalizing fullerene -- on protein-nanoparticle interactions using a model protein, ubiquitin. We applied a set of complementary computational modeling methods, including docking and molecular dynamics simulations with both explicit and implicit solvent, to illustrate the impact of hydroxylated fullerenes on the structure and dynamics of ubiquitin. We found that all derivatives bound to the model protein. Specifically, the more hydrophilic nanoparticles with a higher number of hydroxyl groups bound to the surface of the protein via hydrogen bonds, which stabilized the protein without inducing large conformational changes in the protein structure. In contrast, fullerene derivatives with a smaller number of hydroxyl groups buried their hydrophobic surface inside the protein, thereby causing protein denaturation. Overall, our results revealed a distinct role of surface chemistry on nanoparticle-protein binding and binding-induced protein misfolding.Fullerene and its derivatives with different surface chemistry have great potential in biomedical applications. Accordingly, it is important to delineate the impact of these carbon-based nanoparticles on protein structure, dynamics, and subsequently function. Here, we focused on the effect of hydroxylation -- a common strategy for solubilizing and functionalizing fullerene -- on protein-nanoparticle interactions using a model protein, ubiquitin. We applied a set of complementary computational modeling methods, including docking and molecular dynamics simulations with both explicit and implicit solvent, to illustrate the impact of hydroxylated fullerenes on the structure and

  18. A novel prohibitin-binding compound induces the mitochondrial apoptotic pathway through NOXA and BIM upregulation.

    PubMed

    Moncunill-Massaguer, Cristina; Saura-Esteller, José; Pérez-Perarnau, Alba; Palmeri, Claudia Mariela; Núñez-Vázquez, Sonia; Cosialls, Ana M; González-Gironès, Diana M; Pomares, Helena; Korwitz, Anne; Preciado, Sara; Albericio, Fernando; Lavilla, Rodolfo; Pons, Gabriel; Langer, Thomas; Iglesias-Serret, Daniel; Gil, Joan

    2015-12-01

    We previously described diaryl trifluorothiazoline compound 1a (hereafter referred to as fluorizoline) as a first-in-class small molecule that induces p53-independent apoptosis in a wide range of tumor cell lines. Fluorizoline directly binds to prohibitin 1 and 2 (PHBs), two proteins involved in the regulation of several cellular processes, including apoptosis. Here we demonstrate that fluorizoline-induced apoptosis is mediated by PHBs, as cells depleted of these proteins are highly resistant to fluorizoline treatment. In addition, BAX and BAK are necessary for fluorizoline-induced cytotoxic effects, thereby proving that apoptosis occurs through the intrinsic pathway. Expression analysis revealed that fluorizoline induced the upregulation of Noxa and Bim mRNA levels, which was not observed in PHB-depleted MEFs. Finally, Noxa(-/-)/Bim(-/-) MEFs and NOXA-downregulated HeLa cells were resistant to fluorizoline-induced apoptosis. All together, these findings show that fluorizoline requires PHBs to execute the mitochondrial apoptotic pathway. PMID:26497683

  19. Autophosphorylation and Pin1 binding coordinate DNA damage-induced HIPK2 activation and cell death.

    PubMed

    Bitomsky, Nadja; Conrad, Elisa; Moritz, Christian; Polonio-Vallon, Tilman; Sombroek, Dirk; Schultheiss, Kathrin; Glas, Carolina; Greiner, Vera; Herbel, Christoph; Mantovani, Fiamma; del Sal, Giannino; Peri, Francesca; Hofmann, Thomas G

    2013-11-01

    Excessive genome damage activates the apoptosis response. Protein kinase HIPK2 is a key regulator of DNA damage-induced apoptosis. Here, we deciphered the molecular mechanism of HIPK2 activation and show its relevance for DNA damage-induced apoptosis in cellulo and in vivo. HIPK2 autointeracts and site-specifically autophosphorylates upon DNA damage at Thr880/Ser882. Autophosphorylation regulates HIPK2 activity and mutation of the phosphorylation-acceptor sites deregulates p53 Ser46 phosphorylation and apoptosis in cellulo. Moreover, HIPK2 autophosphorylation is conserved between human and zebrafish and is important for DNA damage-induced apoptosis in vivo. Mechanistically, autophosphorylation creates a binding signal for the phospho-specific isomerase Pin1. Pin1 links HIPK2 activation to its stabilization by inhibiting HIPK2 polyubiquitination and modulating Siah-1-HIPK2 interaction. Concordantly, Pin1 is required for DNA damage-induced HIPK2 stabilization and p53 Ser46 phosphorylation and is essential for induction of apotosis both in cellulo and in zebrafish. Our results identify an evolutionary conserved mechanism regulating DNA damage-induced apoptosis. PMID:24145406

  20. Cold-inducible RNA-binding protein causes endothelial dysfunction via activation of Nlrp3 inflammasome

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Weng-Lang; Sharma, Archna; Wang, Zhimin; Li, Zhigang; Fan, Jie; Wang, Ping

    2016-01-01

    Cold-inducible RNA-binding protein (CIRP) is a damage-associated molecular pattern (DAMP) molecule which stimulates proinflammatory cytokine release in hemorrhage and sepsis. Under these medical conditions, disruption of endothelial homeostasis and barrier integrity, typically induced by proinflammatory cytokines, is an important factor contributing to morbidity and mortality. However, the role of CIRP in causing endothelial dysfunction has not been investigated. In this study, we show that intravenous injection of recombinant murine CIRP (rmCIRP) in C57BL/6 mice causes lung injury, evidenced by vascular leakage, edema, increased leukocyte infiltration and cytokine production in the lung tissue. The CIRP-induced lung damage is accompanied with endothelial cell (EC) activation marked by upregulation of cell-surface adhesion molecules E-selectin and ICAM-1. Using in vitro primary mouse lung vascular ECs (MLVECs), we demonstrate that rmCIRP treatment directly increases the ICAM-1 protein expression and activates NAD(P)H oxidase in MLVECs. Importantly, CIRP stimulates the assembly and activation of Nlrp3 inflammasome in MLVECs accompanied with caspase-1 activation, IL-1β release and induction of proinflammatory cell death pyroptosis. Finally, our study demonstrates CIRP-induced EC pyroptosis in the lungs of C57BL/6 mice for the first time. Taken together, the released CIRP in shock can directly activate ECs and induce EC pyroptosis to cause lung injury. PMID:27217302

  1. A novel prohibitin-binding compound induces the mitochondrial apoptotic pathway through NOXA and BIM upregulation

    PubMed Central

    Moncunill-Massaguer, Cristina; Saura-Esteller, José; Pérez-Perarnau, Alba; Palmeri, Claudia Mariela; Núñez-Vázquez, Sonia; Cosialls, Ana M.; González-Gironès, Diana M.; Pomares, Helena; Korwitz, Anne; Preciado, Sara; Albericio, Fernando; Lavilla, Rodolfo; Pons, Gabriel; Langer, Thomas; Iglesias-Serret, Daniel; Gil, Joan

    2015-01-01

    We previously described diaryl trifluorothiazoline compound 1a (hereafter referred to as fluorizoline) as a first-in-class small molecule that induces p53-independent apoptosis in a wide range of tumor cell lines. Fluorizoline directly binds to prohibitin 1 and 2 (PHBs), two proteins involved in the regulation of several cellular processes, including apoptosis. Here we demonstrate that fluorizoline-induced apoptosis is mediated by PHBs, as cells depleted of these proteins are highly resistant to fluorizoline treatment. In addition, BAX and BAK are necessary for fluorizoline-induced cytotoxic effects, thereby proving that apoptosis occurs through the intrinsic pathway. Expression analysis revealed that fluorizoline induced the upregulation of Noxa and Bim mRNA levels, which was not observed in PHB-depleted MEFs. Finally, Noxa−/−/Bim−/− MEFs and NOXA-downregulated HeLa cells were resistant to fluorizoline-induced apoptosis. All together, these findings show that fluorizoline requires PHBs to execute the mitochondrial apoptotic pathway. PMID:26497683

  2. Cold-inducible RNA-binding protein causes endothelial dysfunction via activation of Nlrp3 inflammasome.

    PubMed

    Yang, Weng-Lang; Sharma, Archna; Wang, Zhimin; Li, Zhigang; Fan, Jie; Wang, Ping

    2016-01-01

    Cold-inducible RNA-binding protein (CIRP) is a damage-associated molecular pattern (DAMP) molecule which stimulates proinflammatory cytokine release in hemorrhage and sepsis. Under these medical conditions, disruption of endothelial homeostasis and barrier integrity, typically induced by proinflammatory cytokines, is an important factor contributing to morbidity and mortality. However, the role of CIRP in causing endothelial dysfunction has not been investigated. In this study, we show that intravenous injection of recombinant murine CIRP (rmCIRP) in C57BL/6 mice causes lung injury, evidenced by vascular leakage, edema, increased leukocyte infiltration and cytokine production in the lung tissue. The CIRP-induced lung damage is accompanied with endothelial cell (EC) activation marked by upregulation of cell-surface adhesion molecules E-selectin and ICAM-1. Using in vitro primary mouse lung vascular ECs (MLVECs), we demonstrate that rmCIRP treatment directly increases the ICAM-1 protein expression and activates NAD(P)H oxidase in MLVECs. Importantly, CIRP stimulates the assembly and activation of Nlrp3 inflammasome in MLVECs accompanied with caspase-1 activation, IL-1β release and induction of proinflammatory cell death pyroptosis. Finally, our study demonstrates CIRP-induced EC pyroptosis in the lungs of C57BL/6 mice for the first time. Taken together, the released CIRP in shock can directly activate ECs and induce EC pyroptosis to cause lung injury. PMID:27217302

  3. Fusion proteins of HIV-1 envelope glycoprotein gp120 with CD4-induced antibodies showed enhanced binding to CD4 and CD4 binding site antibodies

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, Weizao; Feng, Yang; Wang, Yanping; Zhu, Zhongyu; Dimitrov, Dimiter S.

    2012-09-07

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Some recombinant HIV-1 gp120s do not preserve their conformations on gp140s. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer We hypothesize that CD4i antibodies could induce conformational changes in gp120. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer CD4i antibodies enhance binding of CD4 and CD4bs antibodies to gp120. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer CD4i antibody-gp120 fusion proteins could have potential as vaccine immunogens. -- Abstract: Development of successful AIDS vaccine immunogens continues to be a major challenge. One of the mechanisms by which HIV-1 evades antibody-mediated neutralizing responses is the remarkable conformational flexibility of its envelope glycoprotein (Env) gp120. Some recombinant gp120s do not preserve their conformations on gp140s and functional viral spikes, and exhibit decreased recognition by CD4 and neutralizing antibodies. CD4 binding induces conformational changes in gp120 leading to exposure of the coreceptor-binding site (CoRbs). In this study, we test our hypothesis that CD4-induced (CD4i) antibodies, which target the CoRbs, could also induce conformational changes in gp120 leading to better exposed conserved neutralizing antibody epitopes including the CD4-binding site (CD4bs). We found that a mixture of CD4i antibodies with gp120 only weakly enhanced CD4 binding. However, such interactions in single-chain fusion proteins resulted in gp120 conformations which bound to CD4 and CD4bs antibodies better than the original or mutagenically stabilized gp120s. Moreover, the two molecules in the fusion proteins synergized with each other in neutralizing HIV-1. Therefore, fusion proteins of gp120 with CD4i antibodies could have potential as components of HIV-1 vaccines and inhibitors of HIV-1 entry, and could be used as reagents to explore the conformational flexibility of gp120 and mechanisms of entry and immune evasion.

  4. La Piedad Michoacán Mexico Virus V protein antagonizes type I interferon response by binding STAT2 protein and preventing STATs nuclear translocation.

    PubMed

    Pisanelli, Giuseppe; Laurent-Rolle, Maudry; Manicassamy, Balaji; Belicha-Villanueva, Alan; Morrison, Juliet; Lozano-Dubernard, Bernardo; Castro-Peralta, Felipa; Iovane, Giuseppe; García-Sastre, Adolfo

    2016-02-01

    La Piedad Michoacán Mexico Virus (LPMV) is a member of the Rubulavirus genus within the Paramyxoviridae family. LPMV is the etiologic agent of "blue eye disease", causing a significant disease burden in swine in Mexico with long-term implications for the agricultural industry. This virus mainly affects piglets and is characterized by meningoencephalitis and respiratory distress. It also affects adult pigs, causing reduced fertility and abortions in females, and orchitis and epididymitis in males. Viruses of the Paramyxoviridae family evade the innate immune response by targeting components of the interferon (IFN) signaling pathway. The V protein, expressed by most paramyxoviruses, is a well-characterized IFN signaling antagonist. Until now, there were no reports on the role of the LPMV-V protein in inhibiting the IFN response. In this study we demonstrate that LPMV-V protein antagonizes type I but not type II IFN signaling by binding STAT2, a component of the type I IFN cascade. Our results indicate that the last 18 amino acids of LPMV-V protein are required for binding to STAT2 in human and swine cells. While LPMV-V protein does not affect the protein levels of STAT1 or STAT2, it does prevent the IFN-induced phosphorylation and nuclear translocation of STAT1 and STAT2 thereby inhibiting cellular responses to IFN α/β. PMID:26546155

  5. Protection against chemotherapy-induced alopecia: targeting ATP-binding cassette transporters in the hair follicle?

    PubMed

    Haslam, Iain S; Pitre, Aaron; Schuetz, John D; Paus, Ralf

    2013-11-01

    Currently, efficacious treatments for chemotherapy-induced alopecia (hair loss) are lacking, and incidences of permanent hair loss following high-dose chemotherapy are on the increase. In this article, we describe mechanisms by which the pharmacological defense status of the hair follicle might be enhanced, thereby reducing the accumulation of cytotoxic cancer drugs and preventing or reducing hair loss and damage. We believe this could be achieved via the selective increase in ATP-binding cassette (ABC) transporter expression within the hair follicle epithelium, following application of topical agonists for regulatory nuclear receptors. Clinical application would require the development of hair follicle-targeted formulations, potentially utilizing nanoparticle technology. This novel approach has the potential to yield entirely new therapeutic options for the treatment and management of chemotherapy-induced alopecia, providing significant psychological and physical benefit to cancer patients. PMID:24100054

  6. Dominant Driving Forces in Human Telomere Quadruplex Binding-Induced Structural Alterations

    PubMed Central

    Bončina, Matjaž; Hamon, Florian; Islam, Barira; Teulade-Fichou, Marie-Paule; Vesnaver, Gorazd; Haider, Shozeb; Lah, Jurij

    2015-01-01

    Recently various pathways of human telomere (ht) DNA folding into G-quadruplexes and of ligand binding to these structures have been proposed. However, the key issue as to the nature of forces driving the folding and recognition processes remains unanswered. In this study, structural changes of 22-mer ht-DNA fragment (Tel22), induced by binding of ions (K+, Na+) and specific bisquinolinium ligands, were monitored by calorimetric and spectroscopic methods and by gel electrophoresis. Using the global model analysis of a wide variety of experimental data, we were able to characterize the thermodynamic forces that govern the formation of stable Tel22 G-quadruplexes, folding intermediates, and ligand-quadruplex complexes, and then predict Tel22 behavior in aqueous solutions as a function of temperature, salt concentration, and ligand concentration. On the basis of the above, we believe that our work sets the framework for better understanding the heterogeneity of ht-DNA folding and binding pathways, and its structural polymorphism. PMID:26083930

  7. Cold-induced RNA-binding proteins regulate circadian gene expression by controlling alternative polyadenylation

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Yuting; Hu, Wenchao; Murakawa, Yasuhiro; Yin, Jingwen; Wang, Gang; Landthaler, Markus; Yan, Jun

    2013-01-01

    The body temperature is considered a universal cue by which the master clock synchronizes the peripheral clocks in mammals, but the mechanism is not fully understood. Here we identified two cold-induced RNA-binding proteins (RBPs), Cirbp and Rbm3, as important regulators for the temperature entrained circadian gene expression. The depletion of Cirbp or Rbm3 significantly reduced the amplitudes of core circadian genes. PAR-CLIP analyses showed that the 3′UTR binding sites of Cirbp and Rbm3 were significantly enriched near the polyadenylation sites (PASs). Furthermore, the depletion of Cirbp or Rbm3 shortened 3′UTR, whereas low temperature (upregulating Cirbp and Rbm3) lengthened 3′UTR. Remarkably, we found that they repressed the usage of proximal PASs by binding to the common 3′UTR, and many cases of proximal/distal PAS selection regulated by them showed strong circadian oscillations. Our results suggested that Cirbp and Rbm3 regulated the circadian gene expression by controlling alternative polyadenylation (APA). PMID:23792593

  8. Radiation-induced oxidative damage to the DNA-binding domain of the lactose repressor.

    PubMed

    Gillard, Nathalie; Goffinont, Stephane; Buré, Corinne; Davidkova, Marie; Maurizot, Jean-Claude; Cadene, Martine; Spotheim-Maurizot, Melanie

    2007-05-01

    Understanding the cellular effects of radiation-induced oxidation requires the unravelling of key molecular events, particularly damage to proteins with important cellular functions. The Escherichia coli lactose operon is a classical model of gene regulation systems. Its functional mechanism involves the specific binding of a protein, the repressor, to a specific DNA sequence, the operator. We have shown previously that upon irradiation with gamma-rays in solution, the repressor loses its ability to bind the operator. Water radiolysis generates hydroxyl radicals (OH* radicals) which attack the protein. Damage of the repressor DNA-binding domain, called the headpiece, is most likely to be responsible of this loss of function. Using CD, fluorescence spectroscopy and a combination of proteolytic cleavage with MS, we have examined the state of the irradiated headpiece. CD measurements revealed a dose-dependent conformational change involving metastable intermediate states. Fluorescence measurements showed a gradual degradation of tyrosine residues. MS was used to count the number of oxidations in different regions of the headpiece and to narrow down the parts of the sequence bearing oxidized residues. By calculating the relative probabilities of reaction of each amino acid with OH. radicals, we can predict the most probable oxidation targets. By comparing the experimental results with the predictions we conclude that Tyr7, Tyr12, Tyr17, Met42 and Tyr47 are the most likely hotspots of oxidation. The loss of repressor function is thus correlated with chemical modifications and conformational changes of the headpiece. PMID:17263689

  9. SMOC Binds to Pro-EGF, but Does Not Induce Erk Phosphorylation via the EGFR

    PubMed Central

    Thomas, J. Terrig; Chhuy-Hy, Lina; Andrykovich, Kristin R.; Moos, Malcolm

    2016-01-01

    In an attempt to identify the cell-associated protein(s) through which SMOC (Secreted Modular Calcium binding protein) induces mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) signaling, the epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) became a candidate. However, although in 32D/EGFR cells, the EGFR was phosphorylated in the presence of a commercially available human SMOC-1 (hSMOC-1), only minimal phosphorylation was observed in the presence of Xenopus SMOC-1 (XSMOC-1) or human SMOC-2. Analysis of the commercial hSMOC-1 product demonstrated the presence of pro-EGF as an impurity. When the pro-EGF was removed, only minimal EGFR activation was observed, indicating that SMOC does not signal primarily through EGFR and its receptor remains unidentified. Investigation of SMOC/pro-EGF binding affinity revealed a strong interaction that does not require the C-terminal extracellular calcium-binding (EC) domain of SMOC or the EGF domain of pro-EGF. SMOC does not appear to potentiate or inhibit MAPK signaling in response to pro-EGF, but the interaction could provide a mechanism for retaining soluble pro-EGF at the cell surface. PMID:27101391

  10. Dominant Driving Forces in Human Telomere Quadruplex Binding-Induced Structural Alterations.

    PubMed

    Bončina, Matjaž; Hamon, Florian; Islam, Barira; Teulade-Fichou, Marie-Paule; Vesnaver, Gorazd; Haider, Shozeb; Lah, Jurij

    2015-06-16

    Recently various pathways of human telomere (ht) DNA folding into G-quadruplexes and of ligand binding to these structures have been proposed. However, the key issue as to the nature of forces driving the folding and recognition processes remains unanswered. In this study, structural changes of 22-mer ht-DNA fragment (Tel22), induced by binding of ions (K(+), Na(+)) and specific bisquinolinium ligands, were monitored by calorimetric and spectroscopic methods and by gel electrophoresis. Using the global model analysis of a wide variety of experimental data, we were able to characterize the thermodynamic forces that govern the formation of stable Tel22 G-quadruplexes, folding intermediates, and ligand-quadruplex complexes, and then predict Tel22 behavior in aqueous solutions as a function of temperature, salt concentration, and ligand concentration. On the basis of the above, we believe that our work sets the framework for better understanding the heterogeneity of ht-DNA folding and binding pathways, and its structural polymorphism. PMID:26083930