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Sample records for inducible transcript mimicking

  1. Organelle-mimicking liposome dissociates G-quadruplexes and facilitates transcription

    PubMed Central

    Pramanik, Smritimoy; Tateishi-Karimata, Hisae; Sugimoto, Naoki

    2014-01-01

    Important biological reactions involving nucleic acids occur near the surface of membranes such as the nuclear membrane (NM) and rough endoplasmic reticulum (ER); however, the interactions between biomembranes and nucleic acids are poorly understood. We report here that transcription was facilitated in solution with liposomes, which mimic a biomembrane surface, relative to the reaction in a homogeneous aqueous solution when the template was able to form a G-quadruplex. The G-quadruplex is known to be an inhibitor of transcription, but the stability of the G-quadruplex was decreased at the liposome surface because of unfavourable enthalpy. The destabilization of the G-quadruplex was greater at the surface of NM- and ER-mimicking liposomes than at the surfaces of liposomes designed to mimic other organelles. Thermodynamic analyses revealed that the G-rich oligonucleotides adopted an extended structure at the liposome surface, whereas in solution the compact G-quadruplex was formed. Our data suggest that changes in structure and stability of nucleic acids regulate biological reactions at membrane surfaces. PMID:25336617

  2. Amiodarone-induced pulmonary toxicity mimicking acute pulmonary edema.

    PubMed

    Fabiani, Iacopo; Tacconi, Danilo; Grotti, Simone; Brandini, Rossella; Salvadori, Claudia; Caremani, Marcello; Bolognese, Leonardo

    2011-05-01

    Amiodarone is a highly effective antiarrhythmic drug. Its long-term use may, however, lead to several adverse effects, with pulmonary toxicity being the most serious. The article presents the case of a 78-year-old woman with a history of cardiac surgery, who after 2 years of amiodarone therapy for prophylactic treatment of atrial fibrillation developed amiodarone pneumonitis mimicking an acute pulmonary edema. The patient failed to respond to diuretic therapy and several courses of anti-infective therapy. Differential diagnosis of different causes of pulmonary infiltrates did not demonstrate any other abnormality. Lung biopsy findings were consistent with the diagnosis of amiodarone pneumonitis. Given the widespread use of amiodarone as an antiarrhythmic agent, pneumologists and cardiologists should consider this important adverse effect as a differential diagnosis of pulmonary distress refractory to therapy in all patients treated with amiodarone who present with respiratory symptoms and pneumonia-like illness. PMID:19924000

  3. Promoting natural killer cell functions by recombinant immunoligands mimicking an induced self phenotype

    PubMed Central

    Kellner, Christian; Gramatzki, Martin; Peipp, Matthias

    2013-01-01

    Immunoligands for stimulatory natural killer (NK)-cell receptors can be targeted to the surface of malignant cells by fusing them to antibody fragments. Mimicking an “induced-self” phenotype, such recombinant immunoligands signal danger, trigger NK-cell cytotoxicity and synergistically enhance antibody-dependent cellular cytotoxicity. These findings may be translated into novel immunotherapeutic approaches against cancer. PMID:23894708

  4. Notch signaling represses hypoxia-inducible factor-1α-induced activation of Wnt/β-catenin signaling in osteoblasts under cobalt-mimicked hypoxia

    PubMed Central

    LI, CHEN-TIAN; LIU, JIAN-XIU; YU, BO; LIU, RUI; DONG, CHAO; LI, SONG-JIAN

    2016-01-01

    The modification of Wnt and Notch signaling pathways by hypoxia, and its association with osteoblast proliferation and apoptosis remain to be fully elucidated. To investigate Wnt-Notch crosstalk, and its role in hypoxia-induced osteoblast proliferation and apoptosis regulation, the present study investigated the effects of cobalt-mimicked hypoxia on the mouse pre-osteoblast-like cell line, MC3T3-E1, when the Notch signals were repressed using a γ-secretase inhibitor DAPT. The data showed that the cobalt-mimicked hypoxia suppressed cell proliferation under normal conditions, but increased cell proliferation under conditions of Notch repression, in a concentration-dependent manner. The results of western blot and reverse transcription-quantitative polymerase chain reaction analyses showed that the cobalt treatment increased the levels of activated β-catenin protein and the expression levels of the target genes, axis inhibition protein 2 and myelocytomatosis oncogene, under DAPT-induced Notch repression. However, no significant changes were found in the expression levels of the Notch intracellular domain protein or the Notch target gene, hes1. In a β-catenin gene-knockdown experiment, the proliferation of the MC3T3-E1 cells under hypoxia were decreased by DAPT treatment, and knockdown of the expression of hypoxia-inducible factor-1α (HIF-1α) suppressed the cobalt-induced increase in Wnt target gene levels. No significant difference in cell proliferation rate was found following DAPT treatment when the expression of HIF-1α was knocked down. The results of the present study showed the opposing effects of Wnt and Notch signaling under cobalt-mimicked hypoxia, which were partially regulated by HIF-1α, The results also showed that osteoblast proliferation was dependent on Wnt-Notch signal crosstalk. PMID:27220406

  5. Myc Depletion Induces a Pluripotent Dormant State Mimicking Diapause.

    PubMed

    Scognamiglio, Roberta; Cabezas-Wallscheid, Nina; Thier, Marc Christian; Altamura, Sandro; Reyes, Alejandro; Prendergast, Áine M; Baumgärtner, Daniel; Carnevalli, Larissa S; Atzberger, Ann; Haas, Simon; von Paleske, Lisa; Boroviak, Thorsten; Wörsdörfer, Philipp; Essers, Marieke A G; Kloz, Ulrich; Eisenman, Robert N; Edenhofer, Frank; Bertone, Paul; Huber, Wolfgang; van der Hoeven, Franciscus; Smith, Austin; Trumpp, Andreas

    2016-02-11

    Mouse embryonic stem cells (ESCs) are maintained in a naive ground state of pluripotency in the presence of MEK and GSK3 inhibitors. Here, we show that ground-state ESCs express low Myc levels. Deletion of both c-myc and N-myc (dKO) or pharmacological inhibition of Myc activity strongly decreases transcription, splicing, and protein synthesis, leading to proliferation arrest. This process is reversible and occurs without affecting pluripotency, suggesting that Myc-depleted stem cells enter a state of dormancy similar to embryonic diapause. Indeed, c-Myc is depleted in diapaused blastocysts, and the differential expression signatures of dKO ESCs and diapaused epiblasts are remarkably similar. Following Myc inhibition, pre-implantation blastocysts enter biosynthetic dormancy but can progress through their normal developmental program after transfer into pseudo-pregnant recipients. Our study shows that Myc controls the biosynthetic machinery of stem cells without affecting their potency, thus regulating their entry and exit from the dormant state. PMID:26871632

  6. Myc Depletion Induces a Pluripotent Dormant State Mimicking Diapause

    PubMed Central

    Scognamiglio, Roberta; Cabezas-Wallscheid, Nina; Thier, Marc Christian; Altamura, Sandro; Reyes, Alejandro; Prendergast, Áine M.; Baumgärtner, Daniel; Carnevalli, Larissa S.; Atzberger, Ann; Haas, Simon; von Paleske, Lisa; Boroviak, Thorsten; Wörsdörfer, Philipp; Essers, Marieke A.G.; Kloz, Ulrich; Eisenman, Robert N.; Edenhofer, Frank; Bertone, Paul; Huber, Wolfgang; van der Hoeven, Franciscus; Smith, Austin; Trumpp, Andreas

    2016-01-01

    Summary Mouse embryonic stem cells (ESCs) are maintained in a naive ground state of pluripotency in the presence of MEK and GSK3 inhibitors. Here, we show that ground-state ESCs express low Myc levels. Deletion of both c-myc and N-myc (dKO) or pharmacological inhibition of Myc activity strongly decreases transcription, splicing, and protein synthesis, leading to proliferation arrest. This process is reversible and occurs without affecting pluripotency, suggesting that Myc-depleted stem cells enter a state of dormancy similar to embryonic diapause. Indeed, c-Myc is depleted in diapaused blastocysts, and the differential expression signatures of dKO ESCs and diapaused epiblasts are remarkably similar. Following Myc inhibition, pre-implantation blastocysts enter biosynthetic dormancy but can progress through their normal developmental program after transfer into pseudo-pregnant recipients. Our study shows that Myc controls the biosynthetic machinery of stem cells without affecting their potency, thus regulating their entry and exit from the dormant state. PMID:26871632

  7. In simple synthetic promoters YY1-induced DNA bending is important in transcription activation and repression.

    PubMed Central

    Kim, J; Shapiro, D J

    1996-01-01

    Depending on promoter context, YY1 can activate or repress transcription, or provide a site for transcription initiation. To investigate whether the ability of YY1 to induce DNA bending influenced its ability to activate and repress transcription, simple synthetic promoters were constructed in which the YY1 binding site was inserted between the TATA box and either the NF1 or AP1 recognition sequences. In transient transfections of COS cells, the NF1YY1TATA and NF1RYY1TATA promoters exhibited a dramatic 15-20-fold increase in correctly initiated transcription. These promoters exhibited even larger 60-80-fold increases in transcription in HeLa cells. Neither multiple copies of the YY1 binding site alone, nor placement of a YY1 site upstream of the NF1 site activated transcription. Deletion of 4 bp between the NF1 and YY1 sites, which changes the phase of the DNA bends, abolished the 16-fold activation of transcription by NF1YY1TATA. Insertion of the YY1 site between the AP1 site and the TATA box decreased transcription approximately 3-fold. Replacing the YY1 binding site with an intrinsic DNA bending sequence mimicked this transcription repression. Sequences of similar length which do not bend DNA fail to repress AP1-mediated transcription. Gel mobility shift assays were used to show that binding of YY1 to its recognition sequence did not repress binding of AP1 to its recognition sequences. Our data indicate that YY1-induced DNA bending may activate and repress transcription by changing the spatial relationships between transcription activators and components of the basal transcription apparatus. PMID:8932392

  8. HIV transcription is induced in dying cells

    SciTech Connect

    Woloschak, G.E.; Chang-Liu, Chin-Mei; Schreck, S. |; Panozzo, J.; Libertin, C.R.

    1996-02-01

    Using HeLa cells stably transfected with an HIV-LTR-CAT construct, we demonstrated a peak in CAT induction that occurs in viable (but not necessarily cell-division-competent) cells 24 h following exposure to some cell-killing agents. {gamma} rays were the only cell-killing agent which did not induce HIV transcription; this can be attributed to the fact that {gamma}-ray-induced apoptotic death requires functional p53, which is not present in HeLa cells. For all other agents, HIV-LTR induction was dose-dependent and correlated with the amount of cell killing that occurred in the culture. Doses which caused over 99% cell killing induced HIV-LTR transcription maximally, demonstrating that cells that will go on to die by 14 days are the cells expressing HIV-LTR-CAT.

  9. HIV transcription is induced with cell killing

    SciTech Connect

    Woloschak, G.E.; Schreck, S.; Chang-Liu, Chin-Mei; Panozzo, J.; Libertin, C.R.

    1993-11-01

    In this report, we demonstrate that this induction of HIV-LTR transcription occurs when stably transfected HeLa cells are exposed to agents which mediate cell killing, such as UV radiation, electroporation of sucrose buffer, prolonged heating, and low and high pH. Cells cultured following UV exposure demonstrated a peak in CAT expression that is evident in viable (but not necessarily cell division-competent) cells 24 h after exposure; this inductive response continued until at least 72 h after exposure. HIV-LTR induction was dose-dependent, and the amount of CAT transcription induced was correlated with the amount of cell killing that occurred in the culture.

  10. HIV transcription is induced with cell killing

    SciTech Connect

    Woloschak, G.E.; Schreck, S.; Chang-Liu, Chin Mei; Panozzo, J.; Libertin, C.R.

    1994-01-01

    Previous work has shown that HeLa cells stably transfected with an HIV-LTR-CAT construct are induced to express chloramphenicol acetyl transferase (CAT) following exposure to DNA-damaging agents such as ultraviolet radiation, {gamma} rays, neutrons, and others. In this report, the authors demonstrate that this induction of HIV-LTR transcription occurs when stably transfected HeLa cells are exposed to agents which mediate cell killing, such as UV radiation, electroporation of sucrose buffer, prolonged heating, and low and high pH. Cells cultured following UV exposure demonstrated a peak in CAT expression that is evidence in viable (but not necessarily cell division-competent) cells 24 h after exposure; this inductive response continued until at least 72 h after exposure. HIV-LTR induction was dose-dependent, and the amount of CAT transcription induced was correlated with the amount of cell killing that occurred in the culture. Other agents which caused no cell killing (such as heat-shock for up to 2 h, treatment with metronidazole, exposure to sunlight, vitamin C treatment, and others) had no effect on HIV-LTR induction. These results suggest that HIV transcription is induced as a consequence of the turn on of a cellular death or apoptotic pathway.

  11. Mimicking cataract-induced visual dysfunction by means of protein denaturation in egg albumen

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mandracchia, B.; Finizio, A.; Ferraro, P.

    2016-03-01

    As the world's population ages, cataract-induced visual dysfunction and blindness is on the increase. This is a significant global problem. The most common symptoms of cataracts are glared and blurred vision. Usually, people with cataract have trouble seeing and reading at distance or in low light and also their color perception is altered. Furthermore, cataract is a sneaky disease as it is usually a very slow but progressive process, which creates adaptation so that patients find it difficult to recognize. All this can be very difficult to explain, so we built and tested an optical device to help doctors giving comprehensive answers to the patients' symptoms. This device allows visualizing how cataract impairs vision mimicking the optical degradation of the crystalline related cataracts. This can be a valuable optical tool for medical education as well as to provide a method to illustrate the patients how cataract progression process will affect their vision.

  12. Docetaxel-induced hypersensitivity pneumonitis mimicking lymphangitic carcinomatosis in a patient with metastatic adenocarcinoma of the lung.

    PubMed

    Taj, Asma

    2013-01-01

    Docetaxel belongs to the taxane family of anti-cancer drugs, which are commonly used in non-small cell lung cancers. They stabilize microtubules by preventing depolymerization, resulting in cell death. Pneumonitis is an uncommon side effect of docetaxel. We report a case of docetaxel induced hypersensitivity pneumonitis mimicking lymphangitic carcinomatosis in a patient with metastatic adenocarcinoma of the lung. PMID:24096092

  13. Optical tracking of acoustic radiation force impulse-induced dynamics in a tissue-mimicking phantom

    PubMed Central

    Bouchard, Richard R.; Palmeri, Mark L.; Pinton, Gianmarco F.; Trahey, Gregg E.; Streeter, Jason E.; Dayton, Paul A.

    2009-01-01

    Optical tracking was utilized to investigate the acoustic radiation force impulse (ARFI)-induced response, generated by a 5-MHz piston transducer, in a translucent tissue-mimicking phantom. Suspended 10-μm microspheres were tracked axially and laterally at multiple locations throughout the field of view of an optical microscope with 0.5-μm displacement resolution, in both dimensions, and at frame rates of up to 36 kHz. Induced dynamics were successfully captured before, during, and after the ARFI excitation at depths of up to 4.8 mm from the phantom’s proximal boundary. Results are presented for tracked axial and lateral displacements resulting from on-axis and off-axis (i.e., shear wave) acquisitions; these results are compared to matched finite element method modeling and independent ultrasonically based empirical results and yielded reasonable agreement in most cases. A shear wave reflection, generated by the proximal boundary, consistently produced an artifact in tracked displacement data later in time (i.e., after the initial ARFI-induced displacement peak). This tracking method provides high-frame-rate, two-dimensional tracking data and thus could prove useful in the investigation of complex ARFI-induced dynamics in controlled experimental settings. PMID:19894849

  14. TATA-binding protein and transcription factor IIB induce transcript slipping during early transcription by RNA polymerase II.

    PubMed

    Gilman, Benjamin; Drullinger, Linda F; Kugel, Jennifer F; Goodrich, James A

    2009-04-01

    To better understand the mechanism of steps in early transcription by RNA polymerase II (pol II), we investigated the molecular determinants of transcript slipping within complexes assembled on promoters containing a pre-melted transcription bubble from -9 to +3. Transcript slippage occurs when an RNA transcript contains a repetitive sequence that allows the transcript to slip back and pair with the template strand of the DNA at a new register before transcription continues. We established the contributions of individual transcription factors, DNA elements, and RNA length to slipping on a heteroduplex template using a highly purified human pol II transcription system. We found that transcripts slip at a very defined point in the transcription reaction, after pol II completes phosphodiester bond synthesis at register +5. This point is set by the position of the polymerase active site on the DNA template, as opposed to the length of the transcript, as well as by a repetitive CUCU sequence that must occur from +2 to +5. Interestingly, slipping at this juncture is induced by TATA-binding protein and transcription factor IIB and requires a TATA box but not a transcription factor IIB recognition sequence. We propose a model in which transcribing complexes, upon completing phosphodiester bond synthesis at register +5, enter one of two branches in which they either complete productive synthesis of the transcript or undergo multiple rounds of transcript slipping. PMID:19193635

  15. HIV transcription is induced in dying cells

    SciTech Connect

    Woloschak, G.E.; Chang-Liu, Chin-Mei; Schreck, S. |

    1995-06-01

    Using HeLa cells stably transfected with an HIV-LTR-CAT construct, we demonstrated a peak in CAT induction that occurs in viable (but not necessarily cell-division-competent) cells 24 h following exposure to some cell-killing agents. {gamma} rays were the only cell-killing agent which did not induce HIV transcription; this can be attributed to the fact that {gamma}-ray-induced apoptotic death requires functional p53, which is not present in HeLa cells. For all other agents, HIV-LTR induction was dose-dependent and correlated with the amount of cell killing that occurred in the culture. 14 refs., 4 figs., 1 tab.

  16. Protection against West Nile Virus Infection in Mice after Inoculation with Type I Interferon-Inducing RNA Transcripts

    PubMed Central

    Escribano-Romero, Estela; Blázquez, Ana-Belén; Sobrino, Francisco; Borrego, Belén; Sáiz, Margarita; Saiz, Juan-Carlos

    2012-01-01

    West Nile virus (WNV) is a neurovirulent single stranded RNA mosquito-borne flavivirus, whose main natural hosts are birds, but it also infects humans and horses. Nowadays, no human vaccine is commercially available and clinical treatment is only supportive. Recently, it has been shown that RNA transcripts, mimicking structural domains in the non-coding regions (NCRs) of the foot-and mouth disease virus (FMDV) induce a potent IFN response and antiviral activity in transfected cultured cells, and also reduced mice susceptibility to FMDV. By using different transcripts combinations, administration schedules, and infecting routes and doses, we have demonstrated that these FMDV RNA transcripts protect suckling and adult mice against lethal challenge with WNV. The protective activity induced by the transcripts was systemic and dependent on the infection route and dose. These results confirm the antiviral potential of these synthetic RNAs for fighting viruses of different families relevant for human and animal health. PMID:23166685

  17. Protection against West Nile virus infection in mice after inoculation with type I interferon-inducing RNA transcripts.

    PubMed

    Rodríguez-Pulido, Miguel; Martín-Acebes, Miguel A; Escribano-Romero, Estela; Blázquez, Ana-Belén; Sobrino, Francisco; Borrego, Belén; Sáiz, Margarita; Saiz, Juan-Carlos

    2012-01-01

    West Nile virus (WNV) is a neurovirulent single stranded RNA mosquito-borne flavivirus, whose main natural hosts are birds, but it also infects humans and horses. Nowadays, no human vaccine is commercially available and clinical treatment is only supportive. Recently, it has been shown that RNA transcripts, mimicking structural domains in the non-coding regions (NCRs) of the foot-and mouth disease virus (FMDV) induce a potent IFN response and antiviral activity in transfected cultured cells, and also reduced mice susceptibility to FMDV. By using different transcripts combinations, administration schedules, and infecting routes and doses, we have demonstrated that these FMDV RNA transcripts protect suckling and adult mice against lethal challenge with WNV. The protective activity induced by the transcripts was systemic and dependent on the infection route and dose. These results confirm the antiviral potential of these synthetic RNAs for fighting viruses of different families relevant for human and animal health. PMID:23166685

  18. Oxaliplatin-induced sinusoidal obstruction syndrome mimicking metastatic colon cancer in the liver

    PubMed Central

    CHOI, JUNG-HYE; WON, YOUNG-WOONG; KIM, HYUN SUNG; OH, YOUNG-HA; LIM, SANGHYEOK; KIM, HAN-JOON

    2016-01-01

    Oxaliplatin is an effective chemotherapeutic agent for the treatment of colorectal cancer; however, it may cause liver injury, particularly sinusoidal obstruction syndrome (SOS). Although SOS does not usually present with focal lesions on radiological images, the present study describes the case of a 22-year-old woman with oxaliplatin-induced SOS mimicking metastatic colon cancer in the liver. An abdominal computed tomography revealed a novel 1 cm, low-density lesion in segment 1 of the liver following the administration of the fourth round of oxaliplatin-based adjuvant chemotherapy for stage III colon cancer. Since the lesion was indistinguishable from metastasis, even with detailed imaging studies, including magnetic resonance imaging and positron emission tomography-computed tomography, an isolated caudate lobectomy was planned. The cut surface of the resected liver showed a localized reddish congested lesion measuring 1.4 cm in diameter. The adjacent hepatic parenchyma also demonstrated diffuse sinusoidal congestion with a nutmeg-like appearance. Histologically, the lesion exhibited severe sinusoidal congestion with peliosis hepatis-like features. The widened sinusoidal space was outlined by markedly attenuated hepatic cords and filled with erythrocytes. The final diagnosis was oxaliplatin-induced SOS. The patient recovered completely and was relapse-free at the time of writing. PMID:27073565

  19. Molecular basis of transcriptional fidelity and DNA lesion-induced transcriptional mutagenesis

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Liang; Da, Lintai; Plouffe, Steven W.; Chong, Jenny; Kool, Eric; Wang, Dong

    2014-01-01

    Maintaining high transcriptional fidelity is essential for life. Some DNA lesions lead to significant changes in transcriptional fidelity. In this review, we will summarize recent progress towards understanding the molecular basis of RNA polymerase II (Pol II) transcriptional fidelity and DNA lesion-induced transcriptional mutagenesis. In particular, we will focus on the three key checkpoint steps of controlling Pol II transcriptional fidelity: insertion (specific nucleotide selection and incorporation), extension (differentiation of RNA transcript extension of a matched over mismatched 3'-RNA terminus), and proofreading (preferential removal of misincorporated nucleotides from the 3'-RNA end). We will also discuss some novel insights into the molecular basis and chemical perspectives of controlling Pol II transcriptional fidelity through structural, computational, and chemical biology approaches. PMID:24767259

  20. Pathogen-Mimicking Polymeric Nanoparticles based on Dopamine Polymerization as Vaccines Adjuvants Induce Robust Humoral and Cellular Immune Responses.

    PubMed

    Liu, Qi; Jia, Jilei; Yang, Tingyuan; Fan, Qingze; Wang, Lianyan; Ma, Guanghui

    2016-04-01

    Aiming to enhance the immunogenicity of subunit vaccines, a novel antigen delivery and adjuvant system based on dopamine polymerization on the surface of poly(D,L-lactic-glycolic-acid) nanoparticles (NPs) with multiple mechanisms of immunity enhancement is developed. The mussel-inspired biomimetic polydopamine (pD) not only serves as a coating to NPs but also functionalizes NP surfaces. The method is facile and mild including simple incubation of the preformed NPs in the weak alkaline dopamine solution, and incorporation of hepatitis B surface antigen and TLR9 agonist unmethylated cytosine-guanine (CpG) motif with the pD surface. The as-constructed NPs possess pathogen-mimicking manners owing to their size, shape, and surface molecular immune-activating properties given by CpG. The biocompatibility and biosafety of these pathogen-mimicking NPs are confirmed using bone marrow-derived dendritic cells. Pathogen-mimicking NPs hold great potential as vaccine delivery and adjuvant system due to their ability to: 1) enhance cytokine secretion and immune cell recruitment at the injection site; 2) significantly activate and maturate dendritic cells; 3) induce stronger humoral and cellular immune responses in vivo. Furthermore, this simple and versatile dopamine polymerization method can be applicable to endow NPs with characteristics to mimic pathogen structure and function, and manipulate NPs for the generation of efficacious vaccine adjuvants. PMID:26849717

  1. Endothelial protective genes induced by statin is mimicked by FTI-277 and GGTI-298 drug combination-mediated ERK5 activation

    PubMed Central

    Chu, Uyen B.; Duellman, Tyler; Weaver, Sara J.; Tao, Yunting; Yang, Jay

    2015-01-01

    Background Statins are potent inhibitors of cholesterol biosynthesis and are clinically beneficial in preventing cardiovascular diseases, however, the therapeutic utility of these drugs is limited by myotoxicity. Here, we explored the mechanism of statin-mediated activation of ERK5 in the human endothelium with the goal of identifying compounds that confer endothelial protection but are nontoxic to muscle. Methods An ERK5-one hybrid luciferase reporter transfected into COS-7 cells with pharmacological and molecular manipulations dissected the signaling pathway leading to statin activation of ERK5. qRT-PCR of HUVEC cells documented the transcriptional activation of endothelial-protective genes. Lastly, morphological and cellular ATP analysis, and induction of atrogin-1 in C2C12 myotubes were used to assess statin-induced myopathy. Results Statin activation of ERK5 is dependent on the cellular reduction of GGPPs. Furthermore, we found that the combination of FTI-277 (inhibitor of farnesyl transferase) and GGTI-298 (inhibitor of geranylgeranyl transferase I) mimicked the statin-mediated activation of ERK5. FTI-277 and GGTI-298 together recapitulated the beneficial effects of statins by transcriptionally upregulating anti-inflammatory mediators such as eNOS, THBD, and KLF2. Finally, C2C12 skeletal myotubes treated with both FTI-277 and GGTI-298 evoked less morphological and cellular changes recognized as biomarkers of statin-associated myopathy. Conclusions Statin-induced endothelial protection and myopathy are mediated by distinct metabolic intermediates and co-inhibition of farnesyl transferase and geranylgeranyl transferase I confer endothelial protection without myopathy. General Significance The combinatorial FTI-277 and GGTI-298 drug regimen provides a promising alternative avenue for endothelial protection without myopathy. PMID:25829196

  2. PLGA nanoparticles modified with a TNFα mimicking peptide, soluble Leishmania antigens and MPLA induce T cell priming in vitro via dendritic cell functional differentiation.

    PubMed

    Margaroni, Maritsa; Agallou, Maria; Kontonikola, Katerina; Karidi, Konstantina; Kammona, Olga; Kiparissides, Costas; Gaitanaki, Catherine; Karagouni, Evdokia

    2016-08-01

    Poly(lactide-co-glycolide) nanoparticles (PLGA NPs) represent a new approach for vaccine delivery due to their ability to be taken up by phagocytes and to activate immune responses. In the present study PLGA NPs were surface-modified with a TNFα mimicking peptide, and encapsulated soluble Leishmania antigens (sLiAg) and MPLA adjuvant. The synthesized PLGA NPs exhibited low cytotoxicity levels, while surface-modified NPs were more efficiently taken up by dendritic cells (DCs). The prepared nanoformulations induced maturation and functional differentiation of DCs by elevating co-stimulatory molecule levels and stimulating IL-12 and IL-10 production. Sensitized DCs promoted T cell priming, characterized by the development of mixed T cell subsets differentiation expressing Th lineage-specific transcriptional factors and cytokine genes. Moreover, PLGA NPs were biocompatible, while they were located in lymphoid organs and taken up by phagocytic cells. Our results suggest that surface-modified PLGA NPs encapsulating sLiAg and MPLA could be considered as an effective vaccine candidate against leishmaniasis. PMID:27235727

  3. Transcription induces gyration of the DNA template in Escherichia coli.

    PubMed Central

    Figueroa, N; Bossi, L

    1988-01-01

    We show that transcription modulation of a plasmid sequence in exponentially growing Escherichia coli cells leads to a rapid change in the linking number of plasmid DNA. Activation of transcription is accompanied by an increase in the plasmid's level of negative supercoiling. The added superhelical turns, whose number is proportional to the strength of the promoter and to the length of the transcript, are promptly removed when transcription is turned off. The transcription-induced increase of template supercoiling can still be detected in the presence of an inhibitor of ATP-dependent DNA gyrase [DNA topoisomerase (ATP-hydrolyzing), EC 5.99.1.3]. Altogether, our results indicate that, in addition to being under a general control, DNA superhelicity can be modulated locally in response to the topological perturbations associated with DNA tracking processes. We discuss a model in which supercoiling changes are produced by differential swiveling activities on the opposite sides of a transcriptional flow during transcriptional modulation. Images PMID:2849103

  4. Radiation-induced anaplastic ependymoma mimicking a skull base meningioma: A case report

    PubMed Central

    SPALLONE, ALDO; MARCHIONE, PASQUALE; DI CAPUA, MARIO; BELVISI, DANIELE

    2016-01-01

    The present study describes the case of a 63-year-old woman presenting with headache, dizziness and vomiting due to a an ovoid mass in the left pre-bulbar cistern, apparently arising from the lower clivus and the foramen magnum. The clinical history revealed the subtotal removal of a right cerebellar low-grade glioma 15 years previously and subsequent conventional 60-Gy radiotherapy. Notably, following gross total resection, histopathological examination showed microscopic features that resulted in a diagnosis of anaplastic ependymoma. The patient underwent surgery to remove the mass and post-operative chemotherapy with temozolomide. A progressive improvement of neurological signs and symptoms was observed during the postoperative course. At the 6-month follow-up, the patient was free from clinical and radiological recurrence. The unusual features of this rare secondary brain tumor were the extrassial location in the posterior fossa, the unusual age-associated location of the histological subtype and the fact that it closely mimicked a skull-base meningioma. PMID:26893630

  5. In vitro activation of a transcription factor by gamma interferon requires a membrane-associated tyrosine kinase and is mimicked by vanadate.

    PubMed Central

    Igarashi, K; David, M; Larner, A C; Finbloom, D S

    1993-01-01

    Gamma interferon (IFN-gamma) activates the formation of a DNA-binding protein complex (FcRF gamma) that recognizes the gamma response region (GRR) of the promoter for the human high-affinity Fc gamma receptor. In a membrane-enriched fraction prepared from human peripheral blood monocytes, IFN-gamma activation of FcRF gamma occurred within 1 min and was ATP dependent. Activation of FcRF gamma required a tyrosine kinase activity, and recognition of the GRR sequence by FcRF gamma could be abrogated by treatment with a tyrosine-specific protein phosphatase. Treatment of cells with vanadate alone resulted in the formation of FcRF gamma without the need for IFN-gamma. UV cross-linking and antibody competition experiments demonstrated that the FcRF gamma complex was composed of at least two components: the 91-kDa protein of the IFN-alpha-induced transcription complex ISGF3 and a 43-kDa component that bound directly to the GRR. Therefore, specificity for IFN-induced transcriptional activation of early response genes requires at least two events: (i) ligand-induced activation of membrane-associated protein by tyrosine phosphorylation and (ii) formation of a complex composed of an activated membrane protein(s) and a sequence-specific DNA-binding component. Images PMID:8321205

  6. Mitochondrial Reactive Oxygen Species Trigger Hypoxia-Induced Transcription

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chandel, N. S.; Maltepe, E.; Goldwasser, E.; Mathieu, C. E.; Simon, M. C.; Schumacker, P. T.

    1998-09-01

    Transcriptional activation of erythropoietin, glycolytic enzymes, and vascular endothelial growth factor occurs during hypoxia or in response to cobalt chloride (CoCl2) in Hep3B cells. However, neither the mechanism of cellular O2 sensing nor that of cobalt is fully understood. We tested whether mitochondria act as O2 sensors during hypoxia and whether hypoxia and cobalt activate transcription by increasing generation of reactive oxygen species (ROS). Results show (i) wild-type Hep3B cells increase ROS generation during hypoxia (1.5% O2) or CoCl2 incubation, (ii) Hep3B cells depleted of mitochondrial DNA (ρ 0 cells) fail to respire, fail to activate mRNA for erythropoietin, glycolytic enzymes, or vascular endothelial growth factor during hypoxia, and fail to increase ROS generation during hypoxia; (iii) ρ 0 cells increase ROS generation in response to CoCl2 and retain the ability to induce expression of these genes; and (iv) the antioxidants pyrrolidine dithiocarbamate and ebselen abolish transcriptional activation of these genes during hypoxia or CoCl2 in wild-type cells, and abolish the response to CoCl2 in ρ 0 cells. Thus, hypoxia activates transcription via a mitochondria-dependent signaling process involving increased ROS, whereas CoCl2 activates transcription by stimulating ROS generation via a mitochondria-independent mechanism.

  7. Human chorionic gonadotropin induces human macrophages to form intracytoplasmic vacuoles mimicking Hofbauer cells in human chorionic villi.

    PubMed

    Yamaguchi, Munekage; Ohba, Takashi; Tashiro, Hironori; Yamada, Gen; Katabuchi, Hidetaka

    2013-01-01

    The most characteristic morphological feature of macrophages in the stroma of placental villi, known as Hofbauer cells, is their highly vacuolated appearance. They also show positive immunostaining for human chorionic gonadotropin (hCG) and express messenger ribonucleic acid of the luteinizing hormone/chorionic gonadotropin receptor with a deletion of exon 9 (LH/CG-R Δ9). Maternal hCG enters fetal plasma through the mesenchyme of the placental villi and promotes male sexual differentiation in early pregnancy; therefore, excess hCG may induce aberrant genital differentiation and hCG must be adjusted at the fetomaternal interface. We hypothesized that hCG is regulated by Hofbauer cells and that their peculiar vacuoles are involved in a cell-specific function. To assess the morphological modification and expression of LH/CG-R Δ9 in human macrophages after hCG exposure, the present study examined phorbol 12-myristate 13-acetate (PMA)-treated THP-1 cells, a human monocyte-macrophage cell line. hCG induced transient vacuole formation in PMA-treated THP-1 cells, morphologically mimicking Hofbauer cells. Immunocytochemistry showed that PMA-treated THP-1 cells incorporated hCG but not luteinizing hormone or follicle-stimulating hormone. Western blotting analyses demonstrated that PMA-treated THP-1 cells expressed an immunoreactive 60-kDa protein, designated as endogenous LH/CG-R Δ9. hCG induced a transient reduction in the LH/CG-R Δ9, which was synchronous with the appearance of cytoplasmic vacuoles. In conclusion, human macrophages regulating hCG via cytoplasmic LH/CG-R Δ9 mimic the morphological characteristics of Hofbauer cells. Their vacuoles may be associated with their cell-specific function to protect the fetus from exposure to excess maternal hCG during pregnancy. PMID:23128164

  8. HIV transcription is induced with some forms of cell killing

    SciTech Connect

    Woloschak, G.E.; Schreck, S.; Panozzo, J.; Chang-Liu, C.-M.; Libertin, C.R.

    1996-11-01

    Using HeLa cells stably transfected with an HIV-LTR-CAT construct`, we demonstrated a peak in CAT induction that occurs in viable (but not necessarily cell-division-competent) cells 24 h following exposure to some cell-killing agents. {Gamma} rays were the only cell-killing agent which did not induce HIV transcription; this can be attributed to the fact that {gamma}-ray-induced apoptotic death requires function p53, which is missing in HeLa cells. For all other agents, HIV-LTR induction was dose-dependent and correlated with the amount of cell killing that occurred in the culture.

  9. Voriconazole-induced periostitis causing arthralgias mimicking a flare of granulomatosis with polyangiitis.

    PubMed

    Gladue, Heather S; Fox, David A

    2013-12-01

    We describe a case of voriconazole-induced periostitis that occurred in a 68-year-old woman with granulomatosis with polyangiitis. Our patient presented with months of severe hip pain limiting her daily activities, which was initially felt to be a flare of her granulomatosis with polyangiitis. However, upon further review, she had an elevated alkaline phosphatase and periostitis on her hip radiograph; voriconazole was held, and within 2 days she had marked improvement in her pain. Although this clinical syndrome is well documented in transplant patients, it is a rare complication in patients with autoimmune disorders. However, it is important because it may cause severe arthralgias that can mimic a flare of rheumatic diseases. PMID:24263147

  10. In-vitro investigations on laser-induced smoke generation mimicking the laparoscopic laser surgery purposes.

    PubMed

    Khoder, Wael Y; Stief, Christian G; Fiedler, Sebastian; Pongratz, Thomas; Beyer, Wolfgang; Hennig, Georg; Rühm, Adrian; Sroka, Ronald

    2015-09-01

    Intraoperative smoke-generation limits the quality of vision during laparoscopic/endoscopic laser-assisted surgeries. The current study aimed at the evaluation of factors affecting this phenomenon. As a first step, a suitable experimental setup and a test tissue model were established for this investigation. The experimental setup is composed of a specific sample container, a laser therapy component suitable for the ablation of model tissue at different treatment wavelengths (λ = 980 nm, 1350 nm, 1470 nm), a suction unit providing continuous smoke extraction, and a detection unit for smoke quantification via detection of light (λ = 633 nm) scattered from smoke particles. The ablation rate (AR) was calculated by dividing the ablated volume by the ablation time (60 sec). The laser-induced scattering signal intensity of the smoke (SI) was determined from time-charts of the signal intensity as a measure for vision, in addition a delay-time tdelay could be derived defining the onset of SI after the laser was switched on. The ratio SI/AR is used as a measure for smoke generation in relation to the ablation rate. Additionally the light transmission of the tissue samples was used to estimate their optical properties. In this set-up, smoke generation using λ = 980 nm as ablation laser wavelength was detected after a delay-time tdelay = (121.6 ± 24.8) sec which is significantly longer compared to the wavelengths λ = 1350 nm with tdelay = (89.8 ± 19.3) sec and λ = 1470 nm with tdelay = (24.7 ± 5.4) sec. Thus, the delay Experimental set-up consisting of sample container, laser therapy component, suction unit and scattered-light detection compartment. time is wavelength-dependent. The SI/AR ratio was significantly different (p < 0.001) for 1470 nm irradiation compared to 980 nm irradiation [SI/AR(1470) = (11.8 ± 2.6) · 10(3) vs. SI/AR(980) = (8.6 ± 2.0) · 10(3) ]. The ablation crater for 980 nm irradiation was comparable with 1470 nm irradiation, but the

  11. Porphyromonas gingivalis infection-induced tissue and bone transcriptional profiles

    PubMed Central

    Meka, Archana; Bakthavatchalu, Vasudevan; Sathishkumar, Sabapathi; Lopez, M. Cecilia; Verma, Raj K.; Wallet, Shannon M.; Bhattacharyya, Indraneel; Boyce, Brendan F.; Handfield, Martin; Lamont, Richard J.; Baker, Henry V.; Ebersole, Jeffrey L.; Lakshmyya, Kesavalu N.

    2010-01-01

    Introduction Porphyromonas gingivalis has been associated with subgingival biofilms in adult periodontitis. However, the molecular mechanisms of its contribution to chronic gingival inflammation and loss of periodontal structural integrity remain unclear. The objectives of this investigation were to examine changes in the host transcriptional profiles during a P. gingivalis infection using a murine calvarial model of inflammation and bone resorption. Methods P. gingivalis FDC 381 was injected into the subcutaneous soft tissue over the calvaria of BALB/c mice for 3 days, after which the soft tissues and calvarial bones were excised. RNA was isolated from infected soft tissues and calvarial bones and analyzed for transcript profiles using Murine GeneChip® arrays to provide a molecular profile of the events that occur following infection of these tissues. Results After P. gingivalis infection, 5517 and 1900 probe sets in the infected soft tissues and calvarial bone, respectively, were differentially expressed (P ≤ 0.05) and up-regulated. Biological pathways significantly impacted by P. gingivalis infection in tissues and calvarial bone included cell adhesion (immune system) molecules, Toll-like receptors, B cell receptor signaling, TGF-β cytokine family receptor signaling, and MHC class II antigen processing pathways resulting in proinflammatory, chemotactic effects, T cell stimulation, and down regulation of antiviral and T cell chemotactic effects. P. gingivalis-induced inflammation activated osteoclasts, leading to local bone resorption. Conclusion This is the first in vivo evidence that localized P. gingivalis infection differentially induces transcription of a broad array of host genes that differed between inflamed soft tissues and calvarial bone. PMID:20331794

  12. Transcription-induced DNA toxicity at trinucleotide repeats

    PubMed Central

    Wilson, John H

    2011-01-01

    Trinucleotide repeats (TNRs) are a blessing and a curse. In coding regions, where they are enriched, short repeats offer the potential for continuous, rapid length variation with linked incremental changes in the activity of the encoded protein, a valuable source of variation for evolution. But at the upper end of these benign and beneficial lengths, trinucleotide repeats become very unstable, with a dangerous bias toward continual expansion, which can lead to neurological diseases in humans. The mechanisms of expansion are varied and the links to disease are complex. Where they have been delineated, however, they have often revealed unexpected, fundamental aspects of the underlying cell biology. Nowhere is this more apparent than in recent studies, which indicate that expanded CAG repeats can form toxic sites in the genome, which can, upon interaction with normal components of DNA metabolism, trigger cell death. Here we discuss the phenomenon of TNR-induced DNA toxicity, with special emphasis on the role of transcription. Transcription-induced DNA toxicity may have profound biological consequences, with particular relevance to repeat-associated neurodegenerative diseases. PMID:21293182

  13. Oxytocin Regulates Stress-Induced Crf Gene Transcription through CREB-Regulated Transcription Coactivator 3

    PubMed Central

    Jurek, Benjamin; Slattery, David A.; Hiraoka, Yuichi; Liu, Ying; Nishimori, Katsuhiko; Aguilera, Greti; van den Burg, Erwin H.

    2015-01-01

    The major regulator of the neuroendocrine stress response in the brain is corticotropin releasing factor (CRF), whose transcription is controlled by CREB and its cofactors CRTC2/3 (TORC2/3). Phosphorylated CRTCs are sequestered in the cytoplasm, but rapidly dephosphorylated and translocated into the nucleus following a stressful stimulus. As the stress response is attenuated by oxytocin (OT), we tested whether OT interferes with CRTC translocation and, thereby, Crf expression. OT (1 nmol, i.c.v.) delayed the stress-induced increase of nuclear CRTC3 and Crf hnRNA levels in the paraventricular nucleus of male rats and mice, but did not affect either parameter in the absence of the stressor. The increase in Crf hnRNA levels at later time points was parallel to elevated nuclear CRTC2/3 levels. A direct effect of Thr4 Gly7-OT (TGOT) on CRTC3 translocation and Crf expression was found in rat primary hypothalamic neurons, amygdaloid (Ar-5), hypothalamic (H32), and human neuroblastoma (Be(2)M17) cell lines. CRTC3, but not CRCT2, knockdown using siRNA in Be(2)M17 cells prevented the effect of TGOT on Crf hnRNA levels. Chromatin-immunoprecipitation demonstrated that TGOT reduced CRTC3, but not CRTC2, binding to the Crf promoter after 10 min of forskolin stimulation. Together, the results indicate that OT modulates CRTC3 translocation, the binding of CRTC3 to the Crf promoter and, ultimately, transcription of the Crf gene. SIGNIFICANCE STATEMENT The neuropeptide oxytocin has been proposed to reduce hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal (HPA) axis activation during stress. The underlying mechanisms are, however, elusive. In this study we show that activation of the oxytocin receptor in the paraventricular nucleus delays transcription of the gene encoding corticotropin releasing factor (Crf), the main regulator of the stress response. It does so by sequestering the coactivator of the transcription factor CREB, CRTC3, in the cytosol, resulting in reduced binding of CRTC3 to the Crf

  14. Antioxidant-induced changes of the AP-1 transcription complex are paralleled by a selective suppression of human papillomavirus transcription.

    PubMed Central

    Rösl, F; Das, B C; Lengert, M; Geletneky, K; zur Hausen, H

    1997-01-01

    Considering the involvement of a redox-regulatory pathway in the expression of human papillomaviruses (HPVs), HPV type 16 (HPV-16)-immortalized human keratinocytes were treated with the antioxidant pyrrolidine-dithiocarbamate (PDTC). PDTC induces elevated binding of the transcription factor AP-1 to its cognate recognition site within the viral regulatory region. Despite of increased AP-1 binding, normally indispensable for efficient HPV-16 transcription, viral gene expression was selectively suppressed at the level of initiation of transcription. Electrophoretic mobility supershift assays showed that the composition of the AP-1 complex, predominantly consisting of Jun homodimers in untreated cells, was altered. Irrespective of enhanced c-fos expression, c-jun was phosphorylated and became primarily heterodimerized with fra-1, which was also induced after PDTC incubation. Additionally, there was also an increased complex formation between c-jun and junB. Because both fra-1 and junB overexpression negatively interferes with c-jun/c-fos trans-activation of AP-1-responsive genes, our results suggest that the observed block in viral transcription is mainly the consequence of an antioxidant-induced reconstitution of the AP-1 transcription complex. Since expression of the c-jun/c-fos gene family is tightly regulated during cellular differentiation, defined reorganization of a central viral transcription factor may represent a novel mechanism controlling the transcription of pathogenic HPVs during keratinocyte differentiation and in the progression to cervical cancer. PMID:8985358

  15. Transcriptional and epigenetic mechanisms of cellular reprogramming to induced pluripotency.

    PubMed

    van den Hurk, Mark; Kenis, Gunter; Bardy, Cedric; van den Hove, Daniel L; Gage, Fred H; Steinbusch, Harry W; Rutten, Bart P

    2016-08-01

    Enforced ectopic expression of a cocktail of pluripotency-associated genes such as Oct4, Sox2, Klf4 and c-Myc can reprogram somatic cells into induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs). The remarkable proliferation ability of iPSCs and their aptitude to redifferentiate into any cell lineage makes these cells a promising tool for generating a variety of human tissue in vitro. Yet, pluripotency induction is an inefficient process, as cells undergoing reprogramming need to overcome developmentally imposed epigenetic barriers. Recent work has shed new light on the molecular mechanisms that drive the reprogramming of somatic cells to iPSCs. Here, we present current knowledge on the transcriptional and epigenetic regulation of pluripotency induction and discuss how variability in epigenetic states impacts iPSCs' inherent biological properties. PMID:27419933

  16. Activation of transcription factor AP-2 mediates UVA radiation- and singlet oxygen-induced expression of the human intercellular adhesion molecule 1 gene

    SciTech Connect

    Grether-Beck, S.; Olaizola-Horn, S.; Schmitt, H.; Grewe, M.

    1996-12-10

    UVA radiation is the major component of the UV solar spectrum that reaches the earth, and the therapeutic application of UVA radiation is increasing in medicine. Analysis of the cellular effects of UVA radiation has revealed that exposure of human cells to UVA radiation at physiological doses leads to increased gene expression and that this UVA response is primarily mediated through the generation of singlet oxygen. In this study, the mechanisms by which UVA radiation induces transcriptional activation of the human intercellular adhesion molecule 1 (ICAM-1) were examined. UVA radiation was capable of inducing activation of the human ICAM-1 promoter and increasing OCAM-1 mRNA and protein expression. These UVA radiation effects were inhibited by singlet oxygen quenchers, augmented by enhancement of singlet oxygen life-time, and mimicked in unirradiated cells by a singlet oxygen-generating system. UVA radiation as well as singlet oxygen-induced ICAM-1 promoter activation required activation of the transcription factor AP-2. Accordingly, both stimuli activated AP-2, and deletion of the putative AP-2-binding site abrogated ICAM-1 promoter activation in this system. This study identified the AP-2 site as the UVA radiation- and singlet oxygen-responsive element of the human ICAM-1 gene. The capacity of UVA radiation and/or singlet oxygen to induce human gene expression through activation of AP-2 indicates a previously unrecognized role of this transcription factor in the mammalian stress response. 38 refs., 3 figs., 3 tabs.

  17. Transcriptional comparison of human induced and primary midbrain dopaminergic neurons

    PubMed Central

    Xia, Ninuo; Zhang, Pengbo; Fang, Fang; Wang, Zhengyuan; Rothstein, Megan; Angulo, Benjamin; Chiang, Rosaria; Taylor, James; Reijo Pera, Renee A.

    2016-01-01

    Generation of induced dopaminergic (iDA) neurons may provide a significant step forward towards cell replacement therapy for Parkinson’s disease (PD). To study and compare transcriptional programs of induced cells versus primary DA neurons is a preliminary step towards characterizing human iDA neurons. We have optimized a protocol to efficiently generate iDA neurons from human pluripotent stem cells (hPSCs). We then sequenced the transcriptomes of iDA neurons derived from 6 different hPSC lines and compared them to that of primary midbrain (mDA) neurons. We identified a small subset of genes with altered expression in derived iDA neurons from patients with Parkinson’s Disease (PD). We also observed that iDA neurons differ significantly from primary mDA neurons in global gene expression, especially in genes related to neuron maturation level. Results suggest iDA neurons from patient iPSCs could be useful for basic and translational studies, including in vitro modeling of PD. However, further refinement of methods of induction and maturation of neurons may better recapitulate full development of mDA neurons from hPSCs. PMID:26842779

  18. Transcription-dependent and transcription-independent nucleosome disruption induced by dioxin.

    PubMed Central

    Morgan, J E; Whitlock, J P

    1992-01-01

    In mouse hepatoma cells, both the regulatory and the transcribed regions of the cyp1a1 gene assume a nucleosomal configuration when the gene is silent; two nucleosomes occupy specific sites at the transcriptional promoter. Activation of transcription by 2,3,7,8-tetrachlorodibenzo-p-dioxin is accompanied by changes in chromatin structure, which depend upon a functional aromatic hydrocarbon (Ah) receptor. In the transcribed region of the gene, nucleosome disruption occurs as a consequence of RNA elongation. In contrast, at the promoter, loss of positioned nucleosome sis independent of transcription and represents an event in the mechanism by which the liganded Ah receptor enhances transcriptional initiation. Images PMID:1454854

  19. Role of hippocampal activity-induced transcription in memory consolidation.

    PubMed

    Eagle, Andrew L; Gajewski, Paula A; Robison, Alfred J

    2016-08-01

    Experience-dependent changes in the strength of connections between neurons in the hippocampus (HPC) are critical for normal learning and memory consolidation, and disruption of this process drives a variety of neurological and psychiatric diseases. Proper HPC function relies upon discrete changes in gene expression driven by transcription factors (TFs) induced by neuronal activity. Here, we describe the induction and function of many of the most well-studied HPC TFs, including cyclic-AMP response element binding protein, serum-response factor, AP-1, and others, and describe their role in the learning process. We also discuss the known target genes of many of these TFs and the purported mechanisms by which they regulate long-term changes in HPC synaptic strength. Moreover, we propose that future research in this field will depend upon unbiased identification of additional gene targets for these activity-dependent TFs and subsequent meta-analyses that identify common genes or pathways regulated by multiple TFs in the HPC during learning or disease. PMID:27180338

  20. Actin-based modeling of a transcriptionally competent nuclear substructure induced by transcription inhibition

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, I-F.; Chang, H.-Y.; James Shen, C.-K. . E-mail: ckshen@ccvax.sinica.edu.tw

    2006-11-15

    During transcription inactivation, the nuclear bodies in the mammalian cells often undergo reorganization. In particular, the interchromatin granule clusters, or IGCs, become colocalized with RNA polymerase II (RNAP II) upon treatment with transcription inhibitors. This colocalization has also been observed in untreated but transcriptionally inactive cells. We report here that the reorganized IGC domains are unique substructure consisting of outer shells made of SC35, ERK2, SF2/ASF, and actin. The apparently hollow holes of these domains contain clusters of RNAP II, mostly phosphorylated, and the splicing regulator SMN. This class of complexes are also the sites where prominent transcription activities are detected once the inhibitors are removed. Furthermore, actin polymerization is required for reorganization of the IGCs. In connection with this, immunoprecipitation and immunostaining experiments showed that nuclear actin is associated with IGCs and the reorganized IGC domains. The study thus provides further evidence for the existence of an actin-based nuclear skeleton structure in association with the dynamic reorganization processes in the nucleus. Overall, our data suggest that mammalian cells have adapted to utilize the reorganized, uniquely shaped IGC domains as the temporary storage sites of RNAP II transcription machineries in response to certain transient states of transcription inactivation.

  1. Identification of drought-induced transcription factors in peanut (Arachis hypogaea L.)

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Transcription factors play key roles in the regulation of genes involved in normal development as well as tolerance to biotic and abiotic stresses. Specific transcription factors that are induced in peanut under drought conditions have not been identified. The objectives of this study were to comp...

  2. Snf1-Dependent Transcription Confers Glucose-Induced Decay upon the mRNA Product

    PubMed Central

    Braun, Katherine A.; Dombek, Kenneth M.

    2015-01-01

    In the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae, the switch from respiratory metabolism to fermentation causes rapid decay of transcripts encoding proteins uniquely required for aerobic metabolism. Snf1, the yeast ortholog of AMP-activated protein kinase, has been implicated in this process because inhibiting Snf1 mimics the addition of glucose. In this study, we show that the SNF1-dependent ADH2 promoter, or just the major transcription factor binding site, is sufficient to confer glucose-induced mRNA decay upon heterologous transcripts. SNF1-independent expression from the ADH2 promoter prevented glucose-induced mRNA decay without altering the start site of transcription. SNF1-dependent transcripts are enriched for the binding motif of the RNA binding protein Vts1, an important mediator of mRNA decay and mRNA repression whose expression is correlated with decreased abundance of SNF1-dependent transcripts during the yeast metabolic cycle. However, deletion of VTS1 did not slow the rate of glucose-induced mRNA decay. ADH2 mRNA rapidly dissociated from polysomes after glucose repletion, and sequences bound by RNA binding proteins were enriched in the transcripts from repressed cells. Inhibiting the protein kinase A pathway did not affect glucose-induced decay of ADH2 mRNA. Our results suggest that Snf1 may influence mRNA stability by altering the recruitment activity of the transcription factor Adr1. PMID:26667037

  3. Plastidial metabolite MEcPP induces a transcriptionally centered stress-response hub via the transcription factor CAMTA3.

    PubMed

    Benn, Geoffrey; Bjornson, Marta; Ke, Haiyan; De Souza, Amancio; Balmond, Edward I; Shaw, Jared T; Dehesh, Katayoon

    2016-08-01

    The general stress response (GSR) is an evolutionarily conserved rapid and transient transcriptional reprograming of genes central for transducing environmental signals into cellular responses, leading to metabolic and physiological readjustments to cope with prevailing conditions. Defining the regulatory components of the GSR will provide crucial insight into the design principles of early stress-response modules and their role in orchestrating master regulators of adaptive responses. Overaccumulation of methylerythritol cyclodiphosphate (MEcPP), a bifunctional chemical entity serving as both a precursor of isoprenoids produced by the plastidial methylerythritol phosphate (MEP) pathway and a stress-specific retrograde signal, in ceh1 (constitutively expressing hydroperoxide lyase1)-mutant plants leads to large-scale transcriptional alterations. Bioinformatic analyses of microarray data in ceh1 plants established the overrepresentation of a stress-responsive cis element and key GSR marker, the rapid stress response element (RSRE), in the promoters of robustly induced genes. ceh1 plants carrying an established 4×RSRE:Luciferase reporter for monitoring the GSR support constitutive activation of the response in this mutant background. Genetics and pharmacological approaches confirmed the specificity of MEcPP in RSRE induction via the transcription factor CALMODULIN-BINDING TRANSCRIPTION ACTIVATOR 3 (CAMTA3), in a calcium-dependent manner. Moreover, CAMTA3-dependent activation of IRE1a (inositol-requiring protein-1) and bZIP60 (basic leucine zipper 60), two RSRE containing unfolded protein-response genes, bridges MEcPP-mediated GSR induction to the potentiation of protein-folding homeostasis in the endoplasmic reticulum. These findings introduce the notion of transcriptional regulation by a key plastidial retrograde signaling metabolite that induces nuclear GSR, thereby offering a window into the role of interorgannellar communication in shaping cellular adaptive

  4. Protection against Rift Valley fever virus infection in mice upon administration of interferon-inducing RNA transcripts from the FMDV genome.

    PubMed

    Lorenzo, Gema; Rodríguez-Pulido, Miguel; López-Gil, Elena; Sobrino, Francisco; Borrego, Belén; Sáiz, Margarita; Brun, Alejandro

    2014-09-01

    In this work we have addressed the effect of synthetic, non-infectious, RNA transcripts, mimicking structural domains of the non-coding regions (NCRs) of the foot-and-mouth disease virus (FMDV) genome on the infection of mice with Rift Valley fever virus (RVFV). Groups of 5 mice were inoculated intraperitoneally (i.p.) with 200 μg of synthetic RNA resembling the 5'-terminal S region, the internal ribosome entry site (IRES) or the 3'-NCR of the FMDV genome. RNA inoculation was performed 24h before (-24 h), 24 h after (+24 h) or simultaneously to the challenge with a lethal dose of RVFV. Administration of the IRES RNA afforded higher survival rates than administration of S or 3'NCR transcripts either at -24h or +24h after challenge. In contrast, when RNA inoculation and viral challenge were performed simultaneously, all mice survived in both IRES- and 3'NCR-inoculated groups, with an 80% survival in mice receiving the S RNA. Among survivors, a complete correlation between significant anti-RVFV circulating antibody titers and resistance to a second lethal challenge with the virus was observed, supporting a limited viral replication in the RNA-inoculated animals upon the first challenge. All three RNA transcripts were able to induce the production of systemic antiviral and pro-inflammatory cytokines. These data show that triggering of intracellular pathogen sensing pathways constitutes a promising approach towards development of novel RVF preventive or therapeutic strategies. PMID:24973761

  5. Platelet functional and transcriptional changes induced by intralipid infusion.

    PubMed

    Beaulieu, Lea M; Vitseva, Olga; Tanriverdi, Kahraman; Kucukural, Alper; Mick, Eric; Hamburg, Naomi; Vita, Joseph; Freedman, Jane E

    2016-06-01

    Multiple studies have shown the effects of long-term exposure to high-fat or western diets on the vascular system. There is limited knowledge on the acute effects of high circulating fat levels, specifically on platelets, which have a role in many processes, including thrombosis and inflammation. This study investigated the effects of acute, high-fat exposure on platelet function and transcript profile. Twenty healthy participants were given an intravenous infusion of 20% Intralipid emulsion and heparin over 6 hours. Blood samples were taken prior to and the day after infusion to measure platelet function and transcript expression levels. Platelet aggregation was not significantly affected by Intralipid infusion, but, when mitochondria function was inhibited by carbonyl cyanide 3-chlorophenylhydrazone (CCCP) or oligomycin, platelet aggregation was higher in the post-infusion state compared to baseline. Through RNA sequencing, and verified by RT-qPCR, 902 miRNAs and 617 mRNAs were affected by Intralipid infusion. MicroRNAs increased include miR-4259 and miR-346, while miR-517b and miR-517c are both decreased. Pathway analysis identified two clusters significantly enriched, including cell motility. In conclusion, acute exposure to high fat affects mitochondrial-dependent platelet function, as well as the transcript profile. PMID:26940969

  6. Activation of vascular endothelial growth factor gene transcription by hypoxia-inducible factor 1.

    PubMed Central

    Forsythe, J A; Jiang, B H; Iyer, N V; Agani, F; Leung, S W; Koos, R D; Semenza, G L

    1996-01-01

    Expression of vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) is induced in cells exposed to hypoxia or ischemia. Neovascularization stimulated by VEGF occurs in several important clinical contexts, including myocardial ischemia, retinal disease, and tumor growth. Hypoxia-inducible factor 1 (HIF-1) is a heterodimeric basic helix-loop-helix protein that activates transcription of the human erythropoietin gene in hypoxic cells. Here we demonstrate the involvement of HIF-1 in the activation of VEGF transcription. VEGF 5'-flanking sequences mediated transcriptional activation of reporter gene expression in hypoxic Hep3B cells. A 47-bp sequence located 985 to 939 bp 5' to the VEGF transcription initiation site mediated hypoxia-inducible reporter gene expression directed by a simian virus 40 promoter element that was otherwise minimally responsive to hypoxia. When reporters containing VEGF sequences, in the context of the native VEGF or heterologous simian virus 40 promoter, were cotransfected with expression vectors encoding HIF-1alpha and HIF-1beta (ARNT [aryl hydrocarbon receptor nuclear translocator]), reporter gene transcription was much greater in both hypoxic and nonhypoxic cells than in cells transfected with the reporter alone. A HIF-1 binding site was demonstrated in the 47-bp hypoxia response element, and a 3-bp substitution eliminated the ability of the element to bind HIF-1 and to activate transcription in response to hypoxia and/or recombinant HIF-1. Cotransfection of cells with an expression vector encoding a dominant negative form of HIF-1alpha inhibited the activation of reporter transcription in hypoxic cells in a dose-dependent manner. VEGF mRNA was not induced by hypoxia in mutant cells that do not express the HIF-1beta (ARNT) subunit. These findings implicate HIF-1 in the activation of VEGF transcription in hypoxic cells. PMID:8756616

  7. FoxO1 Deacetylation Regulates Thyroid Hormone-induced Transcription of Key Hepatic Gluconeogenic Genes*

    PubMed Central

    Singh, Brijesh Kumar; Sinha, Rohit Anthony; Zhou, Jin; Xie, Sherwin Ying; You, Seo-Hee; Gauthier, Karine; Yen, Paul Michael

    2013-01-01

    Hepatic gluconeogenesis is a concerted process that integrates transcriptional regulation with hormonal signals. A major regulator is thyroid hormone (TH), which acts through its nuclear receptor (TR) to induce the expression of the hepatic gluconeogenic genes, phosphoenolpyruvate carboxykinase (PCK1) and glucose-6-phosphatase (G6PC). Forkhead transcription factor FoxO1 also is an important regulator of these genes; however, its functional interactions with TR are not known. Here, we report that TR-mediated transcriptional activation of PCK1 and G6PC in human hepatic cells and mouse liver was FoxO1-dependent and furthermore required FoxO1 deacetylation by the NAD+-dependent deacetylase, SirT1. siRNA knockdown of FoxO1 decreased, whereas overexpression of FoxO1 increased, TH-dependent transcriptional activation of PCK1 and G6PC in cultured hepatic cells. FoxO1 siRNA knockdown also decreased TH-mediated transcription in vivo. Additionally, TH was unable to induce FoxO1 deacetylation or hepatic PCK1 gene expression in TH receptor β-null (TRβ−/−) mice. Moreover, TH stimulated FoxO1 recruitment to the PCK1 and G6PC gene promoters in a SirT1-dependent manner. In summary, our results show that TH-dependent deacetylation of a second metabolically regulated transcription factor represents a novel mechanism for transcriptional integration of nuclear hormone action with cellular energy status. PMID:23995837

  8. Ciprofloxacin-induced acute generalized exanthematous pustulosis mimicking bullous drug eruption confirmed by a positive patch test.

    PubMed

    Hausermann, P; Scherer, K; Weber, M; Bircher, A J

    2005-01-01

    We report the case of an 80-year-old woman presenting with ciprofloxacin-induced acute generalized exanthematous pustulosis (AGEP) confirmed by a positive patch test. Cutaneous morphology, course and histological findings were consistent with a definite diagnosis according to the AGEP validation score of the EuroSCAR study group. We point to the rarity of quinolone-induced AGEP and discuss immunological mechanisms, the value of in vivo and in vitro tests as well as the main differential diagnosis. Furthermore, we highlight in this particular case the challenging differentiation from bullous drug eruption. PMID:16205075

  9. Induced myelomonocytic differentiation in leukemia cells is accompanied by noncanonical transcription factor expression

    PubMed Central

    Jensen, Holly A.; Yourish, Harmony B.; Bunaciu, Rodica P.; Varner, Jeffrey D.; Yen, Andrew

    2015-01-01

    Transcription factors that drive non-neoplastic myelomonocytic differentiation are well characterized but have not been systematically analyzed in the leukemic context. We investigated widely used, patient-derived myeloid leukemia cell lines with proclivity for differentiation into granulocytes by retinoic acid (RA) and/or monocytes by 1,25-dihyrdroxyvitamin D3 (D3). Using K562 (FAB M1), HL60 (FAB M2), RA-resistant HL60 sublines, NB4 (FAB M3), and U937 (FAB M5), we correlated nuclear transcription factor expression to immunophenotype, G1/G0 cell cycle arrest and functional inducible oxidative metabolism. We found that myelomonocytic transcription factors are aberrantly expressed in these cell lines. Monocytic-lineage factor EGR1 was not induced by D3 (the monocytic inducer) but instead by RA (the granulocytic inducer) in lineage bipotent myeloblastic HL60. In promyelocytic NB4 cells, EGR1 levels were increased by D3, while Gfi-1 expression (which promotes the granulocytic lineage) was upregulated during D3-induced monocytic differentiation in HL60, and by RA treatment in monocytic U937 cells. Furthermore, RARα and VDR expression were not strongly correlated to differentiation. In response to different differentiation inducers, U937 exhibited the most distinct transcription factor expression profile, while similarly mature NB4 and HL60 were better coupled. Overall, the differentiation induction agents RA and D3 elicited cell-specific responses across these common FAB M1-M5 cell lines. PMID:26566473

  10. Butyrate-induced changes in nuclease sensitivity of chromatin cannot be correlated with transcriptional activation

    SciTech Connect

    Birren, B.W.; Taplitz, S.J.; Herschman, H.R.

    1987-11-01

    The authors examined in the H4IIE rat heptoma cell line the relationship between butyrate-induced changes in the nuclease sensitivity of chromatin and changes in transcriptional activity of specific genes. The butyrate-inducible metallothionein I (MT-I) gene underwent a dramatic increase in DNase I sensitivity after 3 h of butyrate treatment. However, genes not transcribed in H4IIE cells underwent the same changes in DNase I sensitivity. Thus, butyrate-induced increases in DNase I sensitivity are not sufficient for the transcriptional activation of a gene. Butyrate treatment has also been reported to alter the sensitivity of sequence to micrococcal nuclease (MNase) in a manner reflecting their tissue-specific expression. Butyrate exposure caused increased digestion of the MT-I gene by MNase. However, butyrate-induced MNase sensitivity also occurred for genes which are neither transcribed in untreated cells nor butyrate inducible. Moreover, cadmium, a potent transcriptional activator of the MT-I gene, does not alter the sensitivity of the MT-I gene to MNase. Thus, the butyrate-induced alterations in MNase sensitivity are neither sufficient for, necessary for, nor indicative of transcriptional activation.

  11. CD40-induced growth inhibition in epithelial cells is mimicked by Epstein-Barr Virus-encoded LMP1: involvement of TRAF3 as a common mediator.

    PubMed

    Eliopoulos, A G; Dawson, C W; Mosialos, G; Floettmann, J E; Rowe, M; Armitage, R J; Dawson, J; Zapata, J M; Kerr, D J; Wakelam, M J; Reed, J C; Kieff, E; Young, L S

    1996-11-21

    CD40, a member of the tumour necrosis factor receptor family, is expressed on the surface of B lymphocytes where its ligation provides a potent survival signal. CD40 is also expressed in basal epithelial cells and in a number of different carcinomas where its function remains unknown. We observed that contrary to the studies in normal B cells, CD40 ligation in carcinoma cell lines and in normal primary epithelial cells resulted in growth inhibition and enhanced susceptibility to apoptosis induced by anti-neoplastic drugs, TNF-alpha, Fas and ceramide. This effect was also observed in CD40-transfected Rat-1 fibroblasts. The expression of Bcl-2 did not affect growth inhibition induced by CD40 ligation in epithelial cells but the Epstein - Barr Virus-encoded latent membrane protein 1 (LMP1) blocked the effect. Whilst transient expression of LMP-1 resulted in the inhibition of epithelial cell growth, this effect was not observed with a LMP1 mutant lacking the binding domain for TRAF3, a protein which may mediate signal transduction by interacting with the cytoplasmic domains of both CD40 and LMP1. Transient expression of TRAF3 also inhibited epithelial cell growth, whilst expression of a dominant-negative TRAF3 partially blocked the inhibitory effect of CD40 ligation and of transient LMP1 expression. These results suggest that CD40 regulates epithelial cell growth in a manner mimicked by LMP1 and implicate TRAF3 as a common mediator in the transduction of the growth inhibitory signals generated via the CD40 and LMP1 pathways. PMID:8950992

  12. Viral Nucleases Induce an mRNA Degradation-Transcription Feedback Loop in Mammalian Cells.

    PubMed

    Abernathy, Emma; Gilbertson, Sarah; Alla, Ravi; Glaunsinger, Britt

    2015-08-12

    Gamma-herpesviruses encode a cytoplasmic mRNA-targeting endonuclease, SOX, that cleaves most cellular mRNAs. Cleaved fragments are subsequently degraded by the cellular 5'-3' mRNA exonuclease Xrn1, thereby suppressing cellular gene expression and facilitating viral evasion of host defenses. We reveal that mammalian cells respond to this widespread cytoplasmic mRNA decay by altering RNA Polymerase II (RNAPII) transcription in the nucleus. Measuring RNAPII recruitment to promoters and nascent mRNA synthesis revealed that the majority of affected genes are transcriptionally repressed in SOX-expressing cells. The transcriptional feedback does not occur in response to the initial viral endonuclease-induced cleavage, but instead to degradation of the cleaved fragments by cellular exonucleases. In particular, Xrn1 catalytic activity is required for transcriptional repression. Notably, viral mRNA transcription escapes decay-induced repression, and this escape requires Xrn1. Collectively, these results indicate that mRNA decay rates impact transcription and that gamma-herpesviruses use this feedback mechanism to facilitate viral gene expression. PMID:26211836

  13. A novel GDNF-inducible gene, BMZF3, encodes a transcriptional repressor associated with KAP-1

    SciTech Connect

    Suzuki, Chikage; Murakumo, Yoshiki Kawase, Yukari; Sato, Tomoko; Morinaga, Takatoshi; Fukuda, Naoyuki; Enomoto, Atsushi; Ichihara, Masatoshi; Takahashi, Masahide

    2008-02-01

    The Krueppel-associated box (KRAB)-containing zinc finger proteins (ZFPs) comprise the largest family of zinc finger transcription factors that function as transcriptional repressors. In the study of glial cell line-derived neurotrophic factor (GDNF)-RET signaling, we have identified bone marrow zinc finger 3 (BMZF3), encoding a KRAB-ZFP, as a GDNF-inducible gene by differential display analysis. The expression of BMZF3 transcripts in the human neuroblastoma cell line TGW increased 1 h after GDNF stimulation, as determined by Northern blotting and quantitative reverse-transcriptase polymerase chain reaction. The BMZF3 possesses transcriptional repressor activity in the KRAB domain. BMZF3 interacts with a co-repressor protein, KRAB-associated protein 1 (KAP-1), through the KRAB domain and siRNA-mediated knockdown of KAP-1 abolished the transcriptional repressor activity of BMZF3, indicating that KAP-1 is necessary for BMZF3 function. Furthermore, siRNA-mediated silencing of BMZF3 inhibited cell proliferation. These findings suggest that BMZF3 is a transcriptional repressor induced by GDNF that plays a role in cell proliferation.

  14. Transcription and double-strand breaks induce similar mitotic recombination events in Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    PubMed Central

    González-Barrera, Sergio; García-Rubio, María; Aguilera, Andrés

    2002-01-01

    We have made a comparative analysis of double-strand-break (DSB)-induced recombination and spontaneous recombination under low- and high-transcription conditions in yeast. We constructed two different recombination substrates, one for the analysis of intermolecular gene conversions and the other for intramolecular gene conversions and inversions. Such substrates were based on the same leu2-HOr allele fused to the tet promoter and containing a 21-bp HO site. Gene conversions and inversions were differently affected by rad1, rad51, rad52, and rad59 single and double mutations, consistent with the actual view that such events occur by different recombination mechanisms. However, the effect of each mutation on each type of recombination event was the same, whether associated with transcription or induced by the HO-mediated DSB. Both the highly transcribed DNA and the HO-cut sequence acted as recipients of the gene conversion events. These results are consistent with the hypothesis that transcription promotes initiation of recombination along the DNA sequence being transcribed. The similarity between transcription-associated and DSB-induced recombination suggests that transcription promotes DNA breaks. PMID:12399375

  15. Transcriptional program for nitrogen starvation-induced lipid accumulation in Chlamydomonas reinhardtii

    SciTech Connect

    Garcia de Lomana, Adrian Lopez; Schäuble, Sascha; Valenzuela, Jacob; Imam, Saheed; Carter, Warren; Bilgin, Damla D.; Yohn, Christopher B.; Turkarslan, Serdar; Reiss, David J.; Orellana, Monica V.; Price, Nathan D.; Baliga, Nitin S.

    2015-12-02

    Algae accumulate lipids to endure different kinds of environmental stresses including macronutrient starvation. Although this response has been extensively studied, an in depth understanding of the transcriptional regulatory network (TRN) that controls the transition into lipid accumulation remains elusive. In this study, we used a systems biology approach to elucidate the transcriptional program that coordinates the nitrogen starvation-induced metabolic readjustments that drive lipid accumulation in Chlamydomonas reinhardtii. We demonstrate that nitrogen starvation triggered differential regulation of 2147 transcripts, which were co-regulated in 215 distinct modules and temporally ordered as 31 transcriptional waves. An early-stage response was triggered within 12 min that initiated growth arrest through activation of key signaling pathways, while simultaneously preparing the intracellular environment for later stages by modulating transport processes and ubiquitin-mediated protein degradation. Subsequently, central metabolism and carbon fixation were remodeled to trigger the accumulation of triacylglycerols. Further analysis revealed that these waves of genome-wide transcriptional events were coordinated by a regulatory program orchestrated by at least 17 transcriptional regulators, many of which had not been previously implicated in this process. We demonstrate that the TRN coordinates transcriptional downregulation of 57 metabolic enzymes across a period of nearly 4 h to drive an increase in lipid content per unit biomass. Notably, this TRN appears to also drive lipid accumulation during sulfur starvation, while phosphorus starvation induces a different regulatory program. The TRN model described here is available as a community-wide web-resource at http://networks.systemsbiology.net/chlamy-portal. In conclusion, in this work, we have uncovered a comprehensive mechanistic model of the TRN controlling the transition from N starvation to lipid accumulation

  16. Transcriptional program for nitrogen starvation-induced lipid accumulation in Chlamydomonas reinhardtii

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Garcia de Lomana, Adrian Lopez; Schäuble, Sascha; Valenzuela, Jacob; Imam, Saheed; Carter, Warren; Bilgin, Damla D.; Yohn, Christopher B.; Turkarslan, Serdar; Reiss, David J.; Orellana, Monica V.; et al

    2015-12-02

    Algae accumulate lipids to endure different kinds of environmental stresses including macronutrient starvation. Although this response has been extensively studied, an in depth understanding of the transcriptional regulatory network (TRN) that controls the transition into lipid accumulation remains elusive. In this study, we used a systems biology approach to elucidate the transcriptional program that coordinates the nitrogen starvation-induced metabolic readjustments that drive lipid accumulation in Chlamydomonas reinhardtii. We demonstrate that nitrogen starvation triggered differential regulation of 2147 transcripts, which were co-regulated in 215 distinct modules and temporally ordered as 31 transcriptional waves. An early-stage response was triggered within 12 minmore » that initiated growth arrest through activation of key signaling pathways, while simultaneously preparing the intracellular environment for later stages by modulating transport processes and ubiquitin-mediated protein degradation. Subsequently, central metabolism and carbon fixation were remodeled to trigger the accumulation of triacylglycerols. Further analysis revealed that these waves of genome-wide transcriptional events were coordinated by a regulatory program orchestrated by at least 17 transcriptional regulators, many of which had not been previously implicated in this process. We demonstrate that the TRN coordinates transcriptional downregulation of 57 metabolic enzymes across a period of nearly 4 h to drive an increase in lipid content per unit biomass. Notably, this TRN appears to also drive lipid accumulation during sulfur starvation, while phosphorus starvation induces a different regulatory program. The TRN model described here is available as a community-wide web-resource at http://networks.systemsbiology.net/chlamy-portal. In conclusion, in this work, we have uncovered a comprehensive mechanistic model of the TRN controlling the transition from N starvation to lipid

  17. IFN-α Induces Transcription of Hypoxia-Inducible Factor-1α to Inhibit Proliferation of Human Endothelial Cells1

    PubMed Central

    Gerber, Scott A.; Pober, Jordan S.

    2009-01-01

    Expression of hypoxia-inducible factor (HIF)-1α, a transcription factor subunit increased by protein stabilization in response to hypoxia, is increased in human endothelial cells (ECs) by IFN-α under normoxic conditions. IFN-α increases HIF-1α transcript levels within 2 h by up to 50% and doubles HIF-1α protein expression. Based on pharmacological inhibition studies, the increase in HIF-1α mRNA involves new transcription, is independent of new protein synthesis, and requires JAK signaling. Protein knockdown by small interfering RNA confirms the involvement of JAK1 and TYK2, as well of IFN-stimulated gene factor 3 (ISGF3). IFN-γ does not significantly induce HIF-1α mRNA, but increases the magnitude and duration of the IFN-α effect. IFN-α-induced HIF-1α protein translocates to the nucleus and can bind to hypoxia response elements in DNA. However, IFN-α treatment fails to induce transcription of several prototypic HIF-responsive genes (VEGF-A, PPARγ, and prostacyclin synthase) due to an insufficient increase in HIF-1α protein levels. Although certain other HIF-responsive genes (PHD3 and VEGF-C) are induced following IFN-α and/or IFN-γ treatment, these responses are not inhibited by siRNA knockdown of HIF-1α. Additionally, IFN-α induction of ISGF3-dependent genes involved in innate immunity (viperin, OAS2, and CXCL10) are also unaffected by knockdown of HIF-1α. Interestingly, knockdown of HIF-1α significantly reduces the capacity of IFN-α to inhibit endothelial cell proliferation. We conclude that IFN-α induces the transcription of HIF-1α in human endothelial cells though a JAK-ISGF3 pathway under normoxic conditions, and that this response contributes to the antiproliferative activity of this cytokine. PMID:18606657

  18. Melorheostosis mimicking synovial osteochondromatosis.

    PubMed

    Wadhwa, Vibhor; Chhabra, Avneesh; Samet, Jonathan D

    2014-01-01

    Melorheostosis is an uncommon, sporadic, sclerosing bone lesion that may affect the adjacent soft tissues. It has been associated with many entities such as osteopoikilosis, soft tissue vascular malformations, bone and soft tissue tumors, nephrotic syndrome, segmental limb contractures, osteosarcoma, desmoid tumor, and mesenteric fibromatosis. Synovial osteochondromatosis is a benign neoplasia of the hyaline cartilage presenting as nodules in the subsynovial tissue of a joint or tendon sheath. The intra-articular extension of melorheostosis mimicking synovial osteochondromatosis has not been reported before. In this article, the authors describe an unusual case mimicking synovial chondromatosis arising as a result of melorheostosis and their characteristic imaging findings. PMID:25971832

  19. Wound Induced Tanscriptional Regulation of Benzylisoquinoline Pathway and Characterization of Wound Inducible PsWRKY Transcription Factor from Papaver somniferum

    PubMed Central

    Singh, Seema; Phukan, Ujjal J.; Gupta, M. M.; Shanker, Karuna; Shukla, Rakesh Kumar

    2013-01-01

    Wounding is required to be made in the walls of the green seed pod of Opium poppy prior exudation of latex. To withstand this kind of trauma plants regulate expression of some metabolites through an induced transcript level. 167 unique wound-inducible ESTs were identified by a repetitive round of cDNA subtraction after 5 hours of wounding in Papaver somniferum seedlings. Further repetitive reverse northern analysis of these ESTs revealed 80 transcripts showing more than two fold induction, validated through semi-quantitative RT-PCR & real time expression analysis. One of the major classified categories among identified ESTs belonged to benzylisoquinoline transcripts. Tissue specific metabolite analysis of benzylisoquinoline alkaloids (BIAs) in response to wounding revealed increased accumulation of narcotine and papaverine. Promoter analysis of seven transcripts of BIAs pathway showed the presence of W-box cis-element with the consensus sequence of TGAC, which is the proposed binding site for WRKY type transcription factors. One of the Wound inducible ‘WRKY’ EST isolated from our subtracted library was made full-length and named as ‘PsWRKY’. Bacterially expressed PsWRKY interacted with the W-box element having consensus sequence TTGACT/C present in the promoter region of BIAs biosynthetic pathway genes. PsWRKY further activated the TYDC promoter in yeast and transiently in tobacco BY2 cells. Preferential expression of PsWRKY in straw and capsule and its interaction with consensus W-box element present in BIAs pathway gene transcripts suggest its possible involvement in the wound induced regulation of BIAs pathway. PMID:23382823

  20. The acquired radioresistance in HeLa cells under conditions mimicking hypoxia was attenuated by a decreased expression of HIF subunit genes induced by RNA interference

    SciTech Connect

    Doi, Nobutaka; Ogawa, Ryohei; Cui, Zheng-Guo; Morii, Akihiro; Watanabe, Akihiko; Kanayama, Shinji; Yoneda, Yuko; Kondo, Takashi

    2015-05-01

    The cancer cells residing in the hypoxic layer are resistant to radiation and these are ones responsible for cancer recurrence after radiation therapy. One of the reasons why hypoxic cancer cells acquire radioresistance may be attributable to changes in the gene expression profile by the activation of hypoxia inducible factors (HIFs). However, the details underlying this process remain unknown. In this study, we investigated the effects of knockdown of HIF subunit genes to elucidate how HIF subunit genes may be involved in the radioresistance acquired by HeLa cells following exposure to a hypoxia mimic. Interestingly, HIF-1α and HIF-2α seemed mutually complementary for each other when either of them was suppressed. We thus suppressed the expression of both genes simultaneously. To do this, we developed a short hairpin RNA (shRNA) targeting a high homology region between HIF-1α and HIF-2α. It was shown that the expression of the shRNA effectively suppressed the acquisition of radioresistance following the hypoxia mimic. Moreover, it was confirmed that suppression of both subunits resulted in the downregulation of stem cell markers and the suppression of spheroid formation during the hypoxia mimicking-conditions. This shRNA-mediated knockdown method targeting a common region shared by a family of genes may offer a new candidate cancer treatment. - Highlights: • Incubation with CoCl{sub 2} confers radioresistance to HeLa cells. • Both HIF-1α and HIF-2α are involved in the acquisition of radioresistance. • An shRNA to a homology region of HIF-1α and HIF-2α suppressed the radioresistance. • The shRNA decreased cells with stem cell markers and a stem cell phenotype.

  1. Transcriptional and Metabolic Analysis of Senescence Induced by Preventing Pollination in Maize1[W][OA

    PubMed Central

    Sekhon, Rajandeep S.; Childs, Kevin L.; Santoro, Nicholas; Foster, Cliff E.; Buell, C. Robin; de Leon, Natalia; Kaeppler, Shawn M.

    2012-01-01

    Transcriptional and metabolic changes were evaluated during senescence induced by preventing pollination in the B73 genotype of maize (Zea mays). Accumulation of free glucose and starch and loss of chlorophyll in leaf was manifested early at 12 d after anthesis (DAA), while global transcriptional and phenotypic changes were evident only at 24 DAA. Internodes exhibited major transcriptomic changes only at 30 DAA. Overlaying expression data onto metabolic pathways revealed involvement of many novel pathways, including those involved in cell wall biosynthesis. To investigate the overlap between induced and natural senescence, transcriptional data from induced senescence in maize was compared with that reported for Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) undergoing natural and sugar-induced senescence. Notable similarities with natural senescence in Arabidopsis included up-regulation of senescence-associated genes (SAGs), ethylene and jasmonic acid biosynthetic genes, APETALA2, ethylene-responsive element binding protein, and no apical meristem transcription factors. However, differences from natural senescence were highlighted by unaltered expression of a subset of the SAGs, and cytokinin, abscisic acid, and salicylic acid biosynthesis genes. Key genes up-regulated during sugar-induced senescence in Arabidopsis, including a cysteine protease (SAG12) and three flavonoid biosynthesis genes (PRODUCTION OF ANTHOCYANIN PIGMENT1 (PAP1), PAP2, and LEUCOANTHOCYANIDIN DIOXYGENASE), were also induced, suggesting similarities in senescence induced by pollination prevention and sugar application. Coexpression analysis revealed networks involving known senescence-related genes and novel candidates; 82 of these were shared between leaf and internode networks, highlighting similarities in induced senescence in these tissues. Insights from this study will be valuable in systems biology of senescence in maize and other grasses. PMID:22732243

  2. ANTHRACYCLINE-INDUCED SUPRESSION OF GATA-4 TRANSCRIPTION FACTOR: IMPLICATION REGULATION OF CARDIAC MYOCYTE APOPTOSIS

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Anthracyclines are effective cancer chemotherapeutic agents but can induce serious cardiotoxicity. Understanding the mechanism of cardiac damage by these agents will help in development of better therapeutic strategies against cancer. The GATA-4 transcription factor is an important regulator of ca...

  3. BROMATE-INDUCED TRANSCRIPTIONAL CHANGES IN LONG-EVANS RAT KIDNEYS

    EPA Science Inventory


    Bromate-Induced Transcriptional Changes in Long-Evans Rat Kidneys.

    Ozone disinfection of surface waters containing bromide ion (Br-) results in the oxidation of bromide to bromate, which can be found in finished drinking water as a by-product. Potassium bromate (KBrO3)...

  4. Regulation of basal and induced levels of the MEL1 transcript in Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    PubMed Central

    Post-Beittenmiller, M A; Hamilton, R W; Hopper, J E

    1984-01-01

    The MEL1 gene in Saccharomyces cerevisiae is required for the production of alpha-galactosidase and for the catabolism of melibiose. Production of alpha-galactosidase is induced by galactose or melibiose and repressed by glucose. Inducibility is controlled by the positive and negative regulatory proteins GAL4 and GAL80, respectively. We have cloned the MEL1 gene to study its transcriptional expression and regulation. Evidence is presented that the MEL1 gene encodes alpha-galactosidase and that mel0 is a naturally occurring allele which lacks the alpha-galactosidase-coding sequences. RNAs prepared from wild-type cells and from cells carrying either the noninducible gal4-2 or GAL80S-100 allele grown on three different carbon sources were examined by Northern hybridization analyses. In wild-type cells under noninducing conditions, such as growth on glycerol-lactic acid, the MEL1 transcript was detected at a basal level which was 1 to 2% of the fully induced level. The basal level of expression was diminished in cells carrying the gal4-2 mutant allele but not in cells carrying the GAL80S-100 allele. The basal and induced RNA levels are repressed by glucose. Size determinations of the MEL1 transcripts detected in glycerol-lactic acid- and galactose-grown cells provided no evidence for two distinct transcripts. Images PMID:6209559

  5. IKK{epsilon} modulates RSV-induced NF-{kappa}B-dependent gene transcription

    SciTech Connect

    Bao Xiaoyong; Indukuri, Hemalatha; Liu Tianshuang; Liao Suiling; Tian, Bing; Brasier, Allan R.; Garofalo, Roberto P.; Casola, Antonella

    2010-12-20

    Respiratory syncytial virus (RSV), a negative-strand RNA virus, is the most common cause of epidemic respiratory disease in infants and young children. RSV infection of airway epithelial cells induces the expression of immune/inflammatory genes through the activation of a subset of transcription factors, including Nuclear Factor-{kappa}B (NF-{kappa}B). In this study we have investigated the role of the non canonical I{kappa}B kinase (IKK){epsilon} in modulating RSV-induced NF-{kappa}B activation. Our results show that inhibition of IKK{epsilon} activation results in significant impairment of viral-induced NF-{kappa}B-dependent gene expression, through a reduction in NF-{kappa}B transcriptional activity, without changes in nuclear translocation or DNA-binding activity. Absence of IKK{epsilon} results in a significant decrease of RSV-induced NF-{kappa}B phosphorylation on serine 536, a post-translational modification important for RSV-induced NF-{kappa}B-dependent gene expression, known to regulate NF-{kappa}B transcriptional activity without affecting nuclear translocation. This study identifies a novel mechanism by which IKK{epsilon} regulates viral-induced cellular signaling.

  6. IKKε MODULATES RSV-INDUCED NF-κB-DEPENDENT GENE TRANSCRIPTION

    PubMed Central

    Bao, Xiaoyong; Indukuri, Hemalatha; Liu, Tianshuang; Liao, Sui-Ling; Tian, Bing; Brasier, Allan R.; Garofalo, Roberto P.; Casola, Antonella

    2010-01-01

    Respiratory syncytial virus (RSV), a negative-strand RNA virus, is the most common cause of epidemic respiratory disease in infants and young children. RSV infection of airway epithelial cells induces the expression of immune/inflammatory genes through the activation of a subset of transcription factors, including Nuclear Factor-κB (NF-κB). In this study we have investigated the role of the non canonical IκB kinase (IKK)ε in modulating RSV-induced NF-κB activation. Our results show that inhibition of IKKε activation results in significant impairment of viral-induced NF-κB-dependent gene expression, through a reduction in NF-κB transcriptional activity, without changes in nuclear translocation or DNA-binding activity. Absence of IKKε results in a significant decrease of RSV-induced NF-κB phosphorylation on serine 536, a post-translational modification important for RSV-induced NF-κB-dependent gene expression, known to regulate NF-κB transcriptional activity without affecting nuclear translocation. This study identifies a novel mechanism by which IKKε regulates viral-induced cellular signaling. PMID:20961594

  7. Caspase 1 deficiency reduces inflammation-induced brain transcription

    PubMed Central

    Mastronardi, Claudio; Whelan, Fiona; Yildiz, Ozlem A.; Hannestad, Jonas; Elashoff, David; McCann, Samuel M.; Licinio, Julio; Wong, Ma-Li

    2007-01-01

    The systemic inflammatory response syndrome (SIRS) is a life-threatening medical condition characterized by a severe and generalized inflammatory state that can lead to multiple organ failure and shock. The CNS regulates many features of SIRS such as fever, cardiovascular, and neuroendocrine responses. Central and systemic manifestations of SIRS can be induced by LPS or IL-1β administration. The crucial role of IL-1β in inflammation has been further highlighted by studies of mice lacking caspase 1 (casp1, also known as IL-1β convertase), a protease that cleaves pro-IL-1β into mature IL-1β. Indeed, casp1 knockout (casp1−/−) mice survive lethal doses of LPS. The key role of IL-1β in sickness behavior and its de novo expression in the CNS during inflammation led us to test the hypothesis that IL-1β plays a major role modulating the brain transcriptome during SIRS. We show a gene–environment effect caused by LPS administration in casp1−/− mice. During SIRS, the expression of several genes, such as chemokines, GTPases, the metalloprotease ADAMTS1, IL-1RA, the inducible nitric oxide synthase, and cyclooxygenase-2, was differentially increased in casp1−/− mice. Our findings may contribute to the understanding of the molecular changes that take place within the CNS during sepsis and SIRS and the development of new therapies for these serious conditions. Our results indicate that those genes may also play a role in several neuropsychiatric conditions in which inflammation has been implicated and indicate that casp1 might be a potential therapeutic target for such disorders. PMID:17409187

  8. Up-Regulation of Human Inducible Nitric Oxide Synthase by p300 Transcriptional Complex.

    PubMed

    Guo, Zhong; Zheng, Liang; Liao, Xinghua; Geller, David

    2016-01-01

    p300, a ubiquitous transcription coactivator, plays an important role in gene activation. Our previous work demonstrated that human inducible nitric oxide synthase (hiNOS) expression can be highly induced with the cytokine mixture (CM) of TNF-α + IL-1β + IFN-γ. In this study, we investigated the functional role of p300 in the regulation of hiNOS gene expression. Our initial data showed that overexpression of p300 significantly increased the basal and cytokine-induced hiNOS promoter activities in A549 cells. Interestingly, p300 activated cytokine-induced hiNOS transcriptional activity was completely abrogated by deleting the upstream hiNOS enhancer at -5 kb to -6 kb in the promoter. Furthermore, p300 over-expression increased cytokine-induced transcriptional activity on a heterologous minimal TK promoter with the same hiNOS enhancer. Site-directed mutagenesis of the hiNOS AP-1 motifs revealed that an intact upstream (-5.3 kb) AP-1 binding site was critical for p300 mediated cytokine-induced hiNOS transcription. Furthermore, our ChIP analysis demonstrated that p300 was binding to Jun D and Fra-2 proteins at -5.3 kb AP-1 binding site in vivo. Lastly, our 3C assay was able to detect a long DNA loop between the hiNOS enhancer and core promoter site, and ChIP loop assay confirmed that p300 binds to AP-1 and RNA pol II proteins. Overall, our results suggest that coactivator p300 mediates cytokine-induced hiNOS transactivation by forming a distant DNA loop between its enhancer and core promoter region. PMID:26751080

  9. Cocaine Enhances HIV-1 Transcription in Macrophages by Inducing p38 MAPK Phosphorylation

    PubMed Central

    Swepson, Chelsie; Ranjan, Alok; Balasubramaniam, Muthukumar; Pandhare, Jui; Dash, Chandravanu

    2016-01-01

    Cocaine is a commonly used illicit drug among HIV-1 infected individuals and is known to increase HIV-1 replication in permissive cells including PBMCs, CD4+ T cells, and macrophages. Cocaine’s potentiating effects on HIV-1 replication in macrophages- the primary targets of the virus in the central nervous system, has been suggested to play an important role in HIV-1 neuro-pathogenesis. However, the mechanism by which cocaine enhances HIV-1 replication in macrophages remain poorly understood. Here, we report the identification of cocaine-induced signaling events that lead to enhanced HIV-1 transcription in macrophages. Treatment of physiologically relevant concentrations of cocaine enhanced HIV-1 transcription in a dose-dependent manner in infected THP-1 monocyte-derived macrophages (THP-1macs) and primary monocyte-derived macrophages (MDMs). Toward decoding the underlying mechanism, results presented in this report demonstrate that cocaine induces the phosphorylation of p38 mitogen activated protein kinase (p38 MAPK), a known activator of HIV-1 transcription. We also present data suggesting that the p38 MAPK-driven HIV-1 transcription is dependent on the induction of mitogen- and stress-activated protein kinase 1 (MSK1). Consequently, MSK1 mediates the phosphorylation of serine 10 residue of histone 3 (H3 Ser10), which is known to activate transcription of genes including that of HIV-1 in macrophages. Importantly, our results show that inhibition of p38 MAPK/MSK1 signaling by specific pharmacological inhibitors abrogated the positive effect of cocaine on HIV-1 transcription. These results validate the functional link between cocaine and p38 MAPK/MSK1 pathways. Together, our results demonstrate for the first time that the p38 MAPK/MSK1 signaling pathway plays a critical role in the cocaine-induced potentiating effects on HIV-1 infection, thus providing new insights into the interplay between cocaine abuse and HIV-1 neuro-pathogenesis. PMID:27375565

  10. Mitochondrial dysfunction induces SESN2 gene expression through Activating Transcription Factor 4.

    PubMed

    Garaeva, Alisa A; Kovaleva, Irina E; Chumakov, Peter M; Evstafieva, Alexandra G

    2016-01-01

    We found that inhibitors of mitochondrial respiratory chain complexes III (myxothiazol) and I (piericidin A) in some epithelial carcinoma cell lines induce transcription of the p53-responsive SESN2 gene that plays an important role in stress response and homeostatic regulation. However, the effect did not depend on p53 because i) there was no induction of p53 after the treatment with piericidin A; ii) after the treatment with myxothiazol the peak of SESN2 gene upregulation occurred as early as 5h, before the onset of p53 activation (13h); iii) a supplementation with uridine that abolishes the p53 activation in response to myxothiazol did not abrogate the induction of SESN2 transcripts; iv) in the p53 negative HCT116 p53 -/- cells SESN2 transcription could be also induced by myxothiazol. In response to the respiratory chain inhibitors we observed an induction of ATF4, the key transcription factor of the integrated stress response (ISR). We found that the induction of SESN2 transcripts could be prevented by the ISR inhibitory small molecule ISRIB. Also, by inhibiting or overexpressing ATF4 with specific shRNA or ATF4-expressing constructs, respectively, we have confirmed the role of ATF4 in the SESN2 gene upregulation induced by mitochondrial dysfunction. At a distance of 228 bp upstream from the SESN2 transcription start site we found a candidate sequence for the ATF4 binding site and confirmed its requirement for the induction of SESN2 in luciferase reporter experiments. We suggest that the upregulation of SESN2 by mitochondrial dysfunction provides a homeostatic feedback that attenuates biosynthetic processes during temporal losses of energy supply from mitochondria thereby assisting better adaptation and viability of cells in hostile environments. PMID:26771712

  11. Transcriptional profiling and biochemical analysis of mechanically induced cartilaginous tissues

    PubMed Central

    Salisbury Palomares, Kristy T.; Gerstenfeld, Louis C.; Wigner, Nathan A.; Lenburg, Marc E.; Einhorn, Thomas A.; Morgan, Elise F.

    2010-01-01

    Objective In order to characterize patterns of molecular expression that lead to cartilage formation in vivo in a post-natal setting, mRNA expression profiling was carried out across the timecourse of mechanically induced chondrogenesis. Methods Retired breeder Sprague-Dawley rats underwent production of a non-critical-size, transverse femoral osteotomy. Experimental animals (n=45) were subjected to bending stimulation (60° cyclic motion in the sagittal plane for 15 minutes/day) of the osteotomy gap beginning on post-operative day (POD) 10. Control animals (n=32) experienced continuous rigid fixation. mRNA isolated on POD 10, 17, 24, and 38 was analyzed using a microarray containing 608 genes involved in skeletal development, tissue differentiation, fracture healing, and mechanotransduction. The glycosaminoglycan (GAG) content of the stimulated tissues was compared to native articular cartilage as a means of assessing the progression of chondrogenic development of the tissues. Results The majority of the 100 genes that were differentially expressed were upregulated in response to mechanical stimulation. Many of these genes are associated with articular cartilage development and maintenance, diarthroidal joint development, cell adhesion, extracellular matrix synthesis, signal transduction, and skeletal development. Quantitative real-time PCR results were consistent with the microarray findings. The GAG content of the stimulated tissues increased over time and was no different from that of articular cartilage at POD 38. Conclusions The mechanical stimulation caused upregulation of genes principally involved in joint cavity morphogenesis and critical to articular cartilage function. Further study of this type of stimulation may identify key signaling events required for post-natal, hyaline cartilage formation. PMID:20131271

  12. The transcription factor MEF2C mediates cardiomyocyte hypertrophy induced by IGF-1 signaling

    SciTech Connect

    Munoz, Juan Pablo; Collao, Andres; Chiong, Mario; Maldonado, Carola; Adasme, Tatiana; Carrasco, Loreto; Ocaranza, Paula; Bravo, Roberto; Gonzalez, Leticia; Diaz-Araya, Guillermo; Hidalgo, Cecilia; Lavandero, Sergio

    2009-10-09

    Myocyte enhancer factor 2C (MEF2C) plays an important role in cardiovascular development and is a key transcription factor for cardiac hypertrophy. Here, we describe MEF2C regulation by insulin-like growth factor-1 (IGF-1) and its role in IGF-1-induced cardiac hypertrophy. We found that IGF-1 addition to cultured rat cardiomyocytes activated MEF2C, as evidenced by its increased nuclear localization and DNA binding activity. IGF-1 stimulated MEF2 dependent-gene transcription in a time-dependent manner, as indicated by increased MEF2 promoter-driven reporter gene activity; IGF-1 also induced p38-MAPK phosphorylation, while an inhibitor of p38-MAPK decreased both effects. Additionally, inhibitors of phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase and calcineurin prevented IGF-1-induced MEF2 transcriptional activity. Via MEF2C-dependent signaling, IGF-1 also stimulated transcription of atrial natriuretic factor and skeletal {alpha}-actin but not of fos-lux reporter genes. These novel data suggest that MEF2C activation by IGF-1 mediates the pro-hypertrophic effects of IGF-1 on cardiac gene expression.

  13. Signal-Induced Functions of the Transcription Factor TFII-I

    PubMed Central

    Roy, Ananda L

    2007-01-01

    We have learned a great deal over the last several years about the molecular mechanisms that govern cell growth, cell division and cell death. Normal cells pass through cell cycle (growth) and divide in response to mitogenic signals that are transduced through their cognate cell surface receptors to the nucleus. Despite the fact that cellular growth and division are mechanistically distinct steps, they are usually coordinately regulated, which is critical for normal cellular proliferation. The precise mechanistic basis for this coordinated regulation is unclear. TFII-I is a unique, signal induced multifunctional transcription factor that is activated upon a variety of signaling pathways and appears to participate in distinct phases of cell growth. For instance, TFII-I is required for growth factor-induced transcriptional activation of the c-fos gene, which is essential for cell cycle entry. Two alternatively spliced isoforms of TFII-I exhibit opposing but necessary functions for mitogen-induced transcriptional activation of c-fos. Besides transcriptional activation of the c-fos proto-oncogene and eventual entry into cell cycle, TFII-I also appears to have a role in later phases of the cell cycle and cell division. Here we discuss how a multitude of signaling inputs target TFII-I isoforms, which may exert their functions in distinct phases of the cell cycle and play a key role in the coordinated regulation of cellular proliferation. PMID:17976384

  14. Phytochrome and retrograde signalling pathways converge to antagonistically regulate a light-induced transcriptional network

    PubMed Central

    Martín, Guiomar; Leivar, Pablo; Ludevid, Dolores; Tepperman, James M.; Quail, Peter H.; Monte, Elena

    2016-01-01

    Plastid-to-nucleus retrograde signals emitted by dysfunctional chloroplasts impact photomorphogenic development, but the molecular link between retrograde- and photosensory-receptor signalling has remained unclear. Here, we show that the phytochrome and retrograde signalling (RS) pathways converge antagonistically to regulate the expression of the nuclear-encoded transcription factor GLK1, a key regulator of a light-induced transcriptional network central to photomorphogenesis. GLK1 gene transcription is directly repressed by PHYTOCHROME-INTERACTING FACTOR (PIF)-class bHLH transcription factors in darkness, but light-activated phytochrome reverses this activity, thereby inducing expression. Conversely, we show that retrograde signals repress this induction by a mechanism independent of PIF mediation. Collectively, our data indicate that light at moderate levels acts through the plant's nuclear-localized sensory-photoreceptor system to induce appropriate photomorphogenic development, but at excessive levels, sensed through the separate plastid-localized RS system, acts to suppress such development, thus providing a mechanism for protection against photo-oxidative damage by minimizing the tissue exposure to deleterious radiation. PMID:27150909

  15. Phytochrome and retrograde signalling pathways converge to antagonistically regulate a light-induced transcriptional network.

    PubMed

    Martín, Guiomar; Leivar, Pablo; Ludevid, Dolores; Tepperman, James M; Quail, Peter H; Monte, Elena

    2016-01-01

    Plastid-to-nucleus retrograde signals emitted by dysfunctional chloroplasts impact photomorphogenic development, but the molecular link between retrograde- and photosensory-receptor signalling has remained unclear. Here, we show that the phytochrome and retrograde signalling (RS) pathways converge antagonistically to regulate the expression of the nuclear-encoded transcription factor GLK1, a key regulator of a light-induced transcriptional network central to photomorphogenesis. GLK1 gene transcription is directly repressed by PHYTOCHROME-INTERACTING FACTOR (PIF)-class bHLH transcription factors in darkness, but light-activated phytochrome reverses this activity, thereby inducing expression. Conversely, we show that retrograde signals repress this induction by a mechanism independent of PIF mediation. Collectively, our data indicate that light at moderate levels acts through the plant's nuclear-localized sensory-photoreceptor system to induce appropriate photomorphogenic development, but at excessive levels, sensed through the separate plastid-localized RS system, acts to suppress such development, thus providing a mechanism for protection against photo-oxidative damage by minimizing the tissue exposure to deleterious radiation. PMID:27150909

  16. Transcription of pattern recognition receptors and abortive agents induced chemokines in the bovine pregnant uterus.

    PubMed

    Silva, Ana Patrícia Carvalho; Costa, Erica Azevedo; Macêdo, Auricélio Alves; Martins, Telma da Mata; Borges, Alan Maia; Paixão, Tatiane Alves; Santos, Renato Lima

    2012-01-15

    Pattern recognition receptors (PRRs) are important components of the innate immune system whose ligands are specific pathogen associated molecular patterns (PAMPs). Considering the scarcity of studies on transcription of PRRs in the pregnant uterus of cows, and its response to PAMPs and microorganisms that cause abortion in cattle, this study aimed to characterize the transcription of TLR1-10, NOD1, NOD2 and MD2 in bovine uterus throughout gestation and to investigate the sensitivity of different uterine tissues at third trimester of pregnancy to purified TLR ligands or heat-killed Brucella abortus, Salmonella enterica serotype Dublin (S. Dublin), Listeria monocytogenes, and Aspergillus fumigatus, by assessing chemokine transcription. RNA extracted from endometrium, placentome and intercotiledonary region of cows at the first (n=6), second (n=6), and third (n=6) trimesters of pregnancy were subjected to real time RT-PCR. After stimulation of endometrium and intercotiledonary regions with purified TLR ligands or heat-killed microorganisms, gene transcription was assessed by real time RT-PCR. In the placentome, there was no significant variation in TLRs transcription throughout the three trimesters of pregnancy. In the endometrium, there was significant variation in TLR4 and TLR5 transcription during the three stages of gestation; i.e. TLR4 transcription was higher during the third trimester, whereas TLR5 transcription was higher during the last two trimesters. In the intercotiledonary region, there was significant variation in transcription of TLR1/6, TLR7, and TLR8, which were more strongly expressed during the first trimester of pregnancy. At the third trimester of gestation, significant transcription of CXCL6 and CXCL8 was detected mostly in endometrial tissues in response to purified TLR4 and TLR2 ligands. Transcription of these chemokines was induced in the endometrium and intercotiledonary region at the third trimester of pregnancy when stimulated with heat

  17. Regulation of endogenous human gene expression by ligand-inducible TALE transcription factors.

    PubMed

    Mercer, Andrew C; Gaj, Thomas; Sirk, Shannon J; Lamb, Brian M; Barbas, Carlos F

    2014-10-17

    The construction of increasingly sophisticated synthetic biological circuits is dependent on the development of extensible tools capable of providing specific control of gene expression in eukaryotic cells. Here, we describe a new class of synthetic transcription factors that activate gene expression in response to extracellular chemical stimuli. These inducible activators consist of customizable transcription activator-like effector (TALE) proteins combined with steroid hormone receptor ligand-binding domains. We demonstrate that these ligand-responsive TALE transcription factors allow for tunable and conditional control of gene activation and can be used to regulate the expression of endogenous genes in human cells. Since TALEs can be designed to recognize any contiguous DNA sequence, the conditional gene regulatory system described herein will enable the design of advanced synthetic gene networks. PMID:24251925

  18. The activation-induced cytidine deaminase (AID) efficiently targets DNA in nucleosomes but only during transcription

    PubMed Central

    Shen, Hong Ming; Poirier, Michael G.; Allen, Michael J.; North, Justin; Lal, Ratnesh; Widom, Jonathan

    2009-01-01

    The activation-induced cytidine deaminase (AID) initiates somatic hypermutation, class-switch recombination, and gene conversion of immunoglobulin genes. In vitro, AID has been shown to target single-stranded DNA, relaxed double-stranded DNA, when transcribed, or supercoiled DNA. To simulate the in vivo situation more closely, we have introduced two copies of a nucleosome positioning sequence, MP2, into a supercoiled AID target plasmid to determine where around the positioned nucleosomes (in the vicinity of an ampicillin resistance gene) cytidine deaminations occur in the absence or presence of transcription. We found that without transcription nucleosomes prevented cytidine deamination by AID. However, with transcription AID readily accessed DNA in nucleosomes on both DNA strands. The experiments also showed that AID targeting any DNA molecule was the limiting step, and they support the conclusion that once targeted to DNA, AID acts processively in naked DNA and DNA organized within transcribed nucleosomes. PMID:19380635

  19. Transcription inhibitors prevent amnesia induced by NMDA antagonist-mediated impairment of memory reconsolidation.

    PubMed

    Nikitin, Vladimir P; Solntseva, Svetlana V; Shevelkin, Alexey V

    2016-09-01

    Recent studies report that long-term memory retrieval can induce memory reconsolidation, and impairment of this reconsolidation might lead to amnesia. Previously, we found that reconsolidation of a conditioned food aversion memory could be disrupted by translation inhibitors for up to 3 h following a reconsolidation event, thus inducing amnesia. We examined the role of transcription processes in the induction of amnesia in the land snail, Helix lucorum. It received N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA) glutamate receptor antagonist and transcription inhibitor 2 days after learning in a neutral context environment; it was then transferred to the learning context followed by reminder with conditioned food stimulus. NMDA receptor blockade, followed by a reminder session, impaired reconsolidation of an aversive memory. Simultaneous administration of an NMDA receptor antagonist and a transcription inhibitor prior to reminder of an aversive event prevented amnesia induction. In contrast, when a transcription inhibitor alone was injected prior to a reminder session, the blockade had no effect on memory. We found that transcription inhibition 0-6 h after amnesia induction suppressed memory loss, but this suppression was lost when inhibitors were administered 9 h after amnesia. Thus, amnesia is likely dependent on transcription processes within a 9-h time window. We can hypothesize that amnesia induction initiates synthesis of specific mRNAs and proteins; furthermore, these events occur within specific time-dependent windows. Our findings could prove useful for the analysis of amnesia formation and for the development of possible ways to prevent memory loss associated with various diseases and injuries in animals and humans. PMID:26742927

  20. A role for the autophagy regulator Transcription Factor EB in amiodarone-induced phospholipidosis.

    PubMed

    Buratta, Sandra; Urbanelli, Lorena; Ferrara, Giuseppina; Sagini, Krizia; Goracci, Laura; Emiliani, Carla

    2015-06-01

    The antiarrhythmic agent amiodarone, a cationic amphiphilic drug, is known to induce phospholipidosis, i.e. the accumulation of phospholipids within lysosomal structures to give multi-lamellar inclusion bodies. Despite the concerns raised about phospholipidosis in the recent years, the molecular mechanisms underlying amiodarone- or other cationic amphiphilic drug-induced phospholipidosis are still under investigation. Here we demonstrated that amiodarone doses able to induce phospholiposis according to NBD-PC uptake assay (1-12 μM, 24 h) activates Transcription Factor EB (TFEB), a pivotal regulator of the autophagic pathway, in human HepG2 cells. Further evidences confirmed the effect of amiodarone on the autophagic-lysosomal system in HepG2 and BEAS-2B cells: lysosomal β-hexosaminidase isoenzymes secretion, transcriptional up-regulation of the lysosomal β-hexosaminidase α-subunit, alteration of cathepsin B, D and L intracellular maturation in a cell- and protease-specific manner. Autophagy activation was also demonstrated by increased conversion of LC3-I into LC3-II and reduced phosphorylation of the mTORC1 target S6 kinase. Besides, we provided evidence that TFEB over-expression prevents amiodarone-induced phospholipid accumulation, suggesting that this transcription factor could be a possible target to develop strategies for phospholipidosis attenuation. PMID:25881747

  1. NeuroD1 reprograms chromatin and transcription factor landscapes to induce the neuronal program.

    PubMed

    Pataskar, Abhijeet; Jung, Johannes; Smialowski, Pawel; Noack, Florian; Calegari, Federico; Straub, Tobias; Tiwari, Vijay K

    2016-01-01

    Cell fate specification relies on the action of critical transcription factors that become available at distinct stages of embryonic development. One such factor is NeuroD1, which is essential for eliciting the neuronal development program and possesses the ability to reprogram other cell types into neurons. Given this capacity, it is important to understand its targets and the mechanism underlying neuronal specification. Here, we show that NeuroD1 directly binds regulatory elements of neuronal genes that are developmentally silenced by epigenetic mechanisms. This targeting is sufficient to initiate events that confer transcriptional competence, including reprogramming of transcription factor landscape, conversion of heterochromatin to euchromatin, and increased chromatin accessibility, indicating potential pioneer factor ability of NeuroD1. The transcriptional induction of neuronal fate genes is maintained via epigenetic memory despite a transient NeuroD1 induction during neurogenesis. NeuroD1 also induces genes involved in the epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition, thereby promoting neuronal migration. Our study not only reveals the NeuroD1-dependent gene regulatory program driving neurogenesis but also increases our understanding of how cell fate specification during development involves a concerted action of transcription factors and epigenetic mechanisms. PMID:26516211

  2. Nuclear receptor-induced transcription is driven by spatially and timely restricted waves of ROS

    PubMed Central

    Perillo, Bruno; Di Santi, Annalisa; Cernera, Gustavo; Ombra, Maria Neve; Castoria, Gabriella; Migliaccio, Antimo

    2014-01-01

    Gene expression is governed by chromatin mainly through posttranslational modifications at the N-terminal tails of nucleosomal histone proteins. According to the histone code theory, peculiar sets of such modifications (marks) give rise to reproducible final effects on transcription and, very recently, a further level of complexity has been highlighted in binary switches between specific marks at adjacent residues. In particular, disappearance of dimethyl-lysine 9 in histone H3 is faced by phosphorylation of the following serine during activation of gene expression. Demethylation of lysine 9 by the lysine-specific demethylase 1 (LSD1) is a pre-requisite for addition of the phosphoryl mark to serine 10 and an essential step in the transcriptional control by estrogens. It generates a local burst of oxygen reactive species (ROS) that induce oxidation of nearby nucleotides and recruitment of repair enzymes with a consequent formation of single or double stranded nicks on DNA that modify chromatin flexibility in order to allow correct assembly of the transcriptional machinery.   We describe here the molecular mechanism by which members of the family of nuclear receptors prevent the potential damage to DNA during transcription of target genes elicited by the use of ROS to shape chromatin. The mechanism is based on the presence of phosphorylated serine 10 in histone H3 to prevent unbalanced DNA oxidation waves. We also discuss the opportunities raised by the use of voluntary derangement of this servo system to induce selective death in hormone-responsive transformed cells. PMID:25482200

  3. Abiotic and Biotic Stressors Causing Equivalent Mortality Induce Highly Variable Transcriptional Responses in the Soybean Aphid

    PubMed Central

    Enders, Laramy S.; Bickel, Ryan D.; Brisson, Jennifer A.; Heng-Moss, Tiffany M.; Siegfried, Blair D.; Zera, Anthony J.; Miller, Nicholas J.

    2014-01-01

    Environmental stress affects basic organismal functioning and can cause physiological, developmental, and reproductive impairment. However, in many nonmodel organisms, the core molecular stress response remains poorly characterized and the extent to which stress-induced transcriptional changes differ across qualitatively different stress types is largely unexplored. The current study examines the molecular stress response of the soybean aphid (Aphis glycines) using RNA sequencing and compares transcriptional responses to multiple stressors (heat, starvation, and plant defenses) at a standardized stress level (27% adult mortality). Stress-induced transcriptional changes showed remarkable variation, with starvation, heat, and plant defensive stress altering the expression of 3985, 510, and 12 genes, respectively. Molecular responses showed little overlap across all three stressors. However, a common transcriptional stress response was identified under heat and starvation, involved with up-regulation of glycogen biosynthesis and molecular chaperones and down-regulation of bacterial endosymbiont cellular and insect cuticular components. Stressor-specific responses indicated heat affected expression of heat shock proteins and cuticular components, whereas starvation altered a diverse set of genes involved in primary metabolism, oxidative reductive processes, nucleosome and histone assembly, and the regulation of DNA repair and replication. Exposure to host plant defenses elicited the weakest response, of which half of the genes were of unknown function. This study highlights the need for standardizing stress levels when comparing across stress types and provides a basis for understanding the role of general vs. stressor specific molecular responses in aphids. PMID:25538100

  4. Fanconi anemia pathway regulates convergent transcription-induced cell death at trinucleotide repeats in human cells

    PubMed Central

    Chatterjee, Nimrat; Lin, Yunfu; Wilson, John H.

    2016-01-01

    Almost 20 incurable neurodegenerative disorders are caused by trinucleotide repeat (TNR) expansion beyond a certain threshold, with disease time of onset and severity positively correlating with repeat length. Typically, long TNRs display a bias toward further expansion and repeats continue to expand not only during germline transmissions from parents to offspring, but also remain highly unstable in somatic tissues of patients. Hence, understanding TNR instability mechanisms sheds light on underlying disease pathology. Recently, we showed that activated ATR is the major signal for convergent-transcription-induced cell death at CAG repeats and is regulated by the mismatch repair (MMR) pathway. Additionally, components of other DNA repair pathways such as transcription-coupled nucleotide excision repair (TC-NER) and R-loop resolution by RNaseH reduce cell death. Because activated ATR signals the Fanconi anemia (FA) pathway of interstrand crosslink DNA repair, we asked whether the FA pathway also modulates convergent-transcription-induced cell death at expanded CAG repeats. We show here that siRNA knockdown of FA components—FANCI, FANCJ, FANCM, FANCA, and FANCD2—decreases cell death, suggesting that FA proteins, like MMR proteins, are activators of cell death during convergent transcription.

  5. Phytochrome-interacting transcription factors PIF4 and PIF5 induce leaf senescence in Arabidopsis.

    PubMed

    Sakuraba, Yasuhito; Jeong, Jinkil; Kang, Min-Young; Kim, Junghyun; Paek, Nam-Chon; Choi, Giltsu

    2014-01-01

    Plants initiate senescence to shed photosynthetically inefficient leaves. Light deprivation induces leaf senescence, which involves massive transcriptional reprogramming to dismantle cellular components and remobilize nutrients. In darkness, intermittent pulses of red light can inhibit senescence, likely via phytochromes. However, the precise molecular mechanisms transducing the signals from light perception to the inhibition of senescence remain elusive. Here, we show that in Arabidopsis, dark-induced senescence requires phytochrome-interacting transcription factors PIF4 and PIF5 (PIF4/PIF5). ELF3 and phytochrome B inhibit senescence by repressing PIF4/PIF5 at the transcriptional and post-translational levels, respectively. PIF4/PIF5 act in the signalling pathways of two senescence-promoting hormones, ethylene and abscisic acid, by directly activating expression of EIN3, ABI5 and EEL. In turn, PIF4, PIF5, EIN3, ABI5 and EEL directly activate the expression of the major senescence-promoting NAC transcription factor ORESARA1, thus forming multiple, coherent feed-forward loops. Our results reveal how classical light signalling connects to senescence in Arabidopsis. PMID:25119965

  6. Mismatch repair enhances convergent transcription-induced cell death at trinucleotide repeats by activating ATR.

    PubMed

    Chatterjee, Nimrat; Lin, Yunfu; Wilson, John H

    2016-06-01

    Trinucleotide repeat (TNR) expansion beyond a certain threshold results in some 20 incurable neurodegenerative disorders where disease anticipation positively correlates with repeat length. Long TNRs typically display a bias toward further expansion during germinal transmission from parents to offspring, and then are highly unstable in somatic tissues of affected individuals. Understanding mechanisms of TNR instability will provide insights into disease pathogenesis. Previously, we showed that enhanced convergent transcription at long CAG repeat tracks induces TNR instability and cell death via ATR activation. Components of TC-NER (transcription-coupled nucleotide excision repair) and RNaseH enzymes that resolve RNA/DNA hybrids oppose cell death, whereas the MSH2 component of MMR (mismatch repair) enhances cell death. The exact role of the MMR pathway during convergent transcription-induced cell death at CAG repeats is not well understood. In this study, we show that siRNA knockdowns of MMR components-MSH2, MSH3, MLHI, PMS2, and PCNA-reduce DNA toxicity. Furthermore, knockdown of MSH2, MLH1, and PMS2 significantly reduces the frequency of ATR foci formation. These observations suggest that MMR proteins activate DNA toxicity by modulating ATR foci formation during convergent transcription. PMID:27131875

  7. Identification of two juvenile hormone inducible transcription factors from the silkworm, Bombyx mori.

    PubMed

    Matsumoto, Hitoshi; Ueno, Chihiro; Nakamura, Yuki; Kinjoh, Terunori; Ito, Yuka; Shimura, Sachiko; Noda, Hiroaki; Imanishi, Shigeo; Mita, Kazuei; Fujiwara, Haruhiko; Hiruma, Kiyoshi; Shinoda, Tetsuro; Kamimura, Manabu

    2015-09-01

    Juvenile hormone (JH) regulates many physiological processes in insects. However, the signal cascades in which JH is active have not yet been fully elucidated, particularly in comparison to another major hormone ecdysteroid. Here we identified two JH inducible transcription factors as candidate components of JH signaling pathways in the silkworm, Bombyx mori. DNA microarray analysis showed that expression of two transcription factor genes, E75 and Enhancer of split mβ (E(spl)mβ), was induced by juvenile hormone I (JH I) in NIAS-Bm-aff3 cells. Real time RT-PCR analysis confirmed that expression of four E75 isoforms (E75A, E75B, E75C and E75D) and E(spl)mβ was 3-8 times greater after JH I addition. Addition of the protein synthesis inhibitor cycloheximide did not suppress JH-induced expression of the genes, indicating that they were directly induced by JH. JH-induced expression of E75 and E(spl)mβ was also observed in four other B. mori cell lines and in larval hemocytes of final instar larvae. Notably, E75A expression was induced very strongly in larval hemocytes by topical application of the JH analog fenoxycarb; the level of induced expression was comparable to that produced by feeding larvae with 20-hydroxyecdysone. These results suggest that E75 and E(spl)mβ are general and direct target genes of JH and that the transcription factors encoded by these genes play important roles in JH signaling. PMID:25770979

  8. Urticaria mimickers in children.

    PubMed

    Mathur, Anubhav N; Mathes, Erin F

    2013-01-01

    Acute urticaria is a self-limited cutaneous condition marked by transient, erythematous, and pruritic wheals. It is a hypersensitivity response that is often secondary to infection, medications, or food allergies in children. In contrast, the urticarial "mimickers" described in this review article are often seen in the context of fever and extracutaneous manifestations in pediatric patients. The differential diagnosis ranges from benign and self-limited hypersensitivity responses to multisystem inflammatory diseases. Establishing the correct diagnosis of an urticarial rash in a pediatric patient is necessary to both prevent an unnecessary work up for self-limited conditions and to appropriately recognize and evaluate multisystem inflammatory disorders. Herein, we describe two cases to illustrate the clinical manifestations, laboratory findings, histopathology and differential diagnoses for several mimickers of acute urticaria including: urticaria multiforme, serum sickness like reaction, Henoch-Schönlein purpura, acute hemorrhagic edema of infancy, systemic onset juvenile idiopathic arthritis, cryopyrin associated periodic syndromes, and urticarial vasculitis. PMID:24552410

  9. Overlapping sites for constitutive and induced DNA binding factors involved in interferon-stimulated transcription.

    PubMed Central

    Dale, T C; Rosen, J M; Guille, M J; Lewin, A R; Porter, A G; Kerr, I M; Stark, G R

    1989-01-01

    A 14 bp interferon (IFN)-stimulated response element (ISRE) from 6-16, a human gene regulated by alpha-IFN, confers IFN inducibility on a heterologous thymidine kinase promoter. A 39 bp double-stranded oligonucleotide corresponding to a 5' region of 6-16 which includes the ISRE competes for factors required for gene expression by alpha-IFN in transfected cells and a single base change (A-11 to C) within the ISRE (GGGAAAATGAAACT) abolishes this competition. Band-shift assays performed with whole-cell extracts and the 39 bp oligonucleotide reveal specific complexes formed by rapidly induced and constitutive factors, both of which fail to bind to the A-11 to C oligonucleotide. A detailed footprinting analysis reveals that these two types of factors bind to overlapping sites within the ISRE, but in very different ways. These data were used to design oligonucleotides which decreased the formation of the inducible complex without affecting the constitutive one. Changes at the 5' margin of the ISRE and upstream of it markedly decrease formation of the induced but not the constitutive complex and also abolish the ability of the 39 bp sequence to function as an inducible enhancer with the thymidine kinase promoter. Thus, induction of 6-16 transcription in IFN-treated cells is likely to be stimulated by binding of the induced factor to the ISRE and upstream sequences, while the subsequent suppression of transcription may involve competition for the ISRE by the other class of factors. Images PMID:2721502

  10. Wnt signaling induces transcription, spatial proximity, and translocation of fusion gene partners in human hematopoietic cells.

    PubMed

    Ugarte, Giorgia D; Vargas, Macarena F; Medina, Matías A; León, Pablo; Necuñir, David; Elorza, Alvaro A; Gutiérrez, Soraya E; Moon, Randall T; Loyola, Alejandra; De Ferrari, Giancarlo V

    2015-10-01

    Chromosomal translocations are frequently associated with a wide variety of cancers, particularly hematologic malignancies. A recurrent chromosomal abnormality in acute myeloid leukemia is the reciprocal translocation t(8;21) that fuses RUNX1 and ETO genes. We report here that Wnt/β-catenin signaling increases the expression of ETO and RUNX1 genes in human hematopoietic progenitors. We found that β-catenin is rapidly recruited into RNA polymerase II transcription factories (RNAPII-Ser5) and that ETO and RUNX1 genes are brought into close spatial proximity upon Wnt3a induction. Notably, long-term treatment of cells with Wnt3a induces the generation a frequent RUNX1-ETO translocation event. Thus, Wnt/β-catenin signaling induces transcription and translocation of RUNX1 and ETO fusion gene partners, opening a novel window to understand the onset/development of leukemia. PMID:26333776

  11. Systematic Analysis of the Transcriptional Switch Inducing Migration of Border Cells

    PubMed Central

    Borghese, Lodovica; Fletcher, Georgina; Mathieu, Juliette; Atzberger, Ann; Eades, William C.; Cagan, Ross L.; Rørth, Pernille

    2010-01-01

    Summary Cell migration within a natural context is tightly controlled, often by specific transcription factors. However, the switch from stationary to migratory behavior is poorly understood. Border cells perform a spatially and temporally controlled invasive migration during Drosophila oogenesis. Slbo, a C/EBP family transcriptional activator, is required for them to become migratory. We purified wild-type and slbo mutant border cells as well as nonmigratory follicle cells and performed comparative whole-genome expression profiling, followed by functional tests of the contributions of identified targets to migration. About 300 genes were significantly upregulated in border cells, many dependent on Slbo. Among these, the microtubule regulator Stathmin was strongly upregulated and was required for normal migration. Actin cytoskeleton regulators were also induced, including, surprisingly, a large cluster of “muscle-specific” genes. We conclude that Slbo induces multiple cytoskeletal effectors, and that each contributes to the behavioral changes in border cells. PMID:16580994

  12. Retinoid-induced apoptosis and Sp1 cleavage occur independently of transcription and require caspase activation.

    PubMed Central

    Piedrafita, F J; Pfahl, M

    1997-01-01

    Vitamin A and its derivatives, the retinoids, are essential regulators of many important biological functions, including cell growth and differentiation, development, homeostasis, and carcinogenesis. Natural retinoids such as all-trans retinoic acid can induce cell differentiation and inhibit growth of certain cancer cells. We recently identified a novel class of synthetic retinoids with strong anti-cancer cell activities in vitro and in vivo which can induce apoptosis in several cancer cell lines. Using an electrophoretic mobility shift assay, we analyzed the DNA binding activity of several transcription factors in T cells treated with apoptotic retinoids. We found that the DNA binding activity of the general transcription factor Sp1 is lost in retinoid-treated T cells undergoing apoptosis. A truncated Sp1 protein is detected by immunoblot analysis, and cytosolic protein extracts prepared from apoptotic cells contain a protease activity which specifically cleaves purified Sp1 in vitro. This proteolysis of Sp1 can be inhibited by N-ethylmaleimide and iodoacetamide, indicating that a cysteine protease mediates cleavage of Sp1. Furthermore, inhibition of Sp1 cleavage by ZVAD-fmk and ZDEVD-fmk suggests that caspases are directly involved in this event. In fact, caspases 2 and 3 are activated in T cells after treatment with apoptotic retinoids. The peptide inhibitors also blocked retinoid-induced apoptosis, as well as processing of caspases and proteolysis of Sp1 and poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase in intact cells. Degradation of Sp1 occurs early during apoptosis and is therefore likely to have profound effects on the basal transcription status of the cell. Interestingly, retinoid-induced apoptosis does not require de novo mRNA and protein synthesis, suggesting that a novel mechanism of retinoid signaling is involved, triggering cell death in a transcriptional activation-independent, caspase-dependent manner. PMID:9343396

  13. PTEN regulates p300-dependent hypoxia-inducible factor 1 transcriptional activity through Forkhead transcription factor 3a (FOXO3a)

    PubMed Central

    Emerling, Brooke M.; Weinberg, Frank; Liu, Juinn-Lin; Mak, Tak W.; Chandel, Navdeep S.

    2008-01-01

    The tumor suppressor PTEN is mutated or deleted in many tumors, causing the activation of the PI3K pathway. Here, we show that the loss of PTEN increases the transcriptional activity of hypoxia-inducible factor 1 (HIF-1) through the inactivation of Forkhead transcription factors (FOXO) in PTEN-null cells. Reintroduction of PTEN into the nucleus, overexpression of a nonphosphorylatable FOXO3a, which accumulates in the nucleus, or inhibition of nuclear export of FOXO3a by leptomycin B represses HIF-1 transcriptional activity in PTEN-null cells. HIF-1 transcriptional activity increases in PTEN-positive cells depleted of FOXO3a with siRNA. PTEN and FOXO3a regulate the transactivation domain of HIF-1α. Chromatin immunoprecipitation indicates that FOXO3a complexes with HIF-1α and p300 on the Glut-1 promoter, a HIF-1 target gene. Overexpression of p300 reverses FOXO3a-mediated repression of HIF-1 transcriptional activity. Coimmunoprecipitation and GAL4-HIF-1α transactivation assays reveal that FOXO3a interferes with p300-dependent HIF-1 transcriptional activity. Thus, FOXO3a negatively regulates HIF-1 transcriptional activity. PMID:18268343

  14. Ethanol induced astaxanthin accumulation and transcriptional expression of carotenogenic genes in Haematococcus pluvialis.

    PubMed

    Wen, Zewen; Liu, Zhiyong; Hou, Yuyong; Liu, Chenfeng; Gao, Feng; Zheng, Yubin; Chen, Fangjian

    2015-10-01

    Haematococcus pluvialis is one of the most promising natural sources of astaxanthin. However, inducing the accumulation process has become one of the primary obstacles in astaxanthin production. In this study, the effect of ethanol on astaxanthin accumulation was investigated. The results demonstrated that astaxanthin accumulation occurred with ethanol addition even under low-light conditions. The astaxanthin productivity could reach 11.26 mg L(-1) d(-1) at 3% (v/v) ethanol, which was 2.03 times of that of the control. The transcriptional expression patterns of eight carotenogenic genes were evaluated using real-time PCR. The results showed that ethanol greatly enhanced transcription of the isopentenyl diphosphate (IPP) isomerase genes (ipi-1 and ipi-2), which were responsible for isomerization reaction of IPP and dimethylallyl diphosphate (DMAPP). This finding suggests that ethanol induced astaxanthin biosynthesis was up-regulated mainly by ipi-1 and ipi-2 at transcriptional level, promoting isoprenoid synthesis and substrate supply to carotenoid formation. Thus ethanol has the potential to be used as an effective reagent to induce astaxanthin accumulation in H. pluvialis. PMID:26215339

  15. Liver lipid molecules induce PEPCK-C gene transcription and attenuate insulin action

    SciTech Connect

    Chen Guoxun

    2007-09-28

    Cytosolic phosphoenolpyruvate carboxykinase (PEPCK-C) plays key roles in gluconeogenesis, glyceroneogenesis, and cataplerosis. Experiments were designed to examine the effects of endogenous lipid molecules from rat livers on the expression of PEPCK-C gene in primary rat hepatocytes. The lipid extracts prepared from livers of Zucker fatty, lean, and Wistar rats induced the expression levels of PEPCK-C transcripts. Insulin-mediated reduction of PEPCK-C gene expression was attenuated by the same treatment. The lipid extracts induced the relative luciferase activity of reporter gene constructs that contain a 2.2-kb 5' promoter fragment of PEPCK-C gene, but not the construct that contains only the 3' untranslated region (UTR) of its mRNA. The estimated half life of PEPCK-C transcripts in the presence of the lipid extract is the same as that in the absence of it. My results demonstrate for the first time that endogenous lipid molecules induce PEPCK-C gene transcription and attenuate insulin action in liver.

  16. Long-term climbing fibre activity induces transcription of microRNAs in cerebellar Purkinje cells.

    PubMed

    Barmack, Neal H; Qian, Zuyuan; Yakhnitsa, Vadim

    2014-09-26

    Synaptic activation of central neurons is often evoked by electrical stimulation leading to post-tetanic potentiation, long-term potentiation or long-term depression. Even a brief electrical tetanus can induce changes in as many as 100 proteins. Since climbing fibre activity is often associated with cerebellar behavioural plasticity, we used horizontal optokinetic stimulation (HOKS) to naturally increase synaptic input to floccular Purkinje cells in mice for hours, not minutes, and investigated how this activity influenced the transcription of microRNAs, small non-coding nucleotides that reduce transcripts of multiple, complementary mRNAs. A single microRNA can reduce the translation of as many as 30 proteins. HOKS evoked increases in 12 microRNA transcripts in floccular Purkinje cells. One of these microRNAs, miR335, increased 18-fold after 24 h of HOKS. After HOKS stopped, miR335 transcripts decayed with a time constant of approximately 2.5 h. HOKS evoked a 28-fold increase in pri-miR335 transcripts compared with an 18-fold increase in mature miR335 transcripts, confirming that climbing fibre-evoked increases in miR335 could be attributed to increases in transcription. We used three screens to identify potential mRNA targets for miR335 transcripts: (i) nucleotide complementarity, (ii) detection of increased mRNAs following microinjection of miR335 inhibitors into the cerebellum, and (iii) detection of decreased mRNAs following HOKS. Two genes, calbindin and 14-3-3-θ, passed these screens. Transfection of N2a cells with miR335 inhibitors or precursors inversely regulated 14-3-3-θ transcripts. Immunoprecipitation of 14-3-3-θ co-immunoprecipitated PKC-γ and GABAAγ2. Knockdown of either 14-3-3-θ or PKC-γ decreased the serine phosphorylation of GABAAγ2, suggesting that 14-3-3-θ and PKC-γ under the control of miR335 homeostatically regulate the phosphorylation and insertion of GABAAγ2 into the Purkinje cell post-synaptic membrane. PMID:25135969

  17. Selective activation of human heat shock gene transcription by nitrosourea antitumor drugs mediated by isocyanate-induced damage and activation of heat shock transcription factor

    SciTech Connect

    Kroes, R.A. Northwestern Univ., Evanston, IL ); Abravaya, K.; Morimoto, R.I. ); Seidenfeld, J. )

    1991-06-01

    Treatment of cultured human tumor cells with the chloroethylnitrosourea antitumor drug 1,3-bis(2-chloroethyl)-1-nitrosourea (BCNU) selectively induces transcription and protein synthesis of a subset of the human heat shock or stress-induced genes (HSP90 and HSP70) with little effect on other stress genes or on expression of the c-fos, c-myc, or {beta}-actin genes. The active component of BCNU and related compounds appears to be the isocyanate moiety that causes carbamoylation of proteins and nucleic acids. Transcriptional activation of the human HSP70 gene by BCNU is dependent on the heat shock element and correlates with the level of heat shock transcription factor and its binding to the heat shock element in vivo. Unlike activation by heat or heavy metals, BCNU-mediated activation is strongly dependent upon new protein synthesis. This suggests that BCNU-induced, isocyanate-mediated damage to newly synthesized protein(s) may be responsible for activation of the heat shock transcription factor and increased transcription of the HSP90 and HSP70 genes.

  18. The basic helix-loop-helix transcription factor, Mist1, induces maturation of mouse fetal hepatoblasts.

    PubMed

    Chikada, Hiromi; Ito, Keiichi; Yanagida, Ayaka; Nakauchi, Hiromitsu; Kamiya, Akihide

    2015-01-01

    Hepatic stem/progenitor cells, hepatoblasts, have a high proliferative ability and can differentiate into mature hepatocytes and cholangiocytes. Therefore, these cells are considered to be useful for regenerative medicine and drug screening for liver diseases. However, it is problem that in vitro maturation of hepatoblasts is insufficient in the present culture system. In this study, a novel regulator to induce hepatic differentiation was identified and the molecular function of this factor was examined in embryonic day 13 hepatoblast culture with maturation factor, oncostatin M and extracellular matrices. Overexpression of the basic helix-loop-helix type transcription factor, Mist1, induced expression of mature hepatocytic markers such as carbamoyl-phosphate synthetase1 and several cytochrome P450 (CYP) genes in this culture system. In contrast, Mist1 suppressed expression of cholangiocytic markers such as Sox9, Sox17, Ck19, and Grhl2. CYP3A metabolic activity was significantly induced by Mist1 in this hepatoblast culture. In addition, Mist1 induced liver-enriched transcription factors, CCAAT/enhancer-binding protein α and Hepatocyte nuclear factor 1α, which are known to be involved in liver functions. These results suggest that Mist1 partially induces mature hepatocytic expression and function accompanied by the down-regulation of cholangiocytic markers. PMID:26456005

  19. Role of the Slug Transcription Factor in Chemically-Induced Skin Cancer

    PubMed Central

    von Maltzan, Kristine; Li, Yafan; Rundhaug, Joyce E.; Hudson, Laurie G.; Fischer, Susan M.; Kusewitt, Donna F.

    2016-01-01

    The Slug transcription factor plays an important role in ultraviolet radiation (UVR)-induced skin carcinogenesis, particularly in the epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT) occurring during tumor progression. In the present studies, we investigated the role of Slug in two-stage chemical skin carcinogenesis. Slug and the related transcription factor Snail were expressed at high levels in skin tumors induced by 7,12-dimethylbenz[α]anthracene application followed by 12-O-tetradecanoylphorbol-13-acetate (TPA) treatment. TPA-induced transient elevation of Slug and Snail proteins in normal mouse epidermis and studies in Slug transgenic mice indicated that Slug modulates TPA-induced epidermal hyperplasia and cutaneous inflammation. Although Snail family factors have been linked to inflammation via interactions with the cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2) pathway, a pathway that also plays an important role in skin carcinogenesis, transient TPA induction of Slug and Snail appeared unrelated to COX-2 expression. In cultured human keratinocytes, TPA induced Snail mRNA expression while suppressing Slug expression, and this differential regulation was due specifically to activation of the TPA receptor. These studies show that Slug and Snail exhibit similar patterns of expression during both UVR and chemical skin carcinogenesis, that Slug and Snail can be differentially regulated under some conditions and that in vitro findings may not recapitulate in vivo results. PMID:26848699

  20. The basic helix-loop-helix transcription factor, Mist1, induces maturation of mouse fetal hepatoblasts

    PubMed Central

    Chikada, Hiromi; Ito, Keiichi; Yanagida, Ayaka; Nakauchi, Hiromitsu; Kamiya, Akihide

    2015-01-01

    Hepatic stem/progenitor cells, hepatoblasts, have a high proliferative ability and can differentiate into mature hepatocytes and cholangiocytes. Therefore, these cells are considered to be useful for regenerative medicine and drug screening for liver diseases. However, it is problem that in vitro maturation of hepatoblasts is insufficient in the present culture system. In this study, a novel regulator to induce hepatic differentiation was identified and the molecular function of this factor was examined in embryonic day 13 hepatoblast culture with maturation factor, oncostatin M and extracellular matrices. Overexpression of the basic helix-loop-helix type transcription factor, Mist1, induced expression of mature hepatocytic markers such as carbamoyl-phosphate synthetase1 and several cytochrome P450 (CYP) genes in this culture system. In contrast, Mist1 suppressed expression of cholangiocytic markers such as Sox9, Sox17, Ck19, and Grhl2. CYP3A metabolic activity was significantly induced by Mist1 in this hepatoblast culture. In addition, Mist1 induced liver-enriched transcription factors, CCAAT/enhancer-binding protein α and Hepatocyte nuclear factor 1α, which are known to be involved in liver functions. These results suggest that Mist1 partially induces mature hepatocytic expression and function accompanied by the down-regulation of cholangiocytic markers. PMID:26456005

  1. Nucleotide Excision Repair, Mismatch Repair, and R-Loops Modulate Convergent Transcription-Induced Cell Death and Repeat Instability

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Yunfu; Wilson, John H.

    2012-01-01

    Expansion of CAG•CTG tracts located in specific genes is responsible for 13 human neurodegenerative disorders, the pathogenic mechanisms of which are not yet well defined. These disease genes are ubiquitously expressed in human tissues, and transcription has been identified as one of the major pathways destabilizing the repeats. Transcription-induced repeat instability depends on transcription-coupled nucleotide excision repair (TC-NER), the mismatch repair (MMR) recognition component MSH2/MSH3, and RNA/DNA hybrids (R-loops). Recently, we reported that simultaneous sense and antisense transcription–convergent transcription–through a CAG repeat not only promotes repeat instability, but also induces a cell stress response, which arrests the cell cycle and eventually leads to massive cell death via apoptosis. Here, we use siRNA knockdowns to investigate whether NER, MMR, and R-loops also modulate convergent-transcription-induced cell death and repeat instability. We find that siRNA-mediated depletion of TC-NER components increases convergent transcription-induced cell death, as does the simultaneous depletion of RNase H1 and RNase H2A. In contrast, depletion of MSH2 decreases cell death. These results identify TC-NER, MMR recognition, and R-loops as modulators of convergent transcription-induced cell death and shed light on the molecular mechanism involved. We also find that the TC-NER pathway, MSH2, and R-loops modulate convergent transcription-induced repeat instability. These observations link the mechanisms of convergent transcription-induced repeat instability and convergent transcription-induced cell death, suggesting that a common structure may trigger both outcomes. PMID:23056461

  2. Transcription Factors OVOL1 and OVOL2 Induce the Mesenchymal to Epithelial Transition in Human Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Roca, Hernan; Hernandez, James; Weidner, Savannah; McEachin, Richard C.; Fuller, David; Sud, Sudha; Schumann, Taibriana; Wilkinson, John E.; Zaslavsky, Alexander; Li, Hangwen; Maher, Christopher A.; Daignault-Newton, Stephanie; Healy, Patrick N.; Pienta, Kenneth J.

    2013-01-01

    Cell plasticity regulated by the balance between the mesenchymal to epithelial transition (MET) and the opposite program, EMT, is critical in the metastatic cascade. Several transcription factors (TFs) are known to regulate EMT, though the mechanisms of MET remain unclear. We demonstrate a novel function of two TFs, OVOL1 and OVOL2, as critical inducers of MET in human cancers. Our findings indicate that the OVOL-TFs control MET through a regulatory feedback loop with EMT-inducing TF ZEB1, and the regulation of mRNA splicing by inducing Epithelial Splicing Regulatory Protein 1 (ESRP1). Using mouse prostate tumor models we show that expression of OVOL-TFs in mesenchymal prostate cancer cells attenuates their metastatic potential. The role of OVOL-TFs as inducers of MET is further supported by expression analyses in 917 cancer cell lines, suggesting their role as crucial regulators of epithelial-mesenchymal cell plasticity in cancer. PMID:24124593

  3. Structurally distinct polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons induce differential transcriptional responses in developing zebrafish

    PubMed Central

    Goodale, Britton C.; Tilton, Susan C.; Wilson, Glenn; Corvi, Margaret M.; Janszen, Derek B.; Anderson, Kim A.; Waters, Katrina M.; Tanguay, Robert L.

    2014-01-01

    Polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) are ubiquitous in the environment as components of fossil fuels and by-products of combustion. These multi-ring chemicals differentially activate the Aryl Hydrocarbon Receptor (AHR) in a structurally dependent manner, and induce toxicity via both AHR-dependent and-independent mechanisms. PAH exposure is known to induce developmental malformations in zebrafish embryos, and recent studies have shown cardiac toxicity induced by compounds with low AHR affinity. Unraveling the potentially diverse molecular mechanisms of PAH toxicity is essential for understanding the hazard posed by complex PAH mixtures present in the environment. We analyzed transcriptional responses to PAH exposure in zebrafish embryos exposed to benz(a)anthracene (BAA), dibenzothiophene (DBT) and pyrene (PYR) at concentrations that induced developmental malformations by 120 hours post-fertilization (hpf). Whole genome microarray analysis of mRNA expression at 24 and 48 hpf identified genes that were differentially regulated over time and in response to the three PAH structures. PAH body burdens were analyzed at both time points using GC-MS, and demonstrated differences in PAH uptake into the embryos. This was important for discerning dose-related differences from those that represented unique molecular mechanisms. While BAA misregulated the least number of transcripts, it caused strong induction of cyp1a and other genes known to be downstream of the AHR, which were not induced by the other two PAHs. Analysis of functional roles of misregulated genes and their predicted regulatory transcription factors also distinguished the BAA response from regulatory networks disrupted by DBT and PYR exposure. These results indicate that systems approaches can be used to classify the toxicity of PAHs based on the networks perturbed following exposure, and may provide a path for unraveling the toxicity of complex PAH mixtures. PMID:23656968

  4. Structurally Distinct Polycyclic Aromatic Hydrocarbons Induce Differential Transcriptional Responses in Developing Zebrafish

    SciTech Connect

    Goodale, Britton; Tilton, Susan C.; Corvi, Margaret M.; Wilson, Glenn V.; Janszen, Derek B.; Anderson, Kim A.; Waters, Katrina M.; Tanguay, Robert

    2013-11-01

    Polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) are ubiquitous in the environment as components of fossil fuels and by-products of combustion. These multi-ring chemicals differentially activate the aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AHR) in a structurally dependent manner, and induce toxicity via both AHR-dependent and -independent mechanisms. PAH exposure is known to induce developmental malformations in zebrafish embryos, and recent studies have shown cardiac toxicity induced by compounds with low AHR affinity. Unraveling the potentially diverse molecular mechanisms of PAH toxicity is essential for understanding the hazard posed by complex PAH mixtures present in the environment. We analyzed transcriptional responses to PAH exposure in zebrafish embryos exposed to benz(a)anthracene (BAA), dibenzothiophene (DBT) and pyrene (PYR) at concentrations that induced developmental malformations by 120 h post-fertilization (hpf). Whole genome microarray analysis of mRNA expression at 24 and 48 hpf identified genes that were differentially regulated over time and in response to the three PAH structures. PAH body burdens were analyzed at both time points using GC-MS, and demonstrated differences in PAH uptake into the embryos. This was important for discerning dose-related differences from those that represented unique molecular mechanisms. While BAA misregulated the least number of transcripts, it caused strong induction of cyp1a and other genes known to be downstream of the AHR, which were not induced by the other two PAHs. Analysis of functional roles of misregulated genes and their predicted regulatory transcription factors also distinguished the BAA response from regulatory networks disrupted by DBT and PYR exposure. These results indicate that systems approaches can be used to classify the toxicity of PAHs based on the networks perturbed following exposure, and may provide a path for unraveling the toxicity of complex PAH mixtures.

  5. Structurally distinct polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons induce differential transcriptional responses in developing zebrafish

    SciTech Connect

    Goodale, Britton C.; Tilton, Susan C.; Corvi, Margaret M.; Wilson, Glenn R.; Janszen, Derek B.; Anderson, Kim A.; Waters, Katrina M.; Tanguay, Robert L.

    2013-11-01

    Polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) are ubiquitous in the environment as components of fossil fuels and by-products of combustion. These multi-ring chemicals differentially activate the aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AHR) in a structurally dependent manner, and induce toxicity via both AHR-dependent and -independent mechanisms. PAH exposure is known to induce developmental malformations in zebrafish embryos, and recent studies have shown cardiac toxicity induced by compounds with low AHR affinity. Unraveling the potentially diverse molecular mechanisms of PAH toxicity is essential for understanding the hazard posed by complex PAH mixtures present in the environment. We analyzed transcriptional responses to PAH exposure in zebrafish embryos exposed to benz(a)anthracene (BAA), dibenzothiophene (DBT) and pyrene (PYR) at concentrations that induced developmental malformations by 120 h post-fertilization (hpf). Whole genome microarray analysis of mRNA expression at 24 and 48 hpf identified genes that were differentially regulated over time and in response to the three PAH structures. PAH body burdens were analyzed at both time points using GC–MS, and demonstrated differences in PAH uptake into the embryos. This was important for discerning dose-related differences from those that represented unique molecular mechanisms. While BAA misregulated the least number of transcripts, it caused strong induction of cyp1a and other genes known to be downstream of the AHR, which were not induced by the other two PAHs. Analysis of functional roles of misregulated genes and their predicted regulatory transcription factors also distinguished the BAA response from regulatory networks disrupted by DBT and PYR exposure. These results indicate that systems approaches can be used to classify the toxicity of PAHs based on the networks perturbed following exposure, and may provide a path for unraveling the toxicity of complex PAH mixtures. - Highlights: • Defined global mRNA expression

  6. Heat Stress-Induced Cup9-Dependent Transcriptional Regulation of SIR2

    PubMed Central

    Laskar, Shyamasree; K, Sheeba; Bhattacharyya, Mrinal K.; Nair, Achuthsankar S.; Dhar, Pawan

    2014-01-01

    The epigenetic writer Sir2 maintains the heterochromatin state of chromosome in three chromosomal regions, namely, the silent mating type loci, telomeres, and the ribosomal DNA (rDNA). In this study, we demonstrated the mechanism by which Sir2 is regulated under heat stress. Our study reveals that a transient heat shock causes a drastic reduction in the SIR2 transcript which results in sustained failure to initiate silencing for as long as 90 generations. Hsp82 overexpression, which is the usual outcome of heat shock treatment, leads to a similar downregulation of SIR2 transcription. Using a series of genetic experiments, we have established that heat shock or Hsp82 overexpression causes upregulation of CUP9 that, in turn, represses SIR2 transcription by binding to its upstream activator sequence. We have mapped the cis regulatory element of SIR2. Our study shows that the deletion of cup9 causes reversal of the Hsp82 overexpression phenotype and upregulation of SIR2 expression in heat-induced Hsp82-overexpressing cells. On the other hand, we found that Cup9 overexpression represses SIR2 transcription and leads to a failure in the establishment of heterochromatin. The results of our study highlight the mechanism by which environmental factors amend the epigenetic configuration of chromatin. PMID:25384977

  7. Activation-induced deoxycytidine deaminase (AID) co-transcriptional scanning at single-molecule resolution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Senavirathne, Gayan; Bertram, Jeffrey G.; Jaszczur, Malgorzata; Chaurasiya, Kathy R.; Pham, Phuong; Mak, Chi H.; Goodman, Myron F.; Rueda, David

    2015-12-01

    Activation-induced deoxycytidine deaminase (AID) generates antibody diversity in B cells by initiating somatic hypermutation (SHM) and class-switch recombination (CSR) during transcription of immunoglobulin variable (IgV) and switch region (IgS) DNA. Using single-molecule FRET, we show that AID binds to transcribed dsDNA and translocates unidirectionally in concert with RNA polymerase (RNAP) on moving transcription bubbles, while increasing the fraction of stalled bubbles. AID scans randomly when constrained in an 8 nt model bubble. When unconstrained on single-stranded (ss) DNA, AID moves in random bidirectional short slides/hops over the entire molecule while remaining bound for ~5 min. Our analysis distinguishes dynamic scanning from static ssDNA creasing. That AID alone can track along with RNAP during transcription and scan within stalled transcription bubbles suggests a mechanism by which AID can initiate SHM and CSR when properly regulated, yet when unregulated can access non-Ig genes and cause cancer.

  8. Activation-induced deoxycytidine deaminase (AID) co-transcriptional scanning at single-molecule resolution.

    PubMed

    Senavirathne, Gayan; Bertram, Jeffrey G; Jaszczur, Malgorzata; Chaurasiya, Kathy R; Pham, Phuong; Mak, Chi H; Goodman, Myron F; Rueda, David

    2015-01-01

    Activation-induced deoxycytidine deaminase (AID) generates antibody diversity in B cells by initiating somatic hypermutation (SHM) and class-switch recombination (CSR) during transcription of immunoglobulin variable (IgV) and switch region (IgS) DNA. Using single-molecule FRET, we show that AID binds to transcribed dsDNA and translocates unidirectionally in concert with RNA polymerase (RNAP) on moving transcription bubbles, while increasing the fraction of stalled bubbles. AID scans randomly when constrained in an 8 nt model bubble. When unconstrained on single-stranded (ss) DNA, AID moves in random bidirectional short slides/hops over the entire molecule while remaining bound for ∼ 5 min. Our analysis distinguishes dynamic scanning from static ssDNA creasing. That AID alone can track along with RNAP during transcription and scan within stalled transcription bubbles suggests a mechanism by which AID can initiate SHM and CSR when properly regulated, yet when unregulated can access non-Ig genes and cause cancer. PMID:26681117

  9. Interleukin-23-Induced Transcription Factor Blimp-1 Promotes Pathogenicity of T Helper 17 Cells.

    PubMed

    Jain, Renu; Chen, Yi; Kanno, Yuka; Joyce-Shaikh, Barbara; Vahedi, Golnaz; Hirahara, Kiyoshi; Blumenschein, Wendy M; Sukumar, Selvakumar; Haines, Christopher J; Sadekova, Svetlana; McClanahan, Terrill K; McGeachy, Mandy J; O'Shea, John J; Cua, Daniel J

    2016-01-19

    Interleukin-23 (IL-23) is a pro-inflammatory cytokine required for the pathogenicity of T helper 17 (Th17) cells but the molecular mechanisms governing this process remain unclear. We identified the transcription factor Blimp-1 (Prdm1) as a key IL-23-induced factor that drove the inflammatory function of Th17 cells. In contrast to thymic deletion of Blimp-1, which causes T cell development defects and spontaneous autoimmunity, peripheral deletion of this transcription factor resulted in reduced Th17 activation and reduced severity of autoimmune encephalomyelitis. Furthermore, genome-wide occupancy and overexpression studies in Th17 cells revealed that Blimp-1 co-localized with transcription factors RORγt, STAT-3, and p300 at the Il23r, Il17a/f, and Csf2 cytokine loci to enhance their expression. Blimp-1 also directly bound to and repressed cytokine loci Il2 and Bcl6. Taken together, our results demonstrate that Blimp-1 is an essential transcription factor downstream of IL-23 that acts in concert with RORγt to activate the Th17 inflammatory program. PMID:26750311

  10. Identification of novel radiation-induced p53-dependent transcripts extensively regulated during mouse brain development.

    PubMed

    Quintens, Roel; Verreet, Tine; Janssen, Ann; Neefs, Mieke; Leysen, Liselotte; Michaux, Arlette; Verslegers, Mieke; Samari, Nada; Pani, Giuseppe; Verheyde, Joris; Baatout, Sarah; Benotmane, Mohammed A

    2015-01-01

    Ionizing radiation is a potent activator of the tumor suppressor gene p53, which itself regulates the transcription of genes involved in canonical pathways such as the cell cycle, DNA repair and apoptosis as well as other biological processes like metabolism, autophagy, differentiation and development. In this study, we performed a meta-analysis on gene expression data from different in vivo and in vitro experiments to identify a signature of early radiation-responsive genes which were predicted to be predominantly regulated by p53. Moreover, we found that several genes expressed different transcript isoforms after irradiation in a p53-dependent manner. Among this gene signature, we identified novel p53 targets, some of which have not yet been functionally characterized. Surprisingly, in contrast to genes from the canonical p53-regulated pathways, our gene signature was found to be highly enriched during embryonic and post-natal brain development and during in vitro neuronal differentiation. Furthermore, we could show that for a number of genes, radiation-responsive transcript variants were upregulated during development and differentiation, while radiation non-responsive variants were not. This suggests that radiation exposure of the developing brain and immature cortical neurons results in the p53-mediated activation of a neuronal differentiation program. Overall, our results further increase the knowledge of the radiation-induced p53 network of the embryonic brain and provide more evidence concerning the importance of p53 and its transcriptional targets during mouse brain development. PMID:25681390

  11. Early iron-deficiency-induced transcriptional changes in Arabidopsis roots as revealed by microarray analyses

    PubMed Central

    Buckhout, Thomas J; Yang, Thomas JW; Schmidt, Wolfgang

    2009-01-01

    Background Iron (Fe) is an essential nutrient in plants and animals, and Fe deficiency results in decreased vitality and performance. Due to limited bio-availability of Fe, plants have evolved sophisticated adaptive alterations in development, biochemistry and metabolism that are mainly regulated at the transcriptional level. We have investigated the early transcriptional response to Fe deficiency in roots of the model plant Arabidopsis, using a hydroponic system that permitted removal of Fe from the nutrient solution within seconds and transferring large numbers of plants with little or no mechanical damage to the root systems. We feel that this experimental approach offers significant advantages over previous and recent DNA microarray investigations of the Fe-deficiency response by increasing the resolution of the temporal response and by decreasing non-Fe deficiency-induced transcriptional changes, which are common in microarray analyses. Results The expression of sixty genes were changed after 6 h of Fe deficiency and 65% of these were found to overlap with a group of seventy-nine genes that were altered after 24 h. A disproportionally high number of transcripts encoding ion transport proteins were found, which function to increase the Fe concentration and decrease the zinc (Zn) concentration in the cytosol. Analysis of global changes in gene expression revealed that changes in Fe availability were associated with the differential expression of genes that encode transporters with presumed function in uptake and distribution of transition metals other than Fe. It appeared that under conditions of Fe deficiency, the capacity for Zn uptake increased, most probably the result of low specificity of the Fe transporter IRT1 that was induced upon Fe deficiency. The transcriptional regulation of several Zn transports under Fe deficiency led presumably to the homeostatic regulation of the cytosolic concentration of Zn and of other transition metal ions such as Mn to

  12. Transcriptional Reprogramming of the Mycoparasitic Fungus Ampelomyces quisqualis During the Powdery Mildew Host-Induced Germination.

    PubMed

    Siozios, Stefanos; Tosi, Lorenzo; Ferrarini, Alberto; Ferrari, Alessandro; Tononi, Paola; Bellin, Diana; Maurhofer, Monika; Gessler, Cesare; Delledonne, Massimo; Pertot, Ilaria

    2015-02-01

    Ampelomyces quisqualis is a mycoparasite of a diverse range of phytopathogenic fungi associated with the powdery mildew disease. Among them are several Erysiphaceae species with great economic impact on high-value crops such as grape. Due to its ability to parasitize and prevent the spread of powdery mildews, A. quisqualis has received considerable attention for its biocontrol potential. However, and in sharp contrast to the extensively studied biocontrol species belonging to the genus Trichoderma, little is known about the biology of A. quisqualis at the molecular and genetic levels. We present the first genome-wide transcription profiling in A. quisqualis during host-induced germination. A total of 1,536 putative genes showed significant changes in transcription during the germination of A. quisqualis. This finding denotes an extensive transcriptional reprogramming of A. quisqualis induced by the presence of the host. Several upregulated genes were predicted to encode for putative mycoparasitism-related proteins such as secreted proteases, virulence factors, and proteins related to toxin biosynthesis. Our data provide the most comprehensive sequence resource currently available for A. quisqualis in addition to offering valuable insights into the biology of A. quisqualis and its mycoparasitic lifestyle. Eventually, this may improve the biocontrol capacity of this mycoparasite. PMID:25185010

  13. Expression of HSF2 decreases in mitosis to enable stress-inducible transcription and cell survival

    PubMed Central

    Elsing, Alexandra N.; Aspelin, Camilla; Björk, Johanna K.; Bergman, Heidi A.; Himanen, Samu V.; Kallio, Marko J.; Roos-Mattjus, Pia

    2014-01-01

    Unless mitigated, external and physiological stresses are detrimental for cells, especially in mitosis, resulting in chromosomal missegregation, aneuploidy, or apoptosis. Heat shock proteins (Hsps) maintain protein homeostasis and promote cell survival. Hsps are transcriptionally regulated by heat shock factors (HSFs). Of these, HSF1 is the master regulator and HSF2 modulates Hsp expression by interacting with HSF1. Due to global inhibition of transcription in mitosis, including HSF1-mediated expression of Hsps, mitotic cells are highly vulnerable to stress. Here, we show that cells can counteract transcriptional silencing and protect themselves against proteotoxicity in mitosis. We found that the condensed chromatin of HSF2-deficient cells is accessible for HSF1 and RNA polymerase II, allowing stress-inducible Hsp expression. Consequently, HSF2-deficient cells exposed to acute stress display diminished mitotic errors and have a survival advantage. We also show that HSF2 expression declines during mitosis in several but not all human cell lines, which corresponds to the Hsp70 induction and protection against stress-induced mitotic abnormalities and apoptosis. PMID:25202032

  14. Pokemon (FBI-1) interacts with Smad4 to repress TGF-β-induced transcriptional responses.

    PubMed

    Yang, Yutao; Cui, Jiajun; Xue, Feng; Zhang, Chuanfu; Mei, Zhu; Wang, Yue; Bi, Mingjun; Shan, Dapeng; Meredith, Alex; Li, Hui; Xu, Zhi-Qing David

    2015-03-01

    Pokemon, an important proto-oncoprotein, is a transcriptional repressor that belongs to the POK (POZ and Krüppel) family. Smad4, a key component of TGF-β pathway, plays an essential role in TGF-β-induced transcriptional responses. In this study, we show that Pokemon can interact directly with Smad4 both in vitro and in vivo. Overexpression of Pokemon decreases TGF-β-induced transcriptional activities, whereas knockdown of Pokemon increases these activities. Interestingly, Pokemon does not affect activation of Smad2/3, formation of Smads complex, or DNA binding activity of Smad4. TGF-β1 treatment increases the interaction between Pokemon and Smad4, and also enhances the recruitment of Pokemon to Smad4-DNA complex. In addition, we also find that Pokemon recruits HDAC1 to Smad4 complex but decreases the interaction between Smad4 and p300/CBP. Taken together, all these data suggest that Pokemon is a new partner of Smad4 and plays a negative role in TGF-β pathway. PMID:25514493

  15. A model of transcriptional and morphological changes during thyroid hormone-induced metamorphosis of the axolotl

    PubMed Central

    Page, Robert B.; Monaghan, James R.; Walker, John A.; Voss, S. Randal

    2009-01-01

    Anuran (frog) metamorphosis has long-served as a model of how thyroid hormones regulate post-embryonic development in vertebrates. However, comparatively little is known about urodele (salamander) metamorphosis. We conducted a detailed time-course study of induced metamorphosis in the Mexican axolotl (Ambystoma mexicanum) that probed metamorphic changes in morphology and gene expression in the skin. Using morphometrics, quantitative PCR, histology, and in situ hybridization we demonstrate that the development of transcriptional markers is fundamental to the resolution of early metamorphic events in axolotls. We then use linear and piecewise linear models to identify a sequence of morphological and transcriptional changes that define larval to adult remodeling events throughout metamorphosis. In addition, we show that transcriptional biomarkers are expressed in specific larval and adult cell populations of the skin and that temporal changes in these biomarkers correlate with tissue remodeling. We compare our results with other studies of natural and induced metamorphosis in urodeles and highlight what appear to be conserved features between urodele and anuran metamorphosis. PMID:19275901

  16. Lung transcriptional profiling: insights into the mechanisms of ozone-induced pulmonary injury in Wistar Kyoto rats

    EPA Science Inventory

    Acute ozone-induced pulmonary injury and inflammation are well characterized in rats; however, mechanistic understanding of the pathways involved is limited. We hypothesized that acute exposure of healthy rats to ozone will cause transcriptional alterations, and comprehensive ana...

  17. Arabidopsis Pol II-Dependent in Vitro Transcription System Reveals Role of Chromatin for Light-Inducible rbcS Gene Transcription.

    PubMed

    Ido, Ayaka; Iwata, Shinya; Iwata, Yuka; Igarashi, Hisako; Hamada, Takahiro; Sonobe, Seiji; Sugiura, Masahiro; Yukawa, Yasushi

    2016-02-01

    In vitro transcription is an essential tool to study the molecular mechanisms of transcription. For over a decade, we have developed an in vitro transcription system from tobacco (Nicotiana tabacum)-cultured cells (BY-2), and this system supported the basic activities of the three RNA polymerases (Pol I, Pol II, and Pol III). However, it was not suitable to study photosynthetic genes, because BY-2 cells have lost their photosynthetic activity. Therefore, Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) in vitro transcription systems were developed from green and etiolated suspension cells. Sufficient in vitro Pol II activity was detected after the minor modification of the nuclear soluble extracts preparation method; removal of vacuoles from protoplasts and L-ascorbic acid supplementation in the extraction buffer were particularly effective. Surprisingly, all four Arabidopsis Rubisco small subunit (rbcS-1A, rbcS-1B, rbcS-2B, and rbcS-3B) gene members were in vitro transcribed from the naked DNA templates without any light-dependent manner. However, clear light-inducible transcriptions were observed using chromatin template of rbcS-1A gene, which was prepared with a human nucleosome assembly protein 1 (hNAP1) and HeLa histones. This suggested that a key determinant of light-dependency through the rbcS gene transcription was a higher order of DNA structure (i.e. chromatin). PMID:26662274

  18. Suppression of tumor growth by designed dimeric epidithiodiketopiperazine targeting hypoxia-inducible transcription factor complex.

    PubMed

    Dubey, Ramin; Levin, Michael D; Szabo, Lajos Z; Laszlo, Csaba F; Kushal, Swati; Singh, Jason B; Oh, Philip; Schnitzer, Jan E; Olenyuk, Bogdan Z

    2013-03-20

    Hypoxia is a hallmark of solid tumors, is associated with local invasion, metastatic spread, resistance to chemo- and radiotherapy, and is an independent, negative prognostic factor for a diverse range of malignant neoplasms. The cellular response to hypoxia is primarily mediated by a family of transcription factors, among which hypoxia-inducible factor 1 (HIF1) plays a major role. Under normoxia, the oxygen-sensitive α subunit of HIF1 is rapidly and constitutively degraded but is stabilized and accumulates under hypoxia. Upon nuclear translocation, HIF1 controls the expression of over 100 genes involved in angiogenesis, altered energy metabolism, antiapoptotic, and pro-proliferative mechanisms that promote tumor growth. A designed transcriptional antagonist, dimeric epidithiodiketopiperazine (ETP 2), selectively disrupts the interaction of HIF1α with p300/CBP coactivators and downregulates the expression of hypoxia-inducible genes. ETP 2 was synthesized via a novel homo-oxidative coupling of the aliphatic primary carbons of the dithioacetal precursor. It effectively inhibits HIF1-induced activation of VEGFA, LOX, Glut1, and c-Met genes in a panel of cell lines representing breast and lung cancers. We observed an outstanding antitumor efficacy of both (±)-ETP 2 and meso-ETP 2 in a fully established breast carcinoma model by intravital microscopy. Treatment with either form of ETP 2 (1 mg/kg) resulted in a rapid regression of tumor growth that lasted for up to 14 days. These results suggest that inhibition of HIF1 transcriptional activity by designed dimeric ETPs could offer an innovative approach to cancer therapy with the potential to overcome hypoxia-induced tumor growth and resistance. PMID:23448368

  19. Aspergillus flavus infection induces transcriptional and physical changes in developing maize kernels

    PubMed Central

    Dolezal, Andrea L.; Shu, Xiaomei; OBrian, Gregory R.; Nielsen, Dahlia M.; Woloshuk, Charles P.; Boston, Rebecca S.; Payne, Gary A.

    2014-01-01

    Maize kernels are susceptible to infection by the opportunistic pathogen Aspergillus flavus. Infection results in reduction of grain quality and contamination of kernels with the highly carcinogenic mycotoxin, aflatoxin. To understanding host response to infection by the fungus, transcription of approximately 9000 maize genes were monitored during the host-pathogen interaction with a custom designed Affymetrix GeneChip® DNA array. More than 4000 maize genes were found differentially expressed at a FDR of 0.05. This included the up regulation of defense related genes and signaling pathways. Transcriptional changes also were observed in primary metabolism genes. Starch biosynthetic genes were down regulated during infection, while genes encoding maize hydrolytic enzymes, presumably involved in the degradation of host reserves, were up regulated. These data indicate that infection of the maize kernel by A. flavus induced metabolic changes in the kernel, including the production of a defense response, as well as a disruption in kernel development. PMID:25132833

  20. Human Trefoil Factor 3 induces the transcription of its own promoter through STAT3

    PubMed Central

    Sun, Yong; Wang, Liangxi; Zhou, Yifang; Mao, Xuefei; Deng, Xiangdong

    2016-01-01

    Human trefoil factor 3 (hTFF3) is a small peptide of potential therapeutic value. The mechanisms underlying the transcriptional regulation of hTFF3 remain unclear. The purpose of this study was to identify the core functional elements for the self-induction action of hTFF3 and transcription factors. First, truncated promoters were constructed to identify the functional regions of the hTFF3 promoter. Next, point mutation, chromatin immunoprecipitation, RNA interference, and gene overexpression experiments were performed to analyze the transcriptional binding sites responsible for the self-induced transcription of hTFF3. Our results revealed the −1450 bp to −1400 bp fragment of the hTFF3 promoter was the functional region for the self-induction action of hTFF3. Bioinformatics analysis confirmed that a STAT3 binding site is present in the −1417 bp to −1409 bp region. Subsequently, site-directed mutagenesis analysis determined that this STAT3 binding site was critical for the self-induction effect of hTFF3. ChIP experiments confirmed that STAT3 binds to the hTFF3 promoter. STAT3 overexpression and knockdown experiments revealed that STAT3 enhanced the self-induction effect and the expression of hTFF3. This study confirmed that hTFF3 exhibits self-induction action, and that STAT3 is the key transcription factor to maintain the function of self-induction. PMID:27453253

  1. The maize transcription factor EREB58 mediates the jasmonate-induced production of sesquiterpene volatiles.

    PubMed

    Li, Shengyan; Wang, Hai; Li, Fengqi; Chen, Zhongliang; Li, Xiuying; Zhu, Li; Wang, Guirong; Yu, Jingjuan; Huang, Dafang; Lang, Zhihong

    2015-10-01

    Over the past two decades, Zea mays (maize) has been established as a model system for the study of indirect plant defense against herbivores. When attacked by lepidopteran larvae, maize leaves emit a complex blend of volatiles, mainly composed of sesquiterpenes, to attract the natural enemies of the herbivores. This is associated with a swift transcriptional induction of terpene synthases such as TPS10; however, the molecular components controlling the complex transcriptional reprogramming in this process are still obscure. Here, by exploiting the finding that the maize TPS10 promoter retained its full responsiveness to herbivory in Arabidopsis, we identified the region from -300 to -200 of the TPS10 promoter as both necessary and sufficient for its herbivore inducibility through 5' deletion mapping. A high-throughput screening of an Arabidopsis transcription factor library using this promoter region as the bait identified seven AP2/ERF family transcription factors. Among their close homologs in maize, EREB58 was the only gene responsive to herbivory, with a spatiotemporal expression pattern highly similar to that of TPS10. Meanwhile, EREB58 was also responsive to Jasmonate. In vivo and in vitro assays indicated that EREB58 promotes TPS10 expression by directly binding to the GCC-box within the region from -300 to -200 of the TPS10 promoter. Transgenic maize plants overexpressing EREB58 constitutively over-accumulate TPS10 transcript, and also (E)-β-farnesene and (E)-α-bergamotene, two major sesquiterpenes produced by TPS10. In contrast, jasmonate induction of TPS10 and its volatiles was abolished in EREB58-RNAi transgenic lines. In sum, these results demonstrate that EREB58 is a positive regulator of sesquiterpene production by directly promoting TPS10 expression. PMID:26303437

  2. RNA sequencing analysis identifies novel spliced transcripts but does not indicate quantitative or qualitative changes of viral transcripts during progression of cottontail rabbit papillomavirus-induced tumours.

    PubMed

    Probst-Hunczek, Sonja; Jäger, Günter; Schneider, Markus; Notz, Ekaterina; Stubenrauch, Frank; Iftner, Thomas

    2015-10-01

    Persistent infections with high-risk human papillomaviruses (HPVs) can result in the development of cancer of the cervix uteri and other malignancies. The underlying molecular mechanisms leading to the progression of HPV-induced lesions are, however, not well understood. Cottontail rabbit papillomavirus (CRPV) induces papillomas in domestic rabbits which progress at a very high rate to cancer. Using this model, we compared the transcriptional patterns of CRPV in papillomas and carcinomas by RNA sequencing (RNA-seq). The most abundant transcripts can encode E7, short E6 and E1^E4, followed by full-length E6, E2, E1 and E9^E2C. In addition, we identified two rare, novel splice junctions 7810/3714 and 1751/3065 in both papillomas and carcinomas which have been described for other papillomaviruses. Neither RNA-seq nor quantitative real-time PCR-based assays identified qualitative or quantitative changes of viral transcription between papillomas and carcinomas. In summary, our analyses confirmed that papillomaviruses have highly similar transcriptional patterns, but they do not suggest that changes in these patterns contribute to the progression of CRPV-induced tumours. PMID:26297146

  3. Amplification of TGFβ Induced ITGB6 Gene Transcription May Promote Pulmonary Fibrosis

    PubMed Central

    Tatler, Amanda L.; Goodwin, Amanda T.; Gbolahan, Olumide; Saini, Gauri; Porte, Joanne; John, Alison E.; Clifford, Rachel L.; Violette, Shelia M.; Weinreb, Paul H.; Parfrey, Helen; Wolters, Paul J.; Gauldie, Jack; Kolb, Martin; Jenkins, Gisli

    2016-01-01

    Idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis (IPF) is a devastating, progressive disease with poor survival rates and limited treatment options. Upregulation of αvβ6 integrins within the alveolar epithelial cells is a characteristic feature of IPF and correlates with poor patient survival. The pro-fibrotic cytokine TGFβ1 can upregulate αvβ6 integrin expression but the molecular mechanisms driving this effect have not previously been elucidated. We confirm that stimulation with exogenous TGFβ1 increases expression of the integrin β6 subunit gene (ITGB6) and αvβ6 integrin cell surface expression in a time- and concentration-dependent manner. TGFβ1-induced ITGB6 expression occurs via transcriptional activation of the ITGB6 gene, but does not result from effects on ITGB6 mRNA stability. Basal expression of ITGB6 in, and αvβ6 integrins on, lung epithelial cells occurs via homeostatic αvβ6-mediated TGFβ1 activation in the absence of exogenous stimulation, and can be amplified by TGFβ1 activation. Fundamentally, we show for the first time that TGFβ1-induced ITGB6 expression occurs via canonical Smad signalling since dominant negative constructs directed against Smad3 and 4 inhibit ITGB6 transcriptional activity. Furthermore, disruption of a Smad binding site at -798 in the ITGB6 promoter abolishes TGFβ1-induced ITGB6 transcriptional activity. Using chromatin immunoprecipitation we demonstrate that TGFβ1 stimulation of lung epithelial cells results in direct binding of Smad3, and Smad4, to the ITGB6 gene promoter within this region. Finally, using an adenoviral TGFβ1 over-expression model of pulmonary fibrosis we demonstrate that Smad3 is crucial for TGFβ1-induced αvβ6 integrin expression within the alveolar epithelium in vivo. Together, these data confirm that a homeostatic, autocrine loop of αvβ6 integrin activated TGFβ1-induced ITGB6 gene expression regulates epithelial basal αvβ6 integrin expression, and demonstrates that this occurs via Smad

  4. Replication-induced transcription of an autorepressed gene: The replication initiator gene of plasmid P1

    PubMed Central

    Mukhopadhyay, Suman; Chattoraj, Dhruba K.

    2000-01-01

    The replication origin of plasmid P1 contains an array of five repeats (iterons) that bind the plasmid-encoded initiator RepA. Within the array lies the repA promoter, which becomes largely repressed on RepA binding (autorepression). One might expect that extra iterons produced on plasmid replication would titrate RepA and release the repression. The promoter, however, is induced poorly by extra iterons. The P1 copy number is reduced by extra iterons in the presence of the autorepressed repA gene but not when additional RepA is provided from constitutive sources. It has been proposed that the iteron-bound RepA couples with the promoter-bound RepA and thereby maintains repression. Although not the product of replication, we find that the act of replication itself can renew RepA synthesis. Replication apparently cleans the promoter of bound RepA and provides a window of opportunity for repA transcription. We propose that replication-induced transcription is required to ensure initiator availability in a system that is induced poorly when challenged with additional initiator binding sites. PMID:10840063

  5. Virus-induced gene complementation reveals a transcription factor network in modulation of tomato fruit ripening

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Tao; Zhang, Hang; Lai, Tongfei; Qin, Cheng; Shi, Nongnong; Wang, Huizhong; Jin, Mingfei; Zhong, Silin; Fan, Zaifeng; Liu, Yule; Wu, Zirong; Jackson, Stephen; Giovannoni, James J.; Rolin, Dominique; Gallusci, Philippe; Hong, Yiguo

    2012-01-01

    Plant virus technology, in particular virus-induced gene silencing, is a widely used reverse- and forward-genetics tool in plant functional genomics. However the potential of virus technology to express genes to induce phenotypes or to complement mutants in order to understand the function of plant genes is not well documented. Here we exploit Potato virus X as a tool for virus-induced gene complementation (VIGC). Using VIGC in tomato, we demonstrated that ectopic viral expression of LeMADS-RIN, which encodes a MADS-box transcription factor (TF), resulted in functional complementation of the non-ripening rin mutant phenotype and caused fruits to ripen. Comparative gene expression analysis indicated that LeMADS-RIN up-regulated expression of the SBP-box (SQUAMOSA promoter binding protein-like) gene LeSPL-CNR, but down-regulated the expression of LeHB-1, an HD-Zip homeobox TF gene. Our data support the hypothesis that a transcriptional network may exist among key TFs in the modulation of fruit ripening in tomato. PMID:23150786

  6. ATRA transcriptionally induces nSMase2 through CBP/p300-mediated histone acetylation.

    PubMed

    Clarke, Christopher J; Shamseddine, Achraf A; Jacob, Joseph J; Khalife, Gabrielle; Burns, Tara A; Hannun, Yusuf A

    2016-05-01

    Neutral sphingomyelinase-2 (nSMase2) is a key ceramide-producing enzyme in cellular stress responses. While many posttranslational regulators of nSMase2 are known, emerging evidence suggests a more protracted regulation of nSMase2 at the transcriptional level. Previously, we reported that nSMase2 is induced by all-trans retinoic acid (ATRA) in MCF7 cells and implicated nSMase2 in ATRA-induced growth arrest. Here, we further investigated how ATRA regulates nSMase2. We find that ATRA regulates nSMase2 transcriptionally through the retinoic acid receptor-α, but this is independent of previously identified transcriptional regulators of nSMase2 (Sp1, Sp3, Runx2) and is not through increased promoter activity. Epigenetically, the nSMase2 gene is not repressively methylated in MCF7 cells. However, inhibition of histone deacetylases (HDACs) with trichostatin A (TSA) induced nSMase2 comparably to ATRA; furthermore, combined ATRA and TSA treatment was not additive, suggesting ATRA regulates nSMase2 through direct modulation of histone acetylation. Confirming this, the histone acetyltransferases CREB-binding protein and p300 were required for ATRA induction of nSMase2. Finally, use of class-specific HDAC inhibitors suggested that HDAC4 and/or HDAC5 are negative regulators of nSMase2 expression. Collectively, these results identify a novel pathway of nSMase2 regulation and suggest that physiological or pharmacological modulation of histone acetylation can directly affect nSMase2 levels. PMID:27013100

  7. Water deprivation-partial rehydration induces sensitization of sodium appetite and alteration of hypothalamic transcripts.

    PubMed

    Pereira-Derderian, Daniela T B; Vendramini, Regina C; Menani, José V; Chiavegatto, Silvana; De Luca, Laurival A

    2016-01-01

    iSodium intake occurs either as a spontaneous or induced behavior, which is enhanced, i.e., sensitized, by repeated episodes of water deprivation followed by subsequent partial rehydration (WD-PR). In the present work, we examined whether repeated WD-PR alters hypothalamic transcripts related to the brain renin-angiotensin system (RAS) and apelin system in male normotensive Holtzman rats (HTZ). We also examined whether the sodium intake of a strain with genetically inherited high expression of the brain RAS, the spontaneously hypertensive rat (SHR), responds differently than HTZ to repeated WD-PR. We found that repeated WD-PR, besides enhancing spontaneous and induced 0.3 M NaCl intake, increased the hypothalamic expression of angiotensinogen, aminopeptidase N, and apelin receptor transcripts (43%, 60%, and 159%, respectively) in HTZ at the end of the third WD-PR. Repeated WD-PR did not change the daily spontaneous 0.3 M NaCl intake and barely changed the need-induced 0.3 M NaCl intake of SHR. The same treatment consistently enhanced spontaneous daily 0.3 M NaCl intake in the normotensive Wistar-Kyoto rats. The results show that repeated WD-PR produces alterations in hypothalamic transcripts and also sensitizes sodium appetite in HTZ. They suggest an association between the components of hypothalamic RAS and the apelin system, with neural and behavioral plasticity produced by repeated episodes of WD-PR in a normotensive strain. The results also indicate that the inherited hyperactive brain RAS is not a guarantee for sensitization of sodium intake in the male adult SHR exposed to repeated WD-PR. PMID:26538239

  8. Transcriptional Regulation of Tetrapyrrole Biosynthetic Genes Explains Abscisic Acid-Induced Heme Accumulation in the Unicellular Red Alga Cyanidioschyzon merolae.

    PubMed

    Kobayashi, Yuki; Tanaka, Kan

    2016-01-01

    Abscisic acid (ABA), a pivotal phytohormone that is synthesized in response to abiotic stresses and other environmental changes, induces various physiological responses. Heme, in its unbound form, has a positive signaling role in cell-cycle initiation in Cyanidioschyzon merolae. ABA induces heme accumulation, but also prevents cell-cycle initiation through the titration of the unbound heme by inducing the heme scavenging protein tryptophan-rich sensory protein-related protein O. In this study, we analyzed the accumulation of tetrapyrrole biosynthetic gene transcripts after the addition of ABA to the medium and found that transcripts of a ferrochelatase and a magnesium-chelatase subunit increased, while other examined transcripts decreased. Under the same conditions, the heme and magnesium-protoporphyrin IX contents increased, while the protoporphyrin IX content decreased. Thus, ABA may regulate the intracellular heme and other tetrapyrrole contents through the transcriptional regulation of biosynthetic genes. PMID:27621743

  9. Transcriptional Regulation of Tetrapyrrole Biosynthetic Genes Explains Abscisic Acid-Induced Heme Accumulation in the Unicellular Red Alga Cyanidioschyzon merolae

    PubMed Central

    Kobayashi, Yuki; Tanaka, Kan

    2016-01-01

    Abscisic acid (ABA), a pivotal phytohormone that is synthesized in response to abiotic stresses and other environmental changes, induces various physiological responses. Heme, in its unbound form, has a positive signaling role in cell-cycle initiation in Cyanidioschyzon merolae. ABA induces heme accumulation, but also prevents cell-cycle initiation through the titration of the unbound heme by inducing the heme scavenging protein tryptophan-rich sensory protein-related protein O. In this study, we analyzed the accumulation of tetrapyrrole biosynthetic gene transcripts after the addition of ABA to the medium and found that transcripts of a ferrochelatase and a magnesium-chelatase subunit increased, while other examined transcripts decreased. Under the same conditions, the heme and magnesium-protoporphyrin IX contents increased, while the protoporphyrin IX content decreased. Thus, ABA may regulate the intracellular heme and other tetrapyrrole contents through the transcriptional regulation of biosynthetic genes. PMID:27621743

  10. Natural Antisense Transcript for Hyaluronan Synthase 2 (HAS2-AS1) Induces Transcription of HAS2 via Protein O-GlcNAcylation*

    PubMed Central

    Vigetti, Davide; Deleonibus, Sara; Moretto, Paola; Bowen, Timothy; Fischer, Jens W.; Grandoch, Maria; Oberhuber, Alexander; Love, Dona C.; Hanover, John A.; Cinquetti, Raffaella; Karousou, Eugenia; Viola, Manuela; D'Angelo, Maria Luisa; Hascall, Vincent C.; De Luca, Giancarlo; Passi, Alberto

    2014-01-01

    Changes in the microenvironment organization within vascular walls are critical events in the pathogenesis of vascular pathologies, including atherosclerosis and restenosis. Hyaluronan (HA) accumulation into artery walls supports vessel thickening and is involved in many cardiocirculatory diseases. Excessive cytosolic glucose can enter the hexosamine biosynthetic pathway, increase UDP-N-acetylglucosamine (UDP-GlcNAc) availability, and lead to modification of cytosolic proteins via O-linked attachment of the monosaccharide β-N-GlcNAc (O-GlcNAcylation) from UDP-GlcNAc by the enzyme O-GlcNAc transferase. As many cytoplasmic and nuclear proteins can be glycosylated by O-GlcNAc, we studied whether the expression of the HA synthases that synthesize HA could be controlled by O-GlcNAcylation in human aortic smooth muscle cells. Among the three HAS isoenzymes, only HAS2 mRNA increased after O-GlcNAcylation induced by glucosamine treatments or by inhibiting O-GlcNAc transferase with PUGNAC (O-(2-acetamido-2-deoxy-d-glucopyranosylidene)amino-N-phenylcarbamate). We found that the natural antisense transcript of HAS2 (HAS2-AS1) was absolutely necessary to induce the transcription of the HAS2 gene. Moreover, we found that O-GlcNAcylation modulated HAS2-AS1 promoter activation by recruiting the NF-κB subunit p65, but not the HAS2 promoter, whereas HAS2-AS1 natural antisense transcript, working in cis, regulated HAS2 transcription by altering the chromatin structure around the HAS2 proximal promoter via O-GlcNAcylation and acetylation. These results indicate that HAS2 transcription can be finely regulated not only by recruiting transcription factors to the promoter as previously described but also by modulating chromatin accessibility by epigenetic modifications. PMID:25183006

  11. GATA2 Mediates Thyrotropin-Releasing Hormone-Induced Transcriptional Activation of the Thyrotropin β Gene

    PubMed Central

    Ohba, Kenji; Sasaki, Shigekazu; Matsushita, Akio; Iwaki, Hiroyuki; Matsunaga, Hideyuki; Suzuki, Shingo; Ishizuka, Keiko; Misawa, Hiroko; Oki, Yutaka; Nakamura, Hirotoshi

    2011-01-01

    Thyrotropin-releasing hormone (TRH) activates not only the secretion of thyrotropin (TSH) but also the transcription of TSHβ and α-glycoprotein (αGSU) subunit genes. TSHβ expression is maintained by two transcription factors, Pit1 and GATA2, and is negatively regulated by thyroid hormone (T3). Our prior studies suggest that the main activator of the TSHβ gene is GATA2, not Pit1 or unliganded T3 receptor (TR). In previous studies on the mechanism of TRH-induced activation of the TSHβ gene, the involvements of Pit1 and TR have been investigated, but the role of GATA2 has not been clarified. Using kidney-derived CV1 cells and pituitary-derived GH3 and TαT1 cells, we demonstrate here that TRH signaling enhances GATA2-dependent activation of the TSHβ promoter and that TRH-induced activity is abolished by amino acid substitution in the GATA2-Zn finger domain or mutation of GATA-responsive element in the TSHβ gene. In CV1 cells transfected with TRH receptor expression plasmid, GATA2-dependent transactivation of αGSU and endothelin-1 promoters was enhanced by TRH. In the gel shift assay, TRH signal potentiated the DNA-binding capacity of GATA2. While inhibition by T3 is dominant over TRH-induced activation, unliganded TR or the putative negative T3-responsive element are not required for TRH-induced stimulation. Studies using GH3 cells showed that TRH-induced activity of the TSHβ promoter depends on protein kinase C but not the mitogen-activated protein kinase, suggesting that the signaling pathway is different from that in the prolactin gene. These results indicate that GATA2 is the principal mediator of the TRH signaling pathway in TSHβ expression. PMID:21533184

  12. Protection from cyanide-induced brain injury by the Nrf2 transcriptional activator carnosic acid.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Dongxian; Lee, Brian; Nutter, Anthony; Song, Paul; Dolatabadi, Nima; Parker, James; Sanz-Blasco, Sara; Newmeyer, Traci; Ambasudhan, Rajesh; McKercher, Scott R; Masliah, Eliezer; Lipton, Stuart A

    2015-06-01

    Cyanide is a life-threatening, bioterrorist agent, preventing cellular respiration by inhibiting cytochrome c oxidase, resulting in cardiopulmonary failure, hypoxic brain injury, and death within minutes. However, even after treatment with various antidotes to protect cytochrome oxidase, cyanide intoxication in humans can induce a delayed-onset neurological syndrome that includes symptoms of Parkinsonism. Additional mechanisms are thought to underlie cyanide-induced neuronal damage, including generation of reactive oxygen species. This may account for the fact that antioxidants prevent some aspects of cyanide-induced neuronal damage. Here, as a potential preemptive countermeasure against a bioterrorist attack with cyanide, we tested the CNS protective effect of carnosic acid (CA), a pro-electrophilic compound found in the herb rosemary. CA crosses the blood-brain barrier to up-regulate endogenous antioxidant enzymes via activation of the Nrf2 transcriptional pathway. We demonstrate that CA exerts neuroprotective effects on cyanide-induced brain damage in cultured rodent and human-induced pluripotent stem cell-derived neurons in vitro, and in vivo in various brain areas of a non-Swiss albino mouse model of cyanide poisoning that simulates damage observed in the human brain. Cyanide, a potential bioterrorist agent, can produce a chronic delayed-onset neurological syndrome that includes symptoms of Parkinsonism. Here, cyanide poisoning treated with the proelectrophillic compound carnosic acid, results in reduced neuronal cell death in both in vitro and in vivo models through activation of the Nrf2/ARE transcriptional pathway. Carnosic acid is therefore a potential treatment for the toxic central nervous system (CNS) effects of cyanide poisoning. ARE, antioxidant responsive element; Nrf2 (NFE2L2, Nuclear factor (erythroid-derived 2)-like 2). PMID:25692407

  13. Epstein-Barr virus-induced autoimmune responses. II. Immunoglobulin G autoantibodies to mimicking and nonmimicking epitopes. Presence in autoimmune disease.

    PubMed Central

    Vaughan, J H; Nguyen, M D; Valbracht, J R; Patrick, K; Rhodes, G H

    1995-01-01

    During infectious mononucleosis, IgM autoantibodies are generated to a protein, p542, which contains a glycine-rich 28-mer epitope cross-reactive with the Epstein-Barr nuclear antigen-1 through Epstein-Barr nuclear antigen-1's glycine/alanine repeat. In normal individuals it is uncommon to find IgG anti-p542, but among patients with progressive systemic sclerosis, systemic lupus erythematosus, and ulcerative colitis high IgG anti-p542 (> 3 SD above the mean of normal 20-50 yr controls) occurred frequently. Lesser elevations occurred in Sjögren's syndrome, rheumatoid arthritis, ankylosing spondylitis, and Crohn's disease, but none with chronic hepatitis B infection. The reactive epitopes on p542 were mapped with deletion mutants, which indicated that the glycine-rich 28-mer was the major antigenic determinant, with lesser antibody responses to other epitopes. We conclude that normally there is an inability to generate IgG autoantibodies to the cross-reactive (mimicking) epitope of the p542 host protein, but that this inability is overcome in a proportion of patients with autoimmune disease. We conclude also that non-cross-reactive autoepitopes exist on p542 protein, to which IgG autoantibodies can commonly be formed in autoimmune disorders. The mechanisms responsible for the latter must involve different mechanisms than those responsible for autoantibodies to the mimicking epitope. Images PMID:7533789

  14. Thioredoxin-interacting protein inhibits hypoxia-inducible factor transcriptional activity.

    PubMed

    Farrell, Michael R; Rogers, Lynette K; Liu, Yusen; Welty, Stephen E; Tipple, Trent E

    2010-11-15

    Vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) is required for proper lung development and is transcriptionally regulated in alveolar epithelial cells by hypoxia-inducible factor (HIF). Previous findings in a newborn mouse model of bronchopulmonary dysplasia (BPD) suggest that thioredoxin-interacting protein (Txnip) is a novel regulator of VEGF expression. The present studies were designed to test the hypothesis that Txnip negatively regulates VEGF through effects on HIF-mediated gene expression. To test this hypothesis, we first examined the levels of VEGF and Txnip protein in the lungs of 1-day-old newborn mice and E19 embryos and detected a significant inverse correlation. To elucidate the mechanisms underlying this relationship, we studied the effects of Txnip overexpression on HIF-mediated transcription using murine lung epithelial (MLE-12) cells. Overexpression of Txnip inhibited HIF-mediated reporter activity in both hypoxia and room air. Suppression of HIF activity by Txnip seemed to be independent of the ability of Txnip to bind to thioredoxin. Thus, our studies support a model in which Txnip is a potentially critical regulator of HIF-mediated gene transcription in the murine lung. Alterations in Txnip expression could alter lung VEGF expression in prematurely born human infants and contribute to the development of BPD. PMID:20692333

  15. Molecular characterization of Treponema denticola infection-induced bone and soft tissue transcriptional profiles

    PubMed Central

    Bakthavatchalu, V.; Meka, A.; Sathishkumar, S.; Lopez, M.C.; Verma, R.K.; Wallet, S.M.; Bhattacharyya, I.; Boyce, B.F.; Mans, J.; Lamont, R.J.; Baker, H.V.; Ebersole, J.L.; Kesavalu, L.

    2010-01-01

    SUMMARY Treponema denticola is associated with subgingival biofilms in adult periodontitis and with acute necrotizing ulcerative gingivitis. However, the molecular mechanisms by which T. denticola impacts periodontal inflammation and alveolar bone resorption remain unclear. Here, we examined changes in the host transcriptional profiles during a T. denticola infection using a murine calvarial model of inflammation and bone resorption. T. denticola was injected into the subcutaneous soft tissue over the calvaria of BALB/c mice for 3 days, after which the soft tissues and the calvarial bones were excised. RNA was isolated and analysed for transcript profiling using Murine GeneChip® arrays. Following T. denticola infection, 2905 and 1234 genes in the infected calvarial bones and soft tissues, respectively, were differentially expressed (p ≤ 0.05). Biological pathways significantly impacted by T. denticola infection in calvarial bone and calvarial tissue included leukocyte transendothelial migration, cell adhesion (immune system) molecules, cell cycle, extracellular matrix–receptor interaction, focal adhesion, B-cell receptor signaling and transforming growth factor-β signaling pathways resulting in proinflammatory, chemotactic effects, and T-cell stimulation. In conclusion, localized T. denticola infection differentially induces transcription of a broad array of host genes, the profiles of which differed between inflamed calvarial bone and soft tissues. PMID:20618700

  16. Transcriptional changes induced by the tumor dormancy-associated microRNA-190

    PubMed Central

    Almog, Nava; Briggs, Christine; Beheshti, Afshin; Ma, Lili; Wilkie, Kathleen P.; Rietman, Edward; Hlatky, Lynn

    2013-01-01

    Tumor dormancy is a highly prevalent stage in cancer progression. We have previously generated and characterized in vivo experimental models of human tumor dormancy in which micro-tumors remain occult until they spontaneously shift into rapid tumor growth. We showed that the dormant micro-tumors undergo a stable microRNA (miRNA) switch during their transition from dormancy to a fast-growing phenotype and reported the identification of a consensus signature of human tumor dormancy-associated miRNAs (DmiRs). miRNA-190 (miR-190) is among the most upregulated DmiRs in all dormant tumors analyzed. Upregulation of miR-190 led to prolonged tumor dormancy in otherwise fast-growing glioblastomas and osteosarcomas. Here we investigate the transcriptional changes induced by miR-190 expression in cancer cells and show similar patterns of miR-190 mediated transcriptional reprogramming in both glioblastoma and osteosarcoma cells. The data suggests that miR-190 mediated effects rely on an extensive network of molecular changes in tumor cells and that miR-190 affects several transcriptional factors, tumor suppressor genes and interferon response pathways. The molecular mechanisms governing tumor dormancy described in this work may provide promising targets for early prevention of cancer and may lead to novel treatments to convert the malignant tumor phenotype into an asymptomatic dormant state. PMID:23863200

  17. Nitrogen starvation-induced transcriptome alterations and influence of transcription regulator mutants in Mycobacterium smegmatis

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background As other bacteria, Mycobacterium smegmatis needs adaption mechanisms to cope with changing nitrogen sources and to survive situations of nitrogen starvation. In the study presented here, transcriptome analyses were used to characterize the response of the bacterium to nitrogen starvation and to elucidate the role of specific transcriptional regulators. Results In response to nitrogen deprivation, a general starvation response is induced in M. smegmatis. This includes changes in the transcription of several hundred genes encoding e.g. transport proteins, proteins involved in nitrogen metabolism and regulation, energy generation and protein turnover. The specific nitrogen-related changes at the transcriptional level depend mainly on the presence of GlnR, while the AmtR protein controls only a small number of genes. Conclusions M. smegmatis is able to metabolize a number of different nitrogen sources and nitrogen control in M. smegmatis is similar to control mechanisms characterized in streptomycetes, while the master regulator of nitrogen control in corynebacteria, AmtR, is plays a minor role in this regulatory network. PMID:24266988

  18. Global analysis of induced transcription factors and cofactors identifies Tfdp2 as an essential coregulator during terminal erythropoiesis.

    PubMed

    Chen, Cynthia; Lodish, Harvey F

    2014-06-01

    Key transcriptional regulators of terminal erythropoiesis, such as GATA-binding factor 1 (GATA1) and T-cell acute lymphocytic leukemia protein 1 (TAL1), have been well characterized, but transcription factors and cofactors and their expression modulations have not yet been explored on a global scale. Here, we use global gene expression analysis to identify 28 transcription factors and 19 transcriptional cofactors induced during terminal erythroid differentiation whose promoters are enriched for binding by GATA1 and TAL1. Utilizing protein-protein interaction databases to identify cofactors for each transcription factor, we pinpoint several co-induced pairs, of which E2f2 and its cofactor transcription factor Dp-2 (Tfdp2) were the most highly induced. TFDP2 is a critical cofactor required for proper cell cycle control and gene expression. GATA1 and TAL1 are bound to the regulatory regions of Tfdp2 and upregulate its expression and knockdown of Tfdp2 results in significantly reduced rates of proliferation as well as reduced upregulation of many erythroid-important genes. Loss of Tfdp2 also globally inhibits the normal downregulation of many E2F2 target genes, including those that regulate the cell cycle, causing cells to accumulate in S phase and resulting in increased erythrocyte size. Our findings highlight the importance of TFDP2 in coupling the erythroid cell cycle with terminal differentiation and validate this study as a resource for future work on elucidating the role of diverse transcription factors and coregulators in erythropoiesis. PMID:24607859

  19. Lysophosphatidic Acid-Induced Transcriptional Profile Represents Serous Epithelial Ovarian Carcinoma and Worsened Prognosis

    PubMed Central

    Murph, Mandi M.; Liu, Wenbin; Yu, Shuangxing; Lu, Yiling; Hall, Hassan; Hennessy, Bryan T.; Lahad, John; Schaner, Marci; Helland, Åslaug; Kristensen, Gunnar; Børresen-Dale, Anne-Lise; Mills, Gordon B.

    2009-01-01

    Background Lysophosphatidic acid (LPA) governs a number of physiologic and pathophysiological processes. Malignant ascites fluid is rich in LPA, and LPA receptors are aberrantly expressed by ovarian cancer cells, implicating LPA in the initiation and progression of ovarian cancer. However, there is an absence of systematic data critically analyzing the transcriptional changes induced by LPA in ovarian cancer. Methodology and Principal Findings In this study, gene expression profiling was used to examine LPA-mediated transcription by exogenously adding LPA to human epithelial ovarian cancer cells for 24 h to mimic long-term stimulation in the tumor microenvironment. The resultant transcriptional profile comprised a 39-gene signature that closely correlated to serous epithelial ovarian carcinoma. Hierarchical clustering of ovarian cancer patient specimens demonstrated that the signature is associated with worsened prognosis. Patients with LPA-signature-positive ovarian tumors have reduced disease-specific and progression-free survival times. They have a higher frequency of stage IIIc serous carcinoma and a greater proportion is deceased. Among the 39-gene signature, a group of seven genes associated with cell adhesion recapitulated the results. Out of those seven, claudin-1, an adhesion molecule and phenotypic epithelial marker, is the only independent biomarker of serous epithelial ovarian carcinoma. Knockdown of claudin-1 expression in ovarian cancer cells reduces LPA-mediated cellular adhesion, enhances suspended cells and reduces LPA-mediated migration. Conclusions The data suggest that transcriptional events mediated by LPA in the tumor microenvironment influence tumor progression through modulation of cell adhesion molecules like claudin-1 and, for the first time, report an LPA-mediated expression signature in ovarian cancer that predicts a worse prognosis. PMID:19440550

  20. Arbuscular mycorrhiza Symbiosis Induces a Major Transcriptional Reprogramming of the Potato SWEET Sugar Transporter Family.

    PubMed

    Manck-Götzenberger, Jasmin; Requena, Natalia

    2016-01-01

    Biotrophic microbes feeding on plants must obtain carbon from their hosts without killing the cells. The symbiotic Arbuscular mycorrhizal (AM) fungi colonizing plant roots do so by inducing major transcriptional changes in the host that ultimately also reprogram the whole carbon partitioning of the plant. AM fungi obtain carbohydrates from the root cortex apoplast, in particular from the periarbuscular space that surrounds arbuscules. However, the mechanisms by which cortical cells export sugars into the apoplast for fungal nutrition are unknown. Recently a novel type of sugar transporter, the SWEET, able to perform not only uptake but also efflux from cells was identified. Plant SWEETs have been shown to be involved in the feeding of pathogenic microbes and are, therefore, good candidates to play a similar role in symbiotic associations. Here we have carried out the first phylogenetic and expression analyses of the potato SWEET family and investigated its role during mycorrhiza symbiosis. The potato genome contains 35 SWEETs that cluster into the same four clades defined in Arabidopsis. Colonization of potato roots by the AM fungus Rhizophagus irregularis imposes major transcriptional rewiring of the SWEET family involving, only in roots, changes in 22 of the 35 members. None of the SWEETs showed mycorrhiza-exclusive induction and most of the 12 induced genes belong to the putative hexose transporters of clade I and II, while only two are putative sucrose transporters from clade III. In contrast, most of the repressed transcripts (10) corresponded to clade III SWEETs. Promoter-reporter assays for three of the induced genes, each from one cluster, showed re-localization of expression to arbuscule-containing cells, supporting a role for SWEETs in the supply of sugars at biotrophic interfaces. The complex transcriptional regulation of SWEETs in roots in response to AM fungal colonization supports a model in which symplastic sucrose in cortical cells could be cleaved

  1. Arbuscular mycorrhiza Symbiosis Induces a Major Transcriptional Reprogramming of the Potato SWEET Sugar Transporter Family

    PubMed Central

    Manck-Götzenberger, Jasmin; Requena, Natalia

    2016-01-01

    Biotrophic microbes feeding on plants must obtain carbon from their hosts without killing the cells. The symbiotic Arbuscular mycorrhizal (AM) fungi colonizing plant roots do so by inducing major transcriptional changes in the host that ultimately also reprogram the whole carbon partitioning of the plant. AM fungi obtain carbohydrates from the root cortex apoplast, in particular from the periarbuscular space that surrounds arbuscules. However, the mechanisms by which cortical cells export sugars into the apoplast for fungal nutrition are unknown. Recently a novel type of sugar transporter, the SWEET, able to perform not only uptake but also efflux from cells was identified. Plant SWEETs have been shown to be involved in the feeding of pathogenic microbes and are, therefore, good candidates to play a similar role in symbiotic associations. Here we have carried out the first phylogenetic and expression analyses of the potato SWEET family and investigated its role during mycorrhiza symbiosis. The potato genome contains 35 SWEETs that cluster into the same four clades defined in Arabidopsis. Colonization of potato roots by the AM fungus Rhizophagus irregularis imposes major transcriptional rewiring of the SWEET family involving, only in roots, changes in 22 of the 35 members. None of the SWEETs showed mycorrhiza-exclusive induction and most of the 12 induced genes belong to the putative hexose transporters of clade I and II, while only two are putative sucrose transporters from clade III. In contrast, most of the repressed transcripts (10) corresponded to clade III SWEETs. Promoter-reporter assays for three of the induced genes, each from one cluster, showed re-localization of expression to arbuscule-containing cells, supporting a role for SWEETs in the supply of sugars at biotrophic interfaces. The complex transcriptional regulation of SWEETs in roots in response to AM fungal colonization supports a model in which symplastic sucrose in cortical cells could be cleaved

  2. Acetaldehyde-induced cytotoxicity involves induction of spermine oxidase at the transcriptional level.

    PubMed

    Uemura, Takeshi; Tanaka, Yuka; Higashi, Kyohei; Miyamori, Daisuke; Takasaka, Tomokazu; Nagano, Tatsuo; Toida, Toshihiko; Yoshimoto, Kanji; Igarashi, Kazuei; Ikegaya, Hiroshi

    2013-08-01

    Ethanol consumption causes serious liver injury including cirrhosis and hepatocellular carcinoma. Ethanol is metabolized mainly in the liver to acetic acid through acetaldehyde. We investigated the effect of ethanol and acetaldehyde on polyamine metabolism since polyamines are essential factors for normal cellular functions. We found that acetaldehyde induced spermine oxidase (SMO) at the transcriptional level in HepG2 cells. The levels and activities of ornithine decarboxylase (ODC) and spermidine/spermine acetyltransferase (SSAT) were not affected by acetaldehyde. Spermidine content was increased and spermine content was decreased by acetaldehyde treatment. Knockdown of SMO expression using siRNA reduced acetaldehyde toxicity. Acetaldehyde exposure increased free acrolein levels. An increase of acrolein by acetaldehyde was SMO dependent. Our results indicate that cytotoxicity of acetaldehyde involves, at least in part, oxidation of spermine to spermidine by SMO, which is induced by acetaldehyde. PMID:23707493

  3. Protection from cyanide-induced brain injury by the Nrf2 transcriptional activator carnosic acid

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Dongxian; Lee, Brian; Nutter, Anthony; Song, Paul; Dolatabadi, Nima; Parker, James; Sanz-Blasco, Sara; Newmeyer, Traci; Ambasudhan, Rajesh; McKercher, Scott R.; Masliah, Eliezer; Lipton, Stuart A.

    2015-01-01

    Cyanide is a life threatening, bioterrorist agent, preventing cellular respiration by inhibiting cytochrome c oxidase, resulting in cardiopulmonary failure, hypoxic brain injury, and death within minutes. However, even after treatment with various antidotes to protect cytochrome oxidase, cyanide intoxication in humans can induce a delayed-onset neurological syndrome that includes symptoms of Parkinsonism. Additional mechanisms are thought to underlie cyanide-induced neuronal damage, including generation of reactive oxygen species (ROS). This may account for the fact that antioxidants prevent some aspects of cyanide-induced neuronal damage. Here, as a potential preemptive countermeasure against a bioterrorist attack with cyanide, we tested the CNS protective effect of carnosic acid (CA), a pro-electrophilic compound found in the herb rosemary. CA crosses the blood-brain-barrier to upregulate endogenous antioxidant enzymes via activation of the Nrf2 transcriptional pathway. We demonstrate that CA exerts neuroprotective effects on cyanide-induced brain damage in cultured rodent and human induced pluripotent stem cell (hiPSC)-derived neurons in vitro, and in vivo in various brain areas of a non-Swiss albino (NSA) mouse model of cyanide poisoning that simulates damage observed in the human brain. PMID:25692407

  4. Inhibition of FoxO transcriptional activity prevents muscle fiber atrophy during cachexia and induces hypertrophy

    PubMed Central

    Reed, Sarah A.; Sandesara, Pooja B.; Senf, Sarah M.; Judge, Andrew R.

    2012-01-01

    Cachexia is characterized by inexorable muscle wasting that significantly affects patient prognosis and increases mortality. Therefore, understanding the molecular basis of this muscle wasting is of significant importance. Recent work showed that components of the forkhead box O (FoxO) pathway are increased in skeletal muscle during cachexia. In the current study, we tested the physiological significance of FoxO activation in the progression of muscle atrophy associated with cachexia. FoxO-DNA binding dependent transcription was blocked in the muscles of mice through injection of a dominant negative (DN) FoxO expression plasmid prior to inoculation with Lewis lung carcinoma cells or the induction of sepsis. Expression of DN FoxO inhibited the increased mRNA levels of atrogin-1, MuRF1, cathepsin L, and/or Bnip3 and inhibited muscle fiber atrophy during cancer cachexia and sepsis. Interestingly, during control conditions, expression of DN FoxO decreased myostatin expression, increased MyoD expression and satellite cell proliferation, and induced fiber hypertrophy, which required de novo protein synthesis. Collectively, these data show that FoxO-DNA binding-dependent transcription is necessary for normal muscle fiber atrophy during cancer cachexia and sepsis, and further suggest that basal levels of FoxO play an important role during normal conditions to depress satellite cell activation and limit muscle growth.—Reed, S. A., Sandesara, P. B., Senf, S. F., Judge, A. R. Inhibition of FoxO transcriptional activity prevents muscle fiber atrophy during cachexia and induces hypertrophy. PMID:22102632

  5. 17-A ETHYNYLESTRADIOL-INDUCED VITELLOGENIN GENE TRANSCRIPTION QUANTIFIED IN LIVERS OF ADULT MALES, LARVAE, AND GILLS OF FATHEAD MINNOW (PIMEPHALES PROMELAS)

    EPA Science Inventory

    We have applied a method for quantifying relative levels of messenger RNA (mRNA) transcription to assess chemically-induced gene expression in fathead minnows (Pimephales promelas). Synthetic oligonucleotides designed for the fathead minnow vitellogenin gene transcription (Vg) p...

  6. 17A-ETHYNYLESTRADIOL-INDUCED VITELLOGENIN GENE TRANSCRIPTION QUANTIFIED IN LIVERS OF ADULT MALES, LARVAE, AND GILLS OF FATHEAD MINNOW (PIMEPHALES PROMELAS)

    EPA Science Inventory

    We have applied a method for quantifying relative levels of messenger RNA (mRNA) transcription to assess chemically-induced gene expression in fathead minnows (Pimephales promelas). Synthetic oligonucleotides designed for the fathead minnow vitellogenin gene transcription (Vg) p...

  7. Functional dissection of a small anaerobically induced bZIP transcription factor from tomato.

    PubMed

    Sell, Simone; Hehl, Reinhard

    2004-11-01

    A small anaerobically induced tomato transcription factor was isolated from a subtractive library. This factor, designated ABZ1 (anaerobic basic leucine zipper), is anaerobically induced in fruits, leaves and roots and encodes a nuclear localized protein. ABZ1 shares close structural and sequence homology with the S-family of small basic leucine zipper (bZIP) transcription factors that are implicated in stress response. Nuclear localization of ABZ1 is mediated by the basic region and occurs under normoxic conditions. ABZ1 binds to G-box-like target sites as a dimer. Binding can be abolished by heterodimerization with a truncated protein retaining the leucine zipper but lacking the DNA binding domain. The protein binds in a sequence specific manner to the CaMV 35S promoter which is down regulated when ABZ1 is coexpressed. This correlates with the anaerobic down regulation of the 35S promoter in tomato and tobacco. These results may suggest that small bZIP proteins are involved in the negative regulation of gene expression under anaerobic conditions. PMID:15560794

  8. Dormancy in potato tuber meristems: chemically induced cessation in dormancy matches the natural process based on transcript profiles.

    PubMed

    Campbell, Michael; Segear, Erika; Beers, Lee; Knauber, Donna; Suttle, Jeffrey

    2008-11-01

    Meristem dormancy in perennial plants is a developmental process that results in repression of metabolism and growth. The cessation of dormancy results in rapid growth and should be associated with the production of nascent transcripts that encode for gene products controlling for cell division and growth. Dormancy cessation was allowed to progress normally or was chemically induced using bromoethane (BE), and microarray analysis was used to demonstrate changes in specific transcripts in response to dormancy cessation before a significant increase in cell division. Comparison of normal dormancy cessation to BE-induced dormancy cessation revealed a commonality in both up and downregulated transcripts. Many transcripts that decrease as dormancy terminates are inducible by abscisic acid particularly in the conserved BURP domain proteins, which include the RD22 class of proteins and in the storage protein patatin. Transcripts that are associated with an increase in expression encoded for proteins in the oxoglutarate-dependent oxygenase family. We conclude that BE-induced cessation of dormancy initiates transcript profiles similar to the natural processes that control dormancy. PMID:18317824

  9. Activation of Aro80 transcription factor by heat-induced aromatic amino acid influx in Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    PubMed

    Lee, Kyusung; Sung, Changmin; Kim, Byung-Gee; Hahn, Ji-Sook

    2013-08-16

    In Saccharomyces cerevisiae, transcription of ARO9 and ARO10 genes, involved in the catabolism of aromatic amino acids, is activated by Aro80 transcription factor in response to aromatic amino acids. Here we show that the transcription of ARO9 and ARO10 is also induced by heat shock in an Aro80-dependent manner. However, heat shock-related signaling pathways including PKA, PKC, and HOG pathways are not involved in the heat shock activation of Aro80. We elucidate that heat-induced increase in aromatic amino acid influx can lead to the inducer-dependent activation of Aro80 upon heat shock. Known aromatic amino acid permeases play an insignificant role in the heat-induced expression of ARO9 and ARO10, suggesting that an increase in plasma membrane fluidity might be responsible for the influx of aromatic amino acids during heat shock stress. PMID:23860270

  10. The obesity-induced transcriptional regulator TRIP-Br2 mediates visceral fat endoplasmic reticulum stress-induced inflammation

    PubMed Central

    Qiang, Guifen; Kong, Hyerim Whang; Fang, Difeng; McCann, Maximilian; Yang, Xiuying; Du, Guanhua; Blüher, Matthias; Zhu, Jinfang; Liew, Chong Wee

    2016-01-01

    The intimate link between location of fat accumulation and metabolic disease risk and depot-specific differences is well established, but how these differences between depots are regulated at the molecular level remains largely unclear. Here we show that TRIP-Br2 mediates endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress-induced inflammatory responses in visceral fat. Using in vitro, ex vivo and in vivo approaches, we demonstrate that obesity-induced circulating factors upregulate TRIP-Br2 specifically in visceral fat via the ER stress pathway. We find that ablation of TRIP-Br2 ameliorates both chemical and physiological ER stress-induced inflammatory and acute phase response in adipocytes, leading to lower circulating levels of inflammatory cytokines. Using promoter assays, as well as molecular and pharmacological experiments, we show that the transcription factor GATA3 is responsible for the ER stress-induced TRIP-Br2 expression in visceral fat. Taken together, our study identifies molecular regulators of inflammatory response in visceral fat that—given that these pathways are conserved in humans—might serve as potential therapeutic targets in obesity. PMID:27109496

  11. The obesity-induced transcriptional regulator TRIP-Br2 mediates visceral fat endoplasmic reticulum stress-induced inflammation.

    PubMed

    Qiang, Guifen; Kong, Hyerim Whang; Fang, Difeng; McCann, Maximilian; Yang, Xiuying; Du, Guanhua; Blüher, Matthias; Zhu, Jinfang; Liew, Chong Wee

    2016-01-01

    The intimate link between location of fat accumulation and metabolic disease risk and depot-specific differences is well established, but how these differences between depots are regulated at the molecular level remains largely unclear. Here we show that TRIP-Br2 mediates endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress-induced inflammatory responses in visceral fat. Using in vitro, ex vivo and in vivo approaches, we demonstrate that obesity-induced circulating factors upregulate TRIP-Br2 specifically in visceral fat via the ER stress pathway. We find that ablation of TRIP-Br2 ameliorates both chemical and physiological ER stress-induced inflammatory and acute phase response in adipocytes, leading to lower circulating levels of inflammatory cytokines. Using promoter assays, as well as molecular and pharmacological experiments, we show that the transcription factor GATA3 is responsible for the ER stress-induced TRIP-Br2 expression in visceral fat. Taken together, our study identifies molecular regulators of inflammatory response in visceral fat that-given that these pathways are conserved in humans-might serve as potential therapeutic targets in obesity. PMID:27109496

  12. Analysis of dynamic changes in retinoid-induced transcription and epigenetic profiles of murine Hox clusters in ES cells

    PubMed Central

    De Kumar, Bony; Parrish, Mark E.; Slaughter, Brian D.; Unruh, Jay R.; Gogol, Madelaine; Seidel, Christopher; Paulson, Ariel; Li, Hua; Gaudenz, Karin; Peak, Allison; McDowell, William; Fleharty, Brian; Ahn, Youngwook; Lin, Chengqi; Smith, Edwin; Shilatifard, Ali; Krumlauf, Robb

    2015-01-01

    The clustered Hox genes, which are highly conserved across metazoans, encode homeodomain-containing transcription factors that provide a blueprint for segmental identity along the body axis. Recent studies have underscored that in addition to encoding Hox genes, the homeotic clusters contain key noncoding RNA genes that play a central role in development. In this study, we have taken advantage of genome-wide approaches to provide a detailed analysis of retinoic acid (RA)-induced transcriptional and epigenetic changes within the homeotic clusters of mouse embryonic stem cells. Although there is a general colinear response, our analyses suggest a lack of strict colinearity for several genes in the HoxA and HoxB clusters. We have identified transcribed novel noncoding RNAs (ncRNAs) and their cis-regulatory elements that function in response to RA and demonstrated that the expression of these ncRNAs from both strands represent some of the most rapidly induced transcripts in ES cells. Finally, we have provided dynamic analyses of chromatin modifications for the coding and noncoding genes expressed upon activation and suggest that active transcription can occur in the presence of chromatin modifications and machineries associated with repressed transcription state over the clusters. Overall, our data provide a resource for a better understanding of the dynamic nature of the coding and noncoding transcripts and their associated chromatin marks in the regulation of homeotic gene transcription during development. PMID:26025802

  13. Analysis of dynamic changes in retinoid-induced transcription and epigenetic profiles of murine Hox clusters in ES cells.

    PubMed

    De Kumar, Bony; Parrish, Mark E; Slaughter, Brian D; Unruh, Jay R; Gogol, Madelaine; Seidel, Christopher; Paulson, Ariel; Li, Hua; Gaudenz, Karin; Peak, Allison; McDowell, William; Fleharty, Brian; Ahn, Youngwook; Lin, Chengqi; Smith, Edwin; Shilatifard, Ali; Krumlauf, Robb

    2015-08-01

    The clustered Hox genes, which are highly conserved across metazoans, encode homeodomain-containing transcription factors that provide a blueprint for segmental identity along the body axis. Recent studies have underscored that in addition to encoding Hox genes, the homeotic clusters contain key noncoding RNA genes that play a central role in development. In this study, we have taken advantage of genome-wide approaches to provide a detailed analysis of retinoic acid (RA)-induced transcriptional and epigenetic changes within the homeotic clusters of mouse embryonic stem cells. Although there is a general colinear response, our analyses suggest a lack of strict colinearity for several genes in the HoxA and HoxB clusters. We have identified transcribed novel noncoding RNAs (ncRNAs) and their cis-regulatory elements that function in response to RA and demonstrated that the expression of these ncRNAs from both strands represent some of the most rapidly induced transcripts in ES cells. Finally, we have provided dynamic analyses of chromatin modifications for the coding and noncoding genes expressed upon activation and suggest that active transcription can occur in the presence of chromatin modifications and machineries associated with repressed transcription state over the clusters. Overall, our data provide a resource for a better understanding of the dynamic nature of the coding and noncoding transcripts and their associated chromatin marks in the regulation of homeotic gene transcription during development. PMID:26025802

  14. E1A activates transcription of p73 and Noxa to induce apoptosis.

    PubMed

    Flinterman, Marcella; Guelen, Lars; Ezzati-Nik, Samira; Killick, Richard; Melino, Gerry; Tominaga, Kazuya; Mymryk, Joe S; Gäken, Joop; Tavassoli, Mahvash

    2005-02-18

    p73, a member of the p53 family of proteins, transcriptionally activates a number of genes involved in the control of cell cycle and apoptosis. Overexpression of p73 was detected in a large number of primary head and neck cancers, and in the established cell lines examined, these all contained inactivating p53 mutations. The significance of p73 overexpression in the pathogenesis of head and neck cancer is currently unclear. We have shown that the expression of adenovirus 5 E1A in a panel of head and neck cancer cell lines induces apoptosis independently of their p53 status. In this study we examined the role of p73 and its transcriptional targets in E1A-mediated induction of apoptosis. E1A expression resulted in significant activation of the TAp73 promoter but had no effect on the alternative, DeltaNp73 promoter. E1A also increased expression of endogenous TAp73 mRNA and protein. E1A mutants lacking the p300- and/or pRB-binding sites showed reduced ability to activate the TAp73 promoter. Additionally, mutations in the E2F1-binding sites in the TAp73 promoter impaired activation by E1A. Importantly, expression of the 13S isoform of E1A substantially induced the p53 apoptotic target Noxa in several p53-deficient cancer cell lines. Our results indicate that E1A activation of p73 and the p53 apoptotic target Noxa can occur in the absence of a functional p53. This activation is likely to play a key role in the mechanism of p53-independent apoptosis induced by E1A in some cancers and may provide an avenue for future cancer therapies. PMID:15572378

  15. Tamoxifen represses alcohol-induced transcription of RNA polymerase III-dependent genes in breast cancer cells

    PubMed Central

    Zhong, Qian; Shi, Ganggang; Zhang, Qingsong; Lu, Lei; Levy, Daniel; Zhong, Shuping

    2014-01-01

    Alcohol consumption in women has been associated with an increased risk of breast cancer, particular in estrogen receptor positive (ER+) cases. Deregulation of RNA polymerase III-dependent (Pol III) transcription enhances cellular tRNAs and 5S rRNA production, leading to an increase in translational capacity to promote cell transformation and tumor formation. Our recent studies demonstrated that alcohol induces Brf1 expression and Pol III gene transcription via ER. Here, we report that Tamoxifen (Tam) inhibits the induction of Brf1 and Pol III genes in ER+ breast cancer cells. Further analysis indicates that alcohol increases c-Jun expression to upregulate the transcription of Brf1 and Pol III genes, whereas Tam reduces c-Jun expression to repress the transcription of Brf1. Repression of cJun decreases cellular levels of ERα and Brf1. Alcohol-dependent increased occupancy of Brf1 in Pol III gene promoters is reduced by Tam. The repression of Brf1 and Pol III genes by Tam reduces alcohol-induced cell proliferation and colony formation. Together, these results indicate that Tam inhibits alcohol-induced Brf1 expression through c-Jun and ERα to downregulate Pol III gene transcription. Our studies uncover a new mechanism of Tam-treated ER+ breast cancer, by which Tam inhibits tumor growth through repressing Pol III gene transcription. PMID:25400119

  16. Aspergillus nidulans catalase-peroxidase gene (cpeA) is transcriptionally induced during sexual development through the transcription factor StuA.

    PubMed

    Scherer, Mario; Wei, Huijun; Liese, Ralf; Fischer, Reinhard

    2002-10-01

    Catalases, peroxidases, and catalase-peroxidases are important enzymes to cope with reactive oxygen species in pro- and eukaryotic cells. In the filamentous fungus Aspergillus nidulans three monofunctional catalases have been described, and a fourth catalase activity was observed in native polyacrylamide gels. The latter activity is probably due to the bifunctional enzyme catalase-peroxidase, which we characterized here. The gene, named cpeA, encodes an 81-kDa polypeptide with a conserved motif for heme coordination. The enzyme comprises of two similar domains, suggesting gene duplication and fusion during evolution. The first 439 amino acids share 22% identical residues with the C terminus. Homologous proteins are found in several prokaryotes, such as Escherichia coli and Mycobacterium tuberculosis (both with 61% identity). In fungi the enzyme has been noted in Penicillium simplicissimum, Septoria tritici, and Neurospora crassa (69% identical amino acids) but is absent from Saccharomyces cerevisiae. Expression analysis in A. nidulans revealed that the gene is transcriptionally induced upon carbon starvation and during sexual development, but starvation is not sufficient to reach high levels of the transcript during development. Besides transcriptional activation, we present evidence for posttranscriptional regulation. A green fluorescent protein fusion protein localized to the cytoplasm of Hülle cells. The Hülle cell-specific expression was dependent on the developmental regulator StuA, suggesting an activating function of this helix-loop-helix transcription factor. PMID:12455692

  17. p300 relieves p53-evoked transcriptional repression of hypoxia-inducible factor-1 (HIF-1).

    PubMed

    Schmid, Tobias; Zhou, Jie; Köhl, Roman; Brüne, Bernhard

    2004-05-15

    HIF-1 (hypoxia-inducible factor-1), a heterodimeric transcription factor comprising HIF-1alpha and HIF-1beta subunits, serves as a key regulator of metabolic adaptation to hypoxia. HIF-1 activity largely increases during hypoxia by attenuating pVHL (von Hippel-Lindau protein)-dependent ubiquitination and subsequent 26 S-proteasomal degradation of HIF-1alpha. Besides HIF-1, the transcription factor and tumour suppressor p53 accumulates and is activated under conditions of prolonged/severe hypoxia. Recently, the interaction between p53 and HIF-1alpha was reported to evoke HIF-1alpha degradation. Destruction of HIF-1alpha by p53 was corroborated in the present study by using pVHL-deficient RCC4 (renal carcinoma) cells, supporting the notion of a pVHL-independent degradation process. In addition, low p53 expression repressed HIF-1 transactivation without affecting HIF-1alpha protein amount. Establishing that p53-evoked inhibition of HIF-1 reporter activity was relieved upon co-transfection of p300 suggested competition between p53 and HIF-1 for limiting amounts of the shared co-activator p300. This assumption was confirmed by showing competitive binding of in vitro transcription/translation-generated p53 and HIF-1alpha to the CH1 domain of p300 in vitro. We conclude that low p53 expression attenuates HIF-1 transactivation by competing for p300, whereas high p53 expression destroys the HIF-1alpha protein and thereby eliminates HIF-1 reporter activity. Thus once p53 becomes activated under conditions of severe hypoxia/anoxia, it contributes to terminating HIF-1 responses. PMID:14992692

  18. HIV-1 Vpu accessory protein induces caspase-mediated cleavage of IRF3 transcription factor.

    PubMed

    Park, Sang Yoon; Waheed, Abdul A; Zhang, Zai-Rong; Freed, Eric O; Bonifacino, Juan S

    2014-12-19

    Vpu is an accessory protein encoded by HIV-1 that interferes with multiple host-cell functions. Herein we report that expression of Vpu by transfection into 293T cells causes partial proteolytic cleavage of interferon regulatory factor 3 (IRF3), a key transcription factor in the innate anti-viral response. Vpu-induced IRF3 cleavage is mediated by caspases and occurs mainly at Asp-121. Cleavage produces a C-terminal fragment of ∼37 kDa that comprises the IRF dimerization and transactivation domains but lacks the DNA-binding domain. A similar cleavage is observed upon infection of the Jurkat T-cell line with vesicular stomatitis virus G glycoprotein (VSV-G)-pseudotyped HIV-1. Two other HIV-1 accessory proteins, Vif and Vpr, also contribute to the induction of IRF3 cleavage in both the transfection and the infection systems. The C-terminal IRF3 fragment interferes with the transcriptional activity of full-length IRF3. Cleavage of IRF3 under all of these conditions correlates with cleavage of poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase, an indicator of apoptosis. We conclude that Vpu contributes to the attenuation of the anti-viral response by partial inactivation of IRF3 while host cells undergo apoptosis. PMID:25352594

  19. Radiation-induced alternative transcription and splicing events and their applicability to practical biodosimetry

    PubMed Central

    Macaeva, Ellina; Saeys, Yvan; Tabury, Kevin; Janssen, Ann; Michaux, Arlette; Benotmane, Mohammed A.; De Vos, Winnok H.; Baatout, Sarah; Quintens, Roel

    2016-01-01

    Accurate assessment of the individual exposure dose based on easily accessible samples (e.g. blood) immediately following a radiological accident is crucial. We aimed at developing a robust transcription-based signature for biodosimetry from human peripheral blood mononuclear cells irradiated with different doses of X-rays (0.1 and 1.0 Gy) at a dose rate of 0.26 Gy/min. Genome-wide radiation-induced changes in mRNA expression were evaluated at both gene and exon level. Using exon-specific qRT-PCR, we confirmed that several biomarker genes are alternatively spliced or transcribed after irradiation and that different exons of these genes exhibit significantly different levels of induction. Moreover, a significant number of radiation-responsive genes were found to be genomic neighbors. Using three different classification models we found that gene and exon signatures performed equally well on dose prediction, as long as more than 10 features are included. Together, our results highlight the necessity of evaluating gene expression at the level of single exons for radiation biodosimetry in particular and transcriptional biomarker research in general. This approach is especially advisable for practical gene expression-based biodosimetry, for which primer- or probe-based techniques would be the method of choice. PMID:26763932

  20. Therapeutic fetal-globin inducers reduce transcriptional repression in hemoglobinopathy erythroid progenitors through distinct mechanisms.

    PubMed

    Dai, Yan; Sangerman, Jose; Luo, Hong Yuan; Fucharoen, Suthat; Chui, David H K; Faller, Douglas V; Perrine, Susan P

    2016-01-01

    Pharmacologic augmentation of γ-globin expression sufficient to reduce anemia and clinical severity in patients with diverse hemoglobinopathies has been challenging. In studies here, representative molecules from four chemical classes, representing several distinct primary mechanisms of action, were investigated for effects on γ-globin transcriptional repressors, including components of the NuRD complex (LSD1 and HDACs 2-3), and the downstream repressor BCL11A, in erythroid progenitors from hemoglobinopathy patients. Two HDAC inhibitors (MS-275 and SB939), a short-chain fatty acid derivative (sodium dimethylbutyrate [SDMB]), and an agent identified in high-throughput screening, Benserazide, were studied. These therapeutics induced γ-globin mRNA in progenitors above same subject controls up to 20-fold, and increased F-reticulocytes up to 20%. Cellular protein levels of BCL11A, LSD-1, and KLF1 were suppressed by the compounds. Chromatin immunoprecipitation assays demonstrated a 3.6-fold reduction in LSD1 and HDAC3 occupancy in the γ-globin gene promoter with Benserazide exposure, 3-fold reduction in LSD-1 and HDAC2 occupancy in the γ-globin gene promoter with SDMB exposure, while markers of gene activation (histone H3K9 acetylation and H3K4 demethylation), were enriched 5.7-fold. These findings identify clinical-stage oral therapeutics which inhibit or displace major co-repressors of γ-globin gene transcription and may suggest a rationale for combination therapy to produce enhanced efficacy. PMID:26603726

  1. Single transcription factor reprogramming of hair follicle dermal papilla cells to induced pluripotent stem cells.

    PubMed

    Tsai, Su-Yi; Bouwman, Britta Am; Ang, Yen-Sin; Kim, Soo Jeong; Lee, Dung-Fang; Lemischka, Ihor R; Rendl, Michael

    2011-06-01

    Reprogramming patient-specific somatic cells into induced pluripotent stem (iPS) cells has great potential to develop feasible regenerative therapies. However, several issues need to be resolved such as ease, efficiency, and safety of generation of iPS cells. Many different cell types have been reprogrammed, most conveniently even peripheral blood mononuclear cells. However, they typically require the enforced expression of several transcription factors, posing mutagenesis risks as exogenous genetic material. To reduce this risk, iPS cells were previously generated with Oct4 alone from rather inaccessible neural stem cells that endogenously express the remaining reprogramming factors and very recently from fibroblasts with Oct4 alone in combination with additional small molecules. Here, we exploit that dermal papilla (DP) cells from hair follicles in the skin express all but one reprogramming factors to show that these accessible cells can be reprogrammed into iPS cells with the single transcription factor Oct4 and without further manipulation. Reprogramming was already achieved after 3 weeks and with efficiencies similar to other cell types reprogrammed with four factors. Dermal papilla-derived iPS cells are comparable to embryonic stem cells with respect to morphology, gene expression, and pluripotency. We conclude that DP cells may represent a preferred cell type for reprogramming accessible cells with less manipulation and for ultimately establishing safe conditions in the future by replacing Oct4 with small molecules. PMID:21563278

  2. A model for genetic and epigenetic regulatory networks identifies rare pathways for transcription factor induced pluripotency

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Artyomov, Maxim; Meissner, Alex; Chakraborty, Arup

    2010-03-01

    Most cells in an organism have the same DNA. Yet, different cell types express different proteins and carry out different functions. This is because of epigenetic differences; i.e., DNA in different cell types is packaged distinctly, making it hard to express certain genes while facilitating the expression of others. During development, upon receipt of appropriate cues, pluripotent embryonic stem cells differentiate into diverse cell types that make up the organism (e.g., a human). There has long been an effort to make this process go backward -- i.e., reprogram a differentiated cell (e.g., a skin cell) to pluripotent status. Recently, this has been achieved by transfecting certain transcription factors into differentiated cells. This method does not use embryonic material and promises the development of patient-specific regenerative medicine, but it is inefficient. The mechanisms that make reprogramming rare, or even possible, are poorly understood. We have developed the first computational model of transcription factor-induced reprogramming. Results obtained from the model are consistent with diverse observations, and identify the rare pathways that allow reprogramming to occur. If validated, our model could be further developed to design optimal strategies for reprogramming and shed light on basic questions in biology.

  3. A Drought-Inducible Transcription Factor Delays Reproductive Timing in Rice.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Chunyu; Liu, Jun; Zhao, Tao; Gomez, Adam; Li, Cong; Yu, Chunsheng; Li, Hongyu; Lin, Jianzhong; Yang, Yuanzhu; Liu, Bin; Lin, Chentao

    2016-05-01

    The molecular mechanisms underlying photoperiod or temperature control of flowering time have been recently elucidated, but how plants regulate flowering time in response to other external factors, such as water availability, remains poorly understood. Using a large-scale Hybrid Transcription Factor approach, we identified a bZIP transcriptional factor, O. sativa ABA responsive element binding factor 1 (OsABF1), which acts as a suppressor of floral transition in a photoperiod-independent manner. Simultaneous knockdown of both OsABF1 and its closest homologous gene, OsbZIP40, in rice (Oryza sativa) by RNA interference results in a significantly earlier flowering phenotype. Molecular and genetic analyses demonstrate that a drought regime enhances expression of the OsABF1 gene, which indirectly suppresses expression of the Early heading date 1 (Ehd1) gene that encodes a key activator of rice flowering. Furthermore, we identified a drought-inducible gene named OsWRKY104 that is under the direct regulation of OsABF1 Overexpression of OsWRKY104 can suppress Ehd1 expression and confers a later flowering phenotype in rice. Together, these findings reveal a novel pathway by which rice modulates heading date in response to the change of ambient water availability. PMID:26945049

  4. Overexpression of a transcription factor LYL1 induces T- and B-cell lymphoma in mice.

    PubMed

    Zhong, Y; Jiang, L; Hiai, H; Toyokuni, S; Yamada, Y

    2007-10-18

    LYL1, a member of the class II basic helix-loop-helix transcription factors, is aberrantly expressed in a fraction of human T-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia. Here, we generated transgenic mice ubiquitously overexpressing LYL1 using a construct expressing full-length cDNA driven by a human elongation factor 1alpha promoter. Four independent lines exhibiting high LYL1 expression were established. Of these transgenic mice, 96% displayed loss of hair with a short kinked tail. Furthermore, 30% of them developed malignant lymphoma, with an average latent period of 352 days. In these mice, histological examination revealed tumor cell infiltration in multiple organs and immunohistochemical analysis showed that the infiltrated tumor cells were either CD3 or CD45R/B220-positive; fluorescence-activated cell sorter analysis indicated that each tumor consisted either of mainly CD4, CD8 double-positive T cells or mature B cells; the clonality of LYL1-induced lymphoma was confirmed by T-cell receptor rearrangement and immunoglobulin heavy-chain gene rearrangement analyses. Mammalian two-hybrid analysis and luciferase assay suggested that excess LYL1 blocked the dimerization of E2A and thus inhibited the regulatory activity of E2A on the CD4 promoter. Reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction results showed that the expression of certain E2A/HEB target genes was downregulated. Taken together, our results provide direct evidence that aberrant expression of LYL1 plays a role in lymphomagenesis. PMID:17486074

  5. Hypoxia-inducible factors 1 and 2 are important transcriptional effectors in primary macrophages experiencing hypoxia.

    PubMed

    Fang, Hsin-Yu; Hughes, Russell; Murdoch, Craig; Coffelt, Seth B; Biswas, Subhra K; Harris, Adrian L; Johnson, Randall S; Imityaz, Hongxia Z; Simon, M Celeste; Fredlund, Erik; Greten, Florian R; Rius, Jordi; Lewis, Claire E

    2009-07-23

    Ischemia exists in many diseased tissues, including arthritic joints, atherosclerotic plaques, and malignant tumors. Macrophages accumulate in these sites and up-regulate hypoxia-inducible transcription factors (HIFs) 1 and 2 in response to the hypoxia present. Here we show that the gene expression profile in primary human and murine macrophages changes markedly when they are exposed to hypoxia for 18 hours. For example, they were seen to up-regulate the cell surface receptors, CXCR4 and GLUT1, and the potent, tumor-promoting cytokines, vascular endothelial growth factor A, interleukin (IL)-1beta and IL-8, adrenomedullin, CXCR4, and angiopoietin-2. Hypoxia also stimulated their expression and/or phosphorylation of various proteins in the nuclear factor-kappaB (NF-kappaB) signaling pathway. We then used both genetic and pharmacologic methods to manipulate the levels of HIFs-1alpha and 2alpha or NF-kappaB in primary macrophages to elucidate their role in the hypoxic induction of many of these key genes. These studies showed that both HIF-1 and -2, but not NF-kappaB, are important transcriptional effectors regulating the responses of macrophages to such a period of hypoxia. Further studies using experimental mouse models are now warranted to investigate the role of such macrophage responses in the progression of various diseased tissues, such as malignant tumors. PMID:19454749

  6. Hypoxia inducible factors 1 and 2 are important transcriptional effectors in primary macrophages experiencing hypoxia

    PubMed Central

    Fang, Hsin-Yu; Hughes, Russell; Murdoch, Craig; Coffelt, Seth; Biswas, Subhra K.; Harris, Adrian L.; Johnson, Randall S.; Imityaz, Hongxia Z.; Simon, M. Celeste; Fredlund, Erik; Greten, Florian; Rius, Jordi; Lewis, Claire E.

    2010-01-01

    Ischemia exists in many diseased tissues including arthritic joints, atherosclerotic plaques and malignant tumors. Macrophages accumulate in these sites and upregulate hypoxia-inducible transcription factors (HIFs) 1 and 2 in response to the hypoxia present. Here we show that the gene expression profile in primary human and murine macrophages changes markedly when they are exposed to hypoxia for 18h. For example, they were seen to upregulate the cell surface receptors, CXCR4 and GLUT1, and the potent, tumor-promoting cytokines, VEGFA, interleukins 1β and 8, adrenomedullin, CXCR4 and angiopoietin-2. Hypoxia also stimulated their expression and/or phosphorylation of various proteins in the NF-κB signalling pathway. We then used both genetic and pharmacological methods to manipulate the levels of HIFs 1α and 2α or NF-κB in primary macrophages in order to elucidate their role in the hypoxic induction of many of these key genes. These studies showed that both HIFs 1 and 2, but not NF-κB, are important transcriptional effectors regulating the responses of macrophages to such a period of hypoxia. Further studies using experimental mouse models are now warranted to investigate the role of such macrophage responses in the progression of various diseased tissues like malignant tumors. PMID:19454749

  7. Genome-Wide Transcriptional Response of Saccharomyces cerevisiae to Stress-Induced Perturbations

    PubMed Central

    Taymaz-Nikerel, Hilal; Cankorur-Cetinkaya, Ayca; Kirdar, Betul

    2016-01-01

    Cells respond to environmental and/or genetic perturbations in order to survive and proliferate. Characterization of the changes after various stimuli at different -omics levels is crucial to comprehend the adaptation of cells to the changing conditions. Genome-wide quantification and analysis of transcript levels, the genes affected by perturbations, extends our understanding of cellular metabolism by pointing out the mechanisms that play role in sensing the stress caused by those perturbations and related signaling pathways, and in this way guides us to achieve endeavors, such as rational engineering of cells or interpretation of disease mechanisms. Saccharomyces cerevisiae as a model system has been studied in response to different perturbations and corresponding transcriptional profiles were followed either statically or/and dynamically, short and long term. This review focuses on response of yeast cells to diverse stress inducing perturbations, including nutritional changes, ionic stress, salt stress, oxidative stress, osmotic shock, and to genetic interventions such as deletion and overexpression of genes. It is aimed to conclude on common regulatory phenomena that allow yeast to organize its transcriptomic response after any perturbation under different external conditions. PMID:26925399

  8. A Drought-Inducible Transcription Factor Delays Reproductive Timing in Rice1[OPEN

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Chunyu; Zhao, Tao; Gomez, Adam; Li, Cong; Yu, Chunsheng; Lin, Jianzhong; Lin, Chentao

    2016-01-01

    The molecular mechanisms underlying photoperiod or temperature control of flowering time have been recently elucidated, but how plants regulate flowering time in response to other external factors, such as water availability, remains poorly understood. Using a large-scale Hybrid Transcription Factor approach, we identified a bZIP transcriptional factor, O. sativa ABA responsive element binding factor 1 (OsABF1), which acts as a suppressor of floral transition in a photoperiod-independent manner. Simultaneous knockdown of both OsABF1 and its closest homologous gene, OsbZIP40, in rice (Oryza sativa) by RNA interference results in a significantly earlier flowering phenotype. Molecular and genetic analyses demonstrate that a drought regime enhances expression of the OsABF1 gene, which indirectly suppresses expression of the Early heading date 1 (Ehd1) gene that encodes a key activator of rice flowering. Furthermore, we identified a drought-inducible gene named OsWRKY104 that is under the direct regulation of OsABF1. Overexpression of OsWRKY104 can suppress Ehd1 expression and confers a later flowering phenotype in rice. Together, these findings reveal a novel pathway by which rice modulates heading date in response to the change of ambient water availability. PMID:26945049

  9. Radiation-induced alternative transcription and splicing events and their applicability to practical biodosimetry.

    PubMed

    Macaeva, Ellina; Saeys, Yvan; Tabury, Kevin; Janssen, Ann; Michaux, Arlette; Benotmane, Mohammed A; De Vos, Winnok H; Baatout, Sarah; Quintens, Roel

    2016-01-01

    Accurate assessment of the individual exposure dose based on easily accessible samples (e.g. blood) immediately following a radiological accident is crucial. We aimed at developing a robust transcription-based signature for biodosimetry from human peripheral blood mononuclear cells irradiated with different doses of X-rays (0.1 and 1.0 Gy) at a dose rate of 0.26 Gy/min. Genome-wide radiation-induced changes in mRNA expression were evaluated at both gene and exon level. Using exon-specific qRT-PCR, we confirmed that several biomarker genes are alternatively spliced or transcribed after irradiation and that different exons of these genes exhibit significantly different levels of induction. Moreover, a significant number of radiation-responsive genes were found to be genomic neighbors. Using three different classification models we found that gene and exon signatures performed equally well on dose prediction, as long as more than 10 features are included. Together, our results highlight the necessity of evaluating gene expression at the level of single exons for radiation biodosimetry in particular and transcriptional biomarker research in general. This approach is especially advisable for practical gene expression-based biodosimetry, for which primer- or probe-based techniques would be the method of choice. PMID:26763932

  10. Molecular mechanisms of nutlin-induced apoptosis in multiple myeloma: evidence for p53-transcription-dependent and -independent pathways.

    PubMed

    Saha, Manujendra N; Jiang, Hua; Chang, Hong

    2010-09-15

    Multiple myeloma (MM) is an incurable plasma cell malignancy in which p53 is rarely mutated. Thus, activation of the p53 pathway by a small molecule inhibitor of the p53-MDM2 interaction, nutlin, in MM cells retaining wild type p53 is an attractive therapeutic strategy. Recently we reported that nutlin plus velcade (a proteasome inhibitor) displayed a synergistic response in MM. However, the mechanism of the p53-mediated apoptosis in MM has not been fully understood. Our data show that nutlin-induced apoptosis correlated with reduction in cell viability, upregulation of p53, p21 and MDM2 protein levels with a simultaneous increase in pro-apoptotic targets PUMA, Bax and Bak and downregulation of anti-apoptotic targets Bcl2 and survivin and activation of caspase in MM cells harboring wild type p53. Nutlin-induced apoptosis was inhibited when activation of caspase was blocked by the caspase inhibitor. Nutlin caused mitochondrial translocation of p53 where it binds with Bcl2, leading to cytochrome C release. Moreover, blocking the transcriptional arm of p53 by the p53-specific transcriptional inhibitor, pifithrin-α, not only inhibited nutlin-induced upregulation of p53-transcriptional targets but also augmented apoptosis in MM cells, suggesting an association of transcription-independent pathway of apoptosis. However, inhibitor of mitochondrial translocation of p53, PFT-μ, did not prevent nutlin-induced apoptosis, suggesting that the p53 transcription-dependent pathway was also operational in nutlin-induced apoptosis in MM. Our study provides the evidence that nutlin-induced apoptosis in MM cells is mediated by transcription-dependent and -independent pathways and supports further clinical evaluation of nutlin as a novel therapeutic agent in MM. PMID:20595817

  11. ZNF32 protects against oxidative stress-induced apoptosis by modulating C1QBP transcription

    PubMed Central

    Li, Yanyan; Wei, Yuyan; Gong, Di; Gao, Junping; Zhang, Jie; Tan, Weiwei; Wen, Tianfu; Zhang, Le; Huang, Lugang; Xiang, Rong; Lin, Ping; Wei, Yuquan

    2015-01-01

    Reactive oxygen species (ROS)-driven oxidative stress has been recognized as a critical inducer of cancer cell death in response to therapeutic agents. Our previous studies have demonstrated that zinc finger protein (ZNF)32 is key to cell survival upon oxidant stimulation. However, the mechanisms by which ZNF32 mediates cell death remain unclear. Here, we show that at moderate levels of ROS, Sp1 directly binds to two GC boxes within the ZNF32 promoter to activate ZNF32 transcription. Alternatively, at cytotoxic ROS concentrations, ZNF32 expression is repressed due to decreased binding activity of Sp1. ZNF32 overexpression maintains mitochondrial membrane potential and enhances the antioxidant capacity of cells to detoxify ROS, and these effects promote cell survival upon pro-oxidant agent treatment. Alternatively, ZNF32-deficient cells are more sensitive and vulnerable to oxidative stress-induced cell injury. Mechanistically, we demonstrate that complement 1q-binding protein (C1QBP) is a direct target gene of ZNF32 that inactivates the p38 MAPK pathway, thereby exerting the protective effects of ZNF32 on oxidative stress-induced apoptosis. Taken together, our findings indicate a novel mechanism by which the Sp1-ZNF32-C1QBP axis protects against oxidative stress and implicate a promising strategy that ZNF32 inhibition combined with pro-oxidant anticancer agents for hepatocellular carcinoma treatment. PMID:26497555

  12. Transcription factor NFAT1 controls allergic contact hypersensitivity through regulation of activation induced cell death program

    PubMed Central

    Kwon, Ho-Keun; Kim, Gi-Cheon; Hwang, Ji Sun; Kim, Young; Chae, Chang-Suk; Nam, Jong Hee; Jun, Chang-Duk; Rudra, Dipayan; Surh, Charles D.; Im, Sin-Hyeog

    2016-01-01

    Allergic contact hypersensitivity (CHS) is an inflammatory skin disease mediated by allergen specific T cells. In this study, we investigated the role of transcription factor NFAT1 in the pathogenesis of contact hypersensitivity. NFAT1 knock out (KO) mice spontaneously developed CHS-like skin inflammation in old age. Healthy young NFAT1 KO mice displayed enhanced susceptibility to hapten-induced CHS. Both CD4+ and CD8+ T cells from NFAT1 KO mice displayed hyper-activated properties and produced significantly enhanced levels of inflammatory T helper 1(Th1)/Th17 type cytokines. NFAT1 KO T cells were more resistant to activation induced cell death (AICD), and regulatory T cells derived from these mice showed a partial defect in their suppressor activity. NFAT1 KO T cells displayed a reduced expression of apoptosis associated BCL-2/BH3 family members. Ectopic expression of NFAT1 restored the AICD defect in NFAT1 KO T cells and increased AICD in normal T cells. Recipient Rag2−/− mice transferred with NFAT1 KO T cells showed more severe CHS sensitivity due to a defect in activation induced hapten-reactive T cell apoptosis. Collectively, our results suggest the NFAT1 plays a pivotal role as a genetic switch in CD4+/CD8+ T cell tolerance by regulating AICD process in the T cell mediated skin inflammation. PMID:26777750

  13. Transcription-coupled nucleotide excision repair factors promote R-loop-induced genome instability

    PubMed Central

    Sollier, Julie; Stork, Caroline Townsend; García-Rubio, María L.; Paulsen, Renee D.; Aguilera, Andrés; Cimprich, Karlene A.

    2014-01-01

    Summary R-loops, consisting of an RNA-DNA hybrid and displaced single-stranded DNA, are physiological structures that regulate various cellular processes occurring on chromatin. Intriguingly, changes in R-loop dynamics have also been associated with DNA damage accumulation and genome instability, however the mechanisms underlying R-loop induced DNA damage remain unknown. Here we demonstrate in human cells that R-loops induced by the absence of diverse RNA processing factors, including the RNA/DNA helicases Aquarius (AQR) and Senataxin (SETX), or by the inhibition of topoisomerase I, are actively processed into DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs) by the nucleotide excision repair endonucleases XPF and XPG. Surprisingly, DSB formation requires the transcription-coupled nucleotide excision repair (TC-NER) factor Cockayne syndrome group B (CSB), but not the global genome repair protein XPC. These findings reveal an unexpected and potentially deleterious role for TC-NER factors in driving R-loop-induced DNA damage and genome instability. PMID:25435140

  14. JC virus induces altered patterns of cellular gene expression: Interferon-inducible genes as major transcriptional targets

    SciTech Connect

    Verma, Saguna; Ziegler, Katja; Ananthula, Praveen; Co, Juliene K.G.; Frisque, Richard J.; Yanagihara, Richard; Nerurkar, Vivek R. . E-mail: nerurkar@pbrc.hawaii.edu

    2006-02-20

    Human polyomavirus JC (JCV) infects 80% of the population worldwide. Primary infection, typically occurring during childhood, is asymptomatic in immunocompetent individuals and results in lifelong latency and persistent infection. However, among the severely immunocompromised, JCV may cause a fatal demyelinating disease, progressive multifocal leukoencephalopathy (PML). Virus-host interactions influencing persistence and pathogenicity are not well understood, although significant regulation of JCV activity is thought to occur at the level of transcription. Regulation of the JCV early and late promoters during the lytic cycle is a complex event that requires participation of both viral and cellular factors. We have used cDNA microarray technology to analyze global alterations in gene expression in JCV-permissive primary human fetal glial cells (PHFG). Expression of more than 400 cellular genes was altered, including many that influence cell proliferation, cell communication and interferon (IFN)-mediated host defense responses. Genes in the latter category included signal transducer and activator of transcription 1 (STAT1), interferon stimulating gene 56 (ISG56), myxovirus resistance 1 (MxA), 2'5'-oligoadenylate synthetase (OAS), and cig5. The expression of these genes was further confirmed in JCV-infected PHFG cells and the human glioblastoma cell line U87MG to ensure the specificity of JCV in inducing this strong antiviral response. Results obtained by real-time RT-PCR and Western blot analyses supported the microarray data and provide temporal information related to virus-induced changes in the IFN response pathway. Our data indicate that the induction of an antiviral response may be one of the cellular factors regulating/controlling JCV replication in immunocompetent hosts and therefore constraining the development of PML.

  15. Ceramide Induces Human Hepcidin Gene Transcription through JAK/STAT3 Pathway

    PubMed Central

    Lu, Sizhao; Natarajan, Sathish Kumar; Mott, Justin L.; Kharbanda, Kusum K.; Harrison-Findik, Duygu Dee

    2016-01-01

    Changes in lipid metabolism and iron content are observed in the livers of patients with fatty liver disease. The expression of hepcidin, an iron-regulatory and acute phase protein synthesized by the liver, is also modulated. The potential interaction of lipid and iron metabolism is largely unknown. We investigated the role of lipid intermediate, ceramide in the regulation of human hepcidin gene, HAMP. Human hepatoma HepG2 cells were treated with cell-permeable ceramide analogs. Ceramide induced significant up-regulation of HAMP mRNA expression in HepG2 cells. The effect of ceramide on HAMP expression was mediated through transcriptional mechanisms because it was completely blocked with actinomycin D treatment. Reporter assays also confirmed the activation of 0.6 kb HAMP promoter by ceramide. HepG2 cells treated with ceramide displayed increased phosphorylation of STAT3, JNK, and NF-κB proteins. However, ceramide induced the binding of STAT3, but not NF-κB or c-Jun, to HAMP promoter, as shown by the chromatin immunoprecipitation assays. The mutation of STAT3 response element within 0.6 kb HAMP promoter region significantly inhibited the stimulatory effect of ceramide on HAMP promoter activity. Similarly, the inhibition of STAT3 with a pan-JAK kinase inhibitor and STAT3 siRNA pool also diminished the induction of both HAMP promoter activity and mRNA expression by ceramide. In conclusion, we have shown a direct role for ceramide in the activation of hepatic HAMP transcription via STAT3. Our findings suggest a crosstalk between lipid and iron metabolism in the liver, which may contribute to the pathogenesis of obesity-related fatty liver disease. PMID:26807955

  16. Human Parainfluenza Virus Type 2 Vector Induces Dendritic Cell Maturation Without Viral RNA Replication/Transcription

    PubMed Central

    Hara, Kenichiro; Fukumura, Masayuki; Ohtsuka, Junpei; Kawano, Mitsuo

    2013-01-01

    Abstract The dendritic cell (DC), a most potent antigen-presenting cell, plays a key role in vaccine therapy against infectious diseases and malignant tumors. Although advantages of viral vectors for vaccine therapy have been reported, potential risks for adverse effects prevent them from being licensed for clinical use. Human parainfluenza virus type 2 (hPIV2), one of the members of the Paramyxoviridae family, is a nonsegmented and negative-stranded RNA virus. We have developed a reverse genetics system for the production of infectious hPIV2 lacking the F gene (hPIV2ΔF), wherein various advantages for vaccine therapy exist, such as cytoplasmic replication/transcription, nontransmissible infectivity, and extremely high transduction efficacy in various types of target cells. Here we demonstrate that hPIV2ΔF shows high transduction efficiency in human DCs, while not so high in mouse DCs. In addition, hPIV2ΔF sufficiently induces maturation of both human and murine DCs, and the maturation state of both human and murine DCs is almost equivalent to that induced by lipopolysaccharide. Moreover, alkylating agent β-propiolactone-inactivated hPIV2ΔF (BPL-hPIV2ΔF) elicits DC maturation without viral replication/transcription. These results suggest that hPIV2ΔF may be a useful tool for vaccine therapy as a novel type of paramyxoviral vector, which is single-round infectious vector and has potential adjuvant activity. PMID:23790317

  17. Ceramide Induces Human Hepcidin Gene Transcription through JAK/STAT3 Pathway.

    PubMed

    Lu, Sizhao; Natarajan, Sathish Kumar; Mott, Justin L; Kharbanda, Kusum K; Harrison-Findik, Duygu Dee

    2016-01-01

    Changes in lipid metabolism and iron content are observed in the livers of patients with fatty liver disease. The expression of hepcidin, an iron-regulatory and acute phase protein synthesized by the liver, is also modulated. The potential interaction of lipid and iron metabolism is largely unknown. We investigated the role of lipid intermediate, ceramide in the regulation of human hepcidin gene, HAMP. Human hepatoma HepG2 cells were treated with cell-permeable ceramide analogs. Ceramide induced significant up-regulation of HAMP mRNA expression in HepG2 cells. The effect of ceramide on HAMP expression was mediated through transcriptional mechanisms because it was completely blocked with actinomycin D treatment. Reporter assays also confirmed the activation of 0.6 kb HAMP promoter by ceramide. HepG2 cells treated with ceramide displayed increased phosphorylation of STAT3, JNK, and NF-κB proteins. However, ceramide induced the binding of STAT3, but not NF-κB or c-Jun, to HAMP promoter, as shown by the chromatin immunoprecipitation assays. The mutation of STAT3 response element within 0.6 kb HAMP promoter region significantly inhibited the stimulatory effect of ceramide on HAMP promoter activity. Similarly, the inhibition of STAT3 with a pan-JAK kinase inhibitor and STAT3 siRNA pool also diminished the induction of both HAMP promoter activity and mRNA expression by ceramide. In conclusion, we have shown a direct role for ceramide in the activation of hepatic HAMP transcription via STAT3. Our findings suggest a crosstalk between lipid and iron metabolism in the liver, which may contribute to the pathogenesis of obesity-related fatty liver disease. PMID:26807955

  18. An RNA Virus-Encoded Zinc-Finger Protein Acts as a Plant Transcription Factor and Induces a Regulator of Cell Size and Proliferation in Two Tobacco Species[C][W

    PubMed Central

    Lukhovitskaya, Nina I.; Solovieva, Anna D.; Boddeti, Santosh K.; Thaduri, Srinivas; Solovyev, Andrey G.; Savenkov, Eugene I.

    2013-01-01

    Plant viruses cause a variety of diseases in susceptible hosts. The disease symptoms often include leaf malformations and other developmental abnormalities, suggesting that viruses can affect plant development. However, little is known about the mechanisms underlying virus interference with plant morphogenesis. Here, we show that a C-4 type zinc-finger (ZF) protein, p12, encoded by a carlavirus (chrysanthemum virus B) can induce cell proliferation, which results in hyperplasia and severe leaf malformation. We demonstrate that the p12 protein activates expression of a regulator of cell size and proliferation, designated upp-L (upregulated by p12), which encodes a transcription factor of the basic/helix-loop-helix family sufficient to cause hyperplasia. The induction of upp-L requires translocation of the p12 protein into the nucleus and ZF-dependent specific interaction with the conserved regulatory region in the upp-L promoter. Our results establish the role of the p12 protein in modulation of host cell morphogenesis. It is likely that other members of the conserved C-4 type ZF family of viral proteins instigate reprogramming of plant development by mimicking eukaryotic transcriptional activators. PMID:23482855

  19. Identification of key transcription factors in caerulein-induced pancreatitis through expression profiling data.

    PubMed

    Qi, Dachuan; Wu, Bo; Tong, Danian; Pan, Ye; Chen, Wei

    2015-08-01

    The current study aimed to isolate key transcription factors (TFs) in caerulein-induced pancreatitis, and to identify the difference between wild type and Mist1 knockout (KO) mice, in order to elucidate the contribution of Mist1 to pancreatitis. The gene profile of GSE3644 was downloaded from the Gene Expression Omnibus database then analyzed using the t-test. The isolated differentially expressed genes (DEGs) were mapped into a transcriptional regulatory network derived from the Integrated Transcription Factor Platform database and in the network, the interaction pairs involving at least one DEG were screened. Fisher's exact test was used to analyze the functional enrichment of the target genes. A total of 1,555 and 3,057 DEGs were identified in the wild type and Mist1KO mice treated with caerulein, respectively. DEGs screened in Mist1KO mice were predominantly enriched in apoptosis, mitogen-activated protein kinase signaling and other cancer-associated pathways. A total of 188 and 51 TFs associated with pathopoiesis were isolated in Mist1KO and wild type mice, respectively. Out of the top 10 TFs (ranked by P-value), 7 TFs, including S-phase kinase-associated protein 2 (Skp2); minichromosome maintenance complex component 3 (Mcm3); cell division cycle 6 (Cdc6); cyclin B1 (Ccnb1); mutS homolog 6 (Msh6); cyclin A2 (Ccna2); and cyclin B2 (Ccnb2), were expressed in the two types of mouse. These TFs were predominantly involved in phosphorylation, DNA replication, cell division and DNA mismatch repair. In addition, specific TFs, including minichromosome maintenance complex component 7 (Mcm7); lymphoid-specific helicase (Hells); and minichromosome maintenance complex component 6 (Mcm6), that function in the unwinding of DNA were identified to participate in Mist1KO pancreatitis. The DEGs, including Cdc6, Mcm6, Msh6 and Wdr1 are closely associated with the regulation of caerulein-induced pancreatitis. Furthermore, other identified TFs were also involved in this type of

  20. Transcription networks responsible for early regulation of Salmonella-induced inflammation in the jejunum of pigs

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background The aim of this study was to identify transcription factors/regulators that play a crucial role in steering the (innate) immune response shortly (within a few hours) after the first contact of the intestinal mucosa with an inflammatory mediator, and to test whether the processes regulated by these factors/regulators can be modulated by chemical substances of natural origin. Methods We experimentally induced inflammation by perfusion of surgically applied jejunal loops with Salmonella enterica subspecies enterica serovar Typhimurium DT104 in three pigs. Segments of mock and Salmonella treated loops were dissected after 2, 4 and 8 hours of perfusion. IL8 and IL1-beta mRNA expression levels were measured in mucosal scrapings of all segments. Furthermore, intra-animal microarray comparisons (isogenic) between Salmonella and mock treated segments after 8 hours, and inter-animal comparisons between similar Salmonella-treated loops of each pig at 2 and 4 hours, were performed. Results IL-1beta and IL8 mRNA levels, and intra-animal microarray comparisons at 8 hours between Salmonella and mock treated segments showed that the response-time and type of response to Salmonella was different in all three pigs. This plasticity allowed us to extract a comprehensive set of differentially expressed genes from inter-animal comparisons at 2 and 4 hours. Pathway analysis indicated that many of these genes play a role in induction and/or tempering the inflammatory response in the intestine. Among them a set of transcription factors/regulators known to be involved in regulation of inflammation, but also factors/regulators for which involvement was not expected. Nine out of twenty compounds of natural origin, which according to literature had the potential to modulate the activity of these factors/regulators, were able to stimulate or inhibit a Salmonella-induced mRNA response of inflammatory-reporter genes IL8 and/or nuclear factor of kappa light polypeptide gene

  1. Quantitative measurement of transcriptional inhibition and mutagenesis induced by site-specifically incorporated DNA lesions in vitro and in vivo.

    PubMed

    You, Changjun; Wang, Yinsheng

    2015-09-01

    Aberrant transcription induced by DNA damage may confer risk for the development of cancer and other human diseases. Traditional methods for measuring lesion-induced transcriptional alterations often involve extensive colony screening and DNA sequencing procedures. Here we describe a protocol for the quantitative assessment of the effects of DNA lesions on the efficiency and fidelity of transcription in vitro and in mammalian cells. The method is also amenable to investigating the influence of specific DNA repair proteins on the biological response toward DNA damage during transcription by manipulating their gene expression. Specifically, we present detailed, step-by-step procedures, including DNA template preparation, in vitro and in vivo transcription, RNA purification, reverse-transcription PCR (RT-PCR) and restriction digestion of RT-PCR products. Analyses of restriction fragments of interest are performed by liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS) and polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (PAGE). The entire procedure described in this protocol can be completed in 15-20 d. PMID:26292071

  2. Abiotic-stress induces demethylation and transcriptional activation of a gene encoding a glycerophosphodiesterase-like protein in tobacco plants.

    PubMed

    Choi, Chang-Sun; Sano, Hiroshi

    2007-05-01

    To examine the relationship between gene expression and DNA methylation, transcriptionally activated genes were screened in hypomethylated transgenic tobacco plants expressing an anti-DNA methyltransferase sequence. Among 16 genes initially identified, one clone was found to encode a glycerophosphodiesterase-like protein (NtGPDL), earlier reported to be responsive to aluminium stress. When detached leaves from wild type tobacco plants were treated with aluminium, NtGPDL transcripts were induced within 6 h, and corresponding genomic loci were demethylated at CCGG sites within 1 h. Direct bisulfite methylation mapping revealed that CG sites in coding regions were selectively demethylated, and that promoter regions were totally unmethylated regardless of the stress. Salt and low temperature treatments also induced similar demethylation patterns. Such effects could be attributable to oxidative stress, since reactive oxygen species generated by paraquat efficiently induced the same pattern of demethylation at coding regions. Pathogen infection induced neither transcripts nor genomic demethylation. These results suggested a close correlation between methylation and expression of NtGPDL upon abiotic stresses with a cause-effect relationship. Since DNA methylation is linked to histone modification, it is conceivable that demethylation at coding regions might induce alteration of chromatin structure, thereby enhancing transcription. We propose that environmental responses of plants are partly mediated through active alteration of the DNA methylation status. PMID:17273870

  3. The transcription-independent mitochondrial p53 program is a major contributor to nutlin-induced apoptosis in tumor cells

    PubMed Central

    Vaseva, Angelina V.; Marchenko, Natalia D.; Moll, Ute M.

    2010-01-01

    Strategies to induce p53 activation in tumors that retain wild-type p53 are promising for cancer therapy. Nutlin is a potent and selective pharmacological MDM2 inhibitor that competitively binds to its p53-binding pocket, thereby leading to non-genotoxic p53 stabilization and activation of growth arrest and apoptosis pathways. Nutlin-induced apoptosis is thought to occur via p53’s transcriptional program. Here we report that the transcription-independent mitochondrial p53 program plays an important role in Nutlin-induced p53-mediated tumor cell death. Aside from nuclear stabilization, Nutlin causes cytoplasmic p53 accumulation and translocation to mitochondria. Monoubiquitinated p53, originating from a distinct cytoplasmic pool, is the preferred p53 species that translocates to mitochondria in response to stress. Nutlin does not interfere with MDM2’s ability to monoubiquitinate p53, due to the fact that MDM2-p53 complexes are only partially disrupted and that Nutlin-stabilized MDM2 retains its E3 ubiquitin ligase activity. Nutlin-induced mitochondrial p53 translocation is rapid and associated with cytochrome C release that precedes induction of p53 target genes. Specific inhibition of mitochondrial p53 translocation by Pifithrin μ reduces the apoptotic Nutlin response by 2.5-fold, underlining the significance of p53’s mitochondrial program in Nutlin-induced apoptosis. Surprisingly, blocking the transcriptional arm of p53, either via α-Amanitin or the p53-specific transcriptional inhibitor Pifithrin α, not only fails to inhibit, but greatly potentiates Nutlin-induced apoptosis. In sum, the direct mitochondrial program is a major mechanism in Nutlin-induced p53-mediated apoptosis. Moreover, at least in some tumors the transcriptional p53 activities in net balance not only are dispensable for the apoptotic Nutlin response, but appear to actively block its therapeutic effect. PMID:19411846

  4. The transcription-independent mitochondrial p53 program is a major contributor to nutlin-induced apoptosis in tumor cells.

    PubMed

    Vaseva, Angelina V; Marchenko, Natalia D; Moll, Ute M

    2009-06-01

    Strategies to induce p53 activation in tumors that retain wild-type p53 are promising for cancer therapy. Nutlin is a potent and selective pharmacological MDM2 inhibitor that competitively binds to its p53-binding pocket, thereby leading to non-genotoxic p53 stabilization and activation of growth arrest and apoptosis pathways. Nutlin-induced apoptosis is thought to occur via p53's transcriptional program. Here we report that the transcription-independent mitochondrial p53 program plays an important role in Nutlin-induced p53-mediated tumor cell death. Aside from nuclear stabilization, Nutlin causes cytoplasmic p53 accumulation and translocation to mitochondria. Monoubiquitinated p53, originating from a distinct cytoplasmic pool, is the preferred p53 species that translocates to mitochondria in response to stress. Nutlin does not interfere with MDM2's ability to monoubiquitinate p53, due to the fact that MDM2-p53 complexes are only partially disrupted and that Nutlin-stabilized MDM2 retains its E3 ubiquitin ligase activity. Nutlin-induced mitochondrial p53 translocation is rapid and associated with cytochrome C release that precedes induction of p53 target genes. Specific inhibition of mitochondrial p53 translocation by Pifithrin mu reduces the apoptotic Nutlin response by 2.5-fold, underlining the significance of p53's mitochondrial program in Nutlin-induced apoptosis. Surprisingly, blocking the transcriptional arm of p53, either via alpha-Amanitin or the p53-specific transcriptional inhibitor Pifithrin alpha, not only fails to inhibit, but greatly potentiates Nutlin-induced apoptosis. In sum, the direct mitochondrial program is a major mechanism in Nutlin-induced p53-mediated apoptosis. Moreover, at least in some tumors the transcriptional p53 activities in net balance not only are dispensable for the apoptotic Nutlin response, but appear to actively block its therapeutic effect. PMID:19411846

  5. Docosahexaenoic acid consumption inhibits deoxynivalenol-induced CREB/ATF1 activation and IL-6 gene transcription in mouse macrophages.

    PubMed

    Jia, Qunshan; Zhou, Hui-Ren; Shi, Yuhui; Pestka, James J

    2006-02-01

    The mycotoxin deoxynivalenol (DON) induces IgA nephropathy in mice by upregulating IL-6 expression, which is suppressed by (n-3) PUFA consumption. The purpose of this study was to test the hypothesis that consumption of the (n-3) PUFA docosahexaenoic acid (DHA) interferes with DON-induced transcriptional and post-transcriptional upregulation of IL-6 mRNA in murine macrophages. DON evoked expression of IL-6 mRNA and IL-6 heterogenous nuclear RNA (hnRNA), an indicator of ongoing IL-6 transcription, in macrophages elicited from mice fed control AIN-93G diet for 4 wk, whereas expression of both RNA species was suppressed in macrophages from mice fed AIN-93G modified to contain 30 g DHA/kg diet for the same time period. DON enhanced IL-6 mRNA stability similarly in macrophages from control and DHA-fed mice suggesting that (n-3) PUFA effects were not post-transcriptional. DON upregulated binding activity of cAMP response element binding protein (CREB) and activator protein (AP-1) to their respective consensus sequences in nuclear extracts from control-fed mice, whereas both activities were suppressed in nuclear extracts from DHA-fed mice. DON induced phosphorylation of CREB at Ser-133 and ATF1 at Ser-63 as well as intranuclear binding of phospho-CREB/ATF1 to the cis element of the IL-6 promoter in control macrophages, whereas both activities were inhibited in macrophages from DHA-fed mice. DHA consumption blocked DON-induced phosphorylation of the CREB kinase AKT. Inhibition of AKT suppressed both CREB/ATF1 phosphorylation and IL-6 transcription. These data suggest that DHA consumption suppresses DON-induced IL-6 transcription in macrophages in part by interfering with AKT-dependent phosphorylation and subsequent binding of CREB/ATF1 to the IL-6 promoter. PMID:16424113

  6. Topoisomerase 1 and Single-Strand Break Repair Modulate Transcription-Induced CAG Repeat Contraction in Human Cells ▿ †

    PubMed Central

    Hubert, Leroy; Lin, Yunfu; Dion, Vincent; Wilson, John H.

    2011-01-01

    Expanded trinucleotide repeats are responsible for a number of neurodegenerative diseases, such as Huntington disease and myotonic dystrophy type 1. The mechanisms that underlie repeat instability in the germ line and in the somatic tissues of human patients are undefined. Using a selection assay based on contraction of CAG repeat tracts in human cells, we screened the Prestwick chemical library in a moderately high-throughput assay and identified 18 novel inducers of repeat contraction. A subset of these compounds targeted pathways involved in the management of DNA supercoiling associated with transcription. Further analyses using both small molecule inhibitors and small interfering RNA (siRNA)-mediated knockdowns demonstrated the involvement of topoisomerase 1 (TOP1), tyrosyl-DNA phosphodiesterase 1 (TDP1), and single-strand break repair (SSBR) in modulating transcription-dependent CAG repeat contractions. The TOP1-TDP1-SSBR pathway normally functions to suppress repeat instability, since interfering with it stimulated repeat contractions. We further showed that the increase in repeat contractions when the TOP1-TDP1-SSBR pathway is compromised arises via transcription-coupled nucleotide excision repair, a previously identified contributor to transcription-induced repeat instability. These studies broaden the scope of pathways involved in transcription-induced CAG repeat instability and begin to define their interrelationships. PMID:21628532

  7. IL-4-induced transcription factor NFIL3/E4BP4 controls IgE class switching.

    PubMed

    Kashiwada, Masaki; Levy, Deborah M; McKeag, Lisa; Murray, Keri; Schröder, Andreas J; Canfield, Stephen M; Traver, Geri; Rothman, Paul B

    2010-01-12

    IL-4 signaling promotes IgE class switching through STAT6 activation and the induction of Ig germ-line epsilon (GLepsilon) transcription. Previously, we and others identified a transcription factor, Nfil3, as a gene induced by IL-4 stimulation in B cells. However, the precise roles of nuclear factor, IL-3-regulated (NFIL3) in IL-4 signaling are unknown. Here, we report that NFIL3 is important for IgE class switching. NFIL3-deficient mice show impaired IgE class switching, and this defect is B-cell intrinsic. The induction of GLepsilon transcripts after LPS and IL-4 stimulation is significantly reduced in NFIL3-deficient B cells. Expression of NFIL3 in NFIL3-deficient B cells restores the impairment of IgE production, and overexpression of NFIL3 in the presence of cycloheximide induces GLepsilon transcripts. Moreover, NFIL3 binds to Iepsilon promoter in vivo. Together, these results identify NFIL3 as a key regulator of IL-4-induced GLepsilon transcription in response to IL-4 and subsequent IgE class switching. PMID:20080759

  8. Alteration of BRCA1 expression affects alcohol-induced transcription of RNA Pol III-dependent genes

    PubMed Central

    Zhong, Qian; Shi, Ganggang; Zhang, Yanmei; Lu, Lei; Levy, Daniel; Zhong, Shuping

    2014-01-01

    Emerging evidence has indicated that alcohol consumption is an established risk factor for breast cancer. Deregulation of RNA polymerase III (Pol III) transcription enhances cellular Pol III gene production, leading to an increase in translational capacity to promote cell transformation and tumor formation. We have reported that alcohol intake increases Pol III gene transcription to promote cell transformation and tumor formation in vitro and in vivo. Studies revealed that tumor suppressors, pRb, p53, PTEN and Maf1 repress the transcription of Pol III genes. BRCA1 is a tumor suppressor and its mutation is tightly related to breast cancer development. However, it is not clear whether BRCA1 expression affects alcohol-induced transcription of Pol III genes. At the present studies, we report that restoring BRCA1 in HCC 1937 cells, which is a BRCA1 deficient cell line, represses Pol III gene transcription. Expressing mutant or truncated BRCA1 in these cells does not affect the ability of repression on Pol III genes. Our analysis has demonstrated that alcohol induces Pol III gene transcription. More importantly, overexpression of BRCA1 in estrogen receptor positive (ER+) breast cancer cells (MCF-7) decreases the induction of tRNALeu and 5S rRNA genes by alcohol, whereas reduction of BRCA1 by its siRNA slightly increases the transcription of the class of genes. This suggests that BRCA1 is associated with alcohol-induced deregulation of Pol III genes. These studies for the first time demonstrate the role of BRCA1 in induction of Pol III genes by alcohol and uncover a novel mechanism of alcohol-associated breast cancer. PMID:25447904

  9. RNA polymerase II pauses at the 5 prime end of the transcriptionally induced Drosophila hsp70 gene

    SciTech Connect

    O'Brien, T.; Lis, J.T. )

    1991-10-01

    An RNA polymerase II molecule is associated with the 5{prime} end of the Drosophila melanogaster hsp70 gene under non-heat shock conditions. This polymerase is engaged in transcription but has paused, or arrested, after synthesizing about 25 nucleotides. Resumption of elongation by this paused polymerase appears to be the rate-limiting step in hsp70 transcription in uninduced cells. Here the authors report results of nuclear run-on assays that measure the distribution of elongating and paused RNA polymerase molecules on the hsp70 gene in induced cells. Pausing of polymerase was detected at the 5{prime} end of hsp70 was transcribed approximately five times during the 25-min heat shock that they used. Therefore, once the hsp70 gene is induced to an intermediate level, initiation of transcription by RNA polymerase II remains more rapid than the resumption of elongation by a paused polymerase molecule.

  10. Gene Transcriptional and Metabolic Profile Changes in Mimetic Aging Mice Induced by D-Galactose

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Yue-Yue; Zhu, Xiao-Juan; Li, Rong-Hua; Mu, Chang-Kao; Wang, Chun-Lin; Song, Wei-Wei

    2015-01-01

    D-galactose injection has been shown to induce many changes in mice that represent accelerated aging. This mouse model has been widely used for pharmacological studies of anti-aging agents. The underlying mechanism of D-galactose induced aging remains unclear, however, it appears to relate to glucose and 1ipid metabolic disorders. Currently, there has yet to be a study that focuses on investigating gene expression changes in D-galactose aging mice. In this study, integrated analysis of gas chromatography/mass spectrometry-based metabonomics and gene expression profiles was used to investigate the changes in transcriptional and metabolic profiles in mimetic aging mice injected with D-galactose. Our findings demonstrated that 48 mRNAs were differentially expressed between control and D-galactose mice, and 51 potential biomarkers were identified at the metabolic level. The effects of D-galactose on aging could be attributed to glucose and 1ipid metabolic disorders, oxidative damage, accumulation of advanced glycation end products (AGEs), reduction in abnormal substance elimination, cell apoptosis, and insulin resistance. PMID:26176541

  11. Drug Repositioning for Cancer Therapy Based on Large-Scale Drug-Induced Transcriptional Signatures

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Haeseung; Kang, Seungmin; Kim, Wankyu

    2016-01-01

    An in silico chemical genomics approach is developed to predict drug repositioning (DR) candidates for three types of cancer: glioblastoma, lung cancer, and breast cancer. It is based on a recent large-scale dataset of ~20,000 drug-induced expression profiles in multiple cancer cell lines, which provides i) a global impact of transcriptional perturbation of both known targets and unknown off-targets, and ii) rich information on drug’s mode-of-action. First, the drug-induced expression profile is shown more effective than other information, such as the drug structure or known target, using multiple HTS datasets as unbiased benchmarks. Particularly, the utility of our method was robustly demonstrated in identifying novel DR candidates. Second, we predicted 14 high-scoring DR candidates solely based on expression signatures. Eight of the fourteen drugs showed significant anti-proliferative activity against glioblastoma; i.e., ivermectin, trifluridine, astemizole, amlodipine, maprotiline, apomorphine, mometasone, and nortriptyline. Our DR score strongly correlated with that of cell-based experimental results; the top seven DR candidates were positive, corresponding to an approximately 20-fold enrichment compared with conventional HTS. Despite diverse original indications and known targets, the perturbed pathways of active DR candidates show five distinct patterns that form tight clusters together with one or more known cancer drugs, suggesting common transcriptome-level mechanisms of anti-proliferative activity. PMID:26954019

  12. Drug Repositioning for Cancer Therapy Based on Large-Scale Drug-Induced Transcriptional Signatures.

    PubMed

    Lee, Haeseung; Kang, Seungmin; Kim, Wankyu

    2016-01-01

    An in silico chemical genomics approach is developed to predict drug repositioning (DR) candidates for three types of cancer: glioblastoma, lung cancer, and breast cancer. It is based on a recent large-scale dataset of ~20,000 drug-induced expression profiles in multiple cancer cell lines, which provides i) a global impact of transcriptional perturbation of both known targets and unknown off-targets, and ii) rich information on drug's mode-of-action. First, the drug-induced expression profile is shown more effective than other information, such as the drug structure or known target, using multiple HTS datasets as unbiased benchmarks. Particularly, the utility of our method was robustly demonstrated in identifying novel DR candidates. Second, we predicted 14 high-scoring DR candidates solely based on expression signatures. Eight of the fourteen drugs showed significant anti-proliferative activity against glioblastoma; i.e., ivermectin, trifluridine, astemizole, amlodipine, maprotiline, apomorphine, mometasone, and nortriptyline. Our DR score strongly correlated with that of cell-based experimental results; the top seven DR candidates were positive, corresponding to an approximately 20-fold enrichment compared with conventional HTS. Despite diverse original indications and known targets, the perturbed pathways of active DR candidates show five distinct patterns that form tight clusters together with one or more known cancer drugs, suggesting common transcriptome-level mechanisms of anti-proliferative activity. PMID:26954019

  13. Generation and gene expression profiling of 48 transcription-factor-inducible mouse embryonic stem cell lines

    PubMed Central

    Yamamizu, Kohei; Sharov, Alexei A.; Piao, Yulan; Amano, Misa; Yu, Hong; Nishiyama, Akira; Dudekula, Dawood B.; Schlessinger, David; Ko, Minoru S. H.

    2016-01-01

    Mouse embryonic stem cells (ESCs) can differentiate into a wide range – and possibly all cell types in vitro, and thus provide an ideal platform to study systematically the action of transcription factors (TFs) in cell differentiation. Previously, we have generated and analyzed 137 TF-inducible mouse ESC lines. As an extension of this “NIA Mouse ESC Bank,” we generated and characterized 48 additional mouse ESC lines, in which single TFs in each line could be induced in a doxycycline-controllable manner. Together, with the previous ESC lines, the bank now comprises 185 TF-manipulable ESC lines (>10% of all mouse TFs). Global gene expression (transcriptome) profiling revealed that the induction of individual TFs in mouse ESCs for 48 hours shifts their transcriptomes toward specific differentiation fates (e.g., neural lineages by Myt1 Isl1, and St18; mesodermal lineages by Pitx1, Pitx2, Barhl2, and Lmx1a; white blood cells by Myb, Etv2, and Tbx6, and ovary by Pitx1, Pitx2, and Dmrtc2). These data also provide and lists of inferred target genes of each TF and possible functions of these TFs. The results demonstrate the utility of mouse ESC lines and their transcriptome data for understanding the mechanism of cell differentiation and the function of TFs. PMID:27150017

  14. Estrogen inhibits phorbol ester-induced I kappa B alpha transcription and protein degradation.

    PubMed

    Sun, W H; Keller, E T; Stebler, B S; Ershler, W B

    1998-03-27

    Estrogen (E2) is known to prevent bone loss and the mechanism is, at least in part, mediated by inhibition of expression of cytokines such as interleukin-6 (IL-6). Expression of IL-6 is tightly regulated and the transcription factor NF kappa B can upregulate IL-6 gene expression by binding to its promoter region. NF kappa B is kept in an inactive state by associating with its cytoplasmic inhibitor I kappa B alpha. Upon mitogenic stimulation, I kappa B alpha becomes phosphorylated, followed by a rapid protein degradation. As a result, NF kappa B is released and translocate to the nucleus where DNA binding occurs. It has been shown that E2 treatment downregulates mitogen-induced IL-6 expression by inhibiting NF kappa B activity. Here, we sought to determine whether E2 regulates IL-6 gene expression by modulating the levels of I kappa B alpha. Our results show that E2 treatment almost completely inhibits phorbol ester-induced I kappa B alpha protein degradation. In addition, E2 inhibits phorbol ester-stimulated I kappa B alpha gene expression. Taken together, our results suggest that E2 maintains steady state levels of I kappa B alpha upon mitogen stimulation, resulting in inhibition of NF kappa B activation and IL-6 gene expression. This may explain the protective effect of E2 on bone loss. PMID:9535726

  15. Even transcriptionally competent proviruses are silent in bovine leukemia virus-induced sheep tumor cells.

    PubMed Central

    Van den Broeke, A; Cleuter, Y; Chen, G; Portetelle, D; Mammerickx, M; Zagury, D; Fouchard, M; Coulombel, L; Kettmann, R; Burny, A

    1988-01-01

    To investigate the role of proviral integration and expression in cellular transformation induced by bovine leukemia virus (BLV), three BLV-induced tumors harboring a single proviral copy were selected upon restriction and hybridization analysis. Tumors 344 and 395 were shown to contain a full-size proviral copy, whereas in tumor 1345 the provirus appeared to be heavily deleted. RNA gel blot hybridization with an antisense RNA probe showed no transcription of the viral sequences in the fresh tumors or in sheep tumor cells growing in vitro. The proviruses were cloned and transfected in mammalian cell lines. Transient-expression experiments revealed that the complete proviruses were still able to express the trans-activating protein (Tat) as well as structural proteins, demonstrating that the nonexpression of a provirus in a tumor cell does not necessarily imply a structural alteration of the viral information. In contrast, sequence analysis of the provirus with a large deletion and transient-expression assays proved that this truncated provirus, isolated from a tumor, was unable to code for viral proteins. These data indicate that expression of viral genes, including tat, is not required for the maintenance of the transformed state. Images PMID:2848258

  16. Modulation of IL-6 induced RANKL expression in arthritic synovium by a transcription factor SOX5

    PubMed Central

    Feng, Xiaoke; Shi, Yumeng; Xu, Lingxiao; Peng, Qiuyue; Wang, Fang; Wang, Xiaoxi; Sun, Wei; Lu, Yan; Tsao, Betty P.; Zhang, Miaojia; Tan, Wenfeng

    2016-01-01

    Receptor activator of nuclear factor κB ligand (RANKL) is critically involved in bone erosion of rheumatoid arthritis (RA). We previously reported association between younger age at onset of RA and a RANKL promoter SNP that conferred an elevated promoter activity via binding to a transcription factor SOX5. Here we study the regulation of SOX5 levels in relation to RANKL expression in RA synovial fibroblasts (SF) and the development of bone erosion in the collagen-induced arthritis (CIA) mouse. Our data indicated SOX5 levels were higher in synovium and synovial fluid from RA compared to osteoarthritis patients. Pro-inflammatory cytokines upregulated SOX5 and RANKL expression in both primary RA SF and the rheumatoid synovial fibroblast cell line, MH7A. Overexpression of SOX5 resulted in significantly increased RANKL levels, while knockdown of SOX5 resulted in diminished IL-6 mediated RANKL upregulation in MH7A cells. Chromatin immunoprecipitation (ChIP) showed approximately 3-fold enrichment of RANKL-specific DNA in anti-SOX5 immunoprecipitate in IL-6 treated MH7A cells as compared to untreated cells. Locally silencing SOX5 gene significantly diminished RANKL positive cells and bone erosion in CIA mice. These findings suggest SOX5 is an important regulator of IL-6-induced RANKL expression in RA SF. PMID:27550416

  17. Modulation of IL-6 induced RANKL expression in arthritic synovium by a transcription factor SOX5.

    PubMed

    Feng, Xiaoke; Shi, Yumeng; Xu, Lingxiao; Peng, Qiuyue; Wang, Fang; Wang, Xiaoxi; Sun, Wei; Lu, Yan; Tsao, Betty P; Zhang, Miaojia; Tan, Wenfeng

    2016-01-01

    Receptor activator of nuclear factor κB ligand (RANKL) is critically involved in bone erosion of rheumatoid arthritis (RA). We previously reported association between younger age at onset of RA and a RANKL promoter SNP that conferred an elevated promoter activity via binding to a transcription factor SOX5. Here we study the regulation of SOX5 levels in relation to RANKL expression in RA synovial fibroblasts (SF) and the development of bone erosion in the collagen-induced arthritis (CIA) mouse. Our data indicated SOX5 levels were higher in synovium and synovial fluid from RA compared to osteoarthritis patients. Pro-inflammatory cytokines upregulated SOX5 and RANKL expression in both primary RA SF and the rheumatoid synovial fibroblast cell line, MH7A. Overexpression of SOX5 resulted in significantly increased RANKL levels, while knockdown of SOX5 resulted in diminished IL-6 mediated RANKL upregulation in MH7A cells. Chromatin immunoprecipitation (ChIP) showed approximately 3-fold enrichment of RANKL-specific DNA in anti-SOX5 immunoprecipitate in IL-6 treated MH7A cells as compared to untreated cells. Locally silencing SOX5 gene significantly diminished RANKL positive cells and bone erosion in CIA mice. These findings suggest SOX5 is an important regulator of IL-6-induced RANKL expression in RA SF. PMID:27550416

  18. Brugia malayi abundant larval transcript 2 protein treatment attenuates experimentally-induced colitis in mice.

    PubMed

    Khatri, Vishal; Amdare, Nitin; Yadav, Ravi Shankar; Tarnekar, Aaditya; Goswami, Kalyan; Reddy, Maryada Venkata Rami

    2015-11-01

    Helminths are known to modulate host's immunity by suppressing host protective pro-inflammatory responses. Such immunomodulatory effects have been experimentally shown to have therapeutic implications in immune mediated disorders. In the present study, we have explored a filarial protein i.e. Brugia malayi recombinant abundant larval transcript 2 (rBmALT2) for its therapeutic effect in dextran sodium sulfate (DSS) induced colitis in mouse model. The immunomodulatory activity of rBmALT-2 was initially confirmed by demonstrating that it suppressed the lipopolysaccharide (LPS) induced nitric oxide synthesis and down-regulated the expression of pro-inflammatory cytokines in vitro by peritoneal exudate cells of mice. Treatment with rBmALT2 reduced severity of colitis associated with significant reduction in weight loss, disease activity, colon damage, mucosal edema and histopathological score including myeloperoxidase activity in colon tissues. rBmALT2 was comparatively more effective in attenuation of colitis when used in the preventive mode than when used for curative purpose. The therapeutic effect of rBmALT2 was found to be associated with downregulation of IFN-γ, IL-6, IL-17 and upregulation of IL-10 cytokines. These results provide strong experimental evidence that BmALT2 could be a potential alternative therapeutic agent in colitis. PMID:26669016

  19. MyoD transcription factor induces myogenesis by inhibiting Twist-1 through miR-206.

    PubMed

    Koutalianos, Demetris; Koutsoulidou, Andrie; Mastroyiannopoulos, Nikilaos P; Furling, Denis; Phylactou, Leonidas A

    2015-10-01

    Twist-1 is mostly expressed during development and has been previously shown to control myogenesis. Because its regulation in muscle has not been fully exploited, the aim of this project was to identify micro (mi)RNAs in muscle that regulate Twist-1. miR-206, one of the most important muscle-specific miRNAs (myomiRs), was identified as a possible regulator of Twist-1 mRNA. Luciferase assays and transfections in human foetal myoblasts showed that Twist-1 is a direct target of miR-206 and that through this pathway muscle cell differentiation is promoted. We next investigated whether MyoD, a major myogenic transcription factor, regulates Twist-1 because it is known that MyoD induces expression of the miR-206 gene. We found that forced MyoD expression induced miR-206 upregulation and Twist-1 downregulation through binding to the miR-206 promoter, followed by increased muscle cell differentiation. Finally, experiments were performed in muscle cells from subjects with congenital myotonic dystrophy type 1, in which myoblasts fail to differentiate into myotubes. MyoD overexpression inhibited Twist-1 through miR-206 induction, which was followed by an increase in muscle cell differentiation. These results reveal a previously unidentified mechanism of myogenesis that might also play an important role in muscle disease. PMID:26272918

  20. System-wide analysis of the transcriptional network of human myelomonocytic leukemia cells predicts attractor structure and phorbol-ester-induced differentiation and dedifferentiation transitions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sakata, Katsumi; Ohyanagi, Hajime; Sato, Shinji; Nobori, Hiroya; Hayashi, Akiko; Ishii, Hideshi; Daub, Carsten O.; Kawai, Jun; Suzuki, Harukazu; Saito, Toshiyuki

    2015-02-01

    We present a system-wide transcriptional network structure that controls cell types in the context of expression pattern transitions that correspond to cell type transitions. Co-expression based analyses uncovered a system-wide, ladder-like transcription factor cluster structure composed of nearly 1,600 transcription factors in a human transcriptional network. Computer simulations based on a transcriptional regulatory model deduced from the system-wide, ladder-like transcription factor cluster structure reproduced expression pattern transitions when human THP-1 myelomonocytic leukaemia cells cease proliferation and differentiate under phorbol myristate acetate stimulation. The behaviour of MYC, a reprogramming Yamanaka factor that was suggested to be essential for induced pluripotent stem cells during dedifferentiation, could be interpreted based on the transcriptional regulation predicted by the system-wide, ladder-like transcription factor cluster structure. This study introduces a novel system-wide structure to transcriptional networks that provides new insights into network topology.

  1. TGF-β-Induced Transcription Sustains Amoeboid Melanoma Migration and Dissemination

    PubMed Central

    Cantelli, Gaia; Orgaz, Jose L.; Rodriguez-Hernandez, Irene; Karagiannis, Panagiotis; Maiques, Oscar; Matias-Guiu, Xavier; Nestle, Frank O.; Marti, Rosa M.; Karagiannis, Sophia N.; Sanz-Moreno, Victoria

    2015-01-01

    Summary Cell migration underlies metastatic dissemination of cancer cells, and fast “amoeboid” migration in the invasive fronts of tumors is controlled by high levels of actomyosin contractility. How amoeboid migration is regulated by extracellular signals and sustained over time by transcriptional changes is not fully understood. Transforming growth factor β (TGF-β) is well known to promote epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition (EMT) and contribute to metastasis, but melanocytes are neural crest derivatives that have undergone EMT during embryonic development. Surprisingly, we find that in melanoma, TGF-β promotes amoeboid features such as cell rounding, membrane blebbing, high levels of contractility, and increased invasion. Using genome-wide transcriptomics, we find that amoeboid melanoma cells are enriched in a TGF-β-driven signature. We observe that downstream of TGF-β, SMAD2 and its adaptor CITED1 control amoeboid behavior by regulating the expression of key genes that activate contractile forces. Moreover, CITED1 is highly upregulated during melanoma progression, and its high expression is associated with poor prognosis. CITED1 is coupled to a contractile-rounded, amoeboid phenotype in a panel of 16 melanoma cell lines, in mouse melanoma xenografts, and in 47 human melanoma patients. Its expression is also enriched in the invasive fronts of lesions. Functionally, we show how the TGF-β-SMAD2-CITED1 axis promotes different steps associated with progression: melanoma detachment from keratinocytes, 2D and 3D migration, attachment to endothelial cells, and in vivo lung metastatic initial colonization and outgrowth. We propose a novel mechanism by which TGF-β-induced transcription sustains actomyosin force in melanoma cells and thereby promotes melanoma progression independently of EMT. PMID:26526369

  2. Bacillus anthracis’ lethal toxin induces broad transcriptional responses in human peripheral monocytes

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Anthrax lethal toxin (LT), produced by the Gram-positive bacterium Bacillus anthracis, is a highly effective zinc dependent metalloprotease that cleaves the N-terminus of mitogen-activated protein kinase kinases (MAPKK or MEKs) and is known to play a role in impairing the host immune system during an inhalation anthrax infection. Here, we present the transcriptional responses of LT treated human monocytes in order to further elucidate the mechanisms of LT inhibition on the host immune system. Results Western Blot analysis demonstrated cleavage of endogenous MEK1 and MEK3 when human monocytes were treated with 500 ng/mL LT for four hours, proving their susceptibility to anthrax lethal toxin. Furthermore, staining with annexin V and propidium iodide revealed that LT treatment did not induce human peripheral monocyte apoptosis or necrosis. Using Affymetrix Human Genome U133 Plus 2.0 Arrays, we identified over 820 probe sets differentially regulated after LT treatment at the p <0.001 significance level, interrupting the normal transduction of over 60 known pathways. As expected, the MAPKK signaling pathway was most drastically affected by LT, but numerous genes outside the well-recognized pathways were also influenced by LT including the IL-18 signaling pathway, Toll-like receptor pathway and the IFN alpha signaling pathway. Multiple genes involved in actin regulation, signal transduction, transcriptional regulation and cytokine signaling were identified after treatment with anthrax LT. Conclusion We conclude LT directly targets human peripheral monocytes and causes multiple aberrant gene responses that would be expected to be associated with defects in human monocyte’s normal signaling transduction pathways and function. This study provides further insights into the mechanisms associated with the host immune system collapse during an anthrax infection, and suggests that anthrax LT may have additional downstream targets outside the well-known MAPK

  3. Transcriptional Dysregulation of Upstream Signaling of IFN Pathway in Chronic HCV Type 4 Induced Liver Fibrosis.

    PubMed

    Ibrahim, Marwa K; Salum, Ghada Maher; Bader El Din, Noha G; Dawood, Reham M; Barakat, Ahmed; Khairy, Ahmed; El Awady, Mostafa K

    2016-01-01

    IFN orchestrates the expression of various genes to halt hepatitis C virus (HCV) replication with the possibility of either reduced or increased liver fibrosis; due to controlled viral replication or overproduction of inflammatory mediators, repectively. In this study, we examined the transcriptional profiling of type I IFN related genes in HCV-chronically infected patients with varying degrees of liver fibrosis. PCR array was used to examine the expression of 84 type I IFN related genes in peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) RNA from 12 treatment-naïve chronic HCV patients (5 F0-F1 and 7 F2-F4) and 5 healthy subjects. We further validated our results by quantitative real time PCR (qRT-PCR) in 103 treatment-naïve chronic HCV patients (43 F0-F1 and 60 F2-F4) and 15 controls. PCR array data revealed dysregulation in TLR7 pathway. The expression of TLR7 was decreased by 4 folds and MyD88 was increased by 3 folds in PBMCs of F2-F4 patients when compared to the healthy volunteers (p = 0.03 and 0.002, respectively). In addition, IRF7 and TLR7 showed dramatic downregulation (6 and 8 folds, respectively) in F2-F4 patients when compared to F0-F1 ones. qRT-PCR confirmed the altered expression patterns of TLR7 and MyD88 in F2-F4 patients when compared to either controls or F0-F1 patients. However, by qRT-PCR, IRF7 and NF-κB1 (TLR7 pathway transcription factors) exhibited similar mRNA abundance among F2-F4 and F0-F1 patients. These results suggest that TLR7 and MyD88 are possible candidates as biomarkers for the progression of HCV-induced liver fibrosis and/ or targets for therapeutic intervention. PMID:27135246

  4. TGF-β-Induced Transcription Sustains Amoeboid Melanoma Migration and Dissemination.

    PubMed

    Cantelli, Gaia; Orgaz, Jose L; Rodriguez-Hernandez, Irene; Karagiannis, Panagiotis; Maiques, Oscar; Matias-Guiu, Xavier; Nestle, Frank O; Marti, Rosa M; Karagiannis, Sophia N; Sanz-Moreno, Victoria

    2015-11-16

    Cell migration underlies metastatic dissemination of cancer cells, and fast "amoeboid" migration in the invasive fronts of tumors is controlled by high levels of actomyosin contractility. How amoeboid migration is regulated by extracellular signals and sustained over time by transcriptional changes is not fully understood. Transforming growth factor β (TGF-β) is well known to promote epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition (EMT) and contribute to metastasis, but melanocytes are neural crest derivatives that have undergone EMT during embryonic development. Surprisingly, we find that in melanoma, TGF-β promotes amoeboid features such as cell rounding, membrane blebbing, high levels of contractility, and increased invasion. Using genome-wide transcriptomics, we find that amoeboid melanoma cells are enriched in a TGF-β-driven signature. We observe that downstream of TGF-β, SMAD2 and its adaptor CITED1 control amoeboid behavior by regulating the expression of key genes that activate contractile forces. Moreover, CITED1 is highly upregulated during melanoma progression, and its high expression is associated with poor prognosis. CITED1 is coupled to a contractile-rounded, amoeboid phenotype in a panel of 16 melanoma cell lines, in mouse melanoma xenografts, and in 47 human melanoma patients. Its expression is also enriched in the invasive fronts of lesions. Functionally, we show how the TGF-β-SMAD2-CITED1 axis promotes different steps associated with progression: melanoma detachment from keratinocytes, 2D and 3D migration, attachment to endothelial cells, and in vivo lung metastatic initial colonization and outgrowth. We propose a novel mechanism by which TGF-β-induced transcription sustains actomyosin force in melanoma cells and thereby promotes melanoma progression independently of EMT. PMID:26526369

  5. Transcriptional Dysregulation of Upstream Signaling of IFN Pathway in Chronic HCV Type 4 Induced Liver Fibrosis

    PubMed Central

    Ibrahim, Marwa K.; Salum, Ghada Maher; Bader El Din, Noha G.; Dawood, Reham M.; Barakat, Ahmed; Khairy, Ahmed; El Awady, Mostafa K.

    2016-01-01

    IFN orchestrates the expression of various genes to halt hepatitis C virus (HCV) replication with the possibility of either reduced or increased liver fibrosis; due to controlled viral replication or overproduction of inflammatory mediators, repectively. In this study, we examined the transcriptional profiling of type I IFN related genes in HCV-chronically infected patients with varying degrees of liver fibrosis. PCR array was used to examine the expression of 84 type I IFN related genes in peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) RNA from 12 treatment-naïve chronic HCV patients (5 F0-F1 and 7 F2-F4) and 5 healthy subjects. We further validated our results by quantitative real time PCR (qRT-PCR) in 103 treatment-naïve chronic HCV patients (43 F0-F1 and 60 F2-F4) and 15 controls. PCR array data revealed dysregulation in TLR7 pathway. The expression of TLR7 was decreased by 4 folds and MyD88 was increased by 3 folds in PBMCs of F2-F4 patients when compared to the healthy volunteers (p = 0.03 and 0.002, respectively). In addition, IRF7 and TLR7 showed dramatic downregulation (6 and 8 folds, respectively) in F2-F4 patients when compared to F0-F1 ones. qRT-PCR confirmed the altered expression patterns of TLR7 and MyD88 in F2-F4 patients when compared to either controls or F0-F1 patients. However, by qRT-PCR, IRF7 and NF-κB1 (TLR7 pathway transcription factors) exhibited similar mRNA abundance among F2-F4 and F0-F1 patients. These results suggest that TLR7 and MyD88 are possible candidates as biomarkers for the progression of HCV-induced liver fibrosis and/ or targets for therapeutic intervention. PMID:27135246

  6. Kurarinol induces hepatocellular carcinoma cell apoptosis through suppressing cellular signal transducer and activator of transcription 3 signaling

    SciTech Connect

    Shu, Guangwen; Yang, Jing; Zhao, Wenhao; Xu, Chan; Hong, Zongguo; Mei, Zhinan; Yang, Xinzhou

    2014-12-01

    Kurarinol is a flavonoid isolated from roots of the medical plant Sophora flavescens. However, its cytotoxic activity against hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) cells and toxic effects on mammalians remain largely unexplored. Here, the pro-apoptotic activities of kurarinol on HCC cells and its toxic impacts on tumor-bearing mice were evaluated. The molecular mechanisms underlying kurarinol-induced HCC cell apoptosis were also investigated. We found that kurarinol dose-dependently provoked HepG2, Huh-7 and H22 HCC cell apoptosis. In addition, kurarinol gave rise to a considerable decrease in the transcriptional activity of signal transducer and activator of transcription 3 (STAT3) in HCC cells. Suppression of STAT3 signaling is involved in kurarinol-induced HCC cell apoptosis. In vivo studies showed that kurarinol injection substantially induced transplanted H22 cell apoptosis with low toxic impacts on tumor-bearing mice. Similarly, the transcriptional activity of STAT3 in transplanted tumor tissues was significantly suppressed after kurarinol treatment. Collectively, our current research demonstrated that kurarinol has the capacity of inducing HCC cell apoptosis both in vitro and in vivo with undetectable toxic impacts on the host. Suppressing STAT3 signaling is implicated in kurarinol-mediated HCC cell apoptosis. - Highlights: • Kurarinol induces hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) cell apoptosis. • Kurarinol induces HCC cell apoptosis via inhibiting STAT3. • Kurarinol exhibits low toxic effects on tumor-bearing animals.

  7. Lack of Transcription Factor p53 Exacerbates Elastase-Induced Emphysema in Mice.

    PubMed

    Chrusciel, Sandra; Zysman, Maéva; Caramelle, Philippe; Tiendrebeogo, Arnaud; Baskara, Indoumady; Le Gouvello, Sabine; Chabot, François; Giraudier, Stéphane; Boczkowski, Jorge; Boyer, Laurent

    2016-02-01

    The transcription factor p53 is overexpressed in the lung of patients with emphysema, but it remains unclear if it has a deleterious or protective effect in disease progression. We investigated the role of p53 in the elastase-induced emphysema model and the molecular underlining mechanisms. Wild-type (WT) and p53(-/-) mice were instilled with pancreatic porcine elastase. We quantified emphysema (morphometric analysis), chemokine (C-C motif) ligand 2 (CCL2), and TNF-α in bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL) (ELISA), oxidative stress markers [heme oxygenase 1 (HO1), NAD(P)H dehydrogenase quinone 1 (NQO1), and quantitative RT-PCR], matrix metalloproteinase 12 (MMP12) expression, and macrophage apoptosis (cleaved caspase-3, immunofluorescence). p53 gene expression was up-regulated in the lung of elastase-instilled mice. p53 deletion aggravated elastase-induced emphysema severity, pulmonary inflammation (macrophage and neutrophil numbers and CCL2 and TNF-α levels in BAL), and lung oxidative stress. These findings, except for the increase in CCL2, were reproduced in WT mice transplanted with p53(-/-) bone marrow cells. The increased number of macrophages in p53(-/-) mice was not a consequence of reduced apoptosis or an excess of chemotaxis toward CCL2. Macrophage expression of MMP12 was higher in p53(-/-) mice compared with WT mice after elastase instillation. These findings provide evidence that p53(-/-) mice and WT mice grafted with p53(-/-) bone marrow cells are more prone to developing elastase-induced emphysema, supporting a protective role of p53, and more precisely p53 expressed in macrophages, against emphysema development. The pivotal role played by macrophages in this phenomenon may involve the MMP12-TNF-α pathway. PMID:26106979

  8. Frustrated expected reward induces differential transcriptional changes in the mouse brain.

    PubMed

    Martín-García, Elena; Fernández-Castillo, Noelia; Burokas, Aurelijus; Gutiérrez-Cuesta, Javier; Sánchez-Mora, Cristina; Casas, Miguel; Ribasés, Marta; Cormand, Bru; Maldonado, Rafael

    2015-01-01

    Frustration represents a particular aspect of the addictive process that is related to loss of control when the expected reward is not obtained. We aim to study the consequences of frustrated expected reward on gene expression in the mouse brain. For this purpose, we used an operant model of frustration using palatable food as reward combined with microarrays. Transcriptomic profiles of frontal cortex, ventral striatum and hippocampus were analysed in five groups of mice: (1) positive control receiving palatable food and the cue light as conditioned stimulus; (2) frustrated group only receiving the cue light; (3) extinction learning group that did not receive palatable food nor the light; (4) negative control that never received the reinforcer nor the light during the whole experiment; and (5) yoked that received palatable food passively. Gene expression changes produced by frustration were revealed in the frontal cortex and ventral striatum, but not in the hippocampus. Most of the changes, such as the modification of the dopamine-DARPP-32 signalling pathway, were common in both areas and estimated to have neuronal origin. Extinction learning induced transcriptional changes only in the ventral striatum, with most genes showing down-regulation and without alteration in the dopamine-DARPP-32 signalling pathway. Active palatable food-seeking behaviour induced changes in gene expression in ventral striatum mainly affecting cell communication. In conclusion, frustration behaviour-induced changes in frontal cortex and ventral striatum mainly related to dopamine-DARPP-32 signalling that could play an important role in the loss of behavioural control during the addictive processes. PMID:25288320

  9. Allergic skin inflammation induced by chemical sensitizers is controlled by the transcription factor Nrf2.

    PubMed

    El Ali, Zeina; Gerbeix, Cédric; Hemon, Patrice; Esser, Philipp R; Martin, Stefan F; Pallardy, Marc; Kerdine-Römer, Saadia

    2013-07-01

    Allergic contact dermatitis (ACD) is induced by low-molecular weight electrophilic chemicals and metal ions. Chemical contact sensitizers trigger reactive oxygen species production and provoke electrophilic stress, leading to the accumulation of the transcription factor nuclear-related factor 2 (Nrf2) in innate immune cell types. The objective of this work was to identify the role of Nrf2 in the regulation of ACD. We used the local lymph node assay (LLNA) and the mouse ear swelling test (MEST) to study the role of Nrf2 in both the sensitization and elicitation phase in nrf2 knockout (nrf2(-/-)) and wild-type (nrf2(+/+)) mice. Five chemicals were used: two compounds known to react with cysteine residues, 2,4-dinitrochlorobenzene (DNCB) and cinnamaldehyde (CinA); one sensitizer known to exhibit mixed reactivity to cysteine and lysine residues, isophorone diisocyanate; and one reacting specifically with lysine residues, trimellitic anhydride and croton oil, a well-known irritant. In the MEST assay, DNCB (1 and 2%) induced a significant increase in ear thickness in nrf2(-/-) compared with nrf2(+/+) mice, suggesting a role for Nrf2 in the control of the inflammatory process. When DNCB was used at 0.25 and 0.5% or when mice were treated with CinA, inflammation was found only in nrf2(-/-) mice. In the LLNA, all chemical sensitizers induced an increase of lymphocyte proliferation in nrf2(-/-) compared with nrf2(+/+) mice for the same chemical concentration. These results reveal an important role for Nrf2 in controlling ACD and lymphocyte proliferation in response to sensitizers. PMID:23564646

  10. Cutting Edge: A Natural Antisense Transcript, AS-IL1α, Controls Inducible Transcription of the Proinflammatory Cytokine IL-1α.

    PubMed

    Chan, Jennie; Atianand, Maninjay; Jiang, Zhaozhao; Carpenter, Susan; Aiello, Daniel; Elling, Roland; Fitzgerald, Katherine A; Caffrey, Daniel R

    2015-08-15

    Natural antisense transcripts (NATs) are a class of long noncoding RNAs (lncRNAs) that are complementary to other protein-coding genes. Although thousands of NATs are encoded by mammalian genomes, their functions in innate immunity are unknown. In this study, we identified and characterized a novel NAT, AS-IL1α, which is partially complementary to IL-1α. Similar to IL-1α, AS-IL1α is expressed at low levels in resting macrophages and is induced following infection with Listeria monocytogenes or stimulation with TLR ligands (Pam3CSK4, LPS, polyinosinic-polycytidylic acid). Inducible expression of IL-1α mRNA and protein were significantly reduced in macrophages expressing shRNA that target AS-IL1α. AS-IL1α is located in the nucleus and did not alter the stability of IL-1α mRNA. Instead, AS-IL1α was required for the recruitment of RNA polymerase II to the IL-1α promoter. In summary, our studies identify AS-IL1α as an important regulator of IL-1α transcription during the innate immune response. PMID:26179904

  11. Transcription-independent heritability of induced histone modifications in the mouse preimplantation embryo.

    PubMed

    VerMilyea, Matthew D; O'Neill, Laura P; Turner, Bryan M

    2009-01-01

    Enzyme-catalyzed, post-translational modifications of core histones have been implicated in the complex changes in gene expression that drive early mammalian development. However, until recently the small number of cells available from the preimplantation embryo itself has prevented quantitative analysis of histone modifications at key regulator genes. The possible involvement of histone modifications in the embryo's response to extracellular signals, or as determinants of cell fate or lineage progression, remains unclear. Here we describe the use of a recently-developed chromatin immunoprecipitation technique (CChIP) to assay histone modification levels at key regulator genes (Pou5f1, Nanog, Cdx2, Hoxb1, Hoxb9) as mouse embryos progress from 8-cell to blastocyst in culture. Only by the blastocyst stage, when the embryonic (Inner Cell Mass) and extra-embryonic (Trophoblast) lineages are compared, do we see the expected association between histone modifications previously linked to active and silent chromatin, and transcriptional state. To explore responses to an environmental signal, we exposed embryos to the histone deacetylase inhibitor, anti-epileptic and known teratogen valproic acid (VPA), during progression from 8-cell to morula stage. Such treatment increased H4 acetylation and H3 lysine 4 methylation at the promoters of Hoxb1 and Hoxb9, but not the promoters of Pou5f1, Nanog,Cdx2 or the housekeeping gene Gapdh. Despite the absence of detectable Hoxb transcription, these VPA-induced changes were heritable, following removal of the inhibitor, at least until the blastocyst stage. The selective hyperacetylation of Hoxb promoters in response to a histone deacetylase inhibitor, suggests that Hox genes have a higher turnover of histone acetates than other genes in the preimplantation embryo. To explain the heritability, through mitosis, of VPA-induced changes in histone modification at Hoxb promoters, we describe how an epigenetic feed-forward loop, based on cross

  12. Ocular surface foreign bodies: novel findings mimicking ocular malignant melanoma

    PubMed Central

    Maudgil, A; Wagner, B E; Rundle, P; Rennie, I G; Mudhar, H S

    2014-01-01

    Purpose Malignant melanoma of the eye is an uncommon condition that is important to recognise. We describe three cases in which ocular foreign bodies have masqueraded as ocular malignant melanoma. Methods Interventional case reports. Results Case 1 describes diathermy-induced carbon particle implantation, during plaque therapy for the treatment of uveal melanoma, mimicking recurrence with extra-scleral invasion. Case 2 shows a foreign body called ‘mullite' mimicking conjunctival melanoma. Case 3 demonstrates a conjunctival foreign body called ‘illite' that mimicked a limbal melanocytic lesion, clinically thought to be either melanocytoma or melanoma. Conclusion This report highlights the importance of careful history taking, examination, and appropriate biopsy in cases of suspected malignant melanoma, to prevent unnecessary and potentially radical treatment. PMID:25104745

  13. Radiation-induced hypomethylation triggers urokinase plasminogen activator transcription in meningioma cells.

    PubMed

    Velpula, Kiran Kumar; Gogineni, Venkateswara Rao; Nalla, Arun Kumar; Dinh, Dzung H; Rao, Jasti S

    2013-02-01

    Our previous studies have shown the role of radiation-induced urokinase plasminogen activator (uPA) expression in the progression of meningioma. In the present study, we investigated whether modulation of DNA methylation profiles could regulate uPA expression. Initially, radiation treatment was found to induce hypomethylation in meningioma cells with a decrease in DNA (cytosine-5)-methyltransferase 1 (DNMT1) and methyl-CpG binding domain protein (MBD) expression. However, oxidative damage by H(2)O(2) or pretreatment of irradiated cells with N-acetyl cysteine (NAC) did not show any influence on these proteins, thereby indicating a radiation-specific change in the methylation patterns among meningioma cells. Further, we identified that hypomethylation is coupled to an increase in uPA expression in these cells. Azacytidine treatment induced a dose-dependent surge of uPA expression, whereas pre-treatment with sodium butyrate inhibited radiation-induced uPA expression, which complemented our prior results. Methylation-specific polymerase chain reaction on bisulfite-treated genomic DNA revealed a diminished methylation of uPA promoter in irradiated cells. Transfection with small hairpin RNA (shRNA)-expressing plasmids targeting CpG islands of the uPA promoter showed a marked decline in uPA expression with subsequent decrease in invasion and proliferation of meningioma cells. Further, radiation treatment was found to recruit SP1 transcription factor, which was abrogated by shRNA treatment. Analysis on signaling events demonstrated the activation of MAP kinase kinase (MEK)-extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK) in radiation-treated cells, while U0126 (MEK/ERK inhibitor) blocked hypomethylation, recruitment of SP1, and uPA expression. In agreement with our in vitro data, low DNMT1 levels and high uPA were found in intracranial tumors treated with radiation compared to untreated tumors. In conclusion, our data suggest that radiation-mediated hypomethylation triggers u

  14. Radiation-Induced Hypomethylation Triggers Urokinase Plasminogen Activator Transcription in Meningioma Cells1

    PubMed Central

    Velpula, Kiran Kumar; Gogineni, Venkateswara Rao; Nalla, Arun Kumar; Dinh, Dzung H; Rao, Jasti S

    2013-01-01

    Our previous studies have shown the role of radiation-induced urokinase plasminogen activator (uPA) expression in the progression of meningioma. In the present study, we investigated whether modulation of DNA methylation profiles could regulate uPA expression. Initially, radiation treatment was found to induce hypomethylation in meningioma cells with a decrease in DNA (cytosine-5)-methyltransferase 1 (DNMT1) and methyl-CpG binding domain protein (MBD) expression. However, oxidative damage by H2O2 or pretreatment of irradiated cells with N-acetyl cysteine (NAC) did not show any influence on these proteins, thereby indicating a radiation-specific change in the methylation patterns among meningioma cells. Further, we identified that hypomethylation is coupled to an increase in uPA expression in these cells. Azacytidine treatment induced a dose-dependent surge of uPA expression, whereas pre-treatment with sodium butyrate inhibited radiation-induced uPA expression, which complemented our prior results. Methylation-specific polymerase chain reaction on bisulfite-treated genomic DNA revealed a diminished methylation of uPA promoter in irradiated cells. Transfection with small hairpin RNA (shRNA)-expressing plasmids targeting CpG islands of the uPA promoter showed a marked decline in uPA expression with subsequent decrease in invasion and proliferation of meningioma cells. Further, radiation treatment was found to recruit SP1 transcription factor, which was abrogated by shRNA treatment. Analysis on signaling events demonstrated the activation of MAP kinase kinase (MEK)-extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK) in radiation-treated cells, while U0126 (MEK/ERK inhibitor) blocked hypomethylation, recruitment of SP1, and uPA expression. In agreement with our in vitro data, low DNMT1 levels and high uPA were found in intracranial tumors treated with radiation compared to untreated tumors. In conclusion, our data suggest that radiation-mediated hypomethylation triggers u

  15. Transcriptional inhibition of the Catalase gene in phosphine-induced oxidative stress in Drosophila melanogaster.

    PubMed

    Liu, Tao; Li, Li; Zhang, Fanhua; Wang, Yuejin

    2015-10-01

    Phosphine (PH3) is a toxic substance to pest insects and is therefore commonly used in pest control. The oxidative damage induced by PH3 is considered to be one of the primary mechanisms of its toxicity in pest insects; however, the precise mode of PH3 action in this process is still unclear. In this study, we evaluated the responses of several oxidative biomarkers and two of the main antioxidant enzymes, catalase (CAT) and superoxide dismutase (SOD), after fumigation treatment with PH3 in Drosophila melanogaster as a model system. The results showed that larvae exposed to sub-lethal levels of PH3 (0.028 mg/L) exhibited lower aerobic respiration rates and higher levels of hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) and lipid peroxidation (LPO). Furthermore, unlike SOD, the activity and expression of CAT and its encoding gene were downregulated by PH3 in a time- and dose-dependent manner. Finally, the responses of six potential transcription factors of PH3 were determined by real-time polymerase chain reaction to explore the regulation mechanism of DmCAT by PH3. There were no significant effects of PH3 on three nuclear factor-kappa B homologs (DORSAL, DIF, and RELISH) or two activator protein-1 genes (JUN and FOS), while dramatic inhibition of DNA replication-related element factor (DREF) expression was observed after fumigation with PH3, suggesting that PH3 could inhibit the expression of DmCAT via the DRE/DREF system. These results confirmed that PH3 induces oxidative stress and targets CAT by downregulating its encoding gene in Drosophila. Our results provide new insight into the signal transduction mechanism between PH3 and its target genes. PMID:26453223

  16. Cylindrospermopsin induced transcriptional responses in human hepatoma HepG2 cells.

    PubMed

    Straser, Alja; Filipič, Metka; Zegura, Bojana

    2013-09-01

    The newly emerging cyanotoxin cylindrospermopsin (CYN) is showing genotoxic effects in a range of test systems. However, the knowledge on the mechanisms involved is limited. To get insight into the cellular responses to CYN a toxicogenomic analysis of selected genes commonly affected by genotoxic stress was performed on HepG2 cells exposed to a non-cytotoxic but genotoxic concentration of CYN (0.5 μg/ml for 12 and 24h). CYN increased expression of the immediate-early response genes from the FOS and JUN gene families and there was strong evidence for the involvement of P53 and NF-κB signaling. Strong up-regulation of the growth arrest and DNA damage inducible genes (GADD45A and GADD45B), cyclin-dependent kinase inhibitors (CDKN1A and CDKN2B), checkpoint kinase 1 (CHEK1), and genes involved in DNA damage repair (XPC, ERCC4 and others) indicated cell-cycle arrest and induction of nucleotide excision and double strand break repair. Up-regulation of metabolic enzyme genes provided evidence for the involvement of phase I (CYP1A1, CYP1B1, ALDH1A2 and CES2) and phase II (UGT1A6, UGT1A1, NAT1 and GSTM3) enzymes in the detoxification response and potential activation of CYN. The obtained transcriptional patterns after exposure of HepG2 cells to CYN provide valuable new information on the cellular response to CYN. PMID:23726867

  17. Mechanism of Mitochondrial Transcription Factor A Attenuation of CpG-Induced Antibody Production

    PubMed Central

    Saifee, Jessica F.; Torres, Raul M.; Janoff, Edward N.

    2016-01-01

    Mitochondrial transcription factor A (TFAM) had previously been shown to act as a damage associated molecular pattern with the ability to enhance CpG-A phosphorothioate oligodeoxynucleotide (ODN)-mediated stimulation of IFNα production from human plasmacytoid dendritic cells. Examination of the mechanism by which TFAM might influence CpG ODN mediated innate immune responses revealed that TFAM binds directly, tightly and selectively to the structurally related CpG-A, -B, and -C ODN. TFAM also modulated the ability of the CpG-B or -C to stimulate the production of antibodies from human B cells. TFAM showed a dose-dependent modulation of CpG-B, and -C -induced antibody production from human B cells in vitro, with enhancement of high dose and inhibition of low doses of CpG stimulation. This effect was linked to the ability of TFAM to directly inhibit the binding of CpG ODNs to B cells, in a manner consistent with the relative binding affinities of TFAM for the ODNs. These data suggest that TFAM alters the free concentration of the CpG available to stimulate B cells by sequestering this ODN in a TFAM-CpG complex. Thus, TFAM has the potential to decrease the pathogenic consequences of exposure to natural CpG-like hypomethylated DNA in vivo, as well as such as that found in traumatic injury, infection, autoimmune disease and during pregnancy. PMID:27280778

  18. Selective transcription and cellular proliferation induced by PDGF require histone deacetylase activity

    SciTech Connect

    Catania, Annunziata; Iavarone, Carlo; Carlomagno, Stella M.; Chiariello, Mario . E-mail: chiariel@unina.it

    2006-05-05

    Histone deacetylases (HDACs) are key regulatory enzymes involved in the control of gene expression and their inhibition by specific drugs has been widely correlated to cell cycle arrest, terminal differentiation, and apoptosis. Here, we investigated whether HDAC activity was required for PDGF-dependent signal transduction and cellular proliferation. Exposure of PDGF-stimulated NIH3T3 fibroblasts to the HDAC inhibitor trichostatin A (TSA) potently repressed the expression of a group of genes correlated to PDGF-dependent cellular growth and pro-survival activity. Moreover, we show that TSA interfered with STAT3-dependent transcriptional activity induced by PDGF. Still, neither phosphorylation nor nuclear translocation and DNA-binding in vitro and in vivo of STAT3 were affected by using TSA to interfere with PDGF stimulation. Finally, TSA treatment resulted in the suppression of PDGF-dependent cellular proliferation without affecting cellular survival of NIH3T3 cells. Our data indicate that inhibition of HDAC activity antagonizes the mitogenic effect of PDGF, suggesting that these drugs may specifically act on the expression of STAT-dependent, PDGF-responsive genes.

  19. Cryptogein-Induced Transcriptional Reprogramming in Tobacco Is Light Dependent1[C][W

    PubMed Central

    Hoeberichts, Frank A.; Davoine, Céline; Vandorpe, Michaël; Morsa, Stijn; Ksas, Brigitte; Stassen, Catherine; Triantaphylidès, Christian; Van Breusegem, Frank

    2013-01-01

    The fungal elicitor cryptogein triggers a light-dependent hypersensitive response in tobacco (Nicotiana tabacum). To assess the effect of light on this nonhost resistance in more detail, we studied various aspects of the response under dark and light conditions using the tobacco-cryptogein experimental system. Here, we show that light drastically alters the plant’s transcriptional response to cryptogein, notably by dampening the induction of genes involved in multiple processes, such as ethylene biosynthesis, secondary metabolism, and glutathione turnover. Furthermore, chlorophyll fluorescence measurements demonstrated that quantum yield and functioning of the light-harvesting antennae decreased simultaneously, indicating that photoinhibition underlies the observed decreased photosynthesis and that photooxidative damage might be involved in the establishment of the altered response. Analysis of the isomer distribution of hydroxy fatty acids illustrated that, in the light, lipid peroxidation was predominantly due to the production of singlet oxygen. Differences in (reduced) glutathione concentrations and the rapid development of symptoms in the light when cryptogein was coinfiltrated with glutathione biosynthesis inhibitors suggest that glutathione might become a limiting factor during the cryptogein-induced hypersensitive response in the dark and that this response might be modified by an increased antioxidant availability in the light. PMID:23878079

  20. Early transcriptional responses to mercury: a role for ethylene in mercury-induced stress.

    PubMed

    Montero-Palmero, M Belén; Martín-Barranco, Amanda; Escobar, Carolina; Hernández, Luis E

    2014-01-01

    Understanding the cellular mechanisms of plant tolerance to mercury (Hg) is important for developing phytoremediation strategies of Hg-contaminated soils. The early responses of alfalfa (Medicago sativa) seedlings to Hg were studied using transcriptomics analysis. A Medicago truncatula microarray was hybridized with high-quality root RNA from M. sativa treated with 3 μM Hg for 3, 6 and 24 h. The transcriptional pattern data were complementary to the measurements of root growth inhibition, lipid peroxidation, hydrogen peroxide (H2 O2 ) accumulation and NADPH-oxidase activity as stress indexes. Of 559 differentially expressed genes (DEGs), 91% were up-regulated. The majority of DEGs were shared between the 3 and 6 h (60%) time points, including the 'stress', 'secondary metabolism' and 'hormone metabolism' functional categories. Genes from ethylene metabolism and signalling were highly represented, suggesting that this phytohormone may be relevant for metal perception and homeostasis. Ethylene-insensitive alfalfa seedlings preincubated with the ethylene signalling inhibitor 1-methylcyclopronene and Arabidopsis thaliana ein2-5 mutants confirmed that ethylene participates in the early perception of Hg stress. It modulates root growth inhibition, NADPH-oxidase activity and Hg-induced apoplastic H2 O2 accumulation. Therefore, ethylene signalling attenuation could be useful in future phytotechnological applications to ameliorate stress symptoms in Hg-polluted plants. PMID:24033367

  1. Abundant and broad expression of transcription-induced chimeras and protein products in mammalian genomes.

    PubMed

    Lu, Guanting; Wu, Jin; Zhao, Gangbin; Wang, Zhiqiang; Chen, Weihua; Mu, Shijie

    2016-02-12

    The expression of transcription-induced chimeras (TICs) was underestimated due to strategic and logical reasons. In order to thoroughly examine TICs, systematic survey of TIC events was conducted in mammalian genomes using ESTs, followed by experimental validation using RT-PCR and real-time quantitative PCR (qPCR). The expression of ∼98% TIC events in at least one tissue or cell line from both mouse and human was verified. Besides, ∼40% TICs were broadly expressed, and ∼33% of TICs showed expression levels comparable to or higher than their upstream parental genes. We further identified putative chimeric proteins in public databases and validated two using Western blotting. GO analysis revealed that proteins resided in one multi-protein complex or functioning in metabolic or signaling pathway tended to produce fused products. Taken together, we have shown substantial evidence for the underestimated TIC events; and TICs could be a novel regulated way to further increases the proteome complexity in mammalian genomes. Possible regulation mechanisms and evolution of TICs were also discussed. PMID:26718406

  2. Xanthogranulomatous cholecystitis mimicking gallbladder cancer.

    PubMed

    Ewelukwa, Ofor; Ali, Omair; Akram, Salma

    2014-01-01

    Xanthogranulomatous cholecystitis (XGC) is a benign, uncommon variant of chronic cholecystitis characterised by focal or diffuse destructive inflammatory process of the gallbladder (GB). Macroscopically, it appears like yellowish tumour-like masses in the wall of the GB. This article reports on a 74-year-old woman with XGC mimicking GB cancer. PMID:24811556

  3. Xanthogranulomatous cholecystitis mimicking gallbladder cancer

    PubMed Central

    Ewelukwa, Ofor; Ali, Omair; Akram, Salma

    2014-01-01

    Xanthogranulomatous cholecystitis (XGC) is a benign, uncommon variant of chronic cholecystitis characterised by focal or diffuse destructive inflammatory process of the gallbladder (GB). Macroscopically, it appears like yellowish tumour-like masses in the wall of the GB. This article reports on a 74-year-old woman with XGC mimicking GB cancer. PMID:24811556

  4. Atypical Cogan's syndrome mimicking encephalitis.

    PubMed

    Lepur, Dragan; Vranjican, Zoran; Himbele, Josip; Barsić, Bruno; Klinar, Igor

    2004-01-01

    Cogan's syndrome is a rare autoimmune multisystem disease. The main clinical features of typical Cogan's syndrome are vestibuloauditory dysfunction and interstitial keratitis. The authors present a case of atypical Cogan's syndrome with headache, fever, deafness, trigeminal neuralgia and electroencephalographic abnormality which mimicked viral encephalitis. PMID:15307593

  5. Kawasaki Disease Mimicking Retropharyngeal Abscess

    PubMed Central

    Srividhya, Vazhkudai Sridharan; Vasanthi, Thiruvengadam; Shivbalan, Somu

    2010-01-01

    Kawasaki disease is an acute, self-limiting febrile mucocutaneous vasculitis of infants and young children. Retropharyngeal lymphadenopathy is a rare presentation of Kawasaki disease. We present a case of Kawasaki disease mimicking a retropharyngeal abscess, with upper airway obstruction resulting in delayed diagnosis. PMID:20635457

  6. Pivotal roles of p53 transcription-dependent and -independent pathways in manganese-induced mitochondrial dysfunction and neuronal apoptosis.

    PubMed

    Wan, Chunhua; Ma, Xa; Shi, Shangshi; Zhao, Jianya; Nie, Xiaoke; Han, Jingling; Xiao, Jing; Wang, Xiaoke; Jiang, Shengyang; Jiang, Junkang

    2014-12-15

    Chronic exposure to excessive manganese (Mn) has been known to lead to neuronal loss and a clinical syndrome resembling idiopathic Parkinson's disease (IPD). p53 plays an integral role in the development of various human diseases, including neurodegenerative disorders. However, the role of p53 in Mn-induced neuronal apoptosis and neurological deficits remains obscure. In the present study, we showed that p53 was critically involved in Mn-induced neuronal apoptosis in rat striatum through both transcription-dependent and -independent mechanisms. Western blot and immunohistochemistrical analyses revealed that p53 was remarkably upregulated in the striatum of rats following Mn exposure. Coincidentally, increased level of cleaved PARP, a hallmark of apoptosis, was observed. Furthermore, using nerve growth factor (NGF)-differentiated PC12 cells as a neuronal cell model, we showed that Mn exposure decreased cell viability and induced apparent apoptosis. Importantly, p53 was progressively upregulated, and accumulated in both the nucleus and the cytoplasm. The cytoplasmic p53 had a remarkable distribution in mitochondria, suggesting an involvement of p53 mitochondrial translocation in Mn-induced neuronal apoptosis. In addition, Mn-induced impairment of mitochondrial membrane potential (ΔΨm) could be partially rescued by pretreatment with inhibitors of p53 transcriptional activity and p53 mitochondrial translocation, Pifithrin-α (PFT-α) and Pifithrin-μ (PFT-μ), respectively. Moreover, blockage of p53 activities with PFT-α and PFT-μ significantly attenuated Mn-induced reactive oxidative stress (ROS) generation and mitochondrial H₂O₂ production. Finally, we observed that pretreatment with PFT-α and PFT-μ ameliorated Mn-induced apoptosis in PC12 cells. Collectively, these findings implicate that p53 transcription-dependent and -independent pathways may play crucial roles in the regulation of Mn-induced neuronal death. PMID:25448048

  7. A plasmid-encoded two-component regulatory system involved in copper-inducible transcription in Lactococcus lactis.

    PubMed

    Khunajakr, N; Liu, C Q; Charoenchai, P; Dunn, N W

    1999-03-18

    Two regulatory genes (lcoR and lcoS) were identified from a plasmid-borne lactococcal copper resistance determinant and characterized by transcriptional fusion to the promoterless chloramphenicol acetyltransferase gene (cat). RT-PCR analysis indicates that lcoR and lcoS are organized within an operon, controlling the transcription of cat in a copper-inducible manner. The amino acid sequences deduced from lcoR and lcoS show homology to the response and sensor proteins of known two-component regulatory systems. Deletion within either lcoS or both genes inactivated the copper-dependent activity, suggesting the presence of no trans-acting lcoR and lcoS homologs in the lactococcal host chromosome. The transcription start site involved in copper induction was mapped by primer extension. PMID:10095123

  8. Role of hypoxia-inducible factor-1 in transcriptional activation of ceruloplasmin by iron deficiency

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mukhopadhyay, C. K.; Mazumder, B.; Fox, P. L.

    2000-01-01

    A role of the copper protein ceruloplasmin (Cp) in iron metabolism is suggested by its ferroxidase activity and by the tissue iron overload in hereditary Cp deficiency patients. In addition, plasma Cp increases markedly in several conditions of anemia, e.g. iron deficiency, hemorrhage, renal failure, sickle cell disease, pregnancy, and inflammation. However, little is known about the cellular and molecular mechanism(s) involved. We have reported that iron chelators increase Cp mRNA expression and protein synthesis in human hepatocarcinoma HepG2 cells. Furthermore, we have shown that the increase in Cp mRNA is due to increased rate of transcription. We here report the results of new studies designed to elucidate the molecular mechanism underlying transcriptional activation of Cp by iron deficiency. The 5'-flanking region of the Cp gene was cloned from a human genomic library. A 4774-base pair segment of the Cp promoter/enhancer driving a luciferase reporter was transfected into HepG2 or Hep3B cells. Iron deficiency or hypoxia increased luciferase activity by 5-10-fold compared with untreated cells. Examination of the sequence showed three pairs of consensus hypoxia-responsive elements (HREs). Deletion and mutation analysis showed that a single HRE was necessary and sufficient for gene activation. The involvement of hypoxia-inducible factor-1 (HIF-1) was shown by gel-shift and supershift experiments that showed HIF-1alpha and HIF-1beta binding to a radiolabeled oligonucleotide containing the Cp promoter HRE. Furthermore, iron deficiency (and hypoxia) did not activate Cp gene expression in Hepa c4 hepatoma cells deficient in HIF-1beta, as shown functionally by the inactivity of a transfected Cp promoter-luciferase construct and by the failure of HIF-1 to bind the Cp HRE in nuclear extracts from these cells. These results are consistent with in vivo findings that iron deficiency increases plasma Cp and provides a molecular mechanism that may help to understand these

  9. Transducer of regulated CREB-binding proteins (TORCs) induce PGC-1α transcription and mitochondrial biogenesis in muscle cells

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Zhidan; Huang, Xueming; Feng, Yajun; Handschin, Christoph; Feng, Yan; Gullicksen, P. Scott; Bare, Olivia; Labow, Mark; Spiegelman, Bruce; Stevenson, Susan C.

    2006-01-01

    PGC-1α (peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor γ coactivator 1α) is a master regulator of mitochondrial biogenesis and plays an important role in several other aspects of energy metabolism. To identify upstream regulators of PGC-1α gene transcription, 10,000 human full-length cDNAs were screened for induction of the PGC-1α promoter. A number of activators of PGC-1α transcription were found; the most potent activator was the transducer of regulated CREB (cAMP response element-binding protein) binding protein (TORC) 1, a coactivator of CREB. The other two members of the TORC family, TORC2 and TORC3, also strongly activated PGC-1α transcription. TORCs dramatically induced PGC-1α gene transcription through CREB. Forced expression of TORCs in primary muscle cells induced the endogenous mRNA of PGC-1α and its downstream target genes in the mitochondrial respiratory chain and TCA cycle. Importantly, these changes in gene expression resulted in increased mitochondrial oxidative capacity measured by cellular respiration and fatty acid oxidation. Finally, we demonstrated that the action of TORCs in promoting mitochondrial gene expression and function requires PGC-1α. Previous studies had indicated that TORCs function as a calcium- and cAMP-sensitive coincidence detector and mediate individual and synergistic effects of these two pathways. Our results, together with previous findings, strongly suggest that TORCs play a key role in linking these external signals to the transcriptional program of adaptive mitochondrial biogenesis by activating PGC-1α gene transcription. PMID:16980408

  10. Dehydration stress-induced oscillations in LEA protein transcripts involves abscisic acid in the moss, Physcomitrella patens.

    PubMed

    Shinde, Suhas; Nurul Islam, M; Ng, Carl K-Y

    2012-07-01

    • Physcomitrella patens is a bryophyte belonging to early diverging lineages of land plants following colonization of land in the Ordovician period. Mosses are typically found in refugial habitats and can experience rapidly fluctuating environmental conditions. The acquisition of dehydration tolerance by bryophytes is of fundamental importance as they lack water-conducting tissues and are generally one cell layer thick. • Here, we show that dehydration induced oscillations in the steady-state transcript abundances of two group 3 late embryogenesis abundant (LEA) protein genes in P. patens protonemata, and that the amplitudes of these oscillations are reflective of the severity of dehydration stress. • Dehydration stress also induced elevations in the concentrations of abscisic acid (ABA), and ABA alone can also induce dosage-dependent oscillatory increases in the steady-state abundance of LEA protein transcripts. Additionally, removal of ABA resulted in rapid attenuation of these oscillatory increases. • Our data demonstrate that dehydration stress-regulated expression of LEA protein genes is temporally dynamic and highlight the importance of oscillations as a robust mechanism for optimal responses. Our results suggest that dehydration stress-induced oscillations in the steady-state abundance of LEA protein transcripts may constitute an important cellular strategy for adaptation to life in a constantly changing environment. PMID:22591374

  11. IL-17A induces signal transducers and activators of transcription-6-independent airway mucous cell metaplasia.

    PubMed

    Newcomb, Dawn C; Boswell, Madison G; Sherrill, Taylor P; Polosukhin, Vasiliy V; Boyd, Kelli L; Goleniewska, Kasia; Brody, Steven L; Kolls, Jay K; Adler, Kenneth B; Peebles, R Stokes

    2013-06-01

    Mucous cell metaplasia is a hallmark of asthma, and may be mediated by signal transducers and activators of transcription (STAT)-6 signaling. IL-17A is increased in the bronchoalveolar lavage fluid of patients with severe asthma, and IL-17A also increases mucus production in airway epithelial cells. Asthma therapeutics are being developed that inhibit STAT6 signaling, but the role of IL-17A in inducing mucus production in the absence of STAT6 remains unknown. We hypothesized that IL-17A induces mucous cell metaplasia independent of STAT6, and we tested this hypothesis in two murine models in which increased IL-17A protein expression is evident. In the first model, ovalbumin (OVA)-specific D011.10 Th17 cells were adoptively transferred into wild-type (WT) or STAT6 knockout (KO) mice, and the mice were challenged with OVA or PBS. WT-OVA and STAT6 KO-OVA mice demonstrated increased airway IL-17A and IL-13 protein expression and mucous cell metaplasia, compared with WT-PBS or STAT6 KO-PBS mice. In the second model, WT, STAT1 KO, STAT1/STAT6 double KO (DKO), or STAT1/STAT6/IL-17 receptor A (RA) triple KO (TKO) mice were challenged with respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) or mock viral preparation, and the mucous cells were assessed. STAT1 KO-RSV mice demonstrated increased airway mucous cell metaplasia compared with WT-RSV mice. STAT1 KO-RSV and STAT1/STAT6 DKO-RSV mice also demonstrated increased mucous cell metaplasia, compared with STAT1/STAT6/IL17RA TKO-RSV mice. We also treated primary murine tracheal epithelial cells (mTECs) from WT and STAT6 KO mice. STAT6 KO mTECs showed increased periodic acid-Schiff staining with IL-17A but not with IL-13. Thus, asthma therapies targeting STAT6 may increase IL-17A protein expression, without preventing IL-17A-induced mucus production. PMID:23392574

  12. Bisphenol AF-induced endogenous transcription is mediated by ERα and ERK1/2 activation in human breast cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Li, Ming; Guo, Jing; Gao, Wenhui; Yu, Jianlong; Han, Xiaoyu; Zhang, Jing; Shao, Bing

    2014-01-01

    Bisphenol AF (BPAF)-induced transcriptional activity has been evaluated by luciferase reporter assay. However, the molecular mechanism of BPAF-induced endogenous transcription in human breast cancer cells has not been fully elucidated. In the present study, we investigated the effect and mechanism of BPAF-induced endogenous transcription detected by real-time PCR in human breast cancer cells. We found that BPAF stimulated transcription of estrogen responsive genes, such as trefoil factor 1 (TFF1), growth regulation by estrogen in breast cancer 1 (GREB1) and cathepsin D (CTSD), through dose-dependent and time-dependent manners in T47D and MCF7 cells. Gene-silencing of ERα, ERβ and G protein-coupled estrogen receptor 1 (GPER) by small interfering RNA revealed that BPAF-induced endogenous transcription was dependent on ERα and GPER, implying both genomic and nongenomic pathways might be involved in the endogenous transcription induced by BPAF. ERα-mediated gene transcription was further confirmed by inhibition of ER activity using ICI 182780 in ERα-positive T47D and MCF7 cells as well as overexpression of ERα in ERα-negative MDA-MB-231 breast cancer cells. Moreover, we utilized Src tyrosine kinase inhibitor PP2 and two MEK inhibitors PD98059 and U0126 to elucidate the rapid nongenomic activation of Src/MEK/ERK1/2 cascade on endogenous transcription. Our data showed that BPAF-induced transcription could be significantly blocked by PP2, PD98059 and U0126, suggesting activation of ERK1/2 was also required to regulate endogenous transcription. Taken together, these results indicate that BPAF-induced endogenous transcription of estrogen responsive genes is mediated through both genomic and nongenomic pathways involving the ERα and ERK1/2 activation in human breast cancer cells. PMID:24727858

  13. Bisphenol AF-Induced Endogenous Transcription Is Mediated by ERα and ERK1/2 Activation in Human Breast Cancer Cells

    PubMed Central

    Li, Ming; Guo, Jing; Gao, Wenhui; Yu, Jianlong; Han, Xiaoyu; Zhang, Jing; Shao, Bing

    2014-01-01

    Bisphenol AF (BPAF)-induced transcriptional activity has been evaluated by luciferase reporter assay. However, the molecular mechanism of BPAF-induced endogenous transcription in human breast cancer cells has not been fully elucidated. In the present study, we investigated the effect and mechanism of BPAF-induced endogenous transcription detected by real-time PCR in human breast cancer cells. We found that BPAF stimulated transcription of estrogen responsive genes, such as trefoil factor 1 (TFF1), growth regulation by estrogen in breast cancer 1 (GREB1) and cathepsin D (CTSD), through dose-dependent and time-dependent manners in T47D and MCF7 cells. Gene-silencing of ERα, ERβ and G protein-coupled estrogen receptor 1 (GPER) by small interfering RNA revealed that BPAF-induced endogenous transcription was dependent on ERα and GPER, implying both genomic and nongenomic pathways might be involved in the endogenous transcription induced by BPAF. ERα-mediated gene transcription was further confirmed by inhibition of ER activity using ICI 182780 in ERα-positive T47D and MCF7 cells as well as overexpression of ERα in ERα-negative MDA-MB-231 breast cancer cells. Moreover, we utilized Src tyrosine kinase inhibitor PP2 and two MEK inhibitors PD98059 and U0126 to elucidate the rapid nongenomic activation of Src/MEK/ERK1/2 cascade on endogenous transcription. Our data showed that BPAF-induced transcription could be significantly blocked by PP2, PD98059 and U0126, suggesting activation of ERK1/2 was also required to regulate endogenous transcription. Taken together, these results indicate that BPAF-induced endogenous transcription of estrogen responsive genes is mediated through both genomic and nongenomic pathways involving the ERα and ERK1/2 activation in human breast cancer cells. PMID:24727858

  14. Stress memory induced transcriptional and metabolic changes of perennial ryegrass (Lolium perenne) in response to salt stress.

    PubMed

    Hu, Tao; Jin, Yupei; Li, Huiying; Amombo, Erick; Fu, Jinmin

    2016-01-01

    Preexposure to a stress could induce stable signals and reactions on plant physiology and gene expression during future encounters as a 'stress memory'. In this study, we found that two trainable genes, BPSP encoding putative brown plant hopper susceptibility protein and sucs encoding sucrose synthase displayed transcriptional memory for their considerably higher transcript levels during two or more subsequent stresses (S3, S4) relative to the initial stress (S0), and their expression returning to basal transcript levels (non-stressed) during the recovery states (R1, R2 and R3). Removing the repetitive stress/recovery exercise, activated transcriptional memory from two trainable genes persisted for at least 4 days in perennial ryegrass. The pretrainable genes with stress memory effort had higher response to the subsequent elevated NaCl concentration treatment than the non-trainable plants, which was confirmed by lower electrolyte leakage and minimum H2 O2 and O2 (-) accumulation. Salt stress elevated the content of 41 metabolites in perennial ryegrass leaves, and sugars and sugar alcohol accounted for more than 74.1% of the total metabolite content. The salt stress memory was associated with higher contents of 11 sugars and 1 sugar alcohol in the pretrainable grass leaves. Similarly, six sugars showed greater content in the pretrainable grass roots. These novel phenomena associated with transcriptional memory and metabolite profiles could lead to new insights into improving plant salinity acclimation process. PMID:25913889

  15. Transcription factors GAF and HSF act at distinct regulatory steps to modulate stress-induced gene activation

    PubMed Central

    Fuda, Nicholas J.; Mahat, Dig B.; Core, Leighton J.; Guertin, Michael J.

    2016-01-01

    The coordinated regulation of gene expression at the transcriptional level is fundamental to development and homeostasis. Inducible systems are invaluable when studying transcription because the regulatory process can be triggered instantaneously, allowing the tracking of ordered mechanistic events. Here, we use precision run-on sequencing (PRO-seq) to examine the genome-wide heat shock (HS) response in Drosophila and the function of two key transcription factors on the immediate transcription activation or repression of all genes regulated by HS. We identify the primary HS response genes and the rate-limiting steps in the transcription cycle that GAGA-associated factor (GAF) and HS factor (HSF) regulate. We demonstrate that GAF acts upstream of promoter-proximally paused RNA polymerase II (Pol II) formation (likely at the step of chromatin opening) and that GAF-facilitated Pol II pausing is critical for HS activation. In contrast, HSF is dispensable for establishing or maintaining Pol II pausing but is critical for the release of paused Pol II into the gene body at a subset of highly activated genes. Additionally, HSF has no detectable role in the rapid HS repression of thousands of genes. PMID:27492368

  16. Computational identification of conserved transcription factor binding sites upstream of genes induced in rat brain by transient focal ischemic stroke.

    PubMed

    Pulliam, John V K; Xu, Zhenfeng; Ford, Gregory D; Liu, Cuimei; Li, Yonggang; Stovall, Kyndra C; Cannon, Virginetta S; Tewolde, Teclemichael; Moreno, Carlos S; Ford, Byron D

    2013-02-01

    Microarray analysis has been used to understand how gene regulation plays a critical role in neuronal injury, survival and repair following ischemic stroke. To identify the transcriptional regulatory elements responsible for ischemia-induced gene expression, we examined gene expression profiles of rat brains following focal ischemia and performed computational analysis of consensus transcription factor binding sites (TFBS) in the genes of the dataset. In this study, rats were sacrificed 24 h after middle cerebral artery occlusion (MCAO) stroke and gene transcription in brain tissues following ischemia/reperfusion was examined using Affymetrix GeneChip technology. The CONserved transcription FACtor binding site (CONFAC) software package was used to identify over-represented TFBS in the upstream promoter regions of ischemia-induced genes compared to control datasets. CONFAC identified 12 TFBS that were statistically over-represented from our dataset of ischemia-induced genes, including three members of the Ets-1 family of transcription factors (TFs). Microarray results showed that mRNA for Ets-1 was increased following tMCAO but not pMCAO. Immunohistochemical analysis of Ets-1 protein in rat brains following MCAO showed that Ets-1 was highly expressed in neurons in the brain of sham control animals. Ets-1 protein expression was virtually abolished in injured neurons of the ischemic brain but was unchanged in peri-infarct brain areas. These data indicate that TFs, including Ets-1, may influence neuronal injury following ischemia. These findings could provide important insights into the mechanisms that lead to brain injury and could provide avenues for the development of novel therapies. PMID:23246490

  17. INO80-dependent regression of ecdysone-induced transcriptional responses regulates developmental timing in Drosophila.

    PubMed

    Neuman, Sarah D; Ihry, Robert J; Gruetzmacher, Kelly M; Bashirullah, Arash

    2014-03-15

    Sequential pulses of the steroid hormone ecdysone regulate the major developmental transitions in Drosophila, and the duration of each developmental stage is determined by the length of time between ecdysone pulses. Ecdysone regulates biological responses by directly initiating target gene transcription. In turn, these transcriptional responses are known to be self-limiting, with mechanisms in place to ensure regression of hormone-dependent transcription. However, the biological significance of these transcriptional repression mechanisms remains unclear. Here we show that the chromatin remodeling protein INO80 facilitates transcriptional repression of ecdysone-regulated genes during prepupal development. In ino80 mutant animals, inefficient repression of transcriptional responses to the late larval ecdysone pulse delays the onset of the subsequent prepupal ecdysone pulse, resulting in a significantly longer prepupal stage. Conversely, increased expression of ino80 is sufficient to shorten the prepupal stage by increasing the rate of transcriptional repression. Furthermore, we demonstrate that enhancing the rate of regression of the mid-prepupal competence factor βFTZ-F1 is sufficient to determine the timing of head eversion and thus the duration of prepupal development. Although ino80 is conserved from yeast to humans, this study represents the first characterization of a bona fide ino80 mutation in any metazoan, raising the possibility that the functions of ino80 in transcriptional repression and developmental timing are evolutionarily conserved. PMID:24468295

  18. Atrophy, hypertrophy, and hypoxemia induce transcriptional regulators of the ubiquitin proteasome system in the rat heart

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    In skeletal muscle, transcript levels of proteins regulating the ubiquitin proteasome system (UPS) increase with atrophy and decrease with hypertrophy. Whether the same is true for heart muscle is not known. We set out to characterize the transcriptional profile of regulators of the UPS during atrop...

  19. Transcriptional read-through is not sufficient to induce an epigenetic switch in the silencing activity of Polycomb response elements

    PubMed Central

    Erokhin, Maksim; Elizar’ev, Pavel; Parshikov, Aleksander; Schedl, Paul; Georgiev, Pavel; Chetverina, Darya

    2015-01-01

    In Drosophila, Polycomb (PcG) and Trithorax (TrxG) group proteins are assembled on Polycomb response elements (PREs) to maintain tissue and stage-specific patterns of gene expression. Critical to coordinating gene expression with the process of differentiation, the activity of PREs can be switched “on” and “off.” When on, the PRE imposes a silenced state on the genes in the same domain that is stably inherited through multiple rounds of cell division. When the PRE is switched off, the domain is in a state permissive for gene expression that can be stably inherited. Previous studies have suggested that a burst of transcription through a PRE sequence displaces PcG proteins and provides a universal mechanism for inducing a heritable switch in PRE activity from on to off; however, the evidence favoring this model is indirect. Here, we have directly tested the transcriptional read-through mechanism. Contrary to previous suggestions, we show that transcription through the PRE is not sufficient for inducing an epigenetic switch in PRE activity. In fact, even high levels of continuous transcription through a PRE fails to dislodge the PcG proteins, nor does it remove repressive histone marks. Our results indicate that other mechanisms involving adjacent DNA regulatory elements must be implicated in heritable switch of PRE activity. PMID:26504232

  20. The hnRNP-Htt axis regulates necrotic cell death induced by transcriptional repression through impaired RNA splicing

    PubMed Central

    Mao, Y; Tamura, T; Yuki, Y; Abe, D; Tamada, Y; Imoto, S; Tanaka, H; Homma, H; Tagawa, K; Miyano, S; Okazawa, H

    2016-01-01

    In this study, we identify signaling network of necrotic cell death induced by transcriptional repression (TRIAD) by α-amanitin (AMA), the selective RNA polymerase II inhibitor, as a model of neurodegenerative cell death. We performed genetic screen of a knockdown (KD) fly library by measuring the ratio of transformation from pupa to larva (PL ratio) under TRIAD, and selected the cell death-promoting genes. Systems biology analysis of the positive genes mapped on protein–protein interaction databases predicted the signaling network of TRIAD and the core pathway including heterogeneous nuclear ribonucleoproteins (hnRNPs) and huntingtin (Htt). RNA sequencing revealed that AMA impaired transcription and RNA splicing of Htt, which is known as an endoplasmic reticulum (ER)-stabilizing molecule. The impairment in RNA splicing and PL ratio was rescued by overexpresion of hnRNP that had been also affected by transcriptional repression. Fly genetics with suppressor or expresser of Htt and hnRNP worsened or ameliorated the decreased PL ratio by AMA, respectively. Collectively, these results suggested involvement of RNA splicing and a regulatory role of the hnRNP-Htt axis in the process of the transcriptional repression-induced necrosis. PMID:27124581

  1. Manganese Superoxide Dismutase Gene Expression Is Induced by Nanog and Oct4, Essential Pluripotent Stem Cells' Transcription Factors.

    PubMed

    Solari, Claudia; Vázquez Echegaray, Camila; Cosentino, María Soledad; Petrone, María Victoria; Waisman, Ariel; Luzzani, Carlos; Francia, Marcos; Villodre, Emilly; Lenz, Guido; Miriuka, Santiago; Barañao, Lino; Guberman, Alejandra

    2015-01-01

    Pluripotent stem cells possess complex systems that protect them from oxidative stress and ensure genomic stability, vital for their role in development. Even though it has been reported that antioxidant activity diminishes along stem cell differentiation, little is known about the transcriptional regulation of the involved genes. The reported modulation of some of these genes led us to hypothesize that some of them could be regulated by the transcription factors critical for self-renewal and pluripotency in embryonic stem cells (ESCs) and in induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs). In this work, we studied the expression profile of multiple genes involved in antioxidant defense systems in both ESCs and iPSCs. We found that Manganese superoxide dismutase gene (Mn-Sod/Sod2) was repressed during diverse differentiation protocols showing an expression pattern similar to Nanog gene. Moreover, Sod2 promoter activity was induced by Oct4 and Nanog when we performed a transactivation assay using two different reporter constructions. Finally, we studied Sod2 gene regulation by modulating the expression of Oct4 and Nanog in ESCs by shRNAs and found that downregulation of any of them reduced Sod2 expression. Our results indicate that pluripotency transcription factors positively modulate Sod2 gene transcription. PMID:26642061

  2. Manganese Superoxide Dismutase Gene Expression Is Induced by Nanog and Oct4, Essential Pluripotent Stem Cells’ Transcription Factors

    PubMed Central

    Solari, Claudia; Vázquez Echegaray, Camila; Cosentino, María Soledad; Petrone, María Victoria; Waisman, Ariel; Luzzani, Carlos; Francia, Marcos; Villodre, Emilly; Lenz, Guido; Miriuka, Santiago; Barañao, Lino; Guberman, Alejandra

    2015-01-01

    Pluripotent stem cells possess complex systems that protect them from oxidative stress and ensure genomic stability, vital for their role in development. Even though it has been reported that antioxidant activity diminishes along stem cell differentiation, little is known about the transcriptional regulation of the involved genes. The reported modulation of some of these genes led us to hypothesize that some of them could be regulated by the transcription factors critical for self-renewal and pluripotency in embryonic stem cells (ESCs) and in induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs). In this work, we studied the expression profile of multiple genes involved in antioxidant defense systems in both ESCs and iPSCs. We found that Manganese superoxide dismutase gene (Mn-Sod/Sod2) was repressed during diverse differentiation protocols showing an expression pattern similar to Nanog gene. Moreover, Sod2 promoter activity was induced by Oct4 and Nanog when we performed a transactivation assay using two different reporter constructions. Finally, we studied Sod2 gene regulation by modulating the expression of Oct4 and Nanog in ESCs by shRNAs and found that downregulation of any of them reduced Sod2 expression. Our results indicate that pluripotency transcription factors positively modulate Sod2 gene transcription. PMID:26642061

  3. The hnRNP-Htt axis regulates necrotic cell death induced by transcriptional repression through impaired RNA splicing.

    PubMed

    Mao, Y; Tamura, T; Yuki, Y; Abe, D; Tamada, Y; Imoto, S; Tanaka, H; Homma, H; Tagawa, K; Miyano, S; Okazawa, H

    2016-01-01

    In this study, we identify signaling network of necrotic cell death induced by transcriptional repression (TRIAD) by α-amanitin (AMA), the selective RNA polymerase II inhibitor, as a model of neurodegenerative cell death. We performed genetic screen of a knockdown (KD) fly library by measuring the ratio of transformation from pupa to larva (PL ratio) under TRIAD, and selected the cell death-promoting genes. Systems biology analysis of the positive genes mapped on protein-protein interaction databases predicted the signaling network of TRIAD and the core pathway including heterogeneous nuclear ribonucleoproteins (hnRNPs) and huntingtin (Htt). RNA sequencing revealed that AMA impaired transcription and RNA splicing of Htt, which is known as an endoplasmic reticulum (ER)-stabilizing molecule. The impairment in RNA splicing and PL ratio was rescued by overexpresion of hnRNP that had been also affected by transcriptional repression. Fly genetics with suppressor or expresser of Htt and hnRNP worsened or ameliorated the decreased PL ratio by AMA, respectively. Collectively, these results suggested involvement of RNA splicing and a regulatory role of the hnRNP-Htt axis in the process of the transcriptional repression-induced necrosis. PMID:27124581

  4. RNA polymerase II transcription is required for human papillomavirus type 16 E7- and hydroxyurea-induced centriole overduplication.

    PubMed

    Duensing, A; Liu, Y; Spardy, N; Bartoli, K; Tseng, M; Kwon, J-A; Teng, X; Duensing, S

    2007-01-11

    Aberrant centrosome numbers are detected in virtually all human cancers where they can contribute to chromosomal instability by promoting mitotic spindle abnormalities. Despite their widespread occurrence, the molecular mechanisms that underlie centrosome amplification are only beginning to emerge. Here, we present evidence for a novel regulatory circuit involved in centrosome overduplication that centers on RNA polymerase II (pol II). We found that human papillomavirus type 16 E7 (HPV-16 E7)- and hydroxyurea (HU)-induced centriole overduplication are abrogated by alpha-amanitin, a potent and specific RNA pol II inhibitor. In contrast, normal centriole duplication proceeded undisturbed in alpha-amanitin-treated cells. Centriole overduplication was significantly reduced by siRNA-mediated knock down of CREB-binding protein (CBP), a transcriptional co-activator. We identified cyclin A2 as a key transcriptional target of RNA pol II during HU-induced centriole overduplication. Collectively, our results show that ongoing RNA pol II transcription is required for centriole overduplication whereas it may be dispensable for normal centriole duplication. Given that many chemotherapeutic agents function through inhibition of transcription, our results may help to develop strategies to target centrosome-mediated chromosomal instability for cancer therapy and prevention. PMID:16819507

  5. LKB1 tumor suppressor and salt-inducible kinases negatively regulate human T-cell leukemia virus type 1 transcription

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Human T-cell leukemia virus type 1 (HTLV-1) causes adult T-cell leukemia (ATL). Treatment options are limited and prophylactic agents are not available. We have previously demonstrated an essential role for CREB-regulating transcriptional coactivators (CRTCs) in HTLV-1 transcription. Results In this study we report on the negative regulatory role of LKB1 tumor suppressor and salt-inducible kinases (SIKs) in the activation of HTLV-1 long terminal repeats (LTR) by the oncoprotein Tax. Activation of LKB1 and SIKs effectively blunted Tax activity in a phosphorylation-dependent manner, whereas compromising these kinases, but not AMP-dependent protein kinases, augmented Tax function. Activated LKB1 and SIKs associated with Tax and suppressed Tax-induced LTR activation by counteracting CRTCs and CREB. Enforced expression of LKB1 or SIK1 in cells transfected with HTLV-1 molecular clone pX1MT repressed proviral transcription. On the contrary, depletion of LKB1 in pX1MT-transfected cells and in HTLV-1-transformed T cells boosted the expression of Tax. Treatment of HTLV-1 transformed cells with metformin led to LKB1/SIK1 activation, reduction in Tax expression, and inhibition of cell proliferation. Conclusions Our findings revealed a new function of LKB1 and SIKs as negative regulators of HTLV-1 transcription. Pharmaceutical activation of LKB1 and SIKs might be considered as a new strategy in anti-HTLV-1 and anti-ATL therapy. PMID:23577667

  6. Stimulus-induced modulation of transcriptional bursting in a single mammalian gene.

    PubMed

    Molina, Nacho; Suter, David M; Cannavo, Rosamaria; Zoller, Benjamin; Gotic, Ivana; Naef, Félix

    2013-12-17

    Mammalian genes are often transcribed discontinuously as short bursts of RNA synthesis followed by longer silent periods. However, how these "on" and "off" transitions, together with the burst sizes, are modulated in single cells to increase gene expression upon stimulation is poorly characterized. By combining single-cell time-lapse luminescence imaging with stochastic modeling of the time traces, we quantified the transcriptional responses of the endogenous connective tissue growth factor gene to different physiological stimuli: serum and TGF-β1. Both stimuli caused a rapid and acute increase in burst sizes. Whereas TGF-β1 showed prolonged transcriptional activation mediated by an increase of transcription rate, serum stimulation resulted in a large and temporally tight first transcriptional burst, followed by a refractory period in the range of hours. Our study thus reveals how different physiological stimuli can trigger kinetically distinct transcriptional responses of the same gene. PMID:24297917

  7. A novel PRD I and TG binding activity involved in virus-induced transcription of IFN-A genes.

    PubMed Central

    Génin, P; Bragança, J; Darracq, N; Doly, J; Civas, A

    1995-01-01

    Comparative analysis of the inducible elements of the mouse interferon A4 and A11 gene promoters (IE-A4 and IE-A11) by transient transfection experiments, DNase 1 footprinting and electrophoretic mobility shift assays resulted in identification of a virus-induced binding activity suggested to be involved in NDV-induced activation of transcription of these genes. The virus-induced factor, termed VIF, is activated early by contact of virions with cells. It specifically recognizes the PRD I-like domain shared by both inducible elements, as well as the TG-like domain of IE-A4. This factor, distinct from the IRF-1, IRF-2 and the alpha F1 binding proteins and presenting a different affinity pattern from that of the TG protein, is proposed as a candidate for IFN-type I gene regulation. Images PMID:8559665

  8. Signal transducers and activators of transcription 3 (STAT3) inhibits transcription of the inducible nitric oxide synthase gene by interacting with nuclear factor kappaB.

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Zhiyuan; Zhang, Wenzheng; Kone, Bruce C

    2002-01-01

    Prolific generation of NO by inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS) can cause unintended injury to host cells during glomerulonephritis and other inflammatory diseases. While much is known about the mechanisms of iNOS induction, few transcriptional repressors have been found. We explored the role of signal transducers and activators of transcription 3 (STAT3) proteins in interleukin (IL)-1beta- and lipopolysaccharide (LPS)+interferon (IFN)-gamma-mediated iNOS induction in murine mesangial cells. Both stimuli induced rapid phosphorylation of STAT3 and sequence-specific STAT3 DNA-binding activity. Supershift assays with a STAT3 element probe demonstrated that nuclear factor kappaB (NF-kappaB) p65 and p50 complexed with STAT3 in the DNA-protein complex. The direct interaction of STAT3 and NF-kappaB p65 was verified in vivo by co-immunoprecipitation and in vitro by pull-down assays with glutathione S-transferase-NF-kappaB p65 fusion protein and in vitro -translated STAT3alpha. Overexpression of STAT3 dramatically inhibited IL-1beta- or LPS+IFN-gamma-mediated induction of iNOS promoter-luciferase constructs that contained the wild-type iNOS promoter or ones harbouring mutated STAT-binding elements. In tests of indirect inhibitory effects of STAT3, overexpression of STAT3 dramatically inhibited the activity of an NF-kappaB-dependent promoter devoid of STAT-binding elements without affecting NF-kappaB DNA-binding activity. Thus STAT3, via direct interactions with NF-kappaB p65, serves as a dominant-negative inhibitor of NF-kappaB activity to suppress indirectly cytokine induction of the iNOS promoter in mesangial cells. These results provide a new model for the termination of NO production by activated iNOS following exposure to pro-inflammatory stimuli. PMID:12057007

  9. Expression profiling of genes regulated by Fra-1/AP-1 transcription factor during bleomycin-induced pulmonary fibrosis

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background The Fra-1/AP-1 transcription factor regulates the expression of genes controlling various processes including migration, invasion, and survival as well as extracellular remodeling. We recently demonstrated that loss of Fra-1 leads to exacerbated bleomycin-induced pulmonary fibrosis, accompanied by enhanced expression of various inflammatory and fibrotic genes. To better understand the molecular mechanisms by which Fra-1 confers protection during bleomycin-induced lung injury, genome-wide mRNA expression profiling was performed. Results We found that Fra-1 regulates gene expression programs that include: 1) several cytokines and chemokines involved in inflammation, 2) several genes involved in the extracellular remodeling and cell adhesion, and 3) several genes involved in programmed cell death. Conclusion Loss of Fra-1 leads to the enhanced expression of genes regulating inflammation and immune responses and decreased the expression of genes involved in apoptosis, suggesting that this transcription factor distinctly modulates early pro-fibrotic cellular responses. PMID:23758685

  10. Calorie restriction in humans inhibits the PI3K/AKT pathway and induces a younger transcription profile

    PubMed Central

    Mercken, Evi M.; Crosby, Seth D.; Lamming, Dudley W.; JeBailey, Lellean; Krzysik-Walker, Susan; Villareal, Dennis; Capri, Miriam; Franceschi, Claudio; Zhang, Yongqing; Becker, Kevin; Sabatini, David M.; de Cabo, Rafael; Fontana, Luigi

    2013-01-01

    Summary Caloric restriction (CR) and down-regulation of the insulin/IGF pathway are the most robust interventions known to increase longevity in lower organisms. However, little is known about the molecular adaptations induced by CR in humans. Here we report that long-term CR in humans inhibits the IGF-1/insulin pathway in skeletal muscle, a key metabolic tissue. We also demonstrate that CR-induced dramatic changes of the skeletal muscle transcriptional profile that resemble those of younger individuals. Finally, in both rats and humans CR evoked similar responses in the transcriptional profiles of skeletal muscle. This common signature consisted of three key pathways typically associated with longevity: IGF-1/insulin signaling, mitochondrial biogenesis and inflammation. Furthermore, our data identifies promising pathways for therapeutic targets to combat age-related diseases and promote health in humans. PMID:23601134

  11. Pivotal roles of p53 transcription-dependent and -independent pathways in manganese-induced mitochondrial dysfunction and neuronal apoptosis

    SciTech Connect

    Wan, Chunhua; Ma, Xa; Shi, Shangshi; Zhao, Jianya; Nie, Xiaoke; Han, Jingling; Xiao, Jing; Wang, Xiaoke; Jiang, Shengyang; Jiang, Junkang

    2014-12-15

    Chronic exposure to excessive manganese (Mn) has been known to lead to neuronal loss and a clinical syndrome resembling idiopathic Parkinson's disease (IPD). p53 plays an integral role in the development of various human diseases, including neurodegenerative disorders. However, the role of p53 in Mn-induced neuronal apoptosis and neurological deficits remains obscure. In the present study, we showed that p53 was critically involved in Mn-induced neuronal apoptosis in rat striatum through both transcription-dependent and -independent mechanisms. Western blot and immunohistochemistrical analyses revealed that p53 was remarkably upregulated in the striatum of rats following Mn exposure. Coincidentally, increased level of cleaved PARP, a hallmark of apoptosis, was observed. Furthermore, using nerve growth factor (NGF)-differentiated PC12 cells as a neuronal cell model, we showed that Mn exposure decreased cell viability and induced apparent apoptosis. Importantly, p53 was progressively upregulated, and accumulated in both the nucleus and the cytoplasm. The cytoplasmic p53 had a remarkable distribution in mitochondria, suggesting an involvement of p53 mitochondrial translocation in Mn-induced neuronal apoptosis. In addition, Mn-induced impairment of mitochondrial membrane potential (ΔΨm) could be partially rescued by pretreatment with inhibitors of p53 transcriptional activity and p53 mitochondrial translocation, Pifithrin-α (PFT-α) and Pifithrin-μ (PFT-μ), respectively. Moreover, blockage of p53 activities with PFT-α and PFT-μ significantly attenuated Mn-induced reactive oxidative stress (ROS) generation and mitochondrial H{sub 2}O{sub 2} production. Finally, we observed that pretreatment with PFT-α and PFT-μ ameliorated Mn-induced apoptosis in PC12 cells. Collectively, these findings implicate that p53 transcription-dependent and -independent pathways may play crucial roles in the regulation of Mn-induced neuronal death. - Highlights: • p53 is robustly

  12. Assessing Concordance of Drug-Induced Transcriptional Response in Rodent Liver and Cultured Hepatocytes

    PubMed Central

    Sutherland, Jeffrey J.; Jolly, Robert A.; Goldstein, Keith M.; Stevens, James L.

    2016-01-01

    The effect of drugs, disease and other perturbations on mRNA levels are studied using gene expression microarrays or RNA-seq, with the goal of understanding molecular effects arising from the perturbation. Previous comparisons of reproducibility across laboratories have been limited in scale and focused on a single model. The use of model systems, such as cultured primary cells or cancer cell lines, assumes that mechanistic insights derived from the models would have been observed via in vivo studies. We examined the concordance of compound-induced transcriptional changes using data from several sources: rat liver and rat primary hepatocytes (RPH) from Drug Matrix (DM) and open TG-GATEs (TG), human primary hepatocytes (HPH) from TG, and mouse liver / HepG2 results from the Gene Expression Omnibus (GEO) repository. Gene expression changes for treatments were normalized to controls and analyzed with three methods: 1) gene level for 9071 high expression genes in rat liver, 2) gene set analysis (GSA) using canonical pathways and gene ontology sets, 3) weighted gene co-expression network analysis (WGCNA). Co-expression networks performed better than genes or GSA when comparing treatment effects within rat liver and rat vs. mouse liver. Genes and modules performed similarly at Connectivity Map-style analyses, where success at identifying similar treatments among a collection of reference profiles is the goal. Comparisons between rat liver and RPH, and those between RPH, HPH and HepG2 cells reveal lower concordance for all methods. We observe that the baseline state of untreated cultured cells relative to untreated rat liver shows striking similarity with toxicant-exposed cells in vivo, indicating that gross systems level perturbation in the underlying networks in culture may contribute to the low concordance. PMID:27028627

  13. Assessing Concordance of Drug-Induced Transcriptional Response in Rodent Liver and Cultured Hepatocytes.

    PubMed

    Sutherland, Jeffrey J; Jolly, Robert A; Goldstein, Keith M; Stevens, James L

    2016-03-01

    The effect of drugs, disease and other perturbations on mRNA levels are studied using gene expression microarrays or RNA-seq, with the goal of understanding molecular effects arising from the perturbation. Previous comparisons of reproducibility across laboratories have been limited in scale and focused on a single model. The use of model systems, such as cultured primary cells or cancer cell lines, assumes that mechanistic insights derived from the models would have been observed via in vivo studies. We examined the concordance of compound-induced transcriptional changes using data from several sources: rat liver and rat primary hepatocytes (RPH) from Drug Matrix (DM) and open TG-GATEs (TG), human primary hepatocytes (HPH) from TG, and mouse liver/HepG2 results from the Gene Expression Omnibus (GEO) repository. Gene expression changes for treatments were normalized to controls and analyzed with three methods: 1) gene level for 9071 high expression genes in rat liver, 2) gene set analysis (GSA) using canonical pathways and gene ontology sets, 3) weighted gene co-expression network analysis (WGCNA). Co-expression networks performed better than genes or GSA when comparing treatment effects within rat liver and rat vs. mouse liver. Genes and modules performed similarly at Connectivity Map-style analyses, where success at identifying similar treatments among a collection of reference profiles is the goal. Comparisons between rat liver and RPH, and those between RPH, HPH and HepG2 cells reveal lower concordance for all methods. We observe that the baseline state of untreated cultured cells relative to untreated rat liver shows striking similarity with toxicant-exposed cells in vivo, indicating that gross systems level perturbation in the underlying networks in culture may contribute to the low concordance. PMID:27028627

  14. The Case of a Zebra That Was Misdiagnosed as a Horse: Pulmonary Tumor Thrombotic Microangiopathy, a New Paraneoplastic Syndrome, Mimicking PD-1-Induced Pneumonitis

    PubMed Central

    Carter, Corey A.; Browning, Robert; Oronsky, Bryan T.; Scicinski, Jan J.; Brzezniak, Christina

    2016-01-01

    A case report of a 47-year-old woman with triple-negative breast cancer on a clinical trial called PRIMETIME (NCT02518958) who received the anti-PD-1 inhibitor nivolumab and the experimental anticancer agent RRx-001 is presented. Although initially diagnosed and treated for anti-PD-1-induced pneumonitis, clinical and radiological abnormalities triggered further investigation, leading to the diagnosis of pulmonary tumor thrombotic microangiopathy (PTTM). This example highlights the importance of exercising due diligence in determining immune-related adverse events and suggests that PD-1-induced pneumonitis should be a diagnosis of exclusion rather than a diagnosis by default. A case history and review of the literature are presented for PTTM, which we propose to define as a paraneoplastic syndrome. PMID:26933422

  15. The transcription factor LEF-1 induces an epithelial–mesenchymal transition in MDCK cells independent of β-catenin

    SciTech Connect

    Kobayashi, Wakako; Ozawa, Masayuki

    2013-12-06

    Highlights: •The transcription factor LEF-1 induces an EMT in MDCK cells. •A mutant LEF-1 that cannot interact with β-catenin retained the ability. •The nuclear function of β-catenin was not necessary for the LEF-1-induced EMT. •The mRNA levels of Slug, ZEB1, and ZEB2 increased significantly in these cells. -- Abstract: The epithelial–mesenchymal transition (EMT), a key process in the tumor metastatic cascade, is characterized by the loss of cell–cell junctions and cell polarity, as well as the acquisition of migratory and invasive properties. LEF-1 is a member of the lymphoid enhancer-binding factor/T-cell factor (LEF/TCF) family of DNA-binding transcription factors, which interact with nuclear β-catenin and act as central transcriptional mediators of Wnt signaling. To investigate the role of LEF-1 in EMT, we generated stable LEF-1 transfectants using MDCK cells. The transfectants had a spindle-shaped mesenchymal morphology, and enhanced migration and invasiveness relative to control cells. These EMT changes were accompanied by the downregulation of an epithelial marker protein, E-cadherin, and the upregulation of mesenchymal marker proteins, vimentin and N-cadherin. Consistent with these observations, the mRNA levels of Slug, ZEB1, and ZEB2—EMT-related transcription factors—increased significantly. Although the N-terminally deleted mutant LEF-1 cannot interact with β-catenin, it retained the ability to induce EMT. Consistent with these observations, neither the expression of a dominant negative β-catenin/engrailed chimera, nor the expression of a cytoplasmic domain of E-cadherin that sequesters β-catenin from binding to LEF/TCF, reversed LEF-1-induced EMT. Together, these data indicated that the nuclear function of β-catenin was not necessary for the induction of Slug, ZEB1, and ZEB2 expression leading to EMT.

  16. Nitrogen Supply Influences Herbivore-Induced Direct and Indirect Defenses and Transcriptional Responses in Nicotiana attenuata[w

    PubMed Central

    Lou, Yonggen; Baldwin, Ian T.

    2004-01-01

    Although nitrogen (N) availability is known to alter constitutive resistance against herbivores, its influence on herbivore-induced responses, including signaling pathways, transcriptional signatures, and the subsequently elicited chemical defenses is poorly understood. We used the native tobacco, Nicotiana attenuata, which germinates in the postfire environment and copes with large changes in soil N during postfire succession, to compare a suite of Manduca sexta- and elicitor-induced responses in plants grown under high- and low-N (LN) supply rates. LN supply decreased relative growth rates and biomass by 35% at 40 d compared to high-N plants; furthermore, it also attenuated (by 39 and 60%) the elicitor-induced jasmonate and salicylate bursts, two N-intensive direct defenses (nicotine and trypsin proteinase inhibitors, albeit by different mechanisms), and carbon-containing nonvolatile defenses (rutin, chlorogenic acid, and diterpene glycosides), but did not affect the induced release of volatiles (cis-α-bergamotene and germacrene A), which function as indirect defenses. M. sexta and methyl jasmonate-induced transcriptional responses measured with a microarray enriched in herbivore-induced genes were also substantially reduced in plants grown under LN supply rates. In M. sexta-attacked LN plants, only 36 (45%) up-regulated and 46 (58%) down-regulated genes showed the same regulation as those in attacked high-N plants. However, transcriptional responses frequently directly countered the observed metabolic changes. Changes in a leaf's sensitivity to elicitation, an attacked leaf's waning ability to export oxylipin wound signals, and/or resource limitations in LN plants can account for the observed results, underscoring the conclusion that defense activation is a resource-intensive response. PMID:15133153

  17. Estrogen induced concentration dependent differential gene expression in human breast cancer (MCF7) cells: Role of transcription factors

    SciTech Connect

    Chandrasekharan, Sabarinath; Kandasamy, Krishna Kumar; Dayalan, Pavithra; Ramamurthy, Viraragavan

    2013-08-02

    Highlights: •Estradiol (E2) at low dose induced cell proliferation in breast cancer cells. •E2 at high concentration induced cell stress in breast cancer cells. •Estrogen receptor physically interacts only with a few transcription factors. •Differential expression of genes with Oct-1 binding sites increased under stress. •Transcription factor binding sites showed distinct spatial distribution on genes. -- Abstract: Background: Breast cancer cells respond to estrogen in a concentration dependent fashion, resulting in proliferation or apoptosis. The mechanism of this concentration dependent differential outcome is not well understood yet. Methodology: Meta-analysis of the expression data of MCF7 cells treated with low (1 nM) or high (100 nM) dose of estradiol (E2) was performed. We identified genes differentially expressed at the low or the high dose, and examined the nature of regulatory elements in the vicinity of these genes. Specifically, we looked for the difference in the presence, abundance and spatial distribution of binding sites for estrogen receptor (ER) and selected transcription factors (TFs) in the genomic region up to 25 kb upstream and downstream from the transcription start site (TSS) of these genes. Results: It was observed that at high dose E2 induced the expression of stress responsive genes, while at low dose, genes involved in cell cycle were induced. We found that the occurrence of transcription factor binding regions (TFBRs) for certain factors such as Sp1 and SREBP1 were higher on regulatory regions of genes expressed at low dose. At high concentration of E2, genes with a higher frequency of Oct-1 binding regions were predominantly involved. In addition, there were differences in the spatial distribution pattern of the TFBRs in the genomic regions among the two sets of genes. Discussion: E2 induced predominantly proliferative/metabolic response at low concentrations; but at high concentration, stress–rescue responses were induced

  18. A viral satellite DNA vector-induced transcriptional gene silencing via DNA methylation of gene promoter in Nicotiana benthamiana.

    PubMed

    Ju, Zheng; Wang, Lei; Cao, Dongyan; Zuo, Jinhua; Zhu, Hongliang; Fu, Daqi; Luo, Yunbo; Zhu, Benzhong

    2016-09-01

    Virus-induced gene silencing (VIGS) has been widely used for plant functional genomics study at the post-transcriptional level using various DNA or RNA viral vectors. However, while virus-induced transcriptional gene silencing (VITGS) via DNA methylation of gene promoter was achieved using several plant RNA viral vectors, it has not yet been done using a satellite DNA viral vector. In this study, a viral satellite DNA associated with tomato yellow leaf curl China virus (TYLCCNV), which has been modified as a VIGS vector in previous research, was developed as a VITGS vector. Firstly, the viral satellite DNA VIGS vector was further optimized to a more convenient p1.7A+2mβ vector with high silencing efficiency of the phytoene desaturase (PDS) gene in Nicotiana benthamiana plants. Secondly, the constructed VITGS vector (TYLCCNV:35S), which carried a portion of the cauliflower mosaic virus 35S promoter, could successfully induce heritable transcriptional gene silencing (TGS) of the green fluorescent protein (GFP) gene in the 35S-GFP transgenic N. benthamiana line 16c plants. Moreover, bisulfite sequencing results revealed higher methylated cytosine residues at CG, CHG and CHH sites of the 35S promoter sequence in TYLCCNV:35S-inoculated plants than in TYLCCNV-inoculated line 16c plants (control). Overall, these results demonstrated that the viral satellite DNA vector could be used as an effective VITGS vector to study DNA methylation in plant genomes. PMID:27422476

  19. Inheritance and memory of stress-induced epigenome change: roles played by the ATF-2 family of transcription factors

    PubMed Central

    Seong, Ki-Hyeon; Maekawa, Toshio; Ishii, Shunsuke

    2012-01-01

    Data on the inheritance-of-stress effect have been accumulating and some mechanistic insights, such as epigenetic regulation, have also been suggested. In particular, the modern view of Lamarckian inheritance appears to be affected by the finding that stress-induced epigenetic changes can be inherited. This review summarizes the current data on the inheritance of stress effect and possible mechanisms involved in this process. In particular, we focus on the stress-induced epigenetic changes mediated by the ATF-2 family of transcription factors. PMID:22380515

  20. A wheat salinity-induced WRKY transcription factor TaWRKY93 confers multiple abiotic stress tolerance in Arabidopsis thaliana.

    PubMed

    Qin, Yuxiang; Tian, Yanchen; Liu, Xiuzhi

    2015-08-21

    Wheat is an important crop in the world. But most of the cultivars are salt sensitive, and often adversely affected by salt stress. WRKY transcription factors play a major role in plant responses to salt stress, but the effective salinity regulatory WRKYs identified in bread wheat are limited and the mechanism of salt stress tolerance is also not well explored. Here, we identified a salt (NaCl) induced class II WRKY transcription factor TaWRKY93. Its transcript level was strongly induced by salt (NaCl) and exogenous abscisic acid (ABA). Over-expression of TaWRKY93 in Arabidopsis thaliana enhanced salt (NaCl), drought, low temperature and osmotic (mannitol) stress tolerance, mainly demonstrated by transgenic plants forming longer primary roots or more lateral roots on MS plates supplemented with NaCl and mannitol individually, higher survival rate under drought and low temperature stress. Further, transgenic plants maintained a more proline content, higher relative water content and less electrolyte leakage than the wild type plants. The transcript abundance of a series of abiotic stress-related genes was up-regulated in the TaWRKY93 transgenic plants. In summary, TaWRKY93 is a new positive regulator of abiotic stress, it may increase salinity, drought and low temperature stress tolerance through enhancing osmotic adjustment, maintaining membrane stability and increasing transcription of stress related genes, and contribute to the superior agricultural traits of SR3 through promoting root development. It can be used as a candidate gene for wheat transgenic engineering breeding against abiotic stress. PMID:26106823

  1. Sense Transgene-Induced Post-Transcriptional Gene Silencing in Tobacco Compromises the Splicing of Endogenous Counterpart Genes

    PubMed Central

    Shin, Mi-Rae; Natsuume, Masaya; Matsumoto, Takashi; Hanaoka, Mitsumasa; Imai, Misaki; Iijima, Ken; Oka, Shin-ichiro; Adachi, Eri; Kodama, Hiroaki

    2014-01-01

    Sense transgene-induced post-transcriptional gene silencing (S-PTGS) is thought to be a type of RNA silencing in which ARGONAUTE1 directs the small interfering RNA (siRNA)-mediated cleavage of a target mRNA in the cytoplasm. Here, we report that the altered splicing of endogenous counterpart genes is a main cause for the reduction of their mature mRNA levels. After the S-PTGS of a tobacco endoplasmic reticulum ω-3 fatty acid desaturase (NtFAD3) gene, 3′-truncated, polyadenylated endo-NtFAD3 transcripts and 5′-truncated, intron-containing endo-NtFAD3 transcripts were detected in the total RNA fraction. Although transcription proceeded until the last exon of the endogenous NtFAD3 gene, intron-containing NtFAD3 transcripts accumulated in the nucleus of the S-PTGS plants. Several intron-containing NtFAD3 transcripts harboring most of the exon sequences were generated when an endogenous silencing suppressor gene, rgs-CaM, was overexpressed in the S-PTGS plants. These intron-containing NtFAD3 splice variants were generated in the presence of NtFAD3 siRNAs that are homologous to the nucleotide sequences of these splice variants. The results of this study indicate that the inhibition of endo-NtFAD3 gene expression is primarily directed via the alteration of splicing and not by cytoplasmic slicer activity. Our results suggest that the transgene and intron-containing endogenous counterpart genes are differentially suppressed in S-PTGS plants. PMID:24586294

  2. Disseminated histoplasmosis mimicking secondary syphilis.

    PubMed

    Pastor, Tony A; Holcomb, Maura J; Motaparthi, Kiran; Grekin, Sarah J; Hsu, Sylvia

    2011-01-01

    A 34-year-old, HIV-positive man living in Texas presented with a 2-week history of fever, malaise, myalgias, oral ulcers, and papules on his chest, back, face, and extremities, including the palms. Initially secondary syphilis was suspected. However, RPR was negative. Histopathologic examination revealed a lymphocytic infiltrate with numerous intra-histiocytic fungal organisms. GMS and PAS stains were positive, consistent with the diagnosis of histoplasmosis. We report a case of disseminated histoplasmosis clinically mimicking secondary syphilis. PMID:22136866

  3. UVB-Induced Cell Death Signaling Is Associated with G1-S Progression and Transcription Inhibition in Primary Human Fibroblasts

    PubMed Central

    Ortolan, Tatiana Grohmann; Menck, Carlos Frederico M.

    2013-01-01

    DNA damage induced by ultraviolet (UV) radiation can be removed by nucleotide excision repair through two sub-pathways, one general (GGR) and the other specific for transcribed DNA (TCR), and the processing of unrepaired lesions trigger signals that may lead to cell death. These signals involve the tumor suppressor p53 protein, a central regulator of cell responses to DNA damage, and the E3 ubiquitin ligase Mdm2, that forms a feedback regulatory loop with p53. The involvement of cell cycle and transcription on the signaling to apoptosis was investigated in UVB-irradiated synchronized, DNA repair proficient, CS-B (TCR-deficient) and XP-C (GGR-deficient) primary human fibroblasts. Cells were irradiated in the G1 phase of the cell cycle, with two doses with equivalent levels of apoptosis (low and high), defined for each cell line. In the three cell lines, the low doses of UVB caused only a transient delay in progression to the S phase, whereas the high doses induced permanent cell cycle arrest. However, while accumulation of Mdm2 correlated well with the recovery from transcription inhibition at the low doses for normal and CS-B fibroblasts, for XP-C cells this protein was shown to be accumulated even at UVB doses that induced high levels of apoptosis. Thus, UVB-induced accumulation of Mdm2 is critical for counteracting p53 activation and apoptosis avoidance, but its effect is limited due to transcription inhibition. However, in the case of XP-C cells, an excess of unrepaired DNA damage would be sufficient to block S phase progression, which would signal to apoptosis, independent of Mdm2 accumulation. The data clearly discriminate DNA damage signals that lead to cell death, depending on the presence of UVB-induced DNA damage in replicating or transcribing regions. PMID:24155908

  4. SOCS1 suppresses IL-1β-induced C/EBPβ expression via transcriptional regulation in human chondrocytes

    PubMed Central

    Ha, You-Jung; Choi, Yong Seok; Kang, Eun Ha; Shin, Kichul; Kim, Tae Kyun; Song, Yeong Wook; Lee, Yun Jong

    2016-01-01

    CAAT/enhancer-binding protein-beta (C/EBPβ) is a transcription factor that regulates interleukin-1β (IL-1β)-induced catabolic pathways, including the expression of matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs), in chondrocytes. We previously reported that suppressor of cytokine signaling 1 (SOCS1) inhibits IL-1β signaling in chondrocytes. However, the effect of SOCS1 on C/EBPβ has not been explored. To investigate the interaction between SOCS1 and C/EBPβ, we established human SW1353 cells with overexpression or knockdown of SOCS1 or C/EBPβ. Both SOCS1 and C/EBPβ were involved in transcription of MMP-3 and MMP-13. When stimulated with IL-1β, C/EBPβ levels were significantly increased by SOCS1 knockdown and decreased by SOCS1 overexpression. A similar change in IL-1β-induced C/EBPβ expression was observed in SOCS1-transfected human articular chondrocytes. However, C/EBPβ overexpression or knockdown did not change the levels of IL-1β-induced SOCS1. SOCS1 regulated the levels of C/EBPβ mRNA by ubiquitination of C/EBPβ as well as transcriptional regulation. Furthermore, it suppressed the phosphorylation of cAMP response element-binding protein (CREB), an active transcription factor of C/EBPβ. In addition, p38 mitogen-activated protein kinases, a target of SOCS1, was involved in CREB phosphorylation. The chromatin immunoprecipitation assay confirmed that SOCS1 overexpression led to reduced binding of C/EBPβ to the MMP-13 promoter. Taken together, our results demonstrate that SOCS1 downregulates the p38-CREB-C/EBPβ pathway resulting in increased expression of MMPs in chondrocytes. PMID:27339399

  5. SOCS1 suppresses IL-1β-induced C/EBPβ expression via transcriptional regulation in human chondrocytes.

    PubMed

    Ha, You-Jung; Choi, Yong Seok; Kang, Eun Ha; Shin, Kichul; Kim, Tae Kyun; Song, Yeong Wook; Lee, Yun Jong

    2016-01-01

    CAAT/enhancer-binding protein-beta (C/EBPβ) is a transcription factor that regulates interleukin-1β (IL-1β)-induced catabolic pathways, including the expression of matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs), in chondrocytes. We previously reported that suppressor of cytokine signaling 1 (SOCS1) inhibits IL-1β signaling in chondrocytes. However, the effect of SOCS1 on C/EBPβ has not been explored. To investigate the interaction between SOCS1 and C/EBPβ, we established human SW1353 cells with overexpression or knockdown of SOCS1 or C/EBPβ. Both SOCS1 and C/EBPβ were involved in transcription of MMP-3 and MMP-13. When stimulated with IL-1β, C/EBPβ levels were significantly increased by SOCS1 knockdown and decreased by SOCS1 overexpression. A similar change in IL-1β-induced C/EBPβ expression was observed in SOCS1-transfected human articular chondrocytes. However, C/EBPβ overexpression or knockdown did not change the levels of IL-1β-induced SOCS1. SOCS1 regulated the levels of C/EBPβ mRNA by ubiquitination of C/EBPβ as well as transcriptional regulation. Furthermore, it suppressed the phosphorylation of cAMP response element-binding protein (CREB), an active transcription factor of C/EBPβ. In addition, p38 mitogen-activated protein kinases, a target of SOCS1, was involved in CREB phosphorylation. The chromatin immunoprecipitation assay confirmed that SOCS1 overexpression led to reduced binding of C/EBPβ to the MMP-13 promoter. Taken together, our results demonstrate that SOCS1 downregulates the p38-CREB-C/EBPβ pathway resulting in increased expression of MMPs in chondrocytes. PMID:27339399

  6. Contribution of transcript stability to a conserved procyanidin-induced cytokine response in γδT cells1

    PubMed Central

    Daughenbaugh, Katie F.; Holderness, Jeff; Graff, Jill C.; Hedges, Jodi F.; Freedman, Brett; Graff, Joel W.; Jutila, Mark A.

    2011-01-01

    γδ T cells function in innate and adaptive immunity and are primed for secondary responses by procyanidin components of unripe apple peel (APP). Here we investigate the effects of APP and purified procyanidins on γ δ T cell gene expression. A microarray analysis was performed on bovine γ δ T cells treated with APP; increases in transcripts encoding GM-CSF, IL-8, and IL-17, but not markers of TCR stimulation such as IFNγ , were observed. Key responses were confirmed in human, mouse, and bovine cells by RT-PCR and/or ELISA, indicating a conserved response to procyanidins. In vivo relevance of the cytokine response was shown in mice following intraperitoneal injection of APP, which induced production of CXCL1/KC and resulted in neutrophil influx to the blood and peritoneum. In the human γ δ T cell-line, MOLT-14, GM-CSF and IL-8 transcripts were increased and stabilized in cells treated with crude APP or purified procyanidins. The ERK1/2 MAPK pathway was activated in APP-treated cells, and necessary for transcript stabilization. Our data describe a unique γ δ T cell inflammatory response during procyanidin treatment and suggest that transcript stability mechanisms could account, at least in part, for the priming phenotype. PMID:21307878

  7. BCL6 induces EMT by promoting the ZEB1-mediated transcription repression of E-cadherin in breast cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Yu, Jin-Mei; Sun, Wei; Hua, Fang; Xie, Jing; Lin, Heng; Zhou, Dan-Dan; Hu, Zhuo-Wei

    2015-09-01

    B-cell CLL/lymphoma 6 (BCL6), a transcriptional repressor, is involved in the development and progression of breast cancers with uncertain mechanism. The purpose of this study is to investigate the potential effect and mechanism of BCL6 in the regulation of epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT), a critical cellular process for controlling the development and progression of breast cancers. We found that BCL6 promoted invasion, migration and growth by stimulating EMT in breast cancer cells. BCL6 induced EMT by enhancing the expression of transcriptional repressor ZEB1 which bound to the E-cadherin promoter and repressing the E-cadherin transcription. Deletion of ZEB1 protected against the pro-EMT roles of BCL6 by restoring the expression of E-cadherin in these cells. Moreover, inhibition of BCL6 with BCL6 inhibitor 79-6 suppressed these functions of BCL6 in breast cancer cells. These findings indicate that BCL6 promotes EMT via enhancing the ZEB1-mediated transcriptional repression of E-cadherin in breast cancer cells. Targeting BCL6 has therapeutic potential against the development and progression of breast cancer. PMID:26049022

  8. Nitrate-induced early transcriptional changes during imbibition in non-after-ripened Sisymbrium officinale seeds.

    PubMed

    Carrillo-Barral, Nestor; Matilla, Angel J; Iglesias-Fernández, Raquel; Del Carmen Rodríguez-Gacio, María

    2013-08-01

    We have here demonstrated for the first time that nitrate not only accelerates testa rupture of non- AR seeds but also modifies expression pattern of the cell-wall remodeling proteins (mannanases; SoMAN6 and SoMAN7) and key genes belonging to metabolism and signaling of ABA (SoNCED6, SoNCED9, SoCYP707A2 and SoABI5) and GAs (SoGA3ox, SoGA20ox, SoGA2ox and SoRGL2). These results were obtained during Sisymbrium officinale seed imbibition in the absence of endosperm rupture. Exogenous ABA induced a notable inhibition of testa rupture in both absence and presence of nitrate being this effect sharply reversed by GA(4+7). However, nitrate was capable to provoke testa rupture in absence of ABA synthesis. The expression of SoMAN6 and SoMAN7 were positively altered by nitrate. Although ABA synthesis seems apparent at the start of non-AR seed imbibition, taken together the results of SoNCED6, SoNCED9 and SoCYP707A2 expression seem to suggest that nitrate leads to a strong net ABA decrease. Likewise, nitrate positively affected the SoABI5 expression when the SoNCED9 expression was also stimulated. By contrast, at the early and final of imbibition, nitrate clearly inhibited the SoABI5 expression. The expression of SoGA2ox6 and SoGA3ox2 are strongly inhibited by nitrate whereas of SoGA20ox6 was stimulated. On the other hand, SoRGL2 transcript level decreased in the presence of nitrate. Taken together, the results presented here suggest that the nitrate signaling is already operative during the non-AR S. officinale seeds imbibition. The nitrate, in cross-talk with the AR network likely increases the favorable molecular conditions that trigger germination. PMID:23106241

  9. Aryl organophosphate flame retardants induced cardiotoxicity during zebrafish embryogenesis: by disturbing expression of the transcriptional regulators.

    PubMed

    Du, Zhongkun; Wang, Guowei; Gao, Shixiang; Wang, Zunyao

    2015-04-01

    As a result of the ban on some brominated flame retardants (BFRs), the use of organophosphate flame retardants (OPFRs) increases, and they are detected in multi-environment media at higher frequency and concentrations. However, the toxicity data of OPFRs, especially those on developmental toxicology are quite limited, which prevents an accurate evaluation of their environmental and health risk. Because a previous study reported that two aryl-OPFRs induced cardiotoxicity during zebrafish embryogenesis, we designed experiments to compare the heart developmental toxicity of a series of aryl-OPFRs with alkyl-OPFRs and explored possible internal mechanism. First, acute toxicity of 9 frequently used OPFRs were studied with zebrafish embryos (2-96 hpf). By comparing the LC50 and EC50 (pericardium edema) data, two aryl-OPFRs, triphenyl phosphate (TPhP) and cresyl diphenyl phosphate (CDP) showed greater heart developmental toxicity than the others. It was also found that the acute toxicity of OPFRs varied mainly depending on their hydrophobicity. Further study on the cardiotoxicity of TPhP and CDP showed that the cardiac looping progress can be impeded by 0.10mg/L TPhP or CDP exposure. Bradycardia and reduction of myocardium were also observed in 0.50 and 1.0mg/L TPhP groups and 0.10, 0.50, and 1.0mg/L CDP groups. 0-48 hpf is the vulnerable window of zebrafish cardiogenesis that can be easily affected by TPhP and CDP. RT-qPCR measurement on the expressions of key transcriptional regulators in cardiogenesis showed that BMP4, NKX2-5, and TBX5 were significantly inhibited at the exposure points of 12 hpf and 24 hpf which may be the internal factors related to the heart developmental toxicity. As zebrafish is a good model organism for human health study, the present results call for a greater attention to the health risk of fetus in pregnant women exposed to such OPFRs. PMID:25661707

  10. HR96 and BR-C modulate phenobarbital induced transcription of cytochrome P450 CYP6D1 in Drosophila S2 cells

    PubMed Central

    Lin, G. G.-H.; Kozaki, T.; Scott, J. G.

    2010-01-01

    Phenobarbital (PB) is a prototypical inducer for studies of xenobiotic responses in animals. In mammals, nuclear receptors CAR and PXR have been identified as key transcription factors regulating PB induced transcription of xenobiotic responsive genes. In insects, much less is known about transcription factors involved in regulating PB induced transcription, although CAR and PXR have a single ortholog, HR96 (hormone receptor-like in 96), in Drosophila melanogaster. Using dual luciferase reporter assays in Drosophila S2 cells, constructs containing variable lengths of the promoter of the PB inducible cytochrome P450 CYP6D1 were evaluated in the presence and absence of PB. The promoter region between −330 and −280 (relative to the position of transcription start site, +1) was found to be critical for PB induction. Putative binding sites for Drosophila BR-C (broad-complex) and DFD (deformed) were identified within this promoter region using TFsearch. RNAi treatment of S2 cells in conjunction with CYP6D1 promoter assays showed that suppression of Drosophila HR96 and BR-C transcription in S2 cells resulted in a significant decrease and increase, respectively, of PB induction. Effects of HR96 and BR-C in mediating PB induction were PB specific and dependent. This represents new functional evidence that Drosophila HR96 and BR-C can act as an activator and repressor, respectively, regulating PB induced transcription in insects. PMID:21029232

  11. Tissue-Mimicking Geometrical Constraints Stimulate Tissue-Like Constitution and Activity of Mouse Neonatal and Human-Induced Pluripotent Stem Cell-Derived Cardiac Myocytes

    PubMed Central

    Pilarczyk, Götz; Raulf, Alexandra; Gunkel, Manuel; Fleischmann, Bernd K.; Lemor, Robert; Hausmann, Michael

    2016-01-01

    The present work addresses the question of to what extent a geometrical support acts as a physiological determining template in the setup of artificial cardiac tissue. Surface patterns with alternating concave to convex transitions of cell size dimensions were used to organize and orientate human-induced pluripotent stem cell (hIPSC)-derived cardiac myocytes and mouse neonatal cardiac myocytes. The shape of the cells, as well as the organization of the contractile apparatus recapitulates the anisotropic line pattern geometry being derived from tissue geometry motives. The intracellular organization of the contractile apparatus and the cell coupling via gap junctions of cell assemblies growing in a random or organized pattern were examined. Cell spatial and temporal coordinated excitation and contraction has been compared on plain and patterned substrates. While the α-actinin cytoskeletal organization is comparable to terminally-developed native ventricular tissue, connexin-43 expression does not recapitulate gap junction distribution of heart muscle tissue. However, coordinated contractions could be observed. The results of tissue-like cell ensemble organization open new insights into geometry-dependent cell organization, the cultivation of artificial heart tissue from stem cells and the anisotropy-dependent activity of therapeutic compounds. PMID:26751484

  12. Tissue-Mimicking Geometrical Constraints Stimulate Tissue-Like Constitution and Activity of Mouse Neonatal and Human-Induced Pluripotent Stem Cell-Derived Cardiac Myocytes.

    PubMed

    Pilarczyk, Götz; Raulf, Alexandra; Gunkel, Manuel; Fleischmann, Bernd K; Lemor, Robert; Hausmann, Michael

    2016-01-01

    The present work addresses the question of to what extent a geometrical support acts as a physiological determining template in the setup of artificial cardiac tissue. Surface patterns with alternating concave to convex transitions of cell size dimensions were used to organize and orientate human-induced pluripotent stem cell (hIPSC)-derived cardiac myocytes and mouse neonatal cardiac myocytes. The shape of the cells, as well as the organization of the contractile apparatus recapitulates the anisotropic line pattern geometry being derived from tissue geometry motives. The intracellular organization of the contractile apparatus and the cell coupling via gap junctions of cell assemblies growing in a random or organized pattern were examined. Cell spatial and temporal coordinated excitation and contraction has been compared on plain and patterned substrates. While the α-actinin cytoskeletal organization is comparable to terminally-developed native ventricular tissue, connexin-43 expression does not recapitulate gap junction distribution of heart muscle tissue. However, coordinated contractions could be observed. The results of tissue-like cell ensemble organization open new insights into geometry-dependent cell organization, the cultivation of artificial heart tissue from stem cells and the anisotropy-dependent activity of therapeutic compounds. PMID:26751484

  13. The Transcription Factor Ehf Is Involved in TGF-β-Induced Suppression of FcεRI and c-Kit Expression and FcεRI-Mediated Activation in Mast Cells.

    PubMed

    Yamazaki, Susumu; Nakano, Nobuhiro; Honjo, Asuka; Hara, Mutsuko; Maeda, Keiko; Nishiyama, Chiharu; Kitaura, Jiro; Ohtsuka, Yoshikazu; Okumura, Ko; Ogawa, Hideoki; Shimizu, Toshiaki

    2015-10-01

    FcεRI, which is composed of α, β, and γ subunits, plays an important role in IgE-mediated allergic responses. TGF-β1 has been reported to suppress FcεRI and stem cell factor receptor c-Kit expression on mast cell surfaces and to suppress mast cell activation induced by cross-linking of FcεRI. However, the molecular mechanism by which these expressions and activation are suppressed by TGF-β1 remains unclear. In this study, we found that the expression of Ets homologous factor (Ehf), a member of the Ets family transcriptional factors, is upregulated by TGF-β/Smad signaling in mouse bone marrow-derived mast cells (BMMCs). Forced expression of Ehf in BMMCs repressed the transcription of genes encoding FcεRIα, FcεRIβ, and c-Kit, resulting in a reduction in cell surface FcεRI and c-Kit expression. Additionally, forced expression of Ehf suppressed FcεRI-mediated degranulation and cytokine production. Ehf inhibited the promoter activity of genes encoding FcεRIα, FcεRIβ, and c-Kit by binding to these gene promoters. Furthermore, the mRNA levels of Gata1, Gata2, and Stat5b were lower in BMMCs stably expressing Ehf compared with control cells. Because GATA-1 and GATA-2 are positive regulators of FcεRI and c-Kit expression, decreased expression of GATAs may be also involved in the reduction of FcεRI and c-Kit expression. Decreased expression of Stat5 may contribute to the suppression of cytokine production by BMMCs. In part, mast cell response to TGF-β1 was mimicked by forced expression of Ehf, suggesting that TGF-β1 suppresses FcεRI and c-Kit expression and suppresses FcεRI-mediated activation through upregulation of Ehf. PMID:26297757

  14. Transcriptional initiation under conditions of anoxia-induced quiescence in mitochondria from Artemia franciscana embryos.

    PubMed

    Eads, Brian D; Hand, Steven C

    2003-02-01

    In response to anoxia, embryos of the brine shrimp Artemia franciscana are able coordinately to downregulate metabolism to levels low enough to permit survival for several years at room temperature. In addition to dramatic decreases in free ATP levels and heat production, intracellular pH drops from 7.8 to 6.3 overnight. Use of isolated mitochondria to study transcriptional responses to anoxia offers several advantages: (1). the localized nature of transcript initiation, processing and degradation, all of which may be followed in organello; (2). the relatively simple cis- and trans-machinery involved and (3). the ability to provide relevant physiological treatments in vitro. In response to anoxic incubation of embryos in vivo for 4 h followed by anoxic mitochondrial isolation and anoxic transcription assay at pH 6.4, a significant decrease in overall UTP incorporation (77%) was seen after 30 min relative to normoxic, pH 7.9 controls. A less severe inhibition of transcription under anoxia (52%) was observed compared with controls when pH was raised to 7.9. Similarly, under normoxia, the incubation at low pH (6.4) reduced transcription by 59%. Ribonuclease protection assays showed that the contribution of in vitro initiation during the assay fell from 78% at pH 7.9 to approximately 32% at pH 6.4 under either normoxic or anoxic conditions. DNA footprinting of putative transcriptional promoters revealed proteins at regular intervals upstream of the 12S rRNA in the control region, which previously had been indirectly inferred to contain promoters for H-strand transcription. The area between 1230 and 12065 contains a sequence in the tRNA(leu) gene believed to bind the transcription termination factor mTERF or TERM, and we provide the first evidence that this sequence is protein-bound in A. franciscana. However, our hypothesis that initiation is reduced at low pH because of a change in DNA binding by mitochondrial transcription factors was not confirmed. We propose that

  15. Signal Transducer and Activator of Transcription-5 Mediates Neuronal Apoptosis Induced by Inhibition of Rac GTPase Activity*

    PubMed Central

    Stankiewicz, Trisha R.; Loucks, F. Alexandra; Schroeder, Emily K.; Nevalainen, Marja T.; Tyler, Kenneth L.; Aktories, Klaus; Bouchard, Ron J.; Linseman, Daniel A.

    2012-01-01

    In several neuronal cell types, the small GTPase Rac is essential for survival. We have shown previously that the Rho family GTPase inhibitor Clostridium difficile toxin B (ToxB) induces apoptosis in primary rat cerebellar granule neurons (CGNs) principally via inhibition of Rac GTPase function. In the present study, incubation with ToxB activated a proapoptotic Janus kinase (JAK)/signal transducer and activator of transcription (STAT) pathway, and a pan-JAK inhibitor protected CGNs from Rac inhibition. STAT1 expression was induced by ToxB; however, CGNs from STAT1 knock-out mice succumbed to ToxB-induced apoptosis as readily as wild-type CGNs. STAT3 displayed enhanced tyrosine phosphorylation following treatment with ToxB, and a reputed inhibitor of STAT3, cucurbitacin (JSI-124), reduced CGN apoptosis. Unexpectedly, JSI-124 failed to block STAT3 phosphorylation, and CGNs were not protected from ToxB by other known STAT3 inhibitors. In contrast, STAT5A tyrosine phosphorylation induced by ToxB was suppressed by JSI-124. In addition, roscovitine similarly inhibited STAT5A phosphorylation and protected CGNs from ToxB-induced apoptosis. Consistent with these results, adenoviral infection with a dominant negative STAT5 mutant, but not wild-type STAT5, significantly decreased ToxB-induced apoptosis of CGNs. Finally, chromatin immunoprecipitation with a STAT5 antibody revealed increased STAT5 binding to the promoter region of prosurvival Bcl-xL. STAT5 was recruited to the Bcl-xL promoter region in a ToxB-dependent manner, and this DNA binding preceded Bcl-xL down-regulation, suggesting transcriptional repression. These data indicate that a novel JAK/STAT5 proapoptotic pathway significantly contributes to neuronal apoptosis induced by the inhibition of Rac GTPase. PMID:22378792

  16. Signal transducer and activator of transcription-5 mediates neuronal apoptosis induced by inhibition of Rac GTPase activity.

    PubMed

    Stankiewicz, Trisha R; Loucks, F Alexandra; Schroeder, Emily K; Nevalainen, Marja T; Tyler, Kenneth L; Aktories, Klaus; Bouchard, Ron J; Linseman, Daniel A

    2012-05-11

    In several neuronal cell types, the small GTPase Rac is essential for survival. We have shown previously that the Rho family GTPase inhibitor Clostridium difficile toxin B (ToxB) induces apoptosis in primary rat cerebellar granule neurons (CGNs) principally via inhibition of Rac GTPase function. In the present study, incubation with ToxB activated a proapoptotic Janus kinase (JAK)/signal transducer and activator of transcription (STAT) pathway, and a pan-JAK inhibitor protected CGNs from Rac inhibition. STAT1 expression was induced by ToxB; however, CGNs from STAT1 knock-out mice succumbed to ToxB-induced apoptosis as readily as wild-type CGNs. STAT3 displayed enhanced tyrosine phosphorylation following treatment with ToxB, and a reputed inhibitor of STAT3, cucurbitacin (JSI-124), reduced CGN apoptosis. Unexpectedly, JSI-124 failed to block STAT3 phosphorylation, and CGNs were not protected from ToxB by other known STAT3 inhibitors. In contrast, STAT5A tyrosine phosphorylation induced by ToxB was suppressed by JSI-124. In addition, roscovitine similarly inhibited STAT5A phosphorylation and protected CGNs from ToxB-induced apoptosis. Consistent with these results, adenoviral infection with a dominant negative STAT5 mutant, but not wild-type STAT5, significantly decreased ToxB-induced apoptosis of CGNs. Finally, chromatin immunoprecipitation with a STAT5 antibody revealed increased STAT5 binding to the promoter region of prosurvival Bcl-xL. STAT5 was recruited to the Bcl-xL promoter region in a ToxB-dependent manner, and this DNA binding preceded Bcl-xL down-regulation, suggesting transcriptional repression. These data indicate that a novel JAK/STAT5 proapoptotic pathway significantly contributes to neuronal apoptosis induced by the inhibition of Rac GTPase. PMID:22378792

  17. Transcriptional regulation is insufficient to explain substrate-induced flux changes in Bacillus subtilis

    PubMed Central

    Chubukov, Victor; Uhr, Markus; Le Chat, Ludovic; Kleijn, Roelco J; Jules, Matthieu; Link, Hannes; Aymerich, Stephane; Stelling, Jörg; Sauer, Uwe

    2013-01-01

    One of the key ways in which microbes are thought to regulate their metabolism is by modulating the availability of enzymes through transcriptional regulation. However, the limited success of efforts to manipulate metabolic fluxes by rewiring the transcriptional network has cast doubt on the idea that transcript abundance controls metabolic fluxes. In this study, we investigate control of metabolic flux in the model bacterium Bacillus subtilis by quantifying fluxes, transcripts, and metabolites in eight metabolic states enforced by different environmental conditions. We find that most enzymes whose flux switches between on and off states, such as those involved in substrate uptake, exhibit large corresponding transcriptional changes. However, for the majority of enzymes in central metabolism, enzyme concentrations were insufficient to explain the observed fluxes—only for a number of reactions in the tricarboxylic acid cycle were enzyme changes approximately proportional to flux changes. Surprisingly, substrate changes revealed by metabolomics were also insufficient to explain observed fluxes, leaving a large role for allosteric regulation and enzyme modification in the control of metabolic fluxes. PMID:24281055

  18. Signal transduction induced by apoptotic cells inhibits HIV transcription in monocytes/macrophages.

    PubMed

    Gekonge, Bethsebah N; Schiralli, Gillian; Schlegel, Robert A; Henderson, Andrew J

    2006-10-01

    The primary targets of HIV are CD4(+) T cells and macrophages. HIV infection is associated with an increase in apoptosis of infected and uninfected CD4(+) T cells, and these infected cells undergo apoptosis and produce HIV virions with phosphatidylserine (PS) on their surface. During phagocytosis of apoptotic cells, macrophages, using an array of receptors, are able to perceive various surface changes on apoptotic cells. The engagement of phagocytic receptors by ligands on the apoptotic cell surface results in the activation of signaling cascades, which facilitate engulfment. In this study, we examined how PS associated with virions and apoptotic cells influences HIV replication. We demonstrate that virus-associated PS is required for HIV infection of macrophages at a step prior to integration but following strong-stop, indicating that PS-initiated signals alter the establishment of HIV provirus. Conversely, apoptotic cells inhibited HIV transcription in infected macrophages, although this ability to suppress transcription was independent of PS. Furthermore, we show that ELMO, a key signaling molecule that participates in the phagocytosis of apoptotic cells, inhibited HIV transcription; however, knocking down endogenous ELMO expression in infected U937 cells rescued HIV transcription when these cells were coincubated with apoptotic targets. Taken together, these data show that apoptotic cells and the signals, which they initiate upon recognition by macrophages, influence the successful establishment of HIV infection and provirus transcription. PMID:16885500

  19. Involvement of fish signal transducer and activator of transcription 3 (STAT3) in nodavirus infection induced cell death.

    PubMed

    Huang, Youhua; Huang, Xiaohong; Yang, Ying; Wang, Wei; Yu, Yepin; Qin, Qiwei

    2015-03-01

    The Janus kinase (JAK)-signal transducer and activator of transcription (STAT) signaling pathway is an important signaling pathway activated by interferons in response to virus infection. Fish STAT3 has been demonstrated to be involved in Singapore grouper iridovirus (SGIV) infection and virus induced paraptosis, but its effects on the replication of other fish viruses still remained uncertain. Here, the roles of grouper STAT3 (Ec-STAT3) in red spotted grouper nervous necrosis virus (RGNNV) infection were investigated. The present data showed that the distribution of phosphorylated Ec-STAT3 was altered in RGNNV infected fish cells, and the promoter activity of STAT3 was significantly increased during virus infection, suggesting that STAT3 activation was involved in RGNNV infection. Using STAT3 specific inhibitor, we found that inhibition of Ec-STAT3 in vitro did not affect the transcription and protein synthesis of RGNNV coat protein (CP), however, the severity of RGNNV induced vacuolation and autophagy was significantly increased. Meanwhile, at the late stage of virus infection, RGNNV induced necrotic cell death was significantly decreased after inhibition of Ec-STAT3. Further studies indicated that Ec-STAT3 inhibition significantly increased the transcript level of autophagy related genes, including UNC-51-like kinase 2 (ULK2) and microtubule-associated protein 1 light chain 3-II (LC3-II) induced by RGNNV infection. Moreover, the expression of several pro-inflammatory factors, including TNFα, IL-1β and IL-8 were mediated by Ec-STAT3 during RGNNV infection. Together, our results not only firstly revealed that STAT3 exerted novel roles in response to fish virus infection, but also provided new insights into understanding the roles of STAT3 in different forms of programmed cell death. PMID:25555814

  20. Transcriptional regulation of cyclin D2 by the PKA pathway and inducible cAMP early repressor in granulosa cells.

    PubMed

    Muñiz, Luis C; Yehia, Ghassan; Mémin, Elisabeth; Ratnakar, Pillarisetty V A L; Molina, Carlos A

    2006-08-01

    Cyclin D2 (Ccnd2) is an essential gene for folliculogenesis, as null mutation in mice impairs granulosa cell proliferation in response to FSH. Ccnd2 mRNA is induced during the estrus cycle by FSH and is rapidly inhibited by LH. Yet, the responsive elements and transcription factors accounting for the gene expression of cyclin D2 in the ovary have not been fully characterized. Using primary cultures of rat granulosa cells and immortalized mouse granulosa cells, we demonstrate a mechanism for the regulation of cyclin D2 at the level of transcription via a PKA-dependent signaling mechanism. The promoter activity of cyclin D2 was shown to be induced by FSH and the catalytic alpha subunit of PKA (PRKACA), and this activity was repressible by inducible cAMP early repressor (ICER), a cAMP response element (CRE) modulator isoform. In silico analysis of the mouse, rat, and human cyclin D2 promoters identified two CRE-binding protein sites, a conserved proximal element and a less conserved distal element relative to the translation start site. The mutation on the proximal element drastically decreases the effects of PRKACA and ICER on the promoter activity, whereas the mutation on the distal element did not contribute to the decrease in the promoter activity. Electrophoretic mobility shift assays and deoxyribonuclease footprint analysis confirmed ICER binding to the proximal element, and chromatin immunoprecipitation analysis demonstrated the occurrence of this binding in vivo. These results showed a CRE within the upstream region of Ccnd2 that is (at least partly) implicated in the stimulation and repression of cyclin D2 transcription. Finally, our data suggest that ICER involvement in the regulation of granulosa cell proliferation as overexpression of ICER results in the inhibition of PRKACA-induced DNA synthesis. PMID:16625003

  1. Estrogen receptor-associated proteins: possible mediators of hormone-induced transcription.

    PubMed

    Halachmi, S; Marden, E; Martin, G; MacKay, H; Abbondanza, C; Brown, M

    1994-06-01

    The estrogen receptor is a transcription factor which, when bound to estradiol, binds DNA and regulates expression of estrogen-responsive genes. A 160-kilodalton estrogen receptor-associated protein, ERAP160, was identified that exhibits estradiol-dependent binding to the receptor. Mutational analysis of the receptor shows that its ability to activate transcription parallels its ability to bind ERAP160. Antiestrogens are unable to promote ERAP160 binding and can block the estrogen-dependent interaction of the receptor and ERAP160 in a dose-dependent manner. This evidence suggests that ERAP160 may mediate estradiol-dependent transcriptional activation by the estrogen receptor. Furthermore, the ability of antiestrogens to block estrogen receptor-ERAP160 complex formation could account for their therapeutic effects in breast cancer. PMID:8197458

  2. Retinoic acid-induced AP-1 transcriptional activity regulates B16 mouse melanoma growth inhibition and differentiation.

    PubMed

    Huang, Ying; Boskovic, Goran; Niles, Richard M

    2003-02-01

    Retinoic acid (RA) inhibits growth and induces differentiation of B16 mouse melanoma cells. These effects are accompanied by a large increase in PKCalpha mRNA and protein levels and surprisingly an increase in activating protein-1 (AP-1) transcriptional activity. To further investigate the RA-induced AP-1 activity we established clones of B16 cells stably expressing an AP-1-luciferase reporter gene. Treatment of these clones with phorbol dibutyrate increased AP-1 activity which peaked at 2-4 h and returned to baseline level by 24 h. In contrast, RA treatment resulted in a slow increase in AP-1 activity that reached a maximum level at 48 h and was maintained for the duration of the treatment. We tested the importance of the RA-induced AP-1 activity by establishing clones which stably express a dominant negative fos gene (A-fos) and have greatly diminished AP-1 activity. Growth rates of untreated A-fos expressing cells were similar to wt B16 and clones not expressing A-fos. However, clones expressing the dominant-negative fos had a markedly decreased sensitivity to RA-induced inhibition of anchorage-dependent and -independent growth. Treatment of wt B16 cells for 48 h with RA increased melanin production by two to fourfold, but this effect was completely lost in the A-fos clones. The ability of RA to induce RARbeta and PKCalpha expression was retained in A-fos clones, suggesting that A-fos was not interfering with RAR transcription activation functions. We tested whether the RA-induced AP-1 activity might be mediated by the ERK1/2 MAPK pathway. Inhibition of ERK1/2 phosphorylation stimulated AP-1 activity, which was not additive to that induced by RA. This finding raises the possibility that this MAPK pathway may be a target of retinoid action. Our observations suggest that AP-1 transcriptional activity induced by RA likely plays an important role in the biological changes mediated by this retinoid in B16 melanoma cells. PMID:12494454

  3. Evaluation of p21 promoter for interleukin 12 radiation induced transcriptional targeting in a mouse tumor model

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Radiation induced transcriptional targeting is a gene therapy approach that takes advantage of the targeting abilities of radiotherapy by using radio inducible promoters to spatially and temporally limit the transgene expression. Cyclin dependent kinase inhibitor 1 (CDKN1A), also known as p21, is a crucial regulator of the cell cycle, mediating G1 phase arrest in response to a variety of stress stimuli, including DNA damaging agents like irradiation. The aim of the study was to evaluate the suitability of the p21 promoter for radiation induced transcriptional targeting with the objective to test the therapeutic effectiveness of the combined radio-gene therapy with p21 promoter driven therapeutic gene interleukin 12. Methods To test the inducibility of the p21 promoter, three reporter gene experimental models with green fluorescent protein (GFP) under the control of p21 promoter were established by gene electrotransfer of plasmid DNA: stably transfected cells, stably transfected tumors, and transiently transfected muscles. Induction of reporter gene expression after irradiation was determined using a fluorescence microplate reader in vitro and by non-invasive fluorescence imaging using fluorescence stereomicroscope in vivo. The antitumor effect of the plasmid encoding the p21 promoter driven interleukin 12 after radio-gene therapy was determined by tumor growth delay assay and by quantification of intratumoral and serum levels of interleukin 12 protein and intratumoral concentrations of interleukin 12 mRNA. Results Using the reporter gene experimental models, p21 promoter was proven to be inducible with radiation, the induction was not dose dependent, and it could be re-induced. Furthermore radio-gene therapy with interleukin 12 under control of the p21 promoter had a good antitumor therapeutic effect with the statistically relevant tumor growth delay, which was comparable to that of the same therapy using a constitutive promoter. Conclusions In this

  4. Prolactin induces phosphorylation of Tyr694 of Stat5 (MGF), a prerequisite for DNA binding and induction of transcription.

    PubMed Central

    Gouilleux, F; Wakao, H; Mundt, M; Groner, B

    1994-01-01

    Mammary gland factor (MGF) is a transcription factor discovered initially in the mammary epithelial cells of lactating animals. It confers the lactogenic hormone response to the milk protein genes. We reported recently the isolation of the cDNA encoding MGF. MGF is a novel member of the cytokine-regulated transcription factor gene family. Members of this gene family mediate interferon alpha/beta and interferon gamma induction of gene transcription, as well as the response to epidermal growth factor and interleukin-6, and have been named signal transducers and activators of transcription (Stat). The name Stat5 has been assigned to MGF. We studied the mechanisms involved in the prolactin activation of Stat5 in COS cells co-transfected with cDNA encoding Stat5 and the prolactin receptor. Prolactin treatment of the transfected cells caused activation of Stat5 within 5-10 min. This activation does not require ongoing protein synthesis. Tyrosine kinase inhibitors prevent Stat5 activation in transfected COS cells. Treatment of recombinant Stat5 with a tyrosine-specific protein phosphatase in vitro abolishes its DNA binding activity. Prolactin stimulation of transfected cells induces Stat5 phosphorylation on tyrosine. Phosphorylation of in vitro transcribed and translated Stat5 with the Jak2 tyrosine kinase, but not with fyn, lyn or lck, confers DNA binding activity. The prolactin response of the beta-casein milk protein gene promoter can be observed in COS cells transfected with cDNA vectors encoding Stat5 and the long form of the prolactin receptor. The short form of the prolactin receptor is unable to promote Stat5 phosphorylation and confer transcriptional induction in COS cells.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) Images PMID:7925280

  5. Transcriptional impact of organophosphate and metal mixtures on olfaction: Copper dominates the chlorpyrifos-induced response in adult zebrafish

    PubMed Central

    Tilton, Fred A.; Tilton, Susan C.; Bammler, Theo K.; Beyer, Richard P.; Stapleton, Patricia L.; Scholz, Nathaniel L.; Gallagher, Evan P.

    2013-01-01

    Chemical exposures in fish have been linked to loss of olfaction leading to an inability to detect predators and prey and decreased survival. However, the mechanisms underlying olfactory neurotoxicity are not well characterized, especially in environmental exposures which involve chemical mixtures. We used zebrafish to characterize olfactory transcriptional responses by two model olfactory inhibitors, the pesticide chlorpyrifos (CPF) and mixtures of CPF with the neurotoxic metal copper (Cu). Microarray analysis was performed on RNA from olfactory tissues of zebrafish exposed to CPF alone or to a mixture of CPF and Cu. Gene expression profiles were analyzed using Principal Component Analysis and hierarchical clustering, whereas gene set analysis was used to identify biological themes in the microarray data. Microarray results were confirmed by real-time PCR on genes serving as potential biomarkers of olfactory injury. In addition, we mined our previously published Cu-induced zebrafish olfactory transcriptional response database (Tilton et al., 2008) for the purposes of discriminating pathways of olfaction impacted by either the individual agents or the CPF-Cu mixture transcriptional signatures. CPF exposure altered the expression of gene pathways associated with cellular morphogenesis and odorant binding, but not olfactory signal transduction, a known olfactory pathway for Cu. The mixture profiles shared genes from the Cu and CPF datasets, whereas some genes were altered only by the mixtures. The transcriptional signature of the mixtures was more similar to that in zebrafish exposed to Cu alone then for CPF. In conclusion, exposure to a mixture containing a common environmental metal and pesticide causes a unique transcriptional signature that is heavily influenced by the metal, even when organophosphate predominates. Our findings support using zebrafish microarray analysis to elucidate mechanisms of olfactory loss and to identify the components of mixtures which

  6. MINCR is a MYC-induced lncRNA able to modulate MYC's transcriptional network in Burkitt lymphoma cells.

    PubMed

    Doose, Gero; Haake, Andrea; Bernhart, Stephan H; López, Cristina; Duggimpudi, Sujitha; Wojciech, Franziska; Bergmann, Anke K; Borkhardt, Arndt; Burkhardt, Birgit; Claviez, Alexander; Dimitrova, Lora; Haas, Siegfried; Hoell, Jessica I; Hummel, Michael; Karsch, Dennis; Klapper, Wolfram; Kleo, Karsten; Kretzmer, Helene; Kreuz, Markus; Küppers, Ralf; Lawerenz, Chris; Lenze, Dido; Loeffler, Markus; Mantovani-Löffler, Luisa; Möller, Peter; Ott, German; Richter, Julia; Rohde, Marius; Rosenstiel, Philip; Rosenwald, Andreas; Schilhabel, Markus; Schneider, Markus; Scholz, Ingrid; Stilgenbauer, Stephan; Stunnenberg, Hendrik G; Szczepanowski, Monika; Trümper, Lorenz; Weniger, Marc A; Hoffmann, Steve; Siebert, Reiner; Iaccarino, Ingram

    2015-09-22

    Despite the established role of the transcription factor MYC in cancer, little is known about the impact of a new class of transcriptional regulators, the long noncoding RNAs (lncRNAs), on MYC ability to influence the cellular transcriptome. Here, we have intersected RNA-sequencing data from two MYC-inducible cell lines and a cohort of 91 B-cell lymphomas with or without genetic variants resulting in MYC overexpression. We identified 13 lncRNAs differentially expressed in IG-MYC-positive Burkitt lymphoma and regulated in the same direction by MYC in the model cell lines. Among them, we focused on a lncRNA that we named MYC-induced long noncoding RNA (MINCR), showing a strong correlation with MYC expression in MYC-positive lymphomas. To understand its cellular role, we performed RNAi and found that MINCR knockdown is associated with an impairment in cell cycle progression. Differential gene expression analysis after RNAi showed a significant enrichment of cell cycle genes among the genes down-regulated after MINCR knockdown. Interestingly, these genes are enriched in MYC binding sites in their promoters, suggesting that MINCR acts as a modulator of the MYC transcriptional program. Accordingly, MINCR knockdown was associated with a reduction in MYC binding to the promoters of selected cell cycle genes. Finally, we show that down-regulation of Aurora kinases A and B and chromatin licensing and DNA replication factor 1 may explain the reduction in cellular proliferation observed on MINCR knockdown. We, therefore, suggest that MINCR is a newly identified player in the MYC transcriptional network able to control the expression of cell cycle genes. PMID:26351698

  7. Two structurally distinct {kappa}B sequence motifs cooperatively control LPS-induced KC gene transcription in mouse macrophages

    SciTech Connect

    Ohmori, Y.; Fukumoto, S.; Hamilton, T.A.

    1995-10-01

    The mouse KC gene is an {alpha}-chemokine gene whose transcription is induced in mononuclear phagocytes by LPS. DNA sequences necessary for transcriptional control of KC by LPS were identified in the region flanking the transcription start site. Transient transfection analysis in macrophages using deletion mutants of a 1.5-kb sequence placed in front of the chloramphenicol acetyl transferase (CAT) gene identified an LPS-responsive region between residues -104 and +30. This region contained two {kappa}B sequence motifs. The first motif (position -70 to -59, {kappa}B1) is highly conserved in all three human GRO genes and in the mouse macrophage inflammatory protein-2 (MIP-2) gene. The second {kappa}B motif (position -89 to -78, {kappa}B2) was conserved only between the mouse and the rat KC genes. Consistent with previous reports, the highly conserved {kappa}B site ({kappa}B1) was essential for LPS inducibility. Surprisingly, the distal {kappa}B site ({kappa}B2) was also necessary for optimal response; mutation of either {kappa}B site markedly reduced sensitivity to LPS in RAW264.7 cells and to TNF-{alpha} in NIH 3T3 fibroblasts. Although both {kappa}B1 and {kappa}B2 sequences were able to bind members of the Rel homology family, including NF{kappa}B1 (P50), RelA (65), and c-Rel, the {kappa}B1 site bound these factors with higher affinity and functioned more effectively than the {kappa}B2 site in a heterologous promoter. These findings demonstrate that transcriptional control of the KC gene requires cooperation between two {kappa}B sites and is thus distinct from that of the three human GRO genes and the mouse MIP-2 gene. 71 refs., 8 figs.

  8. Interferon-independent and -induced regulation of Epstein-Barr virus EBNA-1 gene transcription in Burkitt lymphoma.

    PubMed Central

    Nonkwelo, C; Ruf, I K; Sample, J

    1997-01-01

    Replication of the Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) genome within latently infected cells is dependent on the EBV EBNA-1 protein. The objective of this study was to identify transcriptional regulatory proteins that mediate EBNA-1 expression via the viral promoter Qp, which is active in EBV-associated tumors such as Burkitt lymphoma and nasopharyngeal carcinoma. Results of a yeast one-hybrid screen suggested that a subset of the interferon regulatory factor (IRF) family may regulate EBNA-1 transcription by targeting an essential cis-regulatory element of Qp, QRE-2. Further investigation indicated that the transcriptional activator IRF-1 and the closely related IRF-2, a repressor of interferon-induced gene expression, are both capable of activating Qp. However, the major QRE-2-specific binding activity detected within extracts of Burkitt lymphoma cells was attributed to IRF-2, suggesting that interferon-independent activation of Qp is largely mediated by IRF-2 in these cells. We observed no effect of gamma interferon on Qp activity in transfection assays, whereas we observed a moderate but significant repression of Qp activity in response to alpha interferon, possibly mediated by either the interferon consensus sequence binding protein or IRF-7, a novel alpha interferon-inducible factor identified in this study. Since expression of IRF-1 and IRF-2 is increased in response to interferons, the Qp activity observed in the presence of interferon likely represented an equilibrium between IRF factors that activate and those that repress gene expression in response to interferon. Thus, by usurping both IRF-1 and its transcriptional antagonist IRF-2 to activate Qp, EBV has evolved not only a mechanism to constitutively express EBNA-1 but also one which may sustain EBNA-1 expression in the face of the antiviral effects of interferon. PMID:9261415

  9. Transcript profiles in cortical cells of maize primary root during ethylene-induced lysigenous aerenchyma formation under aerobic conditions

    PubMed Central

    Takahashi, Hirokazu; Yamauchi, Takaki; Rajhi, Imene; Nishizawa, Naoko K.; Nakazono, Mikio

    2015-01-01

    Background and Aims Internal aeration is important for plants to survive during periods of waterlogging, and the ability to form aerenchyma contributes by creating a continuous gas space between the shoots and the roots. Roots of maize (Zea mays) react to prolonged waterlogging by forming aerenchyma in root cortical cells by programmed cell death (PCD) in response to ethylene. The aim of this study was to understand the molecular mechanisms of ethylene-induced aerenchyma formation by identifying genes that are either up- or downregulated by ethylene treatment in maize root cortical cells. Methods Three-day-old maize seedlings were treated with ethylene for several hours under aerobic conditions. Cortical cells were isolated from the primary roots using laser microdissection (LM), and transcript profiles with and without ethylene treatment were compared by microarray. In addition, the effect on ethylene-induced aerenchyma formation of diphenyleneiodonium (DPI), an inhibitor of NADPH oxidases, was examined in order to assess the involvement of reactive oxygen species (ROS). Key Results A total of 223 genes were identified whose transcript levels were significantly increased or decreased by ethylene treatment in root cortical cells under aerobic conditions. Subsequent tissue-specific quantitative reverse-transcription PCR analyses revealed that ethylene increased the transcript levels of genes related to ethylene signalling in all of the root tissues examined (stelar cells, cortical cells and outer cell layers), whereas it increased the transcript levels of genes related to cell wall modification and proteolysis specifically in the cortical cells. DPI treatment inhibited the ethylene-induced aerenchyma formation and suppressed expression of some cell wall modification-related genes. Conclusions Several genes related to cell wall modification and proteolysis are specifically up- or downregulated in cortical cells during lysigenous aerenchyma formation under aerobic

  10. Spilled Gallstones Mimicking Peritoneal Metastases

    PubMed Central

    Loan, William; Carey, Declan P.

    2009-01-01

    Background: Spillage of bile and gallstones due to accidental perforation of the gallbladder wall is often encountered during laparoscopic cholecystectomy. Although spilled stones were once considered harmless, there is increasing evidence that they can result in septic or other potential complications. Case Report: We report a case of spilled gallstones mimicking peritoneal metastases on radiological investigations; diagnosis was confirmed by diagnostic laparoscopy. Conclusion: Every effort should be made to retrieve spilled gallstones during laparoscopic cholecystectomy. When all the stones cannot be retrieved, it should be documented in the patient's medical records to avoid delay in the diagnosis of late complications. Diagnostic laparoscopy is useful when the radiological investigations are inconclusive. PMID:19366546

  11. [Severe PERM syndrom mimicking tetanus].

    PubMed

    Wallet, F; Didelot, A; Delannoy, B; Leray, V; Guerin, C

    2014-01-01

    We report the case of a 55-year-old man without significant medical history admitted to the ICU for a progressive paralysis mimicking life-threatening tetanus. Evolution with classical tetanus treatment was negative, with the need for ventilator support and worsening condition being life threatening. Uncommon evolution revealed a rare glycin antibody-associated hyperekplexia (progressive encephalomyelitis with rigidity syndrome). Patient dramatically improved with immunosuppressive therapy including plasmatic exchanges, cyclophasmid and high dose corticoid infusions. Intensivists should be aware of this very rare syndrome whose treatment is the opposite of tetanus while presentation is very close. Optimal and treatment could lead to prolonged survival. PMID:25168299

  12. Colorimetric detection of gene transcript by target-induced three-way junction formation.

    PubMed

    Wang, Xuchu; Liu, Weiwei; Yin, Binbin; Yu, Pan; Duan, Xiuzhi; Liao, Zhaoping; Liu, Chunhua; Sang, Yiwen; Zhang, Gong; Chen, Yuhua; Tao, Zhihua

    2016-09-01

    Gene transcript often varies by alternative splicing, which plays different biological role that results in diversity of gene expression. Therefore, a simple and accurate identification of targeted transcript variant is of prime importance to achieve a precise molecular diagnosis. In this work, we presented a three-way junction based system where two split G-quadruplex forming sequences were coupled into two probes. Only upon the introduction of target gene transcript that offering a specific recognizable splicing site did the two probes assembled into three way junction conformation in a devised process, thus providing a functional G-quadruplex conformation that greatly enhanced hemin peroxidation. A notable resolution for gene splicing site detection was achieved. The detection limitation by colorimetric assay was 0.063μM, and this system has been proved to discriminate even in a single base false level around splicing site (about 3 times of single mismatched analyte to gain an equal signal by perfect analyte ). Furthermore, recoveries of 78.1%, 88.1%, 104.6% were obtained with 0.75μM, 0.25μM, 0.083μM of target, respectively, showing a capacity to further exploit a simple equipped device for gene transcript detection. PMID:27343570

  13. Concordance of Transcriptional and Apical Benchmark Dose Levels for Conazole-Induced Liver Effects in Mice

    EPA Science Inventory

    ABSTRACT The ability to anchor chemical class-based gene expression changes to phenotypic lesions and to describe these changes as a function of dose and time informs mode of action determinations and improves quantitative risk assessments. Previous transcription-based microarra...

  14. Tomato Whole Genome Transcriptional Response to Tetranychus urticae Identifies Divergence of Spider Mite-Induced Responses Between Tomato and Arabidopsis.

    PubMed

    Martel, Catherine; Zhurov, Vladimir; Navarro, Marie; Martinez, Manuel; Cazaux, Marc; Auger, Philippe; Migeon, Alain; Santamaria, M Estrella; Wybouw, Nicky; Diaz, Isabel; Van Leeuwen, Thomas; Navajas, Maria; Grbic, Miodrag; Grbic, Vojislava

    2015-03-01

    The two-spotted spider mite Tetranychus urticae is one of the most significant mite pests in agriculture, feeding on more than 1,100 plant hosts, including model plants Arabidopsis thaliana and tomato, Solanum lycopersicum. Here, we describe timecourse tomato transcriptional responses to spider mite feeding and compare them with Arabidopsis in order to determine conserved and divergent defense responses to this pest. To refine the involvement of jasmonic acid (JA) in mite-induced responses and to improve tomato Gene Ontology annotations, we analyzed transcriptional changes in the tomato JA-signaling mutant defenseless1 (def-1) upon JA treatment and spider mite herbivory. Overlay of differentially expressed genes (DEG) identified in def-1 onto those from the timecourse experiment established that JA controls expression of the majority of genes differentially regulated by herbivory. Comparison of defense responses between tomato and Arabidopsis highlighted 96 orthologous genes (of 2,133 DEG) that were recruited for defense against spider mites in both species. These genes, involved in biosynthesis of JA, phenylpropanoids, flavonoids, and terpenoids, represent the conserved core of induced defenses. The remaining tomato DEG support the establishment of tomato-specific defenses, indicating profound divergence of spider mite-induced responses between tomato and Arabidopsis. PMID:25679539

  15. Serine 105 phosphorylation of transcription factor GATA4 is necessary for stress-induced cardiac hypertrophy in vivo

    PubMed Central

    van Berlo, Jop H.; Elrod, John W.; Aronow, Bruce J.; Pu, William T.; Molkentin, Jeffery D.

    2011-01-01

    Cardiac hypertrophy is an adaptive growth process that occurs in response to stress stimulation or injury wherein multiple signal transduction pathways are induced, culminating in transcription factor activation and the reprogramming of gene expression. GATA4 is a critical transcription factor in the heart that is known to induce/regulate the hypertrophic program, in part, by receiving signals from MAPKs. Here we generated knock-in mice in which a known MAPK phosphorylation site at serine 105 (S105) in Gata4 that augments activity was mutated to alanine. Homozygous Gata4-S105A mutant mice were viable as adults, although they showed a compromised stress response of the myocardium. For example, cardiac hypertrophy in response to phenylephrine agonist infusion for 2 wk was largely blunted in Gata4-S105A mice, as was the hypertrophic response to pressure overload at 1 and 2 wk of applied stimulation. Gata4-S105A mice were also more susceptible to heart failure and cardiac dilation after 2 wk of pressure overload. With respect to the upstream pathway, hearts from Gata4-S105A mice did not efficiently hypertrophy following direct ERK1/2 activation using an activated MEK1 transgene in vivo. Mechanistically, GATA4 mutant protein from these hearts failed to show enhanced DNA binding in response to hypertrophic stimulation. Moreover, hearts from Gata4-S105A mice had significant changes in the expression of hypertrophy-inducible, fetal, and remodeling-related genes. PMID:21746915

  16. DNA damage-inducible transcript 4 (DDIT4) mediates methamphetamine-induced autophagy and apoptosis through mTOR signaling pathway in cardiomyocytes.

    PubMed

    Chen, Rui; Wang, Bin; Chen, Ling; Cai, Dunpeng; Li, Bing; Chen, Chuanxiang; Huang, Enping; Liu, Chao; Lin, Zhoumeng; Xie, Wei-Bing; Wang, Huijun

    2016-03-15

    Methamphetamine (METH) is an amphetamine-like psychostimulant that is commonly abused. Previous studies have shown that METH can induce damages to the nervous system and recent studies suggest that METH can also cause adverse and potentially lethal effects on the cardiovascular system. Recently, we demonstrated that DNA damage-inducible transcript 4 (DDIT4) regulates METH-induced neurotoxicity. However, the role of DDIT4 in METH-induced cardiotoxicity remains unknown. We hypothesized that DDIT4 may mediate METH-induced autophagy and apoptosis in cardiomyocytes. To test the hypothesis, we examined DDIT4 protein expression in cardiomyocytes and in heart tissues of rats exposed to METH with Western blotting. We also determined the effects on METH-induced autophagy and apoptosis after silencing DDIT4 expression with synthetic siRNA with or without pretreatment of a mTOR inhibitor rapamycin in cardiomyocytes using Western blot analysis, fluorescence microscopy and TUNEL staining. Our results showed that METH exposure increased DDIT4 expression and decreased phosphorylation of mTOR that was accompanied with increased autophagy and apoptosis both in vitro and in vivo. These effects were normalized after silencing DDIT4. On the other hand, rapamycin promoted METH-induced autophagy and apoptosis in DDIT4 knockdown cardiomyocytes. These results suggest that DDIT4 mediates METH-induced autophagy and apoptosis through mTOR signaling pathway in cardiomyocytes. PMID:26825372

  17. Therapeutic doses of irradiation activate viral transcription and induce apoptosis in HIV-1 infected cells.

    PubMed

    Iordanskiy, Sergey; Van Duyne, Rachel; Sampey, Gavin C; Woodson, Caitlin M; Fry, Kelsi; Saifuddin, Mohammed; Guo, Jia; Wu, Yuntao; Romerio, Fabio; Kashanchi, Fatah

    2015-11-01

    The highly active antiretroviral therapy reduces HIV-1 RNA in plasma to undetectable levels. However, the virus continues to persist in the long-lived resting CD4(+) T cells, macrophages and astrocytes which form a viral reservoir in infected individuals. Reactivation of viral transcription is critical since the host immune response in combination with antiretroviral therapy may eradicate the virus. Using the chronically HIV-1 infected T lymphoblastoid and monocytic cell lines, primary quiescent CD4(+) T cells and humanized mice infected with dual-tropic HIV-1 89.6, we examined the effect of various X-ray irradiation (IR) doses (used for HIV-related lymphoma treatment and lower doses) on HIV-1 transcription and viability of infected cells. Treatment of both T cells and monocytes with IR, a well-defined stress signal, led to increase of HIV-1 transcription, as evidenced by the presence of RNA polymerase II and reduction of HDAC1 and methyl transferase SUV39H1 on the HIV-1 promoter. This correlated with the increased GFP signal and elevated level of intracellular HIV-1 RNA in the IR-treated quiescent CD4(+) T cells infected with GFP-encoding HIV-1. Exposition of latently HIV-1infected monocytes treated with PKC agonist bryostatin 1 to IR enhanced transcription activation effect of this latency-reversing agent. Increased HIV-1 replication after IR correlated with higher cell death: the level of phosphorylated Ser46 in p53, responsible for apoptosis induction, was markedly higher in the HIV-1 infected cells following IR treatment. Exposure of HIV-1 infected humanized mice with undetectable viral RNA level to IR resulted in a significant increase of HIV-1 RNA in plasma, lung and brain tissues. Collectively, these data point to the use of low to moderate dose of IR alone or in combination with HIV-1 transcription activators as a potential application for the "Shock and Kill" strategy for latently HIV-1 infected cells. PMID:26184775

  18. The estrogen receptor-α-induced microRNA signature regulates itself and its transcriptional response

    PubMed Central

    Castellano, Leandro; Giamas, Georgios; Jacob, Jimmy; Coombes, R. Charles; Lucchesi, Walter; Thiruchelvam, Paul; Barton, Geraint; Jiao, Long R.; Wait, Robin; Waxman, Jonathan; Hannon, Gregory J.; Stebbing, Justin

    2009-01-01

    Following estrogenic activation, the estrogen receptor-α (ERα) directly regulates the transcription of target genes via DNA binding. MicroRNAs (miRNAs) modulated by ERα have the potential to fine tune these regulatory systems and also provide an alternate mechanism that could impact on estrogen-dependent developmental and pathological systems. Through a microarray approach, we identify the subset of microRNAs (miRNAs) modulated by ERα, which include upregulation of miRNAs derived from the processing of the paralogous primary transcripts (pri-) mir-17–92 and mir-106a-363. Characterization of the mir-17–92 locus confirms that the ERα target protein c-MYC binds its promoter in an estrogen-dependent manner. We observe that levels of pri-mir-17–92 increase earlier than the mature miRNAs derived from it, implicating precursor cleavage modulation after transcription. Pri-mir-17–92 is immediately cleaved by DROSHA to pre-miR-18a, indicating that its regulation occurs during the formation of the mature molecule from the precursor. The clinical implications of this novel regulatory system were confirmed by demonstrating that pre-miR-18a was significantly upregulated in ERα-positive compared to ERα-negative breast cancers. Mechanistically, miRNAs derived from these paralogous pri-miRNAs (miR-18a, miR-19b, and miR-20b) target and downregulate ERα, while a subset of pri-miRNA-derived miRNAs inhibit protein translation of the ERα transcriptional p160 coactivator, AIB1. Therefore, different subsets of miRNAs identified act as part of a negative autoregulatory feedback loop. We propose that ERα, c-MYC, and miRNA transcriptional programs invoke a sophisticated network of interactions able to provide the wide range of coordinated cellular responses to estrogen. PMID:19706389

  19. TG-interacting factor transcriptionally induced by AKT/FOXO3A is a negative regulator that antagonizes arsenic trioxide-induced cancer cell apoptosis

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, Zi-Miao; Tseng, Hong-Yu; Cheng, Ya-Ling; Yeh, Bi-Wen; Wu, Wen-Jeng; Huang, Huei-Sheng

    2015-05-15

    Arsenic trioxide (ATO) is a multi-target drug approved by the Food and Drug Administration as the first-line chemotherapeutic agent for the treatment of acute promyelocytic leukemia. In addition, several clinical trials are being conducted with arsenic-based drugs for the treatment of other hematological malignancies and solid tumors. However, ATO's modest clinical efficacy on some cancers, and potential toxic effects on humans have been reported. Determining how best to reduce these adverse effects while increasing its therapeutic efficacy is obviously a critical issue. Previously, we demonstrated that the JNK-induced complex formation of phosphorylated c-Jun and TG-interacting factor (TGIF) antagonizes ERK-induced cyclin-dependent kinase inhibitor CDKN1A (p21{sup WAF1/CIP1}) expression and resultant apoptosis in response to ATO in A431 cells. Surprisingly, at low-concentrations (0.1–0.2 μM), ATO increased cellular proliferation, migration and invasion, involving TGIF expression, however, at high-concentrations (5–20 μM), ATO induced cell apoptosis. Using a promoter analysis, TGIF was transcriptionally regulated by ATO at the FOXO3A binding site (− 1486 to − 1479 bp) via the c-Src/EGFR/AKT pathway. Stable overexpression of TGIF promoted advancing the cell cycle into the S phase, and attenuated 20 μM ATO-induced apoptosis. Furthermore, blockage of the AKT pathway enhanced ATO-induced CDKN1A expression and resultant apoptosis in cancer cells, but overexpression of AKT1 inhibited CDKN1A expression. Therefore, we suggest that TGIF is transcriptionally regulated by the c-Src/EGFR/AKT pathway, which plays a role as a negative regulator in antagonizing ATO-induced CDKN1A expression and resultant apoptosis. Suppression of these antagonistic effects might be a promising therapeutic strategy toward improving clinical efficacy of ATO. - Highlights: • ATO-induced biphasic survival responses of cancer cells depend on low- or high-concentrations. • TGIF mediates

  20. Urea-inducible Egr-1 transcription in renal inner medullary collecting duct (mIMCD3) cells is mediated by extracellular signal-regulated kinase activation.

    PubMed Central

    Cohen, D M

    1996-01-01

    Urea (200-400 milliosmolar) activates transcription, translation of, and trans-activation by the immediate-early gene transcription factor Egr-1 in a renal epithelial cell-specific fashion. The effect at the transcriptional level has been attributed to multiple serum response elements and their adjacent Ets motifs located within the Egr-1 promoter. Elk-1, a principal ternary complex factor and Ets domain-containing protein, is a substrate of the extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK) mitogen-activated protein kinases. In the renal medullary mIMCD3 cell line, urea (200-400 milliosmolar) activated both ERK1 and ERK2 as determined by in-gel kinase assay and immune-complex kinase assay of epitope-tagged] ERK1 and ERK2. Importantly, urea did not affect abundance of either ERK. Urea-inducible Egr-1 transcription was a consequence of ERK activation because the ERK-specific inhibitor, PD98059, abrogated transcription from the murine Egr-1 promoter in a luciferase reported gene assay. In addition, activators of protein kinase A, including forskolin and 8-Br-cAMP, which are known to inhibit ERK-mediated events, also inhibited urea-inducible Egr-1 transcription. Furthermore, urea-inducible activation of the physiological ERK substrate and transcription factor, Elk-1, was demonstrated through transient cotransfection of a chimeric Elk-1/GAL4 expression plasmid and a GAL4-driven luciferase reporter plasmid. Taken together, these data indicate that, in mIMCD3 cells, urea activates ERKs and the ERK substrate, Elk-1, and that ERK inhibition abrogates urea-inducible Egr-1 transcription. These data are consistent with a model of urea-inducible renal medullary gene expression wherein sequential activation of ERKs and Elk-1 results in increased transcription of Egr-1 through serum response element/Ets motifs. Images Fig. 1 Fig. 2 Fig. 3 Fig. 4 Fig. 5 PMID:8855340

  1. The transcription elongation factor NusA is required for stress-induced mutagenesis in Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Cohen, Susan E; Walker, Graham C

    2010-01-12

    Stress-induced mutagenesis describes the accumulation of mutations that occur in nongrowing cells, in contrast to mutagenesis that occurs in actively dividing populations, and has been referred to as stationary-phase or adaptive mutagenesis. The most widely studied system for stress-induced mutagenesis involves monitoring the appearance of Lac(+) revertants of the strain FC40 under starvation conditions in Escherichia coli. The SOS-inducible translesion DNA polymerase DinB plays an important role in this phenomenon. Loss of DinB (DNA pol IV) function results in a severe reduction of Lac(+) revertants. We previously reported that NusA, an essential component of elongating RNA polymerases, interacts with DinB. Here we report our unexpected observation that wild-type NusA function is required for stress-induced mutagenesis. We present evidence that this effect is unlikely to be due to defects in transcription of lac genes but rather is due to an inability to adapt and mutate in response to environmental stress. Furthermore, we extended our analysis to the formation of stress-induced mutants in response to antibiotic treatment, observing the same striking abolition of mutagenesis under entirely different conditions. Our results are the first to implicate NusA as a crucial participant in the phenomenon of stress-induced mutagenesis. PMID:20036541

  2. STAT5 is a key transcription factor for IL-3-mediated inhibition of RANKL-induced osteoclastogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Jongwon; Seong, Semun; Kim, Jung Ha; Kim, Kabsun; Kim, Inyoung; Jeong, Byung-chul; Nam, Kwang-Il; Kim, Kyung Keun; Hennighausen, Lothar; Kim, Nacksung

    2016-01-01

    Among the diverse cytokines involved in osteoclast differentiation, interleukin (IL)-3 inhibits RANKL-induced osteoclastogenesis. However, the mechanism underlying IL-3-mediated inhibition of osteoclast differentiation is not fully understood. Here we demonstrate that the activation of signal transducers and activators of transcription 5 (STAT5) by IL-3 inhibits RANKL-induced osteoclastogenesis through the induction of the expression of Id genes. We found that STAT5 overexpression inhibited RANKL-induced osteoclastogenesis. However, RANKL did not regulate the expression or activation of STAT5 during osteoclast differentiation. STAT5 deficiency prevented IL-3-mediated inhibition of osteoclastogenesis, suggesting a key role of STAT5 in IL-3-mediated inhibition of osteoclast differentiation. In addition, IL-3-induced STAT5 activation upregulated the expression of Id1 and Id2, which are negative regulators of osteoclastogenesis. Overexpression of ID1 or ID2 in STAT5-deficient cells reversed osteoclast development recovered from IL-3-mediated inhibition. Importantly, microcomputed tomography and histomorphometric analysis revealed that STAT5 conditional knockout mice showed reduced bone mass, with an increased number of osteoclasts. Furthermore, IL-3 inhibited RANKL-induced osteoclast differentiation less effectively in the STAT5 conditional knockout mice than in the wild-type mice after RANKL injection. Taken together, our findings indicate that STAT5 contributes to the remarkable IL-3-mediated inhibition of RANKL-induced osteoclastogenesis by activating Id genes and their associated pathways. PMID:27485735

  3. STAT5 is a key transcription factor for IL-3-mediated inhibition of RANKL-induced osteoclastogenesis.

    PubMed

    Lee, Jongwon; Seong, Semun; Kim, Jung Ha; Kim, Kabsun; Kim, Inyoung; Jeong, Byung-Chul; Nam, Kwang-Il; Kim, Kyung Keun; Hennighausen, Lothar; Kim, Nacksung

    2016-01-01

    Among the diverse cytokines involved in osteoclast differentiation, interleukin (IL)-3 inhibits RANKL-induced osteoclastogenesis. However, the mechanism underlying IL-3-mediated inhibition of osteoclast differentiation is not fully understood. Here we demonstrate that the activation of signal transducers and activators of transcription 5 (STAT5) by IL-3 inhibits RANKL-induced osteoclastogenesis through the induction of the expression of Id genes. We found that STAT5 overexpression inhibited RANKL-induced osteoclastogenesis. However, RANKL did not regulate the expression or activation of STAT5 during osteoclast differentiation. STAT5 deficiency prevented IL-3-mediated inhibition of osteoclastogenesis, suggesting a key role of STAT5 in IL-3-mediated inhibition of osteoclast differentiation. In addition, IL-3-induced STAT5 activation upregulated the expression of Id1 and Id2, which are negative regulators of osteoclastogenesis. Overexpression of ID1 or ID2 in STAT5-deficient cells reversed osteoclast development recovered from IL-3-mediated inhibition. Importantly, microcomputed tomography and histomorphometric analysis revealed that STAT5 conditional knockout mice showed reduced bone mass, with an increased number of osteoclasts. Furthermore, IL-3 inhibited RANKL-induced osteoclast differentiation less effectively in the STAT5 conditional knockout mice than in the wild-type mice after RANKL injection. Taken together, our findings indicate that STAT5 contributes to the remarkable IL-3-mediated inhibition of RANKL-induced osteoclastogenesis by activating Id genes and their associated pathways. PMID:27485735

  4. Inhibin beta E is upregulated by drug-induced endoplasmic reticulum stress as a transcriptional target gene of ATF4

    SciTech Connect

    Brüning, Ansgar Matsingou, Christina; Brem, German Johannes; Rahmeh, Martina; Mylonas, Ioannis

    2012-10-15

    Inhibins and activins are gonadal peptide hormones of the transforming growth factor-β super family with important functions in the reproductive system. By contrast, the recently identified inhibin βE subunit, primarily expressed in liver cells, appears to exert functions unrelated to the reproductive system. Previously shown downregulation of inhibin βE in hepatoma cells and anti-proliferative effects of ectopic inhibin βE overexpression indicated growth-regulatory effects of inhibin βE. We observed a selective re-expression of the inhibin βE subunit in HepG2 hepatoblastoma cells, MCF7 breast cancer cells, and HeLa cervical cancer cells under endoplasmic reticulum stress conditions induced by tunicamycin, thapsigargin, and nelfinavir. Analysis of XPB1 splicing and ATF4 activation revealed that inhibin βE re-expression was associated with induction of the endoplasmic reticulum stress reaction by these drugs. Transfection of an ATF4 expression plasmid specifically induced inhibin βE expression in HeLa cells and indicates inhibin βE as a hitherto unidentified target gene of ATF4, a key transcription factor of the endoplasmic reticulum stress response. Therefore, the inhibin βE subunit defines not only a new player but also a possible new marker for drug-induced endoplasmic reticulum stress. -- Highlights: ► Endoplasmic reticulum stress induces inhibin beta E expression. ► Inhibin beta E is regulated by the transcription factor ATF4. ► Inhibin beta E expression can be used as a marker for drug-induced ER stress.

  5. E2F1 localizes predominantly to neuronal cytoplasm and fails to induce expression of its transcriptional targets in Human Immunodeficiency Virus-induced neuronal damage

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Ying; Shyam, Nikhil; Ting, Jenhao H.; Akay, Cagla; Lindl, Kathryn A.; Jordan-Sciutto, Kelly L.

    2010-01-01

    As human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) does not induce neuronal damage by direct infection, the mechanisms of neuronal damage or loss in HIV associated dementia (HAD) remain unclear. We have shown previously that immunoreactivity of transcription factor, E2F1, increases in neurons, localizing predominantly to the cytoplasm, in HIV-associated pathologies. Here we confirm that E2F1 localization is predominantly cytoplasmic in primary post-mitotic neurons in vitro and cortical neurons in vivo. To determine whether E2F1 contributes to neuronal death in HAD via transactivation of target promoters, we assessed the mRNA and protein levels of several classical E2F1 transcriptional targets implicated in cell cycle progression and apoptosis in an in vitro model of HIV-induced neurotoxicity and in cortical autopsy tissue from patients infected with HIV. By qPCR, we show that mRNA levels of E2F1 transcriptional targets implicated in cell cycle progression (E2F1, cyclin A, proliferating cell nuclear antigen (PCNA), and dyhydrofolate reductase (DHFR)) and apoptosis (caspases 3, 8, 9 and p19ARF) remain unchanged in an in vitro model of HIV-induced neurotoxicity. Further, we show that protein levels of p19ARF, Cyclin A, and PCNA are not altered in vitro or in the cortex of patients with HAD. We propose that the predominantly cytoplasmic localization of E2F1 in neurons may account for the lack of E2F1 target transactivation in neurons responding to HIV-induced neurotoxicity. PMID:20580656

  6. EVI1 promotes cell proliferation in HBx-induced hepatocarcinogenesis as a critical transcription factor regulating lncRNAs

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Chen-xi; Guo, Ying-jun; Sun, Shu-han

    2016-01-01

    The involvement of the hepatitis B virus X (HBx) protein in epigenetic modifications during hepatocarcinogenesis has been previously characterized. Long noncoding RNAs (lncRNAs), a kind of epigenetic regulator molecules, have also been shown to play crucial roles in HBx-related hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC). In this study, we analyzed the key transcription factors of aberrantly expressed lncRNAs in the livers of HBx transgenic mice by bioinformatics prediction, and found that ecotropic viral integration site 1 (Evi1) was a potential main transcription regulator. Further investigation showed that EVI1 was positively correlated to HBx expression and was frequently up-regulated in HBV-related HCC tissues. The forced expression of HBx in liver cell lines resulted in a significant increase of the expression of EVI1. Furthermore, suppression of EVI1 expression decreased the proliferation of HCC cells overexpressing HBx in vitro and in vivo. Conclusion: Our findings suggest that EVI1 is frequently up-regulated and regulates a cluster of lncRNAs in HBV-related hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC). These findings highlight a novel mechanism for HBx-induced hepatocarcinogenesis through transcription factor EVI1 and its target lncRNAs, and provide a potential new approach to predict the functions of lncRNAs. PMID:26967394

  7. Inhibition of SREBP transcriptional activity by a boron-containing compound improves lipid homeostasis in diet-induced obesity.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Xiaoping; Xiaoli; Zong, Haihong; Abdulla, Arian; Yang, Ellen S T; Wang, Qun; Ji, Jun-Yuan; Pessin, Jeffrey E; Das, Bhaskar C; Yang, Fajun

    2014-07-01

    Dysregulation of lipid homeostasis is intimately associated with obesity, type 2 diabetes, and cardiovascular diseases. Sterol regulatory-element binding proteins (SREBPs) are the master regulators of lipid biosynthesis. Previous studies have shown that the conserved transcriptional cofactor Mediator complex is critically required for the SREBP transcriptional activity, and recruitment of the Mediator complex to the SREBP transactivation domains (TADs) is through the MED15-KIX domain. Recently, we have synthesized several boron-containing small molecules. Among these novel compounds, BF175 can specifically block the binding of MED15-KIX to SREBP1a-TAD in vitro, resulting in an inhibition of the SREBP transcriptional activity and a decrease of SREBP target gene expression in cultured hepatocytes. Furthermore, BF175 can improve lipid homeostasis in the mouse model of diet-induced obesity. Compared with the control, BF175 treatment decreased the expression of SREBP target genes in mouse livers and decreased hepatic and blood levels of lipids. These results suggest that blocking the interaction between SREBP-TADs and the Mediator complex by small molecules may represent a novel approach for treating diseases with aberrant lipid homeostasis. PMID:24608444

  8. Palmitate induces transcriptional regulation of BACE1 and presenilin by STAT3 in neurons mediated by astrocytes

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Li; Martin, Rebecca; Kohler, Garrett; Chan, Christina

    2013-01-01

    Deregulation of calcium has been implicated in neurodegenerative diseases, including Alzheimer’s disease (AD). Previously, we showed that saturated free-fatty acid, palmitate, causes AD-like changes in primary cortical neurons mediated by astrocytes. However, the molecular mechanisms by which conditioned media from astrocytes cultured in palmitate induces AD-like changes in neurons are unknown. This study demonstrates that this condition media from astrocytes elevates calcium level in the neurons, which subsequently increases calpain activity, a calcium-dependent protease, leading to enhance p25/Cdk5 activity and phosphorylation and activation of the STAT3 (signal transducer and activator of transcription) transcription factor. Inhibiting calpain or Cdk5 significantly reduces the upregulation in nuclear level of pSTAT3, which we found to transcriptionally regulate both BACE1 and presenilin-1, the latter is a catalytic subunit of γ-secretase. Decreasing pSTAT3 levels reduced the mRNA levels of both BACE1 and presenilin-1 to near control levels. These data demonstrate a signal pathway leading to the activation of STAT3, and the generation of the amyloid peptide. Thus, our results suggest that STAT3 is an important potential therapeutic target of AD pathogenesis. PMID:23968646

  9. Transcriptional landscapes at the intersection of neuronal apoptosis and substance P-induced survival: exploring pathways and drug targets.

    PubMed

    Paparone, S; Severini, C; Ciotti, M T; D'Agata, V; Calissano, P; Cavallaro, S

    2016-01-01

    A change in the delicate equilibrium between apoptosis and survival regulates the neurons fate during the development of nervous system and its homeostasis in adulthood. Signaling pathways promoting or protecting from apoptosis are activated by multiple signals, including those elicited by neurotrophic factors, and depend upon specific transcriptional programs. To decipher the rescue program induced by substance P (SP) in cerebellar granule neurons, we analyzed their whole-genome expression profiles after induction of apoptosis and treatment with SP. Transcriptional pathways associated with the survival effect of SP included genes encoding for proteins that may act as pharmacological targets. Inhibition of one of these, the Myc pro-oncogene by treatment with 10058-F4, reverted in a dose-dependent manner the rescue effect of SP. In addition to elucidate the transcriptional mechanisms at the intersection of neuronal apoptosis and survival, our systems biology-based perspective paves the way towards an innovative pharmacology based on targets downstream of neurotrophic factor receptors. PMID:27551538

  10. Transcriptional landscapes at the intersection of neuronal apoptosis and substance P-induced survival: exploring pathways and drug targets

    PubMed Central

    Paparone, S; Severini, C; Ciotti, M T; D’Agata, V; Calissano, P; Cavallaro, S

    2016-01-01

    A change in the delicate equilibrium between apoptosis and survival regulates the neurons fate during the development of nervous system and its homeostasis in adulthood. Signaling pathways promoting or protecting from apoptosis are activated by multiple signals, including those elicited by neurotrophic factors, and depend upon specific transcriptional programs. To decipher the rescue program induced by substance P (SP) in cerebellar granule neurons, we analyzed their whole-genome expression profiles after induction of apoptosis and treatment with SP. Transcriptional pathways associated with the survival effect of SP included genes encoding for proteins that may act as pharmacological targets. Inhibition of one of these, the Myc pro-oncogene by treatment with 10058-F4, reverted in a dose-dependent manner the rescue effect of SP. In addition to elucidate the transcriptional mechanisms at the intersection of neuronal apoptosis and survival, our systems biology-based perspective paves the way towards an innovative pharmacology based on targets downstream of neurotrophic factor receptors. PMID:27551538

  11. New insights into transcription fidelity: thermal stability of non-canonical structures in template DNA regulates transcriptional arrest, pause, and slippage.

    PubMed

    Tateishi-Karimata, Hisae; Isono, Noburu; Sugimoto, Naoki

    2014-01-01

    The thermal stability and topology of non-canonical structures of G-quadruplexes and hairpins in template DNA were investigated, and the effect of non-canonical structures on transcription fidelity was evaluated quantitatively. We designed ten template DNAs: A linear sequence that does not have significant higher-order structure, three sequences that form hairpin structures, and six sequences that form G-quadruplex structures with different stabilities. Templates with non-canonical structures induced the production of an arrested, a slipped, and a full-length transcript, whereas the linear sequence produced only a full-length transcript. The efficiency of production for run-off transcripts (full-length and slipped transcripts) from templates that formed the non-canonical structures was lower than that from the linear. G-quadruplex structures were more effective inhibitors of full-length product formation than were hairpin structure even when the stability of the G-quadruplex in an aqueous solution was the same as that of the hairpin. We considered that intra-polymerase conditions may differentially affect the stability of non-canonical structures. The values of transcription efficiencies of run-off or arrest transcripts were correlated with stabilities of non-canonical structures in the intra-polymerase condition mimicked by 20 wt% polyethylene glycol (PEG). Transcriptional arrest was induced when the stability of the G-quadruplex structure (-ΔG°37) in the presence of 20 wt% PEG was more than 8.2 kcal mol(-1). Thus, values of stability in the presence of 20 wt% PEG are an important indicator of transcription perturbation. Our results further our understanding of the impact of template structure on the transcription process and may guide logical design of transcription-regulating drugs. PMID:24594642

  12. Inhibition of master transcription factors in pluripotent cells induces early stage differentiation.

    PubMed

    De, Debojyoti; Jeong, Myong-Ho; Leem, Young-Eun; Svergun, Dmitri I; Wemmer, David E; Kang, Jong-Sun; Kim, Kyeong Kyu; Kim, Sung-Hou

    2014-02-01

    The potential for pluripotent cells to differentiate into diverse specialized cell types has given much hope to the field of regenerative medicine. Nevertheless, the low efficiency of cell commitment has been a major bottleneck in this field. Here we provide a strategy to enhance the efficiency of early differentiation of pluripotent cells. We hypothesized that the initial phase of differentiation can be enhanced if the transcriptional activity of master regulators of stemness is suppressed, blocking the formation of functional transcriptomes. However, an obstacle is the lack of an efficient strategy to block protein-protein interactions. In this work, we take advantage of the biochemical property of seventeen kilodalton protein (Skp), a bacterial molecular chaperone that binds directly to sex determining region Y-box 2 (Sox2). The small angle X-ray scattering analyses provided a low resolution model of the complex and suggested that the transactivation domain of Sox2 is probably wrapped in a cleft on Skp trimer. Upon the transduction of Skp into pluripotent cells, the transcriptional activity of Sox2 was inhibited and the expression of Sox2 and octamer-binding transcription factor 4 was reduced, which resulted in the expression of early differentiation markers and appearance of early neuronal and cardiac progenitors. These results suggest that the initial stage of differentiation can be accelerated by inhibiting master transcription factors of stemness. This strategy can possibly be applied to increase the efficiency of stem cell differentiation into various cell types and also provides a clue to understanding the mechanism of early differentiation. PMID:24434556

  13. Inducer responses of BenM, a LysR-type transcriptional regulator from Acinetobacter baylyi ADP1

    SciTech Connect

    Craven, Sarah H.; Ezezika, Obidimma C.; Haddad, Sandra; Hall, Ruth A.; Momany, Cory; Neidle, Ellen L.; Georgia

    2009-06-25

    BenM and CatM control transcription of a complex regulon for aromatic compound degradation. These Acinetobacter baylyi paralogues belong to the largest family of prokaryotic transcriptional regulators, the LysR-type proteins. Whereas BenM activates transcription synergistically in response to two effectors, benzoate and cis,cis-muconate, CatM responds only to cis,cis-muconate. Here, site-directed mutagenesis was used to determine the physiological significance of an unexpected benzoate-binding pocket in BenM discovered during structural studies. Residues in BenM were changed to match those of CatM in this hydrophobic pocket. Two BenM residues, R160 and Y293, were found to mediate the response to benzoate. Additionally, alteration of these residues caused benzoate to inhibit activation by cis,cis-muconate, positioned in a separate primary effector-binding site of BenM. The location of the primary site, in an interdomain cleft, is conserved in diverse LysR-type regulators. To improve understanding of this important family, additional regulatory mutants were analysed. The atomic-level structures were characterized of the effector-binding domains of variants that do not require inducers for activation, CatM(R156H) and BenM(R156H,T157S). These structures clearly resemble those of the wild-type proteins in their activated muconate-bound complexes. Amino acid replacements that enable activation without effectors reside at protein interfaces that may impact transcription through effects on oligomerization.

  14. Baculovirus Induced Transcripts in Hemocytes from the Larvae of Heliothis virescens

    PubMed Central

    Breitenbach, Jonathan E.; Shelby, Kent S.; Popham, Holly J.R.

    2011-01-01

    Using RNA-seq digital difference expression profiling methods, we have assessed the gene expression profiles of hemocytes harvested from Heliothis virescens that were challenged with Helicoverpa zea single nucleopolyhedrovirus (HzSNPV). A reference transcriptome of hemocyte-expressed transcripts was assembled from 202 million 42-base tags by combining the sequence data of all samples, and the assembled sequences were then subject to BLASTx analysis to determine gene identities. We used the fully sequenced HzSNPV reference genome to align 477,264 Illumina sequence tags from infected hemocytes in order to document expression of HzSNPV genes at early points during infection. A comparison of expression profiles of control insects to those lethally infected with HzSNPV revealed differential expression of key cellular stress response genes and genes involved in lipid metabolism. Transcriptional regulation of specific insect hormones in baculovirus-infected insects was also altered. A number of transcripts bearing homology to retroviral elements that were detected add to a growing body of evidence for extensive invasion of errantiviruses into the insect genome. Using this method, we completed the first and most comprehensive gene expression survey of both baculoviral infection and host immune defense in lepidopteran larvae. PMID:22163334

  15. Baculovirus induced transcripts in hemocytes from the larvae of Heliothis virescens.

    PubMed

    Breitenbach, Jonathan E; Shelby, Kent S; Popham, Holly J R

    2011-11-01

    Using RNA-seq digital difference expression profiling methods, we have assessed the gene expression profiles of hemocytes harvested from Heliothis virescens that were challenged with Helicoverpa zea single nucleopolyhedrovirus (HzSNPV). A reference transcriptome of hemocyte-expressed transcripts was assembled from 202 million 42-base tags by combining the sequence data of all samples, and the assembled sequences were then subject to BLASTx analysis to determine gene identities. We used the fully sequenced HzSNPV reference genome to align 477,264 Illumina sequence tags from infected hemocytes in order to document expression of HzSNPV genes at early points during infection. A comparison of expression profiles of control insects to those lethally infected with HzSNPV revealed differential expression of key cellular stress response genes and genes involved in lipid metabolism. Transcriptional regulation of specific insect hormones in baculovirus-infected insects was also altered. A number of transcripts bearing homology to retroviral elements that were detected add to a growing body of evidence for extensive invasion of errantiviruses into the insect genome. Using this method, we completed the first and most comprehensive gene expression survey of both baculoviral infection and host immune defense in lepidopteran larvae. PMID:22163334

  16. Pregnancy Complicated by Obesity Induces Global Transcript Expression Alterations in Visceral and Subcutaneous Fat

    PubMed Central

    Bashiri, Asher; Heo, Hye J.; Ben-Avraham, Danny; Mazor, Moshe; Budagov, Temuri; Einstein, Francine H.; Atzmon, Gil

    2014-01-01

    Maternal obesity is a significant risk factor for development of both maternal and fetal metabolic complications. Increase in visceral fat and insulin resistance is a metabolic hallmark of pregnancy, yet little is known how obesity alters adipose cellular function and how this may contribute to pregnancy morbidities. We sought to identify alterations in genome-wide transcription expression in both visceral (omental) and abdominal subcutaneous fat deposits in pregnancy complicated by obesity. Visceral and abdominal subcutaneous fat deposits were collected from normal weight and obese pregnant women (n=4/group) at time of scheduled uncomplicated cesarean section. A genome-wide expression array (Affymetrix Human Exon 1.0 st platform), validated by quantitative real-time PCR, was utilized to establish the gene transcript expression profile in both visceral and abdominal subcutaneous fat in normal weight and obese pregnant women. Global alteration in gene expression was identified in pregnancy complicated by obesity. These regions of variations lead to identification of indolethylamine N-methyltransferase (INMT), tissue factor pathway inhibitor-2 (TFPI-2), and ephrin type-B receptor 6 (EPHB6), not previously associated with fat metabolism during pregnancy. In addition, subcutaneous fat of obese pregnant women demonstrated increased coding protein transcripts associated with apoptosis compared to lean counterparts. Global alteration of gene expression in adipose tissue may contribute to adverse pregnancy outcomes associated with obesity. PMID:24696292

  17. UV-B induced transcript accumulation of DAHP synthase in suspension-cultured Catharanthus roseus cells

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    The enzyme 3-deoxy-D-arabino-heptulosonate-7-phosphate (DAHP) synthase (EC 4.1.2.15) catalyzes the first committed step in the shikimate pathway of tryptophan synthesis, an important precursor for the production of terpenoid indole alkaloids (TIAs). A full-length cDNA encoding nuclear coded chloroplast-specific DAHP synthase transcript was isolated from a Catharanthus roseus cDNA library. This had high sequence similarity with other members of plant DAHP synthase family. This transcript accumulated in suspension cultured C. roseus cells on ultraviolet (UV-B) irradiation. Pretreatment of C.roseus cells with variety of agents such as suramin, N-acetyl cysteine, and inhibitors of calcium fluxes and protein kinases and MAP kinase prevented this effect of UV-B irriadiation. These data further show that the essential components of the signaling pathway involved in accumulation DAHP synthase transcript in C. roseus cells include suramin-sensitive cell surface receptor, staurosporine-sensitive protein kinase and MAP kinase. PMID:20704760

  18. NAC Transcription Factor SPEEDY HYPONASTIC GROWTH Regulates Flooding-Induced Leaf Movement in Arabidopsis[W

    PubMed Central

    Rauf, Mamoona; Arif, Muhammad; Fisahn, Joachim; Xue, Gang-Ping; Balazadeh, Salma; Mueller-Roeber, Bernd

    2013-01-01

    In rosette plants, root flooding (waterlogging) triggers rapid upward (hyponastic) leaf movement representing an important architectural stress response that critically determines plant performance in natural habitats. The directional growth is based on localized longitudinal cell expansion at the lower (abaxial) side of the leaf petiole and involves the volatile phytohormone ethylene (ET). We report the existence of a transcriptional core unit underlying directional petiole growth in Arabidopsis thaliana, governed by the NAC transcription factor SPEEDY HYPONASTIC GROWTH (SHYG). Overexpression of SHYG in transgenic Arabidopsis thaliana enhances waterlogging-triggered hyponastic leaf movement and cell expansion in abaxial cells of the basal petiole region, while both responses are largely diminished in shyg knockout mutants. Expression of several EXPANSIN and XYLOGLUCAN ENDOTRANSGLYCOSYLASE/HYDROLASE genes encoding cell wall–loosening proteins was enhanced in SHYG overexpressors but lowered in shyg. We identified ACC OXIDASE5 (ACO5), encoding a key enzyme of ET biosynthesis, as a direct transcriptional output gene of SHYG and found a significantly reduced leaf movement in response to root flooding in aco5 T-DNA insertion mutants. Expression of SHYG in shoot tissue is triggered by root flooding and treatment with ET, constituting an intrinsic ET-SHYG-ACO5 activator loop for rapid petiole cell expansion upon waterlogging. PMID:24363315

  19. Triorganotin compounds--ligands for "rexinoid" inducible transcription factors: biological effects.

    PubMed

    Brtko, J; Dvorak, Z

    2015-04-01

    We review trialkyltin and triaryltin compounds, representing a class of organometallic compounds that function as nuclear retinoid X receptors (RXR) agonists due to their capability to bind to the ligand-binding domain of RXR subtypes and function as transcriptional activators. RXRs act predominantly as heterodimers with other nuclear receptors as permissive heterodimers with peroxisome proliferator-activated receptors, liver X receptors, farnesoid X receptor, pregnane X receptor and constitutive androstan receptor or as non-permissive heterodimer with vitamin D receptor, and as conditional heterodimers with retinoid receptors, and thyroid hormone receptors. RXR - "partner" receptor heterodimers are considered to be ligand-activated, DNA-binding, trans-acting, transcription-modulating proteins involved in a general molecular mechanism responsible for transcriptional responses in target genes. Tributyltin at even pico- or nanomolar concentrations may cause the superimposition of male genitalia on female in several aquatic organisms, since they are DNA-targeted, mitotic, and their actions are occurring through target gene(s)-mediated pathways. They may cause molecular interactions with reproductive system in mammals, and as potent environmental obesogens, they promote adipocyte differentiation. Organotin compounds become known also for their immunotoxicity, neurotoxicity, for their effects on reproduction and/or development. We also review effects of organotins with respect to levels and activities of hepatic P450s and aromatase activity. PMID:25683035

  20. FHL2 mediates p53-induced transcriptional activation through a direct association with HIPK2

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, Sang-Wang . E-mail: umsj@sejong.ac.kr

    2006-01-27

    To understand the molecular mechanism underlying HIPK2 regulation of the transcriptional activation by p53, we sought to identify the protein that interacts with HIPK2. From our yeast two-hybrid screen, we found that four and a half LIM domains 2 (FHL2) could bind to the C-terminal half of HIPK2. Further assays in yeast mapped the minimal interaction domain to amino acids 812-907 in HIPK2. The interaction was confirmed using a GST pull-down assay in vitro, and an immunoprecipitation (IP) assay and fluorescence microscopy in vivo. FHL2 alone spread throughout both the cytoplasm and nucleus but was redistributed to dot-like structures in the nucleus when HIPK2 was coexpressed in HEK293 cells. When tethered to the Gal4-responsive promoter through the Gal4 DBD fusion, FHL2 showed autonomous transcriptional activity that was enhanced by wild-type HIPK2, but not by the kinase-defective mutant. In addition, FHL2 increased the p53-dependent transcriptional activation and had an additive effect on the activation when coexpressed with HIPK2, which was again not observed with the kinase-defective mutant of HIPK2. Finally, we found a ternary complex of p53, HIPK2, and FHL2 using IP, and their recruitment to the p53-responsive p21Waf1 promoter in chromatin IP assays. Overall, our findings indicate that FHL2 can also regulate p53 via a direct association with HIPK2.

  1. Flavopiridol induces BCL-2 expression and represses oncogenic transcription factors in leukemic blasts from adults with refractory acute myeloid leukemia

    PubMed Central

    Nelson, Dwella M.; Joseph, Biju; Hillion, Joelle; Segal, Jodi; Karp, Judith E.; Resar, Linda M. S.

    2011-01-01

    Flavopiridol is a cyclin-dependent kinase inhibitor that induces cell cycle arrest, apoptosis, and clinical responses in selected patients with acute myeloid leukemia (AML). A better understanding of the molecular pathways targeted by flavopiridol is needed to design optimal combinatorial therapy. Here, we report that in vivo administration of flavopiridol induced expression of the BCL-2 anti-apoptotic gene in leukemic blasts from adult patients with refractory AML. Moreover, flavopiridol repressed the expression of genes encoding oncogenic transcription factors (HMGA1, STAT3, E2F1) and the major subunit of RNA Polymerase II. Our results provide mechanistic insight into the cellular pathways targeted by flavopiridol and suggest that blocking anti-apoptotic pathways could enhance cytotoxicity and improve outcomes in patients treated with flavopiridol. PMID:21728742

  2. An inducible HSP70 gene from the midge Chironomus dilutus: Characterization and transcription profile under environmental stress

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Karouna-Renier, N. K.; Rao, K.R.

    2009-01-01

    In the present study, we identified and characterized an inducible heat shock protein 70 (HSP70) from the midge Chironomus dilutus and investigated the transcriptional profile of the gene under baseline and environmentally stressful conditions. Using real-time quantitative reverse transcriptase-polymerase chain reaction (qRT-PCR), we observed increased expression of CD-HSP70-1 in response to both heat shock and copper stress. We also investigated the expression of this gene during midge development. All C. dilutus developmental stages expressed CD-HSP70-1 under normal conditions, although at extremely low levels. Phylogenetic analysis of the amino acid sequence demonstrated distinct clustering of this gene with inducible HSP70s from other insect species. ?? 2008 The Authors.

  3. On involvement of transcription factors nuclear factor kappa-light-chain-enhancer of activated B cells, activator protein-1 and signal transducer and activator of transcription-3 in photodynamic therapy-induced death of crayfish neurons and satellite glial cells.

    PubMed

    Berezhnaya, Elena; Neginskaya, Marya; Kovaleva, Vera; Sharifulina, Svetlana; Ischenko, Irina; Komandirov, Maxim; Rudkovskii, Mikhail; Uzdensky, Anatoly B

    2015-07-01

    Photodynamic therapy (PDT) is currently used in the treatment of brain tumors. However, not only malignant cells but also neighboring normal neurons and glial cells are damaged during PDT. In order to study the potential role of transcription factors-nuclear factor kappa-light-chain-enhancer of activated B cells (NF-κB), activator protein (AP-1), and signal transducer and activator of transcription-3 (STAT-3)-in photodynamic injury of normal neurons and glia, we photosensitized the isolated crayfish mechanoreceptor consisting of a single sensory neuron enveloped by glial cells. Application of different inhibitors and activators showed that transcription factors NF-κB (inhibitors caffeic acid phenethyl ester and parthenolide, activator betulinic acid), AP-1 (inhibitor SR11302), and STAT-3 (inhibitors stattic and cucurbitacine) influenced PDT-induced death and survival of neurons and glial cells in different ways. These experiments indicated involvement of NF-κB in PDT-induced necrosis of neurons and apoptosis of glial cells. However, in glial cells, it played the antinecrotic role. AP-1 was not involved in PDT-induced necrosis of neurons and glia, but mediated glial apoptosis. STAT-3 was involved in PDT-induced apoptosis of glial cells and necrosis of neurons and glia. Therefore, signaling pathways that regulate cell death and survival in neurons and glial cells are different. Using various inhibitors or activators of transcription factors, one can differently influence the sensitivity and resistance of neurons and glial cells to PDT. PMID:26160345

  4. On involvement of transcription factors nuclear factor kappa-light-chain-enhancer of activated B cells, activator protein-1 and signal transducer and activator of transcription-3 in photodynamic therapy-induced death of crayfish neurons and satellite glial cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Berezhnaya, Elena; Neginskaya, Marya; Kovaleva, Vera; Sharifulina, Svetlana; Ischenko, Irina; Komandirov, Maxim; Rudkovskii, Mikhail; Uzdensky, Anatoly B.

    2015-07-01

    Photodynamic therapy (PDT) is currently used in the treatment of brain tumors. However, not only malignant cells but also neighboring normal neurons and glial cells are damaged during PDT. In order to study the potential role of transcription factors-nuclear factor kappa-light-chain-enhancer of activated B cells (NF-κB), activator protein (AP-1), and signal transducer and activator of transcription-3 (STAT-3)-in photodynamic injury of normal neurons and glia, we photosensitized the isolated crayfish mechanoreceptor consisting of a single sensory neuron enveloped by glial cells. Application of different inhibitors and activators showed that transcription factors NF-κB (inhibitors caffeic acid phenethyl ester and parthenolide, activator betulinic acid), AP-1 (inhibitor SR11302), and STAT-3 (inhibitors stattic and cucurbitacine) influenced PDT-induced death and survival of neurons and glial cells in different ways. These experiments indicated involvement of NF-κB in PDT-induced necrosis of neurons and apoptosis of glial cells. However, in glial cells, it played the antinecrotic role. AP-1 was not involved in PDT-induced necrosis of neurons and glia, but mediated glial apoptosis. STAT-3 was involved in PDT-induced apoptosis of glial cells and necrosis of neurons and glia. Therefore, signaling pathways that regulate cell death and survival in neurons and glial cells are different. Using various inhibitors or activators of transcription factors, one can differently influence the sensitivity and resistance of neurons and glial cells to PDT.

  5. Activation of transcription factor AP-1 and mitogen-activated protein kinases in aniline-induced splenic toxicity

    SciTech Connect

    Khan, M. Firoze . E-mail: mfkhan@utmb.edu; Kannan, Subburaj; Wang Jianling

    2006-01-15

    Signaling mechanisms in aniline-induced fibrogenic and/or tumorigenic response in the spleen are not known. Previous studies have shown that aniline exposure leads to iron accumulation and oxidative stress in the spleen, which may cause activation of redox-sensitive transcription factors and regulate the transcription of genes involved in fibrosis and/or tumorigenesis. To test this, male SD rats were treated with 0.5 mmol/kg/day aniline via drinking water for 30 days, and activation of transcription factor AP-1 was determined in the splenocyte nuclear extracts (NEs). AP-1 DNA-binding activity in the NEs of freshly isolated splenocytes from aniline-treated rats increased in comparison to the controls, as determined by electrophoretic mobility shift assay (EMSA). AP-1 binding was also determined in the NEs of cultured splenocytes (2 h and 24 h), which showed even a greater increase in binding activity at 2 h. The specificity of AP-1 binding for relevant DNA motifs was confirmed by competition EMSA and by supershift EMSA using antibodies specific to c-Jun and c-Fos. To further explore the signaling mechanisms in the AP-1 activation, phosphorylation patterns of mitogen-activated protein kinases (MAPKs) were pursued. Aniline exposure induced increases in the phosphorylation of the three classes of MAPKs: extracellular-signal-regulated kinase (ERK 1/2), c-Jun N-terminal kinase (JNK 1/2), and p38 MAPKs. Furthermore, TGF-{beta}1 mRNA expression showed a 3-fold increase in the spleens of aniline-treated rats. These observations suggest a strong association among MAPK phosphorylation, AP-1 activation, and enhanced TGF-{beta}1 gene expression. The observed sequence of events subsequent to aniline exposure could regulate genes that lead to fibrogenic and/or tumorigenic response in the spleen.

  6. Triptolide abrogates growth of colon cancer and induces cell cycle arrest by inhibiting transcriptional activation of E2F.

    PubMed

    Oliveira, Amanda R; Beyer, Georg; Chugh, Rohit; Skube, Steven J; Majumder, Kaustav; Banerjee, Sulagna; Sangwan, Veena; Li, Lihua; Dawra, Rajinder K; Subramanian, Subbaya; Saluja, Ashok K; Dudeja, Vikas

    2015-06-01

    Despite significant progress in diagnostics and therapeutics, over 50 thousand patients die from colorectal cancer annually. Hence, there is urgent need for new lines of treatment. Triptolide, a natural compound isolated from the Chinese herb Tripterygium wilfordii, is effective against multiple cancers. We have synthesized a water soluble analog of triptolide, named Minnelide, which is currently in phase I trial against pancreatic cancer. The aims of the current study were to evaluate whether triptolide/Minnelide is effective against colorectal cancer and to elucidate the mechanism by which triptolide induces cell death in colorectal cancer. Efficacy of Minnelide was evaluated in subcutaneous xenograft and liver metastasis model of colorectal cancer. For mechanistic studies, colon cancer cell lines HCT116 and HT29 were treated with triptolide and the effect on viability, caspase activation, annexin positivity, lactate dehydrogenase release, and cell cycle progression was evaluated. Effect of triptolide on E2F transcriptional activity, mRNA levels of E2F-dependent genes, E2F1- retinoblastoma protein (Rb) binding, and proteins levels of regulator of G1-S transition was also measured. DNA binding of E2F1 was evaluated by chromatin immunoprecipitation assay. Triptolide decreased colon cancer cell viability in a dose- and time-dependent fashion. Minnelide markedly inhibited the growth of colon cancer in the xenograft and liver metastasis model of colon cancer and more than doubles the median survival of animals with liver metastases from colon cancer. Mechanistically, we demonstrate that at low concentrations triptolide induces apoptotic cell death but at higher concentrations it induces cell cycle arrest. Our data suggest that triptolide is able to induce G1 cell cycle arrest by inhibiting transcriptional activation of E2F1. Our data also show that triptolide downregulates E2F activity by potentially modulating events downstream of DNA binding. Therefore, we conclude

  7. Expression Profiling of the Maize Flavonoid Pathway Genes Controlled by Estradiol-Inducible Transcription Factors CRC and P

    PubMed Central

    Bruce, Wesley; Folkerts, Otto; Garnaat, Carl; Crasta, Oswald; Roth, Brad; Bowen, Ben

    2000-01-01

    To determine the scope of gene expression controlled by the maize transcription factors C1/R and P, which are responsible for activating flavonoid synthesis, we used GeneCalling, an open-ended, gel-based, mRNA-profiling technology, to analyze cell suspension lines of the maize inbred Black Mexican Sweet (BMS) that harbored estradiol-inducible versions of these factors. BMS cells were transformed with a continually expressed estrogen receptor/maize C1 activator domain fusion gene (ER–C1) and either a fusion of C1 and R (CRC), P, or luciferase genes regulated by a promoter containing four repeats of an estrogen receptor binding site. Increasing amounts of luciferase activity, anthocyanins, and flavan-4-ols were detected in the respective cell lines after the addition of estradiol. The expression of both known and novel genes was detected simultaneously in these BMS lines by profiling the mRNA isolated from replicate samples at 0, 6, and 24 hr after estradiol treatment. Numerous cDNA fragments were identified that showed a twofold or greater difference in abundance at 6 and 24 hr than at 0 hr. The cDNA fragments from the known flavonoid genes, except chalcone isomerase (chi1), were induced in the CRC-expressing line after hormone induction, whereas only the chalcone synthase (c2) and flavanone/dihydroflavonol reductase (a1) genes were induced in the P-expressing line, as was expected. Many novel cDNA fragments were also induced or repressed by lines expressing CRC alone, P alone, or both transcription factors in unique temporal patterns. The temporal differences and the evidence of repression indicate a more diverse set of regulatory controls by CRC or P than originally expected. GeneCalling analysis was successful in detecting members of complex metabolic pathways and uncovering novel genes that were either coincidentally regulated or directly involved in such pathways. PMID:10634908

  8. Triptolide Abrogates Growth of Colon Cancer and Induces Cell Cycle Arrest by Inhibiting Transcriptional Activation of E2F

    PubMed Central

    Chugh, Rohit; Skube, Steven J; Majumder, Kaustav; Banerjee, Sulagna; Sangwan, Veena; Li, Lihua; Dawra, Rajinder; Subramanian, Subbaya; Saluja, Ashok; Dudeja, Vikas

    2016-01-01

    Background Despite significant progress in diagnostics and therapeutics, over fifty thousand patients die from colorectal cancer annually. Hence there is urgent need for new lines of treatment. Triptolide, a natural compound isolated from the Chinese herb Tripterygium wilfordii, is effective against multiple cancers. We have synthesized a water soluble analog of triptolide, named Minnelide, which is currently in phase I trial against pancreatic cancer. The aims of the current study were to evaluate whether triptolide/Minnelide is effective against colorectal cancer and to elucidate the mechanism by which triptolide induces cell death in colorectal cancer. Methods Efficacy of Minnelide was evaluated in subcutaneous xenograft and liver metastasis model of colorectal cancer. For mechanistic studies colon cancer cell lines HCT116 and HT29 were treated with triptolide and the effect on viability, caspase activation, annexin positivity, lactate dehydrogenase(LDH) release and cell cycle progression was evaluated. Effect of triptolide on E2F transcriptional activity, mRNA levels of E2F dependent genes, E2F1-Rb binding and proteins levels of regulator of G1-S transition was also measured. DNA binding of E2F1 was evaluated by chromatin immunoprecipitation assay. Results Triptolide decreased colon cancer cell viability in a dose- and time-dependent fashion. Minnelide markedly inhibited the growth of colon cancer in the xenograft and liver metastasis model of colon cancer and more than doubles the median survival of animals with liver metastases from colon cancer. Mechanistically we demonstrate that at low concentrations, triptolide induces apoptotic cell death but at higher concentrations it induces cell cycle arrest. Our data suggest that triptolide is able to induce G1 cell cycle arrest by inhibiting transcriptional activation of E2F1. Our data also show that triptolide downregulates E2F activity by potentially modulating events downstream of DNA binding. Conclusion

  9. Cocaine induces cell death and activates the transcription nuclear factor kappa-B in PC12 cells.

    PubMed

    Lepsch, Lucilia B; Munhoz, Carolina D; Kawamoto, Elisa M; Yshii, Lidia M; Lima, Larissa S; Curi-Boaventura, Maria F; Salgado, Thais M L; Curi, Rui; Planeta, Cleopatra S; Scavone, Cristoforo

    2009-01-01

    Cocaine is a worldwide used drug and its abuse is associated with physical, psychiatric and social problems. The mechanism by which cocaine causes neurological damage is very complex and involves several neurotransmitter systems. For example, cocaine increases extracellular levels of dopamine and free radicals, and modulates several transcription factors. NF-kappaB is a transcription factor that regulates gene expression involved in cellular death. Our aim was to investigate the toxicity and modulation of NF-kappaB activity by cocaine in PC 12 cells. Treatment with cocaine (1 mM) for 24 hours induced DNA fragmentation, cellular membrane rupture and reduction of mitochondrial activity. A decrease in Bcl-2 protein and mRNA levels, and an increase in caspase 3 activity and cleavage were also observed. In addition, cocaine (after 6 hours treatment) activated the p50/p65 subunit of NF-kappaB complex and the pretreatment of the cells with SCH 23390, a D1 receptor antagonist, attenuated the NF-kappaB activation. Inhibition of NF-kappaB activity by using PDTC and Sodium Salicilate increased cell death caused by cocaine. These results suggest that cocaine induces cell death (apoptosis and necrosis) and activates NF-kappaB in PC12 cells. This activation occurs, at least partially, due to activation of D1 receptors and seems to have an anti-apoptotic effect on these cells. PMID:19183502

  10. Overproduction of Indole-3-Acetic Acid in Free-Living Rhizobia Induces Transcriptional Changes Resembling Those Occurring in Nodule Bacteroids.

    PubMed

    Defez, Roberto; Esposito, Roberta; Angelini, Claudia; Bianco, Carmen

    2016-06-01

    Free-living bacteria grown under aerobic conditions were used to investigate, by next-generation RNA sequencing analysis, the transcriptional profiles of Sinorhizobium meliloti wild-type 1021 and its derivative, RD64, overproducing the main auxin indole-3-acetic acid (IAA). Among the upregulated genes in RD64 cells, we detected the main nitrogen-fixation regulator fixJ, the two intermediate regulators fixK and nifA, and several other genes known to be FixJ targets. The gene coding for the sigma factor RpoH1 and other genes involved in stress response, regulated in a RpoH1-dependent manner in S. meliloti, were also induced in RD64 cells. Under microaerobic condition, quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction analysis revealed that the genes fixJL and nifA were up-regulated in RD64 cells as compared with 1021 cells. This work provided evidence that the overexpression of IAA in S. meliloti free-living cells induced many of the transcriptional changes that normally occur in nitrogen-fixing root nodule. PMID:27003799

  11. N-Acetylneuraminic Acid Supplementation Prevents High Fat Diet-Induced Insulin Resistance in Rats through Transcriptional and Nontranscriptional Mechanisms.

    PubMed

    Yida, Zhang; Imam, Mustapha Umar; Ismail, Maznah; Ismail, Norsharina; Azmi, Nur Hanisah; Wong, Waiteng; Altine Adamu, Hadiza; Md Zamri, Nur Diyana; Ideris, Aini; Abdullah, Maizaton Atmadini

    2015-01-01

    N-Acetylneuraminic acid (Neu5Ac) is a biomarker of cardiometabolic diseases. In the present study, we tested the hypothesis that dietary Neu5Ac may improve cardiometabolic indices. A high fat diet (HFD) + Neu5Ac (50 or 400 mg/kg BW/day) was fed to rats and compared with HFD + simvastatin (10 mg/kg BW/day) or HFD alone for 12 weeks. Weights and serum biochemicals (lipid profile, oral glucose tolerance test, leptin, adiponectin, and insulin) were measured, and mRNA levels of insulin signaling genes were determined. The results indicated that low and high doses of sialic acid (SA) improved metabolic indices, although only the oral glucose tolerance test, serum triglycerides, leptin, and adiponectin were significantly better than those in the HFD and HFD + simvastatin groups (P < 0.05). Furthermore, the results showed that only high-dose SA significantly affected the transcription of hepatic and adipose tissue insulin signaling genes. The data suggested that SA prevented HFD-induced insulin resistance in rats after 12 weeks of administration through nontranscriptionally mediated biochemical changes that may have differentially sialylated glycoprotein structures at a low dose. At higher doses, SA induced transcriptional regulation of insulin signaling genes. These effects suggest that low and high doses of SA may produce similar metabolic outcomes in relation to insulin sensitivity through multiple mechanisms. These findings are worth studying further. PMID:26688813

  12. Epstein-Barr virus induces cellular transcription factors to allow active expression of EBER genes by RNA polymerase III.

    PubMed

    Felton-Edkins, Zoë A; Kondrashov, Alexander; Karali, Dimitra; Fairley, Jennifer A; Dawson, Christopher W; Arrand, John R; Young, Lawrence S; White, Robert J

    2006-11-10

    The EBER genes of Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) are transcribed by RNA polymerase (pol) III to produce untranslated RNAs that are implicated in oncogenesis. These EBER transcripts are the most highly expressed viral gene products in EBV-transformed cells. We have identified changes to the cellular transcription machinery that may contribute to the high levels of EBER RNA. These include phosphorylation of ATF2, which interacts with EBER promoters. A second is induction of TFIIIC, a pol III-specific factor that activates EBER genes; all five subunits of TFIIIC are overexpressed in EBV-positive cells. In addition, EBV induces BDP1, a subunit of the pol III-specific factor TFIIIB. Although BDP1 is the only TFIIIB subunit induced by EBV, its induction is sufficient to stimulate EBER expression in vivo, implying a limiting function. The elevated levels of BDP1 and TFIIIC in EBV-positive cells stimulate production of tRNA, 7SL, and 5S rRNA. Abnormally high expression of these cellular pol III products may contribute to the ability of EBV to enhance growth potential. PMID:16956891

  13. N-Acetylneuraminic Acid Supplementation Prevents High Fat Diet-Induced Insulin Resistance in Rats through Transcriptional and Nontranscriptional Mechanisms

    PubMed Central

    Yida, Zhang; Imam, Mustapha Umar; Ismail, Maznah; Ismail, Norsharina; Azmi, Nur Hanisah; Wong, Waiteng; Altine Adamu, Hadiza; Md Zamri, Nur Diyana; Ideris, Aini; Abdullah, Maizaton Atmadini

    2015-01-01

    N-Acetylneuraminic acid (Neu5Ac) is a biomarker of cardiometabolic diseases. In the present study, we tested the hypothesis that dietary Neu5Ac may improve cardiometabolic indices. A high fat diet (HFD) + Neu5Ac (50 or 400 mg/kg BW/day) was fed to rats and compared with HFD + simvastatin (10 mg/kg BW/day) or HFD alone for 12 weeks. Weights and serum biochemicals (lipid profile, oral glucose tolerance test, leptin, adiponectin, and insulin) were measured, and mRNA levels of insulin signaling genes were determined. The results indicated that low and high doses of sialic acid (SA) improved metabolic indices, although only the oral glucose tolerance test, serum triglycerides, leptin, and adiponectin were significantly better than those in the HFD and HFD + simvastatin groups (P < 0.05). Furthermore, the results showed that only high-dose SA significantly affected the transcription of hepatic and adipose tissue insulin signaling genes. The data suggested that SA prevented HFD-induced insulin resistance in rats after 12 weeks of administration through nontranscriptionally mediated biochemical changes that may have differentially sialylated glycoprotein structures at a low dose. At higher doses, SA induced transcriptional regulation of insulin signaling genes. These effects suggest that low and high doses of SA may produce similar metabolic outcomes in relation to insulin sensitivity through multiple mechanisms. These findings are worth studying further. PMID:26688813

  14. Mouse GATA-4: a retinoic acid-inducible GATA-binding transcription factor expressed in endodermally derived tissues and heart.

    PubMed Central

    Arceci, R J; King, A A; Simon, M C; Orkin, S H; Wilson, D B

    1993-01-01

    We report the cDNA cloning and characterization of mouse GATA-4, a new member of the family of zinc finger transcription factors that bind a core GATA motif. GATA-4 cDNA was identified by screening a 6.5-day mouse embryo library with oligonucleotide probes corresponding to a highly conserved region of the finger domains. Like other proteins of the family, GATA-4 is approximately 50 kDa in size and contains two zinc finger domains of the form C-X-N-C-(X17)-C-N-X-C. Cotransfection assays in heterologous cells demonstrate that GATA-4 trans activates reporter constructs containing GATA promoter elements. Northern (RNA) analysis and in situ hybridization show that GATA-4 mRNA is expressed in the heart, intestinal epithelium, primitive endoderm, and gonads. Retinoic acid-induced differentiation of mouse F9 cells into visceral or parietal endoderm is accompanied by increased expression of GATA-4 mRNA and protein. In vitro differentiation of embryonic stem cells into embryoid bodies is also associated with increased GATA-4 expression. We conclude that GATA-4 is a tissue-specific, retinoic acid-inducible, and developmentally regulated transcription factor. On the basis of its tissue distribution, we speculate that GATA-4 plays a role in gene expression in the heart, intestinal epithelium, primitive endoderm, and gonads. Images PMID:8455608

  15. The cytoskeletal protein ezrin regulates EC proliferation and angiogenesis via TNF-α–induced transcriptional repression of cyclin A

    PubMed Central

    Kishore, Raj; Qin, Gangjian; Luedemann, Corinne; Bord, Evelyn; Hanley, Allison; Silver, Marcy; Gavin, Mary; Goukassain, David; Losordo, Douglas W.

    2005-01-01

    TNF-α modulates EC proliferation and thereby plays a central role in new blood vessel formation in physiologic and pathologic circumstances. TNF-α is known to downregulate cyclin A, a key cell cycle regulatory protein, but little else is known about how TNF-α modulates EC cell cycle and angiogenesis. Using primary ECs, we show that ezrin, previously considered to act primarily as a cytoskeletal protein and in cytoplasmic signaling, is a TNF-α–induced transcriptional repressor. TNF-α exposure leads to Rho kinase–mediated phosphorylation of ezrin, which translocates to the nucleus and binds to cell cycle homology region repressor elements within the cyclin A promoter. Overexpression of dominant-negative ezrin blocks TNF-α–induced modulation of ezrin function and rescues cyclin A expression and EC proliferation. In vivo, blockade of ezrin leads to enhanced transplanted EC proliferation and angiogenesis in a mouse hind limb ischemia model. These observations suggest that TNF-α regulates angiogenesis via Rho kinase induction of a transcriptional repressor function of the cytoskeletal protein ezrin and that ezrin may represent a suitable therapeutic target for processes dependent on EC proliferation. PMID:15965500

  16. Black hole mimickers: Regular versus singular behavior

    SciTech Connect

    Lemos, Jose P. S.; Zaslavskii, Oleg B.

    2008-07-15

    Black hole mimickers are possible alternatives to black holes; they would look observationally almost like black holes but would have no horizon. The properties in the near-horizon region where gravity is strong can be quite different for both types of objects, but at infinity it could be difficult to discern black holes from their mimickers. To disentangle this possible confusion, we examine the near-horizon properties, and their connection with far away asymptotic properties, of some candidates to black mimickers. We study spherically symmetric uncharged or charged but nonextremal objects, as well as spherically symmetric charged extremal objects. Within the uncharged or charged but nonextremal black hole mimickers, we study nonextremal {epsilon}-wormholes on the threshold of the formation of an event horizon, of which a subclass are called black foils, and gravastars. Within the charged extremal black hole mimickers we study extremal {epsilon}-wormholes on the threshold of the formation of an event horizon, quasi-black holes, and wormholes on the basis of quasi-black holes from Bonnor stars. We elucidate whether or not the objects belonging to these two classes remain regular in the near-horizon limit. The requirement of full regularity, i.e., finite curvature and absence of naked behavior, up to an arbitrary neighborhood of the gravitational radius of the object enables one to rule out potential mimickers in most of the cases. A list ranking the best black hole mimickers up to the worst, both nonextremal and extremal, is as follows: wormholes on the basis of extremal black holes or on the basis of quasi-black holes, quasi-black holes, wormholes on the basis of nonextremal black holes (black foils), and gravastars. Since in observational astrophysics it is difficult to find extremal configurations (the best mimickers in the ranking), whereas nonextremal configurations are really bad mimickers, the task of distinguishing black holes from their mimickers seems to

  17. BET Inhibition Attenuates Helicobacter pylori-Induced Inflammatory Response by Suppressing Inflammatory Gene Transcription and Enhancer Activation.

    PubMed

    Chen, Jinjing; Wang, Zhen; Hu, Xiangming; Chen, Ruichuan; Romero-Gallo, Judith; Peek, Richard M; Chen, Lin-Feng

    2016-05-15

    Helicobacter pylori infection causes chronic gastritis and peptic ulceration. H. pylori-initiated chronic gastritis is characterized by enhanced expression of many NF-κB-regulated inflammatory cytokines. Brd4 has emerged as an important NF-κB regulator and regulates the expression of many NF-κB-dependent inflammatory genes. In this study, we demonstrated that Brd4 was not only actively involved in H. pylori-induced inflammatory gene mRNA transcription but also H. pylori-induced inflammatory gene enhancer RNA (eRNA) synthesis. Suppression of H. pylori-induced eRNA synthesis impaired H. pylori-induced mRNA synthesis. Furthermore, H. pylori stimulated NF-κB-dependent recruitment of Brd4 to the promoters and enhancers of inflammatory genes to facilitate the RNA polymerase II-mediated eRNA and mRNA synthesis. Inhibition of Brd4 by JQ1 attenuated H. pylori-induced eRNA and mRNA synthesis for a subset of NF-κB-dependent inflammatory genes. JQ1 also inhibited H. pylori-induced interaction between Brd4 and RelA and the recruitment of Brd4 and RNA polymerase II to the promoters and enhancers of inflammatory genes. Finally, we demonstrated that JQ1 suppressed inflammatory gene expression, inflammation, and cell proliferation in H. pylori-infected mice. These studies highlight the importance of Brd4 in H. pylori-induced inflammatory gene expression and suggest that Brd4 could be a potential therapeutic target for the treatment of H. pylori-triggered inflammatory diseases and cancer. PMID:27084101

  18. Rational Design of Pathogen-Mimicking Amphiphilic Materials as Nanoadjuvants

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ulery, Bret D.; Petersen, Latrisha K.; Phanse, Yashdeep; Kong, Chang Sun; Broderick, Scott R.; Kumar, Devender; Ramer-Tait, Amanda E.; Carrillo-Conde, Brenda; Rajan, Krishna; Wannemuehler, Michael J.; Bellaire, Bryan H.; Metzger, Dennis W.; Narasimhan, Balaji

    2011-12-01

    An opportunity exists today for cross-cutting research utilizing advances in materials science, immunology, microbial pathogenesis, and computational analysis to effectively design the next generation of adjuvants and vaccines. This study integrates these advances into a bottom-up approach for the molecular design of nanoadjuvants capable of mimicking the immune response induced by a natural infection but without the toxic side effects. Biodegradable amphiphilic polyanhydrides possess the unique ability to mimic pathogens and pathogen associated molecular patterns with respect to persisting within and activating immune cells, respectively. The molecular properties responsible for the pathogen-mimicking abilities of these materials have been identified. The value of using polyanhydride nanovaccines was demonstrated by the induction of long-lived protection against a lethal challenge of Yersinia pestis following a single administration ten months earlier. This approach has the tantalizing potential to catalyze the development of next generation vaccines against diseases caused by emerging and re-emerging pathogens.

  19. Odontogenic Keratocyst Mimicking Paradental Cyst

    PubMed Central

    Borgonovo, Andrea Enrico; Bernardini, Luigi; Francinetti, Paola

    2014-01-01

    Objective. The aim of this paper is to present an uncommon clinical and radiographic aspect of odontogenic keratocyst (OKC) mimicking paradental cyst. Methods. A 32-year-old female patient showed a well-delimited radiolucent lesion connected with the root of the left third molar with close anatomical relationship with the mandibular canal. The clinical, radiographic, and anamnestic features lead us to diagnose a paradental cyst that was treated by enucleation after extraction of the partially impacted tooth. Results. Histological analysis showed typical histological features of PKC such as the presence of a lining of stratified squamous epithelium with a well-defined basal layer of palisading columnar of cuboidal cells. Conclusion. Initial X-ray analysis and the position of the lesion related to the third mandibular tooth caused us to mistakenly diagnose a paradental cyst. We were only able to identify the cyst as an PKC rather than a paradental cyst after histological analysis. PMID:25114809

  20. Subaortic membrane mimicking hypertrophic cardiomyopathy.

    PubMed

    Anderson, Mark Joseph; Arruda-Olson, Adelaide; Gersh, Bernard; Geske, Jeffrey

    2015-01-01

    A 34-year-old man was referred for progressive angina and exertional dyspnoea refractory to medical therapy, with a presumptive diagnosis of hypertrophic cardiomyopathy (HCM). Transthoracic echocardiography (TTE) revealed asymmetric septal hypertrophy without systolic anterior motion of the mitral valve leaflet and with no dynamic left ventricular outflow tract (LVOT) obstruction. However, the LVOT velocity was elevated at rest as well as with provocation, without the characteristic late peaking obstruction seen in HCM. Focused TTE to evaluate for suspected fixed obstruction demonstrated a subaortic membrane 2.2 cm below the aortic valve. Coronary CT angiography confirmed the presence of the subaortic membrane and was negative for concomitant coronary artery disease. Surgical resection of the subaortic membrane and septal myectomy resulted in significant symptomatic relief and lower LVOT velocities on postoperative TTE. This case reminds the clinician to carefully evaluate for alternative causes of LVOT obstruction, especially subaortic membrane, as a cause of symptoms mimicking HCM. PMID:26538250

  1. Elevated hepatic apolipoprotein A-I transcription is associated with diet-induced hyperalphalipoproteinemia in rabbits.

    PubMed

    Schwab, D A; Rea, T J; Hanselman, J C; Bisgaier, C L; Krause, B R; Pape, M E

    2000-03-24

    Past studies have shown that a high saturated fatty acid diet containing coconut oil elevates plasma HDL cholesterol and apolipoprotein A-I (apoA-1) in rabbits through a mechanism involving increased synthesis. We have extended those studies by investigating expression of the hepatic apolipoprotein A-I gene and other lipid related genes in that model. Rabbits fed a diet containing 14% coconut oil for 4 weeks showed HDL-C elevations of 170% to 250% over chow-fed controls with peak differences occurring at 1 week. Plasma apoA-I levels were also increased over this time frame (160% to 180%) reflecting the HDL-C changes. After 4 weeks, there were no differences in plasma VLDL-C or LDL-C levels in chow versus coconut oil-fed rabbits. Hepatic levels of apoA-I mRNA in coconut oil-fed animals were elevated 150% after 4 weeks compared to chow-fed controls; hepatic mRNA levels for ten other genes either decreased slightly (apoB, LCAT, hepatic lipase, albumin, ACAT, and HMG CoA reductase) or were unchanged (CETP, apoE, LDL-receptor, and acyl CoA oxidase). Nuclear run-on transcription assays revealed that coconut oil feeding for 4 weeks caused a 220% increase in hepatic apoA-I transcription rate compared to controls; no change was observed for CETP and apoE. Treatment of cultured rabbit liver cells with various saturated fatty acids and sera from chow-fed and coconut oil-fed rabbits did not alter apoA-I mRNA levels as observed in vivo. These data demonstrate that coconut oil elevates plasma HDL-C and apoA-I by increasing hepatic apoA-I transcription while expression of other genes involved in lipid metabolism are reduced or unchanged in response to coconut oil feeding. PMID:10809165

  2. Endothelial Inflammatory Transcriptional Responses Induced by Plasma Following Inhalation of Diesel Emissions

    PubMed Central

    Schisler, Jonathan C.; Ronnebaum, Sarah M.; Madden, Michael; Channell, Meghan M.; Campen, Matthew J.; Willis, Monte S.

    2016-01-01

    Background Air pollution, especially emissions derived from traffic sources, is associated with adverse cardiovascular outcomes. However, it remains unclear how inhaled factors drive extrapulmonary pathology. Objectives Previously, we found that canonical inflammatory response transcripts were elevated in cultured endothelial cells treated with plasma obtained after exposure compared with pre-exposure samples or filtered air (sham) exposures. While the findings confirmed the presence of bioactive factor(s) in the plasma after diesel inhalation, we wanted to better examine the complete genomic response to investigate 1) major responsive transcripts and 2) collected response pathways and ontogeny that may help to refine this method and inform the pathogenesis. Methods We assayed endothelial RNA with gene expression microarrays, examining the responses of cultured endothelial cells to plasma obtained from 6 healthy human subjects exposed to 100 μg/m3 diesel exhaust or filtered air for 2 h on separate occasions. In addition to pre-exposure baseline samples, we investigated samples obtained immediately-post and 24h-post exposure. Results Microarray analysis of the coronary artery endothelial cells challenged with plasma identified 855 probes that changed over time following diesel exhaust exposure. Over-representation analysis identified inflammatory cytokine pathways were upregulated both at the 2 and 24 h condition. Novel pathways related to FOX transcription factors and secreted extracellular factors were also identified in the microarray analysis. Conclusions These outcomes are consistent with our recent findings that plasma contains bioactive and inflammatory factors following pollutant inhalation. The specific study design implicates a novel pathway related to inflammatory blood borne components that may drive the extrapulmonary toxicity of ambient air pollutants. PMID:25942053

  3. Molecular characterization of BZR transcription factor family and abiotic stress induced expression profiling in Brassica rapa.

    PubMed

    Saha, Gopal; Park, Jong-In; Jung, Hee-Jeong; Ahmed, Nasar Uddin; Kayum, Md Abdul; Kang, Jong-Goo; Nou, Ill-Sup

    2015-07-01

    BRASSINAZOLE-RESISTANT (BZR) transcription factors (TFs) are primarily well known as positive regulators of Brassinosteroid (BR) signal transduction in different plants. BR is a plant specific steroid hormone, which has multiple stress resistance functions besides various growth regulatory roles. Being an important regulator of the BR synthesis, BZR TFs might have stress resistance related activities. However, no stress resistance related functional study of BZR TFs has been reported in any crop plants so far. Therefore, this study identified 15 BZR TFs of Brassica rapa (BrBZR) from a genome-wide survey and characterized them through sequence analysis and expression profiling against several abiotic stresses. Various systematic in silico analysis of these TFs validated the fundamental properties of BZRs, where a high degree of similarity also observed with recognized BZRs of other plant species from the comparison studies. In the organ specific expression analyses, 6 BrBZR TFs constitutively expressed in flower developmental stages indicating their flower specific functions. Subsequently, from the stress resistance related expression profiles differential transcript abundance levels were observed by 6 and 11 BrBZRs against salt and drought stresses, respectively. All BrBZRs showed several folds up-regulation against exogenous ABA treatment. All BrBZRs also showed differential expression against low temperature stress treatments and these TFs were proposed as transcriptional activators of CBF cold response pathway of B. rapa. Notably, three BrBZRs gave co-responsive expression against all the stresses tested here, suggesting their multiple stress resistance related functions. Thus, the findings would be helpful in resolving the complex regulatory mechanism of BZRs in stress resistance and further functional genomics study of these potential TFs in different Brassica crops. PMID:25931321

  4. Transcription Factor Amr1 Induces Melanin Biosynthesis and Suppresses Virulence in Alternaria brassicicola

    SciTech Connect

    Cho, Yangrae; Srivastava, Akhil; Ohm, Robin A.; Lawrence, Christopher B.; Wang, Koon-Hui; Grigoriev, Igor V.; Marahatta, Sharadchandra P.

    2012-05-01

    Alternaria brassicicola is a successful saprophyte and necrotrophic plant pathogen. Several A. brassicicola genes have been characterized as affecting pathogenesis of Brassica species. To study regulatory mechanisms of pathogenesis, we mined 421 genes in silico encoding putative transcription factors in a machine-annotated, draft genome sequence of A. brassicicola. In this study, targeted gene disruption mutants for 117 of the transcription factor genes were produced and screened. Three of these genes were associated with pathogenesis. Disruption mutants of one gene (AbPacC) were nonpathogenic and another gene (AbVf8) caused lesions less than half the diameter of wild-type lesions. Unexpectedly, mutants of the third gene, Amr1, caused lesions with a two-fold larger diameter than the wild type and complementation mutants. Amr1 is a homolog of Cmr1, a transcription factor that regulates melanin biosynthesis in several fungi. We created gene deletion mutants of ?amr1 and characterized their phenotypes. The ?amr1 mutants used pectin as a carbon source more efficiently than the wild type, were melanin-deficient, and more sensitive to UV light and glucanase digestion. The AMR1 protein was localized in the nuclei of hyphae and in highly melanized conidia during the late stage of plant pathogenesis. RNA-seq analysis revealed that three genes in the melanin biosynthesis pathway, along with the deleted Amr1 gene, were expressed at low levels in the mutants. In contrast, many hydrolytic enzyme-coding genes were expressed at higher levels in the mutants than in the wild type during pathogenesis. The results of this study suggested that a gene important for survival in nature negatively affected virulence, probably by a less efficient use of plant cell-wall materials. We speculate that the functions of the Amr1 gene are important to the success of A. brassicicola as a competitive saprophyte and plant parasite.

  5. TGF-β1-induced transcription factor networks in Langerhans cell development and maintenance.

    PubMed

    Zhang, X; Gu, J; Yu, F-S; Zhou, L; Mi, Q-S

    2016-06-01

    Langerhans cells (LC) represent a specialized subset of evolutionarily conserved dendritic cells (DC) that populate stratified epithelial tissues, which are essential for the induction of skin and mucosal immunity and tolerance, including allergy. Transforming growth factor-β1 (TGF-β1) has been confirmed to be a predominant factor involved in LC development. Despite great advances in the understanding of LC ontogeny and diverse replenishment patterns, the underlying molecular mechanisms remain elusive. This review focuses on the recent discoveries in TGF-β1-mediated LC development and maintenance, with special attention to the involved transcription factors and related regulators. PMID:26948524

  6. Activation of nuclear transcription factor-kappaB in mouse brain induced by a simulated microgravity environment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wise, Kimberly C.; Manna, Sunil K.; Yamauchi, Keiko; Ramesh, Vani; Wilson, Bobby L.; Thomas, Renard L.; Sarkar, Shubhashish; Kulkarni, Anil D.; Pellis, Neil R.; Ramesh, Govindarajan T.

    2005-01-01

    Microgravity induces inflammatory responses and modulates immune functions that may increase oxidative stress. Exposure to a microgravity environment induces adverse neurological effects; however, there is little research exploring the etiology of these effects resulting from exposure to such an environment. It is also known that spaceflight is associated with increase in oxidative stress; however, this phenomenon has not been reproduced in land-based simulated microgravity models. In this study, an attempt has been made to show the induction of reactive oxygen species (ROS) in mice brain, using ground-based microgravity simulator. Increased ROS was observed in brain stem and frontal cortex with concomitant decrease in glutathione, on exposing mice to simulated microgravity for 7 d. Oxidative stress-induced activation of nuclear factor-kappaB was observed in all the regions of the brain. Moreover, mitogen-activated protein kinase kinase was phosphorylated equally in all regions of the brain exposed to simulated microgravity. These results suggest that exposure of brain to simulated microgravity can induce expression of certain transcription factors, and these have been earlier argued to be oxidative stress dependent.

  7. Activation of nuclear transcription factor-kappaB in mouse brain induced by a simulated microgravity environment.

    PubMed

    Wise, Kimberly C; Manna, Sunil K; Yamauchi, Keiko; Ramesh, Vani; Wilson, Bobby L; Thomas, Renard L; Sarkar, Shubhashish; Kulkarni, Anil D; Pellis, Neil R; Ramesh, Govindarajan T

    2005-01-01

    Microgravity induces inflammatory responses and modulates immune functions that may increase oxidative stress. Exposure to a microgravity environment induces adverse neurological effects; however, there is little research exploring the etiology of these effects resulting from exposure to such an environment. It is also known that spaceflight is associated with increase in oxidative stress; however, this phenomenon has not been reproduced in land-based simulated microgravity models. In this study, an attempt has been made to show the induction of reactive oxygen species (ROS) in mice brain, using ground-based microgravity simulator. Increased ROS was observed in brain stem and frontal cortex with concomitant decrease in glutathione, on exposing mice to simulated microgravity for 7 d. Oxidative stress-induced activation of nuclear factor-kappaB was observed in all the regions of the brain. Moreover, mitogen-activated protein kinase kinase was phosphorylated equally in all regions of the brain exposed to simulated microgravity. These results suggest that exposure of brain to simulated microgravity can induce expression of certain transcription factors, and these have been earlier argued to be oxidative stress dependent. PMID:16029073

  8. RNA Polymerase III Transcriptomes in Human Embryonic Stem Cells and Induced Pluripotent Stem Cells, and Relationships with Pluripotency Transcription Factors

    PubMed Central

    Alla, Ravi K.; Cairns, Bradley R.

    2014-01-01

    Recent genomic approaches have revealed that the repertoire of RNA Pol III-transcribed genes varies in different human cell types, and that this variation is likely determined by a combination of the chromatin landscape, cell-specific DNA-binding transcription factors, and collaboration with RNA Pol II. Although much is known about this regulation in differentiated human cells, there is presently little understanding of this aspect of the Pol III system in human ES cells. Here, we determine the occupancy profiles of Pol III components in human H1 ES cells, and also induced pluripotent cells, and compare to known profiles of chromatin, transcription factors, and RNA expression. We find a relatively large fraction of the Pol III repertoire occupied in human embryonic stem cells (hESCs) and induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs). In ES cells we find clear correlations between Pol III occupancy and active chromatin. Interestingly, we find a highly significant fraction of Pol III-occupied genes with adjacent binding events by pluripotency factors in ES cells, especially NANOG. Notably, in human ES cells we find H3K27me3 adjacent to but not overlapping many active Pol III loci. We observe in all such cases, a peak of H3K4me3 and/or RNA Pol II, between the H3K27me3 and Pol III binding peaks, suggesting that H3K4me3 and Pol II activity may “insulate” Pol III from neighboring repressive H3K27me3. Further, we find iPSCs have a larger Pol III repertoire than their precursors. Finally, the active Pol III genome in iPSCs is not completely reprogrammed to a hESC like state and partially retains the transcriptional repertoire of the precursor. Together, our correlative results are consistent with Pol III binding and activity in human ES cells being enabled by active/permissive chromatin that is shaped in part by the pluripotency network of transcription factors and RNA Pol II activity. PMID:24465633

  9. The Intracellular Domain of Teneurin-1 Induces the Activity of Microphthalmia-associated Transcription Factor (MITF) by Binding to Transcriptional Repressor HINT1

    PubMed Central

    Schöler, Jonas; Ferralli, Jacqueline; Thiry, Stéphane; Chiquet-Ehrismann, Ruth

    2015-01-01

    Teneurins are large type II transmembrane proteins that are necessary for the normal development of the CNS. Although many studies highlight the significance of teneurins, especially during development, there is only limited information known about the molecular mechanisms of function. Previous studies have shown that the N-terminal intracellular domain (ICD) of teneurins can be cleaved at the membrane and subsequently translocates to the nucleus, where it can influence gene transcription. Because teneurin ICDs do not contain any intrinsic DNA binding sequences, interaction partners are required to affect transcription. Here, we identified histidine triad nucleotide binding protein 1 (HINT1) as a human teneurin-1 ICD interaction partner in a yeast two-hybrid screen. This interaction was confirmed in human cells, where HINT1 is known to inhibit the transcription of target genes by directly binding to transcription factors at the promoter. In a whole transcriptome analysis of BS149 glioblastoma cells overexpressing the teneurin-1 ICD, several microphthalmia-associated transcription factor (MITF) target genes were found to be up-regulated. Directly comparing the transcriptomes of MITF versus TEN1-ICD-overexpressing BS149 cells revealed 42 co-regulated genes, including glycoprotein non-metastatic b (GPNMB). Using real-time quantitative PCR to detect endogenous GPNMB expression upon overexpression of MITF and HINT1 as well as promoter reporter assays using GPNMB promoter constructs, we could demonstrate that the teneurin-1 ICD binds HINT1, thus switching on MITF-dependent transcription of GPNMB. PMID:25648896

  10. The intracellular domain of teneurin-1 induces the activity of microphthalmia-associated transcription factor (MITF) by binding to transcriptional repressor HINT1.

    PubMed

    Schöler, Jonas; Ferralli, Jacqueline; Thiry, Stéphane; Chiquet-Ehrismann, Ruth

    2015-03-27

    Teneurins are large type II transmembrane proteins that are necessary for the normal development of the CNS. Although many studies highlight the significance of teneurins, especially during development, there is only limited information known about the molecular mechanisms of function. Previous studies have shown that the N-terminal intracellular domain (ICD) of teneurins can be cleaved at the membrane and subsequently translocates to the nucleus, where it can influence gene transcription. Because teneurin ICDs do not contain any intrinsic DNA binding sequences, interaction partners are required to affect transcription. Here, we identified histidine triad nucleotide binding protein 1 (HINT1) as a human teneurin-1 ICD interaction partner in a yeast two-hybrid screen. This interaction was confirmed in human cells, where HINT1 is known to inhibit the transcription of target genes by directly binding to transcription factors at the promoter. In a whole transcriptome analysis of BS149 glioblastoma cells overexpressing the teneurin-1 ICD, several microphthalmia-associated transcription factor (MITF) target genes were found to be up-regulated. Directly comparing the transcriptomes of MITF versus TEN1-ICD-overexpressing BS149 cells revealed 42 co-regulated genes, including glycoprotein non-metastatic b (GPNMB). Using real-time quantitative PCR to detect endogenous GPNMB expression upon overexpression of MITF and HINT1 as well as promoter reporter assays using GPNMB promoter constructs, we could demonstrate that the teneurin-1 ICD binds HINT1, thus switching on MITF-dependent transcription of GPNMB. PMID:25648896

  11. Estradiol-Induced Transcriptional Regulation of Long Non-Coding RNA, HOTAIR.

    PubMed

    Bhan, Arunoday; Mandal, Subhrangsu S

    2016-01-01

    HOTAIR (HOX antisense intergenic RNA) is a 2.2 kb long non-coding RNA (lncRNA), transcribed from the antisense strand of homeobox C (HOXC) gene locus in chromosome 12. HOTAIR acts as a scaffolding lncRNA. It interacts and guides various chromatin-modifying complexes such as PRC2 (polycomb-repressive complex 2) and LSD1 (lysine-specific demethylase 1) to the target gene promoters leading to their gene silencing. Various studies have demonstrated that HOTAIR overexpression is associated with breast cancer. Recent studies from our laboratory demonstrate that HOTAIR is required for viability of breast cancer cells and is transcriptionally regulated by estradiol (E2) in vitro and in vivo. This chapter describes protocols for analysis of the HOTAIR promoter, cloning, transfection and dual luciferase assays, knockdown of protein synthesis by antisense oligonucleotides, and chromatin immunoprecipitation (ChIP) assay. These protocols are useful for studying the estrogen-mediated transcriptional regulation of lncRNA HOTAIR, as well as other protein coding genes and non-coding RNAs. PMID:26585152

  12. Transcription Factor HBP1 Enhances Radiosensitivity by Inducing Apoptosis in Prostate Cancer Cell Lines

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Yicheng; Wang, Yueping; Yu, Yanlan; Xu, Liwei; Zhang, Youyun; Yu, Shicheng; Li, Gonghui; Zhang, Zhigeng

    2016-01-01

    Radiotherapy for prostate cancer has been gradually carried out in recent years; however, acquired radioresistance often occurred in some patients after radiotherapy. HBP1 (HMG-box transcription factor 1) is a transcriptional inhibitor which could inhibit the expression of dozens of oncogenes. In our previous study, we showed that the expression level of HBP1 was closely related to prostate cancer metastasis and prognosis, but the relationship between HBP1 and radioresistance for prostate cancer is largely unknown. In this study, the clinical data of patients with prostate cancer was compared, and the positive correlation was revealed between prostate cancer brachytherapy efficacy and the expression level of HBP1 gene. Through research on prostate cancer cells in vitro, we found that HBP1 expression levels were negatively correlated with oncogene expression levels. Furthermore, HBP1 overexpression could sensitize prostate cancer cells to radiation and increase apoptosis in prostate cancer cells. In addition, animal model was employed to analyze the relationship between HBP1 gene and prostate cancer radiosensitivity in vivo; the result showed that knockdown of HBP1 gene could decrease the sensitivity to radiation of xenograft. These studies identified a specific molecular mechanism underlying prostate cancer radiosensitivity, which suggested HBP1 as a novel target in prostate cancer radiotherapy. PMID:26942107

  13. A fungal endophyte induces transcription of genes encoding a redundant fungicide pathway in its host plant

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Taxol is an anti-cancer drug harvested from Taxus trees, proposed ecologically to act as a fungicide. Taxus is host to fungal endophytes, defined as organisms that inhabit plants without causing disease. The Taxus endophytes have been shown to synthesize Taxol in vitro, providing Taxus with a second potential biosynthetic route for this protective metabolite. Taxol levels in plants vary 125-fold between individual trees, but the underlying reason has remained unknown. Results Comparing Taxus trees or branches within a tree, correlations were observed between Taxol content, and quantity of its resident Taxol-producing endophyte, Paraconiothyrium SSM001. Depletion of fungal endophyte in planta by fungicide reduced plant Taxol accumulation. Fungicide treatment of intact plants caused concomitant decreases in transcript and/or protein levels corresponding to two critical genes required for plant Taxol biosynthesis. Taxol showed fungicidal activity against fungal pathogens of conifer wood, the natural habitat of the Taxol-producing endophyte. Consistent with other Taxol-producing endophytes, SSM001 was resistant to Taxol. Conclusions These results suggest that the variation in Taxol content between intact Taxus plants and/or tissues is at least in part caused by varying degrees of transcriptional elicitation of plant Taxol biosynthetic genes by its Taxol-producing endophyte. As Taxol is a fungicide, and the endophyte is resistant to Taxol, we discuss how this endophyte strategy may be to prevent colonization by its fungal competitors but at minimal metabolic cost to itself. PMID:23802696

  14. Nonselective inhibition of the epigenetic transcriptional regulator BET induces marked lymphoid and hematopoietic toxicity in mice.

    PubMed

    Lee, Dong U; Katavolos, Paula; Palanisamy, Gopinath; Katewa, Arna; Sioson, Charly; Corpuz, Janice; Pang, Jodie; DeMent, Kevin; Choo, Edna; Ghilardi, Nico; Diaz, Dolores; Danilenko, Dimitry M

    2016-06-01

    Bromo and extra terminal (BET) proteins (BRD2, BRD3, BRD4 and BRDT) are epigenetic transcriptional regulators required for efficient expression of growth promoting, cell cycle progression and antiapoptotic genes. Through their bromodomain, these proteins bind to acetylated lysine residues of histones and are recruited to transcriptionally active chromatin. Inhibition of the BET-histone interaction provides a tractable therapeutic strategy to treat diseases that may have epigenetic dysregulation. JQ1 is a small molecule that blocks BET interaction with histones. It has been shown to decrease proliferation of patient-derived multiple myeloma in vitro and to decrease tumor burden in vivo in xenograft mouse models. While targeting BET appears to be a viable and efficacious approach, the nonclinical safety profile of BET inhibition remains to be well-defined. We report that mice dosed with JQ1 at efficacious exposures demonstrate dose-dependent decreases in their lymphoid and immune cell compartments. At higher doses, JQ1 was not tolerated and due to induction of significant body weight loss led to early euthanasia. Flow cytometry analysis of lymphoid tissues showed a decrease in both B- and T-lymphocytes with a concomitant decrease in peripheral white blood cells that was confirmed by hematology. Further investigation with the inactive enantiomer of JQ1 showed that these in vivo effects were on-target mediated and not elicited through secondary pharmacology due to chemical structure. PMID:27078884

  15. The Bacillus subtilis TRAP protein can induce transcription termination in the leader region of the tryptophan biosynthetic (trp) operon independent of the trp attenuator RNA.

    PubMed

    McAdams, Natalie M; Gollnick, Paul

    2014-01-01

    In Bacillus subtilis, transcription of the tryptophan biosynthetic operon is regulated by an attenuation mechanism. When intracellular tryptophan levels are high, the TRAP protein binds to the 5' leader region of the nascent trp mRNA and induces transcription termination prior to the structural genes. In limiting tryptophan, TRAP does not bind and the operon is transcribed. Two competing RNA secondary structures termed the antiterminator and terminator (attenuator) can form in the leader region RNA. In prior attenuation models, the only role of TRAP binding was to alter the RNA secondary structure to allow formation of the attenuator, which has been thought function as an intrinsic transcription terminator. However, recent studies have shown that the attenuator is not an effective intrinsic terminator. From these studies it was not clear whether TRAP functions independently or requires the presence of the attenuator RNA structure. Hence we have further examined the role of the attenuator RNA in TRAP-mediated transcription termination. TRAP was found to cause efficient transcription termination in the trp leader region in vivo when the attenuator was mutated or deleted. However, TRAP failed to induce transcription termination at these mutant attenuators in a minimal in vitro transcription system with B. subtilis RNA polymerase. Further studies using this system showed that NusA as well as the timing of TRAP binding to RNA play a role in the observed differences in vivo and in vitro. PMID:24505391

  16. Effect of thyroid hormone concentration on the transcriptional response underlying induced metamorphosis in the Mexican axolotl (Ambystoma)

    PubMed Central

    Page, Robert B; Voss, Stephen R; Samuels, Amy K; Smith, Jeramiah J; Putta, Srikrishna; Beachy, Christopher K

    2008-01-01

    Background Thyroid hormones (TH) induce gene expression programs that orchestrate amphibian metamorphosis. In contrast to anurans, many salamanders do not undergo metamorphosis in nature. However, they can be induced to undergo metamorphosis via exposure to thyroxine (T4). We induced metamorphosis in juvenile Mexican axolotls (Ambystoma mexicanum) using 5 and 50 nM T4, collected epidermal tissue from the head at four time points (Days 0, 2, 12, 28), and used microarray analysis to quantify mRNA abundances. Results Individuals reared in the higher T4 concentration initiated morphological and transcriptional changes earlier and completed metamorphosis by Day 28. In contrast, initiation of metamorphosis was delayed in the lower T4 concentration and none of the individuals completed metamorphosis by Day 28. We identified 402 genes that were statistically differentially expressed by ≥ two-fold between T4 treatments at one or more non-Day 0 sampling times. To complement this analysis, we used linear and quadratic regression to identify 542 and 709 genes that were differentially expressed by ≥ two-fold in the 5 and 50 nM T4 treatments, respectively. Conclusion We found that T4 concentration affected the timing of gene expression and the shape of temporal gene expression profiles. However, essentially all of the identified genes were similarly affected by 5 and 50 nM T4. We discuss genes and biological processes that appear to be common to salamander and anuran metamorphosis, and also highlight clear transcriptional differences. Our results show that gene expression in axolotls is diverse and precise, and that axolotls provide new insights about amphibian metamorphosis. PMID:18267027

  17. Trichostatin A selectively suppresses the cold-induced transcription of the ZmDREB1 gene in maize.

    PubMed

    Hu, Yong; Zhang, Lu; Zhao, Lin; Li, Jun; He, Shibin; Zhou, Kun; Yang, Fei; Huang, Min; Jiang, Li; Li, Lijia

    2011-01-01

    Post-translational modifications of histone proteins play a crucial role in responding to environmental stresses. Histone deacetylases (HDACs) catalyze the removal of an acetyl group from histones and are generally believed to be a transcriptional repressor. In this paper, we report that cold treatment highly induces the up-regulation of HDACs, leading to global deacetylation of histones H3 and H4. Treatment of maize with the HDAC inhibitor trichostatin A (TSA) under cold stress conditions strongly inhibits induction of the maize cold-responsive genes ZmDREB1 and ZmCOR413. However, up-regulation of the ZmICE1 gene in response to cold stress is less affected. The expression of drought and salt induced genes, ZmDBF1 and rab17, is almost unaffected by TSA treatment. Thus, these observations show that HDACs may selectively activate transcription. The time course of TSA effects on the expression of ZmDREB1 and ZmCOR413 genes indicates that HDACs appear to directly activate the ZmDREB1 gene, which in turn modulates ZmCOR413 expression. After cold treatment, histone hyperacetylation and DNA demethylation occurs in the ICE1 binding region, accompanied by an increase in accessibility to micrococcal nuclease (MNase). The two regions adjacent to the ICE1 binding site remain hypoacetylated and methylated. However, during cold acclimation, TSA treatment increases the acetylation status and accessibility of MNase and decreases DNA methylation at these two regions. However, TSA treatment does not affect histone hyperacetylation and DNA methylation levels at the ICE1 binding regions of the ZmDREB1 gene. Altogether, our findings indicate that HDACs positively regulate the expression of the cold-induced ZmDREB1 gene through histone modification and chromatin conformational changes and that this activation is both gene and site selective. PMID:21811564

  18. HIF-1α and PPARγ during physiological cardiac hypertrophy induced by pregnancy: Transcriptional activities and effects on target genes.

    PubMed

    Soñanez-Organis, José G; Godoy-Lugo, José A; Hernández-Palomares, Magally L E; Rodríguez-Martínez, Daniel; Rosas-Rodríguez, Jesús A; González-Ochoa, Guadalupe; Virgen-Ortiz, Adolfo; Ortiz, Rudy M

    2016-10-15

    Hypoxia inducible factor 1-α (HIF-1α) and peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor γ (PPARγ) are transcription factors that activate genes involved in cellular metabolism. Physiological cardiac hypertrophy induced by pregnancy initiates compensatory changes in metabolism. However, the contributions of HIF-1α and PPARγ to this physiological status and to its reversible, metabolic process (postpartum) in the heart are not well-defined. Therefore, the aim of the present study was to evaluate the transcriptional activities of HIF-1α and PPARγ in the left ventricle of rats before, during, and after pregnancy. Furthermore, the effects of pregnancy on target genes of glycolysis and glycerol-lipid biosynthesis, key regulatory enzymes, and metabolic intermediates were evaluated. The activities of HIF-1α and PPARγ increased 1.2- and 1.6-fold, respectively, during pregnancy, and decreased to basal levels during postpartum. Expressions of mRNA for glucose transport 1 (GLUT1), enzymes of glycolysis (HK2, PFKM, and GAPDH) and glycerol-lipid biosynthesis (GPAT and GPD1) increased 1.6- to 14-fold during pregnancy and returned to basal levels postpartum. The increase in GPD1 expression translated to an increase in its activity, but such was not the case for GAPDH suggesting that post-translational regulation of these proteins is differential during pregnancy. Glycolytic (glucose, lactate, and DHAP) and glycerol-lipid biosynthesis (G3P and FFA) intermediates increased with pregnancy and were maintained postpartum. The results demonstrate that pregnancy-induced, physiological cardiac hypertrophy activates the expression of genes involved in glycolytic and glycerol-lipid biosynthesis suggesting that the shift in cardiac metabolism is mediated by the activation of HIF-1α and PPARγ. PMID:27312951

  19. Induction and maintenance of DNA methylation in plant promoter sequences by apple latent spherical virus-induced transcriptional gene silencing.

    PubMed

    Kon, Tatsuya; Yoshikawa, Nobuyuki

    2014-01-01

    Apple latent spherical virus (ALSV) is an efficient virus-induced gene silencing vector in functional genomics analyses of a broad range of plant species. Here, an Agrobacterium-mediated inoculation (agroinoculation) system was developed for the ALSV vector, and virus-induced transcriptional gene silencing (VITGS) is described in plants infected with the ALSV vector. The cDNAs of ALSV RNA1 and RNA2 were inserted between the cauliflower mosaic virus 35S promoter and the NOS-T sequences in a binary vector pCAMBIA1300 to produce pCALSR1 and pCALSR2-XSB or pCALSR2-XSB/MN. When these vector constructs were agroinoculated into Nicotiana benthamiana plants with a construct expressing a viral silencing suppressor, the infection efficiency of the vectors was 100%. A recombinant ALSV vector carrying part of the 35S promoter sequence induced transcriptional gene silencing of the green fluorescent protein gene in a line of N. benthamiana plants, resulting in the disappearance of green fluorescence of infected plants. Bisulfite sequencing showed that cytosine residues at CG and CHG sites of the 35S promoter sequence were highly methylated in the silenced generation zero plants infected with the ALSV carrying the promoter sequence as well as in progeny. The ALSV-mediated VITGS state was inherited by progeny for multiple generations. In addition, induction of VITGS of an endogenous gene (chalcone synthase-A) was demonstrated in petunia plants infected with an ALSV vector carrying the native promoter sequence. These results suggest that ALSV-based vectors can be applied to study DNA methylation in plant genomes, and provide a useful tool for plant breeding via epigenetic modification. PMID:25426109

  20. Erythromycin-induced ribosome stall in the ermA leader: a barricade to 5'-to-3' nucleolytic cleavage of the ermA transcript.

    PubMed Central

    Sandler, P; Weisblum, B

    1989-01-01

    The Staphylococcus aureus ermA gene, whose product confers resistance to the macrolide-lincosamide-streptogramin B family of antibiotics, is induced at the level of translation by nanomolar concentrations of erythromycin. Erythromycin also specifically stabilizes ermA transcripts, and the induced stabilization requires in-phase translation of at least one of two small leader peptides in the 5' leader region of the transcript. Erythromycin-induced mRNA stabilization was tested in three constructions in which the ermA transcript was elongated by making insertions at the ermA transcription start. Whereas mRNA downstream of the leader peptide is stabilized by erythromycin, mRNA upstream is not. In the presence of erythromycin, specific mRNA decay intermediates in both the extended ermA genes and the wild-type ermA gene were detected by both Northern blotting and S1 nuclease mapping. The 5' ends of the intermediates map to the sequences that encode each of the two ermA leader peptides, suggesting that the intermediates are produced by stalled erythromycin-bound ribosomes acting as barricades to degradation by 5'-to-3' RNases. In addition, whereas erythromycin was found previously to stabilize ermA transcripts only physically, an ermC-cat-86 hybrid transcript was stabilized both physically and functionally by erythromycin. Images PMID:2592348

  1. Acidic extracellular pH of tumors induces octamer-binding transcription factor 4 expression in murine fibroblasts in vitro and in vivo

    PubMed Central

    Som, Avik; Bloch, Sharon; Ippolito, Joseph E.; Achilefu, Samuel

    2016-01-01

    Octamer-binding transcription factor 4 (OCT-4) is an important marker of cellular de-differentiation that can be induced by environmental stressors, such as acidity. Here we demonstrate that chronic acidic stress in solid tumors induced OCT-4 expression in fibroblasts and other stromal cells in four tumor models. The results have implications for how tumors utilize pH modulation to recruit associated stromal cells, induce partial reprogramming of tumor-associated stromal cells, and respond to therapy. PMID:27302093

  2. The hepatocarcinogenic conazoles: cyproconazole, epoxiconazole, and propiconazole induce a common set of toxicological and transcriptional responses

    EPA Science Inventory

    Conazoles are fungicides used as agricultural pesticides and pharmaceutical products. The mechanism of conazole-induced liver carcinogenesis in mice has been the subject of intensive investigations. The goals of this study were to apply toxicological and transcriptomic approaches...

  3. Rcs signalling-activated transcription of rcsA induces strong anti-sense transcription of upstream fliPQR flagellar genes from a weak intergenic promoter: regulatory roles for the anti-sense transcript in virulence and motility.

    PubMed

    Wang, Qingfeng; Harshey, Rasika M

    2009-10-01

    In Salmonella enterica, an activated Rcs signalling system inhibits initiation of transcription of the flhD master operon. Under these conditions, where motility is shut down, microarray experiments showed an increased RNA signal for three flagellar genes -fliPQR- located upstream of rcsA. We show here that it is the anti-sense (AS) strand of these genes that is transcribed, originating at a weak promoter in the intergenic region between fliR and rcsA. RcsA is an auxiliary regulator for the Rcs system, whose transcription is dependent on the response regulator RcsB. Rcs-activated rightward transcription, but not translation, of rcsA is required for stimulation of leftward AS transcription. Our results implicate a combined action of RcsB and rcsA transcription in activating the AS promoter, likely by modulating DNA superhelicity in the intergenic region. We show that the AS transcript regulates many genes in the Rcs regulon, including SPI-1 and SPI-2 virulence and stress-response genes. In the wild-type strain the AS transcript is present in low amounts, independent of Rcs signalling. Here, AS transcription modulates complementary sense RNA levels and impacts swarming motility. It appears that the flagellar AS transcript has been co-opted by the Rcs system to regulate virulence. PMID:19703110

  4. Rcs signaling-activated transcription of rcsA induces strong anti-sense transcription of upstream fliPQR flagellar genes from a weak intergenic promoter: regulatory roles for the anti-sense transcript in virulence and motility

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Qingfeng; Harshey, Rasika M.

    2009-01-01

    Summary In Salmonella enterica, an activated Rcs signaling system inhibits initiation of transcription of the flhD master operon. Under these conditions, where motility is shut down, microarray experiments showed an increased RNA signal for three flagellar genes - fliPQR - located upstream of rcsA. We show here that it is the anti-sense (AS) strand of these genes that is transcribed, originating at a weak promoter in the intergenic region between fliR and rcsA. RcsA is an auxiliary regulator for the Rcs system, whose transcription is dependent on the response regulator RcsB. Rcs-activated rightward transcription, but not translation, of rcsA is required for stimulation of leftward AS transcription. Our results implicate a combined action of RcsB and rcsA transcription in activating the AS promoter, likely by modulating DNA superhelicity in the intergenic region. We show that the AS transcript regulates many genes in the Rcs regulon, including SPI-1 and SPI-2 virulence and stress-response genes. In the wild-type strain the AS transcript is present in low amounts, independent of Rcs signaling. Here, AS transcription modulates complementary sense RNA levels and impacts swarming motility. It appears that the flagellar AS transcript has been co-opted by the Rcs system to regulate virulence. PMID:19703110

  5. In vitro transcriptional studies of the bkd operon of Pseudomonas putida: L-branched-chain amino acids and D-leucine are the inducers.

    PubMed

    Madhusudhan, K T; Luo, J; Sokatch, J R

    1999-05-01

    BkdR is the transcriptional activator of the bkd operon, which encodes the four proteins of the branched-chain keto acid dehydrogenase multienzyme complex of Pseudomonas putida. In this study, hydroxyl radical footprinting revealed that BkdR bound to only one face of DNA over the same region identified in DNase I protection assays. Deletions of even a few bases in the 5' region of the BkdR-binding site greatly reduced transcription, confirming that the entire protected region is necessary for transcription. In vitro transcription of the bkd operon was obtained by using a vector containing the bkdR-bkdA1 intergenic region plus the putative rho-independent terminator of the bkd operon. Substrate DNA, BkdR, and any of the L-branched-chain amino acids or D-leucine was required for transcription. Branched-chain keto acids, D-valine, and D-isoleucine did not promote transcription. Therefore, the L-branched-chain amino acids and D-leucine are the inducers of the bkd operon. The concentration of L-valine required for half-maximal transcription was 2.8 mM, which is similar to that needed to cause half-maximal proteolysis due to a conformational change in BkdR. A model for transcriptional activation of the bkd operon by BkdR during enzyme induction which incorporates these results is presented. PMID:10217783

  6. Cytosolic calcium transients are a determinant of contraction-induced HSP72 transcription in single skeletal muscle fibers.

    PubMed

    Stary, Creed M; Hogan, Michael C

    2016-05-15

    The intrinsic activating factors that induce transcription of heat shock protein 72 (HSP72) in skeletal muscle following exercise remain unclear. We hypothesized that the cytosolic Ca(2+) transient that occurs with depolarization is a determinant. We utilized intact, single skeletal muscle fibers from Xenopus laevis to test the role of the cytosolic Ca(2+) transient and several other exercise-related factors (fatigue, hypoxia, AMP kinase, and cross-bridge cycling) on the activation of HSP72 transcription. HSP72 and HSP60 mRNA levels were assessed with real-time quantitative PCR; cytosolic Ca(2+) concentration ([Ca(2+)]cyt) was assessed with fura-2. Both fatiguing and nonfatiguing contractions resulted in a significant increase in HSP72 mRNA. As expected, peak [Ca(2+)]cyt remained tightly coupled with peak developed tension in contracting fibers. Pretreatment with N-benzyl-p-toluene sulfonamide (BTS) resulted in depressed peak developed tension with stimulation, while peak [Ca(2+)]cyt remained largely unchanged from control values. Despite excitation-contraction uncoupling, BTS-treated fibers displayed a significant increase in HSP72 mRNA. Treatment of fibers with hypoxia (Po2: <3 mmHg) or AMP kinase activation had no effect on HSP72 mRNA levels. These results suggest that the intermittent cytosolic Ca(2+) transient that occurs with skeletal muscle depolarization provides a sufficient activating stimulus for HSP72 transcription. Metabolic or mechanical factors associated with fatigue development and cross-bridge cycling likely play a more limited role. PMID:26869714

  7. Transcription Factors and Medium Suitable for Initiating the Differentiation of Human-Induced Pluripotent Stem Cells to the Hepatocyte Lineage.

    PubMed

    Tomizawa, Minoru; Shinozaki, Fuminobu; Motoyoshi, Yasufumi; Sugiyama, Takao; Yamamoto, Shigenori; Ishige, Naoki

    2016-09-01

    Transcription factors and culture media were investigated to determine the condition to initiate the differentiation of human-induced pluripotent stem (iPS) cells most efficiently. The expression of genes in human adult liver was compared with that in 201B7 cells (iPS cells) using cDNA microarray analysis. Episomal plasmids expressing transcription factors were constructed. 201B7 cells were transfected with the episomal plasmids and cultured in ReproFF (feeder-free media maintaining pluripotency), Leibovitz-15 (L15), William's E (WE), or Dulbecco's modified Eagle medium/Nutrient F-12 Ham (DF12) for 7 days. RNA was isolated and subjected to real-time quantitative PCR to analyze the expression of alpha-feto protein (AFP) and albumin. cDNA microarray analysis revealed 16 transcription factors that were upregulated in human adult liver relative to that in 201B7 cells. Episomal plasmids expressing these 16 genes were transfected into 201B7 cells. CCAAT/enhancer-binding protein alpha (CEBPA), CCAAT/enhancer-binding protein beta (CEBPB), forkhead box A1 (FOXA1), and forkhead box A3 (FOXA3) up-regulated AFP and down-regulated Nanog. These four genes were further analyzed. The expression of AFP and albumin was the highest in 201B7 cells transfected with the combination of CEBPA, CEBPB, FOXA1, and FOXA3 and cultured in WE. The combination of CEBPA, CEBPB, FOXA1, and FOXA3 was suitable for 201B7 cells to initiate differentiation to the hepatocyte lineage and WE was the most suitable medium for culture after transfection. J. Cell. Biochem. 117: 2001-2009, 2016. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:26773721

  8. Residual expression of reprogramming factors affects the transcriptional program and epigenetic signatures of induced pluripotent stem cells.

    PubMed

    Sommer, Cesar A; Christodoulou, Constantina; Gianotti-Sommer, Andreia; Shen, Steven S; Sailaja, Badi Sri; Hezroni, Hadas; Spira, Avrum; Meshorer, Eran; Kotton, Darrell N; Mostoslavsky, Gustavo

    2012-01-01

    Delivery of the transcription factors Oct4, Klf4, Sox2 and c-Myc via integrating viral vectors has been widely employed to generate induced pluripotent stem cell (iPSC) lines from both normal and disease-specific somatic tissues, providing an invaluable resource for medical research and drug development. Residual reprogramming transgene expression from integrated viruses nevertheless alters the biological properties of iPSCs and has been associated with a reduced developmental competence both in vivo and in vitro. We performed transcriptional profiling of mouse iPSC lines before and after excision of a polycistronic lentiviral reprogramming vector to systematically define the overall impact of persistent transgene expression on the molecular features of iPSCs. We demonstrate that residual expression of the Yamanaka factors prevents iPSCs from acquiring the transcriptional program exhibited by embryonic stem cells (ESCs) and that the expression profiles of iPSCs generated with and without c-Myc are indistinguishable. After vector excision, we find 36% of iPSC clones show normal methylation of the Gtl2 region, an imprinted locus that marks ESC-equivalent iPSC lines. Furthermore, we show that the reprogramming factor Klf4 binds to the promoter region of Gtl2. Regardless of Gtl2 methylation status, we find similar endodermal and hepatocyte differentiation potential comparing syngeneic Gtl2(ON) vs Gtl2(OFF) iPSC clones. Our findings provide new insights into the reprogramming process and emphasize the importance of generating iPSCs free of any residual transgene expression. PMID:23272148

  9. Bone tumor mimickers: A pictorial essay

    PubMed Central

    Mhuircheartaigh, Jennifer Ni; Lin, Yu-Ching; Wu, Jim S

    2014-01-01

    Focal lesions in bone are very common and many of these lesions are not bone tumors. These bone tumor mimickers can include numerous normal anatomic variants and non-neoplastic processes. Many of these tumor mimickers can be left alone, while others can be due to a significant disease process. It is important for the radiologist and clinician to be aware of these bone tumor mimickers and understand the characteristic features which allow discrimination between them and true neoplasms in order to avoid unnecessary additional workup. Knowing which lesions to leave alone or which ones require workup can prevent misdiagnosis and reduce patient anxiety. PMID:25114385

  10. Latent Gammaherpesvirus 68 Infection Induces Distinct Transcriptional Changes in Different Organs

    PubMed Central

    Canny, Susan P.; Goel, Gautam; Reese, Tiffany A.; Zhang, Xin; Xavier, Ramnik

    2014-01-01

    Previous studies identified a role for latent herpesvirus infection in cross-protection against infection and exacerbation of chronic inflammatory diseases. Here, we identified more than 500 genes differentially expressed in spleens, livers, or brains of mice latently infected with gammaherpesvirus 68 and found that distinct sets of genes linked to different pathways were altered in the spleen compared to those in the liver. Several of the most differentially expressed latency-specific genes (e.g., the gamma interferon [IFN-γ], Cxcl9, and Ccl5 genes) are associated with known latency-specific phenotypes. Chronic herpesvirus infection, therefore, significantly alters the transcriptional status of host organs. We speculate that such changes may influence host physiology, the status of the immune system, and disease susceptibility. PMID:24155394

  11. Transcription Factor ATF4 Induces NLRP1 Inflammasome Expression during Endoplasmic Reticulum Stress

    PubMed Central

    D’Osualdo, Andrea; Anania, Veronica G.; Yu, Kebing; Lill, Jennie R.; Kaufman, Randal J.; Matsuzawa, Shu-ichi; Reed, John C.

    2015-01-01

    Perturbation of endoplasmic reticulum (ER) homeostasis triggers the ER stress response (also known as Unfolded Protein Response), a hallmark of many pathological disorders. However the connection between ER stress and inflammation remains largely unexplored. Recent data suggest that ER stress controls the activity of inflammasomes, key signaling platforms that mediate innate immune responses. Here we report that expression of NLRP1, a core inflammasome component, is specifically up-regulated during severe ER stress conditions in human cell lines. Both IRE1α and PERK, but not the ATF6 pathway, modulate NLRP1 gene expression. Furthermore, using mutagenesis, chromatin immunoprecipitation and CRISPR-Cas9-mediated genome editing technology, we demonstrate that ATF4 transcription factor directly binds to NLRP1 promoter during ER stress. Although involved in different types of inflammatory responses, XBP-1 splicing was not required for NLRP1 induction. This study provides further evidence that links ER stress with innate PMID:26086088

  12. Long-distance transport, vacuolar sequestration and transcriptional responses induced by cadmium and arsenic

    PubMed Central

    Mendoza-Cózatl, David G.; Jobe, Timothy O.; Hauser, Felix; Schroeder, Julian I.

    2011-01-01

    Summary Iron, zinc, copper and manganese are essential metals for cellular enzyme functions while cadmium, mercury and the metalloid arsenic lack any biological function. Both, essential and non-essential metals and metalloids are extremely reactive and toxic. Therefore, plants have acquired specialized mechanisms to sense, transport and maintain essential metals within physiological concentrations and to detoxify non-essential metals and metalloids. This review focuses on the recent identification of transporters that sequester cadmium and arsenic in vacuoles and the mechanisms mediating the partitioning of these metal(loid)s between roots and shoots. We further discuss recent models of phloem-mediated long-distance transport, seed accumulation of Cd and As and recent data demonstrating that plants posses a defined transcriptional response that allow plants to preserve metal homeostasis. This research is instrumental for future engineering of reduced toxic metal(loid) accumulation in edible crop tissues as well as for improved phytoremediation technologies. PMID:21820943

  13. Transcription Factor ATF4 Induces NLRP1 Inflammasome Expression during Endoplasmic Reticulum Stress.

    PubMed

    D'Osualdo, Andrea; Anania, Veronica G; Yu, Kebing; Lill, Jennie R; Kaufman, Randal J; Matsuzawa, Shu-ichi; Reed, John C

    2015-01-01

    Perturbation of endoplasmic reticulum (ER) homeostasis triggers the ER stress response (also known as Unfolded Protein Response), a hallmark of many pathological disorders. However the connection between ER stress and inflammation remains largely unexplored. Recent data suggest that ER stress controls the activity of inflammasomes, key signaling platforms that mediate innate immune responses. Here we report that expression of NLRP1, a core inflammasome component, is specifically up-regulated during severe ER stress conditions in human cell lines. Both IRE1α and PERK, but not the ATF6 pathway, modulate NLRP1 gene expression. Furthermore, using mutagenesis, chromatin immunoprecipitation and CRISPR-Cas9-mediated genome editing technology, we demonstrate that ATF4 transcription factor directly binds to NLRP1 promoter during ER stress. Although involved in different types of inflammatory responses, XBP-1 splicing was not required for NLRP1 induction. This study provides further evidence that links ER stress with innate. PMID:26086088

  14. Intermedin/adrenomedullin 2 is a stress-inducible gene controlled by activating transcription factor 4.

    PubMed

    Kovaleva, Irina E; Garaeva, Alisa A; Chumakov, Peter M; Evstafieva, Alexandra G

    2016-09-15

    Intermedin or adrenomedullin 2 is a set of calcitonin-related peptides with a putative tumor angiogenesis promoting activity that are formed by proteolytic processing of the ADM2 gene product. It has been proposed that the ADM2 gene is regulated by the estrogen response element (ERE) and hypoxia response elements (HRE) found within its promoter region. In the present study we reveal a functional mechanism by which ADM2 participates in the unfolded protein response (UPR) and in responses to the mitochondrial respiration chain inhibition. We show that the ADM2 gene is controlled by activating transcription factor 4 (ATF4), the principal regulator of the integrated stress response (ISR). The upregulation of ADM2 mRNA could be prevented by the pharmacological ISR inhibitor ISRIB and by the downregulation of ATF4 with specific shRNA, while ectopic expression of ATF4 cDNA resulted in a notable increase in ADM2 gene transcription. A potential ATF4-binding site was identified in the coding region of the ADM2 gene and the requirement of this site during the ATF4-mediated ADM2 gene promoter activation was validated by the luciferase reporter assay. Mutagenesis of the putative ATF4-response element prevented the induction of luciferase activity in response to ATF4 overproduction, as well as in response to mitochondrial electron transfer chain inhibition by piericidin A and ER stress induction by tunicamycin and brefeldin A. Since ADM2 was shown to inhibit ATF4 expression during myocardial ER stress, a feedback mechanism could be proposed for the ADM2 regulation under ER stress conditions. PMID:27328454

  15. PHO13 deletion-induced transcriptional activation prevents sedoheptulose accumulation during xylose metabolism in engineered Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    PubMed

    Xu, Haiqing; Kim, Sooah; Sorek, Hagit; Lee, Youngsuk; Jeong, Deokyeol; Kim, Jungyeon; Oh, Eun Joong; Yun, Eun Ju; Wemmer, David E; Kim, Kyoung Heon; Kim, Soo Rin; Jin, Yong-Su

    2016-03-01

    The deletion of PHO13 (pho13Δ) in Saccharomyces cerevisiae, encoding a phosphatase enzyme of unknown specificity, results in the transcriptional activation of genes related to the pentose phosphate pathway (PPP) such as TAL1 encoding transaldolase. It has been also reported that the pho13Δ mutant of S. cerevisiae expressing a heterologous xylose pathway can metabolize xylose efficiently compared to its parental strain. However, the interaction between the pho13Δ-induced transcriptional changes and the phenotypes of xylose fermentation was not understood. Thus we investigated the global metabolic changes in response to pho13Δ when cells were exponentially growing on xylose. Among the 134 intracellular metabolites that we identified, the 98% reduction of sedoheptulose was found to be the most significant change in the pho13Δ mutant as compared to its parental strain. Because sedoheptulose-7-phosphate (S7P), a substrate of transaldolase, reduced significantly in the pho13Δ mutant as well, we hypothesized that limited transaldolase activity in the parental strain might cause dephosphorylation of S7P, leading to carbon loss and inefficient xylose metabolism. Mutants overexpressing TAL1 at different degrees were constructed, and their TAL1 expression levels and xylose consumption rates were positively correlated. Moreover, as TAL1 expression levels increased, intracellular sedoheptulose concentration dropped significantly. Therefore, we concluded that TAL1 upregulation, preventing the accumulation of sedoheptulose, is the most critical mechanism for the improved xylose metabolism by the pho13Δ mutant of engineered S. cerevisiae. PMID:26724864

  16. Resveratrol-induced transcriptional up-regulation of ASMase (SMPD1) of human leukemia and cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Mizutani, Naoki; Omori, Yukari; Kawamoto, Yoshiyuki; Sobue, Sayaka; Ichihara, Masatoshi; Suzuki, Motoshi; Kyogashima, Mamoru; Nakamura, Mitsuhiro; Tamiya-Koizumi, Keiko; Nozawa, Yoshinori; Murate, Takashi

    2016-02-19

    Resveratrol (RSV) is a plant-derived phytoalexin present in plants, whose pleiotropic effects for health benefits have been previously reported. Its anti-cancer activity is among the current topics for novel cancer treatment. Here, effects of RSV on cell proliferation and the sphingolipid metabolism of K562, a human leukemia cell line, were analyzed. Some experiments were also performed in HCT116, a human colon cancer cell line. RSV inhibited cell proliferation of both cell lines. Increased cellular ceramide and decreased sphingomyelin and S1P by RSV were observed in RSV-treated K562 cells. Further analysis revealed that acid sphingomyelinase mRNA and enzyme activity levels were increased by RSV. Desipramine, a functional ASMase inhibitor, prevented RSV-induced ceramide increase. RSV increased ATF3, EGR1, EGR3 proteins and phosphorylated c-Jun and FOXO3. However, co-transfection using these transcription factor expression vectors and ASMase promoter reporter vector revealed positive effects of EGR1 and EGR3 but not others. Electrophoresis mobility shift assay (EMSA) and Chromatin immunoprecipitation (ChIP) assay demonstrated the direct binding of EGR1/3 transcription factors with ASMase 5'-promoter. These results indicate that increased EGR1/3 and ASMase expression play an important role in cellular ceramide increase by RSV treatment. PMID:26809095

  17. Registered report: the androgen receptor induces a distinct transcriptional program in castration-resistant prostate cancer in man

    PubMed Central

    Chronscinski, Denise; Cherukeri, Srujana; Tan, Fraser; Lomax, Joelle; Iorns, Elizabeth

    2015-01-01

    The Prostate Cancer Foundation-Movember Foundation Reproducibility Initiative (PCFMFRI) seeks to address growing concerns about reproducibility in scientific research by conducting replications of recent papers in the field of prostate cancer. This Registered Report describes the proposed replication plan of key experiments from “The Androgen Receptor Induces a Distinct Transcriptional Program in Castration-Resistant Prostate Cancer in Man” by Sharma and colleagues (2013), published in Cancer Cell in 2013. Of thousands of targets for the androgen receptor (AR), the authors elucidated a subset of 16 core genes that were consistently downregulated with castration and re-emerged with castration resistance. These 16 AR binding sites were distinct from those observed in cells in culture. The authors suggested that cellular context can have dramatic effects on downstream transcriptional regulation of AR binding sites. The present study will attempt to replicate Fig. 7C by comparing gene expression of the 16 core genes identified by Sharma and colleagues in xenograft tumor tissue compared to androgen treated LNCaP cells in vitro. The Prostate Cancer Foundation-Movember Foundation Reproducibility Initiative is a collaboration between the Prostate Cancer Foundation, the Movember Initiative, and Science Exchange, and the results of the replications will be published by PeerJ. PMID:26401447

  18. S-S Synapsis during Class Switch Recombination Is Promoted by Distantly Located Transcriptional Elements and Activation-Induced Deaminase

    PubMed Central

    Wuerffel, Robert; Wang, Lili; Grigera, Fernando; Manis, John; Selsing, Erik; Perlot, Thomas; Alt, Frederick W.; Cogne, Michel; Pinaud, Eric; Kenter, Amy L.

    2016-01-01

    SUMMARY Molecular mechanisms underlying synapsis of activation-induced deaminase (AID)-targeted S regions during class switch recombination (CSR) are poorly understood. By using chromosome conformation capture techniques, we found that in B cells, the Eμ and 3′Eα enhancers were in close spatial proximity, forming a unique chromosomal loop configuration. B cell activation led to recruitment of the germline transcript (GLT) promoters to the Eμ:3′Eα complex in a cytokine-dependent fashion. This structure facilitated S-S synapsis because Sμ was proximal to Eμ and a downstream S region was corecruited with the targeted GLT promoter to Eμ:3′Eα. We propose that GLT promoter association with the Eμ:3′Eα complex creates an architectural scaffolding that promotes S-S synapsis during CSR and that these interactions are stabilized by AID. Thus, the S-S synaptosome is formed as a result of the self-organizing transcription system that regulates GLT expression and may serve to guard against spurious chromosomal translocations. PMID:17980632

  19. Induced transcription and stability of CELF2 mRNA drives widespread alternative splicing during T-cell signaling

    PubMed Central

    Mallory, Michael J.; Allon, Samuel J.; Qiu, Jinsong; Gazzara, Matthew R.; Tapescu, Iulia; Martinez, Nicole M.; Fu, Xiang-Dong; Lynch, Kristen W.

    2015-01-01

    Studies in several cell types have highlighted dramatic and diverse changes in mRNA processing that occur upon cellular stimulation. However, the mechanisms and pathways that lead to regulated changes in mRNA processing remain poorly understood. Here we demonstrate that expression of the splicing factor CELF2 (CUGBP, Elav-like family member 2) is regulated in response to T-cell signaling through combined increases in transcription and mRNA stability. Transcriptional induction occurs within 6 h of stimulation and is dependent on activation of NF-κB. Subsequently, there is an increase in the stability of the CELF2 mRNA that correlates with a change in CELF2 3′UTR length and contributes to the total signal-induced enhancement of CELF2 expression. Importantly, we uncover dozens of splicing events in cultured T cells whose changes upon stimulation are dependent on CELF2 expression, and provide evidence that CELF2 controls a similar proportion of splicing events during human thymic T-cell development. Taken together, these findings expand the physiologic impact of CELF2 beyond that previously documented in developing neuronal and muscle cells to T-cell development and function, identify unappreciated instances of alternative splicing in the human thymus, and uncover novel mechanisms for CELF2 regulation that may broadly impact CELF2 expression across diverse cell types. PMID:25870297

  20. Hsp90 induces increased genomic instability toward DNA-damaging agents by tuning down RAD53 transcription.

    PubMed

    Khurana, Nidhi; Laskar, Shyamasree; Bhattacharyya, Mrinal K; Bhattacharyya, Sunanda

    2016-08-01

    It is well documented that elevated body temperature causes tumors to regress upon radiotherapy. However, how hyperthermia induces DNA damage sensitivity is not clear. We show that a transient heat shock and particularly the concomitant induction of Hsp90 lead to increased genomic instability under DNA-damaging conditions. Using Saccharomyces cerevisiae as a model eukaryote, we demonstrate that elevated levels of Hsp90 attenuate efficient DNA damage signaling and dictate preferential use of the potentially mutagenic double-strand break repair pathway. We show that under normal physiological conditions, Hsp90 negatively regulates RAD53 transcription to suppress DNA damage checkpoint activation. However, under DNA damaging conditions, RAD53 is derepressed, and the increased level of Rad53p triggers an efficient DNA damage response. A higher abundance of Hsp90 causes increased transcriptional repression on RAD53 in a dose-dependent manner, which could not be fully derepressed even in the presence of DNA damage. Accordingly, cells behave like a rad53 loss-of-function mutant and show reduced NHEJ efficiency, with a drastic failure to up-regulate RAD51 expression and manifestly faster accumulation of CLN1 and CLN2 in DNA-damaged G1, cells leading to premature release from checkpoint arrest. We further demonstrate that Rad53 overexpression is able to rescue all of the aforementioned deleterious effects caused by Hsp90 overproduction. PMID:27307581

  1. The heteromeric transcription factor GABP activates the ITGAM/CD11b promoter and induces myeloid differentiation.

    PubMed

    Ripperger, Tim; Manukjan, Georgi; Meyer, Johann; Wolter, Sabine; Schambach, Axel; Bohne, Jens; Modlich, Ute; Li, Zhixiong; Skawran, Britta; Schlegelberger, Brigitte; Steinemann, Doris

    2015-09-01

    The heteromeric transcription factor GA-binding protein (GABP) consists of two subunits, the alpha subunit (GABPA) carrying the DNA-binding ETS domain, and the beta subunit (GABPB1) harbouring the transcriptional activation domain. GABP is involved in haematopoietic stem cell maintenance and differentiation of myeloid and lymphoid lineages in mice. To elucidate the molecular function of GABP in human haematopoiesis, the present study addressed effects of ectopic overexpression of GABP focussing on the myeloid compartment. Combined overexpression of GABPA and GABPB1 caused a proliferation block in cell lines and drastically reduced the colony-forming capacity of murine lineage-negative cells. Impaired proliferation resulted from perturbed cellular cycling and induction of myeloid differentiation shown by surface markers and myelomonocytic morphology of U937 cells. Depending on the dosage and functional integrity of GABP, ITGAM expression was induced. ITGAM encodes CD11b, the alpha subunit of integrin Mac-1, whose beta subunit, ITGB2/CD18, was already described to be regulated by GABP. Finally, Shield1-dependent proteotuning, luciferase reporter assays and chromatin immunoprecipitation showed that GABP activates the ITGAM/CD11b promoter via three binding sites close to the translational start site. In conclusion, the present study supports the crucial role of GABP in myeloid cell differentiation and identified ITGAM/CD11b as a novel GABP target gene. PMID:26170143

  2. HUMAN PAPILLOMAVIRUS E7 ENHANCES HYPOXIA-INDUCIBLE FACTOR 1 MEDIATED TRANSCRIPTION BY INHIBITING BINDING OF HISTONE DEACETYLASES

    PubMed Central

    Bodily, Jason M.; Mehta, Kavi P. M.; Laimins, Laimonis A.

    2010-01-01

    Infection by human papillomaviruses (HPVs) leads to the formation of benign lesions, warts, and in some cases, cervical cancer. The formation of these lesions is dependent upon increased expression of pro-angiogenic factors. Angiogenesis is linked to tissue hypoxia through the activity of the oxygen sensitive hypoxia inducible factor 1α (HIF-1α). Our studies indicate that the HPV E7 protein enhances HIF-1 transcriptional activity while E6 functions to counteract the repressive effects of p53. Both high and low risk HPV E7 proteins were found to bind to HIF-1α through a domain located in the the N terminus. Importantly, the ability of E7 to enhance HIF-1 activity mapped to the C terminus and correlated with the displacement of the histone deacetylases HDAC1, HDAC4, and HDAC7 from HIF-1α by E7. Our findings describe a novel role of the E7 oncoprotein in activating the function of a key transcription factor mediating hypoxic responses by blocking the binding of HDACs. PMID:21148070

  3. 6-shogaol, a major compound in ginger, induces aryl hydrocarbon receptor-mediated transcriptional activity and gene expression.

    PubMed

    Yoshida, Kazutaka; Satsu, Hideo; Mikubo, Ayano; Ogiwara, Haru; Yakabe, Takafumi; Inakuma, Takahiro; Shimizu, Makoto

    2014-06-18

    Xenobiotics are usually detoxified by drug-metabolizing enzymes and excreted from the body. The expression of many of drug-metabolizing enzymes is regulated by the aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AHR). Some substances in vegetables have the potential to be AHR ligands. To search for vegetable components that exhibit AHR-mediated transcriptional activity, we assessed the activity of vegetable extracts and identified the active compounds using the previously established stable AHR-responsive HepG2 cell line. Among the hot water extracts of vegetables, the highest activity was found in ginger. The ethyl acetate fraction of the ginger hot water extract remarkably induced AHR-mediated transcriptional activity, and the major active compound was found to be 6-shogaol. Subsequently, the mRNA levels of AHR-targeting drug-metabolizing enzymes (CYP1A1, UGT1A1, and ABCG 2) and the protein level of CYP1A1 in HepG2 cells were shown to be increased by 6-shogaol. This is the first report that 6-shogaol can regulate the expression of detoxification enzymes by AHR activation. PMID:24857157

  4. Virus-induced gene silencing unravels multiple transcription factors involved in floral growth and development in Phalaenopsis orchids

    PubMed Central

    Hsieh, Ming-Hsien; Pan, Zhao-Jun; Lai, Pei-Han; Lu, Hsiang-Chia; Yeh, Hsin-Hung; Hsu, Chia-Chi; Wu, Wan-Lin; Chung, Mei-Chu; Wang, Shyh-Shyan; Chen, Wen-Huei; Chen, Hong-Hwa

    2013-01-01

    Orchidaceae, one of the largest angiosperm families, has significant commercial value. Isolation of genes involved in orchid floral development and morphogenesis, scent production, and colouration will advance knowledge of orchid flower formation and facilitate breeding new varieties to increase the commercial value. With high-throughput virus-induced gene silencing (VIGS), this study identified five transcription factors involved in various aspects of flower morphogenesis in the orchid Phalaenopsis equestris. These genes are PeMADS1, PeMADS7, PeHB, PebHLH, and PeZIP. Silencing PeMADS1 and PebHLH resulted in reduced flower size together with a pelaloid column containing petal-like epidermal cells and alterations of epidermal cell arrangement in lip lateral lobes, respectively. Silencing PeMADS7, PeHB, and PeZIP alone resulted in abortion of the first three fully developed flower buds of an inflorescence, which indicates the roles of the genes in late flower development. Furthermore, double silencing PeMADS1 and PeMADS6, C- and B-class MADS-box genes, respectively, produced a combinatorial phenotype with two genes cloned in separate vectors. Both PeMADS1 and PeMADS6 are required to ensure the normal development of the lip and column as well as the cuticle formation on the floral epidermal cell surface. Thus, VIGS allows for unravelling the interaction between two classes of MADS transcription factors for dictating orchid floral morphogenesis. PMID:23956416

  5. A forkhead Transcription Factor Is Wound-Induced at the Planarian Midline and Required for Anterior Pole Regeneration

    PubMed Central

    Scimone, M. Lucila; Lapan, Sylvain W.; Reddien, Peter W.

    2014-01-01

    Planarian regeneration requires positional information to specify the identity of tissues to be replaced as well as pluripotent neoblasts capable of differentiating into new cell types. We found that wounding elicits rapid expression of a gene encoding a Forkhead-family transcription factor, FoxD. Wound-induced FoxD expression is specific to the ventral midline, is regulated by Hedgehog signaling, and is neoblast-independent. FoxD is subsequently expressed within a medial subpopulation of neoblasts at wounds involving head regeneration. Ultimately, FoxD is co-expressed with multiple anterior markers at the anterior pole. Inhibition of FoxD with RNA interference (RNAi) results in the failure to specify neoblasts expressing anterior markers (notum and prep) and in anterior pole formation defects. FoxD(RNAi) animals fail to regenerate a new midline and to properly pattern the anterior blastema, consistent with a role for the anterior pole in organizing pattern of the regenerating head. Our results suggest that wound signaling activates a forkhead transcription factor at the midline and, if the head is absent, FoxD promotes specification of neoblasts at the prior midline for anterior pole regeneration. PMID:24415944

  6. Poly(ADP-ribosyl)ation of Apoptosis Antagonizing Transcription Factor Involved in Hydroquinone-Induced DNA Damage Response.

    PubMed

    Ling, Xiao Xuan; Liu, Jia Xian; Yun, Lin; DU, Yu Jun; Chen, Shao Qian; Chen, Jia Long; Tang, Huan Wen; Liu, Lin Hua

    2016-01-01

    The molecular mechanism of DNA damage induced by hydroquinone (HQ) remains unclear. Poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase-1 (PARP-1) usually works as a DNA damage sensor, and hence, it is possible that PARP-1 is involved in the DNA damage response induced by HQ. In TK6 cells treated with HQ, PARP activity as well as the expression of apoptosis antagonizing transcription factor (AATF), PARP-1, and phosphorylated H2AX (γ-H2AX) were maximum at 0.5 h, 6 h, 3 h, and 3 h, respectively. To explore the detailed mechanisms underlying the prompt DNA repair reaction, the above indicators were investigated in PARP-1-silenced cells. PARP activity and expression of AATF and PARP-1 decreased to 36%, 32%, and 33%, respectively, in the cells; however, γ-H2AX expression increased to 265%. Co-immunoprecipitation (co-IP) assays were employed to determine whether PARP-1 and AATF formed protein complexes. The interaction between these proteins together with the results from IP assays and confocal microscopy indicated that poly(ADP-ribosyl)ation (PARylation) regulated AATF expression. In conclusion, PARP-1 was involved in the DNA damage repair induced by HQ via increasing the accumulation of AATF through PARylation. PMID:26822515

  7. A bHLH-Type Transcription Factor, ABA-INDUCIBLE BHLH-TYPE TRANSCRIPTION FACTOR/JA-ASSOCIATED MYC2-LIKE1, Acts as a Repressor to Negatively Regulate Jasmonate Signaling in Arabidopsis[C][W

    PubMed Central

    Nakata, Masaru; Mitsuda, Nobutaka; Herde, Marco; Koo, Abraham J.K.; Moreno, Javier E.; Suzuki, Kaoru; Howe, Gregg A.; Ohme-Takagi, Masaru

    2013-01-01

    Jasmonates (JAs) are plant hormones that regulate the balance between plant growth and responses to biotic and abiotic stresses. Although recent studies have uncovered the mechanisms for JA-induced responses in Arabidopsis thaliana, the mechanisms by which plants attenuate the JA-induced responses remain elusive. Here, we report that a basic helix-loop-helix–type transcription factor, ABA-INDUCIBLE BHLH-TYPE TRANSCRIPTION FACTOR/JA-ASSOCIATED MYC2-LIKE1 (JAM1), acts as a transcriptional repressor and negatively regulates JA signaling. Gain-of-function transgenic plants expressing the chimeric repressor for JAM1 exhibited substantial reduction of JA responses, including JA-induced inhibition of root growth, accumulation of anthocyanin, and male fertility. These plants were also compromised in resistance to attack by the insect herbivore Spodoptera exigua. Conversely, jam1 loss-of-function mutants showed enhanced JA responsiveness, including increased resistance to insect attack. JAM1 and MYC2 competitively bind to the target sequence of MYC2, which likely provides the mechanism for negative regulation of JA signaling and suppression of MYC2 functions by JAM1. These results indicate that JAM1 negatively regulates JA signaling, thereby playing a pivotal role in fine-tuning of JA-mediated stress responses and plant growth. PMID:23673982

  8. Phorate-induced oxidative stress, DNA damage and transcriptional activation of p53 and caspase genes in male Wistar rats

    SciTech Connect

    Saquib, Quaiser; Attia, Sabry M.; Siddiqui, Maqsood A.; Aboul-Soud, Mourad A.M.; Al-Khedhairy, Abdulaziz A.; Giesy, John P.; Musarrat, Javed

    2012-02-15

    Male Wistar rats exposed to a systemic organophosphorus insecticide, phorate [O,O-diethyl S-[(ethylthio) methyl] phosphorothioate] at varying oral doses of 0.046, 0.092 or 0.184 mg phorate/kg bw for 14 days, exhibited substantial oxidative stress, cellular DNA damage and activation of apoptosis-related p53, caspase 3 and 9 genes. The histopathological changes including the pyknotic nuclei, inflammatory leukocyte infiltrations, renal necrosis, and cardiac myofiber degeneration were observed in the liver, kidney and heart tissues. Biochemical analysis of catalase and glutathione revealed significantly lesser activities of antioxidative enzymes and lipid peroxidation in tissues of phorate exposed rats. Furthermore, generation of intracellular reactive oxygen species and reduced mitochondrial membrane potential in bone marrow cells confirmed phorate-induced oxidative stress. Significant DNA damage was measured through comet assay in terms of the Olive tail moment in bone marrow cells of treated animals as compared to control. Cell cycle analysis also demonstrated the G{sub 2}/M arrest and appearance of a distinctive SubG{sub 1} peak, which signified induction of apoptosis. Up-regulation of tumor suppressor p53 and caspase 3 and 9 genes, determined by quantitative real-time PCR and enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay, elucidated the activation of intrinsic apoptotic pathways in response to cellular stress. Overall, the results suggest that phorate induces genetic alterations and cellular toxicity, which can adversely affect the normal cellular functioning in rats. -- Highlights: ► This is the first report on molecular toxicity of phorate in an in vivo test system. ► Phorate induces biochemical and histological changes in liver, kidney and heart. ► Rats treated with phorate exhibited DNA damage in bone marrow cells. ► Phorate induces apoptosis, oxidative stress and alters mitochondrial fluorescence. ► Phorate induces transcriptional changes and enhanced

  9. Brimonidine Blocks Glutamate Excitotoxicity-Induced Oxidative Stress and Preserves Mitochondrial Transcription Factor A in Ischemic Retinal Injury

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Dongwook; Kim, Keun-Young; Noh, You Hyun; Chai, Stephen; Lindsey, James D.; Ellisman, Mark H.; Weinreb, Robert N.; Ju, Won-Kyu

    2012-01-01

    Glutamate excitotoxicity-induced oxidative stress have been linked to mitochondrial dysfunction in retinal ischemia and optic neuropathies including glaucoma. Brimonindine (BMD), an alpha 2-adrenergic receptor agonist, contributes to the neuroprotection of retinal ganglion cells (RGCs) against glutamate excitotoxicity or oxidative stress. However, the molecular mechanisms of BMD-associated mitochondrial preservation in RGC protection against glutamate excitotoxicity-induced oxidative stress following retinal ischemic injury remain largely unknown. Here, we tested whether activation of alpha 2 adrenergic receptor by systemic BMD treatment blocks glutamate excitotoxicity-induced oxidative stress, and preserves the expression of mitochondrial transcription factor A (Tfam) and oxidative phosphorylation (OXPHOS) complex in ischemic retina. Sprague-Dawley rats received BMD (1 mg/kg/day) or vehicle (0.9% saline) systemically and then transient ischemia was induced by acute intraocular pressure elevation. Systemic BMD treatment significantly increased RGC survival at 4 weeks after ischemia. At 24 hours, BMD significantly decreased Bax expression but increased Bcl-xL and phosphorylated Bad protein expression in ischemic retina. Importantly. BMD significantly blocked the upregulations of N-methyl-D-aspartate receptors 1 and 2A protein expression, as well as of SOD2 protein expression in ischemic retina at 24 hours. During the early neurodegeneration following ischemic injury (12–72 hours), Tfam and OXPHOS complex protein expression were significantly increased in vehicle-treated retina. At 24 hours after ischemia, Tfam immunoreactivity was increased in the outer plexiform layer, inner nuclear layer, inner plexiform layer and ganglion cell layer. Further, Tfam protein was expressed predominantly in RGCs. Finally, BMD preserved Tfam immunoreactivity in RGCs as well as Tfam/OXPHOS complex protein expression in the retinal extracts against ischemic injury. Our findings suggest

  10. CM156, a Sigma Receptor Ligand, Reverses Cocaine-Induced Place Conditioning and Transcriptional Responses in the Brain

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Yan-Tong; Robson, Matthew J.; Szeszel-Fedorowicz, Wioletta; Patel, Divyen; Rooney, Robert; McCurdy, Christopher R.; Matsumoto, Rae R.

    2013-01-01

    Repeated exposure to cocaine induces neuroadaptations which contribute to the rewarding properties of cocaine. Using cocaine-induced conditioned place preference (CPP) as an animal model of reward, earlier studies have shown that sigma (σ) receptor ligands can attenuate the acquisition, expression and reactivation of CPP. However, the underlying molecular mechanisms that are associated with these changes are not yet understood. In the present study, CM156, a novel antagonist with high selectivity and affinity for σ receptors was used to attenuate the expression of cocaine-induced CPP in mice. Immediately following the behavioral evaluations, mouse brain tissues were collected and alterations in gene expression in half brain samples were profiled by cDNA microarray analysis. Microarray data was analyzed by three distinct normalization methods and four genes were consistently found to be upregulated by cocaine when compared to saline controls. Each of these gene changes were found by more than one normalization method to be reversed by at least one dose of CM156. Quantitative real time PCR confirmed that a single administration of CM156 was able to reverse the cocaine-induced increases in three of these four genes: metastasis associated lung adenocarcinoma transcript 1 (malat1), tyrosine 3-monooxygenase/tryptophan 5-monooxygenase activation protein (ywhaz), and transthyretin (ttr). These genes are involved in processes related to neuroplasticity and RNA editing. The data presented herein provides evidence that pharmacological intervention with a putative σ receptor antagonist reverses alterations in gene expression that are associated with cocaine-induced reward. PMID:22234290

  11. Transcript and metabolite alterations increase ganoderic acid content in Ganoderma lucidum using acetic acid as an inducer.

    PubMed

    Ren, Ang; Li, Xiong-Biao; Miao, Zhi-Gang; Shi, Liang; Jaing, Ai-Liang; Zhao, Ming-Wen

    2014-12-01

    Acetic acid at 5-8 mM increased ganoderic acid (GA) accumulation in Ganoderma lucidum. After optimization by the response surface methodology, the GA content reached 5.5/100 mg dry weight, an increase of 105% compared with the control. The intermediate metabolites of GA biosynthesis, lanosterol and squalene also increased to 47 and 15.8 μg/g dry weight, respectively, in response to acetic acid. Acetic acid significantly induced transcription levels of sqs, lano, hmgs and cyp51 in the GA biosynthesis pathway. An acetic acid-unregulated acetyl coenzyme A synthase (acs) gene was selected from ten candidate homologous acs genes. The results indicate that acetic acid alters the expression of genes related to acetic acid assimilation and increases GA biosynthesis and the metabolic levels of lanosterol, squalene and GA-a, thereby resulting in GA accumulation. PMID:25216642

  12. ortho-Carboranylphenoxyacetanilides as inhibitors of hypoxia-inducible factor (HIF)-1 transcriptional activity and heat shock protein (HSP) 60 chaperon activity.

    PubMed

    Li, Guangzhe; Azuma, Soyoko; Sato, Shinichi; Minegishi, Hidemitsu; Nakamura, Hiroyuki

    2015-07-01

    ortho-Carboranylphenoxy derivatives were synthesized and evaluated for their ability to inhibit hypoxia-induced HIF-1 transcriptional activity using a cell-based reporter gene assay. Among the compounds synthesized, compound 1d showed the most significant inhibition of hypoxia-induced HIF-1 transcriptional activity with the IC50 of 0.53μM. Furthermore, compound 1h was found to possess the most significant inhibition of heat shock protein (HSP) 60 chaperon activity among the reported inhibitors: the IC50 toward the porcine heart malate dehydrogenase (MDH) refolding assay was 0.35μM. PMID:25981686

  13. Mild Glucose Starvation Induces KDM2A-Mediated H3K36me2 Demethylation through AMPK To Reduce rRNA Transcription and Cell Proliferation

    PubMed Central

    Tanaka, Yuji; Yano, Hirohisa; Ogasawara, Sachiko; Yoshioka, Sho-ichi; Imamura, Hiromi; Okamoto, Kengo

    2015-01-01

    Environmental conditions control rRNA transcription. Previously, we found that serum and glucose deprivation induces KDM2A-mediated H3K36me2 demethylation in the rRNA gene (rDNA) promoter and reduces rRNA transcription in the human breast cancer cell line MCF-7. However, the molecular mechanism and biological significance are still unclear. In the present study, we found that glucose starvation alone induced the KDM2A-dependent reduction of rRNA transcription. The treatment of cells with 2-deoxy-d-glucose, an inhibitor of glycolysis, reduced rRNA transcription and H3K36me2 in the rDNA promoter, both of which were completely dependent on KDM2A in low concentrations of 2-deoxy-d-glucose, that is, mild starvation conditions. The mild starvation induced these KDM2A activities through AMP-activated kinase (AMPK) but did not affect another AMPK effector of rRNA transcription, TIF-IA. In the triple-negative breast cancer cell line MDA-MB-231, the mild starvation also reduced rRNA transcription in a KDM2A-dependent manner. We detected KDM2A in breast cancer tissues irrespective of their estrogen receptor, progesterone receptor, and HER2 status, including triple-negative cancer tissues. In both MCF-7 and MDA-MB-231 cells, mild starvation reduced cell proliferation, and KDM2A knockdown suppressed the reduction of cell proliferation. These results suggest that under mild glucose starvation AMPK induces KDM2A-dependent reduction of rRNA transcription to control cell proliferation. PMID:26416883

  14. Sodium hydrosulfide induces systemic thermotolerance to strawberry plants through transcriptional regulation of heat shock proteins and aquaporin

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Temperature extremes represent an important limiting factor to plant growth and productivity. The present study evaluated the effect of hydroponic pretreatment of strawberry (Fragaria x ananassa cv. ‘Camarosa’) roots with an H2S donor, sodium hydrosulfide (NaHS; 100 μM for 48 h), on the response of plants to acute heat shock treatment (42°C, 8 h). Results Heat stress-induced phenotypic damage was ameliorated in NaHS-pretreated plants, which managed to preserve higher maximum photochemical PSII quantum yields than stressed plants. Apparent mitigating effects of H2S pretreatment were registered regarding oxidative and nitrosative secondary stress, since malondialdehyde (MDA), H2O2 and nitric oxide (NO) were quantified in lower amounts than in heat-stressed plants. In addition, NaHS pretreatment preserved ascorbate/glutathione homeostasis, as evidenced by lower ASC and GSH pool redox disturbances and enhanced transcription of ASC (GDH) and GSH biosynthetic enzymes (GS, GCS), 8 h after heat stress imposition. Furthermore, NaHS root pretreatment resulted in induction of gene expression levels of an array of protective molecules, such as enzymatic antioxidants (cAPX, CAT, MnSOD, GR), heat shock proteins (HSP70, HSP80, HSP90) and aquaporins (PIP). Conclusion Overall, we propose that H2S root pretreatment activates a coordinated network of heat shock defense-related pathways at a transcriptional level and systemically protects strawberry plants from heat shock-induced damage. PMID:24499299

  15. The influence of EDDS on the metabolic and transcriptional responses induced by copper in hydroponically grown Brassica carinata seedlings.

    PubMed

    Cestone, Benedetta; Cuypers, Ann; Vangronsveld, Jaco; Sgherri, Cristina; Navari-Izzo, Flavia

    2012-06-01

    To improve the knowledge about the use of plants for the removal of toxic metals from contaminated soils, metabolic and transcriptional responses of Brassica carinata to different forms of copper (Cu) were studied. Two-week-old hydroponically grown seedlings were exposed for 24 h to 30 μM CuSO₄ or CuEDDS. CuSO₄ appeared to be more toxic than CuEDDS as roots showed higher levels of thiobarbituric acid reactive substances (TBARS) and increased relative leakage ratios (RLR), although the superoxide dismutase (SOD, EC 1.15.1.1) activity increased following both exposures. In CuSO₄-exposed seedlings the higher toxicity was underlined by increased transcription of lipoxygenases (EC 1.13.11.12) and NADPH oxidases (EC 1.6.99.6) and by the higher Cu accumulation in both tissues compared to CuEDDS exposure. The presence of EDDS increased Cu translocation, which resulted 5-times higher than when exposed to CuSO₄. Decreases in catalase (CAT, EC 1.11.1.6), ascorbate peroxidase (APX, EC 1.11.1.11) and glutathione reductase (GR, EC 1.6.4.2) activities together with increases of reduced glutathione (GSH) and tocopherols and a reduction of lipoic acid (LA) were observed in roots of CuSO₄-exposed seedlings. On the contrary, CuEDDS exposure induced a general increase in enzyme activities and decreases in ascorbate (AsA) and tocopherol levels. In the primary leaves, in both exposures Cu differently affected the oxidative stress responses indicating that the cellular redox balance was anyway maintained. EDDS plays a crucial role in B. carinata tolerance to oxidative stress induced by Cu and might be proposed to improve the efficiency of Cu phytoextraction. PMID:22522579

  16. Root inoculation with Pseudomonas putida KT2440 induces transcriptional and metabolic changes and systemic resistance in maize plants

    PubMed Central

    Planchamp, Chantal; Glauser, Gaetan; Mauch-Mani, Brigitte

    2014-01-01

    Pseudomonas putida KT2440 (KT2440) rhizobacteria colonize a wide range of plants. They have been extensively studied for their capacity to adhere to maize seeds, to tolerate toxic secondary metabolites produced by maize roots and to be attracted by maize roots. However, the response of maize plants to KT2440 colonization has not been investigated yet. Maize roots were inoculated with KT2440 and the local (roots) and systemic (leaves) early plant responses were investigated. The colonization behavior of KT2440 following application to maize seedlings was investigated and transcriptional analysis of stress- and defense-related genes as well as metabolite profiling of local and systemic maize tissues of KT2440-inoculated were performed. The local and systemic responses differed and more pronounced changes were observed in roots compared to leaves. Early in the interaction roots responded via jasmonic acid- and abscisic acid-dependent signaling. Interestingly, during later steps, the salicylic acid pathway was suppressed. Metabolite profiling revealed the importance of plant phospholipids in KT2440-maize interactions. An additional important maize secondary metabolite, a form of benzoxazinone, was also found to be differently abundant in roots 3 days after KT2440 inoculation. However, the transcriptional and metabolic changes observed in bacterized plants early during the interaction were minor and became even less pronounced with time, indicating an accommodation state of the plant to the presence of KT2440. Since the maize plants reacted to the presence of KT2440 in the rhizosphere, we also investigated the ability of these bacteria to trigger induced systemic resistance (ISR) against the maize anthracnose fungus Colletotrichum graminicola. The observed resistance was expressed as strongly reduced leaf necrosis and fungal growth in infected bacterized plants compared to non-bacterized controls, showing the potential of KT2440 to act as resistance inducers. PMID

  17. Transcriptional Profiling in Cotton Associated with Bacillus Subtilis (UFLA285) Induced Biotic-stress Tolerance

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Plant growth promoting rhizobacteria (PGPR) confer disease resistance in many agricultural crops. In the case of Bacillus subtilis (UFLA285) isolated from the cotton producing state of Mato Grosso (Brazil), in addition to inducing foliar and root growth, disease resistance against damping-off cause...

  18. Glyceollin-elicited soy protein consumption induces distinct transcriptional effects as compared to standard soy protein

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Glyceollins are stress-induced compounds in soybeans with bioactive properties distinct from parent soy isoflavones. The goals of this study were to evaluate effects of dietary glyceollin-enriched and standard soy protein isolates and identify candidate target pathways of glyceollins on transcripti...

  19. Bortezomib alleviates drug-induced liver injury by regulating CYP2E1 gene transcription

    PubMed Central

    PARK, WOO-JAE; KIM, SO-YEON; KIM, YE-RYUNG; PARK, JOO-WON

    2016-01-01

    Acute liver failure, i.e., the fatal deterioration of liver function, is the most common indication that emergency liver transplantation is necessary. Moreover, in the USA, drug-induced liver injury (DILI), including acetaminophen (APAP)-induced hepatotoxicity, is the main cause of acute liver failure. Matching a donor for liver transplantation is extremely difficult, and thus the development of a novel therapy for DILI is urgently needed. Following recent approval by the FDA of the proteasomal inhibitor bortezomib, its therapeutic effects on various human diseases, including solid and hematologic malignancies, have been validated. However, the specific action of proteasomal inhibition in cases of DILI had not been elucidated prior to this study. To examine the effects of proteasomal inhibition in DILI experimentally, male C56Bl/6 mice were injected with 1 mg bortezomib/kg before APAP treatment. Bortezomib not only alleviated APAP-induced hepatotoxicity in a time- and dose-dependent manner, it also alleviated CCl4- and thioacetamide-induced hepatotoxicity. We also noted that bortezomib significantly reduced cytochrome P450 2E1 (CYP2E1) expression and activity in the liver, which was accompanied by the induction of endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress. In addition, bortezomib decreased hepatocyte nuclear factor-1α-induced promoter activation of CYP2E1 in Hep3B cells. By contrast, another proteasome inhibitor, MG132, did not cause ER stress and did not markedly affect CYP2E1 enzyme activity. Liver injury induced by APAP was aggravated by MG132, possibly via elevation of connexin 32 expression. This study suggests that proteasome inhibition has different effects in cases of DILI depending on the specific inhibitor being used. Furthermore, results from the mouse model indicated that bortezomib, but not MG132, was effective in alleviating DILI. ER stress induced by proteasome inhibition has previously been shown to exert various effects on DILI patients, and thus each

  20. Burkholderia phytofirmans PsJN induces long-term metabolic and transcriptional changes involved in Arabidopsis thaliana salt tolerance.

    PubMed

    Pinedo, Ignacio; Ledger, Thomas; Greve, Macarena; Poupin, María J

    2015-01-01

    Salinity is one of the major limitations for food production worldwide. Improvement of plant salt-stress tolerance using plant-growth promoting rhizobacteria (PGPR) has arisen as a promising strategy to help overcome this limitation. However, the molecular and biochemical mechanisms controlling PGPR/plant interactions under salt-stress remain unclear. The main objective of this study was to obtain new insights into the mechanisms underlying salt-stress tolerance enhancement in the salt-sensitive Arabidopsis thaliana Col-0 plants, when inoculated with the well-known PGPR strain Burkholderia phytofirmans PsJN. To tackle this, different life history traits, together with the spatiotemporal accumulation patterns for key metabolites and salt-stress related transcripts, were analyzed in inoculated plants under short and long-term salt-stress. Inoculated plants displayed faster recovery and increased tolerance after sustained salt-stress. PsJN treatment accelerated the accumulation of proline and transcription of genes related to abscisic acid signaling (Relative to Dessication, RD29A and RD29B), ROS scavenging (Ascorbate Peroxidase 2), and detoxification (Glyoxalase I 7), and down-regulated the expression of Lipoxygenase 2 (related to jasmonic acid biosynthesis). Among the general transcriptional effects of this bacterium, the expression pattern of important ion-homeostasis related genes was altered after short and long-term stress (Arabidopsis K(+) Transporter 1, High-Affinity K(+) Transporter 1, Sodium Hydrogen Exchanger 2, and Arabidopsis Salt Overly Sensitive 1). In all, the faster and stronger molecular changes induced by the inoculation suggest a PsJN-priming effect, which may explain the observed tolerance after short-term and sustained salt-stress in plants. This study provides novel information about possible mechanisms involved in salt-stress tolerance induced by PGPR in plants, showing that certain changes are maintained over time. This opens up new venues to

  1. Burkholderia phytofirmans PsJN induces long-term metabolic and transcriptional changes involved in Arabidopsis thaliana salt tolerance

    PubMed Central

    Pinedo, Ignacio; Ledger, Thomas; Greve, Macarena; Poupin, María J.

    2015-01-01

    Salinity is one of the major limitations for food production worldwide. Improvement of plant salt-stress tolerance using plant-growth promoting rhizobacteria (PGPR) has arisen as a promising strategy to help overcome this limitation. However, the molecular and biochemical mechanisms controlling PGPR/plant interactions under salt-stress remain unclear. The main objective of this study was to obtain new insights into the mechanisms underlying salt-stress tolerance enhancement in the salt-sensitive Arabidopsis thaliana Col-0 plants, when inoculated with the well-known PGPR strain Burkholderia phytofirmans PsJN. To tackle this, different life history traits, together with the spatiotemporal accumulation patterns for key metabolites and salt-stress related transcripts, were analyzed in inoculated plants under short and long-term salt-stress. Inoculated plants displayed faster recovery and increased tolerance after sustained salt-stress. PsJN treatment accelerated the accumulation of proline and transcription of genes related to abscisic acid signaling (Relative to Dessication, RD29A and RD29B), ROS scavenging (Ascorbate Peroxidase 2), and detoxification (Glyoxalase I 7), and down-regulated the expression of Lipoxygenase 2 (related to jasmonic acid biosynthesis). Among the general transcriptional effects of this bacterium, the expression pattern of important ion-homeostasis related genes was altered after short and long-term stress (Arabidopsis K+ Transporter 1, High-Affinity K+ Transporter 1, Sodium Hydrogen Exchanger 2, and Arabidopsis Salt Overly Sensitive 1). In all, the faster and stronger molecular changes induced by the inoculation suggest a PsJN-priming effect, which may explain the observed tolerance after short-term and sustained salt-stress in plants. This study provides novel information about possible mechanisms involved in salt-stress tolerance induced by PGPR in plants, showing that certain changes are maintained over time. This opens up new venues to

  2. Involvement of fish signal transducer and activator of transcription 3 (STAT3) in SGIV replication and virus induced paraptosis.

    PubMed

    Huang, Xiaohong; Huang, Youhua; Yang, Ying; Wei, Shina; Qin, Qiwei

    2014-12-01

    Signal transducer and activator of transcription 3 (STAT3) is an important transcription factor which plays crucial roles in immune regulation, inflammation, cell proliferation, transformation, and other physiological processes of the organism. In this study, a novel STAT3 gene from orange spotted grouper (Ec-STAT3) was cloned and characterized. Bioinformatic analysis revealed that full-length of Ec-STAT3 was 3105-bp long and contained a 280-bp 5'UTR, a 470-bp 3'UTR, and a 2355-bp open reading frame (ORF) that encoded a 784-amino acid peptide. The deduced protein of Ec-STAT3 showed 98% identity to that of turbot (Scophthalmus maximus). Amino acid alignment showed that Ec-STAT3 contained four conserved domains, including a protein interaction domain, a coiled coil domain, a DNA binding domain, and an SH2 domain. Quantitative real-time PCR analysis showed that the highest expression level was detected in the liver, followed by skin and spleen. After injection with Singapore grouper iridovirus (SGIV), the transcript of Ec-STAT3 in spleen was increased significantly. To further explore the function of Ec-STAT3, we investigated the roles of Ec-STAT3 in SGIV infection in vitro. Immune fluorescence analysis indicated that SGIV infection altered the distribution of phosphorylated Ec-STAT3 in nucleus, and a small part of phosphorylated Ec-STAT3 was associated with virus assembly sites, suggesting that Ec-STAT3 might be important for SGIV infection. Using STAT3 specific inhibitor, S3I-201, we found that inhibition of Ec-STAT3 activation decreased the SGIV replication significantly. Moreover, inhibition of Ec-STAT3 activation obviously altered SGIV infection induced cell cycle arrest and the expression of pro-survival genes, including Bcl-2, Bcl-xL and Bax inhibitor. Together, our results firstly demonstrated the critical roles of fish STAT3 in DNA virus replication and virus induced paraptosis, but also provided new insights into the mechanism of iridovirus pathogenesis

  3. Type V Collagen Induced Tolerance Suppresses Collagen Deposition, TGF-β and Associated Transcripts in Pulmonary Fibrosis

    PubMed Central

    Vittal, Ragini; Mickler, Elizabeth A.; Fisher, Amanda J.; Zhang, Chen; Rothhaar, Katia; Gu, Hongmei; Brown, Krista M.; Emtiazdjoo, Amir; Lott, Jeremy M.; Frye, Sarah B.; Smith, Gerald N.; Sandusky, George E.; Cummings, Oscar W.; Wilkes, David S.

    2013-01-01

    Rationale Idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis (IPF) is a fatal interstitial lung disease characterized by progressive scarring and matrix deposition. Recent reports highlight an autoimmune component in IPF pathogenesis. We have reported anti-col(V) immunity in IPF patients. The objective of our study was to determine the specificity of col(V) expression profile and anti-col(V) immunity relative to col(I) in clinical IPF and the efficacy of nebulized col(V) in pre-clinical IPF models. Methods Col(V) and col(I) expression profile was analyzed in normal human and IPF tissues. C57-BL6 mice were intratracheally instilled with bleomycin (0.025 U) followed by col(V) nebulization at pre-/post-fibrotic stage and analyzed for systemic and local responses. Results Compared to normal lungs, IPF lungs had higher protein and transcript expression of the alpha 1 chain of col(V) and col(I). Systemic anti-col(V) antibody concentrations, but not of anti-col(I), were higher in IPF patients. Nebulized col(V), but not col(I), prevented bleomycin-induced fibrosis, collagen deposition, and myofibroblast differentiation. Col(V) treatment suppressed systemic levels of anti-col(V) antibodies, IL-6 and TNF-α; and local Il-17a transcripts. Compared to controls, nebulized col(V)-induced tolerance abrogated antigen-specific proliferation in mediastinal lymphocytes and production of IL-17A, IL-6, TNF-α and IFN-γ. In a clinically relevant established fibrosis model, nebulized col(V) decreased collagen deposition. mRNA array revealed downregulation of genes specific to fibrosis (Tgf-β, Il-1β, Pdgfb), matrix (Acta2, Col1a2, Col3a1, Lox, Itgb1/6, Itga2/3) and members of the TGF-β superfamily (Tgfbr1/2, Smad2/3, Ltbp1, Serpine1, Nfkb/Sp1/Cebpb). Conclusions Anti-col(V) immunity is pathogenic in IPF, and col(V)-induced tolerance abrogates bleomycin-induced fibrogenesis and down regulates TGF- β-related signaling pathways. PMID:24204629

  4. Tracheobronchial Amyloidosis Mimicking Tracheal Tumor.

    PubMed

    Tanrıverdi, Elif; Özgül, Mehmet Akif; Uzun, Oğuz; Gül, Şule; Çörtük, Mustafa; Yaşar, Zehra; Acat, Murat; Arda, Naciye; Çetinkaya, Erdoğan

    2016-01-01

    Tracheobronchial amyloidosis is a rare presentation and accounts for about 1% of benign tumors in this area. The diagnosis of disease is delayed due to nonspecific pulmonary symptoms. Therapeutic approaches are required to control progressive pulmonary symptoms for most of the patients. Herein, we report a case of a 68-year-old man admitted with progressive dyspnea to our institution for further evaluation and management. He was initially diagnosed with and underwent management for bronchial asthma for two years but had persistent symptoms despite optimal medical therapy. Pulmonary computed tomography scan revealed severe endotracheal stenosis. Bronchoscopy was performed and showed endotracheal mass obstructing 70% of the distal trachea and mimicking a neoplastic lesion. The mass was successfully resected by mechanical resection, argon plasma coagulation (APC), and Nd-YAG laser during rigid bronchoscopy. Biopsy materials showed deposits of amorphous material by hematoxylin and eosin staining and these deposits were selectively stained with Congo Red. Although this is a rare clinical condition, this case indicated that carrying out a bronchoscopy in any patient complaining of atypical bronchial symptoms or with uncontrolled asthma is very important. PMID:27594885

  5. Tracheobronchial Amyloidosis Mimicking Tracheal Tumor

    PubMed Central

    Özgül, Mehmet Akif; Uzun, Oğuz; Yaşar, Zehra; Acat, Murat; Arda, Naciye; Çetinkaya, Erdoğan

    2016-01-01

    Tracheobronchial amyloidosis is a rare presentation and accounts for about 1% of benign tumors in this area. The diagnosis of disease is delayed due to nonspecific pulmonary symptoms. Therapeutic approaches are required to control progressive pulmonary symptoms for most of the patients. Herein, we report a case of a 68-year-old man admitted with progressive dyspnea to our institution for further evaluation and management. He was initially diagnosed with and underwent management for bronchial asthma for two years but had persistent symptoms despite optimal medical therapy. Pulmonary computed tomography scan revealed severe endotracheal stenosis. Bronchoscopy was performed and showed endotracheal mass obstructing 70% of the distal trachea and mimicking a neoplastic lesion. The mass was successfully resected by mechanical resection, argon plasma coagulation (APC), and Nd-YAG laser during rigid bronchoscopy. Biopsy materials showed deposits of amorphous material by hematoxylin and eosin staining and these deposits were selectively stained with Congo Red. Although this is a rare clinical condition, this case indicated that carrying out a bronchoscopy in any patient complaining of atypical bronchial symptoms or with uncontrolled asthma is very important. PMID:27594885

  6. Humanlike Robots - Synthetically Mimicking Humans

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bar-Cohen, Yoseph

    2012-01-01

    Nature inspired many inventions and the field of technology that is based on the mimicking or inspiration of nature is widely known as Biomimetics and it is increasingly leading to many new capabilities. There are numerous examples of biomimetic successes including the copying of fins for swimming, and the inspiration of the insects and birds flight. More and more commercial implementations of biomimetics are appearing and behaving lifelike and applications are emerging that are important to our daily life. Making humanlike robots is the ultimate challenge to biomimetics and, for many years, it was considered science fiction, but such robots are becoming an engineering reality. Advances in producing such robot are allowing them to perform impressive functions and tasks. The development of such robots involves addressing many challenges and is raising concerns that are related to fear of their application implications and potential ethical issues. In this paper, the state-of-the-art of humanlike robots, potential applications and challenges will be reviewed.

  7. Abiotic stress-induced oscillations in steady-state transcript levels of Group 3 LEA protein genes in the moss, Physcomitrella patens.

    PubMed

    Shinde, Suhas; Shinde, Rupali; Downey, Frances; Ng, Carl K-Y

    2013-01-01

    The moss, Physcomitrella patens is a non-seed land plant belonging to early diverging lineages of land plants following colonization of land in the Ordovician period in Earth's history. Evidence suggests that mosses can be highly tolerant of abiotic stress. We showed previously that dehydration stress and abscisic acid treatments induced oscillations in steady-state levels of LEA (Late Embryogenesis Abundant) protein transcripts, and that removal of ABA resulted in rapid attenuation of oscillatory increases in transcript levels. Here, we show that other abiotic stresses like salt and osmotic stresses also induced oscillations in steady-state transcript levels and that the amplitudes of the oscillatory increases in steady-state transcript levels are reflective of the severity of the abiotic stress treatment. Together, our results suggest that oscillatory increases in transcript levels in response to abiotic stresses may be a general phenomenon in P. patens and that temporally dynamic increases in steady-state transcript levels may be important for adaptation to life in constantly fluctuating environmental conditions. PMID:23221763

  8. Transcriptional Pathways in cPGI2-Induced Adipocyte Progenitor Activation for Browning

    PubMed Central

    Bayindir, Irem; Babaeikelishomi, Rohollah; Kocanova, Silvia; Sousa, Isabel Sofia; Lerch, Sarah; Hardt, Olaf; Wild, Stefan; Bosio, Andreas; Bystricky, Kerstin; Herzig, Stephan; Vegiopoulos, Alexandros

    2015-01-01

    De novo formation of beige/brite adipocytes from progenitor cells contributes to the thermogenic adaptation of adipose tissue and holds great potential for the therapeutic remodeling of fat as a treatment for obesity. Despite the recent identification of several factors regulating browning of white fat, there is a lack of physiological cell models for the mechanistic investigation of progenitor-mediated beige/brite differentiation. We have previously revealed prostacyclin (PGI2) as one of the few known endogenous extracellular mediators promoting de novo beige/brite formation by relaying β-adrenergic stimulation to the progenitor level. Here, we present a cell model based on murine primary progenitor cells defined by markers previously shown to be relevant for in vivo browning, including a simplified isolation procedure. We demonstrate the specific and broad induction of thermogenic gene expression by PGI2 signaling in the absence of lineage conversion, and reveal the previously unidentified nuclear relocalization of the Ucp1 gene locus in association with transcriptional activation. By profiling the time course of the progenitor response, we show that PGI2 signaling promoted progenitor cell activation through cell cycle and adhesion pathways prior to metabolic maturation toward an oxidative cell phenotype. Our results highlight the importance of core progenitor activation pathways for the recruitment of thermogenic cells and provide a resource for further mechanistic investigation. PMID:26347713

  9. Characterization and stress-induced expression analysis of Alfin-like transcription factors in Brassica rapa.

    PubMed

    Kayum, Md Abdul; Park, Jong-In; Ahmed, Nasar Uddin; Jung, Hee-Jeong; Saha, Gopal; Kang, Jong-Goo; Nou, Ill-Sup

    2015-08-01

    The Alfin-like (AL) transcription factors (TFs) family is involved in many developmental processes, including the growth and development of roots, root hair elongation, meristem development, etc. However, stress resistance-related function and the regulatory mechanism of these TFs have yet to be elucidated. This study identified 15 Brassica rapa AL (BrAL) TFs from BRAD database, analyzed the sequences and profiled their expression first time in response to Fusarium oxysporum f. sp. conglutinans and Pectobacterium carotovorum subsp. carotovorum in fection, cold, salt and drought stresses in B. rapa. Structural and phylogenetic analyses of 15 BrAL TFs revealed four distinct groups (groups I-IV) with AL TFs of Arabidopsis thaliana. In the expression analyses, ten BrAL TFs showed responsive expression after F. oxysporum f. sp. conglutinans infection, while all BrAL TFs showed responses under cold, salt and drought stresses in B. rapa. Interestingly, ten BrAL TFs showed responses to both biotic and abiotic stress factors tested here. The differentially expressed BrAL TFs thus represent potential resources for molecular breeding of Brassica crops resistant against abiotic and biotic stresses. Our findings will also help to elucidate the complex regulatory mechanism of AL TFs in stress resistance and provide a foundation for further functional genomics studies and applications. PMID:25618423

  10. High atomic weight, high-energy radiation (HZE) induces transcriptional responses shared with conventional stresses in addition to a core “DSB” response specific to clastogenic treatments

    PubMed Central

    Missirian, Victor; Conklin, Phillip A.; Culligan, Kevin M.; Huefner, Neil D.; Britt, Anne B.

    2014-01-01

    Plants exhibit a robust transcriptional response to gamma radiation which includes the induction of transcripts required for homologous recombination and the suppression of transcripts that promote cell cycle progression. Various DNA damaging agents induce different spectra of DNA damage as well as “collateral” damage to other cellular components and therefore are not expected to provoke identical responses by the cell. Here we study the effects of two different types of ionizing radiation (IR) treatment, HZE (1 GeV Fe26+ high mass, high charge, and high energy relativistic particles) and gamma photons, on the transcriptome of Arabidopsis thaliana seedlings. Both types of IR induce small clusters of radicals that can result in the formation of double strand breaks (DSBs), but HZE also produces linear arrays of extremely clustered damage. We performed these experiments across a range of time points (1.5–24 h after irradiation) in both wild-type plants and in mutants defective in the DSB-sensing protein kinase ATM. The two types of IR exhibit a shared double strand break-repair-related damage response, although they differ slightly in the timing, degree, and ATM-dependence of the response. The ATM-dependent, DNA metabolism-related transcripts of the “DSB response” were also induced by other DNA damaging agents, but were not induced by conventional stresses. Both Gamma and HZE irradiation induced, at 24 h post-irradiation, ATM-dependent transcripts associated with a variety of conventional stresses; these were overrepresented for pathogen response, rather than DNA metabolism. In contrast, only HZE-irradiated plants, at 1.5 h after irradiation, exhibited an additional and very extensive transcriptional response, shared with plants experiencing “extended night.” This response was not apparent in gamma-irradiated plants. PMID:25136344

  11. Involvement of heat shock factor 1 in statin-induced transcriptional upregulation of endothelial thrombomodulin

    PubMed Central

    Fu, Qiang; Wang, Junru; Boerma, Marjan; Berbée, Maaike; Qiu, Xiaohua; Fink, Louis M.; Hauer-Jensen, Martin

    2008-01-01

    Statins upregulate endothelial thrombomodulin (TM) by mechanisms that involve members of the Kruppel-like factor (KLF) family. While KLFs are unequivocally implicated in this process experimental evidence points to additional mechanisms. Deletion/mutation analysis of reporter constructs was used to demonstrate that mutation of the SP1/KLF element in the TM promoter only partially abolishes statin-induced TM upregulation whereas simultaneous mutation of relevant heat shock elements (HSEs) and SP1/KLF element completely prevents statin-induced TM upregulation, thus demonstrating a role for heat shock factors (HSFs). We further identified the pathway by which statins increase binding of HSF1 to HSEs in the TM promoter. Specifically, statins caused NO-dependent dissociation of HSF1 from heat shock protein 90 (HSP90), nuclear translocation of HSF1, and binding to HSEs in the TM promoter. Statins also decreased nuclear content of the HSF1 chaperone 14-3-3β. In addition to reducing TM upregulation, inhibition of HSF1 reduced statin-induced upregulation of tissue plasminogen activator (tPA), whereas, downregulation of thrombomospondin (TSP-1), plasminogen activator inhibitor 1 (PAI-1), or connective tissue growth factor (CTGF) was unaffected. Knockdown of 14-3-3β or inhibition of HSF1 phosphorylation enhanced the effect of statins on TM and tPA, but did not influence TSP-1, PAI-1, or CTGF. These data demonstrate that HSF1 is involved in statin-induced regulation of TM. They also suggest that analogous mechanisms may apply to genes that are upregulated by statins, but not to downregulated genes. These results may have broad implications and suggest the use of heat shock protein modulators to selectively regulate pleiotropic statin effects. PMID:18599869

  12. Thrombin selectively induces transcription of genes in human monocytes involved in inflammation and wound healing.

    PubMed

    López, Mercedes L; Bruges, Gustavo; Crespo, Gustavo; Salazar, Victor; Deglesne, Pierre-Antoine; Schneider, Heike; Cabrera-Fuentes, Hector; Schmitz, M Lienhard; Preissner, Klaus T

    2014-11-01

    Thrombin is essential for blood coagulation but functions also as a mediator of cellular signalling. Gene expression microarray experiments in human monocytes revealed thrombin-induced upregulation of a limited subset of genes, which are almost exclusively involved in inflammation and wound healing. Among these, the expression of F3 gene encoding for tissue factor (TF) was enhanced indicating that this physiological initiator of coagulation cascade may create a feed-forward loop to enhance blood coagulation. Activation of protease-activated receptor type 1 (PAR1) was shown to play a main role in promoting TF expression. Moreover, thrombin induced phosphorylation of ERK1/2, an event that is required for expression of thrombin-regulated genes. Thrombin also increased the expression of TF at the protein level in monocytes as evidenced by Western blot and immunostaining. Furthermore, FXa generation induced by thrombin-stimulated monocytes was abolished by a TF blocking antibody and therefore it is entirely attributable to the expression of tissue factor. This cellular activity of thrombin provides a new molecular link between coagulation, inflammation and wound healing. PMID:25057055

  13. Amino acid limitation induces down-regulation of WNT5a at transcriptional level

    SciTech Connect

    Wang Zuguang; Chen Hong

    2009-01-23

    An aberrant WNT signaling contributes to the development and progression of multiple cancers. WNT5a is one of the WNT signaling molecules. This study was designed to test the hypothesis that amino acid deprivation induces changes in the WNT signaling pathway in colon cancer cells. Results showed that targets of the amino acid response pathway, ATF3 and p21, were induced in the human colon cancer cell line SW480 during amino acid limitation. There was a significant decrease in the WNT5a mRNA level following amino acid deprivation. The down-regulation of WNT5a mRNA by amino acid deprivation is not due to mRNA destabilization. There is a reduction of nuclear {beta}-catenin protein level by amino acid limitation. Under amino acid limitation, phosphorylation of ERK1/2 was increased and the blockage of ERK1/2 by the inhibitor U0126 partially restored WNT5a mRNA level. In conclusion, amino acid limitation in colon cancer cells induces phosphorylation of ERK1/2, which then down-regulates WNT5a expression.

  14. 8-Modified-2′-Deoxyadenosine Analogues Induce Delayed Polymerization Arrest during HIV-1 Reverse Transcription

    PubMed Central

    Sleiman, Marwan; Smyth, Redmond; Ben Gaied, Nouha; Barhoum, Patrick; Laumond, Géraldine; Bec, Guillaume; Götte, Matthias; Mak, Johnson; Aubertin, Anne-Marie; Burger, Alain; Marquet, Roland

    2011-01-01

    The occurrence of resistant viruses to any of the anti-HIV-1 compounds used in the current therapies against AIDS underlies the urge for the development of new drug targets and/or new drugs acting through novel mechanisms. While all anti-HIV-1 nucleoside analogues in clinical use and in clinical trials rely on ribose modifications for activity, we designed nucleosides with a natural deoxyribose moiety and modifications of position 8 of the adenine base. Such modifications might induce a steric clash with helix αH in the thumb domain of the p66 subunit of HIV-1 RT at a distance from the catalytic site, causing delayed chain termination. Eleven new 2′-deoxyadenosine analogues modified on position 8 of the purine base were synthesized and tested in vitro and in cell-based assays. In this paper we demonstrate for the first time that chemical modifications on position 8 of 2′-deoxyadenosine induce delayed chain termination in vitro, and also inhibit DNA synthesis when incorporated in a DNA template strand. Furthermore, one of them had moderate anti-HIV-1 activity in cell-culture. Our results constitute a proof of concept indicating that modification on the base moiety of nucleosides can induce delayed polymerization arrest and inhibit HIV-1 replication. PMID:22087320

  15. SPBP Is a Sulforaphane Induced Transcriptional Coactivator of NRF2 Regulating Expression of the Autophagy Receptor p62/SQSTM1

    PubMed Central

    Darvekar, Sagar Ramesh; Elvenes, Julianne; Brenne, Hanne Britt; Johansen, Terje; Sjøttem, Eva

    2014-01-01

    Organisms exposed to oxidative stress respond by orchestrating a stress response to prevent further damage. Intracellular levels of antioxidant agents increase, and damaged components are removed by autophagy induction. The KEAP1-NRF2 signaling pathway is the main pathway responsible for cell defense against oxidative stress and for maintaining the cellular redox balance at physiological levels. Sulforaphane, an isothiocyanate derived from cruciferous vegetables, is a potent inducer of KEAP1-NRF2 signaling and antioxidant response element driven gene expression. In this study, we show that sulforaphane enhances the expression of the transcriptional coregulator SPBP. The expression curve peaks 6–8 hours post stimulation, and parallels the sulforaphane-induced expression of NRF2 and the autophagy receptor protein p62/SQSTM1. Reporter gene assays show that SPBP stimulates the expression of p62/SQSTM1 via ARE elements in the promoter region, and siRNA mediated knock down of SPBP significantly decreases the expression of p62/SQSTM1 and the formation of p62/SQSTM1 bodies in HeLa cells. Furthermore, SPBP siRNA reduces the sulforaphane induced expression of NRF2, and the expression of the autophagy marker protein LC3B. Both these proteins contain ARE-like elements in their promoter regions. Over-expressed SPBP and NRF2 acts synergistically on the p62/SQSTM1 promoter and colocalize in nuclear speckles in HeLa cells. Collectively, these results suggest that SPBP is a coactivator of NRF2, and hence may be important for securing enhanced and sustained expression of NRF2 induced genes such as proteins involved in selective autophagy. PMID:24416372

  16. SPBP is a sulforaphane induced transcriptional coactivator of NRF2 regulating expression of the autophagy receptor p62/SQSTM1.

    PubMed

    Darvekar, Sagar Ramesh; Elvenes, Julianne; Brenne, Hanne Britt; Johansen, Terje; Sjøttem, Eva

    2014-01-01

    Organisms exposed to oxidative stress respond by orchestrating a stress response to prevent further damage. Intracellular levels of antioxidant agents increase, and damaged components are removed by autophagy induction. The KEAP1-NRF2 signaling pathway is the main pathway responsible for cell defense against oxidative stress and for maintaining the cellular redox balance at physiological levels. Sulforaphane, an isothiocyanate derived from cruciferous vegetables, is a potent inducer of KEAP1-NRF2 signaling and antioxidant response element driven gene expression. In this study, we show that sulforaphane enhances the expression of the transcriptional coregulator SPBP. The expression curve peaks 6-8 hours post stimulation, and parallels the sulforaphane-induced expression of NRF2 and the autophagy receptor protein p62/SQSTM1. Reporter gene assays show that SPBP stimulates the expression of p62/SQSTM1 via ARE elements in the promoter region, and siRNA mediated knock down of SPBP significantly decreases the expression of p62/SQSTM1 and the formation of p62/SQSTM1 bodies in HeLa cells. Furthermore, SPBP siRNA reduces the sulforaphane induced expression of NRF2, and the expression of the autophagy marker protein LC3B. Both these proteins contain ARE-like elements in their promoter regions. Over-expressed SPBP and NRF2 acts synergistically on the p62/SQSTM1 promoter and colocalize in nuclear speckles in HeLa cells. Collectively, these results suggest that SPBP is a coactivator of NRF2, and hence may be important for securing enhanced and sustained expression of NRF2 induced genes such as proteins involved in selective autophagy. PMID:24416372

  17. Active and passive MDMA ('ecstasy') intake induces differential transcriptional changes in the mouse brain.

    PubMed

    Fernàndez-Castillo, N; Orejarena, M J; Ribasés, M; Blanco, E; Casas, M; Robledo, P; Maldonado, R; Cormand, B

    2012-02-01

    3,4-Methylenedioxymethamphetamine (MDMA, 'ecstasy') is a recreational drug widely used by adolescents and young adults. Although its rewarding effects are well established, there is controversy on its addictive potential. We aimed to compare the consequences of active and passive MDMA administration on gene expression in the mouse brain since all previous studies were based on passive MDMA administration. We used a yoked-control operant intravenous self-administration paradigm combined with microarray technology. Transcriptomic profiles of ventral striatum, frontal cortex, dorsal raphe nucleus and hippocampus were analysed in mice divided in contingent MDMA, yoked MDMA and yoked saline groups, and several changes were validated by quantitative reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction (qRT-PCR). The comparison of contingent MDMA and yoked MDMA vs. yoked saline mice allowed the identification of differential expression in several genes, most of them with immunological and inflammatory functions, but others being involved in neuroadaptation. In the comparison of contingent MDMA vs. yoked MDMA administration, hippocampus and the dorsal raphe nucleus showed statistically significant changes. The altered expression of several genes involved in neuroadaptative changes and synapse function, which may be related to learning self-administration behaviour, could be validated in these two brain structures. In conclusion, our study shows a strong effect of MDMA administration on the expression of immunological and inflammatory genes in all the four brain regions studied. In addition, experiments on MDMA self-administration suggest that the dorsal raphe nucleus and hippocampus may be involved in active MDMA-seeking behaviour, and show specific alterations on gene expression that support the addictive potential of this drug. PMID:21951708

  18. UV filters induce transcriptional changes of different hormonal receptors in Chironomus riparius embryos and larvae.

    PubMed

    Ozáez, Irene; Aquilino, Mónica; Morcillo, Gloria; Martínez-Guitarte, José-Luis

    2016-07-01

    Organic ultraviolet (UV) filters are emerging contaminants that are ubiquitous in fresh and marine aquatic systems due to their extensive use in cosmetics, plastics, paints, textiles, and many other industrial products. The estrogenic effects of organic UV filters have been long demonstrated in vertebrates, and other hormonal activities may be altered, according to more recent reports. The impact of UV filters on the endocrine system of invertebrates is largely unknown. We have previously reported that some UV filters may affect ecdysone-related genes in the aquatic insect Chironomus riparius, an ecotoxicologically important model organism. To further analyze other possible effects on endocrine pathways, we first characterized four pivotal genes related with hormonal pathways in insects; thereafter, these genes were assessed for alterations in transcriptional activity after exposure to 4-methylbenzylidene camphor (4MBC) or benzophenone-3 (BP-3), two extensively used sunscreens. We found that both chemicals disturbed the expression of all four genes analyzed: hormonal receptor 38 (HR38), methoprene-tolerant (Met), membrane-associate progesterone receptor (MAPR) and insulin-like receptor (INSR), measured by changes in mRNA levels by real-time PCR. An upregulatory effect at the genomic level was detected in different developmental stages. Interestingly, embryos appeared to be more sensitive to the action of the UV filters than larvae. Our results suggest that the risk of disruption through different endocrine routes is not negligible, considering the significant effects of UV filters on key hormonal receptor and regulatory genes. Further effort is needed to develop environmental risk assessment studies on these pollutants, particularly for aquatic invertebrate model organisms. PMID:27089421

  19. Lipopolysaccharide-induced inhibition of transcription of tlr4 in vitro is reversed by dexamethasone and correlates with presence of conserved NFκB binding sites

    SciTech Connect

    Bonin, Camila P.; Baccarin, Raquel Y.A.; Nostell, Katarina; Nahum, Laila A.; Fossum, Caroline; Camargo, Maristela M. de

    2013-03-08

    Highlights: ► Chimpanzees, horses and humans have regions of similarity on TLR4 and MD2 promoters. ► Rodents have few regions of similarity on TLR4 promoter when compared to primates. ► Conserved NFkB binding sites were found in the promoters of TLR4 and MD2. ► LPS-induced inhibition of TLR4 transcription is reversed by dexamethasone. ► LPS-induced transcription of MD2 is inhibited by dexamethasone. -- Abstract: Engagement of Toll-like receptor 4 (TLR4) by lipopolysaccharide (LPS) is a master trigger of the deleterious effects of septic shock. Horses and humans are considered the most sensitive species to septic shock, but the mechanisms explaining these phenomena remain elusive. Analysis of tlr4 promoters revealed high similarity among LPS-sensitive species (human, chimpanzee, and horse) and low similarity with LPS-resistant species (mouse and rat). Four conserved nuclear factor kappa B (NFκB) binding sites were found in the tlr4 promoter and two in the md2 promoter sequences that are likely to be targets for dexamethasone regulation. In vitro treatment of equine peripheral blood mononuclear cells (eqPBMC) with LPS decreased transcripts of tlr4 and increased transcription of md2 (myeloid differentiation factor 2) and cd14 (cluster of differentiation 14). Treatment with dexamethasone rescued transcription of tlr4 after LPS inhibition. LPS-induced transcription of md2 was inhibited in the presence of dexamethasone. Dexamethasone alone did not affect transcription of tlr4 and md2.

  20. Hypoxia-induced expression of RTEF-1 (related transcriptional enhancer factor-1) in endothelial cells is independent of HIF-1 (hypoxia-inducible factor-1)

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Cuili; Song, Q.H.; Li, Jian; Tian, Ye

    2009-04-10

    Related transcriptional enhancer factor-1 (RTEF-1) plays an important role in transcriptional regulation of angiogenic genes in hypoxic endothelial cells. The mechanisms involved in the induction of RTEF-1 expression in hypoxia are poorly understood. In bovine aortic endothelial cells (BAEC) subjected to hypoxia, Western blot and quantitative PCR analysis revealed that RTEF-1 protein and mRNA levels were significantly increased by hypoxia. To address the potential role of the hypoxia-inducible factor-1 (HIF-1) in RTEF-1 induction, a hepatoma cell line deficient in HIF-1 (c4) and a control HIF-1 positive cell line (vT{l_brace}2{r_brace}) were exposed to hypoxia. We report that RTEF-1 protein expression assessed by either Western blotting or immunofluorescence was increased in both cell lines. This demonstrates that HIF-1 is not required for RTEF-1 upregulation by hypoxia. Conversely, RTEF-1 appeared to regulate the expression of HIF-1: HIF-1{alpha} promoter activity was increased (3.6-fold) by RTEF-1 overexpression in BAEC. Furthermore, RTEF-1 enhanced BAEC proliferation and tubule formation; these were inhibited by RTEF-1 knockdown with siRNA. We propose that RTEF-1, acting via HIF-1, is a key regulator of angiogenesis in response to hypoxia.

  1. Inflammation induced NFATc1-STAT3 Transcription Complex Promotes Pancreatic Cancer initiation by KrasG12D

    PubMed Central

    Baumgart, Sandra; Chen, Nai-ming; Siveke, Jens T.; König, Alexander; Zhang, Jin-San; Singh, Shiv K.; Wolf, Elmar; Bartkuhn, Marek; Esposito, Irene; Heßmann, Elisabeth; Reinecke, Johanna; Nikorowitsch, Julius; Brunner, Marius; Singh, Garima; Fernandez-Zapico, Martin E.; Smyrk, Thomas; Bamlet, William R.; Eilers, Martin; Neesse, Albrecht; Gress, Thomas M.; Billadeau, Daniel D.; Tuveson, David; Urrutia, Raul; Ellenrieder, Volker

    2014-01-01

    Summary Cancer-associated inflammation is a molecular key feature in pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma. Oncogenic KRAS in conjunction with persistent inflammation is known to accelerate carcinogenesis, although the underlying mechanisms remain poorly understood. Here we outline a novel pathway whereby the transcription factors NFATc1 and STAT3 cooperate in pancreatic epithelial cells to promote KrasG12D-driven carcinogenesis. NFATc1 activation is induced by inflammation and itself accelerates inflammation-induced carcinogenesis in KrasG12D mice, whereas genetic or pharmacological ablation of NFATc1 attenuates this effect. Mechanistically, NFATc1 complexes with STAT3 for enhancer-promoter communications at jointly regulated genes involved in oncogenesis, e.g. Cyclin, EGFR and WNT family members. The NFATc1-STAT3 cooperativity is operative in pancreatitis-mediated carcinogenesis as well as in established human pancreatic cancer. Together, these studies unravel new mechanisms of inflammatory driven pancreatic carcinogenesis and suggest beneficial effects of chemopreventive strategies using drugs which are currently available for targeting these factors in clinical trials. PMID:24694735

  2. Capsaicin-induced transcriptional changes in hypothalamus and alterations in gut microbial count in high fat diet fed mice.

    PubMed

    Baboota, Ritesh K; Murtaza, Nida; Jagtap, Sneha; Singh, Dhirendra P; Karmase, Aniket; Kaur, Jaspreet; Bhutani, Kamlesh K; Boparai, Ravneet K; Premkumar, Louis S; Kondepudi, Kanthi Kiran; Bishnoi, Mahendra

    2014-09-01

    Obesity is a global health problem and recently it has been seen as a growing concern for developing countries. Several bioactive dietary molecules have been associated with amelioration of obesity and associated complications and capsaicin is one among them. The present work is an attempt to understand and provide evidence for the novel mechanisms of anti-obesity activity of capsaicin in high fat diet (HFD)-fed mice. Swiss albino mice divided in three groups (n=8-10) i.e. control, HFD fed and capsaicin (2mg/kg, po)+HFD fed were administered respective treatment for 3months. After measuring phenotypic and serum related biochemical changes, effect of capsaicin on HFD-induced transcriptional changes in hypothalamus, white adipose tissue (WAT) (visceral and subcutaneous), brown adipose tissue (BAT) and gut microbial alterations was studied and quantified. Our results suggest that, in addition to its well-known effects, oral administration of capsaicin (a) modulates hypothalamic satiety associated genotype, (b) alters gut microbial composition, (c) induces "browning" genotype (BAT associated genes) in subcutaneous WAT and (d) increases expression of thermogenesis and mitochondrial biogenesis genes in BAT. The present study provides evidence for novel and interesting mechanisms to explain the anti-obesity effect of capsaicin. PMID:24917046

  3. Melanogenesis-inducing effect of cirsimaritin through increases in microphthalmia-associated transcription factor and tyrosinase expression.

    PubMed

    Kim, Hyo Jung; Kim, Il Soon; Dong, Yin; Lee, Ik-Soo; Kim, Jin Sook; Kim, Jong-Sang; Woo, Je-Tae; Cha, Byung-Yoon

    2015-01-01

    The melanin-inducing properties of cirsimaritin were investigated in murine B16F10 cells. Cirsimaritin is an active flavone with methoxy groups, which is isolated from the branches of Lithocarpus dealbatus. Tyrosinase activity and melanin content in murine B16F10 melanoma cells were increased by cirsimaritin in a dose-dependent manner. Western blot analysis revealed that tyrosinase, tyrosinase-related protein (TRP) 1, TRP2 protein levels were enhanced after treatment with cirsimaritin for 48 h. Cirsimaritin also upregulated the expression of microphthalmia-associated transcription factor (MITF) after 24 h of treatment. Furthermore, cirsimaritin induced phosphorylation of cyclic adenosine monophosphate (cAMP) response element-binding protein (CREB) in a dose-dependent manner after treatment for 15 min. The cirsimaritin-mediated increase of tyrosinase activity was significantly attenuated by H89, a cAMP-dependent protein kinase A inhibitor. These findings indicate that cirsimaritin stimulates melanogenesis in B16F10 cells by activation of CREB as well as upregulation of MITF and tyrosinase expression, which was activated by cAMP signaling. Finally, the melanogenic effect of cirsimaritin was confirmed in human epidermal melanocytes. These results support the putative application of cirsimaritin in ultraviolet photoprotection and hair coloration treatments. PMID:25903150

  4. Chronic Hypoxia-Inducible Transcription Factor-2 Activation Stably Transforms Juxtaglomerular Renin Cells into Fibroblast-Like Cells In Vivo

    PubMed Central

    Gerl, Katharina; Karger, Christian; Schwarzensteiner, Ilona; Kurtz, Armin

    2015-01-01

    On the basis of previous observations that deletion of the von Hippel–Lindau protein (pVHL) in juxtaglomerular (JG) cells of the kidney suppresses renin and induces erythropoietin expression, this study aimed to characterize the events underlying this striking change of hormone expression. We found that renin cell-specific deletion of pVHL in mice leads to a phenotype switch in JG cells, from a cuboid and multiple vesicle-containing form into a flat and elongated form without vesicles. This shift of cell phenotype was accompanied by the disappearance of marker proteins for renin cells (e.g., aldo-keto reductase family 1, member 7 and connexin 40) and by the appearance of markers of fibroblast-like cells (e.g., collagen I, ecto-5′-nucleotidase, and PDGF receptor-β). Furthermore, hypoxia-inducible transcription factor-2α (HIF-2α) protein constitutively accumulated in these transformed cells. Codeletion of pVHL and HIF-2α in JG cells completely prevented the phenotypic changes. Similar to renin expression in normal JG cells, angiotensin II negatively regulated erythropoietin expression in the transformed cells. In summary, chronic activation of HIF-2 in renal JG cells leads to a reprogramming of the cells into fibroblast-like cells resembling native erythropoietin-producing cells located in the tubulointerstitium. PMID:25071089

  5. Role of x-ray-induced transcripts in adaptive responses following x-rays

    SciTech Connect

    Boothman, D.A.

    1992-01-01

    Potentially lethal damage repair (PLDR) and sublethal damage repair, may be the same manifestations of a series of common enzymatic steps. PLDR, has two distinct phases based upon DNA lesion repair and survival recovery studies. The first phase of PLDR occurs very quickly (t{sub {1/2}}:2--20 mins) to increase the survival of X-irradiated cells by mending the vast array of DNA lesions created by ionizing radiation. The second slower phase of PLDR proceeds much later (i.e., >1--2 hrs) following X-irradiation, during which the remaining double-stranded DNA breaks are completely repaired. This second phase of repair closely corresponds to the restructuring of gross chromosomal damage, and can be partially blocked in some human cells by inhibiting protein synthesis. This slower phase of PLDR correlated with a rapid decline in X-ray-induced transformation of normal cells. The fast component of PLDR may be due to constitutively synthesized DNA ligases, topoisomerases, or polymerases, which act immediately to repair damaged, DNA. In contrast, the slow phase of PLDR in human cells may require the induction of specific genes and gene product's involved in the repair of potentially lethal or carcinogenic DNA lesions. Induced gene products (i.e., proteins) specifically synthesized in response to physiological doses of ionizing radiation in radioresistant human melanoma (U1-Mel) cells, and in a variety of other human normal and cancer-prone cells, were identified using two-dimensional gel electrophoresis. We identified and partially characterized ten proteins synthesized by U1-Mel cells. The synthesis of eight of these proteins were specifically induced by ionizing radiation and two proteins were repressed Neither heat shock, UV-irradiation, nor bifunctional alkylating agent treatments resulted in the induction of these proteins. The expression of one protein, XIP269, correlated very well with PLDR capacity.

  6. Eosinophil resistance to glucocorticoid-induced apoptosis is mediated by the transcription factor NFIL3.

    PubMed

    Pazdrak, Konrad; Moon, Young; Straub, Christof; Stafford, Susan; Kurosky, Alexander

    2016-04-01

    The mainstay of asthma therapy, glucocorticoids (GCs) exert their therapeutic effects through the inhibition of inflammatory signaling and induction of eosinophil apoptosis. However, laboratory and clinical observations of GC-resistant asthma suggest that GCs' effects on eosinophil viability may depend on the state of eosinophil activation. In the present study we demonstrate that eosinophils stimulated with IL-5 show impaired pro-apoptotic response to GCs. We sought to determine the contribution of GC-mediated transactivating (TA) and transrepressing (TR) pathways in modulation of activated eosinophils' response to GC by comparing their response to the selective GC receptor (GR) agonist Compound A (CpdA) devoid of TA activity to that upon treatment with Dexamethasone (Dex). IL-5-activated eosinophils showed contrasting responses to CpdA and Dex, as IL-5-treated eosinophils showed no increase in apoptosis compared to cells treated with Dex alone, while CpdA elicited an apoptotic response regardless of IL-5 stimulation. Proteomic analysis revealed that both Nuclear Factor IL-3 (NFIL3) and Map Kinase Phosphatase 1 (MKP1) were inducible by IL-5 and enhanced by Dex; however, CpdA had no effect on NFIL3 and MKP1 expression. We found that inhibiting NFIL3 with specific siRNA or by blocking the IL-5-inducible Pim-1 kinase abrogated the protective effect of IL-5 on Dex-induced apoptosis, indicating crosstalk between IL-5 anti-apoptotic pathways and GR-mediated TA signaling occurring via the NFIL3 molecule. Collectively, these results indicate that (1) GCs' TA pathway may support eosinophil viability in IL-5-stimulated cells through synergistic upregulation of NFIL3; and (2) functional inhibition of IL-5 signaling (anti-Pim1) or the use of selective GR agonists that don't upregulate NFIL3 may be effective strategies for the restoring pro-apoptotic effect of GCs on IL-5-activated eosinophils. PMID:26880402

  7. Interleukin-4-induced transcriptional activation by stat6 involves multiple serine/threonine kinase pathways and serine phosphorylation of stat6.

    PubMed

    Pesu, M; Takaluoma, K; Aittomäki, S; Lagerstedt, A; Saksela, K; Kovanen, P E; Silvennoinen, O

    2000-01-15

    Stat6 transcription factor is a critical mediator of IL-4-specific gene responses. Tyrosine phosphorylation is required for nuclear localization and DNA binding of Stat6. The authors investigated whether Stat6-dependent transcriptional responses are regulated through IL-4-induced serine/threonine phosphorylation. In Ramos B cells, the serine/threonine kinase inhibitor H7 inhibited IL-4-induced expression of CD23. Treatment with H7 did not affect IL-4R-mediated immediate signaling events such as tyrosine phosphorylation of Jak1, Jak3, insulin receptor substrate (IRS)-1 and IRS-2, or tyrosine phosphorylation and DNA binding of Stat6. To analyze whether the H7-sensitive pathway was regulating Stat6-activated transcription, we used reporter constructs containing different IL-4 responsive elements. H7 abrogated Stat6-, as well as Stat5-, mediated reporter gene activation and partially reduced C/EBP-dependent reporter activity. By contrast, IL-4-induced transcription was not affected by wortmannin, an inhibitor of the phosphatidyl-inositol 3'-kinase pathway. Phospho-amino acid analysis and tryptic phosphopeptide maps revealed that IL-4 induced phosphorylation of Stat6 on serine and tyrosine residues in Ramos cells and in 32D cells lacking endogenous IRS proteins. However, H7 treatment did not inhibit the phosphorylation of Stat6. Instead, H7 inhibited the IL-4-induced phosphorylation of RNA polymerase II. These results indicate that Stat6-induced transcription is dependent on phosphorylation events mediated by H7-sensitive kinase(s) but that it also involves serine phosphorylation of Stat6 by an H7-insensitive kinase independent of the IRS pathway. (Blood. 2000;95:494-502) PMID:10627454

  8. Bispecific antibody mimicking factor VIII.

    PubMed

    Nogami, Keiji

    2016-05-01

    There are some issues in the current factor (F)VIII replacement therapy for severe hemophilia A. One is mental and physical burden for the multiple intravenous infusions, and the other is difficulty in the hemostatic treatment for the patients with FVIII inhibitor. The development of novel drug with fully hemostatic effect, simply procedure, and long-acting reaction has been expected. Recently, FVIIIa-mimicking humanized recombinant bispecific antibody (ACE910) against FIXa and FX was developed. In the non-human clinical study, primate model of acquired hemophilia A demonstrated that the ACE910 was effective on both on-going and spontaneous bleedings. A phase I clinical study was conducted in healthy adults by single subcutaneous infusion of ACE910, followed by the patients' part study, Japanese patients with severe hemophilia A without or with inhibitor were treated with once-weekly subcutaneous injection of ACE910 at three dose levels for 12 successive weeks. There was no significant adverse event related to ACE910 in the clinical and laboratorial findings, and t1/2 of ACE910 was ∼30 days. The median annual bleeding rates were reduced very markedly dose-dependently, independently of inhibitor. Furthermore, among the patients with dose escalation, bleeding rate was decreased as ACE910 dose was increased. In conclusion, ACE910 would have a number of promising features: its high subcutaneous bioavailability and long half-life make the patients possible to be injected subcutaneously with a once-a-week or less frequency. In addition, ACE910 would provide the bleeding prophylactic efficacy, independently of inhibitor. PMID:27207420

  9. Transcriptional and biochemical markers in transplanted Perca flavescens to characterize cadmium- and copper-induced oxidative stress in the field.

    PubMed

    Defo, Michel A; Bernatchez, Louis; Campbell, Peter G C; Couture, Patrice

    2015-05-01

    Despite recent progress achieved in elucidating the mechanisms underlying local adaptation to pollution, little is known about the evolutionary change that may be occurring at the molecular level. The goal of this study was to examine patterns of gene transcription and biochemical responses induced by metal accumulation in clean yellow perch (Perca flavescens) and metal depuration in contaminated fish in a mining and smelting region of Canada. Fish were collected from a reference lake (lake Opasatica) and a Cd, Cu and Zn contaminated lake (lake Dufault) located in the Rouyn-Noranda region (Qc, Canada) and caged for one or four weeks in their own lake or transplanted in the other lake. Free-ranging fish from the same lakes were also collected. Kidney Cd and Cu concentrations in clean fish caged in the contaminated lake increased with the time of exposure, but metal depuration did not occur in contaminated fish caged in the clean lake. After 4 weeks, the major retinoid metabolites analysed, the percentage of free dehydroretinol (dROH) and the retinol dehydrogenase-2 (rdh-2) transcription level in liver decreased in clean fish transplanted into the metal-contaminated lake, suggesting that metal exposure negatively impacted retinoid metabolism. However, we observed an increase in almost all of the retinoid parameters analysed in fish from the metal-impacted lake caged in the same lake, which we interpret as an adaptation response to higher ambient metal concentration. In support of this hypothesis, liver transcription levels of microsomal glutathione-S-transferase-3 (mgst-3) and glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase (g6pdh) were enhanced in clean fish transplanted into the metal-contaminated lake and this up-regulation was accompanied by an increase in the activities of corresponding enzymes, involved in antioxidant response. However, although in the same fish the transcription level of Cu/Zn superoxide dismutase (Cu/Zn sod) was also increased, this did not lead to a

  10. Involvement of a banana MADS-box transcription factor gene in ethylene-induced fruit ripening.

    PubMed

    Liu, Juhua; Xu, Biyu; Hu, Lifang; Li, Meiying; Su, Wei; Wu, Jing; Yang, Jinghao; Jin, Zhiqiang

    2009-01-01

    To investigate the regulation of MADS-box genes in banana (Musa acuminata L. AAA group cv. Brazilian) fruit development and postharvest ripening, we isolated from banana fruit a MADS-box gene designated MuMADS1. Amino acid alignment indicated MuMADS1 belongs to the AGAMOUS subfamily, and phylogenetic analysis indicates that this gene is most similar to class D MADS-box genes. Reverse transcriptase-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) analysis showed that MuMADS1 is expressed in the stamen and pistil of male and female flowers and in the rhizome, the vegetative reproductive organ of the banana plant. In preharvest banana fruit, MuMADS1 is likely expressed throughout banana fruit development. In postharvest banana ripening, MuMADS1 is associated with ethylene biosynthesis. Expression patterns of MuMADS1 during postharvest ripening as determined by real-time RT-PCR suggest that differential expression of MuMADS1 may not only be induced by ethylene biosynthesis associated with postharvest banana ripening, but also may be induced by exogenous ethylene. PMID:18820933

  11. TAL1/SCL induces leukemia by inhibiting the transcriptional activity of E47/HEB.

    PubMed

    O'Neil, Jennifer; Shank, Jennifer; Cusson, Nicole; Murre, Cornelis; Kelliher, Michelle

    2004-06-01

    Activation of the basic-helix-loop-helix (bHLH) gene TAL1 (or SCL) is a frequent gain-of-function mutation in T cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia (T-ALL). To provide genetic evidence that tal1/scl induces leukemia by interfering with E47 and HEB, we expressed tal1/scl in an E2A or HEB heterozygous background. These mice exhibit disease acceleration and perturbed thymocyte development due to repression of E47/HEB target genes. In tal1/scl thymocytes, we find the corepressor mSin3A bound to the CD4 enhancer, whereas an E47/HEB/p300 complex is detected in wild-type thymocytes. Furthermore, tal1/scl tumors are sensitive to pharmacologic inhibition of HDAC and undergo apoptosis. These data demonstrate that tal1/scl induces leukemia by repressing E47/HEB and suggest that HDAC inhibitors may prove efficacious in T-ALL patients who express TAL1/SCL. PMID:15193261

  12. SOXC Transcription Factors Induce Cartilage Growth Plate Formation in Mouse Embryos by Promoting Noncanonical WNT Signaling.

    PubMed

    Kato, Kenji; Bhattaram, Pallavi; Penzo-Méndez, Alfredo; Gadi, Abhilash; Lefebvre, Véronique

    2015-09-01

    Growth plates are specialized cartilage structures that ensure the elongation of most skeletal primordia during vertebrate development. They are made by chondrocytes that proliferate in longitudinal columns and then progress in a staggered manner towards prehypertrophic, hypertrophic and terminal maturation. Complex molecular networks control the formation and activity of growth plates, but remain incompletely understood. We investigated here the importance of the SoxC genes, which encode the SOX4, SOX11 and SOX12 transcription factors, in growth plates. We show that the three genes are expressed robustly in perichondrocytes and weakly in growth plate chondrocytes. SoxC(Prx1Cre) mice, which deleted SoxC genes in limb bud skeletogenic mesenchyme, were born with tiny appendicular cartilage primordia because of failure to form growth plates. In contrast, SoxC(Col2Cre) and SoxC(ATC) mice, which deleted SoxC genes primarily in chondrocytes, were born with mild dwarfism and fair growth plates. Chondrocytes in the latter mutants matured normally, but formed irregular columns, proliferated slowly and died ectopically. Asymmetric distribution of VANGL2 was defective in both SoxC(Prx1Cre) and SoxC(ATC) chondrocytes, indicating impairment of planar cell polarity, a noncanonical WNT signaling pathway that controls growth plate chondrocyte alignment, proliferation and survival. Accordingly, SoxC genes were necessary in perichondrocytes for expression of Wnt5a, which encodes a noncanonical WNT ligand required for growth plate formation, and in chondrocytes and perichondrocytes for expression of Fzd3 and Csnk1e, which encode a WNT receptor and casein kinase-1 subunit mediating planar cell polarity, respectively. Reflecting the differential strengths of the SOXC protein transactivation domains, SOX11 was more powerful than SOX4, and SOX12 interfered with the activity of SOX4 and SOX11. Altogether, these findings provide novel insights into the molecular regulation of skeletal

  13. Definition of early transcriptional circuitry involved in light-induced reversal of PIF imposed repression of photomorphogenesis in young Arabidopsis seedlings

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Light signals perceived by the phytochromes induce the transition from skotomorphogenic to photomorphogenic development (deetiolation) in dark-germinated seedlings. Evidence that a quadruple mutant (pifq) lacking four phytochromeinteracting bHLH transcription factors (PIF1, 3, 4, and 5) is constitut...

  14. Definition of Early Transcriptional Circuitry Involved in Light-Induced Reversal of PIF-Imposed Repression of Photomorphogenesis in Young Arabidopsis Seedlings

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Light signals perceived by the phytochromes induce the transition from skotomorphogenic to photomorphogenic development (deetiolation) in dark-germinated seedlings. Evidence that a quadruple mutant (pifq) lacking four phytochrome-interacting bHLH transcription factors (PIF1, 3, 4, and 5) is constitu...

  15. Release of Positive Transcription Elongation Factor b (P-TEFb) from 7SK Small Nuclear Ribonucleoprotein (snRNP) Activates Hexamethylene Bisacetamide-inducible Protein (HEXIM1) Transcription*

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Pingyang; Xiang, Yanhui; Fujinaga, Koh; Bartholomeeusen, Koen; Nilson, Kyle A.; Price, David H.; Peterlin, B. Matija

    2014-01-01

    By phosphorylating negative elongation factors and the C-terminal domain of RNA polymerase II (RNAPII), positive transcription elongation factor b (P-TEFb), which is composed of CycT1 or CycT2 and CDK9, activates eukaryotic transcription elongation. In growing cells, it is found in active and inactive forms. In the former, free P-TEFb is a potent transcriptional coactivator. In the latter, it is inhibited by HEXIM1 or HEXIM2 in the 7SK small nuclear ribonucleoprotein (snRNP), which contains, additionally, 7SK snRNA, methyl phosphate-capping enzyme (MePCE), and La-related protein 7 (LARP7). This P-TEFb equilibrium determines the state of growth and proliferation of the cell. In this study, the release of P-TEFb from the 7SK snRNP led to increased synthesis of HEXIM1 but not HEXIM2 in HeLa cells, and this occurred only from an unannotated, proximal promoter. ChIP with sequencing revealed P-TEFb-sensitive poised RNA polymerase II at this proximal but not the previously annotated distal HEXIM1 promoter. Its immediate upstream sequences were fused to luciferase reporters and were found to be responsive to many P-TEFb-releasing compounds. The superelongation complex subunits AF4/FMR2 family member 4 (AFF4) and elongation factor RNA polymerase II 2 (ELL2) were recruited to this proximal promoter after P-TEFb release and were required for its transcriptional effects. Thus, P-TEFb regulates its own equilibrium in cells, most likely to maintain optimal cellular homeostasis. PMID:24515107

  16. Global transcriptional profiles of beating clusters derived from human induced pluripotent stem cells and embryonic stem cells are highly similar

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Functional and molecular integrity of cardiomyocytes (CMs) derived from induced pluripotent stem (iPS) cells is essential for their use in tissue repair, disease modelling and drug screening. In this study we compared global transcriptomes of beating clusters (BCs) microdissected from differentiating human iPS cells and embryonic stem (ES) cells. Results Hierarchical clustering and principal component analysis revealed that iPS-BCs and ES-BCs cluster together, are similarly enriched for cardiospecific genes and differ in expression of only 1.9% of present transcripts. Similarly, sarcomeric organization, electrophysiological properties and calcium handling of iPS-CMs were indistinguishable from those of ES-CMs. Gene ontology analysis revealed that among 204 genes that were upregulated in iPS-BCs vs ES-BCs the processes related to extracellular matrix, cell adhesion and tissue development were overrepresented. Interestingly, 47 of 106 genes that were upregulated in undifferentiated iPS vs ES cells remained enriched in iPS-BCs vs ES-BCs. Most of these genes were found to be highly expressed in fibroblasts used for reprogramming and 34% overlapped with the recently reported iPS cell-enriched genes. Conclusions These data suggest that iPS-BCs are transcriptionally highly similar to ES-BCs. However, iPS-BCs appear to share some somatic cell signature with undifferentiated iPS cells. Thus, iPS-BCs may not be perfectly identical to ES-BCs. These minor differences in the expression profiles may occur due to differential cellular composition of iPS-BCs and ES-BCs, due to retention of some genetic profile of somatic cells in differentiated iPS cell-derivatives, or both. PMID:20843318

  17. Ectopic Overexpression of The Transcription Factor OsGLK1 Induces Chloroplast Development in Non-Green Rice Cells

    PubMed Central

    Nakamura, Hidemitsu; Muramatsu, Masayuki; Hakata, Makoto; Ueno, Osamu; Nagamura, Yoshiaki; Hirochika, Hirohiko; Takano, Makoto; Ichikawa, Hiroaki

    2009-01-01

    For systematic and genome-wide analyses of rice gene functions, we took advantage of the full-length cDNA overexpresser (FOX) gene-hunting system and generated >12 000 independent FOX-rice lines from >25 000 rice calli treated with the rice-FOX Agrobacterium library. We found two FOX-rice lines generating green calli on a callus-inducing medium containing 2,4-D, on which wild-type rice calli became ivory yellow. In both lines, OsGLK1 cDNA encoding a GARP transcription factor was ectopically overexpressed. Using rice expression-microarray and northern blot analyses, we found that a large number of nucleus-encoded genes involved in chloroplast functions were highly expressed and transcripts of plastid-encoded genes, psaA, psbA and rbcL, increased in the OsGLK1-FOX calli. Transmission electron microscopy showed the existence of differentiated chloroplasts with grana stacks in OsGLK1-FOX calli cells. However, in darkness, OsGLK1-FOX calli did not show a green color or develop grana stacks. Furthermore, we found developed chloroplasts in vascular bundle and bundle sheath cells of coleoptiles and leaves from OsGLK1-FOX seedlings. The OsGLK1-FOX calli exhibited high photosynthetic activity and were able to grow on sucrose-depleted media, indicating that developed chloroplasts in OsGLK1-FOX rice calli are functional and active. We also observed that the endogenous OsGLK1 mRNA level increased synchronously with the greening of wild-type calli after transfer to plantlet regeneration medium. These results strongly suggest that OsGLK1 regulates chloroplast development under the control of light and phytohormones, and that it is a key regulator of chloroplast development. PMID:19808806

  18. Sigma-1 receptor mediates cocaine-induced transcriptional regulation by recruiting chromatin-remodeling factors at the nuclear envelope

    PubMed Central

    Tsai, Shang-Yi A.; Chuang, Jian-Ying; Tsai, Meng-Shan; Wang, Xiao-fei; Hung, Jan-Jong; Chang, Wen-Chang; Bonci, Antonello; Su, Tsung-Ping

    2015-01-01

    The sigma-1 receptor (Sig-1R) chaperone at the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) plays important roles in cellular regulation. Here we found a new function of Sig-1R, in that it translocates from the ER to the nuclear envelope (NE) to recruit chromatin-remodeling molecules and regulate the gene transcription thereof. Sig-1Rs mainly reside at the ER–mitochondrion interface. However, on stimulation by agonists such as cocaine, Sig-1Rs translocate from ER to the NE, where Sig-1Rs bind NE protein emerin and recruit chromatin-remodeling molecules, including lamin A/C, barrier-to-autointegration factor (BAF), and histone deacetylase (HDAC), to form a complex with the gene repressor specific protein 3 (Sp3). Knockdown of Sig-1Rs attenuates the complex formation. Cocaine was found to suppress the gene expression of monoamine oxidase B (MAOB) in the brain of wild-type but not Sig-1R knockout mouse. A single dose of cocaine (20 mg/kg) in rats suppresses the level of MAOB at nuclear accumbens without affecting the level of dopamine transporter. Daily injections of cocaine in rats caused behavioral sensitization. Withdrawal from cocaine in cocaine-sensitized rats induced an apparent time-dependent rebound of the MAOB protein level to about 200% over control on day 14 after withdrawal. Treatment of cocaine-withdrawn rats with the MAOB inhibitor deprenyl completely alleviated the behavioral sensitization to cocaine. Our results demonstrate a role of Sig-1R in transcriptional regulation and suggest cocaine may work through this newly discovered genomic action to achieve its addictive action. Results also suggest the MAOB inhibitor deprenyl as a therapeutic agent to block certain actions of cocaine during withdrawal. PMID:26554014

  19. Sigma-1 receptor mediates cocaine-induced transcriptional regulation by recruiting chromatin-remodeling factors at the nuclear envelope.

    PubMed

    Tsai, Shang-Yi A; Chuang, Jian-Ying; Tsai, Meng-Shan; Wang, Xiao-Fei; Xi, Zheng-Xiong; Hung, Jan-Jong; Chang, Wen-Chang; Bonci, Antonello; Su, Tsung-Ping

    2015-11-24

    The sigma-1 receptor (Sig-1R) chaperone at the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) plays important roles in cellular regulation. Here we found a new function of Sig-1R, in that it translocates from the ER to the nuclear envelope (NE) to recruit chromatin-remodeling molecules and regulate the gene transcription thereof. Sig-1Rs mainly reside at the ER-mitochondrion interface. However, on stimulation by agonists such as cocaine, Sig-1Rs translocate from ER to the NE, where Sig-1Rs bind NE protein emerin and recruit chromatin-remodeling molecules, including lamin A/C, barrier-to-autointegration factor (BAF), and histone deacetylase (HDAC), to form a complex with the gene repressor specific protein 3 (Sp3). Knockdown of Sig-1Rs attenuates the complex formation. Cocaine was found to suppress the gene expression of monoamine oxidase B (MAOB) in the brain of wild-type but not Sig-1R knockout mouse. A single dose of cocaine (20 mg/kg) in rats suppresses the level of MAOB at nuclear accumbens without affecting the level of dopamine transporter. Daily injections of cocaine in rats caused behavioral sensitization. Withdrawal from cocaine in cocaine-sensitized rats induced an apparent time-dependent rebound of the MAOB protein level to about 200% over control on day 14 after withdrawal. Treatment of cocaine-withdrawn rats with the MAOB inhibitor deprenyl completely alleviated the behavioral sensitization to cocaine. Our results demonstrate a role of Sig-1R in transcriptional regulation and suggest cocaine may work through this newly discovered genomic action to achieve its addictive action. Results also suggest the MAOB inhibitor deprenyl as a therapeutic agent to block certain actions of cocaine during withdrawal. PMID:26554014

  20. Transcriptional Coactivator Cited2 Induces Bmi1 and Mel18 and Controls Fibroblast Proliferation via Ink4a/ARF

    PubMed Central

    Kranc, Kamil R.; Bamforth, Simon D.; Bragança, José; Norbury, Chris; van Lohuizen, Maarten; Bhattacharya, Shoumo

    2003-01-01

    Cited2 (CBP/p300 interacting transactivator with ED-rich tail 2) is required for embryonic development, coactivation of transcription factor AP-2, and inhibition of hypoxia-inducible factor 1 transactivation. Cited2 is induced by multiple growth factors and cytokines and oncogenically transforms cells. Here, we show that the proliferation of Cited2−/− mouse embryonic fibroblasts ceases prematurely. This is associated with a reduction in growth fraction, senescent cellular morphology, and increased expression of the cell proliferation inhibitors p16INK4a, p19ARF, and p15INK4b. Deletion of INK4a/ARF (encoding p16INK4a and p19ARF) completely rescued the defective proliferation of Cited2−/− fibroblasts. However, the deletion of INK4a/ARF did not rescue the embryonic malformations observed in Cited2−/− mice, indicating that INK4a/ARF-independent pathways are likely to be involved here. We found that Cited2−/− fibroblasts had reduced expression of the polycomb-group genes Bmi1 and Mel18, which function as INK4a/ARF and Hox repressors. Complementation with CITED2-expressing retrovirus enhanced proliferation, induced Bmi1/Mel18 expression, and decreased INK4a/ARF expression. Bmi1- and Mel18-expressing retroviruses enhanced the proliferation of Cited2−/− fibroblasts, indicating that they function downstream of Cited2. Our results provide genetic evidence that Cited2 controls the expression of INK4a/ARF and fibroblast proliferation, at least in part via the polycomb-group genes Bmi1 and Mel18. PMID:14560011

  1. The transcriptional PPARβ/δ network in human macrophages defines a unique agonist-induced activation state

    PubMed Central

    Adhikary, Till; Wortmann, Annika; Schumann, Tim; Finkernagel, Florian; Lieber, Sonja; Roth, Katrin; Toth, Philipp M.; Diederich, Wibke E.; Nist, Andrea; Stiewe, Thorsten; Kleinesudeik, Lara; Reinartz, Silke; Müller-Brüsselbach, Sabine; Müller, Rolf

    2015-01-01

    Peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor β/δ (PPARβ/δ) is a lipid ligand-inducible transcription factor with established metabolic functions, whereas its anti-inflammatory function is poorly understood. To address this issue, we determined the global PPARβ/δ-regulated signaling network in human monocyte-derived macrophages. Besides cell type-independent, canonical target genes with metabolic and immune regulatory functions we identified a large number of inflammation-associated NFκB and STAT1 target genes that are repressed by agonists. Accordingly, PPARβ/δ agonists inhibited the expression of multiple pro-inflammatory mediators and induced an anti-inflammatory, IL-4-like morphological phenotype. Surprisingly, bioinformatic analyses also identified immune stimulatory effects. Consistent with this prediction, PPARβ/δ agonists enhanced macrophage survival under hypoxic stress and stimulated CD8+ T cell activation, concomitantly with the repression of immune suppressive target genes and their encoded products CD274 (PD-1 ligand), CD32B (inhibitory Fcγ receptor IIB) and indoleamine 2,3-dioxygenase 1 (IDO-1), as well as a diminished release of the immune suppressive IDO-1 metabolite kynurenine. Comparison with published data revealed a significant overlap of the PPARβ/δ transcriptome with coexpression modules characteristic of both anti-inflammatory and pro-inflammatory cytokines. Our findings indicate that PPARβ/δ agonists induce a unique macrophage activation state with strong anti-inflammatory but also specific immune stimulatory components, pointing to a context-dependent function of PPARβ/δ in immune regulation. PMID:25934804

  2. Stress-induced expression of NICOTINE2-locus genes and their homologs encoding Ethylene Response Factor transcription factors in tobacco.

    PubMed

    Shoji, Tsubasa; Hashimoto, Takashi

    2015-05-01

    Plants have evolved diverse defense metabolites as adaptations to biotic and abiotic stresses. The defense alkaloid nicotine is produced in Nicotiana tabacum (tobacco) and its biosynthesis is elicited by jasmonates in the roots. At least seven jasmonate-responsive genes that encode transcription factors of the Ethylene Response Factor (ERF) family are clustered at the nicotine-regulatory locus NICOTINE2 (NIC2) in the tobacco genome. A subset of the NIC2-locus ERFs and their homologs, including ERF189 and ERF199, have been shown to be most effective in controlling nicotine biosynthetic pathway genes. Herein reported is that the ERF genes of this group, other than ERF189 and ERF199, were strongly induced by NaCl in tobacco hairy roots, although salt stress had no effect on expression of nicotine biosynthesis genes. Abscisic acid and osmotic stress also increased expression of a subset of these NaCl-inducible ERF genes. Promoter expression analysis in transgenic tobacco hairy roots confirmed that while methyl jasmonate (MJ) activated the promoters of ERF29, ERF210 and ERF199, salt stress up-regulated the promoters of only ERF29 and ERF210, but not ERF199. The protein biosynthesis inhibitor cycloheximide induced expression of the ERFs, and simultaneous addition of MJ and cycloheximide showed synergistic effects. These results indicate that, after several gene duplication events, the NIC2-locus ERFs and possibly their homologs appear to have diverged in their responses to jasmonates and various environmental inputs, including salt stress, and may have evolved to regulate distinct metabolic processes and cellular responses. PMID:24947337

  3. BDE47 induces rat CYP3A1 by targeting the transcriptional regulation of miR-23b.

    PubMed

    Sun, Zhenzhen; Zhang, Zhan; Ji, Minghui; Yang, Hongbao; Cromie, Meghan; Gu, Jun; Wang, Chao; Yang, Lu; Yu, Yongquan; Gao, Weimin; Wang, Shou-Lin

    2016-01-01

    Cytochrome P450 3A (CYP3A) is the most abundant CYP450 enzyme in the liver and is involved in the metabolism of over 50% of xenobiotics. Our previous studies revealed that 2,2',4,4'-tetrabromodiphenyl ether (BDE47) could induce rat CYP3A1 expression, but the molecular basis remains unclear. Using in silico analysis, we identified a potential miR-23b recognition element (MRE23b) in the 3'-UTR region of CYP3A1 mRNA, which was verified by the luciferase assay. The miR-23b mimic and inhibitor significantly down- and up-regulated the expression of CYP3A1, respectively. Additionally, BDE47 significantly down-regulated the expression of miR-23b in rats and in hepatic H4IIE cells. Induction or blockage of CYP3A1 by a miR-23b inhibitor or mimic could correspondingly alter BDE47-induced expression of CYP3A1 and cytotoxicity in H4IIE cells. Furthermore, LV-anti-miR-23b significantly decreased endogenous levels of miR-23b and increased the expression and activity of CYP3A1 in rat liver. LV-anti-miR-23b also significantly increased the hydroxylated metabolites of BDE47 (3-OH-BDE47, 4-OH-BDE42, and 4'-OH-BDE49) in rat serum. In conclusion, we first found that BDE47 induced rat CYP3A1 expression by targeting the transcriptional regulation of miR-23b. This study helps provide a better understanding of CYP3A regulation and offers novel clues for the role of miRNAs in the metabolism and distribution of environmental pollutants. PMID:27546062

  4. Transcriptional activation of follistatin by Nrf2 protects pulmonary epithelial cells against silica nanoparticle-induced oxidative stress

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Chen; Zhao, Xinyuan; Sun, Desen; Zhang, Lingda; Fang, Wenpan; Zhu, Tingjia; Wang, Qiang; Liu, Botao; Wei, Saisai; Chen, Guangdi; Xu, Zhengping; Gao, Xiangwei

    2016-01-01

    Silica nanoparticles (SiO2 NPs) cause oxidative stress in respiratory system. Meanwhile, human cells launch adaptive responses to overcome SiO2 NP toxicity. However, besides a few examples, the regulation of SiO2 NP-responsive proteins and their functions in SiO2 NP response remain largely unknown. In this study, we demonstrated that SiO2 NP induced the expression of follistatin (FST), a stress responsive gene, in mouse lung tissue as well as in human lung epithelial cells (A549). The levels of Ac-H3(K9/18) and H3K4me2, two active gene markers, at FST promoter region were significantly increased during SiO2 NP treatment. The induction of FST transcription was mediated by the nuclear factor erythroid 2-related factor 2 (Nrf2), as evidenced by the decreased FST expression in Nrf2-deficient cells and the direct binding of Nrf2 to FST promoter region. Down-regulation of FST promoted SiO2 NP-induced apoptosis both in cultured cells and in mouse lung tissue. Furthermore, knockdown of FST increased while overexpression of FST decreased the expression level of NADPH oxidase 1 (NOX1) and NOX5 as well as the production of cellular reactive oxygen species (ROS). Taken together, these findings demonstrated a protective role of FST in SiO2 NP-induced oxidative stress and shed light on the interaction between SiO2 NPs and biological systems. PMID:26878911

  5. BDE47 induces rat CYP3A1 by targeting the transcriptional regulation of miR-23b

    PubMed Central

    Sun, Zhenzhen; Zhang, Zhan; Ji, Minghui; Yang, Hongbao; Cromie, Meghan; Gu, Jun; Wang, Chao; Yang, Lu; Yu, Yongquan; Gao, Weimin; Wang, Shou-Lin

    2016-01-01

    Cytochrome P450 3A (CYP3A) is the most abundant CYP450 enzyme in the liver and is involved in the metabolism of over 50% of xenobiotics. Our previous studies revealed that 2,2′,4,4′-tetrabromodiphenyl ether (BDE47) could induce rat CYP3A1 expression, but the molecular basis remains unclear. Using in silico analysis, we identified a potential miR-23b recognition element (MRE23b) in the 3′-UTR region of CYP3A1 mRNA, which was verified by the luciferase assay. The miR-23b mimic and inhibitor significantly down- and up-regulated the expression of CYP3A1, respectively. Additionally, BDE47 significantly down-regulated the expression of miR-23b in rats and in hepatic H4IIE cells. Induction or blockage of CYP3A1 by a miR-23b inhibitor or mimic could correspondingly alter BDE47-induced expression of CYP3A1 and cytotoxicity in H4IIE cells. Furthermore, LV-anti-miR-23b significantly decreased endogenous levels of miR-23b and increased the expression and activity of CYP3A1 in rat liver. LV-anti-miR-23b also significantly increased the hydroxylated metabolites of BDE47 (3-OH-BDE47, 4-OH-BDE42, and 4′-OH-BDE49) in rat serum. In conclusion, we first found that BDE47 induced rat CYP3A1 expression by targeting the transcriptional regulation of miR-23b. This study helps provide a better understanding of CYP3A regulation and offers novel clues for the role of miRNAs in the metabolism and distribution of environmental pollutants. PMID:27546062

  6. p53 Ser15 phosphorylation and histone modifications contribute to IR-induced miR-34a transcription in mammary epithelial cells

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Bo; Li, Dongping

    2013-01-01

    Previous studies have demonstrated that miR-34a is a direct transcriptional target of tumor suppressor p53 and plays a crucial role in p53-mediated biological processes, such as cell cycle arrest, apoptosis and senescence. However, the role of p53 phosphorylation at Ser15 and histone modifications in ionizing radiation (IR)-induced miR-34a transcription in human mammary epithelial cells remains unknown. The present study showed that IR triggers miR-34a induction in rat mammary gland tissue and human mammary epithelial cells in a dose- and time-dependent fashion. Gene copy number and CpG methylation exhibit no effect on IR-inducible miR-34a expression, while the levels of phosphorylated p53 at Ser15 are markedly elevated in human mammary epithelial cells 96 h post-IR, which correlates with IR-inducible miR-34a transcription and the p38 MAPK pathway. Conversely, suppression of p38 MAPK with SB239063 inhibits IR-induced p53 phosphorylation at Ser15 and miR-34a expression in a dose-dependent manner. Our study found that wild-type p53 is enriched at miR-34a promoter, and luciferase activity of miR-34a promoter reporter is attenuated by either mutant p53 (Ser15Ala) or mutant miR-34a promoter. Furthermore, IR also triggers phosphorylation, tri-methylation and acetylation of histone H3 and acetylation of histone H4, which correlates with IR-inducible miR-34a transcription, while SAHA potentiates IR-inducible miR-34a expression. Moreover, acetyl-histone H3 is significantly enriched at miR-34a promoter in IR-exposed HMEC cells. Yet, we show that there is no correlation between IR-inducible miR-34a expression and IR-induced rapid and transient G2/M arrest. In sum, our novel data for the first time demonstrate that IR-induced p53 Ser15 phosphorylation via p38 MAPK is essential for its functional regulation of IR-inducible miR-34a transcription in human mammary epithelial cells, and that histone mod