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Sample records for inducing sterilizing immunity

  1. Steric-electronic effects in malarial peptides inducing sterile immunity

    SciTech Connect

    Moreno-Vranich, Armando; Patarroyo, Manuel E.

    2012-07-13

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Is it evident that the residues position are relevant regarding of {phi} angular value. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The geometry considered for detailing the alterations undergone by HABPs. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The inter planar interactions ruled by clashes between the atoms making them up. -- Abstract: Conserved Plasmodium falciparum high activity binding peptides' (HABPs) most relevant proteins involved in malaria parasite invasion are immunologically silent; critical binding residues must therefore be specifically replaced to render them highly immunogenic and protection-inducing. Such changes have a tremendous impact on these peptides' steric-electronic effects, such as modifications to peptide length peptide bonds and electronic orbitals' disposition, to allow a better fit into immune system MHCII molecules and better interaction with the TCR which might account for the final immunological outcome.

  2. Cellular and humoral immune effector mechanisms required for sterile protection against sporozoite challenge induced with the novel malaria vaccine candidate CelTOS.

    PubMed

    Bergmann-Leitner, Elke S; Legler, Patricia M; Savranskaya, Tatyana; Ockenhouse, Christian F; Angov, Evelina

    2011-08-11

    The malarial protein CelTOS, for cell-traversal protein for ookinetes and sporozoites, from Plasmodium berghei has been shown to mediate malarial invasion of both vertebrate and insect host cells and is required for establishing their successful infections. In the vertebrate host, Plasmodium sporozoites traverse via a complex passage through cellular barriers in the skin and the liver sinusoid to infect hepatocytes. Induction of immunity targeted to molecules involved in sporozoite motility and migration into hepatocytes may lead to abrogation of hepatocyte infection. We have previously demonstrated the potential of CelTOS as a target antigen for a pre-erythrocytic vaccine. The objective of the current study was to determine the potency of different vaccine platforms to induce protective immunity and determine the mode of action in protective immune responses. To this end, inbred Balb/c and outbred ICR mice were immunized with either the recombinant protein adjuvanted with Montanide ISA-720 or with a pCI-TPA plasmid encoding the P. berghei CelTOS (epidermal delivery by gene-gun) and assessed for the induction of protective responses against a homologous P. berghei challenge. Humoral and cellular immune responses induced by the various immunization regimens were evaluated in an effort to establish immune correlates. The results confirm that the CelTOS antigen is a potentially interesting pre-erythrocytic vaccine candidate and demonstrate that both arms of the adaptive immune system are required to mediate complete sterile protection against sporozoite challenge. PMID:21722682

  3. Secretion of Protective Antigens by Tissue-Stage Nematode Larvae Revealed by Proteomic Analysis and Vaccination-Induced Sterile Immunity

    PubMed Central

    Hewitson, James P.; Ivens, Al C.; Harcus, Yvonne; Filbey, Kara J.; McSorley, Henry J.; Murray, Janice; Bridgett, Stephen; Ashford, David; Dowle, Adam A.; Maizels, Rick M.

    2013-01-01

    Gastrointestinal nematode parasites infect over 1 billion humans, with little evidence for generation of sterilising immunity. These helminths are highly adapted to their mammalian host, following a developmental program through successive niches, while effectively down-modulating host immune responsiveness. Larvae of Heligmosomoides polygyrus, for example, encyst in the intestinal submucosa, before emerging as adult worms into the duodenal lumen. Adults release immunomodulatory excretory-secretory (ES) products, but mice immunised with adult H. polygyrus ES become fully immune to challenge infection. ES products of the intestinal wall 4th stage (L4) larvae are similarly important in host-parasite interactions, as they readily generate sterile immunity against infection, while released material from the egg stage is ineffective. Proteomic analyses of L4 ES identifies protective antigen targets as well as potential tissue-phase immunomodulatory molecules, using as comparators the adult ES proteome and a profile of H. polygyrus egg-released material. While 135 proteins are shared between L4 and adult ES, 72 are L4 ES-specific; L4-specific proteins correspond to those whose transcription is restricted to larval stages, while shared proteins are generally transcribed by all life cycle forms. Two protein families are more heavily represented in the L4 secretome, the Sushi domain, associated with complement regulation, and the ShK/SXC domain related to a toxin interfering with T cell signalling. Both adult and L4 ES contain extensive but distinct arrays of Venom allergen/Ancylostoma secreted protein-Like (VAL) members, with acetylcholinesterases (ACEs) and apyrase APY-3 particularly abundant in L4 ES. Serum antibodies from mice vaccinated with L4 and adult ES react strongly to the VAL-1 protein and to ACE-1, indicating that these two antigens represent major vaccine targets for this intestinal nematode. We have thus defined an extensive and novel repertoire of H

  4. Secretion of protective antigens by tissue-stage nematode larvae revealed by proteomic analysis and vaccination-induced sterile immunity.

    PubMed

    Hewitson, James P; Ivens, Al C; Harcus, Yvonne; Filbey, Kara J; McSorley, Henry J; Murray, Janice; Bridgett, Stephen; Ashford, David; Dowle, Adam A; Maizels, Rick M

    2013-08-01

    Gastrointestinal nematode parasites infect over 1 billion humans, with little evidence for generation of sterilising immunity. These helminths are highly adapted to their mammalian host, following a developmental program through successive niches, while effectively down-modulating host immune responsiveness. Larvae of Heligmosomoides polygyrus, for example, encyst in the intestinal submucosa, before emerging as adult worms into the duodenal lumen. Adults release immunomodulatory excretory-secretory (ES) products, but mice immunised with adult H. polygyrus ES become fully immune to challenge infection. ES products of the intestinal wall 4th stage (L4) larvae are similarly important in host-parasite interactions, as they readily generate sterile immunity against infection, while released material from the egg stage is ineffective. Proteomic analyses of L4 ES identifies protective antigen targets as well as potential tissue-phase immunomodulatory molecules, using as comparators the adult ES proteome and a profile of H. polygyrus egg-released material. While 135 proteins are shared between L4 and adult ES, 72 are L4 ES-specific; L4-specific proteins correspond to those whose transcription is restricted to larval stages, while shared proteins are generally transcribed by all life cycle forms. Two protein families are more heavily represented in the L4 secretome, the Sushi domain, associated with complement regulation, and the ShK/SXC domain related to a toxin interfering with T cell signalling. Both adult and L4 ES contain extensive but distinct arrays of Venom allergen/Ancylostoma secreted protein-Like (VAL) members, with acetylcholinesterases (ACEs) and apyrase APY-3 particularly abundant in L4 ES. Serum antibodies from mice vaccinated with L4 and adult ES react strongly to the VAL-1 protein and to ACE-1, indicating that these two antigens represent major vaccine targets for this intestinal nematode. We have thus defined an extensive and novel repertoire of H

  5. Atomic evidence that modification of H-bonds established with amino acids critical for host-cell binding induces sterile immunity against malaria

    SciTech Connect

    Patarroyo, Manuel E.; Cifuentes, Gladys; Pirajan, Camilo; Moreno-Vranich, Armando; Vanegas, Magnolia

    2010-04-09

    Based on the 3D X-ray crystallographic structures of relevant proteins of the malaria parasite involved in invasion to host cells and 3D NMR structures of High Activity Binding Peptides (HABPs) and their respective analogues, it was found that HABPs are rendered into highly immunogenic and sterile immunity inducers in the Aotus experimental model by modifying those amino acids that establish H-bonds with other HABPs or binding to host's cells. This finding adds striking and novel physicochemical principles, at the atomic level, for a logical and rational vaccine development methodology against infectious disease, among them malaria.

  6. 3D Analysis of the TCR/pMHCII Complex Formation in Monkeys Vaccinated with the First Peptide Inducing Sterilizing Immunity against Human Malaria

    PubMed Central

    López, Carolina; Yepes, Gloria; Patarroyo, Manuel E.

    2010-01-01

    T-cell receptor gene rearrangements were studied in Aotus monkeys developing high antibody titers and sterilizing immunity against the Plasmodium falciparum malaria parasite upon vaccination with the modified synthetic peptide 24112, which was identified in the Merozoite Surface Protein 2 (MSP-2) and is known to bind to HLA-DRβ1*0403 molecules with high capacity. Spectratyping analysis showed a preferential usage of Vβ12 and Vβ6 TCR gene families in 67% of HLA-DRβ1*0403-like genotyped monkeys. Docking of peptide 24112 into the HLA-DRβ1*0401–HA peptide–HA1.7TCR complex containing the VDJ rearrangements identified in fully protected monkeys showed a different structural signature compared to nonprotected monkeys. These striking results show the exquisite specificity of the TCR/pMHCII complex formation needed for inducing sterilizing immunity and provide important hints for a logical and rational methodology to develop multiepitopic, minimal subunit-based synthetic vaccines against infectious diseases, among them malaria. PMID:20333301

  7. DNA Prime/Adenovirus Boost Malaria Vaccine Encoding P. falciparum CSP and AMA1 Induces Sterile Protection Associated with Cell-Mediated Immunity

    PubMed Central

    Chuang, Ilin; Sedegah, Martha; Cicatelli, Susan; Spring, Michele; Polhemus, Mark; Tamminga, Cindy; Patterson, Noelle; Guerrero, Melanie; Bennett, Jason W.; McGrath, Shannon; Ganeshan, Harini; Belmonte, Maria; Farooq, Fouzia; Abot, Esteban; Banania, Jo Glenna; Huang, Jun; Newcomer, Rhonda; Rein, Lisa; Litilit, Dianne; Richie, Nancy O.; Wood, Chloe; Murphy, Jittawadee; Sauerwein, Robert; Hermsen, Cornelus C.; McCoy, Andrea J.; Kamau, Edwin; Cummings, James; Komisar, Jack; Sutamihardja, Awalludin; Shi, Meng; Epstein, Judith E.; Maiolatesi, Santina; Tosh, Donna; Limbach, Keith; Angov, Evelina; Bergmann-Leitner, Elke; Bruder, Joseph T.; Doolan, Denise L.; King, C. Richter; Carucci, Daniel; Dutta, Sheetij; Soisson, Lorraine; Diggs, Carter; Hollingdale, Michael R.; Ockenhouse, Christian F.; Richie, Thomas L.

    2013-01-01

    Background Gene-based vaccination using prime/boost regimens protects animals and humans against malaria, inducing cell-mediated responses that in animal models target liver stage malaria parasites. We tested a DNA prime/adenovirus boost malaria vaccine in a Phase 1 clinical trial with controlled human malaria infection. Methodology/Principal Findings The vaccine regimen was three monthly doses of two DNA plasmids (DNA) followed four months later by a single boost with two non-replicating human serotype 5 adenovirus vectors (Ad). The constructs encoded genes expressing P. falciparum circumsporozoite protein (CSP) and apical membrane antigen-1 (AMA1). The regimen was safe and well-tolerated, with mostly mild adverse events that occurred at the site of injection. Only one AE (diarrhea), possibly related to immunization, was severe (Grade 3), preventing daily activities. Four weeks after the Ad boost, 15 study subjects were challenged with P. falciparum sporozoites by mosquito bite, and four (27%) were sterilely protected. Antibody responses by ELISA rose after Ad boost but were low (CSP geometric mean titer 210, range 44–817; AMA1 geometric mean micrograms/milliliter 11.9, range 1.5–102) and were not associated with protection. Ex vivo IFN-γ ELISpot responses after Ad boost were modest (CSP geometric mean spot forming cells/million peripheral blood mononuclear cells 86, range 13–408; AMA1 348, range 88–1270) and were highest in three protected subjects. ELISpot responses to AMA1 were significantly associated with protection (p = 0.019). Flow cytometry identified predominant IFN-γ mono-secreting CD8+ T cell responses in three protected subjects. No subjects with high pre-existing anti-Ad5 neutralizing antibodies were protected but the association was not statistically significant. Significance The DNA/Ad regimen provided the highest sterile immunity achieved against malaria following immunization with a gene-based subunit vaccine (27%). Protection was

  8. Long-term persistence of sterile immunity in a volunteer immunized with X-irradiated Plasmodium falciparum sporozoites.

    PubMed

    Edelman, R; Hoffman, S L; Davis, J R; Beier, M; Sztein, M B; Losonsky, G; Herrington, D A; Eddy, H A; Hollingdale, M R; Gordon, D M

    1993-10-01

    Three volunteers were immunized by repeated exposure to the bites of Plasmodium falciparum-infected, X-irradiated mosquitoes to characterize immunologic responses and duration of protective immunity. A primary series of immunizations had been shown previously to induce sterile immunity in these volunteers against sporozoite-induced P. falciparum malaria. In the current study, antibodies to sporozoites circulated at high levels for at least 9-12 months after the volunteers were administered booster bites from X-irradiated infective mosquitoes. One volunteer challenged a second time with P. falciparum 9 months after his last immunization was again shown to be protected, whereas all 5 control subjects developed patent infections. These results set a new standard for persistence of sterile immunity against experimental P. falciparum infection. PMID:8376823

  9. Sterile inflammation induced by Carbopol elicits robust adaptive immune responses in the absence of pathogen-associated molecular patterns.

    PubMed

    Gartlan, Kate H; Krashias, George; Wegmann, Frank; Hillson, William R; Scherer, Erin M; Greenberg, Philip D; Eisenbarth, Stephanie C; Moghaddam, Amin E; Sattentau, Quentin J

    2016-04-27

    Carbopol is a polyanionic carbomer used in man for topical application and drug delivery purposes. However parenteral administration of Carbopol in animal models results in systemic adjuvant activity including strong pro-inflammatory type-1 T-cell (Th1) polarization. Here we investigated potential pathways of immune activation by Carbopol by comparison with other well-characterized adjuvants. Carbopol administration triggered rapid and robust leukocyte recruitment, pro-inflammatory cytokine secretion and antigen capture largely by inflammatory monocytes. The induction of antigen specific Th1 cells by Carbopol was found to occur via a non-canonical pathway, independent of MyD88/TRIF signaling and in the absence of pattern-recognition-receptor (PRR) activation typically associated with Th1/Ig2a induction. Using multispectral fluorescence imaging (Imagestream) and electron microscopy we demonstrated that phagocytic uptake of Carbopol particles followed by entry into the phagosomal/lysosomal pathway elicited conformational changes to the polymer and reactive oxygen species (ROS) production. We therefore conclude that Carbopol may mediate its adjuvant activity via novel mechanisms of antigen presenting cell activation and Th1 induction, leading to enhanced IgG2a responses independent of microbial pattern recognition. PMID:27005810

  10. Sterile inflammation induced by Carbopol elicits robust adaptive immune responses in the absence of pathogen-associated molecular patterns

    PubMed Central

    Gartlan, Kate H.; Krashias, George; Wegmann, Frank; Hillson, William R.; Scherer, Erin M.; Greenberg, Philip D.; Eisenbarth, Stephanie C.; Moghaddam, Amin E.; Sattentau, Quentin J.

    2016-01-01

    Carbopol is a polyanionic carbomer used in man for topical application and drug delivery purposes. However parenteral administration of Carbopol in animal models results in systemic adjuvant activity including strong pro-inflammatory type-1 T-cell (Th1) polarization. Here we investigated potential pathways of immune activation by Carbopol by comparison with other well-characterized adjuvants. Carbopol administration triggered rapid and robust leukocyte recruitment, pro-inflammatory cytokine secretion and antigen capture largely by inflammatory monocytes. The induction of antigen specific Th1 cells by Carbopol was found to occur via a non-canonical pathway, independent of MyD88/TRIF signaling and in the absence of pattern-recognition-receptor (PRR) activation typically associated with Th1/Ig2a induction. Using multispectral fluorescence imaging (Imagestream) and electron microscopy we demonstrated that phagocytic uptake of Carbopol particles followed by entry into the phagosomal/lysosomal pathway elicited conformational changes to the polymer and reactive oxygen species (ROS) production. We therefore conclude that Carbopol may mediate its adjuvant activity via novel mechanisms of antigen presenting cell activation and Th1 induction, leading to enhanced IgG2a responses independent of microbial pattern recognition. PMID:27005810

  11. Sterilizing immunity to influenza virus infection requires local antigen-specific T cell response in the lungs

    PubMed Central

    Dutta, Avijit; Huang, Ching-Tai; Lin, Chun-Yen; Chen, Tse-Ching; Lin, Yung-Chang; Chang, Chia-Shiang; He, Yueh-Chia

    2016-01-01

    Sterilizing immunity is a unique immune status, which prevents effective virus infection into the host. It is different from the immunity that allows infection but with subsequent successful eradication of the virus. Pre-infection induces sterilizing immunity to homologous influenza virus challenge in ferret. In our antigen-specific experimental system, mice pre-infected with PR8 influenza virus through nasal route are likewise resistant to reinfection of the same strain of virus. The virus is cleared before establishment of effective infection. Intramuscular influenza virus injection confers protection against re-infection with facilitated virus clearance but not sterilizing immunity. Pre-infection and intramuscular injection generates comparable innate immunity and antibody response, but only pre-infection induces virus receptor reduction and efficient antigen-specific T cell response in the lungs. Pre-infection with nH1N1 influenza virus induces virus receptor reduction but not PR8-specific T cell immune response in the lungs and cannot prevent infection of PR8 influenza virus. Pre-infection with PR8 virus induced PR8-specific T cell response in the lungs but cannot prevent infection of nH1N1 virus either. These results reveal that antigen-specific T cell immunity is required for sterilizing immunity. PMID:27596047

  12. Sterilizing immunity to influenza virus infection requires local antigen-specific T cell response in the lungs.

    PubMed

    Dutta, Avijit; Huang, Ching-Tai; Lin, Chun-Yen; Chen, Tse-Ching; Lin, Yung-Chang; Chang, Chia-Shiang; He, Yueh-Chia

    2016-01-01

    Sterilizing immunity is a unique immune status, which prevents effective virus infection into the host. It is different from the immunity that allows infection but with subsequent successful eradication of the virus. Pre-infection induces sterilizing immunity to homologous influenza virus challenge in ferret. In our antigen-specific experimental system, mice pre-infected with PR8 influenza virus through nasal route are likewise resistant to reinfection of the same strain of virus. The virus is cleared before establishment of effective infection. Intramuscular influenza virus injection confers protection against re-infection with facilitated virus clearance but not sterilizing immunity. Pre-infection and intramuscular injection generates comparable innate immunity and antibody response, but only pre-infection induces virus receptor reduction and efficient antigen-specific T cell response in the lungs. Pre-infection with nH1N1 influenza virus induces virus receptor reduction but not PR8-specific T cell immune response in the lungs and cannot prevent infection of PR8 influenza virus. Pre-infection with PR8 virus induced PR8-specific T cell response in the lungs but cannot prevent infection of nH1N1 virus either. These results reveal that antigen-specific T cell immunity is required for sterilizing immunity. PMID:27596047

  13. Immunization with Apical Membrane Antigen 1 Confers Sterile Infection-Blocking Immunity against Plasmodium Sporozoite Challenge in a Rodent Model

    PubMed Central

    Schussek, Sophie; Trieu, Angela; Apte, Simon H.; Sidney, John; Sette, Alessandro

    2013-01-01

    Apical membrane antigen 1 (AMA-1) is a leading blood-stage malaria vaccine candidate. Consistent with a key role in erythrocytic invasion, AMA-1-specific antibodies have been implicated in AMA-1-induced protective immunity. AMA-1 is also expressed in sporozoites and in mature liver schizonts where it may be a target of protective cell-mediated immunity. Here, we demonstrate for the first time that immunization with AMA-1 can induce sterile infection-blocking immunity against Plasmodium sporozoite challenge in 80% of immunized mice. Significantly higher levels of gamma interferon (IFN-γ)/interleukin-2 (IL-2)/tumor necrosis factor (TNF) multifunctional T cells were noted in immunized mice than in control mice. We also report the first identification of minimal CD8+ and CD4+ T cell epitopes on Plasmodium yoelii AMA-1. These data establish AMA-1 as a target of both preerythrocytic- and erythrocytic-stage protective immune responses and validate vaccine approaches designed to induce both cellular and humoral immunity. PMID:23836827

  14. Targeted gene silencing to induce permanent sterility.

    PubMed

    Dissen, G A; Lomniczi, A; Boudreau, R L; Chen, Y H; Davidson, B L; Ojeda, S R

    2012-08-01

    A non-surgical method to induce sterility would be a useful tool to control feral populations of animals. Our laboratories have experience with approaches aimed at targeting brain cells in vivo with vehicles that deliver a payload of either inhibitory RNAs or genes intended to correct cellular dysfunction. A combination/modification of these methods may provide a useful framework for the design of approaches that can be used to sterilize cats and dogs. For this approach to succeed, it has to meet several conditions: it needs to target a gene essential for fertility. It must involve a method that can selectively silence the gene of interest. It also needs to deliver the silencing agent via a minimally invasive method. Finally, the silencing effect needs to be sustained for many years, so that expansion of the targeted population can be effectively prevented. In this article, we discuss this subject and provide a succinct account of our previous experience with: (i) molecular reagents able to disrupt reproductive cyclicity when delivered to regions of the brain involved in the control of reproduction and (ii) molecular reagents able to ameliorate neuronal disease when delivered systemically using a novel approach of gene therapy. PMID:22827375

  15. Phi ({Phi}) and psi ({Psi}) angles involved in malarial peptide bonds determine sterile protective immunity

    SciTech Connect

    Patarroyo, Manuel E.; Moreno-Vranich, Armando; Bermudez, Adriana

    2012-12-07

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Phi ({Phi}) and psi ({Psi}) angles determine sterile protective immunity. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Modified peptide's tendency to assume a regular conformation related to a PPII{sub L}. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Structural modifications in mHABPs induce Ab and protective immunity. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer mHABP backbone atom's interaction with HLA-DR{beta}1{sup Asterisk-Operator} is stabilised by H-bonds. -- Abstract: Modified HABP (mHABP) regions interacting with HLA-DR{beta}1{sup Asterisk-Operator} molecules have a more restricted conformation and/or sequence than other mHABPs which do not fit perfectly into their peptide binding regions (PBR) and do not induce an acceptable immune response due to the critical role of their {Phi} and {Psi} torsion angles. These angle's critical role was determined in such highly immunogenic, protection-inducing response against experimental malaria using the conformers (mHABPs) obtained by {sup 1}H-NMR and superimposed into HLA-DR{beta}1{sup Asterisk-Operator }-like Aotus monkey molecules; their phi ({Phi}) and psi ({Psi}) angles were measured and the H-bond formation between these molecules was evaluated. The aforementioned mHABP propensity to assume a regular conformation similar to a left-handed polyproline type II helix (PPII{sub L}) led to suggesting that favouring these conformations according to their amino acid sequence would lead to high antibody titre production and sterile protective immunity induction against malaria, thereby adding new principles or rules for vaccine development, malaria being one of them.

  16. Sterile Protective Immunity to Malaria is Associated with a Panel of Novel P. falciparum Antigens*

    PubMed Central

    Trieu, Angela; Kayala, Matthew A.; Burk, Chad; Molina, Douglas M.; Freilich, Daniel A.; Richie, Thomas L.; Baldi, Pierre; Felgner, Philip L.; Doolan, Denise L.

    2011-01-01

    The development of an effective malaria vaccine remains a global public health priority. Less than 0.5% of the Plasmodium falciparum genome has been assessed as potential vaccine targets and candidate vaccines have been based almost exclusively on single antigens. It is possible that the failure to develop a malaria vaccine despite decades of effort might be attributed to this historic focus. To advance malaria vaccine development, we have fabricated protein microarrays representing 23% of the entire P. falciparum proteome and have probed these arrays with plasma from subjects with sterile protection or no protection after experimental immunization with radiation attenuated P. falciparum sporozoites. A panel of 19 pre-erythrocytic stage antigens was identified as strongly associated with sporozoite-induced protective immunity; 16 of these antigens were novel and 85% have been independently identified in sporozoite and/or liver stage proteomic or transcriptomic data sets. Reactivity to any individual antigen did not correlate with protection but there was a highly significant difference in the cumulative signal intensity between protected and not protected individuals. Functional annotation indicates that most of these signature proteins are involved in cell cycle/DNA processing and protein synthesis. In addition, 21 novel blood-stage specific antigens were identified. Our data provide the first evidence that sterile protective immunity against malaria is directed against a panel of novel P. falciparum antigens rather than one antigen in isolation. These results have important implications for vaccine development, suggesting that an efficacious malaria vaccine should be multivalent and targeted at a select panel of key antigens, many of which have not been previously characterized. PMID:21628511

  17. Surgical sterilization: an underutilized procedure for evaluating the merits of induced sterility

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Kennelly, James J.; Converse, Kathryn A.

    1993-01-01

    Despite more than 4 decades of effort, development of effective wildlife damage control programs based on sterilization of target species has met with limited success. This is partly due to the fact that investigators have assumed, rather than empirically tested, whether the reproductive strategies of the target populations were vulnerable to the planned treatment. Equally important, methods selected to include sterility usually involve a chemical agent that can affect sociosexual behaviors of the nuisance population. In this report, we illustrate how surgically induced sterility circumvents both problems--how the concept without the potentially confounding secondary effects of a chemical. We assessed the merits of initiating research to develop a male chemosterilant for Norway rats, red-winged blackbirds, beaver, and Canada geese by inducing sterility surgically. The infidelity of many red-winged females to their polygynous territorial male was surprising and argued against searching for a male sterilant. On the other hand, beaver and Canada goose studies confirmed previous reports that both form par-bonds and are monogamous. Both should be vulnerable to a male chemosterilant approach, and research toward this goal is justified.

  18. The Hepatitis B Vaccine Protects Re-Exposed Healthcare Workers, but Does Not Provide Sterilizing Immunity

    PubMed Central

    Werner, Jens M.; Abdalla, Adil; Gara, Naveen; Ghany, Marc G.; Rehermann, Barbara

    2013-01-01

    Background & Aims Infection with hepatitis B virus (HBV) can be prevented by vaccination with HBV surface (HBs) antigen, which induces HBs-specific antibodies and T cells. However, the duration of vaccine-induced protective immunity is poorly defined for healthcare workers who were vaccinated as adults. Methods We investigated the immune mechanisms (antibody and T cell responses) of long-term protection by the HBV vaccine in 90 healthcare workers with occupational exposure to HBV, 10–28 y after vaccination. Results Fifty-nine of 90 health-care workers (65%) had levels of antibodies against HBs (anti-HBs) above the cut-off (>12 mIU/ml) and 30/90 (33%) had HBs-specific T cells that produced interferon (IFN)γ. Anti-HBs titers correlated with numbers of HBs-specific IFNγ-producing T cells, but not with time after vaccination. Whereas occupational exposure to HBV after vaccination did not induce antibodies to the HBV core protein (HBcore), the standard biomarker for HBV infection, CD4+ and CD8+ T cells against HBcore and polymerase antigens were detected. Similar numbers of HBcore- and polymerase-specific CD4+ and CD8+ T cells were detected in health-care workers with occupational exposure to HBV and in patients who acquired immunity via HBV infection. Most of the HBcore- and polymerase-specific T cells were CD45RO+CCR7−CD127− effector memory cells in exposed health-care workers and in patients with acquired immunity. In contrast, most of the vaccine-induced HBs-specific T cell cells were CD45RO−CCR7−CD127− and terminally differentiated. Conclusions HBsAg vaccine-induced immunity protects against future infection but does not provide sterilizing immunity, as evidenced by HBcore- and polymerase-specific CD8+ T cells in vaccinated health care workers with occupational exposure to HBV. The presence of HBcore- and HBV polymerase-specific T-cell responses is a more sensitive indicator of HBV exposure than detection of HBcore-specific antibodies. PMID:23916846

  19. Rosiglitazone-induced immune thrombocytopenia.

    PubMed

    Liu, Xiaojing; Huang, Tao; Sahud, Mervyn A

    2006-05-01

    Rosiglitazone is one of the members in the thiazolidinedione (TZD) class of anti-diabetic agents that have proven efficacy in the treatment of patients with type 2 diabetes. We studied serum from a patient who developed acute, severe thrombocytopenia after exposure to rosiglitazone maleate (Avandia) and proposed the mechanisms for rosiglitazone-induced thrombocytopenia. Tested by flow cytometry, the patient's serum was positive for rosiglitazone-induced antibody with the binding ratio of 5.93 (mean fluorescence intensity, MFI) in the presence of the patient's serum and rosiglitazone in a final concentration of 0.53 mmol/l. The antibody was found to bind both glycoprotein (GP) IIb-IIIa complex and GP Ib/IX complex by MAIPA assay using five different monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) against GP complexes Ib/IX, GPIIb/IIIa or GPIa/IIa. Immunoprecipitation studies showed that both GPIIb/IIIa and GP Ib/IX complex were precipitated by antibody in the presence, but not in the absence of rosiglitazone. These findings provide evidence that immune thrombocytopenia can be caused by sensitivity to the antidiabetic agent rosiglitazone maleate. This report documents the first case of rosiglitazone-induced immune thrombocytopenia. PMID:16702039

  20. Qualitative inheritance of water-stress induced apical sterility in wheat (Triticum aestivum).

    PubMed

    Mohammady-D, Shahram; Moore, Keith; Ollerenshaw, John

    2003-01-01

    Grain number per unit area is an effective component of grain yield in bread wheat. Water-stress induced apical sterility (tip sterility) reduces the number of grains and, consequently, the grain yield in semi-arid regions with a shortage of available water during the pre-anthesis period. Crosses between apical sterile and apical fertile varieties and selection lines were made and F1, BC1, and F2 populations were subjected to moderate water-stress to study the inheritance of this character. The F2 and BC1 plants were qualitatively categorised into two phenotypes and tested for monohybrid and dihybrid segregation hypotheses. All the spikes of F1 plants obtained from crosses between apical fertile and apical sterile varieties were fully fertile indicating apical fertility is dominant to apical sterility. The F2 segregation Results from crosses between apical fertile lines and Y82187 suggested two complementary dominant genes segregating independently were involved in tolerance to water-stress induced apical sterility. In other words, two dominant genes determine apical fertility in these crosses and if one of these loci is homozygous, recessive waterstress will induce apical sterility. One F2 population segregated for both apical sterility and vernalisation response. Semi-winter plants had more sterile spikelets and the result of chi-square test confirmed monhybrid segregation for vernalisation response. PMID:14641489

  1. X-ray-induced sterility in Aedes albopictus (Diptera: Culicidae) and male longevity following irradiation.

    PubMed

    Yamada, H; Parker, A G; Oliva, C F; Balestrino, F; Gilles, J R L

    2014-07-01

    The mosquito Aedes albopictus (Skuse, 1895) is a potent vector of several arboviral diseases, most notably chikungunya and dengue fever. In the context of the sterile insect technique (SIT), the sterilization of the male mosquitoes before their release can be achieved by gamma-ray irradiation. As gamma-ray irradiators are becoming increasingly problematic to purchase and transport, the suitability of an X-ray irradiator as an alternative for the sterilization of Ae. albopictus males was studied. The sterilization of up to 200,000 pupae at one time can be achieved with relative ease, and the sterility results obtained were comparable with those achieved by gamma irradiation, where 99% sterility is induced with a dose of 40 Gy. A significant reduction of longevity was observed in the latter stages of the males' life after irradiation treatments, especially at doses > 40 Gy, which is consistent with the negative effects on longevity induced by similar radiation doses using gamma rays. Females irradiated at 40 Gy were not only 100% sterile, but also failed to oviposit entirely, i.e., all of the females laid 0 eggs. Overall, it was found that the X-ray irradiator is generally suitable for the sterilization process for sterile insect technique programs, as it showed a high processing capacity, practicality, high effectiveness, and reproducibility. PMID:25118413

  2. Computational Modeling Predicts Interleukin-10 Control of Lesion Sterilization By Balancing Early Host-Immunity-Mediated Antimicrobial Responses With Caseation During Mycobacterium tuberculosis Infection

    PubMed Central

    Cilfone, Nicholas A.; Ford, Christopher B.; Marino, Simeone; Mattila, Joshua T.; Gideon, Hannah P.; Flynn, JoAnne L.; Kirschner, Denise E.; Linderman, Jennifer J.

    2014-01-01

    Although almost a third of the world’s population is infected with the bacterial pathogen Mycobacterium tuberculosis (Mtb), our understanding of the functions of many immune factors involved in fighting infection is limited. Determining the role of the immunosuppressive cytokine interleukin-10 (IL-10) at the level of the granuloma has proven difficult due to lesional heterogeneity and the limitations of animal models. Here we take an in silico approach and, through a series of virtual experiments, we predict several novel roles for IL-10 in TB granulomas: (1) decreased levels of IL-10 lead to increased numbers of sterile lesions, but at the cost of early increased caseation, (2) small increases in early antimicrobial activity cause this increased lesion sterility, (3) IL-10 produced by activated macrophages is a major mediator of early antimicrobial activity and early host-induced caseation and (4) increasing levels of infected macrophage derived IL-10 promotes bacterial persistence by limiting the early antimicrobial response and preventing lesion sterilization. Our findings, currently only accessible using an in silico approach, suggest that IL-10 at the individual granuloma scale is a critical regulator of lesion outcome. These predictions suggest IL-10 related mechanisms that could be used as adjunctive therapies during TB. PMID:25512604

  3. Molecular mapping of a new induced gene for nuclear male sterility in sunflower (Helianthus annuus L.)

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    A new NMS line, NMS HA89-872, induced by mitomycin C and streptomycin carries a single recessive male-sterile gene ms6. An F2 population of 88 plants was obtained from a cross between nuclear male-sterile mutant NMS HA89-872 (msms) and male-fertile line RHA271 (MsMs). 225 SSR primers and 9 RFLP-deri...

  4. High temperature-induced sterility in the female Nile tilapia, Oreochromis niloticus.

    PubMed

    Pandit, Narayan Prasad; Bhandari, Ramji Kumar; Kobayashi, Yasuhisa; Nakamura, Masaru

    2015-03-01

    High temperature treatments induce germ cell loss in gonads of vertebrate animals, including fish. It could be a reliable source for induction of sterility if the treatments led to a permanent loss of germ cells. Here we report that heat treatment at 37 °C for 45-60 days caused a complete loss of germ cells in female Nile tilapia, Oreochromis niloticus, and that sterility was achieved in fish at all stages of their life cycle. Unlike previous observations, germ cells did not repopulate even after returning them to the water at control conditions suggesting permanent depletion of germ cells. Gonadal somatic cells immunopositive for 3β-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase (3β-HSD) were clustered at one end of the germ cell depleted gonads close to the blood vessel. Serum level of testosterone, 11-ketotestosterone, and 17β-estradiol was significantly decreased in sterile fish compared to control. Body weight of sterile fish was higher than control fish at the end of experiment. Our observations of increased growth and permanent sterilization in the high temperature-treated fish suggest that this method could be an appropriate and eco-friendly tool for inducing sterility in fish with a higher thermal tolerance. PMID:25745814

  5. Whole Transcriptome Analysis Using Next-Generation Sequencing of Sterile-Cultured Eisenia andrei for Immune System Research

    PubMed Central

    Mikami, Yoshikazu; Fukushima, Atsushi; Kuwada-Kusunose, Takao; Sakurai, Tetsuya; Kitano, Taiichi; Komiyama, Yusuke; Iwase, Takashi; Komiyama, Kazuo

    2015-01-01

    Recently, earthworms have become a useful model for research into the immune system, and it is expected that results obtained using this model will shed light on the sophisticated vertebrate immune system and the evolution of the immune response, and additionally help identify new biomolecules with therapeutic applications. However, for earthworms to be used as a genetic model of the invertebrate immune system, basic molecular and genetic resources, such as an expressed sequence tag (EST) database, must be developed for this organism. Next-generation sequencing technologies have generated EST libraries by RNA-seq in many model species. In this study, we used Illumina RNA-sequence technology to perform a comprehensive transcriptome analysis using an RNA sample pooled from sterile-cultured Eisenia andrei. All clean reads were assembled de novo into 41,423 unigenes using the Trinity program. Using this transcriptome data, we performed BLAST analysis against the GenBank non-redundant (NR) database and obtained a total of 12,285 significant BLAST hits. Furthermore, gene ontology (GO) analysis assigned 78 unigenes to 24 immune class GO terms. In addition, we detected a unigene with high similarity to beta-1,3-glucuronyltransferase 1 (GlcAT-P), which mediates a glucuronyl transfer reaction during the biosynthesis of the carbohydrate epitope HNK-1 (human natural killer-1, also known as CD57), a marker of NK cells. The identified transcripts will be used to facilitate future research into the immune system using E. andrei. PMID:25706644

  6. Whole transcriptome analysis using next-generation sequencing of sterile-cultured Eisenia andrei for immune system research.

    PubMed

    Mikami, Yoshikazu; Fukushima, Atsushi; Kuwada-Kusunose, Takao; Sakurai, Tetsuya; Kitano, Taiichi; Komiyama, Yusuke; Iwase, Takashi; Komiyama, Kazuo

    2015-01-01

    Recently, earthworms have become a useful model for research into the immune system, and it is expected that results obtained using this model will shed light on the sophisticated vertebrate immune system and the evolution of the immune response, and additionally help identify new biomolecules with therapeutic applications. However, for earthworms to be used as a genetic model of the invertebrate immune system, basic molecular and genetic resources, such as an expressed sequence tag (EST) database, must be developed for this organism. Next-generation sequencing technologies have generated EST libraries by RNA-seq in many model species. In this study, we used Illumina RNA-sequence technology to perform a comprehensive transcriptome analysis using an RNA sample pooled from sterile-cultured Eisenia andrei. All clean reads were assembled de novo into 41,423 unigenes using the Trinity program. Using this transcriptome data, we performed BLAST analysis against the GenBank non-redundant (NR) database and obtained a total of 12,285 significant BLAST hits. Furthermore, gene ontology (GO) analysis assigned 78 unigenes to 24 immune class GO terms. In addition, we detected a unigene with high similarity to beta-1,3-glucuronyltransferase 1 (GlcAT-P), which mediates a glucuronyl transfer reaction during the biosynthesis of the carbohydrate epitope HNK-1 (human natural killer-1, also known as CD57), a marker of NK cells. The identified transcripts will be used to facilitate future research into the immune system using E. andrei. PMID:25706644

  7. Sterilization System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1990-01-01

    Cox Sterile Products, Inc.'s Rapid Heat Transfer Sterilizer employs a heat exchange process that induces rapid air movement; the air becomes the heat transfer medium, maintaining a uniform temperature of 375 degrees Fahrenheit. It features pushbutton controls for three timing cycles for different instrument loads, a six-minute cycle for standard unpackaged instruments, eight minutes for certain specialized dental/medical instruments and 12 minutes for packaged instruments which can then be stored in a drawer in sterile condition. System will stay at 375 degrees all day. Continuous operation is not expensive because of the sterilizer's very low power requirements.

  8. Oxazolone-Induced Contact Hypersensitivity Reduces Lymphatic Drainage but Enhances the Induction of Adaptive Immunity

    PubMed Central

    Aebischer, David; Willrodt, Ann-Helen; Halin, Cornelia

    2014-01-01

    Contact hypersensitivity (CHS) induced by topical application of haptens is a commonly used model to study dermal inflammatory responses in mice. Several recent studies have indicated that CHS-induced skin inflammation triggers lymphangiogenesis but may negatively impact the immune-function of lymphatic vessels, namely fluid drainage and dendritic cell (DC) migration to draining lymph nodes (dLNs). On the other hand, haptens have been shown to exert immune-stimulatory activity by inducing DC maturation. In this study we investigated how the presence of pre-established CHS-induced skin inflammation affects the induction of adaptive immunity in dLNs. Using a mouse model of oxazolone-induced skin inflammation we observed that lymphatic drainage was reduced and DC migration from skin to dLNs was partially compromised. At the same time, a significantly stronger adaptive immune response towards ovalbumin (OVA) was induced when immunization had occurred in CHS-inflamed skin as compared to uninflamed control skin. In fact, immunization with sterile OVA in CHS-inflamed skin evoked a delayed-type hypersensitivity (DTH) response comparable to the one induced by conventional immunization with OVA and adjuvant in uninflamed skin. Striking phenotypic and functional differences were observed when comparing DCs from LNs draining uninflamed or CHS-inflamed skin. DCs from LNs draining CHS-inflamed skin expressed higher levels of co-stimulatory molecules and MHC molecules, produced higher levels of the interleukin-12/23 p40 subunit (IL-12/23-p40) and more potently induced T cell activation in vitro. Immunization experiments revealed that blockade of IL-12/23-p40 during the priming phase partially reverted the CHS-induced enhancement of the adaptive immune response. Collectively, our findings indicate that CHS-induced skin inflammation generates an overall immune-stimulatory milieu, which outweighs the potentially suppressive effect of reduced lymphatic vessel function. PMID:24911791

  9. Tumor-induced immune dysfunction.

    PubMed

    Kiessling, R; Wasserman, K; Horiguchi, S; Kono, K; Sjöberg, J; Pisa, P; Petersson, M

    1999-10-01

    Immune system-based approaches for the treatment of malignant disease over the past decades have often focused on cytolytic effector cells such as cytotoxic T lymphocytes (CTL), and natural killer (NK) cells. It has also been demonstrated that tumor-bearing mice can be cured using a wide variety of approaches, some of which involve cytokine-mediated enhancement of CTL and NK cell activity. However, the apparent success in mice stands in contrast to the current situation in the clinic, wherein only a minority of patients have thus far benefited from CTL- or NK cell-based antitumor approaches. The underlying causes of tumor-associated immune suppression of CTL and NK cell activity are discussed, and features of interest shared with HIV infection, leprosy, and rheumatoid arthritis are also be mentioned. Remarkable and very recent observations have shed more light upon the causes of dysfunctional alterations in CTL and NK cells often associated with these diseases, that in turn have suggested new immunotherapeutic approaches for cancer and infectious disease. PMID:10501847

  10. Injury-induced immune responses in Hydra.

    PubMed

    Wenger, Yvan; Buzgariu, Wanda; Reiter, Silke; Galliot, Brigitte

    2014-08-01

    The impact of injury-induced immune responses on animal regenerative processes is highly variable, positive or negative depending on the context. This likely reflects the complexity of the innate immune system that behaves as a sentinel in the transition from injury to regeneration. Early-branching invertebrates with high regenerative potential as Hydra provide a unique framework to dissect how injury-induced immune responses impact regeneration. A series of early cellular events likely require an efficient immune response after amputation, as antimicrobial defence, epithelial cell stretching for wound closure, migration of interstitial progenitors toward the wound, cell death, phagocytosis of cell debris, or reconstruction of the extracellular matrix. The analysis of the injury-induced transcriptomic modulations of 2636 genes annotated as immune genes in Hydra identified 43 genes showing an immediate/early pulse regulation in all regenerative contexts examined. These regulations point to an enhanced cytoprotection via ROS signaling (Nrf, C/EBP, p62/SQSMT1-l2), TNFR and TLR signaling (TNFR16-like, TRAF2l, TRAF5l, jun, fos-related, SIK2, ATF1/CREB, LRRC28, LRRC40, LRRK2), proteasomal activity (p62/SQSMT1-l1, Ced6/Gulf, NEDD8-conjugating enzyme Ubc12), stress proteins (CRYAB1, CRYAB2, HSP16.2, DnaJB9, HSP90a1), all potentially regulating NF-κB activity. Other genes encoding immune-annotated proteins such as NPYR4, GTPases, Swap70, the antiproliferative BTG1, enzymes involved in lipid metabolism (5-lipoxygenase, ACSF4), secreted clotting factors, secreted peptidases are also pulse regulated upon bisection. By contrast, metalloproteinases and antimicrobial peptide genes largely follow a context-dependent regulation, whereas the protease inhibitor α2macroglobulin gene exhibits a sustained up-regulation. Hence a complex immune response to injury is linked to wound healing and regeneration in Hydra. PMID:25086685

  11. Immunization.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Guerin, Nicole; And Others

    1986-01-01

    Contents of this double journal issue concern immunization and primary health care of children. The issue decribes vaccine storage and sterilization techniques, giving particular emphasis to the role of the cold chain, i.e., the maintenance of a specific temperature range to assure potency of vaccines as they are moved from a national storage…

  12. Targeted expression of cystatin restores fertility in cysteine protease induced male sterile tobacco plants.

    PubMed

    Shukla, Pawan; Subhashini, Mranu; Singh, Naveen Kumar; Ahmed, Israr; Trishla, Shalibhadra; Kirti, P B

    2016-05-01

    Fertility restoration in male sterile plants is an essential requirement for their utilization in hybrid seed production. In an earlier investigation, we have demonstrated that the targeted expression of a cysteine protease in tapetal cell layer resulted in complete male sterility in tobacco transgenic plants. In the present investigation, we have used a cystatin gene, which encodes for a cysteine protease inhibitor, from a wild peanut, Arachis diogoi and developed a plant gene based restoration system for cysteine protease induced male sterile transgenic tobacco plants. We confirmed the interaction between the cysteine protease and a cystatin of the wild peanut, A. diogoi through in silico modeling and yeast two-hybrid assay. Pollen from primary transgenic tobacco plants expressing cystatin gene under the tapetum specific promoter- TA29 restored fertility on cysteine protease induced male sterile tobacco plants developed earlier. This has confirmed the in vivo interaction of cysteine protease and cystatin in the tapetal cells, and the inactivation of cysteine protease and modulation of its negative effects on pollen fertility. Both the cysteine protease and cystatin genes are of plant origin in contrast to the analogous barnase-barstar system that deploys genes of prokaryotic origin. Because of the deployment of genes of plant origin, this system might not face biosafety problems in developing hybrids in food crops. PMID:26993235

  13. Dual-Track Clearance of Circulating Bacteria Balances Rapid Restoration of Blood Sterility with Induction of Adaptive Immunity.

    PubMed

    Broadley, Steven P; Plaumann, Ann; Coletti, Raffaele; Lehmann, Christin; Wanisch, Andreas; Seidlmeier, Amelie; Esser, Knud; Luo, Shanshan; Rämer, Patrick C; Massberg, Steffen; Busch, Dirk H; van Lookeren Campagne, Menno; Verschoor, Admar

    2016-07-13

    Efficient clearance of bacteremia prevents life-threatening disease. Platelet binding to intravascular bacteria, a process involving platelet glycoprotein GPIb and bacterial opsonization with activated complement C3, influences blood clearance and anti-infective immunity. Using intravital microscopy of the bloodstream of mice infected with Listeria monocytogenes, we show that bacterial clearance is not a uniform process but a "dual-track" mechanism consisting of parallel "fast" and "slow" pathways. "Slow clearance" is regulated by time-dependent bacterial opsonization, stochastic platelet binding, and capture of bacteria-platelet-complexes via the complement receptor of the immunoglobulin superfamily, CRIg. The mechanism spares some bacteria from "fast clearance" and rapid destruction in the liver via Kupffer cell scavenger receptors, keeping them available for adaptive immunity induction by splenic CD8α(+) dendritic cells. We consistently find "fast" and "slow" clearance patterns for a broad panel of other Gram+ and Gram- bacteria. Thus, dual-track clearance balances rapid restoration of blood sterility with induction of specific antibacterial immunity. PMID:27345696

  14. Stress induced neuroendocrine-immune plasticity

    PubMed Central

    Liezmann, Christiane; Stock, Daniel; Peters, Eva M. J.

    2012-01-01

    Research over the past decade has revealed close interaction between the nervous and immune systems in regulation of peripheral inflammation linking psychosocial stress with chronic somatic disease and aging. Moreover emerging data suggests that chronic inflammations lead to a pro-inflammatory status underlying premature aging called inflammaging. In this context, the spleen can be seen as a switch board monitoring peripherally derived neuroendocrine-immune mediators in the blood and keeping up a close communication with the central stress response via its mainly sympathetic innervation. The effect aims at balanced and well-timed stress axis activation and immune adaptation in acute peripheral inflammatory events. Constant adjustment to the needs generated by environmental and endogenous challenges is provided by neuroendocrine-immune plasticity. However, maladaptive plasticity induced e.g., by chronic stress-axis activation and excessive non-neuronal derived neuroendocrine mediators may be at the heart of the observed stress sensitivity promote inflammaging under chronic inflammatory conditions. We here review the role of neurotransmitters, neuropeptides and neurotrophins as stress mediators modulating the immune response in the spleen and their potential role in inflammaging. PMID:23467333

  15. An efferocytosis-induced, IL-4–dependent macrophage-iNKT cell circuit suppresses sterile inflammation and is defective in murine CGD

    PubMed Central

    Zeng, Melody Yue; Pham, Duy; Bagaitkar, Juhi; Liu, Jianyun; Otero, Karel; Shan, Ming; Wynn, Thomas A.; Brombacher, Frank; Brutkiewicz, Randy R.; Kaplan, Mark H.

    2013-01-01

    Efferocytosis of apoptotic neutrophils by macrophages following tissue injury is fundamental to the resolution of inflammation and initiation of tissue repair. Using a sterile peritonitis model in mice, we identified interleukin (IL)-4–producing efferocytosing macrophages in the peritoneum that activate invariant natural killer T (iNKT) cells to produce cytokines including IL-4, IL-13, and interferon-γ. Importantly, IL-4 from macrophages contributes to alternative activation of peritoneal exudate macrophages and augments type 2 cytokine production from NKT cells to suppress inflammation. The increased peritonitis in mice deficient in IL-4, NKT cells, or IL-4Rα expression on myeloid cells suggested that each is a key component for resolution of sterile inflammation. The reduced NAD phosphate oxidase is also critical for this model, because in mice with X-linked chronic granulomatous disease (X-CGD) that lack oxidase subunits, activation of iNKT cells by X-CGD peritoneal exudate macrophages was impaired during sterile peritonitis, resulting in enhanced and prolonged inflammation in these mice. Therefore, efferocytosis-induced IL-4 production and activation of IL-4–producing iNKT cells by macrophages are immunomodulatory events in an innate immune circuit required to resolve sterile inflammation and promote tissue repair. PMID:23426944

  16. Sterile polystyrene culture dishes induce transformation of polyps into medusae in Aurelia aurita (Scyphozoa, Cnidaria).

    PubMed

    Herrmann, Klaus; Siefker, Barbara; Berking, Stefan

    2003-01-01

    Polyps of Aurelia aurita produce medusae once a year. Under laboratory conditions this process, termed strobilation, can be induced by lowering the incubation temperature for about two weeks. Here we report a fast induction of strobilation by sterile polystyrene culture dishes. The effect is abolished when the culture dishes are washed twice with hot water prior to the experiment. We recommend that polystyrene cultureware should be pre-washed whenever there is an indication of unusual effects. PMID:15801158

  17. Antitumor Immunity Induced after α Irradiation123

    PubMed Central

    Gorin, Jean-Baptiste; Ménager, Jérémie; Gouard, Sébastien; Maurel, Catherine; Guilloux, Yannick; Faivre-Chauvet, Alain; Morgenstern, Alfred; Bruchertseifer, Frank; Chérel, Michel; Davodeau, François; Gaschet, Joëlle

    2014-01-01

    Radioimmunotherapy (RIT) is a therapeutic modality that allows delivering of ionizing radiation directly to targeted cancer cells. Conventional RIT uses β-emitting radioisotopes, but recently, a growing interest has emerged for the clinical development of α particles. α emitters are ideal for killing isolated or small clusters of tumor cells, thanks to their specific characteristics (high linear energy transfer and short path in the tissue), and their effect is less dependent on dose rate, tissue oxygenation, or cell cycle status than γ and X rays. Several studies have been performed to describe α emitter radiobiology and cell death mechanisms induced after α irradiation. But so far, no investigation has been undertaken to analyze the impact of α particles on the immune system, when several studies have shown that external irradiation, using γ and X rays, can foster an antitumor immune response. Therefore, we decided to evaluate the immunogenicity of murine adenocarcinoma MC-38 after bismuth-213 (213Bi) irradiation using a vaccination approach. In vivo studies performed in immunocompetent C57Bl/6 mice induced a protective antitumor response that is mediated by tumor-specific T cells. The molecular mechanisms potentially involved in the activation of adaptative immunity were also investigated by in vitro studies. We observed that 213Bi-treated MC-38 cells release “danger signals” and activate dendritic cells. Our results demonstrate that α irradiation can stimulate adaptive immunity, elicits an efficient antitumor protection, and therefore is an immunogenic cell death inducer, which provides an attractive complement to its direct cytolytic effect on tumor cells. PMID:24862758

  18. Sedimentation rapidly induces an immune response and depletes energy stores in a hard coral

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sheridan, C.; Grosjean, Ph.; Leblud, J.; Palmer, C. V.; Kushmaro, A.; Eeckhaut, I.

    2014-12-01

    High sedimentation rates have been linked to reduced coral health within multiple systems; however, whether this is a direct result of compromised coral immunity has not been previously investigated. The potential effects of sedimentation on immunity of the hard coral Montipora patula were examined by comparing physiological responses of coral fragments inoculated with sterilized marine sediments and those under control conditions. Sediments were collected from terrestrial runoff-affected reefs in SW Madagascar and applied cyclically for a total of 24 h at a rate observed during precipitation-induced sedimentation events. Coral health was determined 24 h after the onset of the sedimentation stress through measuring metabolic proxies of O2 budget and lipid ratios. Immune response of the melanin synthesis pathway was measured by quantifying phenoloxidase activity and melanin deposits. Sedimentation induced both immune and metabolic responses in M. patula. Both phenoloxidase activity and melanin deposition were significantly higher in the sediment treatment compared to controls, indicating an induced immune response. Sediment-treated corals also showed a tendency towards increased respiration (during the night) and decreased photosynthesis (during the day) and a significant depletion of energy reserves as compared to controls. These data highlight that short-term (24 h) sedimentation, free of live microorganisms, compromises the health of M. patula. The energetically costly immune response, potentially elicited by residual endotoxins and other inflammatory particles associated with the sterile sediments, likely contributes to the energy depletion. Overall, exposure to sedimentation adversely affects coral health and continued exposure may lead to resource depletion and an increased susceptibility to disease.

  19. Drug-induced immune hemolytic anemia

    MedlinePlus

    Immune hemolytic anemia secondary to drugs; Anemia - immune hemolytic - secondary to drugs ... In some cases, a drug can cause the immune system to mistake your own red blood cells for foreign substances. The body responds by making ...

  20. Drug-induced immune neutropenia/agranulocytosis.

    PubMed

    Curtis, Brian R

    2014-01-01

    Neutrophils are the most abundant white blood cell in blood and play a critical role in preventing infections as part of the innate immune system. Reduction in neutrophils below an absolute count of 500 cells/pL is termed severe neutropenia or agranulocytosis. Drug-induced immune neutropenia (DIIN) occurs when drug-dependent antibodies form against neutrophil membrane glycoproteins and cause neutrophil destruction. Affected patients have fever, chills, and infections; severe infections left untreated can result in death. Treatment with granulocyte colony-stimulating factor can hasten neutrophil recovery. Cumulative data show that severe neutropenia or agranulocytosis associated with exposure to nonchemotherapy drugs ranges from approximately 1.6 to 15.4 cases per million population per year. Drugs most often associated with neutropenia or agranulocytosis include dipyrone, diclofenac, ticlopidine, calcium dobesilate, spironolactone, antithyroid drugs (e.g., propylthiouracil), carbamazepine, sulfamethoxazole- trimethoprim, [3-lactam antibiotics, clozapine, levamisole, and vancomycin. Assays used for detection of neutrophil drug-dependent antibodies (DDAbs) include flow cytometry, monoclonal antibody immobilization of granulocyte antigens, enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay, immunoblotting, granulocyte agglutination, and granulocytotoxicity. However, testing for neutrophil DDAbs is rarely performed owing to its complexity and lack of availability. Mechanisms proposed for DIIN have not been rigorously studied, but those that have been studied include drug- or hapten-induced antibody formation and autoantibody production against drug metabolite or protein adducts covalently attached to neutrophil membrane proteins. This review will address acute, severe neutropenia caused by neutrophil-reactive antibodies induced by nonchemotherapy drugs-DIIN PMID:25247619

  1. Antiplatelet antibodies in oxaliplatin-induced immune thrombocytopenia

    PubMed Central

    McNamara, Michael J; Curtis, Brian R; McCrae, Keith R

    2014-01-01

    Lesson Drug-induced immune thrombocytopenia may be potentially fatal; here we report the development of severe thrombocytopenia with strong oxaliplatin-dependent antiplatelet antibodies. PMID:25057402

  2. Induced hyperlipaemia and immune challenge in locusts.

    PubMed

    Mullen, Lisa M; Lightfoot, Mary E; Goldsworthy, Graham J

    2004-05-01

    Injections of immunogens, such as beta-1,3-glucan or lipopolysaccharide (LPS), bring about a marked hyperlipaemia with associated changes in lipophorins and apolipophorin-III in the haemolymph of Locusta migratoria. These changes are similar to those observed after injection of adipokinetic hormone (AKH). The possibility that endogenous AKH is released as part of the response to these immunogens is investigated using passive immunisation against AKH-I, and measurement of AKH-I titre in the haemolymph after injection of immunogens. The data presented show that, despite the similarity of the changes brought about by the presence of immunogens in the haemolymph to those brought about by AKH, there is no release of endogenous AKH after injection of laminarin or LPS. A direct effect of the immunogens on release of neutral lipids by the fat body cannot be demonstrated in vitro, and the mechanism by which hyperlipaemia is induced during immune challenge remains uncertain. PMID:15121454

  3. U1 RNA Induces Innate Immunity Signaling

    PubMed Central

    Hoffman, Robert W.; Gazitt, Tal; Foecking, Mark F.; Ortmann, Robert A.; Misfeldt, Michael; Jorgenson, Rebecca; Young, Steven L.; Greidinger, Eric L.

    2006-01-01

    Objective The U1–70-kd RNP is a prominent target of autoimmunity in connective tissue diseases. In this study, we explored whether its endogenous ligand, U1 RNA, mediates a proimmune signal and may be immunogenic. Methods We assayed the proliferation of control and MyD88-knockout splenocytes in response to in vitro–synthesized U1 RNA, and measured interleukin-6 (IL-6) and IL-8 secretion induced by U1 RNA in a human cell line competent for signaling through Toll-like receptor 3 (TLR-3) and TLR-5. Results Treatment with U1 RNA or with poly(I-C), a known agonist of TLR-3, induced approximately twice as much control splenocyte proliferation as did treatment with RNase-digested U1 RNA. Proliferation in response to either poly(I-C) or U1 RNA by MyD88-knockout splenocytes was similarly attenuated. Similar to poly(I-C), U1 RNA induced significant secretion of both IL-6 and IL-8 from a TLR-3–expressing human cell line; in contrast, the TLR-5 agonist flagellin induced predominantly IL-8 secretion. Pretreatment of U1 RNA with RNase abolished IL-6 and IL-8 secretion. Conclusion U1 RNA is capable of inducing manifestations consistent with TLR-3 activation. The ability of U1 RNA (which has a substantial double-stranded secondary structure) to activate TLR-3 may contribute to the immunogenicity of the U1–70-kd autoantigen. Stimulation of innate immunity by native RNA molecules with a double-stranded secondary structure may help explain the high prevalence of autoimmunity to RNA binding proteins. PMID:15457457

  4. Sterilization by Laparoscopy

    MedlinePlus

    ... sleep-like state to prevent pain during surgery. Human Immunodeficiency Virus (HIV): A virus that attacks certain cells of the body’s immune system and causes acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS). Hysteroscopic Sterilization: ...

  5. Drug-induced immune hemolytic anemia

    MedlinePlus

    Immune hemolytic anemia secondary to drugs; Anemia - immune hemolytic - secondary to drugs ... Drugs that can cause this type of hemolytic anemia include: Cephalosporins (a class of antibiotics), most common ...

  6. Single immunizing dose of recombinant adenovirus efficiently induces CD8+ T cell-mediated protective immunity against malaria.

    PubMed

    Rodrigues, E G; Zavala, F; Eichinger, D; Wilson, J M; Tsuji, M

    1997-02-01

    The immunogenicity of a recombinant replication defective adenovirus expressing a major malaria Ag, the circumsporozoite (CS) protein (AdPyCS), was determined using a rodent malaria model. A single immunizing dose of this construct induced a large number of CS-specific CD8+ and CD4+ T cells in the spleens of these animals, particularly when given by the s.c. or i.m. route. A single dose of AdPyCS also induced high titers of Abs to Plasmodium yoelii sporozoites in mice. No other form of presentation of the CS protein given as a single immunizing dose, i.e., irradiated sporozoites, recombinant vaccinia, or influenza virus, etc., elicits comparably high numbers of CS-specific CD8+ T cells. The high concentration of CS-specific CD8+ T cells in the spleen was relatively short-lived, decreasing to half of its original value by 4 wk and to one-third at 8 wk after AdPyCS inoculation. The decrease in splenic CS-specific CD4+ T cells was even more rapid. Most importantly, a single dose of inoculation of AdPyCS into mice rendered them highly resistant to sporozoite challenge, resulting in a 93% inhibition of liver stage development of the parasites. This protective effect was primarily mediated by CD8+ T cells, as shown by depletion of this T cell population, while depletion of the CD4+ T cell population had only a minor effect on anti-plasmodial activity. Moreover, the inoculation of mice with AdPyCS induces sterile immunity in a significant proportion of mice, preventing the occurrence of parasitemia. PMID:9013969

  7. De Novo Assembly and Transcriptome Analysis of Wheat with Male Sterility Induced by the Chemical Hybridizing Agent SQ-1.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Qidi; Song, Yulong; Zhang, Gaisheng; Ju, Lan; Zhang, Jiao; Yu, Yongang; Niu, Na; Wang, Junwei; Ma, Shoucai

    2015-01-01

    Wheat (Triticum aestivum L.), one of the world's most important food crops, is a strictly autogamous (self-pollinating) species with exclusively perfect flowers. Male sterility induced by chemical hybridizing agents has increasingly attracted attention as a tool for hybrid seed production in wheat; however, the molecular mechanisms of male sterility induced by the agent SQ-1 remain poorly understood due to limited whole transcriptome data. Therefore, a comparative analysis of wheat anther transcriptomes for male fertile wheat and SQ-1-induced male sterile wheat was carried out using next-generation sequencing technology. In all, 42,634,123 sequence reads were generated and were assembled into 82,356 high-quality unigenes with an average length of 724 bp. Of these, 1,088 unigenes were significantly differentially expressed in the fertile and sterile wheat anthers, including 643 up-regulated unigenes and 445 down-regulated unigenes. The differentially expressed unigenes with functional annotations were mapped onto 60 pathways using the Kyoto Encyclopedia of Genes and Genomes database. They were mainly involved in coding for the components of ribosomes, photosynthesis, respiration, purine and pyrimidine metabolism, amino acid metabolism, glutathione metabolism, RNA transport and signal transduction, reactive oxygen species metabolism, mRNA surveillance pathways, protein processing in the endoplasmic reticulum, protein export, and ubiquitin-mediated proteolysis. This study is the first to provide a systematic overview comparing wheat anther transcriptomes of male fertile wheat with those of SQ-1-induced male sterile wheat and is a valuable source of data for future research in SQ-1-induced wheat male sterility. PMID:25898130

  8. De Novo Assembly and Transcriptome Analysis of Wheat with Male Sterility Induced by the Chemical Hybridizing Agent SQ-1

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Gaisheng; Ju, Lan; Zhang, Jiao; Yu, Yongang; Niu, Na; Wang, Junwei; Ma, Shoucai

    2015-01-01

    Wheat (Triticum aestivum L.), one of the world’s most important food crops, is a strictly autogamous (self-pollinating) species with exclusively perfect flowers. Male sterility induced by chemical hybridizing agents has increasingly attracted attention as a tool for hybrid seed production in wheat; however, the molecular mechanisms of male sterility induced by the agent SQ-1 remain poorly understood due to limited whole transcriptome data. Therefore, a comparative analysis of wheat anther transcriptomes for male fertile wheat and SQ-1–induced male sterile wheat was carried out using next-generation sequencing technology. In all, 42,634,123 sequence reads were generated and were assembled into 82,356 high-quality unigenes with an average length of 724 bp. Of these, 1,088 unigenes were significantly differentially expressed in the fertile and sterile wheat anthers, including 643 up-regulated unigenes and 445 down-regulated unigenes. The differentially expressed unigenes with functional annotations were mapped onto 60 pathways using the Kyoto Encyclopedia of Genes and Genomes database. They were mainly involved in coding for the components of ribosomes, photosynthesis, respiration, purine and pyrimidine metabolism, amino acid metabolism, glutathione metabolism, RNA transport and signal transduction, reactive oxygen species metabolism, mRNA surveillance pathways, protein processing in the endoplasmic reticulum, protein export, and ubiquitin-mediated proteolysis. This study is the first to provide a systematic overview comparing wheat anther transcriptomes of male fertile wheat with those of SQ-1–induced male sterile wheat and is a valuable source of data for future research in SQ-1–induced wheat male sterility. PMID:25898130

  9. Can VHS Virus Bypass the Protective Immunity Induced by DNA Vaccination in Rainbow Trout?

    PubMed Central

    Sepúlveda, Dagoberto; Lorenzen, Niels

    2016-01-01

    DNA vaccines encoding viral glycoproteins have been very successful for induction of protective immunity against diseases caused by rhabdoviruses in cultured fish species. However, the vaccine concept is based on a single viral gene and since RNA viruses are known to possess high variability and adaptation capacity, this work aimed at evaluating whether viral haemorrhagic septicaemia virus (VHSV), an RNA virus and member of Rhabdoviridae family, was able to evade the protective immune response induced by the DNA vaccination of rainbow trout. The experiments comprised repeated passages of a highly pathogenic VHSV isolate in a fish cell line in the presence of neutralizing fish serum (in vitro approach), and in rainbow trout immunized with the VHS DNA vaccine (in vivo approach). For the in vitro approach, the virus collected from the last passage (passaged virus) was as sensitive as the parental virus to serum neutralization, suggesting that the passaging did not promote the selection of virus populations able to bypass the neutralization by serum antibodies. Also, in the in vivo approach, where virus was passaged several times in vaccinated fish, no increased virulence nor increased persistence in vaccinated fish was observed in comparison with the parental virus. However, some of the vaccinated fish did get infected and could transmit the infection to naïve cohabitant fish. The results demonstrated that the DNA vaccine induced a robust protection, but also that the immunity was non-sterile. It is consequently important not to consider vaccinated fish as virus free in veterinary terms. PMID:27054895

  10. Tribenuron-Methyl Induces Male Sterility through Anther-Specific Inhibition of Acetolactate Synthase Leading to Autophagic Cell Death.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Lun; Jing, Xue; Chen, Li; Liu, Yingjun; Su, Yanan; Liu, Tingting; Gao, Changbin; Yi, Bin; Wen, Jing; Ma, Chaozhi; Tu, Jinxing; Zou, Jitao; Fu, Tingdong; Shen, Jinxiong

    2015-12-01

    Tribenuron-methyl (TM) is a powerful sulfonylurea herbicide that inhibits branched-chain amino acid (BCAA) biosynthesis by targeting the catalytic subunit (CSR1) of acetolactate synthase (ALS). Selective induction of male sterility by foliar spraying of TM at low doses has been widely used for hybrid seed production in rapeseed (Brassica napus); however, the underlying mechanism remains unknown. Here, we report greater TM accumulation and subsequent stronger ALS inhibition and BCAA starvation in anthers than in leaves and stems after TM application. Constitutive or anther-specific expression of csr1-1D (a CSR1 mutant) eliminated anther-selective ALS inhibition and reversed the TM-induced male sterile phenotype in both rapeseed and Arabidopsis. The results of TM daub-stem experiments, combined with the observations of little TM accumulation in anthers and reversion of TM-induced male sterility by targeted expression of the TM metabolism gene Bel in either the mesophyll or phloem, suggested that foliar-sprayed TM was polar-transported to anthers mainly through the mesophyll and phloem. Microscopy and immunoblotting revealed that autophagy, a bulk degradation process induced during cell death, was elevated in TM-induced male sterile anthers and by anther-specific knockdown of ALS. Moreover, TM-induced pollen abortion was significantly inhibited by the autophagy inhibitor 3-MA. These data suggested that TM was polar-transported to anthers, resulting in BCAA starvation via anther-specific ALS inhibition and, ultimately, autophagic cell death in anthers. PMID:26362932

  11. Cytological and comparative proteomic analyses on male sterility in Brassica napus L. induced by the chemical hybridization agent monosulphuron ester sodium

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Male sterility induced by a chemical hybridization agent (CHA) is an important tool for utilizing crop heterosis. Monosulphuron ester sodium (MES), a new acetolactate synthase-inhibitor herbicide belonging to the sulphonylurea family, has been developed as an effective CHA to induce male sterility i...

  12. [Genetic and cytological analyses of the male sterility mutation induced in a sorghum tissue culture with streptomycin].

    PubMed

    El'konin, L A; Tsvetova, M I

    2008-05-01

    Treatment of sorghum callus cultures with 500-1000 mg/l streptomycin led to a high regeneration frequency of plants with complete or partial male sterility (MS), up to 100% of all green regenerants. The induced MS mutation (ms-str) was preserved in the F1 and BC1 progenies and was genetically unstable: many families produced semisterile and fertile revertants, whose progenies again contained semisterile and sterile mutants. The ms-str mutation was maintained through eight generations via selection and self-pollination of semisterile plants. The mutation was inherited as a recessive nuclear mutation in tester crosses of sterile plants segregated in the progenies of fertile and semisterile revertants and was expressed only in single cases in a test cross for ms-str transfer through pollen of hybrids with restored male fertility. Recessive nuclear mutations determining a low plant height (dwarfness) and the lack of waxy bloom on the stem and leaves (bloomless) were found in male-sterile plants with the ms-str mutation. Cytological analysis of sterile plants reveal multiple alterations of various pollen development stages and tapetal cells: cytomyxis, defects of chromosome conjugation, distorted cytokinesis in meiotic division II, a lack of tetrad separation, a defective formation of the microspore coat, generation of microspores with two to four nuclei, and the formation of micronuclei and large vacuoles in tapetal cells. A possible transfer of the induced cytoplasmic MS mutation into the nuclear genome and the causes of the high genetic instability are discussed. PMID:18672800

  13. Programmatic Assessment of Potential Induced Radioactivity in Electron Beam Sterilization of Healthcare Products.

    PubMed

    Smith, Mark; Logar, John; Montgomery, Alan; Vrain, Olivier

    2016-08-01

    ISO 11137-1:2006 Sterilization of Healthcare Products-Radiation requires that the potential for induced radioactivity be evaluated for medical devices irradiated with electrons with energy more than 10 MeV. For a manufacturing operation where new devices are being developed, a practical program for making such an evaluation should be engrained in the process, including the device design phase, where selection of materials can make a difference in the potential for activation to occur as a result of the irradiation process. The program, which is based on general assumptions as to the likely activation processes and generalized process assessments is being implemented in three phases: (1) incorporating materials consideration in the design phase, (2) evaluating potential activation empirically, including measurement at the point of irradiation, and (3) implementing routine procedures for the program, including developing a data base of results for consideration in future design efforts. PMID:27356164

  14. Xenotransplantation exposes the etiology of azoospermia factor (AZF) induced male sterility.

    PubMed

    Barr, Justinn; Gordon, Daniel; Schedl, Paul; Deshpande, Girish

    2015-03-01

    Ramathal et al. have employed an elegant xenotransplantation technique to study the fate of human induced pluripotent stem cells (hiPSCs) from fertile males and from males carrying Y chromosome deletions of the azoospermia factor (AZF) region. When placed in a mouse testis niche, hiPSCs from fertile males differentiate into germ cell-like cells (GCLCs). Highlighting the crucial role of cell autonomous factors in male sterility, hiPSCs derived from azoospermic males prove to be less successful under similar circumstances. Their studies argue that the agametic "Sertoli cell only" phenotype of two of the AZF deletions likely arises from a defect in the maintenance of germline stem cells (GSCs) rather than from a defect in their specification. These observations underscore the importance of the dialogue between the somatic niche and its inhabitant stem cells, and open up interesting questions concerning the functioning of the somatic niche and how it communicates to the GSCs. PMID:25524208

  15. A case of oxaliplatin-induced immune-mediated thrombocytopenia

    PubMed Central

    Suh, Seong Eun; Jang, Moon Ju; Chong, So Young; Aster, Richard H.; Curtis, Brian R.

    2014-01-01

    Oxaliplatin is a platinum compound used in patients with gastrointestinal malignancies. It is known to evoke a drug-induced immune-mediated thrombocytopenia, which has not been reported in Korea. We describe a 53-year-old man who developed oxaliplatin-induced immune-mediated thrombocytopenia during chemotherapy for colon cancer. Oxaliplatin-dependent IgG platelet antibodies were detected in his serum on flow cytometry. He was treated with immunoglobulin and corticosteroids without any complications. Physicians should consider oxaliplatin-induced immune-mediated thrombocytopenia, when a sudden, isolated thrombocytopenia develops during chemotherapy with oxaliplatin. PMID:24724069

  16. [Inheritance of reversions to male fertility in male-sterile sorghum hybrids with 9E cytoplasm male sterility induced by environmental conditions].

    PubMed

    Elkonin, L A; Gerashchenkov, G A; Domanina, I V; Rozhnova, N A

    2015-03-01

    sorghum hybrids in the 9E cytoplasm. These data demonstrate that methylation of nuclear genes in sterility-inducing cytoplasm may be one of mechanisms causing the CMS phenomenon. PMID:26027370

  17. A Study of Long-Lived, Oxygen Induced Radicals in Gamma Sterilized Polyethylene*

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shah Jahan, M.; Durant, Jason

    2003-03-01

    Ultra high molecular weight polyethylene (UHMWPE) has been used for many years now as a load bearing component for hip-and knee-joint replacements. However, occasional failures of the joints have been attributed to post-gamma sterilization oxidation of the joints.^1 In this study, three grades of UHMWPE (GUR 4120, GUR 4150, and Himont 1900) samples (4 mm dia., 10 mm long) were sterilized (3.2 MRad 60 Co) in vacuum or nitrogen at 23^oC and then heated at 75^oC for one year during which the primary free radicals (alkyl/allyl) produced from irradiation decayed to 2-5% of their original values. The samples were then exposed to oxygen (air)and stored at 23^oC (room temperature). Free radical measurements were conducted at 23^oC using an X-band electron spin resonace spectrometer. It took about 100 days for the decay of the residual primary radicals and concurrent growth of the oxygen-induced radicals (OIR) to reach their extrema. Although the OIR is found to be stable on a short term, systematic measurements for four years have shown a gradual decay. The growth of the OIR is found to follow a general radial diffusion formula. While only stipulations have been made as to what the physical mechanism of the OIRÂ's decay is, it can be described by the equation: OIRd = PR_max - Rt, where PR_max is the maximum primary radical concentration, R is the decay constant, and t is time. 1. Jahan et al., J. Biomed. Mater. Res., 25 (1991), 1005. * Work supported in part by funds from the NSF Biosurface Center

  18. Postpartum Sterilization

    MedlinePlus

    ... sterilization. In tubal sterilization, the fallopian tubes are closed off or removed. Tubal sterilization prevents the egg ... through the incision. The tubes are cut and closed with special thread or removed completely. The incision ...

  19. CD8(+) T cells specific to a single Yersinia pseudotuberculosis epitope restrict bacterial replication in the liver but fail to provide sterilizing immunity.

    PubMed

    Shen, Haiqian; Gonzalez-Juarbe, Norberto; Blanchette, Krystle; Crimmins, Gregory; Bergman, Molly A; Isberg, Ralph R; Orihuela, Carlos J; Dube, Peter H

    2016-09-01

    CD8(+) T cells use contact-dependent cytolysis of target cells to protect the host against intracellular pathogens. We have previously shown that CD8(+) T cells and perforin are required to protect against the extracellular pathogen Yersinia pseudotuberculosis. Here we establish an experimental system where CD8(+) T cells specific to a single model antigen are the only memory response present at time of challenge. Using mice immunized with a vaccine strain of Listeria monocytogenes that expresses secreted ovalbumin (Lm-OVA), we show that OVA-specific CD8(+) T cells are generated and provide limited protection against challenge with virulent OVA(+)Y. pseudotuberculosis. Perforin expression by OVA-specific CD8(+) T cells was required, as Lm-OVA-immunized perforin-deficient mice showed higher bacterial burden as compared to Lm-OVA-immunized perforin-sufficient mice. Surprisingly, antigen-specific T cell protection waned over time, as Lm-OVA-immune mice eventually succumbed to Yersinia infection. Kinetic analysis of infection in mice with and without OVA-specific CD8(+) T cells revealed that bacterial numbers increased sharply in OVA-naïve mice until death, while OVA-immune mice held bacterial burden to a lower level throughout the duration of illness until death. Clonal analysis of bacterial populations in OVA-naïve and OVA-immune mice at distinct time points revealed equivalent and severe bottle-neck effects for bacteria in both sets of mice immediately after intravenous challenge, demonstrating a dominant role for other aspects of the immune system regardless of CD8(+) T cell status. These studies indicate that CD8(+) T cells against a single antigen can restrict Y. pseudotuberculosis colonization in a perforin-dependent manner, but ultimately are insufficient in their ability to provide sterilizing immunity and protect against death. PMID:27268148

  20. Ultraviolet-induced alloantigen-specific immunosuppression in transplant immunity

    PubMed Central

    Hori, Tomohide; Kuribayashi, Kagemasa; Saito, Kanako; Wang, Linan; Torii, Mie; Uemoto, Shinji; Iida, Taku; Yagi, Shintaro; Kato, Takuma

    2015-01-01

    After the first observation of the immunosuppressive effects of ultraviolet (UV) irradiation was reported in 1974, therapeutic modification of immune responses by UV irradiation began to be investigated in the context immunization. UV-induced immunosuppression is via the action of regulatory T cells (Tregs). Antigen-specific Tregs were induced by high-dose UV-B irradiation before antigen immunization in many studies, as it was considered that functional alteration and/or modulation of antigen-presenting cells by UV irradiation was required for the induction of antigen-specific immunosuppression. However, it is also reported that UV irradiation after immunization induces antigen-specific Tregs. UV-induced Tregs are also dominantly transferable, with interleukin-10 being important for UV-induced immunosuppression. Currently, various possible mechanisms involving Treg phenotype and cytokine profile have been suggested. UV irradiation accompanied by alloantigen immunization induces alloantigen-specific transferable Tregs, which have potential therapeutic applications in the transplantation field. Here we review the current status of UV-induced antigen-specific immunosuppression on the 40th anniversary of its discovery. PMID:25815267

  1. Active immunization by a dengue virus-induced cytokine.

    PubMed Central

    Chaturvedi, U C; Mukerjee, R; Dhawan, R

    1994-01-01

    Dengue type 2 virus (DV)-induced cytotoxic factor (CF) is capable of reproducing various pathological lesions in mice that are seen in human dengue. The present study was undertaken to investigate the protective effect of active immunization of mice with CF. Mice were immunized with 5 microgram of CF and prevention of CF-induced increase in capillary permeability and damage to the blood-brain barrier were studied at weekly intervals, up to 48 weeks, by challenging with 3 microgram of CF. Maximum protection against increase in capillary permeability and damage to the blood-brain barrier was observed in week 4 after immunization. A breakthrough in the protection occurred with higher doses of CF in a dose-dependent manner. Challenge with a lethal intracerebral (i.c.) dose of DV showed significantly prolonged mean survival time and delayed onset of symptoms of sickness in the immunized mice compared with the normal mice, but the titre of the virus in the brain was similar in the two groups. On i.p. challenge with the virus the protection against damage to the blood-brain barrier was 86 +/- 7% at week 4 and 17 +/- 4% at week 26 after immunization. Sera obtained from the immunized mice showed the presence of CF-specific antibodies by ELISA, Western blot, and by neutralization of the cytotoxic activity of CF in vitro. The present study describes successful prevention of a cytokine-induced pathology by specific active immunization. PMID:8187327

  2. Immune markers and correlates of protection for vaccine induced immune responses.

    PubMed

    Thakur, Aneesh; Pedersen, Lasse E; Jungersen, Gregers

    2012-07-13

    Vaccines have been a major innovation in the history of mankind and still have the potential to address the challenges posed by chronic intracellular infections including tuberculosis, HIV and malaria which are leading causes of high morbidity and mortality across the world. Markers of an appropriate humoral response currently remain the best validated correlates of protective immunity after vaccination. Despite advancements in the field of immunology over the past few decades currently there are, however, no sufficiently validated immune correlates of vaccine induced protection against chronic infections in neither human nor veterinary medicine. Technological and conceptual advancements within cell-mediated immunology have led to a number of new immunological read-outs with the potential to emerge as correlates of vaccine induced protection. For T(H)1 type responses, antigen-specific production of interferon-gamma (IFN-γ) has been promoted as a quantitative marker of protective cell-mediated immune responses over the past couple of decades. More recently, however, evidence from several infections has pointed towards the quality of the immune response, measured through increased levels of antigen-specific polyfunctional T cells capable of producing a triad of relevant cytokines, as a better correlate of sustained protective immunity against this type of infections. Also the possibilities to measure antigen-specific cytotoxic T cells (CTL) during infection or in response to vaccination, through recombinant major histocompatibility complex (MHC) class I tetramers loaded with relevant peptides, has opened a new vista to include CTL responses in the evaluation of protective immune responses. Here, we review different immune markers and new candidates for correlates of a protective vaccine induced immune response against chronic infections and how successful they have been in defining the protective immunity in human and veterinary medicine. PMID:22658928

  3. Dominant male sterility in sorghum: effect of nuclear background on inheritance of tissue-culture-induced mutation.

    PubMed

    Elkonin, Lev A

    2005-11-01

    Occurrence of genetic instability and formation of stable mutations are basic genetic processes. This study demonstrates that nuclear background may influence the formation of stable dominant nuclear gene of male sterility (MS) on the basis of unstable mutation, which was induced in tissue culture of the sorghum haploid (cv. Milo-145). The mutants with complete or partial MS segregated in variable ratios in the progenies of diploid regenerants were obtained from different experiments on cultivation of haploid tissues. In the Milo-145 genetic background the mutation demonstrated somatic instability and was gradually eliminated by self-pollination of partially sterile plants. Hybridization of the MS-plants with the sorghum line SK-723, a fertility-restorer of the cytoplasmic MS A1 (milo) type, maintained the induced mutation. By repeated backcrossing of MS-plants with SK-723, the male-sterile versions of this line (SK-723- Ms(tc)) have been created. In BC-generations, fertile, partially and completely sterile plants were observed. The MS-plants from BC-generations are proposed to contain a dominant gene Ms(tc) while fertile plants were ms(tc)/ms(tc) homozygotes. Crossing the original MS-plants with SK-723 was a key factor in stabilization of the Ms(tc) gene. Dominant expression of the Ms(tc) was observed in male-sterile versions of other sorghum lines created by backcrossing to SK-723- Ms(tc). The lines fertility-restorers for this mutation have been revealed. In the crosses of restored F1 hybrids with emasculated plants of the non-restoring line, the Ms(tc) has been transferred through the pollen and manifested in the F1 generation. The possibility of the Ms(tc) originating as a result of interaction of an unstable allele of the Milo-145 with the SK-723 genome is discussed. PMID:16205908

  4. Spacecraft sterilization.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kalfayan, S. H.

    1972-01-01

    Spacecraft sterilization is a vital factor in projects for the successful biological exploration of other planets. The microorganisms of major concern are the fungi and bacteria. Sterilization procedures are oriented toward the destruction of bacterial spores. Gaseous sterilants are examined, giving attention to formaldehyde, beta-propiolactone, ethylene oxide, and the chemistry of the bactericidal action of sterilants. Radiation has been seriously considered as another method for spacecraft sterilization. Dry heat sterilization is discussed together with the effects of ethylene oxide decontamination and dry heat sterilization on materials.

  5. N2O induces mitotic polyploidization in anther somatic cells and restores fertility in sterile interspecific hybrid lilies

    PubMed Central

    Nukui, Shotarou; Kitamura, Satomi; Hioki, Tomoyo; Ootsuka, Hideaki; Miyoshi, Kazumitsu; Satou, Takao; Takatori, Yuka; Oomiya, Tomo; Okazaki, Keiichi

    2011-01-01

    Fertile plants undergoing male gametogenesis can be treated with nitrous oxide (N2O) gas to obtain 2n male gametes. N2O treatment is also expected to restore the fertility of interspecific hybrids through meiotic restitution or mitotic amphidiploidization. However, this technique has few applications to date, and it is un-known how N2O treatment restores fertility in sterile hybrids. To establish optimal N2O treatment conditions and determine its cytological mechanism of action, we treated various sized floral buds with N2O gas at different anther developmental stages from fertile and sterile hybrid lilies. N2O treatment using the optimal 1–4 mm floral buds induced mitotic polyploidization of male archesporial cells to produce 2n pollen in fertile hybrid lilies. In sterile hybrid lilies, N2O treatment doubled the chromosome number in male archesporial cells followed by homologous chromosome pairing and normal meiosis in pollen mother cells (PMC), resulting in restoration of pollen fertility. Backcrossing the resultant fertile pollen to Lilium × formolongi produced many triploid BC1 plants. Thus N2O treatment at the archesporial cell proliferating stage effectively overcame pollen sterility in hybrid lilies, resulting in fertile, 2n pollen grains that could produce progeny. The procedure presented here will promote interspecific or interploidy hybridization of lilies. PMID:23136469

  6. Neutralizing antibodies to HIV-1 induced by immunization

    PubMed Central

    McCoy, Laura E.

    2013-01-01

    Most neutralizing antibodies act at the earliest steps of viral infection and block interaction of the virus with cellular receptors to prevent entry into host cells. The inability to induce neutralizing antibodies to HIV has been a major obstacle to HIV vaccine research since the early days of the epidemic. However, in the past three years, the definition of a neutralizing antibody against HIV has been revolutionized by the isolation of extremely broad and potent neutralizing antibodies from HIV-infected individuals. Considerable hurdles remain for inducing neutralizing antibodies to a protective level after immunization. Meanwhile, novel technologies to bypass the induction of antibodies are being explored to provide prophylactic antibody-based interventions. This review addresses the challenge of inducing HIV neutralizing antibodies upon immunization and considers notable recent advances in the field. A greater understanding of the successes and failures for inducing a neutralizing response upon immunization is required to accelerate the development of an effective HIV vaccine. PMID:23401570

  7. Laser Induced Breakdown Spectroscopy as an In-Space Sample Return Canister Sterilization Method and Instrument

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dreyer, C. B.; Spear, J. R.; Lynch, K. L.; Johnson, L.; Bauer, A. J.

    2012-10-01

    LIBS applied to sterilize a surface via vaporization can be applied in space or on a planetary surface while providing direct characterization of ablated material. Applications include sample return or mitigation of sample cross contamination.

  8. Novel vaccine development strategies for inducing mucosal immunity

    PubMed Central

    Fujkuyama, Yoshiko; Tokuhara, Daisuke; Kataoka, Kosuke; Gilbert, Rebekah S; McGhee, Jerry R; Yuki, Yoshikazu; Kiyono, Hiroshi; Fujihashi, Kohtaro

    2012-01-01

    To develop protective immune responses against mucosal pathogens, the delivery route and adjuvants for vaccination are important. The host, however, strives to maintain mucosal homeostasis by responding to mucosal antigens with tolerance, instead of immune activation. Thus, induction of mucosal immunity through vaccination is a rather difficult task, and potent mucosal adjuvants, vectors or other special delivery systems are often used, especially in the elderly. By taking advantage of the common mucosal immune system, the targeting of mucosal dendritic cells and microfold epithelial cells may facilitate the induction of effective mucosal immunity. Thus, novel routes of immunization and antigen delivery systems also show great potential for the development of effective and safe mucosal vaccines against various pathogens. The purpose of this review is to introduce several recent approaches to induce mucosal immunity to vaccines, with an emphasis on mucosal tissue targeting, new immunization routes and delivery systems. Defining the mechanisms of mucosal vaccines is as important as their efficacy and safety, and in this article, examples of recent approaches, which will likely accelerate progress in mucosal vaccine development, are discussed. PMID:22380827

  9. CRISPR-Induced Distributed Immunity in Microbial Populations

    PubMed Central

    Young, Mark J.; Weitz, Joshua S.; Whitaker, Rachel J.

    2014-01-01

    In bacteria and archaea, viruses are the primary infectious agents, acting as virulent, often deadly pathogens. A form of adaptive immune defense known as CRISPR-Cas enables microbial cells to acquire immunity to viral pathogens by recognizing specific sequences encoded in viral genomes. The unique biology of this system results in evolutionary dynamics of host and viral diversity that cannot be fully explained by the traditional models used to describe microbe-virus coevolutionary dynamics. Here, we show how the CRISPR-mediated adaptive immune response of hosts to invading viruses facilitates the emergence of an evolutionary mode we call distributed immunity - the coexistence of multiple, equally-fit immune alleles among individuals in a microbial population. We use an eco-evolutionary modeling framework to quantify distributed immunity and demonstrate how it emerges and fluctuates in multi-strain communities of hosts and viruses as a consequence of CRISPR-induced coevolution under conditions of low viral mutation and high relative numbers of viral protospacers. We demonstrate that distributed immunity promotes sustained diversity and stability in host communities and decreased viral population density that can lead to viral extinction. We analyze sequence diversity of experimentally coevolving populations of Streptococcus thermophilus and their viruses where CRISPR-Cas is active, and find the rapid emergence of distributed immunity in the host population, demonstrating the importance of this emergent phenomenon in evolving microbial communities. PMID:25000306

  10. A Nonhuman Primate Scrub Typhus Model: Protective Immune Responses Induced by pKarp47 DNA Vaccination in Cynomolgus Macaques

    PubMed Central

    Chattopadhyay, Suchismita; Jiang, Ju; Nawtaisong, Pruksa; Lee, John S.; Tan, Esterlina; Dela Cruz, Eduardo; Burgos, Jasmin; Abalos, Rodolfo; Blacksell, Stuart D.; Lombardini, Eric; Turner, Gareth D.; Day, Nicholas P. J.; Richards, Allen L.

    2015-01-01

    We developed an intradermal (ID) challenge cynomolgus macaque (Macaca fascicularis) model of scrub typhus, the leading cause of treatable undifferentiated febrile illness in tropical Asia, caused by the obligate intracellular bacterium, Orientia tsutsugamushi. A well-characterized animal model is required for the development of clinically relevant diagnostic assays and evaluation of therapeutic agents and candidate vaccines. We investigated scrub typhus disease pathophysiology and evaluated two O. tsutsugamushi 47-kDa, Ag-based candidate vaccines, a DNA plasmid vaccine (pKarp47), and a virus-vectored vaccine (Kp47/47-Venezuelan equine encephalitis virus replicon particle) for safety, immunogenicity, and efficacy against homologous ID challenge with O. tsutsugamushi Karp. Control cynomolgus macaques developed fever, classic eschars, lymphadenopathy, bacteremia, altered liver function, increased WBC counts, pathogen-specific Ab (IgM and IgG), and cell-mediated immune responses. Vaccinated macaques receiving the DNA plasmid pKarp47 vaccine had significantly increased O. tsutsugamushi–specific, IFN-γ–producing PBMCs (p = 0.04), reduced eschar frequency and bacteremia duration (p ≤ 0.01), delayed bacteremia onset (p < 0.05), reduced circulating bacterial biomass (p = 0.01), and greater reduction of liver transaminase levels (p < 0.03) than controls. This study demonstrates a vaccine-induced immune response capable of conferring sterile immunity against high-dose homologous ID challenge of O. tsutsugamushi in a nonhuman primate model, and it provides insight into cell-mediated immune control of O. tsutsugamushi and dissemination dynamics, highlights the importance of bacteremia indices for evaluation of both natural and vaccine-induced immune responses, and importantly, to our knowledge, has determined the first phenotypic correlates of immune protection in scrub typhus. We conclude that this model is suitable for detailed investigations into vaccine-induced

  11. A nonhuman primate scrub typhus model: protective immune responses induced by pKarp47 DNA vaccination in cynomolgus macaques.

    PubMed

    Paris, Daniel H; Chattopadhyay, Suchismita; Jiang, Ju; Nawtaisong, Pruksa; Lee, John S; Tan, Esterlina; Dela Cruz, Eduardo; Burgos, Jasmin; Abalos, Rodolfo; Blacksell, Stuart D; Lombardini, Eric; Turner, Gareth D; Day, Nicholas P J; Richards, Allen L

    2015-02-15

    We developed an intradermal (ID) challenge cynomolgus macaque (Macaca fascicularis) model of scrub typhus, the leading cause of treatable undifferentiated febrile illness in tropical Asia, caused by the obligate intracellular bacterium, Orientia tsutsugamushi. A well-characterized animal model is required for the development of clinically relevant diagnostic assays and evaluation of therapeutic agents and candidate vaccines. We investigated scrub typhus disease pathophysiology and evaluated two O. tsutsugamushi 47-kDa, Ag-based candidate vaccines, a DNA plasmid vaccine (pKarp47), and a virus-vectored vaccine (Kp47/47-Venezuelan equine encephalitis virus replicon particle) for safety, immunogenicity, and efficacy against homologous ID challenge with O. tsutsugamushi Karp. Control cynomolgus macaques developed fever, classic eschars, lymphadenopathy, bacteremia, altered liver function, increased WBC counts, pathogen-specific Ab (IgM and IgG), and cell-mediated immune responses. Vaccinated macaques receiving the DNA plasmid pKarp47 vaccine had significantly increased O. tsutsugamushi-specific, IFN-γ-producing PBMCs (p = 0.04), reduced eschar frequency and bacteremia duration (p ≤ 0.01), delayed bacteremia onset (p < 0.05), reduced circulating bacterial biomass (p = 0.01), and greater reduction of liver transaminase levels (p < 0.03) than controls. This study demonstrates a vaccine-induced immune response capable of conferring sterile immunity against high-dose homologous ID challenge of O. tsutsugamushi in a nonhuman primate model, and it provides insight into cell-mediated immune control of O. tsutsugamushi and dissemination dynamics, highlights the importance of bacteremia indices for evaluation of both natural and vaccine-induced immune responses, and importantly, to our knowledge, has determined the first phenotypic correlates of immune protection in scrub typhus. We conclude that this model is suitable for detailed investigations into vaccine-induced immune

  12. Induced immunity against hepatitis B virus

    PubMed Central

    Said, Zeinab Nabil Ahmed; Abdelwahab, Kouka Saadeldin

    2015-01-01

    Prevention of hepatitis B virus (HBV) infection with its consequent development of HBV chronic liver disease and hepatocellular carcinoma is a global mandatory goal. Fortunately, safe and effective HBV vaccines are currently available. Universal hepatitis B surface antigen HBV vaccination coverage is almost done. Growing knowledge based upon monitoring and surveillance of HBV vaccination programs has accumulated and the policy of booster vaccination has been evaluated. This review article provides an overview of the natural history of HBV infection, immune responses and the future of HBV infection. It also summarizes the updated sources, types and uses of HBV vaccines, whether in the preclinical phase or in the post-field vaccination. PMID:26140085

  13. Induced immunity against hepatitis B virus.

    PubMed

    Said, Zeinab Nabil Ahmed; Abdelwahab, Kouka Saadeldin

    2015-06-28

    Prevention of hepatitis B virus (HBV) infection with its consequent development of HBV chronic liver disease and hepatocellular carcinoma is a global mandatory goal. Fortunately, safe and effective HBV vaccines are currently available. Universal hepatitis B surface antigen HBV vaccination coverage is almost done. Growing knowledge based upon monitoring and surveillance of HBV vaccination programs has accumulated and the policy of booster vaccination has been evaluated. This review article provides an overview of the natural history of HBV infection, immune responses and the future of HBV infection. It also summarizes the updated sources, types and uses of HBV vaccines, whether in the preclinical phase or in the post-field vaccination. PMID:26140085

  14. Immune-stimulating complexes as adjuvants for inducing local and systemic immunity after oral immunization with protein antigens.

    PubMed Central

    Mowat, A M; Maloy, K J; Donachie, A M

    1993-01-01

    Orally active synthetic vaccines containing purified antigens would have many benefits for immunizing against systemic and mucosal diseases. However, several factors have limited the development of such vaccines, including the poor immunogenicity of purified proteins and their usual ability to induce tolerance when given orally. Here, we show that incorporation of ovalbumin (OVA) into immune-stimulating complexes (ISCOMS) containing saponin prevents the induction of oral tolerance in mice. In parallel, the spleen and mesenteric lymph node of mice fed OVA ISCOMS are primed for class I major histocompatibility complex (MHC)-restricted cytotoxic T-cell activity which recognizes physiologically processed epitopes on OVA. Oral immunization with OVA ISCOMS also stimulates high secretory IgA antibody responses in the intestine itself, as well as serum IgG antibodies. None of these active immune responses are detectable in mice fed OVA alone. Despite the potent priming of mucosal priming by OVA ISCOMS, re-exposure to antigen does not induce the intestinal immunopathology found in other systems after the breakdown of oral tolerance. Thus, ISCOMS have several unique properties as vectors for oral immunization and could provide a basis for future mucosal vaccines. PMID:7508416

  15. [Immune-regulating effect of phenibut under lipopolysaccharide-induced immune stress conditions].

    PubMed

    Samotrueva, M A; Tiurenkov, I N; Teplyĭ, D L; Kuleshevskaia, N R; Khlebtsova, E V

    2010-05-01

    The immunoregulating effect of phenibut has been demonstrated on the model of immune stress caused by the injection of lipopolysaccharide from Pseudomonas aeruginosa. The degree of expression of the specific (in a delayed-type hypersensitivity reaction and passive hemagglutination) and nonspecific (phagocytic activity of neutrophils) links of immunomodulation was studied. The formation of lipopolysaccharide (LPS) induced immune stress is characterized by the increase of the indicated parameters of immunity. It is found that phenibut (under intraabdominal injection of 25 mg/kg within 5 days) removes the manifestations of hyperreactivity of the cellular link of immunity, and also restores the amount of phagocytic cells, which is evidence of the immunomodulating properties of the drug under conditions of hyperimmunization. PMID:20597368

  16. Maternal immunity enhances Mycoplasma hyopneumoniae vaccination induced cell-mediated immune responses in piglets

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Passively acquired maternal derived immunity (MDI) is a double-edged sword. Maternal derived antibody-mediated immunity (AMI) and cell-mediated immunity (CMI) are critical immediate defenses for the neonate; however, MDI may interfere with the induction of active immunity in the neonate, i.e. passive interference. The effect of antigen-specific MDI on vaccine-induced AMI and CMI responses to Mycoplasma hyopneumoniae (M. hyopneumoniae) was assessed in neonatal piglets. To determine whether CMI and AMI responses could be induced in piglets with MDI, piglets with high and low levels of maternal M. hyopneumoniae-specific immunity were vaccinated against M. hyopneumoniae at 7 d of age. Piglet M. hyopneumoniae-specific antibody, lymphoproliferation, and delayed type hypersensitivity (DTH) responses were measured 7 d and 14 d post vaccination. Results Piglets with M. hyopneumoniae-specific MDI failed to show vaccine-induced AMI responses; there was no rise in M. hyopneumoniae antibody levels following vaccination of piglets in the presence of M. hyopneumoniae-specific MDI. However, piglets with M. hyopneumoniae-specific MDI had primary (antigen-specific lymphoproliferation) and secondary (DTH) M. hyopneumoniae-specific CMI responses following vaccination. Conclusions In this study neonatal M. hyopneumoniae-specific CMI was not subject to passive interference by MDI. Further, it appears that both maternal derived and endogenous CMI contribute to M. hyopneumoniae-specific CMI responses in piglets vaccinated in the face of MDI. PMID:24903770

  17. Nanomaterial Induced Immune Responses and Cytotoxicity.

    PubMed

    Ali, Ashraf; Suhail, Mohd; Mathew, Shilu; Shah, Muhammad Ali; Harakeh, Steve M; Ahmad, Sultan; Kazmi, Zulqarnain; Alhamdan, Mohammed Abdul Rahman; Chaudhary, Adeel; Damanhouri, Ghazi Abdullah; Qadri, Ishtiaq

    2016-01-01

    Nanomaterials are utilized in a wide array of end user products such as pharmaceuticals, electronics, clothes and cosmetic products. Due to its size (< 100 nm), nanoparticles have the propensity to enter through the airway and skin, making its path perilous with the potential to cause damages of varying severity. Once within the body, these particles have unconstrained access to different tissues and organs including the brain, liver, and kidney. As a result, nanomaterials may cause the perturbation of the immune system eliciting an inflammatory response and cytotoxicity. This potential role is dependent on many factors such as the characteristics of the nanomaterials, presence or absence of diseases, and genetic predisposition. Cobalt and nickel nanoparticles, for example, were shown to have inflammogenic properties, while silver nanoparticles were shown to reduce allergic inflammation. Just as asbestos fibers, carbon nanotubes were shown to cause lungs damage. Some nanomaterials were shown, based on animal studies, to result in cell damage, leading to the formation of pre-cancerous lesions. This review highlights the impact of nanomaterials on immune system and its effect on human health with toxicity consideration. It recommends the development of suitable animal models to study the toxicity and bio-clearance of nanomaterials and propose safety guidelines. PMID:27398432

  18. ROLE OF THE NALP3 INFLAMMASOME IN ACETAMINOPHEN-INDUCED STERILE INFLAMMATION AND LIVER INJURY

    PubMed Central

    Williams, C. David; Antoine, Daniel J.; Shaw, Patrick J.; Benson, Craig; Farhood, Anwar; Williams, Dominic P.; Kanneganti, Thirumala-Devi; Park, B. Kevin; Jaeschke, Hartmut

    2011-01-01

    Acetaminophen (APAP) overdose is the leading cause of acute liver failure in the US and UK. Recent studies implied that APAP-induced injury is partially mediated by interleukin-1β (IL-1β), which can activate and recruit neutrophils, exacerbating injury. Mature IL-1β is formed by caspase-1, dependent on inflammasome activation. The objective of this investigation was to evaluate the role of the Nalp3 inflammasome on release of damage associated molecular patterns (DAMPs), hepatic neutrophil accumulation and liver injury (ALT, necrosis) after APAP overdose. Mice deficient for each component of the Nalp3 inflammasome (Caspase-1, ASC and NALP3) were treated with 300 mg/kg APAP for 24 h; these mice had similar neutrophil recruitment and liver injury as APAP-treated C57Bl/6 wildtype animals. In addition, plasma levels of DAMPs (DNA fragments, keratin-18, hypo- and hyper-acetylated forms of high mobility group box-1 protein) were similarly elevated with no significant difference between wildtype and gene knockout mice. In addition, aspirin treatment, which has been postulated to attenuate cytokine formation and the activation of the Nalp3 inflammasome after APAP, had no effect on release of DAMPs, hepatic neutrophil accumulation or liver injury. Together these data confirm the release of DAMPs and a sterile inflammatory response after APAP overdose. However, as previously reported minor endogenous formation of IL-1β and the activation of the Nalp3 inflammasome have little impact on APAP hepatotoxicity. It appears that the Nalp3 inflammasome is not a promising therapeutic target to treat APAP overdose. PMID:21396389

  19. Role of the Nalp3 inflammasome in acetaminophen-induced sterile inflammation and liver injury.

    PubMed

    Williams, C David; Antoine, Daniel J; Shaw, Patrick J; Benson, Craig; Farhood, Anwar; Williams, Dominic P; Kanneganti, Thirumala-Devi; Park, B Kevin; Jaeschke, Hartmut

    2011-05-01

    Acetaminophen (APAP) overdose is the leading cause of acute liver failure in the US and UK. Recent studies implied that APAP-induced injury is partially mediated by interleukin-1β (IL-1β), which can activate and recruit neutrophils, exacerbating injury. Mature IL-1β is formed by caspase-1, dependent on inflammasome activation. The objective of this invetstigation was to evaluate the role of the Nalp3 inflammasome on release of damage associated molecular patterns (DAMPs), hepatic neutrophil accumulation and liver injury (ALT, necrosis) after APAP overdose. Mice deficient for each component of the Nalp3 inflammasome (caspase-1, ASC and Nalp3) were treated with 300mg/kg APAP for 24h; these mice had similar neutrophil recruitment and liver injury as APAP-treated C57Bl/6 wildtype animals. In addition, plasma levels of DAMPs (DNA fragments, keratin-18, hypo- and hyper-acetylated forms of high mobility group box-1 protein) were similarly elevated with no significant difference between wildtype and gene knockout mice. In addition, aspirin treatment, which has been postulated to attenuate cytokine formation and the activation of the Nalp3 inflammasome after APAP, had no effect on release of DAMPs, hepatic neutrophil accumulation or liver injury. Together, these data confirm the release of DAMPs and a sterile inflammatory response after APAP overdose. However, as previously reported minor endogenous formation of IL-1β and the activation of the Nalp3 inflammasome have little impact on APAP hepatotoxicity. It appears that the Nalp3 inflammasome is not a promising therapeutic target to treat APAP overdose. PMID:21396389

  20. Role of the Nalp3 inflammasome in acetaminophen-induced sterile inflammation and liver injury

    SciTech Connect

    Williams, C. David; Antoine, Daniel J.; Shaw, Patrick J.; Benson, Craig; Farhood, Anwar; Williams, Dominic P.; Kanneganti, Thirumala-Devi; Park, B. Kevin; Jaeschke, Hartmut

    2011-05-01

    Acetaminophen (APAP) overdose is the leading cause of acute liver failure in the US and UK. Recent studies implied that APAP-induced injury is partially mediated by interleukin-1{beta} (IL-1{beta}), which can activate and recruit neutrophils, exacerbating injury. Mature IL-1{beta} is formed by caspase-1, dependent on inflammasome activation. The objective of this invetstigation was to evaluate the role of the Nalp3 inflammasome on release of damage associated molecular patterns (DAMPs), hepatic neutrophil accumulation and liver injury (ALT, necrosis) after APAP overdose. Mice deficient for each component of the Nalp3 inflammasome (caspase-1, ASC and Nalp3) were treated with 300 mg/kg APAP for 24 h; these mice had similar neutrophil recruitment and liver injury as APAP-treated C57Bl/6 wildtype animals. In addition, plasma levels of DAMPs (DNA fragments, keratin-18, hypo- and hyper-acetylated forms of high mobility group box-1 protein) were similarly elevated with no significant difference between wildtype and gene knockout mice. In addition, aspirin treatment, which has been postulated to attenuate cytokine formation and the activation of the Nalp3 inflammasome after APAP, had no effect on release of DAMPs, hepatic neutrophil accumulation or liver injury. Together, these data confirm the release of DAMPs and a sterile inflammatory response after APAP overdose. However, as previously reported minor endogenous formation of IL-1{beta} and the activation of the Nalp3 inflammasome have little impact on APAP hepatotoxicity. It appears that the Nalp3 inflammasome is not a promising therapeutic target to treat APAP overdose.

  1. Immunization with genetically attenuated P52-deficient Plasmodium berghei sporozoites induces a long-lasting effector memory CD8+ T cell response in the liver

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background The induction of sterile immunity and long lasting protection against malaria has been effectively achieved by immunization with sporozoites attenuated by gamma-irradiation or through deletion of genes. For mice immunized with radiation attenuated sporozoites (RAS) it has been shown that intrahepatic effector memory CD8+ T cells are critical for protection. Recent studies have shown that immunization with genetically attenuated parasites (GAP) in mice is also conferred by liver effector memory CD8+ T cells. Findings In this study we analysed effector memory cell responses after immunization of GAP that lack the P52 protein. We demonstrate that immunization with p52-GAP sporozoites also results in a strong increase of effector memory CD8+ T cells, even 6 months after immunization, whereas no specific CD4+ effector T cells response could be detected. In addition, we show that the increase of effector memory CD8+ T cells is specific for the liver and not for the spleen or lymph nodes. Conclusions These results indicate that immunization of mice with P. berghei p52-GAP results in immune responses that are comparable to those induced by RAS or GAP lacking expression of UIS3 or UIS4, with an important role implicated for intrahepatic effector memory CD8+ T cells. The knowledge of the mediators of protective immunity after immunization with different GAP is important for the further development of vaccines consisting of genetically attenuated sporozoites. PMID:22004696

  2. Downy mildew incidence of pearl millet hybrids with different male-sterility inducing cytoplasms.

    PubMed

    Yadav, O P

    1996-02-01

    The use of different sources of cytoplasmic male sterility (CMS) in hybrid seed production of pearl millet [Pennisetum glaucum (L.) R. Br.] is advocated to avoid possible disease epidemics occurring due to cytoplasmic uniformity. The effects of commercially unexploited, but potentially exploitable, sources of CMS, like A2, A3 and A4, on downy mildew [Sclerospora graminicola (Sacc.) Schroet] incidence were studied by using the disease incidence of isonuclear hybrids with male-sterile and fertile cytoplasm. The mean downy mildew incidence of hybrids carrying different male-sterile cytoplasm was similar to that of hybrids retaining the fertile cytoplasm. The cytoplasm accounted for only 0.6% of the total variation and its effect was non-significant; pollinators could explain most of the variation in determining the disease incidence of hybrids. This suggested that these male-sterile cytoplasms are not linked to downy mildew susceptibility and thus can be exploited commercially to broaden the cytoplasmic base of the male-sterile lines and, ultimately, of hybrids. PMID:24166178

  3. WSSV-induced crayfish Dscam shows durable immune behavior.

    PubMed

    Ng, Tze Hann; Hung, Hsin-Yi; Chiang, Yi-An; Lin, Jia-Hung; Chen, Yi-Ning; Chuang, Ya-Chu; Wang, Han-Ching

    2014-09-01

    One of the major gaps in our understanding of arthropod specific immune priming concerns the mechanism[s] by which the observed long-term (>2 weeks) protective effects might be mediated. Hypervariable Dscam (Down syndrome cell adhesion molecule) might support arthropod innate immunity with specificity for more extended periods. We show here that, in the relatively long-lived arthropod Cherax quadricarinatus, CqDscam does not behave like a typical, immediately-acting, short-lived innate immune factor: CqDscam was not induced within hours after challenge with a lethal virus, but instead was only up-regulated after 2-5 days. This initial response faded within ∼ 2 weeks, but another maximum was reached ∼ 1 month later. At around 2 months after the initial challenge, the virus-induced CqDscam bound to the virus virion and acted to neutralize the virus However, although CqDscam helped crayfish to survive during persistent infection, it nevertheless failed to provide any enhanced protection against a subsequent WSSV challenge. Thus, CqDscam is capable of supporting extended anti-virus immune memory in arthropods. Also, during a persistent virus infection, the balance of "immune firepower" in crayfish appears to be altered such that the general immune factors become depleted while CqDscam becomes relatively predominant. PMID:24973514

  4. Cytological and Comparative Proteomic Analyses on Male Sterility in Brassica napus L. Induced by the Chemical Hybridization Agent Monosulphuron Ester Sodium

    PubMed Central

    Li, Zhanjie; Cui, Jianmin; Hu, Shengwu; Zhao, Huixian; Chen, Mingshun

    2013-01-01

    Male sterility induced by a chemical hybridization agent (CHA) is an important tool for utilizing crop heterosis. Monosulphuron ester sodium (MES), a new acetolactate synthase-inhibitor herbicide belonging to the sulphonylurea family, has been developed as an effective CHA to induce male sterility in rapeseed (Brassica napus L.). To understand MES-induced male sterility in rapeseed better, comparative cytological and proteomic analyses were conducted in this study. Cytological analysis indicated that defective tapetal cells and abnormal microspores were gradually generated in the developing anthers of MES-treated plants at various development stages, resulting in unviable microspores and male sterility. A total of 141 differentially expressed proteins between the MES-treated and control plants were revealed, and 131 of them were further identified by MALDI-TOF/TOF MS. Most of these proteins decreased in abundance in tissues of MES-treated rapeseed plants, and only a few increased. Notably, some proteins were absent or induced in developing anthers after MES treatment. These proteins were involved in several processes that may be crucial for tapetum and microspore development. Down-regulation of these proteins may disrupt the coordination of developmental and metabolic processes, resulting in defective tapetum and abnormal microspores that lead to male sterility in MES-treated plants. Accordingly, a simple model of CHA-MES-induced male sterility in rapeseed was established. This study is the first cytological and dynamic proteomic investigation on CHA-MES-induced male sterility in rapeseed, and the results provide new insights into the molecular events of male sterility. PMID:24244648

  5. Reversible Sterilization

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Largey, Gale

    1977-01-01

    Notes that difficult questions arise concerning the use of sterilization for alleged eugenic and euthenic purposes. Thus, how reversible sterilization will be used with relation to the poor, mentally ill, mentally retarded, criminals, and minors, is questioned. (Author/AM)

  6. Sterile technique

    MedlinePlus

    Sterile gloves ... water and soap A sterile kit or pad Gloves (sometimes these are in your kit) A clean, ... border around it. Throw the wrapper away. Your gloves may be separate or inside the kit. To ...

  7. Chemotherapy-induced antitumor immunity requires formyl peptide receptor 1.

    PubMed

    Vacchelli, Erika; Ma, Yuting; Baracco, Elisa E; Sistigu, Antonella; Enot, David P; Pietrocola, Federico; Yang, Heng; Adjemian, Sandy; Chaba, Kariman; Semeraro, Michaela; Signore, Michele; De Ninno, Adele; Lucarini, Valeria; Peschiaroli, Francesca; Businaro, Luca; Gerardino, Annamaria; Manic, Gwenola; Ulas, Thomas; Günther, Patrick; Schultze, Joachim L; Kepp, Oliver; Stoll, Gautier; Lefebvre, Céline; Mulot, Claire; Castoldi, Francesca; Rusakiewicz, Sylvie; Ladoire, Sylvain; Apetoh, Lionel; Bravo-San Pedro, José Manuel; Lucattelli, Monica; Delarasse, Cécile; Boige, Valérie; Ducreux, Michel; Delaloge, Suzette; Borg, Christophe; André, Fabrice; Schiavoni, Giovanna; Vitale, Ilio; Laurent-Puig, Pierre; Mattei, Fabrizio; Zitvogel, Laurence; Kroemer, Guido

    2015-11-20

    Antitumor immunity driven by intratumoral dendritic cells contributes to the efficacy of anthracycline-based chemotherapy in cancer. We identified a loss-of-function allele of the gene coding for formyl peptide receptor 1 (FPR1) that was associated with poor metastasis-free and overall survival in breast and colorectal cancer patients receiving adjuvant chemotherapy. The therapeutic effects of anthracyclines were abrogated in tumor-bearing Fpr1(-/-) mice due to impaired antitumor immunity. Fpr1-deficient dendritic cells failed to approach dying cancer cells and, as a result, could not elicit antitumor T cell immunity. Experiments performed in a microfluidic device confirmed that FPR1 and its ligand, annexin-1, promoted stable interactions between dying cancer cells and human or murine leukocytes. Altogether, these results highlight the importance of FPR1 in chemotherapy-induced anticancer immune responses. PMID:26516201

  8. Inhibition of RPE cell sterile inflammatory responses and endotoxin-induced uveitis by a cell-impermeable HSP90 inhibitor.

    PubMed

    Qin, Suofu; Ni, Ming; Wang, Xiuyun; Maurier-Mahé, Florence; Shurland, Dixie-Lee; Rodrigues, Gerard A

    2011-12-01

    Dying cells release pro-inflammatory molecules, functioning as cytokines to trigger cell/tissue inflammation that is relevant to disease pathology. Heat-shock protein 90 (HSP90) is believed to act as a danger signal for tissue damage once released extracellularly. Potential roles of HSP90 were explored in retinal pigment epithelial (RPE) inflammatory responses to necrosis. Cellular extracts can trigger ARPE-19 cell inflammatory responses, producing cytokines that lead to an increase in ARPE-19 cell monolayer permeability. Addition of recombinant HSP90β mimics the induction of chemokines IL-8 and MCP-1 in cultured RPE cells, suggesting that released HSP90 can incite RPE cell sterile inflammatory responses. Consistent with this, classical HSP90 inhibitors were shown to substantially reduce necrosis-induced cytokine production and permeability increases in ARPE-19 cells. Moreover, a cell-impermeable inhibitor, 17-N,N-dimethylaminoethylamino-17-demethoxy-geldanamycin-N-oxide, also efficiently inhibited necrosis-induced cytokine production and TNF-α/IL-1β-induced increase in ARPE-19 cell permeability in vitro and endotoxin-induced development of uveitis in vivo, suggesting that HSP90 can contribute to necrosis-induced RPE inflammatory responses. Collectively, our data identify HSP90 as a pro-inflammatory molecule in RPE cell sterile inflammatory responses. PMID:22019372

  9. Harnessing DNA-induced immune responses for improving cancer vaccines

    PubMed Central

    Herrada, Andrés A.; Rojas-Colonelli, Nicole; González-Figueroa, Paula; Roco, Jonathan; Oyarce, César; Ligtenberg, Maarten A.; Lladser, Alvaro

    2012-01-01

    DNA vaccines have emerged as an attractive strategy to promote protective cellular and humoral immunity against the encoded antigen. DNA vaccines are easy to generate, inexpensive to produce and purify at large-scale, highly stable and safe. In addition, plasmids used for DNA vaccines act as powerful “danger signals” by stimulating several DNA-sensing innate immune receptors that promote the induction of protective adaptive immunity. The induction of tumor-specific immune responses represents a major challenge for DNA vaccines because most of tumor-associated antigens are normal non-mutated self-antigens. As a consequence, induction of potentially self-reactive T cell responses against such poorly immunogenic antigens is controlled by mechanisms of central and peripheral tolerance as well as tumor-induced immunosuppression. Although several DNA vaccines against cancer have reached clinical testing, disappointing results have been observed. Therefore, the development of new adjuvants that strongly stimulate the induction of antitumor T cell immunity and counteract immune-suppressive regulation is an attractive approach to enhance the potency of DNA vaccines and overcome tumor-associated tolerance. Understanding the DNA-sensing signaling pathways of innate immunity that mediate the induction of T cell responses elicited by DNA vaccines represents a unique opportunity to develop novel adjuvants that enhance vaccine potency. The advance of DNA adjuvants needs to be complemented with the development of potent delivery systems, in order to step toward successful clinical application. Here, we briefly discuss recent evidence showing how to harness DNA-induced immune response to improve the potency of cancer vaccines and counteract tumor-associated tolerance. PMID:23111166

  10. Protective CD8+ T-cell immunity to human malaria induced by chimpanzee adenovirus-MVA immunisation

    PubMed Central

    Ewer, Katie J.; O’Hara, Geraldine A.; Duncan, Christopher J. A.; Collins, Katharine A.; Sheehy, Susanne H.; Reyes-Sandoval, Arturo; Goodman, Anna L.; Edwards, Nick J.; Elias, Sean C.; Halstead, Fenella D.; Longley, Rhea J.; Rowland, Rosalind; Poulton, Ian D.; Draper, Simon J.; Blagborough, Andrew M.; Berrie, Eleanor; Moyle, Sarah; Williams, Nicola; Siani, Loredana; Folgori, Antonella; Colloca, Stefano; Sinden, Robert E.; Lawrie, Alison M.; Cortese, Riccardo; Gilbert, Sarah C.; Nicosia, Alfredo; Hill, Adrian V. S.

    2013-01-01

    Induction of antigen-specific CD8+ T cells offers the prospect of immunization against many infectious diseases, but no subunit vaccine has induced CD8+ T cells that correlate with efficacy in humans. Here we demonstrate that a replication-deficient chimpanzee adenovirus vector followed by a modified vaccinia virus Ankara booster induces exceptionally high frequency T-cell responses (median >2400 SFC/106 peripheral blood mononuclear cells) to the liver-stage Plasmodium falciparum malaria antigen ME-TRAP. It induces sterile protective efficacy against heterologous strain sporozoites in three vaccinees (3/14, 21%), and delays time to patency through substantial reduction of liver-stage parasite burden in five more (5/14, 36%), P=0.008 compared with controls. The frequency of monofunctional interferon-γ-producing CD8+ T cells, but not antibodies, correlates with sterile protection and delay in time to patency (Pcorrected=0.005). Vaccine-induced CD8+ T cells provide protection against human malaria, suggesting that a major limitation of previous vaccination approaches has been the insufficient magnitude of induced T cells. PMID:24284865

  11. Intranasal Immunization with Nontypeable Haemophilus influenzae Outer Membrane Vesicles Induces Cross-Protective Immunity in Mice

    PubMed Central

    Roier, Sandro; Leitner, Deborah R.; Iwashkiw, Jeremy; Schild-Prüfert, Kristina; Feldman, Mario F.; Krohne, Georg; Reidl, Joachim; Schild, Stefan

    2012-01-01

    Abstract Haemophilus influenzae is a Gram-negative human-restricted bacterium that can act as a commensal and a pathogen of the respiratory tract. Especially nontypeable H. influenzae (NTHi) is a major threat to public health and is responsible for several infectious diseases in humans, such as pneumonia, sinusitis, and otitis media. Additionally, NTHi strains are highly associated with exacerbations in patients suffering from chronic obstructive pulmonary disease. Currently, there is no licensed vaccine against NTHi commercially available. Thus, this study investigated the utilization of outer membrane vesicles (OMVs) as a potential vaccine candidate against NTHi infections. We analyzed the immunogenic and protective properties of OMVs derived from various NTHi strains by means of nasopharyngeal immunization and colonization studies with BALB/c mice. The results presented herein demonstrate that an intranasal immunization with NTHi OMVs results in a robust and complex humoral and mucosal immune response. Immunoprecipitation revealed the most important immunogenic proteins, such as the heme utilization protein, protective surface antigen D15, heme binding protein A, and the outer membrane proteins P1, P2, P5 and P6. The induced immune response conferred not only protection against colonization with a homologous NTHi strain, which served as an OMV donor for the immunization mixtures, but also against a heterologous NTHi strain, whose OMVs were not part of the immunization mixtures. These findings indicate that OMVs derived from NTHi strains have a high potential to act as a vaccine against NTHi infections. PMID:22880074

  12. DEVELOPMENT OF MOLECULAR BIOMARKERS TO MEASURE ENVIRONMENTALLY INDUCED IMMUNE RESPONSES

    EPA Science Inventory

    This study will generate a panel of sensitive molecular biomarkers to measure environmentally induced changes in systemic and local immune responses within small biological samples. Once tested and characterized, these reagents can be immediately incorporated as a part of the...

  13. Specific humoral and cellular immunity induced by Trypanosoma cruzi DNA immunization in a canine model.

    PubMed

    Arce-Fonseca, Minerva; Ballinas-Verdugo, Martha A; Zenteno, Emma R Abreu; Suárez-Flores, Davinia; Carrillo-Sánchez, Silvia C; Alejandre-Aguilar, Ricardo; Rosales-Encina, José Luis; Reyes, Pedro A; Rodríguez-Morales, Olivia

    2013-01-01

    Chagas disease has a high incidence in Mexico and other Latin American countries. Because one of the most important known methods of prevention is vector control, which has been effective only in certain areas of South America, the development of a vaccine to protect people at risk has been proposed. In this study, we assessed the cellular and humoral immune response generated following immunization with pBCSP and pBCSSP4 plasmids containing the genes encoding a trans-sialidase protein (present in all three forms of T. cruzi) and an amastigote specific glycoprotein, respectively, in a canine model. Thirty-five beagle dogs were divided randomly into 5 groups (n=7) and were immunized twice intramuscularly with 500 μg of pBCSSP4, pBCSP, pBk-CMV (empty plasmid) or saline solution. Fifteen days after the last immunization the 4 groups were infected intraperitoneally with 500,000 metacyclic trypomastigotes. The fifth group was unimmunized/infected. The parasitaemia in the immunized/infected dogs was for a shorter period (14 vs. 29 days) and the parasite load was lower. The concentration of IgG1 (0.612±0.019 O.D.) and IgG2 (1.167±0.097 O.D.) subclasses was measured (absorbance) 15 days after the last immunization with both recombinant plasmids, the majority of which were IgG2. The treatment of parasites using the serum from dogs immunized with pBCSP and pBCSSP4 plasmids produced 54% (±11.8) and 68% (±21.4) complement-mediated lysis, respectively. At 12 h post immunization, an increase in cytokines was not observed; however, vaccination with pBCSSP4 significantly increased the levels of IFN-γ and IL-10 at 9 months post-infection. The recombinant plasmid immunization stimulated the spleen cell proliferation showing a positive stimulatory index above 2.0. In conclusion, immunization using both genes effectively induces a humoral and cellular immune response. PMID:23497041

  14. Specific humoral and cellular immunity induced by Trypanosoma cruzi DNA immunization in a canine model

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Chagas disease has a high incidence in Mexico and other Latin American countries. Because one of the most important known methods of prevention is vector control, which has been effective only in certain areas of South America, the development of a vaccine to protect people at risk has been proposed. In this study, we assessed the cellular and humoral immune response generated following immunization with pBCSP and pBCSSP4 plasmids containing the genes encoding a trans-sialidase protein (present in all three forms of T. cruzi) and an amastigote specific glycoprotein, respectively, in a canine model. Thirty-five beagle dogs were divided randomly into 5 groups (n = 7) and were immunized twice intramuscularly with 500 μg of pBCSSP4, pBCSP, pBk-CMV (empty plasmid) or saline solution. Fifteen days after the last immunization the 4 groups were infected intraperitoneally with 500 000 metacyclic trypomastigotes. The fifth group was unimmunized/infected. The parasitaemia in the immunized/infected dogs was for a shorter period (14 vs. 29 days) and the parasite load was lower. The concentration of IgG1 (0.612 ± 0.019 O.D.) and IgG2 (1.167 ± 0.097 O.D.) subclasses was measured (absorbance) 15 days after the last immunization with both recombinant plasmids, the majority of which were IgG2. The treatment of parasites using the serum from dogs immunized with pBCSP and pBCSSP4 plasmids produced 54% (± 11.8) and 68% (± 21.4) complement-mediated lysis, respectively. At 12 h post immunization, an increase in cytokines was not observed; however, vaccination with pBCSSP4 significantly increased the levels of IFN-γ and IL-10 at 9 months post-infection. The recombinant plasmid immunization stimulated the spleen cell proliferation showing a positive stimulatory index above 2.0. In conclusion, immunization using both genes effectively induces a humoral and cellular immune response. PMID:23497041

  15. Specific panicle responses resulting from MSMA-induced straighthead sterility in rice

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Straighthead is a physiological disorder of rice causing sterility. A particular characteristic of straighthead is panicles that remain upright because of the light weight of the unfilled grains and hulls which may be distorted into a crescent or parrot-beak shape. Monosodium acid methanearsonate (M...

  16. Coupling to the surface of liposomes alters the immunogenicity of hepatitis C virus-derived peptides and confers sterile immunity.

    PubMed

    Takagi, Akira; Kobayashi, Nobuharu; Taneichi, Maiko; Uchida, Tetsuya; Akatsuka, Toshitaka

    2013-01-01

    We have previously demonstrated that antigens chemically coupled to the surface of liposomes consisting of unsaturated fatty acids were cross-presented by antigen presenting cells to cytotoxic T lymphocytes (CTLs). Liposomal form of immunodominant CTL epitope peptides derived from lymphocytic choriomeningitis virus exhibited highly efficient antiviral CTL responses in immunized mice. In this study, we coupled 15 highly conserved immunodominant CTL epitope peptides derived from hepatitis C virus (HCV) to the surface of liposomes. We also emulsified the peptides in incomplete Freund's adjuvant, and compared the immune responses of the two methods of presenting the peptides by cytotoxicity induction and interferon-gamma (IFN-γ) production by CD8(+) T cells of the immunized mice. We noticed significant variations of the immunogenicity of each peptide between the two antigen delivery systems. In addition, the immunogenicity profiles of the peptides were also different from those observed in the mice infected with recombinant adenoviruses expressing HCV proteins as previously reported. Induction of anti-viral immunity by liposomal peptides was tested by the challenge experiments using recombinant vaccinia viruses expressing corresponding HCV epitopes. One D(b)-restricted and three HLA-A(*)0201-restricted HCV CTL epitope peptides on the surface of liposomes were found to confer complete protection to immunized mice with establishment of long-term memory. Interestingly, their protective efficacy seemed to correlate with the induction of IFN-γ producing cells rather than the cytotoxicity induction suggesting that the immunized mice were protected through non-cytolytic mechanisms. Thus, these liposomal peptides might be useful as HCV vaccines not only for prevention but also for therapeutic use. PMID:23159619

  17. Inducible immune proteins in the dampwood termite Zootermopsis angusticollis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rosengaus, Rebeca B.; Cornelisse, Tara; Guschanski, Katerina; Traniello, James F. A.

    2007-01-01

    Dampwood termites, Zootermopsis angusticollis (Isoptera: Termopsidae), mount an immune response to resist microbial infection. Here we report on results of a novel analysis that allowed us to electrophoretically assess changes in hemolymph proteins in the same individual before and after exposure to a pathogen. We demonstrate that contact with a sublethal concentration of the entomopathogenic fungus Metarhizium anisopliae (Deuteromycotina:Hypomycetes) induces the production of protective proteins in nymphs, pseudergates (false workers), and soldiers. Termites exposed to an immunizing dosage of fungal conidia consistently showed an enhancement of constitutive proteins (62-85 kDa) in the hemolymph as well as an induction of novel proteins (28-48 kDa) relative to preimmunization levels. No significant differences in protein banding patterns relative to baseline levels in control and naïve termites were observed. Incubating excised and eluted induced proteins produced by immunized pseudergates or immunized soldiers with conidia significantly reduced the germination of the fungus. The fungistatic effect of eluted proteins differed significantly among five colonies examined. Our results show that the upregulation of protective proteins in the hemolymph underscores the in vivo immune response we previously recorded in Z. angusticollis.

  18. A Drosophila immune response against Ras-induced overgrowth

    PubMed Central

    Hauling, Thomas; Krautz, Robert; Markus, Robert; Volkenhoff, Anne; Kucerova, Lucie; Theopold, Ulrich

    2014-01-01

    ABSTRACT Our goal is to characterize the innate immune response against the early stage of tumor development. For this, animal models where genetic changes in specific cells and tissues can be performed in a controlled way have become increasingly important, including the fruitfly Drosophila melanogaster. Many tumor mutants in Drosophila affect the germline and, as a consequence, also the immune system itself, making it difficult to ascribe their phenotype to a specific tissue. Only during the past decade, mutations have been induced systematically in somatic cells to study the control of tumorous growth by neighboring cells and by immune cells. Here we show that upon ectopic expression of a dominant-active form of the Ras oncogene (RasV12), both imaginal discs and salivary glands are affected. Particularly, the glands increase in size, express metalloproteinases and display apoptotic markers. This leads to a strong cellular response, which has many hallmarks of the granuloma-like encapsulation reaction, usually mounted by the insect against larger foreign objects. RNA sequencing of the fat body reveals a characteristic humoral immune response. In addition we also identify genes that are specifically induced upon expression of RasV12. As a proof-of-principle, we show that one of the induced genes (santa-maria), which encodes a scavenger receptor, modulates damage to the salivary glands. The list of genes we have identified provides a rich source for further functional characterization. Our hope is that this will lead to a better understanding of the earliest stage of innate immune responses against tumors with implications for mammalian immunity. PMID:24659248

  19. Adenosine signaling and the energetic costs of induced immunity.

    PubMed

    Lazzaro, Brian P

    2015-04-01

    Life history theory predicts that trait evolution should be constrained by competing physiological demands on an organism. Immune defense provides a classic example in which immune responses are presumed to be costly and therefore come at the expense of other traits related to fitness. One strategy for mitigating the costs of expensive traits is to render them inducible, such that the cost is paid only when the trait is utilized. In the current issue of PLOS Biology, Bajgar and colleagues elegantly demonstrate the energetic and life history cost of the immune response that Drosophila melanogaster larvae induce after infection by the parasitoid wasp Leptopilina boulardi. These authors show that infection-induced proliferation of defensive blood cells commands a diversion of dietary carbon away from somatic growth and development, with simple sugars instead being shunted to the hematopoetic organ for rapid conversion into the raw energy required for cell proliferation. This metabolic shift results in a 15% delay in the development of the infected larva and is mediated by adenosine signaling between the hematopoietic organ and the central metabolic control organ of the host fly. The adenosine signal thus allows D. melanogaster to rapidly marshal the energy needed for effective defense and to pay the cost of immunity only when infected. PMID:25915419

  20. Genetic immunization in the lung induces potent local and systemic immune responses.

    PubMed

    Song, Kaimei; Bolton, Diane L; Wei, Chih-Jen; Wilson, Robert L; Camp, Jeremy V; Bao, Saran; Mattapallil, Joseph J; Herzenberg, Leonore A; Herzenberg, Leonard A; Andrews, Charla A; Sadoff, Jerald C; Goudsmit, Jaap; Pau, Maria Grazia; Seder, Robert A; Kozlowski, Pamela A; Nabel, Gary J; Roederer, Mario; Rao, Srinivas S

    2010-12-21

    Successful vaccination against respiratory infections requires elicitation of high levels of potent and durable humoral and cellular responses in the lower airways. To accomplish this goal, we used a fine aerosol that targets the entire lung surface through normal respiration to deliver replication-incompetent recombinant adenoviral vectors expressing gene products from several infectious pathogens. We show that this regimen induced remarkably high and stable lung T-cell responses in nonhuman primates and that it also generated systemic and respiratory tract humoral responses of both IgA and IgG isotypes. Moreover, strong immunogenicity was achieved even in animals with preexisting antiadenoviral immunity, overcoming a critical hurdle to the use of these vectors in humans, who commonly are immune to adenoviruses. The immunogenicity profile elicited with this regimen, which is distinct from either intramuscular or intranasal delivery, has highly desirable properties for protection against respiratory pathogens. We show that it can be used repeatedly to generate mucosal humoral, CD4, and CD8 T-cell responses and as such may be applicable to other mucosally transmitted pathogens such as HIV. Indeed, in a lethal challenge model, we show that aerosolized recombinant adenoviral immunization completely protects ferrets against H5N1 highly pathogenic avian influenza virus. Thus, genetic immunization in the lung offers a powerful platform approach to generating protective immune responses against respiratory pathogens. PMID:21135247

  1. Immunization with avian metapneumovirus harboring chicken Fc induces higher immune responses.

    PubMed

    Paudel, Sarita; Easwaran, Maheswaran; Jang, Hyun; Jung, Ho-Kyoung; Kim, Joo-Hun; Shin, Hyun-Jin

    2016-07-15

    In this study, we evaluated the immune responses of avian metapneumovirus harboring chicken Fc molecule. Stable Vero cells expressing chicken Fc chimera on its surface (Vero-cFc) were established, and we confirmed that aMPV grown in Vero-cFc incorporated host derived chimera Fc into the aMPV virions. Immunization of chicken with aMPV-cFc induced higher level of antibodies and inflammatory cytokines; (Interferon (IFN)-γ and Interleukin (IL)-1β) compared to those of aMPV. The increased levels of antibodies and inflammatory cytokines in chicken immunized with aMPV-cFc were statistically significantly (p<0.05) to that of aMPV and control. The aMPV-cFc group also generated the highest neutralizing antibody response. After challenges, chickens immunized with aMPV-cFc showed much less pathological signs in nasal turbinates and trachea so that we could confirm aMPV-cFc induced higher protection than that of aMPV. The greater ability of aMPV harboring chicken Fc to that of aMPV presented it as a possible vaccine candidate. PMID:27130629

  2. Drug-Induced Glomerular Disease: Immune-Mediated Injury

    PubMed Central

    Markowitz, Glen S.; Radhakrishnan, Jai

    2015-01-01

    Drug-induced autoimmune disease was initially described decades ago, with reports of vasculitis and a lupus-like syndrome in patients taking hydralazine, procainamide, and sulfadiazine. Over the years, multiple other agents have been linked to immune-mediated glomerular disease, often with associated autoantibody formation. Certain clinical and laboratory features may distinguish these entities from their idiopathic counterparts, and making this distinction is important in the diagnosis and management of these patients. Here, drug-induced, ANCA-associated vasculitis, drug-induced lupus, and drug-associated membranous nephropathy are reviewed. PMID:26092827

  3. Radiation-induced effects and the immune system in cancer

    PubMed Central

    Kaur, Punit; Asea, Alexzander

    2012-01-01

    Chemotherapy and radiation therapy (RT) are standard therapeutic modalities for patients with cancers, and could induce various tumor cell death modalities, releasing tumor-derived antigens as well as danger signals that could either be captured for triggering anti-tumor immune response. Historic studies examining tissue and cellular responses to RT have predominantly focused on damage caused to proliferating malignant cells leading to their death. However, there is increasing evidence that RT also leads to significant alterations in the tumor microenvironment, particularly with respect to effects on immune cells and infiltrating tumors. This review will focus on immunologic consequences of RT and discuss the therapeutic reprogramming of immune responses in tumors and how it regulates efficacy and durability to RT. PMID:23251903

  4. Immune-mediated drug-induced liver disease.

    PubMed

    Liu, Zhang-Xu; Kaplowitz, Neil

    2002-08-01

    Drug-induced immune-mediated hepatic injury is an adverse immune response against the liver that results in a disease with hepatitic, cholestatic, or mixed clinical features. Drugs such as halothane, tienilic acid, dihydralazine, and anticonvulsants trigger a hepatitic reaction, and drugs such as chlorpromazine, erythromycins, amoxicillin-calvulanic acid, sulfonamides and sulindac trigger a cholestatic or mixed reaction. Unstable metabolites derived from the metabolism of the drug may bind to cellular proteins or macromolecules, leading to a direct toxic effect on hepatocytes. Protein adducts formed in the metabolism of the drug may be recognized by the immune system as neoantigens. Immunocyte activation may then generate autoantibodies and cell-mediated immune responses, which in turn damage the hepatocytes. Cytochromes 450 are the major oxidative catalysts in drug metabolism, and they can form a neoantigen by covalently binding with the drug metabolite that they produce. Autoantibodies that develop are selectively directed against the particular cytochrome isoenzyme that metabolized the parent drug. The hapten hypothesis proposes that the drug metabolite can act as a hapten and can modify the self of the individual by covalently binding to proteins. The danger hypothesis proposes that the immune system only responds to a foreign antigen if the antigen is associated with a danger signal, such as cell stress or cell death. Most clinically overt adverse hepatic events associated with drugs are unpredictable, and they have intermediate (1 to 8 weeks) or long latency (up to 12 months) periods characteristic of hypersensitivity reactions. Immune-mediated drug-induced liver disease nearly always disappears or becomes quiescent when the drug is removed. Methyldopa, minocycline, and nitrofurantoin can produce a chronic hepatitis resembling AIH if the drug is continued. PMID:12362579

  5. The role of probiotics and prebiotics in inducing gut immunity.

    PubMed

    Vieira, Angélica T; Teixeira, Mauro M; Martins, Flaviano S

    2013-01-01

    The gut immune system is influenced by many factors, including dietary components and commensal bacteria. Nutrients that affect gut immunity and strategies that restore a healthy gut microbial community by affecting the microbial composition are being developed as new therapeutic approaches to treat several inflammatory diseases. Although probiotics (live microorganisms) and prebiotics (food components) have shown promise as treatments for several diseases in both clinical and animal studies, an understanding of the molecular mechanisms behind the direct and indirect effects on the gut immune response will facilitate better and possibly more efficient therapy for diseases. In this review, we will first describe the concept of prebiotics, probiotics, and symbiotics and cover the most recently well-established scientific findings regarding the direct and indirect mechanisms by which these dietary approaches can influence gut immunity. Emphasis will be placed on the relationship of diet, the microbiota, and the gut immune system. Second, we will highlight recent results from our group, which suggest a new dietary manipulation that includes the use of nutrient products (organic selenium and Lithothamnium muelleri) and probiotics (Saccharomyces boulardii UFMG 905 and Bifidobacterium sp.) that can stimulate and manipulate the gut immune response, inducing intestinal homeostasis. Furthermore, the purpose of this review is to discuss and translate all of this knowledge into therapeutic strategies and into treatment for extra-intestinal compartment pathologies. We will conclude by discussing perspectives and molecular advances regarding the use of prebiotics or probiotics as new therapeutic strategies that manipulate the microbial composition and the gut immune responses of the host. PMID:24376446

  6. The Role of Probiotics and Prebiotics in Inducing Gut Immunity

    PubMed Central

    Vieira, Angélica T.; Teixeira, Mauro M.; Martins, Flaviano S.

    2013-01-01

    The gut immune system is influenced by many factors, including dietary components and commensal bacteria. Nutrients that affect gut immunity and strategies that restore a healthy gut microbial community by affecting the microbial composition are being developed as new therapeutic approaches to treat several inflammatory diseases. Although probiotics (live microorganisms) and prebiotics (food components) have shown promise as treatments for several diseases in both clinical and animal studies, an understanding of the molecular mechanisms behind the direct and indirect effects on the gut immune response will facilitate better and possibly more efficient therapy for diseases. In this review, we will first describe the concept of prebiotics, probiotics, and symbiotics and cover the most recently well-established scientific findings regarding the direct and indirect mechanisms by which these dietary approaches can influence gut immunity. Emphasis will be placed on the relationship of diet, the microbiota, and the gut immune system. Second, we will highlight recent results from our group, which suggest a new dietary manipulation that includes the use of nutrient products (organic selenium and Lithothamnium muelleri) and probiotics (Saccharomyces boulardii UFMG 905 and Bifidobacterium sp.) that can stimulate and manipulate the gut immune response, inducing intestinal homeostasis. Furthermore, the purpose of this review is to discuss and translate all of this knowledge into therapeutic strategies and into treatment for extra-intestinal compartment pathologies. We will conclude by discussing perspectives and molecular advances regarding the use of prebiotics or probiotics as new therapeutic strategies that manipulate the microbial composition and the gut immune responses of the host. PMID:24376446

  7. Bacterial Outer Membrane Vesicles Induce Plant Immune Responses.

    PubMed

    Bahar, Ofir; Mordukhovich, Gideon; Luu, Dee Dee; Schwessinger, Benjamin; Daudi, Arsalan; Jehle, Anna Kristina; Felix, Georg; Ronald, Pamela C

    2016-05-01

    Gram-negative bacteria continuously pinch off portions of their outer membrane, releasing membrane vesicles. These outer membrane vesicles (OMVs) are involved in multiple processes including cell-to-cell communication, biofilm formation, stress tolerance, horizontal gene transfer, and virulence. OMVs are also known modulators of the mammalian immune response. Despite the well-documented role of OMVs in mammalian-bacterial communication, their interaction with plants is not well studied. To examine whether OMVs of plant pathogens modulate the plant immune response, we purified OMVs from four different plant pathogens and used them to treat Arabidopsis thaliana. OMVs rapidly induced a reactive oxygen species burst, medium alkalinization, and defense gene expression in A. thaliana leaf discs, cell cultures, and seedlings, respectively. Western blot analysis revealed that EF-Tu is present in OMVs and that it serves as an elicitor of the plant immune response in this form. Our results further show that the immune coreceptors BAK1 and SOBIR1 mediate OMV perception and response. Taken together, our results demonstrate that plants can detect and respond to OMV-associated molecules by activation of their immune system, revealing a new facet of plant-bacterial interactions. PMID:26926999

  8. Flagella-induced immunity against experimental cholera in adult rabbits.

    PubMed Central

    Yancey, R J; Willis, D L; Berry, L J

    1979-01-01

    The adult rabbit ligated ileal loop model was used to evaluate the prophylactic potential of a crude flagellar (CF) vaccine produced from the classical. Inaba strain CA401. A greater than 1,000-fold increase in the challenge inoculum was required to induce an intestinal fluid response in actively immunized adult rabbits equivalent to that produced in unimmunized animals. Similar protection was afforded against challenge with classical and El Tor biotypes of both Inaba and Ogawa serotypes. Highly virulent 35S-labeled vibrios were inhibited in their ability to associated with the intestinal mucosa of CF-immunized rabbits. The protection conferred by CF immunization was found to be superior to that of a commercial bivalent vaccine and also to that of glutaraldehyde-treated cholera toxoid. The critical immunogenic component of CF appears to be a flagella-derived protein. The immunogenicity of CF was destroyed by heat treatment, and absorption of CF-immune serum with aflagellated mutant vibrios did not diminish its ability to confer a high level of passive protection. The intestinal protection of CF-immunized rabbits was completely reversed by the introduction of both goat anti-rabbit immunoglobulins A and G, but by neither alone. PMID:478635

  9. Is immunity a mechanism contributing to statin-induced diabetes?

    PubMed Central

    Henriksbo, Brandyn D; Schertzer, Jonathan D

    2015-01-01

    Statins lower cholesterol and are commonly prescribed for prevention and treatment of cardiovascular disease risk. Statins have pleotropic actions beyond cholesterol lowering, including decreased protein prenylation, which can alter immune function. The general anti-inflammatory effect of statins may be a key pleiotropic effect that improves cardiovascular disease risk. However, a series of findings have shown that statins increase the pro-inflammatory cytokine, IL-1β, via decreased protein prenylation in immune cells. IL-1β can be regulated by the NLRP3 inflammasome containing caspase-1. Statins have been associated with an increased risk of new onset diabetes. Inflammation can promote ineffective insulin action (insulin resistance), which often precedes diabetes. This review highlights the links between statins, insulin resistance and immunity via the NLRP3 inflammasome. We propose that statin-induced changes in immunity should be investigated as a mechanism underlying increased risk of diabetes. It is possible that statin-related insulin resistance occurs through a separate pathway from various mechanisms that confer cardiovascular benefits. Therefore, understanding the potential mechanisms that segregate statin-induced cardiovascular effects from those that cause dysglycemia may lead to improvements in this drugs class. PMID:26451278

  10. Salmonella enterica induces and subverts the plant immune system

    PubMed Central

    García, Ana V.; Hirt, Heribert

    2014-01-01

    Infections with Salmonella enterica belong to the most prominent causes of food poisoning and infected fruits and vegetables represent important vectors for salmonellosis. Although it was shown that plants raise defense responses against Salmonella, these bacteria persist and proliferate in various plant tissues. Recent reports shed light into the molecular interaction between plants and Salmonella, highlighting the defense pathways induced and the means used by the bacteria to escape the plant immune system and accomplish colonization. It was recently shown that plants detect Salmonella pathogen-associated molecular patterns (PAMPs), such as the flagellin peptide flg22, and activate hallmarks of the defense program known as PAMP-triggered immunity (PTI). Interestingly, certain Salmonella strains carry mutations in the flg22 domain triggering PTI, suggesting that a strategy of Salmonella is to escape plant detection by mutating PAMP motifs. Another strategy may rely on the type III secretion system (T3SS) as T3SS mutants were found to induce stronger plant defense responses than wild type bacteria. Although Salmonella effector delivery into plant cells has not been shown, expression of Salmonella effectors in plant tissues shows that these bacteria also possess powerful means to manipulate the plant immune system. Altogether, these data suggest that Salmonella triggers PTI in plants and evolved strategies to avoid or subvert plant immunity. PMID:24772109

  11. Transgenic male-sterile plant induced by an unedited atp9 gene is restored to fertility by inhibiting its expression with antisense RNA.

    PubMed Central

    Zabaleta, E; Mouras, A; Hernould, M; Suharsono; Araya, A

    1996-01-01

    We have previously shown that the expression of an unedited atp9 chimeric gene correlated with male-sterile phenotype in transgenic tobacco plant. To study the relationship between the expression of chimeric gene and the male-sterile trait, hemizygous and homozygous transgenic tobacco lines expressing the antisense atp9 RNA were constructed. The antisense producing plants were crossed with a homozygous male-sterile line, and the F1 progeny was analyzed. The offspring from crosses between homozygous lines produced only male-fertile plants, suggesting that the expression antisense atp9 RNA abolishes the effect of the unedited chimeric gene. In fact, the plants restored to male fertility showed a dramatic reduction of the unedited atp9 transcript levels, resulting in normal flower development and seed production. These results support our previous observation that the expression of unedited atp9 gene can induce male sterility. Images Fig. 1 Fig. 2 Fig. 3 Fig. 4 PMID:8855343

  12. Requirements for innate immune pathways in environmentally induced autoimmunity.

    PubMed

    Pollard, Kenneth Michael; Kono, Dwight H

    2013-01-01

    There is substantial evidence that environmental triggers in combination with genetic and stochastic factors play an important role in spontaneous autoimmune disease. Although the specific environmental agents and how they promote autoimmunity remain largely unknown, in part because of diverse etiologies, environmentally induced autoimmune models can provide insights into potential mechanisms. Studies of idiopathic and environmentally induced systemic autoimmunity show that they are mediated by common adaptive immune response genes. By contrast, although the innate immune system is indispensable for autoimmunity, there are clear differences in the molecular and cellular innate components that mediate specific systemic autoimmune diseases, suggesting distinct autoimmune-promoting pathways. Some of these differences may be related to the bifurcation of toll-like receptor signaling that distinguishes interferon regulatory factor 7-mediated type I interferon production from nuclear factor-κB-driven proinflammatory cytokine expression. Accordingly, idiopathic and pristane-induced systemic autoimmunity require both type I interferon and proinflammatory cytokines whereas the less aggressive mercury-induced autoimmunity, although dependent on nucleic acid-binding toll-like receptors, does not require type I interferon but needs proinflammatory cytokines. Scavenger receptors and the inflammasome may contribute to silica-induced autoimmunity. Greater understanding of the innate mechanisms responsible for idiopathic and environmentally induced autoimmunity should yield new information into the processes that instigate and drive systemic autoimmunity. PMID:23557436

  13. Antitumor immunity induced by hybrid murine tumor cells: requirements for optimal immunization

    SciTech Connect

    McCune, C.S.; O'Donnell, R.W.; Horan, P.K.; Budd, H.S.; Spennacchio, J.L.; Chuang, C.; Henshaw, E.C.

    1982-09-01

    Hybrid tumor cells have been evaluated for their ability to induce specific antitumor immunity in inbred female C3H/He mice challenged with the syngeneic BA tumor. Hybrid cells were produced by fusion of BA cells with a BALB/c renal adenocarcinoma, which is hypoxanthine phosphoribosyl transferase-deficient and grows well in culture. Corynebacterium parvum was evaluated as an adjuvant for BA and hybrid cells. The BA tumor was shown to be poorly immunogenic, and four weekly injections of BA cells alone or C. parvum alone did not confer significant immunity. When BA cells and C. parvum were mixed, survival time was prolonged and most mice remained tumor-free. Hybrid cell lines derived from the BA tumor were produced in culture in unlimited quantities and were successfully used as immunogens. The addition of C. parvum to hybrids gave a significant incremental increase in survival when compared to the survival resulting from immunization by hybrids without adjuvant. When hybrids without adjuvant were used, several weekly injections were required for effective immunization. Irradiated and unirradiated hybrids were compared, and it was found that irradiation did not diminish hybrid immunogenicity. The potential problems and advantages of this concept of therapy are discussed.

  14. Radiation exposure induces inflammasome pathway activation in immune cells.

    PubMed

    Stoecklein, Veit M; Osuka, Akinori; Ishikawa, Shizu; Lederer, Madeline R; Wanke-Jellinek, Lorenz; Lederer, James A

    2015-02-01

    Radiation exposure induces cell and tissue damage, causing local and systemic inflammatory responses. Because the inflammasome pathway is triggered by cell death and danger-associated molecular patterns, we hypothesized that the inflammasome may signal acute and chronic immune responses to radiation. Using a mouse radiation model, we show that radiation induces a dose-dependent increase in inflammasome activation in macrophages, dendritic cells, NK cells, T cells, and B cells as judged by cleaved caspase-1 detection in cells. Time course analysis showed the appearance of cleaved caspase-1 in cells by day 1 and sustained expression until day 7 after radiation. Also, cells showing inflammasome activation coexpressed the cell surface apoptosis marker annexin V. The role of caspase-1 as a trigger for hematopoietic cell losses after radiation was studied in caspase-1(-/-) mice. We found less radiation-induced cell apoptosis and immune cell loss in caspase-1(-/-) mice than in control mice. Next, we tested whether uric acid might mediate inflammasome activation in cells by treating mice with allopurinol and discovered that allopurinol treatment completely blocked caspase-1 activation in cells. Finally, we demonstrate that radiation-induced caspase-1 activation occurs by a Nod-like receptor family protein 3-independent mechanism because radiation-exposed Nlrp3(-/-) mice showed caspase-1 activation profiles that were indistinguishable from those of wild-type mice. In summary, our data demonstrate that inflammasome activation occurs in many immune cell types following radiation exposure and that allopurinol prevented radiation-induced inflammasome activation. These results suggest that targeting the inflammasome may help control radiation-induced inflammation. PMID:25539818

  15. Hepatotoxicants induce cytokine imbalance in response to innate immune system.

    PubMed

    Goto, Shima; Deguchi, Jiro; Nishio, Naoki; Nomura, Naruaki; Funabashi, Hitoshi

    2015-06-01

    In recent years, attention has been paid to innate immune systems as mechanisms to initiate or promote drug-induced liver injury (DILI). Kupffer cells are hepatic resident macrophages and might be involved in the pathogenesis of DILI by release of pro- and anti-inflammatory mediators such as cytokines, chemokines, reactive oxygen species, and/or nitric oxides. The purpose of this study was to investigate alterations in mediator levels induced by hepatotoxic compounds in isolated Kupffer cells and discuss the relation between balance of each cytokine or chemokine and potential of innate immune-mediated DILI. Primary cultured rat Kupffer cells were treated with hepatotoxic (acetaminophen, troglitazone, trovafloxacin) or non-hepatotoxic (pioglitazone, levofloxacin) compounds with or without lipopolysaccharide (LPS). After 24 hr treatment, cell supernatants were collected and various levels of mediators released by Kupffer cells were examined. Although hepatotoxicants had no effect on the LPS-induced tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-α) secretion, they enhanced the release of pro-inflammatory cytokine interleukin-1 beta (IL-1β) and suppressed the anti-inflammatory cytokines interleukin-6 (IL-6) and interleukin-10 (IL-10) induced by LPS. These cytokine shifts were not associated with switching the phenotypes of M1 and M2 macrophages in Kupffer cells. In conclusion, the present study suggested that the levels of some specific cytokines are affected by DILI-related drugs with LPS stimulation, and imbalance between pro- and anti-inflammatory cytokines, induced by the up-regulation of IL-1β and the down-regulation of IL-6 or IL-10, plays a key role in innate immune-mediated DILI. PMID:25972199

  16. Protective immunity spectrum induced by immunization with a vaccine from the TBEV strain Sofjin.

    PubMed

    Chernokhaeva, L L; Rogova, Yu V; Vorovitch, M F; Romanova, L Iu; Kozlovskaya, L I; Maikova, G B; Kholodilov, I S; Karganova, G G

    2016-04-29

    Tick-borne encephalitis (TBE) circulates widely in the territory of Eurasia with up to 10,000 cases registered annually. The TBE virus (TBEV) includes three main subtypes: European, Siberian and Far-Eastern, and two new Asiatic variants, phylogenetically distant from the others. The inactivated antigen of European or Far-Eastern strains is used in commercial TBE vaccines. A set of 14 TBEV strains, isolated in 1937-2008, with different passage histories, representing all subtypes and variants, was used in this work. The chosen set covers almost all the TBE area. Sera of mice, immunized with the TBE vaccine Moscow, prepared from the TBEV strain Sofjin, were studied in a plaque neutralization test against the set of TBEV strains. The vaccine induced antibodies at a protective titer against all TBEV strains and Omsk hemorrhagic fever virus (OHFV) with Е protein amino acid distances of 0.008-0.069, but not against Powassan virus. We showed that after a course of two immunizations, factors such as the period between vaccinations (1-4 weeks), the challenging virus dose (30-1000 LD50) and terms of challenge (1-4 weeks after the last immunization) did not significantly affect the assessment of protective efficacy of the vaccine in vivo. The protective effect of the TBE vaccine Moscow against the set of TBEV strains and the OHFV was demonstrated in in vivo experiments. TBE vaccine Moscow did not protect mice against 10 LD50 of the Powassan virus. We showed that this range of Е protein amino acid distances between the vaccine strain and challenging virus do not have a decisive impact on the TBE vaccine protective effect in vitro and in vivo. Moreover, the TBE vaccine Moscow induces an immune response protective against a wide range of TBEV variants. PMID:27013433

  17. Progress in development of immunocontraceptive vaccines for permanent non-surgical sterilization of cats and dogs.

    PubMed

    Munks, M W

    2012-08-01

    Each year, millions of cats and dogs are euthanized worldwide. There are insufficient resources to control shelter animals in developed countries, as well as feral cat and wild dog population levels, with current surgical sterilization techniques. Thus, population control of these animals will likely depend on the development of new non-surgical methods for cat and dog sterilization. One promising area of research is the development of contraceptive vaccines, or immunocontraceptives. In this article, previous approaches aimed at developing contraceptive vaccines will be reviewed, with a focus on those most related to sterilization of cats and dogs. There are a number of steps in reproduction that have been, or could be, targeted by the immune system, and the advantages and obstacles for inducing immunity to each of these will be discussed. Our current understanding of how these vaccines cause sterility, and our current ability to dissect these mechanisms in cats and dogs, also will be discussed. PMID:22827374

  18. Modulation of Innate Immune Mechanisms to Enhance Leishmania Vaccine-Induced Immunity: Role of Coinhibitory Molecules.

    PubMed

    Gannavaram, Sreenivas; Bhattacharya, Parna; Ismail, Nevien; Kaul, Amit; Singh, Rakesh; Nakhasi, Hira L

    2016-01-01

    No licensed human vaccines are currently available against any parasitic disease including leishmaniasis. Several antileishmanial vaccine formulations have been tested in various animal models, including genetically modified live-attenuated parasite vaccines. Experimental infection studies have shown that Leishmania parasites utilize a broad range of strategies to undermine effector properties of host phagocytic cells, i.e., dendritic cells (DCs) and macrophages (MΦ). Furthermore, Leishmania parasites have evolved strategies to actively inhibit TH1 polarizing functions of DCs and to condition the infected MΦ toward anti-inflammatory/alternative/M2 phenotype. The altered phenotype of phagocytic cells is characterized by decreased production of antimicrobial reactive oxygen, nitrogen molecules, and pro-inflammatory cytokines, such as IFN-γ, IL-12, and TNF-α. These early events limit the activation of TH1-effector cells and set the stage for pathogenesis. Furthermore, this early control of innate immunity by the virulent parasites results in substantial alteration in the adaptive immunity characterized by reduced proliferation of CD4(+) and CD8(+) T cells and TH2-biased immunity that results in production of anti-inflammatory cytokines, such as TGF-β, and IL-10. More recent studies have also documented the induction of coinhibitory ligands, such as CTLA-4, PD-L1, CD200, and Tim-3, that induce exhaustion and/or non-proliferation in antigen-experienced T cells. Most of these studies focus on viral infections in chronic phase, thus limiting the direct application of these results to parasitic infections and much less to parasitic vaccines. However, these studies suggest that vaccine-induced protective immunity can be modulated using strategies that enhance the costimulation that might reduce the threshold necessary for T cell activation and conversely by strategies that reduce or block inhibitory molecules, such as PD-L1 and CD200. In this review, we will focus on

  19. Modulation of Innate Immune Mechanisms to Enhance Leishmania Vaccine-Induced Immunity: Role of Coinhibitory Molecules

    PubMed Central

    Gannavaram, Sreenivas; Bhattacharya, Parna; Ismail, Nevien; Kaul, Amit; Singh, Rakesh; Nakhasi, Hira L.

    2016-01-01

    No licensed human vaccines are currently available against any parasitic disease including leishmaniasis. Several antileishmanial vaccine formulations have been tested in various animal models, including genetically modified live-attenuated parasite vaccines. Experimental infection studies have shown that Leishmania parasites utilize a broad range of strategies to undermine effector properties of host phagocytic cells, i.e., dendritic cells (DCs) and macrophages (MΦ). Furthermore, Leishmania parasites have evolved strategies to actively inhibit TH1 polarizing functions of DCs and to condition the infected MΦ toward anti-inflammatory/alternative/M2 phenotype. The altered phenotype of phagocytic cells is characterized by decreased production of antimicrobial reactive oxygen, nitrogen molecules, and pro-inflammatory cytokines, such as IFN-γ, IL-12, and TNF-α. These early events limit the activation of TH1-effector cells and set the stage for pathogenesis. Furthermore, this early control of innate immunity by the virulent parasites results in substantial alteration in the adaptive immunity characterized by reduced proliferation of CD4+ and CD8+ T cells and TH2-biased immunity that results in production of anti-inflammatory cytokines, such as TGF-β, and IL-10. More recent studies have also documented the induction of coinhibitory ligands, such as CTLA-4, PD-L1, CD200, and Tim-3, that induce exhaustion and/or non-proliferation in antigen-experienced T cells. Most of these studies focus on viral infections in chronic phase, thus limiting the direct application of these results to parasitic infections and much less to parasitic vaccines. However, these studies suggest that vaccine-induced protective immunity can be modulated using strategies that enhance the costimulation that might reduce the threshold necessary for T cell activation and conversely by strategies that reduce or block inhibitory molecules, such as PD-L1 and CD200. In this review, we will focus on the

  20. The role of cytokines in immune changes induced by spaceflight

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sonnenfeld, G.; Miller, E. S.

    1993-01-01

    It has become apparent that spaceflight alters many immune responses. Among the regulatory components of the immune response that have been shown to be affected by spaceflight is the cytokine network. Spaceflight, as well as model systems of spaceflight, have been shown to affect the production and action of various cytokines including interferons, interleukins, colony stimulating factors, and tumor necrosis factors. These changes have been shown not to involve a general shutdown of the cytokine network but, rather, to involve selective alterations of specific cytokine functions by spaceflight. The full breadth of changes in cytokines induced by spaceflight, as well as mechanisms, duration, adaptation, reversibility, and significance to resistance to infection and neoplastic diseases, remains to be established.

  1. Immune response to stem cells and strategies to induce tolerance.

    PubMed

    Batten, Puspa; Rosenthal, Nadia A; Yacoub, Magdi H

    2007-08-29

    Although recent progress in cardiovascular tissue engineering has generated great expectations for the exploitation of stem cells to restore cardiac form and function, the prospects of a common mass-produced cell resource for clinically viable engineered tissues and organs remain problematic. The refinement of stem cell culture protocols to increase induction of the cardiomyocyte phenotype and the assembly of transplantable vascularized tissue are areas of intense current research, but the problem of immune rejection of heterologous cell type poses perhaps the most significant hurdle to overcome. This article focuses on the potential advantages and problems encountered with various stem cell sources for reconstruction of the damaged or failing myocardium or heart valves and also discusses the need for integrating advances in developmental and stem cell biology, immunology and tissue engineering to achieve the full potential of cardiac tissue engineering. The ultimate goal is to produce 'off-the-shelf' cells and tissues capable of inducing specific immune tolerance. PMID:17584730

  2. Immunity-Based Evolutionary Interpretation of Diet-Induced Thermogenesis.

    PubMed

    Liao, Wan-Hui; Henneberg, Maciej; Langhans, Wolfgang

    2016-06-14

    Diet-induced thermogenesis (DIT) has often been argued to be a physiological defense against obesity, but no empirical proof of its effectiveness in limiting human body weight gain is available. We here propose an immune explanation of DIT-i.e., that it results from the coevolution of host and gut microbiota (especially Firmicutes) that ferment ingested food and proliferate, causing periodic, vagally mediated increases in thermogenesis aimed at curtailing their expansion. Because of this evolutionary adaptive significance related to the immune system, DIT is not effective as an "adaptation" to maintain a certain body mass. Were DIT an effective adaptation to prevent obesity, the current obesity epidemic might not have occurred. PMID:27304499

  3. The role of d-dimer as first marker of thrombophilia in women affected by sterility: implications in pathophysiology and diagnosis of thrombophilia induced sterility

    PubMed Central

    Di Micco, Pierpaolo; D'Uva, Maristella; Strina, Ida; Mollo, Antonio; Amato, Valeria; Niglio, Alferio; De Placido, Giuseppe

    2004-01-01

    Background D-dimer is considered a marker of hypercoagulable state and of endogenous fibrinolysis, so increased d-dimer is detectable in patients affected by thrombosis. Yet, several studies showed that also infertility, in particular secondary infertility due to recurrent fetal losses, has been often related to thrombotic events, in particular in women carrying thrombotic risk factors such as inherited thrombophilia (MTHFRC677T, PTHRA20210G, Factor V Leiden polimorphisms and/or inhAfter this screening we selected 39erited protein C, protein S, AT III deficiency) or acquired thrombophilia (primary antiphospholipid syndrome, acquired protein C, protein S, AT III deficiency, drugs induced thrombophilia). However, because its high predictive negative value in case of suspected thrombosis, increased d-dimer has been often associated to subclinical thrombophilia. The aim of this study is to investigate the role of d-dimer as first marker of thrombophilia in women affected by unexplained infertility and subsequently to search the cause of increased d-dimer, such as inherited and/or acquired thrombophilia. Patients and Methods We selected 79 patients with unexplained primary or secondary infertility. We excluded 40 patients affected by hydrosalpinx, uterine fibroids, uterine malformations, endocrinological and immunological diseases, luteal insufficiency, cytogenetical alterations. All remaining 39 patients were tested for d-dimer and divided in two groups: the patients of group A (25 patients) showed increased plasma d-dimer, in group B were included 14 patients with normal plasma level of d-dimer. After this step all 39 patients were screened for MTHFRC677T, PTHRA20210G, Factor V Leiden polimorphisms, protein C, protein S, AT III, anticardiolipin IgM and IgG, lupus anticoagulant. In the control group were included 15 age matched women without sterility problems referred to our outpatient's section of vascular medicine for suspected deep venous thrombosis. Statistical

  4. Sterile Neutrinos

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Palazzo, Antonio

    2016-05-01

    Several anomalies recorded in short-baseline neutrino experiments suggest the possibility that the standard 3-flavor framework may be incomplete and point towards a manifestation of new physics. Light sterile neutrinos provide a credible solution to these puzzling results. Here, we present a concise review of the status of the neutrino oscillations within the 3+1 scheme, the minimal extension of the standard 3-flavor framework endowed with one sterile neutrino species. We emphasize the potential role of LBL experiments in the searches of CP violation related to sterile neutrinos and their complementarity with the SBL experiments.

  5. Diffuse traumatic brain injury induces prolonged immune dysregulation and potentiates hyperalgesia following a peripheral immune challenge

    PubMed Central

    Rowe, Rachel K; Ellis, Gavin I; Harrison, Jordan L; Bachstetter, Adam D; Corder, Gregory F; Van Eldik, Linda J; Taylor, Bradley K; Marti, Francesc

    2016-01-01

    Background Nociceptive and neuropathic pain occurs as part of the disease process after traumatic brain injury (TBI) in humans. Central and peripheral inflammation, a major secondary injury process initiated by the traumatic brain injury event, has been implicated in the potentiation of peripheral nociceptive pain. We hypothesized that the inflammatory response to diffuse traumatic brain injury potentiates persistent pain through prolonged immune dysregulation. Results To test this, adult, male C57BL/6 mice were subjected to midline fluid percussion brain injury or to sham procedure. One cohort of mice was analyzed for inflammation-related cytokine levels in cortical biopsies and serum along an acute time course. In a second cohort, peripheral inflammation was induced seven days after surgery/injury with an intraplantar injection of carrageenan. This was followed by measurement of mechanical hyperalgesia, glial fibrillary acidic protein and Iba1 immunohistochemical analysis of neuroinflammation in the brain, and flow cytometric analysis of T-cell differentiation in mucosal lymph. Traumatic brain injury increased interleukin-6 and chemokine ligand 1 levels in the cortex and serum that peaked within 1–9 h and then resolved. Intraplantar carrageenan produced mechanical hyperalgesia that was potentiated by traumatic brain injury. Further, mucosal T cells from brain-injured mice showed a distinct deficiency in the ability to differentiate into inflammation-suppressing regulatory T cells (Tregs). Conclusions We conclude that traumatic brain injury increased the inflammatory pain associated with cutaneous inflammation by contributing to systemic immune dysregulation. Regulatory T cells are immune suppressors and failure of T cells to differentiate into regulatory T cells leads to unregulated cytokine production which may contribute to the potentiation of peripheral pain through the excitation of peripheral sensory neurons. In addition, regulatory T cells are

  6. Sterile technique

    MedlinePlus

    ... kit) A clean, dry surface Clean paper towels Wash your hands well and keep all work surfaces ... To open a sterile pad or kit: Wash your hands with soap and running ... palms, fingers, and between your fingers thoroughly. Wash ...

  7. Tubal Sterilization

    MedlinePlus

    ... you feel after the operation depends on your general health, the type of procedure and your tolerance to ... to work after sterilization? That depends on your general health, your attitude, your job and the type of ...

  8. [Auto-immune hypoglycemic syndrome induced by pyritinol].

    PubMed

    Faguer de Moustier, B; Burgard, M; Boitard, C; Desplanque, N; Fanjoux, J; Tchobroutsky, G

    1988-01-01

    The auto-immune hypoglycemic syndrome is characterized by the association of hypoglycemia (clinical and/or biological) and anti-insulin antibodies in patients who have never received exogenous insulin. Initially this syndrome was most often described in Japanese patients some of whom were treated with drugs containing a sulfydril group. We now recall the case of a female caucasian patient treated with Pyritinol for rhumatoid polyarthritis and who presented severe spontaneous hypoglycemia linked with the presence of anti-insulin antibodies in her serum. The level of her antibodies decreased abruptly on suspension of the drug. The recent and more developed characterization techniques of the different forms of circulating insulin and of their antibodies may help to differenciate an auto-immune hypoglycemia from hypoglycemia due to the secret auto-administration of bovine and porcine insuline, and permit us to suggest that an abnormality in the structure of the molecule of insulin might be a cause of this syndrome. However, the exact mechanism of hypoglycemia linked with the presence of anti-insulin auto-antibodies is not yet clear as is the predisposition of a drug with a sulfydril group to induce such an auto-immune phenomenon. PMID:3066650

  9. Targeted approaches to induce immune tolerance for Pompe disease therapy

    PubMed Central

    Doerfler, Phillip A; Nayak, Sushrusha; Corti, Manuela; Morel, Laurence; Herzog, Roland W; Byrne, Barry J

    2016-01-01

    Enzyme and gene replacement strategies have developed into viable therapeutic approaches for the treatment of Pompe disease (acid α-glucosidase (GAA) deficiency). Unfortunately, the introduction of GAA and viral vectors encoding the enzyme can lead to detrimental immune responses that attenuate treatment benefits and can impact patient safety. Preclinical and clinical experience in addressing humoral responses toward enzyme and gene therapy for Pompe disease have provided greater understanding of the immunological consequences of the provided therapy. B- and T-cell modulation has been shown to be effective in preventing infusion-associated reactions during enzyme replacement therapy in patients and has shown similar success in the context of gene therapy. Additional techniques to induce humoral tolerance for Pompe disease have been the targeted expression or delivery of GAA to discrete cell types or tissues such as the gut-associated lymphoid tissues, red blood cells, hematopoietic stem cells, and the liver. Research into overcoming preexisting immunity through immunomodulation and gene transfer are becoming increasingly important to achieve long-term efficacy. This review highlights the advances in therapies as well as the improved understanding of the molecular mechanisms involved in the humoral immune response with emphasis on methods employed to overcome responses associated with enzyme and gene therapies for Pompe disease. PMID:26858964

  10. Targeted approaches to induce immune tolerance for Pompe disease therapy.

    PubMed

    Doerfler, Phillip A; Nayak, Sushrusha; Corti, Manuela; Morel, Laurence; Herzog, Roland W; Byrne, Barry J

    2016-01-01

    Enzyme and gene replacement strategies have developed into viable therapeutic approaches for the treatment of Pompe disease (acid α-glucosidase (GAA) deficiency). Unfortunately, the introduction of GAA and viral vectors encoding the enzyme can lead to detrimental immune responses that attenuate treatment benefits and can impact patient safety. Preclinical and clinical experience in addressing humoral responses toward enzyme and gene therapy for Pompe disease have provided greater understanding of the immunological consequences of the provided therapy. B- and T-cell modulation has been shown to be effective in preventing infusion-associated reactions during enzyme replacement therapy in patients and has shown similar success in the context of gene therapy. Additional techniques to induce humoral tolerance for Pompe disease have been the targeted expression or delivery of GAA to discrete cell types or tissues such as the gut-associated lymphoid tissues, red blood cells, hematopoietic stem cells, and the liver. Research into overcoming preexisting immunity through immunomodulation and gene transfer are becoming increasingly important to achieve long-term efficacy. This review highlights the advances in therapies as well as the improved understanding of the molecular mechanisms involved in the humoral immune response with emphasis on methods employed to overcome responses associated with enzyme and gene therapies for Pompe disease. PMID:26858964

  11. Sterile neutrinos

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kopp, J.; Machado, P. A. N.; Maltoni, M.; Schwetz, T.

    2016-06-01

    We characterize statistically the indications of a presence of one or more light sterile neutrinos from MiniBooNE and LSND data, together with the reactor and gallium anomalies, in the global context. The compatibility of the aforementioned signals with null results from solar, atmospheric, reactor, and accelerator experiments is evaluated. We conclude that a severe tension is present in the global fit, and therefore the addition of eV-scale sterile neutrinos does not satisfactorily explain the anomalies.

  12. Candesartan ameliorates impaired fear extinction induced by innate immune activation.

    PubMed

    Quiñones, María M; Maldonado, Lizette; Velazquez, Bethzaly; Porter, James T

    2016-02-01

    Patients with post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) tend to show signs of a relatively increased inflammatory state suggesting that activation of the immune system may contribute to the development of PTSD. In the present study, we tested whether activation of the innate immune system can disrupt acquisition or recall of auditory fear extinction using an animal model of PTSD. Male adolescent rats received auditory fear conditioning in context A. The next day, an intraperitoneal injection of lipopolysaccharide (LPS; 100 μg/kg) prior to auditory fear extinction in context B impaired acquisition and recall of extinction. LPS (100 μg/kg) given after extinction training did not impair extinction recall suggesting that LPS did not affect consolidation of extinction. In contrast to cued fear extinction, contextual fear extinction was not affected by prior injection of LPS (100 μg/kg). Although LPS also reduced locomotion, we could dissociate the effects of LPS on extinction and locomotion by using a lower dose of LPS (50 μg/kg) which impaired locomotion without affecting extinction. In addition, 15 h after an injection of 250 μg/kg LPS in adult rats, extinction learning and recall were impaired without affecting locomotion. A sub-chronic treatment with candesartan, an angiotensin II type 1 receptor blocker, prevented the LPS-induced impairment of extinction in adult rats. Our results demonstrate that activation of the innate immune system can disrupt auditory fear extinction in adolescent and adult animals. These findings also provide direction for clinical studies of novel treatments that modulate the innate immune system for stress-related disorders like PTSD. PMID:26520214

  13. Neuro-immune interactions in chemical-induced airway hyperreactivity.

    PubMed

    Devos, Fien C; Boonen, Brett; Alpizar, Yeranddy A; Maes, Tania; Hox, Valérie; Seys, Sven; Pollaris, Lore; Liston, Adrian; Nemery, Benoit; Talavera, Karel; Hoet, Peter H M; Vanoirbeek, Jeroen A J

    2016-08-01

    Asthma may be induced by chemical sensitisers, via mechanisms that are still poorly understood. This type of asthma is characterised by airway hyperreactivity (AHR) and little airway inflammation. Since potent chemical sensitisers, such as toluene-2,4-diisocyanate (TDI), are also sensory irritants, it is suggested that chemical-induced asthma relies on neuro-immune mechanisms.We investigated the involvement of transient receptor potential channels (TRP) A1 and V1, major chemosensors in the airways, and mast cells, known for their ability to communicate with sensory nerves, in chemical-induced AHR.In vitro intracellular calcium imaging and patch-clamp recordings in TRPA1- and TRPV1-expressing Chinese hamster ovarian cells showed that TDI activates murine TRPA1, but not TRPV1. Using an in vivo model, in which an airway challenge with TDI induces AHR in TDI-sensitised C57Bl/6 mice, we demonstrated that AHR does not develop, despite successful sensitisation, in Trpa1 and Trpv1 knockout mice, and wild-type mice pretreated with a TRPA1 blocker or a substance P receptor antagonist. TDI-induced AHR was also abolished in mast cell deficient Kit(Wsh) (/Wsh) mice, and in wild-type mice pretreated with the mast cell stabiliser ketotifen, without changes in immunological parameters.These data demonstrate that TRPA1, TRPV1 and mast cells play an indispensable role in the development of TDI-elicited AHR. PMID:27126687

  14. Immunological aspects of the immune response induced by mosquito allergens.

    PubMed

    Cantillo, José Fernando; Fernández-Caldas, Enrique; Puerta, Leonardo

    2014-01-01

    Allergies caused by mosquito bites may produce local or systemic reactions. The inhalation of mosquito allergens may also cause asthma and/or allergic rhinoconjunctivitis in sensitized individuals. The mechanisms implicated in the development of these immune responses involve IgE antibodies, different subtypes of IgG and proinflammatory cytokines as well as basophils, eosinophils and mast cells. Several allergenic components have been identified in the saliva and bodies of mosquitoes and some of these are present in different mosquito species. The most common species implicated in allergic reactions belong to the genera Aedes, Culex and Anopheles. Several Aedes aegypti allergens have been cloned and sequenced. The recombinant molecules show IgE reactivity similar to that of the native allergens, making them good candidates for the diagnosis of mosquito allergies. Allergen-specific immunotherapy with mosquito extracts induces a protective response characterized by a decreased production of IgE antibodies, increased IgG levels, a reduction in the severity of cutaneous and respiratory symptoms and the need for medication. The aims of this review are to summarize the progress made in the characterization of mosquito allergens and discuss the types of immune responses induced by mosquito bites and the inhalation of mosquito allergens in atopic individuals. PMID:25661054

  15. Immunizations

    MedlinePlus

    ... How Can I Help a Friend Who Cuts? Immunizations KidsHealth > For Teens > Immunizations Print A A A ... That Shot? en español Las vacunas Why Are Vaccinations Important? Measles, mumps, and whooping cough may seem ...

  16. Immunization

    MedlinePlus

    ... a lot worse. Some are even life-threatening. Immunization shots, or vaccinations, are essential. They protect against things like measles, ... B, polio, tetanus, diphtheria, and pertussis (whooping cough). Immunizations are important for adults as well as children. ...

  17. Immunization

    MedlinePlus

    ... a lot worse. Some are even life-threatening. Immunization shots, or vaccinations, are essential. They protect against ... B, polio, tetanus, diphtheria, and pertussis (whooping cough). Immunizations are important for adults as well as children. ...

  18. Antitumor immune responses induced by photodynamic immunotherapy in rats

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Wei R.; Robinson, Karen E.; Adams, Robert L.; Singhal, Anil K.; Nordquist, Robert E.

    1998-05-01

    A new laser immunotherapy was used to treat metastatic mammary rat tumors. This new modality consists of three components: a near-infrared diode laser, a photosensitizer, and an immunoadjuvant. The sensitizer-adjuvant solution was injected directly to the tumor, followed by a non-invasive laser application. The new method resulted in total eradication of the treated primary tumors and eradication of untreated metastases at remote sites. Observed was the long-term survival of treated tumor-bearing rats: up to 120 days after tumor inoculation, a 300% increase in survival length compared with untreated control tumor-bearing rats. In addition, the successfully treated rats were refractory to tumor rechallenge with 10 times of the original tumor dose. Fluorescein and peroxidase immunochemical assays were also performed using sera from cured rats as the primary antibody. Strong antibody binding to both live and preserved tumor cells was observed. Western blot analysis, using the cured rat serum as primary antibody also showed distinctive protein binding, suggesting the induction of tumor-specific humoral immune response. These results indicated that an immune response was induced by the treatment of laser, photosensitizer and immunoadjuvant.

  19. Molecular diversity of male sterility inducing and male-fertile cytoplasms in the genus Helianthus.

    PubMed

    Horn, R.

    2002-03-01

    The organisation of mtDNA was investigated for 28 sources of cytoplasmic male sterility (CMS) and a fertile line (normal cytoplasm) of Helianthus annuus by Southern hybridisation. In addition to nine known mitochondrial genes ( atp6, atp9, cob, coxI, coxII, coxIII, 18S, 5S and nd5) three probes for the open reading frames in the rearranged area of PET1, orfH522, orfH708 and orfH873, were used. Genetic similarities of the investigat-ed cytoplasms varied between 0.3 and 1. Cluster analyses using the UPGMA method allowed the distinction of ten mitochondrial (mt) types between the 29 investigated cytoplasms. Most mitochondrial types comprise two or more CMS sources, which could not be further separated, like the PET1-like CMS sources (with the exception of ANO1 and PRR1), or ANN1/ANN2/ANN3, ANN4/ ANN5, ARG3/RIG1, BOL1/EXI1/PEF1/PEP1 and GIG1/ PET2. ANL1, ANL2 and the fertile cytoplasms are also regarded as one mitochondrial type. Unique banding patterns were only observed for ANT1 ( atp6), MAX1 ( atp6, orfH522 and orfH708) and PRR1 ( coxII). However, four of the mitochondrial types showed unique hybridisation signals: ANN4/ANN5 had characteristic bands for atp6 and orfH708, PEF1/PEP1/EXI1/BOL1 for atp6and coxII, and PET2/GIG1 for atp9. The PET1-like cytoplasms all shared the same patterns for orfH522, orfH708and cob (except ANO1). It could be demonstrated that CMS sources, like, e.g., PET2 and PEF1, are different from PET1 in mtDNA organisation and the CMS mechanism. Therefore, these CMS sources represent interesting candidates for the development of new hybrid breeding systems based on new CMS mechanisms. PMID:12582659

  20. Human placenta-derived adherent cells induce tolerogenic immune responses.

    PubMed

    Liu, Wei; Morschauser, Andrew; Zhang, Xin; Lu, Xiaohua; Gleason, Joseph; He, Shuyang; Chen, Hong-Jung; Jankovic, Vladimir; Ye, Qian; Labazzo, Kristen; Herzberg, Uri; Albert, Vivian R; Abbot, Stewart E; Liang, Bitao; Hariri, Robert

    2014-05-01

    Human placenta-derived adherent cells (PDAC cells) are a culture expanded, undifferentiated mesenchymal-like population derived from full-term placental tissue, with immunomodulatory and anti-inflammatory properties. PDA-001 (cenplacel-L), an intravenous formulation of PDAC cells, is in clinical development for the treatment of autoimmune and inflammatory diseases. To elucidate the mechanisms underlying the immunoregulatory properties of PDAC cells, we investigated their effects on immune cell populations, including T cells and dendritic cells (DC) in vitro and in vivo. PDAC cells suppressed T-cell proliferation in an OT-II T-cell adoptive transfer model, reduced the severity of myelin oligodendrocyte glycoprotein peptide-induced experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis and ameliorated inflammation in a delayed type hypersensitivity response model. In vitro, PDAC cells suppressed T-cell proliferation and inhibited Th1 and Th17 differentiation. Analysis of tissues derived from PDAC cell-treated animals revealed diminished CD86 expression on splenic DC, suggesting that they can also modulate DC populations. Furthermore, PDAC cells modulate the differentiation and maturation of mouse bone marrow-derived DC. Similarly, human DC differentiated from CD14(+) monocytes in the presence of PDAC cells acquired a tolerogenic phenotype. These tolerogenic DC failed to induce allogeneic T-cell proliferation and differentiation toward Th1, but skewed T-cell differentiation toward Th2. Inhibition of cyclo-oxygenase-2 activity resulted in a significant, but not complete, abrogation of PDAC cells' effects on DC phenotype and function, implying a role for prostaglandin E2 in PDAC-mediated immunomodulation. This study identifies modulation of DC differentiation toward immune tolerance as a key mechanism underlying the immunomodulatory activities of PDAC cells. PMID:25505962

  1. Polar Lipids of Burkholderia pseudomallei Induce Different Host Immune Responses

    PubMed Central

    Gonzalez-Juarrero, Mercedes; Mima, Naoko; Trunck, Lily A.; Schweizer, Herbert P.; Bowen, Richard A.; Dascher, Kyle; Mwangi, Waithaka; Eckstein, Torsten M.

    2013-01-01

    Melioidosis is a disease in tropical and subtropical regions of the world that is caused by Burkholderia pseudomallei. In endemic regions the disease occurs primarily in humans and goats. In the present study, we used the goat as a model to dissect the polar lipids of B. pseudomallei to identify lipid molecules that could be used for adjuvants/vaccines or as diagnostic tools. We showed that the lipidome of B. pseudomallei and its fractions contain several polar lipids with the capacity to elicit different immune responses in goats, namely rhamnolipids and ornithine lipids which induced IFN-γ, whereas phospholipids and an undefined polar lipid induced strong IL-10 secretion in CD4+ T cells. Autologous T cells co-cultured with caprine dendritic cells (cDCs) and polar lipids of B. pseudomallei proliferated and up-regulated the expression of CD25 (IL-2 receptor) molecules. Furthermore, we demonstrated that polar lipids were able to up-regulate CD1w2 antigen expression in cDCs derived from peripheral blood monocytes. Interestingly, the same polar lipids had only little effect on the expression of MHC class II DR antigens in the same caprine dendritic cells. Finally, antibody blocking of the CD1w2 molecules on cDCs resulted in decreased expression for IFN-γ by CD4+ T cells. Altogether, these results showed that polar lipids of B. pseudomallei are recognized by the caprine immune system and that their recognition is primarily mediated by the CD1 antigen cluster. PMID:24260378

  2. Sterilizing Immunity Elicited by Neisseria meningitidis Carriage Shows Broader Protection than Predicted by Serum Antibody Cross-Reactivity in CEACAM1-Humanized Mice

    PubMed Central

    McCaw, Shannon E.; Strobel, Lea; Frosch, Matthias

    2014-01-01

    Neisseria meningitidis asymptomatically colonizes the human upper respiratory tract but is also the cause of meningitis and severe septicemia. Carriage or disease evokes an immune response against the infecting strain. Hitherto, we have known little about the breadth of immunity induced by natural carriage of a single strain or its implications for subsequent infectious challenge. In this study, we establish that transgenic mice expressing human CEACAM1 support nasal colonization by a variety of strains of different capsular types. Next, we nasally challenged these mice with either of the N. meningitidis strains H44/76 (serogroup B, ST-32) and 90/18311 (serogroup C, ST-11), while following the induction of strain-specific immunoglobulin. When these antisera were tested for reactivity with a diverse panel of N. meningitidis strains, very low levels of antibody were detected against all meningococcal strains, yet a mutually exclusive “fingerprint” of high-level cross-reactivity toward certain strains became apparent. To test the efficacy of these responses for protection against subsequent challenge, CEACAM1-humanized mice exposed to strain 90/18311 were then rechallenged with different N. meningitidis strains. As expected, the mice were immune to challenge with the same strain and with a closely related ST-11 strain, 38VI, while H44/76 (ST-32) could still colonize these animals. Notably, however, despite the paucity of detectable humoral response against strain 196/87 (ST-32), this strain was unable to colonize the 90/18311-exposed mice. Combined, our data suggest that current approaches may underestimate the actual breadth of mucosal protection gained through natural exposure to N. meningitidis strains. PMID:25368118

  3. Among-lake reciprocal transplants induce convergent expression of immune genes in threespine stickleback.

    PubMed

    Stutz, William E; Schmerer, Matthew; Coates, Jessica L; Bolnick, Daniel I

    2015-09-01

    Geographic variation in parasite communities can drive evolutionary divergence in host immune genes. However, biotic and abiotic environmental variation can also induce plastic differences in immune function among populations. At present, there is little information concerning the relative magnitudes of heritable vs. induced immune divergence in natural populations. We examined immune gene expression profiles of threespine stickleback (Gasterosteus aculeatus) from six lakes on Vancouver Island, British Columbia. Parasite community composition differs between lake types (large or small, containing limnetic- or benthic-like stickleback) and between watersheds. We observed corresponding differences in immune gene expression profiles among wild-caught stickleback, using a set of seven immune genes representing distinct branches of the immune system. To evaluate the role of environmental effects on this differentiation, we experimentally transplanted wild-caught fish into cages in their native lake, or into a nearby foreign lake. Transplanted individuals' immune gene expression converged on patterns typical of their destination lake, deviating from their native expression profile. Transplant individuals' source population had a much smaller effect, suggesting relatively weak genetic underpinning of population differences in immunity, as viewed through gene expression. This strong environmental regulation of immune gene expression provides a counterpoint to the large emerging literature documenting microevolution and genetic diversification of immune function. Our findings illustrate the value of studying immunity in natural environmental settings where the immune system has evolved and actively functions. PMID:26118468

  4. Unveiling Unexpected Immune Activities Induced by Your Pneumococcal Vaccine

    PubMed Central

    Hurwitz, Julia L.

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT In modern-day vaccine design, a good pneumococcal capsular polysaccharide vaccine is measured by its ability to induce opsonic antibodies. These antibodies label bacteria for phagocytosis by neutrophils and thereby overcome the capsule’s barrier function. Doyle and Pirofski have raised a serious challenge to the current paradigm by describing anti-capsular antibodies that are highly protective but nonopsonic [C.R. Doyle and L. Pirofski, mBio 7(1):e02260-15, 2016, doi:10.1128/mBio.02260-15]. In fact, some functions are not related to neutrophils or phagocytosis at all. An increased awareness of these activities is critical not only for accurate comparisons of vaccine candidates but also for improvements in vaccination outcomes in settings of neutropenia. When vaccine developers select a single gatekeeper assay (e.g., an opsonophagocytic assay for bacteria or a neutralization assay for viruses), promising vaccine candidates may be missed. Doyle and Pirofski stress that multiple functions, not just one, should be investigated to enhance discovery of antibody mechanisms and to best assess vaccine-induced correlates of immune protection. PMID:26908576

  5. A cardiac myosin-specific autoimmune response is induced by immunization with Trypanosoma cruzi proteins.

    PubMed

    Leon, Juan S; Daniels, Melvin D; Toriello, Krista M; Wang, Kegiang; Engman, David M

    2004-06-01

    Trypanosoma cruzi is the protozoan parasite that causes Chagas' heart disease, a potentially fatal cardiomyopathy prevalent in Central and South America. Infection with T. cruzi induces cardiac myosin autoimmunity in susceptible humans and mice, and this autoimmunity has been suggested to contribute to cardiac inflammation. To address how T. cruzi induces cardiac myosin autoimmunity, we investigated whether immunity to T. cruzi antigens could induce cardiac myosin-specific autoimmunity in the absence of live parasites. We immunized A/J mice with a T. cruzi Brazil-derived protein extract emulsified in complete Freund's adjuvant and found that these mice developed cardiac myosin-specific delayed-type hypersensitivity (DTH) and autoantibodies in the absence of detectable cardiac damage. The induction of autoimmunity was specific since immunization with extracts of the related protozoan parasite Leishmania amazonensis did not induce myosin autoimmunity. The immunogenetic makeup of the host was important for this response, since C57BL/6 mice did not develop cardiac myosin DTH upon immunization with T. cruzi extract. Perhaps more interesting, mice immunized with cardiac myosin developed T. cruzi-specific DTH and antibodies. This DTH was also antigen specific, since immunization with skeletal myosin and myoglobin did not induce T. cruzi-specific immunity. These results suggest that immunization with cardiac myosin or T. cruzi antigen can induce specific, bidirectionally cross-reactive immune responses in the absence of detectable cardiac damage. PMID:15155647

  6. Differences in immune responses against Leishmania induced by infection and by immunization with killed parasite antigen: implications for vaccine discovery.

    PubMed

    Mendonça, Sergio C F

    2016-01-01

    The leishmaniases are a group of diseases caused by different species of the protozoan genus Leishmania and transmitted by sand fly vectors. They are a major public health problem in almost all continents. There is no effective control of leishmaniasis and its geographical distribution is expanding in many countries. Great effort has been made by many scientists to develop a vaccine against leishmaniasis, but, so far, there is still no effective vaccine against the disease. The only way to generate protective immunity against leishmaniasis in humans is leishmanization, consisting of the inoculation of live virulent Leishmania as a means to acquire long-lasting immunity against subsequent infections. At present, all that we know about human immune responses to Leishmania induced by immunization with killed parasite antigens came from studies with first generation candidate vaccines (killed promastigote extracts). In the few occasions that the T cell-mediated immune responses to Leishmania induced by infection and immunization with killed parasite antigens were compared, important differences were found both in humans and in animals. This review discusses these differences and their relevance to the development of a vaccine against leishmaniasis, the major problems involved in this task, the recent prospects for the selection of candidate antigens and the use of attenuated Leishmania as live vaccines. PMID:27600664

  7. Immune mechanisms in acetaminophen-induced acute liver failure.

    PubMed

    Krenkel, Oliver; Mossanen, Jana C; Tacke, Frank

    2014-12-01

    An overdose of acetaminophen (N-acetyl-p-aminophenol, APAP), also termed paracetamol, can cause severe liver damage, ultimately leading to acute liver failure (ALF) with the need of liver transplantation. APAP is rapidly taken up from the intestine and metabolized in hepatocytes. A small fraction of the metabolized APAP forms cytotoxic mitochondrial protein adducts, leading to hepatocyte necrosis. The course of disease is not only critically influenced by dose of APAP and the initial hepatocyte damage, but also by the inflammatory response following acetaminophen-induced liver injury (AILI). As revealed by mouse models of AILI and corresponding translational studies in ALF patients, necrotic hepatocytes release danger-associated-molecular patterns (DAMPs), which are recognized by resident hepatic macrophages, Kupffer cell (KC), and neutrophils, leading to the activation of these cells. Activated hepatic macrophages release various proinflammatory cytokines, such as TNF-α or IL-1β, as well as chemokines (e.g., CCL2) thereby further enhancing inflammation and increasing the influx of immune cells, like bone-marrow derived monocytes and neutrophils. Monocytes are mainly recruited via their receptor CCR2 and aggravate inflammation. Infiltrating monocytes, however, can mature into monocyte-derived macrophages (MoMF), which are, in cooperation with neutrophils, also involved in the resolution of inflammation. Besides macrophages and neutrophils, distinct lymphocyte populations, especially γδ T cells, are also linked to the inflammatory response following an APAP overdose. Natural killer (NK), natural killer T (NKT) and T cells possibly further perpetuate inflammation in AILI. Understanding the complex interplay of immune cell subsets in experimental models and defining their functional involvement in disease progression is essential to identify novel therapeutic targets for human disease. PMID:25568858

  8. Gonadal Transcriptome Analysis in Sterile Double Haploid Japanese Flounder

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Guixing; Jiang, Hongbo; Wang, Yufen; Sun, Zhaohui; Jiang, Xiufeng; Yu, Qinghai; Liu, Haijin

    2015-01-01

    Sterility is a serious problem that can affect all bionts. In teleosts, double haploids (DHs) induced by mitogynogenesis are often sterile. This sterility severely restricts the further application of DHs for production of clones, genetic analysis, and breeding. However, sterile DH individuals are good source materials for investigation of the molecular mechanisms of gonad development, especially for studies into the role of genes that are indispensable for fish reproduction. Here, we used the Illumina sequencing platform to analyze the transcriptome of sterile female DH Japanese flounder in order to identify major genes that cause sterility and to provide a molecular basis for an intensive study of gonadal development in teleosts. Through sequencing, assembly, and annotation, we obtained 52,474 contigs and found that 60.7% of these shared homologies with existing sequences. A total of 1225 differentially expressed unigenes were found, including 492 upregulated and 733 downregulated genes. Gene Ontology and KEGG analyses showed that genes showing significant upregulation, such as CYP11A1, CYP11B2, CYP17, CYP21, HSD3β, bcl2l1, and PRLR, principally correlated with sterol metabolic process, steroid biosynthetic process, and the Jak-stat signaling pathway. The significantly downregulated genes were primarily associated with immune response, antigen processing and presentation, cytokine–cytokine receptor interaction, and protein digestion and absorption. Using a co-expression network analysis, we conducted a comprehensive comparison of gene expression in the gonads of fertile and sterile female DH Japanese flounder. Identification of genes showing significantly different expression will provide further insights into DH reproductive dysfunction and oocyte maturation processes in teleosts. PMID:26580217

  9. Recombinant varicella vaccines induce neutralizing antibodies and cellular immune responses to SIV and reduce viral loads in immunized rhesus macaques

    PubMed Central

    Traina-Dorge, V.; Pahar, B.; Marx, P.; Kissinger, P.; Montefiori, D.; Ou, Y.; Gray, W.L.

    2010-01-01

    The development of an effective AIDS vaccine remains one of the highest priorities in HIV research. The live, attenuated varicella-zoster virus (VZV) Oka vaccine, safe and effective for prevention of chickenpox and zoster, also has potential as a recombinant vaccine against other pathogens, including human immunodeficiency virus (HIV). The simian varicella model, utilizing simian varicella virus (SVV), offers an approach to evaluate recombinant varicella vaccine candidates. Recombinant SVV (rSVV) vaccine viruses expressing simian immunodeficiency virus (SIV) env and gag antigens were constructed. The hypothesis tested was that a live, attenuated rSVV-SIV vaccine will induce immune responses against SIV in the rhesus macaques and provide protection against SIV challenge. The results demonstrated that rSVV-SIV vaccination induced low levels of neutralizing antibodies and cellular immune responses to SIV in immunized rhesus macaques and significantly reduced viral loads following intravenous challenge with pathogenic SIVmac251-CX-1. PMID:20654666

  10. Inducible Sterilization of Zebrafish by Disruption of Primordial Germ Cell Migration

    PubMed Central

    Wong, Ten-Tsao; Collodi, Paul

    2013-01-01

    During zebrafish development, a gradient of stromal-derived factor 1a (Sdf1a) provides the directional cue that guides the migration of the primordial germ cells (PGCs) to the gonadal tissue. Here we describe a method to produce large numbers of infertile fish by inducing ubiquitous expression of Sdf1a in zebrafish embryos resulting in disruption of the normal PGC migration pattern. A transgenic line of zebrafish, Tg(hsp70:sdf1a-nanos3, EGFP), was generated that expresses Sdf1a under the control of the heat-shock protein 70 (hsp70) promoter and nanos3 3?UTR. To better visualize the PGCs, the Tg(hsp70:sdf1a-nanos3, EGFP) fish were crossed with another transgenic line, Tg(kop:DsRed-nanos3), that expresses DsRed driven by the PGC-specific kop promoter. Heat treatment of the transgenic embryos caused an induction of Sdf1a expression throughout the embryo resulting in the disruption of their normal migration. Optimal embryo survival and disruption of PGC migration was achieved when transgenic embryos at the 4- to 8-cell stage were incubated at 34.5°C for 18 hours. Under these conditions, disruption of PGC migration was observed in 100% of the embryos. Sixty-four adult fish were developed from three separate batches of heat-treated embryos and all were found to be infertile males. When each male was paired with a wild-type female, only unfertilized eggs were produced and histological examination revealed that each of the adult male fish possessed severely under-developed gonads that lacked gametes. The results demonstrate that inducible Sdf1a expression is an efficient and reliable strategy to produce infertile fish. This approach makes it convenient to generate large numbers of infertile adult fish while also providing the capability to maintain a fertile brood stock. PMID:23826390

  11. Pleomorphic forms of Borrelia burgdorferi induce distinct immune responses.

    PubMed

    Meriläinen, Leena; Brander, Heini; Herranen, Anni; Schwarzbach, Armin; Gilbert, Leona

    2016-01-01

    Borrelia burgdorferi is the causative agent of tick-borne Lyme disease. As a response to environmental stress B. burgdorferi can change its morphology to a round body form. The role of B. burgdorferi pleomorphic forms in Lyme disease pathogenesis has long been debated and unclear. Here, we demonstrated that round bodies were processed differently in differentiated macrophages, consequently inducing distinct immune responses compared to spirochetes in vitro. Colocalization analysis indicated that the F-actin participates in internalization of both forms. However, round bodies end up less in macrophage lysosomes than spirochetes suggesting that there are differences in processing of these forms in phagocytic cells. Furthermore, round bodies stimulated distinct cytokine and chemokine production in these cells. We confirmed that spirochetes and round bodies present different protein profiles and antigenicity. In a Western blot analysis Lyme disease patients had more intense responses to round bodies when compared to spirochetes. These results suggest that round bodies have a role in Lyme disease pathogenesis. PMID:27139815

  12. Radiation sterilization of ketoprofen

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Katušin-Ražem, Branka; Hamitouche, Katia; Maltar-Strmečki, Nadica; Kos, Karmen; Pucić, Irina; Britvić-Budicin, Smiljana; Ražem, Dušan

    2005-06-01

    Radiation sterilization of ketoprofen (KP) dry powder was investigated by selected physico-chemical methods. High-performance liquid chromatography, ultraviolet spectrophotometry, infrared spectrophotometry, differential scanning calorimetry, X-ray diffraction and electron spin resonance spectroscopy did not show any significant degradation at sterilization dose 25 kGy. To determine the nature, extent and direction of radiation-induced changes, KP was irradiated to extremely high doses, much higher than necessary to achieve sterility. The irradiated KP did not show any difference of XRD patterns up to 200 kGy; with DSC and IR some changes were detected only above 1000 and 2000 kGy, respectively; HPLC has shown about 5% destruction at 2000 kGy. Acetyl benzophenon (AcBph) was generated by irradiation with G(AcBph)=(1.6±0.1)×10 -8 mol J -1. Ames test has shown no mutagenicity of KP irradiated with 3000 kGy or of the oily mixure of radiolytic products isolated from it. Solid KP has proven to be very stable on irradiation, and irradiation has been found to be a suitable method for its sterilization.

  13. Th1-biased immune responses induced by DNA-based immunizations are mediated via action on professional antigen-presenting cells to up-regulate IL-12 production

    PubMed Central

    Asakura, Y; Liu, L -J; Shono, N; Hinkula, J; Kjerrström, A; Aoki, I; Okuda, K; Wahren, B; Fukushima, J

    2000-01-01

    The efficacy of DNA-based immunization in conferring protective immunity against certain microbial pathogens including human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) has been described. The potential advantage of DNA-based immunization over the traditional vaccines largely results from its capacity to efficiently induce Th1-biased immune responses against an encoded antigen. We describe how Th1-biased immune responses are induced by DNA-based immunization, using a DNA vaccine construct encoding HIV-1 gp160 cDNA and an eukaryotic expression plasmid carrying murine IFN-γ cDNA. Transfection of an eukaryotic expression plasmid carrying immunostimulatory sequences (ISS) as well as a gene of interest (DNA vaccine) into professional antigen presenting cells (APC) induced transactivation of IL-12 mRNA, which resulted in antigen-specific Th1-biased immune responses against the encoded antigen. Th1-biased immune responses induced by DNA-based immunization were substantially upregulated by a codelivery of an ectopic IFN-γ expression system, and this augmentation was mediated via action on professional antigen presenting cells to upregulate IL-12 production. Taken together, it appears likely that Th1-biased immune responses induced by DNA-based immunization are mediated via action on professional antigen-presenting cells to produce IL-12. Interestingly, the model provided strikingly resembles that previously described in infection with Listeria monocytogenes, an intracellular Gram-positive bacterium that induces strong Th1-biased immune responses. The result suggests that DNA-based immunization mimics certain aspects of natural infection with microbial organisms like attenuated vaccines, which in turn provides a rationale to the question of why DNA-based immunization so efficiently induces protective immunity against these microbial pathogens. PMID:10606974

  14. Locally administered T cells from mice immunized with lipopolysaccharide (LPS) accelerate LPS-induced bone resorption.

    PubMed

    Ozaki, Yukio; Ukai, Takashi; Yamaguchi, Masayuki; Yokoyama, Miho; Haro, Esperanza R Ayón; Yoshimoto, Mayumi; Kaneko, Takashi; Yoshinaga, Miho; Nakamura, Hirotaka; Shiraishi, Chiaki; Hara, Yoshitaka

    2009-06-01

    T cells play important roles in bone destruction and osteoclastogenesis and are found in chronic destructive bone lesions. Lipopolysaccharide (LPS) is one of several pathological factors involved in inflammatory bone destruction. We previously described the importance of T cells in the inflammatory bone resorption that occurs after repeated LPS administration. However, whether local or systemic T cells are important for inflammatory bone resorption and whether immunization of host animals influences bone resorption remain unclear. The present study examines the effects of local extant T cells from LPS-immunized mice on LPS-induced bone resorption. T cells from LPS-immunized or non-immunized mice were injected together with LPS into the gingival tissues of mice with severe combined immunodeficiency disease that lack both T and B cells. We histomorphometrically evaluated bone resorption at sites of T cell injections and examined the influence of T cells from LPS-immunized mice on osteoclastogenesis in vitro. We found that locally administered T cells from LPS-immunized but not non-immunized mice accelerated LPS-induced bone resorption in vivo. Moreover, T cells from LPS-immunized mice increased osteoclastogenesis in vitro induced by receptor activator of NF-kappa B ligand and LPS and anti-tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-alpha antibody inhibited this increase. These results demonstrated that local extant T cells accelerate inflammatory bone resorption. Furthermore, T cells from LPS-immunized mice appear to elevate LPS-induced bone resorption using TNF-alpha. PMID:19437611

  15. Inducible viral receptor, A possible concept to induce viral protection in primitive immune animals.

    PubMed

    Pasharawipas, Tirasak

    2011-01-01

    A pseudolysogen (PL) is derived from the lysogenic Vibrio harveyi (VH) which is infected with the VHS1 (Vibrio harveyi Siphoviridae-like 1) bacteriophage. The lysogenic Vibrio harveyi undergoes an unequivalent division of the extra-chromosomal VHS1 phage genome and its VH host chromosome and produces a true lysogen (TL) and pseudolysogen (PL). The PL is tolerant to super-infection of VHS1, as is of the true lysogen (TL), but the PL does not contain the VHS1 phage genome while the TL does. However, the PL can become susceptible to VHS1 phage infection if the physiological state of the PL is changed. It is postulated that this is due to a phage receptor molecule which can be inducible to an on-and-off regulation influence by an alternating condition of the bacterial host cell. This characteristic of the PL leads to speculate that this phenomenon can also occur in high organisms with low immunity such as shrimp. This article proposes a hypothesis that the viral receptor molecule on the target cell can play a crucial role in which the invertebrate aquaculture animals can become tolerant to viral infection. A possible mechanism may be that the target cell disrupts the viral receptor molecule to prevent super infection. This concept can explain a mechanism for the prevention of viral infection in invertebrate animals which do not have acquired immunity in response to pathogens. It can guide us to develop a mechanism of immunity to viral infection in low-evolved-immune animals. Also, it can be an additional mechanism that exists in high immune organism, as in human for the prevention of viral infection. PMID:21711515

  16. Human immune system mice immunized with Plasmodium falciparum circumsporozoite protein induce protective human humoral immunity against malaria.

    PubMed

    Huang, Jing; Li, Xiangming; Coelho-dos-Reis, Jordana G A; Zhang, Min; Mitchell, Robert; Nogueira, Raquel Tayar; Tsao, Tiffany; Noe, Amy R; Ayala, Ramses; Sahi, Vincent; Gutierrez, Gabriel M; Nussenzweig, Victor; Wilson, James M; Nardin, Elizabeth H; Nussenzweig, Ruth S; Tsuji, Moriya

    2015-12-01

    In this study, we developed human immune system (HIS) mice that possess functional human CD4+ T cells and B cells, named HIS-CD4/B mice. HIS-CD4/B mice were generated by first introducing HLA class II genes, including DR1 and DR4, along with genes encoding various human cytokines and human B cell activation factor (BAFF) to NSG mice by adeno-associated virus serotype 9 (AAV9) vectors, followed by engrafting human hematopoietic stem cells (HSCs). HIS-CD4/B mice, in which the reconstitution of human CD4+ T and B cells resembles to that of humans, produced a significant level of human IgG against Plasmodium falciparum circumsporozoite (PfCS) protein upon immunization. CD4+ T cells in HIS-CD4/B mice, which possess central and effector memory phenotypes like those in humans, are functional, since PfCS protein-specific human CD4+ T cells secreting IFN-γ and IL-2 were detected in immunized HIS-CD4/B mice. Lastly, PfCS protein-immunized HIS-CD4/B mice were protected from in vivo challenge with transgenic P. berghei sporozoites expressing the PfCS protein. The immune sera collected from protected HIS-CD4/B mice reacted against transgenic P. berghei sporozoites expressing the PfCS protein and also inhibited the parasite invasion into hepatocytes in vitro. Taken together, these studies show that our HIS-CD4/B mice could mount protective human anti-malaria immunity, consisting of human IgG and human CD4+ T cell responses both specific for a human malaria antigen. PMID:26410104

  17. Hysteroscopic Sterilization

    MedlinePlus

    ... sleep-like state to prevent pain during surgery. Human Immunodeficiency Virus (HIV): A virus that attacks certain cells of the body’s immune system and causes acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS). Hysterosalpingography (HSG): ...

  18. Evaluation of the Contribution of Multiple DAMPs and DAMP Receptors in Cell Death-Induced Sterile Inflammatory Responses

    PubMed Central

    Patel, Zubin; Rock, Kenneth L.

    2014-01-01

    When cells die by necrosis in vivo they stimulate an inflammatory response. It is thought that this response is triggered when the injured cells expose proinflammatory molecules, collectively referred to as damage associated molecular patterns (DAMPs), which are recognized by cells or soluble molecules of the innate or adaptive immune system. Several putative DAMPs and/or their receptors have been identified, but whether and how much they participate in responses in vivo is incompletely understood, and they have not previously been compared side-by-side in the same models. This study focuses on evaluating the contribution of multiple mechanisms that have been proposed to or potentially could participate in cell death-induced inflammation: The third component of complement (C3), ATP (and its receptor P2X7), antibodies, the C-type lectin receptor Mincle (Clec4e), and protease-activated receptor 2 (PAR2). We investigate the role of these factors in cell death-induced inflammation to dead cells in the peritoneum and acetaminophen-induced liver damage. We find that mice deficient in antibody, C3 or PAR2 have impaired inflammatory responses to dying cells. In contrast there was no reduction in inflammation to cell death in the peritoneum or liver of mice that genetically lack Mincle, the P2X7 receptor or that were treated with apyrase to deplete ATP. These results indicate that antibody, complement and PAR2 contribute to cell death-induced inflammation but that Mincle and ATP- P2X7 receptor are not required for this response in at least 2 different in vivo models. PMID:25127469

  19. [Sterilization of women].

    PubMed

    Tandberg, A

    1988-01-30

    The records of 209 women sterilized in the Lillehammer (Norway) county hospital during the period 1980-82 were examined for age, residence, parity, method of operation, induced abortions and frequency of complications. The patients were sent a questionnaire 6 months after the operation and were asked about how long they had felt unable to work after the operation, whether they regretted the operation, and whether they were satisfied with the cosmetic results. 96% of the patients returned the questionnaires. On the average the women had had 2.4 children at the time of sterilization. Those who had received induced abortions at the same time had 2.5 children. Women resident in the city had 2.1 children, those in the country had 2.4 children. None had 6 children. 20% had received abortion simultaneously. Aside from 1 patient who had transitory paresis in the left arm due to faulty padding in a shoulder support, there were no complications noted in the material. 2 patients regretted the operation. Neither of them had had simultaneous abortion. 1 of these had 1 child. Advised to be sterilized because of severe preeclampsia in her 1st pregnancy, she desired more children. The other, who had 4 children, gave decreased libido as the cause for her regret. Of the 177 who had had laparoscopy, only 6 patients (3.5%) said that they were dissatisfied with the appearance of the scar. PMID:3353913

  20. H. hepaticus-induced liver tumor promotion is associated with increased serum bile acid and a persistent microbial-induced immune response

    PubMed Central

    García, Alexis; Zeng, Yu; Muthupalani, Sureshkumar; Ge, Zhongming; Potter, Amanda; Mobley, Melissa W.; Boussahmain, Chakib; Feng, Yan; Wishnok, John S.; Fox, James G.

    2011-01-01

    Chronic microbial infection influence cancer progression but the mechanisms that link them remain unclear. Constitutive androstane receptor (CAR) is a nuclear receptor that regulates enzymes involved in endobiotic and xenobiotic metabolism. CAR activation is a mechanism of xenobiotic tumor promotion, however, the effects of chronic microbial infection on tumor promotion have not been studied in the context of CAR function. Here we report that CAR limits the effects of chronic infection-associated progression of liver cancer. CAR knockout (KO) and wild-type (WT) male mice were treated or not with the tumor initiator diethylnitrosamine (DEN) at 5 weeks of age and then orally inoculated with Helicobacter hepaticus (Hh) or sterile media at 8 weeks of age. At 50 weeks postinoculation mice were euthanized for histopathological, microbiological, molecular, and metabolomic analyses. Hh infection induced comparable hepatitis in WT and KO mice with or without DEN that correlated with significant upregulation of Tnfα and toll receptor Tlr2. Notably, DEN-treated Hh-infected KO mice exhibited increased numbers of liver lobes with dysplasia and neoplasia, as well as increased multiplicity of neoplasia, relative to similarly treated WT mice. Enhanced tumor promotion was associated with decreased hepatic expression of P450 enzymes Cyp2b10 and Cyp3a11, increased expression of Camp, and increased serum concentrations of chenodeoxycholic acid. Together, our findings suggest that liver tumor promotion is enhanced by an impaired metabolic detoxification of endobiotics and a persistent microbial-induced immune response. PMID:21335546

  1. Immunizations.

    PubMed

    Sanford, Christopher A; Jong, Elaine C

    2016-03-01

    Vaccinations are a cornerstone of the pretravel consultation. The pretravel provider should assess a traveler's past medical history, planned itinerary, activities, mode of travel, and duration of stay and make appropriate vaccine recommendations. Given that domestic vaccine-preventable illnesses are more common in international travelers than are exotic or low-income nation-associated vaccine-preventable illnesses, clinicians should first ensure that travelers are current regarding routine immunizations. Additional immunizations may be indicated in some travelers. Familiarity with geographic distribution and seasonality of infectious diseases is essential. Clinicians should be cognizant of which vaccines are live, as there exist contraindications for live vaccines. PMID:26900111

  2. Psychological stress may induce increased humoral and decreased cellular immunity.

    PubMed

    Paik, I H; Toh, K Y; Lee, C; Kim, J J; Lee, S J

    2000-01-01

    Stress alters immune function and affects different immune cell populations in different ways. The authors examined whether psychological stress has different effects on the production of macrophage, T-helper 1(Th1) cell, and T-helper 2(Th2) cell-derived cytokines. Forty-two college students were recruited and their blood was sampled on the day they were to take a stressful academic examination and again 4 weeks after the examination. The stress from the academic examination significantly increased IL-1 beta, IL-6, and IL-10 and decreased IFN-gamma production. These findings suggest that examination stress may increase Th2 cell-mediated humoral immunity and macrophage activities and may decrease Th1 cell-mediated cellular immunity. PMID:11209594

  3. Sterilization-Induced Changes in Surface Topography of Biodegradable POSS-PCLU and the Cellular Response of Human Dermal Fibroblasts.

    PubMed

    Yildirimer, Lara; Seifalian, Alexander M

    2015-06-01

    The field of tissue engineering is rapidly evolving, generating numerous biodegradable materials suited as regeneration platforms. Material sterility is of fundamental importance for clinical translation; however, a few studies have systematically researched the effects of different sterilization methods on biodegradable materials. Here, we exposed a novel bioabsorbable nanocomposite based on a poly(ɛ-caprolactone urea) urethane backbone integrating polyhedral oligomeric silsesquioxane nanoparticles (POSS-PCLU) to autoclave, microwave, antibiotics, and 70% ethanol sterilization and systematically correlated differences in material characteristics to the attachment, viability, proliferative capacity, and shape of human dermal fibroblasts (HDFa). Nanotopographical profiling of autoclaved or microwaved surfaces revealed relatively deep nano-grooves, increasing total surface area, roughness, and hydrophobicity, which resulted in significantly fewer adherent cells. Antibiotics or 70% ethanol-treated surfaces displayed shallower nano-grooves, a more hydrophilic character, and significantly greater cellular adhesion (p<0.05). In fact, relative cell proliferation on ethanol-treated films surpassed that of cells grown on every other surface by a factor of 9 over 7 days. Filamentous actin staining demonstrated spindle-like morphologies characteristic of HDFa when grown on ethanol-treated films as opposed to cells grown on other films that were significantly more spread out (p<0.05). We argue that treatment with 70% ethanol serves not only as a laboratory-based sterilizing agent but also as a postproduction processing tool to enhance cytocompatibility of tissue engineering scaffolds. PMID:25398409

  4. Acute psychological stress induces short-term variable immune response.

    PubMed

    Breen, Michael S; Beliakova-Bethell, Nadejda; Mujica-Parodi, Lilianne R; Carlson, Joshua M; Ensign, Wayne Y; Woelk, Christopher H; Rana, Brinda K

    2016-03-01

    In spite of advances in understanding the cross-talk between the peripheral immune system and the brain, the molecular mechanisms underlying the rapid adaptation of the immune system to an acute psychological stressor remain largely unknown. Conventional approaches to classify molecular factors mediating these responses have targeted relatively few biological measurements or explored cross-sectional study designs, and therefore have restricted characterization of stress-immune interactions. This exploratory study analyzed transcriptional profiles and flow cytometric data of peripheral blood leukocytes with physiological (endocrine, autonomic) measurements collected throughout the sequence of events leading up to, during, and after short-term exposure to physical danger in humans. Immediate immunomodulation to acute psychological stress was defined as a short-term selective up-regulation of natural killer (NK) cell-associated cytotoxic and IL-12 mediated signaling genes that correlated with increased cortisol, catecholamines and NK cells into the periphery. In parallel, we observed down-regulation of innate immune toll-like receptor genes and genes of the MyD88-dependent signaling pathway. Correcting gene expression for an influx of NK cells revealed a molecular signature specific to the adrenal cortex. Subsequently, focusing analyses on discrete groups of coordinately expressed genes (modules) throughout the time-series revealed immune stress responses in modules associated to immune/defense response, response to wounding, cytokine production, TCR signaling and NK cell cytotoxicity which differed between males and females. These results offer a spring-board for future research towards improved treatment of stress-related disease including the impact of stress on cardiovascular and autoimmune disorders, and identifies an immune mechanism by which vulnerabilities to these diseases may be gender-specific. PMID:26476140

  5. Costs of an induced immune response on sexual display and longevity in field crickets.

    PubMed

    Jacot, Alain; Scheuber, Hannes; Brinkhof, Martin W G

    2004-10-01

    Immune system activation may benefit hosts by generating resistance to parasites. However, natural resources are usually limited, causing a trade-off between the investment in immunity and that in other life-history or sexually selected traits. Despite its importance for the evolution of host defense, state-dependent fitness costs of immunity received little attention under natural conditions. In a field experiment we manipulated the nutritional condition of male field crickets Gryllus campestris and subsequently investigated the effect of an induced immune response through inoculation of bacterial lipopolysaccharides. Immune system activation caused a condition-dependent reduction in body condition, which was proportional to the condition-gain during the preceding food-supplementation period. Independent of nutritional condition, the immune insult induced an enduring reduction in daily calling rate, whereas control-injected males fully regained their baseline level of sexual signaling following a temporary decline. Since daily calling rate affects female mate choice under natural conditions, this suggests a decline in male mating success as a cost of induced immunity. Food supplementation enhanced male life span, whereas the immune insult reduced longevity, independent of nutritional status. Thus, immune system activation ultimately curtails male fitness due to a combined decline in sexual display and life span. Our field study thus indicates a key role for fitness costs of induced immunity in the evolution of host defense. In particular, costs expressed in sexually selected traits might warrant the honest advertisement of male health status, thus representing an important mechanism in parasite-mediated sexual selection. PMID:15562690

  6. Lentiviral vector encoding ubiquitinated hepatitis B core antigen induces potent cellular immune responses and therapeutic immunity in HBV transgenic mice.

    PubMed

    Dai, Shenglan; Zhuo, Meng; Song, Linlin; Chen, Xiaohua; Yu, Yongsheng; Zang, Guoqing; Tang, Zhenghao

    2016-07-01

    Predominant T helper cell type 1 (Th1) immune responses accompanied by boosted HBV-specific cytotoxic T lymphocyte (CTL) activity are essential for the clearance of hepatitis B virus (HBV) in chronic hepatitis B (CHB) patients. Ubiquitin (Ub) serves as a signal for the target protein to be recognized and degraded through the ubiquitin-proteasome system (UPS). Ubiquitinated hepatitis B core antigen (Ub-HBcAg) has been proved to be efficiently degraded into the peptides, which can be presented by major histocompatibility complex (MHC) class I resulting in stimulating cell-mediated responses. In the present study, lentiviral vectors encoding Ub-HBcAg (LV-Ub-HBcAg) were designed and constructed as a therapeutic vaccine for immunotherapy. HBcAg-specific cellular immune responses and anti-viral effects induced by LV-Ub-HBcAg were evaluated in HBV transgenic mice. We demonstrated that immunization with LV-Ub-HBcAg promoted the secretion of cytokines interleukin-2 (IL-2), interferon-γ (IFN-γ) and tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α), generated remarkably high percentages of IFN-γ-secreting CD8(+) T cells and CD4(+) T cells, and enhanced HBcAg-specific CTL activity in HBV transgenic mice. More importantly, vaccination with LV-Ub-HBcAg could efficiently decreased the levels of serum hepatitis B surface antigen (HBsAg), HBV DNA and the expression of HBsAg and HBcAg in liver tissues of HBV transgenic mice. In addition, LV-Ub-HBcAg could upregulate the expression of T cell-specific T-box transcription factor (T-bet) and downregulate the expression of GATA-binding protein 3 (GATA-3) in spleen T lymphocytes. The therapeutic vaccine LV-Ub-HBcAg could break immune tolerance, and induce potent HBcAg specific cellular immune responses and therapeutic effects in HBV transgenic mice. PMID:26874581

  7. Immunity and Tolerance Induced by Intestinal Mucosal Dendritic Cells

    PubMed Central

    Aliberti, Julio

    2016-01-01

    Dendritic cells present in the digestive tract are constantly exposed to environmental antigens, commensal flora, and invading pathogens. Under steady-state conditions, these cells have high tolerogenic potential, triggering differentiation of regulatory T cells to protect the host from unwanted proinflammatory immune responses to innocuous antigens or commensals. On the other hand, these cells must discriminate between commensal flora and invading pathogens and mount powerful immune response against pathogens. A potential result of unbalanced tolerogenic versus proinflammatory responses mediated by dendritic cells is associated with chronic inflammatory conditions, such as Crohn's disease, ulcerative colitis, food allergies, and celiac disease. Herein, we review the dendritic cell population involved in mediating tolerance and immunity in mucosal surfaces, the progress in unveiling their development in vivo, and factors that can influence their functions. PMID:27034589

  8. Immunity and Tolerance Induced by Intestinal Mucosal Dendritic Cells.

    PubMed

    Aliberti, Julio

    2016-01-01

    Dendritic cells present in the digestive tract are constantly exposed to environmental antigens, commensal flora, and invading pathogens. Under steady-state conditions, these cells have high tolerogenic potential, triggering differentiation of regulatory T cells to protect the host from unwanted proinflammatory immune responses to innocuous antigens or commensals. On the other hand, these cells must discriminate between commensal flora and invading pathogens and mount powerful immune response against pathogens. A potential result of unbalanced tolerogenic versus proinflammatory responses mediated by dendritic cells is associated with chronic inflammatory conditions, such as Crohn's disease, ulcerative colitis, food allergies, and celiac disease. Herein, we review the dendritic cell population involved in mediating tolerance and immunity in mucosal surfaces, the progress in unveiling their development in vivo, and factors that can influence their functions. PMID:27034589

  9. Opioid-induced central immune signaling: implications for opioid analgesia

    PubMed Central

    Grace, Peter M.; Maier, Steven F.; Watkins, Linda R.

    2015-01-01

    Despite being the mainstay of pain management, opioids are limited in their clinical utility by adverse effects, such as tolerance and paradoxical hyperalgesia. Research of the past 15 years has extended beyond neurons, to implicate central nervous system immune signaling in these adverse effects. This article will provide an overview of these central immune mechanisms in opioid tolerance and paradoxical hyperalgesia, including those mediated by toll like receptor 4, purinergic, ceramide and chemokine signaling. Challenges for the future, as well as new lines of investigation will be highlighted. PMID:25833219

  10. Mechanistic Differences Leading to Infectious and Sterile Inflammation.

    PubMed

    Behnia, Faranak; Sheller, Samantha; Menon, Ramkumar

    2016-05-01

    Inflammation is a physiologic component of pregnancy and parturition. Overwhelming intrauterine inflammatory load promotes quiescent feto-maternal tissues into a contractile phenotype. Like inflammation, oxidative stress is an inevitable component of both pregnancy and parturition. Pathologic activation of host innate immune response to adverse pregnancy conditions can lead to premature activation of inflammatory and oxidative stress. Inflammation and oxidative stress markers seen with both sterile and infectious inflammation are often similar; therefore, it is difficult to understand causality of conditions like spontaneous preterm birth. This review demonstrates potential mechanistic pathways of activation of sterile and infectious inflammation. We demonstrate the activation of two unique pathways of inflammation by factors that are well-documented proxies for oxidative stress (cigarette smoke extract) and infection (lipopolysaccharide). Sterile inflammation seen after exposure to an oxidative stress inducer is due to cellular elemental damage resulting in p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) induced cellular senescence. Infectious inflammation is through activation of transcription factor NF-κB and independent of oxidative stress-associated damages and p38 MAPK-induced senescence. Understanding the differences in the inflammatory pathway activation by various risk factors is important to design better screening, diagnostic and intervention strategies to reduce the risks of adverse pregnancy outcomes. PMID:26840942

  11. Mycobacterial infection induces a specific human innate immune response

    PubMed Central

    Blischak, John D.; Tailleux, Ludovic; Mitrano, Amy; Barreiro, Luis B.; Gilad, Yoav

    2015-01-01

    The innate immune system provides the first response to infection and is now recognized to be partially pathogen-specific. Mycobacterium tuberculosis (MTB) is able to subvert the innate immune response and survive inside macrophages. Curiously, only 5–10% of otherwise healthy individuals infected with MTB develop active tuberculosis (TB). We do not yet understand the genetic basis underlying this individual-specific susceptibility. Moreover, we still do not know which properties of the innate immune response are specific to MTB infection. To identify immune responses that are specific to MTB, we infected macrophages with eight different bacteria, including different MTB strains and related mycobacteria, and studied their transcriptional response. We identified a novel subset of genes whose regulation was affected specifically by infection with mycobacteria. This subset includes genes involved in phagosome maturation, superoxide production, response to vitamin D, macrophage chemotaxis, and sialic acid synthesis. We suggest that genetic variants that affect the function or regulation of these genes should be considered candidate loci for explaining TB susceptibility. PMID:26586179

  12. A mechanism for trauma induced muscle wasting and immune dysfunction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Madihally, S.; Toner, M.; Yarmush, M.; Mitchell, R.

    A diverse physiological conditions lead to a hypercatabolic state marked by the loss of proteins, primarily derived from skeletal muscle. The sustained loss of proteins results in loss of muscle mass and strength, poor healing, and long-term hospitalization. These problems are further compounded by the deterioration of immunity to infection which is a leading cause of morbidity and mortality of traumatic patients. In an attempt to understand the signal propagation mechanism(s), we tested the role of Interferon-? (IFN-? ) in an animal burn injury model; IFN-? is best conceptualized as a macrophage activating protein and known to modulate a variety of intracellular processes potentially relevant to muscle wasting and immune dysfunction. Mice congenitally -deficient in IFN-? , and IFN-? -Receptor, and wild type (WT) animals treated with IFN-? neutralizing antibody received either a 20% total body surface area burn or a control sham treatment. At days 1, 2, and 7 following treatment, skeletal muscle, peripheral blood, and spleen were harvested from both groups. Overall body weight, protein turnovers, changes in the lymphocyte subpopulations and alterations in the major histocompatibility complex I expression (MHC I) and proliferation capacity of lymphocytes was measured using mixed lymphocyte reaction (MLR). These results indicate that we can prevent both muscle wasting and immune dysfunction. Based on these observations and our previous other animal model results (using insulin therapy), a novel mechanism of interactions leading to muscle wasting and immune dysfunction will be discussed. Further, implications of these findings on future research and clinical therapies will be discussed in detail.

  13. Epitope spreading induced by immunization with synthetic SSB peptides

    PubMed Central

    DING, MIN; ZHANG, JIANZHONG

    2016-01-01

    Sjogren's syndrome type B (SSB)/La antibody is an autoantibody generally observed in connective tissue diseases whereas double-stranded deoxyribonucleic acid (dsDNA) antibodies are the most characteristic autoantibodies found in systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) patients. The relationship of these autoantibodies remains unclear. The aim of the study was to determine the profile of antibody production in rabbits immunized with synthetic SSB peptides alone or with dsDNA. For this purpose, 214–225aa peptide of SSB antigen was synthesized based on the organic chemistry solid-phase peptide synthesis. Rabbits were immunized with the following antigens: i) synthetic SSB peptides linked with keyhole limpet hemocyanin (KLH); ii) dsDNA; iii) SSB plus dsDNA; iv) KLH; and v) phosphate-buffered saline. SSB peptide antibody was measured using the enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay while extractable nuclear antigens (ENA) antibody and dsDNA antibody were measured by immunoblotting and immunofluorescence, respectively. The results showed that a specific anti-SSB peptide antibody was produced following immunization with SSB epitope alone or with dsDNA. The SSB peptide antibody titer in the coimmunization group was higher than that of the SSB alone group. In addition, antibodies against ribonucleoprotein (RNP), Smith and/or dsDNA were detected in rabbits of the coimmunization group. The presence of anti-dsDNA antibodies in the rabbits immunized with SSB peptide suggested the induction of epitope spreading. In conclusions, SSB antibodies were produced in rabbits immunized with SSB peptide or SSB+dsDNA, whereas SSB antibody titers were higher in the coimmunization group. Furthermore, coimmunization was associated with epitope spreading. PMID:27347030

  14. Mast cells mediate the immune suppression induced by dermal exposure to JP-8 jet fuel.

    PubMed

    Limón-Flores, Alberto Y; Chacón-Salinas, Rommel; Ramos, Gerardo; Ullrich, Stephen E

    2009-11-01

    Applying jet propulsion-8 (JP-8) jet fuel to the skin of mice induces immune suppression. Applying JP-8 to the skin of mice suppresses T-cell-mediated immune reactions including, contact hypersensitivity (CHS) delayed-type hypersensitivity and T-cell proliferation. Because dermal mast cells play an important immune regulatory role in vivo, we tested the hypothesis that mast cells mediate jet fuel-induced immune suppression. When we applied JP-8 to the skin of mast cell deficient mice CHS was not suppressed. Reconstituting mast cell deficient mice with wild-type bone marrow derived mast cells (mast cell "knock-in mice") restored JP-8-induced immune suppression. When, however, mast cells from prostaglandin E(2) (PGE(2))-deficient mice were used, the ability of JP-8 to suppress CHS was not restored, indicating that mast cell-derived PGE(2) was activating immune suppression. Examining the density of mast cells in the skin and lymph nodes of JP-8-treated mice indicated that jet fuel treatment caused an initial increase in mast cell density in the skin, followed by increased numbers of mast cells in the subcutaneous space and then in draining lymph nodes. Applying JP-8 to the skin increased mast cell expression of CXCR4, and increased the expression of CXCL12 by draining lymph node cells. Because CXCL12 is a chemoattractant for CXCR4+ mast cells, we treated JP-8-treated mice with AMD3100, a CXCR4 antagonist. AMD3100 blocked the mobilization of mast cells to the draining lymph node and inhibited JP-8-induced immune suppression. Our findings demonstrate the importance of mast cells in mediating jet fuel-induced immune suppression. PMID:19726579

  15. Nanovectorized radiotherapy: a new strategy to induce anti-tumor immunity

    PubMed Central

    Vanpouille-Box, Claire; Hindré, François

    2012-01-01

    Recent experimental findings show that activation of the host immune system is required for the success of chemo- and radiotherapy. However, clinically apparent tumors have already developed multiple mechanisms to escape anti-tumor immunity. The fact that tumors are able to induce a state of tolerance and immunosuppression is a major obstacle in immunotherapy. Hence, there is an overwhelming need to develop new strategies that overcome this state of immune tolerance and induce an anti-tumor immune response both at primary and metastatic sites. Nanovectorized radiotherapy that combines ionizing radiation and nanodevices, is one strategy that could boost the quality and magnitude of an immune response in a predictable and designable fashion. The potential benefits of this emerging treatment may be based on the unique combination of immunostimulatory properties of nanoparticles with the ability of ionizing radiation to induce immunogenic tumor cell death. In this review, we will discuss available data and propose that the nanovectorized radiotherapy could be a powerful new strategy to induce anti-tumor immunity required for positive patient outcome. PMID:23087900

  16. Concerted Activity of IgG1 Antibodies and IL-4/IL-25-Dependent Effector Cells Trap Helminth Larvae in the Tissues following Vaccination with Defined Secreted Antigens, Providing Sterile Immunity to Challenge Infection

    PubMed Central

    Hewitson, James P.; Filbey, Kara J.; Esser-von Bieren, Julia; Camberis, Mali; Schwartz, Christian; Murray, Janice; Reynolds, Lisa A.; Blair, Natalie; Robertson, Elaine; Harcus, Yvonne; Boon, Louis; Huang, Stanley Ching-Cheng; Yang, Lihua; Tu, Yizheng; Miller, Mark J.; Voehringer, David; Le Gros, Graham; Harris, Nicola; Maizels, Rick M.

    2015-01-01

    Over 25% of the world's population are infected with helminth parasites, the majority of which colonise the gastrointestinal tract. However, no vaccine is yet available for human use, and mechanisms of protective immunity remain unclear. In the mouse model of Heligmosomoides polygyrus infection, vaccination with excretory-secretory (HES) antigens from adult parasites elicits sterilising immunity. Notably, three purified HES antigens (VAL-1, -2 and -3) are sufficient for effective vaccination. Protection is fully dependent upon specific IgG1 antibodies, but passive transfer confers only partial immunity to infection, indicating that cellular components are also required. Moreover, immune mice show greater cellular infiltration associated with trapping of larvae in the gut wall prior to their maturation. Intra-vital imaging of infected intestinal tissue revealed a four-fold increase in extravasation by LysM+GFP+ myeloid cells in vaccinated mice, and the massing of these cells around immature larvae. Mice deficient in FcRγ chain or C3 complement component remain fully immune, suggesting that in the presence of antibodies that directly neutralise parasite molecules, the myeloid compartment may attack larvae more quickly and effectively. Immunity to challenge infection was compromised in IL-4Rα- and IL-25-deficient mice, despite levels of specific antibody comparable to immune wild-type controls, while deficiencies in basophils, eosinophils or mast cells or CCR2-dependent inflammatory monocytes did not diminish immunity. Finally, we identify a suite of previously uncharacterised heat-labile vaccine antigens with homologs in human and veterinary parasites that together promote full immunity. Taken together, these data indicate that vaccine-induced immunity to intestinal helminths involves IgG1 antibodies directed against secreted proteins acting in concert with IL-25-dependent Type 2 myeloid effector populations. PMID:25816012

  17. Retnla (Relma/Fizz1) suppresses helminth-induced Th2-Type immunity

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Retnla (Resistin-like molecule alpha/FIZZ1) is induced during Th2 cytokine immune responses. Using Retnla deficient (-/-) mice and three helminth models, we show that Retnla functions as a negative regulator of Th2 responses. Pulmonary granuloma formation induced by the eggs of the helminth parasite...

  18. Kinetics of immunosuppression of sporozoite-induced immunity by Mycobacterium bovis BCG.

    PubMed Central

    Smrkovski, L L

    1982-01-01

    The data reported in this study demonstrate that the vaccination of NIH/Nmri mice with viable Mycobacterium bovis BCG organisms induces a state of immunosuppression that renders the recipient animals incapable of a protective immune response to the malaria sporozoite vaccine. The expression of this altered protective immune response is dependent upon the dosage of the two live vaccines, as well as upon the sequence of their administration. Data presented here show that the skin test responses (Arthus and delayed type) of BCG-vaccinated mice do not correlate with the suppression of sporozoite immunity. Evidence is also presented to support the hypothesis that the abrogated immune response to sporozoite vaccination induced by BCG is a result of a loss of immunological memory. PMID:6215354

  19. Distinct Pathways of Humoral and Cellular Immunity Induced with the Mucosal Administration of a Nanoemulsion Adjuvant

    PubMed Central

    Makidon, Paul E.; Janczak, Katarzyna W.; Blanco, Luz P.; Swanson, Benjamin; Smith, Douglas M.; Pham, Tiffany; Szabo, Zsuzsanna; Kukowska-Latallo, Jolanta F.; Baker, James R.

    2014-01-01

    Nasal administration of an oil-in-water nanoemulsion (NE) adjuvant W805EC produces potent systemic and mucosal, Th-1– and Th-17–balanced cellular responses. However, its molecular mechanism of action has not been fully characterized and is of particular interest because NE does not contain specific ligands for innate immune receptors. In these studies, we demonstrate that W805EC NE adjuvant activates innate immunity, induces specific gene transcription, and modulates NF-κB activity via TLR2 and TLR4 by a mechanism that appears to be distinct from typical TLR agonists. Nasal immunization with NE-based vaccine showed that the TLR2, TLR4, and MyD88 pathways and IL-12 and IL-12Rβ1 expression are not required for an Ab response, but they are essential for the induction of balanced Th-1 polarization and Th-17 cellular immunity. NE adjuvant induces MHC class II, CD80, and CD86 costimulatory molecule expression and dendritic cell maturation. Further, upon immunization with NE, adjuvant mice deficient in the CD86 receptor had normal Ab responses but significantly reduced Th-1 cellular responses, whereas animals deficient in both CD80 and CD86 or lacking CD40 failed to produce either humoral or cellular immunity. Overall, our data show that intranasal administration of Ag with NE induces TLR2 and TLR4 activation along with a MyD88-independent Ab response and a MyD88-dependent Th-1 and Th-17 cell–mediated immune response. These findings suggest that the unique properties of NE adjuvant may offer novel opportunities for understanding previously unrecognized mechanisms of immune activation important for generating effective mucosal and systemic immune responses. PMID:24532579

  20. Mumps virus-induced innate immune responses in mouse Sertoli and Leydig cells

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Han; Shi, Lili; Wang, Qing; Cheng, Lijing; Zhao, Xiang; Chen, Qiaoyuan; Jiang, Qian; Feng, Min; Li, Qihan; Han, Daishu

    2016-01-01

    Mumps virus (MuV) infection frequently causes orchitis and impairs male fertility. However, the mechanisms underlying the innate immune responses to MuV infection in the testis have yet to be investigated. This study showed that MuV induced innate immune responses in mouse Sertoli and Leydig cells through TLR2 and retinoic acid-inducible gene I (RIG-I) signaling, which result in the production of proinflammatory cytokines and chemokines, including TNF-α, IL-6, MCP-1, CXCL10, and type 1 interferons (IFN-α and IFN-β). By contrast, MuV did not induce the cytokine production in male germ cells. In response to MuV infection, Sertoli cells produced higher levels of proinflammatory cytokines and chemokines but lower levels of type 1 IFNs than Leydig cells did. The MuV-induced cytokine production by Sertoli and Leydig cells was significantly reduced by the knockout of TLR2 or the knockdown of RIG-I signaling. The local injection of MuV into the testis triggered the testicular innate immune responses in vivo. Moreover, MuV infection suppressed testosterone synthesis by Leydig cells. This is the first study examining the innate immune responses to MuV infection in testicular cells. The results provide novel insights into the mechanisms underlying the MuV-induced innate immune responses in the testis. PMID:26776505

  1. An Alphavirus Vector-Based Tetravalent Dengue Vaccine Induces a Rapid and Protective Immune Response in Macaques That Differs Qualitatively from Immunity Induced by Live Virus Infection

    PubMed Central

    Sariol, Carlos A.; Mattocks, Melissa D.; Wahala M. P. B., Wahala; Yingsiwaphat, Vorraphun; Collier, Martha L.; Whitley, Jill; Mikkelsen, Rochelle; Rodriguez, Idia V.; Martinez, Melween I.; de Silva, Aravinda; Johnston, Robert E.

    2013-01-01

    Despite many years of research, a dengue vaccine is not available, and the more advanced live attenuated vaccine candidate in clinical trials requires multiple immunizations with long interdose periods and provides low protective efficacy. Here, we report important contributions to the development of a second-generation dengue vaccine. First, we demonstrate that a nonpropagating vaccine vector based on Venezuelan equine encephalitis virus replicon particles (VRP) expressing two configurations of dengue virus E antigen (subviral particles [prME] and soluble E dimers [E85]) successfully immunized and protected macaques against dengue virus, while antivector antibodies did not interfere with a booster immunization. Second, compared to prME-VRP, E85-VRP induced neutralizing antibodies faster, to higher titers, and with improved protective efficacy. Third, this study is the first to map antigenic domains and specificities targeted by vaccination versus natural infection, revealing that, unlike prME-VRP and live virus, E85-VRP induced only serotype-specific antibodies, which predominantly targeted EDIII, suggesting a protective mechanism different from that induced by live virus and possibly live attenuated vaccines. Fourth, a tetravalent E85-VRP dengue vaccine induced a simultaneous and protective response to all 4 serotypes after 2 doses given 6 weeks apart. Balanced responses and protection in macaques provided further support for exploring the immunogenicity and safety of this vaccine candidate in humans. PMID:23302884

  2. Improved immune response to recombinant influenza nucleoprotein formulated with ISCOMATRIX.

    PubMed

    Cargnelutti, Diego E; Sanchez, Maria V; Alvarez, Paula; Boado, Lorena; Glikmann, Graciela; Mattion, Nora; Scodeller, Eduardo A

    2012-03-01

    Current influenza vaccines elicit antibodies effective against homologous strains, but new strategies are urgently needed for protection against emerging epidemic or pandemic strains. Although influenza vaccine candidates based on the viral nucleoprotein (NP) or matrix protein do not elicit sterilizing immunity, they have the advantage of inducing immunity that may cover a larger number of viral strains. In this study, recombinant NP produced in Escherichia coli was purified and formulated in combination with the adjuvant ISCOMATRIX. This formulation increased a NP-specific immunity in mice, with a Th1 profile, and may constitute a promising low-cost influenza vaccine candidate, with ability to stimulate humoral and cellular immune responses.. PMID:22450799

  3. Variations in the structure and transcription of the mitochondrial atp and cox genes in wild Solanum species that induce male sterility in eggplant (S. melongena).

    PubMed

    Yoshimi, M; Kitamura, Y; Isshiki, S; Saito, T; Yasumoto, K; Terachi, T; Yamagishi, H

    2013-07-01

    In order to determine the molecular basis of cytoplasmic male sterility (CMS) in alloplasmic lines of eggplant, the genomic structures and transcription patterns of mitochondrial ATP synthase subunit (atp) and cytochrome oxidase subunit (cox) genes were studied for wild and cultivated eggplants. Alloplasmic eggplant lines with cytoplasms of wild Solanum species showing either anther indehiscent type of CMS or non-pollen production type of CMS were studied with the cultivated eggplant Solanum melongena, used as a control. Southern hybridization of the mitochondrial genes indicated the difference between the two types of CMS and showed complete identity within each type. The cytoplasmic patterns of all wild species differed from that of the cultivated eggplant. Thus, the cytoplasm of the six wild eggplants and the one cultivated eggplant was classified into three groups. Male sterile plants of both types of CMS showed novel transcription patterns of atp1, whereas a different transcription pattern of cox2 was observed only in the anther indehiscent type. Based on these differences, we determined the DNA sequences of about a 4 kbp segment in the atp1 region. Although the coding and 3' flanking regions were almost identical among the cytoplasms, the 5' flanking region was completely different and novel open reading frames (orfs) were found for each of the CMS types and the cultivated eggplant. The cytoplasm of Solanum kurzii inducing the anther indehiscent type CMS had orf312, and those of Solanum aethiopicum and Solanum grandifolium of non-pollen production type CMS had orf218. The correspondence between the transcription patterns of these orfs and phenotypic expression of male sterility strongly suggests that these orfs are causal genes for each type of CMS. PMID:23604528

  4. Glucose supplement reverses the fasting-induced suppression of cellular immunity in Mongolian gerbils (Meriones unguiculatus).

    PubMed

    Xu, De-Li; Wang, De-Hua

    2011-10-01

    Glucose plays an important role in immunity. Three day fasting will decrease cellular immunity and blood glucose levels in Mongolian gerbils (Meriones unguiculatus). In the present study, we tested the hypothesis that glucose supplement can reverse the fasting-induced suppression in cellular immunity in gerbils. Twenty-eight male gerbils were selected and randomly divided into fed and fasting groups. Half of the gerbils in each group were then provided with either 10% glucose water or pure water. After 66 h, each gerbil was injected with phytohaemagglutinin (PHA) solution to challenge cellular immunity. Results showed that glucose supplement restored blood glucose levels in fasted gerbils to those of the fed controls. It also recovered cellular immunity, body fat mass and serum leptin levels in fasted gerbils to the values of the fed controls. Blood glucose levels were positively correlated with body fat mass, leptin levels and cellular immune responses. Thymus and spleen masses, and white blood cells in fasted gerbils were not affected by glucose supplement. In general, our data demonstrate that glucose supplement could reverse fasting-induced suppression of cellular immunity in Mongolian gerbils. PMID:21885265

  5. Strain-Specific Protective Effect of the Immunity Induced by Live Malarial Sporozoites under Chloroquine Cover

    PubMed Central

    Wijayalath, Wathsala; Cheesman, Sandra; Tanabe, Kazuyuki; Handunnetti, Shiroma; Carter, Richard; Pathirana, Sisira

    2012-01-01

    The efficacy of a whole-sporozoite malaria vaccine would partly be determined by the strain-specificity of the protective responses against malarial sporozoites and liver-stage parasites. Evidence from previous reports were inconsistent, where some studies have shown that the protective immunity induced by irradiated or live sporozoites in rodents or humans were cross-protective and in others strain-specific. In the present work, we have studied the strain-specificity of live sporozoite-induced immunity using two genetically and immunologically different strains of Plasmodium cynomolgi, Pc746 and PcCeylon, in toque monkeys. Two groups of monkeys were immunized against live sporozoites of either the Pc746 (n = 5), or the PcCeylon (n = 4) strain, by the bites of 2–4 sporozoite-infected Anopheles tessellates mosquitoes per monkey under concurrent treatments with chloroquine and primaquine to abrogate detectable blood infections. Subsequently, a group of non-immunized monkeys (n = 4), and the two groups of immunized monkeys were challenged with a mixture of sporozoites of the two strains by the bites of 2–5 infective mosquitoes from each strain per monkey. In order to determine the strain-specificity of the protective immunity, the proportions of parasites of the two strains in the challenge infections were quantified using an allele quantification assay, Pyrosequencing™, based on a single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) in the parasites’ circumsporozoite protein gene. The Pyrosequencing™ data showed that a significant reduction of parasites of the immunizing strain in each group of strain-specifically immunized monkeys had occurred, indicating a stronger killing effect on parasites of the immunizing strain. Thus, the protective immunity developed following a single, live sporozoite/chloroquine immunization, acted specifically against the immunizing strain and was, therefore, strain-specific. As our experiment does not allow us to determine the

  6. The Skin Microbiome: Is It Affected by UV-induced Immune Suppression?

    PubMed Central

    Patra, VijayKumar; Byrne, Scott N.; Wolf, Peter

    2016-01-01

    Human skin apart from functioning as a physical barricade to stop the entry of pathogens, also hosts innumerable commensal organisms. The skin cells and the immune system constantly interact with microbes, to maintain cutaneous homeostasis, despite the challenges offered by various environmental factors. A major environmental factor affecting the skin is ultraviolet radiation (UV-R) from sunlight. UV-R is well known to modulate the immune system, which can be both beneficial and deleterious. By targeting the cells and molecules within skin, UV-R can trigger the production and release of antimicrobial peptides, affect the innate immune system and ultimately suppress the adaptive cellular immune response. This can contribute to skin carcinogenesis and the promotion of infectious agents such as herpes simplex virus and possibly others. On the other hand, a UV-established immunosuppressive environment may protect against the induction of immunologically mediated skin diseases including some of photodermatoses such as polymorphic light eruption. In this article, we share our perspective about the possibility that UV-induced immune suppression may alter the landscape of the skin’s microbiome and its components. Alternatively, or in concert with this, direct UV-induced DNA and membrane damage to the microbiome may result in pathogen associated molecular patterns (PAMPs) that interfere with UV-induced immune suppression. PMID:27559331

  7. The Skin Microbiome: Is It Affected by UV-induced Immune Suppression?

    PubMed

    Patra, VijayKumar; Byrne, Scott N; Wolf, Peter

    2016-01-01

    Human skin apart from functioning as a physical barricade to stop the entry of pathogens, also hosts innumerable commensal organisms. The skin cells and the immune system constantly interact with microbes, to maintain cutaneous homeostasis, despite the challenges offered by various environmental factors. A major environmental factor affecting the skin is ultraviolet radiation (UV-R) from sunlight. UV-R is well known to modulate the immune system, which can be both beneficial and deleterious. By targeting the cells and molecules within skin, UV-R can trigger the production and release of antimicrobial peptides, affect the innate immune system and ultimately suppress the adaptive cellular immune response. This can contribute to skin carcinogenesis and the promotion of infectious agents such as herpes simplex virus and possibly others. On the other hand, a UV-established immunosuppressive environment may protect against the induction of immunologically mediated skin diseases including some of photodermatoses such as polymorphic light eruption. In this article, we share our perspective about the possibility that UV-induced immune suppression may alter the landscape of the skin's microbiome and its components. Alternatively, or in concert with this, direct UV-induced DNA and membrane damage to the microbiome may result in pathogen associated molecular patterns (PAMPs) that interfere with UV-induced immune suppression. PMID:27559331

  8. Immune Cells and Molecular Networks in Experimentally Induced Pulpitis.

    PubMed

    Renard, E; Gaudin, A; Bienvenu, G; Amiaud, J; Farges, J C; Cuturi, M C; Moreau, A; Alliot-Licht, B

    2016-02-01

    Dental pulp is a dynamic tissue able to resist external irritation during tooth decay by using immunocompetent cells involved in innate and adaptive responses. To better understand the immune response of pulp toward gram-negative bacteria, we analyzed biological mediators and immunocompetent cells in rat incisor pulp experimentally inflamed by either lipopolysaccharide (LPS) or saline solution (phosphate-buffered saline [PBS]). Untreated teeth were used as control. Expression of pro- and anti-inflammatory cytokines, chemokine ligands, growth factors, and enzymes were evaluated at the transcript level, and the recruitment of the different leukocytes in pulp was measured by fluorescence-activated cell-sorting analysis after 3 h, 9 h, and 3 d post-PBS or post-LPS treatment. After 3 d, injured rat incisors showed pulp wound healing and production of reparative dentin in both LPS and PBS conditions, testifying to the reversible pulpitis status of this model. IL6, IL1-β, TNF-α, CCL2, CXCL1, CXCL2, MMP9, and iNOS gene expression were significantly upregulated after 3 h of LPS stimulation as compared with PBS. The immunoregulatory cytokine IL10 was also upregulated after 3 h, suggesting that LPS stimulates not only inflammation but also immunoregulation. Fluorescence-activated cell-sorting analysis revealed a significant, rapid, and transient increase in leukocyte levels 9 h after PBS and LPS stimulation. The quantity of dendritic cells was significantly upregulated with LPS versus PBS. Interestingly, we identified a myeloid-derived suppressor cell-enriched cell population in noninjured rodent incisor dental pulp. The percentage of this population, known to regulate immune response, was higher 9 h after inflammation triggered with PBS and LPS as compared with the control. Taken together, these data offer a better understanding of the mechanisms involved in the regulation of dental pulp immunity that may be elicited by gram-negative bacteria. PMID:26472753

  9. Novel Adenovirus type 5 vaccine platform induces cellular immunity against HIV-1 Gag, Pol, Nef despite the presence of Ad5 immunity.

    PubMed

    Gabitzsch, Elizabeth S; Xu, Younong; Yoshida, Lois H; Balint, Joseph; Amalfitano, Andrea; Jones, Frank R

    2009-10-30

    Recombinant Adenovirus serotype 5 (Ad5) vectors have been used as vaccine platforms in numerous animal and human clinical studies. The immune response induced by Ad5 vaccines can be mitigated due to pre-existing Ad5 immunity. We previously reported the use of a novel Ad5 platform to induce cellular immune responses (CMI) against HIV-1 Gag in Ad5 hyper immune mice. Here, the effectiveness of the Ad5 [E1-, E2b-] vaccine platform was evaluated using a triad mixture of HIV-1 Gag, Pol, and Nef as antigenic transgenes. Broad CMI was induced following vaccination with the HIV-1 expressing vectors in Ad5 naïve and Ad5 immunized mice. A mixture of the three vaccines induced CMI against each transgene product even in the presence of hyper Ad5 immunity. These studies revealed that CMI responses to immunization with Ad5 [E1-, E2b-]-gag, Ad5 [E1-, E2b-]-pol or Ad5 [E1-, E2b-]-nef vectors were transgene specific and did not induce CMI responses against irrelevant antigens such as carcinoembryonic antigen (CEA), herpes simplex virus glycoprotein B (HSV), cytomegalovirus (CMV) or influenza virus antigens. We are evaluating this recombinant triad viral vector as an HIV-1 vaccine in a non-human primate model and the data indicate that the vaccine is worthy of clinical evaluation. PMID:19559110

  10. Polycation-decorated PLA microspheres induce robust immune responses via commonly used parenteral administration routes.

    PubMed

    Chen, Xiaoming; Wang, Lianyan; Liu, Qi; Jia, Jilei; Liu, Yuan; Zhang, Weifeng; Ma, Guanghui; Su, Zhiguo

    2014-12-01

    Recombinant viral subunit-based vaccines have gained increasing attention due to their enhanced safety over the classic live-attenuated or inactivated vaccines. The low immunogenicity of the subunit antigen alone, however, requires the addition of an adjuvant to induce immunity. Particulate-based delivery systems have great potential for developing new vaccine adjuvants, compared to traditional aluminum-based saline adjuvants. The physicochemical properties of particulate vaccines have been extensively investigated; however, few studies have focused on how the administration route of various adjuvant-antigen combinations impacts the efficacy of the immune response. Here, for the first time, the viral Hepatitis B surface antigen (HBsAg) was combined with aluminum-based or cationic-microsphere (MP) based adjuvants to investigate the characteristics of immune responses elicited after immunization via the subcutaneous, intramuscular, or intraperitoneal routes respectively. In vitro, the MP-based vaccine significantly increased dendritic cell (DC) activation with up-regulated CD40 and CD80 expression and IL-12 production compared to alum-based vaccine. After immunization, both MP and alum-based vaccines produced increased IgG titers in mice. The administration route of these vaccines did influenced immune responses. The MP-based vaccine delivered via the intramuscular route yielded the highest levels of the IgG2a isotype. The alum-based vaccine, delivered via the same route, produced an IgG1-dominated humoral immune response. Moreover, subcutaneous and intramuscular immunizations with MP-based vaccine augmented Granzyme B, Th1-type cytokines (IL-2, IL-12, and IFN-γ), and Th2 cytokine IL-4 secretions. These results demonstrate that MP-based vaccines have the capacity to induce higher cellular and humoral immune response especially via an intramuscular administration route than an alum-based vaccine. PMID:25466267

  11. Photodynamic therapy induces an immune response against a bacterial pathogen

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Ying-Ying; Tanaka, Masamitsu; Vecchio, Daniela; Garcia-Diaz, Maria; Chang, Julie; Morimoto, Yuji; Hamblin, Michael R

    2012-01-01

    Photodynamic therapy (PDT) employs the triple combination of photosensitizers, visible light and ambient oxygen. When PDT is used for cancer, it has been observed that both arms of the host immune system (innate and adaptive) are activated. When PDT is used for infectious disease, however, it has been assumed that the direct antimicrobial PDT effect dominates. Murine arthritis caused by methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus in the knee failed to respond to PDT with intravenously injected Photofrin®. PDT with intra-articular Photofrin produced a biphasic dose response that killed bacteria without destroying host neutrophils. Methylene blue was the optimum photosensitizer to kill bacteria while preserving neutrophils. We used bioluminescence imaging to noninvasively monitor murine bacterial arthritis and found that PDT with intra-articular methylene blue was not only effective, but when used before infection, could protect the mice against a subsequent bacterial challenge. The data emphasize the importance of considering the host immune response in PDT for infectious disease. PMID:22882222

  12. Does Infection-Induced Immune Activation Contribute to Dementia?

    PubMed Central

    Barichello, Tatiana; Generoso, Jaqueline S; Goularte, Jessica A; Collodel, Allan; Pitcher, Meagan R; Simões, Lutiana R; Quevedo, João; Dal-Pizzol, Felipe

    2015-01-01

    The central nervous system (CNS) is protected by a complex blood-brain barrier system; however, a broad diversity of virus, bacteria, fungi, and protozoa can gain access and cause illness. As pathogens replicate, they release molecules that can be recognized by innate immune cells. These molecules are pathogen-associated molecular patterns (PAMP) and they are identified by pattern-recognition receptors (PRR) expressed on antigen-presenting cells. Examples of PRR include toll-like receptors (TLR), receptors for advanced glycation endproducts (RAGE), nucleotide binding oligomerisation domain (NOD)-like receptors (NLR), c-type lectin receptors (CLR), RIG-I-like receptors (RLR), and intra-cytosolic DNA sensors. The reciprocal action between PAMP and PRR triggers the release of inflammatory mediators that regulate the elimination of invasive pathogens. Damage-associated molecular patterns (DAMP) are endogenous constituents released from damaged cells that also have the ability to activate the innate immune response. An increase of RAGE expression levels on neurons, astrocytes, microglia, and endothelial cells could be responsible for the accumulation of αβ-amyloid in dementia and related to the chronic inflammatory state that is found in neurodegenerative disorders. PMID:26425389

  13. Hydralazine-induced pauci-immune glomerulonephritis: intriguing case series with misleading diagnoses

    PubMed Central

    Babar, Faizan; Posner, Jeffery N.; Obah, Eugene A.

    2016-01-01

    Hydralazine has been used since the 1950s for the management of hypertension. Evidence for hydralazine-associated vasculitis dates to pre-ANCA (antineutrophil cytoplasmic antibodies) era. This abstract describes two cases of ANCA-positive pauci-immune glomerulonephritis (GN) in challenging scenarios where diagnosis was misconstrued. A comprehensive literature review was done to understand the pathogenesis of drug-induced pauci-immune GN. We have described key diagnostic features that are helpful in distinguishing idiopathic ANCA vasculitis from drug-induced vasculitis. Additionally, we have also described different treatments meant to provide therapy options with the least side effects. PMID:27124161

  14. Neonatal Immunization with Respiratory Syncytial Virus Glycoprotein Fragment Induces Protective Immunity in the Presence of Maternal Antibodies in Mice

    PubMed Central

    Noh, Youran; Shim, Byoung-Shik; Cheon, In Su; Rho, Semi; Kim, Hee Joo; Choi, Youngjoo; Kang, Chang-Yuil; Chang, Jun

    2013-01-01

    Abstract Respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) is a major cause of severe lower respiratory tract infections in infants and the elderly worldwide. The significant morbidity and mortality associated with this infection underscores the urgent need for development of RSV vaccine. In this study, we first show that intranasal administration of RSV glycoprotein core fragment (Gcf) to neonatal mice can induce systemic humoral immune responses and protective immunity against RSV without causing lung eosinophilia, although antibody response was shifted to a Th2 response. Next, we examined whether the presence of maternal anti-RSV antibodies would affect the responsiveness and protection efficacy of Gcf in newborn mice, since infants can possess RSV-specific maternal antibodies due to frequent RSV re-infections to adults. Intranasal administration of Gcf induced antibody response and increased IFNγ secretion and protected mice against RSV challenge without severe lung eosinophilia, even in the presence of high levels of RSV-specific maternal antibodies. Thus, our findings suggest that Gcf may be an effective and safe RSV vaccine during the neonatal period. PMID:23869549

  15. Pertussis immunity and epidemiology: mode and duration of vaccine-induced immunity.

    PubMed

    Magpantay, F M G; Domenech DE Cellès, M; Rohani, P; King, A A

    2016-06-01

    The resurgence of pertussis in some countries that maintain high vaccination coverage has drawn attention to gaps in our understanding of the epidemiological effects of pertussis vaccines. In particular, major questions surround the nature, degree and durability of vaccine protection. To address these questions, we used mechanistic transmission models to examine regional time series incidence data from Italy in the period immediately following the introduction of acellular pertussis (aP) vaccine. Our results concur with recent animal-challenge experiments wherein infections in aP-vaccinated individuals proved as transmissible as those in naive individuals but much less symptomatic. On the other hand, the data provide evidence for vaccine-driven reduction in susceptibility, which we quantify via a synthetic measure of vaccine impact. As to the precise nature of vaccine failure, the data do not allow us to distinguish between leakiness and waning of vaccine immunity, or some combination of these. Across the range of well-supported models, the nature and duration of vaccine protection, the age profile of incidence and the range of projected epidemiological futures differ substantially, underscoring the importance of the remaining unknowns. We identify key data gaps: sources of data that can supply the information needed to eliminate these remaining uncertainties. PMID:26337864

  16. Intranasal immunization with protective antigen of Bacillus anthracis induces a long-term immunological memory response.

    PubMed

    Woo, Sun-Je; Kang, Seok-Seong; Park, Sung-Moo; Yang, Jae Seung; Song, Man Ki; Yun, Cheol-Heui; Han, Seung Hyun

    2015-10-01

    Although intranasal vaccination has been shown to be effective for the protection against inhalational anthrax, establishment of long-term immunity has yet to be achieved. Here, we investigated whether intranasal immunization with recombinant protective antigen (rPA) of Bacillus anthracis induces immunological memory responses in the mucosal and systemic compartments. Intranasal immunization with rPA plus cholera toxin (CT) sustained PA-specific antibody responses for 6 months in lung, nasal washes, and vaginal washes as well as serum. A significant induction of PA-specific memory B cells was observed in spleen, cervical lymph nodes (CLNs) and lung after booster immunization. Furthermore, intranasal immunization with rPA plus CT remarkably generated effector memory CD4(+) T cells in the lung. PA-specific CD4(+) T cells preferentially increased the expression of Th1- and Th17-type cytokines in lung, but not in spleen or CLNs. Collectively, the intranasal immunization with rPA plus CT promoted immunologic memory responses in the mucosal and systemic compartments, providing long-term immunity. PMID:26278659

  17. Pentabody-mediated antigen delivery induces antigen-specific mucosal immune response.

    PubMed

    Li, Shenghua; Zheng, Wenju; Kuolee, Rhonda; Hirama, Tomoko; Henry, Matthew; Makvandi-Nejad, Shokouh; Fjällman, Ted; Chen, Wangxue; Zhang, Jianbing

    2009-05-01

    An efficient immunization system is essential for the development of mucosal vaccine. Cholera toxin (CT) and Escherichia coli heat labile toxin (LT) are among the strongest adjuvants tested in experimental animals but their use in humans has been hindered by their toxicity. On the other hand, the role of their non-toxic B-subunits, CTB or LTB, in enhancing mucosal immune response is not clear. We propose here a novel strategy for the induction of mucosal immune responses. Single domain antibodies (sdAbs) against a model antigen bovine serum albumin (BSA) were raised from the antibody repertoire of a llama immunized with BSA, pentamerized by fusing the sdAbs to CTB, generating the so-called pentabodies. These pentabodies were used to deliver the antigen by mixing the two components and administering the mixture to mice intranasally. One construct was equivalent to CT in helping induce mucosal immune response. It was also found that this ability was probably due to its high affinity to BSA, providing some insight into the controversial role of CTB in mucosal immunization: at least for BSA, the model antigen BSA employed in this study, CTB has to be tightly linked to the antigen to have adjuvant/immune-enhancing effect. PMID:19269688

  18. Mouse and pig models for studies of natural and vaccine-induced immunity to Bordetella pertussis.

    PubMed

    Mills, Kingston H G; Gerdts, Volker

    2014-04-01

    The increasing incidence of whooping cough in many developed countries has been linked with waning immunity induced after immunization with acellular pertussis (aP) vaccines. The rational design of an improved aP vaccine requires a full understanding of the mechanism of protective immunity and preclinical studies in animal models. Infection of mice and pigs with Bordetella pertussis has many features of the infection seen in humans and has already provided valuable information on the roles of innate and adaptive immune responses in protection. Recent findings in these models have already indicated that it may be possible to develop an improved aP vaccine based on a formulation that includes a Toll-like receptor agonist as an adjuvant. PMID:24626866

  19. Commonly administered bacille Calmette-Guerin strains induce comparable immune response

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Jun-Fang; Dai, Fu-Ying; Gong, Xue-Li; Bao, Lang

    2015-01-01

    Bacille Calmette-Guerin (BCG) is currently the only available vaccine against tuberculosis (TB), but its protective efficacy in adults is highly variable. This study aimed to compare the immune response induced by two widely used BCG strains: BCG China strain (derivative of BCG Danish strain) in DU2-III group and BCG Pasteur in DU2 -IV group. Healthy BALB/c mice were immunized with BCG China strain or BCG Pasteur strain. Specific IgG, IgG1, and IgG2a antibodies titers, the proliferation of splenocytes, the percentages of splenocyte subsets and the concentrations of induced IFN-γ and IL-4 at 6th, 8th, 10th, and 12th weeks after the immunization were detected. We found that BCG Pasteur strain induced higher specific IgG and IgG1 titers, higher proliferation of splenocytes, higher percentages of CD4+ or CD8+ T cells, and higher concentration of secreted IFN-γ than BCG China strain. However, there were no significant differences in IgG2a titer and IL-4 concentration between both strains. In conclusion, our study shows that immune responses to BCG vaccine differ by strain, which may account for variable outcomes of BCG immunization. PMID:26629084

  20. Sterilizing the Poor

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rothman, Sheila M.

    1977-01-01

    Suggests that freedom for the middle classes may mean vulnerability for the poor. The enthusiasm for sterilization may be so intense as to deprive the poor of their right not to be sterilized. (Author/AM)

  1. Apparatus Circulates Sterilizing Gas

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cross, John H.; Schwarz, Ray P.

    1991-01-01

    Apparatus circulates sterilizing gas containing ethylene oxide and chlorofluorocarbon through laboratory or medical equipment. Confines sterilizing gas, circulating it only through parts to be treated. Consists of two units. One delivers ethylene oxide/chlorofluorocarbon gas mixture and removes gas after treatment. Other warms, humidifies, and circulates gas through equipment to be treated. Process provides reliable sterilization with negligible residual toxicity from ethylene oxide. Particularly suitable for sterilization of interiors of bioreactors, heart/lung machines, dialyzers, or other equipment including complicated tubing.

  2. Steroid-induced femoral head osteonecrosis in immune thrombocytopenia treatment with osteochondral autograft transplantation.

    PubMed

    Fotopoulos, Vasileios Ch; Mouzopoulos, George; Floros, Themistoklis; Tzurbakis, Matthaios

    2015-09-01

    Osteonecrosis of the femoral head is a devastating complication of steroid administration and has rarely been observed in the treatment of immune thrombocytopenia. The treatment of osteochondral defects in advanced stages of avascular necrosis (AVN), characterized by collapse of the subchondral bone, remains an unsolved burden in orthopedic surgery. In this report, we present a case of a 19-year-old female that was admitted in the Emergency Department with walking disability and painful hip joint movement due to steroid-induced femoral head osteonecrosis. Two years before she was diagnosed with immune thrombocytopenia, for which she received pulse steroid therapy with high dose of dexamethasone and underwent a splenectomy. This case report is the first to describe the use of osteochondral autograft transplantation as a treatment of steroid-induced AVN of the femoral head due to immune thrombocytopenia at the age of 19 years with very good clinical and radiological results 3 years postoperatively. PMID:25173503

  3. Oxaliplatin-induced immune-mediated cytopenias: a case report and literature review.

    PubMed

    Forcello, Nicholas P; Khubchandani, Sapna; Patel, Shrina J; Brahaj, Driola

    2015-04-01

    Oxaliplatin is a third-generation platinum antineoplastic agent that commonly causes diarrhea, nausea, vomiting, myelosuppression, and peripheral neuropathy. Less common adverse effects that are increasingly being reported include acute immune-mediated thrombocytopenia, hemolytic anemia, and pancytopenia. Here, we report a patient case of suspected oxaliplatin-induced immune-mediated thrombocytopenia and a thorough literature evaluation of acute oxaliplatin-induced immune-mediated thrombocytopenia, hemolytic anemia, and pancytopenia that has yet to be reported until now. There have been 39 previously published reports of these cytopenic events with a median number of 16 treatment cycles prior to presentation. Patients experiencing unusual signs and symptoms such as chills, rigors, fever, back pain, abdominal pain, ecchymosis, hematemesis, hematuria, dark urine, hematochezia, petechiae, epistaxis, or mental status changes during or shortly after an oxaliplatin infusion should have complete blood counts ordered and evaluated promptly. PMID:24500808

  4. Human Pappilomavirus (HPV) induced cancers and prevention by immunization.

    PubMed

    Khaliq, Sheikh Abdul; Shyum Naqvi, Syed Baqir; Fatima, Anab

    2012-10-01

    Incidences of different types of cancer are increasing in Pakistan, among which cancer of Cervix and Respiratory pappilomatosis are of great concern because of their association with human Pappilomavirus (HPV). Cervical cancers typically distress women of middle age or older; however it may affect women in any age after the puberty. Two serotypes of HPV (16 & 18) accounts 70% of cervical cancer cases, while HPV (6 & 11) are considered low-risk viruses associated with genital warts (Condyloma acuminata) and Respiratory pappilomatosis in both gender. Generally, there is transient role of HPV in human body and are removed by immune system in or around 1 year. Data from different Pakistani hospitals provides sound evidence for increasing trends of cervical cancer, which is, being developing country imperative for us. As the cost of cancer management is increasing day by day with poor survival rate and its burden is borne by patient, their family or society in-large, so if screening or prevention is possible then there would be need to identify target population for screening and vaccination. By quality adjusted life year (QALY) measurement, the data from different sources indicates that adolescent age is the appropriate target population and is cost effective for vaccination. Two vaccines manufactured by recombinant DNA technology are licensed in some parts of the world for prevention of HPV related cancers, however both have certain advantage over another, as one of the vaccines contains viral like proteins of two HPV serotypes 16 & 18 and provide additional cross protection against HPV type 13 and 45 with 100% seroprotection, while the other vaccine, being quadrivalent offers protection against four serotypes 6, 11, 16 and 18. Both vaccines tolerability and safety profiles are similar and acceptable, however bivalent vaccine appears to provide long-lasting immunity by the development of memory B-cells hypothetically due to difference of adsorbing agent used by

  5. T-Cell Immune Response Assessment as a Complement to Serology and Intranasal Protection Assays in Determining the Protective Immunity Induced by Acellular Pertussis Vaccines in Mice

    PubMed Central

    Ausiello, C. M.; Lande, R.; Stefanelli, P.; Fazio, C.; Fedele, G.; Palazzo, R.; Urbani, F.; Mastrantonio, P.

    2003-01-01

    The relative value of antibodies and/or T-cell immune responses to Bordetella pertussis antigens in the immunity induced by acellular pertussis (aP) vaccines is still an open issue, probably due to the incomplete knowledge on the mechanisms of protective immunity to pertussis. The relevance of T-cell immune responses in protection from pertussis has been demonstrated in murine and human models of infection; thus, in this study, the ability of different vaccine preparations of three component (pertussis toxin, filamentous hemagglutinin, and pertactin) aP vaccines to induce T-cell responses was investigated in mice. All vaccine preparations examined passed the immunogenicity control test, based on antibody titer assessment, according to European Pharmacopoeia standards, and protected mice from B. pertussis intranasal challenge, but not all preparations were able to prime T cells to pertussis toxin, the specific B. pertussis antigen. In particular, one vaccine preparation was unable to induce proliferation and gamma interferon (IFN-γ) production while the other two gave borderline results. The evaluation of T-cell responses to pertussis toxin antigen may provide information on the protective immunity induced by aP vaccines in animal models. Considering the critical role of the axis interleukin-12-IFN-γ for protection from pertussis, our results suggest that testing the induction of a key protective cytokine such as IFN-γ could be an additional tool for the evaluation of the immune response induced by aP vaccines. PMID:12853397

  6. Perillyl alcohol suppresses antigen-induced immune responses in the lung

    SciTech Connect

    Imamura, Mitsuru; Sasaki, Oh; Okunishi, Katsuhide; Nakagome, Kazuyuki; Harada, Hiroaki; Kawahata, Kimito; Tanaka, Ryoichi; Yamamoto, Kazuhiko; Dohi, Makoto

    2014-01-03

    Highlights: •Perillyl alcohol (POH) is an isoprenoid which inhibits the mevalonate pathway. •We examined whether POH suppresses immune responses with a mouse model of asthma. •POH treatment during sensitization suppressed Ag-induced priming of CD4{sup +} T cells. •POH suppressed airway eosinophila and cytokine production in thoracic lymph nodes. -- Abstract: Perillyl alcohol (POH) is an isoprenoid which inhibits farnesyl transferase and geranylgeranyl transferase, key enzymes that induce conformational and functional changes in small G proteins to conduct signal production for cell proliferation. Thus, it has been tried for the treatment of cancers. However, although it affects the proliferation of immunocytes, its influence on immune responses has been examined in only a few studies. Notably, its effect on antigen-induced immune responses has not been studied. In this study, we examined whether POH suppresses Ag-induced immune responses with a mouse model of allergic airway inflammation. POH treatment of sensitized mice suppressed proliferation and cytokine production in Ag-stimulated spleen cells or CD4{sup +} T cells. Further, sensitized mice received aerosolized OVA to induce allergic airway inflammation, and some mice received POH treatment. POH significantly suppressed indicators of allergic airway inflammation such as airway eosinophilia. Cytokine production in thoracic lymph nodes was also significantly suppressed. These results demonstrate that POH suppresses antigen-induced immune responses in the lung. Considering that it exists naturally, POH could be a novel preventive or therapeutic option for immunologic lung disorders such as asthma with minimal side effects.

  7. Fatal carboplatin-induced immune hemolytic anemia in a child with a brain tumor

    PubMed Central

    Haley, Kristina M; Russell, Thomas B; Boshkov, Lynn; Leger, Regina M; Garratty, George; Recht, Michael; Nazemi, Kellie J

    2014-01-01

    Drug-induced immune hemolytic anemia (DIIHA) is an uncommon side effect of pharmacologic intervention. A rare mediator of DIIHA, carboplatin is an agent used to treat many pediatric cancers. We describe here, the first case of fatal carboplatin induced DIIHA in a pediatric patient and a brief review of the literature. Our patient developed acute onset of multi-organ failure with evidence of complement activation, secondary to a drug induced red cell antibody. Early recognition of the systemic insult associated with carboplatin induced hemolytic anemia may allow for future affected patients to receive plasmapheresis, a potentially effective therapy. PMID:24868179

  8. ISO radiation sterilization standards

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lambert, Byron J.; Hansen, Joyce M.

    1998-06-01

    This presentation provides an overview of the current status of the ISO radiation sterilization standards. The ISO standards are voluntary standards which detail both the validation and routine control of the sterilization process. ISO 11137 was approved in 1994 and published in 1995. When reviewing the standard you will note that less than 20% of the standard is devoted to requirements and the remainder is guidance on how to comply with the requirements. Future standards developments in radiation sterilization are being focused on providing additional guidance. The guidance that is currently provided in informative annexes of ISO 11137 includes: device/packaging materials, dose setting methods, and dosimeters and dose measurement, currently, there are four Technical Reports being developed to provide additional guidance: 1. AAMI Draft TIR, "Radiation Sterilization Material Qualification" 2. ISO TR 13409-1996, "Sterilization of health care products — Radiation sterilization — Substantiation of 25 kGy as a sterilization dose for small or infrequent production batches" 3. ISO Draft TR, "Sterilization of health care products — Radiation sterilization Selection of a sterilization dose for a single production batch" li]4. ISO Draft TR, "Sterilization of health care products — Radiation sterilization-Product Families, Plans for Sampling and Frequency of Dose Audits."

  9. GMCSF-armed vaccinia virus induces an antitumor immune response.

    PubMed

    Parviainen, Suvi; Ahonen, Marko; Diaconu, Iulia; Kipar, Anja; Siurala, Mikko; Vähä-Koskela, Markus; Kanerva, Anna; Cerullo, Vincenzo; Hemminki, Akseli

    2015-03-01

    Oncolytic Western Reserve strain vaccinia virus selective for epidermal growth factor receptor pathway mutations and tumor-associated hypermetabolism was armed with human granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor (GMCSF) and a tdTomato fluorophore. As the assessment of immunological responses to human transgenes is challenging in the most commonly used animal models, we used immunocompetent Syrian golden hamsters, known to be sensitive to human GMCSF and semipermissive to vaccinia virus. Efficacy was initially tested in vitro on various human and hamster cell lines and oncolytic potency of transgene-carrying viruses was similar to unarmed virus. The hGMCSF-encoding virus was able to completely eradicate subcutaneous pancreatic tumors in hamsters, and to fully protect the animals from subsequent rechallenge with the same tumor. Induction of specific antitumor immunity was also shown by ex vivo co-culture experiments with hamster splenocytes. In addition, histological examination revealed increased infiltration of neutrophils and macrophages in GMCSF-virus-treated tumors. These findings help clarify the mechanism of action of GMCSF-armed vaccinia viruses undergoing clinical trials. PMID:25042001

  10. Heterologous Vaccination and Checkpoint Blockade Synergize To Induce Antileukemia Immunity.

    PubMed

    Manlove, Luke S; Schenkel, Jason M; Manlove, Kezia R; Pauken, Kristen E; Williams, Richard T; Vezys, Vaiva; Farrar, Michael A

    2016-06-01

    Checkpoint blockade-based immunotherapies are effective in cancers with high numbers of nonsynonymous mutations. In contrast, current paradigms suggest that such approaches will be ineffective in cancers with few nonsynonymous mutations. To examine this issue, we made use of a murine model of BCR-ABL(+) B-lineage acute lymphoblastic leukemia. Using a principal component analysis, we found that robust MHC class II expression, coupled with appropriate costimulation, correlated with lower leukemic burden. We next assessed whether checkpoint blockade or therapeutic vaccination could improve survival in mice with pre-established leukemia. Consistent with the low mutation load in our leukemia model, we found that checkpoint blockade alone had only modest effects on survival. In contrast, robust heterologous vaccination with a peptide derived from the BCR-ABL fusion (BAp), a key driver mutation, generated a small population of mice that survived long-term. Checkpoint blockade strongly synergized with heterologous vaccination to enhance overall survival in mice with leukemia. Enhanced survival did not correlate with numbers of BAp:I-A(b)-specific T cells, but rather with increased expression of IL-10, IL-17, and granzyme B and decreased expression of programmed death 1 on these cells. Our findings demonstrate that vaccination to key driver mutations cooperates with checkpoint blockade and allows for immune control of cancers with low nonsynonymous mutation loads. PMID:27183622

  11. A VACCINE STRATEGY THAT INDUCES PROTECTIVE IMMUNITY AGAINST HEROIN

    PubMed Central

    Stowe, G. Neil; Vendruscolo, Leandro F.; Edwards, Scott; Schlosburg, Joel E.; Misra, Kaushik K.; Schulteis, Gery; Mayorov, Alexander V.; Zakhari, Joseph S.; Koob, George F.; Janda, Kim D.

    2011-01-01

    Heroin addiction is a wide-reaching problem with a spectrum of damaging social consequences. A vaccine capable of blocking heroin's effects could provide a long-lasting and sustainable adjunct to heroin addiction therapy. Heroin, however, presents a particularly challenging immunotherapeutic target as it is metabolized to multiple psychoactive molecules. To reconcile this dilemma we examined the idea of a singular vaccine with the potential to display multiple drug-like antigens; thus two haptens were synthesized, one heroin-like and another morphine-like in chemical structure. A key feature in this approach is that immunopresentation with the heroin-like hapten is thought to be immunochemically dynamic such that multiple haptens are simultaneously presented to the immune system. We demonstrate the significance of this approach though the extremely rapid generation of robust polyclonal antibody titers with remarkable specificity. Importantly, both the antinociceptive effects of heroin and acquisition of heroin self-administration were blocked in rats vaccinated using the heroin-like hapten. PMID:21692508

  12. Marek's Disease Virus-Induced Immunosuppression: Array Analysis of Chicken Immune Response Gene Expression Profiling

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Marek’s disease (MD) is a lymphoproliferative disease of chickens induced by a highly cell-associated oncogenic alpha-herpesvirus, Marek’s disease virus (MDV). MDV replicates in chicken lymphocytes and establishes a latency infection within CD4+ T cells. Host-virus interaction, immune responses to...

  13. Antigens linked to synthetic microspheres induce immune responses in primates in the absence of adjuvant.

    PubMed

    Sedlik, C; Perraut, R; Bonnemains, B; Leclerc, C

    1996-01-01

    Although most strategies of vaccination require immunopotentiation to induce efficient immune responses, the development of new adjuvants for human vaccines is highly limited by safety problems. In order to overcome this problem, we developed a new vaccine formulation based on the covalent linkage of protein or peptide to synthetic microspheres. In previous experiments performed in mice, we demonstrated that these particulate antigens induce strong antigen-specific CD4+ T cell proliferative responses in the absence of adjuvant. In the present study, we analyzed the immunogenicity in primate Saimiri sciureus monkeys of two different proteins linked to synthetic microspheres. Immune responses induced by these particulate proteins administered without adjuvant were compared to those stimulated by the soluble antigens injected with alum. We currently demonstrated that, in monkeys, particulate antigens administered without adjuvant, induced good PBMC proliferative response and antibody production. Furthermore, the analysis of antibody responses using mAbs specific for different Saimiri sciureus immunoglobulins showed that the antibody response profiles were different in monkeys immunized with soluble versus particulate form of antigens. Results of this study demonstrate that particulate form of antigen may stimulate qualitatively different immune responses as compared to alum and therefore suggest that this new antigen formulation could be an attractive candidate for the development of vaccines. PMID:8852604

  14. Glycerol-3-phosphate is a critical mobile inducer of systemic immunity in plants

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Glycerol-3-phosphate (G3P) is an important metabolite that contributes to the growth and disease-related physiologies of prokaryotes, plants, animals and humans alike. Here we show that G3P serves as the inducer of an important form of broad-spectrum immunity in plants, termed systemic acquired resi...

  15. Fungal innate immunity induced by bacterial microbe-associated molecular patterns (MAMPs)

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Plants and animals detect bacterial presence through Microbe-Associated Molecular Patterns (MAMPs) which induce an innate immune response. The field of fungal-bacterial interaction at the molecular level is still in its infancy and very little is known about fungal molecular responses to bacteria, a...

  16. Basophil-derived amphiregulin is essential for UVB irradiation-induced immune suppression.

    PubMed

    Meulenbroeks, Chantal; van Weelden, Huib; Schwartz, Christian; Voehringer, David; Redegeld, Frank A M; Rutten, Victor P M G; Willemse, Ton; Sijts, Alice J A M; Zaiss, Dietmar M W

    2015-01-01

    UVB irradiation (290-320 nm) is used to treat skin diseases like psoriasis and atopic dermatitis, and is known to suppress contact hypersensitivity (CHS) reactions in mouse models. Regulatory T cells (Treg cells) have been shown to be responsible for this UVB-induced suppression of CHS. The epidermal growth factor (EGF)-like growth factor amphiregulin (AREG) engages EGFR on Treg cells and, in different disease models, it was shown that mast cell-derived AREG is essential for optimal Treg cell function in vivo. Here we determined whether AREG has a role in UVB-induced, Treg cell-mediated suppression of CHS reactions in the skin. Our data show that AREG is essential for UVB-induced CHS suppression. In contrast to the general assumption, however, mast cells were dispensable for UVB-induced immune suppression, whereas basophil-derived AREG was essential. These data reveal, to our knowledge, a previously unreported function for basophils in the homeostasis of immune responses in the skin. Basophils thus fulfill a dual function: they contribute to the initiation of effective type 2 immune responses and, by enhancing the suppressive capacity of local Treg cell populations, also to local immune regulation in the skin. PMID:25089660

  17. Co-adjuvant effects of retinoic acid and IL-15 induce inflammatory immunity to dietary antigens

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Under physiological conditions the gut-associated lymphoid tissues not only prevent the induction of a local inflammatory immune response, but also induce systemic tolerance to fed antigens. A notable exception is coeliac disease, where genetically susceptible individuals expressing human leukocyte...

  18. In vitro activation of rat neutrophils and alveolar macrophages with IgA and IgG immune complexes. Implications for immune complex-induced lung injury.

    PubMed Central

    Warren, J. S.; Kunkel, S. L.; Johnson, K. J.; Ward, P. A.

    1987-01-01

    In the rat, both IgG and IgA immune complexes induce oxygen radical mediated lung injury that is partially complement-dependent. In vivo studies have suggested that the chief sources of oxygen radicals in IgG and IgA immune complex-induced lung injury are neutrophils and tissue macrophages, respectively. The current studies have been designed to provide additional insights into these two models of tissue injury. Preformed monoclonal IgG and IgA immune complexes stimulated dose-dependent O2-. and H2O2 production by alveolar macrophages. In contrast, neutrophils exhibited O2-. production and lysosomal enzyme secretion in response to IgG immune complexes, but not in response to IgA complexes. There is evidence that C5a significantly amplifies these responses. Purified human C5a enhanced the O2-. responses of neutrophils activated with IgG immune complexes and alveolar macrophages activated with either IgG or IgA immune complexes. Addition of C5a alone to neutrophils or alveolar macrophages had no direct stimulatory effect as measured by O2-. production. The observation that O2-. responses of immune complex-activated alveolar macrophages can be significantly enhanced by the presence of C5a and that C5a can also enhance O-2. responses of IgG immune complex-stimulated neutrophils suggests a potential amplification mechanism through which complement may participate in both IgG and IgA immune complex-induced lung injury. The present data corroborate in vivo studies which suggest that IgG immune complex lung injury is primarily neutrophil-mediated, whereas IgA complex lung injury is predominantly macrophage-mediated. PMID:2827492

  19. Immunization with adenovirus LIGHT-engineered dendritic cells induces potent T cell responses and therapeutic immunity in HBV transgenic mice.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Wenzheng; Chen, Ran; Kong, Xiaobo; Long, Fengying; Shi, Yaru

    2014-07-31

    LIGHT, a TNF superfamily member (TNFSF14), is a type II transmembrane protein expressed on activated T cells and immature dendritic cells (DCs). However, the expression of LIGHT on mature DCs is down-regulated. Recent studies demonstrated that LIGHT provides potent costimulatory activity for T cells, enhancing proliferation and the production of Th1 cytokines independently of the B7-CD28 pathway. Here, we evaluated the effectiveness of peptide-pulsed DC-mediated antiviral immunity in HBV transgenic mice and the immunoadjuvant effect of LIGHT. The bone marrow-derived DCs were modified in vitro with an adenovirus (Ad) vector expressing mouse LIGHT (Ad-LIGHT), the expression of costimulatory molecules was up-regulated and the secretion of cytokines IL-12 and IFN-γ increased. LIGHT-modified DCs enhanced allostimulation for T cells in mixed lymphocyte reaction (MLR). HBV peptide-pulsed DCs elicited HBV specific CD8+ T cell response and reduced the level of HBsAg and HBV DNA in sera of HBV transgenic mice. Importantly, LIGHT-modified DCs could induce stronger antiviral immunity. These results support the concept that genetic modification of DCs with a recombinant LIGHT adenovirus vector may be a useful strategy for antiviral immunotherapy. PMID:24951859

  20. Immune response to UV-induced tumors: mediation of progressor tumor rejection by natural killer cells

    SciTech Connect

    Streeter, P.R.; Fortner, G.W.

    1986-03-01

    Skin tumors induced in mice by chronic ultraviolet (UV) irradiation are highly antigenic and can induce a state of transplantation immunity in syngeneic animals. In the present study, the authors compared the in vitro cytolytic activity of splenic lymphocytes from mice immunized with either regressor or progressor UV-tumors. The results of this comparison implicated tumor-specific cytolytic T (Tc) lymphocytes in rejection of regressor UV-tumors, and revealed that immunization with the progressor UV-tumor 2237 failed to elicit detectable levels of progressor tumor-specific Tc cells even as the tumors rejected. Following in vitro resensitization of spleen cells from either regressor or progressor tumor immune animals, the authors found NK-like lymphocytes with anti-tumor activity. As the authors had not detected cells with this activity in splenic lymphocyte preparations prior to in vitro resensitization, the authors examined lymphocytes from the local tumor environment during the course of progressor tumor rejection for this activity. This analysis revealed NK lymphocytes exhibiting significant levels of cytolytic activity against UV-tumors. These results implicate NK cells as potential effector cells in the rejection of progressor UV-tumors by immune animals, and suggests that these cells may be regulated by T lymphocytes.

  1. Coffea arabica Seed Extract Stimulate the Cellular Immune Function and Cyclophosphamide-induced Immunosuppression in Mice

    PubMed Central

    Rafiul Haque, Mohammad; Ansari, Shahid Hussain; Rashikh, Azhar

    2013-01-01

    In this study, we investigate the immunostimulatory effects of alcoholic extract of the coffee seed on cell-mediated immune response and cyclophosphamide-induced (CP) immunosuppressed mice. The assessment of cellular immune function was carried out by the measurement of delayed-type hypersensitivity (DTH) response. According to the literature survey, cyclophosphamide has only suppressing effect on the lymphoid organ, white blood cell (WBC) and other parts of humoral immunity. Humoral immunity was assessed by the hemagglutination antibody titre. Mice were treated with three doses of extract (50, 150 and 250 mg/Kg body weight per os). Relative organ weight and WBC counts were also studied in these animals. At doses of 50 and 150, a significant increase (p < 0.05) in relative organ weight of spleen and thymus was observed but there was no effect on kidney and liver weights. WBC counts was also increased significantly (p < 0.001) in all doses of the plant extract. Coffea arabica extract elicited a significant (p < 0.001) increase in the DTH response at doses of 50 and 150 mg/Kg, but the change at higher dose of 250 mg/Kg was not statistically significant. In the HT test, plant extract also showed modulatory effect at all doses groups. Over all, coffee seed showed the stimulatory effect on cellular immune function and cyclophosphamide induced immunosuppression in mice. PMID:24250577

  2. Mucosal and systemic immune responses induced by a single time vaccination strategy in mice.

    PubMed

    González Aznar, Elizabeth; Romeu, Belkis; Lastre, Miriam; Zayas, Caridad; Cuello, Maribel; Cabrera, Osmir; Valdez, Yolanda; Fariñas, Mildrey; Pérez, Oliver

    2015-08-01

    Vaccination is considered by the World Health Organization as the most cost-effective strategy for controlling infectious diseases. In spite of great successes with vaccines, many infectious diseases are still leading killers, because of the inadequate coverage of many vaccines. Several factors have been responsible: number of doses, high vaccine reactogenicity, vaccine costs, vaccination policy, among others. Contradictorily, few vaccines are of single dose and even less of mucosal administration. However, more common infections occur via mucosa, where secretory immunoglobulin A plays an essential role. As an alternative, we proposed a novel protocol of vaccination called Single Time Vaccination Strategy (SinTimVaS) by immunizing 2 priming doses at the same time: one by mucosal route and the other by parenteral route. Here, the mucosal and systemic responses induced by Finlay adjuvants (AF Proteoliposome 1 and AF Cochleate 1) implementing SinTimVaS in BALB/c mice were evaluated. One intranasal dose of AF Cochleate 1 and an intramuscular dose of AF Proteoliposome 1 adsorbed onto aluminum hydroxide, with bovine serum albumin or tetanus toxoid as model antigens, administrated at the same time, induced potent specific mucosal and systemic immune responses. Also, we demonstrated that SinTimVaS using other mucosal routes like oral and sublingual, in combination with the subcutaneous route elicits immune responses. SinTimVaS, as a new immunization strategy, could increase vaccination coverage and reduce time-cost vaccines campaigns, adding the benefits of immune response in mucosa. PMID:26140382

  3. Immunity against Boophilus annulatus induced by the Bm86 (Tick-GARD) vaccine.

    PubMed

    Pipano, Eugene; Alekceev, Eugene; Galker, Felicia; Fish, Lea; Samish, Michael; Shkap, Varda

    2003-01-01

    Friesian cattle were immunized with two inoculations of anti-tick Bm86 (Tick-GARD) vaccine and were challenged 30 or 90 d later with Boophilus annulatus larvae derived from 1.2 g of eggs. No nymphs or adult ticks were found on the immunized cattle during four weeks after challenge. Repeated infestations (2 to 4) with larvae on three other calves during a period of 160 and 390 d after the immunization did not result in development of nymphal and adult stages. In control, non-immunized cattle infested with corresponding batches of larvae 1380 to 4653 replete adult female ticks were collected. Larvae issued from Babesia bovis-infected female ticks transmitted the infection to Bm86-immunized cattle, but the progeny of B. bigemina-infected females did not. Since B. bigemina is transmitted exclusively by nymphal stages of Bo. annulatus these results support the observation that immunity induced by Bm86 affects the larval stage of this tick. PMID:14580066

  4. Lipopolysaccharide Induces Immune Activation and SIV Replication in Rhesus Macaques of Chinese Origin

    PubMed Central

    Bao, Rong; Zhuang, Ke; Liu, Jinbiao; Wu, Jianguo; Li, Jieliang; Wang, Xu; Ho, Wen-Zhe

    2014-01-01

    Background Chronic immune activation is a hallmark of progressive HIV infection and a key determinant of immunodeficiency in HIV-infected individuals. Bacterial lipopolysaccharide (LPS) in the circulation has been implicated as a key factor in HIV infection-related systemic immune activation. We thus investigate the impact of LPS on systemic immune activation in simian immunodeficiency virus (SIV)-infected rhesus macaques of Chinese origin. Methods The animals were inoculated intravenously with SIVmac239. The levels of plasma viral load and host inflammatory cytokines in PBMC were measured by real-time RT-PCR. CD4/CD8 ratio and systemic immune activation markers were examined by flow cytometric analysis of PBMCs. White blood cell and neutrophil counts and C Reactive Protein levels were determined using biochemistry analyzer. The plasma levels of LPS were determined by Tachypleus Amebocyte Lysate (TAL) test. Results The animals inoculated with SIVmac239 became infected as evidenced by the increased plasma levels of SIV RNA and decreased CD4/CD8 ratio. LPS administration of SIV-infected animals induced a transient increase of plasma SIV RNA and immune activation, which was indicated by the elevated expression of the inflammatory cytokines and CD4+HLA-DR+ T cells in PBMCs. Conclusions These data support the concept that LPS is a driving factor in systemic immune activation of HIV disease. PMID:24918575

  5. Brief Report: Immune Microenvironment Determines the Immunogenicity of Induced Pluripotent Stem Cell Derivatives.

    PubMed

    Todorova, Dilyana; Kim, Jinchul; Hamzeinejad, Sara; He, Jingjin; Xu, Yang

    2016-02-01

    The breakthrough of induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs) has raised the possibility that patient-specific iPSCs can provide autologous cells for cell therapy without the concern for immune rejection. However, the immunogenicity of iPSC-derived cells remains controversial. Using syngeneic C57BL/6 (B6) mouse transplantation model, several studies indicate that B6 iPSC-derived cells exhibit some levels of immunogenicity when transplanted into B6 mice subcutaneously. In contrast, one recent study has concluded that various lineages of B6 iPSC-derived cells exhibit no immunogenicity when transplanted under the kidney capsule of B6 mice. To resolve the controversy concerning this critical issue of iPSC biology, we used the same B6 transplantation model to demonstrate that the immune response toward antigens is dependent on the immune environment of the transplantation site. Immunogenic antigen-expressing B6 embryonic stem cells (ESCs) as well as B6 iPSCs and their terminally differentiated cells survived under the kidney capsule but are immune rejected when transplanted subcutaneously or intramuscularly. The cotransplantation of mature B6 dendritic cells under the kidney capsule leads to immune rejection of B6 iPSC-derived grafts but not B6 ESC-derived grafts, indicating that the lack of detectable immune response to iPSC-derived grafts under the kidney capsule is due to the lack of functional antigen presenting cells. PMID:26439188

  6. Zinc deficiency enhanced inflammatory response by increasing immune cell activation and inducing IL6 promoter demethylation

    PubMed Central

    Wong, Carmen P.; Rinaldi, Nicole A.; Ho, Emily

    2015-01-01

    Scope Zinc deficiency results in immune dysfunction and promotes systemic inflammation. The objective of this study was to examine the effects of zinc deficiency on cellular immune activation and epigenetic mechanisms that promote inflammation. This work is potentially relevant to the aging population given that age-related immune defects, including chronic inflammation, coincide with declining zinc status. Methods and results An in vitro cell culture system and the aged mouse model were used to characterize immune activation and DNA methylation profiles that may contribute to the enhanced proinflammatory response mediated by zinc deficiency. Zinc deficiency up-regulated cell activation markers ICAM1, MHC class II, and CD86 in THP1 cells, that coincided with increased IL1β and IL6 responses following LPS stimulation. A decreased zinc status in aged mice was similarly associated with increased ICAM1 and IL6 gene expression. Reduced IL6 promoter methylation was observed in zinc deficient THP1 cells, as well as in aged mice and human lymphoblastoid cell lines derived from aged individuals. Conclusion Zinc deficiency induced inflammatory response in part by eliciting aberrant immune cell activation and altered promoter methylation. Our results suggested potential interactions between zinc status, epigenetics, and immune function, and how their dysregulation could contribute to chronic inflammation. PMID:25656040

  7. High physical activity in young children suggests positive effects by altering autoantigen-induced immune activity.

    PubMed

    Carlsson, E; Ludvigsson, J; Huus, K; Faresjö, M

    2016-04-01

    Physical activity in children is associated with several positive health outcomes such as decreased cardiovascular risk factors, improved lung function, enhanced motor skill development, healthier body composition, and also improved defense against inflammatory diseases. We examined how high physical activity vs a sedentary lifestyle in young children influences the immune response with focus on autoimmunity. Peripheral blood mononuclear cells, collected from 55 5-year-old children with either high physical activity (n = 14), average physical activity (n = 27), or low physical activity (n = 14), from the All Babies In Southeast Sweden (ABIS) cohort, were stimulated with antigens (tetanus toxoid and beta-lactoglobulin) and autoantigens (GAD65 , insulin, HSP60, and IA-2). Immune markers (cytokines and chemokines), C-peptide and proinsulin were analyzed. Children with high physical activity showed decreased immune activity toward the autoantigens GAD65 (IL-5, P < 0.05), HSP60 and IA-2 (IL-10, P < 0.05) and also low spontaneous pro-inflammatory immune activity (IL-6, IL-13, IFN-γ, TNF-α, and CCL2 (P < 0.05)) compared with children with an average or low physical activity. High physical activity in young children seems to have positive effects on the immune system by altering autoantigen-induced immune activity. PMID:25892449

  8. Repeated stress-induced stimulation of catecholamine response is not followed by altered immune cell redistribution.

    PubMed

    Imrich, Richard; Tibenska, Elena; Koska, Juraj; Ksinantova, Lucia; Kvetnansky, Richard; Bergendiova-Sedlackova, Katarina; Blazicek, Pavol; Vigas, Milan

    2004-06-01

    Stress response is considered an important factor in the modulation of immune function. Neuroendocrine hormones, including catecholamines, affect the process of immune cell redistribution, important for cell-mediated immunity. This longitudinal investigation was aimed at evaluating the effect of repeated stress-induced elevation of catecholamines on immune cell redistribution and expression of adhesive molecules. We assessed the responses of epinephrine (EPI), norepinephrine (NE), cortisol, changes in lymphocytes subpopulations, and percentages of CD11a+, CD11b+, and CD62L+ lymphocytes to a 20-min treadmill exercise of an intensity equal to 80% of the individual's Vo(2)max. The exercise was performed before and after 6 weeks of endurance training consisting of a 1-h run 4 times a week (ET) and after 5 days of bed rest (HDBR) in 10 healthy males. We did not observe any significant changes in the basal levels of EPI, NE, and cortisol in the plasma, nor in the immune parameters after ET and HDBR. The exercise test led to a significant (P <.001) elevation of EPI and NE levels after both ET and HDBR, a significant elevation (P <.01) of cortisol after HDBR, an increase in the absolute numbers of leukocytes, granulocytes, monocytes, CD3+, CD4+, CD8+, CD16+, CD19+ lymphocytes, percentage of CD11a+ and CD11b+ lymphocytes, and to a decrease of CD62L1 before, after ET, and after HDBR. We found comparable changes in all measured immune parameters after ET and HDBR. In conclusion, repeated stress-induced elevation of EPI and NE was not associated with an alteration in immune cell redistribution found in response to the single bout of exercise. PMID:15240377

  9. Commercial sunscreen lotions prevent ultraviolet-radiation-induced immune suppression of contact hypersensitivity.

    PubMed

    Roberts, L K; Beasley, D G

    1995-09-01

    Ultraviolet (UV) radiation suppresses certain immunologic responses, such as contact hypersensitivity (CH). Some previous studies, using sunlamps emitting nonsolar-spectrum UV or excessive UV doses, have questioned the ability of sunscreens to prevent UV-induced immune suppression. Our study evaluated the immune protection capacities of commercial sunscreen lotions in relation to the effects of UV spectrum and dose. C3H mice were exposed to a fixed UV dose from Kodacel-filtered FS sunlamps that caused maximum Langerhans cell depletion and suppression of CH. Kodacel film blocks UV energy below 290 nm, thus eliminating immune-suppressive effects of UVC (200-290 nm) not present in sunlight. CH was equally suppressed in unprotected and placebo-lotion-treated, UV-exposed mice. Mice protected with sun protection factor (SPF)-15 and SPF-30 sunscreens mounted normal CH responses. SPF-4 and SPF-8 sunscreen-protected mice had CH responses significantly greater than those of unprotected mice. Direct effects of UV spectral differences on the immune protection value of an SPF-15 sunscreen were determined by exposing mice to UV radiation from unfiltered and Kodacel-filtered sunlamps and a 1000-W xenon lamp solar simulator (UV spectrum nearly equivalent to sunlight). The sunscreen immune protection value was 30 times the minimum immune suppression dose for the solar simulator, while being 7.5 times this dose for Kodacel-filtered and 2 times the dose for unfiltered sunlamps. These results demonstrate that commercial sunscreen lotions prevent UV-induced immune suppression at a level exceeding the labeled SPF when tested with an environmentally relevant UV source. PMID:7665909

  10. Electron paramagnetic resonance analyses of surface radical chemistries of gamma-sterilized orthopedic materials: implications pointing to cytotoxicity via wear debris-induced inflammation.

    PubMed

    DiCicco, Michael; Compton, Ryan; Duong, Thanh; Jansen-Varnum, Susan A

    2005-10-01

    In this research, electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) spin-trapping was utilized to determine if surface radical chemistries occur for gamma (gamma)-sterilized orthopedic materials-ultra-high molecular weight polyethylene (UHMWPE) and the novel, hybrid, diurethane dimethacrylate (DUDMA)-based RHAKOSS. The materials' ability to competitively chelate catalytic ferrous ions (Fe(2+)) or readily reduce ferric ions (Fe(3+)), and hydrogen peroxide (H(2)O(2)) directly, in facilitating the Fenton reaction (FR), is indicative of cytotoxicity. Validations with a radical scavenger aids to confirm a radical mechanism. In conjunction, materials were thermally annealed and characterized by attenuated total reflectance-Fourier-transform infrared (ATR-FTIR) spectroscopy in order to explore accelerated oxidative degradation induced by residual radicals evolving from gamma-sterilization. Particularly, there was a significant decrease in spin-adduct peak areas obtained from the reduction of H(2)O(2) in the presence of RHAKOSS or UHMWPE, evaluated against their respective controls. Additionally, chelated Fe(2+) accelerated the rate of FR. This phenomenon suggests that the materials are not better chelators than the Fe-activating chelator, edta. Neither material had the propensity to readily reduce Fe(3+) to the relevant Fe(2+), as certified by a nonradical mechanism. Alternatively, the false spin-adduct signal acquired when chelated Fe(3+) is employed arises via the nucleophilic addition of water onto the DMPO spin trap. Residual radicals in UHMWPE did not recombine/terminate following thermal annealing in an inert atmosphere. The radicals in RHAKOSS, however, did recombine under mild heating in an oxidizing or inert atmosphere. Both materials displayed quenching of ( )OH; however, for UHMWPE, this mechanism was jointly accountable for its accelerated degradation, evidenced by ATR-FTIR. Quenching of ( )OH by the silica found in RHAKOSS manifested in a competing effect that

  11. Trivalent Combination Vaccine Induces Broad Heterologous Immune Responses to Norovirus and Rotavirus in Mice

    PubMed Central

    Tamminen, Kirsi; Lappalainen, Suvi; Huhti, Leena; Vesikari, Timo; Blazevic, Vesna

    2013-01-01

    Rotavirus (RV) and norovirus (NoV) are the two major causes of viral gastroenteritis (GE) in children worldwide. We have developed an injectable vaccine design to prevent infection or GE induced with these enteric viruses. The trivalent combination vaccine consists of NoV capsid (VP1) derived virus-like particles (VLPs) of GI-3 and GII-4 representing the two major NoV genogroups and tubular RV recombinant VP6 (rVP6), the most conserved and abundant RV protein. Each component was produced in insect cells by a recombinant baculovirus expression system and combined in vitro. The vaccine components were administered intramuscularly to BALB/c mice either separately or in the trivalent combination. High levels of NoV and RV type specific serum IgGs with high avidity (>50%) as well as intestinal IgGs were detected in the immunized mice. Cross-reactive IgG antibodies were also elicited against heterologous NoV VLPs not used for immunization (GII-4 NO, GII-12 and GI-1 VLPs) and to different RVs from cell cultures. NoV-specific serum antibodies blocked binding of homologous and heterologous VLPs to the putative receptors, histo-blood group antigens, suggesting broad NoV neutralizing activity of the sera. Mucosal antibodies of mice immunized with the trivalent combination vaccine inhibited RV infection in vitro. In addition, cross-reactive T cell immune responses to NoV and RV-specific antigens were detected. All the responses were sustained for up to six months. No mutual inhibition of the components in the trivalent vaccine combination was observed. In conclusion, the NoV GI and GII VLPs combination induced broader cross-reactive and potentially neutralizing immune responses than either of the VLPs alone. Therefore, trivalent vaccine might induce protective immune responses to the vast majority of circulating NoV and RV genotypes. PMID:23922988

  12. Combining mapping of physiological quantitative trait loci and transcriptome for cold tolerance for counteracting male sterility induced by low temperatures during reproductive stage in rice.

    PubMed

    Shimono, Hiroyuki; Abe, Akira; Aoki, Naohiro; Koumoto, Takemasa; Sato, Masahiro; Yokoi, Shuji; Kuroda, Eiki; Endo, Takashi; Saeki, Ken-Ich; Nagano, Kuniaki

    2016-06-01

    Male sterility induced by low temperatures (LTs) during the reproductive stage is a major constraint for temperate zone rice. To detect physiological quantitative trait loci (QTLs), we modeled genotypic variation in the physiological processes involved in low temperature spikelet sterility on the basis of anther length (AL), a proxy for microspore and pollen grain number per anther. The model accounted for 83% of the genotypic variation in potential AL at normal temperature and the ability to maintain AL at LT. We tested the model on 208 recombinant inbred lines of cold-tolerant 'Tohoku-PL3' (PL3) × cold-sensitive 'Akihikari' (AH) for 2 years. QTLs for spikelet fertility (FRT) at LT were detected on chromosomes 5 (QTL for Cold Tolerance at Reproductive stage, qCTR5) and 12 (qCTR12). qCTR12 was annotated with the ability to maintain AL under LTs. qCTR5 was in a region shared with QTLs for culm length and heading date. Genome-wide expression analysis showed 798 genes differentially expressed in the spikelets between the parents at LTs. Of these, 12 were near qCTR5 and 23 were near qCTR12. Gene expression analysis confirmed two candidate genes for qCTR5 (O-methyltransferase ZRP4, Os05g0515600; beta-1,3-glucanase-like protein, Os05g0535100) and one for qCTR12 (conserved hypothetical protein, Os12g0550600). Nucleotide polymorphisms (21 deletions, 2 insertions and 10 single nucleotide polymorphisms) in PL3 were found near the candidate conserved hypothetical protein (Os12g0550600) and upstream in PL3, but not in AH. Haplotype analysis revealed that this gene came from 'Kuchum'. The combination of mapping physiological QTLs with gene expression analysis can be extended to identify other genes for abiotic stress response in cereals. PMID:26607766

  13. Polysaccharides Isolated from Açaí Fruit Induce Innate Immune Responses

    PubMed Central

    Holderness, Jeff; Schepetkin, Igor A.; Freedman, Brett; Kirpotina, Liliya N.; Quinn, Mark T.; Hedges, Jodi F.; Jutila, Mark A.

    2011-01-01

    The Açaí (Acai) fruit is a popular nutritional supplement that purportedly enhances immune system function. These anecdotal claims are supported by limited studies describing immune responses to the Acai polyphenol fraction. Previously, we characterized γδ T cell responses to both polyphenol and polysaccharide fractions from several plant-derived nutritional supplements. Similar polyphenol and polysaccharide fractions are found in Acai fruit. Thus, we hypothesized that one or both of these fractions could activate γδ T cells. Contrary to previous reports, we did not identify agonist activity in the polyphenol fraction; however, the Acai polysaccharide fraction induced robust γδ T cell stimulatory activity in human, mouse, and bovine PBMC cultures. To characterize the immune response to Acai polysaccharides, we fractionated the crude polysaccharide preparation and tested these fractions for activity in human PBMC cultures. The largest Acai polysaccharides were the most active in vitro as indicated by activation of myeloid and γδ T cells. When delivered in vivo, Acai polysaccharide induced myeloid cell recruitment and IL-12 production. These results define innate immune responses induced by the polysaccharide component of Acai and have implications for the treatment of asthma and infectious disease. PMID:21386979

  14. Agents that reverse UV-induced immune suppression and photocarcinogenesis affect DNA repair

    PubMed Central

    Sreevidya, Coimbatore S.; Fukunaga, Atsushi; Khaskhely, Noor M.; Masaki, Taro; Ono, Ryusuke; Nishigori, Chikako; Ullrich, Stephen E.

    2010-01-01

    UV exposure induces skin cancer, in part by inducing immune suppression. Repairing DNA damage, neutralizing the activity of cis-urocanic acid (cis-UCA), and reversing oxidative stress abrogates UV-induced immune suppression and skin cancer induction, suggesting the DNA, UCA and lipid photo-oxidation serves as UV photoreceptors. What is not clear is whether signaling through each of these different photoreceptors activates independent pathways to induce biological effects or whether there is a common checkpoint where these pathways converge. Here we show that agents known to reverse photocarcinogenesis and photoimmune suppression, such as platelet activating factor (PAF) and serotonin (5-HT) receptor antagonists regulate DNA repair. Pyrimidine dimer repair was accelerated in UV-irradiated mice injected with PAF and 5-HT receptor antagonists. Nucleotide excision repair, as measured by unscheduled DNA synthesis, was accelerated by PAF and 5-HT receptor antagonists. Injecting PAF and 5-HT receptor antagonists into UV-irradiated Xeroderma pigmentosum complementation group A (XPA) deficient mice, which lack the enzymes responsible for nucleotide excision repair, did not accelerate photoproduct repair. Similarly, UV-induced formation of 8-oxo-deoxyguanosine (8-oxo-dG) was reduced by PAF and 5-HT receptor antagonists. We conclude that PAF and 5-HT receptor antagonists accelerate DNA repair caused by UV radiation, which prevents immune suppression and interferes with photocarcinogenesis. PMID:19829299

  15. TLR 9 involvement in early protection induced by immunization with rPb27 against Paracoccidioidomycosis.

    PubMed

    Morais, Elis Araujo; Chame, Daniela Ferreira; Melo, Eliza Mathias; de Carvalho Oliveira, Junnia Alvarenga; de Paula, Ana Cláudia Chagas; Peixoto, Andiara Cardoso; da Silva Santos, Lílian; Gomes, Dawidson Assis; Russo, Remo Castro; de Goes, Alfredo Miranda

    2016-02-01

    Paracoccidioidomycosis is caused by fungi of the Paracoccidioides genus and constitutes the most prevalent deep mycosis in Latin America. Toll-like receptors promote immune response against infectious agents. Recently, it was reported that TLR9 is crucial for mice survival during the first 48 h of P. brasiliensis infection. In this study, we used CPG oligodeoxynucleotide motif as an adjuvant with and without rPb27 to immunize mice against Paracoccidioidomycosis. CPG adjuvant induced differential recruitment of lymphocytes in the inflammatory process and a lower recruitment of neutrophils. In addition, CPG induced the production of pro-inflammatory cytokines such as IL-1β, TNF-α, IL-6 and IL-12; increased phagocytic ability and microbicidal activity by macrophages; and induced differential production of lgG2a and lgG2b, subtypes of Ig. Knockout mice for TLR9 and IL-12 showed higher fungal loads and rates of mortality compared to control mice after 30 days of infection. The association between CPG and rPb27 induced a high level of protection against Paracoccidioidomycosis after the first 30 days of infection but not at 60 days. Our findings demonstrate that TLR 9 plays a role in the protection induced by immunization with rPb27 and confirms the importance of TLR9 in the initial protection against Paracoccidioidomycosis. PMID:26597327

  16. Cell mediated immunity to corn starch in starch-induced granulomatous peritonitis.

    PubMed

    Goodacre, R L; Clancy, R L; Davidson, R A; Mullens, J E

    1976-03-01

    Two patients with histologically diagnosed starch induced granulomatous peritonitis (SGP) have been shown to have cell mediated immunity to corn starch using the techniques of macrophage migration inhibition and lymphocyte DNA synthesis. Control groups of normal subjects, patients with uncomplicated laparotomy, and patients with Crohn's disease were negative in both tests. Lymphocytes from two patients with band adhesions, one of whom had biopsy evidence of a granulomatous reaction to starch, were sensitized to starch. Cell mediated immunity to starch may contribute to the pathogenesis of SGP, and some band adhesions may be a chronic low grade manifestation of this disorder. PMID:1269987

  17. Drug-induced immune hemolytic anemia associated with albumin-bound paclitaxel.

    PubMed

    Thomas, Roby; Shillingburg, Alexandra

    2015-08-01

    Drug-induced immune hemolytic anemia (DIIHA) is rare, with only 1 patient in 1 million affected by the condition.1 Garratty identified 125 drugs indicated in DIIHA of which 11% were antineoplastic agents, and neither paclitaxel nor albumin-bound paclitaxel were included.2 In addition, we did not find any reports in our own search of the literature. Taxanes are known to cause anemia as a result of their myelosuppressive effects, but an immune hemolysis is rare. To our knowledge, we present here the first case of DIIHA with nab-paclitaxel. PMID:26859672

  18. The first report of cabergoline-induced immune hemolytic anemia in an adolescent with prolactinoma.

    PubMed

    Gürbüz, Fatih; Yağcı-Küpeli, Begül; Kör, Yılmaz; Yüksel, Bilgin; Zorludemir, Suzan; Gürbüz, Berrak Bilginer; Küpeli, Serhan

    2014-01-01

    Prolactinomas are common pituitary tumors that can cause gonadal dysfunction and infertility related to hyperprolactinemia. Dopamine agonists are the first-line treatment in these patients. Cabergoline leads to significant reduction in serum prolactin levels and tumor size in patients with prolactinoma. Dopamine agonists have been associated with adverse effects such as nausea, vomiting and psychosis. We report here a case with cabergoline-induced immune hemolytic anemia. The patient had cabergoline treatment history for prolactinoma and presented with weakness, fatigue, nausea, and paleness. Laboratory findings revealed severe anemia-related immune hemolysis. There were no causes identified to explain hemolytic anemia except cabergoline. Therefore, cabergoline therapy was stopped and subsequently hemolytic anemia resolved and did not occur again. This is the first reported pediatric case with prolactinoma and cabergoline-induced hemolytic anemia. Clinicians should be watchful for this rare side effect induced by cabergoline. PMID:23945126

  19. NOS Inhibition Modulates Immune Polarization and Improves Radiation-Induced Tumor Growth Delay.

    PubMed

    Ridnour, Lisa A; Cheng, Robert Y S; Weiss, Jonathan M; Kaur, Sukhbir; Soto-Pantoja, David R; Basudhar, Debashree; Heinecke, Julie L; Stewart, C Andrew; DeGraff, William; Sowers, Anastasia L; Thetford, Angela; Kesarwala, Aparna H; Roberts, David D; Young, Howard A; Mitchell, James B; Trinchieri, Giorgio; Wiltrout, Robert H; Wink, David A

    2015-07-15

    Nitric oxide synthases (NOS) are important mediators of progrowth signaling in tumor cells, as they regulate angiogenesis, immune response, and immune-mediated wound healing. Ionizing radiation (IR) is also an immune modulator and inducer of wound response. We hypothesized that radiation therapeutic efficacy could be improved by targeting NOS following tumor irradiation. Herein, we show enhanced radiation-induced (10 Gy) tumor growth delay in a syngeneic model (C3H) but not immunosuppressed (Nu/Nu) squamous cell carcinoma tumor-bearing mice treated post-IR with the constitutive NOS inhibitor N(G)-nitro-l-arginine methyl ester (L-NAME). These results suggest a requirement of T cells for improved radiation tumor response. In support of this observation, tumor irradiation induced a rapid increase in the immunosuppressive Th2 cytokine IL10, which was abated by post-IR administration of L-NAME. In vivo suppression of IL10 using an antisense IL10 morpholino also extended the tumor growth delay induced by radiation in a manner similar to L-NAME. Further examination of this mechanism in cultured Jurkat T cells revealed L-NAME suppression of IR-induced IL10 expression, which reaccumulated in the presence of exogenous NO donor. In addition to L-NAME, the guanylyl cyclase inhibitors ODQ and thrombospondin-1 also abated IR-induced IL10 expression in Jurkat T cells and ANA-1 macrophages, which further suggests that the immunosuppressive effects involve eNOS. Moreover, cytotoxic Th1 cytokines, including IL2, IL12p40, and IFNγ, as well as activated CD8(+) T cells were elevated in tumors receiving post-IR L-NAME. Together, these results suggest that post-IR NOS inhibition improves radiation tumor response via Th1 immune polarization within the tumor microenvironment. PMID:25990221

  20. Spinal cord injury-induced immune deficiency syndrome enhances infection susceptibility dependent on lesion level.

    PubMed

    Brommer, Benedikt; Engel, Odilo; Kopp, Marcel A; Watzlawick, Ralf; Müller, Susanne; Prüss, Harald; Chen, Yuying; DeVivo, Michael J; Finkenstaedt, Felix W; Dirnagl, Ulrich; Liebscher, Thomas; Meisel, Andreas; Schwab, Jan M

    2016-03-01

    Pneumonia is the leading cause of death after acute spinal cord injury and is associated with poor neurological outcome. In contrast to the current understanding, attributing enhanced infection susceptibility solely to the patient's environment and motor dysfunction, we investigate whether a secondary functional neurogenic immune deficiency (spinal cord injury-induced immune deficiency syndrome, SCI-IDS) may account for the enhanced infection susceptibility. We applied a clinically relevant model of experimental induced pneumonia to investigate whether the systemic SCI-IDS is functional sufficient to cause pneumonia dependent on spinal cord injury lesion level and investigated whether findings are mirrored in a large prospective cohort study after human spinal cord injury. In a mouse model of inducible pneumonia, high thoracic lesions that interrupt sympathetic innervation to major immune organs, but not low thoracic lesions, significantly increased bacterial load in lungs. The ability to clear the bacterial load from the lung remained preserved in sham animals. Propagated immune susceptibility depended on injury of central pre-ganglionic but not peripheral postganglionic sympathetic innervation to the spleen. Thoracic spinal cord injury level was confirmed as an independent increased risk factor of pneumonia in patients after motor complete spinal cord injury (odds ratio = 1.35, P < 0.001) independently from mechanical ventilation and preserved sensory function by multiple regression analysis. We present evidence that spinal cord injury directly causes increased risk for bacterial infection in mice as well as in patients. Besides obvious motor and sensory paralysis, spinal cord injury also induces a functional SCI-IDS ('immune paralysis'), sufficient to propagate clinically relevant infection in an injury level dependent manner. PMID:26754788

  1. DNA vaccination using expression vectors carrying FIV structural genes induces immune response against feline immunodeficiency virus.

    PubMed

    Cuisinier, A M; Mallet, V; Meyer, A; Caldora, C; Aubert, A

    1997-07-01

    Following inactivated virus vaccination trials, the surface glycoprotein gp120 of the feline immunodeficiency virus (FIV) was considered as one of the determinants for protection. However, several vaccination trials using recombinant Env protein or some peptides failed to induce protection. To understand the role of the gp120 protein in vivo, we vaccinated cats with naked DNA coding for FIV structural proteins gp120 and p10. We analyzed the ability of these vaccinations to induce immune protection and to influence the onset of infection. Injection in cat muscles of expression vectors coding for the FIV gp120 protein induced a humoral response. Cats immunized twice with the gp120 gene showed different patterns after challenge. Two cats were, like the control cats, infected from the second week after infection onwards. The two others maintained a low proviral load with no modification of their antibody pattern. The immune response induced by gp120 DNA injection could control the level of viral replication. This protective-like immune response was not correlated to the humoral response. All the cats immunized with the gp120 gene followed by the p10 gene were infected, like the control cats, from the second week but they developed a complete humoral response against viral proteins after challenge. Furthermore, they showed a sudden but transient drop of the proviral load at 4 weeks after infection. Under these conditions, one injection of the p10 gene after one injection of the gp120 gene was not sufficient to stimulate protection. On the contrary, after a period, it seems to facilitate virus replication. PMID:9269051

  2. CsBAFF, a Teleost B Cell Activating Factor, Promotes Pathogen-Induced Innate Immunity and Vaccine-Induced Adaptive Immunity

    PubMed Central

    Sun, Yun; Sun, Li

    2015-01-01

    B cell activating factor (BAFF) is a member of the tumor necrosis factor family that is known to play an important role in B cell activation, proliferation, and differentiation in mammals. However, studies of BAFF in teleosts are very limited and its function, in particular that under in vivo conditions, is essentially unknown. In this study, we conducted in vivo as well as in vitro functional analyses of a BAFF homologue (CsBAFF) from the teleost fish tongue sole (Cynoglossus semilaevis). CsBAFF is composed of 261 residues and shares moderate sequence identities with known BAFFs of other teleosts. CsBAFF expression was most abundant in immune organs and was upregulated during bacterial infection. Purified recombinant CsBAFF (rCsBAFF) bound to tongue sole lymphocytes and promoted cellular proliferation and survival. The results of an in vivo study showed that CsBAFF overexpression in tongue sole significantly enhanced macrophage activation and reduced bacterial infection in fish tissues, whereas knockdown of CsBAFF expression resulted in increased bacterial dissemination and colonization in fish tissues. Furthermore, vaccination studies showed that CsBAFF enhanced the immunoprotection of a DNA vaccine and augmented the production of specific serum antibodies. Taken together, these results provide the first in vivo evidence to indicate that teleost BAFF is an immunostimulator that significantly contributes to the innate antibacterial immune response and vaccine-induced adaptive immune response. PMID:26295165

  3. Retinoic acid induces homing of protective T and B cells to the gut after subcutaneous immunization in mice.

    PubMed

    Hammerschmidt, Swantje I; Friedrichsen, Michaela; Boelter, Jasmin; Lyszkiewicz, Marcin; Kremmer, Elisabeth; Pabst, Oliver; Förster, Reinhold

    2011-08-01

    Diarrheal diseases represent a major health burden in developing countries. Parenteral immunization typically does not induce efficient protection against enteropathogens because it does not stimulate migration of immune cells to the gut. Retinoic acid (RA) is critical for gut immunity, inducing upregulation of gut-homing receptors on activated T cells. In this study, we have demonstrated that RA can redirect immune responses elicited by s.c. vaccination of mice from skin-draining inguinal LNs (ingLNs) to the gut. When present during priming, RA induced robust upregulation of gut-homing receptors in ingLNs, imprinting gut-homing capacity on T cells. Concurrently, RA triggered the generation of gut-tropic IgA+ plasma cells in ingLNs and raised the levels of antigen-specific IgA in the intestinal lumen and blood. RA applied s.c. in vivo induced autonomous RA production in ingLN DCs, further driving efficient induction of gut-homing molecules on effector cells. Importantly, RA-supplemented s.c. immunization elicited a potent immune response in the small intestine that protected mice from cholera toxin–induced diarrhea and diminished bacterial loads in Peyer patches after oral infection with Salmonella. Thus, the use of RA as a gut-homing navigator represents a powerful tool to induce protective immunity in the intestine after s.c. immunization, offering what we believe to be a novel approach for vaccination against enteropathogens. PMID:21737878

  4. New sterilization technologies alternative to ethylene oxide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tabrizian, Maryam; Lerouge, Sophie; Debrie, Anne; Yahia, L'Hocine

    1997-06-01

    Sterilization of biomedical devices may induce bulk and surface modification, responsible for the decrease or loss of their biofunctionality. Pure ethylene oxide (EO) at low temperature and new alternative techniques such as cold gas plasma sterilization have been developed for heat-sensitive polymers. There is a lack of the knowledge concerning their safety in terms of materials damage and consequences on the biofunctionality of sterilized devices. The objective of our work consists in studying bulk and surface changes in biomedical devices induced by these two sterilization techniques. Samples from PVC, Polyurethane, Polyacrylate and Polyethylene-based medical devices are subjected to 1, 5, and 10 sterilization cycles by Steri-Vac-3M (pure EO), Sterrad-100$TM, J&J (gas plasma + H2O2), and studied by X-rays photoelectron spectroscopy. Preliminary results show an increasing in Oxygen/Carbon ratio by a factor of 1.3 to 4.4 between the first and tenth cycle indicating the surface oxidation by gas plasma sterilization processes. Some changes in C-C chemical bounding are associated with EO sterilization.

  5. Beryllium-induced immune response in C3H mice

    SciTech Connect

    Benson, J.M.; Bice, D.E.; Nikula, K.J.

    1995-12-01

    Studies conducted at ITRI over the past several years have investigated whether Beagle dogs, monkeys, and mice are suitable models for human chronic beryllium-induced lung disease (CBD). Recent studies have focused on the histopathological and immunopathological changes occurring in A/J and C3H/HeJ mice acutely exposed by inhalation to Be metal. Lung lesions in both strains of mice included focal lymphocyte aggregates comprised primarily of B lymphocytes and lesser amounts of T-helper lymphocytes and microgranulomas consisting chiefly of macrophages and T-helper lymphocytes. The distribution of proliferating cells within the microgranulomas was similar to the distribution of T-helper cells. These results strongly suggested that A/J and C3H/HeJ mice responded to inhaled Be metal in a fashion similar to humans in terms of pulmonary lesions and the apparent in situ proliferation of T-helper cells. Results of these studies confirm lymphocyte involvement in the pulmonary response to inhaled Be metal.

  6. Characterization of the immune response induced by pertussis OMVs-based vaccine.

    PubMed

    Bottero, D; Gaillard, M E; Zurita, E; Moreno, G; Martinez, D Sabater; Bartel, E; Bravo, S; Carriquiriborde, F; Errea, A; Castuma, C; Rumbo, M; Hozbor, D

    2016-06-14

    For the development of a third generation of pertussis vaccine that could improve the control of the disease, it was proposed that the immune responses induced by the classic whole cell vaccine (wP) or after infection should be used as a reference point. We have recently identified a vaccine candidate based on outer membrane vesicles (OMVs) derived from the disease etiologic agent that have been shown to be safe and protective in mice model of infection. Here we characterized OMVs-mediated immunity and the safety of our new candidate. We also deepen the knowledge of the induced humoral response contribution in pertussis protection. Regarding the safety of the OMVs based vaccine (TdapOMVsBp,) the in vitro whole blood human assay here performed, showed that the low toxicity of OMVs-based vaccine previously detected in mice could be extended to human samples. Stimulation of splenocytes from immunized mice evidenced the presence of IFN-γ and IL-17-producing cells, indicated that OMVs induces both Th1 and Th17 response. Interestingly TdapOMVsBp-raised antibodies such as those induced by wP and commercial acellular vaccines (aP) which contribute to induce protection against Bordetella pertussis infection. As occurs with wP-induced antibodies, the TdapOMVsBp-induced serum antibodies efficiently opsonized B. pertussis. All the data here obtained shows that OMVs based vaccine is able to induce Th1/Th17 and Th2 mixed profile with robust humoral response involved in protection, positioning this candidate among the different possibilities to constitute the third generation of anti-pertussis vaccines. PMID:27151884

  7. Molecular Components of the Sporothrix schenckii Complex that Induce Immune Response.

    PubMed

    Alba-Fierro, Carlos A; Pérez-Torres, Armando; Toriello, Conchita; Romo-Lozano, Yolanda; López-Romero, Everardo; Ruiz-Baca, Estela

    2016-08-01

    Sporotrichosis is a fungal disease caused by the Sporothrix schenckii complex that includes species such as S. brasiliensis, S. schenckii sensu stricto, S. globosa, S. luriei, S. mexicana, and S. pallida, which exhibit different potentially antigenic molecular components. The immune response of susceptible hosts to control infection and disease caused by these fungi has been little studied. Besides, the fungus-host interaction induces the activation of different types of immune response. This mini-review analyzes and discusses existing reports on the identification and functional characterization of molecules from species of the S. schenckii complex with clinical relevance, and the mechanisms that mediate the type and magnitude of the immune response in experimental models in vivo and in vitro. This knowledge is expected to contribute to the development of protective and therapeutic strategies against sporotrichosis and other mycoses. PMID:27117164

  8. Dissecting Polyclonal Vaccine-Induced Humoral Immunity against HIV Using Systems Serology.

    PubMed

    Chung, Amy W; Kumar, Manu P; Arnold, Kelly B; Yu, Wen Han; Schoen, Matthew K; Dunphy, Laura J; Suscovich, Todd J; Frahm, Nicole; Linde, Caitlyn; Mahan, Alison E; Hoffner, Michelle; Streeck, Hendrik; Ackerman, Margaret E; McElrath, M Juliana; Schuitemaker, Hanneke; Pau, Maria G; Baden, Lindsey R; Kim, Jerome H; Michael, Nelson L; Barouch, Dan H; Lauffenburger, Douglas A; Alter, Galit

    2015-11-01

    While antibody titers and neutralization are considered the gold standard for the selection of successful vaccines, these parameters are often inadequate predictors of protective immunity. As antibodies mediate an array of extra-neutralizing Fc functions, when neutralization fails to predict protection, investigating Fc-mediated activity may help identify immunological correlates and mechanism(s) of humoral protection. Here, we used an integrative approach termed Systems Serology to analyze relationships among humoral responses elicited in four HIV vaccine trials. Each vaccine regimen induced a unique humoral "Fc fingerprint." Moreover, analysis of case:control data from the first moderately protective HIV vaccine trial, RV144, pointed to mechanistic insights into immune complex composition that may underlie protective immunity to HIV. Thus, multi-dimensional relational comparisons of vaccine humoral fingerprints offer a unique approach for the evaluation and design of novel vaccines against pathogens for which correlates of protection remain elusive. PMID:26544943

  9. Antigen-oriented T cell migration contributes to myelin peptide induced-EAE and immune tolerance.

    PubMed

    Zheng, Peiguo; Fu, Hanxiao; Wei, Gaohui; Wei, Zhongwei; Zhang, Junhua; Ma, Xuehan; Rui, Dong; Meng, Xianchun; Ming, Liang

    2016-08-01

    Treatment with soluble myelin peptide can efficiently and specifically induce tolerance to demyelination autoimmune diseases including multiple sclerosis, however the mechanism underlying this therapeutic effect remains to be elucidated. In actively induced mouse model of experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EAE) we analyzed T cell and innate immune cell responses in the central nervous system (CNS) and spleen after intraperitoneal (i.p.) infusion of myelin oligodendrocyte glycoprotein (MOG). We found that i.p. MOG infusion blocked effector T cell recruitment to the CNS and protected mice from EAE and lymphoid organ atrophy. Innate immune CD11b(+) cells preferentially recruited MOG-specific effector T cells, particularly when activated to become competent antigen presenting cells (APCs). During EAE development, mature APCs were enriched in the CNS rather than in the spleen, attracting effector T cells to the CNS. Increased myelin antigen exposure induced CNS-APC maturation, recruiting additional effector T cells to the CNS, causing symptoms of disease. MOG triggered functional maturation of splenic APCs. MOG presenting APCs interacted with MOG-specific T cells in the spleen, aggregating to cluster around CD11b(+) cells, and were trapped in the periphery. This process was MHC II dependent as an MHC II directed antibody blocked CD4(+) T cell cluster formation. These findings highlight the role of myelin peptide-loaded APCs in myelin peptide-induced EAE and immune tolerance. PMID:27327113

  10. Gene expression profiling of Gram-negative bacteria-induced inflammation in human whole blood: The role of complement and CD14-mediated innate immune response.

    PubMed

    Lau, Corinna; Olstad, Ole Kristoffer; Holden, Marit; Nygård, Ståle; Fure, Hilde; Lappegård, Knut Tore; Brekke, Ole-Lars; Espevik, Terje; Hovig, Eivind; Mollnes, Tom Eirik

    2015-09-01

    Non-sterile pathogen-induced sepsis and sterile inflammation like in trauma or ischemia-reperfusion injury may both coincide with the life threatening systemic inflammatory response syndrome and multi-organ failure. Consequently, there is an urgent need for specific biomarkers in order to distinguish sepsis from sterile conditions. The overall aim of this study was to uncover putative sepsis biomarkers and biomarker pathways, as well as to test the efficacy of combined inhibition of innate immunity key players complement and Toll-like receptor co-receptor CD14 as a possible therapeutic regimen for sepsis. We performed whole blood gene expression analyses using microarray in order to profile Gram-negative bacteria-induced inflammatory responses in an ex vivo human whole blood model. The experiments were performed in the presence or absence of inhibitors of complement proteins (C3 and CD88 (C5a receptor 1)) and CD14, alone or in combination. In addition, we used blood from a C5-deficient donor. Anti-coagulated whole blood was challenged with heat-inactivated Escherichia coli for 2 h, total RNA was isolated and microarray analyses were performed on the Affymetrix GeneChip Gene 1.0 ST Array platform. The initial experiments were performed in duplicates using blood from two healthy donors. C5-deficiency is very rare, and only one donor could be recruited. In order to increase statistical power, a technical replicate of the C5-deficient samples was run. Subsequently, log2-transformed intensities were processed by robust multichip analysis and filtered using a threshold of four. In total, 73 microarray chips were run and analyzed. The normalized and filtered raw data have been deposited in NCBI's Gene Expression Omnibus (GEO) and are accessible with GEO Series accession number GSE55537. Linear models for microarray data were applied to estimate fold changes between data sets and the respective multiple testing adjusted p-values (FDR q-values). The interpretation of the