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Sample records for induction heating stress

  1. Finite element residual stress analysis of induction heating bended ferritic steel piping

    SciTech Connect

    Kima, Jong Sung; Kim, Kyoung-Soo; Oh, Young-Jin; Chang, Hyung-Young; Park, Heung-Bae

    2014-10-06

    Recently, there is a trend to apply the piping bended by induction heating process to nuclear power plants. Residual stress can be generated due to thermo-mechanical mechanism during the induction heating bending process. It is well-known that the residual stress has important effect on crack initiation and growth. The previous studies have focused on the thickness variation. In part, some studies were performed for residual stress evaluation of the austenitic stainless steel piping bended by induction heating. It is difficult to find the residual stresses of the ferritic steel piping bended by the induction heating. The study assessed the residual stresses of induction heating bended ferriticsteel piping via finite element analysis. As a result, it was identified that high residual stresses are generated on local outersurface region of the induction heating bended ferritic piping.

  2. Aging impairs induction of redox factor-1 after heat stress: a potential mechanism for heat-induced liver injury

    PubMed Central

    Sholomskas, Leslee M; Roche, Kathryn L; Bloomer, Steven A

    2015-01-01

    Aging is associated with reduced tolerance to physiological stressors such as hyperthermia. In animal models, heat stress is associated with increased oxidative damage in the livers of old rats. In this study, we evaluated the expression of redox factor-1 (Ref-1), a DNA repair enzyme, and thioredoxin-1 (Trx-1), an antioxidant protein. We hypothesized that these proteins would be induced by heat stress in young animals, and that aging would attenuate this response. Young (6 mo) and old (24 mo) male Fischer 344 rats were exposed to a two-heat stress protocol, and livers were harvested at several time points after the second heat stress. Ref-1 and Trx-1 were evaluated by immunoblot and immunohistochemistry. In young rats, Ref-1 was induced by ~50% immediately (0 h) after heat stress, and returned to control levels at 2 h. We observed no change in Ref-1 after hyperthermia in old rats; however, aging was associated with a 2-fold increase in Ref-1 expression. At 2 h after heat stress, Trx-1 was increased in old rats, but there was no change in young rats. In tissue sections, we observed frequent ductular reactions in the old rats that were positive for both Ref-1 and Trx-1. The impairment in the induction of Ref-1 suggests a mechanism for the increased oxidative injury observed in old rats after heat stress. Furthermore, the observation of ductular reactions positive for both Ref-1 and Trx-1 demonstrates a proliferative cellular niche that develops with aging. PMID:26069525

  3. Induction of Rhizopus oryzae germination under starvation using host metabolites increases spore susceptibility to heat stress.

    PubMed

    Turgeman, Tidhar; Kakongi, Nathan; Schneider, Avishai; Vinokur, Yakov; Teper-Bamnolker, Paula; Carmeli, Shmuel; Levy, Maggie; Skory, Christopher D; Lichter, Amnon; Eshel, Dani

    2014-03-01

    Sweetpotato is a nutritional source worldwide. Soft rot caused by Rhizopus spp. is a major limiting factor in the storage of produce, rendering it potentially unsafe for human consumption. In this study, Rhizopus oryzae was used to develop a concept of postharvest disease control by weakening the pathogen through induction of spore germination under starvation conditions. We isolated the sweetpotato active fractions (SPAFs) that induce spore germination and used them at a low dose to enhance spore weakening caused by starvation. Germination in SPAF at 1 mg/ml weakened the pathogen spores by delaying their ability to form colonies on rich media and by increasing their sensitivity to heat stress. The weakening effect was also supported by reduced metabolic activity, as detected by Alarmar Blue fluorescent dye assays. Spores incubated with SPAF at 1 mg/ml showed DNA fragmentation in some of their nuclei, as observed by TUNEL assay. In addition, these spores exhibited changes in ultrastructural morphology (i.e., shrinkage of germ tubes, nucleus deformation, and vacuole formation) which are hallmarks of programmed cell death. We suggest that induction of spore germination under starvation conditions increases their susceptibility to stress and, therefore, might be considered a new strategy for pathogen control. PMID:24093921

  4. Induction heat treatment of steel

    SciTech Connect

    Semiatin, S.L.; Stutz, D.E.

    1985-01-01

    This book discusses the induction heating. After reviewing heat treating operations for steel and the principles of the heat treatment of steel, an overview of induction heat treating is provided. Next, consideration is given to equipment and equipment selection, coil design, power requirements and temperature control. A discussion of surface and through hardening of steel is provided, including information on frequency and power selection and quenching apparatus. Tempering is considered, followed by information on control of residual stresses, cracking, temper brittleness and the important metallurgical and hardness differences between induction and furnace treated steel.

  5. Heat Stress

    MedlinePlus

    ... Stress Learn some tips to protect workers including: acclimatization, rest breaks, and fluid recommendations. NIOSH Workplace Solution: ... Blog: Adjusting to Work in the Heat: Why Acclimatization Matters The natural adaptation to the heat takes ...

  6. Induction of the major heat-stress protein in purified rat glial cells

    SciTech Connect

    Nishimura, R.N.; Dwyer, B.E.; Welch, W.; Cole, R.; de Vellis, J.; Liotta, K.

    1988-05-01

    Cultured purified oligodendroglia and astroglia exposed to heat stress (45 degrees C, 10 or 20 min) synthesized a 68-kDa heat-stress protein, which migrates on two-dimensional gel electrophoresis and reacts with a specific monoclonal antibody suggesting it is similar to a major 72-kDa heat-shock protein previously reported in other cell types. This protein was not detected in control glial cultures. Actinomycin D prevented synthesis of this protein demonstrating an absolute requirement for newly synthesized mRNA. The response was prolonged by increasing the period of heat stress from 10 to 20 min. In addition to the 68-kDa HSP protein, the incorporation of radioactivity into 70-, 89-, and 97-kDa proteins was also increased after heating, but in contrast to the 68 kDa protein these proteins appeared to be made in control glial cultures.

  7. Induction heating coupler

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fox, Robert L. (Inventor); Copeland, Carl E. (Inventor); Swaim, Robert J. (Inventor); Coultrip, Robert H. (Inventor); Johnston, David F. (Inventor); Phillips, W. Morris (Inventor); Johnson, Samuel D. (Inventor); Dinkins, James R. (Inventor); Buckley, John D. (Inventor)

    1994-01-01

    An induction heating device includes a handle having a hollow interior and two opposite ends, a wrist connected to one end of the handle, a U-shaped pole piece having two spaced apart ends, a tank circuit including an induction coil wrapped around the pole piece and a capacitor connected to the induction coil, a head connected to the wrist and including a housing for receiving the U-shaped pole piece, the two spaced apart ends of the pole piece extending outwardely beyond the housing, and a power source connected to the tank circuit. When the tank circuit is energized and a susceptor is placed in juxtaposition to the ends of the U-shaped pole piece, the susceptor is heated by induction heating due to magnetic flux passing between the two ends of the pole piece.

  8. Flexible heating head for induction heating

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fox, Robert L. (Inventor); Johnson, Samuel D. (Inventor); Coultrip, Robert H. (Inventor); Phillips, W. Morris (Inventor)

    1993-01-01

    An induction heating head includes a length of wire having first and second opposite ends and being wound in a flat spiral shape to form an induction coil, a capacitor connected to the first and second ends of the wire, the induction coil and capacitor defining a tank circuit, and a flexible, elastomeric body molded to encase the induction coil. When a susceptor is placed in juxtaposition to the body, and the tank circuit is powered, the susceptor is inductively heated.

  9. Adjustable Induction-Heating Coil

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ellis, Rod; Bartolotta, Paul

    1990-01-01

    Improved design for induction-heating work coil facilitates optimization of heating in different metal specimens. Three segments adjusted independently to obtain desired distribution of temperature. Reduces time needed to achieve required temperature profiles.

  10. Quantification of the decay and re-induction of heat acclimation in dry-heat following 12 and 26 days without exposure to heat stress.

    PubMed

    Weller, Andrew S; Linnane, Denise M; Jonkman, Anna G; Daanen, Hein A M

    2007-12-01

    Compared with the induction of heat acclimation (HA), studies investigating the decay and re-induction of HA (RA) are relatively sparse and have yielded conflicting results. Therefore, 16 semi-nude men were acclimated to dry-heat by undertaking an exercise protocol in a hot chamber (dry-bulb temperature 46.1 +/- 0.1 degrees C; relative humidity 17.9 +/- 0.1%) on 10 consecutive days (HA1-10) in winter UK. Thereafter, the subjects were divided into two groups and re-exposed to the work-in-heat tests after 12 and 26 days until RA was attained (RA(12), n = 8; RA(26), n = 8). The exercise protocol consisted of 60 min of treadmill walking (1.53 m s(-1)) at an incline individually set to induce a rectal temperature (T (re)) of approximately 38.5 degrees C during HA1 (equating to 45 +/- 4% peak oxygen uptake), followed by 10 min of rest and 40 min of further treadmill exercise, the intensity of which was increased across HA to maintain T(re )at approximately 38.5 degrees C. T(re), mean skin temperature, heart rate and rate of total water loss measured at 60 min did not change after HA7, and HA was taken as the mean of the responses during HA8-10. For both groups, there was no decay in T(re) and for all measured variables RA was attained after 2 and 4 days in RA(12) and RA(26), respectively. It is concluded that once adaptation to heat has been attained, the time that individuals may spend in cooler conditions before returning to a hot environment could be as long as one month, without the need for extensive re-adaptation to heat. PMID:17891541

  11. Effects of icing or heat stress on the induction of fibrosis and/or regeneration of injured rat soleus muscle.

    PubMed

    Shibaguchi, Tsubasa; Sugiura, Takao; Fujitsu, Takanori; Nomura, Takumi; Yoshihara, Toshinori; Naito, Hisashi; Yoshioka, Toshitada; Ogura, Akihiko; Ohira, Yoshinobu

    2016-07-01

    The effects of icing or heat stress on the regeneration of injured soleus muscle were investigated in male Wistar rats. Bupivacaine was injected into soleus muscles bilaterally to induce muscle injury. Icing (0 °C, 20 min) was carried out immediately after the injury. Heat stress (42 °C, 30 min) was applied every other day during 2-14 days after the bupivacaine injection. Injury-related increase in collagen deposition was promoted by icing. However, the level of collagen deposition in heat-stressed animals was maintained at control levels throughout the experimental period and was significantly lower than that in icing-treated animals at 15 and 28 days after bupivacaine injection. Furthermore, the recovery of muscle mass, protein content, and muscle fiber size of injured soleus toward control levels was partially facilitated by heat stress. These results suggest that, compared with icing, heat stress may be a beneficial treatment for successful muscle regeneration at least by reducing fibrosis. PMID:26759024

  12. Induction heating coupler and annealer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fox, Robert L. (Inventor); Johnson, Samuel D. (Inventor); Copeland, Carl E. (Inventor); Coultrip, Robert H. (Inventor); Phillips, W. Morris (Inventor); Johnston, David F. (Inventor); Swaim, Robert J. (Inventor); Dinkins, James R. (Inventor)

    1994-01-01

    An induction heating device includes a handle having a hollow interior and two opposite ends, a wrist connected to one end of the handle, a U-shaped pole piece having- two spaced apart ends, a tank circuit including an induction coil wrapped around the pole piece and a capacitor connected to the induction coil, a head connected to the wrist and including a housing for receiving the U-shaped pole piece, the two spaced apart ends of the pole piece extending outwardly beyond the housing, and a power source connected to the tank circuit. When the tank circuit is energized and a susceptor is placed in juxtaposition to the ends of the U-shaped pole piece, the susceptor is heated by induction heating due to a magnetic flux passing between the two ends of the pole piece.

  13. In vivo studies on artificial induction of thermotolerance to detached panicles of wheat (Triticum aestivum L) cultivars under heat stress.

    PubMed

    Asthir, Bavita; Bhatia, Surekha

    2014-01-01

    The mechanism imparting thermotolerance by gibberellic acid (GA3) and abscisic acid (ABA) is still unresolved using either spraying technique or in vitro conditions. Alternative way of studying these effects under near in vivo conditions is through the use of liquid culturing technique. Effects of GA3 and ABA (100 μM) on sucrose metabolism (invertase and sucrose synthase) and aminotransferases (GOT and GPT) in relation to starch and protein accumulation were studied in detached panicles of three wheat (Triticum aestivum L.) cultivars PBW 343, C 306 (heat tolerant) and WH 542 (heat susceptible) cultured in a liquid medium. Ears were subjected to heat shock treatment (45 °C for 2 h) and then maintained at 25 °C for 5 days. Heat shock treatment resulted in a significant decline in starch content but caused a marked build -up of total free sugars and protein content in grains of all cultivars. However, activities of acid and neutral invertases increased only in tolerant cultivars but reduced in susceptible cultivar. Following treatment with GA3 contents of starch and free sugars increased in grains maintained at 25 °C but free sugar content decreased in stressed grains compared to control. ABA application showed inhibitory effect on starch accumulation under normal temperature but was promotory under stress conditions. Concomitantly, soluble protein content also increased in conjunction with an increase in the activities of glutamate-oxaloacetate transaminase (GOT) and glutamate-pyruvate transaminase (GPT). Apparently, the wheat grain responds to heat shock mediated disruption of carbon metabolism by a compensatory effect on nitrogen metabolism. GA3 stimulated grain sink activity both under stress and non stress condition while ABA was promotory only under stress condition. PMID:24426056

  14. Stress and Distortion Evolution During Induction Case Hardening of Tube

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nemkov, Valentin; Goldstein, Robert; Jackowski, John; Ferguson, Lynn; Li, Zhichao

    2013-07-01

    Simulation of stresses during heat treatment relates usually to furnace heating. Induction heating provides a very different evolution of temperature in the part and therefore different stresses. This may be positive for service properties or negative, reducing component strength or even causing cracks. A method of coupled simulation between electromagnetic, thermal, structural, stress, and deformation phenomena during induction tube hardening is described. Commercial software package ELTA is used to calculate the power density distribution in the load resulting from the induction heating process. The program DANTE is used to predict temperature distribution, phase transformations, stress state, and deformation during heating and quenching. Analyses of stress and deformation evolution were made on a simple case of induction hardening of external (1st case) and internal (2nd case) surfaces of a thick-walled tubular body.

  15. Induction heating plant for heat treatment of spherical metal products

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meshcheryakov, V. N.; Titov, S. S.

    2015-12-01

    A control system for an induction heating plant is developed and studied to perform symmetric high-rate surface induction heating of spherical metal products with given technological parameters for heat treatment.

  16. Electron heating in inductive discharges

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hagelaar, Gerjan

    2009-10-01

    Radio-frequency inductive discharges are used to sustain plasma in negative ion sources for neutral beam injection [W. Kraus et al 2002 Rev. Sci. Instrum. 73, 1096] currently under development for the ITER fusion experiment. To accompany the experimental development, a comprehensive numerical model is being developed, describing the main physical principles of these sources self-consistently: inductive coupling and electron heating in the source drivers, magnetised plasma transport in the source body, negative ion extraction across a magnetic filter, low-density neutral flow and depletion by the plasma, chemistry of negative ion creation in the volume and at the surface, etc. In this presentation we discuss the principles and modelling of the inductive electron heating in these sources. In particular, we propose a simple method to describe the anomalous skin effect through a fluid equation for electron momentum including a viscosity term with an effective viscosity coefficient. We also discuss the effects of the static and radio-frequency magnetic fields on the inductive coupling and the consequences for the plasma properties.

  17. Heat stress proteins in hypertension

    SciTech Connect

    Malo, D.; Tremblay, J.; Pang, S.C.; Schlager, G.; Hamet, P.

    1986-03-05

    It has been described that spontaneously hypertensive rats (SHR) are more sensitive to an acute environmental heat stress and that cultured cardiomyocytes from neonatal SHR are demonstrated to be more thermosensitive. In addition, chronically heat exposed spontaneously hypertensive mice leads to a decrease of blood pressure in these animals. Heat shock is known to induce the synthesis of a new set of proteins (HSP) in every cell tested. This ubiquitous response seems to be involved in the induction of a thermotolerant state. The synthesis of 70K HSP was observed in lymphocytes isolated from the spleen of chronically heated mice. They used lymphocytes, previously isolated on a ficoll gradient, to evaluate the HSP induction in normotensive (WKY) and hypertensive (SHR) rats. The heat shock was induced by exposing the lymphocytes at 46/sup 0/C during 5 min in a hot water bath. The cells were then labeled with (/sup 75/Se)-methionine, washed, homogenized and separated on 5-30% SDS-polyacrylamide gel. Preliminary results suggest an abnormal pattern of induction of 70K and 90K HSP in hypertension. Heat sensitivity, thermotolerance and expression of HSP may, thus, be related to hypertension.

  18. Induction of neutral trehalase Nth1 by heat and osmotic stress is controlled by STRE elements and Msn2/Msn4 transcription factors: variations of PKA effect during stress and growth.

    PubMed

    Zähringer, H; Thevelein, J M; Nwaka, S

    2000-01-01

    Saccharomyces cerevisiae neutral trehalase, encoded by NTH1, controls trehalose hydrolysis in response to multiple stress conditions, including nutrient limitation. The presence of three stress responsive elements (STREs, CCCCT) in the NTH1 promoter suggested that the transcriptional activator proteins Msn2 and Msn4, as well as the cAMP-dependent protein kinase (PKA), control the stress-induced expression of Nth1. Here, we give direct evidence that Msn2/Msn4 and the STREs control the heat-, osmotic stress- and diauxic shift-dependent induction of Nth1. Disruption of MSN2 and MSN4 abolishes or significantly reduces the heat- and NaCl-induced increases in Nth1 activity and transcription. Stress-induced increases in activity of a lacZ reporter gene put under control of the NTH1 promoter is nearly absent in the double mutant. In all instances, basal expression is also reduced by about 50%. The trehalose concentration in the msn2 msn4 double mutant increases less during heat stress and drops more slowly during recovery than in wild-type cells. This shows that Msn2/Msn4-controlled expression of enzymes of trehalose synthesis and hydrolysis help to maintain trehalose concentration during stress. However, the Msn2/Msn4-independent mechanism exists for heat control of trehalose metabolism. Site-directed mutagenesis of the three STREs (CCCCT changed to CATCT) in NTH1 promoter fused to a reporter gene indicates that the relative proximity of STREs to each other is important for the function of NTH1. Elimination of the three STREs abolishes the stress-induced responses and reduces basal expression by 30%. Contrary to most STRE-regulated genes, the PKA effect on the induction of NTH1 by heat and sodium chloride is variable. During diauxic growth, NTH1 promoter-controlled reporter activity strongly increases, as opposed to the previously observed decrease in Nth1 activity, suggesting a tight but opposite control of the enzyme at the transcriptional and post-translational levels

  19. Protecting Yourself from Heat Stress

    MedlinePlus

    ... Contact NIOSH NIOSH Fast Facts: Protecting Yourself from Heat Stress Language: English Español (Spanish) Kreyol Haitien (Haitian ... as heat stroke, heat exhaustion, or heat cramps. Heat Stroke A condition that occurs when the body ...

  20. Stress and heat flow

    SciTech Connect

    Lachenbrunch, A.H.; McGarr, A.

    1990-01-01

    As the Pacific plate slides northward past the North American plate along the San Andreas fault, the frictional stress that resists plate motion there is overcome to cause earthquakes. However, the frictional heating predicted for the process has never been detected. Thus, in spite of its importance to an understanding of both plate motion and earthquakes, the size of this frictional stress is still uncertain, even in order of magnitude.

  1. Ion plating with an induction heating source

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Spalvins, T.; Brainard, W. A.

    1976-01-01

    Induction heating is introduced as an evaporation heat source in ion plating. A bare induction coil without shielding can be directly used in the glow discharge region with no arcing. The only requirement is to utilize an rf inductive generator with low operating frequency of 75 kHz. Mechanical simplicity of the ion plating apparatus and ease of operation is a great asset for industrial applications; practically any metal such as nickel, iron, and the high temperature refractories can be evaporated and ion plated.

  2. Protecting Workers from Heat Stress

    MedlinePlus

    QUICK CARD TM Protecting Workers from Heat Stress Heat Illness Exposure to heat can cause illness and death. The most serious ... OSHA (6742) OSHA 3154 -06R 2014 QUICK CARD TM • Modify work schedules and arrange frequent rest periods ...

  3. Heat Stress Monitor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1994-01-01

    The heavy, cumbersome body protection suits worn by members of hazardous materials response teams cause marked elevation of body temperatures, which can reduce effectiveness and lead to heat stress and injury. The CorTemp System, marketed by Human Technologies, Inc., provides the basis for a body temperature monitoring alarm system. Encased in a three-quarter-inch ingestible capsule, the system includes a mini-thermometer, miniature telemetry system, a microbattery and temperature sensor. It makes its way through the digestive system, continuously monitoring temperature. Findings are sent to the recorder by telemetry, and then displayed and stored for transfer to a computer.

  4. Defect characterization by inductive heated thermography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Noethen, Matthias; Meyendorf, Norbert

    2012-05-01

    During inductive-thermographic inspection, an eddy current of high intensity is induced into the inspected material and the thermal response is detected by an infrared camera. Anomalies in the surface temperature during and after inductive heating correspond to inhomogeneities in the material. A finite element simulation of the surface crack detection process using active thermography with inductive heating has been developed. The simulation model is based on the finite element software ANSYS. The simulation tool was tested and used for investigations on steel components with different longitudinal orientated cracks, varying in shape, width and height. This paper focuses on surface connected longitudinal orientated cracks in austenitic steel. The results show that depending on the excitation frequency the temperature distribution of the material under test are different and a possible way to measure the depth of the crack will be discussed.

  5. Heat stress in feedlot cattle

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Heat stress in feedlot cattle is a common summer time occurrence in cattle-producing parts of the world (United States, Australia, Brazil, etc.). The impact of heat stress on feedlot animals is quite varied--from little to no effect in a brief exposure, to causing reductions in feed intake, growth,...

  6. Heat induction of heat shock protein 25 requires cellular glutamine in intestinal epithelial cells.

    PubMed

    Phanvijhitsiri, Kittiporn; Musch, Mark W; Ropeleski, Mark J; Chang, Eugene B

    2006-08-01

    Glutamine is considered a nonessential amino acid; however, it becomes conditionally essential during critical illness when consumption exceeds production. Glutamine may modulate the heat shock/stress response, an important adaptive cellular response for survival. Glutamine increases heat induction of heat shock protein (Hsp) 25 in both intestinal epithelial cells (IEC-18) and mesenchymal NIH/3T3 cells, an effect that is neither glucose nor serum dependent. Neither arginine, histidine, proline, leucine, asparagine, nor tyrosine acts as physiological substitutes for glutamine for heat induction of Hsp25. The lack of effect of these amino acids was not caused by deficient transport, although some amino acids, including glutamate (a major direct metabolite of glutamine), were transported poorly by IEC-18 cells. Glutamate uptake could be augmented in a concentration- and time-dependent manner by increasing either media concentration and/or duration of exposure. Under these conditions, glutamate promoted heat induction of Hsp25, albeit not as efficiently as glutamine. Further evidence for the role of glutamine conversion to glutamate was obtained with the glutaminase inhibitor 6-diazo-5-oxo-l-norleucine (DON), which inhibited the effect of glutamine on heat-induced Hsp25. DON inhibited phosphate-dependent glutaminase by 75% after 3 h, decreasing cell glutamate. Increased glutamine/glutamate conversion to glutathione was not involved, since the glutathione synthesis inhibitor, buthionine sulfoximine, did not block glutamine's effect on heat induction of Hsp25. A large drop in ATP levels did not appear to account for the diminished Hsp25 induction during glutamine deficiency. In summary, glutamine is an important amino acid, and its requirement for heat-induced Hsp25 supports a role for glutamine supplementation to optimize cellular responses to pathophysiological stress. PMID:16554407

  7. Induction Heating of Planetesimals in Protoplanetary Disks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Menzel, Raymond L.; Roberge, W.

    2011-01-01

    Induction heating is a process originally proposed by Sonett et al. to explain thermal processing of asteroids, some of which were heated to temperatures >1000 K in the solar nebula. In the scenario of Sonett et al., the asteroids were heated during the Sun's T Tauri phase by a dense, fully-ionized solar wind. In their view an asteroid exposed to such a wind would "see” a motional electric field E=-v/c x B, where v is the wind velocity and B is the magnetic field in the wind's rest frame. If correct, the resulting electric polarization of the asteroidal material would produce electrical currents and heating via Ohmic dissipation. We revisit the induction heating mechanism to assess its possible relevance to planetesimals in weakly-ionized protoplanetary disks, where large magnetic fields of 0.1-1 G are predicted on a variety of grounds. Due to the high densities of these disks, we adopt a fluid approach for the plasma. We point out that E=-v/c x B is strictly speaking the electric field far from a planetesimal, where the plasma streams freely. At the planetesimal surface, viscous forces in a shear layer bring the plasma to rest and the motional electric field vanishes. We show that there is nevertheless a nonvanishing electric field produced indirectly via magnetic field perturbations in the shear layer. We calculate these perturbations by solving the equations of nonideal MHD, including Ohmic dissipation, the Hall effect, and ambipolar diffusion. We use these results to find the electric field in- and outside a planetesimal and give quantitative estimates of the rates of heating by Ohmic dissipation, viscous dissipation, and energy dissipation associated with ambipolar diffusion.

  8. Verification and validation for induction heating

    SciTech Connect

    Lam, Kin; Tippetts, Trevor B; Allen, David W

    2008-01-01

    Truchas is a software package being developed at LANL within the Telluride project for predicting the complex physical processes in metal alloy casting. The software was designed to be massively parallel, multi-material, multi-physics, and to run on 3D, fully unstructured meshes. This work describes a Verification and Validation assessment of Truchas for simulating the induction heating phase of a casting process. We used existing data from a simple experiment involving the induction heating of a graphite cylinder, as graphite is a common material used for mold assemblies. Because we do not have complete knowledge of all the conditions and properties in this experiment (as is the case in many other experiments), we performed a parameter sensitivity study, modeled the uncertainties of the most sensitive parameters, and quantified how these uncertainties propagate to the Truchas output response. A verification analysis produced estimates of the numerical error of the Truchas solution to our computational model. The outputs from Truchas runs with randomly sampled parameter values were used for the validation study.

  9. Improved Heat-Stress Algorithm

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Teets, Edward H., Jr.; Fehn, Steven

    2007-01-01

    NASA Dryden presents an improved and automated site-specific algorithm for heat-stress approximation using standard atmospheric measurements routinely obtained from the Edwards Air Force Base weather detachment. Heat stress, which is the net heat load a worker may be exposed to, is officially measured using a thermal-environment monitoring system to calculate the wet-bulb globe temperature (WBGT). This instrument uses three independent thermometers to measure wet-bulb, dry-bulb, and the black-globe temperatures. By using these improvements, a more realistic WBGT estimation value can now be produced. This is extremely useful for researchers and other employees who are working on outdoor projects that are distant from the areas that the Web system monitors. Most importantly, the improved WBGT estimations will make outdoor work sites safer by reducing the likelihood of heat stress.

  10. The Chlamydomonas heat stress response.

    PubMed

    Schroda, Michael; Hemme, Dorothea; Mühlhaus, Timo

    2015-05-01

    Heat waves occurring at increased frequency as a consequence of global warming jeopardize crop yield safety. One way to encounter this problem is to genetically engineer crop plants toward increased thermotolerance. To identify entry points for genetic engineering, a thorough understanding of how plant cells perceive heat stress and respond to it is required. Using the unicellular green alga Chlamydomonas reinhardtii as a model system to study the fundamental mechanisms of the plant heat stress response has several advantages. Most prominent among them is the suitability of Chlamydomonas for studying stress responses system-wide and in a time-resolved manner under controlled conditions. Here we review current knowledge on how heat is sensed and signaled to trigger temporally and functionally grouped sub-responses termed response elements to prevent damage and to maintain cellular homeostasis in plant cells. PMID:25754362

  11. Induction heat treatment as a means of increasing production

    SciTech Connect

    Golovin, G.F.; Shamov, A.N.

    1988-01-01

    The economic effectiveness of induction heat treatment was determined by a number of factors, including: saving energy and resources by substituting surface hardening for bulk or casehardening, improving labor productivity by process automation and including induction heat treatment equipment in the production line. Induction heating was found to be quick, does not require protection from oxidation, makes it possible to mechanize and automate the production process, and improves stabilization properties after annealing.

  12. Heat Shock-Independent Induction of Multidrug Resistance by Heat Shock Factor 1†

    PubMed Central

    Tchénio, Thierry; Havard, Marilyne; Martinez, Luis A.; Dautry, François

    2006-01-01

    The screening of two different retroviral cDNA expression libraries to select genes that confer constitutive doxorubicin resistance has in both cases resulted in the isolation of the heat shock factor 1 (HSF1) transcription factor. We show that HSF1 induces a multidrug resistance phenotype that occurs in the absence of heat shock or cellular stress and is mediated at least in part through the constitutive activation of the multidrug resistance gene 1 (MDR-1). This drug resistance phenotype does not correlate with an increased expression of heat shock-responsive genes (heat shock protein genes, or HSPs). In addition, HSF1 mutants lacking HSP gene activation are also capable of conferring multidrug resistance, and only hypophosphorylated HSF1 complexes accumulate in transduced cells. Our results indicate that HSF1 can activate MDR-1 expression in a stress-independent manner that differs from the canonical heat shock-activated mechanism involved in HSP induction. We further provide evidence that the induction of MDR-1 expression occurs at a posttranscriptional level, revealing a novel undocumented role for hypophosphorylated HSF1 in posttranscriptional gene regulation. PMID:16382149

  13. Analysis of the induction of general stress proteins of Bacillus subtilis.

    PubMed

    Völker, U; Engelmann, S; Maul, B; Riethdorf, S; Völker, A; Schmid, R; Mach, H; Hecker, M

    1994-04-01

    In Bacillus subtilis stress proteins are induced in response to different environmental conditions such as heat shock, salt stress, glucose and oxygen limitation or oxidative stress. These stress proteins have been previously grouped into general stress proteins (Gsps) and heat-specific stress proteins (Hsps). In this investigation the N-terminal sequences of 13 stress proteins of B. subtilis were determined. The quantification of the mRNA and the analysis of the protein synthesis pattern support the initial hypothesis that the chaperones DnaK and GroEL are Hsps in B. subtilis. In contrast, the recently described proteins GsiB, Ctc and RsbW belong to a class of Gsps that are induced by various stresses including heat shock. The main part of the Gsps described in this study failed to be induced in the sigB deletion mutant ML6 in response to heat shock. However, all the five Hsps were induced in this mutant in response to heat shock. These data indicate that SigB plays a crucial role in the induction of general stress genes, but is dispensable for the induction of Hsps. PMID:8012595

  14. Inductively heated particulate matter filter regeneration control system

    DOEpatents

    Gonze, Eugene V; Paratore Jr., Michael J; Kirby, Kevin W; Phelps, Amanda; Gregoire, Daniel J

    2012-10-23

    A system includes a particulate matter (PM) filter with an upstream end for receiving exhaust gas, a downstream end and zones. The system also includes a heating element. A control module selectively activates the heating element to inductively heat one of the zones.

  15. Inhibition of the oxidative stress response by heat stress in Caenorhabditis elegans.

    PubMed

    Crombie, Timothy A; Tang, Lanlan; Choe, Keith P; Julian, David

    2016-07-15

    It has long been recognized that simultaneous exposure to heat stress and oxidative stress shows a synergistic interaction that reduces organismal fitness, but relatively little is known about the mechanisms underlying this interaction. We investigated the role of molecular stress responses in driving this synergistic interaction using the nematode Caenorhabditis elegans To induce oxidative stress, we used the pro-oxidant compounds acrylamide, paraquat and juglone. As expected, we found that heat stress and oxidative stress interact synergistically to reduce survival. Compared with exposure to each stressor alone, during simultaneous sublethal exposure to heat stress and oxidative stress the normal induction of key oxidative-stress response (OxSR) genes was generally inhibited, whereas the induction of key heat-shock response (HSR) genes was not. Genetically activating the SKN-1-dependent OxSR increased a marker for protein aggregation and decreased whole-worm survival during heat stress alone, with the latter being independent of HSF-1. In contrast, compared with wild-type worms, inactivating the HSR by HSF-1 knockdown, which would be expected to decrease basal heat shock protein expression, increased survival during oxidative stress alone. Taken together, these data suggest that, in C. elegans, the HSR and OxSR cannot be simultaneously activated to the same extent that each can be activated during a single stressor exposure. We conclude that the observed synergistic reduction in survival during combined exposure to heat stress and oxidative stress is due, at least in part, to inhibition of the OxSR during activation of the HSR. PMID:27207646

  16. Contrasting effects of midazolam on induction of heat shock protein 27 by vasopressin and heat in aortic smooth muscle cells.

    PubMed

    Tanabe, K; Kozawa, O; Niwa, M; Yamomoto, T; Matsuno, H; Ito, H; Kato, K; Dohi, S; Uematsu, T

    2001-01-01

    We previously showed that vasopressin stimulates the induction of heat shock protein (HSP) 27, a low molecular-weight HSP, through protein kinase C activation in aortic smooth muscle A10 cells. In the present study, we examined the effects of midazolam, an intravenous anesthetic, on the HSP27 induction stimulated by vasopressin, heat, or sodium arsenite (arsenite) in A10 cells. Midazolam inhibited the accumulation of HSP27 induced by vasopressin or 12-O-tetradecanoylphorbol 13-acetate (TPA), a direct activator of protein kinase C. Midazolam also reduced the vasopressin-induced level of the mRNA for HSP27. In contrast, midazolam enhanced the HSP27-accumulation induced by heat or arsenite. Midazolam also enhanced the heat-increased level of the mRNA for HSP27. However, midazolam had no effect on the dissociation of the aggregated form of HSP27 following stimulation by vasopressin, heat, or arsenite. These results suggest that midazolam suppresses vasopressin-stimulated HSP27 induction in vascular smooth muscle cells, and that this inhibitory effect is exerted at a point downstream from protein kinase C. In contrast, midazolam enhanced heat- or arsenite-stimulated HSP27 induction. Thus, midazolam has dual effects on the HSP27 induction stimulated by various stresses in vascular smooth muscle cells. PMID:11746514

  17. Inductive heating with magnetic materials inside flow reactors.

    PubMed

    Ceylan, Sascha; Coutable, Ludovic; Wegner, Jens; Kirschning, Andreas

    2011-02-01

    Superparamagnetic nanoparticles coated with silica gel or alternatively steel beads are new fixed-bed materials for flow reactors that efficiently heat reaction mixtures in an inductive field under flow conditions. The scope and limitations of these novel heating materials are investigated in comparison with conventional and microwave heating. The results suggest that inductive heating can be compared to microwave heating with respect to rate acceleration. It is also demonstrated that a very large diversity of different reactions can be performed under flow conditions by using inductively heated flow reactors. These include transfer hydrogenations, heterocyclic condensations, pericyclic reactions, organometallic reactions, multicomponent reactions, reductive cyclizations, homogeneous and heterogeneous transition-metal catalysis. Silica-coated iron oxide nanoparticles are stable under many chemical conditions and the silica shell could be utilized for further functionalization with Pd nanoparticles, rendering catalytically active heatable iron oxide particles. PMID:21274939

  18. ADHEREND THERMAL EFFECTS DURING BONDING WITH INDUCTIVELY HEATED FILMS

    EPA Science Inventory

    The thermal performance of an inductively heated film sandwiched between two identical adherends is investigated. Models for infinite conductivity finite thickness adherends, finite conductivity semi-infinite thickness adherends, and finite conductivity finite thickness adherends...

  19. REEXAMINATION OF INDUCTION HEATING OF PRIMITIVE BODIES IN PROTOPLANETARY DISKS

    SciTech Connect

    Menzel, Raymond L.; Roberge, Wayne G. E-mail: roberw@rpi.edu

    2013-10-20

    We reexamine the unipolar induction mechanism for heating asteroids originally proposed in a classic series of papers by Sonett and collaborators. As originally conceived, induction heating is caused by the 'motional electric field' that appears in the frame of an asteroid immersed in a fully ionized, magnetized solar wind and drives currents through its interior. However, we point out that classical induction heating contains a subtle conceptual error, in consequence of which the electric field inside the asteroid was calculated incorrectly. The problem is that the motional electric field used by Sonett et al. is the electric field in the freely streaming plasma far from the asteroid; in fact, the motional field vanishes at the asteroid surface for realistic assumptions about the plasma density. In this paper we revisit and improve the induction heating scenario by (1) correcting the conceptual error by self-consistently calculating the electric field in and around the boundary layer at the asteroid-plasma interface; (2) considering weakly ionized plasmas consistent with current ideas about protoplanetary disks; and (3) considering more realistic scenarios that do not require a fully ionized, powerful T Tauri wind in the disk midplane. We present exemplary solutions for two highly idealized flows that show that the interior electric field can either vanish or be comparable to the fields predicted by classical induction depending on the flow geometry. We term the heating driven by these flows 'electrodynamic heating', calculate its upper limits, and compare them to heating produced by short-lived radionuclides.

  20. Reexamination of Induction Heating of Primitive Bodies in Protoplanetary Disks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Menzel, Raymond L.; Roberge, Wayne G.

    2013-10-01

    We reexamine the unipolar induction mechanism for heating asteroids originally proposed in a classic series of papers by Sonett and collaborators. As originally conceived, induction heating is caused by the "motional electric field" that appears in the frame of an asteroid immersed in a fully ionized, magnetized solar wind and drives currents through its interior. However, we point out that classical induction heating contains a subtle conceptual error, in consequence of which the electric field inside the asteroid was calculated incorrectly. The problem is that the motional electric field used by Sonett et al. is the electric field in the freely streaming plasma far from the asteroid; in fact, the motional field vanishes at the asteroid surface for realistic assumptions about the plasma density. In this paper we revisit and improve the induction heating scenario by (1) correcting the conceptual error by self-consistently calculating the electric field in and around the boundary layer at the asteroid-plasma interface; (2) considering weakly ionized plasmas consistent with current ideas about protoplanetary disks; and (3) considering more realistic scenarios that do not require a fully ionized, powerful T Tauri wind in the disk midplane. We present exemplary solutions for two highly idealized flows that show that the interior electric field can either vanish or be comparable to the fields predicted by classical induction depending on the flow geometry. We term the heating driven by these flows "electrodynamic heating," calculate its upper limits, and compare them to heating produced by short-lived radionuclides.

  1. Water Replacement Schedules in Heat Stress

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Londeree, Ben R.; and others

    1969-01-01

    Although early ingestion of cold water appears to lead to greater relief from heat stress during physical exertion than late ingestion, this difference is reduced toward the end of an hour's work in high heat and humidity. (CK)

  2. Synthesis of Multiwall Carbon Nanotubes by Inductive Heating CCVD

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Biris, A. R.; Biris, A. S.; Lupu, D.; Trigwell, S.; Rahman, Z. U.; Aldea, N.; Marginean, P.

    2005-01-01

    The CCVD syntheses of MWCNTs from acetylene on Fe:Co:CaCO 3 and Fe:Co:CaO were performed using two different methods of heating: outer furnace and inductive heating. The comparative analysis of the MWCNTs obtained by the two methods show that the tubes grown in inductive heating have smaller diameters (5-25 nm), with fewer walls and aspect ratio of the order of hundreds. The ratio of outer to inner diameter (od/id) is ranging between 2 and 2.5. Inductively assisted CCVD is a very attractive method because of the major advantages that it presents, like low energetic consumption, thinner, well crystallized and more uniform tubes.

  3. Fluvoxamine alleviates ER stress via induction of Sigma-1 receptor.

    PubMed

    Omi, T; Tanimukai, H; Kanayama, D; Sakagami, Y; Tagami, S; Okochi, M; Morihara, T; Sato, M; Yanagida, K; Kitasyoji, A; Hara, H; Imaizumi, K; Maurice, T; Chevallier, N; Marchal, S; Takeda, M; Kudo, T

    2014-01-01

    We recently demonstrated that endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress induces sigma-1 receptor (Sig-1R) expression through the PERK pathway, which is one of the cell's responses to ER stress. In addition, it has been demonstrated that induction of Sig-1R can repress cell death signaling. Fluvoxamine (Flv) is a selective serotonin reuptake inhibitor (SSRI) with a high affinity for Sig-1R. In the present study, we show that treatment of neuroblastoma cells with Flv induces Sig-1R expression by increasing ATF4 translation directly, through its own activation, without involvement of the PERK pathway. The Flv-mediated induction of Sig-1R prevents neuronal cell death resulting from ER stress. Moreover, Flv-induced ER stress resistance reduces the infarct area in mice after focal cerebral ischemia. Thus, Flv, which is used frequently in clinical practice, can alleviate ER stress. This suggests that Flv could be a feasible therapy for cerebral diseases caused by ER stress. PMID:25032855

  4. Wireless induction heating in a microfluidic device for cell lysis.

    PubMed

    Baek, Seung-ki; Min, Junghong; Park, Jung-Hwan

    2010-04-01

    A wireless induction heating system in a microfluidic device was devised for cell lysis to extract DNA and RNA from Escherichia coli. The thermal responses of nickel, iron and copper heating units were studied by applying an alternating magnetic field as a function of geometry of unit, strength of magnetic field, and kind of metal. Heating units were prepared by cutting metal film using a fiber laser, and the units were integrated into a microchannel system using a soft lithographic process. Variation and distribution of temperature on the surface of the heating units was observed using a thermographic camera and temperature labels. The amount of protein released from E. coli by thermal lysis was determined by protein concentration measurement. Hemoglobin released from red blood cells was observed using colorimetric intensity measurement. Extracted DNA was quantified by real-time polymerase chain reaction, and the profile was compared with that of a positive control of ultrasonically disrupted E. coli. The stability of RNA extracted by induction heating was quantified by the measurement of 23S/16S rRNA ratio and comparison with that by normal RNA extraction kit as a gold standard. A solid-shaped nickel structure was selected as the induction heating element in the microfluidic device because of the relatively small influence of geometries and faster thermal response.The amount of protein extracted from E. coli and hemoglobin released from red blood cells by induction heating of the nickel unit in the microfluidic device was proportional to the strength of the applied magnetic field. The lysis of E. coli by induction heating was as effective as lysis of DNA by the ultrasonication method because the threshold cycle values of the sample were compatible with those of the positive control as measured by ultrasonication. Thermal lysis of E. coli by induction heating represents a reasonable alternative to a commercial RNA extraction method as shown by the comparative

  5. Induction heaters used to heat subsurface formations

    DOEpatents

    Nguyen, Scott Vinh; Bass, Ronald M.

    2012-04-24

    A heating system for a subsurface formation includes an elongated electrical conductor located in the subsurface formation. The electrical conductor extends between at least a first electrical contact and a second electrical contact. A ferromagnetic conductor at least partially surrounds and at least partially extends lengthwise around the electrical conductor. The electrical conductor, when energized with time-varying electrical current, induces sufficient electrical current flow in the ferromagnetic conductor such that the ferromagnetic conductor resistively heats to a temperature of at least about 300.degree. C.

  6. Joule heating of Io's ionosphere by unipolar induction currents

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Herbert, F.; Lichtenstein, B. R.

    1980-01-01

    Electrical induction in Io's ionosphere, due to the corotating plasma bound to the Jovian magnetosphere, is one possible source for the attainment of the high temperatures suggested by the large scale height of Io's ionosphere. Unipolar induction models are constructed to calculate ionospheric joule heating numerically, whose heating rates lie between 10 to the -9th and 10 to the -8th W/cu m. The binding and coupling of the ionosphere is due to the dense, and possibly ionized, neutral SO2 atmosphere, and there appears to be no need to postulate the existence of an intrinsic Ionian magnetic field in order to retain the observed ionnosphere.

  7. A computer simulation of an induction heating system

    SciTech Connect

    Egan, L.R. ); Furlani, E.P. )

    1991-09-01

    In this paper a method is presented for the design and analysis of induction heating systems. The method entails the simulation of system performance using an equivalent circuit approach. Equivalent circuit models are obtained for the three pats of an induction heating system: the power source, the impedance matching circuit, and the load. These model are combined in a system model which is analyzed using the Advanced Continuous Simulation Language (ACSL). This approach is applied to an existing system, and the predicted performance is in close agreement with measured data.

  8. Viscous effects on motion and heating of electrons in inductively coupled plasma reactors

    SciTech Connect

    Chang, C.H.; Bose, D.

    1999-10-01

    A transport model is developed for nonlocal effects on motion and heating of electrons in inductively coupled plasma reactors. The model is based on the electron momentum equation derived from the Boltzmann equation, retaining anisotropic stress components which in fact are viscous stresses. The resulting model consists of transport equations for the magnitude of electron velocity oscillation and terms representing energy dissipation due to viscous stresses in the electron energy equation. In this model, electrical current is obtained in a nonlocal manner due to viscous effects, instead of Ohm's law or the electron momentum equation without viscous effects, while nonlocal heating of electrons is represented by the viscous dissipation. Computational results obtained by two-dimensional numerical simulations show that nonlocal determination of electrical current indeed is important, and viscous dissipation becomes an important electron heating mechanism at low pressures. It is suspected that viscous dissipation in inductively coupled plasma reactors in fact represents stochastic heating of electrons, and this possibility is exploited by discussing physical similarities between stochastic heating and energy dissipation due to the stress tensor.

  9. Induction of Oxidative Stress in Kidney

    PubMed Central

    Ozbek, Emin

    2012-01-01

    Oxidative stress has a critical role in the pathophysiology of several kidney diseases, and many complications of these diseases are mediated by oxidative stress, oxidative stress-related mediators, and inflammation. Several systemic diseases such as hypertension, diabetes mellitus, and hypercholesterolemia; infection; antibiotics, chemotherapeutics, and radiocontrast agents; and environmental toxins, occupational chemicals, radiation, smoking, as well as alcohol consumption induce oxidative stress in kidney. We searched the literature using PubMed, MEDLINE, and Google scholar with “oxidative stress, reactive oxygen species, oxygen free radicals, kidney, renal injury, nephropathy, nephrotoxicity, and induction”. The literature search included only articles written in English language. Letters or case reports were excluded. Scientific relevance, for clinical studies target populations, and study design, for basic science studies full coverage of main topics, are eligibility criteria for articles used in this paper. PMID:22577546

  10. Aging augments mitochondrial susceptibility to heat stress

    PubMed Central

    Haak, Jodie L.; Buettner, Garry R.; Spitz, Douglas R.; Kregel, Kevin C.

    2009-01-01

    The pathophysiology of aging is accompanied by a decline in tolerance to environmental stress. While mitochondria are primary suspects in the etiology of aging, little is known about their ability to tolerate perturbations to homeostasis in older organisms. To investigate the role of mitochondria in the increased susceptibility to heat stress that accompanies aging, young and old Fischer 344 rats underwent a heat stress protocol known to elicit exaggerated cellular damage with aging. At either 2 or 24 h after heat stress, livers were removed from animals, and hepatic mitochondria were isolated. Electron microscopy revealed extensive morphological damage to mitochondria from young and, to a greater extent, old rats after heat stress. There was also a significant loss of cytochrome c from old, but not young, mitochondria and a persistent increase in 4-hydroxynonenal-modified proteins in old vs. young mitochondria exposed to heat stress. Electron paramagnetic resonance measurements of superoxide indicate greater superoxide production from mitochondria of old compared with young animals and suggest that mitochondrial integrity was altered during heat stress. The mitochondrial stress response, which functions to correct stress-induced damage to mitochondrial proteins, was also blunted in old rats. Delayed and reduced levels of heat shock protein 60 (Hsp60), the main inducible mitochondrial stress protein, were observed in old compared with young mitochondria after heat stress. Additionally, the amount of Hsp10 protein increased in young, but not old, rat liver mitochondria after hyperthermic challenge. Taken together, these data suggest that mitochondria in old animals are more vulnerable to incurring and less able to repair oxidative damage that occurs in response to a physiologically relevant heat stress. PMID:19144753

  11. Human Cardiovascular Responses to Passive Heat Stress

    PubMed Central

    Crandall, Craig G.; Wilson, Thad E.

    2016-01-01

    Heat stress increases human morbidity and mortality compared to normothermic conditions. Many occupations, disease states, as well as stages of life are especially vulnerable to the stress imposed on the cardiovascular system during exposure to hot ambient conditions. This review focuses on the cardiovascular responses to heat stress that are necessary for heat dissipation. To accomplish this regulatory feat requires complex autonomic nervous system control of the heart and various vascular beds. For example, during heat stress cardiac output increases up to twofold, by increases in heart rate and an active maintenance of stroke volume via increases in inotropy in the presence of decreases in cardiac preload. Baroreflexes retain the ability to regulate blood pressure in many, but not all, heat stress conditions. Central hypovolemia is another cardiovascular challenge brought about by heat stress, which if added to a subsequent central volumetric stress, such as hemorrhage, can be problematic and potentially dangerous, as syncope and cardiovascular collapse may ensue. These combined stresses can compromise blood flow and oxygenation to important tissues such as the brain. It is notable that this compromised condition can occur at cardiac outputs that are adequate during normothermic conditions but are inadequate in heat because of the increased systemic vascular conductance associated with cutaneous vasodilation. Understanding the mechanisms within this complex regulatory system will allow for the development of treatment recommendations and countermeasures to reduce risks during the ever-increasing frequency of severe heat events that are predicted to occur. PMID:25589263

  12. Human cardiovascular responses to passive heat stress.

    PubMed

    Crandall, Craig G; Wilson, Thad E

    2015-01-01

    Heat stress increases human morbidity and mortality compared to normothermic conditions. Many occupations, disease states, as well as stages of life are especially vulnerable to the stress imposed on the cardiovascular system during exposure to hot ambient conditions. This review focuses on the cardiovascular responses to heat stress that are necessary for heat dissipation. To accomplish this regulatory feat requires complex autonomic nervous system control of the heart and various vascular beds. For example, during heat stress cardiac output increases up to twofold, by increases in heart rate and an active maintenance of stroke volume via increases in inotropy in the presence of decreases in cardiac preload. Baroreflexes retain the ability to regulate blood pressure in many, but not all, heat stress conditions. Central hypovolemia is another cardiovascular challenge brought about by heat stress, which if added to a subsequent central volumetric stress, such as hemorrhage, can be problematic and potentially dangerous, as syncope and cardiovascular collapse may ensue. These combined stresses can compromise blood flow and oxygenation to important tissues such as the brain. It is notable that this compromised condition can occur at cardiac outputs that are adequate during normothermic conditions but are inadequate in heat because of the increased systemic vascular conductance associated with cutaneous vasodilation. Understanding the mechanisms within this complex regulatory system will allow for the development of treatment recommendations and countermeasures to reduce risks during the ever-increasing frequency of severe heat events that are predicted to occur. PMID:25589263

  13. Stress state of a plate heated by a heat source

    SciTech Connect

    Motovilovets, I.A.

    1995-11-01

    THis article presents the solution to a thermoelastic problem concerning the stress-strain of an infinite plate heated by a heat source. It is assumed that the temperature and the source of heat change linearly through the thickness of the plate. Errors made in [2,5,6] in the derivation of the thermoelastic equations of state are explained.

  14. Heat Stress-Induced DNA Damage

    PubMed Central

    Kantidze, O.L.; Velichko, A.K.; Luzhin, A.V.; Razin, S.V.

    2016-01-01

    Although the heat-stress response has been extensively studied for decades, very little is known about its effects on nucleic acids and nucleic acid-associated processes. This is due to the fact that the research has focused on the study of heat shock proteins and factors (HSPs and HSFs), their involvement in the regulation of transcription, protein homeostasis, etc. Recently, there has been some progress in the study of heat stress effects on DNA integrity. In this review, we summarize and discuss well-known and potential mechanisms of formation of various heat stress-induced DNA damage. PMID:27437141

  15. Inductions Buffer Nurses' Job Stress, Health, and Organizational Commitment.

    PubMed

    Kamau, Caroline; Medisauskaite, Asta; Lopes, Barbara

    2015-01-01

    Nurses suffer disproportionate levels of stress and are at risk of sickness-absence and turnover intentions, but there is a lack of research clarifying preventions. This study investigated the impact of inductions (job preparation courses) about mental health for nurses' job stress, general health, and organizational commitment. Data from 6,656 nurses were analyzed using structural equation modeling (SEM), showing that mental health inductions increase nurses' job satisfaction, which reduces their occupational stress and improves their health. SEM showed that these occupational health benefits increase the nurses' commitment to the organization. Job satisfaction (feeling valued, rewarded) also had a direct effect on nurses' intentions to continue working for the organization. Mental health inductions are therefore beneficial beyond job performance: they increase occupational health in the nursing profession. PMID:24971576

  16. A validated model for induction heating of shape memory alloy actuators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saunders, Robert N.; Boyd, James G.; Hartl, Darren J.; Brown, Jonathan K.; Calkins, Frederick T.; Lagoudas, Dimitris C.

    2016-04-01

    Shape memory alloy (SMA) actuators deliver high forces while being compact and reliable, making them ideal for consideration in aerospace applications. One disadvantage of these thermally driven actuators is their slow cyclic time response compared to conventional actuators. Induction heating has recently been proposed to quickly heat SMA components. However efforts to date have been purely empirical. The present work approachs this problem in a computational manner by developing a finite element model of induction heating in which the time-harmonic electromagnetic equations are solved for the Joule heat power field, the energy equation is solved for the temperature field, and the linear momentum equations are solved to find the stress, displacement, and internal state variable fields. The combined model was implemented in Abaqus using a Python script approach and applied to SMA torque tube and beam actuators. The model has also been used to examine magnetic flux concentrators to improve the induction systems performance. Induction heating experiments were performed using the SMA torque tube, and the model agreed well with the experiments.

  17. Satellite III non-coding RNAs show distinct and stress-specific patterns of induction

    SciTech Connect

    Sengupta, Sonali; Parihar, Rashmi; Ganesh, Subramaniam

    2009-04-24

    The heat shock response in human cells is associated with the transcription of satellite III repeats (SatIII) located in the 9q12 locus. Upon induction, the SatIII transcripts remain associated with the locus and recruit several transcription and splicing factors to form the nuclear stress bodies (nSBs). The nSBs are thought to modulate epigenetic changes during the heat shock response. We demonstrate here that the nSBs are induced by a variety of stressors and show stress-specific patterns of induction. While the transcription factor HSF1 is required for the induction of SatIII locus by the stressors tested, its specific role in the transcriptional process appears to be stress dependent. Our results suggest the existence of multiple transcriptional loci for the SatIII transcripts and that their activation might depend upon the type of stressors. Thus, induction of SatIII transcripts appears to be a generic response to a variety of stress conditions.

  18. Transverse flux induction heating of aluminum alloy strip

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Waggott, R.; Walker, D. J.; Gibson, R. C.; Johnson, R. C.

    1981-07-01

    Transverse flux induction heating, an efficient electrical technique particularly suited to the continuous heat treatment of metal strip, is explained. Also described is a 1MW transverse flux inductor designed and built at the Electricity Council Research Centre, Capenhurst, and installed in a tension leveller line at Alcan Plate Ltd., Birmingham, UK. It has been successfully used for the continuous heat treatment of wide (1200-1250 mm) aluminum alloy strip, involving full and partial annealing at line speeds up to 2/ms as well as the solution treatment of certain high strength aluminum alloys. The advantages of this form of induction heating are compactness, controllability, hence ease of automation, and high efficiency. As a consequence, compared with existing batch and continuous heat treatment equipment, major economies in plant operation result due to reduced energy consumption as well as reduced capital and labor costs. The compactness of the technique allows the possibility of introducing transverse flux induction heat treatment furnaces into existing process lines.

  19. Plant Heat Adaptation: priming in response to heat stress

    PubMed Central

    Bäurle, Isabel

    2016-01-01

    Abiotic stress is a major threat to crop yield stability. Plants can be primed by heat stress, which enables them to subsequently survive temperatures that are lethal to a plant in the naïve state. This is a rapid response that has been known for many years and that is highly conserved across kingdoms. Interestingly, recent studies in Arabidopsis and rice show that this thermo-priming lasts for several days at normal growth temperatures and that it is an active process that is genetically separable from the priming itself. This is referred to as maintenance of acquired thermotolerance or heat stress memory. Such a memory conceivably has adaptive advantages under natural conditions, where heat stress often is chronic or recurring. In this review, I will focus on recent advances in the mechanistic understanding of heat stress memory. PMID:27134736

  20. Advances in induction-heated plasma torch technology

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Poole, J. W.; Vogel, C. E.

    1972-01-01

    Continuing research has resulted in significant advances in induction-heated plasma torch technology which extend and enhance its potential for broad range of uses in chemical processing, materials development and testing, and development of large illumination sources. Summaries of these advances are briefly described.

  1. Induction heating apparatus and methods of operation thereof

    SciTech Connect

    Richardson, John G.

    2006-08-01

    Methods of operation of an induction melter include providing material within a cooled crucible proximate an inductor. A desired electromagnetic flux skin depth for heating the material within the crucible may be selected, and a frequency of an alternating current for energizing the inductor and for producing the desired skin depth may be selected. The alternating current frequency may be adjusted after energizing the inductor to maintain the desired electromagnetic flux skin depth. The desired skin depth may be substantially maintained as the temperature of the material varies. An induction heating apparatus includes a sensor configured to detect changes in at least one physical characteristic of a material to be heated in a crucible, and a controller configured for selectively varying a frequency of an alternating current for energizing an inductor at least partially in response to changes in the physical characteristic to be detected by the sensor.

  2. Heat Stress in Older Adults

    MedlinePlus

    ... well as young people to sudden changes in temperature. They are more likely to have a chronic ... that impair the body's ability to regulate its temperature or that inhibit perspiration. Heat Stroke Heat stroke ...

  3. Mechanisms of orthostatic intolerance during heat stress.

    PubMed

    Schlader, Zachary J; Wilson, Thad E; Crandall, Craig G

    2016-04-01

    Heat stress profoundly and unanimously reduces orthostatic tolerance. This review aims to provide an overview of the numerous and multifactorial mechanisms by which this occurs in humans. Potential causal factors include changes in arterial and venous vascular resistance and blood distribution, and the modulation of cardiac output, all of which contribute to the inability to maintain cerebral perfusion during heat and orthostatic stress. A number of countermeasures have been established to improve orthostatic tolerance during heat stress, which alleviate heat stress induced central hypovolemia (e.g., volume expansion) and/or increase peripheral vascular resistance (e.g., skin cooling). Unfortunately, these countermeasures can often be cumbersome to use with populations prone to syncopal episodes. Identifying the mechanisms of inter-individual differences in orthostatic intolerance during heat stress has proven elusive, but could provide greater insights into the development of novel and personalized countermeasures for maintaining or improving orthostatic tolerance during heat stress. This development will be especially impactful in occuational settings and clinical situations that present with orthostatic intolerance and/or central hypovolemia. Such investigations should be considered of vital importance given the impending increased incidence of heat events, and associated cardiovascular challenges that are predicted to occur with the ensuing changes in climate. PMID:26723547

  4. Drivers and barriers to heat stress resilience.

    PubMed

    Hatvani-Kovacs, Gertrud; Belusko, Martin; Skinner, Natalie; Pockett, John; Boland, John

    2016-11-15

    Heatwaves are the most dangerous natural hazard to health in Australia. The frequency and intensity of heatwaves will increase due to climate change and urban heat island effects in cities, aggravating the negative impacts of heatwaves. Two approaches exist to develop population heat stress resilience. Firstly, the most vulnerable social groups can be identified and public health services can prepare for the increased morbidity. Secondly, the population level of adaptation and the heat stress resistance of the built environment can be increased. The evaluation of these measures and their efficiencies has been fragmented across research disciplines. This study explored the relationships between the elements of heat stress resilience and their potential demographic and housing drivers and barriers. The responses of a representative online survey (N=393) about heat stress resilience at home and work from Adelaide, South Australia were analysed. The empirical findings demonstrate that heat stress resistant buildings increased adaptation capacity and decreased the number of health problems. Air-conditioning increased dependence upon it, limited passive adaptation and only people living in homes with whole-house air-conditioning had less health problems during heatwaves. Tenants and respondents with pre-existing health conditions were the most vulnerable, particularly as those with health conditions were not aware of their vulnerability. The introduction of an Energy Performance Certificate is proposed and discussed as an effective incentive to increase the heat stress resistance of and the general knowledge about the built environment. PMID:27432732

  5. TORO II simulations of induction heating in ferromagnetic materials

    SciTech Connect

    Adkins, D.R.; Gartling, D.K.; Kelley, J.B.; Kahle, P.M.

    1997-09-01

    TORO II is a finite element computer program that is used in the simulation of electric and magnetic fields. This code, which was developed at Sandia National Laboratories, has been coupled with a finite element thermal code, COYOTE II, to predict temperature profiles in inductively heated parts. The development of an effective technique to account for the nonlinear behavior of the magnetic permeability in ferromagnetic parts is one of the more difficult aspects of solving induction heating problems. In the TORO II code, nonlinear, spatially varying magnetic permeability is approximated by an effective permeability on an element-by-element basis that effectively provides the same energy deposition that is produced when the true permeability is used. This approximation has been found to give an accurate estimate of the volumetric heating distribution in the part, and predicted temperature distributions have been experimentally verified using a medium carbon steel and a 10kW industrial induction heating unit. Work on the model was funded through a Cooperative Research and Development Agreement (CRADA) between the Department of Energy and General Motors` Delphi Saginaw Steering Systems.

  6. Heat Stress- and Heat Shock Transcription Factor-Dependent Expression and Activity of Ascorbate Peroxidase in Arabidopsis1

    PubMed Central

    Panchuk, Irina I.; Volkov, Roman A.; Schöffl, Friedrich

    2002-01-01

    To find evidence for a connection between heat stress response, oxidative stress, and common stress tolerance, we studied the effects of elevated growth temperatures and heat stress on the activity and expression of ascorbate peroxidase (APX). We compared wild-type Arabidopsis with transgenic plants overexpressing heat shock transcription factor 3 (HSF3), which synthesize heat shock proteins and are improved in basal thermotolerance. Following heat stress, APX activity was positively affected in transgenic plants and correlated with a new thermostable isoform, APXS. This enzyme was present in addition to thermolabile cytosolic APX1, the prevalent isoform in unstressed cells. In HSF3-transgenic plants, APXS activity was detectable at normal temperature and persisted after severe heat stress at 44°C. In nontransgenic plants, APXS was undetectable at normal temperature, but could be induced by moderate heat stress. The mRNA expression profiles of known and three new Apx genes were determined using real-time PCR. Apx1 and Apx2 genes encoding cytosolic APX were heat stress and HSF dependently expressed, but only the representations of Apx2 mRNA met the criteria that suggest identity between APXS and APX2: not expressed at normal temperature in wild type, strong induction by heat stress, and HSF3-dependent expression in transgenic plants. Our data suggest that Apx2 is a novel heat shock gene and that the enzymatic activity of APX2/APXS is required to compensate heat stress-dependent decline of APX1 activity in the cytosol. The functional roles of modulations of APX expression and the interdependence of heat stress and oxidative stress response and signaling mechanisms are discussed. PMID:12068123

  7. Protective clothing and heat stress.

    PubMed

    Holmér, I

    1995-01-01

    The high level of protection required by protective clothing (PPC) severely impedes heat exchange by sweat evaporation. As a result work associated with wearing PPC, particularly in hot environments, implies considerable physiological strain and may render workers exhausted in a short time. Current methods of describing evaporative heat exchange with PPC are insufficient, will overestimate evaporative heat loss and should not be recommended. More reliable measures of the resistance to evaporative heat transfer by PPC should be developed and standardized. Direct measurements of evaporative resistance of PPC may be carried. However, a more promising method appears to be the definition of evaporative resistance on the basis of the icl-index for the fabric layers. The icl-index is a permeation efficiency ratio, which in combination with clothing insulation determines the evaporative heat transfer. Current methods should be further developed to account for effects of moisture condensation and microclimate ventilation. PMID:7875118

  8. Induction of the cellular stress response by Mytilus edulis upon contaminant exposure in situ

    SciTech Connect

    Ellison, H.; Sanders, B.; Steinert, S.

    1995-12-31

    The cellular stress response entails the induction of a suite of stress proteins which protect and repair vulnerable intracellular proteins from environmentally-induced damage. Since the induction of stress proteins reflects damage to proteins at a cellular level, the authors hypothesized that the tissue-level stress response would depend upon the mode of uptake, accumulation and mechanisms of toxicity for each contaminant. Here they examine the expression of the heat shock proteins hsp70 and cpn60 by the bay mussel, Mytilus edulis, in gill and mantle tissue at six stations in San Diego Bay which exhibit a range of PAH concentrations. After 30 days the mussels were retrieved, and gill and mantle tissues dissected. Western blotting techniques were used to measure the abundance of hsp70 and cpn60 in the two tissues. In contrast to induction by trace metals, both the basal and inducable levels of induction of stress proteins were greater in mantle than gill tissue. Relative abundance of hsp70 ranged from approximately one- to two-fold of the time 0 controls in both tissues, whereas cpn60 in mantle increased up to 5-fold for the most contaminated site. These data will be discussed in relation to the concentrations of contaminants in the sediments, contaminant bioaccumulation and mussel growth. This study will provide insight into the utility of using the stress response to identify vulnerable target tissues and modes of action of specific contaminants. It will also examine the extent to which tissue level expression of the stress response might help identify the types of contaminants that induce the stress response in mussels exposed to contaminants in situ.

  9. Soft Switching SEPP High Frequency Inverter for Induction Heating

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ogiwara, Hiroyuki; Nakaoka, Mutsuo

    This paper presents a novel circuit topology to attain soft switching operation of a high frequency inverter. Its output power is regulated over a wide range using a PWM control technique by connecting an auxiliary resonant circuit to the conventional single ended push pull (SEPP) high frequency inverter for induction heating. All switching devices in the proposed inverter are operated soft switching mode. This paper describes its circuit constitution and obtained experimental results from a practical point of view.

  10. Adaptive control in series load PWM induction heating inverters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Szelitzky, Tibor; Henrietta Dulf, Eva

    2013-12-01

    Permanent variations of the electric properties of the load in induction heating equipment make difficult to control the plant. To overcome these disadvantages, the authors propose a new approach based on adaptive control methods. For real plants it is enough to present desired performances or start-up variables for the controller, from which the algorithms tune the controllers by itself. To present the advantages of the proposed controllers, comparisons are made to a PI controller tuned through Ziegler-Nichols method.

  11. Computer simulation of residual stresses/distortion and structural change in the course of scanning induction hardening

    SciTech Connect

    Ikuta, F.; Arimoto, K.; Inoue, T.

    1996-12-31

    Simulated results of structural change, residual stresses and distortion are presented for carbon steel cylinder in the scanning-type induction hardening process by a CAE system {open_quotes}HEARTS (HEAt tReaTment Simulation system){close_quotes}. The system HEARTS has been developed to simulate heat treatment processes based on {open_quotes}metallo-thermo-mechanics{close_quotes} available for describing the coupling effect between metallurgical change due to phase transformation, temperature and inelastic stress/strain. A steel cylinder is treated as an axisymmetric model with scanning internal heat generation and convection boundary. The results under different scanning velocity and magnitude of the heat source from induction coil are compared with experimental data of distortions, volume fraction of metallic phases as well as residual stresses.

  12. Effect of Quenching Rate on Distortion and Residual Stresses During Induction Hardening of a Full-Float Truck Axle Shaft

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Zhichao; Ferguson, B. Lynn; Nemkov, Valentin; Goldstein, Robert; Jackowski, John; Fett, Greg

    2014-12-01

    Computer simulation is used to predict the residual stresses and distortion of a full-float truck axle shaft that has been induction scan hardened. Flux2D® is used to model the electromagnetic behavior and the power distributions inside the axle shaft in terms of time. The power distributions are imported and mapped into DANTE® model for thermal, phase transformation, and stress analysis. The truck axle shaft has three main geometrical regions: the flange/filet, the shaft, and the spline. Both induction heating and spray quenching processes have significant effect on the quenching results: distortion and residual stress distributions. In this study, the effects of spray quenching severity on residual stresses and distortion are investigated using modeling. The spray quenching rate can be adjusted by spray nozzle design, ratio of polymer solution, and quenchant flow rate. Different quenching rates are modeled by assigning different heat transfer coefficients as thermal boundary conditions during spray quenching. In this paper, three heat transfer coefficients, 5, 12, and 25 kW/(m2 °C), are applied while keeping all other conditions constant. With the understanding of effects of heating and quenching on residual stresses and distortion of induction hardened parts, the induction hardening process can be optimized for improved part performance.

  13. Induction Heating Model of Cermet Fuel Element Environmental Test (CFEET)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gomez, Carlos F.; Bradley, D. E.; Cavender, D. P.; Mireles, O. R.; Hickman, R. R.; Trent, D.; Stewart, E.

    2013-01-01

    Deep space missions with large payloads require high specific impulse and relatively high thrust to achieve mission goals in reasonable time frames. Nuclear Thermal Rockets (NTR) are capable of producing a high specific impulse by employing heat produced by a fission reactor to heat and therefore accelerate hydrogen through a rocket nozzle providing thrust. Fuel element temperatures are very high (up to 3000 K) and hydrogen is highly reactive with most materials at high temperatures. Data covering the effects of high-temperature hydrogen exposure on fuel elements are limited. The primary concern is the mechanical failure of fuel elements due to large thermal gradients; therefore, high-melting-point ceramics-metallic matrix composites (cermets) are one of the fuels under consideration as part of the Nuclear Cryogenic Propulsion Stage (NCPS) Advance Exploration System (AES) technology project at the Marshall Space Flight Center. The purpose of testing and analytical modeling is to determine their ability to survive and maintain thermal performance in a prototypical NTR reactor environment of exposure to hydrogen at very high temperatures and obtain data to assess the properties of the non-nuclear support materials. The fission process and the resulting heating performance are well known and do not require that active fissile material to be integrated in this testing. A small-scale test bed; Compact Fuel Element Environmental Tester (CFEET), designed to heat fuel element samples via induction heating and expose samples to hydrogen is being developed at MSFC to assist in optimal material and manufacturing process selection without utilizing fissile material. This paper details the analytical approach to help design and optimize the test bed using COMSOL Multiphysics for predicting thermal gradients induced by electromagnetic heating (Induction heating) and Thermal Desktop for radiation calculations.

  14. Heat-treatment by using induction heating on the Minsk Tractor Plant

    SciTech Connect

    Kosmovich, L.S.; Baranov, V.S.; Koshelenkov, K.N.; Fel'dman, L.Ya.

    1988-01-01

    The Minsk Tractor Plant uses a technique for hardening preceded by induction heating for more than 50% of its heat-treated parts made from 45, 40Kh, 38KhGs, and 33KhS steels. The majority of parts undergo heat-treatment on the machining lines. This method made it possible to develop and put into service an automatic device for strainless hardening of strips in the forced conditions. Improving and introducing this new technological process, equipment, and fittings for heat treatment by induction heating was found to increase the life of the tractor parts, reduce labor costs for their manufacture as well as increase savings in electricity and rolled materials.

  15. Promoted-Combustion Chamber with Induction Heating Coil

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Richardson, Erin; Hagood, Richard; Lowery, Freida; Herald, Stephen

    2006-01-01

    An improved promoted-combustion system has been developed for studying the effects of elevated temperatures on the flammability of metals in pure oxygen. In prior promoted-combustion chambers, initial temperatures of metal specimens in experiments have been limited to the temperatures of gas supplies, usually near room temperature. Although limited elevated temperature promoted-combustion chambers have been developed using water-cooled induction coils for preheating specimens, these designs have been limited to low-pressure operation due to the hollow induction coil. In contrast, the improved promoted-combustion chamber can sustain a pressure up to 10 kpsi (69 MPa) and, through utilization of a solid induction coil, is capable of preheating a metal specimen up to its melting point [potentially in excess of 2,000 F (approximately equal to 1,100 C)]. Hence, the improved promoted combustion chamber makes a greater range of physical conditions and material properties accessible for experimentation. The chamber consists of a vertical cylindrical housing with an inner diameter of 8 in. (20.32 cm) and an inner height of 20.4 in. (51.81 cm). A threaded, sealing cover at one end of the housing can be unscrewed to gain access for installing a specimen. Inlet and outlet ports for gases are provided. Six openings arranged in a helical pattern in the chamber wall contain sealed sapphire windows for viewing an experiment in progress. The base of the chamber contains pressure-sealed electrical connectors for supplying power to the induction coil. The connectors feature a unique design that prevents induction heating of the housing and the pressure sealing surfaces; this is important because if such spurious induction heating were allowed to occur, chamber pressure could be lost. The induction coil is 10 in. (25.4 cm) long and is fitted with a specimen holder at its upper end. At its lower end, the induction coil is mounted on a ceramic base, which affords thermal insulation to

  16. Systemic effects of AGEs in ER stress induction in vivo.

    PubMed

    Adamopoulos, Christos; Mihailidou, Chrysovalantou; Grivaki, Christofora; Papavassiliou, Kostas A; Kiaris, Hippokratis; Piperi, Christina; Papavassiliou, Athanasios G

    2016-08-01

    Emerging evidence indicates that accumulation of advanced glycation end products (AGEs) in human tissues may contribute to cell injury, inflammation and apoptosis through induction of endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress. Human metabolism relies on ER homeostasis for the coordinated response of all metabolic organs by controlling the synthesis and catabolism of various nutrients. In vitro studies have demonstrated AGE-induced enhancement of unfolded protein response (UPR) in different cell types including endothelial, neuronal, pancreatic cells and podocytes, suggesting this crosstalk as an underlying pathological mechanism that contributes to metabolic diseases. In this minireview, we describe in vivo studies undertaken by our group and others that demonstrate the diverse systemic effects of AGEs in ER stress induction in major metabolic tissues such as brain, kidney, liver and pancreas of normal mice. Administration of high-AGEs content diet to normal mice for the period of 4 weeks upergulates the mRNA and protein levels of ER chaperone Bip (GRP78) indicative of UPR initiation in all major metabolic organs and induces activation of the pivotal transcription factor XBP1 that regulates glucose and lipid metabolism. Furthermore, animals with genetic ablation of UPR-activated transcription factor C/EBP homologous protein CHOP allocated in high-AGEs diet, exhibited relative resistance to UPR induction (BiP levels) and XBP1 activation in major metabolic organs. Since CHOP presents a critical mediator that links accumulation and aggregation of unfolded proteins with induction of oxidative stress and ER stress-related apoptosis, it is revealed as an important molecular target for the management of metabolic diseases. PMID:27236787

  17. Considerations of radiofrequency induction heating for localised hyperthermia.

    PubMed

    Hand, J W; Ledda, J L; Evans, N T

    1982-01-01

    A finite difference technique for studying both spatial and temporal variations in temperature in tissues subjected to local hyperthermia is described. The calculation offers speed and simplicity whilst remaining stable. Its form is discussed in both 3-dimensional Cartesian coordinates and cylindrical coordinates. The technique is used to predict RF induction heating of a plane skin-fat-muscle model. Physical and physiological parameters are incorporated. These include the contributions to heating from both E and H fields associated with a plane coil, heat transfer across the skin surface for various environmental conditions, and an appropriate dependence of blood flow on temperature for each tissue layer. The effects on tissue temperature of varying each of a number of parameters in the model are considered. PMID:7071131

  18. Impact of Gas Heating in Inductively Coupled Plasmas

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hash, D. B.; Bose, D.; Rao, M. V. V. S.; Cruden, B. A.; Meyyappan, M.; Sharma, S. P.; Biegel, Bryan (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    Recently it has been recognized that the neutral gas in inductively coupled plasma reactors heats up significantly during processing. The resulting gas density variations across the reactor affect reaction rates, radical densities, plasma characteristics, and uniformity within the reactor. A self-consistent model that couples the plasma generation and transport to the gas flow and heating has been developed and used to study CF4 discharges. A Langmuir probe has been used to measure radial profiles of electron density and temperature. The model predictions agree well with the experimental results. As a result of these comparisons along with the poorer performance of the model without the gas-plasma coupling, the importance of gas heating in plasma processing has been verified.

  19. Induction heating assisted optical fiber bonding and sealing technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Niewczas, Pawel; Fusiek, Grzegorz

    2011-05-01

    A novel technique for providing hermetic sealing within an optical fiber feed-through or high-performance fiber attachment to a metal part is presented. The system utilizes a specially designed heat concentrator surrounding the metal part and metal coated fiber that is heated to above 800°C using an induction heating method to achieve melting of a hightemperature brazing material used to join the two parts. The strength of the bond and sealing between the fiber and metal part is evaluated by constructing a simple extrinsic Fabry-Perot pressure transducer subjected to temperature and pressure variations in the range of 20-350°C and 0-15,000 psi, demonstrating the expected spectral responses from the transducer.

  20. Physical Aspects of Magnetic Induction Heating in Hyperthermia.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Mann-Tchao

    The technical aspects of the heating of a deep -seated lung tumor by electromagnetic induction have been explored by means of a theoretical model. It was found that frequencies up to 30 MHz can be used without significant losses in magnetic field depth penetration. Steady-state temperature solutions to the bio-heat equation are presented for the heating of a thorax model consisting of a spherical tumor embedded in lung tissue which is layered by muscle and fatty tissue. Analytical solutions are presented for each of the tissue regions along with their numerical evaluations over a range of physical characteristics, including surface cooling effects. A strong dependence of tumor temperature on size and blood perfusion rate is shown to exist and can be used to optimize treatment parameters. Tendencies of the chest muscles and overlaying fatty tissue to overheat, particularly in the case of an obese patient, are discussed along with the alleviating influence of surface cooling. Healthy lung tissue, on the other hand, is shown to be safe from any significant damage in such a heating situation. Transient times required for tumors to achieve thermal equilibrium are computed and shown to depend strongly on tumor size and, to a lesser extent, on blood perfusion rate. The overall results obtained from the model are compared with available clinical data and are found to be in line with those observations. The design and construction of an apparatus which can produce the required induction fields is described. The device consists of a single-turn induction coil with a resonant capacitor and two coupling capacitors. It can be tuned for any patient to represent a 50 ohm matched load at 13.56 MHz. The design is carefully balanced for minimum interference with the thermocouple thermometer, making it possible to make measurements while the radio frequency power is turned on.

  1. Induction of heat shock proteins in B-cell exosomes.

    PubMed

    Clayton, Aled; Turkes, Attilla; Navabi, Hossein; Mason, Malcolm D; Tabi, Zsuzsanna

    2005-08-15

    Exosomes are nanometer-sized vesicles secreted by a diverse range of live cells that probably have physiological roles in modulating cellular immunity. The extracellular factors that regulate the quantity and phenotype of exosomes produced are poorly understood, and the properties of exosomes that dictate their immune functions are not yet clear. We investigated the effect of cellular stress on the exosomes produced by B-lymphoblastoid cell lines. Under steady-state conditions, the exosomes were positive for hsp27, hsc70, hsp70 and hsp90, and other recognised exosome markers such as MHC class I, CD81, and LAMP-2. Exposing cells to heat stress (42 degrees C for up to 3 hours), resulted in a marked increase in these heat shock proteins (hsps), while the expression of other stress proteins such as hsp60 and gp96 remained negative, and other exosome markers remained unchanged. Stress also triggered a small increase in the quantity of exosomes produced [with a ratio of 1.245+/-0.07 to 1 (mean+/-s.e.m., n=20) of 3-hour-stress-exosomes to control-exosomes]. Flow-cytometric analysis of exosome-coated beads and immuno-precipitation of intact exosomes demonstrated that hsps were located within the exosome lumen, and not present at the exosome-surface, suggesting that such exosomes may not interact with target cells through cell-surface hsp-receptors. Functional studies further supported this finding, in that exosomes from control or heat-stressed B cells did not trigger dendritic cell maturation, assessed by analysis of dendritic-cell-surface phenotype, and cytokine secretion profile. Our findings demonstrate that specific alterations in exosome phenotype are a hitherto unknown component of the cellular response to environmental stress and their extracellular function does not involve the direct activation of dendritic cells. PMID:16046478

  2. Experimental Observations and Numerical Prediction of Induction Heating in a Graphite Test Article

    SciTech Connect

    Jankowski, Todd A; Johnson, Debra P; Jurney, James D; Freer, Jerry E; Dougherty, Lisa M; Stout, Stephen A

    2009-01-01

    The induction heating coils used in the plutonium casting furnaces at the Los Alamos National Laboratory are studied here. A cylindrical graphite test article has been built, instrumented with thermocouples, and heated in the induction coil that is normally used to preheat the molds during casting operations. Preliminary results of experiments aimed at understanding the induction heating process in the mold portion of the furnaces are reported. The experiments have been modeled in COMSOL Multiphysics and the numerical and experimental results are compared to one another. These comparisons provide insight into the heating process and provide a benchmark for COMSOL calculations of induction heating in the mold portion of the plutonium casting furnaces.

  3. Induction Heating of Hypervelocity Impact Samples to 2500 Degrees Centigrade

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Simmons, Joshua; Pardo, Art; Henderson, Don; Rodriguez, Karen

    2014-01-01

    The Remote Hypervelocity Test Laboratory (RHTL) at White Sands Test Facility (WSTF) was asked to heat samples up to 2500 degrees Centigrade (4532 degrees Fahrenheit) to simulate reentry scenarios of crafts where heated shields are impacted with single small particles ranging from 0.2 to 1.0 millimeters (.008 to.039 inches) of various materials. The team decided an electromagnetic induction (induction heater) was the best method to achieve and control the temperatures in a rapid manner. The samples consisted of three-dimensional carbon-carbon and two-dimensional carbon-phenolic, which are both electrically conductive. After several attempts the team was able to achieve over 2500 degrees Centigrade (4532 degrees Fahrenheit) in ambient atmosphere. When the system was moved to the target chamber and the vacuum system evacuated down to 250 millitorr, arcing occurred between the bus bars and tank, the feedthrough fittings that carried the coolant and current, and between the target sample and coil. To overcome this arcing, conformal coatings, room temperature vulcanization (RTV) silicone, and other non-conductive materials were used to isolate the electromagnetic fields.

  4. Heat Stress Effects on Growing-Finishing Swine

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Understanding the factors that create heat stress, the response of the animals while under heat stress, and the signs of heat-stressed swine are essential to making rational decisions for the selection, design, and management of their environments. Heat stressors include combinations of environment...

  5. Collisionless electron heating in periodic arrays of inductively coupled plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Czarnetzki, U.; Tarnev, Kh.

    2014-12-15

    A novel mechanism of collisionless heating in large planar arrays of small inductive coils operated at radio frequencies is presented. In contrast to the well-known case of non-local heating related to the transversal conductivity, when the electrons move perpendicular to the planar coil, we investigate the problem of electrons moving in a plane parallel to the coils. Two types of periodic structures are studied. Resonance velocities where heating is efficient are calculated analytically by solving the Vlasov equation. Certain scaling parameters are identified. The concept is further investigated by a single particle simulation based on the ergodic principle and combined with a Monte Carlo code allowing for collisions with Argon atoms. Resonances, energy exchange, and distribution functions are obtained. The analytical results are confirmed by the numerical simulation. Pressure and electric field dependences are studied. Stochastic heating is found to be most efficient when the electron mean free path exceeds the size of a single coil cell. Then the mean energy increases approximately exponentially with the electric field amplitude.

  6. SIGNAL MEDIATORS AT INDUCTION OF HEAT RESISTANCE OF WHEAT PLANTLETS BY SHORT-TERM HEATING.

    PubMed

    Karpets, Yu V; Kolupaev, Yu E; Yastreb, T O

    2015-01-01

    The effects of functional interplay of calcium ions, reactive oxygen species (ROS) and nitric oxide (NO) in the cells of wheat plantlets roots (Triticum aestivum L.) at the induction of their heat resistance by a short-term influence of hyperthermia (heating at the temperature of 42 degrees C during 1 minute) have been investigated. The transitional increase of NO and H2O2 content, invoked by heating, was suppressed by the treatment of plantlets with the antagonists of calcium EGTA (chelator of exocellular calcium), lanthanum chloride (blocker of calcium channels of various types) and neomycin (inhibitor of phosphatidylinositol-dependent phospholipase C). The rise of hydrogen peroxide content, caused by hardening, was partially suppressed by the action of inhibitors of nitrate reductase (sodium wolframate) and NO-synthase (N(G)-nitro-L-arginine methyl ester--L-NAME), and the increasing of nitric oxide content was suppressed by the treatment of plants with the antioxidant ionol and with the scavenger of hydrogen peroxide (dimethylthiourea). These compounds and antagonists of calcium also partially removed the effect of the rise of plantlets' heat resistance, invoked by hardening heating. The conclusion on calcium's role in the activation of enzymatic systems, generating reactive oxygen species and nitric oxide, and on the functional interplay of these signal mediators at the induction of heat resistance of plantlets by hardening heating is made. PMID:27025064

  7. Initiation of shape-memory effect by inductive heating of magnetic nanoparticles in thermoplastic polymers.

    PubMed

    Mohr, R; Kratz, K; Weigel, T; Lucka-Gabor, M; Moneke, M; Lendlein, A

    2006-03-01

    In shape-memory polymers, changes in shape are mostly induced by heating, and exceeding a specific switching temperature, T(switch). If polymers cannot be warmed up by heat transfer using a hot liquid or gaseous medium, noncontact triggering will be required. In this article, the magnetically induced shape-memory effect of composites from magnetic nanoparticles and thermoplastic shape-memory polymers is introduced. A polyetherurethane (TFX) and a biodegradable multiblock copolymer (PDC) with poly(p-dioxanone) as hard segment and poly(epsilon-caprolactone) as soft segment were investigated as matrix component. Nanoparticles consisting of an iron(III)oxide core in a silica matrix could be processed into both polymers. A homogeneous particle distribution in TFX could be shown. Compounds have suitable elastic and thermal properties for the shape-memory functionalization. Temporary shapes of TFX compounds were obtained by elongating at increased temperature and subsequent cooling under constant stress. Cold-drawing of PDC compounds at 25 degrees C resulted in temporary fixation of the mechanical deformation by 50-60%. The shape-memory effect of both composite systems could be induced by inductive heating in an alternating magnetic field (f = 258 kHz; H = 30 kA x m(-1)). The maximum temperatures achievable by inductive heating in a specific magnetic field depend on sample geometry and nanoparticle content. Shape recovery rates of composites resulting from magnetic triggering are comparable to those obtained by increasing the environmental temperature. PMID:16537442

  8. Protective effects of ectoine on heat-stressed Daphnia magna.

    PubMed

    Adam, Bownik; Zofia, Stępniewska; Tadeusz, Skowroński

    2014-12-01

    Ectoine (ECT) is an amino acid produced and accumulated by halophilic bacteria in stressful conditions in order to prevent the loss of water from the cell. There is a lack of knowledge on the effects of ECT in heat-stressed aquatic animals. The purpose of our study was to determine the influence of ECT on Daphnia magna subjected to heat stress with two temperature gradients: 1 and 0.1 °C/min in the range of 23-42 °C. Time to immobilisation, survival during recovery, swimming performance, heart rate, thoracic limb movement and the levels of heat shock protein 70 kDa 1A (HSP70 1A), catalase (CAT) and nitric oxide species (NOx) were determined in ECT-exposed and unexposed daphnids; we showed protective effects of ECT on Daphnia magna subjected to heat stress. Time to immobilisation of daphnids exposed to ECT was longer when compared to the unexposed animals. Also, survival rate during the recovery of daphnids previously treated with ECT was higher. ECT significantly attenuated a rapid increase of mean swimming velocity which was elevated in the unexposed daphnids. Moreover, we observed elevation of thoracic limb movement and modulation of heart rate in ECT-exposed animals. HSP70 1A and CAT levels were reduced in the presence of ECT. On the other hand, NOx level was slightly elevated in both ECT-treated and unexposed daphnids, however slightly higher NOx level was found in ECT-treated animals. We conclude that the exposure to ectoine has thermoprotective effects on Daphnia magna, however their mechanisms are not associated with the induction of HSP70 1A. PMID:25223383

  9. Characterization of the Inductively Heated Plasma Source IPG6-B

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dropmann, Michael; Laufer, Rene; Herdrich, Georg; Matthews, Lorin; Hyde, Truell

    2014-10-01

    In close collaboration between the Center for Astrophysics, Space Physics and Engineering Research (CASPER) at Baylor University, Texas, and the Institute of Space Systems (IRS) at the University of Stuttgart, Germany, two plasma facilities have been established using the Inductively heated Plasma Generator 6 (IPG6). The facility at Baylor University (IPG6-B) works at a frequency of 13.56 MHz and a maximum power of 15 kW. A vacuum pump of 160 m3/h in combination with a butterfly valve allows pressure control over a wide range. Intended fields of research include basic investigation into thermo-chemistry and plasma radiation, space plasma environments and high heat fluxes e.g. those found in fusion devices or during atmospheric re-entry of spacecraft. After moving the IPG6-B facility to the Baylor Research and Innovation Collaborative (BRIC) it was placed back into operation during the summer of 2014. Initial characterization in the new lab, using a heat flux probe, Pitot probe and cavity calorimeter, has been conducted for Air, Argon and Helium. The results of this characterization are presented.

  10. Lipocalin 2 regulation by thermal stresses: Protective role of Lcn2/NGAL against cold and heat stresses

    SciTech Connect

    Roudkenar, Mehryar Habibi; Halabian, Raheleh; Roushandeh, Amaneh Mohammadi; Nourani, Mohammad Reza; Masroori, Nasser; Ebrahimi, Majid; Nikogoftar, Mahin; Rouhbakhsh, Mehdi; Bahmani, Parisa; Najafabadi, Ali Jahanian; Shokrgozar, Mohammad Ali

    2009-11-01

    Environmental temperature variations are the most common stresses experienced by a wide range of organisms. Lipocalin 2 (Lcn2/NGAL) is expressed in various normal and pathologic conditions. However, its precise functions have not been fully determined. Here we report the induction of Lcn2 by thermal stresses in vivo, and its role following exposure to cold and heat stresses in vitro. Induction of Lcn2 in liver, heart and kidney was detected by RT-PCR, Western blot and immunohistochemistry following exposure of mice to heat and cold stresses. When CHO and HEK293T cells overexpressing NGAL were exposed to cold stress, cell proliferation was higher compared to controls. Down-regulatrion of NGAL by siRNA in A549 cells resulted in less proliferation when exposed to cold stress compared to control cells. The number of apoptotic cells and expression of pro-apoptotic proteins were lower in the NGAL overexpressing CHO and HEK293T cells, but were higher in the siRNA-transfected A549 cells compared to controls, indicating that NGAL protects cells against cold stress. Following exposure of the cells to heat stress, ectopic expression of NGAL protected cells while addition of exogenous recombinant NGAL to the cell culture medium exacerbated the toxicity of heat stress specially when there was low or no endogenous expression of NGAL. It had a dual effect on apoptosis following heat stress. NGAL also increased the expression of HO-1. Lcn2/NGAL may have the potential to improve cell proliferation and preservation particularly to prevent cold ischemia injury of transplanted organs or for treatment of some cancers by hyperthermia.

  11. Heat Induction of Cyclic Electron Flow around Photosystem I in the Symbiotic Dinoflagellate Symbiodinium.

    PubMed

    Aihara, Yusuke; Takahashi, Shunichi; Minagawa, Jun

    2016-05-01

    Increases in seawater temperature impair photosynthesis (photoinhibition) in the symbiotic dinoflagellate Symbiodinium within cnidarian hosts, such as corals and sea anemones, and may destroy their symbiotic relationship. Although the degree of photoinhibition in Symbiodinium under heat stress differs among strains, the differences in their responses to increased temperatures, including cyclic electron flow (CEF), which sustains photoprotective thermal energy dissipation, have not been investigated. Here, we examined CEF in cultured Symbiodinium cells or those in an endosymbiotic relationship within a cnidarian host. The light-dependent reduction of the primary electron donor photosystem I, i.e. P700(+), was enhanced in any Symbiodinium cell by increasing temperatures, indicating CEF was induced by heat, which was accompanied by thermal energy dissipation activation. The critical temperatures for inducing CEF were different among Symbiodinium strains. The clade A strains with greater susceptibility to photoinhibition, OTcH-1 and Y106, exhibited higher CEF activities under moderate heat stress than a more phototolerant clade B strain Mf1.05b, suggesting that the observed CEF induction was not a preventive measure but a stress response in Symbiodinium. PMID:26951432

  12. A low-cost induction power supply for substrate heating

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meiners, L. G.; Hemmelman, B. T.

    1993-05-01

    The design and construction of a 1-kW induction heating supply is described. The system was optimized for applications in which the power is coupled into a graphite susceptor which is the substrate holder for samples placed in the reaction chamber of a chemical vapor deposition system. The supply draws power from a 120-V, 20-A service outlet and delivers a 10-kHz output which is proportional to the magnitude of a 0-5 Vdc control signal. Presently available power n-metal-oxide-semiconductor field-effect transistors permit the construction of a compact unit which is small enough to be installed inside of a deposition cabinet.

  13. Exchange-coupled magnetic nanoparticles for efficient heat induction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Jae-Hyun; Jang, Jung-Tak; Choi, Jin-Sil; Moon, Seung Ho; Noh, Seung-Hyun; Kim, Ji-Wook; Kim, Jin-Gyu; Kim, Il-Sun; Park, Kook In; Cheon, Jinwoo

    2011-07-01

    The conversion of electromagnetic energy into heat by nanoparticles has the potential to be a powerful, non-invasive technique for biotechnology applications such as drug release, disease treatment and remote control of single cell functions, but poor conversion efficiencies have hindered practical applications so far. In this Letter, we demonstrate a significant increase in the efficiency of magnetic thermal induction by nanoparticles. We take advantage of the exchange coupling between a magnetically hard core and magnetically soft shell to tune the magnetic properties of the nanoparticle and maximize the specific loss power, which is a gauge of the conversion efficiency. The optimized core-shell magnetic nanoparticles have specific loss power values that are an order of magnitude larger than conventional iron-oxide nanoparticles. We also perform an antitumour study in mice, and find that the therapeutic efficacy of these nanoparticles is superior to that of a common anticancer drug.

  14. Defect characterisation based on heat diffusion using induction thermography testing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    He, Yunze; Pan, Mengchun; Luo, Feilu

    2012-10-01

    Pulsed eddy current (PEC) thermography (a.k.a. induction thermography) has been successfully applied to detect defects (corrosion, cracks, impact, and delamination) in metal alloy and carbon fiber reinforced plastic. During these applications, the defect detection mechanism is mainly investigated based on the eddy current interaction with defect. In this paper, defect characterisation for wall thinning defect and inner defect in steel is investigated based on heat diffusion. The paper presents the PEC thermography testing, which integrates the reflection mode and transmission mode by means of configuring two cameras on both sides of sample. The defect characterisation methods under transmission mode and reflection mode are investigated and compared through 1D analytical analysis, 3D numerical studies, and experimental studies. The suitable detection mode for wall thinning and inner defects quantification is concluded.

  15. A Novel Coil Distribution for Transverse Flux Induction Heating

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Yu; Wang, Youhua; Yang, Xiaoguang; Pang, Lingling

    For solving the problem of inhomogeneous temperature distribution on the surface of the work piece at the transverse flux induction heating (TFIH) device outlet, a novel coil distribution of the inductor is presented in this paper. The relationship between coil geometry and temperature distribution was analyzed firstly. According to the theoretical analysis results, the novel coil geometry was designed in order to get a uniform temperature distribution. Then the non-linear coupled electromagnetic- thermal problem in TFIH was simulated. The distributions of the magnetic flux density and eddy current of the novel and the traditional rectangular coil geometry were presented. Finally, a prototype was developed according to the numerical results. The experimental results of the temperature distribution agreed with the numerical analysis.

  16. Defect characterisation based on heat diffusion using induction thermography testing.

    PubMed

    He, Yunze; Pan, Mengchun; Luo, Feilu

    2012-10-01

    Pulsed eddy current (PEC) thermography (a.k.a. induction thermography) has been successfully applied to detect defects (corrosion, cracks, impact, and delamination) in metal alloy and carbon fiber reinforced plastic. During these applications, the defect detection mechanism is mainly investigated based on the eddy current interaction with defect. In this paper, defect characterisation for wall thinning defect and inner defect in steel is investigated based on heat diffusion. The paper presents the PEC thermography testing, which integrates the reflection mode and transmission mode by means of configuring two cameras on both sides of sample. The defect characterisation methods under transmission mode and reflection mode are investigated and compared through 1D analytical analysis, 3D numerical studies, and experimental studies. The suitable detection mode for wall thinning and inner defects quantification is concluded. PMID:23126785

  17. Toroid Joining Gun. [thermoplastic welding system using induction heating

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Buckley, J. D.; Fox, R. L.; Swaim, R J.

    1985-01-01

    The Toroid Joining Gun is a low cost, self-contained, portable low powered (100-400 watts) thermoplastic welding system developed at Langley Research Center for joining plastic and composite parts using an induction heating technique. The device developed for use in the fabrication of large space sructures (LSST Program) can be used in any atmosphere or in a vacuum. Components can be joined in situ, whether on earth or on a space platform. The expanded application of this welding gun is in the joining of thermoplastic composites, thermosetting composites, metals, and combinations of these materials. Its low-power requirements, light weight, rapid response, low cost, portability, and effective joining make it a candidate for solving many varied and unique bonding tasks.

  18. Induction of mycobacterial proteins during phagocytosis and heat shock: a time interval analysis.

    PubMed

    Alavi, M R; Affronti, L F

    1994-05-01

    Mycobacterium tuberculosis survives macrophage bactericidal activities by mechanisms that may include induction of stress proteins. We sought to determine whether the synthesis of any mycobacterial proteins is increased during phagocytosis and whether any of these proteins are also up-regulated during heat shock. Protein synthesis by M. tuberculosis H37Ra during phagocytosis by the mouse macrophage cell line IC-21, and during heat shock at 45 and 48 degrees C, was monitored at various time intervals using 35S-labeled methionine/cysteine and sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis. Our data suggest the existence of certain common elements in the stress response of mycobacteria to the three stress stimuli. This apparent similarity was best characterized by the up-regulation of a 25-kDa protein after exposure to each of the stress conditions. Furthermore, this 25-kDa protein and a 37-kDa protein that was also synthesized during phagocytosis appeared to be extracellular because they were preferentially solubilized when infected macrophages were lysed with 0.5% NP-40. PMID:8182341

  19. Time-course changes in muscle protein degradation in heat-stressed chickens: Possible involvement of corticosterone and mitochondrial reactive oxygen species generation in induction of the ubiquitin-proteasome system.

    PubMed

    Furukawa, Kyohei; Kikusato, Motoi; Kamizono, Tomomi; Toyomizu, Masaaki

    2016-03-01

    Heat stress (HS) induces muscle protein degradation as well as production of mitochondrial reactive oxygen species (ROS). In the present study, to improve our understanding of how protein degradation is induced by HS treatment in birds, a time course analysis of changes in the circulating levels of glucocorticoid and N(τ)-methylhistidine, muscle proteolysis-related gene expression, and mitochondrial ROS generation, was conducted. At 25days of age, chickens were exposed to HS conditions (33°C) for 0, 0.5, 1 or 3days. While no alteration in plasma N(τ)-methylhistidine concentration relative to that of the control group was observed in the 0.5day HS group, the concentration was significantly higher in the 3-d HS treatment group. Plasma corticosterone concentrations increased in response to 0.5-d HS treatment, but subsequently returned to near-normal values. HS treatment for 0.5days did not change the levels of μ-calpain, cathepsin B, or proteasome C2 subunit mRNA, but increased the levels of mRNA encoding atrogin-1 (P<0.05) and its transcription factor, forkhead box O3 (P=0.09). Under these hyperthermic conditions, mitochondrial superoxide production was significantly increased than that of thermoneutral control. Here, we show that HS-induced muscle protein degradation may be due to the activation of ubiquitination by atrogin-1, and that this process may involve mitochondrial ROS production as well as corticosterone secretion. PMID:26883687

  20. Tank waste remediation system heat stress control program report, 1995

    SciTech Connect

    Carls, D.R.

    1995-09-28

    Protecting employees from heat stress within tank farms during the summer months is challenging. Work constraints typically experienced in tank farms complicate the measures taken to protect employees from heat stress. TWRS-Industrial Hygiene (IH) has endeavored to control heat stress injuries by anticipating, recognizing, evaluating and controlling the factors which lead or contribute to heat stress in Tank Farms. The TWRS Heat Stress Control Program covers such areas as: employee and PIC training, communication of daily heat stress alerts to tank farm personnel, setting work/rest regimens, and the use of engineering and personal protective controls when applicable. The program has increased worker awareness of heat stress and prevention, established provisions for worker rest periods, increased drinking water availability to help ensure worker hydration, and allowed for the increased use of other protective controls to combat heat stress. The TWRS Heat Stress Control Program is the cornerstone for controlling heat stress among tank farm employees. The program has made great strides since it`s inception during the summer of 1994. Some improvements can still be made to enhance the program for the summer of 1996, such as: (1) procurement and use of personal heat stress monitoring equipment to ensure appropriate application of administrative controls, (2) decrease the need for use of containment tents and anti-contamination clothing, and (3) providing a wider variety of engineering and personal protective controls for heat stress prevention

  1. Quantitative thermal diffusivity imaging of disbonds in thermal protective coatings using inductive heating

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Heath, D. M.; Winfree, William P.

    1990-01-01

    An inductive heating technique for making thermal diffusivity images of disbonds between thermal protective coatings and their substrates is presented. Any flaw in the bonding of the coating and the substrate shows as an area of lowered values in the diffusivity image. The benefits of the inductive heating approach lie in its ability to heat the conductive substrate without directly heating the dielectric coating. Results are provided for a series of samples with fabricated disbonds, for a range of coating thicknesses.

  2. How specialized volatiles respond to chronic and short-term physiological and shock heat stress in Brassica nigra.

    PubMed

    Kask, Kaia; Kännaste, Astrid; Talts, Eero; Copolovici, Lucian; Niinemets, Ülo

    2016-09-01

    Brassicales release volatile glucosinolate breakdown products upon tissue mechanical damage, but it is unclear how the release of glucosinolate volatiles responds to abiotic stresses such as heat stress. We used three different heat treatments, simulating different dynamic temperature conditions in the field to gain insight into stress-dependent changes in volatile blends and photosynthetic characteristics in the annual herb Brassica nigra (L.) Koch. Heat stress was applied by either heating leaves through temperature response curve measurements from 20 to 40 °C (mild stress), exposing plants for 4 h to temperatures 25-44 °C (long-term stress) or shock-heating leaves to 45-50 °C. Photosynthetic reduction through temperature response curves was associated with decreased stomatal conductance, while the reduction due to long-term stress and collapse of photosynthetic activity after heat shock stress were associated with non-stomatal processes. Mild stress decreased constitutive monoterpene emissions, while long-term stress and shock stress resulted in emissions of the lipoxygenase pathway and glucosinolate volatiles. Glucosinolate volatile release was more strongly elicited by long-term stress and lipoxygenase product released by heat shock. These results demonstrate that glucosinolate volatiles constitute a major part of emission blend in heat-stressed B. nigra plants, especially upon chronic stress that leads to induction responses. PMID:27287526

  3. Induction of oxidative stress in paraquat formulating workers.

    PubMed

    Ranjbar, Akram; Pasalar, Parvin; Sedighi, Alireza; Abdollahi, Mohammad

    2002-05-28

    Paraquat as a bipyridyl compound is widely used as an effective herbicide worldwide. In this study, oxidative stress was investigated in blood samples of workers in a pesticide factory, formulating paraquat products for use in agriculture. Controls were age-matched workers with no history of pesticide exposure. They were measured for lipid peroxidation (LPO), antioxidant power and total thiol (SH) groups in blood. The results expressed as mean+/-SD show induction of oxidative stress in workers as revealed by increased plasma LPO (11.46+/-0.99 vs 10.11+/-0.69, P<0.001), decreased plasma antioxidant capacity (1.35+/-0.03 vs 1.54+/-0.05, P<0.001) and plasma SH groups (0.16+/-0.01 vs 0.21+/-0.01, P<0.001) in comparison to those of controls. It is concluded that paraquat-formulating factory workers have elevated LPO and decreased antioxidant power, which may put them in further consequences of oxidative stress. PMID:11992738

  4. Method and device for determining bond separation strength using induction heating

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Coultrip, Robert H. (Inventor); Johnson, Samuel D. (Inventor); Copeland, Carl E. (Inventor); Phillips, W. Morris (Inventor); Fox, Robert L. (Inventor)

    1994-01-01

    An induction heating device includes an induction heating gun which includes a housing, a U-shaped pole piece having two spaced apart opposite ends defining a gap there between, the U-shaped pole piece being mounted in one end of the housing, and a tank circuit including an induction coil wrapped around the pole piece and a capacitor connected to the induction coil. A power source is connected to the tank circuit. A pull test machine is provided having a stationary chuck and a movable chuck, the two chucks holding two test pieces bonded together at a bond region. The heating gun is mounted on the pull test machine in close proximity to the bond region of the two test pieces, whereby when the tank circuit is energized, the two test pieces are heated by induction heating while a tension load is applied to the two test pieces by the pull test machine to determine separation strength of the bond region.

  5. Comparison of the heat stress induced variations in DNA methylation between heat-tolerant and heat-sensitive rapeseed seedlings

    PubMed Central

    Gao, Guizhen; Li, Jun; Li, Hao; Li, Feng; Xu, Kun; Yan, Guixin; Chen, Biyun; Qiao, Jiangwei; Wu, Xiaoming

    2014-01-01

    DNA methylation is responsive to various biotic and abiotic stresses. Heat stress is a serious threat to crop growth and development worldwide. Heat stress results in an array of morphological, physiological and biochemical changes in plants. The relationship between DNA methylation and heat stress in crops is relatively unknown. We investigated the differences in methylation levels and changes in the cytosine methylation patterns in seedlings of two rapeseed genotypes (heat-sensitive and heat-tolerant) under heat stress. Our results revealed that the methylation levels were different between a heat-tolerant genotype and a heat-sensitive one under control conditions. Under heat treatment, methylation increased more in the heat-sensitive genotype than in the heat-tolerant genotype. More DNA demethylation events occurred in the heat-tolerant genotype, while more DNA methylation occurred in the heat-sensitive genotype. A large and diverse set of genes were affected by heat stress via cytosine methylation changes, suggesting that these genes likely play important roles in the response and adaption to heat stress in Brassica napus L. This study indicated that the changes in DNA methylation differed between heat-tolerant and heat-sensitive genotypes of B. napus in response to heat stress, which further illuminates the molecular mechanisms of the adaption to heat stress in B. napus. PMID:24987298

  6. Modeling an RF Cold Crucible Induction Heated Melter with Subsidence

    SciTech Connect

    Grant L. Hawkes

    2004-07-01

    A method to reduce radioactive waste volume that includes melting glass in a cold crucible radio frequency induction heated melter has been investigated numerically. The purpose of the study is to correlate the numerical investigation with an experimental apparatus that in the above mentioned melter. Unique to this model is the subsidence of the glass as it changes from a powder to molten glass and drastically changes density. A model has been created that couples the magnetic vector potential (real and imaginary) to a transient startup of the melter process. This magnetic field is coupled to the mass, momentum, and energy equations that vary with time and position as the melt grows. The coupling occurs with the electrical conductivity of the glass as it rises above the melt temperature of the glass and heat is generated. Natural convection within the molten glass helps determine the shape of the melt as it progresses in time. An electromagnetic force is also implemented that is dependent on the electrical properties and frequency of the coil. This study shows the progression of the melt shape with time along with temperatures, power input, velocities and magnetic vector potential. Coupled to all of this is a generator that will be used for this lab sized experiment. The coupling with the 60 kW generator occurs with the impedance of the melt as it progresses and changes with time. A power controller has been implemented that controls the primary coil current depending on the power that is induced into the molten glass region.

  7. An inductively heated hot cavity catcher laser ion source.

    PubMed

    Reponen, M; Moore, I D; Pohjalainen, I; Rothe, S; Savonen, M; Sonnenschein, V; Voss, A

    2015-12-01

    An inductively heated hot cavity catcher has been constructed for the production of low-energy ion beams of exotic, neutron-deficient Ag isotopes. A proof-of-principle experiment has been realized by implanting primary (107)Ag(21+) ions from a heavy-ion cyclotron into a graphite catcher. A variable-thickness nickel foil was used to degrade the energy of the primary beam in order to mimic the implantation depth expected from the heavy-ion fusion-evaporation recoils of N = Z (94)Ag. Following implantation, the silver atoms diffused out of the graphite and effused into the catcher cavity and transfer tube, where they were resonantly laser ionized using a three-step excitation and ionization scheme. Following mass separation, the ions were identified by scanning the frequency of the first resonant excitation step while recording the ion count rate. Ion release time profiles were measured for different implantation depths and cavity temperatures with the mean delay time varying from 10 to 600 ms. In addition, the diffusion coefficients for silver in graphite were measured for temperatures of 1470 K, 1630 K, and 1720 K, from which an activation energy of 3.2 ± 0.3 eV could be determined. PMID:26724021

  8. An inductively heated hot cavity catcher laser ion source

    SciTech Connect

    Reponen, M.; Moore, I. D. Pohjalainen, I.; Savonen, M.; Voss, A.; Rothe, S.; Sonnenschein, V.

    2015-12-15

    An inductively heated hot cavity catcher has been constructed for the production of low-energy ion beams of exotic, neutron-deficient Ag isotopes. A proof-of-principle experiment has been realized by implanting primary {sup 107}Ag{sup 21+} ions from a heavy-ion cyclotron into a graphite catcher. A variable-thickness nickel foil was used to degrade the energy of the primary beam in order to mimic the implantation depth expected from the heavy-ion fusion-evaporation recoils of N = Z {sup 94}Ag. Following implantation, the silver atoms diffused out of the graphite and effused into the catcher cavity and transfer tube, where they were resonantly laser ionized using a three-step excitation and ionization scheme. Following mass separation, the ions were identified by scanning the frequency of the first resonant excitation step while recording the ion count rate. Ion release time profiles were measured for different implantation depths and cavity temperatures with the mean delay time varying from 10 to 600 ms. In addition, the diffusion coefficients for silver in graphite were measured for temperatures of 1470 K, 1630 K, and 1720 K, from which an activation energy of 3.2 ± 0.3 eV could be determined.

  9. An inductively heated hot cavity catcher laser ion source

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reponen, M.; Moore, I. D.; Pohjalainen, I.; Rothe, S.; Savonen, M.; Sonnenschein, V.; Voss, A.

    2015-12-01

    An inductively heated hot cavity catcher has been constructed for the production of low-energy ion beams of exotic, neutron-deficient Ag isotopes. A proof-of-principle experiment has been realized by implanting primary 107Ag21+ ions from a heavy-ion cyclotron into a graphite catcher. A variable-thickness nickel foil was used to degrade the energy of the primary beam in order to mimic the implantation depth expected from the heavy-ion fusion-evaporation recoils of N = Z 94Ag. Following implantation, the silver atoms diffused out of the graphite and effused into the catcher cavity and transfer tube, where they were resonantly laser ionized using a three-step excitation and ionization scheme. Following mass separation, the ions were identified by scanning the frequency of the first resonant excitation step while recording the ion count rate. Ion release time profiles were measured for different implantation depths and cavity temperatures with the mean delay time varying from 10 to 600 ms. In addition, the diffusion coefficients for silver in graphite were measured for temperatures of 1470 K, 1630 K, and 1720 K, from which an activation energy of 3.2 ± 0.3 eV could be determined.

  10. Design of a superconducting 20 MJ induction heating coil

    SciTech Connect

    Singh, S.K.; Ibrahim, E.A.; Gaberson, P.C.; Eckels, P.W.; Jarabak, A.J.; Rogers, J.D.; Thullen, P.; Walker, M.S.

    1980-01-01

    A pancake-wound, low-loss, superconducting, induction-heating coil has been designed to demonstrate the feasibility of superconducting polaidal system for the Tokamak reactors, to provide confidence in application of superconductivity to actual reactors, and to provide the opportunity to solve specific engineering problems to support the fusion pulsed coil program. the coil is designed to store 20 MJ at 50 kA. The superconductor material is NbTi for a 7.5 tesla maximum field. The coil is designed to survive at least 100,000 cycles of full bipolar half cycle sinusoidal operation from +7.5 tesla to -7.5 telsa fields in one second. The coil is natural convection immersion-cooled at 4.5/sup 0/K in liquid helium bath. The design demonstrates confidence in an advanced design, low-loss, cryostable conductor, along with safety, reliability and the operating life of the coil of more than 100,000 cycles.

  11. Heat-stressed structural components in combustion-engine design

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kraemer, Otto

    1938-01-01

    Heated structural parts alter their shape. Anything which hinders free heat expansion will give rise to heat stresses. Design rules are thus obtained for the heated walls themselves as well as for the adjoining parts. An important guiding principle is that of designing the heat-conducting walls as thin as possible.

  12. Initiation of shape-memory effect by inductive heating of magnetic nanoparticles in thermoplastic polymers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mohr, R.; Kratz, K.; Weigel, T.; Lucka-Gabor, M.; Moneke, M.; Lendlein, A.

    2006-03-01

    In shape-memory polymers, changes in shape are mostly induced by heating, and exceeding a specific switching temperature, Tswitch. If polymers cannot be warmed up by heat transfer using a hot liquid or gaseous medium, noncontact triggering will be required. In this article, the magnetically induced shape-memory effect of composites from magnetic nanoparticles and thermoplastic shape-memory polymers is introduced. A polyetherurethane (TFX) and a biodegradable multiblock copolymer (PDC) with poly(p-dioxanone) as hard segment and poly(-caprolactone) as soft segment were investigated as matrix component. Nanoparticles consisting of an iron(III)oxide core in a silica matrix could be processed into both polymers. A homogeneous particle distribution in TFX could be shown. Compounds have suitable elastic and thermal properties for the shape-memory functionalization. Temporary shapes of TFX compounds were obtained by elongating at increased temperature and subsequent cooling under constant stress. Cold-drawing of PDC compounds at 25°C resulted in temporary fixation of the mechanical deformation by 50-60%. The shape-memory effect of both composite systems could be induced by inductive heating in an alternating magnetic field (f = 258 kHz; H = 30 kA·m-1). The maximum temperatures achievable by inductive heating in a specific magnetic field depend on sample geometry and nanoparticle content. Shape recovery rates of composites resulting from magnetic triggering are comparable to those obtained by increasing the environmental temperature. nanocomposite | shape-memory polymer | stimuli-sensitive polymer


  13. Heat stress and strain in exercise and sport.

    PubMed

    Brotherhood, John R

    2008-01-01

    Heat stress arising from the thermal environment is of concern to sports medicine and to sports administration because of the perceived risk of heat casualties, in particular heat stroke. Many sports organizations recommend environmental indices such as the WBGT for assessing risk and setting environmental limits for training and competition. But the limits are not justified by evidence. This article describes the nature of heat stress in sport and how it may be assessed objectively. Heat stress and the principal human responses to exercise heat stress are reviewed briefly. Metabolic heat production and the thermal environment provoke separate and largely independent physiological strains. Metabolic heat production drives body core temperature, and the thermal environment drives skin temperature; the combined stresses are integrated to drive sweat rate. Control of core temperature depends on adequate sweat production and the capacity of the environment to evaporate the sweat. The nature of exercise heat stress is demonstrated by rational analysis of the physical heat exchanges between the body and the environment. The principles of this analysis are applied to critical review of current practice in the assessment of heat stress in sport. The article concludes with discussion of research to establish methods for objective sport-specific assessment of heat stress. PMID:17997136

  14. Modeling heat stress under different environmental conditions.

    PubMed

    Carabaño, M J; Logar, B; Bormann, J; Minet, J; Vanrobays, M-L; Díaz, C; Tychon, B; Gengler, N; Hammami, H

    2016-05-01

    Renewed interest in heat stress effects on livestock productivity derives from climate change, which is expected to increase temperatures and the frequency of extreme weather events. This study aimed at evaluating the effect of temperature and humidity on milk production in highly selected dairy cattle populations across 3 European regions differing in climate and production systems to detect differences and similarities that can be used to optimize heat stress (HS) effect modeling. Milk, fat, and protein test day data from official milk recording for 1999 to 2010 in 4 Holstein populations located in the Walloon Region of Belgium (BEL), Luxembourg (LUX), Slovenia (SLO), and southern Spain (SPA) were merged with temperature and humidity data provided by the state meteorological agencies. After merging, the number of test day records/cows per trait ranged from 686,726/49,655 in SLO to 1,982,047/136,746 in BEL. Values for the daily average and maximum temperature-humidity index (THIavg and THImax) ranges for THIavg/THImax were largest in SLO (22-74/28-84) and shortest in SPA (39-76/46-83). Change point techniques were used to determine comfort thresholds, which differed across traits and climatic regions. Milk yield showed an inverted U-shaped pattern of response across the THI scale with a HS threshold around 73 THImax units. For fat and protein, thresholds were lower than for milk yield and were shifted around 6 THI units toward larger values in SPA compared with the other countries. Fat showed lower HS thresholds than protein traits in all countries. The traditional broken line model was compared with quadratic and cubic fits of the pattern of response in production to increasing heat loads. A cubic polynomial model allowing for individual variation in patterns of response and THIavg as heat load measure showed the best statistical features. Higher/lower producing animals showed less/more persistent production (quantity and quality) across the THI scale. The

  15. Sprint performance under heat stress: A review.

    PubMed

    Girard, O; Brocherie, F; Bishop, D J

    2015-06-01

    Training and competition in major track-and-field events, and for many team or racquet sports, often require the completion of maximal sprints in hot (>30 °C) ambient conditions. Enhanced short-term (<30 s) power output or single-sprint performance, resulting from transient heat exposure (muscle temperature rise), can be attributed to improved muscle contractility. Under heat stress, elevations in skin/core temperatures are associated with increased cardiovascular and metabolic loads in addition to decreasing voluntary muscle activation; there is also compelling evidence to suggest that large performance decrements occur when repeated-sprint exercise (consisting of brief recovery periods between sprints, usually <60 s) is performed in hot compared with cool conditions. Conversely, poorer intermittent-sprint performance (recovery periods long enough to allow near complete recovery, usually 60-300 s) in hotter conditions is solely observed when exercise induces marked hyperthermia (core temperature >39 °C). Here we also discuss strategies (heat acclimatization, precooling, hydration strategies) employed by "sprint" athletes to mitigate the negative influence of higher environmental temperatures. PMID:25943658

  16. Endoplasmic reticulum stress-mediated induction of SESTRIN 2 potentiates cell survival

    PubMed Central

    Ayo, Abiodun; Pakos-Zebrucka, Karolina; Patterson, John B

    2016-01-01

    Upregulation of SESTRIN 2 (SESN2) has been reported in response to diverse cellular stresses. In this study we demonstrate SESTRIN 2 induction following endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress. ER stress-induced increases in SESTRIN 2 expression were dependent on both PERK and IRE1/XBP1 arms of the unfolded protein response (UPR). SESTRIN 2 induction, post ER stress, was responsible for mTORC1 inactivation and contributed to autophagy induction. Conversely, knockdown of SESTRIN 2 prolonged mTORC1 signaling, repressed autophagy and increased ER stress-induced cell death. Unexpectedly, the increase in ER stress-induced cell death was not linked to autophagy inhibition. Analysis of UPR pathways identified prolonged eIF2α, ATF4 and CHOP signaling in SESTRIN 2 knockdown cells following ER stress. SESTRIN 2 regulation enables UPR derived signals to indirectly control mTORC1 activity shutting down protein translation thus preventing further exacerbation of ER stress. PMID:26930721

  17. Inductive heating kills cells that contribute to plaque: a proof-of-concept

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Gwangseong

    2015-01-01

    Inducing cell death by heating targeted particles shows promise in cancer treatment. Here, we aim to demonstrate the feasibility of extending the use of this technique to treat and remove vascular deposits and thrombosis. We used induction heating of macrophages, which are key contributors to atherosclerosis and have demonstrated clear feasibility for heating and destroying these cells using ferromagnetic and pure iron particles. Specifically, iron particles achieved maximum temperatures of 51 ± 0.5 °C and spherical particles achieved a maximum temperature of 43.9 ± 0.2 °C (N = 6) after 30 min of inductive heating. Two days of subsequent observation demonstrated that inductive heating led to a significant reduction in cell number. Prior to induction heating, cell density was 105,000 ± 20,820 cells/ml (N = 3). This number was reduced to 6,666 ± 4,410 cells/ml for the spherical particles and 16,666 ± 9,280 cells/ml for the iron particles 24 h after inductive heating. Though cell density increased on the second day following inductive heating, the growth was minimal. Cells grew to 26,667 ± 6,670 cells/ml and 30,000 ± 15,280 cells/ml respectively. Compared to cell cultures with iron and spherical particles that were not subjected to induction heating, we observed a 97% reduction in cell count for the spherical particles and a 91% reduction for the iron particles after the first 24 h. After 48 h we observed a 95% reduction in cell growth for both spherical and iron particles. Induction heating of microparticles was thus highly effective in reducing the macrophage population and preventing their growth. These results demonstrate the feasibility of targeting cells involved in atherosclerosis and warrant further research into potential clinical applications. PMID:25945318

  18. Acrolein induction of oxidative stress and degranulation in mast cells.

    PubMed

    Hochman, Daniel J; Collaco, Christopher R; Brooks, Edward G

    2014-08-01

    Increases in asthma worldwide have been associated epidemiologically with expanding urban air pollution. The mechanistic relationship between airway hyper-responsiveness, inflammation, and ambient airborne triggers remains ambiguous. Acrolein, a ubiquitous aldehyde pollutant, is a product of incomplete combustion reactions. Acrolein is abundant in cigarette smoke, effluent from industrial smokestacks, diesel exhaust, and even hot oil cooking vapors. Acrolein is a potent airway irritant and can induce airway hyper-responsiveness and inflammation in the lungs of animal models. In the present study, we utilized the mast cell analog, RBL-2H3, to interrogate the responses of cells relevant to airway inflammation and allergic responses as a model for the induction of asthma-like conditions upon exposure to acrolein. We hypothesized that acrolein would induce oxidative stress and degranulation in airway mast cells. Our results indicate that acrolein at 1 ppm initiated degranulation and promoted the generation of reactive oxygen species (ROS). Introduction of antioxidants to the system significantly reduced both ROS generation and degranulation. At higher levels of exposure (above 100 ppm), RBL-2H3 cells displayed signs of severe toxicity. This experimental data indicates acrolein can induce an allergic inflammation in mast cell lines, and the initiation of degranulation was moderated by the application of antioxidants. PMID:23047665

  19. Myocardial protection after whole body heat stress in the rabbit is dependent on metabolic substrate and is related to the amount of the inducible 70-kD heat stress protein.

    PubMed Central

    Marber, M S; Walker, J M; Latchman, D S; Yellon, D M

    1994-01-01

    The aims of this study were to examine the effects of whole body heat stress and subsequent stress protein induction on glycolytic metabolism, mitochondrial metabolism, and calcium handling within the heart. The effect of heat stress on glycolytic and mitochondrial pathways was examined by measuring contractile performance in the presence of glucose and pyruvate, respectively. Calcium handling was assessed using force-interval relationships. Right ventricular papillary muscles taken from heat-stressed and control rabbit hearts were superfused with Kreb's solution containing either glucose or pyruvate and rendered hypoxic for 30 min. After reoxygenation, the greatest recovery of contractile function occurred in the heat-stressed muscles with pyruvate as substrate; there was, however, no difference in the force-interval relationship between the groups. The degree of contractile recovery was related to the content of the inducible 70-kD but not the 65-kD, heat stress protein. This study suggests that heat stress enhances the ability of rabbit papillary muscle to use pyruvate, but not glucose, after reoxygenation, and that the differences seen in contractility may be secondary to induction of the 72-kD stress protein. Images PMID:8132747

  20. Mechanical and electromagnetic induction of protection against oxidative stress.

    PubMed

    Di Carlo, A L; White, N C; Litovitz, T A

    2001-01-01

    Cells and tissues can be protected against a potentially lethal stress by first exposing them to a brief dose of the same or different stress. This "pre-conditioning" phenomenon has been documented in many models of protection against oxidative stress, including ischemia/reperfusion and ultraviolet (UV) light exposure. Stimuli which induce this protective response include heat, chemicals, brief ischemia, and electromagnetic (EM) field exposures. We report here that constant mechanical vibration pre-conditions chick embryos, protecting them during subsequent stress from hypoxia or UV light exposure. Continuously mechanically vibrated embryos (60 Hz, 1 g (32 ft/s2), 20 min) exhibited nearly double the survival (67.5%, P < 0.001) after subsequent hypoxia as compared to non-vibrated controls (37.6%). As a second set of experiments, embryos were vibrated and then exposed to UV light stress. Those embryos that were vibrated prior to UV had nearly double the survival 3 h after UV exposure (66%, P < 0.001) as compared to controls (35%). The degree of protection, however, was dependent on the constancy of the vibration amplitude. When vibration was turned on and off at 1-s intervals throughout exposure, no increase in hypoxia protection was noted. For 50 s on/off vibration intervals, however, hypoxia protection comparable to continuous vibration was obtained. In contrast, random, inconstant mechanical vibration did not induce protection against subsequent UV exposure. These data suggest that to be an effective pre-conditioning agent, mechanical vibration must have a degree of temporally constancy (on/off intervals of greater than 1 s). Further experiments in both models (hypoxia and UV) indicated an interaction between vibration and EM field-induced protection. Vibration-induced hypoxia protection was inhibited by superposition of a random EM noise field (previously shown to inhibit EM field-induced protection). In addition, EM field-induced UV protection was inhibited by

  1. Cytotoxic and Genotoxic Consequences of Heat Stress Are Dependent on the Presence of Oxygen in Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    PubMed Central

    Davidson, John F.; Schiestl, Robert H.

    2001-01-01

    Lethal heat stress generates oxidative stress in Saccharomyces cerevisiae, and anaerobic cells are several orders of magnitude more resistant than aerobic cells to a 50°C heat shock. Here we characterize the oxidative effects of this heat stress. The thermoprotective effect in anaerobic cells was not due to expression of HSP104 or any other heat shock gene, raising the possibility that the toxicity of lethal heat shock is due mainly to oxidative stress. Aerobic but not anaerobic heat stress caused elevated frequencies of forward mutations and interchromosomal DNA recombination. Oxidative DNA repair glycosylase-deficient strains under aerobic conditions showed a powerful induction of forward mutation frequencies compared to wild-type cells, which was completely abolished under anaerobiosis. We also investigated potential causes for this oxygen-dependent heat shock-induced genetic instability. Levels of sulfhydryl groups, dominated mainly by the high levels of the antioxidant glutathione (reduced form) and levels of vitamin E, decreased after aerobic heat stress but not after anaerobic heat stress. Aerobic heat stress also led to an increase in mitochondrial membrane disruption of several hundredfold, which was 100-fold reduced under anaerobic conditions. PMID:11443093

  2. Effects of heat stress on baroreflex function in humans

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Crandall, Craig G.; Cui, Jian; Wilson, Thad E.

    2003-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: Heat stress significantly reduces orthostatic tolerance in humans. The mechanism(s) causing this response remain unknown. The purpose of this review article is to present data pertaining to the hypothesis that reduced orthostatic tolerance in heat stressed individuals is a result of heat stress induced alterations in baroflex function. METHODS: In both normothermic and heat stressed conditions baroreflex responsiveness was assessed via pharmacological and non-pharmacological methods. In addition, the effects of heat stress on post-synaptic vasoconstrictor responsiveness were assessed. RESULTS: Generally, whole body heating did not alter baroreflex sensitivity defined as the gain of the linear portion of the baroreflex curve around the operating point. However, whole body heating shifted the baroreflex curve to the prevailing (i.e. elevated) heart rate and muscle sympathetic nerve activity. Finally, the heat stress impaired vasoconstrictor responses to exogenous administration of adrenergic agonists. CONCLUSION: Current data do not support the hypothesis that reduced orthostatic tolerance associated with heat stress in humans is due to impaired baroreflex responsiveness. This phenomenon may be partially due to the effects of heat stress on reducing vasoconstrictor responsiveness.

  3. Diversity in Robustness of Lactococcus lactis Strains during Heat Stress, Oxidative Stress, and Spray Drying Stress

    PubMed Central

    Dijkstra, Annereinou R.; Setyawati, Meily C.; Bayjanov, Jumamurat R.; Alkema, Wynand; van Hijum, Sacha A. F. T.; Hugenholtz, Jeroen

    2014-01-01

    In this study we tested 39 Lactococcus lactis strains isolated from diverse habitats for their robustness under heat and oxidative stress, demonstrating high diversity in survival (up to 4 log units). Strains with an L. lactis subsp. lactis phenotype generally displayed more-robust phenotypes than strains with an L. lactis subsp. cremoris phenotype, whereas the habitat from which the strains had been isolated did not appear to influence stress survival. Comparison of the stress survival phenotypes with already available comparative genomic data sets revealed that the absence or presence of specific genes, including genes encoding a GntR family transcriptional regulator, a manganese ABC transporter permease, a cellobiose phosphotransferase system (PTS) component, the FtsY protein, and hypothetical proteins, was associated with heat or oxidative stress survival. Finally, 14 selected strains also displayed diversity in survival after spray drying, ranging from 20% survival for the most robust strains, which appears acceptable for industrial application, to 0.1% survival for the least-tolerant strains. The high and low levels of survival upon spray drying correlated clearly with the combined robustness under heat and oxidative stress. These results demonstrate the relevance of screening culture collections for robustness under heat and oxidative stress on top of the typical screening for acidifying and flavor-forming properties. PMID:24212574

  4. Control of power to an inductively heated part

    DOEpatents

    Adkins, Douglas R.; Frost, Charles A.; Kahle, Philip M.; Kelley, J. Bruce; Stanton, Suzanne L.

    1997-01-01

    A process for induction hardening a part to a desired depth with an AC signal applied to the part from a closely coupled induction coil includes measuring the voltage of the AC signal at the coil and the current passing through the coil; and controlling the depth of hardening of the part from the measured voltage and current. The control system determines parameters of the part that are functions of applied voltage and current to the induction coil, and uses a neural network to control the application of the AC signal based on the detected functions for each part.

  5. Control of power to an inductively heated part

    DOEpatents

    Adkins, D.R.; Frost, C.A.; Kahle, P.M.; Kelley, J.B.; Stanton, S.L.

    1997-05-20

    A process for induction hardening a part to a desired depth with an AC signal applied to the part from a closely coupled induction coil includes measuring the voltage of the AC signal at the coil and the current passing through the coil; and controlling the depth of hardening of the part from the measured voltage and current. The control system determines parameters of the part that are functions of applied voltage and current to the induction coil, and uses a neural network to control the application of the AC signal based on the detected functions for each part. 6 figs.

  6. Boechera Species Exhibit Species-Specific Responses to Combined Heat and High Light Stress

    PubMed Central

    Gallas, Genna; Waters, Elizabeth R.

    2015-01-01

    As sessile organisms, plants must be able to complete their life cycle in place and therefore tolerance to abiotic stress has had a major role in shaping biogeographical patterns. However, much of what we know about plant tolerance to abiotic stresses is based on studies of just a few plant species, most notably the model species Arabidopsis thaliana. In this study we examine natural variation in the stress responses of five diverse Boechera (Brassicaceae) species. Boechera plants were exposed to basal and acquired combined heat and high light stress. Plant response to these stresses was evaluated based on chlorophyll fluorescence measurements, induction of leaf chlorosis, and gene expression. Many of the Boechera species were more tolerant to heat and high light stress than A. thaliana. Gene expression data indicates that two important marker genes for stress responses: APX2 (Ascorbate peroxidase 2) and HsfA2 (Heat shock transcription factor A2) have distinct species-specific expression patterns. The findings of species-specific responses and tolerance to stress indicate that stress pathways are evolutionarily labile even among closely related species. PMID:26030823

  7. Nutritional interventions to alleviate the negative consequences of heat stress.

    PubMed

    Rhoads, Robert P; Baumgard, Lance H; Suagee, Jessica K; Sanders, Sara R

    2013-05-01

    Energy metabolism is a highly coordinated process, and preferred fuel(s) differ among tissues. The hierarchy of substrate use can be affected by physiological status and environmental factors including high ambient temperature. Unabated heat eventually overwhelms homeothermic mechanisms resulting in heat stress, which compromises animal health, farm animal production, and human performance. Various aspects of heat stress physiology have been extensively studied, yet a clear understanding of the metabolic changes occurring at the cellular, tissue, and whole-body levels in response to an environmental heat load remains ill-defined. For reasons not yet clarified, circulating nonesterified fatty acid levels are reduced during heat stress, even in the presence of elevated stress hormones (epinephrine, glucagon, and cortisol), and heat-stressed animals often have a blunted lipolytic response to catabolic signals. Either directly because of or in coordination with this, animals experiencing environmental hyperthermia exhibit a shift toward carbohydrate use. These metabolic alterations occur coincident with increased circulating basal and stimulated plasma insulin concentrations. Limited data indicate that proper insulin action is necessary to effectively mount a response to heat stress and minimize heat-induced damage. Consistent with this idea, nutritional interventions targeting increased insulin action may improve tolerance and productivity during heat stress. Further research is warranted to uncover the effects of heat on parameters associated with energy metabolism so that more appropriate and effective treatment methodologies can be designed. PMID:23674792

  8. Heat-shock protein 70 expression in shrimp Fenneropenaeus chinensis during thermal and immune-challenged stress

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guo, Zhenyu; Jiao, Chuanzhen; Xiang, Jianhai

    2004-12-01

    Using western immunoblotting we obtained heat-shock protein 70 (HSP70) induction data and distribution in different tissues from shrimp Fenneropenaeus chinensis during thermal and immune-challenged stresses. This is probably the first report of the effects of various stressors on the expression of HSP70 in shrimp. HSP70 was prominently induced in hepatopancreas and gills, but not in muscle, eyestalk and hemolymph, when the shrimp were exposed to heat shock and Vibrio anguillavium-challenged stresses. Cold shock and WSSV treatment had no significant effects on the levels of HSP70 expression in all tissues examined. HSP70 induction was greatest after 2 h exposure to heat shock stress, which was elevated after acute heat shock exposure of 10°C above ambient temperature.

  9. Improvement of Mechanical Properties of Spheroidized 1045 Steel by Induction Heat Treatment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Minwook; Shin, Jung-Ho; Choi, Young; Lee, Seok-Jae

    2016-04-01

    The effects of induction heat treatment on the formation of carbide particles and mechanical properties of spheroidized 1045 steel were investigated by means of microstructural analysis and tensile testing. The induction spheroidization accelerated the formation of spherical cementite particles and effectively softened the steel. The volume fraction of cementite was found to be a key factor that affected the mechanical properties of spheroidized steels. Further tests showed that sequential spheroidization by induction and furnace heat treatments enhanced elongation within a short spheroidization time, resulting in better mechanical properties. This was due to the higher volume fraction of spherical cementite particles that had less diffusion time for particle coarsening.

  10. System and method of adjusting the equilibrium temperature of an inductively-heated susceptor

    DOEpatents

    Matsen, Marc R; Negley, Mark A; Geren, William Preston

    2015-02-24

    A system for inductively heating a workpiece may include an induction coil, at least one susceptor face sheet, and a current controller coupled. The induction coil may be configured to conduct an alternating current and generate a magnetic field in response to the alternating current. The susceptor face sheet may be configured to have a workpiece positioned therewith. The susceptor face sheet may be formed of a ferromagnetic alloy having a Curie temperature and being inductively heatable to an equilibrium temperature approaching the Curie temperature in response to the magnetic field. The current controller may be coupled to the induction coil and may be configured to adjust the alternating current in a manner causing a change in at least one heating parameter of the susceptor face sheet.

  11. Re-evaluating occupational heat stress in a changing climate.

    PubMed

    Spector, June T; Sheffield, Perry E

    2014-10-01

    The potential consequences of occupational heat stress in a changing climate on workers, workplaces, and global economies are substantial. Occupational heat stress risk is projected to become particularly high in middle- and low-income tropical and subtropical regions, where optimal controls may not be readily available. This commentary presents occupational heat stress in the context of climate change, reviews its impacts, and reflects on implications for heat stress assessment and control. Future efforts should address limitations of existing heat stress assessment methods and generate economical, practical, and universal approaches that can incorporate data of varying levels of detail, depending on resources. Validation of these methods should be performed in a wider variety of environments, and data should be collected and analyzed centrally for both local and large-scale hazard assessments and to guide heat stress adaptation planning. Heat stress standards should take into account variability in worker acclimatization, other vulnerabilities, and workplace resources. The effectiveness of controls that are feasible and acceptable should be evaluated. Exposure scientists are needed, in collaboration with experts in other areas, to effectively prevent and control occupational heat stress in a changing climate. PMID:25261455

  12. Rubisco activase and wheat productivity under heat stress conditions

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Rubisco activase (RCA) constrains the photosynthetic potential of plants at high temperature (heat stress). We hypothesized that endogenous levels of RCA could serve as an important determinant of plant productivity under heat stress conditions. In this study, we investigated the possible relation...

  13. Re-evaluating Occupational Heat Stress in a Changing Climate

    PubMed Central

    Spector, June T.; Sheffield, Perry E.

    2014-01-01

    The potential consequences of occupational heat stress in a changing climate on workers, workplaces, and global economies are substantial. Occupational heat stress risk is projected to become particularly high in middle- and low-income tropical and subtropical regions, where optimal controls may not be readily available. This commentary presents occupational heat stress in the context of climate change, reviews its impacts, and reflects on implications for heat stress assessment and control. Future efforts should address limitations of existing heat stress assessment methods and generate economical, practical, and universal approaches that can incorporate data of varying levels of detail, depending on resources. Validation of these methods should be performed in a wider variety of environments, and data should be collected and analyzed centrally for both local and large-scale hazard assessments and to guide heat stress adaptation planning. Heat stress standards should take into account variability in worker acclimatization, other vulnerabilities, and workplace resources. The effectiveness of controls that are feasible and acceptable should be evaluated. Exposure scientists are needed, in collaboration with experts in other areas, to effectively prevent and control occupational heat stress in a changing climate. PMID:25261455

  14. Management of heat stress in the livestock industry

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Heat stress costs the animal industry over $1.7 billion annually. Annual losses average $369 million in the beef cattle industry and $299 million in the swine industry. The impacts of a single heat stress event on individual animals are quite varied. Brief events often cause little or no effect. ...

  15. Heat loss through the glabrous skin surfaces of heavily insulated, heat-stressed individuals.

    PubMed

    Grahn, D A; Dillon, J L; Heller, H C

    2009-07-01

    Insulation reduces heat exchange between a body and the environment. Glabrous (nonhairy) skin surfaces (palms of the hands, soles of the feet, face, and ears) constitute a small percentage of total body surface area but contain specialized vascular structures that facilitate heat loss. We have previously reported that cooling the glabrous skin surfaces is effective in alleviating heat stress and that the application of local subatmospheric pressure enhances the effect. In this paper, we compare the effects of cooling multiple glabrous skin surfaces with and without vacuum on thermal recovery in heavily insulated heat-stressed individuals. Esophageal temperatures (T(es)) and heart rates were monitored throughout the trials. Water loss was determined from pre- and post-trial nude weights. Treadmill exercise (5.6 km/h, 9-16% slope, and 25-45 min duration) in a hot environment (41.5 degrees C, 20-30% relative humidity) while wearing insulating pants and jackets was used to induce heat stress (T(es)>or=39 degrees C). For postexercise recovery, the subjects donned additional insulation (a balaclava, winter gloves, and impermeable boot covers) and rested in the hot environment for 60 min. Postexercise cooling treatments included control (no cooling) or the application of a 10 degrees C closed water circulating system to (a) the hand(s) with or without application of a local subatmospheric pressure, (b) the face, (c) the feet, or (d) multiple glabrous skin regions. Following exercise induction of heat stress in heavily insulated subjects, the rate of recovery of T(es) was 0.4+/-0.2 degrees C/h(n=12), but with application of cooling to one hand, the rate was 0.8+/-0.3 degrees C/h(n=12), and with one hand cooling with subatmospheric pressure, the rate was 1.0+/-0.2 degrees C/h(n=12). Cooling alone yielded two responses, one resembling that of cooling with subatmospheric pressure (n=8) and one resembling that of no cooling (n=4). The effect of treating multiple surfaces was

  16. Heat stress increases insulin sensitivity in pigs

    PubMed Central

    Sanz Fernandez, M Victoria; Stoakes, Sara K; Abuajamieh, Mohannad; Seibert, Jacob T; Johnson, Jay S; Horst, Erin A; Rhoads, Robert P; Baumgard, Lance H

    2015-01-01

    Proper insulin homeostasis appears critical for adapting to and surviving a heat load. Further, heat stress (HS) induces phenotypic changes in livestock that suggest an increase in insulin action. The current study objective was to evaluate the effects of HS on whole-body insulin sensitivity. Female pigs (57 ± 4 kg body weight) were subjected to two experimental periods. During period 1, all pigs remained in thermoneutral conditions (TN; 21°C) and were fed ad libitum. During period 2, pigs were exposed to: (i) constant HS conditions (32°C) and fed ad libitum (n = 6), or (ii) TN conditions and pair-fed (PFTN; n = 6) to eliminate the confounding effects of dissimilar feed intake. A hyperinsulinemic euglycemic clamp (HEC) was conducted on d3 of both periods; and skeletal muscle and adipose tissue biopsies were collected prior to and after an insulin tolerance test (ITT) on d5 of period 2. During the HEC, insulin infusion increased circulating insulin and decreased plasma C-peptide and nonesterified fatty acids, similarly between treatments. From period 1 to 2, the rate of glucose infusion in response to the HEC remained similar in HS pigs while it decreased (36%) in PFTN controls. Prior to the ITT, HS increased (41%) skeletal muscle insulin receptor substrate-1 protein abundance, but did not affect protein kinase B or their phosphorylated forms. In adipose tissue, HS did not alter any of the basal or stimulated measured insulin signaling markers. In summary, HS increases whole-body insulin-stimulated glucose uptake. PMID:26243213

  17. Quantifying Livestock Heat Stress Impacts in the Sahel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Broman, D.; Rajagopalan, B.; Hopson, T. M.

    2014-12-01

    Livestock heat stress, especially in regions of the developing world with limited adaptive capacity, has a largely unquantified impact on food supply. Though dominated by ambient air temperature, relative humidity, wind speed, and solar radiation all affect heat stress, which can decrease livestock growth, milk production, reproduction rates, and mortality. Indices like the thermal-humidity index (THI) are used to quantify the heat stress experienced from climate variables. Livestock experience differing impacts at different index critical thresholds that are empirically determined and specific to species and breed. This lack of understanding has been highlighted in several studies with a limited knowledge of the critical thresholds of heat stress in native livestock breeds, as well as the current and future impact of heat stress,. As adaptation and mitigation strategies to climate change depend on a solid quantitative foundation, this knowledge gap has limited such efforts. To address the lack of study, we have investigated heat stress impacts in the pastoral system of Sub-Saharan West Africa. We used a stochastic weather generator to quantify both the historic and future variability of heat stress. This approach models temperature, relative humidity, and precipitation, the climate variables controlling heat stress. Incorporating large-scale climate as covariates into this framework provides a better historical fit and allows us to include future CMIP5 GCM projections to examine the climate change impacts on heat stress. Health and production data allow us to examine the influence of this variability on livestock directly, and are considered in conjunction with the confounding impacts of fodder and water access. This understanding provides useful information to decision makers looking to mitigate the impacts of climate change and can provide useful seasonal forecasts of heat stress risk. A comparison of the current and future heat stress conditions based on

  18. Role of TRP channels in the induction of heat shock proteins (Hsps) by heating skin

    PubMed Central

    Hsu, Wen-Li; Yoshioka, Tohru

    2015-01-01

    Transient receptor potential (TRP) channels in skin are crucial for achieving temperature sensitivity to maintain internal temperature balance and thermal homeostasis, as well as to protect skin cells from environmental stresses such as infrared (IR) or near-infrared (NIR) radiation via heat shock protein (Hsp) production. However, the mechanisms by which IR and NIR activate TRP channels and produce Hsps intracellularly have been independently reported. In this review, we discuss the relationship between TRP channel activation and Hsp production, and introduce the roles of several skin TRP channels in the regulation of HSP production by IR and NIR exposure. PMID:27493511

  19. Reduced heat pain thresholds after sad-mood induction are associated with changes in thalamic activity.

    PubMed

    Wagner, Gerd; Koschke, Mandy; Leuf, Tanja; Schlösser, Ralf; Bär, Karl-Jürgen

    2009-03-01

    Negative affective states influence pain processing in healthy subjects in terms of augmented pain experience. Furthermore, our previous studies revealed that patients with major depressive disorder showed increased heat pain thresholds on the skin. Potential neurofunctional correlates of this finding were located within the fronto-thalamic network. The aim of the present study was to investigate the neurofunctional underpinnings of the influence of sad mood upon heat pain processing in healthy subjects. For this purpose, we used a combination of the Velten Mood Induction procedure and a piece of music to induce sad affect. Initially we assessed heat pain threshold after successful induction of sad mood outside the MR scanner in Experiment 1. We found a highly significant reduction in heat pain threshold on the left hand and a trend for the right. In Experiment 2, we applied thermal pain stimuli on the left hand (37, 42, and 45 degrees C) in an MRI scanner. Subjects were scanned twice, one group before and after sad-mood induction and another group before and after neutral-mood induction, respectively. Our main finding was a significant group x mood-induction interaction bilaterally in the ventrolateral nucleus of the thalamus indicating a BOLD signal increase after sad-mood induction and a BOLD signal decrease in the control group. We present evidence that induced sad affect leads to reduced heat pain thresholds in healthy subjects. This is probably due to altered lateral thalamic activity, which is potentially associated with changed attentional processes. PMID:19027763

  20. External induction of heat shock stimulates the immune response and longevity of Caenorhabditis elegans towards pathogen exposure.

    PubMed

    Prithika, Udayakumar; Deepa, Veerappan; Balamurugan, Krishnaswamy

    2016-08-01

    Heat shock proteins (HSPs) are highly chaperonic molecules that give immediate response during any stress, tissue damage or bacterial infections. In the present study, the role of HSPs upon bacterial encounter is studied by applying external heat induction to live Caenorhabditis elegans Heat shock was observed to increase the life span of wild type C. elegans upon pathogenic encounter, indicating a role of HSPs in bacterial infection and immunity. Similar increase in resistance towards pathogenesis observed in long-lived C. elegans daf-2 mutants and the increase in the lifespan indicated a role for the insulin/IGF-1 signaling (IIS) pathway in HSP-mediated pathogenic resistance. The microscopic observation of C. elegans after external heat induction and sequential exposure of pathogens indicated reduction of egg viability. Results of Real-time PCR and immunoblotting analysis of candidate genes revealed that heat shock and IIS pathways collaborate in the observed pathogenic resistance and further suggested SGK-1 to be the possible factor linking both these pathways. In addition, survival assays carried out using mutants equips us with supporting evidence that HSP and HSF-1 are necessary for the accelerated lifespan of C. elegans Our findings thus confirm that crosstalk between HSPs and SGK-1 influences C. elegans longevity. PMID:27317398

  1. Oxidative stress induction by nanoparticles in THP-1 cells with 4-HNE production: stress biomarker or oxidative stress signalling molecule?

    PubMed

    Foucaud, L; Goulaouic, S; Bennasroune, A; Laval-Gilly, P; Brown, D; Stone, V; Falla, J

    2010-09-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate whether carbon black (CB) nanoparticles might induce toxicity to monocytic cells in vitro via an oxidative stress mechanism involving formation of the lipid peroxidation product 4-hydroxynonenal (4-HNE) and the subsequent role of 4-HNE in inducing further cytotoxic effects. ROS production in cells by CB nanoparticles was shown by the oxidation of DCFH after a short time exposure. These particles induced the formation of 4-HNE-protein adducts and significant modification of glutathione content corresponding to an increase of oxidized glutathione form (GSSG) and a decrease of total glutathione (GSX) content. These results attest to an oxidative stress induced by the carbon black nanoparticles, although no induction of HO-1 protein expression was detected. Concerning the effects of a direct exposure to 4-HNE, our results showed that 4-HNE is not cytotoxic for concentrations lower than 12.5 microM. By contrast, it provokes a very high cytotoxicity for concentrations above 25 microM. An induction of HO-1 expression was observed from concentrations above 5 microM of 4-HNE. Finally, glutathione content decreased significantly from 5 microM of 4-HNE but no modification was observed under this concentration. The discrepancy between effects of carbon black nanoparticles and 4-HNE on the intracellular markers of oxidative stress suggests that 4-HNE is not directly implied in the signalling of oxidative toxicity of nanoparticles but is an effective biomarker of oxidative effects of nanoparticles. PMID:20638469

  2. Induction Tempering vs Conventional Tempering of a Heat-Treatable Steel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sackl, Stephanie; Zuber, Michael; Clemens, Helmut; Primig, Sophie

    2016-07-01

    An induction heat treatment is favorable compared to a conventional one mainly due to significant time and cost savings. Therefore, in this study, the microstructure property relationships during induction and conventional heat treatment of a heat treatable steel 42CrMo4 is investigated. The yield strength and hardness is slightly higher for the conventionally heat-treated steel, whereas the induction heat-treated condition exhibits a roughly 30 J/cm2 higher impact energy. In a previous investigation of the authors, it has been proved that the difference in yield strength originates from the smaller block size of the conventionally heat-treated steel, which was already present after hardening. In the present work, it can be shown that during tempering the martensitic blocks become equi-axed ferrite grains due to recrystallization as revealed by electron back scatter diffraction. Nevertheless, a larger grain size usually is less favorable for the impact toughness of steels. Therefore, another mechanism is responsible for the higher impact energy of the induction hardened and tempered steel. With the aid of transmission electron microscopy a finer distribution of cementite was observed in the induction heat-treated samples. The delay of recovery is the reason for the presence of finer cementite in case of the induction heat-treated steel. Here, the higher heating rates and shorter process times reduce the annihilation of dislocation and as a consequence provide more nucleation sites for precipitation of cementite during tempering. From the obtained experimental results, it is believed that the finer distribution of carbides causes the observed higher impact toughness.

  3. Induction Tempering vs Conventional Tempering of a Heat-Treatable Steel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sackl, Stephanie; Zuber, Michael; Clemens, Helmut; Primig, Sophie

    2016-05-01

    An induction heat treatment is favorable compared to a conventional one mainly due to significant time and cost savings. Therefore, in this study, the microstructure property relationships during induction and conventional heat treatment of a heat treatable steel 42CrMo4 is investigated. The yield strength and hardness is slightly higher for the conventionally heat-treated steel, whereas the induction heat-treated condition exhibits a roughly 30 J/cm2 higher impact energy. In a previous investigation of the authors, it has been proved that the difference in yield strength originates from the smaller block size of the conventionally heat-treated steel, which was already present after hardening. In the present work, it can be shown that during tempering the martensitic blocks become equi-axed ferrite grains due to recrystallization as revealed by electron back scatter diffraction. Nevertheless, a larger grain size usually is less favorable for the impact toughness of steels. Therefore, another mechanism is responsible for the higher impact energy of the induction hardened and tempered steel. With the aid of transmission electron microscopy a finer distribution of cementite was observed in the induction heat-treated samples. The delay of recovery is the reason for the presence of finer cementite in case of the induction heat-treated steel. Here, the higher heating rates and shorter process times reduce the annihilation of dislocation and as a consequence provide more nucleation sites for precipitation of cementite during tempering. From the obtained experimental results, it is believed that the finer distribution of carbides causes the observed higher impact toughness.

  4. Molecular mechanisms of the plant heat stress response

    SciTech Connect

    Qu, Ai-Li; Ding, Yan-Fei; Jiang, Qiong; Zhu, Cheng

    2013-03-08

    Highlights: ► This review elaborates the response networks of heat stress in plants. ► It elaborates proteins responding to heat stress in special physiological period. ► The proteins and pathways have formed a basic network of the heat stress response. ► Achievements of the various technologies are also combined. -- Abstract: High temperature has become a global concern, which seriously affects the growth and production of plants, particularly crops. Thus, the molecular mechanism of the heat stress response and breeding of heat-tolerant plants is necessary to protect food production and ensure crop safety. This review elaborates on the response networks of heat stress in plants, including the Hsf and Hsp response pathways, the response of ROS and the network of the hormones. In addition, the production of heat stress response elements during particular physiological periods of the plant is described. We also discuss the existing problems and future prospects concerning the molecular mechanisms of the heat stress response in plants.

  5. Vacuum-Induction, Vacuum-Arc, and Air-Induction Melting of a Complex Heat-Resistant Alloy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Decker, R. F.; Rowe, John P.; Freeman, J. W.

    1959-01-01

    The relative hot-workability and creep-rupture properties at 1600 F of a complex 55Ni-20Cr-15Co-4Mo-3Ti-3Al alloy were evaluated for vacuum-induction, vacuum-arc, and air-induction melting. A limited study of the role of oxygen and nitrogen and the structural effects in the alloy associated with the melting process was carried out. The results showed that the level of boron and/or zirconium was far more influential on properties than the melting method. Vacuum melting did reduce corner cracking and improve surface during hot-rolling. It also resulted in more uniform properties within heats. The creep-rupture properties were slightly superior in vacuum heats at low boron plus zirconium or in heats with zirconium. There was little advantage at high boron levels and air heats were superior at high levels of boron plus zirconium. Vacuum heats also had fewer oxide and carbonitride inclusions although this was a function of the opportunity for separation of the inclusions from high oxygen plus nitrogen heats. The removal of phosphorous by vacuum melting was not found to be related to properties. Oxygen plus nitrogen appeared to increase ductility in creep-rupture tests suggesting that vacuum melting removes unidentified elements detrimental to ductility. Oxides and carbonitrides in themselves did not initiate microcracks. Carbonitrides in the grain boundaries of air heats did initiate microcracks. The role of microcracking from this source and as a function of oxygen and nitrogen content was not clear. Oxygen and nitrogen did intensify corner cracking during hot-rolling but were not responsible for poor surface which resulted from rolling heats melted in air.

  6. Electromagnetic inductive heating of the asteroids and moon as evidence bearing on the primordial solar wind

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Herbert, F.; Sonett, C. P.

    1980-01-01

    Thermal evolutionary models of the asteroids and the moon based on the hypothesis of electrical inductive heating by a dense primordial solar wind are compared with observation. Inferences (derived from spectroscopy) of asteroidal mineralogy when compared with electrical heating models, the variation of cooling rates recorded in iron meteorites, and the occurrence of the lunar magma ocean event lend support to the hypothesis of inductive heating. A high primordial solar rotation rate and magnetic field together with the loss due to plasma outflow of a substantial fraction of the initial solar mass would follow.

  7. Acoustic sensor for real-time control for the inductive heating process

    DOEpatents

    Kelley, John Bruce; Lu, Wei-Yang; Zutavern, Fred J.

    2003-09-30

    Disclosed is a system and method for providing closed-loop control of the heating of a workpiece by an induction heating machine, including generating an acoustic wave in the workpiece with a pulsed laser; optically measuring displacements of the surface of the workpiece in response to the acoustic wave; calculating a sub-surface material property by analyzing the measured surface displacements; creating an error signal by comparing an attribute of the calculated sub-surface material properties with a desired attribute; and reducing the error signal below an acceptable limit by adjusting, in real-time, as often as necessary, the operation of the inductive heating machine.

  8. Effect of acute heat stress on plant nutrient metabolism proteins

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Abrupt heating decreased the levels (per unit total root protein) of all but one of the nutrient metabolism proteins examined, and for most of the proteins, effects were greater for severe vs. moderate heat stress. For many of the nutrient metabolism proteins, initial effects of heat (1 d) were r...

  9. Occupational Heat Stress Profiles in Selected Workplaces in India.

    PubMed

    Venugopal, Vidhya; Chinnadurai, Jeremiah S; Lucas, Rebekah A I; Kjellstrom, Tord

    2016-01-01

    Health and productivity impacts from occupational heat stress have significant ramifications for the large workforce of India. This study profiled occupational heat stress impacts on the health and productivity of workers in select organized and unorganized Indian work sectors. During hotter and cooler seasons, Wet Bulb Globe Temperatures (WBGT) were used to quantify the risk of heat stress, according to International workplace guidelines. Questionnaires assessed workers' perceived health and productivity impacts from heat stress. A total of 442 workers from 18 Indian workplaces participated (22% and 78% from the organized and unorganized sector, respectively). Overall 82% and 42% of workers were exposed to higher than recommended WBGT during hotter and cooler periods, respectively. Workers with heavy workloads reported more heat-related health issues (chi square = 23.67, p ≤ 0.001) and reduced productivity (chi square = 15.82, p ≤ 0.001), especially the outdoor workers. Heat-rashes, dehydration, heat-syncope and urinogenital symptoms were self-reported health issues. Cited reasons for productivity losses were: extended-work hours due to fatigue/exhaustion, sickness/hospitalization and wages lost. Reducing workplace heat stress will benefit industries and workers via improving worker health and productivity. Adaptation and mitigation measures to tackle heat stress are imperative to protect the present and future workforce as climate change progresses. PMID:26729144

  10. Occupational Heat Stress Profiles in Selected Workplaces in India

    PubMed Central

    Venugopal, Vidhya; Chinnadurai, Jeremiah S.; Lucas, Rebekah A. I.; Kjellstrom, Tord

    2015-01-01

    Health and productivity impacts from occupational heat stress have significant ramifications for the large workforce of India. This study profiled occupational heat stress impacts on the health and productivity of workers in select organized and unorganized Indian work sectors. During hotter and cooler seasons, Wet Bulb Globe Temperatures (WBGT) were used to quantify the risk of heat stress, according to International workplace guidelines. Questionnaires assessed workers’ perceived health and productivity impacts from heat stress. A total of 442 workers from 18 Indian workplaces participated (22% and 78% from the organized and unorganized sector, respectively). Overall 82% and 42% of workers were exposed to higher than recommended WBGT during hotter and cooler periods, respectively. Workers with heavy workloads reported more heat-related health issues (chi square = 23.67, p ≤ 0.001) and reduced productivity (chi square = 15.82, p ≤ 0.001), especially the outdoor workers. Heat-rashes, dehydration, heat-syncope and urinogenital symptoms were self-reported health issues. Cited reasons for productivity losses were: extended-work hours due to fatigue/exhaustion, sickness/hospitalization and wages lost. Reducing workplace heat stress will benefit industries and workers via improving worker health and productivity. Adaptation and mitigation measures to tackle heat stress are imperative to protect the present and future workforce as climate change progresses. PMID:26729144

  11. Transcriptionally and post-transcriptionally regulated microRNAs in heat stress response in barley

    PubMed Central

    Kruszka, Katarzyna; Pacak, Andrzej; Swida-Barteczka, Aleksandra; Nuc, Przemyslaw; Alaba, Sylwia; Wroblewska, Zuzanna; Karlowski, Wojciech; Jarmolowski, Artur; Szweykowska-Kulinska, Zofia

    2014-01-01

    Heat stress is one of the major abiotic factors that can induce severe plant damage, leading to a decrease in crop plant productivity. Despite barley being a cereal of great economic importance, few data are available concerning its thermotolerance mechanisms. In this work microRNAs (miRNAs) involved in heat stress response in barley were investigated. The level of selected barley mature miRNAs was examined by hybridization. Quantitative real-time PCR (RT-qPCR) was used to monitor the changes in the expression profiles of primary miRNA (pri-miRNA) precursors, as well as novel and conserved target genes during heat stress. The miRNA-mediated cleavage sites in the target transcripts were confirmed by degradome analysis and the 5’ RACE (rapid amplification of cDNA ends) approach. Four barley miRNAs (miR160a, 166a, 167h, and 5175a) were found which are heat stress up-regulated at the level of both mature miRNAs and precursor pri-miRNAs. Moreover, the splicing of introns hosting miR160a and miR5175a is also heat induced. The results demonstrate transcriptional and post-transcriptional regulation of heat-responsive miRNAs in barley. The observed induction of miRNA expression is correlated with the down-regulation of the expression level of their experimentally identified new and conservative target genes. PMID:25183744

  12. Heat stress and antioxidant enzyme activity in bubaline (Bubalus bubalis) oocytes during in vitro maturation.

    PubMed

    Waiz, Syma Ashraf; Raies-Ul-Haq, Mohammad; Dhanda, Suman; Kumar, Anil; Goud, T Sridhar; Chauhan, M S; Upadhyay, R C

    2016-09-01

    In vitro environments like heat stress usually increase the production of reactive oxygen species in bubaline oocytes which have been implicated as one of the major causes for reduced developmental competence. Oocytes during meiotic maturation are sensitive to oxidative stress, and heat stress accelerates cellular metabolism, resulting in the higher production of free radicals. Therefore, the aim of present work was to assess the impact of heat stress during meiotic maturation on bubaline cumulus-oocyte complexes (COC), denuded oocytes (DO), and cumulus cell mass in terms of their oxidative status. Accordingly, for control group, COC were matured at 38.5 °C for complete 24 h of meiotic maturation and heat stress of 40.5 and 41.5 °C was applied to COC during the first 12 h of maturation and then moved to 38.5 °C for rest of the 12 h. In another group, COC after maturation were denuded from the surrounding cumulus cells by manual pipetting. Results indicated that the production of reactive oxygen species (ROS), lipid peroxides, and nitric oxide (NO) was significantly (P < 0.05) higher in the oocytes subjected to heat stress (40.5 and 41.5 °C) during meiotic maturation compared to the oocytes matured under standard in vitro culture conditions (38.5 °C). Also, the antioxidant enzymatic activities of superoxide dismutase, catalase, glutathione peroxidase, and glutathione reductase were significantly (P < 0.05) increased in all the treatment groups compared to the control group. Therefore, the present study clearly establishes that heat stress ensues oxidative stress in bubaline oocytes which triggers the induction of antioxidant enzymatic defense system for scavenging the ROS. PMID:26781547

  13. Heat stress and antioxidant enzyme activity in bubaline (Bubalus bubalis) oocytes during in vitro maturation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Waiz, Syma Ashraf; Raies-ul-Haq, Mohammad; Dhanda, Suman; Kumar, Anil; Goud, T. Sridhar; Chauhan, M. S.; Upadhyay, R. C.

    2016-01-01

    In vitro environments like heat stress usually increase the production of reactive oxygen species in bubaline oocytes which have been implicated as one of the major causes for reduced developmental competence. Oocytes during meiotic maturation are sensitive to oxidative stress, and heat stress accelerates cellular metabolism, resulting in the higher production of free radicals. Therefore, the aim of present work was to assess the impact of heat stress during meiotic maturation on bubaline cumulus-oocyte complexes (COC), denuded oocytes (DO), and cumulus cell mass in terms of their oxidative status. Accordingly, for control group, COC were matured at 38.5 °C for complete 24 h of meiotic maturation and heat stress of 40.5 and 41.5 °C was applied to COC during the first 12 h of maturation and then moved to 38.5 °C for rest of the 12 h. In another group, COC after maturation were denuded from the surrounding cumulus cells by manual pipetting. Results indicated that the production of reactive oxygen species (ROS), lipid peroxides, and nitric oxide (NO) was significantly (P < 0.05) higher in the oocytes subjected to heat stress (40.5 and 41.5 °C) during meiotic maturation compared to the oocytes matured under standard in vitro culture conditions (38.5 °C). Also, the antioxidant enzymatic activities of superoxide dismutase, catalase, glutathione peroxidase, and glutathione reductase were significantly (P < 0.05) increased in all the treatment groups compared to the control group. Therefore, the present study clearly establishes that heat stress ensues oxidative stress in bubaline oocytes which triggers the induction of antioxidant enzymatic defense system for scavenging the ROS.

  14. Perceived heat stress and health effects on construction workers

    PubMed Central

    Dutta, Priya; Rajiva, Ajit; Andhare, Dileep; Azhar, Gulrez Shah; Tiwari, Abhiyant; Sheffield, Perry

    2015-01-01

    Introduction: Increasing heat waves-particularly in urban areas where construction is most prevalent, highlight a need for heat exposure assessment of construction workers. This study aims to characterize the effects of heat on construction workers from a site in Gandhinagar. Materials and Methods: This study involved a mixed methods approach consisting of a cross sectional survey with anthropometric measurements (n = 219) and four focus groups with construction workers, as well as environmental measurements of heat stress exposure at a construction site. Survey data was collected in two seasons i.e., summer and winter months, and heat illness and symptoms were compared between the two time periods. Thematic coding of focus group data was used to identify vulnerability factors and coping mechanisms of the workers. Heat stress, recorded using a wet bulb globe temperature monitor, was compared to international safety standards. Results: The survey findings suggest that heat-related symptoms increased in summer; 59% of all reports in summer were positive for symptoms (from Mild to Severe) as compared to 41% in winter. Focus groups revealed four dominant themes: (1) Non-occupational stressors compound work stressors; (2) workers were particularly attuned to the impact of heat on their health; (3) workers were aware of heat-related preventive measures; and (4) few resources were currently available to protect workers from heat stress. Working conditions often exceed international heat stress safety thresholds. Female workers and new employees might be at increased risk of illness or injury. Conclusion: This study suggests significant health impacts on construction workers from heat stress exposure in the workplace, showed that heat stress levels were higher than those prescribed by international standards and highlights the need for revision of work practices, increased protective measures, and possible development of indigenous work safety standards for heat exposure

  15. A systems biology approach to heat stress, heat injury, and heat stroke

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stallings, Jonathan D.; Ippolito, Danielle L.

    2015-05-01

    Heat illness is a major source of injury for military populations in both deployed and training settings. Developing tools to help leaders enhance unit performance while reducing the risk of injury is of paramount importance to the military. Here, we review our recent systems biology approaches to heat stress in order to develop a 3-dimensional (3D) realistic thermoregulation model, identify the molecular basis and mediators of injury, and characterize associated biomarkers. We discuss the implications of our work, future directions, and the type of tools necessary to enhance force health protection in the future.

  16. Heat stress and societal impacts in the 21st century

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Coffel, E.; Horton, R. M.; de Sherbinin, A. M.

    2015-12-01

    Heat is the number-one weather related killer in the US and around the world. As a result of rising temperatures and steady or slightly rising levels of specific humidity, heat stress is projected to become increasingly severe. Here we show that heat stress as measured by two common indices -- the heat index and the wet-bulb temperature -- is projected to rapidly and dramatically increase, and that by mid-century crippling summertime conditions are possible across some of the most densely populated regions of the planet. Many of these regions are places where cooling infrastructure is scarce, adaptive capacity is low, and populations are rapidly rising. We find that by the end of the 21st century, the habitability of some regions of the planet may be questionable due to heat stress alone, and in many other regions severe impacts to human health, infrastructure, agriculture, and economic performance will create significant societal stress and necessitate rapid adaptation.

  17. Wireless Metal Detection and Surface Coverage Sensing for All-Surface Induction Heating.

    PubMed

    Kilic, Veli Tayfun; Unal, Emre; Demir, Hilmi Volkan

    2016-01-01

    All-surface induction heating systems, typically comprising small-area coils, face a major challenge in detecting the presence of a metallic vessel and identifying its partial surface coverage over the coils to determine which of the coils to power up. The difficulty arises due to the fact that the user can heat vessels made of a wide variety of metals (and their alloys). To address this problem, we propose and demonstrate a new wireless detection methodology that allows for detecting the presence of metallic vessels together with uniquely sensing their surface coverages while also identifying their effective material type in all-surface induction heating systems. The proposed method is based on telemetrically measuring simultaneously inductance and resistance of the induction coil coupled with the vessel in the heating system. Here, variations in the inductance and resistance values for an all-surface heating coil loaded by vessels (made of stainless steel and aluminum) at different positions were systematically investigated at different frequencies. Results show that, independent of the metal material type, unique identification of the surface coverage is possible at all freqeuncies. Additionally, using the magnitude and phase information extracted from the coupled coil impedance, unique identification of the vessel effective material is also achievable, this time independent of its surface coverage. PMID:26978367

  18. An induction heating diamond anvil cell for high pressure and temperature micro-Raman spectroscopic measurements.

    PubMed

    Shinoda, Keiji; Noguchi, Naoki

    2008-01-01

    A new external heating configuration is presented for high-temperature diamond anvil cell instruments. The supporting rockers are thermally excited by induction from an externally mounted copper coil passing a 30 kHz alternating current. The inductive heating configuration therefore avoids the use of breakable wires, yet is capable of cell temperatures of 1100 K or higher. The diamond anvil cell has no resistive heaters, but uses a single-turn induction coil for elevating the temperature. The induction coil is placed near the diamonds and directly heats the tungsten carbide rockers that support the diamond. The temperature in the cell is determined from a temperature-power curve calibrated by the ratio between the intensities of the Stokes and anti-Stokes Raman lines of silicon. The high-pressure transformation of quartz to coesite is successfully observed by micro-Raman spectroscopy using this apparatus. The induction heating diamond anvil cell is thus a useful alternative to resistively heated diamond anvil cells. PMID:18248060

  19. Wireless Metal Detection and Surface Coverage Sensing for All-Surface Induction Heating

    PubMed Central

    Kilic, Veli Tayfun; Unal, Emre; Demir, Hilmi Volkan

    2016-01-01

    All-surface induction heating systems, typically comprising small-area coils, face a major challenge in detecting the presence of a metallic vessel and identifying its partial surface coverage over the coils to determine which of the coils to power up. The difficulty arises due to the fact that the user can heat vessels made of a wide variety of metals (and their alloys). To address this problem, we propose and demonstrate a new wireless detection methodology that allows for detecting the presence of metallic vessels together with uniquely sensing their surface coverages while also identifying their effective material type in all-surface induction heating systems. The proposed method is based on telemetrically measuring simultaneously inductance and resistance of the induction coil coupled with the vessel in the heating system. Here, variations in the inductance and resistance values for an all-surface heating coil loaded by vessels (made of stainless steel and aluminum) at different positions were systematically investigated at different frequencies. Results show that, independent of the metal material type, unique identification of the surface coverage is possible at all freqeuncies. Additionally, using the magnitude and phase information extracted from the coupled coil impedance, unique identification of the vessel effective material is also achievable, this time independent of its surface coverage. PMID:26978367

  20. Salicylic acid and heat acclimation pretreatment protects Laminaria japonica sporophyte (Phaeophyceae) from heat stress

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Bin; Tang, Xuexi; Wang, You

    2010-07-01

    Possible mediatory roles of heat acclimation and salicylic acid in protecting the sporophyte of marine macroalga Laminaria japonica (Phaeophyceae) from heat stress were studied. Heat stress resulted in oxidative injury in the kelp blades. Under heat stress significant accumulation of hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) and malonaldehyde (MDA), a membrane lipid peroxidation product, and a drastic decrease in chlorophyll a content were recorded. Activity of the enzymatic antioxidant system was drastically affected by heat stress. The activity of superoxide dismutase (SOD) was significantly increased while peroxidase (POD), catalase (CAT) and glutathione peroxidase (GPX) were greatly inhibited and, simultaneously, phenylalanine ammonia-lyase was activated while polyphenol oxidase (PPO) was inhibited. Both heat acclimation pretreatment and exogenous application of salicylic acid alleviated oxidative damage in kelp blades. Blades receiving heat acclimation pretreatment and exogenous salicylic acid prior to heat stress exhibited a reduced increase in H2O2 and MDA content, and a lower reduction in chlorophyll a content. Pretreatment with heat acclimation and salicylic acid elevated activities of SOD, POD, CAT, GPX and PPO. Considering these results collectively, we speculate that the inhibition of antioxidant enzymes is a possible cause of the heat-stress-induced oxidative stress in L. japonica, and enhanced thermotolerance may be associated, at least in part, with the elevated activity of the enzymatic antioxidant system.

  1. Electromagnetic Induction Heat Generation of Nano-ferrofluid and Other Stimulants for Heavy Oil Recovery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pramana, A. A.; Abdassah, D.; Rachmat, S.; Mikrajuddin, A.

    2010-10-01

    Nano-ferrofluid and graphite-fluid are proposed to be used as stimulants for heavy oil recovery processes using electromagnetic induction. The heat generation in the stimulants will be used for reducing the viscosity of heavy oil. The temperature increase of the stimulants are observed with the presence of electromagnetic induction. These increments are better compared to those of the varying concentration of salt water (brine) usually exist in the oil reservoir.

  2. Do asteroids evaporate near pulsars? Induction heating by pulsar waves revisited

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kotera, Kumiko; Mottez, Fabrice; Voisin, Guillaume; Heyvaerts, Jean

    2016-07-01

    Aims: We investigate the evaporation of close-by pulsar companions, such as planets, asteroids, and white dwarfs, by induction heating. Methods: Assuming that the outflow energy is dominated by a Poynting flux (or pulsar wave) at the location of the companions, we calculate their evaporation timescales, by applying the Mie theory. Results: Depending on the size of the companion compared to the incident electromagnetic wavelength, the heating regime varies and can lead to a total evaporation of the companion. In particular, we find that inductive heating is mostly inefficient for small pulsar companions, although it is generally considered the dominant process. Conclusions: Small objects like asteroids can survive induction heating for 104 yr at distances as small as 1 R⊙ from the neutron star. For degenerate companions, induction heating cannot lead to evaporation and another source of heating (likely by kinetic energy of the pulsar wind) has to be considered. It was recently proposed that bodies orbiting pulsars are the cause of fast radio bursts; the present results explain how those bodies can survive in the pulsar's highly energetic environment.

  3. Heat transfer enhancement in the unfinned frame of an externally cooled induction motor

    SciTech Connect

    Jeon, C.S.; Yoon, M.K.; Kauh, S.K.

    2000-02-01

    This article describes an experimental investigation to study the effect of guide vanes on the heat transfer coefficient over the unfinned frame of an externally cooled induction motor. Guide vanes with various heights and spacings have been tested. In general, the guide vanes modify the air flow over the frame, hence increasing the heat transfer coefficient. An optimum heat transfer case is found, for which the average heat transfer coefficient is 70% higher than for the case without guide vanes. The velocity distributions of the air flow are measured for comparison with the heat transfer coefficient fields. The location of the terminal box is optimized, resulting in a 1 C drop in the average temperature rise of the coil motor. Finally, the results of this research are applied to a real induction motor and its average coil temperature becomes 9 C lower than that of a commercial motor.

  4. Induction hardening: Differences to a conventional heat treatment process and optimization of its parameters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vieweg, A.; Ressel, G.; Prevedel, P.; Raninger, P.; Panzenböck, M.; Marsoner, S.; Ebner, R.

    2016-03-01

    The possibility of obtaining similar mechanical properties with faster heating processes than the conventional ones has been of interest for several years. In the present study, investigations were performed in terms of the influences of such fast heat-treatments on the microstructure and mechanical properties of the material. This investigation compares an inductive with a conventional furnace heat treating process of a 50CrMo4 steel, however only the austenitizing treatment was changed and subsequent quenching and tempering was done in the same way. To this end experiments with a middle frequency generator, using different heating rates and austenitizing temperatures, were conducted and followed by oil quenching of the workpieces. The resulting structures were characterized regarding their microstructures and mechanical properties in order to gather a better understanding of the differences between the inductive and the conventional heat treating process. As a main result it was found, that the fast austenitized samples exhibited worse ductility than the conventional treated material.

  5. Solid fossil-fuel recovery by electrical induction heating in situ - A proposal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fisher, S.

    1980-04-01

    A technique, termed electrical induction heating, is proposed for in situ processes of energy production from solid fossil fuels, such as bitumen production from underground distillation of oil sand; oil by underground distillation of oil shale; petroleum from heavy oil by underground mobilization of heavy oil, from either residues of conventional liquid petroleum deposits or new deposits of viscous oil; methane and coal tar from lignite and coal deposits by underground distillation of coal; and generation of electricity by surface combustion of low calorific-value gas from underground coke gasification by combustion of the organic residue left from the underground distillation of coal by induction heating. A method of surface distillation of mined coking coal by induction heating to produce coke, methane, and coal tar is also proposed.

  6. Compilation of information on modeling of inductively heated cold crucible melters

    SciTech Connect

    Lessor, D.L.

    1996-03-01

    The objective of this communication, Phase B of a two-part report, is to present information on modeling capabilities for inductively heated cold crucible melters, a concept applicable to waste immobilization. Inductively heated melters are those in which heat is generated using coils around, rather than electrodes within, the material to be heated. Cold crucible or skull melters are those in which the melted material is confined within unmelted material of the same composition. This phase of the report complements and supplements Phase A by Loren Eyler, specifically by giving additional information on modeling capabilities for the inductively heated melter concept. Eyler discussed electrically heated melter modeling capabilities, emphasizing heating by electrodes within the melt or on crucible walls. Eyler also discussed requirements and resources for the computational fluid dynamics, heat flow, radiation effects, and boundary conditions in melter modeling; the reader is referred to Eyler`s discussion of these. This report is intended for use in the High Level Waste (HLW) melter program at Hanford. We sought any modeling capabilities useful to the HLW program, whether through contracted research, code license for operation by Department of Energy laboratories, or existing codes and modeling expertise within DOE.

  7. Effect of heating method on stress-rupture life

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bizon, P. T.; Calfo, F. D.

    1977-01-01

    The effect of radiant(furnace), resistance(electric current), burner(hot gas stream), and a combination of resistance and burner heating on intermediate time (100 to 300 hr) stress-rupture life and reduction of area was evaluated. All heating methods were studied using the nickel-based alloy Udimet 700 while all but burner heating were evaluated with the cobalt-based alloy Mar-M 509. Limited test results of eight other superalloys were also included in this study. Resistance heated specimens had about 20 to 30 percent of the stress-rupture life of radiant heated specimens. The limited burner heating data showed about a 50 percent life reduction as compared to the radiant heated tests. A metallurgical examination gave no explanation for these reductions.

  8. Numerical simulations of inductive-heated float-zone growth

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chan, Y. T.; Choi, S. K.

    1992-01-01

    The present work provides an improved fluid flow and heat-transfer modeling of float-zone growth by introducing a RF heating model so that an ad hoc heating temperature profile is not necessary. Numerical simulations were carried out to study the high-temperature float-zone growth of titanium carbide single crystal. The numerical results showed that the thermocapillary convection occurring inside the molten zone tends to increase the convexity of the melt-crystal interface and decrease the maximum temperature of the molten zone, while the natural convection tends to reduce the stability of the molten zone by increasing its height. It was found that the increase of induced heating due to the increase of applied RF voltage is reduced by the decrease of zone diameter. Surface tension plays an important role in controlling the amount of induced heating. Finally, a comparison of the computed shape of the free surface with a digital image obtained during a growth run showed adequate agreement.

  9. Biophysical aspects of human thermoregulation during heat stress.

    PubMed

    Cramer, Matthew N; Jay, Ollie

    2016-04-01

    Humans maintain a relatively constant core temperature through the dynamic balance between endogenous heat production and heat dissipation to the surrounding environment. In response to metabolic or environmental disturbances to heat balance, the autonomic nervous system initiates cutaneous vasodilation and eccrine sweating to facilitate higher rates of dry (primarily convection and radiation) and evaporative transfer from the body surface; however, absolute heat losses are ultimately governed by the properties of the skin and the environment. Over the duration of a heat exposure, the cumulative imbalance between heat production and heat dissipation leads to body heat storage, but the consequent change in core temperature, which has implications for health and safety in occupational and athletic settings particularly among certain clinical populations, involves a complex interaction between changes in body heat content and the body's morphological characteristics (mass, surface area, and tissue composition) that collectively determine the body's thermal inertia. The aim of this review is to highlight the biophysical aspects of human core temperature regulation by outlining the principles of human energy exchange and examining the influence of body morphology during exercise and environmental heat stress. An understanding of the biophysical factors influencing core temperature will enable researchers and practitioners to better identify and treat individuals/populations most vulnerable to heat illness and injury during exercise and extreme heat events. Further, appropriate guidelines may be developed to optimize health, safety, and work performance during heat stress. PMID:26971392

  10. Proteomics Analysis of Alfalfa Response to Heat Stress

    PubMed Central

    Li, Weimin; Wei, Zhenwu; Qiao, Zhihong; Wu, Zinian; Cheng, Lixiang; Wang, Yuyang

    2013-01-01

    The proteome responses to heat stress have not been well understood. In this study, alfalfa (Medicago sativa L. cv. Huaiyin) seedlings were exposed to 25°C (control) and 40°C (heat stress) in growth chambers, and leaves were collected at 24, 48 and 72 h after treatment, respectively. The morphological, physiological and proteomic processes were negatively affected under heat stress. Proteins were extracted and separated by two-dimensional polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (2-DE), and differentially expressed protein spots were identified by mass spectrometry (MS). Totally, 81 differentially expressed proteins were identified successfully by MALDI-TOF/TOF. These proteins were categorized into nine classes: including metabolism, energy, protein synthesis, protein destination/storage, transporters, intracellular traffic, cell structure, signal transduction and disease/defence. Five proteins were further analyzed for mRNA levels. The results of the proteomics analyses provide a better understanding of the molecular basis of heat-stress responses in alfalfa. PMID:24324825

  11. Influence of coil geometry on the induction heating process in crystal growth systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tavakoli, M. H.; Ojaghi, A.; Mohammadi-Manesh, E.; Mansour, M.

    2009-03-01

    Different shapes and orientations of the RF-coil turns in oxide Czochralski crystal growth systems are considered and corresponding results of electromagnetic field and volumetric heat generation have been computed using a finite element method. For the calculations, the eddy current in the induction coil (i.e. the self-inductance effect) has been taken into account. The calculation results show the importance of cross section shape, geometry and position of the RF-coil turns with respect to the crucible and afterheater on the heat generation distribution in a Czochralski growth system.

  12. INDUCTION HEATING OF CARBON-FIBER COMPOSITES: THERMAL GENERATION MODEL

    EPA Science Inventory

    A theory of local and global mechanisms of heat generation and distribution in carbon-fiber-based composites subjected to an alternating magnetic field has been proposed. A model that predicts the strength and distribution of thermal generation through the thickness of carbon-fib...

  13. Demonstration of a non-contact x-ray source using an inductively heated pyroelectric accelerator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Klopfer, Michael; Satchouk, Vladimir; Cao, Anh; Wolowiec, Thomas; Alivov, Yahya; Molloi, Sabee

    2015-04-01

    X-ray emission from pyroelectric sources can be produced through non-contact thermal cycling using induction heating. In this study, we demonstrated a proof of concept non-contact x-ray source powered via induction heating. An induction heater operating at 62.5 kHz provided a total of 6.5 W of delivered peak thermal power with 140 V DC of driving voltage. The heat was applied to a ferrous substrate mechanically coupled to a cubic 1 cm3 Lithium Niobate (LiNbO3) pyroelectric crystal maintained in a 3-12 mTorr vacuum. The maximum temperature reached was 175 °C in 86 s of heating. The cooling cycle began immediately after heating and was provided by passive radiative cooling. The total combined cycle time was 250 s. x-ray photons were produced and analyzed in both heating and cooling phases. Maximum photon energies of 59 keV and 55 keV were observed during heating and cooling, respectively. Non-contact devices such as this, may find applications in cancer therapy (brachytherapy), non-destructive testing, medical imaging, and physics education fields.

  14. Dryout of an inductively heated bed of steel particles with subcooled flow from beneath the bed

    SciTech Connect

    Tsai, F.P.; Catton, I.; Dhir, V.K.; Jakobsson, J.

    1984-04-01

    An experimental investigation has been conducted of dryout heat flux in an inductively heated bed of metal particles with forced flow from beneath the bed. The mass flux varied from 0 to 3.11 kg/m/sup 2/.s. Freon113 was used as coolant. Particle sizes were 1588, 3175, and 4763 /rho/m in diameter. The dryout heat flux was found to increase as mass flux increases. When the mass flux is large enough, the dryout heat flux asymptotically approaches the total evaporation energy of the inlet flow.

  15. Cardiovascular function in the heat-stressed human.

    PubMed

    Crandall, C G; González-Alonso, J

    2010-08-01

    Heat stress, whether passive (i.e. exposure to elevated environmental temperatures) or via exercise, results in pronounced cardiovascular adjustments that are necessary for adequate temperature regulation as well as perfusion of the exercising muscle, heart and brain. The available data suggest that generally during passive heat stress baroreflex control of heart rate and sympathetic nerve activity are unchanged, while baroreflex control of systemic vascular resistance may be impaired perhaps due to attenuated vasoconstrictor responsiveness of the cutaneous circulation. Heat stress improves left ventricular systolic function, evidenced by increased cardiac contractility, thereby maintaining stroke volume despite large reductions in ventricular filling pressures. Heat stress-induced reductions in cerebral perfusion likely contribute to the recognized effect of this thermal condition in reducing orthostatic tolerance, although the mechanism(s) by which this occurs is not completely understood. The combination of intense whole-body exercise and environmental heat stress or dehydration-induced hyperthermia results in significant cardiovascular strain prior to exhaustion, which is characterized by reductions in cardiac output, stroke volume, arterial pressure and blood flow to the brain, skin and exercising muscle. These alterations in cardiovascular function and regulation late in heat stress/dehydration exercise might involve the interplay of both local and central reflexes, the contribution of which is presently unresolved. PMID:20345414

  16. The Response to Heat Shock and Oxidative Stress in Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    PubMed Central

    Morano, Kevin A.; Grant, Chris M.; Moye-Rowley, W. Scott

    2012-01-01

    A common need for microbial cells is the ability to respond to potentially toxic environmental insults. Here we review the progress in understanding the response of the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae to two important environmental stresses: heat shock and oxidative stress. Both of these stresses are fundamental challenges that microbes of all types will experience. The study of these environmental stress responses in S. cerevisiae has illuminated many of the features now viewed as central to our understanding of eukaryotic cell biology. Transcriptional activation plays an important role in driving the multifaceted reaction to elevated temperature and levels of reactive oxygen species. Advances provided by the development of whole genome analyses have led to an appreciation of the global reorganization of gene expression and its integration between different stress regimens. While the precise nature of the signal eliciting the heat shock response remains elusive, recent progress in the understanding of induction of the oxidative stress response is summarized here. Although these stress conditions represent ancient challenges to S. cerevisiae and other microbes, much remains to be learned about the mechanisms dedicated to dealing with these environmental parameters. PMID:22209905

  17. Feedlot cattle susceptibility to heat stress: an animal specific model

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The extreme effects of heat stress in a feedlot situation can cause losses exceeding 5% of all the cattle on feed in a single feedlot. These losses can be very devastating to a localized area of feedlot producers. Animal stress is a result of the combination of three different components: environm...

  18. Estimates of heat stress relief needs for Holstein dairy cows.

    PubMed

    Berman, A

    2005-06-01

    Estimates of environmental heat stress are required for heat stress relief measures in cattle. Heat stress is commonly assessed by the temperature-humidity index (THI), the sum of dry and wet bulb temperatures. The THI does not include an interaction between temperature and humidity, although evaporative heat loss increases with rising air temperature. Coat, air velocity, and radiation effects also are not accounted for in the THI. The Holstein dairy cow is the primary target of heat stress relief, followed by feedlot cattle. Heat stress may be estimated for a variety of conditions by thermal balance models. The models consist of animal-specific data (BW, metabolic heat production, tissue and coat insulation, skin water loss, coat depth, and minimal and maximal tidal volumes) and of general heat exchange equations. A thermal balance simulation model was modified to adapt it for Holstein cows by using Holstein data for the animal characteristics in the model, and was validated by comparing its outputs to experimental data. Model outputs include radiant, convective, skin evaporative, respiratory heat loss and rate of change of body temperature. Effects of milk production (35 and 45 kg/d), hair coat depth (3 and 6 mm), air temperature (20 to 45 degrees C), air velocity (0.2 to 2.0 m/s), air humidity (0.8 to 3.9 kPa), and exposed body surface (100, 75, and 50%) on thermal balance outputs were examined. Environmental conditions at which respiratory heat loss attained approximately 50% of its maximal value were defined as thresholds for intermediate heat stress. Air velocity increased and humidity significantly decreased threshold temperatures, particularly at higher coat depth. The effect of air velocity was amplified at high humidity. Increasing milk production from 35 to 45 kg/d decreased threshold temperature by 5 degrees C. In the lying cow, the lower air velocity in the proximity of body surface and the smaller exposed surface markedly decrease threshold

  19. A virtual rat for simulating environmental and exertional heat stress.

    PubMed

    Rakesh, Vineet; Stallings, Jonathan D; Reifman, Jaques

    2014-12-01

    Severe cases of environmental or exertional heat stress can lead to varying degrees of organ dysfunction. To understand heat-injury progression and develop efficient management and mitigation strategies, it is critical to determine the thermal response in susceptible organs under different heat-stress conditions. To this end, we used our previously published virtual rat, which is capable of computing the spatiotemporal temperature distribution in the animal, and extended it to simulate various heat-stress scenarios, including 1) different environmental conditions, 2) exertional heat stress, 3) circadian rhythm effect on the thermal response, and 4) whole body cooling. Our predictions were consistent with published in vivo temperature measurements for all cases, validating our simulations. We observed a differential thermal response in the organs, with the liver experiencing the highest temperatures for all environmental and exertional heat-stress cases. For every 3°C rise in the external temperature from 40 to 46°C, core and organ temperatures increased by ∼0.8°C. Core temperatures increased by 2.6 and 4.1°C for increases in exercise intensity from rest to 75 and 100% of maximal O2 consumption, respectively. We also found differences as large as 0.8°C in organ temperatures for the same heat stress induced at different times during the day. Even after whole body cooling at a relatively low external temperature (1°C for 20 min), average organ temperatures were still elevated by 2.3 to 2.5°C compared with normothermia. These results can be used to optimize experimental protocol designs, reduce the amount of animal experimentation, and design and test improved heat-stress prevention and management strategies. PMID:25277741

  20. Transcriptome Profiles of Populus euphratica upon Heat Shock stress

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Jinhuan; Yin, Weilun; Xia, Xinli

    2014-01-01

    Heat stress, which strongly affects plant performance and often results in reduced vegetative growth and yields depression, has become an increasingly serious global problem. Populus euphratica Oliv. which has been considered as a tree model for the study of plant response to abiotic stresses, could be resistant to an extremely wide environmental temperature range (–40 °C to 45 °C). Previous study is mainly focused on its gene regulation upon drought and salt stress. However, little is known about gene regulation at the global transcriptome level upon heat stress. To understand the gene network controlling heat stress in P. euphratica, a transcriptome sequencing using Illumina Hiseq 2000 was performed to generate a 10 gigabases depth for each sample in the tissue of leaf. 119,573 unigeneswere generated with an average length of 474 bp. Approximately 49,605 (41.49%) unigenes exhibited significantly different expressions between two libraries. Among these unigenes, 11,165 (9.34%) were upregulated and 38,440 (32.15%) were down regulated. Heat shock proteins classified as molecular chaperones showed a significant percentage (1.13%) in the up regulated group. Heat responsive genes, such as polyubiquitins, were over expressed in heat treated sample. GO enrichment analysis revealed that the Go terms for differentially expressed unigenes were significantly enriched in hormone-mediated signal, biological process regulation and metabolic process regulation. Our data revealed a global transcriptome picture of P. euphratica in response to heat shock. The identified potential heat stress-related transcripts can be used to infer the gene regulation networks underlying the molecular mechanisms of heat response in P. euphratica. PMID:25435796

  1. Targeted induction of endoplasmic reticulum stress induces cartilage pathology.

    PubMed

    Rajpar, M Helen; McDermott, Ben; Kung, Louise; Eardley, Rachel; Knowles, Lynette; Heeran, Mel; Thornton, David J; Wilson, Richard; Bateman, John F; Poulsom, Richard; Arvan, Peter; Kadler, Karl E; Briggs, Michael D; Boot-Handford, Raymond P

    2009-10-01

    Pathologies caused by mutations in extracellular matrix proteins are generally considered to result from the synthesis of extracellular matrices that are defective. Mutations in type X collagen cause metaphyseal chondrodysplasia type Schmid (MCDS), a disorder characterised by dwarfism and an expanded growth plate hypertrophic zone. We generated a knock-in mouse model of an MCDS-causing mutation (COL10A1 p.Asn617Lys) to investigate pathogenic mechanisms linking genotype and phenotype. Mice expressing the collagen X mutation had shortened limbs and an expanded hypertrophic zone. Chondrocytes in the hypertrophic zone exhibited endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress and a robust unfolded protein response (UPR) due to intracellular retention of mutant protein. Hypertrophic chondrocyte differentiation and osteoclast recruitment were significantly reduced indicating that the hypertrophic zone was expanded due to a decreased rate of VEGF-mediated vascular invasion of the growth plate. To test directly the role of ER stress and UPR in generating the MCDS phenotype, we produced transgenic mouse lines that used the collagen X promoter to drive expression of an ER stress-inducing protein (the cog mutant of thyroglobulin) in hypertrophic chondrocytes. The hypertrophic chondrocytes in this mouse exhibited ER stress with a characteristic UPR response. In addition, the hypertrophic zone was expanded, gene expression patterns were disrupted, osteoclast recruitment to the vascular invasion front was reduced, and long bone growth decreased. Our data demonstrate that triggering ER stress per se in hypertrophic chondrocytes is sufficient to induce the essential features of the cartilage pathology associated with MCDS and confirm that ER stress is a central pathogenic factor in the disease mechanism. These findings support the contention that ER stress may play a direct role in the pathogenesis of many connective tissue disorders associated with the expression of mutant extracellular matrix

  2. Fluid and electrolyte supplementation for exercise heat stress.

    PubMed

    Sawka, M N; Montain, S J

    2000-08-01

    During exercise in the heat, sweat output often exceeds water intake, resulting in a body water deficit (hypohydration) and electrolyte losses. Because daily water losses can be substantial, persons need to emphasize drinking during exercise as well as at meals. For persons consuming a normal diet, electrolyte supplementation is not warranted except perhaps during the first few days of heat exposure. Aerobic exercise is likely to be adversely affected by heat stress and hypohydration; the warmer the climate the greater the potential for performance decrements. Hypohydration increases heat storage and reduces a person's ability to tolerate heat strain. The increased heat storage is mediated by a lower sweating rate (evaporative heat loss) and reduced skin blood flow (dry heat loss) for a given core temperature. Heat-acclimated persons need to pay particular attention to fluid replacement because heat acclimation increases sweat losses, and hypohydration negates the thermoregulatory advantages conferred by acclimation. It has been suggested that hyperhydration (increased total body water) may reduce physiologic strain during exercise heat stress, but data supporting that notion are not robust. Research is recommended for 3 populations with fluid and electrolyte balance problems: older adults, cystic fibrosis patients, and persons with spinal cord injuries. PMID:10919961

  3. Comparative effects of ohmic, induction cooker, and electric stove heating on soymilk trypsin inhibitor inactivation.

    PubMed

    Lu, Lu; Zhao, Luping; Zhang, Caimeng; Kong, Xiangzhen; Hua, Yufei; Chen, Yeming

    2015-03-01

    During thermal treatment of soymilk, a rapid incorporation of Kunitz trypsin inhibitor (KTI) into protein aggregates by covalent (disulfide bond, SS) and/or noncovalent interactions with other proteins is responsible for its fast inactivation of trypsin inhibitor activity (TIA). In contrast, the slow cleavage of a single Bowman-Birk inhibitor (BBI) peptide bond is responsible for its slow inactivation of TIA and chymotrypsin inhibitor activity (CIA). In this study, the effects of Ohmic heating (220 V, 50 Hz) on soymilk TIA and CIA inactivation were examined and compared to induction cooker and electric stove heating with similar thermal histories. It was found that: (1) TIA and CIA inactivation was slower from 0 to 3 min, and faster after 3 min as compared to induction cooker and electric stove. (2) The thiol (SH) loss rate was slower from 0 to 3 min, and similar to induction cooker and electric stove after 3 min. (3) Ohmic heating slightly increased protein aggregate formation. (4) In addition to the cleavage of one BBI peptide bond, an additional reaction might occur to enhance BBI inactivation. (5) Ohmic heating was more energy-efficient for TIA and CIA inactivation. (6) TIA and CIA inactivation was accelerated with increasing electric voltage (110, 165, and 220 V) of Ohmic heating. It is likely that the enhanced inactivation of TIA by Ohmic heating is due to its combined electrochemical and thermal effects. PMID:25678063

  4. Induced electric fields in workers near low-frequency induction heating machines.

    PubMed

    Kos, Bor; Valič, Blaž; Kotnik, Tadej; Gajšek, Peter

    2014-04-01

    Published data on occupational exposure to induction heating equipment are scarce, particularly in terms of induced quantities in the human body. This article provides some additional information by investigating exposure to two such machines-an induction furnace and an induction hardening machine. Additionally, a spatial averaging algorithm for measured fields we developed in a previous publication is tested on new data. The human model was positioned at distances where measured values of magnetic flux density were above the reference levels. All human exposure was below the basic restriction-the lower bound of the 0.1 top percentile induced electric field in the body of a worker was 0.193 V/m at 30 cm from the induction furnace. PMID:24203794

  5. Heat stress in grapevine: the pros and cons of acclimation.

    PubMed

    Carvalho, Luísa C; Coito, João L; Colaço, Silvana; Sangiogo, Maurício; Amâncio, Sara

    2015-04-01

    Heat stress is a major limiting factor of grapevine production and quality. Acclimation and recovery are essential to ensure plant survival, and the recovery mechanisms can be independent of the heat response mechanisms. An experimental set up with and without acclimation to heat followed by recovery [stepwise acclimation and recovery (SAR) and stepwise recovery (SR), respectively] was applied to two grapevine varieties, Touriga Nacional (TN), and Trincadeira (TR), with different tolerance to abiotic stress. Major differences were found between leaves of SAR and SR, especially after recovery; in SAR, almost all parameters returned to basal levels while in SR they remained altered. Acclimation led to a swifter and short-term antioxidative response, affecting the plant to a lesser extent than SR. Significant differences were found among varieties: upon stress, TN significantly increased ascorbate and glutathione reduction levels, boosting the cell's redox-buffering capacity, while TR needed to synthesize both metabolites, its response being insufficient to keep the redox state at working levels. TR was affected by stress for a longer period and the up-regulation pattern of antioxidative stress genes was more obvious. In TN, heat shock proteins were significantly induced, but the canonical heat-stress gene signature was not evident probably because no shutdown of the housekeeping metabolism was needed. PMID:25211707

  6. Acceleration of solar wind in polar coronal holes by induction heating

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chertkov, A. D.; Shkrebets, A. E.; Arkhipov, Yu. V.; Soldatov, V. A.

    1995-01-01

    The universal induction heating mechanism supplying with the energy all the processes of coronal heating and the solar wind acceleration is developed. The observed relative 'trembling' of photospheric super-large scale magnetic fields with quasi-periods of 1-4 days amounts 30-40 percent in amplitude. The inductive electric field appears in the corona. The electric currents cause the Joule dissipation. The uneven heating leads to the solar wind acceleration. A model is suggested in which high-speed streams in space are caused by the combination of the enhanced inductive energy flux from the solar coronal active regions; the work against the regular magnetic field; losses from coronal emission. The consideration is made in terms of the dissipative solar wind theory with the finite electrical conductivity of plasma. The leakage of plasma and the energy flux across the magnetic field, caused by the induction heating processes, are taken into account. The polar coronal holes (and the mid-latitude ones) are indicators of energy transfer balance but not direct sources of high-speed streams in the solar wind.

  7. The Plant Heat Stress Transcription Factors (HSFs): Structure, Regulation, and Function in Response to Abiotic Stresses

    PubMed Central

    Guo, Meng; Liu, Jin-Hong; Ma, Xiao; Luo, De-Xu; Gong, Zhen-Hui; Lu, Ming-Hui

    2016-01-01

    Abiotic stresses such as high temperature, salinity, and drought adversely affect the survival, growth, and reproduction of plants. Plants respond to such unfavorable changes through developmental, physiological, and biochemical ways, and these responses require expression of stress-responsive genes, which are regulated by a network of transcription factors (TFs), including heat stress transcription factors (HSFs). HSFs play a crucial role in plants response to several abiotic stresses by regulating the expression of stress-responsive genes, such as heat shock proteins (Hsps). In this review, we describe the conserved structure of plant HSFs, the identification of HSF gene families from various plant species, their expression profiling under abiotic stress conditions, regulation at different levels and function in abiotic stresses. Despite plant HSFs share highly conserved structure, their remarkable diversification across plants reflects their numerous functions as well as their integration into the complex stress signaling and response networks, which can be employed in crop improvement strategies via biotechnological intervention. PMID:26904076

  8. Development and characterization of induction heating electrothermal vaporization (IH-ETV) sample introduction for inductively coupled plasma spectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rybak, Michael E.; Salin, Eric D.

    2001-03-01

    A general study of performance attributes was conducted for a prototypical electrothermal vaporization (ETV) sample introduction system, in which induction heating (IH) was used to facilitate the drying, pyrolysis, and vaporization of samples from long, undercut graphite cup probes in a radio-frequency (RF) induction field. In the first part of this study, experiments were carried out to determine the heating characteristics and temperature control aspects of an IH-ETV arrangement. Using a remote-sensing infrared thermocouple, it was determined that a 3/8-inch (9.53-mm) outer diameter graphite cup sample probe could be heated to a maximum temperature of 1860°C in the induction field of the IH-ETV under full forward power (1.5 kW). The IH-ETV device was found to have a rapid heating response (1/ e time-constant of 2.0±0.2 s) that was independent of the initial/final temperatures chosen. Linear temperature control was possible by regulating either the DC voltage applied to the plate or the current flowing to the grid of the RF generator oscillator tube. The second part of this work consisted of studies to establish benchmarks, such as limits of detection (LOD) with inductively coupled plasma optical emission spectrometry (ICP-OES) and transport efficiency for analyte vaporization under several x-Ar mixed gas atmospheres [where x=15% N 2, 10% O 2, HCl (sparged), or 15% SF 6 (v/v)]. In general, reproducible transient signals with evolution times of 5-15 s were seen for the vaporization of most elements studied, with peak area intensity and reproducibility generally being the best with SF 6-Ar. A 10-fold increase in transport efficiency was seen for refractory carbide-forming analytes (Cr, V) when vaporization was conducted in a halogenous ( x=HCl, SF 6) versus non-halogenous ( x=N 2, O 2) environment, with a two-fold improvement being observed for most other non-refractory elements (Cd, Cu, Fe, Mn, Ni, Pb, Zn). The transport of arsenic proved to be a special case

  9. Physiological responses of heat-stressed broilers fed nicarbazin.

    PubMed

    Beers, K W; Raup, T J; Bottje, W G; Odom, T W

    1989-03-01

    Two experiments were conducted to determine physiological responses in heat-stressed broilers fed a control diet or one containing 125 ppm Nicarbazin. Male birds were surgically implanted with a carotid catheter and fitted with a chest movement transducer and rectal probe. In Experiment 1, birds were exposed to an abrupt change from thermoneutral (22.5 C, 70% relative humidity [RH]) to heat stress (37 C and 40 to 50% RH) conditions within 10 min and maintained in this environment for 120 min. In Experiment 2, birds were exposed to a gradual change from thermoneutral to heat stress (38 C, 68% RH) conditions over 4 h and maintained in this environment for an additional 1 h. Heart rate (HR), respiration rate (RR), and body temperature (Tb) were monitored throughout each experiment, and arterial samples were obtained for determination of acid-base balance and lactate. Birds fed Nicarbazin had higher (P less than .05) Tb and lower (P less than .05) blood PCO2 and bicarbonate during heat stress than controls in both experiments. Thermal polypnea was observed in both experiments, but, although there were no treatment differences in Experiment 1, RR was lower (P less than .05) in the last hour of heat stress for Nicarbazin-fed birds in Experiment 2. In the second experiment, birds fed Nicarbazin exhibited higher (P less than .05) HR and blood lactate during heat stress than control-fed birds. The results of this study indicate that Nicarbazin, by an as yet unidentified mechanism, increases Tb in heat-stressed birds, which results in greater deviations in blood acid-base balance, blood lactate, and HR than in control-fed birds. PMID:2704700

  10. Effects of passive heat stress on human somatosensory processing.

    PubMed

    Nakata, Hiroki; Oshiro, Misaki; Namba, Mari; Shibasaki, Manabu

    2015-12-01

    Herein, we investigated the effects of passive heat stress on human somatosensory processing recorded by somatosensory-evoked potentials (SEPs). Fifteen healthy subjects received a median nerve stimulation at the left wrist under two thermal conditions: Heat Stress and normothermic Time Control. The latencies and amplitudes of P14, N20, P25, N35, P45, and N60 at C4' and P14, N18, P22, and N30 at Fz were evaluated. Under the Heat Stress condition, SEPs were recorded at normothermic baseline (1st), early in heat stress (2nd), when esophageal temperature had increased by ~1.0°C (3rd) and ~2.0°C (4th), and after heat stress (5th). In the Time Control condition, SEPs were measured at the same time intervals as those in the Heat Stress condition. The peak latencies and amplitudes of SEPs did not change early in heat stress. However, the latencies of P14, N20, and N60 at C4' and P14, N18, and P22 at Fz were significantly shorter in the 4th session than in the 1st session. Furthermore, the peak amplitudes of P25 and N60 at C4', and P22 and N30 at Fz decreased with increases in body temperature. On the other hand, under the Time Control condition, no significant differences were observed in the amplitudes or latencies of any component of SEPs. These results suggested that the conduction velocity of the ascending somatosensory input was accelerated by increases in body temperature, and hyperthermia impaired the neural activity of cortical somatosensory processing. PMID:26468258

  11. Heat stress causes oxidative stress but not inflammatory signaling in porcine skeletal muscle

    PubMed Central

    Montilla, Sandra I Rosado; Johnson, Theresa P; Pearce, Sarah C; Gardan-Salmon, Delphine; Gabler, Nicholas K; Ross, Jason W; Rhoads, Robert P; Baumgard, Lance H; Lonergan, Steven M; Selsby, Joshua T

    2014-01-01

    Heat stress is associated with death and other maladaptions including muscle dysfunction and impaired growth across species. Despite this common observation, the molecular effects leading to these pathologic changes remain unclear. The purpose of this study was to determine the extent to which heat stress disrupted redox balance and initiated an inflammatory response in oxidative and glycolytic skeletal muscle. Female pigs (5–6/group) were subjected to thermoneutral (20 °C) or heat stress (35 °C) conditions for 1 or 3 days and the semitendinosus removed and dissected into red (STR) and white (STW) portions. After 1 day of heat stress, relative abundance of proteins modified by malondialdehyde, a measure of oxidative damage, was increased 2.5-fold (P < 0.05) compared with thermoneutral in the STR but not the STW, before returning to thermoneutral conditions following 3 days of heat stress. This corresponded with increased catalase and superoxide dismutase-1 gene expression (P < 0.05) and superoxide dismutase-1 protein abundance (P < 0.05) in the STR but not the STW. In the STR catalase and total superoxide dismutase activity were increased by ~30% and ~130%, respectively (P < 0.05), after 1 day of heat stress and returned to thermoneutral levels by day 3. One or 3 days of heat stress did not increase inflammatory signaling through the NF-κB pathway in the STR or STW. These data suggest that oxidative muscle is more susceptible to heat stress-mediated changes in redox balance than glycolytic muscle during chronic heat stress.

  12. Dynamics of urban heat stress events in climate models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, David

    2016-04-01

    Extreme heat stress events as measured by the wet-bulb temperature require extraordinarily high air temperatures coupled with high humidity. These conditions are rare, as relative humidity rapidly falls with rising air temperature, and this effect often results in decreasing heat stress as temperature rises. However, in certain coastal locations in the Middle East recent heat waves have resulted in wet-bulb temperatures of 33-35 degrees C, which approach the theoretical limits of human tolerance. These conditions result from the combination of extreme desert heat and humid winds off of the warm ocean waters. It is unclear if climate models properly simulate these dynamics. This study will analyse the ability of the CMIP5 model suite to replicate observed dynamics during extreme heat events in major urban areas.

  13. [Conditions for initiating heat stress in Pseudomonas geniculata].

    PubMed

    Elisashvili, V I; Soshnikova, M V

    1984-01-01

    The heating of Pseudomonas geniculata 338 at an elevated temperature causes a heat stress in the culture. The extent of the stress depends on the temperature and duration of heating. The incubation of the bacterium at 40 and 45 degrees C did not inhibit its growth after 30 min of heating, and no essential quantities of intracellular compounds absorbing at 260 nm were lost (E260 increased by 12-19%). When the bacterium was heated at 50 degrees C for the same period of time, a three-hour lag-phase appeared during the subsequent cultivation of the bacterium whereas. E260 rose by a factor of 1.7. The resistance of the bacterium to heating depended on the physiological state of the culture: cells at the logarithmic growth phase were most susceptible to heating while the bacterium became more resistant to heating in the course of aging. The addition of NaCl at a concentration of 1.5% or of 10(-3)-10(-4) M EDTA to the reparation medium makes it possible to estimate the population of bacterial cells in the state of stress. PMID:6431240

  14. Inhibition of Heat Shock Induction of Heat Shock Protein 70 and Enhancement of Heat Shock Protein 27 Phosphorylation by Quercetin Derivatives

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Rongsheng E.; Kao, Jeffrey L.-F.; Hilliard, Carolyn A.; Pandita, Raj K.; Roti, Joseph L. Roti; Hunt, Clayton R.; Taylor, John-Stephen

    2009-01-01

    Inhibitors of heat-induced heat shock protein 70 (HSP70)a expression have the potential to enhance the therapeutic effectiveness of heat induced radiosensitization of tumors. Among known small molecule inhibitors, quercetin has the advantage of being easily modified for structure-activity studies. Herein, we report the ability of five mono-methyl and five carbomethoxymethyl derivatives of quercetin to inhibit heat-induced HSP70 expression and enhance HSP27 phosphorylation in human cells. While quercetin and several derivatives inhibit HSP70 induction and enhance HSP27 phosphorylation at Ser78, other analogs selectively inhibit HSP70 induction without enhancing HSP27 phosphorylation that would otherwise aid in cell survival. We also show that good inhibitors of HSP70 induction are also good inhibitors of both CK2 and CamKII, kinases that are known to activate HSP70 expression by phosphorylation of heat shock transcription factor 1. Derivatives that show poor inhibition of either or both kinases are not good inhibitors of HSP70 induction, suggesting that quercetin’s effectiveness is due to its ability to inhibit both kinases. PMID:19296652

  15. Unsaturated FAs prevent palmitate-induced LOX-1 induction via inhibition of ER stress in macrophages

    PubMed Central

    Ishiyama, Junichi; Taguchi, Ryoko; Akasaka, Yunike; Shibata, Saiko; Ito, Minoru; Nagasawa, Michiaki; Murakami, Koji

    2011-01-01

    Palmitic acid (PA) upregulates oxidized LDL receptor-1 (LOX-1), a scavenger receptor responsible for uptake of oxidized LDL (oxLDL), and enhances oxLDL uptake in macrophages. However, the precise underlying mechanism remains to be elucidated. PA is known to induce endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress in various cell types. Therefore, we investigated whether ER stress is involved in PA-induced LOX-1 upregulation. PA induced ER stress, as determined by phosphorylation of PERK, eIF2α, and JNK, as well as induction of CHOP in macrophage-like THP-1 cells. Inhibitors [4-phenylbutyric acid (PBA), sodium tauroursodeoxycholate (TUDCA), and salubrinal] and small interfering RNA (siRNA) for the ER stress response decreased PA-induced LOX-1 upregulation. Thapsigargin, an ER stress inducer, upregulated LOX-1, which was decreased by PBA and TUDCA. We next examined whether unsaturated FAs could counteract the effect of PA. Both oleic acid (OA) and linoleic acid (LA) suppressed PA-induced LOX-1. Activation of the ER stress response observed in the PA-treated cells was markedly attenuated when the cells were cotreated with OA or LA. In addition, OA and LA suppressed thapsigargin-induced LOX-1 upregulation with reduced activation of ER stress markers. Our results indicate that activation of ER stress is involved in PA-induced LOX-1 upregulation in macrophages, and that OA and LA inhibit LOX-1 induction through suppression of ER stress. PMID:21078775

  16. Involvement of small heat shock proteins, trehalose, and lipids in the thermal stress management in Schizosaccharomyces pombe.

    PubMed

    Glatz, Attila; Pilbat, Ana-Maria; Németh, Gergely L; Vince-Kontár, Katalin; Jósvay, Katalin; Hunya, Ákos; Udvardy, Andor; Gombos, Imre; Péter, Mária; Balogh, Gábor; Horváth, Ibolya; Vígh, László; Török, Zsolt

    2016-03-01

    Changes in the levels of three structurally and functionally different important thermoprotectant molecules, namely small heat shock proteins (sHsps), trehalose, and lipids, have been investigated upon heat shock in Schizosaccharomyces pombe. Both α-crystallin-type sHsps (Hsp15.8 and Hsp16) were induced after prolonged high-temperature treatment but with different kinetic profiles. The shsp null mutants display a weak, but significant, heat sensitivity indicating their importance in the thermal stress management. The heat induction of sHsps is different in wild type and in highly heat-sensitive trehalose-deficient (tps1Δ) cells; however, trehalose level did not show significant alteration in shsp mutants. The altered timing of trehalose accumulation and induction of sHsps suggest that the disaccharide might provide protection at the early stage of the heat stress while elevated amount of sHsps are required at the later phase. The cellular lipid compositions of two different temperature-adapted wild-type S. pombe cells are also altered according to the rule of homeoviscous adaptation, indicating their crucial role in adapting to the environmental temperature changes. Both Hsp15.8 and Hsp16 are able to bind to different lipids isolated from S. pombe, whose interaction might provide a powerful protection against heat-induced damages of the membranes. Our data suggest that all the three investigated thermoprotectant macromolecules play a pivotal role during the thermal stress management in the fission yeast. PMID:26631139

  17. Heat-shock induction of ultraviolet light resistance in Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    SciTech Connect

    Mitchel, R.E.J.; Morrison, D.P.

    1983-10-01

    When exponentially growing diploid wild type Saccharomyces cervisiae cells were subjected to a sudden rise in temperature (heat shock) they responded by increasing their resistance to the lethal effects of ultraviolet light. We have previously reported heat shock-induced increases in heat and ionizing radiation resistance. The shock-induced rise in resistance to uv light reported here was examined in terms of DNA repair capacity, and we find that the increase is due to induction of the recombinational repair system with no significant response from the uv-excision repair process.

  18. Induction heating to trigger the nickel surface modification by in situ generated 4-carboxybenzene diazonium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arrotin, Bastien; Jacques, Amory; Devillers, Sébastien; Delhalle, Joseph; Mekhalif, Zineb

    2016-05-01

    Nickel is commonly used in numerous applications and is one of the few materials that present strong ferromagnetic properties. These make it a suitable material for induction heating which can be used to activate the grafting of organic species such as diazonium salts onto the material. Diazonium compounds are often used for the modification of metals and alloys thanks to their easy chemical reduction onto the substrates and the possibility to apply a one-step in situ generation process of the diazonium species. This work focuses on the grafting of 4-aminocarboxybenzene on nickel substrates in the context of a spontaneous grafting conducted either at room temperature or by thermal assistance through conventional heating and induction heating. These modifications are also carried out with the goal of maintaining the oxides layer as much as possible unaffected. The benefits of using induction heating with respect to conventional heating are an increase of the grafting rate, a better control of the reaction and a slighter impact on the oxides layer.

  19. Use of miniature magnetic sensors for real-time control of the induction heating process

    DOEpatents

    Bentley, Anthony E.; Kelley, John Bruce; Zutavern, Fred J.

    2002-01-01

    A method of monitoring the process of induction heating a workpiece. A miniature magnetic sensor located near the outer surface of the workpiece measures changes in the surface magnetic field caused by changes in the magnetic properties of the workpiece as it heats up during induction heating (or cools down during quenching). A passive miniature magnetic sensor detects a distinct magnetic spike that appears when the saturation field, B.sub.sat, of the workpiece has been exceeded. This distinct magnetic spike disappears when the workpiece's surface temperature exceeds its Curie temperature, due to the sudden decrease in its magnetic permeability. Alternatively, an active magnetic sensor can also be used to measure changes in the resonance response of the monitor coil when the excitation coil is linearly swept over 0-10 MHz, due to changes in the magnetic permeability and electrical resistivity of the workpiece as its temperature increases (or decreases).

  20. Reductions in labour capacity from heat stress under climate warming

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dunne, John P.; Stouffer, Ronald J.; John, Jasmin G.

    2013-06-01

    A fundamental aspect of greenhouse-gas-induced warming is a global-scale increase in absolute humidity. Under continued warming, this response has been shown to pose increasingly severe limitations on human activity in tropical and mid-latitudes during peak months of heat stress. One heat-stress metric with broad occupational health applications is wet-bulb globe temperature. We combine wet-bulb globe temperatures from global climate historical reanalysis and Earth System Model (ESM2M) projections with industrial and military guidelines for an acclimated individual's occupational capacity to safely perform sustained labour under environmental heat stress (labour capacity)--here defined as a global population-weighted metric temporally fixed at the 2010 distribution. We estimate that environmental heat stress has reduced labour capacity to 90% in peak months over the past few decades. ESM2M projects labour capacity reduction to 80% in peak months by 2050. Under the highest scenario considered (Representative Concentration Pathway 8.5), ESM2M projects labour capacity reduction to less than 40% by 2200 in peak months, with most tropical and mid-latitudes experiencing extreme climatological heat stress. Uncertainties and caveats associated with these projections include climate sensitivity, climate warming patterns, CO2 emissions, future population distributions, and technological and societal change.

  1. Chloroplast Retrograde Regulation of Heat Stress Responses in Plants.

    PubMed

    Sun, Ai-Zhen; Guo, Fang-Qing

    2016-01-01

    It is well known that intracellular signaling from chloroplast to nucleus plays a vital role in stress responses to survive environmental perturbations. The chloroplasts were proposed as sensors to heat stress since components of the photosynthetic apparatus housed in the chloroplast are the major targets of thermal damage in plants. Thus, communicating subcellular perturbations to the nucleus is critical during exposure to extreme environmental conditions such as heat stress. By coordinating expression of stress specific nuclear genes essential for adaptive responses to hostile environment, plants optimize different cell functions and activate acclimation responses through retrograde signaling pathways. The efficient communication between plastids and the nucleus is highly required for such diverse metabolic and biosynthetic functions during adaptation processes to environmental stresses. In recent years, several putative retrograde signals released from plastids that regulate nuclear genes have been identified and signaling pathways have been proposed. In this review, we provide an update on retrograde signals derived from tetrapyrroles, carotenoids, reactive oxygen species (ROS) and organellar gene expression (OGE) in the context of heat stress responses and address their roles in retrograde regulation of heat-responsive gene expression, systemic acquired acclimation, and cellular coordination in plants. PMID:27066042

  2. Chloroplast Retrograde Regulation of Heat Stress Responses in Plants

    PubMed Central

    Sun, Ai-Zhen; Guo, Fang-Qing

    2016-01-01

    It is well known that intracellular signaling from chloroplast to nucleus plays a vital role in stress responses to survive environmental perturbations. The chloroplasts were proposed as sensors to heat stress since components of the photosynthetic apparatus housed in the chloroplast are the major targets of thermal damage in plants. Thus, communicating subcellular perturbations to the nucleus is critical during exposure to extreme environmental conditions such as heat stress. By coordinating expression of stress specific nuclear genes essential for adaptive responses to hostile environment, plants optimize different cell functions and activate acclimation responses through retrograde signaling pathways. The efficient communication between plastids and the nucleus is highly required for such diverse metabolic and biosynthetic functions during adaptation processes to environmental stresses. In recent years, several putative retrograde signals released from plastids that regulate nuclear genes have been identified and signaling pathways have been proposed. In this review, we provide an update on retrograde signals derived from tetrapyrroles, carotenoids, reactive oxygen species (ROS) and organellar gene expression (OGE) in the context of heat stress responses and address their roles in retrograde regulation of heat-responsive gene expression, systemic acquired acclimation, and cellular coordination in plants. PMID:27066042

  3. Design and performance of a new induction furnace for heat treatment of superconducting radiofrequency niobium cavities

    SciTech Connect

    Dhakal, Pashupati; Ciovati, Gianluigi; Myneni, Ganapati Rao; Rigby, Wayne; Wallace, John

    2012-06-15

    Superconducting radio frequency (SRF) cavities made of high purity niobium (Nb) are the building blocks of many modern particle accelerators. The fabrication process includes several cycles of chemical and heat treatment at low ({approx}120 Degree-Sign C) and high ({approx}800 Degree-Sign C) temperatures. In this contribution, we describe the design and performance of an ultra-high-vacuum furnace which uses an induction heating system to heat treat SRF cavities. Cavities are heated by radiation from the Nb susceptor. By using an all-niobium hot zone, contamination of the Nb cavity by foreign elements during heat treatment is minimized and allows avoiding subsequent chemical etching. The furnace was operated up to 1400 Degree-Sign C with a maximum pressure of {approx}1 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup -5} Torr and the maximum achievable temperature is estimated to be higher than 2000 Degree-Sign C. Initial results on the performance of a single cell 1.5 GHz cavity made of ingot Nb heat treated at 1200 Degree-Sign C using this new induction furnace and without subsequent chemical etching showed a reduction of the RF losses by a factor of {approx}2 compared to cavities made of fine-grain Nb which underwent standard chemical and heat treatments.

  4. Design and performance of a new induction furnace for heat treatment of superconducting radiofrequency niobium cavities

    SciTech Connect

    Pashupati Dhakal, Gianluigi Ciovati, Wayne Rigby, John Wallace, Ganapati Rao Myneni

    2012-06-01

    Superconducting radio frequency (SRF) cavities made of high purity niobium (Nb) are the building blocks of many modern particle accelerators. The fabrication process includes several cycles of chemical and heat treatment at low ({approx}120 deg C) and high ({approx}800 deg C) temperatures. In this contribution, we describe the design and performance of an ultra-high-vacuum furnace which uses an induction heating system to heat treat SRF cavities. Cavities are heated by radiation from the Nb susceptor. By using an all-niobium hot zone, contamination of the Nb cavity by foreign elements during heat treatment is minimized and allows avoiding subsequent chemical etching. The furnace was operated up to 1400 deg C with a maximum pressure of {approx}1 x 10{sup -5} Torr and the maximum achievable temperature is estimated to be higher than 2000 deg C. Initial results on the performance of a single cell 1.5 GHz cavity made of ingot Nb heat treated at 1200 deg C using this new induction furnace and without subsequent chemical etching showed a reduction of the RF losses by a factor of {approx}2 compared to cavities made of fine-grain Nb which underwent standard chemical and heat treatments.

  5. Beginning Teachers' Self-Efficacy and Stress and the Supposed Effects of Induction Arrangements

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Helms-Lorenz, Michelle; Slof, Bert; Vermue, Carlien E.; Canrinus, Esther T.

    2012-01-01

    Induction arrangements are implemented in schools all over the world to support beginning teachers (BTs) (novices) in gradually growing into their profession. The aim of this study is to gain more insight into two key psychological processes involved in the work of a qualified beginning teacher, namely perceived stress and self-efficacy. This…

  6. The response of Bacillus licheniformis to heat and ethanol stress and the role of the SigB regulon.

    PubMed

    Voigt, Birgit; Schroeter, Rebecca; Jürgen, Britta; Albrecht, Dirk; Evers, Stefan; Bongaerts, Johannes; Maurer, Karl-Heinz; Schweder, Thomas; Hecker, Michael

    2013-07-01

    The heat and ethanol stress response of Bacillus licheniformis DSM13 was analyzed at the transcriptional and/or translational level. During heat shock, regulons known to be heat-induced in Bacillus subtilis 168 are upregulated in B. licheniformis, such as the HrcA, SigB, CtsR, and CssRS regulon. Upregulation of the SigY regulon and of genes controlled by other extracytoplasmic function (ECF) sigma factors indicates a cell-wall stress triggered by the heat shock. Furthermore, tryptophan synthesis enzymes were upregulated in heat stressed cells as well as regulons involved in usage of alternative carbon and nitrogen sources. Ethanol stress led to an induction of the SigB, HrcA, and CtsR regulons. As indicated by the upregulation of a SigM-dependent protein, ethanol also triggered a cell wall stress. To characterize the SigB regulon of B. licheniformis, we analyzed the heat stress response of a sigB mutant. It is shown that the B. licheniformis SigB regulon comprises additional genes, some of which do not exist in B. subtilis, such as BLi03885, encoding a hypothetical protein, the Na/solute symporter gene BLi02212, the arginase homolog-encoding gene BLi00198 and mcrA, encoding a protein with endonuclease activity. PMID:23592518

  7. Phosphoinositolphosphate (PIP) cascade induction by hypertonic stress of plant tissue

    SciTech Connect

    Srivastava, A.; Jacoby, B. )

    1989-04-01

    Inositol 1,4,5-trisphosphate (IP{sub 3}) was determined by competition with ({sup 3}H)-IP{sub 3} for binding to an IP{sub 3} specific protein. A hypertonic mannitol, sorbitol or lactose shock induced an increase in the rate of K{sup +} uptake and raised the IP{sub 3} content of Beta vulgaris slices, excised Vigna mungo and Sorghum bicolor roots, as well as attached V. mungo roots. Increased K{sup +} uptake could also be induced by compounds that artificially induce the PIP cascade, or mimic it's products. A hypertonic shock, administered to intact B. vulgaris slices, further enhanced the phosphorylation of a 20 kD protein in the plasmalemma. Maximal IP{sub 3} content was found 10 min after hypertonic induction and maximal K{sup +} uptake was obtained 10 min later. The effect of a continuous hypertonic treatment on IP{sub 3} content, but not on K{sup +} uptake, was transient. Li{sup +} decreased the rate of IP{sub 3} metabolism.

  8. Surface engineering glass-metal coatings designed for induction heating of ceramic components

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khan, Amir Azam; Labbe, Jean Claude

    2014-06-01

    The term Surface Engineering is of relatively recent origin and use, however, the use of coatings and treatments to render surfaces of materials more suitable for certain application or environment is not new. With the advent of Vacuum Technology, Surface Engineering has gained a whole new impetus, whereby expensive materials with adequate mechanical, chemical and thermal properties are being coated or treated on their surfaces in order to achieve what is called as Surface Engineered materials. The present paper presents an overview of recent achievements in Surface Engineering and gives a detailed view of a specific application where glass-metal composite coatings were deposited on ceramic components in order to render them sensitive to induction heating. Sintered glaze coatings containing silver particles in appropriate concentration can be used for the induction heating of porcelain. Mixtures of glass ceramic powders with silver are used to prepare self-transfer patterns, which are deposited over porcelain. Several configurations of these coatings, which are aesthetic to start with, are employed and heating patterns are recorded. The microstructure of these coatings is discussed in relation to the heating ability by a classical household induction system. The results show that this technique is practical and commercially viable.

  9. Time constant measurement for control of induction heating processes for thixoforming

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gerlach, O.; Lechler, A.; Verl, A.

    2015-02-01

    In controlling induction heating systems, several measurement methods exist for controlled heating of metal billets into the semi-solid state for thixoforming. The most common approach is to measure the billet temperature, which suffers from various drawbacks leading to difficulties in process stability. The main disadvantages are the small temperature range of the process window and the alloy composition dependency of the correlation between temperature and liquid fraction. An alternative is to determine the liquid fraction of the billet by measuring the time constant of the load. Although time constant measurement is not affected by the mentioned problems, it is difficult to use it as a controlled variable. This paper shows that disturbances affecting time constant measurement are mainly caused by semiconductor losses inside the inverter. A method is introduced to compensate these losses. This method was implemented and tested in the embedded system of an induction heating unit, thereby showing that it is possible to use time constant measurement to determine the liquid fraction of a billet during induction heating.

  10. Design, Fabrication and Testing of Two Different Laboratory Prototypes of CSI-based Induction Heating Units

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roy, M.; Sengupta, M.

    2012-09-01

    Induction heating is a non-contact heating process which became popular due to its energy efficiency. Current source inverter (CSI) based induction heating units are commonly used in the industry. Most of these CSIs are thyristor based, since thyristors of higher ratings are easily available. These being load commutated apparatus a start-up circuit is needed to initiate commutation. In this paper the design and fabrication of two laboratory prototypes have been presented. The first one, a SCR-based CSI fed controlled induction heating unit (IHU), has been tested with two different types of start-up procedures. Thereafter the fabrication and performance of another IGBT-based CSI is compared with the thyristor-based CSI for a 2 kW, 10 kHz application. These two types of CSIs are fully fabricated in laboratory along with the IHU. Performance analysis and simulation of two different CSIs has been done by using SequelGUI2. The triggering pulses for the inverter devices (for both CSI devices as well as auxilliary thyristor of start-up circuit) have been generated and closed-loop control has been done in FPGA platform built around an Altera make cyclone EPIC12Q240C processor which can be programmed using Quartus II software. Close agreement between simulated and experimental results highlight the accuracy of the experimental work.

  11. Pharmacologic heat shock protein 70 induction confers cytoprotection against inflammation in gliovascular cells.

    PubMed

    Kacimi, Rachid; Yenari, Midori A

    2015-07-01

    The inhibition of the 90-kDa heat shock protein (HSP90) leads to upregulation of the 70-kDa-inducible HSP70. HSP70 has been previously shown to be neuroprotective and anti-inflammatory. Geldanamycin (GA) and other HSP90 inhibitors have emerged as promising therapeutic agents in cancer, presumably owing to their ability to upregulate HSP70. However, the effects of HSP90 inhibition in brain inflammation are still unclear. We investigate the effect of a panel of HSP90 inhibitors on endotoxin-activated microglia and eventual protection from brain-derived endothelial cells. Prior studies have shown that GA protects brain cells from oxidative stress. We show here that when astrocytes or microglial BV2 cells were pretreated with GA or other HSP90 inhibitors, endotoxin-induced cell death was reduced in cocultures of BV2 microglia and brain-derived endothelial cells (bEND.3). Endotoxin-stimulated BV2 cells led to increased nitric oxide (NO) and inducible nitric oxide synthase which was prevented by treatment with all HSP90 inhibitors. HSP90 inhibitors also prevented lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-induced BV2 cell death. We also found that HSP90 inhibition blocked nuclear translocation of nuclear factor kappa B and attenuated IκBα degradation, and inhibited LPS-activated JAK-STAT phosphorylation. We show that pharmacologic inhibition of HSP90 with subsequent HSP70 induction protects cells that comprise the cerebral vasculature against cell death owing to proinflammatory stimuli. This approach may have therapeutic potential in neurological conditions with an inflammatory component. PMID:25802219

  12. Enemies with benefits: parasitic endoliths protect mussels against heat stress

    PubMed Central

    Zardi, G. I.; Nicastro, K. R.; McQuaid, C. D.; Ng, T. P. T.; Lathlean, J.; Seuront, L.

    2016-01-01

    Positive and negative aspects of species interactions can be context dependant and strongly affected by environmental conditions. We tested the hypothesis that, during periods of intense heat stress, parasitic phototrophic endoliths that fatally degrade mollusc shells can benefit their mussel hosts. Endolithic infestation significantly reduced body temperatures of sun-exposed mussels and, during unusually extreme heat stress, parasitised individuals suffered lower mortality rates than non-parasitised hosts. This beneficial effect was related to the white discolouration caused by the excavation activity of endoliths. Under climate warming, species relationships may be drastically realigned and conditional benefits of phototrophic endolithic parasites may become more important than the costs of infestation. PMID:27506855

  13. Enemies with benefits: parasitic endoliths protect mussels against heat stress.

    PubMed

    Zardi, G I; Nicastro, K R; McQuaid, C D; Ng, T P T; Lathlean, J; Seuront, L

    2016-01-01

    Positive and negative aspects of species interactions can be context dependant and strongly affected by environmental conditions. We tested the hypothesis that, during periods of intense heat stress, parasitic phototrophic endoliths that fatally degrade mollusc shells can benefit their mussel hosts. Endolithic infestation significantly reduced body temperatures of sun-exposed mussels and, during unusually extreme heat stress, parasitised individuals suffered lower mortality rates than non-parasitised hosts. This beneficial effect was related to the white discolouration caused by the excavation activity of endoliths. Under climate warming, species relationships may be drastically realigned and conditional benefits of phototrophic endolithic parasites may become more important than the costs of infestation. PMID:27506855

  14. Hypersonic Composites Resist Extreme Heat and Stress

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2007-01-01

    Through research contracts with NASA, Materials and Electrochemical Research Corporation (MER), of Tucson, Arizona, contributed a number of technologies to record-breaking hypersonic flights. Through this research, MER developed a coating that successfully passed testing to simulate Mach 10 conditions, as well as provide several additional carbon-carbon (C-C) composite components for the flights. MER created all of the leading edges for the X-43A test vehicles at Dryden-considered the most critical parts of this experimental craft. In addition to being very heat resistant, the coating had to be very lightweight and thin, as the aircraft was designed to very precise specifications and could not afford to have a bulky coating. MER patented its carbon-carbon (C-C) composite process and then formed a spinoff company, Frontier Materials Corporation (FMC), also based in Tucson. FMC is using the patent in conjunction with low-cost PAN (polyacrylonitrile)-based fibers to introduce these materials to the commercial markets. The C-C composites are very lightweight and exceptionally strong and stiff, even at very high temperatures. The composites have been used in industrial heating applications, the automotive and aerospace industries, as well as in glass manufacturing and on semiconductors. Applications also include transfer components for glass manufacturing and structural members for carrier support in semiconductor processing.

  15. Sphingolipids are potential heat stress signals in Saccharomyces.

    PubMed

    Dickson, R C; Nagiec, E E; Skrzypek, M; Tillman, P; Wells, G B; Lester, R L

    1997-11-28

    The ability of organisms to quickly respond to stresses requires the activation of many intracellular signal transduction pathways. The sphingolipid intermediate ceramide is thought to be particularly important for activating and coordinating signaling pathways during mammalian stress responses. Here we present the first evidence that ceramide and other sphingolipid intermediates are signaling molecules in the Saccharomyces cerevisiae heat stress response. Our data show a 2-3-fold transient increase in the concentration of C18-dihydrosphingosine and C18-phytosphingosine, more than a 100-fold transient increase in C20-dihydrosphingosine and C20-phytosphingosine, and a more stable 2-fold increase in ceramide containing C18-phytosphingosine and a 5-fold increase in ceramide containing C20-phytosphingosine following heat stress. Treatment of cells with dihydrosphingosine activates transcription of the TPS2 gene encoding a subunit of trehalose synthase and causes trehalose, a known thermoprotectant, to accumulate. Dihydrosphingosine induces expression of a STRE-LacZ reporter gene, showing that the global stress response element, STRE, found in many yeast promoter sequences can be activated by sphingolipid signals. The TPS2 promoter contains four STREs that may mediate dihydrosphingosine responsiveness. Using genetic and other approaches it should be possible to identify sphingolipid signaling pathways in S. cerevisiae and quantify the importance of each during heat stress. PMID:9374502

  16. Induction of apurinic endonuclease 1 overexpression by endoplasmic reticulum stress in hepatoma cells.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Tsung-Lin; Chen, Pin-Shern; Li, Ren-Hao; Yuan, Shyng-Shiou; Su, Ih-Jen; Hung, Jui-Hsiang

    2014-01-01

    Hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) is one of the most common malignancies worldwide with poor prognosis due to resistance to conventional chemotherapy and limited efficacy of radiotherapy. Previous studies have noted the induction of endoplasmic reticulum stress or apurinic endonuclease 1 (APE1) expression in many tumors. Therefore, the aim of this study was to investigate the relationship between endoplasmic reticulum (ER stress) and APE1 in hepatocellular carcinoma. Here we investigate the expression of APE1 during ER stress in HepG2 and Huh-7 cell lines. Tunicamycin or brefeldin A, two ER stress inducers, increased APE1 and GRP78, an ER stress marker, expression in HepG2 and Huh-7 cells. Induction of APE1 expression was observed through transcription level in response to ER stress. APE1 nuclear localization during ER stress was determined using immunofluorescence assays in HepG2 cells. Furthermore, expression of Hepatitis B virus pre-S2∆ large mutant surface protein (pre-S2∆), an ER stress-induced protein, also increased GRP78 and APE1 expression in the normal hepatocyte NeHepLxHT cell line. Similarly, tumor samples showed higher expression of APE1 in ER stress-correlated liver cancer tissue in vivo. Our results demonstrate that ER stress and HBV pre-S2∆ increased APE1 expression, which may play an important role in resistance to chemotherapeutic agents or tumor development. Therefore, these data provide an important chemotherapeutic strategy in ER stress and HBV pre-S2∆-associated tumors. PMID:25026174

  17. Low, medium and high heat tolerant strains of Listeria monocytogenes and increased heat stress resistance after exposure to sublethal heat

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Listeria monocytogenes exhibits sophisticated adaptive mechanisms to counteract higher levels of lethal acid, heat, salt or oxidative stresses after pre-exposure to sublethal concentrations of homogenous stress. A group of 37 strains representing all 13 serotypes of Listeria monocytogenes with initi...

  18. Daily heat stress treatment rescues denervation-activated mitochondrial clearance and atrophy in skeletal muscle

    PubMed Central

    Tamura, Yuki; Kitaoka, Yu; Matsunaga, Yutaka; Hoshino, Daisuke; Hatta, Hideo

    2015-01-01

    Traumatic nerve injury or motor neuron disease leads to denervation and severe muscle atrophy. Recent evidence indicates that loss of mitochondria and the related reduction in oxidative capacity could be key mediators of skeletal muscle atrophy. As our previous study showed that heat stress increased the numbers of mitochondria in skeletal muscle, we evaluated whether heat stress treatment could have a beneficial impact on denervation-induced loss of mitochondria and subsequent muscle atrophy. Here, we report that daily heat stress treatment (mice placed in a chamber with a hot environment; 40°C, 30 min day−1, for 7 days) rescues the following parameters: (i) muscle atrophy (decreased gastrocnemius muscle mass); (ii) loss of mitochondrial content (decreased levels of ubiquinol–cytochrome c reductase core protein II, cytochrome c oxidase subunits I and IV and voltage-dependent anion channel protein); and (iii) reduction in oxidative capacity (reduced maximal activities of citrate synthase and 3-hydroxyacyl-CoA dehydrogenase) in denervated muscle (produced by unilateral sciatic nerve transection). In order to gain a better understanding of the above mitochondrial adaptations, we also examined the effects of heat stress on autophagy-dependent mitochondrial clearance (mitophagy). Daily heat stress normalized denervation-activated induction of mitophagy (increased mitochondrial microtubule-associated protein 1A/1B-light chain3-II (LC3-II) with and without blocker of autophagosome clearance). The molecular basis of this observation was explained by the results that heat stress attenuated the denervation-induced increase in key proteins that regulate the following steps: (i) the tagging step of mitochondrial clearance (increased mitochondrial Parkin, ubiquitin-conjugated, P62/sequestosome 1 (P62/SQSTM1)); and (ii) the elongation step of autophagosome formation (increased Atg5–Atg12 conjugate and Atg16L). Overall, our results contribute to the better

  19. Sympathetic activity during passive heat stress in healthy aged humans

    PubMed Central

    Gagnon, Daniel; Schlader, Zachary J; Crandall, Craig G

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Cardiovascular adjustments during heat stress are generally attenuated in healthy aged humans, which could be due to lower increases in sympathetic activity compared to the young. We compared muscle sympathetic nerve activity (MSNA) between 11 young (Y: 28 ± 4 years) and 10 aged (A: 70 ± 5 years) subjects prior to and during passive heating. Furthermore, MSNA responses were compared when a cold pressor test (CPT) and lower body negative pressure (LBNP) were superimposed upon heating. Baseline MSNA burst frequency (Y: 15 ± 4 vs. A: 31 ± 3 bursts min−1, P ≤ 0.01) and burst incidence (Y: 26 ± 8 vs. A: 50 ± 7 bursts (100 cardiac cycles (CC))−1, P ≤ 0.01) were greater in the aged. Heat stress increased core temperature to a similar extent in both groups (Y: +1.2 ± 0.1 vs. A: +1.2 ± 0.0°C, P = 0.99). Absolute levels of MSNA remained greater in the aged during heat stress (burst frequency: Y: 47 ± 6 vs. A: 63 ± 11 bursts min−1, P ≤ 0.01; burst incidence: Y: 48 ± 8 vs. A: 67 ± 9 bursts (100 CC)−1, P ≤ 0.01); however, the increase in both variables was similar between groups (both P ≥ 0.1). The CPT and LBNP further increased MSNA burst frequency and burst incidence, although the magnitude of increase was similar between groups (both P ≥ 0.07). These results suggest that increases in sympathetic activity during heat stress are not attenuated in healthy aged humans. Key points Cardiovascular adjustments to heat stress are attenuated in healthy aged individuals, which could contribute to their greater prevalence of heat-related illnesses and deaths during heat waves. The attenuated cardiovascular adjustments in the aged could be due to lower increases in sympathetic nerve activity during heat stress. We examined muscle sympathetic nerve activity (MSNA) and plasma catecholamine concentrations in healthy young and aged individuals during whole-body passive heat stress. The main finding

  20. Closed loop control of the induction heating process using miniature magnetic sensors

    DOEpatents

    Bentley, Anthony E.; Kelley, John Bruce; Zutavern, Fred J.

    2003-05-20

    A method and system for providing real-time, closed-loop control of the induction hardening process. A miniature magnetic sensor located near the outer surface of the workpiece measures changes in the surface magnetic field caused by changes in the magnetic properties of the workpiece as it heats up during induction heating (or cools down during quenching). A passive miniature magnetic sensor detects a distinct magnetic spike that appears when the saturation field, B.sub.sat, of the workpiece has been exceeded. This distinct magnetic spike disappears when the workpiece's surface temperature exceeds its Curie temperature, due to the sudden decrease in its magnetic permeability. Alternatively, an active magnetic sensor can measure changes in the resonance response of the monitor coil when the excitation coil is linearly swept over 0-10 MHz, due to changes in the magnetic permeability and electrical resistivity of the workpiece as its temperature increases (or decreases).

  1. Gas nitriding of Ti-6Al-4V by induction heating

    SciTech Connect

    Grosch, J.; Saglitz, M.

    1995-12-31

    The usually poor wear behavior of titanium materials can be improved by thermochemical surface heat treatment. In contrast to conventional procedures, which necessitate prolonged treatment, it is possible to reduce the heat treatment period considerably by means of HF induction. Serving as an example in this context is a Ti-6Al-4V titanium alloy that is to demonstrate the possibilities of induction gas nitriding. Temperature variations between 900 C and 1,600 C have resulted in homogeneous surface structures whose microstructures can basically be explained by the titanium-nitrogen diagram. In particular with the 1,600 C variant, the wear resistance has been improved, compared with the untreated titanium material there is a seventyfold increase in wear resistance.

  2. Climate Change and the Emergent Epidemic of CKD from Heat Stress in Rural Communities: The Case for Heat Stress Nephropathy.

    PubMed

    Glaser, Jason; Lemery, Jay; Rajagopalan, Balaji; Diaz, Henry F; García-Trabanino, Ramón; Taduri, Gangadhar; Madero, Magdalena; Amarasinghe, Mala; Abraham, Georgi; Anutrakulchai, Sirirat; Jha, Vivekanand; Stenvinkel, Peter; Roncal-Jimenez, Carlos; Lanaspa, Miguel A; Correa-Rotter, Ricardo; Sheikh-Hamad, David; Burdmann, Emmanuel A; Andres-Hernando, Ana; Milagres, Tamara; Weiss, Ilana; Kanbay, Mehmet; Wesseling, Catharina; Sánchez-Lozada, Laura Gabriela; Johnson, Richard J

    2016-08-01

    Climate change has led to significant rise of 0.8°C-0.9°C in global mean temperature over the last century and has been linked with significant increases in the frequency and severity of heat waves (extreme heat events). Climate change has also been increasingly connected to detrimental human health. One of the consequences of climate-related extreme heat exposure is dehydration and volume loss, leading to acute mortality from exacerbations of pre-existing chronic disease, as well as from outright heat exhaustion and heat stroke. Recent studies have also shown that recurrent heat exposure with physical exertion and inadequate hydration can lead to CKD that is distinct from that caused by diabetes, hypertension, or GN. Epidemics of CKD consistent with heat stress nephropathy are now occurring across the world. Here, we describe this disease, discuss the locations where it appears to be manifesting, link it with increasing temperatures, and discuss ongoing attempts to prevent the disease. Heat stress nephropathy may represent one of the first epidemics due to global warming. Government, industry, and health policy makers in the impacted regions should place greater emphasis on occupational and community interventions. PMID:27151892

  3. Thermal Indices and Thermophysiological Modeling for Heat Stress.

    PubMed

    Havenith, George; Fiala, Dusan

    2015-01-01

    The assessment of the risk of human exposure to heat is a topic as relevant today as a century ago. The introduction and use of heat stress indices and models to predict and quantify heat stress and heat strain has helped to reduce morbidity and mortality in industrial, military, sports, and leisure activities dramatically. Models used range from simple instruments that attempt to mimic the human-environment heat exchange to complex thermophysiological models that simulate both internal and external heat and mass transfer, including related processes through (protective) clothing. This article discusses the most commonly used indices and models and looks at how these are deployed in the different contexts of industrial, military, and biometeorological applications, with focus on use to predict related thermal sensations, acute risk of heat illness, and epidemiological analysis of morbidity and mortality. A critical assessment is made of tendencies to use simple indices such as WBGT in more complex conditions (e.g., while wearing protective clothing), or when employed in conjunction with inappropriate sensors. Regarding the more complex thermophysiological models, the article discusses more recent developments including model individualization approaches and advanced systems that combine simulation models with (body worn) sensors to provide real-time risk assessment. The models discussed in the article range from historical indices to recent developments in using thermophysiological models in (bio) meteorological applications as an indicator of the combined effect of outdoor weather settings on humans. PMID:26756633

  4. Interactions between 2-Cys peroxiredoxins and ascorbate in autophagosome formation during the heat stress response in Solanum lycopersicum

    PubMed Central

    Cheng, Fei; Yin, Ling-Ling; Zhou, Jie; Xia, Xiao-Jian; Shi, Kai; Yu, Jing-Quan; Zhou, Yan-Hong; Foyer, Christine Helen

    2016-01-01

    2-Cys peroxiredoxins (2-CPs) function in the removal of hydrogen peroxide and lipid peroxides but their precise roles in the induction of autophagy have not been characterized. Here we show that heat stress, which is known to induce oxidative stress, leads to the simultaneous accumulation of transcripts encoding 2-CPs and autophagy proteins, as well as autophagosomes, in tomato (Solanum lycopersicum) plants. Virus-induced gene silencing of the tomato peroxiredoxin genes 2-CP1, 2-CP2, and 2-CP1/2 resulted in an increased sensitivity of tomato plants to heat stress. Silencing 2-CP2 or 2-CP1/2 increased the levels of transcripts associated with ascorbate biosynthesis but had no effect on the glutathione pool in the absence of stress. However, the heat-induced accumulation of transcripts associated with the water-water cycle was compromised by the loss of 2-CP1/2 functions. The transcript levels of autophagy-related genes ATG5 and ATG7 were higher in plants with impaired 2-CP1/2 functions, and the formation of autophagosomes increased, together with an accumulation of oxidized and insoluble proteins. Silencing of ATG5 or ATG7 increased the levels of 2-CP transcripts and protein but decreased heat stress tolerance. These results demonstrate that 2-CPs fulfil a pivotal role in heat stress tolerance in tomato, via interactions with ascorbate-dependent pathways and autophagy. PMID:26834179

  5. Interactions between 2-Cys peroxiredoxins and ascorbate in autophagosome formation during the heat stress response in Solanum lycopersicum.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Fei; Yin, Ling-Ling; Zhou, Jie; Xia, Xiao-Jian; Shi, Kai; Yu, Jing-Quan; Zhou, Yan-Hong; Foyer, Christine Helen

    2016-03-01

    2-Cys peroxiredoxins (2-CPs) function in the removal of hydrogen peroxide and lipid peroxides but their precise roles in the induction of autophagy have not been characterized. Here we show that heat stress, which is known to induce oxidative stress, leads to the simultaneous accumulation of transcripts encoding 2-CPs and autophagy proteins, as well as autophagosomes, in tomato (Solanum lycopersicum) plants. Virus-induced gene silencing of the tomato peroxiredoxin genes 2-CP1, 2-CP2, and 2-CP1/2 resulted in an increased sensitivity of tomato plants to heat stress. Silencing 2-CP2 or 2-CP1/2 increased the levels of transcripts associated with ascorbate biosynthesis but had no effect on the glutathione pool in the absence of stress. However, the heat-induced accumulation of transcripts associated with the water-water cycle was compromised by the loss of 2-CP1/2 functions. The transcript levels of autophagy-related genes ATG5 and ATG7 were higher in plants with impaired 2-CP1/2 functions, and the formation of autophagosomes increased, together with an accumulation of oxidized and insoluble proteins. Silencing of ATG5 or ATG7 increased the levels of 2-CP transcripts and protein but decreased heat stress tolerance. These results demonstrate that 2-CPs fulfil a pivotal role in heat stress tolerance in tomato, via interactions with ascorbate-dependent pathways and autophagy. PMID:26834179

  6. Bypass ZVS-PWM High-Frequency Inverter for Induction Heating

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shoji, Hiroyuki; Uruno, Junpei; Isogai, Masayuki

    In this paper, we present a novel circuit topology for achieving thezero-voltage switching (ZVS) operation in a high-frequency inverter. The output power of the inverter is regulated over a wide range using a pulse widthmodulation (PWM) technique and by connecting a bypass circuit to a conventional single-ended push-pull (SEPP) high-frequency inverter for induction heating. All the switching devices of the proposed inverter are operated in the ZVS mode.

  7. Study of TiO2 nanomembranes obtained by an induction heated MOCVD reactor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Crisbasan, A.; Chaumont, D.; Sacilotti, M.; Crisan, A.; Lazar, A. M.; Ciobanu, I.; Lacroute, Y.; Chassagnon, R.

    2015-12-01

    Nanostructures of TiO2 were grown using the metal oxide chemical vapor deposition (MOCVD) technique. The procedure used induction heating on a graphite susceptor. This specific feature and the use of cobalt and ferrocene catalysts resulted in nanomembranes never obtained by common MOCVD reactors. The present study discusses the preparation of TiO2 nanomembranes and the dependence of nanomembrane structure and morphology on growth parameters.

  8. Induction heat treatment and technique of bioceramic coatings production on medical titanium alloys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fomin, Aleksandr A.; Rodionov, Igor V.; Fomina, Marina A.; Poshivalova, Elena Y.; Krasnikov, Aleksandr V.; Petrova, Natalia N.; Zakharevich, Andrey M.; Skaptsov, Alexander A.; Gribov, Andrey N.; Atkin, Vsevolod S.

    2015-03-01

    Prospective composite bioceramic titania coatings were obtained on intraosseous implants fabricated from medical titanium alloy VT16 (Ti-2.5Al-5Mo-5V). Consistency changes of morphological characteristics, physico-mechanical properties and biocompatibility of experimental titanium implant coatings obtained by oxidation during induction heat treatment are defined. Technological recommendations for obtaining bioceramic coatings with extremely high strength on titanium items surface are given.

  9. Induction-linac based free-electron laser amplifiers for plasma heating

    SciTech Connect

    Jong, R.A.

    1988-08-22

    We describe an induction-linac based free-electron laser amplifier that is presently under construction at the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory. It is designed to produce up to 2 MW of average power at a frequency of 250 GHz for plasma heating experiments in the Microwave Tokamak Experiment. In addition, we shall describe a FEL amplifier design for plasma heating of advanced tokamak fusion devices. This system is designed to produce average power levels of about 10 MW at frequencies ranging form 280 to 560 GHz. 7 refs., 1 tab.

  10. Induction of Excessive Endoplasmic Reticulum Stress in the Drosophila Male Accessory Gland Results in Infertility

    PubMed Central

    Chow, Clement Y.; Avila, Frank W.; Clark, Andrew G.; Wolfner, Mariana F.

    2015-01-01

    Endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress occurs when misfolded proteins accumulate in the lumen of the ER. A cell responds to ER stress with the unfolded protein response (UPR), a complex program of transcriptional and translational changes aimed at clearing misfolded proteins. Secretory tissues and cells are particularly well adapted to respond to ER stress because their function requires high protein production and secretory load. The insect male accessory gland (AG) is a secretory tissue involved in male fertility. The AG secretes many seminal fluid proteins (SFPs) essential for male reproduction. Among adult Drosophila tissues, we find that genes upregulated by ER stress are most highly expressed in the AG, suggesting that the AG is already undergoing high levels of ER stress due to its normal secretory functions. We hypothesized that induction of excessive ER stress in the AG above basal levels, would perturb normal function and provide a genetic tool for studying AG and SFP biology. To test this, we genetically induced excessive ER stress in the AG by conditional 1) expression of a misfolded protein or 2) knockdown of the UPR regulatory protein, BiP. Both genetic manipulations induced excessive ER stress in the AG, as indicated by the increase in Xbp1 splicing, a marker of ER stress. Both models resulted in a large decrease in or loss of SFP production and male infertility. Sperm production, motility, and transfer appeared unaffected. The induction of strong ER stress in the insect male AG may provide a simple way for studying or manipulating male fertility, as it eliminates AG function while preserving sperm production. PMID:25742606

  11. Inductively heated shape memory polymer for the magnetic actuation of medical devices.

    PubMed

    Buckley, Patrick R; McKinley, Gareth H; Wilson, Thomas S; Small, Ward; Benett, William J; Bearinger, Jane P; McElfresh, Michael W; Maitland, Duncan J

    2006-10-01

    Presently, there is interest in making medical devices such as expandable stents and intravascular microactuators from shape memory polymer (SMP). One of the key challenges in realizing SMP medical devices is the implementation of a safe and effective method of thermally actuating various device geometries in vivo. A novel scheme of actuation by Curie-thermoregulated inductive heating is presented. Prototype medical devices made from SMP loaded with nickel zinc ferrite ferromagnetic particles were actuated in air by applying an alternating magnetic field to induce heating. Dynamic mechanical thermal analysis was performed on both the particle-loaded and neat SMP materials to assess the impact of the ferrite particles on the mechanical properties of the samples. Calorimetry was used to quantify the rate of heat generation as a function of particle size and volumetric loading of ferrite particles in the SMP. These tests demonstrated the feasibility of SMP actuation by inductive heating. Rapid and uniform heating was achieved in complex device geometries and particle loading up to 10% volume content did not interfere with the shape recovery of the SMP. PMID:17019872

  12. Inductively Heated Shape Memory Polymer for the Magnetic Actuation of Medical Devices

    SciTech Connect

    Buckley, P; Mckinley, G; Wilson, T; Small, W; Benett, W; Bearinger, J; McElfresh, M; Maitland, D

    2005-09-06

    Presently there is interest in making medical devices such as expandable stents and intravascular microactuators from shape memory polymer (SMP). One of the key challenges in realizing SMP medical devices is the implementation of a safe and effective method of thermally actuating various device geometries in vivo. A novel scheme of actuation by Curie-thermoregulated inductive heating is presented. Prototype medical devices made from SMP loaded with Nickel Zinc ferrite ferromagnetic particles were actuated in air by applying an alternating magnetic field to induce heating. Dynamic mechanical thermal analysis was performed on both the particle-loaded and neat SMP materials to assess the impact of the ferrite particles on the mechanical properties of the samples. Calorimetry was used to quantify the rate of heat generation as a function of particle size and volumetric loading of ferrite particles in the SMP. These tests demonstrated the feasibility of SMP actuation by inductive heating. Rapid and uniform heating was achieved in complex device geometries and particle loading up to 10% volume content did not interfere with the shape recovery of the SMP.

  13. Heat stress: intestinal barrier and immune disruption in pigs

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Economic losses to the livestock industry due to heat stress (HS) are estimated to be greater than $2.0 billion annually. HS morbidity is linked to disruption of normal intestinal tract (IT) absorptive and barrier functions, is often manifested as decreased performance; however, extreme HS can have ...

  14. Body Temperature Versus Microclimate Selection in Heat Stressed Dairy Cows

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The purpose of this study is to characterize the thermoregulatory responses of unrestrained heat-stressed dairy cows within a freestall environment using fan and spray configurations for cooling cows while lying or standing. An experimental treatment sprayed individual cows lying in freestalls from ...

  15. Boundary element techniques - Applications in stress analysis and heat transfer

    SciTech Connect

    Brebbia, C.A.; Venturini, W.S.

    1987-01-01

    This volume includes contributions in the field of stress analysis, soil and rock mechanics, non-linear problems, dynamics and vibrations, plate bending and heat transfer. The companion volume includes contributions dealing with viscous and inviscid fluid flow, aerodynamics and hydrodynamics applications, elastostatics and computational and mathematical aspects.

  16. Simulating canopy temperature for modelling heat stress in cereals

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Crop models must be improved to account for the large effects of heat stress effects on crop yields. To date, most approaches in crop models use air temperature despite evidence that crop canopy temperature better explains yield reductions associated with high temperature events. This study presents...

  17. Heat stress in atlanta: preparing for the olympic worst.

    PubMed

    Roos, R

    1996-06-01

    The weather might provide the toughest competition for endurance athletes at the Summer Olympic Games in Atlanta next month. The heat stress is likely to be higher than in any of the last several summer games. Here's a report on the expected conditions and how medical officials for the games are preparing. PMID:20086999

  18. Heat Stress Screening of Peanut Seedlings for Acquired Thermotolerance

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The objective of this research was to develop a user-friendly and medium throughput laboratory protocol using acquired thermotolerance (ATT) in peanut seedlings as a measure of one mechanism of heat stress tolerance. Sixteen genotypes, including selected accessions of the U.S. peanut min...

  19. Peripheral vascular responses to heat stress after hindlimb suspension

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Looft-Wilson, Robin C.; Gisolfi, Carl V.

    2002-01-01

    PURPOSE: The purpose of this study was to determine whether hindlimb suspension (which simulates the effects of microgravity) results in impaired hemodynamic responses to heat stress or alterations in mesenteric small artery sympathetic nerve innervation. METHODS: Over 28 d, 16 male Sprague-Dawley rats were hindlimb-suspended, and 13 control rats were housed in the same type of cage. After the treatment, mean arterial pressure (MAP), colonic temperature (Tcol), and superior mesenteric and iliac artery resistances (using Doppler flowmetry) were measured during heat stress [exposure to 42 degrees C until the endpoint of 80 mm Hg blood pressure was reached (75 +/- 9 min); endpoint Tcore = 43.6 +/- 0.2] while rats were anesthetized (sodium pentobarbital, 50 mg x kg(-1) BW). RESULTS: Hindlimb-suspended and control rats exhibited similar increases in Tcol, MAP, and superior mesenteric artery resistance, and similar decreases in iliac resistance during heat stress (endpoint was a fall in MAP below 80 mm Hg). Tyrosine hydroxylase immunostaining indicated similar sympathetic nerve innervation in small mesenteric arteries from both groups. CONCLUSION: Hindlimb suspension does not alter the hemodynamic or thermoregulatory responses to heat stress in the anesthetized rat or mesenteric sympathetic nerve innervation, suggesting that this sympathetic pathway is intact.

  20. Short Communication: Genotype by Environment Interaction Due to Heat Stress

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Heat stress was evaluated as a factor in differences between regional evaluations for milk yield in the United States. The national data set (NA) consisted of 56 million first-parity test-day milk yields on 6 million Holsteins. The Northeastern subset (NE) included 12.5 million records on 1.3 millio...

  1. Genetic solutions to infertility caused by heat stress

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Reproductive function in mammals is very susceptible to disruption by heat stress. In lactating dairy cows, for example, pregnancy rates per insemination can be as low as 10-15% in the summer vs. 25-40% in cool weather. Reduced fertility in females is caused by a combination of 1) the negative cons...

  2. Carotid baroreflex responsiveness in heat-stressed humans

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Crandall, C. G.

    2000-01-01

    The effects of whole body heating on human baroreflex function are relatively unknown. The purpose of this project was to identify whether whole body heating reduces the maximal slope of the carotid baroreflex. In 12 subjects, carotid-vasomotor and carotid-cardiac baroreflex responsiveness were assessed in normothermia and during whole body heating. Whole body heating increased sublingual temperature (from 36.4 +/- 0.1 to 37.4 +/- 0.1 degrees C, P < 0.01) and increased heart rate (from 59 +/- 3 to 83 +/- 3 beats/min, P < 0. 01), whereas mean arterial blood pressure (MAP) was slightly decreased (from 88 +/- 2 to 83 +/- 2 mmHg, P < 0.01). Carotid-vasomotor and carotid-cardiac responsiveness were assessed by identifying the maximal gain of MAP and heart rate to R wave-triggered changes in carotid sinus transmural pressure. Whole body heating significantly decreased the responsiveness of the carotid-vasomotor baroreflex (from -0.20 +/- 0.02 to -0.13 +/- 0.02 mmHg/mmHg, P < 0.01) without altering the responsiveness of the carotid-cardiac baroreflex (from -0.40 +/- 0.05 to -0.36 +/- 0.02 beats x min(-1) x mmHg(-1), P = 0.21). Carotid-vasomotor and carotid-cardiac baroreflex curves were shifted downward and upward, respectively, to accommodate the decrease in blood pressure and increase in heart rate that accompanied the heat stress. Moreover, the operating point of the carotid-cardiac baroreflex was shifted closer to threshold (P = 0.02) by the heat stress. Reduced carotid-vasomotor baroreflex responsiveness, coupled with a reduction in the functional reserve for the carotid baroreflex to increase heart rate during a hypotensive challenge, may contribute to increased susceptibility to orthostatic intolerance during a heat stress.

  3. Causes, effects and molecular mechanisms of testicular heat stress.

    PubMed

    Durairajanayagam, Damayanthi; Agarwal, Ashok; Ong, Chloe

    2015-01-01

    The process of spermatogenesis is temperature-dependent and occurs optimally at temperatures slightly lower than that of the body. Adequate thermoregulation is imperative to maintain testicular temperatures at levels lower than that of the body core. Raised testicular temperature has a detrimental effect on mammalian spermatogenesis and the resultant spermatozoa. Therefore, thermoregulatory failure leading to heat stress can compromise sperm quality and increase the risk of infertility. In this paper, several different types of external and internal factors that may contribute towards testicular heat stress are reviewed. The effects of heat stress on the process of spermatogenesis, the resultant epididymal spermatozoa and on germ cells, and the consequent changes in the testis are elaborated upon. We also discuss the molecular response of germ cells to heat exposure and the possible mechanisms involved in heat-induced germ cell damage, including apoptosis, DNA damage and autophagy. Further, the intrinsic and extrinsic pathways that are involved in the intricate mechanism of germ cell apoptosis are explained. Ultimately, these complex mechanisms of apoptosis lead to germ cell death. PMID:25456164

  4. Thermal Stress Behavior of Aluminum Nanofilms under Heat Cycling

    SciTech Connect

    Kusaka, Kazuya; Hanabusa, Takao; Shingubara, Shoso; Matsue, Tatsuya; Sakata, Osami; Noda, Kazuhiro; Hataya, Mitsuhiko

    2004-12-08

    In-situ thermal stress in aluminum nanofilms with silicon oxide glass (SOG) passivation was investigated by using synchrotron radiation at the SPring-8. Aluminum films of varying thickness (10, 20, 50 nm) were deposited on thermally oxidized silicon wafers by RF magnetron sputtering. Each specimen was heated in air over two cycles between room temperature and 300 deg. C. The following results were obtained: (1) {l_brace}111{r_brace} planes of aluminum nanofilm crystals were oriented parallel to the substrate normal; (2) the intensity of 111 diffraction was almost independent of temperature except in the case of the 50-nm-thick film; (3) the FWHM of 111 diffraction was almost independent of temperature at any given film thickness; and (4) for all films, the thermal stress varied linearly with heating temperature, and the hysteresis between the heating and cooling steps disappeared.

  5. Induction of oxidative stress by low doses of lead in human hepatic cell line WRL-68.

    PubMed

    Hernández-Franco, Pablo; Silva, Martín; Valverde, Mahara; Rojas, Emilio

    2011-10-01

    Even though the molecular mechanisms by which lead induces toxicity and cancer have been intensely studied for many years, its carcinogenic mechanisms are not well understood yet. Several possible mechanisms have been examined to gain understanding on the carcinogenic properties of lead, which include mitogenesis, alteration of gene expression, and oxidative damage, among others. The aim of the present study was to explore the induction of oxidative damage at low lead concentrations using human embryonic hepatic cells WRL-68. Our results showed induction of reactive oxygen species, changes in the superoxide dismutase and catalase activity, as well as an induction of lipidperoxidation and DNA damage. However, after 5 weeks of exposure, these alterations returned to their basal levels. These results taking together indicate that at low concentrations, lead is able to establish an oxidative stress scenario; however under optimal antioxidant defense the oxidative scenario could be abolished through an adaptative process. PMID:21503682

  6. The effect of heat stress on skeletal muscle contractile properties.

    PubMed

    Locke, Marius; Celotti, Carlo

    2014-07-01

    An elevated heat-shock protein (HSP) content protects cells and tissues, including skeletal muscles, from certain stressors. We determined if heat stress and the elevated HSP content that results is correlated with protection of contractile characteristics of isolated fast and slow skeletal muscles when contracting at elevated temperatures. To elevate muscle HSP content, one hindlimb of Sprague-Dawley rats (21-28 days old, 70-90 g) was subjected to a 15 min 42 °C heat-stress. Twenty-four hours later, both extensor digitorum longus (EDL) and soleus muscles were removed, mounted in either 20 °C or 42 °C Krebs-Ringer solution, and electrically stimulated. Controls consisted of the same muscles from the contra-lateral (non-stressed) hindlimbs as well as muscles from other (unstressed) animals. Isolated muscles were twitched and brought to tetanus every 5 min for 30 min. As expected, HSP content was elevated in muscles from the heat-stressed limbs when compared with controls. Regardless of prior treatment, both EDL and soleus twitch tensions were lower at 42 °C when compared with 20 °C. In addition, when incubated at 42 °C, both muscles showed a drop in twitch tension between 5 and 30 min. For tetanic tension, both muscles also showed an increase in tension between 5 and 30 min when stimulated at 20 °C regardless of treatment but when stimulated at 42 °C no change was observed. No protective effect of an elevated HSP content was observed for either muscle. In conclusion, although heat stress caused an elevation in HSP content, no protective effects were conferred to isolated contracting muscles. PMID:24264930

  7. Differential expression pattern of heat shock protein 70 gene in tissues and heat stress phenotypes in goats during peak heat stress period.

    PubMed

    Rout, P K; Kaushik, R; Ramachandran, N

    2016-07-01

    It has been established that the synthesis of heat shock protein 70 (Hsp70) is temperature-dependent. The Hsp70 response is considered as a cellular thermometer in response to heat stress and other stimuli. The variation in Hsp70 gene expression has been positively correlated with thermotolerance in Drosophila melanogaster, Caenorhabditis elegans, rodents and human. Goats have a wide range of ecological adaptability due to their anatomical and physiological characteristics; however, the productivity of the individual declines during thermal stress. The present study was carried out to analyze the expression of heat shock proteins in different tissues and to contrast heat stress phenotypes in response to chronic heat stress. The investigation has been carried out in Jamunapari, Barbari, Jakhrana and Sirohi goats. These breeds differ in size, coat colour and production performance. The heat stress assessment in goats was carried out at a temperature humidity index (THI) ranging from 85.36-89.80 over the period. Phenotyping for heat stress susceptibility was carried out by combining respiration rate (RR) and heart rate (HR). Based on the distribution of RR and HR over the breeds in the population, individual animals were recognized as heat stress-susceptible (HSS) and heat stress-tolerant (HST). Based on their physiological responses, the selected animals were slaughtered for tissue collection during peak heat stress periods. The tissue samples from different organs such as liver, spleen, heart, testis, brain and lungs were collected and stored at -70 °C for future use. Hsp70 concentrations were analyzed from tissue extract with ELISA. mRNA expression levels were evaluated using the SYBR green method. Kidney, liver and heart had 1.5-2.0-fold higher Hsp70 concentrations as compared to other organs in the tissue extracts. Similarly, the gene expression pattern of Hsp70 in different organs indicated that the liver, spleen, brain and kidney exhibited 5.94, 4.96, 5

  8. Study of heat-stress levels in naturally ventilated sheep barns during heat waves: development and assessment of regression models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Papanastasiou, D. K.; Bartzanas, T.; Panagakis, P.; Zhang, G.; Kittas, C.

    2016-03-01

    It is well documented that heat-stress burdens sheep welfare and productivity. Peak heat-stress levels are observed when high temperatures prevail, i.e. during heat waves; however, continuous measurements inside livestock buildings are not usually available for long periods so as to study the variation of summer heat-stress levels for several years, especially during extreme hot weather. Α methodology to develop a long time series of summer temperature and relative humidity inside naturally ventilated sheep barns is proposed. The accuracy and the transferability of the developed linear regression models were verified. Temperature Humidity Index (THI) was used to assess sheep's potential heat-stress. Τhe variation of THI inside a barn during heat wave and non-heat wave days was examined, and the results were comparatively assessed. The analysis showed that sheep were exposed to moderate, severe, and extreme severe heat-stress in 10, 21 and 66 % of hours, respectively, during heat wave days, while the corresponding values during non-heat wave days were 14, 33 and 43 %, respectively. The heat load on sheep was much higher during heat wave events than during non-heat wave periods. Additionally, based on the averaged diurnal variation of THI, it was concluded that extreme severe heat-stress conditions were prevailing between 1000 and 2400 hours local time during heat wave days. Cool off night periods were never and extremely rarely detected during heat wave and non-heat wave days, respectively.

  9. High temperature setup for measurements of Seebeck coefficient and electrical resistivity of thin films using inductive heating.

    PubMed

    Adnane, L; Williams, N; Silva, H; Gokirmak, A

    2015-10-01

    We have developed an automated setup for simultaneous measurement of Seebeck coefficient S(T) and electrical resistivity ρ(T) of thin film samples from room temperature to ∼650 °C. S and ρ are extracted from current-voltage (I-V) measurements obtained using a semiconductor parameter analyzer and temperature measurements obtained using commercial thermocouples. The slope and the x-axis intercept of the I-V characteristics represent the sample conductance G and the Seebeck voltage, respectively. The measured G(T) can be scaled to ρ(T) by the geometry factor obtained from the room temperature resistivity measurement of the film. The setup uses resistive or inductive heating to control the temperature and temperature gradient on the sample. Inductive heating is achieved with steel plates that surround the test area and a water cooled copper pipe coil underneath that generates an AC magnetic field. The measurements can be performed using resistive heating only or inductive heating only, or a combination of both depending on the desired heating ranges. Inductive heating provides a more uniform heating of the test area, does not require contacts to the sample holder, can be used up to the Curie temperature of the particular magnetic material, and the temperature gradients can be adjusted by the relative positions of the coil and sample. Example results obtained for low doped single-crystal silicon with inductive heating only and with resistive heating only are presented. PMID:26520996

  10. Oxidative stress contributes to autophagy induction in response to endoplasmic reticulum stress in Chlamydomonas reinhardtii.

    PubMed

    Pérez-Martín, Marta; Pérez-Pérez, María Esther; Lemaire, Stéphane D; Crespo, José L

    2014-10-01

    The accumulation of unfolded/misfolded proteins in the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) results in the activation of stress responses, such as the unfolded protein response or the catabolic process of autophagy to ultimately recover cellular homeostasis. ER stress also promotes the production of reactive oxygen species, which play an important role in autophagy regulation. However, it remains unknown whether reactive oxygen species are involved in ER stress-induced autophagy. In this study, we provide evidence connecting redox imbalance caused by ER stress and autophagy activation in the model unicellular green alga Chlamydomonas reinhardtii. Treatment of C. reinhardtii cells with the ER stressors tunicamycin or dithiothreitol resulted in up-regulation of the expression of genes encoding ER resident endoplasmic reticulum oxidoreductin1 oxidoreductase and protein disulfide isomerases. ER stress also triggered autophagy in C. reinhardtii based on the protein abundance, lipidation, cellular distribution, and mRNA levels of the autophagy marker ATG8. Moreover, increases in the oxidation of the glutathione pool and the expression of oxidative stress-related genes were detected in tunicamycin-treated cells. Our results revealed that the antioxidant glutathione partially suppressed ER stress-induced autophagy and decreased the toxicity of tunicamycin, suggesting that oxidative stress participates in the control of autophagy in response to ER stress in C. reinhardtii In close agreement, we also found that autophagy activation by tunicamycin was more pronounced in the C. reinhardtii sor1 mutant, which shows increased expression of oxidative stress-related genes. PMID:25143584