Science.gov

Sample records for industrial process heat

  1. Solar industrial process heat

    SciTech Connect

    Lumsdaine, E.

    1981-04-01

    The aim of the assessment reported is to candidly examine the contribution that solar industrial process heat (SIPH) is realistically able to make in the near and long-term energy futures of the United States. The performance history of government and privately funded SIPH demonstration programs, 15 of which are briefly summarized, and the present status of SIPH technology are discussed. The technical and performance characteristics of solar industrial process heat plants and equipment are reviewed, as well as evaluating how the operating experience of over a dozen SIPH demonstration projects is influencing institutional acceptance and economoc projections. Implications for domestic energy policy and international implications are briefly discussed. (LEW)

  2. Agricultural and industrial process heat

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dollard, J.

    1978-01-01

    The application of solar energy to agricultural and industrial process heat requirements is discussed. This energy end use sector has been the largest and it appears that solar energy can, when fully developed and commercialized, displace from three to eight or more quads of oil and natural gas in U.S. industry. This potential for fossil fuel displacement in the agricultural and industrial process heat area sector represents a possible savings of 1.4 to 3.8 million barrels of oil daily.

  3. Industrial process heat market assessment

    SciTech Connect

    Bresnick, S.

    1981-12-01

    This report is designed to be a reference resource, giving a broad perspective of the potential HTGR market for industrial process heat. It is intended to serve as a briefing document for those wishing to obtain background information and also to serve as a starting point from which more detailed and refined studies may be undertaken. In doing so, the report presents a qualitative and quantitative description of the industrial process heat market in the US, provides a summary discussion of cogeneration experience to date, and outlines the existing institutional and financial framework for cogeneration. The intent is to give the reader an understanding of the current situation and experience in this area. The cogeneration area in particular is an evolving one because of regulations and tax laws, which are still in the process of being developed and interpreted. The report presents the latest developments in regulatory and legislative activities which are associated with that technology. Finally, the report presents a brief description of the three HTGR systems under study during the current fiscal year and describes the specific market characteristics which each application is designed to serve.

  4. Integration of heat pumps into industrial processes

    SciTech Connect

    Chappell, R.N. ); Priebe, S.J. )

    1989-01-01

    The Department of Energy and others have funded studies to assess the potential for energy savings using industrial heat pumps. The studies included classifications of heat pumps, economic evaluations, and placement of heat pumps in industrial processes. Pinch technology was used in the placement studies to determine the placement, size, and type of heat pumps for a given applications. There appears to be considerable scope for heat pumping in several industries, but, where maximum process energy savings are desired, it is important to consider heat pumping in the context of overall process integration. 19 refs., 15 figs.

  5. Solar energy for industrial process heat

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Barbieri, R. H.; Pivirotto, D. L.

    1979-01-01

    Findings of study of potential use for solar energy utilization by California dairy industry, prove that applicable solar energy system furnish much of heat needed for milk processing with large savings in expenditures for oil and gas and ensurance of adequate readily available sources of process heat.

  6. Characterization of industrial process waste heat and input heat streams

    SciTech Connect

    Wilfert, G.L.; Huber, H.B.; Dodge, R.E.; Garrett-Price, B.A.; Fassbender, L.L.; Griffin, E.A.; Brown, D.R.; Moore, N.L.

    1984-05-01

    The nature and extent of industrial waste heat associated with the manufacturing sector of the US economy are identified. Industry energy information is reviewed and the energy content in waste heat streams emanating from 108 energy-intensive industrial processes is estimated. Generic types of process equipment are identified and the energy content in gaseous, liquid, and steam waste streams emanating from this equipment is evaluated. Matchups between the energy content of waste heat streams and candidate uses are identified. The resultant matrix identifies 256 source/sink (waste heat/candidate input heat) temperature combinations. (MHR)

  7. Solar/gas industrial process heat assessment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kearney, D. W.

    1982-12-01

    An assessment was conducted of solar/gas industrial process heat systems, including consideration of market applications, the status and cost of applicable solar technologies, potential technical barriers to the efficient interfacing of solar with conventional gas fired equipment, and a detailed evaluation comparing solar/gas systems to competing options.

  8. Value of solar thermal industrial process heat

    SciTech Connect

    Brown, D.R.; Fassbender, L.L.; Chockie, A.D.

    1986-03-01

    This study estimated the value of solar thermal-generated industrial process heat (IPH) as a function of process heat temperature. The value of solar thermal energy is equal to the cost of producing energy from conventional fuels and equipment if the energy produced from either source provides an equal level of service. This requirement put the focus of this study on defining and characterizing conventional process heat equipment and fuels. Costs (values) were estimated for 17 different design points representing different combinations of conventional technologies, temperatures, and fuels. Costs were first estimated for median or representative conditions at each design point. The cost impact of capacity factor, efficiency, fuel escalation rate, and regional fuel price differences were then evaluated by varying each of these factors within credible ranges.

  9. Waste heat utilization in industrial processes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Weichsel, M.; Heitmann, W.

    1978-01-01

    A survey is given of new developments in heat exchangers and heat pumps. With respect to practical applications, internal criteria for plant operation are discussed. Possibilities of government support are pointed out. Waste heat steam generators and waste heat aggregates for hot water generation or in some cases for steam superheating are used. The possibilities of utilization can be classified according to the economic improvements and according to their process applications, for example, gascooling. Examples are presented for a large variety of applications.

  10. Thermal storage technologies for solar industrial process heat applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gordon, L. H.

    1979-01-01

    The state-of-the-art of thermal storage subsystems for the intermediate and high temperature (100 C to 600 C) solar industrial process heat generation is presented. Primary emphasis is focused on buffering and diurnal storage as well as total energy transport. In addition, advanced thermal storage concepts which appear promising for future solar industrial process heat applications are discussed.

  11. High-lift chemical heat pump technologies for industrial processes

    SciTech Connect

    Olszewski, M.; Zaltash, A.

    1995-03-01

    Traditionally industrial heat pumps (IHPs) have found applications on a process specific basis with reject heat from a process being upgraded and returned to the process. The IHP must be carefully integrated into a process since improper placement may result in an uneconomic application. Industry has emphasized a process integration approach to the design and operation of their plants. Heat pump applications have adopted this approach and the area of applicability was extended by utilizing a process integrated approach where reject heat from one process is upgraded and then used as input for another process. The DOE IHP Program has extended the process integration approach of heat pump application with a plant utility emphasis. In this design philosophy, reject heat from a process is upgraded to plant utility conditions and fed into the plant distribution system. This approach has the advantage that reject heat from any pr@s can be used as input and the output can be used at any location within the plant. Thus the approach can be easily integrated into existing industrial applications and all reject heat streams are potential targets of opportunity. The plant utility approach can not be implemented without having heat pumps with high-lift capabilities (on the order of 65{degree}C). Current heat pumps have only about half the lift capability required. Thus the current emphasis for the DOE IHP Program is the development of high lift chemical heat pumps that can deliver heat more economically to higher heat delivery temperatures. This is achieved with innovative cooling (refrigeration) and heating technologies which are based on advanced cycles and advanced working fluids or a combination of both. This paper details the plan to develop economically competitive, environmentally acceptable heat pump technologies that are capable of providing the delivery temperature and lift required to supply industrial plant utility-grade process heating and/or cooling.

  12. Agricultural and Industrial Process-Heat-Market Sector workbook

    SciTech Connect

    Shulman, M. J.; Kannan, N. P.; deJong, D. L.

    1980-01-01

    This workbook summarizes the preliminary data and assumptions of the Agricultural and Industrial Process Heat Market Sector prepared in conjunction with the development of inputs for a National Plan for the Accelerated Commercialization of Solar Energy.

  13. Diffusion-Welded Microchannel Heat Exchanger for Industrial Processes

    SciTech Connect

    Piyush Sabharwall; Denis E. Clark; Michael V. Glazoff; Michael G. McKellar; Ronald E. Mizia

    2013-03-01

    The goal of next generation reactors is to increase energy ef?ciency in the production of electricity and provide high-temperature heat for industrial processes. The ef?cient transfer of energy for industrial applications depends on the ability to incorporate effective heat exchangers between the nuclear heat transport system and the industrial process. The need for ef?ciency, compactness, and safety challenge the boundaries of existing heat exchanger technology. Various studies have been performed in attempts to update the secondary heat exchanger that is downstream of the primary heat exchanger, mostly because its performance is strongly tied to the ability to employ more ef?cient industrial processes. Modern compact heat exchangers can provide high compactness, a measure of the ratio of surface area-to-volume of a heat exchange. The microchannel heat exchanger studied here is a plate-type, robust heat exchanger that combines compactness, low pressure drop, high effectiveness, and the ability to operate with a very large pressure differential between hot and cold sides. The plates are etched and thereafter joined by diffusion welding, resulting in extremely strong all-metal heat exchanger cores. After bonding, any number of core blocks can be welded together to provide the required ?ow capacity. This study explores the microchannel heat exchanger and draws conclusions about diffusion welding/bonding for joining heat exchanger plates, with both experimental and computational modeling, along with existing challenges and gaps. Also, presented is a thermal design method for determining overall design speci?cations for a microchannel printed circuit heat exchanger for both supercritical (24 MPa) and subcritical (17 MPa) Rankine power cycles.

  14. Impact of land use on solar industrial process heat for the food processing industry

    SciTech Connect

    Casamajor, A.B.

    1980-10-02

    A solar land use study of 1330 food processing plants located in the far-western United States (Arizona, California, Hawaii, Oregon, and Washington) has been conducted. Based upon estimates of each plant's annual energy consumption of process heat, derived from: annual sales figures, employment, and total energy consumption for that plant's Standard Industrial Classification (SIC) group; and the available surface area at each plant, determined by a site inspection, an assessment of each plant's potential for solar energy was made. Those industries having the highest potential for applying solar energy to their process heat loads include: fruit and vegetable packing, sugar refining, meat packing, wine and brandy, bread, and dairy products. It has been further determined that about 25% of the energy used for food processing in the study area can be supplied by solar if all of the available surface area at and adjacent to these plants is devoted to solar collectors.

  15. Thermal storage for industrial process and reject heat

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Duscha, R. A.; Masica, W. J.

    1978-01-01

    Industrial production uses about 40 percent of the total energy consumed in the United States. The major share of this is derived from fossil fuel. Potential savings of scarce fuel is possible through the use of thermal energy storage (TES) of reject or process heat for subsequent use. Three especially significant industries where high temperature TES appears attractive - paper and pulp, iron and steel, and cement are discussed. Potential annual fuel savings, with large scale implementation of near-term TES systems for these three industries, is nearly 9,000,000 bbl of oil.

  16. Thermal storage for industrial process and reject heat

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Duscha, R. A.; Masica, W. J.

    1978-01-01

    Industrial production uses about 40% of the total energy consumed in the United States. The major share of this is derived from fossil fuel. Potential savings of scarce fuel is possible through the use of thermal energy storage (TES) of reject or process heat for subsequent use. Results of study contracts awarded by the Department of Energy (DOE) and managed by the NASA Lewis Research Center have identified three especially significant industries where high temperature TES appears attractive - paper and pulp, iron and steel, and cement. Potential annual fuel savings with large scale implementation of near-term TES systems for these three industries is nearly 9 million bbl of oil.

  17. Process Integration Study [Advanced Industrial Heat Pump Applications and Evaluations

    SciTech Connect

    Eastwood, A.

    1992-06-01

    This work was carried out in two phases: Phase 1; identification of opportunities for heat pumps in industrial applications and Phase 2; evaluation of heat pumps in industrial applications. In Phase 1, pinch analysis was applied to several industrial sites to identify the best opportunities for heat pumping and other forms of heat integration. In Phase 2, more detailed analyses were undertaken, including the evaluation of a heat pump installed as a recommendation of Phase 1.

  18. Preliminary operational results of the industrial process heat field tests

    SciTech Connect

    Kutscher, C.; Davenport, R.

    1980-04-01

    There are currently six DOE-funded solar industrial process heat (IPH) field tests which have been operational for one year or longer. These are all low temperature first generation projects which supply heat at temperatures below 100/sup 0/C - three hot water and three hot air. During the 1979 calendar year, personnel from the Solar Energy Research Institute (SERI) visited all of these sites; the performance and cost results obtained for each project and the operational problems encountered at each site are discussed.

  19. Industrial process heat case studies. [PROSYS/ECONMAT code

    SciTech Connect

    Hooker, D.W.; May, E.K.; West, R.E.

    1980-05-01

    Commercially available solar collectors have the potential to provide a large fraction of the energy consumed for industrial process heat (IPH). Detailed case studies of individual industrial plants are required in order to make an accurate assessment of the technical and economic feasibility of applications. This report documents the results of seven such case studies. The objectives of the case study program are to determine the near-term feasibility of solar IPH in selected industries, identify energy conservation measures, identify conditions of IPH systems that affect solar applications, test SERI's IPH analysis software (PROSYS/ECONOMAT), disseminate information to the industrial community, and provide inputs to the SERI research program. The detailed results from the case studies are presented. Although few near-term, economical solar applications were found, the conditions that would enhance the opportunities for solar IPH applications are identified.

  20. Operation and design of selected industrial process heat field tests

    SciTech Connect

    Kearney, D. W.

    1981-02-01

    The DOE program of solar industrial process heat field tests has shown solar energy to be compatible with numerous industrial needs. Both the operational projects and the detailed designs of systems that are not yet operational have resulted in valuable insights into design and hardware practice. Typical of these insights are the experiences discussed for the four projects reviewed. Future solar IPH systems should benefit greatly not only from the availability of present information, but also from the wealth of operating experience from projects due to start up in 1981.

  1. Industrial and agricultural process heat information user study

    SciTech Connect

    Belew, W.W.; Wood, B.L.; Marle, T.L.; Reinhardt, C.L.

    1981-03-01

    The results of a series of telephone interviews with groups of users of information on solar industrial and agricultural process heat (IAPH) are described. These results, part of a larger study on many different solar technologies, identify types of information each group needed and the best ways to get information to each group. In the current study only high-priority groups were examined. Results from 10 IAPH groups of respondents are analyzed in this report: IPH Researchers; APH Researchers; Representatives of Manufacturers of Concentrating and Nonconcentrating Collectors; Plant, Industrial, and Agricultural Engineers; Educators; Representatives of State Agricultural Offices; and County Extension Agents.

  2. Solar industrial process heat: A study of applications and attitudes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wilson, V.

    1981-04-01

    Data were gathered through site visits to 100 industrial plants. The site specific data suggests several possible near term market opportunities for solar thermal energy systems. Plants using electricity as their primary fuel for industrial process heat were identified, on the basis of their high fuel prices, as attractive early entry markets for solar energy. Additional opportunities were reflected in plants that had accomplished much of their conservation plans, or bad sizeable percentages of their operating budgets committed to energy expenses. A suitability analysis identified eleven industrial plants as highly suitable for solar thermal applications, they included producers of fluid milk, pottery, canned and bottled soft drinks, fabricated structural metal, refined petroleum, aluminum cans, chrome and nickel plating and stamped frame metal and metal finishings.

  3. Market development directory for solar industrial process heat systems

    SciTech Connect

    1980-02-01

    The purpose of this directory is to provide a basis for market development activities through a location listing of key trade associations, trade periodicals, and key firms for three target groups. Potential industrial users and potential IPH system designers were identified as the prime targets for market development activities. The bulk of the directory is a listing of these two groups. The third group, solar IPH equipment manufacturers, was included to provide an information source for potential industrial users and potential IPH system designers. Trade associates and their publications are listed for selected four-digit Standard Industrial Code (SIC) industries. Since industries requiring relatively lower temperature process heat probably will comprise most of the near-term market for solar IPH systems, the 80 SIC's included in this chapter have process temperature requirements less than 350/sup 0/F. Some key statistics and a location list of the largest plants (according to number of employees) in each state are included for 15 of the 80 SIC's. Architectural/engineering and consulting firms are listed which are known to have solar experience. Professional associated and periodicals to which information on solar IPH sytstems may be directed also are included. Solar equipment manufacturers and their associations are listed. The listing is based on the SERI Solar Energy Information Data Base (SEIDB).

  4. Thermal control system. [removing waste heat from industrial process spacecraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hewitt, D. R. (Inventor)

    1983-01-01

    The temperature of an exothermic process plant carried aboard an Earth orbiting spacecraft is regulated using a number of curved radiator panels accurately positioned in a circular arrangement to form an open receptacle. A module containing the process is insertable into the receptacle. Heat exchangers having broad exterior surfaces extending axially above the circumference of the module fit within arcuate spacings between adjacent radiator panels. Banks of variable conductance heat pipes partially embedded within and thermally coupled to the radiator panels extend across the spacings and are thermally coupled to broad exterior surfaces of the heat exchangers by flanges. Temperature sensors monitor the temperature of process fluid flowing from the module through the heat exchanges. Thermal conduction between the heat exchangers and the radiator panels is regulated by heating a control fluid within the heat pipes to vary the effective thermal length of the heat pipes in inverse proportion to changes in the temperature of the process fluid.

  5. Industrial process heat data analysis and evaluation. Volume 2

    SciTech Connect

    Lewandowski, A; Gee, R; May, K

    1984-07-01

    The Solar Energy Research Institute (SERI) has modeled seven of the Department of Energy (DOE) sponsored solar Industrial Process Heat (IPH) field experiments and has generated thermal performance predictions for each project. Additionally, these performance predictions have been compared with actual performance measurements taken at the projects. Predictions were generated using SOLIPH, an hour-by-hour computer code with the capability for modeling many types of solar IPH components and system configurations. Comparisons of reported and predicted performance resulted in good agreement when the field test reliability and availability was high. Volume I contains the main body of the work; objective model description, site configurations, model results, data comparisons, and summary. Volume II contains complete performance prediction results (tabular and graphic output) and computer program listings.

  6. Industrial process heat data analysis and evaluation. Volume 1

    SciTech Connect

    Lewandowski, A; Gee, R; May, K

    1984-07-01

    The Solar Energy Research Institute (SERI) has modeled seven of the Department of Energy (DOE) sponsored solar Industrial Process Heat (IPH) field experiments and has generated thermal performance predictions for each project. Additionally, these performance predictions have been compared with actual performance measurements taken at the projects. Predictions were generated using SOLIPH, an hour-by-hour computer code with the capability for modeling many types of solar IPH components and system configurations. Comparisons of reported and predicted performance resulted in good agreement when the field test reliability and availability was high. Volume I contains the main body of the work: objective, model description, site configurations, model results, data comparisons, and summary. Volume II contains complete performance prediction results (tabular and graphic output) and computer program listings.

  7. Candidate thermal energy storage technologies for solar industrial process heat applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Furman, E. R.

    1979-01-01

    A number of candidate thermal energy storage system elements were identified as having the potential for the successful application of solar industrial process heat. These elements which include storage media, containment and heat exchange are shown.

  8. Reduce Natural Gas Use in Your Industrial Process Heating Systems Trifold

    SciTech Connect

    2010-06-25

    This DOE Industrial Technologies Program fact sheet describes ten effective ways to save energy and money in industrial process heating systems by making some changes in equipment, operations, and maintenance.

  9. Applications and systems studies for solar industrial process heat

    SciTech Connect

    Brown, K.C.

    1980-01-01

    The program has been highlighted by the development of analytical computer programs, engineering case studies in specific industries, applications and market studies and the assessment of operating experience in actual solar installations. For example, two analytical computer codes (known as PROSYS and ECONMAT) have been assembled and used for the large-scale matching of industrial processes with different types of solar equipment. Verification of the results of this large-scale matching have resulted in a program of detailed case studies of solar and conservation options in local dairies, metal can manufacturing plants, meatpacking plants, and other factories.

  10. Thermodynamic and economic analysis of heat pumps for energy recovery in industrial processes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Urdaneta-B, A. H.; Schmidt, P. S.

    1980-09-01

    A computer code has been developed for analyzing the thermodynamic performance, cost and economic return for heat pump applications in industrial heat recovery. Starting with basic defining characteristics of the waste heat stream and the desired heat sink, the algorithm first evaluates the potential for conventional heat recovery with heat exchangers, and if applicable, sizes the exchanger. A heat pump system is then designed to process the residual heating and cooling requirements of the streams. In configuring the heat pump, the program searches a number of parameters, including condenser temperature, evaporator temperature, and condenser and evaporator approaches. All system components are sized for each set of parameters, and economic return is estimated and compared with system economics for conventional processing of the heated and cooled streams (i.e., with process heaters and coolers). Two case studies are evaluated, one in a food processing application and the other in an oil refinery unit.

  11. An assessment of vapor compression heat pump technology and applications for industrial processes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kearney, D. W.

    1982-04-01

    Vapor compression heat pumps (VCHPs) are an energy conservation technology which can utilize the energy from low temperature waste streams to provide higher temperature energy requirements for industrial processes. The VCHPs are driven by electric motors, steam or gas turbines, or gas engines. The use of heat pumps affects the utilization of natural gas for industrial processes, reducing usage through more efficient utilization or increasing usage through the adoption of gas fired prime movers. The current status and potential of vapor compression heat pump technology and applications for industry and impact of this technology on natural gas utilization is assessed. Industrial applications are identified on a four digit SIC level for each of the generic types of closed and open cycle VCHP systems; temperature boosting, dehumidification, mechanical vapor recompression, and low pressure steam production. It is concluded that vapor compression heat pumps offer a promising energy efficient alternative in many industrial processes.

  12. Solar Program Assessment: Environmental Factors - Solar Agricultural and Industrial Process Heat.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Energy Research and Development Administration, Washington, DC. Div. of Solar Energy.

    The purpose of this report is to present and prioritize the major environmental issues associated with the further development of solar energy as a source of process heat in the industrial and agricultural sectors. To provide a background for this environmental analysis, the basic concepts and technologies of solar process heating are reviewed.…

  13. Summary of some feasibility studies for site-specific solar industrial process heat

    SciTech Connect

    1982-01-01

    Some feasibility studies for several different site specific solar industrial process heat applications are summarized. The followng applications are examined. Leather Tanning; Concrete Production: Lumber and Paper Processing; Milk Processing; Molding, Curing or Drying; Automobile Manufacture; and Food Processing and Preparation. For each application, site and process data, system design, and performance and cost estimates are summarized.

  14. Advanced Thermoelectric Materials for Efficient Waste Heat Recovery in Process Industries

    SciTech Connect

    Adam Polcyn; Moe Khaleel

    2009-01-06

    The overall objective of the project was to integrate advanced thermoelectric materials into a power generation device that could convert waste heat from an industrial process to electricity with an efficiency approaching 20%. Advanced thermoelectric materials were developed with figure-of-merit ZT of 1.5 at 275 degrees C. These materials were not successfully integrated into a power generation device. However, waste heat recovery was demonstrated from an industrial process (the combustion exhaust gas stream of an oxyfuel-fired flat glass melting furnace) using a commercially available (5% efficiency) thermoelectric generator coupled to a heat pipe. It was concluded that significant improvements both in thermoelectric material figure-of-merit and in cost-effective methods for capturing heat would be required to make thermoelectric waste heat recovery viable for widespread industrial application.

  15. Potential for solar industrial process heat in the United States: A look at California

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kurup, Parthiv; Turchi, Craig

    2016-05-01

    The use of Concentrating Solar Power (CSP) collectors (e.g., parabolic trough or linear Fresnel systems) for industrial thermal applications has been increasing in global interest in the last few years. In particular, the European Union has been tracking the deployment of Solar Industrial Process Heat (SIPH) plants. Although relatively few plants have been deployed in the United States (U.S.), we establish that 29% of primary energy consumption in the U.S. manufacturing sector is used for process heating. Perhaps the best opportunities for SIPH reside in the state of California due to its excellent solar resource, strong industrial base, and solar-friendly policies. This initial analysis identified 48 TWhth/year of process heat demand in certain California industries versus a technical solar-thermal energy potential of 23,000 TWhth/year. The top five users of industrial steam in the state are highlighted and special attention paid to the food sector that has been an early adopter of SIPH in other countries. A comparison of the cost of heat from solar-thermal collectors versus the cost of industrial natural gas in California indicates that SIPH may be cost effective even under the relatively low gas prices seen in 2014. A recommended next step is the identification of pilot project candidates to promote the deployment of SIPH facilities.

  16. Design considerations for solar industrial process heat systems: nontracking and line focus collector technologies

    SciTech Connect

    Kutscher, C.F.

    1981-03-01

    Items are listed that should be considered in each aspect of the design of a solar industrial process heat system. The collector technologies covered are flat-plate, evacuated tube, and line focus. Qualitative design considerations are stressed rather than specific design recommendations. (LEW)

  17. Process industry demand for more efficient, more cost-effective heat exchanger tubing

    SciTech Connect

    Thors, P.

    1987-01-01

    In the future the process industry will see a bigger selection of enhanced heat transfer tubes, one of the reasons being the continued production of special patented technology involved in making them. Here the author mentions only some of the factors that might influence the increased usage of these enhanced tubes. In using more efficient tubing in a heat exchanger the designer has available the options to increase the total heat duty per unit volume, lower operating costs by reducing the mean temperature difference at a given heat duty, save material, or reduce the size and/or pumping power, among others. This can be achieved, for example, by replacing plain tubes with appropriate enhanced tubes in retubing applications, where old heat exchangers need to be upgraded and total efficiency improved. When a new heat exchanger is to be built, it is easier for the designer to include the more efficient tubing to utilize all the benefits of the increased thermal performance.

  18. Process Integration Study of Cache Valley Cheese Plant [Advanced Industrial Heat Pump Applications and Evaluations

    SciTech Connect

    Eastwood, A.

    1991-10-01

    This work has carried out in two phases: Phase 1; identification of opportunities for heat pumps in industrial applications and Phase 2; evaluation of heat pumps in industrial applications. In Phase 1, pinch analysis was applied to several industrial sites to identify the best opportunities for heat pumping and other forms of heat integration. In Phase 2, more detailed analyses were undertaken, including the evaluation of a heat pump installed as a recommendation of Phase 1.

  19. Industrial heat pump assessment study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chappell, R. N.; Priebe, S. J.; Wilfert, G. L.

    1989-03-01

    This report summarizes preliminary studies that assess the potential of industrial heat pumps for reduction of process heating requirements in industries receiving power from the Bonneville Power Administration (BPA). This project was initiated at the request of BPA to determine the potential of industrial heat pumps in BPA's service area. Working from known heat pump principles and from a list of BPA's industrial customers, the authors estimated the fuel savings potential for six industries. Findings indicate that the pulp and paper industry would yield the greatest fuel savings and increased electrical consumption. Assessments presented in this report represent a cooperative effort between The Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL), and Battelle-Northwest Laboratories.

  20. End-use matching for solar industrial process heat. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Brown, K.C.; Hooker, D.W.; Rabl, A.; Stadjuhar, S.A.; West, R.E.

    1980-01-01

    Because of the large energy demand of industry (37% of US demand) and the wide spectrum of temperatures at which heat is required, the industrial sector appears to be very suitable for the matching of solar thermal technology with industrial process heat (IPH) requirements. A methodology for end-use matching has been devised, complete with required data bases and an evaluation program PROSYS/ECONMAT. Six cities in the United States were selected for an analysis of solar applications to IPH. Typical process heat requirements for 70% of the industrial plants in each city were identified and evaluated in conjunction with meteorological and economic data for each site to determine lowest-cost solar systems for each application. The flexibility and scope of PROSYS/ECONMAT is shown in a variety of sensitivity studies that expand the results of the six-city analysis. Case studies of two industrial plants were performed to evaluate the end-use matching procedure; these results are reported.

  1. Detailed design procedure for solar industrial-process-heat systems: overview

    SciTech Connect

    Kutscher, C F

    1982-12-01

    A large number of handbooks have been written on the subject of designing solar heating and cooling systems for buildings. One of these is summarized here. Design Approaches for Solar Industrial Process Heat Systems, published in September 1982, addresses the complete spectrum of problems associated with the design of a solar IPH system. A highly general method, derived from computer simulations, is presented for determining actual energy delivered to the process load. Also covered are siting and selection of subsystem components, cost estimation, safety and environmental considerations, and installation concerns. An overview of the design methodology developed is given and some specific examples of technical issues addressed are provided.

  2. Development of a System for Thermoelectric Heat Recovery from Stationary Industrial Processes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ebling, D. G.; Krumm, A.; Pfeiffelmann, B.; Gottschald, J.; Bruchmann, J.; Benim, A. C.; Adam, M.; Labs, R.; Herbertz, R. R.; Stunz, A.

    2016-05-01

    The hot forming process of steel requires temperatures of up to 1300°C. Usually, the invested energy is lost to the environment by the subsequent cooling of the forged parts to room temperature. Thermoelectric systems are able to recover this wasted heat by converting the heat into electrical energy and feeding it into the power grid. The proposed thermoelectric system covers an absorption surface of half a square meter, and it is equipped with 50 Bismuth-Telluride based thermoelectric generators, five cold plates, and five inverters. Measurements were performed under production conditions of the industrial environment of the forging process. The heat distribution and temperature profiles are measured and modeled based on the prevailing production conditions and geometric boundary conditions. Under quasi-stationary conditions, the thermoelectric system absorbs a heat radiation of 14.8 kW and feeds electrical power of 388 W into the power grid. The discussed model predicts the measured values with slight deviations.

  3. Development of a System for Thermoelectric Heat Recovery from Stationary Industrial Processes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ebling, D. G.; Krumm, A.; Pfeiffelmann, B.; Gottschald, J.; Bruchmann, J.; Benim, A. C.; Adam, M.; Labs, R.; Herbertz, R. R.; Stunz, A.

    2016-07-01

    The hot forming process of steel requires temperatures of up to 1300°C. Usually, the invested energy is lost to the environment by the subsequent cooling of the forged parts to room temperature. Thermoelectric systems are able to recover this wasted heat by converting the heat into electrical energy and feeding it into the power grid. The proposed thermoelectric system covers an absorption surface of half a square meter, and it is equipped with 50 Bismuth-Telluride based thermoelectric generators, five cold plates, and five inverters. Measurements were performed under production conditions of the industrial environment of the forging process. The heat distribution and temperature profiles are measured and modeled based on the prevailing production conditions and geometric boundary conditions. Under quasi-stationary conditions, the thermoelectric system absorbs a heat radiation of 14.8 kW and feeds electrical power of 388 W into the power grid. The discussed model predicts the measured values with slight deviations.

  4. Recovery of waste heat from industrial slags via modified float glass process

    SciTech Connect

    Serth, R.W.; Ctvrtnicek, T.E.; McCormick, R.J.; Zanders, D.L.

    1981-01-01

    A novel process for recovering waste heat from molten slags produced as by-products in the steel, copper, and elemental phosphorus industries is investigated. The process is based on technology developed in the glass industry for the commercial production of flat glass. In this process, energy is recovered from molten slag as it cools and solidifies on the surface of a pool of molten tin. In order to determine the technical and economic feasibility of the process, an energy recovery facility designed to handle the slag from a large elemental phosphorus plant is studied. Results indicate that the process is marginally economical at current energy price levels. A number of technical uncertainties in the process design are also identified. 9 refs.

  5. Solar feasibility study for site-specific industrial-process-heat applications. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Murray, O.L.

    1980-03-18

    This study addresses the technical feasibility of solar energy in industrial process heat (IPH) applications in Mid-America. The study was one of two contracted efforts covering the MASEC 12-state region comprised of: Illinois, Michigan, North Dakota, Indiana, Minnesota, Ohio, Iowa, Missouri, South Dakota, Kansas, Nebraska, Wisconsin. The results of our study are encouraging to the potential future role of solar energy in supplying process heat to a varied range of industries and applications. We identified and developed Case Study documentation of twenty feasible solar IPH applications covering eight major SIC groups within the Mid-American region. The geographical distribution of these applications for the existing range of solar insolation levels are shown and the characteristics of the applications are summarized. The results of the study include process identification, analysis of process heat requirements, selection of preliminary solar system characteristics, and estimation of system performance and cost. These are included in each of the 20 Case Studies. The body of the report is divided into two primary discussion sections dealing with the Study Methodology employed in the effort and the Follow-On Potential of the identified applications with regard to possible demonstration projects. The 20 applications are rated with respect to their relative overall viability and procedures are discussed for possible demonstration project embarkment. Also, a possible extension of this present feasibility study for late-comer industrial firms expressing interest appears worthy of consideration.

  6. Initial Investigation into the Potential of CSP Industrial Process Heat for the Southwest United States

    SciTech Connect

    Kurup, Parthiv; Turchi, Craig

    2015-11-01

    After significant interest in the 1970s, but relatively few deployments, the use of solar technologies for thermal applications, including enhanced oil recovery (EOR), desalination, and industrial process heat (IPH), is again receiving global interest. In particular, the European Union (EU) has been a leader in the use, development, deployment, and tracking of Solar Industrial Process Heat (SIPH) plants. The objective of this study is to ascertain U.S. market potential of IPH for concentrating collector technologies that have been developed and promoted through the U.S. Department of Energy's Concentrating Solar Power (CSP) Program. For this study, the solar-thermal collector technologies of interest are parabolic trough collectors (PTCs) and linear Fresnel (LF) systems.

  7. Design approaches for solar industrial process-heat systems: nontracking and line-focus collector technologies

    SciTech Connect

    Kutscher, C.F.; Davenport, R.L.; Dougherty, D.A.; Gee, R.C.; Masterson, P.M.; May, E.K.

    1982-08-01

    The design methodology for solar industrial process heat systems is described, and an overview is given of the use of solar energy in industry. A way to determine whether solar energy makes sense for a particular application is described. The basic system configurations used to supply hot water or steam are discussed, and computer-generated graphs are supplied that allow the user to select a collector type. Detailed energy calculations are provided, including the effects of thermal losses and storage. The selection of subsystem components is described, and control systems, installation and start-up details, economics, and safety and environmental issues are explained. (LEW)

  8. Financial barriers to the use of solar-industrial-process heat

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1981-03-01

    Industry concerns about solar process heat, attitudes toward investment in solar process heat, and decision processes and factors are reported. Four cases were selected from among 30 potential solar process heat installations that had been carried through the design stage, and case was analyzed using discounted cash flow to determine what internal rate of return would be earned under current tax laws over 10 years. No case showed any significant rate of return from capital invested in the solar installation. Several possible changes in the cost of solar equipment, its tax treatment or methods of financing were tested through computer simulation. A heavy load of extra tax incentives can improve the return on an investment, but such action is not recommended because they are not found to induce adoption of solar process heat, and if they were effective, capital may be drawn away from applications such as conservation were the potential to improve the nation's energy dilemma is greater. Tax shelter financing through limited partnership may be available. (LEW)

  9. Applications of thermal energy storage to waste heat recovery in the food processing industry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wojnar, F.; Lunberg, W. L.

    1980-01-01

    A study to assess the potential for waste heat recovery in the food industry and to evaluate prospective waste heat recovery system concepts employing thermal energy storage was conducted. The study found that the recovery of waste heat in canning facilities can be performed in significant quantities using systems involving thermal energy storage that are both practical and economical. A demonstration project is proposed to determine actual waste heat recovery costs and benefits and to encourage system implementation by the food industry.

  10. Whole-Genome Transcriptional Analysis of Escherichia coli during Heat Inactivation Processes Related to Industrial Cooking

    PubMed Central

    Guernec, A.; Robichaud-Rincon, P.

    2013-01-01

    Escherichia coli K-12 was grown to the stationary phase, for maximum physiological resistance, in brain heart infusion (BHI) broth at 37°C. Cells were then heated at 58°C or 60°C to reach a process lethality value (Fo7010) of 2 or 3 or to a core temperature of 71°C (control industrial cooking temperature). Growth recovery and cell membrane integrity were evaluated immediately after heating, and a global transcription analysis was performed using gene expression microarrays. Only cells heated at 58°C with Fo = 2 were still able to grow on liquid or solid BHI broth after heat treatment. However, their transcriptome did not differ from that of bacteria heated at 58°C with Fo = 3 (P value for the false discovery rate [P-FDR] > 0.01), where no growth recovery was observed posttreatment. Genome-wide transcriptomic data obtained at 71°C were distinct from those of the other treatments without growth recovery. Quantification of heat shock gene expression by real-time PCR revealed that dnaK and groEL mRNA levels decreased significantly above 60°C to reach levels similar to those of control cells at 37°C (P < 0.0001). Furthermore, despite similar levels of cell inactivation measured by growth on BHI media after heating, 132 and 8 genes were differentially expressed at 71°C compared to 58°C and 60°C at Fo = 3, respectively (P-FDR < 0.01). Among them, genes such as aroA, citE, glyS, oppB, and asd, whose expression was upregulated at 71°C, may be worth investigating as good biomarkers for accurately determining the efficiency of heat treatments, especially when cells are too injured to be enumerated using growth media. PMID:23770902

  11. Economic analysis for the Hilo Coast Processing Company's solar industrial process heat system

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1980-05-01

    Levelized required revenues per total investment dollar for a variety of investment rates were developed for the project. These values were used in turn to develop the following economic characteristics: internal rate of return assuming the entire component represents an investment by the contractor; internal rate of return assuming the solar investment consists only of the equity portion of total projected project costs; the levelized price of the solar thermal process heat energy produced under varying discount rates; the levelized price of the alternative conventional energy under varying discount rates; expected annual fossil fuel savings; and payback period. (MHR)

  12. Preliminary operational results of the low-temperature solar industrial process heat field tests

    SciTech Connect

    Kutscher, C.F.; Davenport, R.L.

    1980-06-01

    Six solar industrial process heat field tests have been in operation for a year or more - three are hot water systems and three are hot air systems. All are low-temperature projects (process heat at temperatures below 212/sup 0/F). Performance results gathered by each contractor's data acquisition system are presented and project costs and problems encountered are summarized. Flat-plate, evacuated-tube, and line-focus collectors are all represented in the program, with collector array areas ranging from 2500 to 21,000 ft/sup 2/. Collector array efficiencies ranged from 12% to 36% with net system efficiencies from 8% to 33%. Low efficiencies are attributable in some cases to high thermal losses and, for the two projects using air collectors, are due in part to high parasitic power consumption. Problems have included industrial effluents on collectors, glazing and absorber surface failures, excessive thermal losses, freezing and overheating, control problems, and data acquisition system failure. With design and data acquisition costs excluded costs of the projects ranged from $25/ft/sup 2/ to $87/ft/sup 2/ and $499/(MBtu/yr) to $1537/(MBtu/yr).

  13. A coal-fired combustion system for industrial process heating applications

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1992-09-03

    PETC has implemented a number of advanced combustion research projects that will lead to the establishment of a broad, commercially acceptable engineering data base for the advancement of coal as the fuel of choice for boilers, furnaces, and process heaters. Vortec Corporation's Phase III development contract DE-AC22-91PC91161 for a Coal-Fired Combustion System for Industrial Process Heating Applications'' is project funded under the DOE/PETC advanced combustion program. This advanced combustion system research program is for the development of innovative coal-fired process heaters which can be used for high temperature melting, smelling and waste vitrification processes. The process heater concepts to be developed are based on advanced glass melting and ore smelting furnaces developed and patented by Vortec Corporation. The process heater systems to be developed have multiple use applications; however, the Phase III research effort is being focused on the development of a process heater system to be used for producing value added vitrified glass products from boiler/incinerator ashes and industrial wastes. The primary objective of the Phase III project is to develop and integrate all the system components, from fuel through total system controls, and then test the complete system in order to evaluate its potential marketability. During the current reporting period, approval of Vortec's Environmental Assessment (EA) required under the National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA) was approved. The EA approval cycle took approximately 9 months. The preliminary test program which was being held in abeyance pending approval of the EA was initiated. Six preliminary test runs were successfully competed during the period. Engineering and design activities in support of the Phase III proof of concept are continuing, and modifications to the existing test system configuration to allow performance of the preliminary tests were completed.

  14. Simple energy-calculation method for solar industrial-process-heat steam systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gee, R. C.

    1983-01-01

    Designing a solar industrial process heat (IPH) system, sizing its components and predicting its annual energy delivery requires a method for calculating solar system performance. A calculation method that is accurate, easy to use, accounts for the impact of all important system parameters, and does not require use of a computer is described. Only simple graphs and a hand calculator are required to predict annual collector field performance and annual system losses. The energy calculation method is applicable to a variety of solar system configurations. The calculation method applied only to parabolic trough steam generation systems that do not employ thermal storage is described. Both flash tank and unfired boiler steam systems are covered.

  15. Simple energy-calculation method for solar industrial-process-heat steam systems

    SciTech Connect

    Gee, R.

    1983-01-01

    Designing a solar industrial-process heat (IPH) system, sizing its components and predicting its annual energy delivery requires a method for calculating solar system performance. A calculation method that is accurate, easy to use, accounts for the impact of all important system parameters, and does not require use of a computer is described. Only simple graphs and a hand calculator are required to predict annual collector field performance and annual system losses. The energy-calculation method is applicable to a variety of solar-system configurations. The calculation method applied only to parabolic-trough steam-generation systems that do not employ thermal storage is described. Both flash tank and unfired-boiler steam systems are covered.

  16. Method for evaluating the potential of geothermal energy in industrial process heat applications

    SciTech Connect

    Packer, M.B.; Mikic, B.B.; Meal, H.C., Guillamon-Duch, H.

    1980-05-01

    A method is presented for evaluating the technical and economic potential of geothermal energy for industrial process heat applications. The core of the method is a computer program which can be operated either as a design analysis tool to match energy supplies and demands, or as an economic analysis tool if a particular design for the facility has already been selected. Two examples are given to illustrate the functioning of the model and to demonstrate that results reached by use of the model closely parallel those that have been determined by more traditional techniques. Other features of interest in the model include: (1) use of decision analysis techniques as well as classical methods to deal with questions relating optimization; (2) a tax analysis of current regulations governing percentage depletion for geothermal deposits; and (3) development of simplified correlations for the thermodynamic properties of salt solutions in water.

  17. The development of a coal-fired combustion system for industrial process heating applications

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1992-07-16

    PETC has implemented a number of advanced combustion research projects that will lead to the establishment of a broad, commercially acceptable engineering data base for the advancement of coal as the fuel of choice for boilers, furnaces, and process heaters. Vortec Corporation's Coal-Fired Combustion System for Industrial Process Heating Applications has been selected for Phase III development under contract DE-AC22-91PC91161. This advanced combustion system research program is for the development of innovative coal-fired process heaters which can be used for high temperature melting, smelting, recycling, and refining processes. The process heater concepts to be developed are based on advanced glass melting and ore smelting furnaces developed and patented by Vortec Corporation. The process heater systems to be developed have multiple use applications; however, the Phase HI research effort is being focused on the development of a process heater system to be used for producing glass frits and wool fiber from boiler and incinerator ashes. The primary objective of the Phase III project is to develop and integrate all the system components, from fuel through total system controls, and then test the complete system in order to evaluate its potential marketability. The economic evaluation of commercial scale CMS processes has begun. In order to accurately estimate the cost of the primary process vessels, preliminary designs for 25, 50, and 100 ton/day systems have been started under Task 1. This data will serve as input data for life cycle cost analysis performed as part of techno-economic evaluations. The economic evaluations of commercial CMS systems will be an integral part of the commercialization plan.

  18. The small community solar thermal power experiment. Parabolic dish technology for industrial process heat application

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Polzien, R. E.; Rodriguez, D.

    1981-01-01

    Aspects of incorporating a thermal energy transport system (ETS) into a field of parabolic dish collectors for industrial process heat (IPH) applications were investigated. Specific objectives are to: (1) verify the mathematical optimization of pipe diameters and insulation thicknesses calculated by a computer code; (2) verify the cost model for pipe network costs using conventional pipe network construction; (3) develop a design and the associated production costs for incorporating risers and downcomers on a low cost concentrator (LCC); (4) investigate the cost reduction of using unconventional pipe construction technology. The pipe network design and costs for a particular IPH application, specifically solar thermally enhanced oil recovery (STEOR) are analyzed. The application involves the hybrid operation of a solar powered steam generator in conjunction with a steam generator using fossil fuels to generate STEOR steam for wells. It is concluded that the STEOR application provides a baseline pipe network geometry used for optimization studies of pipe diameter and insulation thickness, and for development of comparative cost data, and operating parameters for the design of riser/downcomer modifications to the low cost concentrator.

  19. Strategic Coupling of Advanced Induction Heating with Magnetic Field Processing Technologies Provides Innovative Solutions for Elevated Industries Demands

    SciTech Connect

    Ludtka, Mackiewicz-Ludtka; Pfaffmann, George; Ludtka, Gerard Michael

    2013-01-01

    Industry s relentless pursuit of product performance improvements is now challenging the capability of available/existing Thermal processing technologies, i.e., Heat Treating. In fact, the EPA-mandated requirement for light-weighting vehicles underscores the urgent US need for achieving higher product strength improvements.

  20. Applications of thermal energy storage to process heat and waste heat recovery in the iron and steel industry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Katter, L. B.; Peterson, D. J.

    1978-01-01

    The system identified operates from the primary arc furnace evacuation system as a heat source. Energy from the fume stream is stored as sensible energy in a solid medium (packed bed). A steam-driven turbine is arranged to generate power for peak shaving. A parametric design approach is presented since the overall system design, at optimum payback is strongly dependent upon the nature of the electric pricing structure. The scope of the project was limited to consideration of available technology so that industry-wide application could be achieved by 1985. A search of the literature, coupled with interviews with representatives of major steel producers, served as the means whereby the techniques and technologies indicated for the specific site are extrapolated to the industry as a whole and to the 1985 time frame. The conclusion of the study is that by 1985, a national yearly savings of 1.9 million barrels of oil could be realized through recovery of waste heat from primary arc furnace fume gases on an industry-wide basis. Economic studies indicate that the proposed system has a plant payback time of approximately 5 years.

  1. Process heat in California: Applications and potential for solar energy in the industrial, agricultural and commercial sectors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Barbieri, R. H.; Bartera, R. E.; Davis, E. S.; Hlavka, G. E.; Pivirotto, D. S.; Yanow, G.

    1978-01-01

    A summary of the results of a survey of potential applications of solar energy for supplying process heat requirements in the industrial, agricultural, and commercial sectors of California is presented. Technical, economic, and institutional characteristics of the three sectors are examined. Specific applications for solar energy are then discussed. Finally, implications for California energy policy are discussed along with recommendations for possible actions by the State of California.

  2. Industrial heat pump demonstration project

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1988-09-01

    This booklet describes an industrial heat pump demonstration project conducted at a plant in Norwich, New York. The project required retrofitting an open-cycle heat pump to a single-effect, recirculating-type evaporator. The heat pump design uses an electrically driven centrifugal compressor to recover the latent heat of the water vapor generated by the evaporator. The compressed vapor is returned to the process, where it displaces the use of boiler steam. The goal was to reduce costs associated with operating the evaporator, which is used for reduction the water content of whey (a liquid by-product from cheese production). The retrofit equipment has now completed more than one year of successful operation. Heat pump coefficient of performance has been measured and is in the range of 14 to 18 under varying process conditions. Generalization of project results indicates that the demonstrated technology achieved attractive economics over a wide range of energy price assumptions, especially when the heat pump is applied to larger processes. 5 refs., 17 figs.

  3. Solar energy for process heat: Design/cost studies of four industrial retrofit applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    French, R. L.; Bartera, R. E.

    1978-01-01

    Five specific California plants with potentially attractive solar applications were identified in a process heat survey. These five plants were visited, process requirements evaluated, and conceptual solar system designs were generated. Four DOE (ERDA) sponsored solar energy system demonstration projects were also reviewed and compared to the design/cost cases included in this report. In four of the five cases investigated, retrofit installations providing significant amounts of thermal energy were found to be feasible. The fifth was rejected because of the condition of the building involved, but the process (soap making) appears to be an attractive potential solar application. Costs, however, tend to be high. Several potential areas for cost reduction were identified including larger collector modules and higher duty cycles.

  4. A coal-fired combustion system for industrial process heating applications

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1992-10-30

    This advanced combustion system research program is for the development of innovative coal-fired process heaters which can be used for high temperature melting, smelting and waste vitrification processes. The process heater concepts to be developed are based on advanced glass melting and ore smelting furnaces developed and patented by Vortec Corporation. The process heater systems to be developed have multiple use applications; however, the Phase III research effort is being focused on the development of a process heater system to be used for producing value added vitrified glass products from boiler/incinerator ashesand industrial wastes. ne primary objective of the Phase III project is to develop and integrate all the system components, from fuel through total system controls, and then test the complete system in order toevaluate its potential marketability. During the current reporting period, three preliminary coal-fired tests were successfully completed. These tests used industrial boiler flyash, sewer sludge ash, and waste glass collet as feedstocks. The coal-fired ash vitrification tests are considered near term potential commercial applications of the CMS technology. The waste glass cullet provided necessary dam on the effect of coal firing with respect to vitrified product oxidation state. Engineering and design activities in support of the Phase III proof of concept are continuing, and modifications to the existing test system configuration to allow performance of the proof-of-concept tests are continuing. The economic evaluation of commercial scale CMS processes is continuing. Preliminary designs for 15, 25, 100 and 400 ton/day systems are in progress. This dam will serve as input data to the life cycle cost analysis which will be-an integral part of the CMS commercialization plan.

  5. A coal-fired combustion system for industrial process heating applications

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1993-01-29

    This advanced combustion system research program is for the development of innovative coal-fired process heaters which can be used for high temperature melting, smelting and waste vitrification processes. The process heater concepts to be developed are based on advanced glass melting and ore smelting furnaces developed and patented by Vortec Corporation. The process heater systems to be developed have multiple use applications; however, the Phase III research effort is being focused on the development of a process heater system to be used for producing value added vitrified glass products from boiler/incinerator ashesand industrial wastes. The primary objective of the Phase III project is to develop and integrate all the system components, from fuel through total system controls, and then test the complete system in order to evaluate its potential marketability. During the current reporting period, a majority of the effort was spent relining the separator/reservoir and the cyclone melter. The relinings were completed, the cyclonemelter was reinstalled, and the test system was returned to operational status. The wet ESP was delivered and placed on its foundation. The focus during the upcoming months will be completing the integration ofthe wet ESP and conducting the first industrial proof-of-concept test. The other system modifications are well underway with the designs of the recuperator installation and the batch/coal feed system progressing smoothly. The program is still slightly behind the original schedule but it is anticipated that it will be back on schedule by the end of the year. The commercialization planning is continuing with the identification of seven potential near-term commercial demonstration opportunities.

  6. Precision Heating Process

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1992-01-01

    A heat sealing process was developed by SEBRA based on technology that originated in work with NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory. The project involved connecting and transferring blood and fluids between sterile plastic containers while maintaining a closed system. SEBRA markets the PIRF Process to manufacturers of medical catheters. It is a precisely controlled method of heating thermoplastic materials in a mold to form or weld catheters and other products. The process offers advantages in fast, precise welding or shape forming of catheters as well as applications in a variety of other industries.

  7. A coal-fired combustion system for industrial process heating applications. Quarterly technical progress report, October 1993--December 1993

    SciTech Connect

    1994-01-30

    PETC has implemented a number of advanced combustion research projects that will lead to the establishment of a broad, commercially acceptable engineering data base for the advancement of coal as the fuel of choice for boilers, furnaces, and process heaters. Vortec Corporation`s Phase III development contract DE-AC22-91PC91161 for a {open_quotes}Coal-Fired Combustion System for Industrial Process Heating Applications{close_quotes} is a project funded under the DOE/PETC advanced combustion program. This advanced combustion system research program is for the development of innovative coal-fired process heaters which can be used for high temperature melting, smelting and waste vitrification processes. The process heater systems to be developed have multiple use applications; however, the Phase III research effort is being focused on the development of a process heater system to be used for producing value added vitrified glass products from boiler/incinerator ashes and industrial wastes. The primary objective of the Phase III project is to develop and integrate all the system components, from fuel through total system controls, and then test the complete system in order to evaluate its potential marketability. During the past quarter, the major effort was completing the system modification installation designs, completing the TSCA ash testing, and conducting additional industry funded testing. Final detailed installation designs for the integrated test system configuration are being completed.

  8. A coal-fired combustion system for industrial process heating applications. Quarterly technical progress report, July 1993--September 1993

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1994-01-30

    The Pittsburgh Energy Technology Center (PETC) of the US Department of Energy awarded Vortec Corporation this Phase III contract (No. DE-AC22-91PC91161) for the development of {open_quotes}A Coal-Fired Combustion System for Industrial Process Heating Applications{close_quotes}. The effective contrast start date was September 3, 1991. The contract period of performance is 36 months. This advanced combustion system research program is for the development of innovative coal-fired process heaters which can be used for high temperature melting, smelting and waste vitrification processes. The process heater systems to be developed have multiple use applications; however, the Phase III research effort is being focused on the development of a process heater system to be used for producing value added vitrified glass products from boiler/incinerator ashes and industrial wastes. The primary objective of the Phase III project is to develop and integrate all the system components, from fuel through total system controls, and then test the complete system in order to evaluate its potential marketability. Final detailed installation designs for the integrated test system configuration are being completed. The equipment is being fabricated and deliveries have begun. The industry funded testing consisted of vitrifying Spent Aluminum Potliner (SPL) which is a listed hazardous waste. This testing has verified that SPL can be vitrified into a safe recyclable glass product.

  9. Preliminary definition and characterization of a solar industrial process heat technology and manufacturing plant for the year 2000

    SciTech Connect

    Prythero, T.; Meyer, R. T.

    1980-09-01

    A solar industrial process heat technology and an associated solar systems manufacturing plant for the year 2000 has been projected, defined, and qualitatively characterized. The technology has been defined for process heat applications requiring temperatures of 300/sup 0/C or lower, with emphasis on the 150/sup 0/ to 300/sup 0/C range. The selected solar collector technology is a parabolic trough collector of the line-focusing class. The design, structure, and material components are based upon existing and anticipated future technological developments in the solar industry. The solar system to be manufactured and assembled within a dedicated manufacturing plant is projected to consist of the collector and the major collector components, including reflector, absorber, parabolic trough structure, support stand, tracking drive mechanism, sun-sensing device and control system, couplings, etc. Major manufacturing processes to be introduced into the year 2000 plant operations are glassmaking, silvering, electroplating and plastic-forming. These operations will generate significant environmental residuals not encountered in present-day solar manufacturing plants. Important residuals include chemical vapors, acids, toxic elements (e.g. arsenic), metallic and chemical sludges, fumes from plastics, etc. The location, design, and operations of these sophisticated solar manufacturing plants will have to provide for the management of the environmental residuals.

  10. Heat pipes for industrial waste heat recovery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Merrigan, M. A.

    1981-01-01

    Development work on the high temperature ceramic recuperator at Los Alamos National Laboratory is described and involved material investigations, fabrication methods development, compatibility tests, heat pipe operation, and the modeling of application conditions based on current industrial usage. Solid ceramic heat pipes, ceramic coated refractory pipes, and high-temperature oxide protected metallic pipes are investigated. Economic studies of the use of heat pipe based recuperators in industrial furnaces are conducted and payback periods determined as a function of material, fabrication, and installation cost.

  11. A coal-fired combustion system for industrial process heating applications. Quarterly technical progress report, April 1993--June 1993

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1993-07-30

    Vortec Corporation`s Phase III development contract DE-AC22-91PC91161 for a ``Coal-Fired Combustion System for Industrial Process Heating Applications`` is project funded under the DOE/PETC advanced combustion program. This advanced combustion system research program is for the development of innovative coal-fired process heaters which can be used for high temperature melting, smelting and waste vitrification processes. The process heater systems to be developed have multiple use applications; however, the Phase III research effort is being focused on the development of a process heater system to be used for producing value added vitrified glass products from boiler/incinerator ashes and industrial wastes. The primary objective of the Phase III project is to develop and integrate all the system components, from fuel through total system controls, and then test the complete system in order to evaluate its potential marketability. During the past quarter, the designs of the remaining major components of the integrated system were completed and the equipment was ordered. DOE has elected to modify the scope of the existing R&D program being conducted under this contract to include testing of a simulated TSCA incinerator ash. The modification will be in the form of an additional Task (Task 8 -- TSCA Ash Testing) to the original Statement of Work.

  12. Ceramic heat recuperators for industrial heat recovery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cleveland, J. J.; Gonzalez, J. M.; Kohnken, K. H.; Rebello, W. J.

    1980-08-01

    A cordierite (magnesium aluminum silicate) recuperator was designed for relatively small furnaces with firing rates of 0.3 MM to 0.6 MM Btu/h and with exhaust gas temperatures of 1500 F to 2600 F. Five demonstration programs were performed to determine the heat transfer performance of the device, establish the energy savings by recovery, demonstrate the durability of the ceramic core, determine the operating requirements of the burners and controls with recuperation, and establish the overall system costs and payback period. The recuperator is described and results of tests and measurements, system economics, and cost performance analyses are presented. The methodology is developed and techniques for impact analysis are described. Industrial applications are implied and a process flow diagram for smelting and refining primary copper is shown.

  13. Application of thermal energy storage to process heat recovery in the aluminum industry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mccabe, J.

    1980-01-01

    The economic viability and the institutional compatibility of a district heating system in the city of Bellingham, Washington are assessed and the technical and economic advantages of using thermal energy storage methods are determined.

  14. Enhanced shell-and-tube heat eschangers for the power and process industries. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Bergles, A.E.; Jensen, M.K.; Somerscales, E.F.; Curcio, L.A. Jr.; Trewin, R.R.

    1994-08-01

    Single-tube pool boiling tests were performed with saturated pure refrigerants and binary mixtures of refrigerants. Generally, with pure refrigerants, the High Flux surface performed better at the higher heat fluxes compared to the Turbo-B tube, and both enhanced surfaces performed significantly better than smooth surface. In tests of R-11/R-113 mixtures, the enhanced surfaces had much less degradation in heat transfer coefficient due to mixture effects compared to smooth tubes; the largest degradation occurred at a mixture of 25% R-11/75% R-113. Under boiling in saturated aqueous solution of calcium sulfate, with a single tube, effects of fouling were more pronounced at the higher heat fluxes for all surfaces. Two staggered tube bundles were tested with tube pitch-diameter ratios of 1.17 and 1.50. For the pure refrigerant, tests on the smooth-tube bundle indicated that the effects on the heat transfer coefficient of varying mass flux, quality, and tube-bundle geometry were small, except at low heat fluxes. Neither enhanced surface showed any effect with changing mass flux or quality. The binary mixture bundle-boiling tests had results that were very similar to those obtained with the pure refrigerants. When boiling a refrigerant-oil mixture, all three surfaces (smooth, High Flux, and Turbo-B) experienced a degradation in its heat transfer coefficient; no surface studied was found to be immune or vulnerable to the presence of oil than another surface.

  15. "Nanotechnology Enabled Advanced Industrial Heat Transfer Fluids"

    SciTech Connect

    Dr. Ganesh Skandan; Dr. Amit Singhal; Mr. Kenneth Eberts; Mr. Damian Sobrevilla; Prof. Jerry Shan; Stephen Tse; Toby Rossmann

    2008-06-12

    ABSTRACT Nanotechnology Enabled Advanced industrial Heat Transfer Fluids” Improving the efficiency of Industrial Heat Exchangers offers a great opportunity to improve overall process efficiencies in diverse industries such as pharmaceutical, materials manufacturing and food processing. The higher efficiencies can come in part from improved heat transfer during both cooling and heating of the material being processed. Additionally, there is great interest in enhancing the performance and reducing the weight of heat exchangers used in automotives in order to increase fuel efficiency. The goal of the Phase I program was to develop nanoparticle containing heat transfer fluids (e.g., antifreeze, water, silicone and hydrocarbon-based oils) that are used in transportation and in the chemical industry for heating, cooling and recovering waste heat. Much work has been done to date at investigating the potential use of nanoparticle-enhanced thermal fluids to improve heat transfer in heat exchangers. In most cases the effect in a commercial heat transfer fluid has been marginal at best. In the Phase I work, we demonstrated that the thermal conductivity, and hence heat transfer, of a fluid containing nanoparticles can be dramatically increased when subjected to an external influence. The increase in thermal conductivity was significantly larger than what is predicted by commonly used thermal models for two-phase materials. Additionally, the surface of the nanoparticles was engineered so as to have a minimal influence on the viscosity of the fluid. As a result, a nanoparticle-laden fluid was successfully developed that can lead to enhanced heat transfer in both industrial and automotive heat exchangers

  16. Forging; Heat Treating and Testing; Technically Oriented Industrial Materials and Process 1: 5898.05.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dade County Public Schools, Miami, FL.

    The course provides students with advanced and exploratory experience in the area of plastic deformation of metals and in the changing of the physical characteristics of metals by the controlled application and timed removal of heat. Course content includes goals, specific objectives, safety in forge work, forging tools and equipment, industrial…

  17. A coal-fired combustion system for industrial processing heating applications. Quarterly technical progress report, January 1995--March 1995

    SciTech Connect

    1995-04-01

    PETC has implemented a number of advanced combustion research projects that will lead to the establishment of a broad, commercially acceptable engineering data base for the advancement of coal as the fuel of choice for boilers, furnaces, and process heaters. Vortec Corporation`s Phase III development contract DE-AC22-91PC91161 for a {open_quotes}Coal-Fired Combustion System for Industrial Process Heating Applications{close_quotes} is a project funded under the DOE/PETC advanced combustion program. This advanced combustion system research program is for the development of innovative coal-fired process heaters which can be used for high temperature melting, smelting and waste vitrification processes. The process heater systems to be developed have multiple use applications; however, the Phase III research effort is being focused on the development of a process heater system to be used for producing value added vitrified glass products from boiler/incinerator ashes and industrial wastes. The primary objective of the Phase III project is to develop and integrate all the system components, from fuel through total system controls, and then test the complete system in order to evaluate its potential marketability. The test program consisted of one test run, with a duration of 100 hours at a nominal feed rate of 1000 lbs/hr. Throughout the test, the CMS was fired with coal and a coal by-product (i.e. coal-fired boiler fly ash) as the primary fuels. Natural gas was used as an auxiliary fuel as necessary to provide process trim. The feedstock consisted of a coal-fired utility boiler fly ash and dolomite and produced a stable, fully-reacted vitrified product. The fly ash, supplied by PENELEC, contained between 6 and 12% by weight of carbon because of the low NOx burners on the PENELEC boilers. Therefore, a substantial portion of the required thermal input came from the fly ash.

  18. A coal-fired combustion system for industrial process heating applications. Quarterly technical progress report, April 1992--June 1992

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1992-09-03

    PETC has implemented a number of advanced combustion research projects that will lead to the establishment of a broad, commercially acceptable engineering data base for the advancement of coal as the fuel of choice for boilers, furnaces, and process heaters. Vortec Corporation`s Phase III development contract DE-AC22-91PC91161 for a ``Coal-Fired Combustion System for Industrial Process Heating Applications`` is project funded under the DOE/PETC advanced combustion program. This advanced combustion system research program is for the development of innovative coal-fired process heaters which can be used for high temperature melting, smelling and waste vitrification processes. The process heater concepts to be developed are based on advanced glass melting and ore smelting furnaces developed and patented by Vortec Corporation. The process heater systems to be developed have multiple use applications; however, the Phase III research effort is being focused on the development of a process heater system to be used for producing value added vitrified glass products from boiler/incinerator ashes and industrial wastes. The primary objective of the Phase III project is to develop and integrate all the system components, from fuel through total system controls, and then test the complete system in order to evaluate its potential marketability. During the current reporting period, approval of Vortec`s Environmental Assessment (EA) required under the National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA) was approved. The EA approval cycle took approximately 9 months. The preliminary test program which was being held in abeyance pending approval of the EA was initiated. Six preliminary test runs were successfully competed during the period. Engineering and design activities in support of the Phase III proof of concept are continuing, and modifications to the existing test system configuration to allow performance of the preliminary tests were completed.

  19. Industrial food processing and space heating with geothermal heat. Final report, February 16, 1979-August 31, 1982

    SciTech Connect

    Kunze, J.F.; Marlor, J.K.

    1982-08-01

    A competitive aware for a cost sharing program was made to Madison County, Idaho to share in a program to develop moderate-to-low temperature geothermal energy for the heating of a large junior college, business building, public shcools and other large buildings in Rexburg, Idaho. A 3943 ft deep well was drilled at the edge of Rexburg in a region that had been probed by some shallower test holes. Temperatures measured near the 4000 ft depth were far below what was expected or needed, and drilling was abandoned at that depth. In 1981 attempts were made to restrict downward circulation into the well, but the results of this effort yielded no higher temperatures. The well is a prolific producer of 70/sup 0/F water, and could be used as a domestic water well.

  20. Coal-fired combustion system for industrial process heating applications. Quarterly technical progress report, April 1995--June 1995

    SciTech Connect

    1995-08-01

    PETC has implemented a number of advanced combustion research projects that will lead to the establishment of a broad, commercially acceptable engineering data base for the advancement of coal as the fuel of choice for boilers, furnaces, and process heaters. This includes new installations and those existing installations that were originally designed for oil or gas firing. The data generated by these projects must be sufficient for private-sector decisions on the feasibility of using coal as the fuel of choice. This work should also provide incentives for the private sector to continue and expand the development, demonstration, and application of these combustion systems. Vortec Corporation`s Coal-Fired Combustion System for Industrial Process Heating Applications is being developed under contract DE-AC22-91PC91161 as part of this DOE development program. The current contract represents the third phase of a three-phase development program. Phase I of the program addressed the technical and economic feasibility of the process, and was initiated in 1987 and completed 1989. Phase II was initiated in 1989 and completed in 1990. During Phase II of the development, design improvements were made to critical components and the test program addressed the performance of the process using several different feedstocks. Phase III of the program was initiated September 1991 and is scheduled for completion in 1994. The Phase III research effort is being focused on the development of a process heater system to be used for producing value-added vitrified glass products from boiler/incinerator ashes and selected industrial wastes.

  1. Conceptual design of a solar cogeneration facility industrial process heat, category A. Executive summary

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Joy, P.; Brzeczek, M.; Seilestad, H.; Silverman, C.; Yenetchi, G.

    1981-07-01

    The conceptual design of a central receiver solar cogeneration facility at a California oil field is described. The process of selecting the final cogeneration system configuration is described and the various system level and subsystem level tradeoff studies are presented, including the system configuration study, technology options, and system sizing. The facility is described, and the functional aspects, requirements operational characteristics, and performance are discussed. Capital and operating costs, safety, environmental, regulatory issues and potential limiting considerations for the design are included. Each subsystem is described in detail including a discussion of the functional requirements, design, operating characteristics performance estimates and a top level cost estimate. An economic assessment is performed to determine the near-term economic viability of the project and to examine the impact of variations in major economic parameters such as capital and operating and maintenance costs on economic viability. Two measures of economic viability used are levelized energy cost and net present value.

  2. A coal-fired combustion system for industrial process heating applications. Quarterly technical progress report, October 1994--December 1994

    SciTech Connect

    1995-03-01

    PETC has implemented a number of advanced combustion research projects that will lead to the establishment of a broad, commercially acceptable engineering data base for the advancement of coal as the fuel of choice for boilers, furnaces, and process heaters. Vortec Corporation`s Phase III development contract DE-AC22-91PC91161 for a {open_quotes}Coal-Fired Combustion System for Industrial Process Heating Applications{close_quotes} is a project funded under the DOE/PETC advanced combustion program. This advanced combustion system research program is for the development of innovative coal-fired process heaters which can be used for high temperature melting, smelting and waste vitrification processes. The process heater systems to be developed have multiple use applications; however, the Phase III research effort is being focused on the development of a process heater system to be used for producing value added vitrified glass products from boiler/incinerator ashes and industrial wastes. The primary objective of the Phase III project is to develop and integrate all the system components, from fuel through total system controls, and then test the complete system in order to evaluate its potential marketability. During the past quarter, the major effort was concentrated on conducting the 100 hour demonstration test. The test was successfully conducted from September 12th through the 16th. The test program consisted of one test run, with a duration of 100 hours at a nominal feed rate of 1000 lbs/hr. Throughout the test, the CMS was fired with coal and a coal by-product (i.e. coal-fired boiler flyash) as the primary fuels. Natural gas was used as an auxiliary fuel as necessary to provide process trim. The feedstock consisted of a coal-fired utility boiler flyash and dolomite and produced a stable, fully-reacted vitrified product. The fly ash, supplied by PENELEC, contained between 6 and 12% by weight of carbon because of the low NO{sub x} burners on the PENELEC boilers.

  3. Process Integration Study of the Decatur HFCS Plant for American Fructose Company, Decatur, AL [Advanced Industrial Heat Pump Applications and Evaluations

    SciTech Connect

    Eastwood, A.

    1989-11-10

    This work has carried out in two phases: Phase 1, identification of opportunities for heat pumps in industrial applications and Phase 2; evaluation of heat pumps in industrial applications. In Phase 1, pinch analysis was applied to several industrial sites to identify the best opportunities for heat pumping and other forms of heat integration. In Phase 2, more detailed analyses were undertaken, including the evaluation of a heat pump installed as a recommendation of Phase 1.

  4. Industrial process surveillance system

    DOEpatents

    Gross, K.C.; Wegerich, S.W.; Singer, R.M.; Mott, J.E.

    1998-06-09

    A system and method are disclosed for monitoring an industrial process and/or industrial data source. The system includes generating time varying data from industrial data sources, processing the data to obtain time correlation of the data, determining the range of data, determining learned states of normal operation and using these states to generate expected values, comparing the expected values to current actual values to identify a current state of the process closest to a learned, normal state; generating a set of modeled data, and processing the modeled data to identify a data pattern and generating an alarm upon detecting a deviation from normalcy. 96 figs.

  5. Industrial Process Surveillance System

    DOEpatents

    Gross, Kenneth C.; Wegerich, Stephan W; Singer, Ralph M.; Mott, Jack E.

    2001-01-30

    A system and method for monitoring an industrial process and/or industrial data source. The system includes generating time varying data from industrial data sources, processing the data to obtain time correlation of the data, determining the range of data, determining learned states of normal operation and using these states to generate expected values, comparing the expected values to current actual values to identify a current state of the process closest to a learned, normal state; generating a set of modeled data, and processing the modeled data to identify a data pattern and generating an alarm upon detecting a deviation from normalcy.

  6. Industrial process surveillance system

    DOEpatents

    Gross, Kenneth C.; Wegerich, Stephan W.; Singer, Ralph M.; Mott, Jack E.

    1998-01-01

    A system and method for monitoring an industrial process and/or industrial data source. The system includes generating time varying data from industrial data sources, processing the data to obtain time correlation of the data, determining the range of data, determining learned states of normal operation and using these states to generate expected values, comparing the expected values to current actual values to identify a current state of the process closest to a learned, normal state; generating a set of modeled data, and processing the modeled data to identify a data pattern and generating an alarm upon detecting a deviation from normalcy.

  7. Recovering waste industrial heat efficiently

    SciTech Connect

    Hnat, J.G.; Bartone, L.M.; Cutting, J.C.; Patten, J.S.

    1983-03-01

    Organic Rankine Cycles (ORC's) are being used in the generation of electrical or mechanical power in situations where little demand exists for process steam. Using organic fluids in Rankine cycles improves the potential for economic recovery of waste heat. The right organic fluid can enhance the conversion efficiency by tailoring the ORC heat recovery cycle to the thermodynamic characteristics of the waste heat stream. The selection of the working fluid is affected by its flammability, toxicity, environmental impact, materials compatibility, and cost. Water, ethanol, 2-methyl Pyridine/H2O, Flourinol, Toluene, Freon R-11, and Freon R-113 are compared. An organic cycle using toluene as the working fluid is schematicized.

  8. Antinutritional factors and functionality of protein-rich fractions of industrial guar meal as affected by heat processing.

    PubMed

    Nidhina, N; Muthukumar, S P

    2015-04-15

    Proximate composition analysis and antinutritional factor composition of different fractions of industrial guar meal: raw churi (IRC), heated churi (IHC), final churi (IFC) and guar korma (IGK) were studied and compared. Protein content was found to be very high in IGK (52.7%) when compared to the churi fractions (32-33%) and the trypsin inhibitor activities were found to be negligible in all the fractions (0.58-1.8 mg/g). Single fraction (IGK) was selected for further studies, based on the protein content. The antinutritional factors of selected fractions were significantly reduced by different heat treatments. Heat treatments significantly increased the water absorbing capacity of IGK, but reduced the nitrogen solubility, emulsifying and foaming capacity. Highest L(∗) value was observed for boiled IGK, highest a(∗) and b(∗) values for roasted IGK, during colour measurement. FTIR spectral analysis revealed the presence several aromatic groups in IGK and slight modifications in the molecular structure during heat treatments. PMID:25466107

  9. Commercial/Industrial Heat Loss

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Raugland, Robert C.

    1981-01-01

    Infrared thermography has advanced to the stage where it is feasible for the owners of commercial and industrial buildings to secure an infrared survey to detect and priortize definitive areas of heat loss. The nature of the information required determines the type of infrared equipment to be used. The information obtained from the survey can be recorded on video tape with an audio overlay which is quite definitive and permits easy review by the client. Another area of heat loss is moisture laden roof insulation. An infrared survey can detect with startling accuracy areas of wet insulation. Both of these types of surveys are very compatible with either the mini or maxi audits and are conspicuously useful at the retrofit stages.

  10. High-Efficiency, Cost-effective Thermoelectric Materials/Devices for Industrial Process Refrigeration and Waste Heat Recovery, STTR Phase II Final Report

    SciTech Connect

    Lin, Timothy

    2011-01-07

    This is the final report of DoE STTR Phase II project, “High-efficiency, Cost-effective Thermoelectric Materials/Devices for Industrial Process Refrigeration and Waste Heat Recovery”. The objective of this STTR project is to develop a cost-effective processing approach to produce bulk high-performance thermoelectric (TE) nanocomposites, which will enable the development of high-power, high-power-density TE modulus for waste heat recovery and industrial refrigeration. The use of this nanocomposite into TE modules are expected to bring about significant technical benefits in TE systems (e.g. enhanced energy efficiency, smaller sizes and light weight). The successful development and applications of such nanocomposite and the resultant TE modules can lead to reducing energy consumption and environmental impacts, and creating new economic development opportunities.

  11. Thermal energy storage for industrial waste heat recovery

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hoffman, H. W.; Kedl, R. J.; Duscha, R. A.

    1978-01-01

    Thermal energy storage systems designed for energy conservation through the recovery, storage, and reuse of industrial process waste heat are reviewed. Consideration is given to systems developed for primary aluminum, cement, the food processing industry, paper and pulp, and primary iron and steel. Projected waste-heat recovery and energy savings are listed for each category.

  12. A coal-fired combustion system for industrial process heating applications. Quarterly technical progress report, July 1993--September 1993

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1993-10-30

    This advanced combustion system research program is for the development of innovative coal-fired process heaters which can be used for high temperature melting, smelting and waste vitrification processes. The process heater systems to be developed have multiple use applications; however, the Phase 3 research effort is being focused on the development of a process heater system to be used for producing value added vitrified glass products from boiler/incinerator ashes and industrial wastes. The primary objective of the Phase 3 project is to develop and integrate all the system components, from fuel through total system controls, and then test the complete system in order to evaluate its potential marketability. During the past quarter, the major effort was completing some of the system modification installation designs, completing industry funded testing, developing a surrogate TSCA ash composition, and completing the TSCA ash Test Plan. The installation designs will be used for the equipment modifications planned for the end of CY 93. The industry funded testing consisted of vitrifying Spent Aluminum Potliner (SPL) which is a listed hazardous waste. This testing has verified that SPL can be vitrified into a safe, recyclable glass product. Some results from this testing are provided in Section 2.2.1. The surrogate TSCA ash composition was developed with input from various DOE laboratories and subcontractors. The surrogate ash consists of a mixture of MSW fly ash and bottom ash spiked with heavy metal contaminants. The levels of metal additives are sufficient to ascertain the partitioning of the contaminants between the glass and effluent flow streams. Details of the surrogate composition and the planned testing is provided in Section 4.2.2.

  13. A coal-fired combustion system for industrial process heating applications. Quarterly technical progress report, July 1992--September 1992

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1992-10-30

    This advanced combustion system research program is for the development of innovative coal-fired process heaters which can be used for high temperature melting, smelting and waste vitrification processes. The process heater concepts to be developed are based on advanced glass melting and ore smelting furnaces developed and patented by Vortec Corporation. The process heater systems to be developed have multiple use applications; however, the Phase III research effort is being focused on the development of a process heater system to be used for producing value added vitrified glass products from boiler/incinerator ashesand industrial wastes. ne primary objective of the Phase III project is to develop and integrate all the system components, from fuel through total system controls, and then test the complete system in order toevaluate its potential marketability. During the current reporting period, three preliminary coal-fired tests were successfully completed. These tests used industrial boiler flyash, sewer sludge ash, and waste glass collet as feedstocks. The coal-fired ash vitrification tests are considered near term potential commercial applications of the CMS technology. The waste glass cullet provided necessary dam on the effect of coal firing with respect to vitrified product oxidation state. Engineering and design activities in support of the Phase III proof of concept are continuing, and modifications to the existing test system configuration to allow performance of the proof-of-concept tests are continuing. The economic evaluation of commercial scale CMS processes is continuing. Preliminary designs for 15, 25, 100 and 400 ton/day systems are in progress. This dam will serve as input data to the life cycle cost analysis which will be-an integral part of the CMS commercialization plan.

  14. A coal-fired combustion system for industrial process heating applications. Quarterly technical progress report, October 1992--December 1992

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1993-01-29

    This advanced combustion system research program is for the development of innovative coal-fired process heaters which can be used for high temperature melting, smelting and waste vitrification processes. The process heater concepts to be developed are based on advanced glass melting and ore smelting furnaces developed and patented by Vortec Corporation. The process heater systems to be developed have multiple use applications; however, the Phase III research effort is being focused on the development of a process heater system to be used for producing value added vitrified glass products from boiler/incinerator ashesand industrial wastes. The primary objective of the Phase III project is to develop and integrate all the system components, from fuel through total system controls, and then test the complete system in order to evaluate its potential marketability. During the current reporting period, a majority of the effort was spent relining the separator/reservoir and the cyclone melter. The relinings were completed, the cyclonemelter was reinstalled, and the test system was returned to operational status. The wet ESP was delivered and placed on its foundation. The focus during the upcoming months will be completing the integration ofthe wet ESP and conducting the first industrial proof-of-concept test. The other system modifications are well underway with the designs of the recuperator installation and the batch/coal feed system progressing smoothly. The program is still slightly behind the original schedule but it is anticipated that it will be back on schedule by the end of the year. The commercialization planning is continuing with the identification of seven potential near-term commercial demonstration opportunities.

  15. EDITORIAL: Industrial Process Tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anton Johansen, Geir; Wang, Mi

    2008-09-01

    There has been tremendous development within measurement science and technology over the past couple of decades. New sensor technologies and compact versatile signal recovery electronics are continuously expanding the limits of what can be measured and the accuracy with which this can be done. Miniaturization of sensors and the use of nanotechnology push these limits further. Also, thanks to powerful and cost-effective computer systems, sophisticated measurement and reconstruction algorithms previously only accessible in advanced laboratories are now available for in situ online measurement systems. The process industries increasingly require more process-related information, motivated by key issues such as improved process control, process utilization and process yields, ultimately driven by cost-effectiveness, quality assurance, environmental and safety demands. Industrial process tomography methods have taken advantage of the general progress in measurement science, and aim at providing more information, both quantitatively and qualitatively, on multiphase systems and their dynamics. The typical approach for such systems has been to carry out one local or bulk measurement and assume that this is representative of the whole system. In some cases, this is sufficient. However, there are many complex systems where the component distribution varies continuously and often unpredictably in space and time. The foundation of industrial tomography is to conduct several measurements around the periphery of a multiphase process, and use these measurements to unravel the cross-sectional distribution of the process components in time and space. This information is used in the design and optimization of industrial processes and process equipment, and also to improve the accuracy of multiphase system measurements in general. In this issue we are proud to present a selection of the 145 papers presented at the 5th World Congress on Industrial Process Tomography in Bergen

  16. Innovative industrial materials processes

    SciTech Connect

    Hane, G.; Abarcar, R.; Hauser, S.G.; Williams, T.A.

    1983-08-01

    This paper reviews innovative industrial materials processes that have the potential for significant improvements in energy use, yet require long-term research to achieve that potential. Potential revolutionary alternatives are reviewed for the following industries: iron and steel; aluminum; petroleum refining; paper and pulp; food and kindred products; stone, clay and glass; textiles; and chemicals. In total, 45 candidate processes were identified. Examples of these processes include direct steelmaking and ore-to-powder systems that potentially require 30% and 40% less energy, respectively, than conventional steelmaking systems; membrane separations and freeze crystallization that offer up to 90% reductions in energy use when compared with distillation; cold processing of cement that offers a 50% reduction in energy requirements; and dry forming of paper that offers a 25% reduction in the energy needed for papermaking.

  17. Phase Change Heat Transfer Device for Process Heat Applications

    SciTech Connect

    Piyush Sabharwall; Mike Patterson; Vivek Utgikar; Fred Gunnerson

    2010-10-01

    The next generation nuclear plant (NGNP) will most likely produce electricity and process heat, with both being considered for hydrogen production. To capture nuclear process heat, and transport it to a distant industrial facility requires a high temperature system of heat exchangers, pumps and/or compressors. The heat transfer system is particularly challenging not only due to the elevated temperatures (up to approx.1300 K) and industrial scale power transport (=50MW), but also due to a potentially large separation distance between the nuclear and industrial plants (100+m) dictated by safety and licensing mandates. The work reported here is the preliminary analysis of two-phase thermosyphon heat transfer performance with alkali metals. A thermosyphon is a thermal device for transporting heat from one point to another with quite extraordinary properties. In contrast to single-phased forced convective heat transfer via ‘pumping a fluid’, a thermosyphon (also called a wickless heat pipe) transfers heat through the vaporization/condensing process. The condensate is further returned to the hot source by gravity, i.e., without any requirement of pumps or compressors. With this mode of heat transfer, the thermosyphon has the capability to transport heat at high rates over appreciable distances, virtually isothermally and without any requirement for external pumping devices. Two-phase heat transfer by a thermosyphon has the advantage of high enthalpy transport that includes the sensible heat of the liquid, the latent heat of vaporization, and vapor superheat. In contrast, single-phase forced convection transports only the sensible heat of the fluid. Additionally, vapor-phase velocities within a thermosyphon are much greater than single-phase liquid velocities within a forced convective loop. Thermosyphon performance can be limited by the sonic limit (choking) of vapor flow and/or by condensate entrainment. Proper thermosyphon requires analysis of both.

  18. EDITORIAL: Industrial Process Tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    West, Robert M.

    2004-07-01

    Industrial process tomography remains a multidisciplinary field with considerable interest for many varied participants. Indeed this adds greatly to its appeal. It is a pleasure and a privilege to once again act as guest editor for a special feature issue of Measurement Science and Technology on industrial process tomography, the last being in December 2002. Those involved in the subject appreciate the efforts of Measurement Science and Technology in producing another issue and I thank the journal on their behalf. It can be seen that there are considerable differences in the composition of material covered in this issue compared with previous publications. The dominance of electrical impedance and electrical capacitance techniques is reduced and there is increased emphasis on general utility of tomographic methods. This is encompassed in the papers of Hoyle and Jia (visualization) and Dierick et al (Octopus). Electrical capacitance tomography has been a core modality for industrial applications. This issue includes new work in two very interesting aspects of image reconstruction: pattern matching (Takei and Saito) and simulated annealing (Ortiz-Aleman et al). It is important to take advantage of knowledge of the process such as the presence of only two components, and then to have robust reconstruction methods provided by pattern matching and by simulated annealing. Although crude reconstruction methods such as approximation by linear back projection were utilized for initial work on electrical impedance tomography, the techniques published here are much more advanced. The paper by Kim et al includes modelling of a two-component system permitting an adaption-related approach; the paper by Tossavainen et al models free surface boundaries to enable the estimation of shapes of objects within the target. There are clear improvements on the previous crude and blurred reconstructions where boundaries were merely inferred rather than estimated as in these new developments

  19. Microwave heating: Industrial applications. (Latest citations from the NTIS bibliographic database). Published Search

    SciTech Connect

    1995-12-01

    The bibliography contains citations concerning industrial uses and design of microwave heating equipment. Included are heating and drying of paper, industrial process heat, vulcanization, textile processing, metallurgical heat for sintering and ceramic manufacturing, food processing, and curing of polymers.(Contains 50-250 citations and includes a subject term index and title list.) (Copyright NERAC, Inc. 1995)

  20. Rapid assessment of bovine spongiform encephalopathy prion inactivation by heat treatment in yellow grease produced in the industrial manufacturing process of meat and bone meals

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Prions, infectious agents associated with transmissible spongiform encephalopathy, are primarily composed of the misfolded and pathogenic form (PrPSc) of the host-encoded prion protein. Because PrPSc retains infectivity after undergoing routine sterilizing processes, the cause of bovine spongiform encephalopathy (BSE) outbreaks are suspected to be feeding cattle meat and bone meals (MBMs) contaminated with the prion. To assess the validity of prion inactivation by heat treatment in yellow grease, which is produced in the industrial manufacturing process of MBMs, we pooled, homogenized, and heat treated the spinal cords of BSE-infected cows under various experimental conditions. Results Prion inactivation was analyzed quantitatively in terms of the infectivity and PrPSc of the treated samples. Following treatment at 140°C for 1 h, infectivity was reduced to 1/35 of that of the untreated samples. Treatment at 180°C for 3 h was required to reduce infectivity. However, PrPSc was detected in all heat-treated samples by using the protein misfolding cyclic amplification (PMCA) technique, which amplifies PrPScin vitro. Quantitative analysis of the inactivation efficiency of BSE PrPSc was possible with the introduction of the PMCA50, which is the dilution ratio of 10% homogenate needed to yield 50% positivity for PrPSc in amplified samples. Conclusions Log PMCA50 exhibited a strong linear correlation with the transmission rate in the bioassay; infectivity was no longer detected when the log PMCA50 of the inoculated sample was reduced to 1.75. The quantitative PMCA assay may be useful for safety evaluation for recycling and effective utilization of MBMs as an organic resource. PMID:23835086

  1. Boost Process Heating Efficiency - PHAST

    SciTech Connect

    2005-05-01

    Use the Process Heating Assessment and Survey Tool (PHAST) to survey all process heating equipment within a facility, select the equipment that uses the most energy, and identify ways to increase efficiency.

  2. The development of a coal-fired combustion system for industrial process heating applications. Quarterly technical progress report, January 1992--March 1992

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1992-07-16

    PETC has implemented a number of advanced combustion research projects that will lead to the establishment of a broad, commercially acceptable engineering data base for the advancement of coal as the fuel of choice for boilers, furnaces, and process heaters. Vortec Corporation`s Coal-Fired Combustion System for Industrial Process Heating Applications has been selected for Phase III development under contract DE-AC22-91PC91161. This advanced combustion system research program is for the development of innovative coal-fired process heaters which can be used for high temperature melting, smelting, recycling, and refining processes. The process heater concepts to be developed are based on advanced glass melting and ore smelting furnaces developed and patented by Vortec Corporation. The process heater systems to be developed have multiple use applications; however, the Phase HI research effort is being focused on the development of a process heater system to be used for producing glass frits and wool fiber from boiler and incinerator ashes. The primary objective of the Phase III project is to develop and integrate all the system components, from fuel through total system controls, and then test the complete system in order to evaluate its potential marketability. The economic evaluation of commercial scale CMS processes has begun. In order to accurately estimate the cost of the primary process vessels, preliminary designs for 25, 50, and 100 ton/day systems have been started under Task 1. This data will serve as input data for life cycle cost analysis performed as part of techno-economic evaluations. The economic evaluations of commercial CMS systems will be an integral part of the commercialization plan.

  3. Heat distribution ceramic processing method

    DOEpatents

    Tiegs, Terry N.; Kiggans, Jr., James O.

    2001-01-01

    A multi-layered heat distributor system is provided for use in a microwave process. The multi-layered heat distributors includes a first inner layer of a high thermal conductivity heat distributor material, a middle insulating layer and an optional third insulating outer layer. The multi-layered heat distributor system is placed around the ceramic composition or article to be processed and located in a microwave heating system. Sufficient microwave energy is applied to provide a high density, unflawed ceramic product.

  4. Industrial Applications of Image Processing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ciora, Radu Adrian; Simion, Carmen Mihaela

    2014-11-01

    The recent advances in sensors quality and processing power provide us with excellent tools for designing more complex image processing and pattern recognition tasks. In this paper we review the existing applications of image processing and pattern recognition in industrial engineering. First we define the role of vision in an industrial. Then a dissemination of some image processing techniques, feature extraction, object recognition and industrial robotic guidance is presented. Moreover, examples of implementations of such techniques in industry are presented. Such implementations include automated visual inspection, process control, part identification, robots control. Finally, we present some conclusions regarding the investigated topics and directions for future investigation

  5. Applications of thermal energy storage to process heat storage and recovery in the paper and pulp industry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Carr, J. H.; Hurley, P. J.; Martin, P. J.

    1978-01-01

    Applications of Thermal Energy Storage (TES) in a paper and pulp mill power house were studied as one approach to the transfer of steam production from fossil fuel boilers to waste fuel of (hog fuel) boilers. Data from specific mills were analyzed, and various TES concepts evaluated for application in the process steam supply system. Constant pressure and variable pressure steam accumulators were found to be the most attractive storage concepts for this application.

  6. Advanced technology options for industrial heating equipment research

    SciTech Connect

    Jain, R.C.

    1992-10-01

    This document presents a strategy for a comprehensive program plan that is applicable to the Combustion Equipment Program of the DOE Office of Industrial Technologies (the program). The program seeks to develop improved heating equipment and advanced control techniques which, by improvements in combustion and beat transfer, will increase energy-use efficiency and productivity in industrial processes and allow the preferred use of abundant, low grade and waste domestic fuels. While the plan development strategy endeavors to be consistent with the programmatic goals and policies of the office, it is primarily governed by the needs and concerns of the US heating equipment industry. The program, by nature, focuses on energy intensive industrial processes. According to the DOE Manufacturing Energy Consumption Survey (MECS), the industrial sector in the US consumed about 21 quads of energy in 1988 in the form of coal, petroleum, natural gas and electricity. This energy was used as fuels for industrial boilers and furnaces, for agricultural uses, for construction, as feedstocks for chemicals and plastics, and for steel, mining, motors, engines and other industrial use over 75 percent of this energy was consumed to provide heat and power for manufacturing industries. The largest consumers of fuel energy were the primary metals, chemical and allied products, paper and allied products, and stone, clay and glass industry groups which accounted for about 60% of the total fuel energy consumed by the US manufacturing sector.

  7. WASTE HEAT RECOVERY POTENTIAL IN SELECTED INDUSTRIES

    EPA Science Inventory

    The research project was initiated with the overall objective of identifying the points, qualities, and quantities, of waste heat discharged to the environment by energy intensive industries and emerging technologies for energy development. These data may then be utilized to eval...

  8. Industrial processes influenced by gravity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ostrach, Simon

    1988-01-01

    In considering new directions for low gravity research with particular regard to broadening the number and types of industrial involvements, it is noted that transport phenomena play a vital role in diverse processes in the chemical, pharmaceutical, food, and biotech industries. Relatively little attention has been given to the role of gravity in such processes. Accordingly, numerous industrial processes and phenomena are identified which involve gravity and/or surface tension forces. Phase separations and mixing are examples that will be significantly different in low gravity conditions. A basis is presented for expanding the scope of the low gravity research program and the potential benefits of such research is indicated.

  9. The Potential of Thermophotovoltaic Heat Recovery for the Glass Industry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bauer, T.; Forbes, I.; Penlington, R.; Pearsall, N.

    2003-01-01

    This paper aims to provide an overview of heat recovery by thermophotovoltaics (TPV) from industrial high-temperature processes and uses the glass industry in the UK as an example. The work is part of a study of potential industrial applications of TPV in the UK being carried out by the Northumbria Photovoltaics Applications Centre. The paper reviews the relevant facts about TPV technology and the glass industry and identifies locations of use for TPV. These are assessed in terms of glass sector, furnace type, process temperature, impact on the existing process, power scale and development effort of TPV. Knowledge of these factors should contribute to the design of an optimum TPV system. The paper estimates possible energy savings and reductions of CO2 emissions using TPV in the glass industry.

  10. Electronic waste disassembly with industrial waste heat.

    PubMed

    Chen, Mengjun; Wang, Jianbo; Chen, Haiyian; Ogunseitan, Oladele A; Zhang, Mingxin; Zang, Hongbin; Hu, Jiukun

    2013-01-01

    Waste printed circuit boards (WPCBs) are resource-rich but hazardous, demanding innovative strategies for post-consumer collection, recycling, and mining for economically precious constituents. A novel technology for disassembling electronic components from WPCBs is proposed, using hot air to melt solders and to separate the components and base boards. An automatic heated-air disassembling equipment was designed to operate at a heating source temperature at a maximum of 260 °C and an inlet pressure of 0.5 MPa. A total of 13 individual WPCBs were subjected to disassembling tests at different preheat temperatures in increments of 20 °C between 80 and 160 °C, heating source temperatures ranging from 220 to 300 °C in increments of 20 °C, and incubation periods of 1, 2, 4, 6, or 8 min. For each experimental treatment, the disassembly efficiency was calculated as the ratio of electronic components released from the board to the total number of its original components. The optimal preheat temperature, heating source temperature, and incubation period to disassemble intact components were 120 °C, 260 °C, and 2 min, respectively. The disassembly rate of small surface mount components (side length ≤ 3 mm) was 40-50% lower than that of other surface mount components and pin through hole components. On the basis of these results, a reproducible and sustainable industrial ecological protocol using steam produced by industrial exhaust heat coupled to electronic-waste recycling is proposed, providing an efficient, promising, and green method for both electronic component recovery and industrial exhaust heat reutilization. PMID:24073987

  11. GUIDES TO POLLUTION PREVENTION: METAL CASTING AND HEAT TREATING INDUSTRY

    EPA Science Inventory

    This guide provides an overview of the major waste generating process of metal casting and heat treating operations and presents options for reducing this waste through source reduction and recycling. ost waste generated by the metal casting, or foundry, industry is from melting ...

  12. Microwave heating: Industrial applications. (Latest citations from the EI Compendex*plus database). Published Search

    SciTech Connect

    1996-04-01

    The bibliography contains citations concerning industrial uses and design of microwave heating equipment. Citations discuss applications in food processing, industrial heating, vulcanization, textile finishing, metallurgical sintering, ceramic manufacturing, paper industries, and curing of polymers. (Contains 50-250 citations and includes a subject term index and title list.) (Copyright NERAC, Inc. 1995)

  13. Microwave heating: Industrial applications. September 1986-September 1989 (Citations from the COMPENDEX data base). Report for September 1986-September 1989

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1989-10-01

    This bibliography contains citations concerning industrial uses and design of microwave heating equipment. Included are heating and drying of paper, industrial process heat, vulcanization, textile processing, metallurgical heat for sintering and ceramic manufacturing, food processing, and curing of polymers. (This updated bibliography contains 116 citations, 11 of which are new entries to the previous edition.)

  14. Effects of steam pretreatment and co-production with ethanol on the energy efficiency and process economics of combined biogas, heat and electricity production from industrial hemp

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background The study presented here has used the commercial flow sheeting program Aspen Plus™ to evaluate techno-economic aspects of large-scale hemp-based processes for producing transportation fuels. The co-production of biogas, district heat and power from chopped and steam-pretreated hemp, and the co-production of ethanol, biogas, heat and power from steam-pretreated hemp were analysed. The analyses include assessments of heat demand, energy efficiency and process economics in terms of annual cash flows and minimum biogas and ethanol selling prices (MBSP and MESP). Results Producing biogas, heat and power from chopped hemp has the highest overall energy efficiency, 84% of the theoretical maximum (based on lower heating values), providing that the maximum capacity of district heat is delivered. The combined production of ethanol, biogas, heat and power has the highest energy efficiency (49%) if district heat is not produced. Neither the inclusion of steam pretreatment nor co-production with ethanol has a large impact on the MBSP. Ethanol is more expensive to produce than biogas is, but this is compensated for by its higher market price. None of the scenarios examined are economically viable, since the MBSP (EUR 103–128 per MWh) is higher than the market price of biogas (EUR 67 per MWh). The largest contribution to the cost is the cost of feedstock. Decreasing the retention time in the biogas process for low solids streams by partly replacing continuous stirred tank reactors by high-rate bioreactors decreases the MBSP. Also, recycling part of the liquid from the effluent from anaerobic digestion decreases the MBSP. The production and prices of methane and ethanol influence the process economics more than the production and prices of electricity and district heat. Conclusions To reduce the production cost of ethanol and biogas from biomass, the use of feedstocks that are cheaper than hemp, give higher output of ethanol and biogas, or combined production with

  15. Thermal energy storage for industrial waste heat recovery

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hoffman, H. W.; Kedl, R. J.; Duscha, R. A.

    1978-01-01

    The potential is examined for waste heat recovery and reuse through thermal energy storage in five specific industrial categories: (1) primary aluminum, (2) cement, (3) food processing, (4) paper and pulp, and (5) iron and steel. Preliminary results from Phase 1 feasibility studies suggest energy savings through fossil fuel displacement approaching 0.1 quad/yr in the 1985 period. Early implementation of recovery technologies with minimal development appears likely in the food processing and paper and pulp industries; development of the other three categories, though equally desirable, will probably require a greater investment in time and dollars.

  16. Effects of Industrial Heating Processes of Milk-Based Enteral Formulas on Site-Specific Protein Modifications and Their Relationship to in Vitro and in Vivo Protein Digestibility.

    PubMed

    Wada, Yasuaki; Lönnerdal, Bo

    2015-08-01

    Heat treatments are applied to milk and dairy products to ensure their microbiological safety and shelf lives. Types of heating processes may have different effects on protein modifications, leading to different protein digestibility. In this study, milk-based liquid nutritional formulas (simulating enteral formulas) were subjected to steam injection ultra-high-temperature treatment or in-can sterilization, and the formulas were investigated by proteomic methods and in vitro and in vivo digestion assays. Proteomic analyses revealed that in-can sterilization resulted in higher signals for N(ε)-carboxymethyllysine and dephosphorylation of Ser residues in major milk proteins than in steam-injected formula, reflecting the more severe thermal process of in-can sterilization. In vitro and in vivo digestion assays indicated that steam injection improved protein digestibility, supposedly by denaturation, while the improvement seemed to be overwhelmed by formation of aggregates that showed resistance to digestion in in-can sterilized formula. Adverse effects of heat treatment on protein digestibility are more likely to be manifested in milk-based formulas than in cow's milk. Although the differences might be of limited significance in terms of amino acid bioavailability, these results emphasize the importance of protein quality of raw materials and selection of heating processes. PMID:26161498

  17. INDUSTRIAL PROCESS PROFILES FOR ENVIRONMENTAL USE: CHAPTER 26. TITANIUM INDUSTRY

    EPA Science Inventory

    The titanium industry produces two principal products, titanium metal and titanium dioxide. For purposes of analyses, therefore, the industry is considered in two segments: titanium metal production and titanium dioxide production. Two industrial process flow diagrams and eleven ...

  18. New industrial heat pump applications to textile production

    SciTech Connect

    1990-12-01

    Application of pinch technology to the US industries in an early screening study has identified potential for heat pumps in several standard processes such as distillation and drying processes. Due to lack process information, the previous study was not able to draw any definite conclusion concerning the heat pump application potential in textile process. However, the commonly encountered drying process in the finishing section of textile plant has been shown to create opportunities for heat pump placement. The site selected for this study is a textile plant in North Carolina and the participating utility is Duke Power Company. The objective of this study is to further identify the energy savings potential through advanced heat pumps and other energy conservation methods developed in the context of pinch technology. The key findings of this study are as follows. The previously unrecoverable waste heat from the exhaust air can now be reclaimed through a spray type air washer and heat pump system. The recommended heat pump system recovers heat from the looper exhaust and use it to preheat the air in the gas tenter. A reduction of 50% of the gas consumption in the tenter can be achieved. The removal of lint from the exhaust air reduced the potential of air pollution. The collected lint can be burned in the boiler as a supplemental fuel source to reduce the fuel consumption in the plant. With fuel price predicted to go up and electricity price remain relatively stable in the future, the heat pump system can payback in less than three years. 15 figs., 4 tabs.

  19. Waste heat driven absorption refrigeration process and system

    DOEpatents

    Wilkinson, William H.

    1982-01-01

    Absorption cycle refrigeration processes and systems are provided which are driven by the sensible waste heat available from industrial processes and other sources. Systems are disclosed which provide a chilled water output which can be used for comfort conditioning or the like which utilize heat from sensible waste heat sources at temperatures of less than 170.degree. F. Countercurrent flow equipment is also provided to increase the efficiency of the systems and increase the utilization of available heat.

  20. Air pollution control and heat recovery system for industrial ovens

    SciTech Connect

    Jamaluddin, A.A.

    1980-12-30

    A system of air pollution control and heat recovery is provided for an arrangement of industrial ovens, especially for drum manufacture. A plurality of paint bake ovens of various capacities, lengths and heat input are provided for multi-stage processing in the manufacture of drums and lids therefor. A supply of high temperature water is provided for multi-stage cleaning and rinsing in the manufacturing operation. The combined exhaust from the oven is preheated in a heat exchanger and then all of the combustible components are burnt off by passing through the flames of an incinerator grid burner. The effluent from the burner first passes through the heat exchanger to preheat said oven exhaust gases and then through hot water coils to provide all of the necessary hot water for the system. High pressure hot water (275/sup 0/) is provided in this heat exchange operation. The hot gasses from the last heat exchanger, completely free of combustible contaminates, are mixed with fresh air to supply hot air for the dryers used in the process. There is a substantially complete recovery of heat and the gasses discharged to atmosphere meet air quality standards.

  1. New industrial heat pump applications to cheese production

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1990-04-01

    A energy cost reduction of the Sorrento Cheese Co. Inc. cheese/whey powder process has been completed. Of Particular interest were the opportunities for utilizing heat pumps for energy cost reduction or other profit improving uses. Pinch Technology was used to identify heat recovery, heat pumping, process modification and congeneration options. Pinch Technology provides a thermodynamically consistent base from which the relative merits of competing cost reduction options can be assessed. The study identified heat recovery opportunities which could save $198,000/yr at an over all payback of 26 months. Individual project paybacks range from 18 to 36 months. The use of heat pumps in the form of MVR and TVR evaporators is well established in the dairy industry. For this process, which already incorporates a TVR evaporator, no additional cost effective opportunities for utilizing heat pumps were identified. It is felt that the results obtained in this study are applicable to other cheese/whey powder manufacturing sits. This study, and others, indicate that reductions in thermal energy consumption of 10--15% can be expected. Also the use of MVR and TVR evaporators is appropriate. 10 figs., 1 tab.

  2. Management of heat stress in the livestock industry

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Heat stress costs the animal industry over $1.7 billion annually. Annual losses average $369 million in the beef cattle industry and $299 million in the swine industry. The impacts of a single heat stress event on individual animals are quite varied. Brief events often cause little or no effect. ...

  3. Engineering Scoping Study of Thermoelectric Generator Systems for Industrial Waste Heat Recovery

    SciTech Connect

    Hendricks, Terry; Choate, William T.

    2006-11-01

    This report evaluates thermoelectric generator (TEG) systems with the intent to: 1) examine industrial processes in order to identify and quantify industrial waste heat sources that could potentially use TEGs; 2) describe the operating environment that a TEG would encounter in selected industrial processes and quantify the anticipated TEG system performance; 3) identify cost, design and/or engineering performance requirements that will be needed for TEGs to operate in the selected industrial processes; and 4) identify the research, development and deployment needed to overcome the limitations that discourage the development and use of TEGs for recovery of industrial waste heat.

  4. Monitoring the Surface Heat Island (shi) Effects of Industrial Enterprises

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Şekertekin, A.; Kutoglu, Ş. H.; Kaya, S.; Marangoz, A. M.

    2016-06-01

    The aim of this study is to present the effects of industrial enterprises on Land Surface Temperature (LST) and to retrieve Surface Heat Island (SHI) maps of these regions. SHI is one of the types of Urban Heat Island (UHI) and as the urban areas grow in a city, UHI effect becomes bigger. The city centre of Zonguldak was chosen as study area and Landsat 5 satellite data were used as materials. Zonguldak has important industrial enterprises like thermal power plants and iron and steel plant. ERDEMIR is the biggest iron and steel plant in Turkey and it is one of the biggest ones in Europe, as well. There are three operating thermal power plants in the region namely CATES, ZETES1 and ZETES2. In order to investigate these industrial regions, Landsat 5 satellite data were processed using mono-window algorithm to retrieve LST and they were acquired on 11.09.1987, 18.09.2007 and 29.09.2011, respectively. The obtained results revealed that from 1987 to 2011, spatial and temporal variability in LST in industrial enterprises became higher than the surroundings. Besides, the sizes of SHIs in 2011 are bigger than the ones in 1987. For the countries and governments, having industrial enterprises is crucial for the development and it is also important to present the community better conditions in life. Thus, decision makers should consider mitigating the effects of these regions on LST.

  5. Industrialization of the ion plating process

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Spalvins, T.

    1976-01-01

    A new process referred to as ion plating by induction heating (IPIH) is described, which combines the advantages of both ion plating and induction heating. The IPIH apparatus consists of the specimen (cathode) to be coated and the evaporation heating source, which is a ceramic crucible containing the metal to be heated. The specimen is an internal part of the high-voltage ceramic-metal vacuum feedthrough and is connected to the negative terminal of the high-voltage power supply, the positive terminal of the power supply being grounded. The plating conditions are the same as those most commonly used in industrial ion plating. A number of metals - such as nickel, iron, platinum - which were practically impossible to deposit by resistance heating evaporation can now be effectively evaporated and deposited to any desired thickness. Excellent adherence is observed for many metals deposited on various metal surfaces in thicknesses from 0.15 to 50 microns, regardless of the materials selected for coating and substrate.

  6. Vision Systems Illuminate Industrial Processes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2013-01-01

    When NASA designs a spacecraft to undertake a new mission, innovation does not stop after the design phase. In many cases, these spacecraft are firsts of their kind, requiring not only remarkable imagination and expertise in their conception but new technologies and methods for their manufacture. In the realm of manufacturing, NASA has from necessity worked on the cutting-edge, seeking new techniques and materials for creating unprecedented structures, as well as capabilities for reducing the cost and increasing the efficiency of existing manufacturing technologies. From friction stir welding enhancements (Spinoff 2009) to thermoset composites (Spinoff 2011), NASA s innovations in manufacturing have often transferred to the public in ways that enable the expansion of the Nation s industrial productivity. NASA has long pursued ways of improving upon and ensuring quality results from manufacturing processes ranging from arc welding to thermal coating applications. But many of these processes generate blinding light (hence the need for special eyewear during welding) that obscures the process while it is happening, making it difficult to monitor and evaluate. In the 1980s, NASA partnered with a company to develop technology to address this issue. Today, that collaboration has spawned multiple commercial products that not only support effective manufacturing for private industry but also may support NASA in the use of an exciting, rapidly growing field of manufacturing ideal for long-duration space missions.

  7. Waste heat recovery: Textile industry. (Latest citations from World Textile Abstracts database). Published Search

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1993-08-01

    The bibliography contains citations concerning descriptions and evaluations of waste heat recovery operations used in the textile industry. Heat recovery and utilization from wastewater streams, flue gas, finishing processes, dyeing operations, and air jet systems are presented. The use of waste heat for space heating and process preheating is considered. (Contains a minimum of 162 citations and includes a subject term index and title list.)

  8. Development of a coal-fired combustion system for industrial process heating applications. Phase 3 final report, November 1992--December 1994

    SciTech Connect

    1995-09-26

    A three phase research and development program has resulted in the development and commercialization of a Cyclone Melting System (CMS{trademark}), capable of being fueled by pulverized coal, natural gas, and other solid, gaseous, or liquid fuels, for the vitrification of industrial wastes. The Phase 3 research effort focused on the development of a process heater system to be used for producing value added glass products from the vitrification of boiler/incinerator ashes and industrial wastes. The primary objective of the Phase 3 project was to develop and integrate all the system components, from fuel through total system controls, and then test the complete system in order to evaluate its potential for successful commercialization. The demonstration test consisted of one test run with a duration of 105 hours, approximately one-half (46 hours) performed with coal as the primary fuel source (70% to 100%), the other half with natural gas. Approximately 50 hours of melting operation were performed vitrifying approximately 50,000 lbs of coal-fired utility boiler flyash/dolomite mixture, producing a fully-reacted vitrified product.

  9. Super-sensing through industrial process tomography

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    In this introduction article, we present a brief overview of industrial process tomography. This will start by linking between the concept of industrial process tomography and super-sensing. This will follow with a brief introduction to various process tomography systems and in particular electrical tomography methods. This article is part of the themed issue ‘Supersensing through industrial process tomography’. PMID:27185965

  10. Super-sensing through industrial process tomography.

    PubMed

    Soleimani, Manuchehr

    2016-06-28

    In this introduction article, we present a brief overview of industrial process tomography. This will start by linking between the concept of industrial process tomography and super-sensing. This will follow with a brief introduction to various process tomography systems and in particular electrical tomography methods.This article is part of the themed issue 'Supersensing through industrial process tomography'. PMID:27185965

  11. Industrial processes with animal cells.

    PubMed

    Kretzmer, G

    2002-07-01

    Industrial processes involving animal cells for the production of useful products still seem to be rather uncommon. Nevertheless, during the last four decades of the last century the number of relevant processes has increased from production of virus vaccines to monoclonal antibodies and finally complex structured glycoproteins. As soon as cell lines became permanent and culture medium changed from purely biological fluids to more or less defined chemical media, large-scale cultivation could begin. The developments of the 1970s - fusion of cells to form hybridomas, and genetic engineering - triggered a second wave of products. Monoclonal antibodies and recombinant proteins for diagnosis and therapy set new challenges for the inventors. Historically, there has been no straightforward process development since the product dictates the process operation. Therefore, the scale of production covers the whole range from small multiple-unit reactors (flasks or roller bottles) up to 10,000-l single-unit batch reactors. Products with high value and small demand can be produced in multiple-unit systems whereas "bulk" products for vaccination and therapy may need large-scale bioreactors to be cost effective. All the different systems have their advantages and disadvantages and significant challenges that curb the development of effective perfusion cultures still remain. PMID:12111138

  12. Development of a coal-fired combustion system for industrial process heating applications. Quarterly technical progress report, January--March 1994

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1994-04-30

    This advanced combustion system research program is for the development of innovative coal-fired process heaters which can be used for high temperature melting, smelting and waste vitrification processes. The process heater systems to be developed have multiple use applications; however, the Phase III research effort is being focused on the development of a process heater system to be used for producing value added vitrified glass products from boiler/incinerator ashes and industrial wastes. The primary objective of the Phase III project is to develop and integrate all the system components, from fuel through total system, controls, and then test the complete system in order to evaluate its potential marketability. The past quarter began with a two-day test performed in January to determine the cause of pulsations in the batch feed system observed during pilot-scale testing of surrogate TSCA incinerator ash performed in December of 1993. Two different batch feedstocks were used during this test: flyash and cullet. The cause of the pulsations was traced to a worn part in the feeder located at the bottom of the batch feed tank. The problem was corrected by replacing the wom part with the corresponding part on the existing coal feed tank. A new feeder for the existing coal tank, which had previously been ordered as part of the new coal handling system, was procured and installed. The data from the pilot-scale tests performed on surrogate TSCA incinerator ash during December of 1993 was collected and analyzed. All of the glass produced during the test passed both the Toxicity characteristics Leach Procedure (TCLP) and the Product Consistency Test (PCT) by approximately two orders of magnitude.

  13. INDUSTRIAL PROCESS PROFILES FOR ENVIRONMENTAL USE: CHAPTER 13. PLASTICIZERS INDUSTRY

    EPA Science Inventory

    The catalog of Industrial Process Profiles for Environmental Use was developed as an aid in defining the environmental impacts of industrial activity in the United States. Entries for each industry are in consistent format and form separate chapters of the study. The Plasticizer ...

  14. NGNP Process Heat Utilization: Liquid Metal Phase Change Heat Exchanger

    SciTech Connect

    Piyush Sabharwall; Mike Patterson; Vivek Utgikar; Fred Gunnerson

    2008-09-01

    One key long-standing issue that must be overcome to fully realize the successful growth of nuclear power is to determine other benefits of nuclear energy apart from meeting the electricity demands. The Next Generation Nuclear Plant (NGNP) will most likely be producing electricity and heat for the production of hydrogen and/or oil retrieval from oil sands and oil shale to help in our national pursuit of energy independence. For nuclear process heat to be utilized, intermediate heat exchange is required to transfer heat from the NGNP to the hydrogen plant or oil recovery field in the most efficient way possible. Development of nuclear reactor - process heat technology has intensified the interest in liquid metals as heat transfer media because of their ideal transport properties. Liquid metal heat exchangers are not new in practical applications. An important rational for considering liquid metals is the potential convective heat transfer is among the highest known. Thus explains the interest in liquid metals as coolant for intermediate heat exchange from NGNP. For process heat it is desired that, intermediate heat exchangers (IHX) transfer heat from the NGNP in the most efficient way possible. The production of electric power at higher efficiency via the Brayton Cycle, and hydrogen production, requires both heat at higher temperatures and high effectiveness compact heat exchangers to transfer heat to either the power or process cycle. Compact heat exchangers maximize the heat transfer surface area per volume of heat exchanger; this has the benefit of reducing heat exchanger size and heat losses. High temperature IHX design requirements are governed in part by the allowable temperature drop between the outlet and inlet of the NGNP. In order to improve the characteristics of heat transfer, liquid metal phase change heat exchangers may be more effective and efficient. This paper explores the overall heat transfer characteristics and pressure drop of the phase change

  15. Heat recovery reduces process energy losses

    SciTech Connect

    Anon

    1981-09-01

    After evaluation of process and plant operation losses, a pharmaceutical plant found heat recovery a viable means of reducing energy losses. One of the first applications of air-to-air heat recovery was in a recirculation/dehumidification process. Heat exchangers were used to recover heat from the air used to generate or dry the dehumidification material.

  16. Experiments Demonstrate Geothermal Heating Process

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Roman, Harry T.

    2012-01-01

    When engineers design heat-pump-based geothermal heating systems for homes and other buildings, they can use coil loops buried around the perimeter of the structure to gather low-grade heat from the earth. As an alternative approach, they can drill well casings and store the summer's heat deep in the earth, then bring it back in the winter to warm…

  17. Waste heat recovery systems in the sugar industry: An Indian perspective

    SciTech Connect

    Madnaik, S.D.; Jadhav, M.G.

    1996-04-01

    This article identifies the key role of the sugar industry in the rural development of developing countries. The Indian sugar industry, already second largest among the country`s processing industries, shows even greater potential, according to the Plan Documents (shown in a table). The potential of waste heat in sugar processing plants, which produce white crystal sugar using the double sulphitation clarification process, is estimated at 5757.9 KJ/kg of sugar. Efficient waste heat recovery (WHR) systems could help arrest the trend of increasing production costs. This would help the sugar industry not only in India, but in many other countries as well. The innovative methods suggested and discussed briefly in this article include dehydration of prepared cane, bagasse drying, and juice heating using waste heat. These methods can reduce the cost of energy in sugar production by at least 10% and improve efficiency and productivity.

  18. Operational fact-finding report on heat pump systems for industrial use

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kamisawa, Jun

    1988-03-01

    Operational circumstances of heat pump systems for industrial use were widely investigated to open their successful cases in practical applications to the public and to widely spread them throughout the industrial sector. As a summary of questionaire totaled 144 cases, 79 cases were motor-operated heat pumps, 37 cases absorption heat pumps and 28 cases engine-driven heat pumps, and, in application, 65 cases were manufacturing process use, 46 cases for factory air conditioning and 5 cases for others (such as snow melting and pool water heating). Most of them were motor-operated heat pumps in application of heat sources for manufacturing process and air conditioning, however, it was recognized a trend toward spreading uses for primary industries and increasing absorption heat pumps and engine-driven heat pumps. As for successful examples, outlines of a motor-operated heat pump system for distilling alcohol at Osaka Plant of Suntory Ltd. and an absorption heat pump system for refining alcohol at Ishioka Alcohol Factory of NEDO (New Energy and Industrial Technology Development Organization) and others were illustrated. Their operational circumstances and energy conservation results were investigated.

  19. SOLTECH 92 proceedings: Solar Process Heat Program

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1992-03-01

    This document is a limited Proceedings, documenting the presentations given at the symposia conducted by the US Department of Energy's (DOE) Solar Industrial Program and Solar Thermal Electrical Program at SOLTECH92. The SOLTECH92 national solar energy conference was held in Albuquerque, New Mexico during the period February 17--20, 1992. The National Renewable Energy Laboratory manages the Solar Industrial Program; Sandia National Laboratories (Albuquerque) manages the Solar Thermal Electric Program. The symposia sessions were as follows: (1) Solar Industrial Program and Solar Thermal Electric Program Overviews, (2) Solar Process Heat Applications, (3) Solar Decontamination of Water and Soil; (4) Solar Building Technologies, (5) Solar Thermal Electric Systems, (6) PV Applications and Technologies. For each presentation given in these symposia, these Proceedings provide a one- to two-page abstract and copies of the viewgraphs and/or 35mm slides utilized by the speaker. Some speakers provided additional materials in the interest of completeness. The materials presented in this document were not subjected to a peer review process.

  20. Heat Transfer in a Thermoacoustic Process

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Beke, Tamas

    2012-01-01

    Thermoacoustic instability is defined as the excitation of acoustic modes in chambers with heat sources due to the coupling between acoustic perturbations and unsteady heat addition. The major objective of this paper is to achieve accurate theoretical results in a thermoacoustic heat transfer process. We carry out a detailed heat transfer analysis…

  1. Modeling of Heating During Food Processing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zheleva, Ivanka; Kamburova, Veselka

    Heat transfer processes are important for almost all aspects of food preparation and play a key role in determining food safety. Whether it is cooking, baking, boiling, frying, grilling, blanching, drying, sterilizing, or freezing, heat transfer is part of the processing of almost every food. Heat transfer is a dynamic process in which thermal energy is transferred from one body with higher temperature to another body with lower temperature. Temperature difference between the source of heat and the receiver of heat is the driving force in heat transfer.

  2. GREENHOUSE PRODUCTION OF BEDDING AND FOLIAGE PLANTS WITH INDUSTRIAL HEAT

    EPA Science Inventory

    The report gives results of an evaluation of potentially beneficial uses of industrial waste heat for production of bedding and foliage plants, using conventionally and warm-water heated greenhouses in Fort Valley, GA. Each greenhouse was a plastic covered, 30 x 72-ft quonset. Th...

  3. Heat-exchanger needs for recovering waste heat in the glass-making industry. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Webb, R.L.; Kulkarni, A.K.

    1983-02-01

    The state of the art of waste heat recovery technology in the glass-making industry is assessed. Fouling and corrosion glass furnace regenerators are reviewed. Heat recovery from the exhaust gases leaving the brick checkers regenerator of a soda lime glass furnace is addressed. Research and development needs that will advance the use of secondary heat recovery in the glass industry are identified. (LEW)

  4. Process modeling and industrial energy use

    SciTech Connect

    Howe, S O; Pilati, D A; Sparrow, F T

    1980-11-01

    How the process models developed at BNL are used to analyze industrial energy use is described and illustrated. Following a brief overview of the industry modeling program, the general methodology of process modeling is discussed. The discussion highlights the important concepts, contents, inputs, and outputs of a typical process model. A model of the US pulp and paper industry is then discussed as a specific application of process modeling methodology. Case study results from the pulp and paper model illustrate how process models can be used to analyze a variety of issues. Applications addressed with the case study results include projections of energy demand, conservation technology assessment, energy-related tax policies, and sensitivity analysis. A subsequent discussion of these results supports the conclusion that industry process models are versatile and powerful tools for energy end-use modeling and conservation analysis. Information on the current status of industry models at BNL is tabulated.

  5. Hydrothermal industrialization: direct heat development. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1982-05-01

    A description of hydrothermal resources suitable for direct applications, their associated temperatures, geographic distribution and developable capacity are given. An overview of the hydrothermal direct-heat development infrastructure is presented. Development activity is highlighted by examining known and planned geothermal direct-use applications. Underlying assumptions and results for three studies conducted to determine direct-use market penetration of geothermal energy are discussed.

  6. Extraterrestrial materials processing and construction. [space industrialization

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Criswell, D. R.; Waldron, R. D.; Mckenzie, J. D.

    1980-01-01

    Three different chemical processing schemes were identified for separating lunar soils into the major oxides and elements. Feedstock production for space industry; an HF acid leach process; electrorefining processes for lunar free metal and metal derived from chemical processing of lunar soils; production and use of silanes and spectrally selective materials; glass, ceramics, and electrochemistry workshops; and an econometric model of bootstrapping space industry are discussed.

  7. INDUSTRIAL PROCESS PROFILES FOR ENVIRONMENTAL USE: CHAPTER 6. THE INDUSTRIAL ORGANIC CHEMICALS INDUSTRY

    EPA Science Inventory

    The catalog of Industrial Process Profiles for Environmental Use was developed as an aid in defining the environmental impacts of industrial activity in the U.S. Entries for each industry are in consistent format and form separate chapters of the study. Industrial organic chemica...

  8. Novel Process Revolutionizes Welding Industry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2008-01-01

    Glenn Research Center, Delphi Corporation, and the Michigan Research Institute entered into a research project to study the use of Deformation Resistance Welding (DRW) in the construction and repair of stationary structures with multiple geometries and dissimilar materials, such as those NASA might use on the Moon or Mars. Traditional welding technologies are burdened by significant business and engineering challenges, including high costs of equipment and labor, heat-affected zones, limited automation, and inconsistent quality. DRW addresses each of those issues, while drastically reducing welding, manufacturing, and maintenance costs.

  9. New industrial heat pump applications to phosphate fertilizer production

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1990-06-01

    In this study Process Integration techniques based on Pinch Technology have been applied to Chevron's fertilizer complex in Rock Springs, Wyoming. The objectives of the study were to: identify heat pump opportunities and to determine the cost effectiveness of heat pumping compared to other process improvements. Significance of this Work Chevron's fertilizer complex is an example of an exothermic process. The sulfuric acid plant produces more heat than is needed for the rest of the site. The complex has, therefore, no need for a heating utility. The heat created in the sulfuric acid plant is used to produce high pressure steam, which is let down through a turbo generator satisfying most of the site's electrical needs. This type of process would normally not be considered for heat pumping because there is no heating utility load to reduce. However, reducing the requirements for extraction steam will liberate more steam for power generation. Heat recovery and heat pumping, therefore, have the unusual effect of an increase in electricity production, resulting in a reduction in electricity import, rather than a reduction in fuel consumption. Heat recovery opportunities show promise at both the sulfuric acid and phosphoric acid plants. No economically attractive opportunities were found for heat pumps in the process units when they were considered individually; however, the study identified that significant energy savings can be achieved by heat integration between the sulfuric acid plant and the phosphoric acid plant. 16 figs.

  10. NGNP Process Heat Applications: Hydrogen Production Accomplishments for FY2010

    SciTech Connect

    Charles V Park

    2011-01-01

    This report summarizes FY10 accomplishments of the Next Generation Nuclear Plant (NGNP) Engineering Process Heat Applications group in support of hydrogen production technology development. This organization is responsible for systems needed to transfer high temperature heat from a high temperature gas-cooled reactor (HTGR) reactor (being developed by the INL NGNP Project) to electric power generation and to potential industrial applications including the production of hydrogen.

  11. Industrial Waste Heat Recovery - Potential Applications, Available Technologies and Crosscutting R&D Opportunities

    SciTech Connect

    Thekdi, Arvind; Nimbalkar, Sachin U.

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this report was to explore key areas and characteristics of industrial waste heat and its generation, barriers to waste heat recovery and use, and potential research and development (R&D) opportunities. The report also provides an overview of technologies and systems currently available for waste heat recovery and discusses the issues or barriers for each. Also included is information on emerging technologies under development or at various stages of demonstrations, and R&D opportunities cross-walked by various temperature ranges, technology areas, and energy-intensive process industries.

  12. Foundations for Excellence in the Chemical Process Industries. Voluntary Industry Standards for Chemical Process Industries Technical Workers.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hofstader, Robert; Chapman, Kenneth

    This document discusses the Voluntary Industry Standards for Chemical Process Industries Technical Workers Project and issues of relevance to the education and employment of chemical laboratory technicians (CLTs) and process technicians (PTs). Section 1 consists of the following background information: overview of the chemical process industries,…

  13. Overview of current research opportunities in industrial microwave heating

    SciTech Connect

    Silberglitt, R.; Hien, L.K.; Rattien, S.

    1983-08-01

    The use of electromagnetic energy in industrial heating applications has many potential advantages as compared to conventional heating methods, e.g., increased energy efficiency, increased uniformity, lower product surface temperature, decreased space and production time requirements, and even improved product quality. However, industry has been slow to adopt this technique, especially as compared to the recent market penetration of consumer microwave ovens. This has been attributed to technological inertia, as well as the difficulty of demonstrating the cost-effectiveness of electromagnetic heating because at present most equipment must be custom-designed. Based upon a detailed survey of existing electromagnetic heating research and application areas, a number of research opportunities with significant technological innovation potential have been identified. These are reviewed, with emphasis on the microwave frequency range.

  14. Role of fuel upgrading for industry and residential heating

    SciTech Connect

    Merriam, N.W.; Gentile, R.H.

    1995-12-01

    The Koppleman Series C Process is presently being used in pilot plant tests with Wyoming coal to upgrade the Powder River Basin coal containing 30 wt% moisture and having a heating value of 8100 Btu/lb to a product containing less than 1 wt% moisture and having a heating value of 12,200 Btu/lb. This process is described.

  15. Surveillance of industrial processes with correlated parameters

    DOEpatents

    White, A.M.; Gross, K.C.; Kubic, W.L.; Wigeland, R.A.

    1996-12-17

    A system and method for surveillance of an industrial process are disclosed. The system and method includes a plurality of sensors monitoring industrial process parameters, devices to convert the sensed data to computer compatible information and a computer which executes computer software directed to analyzing the sensor data to discern statistically reliable alarm conditions. The computer software is executed to remove serial correlation information and then calculate Mahalanobis distribution data to carry out a probability ratio test to determine alarm conditions. 10 figs.

  16. Surveillance of industrial processes with correlated parameters

    DOEpatents

    White, Andrew M.; Gross, Kenny C.; Kubic, William L.; Wigeland, Roald A.

    1996-01-01

    A system and method for surveillance of an industrial process. The system and method includes a plurality of sensors monitoring industrial process parameters, devices to convert the sensed data to computer compatible information and a computer which executes computer software directed to analyzing the sensor data to discern statistically reliable alarm conditions. The computer software is executed to remove serial correlation information and then calculate Mahalanobis distribution data to carry out a probability ratio test to determine alarm conditions.

  17. Expert systems in the process industries

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stanley, G. M.

    1992-01-01

    This paper gives an overview of industrial applications of real-time knowledge based expert systems (KBES's) in the process industries. After a brief overview of the features of a KBES useful in process applications, the general roles of KBES's are covered. A particular focus is diagnostic applications, one of the major applications areas. Many applications are seen as an expansion of supervisory control. The lessons learned from numerous online applications are summarized.

  18. Semiconductor Industry Plasma Processing Needs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wise, Richard; Panda, Siddhartha; Yan, Wendy

    2003-10-01

    The plasma requirements of dry etch equipment used for advanced semiconductor process development and low cost semiconductor manufacturing are reviewed. Introduction of ArF (193nm) photolithography has resulted in increased demands on resist selectivity, increased sensitivity to plasma induced or exacerbated line edge roughness, and the introduction of novel hard and soft mask schemes. State of the art plasma processing chambers must be able to deliver low DC bias due to line edge roughness requirements with adequate ion/radical density to prevent loss of critical dimension control in deep features. These same systems may be required to operate in a high DC bias, low plasma density regime to achieve adequate etch rate on different films, and in many cases the system must be able to switch between low and high DC bias modes. The acceptable plasma density is limited by that necessary to provide adequate production of passivation agents necessary to achieve selectivity to ArF photoresists. Further limits on plasma density may be needed due to device and etch profile sensitivity to differential charging. The allowable DC bias may be limited to avoid damage to shallow implanted regions and thin gate. Decreases in gate length have increased sensitivity to non-anisotropic profiles, which in turn requires a minimum of DC bias to provide anisotropy. Particle sensitivity has resulted in a migration toward integrated plasma processing, putting additional demands on the stability and flexibility of the plasma equipment. State of the art plasma tooling must be capable of operating over a wide range of plasma densities, delivering both high and low DC bias, and provide RF stability over a wide range of wafer/chamber impedances. The increased uniformity requirements of 300 mm tools requires the anode and cathode potential be uniformly distributed over the entire surface, and that the plasma generation be as uniform as possible. Extended wet clean cycles have driven the need for

  19. INDUSTRIAL PROCESS PROFILES FOR ENVIRONMENTAL USE. CHAPTER 10A. THE PLASTICS AND RESINS PROCESSING INDUSTRY

    EPA Science Inventory

    The report contains a detailed analysis of the plastics and resins processing industry, which includes operations that convert polymers and resins into consumer products. Analytical elements include industry definition, raw materials, products, manufacturers, environmental impact...

  20. Industrial waste treatment process engineering. Volume 2: Biological processes

    SciTech Connect

    Celenza, G.J.

    1999-11-01

    Industrial Waste Treatment Process Engineering is a step-by-step implementation manual in three volumes, detailing the selection and design of industrial liquid and solid waste treatment systems. It consolidates all the process engineering principles required to evaluate a wide range of industrial facilities, starting with pollution prevention and source control and ending with end-of-pipe treatment technologies. This three-volume set is a practical guide for environmental engineers with process implementation responsibilities; a one-stop resource for process engineering requirements--from plant planning to implementing specific treatment technologies for unit operations; a comprehensive reference for industrial waste treatment technologies; and includes calculations and worked problems based on industry cases. The contents of Volume 2 include: aeration; aerobic biological oxidation; activated sludge system; biological oxidation: lagoons; biological oxidation: fixed film processes; aerobic digesters; anaerobic waste treatment, anaerobic sludge treatment; and sedimentation.

  1. Heat and mass transfer in materials processing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tanasawa, Ichiro; Lior, Noam

    Various papers on heat and mass transfer in materials processing are presented. The topics addressed include: heat transfer in plasma spraying, structure of ultrashort pulse plasma for CVD processing, heat flow and thermal contraction during plasma spray deposition, metal melting process by laser heating, improved electron beam weld design and control with beam current profile measurements, transport phenomena in laser materials processing, perspectives on integrated modeling of transport processes in semiconductor crystal growth, numerical simulation of natural convection in crystal growth in space and on the earth, conjugate heat transfer in crystal growth, effects of convection on the solidification of binary mixtures. Also discussed are: heat transfer in in-rotating-liquid-spinning process, thermal oscillations in materials processing, modeling and simulation of manufacturing processes of advanced composite materials, reaction engineering principles of combustion synthesis of advanced materials, numerical evaluation of the physical properties of magnetic fluids suitable for heat transfer control, and measurement techniques of thermophysical properties of high temperature melts. (For individual items see A93-10827 to A93-10843)

  2. An Overview of Opportunities for Waste Heat Recovery and Thermal Integration in the Primary Aluminum Industry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nowicki, Cassandre; Gosselin, Louis

    2012-08-01

    Efficient smelters currently consume roughly 13 MWh of electricity per ton of aluminum, while roughly half of that energy is lost as thermal waste. Although waste heat is abundant, current thermal integration in primary aluminum facilities remains limited. This is due to both the low quality of waste heat available and the shortage of potential uses within reasonable distance of identified waste heat sources. In this article, we present a mapping of both heat dissipation processes and heat demands around a sample facility (Alcoa Deschambault Quebec smelter). Our primary aim is to report opportunities for heat recovery and integration in the primary aluminum industry. We consider potential heat-to-sink pairings individually and assess their thermodynamic potential for producing energy savings.

  3. Evaluation of Thermocompression Heat Pump Performance for American Maize, Decatur, AL [Advanced Industrial Heat Pump Applications and Evaluations

    SciTech Connect

    Eastwood, A.

    1993-06-01

    This work was carried out in two phases: Phase 1, identification of opportunities for heat pumps in industrial applications and Phase 2, evaluation of heat pumps in industrial applications. In Phase 1, pinch analysis was applied to several industrial sites to identify the best opportunities for heat pumping and other forms of heat integration. In Phase 2, more detailed analyses were undertaken, including the evaluation of a heat pump installed as a recommendation of Phase 1.

  4. Review of thermo-physical properties, wetting and heat transfer characteristics of nanofluids and their applicability in industrial quench heat treatment

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    The success of quenching process during industrial heat treatment mainly depends on the heat transfer characteristics of the quenching medium. In the case of quenching, the scope for redesigning the system or operational parameters for enhancing the heat transfer is very much limited and the emphasis should be on designing quench media with enhanced heat transfer characteristics. Recent studies on nanofluids have shown that these fluids offer improved wetting and heat transfer characteristics. Further water-based nanofluids are environment friendly as compared to mineral oil quench media. These potential advantages have led to the development of nanofluid-based quench media for heat treatment practices. In this article, thermo-physical properties, wetting and boiling heat transfer characteristics of nanofluids are reviewed and discussed. The unique thermal and heat transfer characteristics of nanofluids would be extremely useful for exploiting them as quench media for industrial heat treatment. PMID:21711877

  5. Using Waste Heat for External Processes (English/Chinese) (Fact Sheet)

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    2011-10-01

    Chinese translation of the Using Waste Heat for External Processes fact sheet. Provides suggestions on how to use waste heat in industrial applications. The temperature of exhaust gases from fuel-fired industrial processes depends mainly on the process temperature and the waste heat recovery method. Figure 1 shows the heat lost in exhaust gases at various exhaust gas temperatures and percentages of excess air. Energy from gases exhausted from higher temperature processes (primary processes) can be recovered and used for lower temperature processes (secondary processes). One example is to generate steam using waste heat boilers for the fluid heaters used in petroleum crude processing. In addition, many companies install heat exchangers on the exhaust stacks of furnaces and ovens to produce hot water or to generate hot air for space heating.

  6. New industrial heat pump applications to a synthetic rubber plant. Final report, Phase IIA

    SciTech Connect

    1993-12-31

    This report summarizes the results of the Phase IIA of the DOE sponsored study titled, Advanced Industrial Heat Pump Application and Evaluation. The scope of this phase of the study was to finalize the process design of the heat pump scheme, develop a process and instrumentation diagram, and a detailed cost estimate for the project. This information is essential for the site management to evaluate the economic viability and operability of the proposed heat pump design, prior to the next phase of installation and testing.

  7. PBMR as an Ideal Heat Source for High-Temperature Process Heat Applications

    SciTech Connect

    Correia, Michael; Greyvenstein, Renee; Silady, Fred; Penfield, Scott

    2006-07-01

    The Pebble Bed Modular Reactor (PBMR) is an advanced helium-cooled, graphite-moderated High Temperature Gas-cooled Reactor (HTGR). A 400 MWt PBMR Demonstration Power Plant (DPP) for the production of electricity is being developed in South Africa. This PBMR technology is also an ideal heat source for process heat applications, including Steam Methane Reforming, steam for Oil Sands bitumen recovery, Hydrogen Production and co-generation (process heat and/or electricity and/or process steam) for petrochemical industries. The cycle configuration used to transport the heat of the reactor to the process plant or to convert the reactor's heat into electricity or steam directly influences the cycle efficiency and plant economics. The choice of cycle configuration depends on the process requirements and is influenced by practical considerations, component and material limitations, maintenance, controllability, safety, performance, risk and cost. This paper provides an overview of the use of a PBMR reactor for process applications and possible cycle configurations are presented for applications which require high temperature process heat and/or electricity. (authors)

  8. Industrial application of semantic process mining

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Espen Ingvaldsen, Jon; Atle Gulla, Jon

    2012-05-01

    Process mining relates to the extraction of non-trivial and useful information from information system event logs. It is a new research discipline that has evolved significantly since the early work on idealistic process logs. Over the last years, process mining prototypes have incorporated elements from semantics and data mining and targeted visualisation techniques that are more user-friendly to business experts and process owners. In this article, we present a framework for evaluating different aspects of enterprise process flows and address practical challenges of state-of-the-art industrial process mining. We also explore the inherent strengths of the technology for more efficient process optimisation.

  9. Heat resistant process gas line

    SciTech Connect

    Venable, C.R. Jr.

    1987-05-12

    A method is described of forming a heat resistant gas transfer line comprising a tubular metal outer shell, a tubular inner liner formed of prefired refractory rings joined together by shiplap joints having expansion gaps, and an intermediate liner comprising bubble alumina concrete filing the annular space between the inner liner and the outer shell. The method comprises placing on the inside lower surface of the outershell bubble alumina concrete forms capable of supporting the refractory rings in the desired location within the outer shell, securing decomposable rings to the refractory rings in the area where the shiplap joints are to be so that a suitable expansion gap will be provided in the shiplap joints when the combustible rings are destroyed.

  10. Interface design in the process industries

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Beaverstock, M. C.; Stassen, H. G.; Williamson, R. A.

    1977-01-01

    Every operator runs his plant in accord with his own mental model of the process. In this sense, one characteristic of an ideal man-machine interface is that it be in harmony with that model. With this theme in mind, the paper first reviews the functions of the process operator and compares them with human operators involved in control situations previously studied outside the industrial environment (pilots, air traffic controllers, helmsmen, etc.). A brief history of the operator interface in the process industry and the traditional methodology employed in its design is then presented. Finally, a much more fundamental approach utilizing a model definition of the human operator's behavior is presented.

  11. Enhancing probiotic stability in industrial processes

    PubMed Central

    Gueimonde, Miguel; Sánchez, Borja

    2012-01-01

    Background Manufacture of probiotic products involves industrial processes that reduce the viability of the strains. This lost of viability constitutes an economic burden for manufacturers, compromising the efficacy of the product and preventing the inclusion of probiotics in many product categories. Different strategies have been used to improve probiotic stability during industrial processes. These include technological approaches, such as the modification of production parameters or the reformulation of products, as well as microbiological approaches focused on the strain intrinsic resistance. Among the later, both selection of natural strains with the desired properties and stress-adaptation of strains have been widely used. Conclusion During recent years, the knowledge acquired on the molecular basis of stress-tolerance of probiotics has increased our understanding on their responses to industrial stresses. This knowledge on stress-response may nowadays be used for the selection of the best strains and industrial conditions in terms of probiotic stability in the final product. PMID:23990824

  12. The industrial processing of unidirectional fiber prepregs

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Laird, B.

    1981-01-01

    Progress made in the industrial processing of preimpregnated composites with unidirectional fibers is discussed, with particular emphasis on applications within the aerospace industry. Selection of industrial materials is considered. Attention is given to the conditions justifying the use of composites and the properties required of industrial prepregs. The hardening cycle is examined for the cases of nonmodified and polymer modified resins, with attention given to the stabilization of flow, the necessary changes of state, viscosity control, and the elimination of porosity. The tooling necessary for the fabrication of a laminated plate is illustrated, and the influence of fabrication and prepreg properties on the mechanical characteristics of a laminate are indicated. Finally, the types of prepregs available and the processing procedures necessary for them are summarized.

  13. Course Development: Industrial or Social Process.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kaufman, David

    The development of course materials at the Open Learning Institute, British Columbia, Canada, is examined from two perspectives: as an industrial process and as a social process. The public institute provides distance education through paced home-study courses. The course team model used at the Institute is a system approach. Course development…

  14. Technical assessment of the Office of Industrial Programs' Advanced Heat Exchanger Program

    SciTech Connect

    Rinker, F.G.; Bergles, A.E.; Marciniak, T.J.; Batman, J.

    1987-02-01

    The DOE's AHX Program is an integral part of the OIP's Waste Heat Recovery Program whose goals are to increase the end-use energy efficiency of industry and agricultural operations, and to expand the energy options for manufacturing processes by providing technologies which use various fuels including coal, renewables, oil, and natural gas. The OIP and PNL convened a panel of industry experts to conduct a technical assessment of OIP's AHX program. This report documents the results of the panel's assessment.

  15. Analysis of the heat setting process

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Besler, N.; Gloy, Y. S.; Gries, T.

    2016-07-01

    Heat setting is an expensive and energy elaborative textile process. Heat setting is necessary to guarantee size accuracy and dimensional stability for textile materials. Depending on the material different heat setting methods such as saturated steam or hot air are used for the fixation. The research aim is to define the influence of heat setting on mechanical characteristics and to analyse the correlation of heat setting parameters for polyester. With the help of a “one factor at a time” experimental design heat setting parameters are varied. Mechanical characteristics and the material quality of heat set and not heat set material are evaluated to analyse the heat setting influence. In the described experimental design up to a temperature of 195 °C and a dwell time of 30 seconds the material shrinkage of polyester is increasing with increasing temperature and dwell time. Shrinkage in wales direction is higher than in course direction. The tensile strength in course direction stays constant whereas the tensile strength in wales direction can be increased by heat setting.

  16. Industrial Holography Combined With Image Processing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schorner, J.; Rottenkolber, H.; Roid, W.; Hinsch, K.

    1988-01-01

    Holographic test methods have gained to become a valuable tool for the engineer in research and development. But also in the field of non-destructive quality control holographic test equipment is now accepted for tests within the production line. The producer of aircraft tyres e. g. are using holographic tests to prove the guarantee of their tyres. Together with image processing the whole test cycle is automatisized. The defects within the tyre are found automatically and are listed on an outprint. The power engine industry is using holographic vibration tests for the optimization of their constructions. In the plastics industry tanks, wheels, seats and fans are tested holographically to find the optimum of shape. The automotive industry makes holography a tool for noise reduction. Instant holography and image processing techniques for quantitative analysis have led to an economic application of holographic test methods. New developments of holographic units in combination with image processing are presented.

  17. Review of industry interest in space processing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mcdowell, J. R.

    1978-01-01

    The interest on the part of selected U.S. corporation in using the research facilities and capabilities for materials processing in space utilizing the Space Shuttle was assessed. The effectiveness of the interview techniques as a method for gaining insight into the complex array of issues related to materials processing in space was evaluated. The survey, conducted was intended as a random sample of individuals, representing industry, who were currently involved in materials processing in space.

  18. Energy conservation and cost benefits in the dairy processing industry

    SciTech Connect

    1982-01-01

    Guidance is given on measuring energy consumption in the plant and pinpointing areas where energy-conservation activities can return the most favorable economics. General energy-conservation techniques applicable to most or all segments of the dairy processing industry, including the fluid milk segment, are emphasized. These general techniques include waste heat recovery, improvements in electric motor efficiency, added insulation, refrigeration improvements, upgrading of evaporators, and increases in boiler efficiency. Specific examples are given in which these techniques are applied to dairy processing plants. The potential for energy savings by cogeneration of process steam and electricity in the dairy industry is also discussed. Process changes primarily applicable to specific milk products which have resulted in significant energy cost savings at some facilities or which promise significant contributions in the future are examined. A summary checklist of plant housekeeping measures for energy conservation and guidelines for economic evaluation of conservation alternatives are provided. (MHR)

  19. New industrial heat pump applications to a petrochemical plant, Phase IIA: Final report

    SciTech Connect

    1995-12-31

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the energy conservation potential of a heat pump in an industrial site. The proper placement of the heat pump was based on the principles of Pinch Technology. Chevron`s refinery at Port Arthur, Texas, was selected as the industrial site for this study. Two energy conservation options were identified for this site with a combined total savings of $570,000 per year. This represents over 10% reduction in current thermal energy consumption of the process units, which were part of this study. The details of each option are described. The first option was a passive heat integration scheme. The second option involves a semi-open cycle mechanical vapor recompression heat pump that compresses the steam generated from the reactor exhaust streams of the cyclohexane unit to provide part of the reboiling duty of the benzene column.

  20. Digital Image Processing in Private Industry.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Moore, Connie

    1986-01-01

    Examines various types of private industry optical disk installations in terms of business requirements for digital image systems in five areas: records management; transaction processing; engineering/manufacturing; information distribution; and office automation. Approaches for implementing image systems are addressed as well as key success…

  1. Safety Considerations in the Chemical Process Industries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Englund, Stanley M.

    There is an increased emphasis on chemical process safety as a result of highly publicized accidents. Public awareness of these accidents has provided a driving force for industry to improve its safety record. There has been an increasing amount of government regulation.

  2. ENVIRONMENTAL POLLUTION CONTROL: TEXTILE PROCESSING INDUSTRY

    EPA Science Inventory

    This manual contains information relating to the design of air, water and solids pollution abatement systems for the textile industry. It is intended for use by process design engineers, consultants, and engineering companies active in the design or upgrading of textile waste tre...

  3. Gravity-dependent transport in industrial processes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ostrach, Simon; Kamotani, Yasuhiro

    1994-01-01

    Gravity-dependent transport phenomena in various industrial processes are investigated in order to address a broader range of microgravity phenomena and to develop new applications of microgravity. A number of important topics are identified and analyzed in detail. The present article describes results on coating flow, zeolite growth, and rotating electrochemical system.

  4. Microprocessor systems for industrial process control

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lesh, F. H.

    1980-01-01

    Six computers operate synchronously and are interconnected by three independent data buses. Processors control one subsystem. Some can control buses to transfer data at 1 megabit per second. Every 2.5 msec each processor examines list of things to do during next interval. This spacecraft control system could be adapted for controlling complex industrial processes.

  5. Chemicals Industry New Process Chemistry Roadmap

    SciTech Connect

    none,

    2000-08-01

    The Materials Technology I workshop was held in November 1998 to address future research needs for materials technology that will support the chemical industry. Areas covered included disassembly, recovery, reuse and renewable technology; new materials; and materials measurement and characterization. The Materials Technology II workshop was held in September 1999 and covered additives, modeling and prediction and an additional segment on new materials. Materials Technology Institute (MTI) for the Chemical Process Industries, Inc. and Air Products & Chemicals lead the workshops. The Materials Technology Roadmap presents the results from both workshops.

  6. New industrial heat pump applications to an integrated thermomechanical pulp and paper mill

    SciTech Connect

    1991-01-01

    Application of pinch technology US industries in an early screening study done by TENSA Services (DOE/ID/12583-1) identified potential for heat pumps in several industrial sectors. Among these, processes with large evaporation units were found to be some of the most promising sectors for advanced heat pump placement. This report summarizes the results of a study for Bowater Incorporated, Carolina Division. The units selected for this study are the thermo-mechanical pulper (TMP), kraft digester, evaporators, boiler feed water (BFW) train and pulp dryer. Based on the present level of operation, the following recommendations are made: 1. Install a mechanical vapor compression (MVR) heat pump between the TMP mill and {number sign}3 evaporator. This heat pump will compress the 22 psig steam from the TMP heat recovery system and use it to replace about 70% of the 60 psig steam required in {number sign} evaporator. The boiler feed water heat losses (in the low pressure deaerator) will be supplied by heat available in the TMR's zero psig vent steam. 2. Study the digester to verify the practicality of installing an MVR heat pump which will compress the dirty weapons from the cyclone separator. The compressed vapors can be directly injected into the digester and thus reduce the 135 psig steam consumption. 31 figs., 9 tabs.

  7. FTIR monitoring of industrial scale CVD processes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hopfe, V.; Mosebach, H.; Meyer, M.; Sheel, D.; Grählert, W.; Throl, O.; Dresler, B.

    1998-06-01

    The goal is to improve chemical vapour deposition (CVD) and infiltration (CVI) process control by a multipurpose, knowledge based feedback system. For monitoring the CVD/CVI process in-situ FTIR spectroscopic data has been identified as input information. In the presentation, three commonly used, and distinctly different, types of industrial CVD/CVI processes are taken as test cases: (i) a thermal high capacity CVI batch process for manufacturing carbon fibre reinforced SiC composites for high temperature applications, (ii) a continuously driven CVD thermal process for coating float glass for energy protection, and (iii) a laser stimulated CVD process for continuously coating bundles of thin ceramic fibers. The feasibility of the concept with FTIR in-situ monitoring as a core technology has been demonstrated. FTIR monitoring sensibly reflects process conditions.

  8. Hazardous waste incineration in industrial processes: cement and lime kilns

    SciTech Connect

    Mournighan, R.E.; Peters, J.A.; Branscome, M.R.; Freeman, H.

    1985-07-01

    With more liquid wastes due to be banned from land disposal facilities, expanding hazardous waste incineration capacity becomes increasingly important. At the same time, industrial plants are increasingly seeking to find new sources of lower cost fuel, specifically from the disposal of hazardous wastes with heating value. The Hazardous Waste Engineering Research Laboratory (HWERL) is currently evaluating the disposal of hazardous wastes in a wide range of industrial processes. The effort includes sampling stack emissions at cement, lime and aggregate plants, asphalt plants and blast furnaces, which use waste as a supplemental fuel. This research program is an essential part of EPA's determination of the overall environmental impact of various disposal options available to industry. This paper summarizes the results of the HWERL program of monitoring emissions from cement and lime kilns burning hazardous wastes as fuel.

  9. Alternative starting materials for industrial processes.

    PubMed Central

    Mitchell, J W

    1992-01-01

    In the manufacture of chemical feedstocks and subsequent processing into derivatives and materials, the U.S. chemical industry sets the current standard of excellence for technological competitiveness. This world-class leadership is attributed to the innovation and advancement of chemical engineering process technology. Whether this status is sustained over the next decade depends strongly on meeting increasingly demanding challenges stimulated by growing concerns about the safe production and use of chemicals without harmful impacts on the environment. To comply with stringent environmental regulations while remaining economically competitive, industry must exploit alternative benign starting materials and develop environmentally neutral industrial processes. Opportunities are described for development of environmentally compatible alternatives and substitutes for some of the most abundantly produced, potentially hazardous industrial chemicals now labeled as "high-priority toxic chemicals." For several other uniquely important commodity chemicals where no economically competitive, environmentally satisfactory, nontoxic alternative starting material exists, we advocate the development of new dynamic processes for the on-demand generation of toxic chemicals. In this general concept, which obviates mass storage and transportation of chemicals, toxic raw materials are produced in real time, where possible, from less-hazardous starting materials and then chemically transformed immediately into the final product. As a selected example for semiconductor technology, recent progress is reviewed for the on-demand production of arsine in turnkey electrochemical generators. Innovation of on-demand chemical generators and alternative processes provide rich areas for environmentally responsive chemical engineering processing research and development for next-generation technology. Images PMID:11607260

  10. Modelling of the Heating Process in a Thermal Screw

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Xuan; Veje, Christian T.; Lassen, Benny; Willatzen, Morten

    2012-11-01

    The procedure of separating efficiently dry-stuff (proteins), fat, and water is an important process in the handling of waste products from industrial and commercial meat manufactures. One of the sub-processes in a separation facility is a thermal screw where the raw material (after proper mincing) is heated in order to melt fat, coagulate protein, and free water. This process is very energy consuming and the efficiency of the product is highly dependent on accurate temperature control of the process. A key quality parameter is the time that the product is maintained at temperatures within a certain threshold. A detailed mathematical model for the heating process in the thermal screw is developed and analysed. The model is formulated as a set of partial differential equations including the latent heat for the melting process of the fat and the boiling of water, respectively. The product is modelled by three components; water, fat and dry-stuff (bones and proteins). The melting of the fat component is captured as a plateau in the product temperature. The model effectively captures the product outlet temperature and the energy consumed. Depending on raw material composition, "soft" or "dry", the model outlines the heat injection and screw speeds necessary to obtain optimal output quality.

  11. Fuel quality issues in the oil heat industry

    SciTech Connect

    Litzke, Wai-Lin

    1992-12-01

    The quality of fuel oil plays an essential role in combustion performance and efficient operation of residential heating equipment. With the present concerns by the oil-heat industry of declining fuel-oil quality, a study was initiated to identify the factors that have brought about changes in the quality of distillate fuel. A background of information will be provided to the industry, which is necessary to deal with the problems relating to the fuel. The high needs for servicing heating equipment are usually the result of the poor handling characteristics of the fuel during cold weather, the buildup of dirt and water in storage tanks, and microbial growth. A discussion of how to deal with these problems is presented in this paper. The effectiveness of fuel additives to control these problems of quality is also covered to help users better understand the functions and limitations of chemical treatment. Test data have been collected which measure and compare changes in the properties of fuel using selected additives.

  12. Design, construction, operation, and evaluation of solar systems for industrial process-heat applications in the intermediate-temperature range (212/sup 0/F to 550/sup 0/F). Environmental assessment

    SciTech Connect

    1982-01-01

    The environmental impacts are assessed for a proposed 50,000 square foot field of single axis tracking, concentrating solar collectors along the Ohio River in southern Ohio. The facility is planned to produce process steam for use in the production of polystyrene. Absorbed solar energy would heat an aliphatic hydrocarbon synthetic heat transfer fluid to a maximum temperature of 500/sup 0/F. The existing environment is briefly described, particularly regarding air quality. The potential environmental impacts of the solar process heat system on the air, water, soil, endangered species and archaeological and historical resources are examined, including risks due to flood and glare and a comparison of alternatives. Also included are a Consent Judgment relating to two coal-fired boilers in violation of EPA regulations, property data of Gulf Synfluid 4CS (a candidate heat transfer fluid), piping and instrumentation diagrams and schematics, site grade and drainage plan, geological survey map, subsurface soil investigation, Ohio endangered species list, Ohio Archaeological Counsel certification list, and a study of heat transfer fluids and their properties. (LEW)

  13. Coupled simulation of an electromagnetic heating process using the finite difference time domain method.

    PubMed

    Chen, Hao; Tang, Juming; Liu, Fang

    2007-01-01

    Due to the complexity of interactions between microwaves and food products, a reliable and efficient simulation model can be a very useful tool to guide the design of microwave heating systems and processes. This research developed a model to simulate coupled phenomena of electromagnetic heating and conventional heat transfer by combining commercial electromagnetic software with a customer built heat transfer model. Simulation results were presented and compared with experimental results for hot water and microwave heating in a single mode microwave system at 915 MHz. Good agreement was achieved, showing that this model was able to provide insight into industrial electromagnetic heating processes. PMID:18351003

  14. Bates solar industrial process steam application environmental impact assessment

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1981-06-30

    It is planned to install 34,440 square feet of linear parabolic trough solar collectors at a new corrugator plant for making corrugated boxes. The system is to operate in parallel with a fossil fuel boiler. An assessment is presented of the impacts of the solar energy system on the existing environment and to determine whether or not a more detailed environmental impact statement is needed. The environmental assessment is based on actual operational data obtained on the collector, fluid, and heat transport system. A description of the design of the solar energy system and its application is given. Also included is a discussion of the location of the new plant in Fort Worth, Texas, and of the surrounding environment. Environmental impacts are discussed in detail, and alternatives to the solar industrial process steam retrofit application are offered. It is concluded that the overall benefits from the solar industrial process heat system outweigh any negative environmental factors. Benefits include reduced fossil fuel demand, with attending reductions in air pollutants. The selection of a stable heat transfer fluid with low toxicity and biodegradable qualities minimizes environmental damage due to fluid spills, personal exposure, and degradation byproducts. The collector is found to be aesthetically attractive with minimal hazards due to glare. (LEW)

  15. Heat for film processing from solar energy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1981-01-01

    Report describes solar water heating system for laboratory in Mill Valley, California. System furnishes 59 percent of hot water requirements for photographic film processing. Text of report discusses system problems and modifications, analyzes performance and economics, and supplies drawings and operation/maintenance manual.

  16. Heat accumulation during pulsed laser materials processing.

    PubMed

    Weber, Rudolf; Graf, Thomas; Berger, Peter; Onuseit, Volkher; Wiedenmann, Margit; Freitag, Christian; Feuer, Anne

    2014-05-01

    Laser materials processing with ultra-short pulses allows very precise and high quality results with a minimum extent of the thermally affected zone. However, with increasing average laser power and repetition rates the so-called heat accumulation effect becomes a considerable issue. The following discussion presents a comprehensive analytical treatment of multi-pulse processing and reveals the basic mechanisms of heat accumulation and its consequence for the resulting processing quality. The theoretical findings can explain the experimental results achieved when drilling microholes in CrNi-steel and for cutting of CFRP. As a consequence of the presented considerations, an estimate for the maximum applicable average power for ultra-shorts pulsed laser materials processing for a given pulse repetition rate is derived. PMID:24921828

  17. INDUSTRIAL PROCESS PROFILES FOR ENVIRONMENTAL USE: CHAPTER 8. PESTICIDES INDUSTRY

    EPA Science Inventory

    The catalog was developed to aid in defining the environmental impacts of U.S. industrial activity. Entries for each industry are in consistent format and form separate chapters of the catalog. The pesticides industry produces organic chemicals used: to control agricultural pests...

  18. Heat and mass transfer in materials processing

    SciTech Connect

    Tanasawa, I. . Inst. of Industrial Science); Lior, N. . Dept. of Mechanical Engineering and Applied Mechanics)

    1992-01-01

    This book contains forty papers presented at the seminar. The papers are representative of the seminar's scope, and include plasma spraying, laser and electron beam processing, crystal growth, solidification, steel processing, casting and molding, and papermaking, as well as fundamental heat transfer issues and physical properties underlying all of the above. The seminar emphasized thorough discussion of the presentations and of the subfields. Brief summaries of the discussions are presented in the rapporteurs' reports.

  19. Iron and steel industry process model

    SciTech Connect

    Sparrow, F.T.; Pilati, D.; Dougherty, T.; McBreen, E.; Juang, L.L.

    1980-01-01

    The iron and steel industry process model depicts expected energy-consumption characteristics of the iron and steel industry and ancillary industries for the next 25 years by means of a process model of the major steps in steelmaking, from ore mining and scrap recycling to the final finishing of carbon, alloy, and stainless steel into steel products such as structural steel, slabs, plates, tubes, and bars. Two plant types are modeled: fully integrated mills and mini-mills. User-determined inputs into the model are as follows: projected energy and materials prices; projected costs of capacity expansion and replacement; energy-conserving options, both operating modes and investments; the internal rate of return required on investment; and projected demand for finished steel. Nominal input choices in the model for the inputs listed above are as follows: National Academy of Sciences Committee on Nuclear and Alternative Energy Systems Demand Panel nominal energy-price projections for oil, gas, distillates, residuals, and electricity and 1975 actual prices for materials; actual 1975 costs; new technologies added; 15% after taxes; and 1975 actual demand with 1.5%/y growth. The model reproduces the base-year (1975) actual performance of the industry; then, given the above nominal input choices, it projects modes of operation and capacity expansion that minimize the cost of meeting the given final demands for each of 5 years, each year being the midpoint of a 5-year interval. The output of the model includes the following: total energy use and intensity (Btu/ton) by type, by process, and by time period; energy conservation options chosen; utilization rates for existing capacity; capital-investment decisions for capacity expansion.

  20. Coronal loops - Current-based heating processes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Beaufume, P.; Coppi, B.; Golub, L.

    1992-01-01

    Based on new observations, a theoretical model of magnetic-field related heating processes in the solar corona is given. In this model, field-aligned currents are induced along coronal loops in thin current sheaths. Excitation of instabilities involving magnetic reconnection converts the energy associated with the current-related magnetic field directly into particle energy, where the heating process proceeds via short bursts corresponding to an intermittent disruption of the current sheath configuration. Because of the relatively low transverse thermal conduction, only a small fraction of the loop volume is heated to a much higher temperature than the average value. This is consistent with experimental observations of low filling factors of hot plasmas in coronal loops. Thus the model involves a repeated sequence of dynamic events taking into account the observed loop topology, the differential emission measure distribution in the 10 exp 6 - 10 exp 7 K range, the energy balance requirements in the loop, and the probable duty cycles involved in the heating processes.

  1. Solar augmentation for process heat with central receiver technology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kotzé, Johannes P.; du Toit, Philip; Bode, Sebastian J.; Larmuth, James N.; Landman, Willem A.; Gauché, Paul

    2016-05-01

    Coal fired boilers are currently one of the most widespread ways to deliver process heat to industry. John Thompson Boilers (JTB) offer industrial steam supply solutions for industry and utility scale applications in Southern Africa. Transport cost add significant cost to the coal price in locations far from the coal fields in Mpumalanga, Gauteng and Limpopo. The Helio100 project developed a low cost, self-learning, wireless heliostat technology that requires no ground preparation. This is attractive as an augmentation alternative, as it can easily be installed on any open land that a client may have available. This paper explores the techno economic feasibility of solar augmentation for JTB coal fired steam boilers by comparing the fuel savings of a generic 2MW heliostat field at various locations throughout South Africa.

  2. New industrial heat pump applications to naphtha splitter and deisobutanizer column

    SciTech Connect

    1990-11-01

    Application of pinch technology to the US industries in an early screening study has identified potential for heat pumps in several of the industrial sectors. The site selected for this study is Kerr-McGee Refining Co. in Wynnewood, Oklahoma and the participating utility is Oklahoma Gas and Electric Co. The objective of this study is to further identify the energy savings potential through advanced heat pumps and other energy conservation methods developed in the context of pinch technology. Three units: hydrocracker, deisobutanizer and splitters were selected for this study. Three energy conservation retrofit options as described below, are identified with a combined total savings of about $493,930/year in a payback period of 2.2 years. These savings represent from about 44% reduction of current energy consumption of all the three units. The hydrocracker does not provide a good opportunity for heat pumping; however, it has good potential for heat exchange. The heat exchange option calls for increasing the process interchanger area in the hydrocracker unit by 3079 ft{sup 2}. The splitters provide a good opportunity for heat pumping. The splitters' semi-open cycle (mechanical vapor recompression) heat pump option compresses the overhead vapors of the 100W splitter and condenses it to partially supply the heat for the {number sign}2 splitter reboiler. The second heat pump opportunity was identified in the deisobutanizer unit. This mechanical vapor recompression heat pump compresses the overhead vapors of the deisobutanizer and condenses it to completely supply the reboiler duty of the same column. 20 figs., 16 tabs.

  3. Hierarchical Nanoceramics for Industrial Process Sensors

    SciTech Connect

    Ruud, James, A.; Brosnan, Kristen, H.; Striker, Todd; Ramaswamy, Vidya; Aceto, Steven, C.; Gao, Yan; Willson, Patrick, D.; Manoharan, Mohan; Armstrong, Eric, N., Wachsman, Eric, D.; Kao, Chi-Chang

    2011-07-15

    This project developed a robust, tunable, hierarchical nanoceramics materials platform for industrial process sensors in harsh-environments. Control of material structure at multiple length scales from nano to macro increased the sensing response of the materials to combustion gases. These materials operated at relatively high temperatures, enabling detection close to the source of combustion. It is anticipated that these materials can form the basis for a new class of sensors enabling widespread use of efficient combustion processes with closed loop feedback control in the energy-intensive industries. The first phase of the project focused on materials selection and process development, leading to hierarchical nanoceramics that were evaluated for sensing performance. The second phase focused on optimizing the materials processes and microstructures, followed by validation of performance of a prototype sensor in a laboratory combustion environment. The objectives of this project were achieved by: (1) synthesizing and optimizing hierarchical nanostructures; (2) synthesizing and optimizing sensing nanomaterials; (3) integrating sensing functionality into hierarchical nanostructures; (4) demonstrating material performance in a sensing element; and (5) validating material performance in a simulated service environment. The project developed hierarchical nanoceramic electrodes for mixed potential zirconia gas sensors with increased surface area and demonstrated tailored electrocatalytic activity operable at high temperatures enabling detection of products of combustion such as NOx close to the source of combustion. Methods were developed for synthesis of hierarchical nanostructures with high, stable surface area, integrated catalytic functionality within the structures for gas sensing, and demonstrated materials performance in harsh lab and combustion gas environments.

  4. Automated full matrix capture for industrial processes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brown, Roy H.; Pierce, S. Gareth; Collison, Ian; Dutton, Ben; Dziewierz, Jerzy; Jackson, Joseph; Lardner, Timothy; MacLeod, Charles; Morozov, Maxim

    2015-03-01

    Full matrix capture (FMC) ultrasound can be used to generate a permanent re-focusable record of data describing the geometry of a part; a valuable asset for an inspection process. FMC is a desirable acquisition mode for automated scanning of complex geometries, as it allows compensation for surface shape in post processing and application of the total focusing method. However, automating the delivery of such FMC inspection remains a significant challenge for real industrial processes due to the high data overhead associated with the ultrasonic acquisition. The benefits of NDE delivery using six-axis industrial robots are well versed when considering complex inspection geometries, but such an approach brings additional challenges to scanning speed and positional accuracy when combined with FMC inspection. This study outlines steps taken to optimize the scanning speed and data management of a process to scan the diffusion bonded membrane of a titanium test plate. A system combining a KUKA robotic arm and a reconfigurable FMC phased array controller is presented. The speed and data implications of different scanning methods are compared, and the impacts on data visualization quality are discussed with reference to this study. For the 0.5 m2 sample considered, typical acquisitions of 18 TB/m2 were measured for a triple back wall FMC acquisition, illustrating the challenge of combining high data throughput with acceptable scanning speeds.

  5. Field Heat Treatment Technician: Competency Profile. Apprenticeship and Industry Training. 20908.1

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Alberta Advanced Education and Technology, 2008

    2008-01-01

    The graduate of the Field Heat Treatment Technician apprenticeship program is a certified journeyperson who will be able: (1) use heat treatment equipment to apply heat to materials in order to change a material's properties; (2) Use their knowledge of the properties of heat, industry codes and specifications to determine how heat treatment will…

  6. District heating system, College Industrial Park, Klamath Falls, Oregon

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1981-10-01

    The College Industrial Park (CIP) is located to the northwest of the Oregon Institute of Technology (OIT) campus. Waste water from the OIT campus geothermal heating system flows through an open ditch to the south of the Park. Being aware of this, city personnel have requested the Geo-Heat Center design a distribution network for the Park to eventually utilize an estimated 600 GPM of the 130/sup 0/F waste water. Geothermal water from each campus building is discharged into storm drains which also collect surface run off from parking lots, roofs and grounds. Waste water temperatures are generally between 120/sup 0/F and 130/sup 0/F, however, it may drop as low as 90/sup 0/F when mixing occurs with large amounts of surface run off. Peak heating load requirements for the OIT campus are estimated to be 17.8 x 10/sup 6/ Btu/hour for 567,000 square feet of space. Peak flow rate of geothermal fluid to satisfy this load is then 593 GPM based on a net 60/sup 0/F temperature differential. Three wells are available to supply the necessary flow. A Lithium-Bromide Absorption Chiller (185 ton) was installed in 1980 to provide space cooling. The chiller requires a constant flow rate of 550 GPM and discharges 170/sup 0/F water to the storm drains during summer months.

  7. Gravity-Dependent Transport in Industrial Processes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ostrach, Simon; Kamotani, Yasuhiro

    1996-01-01

    Gravity dependent transport phenomena in various industrial processes are investigated in order to indicate new directions for micro-gravity research that enhance the commercial success of the space program. The present article describes the commercialization possibilities of such topics associated with physicochemical transport phenomena. The topics are: coating flow, rotating electrochemical system, and convection in low Plandtl number fluids. The present study is directed to understand these phenomena, and to develop a knowledge base for their applications with emphasis to a micro-gravity environment.

  8. Low-temperature waste-heat recovery in the food and paper industries

    SciTech Connect

    Foell, W.K.; Lund, D.; Mitchell, J.W.; Ray, D.; Stevenson, R.; TenWolde, A.

    1980-11-01

    The potential of low-temperature waste-heat recovery technology is examined. An examination of barriers to impede waste-heat recovery is made and research programs are identified. Extensive information and data are presented in the following chapters: Waste Heat Recovery in the Wisconsin Food Industry; Waste Heat Recovery in the Wisconsin Pulp and Paper Industry; Industries' Economic Analysis of Energy Conservation Projects; Industrial Waste Heat Recovery (selection of heat-recovery heat exchangers for industrial applications, simplified procedure for selection of heat recovery heat exchangers for industrial applications, selection of heat pumps for industrial applications); Institutional Aspects of Industrial Energy Conservation (economic motivation for energy conservation and the industrial response, intrafirm idea channels and their sources, evaluation and approval of plant improvement projects, reported barriers to adopting waste heat recovery projects and recommendations for government involvement, and the final chapter is a summary with major conclusions given. Additional information is given in two appendices on the potential waste heat recovery in a cheese plant (calculation) and conditions for optimum exchanger size and break-even fuel cost. (MCW)

  9. Evaluation of geothermal energy as a heat source for the oilsands industry in Northern Alberta (Canada)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Majorowicz, J. A.; Unsworth, M.; Gray, A.; Nieuwenhuis, G.; Babadagli, T.; Walsh, N.; Weides, S.; Verveda, R.

    2012-12-01

    The extraction and processing of bitumen from the oilsands of Northern Alberta requires very large amounts of heat that is obtained by burning natural gas. At current levels, the gas used represents 6% of Canada's natural gas production. Geothermal energy could potentially provide this heat, thereby reducing both the financial costs and environmental impact of the oilsands industry. The Helmholtz Alberta Initiative is evaluating this application of geothermal energy through an integrated program of geology, geophysics, reservoir simulation and calculations of the cost benefit. A first stage in this evaluation is refining estimates of subsurface temperature beneath Northern Alberta. This has involved three stages: (1) Corrected industrial thermal data have been used to revise estimates of the upper crustal temperatures beneath the oilsands regions in Alberta. The geothermal gradient map produced using heat flow and thermal conductivity for the entire Phanerozoic column suggests that the overall gradient of the entire column is less than the gradients calculated directly from industry measurements. (2) Paleoclimatic corrections must be applied , since this region has experienced a significant increase in surface temperatures since the end of the last ice age causing a perturbation of shallow heat flow. For this reason, estimates of geothermal gradient based on shallow data are not necessarily characteristic of the whole sedimentary column and can lead to errors in temperature prediction at depth. (3) Improved measurements have been made of the thermal conductivity of the crystalline basement rocks (average = 2.9±0.8 W/m K). Thermal conductivity exhibits significant spatial variability and to a large degree controls the temperature conditions in the Precambrian crystalline basement rocks and its heat content at given heat flow-heat generation. When these steps are used to calculate subsurface temperatures, it can be shown that the temperatures required for geothermal

  10. Heat pump processes induced by laser radiation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Garbuny, M.; Henningsen, T.

    1980-01-01

    A carbon dioxide laser system was constructed for the demonstration of heat pump processes induced by laser radiation. The system consisted of a frequency doubling stage, a gas reaction cell with its vacuum and high purity gas supply system, and provisions to measure the temperature changes by pressure, or alternatively, by density changes. The theoretical considerations for the choice of designs and components are dicussed.

  11. Public relations and the radiation processing industry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Coates, T. Donna

    The world's uneasiness and mistrust regarding anything nuclear has heightened in recent years due to events such as Chernobyl and Three Mile Island. Opinion polls and attitude surveys document the public's growing concern about issues such as the depletion of the ozone layer, the resulting greenhouse effect and exposure of our planet to cosmic radiation. Ultimately, such research reveals an underlying fear regarding the unseen impacts of modern technology on the environment and on human health. These concerns have obvious implications for the radiation processing industry, whose technology is nuclear based and not easily understood by the public. We have already seen organized nuclear opponents mobilize public anxiety, fear and misunderstanding in order to oppose the installation of radiation processing facilities and applications such as food irradiation. These opponents will no doubt try to strengthen resistance to our technology in the future. Opponents will attempt to convince the public that the risks to public and personal health and safety outweigh the benefits of our technology. We in the industry must head off any tendency for the public to see us as the "enemy". Our challenge is to counter public uneasiness and misunderstanding by effectively communicating the human benefits of our technology. Clearly it is a challenge we cannot afford to ignore.

  12. Heating and cooling in adiabatic mixing process

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Jing; Cai, Zi; Zou, Xu-Bo; Guo, Guang-Can

    2010-12-01

    We study the effect of interaction on the temperature change in the process of adiabatic mixing of two components of Fermi gases using the real-space Bogoliubov-de Gennes method. We find that in the process of adiabatic mixing, the competition between the adiabatic expansion and the attractive interaction makes it possible to cool or heat the system depending on the strength of the interaction and the initial temperature of the system. The changes of the temperature in a bulk system and in a trapped system are investigated.

  13. Neural networks in the process industries

    SciTech Connect

    Ben, L.R.; Heavner, L.

    1996-12-01

    Neural networks, or more precisely, artificial neural networks (ANNs), are rapidly gaining in popularity. They first began to appear on the process-control scene in the early 1990s, but have been a research focus for more than 30 years. Neural networks are really empirical models that approximate the way man thinks neurons in the human brain work. Neural-net technology is not trying to produce computerized clones, but to model nature in an effort to mimic some of the brain`s capabilities. Modeling, for the purposes of this article, means developing a mathematical description of physical phenomena. The physics and chemistry of industrial processes are usually quite complex and sometimes poorly understood. Our process understanding, and our imperfect ability to describe complexity in mathematical terms, limit fidelity of first-principle models. Computational requirements for executing these complex models are a further limitation. It is often not possible to execute first-principle model algorithms at the high rate required for online control. Nevertheless, rigorous first principle models are commonplace design tools. Process control is another matter. Important model inputs are often not available as process measurements, making real-time application difficult. In fact, engineers often use models to infer unavailable measurements. 5 figs.

  14. Heat transfer in an industrial directional solidification furnace with multi-heaters for silicon ingots

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Zaoyang; Liu, Lijun; Liu, Xin; Zhang, Yunfeng; Xiong, Jingfeng

    2014-01-01

    We carried out transient global simulations of melting, growing and annealing processes in an industrial directional solidification furnace with a top and side heater. The power distribution between the two heaters was set to 3:7, 5:5 and 7:3 to investigate its effect on global heat transfer and silicon crystal growth. Quantitative comparisons of temperature distributions are presented. Increasing the top heating power slightly increases the melting time and changes the melting sequence. In the crystal growth process, adjusting the power distribution from 3:7 to 7:3 can lead to an 8-12 K change in axial temperature difference in the silicon domain. Both the intensity and pattern of the silicon melt flow are influenced by the change in power distribution. The melt-crystal interface is less convex to the melt with an increase in top heating power, especially at the final stage of solidification. In the annealing process, the ingot temperature decreases to approximately 1600 K to reduce the thermal stress and dislocation density. Isotherm shapes are different at this stage and may lead to different thermal stress and dislocation density distributions in the silicon ingot. The numerical results provide a basic understanding of the heat transfer characteristics due to power distribution in an industrial multi-heater directional solidification furnace.

  15. Prospects for using heat pumps in systems supplying power to industrial and municipal enterprises

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Efimov, N. N.; Malyshev, P. A.

    2009-11-01

    The use of heat pumps for industrial and municipal applications is analyzed. It is shown that application of heat-pump units in the heating systems of industrial and municipal enterprises is already economically justified with the existing tariffs for electricity and natural gas.

  16. A performance data network for solar process heat systems

    SciTech Connect

    Barker, G.; Hale, M.J.

    1996-03-01

    A solar process heat (SPH) data network has been developed to access remote-site performance data from operational solar heat systems. Each SPH system in the data network is outfitted with monitoring equipment and a datalogger. The datalogger is accessed via modem from the data network computer at the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL). The dataloggers collect both ten-minute and hourly data and download it to the data network every 24-hours for archiving, processing, and plotting. The system data collected includes energy delivered (fluid temperatures and flow rates) and site meteorological conditions, such as solar insolation and ambient temperature. The SPH performance data network was created for collecting performance data from SPH systems that are serving in industrial applications or from systems using technologies that show promise for industrial applications. The network will be used to identify areas of SPH technology needing further development, to correlate computer models with actual performance, and to improve the credibility of SPH technology. The SPH data network also provides a centralized bank of user-friendly performance data that will give prospective SPH users an indication of how actual systems perform. There are currently three systems being monitored and archived under the SPH data network: two are parabolic trough systems and the third is a flat-plate system. The two trough systems both heat water for prisons; the hot water is used for personal hygiene, kitchen operations, and laundry. The flat plate system heats water for meat processing at a slaughter house. We plan to connect another parabolic trough system to the network during the first months of 1996. We continue to look for good examples of systems using other types of collector technologies and systems serving new applications (such as absorption chilling) to include in the SPH performance data network.

  17. Heat transfer and temperature of foods during processing.

    PubMed

    Holmes, Z A; Woodburn, M

    1981-01-01

    Safety and economics concerns have accentuated an interest in energy input and consumption in the foods industry. This review article focuses on reported temperatures and temperature histories in food preparation and processing. To assist in interpreting reported data, a basic understanding of heat transfer parameters used is given. The relationships between temperature and time histories and quality effects of physical and chemical changes in foods, the production of new compounds with possible health effects, and microbiological safety are summarized. Several areas of needed research are identified. PMID:7018836

  18. Case studies on heat stress related perceptions in different industrial sectors in southern India.

    PubMed

    Balakrishnan, Kalpana; Ramalingam, Ayyappan; Dasu, Venkatesan; Stephen, Jeremiah Chinnadurai; Sivaperumal, Mohan Raj; Kumarasamy, Deepan; Mukhopadhyay, Krishnendu; Ghosh, Santu; Sambandam, Sankar

    2010-01-01

    Linkages between thermal loads and its physiological consequences have been widely studied in non-tropical developed country settings. In many developing countries like India, despite the widespread recognition of the problem, limited attempts have been made to estimate health impacts related to occupational heat stress and fewer yet to link heat stress with potential productivity losses. This is reflected in the ubiquity of workplaces with limited or no controls to reduce exposures. As a prelude to understanding the feasibility of alternative interventions in different industrial sectors, we present case studies from 10 different industrial units in Tamil Nadu, Chennai, which describe perceptions of occupational heat stress among the workers and supervisors/management.Units were selected from among those who had previously requested an assessment of workplace heat stress exposure at select locations as part of routine industrial hygiene services provided by the investigators. Since the earlier measurements were performed in response to a management request, all units were revisited to generate a simple job and process profile using checklists in order to understand the overall heat exposure situation in the concerned unit. This was followed by a simple questionnaire administration to a small subsample of employees to evaluate the perceptions of workers and supervisors/management. Finally, we retrieved available quantitative data from previous measurements of heat stress at these units to correlate prevalence of exposures with respective perceptions.Results indicate that the existing level of controls may not be sufficient for managing work-related heat stress in any of the sectors studied, with wide variations in perceived risks. There was a noticeable disconnect between worker's perceptions and their ability to secure workplace improvements related to heat stress from the management. Wider availability of engineering and administrative controls in the industries

  19. Case studies on heat stress related perceptions in different industrial sectors in southern India

    PubMed Central

    Balakrishnan, Kalpana; Ramalingam, Ayyappan; Dasu, Venkatesan; Stephen, Jeremiah Chinnadurai; Sivaperumal, Mohan Raj; Kumarasamy, Deepan; Mukhopadhyay, Krishnendu; Ghosh, Santu; Sambandam, Sankar

    2010-01-01

    Linkages between thermal loads and its physiological consequences have been widely studied in non-tropical developed country settings. In many developing countries like India, despite the widespread recognition of the problem, limited attempts have been made to estimate health impacts related to occupational heat stress and fewer yet to link heat stress with potential productivity losses. This is reflected in the ubiquity of workplaces with limited or no controls to reduce exposures. As a prelude to understanding the feasibility of alternative interventions in different industrial sectors, we present case studies from 10 different industrial units in Tamil Nadu, Chennai, which describe perceptions of occupational heat stress among the workers and supervisors/management. Units were selected from among those who had previously requested an assessment of workplace heat stress exposure at select locations as part of routine industrial hygiene services provided by the investigators. Since the earlier measurements were performed in response to a management request, all units were revisited to generate a simple job and process profile using checklists in order to understand the overall heat exposure situation in the concerned unit. This was followed by a simple questionnaire administration to a small subsample of employees to evaluate the perceptions of workers and supervisors/management. Finally, we retrieved available quantitative data from previous measurements of heat stress at these units to correlate prevalence of exposures with respective perceptions. Results indicate that the existing level of controls may not be sufficient for managing work-related heat stress in any of the sectors studied, with wide variations in perceived risks. There was a noticeable disconnect between worker's perceptions and their ability to secure workplace improvements related to heat stress from the management. Wider availability of engineering and administrative controls in the

  20. Heat recovery/thermal energy storage for energy conservation in food processing

    SciTech Connect

    Combes, R.S.; Boykin, W.B.

    1981-01-01

    Based on energy consumption data compiled for 1974, 59% of the total energy consumed in the US food processing industry was thermal energy. The energy-consuming processes which utilize this thermal energy reject significant quantities of waste heat, usually to the atmosphere or to the wastewater discharged from the plant. Design considerations for waste heat recovery systems in the food processing industry are discussed. A systematic analysis of the waste heat source, in terms of quantity and quality is explored. Other aspects of the waste heat source, such as contamination, are addressed as potential impediments to practical heat recovery. The characteristics of the recipient process which will utilize the recovered waste heat are discussed. Thermal energy storage, which can be used as a means of allowing the waste eat recovery process to operate independent of the subsequent utilization of the recovered energy, is discussed. The project included the design, installation and monitoring of two heat recovery systems in a Gold Kist broiler processing plant. These systems recover waste heat from a poultry scalder overflow (heated wastewater) and from a refrigeration condenser utilizing ammonia as the refrigerant. The performance and economic viability of the heat recovery systems are presented.

  1. 27 CFR 19.36 - Spirits produced in industrial processes.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... industrial processes. 19.36 Section 19.36 Alcohol, Tobacco Products and Firearms ALCOHOL AND TOBACCO TAX AND... industrial processes. (a) General. Except as otherwise provided in paragraph (b) of this section, any person who produces distilled spirits in an industrial process, including spirits produced as a byproduct...

  2. 27 CFR 19.36 - Spirits produced in industrial processes.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... industrial processes. 19.36 Section 19.36 Alcohol, Tobacco Products and Firearms ALCOHOL AND TOBACCO TAX AND... industrial processes. (a) General. Except as otherwise provided in paragraph (b) of this section, any person who produces distilled spirits in an industrial process, including spirits produced as a byproduct...

  3. 27 CFR 19.36 - Spirits produced in industrial processes.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... industrial processes. 19.36 Section 19.36 Alcohol, Tobacco Products and Firearms ALCOHOL AND TOBACCO TAX AND... industrial processes. (a) General. Except as otherwise provided in paragraph (b) of this section, any person who produces distilled spirits in an industrial process, including spirits produced as a byproduct...

  4. 27 CFR 19.36 - Spirits produced in industrial processes.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... industrial processes. 19.36 Section 19.36 Alcohol, Tobacco Products and Firearms ALCOHOL AND TOBACCO TAX AND... industrial processes. (a) General. Except as otherwise provided in paragraph (b) of this section, any person who produces distilled spirits in an industrial process, including spirits produced as a byproduct...

  5. Simplification of simulation processes at gravity heat pipes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hrabovský, Peter; Papučík, Štefan; Lenhard, Richard

    2016-03-01

    Water heating by heat pipe is currently the object examined on the use in sphere of recovering heat from technological processes. The heat pipe is the device for water heating that provides us a very effective way of transferring heat from the heat source (combustion) to the place of consumption (water). For the draft proposal of such equipment is produced under the required conditions mathematical model of ANSYS that verifies the actual measurements the experiments. The paper deals with the possibility of simulations of heat pipes in the process of heat transport and apposite simplification of the simulation process by defining apposite the substitutes of the solid materials with its own thermal properties that ensure a similar heat transport as a heat transfer medium in the heat pipe.

  6. Cogeneration Technology Alternatives Study (CTAS). Volume 3: Industrial processes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Palmer, W. B.; Gerlaugh, H. E.; Priestley, R. R.

    1980-01-01

    Cogenerating electric power and process heat in single energy conversion systems rather than separately in utility plants and in process boilers is examined in terms of cost savings. The use of various advanced energy conversion systems are examined and compared with each other and with current technology systems for their savings in fuel energy, costs, and emissions in individual plants and on a national level. About fifty industrial processes from the target energy consuming sectors were used as a basis for matching a similar number of energy conversion systems that are considered as candidate which can be made available by the 1985 to 2000 time period. The sectors considered included food, textiles, lumber, paper, chemicals, petroleum, glass, and primary metals. The energy conversion systems included steam and gas turbines, diesels, thermionics, stirling, closed cycle and steam injected gas turbines, and fuel cells. Fuels considered were coal, both coal and petroleum based residual and distillate liquid fuels, and low Btu gas obtained through the on site gasification of coal. An attempt was made to use consistent assumptions and a consistent set of ground rules specified by NASA for determining performance and cost. Data and narrative descriptions of the industrial processes are given.

  7. Processing of nickel aluminides and their industrial applications

    SciTech Connect

    Sikka, V.K. ); Mavity, J.T.; Anderson, K. )

    1991-01-01

    Ductile Ni{sub 3}Al-based alloys offer unique properties. However, their use has been limited because information is lacking regarding their processing into various product forms. This paper describes the recent progress made toward melting, electroslag remelting, and the processing of large-scale ingots of one of the Ni{sub 3}Al-based alloys. Microstructural data are presented after various homogenization treatments. Both as-cast and homogenized samples were subjected to hot-compression testing. The hot-compression data for the commercial-size ingot showed the same behavior as previously reported on the experimental heats. The status of industrial applications of nickel-aluminide alloys is also described. 12 refs., 12 figs., 2 tabs.

  8. In situ heat treatment process utilizing a closed loop heating system

    DOEpatents

    Vinegar, Harold J.; Nguyen, Scott Vinh

    2010-12-07

    Systems and methods for an in situ heat treatment process that utilizes a circulation system to heat one or more treatment areas are described herein. The circulation system may use a heated liquid heat transfer fluid that passes through piping in the formation to transfer heat to the formation. In some embodiments, the piping may be positioned in at least two of the wellbores.

  9. Theoretical Design of Thermosyphon for Process Heat Transfer from NGNP to Hydrogen Plant

    SciTech Connect

    Piyush Sabharwall; Mike Patterson; Fred Gunnerson

    2008-09-01

    The Next Generation Nuclear Plant (NGNP) will most likely produce electricity and process heat, with both being considered for hydrogen production. To capture nuclear process heat, and transport it to a distant industrial facility requires a high temperature system of heat exchangers, pumps and/or compressors. The heat transfer system is particularly challenging not only due to the elevated temperatures (up to ~ 1300K) and industrial scale power transport (=50 MW), but also due to a potentially large separation distance between the nuclear and industrial plants (100+m) dictated by safety and licensing mandates. The work reported here is the preliminary analysis of two-phase thermosyphon heat transfer performance with alkali metals. A thermosyphon is a device for transporting heat from one point to another with quite extraordinary properties. In contrast to single-phased forced convective heat transfer via ‘pumping a fluid’, a thermosyphon (also called a wickless heat pipe) transfers heat through the vaporization / condensing process. The condensate is further returned to the hot source by gravity, i.e. without any requirement of pumps or compressors. With this mode of heat transfer, the thermosyphon has the capability to transport heat at high rates over appreciable distances, virtually isothermally and without any requirement for external pumping devices. Two-phase heat transfer by a thermosyphon has the advantage of high enthalpy transport that includes the sensible heat of the liquid, the latent heat of vaporization, and vapor superheat. In contrast, single-phase forced convection transports only the sensible heat of the fluid. Additionally, vapor-phase velocities within a thermosyphon are much greater than single-phase liquid velocities within a forced convective loop. Thermosyphon performance can be limited by the sonic limit (choking) or vapor flow and/or by condensate entrainment. Proper thermosyphon requires analysis of both.

  10. Study of heat dissipation process from heat sink using lensless Fourier transform digital holographic interferometry.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Varun; Shakher, Chandra

    2015-02-20

    This paper presents the results of experimental investigations about the heat dissipation process of plate fin heat sink using digital holographic interferometry. Visual inspection of reconstructed phase difference maps of the air field around the heat sink with and without electric power in the load resistor provides qualitative information about the variation of temperature and the heat dissipation process. Quantitative information about the temperature distribution is obtained from the relationship between the digitally reconstructed phase difference map of ambient air and heated air. Experimental results are presented for different current and voltage in the load resistor to investigate the heat dissipation process. The effect of fin spacing on the heat dissipation performance of the heat sink is also investigated in the case of natural heat convection. From experimental data, heat transfer parameters, such as local heat flux and convective heat transfer coefficients, are also calculated. PMID:25968185

  11. 5 MV 30 mA industrial electron processing system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hoshi, Y.; Mizusawa, K.

    1991-05-01

    Industrial electron beam processing systems have been in use in various application fields such as: improving heat resistivity of wire insulation; controlling quality of automobile rubber tires and melt index characteristics of PE foams; and curing paintings or printing inks. Recently, there has come up a need for electron beam with an energy higher than 3 MV in order to disinfect salmonella in chicken meat, to kill bugs in fruits, and to sterilize medical disposables. To meet this need we developed a 5 MV 30 mA electron processing system with an X-ray conversion target. The machine was tested in NHV's plant in Kyoto at continuous operation of full voltage and full current. It proved to be very steady in operation with a high efficiency (as much as 72%). Also, the X-ray target was tested in a continuous run of 5 MV 30 mA (150 kW). It proved to be viable in industrial utilization. This paper introduces the process and the results of the development.

  12. THE INTEGRATION OF PROCESS HEAT APPLICATIONS TO HIGH TEMPERATURE GAS REACTORS

    SciTech Connect

    Michael G. McKellar

    2011-11-01

    A high temperature gas reactor, HTGR, can produce industrial process steam, high-temperature heat-transfer gases, and/or electricity. In conventional industrial processes, these products are generated by the combustion of fossil fuels such as coal and natural gas, resulting in significant emissions of greenhouse gases such as carbon dioxide. Heat or electricity produced in an HTGR could be used to supply process heat or electricity to conventional processes without generating any greenhouse gases. Process heat from a reactor needs to be transported by a gas to the industrial process. Two such gases were considered in this study: helium and steam. For this analysis, it was assumed that steam was delivered at 17 MPa and 540 C and helium was delivered at 7 MPa and at a variety of temperatures. The temperature of the gas returning from the industrial process and going to the HTGR must be within certain temperature ranges to maintain the correct reactor inlet temperature for a particular reactor outlet temperature. The returning gas may be below the reactor inlet temperature, ROT, but not above. The optimal return temperature produces the maximum process heat gas flow rate. For steam, the delivered pressure sets an optimal reactor outlet temperature based on the condensation temperature of the steam. ROTs greater than 769.7 C produce no additional advantage for the production of steam.

  13. A Course in Project Evaluation in the Chemical Process Industries.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Valle-Riestra, J. Frank

    1983-01-01

    Describes a course designed to expose neophytes to methodology used in chemical process industries to evaluate commercial feasibility of proposed projects. Previously acquired disciplines are integrated to facilitate process synthesis, gain appreciation of nature of industrial projects and industrial viewpoint in managing them, and to become adept…

  14. SOLTECH 92 proceedings: Solar Process Heat Program. Volume 1

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1992-03-01

    This document is a limited Proceedings, documenting the presentations given at the symposia conducted by the US Department of Energy`s (DOE) Solar Industrial Program and Solar Thermal Electrical Program at SOLTECH92. The SOLTECH92 national solar energy conference was held in Albuquerque, New Mexico during the period February 17--20, 1992. The National Renewable Energy Laboratory manages the Solar Industrial Program; Sandia National Laboratories (Albuquerque) manages the Solar Thermal Electric Program. The symposia sessions were as follows: (1) Solar Industrial Program and Solar Thermal Electric Program Overviews, (2) Solar Process Heat Applications, (3) Solar Decontamination of Water and Soil; (4) Solar Building Technologies, (5) Solar Thermal Electric Systems, (6) PV Applications and Technologies. For each presentation given in these symposia, these Proceedings provide a one- to two-page abstract and copies of the viewgraphs and/or 35mm slides utilized by the speaker. Some speakers provided additional materials in the interest of completeness. The materials presented in this document were not subjected to a peer review process.

  15. SOLTECH 1992 proceedings: Solar Process Heat Program, volume 1

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    1992-03-01

    This document is a limited Proceedings, documenting the presentations given at the symposia conducted by the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE) Solar Industrial Program and Solar Thermal Electrical Program at SOLTECH92. The SOLTECH92 national solar energy conference was held in Albuquerque, New Mexico during the period February 17-20, 1992. The National Renewable Energy Laboratory manages the Solar Industrial Program; Sandia National Laboratories (Albuquerque) manages the Solar Thermal Electric Program. The symposia sessions were as follows: (1) Solar Industrial Program and Solar Thermal Electric Program Overviews, (2) Solar Process Heat Applications, (3) Solar Decontamination of Water and Soil, (4) Solar Building Technologies, (5) Solar Thermal Electric Systems, and (6) Photovoltaic (PV) Applications and Technologies. For each presentation given in these symposia, these Proceedings provide a one- to two-page abstract and copies of the viewgraphs and/or 35 mm slides utilized by the speaker. Some speakers provided additional materials in the interest of completeness. The materials presented in this document were not subjected to a peer review process.

  16. Industrial waste reduction: The process problem

    SciTech Connect

    Valentino, F.W.; Walmet, G.E.

    1986-09-01

    Industrial waste problems, especially those involving hazardous waste, seem to be pervasive. The national media report newly discovered waste problems and sites with alarming regularity. Examples that immediately come to mind are Love Canal, New York; Times Beach, Missouri; and Seveso, Italy. Public perceptions of the industrial waste problem, reflecting the media's focus, appear to be that: large corporations are solely responsible for creating waste dumps, and the only role of government is to prevent illegal dumping and to regulate, fine, and require corporations to rectify the problem; all efforts should be directed toward preventing illegal dumping and treatment of the existing waste dumps; all industrial wastes can be classified as hazardous in nature. This general impression is both inaccurate and incomplete. All industrial waste is not hazardous (although most of it is not benign). All waste producers are not large corporations: nearly all industries produce some wastes. And, while existing waste sites must be effectively treated, additional efforts are needed at other points in the industrial waste cycle. Most people would agree both that waste dumping must be carefully regulated because of its negative impacts on the environment and that the less waste the better, even with carefully regulated disposal. Since nearly all industry now produces some waste and no one expects industry to shut down to resolve the waste problem, other strategies need to be available to deal with the problem at the front end. This paper discusses alternative strategies.

  17. Heat pipe life and processing study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Antoniuk, D.; Luedke, E. E.

    1979-01-01

    The merit of adding water to the reflux charge in chemically and solvent cleaned aluminum/slab wick/ammonia heat pipes was evaluated. The effect of gas in the performance of three heat pipe thermal control systems was found significant in simple heat pipes, less significant in a modified simple heat pipe model with a short wickless pipe section. Use of gas data for the worst and best heat pipes of the matrix in a variable conductance heat pipe model showed a 3 C increase in the source temperature at full on condition after 20 and 246 years, respectively.

  18. A Fresnel collector process heat experiment at Capitol Concrete Products

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hauger, J. S.

    1981-01-01

    An experiment is planned, conducted and evaluated to determine the feasibility of using a Power Kinetics' Fresnel concentrator to provide process heat in an industrial environment. The plant provides process steam at 50 to 60 psig to two autoclaves for curing masonry blocks. When steam is not required, the plant preheats hot water for later use. A second system is installed at the Jet Propulsion Laboratory parabolic dish test site for hardware validation and experiment control. Experiment design allows for the extrapolation of results to varying demands for steam and hot water, and includes a consideration of some socio-technical factors such as the impact on production scheduling of diurnal variations in energy availability.

  19. Industry

    SciTech Connect

    Bernstein, Lenny; Roy, Joyashree; Delhotal, K. Casey; Harnisch, Jochen; Matsuhashi, Ryuji; Price, Lynn; Tanaka, Kanako; Worrell, Ernst; Yamba, Francis; Fengqi, Zhou; de la Rue du Can, Stephane; Gielen, Dolf; Joosen, Suzanne; Konar, Manaswita; Matysek, Anna; Miner, Reid; Okazaki, Teruo; Sanders, Johan; Sheinbaum Parado, Claudia

    2007-12-01

    This chapter addresses past, ongoing, and short (to 2010) and medium-term (to 2030) future actions that can be taken to mitigate GHG emissions from the manufacturing and process industries. Globally, and in most countries, CO{sub 2} accounts for more than 90% of CO{sub 2}-eq GHG emissions from the industrial sector (Price et al., 2006; US EPA, 2006b). These CO{sub 2} emissions arise from three sources: (1) the use of fossil fuels for energy, either directly by industry for heat and power generation or indirectly in the generation of purchased electricity and steam; (2) non-energy uses of fossil fuels in chemical processing and metal smelting; and (3) non-fossil fuel sources, for example cement and lime manufacture. Industrial processes also emit other GHGs, e.g.: (1) Nitrous oxide (N{sub 2}O) is emitted as a byproduct of adipic acid, nitric acid and caprolactam production; (2) HFC-23 is emitted as a byproduct of HCFC-22 production, a refrigerant, and also used in fluoroplastics manufacture; (3) Perfluorocarbons (PFCs) are emitted as byproducts of aluminium smelting and in semiconductor manufacture; (4) Sulphur hexafluoride (SF{sub 6}) is emitted in the manufacture, use and, decommissioning of gas insulated electrical switchgear, during the production of flat screen panels and semiconductors, from magnesium die casting and other industrial applications; (5) Methane (CH{sub 4}) is emitted as a byproduct of some chemical processes; and (6) CH{sub 4} and N{sub 2}O can be emitted by food industry waste streams. Many GHG emission mitigation options have been developed for the industrial sector. They fall into three categories: operating procedures, sector-wide technologies and process-specific technologies. A sampling of these options is discussed in Sections 7.2-7.4. The short- and medium-term potential for and cost of all classes of options are discussed in Section 7.5, barriers to the application of these options are addressed in Section 7.6 and the implication of

  20. IMPROVING INDUSTRIAL WASTEWATER TREATMENT PROCESS RELIABILITY TO ENHANCE SUSTAINABLE DEVELOPMENT

    EPA Science Inventory

    Sustainable development includes the recovery of resources from industrial manufacturing processes. One valuable resource that can often be purified and reused is process wastewater. Typically, pollutants are removed from process wastewater using physical, chemical, and biologica...

  1. Process for removing sulfur and sulfur compounds from the effluent of industrial processes

    SciTech Connect

    Sims, A.V.

    1981-03-10

    Sulfur dioxide in the stack gas from an industrial process is converted to elemental sulfur in a claus reactor at low temperature to produce sulfur fume. The sulfur is condensed by direct heat transfer with a continuously flowing countercurrent recirculating catalyst and a substantially sulfur dioxide-free gas is discharged. Catalyst and condensed sulfur are fed into the top of a sulfur recovery column and heated in the top of the column by direct heat transfer with a countercurrent stream of recycle gas. The sulfur and catalyst descend into a vaporization zone of the column where sulfur is vaporized. The vaporized sulfur is carried by the recycle gas back towards the top of the column and condensed to a fume by incoming sulfur bearing catalyst. The sulfur fume is carried from the top of the column in cold recycle gas. Hot catalyst from the vaporization section of the column is cooled by recycle gas entering the bottom of the column. Sulfur fume is recovered conventionally. Regenerated catalyst from the column is returned to the sulfur dioxide reactor. Claus plant tail gas with air passes into the base of an incinerator and passes countercurrent to recycled heat transfer solids and is oxidized to convert sulfur and sulfur bearing compounds to sulfur dioxide. The sulfur dioxide is then converted to sulfur in the process just described.

  2. Metal and Glass Manufactures Reduce Costs by Increasing Energy Efficiency in Process Heating Systems

    SciTech Connect

    2004-05-01

    Process heating plays a key role in producing steel, aluminum, and glass and in manufacturing products made from these materials. Faced with regulatory and competitive pressures to control emissions and reduce operating costs, metal and glass manufacturers are considering a variety of options for reducing overall energy consumption. As 38% of the energy used in U.S. industrial plants is consumed for process heating applications, metal and glass manufacturers are discovering that process heating technologies provide significant opportunities for improving industrial productivity, energy efficiency, and global competitiveness. This fact sheet is the first in a series to describe such opportunities that can be realized in industrial systems by conducting plant-wide assessments (PWA).

  3. Utilization of geothermal heat in tropical fruit-drying process

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, B.H.; Lopez, L.P.; King, R.; Fujii, J.; Tanaka, M.

    1982-10-01

    The power plant utilizes only the steam portion of the HGP-A well production. There are approximately 50,000 pounds per hour of 360/sup 0/F water produced (approximately 10 million Btu per hour) and the water is currently not used and is considered a waste. This tremendous resource could very well be used in applications such as food processing, food dehydration and other industrial processing that requires low-grade heat. One of the applications is examined, namely the drying of tropical fruits particularly the papaya. The papaya was chosen for the obvious reason that it is the biggest crop of all fruits produced on the Big Island. A conceptual design of a pilot plant facility capable of processing 1000 pounds of raw papaya per day is included. This facility is designed to provide a geothermally heated dryer to dehydrate papayas or other tropical fruits available on an experimental basis to obtain data such as drying time, optimum drying temperature, etc.

  4. Potential for geothermal direct use in the greenhouse, lumber, chemical, and potato and onion processing industries

    SciTech Connect

    Bressler, S.E.

    1980-09-01

    It has generally been assumed that rising energy costs in industries with high energy needs for low-temperature process heat will induce increasingly widespread geothermal direct use, so long as technical feasibility and cost advantage can be demonstrated. However, few systematic attempts have been made to determine how industry management and technical personnel within these industries view this possibility in light of factors they deem important to their own firms' energy supply choices. This paper discusses that subject in relation to potential commercial geothermal use in the greenhouse, lumber, chemical, and potato and onion processing industries. It is based upon extensive interviews with decision-makers in over 50 firms representing various segments of these industries and is a selected synthesis of material compiled into reports on each industry.

  5. Refractories for Industrial Processing. Opportunities for Improved Energy Efficiency

    SciTech Connect

    Hemrick, James G.; Hayden, H. Wayne; Angelini, Peter; Moore, Robert E.; Headrick, William L.

    2005-01-01

    Refractories are a class of materials of critical importance to manufacturing industries with high-temperature unit processes. This study describes industrial refractory applications and identifies refractory performance barriers to energy efficiency for processing. The report provides recommendations for R&D pathways leading to improved refractories for energy-efficient manufacturing and processing.

  6. Advanced Process Heater for the Steel, Aluminum and Chemical Industries of the Future

    SciTech Connect

    Thomas D. Briselden

    2007-10-31

    The Roadmap for Process Heating Technology (March 16, 2001), identified the following priority R&D needs: “Improved performance of high temperature materials; improved methods for stabilizing low emission flames; heating technologies that simultaneously reduce emissions, increase efficiency, and increase heat transfer”. Radiant tubes are used in almost every industry of the future. Examples include Aluminum re-heat furnaces; Steel strip annealing furnaces, Petroleum cracking/ refining furnaces, Metal Casting/Heat Treating in atmosphere and fluidized bed furnaces, Glass lair annealing furnaces, Forest Products infrared paper driers, Chemical heat exchangers and immersion heaters, and the indirect grain driers in the Agriculture Industry. Several common needs among the industries are evident: (1) Energy Reductions, (2) Productivity Improvements, (3) Zero Emissions, and (4) Increased Component Life. The Category I award entitled “Proof of Concept of an Advanced Process Heater (APH) for Steel, Aluminum, and Petroleum Industries of the Future” met the technical feasibility goals of: (1) doubling the heat transfer rates (2) improving thermal efficiencies by 20%, (3) improving temperature uniformity by 100oF (38 oC) and (4) simultaneously reducing NOx and CO2 emissions. The APH addresses EERE’s primary mission of increasing efficiency/reducing fuel usage in energy intensive industries. The primary goal of this project was to design, manufacture and test a commercial APH prototype by integrating three components: (1) Helical Heat Exchanger, (2) Shared Wall Radiant U-tube, and (3) Helical Flame Stabilization Element. To accomplish the above, a near net shape powder ceramic Si-SiC low-cost forming process was used to manufacture the components. The project defined the methods for making an Advanced Process Heater that produced an efficiency between 70% to 80% with temperature uniformities of less than 5oF/ft (9oC/m). Three spin-off products resulted from this

  7. Low cost process heat recovery. Interim report

    SciTech Connect

    Theisen, P.; McCray, J.

    1980-01-01

    The objectives of this project are to analyze waste heat recovery potential, economic analysis, heat exchanger and system design, and computer analysis programs. The heating demand and heat recovery potential at a Madison neighborhood bakery was conducted. The building has steam heat and natural gas is used in the hot water heater, the cooking stoves, and in the baking oven. Heat recovery potential was analyzed based upon fuel consumption in the baking oven, flue gas temperature, mass flow rate, and hours of oven operation. The feasibility of waste heat recovery systems is analyzed using life cycle cost and life cycle savings. For a first approximation, hand calculations were performed for air-to-air flat plate, fin-plate, and liquid-to-air tube type heat exchangers using the temperature and mass flow data from a pizza restaurant in Madison. Then a heat exchanger analysis program was written in interactive BASIC. The analysis indicates that heat recovery using the flat-plate and fin-plate exchanger designs is technically feasible and yields high effectiveness. (MCW)

  8. INCORPORATING INDUSTRIAL ECOLOGY INTO HIERARCHICAL CHEMICAL PROCESS DESIGN

    EPA Science Inventory

    Incorporating Industrial Ecology into Hierarchical Chemical Process Design: Determining Targets for the Exchange of Waste

    The exchange of waste to be used as a recycled feed has long been encouraged by practitioners of industrial ecology. Industrial ecology is a field t...

  9. Renewable-energy-resource options for the food-processing industry

    SciTech Connect

    Eakin, D.E.; Clark, M.A.; Inaba, L.K.

    1981-09-01

    The food processing industry generates significant quantities of organic process wastes which often require treatment prior to disposal or result in additional expenses for disposal. The food processing industry also requires fuel and electricity to provide the process energy to convert raw materials into finished food products. Depending on the particular process, organic wastes can represent a potential resource for conversion to energy products that can be used for providing process energy or other energy products. This document reports the results of an evaluation of renewable energy resource options for the food processing industry. The options evaluated were direct combustion for providing process heat, fermentation for ethanol production and anaerobic digestion for generation of methane.

  10. Process Heat Exchanger Options for the Advanced High Temperature Reactor

    SciTech Connect

    Piyush Sabharwall; Eung Soo Kim; Michael McKellar; Nolan Anderson

    2011-06-01

    The work reported herein is a significant intermediate step in reaching the final goal of commercial-scale deployment and usage of molten salt as the heat transport medium for process heat applications. The primary purpose of this study is to aid in the development and selection of the required heat exchanger for power production and process heat application, which would support large-scale deployment.

  11. Process Heat Exchanger Options for Fluoride Salt High Temperature Reactor

    SciTech Connect

    Piyush Sabharwall; Eung Soo Kim; Michael McKellar; Nolan Anderson

    2011-04-01

    The work reported herein is a significant intermediate step in reaching the final goal of commercial-scale deployment and usage of molten salt as the heat transport medium for process heat applications. The primary purpose of this study is to aid in the development and selection of the required heat exchanger for power production and process heat application, which would support large-scale deployment.

  12. Industrial Technologies Program Research Plan for Energy-Intensive Process Industries

    SciTech Connect

    Chapas, Richard B.; Colwell, Jeffery A.

    2007-10-01

    In this plan, the Industrial Technologies Program (ITP) identifies the objectives of its cross-cutting strategy for conducting research in collaboration with industry and U.S. Department of Energy national laboratories to develop technologies that improve the efficiencies of energy-intensive process industries.

  13. INDUSTRIAL PROCESS PROFILES FOR ENVIRONMENTAL USE: CHAPTER 20. THE MICA INDUSTRY

    EPA Science Inventory

    The catalog of Industrial Process Profiles for Environmental Use was developed as an aid in defining the environmental impacts of industrial activity in the United States. Entries for each industry are in consistent format and form separate chapters of the study. Mica is a group ...

  14. INDUSTRIAL PROCESS PROFILES FOR ENVIRONMENTAL USE: CHAPTER 21. THE CEMENT INDUSTRY

    EPA Science Inventory

    The catalog of Industrial Process Profiles for Environmental Use was developed as an aid in defining the environmental impacts of industrial activity in the United States. Entries for each industry are in consistent format and form separate chapters of the study. The cement indus...

  15. INDUSTRIAL PROCESS PROFILES FOR ENVIRONMENTAL USE: CHAPTER 15. BRINE AND EVAPORITE CHEMICALS INDUSTRY

    EPA Science Inventory

    The catalog of Industrial Process Profiles for Environmental Use was developed as an aid in defining the environmental impacts of industrial activity in the United States. Entries for each industry are in consistent format and form separate chapters of the study. The Brine and Ev...

  16. INDUSTRIAL PROCESS PROFILES FOR ENVIRONMENTAL USE: CHAPTER 17. THE GYPSUM AND WALLBOARD INDUSTRY

    EPA Science Inventory

    The catalog of Industrial Process Profiles for Environmental Use was developed as an aid in defining the environmental impacts of industrial activity in the United States. Entries for each industry are in consistent format and form separate chapters of the study. The gypsum and w...

  17. INDUSTRIAL PROCESS PROFILES FOR ENVIRONMENTAL USE: CHAPTER 25. PRIMARY ALUMINUM INDUSTRY

    EPA Science Inventory

    The catalog of Industrial Process Profiles for Environmental Use was developed as an aid in defining the environmental impacts of industrial activity in the United States. Entries for each industry are in consistent format and form separate chapters of the study. The primary alum...

  18. INDUSTRIAL PROCESS PROFILES FOR ENVIRONMENTAL USE: CHAPTER 19. THE CLAY INDUSTRY

    EPA Science Inventory

    The catalog of Industrial Process Profiles for Environmental Use was developed as an aid in defining the environmental impacts of industrial activity in the United States. Entries for each industry are in consistent format and form separate chapters of the study. The clay industr...

  19. INDUSTRIAL PROCESS PROFILES FOR ENVIRONMENTAL USE: CHAPTER 4. CARBON BLACK INDUSTRY

    EPA Science Inventory

    The catalog of Industrial Process Profiles for Environmental Use was developed as an aid in defining the environmental impacts of industrial activity in the United States Entries for each industry are in consistent format and form separate chapters of the study. The carbon black ...

  20. INDUSTRIAL PROCESS PROFILES FOR ENVIRONMENTAL USE: CHAPTER 2. OIL AND GAS PRODUCTION INDUSTRY

    EPA Science Inventory

    The catalog of Industrial Process Profiles for Environmental Use was developed as an aid in defining the environmental impacts of industrial activity in the United States. Entries for each industry are in consistent format and form separate chapters of the study. The oil and gas ...

  1. INDUSTRIAL PROCESS PROFILES FOR ENVIRONMENTAL USE: CHAPTER 12. THE EXPLOSIVES INDUSTRY

    EPA Science Inventory

    The catalog of Industrial Process Profiles for Environmental Use was developed as an aid in defining the environmental impacts of industrial activity in the United States. Entries for each industry are in consistent format and form separate chapters of the study. The explosives i...

  2. INDUSTRIAL PROCESS PROFILES FOR ENVIRONMENTAL USE: CHAPTER 24. THE IRON AND STEEL INDUSTRY

    EPA Science Inventory

    The catalog was developed to aid in defining the environmental impacts of U.S. industrial activity. Entries for each industry are in consistent format and form separate chapters of the catalog. The Iron and Steel Industry encompasses a variety of processes for transforming iron o...

  3. INDUSTRIAL PROCESS PROFILES FOR ENVIRONMENTAL USE: CHAPTER 16. THE FLUOROCARBON-HYDROGEN FLORIDE INDUSTRY

    EPA Science Inventory

    The catalog of Industrial Process Profiles for Environmental Use was developed as an aid in defining the environmental impacts of industrial activity in the United States. Entries for each industry are in consistent format and form separate chapters of the study. The materials of...

  4. INDUSTRIAL PROCESS PROFILES FOR ENVIRONMENTAL USE: CHAPTER 18. THE LIME INDUSTRY

    EPA Science Inventory

    The catalog of Industrial Process Profiles for Environmental Use was developed as an aid in defining the environmental impacts of industrial activity in the United States. Entries for each industry are in consistent format and form separate chapters of the study. The lime industr...

  5. INDUSTRIAL PROCESS PROFILES FOR ENVIRONMENTAL USE: CHAPTER 9. THE SYNTHETIC RUBBER INDUSTRY

    EPA Science Inventory

    The catalog of Industrial Process Profiles for Environmental Use was developed as an aid in defining the environmental impacts of industrial activity in the United States. Entries for each industry are in consistent format and form separate chapters of the study. The synthetic ru...

  6. INDUSTRIAL PROCESS PROFILES FOR ENVIRONMENTAL USE: CHAPTER 7. ORGANIC DYES AND PIGMENTS INDUSTRY

    EPA Science Inventory

    The catalog of Industrial Process Profiles for Environmental Use was developed as an aid in defining the environmental impacts of industrial activity in the United States. Entries for each industry are in consistent format and form separate chapters of the study. The organic dyes...

  7. INDUSTRIAL PROCESS PROFILES FOR ENVIRONMENTAL USE: CHAPTER 10. PLASTICS AND RESINS INDUSTRY

    EPA Science Inventory

    The catalog of Industrial Process Profiles for Environmental Use was developed as an aid in defining the environmental impacts of industrial activity in the United States. Entries for each industry are in consistent format and form separate chapters of the study. The Plastics and...

  8. INDUSTRIAL PROCESS PROFILES FOR ENVIRONMENTAL USE: CHAPTER 29 PRIMARY COPPER INDUSTRY

    EPA Science Inventory

    The catalog of Industrial Process Profiles for Environmental Use was developed as an aid in defining the environmental impacts of industrial activity in the United States. Entries for each industry are in consistent format and form separate chapters of the study. The primary copp...

  9. INDUSTRIAL PROCESS PROFILES FOR ENVIRONMENTAL USE: CHAPTER 11. THE SYNTHETIC FIBER INDUSTRY

    EPA Science Inventory

    The catalog of Industrial Process Profiles for Environmental Use was developed as an aid in defining the environmental impacts of industrial activity in the United States. Entries for each industry are in consistent format and form separate chapters of the study. Synthetic fibers...

  10. Profit opportunities for the chemical process industries

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1971-01-01

    Papers given at a seminar designed to assist industry in the utilization of NASA-developed technology are presented. The topics include the following: the Technology Utilization program, NASA patent policy changes, transfer of Hysttl resin technology, nonflammable cellulosic materials development, nonflammable paper technology, circuit board laminates and construction, polymide resins and other polymers, and intumescent coatings.

  11. Rubber Plastics Processing Industry Training Board

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Industrial Training International, 1974

    1974-01-01

    The training adviser's role is changing from trainer to problem analyst. Some of the problems being dealt with include: (1) the school to industry transition, (2) new training methods for the 16 to 18 year old entry worker, (3) foreign language training, (4) safety programs, and (5) tire-fitter training. (MW)

  12. Advanced solidification processing of an industrial gas turbine engine component

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Clemens, Mei Ling; Price, Allen; Bellows, Richard S.

    2003-03-01

    This paper will describe the efforts of the Advanced Turbine Airfoil Manufacturing Technology Program sponsored by the U.S. Department of Energy through the Oak Ridge National Laboratory and Howmet Research Corporation. The purpose of the program is to develop single-crystal and directionally solidified casting technologies to benefit Advanced Turbine Systems (ATS) industrial and utility gas turbine engines. The focus is on defining and implementing advanced Vacuum Induction Melting (VIM) furnace enhancements that provide precise control of mold temperatures during solidification. Emphasis was placed on increasing the total magnitude of thermal gradients while minimizing the difference in maximum and minimum gradients produced during the solidification process. Advanced VIM casting techniques were applied to Solar Turbines Incorporated’s Titan 130 First Stage High Pressure Turbine Blade under the ATS program. A comparison of the advanced VIM casting process to the conventional Bridgeman casting process will be presented as it pertains to the thermal gradients achieved during solidification, microstructure, elemental partitioning characterization, and solution heat treat response.

  13. Solar heated oil shale pyrolysis process

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Qader, S. A. (Inventor)

    1985-01-01

    An improved system for recovery of a liquid hydrocarbon fuel from oil shale is presented. The oil shale pyrolysis system is composed of a retort reactor for receiving a bed of oil shale particules which are heated to pyrolyis temperature by means of a recycled solar heated gas stream. The gas stream is separated from the recovered shale oil and a portion of the gas stream is rapidly heated to pyrolysis temperature by passing it through an efficient solar heater. Steam, oxygen, air or other oxidizing gases can be injected into the recycle gas before or after the recycle gas is heated to pyrolysis temperature and thus raise the temperature before it enters the retort reactor. The use of solar thermal heat to preheat the recycle gas and optionally the steam before introducing it into the bed of shale, increases the yield of shale oil.

  14. High Magnetic Field Processing - A Heat-Free Heat Treating Method

    SciTech Connect

    Ludtka, Gerard Michael; Ludtka, Gail Mackiewicz-; Wilgen, John B; Kenik, Edward A; Parish, Chad M; Rios, Orlando; Rogers, Hiram; Manuel, Michele; Kisner, Roger A; Watkins, Thomas R; Murphy, Bart L

    2012-08-01

    -free', heat treating technology. Lower residual stresses in HTMP treated materials are anticipated since no thermal strains are involved in inducing the transformation of retained austenite to martensite in high alloy steel. (2) The simultaneous increase of 12% in yield strength and 22% in impact energy in a bainitic alloy using HTMP processing. This is a major breakthrough in materials processing for the next generation of structural materials since conventionally processed materials show a reduction in impact toughness with an increase in yield strength. HTMP is a new paradigm to beneficially increase both yield strength and impact energy absorption simultaneously. (3) HTMP processing refined both the martensite lath population and the carbide dispersion in a bainitic steel alloy during Gausstempering. The refinement was believed to be responsible for the simultaneous increase in strength and toughness. Hence, HTMP significantly impacts nucleation and growth phenomenon. (4) HTMP processing developed comparable ultimate tensile strength and twice the impact energy in a lower cost, lower alloy content ({approx}8% alloy content) steel, compared to highly alloyed, (31% alloy elements involving Ni, Co, and Mo) 250-grade margining steel. Future low-cost HTMP alloys appear viable that will exceed the structural performance of highly alloyed materials that are conventionally processed. This economic benefit will enable U.S. industry to reduce cost (better more competitive worldwide) while maintaining or exceeding current performance. (5) EMAT processed cast iron exhibits significantly higher hardness (by 51% for a 9T condition) than a no-field processed sample. (6) EMAT produced microstructures in cast iron resulted in an unique graphite nodule morphology, a modified pearlite content, and unique carbide types, that formed during solidification and cooling. (7) EMAT processed nanoparticle dispersions in Mg resulted in a very fine, unagglomerated distribution of the nanoparticles in

  15. Solar production of industrial process steam for the Lone Star Brewery. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Deffenbaugh, D.M.; Svedeman, S.J.

    1985-09-15

    The existing solar process heat system at the Lone Star Brewery in San Antonio, Texas was converted to a lower temperature water preheat system. The performance of the new system was monitored. System maintenance and operation, and economic aspects are briefly described. The system was found to be unreliable for the industrial environment and not cost effective at current energy prices. (BCS)

  16. System for monitoring an industrial or biological process

    DOEpatents

    Gross, Kenneth C.; Wegerich, Stephan W.; Vilim, Rick B.; White, Andrew M.

    1998-01-01

    A method and apparatus for monitoring and responding to conditions of an industrial process. Industrial process signals, such as repetitive manufacturing, testing and operational machine signals, are generated by a system. Sensor signals characteristic of the process are generated over a time length and compared to reference signals over the time length. The industrial signals are adjusted over the time length relative to the reference signals, the phase shift of the industrial signals is optimized to the reference signals and the resulting signals output for analysis by systems such as SPRT.

  17. System for monitoring an industrial or biological process

    DOEpatents

    Gross, K.C.; Wegerich, S.W.; Vilim, R.B.; White, A.M.

    1998-06-30

    A method and apparatus are disclosed for monitoring and responding to conditions of an industrial process. Industrial process signals, such as repetitive manufacturing, testing and operational machine signals, are generated by a system. Sensor signals characteristic of the process are generated over a time length and compared to reference signals over the time length. The industrial signals are adjusted over the time length relative to the reference signals, the phase shift of the industrial signals is optimized to the reference signals and the resulting signals output for analysis by systems such as SPRT. 49 figs.

  18. [Evaluation of microbial contamination of linens in industrial laundry processes].

    PubMed

    Sanna, Adriana; Coroneo, Valentina; Dessì, Sandro; Brandas, Valeria

    2013-01-01

    Laundering linens and protecting them from microbiological recontamination are critical issues for the hotel and food industries and especially for hospitals. This study was performed to evaluate a sample of industrial laundries in Sardinia (Italy), to assess their compliance with national hygienic and sanitary regulations, along the complete laundering process. Study results indicate that industrial laundering processes are effective and that better awareness of staff who handle laundered textiles is required to reduce the risk of recontamination. PMID:23903035

  19. Evaluating Effects of Heat Stress on Cognitive Function among Workers in a Hot Industry

    PubMed Central

    Mazloumi, Adel; Golbabaei, Farideh; Mahmood Khani, Somayeh; Kazemi, Zeinab; Hosseini, Mostafa; Abbasinia, Marzieh; Farhang Dehghan, Somayeh

    2014-01-01

    Background:Heat stress, as one of the most common occupational health problems, can impair operators' cognitive processes. The aim of this study was to evaluate the impact of thermal stress on cognitive function among workers in a hot industry. Methods: In this cross-sectional study conducted in Malibel Saipa Company in 2013, workers were assigned into two groups: one group were exposed to heat stress (n=35), working in casting unit and the other group working in machining unit (n=35) with a normal air conditioning. Wet Bulb Globe Temperature was measured at three heights of ankle, abdomen, and head. In order to evaluate the effects of heat stress on attention and reaction time, Stroop tests 1, 2, and 3 were conducted before starting the work and during the work. Results: A significant positive correlation was observed between WBGT and test duration (P=0.01) and reaction time of Stroop test 3 (P=0.047), and between number of errors in Stroop tests 1, 2, and 3, during the work (P= 0.001). Moreover, Stroop test 3 showed a significant higher score for both test duration and reaction time of workers in case group. Conclusion: Results of the present study, conducted in a real work environment, confirmed the impairment of cognitive functions, including selective attention and reaction time, under heat stress conditions. PMID:25649311

  20. Process models: analytical tools for managing industrial energy systems

    SciTech Connect

    Howe, S O; Pilati, D A; Balzer, C; Sparrow, F T

    1980-01-01

    How the process models developed at BNL are used to analyze industrial energy systems is described and illustrated. Following a brief overview of the industry modeling program, the general methodology of process modeling is discussed. The discussion highlights the important concepts, contents, inputs, and outputs of a typical process model. A model of the US pulp and paper industry is then discussed as a specific application of process modeling methodology. Applications addressed with the case study results include projections of energy demand, conservation technology assessment, energy-related tax policies, and sensitivity analysis. A subsequent discussion of these results supports the conclusion that industry process models are versatile and powerful tools for managing industrial energy systems.

  1. Unit Operation Experiment Linking Classroom with Industrial Processing

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Benson, Tracy J.; Richmond, Peyton C.; LeBlanc, Weldon

    2013-01-01

    An industrial-type distillation column, including appropriate pumps, heat exchangers, and automation, was used as a unit operations experiment to provide a link between classroom teaching and real-world applications. Students were presented with an open-ended experiment where they defined the testing parameters to solve a generalized problem. The…

  2. Final Technical Report: Intensive Quenching Technology for Heat Treating and Forging Industries

    SciTech Connect

    Aronov, Michael A.

    2005-12-21

    Intensive quenching (IQ) process is an alternative way of hardening (quenching) steel parts through the use of highly agitated water and then still air. It was developed by IQ Technologies, Inc. (IQT) of Akron, Ohio. While conventional quenching is usually performed in environmentally unfriendly oil or water/polymer solutions, the IQ process uses highly agitated environmentally friendly water or low concentration water/mineral salt solutions. The IQ method is characterized by extremely high cooling rates of steel parts. In contrast to conventional quenching, where parts cool down to the quenchant temperature and usually have tensile or neutral residual surface stresses at the end of quenching. The IQ process is interrupted when the part core is still hot and when there are maximum compressive stresses deep into the parts, thereby providing hard, ductile, better wear resistant parts. The project goal was to advance the patented IQ process from feasibility to commercialization in the heat-treating and forging industries to reduce significantly energy consumption and environmental impact, to increase productivity and to enhance economic competitiveness of these industries as well as Steel, Metal Casting and Mining industries. To introduce successfully the IQ technology in the U.S. metal working industry, the project team has completed the following work over the course of this project: A total of 33 manufacturers of steel products provided steel parts for IQ trails. IQT conducted IQ demonstrations for 34 different steel parts. Our customers tested intensively quenched parts in actual field conditions to evaluate the product service life and performance improvement. The data obtained from the field showed the following: Service life (number of holes punched) of cold-work punches (provided by EHT customer and made of S5 shock-resisting steel) was improved by two to eight times. Aluminum extrusion dies provided by GAM and made of hot work H-13 steel outperformed the

  3. Heat exchanger for coal gasification process

    DOEpatents

    Blasiole, George A.

    1984-06-19

    This invention provides a heat exchanger, particularly useful for systems requiring cooling of hot particulate solids, such as the separated fines from the product gas of a carbonaceous material gasification system. The invention allows effective cooling of a hot particulate in a particle stream (made up of hot particulate and a gas), using gravity as the motive source of the hot particulate. In a preferred form, the invention substitutes a tube structure for the single wall tube of a heat exchanger. The tube structure comprises a tube with a core disposed within, forming a cavity between the tube and the core, and vanes in the cavity which form a flow path through which the hot particulate falls. The outside of the tube is in contact with the cooling fluid of the heat exchanger.

  4. Fluidized bed heating process and apparatus

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    McHale, Edward J. (Inventor)

    1981-01-01

    Capacitive electrical heating of a fluidized bed enables the individual solid particles within the bed to constitute the hottest portion thereof. This effect is achieved by applying an A. C. voltage potential between dielectric coated electrodes, one of which is advantageously the wall of the fluidized bed rejection zone, sufficient to create electrical currents in said particles so as to dissipate heat therein. In the decomposition of silane or halosilanes in a fluidized bed reaction zone, such heating enhances the desired deposition of silicon product on the surface of the seed particles within the fluidized bed and minimizes undesired coating of silicon on the wall of the reaction zone and the homogeneous formation of fine silicon powder within said zone.

  5. Evolution of the radiation processing industry

    SciTech Connect

    Cleland, Marshall R.

    2013-04-19

    Early investigations of the effects of treating materials with ionizing radiations began in 1894 with the irradiation of gases at atmospheric pressure using cathode rays from a Crookes gas-discharge tube, in 1895 with the discovery of X-rays emitted from a Crookes tube, and in 1896 with the discovery of radioactivity in uranium. In 1897, small electrically charged particles were detected and identified in the gas discharges inside Crookes tubes. These particles were then named electrons. During the next three decades, it was found that these novel forms of energy could produce ions to initiate chemical reactions in some gases and liquids. By 1921, it had also been shown that insects, parasites and bacteria could be killed by treatment with ionizing radiation. In 1925, a high-vacuum tube with a thermionic cathode and a thin metallic anode was developed to produce electron beams in air by using accelerating potentials up to 250 kilovolts. That unique apparatus was the precursor of the many types of electron accelerators that have been developed since then for a variety of industrial applications. In 1929, the vulcanization of natural rubber without using any chemical additives was achieved by irradiation with electrons from a 250 kilovolt accelerator. In 1939, several liquid monomers were polymerized by treatment with gamma rays from radioactive nuclides. These early results were not exploited before the end of World War II because intense sources of ionizing radiation were not available then. Shortly after that war, there was increased interest in developing the peaceful uses of atomic energy, which included the chemical and biological effects of radiation exposures. Many uses that have been developed since then are described briefly in this paper. These industrial applications are now producing billions of US dollars in revenue every year.

  6. Evolution of the radiation processing industry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cleland, Marshall R.

    2013-04-01

    Early investigations of the effects of treating materials with ionizing radiations began in 1894 with the irradiation of gases at atmospheric pressure using cathode rays from a Crookes gas-discharge tube, in 1895 with the discovery of X-rays emitted from a Crookes tube, and in 1896 with the discovery of radioactivity in uranium. In 1897, small electrically charged particles were detected and identified in the gas discharges inside Crookes tubes. These particles were then named electrons. During the next three decades, it was found that these novel forms of energy could produce ions to initiate chemical reactions in some gases and liquids. By 1921, it had also been shown that insects, parasites and bacteria could be killed by treatment with ionizing radiation. In 1925, a high-vacuum tube with a thermionic cathode and a thin metallic anode was developed to produce electron beams in air by using accelerating potentials up to 250 kilovolts. That unique apparatus was the precursor of the many types of electron accelerators that have been developed since then for a variety of industrial applications. In 1929, the vulcanization of natural rubber without using any chemical additives was achieved by irradiation with electrons from a 250 kilovolt accelerator. In 1939, several liquid monomers were polymerized by treatment with gamma rays from radioactive nuclides. These early results were not exploited before the end of World War II because intense sources of ionizing radiation were not available then. Shortly after that war, there was increased interest in developing the peaceful uses of atomic energy, which included the chemical and biological effects of radiation exposures. Many uses that have been developed since then are described briefly in this paper. These industrial applications are now producing billions of US dollars in revenue every year.

  7. Marketing research for EE G Mound Applied Technologies' heat treatment process of high strength materials

    SciTech Connect

    Shackson, R.H.

    1991-10-09

    This report summarizes research conducted by ITI to evaluate the commercialization potential of EG G Mound Applied Technologies' heat treatment process of high strength materials. The remainder of the report describes the nature of demand for maraging steel, extent of demand, competitors, environmental trends, technology life cycle, industry structure, and conclusion. (JL)

  8. Induced radioactivity from industrial radiation processing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lone, M. A.

    1990-12-01

    Analytic expressions are developed for quantitative analysis of radioactivity induced by radiation processing of products with electrons or photons. These expressions provide reasonable estimates of induced activity much faster than Monte Carlo simulations. Analysis of radioactivity from processing of meat with 10 MeV electrons shows an induced activity of less than 10 mBq/(kgkGy) just after irradiation. This is 4 orders of magnitude less than the natural background activity of about 100 Bq/kg found in meat. Five days after processing the induced activity will reduce by a factor of 300.

  9. Development and demonstration of an electric heat pump for waste-heat recovery in industry. Design and analysis report and analysis report

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moreland, W. C.; Eder, J. S.; Wolfe, R. W.

    1981-03-01

    The output capacity of the unit is 30 x 10 to the 6th power Btu/h in the form of process steam delivered at 50 psig with 20 F superheat (318 F). A functional description of the heat pump system is given along with a thermodynamic analysis of the cycle. The various subsystems, controls, and major components are also described and a safety analysis presented. A general discussion of the important considerations involved when considering the application of a heat pump to an industrial process is given. Additional information includes an analysis of the hot gas by-pass and control of the intercooler; pressure drops in methanol piping and heat exchangers; and typical liquid nitrogen storage system information.

  10. Heat pipe cooling of an aerospace foam mold manufacturing process

    SciTech Connect

    Hahn, D.R.; Feldman, K.T.; Marjon, P.L.

    1980-01-01

    A passive heat pipe cooling system was developed to cool a Bendix foam mold used to manufacture aerospace foam parts. The cooling system consists of ten copper-water heat pipes with cooling fins implanted into the aluminum mold and cooled by a domestic size fan blowing ambient air. The number and location of the heat pipes was determined to provide the most effective cooling and mold isothermalization based on experimental measurements of mold temperatures during the exothermic foaming process and from practical considerations of the mold geometry and use. Performance tests were cnducted on an individual heat pipe and on the ten heat pipes implanted in the mold. Both exothermic foam heating and internal electrical heat input were used in the experiments. The experimental test results indicate that the heat pipe cooling system with a fan is four to six times faster than free convection cooling of the mold with no heat pipes or fan and nearly twice as fast as cooling by the fan only. Similarly fast increases in mold heating time in the cure furnace could be realized if the heat pipes are used during this part of the production process. The heat pipes also cool hot spots in the mold and help isothermalize the mold so that better quality foam parts should be produced.

  11. Latest Development of Infrared Radiation Heating for Food Processing

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Infrared (IR) heating could be an alternative technology for thermal and dehydration processing of food and agricultural products with many advantages, including high process and energy efficiencies, high product quality, improved food safety and reduced environmental pollution. This paper reviews ...

  12. Nuclear heat source component design considerations for HTGR process heat reactor plant concept

    SciTech Connect

    McDonald, C.F.; Kapich, D.; King, J.H.; Venkatesh, M.C.

    1982-05-01

    The coupling of a high-temperature gas-cooled reactor (HTGR) and a chemical process facility has the potential for long-term synthetic fuel production (i.e., oil, gasoline, aviation fuel, hydrogen, etc) using coal as the carbon source. Studies are in progress to exploit the high-temperature capability of an advanced HTGR variant for nuclear process heat. The process heat plant discussed in this paper has a 1170-MW(t) reactor as the heat source and the concept is based on indirect reforming, i.e., the high-temperature nuclear thermal energy is transported (via an intermediate heat exchanger (IHX)) to the externally located process plant by a secondary helium transport loop. Emphasis is placed on design considerations for the major nuclear heat source (NHS) components, and discussions are presented for the reactor core, prestressed concrete reactor vessel (PCRV), rotating machinery, and heat exchangers.

  13. Process for heating coal-oil slurries

    DOEpatents

    Braunlin, W.A.; Gorski, A.; Jaehnig, L.J.; Moskal, C.J.; Naylor, J.D.; Parimi, K.; Ward, J.V.

    1984-01-03

    Controlling gas to slurry volume ratio to achieve a gas holdup of about 0.4 when heating a flowing coal-oil slurry and a hydrogen containing gas stream allows operation with virtually any coal to solvent ratio and permits operation with efficient heat transfer and satisfactory pressure drops. The critical minimum gas flow rate for any given coal-oil slurry will depend on numerous factors such as coal concentration, coal particle size distribution, composition of the solvent (including recycle slurries), and type of coal. Further system efficiency can be achieved by operating with multiple heating zones to provide a high heat flux when the apparent viscosity of the gas saturated slurry is highest. Operation with gas flow rates below the critical minimum results in system instability indicated by temperature excursions in the fluid and at the tube wall, by a rapid increase and then decrease in overall pressure drop with decreasing gas flow rate, and by increased temperature differences between the temperature of the bulk fluid and the tube wall. At the temperatures and pressures used in coal liquefaction preheaters the coal-oil slurry and hydrogen containing gas stream behaves essentially as a Newtonian fluid at shear rates in excess of 150 sec[sup [minus]1]. The gas to slurry volume ratio should also be controlled to assure that the flow regime does not shift from homogeneous flow to non-homogeneous flow. Stable operations have been observed with a maximum gas holdup as high as 0.72. 29 figs.

  14. Process for heating coal-oil slurries

    DOEpatents

    Braunlin, Walter A.; Gorski, Alan; Jaehnig, Leo J.; Moskal, Clifford J.; Naylor, Joseph D.; Parimi, Krishnia; Ward, John V.

    1984-01-03

    Controlling gas to slurry volume ratio to achieve a gas holdup of about 0.4 when heating a flowing coal-oil slurry and a hydrogen containing gas stream allows operation with virtually any coal to solvent ratio and permits operation with efficient heat transfer and satisfactory pressure drops. The critical minimum gas flow rate for any given coal-oil slurry will depend on numerous factors such as coal concentration, coal particle size distribution, composition of the solvent (including recycle slurries), and type of coal. Further system efficiency can be achieved by operating with multiple heating zones to provide a high heat flux when the apparent viscosity of the gas saturated slurry is highest. Operation with gas flow rates below the critical minimum results in system instability indicated by temperature excursions in the fluid and at the tube wall, by a rapid increase and then decrease in overall pressure drop with decreasing gas flow rate, and by increased temperature differences between the temperature of the bulk fluid and the tube wall. At the temperatures and pressures used in coal liquefaction preheaters the coal-oil slurry and hydrogen containing gas stream behaves essentially as a Newtonian fluid at shear rates in excess of 150 sec.sup. -1. The gas to slurry volume ratio should also be controlled to assure that the flow regime does not shift from homogeneous flow to non-homogeneous flow. Stable operations have been observed with a maximum gas holdup as high as 0.72.

  15. INDUSTRIAL WASTE HEAT RECOVERY AND THE POTENTIAL FOR EMISSIONS REDUCTION. VOLUME 1. MAIN REPORT

    EPA Science Inventory

    This report examines the applicability of conservation equipment to various industrial sectors, determines the net costs involved, and assesses the potential for conservation as a means of air pollution control. Predictions of the amount of waste heat available from U.S. industri...

  16. EMISSIONS FORECASTS FOR INDUSTRIAL PROCESS SOURCES

    EPA Science Inventory

    The report gives national and regional air emissions forecasts from several sulfur oxide and nitrogen oxide (SOx and NOx) emissions control Process Model Projection Technique (PROMPT) test runs. PROMPT, one of a number of National Acid Precipitation Assessment Program emission fo...

  17. An example of a tailored industrial combined heat and power plant -- The Tarrogona power plant

    SciTech Connect

    Izarny-Gargas, L.

    1998-07-01

    Encouraged by the economic and regulatory context in some European countries like Spain. Middle-sized cogeneration plants known as combined heat and power plants continue to raise the interest of industrial companies. This type of power plant represents a reliable resource for aiding the competitiveness of their owners, using residual thermal energy or producing additional steam for a process, while generating electrical energy. The generated kilowatt-hours feed their own industrial utility, enabling substantial cuts in their energy bill, and sometimes generating profits from sales of electricity to the grid. One salient aspect of this type of project is the request for deep integration in the industrial utility, from the process point of view (exchanges of steam and water, control system interfaces...) as well as from the cultural point of view (compliance with the technical standards and requirements of a given industrial sector...). As a matter of fact, the newly commissioned TARRAGONA combined cycle power plant is representative of what can be achieved in terms of deep integration of a power plant in a petrochemical site. The aim of the present paper is not to provide an exhaustive description of the CHPP of TARRAGONA, rather to expose the most interesting aspects of the project and present the major components at the source of its efficiency and reliability : the FRAME 6B heavy duty gas turbine and the TM-2 steam turbine both manufactured by GEC ALSTHOM and especially adapted to this type of application. The GEC ALSTHOM combined cycle family VEGA X06 is based on these machines.

  18. Heat transfer for falling film evaporation of industrially relevant fluids up to very high Prandtl numbers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gourdon, Mathias; Karlsson, Erik; Innings, Fredrik; Jongsma, Alfred; Vamling, Lennart

    2016-02-01

    In many industrial applications, falling film evaporation is an attractive technique for solvent removal due to high heat transfer and low residence times. Examples are the powder production in the dairy industry and in kraft pulp production process to remove water from so called black liquor. Common for both applications is that the fluids exhibit high viscosities in industrial practice. In this paper, results from experimental studies on both black liquor and a dairy product are reported for Prandtl numbers up to 800. The results are compared with several existing correlation in literature, and the need for a modified correlation is recognized especially to cover higher Prandtl-numbers. The following correlation for the turbulent flow region with 3 < Pr < 800 was derived from the data: {Nu}t = 0.0085 \\cdot Re^{0.2} \\cdot {Pr^{0.65}} The correlation has been compared to literature data from one additional study on two other fluids (propylene glycol and cyclohexanol) with fairly high Prandtl-numbers, from 40 to 58 and from 45 to 155 respectively and the agreement was within ±40 %.

  19. Dependable Hydrogen and Industrial Heat Generation from the Next Generation Nuclear Plant

    SciTech Connect

    Charles V. Park; Michael W. Patterson; Vincent C. Maio; Piyush Sabharwall

    2009-03-01

    The Department of Energy is working with industry to develop a next generation, high-temperature gas-cooled nuclear reactor (HTGR) as a part of the effort to supply the US with abundant, clean and secure energy. The Next Generation Nuclear Plant (NGNP) project, led by the Idaho National Laboratory, will demonstrate the ability of the HTGR to generate hydrogen, electricity, and high-quality process heat for a wide range of industrial applications. Substituting HTGR power for traditional fossil fuel resources reduces the cost and supply vulnerability of natural gas and oil, and reduces or eliminates greenhouse gas emissions. As authorized by the Energy Policy Act of 2005, industry leaders are developing designs for the construction of a commercial prototype producing up to 600 MWt of power by 2021. This paper describes a variety of critical applications that are appropriate for the HTGR with an emphasis placed on applications requiring a clean and reliable source of hydrogen. An overview of the NGNP project status and its significant technology development efforts are also presented.

  20. Developing and Managing University-Industry Research Collaborations through a Process Methodology/Industrial Sector Approach

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Philbin, Simon P.

    2010-01-01

    A management framework has been successfully utilized at Imperial College London in the United Kingdom to improve the process for developing and managing university-industry research collaborations. The framework has been part of a systematic approach to increase the level of research contracts from industrial sources, to strengthen the…

  1. INDUSTRIAL PROCESS PROFILES FOR ENVIRONMENTAL USE: CHAPTER 30. THE ELECTRONIC COMPONENT MANUFACTURING INDUSTRY

    EPA Science Inventory

    This report is one of a series constituting the catalog of Industrial Process Profiles for Environmental Use. Each industry sector is addressed as a separate chapter of the study. The catalog was developed for the purpose of compiling relevant information concerning air, water, a...

  2. Secure VM for Monitoring Industrial Process Controllers

    SciTech Connect

    Dasgupta, Dipankar; Ali, Mohammad Hassan; Abercrombie, Robert K; Schlicher, Bob G; Sheldon, Frederick T; Carvalho, Marco

    2011-01-01

    In this paper, we examine the biological immune system as an autonomic system for self-protection, which has evolved over millions of years probably through extensive redesigning, testing, tuning and optimization process. The powerful information processing capabilities of the immune system, such as feature extraction, pattern recognition, learning, memory, and its distributive nature provide rich metaphors for its artificial counterpart. Our study focuses on building an autonomic defense system, using some immunological metaphors for information gathering, analyzing, decision making and launching threat and attack responses. In order to detection Stuxnet like malware, we propose to include a secure VM (or dedicated host) to the SCADA Network to monitor behavior and all software updates. This on-going research effort is not to mimic the nature but to explore and learn valuable lessons useful for self-adaptive cyber defense systems.

  3. Maraging superalloys and heat treatment processes

    DOEpatents

    Korenko, Michael K.; Gelles, David S.; Thomas, Larry E.

    1986-01-01

    Described herein are nickel-chromium-iron maraging, gamma prime strengthened superalloys containing about 18 to 25 weight percent nickel, about 4 to 8 weight percent chromium, gamma prime forming elements such as aluminum and/or titanium, and a solid solution strengthening element, such as molybdenum. After heat treatment, which includes at least one ausaging treatment and at least one maraging treatment, a microstructure containing gamma prime phase and decomposed Fe-Ni-Cr type martensite is produced.

  4. A review of heat stress and its management in the power industry

    SciTech Connect

    Waner, N.S.

    1986-06-01

    The effects of heat stress on plant operator performance is discussed. Sources of heat stress are reviewed, in particular, those unique to the Nuclear Power Industry. Measurement techniques correlating environmental conditions with physiological responses are covered, along with suggested assessment indices to establish criteria for worker health and safety. Available major countermeasures are described and include those categorized as, procedural, personal support systems, and plant betterment/engineering programs. Data, recommended standards, and industry practices are presented as viable guidelines along with references and information resources to assist the reader in establishing and implementing programs for managing heat stress.

  5. FEL for the polymer processing industries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kelley, Michael J.

    1997-05-01

    Polymers are everywhere in modern life because of their unique combination of end-use functionalities, ease of processing, recycling potential and modest cost. The physical and economic scope of the infrastructure committed to present polymers makes the introduction of entirely new chemistry unlikely. Rather, the breadth of commercial offerings more likely to shrink in the face of the widening mandate for recycling, especially of packaging. Improved performance and new functionality must therefore come by routes such as surface modification. However they must come with little environmental impact and at painfully low cost. Processing with strongly absorbed light offers unique advantages. The journal and patent literatures disclose a number of examples of benefits that can be achieved, principally by use of excimer lasers or special UV lamps. Examples of commercialization are few, however, because of the unit cost and maximum scale of existing light sources. A FEL, however, offers unique advantages: tunability to the optimum wavelength, potential for scale up to high average power, and a path to attractively low unit cost of light. A business analysis of prospective applications defines the technical and economic requirements a FEL for polymer surface processing must meet. These are compared to FEL technology as it now stands and as it is envisioned.

  6. Bates solar industrial process-steam application: preliminary design review

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1980-01-07

    The design is analyzed for a parabolic trough solar process heat system for a cardboard corrugation fabrication facility in Texas. The program is briefly reviewed, including an analysis of the plant and process. The performance modeling for the system is discussed, and the solar system structural design, collector subsystem, heat transport and distribution subsystem are analyzed. The selection of the heat transfer fluid, and ullage and fluid maintenance are discussed, and the master control system and data acquisition system are described. Testing of environmental degradation of materials is briefly discussed. A brief preliminary cost analysis is included. (LEW)

  7. Effects of different additives with assistance of microwave heating for heavy metal stabilization in electronic industry sludge.

    PubMed

    Jothiramalingam, R; Lo, Shang-Lien; Chen, Ching-lung

    2010-01-01

    Electronic industrial wastewater sludge in Taiwan is normally passed through an acid-extraction process to reclaim most of the copper ions, the remaining residue may still need to be treated by various stabilization technologies using suitable additives. Cement solidification is used as the common method to stabilize the industrial wastewater sludge in Taiwan. However, this method has the disadvantage of an increase in waste volume. In the present study selective additives such as sodium sulfide, barium manganate and different phase of alumina were tested as a possible alternate additive to stabilize the heavy metal ion in the treated solid waste sludge via microwave heating treatment. The effects of additive amount, power of microwave irradiation and reaction time have been studied. Heavy metal leaching capacity is determined by using standard toxicity characteristic leaching procedure test and elemental content in the leachate is analyzed by inductively coupled plasma analysis. Sodium sulfide is effectively stabilizing the leaching copper ion with high selectivity in the presence of microwave irradiation and finally stabilized in the form of copper sulfide, which is a significant reaction to stabilize the copper ion leaching in the waste sludge. Complete stabilization of heavy metal ion and copper ion content (<5mgL(-1)) in industrial sludge is achieved by heating the microwave treated barium manganate and alumina additives by adopting suitable reaction conditions. Hybrid microwave and conventional heating process with minor amount of additive providing the efficient heavy metal stabilization for treated electronic industry waste sludge. PMID:19945139

  8. Inspection effectiveness and risk in process industries

    SciTech Connect

    Conley, M.J.; Tallin, A.G.

    1996-12-01

    Failures occasionally occur in refinery and petrochemical process equipment due to in-service damage such as internal corrosion, external corrosion, or stress corrosion cracking. Many of these failures should be preventable by detection of the damage prior to failure. However, selection of an inspection method for detection of damage has not always been based upon an evaluation of the required inspection effectiveness. Resources can be wasted by using an inspection method that is incapable of detecting damage, or is so unlikely to detect damage that it may be considered to be ineffective. Another waste of resources is excessive inspection, where the amount of inspection effort is not matched to the benefit. This paper outlines an approach to quantify the effectiveness of the complete inspection method, here defined as all of the elements that determine the mechanical integrity of an equipment item. This paper demonstrates the use of simple statistical tools or experimental techniques for estimating the effectiveness of an inspection method, and using this estimate in a risk evaluation. The approach is used to update the estimated severity of damage in process equipment after an inspection has been performed. The result of the analysis can be used in a risk assessment to estimate the risk associated with equipment failure before and after an inspection, thus providing a powerful tool to realistically set priorities for inspection planning.

  9. A leak-proof plate-fin heat exchanger concept for process plant applications

    SciTech Connect

    McDonald, C.F.

    1997-12-31

    Over the last four decades, plate-fin heat exchangers have been used extensively for aerospace applications, their major attributes being compact size, light weight overall assembly, and high reliability. Several million units have seen service for a wide range of fluids, including operation t high temperature and pressure, and clearly a well established technology base exists. Within the process industries the heat exchanger trend is towards units of smaller size and weight, and lower cost, and the utilization of the plate-fin type of construction is viewed as being in concert with these goals. Recognizing that there are applications involving dissimilar fluids, where an internal heat exchanger leak could result in a hazardous condition, a leak-proof concept to avoid this is discussed in this paper. For a plate-fin heat exchanger of brazed construction, this is achieved by means of a double headering bar system, and a buffer layer between the two fluids. On-line monitoring of heat exchanger integrity can be achieved by monitoring a small continuous purge flow in the buffer interspace. The process industry can benefit from a well established aircraft heat exchanger technology base that exists for this type of compact leak-proof heat exchanger.

  10. Energy conservation in industry and heating. A challenge to the oil industry

    SciTech Connect

    Rojey, A.

    1981-05-01

    Efforts undertaken in the field of energy conservation which should result in annual saving of 60 million toe in 1990 demand a thorough reconversion on the part of the oil industry at all stages from production to utilization. As concerns production, prospecting for new resources takes place on 2 levels: (1) better management of known resources by gradual implementation of enhanced recovery methods and recovery of gas from marginal fields or associated gas; and (2) in addition to oil resources, the use of new substrates, such as coal. With respect to transport, refining and distribution, the internal consumption involved in these different stages must be reduced by using new equipment, and considerable adaptation efforts also must be made: (1) adaptation to modifications in the upstream production structure which increasingly involves heavy crude which is difficult to process; and (2) adaptation to modifications in the downstream consumption structure requiring, in particular, the implementation of extensive heavy product conversion equipment, given the decrease in the demand for heavy fuel.

  11. Imaging spectrometer for process industry applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Herrala, Esko; Okkonen, Jukka T.; Hyvarinen, Timo S.; Aikio, Mauri; Lammasniemi, Jorma

    1994-11-01

    This paper presents an imaging spectrometer principle based on a novel prism-grating-prism (PGP) element as the dispersive component and advanced camera solutions for on-line applications. The PGP element uses a volume type holographic plane transmission grating made of dichromated gelatin (DCG). Currently, spectrographs have been realized for the 400 - 1050 nm region but the applicable spectral region of the PGP is 380 - 1800 nm. Spectral resolution is typically between 1.5 and 5 nm. The on-axis optical configuration and simple rugged tubular optomechanical construction of the spectrograph provide a good image quality and resistance to harsh environmental conditions. Spectrograph optics are designed to be interfaced to any standard CCD camera. Special camera structures and operating modes can be used for applications requiring on-line data interpretation and process control.

  12. Targeting industrial processes for pollution prevention

    SciTech Connect

    Li, D.W.

    1997-05-01

    Before investing in pollution prevention projects, companies need to focus on the processes that have the potential to result in the greatest payback. All too often, companies hire outside consultants to conduct one-time, isolated opportunity assessments in response to state or Federal planning requirements but do not continue to seek opportunities as operations are modified. As a result, companies may end up investing in projects to meet their immediate needs while missing opportunities for savings that may result from broader, longer term solutions. Similarly, departments may implement projects independently and end up missing opportunities to take advantage of economies of scale or internal reuse/recycling possibilities. The companies that have profited the most from pollution prevention strategies are those that have fully integrated the concept into their major business decisions at all levels within the organization. In this respect, pollution prevention is one of several possible tools to minimize projected environmental impacts.

  13. Interference Analysis Process in Military Aircraft Industry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rothenhaeusler, M.; Poisel, W.

    2012-05-01

    As flying platforms do have limited space for integration and increasing demands for antennas, interference and EMC analysis becomes ever more relevant for optimised antenna concepts. Of course aerodynamic and operational aspects are still important and can not be neglected, but interference can also be a performance killer if it is not analysed in a proper way. This paper describes an interference analysis process which is based on the electrical data of all transmitters and receivers, in- and out-of-band numerical simulation of the decoupling values of all involved antennas and includes EMC relevant data of conducted and radiated emissions, based on EMC standards like MIL-STD-461. Additionally hardware based interference cancellation is also taken into account as the last opportunity for the antenna engineer to reach the required decoupling for undisturbed communication.

  14. Heat pipe cooling of power processing magnetics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hansen, I. G.; Chester, M. S.

    1979-01-01

    A heat pipe cooled transformer and input filter were developed for the 2.4 kW beam supply of a 30 cm ion thruster system. This development yielded a mass reduction of 40% (1.76 kg) and lower mean winding temperature (20 C lower). While these improvements are significant, preliminary designs predict even greater benefits to be realized at higher power. The design details are presented along with the results of thermal vacuum operation and the component performance in a 3 kW breadboard power processor.

  15. Solar production of intermediate temperature process heat. Phase I design. Final report. [For sugarcane processing plant in Hawaii

    SciTech Connect

    1980-08-01

    This report is the final effort in the Phase I design of a solar industrial process heat system for the Hilo Coast Processing Company (HCPC) in Pepeekeo, Hawaii. The facility is used to wash, grind and extract sugar from the locally grown sugarcane and it operates 24 hours a day, 305 days per year. The major steam requirements in the industrial process are for the prime movers (mill turbines) in the milling process and heat for evaporating water from the extracted juices. Bagasse (the fibrous residue of milled sugarcane) supplied 84% of the fuel requirement for steam generation in 1979, while 65,000 barrels of No. 6 industrial fuel oil made up the remaining 16%. These fuels are burned in the power plant complex which produces 825/sup 0/F, 1,250 psi superheated steam to power a turbogenerator set which, in addition to serving the factory, generates from 7 to 16 megawatts of electricity that is exported to the local utility company. Extracted steam from the turbo-generator set supplies the plant's process steam needs. The system consists of 42,420 ft./sup 2/ of parabolic trough, single axis tracking, concentrating solar collectors. The collectors will be oriented in a North-South configuration and will track East-West. A heat transfer fluid (Gulf Synfluid 4cs) will be circulated in a closed loop fashion through the solar collectors and a series of heat exchangers. The inlet and outlet fluid temperatures for the collectors are 370/sup 0/F and 450/sup 0/F respectively. It is estimated that the net useable energy delivered to the industrial process will be 7.2 x 10/sup 9/ Btu's per year. With an HCPC boiler efficiency of 78% and 6.2 x 10/sup 6/ Btu's per barrel of oil, the solar energy system will displace 1489 barrels of oil per year. (WHK)

  16. Direct contact melting process on a porous heating wall

    SciTech Connect

    Oka, M.; Hasegawa, E.

    1995-12-31

    Direct contact melting process takes place in many natural and technological processes. One of the important application of this process is thermal storage system. Phase change material (PCM) is stored in a small capsule. It melts by heating peripherally. This paper presents a theoretical study of direct contact melting process in a capsule. Inner wall surface of the capsule is made of porous material. In this melting process, melting rate is important factor for the efficiency of the system. In this paper, the authors propose utilization of porous material as a heating wall. This is one of the effective way to accelerate melting rate. Melted liquid goes through into the porous heating wall. As a result, the solid PCM can reach closer to the heating wall. The authors also discussed conductivity of the porous wall.

  17. Preliminary overview of innovative industrial-materials processes

    SciTech Connect

    Hane, G.J.; Hauser, S.G.; Blahnik, D.E.; Eakin, D.E.; Gurwell, W.E.; Williams, T.A.; Abarcar, R.; Szekely, J.; Ashton, W.B.

    1983-09-01

    In evaluating the potential for industrial energy conservation, 45 candidate processes were identified. The chemical and the iron and steel industries presented the most well-developed candidates, whereas those processes identified in the pulp and paper and textiles industries were the most speculative. Examples of the candidate processes identified include direct steelmaking and ore-to-powder systems, which potentially require 30 to 40% less energy, respectively, than conventional steelmaking systems; membrane separations and freeze crystallization, which offer up to 90% reductions in energy use when compared with distillation; the cold processing of cement, which offers a 50% reduction in energy requirements; and the dry forming of paper, which offers a 25% reduction in the energy needed for papermaking. A review of all the industries revealed that the revolutionary alternatives often use similar concepts in avoiding current process inefficiencies. These concepts include using chemical, physical, or biological processes to replace thermally intensive processes; using specific forms of energy to minimize wasteful thermal diffusion; using chemical, biological, or ultrasonic processes to replace physical reduction; combining multiple processing steps into a single reactor; using a dry processing to eliminate energy needed for evaporation; and using sterilization or biotechnology to reduce the need for refrigeration.

  18. Industrial fuel gas plant project. Phase II. Memphis industrial fuel gas plant. Final report. [U-GAS process

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1983-01-01

    The Industrial Fuel Gas Plant produces a nominal 50 billion Btu/day of product gas. The entire IFG production will be sold to MLGW. Under normal conditions, 20% of the output of the plant will be sold by MLGW to the local MAPCO refinery and exchanged for pipeline quality refinery gas. The MAPCO refinery gas will be inserted into the Memphis Natural Gas Distribution System. A portion (normally 10%) of the IFG output of the plant will be diverted to a Credit Generation Unit, owned by MLGW, where the IFG will be upgraded to pipeline quality (950 Btu/SCF). This gas will be inserted into MLGW's Natural Gas Distribution System. The remaining output of the IFG plant (gas with a gross heating value of 300 Btu/SCF) will be sold by MLGW as Industrial Fuel Gas. During periods when the IFG plant is partially or totally off-stream, natural gas from the Memphis Natural Gas Distribution System will be sent to an air mixing unit where the gas will be diluted to a medium Btu content and distributed to the IFG customers. Drawing 2200-1-50-00104 is the plant block flow diagram showing the process sequence and process related support facilities of this industrial plant. Each process unit as well as each process-related support facility is described briefly.

  19. Upgrading selected Czech coals for home and industrial heating

    SciTech Connect

    Musich, M.A.; Young, B.C.

    1995-12-31

    The Czech Republic has large coal reserves, particularly brown coal and lignite, and to a lesser extent, bituminous coal. Concurrent with the recent political changes, there has been a reassessment of the role of coal for electrical and heating energy in the future economy, owing to the large dependence on brown coal and lignite and the implementation of more stringent environmental regulations. These coals have a relatively high sulfur content, typically 1-3 wt%, and ash content, leading to significant SO{sub 2} and other gaseous and particulate emissions. Some of the bituminous coals also exhibit high ash content. Against this background, the Energy & Environmental Research Center, on behalf of the U.S. Agency for International Development and the U.S. Department of Energy Office of Fossil Energy, undertook a project on upgrading Czech coals to achieve desired fuel properties. The purpose of the project was to assist the city of Usti nad Labem in Northern Bohemia in developing cost-effective alternatives for reducing environmental emissions from district and home heating systems.

  20. A survey of geothermal process heat applications in Guatemala: An engineering survey

    SciTech Connect

    Altseimer, J.H.; Edeskuty, F.J.

    1988-08-01

    This study investigates how process heat from Guatemala's geothermal energy resources can be developed to reduce Guatemala's costly importation of oil, create new employment by encouraging new industry, and reduce fuel costs for existing industry. This investigation was funded by the US Agency for International Development and carried out jointly by the Guatemalan Government and the Los Alamos National Laboratory. Two sites, Amatitlan and Zunil, are being developed geothermally. Amatitlan is in the better industrial area but Zunil's geothermal development is more advanced. The industry around Zunil is almost exclusively agricultural and the development of an agricultural processing plant (freezing, dehydration, and cold storage) using geothermal heat is recommended. Similar developments throughout the volcanic zones of Guatemala are possible. Later, when the field at Amatitlan has been further developed, an industrial park can be planned. Potential Amatitlan applications are the final stage of salt refining, a thermal power plant, hospital/hotel heating and cooling, steam curing of concrete blocks, production of alcohol from sugar cane, and production of polyethylene from ethanol. Other special developments such as water pumping for the city of Guatemala and the use of moderate-temperature geothermal fluids for localized power production are also possible. 12 refs., 13 figs., 14 tabs.

  1. A detailed evaluation of heating processes in the middle atmosphere

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mlynczak, Martin; Solomon, Susan

    1994-01-01

    A fundamental problem in the study of the terrestrial middle atmosphere is to calculate accurately the local heating due to the absorption of solar radiation. Knowledge of the heat budget is essential to understanding the atmospheric thermal structure, atmospheric motions, atmospheric chemistry, and their coupling. The evaluation of heating rates is complicated (especially above the stratopause) by the fact that the heating is not a simple one-step process. That is, the absorbed solar energy does not all immediately appear as heat. Rather, substantial portions of the incident energy may appear as internal energy of excited photolysis products (e.g., O(1D) or O2(1 delta)) or as chemical potential energy of product species such as atomic oxygen. The ultimate disposition of the internal and chemical energy possessed by the photolysis products determines the efficiency and thus the rate at which the middle atmosphere is heated. In studies of the heat budget, it is also vitally important to consider transport of long lived chemical species such as atomic oxygen above approximately 80 km. In such cases, the chemical potential energy may be transported great distances (horizontally or vertically) before undergoing a reaction to release the heat. Atomic oxygen influences the heating not only by reactions with itself and with O2 but also by reactions with odd-hydrogen species, especially those involving OH (Mlynczak and Solomon, 1991a). Consequently, absorbed solar energy may finally by converted to heat a long time after and at a location far from the original deposition. The purpose of this paper is to examine the solar and chemical heating processes and to present parameterizations for the heating efficiencies readily applicable for use in numerical models and heat budget studies. In the next two sections the processes relevant to the heating efficiencies for ozone and molecular oxygen will be reviewed. In section 4 the processes for the exothermic reactions will be

  2. High Magnetic Field Processing (HMFP): A Heat-Free, Heat-Treating Method

    SciTech Connect

    2009-05-01

    This factsheet describes a research project whose main goal is to research and develop high magnetic field processing (HMFP) technology for selected high-energy consumption heat treatment operations by reducing or eliminating the need for cryogenic cooling or double temper heat treatments.

  3. Experimental evidence of hyperbolic heat conduction in processed meat

    SciTech Connect

    Mitra, K.; Kumar, S.; Vedavarz, A.; Moallemi, M.K.

    1995-08-01

    The objective of this paper is to present experimental evidence of the wave nature of heat propagation in processed meat and to demonstrate that the hyperbolic heat conduction model is an accurate representation, on a macroscopic level, of the heat conduction process in such biological material. The value of the characteristic thermal time of a specific material, processed bologna meat, is determined experimentally. As a part of the work different thermophysical properties are also measured. The measured temperature distributions in the samples are compared with the Fourier results and significant deviation between the two is observed, especially during the initial stages of the transient conduction process. The measured values are found to match the theoretical non-Fourier hyperbolic predictions very well. The superposition of waves occurring inside the meat sample due to the hyperbolic nature of heat conduction is also proved experimentally. 14 refs., 7 figs., 2 tabs.

  4. Heat sink effects on weld bead: VPPA process

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Steranka, Paul O., Jr.

    1990-01-01

    An investigation into the heat sink effects due to weldment irregularities and fixtures used in the variable polarity plasma arc (VPPA) process was conducted. A basic two-dimensional model was created to represent the net heat sink effect of surplus material using Duhamel's theorem to superpose the effects of an infinite number of line heat sinks of variable strength. Parameters were identified that influence the importance of heat sink effects. A characteristic length, proportional to the thermal diffusivity of the weldment material divided by the weld torch travel rate, correlated with heat sinking observations. Four tests were performed on 2219-T87 aluminum plates to which blocks of excess material were mounted in order to demonstrate heat sink effects. Although the basic model overpredicted these effects, it correctly indicated the trends shown in the experimental study and is judged worth further refinement.

  5. Heat sink effects on weld bead: VPPA process

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Steranka, Paul O., Jr.

    1989-01-01

    An investigation into the heat sink effects due to weldment irregularities and fixtures used in the variable polarity plasma arc (VPPA) process was conducted. A basic two-dimensional model was created to represent the net heat sink effect of surplus material using Duhamel's theorem to superpose the effects of an infinite number of line heat sinks of variable strength. Parameters were identified that influence the importance of heat sink effects. A characteristic length, proportional to the thermal diffusivity of the weldment material divided by the weld torch travel rate, correlated with heat sinking observations. Four tests were performed on 2219-T87 aluminum plates to which blocks of excess material were mounted in order to demonstrate heat sink effects. Although the basic model overpredicted these effects, it correctly indicated the trends shown in the experimental study and is judged worth further refinement.

  6. Society of the plastic industry process emission initiatives

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mcdermott, Joseph

    1994-01-01

    At first view, plastics process emissions research may not seem to have much bearing on outgassing considerations relative to advanced composite materials; however, several parallel issues and cross currents are of mutual interest. The following topics are discussed: relevance of plastics industry research to aerospace composites; impact of clean air act amendment requirements; scope of the Society of the Plastics Industry, Inc. activities in thermoplastic process emissions and reinforced plastics/composites process emissions; and utility of SPI research for advanced polymer composites audiences.

  7. Advances toward industrialization of novel molten salt electrochemical processes.

    PubMed

    Ito, Yasuhiko; Nishikiori, Tokujiro; Tsujimura, Hiroyuki

    2016-08-15

    We have invented various novel molten salt electrochemical processes, that can be put to practical use in the fields of energy and materials. These processes are promising from both technological and commercial viewpoints, and they are currently under development for industrial application. To showcase current developments in work toward industrialization, we focus here on three of these processes: (1) electrolytic synthesis of ammonia from water and nitrogen under atmospheric pressure, (2) electrochemical formation of carbon film, and (3) plasma-induced discharge electrolysis to produce nanoparticles. PMID:27265244

  8. Optimizing the availability of a buffered industrial process

    DOEpatents

    Martz, Jr., Harry F.; Hamada, Michael S.; Koehler, Arthur J.; Berg, Eric C.

    2004-08-24

    A computer-implemented process determines optimum configuration parameters for a buffered industrial process. A population size is initialized by randomly selecting a first set of design and operation values associated with subsystems and buffers of the buffered industrial process to form a set of operating parameters for each member of the population. An availability discrete event simulation (ADES) is performed on each member of the population to determine the product-based availability of each member. A new population is formed having members with a second set of design and operation values related to the first set of design and operation values through a genetic algorithm and the product-based availability determined by the ADES. Subsequent population members are then determined by iterating the genetic algorithm with product-based availability determined by ADES to form improved design and operation values from which the configuration parameters are selected for the buffered industrial process.

  9. APPLICATIONS OF PULSE COMBUSTION IN INDUSTRIAL AND INCINERATION PROCESSES

    EPA Science Inventory

    The paper describes a recently developed approach for using a tunable pulse combustor (PC) to improve the performance of energy intensive industrial processes (e. g., drying, calcining, and incineration) by retrofitting the process with a tunable PC that is operated at a frequenc...

  10. online Surveillance of Industrial Processes with Correlated Parameters

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center (ESTSC)

    1996-12-18

    SMP is a system for online surveillance of industrial processes or machinery for determination of the incipience or onset of abnormal operating conditions. SMP exploits the cross correlation between all of the sensors that are available on the system under surveillance to provide an extremely high sensitivity for annunciation of subtle disturbances in process variables.

  11. REVIEW OF COMPUTER PROCESS SIMULATION TO INDUSTRIAL POLLUTION PREVENTION

    EPA Science Inventory

    The objective of this report is to provide environmental professionals with an understanding of the power and utility of state-of-the-art process simulation software for industrial pollution prevention (P2) analysis. rocess simulators are process design tools that were once used ...

  12. U.S. Fruit and Vegetable Processing Industries.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Buckley, Katharine C.; And Others

    Because of shifts in consumer tastes and preferences, demographics, technology, government regulation, and the expanding interdependence of world markets, the United States fruit and vegetable processing industries must operate in a constantly changing and uncertain economic environment. U.S. per capita use of processed fruits and vegetables is…

  13. Waste minimization in the poultry processing industry. Process and water quality aspects

    SciTech Connect

    Gelman, S.R.; Scott, S.; Davis, H.

    1989-11-09

    The poultry processing industry is a large, water intensive industry. In a typical week in Alabama up to 15 million birds are processed, and Arkansas, Georgia, and North Carolina have similar processing volumes. This presentation will focus on issues surrounding waste minimization in the live processing industry as well as provide a brief look at the prepared foods segment, mainly cooked chicken products. The case study also reviews water quality issues that require us to examine waste treatment in a new light. This information will also apply to other industries facing more stringent treatment requirements as a result of stiffer water quality regulations.

  14. Development and Field Trial of Dimpled-Tube Technology for Chemical Industry Process Heaters

    SciTech Connect

    Yaroslav Chudnovsky; Aleksandr Kozlov

    2006-10-12

    Most approaches to increasing heat transfer rates in the convection sections of gas-fired process heaters involve the incorporation of fins, baffles, turbulizers, etc. to increase either the heat transfer surface area or turbulence or both. Although these approaches are effective in increasing the heat transfer rates, this increase is invariably accompanied by an associated increase in convection section pressure drop as well as, for heaters firing ‘dirty’ fuel mixtures, increased fouling of the tubes – both of which are highly undesirable. GTI has identified an approach that will increase heat transfer rates without a significant increase in pressure drop or fouling rate. Compared to other types of heat transfer enhancement approaches, the proposed dimpled tube approach achieves very high heat transfer rates at the lowest pressure drops. Incorporating this approach into convection sections of chemical industry fired process heaters may increase energy efficiency by 3-5%. The energy efficiency increase will allow reducing firing rates to provide the required heating duty while reducing the emissions of CO2 and NOx.

  15. Industrial process profiles for environmental use: chapter 27 primary lead industry

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1980-07-01

    The primary lead industry as defined for this study consists of mining, beneficiation, smelting, and refining. A profile of the industry is given including plant locations, capacities, and various statistics regarding production and consumption of lead, co-products, and by-products. The report summarizes the various commercial routes practiced domestically for lead production in a series of process flow diagrams and detailed process descriptions. Each process description includes available data regarding input materials, operating conditions, energy and utility requirements, waste streams produced (air, water, and solid waste), and control technology practices and problems.

  16. Industrial process profiles for environmental use: Chapter 30. The electronic component manufacturing industry. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1983-04-01

    This report is one of a series constituting the catalog of Industrial Process Profiles for Environmental Use. Each industry sector is addressed as a separate chapter of the study. The catalog was developed for the purpose of compiling relevant information concerning air, water, and solid waste emissions from industries which employ similar technologies, have common types of environmental impacts, and supply their products for further processing or consumption to the same general population of customers. This report addresses the following segments of the electronic component manufacturing industry: semiconductors, SIC 3674; capacitors, SIC 3675; resistors, SIC 3676; transformer and inductors, SIC 3677; printed circuit boards, SIC 3679052; electron tubes, SIC 36711, 36713; and cathode ray tubes, SIC 36712, 3671385.

  17. Process for the recovery of coke oven waste heat

    SciTech Connect

    Flockenhaus, C.; Meckel, J.F.; Wagener, D.

    1981-01-20

    This invention is directed to a process for making coke and recovering the heat therefrom for preheating the firing gas to the coke oven. The process involves the use of the coke oven firing gas to extract the sensible heat from the hot coke from the coking oven to both preheat the firing gas for the coke oven and cool the hot coke. Significant economies are achieved in the two-fold function of coke production and heat recovery in accordance with the method disclosed.

  18. Cadmium isotope fractionation of materials derived from various industrial processes.

    PubMed

    Martinková, Eva; Chrastný, Vladislav; Francová, Michaela; Šípková, Adéla; Čuřík, Jan; Myška, Oldřich; Mižič, Lukáš

    2016-01-25

    Our study represents ϵ(114/110) Cd NIST3108 values of materials resulting from anthropogenic activities such as coal burning, smelting, refining, metal coating, and the glass industry. Additionally, primary sources (ore samples, pigment, coal) processed in the industrial premises were studied. Two sphalerites, galena, coal and pigment samples exhibited ϵ(114/110) CdNIST3108 values of 1.0±0.2, 0.2±0.2, 1.3±0.1, -2.3±0.2 and -0.1±0.3, respectively. In general, all studied industrial processes were accompanied by Cd isotope fractionation. Most of the industrial materials studied were clearly distinguishable from the samples used as a primary source based on ϵ(114/110) Cd NIST3108 values. The heaviest ϵ(114/110) CdNIST3108 value of 58.6±0.9 was found for slag resulting from coal combustion, and the lightest ϵ(114/110) CdNIST3108 value of -23±2.5 was observed for waste material after Pb refinement. It is evident that ϵ(114/110) Cd NIST3108 values depend on technological processes, and in case of incomplete Cd transfer from source to final waste material, every industrial activity creates differences in Cd isotope composition. Our results show that Cd isotope analysis is a promising tool to track the origins of industrial waste products. PMID:26452089

  19. Solar process heat technology in action: The process hot water system at the California Correctional Institution at Tehachapi

    SciTech Connect

    Hewett, R. ); Gee, R.; May, K. )

    1991-12-01

    Solar process heat technology relates to solar thermal energy systems for industry, commerce, and government. Applications include water preheating and heating, steam generation, process hot air, ventilation air heating, and refrigeration. Solar process heat systems are available for commercial use. At the present time, however, they are economically viable only in niche markets. This paper describes a functioning system in one such market. The California Department of Corrections (CDOC), which operates correctional facilities for the state of California, uses a solar system for providing hot water and space heating at the California Correctional Institute at Tehachapi (CCI/Tehachapi). CCI/Tehachapi is a 5100-inmate facility. The CDOC does not own the solar system. Rather, it buys energy from private investors who own the solar system located on CCI/Tehachapi property; this arrangement is part of a long-term energy purchase agreement. United Solar Technologies (UST) of Olympia Washington is the system operator. The solar system, which began operating in the fall of 1990, utilizes 2677 m{sup 2} (28,800 ft{sup 2}) of parabolic through solar concentrators. Thermal energy collected by the system is used to generate hot water for showers, kitchen operations, and laundry functions. Thermal energy collected by the system is also used for space heating. At peak operating conditions, the system is designed to meet approximately 80 percent of the summer thermal load. 4 figs., 4 tabs.

  20. Expert system for testing industrial processes and determining sensor status

    DOEpatents

    Gross, Kenneth C.; Singer, Ralph M.

    1998-01-01

    A method and system for monitoring both an industrial process and a sensor. The method and system include determining a minimum number of sensor pairs needed to test the industrial process as well as the sensor for evaluating the state of operation of both. The technique further includes generating a first and second signal characteristic of an industrial process variable. After obtaining two signals associated with one physical variable, a difference function is obtained by determining the arithmetic difference between the pair of signals over time. A frequency domain transformation is made of the difference function to obtain Fourier modes describing a composite function. A residual function is obtained by subtracting the composite function from the difference function and the residual function (free of nonwhite noise) is analyzed by a statistical probability ratio test.

  1. Expert system for testing industrial processes and determining sensor status

    DOEpatents

    Gross, K.C.; Singer, R.M.

    1998-06-02

    A method and system are disclosed for monitoring both an industrial process and a sensor. The method and system include determining a minimum number of sensor pairs needed to test the industrial process as well as the sensor for evaluating the state of operation of both. The technique further includes generating a first and second signal characteristic of an industrial process variable. After obtaining two signals associated with one physical variable, a difference function is obtained by determining the arithmetic difference between the pair of signals over time. A frequency domain transformation is made of the difference function to obtain Fourier modes describing a composite function. A residual function is obtained by subtracting the composite function from the difference function and the residual function (free of nonwhite noise) is analyzed by a statistical probability ratio test. 24 figs.

  2. Heat transfer monitor for measurements of fouling of industrial heat exchangers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Panchal, C. B.

    1985-01-01

    A Heat Transfer Monitor (HTM) is a sensitive device that quantifies development of fouling on heat exchanger surfaces in terms of degradation in the heat transfer coefficient as fouling progresses. The Argonne HTM was originally developed by Carnegie-Mellon University for Ocean Thermal Energy Conversion (OTEC) applications and later modified by Argonne National Laboratory. The HTM has been used for the OTEC biofouling and corrosion studies at the Natural Energy Laboratory of Hawaii for the last four years. The major findings from the experimental investigation are: (1) periodic low level of 50 to 70 ppB of chlorination can remove and prevent biofouling; (2) biofouling for deep cold water is negligible; and (3) biofouling control methods for moderately enhanced surfaces are comparable to those for smooth surfaces.

  3. Heat transfer monitor for measurements of fouling of industrial heat exchangers

    SciTech Connect

    Panchal, C.B.

    1985-01-01

    A Heat Transfer Monitor (HTM) is a sensitive device that quantifies development of fouling on heat exchanger surfaces in terms of degradation in the heat transfer coefficient as fouling progresses. The Argonne HTM was originally developed by Carnegie-Mellon University for Ocean Thermal Energy Conversion (OTEC) applications and later modified by Argonne National Laboratory. The HTM has been used for the OTEC biofouling and corrosion studies at the Natural Energy Laboratory of Hawaii for the last four years. The monitor has produced consistent results with an accuracy of about 0.0035 K m/sup 2//kW (0.00002/sup 0/F.h.ft/sup 2//Btu). The major findings from the experimental investigation are: (a) periodic low level of 50 to 70 ppB of chlorination can remove and prevent biofouling, (b) biofouling for deep cold water is negligible, and (c) biofouling control methods for moderately enhanced surfaces are comparable to those for smooth surfaces.

  4. In situ control of industrial processes using laser light scattering and optical rotation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mendoza Sanchez, Patricia Judith; López Echevarria, Daniel; Huerta Ruelas, Jorge Adalberto

    2006-02-01

    We present results of optical measurements in products or processes usually found in industrial processes, which can be used to control them. Laser light scattering was employed during semiconductor epitaxial growth by molecular beam epitaxy. With this technique, it was possible to determine growth rate, roughness and critical temperatures related to substrate degradation. With the same scattering technique, oil degradation as function of temperature was monitored for different automotive lubricants. Clear differences can be studied between monograde and multigrade oils. Optical rotation measurements as function of temperature were performed in apple juice in a pasteurization process like. Average variations related to optical rotation dependence of sugars were measured and monitored during heating and cooling process, finding a reversible behavior. As opposite behavior, sugar-protein solution was measured in a similar heating and cooling process. Final result showed a non-reversible behavior related to protein denaturation. Potential applications are discussed for metal-mechanic, electronic, food, and pharmaceutical industry. Future improvements in optical systems to make them more portable and easily implemented under typical industry conditions are mentioned.

  5. Visual investigation on the heat dissipation process of a heat sink by using digital holographic interferometry

    SciTech Connect

    Wu, Bingjing; Zhao, Jianlin Wang, Jun; Di, Jianglei; Chen, Xin; Liu, Junjiang

    2013-11-21

    We present a method for visually and quantitatively investigating the heat dissipation process of plate-fin heat sinks by using digital holographic interferometry. A series of phase change maps reflecting the temperature distribution and variation trend of the air field surrounding heat sink during the heat dissipation process are numerically reconstructed based on double-exposure holographic interferometry. According to the phase unwrapping algorithm and the derived relationship between temperature and phase change of the detection beam, the full-field temperature distributions are quantitatively obtained with a reasonably high measurement accuracy. And then the impact of heat sink's channel width on the heat dissipation performance in the case of natural convection is analyzed. In addition, a comparison between simulation and experiment results is given to verify the reliability of this method. The experiment results certify the feasibility and validity of the presented method in full-field, dynamical, and quantitative measurement of the air field temperature distribution, which provides a basis for analyzing the heat dissipation performance of plate-fin heat sinks.

  6. Cogeneration technology alternatives study. Volume 2: Industrial process characteristics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1980-01-01

    Information and data for 26 industrial processes are presented. The following information is given for each process: (1) a description of the process including the annual energy consumption and product production and plant capacity; (2) the energy requirements of the process for each unit of production and the detailed data concerning electrical energy requirements and also hot water, steam, and direct fired thermal requirements; (3) anticipated trends affecting energy requirements with new process or production technologies; and (4) representative plant data including capacity and projected requirements through the year 2000.

  7. Optical sensors for process control and emissions monitoring in industry

    SciTech Connect

    S. W. Alendorf; D. K. Ottensen; D. W. Hahn; T. J. Kulp; U. B. Goers

    1999-01-01

    Sandia National Laboratories has a number of ongoing projects developing optical sensors for industrial environments. Laser-based sensors can be attractive for relatively harsh environments where extractive sampling is difficult, inaccurate, or impractical. Tools developed primarily for laboratory research can often be adapted for the real world and applied to problems far from their original uses. Spectroscopic techniques, appropriately selected, have the potential to impact the bottom line of a number of industries and industrial processes. In this paper the authors discuss three such applications: a laser-based instrument for process control in steelmaking, a laser-induced breakdown method for hazardous metal detection in process streams, and a laser-based imaging sensor for evaluating surface cleanliness. Each has the potential to provide critical, process-related information in a real-time, continuous manner. These sensor techniques encompass process control applications and emissions monitoring for pollution prevention. They also span the range from a field-tested pre-commercial prototype to laboratory instrumentation. Finally, these sensors employ a wide range of sophistication in both the laser source and associated analytical spectroscopy. In the ultimate applications, however, many attributes of the sensors are in common, such as the need for robust operation and hardening for harsh industrial environments.

  8. Transient heat transfer program for glovebox process vessels

    SciTech Connect

    Preuss, D.E.; Frigo, A.A.; Bailey, J.L.

    1997-09-01

    A software program has been developed at Argonne National Laboratory to aid in designing process vessels to be used in gloveboxes. The Transient Heat Transfer Program for Glovebox Process Vessels provides engineers with a method of analyzing the heat transfer characteristics of vessels during heating and cooling of metals, salts, and other materials. The user need only provide information on the components and geometry of the vessel and a few operating conditions. The program approximates the changes in the internal vessel temperature over a number of time steps. This temperature information can then be used to estimate parameters that are needed in the vessel design. These parameters include insulation thickness, amount of heat shielding, and heater size. This software has been designed for ease of use. A background in the thermal sciences is not necessary to use it.

  9. Constraints on rift thermal processes from heat flow and uplift

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Morgan, P.

    1983-01-01

    The implications of heat flow data available from five major Cenozoic continental rift systems for the processes of continental rifting are discussed, and simple thermal models of lithospheric thinning which predict uplift are used to further constrain the thermal processes in the lithosphere during rifting. Compilations of the heat flow data are summarized and the salient results of these compilations are briefly discussed. The uplift predictions of the slow and rapid thinning models, in which thinning is assumed to occur at a respectively slower and faster rate than heat can be conducted into the lithosphere, are presented. Comparison of uplift rates with model results indicates that the lithosphere is in a state between the two models. While uplift is predicted to continue after thinning has ceased due to thermal relaxation of the lithosphere, the rapid thinning model is always predicted to apply to surface heat flow, and an anomaly in this flow is not predicted to develop until after thinning has stopped.

  10. High-temperature process heat applications with an HTGR

    SciTech Connect

    Quade, R.N.; Vrable, D.L.

    1980-04-01

    An 842-MW(t) HTGR-process heat (HTGR-PH) design and several synfuels and energy transport processes to which it could be coupled are described. As in other HTGR designs, the HTGR-PH has its entire primary coolant system contained in a prestressed concrete reactor vessel (PCRV) which provides the necessary biological shielding and pressure containment. The high-temperature nuclear thermal energy is transported to the externally located process plant by a secondary helium transport loop. With a capability to produce hot helium in the secondary loop at 800/sup 0/C (1472/sup 0/F) with current designs and 900/sup 0/C (1652/sup 0/F) with advanced designs, a large number of process heat applications are potentially available. Studies have been performed for coal liquefaction and gasification using nuclear heat.

  11. Process Control Systems in the Chemical Industry: Safety vs. Security

    SciTech Connect

    Jeffrey Hahn; Thomas Anderson

    2005-04-01

    Traditionally, the primary focus of the chemical industry has been safety and productivity. However, recent threats to our nation’s critical infrastructure have prompted a tightening of security measures across many different industry sectors. Reducing vulnerabilities of control systems against physical and cyber attack is necessary to ensure the safety, security and effective functioning of these systems. The U.S. Department of Homeland Security has developed a strategy to secure these vulnerabilities. Crucial to this strategy is the Control Systems Security and Test Center (CSSTC) established to test and analyze control systems equipment. In addition, the CSSTC promotes a proactive, collaborative approach to increase industry's awareness of standards, products and processes that can enhance the security of control systems. This paper outlines measures that can be taken to enhance the cybersecurity of process control systems in the chemical sector.

  12. Plasma heating for containerless and microgravity materials processing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Leung, Emily W. (Inventor); Man, Kin F. (Inventor)

    1994-01-01

    A method for plasma heating of levitated samples to be used in containerless microgravity processing is disclosed. A sample is levitated by electrostatic, electromagnetic, aerodynamic, or acoustic systems, as is appropriate for the physical properties of the particular sample. The sample is heated by a plasma torch at atmospheric pressure. A ground plate is provided to help direct the plasma towards the sample. In addition, Helmholtz coils are provided to produce a magnetic field that can be used to spiral the plasma around the sample. The plasma heating system is oriented such that it does not interfere with the levitation system.

  13. Compositions produced using an in situ heat treatment process

    DOEpatents

    Roes, Augustinus Wilhelmus Maria; Nair, Vijay; Munsterman, Erwin Hunh; Van Bergen, Petrus Franciscus; Van Den Berg, Franciscus Gondulfus Antonius

    2013-05-28

    Methods for treating a subsurface formation and compositions produced therefrom are described herein. At least one method for producing hydrocarbons from a subsurface formation includes providing heat to the subsurface formation using an in situ heat treatment process. One or more formation particles may be formed during heating of the subsurface formation. Fluid that includes hydrocarbons and the formation particles may be produced from the subsurface formation. The formation particles in the produced fluid may include cenospheres and have an average particle size of at least 0.5 micrometers.

  14. Compositions produced using an in situ heat treatment process

    SciTech Connect

    Roes, Augustinus Wilhelmus Maria; Nair, Vijay; Munsterman, Erwin Henh; Van Bergen, Petrus Franciscus; Van Den Berg, Franciscus Gondulfus Antonius

    2009-10-20

    Systems, methods, and heaters for treating a subsurface formation are described herein. At least one method for producing hydrocarbons from a subsurface formation includes providing heat to the subsurface formation using an in situ heat treatment process. One or more formation particles may be formed during heating of the subsurface formation. Fluid that includes hydrocarbons and the formation particles may be produced from the subsurface formation. The formation particles in the produced fluid may include cenospheres and have an average particle size of at least 0.5 micrometers.

  15. Industrial process models of electricity demand. Volume 4. The aluminum industry. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Pierce, B.L.; Coward, H.; Sparrow, F.T.; Pilati, D.A.

    1984-05-01

    The National Center for Analysis of Energy Systems at Brookhaven National Laboratory has developed a process model of the US aluminum industry. The model consists of the major process steps in the manufacture of milled and cast aluminum products and is designed to select modes of operation and energy consumption characteristics that minimize the cost of meeting projected demands for the industry's products. Domestic refineries and primary smelters are represented individually in the model. Industry structure in terms of plant ownership and allowed transfers of aluminum-bearing materials is explicitly modeled. With a growth in product demand of 4.2% per year, model results show a decline in electricity intensity of primary production.

  16. Practical Use of Operation Data in the Process Industry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kano, Manabu

    This paper aims to reveal real problems in the process industry and introduce recent development to solve such problems from the viewpoint of effective use of operation data. Two topics are discussed: virtual sensor and process control. First, in order to clarify the present state and problems, a part of our recent questionnaire survey of process control is quoted. It is emphasized that maintenance is a key issue not only for soft-sensors but also for controllers. Then, new techniques are explained. The first one is correlation-based just-in-time modeling (CoJIT), which can realize higher prediction performance than conventional methods and simplify model maintenance. The second is extended fictitious reference iterative tuning (E-FRIT), which can realize data-driven PID control parameter tuning without process modeling. The great usefulness of these techniques are demonstrated through their industrial applications.

  17. Solutions for Arsenic Control in Mining Processes and Extractive Industry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Neitola, Raisa; Korhonen, Tero; Backnäs, Soile; Turunen, Kaisa; Kaartinen, Tommi; Laine-Ylijoki, Jutta; Wahlström, Margareta; Venho, Antti; Ahoranta, Sarita; Nissilä, Marika; Puhakka, Jaakko

    2015-04-01

    In mining, quarrying and industrial minerals production arsenic is a common element, thus creating a challenge in mining processes. This project aimed to develop solutions to control and remove As-compounds in materials and effluents of beneficiation processes and other mining operations. Focus was on various technologies e.g. traditional mineral processing, bioprocessing, water treatment, as well as various materials such as gold ores and concentrates, industrial by-products, and mine waters. The results of suggest that by novel mineral processing and proper water treatment methods the amount of As-compounds in tailings and effluents can be reduced to levels that satisfy the regulations concerning mining waste management. According to the environmental research, mining activities tend to increase the proportion of potentially mobile and available elements in soil. The effect of mining activity on geogenic contamination needs to be considered in risk assessment.

  18. 27 CFR 19.37 - Application for industrial processes waiver.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... industrial processes waiver. (a) Application for waiver. If the producer of a nonpotable chemical mixture... of the producer; (2) Chemical composition and source of the nonpotable mixture; (3) Approximate... subject to such terms and conditions, and to the furnishing of any bond, that the appropriate TTB...

  19. 27 CFR 19.37 - Application for industrial processes waiver.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... industrial processes waiver. (a) Application for waiver. If the producer of a nonpotable chemical mixture... of the producer; (2) Chemical composition and source of the nonpotable mixture; (3) Approximate... subject to such terms and conditions, and to the furnishing of any bond, that the appropriate TTB...

  20. 27 CFR 19.37 - Application for industrial processes waiver.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... industrial processes waiver. (a) Application for waiver. If the producer of a nonpotable chemical mixture... of the producer; (2) Chemical composition and source of the nonpotable mixture; (3) Approximate... subject to such terms and conditions, and to the furnishing of any bond, that the appropriate TTB...

  1. 27 CFR 19.37 - Application for industrial processes waiver.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... industrial processes waiver. (a) Application for waiver. If the producer of a nonpotable chemical mixture... of the producer; (2) Chemical composition and source of the nonpotable mixture; (3) Approximate... subject to such terms and conditions, and to the furnishing of any bond, that the appropriate TTB...

  2. Computer simulation program is adaptable to industrial processes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schultz, F. E.

    1966-01-01

    The Reaction kinetics ablation program /REKAP/, developed to simulate ablation of various materials, provides mathematical formulations for computer programs which can simulate certain industrial processes. The programs are based on the use of nonsymmetrical difference equations that are employed to solve complex partial differential equation systems.

  3. Advantages of Laser Polarimetry Applied to Tequila Industrial Process Control

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fajer, V.; Rodriguez, C.; Flores, R.; Naranjo, S.; Cossio, G.; Lopez, J.

    2002-03-01

    The development of a polarimetric method for crude and cooked agave juice quality control not only by direct polarimetric measurement also by means of laser polarimeter LASERPOL 101M used as a liquid chromatographic detector is presented. The viability and advantage of this method for raw material quality control and during Tequila industrial process is shown.

  4. Assessment of critical-fluid extractions in the process industries

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1982-01-01

    The potential for critical-fluid extraction as a separation process for improving the productive use of energy in the process industries is assessed. Critical-fluid extraction involves the use of fluids, normally gaseous at ambient conditions, as extraction solvents at temperatures and pressures around the critical point. Equilibrium and kinetic properties in this regime are very favorable for solvent applications, and generally allow major reductions in the energy requirements for separating and purifying chemical component of a mixture.

  5. Weaknesses in Applying a Process Approach in Industry Enterprises

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kučerová, Marta; Mĺkva, Miroslava; Fidlerová, Helena

    2012-12-01

    The paper deals with a process approach as one of the main principles of the quality management. Quality management systems based on process approach currently represents one of a proofed ways how to manage an organization. The volume of sales, costs and profit levels are influenced by quality of processes and efficient process flow. As results of the research project showed, there are some weaknesses in applying of the process approach in the industrial routine and it has been often only a formal change of the functional management to process management in many organizations in Slovakia. For efficient process management it is essential that companies take attention to the way how to organize their processes and seek for their continuous improvement.

  6. Industrial-Scale Processes For Stabilizing Radioactively Contaminated Mercury Wastes

    SciTech Connect

    Broderick, T. E.; Grondin, R.

    2003-02-24

    This paper describes two industrial-scaled processes now being used to treat two problematic mercury waste categories: elemental mercury contaminated with radionuclides and radioactive solid wastes containing greater than 260-ppm mercury. The stabilization processes were developed by ADA Technologies, Inc., an environmental control and process development company in Littleton, Colorado. Perma-Fix Environmental Services has licensed the liquid elemental mercury stabilization process to treat radioactive mercury from Los Alamos National Laboratory and other DOE sites. ADA and Perma-Fix also cooperated to apply the >260-ppm mercury treatment technology to a storm sewer sediment waste collected from the Y-12 complex in Oak Ridge, TN.

  7. Advanced Reactors Thermal Energy Transport for Process Industries

    SciTech Connect

    P. Sabharwall; S.J. Yoon; M.G. McKellar; C. Stoots; George Griffith

    2014-07-01

    The operation temperature of advanced nuclear reactors is generally higher than commercial light water reactors and thermal energy from advanced nuclear reactor can be used for various purposes such as liquid fuel production, district heating, desalination, hydrogen production, and other process heat applications, etc. Some of the major technology challenges that must be overcome before the advanced reactors could be licensed on the reactor side are qualification of next generation of nuclear fuel, materials that can withstand higher temperature, improvement in power cycle thermal efficiency by going to combined cycles, SCO2 cycles, successful demonstration of advanced compact heat exchangers in the prototypical conditions, and from the process side application the challenge is to transport the thermal energy from the reactor to the process plant with maximum efficiency (i.e., with minimum temperature drop). The main focus of this study is on doing a parametric study of efficient heat transport system, with different coolants (mainly, water, He, and molten salts) to determine maximum possible distance that can be achieved.

  8. Intensification of heat and mass transfer by ultrasound: application to heat exchangers and membrane separation processes.

    PubMed

    Gondrexon, N; Cheze, L; Jin, Y; Legay, M; Tissot, Q; Hengl, N; Baup, S; Boldo, P; Pignon, F; Talansier, E

    2015-07-01

    This paper aims to illustrate the interest of ultrasound technology as an efficient technique for both heat and mass transfer intensification. It is demonstrated that the use of ultrasound results in an increase of heat exchanger performances and in a possible fouling monitoring in heat exchangers. Mass transfer intensification was observed in the case of cross-flow ultrafiltration. It is shown that the enhancement of the membrane separation process strongly depends on the physico-chemical properties of the filtered suspensions. PMID:25216897

  9. Numerical study on heat and mass transfer in hygroscopic rotor during sorption process

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shin, Hyun-Geun; Park, Il Seouk

    2016-06-01

    Recently, interest in hygroscopic dehumidifiers has rapidly increased in the indoor environment industry because of their potential contribution to the development of hybrid (refrigerating + hygroscopic) dehumidifiers. Heat and mass transport phenomena such as adsorption and desorption, and their complex interactions occur in a desiccant rotor, which comprises many small hygroscopic channels. This study numerically investigated the conjugated heat and mass transfers in a channel modeled with the flow and porous desiccant regions, where only ordinary and surface diffusions (excluding Knudsen diffusion) during the sorption processes were considered. The change in the dehumidification performance depending on operating conditions such as the rotor's rotating speed, air flow rate, and adsorption-desorption ratio, was examined under various working environments. The temporal and spatial variations in the temperature, vapor mass fraction, and liquid water mass fraction in the channel were considered in detail. The closely linked heat and mass transports were clarified for a better understanding of the sorption processes in the desiccant rotor.

  10. Five years of industrial experience with the plasma dross treatment process

    SciTech Connect

    Lavoie, S.; Lachance, J.

    1995-12-31

    Alcan`s Guillaume-Tremblay plant, located in Jonquiere, Quebec, has been in operation since 1990. This was the first plasma dross processing plant ever built. In addition to the use of the plasma heating technology, Guillaume-Tremblay has other unique features making it a modern and efficient dross processing facility. This paper presents a general over-view of the practical experience at the Guillaume-Tremblay plant. In particular, the utilization of plasma heating in industrial conditions, the metallurgical performance, the unique dross handling system, the control and information management system and the reclaiming of the by-products will be discussed. Finally, the use of the plasma process for salty dross will be addressed briefly.

  11. Dynamic Complexity Study of Nuclear Reactor and Process Heat Application Integration

    SciTech Connect

    J'Tia Patrice Taylor; David E. Shropshire

    2009-09-01

    Abstract This paper describes the key obstacles and challenges facing the integration of nuclear reactors with process heat applications as they relate to dynamic issues. The paper also presents capabilities of current modeling and analysis tools available to investigate these issues. A pragmatic approach to an analysis is developed with the ultimate objective of improving the viability of nuclear energy as a heat source for process industries. The extension of nuclear energy to process heat industries would improve energy security and aid in reduction of carbon emissions by reducing demands for foreign derived fossil fuels. The paper begins with an overview of nuclear reactors and process application for potential use in an integrated system. Reactors are evaluated against specific characteristics that determine their compatibility with process applications such as heat outlet temperature. The reactor system categories include light water, heavy water, small to medium, near term high-temperature, and far term high temperature reactors. Low temperature process systems include desalination, district heating, and tar sands and shale oil recovery. High temperature processes that support hydrogen production include steam reforming, steam cracking, hydrogen production by electrolysis, and far-term applications such as the sulfur iodine chemical process and high-temperature electrolysis. A simple static matching between complementary systems is performed; however, to gain a true appreciation for system integration complexity, time dependent dynamic analysis is required. The paper identifies critical issues arising from dynamic complexity associated with integration of systems. Operational issues include scheduling conflicts and resource allocation for heat and electricity. Additionally, economic and safety considerations that could impact the successful integration of these systems are considered. Economic issues include the cost differential arising due to an integrated

  12. EDITORIAL: Sixth World Congress on Industrial Process Tomography (WCIPT6) Sixth World Congress on Industrial Process Tomography (WCIPT6)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Takei, Masahiro; Xu, Lijun

    2011-10-01

    We are pleased to publish this special feature on the Sixth World Congress on Industrial Process Tomography (WCIPT6) in Measurement Science and Technology. The international congress was successfully held in the campus of Beihang University, Beijing, China, from 6-9 September 2010. It was jointly organized by International Society for Industrial Process Tomography (ISIPT), North China Electric Power University (NCEPU) and Beihang University (BUAA). Process tomography is a tangible tool to visualize and determine the material distribution inside a process non-intrusively in real time. The internal features that can be monitored by process tomography are frequently encountered and required in the design of processes and industrial plants in the fields of chemical, oil, power and metallurgical engineering as well as many other activities such as food, material handling and combustion systems. One of the key characteristics of process tomography is to provide a direct impression and instant and clear understanding of a complex phenomenon. From the viewpoint of practical applications, industries all over the world are currently facing a number of daunting challenges including many wide-range and complex technical problems. The innovative technology of process tomography consistently contributes to providing better and better solutions to the problems as 'seeing is believing'. As a regular event, WCIPT is playing a more and more important role in addressing the challenges to overcome these problems. We are glad to see that this special feature provides a great opportunity for world-wide top-level researchers to discuss and make further developments in process tomography and its applications. The 20 articles included in this issue cover a wide range of relevant topics including sensors and sensing mechanisms, data acquisition systems and instrumentation, electrical, optical, acoustic and hybrid systems, image reconstruction and system evaluation, data and sensor fusion

  13. Ergonomics and simulation tools for service & industrial process improvement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sánchez, A.; García, M.

    2012-04-01

    Human interaction within designed processes is a really important factor in how efficiently any process will operate. How a human will function in relation to a process is not easy to predict. All the ergonomic considerations traditionally have been evaluated outside of the 3D product design. Nowadays technologies of 3D process design and simulation tools give us this opportunity from the earliest stages of the design process. Also they can be used to improve current process in order to increase human comfort, productivity and safety. This work shows a methodology using 3D design and simulation tools to improve industrial and service process. This methodology has as an objective the detection, evaluation, control of work-related musculoskeletal disorders (WMSDs).

  14. Antioxidants in heat-processed koji and the production mechanisms.

    PubMed

    Okutsu, Kayu; Yoshizaki, Yumiko; Ikeda, Natsumi; Kusano, Tatsuro; Hashimoto, Fumio; Takamine, Kazunori

    2015-11-15

    We previously developed antioxidative heat-processed (HP)-koji via two-step heating (55 °C/2days → 75 °C/3 days) of white-koji. In this study, we isolated antioxidants in HP-koji and investigated their formation mechanisms. The antioxidants were identified to be 5-hydroxymethyl furfural (HMF) and 5-(α-D-glucopyranosyloxymethyl)-2-furfural (GMF) based on nuclear magnetic resonance spectral analysis. HMF and GMF were not present in intact koji, but were formed by heating at 75 °C. As production of these antioxidants was more effective by two-step heating than by constant heating at 55 °C or 75 °C, we presumed that the antioxidant precursors are derived enzymatically at 55°C and that the antioxidants are formed subsequently by thermal reaction at 75 °C. The heating assay of saccharide solutions revealed glucose and isomaltose as HMF and GMF precursors, respectively, and thus the novel finding of GMF formation from isomaltose. Finally, HMF and GMF were effectively formed by two-step heating from glucose and isomaltose present in koji. PMID:25977038

  15. Fever and the heat shock response: distinct, partially overlapping processes

    PubMed Central

    Hasday, Jeffrey D.; Singh, Ishwar S.

    2000-01-01

    The heat shock response is an ancient and highly conserved process that is essential for surviving environmental stresses, including extremes of temperature. Fever is a more recently evolved response, during which organisms temporarily subject themselves to thermal stress in the face of infections. We review studies showing that fever is beneficial in the infected host. We show that core temperatures achieved during fever can activate the heat shock response and discuss some of the biochemical consequences of such an effect. We present data suggesting 4 possible mechanisms by which fever might confer protection: (1) directly killing or inhibiting growth of pathogens; (2) inducing cytoprotective heat shock proteins (Hsps) in host cells; (3) inducing expression of pathogen Hsps, an activator of host defenses; and (4) modifying and orchestrating host defenses. Two of these mechanisms directly involve the heat shock response. We describe how heat shock factor-1, the predominant heat-induced transcriptional enhancer not only activates transcription of Hsps but also regulates expression of pivotal cytokines and early response genes. The relationship between fever and the heat shock response is an illuminating example of how a more recently evolved response might exploit preexisting biochemical pathways for a new function. PMID:11189454

  16. From research to industry — The establishment of a radiation processing industry in South Africa

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Plessis, T. A. Du; Stevens, RCB

    In the late sixties the South African Atomic Energy Board in pursuing its objectives to promote the peaceful application of nuclear energy in general, established a research group with the specific purpose of investigating and developing radiation processing as a new technique. During the early years it was realised that the economic and technological facets of establishing a new industry were equally important and, in addition to fundamental research, strong emphasis was placed on the necessity of marketing this new technology. Although the initial emphasis was put on gamma sterilization, and today still forms the backbone of the radiation processing industry, the promising fields of polymer modification and food irradiation hold a lot of promise in the radiation processing industry. Following ten years of successfully introducing and providing a radiation service, the South African Atomic Energy Board in 1980 decided to transfer its service to the private sector. These developments in South Africa are a good sample of how a small country, through initial government envolvement, can acquire a sophisticated new private industry.

  17. Industrial process models of electricity demand. Volume 2. The pulp and paper industry. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Pierce, B.L.; Pilati, D.A.; Chang, J.; Sparrow, F.T.

    1984-05-01

    The National Center for Analysis of Energy Systems at Brookhaven National Laboratory has developed a process model of the US pulp and paper industry. The model is based on data from economic and engineering analyses of the major manufacturing processes in pulp and papermaking and includes Standard Industrial Classifications 2611, 2621, 2631, and 2661. Energy conserving alternatives to conventional technologies are included. The pulp and paper model is a dynamic and regional process optimization model incorporating the Bureau of Census defined regions of the Northeast, North Central, South and West. It is dynamic in that it analyzes a 25-year time horizon. Given fuel prices and product demand projections, the model selects modes of operation and energy consumption characteristics that minimize the cost of meeting the projected demands. With a projected average annual growth rate of 3.3% for paper products, model results show a decline in the energy intensity of paper production and an increase in the demand for electricity.

  18. Application of Laser Ablation Processing in Electric Power System Industries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Konagai, Chikara; Sano, Yuji; Nittoh, Koichi; Kuwako, Akira

    The present status of laser ablation processing applied in electric power system industries is reviewed. High average power LD-pumped Nd:YAG lasers with Q-switch have been developed and currently introduced into various applications. Optical fiber based laser beam delivery systems for Q-switched pulse laser are also being developed these years. Based on such laser and beam delivery technology, laser ablation processes are gradually introduced in maintenance of nuclear power plant, thermal power plant and electrical power distribution system. Cost effectiveness, robustness and reliability of the process is highly required for wide utilization in these fields.

  19. Characterization and assessment of selected solar thermal energy systems for residential and process heat applications

    SciTech Connect

    D'Alessio, Gregory J.; Blaustein, Robert P.

    1980-09-01

    The results of studies of seven solar thermal energy applications are presented. Five of these are residential applications: space heating-active liquid, space heating-active air, domestic hot water-active, space heating-passive, and space heating and cooling- active liquid. Denver, Colorado, was selected as a representative location for each of the above applications. The remaining two applications produce industrial process heat: a flat-plate collector system producing 50/sup 0/C to 100/sup 0/C hot water for a commercial laundry in Indianapolis, Indiana; and a concentrating collector system that could produce 100/sup 0/C to 300/sup 0/C process heat adequate to the needs of a pulp mill in Madison, Wisconsin. For each application, a representative system model and preliminary designs of major system elements were established. Then the following data were generated: annual useful energy produced, type and weight of the basic component materials, environmental residuals generated during system operation, and land and water requirements. These data were generalized for other TASE study purposes by expressing them as quantities per 10/sup 15/ Btu of useful energy. The system characteristics are discussed and the environmental impacts are evaluated. To allow the reader to estimate system performance at other geographic locations than those studied, insolation and other pertinent data are provided.

  20. Porous coordination polymers as novel sorption materials for heat transformation processes.

    PubMed

    Janiak, Christoph; Henninger, Stefan K

    2013-01-01

    Porous coordination polymers (PCPs)/metal-organic frameworks (MOFs) are inorganic-organic hybrid materials with a permanent three-dimensional porous metal-ligand network. PCPs or MOFs are inorganic-organic analogs of zeolites in terms of porosity and reversible guest exchange properties. Microporous water-stable PCPs with high water uptake capacity are gaining attention for low temperature heat transformation applications in thermally driven adsorption chillers (TDCs) or adsorption heat pumps (AHPs). TDCs or AHPs are an alternative to traditional air conditioners or heat pumps operating on electricity or fossil fuels. By using solar or waste heat as the operating energy TDCs or AHPs can significantly help to minimize primary energy consumption and greenhouse gas emissions generated by industrial or domestic heating and cooling processes. TDCs and AHPs are based on the evaporation and consecutive adsorption of coolant liquids, preferably water, under specific conditions. The process is driven and controlled by the microporosity and hydrophilicity of the employed sorption material. Here we summarize the current investigations, developments and possibilities of PCPs/MOFs for use in low-temperature heat transformation applications as alternative materials for the traditional inorganic porous substances like silica gel, aluminophosphates or zeolites. PMID:23945102

  1. Control of cell morphology of probiotic Lactobacillus acidophilus for enhanced cell stability during industrial processing.

    PubMed

    Senz, Martin; van Lengerich, Bernhard; Bader, Johannes; Stahl, Ulf

    2015-01-01

    The viability of bacteria during industrial processing is an essential quality criterion for bacterial preparations, such as probiotics and starter cultures. Therefore, producing stable microbial cultures during proliferation is of great interest. A strong correlation between the culture medium and cellular morphology was observed for the lactic acid bacterium Lactobacillus acidophilus NCFM, which is commonly used in the dairy industry as a probiotic supplement and as a starter culture. The cell shapes ranged from single short rods to long filamentous rods. The culture medium composition could control this phenomenon of pleomorphism, especially the use of peptone in combination with an adequate heating of the medium during preparation. Furthermore, we observed a correlation between the cell size and stability of the microorganisms during industrial processing steps, such as freeze-drying, extrusion encapsulation and storage following dried preparations. The results revealed that short cells are more stable than long cells during each of the industrially relevant processing steps. As demonstrated for L. acidophilus NCFM, the adaptation of the medium composition and optimized medium preparation offer the possibility to increase the concentration of viable cells during up- and survival rate during down-stream processing. PMID:25305442

  2. Towards A Unified HFE Process For The Nuclear Industry

    SciTech Connect

    Jacques Hugo

    2012-07-01

    As nuclear power utilities embark on projects to upgrade and modernize power plants, they are likely to discover that traditional engineering methods do not typically make provision for the integration of human considerations. In addition, human factors professionals will find that traditional human performance methods such as function allocation, task analysis, human reliability analysis and human-machine interface design do not scale well to the complexity of a large-scale nuclear power upgrade project. Up-to-date human factors engineering processes, methods, techniques and tools are required to perform these kinds of analyses. This need is recognized widely in industry and an important part of the Department of Energy’s Light Water Reactor Sustainability Program deals with identifying potential impacts of emerging technologies on human performance and the technical bases needed to address them. However, so far no formal initiative has been launched to deal with the lack of integrated processes. Although human factors integration frameworks do exist in industries such as aviation or defense, no formal integrated human factors process exists in the nuclear industry. As a first step towards creating such a process, a “unified human factors engineering process” is proposed as a framework within which engineering organizations, human factors practitioners and regulatory bodies can ensure that human factors requirements are embedded in engineering activities throughout the upgrade project life cycle.

  3. Numerical simulation of plasma processes driven by transverse ion heating

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Singh, Nagendra; Chan, C. B.

    1993-01-01

    The plasma processes driven by transverse ion heating in a diverging flux tube are investigated with numerical simulation. The heating is found to drive a host of plasma processes, in addition to the well-known phenomenon of ion conics. The downward electric field near the reverse shock generates a doublestreaming situation consisting of two upflowing ion populations with different average flow velocities. The electric field in the reverse shock region is modulated by the ion-ion instability driven by the multistreaming ions. The oscillating fields in this region have the possibility of heating electrons. These results from the simulations are compared with results from a previous study based on a hydrodynamical model. Effects of spatial resolutions provided by simulations on the evolution of the plasma are discussed.

  4. Study on heat flux from resin to mold in injection molding process

    SciTech Connect

    Nishiwaki, Nobuhiko; Hori, Sankei

    1999-07-01

    Recently, an injection molding of thermoplastic is widely used in many industries, because this manufacturing method is very suitable for mass production. For injection molding processes, a number of software packages for simulating an injection molding process have been developed. It is assumed in these software packages that the heat transfer coefficient between the resin and the mold surface is constant at the filling or cooling stages. In general, when melted resin flows into the mold, heat is generated in the flowing resin because of the high viscosity at the filling stage. Moreover at the cooling stage, a separation of the molded part from the mold surface generally occurs because of shrinkage of the molded material. Therefore, the heat transfer coefficient has not been accurately obtained yet at these stages. In this paper, the temperature near the surface of the mold cavity has been experimentally measured, so the heat flux that flows from the resin to the mold has been able to be analytically estimated by an inverse conduction method. On the other hand, the separating behavior of the resin from the mold surface has been measured using an ultrasonic transducer attached to the outer surface of the stationary mold. The heat flux that flows from the resin to the mold has been analytically estimated. The apparent heat transfer coefficient can be obtained from the heat flux and the representative temperature difference, which is measured by an ultrasonic technique. It was discovered that the heat flux and the apparent heat transfer coefficient are hardly influenced by the separation.

  5. Progress Report for Diffusion Welding of the NGNP Process Application Heat Exchangers

    SciTech Connect

    R.E. Mizia; D.E. Clark; M.V. Glazoff; T.E. Lister; T.L. Trowbridge

    2011-04-01

    The NGNP Project is currently investigating the use of metallic, diffusion welded, compact heat exchangers to transfer heat from the primary (reactor side) heat transport system to the secondary heat transport system. The intermediate heat exchanger will transfer this heat to downstream applications such as hydrogen production, process heat, and electricity generation. The channeled plates that make up the heat transfer surfaces of the intermediate heat exchanger will have to be assembled into an array by diffusion welding.

  6. Consideration of Thermoelectric Power Generation by Using Hot Spring Thermal Energy or Industrial Waste Heat

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sasaki, Keiichi; Horikawa, Daisuke; Goto, Koichi

    2015-01-01

    Today, we face some significant environmental and energy problems such as global warming, urban heat island, and the precarious balance of world oil supply and demand. However, we have not yet found a satisfactory solution to these problems. Waste heat recovery is considered to be one of the best solutions because it can improve energy efficiency by converting heat exhausted from plants and machinery to electric power. This technology would also prevent atmospheric temperature increases caused by waste heat, and decrease fossil fuel consumption by recovering heat energy, thus also reducing CO2 emissions. The system proposed in this research generates electric power by providing waste heat or unharnessed thermal energy to built-in thermoelectric modules that can convert heat into electric power. Waste heat can be recovered from many places, including machinery in industrial plants, piping in electric power plants, waste incineration plants, and so on. Some natural heat sources such as hot springs and solar heat can also be used for this thermoelectric generation system. The generated power is expected to be supplied to auxiliary machinery around the heat source, stored as an emergency power supply, and so on. The attributes of this system are (1) direct power generation using hot springs or waste heat; (2) 24-h stable power generation; (3) stand-alone power system with no noise and no vibration; and (4) easy maintenance attributed to its simple structure with no moving parts. In order to maximize energy use efficiency, the temperature difference between both sides of the thermoelectric (TE) modules built into the system need to be kept as large as possible. This means it is important to reduce thermal resistance between TE modules and heat source. Moreover, the system's efficiency greatly depends on the base temperature of the heat sources and the material of the system's TE modules. Therefore, in order to make this system practical and efficient, it is necessary to

  7. Summary of the government/industry workshop on new materials and processing technologies for industrial applications

    SciTech Connect

    Young, J.K.

    1992-07-01

    This report presents a summary of the 1-day workshop conducted at Ann Arbor, Michigan, on April 16, 1992, between the National Center for Manufacturing Sciences (NCMS) and the US Department of Energy Advanced Industrial Materials Program (DOE AIM). The workshop objectives were to: (1) encourage collaboration between DOE, the DOE national laboratories, and NCMS material manufacturers and (2) assist the DOE AIM program in targeting research and development (R&D) more effectively. During the workshop, participants from industry and DOE laboratories were divided into three working groups. Representatives from the DOE national laboratories currently conducting major research programs for AIM were asked to be working group leaders. The groups developed recommendations for NCMS and AIM managers using a six-step process. As a result of the workshop, the groups identified problems of key concern to NCMS member companies and promising materials and processes to meet industry needs. Overall, the workshop found that the research agenda of DOE AIM should include working with suppliers to develop manufacturing technology. The agenda should not be solely driven by energy considerations, but rather it should be driven by industry needs. The role of DOE should be to ensure that energy-efficient technology is available to meet these needs.

  8. Summary of the government/industry workshop on new materials and processing technologies for industrial applications

    SciTech Connect

    Young, J K

    1992-07-01

    This report presents a summary of the 1-day workshop conducted at Ann Arbor, Michigan, on April 16, 1992, between the National Center for Manufacturing Sciences (NCMS) and the US Department of Energy Advanced Industrial Materials Program (DOE AIM). The workshop objectives were to: (1) encourage collaboration between DOE, the DOE national laboratories, and NCMS material manufacturers and (2) assist the DOE AIM program in targeting research and development (R D) more effectively. During the workshop, participants from industry and DOE laboratories were divided into three working groups. Representatives from the DOE national laboratories currently conducting major research programs for AIM were asked to be working group leaders. The groups developed recommendations for NCMS and AIM managers using a six-step process. As a result of the workshop, the groups identified problems of key concern to NCMS member companies and promising materials and processes to meet industry needs. Overall, the workshop found that the research agenda of DOE AIM should include working with suppliers to develop manufacturing technology. The agenda should not be solely driven by energy considerations, but rather it should be driven by industry needs. The role of DOE should be to ensure that energy-efficient technology is available to meet these needs.

  9. COEX - process: cross-breeding between innovation and industrial experience

    SciTech Connect

    Drain, F.; Emin, J.L.; Vinoche, R.; Baron, P.

    2008-07-01

    Recycling used nuclear fuel at an industrial scale has been a reality for over 40 years. Since it was founded in 1976, AREVA has designed and built two used fuel treatment plants in La Hague, France. These plants, named UP2-800 and UP3, use the PUREX process. UP3 began operations at the end of the 80's and UP2-800 in the mid 90's. The plutonium extracted in UP2-800 and UP3 is then processed in MELOX plant which started operation in 1995, to be recycled under the form of MOX fuel in LWR. This technology has been selected by JNFL for its reprocessing and recycling plants. Rokkasho-Mura reprocessing plant incorporates also some Japanese technologies and is being commissioned soon. Over 23,000 tons of LWR used fuels have been treated in La Hague plants and over 1200 tons of MOX fuels have been produced by MELOX plant. Innovations have been constantly incorporated to these plants to improve process efficiency and to reduce the activity and volume of waste. During these years, AREVA has acquired an invaluable experience in industrializing processes and technologies developed in the laboratory. In the frame of its continuous improvement policy, AREVA has developed jointly with CEA (French Atomic Energy Agency) a new process, COEX{sup TM} process, offering significant improvement in term of proliferation resistance, process performance and investment and operating cost. The present paper recalls the process principles applied in French and Japanese recycling plants. Then it describes the main steps of COEX{sup TM} process, the status of its development and the improvements compared to PUREX process. The possible evolution of COEX{sup TM} process to cope with needs of future nuclear fuel cycles using fast reactors and possible recycling of minor actinides is presented. (authors)

  10. System for monitoring an industrial process and determining sensor status

    DOEpatents

    Gross, K.C.; Hoyer, K.K.; Humenik, K.E.

    1997-05-13

    A method and system are disclosed for monitoring an industrial process and a sensor. The method and system include generating a first and second signal characteristic of an industrial process variable. One of the signals can be an artificial signal generated by an auto regressive moving average technique. After obtaining two signals associated with one physical variable, a difference function is obtained by determining the arithmetic difference between the two pairs of signals over time. A frequency domain transformation is made of the difference function to obtain Fourier modes describing a composite function. A residual function is obtained by subtracting the composite function from the difference function and the residual function (free of nonwhite noise) is analyzed by a statistical probability ratio test. 17 figs.

  11. System for monitoring an industrial process and determining sensor status

    DOEpatents

    Gross, K.C.; Hoyer, K.K.; Humenik, K.E.

    1995-10-17

    A method and system for monitoring an industrial process and a sensor are disclosed. The method and system include generating a first and second signal characteristic of an industrial process variable. One of the signals can be an artificial signal generated by an auto regressive moving average technique. After obtaining two signals associated with one physical variable, a difference function is obtained by determining the arithmetic difference between the two pairs of signals over time. A frequency domain transformation is made of the difference function to obtain Fourier modes describing a composite function. A residual function is obtained by subtracting the composite function from the difference function and the residual function (free of nonwhite noise) is analyzed by a statistical probability ratio test. 17 figs.

  12. System for monitoring an industrial process and determining sensor status

    DOEpatents

    Gross, Kenneth C.; Hoyer, Kristin K.; Humenik, Keith E.

    1995-01-01

    A method and system for monitoring an industrial process and a sensor. The method and system include generating a first and second signal characteristic of an industrial process variable. One of the signals can be an artificial signal generated by an auto regressive moving average technique. After obtaining two signals associated with one physical variable, a difference function is obtained by determining the arithmetic difference between the two pairs of signals over time. A frequency domain transformation is made of the difference function to obtain Fourier modes describing a composite function. A residual function is obtained by subtracting the composite function from the difference function and the residual function (free of nonwhite noise) is analyzed by a statistical probability ratio test.

  13. System for monitoring an industrial process and determining sensor status

    DOEpatents

    Gross, Kenneth C.; Hoyer, Kristin K.; Humenik, Keith E.

    1997-01-01

    A method and system for monitoring an industrial process and a sensor. The method and system include generating a first and second signal characteristic of an industrial process variable. One of the signals can be an artificial signal generated by an auto regressive moving average technique. After obtaining two signals associated with one physical variable, a difference function is obtained by determining the arithmetic difference between the two pairs of signals over time. A frequency domain transformation is made of the difference function to obtain Fourier modes describing a composite function. A residual function is obtained by subtracting the composite function from the difference function and the residual function (free of nonwhite noise) is analyzed by a statistical probability ratio test.

  14. Energy determination in industrial X-ray processing facilities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cleland, M. R.; Gregoire, O.; Stichelbaut, F.; Gomola, I.; Galloway, R. A.; Schlecht, J.

    2005-12-01

    In industrial irradiation facilities, the determination of maximum photon or electron energy is important for regulated processes, such as food irradiation, and for assurance of treatment reproducibility. With electron beam irradiators, this has been done by measuring the depth-dose distribution in a homogeneous material. For X-ray irradiators, an analogous method has not yet been recommended. This paper describes a procedure suitable for typical industrial irradiation processes, which is based on common practice in the field of therapeutic X-ray treatment. It utilizes a measurement of the slope of the exponential attenuation curve of X-rays in a thick stack of polyethylene plates. Monte Carlo simulations and experimental tests have been performed to verify the suitability and accuracy of the method between 3 MeV and 8 MeV.

  15. The Statistical Interpretation of Classical Thermodynamic Heating and Expansion Processes

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cartier, Stephen F.

    2011-01-01

    A statistical model has been developed and applied to interpret thermodynamic processes typically presented from the macroscopic, classical perspective. Through this model, students learn and apply the concepts of statistical mechanics, quantum mechanics, and classical thermodynamics in the analysis of the (i) constant volume heating, (ii)…

  16. Supply problems in the solar heating and cooling industry. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1981-08-01

    Future distribution channels and costs in the solar-heating-and-cooling industry are discussed and some of the external factors influencing the industry are examined such as public policy initiatives and competing technologies. The distribution channels through which solar equipment passes from manufacturer to consumer are examined; future industry evolution will most likely be towards a multiplicity of distribution networks, each serving a different market segment. The components of solar costs, including collector, other system components, indirect and marketing, and installation and O and M costs, are also reviewed. Costs for high quality solar collectors are projected to increase, however the rate of increase is uncertain. Solar costs could increase at: (a) construction industry cost escalation rates; (b) general economic inflation rates; or (c) lower than the general inflation rate. Nevertheless, the average price paid by consumers is expected to increase at slightly less than the rate of inflation because lower-quality, low-priced systems are expected to garner a larger share of future solar sales. Pertinent public policy initiatives are reviewed which may critically influence the development of solar energy, and the impact of competing energy sources on solar heating economics is considered. Consideration of the projections for the aforementioned supply characteristics suggests that product supply may have a significant constraining influence on the growth of the solar industry.

  17. Industrial scale microwave processing of tomato juice using a novel continuous microwave system.

    PubMed

    Stratakos, Alexandros Ch; Delgado-Pando, Gonzalo; Linton, Mark; Patterson, Margaret F; Koidis, Anastasios

    2016-01-01

    This study evaluated the effect of an industrial scale continuous flow microwave volumetric heating system in comparison to conventional commercial scale pasteurisation for the processing of tomato juice in terms of physicochemical properties, microbial characteristics and antioxidant capacity. The effect against oxidative stress in Caco-2 cells, after in vitro digestion was also investigated. Physicochemical and colour characteristics of juices were very similar between technologies and during storage. Both conventional and microwave pasteurisation inactivated microorganisms and kept them in low levels throughout storage. ABTS[Symbol: see text](+) values, but not ORAC, were higher for the microwave pasteurised juice at day 0 however no significant differences between juices were observed during storage. Juice processed with the microwave system showed an increased cytoprotective effect against H2O2 induced oxidation in Caco-2 cells. Organoleptic analysis revealed that the two tomato juices were very similar. The continuous microwave volumetric heating system appears to be a viable alternative to conventional pasteurisation. PMID:26213019

  18. Coastal Altimetry, From Data Processing To Industrial Applications: Some Illustrations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cancet, M.; Jeansou, E.; Lamouroux, J.; Crespon, F.; Birol, F.; Lyard, F.; Morrow, R.; Bronner, E.; Benveniste, J.

    2013-12-01

    During the last ten years, many efforts were made to develop corrections and processing strategies dedicated to the coastal altimetry observations. Ever since, the coastal altimetry data has proved to be of high value in many scientific and industrial applications. This paper gives an overview of some of NOVELTIS recent projects related to coastal altimetry, from the products improvement and assessment to the promotion of coastal altimetry through the development of new added-value products.

  19. Effects of passive heat stress on human somatosensory processing.

    PubMed

    Nakata, Hiroki; Oshiro, Misaki; Namba, Mari; Shibasaki, Manabu

    2015-12-01

    Herein, we investigated the effects of passive heat stress on human somatosensory processing recorded by somatosensory-evoked potentials (SEPs). Fifteen healthy subjects received a median nerve stimulation at the left wrist under two thermal conditions: Heat Stress and normothermic Time Control. The latencies and amplitudes of P14, N20, P25, N35, P45, and N60 at C4' and P14, N18, P22, and N30 at Fz were evaluated. Under the Heat Stress condition, SEPs were recorded at normothermic baseline (1st), early in heat stress (2nd), when esophageal temperature had increased by ~1.0°C (3rd) and ~2.0°C (4th), and after heat stress (5th). In the Time Control condition, SEPs were measured at the same time intervals as those in the Heat Stress condition. The peak latencies and amplitudes of SEPs did not change early in heat stress. However, the latencies of P14, N20, and N60 at C4' and P14, N18, and P22 at Fz were significantly shorter in the 4th session than in the 1st session. Furthermore, the peak amplitudes of P25 and N60 at C4', and P22 and N30 at Fz decreased with increases in body temperature. On the other hand, under the Time Control condition, no significant differences were observed in the amplitudes or latencies of any component of SEPs. These results suggested that the conduction velocity of the ascending somatosensory input was accelerated by increases in body temperature, and hyperthermia impaired the neural activity of cortical somatosensory processing. PMID:26468258

  20. r-process Lanthanide Production and Heating Rates in Kilonovae

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lippuner, Jonas; Roberts, Luke F.

    2015-12-01

    r-process nucleosynthesis in material ejected during neutron star mergers may lead to radioactively powered transients called kilonovae. The timescale and peak luminosity of these transients depend on the composition of the ejecta, which determines the local heating rate from nuclear decays and the opacity. Kasen et al. and Tanaka & Hotokezaka pointed out that lanthanides can drastically increase the opacity in these outflows. We use the new general-purpose nuclear reaction network SkyNet to carry out a parameter study of r-process nucleosynthesis for a range of initial electron fractions Ye, initial specific entropies s, and expansion timescales τ. We find that the ejecta is lanthanide-free for Ye ≳ 0.22-0.30, depending on s and τ. The heating rate is insensitive to s and τ, but certain, larger values of Ye lead to reduced heating rates, due to individual nuclides dominating the heating. We calculate approximate light curves with a simplified gray radiative transport scheme. The light curves peak at about a day (week) in the lanthanide-free (-rich) cases. The heating rate does not change much as the ejecta becomes lanthanide-free with increasing Ye, but the light-curve peak becomes about an order of magnitude brighter because it peaks much earlier when the heating rate is larger. We also provide parametric fits for the heating rates between 0.1 and 100 days, and we provide a simple fit in Ye, s, and τ to estimate whether or not the ejecta is lanthanide-rich.

  1. Statistical Modeling of the Industrial Sodium Aluminate Solutions Decomposition Process

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Živković, Živan; Mihajlović, Ivan; Djurić, Isidora; Štrbac, Nada

    2010-10-01

    This article presents the results of the statistical modeling of industrial sodium aluminate solution decomposition as part of the Bayer alumina production process. The aim of this study was to define the correlation dependence of degree of the aluminate solution decomposition on the following parameters of technological processes: concentration of the Na2O (caustic), caustic ratio and crystallization ratio, starting temperature, final temperature, average diameter of crystallization seed, and duration of decomposition process. Multiple linear regression analysis (MLRA) and artificial neural networks (ANNs) were used as the tools for the mathematical analysis of the indicated problem. On the one hand, the attempt of process modeling, using MLRA, resulted in a linear model whose correlation coefficient was equal to R 2 = 0.731. On the other hand, ANNs enabled, to some extent, better process modeling, with a correlation coefficient equal to R 2 = 0.895. Both models obtained using MLRA and ANNs can be used for the efficient prediction of the degree of sodium aluminate solution decomposition, as the function of the input parameters, under industrial conditions of the Bayer alumina production process.

  2. Implementation of Haccp in the Mexican Poultry Processing Industry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maldonado-Siman, Ema; Martínez-Hernández, Pedro Arturo; Ruíz-Flores, Agustín; García-Muñiz, José G.; Cadena-Meneses, José A.

    Hazard Analysis and Critical Control Point (HACCP) is a safety and quality management tool used as major issue in international and domestic trade in food industry. However, detailed information on costs and benefits of HACCP implementation is needed to provide appropriate advice to food processing plants. This paper reports on the perceptions of costs and benefits by the Mexican poultry processing plants and sale destinations. The results suggest that the major costs of implementing and operating HACCP within poultry processing plants are record keeping and external technical advice. The main benefit indicated by the majority of processing plants is a reduction in microbial counts. Over 39% of poultry production is sent to nation-wide chains of supermarkets, and less than 13% is sent to international markets. It was concluded that the adoption of HACCP by the Mexican poultry processing sector is based on the concern to increase and keep the domestic market, rather than to compete in the international market.

  3. Combined heat and mass transfer in absorption processes

    SciTech Connect

    Grossman, G.

    1982-01-01

    The approach to theoretical analysis of the combined heat and mass transfer process taking place in absorption systems is described. The two tranfer phenomena are strongly coupled here. The purpose of the analysis is to relate, quantitatively, the heat and mass transfer coefficients to the physical properties of the working fluids and to the geometry of the system. The preferred configuration is that of a falling film of liquid on a metallic surface which serves to transfer heat from the absorbent in contact with the vapor of the absorbate. The model developed may be solved for laminar, turbulent, or transition flow regimes. The results of the solution describe the development of the thermal and concentration boundary layers and the variation of the temperatures, concentrations, and heat and mass fluxes. These quantities in their normalized, dimensionless form depend on two characteristic parameters of the system: the Lewis number Le and the dimensionless heat of absorption lambda. The length in the direction of flow is normalized with respect to the Peclet number and the film thickness. Heat and mass transfer coefficients for the system were calculated. The Sherwood number for mass transfer from the vapor-liquid interface to the bulk of the film reaches a constant value of 3.63 with fully developed boundary layers for both the adiabatic and constant temperature wall. The Nusselt number for heat transfer from the interface to the bulk reaches under the same conditions values of 3.63 and 2.67 for the adiabatic and constant temperature wall, respectively. The Nusselt number for heat tranfer from the bulk to the wall reaches 1.60.

  4. Solar production of industrial process steam at the Home Cleaning and Laundry Co. Final technical report

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1984-06-01

    This report presents the results of the operation and performance evaluation period at the Home Laundry Solar Industrial Process Heat Project at Pasadena, California. The installation comprises 6496 ft/sup 2/ (603.5 m/sup 2/) of linear parabolic trough concentrating collectors supplying solar thermal energy for use in laundry and dry cleaning processes. The design phase began in September 1977, and an acceptance test was conducted during the week of April 12, 1982. The plant has been in operation since May 1982, with the 12-month Phase III (operational) period starting in October 1982. The objective of the operational evaluation experiment was to maximize energy delivery to the industrial participant while characterizing system performance. Data were acquired for monthly documentation of system performance, maintenance requirements, and operating costs.

  5. Refinery chooses ORC to convert process waste heat to electric power

    SciTech Connect

    Makansi, J.

    1985-03-01

    The organic Rankine-cycle (ORC) waste-heat-recovery system is one of several concepts that DOE, energy-systems suppliers, and others have been developing to make use of low-level waste-heat streams at process and manufacturing plants. Now, several years after the oil crisis of the 1970s accelerated this development, one ORC system has found a home in the energy-intensive refining industry. Mobil Oil Corp has been generating electric power with an ORC system supplied by Turbonetics Energy Inc, a subsidiary of Mechanical Technology Inc (MTI), Latham, NY - at its Torrence (Calif) refinery complex for about nine months. Two modules, each rated at 1070 kW, recover heat from a 300F vapor product stream leaving a fluidcatalytic-cracking (FCC) unit. As a result, cooling duty on the existing overhead coolers has been reduced by about 70-million Btu/hr.

  6. [Influence of industrial factors on the health status of heat and power plant workers].

    PubMed

    Ivanov, S I; Burtseva, T I; Skal'nyĭ, A V; Notova, S V; Vibartseva, E V; Chadova, L A; Burlutskaia, O I

    2009-01-01

    The hair levels of chemical elements (Al, As, Be, Ca, Cd, Co, Cr, Cu, Fe, Hg, I, K, Li, Mg, Mn, Na, Ni, P, Pb, Se, Si, Sn, V, and Zn) were studied in Orenburg heat and power plant workers. The specific features of the elemental composition of biosubstrates were revealed in relation to the physical and chemical exposures of the workers to industrial factors. The peculiarities of element-to-element relations were established in man under different working conditions. PMID:19358351

  7. Picosecond and femtosecond lasers for industrial material processing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mayerhofer, R.; Serbin, J.; Deeg, F. W.

    2016-03-01

    Cold laser materials processing using ultra short pulsed lasers has become one of the most promising new technologies for high-precision cutting, ablation, drilling and marking of almost all types of material, without causing unwanted thermal damage to the part. These characteristics have opened up new application areas and materials for laser processing, allowing previously impossible features to be created and also reducing the amount of post-processing required to an absolute minimum, saving time and cost. However, short pulse widths are only one part of thee story for industrial manufacturing processes which focus on total costs and maximum productivity and production yield. Like every other production tool, ultra-short pulse lasers have too provide high quality results with maximum reliability. Robustness and global on-site support are vital factors, as well ass easy system integration.

  8. Heat flux: thermohydraulic investigation of solar air heaters used in agro-industrial applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rahmati Aidinlou, H.; Nikbakht, A. M.

    2016-07-01

    A new design of solar air heater simulator is presented to comply with the extensive applications inagro-industry. A wise installation of increased heat transfer surface area provided uniform and efficient heat diffusion over the duct. Nusselt number and friction factor have been investigated based on the constant roughness parameters such as relative roughness height (e/D), relative roughness pitch (P/e), angle of attack (α) and aspect ratio with Reynolds numbers ranging from 5000 to 19,000 in the fully developed region. Heat fluxes of 800, 900 and 1000 Wm-2 were provided. The enhancement in friction factor is observed to be 3.1656, 3.47 and 3.0856 times, and for the Nusselt number either, augmentation is calculated to be 1.4437, 1.4963 and 1.535 times, respectively, over the smooth duct for 800, 900 and 1000 Wm-2 heat fluxes. Thermohydraulic performance is plotted versus the Reynolds number based on the aforementioned roughness parameters at varying heat fluxes. The results show up that thermohydraulic performance is found to be maximum for 1000 Wm-2 at the average Reynolds number of 5151. Based on the results, we can verify that the introduced solar simulator can help analyzing and developing solar collector installations at the simulated heat fluxes.

  9. Countercurrent direct contact heat exchange process and system

    DOEpatents

    Wahl, III, Edward F.; Boucher, Frederic B.

    1979-01-01

    Recovery of energy from geothermal brines and other hot water sources by direct contact heat exchange with a working fluid, such as a hydrocarbon working fluid, e.g. isobutane. The process and system consists of a plurality of stages, each stage including mixing and settling units. In the first stage, hot brine and arm working fluid are intimately mixed and passed into a settler wherein the brine settles to the bottom of the settler and the hot working fluid rises to the top. The hot working fluid is passed to a heat engine or turbine to produce work and the working fluid is then recycled back into the system. The system is comprised of a series of stages each containing a settler and mixer, and wherein the working fluid and the brine flow in a countercurrent manner through the stages to recover the heat from the brine in increments and raise the temperature of the working fluid in increments.

  10. Predictive maintenance of critical equipment in industrial processes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hashemian, Hashem M.

    This dissertation is an account of present and past research and development (R&D) efforts conducted by the author to develop and implement new technology for predictive maintenance and equipment condition monitoring in industrial processes. In particular, this dissertation presents the design of an integrated condition-monitoring system that incorporates the results of three current R&D projects with a combined funding of $2.8 million awarded to the author by the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE). This system will improve the state of the art in equipment condition monitoring and has applications in numerous industries including chemical and petrochemical plants, aviation and aerospace, electric power production and distribution, and a variety of manufacturing processes. The work that is presented in this dissertation is unique in that it introduces a new class of condition-monitoring methods that depend predominantly on the normal output of existing process sensors. It also describes current R&D efforts to develop data acquisition systems and data analysis algorithms and software packages that use the output of these sensors to determine the condition and health of industrial processes and their equipment. For example, the output of a pressure sensor in an operating plant can be used not only to indicate the pressure, but also to verify the calibration and response time of the sensor itself and identify anomalies in the process such as blockages, voids, and leaks that can interfere with accurate measurement of process parameters or disturb the plant's operation, safety, or reliability. Today, process data are typically collected at a rate of one sample per second (1 Hz) or slower. If this sampling rate is increased to 100 samples per second or higher, much more information can be extracted from the normal output of a process sensor and then used for condition monitoring, equipment performance measurements, and predictive maintenance. A fast analog-to-digital (A

  11. Waste disposal and treatment in the food-processing industry. (Latest citations from the Biobusiness data base). Published Search

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1992-08-01

    The bibliography contains citations concerning waste treatment and disposal in the food processing industry. Methods, equipment, and technology are considered. Specific areas include waste heat recovery, and food industry wastes from meat and seafood processing, dairy and beverage production, and processing of fruits and vegetables. The citations explore conversion of the treated waste to fertilizer, and uses in animal feeds, combustion for energy production, biogas production, and composting. The recovery and recycling of usable chemicals from the food waste is also covered. Food packaging recycling is considered in a related bibliography. (Contains 250 citations and includes a subject term index and title list.)

  12. Aerogel-Based Insulation for High-Temperature Industrial Processes

    SciTech Connect

    Dr. Owen Evans

    2011-10-13

    Under this program, Aspen Aerogels has developed an industrial insulation called Pyrogel HT, which is 4-5 times more thermally efficient than current non-aerogel technology. Derived from nanoporous silica aerogels, Pyrogel HT was specifically developed to address a high temperature capability gap not currently met with Aspen Aerogels{trademark} flagship product, Pyrogel XT. Pyrogel XT, which was originally developed on a separate DOE contract (DE-FG36-06GO16056), was primarily optimized for use in industrial steam processing systems, where application temperatures typically do not exceed 400 C. At the time, further improvements in thermal performance above 400 C could not be reasonably achieved for Pyrogel XT without significantly affecting other key material properties using the current technology. Cumulative sales of Pyrogel HT into domestic power plants should reach $125MM through 2030, eventually reaching about 10% of the total insulation market share in that space. Global energy savings would be expected to scale similarly. Over the same period, these sales would reduce domestic energy consumption by more than 65 TBtu. Upon branching out into all industrial processes in the 400 C-650 C regime, Pyrogel HT would reach annual sales levels of $150MM, with two-thirds of that being exported.

  13. Operation of an industrial radiation processing facility in Mexico

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Torres C., Gilberto

    A 10 years old JS-6500 industrial Cobalt 60 irradiator was installed in 1980 at the ININ Nuclear Center in Mexico with 960 kGy. The facility was commissioning in August with some minor changes with respect to the original AECL design, in order to give services to different industries and also to do research in several fields. During that year promotional activities were done to increase interest from industry in the use of radiation processing. In 1981, an interruption due to pool's leakage and its reparation, put the facility out of operation. During the next three years the demand increases but never reach more than 50% if the capacity. In that time, the potential users did not show confidence in the process, even knowing that health authorities approved with no restrictions radiation sterilization. Actually, there are 34 different companies irradiating 48 different products. Even those within the same grouping, require different minimum and maximum radiation doses, so the facility has been operated combining products and valumes. The experiences are presented in this paper. Also, maintenance of the irradiator is discussed and some modifications to the original programme have been done due to the necessity to use local spare parts instead of imported ones.

  14. HTR-100 industrial nuclear power plant for generation of heat and electricity

    SciTech Connect

    Brandes, S.; Kohl, W.

    1987-11-01

    Based on their proven high-temperature reactor (HTR) with pebble-bed core, Brown, Boveri and Cie/Hochtemperatur-Reaktorbau have developed an HTR-100 plant that combines favorable capital costs and high availability. Due to the high HTR-specific standards and passive safety features, this plant is especially well suited for siting near the end user. The safety concept permits further operation of the plant or decay heat removal via the operational heat sinks in the event of maloperation and design basis accidents having a higher probability of occurrence. In the event of hypothetical accidents, the decay heat is removed from the reactor pressure vessel by radiation, conduction, and convection to a concrete cooling system operating in natural convection. As an example of the new HTR-100 plant concept, a twin-block plant design for extraction of industrial steam is presented.

  15. Combined heat and mass transfer device for improving separation process

    DOEpatents

    Tran, Thanh Nhon

    1999-01-01

    A two-phase small channel heat exchange matrix simultaneously provides for heat transfer and mass transfer between the liquid and vapor phases of a multi-component mixture at a single, predetermined location within a separation column, significantly improving the thermodynamic efficiency of the separation process. The small channel heat exchange matrix is composed of a series of channels having a hydraulic diameter no greater than 5.0 millimeters for conducting a two-phase coolant. In operation, the matrix provides the liquid-vapor contacting surfaces within the separation column, such that heat and mass are transferred simultaneously between the liquid and vapor phases. The two-phase coolant allows for a uniform heat transfer coefficient to be maintained along the length of the channels and across the surface of the matrix. Preferably, a perforated, concave sheet connects each channel to an adjacent channel to facilitate the flow of the liquid and vapor phases within the column and to increase the liquid-vapor contacting surface area.

  16. Combined heat and mass transfer device for improving separation process

    DOEpatents

    Tran, T.N.

    1999-08-24

    A two-phase small channel heat exchange matrix simultaneously provides for heat transfer and mass transfer between the liquid and vapor phases of a multi-component mixture at a single, predetermined location within a separation column, significantly improving the thermodynamic efficiency of the separation process. The small channel heat exchange matrix is composed of a series of channels having a hydraulic diameter no greater than 5.0 millimeters for conducting a two-phase coolant. In operation, the matrix provides the liquid-vapor contacting surfaces within the separation column, such that heat and mass are transferred simultaneously between the liquid and vapor phases. The two-phase coolant allows for a uniform heat transfer coefficient to be maintained along the length of the channels and across the surface of the matrix. Preferably, a perforated, concave sheet connects each channel to an adjacent channel to facilitate the flow of the liquid and vapor phases within the column and to increase the liquid-vapor contacting surface area. 12 figs.

  17. Self-heating of dried industrial tannery wastewater sludge induced by pyrophoric iron sulfides formation.

    PubMed

    Bertani, R; Biasin, A; Canu, P; Della Zassa, M; Refosco, D; Simionato, F; Zerlottin, M

    2016-03-15

    Similarly to many powders of solids, dried sludge originated from tannery wastewater may result in a self-heating process, under given circumstances. In most cases, it causes a moderate heating (reaching 70-90°C), but larger, off-design residence times in the drier, in a suboxic atmosphere, extremely reactive solids can be produced. Tannery waste contains several chemicals that mostly end up in the wastewater treatment sludge. Unexpected and uncontrolled self heating could lead to a combustion and even to environmental problems. Elaborating on previous studies, with the addition of several analytical determinations, before and after the self-heating, we attempted to formulate a mechanism for the onset of heating. We demonstrated that the system Fe/S/O has been involved in the process. We proved that the formation of small quantities of pyrophoric iron sulfides is the key. They are converted to sulfated by reaction with water and oxygen with exothermic processes. The pyrite/pyrrhotite production depends on the sludge drying process. The oxidation of sulfides to oxides and sulfates through exothermic steps, reasonably catalyzed by metals in the sludge, occurs preferentially in a moist environment. The mechanism has been proved by reproducing in the laboratory prolonged heating under anoxic/suboxic atmosphere. PMID:26651067

  18. Competent statistical programmer: Need of business process outsourcing industry.

    PubMed

    Khan, Imran

    2014-07-01

    Over the last two decades Business Process Outsourcing (BPO) has evolved as much mature practice. India is looked as preferred destination for pharmaceutical outsourcing over a cost arbitrage. Among the biometrics outsourcing, statistical programming and analysis required very niche skill for service delivery. The demand and supply ratios are imbalance due to high churn out rate and less supply of competent programmer. Industry is moving from task delivery to ownership and accountability. The paradigm shift from an outsourcing to consulting is triggering the need for competent statistical programmer. Programmers should be trained in technical, analytical, problem solving, decision making and soft skill as the expectations from the customer are changing from task delivery to accountability of the project. This paper will highlight the common issue SAS programming service industry is facing and skills the programmers need to develop to cope up with these changes. PMID:24987578

  19. Competent statistical programmer: Need of business process outsourcing industry

    PubMed Central

    Khan, Imran

    2014-01-01

    Over the last two decades Business Process Outsourcing (BPO) has evolved as much mature practice. India is looked as preferred destination for pharmaceutical outsourcing over a cost arbitrage. Among the biometrics outsourcing, statistical programming and analysis required very niche skill for service delivery. The demand and supply ratios are imbalance due to high churn out rate and less supply of competent programmer. Industry is moving from task delivery to ownership and accountability. The paradigm shift from an outsourcing to consulting is triggering the need for competent statistical programmer. Programmers should be trained in technical, analytical, problem solving, decision making and soft skill as the expectations from the customer are changing from task delivery to accountability of the project. This paper will highlight the common issue SAS programming service industry is facing and skills the programmers need to develop to cope up with these changes. PMID:24987578

  20. Vermicomposting of milk processing industry sludge spiked with plant wastes.

    PubMed

    Suthar, Surindra; Mutiyar, Pravin K; Singh, Sushma

    2012-07-01

    This work illustrates the vermistabilization of wastewater sludge from a milk processing industry (MPIS) unit spiked with cow dung (CD), sugarcane trash (ST) and wheat straw (WS) employing earthworms Eisenia fetida. A total of nine experimental vermibeds were established and changes in chemical parameters of waste material have been observed for 90 days. Vermistabilization caused significant reduction in pH, organic carbon and C:N ratio and substantial increase in total N, available P and exchangeable K. The waste mixture containing MPIS (60%)+CD (10%)+ST (30%) and MPIS (60%)+CD (10%)+WS (30%) had better waste mineralization rate among waste mixtures studied. The earthworm showed better biomass and cocoon numbers in all vermibeds during vermicomposting operation. Results, thus suggest the suitability of E. fetida for conversion of noxious industrial waste into value-added product for land restoration programme. PMID:22609678

  1. Theory and Practice Meets in Industrial Process Design -Educational Perspective-

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aramo-Immonen, Heli; Toikka, Tarja

    Software engineer should see himself as a business process designer in enterprise resource planning system (ERP) re-engineering project. Software engineers and managers should have design dialogue. The objective of this paper is to discuss the motives to study the design research in connection of management education in order to envision and understand the soft human issues in the management context. Second goal is to develop means of practicing social skills between designers and managers. This article explores the affective components of design thinking in industrial management domain. In the conceptual part of this paper are discussed concepts of network and project economy, creativity, communication, use of metaphors, and design thinking. Finally is introduced empirical research plan and first empirical results from design method experiments among the multi-disciplined groups of the master-level students of industrial engineering and management and software engineering.

  2. Biodiesel production process from microalgae oil by waste heat recovery and process integration.

    PubMed

    Song, Chunfeng; Chen, Guanyi; Ji, Na; Liu, Qingling; Kansha, Yasuki; Tsutsumi, Atsushi

    2015-10-01

    In this work, the optimization of microalgae oil (MO) based biodiesel production process is carried out by waste heat recovery and process integration. The exergy analysis of each heat exchanger presented an efficient heat coupling between hot and cold streams, thus minimizing the total exergy destruction. Simulation results showed that the unit production cost of optimized process is 0.592$/L biodiesel, and approximately 0.172$/L biodiesel can be avoided by heat integration. Although the capital cost of the optimized biodiesel production process increased 32.5% and 23.5% compared to the reference cases, the operational cost can be reduced by approximately 22.5% and 41.6%. PMID:26133477

  3. Lodging industry solutions: Heating and cooling space conditioning technology guidebook. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Smit, K.

    1998-12-01

    The American lodging industry has experienced growth and relative prosperity in recent years. Operating costs and occupancy rates are critical to the economic success of any lodging establishment. Recent financial gains in the lodging industry are making more funds available for heating and cooling system upgrades. Among new equipment installations in the lodging industry (air handling equipment, water heaters, laundry and cooking equipment), about 70% is in new construction, remodeling, or expansion, 14% replaces non-functioning equipment, and the remainder is for miscellaneous purposes (AGA 1998). By providing good advice on heating, ventilation, and air conditioning (HVAC) equipment, utilities can help property owners and managers make wise decisions and avoid poor equipment choices that could hamper their profits over the long run. The benefits to utilities of offering this service will take the form of improved customer relations and strengthened customer loyalty. This guidebook is developed to assist utilities in advising the loading industry about HVAC equipment options. By serving as a useful reference source, it can help them perform this much-needed, valuable service.

  4. A survey of gas-side fouling in industrial heat-transfer equipment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Marner, W. J.; Suitor, J. W.

    1983-01-01

    Gas-side fouling and corrosion problems occur in all of the energy intensive industries including the chemical, petroleum, primary metals, pulp and paper, glass, cement, foodstuffs, and textile industries. Topics of major interest include: (1) heat exchanger design procedures for gas-side fouling service; (2) gas-side fouling factors which are presently available; (3) startup and shutdown procedures used to minimize the effects of gas-side fouling; (4) gas-side fouling prevention, mitigation, and accommodation techniques; (5) economic impact of gas-side fouling on capital costs, maintenance costs, loss of production, and energy losses; and (6) miscellaneous considerations related to gas-side fouling. The present state-of-the-art for industrial gas-side fouling is summarized by a list of recommendations for further work in this area.

  5. Effect of heat processing on selected grain amaranth physicochemical properties

    PubMed Central

    Muyonga, John H; Andabati, Brian; Ssepuuya, Geoffrey

    2014-01-01

    Grain amaranth is a pseudocereal with unique agricultural, nutritional, and functional properties. This study was undertaken to determine the effect of different heat-processing methods on physicochemical and nutraceutical properties in two main grain amaranth species, of Amaranthus hypochondriacus L. and Amaranthus cruentus L. Grains were prepared by roasting and popping, milled and analyzed for changes in in vitro protein digestibility, gruel viscosity, pasting characteristics, antioxidant activity, flavonoids, and total phenolics. In vitro protein digestibility was determined using the pepsin-pancreatin enzyme system. Viscosity and pasting characteristics of samples were determined using a Brookfield Viscometer and a Rapid Visco Analyzer, respectively. The grain methanol extracts were analysed for phenolics using spectrophotometry while antioxidant activity was determined using the DPPH (2,2-diphenyl-1-picrylhydrazyl) method. Heat treatment led to a reduction in protein digestibility, the effect being higher in popped than in roasted samples. Viscosities for roasted grain amaranth gruels were significantly higher than those obtained from raw and popped grain amaranth gruels. The results for pasting properties were consistent with the results for viscosity. In both A. hypochondriacus L. and A. cruentus L., the order of the viscosity values was roasted>raw>popped. The viscosities were also generally lower for A. cruentus L. compared to A. hypochondriacus L. Raw samples for both A. hypochondriacus L. and A. cruentus L. did not significantly differ in total phenolic content (TPC), total flavonoid content (TFC), and total antioxidant activity values. Thermal processing led to an increase in TFC and antioxidant activity. However, TPC of heat-processed samples remained unchanged. From the results, it can be concluded that heat treatment enhances antioxidant activity of grain amaranth and causes rheological changes dependent on the nature of heat treatment. PMID

  6. Numerical Analysis of Heat Transfer During Quenching Process

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Madireddi, Sowjanya; Krishnan, Krishnan Nambudiripad; Reddy, Ammana Satyanarayana

    2016-06-01

    A numerical model is developed to simulate the immersion quenching process of metals. The time of quench plays an important role if the process involves a defined step quenching schedule to obtain the desired characteristics. Lumped heat capacity analysis used for this purpose requires the value of heat transfer coefficient, whose evaluation requires large experimental data. Experimentation on a sample work piece may not represent the actual component which may vary in dimension. A Fluid-Structure interaction technique with a coupled interface between the solid (metal) and liquid (quenchant) is used for the simulations. Initial times of quenching shows boiling heat transfer phenomenon with high values of heat transfer coefficients (5000-2.5 × 105 W/m2K). Shape of the work piece with equal dimension shows less influence on the cooling rate Non-uniformity in hardness at the sharp corners can be reduced by rounding off the edges. For a square piece of 20 mm thickness, with 3 mm fillet radius, this difference is reduced by 73 %. The model can be used for any metal-quenchant combination to obtain time-temperature data without the necessity of experimentation.

  7. The research of ceramic materials for applications in the glass industry including microwave heating techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kogut, K.; Kasprzyk, K.; Zboromirska-Wnukiewicz, B.; Ruziewicz, T.

    2016-02-01

    The melting of a glass is a very energy-intensive process. Selection of energy sources, the heating technique and the method of heating recovery are a fundamental issue from the furnace design point of view of and economic effectiveness of the process. In these processes the problem constitutes the lack of the appropriate ceramic materials that would meet the requirements. In this work the standard ceramic materials were examined and verified. The possibilities of application of microwave techniques were evaluated. In addition the requirements regarding the parameters of new ceramic materials applied for microwave technologies were determined.

  8. Heat-resistant fungi of importance to the food and beverage industry.

    PubMed

    Tournas, V

    1994-01-01

    Spoilage of pasteurized and canned fruit and fruit products caused by heat-resistant molds have been reported repeatedly in recent years. Species most commonly implicated in fruit and fruit product disintegration are Byssochlamys fulva, Byssochlamys nivea, Neosartorya fischeri, Talaromyces flavus, and Eupenicillium brefeldianum. These organisms are saprophytic rather than parasitic and usually contaminate fruits on or near the ground. They can survive heat treatments used for fruit processing and can grow and spoil the products during storage at room temperature, which results in great economic losses. Mold heat resistance is attributed to the formation of sexual spores, ascospores. Ascospores have a wide range of heat resistance, depending on species, strain, age of organism, heating medium, pH, presence of sugars, fats, and acids in heating medium, growth conditions, etc. The mechanism(s) of thermoresistance are not clear; probably some very stable compound(s) critical to germination and outgrowth are present in the heat-resistant ascospores. Besides spoilage, the heat-resistant molds produce a number of toxic secondary metabolites, such as byssotoxin A; byssochlamic acid; the carcinogen, patulin, the tremorgenic substances, fumitremorgin A and C, and verruculogen; fischerin, which caused fatal peritonitis in mice; and eupenifeldin, a compound possessing cytotoxicity as well as in vivo antitumor activity. Growth of heat-resistant fungi can be controlled by lowering the water activity, adding sulfur dioxide, sorbate, or benzoate; washing of fruits in hypochlorite solution before heat treatment reduces the number of ascospores and makes the heat destruction more successful. More research is needed to elucidate the mechanism(s) of thermoresistance and develop new methods for the complete inactivation of resistant ascospores. PMID:7857517

  9. Industrial process system assessment: bridging process engineering and life cycle assessment through multiscale modeling.

    EPA Science Inventory

    The Industrial Process System Assessment (IPSA) methodology is a multiple step allocation approach for connecting information from the production line level up to the facility level and vice versa using a multiscale model of process systems. The allocation procedure assigns inpu...

  10. PROCESS MODIFICATIONS TOWARDS MINIMIZATION OF ENVIRONMENTAL POLLUTANTS IN THE CHEMICAL PROCESSING INDUSTRY

    EPA Science Inventory

    The report covers the development of a matrix of significant pollution problems and attendant process modifications which would have impact on the reduction or elimination of pollutants inherent in these processes. Industries covered are: (1) Refining of Nonferrous Metals; (2) Th...

  11. Diesel organic Rankine bottoming cycle powerplant program: Volume II. Industrial waste heat applications. Final report. [Using Fluorinol-85 as working fluid

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1981-10-01

    Several industrial processes and facilities were evaluated as possible sites to demonstrate the application of an Organic Rankine Cycle system (ORCS) using Fluorinol-85 as the working fluid to effect industrial waste-heat recovery. The economic applications for ORCS's using Fluorinol as the working fluid are in situations where the temperature of the waste-heat stream is between 400/sup 0/ and 1000/sup 0/F. A literature review indicated that the greatest potential and economic advantage for an industrial application for the recovery of waste heat by means of an ORCS using Fluorinol as the working fluid is from the exhausts of high-temperature furnaces and boilers for six major industry categories. Together they expend 80% of the US annual energy consumption in the industrial sector. From these categories, four potential applications were selected, specific information about plant characteristics was obtained, and detailed performance predictions were carried out for an ORC waste-heat recovery system operating in these plants. In addition, the performance of the existing demonstration system hardware was predicted for two recommended applications, the petroleum refinery and the steel mill, utilizing only a portion of the available exhaust gas flow. Only nominal modifications would be required to make the existing hardware suitable for a demonstration program for either of these recommended applications.

  12. Atmospheric heat transfer to the Arctic under main synoptic processes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yurova, Alla; Gnatiuk, Natalia; Bobylev, Leonid; Zhu, Yali

    2016-04-01

    Arctic - mid-latitude teleconnections are operating in both ways and behind them are potentially some causes of the enhanced Arctic warming (e.g., through heat transfer from lower to higher latitudes) and the feedbacks from the Arctic climate to the mid-latitude weather patterns. In order to explain the variability of the surface air temperature in the Arctic, we aim to analyse the typical synoptic situations that, we hypothesize, are characterized by a specific patterns of heat exchange between the Arctic and mid-latitudes. According to classification of synoptic processes in the Arctic developed at the Arctic and Antarctic Research Institute (AARI) in St. Petersburg major typical groups of synoptic situations in the Arctic are few (six). They correspond to position and intensity of low- and high-pressure centres. Therefore, the whole data sample for the winter period for the entire period of instrumental observations (archive exists back to 1939) can be split into six groups that sub-sample each of six groups/types of synoptic situations. Then heat transfer to the Arctic can be estimated as the divergence of the horizontal (advective) heat flux (the product of wind speed and temperature gradient) within each vertical atmospheric layer, which is calculated based on the ERA Interim Reanalysis data for the winter season (1979-now). Mapping heat divergence fields will reveal the main mid-latitude sources of heat transported to the Arctic, average for the whole data sample and for each of the six main groups of synoptic situations. This work was supported by RFBR grants 16-55-53031

  13. Cogeneration handbook for the food processing industry. [Contains glossary

    SciTech Connect

    Eakin, D.E.; Fassbender, L.L.; Garrett-Price, B.A.; Moore, N.L.; Fasbender, A.G.; Gorges, H.A.

    1984-03-01

    The decision of whether to cogenerate involves several considerations, including technical, economic, environmental, legal, and regulatory issues. Each of these issues is addressed separately in this handbook. In addition, a chapter is included on preparing a three-phase work statement, which is needed to guide the design of a cogeneration system. In addition, an annotated bibliography and a glossary of terminology are provided. Appendix A provides an energy-use profile of the food processing industry. Appendices B through O provide specific information that will be called out in subsequent chapters.

  14. Cryogenic thermal storage system for discontinuous industrial vacuum processes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bruzzi, M.; Chesi, A.; Baldi, A.; Tarani, F.; Mori, R.; Scaringella, M.; Carnevale, E.

    2012-10-01

    Phase Change Materials are proposed for refrigerating systems in discontinuous industrial vacuum processes where temperatures as low as -140 ÷ -100°C are necessary within time-frames representing 10÷20% of total operating time. An application is proposed for cooling systems used in a Physical Vapour Deposition (PVD) apparatus. A prototype has been manufactured which couples a cryopump with a reservoir filled with MethylCycloPentane (MCP-C6H12) and a distribution line where nitrogen in the gaseous state is flowing. Preliminary tests show that temperatures of about -120°C are actually achieved within time windows compatible with PVD applications.

  15. Waste Heat Recovery and Recycling in Thermal Separation Processes: Distillation, Multi-Effect Evaporation (MEE) and Crystallization Processes

    SciTech Connect

    Emmanuel A. Dada; Chandrakant B. Panchal; Luke K. Achenie; Aaron Reichl; Chris C. Thomas

    2012-12-03

    Evaporation and crystallization are key thermal separation processes for concentrating and purifying inorganic and organic products with energy consumption over 1,000 trillion Btu/yr. This project focused on a challenging task of recovering low-temperature latent heat that can have a paradigm shift in the way thermal process units will be designed and operated to achieve high-energy efficiency and significantly reduce the carbon footprint as well as water footprint. Moreover, this project has evaluated the technical merits of waste-heat powered thermal heat pumps for recovery of latent heat from distillation, multi-effect evaporation (MEE), and crystallization processes and recycling into the process. The Project Team has estimated the potential energy, economics and environmental benefits with the focus on reduction in CO2 emissions that can be realized by 2020, assuming successful development and commercialization of the technology being developed. Specifically, with aggressive industry-wide applications of heat recovery and recycling with absorption heat pumps, energy savings of about 26.7 trillion Btu/yr have been estimated for distillation process. The direct environmental benefits of this project are the reduced emissions of combustible products. The estimated major reduction in environmental pollutants in the distillation processes is in CO2 emission equivalent to 3.5 billion lbs/year. Energy consumption associated with water supply and treatments can vary between 1,900 kWh and 23,700 kWh per million-gallon water depending on sources of natural waters [US DOE, 2006]. Successful implementation of this technology would significantly reduce the demand for cooling-tower waters, and thereby the use and discharge of water treatment chemicals. The Project Team has also identified and characterized working fluid pairs for the moderate-temperature heat pump. For an MEE process, the two promising fluids are LiNO3+KNO3+NANO3 (53:28:19 ) and LiNO3+KNO3+NANO2

  16. Opportunity Analysis for Recovering Energy from Industrial Waste Heat and Emissions

    SciTech Connect

    Viswanathan, Vish V.; Davies, Richard W.; Holbery, Jim D.

    2006-04-01

    United States industry consumed 32.5 Quads (34,300 PJ) of energy during 2003, which was 33.1% of total U.S. energy consumption (EIA 2003 Annual Energy Review). The U.S. industrial complex yields valuable goods and products. Through its manufacturing processes as well as its abundant energy consumption, it supports a multi-trillion dollar contribution to the gross domestic product and provides millions of jobs in the U.S. each year. Industry also yields waste products directly through its manufacturing processes and indirectly through its energy consumption. These waste products come in two forms, chemical and thermal. Both forms of waste have residual energy values that are not routinely recovered. Recovering and reusing these waste products may represent a significant opportunity to improve the energy efficiency of the U.S. industrial complex. This report was prepared for the U.S. Department of Energy Industrial Technologies Program (DOE-ITP). It analyzes the opportunity to recover chemical emissions and thermal emissions from U.S. industry. It also analyzes the barriers and pathways to more effectively capitalize on these opportunities. A primary part of this analysis was to characterize the quantity and energy value of the emissions. For example, in 2001, the industrial sector emitted 19% of the U.S. greenhouse gases (GHG) through its industrial processes and emitted 11% of GHG through electricity purchased from off-site utilities. Therefore, industry (not including agriculture) was directly and indirectly responsible for emitting 30% of the U.S. GHG. These emissions were mainly comprised of carbon dioxide (CO2), but also contained a wide-variety of CH4 (methane), CO (carbon monoxide), H2 (hydrogen), NMVOC (non-methane volatile organic compound), and other chemicals. As part of this study, we conducted a survey of publicly available literature to determine the amount of energy embedded in the emissions and to identify technology opportunities to capture and

  17. Kinetics of the zinc slag-Fuming process: Part i. industrial measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Richards, G. G.; Brimacombe, J. K.; Toop, G. W.

    1985-09-01

    A study involving industrial measurements and mathematical modeling has been conducted to eluci-date kinetic phenomena in the zinc slag fuming process. In the first part of this three-part paper, the results of industrial measurements and observations are presented. In Part II a mathematical model of the process is developed, and finally in Part III the implications of a kinetic conception of the process for process improvement are explored. The industrial work consisted primarily of slag sampling through the fuming cycles of five different fuming operations. In addition, tuyere back-pressure mea-surements, tuyere photography using a tuyerescope, and sampling of the fume product were under-taken at one operation. Analysis of the slag samples has shown that, in general, the zinc elimination curve is linear with time and that a portion of the injected coal entrains in the slag. Analysis of tuyere back-pressure fluctuations and movie photographs of the tuyere tip indicate that the coal-air mixture enters the slag in the form of discrete bubbles. From these results it can be deduced that the fuming furnace consists of two reaction zones which are created by the division of coal between the slag and the tuyere gas stream. The coal entrained in the slag reduces ZnO and Fe3O4 in a “reduction zone” which is responsible for fuming. The coal remaining in the tuyere gas stream combusts in an “oxidation zone” although a fraction passes through the bath unconsumed and reports to the solid products. The oxidation zone supplies heat to the endothermic reduction reactions and heat losses.

  18. Energy Efficient Microwave Hybrid Processing of Lime for Cement, Steel, and Glass Industries

    SciTech Connect

    Fall, Morgana L; Yakovlev, Vadim; Sahi, Catherine; Baranova, Inessa; Bowers, Johnney G; Esquenazi , Gibran L

    2012-02-10

    In this study, the microwave materials interactions were studied through dielectric property measurements, process modeling, and lab scale microwave hybrid calcination tests. Characterization and analysis were performed to evaluate material reactions and energy usage. Processing parameters for laboratory scale and larger scale calcining experiments were developed for MAT limestone calcination. Early stage equipment design concepts were developed, with a focus on microwave post heating treatment. The retrofitting of existing rotary calcine equipment in the lime industry was assessed and found to be feasible. Ceralink sought to address some of the major barriers to the uptake of MAT identified as the need for (1) team approach with end users, technology partners, and equipment manufacturers, (2) modeling that incorporates kiln materials and variations to the design of industrial microwave equipment. This project has furthered the commercialization effort of MAT by working closely with an industrial lime manufacturer to educate them regarding MAT, identifying equipment manufacturer to supply microwave equipment, and developing a sophisticated MAT modeling with WPI, the university partner. MAT was shown to enhance calcining through lower energy consumption and faster reaction rates compared to conventional processing. Laboratory testing concluded that a 23% reduction in energy was possible for calcining small batches (5kg). Scale-up testing indicated that the energy savings increased as a function of load size and 36% energy savings was demonstrated (22 kg). A sophisticated model was developed which combines simultaneous microwave and conventional heating. Continued development of this modeling software could be used for larger scale calcining simulations, which would be a beneficial low-cost tool for exploring equipment design prior to actual building. Based on these findings, estimates for production scale MAT calcining benefits were calculated, assuming uptake of

  19. INDUSTRIAL PROCESS PROFILES FOR ENVIRONMENTAL USE. CHAPTER 10. THE PLASTICS AND RESINS PRODUCTION INDUSTRY

    EPA Science Inventory

    The report presents a detailed analysis of the plastics and resins production industry, which includes operations that convert industrial organic chemicals into solid or liquid polymers. Elements of the analysis include an industry definition, raw materials, products and manufact...

  20. Mathematical modeling heat and mass transfer processes in porous media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Akhmed-Zaki, Darkhan

    2013-11-01

    On late development stages of oil-fields appears a complex problem of oil-recovery reduction. One of solution approaches is injecting of surfactant together with water in the form of active impurities into the productive layer - for decreasing oil viscosity and capillary forces between ``oil-water'' phases system. In fluids flow the surfactant can be in three states: dissolved in water, dissolved in oil and adsorbed on pore channels' walls. The surfactant's invasion into the reservoir is tracked by its diffusion with reservoir liquid and mass-exchange with two phase (liquid and solid) components of porous structure. Additionally, in this case heat exchange between fluids (injected, residual) and framework of porous medium has practical importance for evaluating of temperature influences on enhancing oil recovery. Now, the problem of designing an adequate mathematical model for describing a simultaneous flowing heat and mass transfer processes in anisotropic heterogeneous porous medium -surfactant injection during at various temperature regimes has not been fully researched. In this work is presents a 2D mathematical model of surfactant injections into the oil reservoir. Description of heat- and mass transfer processes in a porous media is done through differential and kinetic equations. For designing a computational algorithm is used modify version of IMPES method. The sequential and parallel computational algorithms are developed using an adaptive curvilinear meshes which into account heterogeneous porous structures. In this case we can evaluate the boundaries of our process flows - fronts (``invasion'', ``heat'' and ``mass'' transfers), according to the pressure, temperature, and concentration gradient changes.

  1. Direction of CRT waste glass processing: Electronics recycling industry communication

    SciTech Connect

    Mueller, Julia R.; Boehm, Michael W.; Drummond, Charles

    2012-08-15

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Given a large flow rate of CRT glass {approx}10% of the panel glass stream will be leaded. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The supply of CRT waste glass exceeded demand in 2009. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Recyclers should use UV-light to detect lead oxide during the separation process. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Recycling market analysis techniques and results are given for CRT glass. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Academic initiatives and the necessary expansion of novel product markets are discussed. - Abstract: Cathode Ray Tube, CRT, waste glass recycling has plagued glass manufacturers, electronics recyclers and electronics waste policy makers for decades because the total supply of waste glass exceeds demand, and the formulations of CRT glass are ill suited for most reuse options. The solutions are to separate the undesirable components (e.g. lead oxide) in the waste and create demand for new products. Achieving this is no simple feat, however, as there are many obstacles: limited knowledge of waste glass composition; limited automation in the recycling process; transportation of recycled material; and a weak and underdeveloped market. Thus one of the main goals of this paper is to advise electronic glass recyclers on how to best manage a diverse supply of glass waste and successfully market to end users. Further, this paper offers future directions for academic and industry research. To develop the recommendations offered here, a combination of approaches were used: (1) a thorough study of historic trends in CRT glass chemistry; (2) bulk glass collection and analysis of cullet from a large-scale glass recycler; (3) conversations with industry members and a review of potential applications; and (4) evaluation of the economic viability of specific uses for recycled CRT glass. If academia and industry can solve these problems (for example by creating a database of composition organized by manufacturer and glass source

  2. Low effluent processing in the pulp and paper industry: Electrodialysis for continuous selective chloride removal

    SciTech Connect

    Pfromm, P.H.

    1997-12-01

    Pollution prevention is currently a major focus of the United States pulp and paper industry. Significant process changes are inevitable to implement low effluent processing. The kraft pulping process is prevalent for the production of wood pulp. About 50 million tons of wood pulp are produced annually in the United States alone using the kraft process. Water consumption is currently roughly between 30 and 200 m{sup 3} of water per ton of air dry bleached kraft pulp. In-process recycling of water is now being implemented by many mills to reduce the use of increasingly scarce water resources and to reduce the need for waste-water treatment. Mass balance considerations and industrial experience show that nonprocess elements, which are detrimental to the kraft process, such as chloride and potassium, will quickly build up once water use is significantly reduced. High concentrations of chloride and potassium can cause corrosion and lead to more frequent mill shutdowns due to fouling of heat exchanger surfaces in the kraft recovery furnace. Electrodialysis will monovalent selective anion and cation exchange membranes was explored here to selectively remove chlorine as sodium and potassium chloride from a feed stream with very high ionic strength. Experiments with model solutions and extended tests with the actual pulp mill materials were performed. Very good selectivities and current efficiencies were observed for chloride over sulfate. The outstanding performance of the process with actual mill materials containing organic and inorganic contamination shows great promise for rapid transfer to the pilot scale. This work is an example of the usefulness of membrane separations as a kidney in low effluent industrial processing.

  3. Microfabricated Instrumentation for Chemical Sensing in Industrial Process Control

    SciTech Connect

    Ramsey, J. M.

    2000-06-01

    The monitoring of chemical constituents in manufacturing processes is of economic importance to most industries. The monitoring and control of chemical constituents may be of importance for product quality control or, in the case of process effluents, of environmental concern. The most common approach now employed for chemical process control is to collect samples which are returned to a conventional chemical analysis laboratory. This project attempts to demonstrate the use of microfabricated structures, referred to as 'lab-on-a-chip' devices, that accomplish chemical measurement tasks that emulate those performed in the conventional laboratory. The devices envisioned could be used as hand portable chemical analysis instruments where samples are analyzed in the field or as emplaced sensors for continuous 'real-time' monitoring. This project focuses on the development of filtration elements and solid phase extraction elements that can be monolithically integrated onto electrophoresis and chromatographic structures pioneered in the laboratory. Successful demonstration of these additional functional elements on integrated microfabricated devices allows lab-on-a-chip technologies to address real world samples that would be encountered in process control environments. The resultant technology has a broad application to industrial environmental monitoring problems. such as monitoring municipal water supplies, waste water effluent from industrial facilities, or monitoring of run-off from agricultural activities. The technology will also be adaptable to manufacturing process control scenarios. Microfabricated devices integrating sample filtration, solid phase extraction, and chromatographic separation with solvent programming were demonstrated. Filtering of the sample was accomplished at the same inlet with an array of seven channels each 1 {micro}m deep and 18 {micro}m wide. Sample concentration and separation were performed on channels 5 {micro}m deep and 25 {micro

  4. Industrial processing of complex fluids: Formulation and modeling

    SciTech Connect

    Scovel, J.C.; Bleasdale, S.; Forest, G.M.; Bechtel, S.

    1997-08-01

    The production of many important commercial materials involves the evolution of a complex fluid through a cooling phase into a hardened product. Textile fibers, high-strength fibers(KEVLAR, VECTRAN), plastics, chopped-fiber compounds, and fiber optical cable are such materials. Industry desires to replace experiments with on-line, real time models of these processes. Solutions to the problems are not just a matter of technology transfer, but require a fundamental description and simulation of the processes. Goals of the project are to develop models that can be used to optimize macroscopic properties of the solid product, to identify sources of undesirable defects, and to seek boundary-temperature and flow-and-material controls to optimize desired properties.

  5. Benefits of SPC for the hydrocarbon process industries

    SciTech Connect

    Herrmann, W.B.; Armitage, S.J.; Strong, R.C.

    1988-01-01

    Besides the benefits of improved efficiency and customer satisfaction, quality improvement also yields higher profits for a refiner. These benefits can best be realized by first identifying areas with high prices of nonconformance. Then efforts are concentrated in these areas to identify and eliminate the root causes of these nonconformances. One of the best tools for identifying and eliminating root causes is Statistical Process Control (SPC). This paper will present recommendations on how to implement a quality improvement system to realize the potential benefits, discuss SPC's place in this system, provide an overview of SPC techniques appropriate to the hydrocarbon process industries; offer two case studies of actual improvements, and summarize the benefits of SPC.

  6. Laser processing of thin films for industrial packaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sozzi, Michele; Lutey, Adrian H. A.; Cucinotta, Annamaria; Selleri, Stefano; Molari, Pier Gabriele

    2014-05-01

    Single layer thin-film materials such as aluminum, polyethylene, polypropylene, and their multi-layer combinations such as aluminum-paper have been exposed to different laser radiation. A wide number of samples have been processed with 10 - 12.5 ns IR and Green, and 500 - 800 ps IR laser radiation at different translating speeds ranging from 50 mm/s to 1 m/s. High quality incisions have been obtained for all tested materials within the experimental conditions. The presented results provide the necessary parameters for an efficient cut and processing of the tested materials, for the employment of pulsed laser sources in the packaging industry, allowing the laser to prevail in lieu of more costly and energy intensive methods.

  7. Particle-in-Cell (PIC) simulation of CW industrial heating magnetron.

    PubMed

    Andreev, Andrey D; Hendricks, Kyle J

    2010-01-01

    Modern CW industrial heating magnetrons are capable for producing as high as 300 kW of continuous-wave microwave power at frequencies around 900 MHz and are sold commercially [Wynn et al., 2004]. However, to utilize these magnetrons in some specific research and scientific applications being of interest for the Air Force, the necessary adaptation and redesign are required. It means that the detailed knowledge of principles of their operation and full understanding of how the changes of the design parameters affect their operational characteristics are necessary. We have developed and tested computer model of a 10-vane high-power strapped magnetron, which geometrical dimensions and design parameters are close to those of the California Tube Laboratory's commercially produced CWM-75/100L tube. The computer model is built by using the 3-D Improved Concurrent Electromagnetic Particle-in-Cell (ICEPIC) code. Simulations of the strapped magnetron operation are performed and the following operational characteristics are obtained during the simulation: frequency and mode of magnetron oscillations, output microwave power and efficiency of magnetron operation, anode current and anode-cathode voltage dynamics. The developed computer model of a non-relativistic high-power strapped magnetron may be used by the industrial magnetron community for designing following generations of the CW industrial heating high-power magnetrons. PMID:21721323

  8. Emerging Laser Materials Processing Techniques for Future Industrial Applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kukreja, L. M.; Kaul, R.; Paul, C. P.; Ganesh, P.; Rao, B. T.

    Lasers are not only the proven and indispensable tools for some of the contemporary manufacturing technologies but have the potential for providing solutions to some of the upcoming intricate problems of industrial materials processing. The ongoing research is spearheading in the direction to develop novel fabrication techniques for improving qualities of the products, possibilities to engineer integrated multi-materials and multi-functional components and enhancing economic or procedural benefits. To explore the possibilities of achieving some of these objectives, we have carried out studies on the laser rapid manufacturing of structures of different metals with control over porosity, bimetallic integration, and other technologically important mechanical characteristics, laser melting based surface processing , laser shock peening , hybrid welding , and laser profile cutting of metal sheets. The results of these studies with comprehensiveness are presented and discussed in this chapter. A brief review of their scope for the industrial acceptability and adaptability has also been presented to assess the real potential of these research areas.

  9. Development of a process control sensor for the glass industry

    SciTech Connect

    Gardner, M.; Candee, A.; Kramlich, J.; Koppang, R.

    1991-05-01

    This project was initiated to fill a need in the glass industry for a non-contact temperature sensor for glass melts. At present, the glass forming industry (e.g., bottle manufacture) consumes significant amounts of energy. Careful control of temperature at the point the bottle is molded is necessary to prevent the bottle from being rejected as out-of-specification. In general, the entire glass melting and conditioning process is designed to minimize this rejection rate, maximize throughput and thus control energy and production costs. This program focuses on the design, development and testing of an advanced optically based pyrometer for glass melts. The pyrometer operates simultaneously at four wavelengths; through analytical treatment of the signals, internal temperature profiles within the glass melt can be resolved. A novel multiplexer alloys optical signals from a large number of fiber-optic sensors to be collected and resolved by a single detector at a location remote from the process. This results in a significant cost savings on a per measurement point basis. The development program is divided into two phases. Phase 1 involves the construction of a breadboard version on the instrument and its testing on a pilot-scale furnace. In Phase 2, a prototype analyzer will be constructed and tested on a commercial forehearth. This report covers the Phase 1 activities.

  10. Research and Development for Thermoelectric Generation Technology Using Waste Heat from Steelmaking Process

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuroki, Takashi; Murai, Ryota; Makino, Kazuya; Nagano, Kouji; Kajihara, Takeshi; Kaibe, Hiromasa; Hachiuma, Hirokuni; Matsuno, Hidetoshi

    2015-06-01

    In Japan, integrated steelworks have greatly lowered their energy use over the past few decades through investment in energy-efficient processes and facilities, maintaining the highest energy efficiency in the world. However, in view of energy security, the steelmaking industry is strongly required to develop new technologies for further energy saving. Waste heat recovery can be one of the key technologies to meet this requirement. To recover waste heat, particularly radiant heat from steel products which has not been used efficiently yet, thermoelectric generation (TEG) is one of the most effective technologies, being able to convert heat directly into electric power. JFE Steel Corporation (JFE) implemented a 10-kW-class grid-connected TEG system for JFE's continuous casting line with KELK Ltd. (KELK), and started verification tests to generate electric power using radiant heat from continuous casting slab at the end of fiscal year 2012. The TEG system has 56 TEG units, each containing 16 TEG modules. This paper describes the performance and durability of the TEG system, which has been investigated under various operating conditions at the continuous casting line.

  11. Considerations concerning the physical heat-recovery of raw coke-oven gas in an industrial pilot-station

    SciTech Connect

    Paunescu, L.; Gaba, A.

    1998-12-31

    The paper presents the conception and realization obtained by the research team at the Metallurgical Researches Institute in an industrial pilot-station on the field of the physical heat-recovery of raw coke-oven gas.

  12. Laser heated pedestal growth system commissioning and fiber processing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Buric, Michael; Yip, M. J.; Chorpening, Ben; Ohodnicki, Paul

    2016-05-01

    A new Laser Heated Pedestal Growth system was designed and fabricated using various aspects of effective legacy designs for the growth of single-crystal high-temperature-compatible optical fibers. The system is heated by a 100-watt, DC driven, CO2 laser with PID power control. Fiber diameter measurements are performed using a telecentric video system which identifies the molten zone and utilizes edge detection algorithms to report fiber-diameter. Beam shaping components include a beam telescope; along with gold-coated reflaxicon, turning, and parabolic focusing mirrors consistent with similar previous systems. The optical system permits melting of sapphire-feedstock up to 1.5mm in diameter for growth. Details regarding operational characteristics are reviewed and properties of single-crystal sapphire fibers produced by the system are evaluated. Aspects of the control algorithm efficacy will be discussed, along with relevant alternatives. Finally, some new techniques for in-situ processing making use of the laser-heating system are discussed. Ex-situ fiber modification and processing are also examined for improvements in fiber properties.

  13. Energy conservation and cost benefits in the meat and poultry processing industry. Technology transfer; a technology applications manual

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1982-01-01

    Auditing energy consumption and pinpointing areas where energy-conservation activities and investments can provide the most favorable economic return are covered. The wide-application energy-conservation techniques applicable in most industries, including the meat and poultry processing industries, are emphasized. Wide-application (often called generic) techniques include waste heat recovery, improvement of electric motor efficiency, added insulation, refrigeration improvements, and increases in boiler efficiencies. Specific examples of the application of these techniques in meat packing and poultry processing plants are cited. Specific processing changes that have already resulted in significant energy cost savings at some meat packing or poultry processing plants are examined. A summary checklist for energy conservation and brief case studies from industry are provided. Information is presented on energy price trends and discusses the analysis of capital investment alternatives.

  14. Operational performance comparisons in the gas processing industry

    SciTech Connect

    Salahor, G.S.

    1996-12-31

    Comparison and benchmarking of operational performance measures in the natural gas processing and gathering industry has helped operators to identify and prioritize improvement initiatives and has led to direct and tangible improvements in operating efficiency. However, proper interpretation and utilization of performance benchmarking data in a complex operation such as gas processing must reflect due consideration of the technical factors which influence the overall economic performance and resource requirements. Plant operators must be able to use the data to understand the key technical influences reflected in their results, and thereby set performance targets commensurate with the structural considerations particular to their facility. Ernst and Young has developed an analytical framework for gas processing and gathering operations incorporating such considerations, and conducted a study involving North American and international participants for the past four years. The information obtained form this work has revealed a wide range of performance results across plants, and has served to challenge much of the conventional wisdom regarding what levels of performance are attainable, and to provide understanding as to how gas processing operational resource requirements are influenced by technical parameters.

  15. Technology for industrial waste heat recovery by organic Rankine cycle systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cain, W. G.; Drake, R. L.; Prisco, C. J.

    1984-10-01

    The recovery of industrial waste heat and the conversion thereof to useful electric power by use of Rankine cycle systems is studied. Four different aspects of ORC technology were studied: possible destructive chemical reaction between an aluminum turbine wheel and R-113 working fluid under wheel-to-rotor rub conditions; possible chemical reaction between stainless steel or carbon steel and any of five different ORC working fluids under rotor-stator rub conditions; effects on electric generator properties of extended exposure to an environment of saturated R-113 vapor/fluid; and operational proof tests under laboratory conditions of two 1070 kW, ORC, R-113 hermetic turbogenerator power module systems.

  16. Heat transport by phonons and the generation of heat by fast phonon processes in ferroelastic materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ding, X.; Salje, E. K. H.

    2015-05-01

    Thermal conductivity of ferroelastic device materials can be reversibly controlled by strain. The nucleation and growth of twin boundaries reduces thermal conductivity if the heat flow is perpendicular to the twin wall. The twin walls act as phonon barriers whereby the thermal conductivity decreases linearly with the number of such phonon barriers. Ferroelastic materials also show elasto-caloric properties with a high frequency dynamics. The upper frequency limit is determined by heat generation on a time scale, which is some 5 orders of magnitude below the typical bulk phonon times. Some of these nano-structural processes are irreversible under stress release (but remain reversible under temperature cycling), in particular the annihilation of needle domains that are a key indicator for ferroelastic behaviour in multiferroic materials.

  17. Development of an evaporator for industrial heat pumps capable of recovering heat from contaminated sources. Phase 1. Final report, October 1, 1984-July 31, 1985

    SciTech Connect

    Doyle, E.F.; Balsavich, J.

    1985-08-01

    Industry regularly loses large amounts of potentially recoverable energy by venting or condensing steam that cannot be used in the plant because it is too low in temperature and too contaminated for reuse. A heat pump could raise the temperature of this energy to a usable level if a suitable heat exchanger were available for extracting the heat from the contaminated steam. The objective of this program is to develop a heat exchanger uniquely configured for this purpose. Its availability would greatly increase the number of viable applications for industrial heat pumps. The heat exchanger under development uses falling-film heat transfer on both sides of vertical tubes to generate clean vapor by condensing contaminated steam. This approach provides a self-cleaning action and makes maximum use of the available temperature difference between the condensing contaminated steam and the boiling heat pump fluid. This report describes the work performed under Phase I of the program in which a laboratory prototype heat exchanger was designed, built and tested, and an economic evaluation of the concept was made.

  18. Science, technology, and the industrialization of laser-driven processes

    SciTech Connect

    Davis, J.I.; Paisner, J.A.

    1985-05-01

    Members of the laser program at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) reviewed potential applications of lasers in industry, some of which are: isotope separation; cleanup of radioactive waste; trace impurity removal; selective chemical reactions; photochemical activation or dissociation of gases; control of combustion particulates; crystal and powder chemistry; and laser induced biochemistry. Many of these areas are currently under active study in the community. The investigation at LLNL focused on laser isotope separation of atomic uranium because of the large demand (> 1000 tonnes/year) and high product enrichment price (> $600/kg of product) for material used as fuel in commercial light-water nuclear power reactors. They also believed that once the technology was fully developed and deployed, it could be applied directly to separating many elements economically on an industrial scale. The Atomic Vapor Laser Isotope Separation (AVLIS) program at LLNL has an extensive uranium and plutonium program of >$100 M in FY85 and a minor research program for other elements. This report describes the AVLIS program conducted covering the following topics; candidate elements; separative work units; spectroscopic selectivety; major systems; facilities; integrated process model;multivariable sensitivety studies; world market; and US enrichment enterprise. 23 figs. (AT)

  19. Design of the HTGR for process heat applications

    SciTech Connect

    Vrable, D.L.; Quade, R.N.

    1980-05-01

    This paper discusses a design study of an advanced 842-MW(t) HTGR with a reactor outlet temperature of 850/sup 0/C (1562/sup 0/F), coupled with a chemical process whose product is hydrogen (or a mixture of hydrogen and carbon monoxide) generated by steam reforming of a light hydrocarbon mixture. This paper discusses the plant layout and design for the major components of the primary and secondary heat transfer systems. Typical parametric system study results illustrate the capability of a computer code developed to model the plant performance and economics.

  20. Chemical Modification for PAN Fibers during Heat-treatment Process

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Yi; Yin, Wenyan

    Chemical modification for Polyacrylonitrile (PAN) fibers during heat-treatment process were systematically studied by DSC, FT-IR, EA, XPS, etal. Comparing with original PAN fibers, chemical reactions, structures and elemental compositions of fibers modified with potassium permanganate (KMnO4) solutions were totally changed at a certain extent. KMnO4 had reduced the activation energy of cyclization, decreased the area and widened the peak of exothermic curve, decreased the velocity of cyclization reaction, increased the oxygen content about 67%, hence increased C-O-C and C=O groups and the core/shell ratio.

  1. Exposures to carbon dioxide in the poultry processing industry

    SciTech Connect

    Jacobs, D.E.; Smith, M.S.

    1988-12-01

    The use of dry ice has increased dramatically in poultry processing plants because of changes in the fast food industry. Concentrations of carbon dioxide in four such plants were measured and were found to exceed the Immediately Dangerous to Life and Health Level (50,000 ppm) inside holding coolers where ventilation is poor. In other areas, where dry ice is delivered to poultry packages, time-weighted average exposures can exceed the threshold limit value of 5000 ppm by substantial margins, even if local exhaust ventilation systems are present. Reports of adverse health effects from carbon dioxide exposure and various control measures are reviewed. Recommendations regarding sampling and analytical techniques also are presented. Operators of poultry plants where dry ice is used need to recognize the occupational hazards of exposure to carbon dioxide.

  2. Application of process safety management to the coke industry

    SciTech Connect

    Mentzer, W.P. )

    1994-09-01

    OSHA's Process Safety Management (PSM) standard went into effect on May 26, 1992. Explosions at various industrial facilities that claimed the lives of workers over the past several years were the catalyst for the new federal regulations. The new PSM standard deals with 130 specific chemicals along with flammable liquids and gases used at nearly 25,000 worksites. The performance-based PSM standard consists of 14 elements that establish goals and describe basic program elements to fulfill these goals. The PSM standard requires employers to conduct a process hazard analysis to examine potential problems and determine what preventative measures should be taken. Key elements include employee training, written operating procedures, safety reviews and maintenance requirements to insure the mechanical integrity of critical components. The presentation will cover the evolution of OSHA's PSM standard, the requirements of the 14 elements in the PSM standard and discuss the significant achievements in the development and implementation of the PSM process at US Steel's Clairton coke plant.

  3. [Super sweet corn hybrids adaptability for industrial processing. I freezing].

    PubMed

    Alfonzo, Braunnier; Camacho, Candelario; Ortiz de Bertorelli, Ligia; De Venanzi, Frank

    2002-09-01

    With the purpose of evaluating adaptability to the freezing process of super sweet corn sh2 hybrids Krispy King, Victor and 324, 100 cobs of each type were frozen at -18 degrees C. After 120 days of storage, their chemical, microbiological and sensorial characteristics were compared with a sweet corn su. Industrial quality of the process of freezing and length and number of rows in cobs were also determined. Results revealed yields above 60% in frozen corns. Length and number of rows in cobs were acceptable. Most of the chemical characteristics of super sweet hybrids were not different from the sweet corn assayed at the 5% significance level. Moisture content and soluble solids of hybrid Victor, as well as total sugars of hybrid 324 were statistically different. All sh2 corns had higher pH values. During freezing, soluble solids concentration, sugars and acids decreased whereas pH increased. Frozen cobs exhibited acceptable microbiological rank, with low activities of mesophiles and total coliforms, absence of psychrophiles and fecal coliforms, and an appreciable amount of molds. In conclusion, sh2 hybrids adapted with no problems to the freezing process, they had lower contents of soluble solids and higher contents of total sugars, which almost doubled the amount of su corn; flavor, texture, sweetness and appearance of kernels were also better. Hybrid Victor was preferred by the evaluating panel and had an outstanding performance due to its yield and sensorial characteristics. PMID:12448345

  4. Evaluation of separation and purification processes in the antibiotic industry

    SciTech Connect

    Bienkowski, P.R.; Lee, D.D.; Byers, C.H.

    1987-05-01

    The different separation and purification processes for three major types of antibiotics, Penicillins, Cephalosporins and Tetracyclines will be discussed. All antibiotic, processing plants contain two majors sections, a relatively small and highly specialized fermentation section and a very large (60-80% of the plant) separation and purification section. The fermentation sections for the different antibiotics are essentially identical, except for differences in growth media and operating variables, but there are vast differences in the separation and purification sections. Several different separation methods are used including filtration, ultrafiltration, centrifugation, precipitation, extraction, chromatography and various membrane methods. Variables affecting the specific separation and purification configurations include final fermentation broth concentration, by-product formed during fermentation, the physical properties and molecular structure of the various antibiotics and special purification requirements. Necessary reductions in the separation and purification processes required for rebuilding the antibiotic industry after a national emergency are discussed along with several relatively new separation/purification methods that hold great promise for effecting these reductions, chromatography, supercritical fluid extraction (SCF), and membranes. 35 refs., 10 figs., 2 tabs.

  5. [Behavior of selected veterinary preparations during industrial milk processing].

    PubMed

    Konrad, H; Gabro, T; Dedek, W

    1977-01-01

    Since the extensive veterinary-hygienic treatment of herds with insecticidal veterinary preparations may lead to milk contamination, the authors studied the behaviour of some active agents (butonate, dichlorvos (DDVP), trichlorphon, naled, carbaryl, hexachloro-p-xylene and rafoxanide) during the industrial processing of milk to fluid milk, cream, butter, cheese and milk powder, and during the storage of these products. Small-scale model experiments served to investigate the effects of pasteurization (74 and 95 degrees C.), separation and churning as well as of the processing to milk powder and cheese. Analyses for residues were performed by thin-layer chromatography, colorimetry and with the aid of the isotope technique. From the viewpoint of milk processing, the use of TCP and, in part, that of DDVP may be considered as less critical due to their hydrophilic properties and rapid degradation. In view of their lipophilic behaviour, the use of butonate, carbaryl, rafoxanide and hexachloro-p-xylene as active agents in veterinary preparations for milk cows must be regarded as problematic. The utilization of naled is also problematic due to the fact that the toxicology of its metabolites is not yet sufficiently known. PMID:404556

  6. Heat transfer and lethality considerations in aseptic processing of liquid/particle mixtures: a review.

    PubMed

    Ramaswamy, H S; Awuah, G B; Simpson, B K

    1997-04-01

    Consumer awareness and demand for nutritious yet inexpensive food products call for innovative processing techniques that have both safety and quality as primary objectives. These challenges appear to have been met by aseptic processing techniques, especially for liquid and high-acid foods. However, the extension of aseptic processing principles to low-acid foods containing discrete particles in viscous sauces has not been approved by regulatory agencies, particularly in North America. This apparent limitation is due primarily to the lack of adequate temperature monitoring devices to keep track of particles in dynamic motion, as well as to the residence time distribution of particles flowing in the continuous heat-hold-cool sections of the aseptic processing system. These problems have prompted active research to describe the phenomenal behavior of particulates through sound mathematical modeling and computer simulators. The accuracy of mathematical models depends heavily on how accurate input parametric values are. These parameters include the thermophysical properties of the carrier fluid and particles, as well as the aseptic processing system characteristics in relation to residence time distribution and the fluid-to-particle interfacial heat transfer coefficient. Apparently, several contradictory findings have been reported in the literature with respect to the effect of various processing parameters on the above-mentioned input parametric values. The need therefore arises for more collaborative studies involving the industry and academia. This review brings to perspective, the current status on the aseptic processing of particulate foods with respect to the critical processing parameters which affect the fluid-to-particle convective heat transfer coefficient associated with particulate laden products. PMID:9143820

  7. Comparison of local and regional heat transport processes into the subsurface urban heat island of Karlsruhe, Germany

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Benz, Susanne; Bayer, Peter; Menberg, Kathrin; Blum, Philipp

    2014-05-01

    Temperatures in shallow urban ground are typically elevated. They manifest as subsurface urban heat islands, which are observed worldwide in different metropolitan areas and which have a site-specific areal extent and intensity. As of right now the governing heat transport processes accumulating heat in the subsurface of cities are insufficiently understood. Based on a spatial assessment of groundwater temperatures, six individual heat flux processes could be identified: (1) heat flux from elevated ground surface temperatures (GST), (2) heat flux from basements of buildings, (3) reinjection of thermal waste water, (4) sewage drains, (5) sewage leakage, and (6) district heating. In this study, the contributions of these processes are quantified on local and regional scales for the city of Karlsruhe in Germany. For the regional scale, the Regionalized Monte Carlo (RMC) method is used. This method applies a single Monte Carlo (MC) simulation for the entire study area. At relatively low data demand, the RMC method provides basic insights into the heat contribution for the entire city. For the local scale, the Local Monte Carlo (LMC) method was developed and applied. This method analyzes all dominant heat fluxes spatially dependent by performing an MC simulation for each arbitrary sized pixel of the study area (here 10 x 10 m). This more intricate approach allows for a spatial representation of all heat flux processes, which is necessary for the local planning of geothermal energy use. In order to evaluate the heat transport processes on a regional scale, we compared the mean annual thermal energies that result from the individual heat flux processes. Both methods identify the heat flux from elevated GST and the heat flux from buildings as the dominant regional processes. However, reinjection of thermal wastewater is by far the most dominant local heat flux processes with an average heat flux of 16 ± 2 W/m2 in the affected areas. Although being dominant on the regional

  8. Identification of iron oxide impurities in earliest industrial-scale processed platinum

    SciTech Connect

    Weerd, Jaap van der; Rehren, Thilo . E-mail: th.rehren@ucl.ac.uk; Firth, Steven; Clark, Robin J.H. . E-mail: r.j.h.clark@ucl.ac.uk

    2004-09-15

    A detailed investigation of iron oxide inclusions in a 19th century Russian platinum coin is presented. Such coins represent the products of the first industrial-scale purification of platinum metal. The processed metal is far from pure, however, and two types of iron oxide inclusions are identified by electron microprobe and Raman microscopy. The results show that the inclusions mainly consist of magnetite and haematite. The Raman band of magnetite at 668 cm{sup -1} was found to shift to about 680 cm{sup -1} with an increase in the average oxidation state of the iron. It is concluded that the iron oxides are formed during the heating of the platinum metal powder in the manufacturing process.

  9. Industrial-era global ocean heat uptake doubles in recent decades

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gleckler, Peter J.; Durack, Paul J.; Stouffer, Ronald J.; Johnson, Gregory C.; Forest, Chris E.

    2016-04-01

    Formal detection and attribution studies have used observations and climate models to identify an anthropogenic warming signature in the upper (0-700 m) ocean. Recently, as a result of the so-called surface warming hiatus, there has been considerable interest in global ocean heat content (OHC) changes in the deeper ocean, including natural and anthropogenically forced changes identified in observational, modelling and data re-analysis studies. Here, we examine OHC changes in the context of the Earth’s global energy budget since early in the industrial era (circa 1865-2015) for a range of depths. We rely on OHC change estimates from a diverse collection of measurement systems including data from the nineteenth-century Challenger expedition, a multi-decadal record of ship-based in situ mostly upper-ocean measurements, the more recent near-global Argo floats profiling to intermediate (2,000 m) depths, and full-depth repeated transoceanic sections. We show that the multi-model mean constructed from the current generation of historically forced climate models is consistent with the OHC changes from this diverse collection of observational systems. Our model-based analysis suggests that nearly half of the industrial-era increases in global OHC have occurred in recent decades, with over a third of the accumulated heat occurring below 700 m and steadily rising.

  10. 9 CFR 355.25 - Canning with heat processing and hermetically sealed containers; closures; code marking; heat...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 9 Animals and Animal Products 2 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Canning with heat processing and hermetically sealed containers; closures; code marking; heat processing; incubation. 355.25 Section 355.25 Animals and Animal Products FOOD SAFETY AND INSPECTION SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE AGENCY ORGANIZATION AND TERMINOLOGY; MANDATORY MEAT...

  11. 9 CFR 355.25 - Canning with heat processing and hermetically sealed containers; closures; code marking; heat...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 9 Animals and Animal Products 2 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Canning with heat processing and hermetically sealed containers; closures; code marking; heat processing; incubation. 355.25 Section 355.25 Animals and Animal Products FOOD SAFETY AND INSPECTION SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE...

  12. Comparison of conventional and solar-water-heating products and industries report

    SciTech Connect

    Noreen, D; LeChevalier, R; Choi, M; Morehouse, J

    1980-07-11

    President Carter established a goal that would require installation of at least one million solar water heaters by 1985 and 20 million water-heating systems by the year 2000. The goals established require that the solar industry be sufficiently mature to provide cost-effective, reliable designs in the immediate future. The objective of this study was to provide the Department of Energy with quantified data that can be used to assess and redirect, if necessary, the program plans to assure compliance with the President's goals. Results deal with the product, the industry, the market, and the consumer. All issues are examined in the framework of the conventional-hot-water industry. Based on the results of this solar hot water assessment study, there is documented proof that the solar industry is blessed with over 20 good solar hot water systems. A total of eight generic types are currently being produced, but a majority of the systems being sold are included in only five generic types. The good systems are well-packaged for quality, performance and installation ease. These leading systems are sized and designed to fit the requirements of the consumer in every respect. This delivery end also suffers from a lack of understanding of the best methods for selling the product. At the supplier end, there are problems also, including: some design deficiencies, improper materials selection and, occasionally, the improper selection of components and subsystems. These, in total, are not serious problems in the better systems and will be resolved as this industry matures.

  13. Heat transfer model for cw laser material processing

    SciTech Connect

    Mazumder, J.; Steen, W.M.

    1980-02-01

    A three-dimensional heat transfer model for laser material processing with a moving Gaussian heat source is developed using finite difference numerical techniques. In order to develop the model, the process is physically defined as follows: A laser beam, having a defined power distribution, strikes the surface of an opaque substrate of infinite length but finite width and depth moving with a uniform velocity in the positive x direction (along the length). The incident radiation is partly reflected and partly absorbed according to the value of the reflectivity. The reflectivity is considered to be zero at any surface point where the temperature exceeds the boiling point. This is because a ''keyhole'' is considered to have formed which will act as a black body. Some of the absorbed energy is lost by reradiation and convection from both the upper and lower surfaces while the rest is conducted into the substrate. That part of the incident radiant power which falls on a keyhole is considered to pass into the keyhole losing some power by absorption and reflection from the plasma within the keyhole as described by a Beer Lambert absorption coefficient. Matrix points within the keyhole are considered as part of the solid conduction network, but operating at fictitiously high temperatures. The convective heat transfer coefficient is enhanced to allow for a concentric gas jet on the upper surface as used for shielding in welding and surface treatment, but not cutting. The system is considered to be in a quasi-steady-state condition in that the thermal profile is considered steady relative to the position of the laser beam. The advantages of this method of calculation over others are discussed together with comparisons between the model predictions and experiments in laser welding, laser arc augmented welding, laser surface treatment, and laser glazing.

  14. [Evaluation of commercial UHT milk and optimization of industrial process].

    PubMed

    Simpson, R; Jiménez, M; Vega, M; Romero, A; Costa, M

    2000-12-01

    From the nutrition al point of view milk is one of the most complete food in the diet of mammals. It contains nearly all the nutrients necessary to sustain life, but milk can deteriorate very easily, either by microbiological contamination or by biochemical reactions during processing and/or storage. The objective of this research study was to design a modified UHT treatment to achieve commercial sterilization and maximize the stabilization of the heat-treated product during storage. To search for a modified UHT process, a mathematical model coupled with an optimization routine (complex method) was developed. The mathematical model considers Kinetics for the inactivation of Bacillus stearothermophilus and several quality factors. To attain the objective function, several commercial UHT milk were analyzed and for the computer search the minimization of hydroxy methyl furfural (HMF) formation was considered and also including constraints for protease and lipase inactivation. The complex optimization procedure was implemented to search for the optimum modified UHT treatment.. One of the optimum modified UHT treatments was the combination of two pre-treatment (3.16 minutes at 62.30 degrees C and 6 minutes at 75 degrees C) in addition with a UHT treatment (0.75 s at 148.8 degrees C). This treatment attains the maximum product stability with a negligible effect on composition and color formation in the treated milk (HMF formation less than 3 mg/mL). PMID:11464666

  15. The potential for bulk undercooling as an industrial process

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Laxmanan, V.

    1984-01-01

    The main focus is on solidification occurring in highly supercooled melts. Solidification rates in such melts are extremely high, an attractive feature from a commercial standpoint. Thus, the reported growth velocities for pure Ni and Co dendrites at a supercooling of 175 K are in excess of 180 km/hr. Rapidly quenched crystalline alloys produced by various atomization processes (e.g., centrifugal atomization or inert gas atomization) or melt spinning are examples of solidification processes, currently being intensively explored commercially, wherein extremely high solidification rates are achieved. Estimated dendrite tip growth rates are about 2 km/hr in a binary Al-4.5 wt % alloy, with a heat transfer coefficient of 6.4x10 sub 5 w/sq cm K or 15 cal/cu cm sK. In the limit, when the solidification rate exceeds a critical value, a glassy microstructure is obtained even in highly alloyed melts, which under normal conditions would solidity to form one or more crystalline phases. Glassy metals, also called metallic glasses, are candidate materials for distribution transformers because of their very low energy losses and are also being used in brazing and soldering applications.

  16. Innovative food processing technology using ohmic heating and aseptic packaging for meat.

    PubMed

    Ito, Ruri; Fukuoka, Mika; Hamada-Sato, Naoko

    2014-02-01

    Since the Tohoku earthquake, there is much interest in processed foods, which can be stored for long periods at room temperature. Retort heating is one of the main technologies employed for producing it. We developed the innovative food processing technology, which supersede retort, using ohmic heating and aseptic packaging. Electrical heating involves the application of alternating voltage to food. Compared with retort heating, which uses a heat transfer medium, ohmic heating allows for high heating efficiency and rapid heating. In this paper we ohmically heated chicken breast samples and conducted various tests on the heated samples. The measurement results of water content, IMP, and glutamic acid suggest that the quality of the ohmically heated samples was similar or superior to that of the retort-heated samples. Furthermore, based on the monitoring of these samples, it was observed that sample quality did not deteriorate during storage. PMID:24200557

  17. Infrared Heating

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    IR heating was first industrially used in the 1930s for automotive curing applications and rapidly became a widely applied technology in the manufacturing industry. Contrarily, a slower pace in the development of IR technologies for processing foods and agricultural products was observed, due to lim...

  18. An Analysis of Price Determination and Markups in the Air-Conditioning and Heating Equipment Industry

    SciTech Connect

    Dale, Larry; Millstein, Dev; Coughlin, Katie; Van Buskirk, Robert; Rosenquist, Gregory; Lekov, Alex; Bhuyan, Sanjib

    2004-01-30

    In this report we calculate the change in final consumer prices due to minimum efficiency standards, focusing on a standard economic model of the air-conditioning and heating equipment (ACHE) wholesale industry. The model examines the relationship between the marginal cost to distribute and sell equipment and the final consumer price in this industry. The model predicts that the impact of a standard on the final consumer price is conditioned by its impact on marginal distribution costs. For example, if a standard raises the marginal cost to distribute and sell equipment a small amount, the model predicts that the standard will raise the final consumer price a small amount as well. Statistical analysis suggest that standards do not increase the amount of labor needed to distribute equipment the same employees needed to sell lower efficiency equipment can sell high efficiency equipment. Labor is a large component of the total marginal cost to distribute and sell air-conditioning and heating equipment. We infer from this that standards have a relatively small impact on ACHE marginal distribution and sale costs. Thus, our model predicts that a standard will have a relatively small impact on final ACHE consumer prices. Our statistical analysis of U.S. Census Bureau wholesale revenue tends to confirm this model prediction. Generalizing, we find that the ratio of manufacturer price to final consumer price prior to a standard tends to exceed the ratio of the change in manufacturer price to the change in final consumer price resulting from a standard. The appendix expands our analysis through a typical distribution chain for commercial and residential air-conditioning and heating equipment.

  19. Sources and potential application of waste heat utilization at a gas processing facility

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alshehhi, Alyas Ali

    Waste heat recovery (WHR) has the potential to significantly improve the efficiency of oil and gas plants, chemical and other processing facilities, and reduce their environmental impact. In this Thesis a comprehensive energy audit at Abu Dhabi Gas Industries Ltd. (GASCO) ASAB gas processing facilities is undertaken to identify sources of waste heat and evaluate their potential for on-site recovery. Two plants are considered, namely ASAB0 and ASAB1. Waste heat evaluation criteria include waste heat grade (i.e., temperature), rate, accessibility (i.e., proximity) to potential on-site waste heat recovery applications, and potential impact of recovery on installation performance and safety. The operating parameters of key waste heat source producing equipment are compiled, as well as characteristics of the waste heat streams. In addition, potential waste heat recovery applications and strategies are proposed, focusing on utilities, i.e., enhancement of process cooling/heating, electrical/mechanical power generation, and steam production. The sources of waste heat identified at ASAB facilities consist of gas turbine and gas generator exhaust gases, flared gases, excess propane cooling capacity, excess process steam, process gas air-cooler heat dissipation, furnace exhaust gases and steam turbine outlet steam. Of the above waste heat sources, exhaust gases from five gas turbines and one gas generator at ASAB0 plant, as well as from four gas turbines at ASAB1 plant, were found to meet the rate (i.e., > 1 MW), grade (i.e., > 180°C), accessibility (i.e., < 50 m from potential on-site WHR applications) and minimal impact criteria on the performance and safety of existing installations, for potential waste heat recovery. The total amount of waste heat meeting these criteria were estimated at 256 MW and 289 MW at ASAB0 and ASAB1 plants, respectively, both of which are substantial. Of the 289 MW waste generated at ASAB1, approximately 173 MW are recovered by waste heat

  20. INDUSTRIAL PROCESS PROFILES FOR ENVIRONMENTAL USE: CHAPTER 3. PETROLEUM REFINING INDUSTRY

    EPA Science Inventory

    The catalog was developed to aid in defining the environmental impacts of U.S. industrial activity. Entries for each industry are in consistent format and form separate chapters of the catalog. The petroleum refining industry is involved primarily in the conversion of crude oil i...

  1. INDUSTRIAL PROCESS PROFILES FOR ENVIRONMENTAL USE: CHAPTER 5. BASIC PETROCHEMICALS INDUSTRY

    EPA Science Inventory

    The catalog was developed to aid in defining the environmental impacts of U.S. industrial activity. Entries for each industry are in consistent format and form separate chapters of the catalog. The basic petroleum industry includes companies that treat hydrocarbon streams from th...

  2. Advances in Linac-Based Technology for Industrial Radiation Processing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McKeown, Joseph

    1997-04-01

    Experience with the Industrial Materials Processing Electron Linear Accelerator, IMPELA, over 30,000 hours of 50 kW operation is reported for three irradiators, two of which are in commercial service. Operations are sufficiently mature that research is now concentrated on split beams, photon conversion, dose monitoring, beam scanning, new shielding designs and QA controls. The efficacy of increasing the incident electron energy on bremsstrahlung converters to 7.5 MeV, as proposed by an IAEA committee, is examined experimentally on an IMPELA accelerator over the energy range 7 MeV to 11 MeV to evaluate conversion efficiency, activation of machine components, converter engineering and the activation of red meat. Above 8 MeV the radioactive isotopes ^38Cl and ^24Na, formed primarily by neutrons produced in a tantalum converter, were clearly identified in the meat, while above 10.5 MeV the radiation from ^13N becomes dominant. Implications for the practicality of processing other high density products are discussed.

  3. Inhomogeneous feed gas processing in industrial ozone generation.

    PubMed

    Krogh, Fabio; Merz, Reto; Gisler, Rudolf; Müller, Marco; Paolini, Bernhard; Lopez, Jose L; Freilich, Alfred

    2008-01-01

    The synthesis of ozone by means of dielectric barrier discharge (DBD) is extensively used in industry. Ozone generators available on the market differ in ozone production capacities, electrode arrangements and working parameters, but operate with a uniformly distributed filamentary discharge plasma pattern.In the presented work the benefits of inhomogeneous feed gas processing are explored. Causality between power induction, production efficiency and working parameters are investigated. Different electrode arrangements, evenly distributed within a given space parameter, were designed, simulated, manufactured and tested on a representative scale. A finite element model was utilized to simulate an inhomogeneous power induction pattern along the ozone generator tube. The simulation yielded the local power density, the local gas temperature gradient and the relative DBD packing density.Results show that the degree of filamentation turns out to be decisive, indicating a new potential by means of plasma tailoring. An arrangement with a pronounced power induction at the inlet of the ozone generator revealed several advantages over homogeneous plasma processing arrangements, for which an increase in robustness and a reduction in electrical power consumption are achieved. PMID:19092182

  4. Soil Heat Flow. Physical Processes in Terrestrial and Aquatic Ecosystems, Transport Processes.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Simpson, James R.

    These materials were designed to be used by life science students for instruction in the application of physical theory to ecosystem operation. Most modules contain computer programs which are built around a particular application of a physical process. Soil heat flow and the resulting soil temperature distributions have ecological consequences…

  5. Heat Transfer Processes for the Thermal Energy Balance of Organisms. Physical Processes in Terrestrial and Aquatic Ecosystems, Transport Processes.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stevenson, R. D.

    This module is part of a series designed to be used by life science students for instruction in the application of physical theory to ecosystem operation. Most modules contain computer programs which are built around a particular application of a physical process. This module describes heat transfer processes involved in the exchange of heat…

  6. Potential Applications of Concentrated Solar Thermal Technologies in the Australian Minerals Processing and Extractive Metallurgical Industry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eglinton, Thomas; Hinkley, Jim; Beath, Andrew; Dell'Amico, Mark

    2013-12-01

    The Australian minerals processing and extractive metallurgy industries are responsible for about 20% of Australia's total greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions. This article reviews the potential applications of concentrated solar thermal (CST) energy in the Australian minerals processing industry to reduce this impact. Integrating CST energy into these industries would reduce their reliance upon conventional fossil fuels and reduce GHG emissions. As CST technologies become more widely deployed and cheaper, and as fuel prices rise, CST energy will progressively become more competitive with conventional energy sources. Some of the applications identified in this article are expected to become commercially competitive provided the costs for pollution abatement and GHG mitigation are internalized. The areas of potential for CST integration identified in this study can be classed as either medium/low-temperature or high-temperature applications. The most promising medium/low-grade applications are electricity generation and low grade heating of liquids. Electricity generation with CST energy—also known as concentrated solar power—has the greatest potential to reduce GHG emissions out of all the potential applications identified because of the 24/7 dispatchability when integrated with thermal storage. High-temperature applications identified include the thermal decomposition of alumina and the calcination of limestone to lime in solar kilns, as well as the production of syngas from natural gas and carbonaceous materials for various metallurgical processes including nickel and direct reduced iron production. Hybridization and integration with thermal storage could enable CST to sustain these energy-intensive metallurgical processes continuously. High-temperature applications are the focus of this paper.

  7. Large deviations in stochastic heat-conduction processes provide a gradient-flow structure for heat conduction

    SciTech Connect

    Peletier, Mark A.; Redig, Frank; Vafayi, Kiamars

    2014-09-01

    We consider three one-dimensional continuous-time Markov processes on a lattice, each of which models the conduction of heat: the family of Brownian Energy Processes with parameter m (BEP(m)), a Generalized Brownian Energy Process, and the Kipnis-Marchioro-Presutti (KMP) process. The hydrodynamic limit of each of these three processes is a parabolic equation, the linear heat equation in the case of the BEP(m) and the KMP, and a nonlinear heat equation for the Generalized Brownian Energy Process with parameter a (GBEP(a)). We prove the hydrodynamic limit rigorously for the BEP(m), and give a formal derivation for the GBEP(a). We then formally derive the pathwise large-deviation rate functional for the empirical measure of the three processes. These rate functionals imply gradient-flow structures for the limiting linear and nonlinear heat equations. We contrast these gradient-flow structures with those for processes describing the diffusion of mass, most importantly the class of Wasserstein gradient-flow systems. The linear and nonlinear heat-equation gradient-flow structures are each driven by entropy terms of the form -log ρ; they involve dissipation or mobility terms of order ρ² for the linear heat equation, and a nonlinear function of ρ for the nonlinear heat equation.

  8. 355nm DPSS UV laser micro-processing for the semiconductor and electronics industry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Fei; Duan, Jun; Zeng, XiaoYan; Li, XiangYou

    2010-02-01

    During the last decade, diode-pumped solid state (DPSS) lasers have been gained wider application in semiconductor and electronics industry due to the advantages of high efficiency, low operating cost, good beam quality and flexibility as well as miniature size. Now, 355nm DPSS UV laser has increasingly been adopted in micro-processing application for both semiconductor and electronics industry where both micro-processing quality and precision of high-density, multilayer and multi-material components are in a strong demand. Our works on typical applications of 355nm DPSS UV laser micro-processing both semiconducting and electronic materials have been introduced in this paper, including drilling (200μm blind holes in 4-layer FPC), cutting (coverlay, CCL, FPC, 0.6mm silicon), and etching (ITO-glass). The effects of the processing parameters (pulse energy, frequency, peak power, scanning speed and focal plane position as well as processing modes) on the micro-processing quality and precision have been investigated and analyzed. By optimizing the processing parameters, the blind drilling depth to the second copper layer can be controlled accurately and the roughness Sq 1.33μm on the second copper surface can be achieved. A high quality and size precision (position precision 20μm) cutting edge without charring, burrs and micro-cracks as well as with very small heat affected zone (HAZ) can be also obtained. When etching function film, the etching width is less than 20 micron, and the etching speed is more than 500mm/s.

  9. Impact of heat shield structure in the growth process of Czochralski silicon derived from numerical simulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Jing; Liu, Ding; Zhao, Yue; Jiao, Shangbin

    2014-05-01

    Further development of the photovoltaic industry is restricted by the productivity of mono-crystalline silicon technology due to its requirements of low cost and high efficient photocells. The heat shield is not only the important part of the thermal field in Czochralski(Cz) mono-crystalline silicon furnace, but also one of the most important factors influencing the silicon crystal growth. Large-diameter Cz-Si crystal growth process is taken as the study object. Based on FEM numerical simulation, different heat shield structures are analyzed to investigate the heater power, the melt-crystal interface shape, the argon flow field, and the oxygen concentration at the melt-crystal interface in the process of large Cz-Si crystal growth. The impact of these factors on the growth efficiency and crystal quality are analyzed. The results show that the oxygen concentration on the melt-crystal interface and the power consumption of the heater stay high due to the lack of a heat shield in the crystal growth system. Argon circumfluence is generated on the external side of the right angle heat shield. By the right-angle heat shield, the speed of gas flow is lowered on the melt free surface, and the temperature gradient of the free surface is increased around the melt-crystal interface. It is not conducive for the stable growth of crystal. The shape of the melt-crystal interface and the argon circulation above the melt free surface are improved by the inclined heat shield. Compared with the others, the system pulling rate is increased and the lowest oxygen concentration is achieved at the melt-crystal interface with the composite heat shield. By the adoption of the optimized composite heat shield in experiment, the real melt-crystal interface shapes and its deformation laws obtained by Quick Pull Separation Method at different pulling rates agree with the simulation results. The results show that the method of simulation is feasible. The proposed research provides the theoretical

  10. Occupational exposure in small and medium scale industry with specific reference to heat and noise.

    PubMed

    Singh, Lakhwinder Pal; Bhardwaj, Arvind; Deepak, Kishore Kumar

    2010-01-01

    This study was undertaken to assess heat and noise exposure and occupational safety practices in small and medium scale casting and forging units (SMEs) of Northern India. We conducted personal interviews of 350 male workers of these units through a comprehensive questionnaire and collected information on heat and noise exposure, use of protective equipment, sweat loss and water intake, working hour. The ambient wet bulb globe temperature (WBGT index) was measured using quest temp 34/36o area heat stress monitor. A-weighted Leq ambient noise was measured using a quest sound level meter "ANSI SI. 43-1997 (R 2002) type-1 model SOUNDPRO SE/DL". We also incorporated OSHA norms for hearing conservation which include - an exchange rate of 5dB(A), criterion level at 90dB(A), criterion time of eight hours, threshold level is equal to 80dB(A), upper limit is equal to 140dB(A) and with F/S response rate. Results of the study revealed that occupational heat exposure in melting, casting, forging and punching sections is high compared to ACGIH/NIOSH norms. Ambience noise in various sections like casting / molding, drop forging, cutting presses, punching, grinding and barreling process was found to be more than 90dB(A). About 95% of the workers suffered speech interference where as high noise annoyance was reported by only 20%. Overall, 68% workers were not using any personal protective equipment (PPE). The study concluded that the proportion of SME workers exposed to high level heat stress and noise (60 - 72 hrs/week) is high. The workers engaged in forging and grinding sections are more prone to noise induced hearing loss (NIHL) at higher frequencies as compared to workers of other sections. It is recommended that there is a strong need to implement the standard of working hours as well as heat stress and noise control measures. PMID:20160389

  11. Understanding the Mechanism of Thermotolerance Distinct From Heat Shock Response Through Proteomic Analysis of Industrial Strains of Saccharomyces cerevisiae*

    PubMed Central

    Shui, Wenqing; Xiong, Yun; Xiao, Weidi; Qi, Xianni; Zhang, Yong; Lin, Yuping; Guo, Yufeng; Zhang, Zhidan; Wang, Qinhong; Ma, Yanhe

    2015-01-01

    Saccharomyces cerevisiae has been intensively studied in responses to different environmental stresses such as heat shock through global omic analysis. However, the S. cerevisiae industrial strains with superior thermotolerance have not been explored in any proteomic studies for elucidating the tolerance mechanism. Recently a new diploid strain was obtained through evolutionary engineering of a parental industrial strain, and it exhibited even higher resistance to prolonged thermal stress. Herein, we performed iTRAQ-based quantitative proteomic analysis on both the parental and evolved industrial strains to further understand the mechanism of thermotolerant adaptation. Out of ∼2600 quantifiable proteins from biological quadruplicates, 193 and 204 proteins were differentially regulated in the parental and evolved strains respectively during heat-stressed growth. The proteomic response of the industrial strains cultivated under prolonged thermal stress turned out to be substantially different from that of the laboratory strain exposed to sudden heat shock. Further analysis of transcription factors underlying the proteomic perturbation also indicated the distinct regulatory mechanism of thermotolerance. Finally, a cochaperone Mdj1 and a metabolic enzyme Adh1 were selected to investigate their roles in mediating heat-stressed growth and ethanol production of yeasts. Our proteomic characterization of the industrial strain led to comprehensive understanding of the molecular basis of thermotolerance, which would facilitate future improvement in the industrially important trait of S. cerevisiae by rational engineering. PMID:25926660

  12. Waste disposal and treatment in the food-processing industry. March 1985-October 1989 (Citations from the Biobusiness data base). Report for March 1985-October 1989

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1989-11-01

    This bibliography contains citations concerning waste treatment and disposal in the food-processing industry. Methods, equipment, and technology are considered. Specific areas include waste-heat recovery, meat processing, seafood processing, dairy wastes, beverage industry, fruits and vegetables, and other food-industry wastes. Waste utilization includes animal feeds, combustion for energy production, biogas production, conversion to fertilizer, composting, and recovery and recycling of usable chemicals. Food-packaging recycling is considered in a related bibliography. (Contains 169 citations fully indexed and including a title list.)

  13. Waste disposal and treatment in the food processing industry. (Latest citations from the Biobusiness database). Published Search

    SciTech Connect

    1995-01-01

    The bibliography contains citations concerning waste treatment and disposal in the food processing industry. Methods, equipment, and technology are considered. References discuss waste heat recovery and examine treatment of wastes resulting from meat and seafood processing, dairy and beverage production, and fruit and vegetable processing. The citations explore conversion of the treated waste to fertilizer and for use in animal feeds, combustion for energy production, biogas production, and composting. The recovery and recycling of usable chemicals from the food waste are also covered. Food packaging recycling is considered in a related bibliography. (Contains 250 citations and includes a subject term index and title list.)

  14. Waste disposal and treatment in the food processing industry. (Latest citations from the Biobusiness database). Published Search

    SciTech Connect

    1995-12-01

    The bibliography contains citations concerning waste treatment and disposal in the food processing industry. Methods, equipment, and technology are considered. References discuss waste heat recovery and examine treatment of wastes resulting from meat and seafood processing, dairy and beverage production, and fruit and vegetable processing. The citations explore conversion of the treated waste to fertilizer and for use in animal feeds, combustion for energy production, biogas production, and composting. The recovery and recycling of usable chemicals from the food waste are also covered. Food packaging recycling is considered in a related bibliography. (Contains 50-250 citations and includes a subject term index and title list.) (Copyright NERAC, Inc. 1995)

  15. Waste disposal and treatment in the food processing industry. (Latest citations from the Biobusiness database). Published Search

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1994-02-01

    The bibliography contains citations concerning waste treatment and disposal in the food processing industry. Methods, equipment, and technology are considered. References discuss waste heat recovery and examine treatment of wastes resulting from meat and seafood processing, dairy and beverage production, and fruit and vegetable processing. The citations explore conversion of the treated waste to fertilizer and for use in animal feeds, combustion for energy production, biogas production, and composting. The recovery and recycling of usable chemicals from the food waste are also covered. Food packaging recycling is considered in a related bibliography. (Contains 250 citations and includes a subject term index and title list.)

  16. In situ post-weld heat treatment on martensitic stainless steel turbine runners using a robotic induction heating process to control temperature distribution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boudreault, E.; Hazel, B.; Côté, J.; Godin, S.

    2014-03-01

    A new robotic heat treatment process is developed. Using this solution it is now possible to perform local heat treatment on large steel components. Crack, cavitation and erosion repairs on turbine blades and Pelton buckets are among the applications of this technique. The proof of concept is made on a 13Cr-4Ni stainless steel designated "CA6NM". This alloy is widely used in the power industry for modern system components. Given the very tight temperature tolerance (600 to 630 °C) for post-weld heat treatment on this alloy, 13Cr-4Ni stainless steel is very well suited for demonstrating the possibilities of this process. To achieve heat treatment requirements, an induction heating system is mounted on a compact manipulator named "Scompi". This robot moves a pancake coil in order to control the temperature distribution. A simulator using thermal finite element analysis is first used for path planning. A feedback loop adjusts parameters in function of environmental conditions.

  17. Science, technology and the industrialization of laser-driven processes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Davis, J. I.; Paisner, J. A.

    1985-05-01

    Members of the laser program at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) potential applications of lasers in industry, some of which are: isotope separation, cleanup of radioactive waste, trace impurity removal, selective chemical reactions, photochemical activation or dissociation of gases, control of combustion particulates, crystal and powder chemistry, and laser induced biochemistry are reviewed. Many of these areas are currently under active study in the community. The investigation at LLNL focused on laser isotope separation of atomic uranium because of the large demand and high product enrichment price for material used as fuel in commercial light-water nuclear power reactors. They also believed that once the technology was fully developed and deployed, it could be applied directly to separating many elements economicprogram at LLNL has an extensive uranium and plutonium program of $100 M in Fy85 and a minor research program for other elements. This report describes the AVLIS program conducted covering the following topics: candidate elements, separative work units, sepctroscopic selectivety, major systems, facilities, integrated process model, multivariable sensitivity studies, world market, and US enrichment enterprise.

  18. Environmental assessment for radioisotope heat source fuel processing and fabrication

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1991-07-01

    DOE has prepared an Environmental Assessment (EA) for radioisotope heat source fuel processing and fabrication involving existing facilities at the Savannah River Site (SRS) near Aiken, South Carolina and the Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) near Los Alamos, New Mexico. The proposed action is needed to provide Radioisotope Thermoelectric Generators (RTG) to support the National Aeronautics and Space Administration's (NASA) CRAF and Cassini Missions. Based on the analysis in the EA, DOE has determined that the proposed action does not constitute a major Federal action significantly affecting the quality of the human environment within the meaning of the National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA) of 1969. Therefore, an Environmental Impact Statement is not required. 30 refs., 5 figs.

  19. A numerical study of EGS heat extraction process based on a thermal non-equilibrium model for heat transfer in subsurface porous heat reservoir

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Jiliang; Jiang, Fangming

    2016-02-01

    With a previously developed numerical model, we perform a detailed study of the heat extraction process in enhanced or engineered geothermal system (EGS). This model takes the EGS subsurface heat reservoir as an equivalent porous medium while it considers local thermal non-equilibrium between the rock matrix and the fluid flowing in the fractured rock mass. The application of local thermal non-equilibrium model highlights the temperature-difference heat exchange process occurring in EGS reservoirs, enabling a better understanding of the involved heat extraction process. The simulation results unravel the mechanism of preferential flow or short-circuit flow forming in homogeneously fractured reservoirs of different permeability values. EGS performance, e.g. production temperature and lifetime, is found to be tightly related to the flow pattern in the reservoir. Thermal compensation from rocks surrounding the reservoir contributes little heat to the heat transmission fluid if the operation time of an EGS is shorter than 15 years. We find as well the local thermal equilibrium model generally overestimates EGS performance and for an EGS with better heat exchange conditions in the heat reservoir, the heat extraction process acts more like the local thermal equilibrium process.

  20. Utility reduces fuel cost with heat recovery, industrial byproduct fuel, cogeneration

    SciTech Connect

    Holland, R.J.

    1982-02-01

    A 50-MW North Dakota power plant is refurbished to recover major waste-heat sources. Use of agricultural byproduct fuel and cogeneration also helps to cut future costs. The plant is saving on fuel costs by burning 150-200 tons/day of sunflower seed hulls from a local processing plant. The hulls are pulverized and mixed with the primary fuel, North Dakota lignite. At the same time, the processing plant that supplies the sunflower hulls buys steam from the power plant, thus giving the utility some of the economic benefits of cogeneration.