Science.gov

Sample records for industrial technologies summary

  1. Energy-conserving technologies for industry: a summary of recent progress in research and development

    SciTech Connect

    Monarch, M.; Alston, T.; Macal, K.; Macal, C.; Tatar, J.; Hersh, H.; Blomquist, C.; Singh, M.; Larsen, R.

    1984-01-01

    Fifty-six summary sheets on energy-conserving industrial technologies were prepared. These summaries describe Office of Industrial Programs (OIP) energy-conservation and waste-recovery projects that have progressed to the point of potential industrial application. Possibilities for cross-industry applications are pointed out in many of the summary sheets. Each summary includes the following types of information: industrial application, process energy savings, conventional situation, new technology, R and D project development and status, technical information, economic analysis, and industry-wide savings.

  2. Office of Industrial Technologies: Summary of program results

    SciTech Connect

    1999-01-01

    Working in partnership with industry, the US Department of Energy`s (DOE`s) Office of Industrial Technologies (OIT) is helping reduce industrial energy use, emissions, and waste while boosting productivity. Operating within the Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EE), OIT conducts research, development, demonstration, and technology transfer efforts that are producing substantial, measurable benefits to industry. This document summarizes some of the impacts of OIT`s programs through 1997. OIT tracks energy savings as well as other benefits associated with the successfully commercialized technologies resulting from OIT-supported research partnerships. Specifically, a chart shows current and cumulative energy savings as well as cumulative reductions of various air pollutants including particulates, volatile organic compounds (VOCs), nitrogen oxides (NO{sub x}), sulfur oxides (SO{sub x}), and the greenhouse gas, carbon dioxide (CO{sub 2}). The bulk of the document consists of four appendices. Appendix 1 describes the technologies currently available commercially, along with their applications and benefits; Appendix 2 describes the OIT-supported emerging technologies that are likely to be commercialized within the next year or two; Appendix 3 describes OIT-sponsored technologies used in commercial applications in the past that are no longer tracked; and Appendix 4 describes the methodology used to assess and track OIT-supported technologies.

  3. Summary of the government/industry workshop on new materials and processing technologies for industrial applications

    SciTech Connect

    Young, J.K.

    1992-07-01

    This report presents a summary of the 1-day workshop conducted at Ann Arbor, Michigan, on April 16, 1992, between the National Center for Manufacturing Sciences (NCMS) and the US Department of Energy Advanced Industrial Materials Program (DOE AIM). The workshop objectives were to: (1) encourage collaboration between DOE, the DOE national laboratories, and NCMS material manufacturers and (2) assist the DOE AIM program in targeting research and development (R&D) more effectively. During the workshop, participants from industry and DOE laboratories were divided into three working groups. Representatives from the DOE national laboratories currently conducting major research programs for AIM were asked to be working group leaders. The groups developed recommendations for NCMS and AIM managers using a six-step process. As a result of the workshop, the groups identified problems of key concern to NCMS member companies and promising materials and processes to meet industry needs. Overall, the workshop found that the research agenda of DOE AIM should include working with suppliers to develop manufacturing technology. The agenda should not be solely driven by energy considerations, but rather it should be driven by industry needs. The role of DOE should be to ensure that energy-efficient technology is available to meet these needs.

  4. Summary of the government/industry workshop on new materials and processing technologies for industrial applications

    SciTech Connect

    Young, J K

    1992-07-01

    This report presents a summary of the 1-day workshop conducted at Ann Arbor, Michigan, on April 16, 1992, between the National Center for Manufacturing Sciences (NCMS) and the US Department of Energy Advanced Industrial Materials Program (DOE AIM). The workshop objectives were to: (1) encourage collaboration between DOE, the DOE national laboratories, and NCMS material manufacturers and (2) assist the DOE AIM program in targeting research and development (R D) more effectively. During the workshop, participants from industry and DOE laboratories were divided into three working groups. Representatives from the DOE national laboratories currently conducting major research programs for AIM were asked to be working group leaders. The groups developed recommendations for NCMS and AIM managers using a six-step process. As a result of the workshop, the groups identified problems of key concern to NCMS member companies and promising materials and processes to meet industry needs. Overall, the workshop found that the research agenda of DOE AIM should include working with suppliers to develop manufacturing technology. The agenda should not be solely driven by energy considerations, but rather it should be driven by industry needs. The role of DOE should be to ensure that energy-efficient technology is available to meet these needs.

  5. AICD -- Advanced Industrial Concepts Division Biological and Chemical Technologies Research Program. 1993 Annual summary report

    SciTech Connect

    Petersen, G.; Bair, K.; Ross, J.

    1994-03-01

    The annual summary report presents the fiscal year (FY) 1993 research activities and accomplishments for the United States Department of Energy (DOE) Biological and Chemical Technologies Research (BCTR) Program of the Advanced Industrial Concepts Division (AICD). This AICD program resides within the Office of Industrial Technologies (OIT) of the Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EE). The annual summary report for 1993 (ASR 93) contains the following: A program description (including BCTR program mission statement, historical background, relevance, goals and objectives), program structure and organization, selected technical and programmatic highlights for 1993, detailed descriptions of individual projects, a listing of program output, including a bibliography of published work, patents, and awards arising from work supported by BCTR.

  6. Technology partnerships: Enhancing the competitiveness, efficiency, and environmental quality of American industry. Executive summary

    SciTech Connect

    1995-04-01

    This document briefly describes the Department of Energy`s (DOE`s) Office of Industrial Technologies (OIT) program. It profiles the energy, economic, and environmental characteristics of OIT`s principal customers--the materials and process industries--that consume nearly 80% of all energy used by industry in the US. OIT-supported research, development, and demonstration (RD and D) activities relating to these industries are described as well as OIT`s crosscutting technology programs that target the needs of multiple US industries. Quantitative estimates of the potential benefits (or metrics) to US industry of many current OIT-supported technologies are also discussed.

  7. SUMMARY REPORT: CONTROL AND TREATMENT TECHNOLOGY FOR THE METAL FINISHING INDUSTRY: ION EXCHANGE

    EPA Science Inventory

    This Technology Transfer ummary Report is one of a series of reports that summarizes a pollution control technology for the metal finishing industry. he 45-page report is intended to promote an understanding of the use of ion exchange in the metal finishing industry. The sections...

  8. IMPACTS. Industrial Technologies Program: Summary of Program Results for CY 2008

    SciTech Connect

    none,

    2010-08-02

    The Impacts report summarizes benefits resulting from ITP-sponsored technologies, including energy savings, waste reduction, increased productivity, and lowered emissions. It also provides an overview of the activities of the Industrial Assessment Centers, BestPractices Program, and Combined Heat and Power efforts.

  9. SUMMARY REPORT: CONTROL AND TREATMENT TECHNOLOGY FOR THE METAL FINISHING INDUSTRY: IN -PLANT CHANGES

    EPA Science Inventory

    This 30 - page Technology Transfer Report ummarizes how he metal finishing industry in the United States is subject to a variety of changing business conditions. wo of the most significant factors are the increasing costs of materials, such as plating chemicals and process water,...

  10. Summary of Industry-Academia Collaboration Projects on Cluster Ion Beam Process Technology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yamada, Isao; Matsuo, Jiro; Toyoda, Noriaki

    2008-11-01

    Processes employing clusters of ions comprised of a few hundred to many thousand atoms are now being developed into a new field of ion beam technology. Cluster-surface collisions produce important non-linear effects which are being applied to shallow junction formation, to etching and smoothing of semiconductors, metals, and dielectrics, to assisted formation of thin films with nano-scale accuracy, and to other surface modification applications. In 2000, a four year R&D project for development of industrial technology began in Japan under funding from the New Energy and Industrial Technology Development Organization (NEDO). Subjects of the projects are in areas of equipment development, semiconductor surface processing, high accuracy surface processing and high-quality film formation. In 2002, another major cluster ion beam project which emphasized nano-technology applications has started under a contract from the Ministry of Economy and Technology for Industry (METI). This METI project involved development related to size-selected cluster ion beam equipment and processes, and development of GCIB processes for very high rate etching and for zero damage etching of magnetic materials and compound semiconductor materials. This paper describes summery of the results.

  11. A summary of the report on prospects for pyrolysis technologies in managing municipal, industrial, and Department of Energy cleanup wastes

    SciTech Connect

    Reaven, S.J.

    1994-08-01

    Pyrolysis converts portions of municipal solid wastes, hazardous wastes and special wastes such as tires, medical wastes and even old landfills into solid carbon and a liquid or gaseous hydrocarbon stream. In the past twenty years, advances in the engineering of pyrolysis systems and in sorting and feeding technologies for solid waste industries have ensured consistent feedstocks and system performance. Some vendors now offer complete pyrolysis systems with performance warranties. This report analyzes the potential applications of pyrolysis in the Long Island region and evaluates the four most promising pyrolytic systems for their readiness, applicability to regional waste management needs and conformity with DOE environmental restoration and waste management requirements. This summary characterizes the engineering performance, environmental effects, costs, product applications and markets for these pyrolysis systems.

  12. Solar thermal technologies program summary

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1985-05-01

    The primary applications being developed in solar thermal technology are the production of electricity and industrial process heat. Additional applications, such as the production of a transportable fuel, are also being studied to determine their feasibility. Two collector concepts are being examined: central receiver and distributed receiver. Some significant achievements are briefly described, as well as program goals and strategies. The research plan for the 1984 fiscal year is also briefly discussed, including a summary of the budget. (LEW)

  13. Industry/government seminar on Large Space systems technology: Executive summary

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Scala, S. M.

    1978-01-01

    The critical technology developments which the participating experts recommend as being required to support the early generation large space systems envisioned as space missions during the years 1985-2000 are summarized.

  14. IMPACTS. Industrial Technologies Program: Summary of Program Results for CY 2009

    SciTech Connect

    none,

    2011-10-01

    This annual report tracks the energy and other benefits of our commercialized technologies. From the 1980s to 2009, cumulative net energy savings are estimated at 10.0 quads, with an associated cost savings of $50.55 billion (in 2009 dollars).

  15. Summary of innovative concepts for industrial process improvement: An experimental technology exchange

    SciTech Connect

    Conger, R.L.; Lee, V.E.; Buel, L.M.

    1995-08-01

    This document is a compilation of one-page technical briefs that summarize the highlights of thirty-eight innovations that were presented at the seventh Innovative Concepts Fair, held in Denver, Colorado on April 20--21, 1995. Sixteen of the innovations were funded through the Innovative Concepts Program, and twenty-two innovations represent other state or federally funded programs. The concepts in this year`s fair addressed innovations that can substantially improve industrial processes. Each tech brief describes the need for the proposed concept; the concept being proposed; and the concept`s economics and market potential, key experimental results, and future development needs. A contact block is also included with each flier.

  16. A case study in technology utilization: Industrial products and practices. [summary of benefits to national economy resulting from space programs

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1973-01-01

    In pursuit of such missions as Apollo, the National Aeronautics and Space Administration has called into being unique equipment that obviously has little direct application beyond the achievement of mission objectives. Yet, to assume that further direct application of space program hardware is somehow a measure of the industrial benefits accruing to the nation is to misunderstand how the creation of new technology affects modern industrial capability. This document presents a profile of the significant ways in which technological developments in response to aerospace mission requirements have been coupled into industrial practice, with the result being that improved products and processes are now being utilized to benefit the nation.

  17. Space electronics technology summary

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1976-01-01

    An overview is given of current electronics R and D activities, potential future thrusts, and related NASA payoffs. Major increases in NASA mission return and significant concurrent reductions in mission cost appear possible through a focused, long range electronics technology program. The overview covers: guidance assessments, navigation and control, and sensing and data acquisition processing, storage, and transfer.

  18. Photonics: Technology project summary

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Depaula, Ramon P.

    1991-01-01

    Photonics involves the use of light (photons) in conjunction with electronics for applications in communications, computing, control, and sensing. Components used in photonic systems include lasers, optical detectors, optical wave guide devices, fiber optics, and traditional electronic devices. The goal of this program is to develop hybrid optoelectronic devices and systems for sensing, information processing, communications, and control. It is hoped that these new devices will yield at least an order of magnitude improvement in performance over existing technology. The objective of the program is to conduct research and development in the following areas: (1) materials and devices; (2) networking and computing; (3) optical processing/advanced pattern recognition; and (4) sensing.

  19. Space Station Technology Summary

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Iacabucci, R.; Evans, S.; Briley, G.; Delventhal, R. A.; Braunscheidel, E.

    1989-01-01

    The completion of the Space Station Propulsion Advanced Technology Programs established an in-depth data base for the baseline gaseous oxygen/gaseous hydrogen thruster, the waste gas resistojet, and the associated system operations. These efforts included testing of a full end-to-end system at National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA)-Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) in which oxygen and hydrogen were generated from water by electrolysis at 6.89 MPa (1,000 psia), stored and fired through the prototype thruster. Recent end-to-end system tests which generate the oxygen/hydrogen propellants by electrolysis of water at 20.67 MPa (3,000 psia) were completed on the Integrated Propulsion Test Article (IPTA) at NASA-Johnson Space Center (JSC). Resistojet testing has included 10,000 hours of life testing, plume characterization, and electromagnetic interference (EMI) testing. Extensive 25-lbf thruster testing was performed defining operating performance characteristics across the required mixture ratio and thrust level ranges. Life testing has accumulated 27 hours of operation on the prototype thruster. A total of seven injectors and five thrust chambers were fabricated to the same basic design. Five injectors and three thrust chambers designed to incorporate improved life, performance, and producibility characteristics are ready for testing. Five resistojets were fabricated and tested, with modifications made to improve producibility. The lessons learned in the area of producibility for both the O2/H2 thrusters and for the resistojet have resolved critical fabrication issues. The test results indicate that all major technology issues for long life and reliability for space station application were resolved.

  20. Metalcasting Industry Technology Roadmap

    SciTech Connect

    none,

    1998-01-01

    The Roadmap sets out the strategy for pursuing near-, mid-, and long-term goals set out by industry and for carrying out the cooperative agreement between the U.S. Department of Energy and industry. The Roadmap outlines key goals for products and markets, materials technology, manufacturing technology, environmental technology, human resources, and industry health programs. The Roadmap sets out the strategy for pursuing near-, mid-, and long-term goals set out by industry and for carrying out the cooperative agreement between the U.S. Department of Energy and industry. The Roadmap sets out the strategy for pursuing near-, mid-, and long-term goals set out by industry and for carrying out the cooperative agreement between the U.S. Department of Energy and industry.

  1. Chicago Operations Office: Technology summary

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1994-12-01

    This document has been prepared by the Department of Energy`s (DOE) Environmental Management (EM) Office of Technology Development (OTD) to highlight its research, development, demonstration, testing, and evaluation (RDDT and E) activities funded through the Chicago Operations Office. Technologies and processes described have the potential to enhance DOE`s cleanup and waste management efforts, as well as improve US Industry`s competitiveness in global environmental markets. The information has been assembled from recently produced OTD documents which highlight technology development activities within each of the OTD program elements. OTD technologies addresses three specific problem areas: (1) groundwater and soils cleanup; (2) waste retrieval and processing; and (3) pollution prevention. These problems are not unique to DOE, but are associated with other Federal agency and industry sites as well. Thus, technical solutions developed within OTD programs will benefit DOE, and should have direct applications in outside markets.

  2. Transferring Technology to Industry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wolfenbarger, J. Ken

    2006-01-01

    This slide presentation reviews the technology transfer processes in which JPL has been involved to assist in transferring the technology derived from aerospace research and development to industry. California Institute of Technology (CalTech), the organization that runs JPL, is the leading institute in patents for all U.S. universities. There are several mechanisms that are available to JPL to inform industry of these technological advances: (1) a dedicated organization at JPL, National Space Technology Applications (NSTA), (2) Tech Brief Magazine, (3) Spinoff magazine, and (4) JPL publications. There have also been many start-up organizations and businesses from CalTech.

  3. Plutonium focus area: Technology summary

    SciTech Connect

    1996-03-01

    To ensure research and development programs focus on the most pressing environmental restoration and waste management problems at the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), the Assistant Secretary for the Office of Environmental Management (EM) established a working group in August 1993 to implement a new approach to research and technology development. As part of this approach, EM developed a management structure and principles that led to creation of specific focus areas. These organizations were designed to focus scientific and technical talent throughout DOE and the national scientific community on major environmental restoration and waste management problems facing DOE. The focus area approach provides the framework for inter-site cooperation and leveraging of resources on common problems. After the original establishment of five major focus areas within the Office of Technology Development (EM-50), the Nuclear Materials Stabilization Task Group (NMSTG, EM-66) followed EM-50`s structure and chartered the Plutonium Focus Area (PFA). NMSTG`s charter to the PFA, described in detail later in this book, plays a major role in meeting the EM-66 commitments to the Defense Nuclear Facilities Safety Board (DNFSB). The PFA is a new program for FY96 and as such, the primary focus of revision 0 of this Technology Summary is an introduction to the Focus Area; its history, development, and management structure, including summaries of selected technologies being developed. Revision 1 to the Plutonium Focus Area Technology Summary is slated to include details on all technologies being developed, and is currently planned for release in August 1996. The following report outlines the scope and mission of the Office of Environmental Management, EM-60, and EM-66 organizations as related to the PFA organizational structure.

  4. Morgantown Energy Technology Center, technology summary

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1994-06-01

    This document has been prepared by the DOE Environmental Management (EM) Office of Technology Development (OTD) to highlight its research, development, demonstration, testing, and evaluation activities funded through the Morgantown Energy Technology Center (METC). Technologies and processes described have the potential to enhance DOE`s cleanup and waste management efforts, as well as improve US industry`s competitiveness in global environmental markets. METC`s R&D programs are focused on commercialization of technologies that will be carried out in the private sector. META has solicited two PRDAs for EM. The first, in the area of groundwater and soil technologies, resulted in twenty-one contact awards to private sector and university technology developers. The second PRDA solicited novel decontamination and decommissioning technologies and resulted in eighteen contract awards. In addition to the PRDAs, METC solicited the first EM ROA in 1993. The ROA solicited research in a broad range of EM-related topics including in situ remediation, characterization, sensors, and monitoring technologies, efficient separation technologies, mixed waste treatment technologies, and robotics. This document describes these technology development activities.

  5. Plutonium focus area. Technology summary

    SciTech Connect

    1997-09-01

    The Assistant Secretary for the Office of Environmental Management (EM) at the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) chartered the Plutonium Focus Area (PFA) in October 1995. The PFA {open_quotes}...provides for peer and technical reviews of research and development in plutonium stabilization activities...{close_quotes} In addition, the PFA identifies and develops relevant research and technology. The purpose of this document is to focus attention on the requirements used to develop research and technology for stabilization, storage, and preparation for disposition of nuclear materials. The PFA Technology Summary presents the approach the PFA uses to identify, recommend, and review research. It lists research requirements, research being conducted, and gaps where research is needed. It also summarizes research performed by the PFA in the traditional research summary format. This document encourages researchers and commercial enterprises to do business with PFA by submitting research proposals or {open_quotes}white papers.{close_quotes} In addition, it suggests ways to increase the likelihood that PFA will recommend proposed research to the Nuclear Materials Stabilization Task Group (NMSTG) of DOE.

  6. Pollution Prevention Program: Technology summary

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1994-02-01

    The Department of Energy (DOE) has established a national Research, Development, Demonstration, Testing, and Evaluation (RDDT&E) Program for pollution prevention and waste minimization at its production plants During FY89/90 the Office of Environmental Restoration and Waste Management (EM), through the Office of Technology Development (OTD), established comprehensive, pollution prevention technical support programs to demonstrate new, environmentally-conscious technology for production processes. The RDDT&E program now entails collaborative efforts across DOE. The Pollution Prevention Program is currently supporting three major activities: The DOE/US Air Force Memorandum of Understanding Program is a collaborative effort to utilize the combined resources of DOE and the Department of Defense, eliminate duplication of effort in developing technologies, and to facilitate technology solutions aimed at reducing waste through process modification, material substitution or recycling. The Waste Component Recycle, Treatment and Disposal Integrated Demonstration (WeDID) will develop recycle, treatment, and disposal processes and associated technologies for use in the dismantlement of non-nuclear weapons components, to support US arms treaties and policies. This program will focus on meeting all security and regulatory requirements (with additional benefit to the commercial electronics industry). The Environmentally Conscious Manufacturing Integrated Demonstration (ECMID) will effectively implement ECM technologies that address both the needs of the DOE Complex and US electronics industry, and encourage strong interaction between DOE and US industry. The ECMID will also develop life cycle analysis tools that will aid decisionmakers in selecting the optimum process based on the tradeoffs between cost an environmental impact.

  7. Building Technologies Program Planning Summary

    SciTech Connect

    none,

    2009-11-01

    The U.S. Department of Energy’s (DOE) Building Technologies Program (BTP) works in partnership with industry, state, municipal, and other federal organizations to achieve the goals of marketable net-zero energy buildings. To carry out its mission, BTP involves builders; appliance, window, lighting, operational systems, and component manufacturers; and end users in setting the program’s research priorities. These groups advise and help guide BTP through implementing, deploying, and standardizing new technologies, equipment, and processes being developed and tested in DOE’s national laboratories and in real-world applications in many U.S. communities.

  8. Office of Industrial Technologies research in progress

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1993-05-01

    The US Department of Energy (DOE) Office of Industrial Technologies (OIT) conducts research and development activities which focus on improving energy efficiency and providing for fuel flexibility within US industry in the area of industrial conservation. The mission of OIT is to increase the utilization of existing energy-efficient equipment and to find and promote new, cost-effective ways for industrial facilities to improve their energy efficiency and minimize waste products. To ensure advancement of the technological leadership of the United States and to improve the competitiveness of American industrial products in world markets, OIT works closely with industrial partners, the staffs of the national laboratories, and universities to identify research and development needs and to solve technological challenges. This report contains summaries of the currently active projects supported by the Office of Industrial Technologies.

  9. Innovation investment area: Technology summary

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1994-03-01

    The mission of Environmental Management`s (EM) Office of Technology Development (OTD) Innovation Investment Area is to identify and provide development support for two types of technologies that are developed to characterize, treat and dispose of DOE waste, and to remediate contaminated sites. They are: technologies that show promise to address specific EM needs, but require proof-of-principle experimentation; and (2) already proven technologies in other fields that require critical path experimentation to demonstrate feasibility for adaptation to specific EM needs. The underlying strategy is to ensure that private industry, other Federal Agencies, universities, and DOE National Laboratories are major participants in developing and deploying new and emerging technologies. To this end, about 125 different new and emerging technologies are being developed through Innovation Investment Area`s (IIA) two program elements: RDDT&E New Initiatives (RD01) and Interagency Agreements (RD02). Both of these activities are intended to foster research and development partnerships so as to introduce innovative technologies into other OTD program elements for expedited evaluation.

  10. Research and Technology Operating Plan Summary, Fiscal Year 1972 Research and Technology Program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1971-01-01

    The NASA Research and Technology program for FY 1972 is presented. It is a compilation of the summary portions of each of the RTOPs (Research and Technology Operating Plan) used for management review and control of research currently in progress throughout NASA. The RTOP Summary is designed to facilitate communication and coordination among concerned technical personnel in government, in industry, and in universities.

  11. Research and Technology Objectives and Plans Summary (RTOPS)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1977-01-01

    The NASA Research and Technology program for FY 1978 is represented by this compilation of the 'Summary' portions of each of the Research and Technology Objectives and Plans (RTOPS). The RTOP Summary is designed to facilitate communication and coordination among concerned technical personnel in government, in industry, and in universities. The first section contains citations and abstracts of the RTOPs. Following this section are four indexes: Subject, Technical Monitor, Responsible NASA Organization, and RTOP Number.

  12. Research and Technology Objectives and Plans Summary (RTOPS)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1990-01-01

    The NASA research and technology program for FY 1990 is presented. The summary portions is compiled of each of the RTOPs (Research and Technology Objectives and Plans) used for management review and control of research currently in progress throughout NASA. The RTOP summary is designed to facilitate communication and coordination among concerned technical personnel in government, industry, and universities. The first section containing citations and abstracts of the RTOPs is followed by four indices: Subject; Technical Monitor; Responsible NASA Organization; and RTOP number.

  13. Cryogenic thermal control technology summaries

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stark, J. A.; Leonhard, K. E.; Bennett, F. O., Jr.

    1974-01-01

    A summarization and categorization is presented of the pertinent literature associated with cryogenic thermal control technology having potential application to in-orbit fluid transfer systems and/or associated space storage. Initially, a literature search was conducted to obtain pertinent documents for review. Reports determined to be of primary significance were summarized in detail. Each summary, where applicable, consists of; (1) report identification, (2) objective(s) of the work, (3) description of pertinent work performed, (4)major results, and (5) comments of the reviewer (GD/C). Specific areas covered are; (1) multilayer insulation of storage tanks with and without vacuum jacketing, (2) other insulation such as foams, shadow shields, microspheres, honeycomb, vent cooling and composites, (3) vacuum jacketed and composite fluid lines, and (4) low conductive tank supports and insulation penetrations. Reports which were reviewed and not summarized, along with reasons for not summarizing, are also listed.

  14. Existing technology transfer reports. Summary

    SciTech Connect

    Schweighardt, F.K.

    1984-06-01

    From 1974 to 1980, Air Products and Chemicals, Inc. (APCI) conducted a broad spectrum of internal research projects on coal, coal liquefaction processing, and coal liquids analysis. The sum of all of these projects is reported to the United States Department of Energy (DOE) by a set of five Existing Technology Transfer Reports under the following titles: (1) Liquefaction Process and Product Studies, DOE/OR/03054-109; (2) Filtration and Deashing Technology, DOE/OR/03054-118; (3) Dissolver Cold-Flow Modelling, DOE/OR/03054-108; (4) Second-Stage Support, DOE/OR/03054-117; and (5) Analytical Capabilities, DOE/OR/03054-116. This summary report provides an overview of the five Existing Technology Transfer Reports by highlighting the program objectives/results and listing the documents in which the original experimental data are contained. These documents are presented as either an attached appendix or as a file of raw data maintained by the US DOE and the International Coal Refining Company (ICRC).

  15. Ethics for Industrial Technology

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rosentrater, Kurt A.; Balamuralikrishna, Radha

    2005-01-01

    This paper takes aim at one specific, as well as basic, need in teamwork and interdisciplinary projects--ethics and its implications for professional practice. A preliminary study suggests that students majoring in industrial technology degree programs may not have adequate opportunity to formally study and engage in ethical aspects of technology…

  16. Wind energy technology program summary

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    1984-10-01

    The purpose of the Federal Wind Energy Technology Program is to perform research that will enable the private sector to develop and utilize safe, reliable, and efficient wind energy systems. Generic research will provide the technology base and scientific understanding necessary to allow industry to develop wind energy systems competitive with conventional energy sources. The goal of the DOE wind program is to improve the basic understanding of aerodynamics and structural dynamics in order to more accurately predict wind turbine aerodynamic performance, natural resonance frequencies, and structural loads. Areas included in the research plan being developed for the next five years include: advanced fluid dynamics, aerodynamics research, structural dynamics research, and advanced components and systems research, including multimegawatt (MOD-5) development.

  17. Computer Technology for Industry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1979-01-01

    In this age of the computer, more and more business firms are automating their operations for increased efficiency in a great variety of jobs, from simple accounting to managing inventories, from precise machining to analyzing complex structures. In the interest of national productivity, NASA is providing assistance both to longtime computer users and newcomers to automated operations. Through a special technology utilization service, NASA saves industry time and money by making available already developed computer programs which have secondary utility. A computer program is essentially a set of instructions which tells the computer how to produce desired information or effect by drawing upon its stored input. Developing a new program from scratch can be costly and time-consuming. Very often, however, a program developed for one purpose can readily be adapted to a totally different application. To help industry take advantage of existing computer technology, NASA operates the Computer Software Management and Information Center (COSMIC)(registered TradeMark),located at the University of Georgia. COSMIC maintains a large library of computer programs developed for NASA, the Department of Defense, the Department of Energy and other technology-generating agencies of the government. The Center gets a continual flow of software packages, screens them for adaptability to private sector usage, stores them and informs potential customers of their availability.

  18. Missouri Industrial Technology Education Guide.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Missouri Univ., Columbia. Dept. of Practical Arts and Vocational-Technical Education.

    This guide is intended to serve as Missouri's primary resource for planning, implementing, and evaluating industrial technology/industrial arts education. The following topics are covered: selecting a direction for industrial technology education (ITE) (its underlying philosophy, mission, goals); planning an ITE program (recommended scope and…

  19. Research and Technology Objectives and Plans Summary (RTOPS)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1987-01-01

    This publication represents the NASA research and technology program for FY87. It is a compilation of the Summary portions of each of the RTOPs (Research and Technology Objectives and Plans) used for management review and control of research currently in progress throughout NASA. The RTOP Summary is designed to facilitate communication and coordination among concerned technical personnel in government, in industry, and in universities. The first section containing citations and abstracts of the RTOPs is followed by four indexes: Subject, Technical Monitor, Responsible NASA Organization, and RTOP Number.

  20. Research and Technology Objectives and Plans Summary (RTOPS)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1989-01-01

    This publication represents the NASA research and technology program for FY89. It is a compilation of the Summary portions of each of the RTOPs (Research and Technology Objectives and Plans) used for management review and control of research currently in progress throughout NASA. The RTOP Summary is designed to facilitate communication and coordination among concerned technical personnel in government, in industry, and in universities. The first section containing citations and abstracts of the RTOPs is followed by four indexes: Subject, Technical Monitor, Responsible NASA Organization, and RTOP Number.

  1. Research and Technology Objectives and Plans Summary (RTOPS)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1993-01-01

    This publication represents the NASA research and technology program for FY-93. It is a compilation of the Summary portions of each of the RTOP's (Research and Technology Objectives and Plans) used for management review and control of research currently in progress throughout NASA. The RTOP Summary is designed to facilitate communication and coordination among concerned technical personnel in government, in industry, and in universities. The first section containing citations and abstracts of the RTOP's is followed by four indexes: Subject, Technical Monitor, Responsible NASA Organization, and RTOP Number.

  2. Research and Technology Objectives and Plans Summary (RTOPS)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1985-01-01

    This publication represents the NASA research and technology program for FY 1985. It is a compilation of the Summary portions of each of the RTOPs (Research and Technology Objectives and Plans) used for management review and control of research currently in progress throughout NASA. The RTOP summary is designed to facilitate communication and coordination among concerned technical personnel in government, in industry, and in universities. The first section containing citations and abstracts of the RTOPs is followed by four indexes: Subject, Technical Monitor, Responsible NASA Organization, and RTOP number.

  3. Biological and chemical technologies research. FY 1995 annual summary report

    SciTech Connect

    1996-03-01

    The annual summary report presents the fiscal year (FY) 1995 research activities and accomplishments for the United States Department of Energy (DOE) Biological and Chemical Technologies Research (BCTR) Program. This BCTR program resides within the Office of Industrial Technologies (OIT) of the Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EE). The annual summary report for 1995 (ASR 95) contains the following: program description (including BCTR program mission statement, historical background, relevance, goals and objectives); program structure and organization, selected technical and programmatic highlights for 1995; detailed descriptions of individual projects; a listing of program output, including a bibliography of published work; patents; and awards arising from work supported by the BCTR.

  4. Research and technology objectives and plans: Summary fiscal year 1991

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1991-01-01

    This publication represents the NASA research and technology program for FY 1991. It is a compilation of the Summary portions of each of the RTOP's (Research and Technology Objectives and Plans) used for management review and control of research currently in progress throughout NASA. The RTOP Summary is designed to facilitate communication and coordination among concerned technical personnel in government, industry, and in universities. The first section contains citations and abstracts of the RTOP's and is followed by four indexes: Subject, Technical Monitor, Responsible NASA Organization, and RTOP Number.

  5. Research and Technology Objectives and Plans Summary (RTOPS)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1988-01-01

    This publication represents the NASA research and technology program for FY88. It is a compilation of the Summary portions of each of the RTOPs (Research and Technology Objectives and Plans) used for management review and control of research currently in progress throughout NASA. The RTOP Summary is designed to facilitate communication and coordination among concerned technical personnel in government, in industry, and in universities. The first section containing citations and abstracts of the RTOPs is followed by four indexes: Subject, Technical Monitor, Responsible NASA Organization, and RTOP Number.

  6. Research and Technology Objectives and Plans Summary (RTOPS)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1992-01-01

    This publication represents the NASA research and technology program for FY92. It is a compilation of the Summary portions of each of the RTOP's (Research and Technology Objectives and Plans) used for management review and control of research currently in progress throughout NASA. The RTOP Summary is designed to facilitate communication and coordination among concerned technical personnel in government, in industry, and in universities. The first section containing citations and abstracts of the RTOP's is followed by four indexes: Subject, Technical Monitor, Responsible NASA Organization, and RTOP Number.

  7. Top Level Summary of Technologies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Craig, Douglas, A.

    2009-01-01

    This document is a chart that reviews the technology of various NASA projects. Included in the chart is the title, a brief description of the technology, the funding status, a statement of the benefits, the date required, how the element connects to the Constellation project architecture, and how critical the technology is to the Constellation project.

  8. Forest Products Industry Technology Roadmap

    SciTech Connect

    none,

    2010-04-01

    This document describes the forest products industry's research and development priorities. The original technology roadmap published by the industry in 1999 and was most recently updated in April 2010.

  9. Richland Operations Office technology summary

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1994-05-01

    This document has been prepared by the Department of Energy`s Environmental Management Office of Technology Development to highlight its research, development, demonstration, testing, and evaluation activities funded through the Richland Operations Office. Technologies and processes described have the potential to enhance cleanup and waste management efforts.

  10. Robotics crosscutting program: Technology summary

    SciTech Connect

    1996-08-01

    The Office of Environmental Management (EM) is responsible for cleaning up the legacy of radioactive and chemically hazardous waste at contaminated sites and facilities throughout the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) nuclear weapons complex, preventing further environmental contamination, and instituting responsible environmental management. Initial efforts to achieve this mission resulted in the establishment of environmental restoration and waste management programs. However, as EM began to execute its responsibilities, decision makers became aware that the complexity and magnitude of this mission could not be achieved efficiently, affordably, safely, or reasonably with existing technology. Once the need for advanced cleanup technologies became evident, EM established an aggressive, innovative program of applied research and technology development. The Office of Technology Development (OTD) was established in November 1989 to advance new and improved environmental restoration and waste management technologies that would reduce risks to workers, the public, and the environment; reduce cleanup costs; and devise methods to correct cleanup problems that currently have no solutions. In 1996, OTD added two new responsibilities - management of a Congressionally mandated environmental science program and development of risk policy, requirements, and guidance. OTD was renamed the Office of Science and Technology (OST). This documents presents information concerning robotics tank waste retrieval overview, robotic chemical analysis automation, robotics decontamination and dismantlement, and robotics crosscutting and advanced technology.

  11. Manpower Impacts of Industrial Technology.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    New York State Dept. of Labor, Albany. Research and Statistics Office.

    The effects of technological change on the manpower and training needs of New York State industry were studied in a survey of 281 Industrial situations. The study was designed to help answer questions about the effects of factory and related technological change in displacing workers, in creating recruitment and training needs, and in altering the…

  12. Irradiation technologyIndustrial use

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zyball, A.

    1995-02-01

    The most important applications of the radiation technology are the crosslinking of polymers and sterilisation. Although extensive experience about the use of this technology is available and powerful and dependable radiation facilities can be obtained, as yet the radiation technology has not found the acceptance it deserves in the industry. The main reason herefore has to do with how the question of radiation or the term radiation is presented to the industry and among the population. This paper will deal with considerations and ways in which the industrial use of the radiation technology can be expanded.

  13. Aluminum Industry Technology Roadmap

    SciTech Connect

    none,

    2003-02-01

    This roadmap describes the industry's R&D strategy, priorities, milestones, and performance targets for achieving its long-term goals. It accounts for changes in the industry and the global marketplace since the first roadmap was published in 1997. An updated roadmap was published November 2001. (PDF 1.1 MB).

  14. Innovative Technology Summary Report (ITSR)

    SciTech Connect

    1999-10-01

    This section summarizes the demonstration of an Infrared-based Non-Intrusive Liquid Level Detection Technology (NLLDT) at the 221-U Facility located within the Hanford site. This demonstration was conducted by Infrared, Inc. of Reno Nevada in conjunction with Bechtel Hanford Inc. (Environmental Restoration Contractor) and DOE Engineers. The Infrared Imaging System demonstrated by Infrared, Inc. provides an attractive alternative to the baseline technology which employs mechanical methods of opening vessels to detect liquid level. An Infrared Imaging Systems is able to exploit the variations in physical properties of tanks, vessels and piping systems and the enclosed liquid and air to produce clearly defined locations of liquids, if they exist. For decontamination and commissioning (D and D) projects, the use of the NLLDT System to detect liquids in vessels eliminates the need to physically open and inspect these vessels. Risks to workers associated with gaining access to these type objects and the possible exposure to radioactive or contaminated materials can nearly be eliminated. This demonstration was conducted with the goal of characterizing a number of target vessels located on the deck of the 221 U Facility. This technology is suitable for DOE nuclear facilities D and D sites or similar public or commercial sites that must be decontaminated.

  15. Cone penetrometer: Innovative technology summary report

    SciTech Connect

    1996-04-01

    Cone penetrometer technology (CPT) provides cost-effective, real-time data for use in the characterization of the subsurface. Recent innovations in this baseline technology allow for improved access to the subsurface for environmental restoration applications. The technology has been improved by both industry and government agencies and is constantly advancing due to research efforts. The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office of Science and Technology (formerly Technology Development) has contributed significantly to these efforts. This report focuses on the advancements made in conjunction with DOE`s support but recognizes Department of Defense (DOD) and industry efforts.

  16. Research and Technology Operating Plan Summary: Fiscal Year 1973 Research and Technology Program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1972-01-01

    Abstracts are presented of each of the Research and Technology Operating Plans (RTOP) used for management review and control of research currently in progress throughout NASA. This RTOP Summary is designed to facilitate communication and coordination among concerned technical personnel in government, industry, and universities. The summary is arranged in five sections consisting of citations and abstracts of the RTOPs and subject, technical monitor, responsible NASA organization, and RTOP number indexes.

  17. Albuquerque Operations Office, Albuquerque, New Mexico: Technology summary

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1994-08-01

    This document has been prepared by the Department of Energy`s (DOE) Environmental Management (EM) Office of Technology Development (OTD) in order to highlight research, development, demonstration, testing, and evaluation (RDDT&E) activities funded through the Albuquerque Operations Office. Technologies and processes described have the potential to enhance DOE`s cleanup and waste management efforts, as well as improve US industry`s competitiveness in global environmental markets. The information has been assembled from recently produced OTD documents that highlight technology development activities within each of the OTD program elements. These integrated program summaries include: Volatile Organic Compounds in Non-Arid Soils, Volatile Organic Compounds in Arid Soils, Mixed Waste Landfill Integrated Demonstration, Uranium in Soils Integrated Demonstration, Characterization, Monitoring, and Sensor Technology, In Situ Remediation, Buried Waste Integrated Demonstration, Underground Storage Tank, Efficient Separations and Processing, Mixed Waste Integrated Program, Rocky Flats Compliance Program, Pollution Prevention Program, Innovation Investment Area, and Robotics Technology.

  18. BCTR: Biological and Chemical Technologies Research 1994 annual summary report

    SciTech Connect

    Petersen, G.

    1995-02-01

    The annual summary report presents the fiscal year (FY) 1994 research activities and accomplishments for the United States Department of Energy (DOE) Biological and Chemical Technologies Research (BCTR) Program of the Advanced Industrial Concepts Division (AICD). This AICD program resides within the Office of Industrial Technologies (OIT) of the Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EE). Although the OIT was reorganized in 1991 and AICD no longer exists, this document reports on efforts conducted under the former structure. The annual summary report for 1994 (ASR 94) contains the following: program description (including BCTR program mission statement, historical background, relevance, goals and objectives); program structure and organization, selected technical and programmatic highlights for 1994; detailed descriptions of individual projects; a listing of program output, including a bibliography of published work; patents, and awards arising from work supported by BCTR.

  19. Summary of New Generation Technologies and Resources

    SciTech Connect

    1993-01-08

    This compendium includes a PG&E R&D program perspective on the Advanced Energy Systems Technology Information Module (TIM) project, a glossary, a summary of each TIM, updated information on the status and trends of each technology, and a bibliography. The objectives of the TIMs are to enhance and document the PG&E R&D Program's understanding of the technology status, resource potential, deployment hurdles, commercial timing, PG&E applications and impacts, and R&D issues of advanced technologies for electric utility applications in Northern California. [DJE-2005

  20. Technology for Space Station Evolution. Executive summary and overview

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1990-01-01

    NASA's Office of Aeronautics and Space Technology (OAST) conducted a workshop on technology for space station evolution 16-19 Jan. 1990. The purpose of this workshop was to collect and clarify Space Station Freedom technology requirements for evolution and to describe technologies that can potentially fill those requirements. These proceedings are organized into an Executive Summary and Overview and five volumes containing the technology discipline presentations. The Executive Summary and Overview contains an executive summary for the workshop, the technology discipline summary packages, and the keynote address. The executive summary provides a synopsis of the events and results of the workshop and the technology discipline summary packages.

  1. Fluid management systems technology summaries

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stark, J. A.; Blatt, M. H.; Bennett, F. O., Jr.; Campbell, B. J.

    1974-01-01

    A summarization and categorization of the pertinent literature associated with fluid management systems technology having potential application to in-orbit fluid transfer and/or associated storage are presented. A literature search was conducted to obtain pertinent documents for review. Reports determined to be of primary significance were summarized in the following manner: (1) report identification, (2) objective(s) of the work, (3) description of pertinent work performed, (4) major results, and (5) comments of the reviewer. Pertinent figures are presented on a single facing page separate from the text. Specific areas covered are: fluid line dynamics and thermodynamics, low-g mass gauging, other instrumentation, stratification/pressurization, low-g vent systems, fluid mixing refrigeration and reliquefaction, and low-g interface control and liquid acquisition systems. Reports which were reviewed and not summarized, along with reasons for not summarizing, are also listed.

  2. Robotics Technology Crosscutting Program. Technology summary

    SciTech Connect

    1995-06-01

    The Robotics Technology Development Program (RTDP) is a needs-driven effort. A length series of presentations and discussions at DOE sites considered critical to DOE`s Environmental Restoration and Waste Management (EM) Programs resulted in a clear understanding of needed robotics applications toward resolving definitive problems at the sites. A detailed analysis of the resulting robotics needs assessment revealed several common threads running through the sites: Tank Waste Retrieval (TWR), Contaminant Analysis Automation (CAA), Mixed Waste Operations (MWO), and Decontamination and Dismantlement (D and D). The RTDP Group also realized that some of the technology development in these four areas had common (Cross Cutting-CC) needs, for example, computer control and sensor interface protocols. Further, the OTD approach to the Research, Development, Demonstration, Testing, and Evaluation (RDDT and E) process urged an additional organizational breakdown between short-term (1--3 years) and long-term (3--5 years) efforts (Advanced Technology-AT). These factors lead to the formation of the fifth application area for Crosscutting and Advanced Technology (CC and AT) development. The RTDP is thus organized around these application areas -- TWR, CAA, MWO, D and D, and CC and AT -- with the first four developing short-term applied robotics. An RTDP Five-Year Plan was developed for organizing the Program to meet the needs in these application areas.

  3. Robotics Technology Development Program. Technology summary

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1994-02-01

    The Robotics Technology Development Program (RTDP) is a ``needs-driven`` effort. A lengthy series of presentations and discussions at DOE sites considered critical to DOE`s Environmental Restoration and Waste Management (EM) Programs resulted in a clear understanding of needed robotics applications toward resolving definitive problems at the sites. A detailed analysis of the Tank Waste Retrieval (TWR), Contaminant Analysis Automation (CAA), Mixed Waste Operations (MWO), and Decontamination & Dismantlement (D&D). The RTDP Group realized that much of the technology development was common (Cross Cutting-CC) to each of these robotics application areas, for example, computer control and sensor interface protocols. Further, the OTD approach to the Research, Development, Demonstration, Testing, and Evaluation (RDDT&E) process urged an additional organizational break-out between short-term (1--3 years) and long-term (3--5 years) efforts (Advanced Technology-AT). The RDTP is thus organized around these application areas -- TWR, CAA, MWO, D&D and CC&AT -- with the first four developing short-term applied robotics. An RTDP Five-Year Plan was developed for organizing the Program to meet the needs in these application areas.

  4. Computer Technology for Industry.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Aviation/Space, 1982

    1982-01-01

    A special National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) service is contributing to national productivity by providing industry with reusable, low-cost, government-developed computer programs. Located at the University of Georgia, NASA's Computer Software Management and Information Center (COSMIC) has developed programs for equipment…

  5. Risk assessment for the Waste Technologies Industries (WTI) hazardous waste incinerator facility (east Liverpool, Ohio). Volume 1. Executive summary. Draft report

    SciTech Connect

    1995-11-01

    This report constitutes a comprehensive site-specific risk assessment for the WTI incineration facility located in East Liverpool, OH. Volume I is a description of the components and methodologies used in the risk assessment and provides a summary of the major results from the three components of the assessment.

  6. Innovative Technology Development Program. Final summary report

    SciTech Connect

    Beller, J.

    1995-08-01

    Through the Office of Technology Development (OTD), the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) has initiated a national applied research, development, demonstration, testing, and evaluation program, whose goal has been to resolve the major technical issues and rapidly advance technologies for environmental restoration and waste management. The Innovative Technology Development (ITD) Program was established as a part of the DOE, Research, Development, Demonstration, Testing, and Evaluation (RDDT&E) Program. The plan is part of the DOE`s program to restore sites impacted by weapons production and to upgrade future waste management operations. On July 10, 1990, DOE issued a Program Research and Development Announcement (PRDA) through the Idaho Operations Office to solicit private sector help in developing innovative technologies to support DOE`s clean-up goals. This report presents summaries of each of the seven projects, which developed and tested the technologies proposed by the seven private contractors selected through the PRDA process.

  7. Space industrialization. Volume 1: Executive summary

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1978-01-01

    Potential goals for space industrialization were identified, and evolutionary program options for the realization of those goals were developed and assessed. Program support demands were defined, and recommendations were made in relation to program implementation.

  8. Research Projects in Industrial Technology.

    SciTech Connect

    United States. Bonneville Power Administration. Industrial Technology Section.

    1990-06-01

    The purpose of this booklet is to briefly describe ongoing and completed projects being carried out by Bonneville Power Administration's (BPA) Industrial Technology Section. In the Pacific Northwest, the industrial sector is the largest of the four consuming sectors. It accounted for thirty-nine percent of the total firm demand in the region in 1987. It is not easy to asses the conservation potential in the industrial sector. Recognizing this, the Northwest Power Planning Council established an objective to gain information on the size, cost, and availability of the conservation resource in the industrial sector, as well as other sectors, in its 1986 Power Plan. Specifically, the Council recommended that BPA operate a research and development program in conjunction with industry to determine the potential costs and savings from efficiency improvements in industrial processes which apply to a wide array of industrial firms.'' The section, composed of multidisciplinary engineers, provides technical support to the Industrial Programs Branch by designing and carrying out research relating to energy conservation in the industrial sector. The projects contained in this booklet are arranged by sector --industrial, utility, and agricultural -- and, within each sector, chronologically from ongoing to completed, with those projects completed most recently falling first. For each project the following information is given: its objective approach, key findings, cost, and contact person. Completed projects also include the date of completion, a report title, and report number.

  9. Idaho Operations Office: Technology summary, June 1994

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1994-06-01

    This document has been prepared by the Department of Energy`s (DOE) Environmental Management (EM) Office of Technology Development (OTD) in order to highlight research, development, demonstration, testing, and evaluation (RDDT&E) activities funded through the Idaho Operations Office. Technologies and processes described have the potential to enhance DOE`s cleanup and waste management efforts, as well as improve US industry`s competitiveness in global environmental markets. OTD programs are designed to make new, innovative, and more cost-effective technologies available for transfer to DOE environmental restoration and waste management end-users. Projects are demonstrated, tested, and evaluated to produce solutions to current problems. Transition of technologies into more advanced stages of development is based upon technological, regulatory, economic, and institutional criteria. New technologies are made available for use in eliminating radioactive, hazardous, and other wastes in compliance with regulatory mandates. The primary goal is to protect human health and prevent further contamination. OTD`s technology development programs address three major problem areas: (1) groundwater and soils cleanup; (2) waste retrieval and processing; and (3) pollution prevention. These problems are not unique to DOE, but are associated with other Federal agency and industry sites as well. Thus, technical solutions developed within OTD programs will benefit DOE, and should have direct applications in outside markets.

  10. SDI and industrial technology policy

    SciTech Connect

    Zegveld, W.; Enzing, C.

    1987-01-01

    The author's central thesis is that the Strategic Defense Initiative (SDI) program contains strong elements of industrial technology policy. They approach this thesis from the perspective of the role of government in the development of science and technology and from insight in the processes of technological innovation. They also investigate the issue of the economic consequences of simulating scientific and technological development via the military route. The study is structured in three parts. Part I discusses the SDI program, its origin, content, size, and prospects. Part II focusses on the role of government in technological development on the (meso) process of technological innovation. Part III focusses on the process of technological innovation and the economic significance of military R and D-spending.

  11. Buried Waste Integrated Demonstration. Technology summary

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1994-03-01

    The Buried Waste Integrated Demonstration (BWID) supports the applied research, development, demonstration, and evaluation of a suite of advanced technologies that offer promising solutions to the problems associated with the remediation of buried waste. BWID addresses the difficult remediation problems associated with DOE complex-wide buried waste, particularly transuranic (TRU) contaminated buried waste. BWID has implemented a systems approach to the development and demonstration of technologies that will characterize, retrieve, treat, and dispose of DOE buried wastes. This approach encompasses the entire remediation process from characterization to post-monitoring. The development and demonstration of the technology is predicated on how a technology fits into the total remediation process. To address all of these technological issues, BWID has enlisted scientific expertise of individuals and groups from within the DOE Complex, as well as experts from universities and private industry. The BWID mission is to support development and demonstration of a suite of technologies that, when integrated with commercially-available technologies, forms a comprehensive, remediation system for the effective and efficient remediation of buried waste throughout the DOE Complex. BWID will evaluate and validate demonstrated technologies and transfer this information and equipment to private industry to support the Office of Environmental Restoration (ER), Office of Waste Management (WM), and Office of Facility Transition (FT) remediation planning and implementation activities.

  12. The Rationale for Industrial Technology/Industrial Arts in Texas.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Texas Education Agency, Austin.

    The goal of industrial technology for industrial arts education in Texas is the education of society to enable its members to function efficiently in the world of advancing technology. Policymakers in Texas have chosen to organize the industrial technology curriculum around three technology clusters: visual communication, production, and energy…

  13. Technology and Soviet energy availability: Summary

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    1981-11-01

    The course Soviet energy production will take if present policies in the West and the USSR remain unchanged is investigated. Opportunities and problems in the five primary Soviet energy industries: oil, gas, coal, nuclear, and electric power; equipment and technology requirements; and the implications of providing or withholding assistance are addressed.

  14. Advanced Industrial Materials (AIM) program. Compilation of project summaries and significant accomplishments FY 1996

    SciTech Connect

    1997-04-01

    In many ways, the Advanced Industrial Materials (AIM) Program underwent a major transformation in Fiscal Year 1995 and these changes have continued to the present. When the Program was established in 1990 as the Advanced Industrial Concepts (AIC) Materials Program, the mission was to conduct applied research and development to bring materials and processing technologies from the knowledge derived from basic research to the maturity required for the end use sectors for commercialization. In 1995, the Office of Industrial Technologies (OIT) made radical changes in structure and procedures. All technology development was directed toward the seven {open_quotes}Vision Industries{close_quotes} that use about 80% of industrial energy and generated about 90% of industrial wastes. These are: (1) Aluminum; (2) Chemical; (3) Forest Products; (4) Glass; (5) Metal Casting; (6) Refineries; and (7) Steel. This report is a compilation of project summaries and significant accomplishments on materials.

  15. OAST Technology for the Future. Executive Summary

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1988-01-01

    NASA's Office of Aeronautics and Space Technology (OAST) conducted a workshop on the In-Space Technology Experiments Program (IN-STEP) December 6-9, 1988, in Atlanta, Georgia. The purpose of this workshop was to identify and prioritize space technologies which are critical for future national space programs and which require validation in the space environment. A secondary objective was to review the current NASA (In-Reach) and Industry/University (Out-Reach) experiments. Finally, the aerospace community was requested to review and comment on the proposed plans for the continuation of the In-Space Technology Experiments Program. In particular, the review included the proposed process for focusing the next experiment selection on specific, critical technologies and the process for implementing the hardware development and integration on the Space Shuttle vehicle. The product of the workshop was a prioritized listing of the critical space technology needs in each of eight technology disciplines. These listings were the cumulative recommendations of nearly 400 participants, which included researchers, technologists, and managers from aerospace industries, universities, and government organizations.

  16. Industrial Arts Education Competency Catalogs for Metals Technology, Woods Technology, General Industrial Arts, Industrial Crafts.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Old Dominion Univ., Norfolk, VA. Dept. of Industrial Arts Education.

    Four competency catalogs of tasks for industrial arts programs are presented. These include catalogs in Metals Technology, Woods Technology, General Industrial Arts, and Industrial Crafts. The purpose of each catalog is to establish a basis for program content selection and criterion levels from which one may measure to see if individual learners…

  17. Ceramic Technology Project database: September 1990 summary report

    SciTech Connect

    Keyes, B.L.P.

    1992-06-01

    Data generated within the Ceramic Technology Project (CTP) represent a valuable resource for both research and industry. The CTP database was created to provide easy access to this information in electronic and hardcopy forms by using a computerized database and by issuing periodic hardcopy reports on the database contents. This report is the sixth in a series of semiannual database summaries and covers recent additions to the database, including joined brazed specimen test data. It covers 1 SiC, 34 SiN, 10 whisker-reinforced SiN, 2 zirconia-toughened aluminas, 8 zirconias, and 34 joints.

  18. Summary of solar energy technology characterizations

    SciTech Connect

    D'Alessio, Dr., Gregory J.; Blaunstein, Dr., Robert R.

    1980-09-01

    This report summarizes the design, operating, energy, environmental, and economic characteristics of 38 model solar systems used in the Technology Assessment of Solar Energy Systems Project including solar heating and cooling of buildings, agricultural and industrial process heat, solar electric conversion, and industrial biomass systems. The generic systems designs utilized in this report were based on systems studies and mission analyses performed by the DOE National Laboratories and the MITRE Corporation. The purpose of those studies were to formulate materials and engineering cost data and performance data of solar equipment once mass produced.

  19. Low-G fluid behavior technology summaries

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stark, J. A.; Bradshaw, R. D.; Blatt, M. H.

    1974-01-01

    This report presents a summarization and categorization of the pertinent literature associated with low-g fluid behavior technology. Initially a literature search was conducted to obtain pertinent documents for review. Reports determined to be of primary significance are summarized in detail. Each summary, where applicable, consists of; (1) report identification, (2) objective(s) of the work, (3) description of pertinent work performed, (4) major results, and (5) comments of the reviewer (GD/C). Pertinent figures are presented on a single facing page separate from the text. Specific areas covered are; interface configuration, interface stability, natural frequency and damping, liquid reorientation, bubbles and droplets, fluid inflow, fluid outflow, convection, boiling and condensation heat transfer, venting effects, and fluid properties. Reports which were reviewed and not summarized, along with reasons for not summarizing, are also listed. Cryogenic thermal control and fluid management systems technology are presented.

  20. The Western Environmental Technology Office (WETO), Butte, Montana, technology summary

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1994-09-01

    This document has been prepared by the DOE Environmental Management (EM) Office of Technology Development (OTD) to highlight its research, development, demonstration, testing, and evaluation activities funded through the Western Environmental Technology Office (WETO) in Butte, Montana. Technologies and processes described have the potential to enhance DOE`s cleanup and waste management efforts, as well as improve US industry`s competitiveness in global environmental markets. WETO`s environmental technology research and testing activities focus on the recovery of useable resources from waste. Environmental technology development and commercialization activities will focus on mine cleanup, waste treatment, resource recovery, and water resource management. Since the site has no record of radioactive material use and no history of environmental contamination/remediation activities, DOE-EM can concentrate on performing developmental and demonstration activities without the demands of regulatory requirements and schedules. Thus, WETO will serve as a national resource for the development of new and innovative environmental technologies.

  1. NASA/industry advanced turboprop technology program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ziemianski, Joseph A.; Whitlow, John B., Jr.

    1988-01-01

    Experimental and analytical effort shows that use of advanced turboprop (propfan) propulsion instead of conventional turbofans in the older narrow-body airline fleet could reduce fuel consumption for this type of aircraft by up to 50 percent. The NASA Advanced Turboprop (ATP) program was formulated to address the key technologies required for these thin, swept-blade propeller concepts. A NASA, industry, and university team was assembled to develop and validate applicable design codes and prove by ground and flight test the viability of these propeller concepts. Some of the history of the ATP Project, an overview of some of the issues, and a summary of the technology developed to make advanced propellers viable in the high-subsonic cruise speed application are presented. The ATP program was awarded the prestigious Robert J. Collier Trophy for the greatest achievement in aeronautics and astronautics in America in 1987.

  2. NASA/industry advanced turboprop technology program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ziemianski, Joseph A.; Whitlow, John B., Jr.

    1988-01-01

    Experimental and analytical effort shows that use of advanced turboprop (propfan) propulsion instead of conventional turbofans in the older narrow-body airline fleet could reduce fuel consumption for this type of aircraft by up to 50 percent. The NASA Advanced Turboprop (ATP) program was formulated to address the key technologies required for these thin, swept-blade propeller concepts. A NASA, industry, and university team was assembled to develop and validate applicable design codes and prove by ground and flight test the viability of these propeller concepts. Some of the history of the ATP project, an overview of some of the issues, and a summary of the technology developed to make advanced propellers viable in the high-subsonic cruise speed application are presented. The ATP program was awarded the prestigious Robert J. Collier Trophy for the greatest achievement in aeronautics and astronautics in America in 1987.

  3. Satellite communications systems and technology. Executive Summary

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Edelson, Burton I.; Pelton, Joseph N.; Bostian, Charles W.; Brandon, William T.; Chan, Vincent W. S.; Hager, E. Paul; Helm, Neil R.; Jennings, Raymond D.; Kwan, Robert; Mahle, Christoph E.

    1993-01-01

    NASA and the National Science Foundation (NSF) commissioned a panel of US experts to study the international status of satellite communications systems and technology. The study covers emerging systems concepts, applications, services, and the attendant technologies. The panel members travelled to Europe, Japan, and Russia to gather information first-hand. They visited 17 sites in Europe, 20 sites in Japan, and four in Russia. These included major manufacturers, government organizations, service providers, and associated R&D facilities. The panel's report was reviewed by the sites visited, by the panel, and by representatives of US industry. The report details the information collected and compares it to US activities.

  4. Information Technology Assessment Study: Executive Summary

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Peterson, John (Editor)

    2002-01-01

    A team was formed to assess NASA Office of Space Science (OSS) information technology research and development activities. These activities were reviewed for their relevance to OSS missions, for their potential for using products better supplied by industry or other government agencies, and for recommending an IT infusion strategy for appropriate products for OSS missions. Assessment scope and methodology and the findings and recommendations of OSS IT users and providers are presented.

  5. Raman probe. Innovative technology summary report

    SciTech Connect

    1999-07-01

    The Raman probe is deployed in high-level waste tanks with the cone penetrometer (CPT). These technologies are engineered and optimized to work together. All of the hardware is radiation hardened, designed for and tested in the high-radiation, highly caustic chemical environment of US Department of Energy`s (DOE`s) waste storage tanks. When deployed in tanks, the system is useful for rapidly assessing the species and concentrations of organic-bearing tank wastes. The CPT was originally developed for geological and groundwater applications, with sensors that measure physical parameters such as soil moisture, temperature, and pH. When deployed, it is hydraulically forced directly into the ground rather than using boring techniques utilized by rotary drilling systems. There is a separate Innovative Technology Summary Report for the CPT, so this report will focus on the changes made specifically to support the Raman probe. The most significant changes involve adapting the Raman probe for in-tank and subsurface field use and developing meaningful real-time data analysis. Testing of the complete LLNL system was conducted in a hot cell in the 222-S Laboratory at the Hanford site in summer 1997. Both instruments were tested in situ on solvent-contaminated soils (TCE and PCE) at the Savannah River Site in February and June 1998. This report describes the technology, its performance, its uses, cost, regulatory and policy issues, and lessons learned.

  6. Industrial Technology Programs: The Influence of Industry on Program Revision.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kozak, Michael R.; Richards, John V.

    1981-01-01

    Presents data collected concerning concepts and skills which should be emphasized in the general academic curriculum and in the industrial technology curriculum, recommended minor fields of study for industrial technology majors, characteristics of successful employees, and present and future professional industrial employment needs in the…

  7. Energy Technology Division research summary - 1999.

    SciTech Connect

    1999-03-31

    The Energy Technology Division provides materials and engineering technology support to a wide range of programs important to the US Department of Energy. As shown on the preceding page, the Division is organized into ten sections, five with concentrations in the materials area and five in engineering technology. Materials expertise includes fabrication, mechanical properties, corrosion, friction and lubrication, and irradiation effects. Our major engineering strengths are in heat and mass flow, sensors and instrumentation, nondestructive testing, transportation, and electromechanics and superconductivity applications. The Division Safety Coordinator, Environmental Compliance Officers, Quality Assurance Representative, Financial Administrator, and Communication Coordinator report directly to the Division Director. The Division Director is personally responsible for cultural diversity and is a member of the Laboratory-wide Cultural Diversity Advisory Committee. The Division's capabilities are generally applied to issues associated with energy production, transportation, utilization, or conservation, or with environmental issues linked to energy. As shown in the organization chart on the next page, the Division reports administratively to the Associate Laboratory Director (ALD) for Energy and Environmental Science and Technology (EEST) through the General Manager for Environmental and Industrial Technologies. While most of our programs are under the purview of the EEST ALD, we also have had programs funded under every one of the ALDs. Some of our research in superconductivity is funded through the Physical Research Program ALD. We also continue to work on a number of nuclear-energy-related programs under the ALD for Engineering Research. Detailed descriptions of our programs on a section-by-section basis are provided in the remainder of this book.

  8. Assessment of US industry's technology trends and new technology requirements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1984-01-01

    The utility and effectiveness of a novel approach (the Applications Development, or AD approach), intended to augment the efficiency of NASA's technology utilization (TU) through dissemination of NASA technologies and joint technology development efforts with U.S. industry is tested. The innovative AD approach consists of the following key elements: selection of NASA technologies appearing to have leading edge attributes; interaction with NASA researchers to assess the characteristics and quality of each selected technology; identification of industry's needs in the selected technology areas; structuring the selected technologies in terms of specifications and standards familiar to industry (industrial Spec. Sheets); identification and assessment of industry's interest in the specific selected NASA technologies, utilizing the greatly facilitated communication made possible by the availability of the industrial Spec. Sheets; and matching selected NASA technologies with the needs of selected industries.

  9. Industrial ecology at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory summary statement

    SciTech Connect

    Gilmartin, T.J.

    1996-06-04

    At Livermore our hope and our intention is to make important contributions to global sustainability by basing both our scientific and technological research and our business practices on the principles of industrial ecology. Current efforts in the following fields are documented: global security, global ecology, energy for transportation, fusion energy, materials sciences, environmental technology, and bioscience.

  10. The Extreme-Technology Industry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hoefflinger, Bernd

    The persistent annual R&D quota of >15% of revenue in the semiconductor industry has been and continues to be more than twice as high as the OECD definition for High-Technology Industry. At the frontiers of miniaturization, the Cost-of-Ownership (COO) continues to rise upwards to beyond 10 billion for a Gigafactory. Only leaders in the world market for selected processors and memories or for foundry services can afford this. Others can succeed with high-value custom products equipped with high-performance application-specific standard products acquired from the leaders in their specific fields or as fabless original-device manufacturers buying wafers from top foundries and packaging/testing from contract manufacturers, thus eliminating the fixed cost for a factory. An overview is offered on the leaders in these different business models. In view of the coming highly diversified and heterogeneous world of nanoelectronic-systems competence, the point is made for global networks of manufacturing and services with the highest standards for product quality and liability.

  11. Energy Technology Division research summary 1997.

    SciTech Connect

    1997-10-21

    The Energy Technology Division provides materials and engineering technology support to a wide range of programs important to the US Department of Energy. As shown on the preceding page, the Division is organized into ten sections, five with concentrations in the materials area and five in engineering technology. Materials expertise includes fabrication, mechanical properties, corrosion, friction and lubrication, and irradiation effects. Our major engineering strengths are in heat and mass flow, sensors and instrumentation, nondestructive testing, transportation, and electromechanics and superconductivity applications. The Division Safety Coordinator, Environmental Compliance Officers, Quality Assurance Representative, Financial Administrator, and Communication Coordinator report directly to the Division Director. The Division Director is personally responsible for cultural diversity and is a member of the Laboratory-wide Cultural Diversity Advisory Committee. The Division's capabilities are generally applied to issues associated with energy production, transportation, utilization or conservation, or with environmental issues linked to energy. As shown in the organization chart on the next page, the Division reports administratively to the Associate Laboratory Director (ALD) for Energy and Environmental Science and Technology (EEST) through the General Manager for Environmental and Industrial Technologies. While most of our programs are under the purview of the EEST ALD, we also have had programs funded under every one of the ALDs. Some of our research in superconductivity is funded through the Physical Research Program ALD. We also continue to work on a number of nuclear-energy-related programs under the ALD for Engineering Research. Detailed descriptions of our programs on a section-by-section basis are provided in the remainder of this book. This Overview highlights some major trends. Research related to the operational safety of commercial light water nuclear

  12. Industrial Technology. It's an Exciting World!

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Missouri State Dept. of Elementary and Secondary Education, Jefferson City.

    This booklet provides information on industrial technology education (ITE) in Missouri. It describes the challenges to society of changing technology and Missouri's response. It addresses ITE's mission to develop the following in each student: (1) ability to understand, evaluate, and apply industrial and technological systems; (2) values and…

  13. High-Technology Industries through Entrepreneurial Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Parikh, V. M.

    This report examines a study to promote high-technology industries in British Columbia using an essentially integrated educational and economic development program. Human resources, skilled in high-technology and entrepreneurship, are recognized as prime sources of potential development of high-technology industries in the Province. An educational…

  14. Buckminster Fuller Reflects on Industry and Technology.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Estrem, William A.

    1983-01-01

    Fuller offers insights into the meanings of industry and technology and how they have acquired undeserved connotations. He examines capitalism, enterprise, and integrity as exemplified by Henry Ford and the consequences of the current lack of integrity in industry. (SK)

  15. Concrete shaver. Innovative technology summary report

    SciTech Connect

    1998-12-01

    The US Department of Energy (DOE) is in the process of decontamination and decommissioning (D and D) for many of its nuclear facilities throughout the United States. These facilities must be dismantled and the demolition waste sized into manageable pieces for handling and disposal. The facilities undergoing D and D are typically chemically and/or radiologically contaminated. To facilitate this work, DOE requires a tool capable of removing the surface of radiologically contaminated concrete floors. Operating requirements for the tool include simple and economical operation, the capability of operating in ambient temperatures from 3 C to 40 C (37 F to 104 F), and the ability to be easily decontaminated. The tool also must be safe for workers. The Marcrist Industries Limited concrete shaver is an electrically driven, self-propelled concrete and coating removal system. This technology consists of a 25-cm (10-in.)-wide diamond impregnated shaving drum powered by an electric motor and contains a vacuum port for dust extraction. The concrete shaver is ideal for use on open, flat, floor areas. The shaver may also be used on slightly curved surfaces. This shaver is self-propelled and produces a smooth, even surface with little vibration. The concrete shaver is an attractive alternative to traditional pneumatic scabbling tools, which were considered the baseline in this demonstration. The use of this tool reduces worker fatigue (compared to the baseline) due to lower vibration. The shaver is more than five times faster than the five-piston pneumatic scabbler at removing contamination from concrete. Because of this increased productivity, the shaver is 50% less costly to operate than baseline technologies. The DOE has successfully demonstrated the concrete shaver for decontaminating floors for free-release surveys prior to demolition work.

  16. The Western Environmental Technology Office (WETO), Butte, Montana. Technology summary

    SciTech Connect

    1996-03-01

    The Western Environmental Technology Office (WETO) is a multi-purpose engineering test facility located in Butte, Montana, and is managed by MSE, Inc. WETO seeks to contribute to environmental research by emphasizing projects to develop heavy metals removal and recovery processes, thermal vitrification systems, and waste minimization/pollution prevention technologies. WETO`s environmental technology research and testing activities focus on the recovery of usable resources from waste. In one of WETO`s areas of focus, groundwater contamination, water from the Berkeley Pit, located near the WETO site, is being used in demonstrations directed toward the recovery of potable water and metal from the heavy metal-bearing water. The Berkeley Pit is part of an inactive copper mine near Butte that was once part of the nation`s largest open-pit mining operation. The Pit contains approximately 25 billion gallons of Berkeley Pit groundwater and surface water containing many dissolved minerals. As part of DOE/OST`s Resource Recovery Project (RRP), technologies are being demonstrated to not only clean the contaminated water but to recover metal values such as copper, zinc, and iron with an estimated gross value of more than $100 million. When recovered, the Berkeley Pit waters could benefit the entire Butte valley with new water resources for fisheries, irrigation, municipal, and industrial use. At WETO, the emphasis is on environmental technology development and commercialization activities, which will focus on mine cleanup, waste treatment, resource recovery, and water resource management.

  17. NASA Remediation Technology Collaboration Development Task, Overview and Project Summaries

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Romeo, James G.

    2014-01-01

    An overview presentation of NASA's Remediation Technology Collaboration Development Task including the following project summaries: in situ groundwater monitor, in situ chemical oxidation, in situ bioremediation, horizontal multi-port well, and high resolution site characterization.

  18. ANNUAL SUMMARY OF TECHNICAL AWARENESS IN THE NONFERROUS METALS INDUSTRY

    EPA Science Inventory

    The goal of this project was to pilot and refine methods and procedures for maintaining current awareness of technology and commercial trends in the U.S. nonferrous metal mining and manufacturing industry. The principal effort resulted in the publication of six bimonthly technica...

  19. TECHNOLOGY SUMMARY ADVANCING TANK WASTE RETREIVAL AND PROCESSING

    SciTech Connect

    SAMS TL

    2010-07-07

    This technology overview provides a high-level summary of technologies being investigated and developed by Washington River Protection Solutions (WRPS) to advance Hanford Site tank waste retrieval and processing. Technology solutions are outlined, along with processes and priorities for selecting and developing them.

  20. TECHNOLOGY SUMMARY ADVANCING TANK WASTE RETRIEVAL AND PROCESSING

    SciTech Connect

    SAMS TL; MENDOZA RE

    2010-08-11

    This technology overview provides a high-level summary of technologies being investigated and developed by Washington River Protection Solutions (WRPS) to advance Hanford Site tank waste retrieval and processing. Technology solutions are outlined, along with processes and priorities for selecting and developing them.

  1. Industrial Maintenance Technology. Technical Committee Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Idaho State Dept. of Education, Boise. Div. of Vocational Education.

    This Technical Committee Report prepared by industry representatives in Idaho lists the skills currently necessary for an employee in that state to obtain a job in industrial maintenance technology, retain a job once hired, and advance in that occupational field. (Task lists are grouped according to duty areas generally used in industry settings,…

  2. Technology Roadmap for the Petroleum Industry

    SciTech Connect

    none,

    2000-02-01

    The petroleum refining industry defined a detailed R&D roadmap, Technology Roadmap for the Petroleum Industry, to identify high-priority areas for technology R&D. Those priorities helped ITP target cost-shared solicitations and guide development of a balanced R&D portfolio to yield useful results in the near, mid, and long-term.

  3. EPA's Technology Transfer: Now Geared to Industry

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Environmental Science and Technology, 1973

    1973-01-01

    Through capsule reports, seminars, and design manuals, Environmental Protection Agency has activated its industrial technology transfer program for marketing the products of federal research, development, and demonstration activities. Its purpose is to disseminate information to industry on available technology for control and treatment of air,…

  4. The Dairy Technology System in Venezuela. Summary of Research 79.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nieto, Ruben D.; Henderson, Janet L.

    A study examined the agricultural technology system in Venezuela with emphasis on the dairy industry. An analytical framework was used to identify the strengths and weaknesses of the following components of Venezuela's agricultural technology system: policy, technology development, technology transfer, and technology use. Selected government…

  5. Oakland Operations Office, Oakland, California: Technology summary

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1994-11-01

    DOE`s Office of Technology Development manages an aggressive national program for applied research, development, demonstration, testing, and evaluation. This program develops high, payoff technologies to clean up the inventory of DOE nuclear component manufacturing sites and to manage DOE-generated waste faster, safer, and cheaper than current environmental cleanup technologies. OTD programs are designed to make new, innovative, and more effective technologies available for transfer to users through progressive development. Projects are demonstrated, tested, and evaluated to produce solutions to current problems. Transition of technologies into more advanced stages of development is based upon technological, regulatory, economic, and institutional criteria. New technologies are made available for use in eliminating radioactive, hazardous, and other wastes in compliance with regulatory mandates. The primary goal is to protect human health and prevent further contamination. OTD technologies address three specific problem areas: (1) groundwater and soils cleanup; (2) waste retrieval and processing; and (3) pollution prevention.

  6. How a utility markets technology to industry

    SciTech Connect

    Kaczor, E.M.

    1986-03-01

    In response to economic contractions in its service area, Niagara Mohawk Power Company has instituted a technology transfer program for its industrial customers. The underlying motivation has been to maintain its industrial customers, as they provide a more substantial base to the economy than do service sector jobs. The program consists mainly of specialized seminars aimed at increasing industry's competitiveness by improving production efficiency. In addition, technical information is directly delivered to specific target industries.

  7. Industrial Technology Orientation Curriculum Guide.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Illinois State Board of Education, Springfield. Dept. of Adult, Vocational and Technical Education.

    The four courses in this guide were designed to meet the specifications for the career orientation level of Illinois' Education for Employment Curriculum Model. These orientation-level courses can be taken by high school students in any sequence: (1) communication technology; (2) energy utilization technology; (3) production technology; and (4)…

  8. OSMA Research and Technology Strategy Team Summary

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wetherholt, Martha

    2010-01-01

    This slide presentation reviews the work of the Office of Safety and Mission Assurance (OSMA), and the OSMA Research and Technology Strategy (ORTS) team. There is discussion of the charter of the team, Technology Readiness Levels (TRLs) and how the teams responsibilities are related to these TRLs. In order to improve the safety of all levels of the development through the TRL phases, improved communication, understanding and cooperation is required at all levels, particularly at the mid level technologies development.

  9. The future steelmaking industry and its technologies

    SciTech Connect

    Fruehan, R.J.; Paxton, H.W.; Giarratani, F.; Lave, L. |

    1995-01-01

    The objective of this report is to develop a vision of the future steelmaking industry including its general characteristics and technologies. In addition, the technical obstacles and research and development opportunities for commercialization of these technologies are identified. The report is being prepared by the Sloan Steel Industry Competitiveness Study with extensive input from the industry. Industry input has been through AISI (American Iron and Steel Institute), SMA (Steel Manufacturers Association) and contacts with individual company executives and technical leaders. The report identifies the major industry drivers which will influence technological developments in the industry for the next 5--25 years. Initially, the role of past drivers in shaping the current industry was examined to help understand the future developments. Whereas this report concentrates on future technologies other major factors such as national and international competition, human resource management and capital concerns are examined to determine their influence on the future industry. The future industry vision does not specify specific technologies but rather their general characteristics. Finally, the technical obstacles and the corresponding research and development required for commercialization are detailed.

  10. Oak Ridge National Laboratory Technology Logic Diagram. Executive Summary

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1993-06-30

    This executive summary contains a description of the logic diagram format; some examples from the diagram (Vol. 2) and associated technology evaluation data sheets (Vol. 3); a complete (albeit condensed) listing of the RA, D&D, and WM problems at ORNL; and a complete listing of the technology rankings for all the areas covered by the diagram.

  11. 2015 Summary Report on Industrial and Regulatory Engagement Activities

    SciTech Connect

    Thomas, Kenneth David

    2015-09-01

    The Advanced Instrumentation, Information, and Control (II&C) Systems Technologies pathway of the Light Water Reactor Sustainability(LWRS) Program conducts a vigorous engagement strategy with the U.S. nuclear power industry, including the nuclear operating companies, major support organizations, the Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC), and suppliers. The goal of this engagement strategy is to develop a shared vision and common understanding across the nuclear industry of the need for II&C modernization, the performance improvement that can be obtained, and the opportunities for collaboration to enact this vision. The primary means of engaging the nuclear operating companies is through a Utility Working Group (UWG), composed of utility representatives that participate in formal meetings and bi-monthly phone calls to provide input on nuclear plant needs and priorities for II&C technologies. Two working groups were initiated during FY 2015 to provide a means for UWG members to focus on particular technologies of interest. The Outage Improvement Working Group consists of eight utilities that participate in periodic conference calls and have access to a share-point web page for acccess to project materials developed in the Advanced Outage Control Center pilot project. In the area of computer-based procedures and automated work packages, the II&C Pathway has worked with the Nuclear Information Technology Strategic Leadership (NITSL) to set up a monthly conference call with interested utility members to discuss various aspects of mobile worker technologies. Twenty one technical and project reports were delivered to the UWG during FY 2015, reflecting the work of the II&C Pathway pilot projects during the year. Distribution of these reports is one of the primary means of transferring to the nuclear industry the knowledge and experience gained during the development of advanced II&C technologies in support of LWR sustainability. Site visits to discuss pilot project

  12. Industrial Arts Curriculum Guide for Power Technology.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Connecticut State Dept. of Education, Hartford. Div. of Vocational Education.

    This curriculum guide provides topic outlines and objectives for units in a three-level/-course Power Technology program. Introductory materials are objectives for industrial education and for power technology and list of general safety rules. Units contained in Level I, Power Technology, are History of Power, Basic Machines, Forms of Power, Power…

  13. ENVIRONMENTAL REGULATIONS AND TECHNOLOGY - THE ELECTROPLATING INDUSTRY

    EPA Science Inventory

    This 44-page Technology Transfer Environmental Regulations and Technology publication is an update of a 1980 EPA publication that has been revised to reflect changes in the EPA regulations, as well as in the pollution control technologies that affect the electroplating industry. ...

  14. Savannah River Site Patented Technologies Summaries

    SciTech Connect

    Rabold, D.E.

    1995-07-18

    This information represents SRS`s contribution of the DOE technology information network, an internet service coordinated out of Los Alamos. The information provided is strictly DOE-SR-titled and-issued patented technologies including environmental remediation, robotics, sensors, materials science, biomedical applications, hydrogen, and consumer products.

  15. Machine Tool Advanced Skills Technology (MAST). Common Ground: Toward a Standards-Based Training System for the U.S. Machine Tool and Metal Related Industries. Volume 1: Executive Summary, of a 15-Volume Set of Skills Standards and Curriculum Training Materials for the Precision Manufacturing Industry.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Texas State Technical Coll., Waco.

    The Machine Tool Advanced Skills Technology (MAST) consortium was formed to address the shortage of skilled workers for the machine tools and metals-related industries. Featuring six of the nation's leading advanced technology centers, the MAST consortium developed, tested, and disseminated industry-specific skill standards and model curricula for…

  16. The Office of Industrial Technologies technical reports

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1992-01-01

    The US Department of Energy's Office of Industrial Technologies (OIT) conducts R D activities which focus on the objectives of improving energy efficiency and providing for fuel flexibility within US industry in the area of industrial energy conservation. The Office also conducts programs to reduce waste generation, increase recycling efforts, and improve the use of wastes as process feedstocks. An active program of technology transfer and education supports these activities and encourages adoption of new technologies. To accomplish these objectives OIT cooperates with the private sector to identify its technological needs and to share R D efforts. R D is conducted to the point that a new technology is shown to work and that it can be transferred to the private sector end-users. This bibliography contains information on all scientific and technical reports sponsored by the DOE Industrial Energy Conservation Program during the years 1988--1990.

  17. Flameless thermal oxidation. Innovative technology summary report

    SciTech Connect

    1995-09-01

    The Flameless Thermal Oxidizer (FTO) is a commercial technology offered by Thermatrix, Inc. The FTO has been demonstrated to be an effective destructive technology for process and waste stream off-gas treatment of volatile organic compounds (VOCs), and in the treatment of VOC and chlorinated volatile organic compounds (CVOCs) off-gases generated during site remediation using either baseline or innovative in situ environmental technologies. The FTO process efficiently converts VOCs and CVOCs to carbon dioxide, water, and hydrogen chloride. When FTO is coupled with a baseline technology, such as soil vapor extraction (SVE), an efficient in situ soil remediation system is produced. The innovation is in using a simple, reliable, scalable, and robust technology for the destruction of VOC and CVOC off-gases based on a design that generates a uniform thermal reaction zone that prevents flame propagation and efficiently oxidizes off-gases without forming products of incomplete combustion (PICs).

  18. Flameless Thermal Oxidation. Innovative Technology Summary Report

    SciTech Connect

    1995-09-01

    The Flameless Thermal Oxidizer (FTO) is a commercial technology offered by Thermatrix, Inc. The FTO has been demonstrated to be an effective destructive technology for process and waste stream off-gas treatment of volatile organic compounds (VOCs), and in the treatment of VOC and chlorinated volatile organic compounds (CVOCs) off-gases generated during site remediation using either baseline or innovative in situ environmental technologies. The FTO process efficiently converts VOCs and CVOCs to carbon dioxide, water, and hydrogen chloride. When FTO is coupled with a baseline technology, such as soil vapor extraction (SVE), an efficient in situ soil remediation system is produced. The innovation is in using a simple, reliable, scalable, and robust technology for the destruction of VOC and CVOC off-gases based on a design that generates a uniform thermal reaction zone that prevents flame propagation and efficiently oxidizes off-gases without forming products of incomplete combustion (Plcs ).

  19. Proceedings: Outer Planet Probe Technology Workshop, summary volume

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1974-01-01

    A summary report and overview of the Outer Planet Probe Technology Conference are given. Summary data cover: (1) state of the art concerning mission definitions, probe requirements, systems, subsystems, and mission peculiar hardware, (2) mission and equipment trade-offs associated with Saturn/Uranus baseline configuration and the influence of Titan and Jupiter options on mission performance and costs, and (3) identification of critically required future R and D activities.

  20. Centrifugal shot blasting. Innovative technology summary report

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1999-07-01

    At the US Department of Energy (DOE) Fernald Environmental Management Project (FEMP), the Facilities Closure and Demolition Projects Integrated Remedial Design/Remedial Action (RD/RA) work plan calls for the removal of one inch (1 in) depth of concrete surface in areas where contamination with technetium-99 has been identified. This report describes a comparative demonstration between two concrete removal technologies: an innovative system using Centrifugal Shot Blasting (CSB) and a modified baseline technology called a rotary drum planer.

  1. Steam vacuum cleaning. Innovative technology summary report

    SciTech Connect

    1999-05-01

    The US Department of Energy (DOE) continually seeks safer and more cost-effective remediation technologies for use in the decontamination and decommissioning (D and D) of nuclear facilities. The baseline technology currently used for washing debris is a high-pressure water cleaning (HPWC) system. The system used at the FEMP is the Hotsy{reg_sign} Model 550B HPWC. Although the HPWC technology has functioned satisfactorily, improvements are being sought in areas related to reduced liquid waste volume, increased productivity, increased washing effectiveness, and decreased airborne contamination. An innovative technology that offers potential improvements in these areas is a steam vacuum cleaning (SVC) system that integrates high-pressure steam cleaning with a vacuum recovery sub-system that simultaneously collects dislodged contaminants thereby reducing airborne contamination. The SVC system selected for demonstration at the FEMP was the Kelly{trademark} Decontamination System shown. This report provides comparative performance and cost analyses between the Hotsy HPWC system and the Kelly Decontamination System. Both technologies were demonstrated at the FEMP site located at Fernald, Ohio from July 29, 1996 through August 15, 1996. The demonstrations were conducted at the FEMP Plant 1 as part of the LSTD project sponsored by the Deactivation and Decommissioning Focus Area (DDFA) of the US DOE`s Office of Science and Technology.

  2. 2008 Industrial Technologies Market Report, May 2009

    SciTech Connect

    Energetics; DOE

    2009-07-01

    The industrial sector is a critical component of the U.S. economy, providing an array of consumer, transportation, and national defense-related goods we rely on every day. Unlike many other economic sectors, however, the industrial sector must compete globally for raw materials, production, and sales. Though our homes, stores, hospitals, and vehicles are located within our borders, elements of our goods-producing industries could potentially be moved offshore. Keeping U.S. industry competitive is essential to maintaining and growing the U.S. economy. This report begins with an overview of trends in industrial sector energy use. The next section of the report focuses on some of the largest and most energy-intensive industrial subsectors. The report also highlights several emerging technologies that could transform key segments of industry. Finally, the report presents policies, incentives, and drivers that can influence the competitiveness of U.S. industrial firms.

  3. Rocky Flats Compliance Program; Technology summary

    SciTech Connect

    1994-02-01

    The Department of Energy (DOE) established the Office of Technology Development (EM-50) (OTD) as an element of Environmental Restoration and Waste Management (EM) in November 1989. The primary objective of the Office of Technology Development, Rocky Flats Compliance Program (RFCP), is to develop altemative treatment technologies for mixed low-level waste (wastes containing both hazardous and radioactive components) to use in bringing the Rocky Flats Plant (RFP) into compliance with Federal and state regulations and agreements. Approximately 48,000 cubic feet of untreated low-level mixed waste, for which treatment has not been specified, are stored at the RFP. The cleanup of the Rocky Flats site is driven by agreements between DOE, the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA), and the Colorado Department of Health (CDH). Under these agreements, a Comprehensive Treatment and Management Plan (CTMP) was drafted to outline the mechanisms by which RFP will achieve compliance with the regulations and agreements. This document describes DOE`s strategy to treat low-level mixed waste to meet Land Disposal Restrictions and sets specific milestones related to the regulatory aspects of technology development. These milestones detail schedules for the development of technologies to treat all of the mixed wastes at the RFP. Under the Federal Facilities Compliance Act (FFCA), the CTMP has been incorporated into Rocky Flats Plant Conceptual Site Treatment Plan (CSTP). The CSTP will become the Rocky Flats Plant site Treatment Plan in 1995 and will supersede the CTMP.

  4. Mixed Waste Landfill Integrated Demonstration; Technology summary

    SciTech Connect

    1994-02-01

    The mission of the Mixed Waste Landfill Integrated Demonstration (MWLID) is to demonstrate, in contaminated sites, new technologies for clean-up of chemical and mixed waste landfills that are representative of many sites throughout the DOE Complex and the nation. When implemented, these new technologies promise to characterize and remediate the contaminated landfill sites across the country that resulted from past waste disposal practices. Characterization and remediation technologies are aimed at making clean-up less expensive, safer, and more effective than current techniques. This will be done by emphasizing in-situ technologies. Most important, MWLID`s success will be shared with other Federal, state, and local governments, and private companies that face the important task of waste site remediation. MWLID will demonstrate technologies at two existing landfills. Sandia National Laboratories` Chemical Waste Landfill received hazardous (chemical) waste from the Laboratory from 1962 to 1985, and the Mixed-Waste Landfill received hazardous and radioactive wastes (mixed wastes) over a twenty-nine year period (1959-1988) from various Sandia nuclear research programs. Both landfills are now closed. Originally, however, the sites were selected because of Albuquerque`s and climate and the thick layer of alluvial deposits that overlay groundwater approximately 480 feet below the landfills. This thick layer of ``dry`` soils, gravel, and clays promised to be a natural barrier between the landfills and groundwater.

  5. Spotlight on Technology: The New Industrial Revolution.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Suddath, John F.

    1994-01-01

    Describes how an industrial technology teacher teamed with employers and vendors of computer-aided design and manufacturing equipment to set curriculum, create purchasing plans, and get some bargains in the process. (Author)

  6. Industrial Combustion Technology Roadmap: A Technology Roadmap by and for the Industrial Combustion Community (2002)

    SciTech Connect

    none,

    2002-10-01

    The Industrial Technology Program (ITP) convened industry workshops in 2001 to update the 1999 roadmap. The revised plan, in which the combustion industry lays out the R&D initiatives to meet its performance targets for the next 20 years, is presented in the Industrial Combustion Technology Roadmap. This roadmap showcases a comprehensive R&D plan for the industry and specifies the coordination and alignment of key groups, such as industry, academia, and the federal government, to meet the future energy and environmental goals of the industry.

  7. A Partnership Approach to Industrial Technology Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hoops, John; And Others

    This report summarizes and assesses the planning and first-year implementation of the Industrial Technology Program created through a partnership between South Shore Vocational Technical High School (SSVT) in Hanover, Massachusetts, and Procter & Gamble (P&G). It is a guide for the development of effective education/industry partnerships. An…

  8. Emerging energy-efficient industrial technologies

    SciTech Connect

    Martin, N.; Worrell, E.; Ruth, M.; Price, L.; Elliott, R.N.; Shipley, A.M.; Thorne, J.

    2000-10-01

    U.S. industry consumes approximately 37 percent of the nation's energy to produce 24 percent of the nation's GDP. Increasingly, industry is confronted with the challenge of moving toward a cleaner, more sustainable path of production and consumption, while increasing global competitiveness. Technology will be essential for meeting these challenges. At some point, businesses are faced with investment in new capital stock. At this decision point, new and emerging technologies compete for capital investment alongside more established or mature technologies. Understanding the dynamics of the decision-making process is important to perceive what drives technology change and the overall effect on industrial energy use. The assessment of emerging energy-efficient industrial technologies can be useful for: (1) identifying R&D projects; (2) identifying potential technologies for market transformation activities; (3) providing common information on technologies to a broad audience of policy-makers; and (4) offering new insights into technology development and energy efficiency potentials. With the support of PG&E Co., NYSERDA, DOE, EPA, NEEA, and the Iowa Energy Center, staff from LBNL and ACEEE produced this assessment of emerging energy-efficient industrial technologies. The goal was to collect information on a broad array of potentially significant emerging energy-efficient industrial technologies and carefully characterize a sub-group of approximately 50 key technologies. Our use of the term ''emerging'' denotes technologies that are both pre-commercial but near commercialization, and technologies that have already entered the market but have less than 5 percent of current market share. We also have chosen technologies that are energy-efficient (i.e., use less energy than existing technologies and practices to produce the same product), and may have additional ''non-energy benefits.'' These benefits are as important (if not more important in many cases) in influencing

  9. STEM: Science Technology Engineering Mathematics. Executive Summary

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Carnevale, Anthony P.; Smith, Nicole; Melton, Michelle

    2011-01-01

    Science, Technology, Engineering, and Mathematics (STEM) occupations are critical to the nation's continued economic competitiveness because of their direct ties to innovation, economic growth, and productivity, even though they will only be 5 percent of all jobs in the U.S. economy by 2018. The disproportionate influence of STEM raises a…

  10. Aerospace Environmental Technology Conference: Exectutive summary

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Whitaker, A. F. (Editor)

    1995-01-01

    The mandated elimination of CFC's, Halons, TCA, and other ozone depleting chemicals and specific hazardous materials has required changes and new developments in aerospace materials and processes. The aerospace industry has been involved for several years in providing product substitutions, redesigning entire production processes, and developing new materials that minimize or eliminate damage to the environment. These activities emphasize replacement cleaning solvents and their application verifications, compliant coatings including corrosion protection systems, and removal techniques, chemical propulsion effects on the environment, and the initiation of modifications to relevant processing and manufacturing specifications and standards. The papers from this conference are being published in a separate volume as NASA CP-3298.

  11. Industrial Combustion Technology Roadmap: A Technology Roadmap by and for the Industrial Combustion Community (1999)

    SciTech Connect

    none,

    1999-04-01

    Combustion system users and manufacturers joined forces in 1999 to develop the Industrial Combustion Technology Roadmap. The roadmap outlines R&D priorities for developing advanced, highly efficient combustion systems that U.S. industry will require in the future.

  12. Blade Plunging Cutter. Innovative Technology Summary Report

    SciTech Connect

    2001-09-01

    The Los Alamos LSDDP demonstrated a Mega-Tech hydraulic cutting shear to remove legs from plutonium glove boxes. The baseline technology used at LANL for removal of glove box legs is a reciprocating saw. Legs on glove boxes are typically either 3-inch diameter pipe or unistrut. During the demonstration, the Mega-Tech hydraulic cutting shear cut eight pipe legs in 15 minutes, while the reciprocating saw took 45-60 minutes to cut through eight legs, including a rest break to alleviate worker fatigue. Despite its lower production rate, the reciprocating saw may be favored in confined spaces, because it does not require as much access room as the hydraulic shears. Based on the faster production rate of the hydraulic shear, LANL and Rocky Flats are expected to begin using the hydraulic shear as their new baseline technology to remove legs from over 1,500 plutonium glove boxes at the two sites.

  13. Dynamic underground stripping. Innovative technology summary report

    SciTech Connect

    1995-04-01

    Dynamic Underground Stripping (DUS) is a combination of technologies targeted to remediate soil and ground water contaminated with organic compounds. DUS is effective both above and below the water table and is especially well suited for sites with interbedded sand and clay layers. The main technologies comprising DUS are steam injection at the periphery of a contaminated area to heat permeable subsurface areas, vaporize volatile compounds bound to the soil, and drive contaminants to centrally located vacuum extraction wells; electrical heating of less permeable sediments to vaporize contaminants and drive them into the steam zone; and underground imaging such as Electrical Resistance Tomography to delineate heated areas to ensure total cleanup and process control. A full-scale demonstration was conducted on a gasoline spill site at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory in Livermore, California from November 1992 through December 1993.

  14. VOCs in Arid soils: Technology summary

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1994-02-01

    The Volatile Organic Compounds In Arid Soils Integrated Demonstration (VOC-Arid ID) focuses on technologies to clean up volatile organic compounds and associated contaminants in soil and groundwater at arid sites. The initial host site is the 200 West Area at DOE`s Hanford site in southeastern Washington state. The primary VOC contaminant is carbon tetrachloride, in association with heavy metals and radionuclides. An estimated 580--920 metric tons of carbon tetrachloride were disposed of between 1955 and 1973, resulting in extensive soil and groundwater contamination. The VOC-Arid ID schedule has been divided into three phases of implementation. The phased approach provides for: rapid transfer of technologies to the Environmental Restoration (EM-40) programs once demonstrated; logical progression in the complexity of demonstrations based on improved understanding of the VOC problem; and leveraging of the host site EM-40 activities to reduce the overall cost of the demonstrations. During FY92 and FY93, the primary technology demonstrations within the ID were leveraged with an ongoing expedited response action at the Hanford 200 West Area, which is directed at vapor extraction of VOCs from the vadose (unsaturated) zone. Demonstration efforts are underway in the areas of subsurface characterization including: drilling and access improvements, off-gas and borehole monitoring of vadose zone VOC concentrations to aid in soil vapor extraction performance evaluation, and treatment of VOC-contaminated off-gas. These current demonstration efforts constitute Phase 1 of the ID and, because of the ongoing vadose zone ERA, can result in immediate transfer of successful technologies to EM-40.

  15. Summary of emissions reduction technology programs

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Niedzwiecki, R. W.

    1977-01-01

    The NASA emissions reduction contract programs for EPA aircraft engine classes P2 (turboshaft engines), T1 (jet engines with thrust under 8000 lb), T4 (JT8D) engines), and T2 (jet engines with thrust over 8000 lb) are discussed. The most important aspects of these programs, the commonality of approaches used, the test results, and assessments regarding applications of the derived technology are summarized.

  16. Minimum Additive Waste Stabilization (MAWS). Technology summary

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1994-02-01

    In the Minimum Additive Waste Stabilization(MAWS) concept, actual waste streams are utilized as additive resources for vitrification, which may contain the basic components (glass formers and fluxes) for making a suitable glass or glassy slag. If too much glass former is present, then the melt viscosity or temperature will be too high for processing; while if there is too much flux, then the durability may suffer. Therefore, there are optimum combinations of these two important classes of constituents depending on the criteria required. The challenge is to combine these resources in such a way that minimizes the use of non-waste additives yet yields a processable and durable final waste form for disposal. The benefit to this approach is that the volume of the final waste form is minimized (waste loading maximized) since little or no additives are used and vitrification itself results in volume reduction through evaporation of water, combustion of organics, and compaction of the solids into a non-porous glass. This implies a significant reduction in disposal costs due to volume reduction alone, and minimizes future risks/costs due to the long term durability and leach resistance of glass. This is accomplished by using integrated systems that are both cost-effective and produce an environmentally sound waste form for disposal. individual component technologies may include: vitrification; thermal destruction; soil washing; gas scrubbing/filtration; and, ion-exchange wastewater treatment. The particular combination of technologies will depend on the waste streams to be treated. At the heart of MAWS is vitrification technology, which incorporates all primary and secondary waste streams into a final, long-term, stabilized glass wasteform. The integrated technology approach, and view of waste streams as resources, is innovative yet practical to cost effectively treat a broad range of DOE mixed and low-level wastes.

  17. Innovative technology summary report: Transportable vitrification system

    SciTech Connect

    1998-09-01

    At the end of the cold war, many of the Department of Energy`s (DOE`s) major nuclear weapons facilities refocused their efforts on finding technically sound, economic, regulatory compliant, and stakeholder acceptable treatment solutions for the legacy of mixed wastes they had produced. In particular, an advanced stabilization process that could effectively treat the large volumes of settling pond and treatment sludges was needed. Based on this need, DOE and its contractors initiated in 1993 the EM-50 sponsored development effort required to produce a deployable mixed waste vitrification system. As a consequence, the Transportable Vitrification System (TVS) effort was undertaken with the primary requirement to develop and demonstrate the technology and associated facility to effectively vitrify, for compliant disposal, the applicable mixed waste sludges and solids across the various DOE complex sites. After 4 years of development testing with both crucible and pilot-scale melters, the TVS facility was constructed by Envitco, evaluated and demonstrated with surrogates, and then successfully transported to the ORNL ETTP site and demonstrated with actual mixed wastes in the fall of 1997. This paper describes the technology, its performance, the technology applicability and alternatives, cost, regulatory and policy issues, and lessons learned.

  18. Handbook of industrial membrane technology

    SciTech Connect

    Porter, M.C.

    1989-01-01

    This book emphasizes the use of synthetic membranes for separations involving industrial or municipal process streams. In addition to the classic membrane processes-microfiltration, ultrafiltration, reverse osmosis, gas separation, and electrodialysis-chapters on enzyme membrane reactors, membrane fermentors and coupled transport membranes are included. The preparation of synthetic membranes and process design and optimization are also covered. Most of the membrane processes are pressure driven, the notable exception being electrodialysis, by which ions are separated under the influence of an electric field. In addition, coupled transport covers processes driven under the influence of a concentration gradient.

  19. Liposome Technology for Industrial Purposes

    PubMed Central

    Wagner, Andreas; Vorauer-Uhl, Karola

    2011-01-01

    Liposomes, spherical vesicles consisting of one or more phospholipid bilayers, were first described in the mid 60s by Bangham and coworkers. Since then, liposomes have made their way to the market. Today, numerous lab scale but only a few large-scale techniques are available. However, a lot of these methods have serious limitations in terms of entrapment of sensitive molecules due to their exposure to mechanical and/or chemical stress. This paper summarizes exclusively scalable techniques and focuses on strengths, respectively, limitations in respect to industrial applicability. An additional point of view was taken to regulatory requirements concerning liposomal drug formulations based on FDA and EMEA documents. PMID:21490754

  20. Transfer of space technology to industry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hamilton, J. T.

    1974-01-01

    Some of the most significant applications of the NASA aerospace technology transfer to industry and other government agencies are briefly outlined. The technology utilization program encompasses computer programs for structural problems, life support systems, fuel cell development, and rechargeable cardiac pacemakers as well as reliability and quality research for oil recovery operations and pollution control.

  1. Information Technology and the Third Industrial Revolution.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fitzsimmons, Joe

    1994-01-01

    Discusses the so-called third industrial revolution, or the information revolution. Topics addressed include the progression of the revolution in the U.S. economy, in Europe, and in Third World countries; the empowering technologies, including digital switches, optical fiber, semiconductors, CD-ROM, networks, and combining technologies; and future…

  2. NASA partnership with industry: Enhancing technology transfer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1983-01-01

    Recognizing the need to accelerate and expand the application of NASA-derived technology for other civil uses in the United States, potential opportunities were assessed; the range of benefits to NASA, industry and the nations were explored; public policy implications were assessed; and this new range of opportunities were related to current technology transfer programs of NASA.

  3. The Model Industrial Technology Systems Project.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bowling Green State Univ., OH.

    This document contains materials used in a model industrial technology program that introduced technology into the curricula of elementary, middle, and high schools in three sites in Ohio: the Central site (coordinated through Ohio State University); the Northeast site (coordinated through Kent State University); and the Northwest site…

  4. Landfill stabilization focus area: Technology summary

    SciTech Connect

    1995-06-01

    Landfills within the DOE Complex as of 1990 are estimated to contain 3 million cubic meters of buried waste. The DOE facilities where the waste is predominantly located are at Hanford, the Savannah River Site (SRS), the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL), the Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL), the Oak Ridge Reservation (ORR), the Nevada Test Site (NTS), and the Rocky Flats Plant (RFP). Landfills include buried waste, whether on pads or in trenches, sumps, ponds, pits, cribs, heaps and piles, auger holes, caissons, and sanitary landfills. Approximately half of all DOE buried waste was disposed of before 1970. Disposal regulations at that time permitted the commingling of various types of waste (i.e., transuranic, low-level radioactive, hazardous). As a result, much of the buried waste throughout the DOE Complex is presently believed to be contaminated with both hazardous and radioactive materials. DOE buried waste typically includes transuranic-contaminated radioactive waste (TRU), low-level radioactive waste (LLW), hazardous waste per 40 CFR 26 1, greater-than-class-C waste per CFR 61 55 (GTCC), mixed TRU waste, and mixed LLW. The mission of the Landfill Stabilization Focus Area is to develop, demonstrate, and deliver safer,more cost-effective and efficient technologies which satisfy DOE site needs for the remediation and management of landfills. The LSFA is structured into five technology areas to meet the landfill remediation and management needs across the DOE complex. These technology areas are: assessment, retrieval, treatment, containment, and stabilization. Technical tasks in each of these areas are reviewed.

  5. Corrosion probe. Innovative technology summary report

    SciTech Connect

    1999-05-01

    Over 253 million liters of high-level waste (HLW) generated from plutonium production is stored in mild steel tanks at the Department of Energy (DOE) Hanford Site. Corrosion monitoring of double-shell storage tanks (DSTs) is currently performed at Hanford using a combination of process knowledge and tank waste sampling and analysis. Available technologies for corrosion monitoring have progressed to a point where it is feasible to monitor and control corrosion by on-line monitoring of the corrosion process and direct addition of corrosion inhibitors. The electrochemical noise (EN) technique deploys EN-based corrosion monitoring probes into storage tanks. This system is specifically designed to measure corrosion rates and detect changes in waste chemistry that trigger the onset of pitting and cracking. These on-line probes can determine whether additional corrosion inhibitor is required and, if so, provide information on an effective end point to the corrosion inhibitor addition procedure. This report describes the technology, its performance, its application, costs, regulatory and policy issues, and lessons learned.

  6. MIxed Waste Integrated Program (MWIP): Technology summary

    SciTech Connect

    1994-02-01

    The mission of the Mixed Waste Integrated Program (MWIP) is to develop and demonstrate innovative and emerging technologies for the treatment and management of DOE`s mixed low-level wastes (MLLW) for use by its customers, the Office of Waste Operations (EM-30) and the Office of Environmental Restoration (EM-40). The primary goal of MWIP is to develop and demonstrate the treatment and disposal of actual mixed waste (MMLW and MTRU). The vitrification process and the plasma hearth process are scheduled for demonstration on actual radioactive waste in FY95 and FY96, respectively. This will be accomplished by sequential studies of lab-scale non-radioactive testing followed by bench-scale radioactive testing, followed by field-scale radioactive testing. Both processes create a highly durable final waste form that passes leachability requirements while destroying organics. Material handling technology, and off-gas requirements and capabilities for the plasma hearth process and the vitrification process will be established in parallel.

  7. Expedited site characterization. Innovative technology summary report

    SciTech Connect

    1998-12-01

    Expedited Site Characterization (ESC) has been developed, demonstrated, and deployed as a new time-saving, cost-effective approach for hazardous waste site investigations. ESC is an alternative approach that effectively shortens the length of the assessment period and may significantly reduce costs at many sites. It is not a specific technology or system but is a methodology for most effectively conducting a site characterization. The principal elements of ESC are: a field investigation conducted by an integrated team of experienced professionals working in the field at the same time, analysis, integration and initial validation of the characterization data as they are obtained in the field, and a dynamic work plan that enables the team to take advantage of new insights from recent data to adjust the work plan in the field. This report covers demonstrations that took place between 1989 and 1996. This paper gives a description of the technology and discusses its performance, applications, cost, regulatory and policy issues, and lessons learned.

  8. Technology development needs summary, FY 1995

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1994-03-01

    Historic activities of DOE during the period of nuclear weapons development, and disposal practices of that time, resulted in the discharge of chemical and radioactive materials to the environment at many DOE facilities and sites. DOE has now focused a major technical effort on mitigating the effects of those discharges through an environmental restoration program. Since this could lead to prohibitive costs if conventional technology is applied for remedial action, a national program will be initiated to develop and demonstrate faster, better, cheaper, and safer means of restoring the DOE sites to conditions that will meet state and federal environment regulations. Key elements of the initiative are the Integrated Programs and Integrated Demonstrations, which work together to identify possible solutions to major environmental problems. Needed statements are given for the following programs: mixed waste landfill, uranium in soils, VOC-arid, decontamination and decommissioning of facilities, buried waste, characterization/monitoring/sensor technology, mixed waste, in situ remediation, efficient separations/processing, minimum additive waste stabilization, supercritical water oxidation. A section on how to get involved is included.

  9. Foreign technology summary of flight crucial flight control systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rediess, H. A.

    1984-01-01

    A survey of foreign technology in flight crucial flight controls is being conducted to provide a data base for planning future research and technology programs. Only Free World countries were surveyed, and the primary emphasis was on Western Europe because that is where the most advanced technology resides. The survey includes major contemporary systems on operational aircraft, R&D flight programs, advanced aircraft developments, and major research and technology programs. The information was collected from open literature, personal communications, and a tour of several companies, government organizations, and research laboratories in the United Kingdom, France, and the Federal Republic of Germany. A summary of the survey results to date is presented.

  10. Research and Technology Objectives and Plans (RTOP), summary

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1982-01-01

    A compilation of summary portions of each of the Research and Technology Operating Plans (RTOPS) used for management review and control of research currently in progress throughout NASA is presented. Subject, technical monitor, responsible NASA organization, and RTOP number indexes are included.

  11. Research and Technology Objectives and Plans Summary (RTOPS)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1976-01-01

    A compilation of the summary portion of each of the Research and Technology Operating Plans (RTOP) used for management review and control of research currently in progress throughout NASA is presented along with citations and abstracts of the RTOPs. Four indexes are included: (1) subject; (2) technical monitor; (3) responsible NASA organization; and (4) RTOP number.

  12. Research and Technology Objectives and Plans Summary (RTOPS)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1982-01-01

    A compilation of summary portions of each of the Research and Technology Objectives and Plans (RTOPS) used for management review and control of research currently in progress throughout NASA is presented. Subject, technical monitors, responsible NASA organization, and RTOP number indexes are included.

  13. Ceramic Technology Project database: March 1990 summary report

    SciTech Connect

    Keyes, B.L.P.

    1992-07-01

    This report is the fifth in a series of semiannual data summary reports on information being stored in the Ceramic Technology Project (CTP) database. The overall system status as of March 31, 1990, is summarized, and the latest additions of ceramic mechanical properties data are given for zirconia, silicon carbide, and silicon nitride ceramic mechanical properties data, including some properties on brazed specimens.

  14. Research and Technology Objectives and Plans Summary (RTOPS)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1980-01-01

    A compilation of the summary portions of each of the Research and Technology Objectives and Plans (RTOPS) used for management review and control research currently in progress throughout NASA is presented. Indexes include: subject, technical monitor, responsible NASA organization, and RTOP number.

  15. Research and Technology Objectives and Plans Summary (RTOPS)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1981-01-01

    A compilation of the summary portions of each of the Research and Technology Objective Plans (RTOP) used for management review and control of research currently in progress throughout NASA is presented. Indexes include: subject, technical monitor, responsible NASA organization, and RTOP number.

  16. Energy Technology Division research summary -- 1994

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1994-09-01

    Research funded primarily by the NRC is directed toward assessing the roles of cyclic fatigue, intergranular stress corrosion cracking, and irradiation-assisted stress corrosion cracking on failures in light water reactor (LWR) piping systems, pressure vessels, and various core components. In support of the fast reactor program, the Division has responsibility for fuel-performance modeling and irradiation testing. The Division has major responsibilities in several design areas of the proposed International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor (ITER). The Division supports the DOE in ensuring safe shipment of nuclear materials by providing extensive review of the Safety Analysis Reports for Packaging (SARPs). Finally, in the nuclear area they are investigating the safe disposal of spent fuel and waste. In work funded by DOE`s Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy, the high-temperature superconductivity program continues to be a major focal point for industrial interactions. Coatings and lubricants developed in the division`s Tribology Section are intended for use in transportation systems of the future. Continuous fiber ceramic composites are being developed for high-performance heat engines. Nondestructive testing techniques are being developed to evaluate fiber distribution and to detect flaws. A wide variety of coatings for corrosion protection of metal alloys are being studied. These can increase lifetimes significant in a wide variety of coal combustion and gasification environments.

  17. SRS tank closure. Innovative technology summary report

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1999-08-01

    High-level waste (HLW) tank closure technology is designed to stabilize any remaining radionuclides and hazardous constituents left in a tank after bulk waste removal. Two Savannah River Site (SRS) HLW tanks were closed after cleansing and then filling each tank with three layers of grout. The first layer consists of a chemically reducing grout. The fill material has chemical properties that retard the movement of some radionuclides and chemical constituents. A layer of controlled low-strength material (CLSM), a self-leveling fill material, is placed on top of the reducing grout. CLSM provides sufficient strength to support the overbearing weight. The final layer is a free-flowing, strong grout similar to normal concrete. After the main tank cavity is filled, risers are filled with grout, and all waste transfer piping connected to the tank is isolated. The tank ventilation system is dismantled, and the remaining systems are isolated. Equipment that remains with the tank is filled with grout. The tank and ancillary systems are left in a state requiring only limited surveillance. Administrative procedures are in place to control land use and access. DOE eventually plans to remove all of its HLW storage tanks from service. These tanks are located at SRS, Hanford, and Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory. Low-activity waste storage tanks at Oak Ridge Reservation are also scheduled for closure.

  18. In Situ Remediation Integrated Program: Technology summary

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1994-02-01

    The In Situ Remediation Integrated Program (ISR IP) was instituted out of recognition that in situ remediation could fulfill three important criteria: significant cost reduction of cleanup by eliminating or minimizing excavation, transportation, and disposal of wastes; reduced health impacts on workers and the public by minimizing exposure to wastes during excavation and processing; and remediation of inaccessible sites, including: deep subsurfaces, in, under, and around buildings. Buried waste, contaminated soils and groundwater, and containerized wastes are all candidates for in situ remediation. Contaminants include radioactive wastes, volatile and non-volatile organics, heavy metals, nitrates, and explosive materials. The ISR IP intends to facilitate development of in situ remediation technologies for hazardous, radioactive, and mixed wastes in soils, groundwater, and storage tanks. Near-term focus is on containment of the wastes, with treatment receiving greater effort in future years. ISR IP is an applied research and development program broadly addressing known DOE environmental restoration needs. Analysis of a sample of 334 representative sites by the Office of Environmental Restoration has shown how many sites are amenable to in situ remediation: containment--243 sites; manipulation--244 sites; bioremediation--154 sites; and physical/chemical methods--236 sites. This needs assessment is focused on near-term restoration problems (FY93--FY99). Many other remediations will be required in the next century. The major focus of the ISR EP is on the long term development of permanent solutions to these problems. Current needs for interim actions to protect human health and the environment are also being addressed.

  19. Innovative technology summary report: Concrete grinder

    SciTech Connect

    1998-09-01

    The Flex concrete grinder is a lightweight, hand-held concrete and coating removal system used for decontaminating or stripping concrete surfaces. The US Department of Energy has successfully demonstrated it for decontaminating walls and floors for free release surveys prior to demolition work. The grinder is an electric-powered tool with a vacuum port for dust extraction and a diamond grinding wheel. The grinder is suitable for flat or slightly curved surfaces and results in a smooth surface, which makes release surveys more reliable. The grinder is lightweight and produces very little vibration, thus reducing worker fatigue. The grinder is more efficient than traditional baseline, tools at removing contamination from concrete surfaces (more than four times faster than hand-held pneumatic scabbling and scaling tools). Grinder consumables (i.e., replacement diamond grinding wheel) are more expensive than the replacement carbide parts for the scaler and scabbler. However, operating costs are outweighed by the lower purchase price of the grinder (50% of the price of the baseline scaler and 8% of the price of the baseline scabbler). Overall, the concrete grinder is an attractive alternative to traditional scabbling and scaling pneumatic tools. To this end, in July 1998, the outer rod room exposed walls of the Safe Storage Enclosure (SSE), an area measuring approximately 150 m{sup 2}, may be decontaminated with the hand-held grinder. This concrete grinder technology was demonstrated for the first time at the DOE`s Hanford Site. Decontamination of a sample room walls was performed at the C Reactor to free release the walls prior to demolition. The demonstration was conducted by onsite D and D workers, who were instructed by the vendor prior to and during the demonstration.

  20. Benefits of advanced technology in industrial cogeneration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Barna, G. J.; Burns, R. K.

    1979-01-01

    This broad study is aimed at identifying the most attractive advanced energy conversion systems for industrial cogeneration for the 1985 to 2000 time period and assessing the advantages of advanced technology systems compared to using today's commercially available technology. Energy conversion systems being studied include those using steam turbines, open cycle gas turbines, combined cycles, diesel engines, Stirling engines, closed cycle gas turbines, phosphoric acid and molten carbonate fuel cells and thermionics. Specific cases using today's commercially available technology are being included to serve as a baseline for assessing the advantages of advanced technology.

  1. Industrialization of Superconducting RF Accelerator Technology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peiniger, Michael; Pekeler, Michael; Vogel, Hanspeter

    2012-01-01

    Superconducting RF (SRF) accelerator technology has basically existed for 50 years. It took about 20 years to conduct basic R&D and prototyping at universities and international institutes before the first superconducting accelerators were built, with industry supplying complete accelerator cavities. In parallel, the design of large scale accelerators using SRF was done worldwide. In order to build those accelerators, industry has been involved for 30 years in building the required cavities and/or accelerator modules in time and budget. To enable industry to supply these high tech components, technology transfer was made from the laboratories in the following three regions: the Americas, Asia and Europe. As will be shown, the manufacture of the SRF cavities is normally accomplished in industry whereas the cavity testing and module assembly are not performed in industry in most cases, yet. The story of industrialization is so far a story of customized projects. Therefore a real SRF accelerator product is not yet available in this market. License agreements and technology transfer between leading SRF laboratories and industry is a powerful tool for enabling industry to manufacture SRF components or turnkey superconducting accelerator modules for other laboratories and users with few or no capabilities in SRF technology. Despite all this, the SRF accelerator market today is still a small market. The manufacture and preparation of the components require a range of specialized knowledge, as well as complex and expensive manufacturing installations like for high precision machining, electron beam welding, chemical surface preparation and class ISO4 clean room assembly. Today, the involved industry in the US and Europe comprises medium-sized companies. In Japan, some big enterprises are involved. So far, roughly 2500 SRF cavities have been built by or ordered from industry worldwide. Another substantial step might come from the International Linear Collider (ILC) project

  2. Characterization, monitoring, and sensor technology crosscutting program: Technology summary

    SciTech Connect

    1995-06-01

    The purpose of the Characterization, Monitoring, and Sensor Technology Crosscutting Program (CMST-CP) is to deliver appropriate characterization, monitoring, and sensor technology (CMST) to the Office of Waste Management (EM-30), the Office of Environmental Restoration (EM-40), and the Office of Facility Transition and Management (EM-60). The technology development must also be cost effective and appropriate to EM-30/40/60 needs. Furthermore, the required technologies must be delivered and implemented when needed. Accordingly, and to ensure that available DOE and other national resources are focused an the most pressing needs, management of the technology development is concentrated on the following Focus Areas: Contaminant Plume Containment and Remediation (PFA); Landfill Stabilization (LSFA); High-Level Waste Tank Remediation (TFA); Mixed Waste Characterization, Treatment, and Disposal (MWFA); and Facility Deactivation, Decommissioning, and Material Disposition (FDDMDFA). Brief descriptions of CMST-CP projects funded in FY95 are presented.

  3. Mechanical Systems Technology Branch research summary, 1985 - 1992

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Krantz, Timothy L. (Editor)

    1993-01-01

    A collection of significant accomplishments from the research of the Mechanical Systems Technology Branch at the NASA Lewis Research Center completed during the years 1985-1992 is included. The publication highlights and accomplishments made in bearing and gearing technology through in-house research, university grants, and industry contracted projects. The publication also includes a complete listing of branch publications for these years.

  4. EMERGING TECHNOLOGY SUMMARY: DEMONSTRATION OF AMBERSORB 563 ADSORBENT TECHNOLOGY

    EPA Science Inventory

    A field pilot study was conducted to demonstrate the technical feasibility and cost-effectiveness of Ambersorb® 5631 carbonaceous adsorbent for remediating groundwater contaminated with volatile organic compounds (VOCs). The Ambersorb adsorbent technology demonstration consist...

  5. A planning framework for transferring building energy technologies: Executive Summary

    SciTech Connect

    Farhar, B C; Brown, M A; Mohler, B L; Wilde, M; Abel, F H

    1990-08-01

    Accelerating the adoption of new and existing cost-effective technologies has significant potential to reduce the energy consumed in US buildings. This report summarizes some of the key results of an interlaboratory technology transfer planning effort in support of the US Department of Energy's Office of Building Technologies (the full report is published under SERI number TP-260-3729). A guiding assumption for planning was that OBT's R D program should forge linkages with existing programs whose goals involved enhancing energy efficiency in buildings. An ad hoc Technology Transfer Advisory Group reviewed the existing analysis and technology transfer program, brainstormed technology transfer approaches, interviewed DOE program managers, identified applicable research results, and developed a framework that management could use in deciding on the best investments of technology transfer resources. Representatives of 22 organizations were interviewed on their views of the potential for transferring energy efficiency technologies through active linking with OBT. The report describes in summary these programs and interview results; outlines OBT tools, technologies, and practices to be transferred; defines OBT audiences; identifies technology transfer functions and presents a framework devised using functions and audiences; presents some example technology transfer activities; and summarizes the Advisory Group's recommendations.

  6. Wireless Success Story - Industrial Technologies Program (ITP)

    SciTech Connect

    none,

    2010-05-01

    This success story presents the results of wireless research by Sensors & Automation, a sub-program of the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Industrial Technologies Program (ITP). The prioritized research resulted in success with realized energy and cost savings.

  7. ANTIMONY REMOVAL TECHNOLOGY FOR MINING INDUSTRY WASTEWATERS

    EPA Science Inventory

    This report assessed the current state-of-the-art of antimony removal technology for mining industry wastewaters. Through literature review and personal interviews, it was found that most mines and mills reporting significant quantities of antimony in their raw wastewater had app...

  8. Industrial Arts, Technology, and the Future

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mangano, Ronald M.

    1976-01-01

    Industrial arts educators' goal should be preparing individuals for a future embracing a "soft" technology, suited to human needs, non-violent, and environmentally gentle. Labor needs will change; career education competencies and craftsmanship will be required. Teachers can futurize courses by simple, inexpensive means: reading, and using games…

  9. South Carolina Guide for Industrial Technology Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    South Carolina State Dept. of Education, Columbia. Office of Occupational Education.

    This guide is intended for teachers conducting industrial technology education (TE) courses in South Carolina. Presented first is introductory information about the mission, clusters and units, and recommended educational format of TE in South Carolina. Discussed in the seven sections are various aspects of South Carolina's modular delivery system…

  10. Transformations: Technology and the Music Industry.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Peters, G. David

    2001-01-01

    Focuses on the companies and organizations of the Music Industry Conference (MIC). Addresses topics such as: changes in companies due to technology, audio compact discs, the music instrument digital interface (MIDI) , digital sound recording, and the MIC on-line music instruction programs offered. (CMK)

  11. Exemplary Training Models in Industrial Technology.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hatton, Michael J., Comp.

    Prepared by Canadian, Chinese Taipei, and Thai educational agencies and based on surveys of Asia Pacific Economic Cooperation member nations, this report provides descriptions of 52 exemplary industrial technology training models in Australia, Brunei, Canada, Chinese Taipei, Hong Kong, Malaysia, New Zealand, the Philippines, the People's Republic…

  12. Industrial Technology and the Productivity Problem.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sinn, John W.

    1982-01-01

    The role of industrial technology in addressing productivity encompasses work experience and attitude, quality assurance, research and development, time and motion studies, plant layout and flow diagramming, cost analysis, production process selection, maintenance, computer applications, materials and inventory requirements, safety programming,…

  13. Industrial Combustion Technology Roadmap. A Technology Roadmap by and for the Industrial Combustion Community

    SciTech Connect

    None, None

    2002-10-01

    The U.S. combustion industry is among the most productive, efficient, and technologically sophisticated in the world and remains vital to the nation’s economic competitiveness and national security. As the industry looks forward, it confronts tremendous growth opportunities but also significant technical and market challenges. Future industry success will depend on the industry's ability to respond to competitive pressures as well as public expectations for a clean and sustainable industry. Much progress has been made in understanding the fundamental science of combustion; however, much more is needed as regulatory and competitive forces push the industry to develop combustion equipment with better performance, lower environmental impact, and greater flexibility. Immense opportunities exist for companies to develop and apply new technology responding to these needs. Unfortunately, few companies can accept the high technical and financial risk required for the research if the technology is not adopted widely enough to provide a payback on their investment.

  14. Characterizing emerging industrial technologies in energy models

    SciTech Connect

    Laitner, John A.; Worrell, Ernst; Galitsky, Christina; Hanson, Donald A.

    2003-07-29

    Conservation supply curves are a common tool in economic analysis. As such, they provide an important opportunity to include a non-linear representation of technology and technological change in economy-wide models. Because supply curves are closely related to production isoquants, we explore the possibility of using bottom-up technology assessments to inform top-down representations of energy models of the U.S. economy. Based on a recent report by LBNL and ACEEE on emerging industrial technologies within the United States, we have constructed a supply curve for 54 such technologies for the year 2015. Each of the selected technologies has been assessed with respect to energy efficiency characteristics, likely energy savings by 2015, economics, and environmental performance, as well as needs for further development or implementation of the technology. The technical potential for primary energy savings of the 54 identified technologies is equal to 3.54 Quads, or 8.4 percent of the assume d2015 industrial energy consumption. Based on the supply curve, assuming a discount rate of 15 percent and 2015 prices as forecasted in the Annual Energy Outlook2002, we estimate the economic potential to be 2.66 Quads - or 6.3 percent of the assumed forecast consumption for 2015. In addition, we further estimate how much these industrial technologies might contribute to standard reference case projections, and how much additional energy savings might be available assuming a different mix of policies and incentives. Finally, we review the prospects for integrating the findings of this and similar studies into standard economic models. Although further work needs to be completed to provide the necessary link between supply curves and production isoquants, it is hoped that this link will be a useful starting point for discussion with developers of energy-economic models.

  15. Technology opportunities in a restructured electric industry

    SciTech Connect

    Gehl, S.

    1995-12-31

    This paper describes the Strategic Research & Development (SR&D) program of the Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI). The intent of the program is to anticipate and shape the scientific and technological future of the electricity enterprise. SR&D serves those industry R&D needs that are more exploratory, precompetitive, and longer-term. To this end, SR&D seeks to anticipate technological change and, where possible, shape that change to the advantage of the electric utility enterprise and its customers. SR&D`s response to this challenge is research and development program that addresses the most probable future of the industry, but at the same time is robust against alternative futures. The EPRI SR&D program is organized into several vectors, each with a mission that relates directly to one or more EPRI industry goals, which are summarized in the paper. 1 fig., 2 tabs.

  16. Spatial perspective on the process of technological innovation in technology-intensive industry

    SciTech Connect

    Brugman, B.L.

    1983-01-01

    Focus here is on how knowledge capital and technological entrepreneurship shape the interstate pattern of technological innovation in technology-intensive industries. Technological innovation, the endogenous variable, is measures by an index of new-product generation. Technological entrepreneurship, identified with net firm formation in the present study, is measured by net change in the number of electronics establishments. Knowledge capital is represented by a number of indicators. Some are measures of R and D effort and others measure the number of industrial employees with specialized backgrounds in fields pertaining to the electronics knowledge base. New firm formation and university R and D show a strong, positive and direct effect on the subsequent interstate pattern of technological innovation. Company-funded R and D lags behind university R and D as an influence on subsequent technological entrepreneurship, and as an indirect influence on new product generation. In summary, technological entrepreneurship and knowledge capital have proved useful concepts in drawing out and testing implications about where technological innovation will appear.

  17. Biological and Chemical Technologies Research at OIT: Annual Summary Report, FY 1997

    SciTech Connect

    Peterson, G.

    1998-03-01

    The annual summary report presents the fiscal year (FY) 1 997 research activities and accomplishments for the United States Department of Energy (DOE) Biological and Chemical Technologies Research (BCTR) Program. This BCTR program resides within the Office of Industrial Technologies (OIT) of the Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EE). The annual summary report for 1997 (ASR 97) contains the following: program description (including BCTR program mission statement, historical background, relevance, goals and objectives); program structure and organization; selected technical and programmatic highlights for 1 997; detailed descriptions of individual projects; and a listing of program output, including a bibliography of published work, patents, and awards arising from work supported by the program.

  18. Applications of aerospace technology in industry. A technology transfer profile: Food technology

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Murray, D. M.

    1971-01-01

    Food processing and preservation technologies are reviewed, expected technological advances are considered including processing and market factors. NASA contributions to food technology and nutrition are presented with examples of transfer from NASA to industry.

  19. Photovoltaic industry manufacturing technology. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Vanecek, D.; Diver, M.; Fernandez, R.

    1998-08-01

    This report contains the results of the Photovoltaic (PV) Industry Manufacturing Technology Assessment performed by the Automation and Robotics Research Institute (ARRI) of the University of Texas at Arlington for the National Renewable Energy laboratory. ARRI surveyed eleven companies to determine their state-of-manufacturing in the areas of engineering design, operations management, manufacturing technology, equipment maintenance, quality management, and plant conditions. Interviews with company personnel and plant tours at each of the facilities were conducted and the information compiled. The report is divided into two main segments. The first part of the report presents how the industry as a whole conforms to ``World Class`` manufacturing practices. Conclusions are drawn from the results of a survey as to the areas that the PV industry can improve on to become more competitive in the industry and World Class. Appendix A contains the questions asked in the survey, a brief description of the benefits to performing this task and the aggregate response to the questions. Each company participating in the assessment process received the results of their own facility to compare against the industry as a whole. The second part of the report outlines opportunities that exist on the shop floor for improving Process Equipment and Automation Strategies. Appendix B contains the survey that was used to assess each of the manufacturing processes.

  20. Frozen soil barrier technology. Innovative technology summary report

    SciTech Connect

    1995-04-01

    The technology of using refrigeration to freeze soils has been employed in large-scale engineering projects for a number of years. This technology bonds soils to give load-bearing strength during construction; to seal tunnels, mine shafts, and other subsurface structures against flooding from groundwater; and to stabilize soils during excavation. Examples of modern applications include several large subway, highway, and water supply tunnels. Ground freezing to form subsurface frozen soil barriers is an innovative technology designed to contain hazardous and radioactive contaminants in soils and groundwater. Frozen soil barriers that provide complete containment ({open_quotes}V{close_quotes}configuration) are formed by drilling and installing refrigerant piping (on 8-ft centers) horizontally at approximately 45{degrees} angles for sides and vertically for ends and then recirculating an environmentally safe refrigerant solution through the piping to freeze the soil porewater. Freeze plants are used to keep the containment structure at subfreezing temperatures. A full-scale containment structure was demonstrated from May 12 to October 10, 1994, at a nonhazardous site on SEG property on Gallaher Road, Oak Ridge, Tennessee.

  1. Industrial Applications of Electronic Nose Technology in the Textiles Industry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gibson, Tim; Chandler, Rob; Hallam, Viv; Simpson, Claire; Bentham, Martin

    2009-05-01

    Electronic nose technology has been available commercially for over 12 years but uptake in actual industrial applications has yet to be fully realised. We report 2 specific test protocols being used in the textiles industry that allow the direct measurement of anti-odour and anti-microbial capabilities of fabrics. Results will be shown for the standard anti-odour test which was specifically commissioned by Courtaulds PLC and which is being used by a number of manufacturers. The second test, which measures the anti-microbial and the anti-odour capabilities of fabrics simultaneously was developed in 2008. Results will be shown that clearly indicate both parameters are detected and proofs of anti-microbial capabilities will be given. These 2 tests will for the first time, enable the fulfillment of legislation that states for textile product claims, anti-odour and anti-microbial capabilities of fabrics must be scientifically substantiated.

  2. Cogeneration technology alternatives study. Volume 1: Summary report

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1980-01-01

    Data and information in the area of advanced energy conversion systems for industrial congeneration applications in the 1985-2000 time period was studied. Six current and thirty-one advanced energy conversion systems were defined and combined with appropriate balance-of-plant equipment. Twenty-six industrial processes were selected from among the high energy consuming industries to serve as a framework for the study. Each conversion system was analyzed as a cogenerator with each industrial plant. Fuel consumption, costs, and environmental intrusion were evaluated and compared to corresponding traditional values. Various cogeneration strategies were analyzed and both topping and bottoming (using industrial by-product heat) applications were included. The advanced energy conversion technologies indicated reduced fuel consumption, costs, and emissions. Typically fuel energy savings of 10 to 25 percent were predicted compared to traditional on-site furnaces and utility electricity. With the variety of industrial requirements, each advanced technology had attractive applications. Overall, fuel cells indicated the greatest fuel energy savings and emission reductions. Gas turbines and combined cycles indicated high overall annual cost savings. Steam turbines and gas turbines produced high estimated returns. In some applications, diesels were most efficient. The advanced technologies used coal-derived fuels, or coal with advanced fluid bed combustion or on-site gasification systems.

  3. Membrane Technologies in Wine Industry: An Overview.

    PubMed

    El Rayess, Youssef; Mietton-Peuchot, Martine

    2016-09-01

    Membrane processes are increasingly reported for various applications in wine industry such as microfiltration, electrodialysis, and reverse osmosis, but also emerging processes as bipolar electrodialysis and membrane contactor. Membrane-based processes are playing a critical role in the field of separation/purification, clarification, stabilization, concentration, and de-alcoholization of wine products. They begin to be an integral part of the winemaking process. This review will provide an overview of recent developments, applications, and published literature in membrane technologies applied in wine industry. PMID:25751507

  4. Advanced Thermionic Technology Program: summary report. Volume 1. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1984-10-01

    This report summarizes the progress made by the Advanced Thermionic Technology Program during the past several years. This program, sponsored by the US Department of Energy, has had as its goal adapting thermionic devices to generate electricity in a terrestrial (i.e., combustion) environment. The technology has previously been developed for astronautical applications. The report is organized in four volumes, each focused as much as possible on the needs of a particular audience. Volume 1 contains Part A, the Executive Summary. This Executive Summary describes the accomplishments of the Program in brief, but assumes the reader's familiarity with the thermionic process and the technical issues associated with the Program. For this reason, Volume 1 also contains Part B, a minimally technical overview of the Advanced Thermionic Technology Program. Volume 2 (Part C) concentrates on the progress made in developing and fabricating the ''current generation'' of chemical vapor deposited hot shell thermionic converters and is addressed to those primarily concerned with today's capabilities in terrestrial thermionic technology. Volume 3 (Part D) contains the results of systems studies of primary interest to those involved in identifying and evaluating applications for thermionics. Volume 4 (Part E) is a highly technical discussion of the attempts made by the program to push the state-of-the-art beyond the current generation of converters and is directed toward potential researchers engaged in this same task. These technical discussions are complemented with Appendices where appropriate.

  5. Industrial Enterprise. Grade 12. Course #8196 (Semester). Technology Education Course Guide. Industrial Arts/Technology Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    North Carolina State Dept. of Public Instruction, Raleigh. Div. of Vocational Education.

    This guide is intended for use in teaching a course in industrial enterprise. The course, which has been designed using a student-centered approach, is intended to help students understand the dynamics of an industrial enterprise as a fusion of two technologies--material processing and management. The first two sections discuss the guide's…

  6. Science and technology for industrial ecology

    SciTech Connect

    Gilmartin, T.J.; Allenby, B.R.

    1996-07-10

    Scientific and technological communities have a significant role to play and responsibility for the evolution of global sustainability (continuously improving quality of life into the indefinite future). Sustainability is not possible without a substantially improved science and technology basis for industrial ecology. Society needs data and understanding of complex ecological issues to govern itself in a sustainable manner. We should: support and develop multi-disciplinary programs which create the scientific basis for understanding natural and anthropogenic complex systems and for developing environmentally and economically efficient technology; demonstrate a systems-based approach to science and technology issues which is life-cycle comprehensive, integrates environmental considerations, and promotes conservation of natural resources; and encourage development of responsible, technically and scientifically valid, cost-effective environmental laws and practices.

  7. Innovative technology summary report: ResonantSonic{reg_sign} drilling

    SciTech Connect

    1995-04-01

    ResonantSonic{trademark} drilling has been demonstrated and deployed as an innovative tool to access the subsurface for installation of monitoring and/or remediation wells and for collection of subsurface materials for environmental restoration applications. The technology has been developed by industry with assistance from the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office of Technology Development to ensure it meets the needs of the environmental restoration market.

  8. Selected technology for the gas industry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1975-01-01

    A number of papers were presented at a conference concerned with the application of technical topics from aerospace activities for the gas industry. The following subjects were covered: general future of fossil fuels in America, exploration for fossil and nuclear fuels from orbital altitudes, technology for liquefied gas, safety considerations relative to fires, explosions, and detonations, gas turbomachinery technology, fluid properties, fluid flow, and heat transfer, NASA information and documentation systems, instrumentation and measurement, materials and life prediction, reliability and quality assurance, and advanced energy systems (including synthetic fuels, energy storage, solar energy, and wind energy).

  9. Robotic technologies for outdoor industrial vehicles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stentz, Anthony

    2001-09-01

    The commercial industries of agriculture, mining, construction, and material handling employ a wide variety of mobile machines, including tractors, combines, Load-Haul-Dump vehicles, trucks, paving machines, fork trucks, and many more. Automation of these vehicles promises to improve productivity, reduce operational costs, and increase safety. Since the vehicles typically operate in difficult environments, under all weather conditions, and in the presence of people and other obstacles, reliable automation faces severe technical challenges. Furthermore, the viable technology solutions are constrained by cost considerations. Fortunately, due to the limited application domain, repetitive nature, and the utility of partial automation for most tasks, robotics technologies can have a profound impact on industrial vehicles. In this paper, we describe a technical approach developed at Carnegie Mellon University for automating mobile machines in several applications, including mass excavation, mining, and agriculture. The approach is introduced via case studies, and the results are presented.

  10. Summary of the particle physics and technology working group

    SciTech Connect

    Stephan Lammel et al.

    2002-12-10

    Progress in particle physics has been tightly related to technological advances during the past half century. Progress in technologies has been driven in many cases by the needs of particle physics. Often, these advances have benefited fields beyond particle physics: other scientific fields, medicine, industrial development, and even found commercial applications. The particle physics and technology working group of Snowmass 2001 reviewed leading-edge technologies recently developed or in the need of development for particle physics. The group has identified key areas where technological advances are vital for progress in the field, areas of opportunities where particle physics may play a principle role in fostering progress, and areas where advances in other fields may directly benefit particle physics. The group has also surveyed the technologies specifically developed or enhanced by research in particle physics that benefit other fields and/or society at large.

  11. SUMMARY REPORT ON EMISSIONS FROM THE GLASS MANUFACTURING INDUSTRY

    EPA Science Inventory

    This project was undertaken to evaluate emissions rates from typical glass manufacturing furnaces. The effort concentrated on the container segment of the industry, however, tests were also conducted on the pressed blown, and flat glass segments of the industry. The quantitative ...

  12. Cogeneration Technology Alternatives Study (CTAS). Volume 1: Summary

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Barna, G. J.; Burns, R. K.; Sagerman, G. D.

    1980-01-01

    Various advanced energy conversion systems that can use coal or coal-derived fuels for industrial cogeneration applications were compared to provide information needed by DOE to establish research and development funding priorities for advanced-technology systems that could significantly advance the use of coal or coal-derived fuels in industrial cogeneration. Steam turbines, diesel engines, open-cycle gas turbines, combined cycles, closed-cycle gas turbines, Stirling engines, phosphoric acid fuel cells, molten carbonate fuel cells, and thermionics were studied with technology advancements appropriate for the 1985-2000 time period. The various advanced systems were compared and evaluated for wide diversity of representative industrial plants on the basis of fuel energy savings, annual energy cost savings, emissions savings, and rate of return on investment as compared with purchasing electricity from a utility and providing process heat with an on-site boiler. Also included in the comparisons and evaluations are results extrapolated to the national level.

  13. Space Transportation Propulsion Technology Symposium. Volume 1: Executive summary

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1991-01-01

    The Space Transportation Propulsion Technology Symposium was held to provide a forum for communication within the propulsion within the propulsion technology developer and user communities. Emphasis was placed on propulsion requirements and initiatives to support current, next generation, and future space transportation systems, with the primary objectives of discerning whether proposed designs truly meet future transportation needs and identifying possible technology gaps, overlaps, and other programmatic deficiencies. Key space transportation propulsion issues were addressed through four panels with government, industry, and academia membership. The panels focused on systems engineering and integration; development, manufacturing and certification; operational efficiency; and program development and cultural issues.

  14. Intelligent Propulsion System Foundation Technology: Summary of Research

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2008-01-01

    The purpose of this cooperative agreement was to develop a foundation of intelligent propulsion technologies for NASA and industry that will have an impact on safety, noise, emissions, and cost. These intelligent engine technologies included sensors, electronics, communications, control logic, actuators, smart materials and structures, and system studies. Furthermore, this cooperative agreement helped prepare future graduates to develop the revolutionary intelligent propulsion technologies that will be needed to ensure pre-eminence of the U.S. aerospace industry. This Propulsion 21 - Phase 11 program consisted of four primary research areas and associated work elements at Ohio universities: 1.0 Turbine Engine Prognostics, 2.0 Active Controls for Emissions and Noise Reduction, 3.0 Active Structural Controls and Performance, and 4.0 System Studies and Integration. Phase l, which was conducted during the period August 1, 2003, through September 30, 2004, has been reported separately.

  15. Intelligent Propulsion System Foundation Technology: Summary of Research

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Williams, James C.

    2004-01-01

    The purpose of this cooperative agreement was to develop a foundation of intelligent propulsion technologies for NASA and industry that will have an impact on safety, noise, emissions and cost. These intelligent engine technologies included sensors, electronics, communications, control logic, actuators, and smart materials and structures. Furthermore this cooperative agreement helped prepare future graduates to develop the revolutionary intelligent propulsion technologies that will be needed to ensure pre-eminence of the U.S. aerospace industry. The program consisted of three primary research areas (and associated work elements at Ohio universities): 1.0 Turbine Engine Prognostics, 2.0 Active Controls for Emissions and Noise Reduction, and 3.0 Active Structural Controls.

  16. Industrial Cogeneration Optimization Program: A summary of two studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    1981-08-01

    Two industrial cogeneration optimization programs were performed to examine the economic and energy saving impacts of adding cogeneration to site specific plants in the chemical, food, pulp and paper, petroleum refining, and textile industries. Industrial cogeneration is reviewed. The two parallel ICOP studies are described. The five industrial sectors are also described, followed by highlights of each of the site specific case studies. Steam turbine cogeneration systems fired by coal or alternative fuels are generally the most attractive in terms of economic performance and oil/gas savings potential. Of the 15 cogeneration systems selected as optimum in the ICOP studies, 11 were coal or wood fired steam turbines. By contrast, gas turbines, combined cycles, and diesel engines, which are limited to oil or gas firing, are usually less economical.

  17. Sensitive oil industry: users of advanced technology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lindsey, Rhonda P.; Barnes, James L.

    1999-01-01

    The oil industry exemplifies mankind's search for resource sin a harsh environment here on the earth. Traditionally, the oil industry has created technological solutions to increasingly difficult exploration, drilling, and production activities as the need has arisen. The depths to which a well must be drilled to produce the finite hydrocarbon resources are increasing and the surface environments during oil and gas activities is the key to success, not information that is hours old or incomplete; but 'real-time' data that responds to the variable environment downhole and allows prediction and prevention. The difference that information makes can be the difference between a successfully drilled well and a blowout that causes permanent damage to the reservoir and may reduce the value of the reserves downhole. The difference that information makes can make the difference between recovering 22 percent of the hydrocarbon reserves in a profitable field and recovering none of the reserves because of an uneconomic bottom line. Sensors of every type are essential in the new oil and gas industry and they must be rugged, accurate, affordable, and long lived. It is not just for the sophisticated majors exploring the very deep waters of the world but for the thousands of independent producers who provide a lion's share of the oil and gas produced in the US domestic market. The Department of Energy has been instrumental in keeping reserves from being lost by funding advancements in sensor technology. Due to sponsorship by the Federal Government, the combined efforts of researchers in the National Laboratories, academic institutions, and industry research centers are producing increasingly accurate tools capable of functioning in extreme conditions with economics acceptable to the accountants of the industry. Three examples of such senors developed with Federal funding are given.

  18. Advanced technology for America's future in space. Executive summary

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    1990-12-01

    This report summarizes the results of a review by a select external technology advisory committee of NASA's recently developed Integrated Technology Plan for the Civil Space Program. This document is the Summary Report from the review by the Space Systems and Technology Advisory Committee (SSTAC), a subcommittee of the NASA Advisory Committee with the assistance of the Space Science and Applications Advisory Committee and the Aerospace Medicine Advisory Committee, and the Aeronautics and Space Engineering Board and Space Studies Board of the National Research Council. The report asks the question 'Why should space technology be a national priority?' The report describes the benefits to the nation as Improving National Competitiveness, Stimulating Quality Science and Engineering Education, Developing Broadly Applicable New Technologies. Specific Benefits for future space endeavors include Improving the Quality for Future U.S. Flight Programs, Reducing the Cost of Access to Space, Increasing Safety and Reliability, Enabling New Space Missions, and Sustaining NASA Expertise. Other improvements and the value of the Integrated Technology Plan are emphasized. Almost uniformly, the review team found that the quality of individual research projects was very high and well integrated with other national efforts.

  19. Advanced Thermionic Technology Program: summary report. Volume 3. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1984-10-01

    This report summarizes the progress made by the Advanced Thermionic Technology Program during the past several years. This Program, sponsored by the US Department of Energy, has had as its goal adapting thermionic devices to generate electricity in a terrestrial (i.e., combustion) environment. Volume 3 (Part D) contains the results of systems studies of primary interest to those involved in identifying and evaluating applications for thermionics. As a general rule of thumb, cogeneration technologies are most attractive to industries when those technologies naturally produce a ration of electrical to thermal output which closely matches the demand within the industrial facilities themselves. Several of the industries which consume the largest amounts of energy have an electrical-to-thermal ratio of about ten percent, as can be seen in Exhibit D-1.1. This closely matches the electrical efficiency of thermionic converters. Thermionic cogeneration has several other unique advantages relative to alternative technologies for cogeneration which should lead to a much broader application of cogeneration in industry. These advantages accrue from the much higher temperatures at which thermionic energy conversion takes place, its suitability for very small as well as large process heaters, and, of course, its production of direct heat rather than process steam. In fact, thermionics can even be coupled to more conventional cogeneration technologies (e.g., steam turbines) to extend their applicability to processes requiring a greater electrical-to-thermal ratio than either cogeneration technology alone can provide. Several examples of thermionic cogeneration are presented in greater detail: copper refining by the Noranda process; thermionic topping cycles for gas turbine; and combined cycle and fossil-fuel steam power plants. 13 refs., 71 figs.

  20. Industrial Arts: Careers in Engineering and Technology for Minority Persons.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Eddy, John P.; Waldrop, Phillip S.

    1981-01-01

    Discusses industrial arts as an opportunity to develop a technological orientation and as a professional technical career base for minorities. Describes employment opportunities for the industrial arts graduate in engineering, technology, and other areas. Considers advantages for minority students. (RC)

  1. Applications of aerospace technology in the electric power industry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1973-01-01

    An overview of the electric power industry, selected NASA contributions to progress in the industry, linkages affecting the transfer and diffusion of technology, and, finally, a perspective on technology transfer issues are presented.

  2. Pipe Explorer{trademark} surveying system. Innovative technology summary report

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1999-06-01

    The US Department of Energy`s (DOE) Chicago Operations Office and the DOE`s Federal Energy Technology Center (FETC) developed a Large Scale Demonstration Project (LSDP) at the Chicago Pile-5 Research Reactor (CP-5) at Argonne National Laboratory-East (ANL). The objective of the LSDP is to demonstrate potentially beneficial decontamination and decommissioning (D and D) technologies in comparison with current baseline technologies. The Pipe Explorer{trademark} system was developed by Science and Engineering Associates, Inc. (SEA), Albuquerque, NM as a deployment method for transporting a variety of survey tools into pipes and ducts. Tools available for use with the system include alpha, beta and gamma radiation detectors; video cameras; and pipe locator beacons. Different versions of this technology have been demonstrated at three other sites; results of these demonstrations are provided in an earlier Innovative Technology Summary Report. As part of a D and D project, characterization radiological contamination inside piping systems is necessary before pipes can be recycled, remediated or disposed. This is usually done manually by surveying over the outside of the piping only, with limited effectiveness and risk of worker exposure. The pipe must be accessible to workers, and embedded pipes in concrete or in the ground would have to be excavated at high cost and risk of exposure to workers. The advantage of the Pipe Explorer is its ability to perform in-situ characterization of pipe internals.

  3. Advanced Lost Foam Casting technology: 1997 summary report

    SciTech Connect

    1997-12-31

    Previous research made significant advances in understanding the Lost Foam Casting (LFC) Process and clearly identified areas where additional research was needed to improve the process and make it more functional in an industrial environment. The current project focused on eight tasks listed as follows: Task 1--pyrolysis defects and sand distortion; Task 2--bronze casting technology; Task 3--steel casting technology; Task 4--sand filling and compaction; Task 5--coating technology; Task 6--precision pattern production; Task 7--computational modeling; and Task 8--project management and technology transfer. This report summarizes the work done under the current contract in all eight tasks in the period of October 1, 1995 through December 31, 1997.

  4. TRADE, INDUSTRIAL, AND TECHNICAL EDUCATION. RCU RESEARCH SUMMARIES.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    California State Dept. of Education, Sacramento. Research Coordinating Unit.

    RESEARCH REPRESENTATIVE OF THE TYPE RECENTLY COMPLETED IN THE FIELD OF INDUSTRIAL AND TECHNICAL EDUCATION IS SUMMARIZED. STUDIES IN VOCATIONAL-TECHNICAL EDUCATION AT THE POST-HIGH SCHOOL LEVEL ARE CONCERNED WITH SCHOOLS AND STUDENTS, TEACHING TECHNIQUES, AND CURRICULUM EFFECTIVENESS. RESEARCH RELATING TO TRAINING AND RETRAINING CONCERNED…

  5. Report on Survey of Industry Needs for Quality. Summary Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Neylon, Kevin; And Others

    The TAFE (Technical and Further Education) National Centre for Research and Development conducted a survey to determine industry needs for quality training in Australia. Interviews were conducted with managers in manufacturing and tourism/hospitality companies throughout Australia, especially with firms with a high reputation. Interview forms were…

  6. Industrial wastewater treatment technology, Second edition

    SciTech Connect

    Patterson, J.W.

    1985-01-01

    The author has organized the book by specific pollutant or class of pollutants for reference. For each topic there is a description of sources and typical industry discharge levels of the pollutant, the appropriate treatment technologies and their applications and limitations, as well as the relative costs of each. Major Sections: Aluminium; Arsenic; Barium; Cadmium; Hexavalent Chromium; Trivalent Chromium; Copper; Cyanide; Fluoride; Iron; Lead; Manganese; Mercury; Nickel; Organic and Ammonia Nitrogen; Nitrite and Nitrate Nitrogen; Oil and Grease; Toxic Organics; pH Control; Phenol; Selenium; Silver; Total Dissolved Solids; Zinc.

  7. Industrial ecology at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory summary statement

    SciTech Connect

    Gilmartin, T.J.

    1996-05-21

    This statement summarizes Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory`s committment to making important scientific, technological, and business contributions to global sustainability. The quest has many aspects, some socio-political or economic and some technological, and some in which the soft and hard sciences become indistinguishable, as in visionary national strategies, like Holland`s, and futuristic regional and city development plans, like those of Kagoshima and Chattanooga.

  8. Aerosol sensing technologies in the mining industry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Janisko, Samuel J.; Noll, James D.; Cauda, Emanuele E.

    2011-06-01

    Recent health, safety and environmental regulations are causing an increased demand for monitoring of aerosols in the mining industry. Of particular concern are airborne concentrations of combustible and toxic rock dusts as well as particulate matter generated from diesel engines in underground mines. In response, the National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health (NIOSH) has been evaluating a number of real time sensing technologies for potential use in underground mines. In particular, extensive evaluation has been done on filter-based light extinction using elemental carbon (EC) as a surrogate measurement of total diesel particulate matter (DPM) mass concentration as well as mechanical tapered element oscillating microbalance (TEOM) technology for measurement of both DPM and rock dust mass concentrations. Although these technologies are promising in their ability to accurately measure mine aerosols for their respective applications, there are opportunities for design improvements or alternative technologies that may significantly enhance the monitoring of mine aerosols. Such alterations can lead to increases in sensitivity or a reduction in the size and cost of these devices. This paper provides a brief overview of current practices and presents results of NIOSH research in this area. It concludes with a short discussion of future directions in mine aerosol sensing research.

  9. Sustainable technologies for the building construction industry

    SciTech Connect

    Vanegas, J.A.; DuBose, J.R.; Pearce, A.R.

    1995-12-31

    As the dawn of the twenty-first century approaches, the current pattern of unsustainable, inequitable and unstable asymmetric demographic and economic growth has forced many segments of society to come together in facing a critical challenge: how can societies across the world meet their current basic human needs, aspirations and desires, without compromising the ability of future generations to meet their own needs? At the core of this challenge is the question: how can the human race maintain in perpetuity a healthy, physically attractive and biologically productive environment. The development path that we have been taking, in the past few centuries, has been ultimately detrimental to the health of our surrounding ecological context. We are consuming an increasing share of the natural resources available to use on this planet, and we are creating sufficiently large amounts of waste and pollution such that the earth can no longer assimilate our wastes and recover from the negative impacts. This is a result of a growing population as well as new technologies which make it easier for use to access natural resources and also require the consumption of more resources. Unsustainable technology has been the result of linear rather than cyclic thinking. The paradigm shift from linear to cyclic thinking in technological design is the crux of the shift from unsustainability to sustainability. This paper discusses the implications for the building design and construction industries. Strategies, technologies, and opportunities are presented to improve the sustainability of the built environment.

  10. Research and Technology Operating Plan. Summary: Fiscal year 1976 research and technology program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1976-01-01

    A compilation of the summary portions of each of the Research and Technology Operating Plans (RTOP) used for management review and control of research currently in progress throughout NASA was presented. The document is arranged in five sections. The first one contains citations and abstracts of the RTOP. This is followed by four indexes: subject, technical monitor, responsible NASA organization, and RTOP number.

  11. Ceramic Technology Project database: March 1990 summary report. DOE/ORNL Ceramic Technology Project

    SciTech Connect

    Keyes, B.L.P.

    1992-07-01

    This report is the fifth in a series of semiannual data summary reports on information being stored in the Ceramic Technology Project (CTP) database. The overall system status as of March 31, 1990, is summarized, and the latest additions of ceramic mechanical properties data are given for zirconia, silicon carbide, and silicon nitride ceramic mechanical properties data, including some properties on brazed specimens.

  12. A Comparative Analysis of Industrial Technology Education in Minnesota and the Requirements of Industry.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Strom, Irving Elner

    Questionnaires designed to determine to what extent existing 4-year industrial technology curriculums in the State of Minnesota were meeting the needs of the selected Minnesota industries were returned from all existing 4-year industrial technology programs and from 111 (80 percent) selected industries. Some of the findings were: (1) Aeronautics,…

  13. An Analysis of Industrial Technology Curriculum and Its Significance to the Casting Industry.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hauser, Roger Emmett

    The purpose of this study was to determine to what extent industrial technology programs are training technologists in light of the needs of the casting industry. To determine the type of curriculum needed to prepare individuals for entry into the casting industry, and to study industrial technology programs as they relate to metal casting,…

  14. Educational Resources for the Machine Tool Industry. Executive Summary.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Texas State Technical Coll. System, Waco.

    This document describes the MASTER (Machine Tool Advanced Skills Educational Resources) program, a geographic partnership of seven of the nation's best 2-year technical and community colleges located in seven states. The project developed and disseminated a national training model for manufacturing processes and new technologies within the…

  15. 15 CFR 1160.3 - Assistance to industrial technology partnerships.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 15 Commerce and Foreign Trade 3 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Assistance to industrial technology... Trade (Continued) TECHNOLOGY ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCE PRODUCTIVITY, TECHNOLOGY AND INNOVATION Promotion of Private Sector Industrial Technology Partnerships § 1160.3 Assistance to...

  16. Report on Community College Industrial Production Technology Programs.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Illinois Community Coll. Board, Springfield.

    This report provides an in-depth analysis of the Industrial Production Technology Programs in Illinois, which, according to Illinois Community College Board policy, must be reviewed at least once every five years. The disciplines included in this report are: industrial manufacturing technology, corrosion technology, plastics technology, and…

  17. Assessment of energy saving technologies with potential for applications in US industries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    1982-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to assess and evaluate information on energy technologies displayed at international trade shows was assessed and evaluated. Technologies that had potential for saving energy in applications in US industries were identified. These technologies are identified and concise summaries on potential energy savings, economics, basic operational considerations, and potential applications are prepared. An objective of this study was to determine whether international trade shows can provide a convenient and useful forum for the identification of energy saving technologies which could have wider applications in US industry. Forty-four technologies were chosen for inclusion which are grouped into the following categories: heat recovery devices, heat exchangers, heat pumps, and various other technologies. Some of the technologies include: a low energy drying system, solid waste in cement manufacturing, boiler fuel optimization system, multifuel boiler plant and coal combustion efficiency improvements.

  18. ENVIRONMENTAL TECHNOLOGY VERIFICATION REPORT: EXEL INDUSTRIAL AIRMIX SPRAY GUN

    EPA Science Inventory

    The Environmental Technology Verification Program has partnered with Concurrent Technologies Corp. to verify innovative coatings and coating equipment technologies for reducing air emissions. This report describes the performance of EXEL Industrial's Kremlin Airmix high transfer ...

  19. MHD magnet technology development program summary, September 1982

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1983-11-01

    The program of MHD magnet technology development conducted for the US Department of Energy by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology during the past five years is summarized. The general strategy is explained, the various parts of the program are described and the results are discussed. Subjects covered include component analysis, research and development aimed at improving the technology base, preparation of reference designs for commercial-scale magnets with associated design evaluations, manufacturability studies and cost estimations, the detail design and procurement of MHD test facility magnets involving transfer of technology to industry, investigations of accessory subsystem characteristics and magnet-flow-train interfacing considerations and the establishment of tentative recommendations for design standards, quality assurance procedures and safety procedures. A systematic approach (framework) developed to aid in the selection of the most suitable commercial-scale magnet designs is presented and the program status as of September 1982 is reported. Recommendations are made for future work needed to complete the design evaluation and selection process and to provide a sound technological base for the detail design and construction of commercial-scale MHD magnets. 85 references.

  20. Technology transfer into the solid propulsion industry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Campbell, Ralph L.; Thomson, Lawrence J.

    1995-01-01

    This paper is a survey of the waste minimization efforts of industries outside of aerospace for possible applications in the manufacture of solid rocket motors (SRM) for NASA. The Redesigned Solid Rocket Motor (RSRM) manufacturing plan was used as the model for processes involved in the production of an SRM. A literature search was conducted to determine the recycling, waste minimization, and waste treatment methods used in the commercial sector that might find application in SRM production. Manufacturers, trade organizations, and professional associations were also contacted. Waste minimization efforts for current processes and replacement technologies, which might reduce the amount or severity of the wastes generated in SRM production, were investigated. An overview of the results of this effort are presented in this paper.

  1. Engineering and Industrial Fields. Revised Summary Report: Technical Employment in Northeast Florida.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Baker, William E.; And Others

    The document is one of five summary reports, all part of a Pre-Technical Curriculum Planning Project for secondary students who aspire to technical employment or post secondary technical education. This report represents the results of an assessment of the northeast Florida area's technical occupations in engineering and industrial fields. A…

  2. IDC RP2 & 3 US Industry Standard Cost Estimate Summary.

    SciTech Connect

    Harris, James M.; Huelskamp, Robert M.

    2015-01-01

    Sandia National Laboratories has prepared a ROM cost estimate for budgetary planning for the IDC Reengineering Phase 2 & 3 effort, using a commercial software cost estimation tool calibrated to US industry performance parameters. This is not a cost estimate for Sandia to perform the project. This report provides the ROM cost estimate and describes the methodology, assumptions, and cost model details used to create the ROM cost estimate. ROM Cost Estimate Disclaimer Contained herein is a Rough Order of Magnitude (ROM) cost estimate that has been provided to enable initial planning for this proposed project. This ROM cost estimate is submitted to facilitate informal discussions in relation to this project and is NOT intended to commit Sandia National Laboratories (Sandia) or its resources. Furthermore, as a Federally Funded Research and Development Center (FFRDC), Sandia must be compliant with the Anti-Deficiency Act and operate on a full-cost recovery basis. Therefore, while Sandia, in conjunction with the Sponsor, will use best judgment to execute work and to address the highest risks and most important issues in order to effectively manage within cost constraints, this ROM estimate and any subsequent approved cost estimates are on a 'full-cost recovery' basis. Thus, work can neither commence nor continue unless adequate funding has been accepted and certified by DOE.

  3. Summary of mineral industry activities in Colorado. Part I: coal

    SciTech Connect

    Pascoe, D.M.

    1981-01-01

    Coal production for 1981 was a record, with production at 19,701,496 tons of coal mined and reported to the Division of Mines. This was a 4.95% increase over 1980. Statewide Divisional efforts to support a practical type of health and safety training program while encouraging skill education appropriate to mining needs, saw extensive accomplishment in 1981. The Division gave direct or monetary support through training grant funds, largely used for reimbursed tuition from strategically located state vocational schools who taught on campus as well as at mine sites. Total miner training reported by area schools to the Division of Mines indicates that 8408 students received 86,251 hours of classroom and on-the-job training. It is hoped that the education and training programs throughout the state will be continued in an effort to educate both the new and old miners. We believe this is the best approach to the coal industry's never ending task of reducing both lost-time and fatal accidents. Coal mine certification in all categories totaled 780 certificates issued. This was a decrease from 1980, and will probably decrease again in 1982 with the initiation of the $25.00 fee for each examination. Coal mining activity is reported by district.

  4. Industrial Arts Education Competency Catalogs for Communication Technology, Materials and Processes Technology, Power and Transportation Technology.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dugger, William E.; And Others

    Three competency catalogs of tasks for industrial arts programs are presented. These include catalogs in Communications Technology, Materials and Processes Technology, and Power and Transportation Technology. The purpose of each catalog is to establish a basis for program content selection and criterion levels from which one may measure to see if…

  5. Exploring Computer Technology. The Illinois Plan for Industrial Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Illinois State Univ., Normal.

    This guide, which is one in the "Exploration" series of curriculum guides intended to assist junior high and middle school industrial educators in helping their students explore diverse industrial situations and technologies used in industry, deals with exploring computer technology. The following topics are covered in the individual lessons: the…

  6. The NASA hydrogen energy systems technology study: A summary

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Laumann, E. A.

    1976-01-01

    The results and conclusions of the study, which found a significant current usage of hydrogen, dominated by chemical-industry needs and supplied mostly from natural gas and petroleum feedstocks are discussed. These needs are expected to increase significantly in the remainder of this century and to largely outgrow the current means of supply. Several hydrogen production methods were evaluated. Those not dependent on fossil resources were found to be presently more costly and technically more difficult than fossil-feedstock-based technologies, but it is clear that they will eventually need to be implemented.

  7. Industrial Perspectives on Innovation and Interactions with Universities. Summary of Interviews with Senior Industrial Officials.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Industrial Research Inst., New York, NY.

    A study was done of the views of senior research managers in industry on the roles of business and universities in innovation, techical change, and competitiveness. This effort stemmed from an earlier set of roundtable discussions on university-industry research alliances and sought to add a stronger component of industrial views to an ongoing…

  8. The 1995 HEV challenge: Results and technology summary

    SciTech Connect

    LeBlanc, N.; Larsen, R.; Duoba, M.

    1996-03-01

    The objective of this paper is to analyze and summarize the performance results and the technology used in the 1995 Hybrid Electric Vehicle (HEV) Challenge. Government and industry are exploring hybrid electric vehicle technology to significantly improve fuel economy and reduce emissions of the vehicles without sacrificing performance. This last in a three-year series of HEV competitions provided the testing grounds to evaluate the different approaches of 29 universities and colleges constructing HEVS. These HEVs competed in an affay of events, including: acceleration, emissions testing, consumer acceptance, range, vehicle handling, HVAC testing, fuel economy, and engineering design. The teams also documented the attributes of their vehicles in the technical reports. The strategies and approaches to HEV design are analyzed on the basis of the data from each of the events. The overall performance for promising HEV approaches is also examined. Additional significant design approaches employed by the teams are presented, and the results from the events are discussed.

  9. Direct conversion technology: Annual summary report CY 1988

    SciTech Connect

    Massier, P.F.; Bankston, C.P.; Fabris, G.; Kirol, L.D.

    1988-12-01

    The overall objective of the Direct Conversion Technology task is to develop an experimentally verified technology base for promising direct thermal-to-electric energy conversion systems that have potential application for energy conservation in the end-use sectors. This report contains progress of research on the Alkali Metal Thermal-to-Electric Converter (AMTEC), and on the Two-Phase Liquid-Metal MHD Electrical Generator (LMMHD) for the period January 1988 through December 1988. Research on these concepts was initiated during October 1987. In addition, status reviews and assessments are presented for thermomagnetic converter concepts and for thermoelastic converters (Nitinol heat engines). Reports prepared on previous occasions contain discussions on the following other direct conversion concepts: thermoelectric, pyroelectric, thermionic thermophotovoltaic and thermoacoustic; and also, more complete discussions of AMTEC and LMMHD systems. A tabulated summary of the various systems which have been reviewed thus far has been prepared. Some of the important technical research needs are listed and a schematic of each system is shown. These tabulations are included herein as figures. 43 refs., 26 figs., 1 tab.

  10. Transition costs in the electricity industry: A summary of issues

    SciTech Connect

    Baxter, L.; Hirst, E.; Hadley, S.

    1996-10-01

    Progress is evident as the restructuring debate in the U.S. electricity industry completes its third year. The Federal Energy Regulatory Commission released a final rule on transmission open access-a key element to facilitate more efficient wholesale markets. The majority of states have initiated investigations or discussions on restructuring retail markets. Yet hurdles remain in formulating and implementing state-level restructuring proposals. Perhaps foremost among these hurdles is the issue of transition costs (the potential monetary losses experienced by utilities, consumers, and other economic actors as a result of government initiatives to transform electricity generation from a regulated to a competitive market). Transition costs are approximately equal to the difference between the embedded cost for generation services under traditional cost-of-service regulation and the competitive-market price for power. When government takes action to open current monopoly franchises to multiple generation providers and the competitive-market price falls below embedded generation costs, then transition costs will arise. Transition costs will include one or more of the following four classes of costs: (1) assets, primarily utility-owned power plants; (2) liabilities, primarily long-term power-purchase and fuel-supply contracts; (3) regulatory assets, including deferred expenses and costs that regulators allow utilities to place on their balance sheets; and (4) public-policy programs, such as energy efficiency, low-income programs, and research and development. What is at issue in the transition-cost debate? The debate turns on four questions: (1) How large are the potential transition costs from restructuring? (2) How are these costs estimated? (3) What, if anything, might be done to address these costs? (4) Who will ultimately pay for any remaining costs and how? This paper summarizes some of the key results from a project at ORNL that addresses these four questions.

  11. Projection display industry market and technology trends

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Castellano, Joseph A.; Mentley, David E.

    1995-04-01

    The projection display industry is diverse, embracing a variety of technologies and applications. In recent years, there has been a high level of interest in projection displays, particularly those using LCD panels or light valves because of the difficulty in making large screen, direct view displays. Many developers feel that projection displays will be the wave of the future for large screen HDTV (high-definition television), penetrating the huge existing market for direct view CRT-based televisions. Projection displays can have the images projected onto a screen either from the rear or the front; the main characteristic is their ability to be viewed by more than one person. In addition to large screen home television receivers, there are numerous other uses for projection displays including conference room presentations, video conferences, closed circuit programming, computer-aided design, and military command/control. For any given application, the user can usually choose from several alternative technologies. These include CRT front or rear projectors, LCD front or rear projectors, LCD overhead projector plate monitors, various liquid or solid-state light valve projectors, or laser-addressed systems. The overall worldwide market for projection information displays of all types and for all applications, including home television, will top DOL4.6 billion in 1995 and DOL6.45 billion in 2001.

  12. New Technology Industries. Skills Task Force Research Paper 10.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hendry, Chris

    This paper provides an overview of the growth of new technology industries in Great Britain and the skills needed for these industries. The industries are advanced materials, biotechnology, and opto-electronics. The report profiles the current status, expected growth, and skills needed for each of these industry sectors. It also points out the…

  13. Contaminant plumes containment and remediation focus area. Technology summary

    SciTech Connect

    1995-06-01

    EM has established a new approach to managing environmental technology research and development in critical areas of interest to DOE. The Contaminant Plumes Containment and Remediation (Plumes) Focus Area is one of five areas targeted to implement the new approach, actively involving representatives from basic research, technology implementation, and regulatory communities in setting objectives and evaluating results. This document presents an overview of current EM activities within the Plumes Focus Area to describe to the appropriate organizations the current thrust of the program and developing input for its future direction. The Plumes Focus Area is developing remediation technologies that address environmental problems associated with certain priority contaminants found at DOE sites, including radionuclides, heavy metals, and dense non-aqueous phase liquids (DNAPLs). Technologies for cleaning up contaminants of concern to both DOE and other federal agencies, such as volatile organic compounds (VOCs), polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs), and other organics and inorganic compounds, will be developed by leveraging resources in cooperation with industry and interagency programs.

  14. New Ways in Technology Transfer from University Towards Industry.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    van den Kroonenberg, H.H.

    1983-01-01

    Three approaches to technology transfer are described: passive, stimulative, and active. A condition for successful technology transfer to small- and medium-sized industry is the availability of "receivers" in the industries. Stimulating young engineers to start their own small company can affect technology transfer positively. (MSE)

  15. Advanced-technology space station study: Summary of systems and pacing technologies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Butterfield, A. J.; Garn, P. A.; King, C. B.; Queijo, M. J.

    1990-01-01

    The principal system features defined for the Advanced Technology Space Station are summarized and the 21 pacing technologies identified during the course of the study are described. The descriptions of system configurations were extracted from four previous study reports. The technological areas focus on those systems particular to all large spacecraft which generate artificial gravity by rotation. The summary includes a listing of the functions, crew requirements and electrical power demand that led to the studied configuration. The pacing technologies include the benefits of advanced materials, in-orbit assembly requirements, stationkeeping, evaluations of electrical power generation alternates, and life support systems. The descriptions of systems show the potential for synergies and identifies the beneficial interactions that can result from technological advances.

  16. Technology Education Guidelines: Vocational Industrial, Industrial Arts, Home Economics.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Manitoba Dept. of Education and Training, Winnipeg. Curriculum Services Branch.

    This guide is intended as a source book of policies, ideas, and suggestions for use by Manitoba division and school administrators responsibilities for planning, implementing, and monitoring courses in industrial arts, home economics, and vocational-industrial education. Presented in Section 1 is background on the development of…

  17. METAL FORMING (INDUSTRIAL MULTIMEDIA BRANCH, SUSTAINABLE TECHNOLOGY DIVISION, NRMRL)

    EPA Science Inventory

    The Industrial Multimedia Branch's research program in metal products manufacturing was developed to identify environmental problems and deliver solutions for environmental improvements based on sustainable technology to the industry. There are over 35,000 manufacturing establish...

  18. Office of Industrial Technologies (OIT) Financial Assistance Brochure

    SciTech Connect

    Ericksen, E.

    1999-02-04

    In today's competitive world markets, the success of U.S. industry hinges on technological advances. Financial Assistance helps technology innovators develop and deliver clean, energy-saving technologies to the marketplace. Two Office of Industrial Technologies (OIT) programs Inventions and Innovation and NICE3 provide independent inventors, technology developers, and industry with easy access to a flexible package of services. Together, these programs issue 35 to 40 new grants each year to address pressing energy and environmental issues. Financial Assistance focuses specifically on technologies that can potentially improve energy efficiency, reduce wastes, and enhance productivity.

  19. Industrial Technologies Program Research Plan for Energy-Intensive Process Industries

    SciTech Connect

    Chapas, Richard B.; Colwell, Jeffery A.

    2007-10-01

    In this plan, the Industrial Technologies Program (ITP) identifies the objectives of its cross-cutting strategy for conducting research in collaboration with industry and U.S. Department of Energy national laboratories to develop technologies that improve the efficiencies of energy-intensive process industries.

  20. Systems autonomy technology: Executive summary and program plan

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bull, John S (Editor)

    1987-01-01

    The National Space Strategy approved by the President and Congress in 1984 sets for NASA a major goal of conducting effective and productive space applications and technology programs which contribute materially toward United States leadership and security. To contribute to this goal, OAST supports the Nation's civil and defense space programs and overall economic growth. OAST objectives are to ensure timely provision of new concepts and advanced technologies, to support both the development of NASA missions in space and the space activities of industry and other organizations, to utilize the strengths of universities in conducting the NASA space research and technology program, and to maintain the NASA centers in positions of strength in critical space technology areas. In line with these objectives, NASA has established a new program in space automation and robotics that will result in the development and transfer and automation technology to increase the capabilities, productivity, and safety of NASA space programs including the Space Station, automated space platforms, lunar bases, Mars missions, and other deep space ventures. The NASA/OAST Automation and Robotics program is divided into two parts. Ames Research Center has the lead role in developing and demonstrating System Autonomy capabilities for space systems that need to make their own decisions and do their own planning. The Jet Propulsion Laboratory has the lead role for Telerobotics (that portion of the program that has a strong human operator component in the control loop and some remote handling requirement in space). This program is intended to be a working document for NASA Headquarters, Program Offices, and implementing Project Management.

  1. The Western Environmental Technology Office (WETO), Butte, Montana. Technology summary (Revised)

    SciTech Connect

    1996-03-01

    This document has been prepared by the US Department of Energy`s (DOE`s) Office of Environmental Management (EM) Office of Science and Technology (OST) to highlight its research, development, demonstration, testing, and evaluation (RDDT&E) activities funded through the Western environmental Technology Office (WETO) in Butte, Montana. Technologies and processes described in this document have the potential to enhance DOE`s cleanup and waste management efforts, as well as improve US industry`s competitiveness in global environmental markets. The information presented in this document has been assembled from recently produced OST documents that highlight technology development activities within each of the OST program elements and Focus Areas. This document presents one in a series for each of DOE`s Operations Office and Energy Technology Centers.

  2. Research and technology operating plan summary: Fiscal year 1975 research and technology program. [space programs, energy technology, and aerospace sciences

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1975-01-01

    Summaries are presented of Research and Technology Operating Plans currently in progress throughout NASA. Citations and abstracts of the operating plans are presented along with a subject index, technical monitor index, and responsible NASA organization index. Research programs presented include those carried out in the Office of Aeronautics and Space Technology, Office of Energy Programs, Office of Applications, Office of Space Sciences, Office of Tracking and Data Acquisition, and the Office of Manned Space Flight.

  3. Demonstration of Autonomous Rendezvous Technology (DART) Project Summary

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rumford, TImothy E.

    2003-01-01

    Since the 1960's, NASA has performed numerous rendezvous and docking missions. The common element of all US rendezvous and docking is that the spacecraft has always been piloted by astronauts. Only the Russian Space Program has developed and demonstrated an autonomous capability. The Demonstration of Autonomous Rendezvous Technology (DART) project currently funded under NASA's Space Launch Initiative (SLI) Cycle I, provides a key step in establishing an autonomous rendezvous capability for the United States. DART's objective is to demonstrate, in space, the hardware and software necessary for autonomous rendezvous. Orbital Sciences Corporation intends to integrate an Advanced Video Guidance Sensor and Autonomous Rendezvous and Proximity Operations algorithms into a Pegasus upper stage in order to demonstrate the capability to autonomously rendezvous with a target currently in orbit. The DART mission will occur in April 2004. The launch site will be Vandenburg AFB and the launch vehicle will be a Pegasus XL equipped with a Hydrazine Auxiliary Propulsion System 4th stage. All mission objectives will be completed within a 24 hour period. The paper provides a summary of mission objectives, mission overview and a discussion on the design features of the chase and target vehicles.

  4. Challenges in industrial fermentation technology research.

    PubMed

    Formenti, Luca Riccardo; Nørregaard, Anders; Bolic, Andrijana; Hernandez, Daniela Quintanilla; Hagemann, Timo; Heins, Anna-Lena; Larsson, Hilde; Mears, Lisa; Mauricio-Iglesias, Miguel; Krühne, Ulrich; Gernaey, Krist V

    2014-06-01

    Industrial fermentation processes are increasingly popular, and are considered an important technological asset for reducing our dependence on chemicals and products produced from fossil fuels. However, despite their increasing popularity, fermentation processes have not yet reached the same maturity as traditional chemical processes, particularly when it comes to using engineering tools such as mathematical models and optimization techniques. This perspective starts with a brief overview of these engineering tools. However, the main focus is on a description of some of the most important engineering challenges: scaling up and scaling down fermentation processes, the influence of morphology on broth rheology and mass transfer, and establishing novel sensors to measure and control insightful process parameters. The greatest emphasis is on the challenges posed by filamentous fungi, because of their wide applications as cell factories and therefore their relevance in a White Biotechnology context. Computational fluid dynamics (CFD) is introduced as a promising tool that can be used to support the scaling up and scaling down of bioreactors, and for studying mixing and the potential occurrence of gradients in a tank. PMID:24846823

  5. Innovative technology summary report: Sealed-seam sack suits

    SciTech Connect

    1998-09-01

    Sealed-seam sack suits are an improved/innovative safety and industrial hygiene technology designed to protect workers from dermal exposure to contamination. Most of these disposable, synthetic-fabric suits are more protective than cotton suits, and are also water-resistant and gas permeable. Some fabrics provide a filter to aerosols, which is important to protection against contamination, while allowing air to pass, increasing comfort level of workers. It is easier to detect body-moisture breakthrough with the disposable suits than with cotton, which is also important to protecting workers from contamination. These suits present a safe and cost-effective (6% to 17% less expensive than the baseline) alternative to traditional protective clothing. This report covers the period from October 1996 to August 1997. During that time, sealed-seam sack suits were demonstrated during daily activities under normal working conditions at the C Reactor and under environmentally controlled conditions at the Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL).

  6. Offset Stream Technology Test-Summary of Results

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brown, Clifford A.; Bridges, James E.; Henderson, Brenda

    2007-01-01

    Statistical jet noise prediction codes that accurately predict spectral directivity for both cold and hot jets are highly sought both in industry and academia. Their formulation, whether based upon manipulations of the Navier-Stokes equations or upon heuristic arguments, require substantial experimental observation of jet turbulence statistics. Unfortunately, the statistics of most interest involve the space-time correlation of flow quantities, especially velocity. Until the last 10 years, all turbulence statistics were made with single-point probes, such as hotwires or laser Doppler anemometry. Particle image velocimetry (PIV) brought many new insights with its ability to measure velocity fields over large regions of jets simultaneously; however, it could not measure velocity at rates higher than a few fields per second, making it unsuitable for obtaining temporal spectra and correlations. The development of time-resolved PIV, herein called TR-PIV, has removed this limitation, enabling measurement of velocity fields at high resolution in both space and time. In this paper, ground-breaking results from the application of TR-PIV to single-flow hot jets are used to explore the impact of heat on turbulent statistics of interest to jet noise models. First, a brief summary of validation studies is reported, undertaken to show that the new technique produces the same trusted results as hotwire at cold, low-speed jets. Second, velocity spectra from cold and hot jets are compared to see the effect of heat on the spectra. It is seen that heated jets possess 10 percent more turbulence intensity compared to the unheated jets with the same velocity. The spectral shapes, when normalized using Strouhal scaling, are insensitive to temperature if the stream-wise location is normalized relative to the potential core length. Similarly, second order velocity correlations, of interest in modeling of jet noise sources, are also insensitive to temperature as well.

  7. Technology Education in Taiwan: A Transition from Industrial Arts to Living Technology.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lee, Lung-Sheng Steven

    Secondary-level technology education in Taiwan is shifting its emphasis from industrial arts to living technology in an effort to overcome the following problems: industrial arts is seen as a subordinate subject; the public's perceptions are not aligned with the field; and industrial technology teachers have had to struggle with huge class sizes…

  8. A continuing program for technology transfer to the apparel industry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Clingman, W. H.

    1971-01-01

    A six month program has been carried out to investigate various mechanisms for transferring technology to industry. This program has focused on transfer to the apparel industry through the Apparel Research Foundation. The procedure was to analyze the problem, obtain potentially relevant aerospace technology, and then transfer this technology to the industry organization. This was done in a specific case. Technology was identified relevant to stitchless joining, and this technology was transferred to the Apparel Research Foundation. The feasibility and ground rules for carrying out such activities on a broader scale were established. A specific objective was to transfer new technology from the industry organization to the industry itself. This required the establishment of an application engineering program. Another transfer mechanism tested was publication of solutions to industry problems in a format familiar to the industry. This is to be distinguished from circulating descriptions of new technology. Focus is on the industry problem and the manager is given a formula for solving it that he can follow. It was concluded that this mechanism can complement the problem statement approach to technology transfer. It is useful in achieving transfer when a large amount of application engineering is not necessary. A wide audience is immediately exposed to the technology. On the other hand, the major manufacturing problems which require a sophisticated technical solution integrating many innovations are less likely to be helped.

  9. High technology industries: Profiles and outlooks. The semiconductor industry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    This profile is designed to assess the international competitive position of the U.S. Semiconductor Industry; pinpoint the major foreign and domestic challenges to American semiconductor manufacturers; and present for discussion possible options in terms of U.S. government policies affecting the sector's international standing.

  10. VOCs in Non-Arid Soils Integrated Demonstration: Technology summary

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1994-02-01

    The Volatile Organic Compounds (VOCs) in Non-Arid Soils Integrated Demonstration (ID) was initiated in 1989. Objectives for the ID were to test the integrated demonstration concept, demonstrate and evaluate innovative technologies/systems for the remediation of VOC contamination in soils and groundwater, and to transfer technologies and systems to internal and external customers for use in fullscale remediation programs. The demonstration brought together technologies from DOE laboratories, other government agencies, and industry for demonstration at a single test bed. The Savannah River Site was chosen as the location for this ID as the result of having soil and groundwater contaminated with VOCS. The primary contaminants, trichlorethylene and tetrachloroethylene, originated from an underground process sewer line servicing a metal fabrication facility at the M-Area. Some of the major technical accomplishments for the ID include the successful demonstration of the following: In situ air stripping coupled with horizontal wells to remediate sites through air injection and vacuum extraction; Crosshole geophysical tomography for mapping moisture content and lithologic properties of the contaminated media; In situ radio frequency and ohmic heating to increase mobility, of the contaminants, thereby speeding recovery and the remedial process; High-energy corona destruction of VOCs in the off-gas of vapor recovery wells; Application of a Brayton cycle heat pump to regenerate carbon adsorption media used to trap VOCs from the offgas of recovery wells; In situ permeable flow sensors and the colloidal borescope to determine groundwater flow; Chemical sensors to rapidly quantify chlorinated solvent contamination in the subsurface; In situ bioremediation through methane/nutrient injection to enhance degradation of contaminants by methanotrophic bateria.