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Sample records for industry copper indium

  1. Precursors for formation of copper selenide, indium selenide, copper indium diselenide, and/or copper indium gallium diselenide films

    SciTech Connect

    Curtis, Calvin J; Miedaner, Alexander; Van Hest, Maikel; Ginley, David S

    2014-11-04

    Liquid-based precursors for formation of Copper Selenide, Indium Selenide, Copper Indium Diselenide, and/or copper Indium Galium Diselenide include copper-organoselenides, particulate copper selenide suspensions, copper selenide ethylene diamine in liquid solvent, nanoparticulate indium selenide suspensions, and indium selenide ethylene diamine coordination compounds in solvent. These liquid-based precursors can be deposited in liquid form onto substrates and treated by rapid thermal processing to form crystalline copper selenide and indium selenide films.

  2. Derived reference doses for three compounds used in the photovoltaics industry: Copper indium diselenide, copper gallium diselenide, and cadmium telluride

    SciTech Connect

    Moskowitz, P.D.; Bernholc, N.; DePhillips, M.P.; Viren, J.

    1995-07-06

    Polycrystalline thin-film photovoltaic modules made from copper indium diselenide (CIS), copper gallium diselenide (CGS), and cadmium telluride (CdTe) arc nearing commercial development. A wide range of issues are being examined as these materials move from the laboratory to large-scale production facilities to ensure their commercial success. Issues of traditional interest include module efficiency, stability and cost. More recently, there is increased focus given to environmental, health and safety issues surrounding the commercialization of these same devices. An examination of the toxicological properties of these materials, and their chemical parents is fundamental to this discussion. Chemicals that can present large hazards to human health or the environment are regulated often more strictly than those that are less hazardous. Stricter control over how these materials are handled and disposed can increase the costs associated with the production and use of these modules dramatically. Similarly, public perception can be strongly influenced by the inherent biological hazard that these materials possess. Thus, this report: presents a brief background tutorial on how toxicological data are developed and used; overviews the toxicological data available for CIS, CGS and CdTe; develops ``reference doses`` for each of these compounds; compares the reference doses for these compounds with those of their parents; discusses the implications of these findings to photovoltaics industry.

  3. Formation of copper-indium-selenide and/or copper-indium-gallium-selenide films from indium selenide and copper selenide precursors

    DOEpatents

    Curtis, Calvin J.; Miedaner, Alexander; Van Hest, Maikel; Ginley, David S.; Nekuda, Jennifer A.

    2011-11-15

    Liquid-based indium selenide and copper selenide precursors, including copper-organoselenides, particulate copper selenide suspensions, copper selenide ethylene diamine in liquid solvent, nanoparticulate indium selenide suspensions, and indium selenide ethylene diamine coordination compounds in solvent, are used to form crystalline copper-indium-selenide, and/or copper indium gallium selenide films (66) on substrates (52).

  4. 40 CFR 721.10391 - Copper gallium indium selenide.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 31 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Copper gallium indium selenide. 721... Substances § 721.10391 Copper gallium indium selenide. (a) Chemical substance and significant new uses subject to reporting. (1) The chemical substance identified as copper gallium indium selenide (PMN...

  5. 40 CFR 721.10391 - Copper gallium indium selenide.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 32 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Copper gallium indium selenide. 721... Substances § 721.10391 Copper gallium indium selenide. (a) Chemical substance and significant new uses subject to reporting. (1) The chemical substance identified as copper gallium indium selenide (PMN...

  6. 40 CFR 721.10391 - Copper gallium indium selenide.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 32 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Copper gallium indium selenide. 721... Substances § 721.10391 Copper gallium indium selenide. (a) Chemical substance and significant new uses subject to reporting. (1) The chemical substance identified as copper gallium indium selenide (PMN...

  7. Preparation Of Copper Indium Gallium Diselenide Films For Solar Cells

    DOEpatents

    Bhattacharya, Raghu N.; Contreras, Miguel A.; Keane, James; Tennant, Andrew L. , Tuttle, John R.; Ramanathan, Kannan; Noufi, Rommel

    1998-08-08

    High quality thin films of copper-indium-gallium-diselenide useful in the production of solar cells are prepared by electrodepositing at least one of the constituent metals onto a glass/Mo substrate, followed by physical vapor deposition of copper and selenium or indium and selenium to adjust the final stoichiometry of the thin film to approximately Cu(In,Ga)Se.sub.2. Using an AC voltage of 1-100 KHz in combination with a DC voltage for electrodeposition improves the morphology and growth rate of the deposited thin film. An electrodeposition solution comprising at least in part an organic solvent may be used in conjunction with an increased cathodic potential to increase the gallium content of the electrodeposited thin film.

  8. Liquid phase synthesis of copper indium diselenide nanoparticles

    SciTech Connect

    Jakhmola, Priyanka; Agarwal, Garima; Jha, Prafulla K.; Bhatnagar, S. P.

    2014-04-24

    Nanoparticles of Copper Indium diselenide (CuInSe{sub 2}), belongs to I-III-VI{sub 2} family has been synthesized via liquid phase route using ethylenediamine as a solvent. Characterization of as-grown particles is done by XRD, HRTEM, DLS, optical microscopy and UV-Vis spectroscopy. X-ray diffraction pattern confirmed that the CuInSe2 nanoparticles obtained reveals chalcopyrite structure. Particle size evaluated from dynamic light scattering of as grown particle possessing radius of 90 nm. The bandgap of 1.05eV is obtained from UV-Vis spectrum which will applicable to the solar cell devices.

  9. Photoconductivity in reactively evaporated copper indium selenide thin films

    SciTech Connect

    Urmila, K. S. Asokan, T. Namitha Pradeep, B.; Jacob, Rajani; Philip, Rachel Reena

    2014-01-28

    Copper indium selenide thin films of composition CuInSe{sub 2} with thickness of the order of 130 nm are deposited on glass substrate at a temperature of 423 ±5 K and pressure of 10{sup −5} mbar using reactive evaporation, a variant of Gunther's three temperature method with high purity Copper (99.999%), Indium (99.999%) and Selenium (99.99%) as the elemental starting materials. X-ray diffraction (XRD) studies shows that the films are polycrystalline in nature having preferred orientation of grains along the (112) plane. The structural type of the film is found to be tetragonal with particle size of the order of 32 nm. The structural parameters such as lattice constant, particle size, dislocation density, number of crystallites per unit area and strain in the film are also evaluated. The surface morphology of CuInSe{sub 2} films are studied using 2D and 3D atomic force microscopy to estimate the grain size and surface roughness respectively. Analysis of the absorption spectrum of the film recorded using UV-Vis-NIR Spectrophotometer in the wavelength range from 2500 nm to cutoff revealed that the film possess a direct allowed transition with a band gap of 1.05 eV and a high value of absorption coefficient (α) of 10{sup 6} cm{sup −1} at 570 nm. Photoconductivity at room temperature is measured after illuminating the film with an FSH lamp (82 V, 300 W). Optical absorption studies in conjunction with the good photoconductivity of the prepared p-type CuInSe{sub 2} thin films indicate its suitability in photovoltaic applications.

  10. Growth of copper indium sulphide films by thermal evaporation of mixtures of copper sulphide and indium sulphide powders

    SciTech Connect

    Rao, Pritty; Kumar, Sanjiv Sahoo, N.K.

    2013-08-01

    Graphical abstract: - Highlights: • CuInS{sub 2} films are prepared by resistively heating mixtures of CuS and In{sub 2}S{sub 3}. • As deposited films consist of Cu{sub 7}S{sub 4}, InS and In{sub 2}S{sub 3}. • These species react during vacuum annealing to produce CuInS{sub 2} films. • The films bear stoichiometric or Cu-rich composition. • Their electrical and optical features are conducive for photovoltaic applications. - Abstract: The physical evaporation of a 1:1 mixture of copper sulphide (CuS) and indium sulphide (In{sub 2}S{sub 3}) powders by resistive heating followed by the vacuum annealing of the resulting films at 723 K produces copper indium sulphide (CuInS{sub 2}) films with about 95% phase purity. Composed of sub-micron sized grains, the films bear stoichiometric or Cu-rich composition and are endowed with p-type conductivity, a band gap of about 1.5 eV and an absorption coefficient of about 4 × 10{sup 4} cm{sup −1} in visible region. Mechanistically, the formation of CuInS{sub 2} films takes place as a result of solid state reaction among Cu{sub 7}S{sub 4}, InS and In{sub 2}S{sub 3} in the condensed phase. These intermediate species are produced from the decomposition of CuInS{sub 2} formed in the evaporating mixture due to the reaction between CuS and In{sub 2}S{sub 3}, and excess CuS. Process simplicity and the absence of a sulphurisation step make this approach attractive for synthesising CuInS{sub 2} absorber layers for photovoltaic applications.

  11. Polycrystalline Thin-Film Research: Copper Indium Gallium Diselenide (Fact Sheet)

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    2011-06-01

    Capabilities fact sheet for the National Center for Photovoltaics: Polycrystalline Thin-Film Research: Copper Indium Gallium Diselenide that includes scope, core competencies and capabilities, and contact/web information.

  12. Investigation of an Electrochemical Method for Separation of Copper, Indium, and Gallium from Pretreated CIGS Solar Cell Waste Materials.

    PubMed

    Gustafsson, Anna M K; Björefors, Fredrik; Steenari, Britt-Marie; Ekberg, Christian

    2015-01-01

    Recycling of the semiconductor material copper indium gallium diselenide (CIGS) is important to ensure a future supply of indium and gallium, which are relatively rare and therefore expensive elements. As a continuation of our previous work, where we recycled high purity selenium from CIGS waste materials, we now show that copper and indium can be recycled by electrodeposition from hydrochloric acid solutions of dissolved selenium-depleted material. Suitable potentials for the reduction of copper and indium were determined to be -0.5 V and -0.9 V (versus the Ag/AgCl reference electrode), respectively, using cyclic voltammetry. Electrodeposition of first copper and then indium from a solution containing the dissolved residue from the selenium separation and ammonium chloride in 1 M HCl gave a copper yield of 100.1 ± 0.5% and an indium yield of 98.1 ± 2.5%. The separated copper and indium fractions contained no significant contamination of the other elements. Gallium remained in solution together with a small amount of indium after the separation of copper and indium and has to be recovered by an alternative method since electrowinning from the chloride-rich acid solution was not effective. PMID:26347901

  13. Investigation of an Electrochemical Method for Separation of Copper, Indium, and Gallium from Pretreated CIGS Solar Cell Waste Materials

    PubMed Central

    Gustafsson, Anna M. K.; Björefors, Fredrik; Steenari, Britt-Marie; Ekberg, Christian

    2015-01-01

    Recycling of the semiconductor material copper indium gallium diselenide (CIGS) is important to ensure a future supply of indium and gallium, which are relatively rare and therefore expensive elements. As a continuation of our previous work, where we recycled high purity selenium from CIGS waste materials, we now show that copper and indium can be recycled by electrodeposition from hydrochloric acid solutions of dissolved selenium-depleted material. Suitable potentials for the reduction of copper and indium were determined to be −0.5 V and −0.9 V (versus the Ag/AgCl reference electrode), respectively, using cyclic voltammetry. Electrodeposition of first copper and then indium from a solution containing the dissolved residue from the selenium separation and ammonium chloride in 1 M HCl gave a copper yield of 100.1 ± 0.5% and an indium yield of 98.1 ± 2.5%. The separated copper and indium fractions contained no significant contamination of the other elements. Gallium remained in solution together with a small amount of indium after the separation of copper and indium and has to be recovered by an alternative method since electrowinning from the chloride-rich acid solution was not effective. PMID:26347901

  14. Environmental and health aspects of copper-indium-diselenide thin-film photovoltaic modules

    SciTech Connect

    Steinberger, H.; Thumm, W.; Freitag, R.; Moskowitz, P.D.; Chapin, R.

    1994-12-31

    Copper-indium-diselenide (CIS) is a semiconductor compound that can be used to produce thin-film photovoltaic modules. There is on-going research being conducted by various federal agencies and private industries to demonstrate the commercial viability of this material. Because this is a new technology, and because scant information about the health and environmental hazards associated with the use of this material is available, studies have been initiated to characterize the environmental mobility and environmental toxicology of this compound. The objective of these studies is to identify the environmental and health hazards associated with the production, use, and disposal of CIS thin-film photovoltaic modules. The program includes both experimental and theoretical components. Theoretical studies are being undertaken to estimate material flows through the environment for a range of production options as well as use and disposal scenarios. The experimental programs characterize the physical, chemical e.g. leachability and biological parameters e.g. EC{sub 50} in daphnia and algae, and feeding studies in rats.

  15. Environmental and health aspects of copper-indium-diselenide thin-film photovoltaic modules

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Steinberger, Hartmut; Thumm, Werner; Freitag, Renate; Moskowitz, Paul D.; Chapin, Robert

    Copper-indium-diselenide (CIS) is a semiconductor compound that can be used to produce thin-film photovoltaic modules. There is on-going research being conducted by various federal agencies and private industries to demonstrate the commercial viability of this material. Because this is a new technology, and because scant information about the health and environmental hazards associated with the use of this material is available, studies have been initiated to characterize the environmental mobility and environmental toxicology of this compound. The objective of these studies is to identify the environmental and health hazards associated with the production, use, and disposal of CIS thin-film photovoltaic modules. The program includes both experimental and theoretical components. Theoretical studies are being undertaken to estimate material flows through the environment for a range of production options as well as use and disposal scenarios. The experimental programs characterize the physical, chemical (e.g. leachability), and biological parameters (e.g. EC(sub 50)) in daphnia and algae, and feeding studies in rats.

  16. Thermal resistance of indium coated sapphire-copper contacts below 0.1 K

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eisel, T.; Bremer, J.; Koettig, T.

    2014-11-01

    High thermal resistances exist at ultra-low temperatures for solid-solid interfaces. This is especially true for pressed metal-sapphire joints, where the heat is transferred by phonons only. For such pressed joints it is difficult to achieve good physical, i.e. thermal contacts due to surface irregularities in the microscopic or larger scale. Applying ductile indium as an intermediate layer reduces the thermal resistance of such contacts. This could be proven by measurements of several researchers. However, the majority of the measurements were performed at temperatures higher than 1 K. Consequently, it is difficult to predict the thermal resistance of pressed metal-sapphire joints at temperatures below 1 K. In this paper the thermal resistances across four different copper-sapphire-copper sandwiches are presented in a temperature range between 30 mK and 100 mK. The investigated sandwiches feature either rough or polished sapphire discs (Ø 20 mm × 1.5 mm) to investigate the phonon scattering at the boundaries. All sandwiches apply indium foils as intermediate layers on both sides of the sapphire. Additionally to the indium foils, thin indium films are vapour deposited onto both sides of one rough and one polished sapphire in order to improve the contact to the sapphire. Significantly different thermal resistances have been found amongst the investigated sandwiches. The lowest total thermal resistivity (roughly 26 cm2 K4/W at 30 mK helium temperature) is achieved across a sandwich consisting of a polished sapphire with indium vapour deposition. The thermal boundary resistance between indium and sapphire is estimated from the total thermal resistivity by assuming the scattering at only one boundary, which is the warm sapphire boundary where phonons impinge, and taking the scattering in the sapphire bulk into account. The so derived thermal boundary resistance agrees at low temperatures very well with the acoustic mismatch theory.

  17. Waste reduction options for manufacturers of copper indium diselenide photovoltaic cells

    SciTech Connect

    DePhillips, M.P.; Fthenakis, V.M.; Moskowitz, P.D.

    1994-03-01

    This paper identifies general waste reduction concepts and specific waste reduction options to be used in the production of copper indium diselenide (CIS) photovoltaic cells. A general discussion of manufacturing processes used for the production of photovoltaic cells is followed by a description of the US Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) guidelines for waste reduction (i.e., waste minimization through pollution prevention). A more specific discussion of manufacturing CIS cells is accompanied by detailed suggestions regarding waste minimization options for both inputs and outputs for ten stages of this process. Waste reduction from inputs focuses on source reduction and process changes, and reduction from outputs focuses on material reuse and recycling.

  18. Energy and materials flows in the copper industry

    SciTech Connect

    Gaines, L.L.

    1980-12-01

    The copper industry comprises both the primary copper industry, which produces 99.9%-pure copper from copper ore, and the secondary copper industry, which salvages and recycles copper-containing scrap metal to extract pure copper or copper alloys. The United States uses about 2 million tons of copper annually, 60% of it for electrical applications. Demand is expected to increase less than 4% annually for the next 20 years. The primary copper industry is concentrated in the Southwest; Arizona produced 66% of the 1979 total ore output. Primary production uses about 170 x 10/sup 12/ Btu total energy annually (about 100 x 10/sup 6/ Btu/ton pure copper produced from ore). Mining and milling use about 60% of the total consumption, because low-grade ore (0.6% copper) is now being mined. Most copper is extracted by smelting sulfide ores, with concomitant production of sulfur dioxide. Clean air regulations will require smelters to reduce sulfur emissions, necessitating smelting process modifications that could also save 20 x 10/sup 12/ Btu (10 x 10/sup 6/ Btu/ton of copper) in smelting energy. Energy use in secondary copper production averages 20 x 10/sup 6/ Btu/ton of copper. If all copper products were recycled, instead of the 30% now salvaged, the energy conservation potential would be about one-half the total energy consumption of the primary copper industry.

  19. Electronic properties of copper indium diselenide fabricated by two-step/solid selenium processing

    SciTech Connect

    Cai, L.; Attar, G.; Wu, C.; Morel, D.L. )

    1992-12-01

    Thin-film Copper Indium Diselenide has been deposited using a two-step process with solid selenium as the Se source rather than H[sub 2]Se. Film properties are strongly influenced by the substrate. Borosilicate glass produces more nucleation sites and smoother thin-films, while 1000 A films deposited on soda lime glass may exhibit disconnectedness. Electronic properties are similarly affected, particularly mobilities. Using MOSFET devices as analytical tools electron channel mobilities of up to 45 cm[sup 2]/Vs have been measured. Preliminary results from thin-film transistor dynamics indicate that traps with a trapping time of about 10 seconds are controlling surface properties and limiting solar cell performance.

  20. Synthesis Characterization and Decomposition Studies of tris[N-N-dibenzyidithocarbaso)Indium (III) Chemical Spray Deposition of Polycrystalline CuInS2 on Copper Films

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hehemann, David G.; Lau, J. Eva; Harris, Jerry D.; Hoops, Michael D.; Duffy, Norman V.

    2005-01-01

    This paper presents the results of the synthesis characterization and decomposition studies of tris[N-N-dibenzyidithocarbaso)Indium (III) with chemical spray deposition of polycrystalline CuInS2 on Copper Films.

  1. Potential health and safety hazards associated with the production of cadmium telluride, copper indium diselenide, and zinc phosphide photovoltaic cells

    SciTech Connect

    Moskowitz, P.D.; Fthenakis, V.M.; Lee, J.C.

    1985-04-01

    In large-scale manufacture of cadmium telluride, copper indium diselenide, and zinc phosphide photovoltaic cells, the materials and equipment used may present potential health and safety hazards to workers and the public. These hazards were identified by reviewing data on process materials, availability of control technology, biomedical effects, and health and environmental standards. Quantitative estimates of material inputs and outputs, and control technology costs for selected processes were based on preliminary engineering designs for hypothetical 10-MWp/yr photovoltaic cell production facilities. In the fabrication of these devices, unusually large quantities of some toxic gases may be used; large demands for phosphine and hydrogen selenide are of special concern. Because projected usage of these materials is much larger than the current one, a thorough evaluation of engineering controls will be needed before the technologies are commercialized. These materials could also present occupational health hazards. Some management options to reduce occupational exposures to these materials are presented. Although specific federal and state regulations have not been promulgated for emissions from the photovoltaic industry, prudent engineering practice should be applied to all waste streams - solid, atmospheric, or liquid - containing toxic pollutants to limit discharges of these materials. Control costs for most atmospheric waste streams should not be large (<0.01 cent per watt); for phosphine, however, costs are potentially much larger (4.4 cents per watt). Some processes may also produce large quantities of solid waste defined as toxic or hazardous under US Environmental Protection Agency guidelines. Disposal costs for these materials are presented.

  2. Transmission electron microscopy of the amorphization of copper indium diselenide by in situ ion irradiation

    SciTech Connect

    Hinks, J. A.; Edmondson, P. D.

    2012-03-01

    Copper indium diselenide (CIS), along with its derivatives Cu(In,Ga)(Se,S){sub 2}, is a prime candidate for use in the absorber layers of photovoltaic devices. Due to its ability to resist radiation damage, it is particularly well suited for use in extraterrestrial and other irradiating environments. However, the nature of its radiation hardness is not well understood. In this study, transmission electron microscopy (TEM) with in situ ion irradiation was used to monitor the dynamic microstructural effects of radiation damage on CIS. Samples were bombarded with 400 keV xenon ions to create large numbers of atomic displacements within the thickness of the TEM samples and thus explore the conditions under which, if any, CIS could be amorphized. By observing the impact of heavily damaging radiation in situ--rather than merely the end-state possible in ex situ experiments--at the magnifications allowed by TEM, it was possible to gain an understanding of the atomistic processes at work and the underlying mechanism that give rise to the radiation hardness of CIS. At 200 K and below, it was found that copper-poor samples could be amorphized and copper-rich samples could not. This difference in behavior is linked to the crystallographic phases that are present at different compositions. Amorphization was found to progress via a combination of one- and two-hit processes. The radiation hardness of CIS is discussed in terms of crystallographic structures/defects and the consequences these have for the ability of the material to recover from the effects of displacing radiation.

  3. Preparation of copper-indium-gallium-diselenide precursor films by electrodeposition for fabricating high efficiency solar cells

    DOEpatents

    Bhattacharya, Raghu N.; Hasoon, Falah S.; Wiesner, Holm; Keane, James; Noufi, Rommel; Ramanathan, Kannan

    1999-02-16

    A photovoltaic cell exhibiting an overall conversion efficiency of 13.6% is prepared from a copper-indium-gallium-diselenide precursor thin film. The film is fabricated by first simultaneously electrodepositing copper, indium, gallium, and selenium onto a glass/molybdenum substrate (12/14). The electrodeposition voltage is a high frequency AC voltage superimposed upon a DC voltage to improve the morphology and growth rate of the film. The electrodeposition is followed by physical vapor deposition to adjust the final stoichiometry of the thin film to approximately Cu(In.sub.1-n Ga.sub.x)Se.sub.2, with the ratio of Ga/(In+Ga) being approximately 0.39.

  4. Brazing open cell reticulated copper foam to stainless steel tubing with vacuum furnace brazed gold/indium alloy plating

    DOEpatents

    Howard, Stanley R.; Korinko, Paul S.

    2008-05-27

    A method of fabricating a heat exchanger includes brush electroplating plated layers for a brazing alloy onto a stainless steel tube in thin layers, over a nickel strike having a 1.3 .mu.m thickness. The resultant Au-18 In composition may be applied as a first layer of indium, 1.47 .mu.m thick, and a second layer of gold, 2.54 .mu.m thick. The order of plating helps control brazing erosion. Excessive amounts of brazing material are avoided by controlling the electroplating process. The reticulated copper foam rings are interference fit to the stainless steel tube, and in contact with the plated layers. The copper foam rings, the plated layers for brazing alloy, and the stainless steel tube are heated and cooled in a vacuum furnace at controlled rates, forming a bond of the copper foam rings to the stainless steel tube that improves heat transfer between the tube and the copper foam.

  5. Synthesis, Characterization, and Processing of Copper, Indium, and Gallium Dithiocarbamates for Energy Conversion Applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Duraj, S. A.; Duffy, N. V.; Hepp, A. F.; Cowen, J. E.; Hoops, M. D.; Brothrs, S. M.; Baird, M. J.; Fanwick, P. E.; Harris, J. D.; Jin, M. H.-C.

    2009-01-01

    Ten dithiocarbamate complexes of indium(III) and gallium(III) have been prepared and characterized by elemental analysis, infrared spectra and melting point. Each complex was decomposed thermally and its decomposition products separated and identified with the combination of gas chromatography/mass spectrometry. Their potential utility as photovoltaic materials precursors was assessed. Bis(dibenzyldithiocarbamato)- and bis(diethyldithiocarbamato)copper(II), Cu(S2CN(CH2C6H5)2)2 and Cu(S2CN(C2H5)2)2 respectively, have also been examined for their suitability as precursors for copper sulfides for the fabrication of photovoltaic materials. Each complex was decomposed thermally and the products analyzed by GC/MS, TGA and FTIR. The dibenzyl derivative complex decomposed at a lower temperature (225-320 C) to yield CuS as the product. The diethyl derivative complex decomposed at a higher temperature (260-325 C) to yield Cu2S. No Cu containing fragments were noted in the mass spectra. Unusual recombination fragments were observed in the mass spectra of the diethyl derivative. Tris(bis(phenylmethyl)carbamodithioato-S,S'), commonly referred to as tris(N,N-dibenzyldithiocarbamato)indium(III), In(S2CNBz2)3, was synthesized and characterized by single crystal X-ray crystallography. The compound crystallizes in the triclinic space group P1(bar) with two molecules per unit cell. The material was further characterized using a novel analytical system employing the combined powers of thermogravimetric analysis, gas chromatography/mass spectrometry, and Fourier transform infrared (FT-IR) spectroscopy to investigate its potential use as a precursor for the chemical vapor deposition (CVD) of thin film materials for photovoltaic applications. Upon heating, the material thermally decomposes to release CS2 and benzyl moieties in to the gas phase, resulting in bulk In2S3. Preliminary spray CVD experiments indicate that In(S2CNBz2)3 decomposed on a Cu substrate reacts to produce

  6. Impact of atmospheric species on copper indium gallium selenide solar cell stability: an overview

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Theelen, Mirjam

    2016-01-01

    An overview of the measurement techniques and results of studies on the stability of copper indium gallium selenide (CIGS) solar cells and their individual layers in the presence of atmospheric species is presented: in these studies, Cu(In,Ga)Se2 solar cells, their molybdenum back contact, and their ZnO:Al front contact were exposed to liquid water purged with gases from the atmosphere, like carbon dioxide (CO2), oxygen (O2), nitrogen (N2), and air. The samples were analyzed before, during, and after exposure in order to define their stability under these conditions. The complete CIGS solar cells as well as the ZnO:Al front contact degraded rapidly when exposed to H2O combined with CO2, while they were relatively stable in H2O purged with O2 or N2. This was caused by either degradation of the grain boundaries in the ZnO:Al film or by the dissolution of part of this film. Uncovered molybdenum films, on the other hand, oxidized rapidly in the presence of H2O and O2, while they were more stable in the presence of H2O with N2 and/or CO2.

  7. Point contacts at the copper-indium-gallium-selenide interface—A theoretical outlook

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bercegol, Adrien; Chacko, Binoy; Klenk, Reiner; Lauermann, Iver; Lux-Steiner, Martha Ch.; Liero, Matthias

    2016-04-01

    For a long time, it has been assumed that recombination in the space-charge region of copper-indium-gallium-selenide (CIGS) is dominant, at least in high efficiency solar cells with low band gap. The recent developments like potassium fluoride post deposition treatment and point-contact junction may call this into question. In this work, a theoretical outlook is made using three-dimensional simulations to investigate the effect of point-contact openings through a passivation layer on CIGS solar cell performance. A large set of solar cells is modeled under different scenarios for the charged defect levels and density, radius of the openings, interface quality, and conduction band offset. The positive surface charge created by the passivation layer induces band bending and this influences the contact (CdS) properties, making it beneficial for the open circuit voltage and efficiency, and the effect is even more pronounced when coverage area is more than 95%, and also makes a positive impact on the device performance, even in the presence of a spike at CIGS/CdS heterojunction.

  8. The dissociation of excitons at indium tin oxide-copper phthalocyanine interface in organic solar cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, X. Y.; Song, Q. L.; Wang, M. L.; Ding, X. M.; Hou, X. Y.; Zhou, Z. G.; Li, F. Y.

    2008-11-01

    Exciton dissociation process at indium tin oxide (ITO)/copper phthalocyanine (CuPc) interface of ITO/CuPc(370 nm)/Al is studied by transient photovoltage method. A negative-to-positive change in the polarity of photovoltage upon pulsed laser irradiation is observed in CuPc thin film. The polarity change is regarded as a summation of the effect of exciton dissociation at ITO/CuPc interface (fast process) and that of free carrier separation by built-in field (slow process). Further experiments confirm the existence of exciton dissociation at ITO/CuPc interface, and the direction of which is electron injected into ITO, with holes left in CuPc film. This is opposite to that of the interfacial dissociation at donor/acceptor (D/A) interface in single heterojunction cells (ITO/D/A/buffer/Al). 3-nm-thick LiF insulating layer is inserted between ITO and CuPc to inhibit the exciton dissociation at ITO/CuPc interface. Thereby, the open-circuit voltage and power conversion efficiency of the single layer cell have been increased by several times.

  9. Flexible copper-indium-diselenide films and devices for space applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Armstrong, J. H.; Pistole, C. O.; Misra, M. S.; Kapur, V. K.; Basol, B. M.

    1991-01-01

    With the ever increasing demands on space power systems, it is imperative that low cost, lightweight, reliable photovoltaics be developed. One avenue of pursuit for future space power applications is the use of low cost, lightweight flexible PV cells and arrays. Most work in this area assumes the use of flexible amorphous silicon (a-Si), despite its inherent instability and low efficiencies. However, polycrystalline thin film PV such as copper-indium-diselenide (CIS) are inherently more stable and exhibit better performance than a-Si. Furthermore, preliminary data indicate that CIS also offers exciting properties with respect to space applications. However, CIS has only heretofore only produced on rigid substrates. The implications of flexible CIS upon present and future space power platforms was explored. Results indicate that space qualified CIS can dramatically reduce the cost of PV, and in most cases, can be substituted for silicon (Si) based on end-of-life (EOL) estimations. Furthermore, where cost is a prime consideration, CIS can become cost effective than gallium arsenide (GaAs) in some applications. Second, investigations into thin film deposition on flexible substrates were made, and data from these tests indicate that fabrication of flexible CIS devices is feasible. Finally, data is also presented on preliminary TCO/CdS/CuInSe2/Mo devices.

  10. Low-temperature approach to highly emissive copper indium sulfide colloidal nanocrystals and their bioimaging applications.

    PubMed

    Yu, Kui; Ng, Peter; Ouyang, Jianying; Zaman, Md Badruz; Abulrob, Abedelnasser; Baral, Toya Nath; Fatehi, Dorothy; Jakubek, Zygmunt J; Kingston, David; Wu, Xiaohua; Liu, Xiangyang; Hebert, Charlie; Leek, Donald M; Whitfield, Dennis M

    2013-04-24

    We report our newly developed low-temperature synthesis of colloidal photoluminescent (PL) CuInS2 nanocrystals (NCs) and their in vitro and in vivo imaging applications. With diphenylphosphine sulphide (SDPP) as a S precursor made from elemental S and diphenylphosphine, this is a noninjection based approach in 1-dodecanethiol (DDT) with excellent synthetic reproducibility and large-scale capability. For a typical synthesis with copper iodide (CuI) as a Cu source and indium acetate (In(OAc)3) as an In source, the growth temperature was as low as 160 °C and the feed molar ratios were 1Cu-to-1In-to-4S. Amazingly, the resulting CuInS2 NCs in toluene exhibit quantum yield (QY) of ~23% with photoemission peaking at ~760 nm and full width at half maximum (FWHM) of ~140 nm. With a mean size of ~3.4 nm (measured from the vertices to the bases of the pyramids), they are pyramidal in shape with a crystal structure of tetragonal chalcopyrite. In situ (31)P NMR (monitored from 30 °C to 100 °C) and in situ absorption at 80 °C suggested that the Cu precursor should be less reactive toward SDPP than the In precursor. For our in vitro and in vivo imaging applications, CuInS2/ZnS core-shell QDs were synthesized; afterwards, dihydrolipoic acid (DHLA) or 11-mercaptoundecanoic acid (MUA) were used for ligand exchange and then bio-conjugation was performed. Two single-domain antibodies (sdAbs) were used. One was 2A3 for in vitro imaging of BxPC3 pancreatic cancer cells. The other was EG2 for in vivo imaging of a Glioblastoma U87MG brain tumour model. The bioimaging data illustrate that the CuInS2 NCs from our SDPP-based low-temperature noninjection approach are good quality. PMID:23486927

  11. Single-Step Production of Nanostructured Copper-Nickel (CuNi) and Copper-Nickel-Indium (CuNiIn) Alloy Particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Apaydın, Ramazan Oğuzhan; Ebin, Burçak; Gürmen, Sebahattin

    2016-04-01

    Nanostructured copper-nickel (CuNi) and copper-nickel-indium (CuNiIn) alloy particles were produced from aqueous solutions of copper, nickel nitrates and indium sulfate by hydrogen reduction-assisted ultrasonic spray pyrolysis. The effects of reduction temperatures, at 973 K, 1073 K, and 1173 K (700 °C, 800 °C, and 900 °C), on the morphology and crystalline structure of the alloy particles were investigated under the conditions of 0.1 M total precursor concentration and 0.5 L/min H2 volumetric flow rate. X-ray diffraction studies were performed to investigate the crystalline structure. Particle size and morphology were investigated by scanning electron microscope and energy-dispersive spectroscopy was applied to determine the chemical composition of the particles. Spherical nanocrystalline binary CuNi alloy particles were prepared in the particle size range from 74 to 455 nm, while ternary CuNiIn alloy particles were obtained in the particle size range from 80 to 570 nm at different precursor solution concentrations and reduction temperatures. Theoretical and experimental chemical compositions of all the particles are nearly the same. Results reveal that the precursor solution and reduction temperature strongly influence the particle size of the produced alloy particles.

  12. Single-Step Production of Nanostructured Copper-Nickel (CuNi) and Copper-Nickel-Indium (CuNiIn) Alloy Particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Apaydın, Ramazan Oğuzhan; Ebin, Burçak; Gürmen, Sebahattin

    2016-07-01

    Nanostructured copper-nickel (CuNi) and copper-nickel-indium (CuNiIn) alloy particles were produced from aqueous solutions of copper, nickel nitrates and indium sulfate by hydrogen reduction-assisted ultrasonic spray pyrolysis. The effects of reduction temperatures, at 973 K, 1073 K, and 1173 K (700 °C, 800 °C, and 900 °C), on the morphology and crystalline structure of the alloy particles were investigated under the conditions of 0.1 M total precursor concentration and 0.5 L/min H2 volumetric flow rate. X-ray diffraction studies were performed to investigate the crystalline structure. Particle size and morphology were investigated by scanning electron microscope and energy-dispersive spectroscopy was applied to determine the chemical composition of the particles. Spherical nanocrystalline binary CuNi alloy particles were prepared in the particle size range from 74 to 455 nm, while ternary CuNiIn alloy particles were obtained in the particle size range from 80 to 570 nm at different precursor solution concentrations and reduction temperatures. Theoretical and experimental chemical compositions of all the particles are nearly the same. Results reveal that the precursor solution and reduction temperature strongly influence the particle size of the produced alloy particles.

  13. Heterojunction between the delafossite TCO n-copper indium oxide and p-Si for solar cell applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Keerthi, K.; Masuzawa, T.; Nair, B. G.; Saito, I.; Okano, K.; Johns, N.; Philip, R. R.

    2016-05-01

    Junction formation of n-copper indium oxide (CIO) (extrinsically undoped) with p-Si leading to conversion of photons in the UV-Vis range is being reported for the first time. I-V and temporal photoconductivity data confirm positively the carrier generation in CIO under irradiation while optical absorbance data furnish its band gap to be ~ 3.1eV. Ultraviolet photoelectron spectroscopy is used to study the electronic band structure of CIO on Si and to construct a schematic diagram of the hetero-junction to explain the observed photovoltaic phenomena.

  14. Efficient Synthesis of Highly Luminescent Copper Indium Sulfide-Based Core/Shell Nanocrystals with Surprisingly Long-Lived Emission

    SciTech Connect

    Li, Liang; Pandey, Anshu; Werder, Donald J.; Khanal, Bishnu P.; Pietryga, Jeffrey M.; Klimov, Victor I.

    2011-02-09

    We report an efficient synthesis of copper indium sulfide nanocrystals with strong photoluminescence in the visible to near-infrared. This method can produce gram quantities of material with a chemical yield in excess of 90% with minimal solvent waste. The overgrowth of as-prepared nanocrystals with a few monolayers of CdS or ZnS increases the photoluminescence quantum efficiency to > 80%. On the basis of time-resolved spectroscopic studies of core/shell particles, we conclude that the emission is due to an optical transition that couples a quantized electron state to a localized hole state, which is most likely associated with an internal defect.

  15. I. Electroluminescence from Hydrogen Uranyl Phosphate. I. Indium-Substituted Bismuth Copper Oxide Superconductors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dieckmann, Gunnar Rudolph

    1990-01-01

    Chapter 1. A review of the general aspects of solid electrolytes is presented along with a summary of the electrical and optical properties of hydrogen uranyl phosphate (HUO_2PO_4 bullet4H_2O, HUP). A review of impedance spectroscopy, as it relates to the determination of ionic conductivities and dielectric constants of solid electrolytes is presented. The final section covers some aspects of gas plasma display devices. Chapter 2. Electroluminescence (EL) cells have been constructed with the ionically conducting solid HUP as the emissive medium. With ac excitation, both uranyl emission and molecular nitrogen plasma emission are observed, with the latter appearing to excite the former. Similar results were obtained with fully-substituted sodium (NaUP), magnesium (Mg_{0.5}UP), and pyridinium (pyHUP) derivatives of HUP. For all of these solids, the dependence of the EL intensity on sample thickness, ac frequency, and applied voltage has been determined. Impedance measurements permitted acquisition of dielectric constants and ionic conductivities for these solids, both of which decrease in the order HUP > NaUP > Mg_{0.5}UP > pyHUP. A model describing the dependence of EL intensity on cell parameters is presented. Chapter 3. The copper oxide superconductors can be structurally classified into five major families, represented by the compositions, (La,Sr)_2CuO _4, YBa_2Cu_3O_7, Pb_2Sr_2(Y,Ca)Cu_3O_8, (TIO)_{m}Ca_{n-1}Ba_2Cu _{n}O_{2n+2}, and Bi_2Sr_2(Ln_{1-x}Ce _{x})_2Cu_2O_{10+y }. All families are linked by a CuO _2 layer, which is crucial for superconductivity. The structural and chemical aspects of each family is covered with emphasis on the bismuth and thallium systems. The effects of substitution and oxygen annealing are also briefly considered. Chapter 4. The attempted substitution of indium into the rm Bi_2(Ca,Sr)_2CuO _6 and Bi_2(Ca,Sr) _3Cu_2O _8 systems is reported. Previously unreported side products, (Ca,Sr)In_2O _4 and Bi-Ca-Sr-O, viz., produced in the

  16. Selective recovery of pure copper nanopowder from indium-tin-oxide etching wastewater by various wet chemical reduction process: Understanding their chemistry and comparisons of sustainable valorization processes.

    PubMed

    Swain, Basudev; Mishra, Chinmayee; Hong, Hyun Seon; Cho, Sung-Soo

    2016-05-01

    Sustainable valorization processes for selective recovery of pure copper nanopowder from Indium-Tin-Oxide (ITO) etching wastewater by various wet chemical reduction processes, their chemistry has been investigated and compared. After the indium recovery by solvent extraction from ITO etching wastewater, the same is also an environmental challenge, needs to be treated before disposal. After the indium recovery, ITO etching wastewater contains 6.11kg/m(3) of copper and 1.35kg/m(3) of aluminum, pH of the solution is very low converging to 0 and contain a significant amount of chlorine in the media. In this study, pure copper nanopowder was recovered using various reducing reagents by wet chemical reduction and characterized. Different reducing agents like a metallic, an inorganic acid and an organic acid were used to understand reduction behavior of copper in the presence of aluminum in a strong chloride medium of the ITO etching wastewater. The effect of a polymer surfactant Polyvinylpyrrolidone (PVP), which was included to prevent aggregation, to provide dispersion stability and control the size of copper nanopowder was investigated and compared. The developed copper nanopowder recovery techniques are techno-economical feasible processes for commercial production of copper nanopowder in the range of 100-500nm size from the reported facilities through a one-pot synthesis. By all the process reported pure copper nanopowder can be recovered with>99% efficiency. After the copper recovery, copper concentration in the wastewater reduced to acceptable limit recommended by WHO for wastewater disposal. The process is not only beneficial for recycling of copper, but also helps to address environment challenged posed by ITO etching wastewater. From a complex wastewater, synthesis of pure copper nanopowder using various wet chemical reduction route and their comparison is the novelty of this recovery process. PMID:26918838

  17. Metastability of copper indium gallium diselenide polycrystalline thin film solar cell devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Jinwoo

    High efficiency thin film solar cells have the potential for being a world energy solution because of their cost-effectiveness. Looking to the future of solar energy, there is the opportunity and challenge for thin film solar cells. The main theme of this research is to develop a detailed understanding of electronically active defect states and their role in limiting device performance in copper indium gallium diselenide (CIGS) solar cells. Metastability in the CIGS is a good tool to manipulate electronic defect density and thus identify its effect on the device performance. Especially, this approach keeps many device parameters constant, including the chemical composition, grain size, and interface layers. Understanding metastability is likely to lead to the improvement of CIGS solar cells. We observed systematic changes in CIGS device properties as a result of the metastable changes, such as increases in sub-bandgap defect densities and decreases in hole carrier mobilities. Metastable changes were characterized using high frequency admittance spectroscopy, drive-level capacitance profiling (DLCP), and current-voltage measurements. We found two distinctive capacitance steps in the high frequency admittance spectra that correspond to (1) the thermal activation of hole carriers into/out of acceptor defect and (2) a temperature-independent dielectric relaxation freeze-out process and an equivalent circuit analysis was employed to deduce the dielectric relaxation time. Finally, hole carrier mobility was deduced once hole carrier density was determined by DLCP method. We found that metastable defect creation in CIGS films can be made either by light-soaking or with forward bias current injection. The deep acceptor density and the hole carrier density were observed to increase in a 1:1 ratio, which seems to be consistent with the theoretical model of VCu-V Se defect complex suggested by Lany and Zunger. Metastable defect creation kinetics follows a sub-linear power law

  18. Chemical vapor deposited copper indium diselenide thin film materials research. Final report, 15 November 1982-14 January 1984

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1984-03-01

    The objective of the contract is to demonstrate the feasibility of producing device-quality copper indium diselenide films by the close-spacing chemical vapor transport (CSCVT) technique. The technical approaches used in this work consist of (1) the preparation of the CuInSe/sub 2/ source material by direct synthesis and the characterization of its properties, (2) the deposition of CuInSe/sub 2/ films on conducting and insulating substrates by the CSCVT technique, and (3) the formation and characterization of heterojunction solar cells. During the course of this subcontract, a number of copper indium selenide ingots (source material) have been synthesized from the elements, and their structural and electrical properties characterized. The deposition of p-type CuInSe/sub 2/ films on graphite, alumina, and coated graphite substrates by the CSCVT technique using iodine and hydrogen iodide as the transport agent has been carried out under a wide range of conditions. The compositional, structural, and electrical properties of CuInSe/sub 2/ films have been characterized. A number of n-ZnO/p-CuInSe/sub 2/ and n-CdO/p-CuInSe/sub 2/ heterojunction solar cells have been prepared by the deposition of the transparent oxide on p-CuInSe/sub 2/ films by ion-beam sputtering. The AM1 efficiency of these cells is in the range of 2% to 3%.

  19. Ecotoxicological assessment of solar cell leachates: Copper indium gallium selenide (CIGS) cells show higher activity than organic photovoltaic (OPV) cells.

    PubMed

    Brun, Nadja Rebecca; Wehrli, Bernhard; Fent, Karl

    2016-02-01

    Despite the increasing use of photovoltaics their potential environmental risks are poorly understood. Here, we compared ecotoxicological effects of two thin-film photovoltaics: established copper indium gallium selenide (CIGS) and organic photovoltaic (OPV) cells. Leachates were produced by exposing photovoltaics to UV light, physical damage, and exposure to environmentally relevant model waters, representing mesotrophic lake water, acidic rain, and seawater. CIGS cell leachates contained 583 μg L(-1) molybdenum at lake water, whereas at acidic rain and seawater conditions, iron, copper, zinc, molybdenum, cadmium, silver, and tin were present up to 7219 μg L(-1). From OPV, copper (14 μg L(-1)), zinc (87 μg L(-1)) and silver (78 μg L(-1)) leached. Zebrafish embryos were exposed until 120 h post-fertilization to these extracts. CIGS leachates produced under acidic rain, as well as CIGS and OPV leachates produced under seawater conditions resulted in a marked hatching delay and increase in heart edema. Depending on model water and solar cell, transcriptional alterations occurred in genes involved in oxidative stress (cat), hormonal activity (vtg1, ar), metallothionein (mt2), ER stress (bip, chop), and apoptosis (casp9). The effects were dependent on the concentrations of cationic metals in leachates. Addition of ethylenediaminetetraacetic acid protected zebrafish embryos from morphological and molecular effects. Our study suggests that metals leaching from damaged CIGS cells, may pose a potential environmental risk. PMID:26615488

  20. Highly sensitive photodetectors based on hybrid 2D-0D SnS2-copper indium sulfide quantum dots

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Yun; Zhan, Xueying; Xu, Kai; Yin, Lei; Cheng, Zhongzhou; Jiang, Chao; Wang, Zhenxing; He, Jun

    2016-01-01

    Both high speed and efficiency of photoelectric conversion are essential for photodetectors. As an emerging layered metal dichalcogenide (LMD), tin disulfide owns intrinsic faster photodetection ability than most other LMDs but poor light absorption and low photoelectric conversion efficiency. We develop an efficient method to enhance its performance by constructing a SnS2-copper indium sulfide hybrid structure. As a result, the responsivity reaches 630 A/W, six times stronger than pristine SnS2 and much higher than most other LMDs photodetectors. Additionally, the photocurrents are enhanced by more than 1 order of magnitude. Our work may open up a pathway to improve the performance of photodetectors based on LMDs.

  1. Commercial and industrial applications of indium gallium arsenide near-infrared focal plane arrays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cohen, Marshall J.; Ettenberg, Martin H.; Lange, Michael J.; Olsen, Gregory H.

    1999-07-01

    Sensors Unlimited, Inc. has developed focal pane arrays (FPAs) fabricated with indium gallium arsenide (InGaAs) photodiode arrays and silicon CMOS readout integrated circuits. These devices are readily available in a wide variety of formats suitable for commercial and industrial applications. InGaAs FPAs are sensitive to the near IR, operate without cooling, and come in both 2D formats and 1D formats. 1D InGaAs FPAs are used as both spectroscopic detectors and line scan imagers. Key applications include miniature spectrometers used for wavelength control and monitoring of WDM laser sources, octane determination, the sorting o plastics during recycling, and web process control. 2D InGaAs FPAs find use in applications such as laser beam profiling, visualization of 'clear' ice on aircraft and roadways, and industrial thermal imaging.

  2. Fabrication and characterization of copper oxide (CuO)–gold (Au)–titania (TiO{sub 2}) and copper oxide (CuO)–gold (Au)–indium tin oxide (ITO) nanowire heterostructures

    SciTech Connect

    Chopra, Nitin; Shi, Wenwu; Lattner, Andrew

    2014-10-15

    Nanoscale heterostructures composed of standing copper oxide nanowires decorated with Au nanoparticles and shells of titania and indium tin oxide were fabricated. The fabrication process involved surfactant-free and wet-chemical nucleation of gold nanoparticles on copper oxide nanowires followed by a line-of-sight sputtering of titania or indium tin oxide. The heterostructures were characterized using high resolution electron microscopy, diffraction, and energy dispersive spectroscopy. The interfaces, morphologies, crystallinity, phases, and chemical compositions were analyzed. The process of direct nucleation of gold nanoparticles on copper oxide nanoparticles resulted in low energy interface with aligned lattice for both the components. Coatings of polycrystalline titania or amorphous indium tin oxide were deposited on standing copper oxide nanowire–gold nanoparticle heterostructures. Self-shadowing effect due to standing nanowire heterostructures was observed for line-of-sight sputter deposition of titania or indium tin oxide coatings. Finally, the heterostructures were studied using Raman spectroscopy and ultraviolet–visible spectroscopy, including band gap energy analysis. Tailing in the band gap energy at longer wavelengths (or lower energies) was observed for the nanowire heterostructures. - Highlights: • Heterostructures comprised of CuO nanowires coated with Au nanoparticles. • Au nanoparticles exhibited nearly flat and low energy interface with nanowire. • Heterostructures were further sputter-coated with oxide shell of TiO{sub 2} or ITO. • The process resulted in coating of polycrystalline TiO{sub 2} and amorphous ITO shell.

  3. Metals fact sheet - indium

    SciTech Connect

    1994-01-01

    Indium is generally found in concentrations averaging 10 to 20 ppm in sphalerite and chalcopyrite ores associated with zinc, copper, lead and tin deposits. Indium is recovered as a by-product of base metal mining by open pit, underground and other methods. After the recovery of zinc by the electrolytic process (copper concentrate by flotation, and lead and tin by electrolysis), indium antimonide slimes left on the anode and the indium-containing spent electrolyte become the input material for the processing of indium. Sulfuric acid is combined with the residues and heated to form sulfates which are then leached with water to filter off the remaining tin, lead and antimony. The indium in solution is recovered by cementation on aluminum, washed, melted, and refined into a metal.

  4. Industrial applications of high-power copper vapor lasers

    SciTech Connect

    Warner, B.E.; Boley, C.D.; Chang, J.J.; Dragon, E.P.; Havstad, M.A.; Martinez, M.; McLean, W. II

    1995-08-01

    A growing appreciation has developed in the last several years for the copper vapor laser because of its utility in ablating difficult materials at high rates. Laser ablation at high rates shows promise for numerous industrial applications such as thin film deposition, precision hole drilling, and machining of ceramics and other refractories.

  5. Auger electron spectroscopy study of surface segregation in the binary alloys copper-1 atomic percent indium, copper-2 atomic percent tin, and iron-6.55 atomic percent silicon

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ferrante, J.

    1973-01-01

    Auger electron spectroscopy was used to examine surface segregation in the binary alloys copper-1 at. % indium, copper-2 at. % tin and iron-6.55 at. % silicon. The copper-tin and copper-indium alloys were single crystals oriented with the /111/ direction normal to the surface. An iron-6.5 at. % silicon alloy was studied (a single crystal oriented in the /100/ direction for study of a (100) surface). It was found that surface segregation occurred following sputtering in all cases. Only the iron-silicon single crystal alloy exhibited equilibrium segregation (i.e., reversibility of surface concentration with temperature) for which at present we have no explanation. McLean's analysis for equilibrium segregation at grain boundaries did not apply to the present results, despite the successful application to dilute copper-aluminum alloys. The relation of solute atomic size and solubility to surface segregation is discussed. Estimates of the depth of segregation in the copper-tin alloy indicate that it is of the order of a monolayer surface film.

  6. Highly Efficient Copper-Indium-Selenide Quantum Dot Solar Cells: Suppression of Carrier Recombination by Controlled ZnS Overlayers.

    PubMed

    Kim, Jae-Yup; Yang, Jiwoong; Yu, Jung Ho; Baek, Woonhyuk; Lee, Chul-Ho; Son, Hae Jung; Hyeon, Taeghwan; Ko, Min Jae

    2015-11-24

    Copper-indium-selenide (CISe) quantum dots (QDs) are a promising alternative to the toxic cadmium- and lead-chalcogenide QDs generally used in photovoltaics due to their low toxicity, narrow band gap, and high absorption coefficient. Here, we demonstrate that the photovoltaic performance of CISe QD-sensitized solar cells (QDSCs) can be greatly enhanced simply by optimizing the thickness of ZnS overlayers on the QD-sensitized TiO2 electrodes. By roughly doubling the thickness of the overlayers compared to the conventional one, conversion efficiency is enhanced by about 40%. Impedance studies reveal that the thick ZnS overlayers do not affect the energetic characteristics of the photoanode, yet enhance the kinetic characteristics, leading to more efficient photovoltaic performance. In particular, both interfacial electron recombination with the electrolyte and nonradiative recombination associated with QDs are significantly reduced. As a result, our best cell yields a conversion efficiency of 8.10% under standard solar illumination, a record high for heavy metal-free QD solar cells to date. PMID:26431392

  7. Thin-film copper indium gallium selenide solar cell based on low-temperature all-printing process.

    PubMed

    Singh, Manjeet; Jiu, Jinting; Sugahara, Tohru; Suganuma, Katsuaki

    2014-09-24

    In the solar cell field, development of simple, low-cost, and low-temperature fabrication processes has become an important trend for energy-saving and environmental issues. Copper indium gallium selenide (CIGS) solar cells have attracted much attention due to the high absorption coefficient, tunable band gap energy, and high efficiency. However, vacuum and high-temperature processing in fabrication of solar cells have limited the applications. There is a strong need to develop simple and scalable methods. In this work, a CIGS solar cell based on all printing steps and low-temperature annealing is developed. CIGS absorber thin film is deposited by using dodecylamine-stabilized CIGS nanoparticle ink followed by printing buffer layer. Silver nanowire (AgNW) ink and sol-gel-derived ZnO precursor solution are used to prepare a highly conductive window layer ZnO/[AgNW/ZnO] electrode with a printing method that achieves 16 Ω/sq sheet resistance and 94% transparency. A CIGS solar cell based on all printing processes exhibits efficiency of 1.6% with open circuit voltage of 0.48 V, short circuit current density of 9.7 mA/cm(2), and fill factor of 0.34 for 200 nm thick CIGS film, fabricated under ambient conditions and annealed at 250 °C. PMID:25180569

  8. Selective ablation of Copper-Indium-Diselenide solar cells monitored by laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy and classification methods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Diego-Vallejo, David; Ashkenasi, David; Lemke, Andreas; Eichler, Hans Joachim

    2013-09-01

    Laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy (LIBS) and two classification methods, i.e. linear correlation and artificial neural networks (ANN), are used to monitor P1, P2 and P3 scribing steps of Copper-Indium-Diselenide (CIS) solar cells. Narrow channels featuring complete removal of desired layers with minimum damage on the underlying film are expected to enhance efficiency of solar cells. The monitoring technique is intended to determine that enough material has been removed to reach the desired layer based on the analysis of plasma emission acquired during multiple pass laser scribing. When successful selective scribing is achieved, a high degree of similarity between test and reference spectra has to be identified by classification methods in order to stop the scribing procedure and avoid damaging the bottom layer. Performance of linear correlation and artificial neural networks is compared and evaluated for two spectral bandwidths. By using experimentally determined combinations of classifier and analyzed spectral band for each step, classification performance achieves errors of 7, 1 and 4% for steps P1, P2 and P3, respectively. The feasibility of using plasma emission for the supervision of processing steps of solar cell manufacturing is demonstrated. This method has the potential to be implemented as an online monitoring procedure assisting the production of solar cells.

  9. Electrical Bias as an Alternate Method for Reproducible Measurement of Copper Indium Gallium Diselenide (CIGS) Photovoltaic Modules: Preprint

    SciTech Connect

    Deline, C.; Stokes, A.; Silverman, T. J.; Rummel, S.; Jordan, D.; Kurtz, S.

    2012-08-01

    Light-to-dark metastable changes in thin-film photovoltaic (PV) modules can introduce uncertainty when measuring module performance on indoor flash testing equipment. This study describes a method to stabilize module performance through forward-bias current injection rather than light exposure. Measurements of five pairs of thin-film copper indium gallium diselenide (CIGS) PV modules indicate that forward-bias exposure maintained the PV modules at a stable condition (within 1%) while the unbiased modules degraded in performance by up to 12%. It was additionally found that modules exposed to forward bias exhibited stable performance within about 3% of their long-term outdoor exposed performance. This carrier-injection method provides a way to reduce uncertainty arising from fast transients in thin-film module performance between the time a module is removed from light exposure and when it is measured indoors, effectively simulating continuous light exposure by injecting minority carriers that behave much as photocarriers do. This investigation also provides insight into the initial light-induced transients of thin-film modules upon outdoor deployment.

  10. Colloidally stable selenium@copper selenide core@shell nanoparticles as selenium source for manufacturing of copper-indium-selenide solar cells.

    PubMed

    Dong, Hailong; Quintilla, Aina; Cemernjak, Marco; Popescu, Radian; Gerthsen, Dagmar; Ahlswede, Erik; Feldmann, Claus

    2014-02-01

    Selenium nanoparticles with diameters of 100-400nm are prepared via hydrazine-driven reduction of selenious acid. The as-prepared amorphous, red selenium (a-Se) particles were neither a stable phase nor were they colloidally stable. Due to phase transition to crystalline (trigonal), grey selenium (t-Se) at or even below room temperature, the particles merged rapidly and recrystallized as micronsized crystal needles. As a consequence, such Se particles were not suited for layer deposition and as a precursor to manufacture thin-film CIS (copper indium selenide/CuInSe2) solar cells. To overcome this restriction, Se@CuSe core@shell particles are presented here. For these Se@CuSe core@shell nanoparticles, the phase transition a-Se→t-Se is shifted to temperatures higher than 100°C. Moreover, a spherical shape of the particles is retained even after phase transition. Composition and structure of the Se@CuSe core@shell nanostructure are evidenced by electron microscopy (SEM/STEM), DLS, XRD, FT-IR and line-scan EDXS. As a conceptual study, the newly formed Se@CuSe core@shell nanostructures with CuSe acting as a protecting layer to increase the phase-transition temperature and to improve the colloidal stability were used as a selenium precursor for manufacturing of thin-film CIS solar cells and already lead to conversion efficiencies up to 3%. PMID:24267336

  11. Influence of Indium Addition on Whisker Mitigation in Electroplated Tin Coatings on Copper Substrates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meinshausen, L.; Bhassyvasantha, S.; Majumdar, B. S.; Dutta, I.

    2016-01-01

    Among many factors that influence whisker nucleation and growth in electroplated tin, it is now well established that small additions of Pb leads to whisker mitigation. To date, a good non-toxic elemental alternative to Pb that would mitigate whiskers remains elusive. In this work, a 50-100 nm In electroplated layer was incorporated into a 1- μm-thick electroplated Sn on a pure Cu substrate. In order to permit diffusion of In into Sn, heat treatments (HTs) between 125°C and 160°C were performed. The diffusion profile of In was altered by varying the dwell times of the HT and by utilizing two variants of In layer deposition, namely, (1) electroplating In at the top of the Sn plating, and (2) by sandwiching the In plating between two Sn layers, each approximately 500 nm thick. Appropriate control samples of pure Sn were utilized to permit valid data on the influence of In on whisker mitigation. Indium additions reduced whisker growth by at least two orders of magnitude following the 160°C treatment, independent of the location of the In layer. X-ray microanalysis of a focused ion beam cross section of the sandwich plating confirmed that In had indeed diffused into the Sn through the 160°C HT and was a likely reason for the mitigation of Sn whiskers.

  12. Copper, indium, tin, and lead complexes with fluorinated selenolate ligands: precursors to MSex.

    PubMed

    Holligan, Kareem; Rogler, Patrick; Rehe, David; Pamula, Michael; Kornienko, Anna Y; Emge, Thomas J; Krogh-Jespersen, Karsten; Brennan, John G

    2015-09-21

    Reductive cleavage of C6F5SeSeC6F5 with elemental M (M = Cu, In, Sn, Pb) in pyridine results in the formation of (py)4Cu2(SeC6F5)2, (py)2In(SeC6F5)3, (py)2Sn(SeC6F5)2, and (py)2Pb(SeC6F5)2. Each group adopts a unique structure: the Cu(I) compound crystallizes as a dimer with a pair of bridging selenolates, two pyridine ligands coordinating to each Cu(I) ion, and a short Cu(I)-Cu(I) distance (2.595 Å). The indium compound crystallizes as monometallic five-coordinate (py)2In(SeC6F5)3 in a geometry that approximates a trigonal bipyramidal structure with two axial pyridine ligands and three selenolates. The tin and lead derivatives (py)2M(SeC6F5)2 are also monomeric, but they adopt nearly octahedral geometries with trans pyridine ligands, a pair of cis-selenolates, and two "empty" cis-positions on the octahedron that are oriented toward extremely remote selenolates (M-Se = 3.79 Å (Sn), 3.70 Å (Pb)) from adjacent molecules. Two of the four compounds (Cu, In) exhibit intermolecular π-π stacking arrangements in the solid state, whereas the stacking of molecules for the other two compounds (Sn, Pb) appears to be based upon molecular shape and crystal packing forces. All compounds are volatile and decompose at elevated temperatures to give MSex and Se(C6F5)2.The electronic structures of the dimeric Cu compound and monomeric (py)2M(SeC6F5)2 (M = Sn, Pb) were examined with density functional theory calculations. PMID:26317752

  13. Indium oxide (In2O3) nanoparticles induce progressive lung injury distinct from lung injuries by copper oxide (CuO) and nickel oxide (NiO) nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Jeong, Jiyoung; Kim, Jeongeun; Seok, Seung Hyeok; Cho, Wan-Seob

    2016-04-01

    Indium is an essential element in the manufacture of liquid crystal displays and other electronic devices, and several forms of indium compounds have been developed, including nanopowders, films, nanowires, and indium metal complexes. Although there are several reports on lung injury caused by indium-containing compounds, the toxicity of nanoscale indium oxide (In2O3) particles has not been reported. Here, we compared lung injury induced by a single exposure to In2O3 nanoparticles (NPs) to that caused by benchmark high-toxicity nickel oxide (NiO) and copper oxide (CuO) NPs. In2O3 NPs at doses of 7.5, 30, and 90 cm(2)/rat (50, 200, and 600 µg/rat) were administered to 6-week-old female Wistar rats via pharyngeal aspiration, and lung inflammation was evaluated 1, 3, 14, and 28 days after treatment. Neutrophilic inflammation was observed on day 1 and worsened until day 28, and severe pulmonary alveolar proteinosis (PAP) was observed on post-aspiration days 14 and 28. In contrast, pharyngeal aspiration of NiO NPs showed severe neutrophilic inflammation on day 1 and lymphocytic inflammation with PAP on day 28. Pharyngeal aspiration of CuO NPs showed severe neutrophilic inflammation on day 1, but symptoms were completely resolved after 14 days and no PAP was observed. The dose of In2O3 NPs that produced progressive neutrophilic inflammation and PAP was much less than the doses of other toxic particles that produced this effect, including crystalline silica and NiO NPs. These results suggest that occupational exposure to In2O3 NPs can cause severe lung injury. PMID:25731971

  14. Copper-indium ordering in RECu 6In 6 ( RE=Y, Ce, Pr, Nd, Gd, Tb, Dy)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zaremba, Roman; Muts, Ihor; Hoffmann, Rolf-Dieter; Kalychak, Yaroslav M.; Zaremba, Vasyl' I.; Pöttgen, Rainer

    2007-09-01

    The rare earth metal-copper-indides RECu 6In 6 ( RE=Y, Ce, Pr, Nd, Gd, Tb, Dy) were synthesized from the elements by arc-melting. Well-crystallized samples were obtained by slowly cooling the melted buttons from 1320 to 670 K in sealed silica tubes in a muffle furnace. They were investigated by X-ray diffraction on powders and single crystals: ThMn 12 type, space group I4/ mmm, Z=2, a=916.3(2), c=535.8(2) pm, w R2=0.063, 216 F2 values, 15 variables for YCu 6In 6, a=926.5(4), c=543.5(3) pm, w R2=0.064, 314 F2 values, 15 variables for CeCu 6In 6, a=925.7(4), c=540.1(3) pm, w R2=0.075, 219 F2 values, 15 variables for PrCu 6In 6, a=923.1(4), c=540.3(3) pm, w R2=0.071, 218 F2 values, 15 variables for NdCu 6In 6, a=917.7(4), c=540.2(3) pm, w R2=0.076, 207 F2 values, 15 variables for GdCu 6In 6, a=917.0(5), c=540.5(4) pm, w R2=0.062, 215 F2 values, 15 variables for TbCu 6In 6, a=915.2(8), c=540.7(7) pm, w R2=0.108, 218 F2 values, 15 variables for DyCu 6In 6. The structures have been refined with a split position (50% Cu+50% In) for the 8 j site. They can be explained by a tetragonal body-centered packing of CN 20 polyhedra (10Cu+10In) around the rare earth atoms. The ordering models of the copper and indium atoms and the limitations/resolution of X-ray diffraction for this topic are discussed.

  15. Growth and characterization of indium doped silicon single crystals at industrial scale

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haringer, Stephan; Giannattasio, Armando; Alt, Hans Christian; Scala, Roberto

    2016-03-01

    Indium is becoming one of the most important dopant species for silicon crystals used in photovoltaics. In this work we have investigated the behavior of indium in silicon crystals grown by the Czochralski pulling process. The experiments were performed by growing 200 mm crystals, which is a standard diameter for large volume production, thus the data reported here are of technological interest for the large scale production of indium doped p-type silicon. The indium segregation coefficient and the evaporation rate from the silicon melt have been calculated to be 5 × 10-4 ± 3% and 1.6 × 10-4 cm·s-1, respectively. In contrast to previous works the indium was introduced in liquid phase and the efficiency was compared with that deduced by other authors, using different methods. In addition, the percentage of electrically active indium at different dopant concentrations is calculated and compared with the carrier concentration at room temperature, measured by four-point bulk method.

  16. Copper:molybdenum sub-oxide blend as transparent conductive electrode (TCE) indium free

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hssein, Mehdi; Cattin, Linda; Morsli, Mustapha; Addou, Mohammed; Bernède, Jean-Christian

    2016-05-01

    Oxide/metal/oxide structures have been shown to be promising alternatives to ITO. In such structures, in order to decrease the high light reflection of the metal film it is embedded between two metal oxides dielectric. MoO3-x is often used as oxide due to its capacity to be a performing anode buffer layer in organic solar cells, while silver is the metal the most often used [1]. Some attempts to use cheaper metal such as copper have been done. However it was shown that Cu diffuses strongly into MoO3-x [2]. Here we used this property to grow simple new transparent conductive oxide (TCE), i.e., Cu: MoO3-x blend. After the deposition of a thin Cu layer, a film of MoO3-x is deposited by sublimation. An XPS study shows more than 50% of Cu is present at the surface of the structure. In order to limit the Cu diffusion an ultra-thin Al layer is deposited onto MoO3-x. Then, in order to obtain a good hole collecting contact with the electron donor of the organic solar cells, a second MoO3-x layer is deposited. After optimization of the thickness of the different layers, the optimum structure is as follow: Cu (12 nm) : MoO3-x (20 nm)/Al (0.5 nm)/ MoO3-x (10 nm). The sheet resistance of this structure is Rsq = 5.2 Ω/sq. and its transmittance is Tmax = 65%. The factor of merit ϕM = T10/Rsq. = 2.41 × 10-3 Ω-1, which made this new TCE promising as anode in organic solar cells. Contribution to the topical issue "Materials for Energy Harvesting, Conversion and Storage (ICOME 2015) - Elected submissions", edited by Jean-Michel Nunzi, Rachid Bennacer and Mohammed El Ganaoui

  17. Thin film metallic glass as a diffusion barrier for copper indium gallium selenide solar cell on stainless steel substrate: A feasibility study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Diyatmika, Wahyu; Xue, Lingjun; Lin, Tai-Nan; Chang, Chia-wen; Chu, Jinn P.

    2016-08-01

    The feasibility of using Zr53.5Cu29.1Al6.5Ni10.9 thin-film metallic glass (TFMG) as a diffusion barrier for copper indium gallium selenide (CIGS) solar cells on stainless steel (SS) is investigated. The detrimental Fe diffusion from SS into CIGS is found to be effectively hindered by the introduction of a 70-nm-thick TFMG barrier; the cell performance is thus improved. Compared with the 2.73% of CIGS on bare SS, a higher efficiency of 5.25% is obtained for the cell with the Zr52Cu32Al9Ni7 TFMG barrier.

  18. Industrial aspects of precision machining with copper vapor lasers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hartmann, Martin; Koch, Juergen; Lang, Adolf; Schutte, Karsten; Bergmann, Hans W.

    1997-08-01

    The applications of conventional infrared lasers running cw or quasi-sw for drilling, cutting and shaping are limited in the precision achievable due to the long interaction time which leads to heat affected zones. The necessity to use a gas jet to blow the molten material out of the cut kerf will damage fragile workpieces like thin foils. Short laser pulses of sufficient intensity remove the material directly by evaporation and minimize the amount of heat transferred into the solid. Classical infrared laser sources generate a shielding air plasma within some ns at power densities above some 107W/cm2. The optical breakdown threshold value in air can be shifted to higher intensities by using visible light as well as reducing the focal diameter. An alternative way is to shorten the pulse duration to less than 10 ps that a plasma is generated only after the pulse. Thus, the material removal process begins after the deposition of the pulse energy into the material. But such short pulses will generate a pressure wave due to the sudden thermal expansion and can damage or destroy microscopic components. For industrial production the productivity is a further aspect. Hence, a certain mean power is required in order to obtain the desired production rate. Considering the above aspects, copper vapor lasers (CVLs) with ns pulse duration are well suited for precision machining of metals and ceramics. Processing with CVLs is an advantage in that its wavelength is highly absorbed by metallic targets and the probability for the optical breakdown in air is low. CVLs in an oscillator-amplifier-setup incorporate diffraction limited beam quality and high average power. The present paper outlines the potential of the CVL for the industrial use regarding high processing speed and precision. Under these aspects the limiting mechanisms on the material removal process and the necessary processing strategies for scaling up the productivity are shown. The relevant laser parameters for

  19. Surface potential measurement of fullerene derivative/copper phthalocyanine on indium tin oxide electrode by Kelvin probe force microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Satoh, Nobuo; Yamaki, Michio; Noda, Kei; Katori, Shigetaka; Kobayashi, Kei; Matsushige, Kazumi; Yamada, Hirofumi

    2015-08-01

    We have investigated the organic semiconductor thin films deposited by vacuum evaporation deposition using intersecting metal shadow masks on indium tin oxide (ITO) electrode/glass substrates to simulate organic solar cells by simultaneous observation with dynamic force microscopy (DFM)/Kelvin-probe force microscopy (KFM). The energy band diagram was depicted by simultaneously obtaining topographic and surface potential images of the same area using DFM/KFM. We considered the charge behavior at the interface having band bending in the phenyl-C61-butyric acid methyl ester (PCBM) film.

  20. Indium Sorption to Iron Oxides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    White, S. J.; Sacco, S. A.; Hemond, H.; Hussain, F. A.; Runkel, R. L.; Walton-Day, K. E.; Kimball, B. A.; Shine, J. P.

    2014-12-01

    Indium is an increasingly important metal in semiconductors and electronics, and its use is growing rapidly as a semiconductive coating (as indium tin oxide) for liquid crystal displays (LCDs) and flat panel displays. It also has uses in important energy technologies such as light emitting diodes (LEDs) and photovoltaic cells. Despite its rapid increase in use, very little is known about the environmental behavior of indium, and concerns are being raised over the potential health effects of this emerging metal contaminant. One source of indium to the environment is acid mine drainage from the mining of lead, zinc, and copper sulfides. In our previous studies of a stream in Colorado influenced by acid mine drainage from lead and zinc mining activities, indium concentrations were found to be 10,000 times those found in uncontaminated rivers. However, the speciation and mobility of indium could not be reliably modeled because sorption constants to environmental sorbents have not been determined. In this study, we generate sorption constants for indium to ferrihydrite in the laboratory over a range of pHs, sorbent to sorbate ratios, and ionic strengths. Ferrihydrite is one of the most important sorbents in natural systems, and sorption to amorphous iron oxides such as ferrihydrite is thought to be one of the main removal mechanisms of metals from the dissolved phase in aqueous environments. Because of its relatively low solubility, we also find that indium hydroxide precipitation can dominate indium's partitioning at micromolar concentrations of indium. This precipitation may be important in describing indium's behavior in our study stream in Colorado, where modeling sorption to iron-oxides does not explain the complete removal of indium from the dissolved phase when the pH of the system is artificially raised to above 8. This study contributes much-needed data about indium's aqueous behavior, in order to better understand its fate, transport, and impacts in the

  1. Indium fluoride glass fibers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saad, Mohammed

    2012-03-01

    Fluoride glasses are the only material that transmit light from ultraviolet to mid-infrared and can be drawn into industrial optical fibers. The mechanical and optical properties of new indium fluoride glass fibers have been investigated. Multimode fiber 190 microns, has very high mechanical strength greater than 100 kpsi and optical loss as low as 45 dB/km between 2 and 4 microns. Unlike chalcogenide glass fibers, indium fluoride fiber has a wide transmission window from 0.3 to 5.5 microns without any absorption peak. Indium fluoride glass fibers are the technology of choice for all application requiring transmission up to 5 micron such as infrared contour measure (IRCM) and chemical sensing. Furthermore, Indium fluoride glasses have low phonon energy and can be heavily doped and co-doped whit rare-earth elements. Therefore they are very promising candidates for infrared fiber lasers.

  2. High color rendering index white light emitting diodes fabricated from a combination of carbon dots and zinc copper indium sulfide quantum dots

    SciTech Connect

    Sun, Chun; Liu, Wenyan; Zhang, Xiaoyu; Zhang, Yu E-mail: wyu6000@gmail.com; Wang, Yu; Kalytchuk, Sergii; Kershaw, Stephen V.; Rogach, Andrey L.; Zhang, Tieqiang; Zhao, Jun; Yu, William W. E-mail: wyu6000@gmail.com

    2014-06-30

    In a line with most recent trends in developing non-toxic fluorescent nanomaterials, we combined blue emissive carbon dots with green and red emissive zinc copper indium sulfide (ZCIS) core/shell quantum dots (QDs) to achieve white light-emitting diodes (WLEDs) with a high color rendering index of 93. This indicates that ZCIS QDs, with their broad emission bands, can be employed to effectively make up the emission of carbon dots in the yellow and red regions to produce WLEDs in the wide region of color temperature by tuning the volume ratio of these constituting luminophores. Their electroluminescence characteristics including color rendering index, Commission Internationale de l'Eclairage (CIE) color coordinates, and color temperatures were evaluated as a function of forward current. The CIE-1931 chromaticity coordinates of the as-prepared WLEDs, exhibiting good stability, were slightly shifted from (0.321, 0.312) at 10 mA to (0.351, 0.322) at 30 mA, which was mainly caused by the different thermal quenching coefficients of carbon dots and ZCIS QDs.

  3. An econometric model of the U.S. secondary copper industry: Recycling versus disposal

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Slade, M.E.

    1980-01-01

    In this paper, a theoretical model of secondary recovery is developed that integrates microeconomic theories of production and cost with a dynamic model of scrap generation and accumulation. The model equations are estimated for the U.S. secondary copper industry and used to assess the impacts that various policies and future events have on copper recycling rates. The alternatives considered are: subsidies for secondary production, differing energy costs, and varying ore quality in primary production. ?? 1990.

  4. COPPER

    EPA Science Inventory

    The report is a review of current knowledge of the distribution of copper in the environment and living things. Metabolism and the effects of copper in the biosphere are also considered. Copper compounds are common and widely distributed in nature. They are also extensively mined...

  5. Cadmium, copper and nickel levels in vegetables from industrial and residential areas of Lagos City, Nigeria.

    PubMed

    Yusuf, A A; Arowolo, T A; Bamgbose, O

    2003-03-01

    The levels of cadmium, copper and nickel in five different edible vegetables, Talinum triangulare, Celosia trigyna, Corchorus olitorus, Venomia amygydalina and Telfaria accidentalis, and the soils in which they were grown, from three industrial and three residential areas of Lagos City, Nigeria, were determined using atomic absorption spectrophotometry. The results obtained for these three heavy metals from the industrial areas were higher than those of the residential areas as a result of pollution. Industrial area results for vegetables ranged between 1.13 and 1.67 microg/g for cadmium; 25.08 and 56.84 microg/g for copper and 1.33 and 2.06 microg/g for nickel. There were statistically significant differences (P<0.05) between the levels of copper and nickel in all the vegetables studied from industrial and residential areas, while there was no statistically significant difference for cadmium. The results also show that Corchorus olitorus (bush okra) has the ability to accumulate more copper and nickel than the other vegetable studied but has the least ability to accumulate cadmium. PMID:12504169

  6. Indium: bringing liquid-crystal displays into focus

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Mercer, Celestine N.

    2015-01-01

    Compared to more abundant industrial metals such as lead and zinc, information about the behavior and toxicity of indium in the environment is limited. However, many indium compounds have been proven to be toxic to animals.

  7. Life in blue: copper resistance mechanisms of bacteria and archaea used in industrial biomining of minerals.

    PubMed

    Orell, Alvaro; Navarro, Claudio A; Arancibia, Rafaela; Mobarec, Juan C; Jerez, Carlos A

    2010-01-01

    Industrial biomining processes to extract copper, gold and other metals involve the use of extremophiles such as the acidophilic Acidithiobacillus ferrooxidans (Bacteria), and the thermoacidophilic Sulfolobus metallicus (Archaea). Together with other extremophiles these microorganisms subsist in habitats where they are exposed to copper concentrations higher than 100mM. Herein we review the current knowledge on the Cu-resistance mechanisms found in these microorganisms. Recent information suggests that biomining extremophiles respond to extremely high Cu concentrations by using simultaneously all or most of the following key elements: 1) a wide repertoire of Cu-resistance determinants; 2) duplication of some of these Cu-resistance determinants; 3) existence of novel Cu chaperones; 4) a polyP-based Cu-resistance system, and 5) an oxidative stress defense system. Further insight of the biomining community members and their individual response to copper is highly relevant, since this could provide key information to the mining industry. In turn, this information could be used to select the more fit members of the bioleaching community to attain more efficient industrial biomining processes. PMID:20627124

  8. INDUSTRIAL PROCESS PROFILES FOR ENVIRONMENTAL USE: CHAPTER 29 PRIMARY COPPER INDUSTRY

    EPA Science Inventory

    The catalog of Industrial Process Profiles for Environmental Use was developed as an aid in defining the environmental impacts of industrial activity in the United States. Entries for each industry are in consistent format and form separate chapters of the study. The primary copp...

  9. Copper

    Integrated Risk Information System (IRIS)

    Copper ; CASRN 7440 - 50 - 8 Human health assessment information on a chemical substance is included in the IRIS database only after a comprehensive review of toxicity data , as outlined in the IRIS assessment development process . Sections I ( Health Hazard Assessments for Noncarcinogenic Effects )

  10. Development of the copper and molybdenum industries and the Armenian economy

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Bond, A.R.; Levine, R.M.

    1997-01-01

    Production of copper and molybdenum in Armenia is examined, with special emphasis on the location of major deposits, former and proposed future centers of processing, and contribution of metals exports to the country's foreign trade revenues. Particular emphasis is placed on the impacts on these industries of the disruption of economic ties resulting from the dissolution of the USSR and an economic crisis precipitated by a major earthquake, Armenia's tension with Azerbaijan over armed conflict in Nagorno-Karabakh and surrounding areas in Azerbaijan, an economic blockade imposed by Turkey and Azerbaijan, and a consequent severe energy crisis. The paper highlights developments in the mid-1990s in copper and molybdenum and in the recent expansion of trade relations with Iran.

  11. Surface Alteration of Activated Carbon for Detoxification of Copper (ii) from Industrial Effluents

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bhutto, Sadaf; Khan, M. Nasiruddin

    2013-04-01

    The low-cost modified activated carbons were prepared from Thar and Lakhra (Pakistan) coals by activation with sulfuric acid and further modified with citric, tartaric and acetic acids for the selective adsorption of Cu(II) from aqueous solution. The original carbon obtained from activated Thar and Lakhra coals at pH 3.0 displayed significant adsorption capacity for lead and insignificant capacity values (0.880 and 0.830 mgṡg-1) for copper. However, after modification with citric, tartaric and acetic acid the copper adsorption capacities enhanced in the range of 5.56-21.85 and 6.05-44.61 times, respectively. The Langmuir, Freundlich and Temkin adsorption isotherms were used to elucidate the observed sorption phenomena. The isotherm equilibrium data was well fitted by the Langmuir and sufficiently fitted to the Freundlich models. The calculated thermodynamic parameters such as change in Gibbs free energy (ΔG°), enthalpy (ΔH°) and entropy (ΔS°) inferred that the investigated adsorption was spontaneous and endothermic in nature. Based on the results, it was concluded that the surface alteration with citric and tartaric acid, Thar and Lakhra activated carbons had significant potential for selective removal of copper(II) from industrial wastewater.

  12. Reduction of pollutants and disinfection of industrial wastewater by an integrated system of copper electrocoagulation and electrochemically generated hydrogen peroxide.

    PubMed

    Barrera-Díaz, Carlos E; Frontana-Uribe, Bernardo A; Roa-Morales, Gabriela; Bilyeu, Bryan W

    2015-01-01

    The objective of this study was to evaluate the effect of copper electrocoagulation and hydrogen peroxide on COD, color, turbidity, and bacterial activity in a mixed industry wastewater. The integrated system of copper electrocoagulation and hydrogen peroxide is effective at reducing the organic and bacterial content of industrial wastewater. The copper electrocoagulation alone reduces COD by 56% in 30 min at pH 2.8, but the combined system reduces COD by 78%, biochemical oxygen demand (BOD5) by 81%, and color by 97% under the same conditions. Colloidal particles are flocculated effectively, as shown by the reduction of zeta potential and the 84% reduction in turbidity and 99% reduction in total solids. Additionally, the total coliforms, fecal coliforms, and bacteria are all reduced by 99%. The integrated system is effective and practical for the reduction of both organic and bacterial content in industrial wastewater. PMID:25723067

  13. Treatment of copper ores and concentrates with industrial nitrogen species catalyzed pressure leaching and non-cyanide precious metals recovery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anderson, Corby G.

    2003-04-01

    Today, with a stringent economic and environmental climate prevailing in the copper business, there is increased interest in evaluating new processing alternatives for production. Hydrometallurgical pressure oxidation of copper concentrates is one of the more viable approaches, and several technological candidates have emerged. Of these, an overlooked but, ironically, the first industrially proven methodology utilized nitrogen species catalyzation in the oxidizing pressure-leach system to produce copper via solvent extraction/electrowinning. Given its advantages, this may prove to be a feasible process alternative for the future. In this article, the history of the system and its application to copper concentrates and ores will be outlined. In particular, a non-cyanide methodology for effective recovery of precious metals from chalcopyrite concentrates will be discussed.

  14. Synthesis, Characterization and Decomposition Studies of Tris(N,N-dibenzyldithiocarbamato) Indium(III): Chemical Spray Deposition of Polycrystalline CuInS2 on Copper Films

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hehemann, David G.; Lau, J. Eva; Harris, Jerry D.; Hoops, Michael D.; Duffy, Norman V.; Fanwick, Philip E.; Khan, Osman; Jin, Michael H.-C.; Hepp, Aloysius F.

    2005-01-01

    Tris(bis(phenylmethyl)carbamodithioato-S,S ), commonly referred to as tris(N,Ndibenzyldithiocarbamato) indium(III), In(S2CNBz2)3, was synthesized and characterized by single crystal X-ray crystallography. The compound crystallizes in the triclinic space group P1 bar with two molecules per unit cell. The material was further characterized using a novel analytical system employing the combined powers of thermogravimetric analysis, gas chromatography/mass spectrometry and Fourier-Transform infrared spectroscopy to investigate its potential use as a precursor for the chemical vapor deposition (CVD) of thin film materials for photovoltaic applications. Upon heating, the material thermally decomposes to release CS2 and benzyl moieties in to the gas phase, resulting in bulk In2S3. Preliminary spray CVD experiments indicate that In(S2CNBz2)3 decomposed on a Cu substrate reacts to produce stoichiometric CuInS2 films.

  15. Alumina polymorphs affect the metal immobilization effect when beneficially using copper-bearing industrial sludge for ceramics.

    PubMed

    Tang, Yuanyuan; Lu, Xiuqing; Shih, Kaimin

    2014-12-01

    The feasibility of recycling copper-bearing industrial sludge as a part of ceramic raw materials was evaluated through thermal interaction of sludge with aluminum-rich precursors. To observe copper incorporation mechanism, mixtures of copper-bearing sludge with alumina polymorphs (γ-Al2O3 and α-Al2O3) were fired between 750 and 1250°C. Different copper-hosting phases were identified by X-ray diffraction, and CuAl2O4 was found to be the predominant phase throughout the reactions. The experimental results indicate different CuAl2O4 initiating temperatures for two alumina materials, and the optimal temperature for CuAl2O4 formation is around 1100°C. To monitor the stabilization effect, prolonged leaching tests were carried out to leach sintered products for up to 20d. The results clearly demonstrate a substantial decrease in copper leachability for products with higher CuAl2O4 content formed from both alumina precursors despite their different sintering behavior. Meanwhile, the leachability of aluminum was much lower than that of copper, and it decreased by more than fourfold through the formation of CuAl2O4 spinel in γ-Al2O3 system. This study clearly indicates spinel formation as the most crucial metal stabilization mechanism when sintering multiphase copper-bearing industrial sludge with aluminum-rich ceramic raw materials, and suggests a promising and reliable technique for reusing industrial sludge. PMID:25299935

  16. Atmospheric Deposition of Indium in the Northeastern United States: Flux and Historical Trends.

    PubMed

    White, Sarah Jane O; Keach, Carrie; Hemond, Harold F

    2015-11-01

    The metal indium is an example of an increasingly important material used in electronics and new energy technologies, whose environmental behavior and toxicity are poorly understood despite increasing evidence of detrimental health impacts and human-induced releases to the environment. In the present work, the history of indium deposition from the atmosphere is reconstructed from its depositional record in an ombrotrophic bog in Massachusetts. A novel freeze-coring technique is used to overcome coring difficulties posed by woody roots and peat compressibility, enabling retrieval of relatively undisturbed peat cores dating back more than a century. Results indicate that long-range atmospheric transport is a significant pathway for the transport of indium, with peak concentrations of 69 ppb and peak fluxes of 1.9 ng/cm2/yr. Atmospheric deposition to the bog began increasing in the late 1800s/early 1900s, and peaked in the early 1970s. A comparison of deposition data with industrial production and emissions estimates suggests that both coal combustion and the smelting of lead, zinc, copper, and tin sulfides are sources of indium to the atmosphere in this region. Deposition appears to have decreased considerably since the 1970s, potentially a visible effect of particulate emissions controls instated in North America during that decade. PMID:26426729

  17. New Cu(TiBN x ) copper alloy films for industrial applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, Chon-Hsin

    2016-06-01

    In this study, I explore a new type of copper alloy, Cu(TiBN x ), films by cosputtering Cu and TiB within an Ar/N2 gas atmosphere on Si substrates. The films are then annealed for 1 h in a vacuum environment at temperatures up to 700 °C. The annealed films exhibit not only excellent thermal stability and low resistivity but also little leakage current and strong adhesion to the substrates while no Cu/Si interfacial interactions are apparent. Within a Sn/Cu(TiBN x )/Si structure at 200 °C, the new alloy exhibits a minute dissolution rate, which is lower than that of pure Cu by at least one order of magnitude. Furthermore, the new alloy’s consumption rate is comparable to that of Ni commonly used in solder joints. The new films appear suitable for some industrial applications, such as barrierless Si metallization and new wetting and diffusion barrier layers required in flip-chip solder joints.

  18. Influence of copper to indium atomic ratio on the properties of Cu-In-Te based thin-film solar cells prepared by low-temperature co-evaporation

    SciTech Connect

    Mise, Takahiro; Nakada, Tokio

    2012-09-15

    The influence of copper to indium atomic ratio (Cu/In) on the properties of Cu-In-Te based thin films and solar cells was investigated. The films (Cu/In = 0.38-1.17) were grown on both bare and Mo-coated soda-lime glass substrates at 250 Degree-Sign C by single-step co-evaporation using a molecular beam epitaxy system. Highly (112)-oriented CuInTe{sub 2} films were obtained at Cu/In ratios of 0.84-0.99. However, stoichiometric and Cu-rich films showed a poor film structure with high surface roughness. The films consist of polyhedron-shaped grains, which are related to the coexistence of a Cu{sub 2-x}Te phase, and significant evidence for the coexistence of the Cu{sub 2-x}Te phase in the stoichiometric and Cu-rich films is presented. KCN treatment was performed for the films in order to remove the Cu{sub 2-x}Te phase. The stoichiometric CuInTe{sub 2} thin films exhibited a high mobility above 50 cm{sup 2}/V s at room temperature after the KCN treatment. A preliminary solar cell fabricated using a 1.4-{mu}m-thick Cu-poor CuInTe{sub 2} thin film (Cu/In = 0.84, E{sub g} = 0.988 eV) yielded a total-area efficiency of 2.10%. The photovoltaic performance of the cell was improved after long-term ambient aging in dark conditions.

  19. Improving the efficiency of copper indium gallium (Di-)selenide (CIGS) solar cells through integration of a moth-eye textured resist with a refractive index similar to aluminum doped zinc oxide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Burghoorn, M.; Kniknie, B.; van Deelen, J.; Xu, M.; Vroon, Z.; van Ee, R.; van de Belt, R.; Buskens, P.

    2014-12-01

    Textured transparent conductors are widely used in thin-film silicon solar cells. They lower the reflectivity at interfaces between different layers in the cell and/or cause an increase in the path length of photons in the Si absorber layer, which both result in an increase in the number of absorbed photons and, consequently, an increase in short-circuit current density (Jsc) and cell efficiency. Through optical simulations, we recently obtained strong indications that texturing of the transparent conductor in copper indium gallium (di-)selenide (CIGS) solar cells is also optically advantageous. Here, we experimentally demonstrate that the Jsc and efficiency of CIGS solar cells with an absorber layer thickness (dCIGS) of 0.85 μm, 1.00 μm and 2.00 μm increase through application of a moth-eye textured resist with a refractive index that is sufficiently similar to AZO (nresist = 1.792 vs. nAZO = 1.913 at 633 nm) to avoid large optical losses at the resist-AZO interface. On average, Jsc increases by 7.2%, which matches the average reduction in reflection of 7.0%. The average relative increase in efficiency is slightly lower (6.0%). No trend towards a larger relative increase in Jsc with decreasing dCIGS was observed. Ergo, the increase in Jsc can be fully explained by the reduction in reflection, and we did not observe any increase in Jsc based on an increased photon path length.

  20. Improving the efficiency of copper indium gallium (Di-)selenide (CIGS) solar cells through integration of a moth-eye textured resist with a refractive index similar to aluminum doped zinc oxide

    SciTech Connect

    Burghoorn, M.; Kniknie, B.; Deelen, J. van; Ee, R. van; Xu, M.; Vroon, Z.; Belt, R. van de; Buskens, P. E-mail: buskens@dwi.rwth-aachen.de

    2014-12-15

    Textured transparent conductors are widely used in thin-film silicon solar cells. They lower the reflectivity at interfaces between different layers in the cell and/or cause an increase in the path length of photons in the Si absorber layer, which both result in an increase in the number of absorbed photons and, consequently, an increase in short-circuit current density (J{sub sc}) and cell efficiency. Through optical simulations, we recently obtained strong indications that texturing of the transparent conductor in copper indium gallium (di-)selenide (CIGS) solar cells is also optically advantageous. Here, we experimentally demonstrate that the J{sub sc} and efficiency of CIGS solar cells with an absorber layer thickness (d{sub CIGS}) of 0.85 μm, 1.00 μm and 2.00 μm increase through application of a moth-eye textured resist with a refractive index that is sufficiently similar to AZO (n{sub resist} = 1.792 vs. n{sub AZO} = 1.913 at 633 nm) to avoid large optical losses at the resist-AZO interface. On average, J{sub sc} increases by 7.2%, which matches the average reduction in reflection of 7.0%. The average relative increase in efficiency is slightly lower (6.0%). No trend towards a larger relative increase in J{sub sc} with decreasing d{sub CIGS} was observed. Ergo, the increase in J{sub sc} can be fully explained by the reduction in reflection, and we did not observe any increase in J{sub sc} based on an increased photon path length.

  1. InP (Indium Phosphide): Into the future

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brandhorst, Henry W., Jr.

    1989-01-01

    Major industry is beginning to be devoted to indium phosphide and its potential applications. Key to these applications are high speed and radiation tolerance; however the high cost of indium phosphide may be an inhibitor to progress. The broad applicability of indium phosphide to many devices will be discussed with an emphasis on photovoltaics. Major attention is devoted to radiation tolerance and means of reducing cost of devices. Some of the approaches applicable to solar cells may also be relevant to other devices. The intent is to display the impact of visionary leadership in the field and enable the directions and broad applicability of indium phosphide.

  2. Electrochemical treatment of heavy metals (Cu2+, Cr6+, Ni2+) from industrial effluent and modeling of copper reduction.

    PubMed

    Hunsom, M; Pruksathorn, K; Damronglerd, S; Vergnes, H; Duverneuil, P

    2005-02-01

    An electrochemical technique was tested in a laboratory scale to treat heavy metals (Cu2+, Cr6+ and Ni2+) from plating industrial effluent. The experiments were performed in a membrane reactor having a capacity of 1 l. Stainless-steel sheets with surface area of 0.011 m2 and titanium coated with ruthenium oxide were used as cathode and anode, respectively. The electrolyte was circulated at a constant flow rate (0.42 l/min) and the pH was kept constant at 1. Applied current densities were 10 and 90 A/m2. According to the experiment, it was found that a membrane reactor with plane electrode was capable for treating plating wastewater with low energy consumption (42.30 kWh/kg metal) and low operating cost (5.43 US dollars/m3). More than 99% of metal reduction was achieved and the final concentrations of copper, chromium and nickel in treated water were 0.10-0.13, 0.19-0.20 and 0.05-0.13 ppm, respectively. The brightener had no effect on copper reduction whereas hexavalent chromium had strong effect. The kinetic of copper reduction in the presence of hexavalent chromium was modeled as a two-step process with respect to copper concentration. PMID:15707634

  3. COPPER(1-Y)SILVER(Y)INDIUM - DISULFIDE(1-X)SELENIDE(2X) as a Prototype of the Pentenary Chalcopyrite Semiconductor Systems.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chapman, Glenn Harrison

    The group III-V mixed alloy quarternary semiconductors, such as Ga(,(1-y))In(,y)As(,(1-x))P(,x) have been extensively employed in lattice matching different semiconducting layers (at specific bandgaps) to form heterojunction electro-optical devices. However, these cover only a limited set of direct bandgap/lattice constant combinations. The analogous pentenary alloys, consisting of the ternary chalcopyrite groups I -III-VI(,2) and II-IV-V(,2), have the potential of similar applications as they cover an even wider band/lattice range. As a prototype of such alloys, samples of the pentenary Cu(,(1 -y))Ag(,y)InS(,2(1-x))Se(,2x) have been synthesized and studied. Samples were prepared by reacting stoichimetric powder mixtures at about 900 C. X-ray diffractometry tests suggest the compounds maintained complete powder solid solubility throughout the system in the chalcopyrite crystal structure. The intrinsic conductivity type of the alloys appear to follow a trend towards n-type for silver and sulfur rich compounds, while forming p-type for copper and selenium rich materials. The bandgap of these samples were measured using cathodoluminescence techniques, which generally have some ambiguity in their resulting estimates. To generate better values of the band parameters extensive computer modeling for the emission spectra from heavily doped direct bandgap materials was done. The effect of band tails and Gaussian impurity states on the luminescence spectra was studied for changes in doping densities, temperature and carrier injection levels. Formulae were derived from these models to obtain better estimates of the bandgap and impurity activation levels. Algorithms were developed to obtain the impurity spreading energy of a tailed or Gaussian band, and the quasi-Fermi energy levels for injected current in a material with a specific band structure. Cathodoluminescence measurements were made at 300 and 77 K on the samples. As predicted by the models, it was found easier to

  4. Ammonia Leaching: A New Approach of Copper Industry in Hydrometallurgical Processes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Radmehr, Vahid; Koleini, Seyed Mohammad Javad; Khalesi, Mohammad Reza; Tavakoli Mohammadi, Mohammad Reza

    2013-10-01

    Ammonia and ammonium salts have been recognized as effective leaching agents in hydrometallurgical processes due to low toxicity and cost, easy recovery and high selective recovery of metals. New research findings on considerable advantages of leaching by these agents and elimination of problems associated with acid leaching have resulted in a new approach in the world to this method. The investigations in this field indicate more frequent use of this method for extracting copper from ore and concentrate relative to other basic metals. In this paper, an attempt was made to describe the basis and different ammonia leaching methods and present the major research activities in this field for copper. Also latest findings and related novel processes have been presented. Comparisons including assessment of advantages and disadvantages of this method relative to acid leaching method, kinetic study of copper ammonia leaching and evaluation of Eh-pH diagrams in a system containing water and ammonia are other parts of this study. Finally, by describing the studies on copper extraction from the resulting pregnant solutions, the applicable extraction agents have been reviewed.

  5. Fluxless indium and silver-indium bonding processes for photonics and high-temperature electronics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    So, William Wilson

    .5 kg. Indium has been a choice for bonding photonic devices such as laser diodes. A major concern is the change of solder composition during device operation caused by diffusion of copper atoms from the copper substrate. Copper atoms can easily diffuse into and react with the indium joint to form intermetallic compounds Cu2In, CuIn, Cu9In4, Cu11 In9. This reaction continues even after the bonding process is completed and the device is put in operation at some temperature. Consequently, the composition, the microstructure and physical properties of the joint change during the device life.To prevent the intermetallic formation, the solder joint must remain indium rich. A barrier metallization on the copper substrate is necessary to stop copper atoms from getting into the solder joint. Device packages usually need more than one soldering operation to complete. The indium-rich alloys have a 156°C melting temperature. During subsequent bonding operations, another process with a bonding temperature lower than 156°C is valuable. Desirable bonding temperature should be lower than 156°C but higher than the maximum temperature of the joint during device operation. In-Sn eutectic alloy with a melting temperature of 118°C is chosen. (Abstract shortened by UMI.)

  6. Regularly arranged indium islands on glass/molybdenum substrates upon femtosecond laser and physical vapor deposition processing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ringleb, F.; Eylers, K.; Teubner, Th.; Boeck, T.; Symietz, C.; Bonse, J.; Andree, S.; Krüger, J.; Heidmann, B.; Schmid, M.; Lux-Steiner, M.

    2016-03-01

    A bottom-up approach is presented for the production of arrays of indium islands on a molybdenum layer on glass, which can serve as micro-sized precursors for indium compounds such as copper-indium-gallium-diselenide used in photovoltaics. Femtosecond laser ablation of glass and a subsequent deposition of a molybdenum film or direct laser processing of the molybdenum film both allow the preferential nucleation and growth of indium islands at the predefined locations in a following indium-based physical vapor deposition (PVD) process. A proper choice of laser and deposition parameters ensures the controlled growth of indium islands exclusively at the laser ablated spots. Based on a statistical analysis, these results are compared to the non-structured molybdenum surface, leading to randomly grown indium islands after PVD.

  7. Indium sealing techniques.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hochuli, U.; Haldemann, P.

    1972-01-01

    Gold films are used as an alloying flux to form 5-micron-thick indium film seals at temperatures below 300 C. Pyrex was sealed to quartz, ULE, CER-VIT, Irtran 2, Ge, GaAs, Invar, Kovar, Al, and Cu. The seals can also be used as current feedthroughs and graded seals.

  8. Quantification of zinc atoms in a surface alloy on copper in an industrial-type methanol synthesis catalyst.

    PubMed

    Kuld, Sebastian; Conradsen, Christian; Moses, Poul Georg; Chorkendorff, Ib; Sehested, Jens

    2014-06-01

    Methanol has recently attracted renewed interest because of its potential importance as a solar fuel. Methanol is also an important bulk chemical that is most efficiently formed over the industrial Cu/ZnO/Al2O3 catalyst. The identity of the active site and, in particular, the role of ZnO as a promoter for this type of catalyst is still under intense debate. Structural changes that are strongly dependent on the pretreatment method have now been observed for an industrial-type methanol synthesis catalyst. A combination of chemisorption, reaction, and spectroscopic techniques provides a consistent picture of surface alloying between copper and zinc. This analysis enables a reinterpretation of the methods that have been used for the determination of the Cu surface area and provides an opportunity to independently quantify the specific Cu and Zn areas. This method may also be applied to other systems where metal-support interactions are important, and this work generally addresses the role of the carrier and the nature of the interactions between carrier and metal in heterogeneous catalysts. PMID:24764288

  9. Emissions from the copper-nickel industry on the Kola Peninsula and at Noril'sk, Russia

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Boyd, Ron; Barnes, S.-J.; De Caritat, P.; Chekushin, V.A.; Melezhik, V.A.; Reimann, C.; Zientek, M.L.

    2009-01-01

    Published estimates for base metal emissions from the copper-nickel industry on the Kola Peninsula are re-examined in the light of (a) chemical data on the composition of the ores; (b) official emission figures for 1994; and (c) modelled emissions based on dry and wet deposition estimates derived from data for snow and rain samples collected in 1994. The modelled emissions, official emission figures and chemical data are mutually compatible for Ni, Cu and Co and show that previously published figures underestimated the emissions of the major elements, Ni and Cu (though within the same order of magnitude) and overestimated the emissions of As, Pb, Sb and Zn by up to several orders of magnitude, in some cases exceeding the calculated total input to the plants. Published estimates have neglected information on the nature and chemistry of the ores processed in metallurgical industries in the Noril'sk area of Siberia and the Urals. Revised emission estimates for 1994, using knowledge of the chemistry of the ores, are proposed: taken with published information on total emissions up to 2000 these data give an indication of emission levels in more recent years. ?? 2008 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. Respirable Indium Exposures, Plasma Indium, and Respiratory Health Among Indium-Tin Oxide (ITO) Workers

    PubMed Central

    Cummings, Kristin J.; Virji, M. Abbas; Park, Ji Young; Stanton, Marcia L.; Edwards, Nicole T.; Trapnell, Bruce C.; Carey, Brenna; Stefaniak, Aleksandr B.; Kreiss, Kathleen

    2016-01-01

    Background Workers manufacturing indium-tin oxide (ITO) are at risk of elevated indium concentration in blood and indium lung disease, but relationships between respirable indium exposures and biomarkers of exposure and disease are unknown. Methods For 87 (93%) current ITO workers, we determined correlations between respirable and plasma indium and evaluated associations between exposures and health outcomes. Results Current respirable indium exposure ranged from 0.4 to 108 μg/m3 and cumulative respirable indium exposure from 0.4 to 923 μg-yr/m3. Plasma indium better correlated with cumulative (rs = 0.77) than current exposure (rs = 0.54) overall and with tenure ≥1.9 years. Higher cumulative respirable indium exposures were associated with more dyspnea, lower spirometric parameters, and higher serum biomarkers of lung disease (KL-6 and SP-D), with significant effects starting at 22 μg-yr/m3, reached by 46% of participants. Conclusions Plasma indium concentration reflected cumulative respirable indium exposure, which was associated with clinical, functional, and serum biomarkers of lung disease. PMID:27219296

  11. Use of sepiolite as an adsorbent for the removal of copper (II) from industrial waste leachate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gamze Turan, N.; Ardali, Yüksel

    2013-04-01

    Land filling is the most common method of disposal of solid waste all over the world. As well as municipal solid waste, industrial wastes, which may contain hazardous substances, are also received by landfills in many countries. Leachate is one of the problems arising from landfills. When water percolates through solid wastes, contaminants are leached into solution. The major concern with the movement of leachate into the subsurface aquifer is the fate of the constituents found in leachate. The fate of heavy metals is the greatest interest in leachate. Several treatment technologies have been developed for eliminating heavy metals recently. Adsorption is one of the most interesting methods that it has been successfully applied for the heavy metal removal. Activated carbons were widely used as adsorbent materials because of their extended surface area, microporous structure, high adsorption capacity and high degree of surface reactivity. However, it is restricted due to its relatively high price, high operation costs, and problems with generation for the industrial scale applications. Recently, more research efforts have been focused on effective sorbents material in order to minimize the processing cost and solve their disposal problems in an environmentally sustainable way. Adsorption of metal ions onto clay minerals has been studied extensively because both metal ions and clays are common components in nature. The cost of clays is relatively low as compared to other alternative adsorbents. Furthermore, the high specific surface area, chemical and mechanical stability, variety of structural and surface properties and higher values of cation exchange capacities make the clays an excellent group of adsorbents. Sepiolite (Si12O30Mg8(OH)4(H2O)4•8H2O) is a natural, fibrous clay mineral with fine microporous channels running parallel to the length of the fibers. The structure of sepiolite, in some aspects, is similar to those of other 2:1 trioctahedral silicates, such

  12. Sorption of indium (III) onto carbon nanotubes.

    PubMed

    Alguacil, F J; Lopez, F A; Rodriguez, O; Martinez-Ramirez, S; Garcia-Diaz, I

    2016-08-01

    Indium has numerous applications in different industrial sectors and is not an abundant element. Therefore appropriate technology to recover this element from various process wastes is needed. This research reports high adsorption capacity of multiwalled carbon nanotubes (MWCNT) for In(III). The effects of pH, kinetics, isotherms and adsorption mechanism of MWCNT on In(III) adsorption were investigated and discussed in detail. The pH increases improves the adsorption capacity for In(III). The Langmuir adsorption model is the best fit with the experimental data. For the kinetic study, the adsorption onto MWCNT could be fitted to pseudo second-order. The adsorption of indium(III) can be described to a mechanism which consists of a film diffusion controlled process. Metal desorption can be achieved with acidic solutions. PMID:27085001

  13. Assessing toxicity of copper, cadmium and chromium levels relevant to discharge limits of industrial effluents into inland surface waters using common onion, Allium cepa bioassay.

    PubMed

    Hemachandra, Chamini K; Pathiratne, Asoka

    2015-02-01

    Toxicity of copper, cadmium and chromium relevant to established tolerance limits for the discharge of industrial effluents into inland surface waters was evaluated by Allium cepa bioassay. The roots of A. cepa bulbs exposed to Cu(2+) (3 mg L(-1)) individually or in mixtures with Cd(2+) (0.1 mg L(-1)) or/and Cr(6+) (0.1 mg L(-1)) exhibited the highest growth inhibition, mitotic index depression and nuclear abnormalities. Root tip cells exposed to Cr(6+) or Cd(2+) alone or in mixture displayed significant chromosomal aberrations in comparison to the controls. EC50s for root growth inhibition followed the order Cu(2+) < Cd(2+) < Cr(6+) indicating greater toxicity of copper. The results show that the industrial effluent discharge regulatory limits for these metals need to be reviewed considering potential cyto-genotoxicity to biological systems. PMID:25201323

  14. The use of exopolysaccharide - producing cyanobacteria as biosorbents to remove copper from industrial waste - waters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rossi, Federico; El Badaoui, Hajar; De Philippis, Roberto

    2014-05-01

    The accumulation of heavy metals in water bodies represent a widespread cause of pollution, and poses the need to develop novel technologies to remove metals at the source, abating the costs of the commonly used chemical and physio-chemical methods. The use of cyanobacteria as biosorbents has been acknowledged as a promising alternative, due to their charged polysaccharidic envelopes which have affinity for metal ions. Nonetheless, the reseach must move towards: i) assessing the effectiveness of the process towards complex wastewater solutions which contain chemical species that can interfere with the sorption process, also considering the characteristics of the used strains, and ii) developing novel devices that support biomass growth and use, in order to achieve a scaling up of the process. We compared the specific removal of three cyanobacteria, Cyanothece 16 Som 2, Cyanothece ET5 and Cyanospira capsulata, towards Cu2+ contained, with various other metals, in two industrial effluents (one at pH 1.26 and one at pH 10.26). The strains were selected due to their previously assayed affinity toward Cu2+ in pure solutions (De Philippis et al. 2011). Acid or basic pretreatments (respectively for the acid and the basic effluent) were performed in the tentative to increase the specific removal. Metal concentration in solution, before and after the contact with the biomasses, was determined by atomic absorption spectrometry. Specific removals resulted different to those obtained towards pure metal solutions, likely due to the presence of other competing ions. Cyanothece 16 Som 2 showed the highest Cu2+ specific removal towards both the effluents. The pretreatment was effective only in the case of the basic effluent. Results proved the capacity of Cyanothece 16 Som 2 to act as a selective Cu2+ sorbent even in the presence of complex solutions. A novel prototype device is being projected in order to support the growth and the immobilization of the cyanobacterial biomass for

  15. Soil acidity status in the vicinity of the Severonikel copper-nickel industrial complex, Kola Peninsula

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kashulina, G. M.; Kubrak, A. N.; Korobeinikova, N. M.

    2015-04-01

    The physicochemical properties of soils exposed to emissions from the Severonikel industrial complex (one of the largest sources of SO2 and heavy metals in northern Europe) for 70 years were studied. The results showed that even after the long-term impact of heavy SO2 emissions, the , the content of exchangeable bases, and the base saturation remained at the medium and high levels inherent to undisturbed soils of the region studied. An exclusion was the illuvial horizon of the podzols, where a relative reduction of the (at the level of low values of the natural variation) was revealed. At the same time, the hydrolytic acidity and cation exchange capacity in most samples of podzols, peat eutrophic, and mountain soils in the zone exposed to emissions (local zone) were also reduced. This fact is explained by indirect effects of the emissions: the gradual decrease in the organic matter content in the soils due to the destruction of the vegetation, the absence of fresh plant falloff, the development of erosion, and the disturbance of the hydrological regime of the soils and landscapes.

  16. Indium acetate toxicity in male reproductive system in rats.

    PubMed

    Lee, Kuo-Hsin; Chen, Hsiu-Ling; Leung, Chung-Man; Chen, Hsin-Pao; Hsu, Ping-Chi

    2016-01-01

    Indium, a rare earth metal characterized by high plasticity, corrosion resistance, and a low melting point, is widely used in the electronics industry, but has been reported to be an environmental pollutant and a health hazard. We designed a study to investigate the effects of subacute exposure of indium compounds on male reproductive function. Twelve-week old male Sprague-Dawley rats were randomly divided into test and control groups, and received weekly intraperitoneal injections of indium acetate (1.5 mg/kg body weight) and normal saline, respectively, for 8 weeks. Serum indium levels, cauda epididymal sperm count, motility, morphology, chromatin DNA structure, mitochondrial membrane potential, oxidative stress, and testis DNA content were investigated. The indium acetate-treated group showed significant reproductive toxicity, as well as an increased percentage of sperm morphology abnormality, chromatin integrity damage, and superoxide anion generation. Furthermore, positive correlations among sperm morphology abnormalities, chromatin DNA damage, and superoxide anion generation were also noted. The results of this study demonstrated the toxic effect of subacute low-dose indium exposure during the period of sexual maturation on male reproductive function in adulthood, through an increase in oxidative stress and sperm chromatin DNA damage during spermiogenesis, in a rodent model. PMID:25044390

  17. Mineral of the month: indium

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    George, Micheal W.

    2004-01-01

    Indium was discovered in Germany in 1863. Although it is a lustrous silver-white color, the finders named the new material for the “indigo” spectral lines the mineral created on the spectrograph. Indium ranks 61st in abundance in Earth’s crust and is about three times more abundant than silver or mercury.

  18. Effect of Lead and Copper on the Growth of Heavy Metal Resistance Fungi Isolated from Second Industrial City in Riyadh, Saudi Arabia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Siham, Al-Kadeeb A.

    In this study, soil samples for isolation of heavy metal resistance fungi were collected from different distance of Electric Meter manufactory in Second Industrial City, Riyadh, Saudi Arabia. Soil samples were analyzed chemically for heavy metal concentrations, total soluble salts and pH and mechanically for composition of soils. Saturation percent were determined also. Eighteen fungal isolates were grown in 10 mM concentration of either lead or copper ions. Aspergillus was predominant and represented by 6 species. Fusarium was represented by 4 species. Mucor was represented by 3 species. Penicillium was represented by 2 species. While Alternaria, Cephaliophora, Eurotium were represented by one species each. The intraspecific variability in growth response to Pb2+ and Cu2+ on agar and liquid culture was studied among isolated fungi. The growth rate of some fungi isolated on solid media was less sensitive to addition of lead or copper than biomass production in liquid culture.

  19. [Health effects of solar cell component material. Toxicity of indium compounds to laboratory animals determined by intratracheal instillations].

    PubMed

    Tanaka, Akiyo; Hirata, Miyuki

    2013-01-01

    Owing to the increasing interest being paid to the issue of the global environment, the production of solar cells has increased rapidly in recent years. Copper indium gallium diselenide (CIGS) is a new efficient thin film used in some types of solar cell. Indium is a constitutive element of CIGS thin-film solar cells. It was thought that indium compounds were not harmful until the beginning of the 1990s because there was little information regarding the adverse health effects on humans or animals arising from exposure to indium compounds. After the mid-1990s, data became available indicating that indium compounds can be toxic to animals. In animal studies, it has been clearly demonstrated that indium compounds cause pulmonary toxicity and that the dissolution of indium compounds in the lungs is considerably slow, as shown by repeated intratracheal instillations in experimental animals. Thus, it is necessary to pay much greater attention to human exposure to indium compounds, and precautions against possible exposure to indium compounds are paramount with regard to health management. PMID:23718969

  20. Indium Second-Surface Mirrors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bouquet, F. L.; Hasegawa, T.

    1982-01-01

    Second-surface mirrors are formed by vapor deposition of indium onto glass. Mirrors have reflectances comparable to those of ordinary silver or aluminized mirrors and are expected to show superior corrosion resistance. Mirrors may be used in solar concentrators.

  1. Current and historical record of indium deposition from the atmosphere to an ombrotrophic bog in northeastern United States

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    White, S. O.; Keach, C.; Hemond, H.

    2012-12-01

    The industrial production of indium is increasing dramatically due to new uses in the rapidly growing electronics, photovoltaic, and LED industries. Little is known, however, about the natural or industrial cycling of indium or its environmental behavior, despite the fact that industrial emissions to the atmosphere appear to have already exceeded natural emissions. The history of metal deposition from the atmosphere is often reflected in the vertical profiles of the metals in ombrotrophic bogs, which by definition do not receive surface or subsurface runoff. Analysis of a peat core obtained using a novel freeze corer at Thoreau's Bog in Concord, MA shows that the rate of indium deposition to the bog increased beginning in the early 1900s, peaked in the early 1970s, and then decreased dramatically to pre-1900 values by the present time. This profile is counter to the pattern of indium's industrial use, which has increased only in the past 30-40 years. The profile coincides well, however, with the estimated history of particulate emissions from smelting and from coal combustion in North America. Back-trajectory analysis suggests that smelting was the dominant source of atmospheric particles with high indium concentrations deposited to the bog. This study suggests that metal smelting and coal burning are currently indium's primary industrial environmental sources. While releases from the semiconductor and electronics industries are comparatively small at present, this scenario may change with the rapid growth of indium use in these industries.

  2. Performance comparison of experimental constructed wetlands with different filter media and macrophytes treating industrial wastewater contaminated with lead and copper.

    PubMed

    Scholz, Miklas; Xu, Jing

    2002-06-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the treatment efficiency of passive vertical-flow wetland filters containing different macrophytes (Phragmites and/or Typha) and granular media with different adsorption capacities. Gravel, sand, granular activated carbon, charcoal and Filtralite (light expanded clay) were used as filter media. Different concentrations of lead and copper sulfate were added to polluted urban stream inflow water to simulate pretreated mine wastewater. The relationships between growth media, microbial and plant communities as well as the reduction of predominantly lead, copper and five-day biochemical oxygen demand (BOD5) were investigated. An analysis of variance showed that concentration reductions (mg l(-1)) of lead, copper and BOD5 were significantly similar for the six experimental wetlands. Microbial diversity was low due to metal pollution and similar for all filters. There appears to be no additional benefit in using adsorption media and macrophytes to enhance biomass performance during the first 10 months of operation. PMID:12056494

  3. Indium oxide based fiber optic SPR sensor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shukla, Sarika; Sharma, Navneet K.

    2016-05-01

    Surface plasmon resonance based fiber optic sensor using indium oxide layer is presented and theoretically studied. It has been found that with increase in thickness of indium oxide layer beyond 170 nm, the sensitivity of SPR sensor decreases. 170 nm thick indium oxide layer based SPR sensor holds maximum sensitivity.

  4. Indium Foil Serves As Thermally Conductive Gasket

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Eastman, G. Yale; Dussinger, Peter M.

    1993-01-01

    Indium foil found useful as gasket to increase thermal conductance between bodies clamped together. Deforms to fill imperfections on mating surfaces. Used where maximum temperature in joint less than melting temperature of indium. Because of low melting temperature of indium, most useful in cryogenic applications.

  5. Groundwater composition near the nickel—copper smelting industry on the Kola Peninsula, central Barents Region (NW Russia and NE Norway)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Caritat, Patrice; Danilova, Svetlana; Jæger, Øystein; Reimann, Clemens; Storrø, Gaute

    1998-07-01

    The chemical composition of 185 groundwater samples collected from two catchments in the extreme NE Norway and NW Russia over the period April 1994 to November 1995 is reported in terms of Ag, Al, As, B, Ba, Be, Bi, Br, Ca, Cd, Cl, Co, Cr, Cu, F, Fe, K, Li, Mg, Mn, Mo, Na, Ni, NO 3, P, Pb, PO 4,Rb, S, Sb, Se, Si, SO 4, Sr, Th, Ti, Tl, U, V and Zn concentrations (as determined by ICP-MS, ICP-AES and IC), pH and electrical conductance. One catchment (C2) is located in Russia 5 km downwind of the nickel—copper ore smelting industry in Monchegorsk, which is a major SO 2 and trace metal emission source, the other (C5) is located in Norway 30 km off-wind from the nickel-copper ore smelter in Nikel and 52 km off-wind from the nickel—copper ore roasting plant of Zapoljarniy, which are also significant emitters of inorganic atmospheric pollutants. Groundwater chemistry mostly reflects the mineralogical composition of the gabbro aquifer in C2 and the Quaternary deposits in C5, although groundwater in C2 also shows signs of incipient contamination from surface waters (heavy metals, sulphate, chloride). Groundwater in C2 appears to have been acidified by S-compounds emitted from Monchegorsk, but the groundwater's capacity to neutralise incoming acidity has not been exhausted. In C5, groundwater has not been acidified to any extent and has a high acid neutralising capacity. This study demonstrates that the geological substrate of a catchment is a fundamental control on how groundwater responds to atmospheric pollution, even if the latter is severe.

  6. Rapid-extraction oxidation process to recover and reuse copper chromium and arsenic from industrial wood preservative sludge.

    PubMed

    Kazi, F K M; Cooper, P A

    2002-01-01

    Chromated copper arsenate (CCA) wood preservative can form insoluble sludges when the hexavalent chromium component is reduced by wood extractives, wood particles and preservative additives in the solution. This sludge accumulates in treating solution work tanks, sumps and in-line filters and must be disposed of as hazardous wastes by waste disposal companies at high costs. A number of commercial sludges were investigated and found to contain 18-94% copper, chromium and arsenic as oxides combined with sand, oil, wood particles, additives and wood extractives. We have developed a multi-stage recycling process whereby approximately 97% of the CCA components are recovered from the sludge. It involves extraction with sodium hypochlorite to remove and oxidize chromium (more than 90%) and extract most of the arsenic (approx. 80%) followed by extraction of the copper and remaining arsenic and chromium with phosphoric acid. The phosphoric acid extract contains some trivalent chromium, which is subsequently oxidized by sodium hypochlorite. The combined oxidized extract containing CrVI, CuII and AsV was compatible with CCA treating solutions and could be re-used commercially for treating wood without having a significant effect on the preservative fixation rate or the leach resistance of the treated wood. A cost analysis showed that the economic savings from recovery of CCA chemicals and reduced landfill costs exceeded the variable costs for materials and energy for the process by as much as Can $966 per tonne of sludge if sodium sulfite can be acquired in bulk quantities for the process. PMID:11952176

  7. Utilizing an earthworm bioassay (Eisenia andrei) to assess a South African soil screening value with regards to effects from a copper manufacturing industry.

    PubMed

    Maboeta, Mark; Fouché, Tanya

    2014-09-01

    Metal contamination of soil due to industrialization has become an increasingly important problem in South Africa. This study aimed to investigate the potential impact of a copper (CuSO4·5H2O) production company on the soil environment. Bioassays using Eisenia andrei were performed to assess changes in biomass, reproduction and a biomarker, neutral red retention time, over a 28 day period. Earthworms exposed to soils from the Cu production site differed significantly (p < 0.05) from those exposed to soils 500 m and 5 km away in terms of the measured endpoints. These findings are consistent with the results from the chemical analysis which showed an elevated soil Cu content for both sites closest to the chemical production company compared to the reference site. The results confirm the importance and predictive value of using bioassays in conjunction with chemical analysis during soil quality assessments. PMID:24875827

  8. Influence of alloying elements on friction and wear of copper

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Buckley, D. H.

    1972-01-01

    The friction and wear characteristics were determined for copper binary alloys containing 10 atomic percent aluminum, silicon, indium, and tin. A ternary alloy containing 10 atomic percent aluminum and 5 atomic percent silicon was also examined. The effectiveness of each of the alloying elements aluminum and silicon were very effective in reducing friction. Silicon, however, also reduced wear appreciably. With lubrication, silicon, indium, and tin were all effective alloying elements in reducing friction and wear from values obtained for copper. Silicon was the most effective single element in reducing friction and wear in dry sliding and with lubrication.

  9. Optimization of Indium Bump Morphology for Improved Flip Chip Devices

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jones, Todd J.; Nikzad, Shouleh; Cunningham, Thomas J.; Blazejewski, Edward; Dickie, Matthew R.; Hoenk, Michael E.; Greer, Harold F.

    2011-01-01

    Flip-chip hybridization, also known as bump bonding, is a packaging technique for microelectronic devices that directly connects an active element or detector to a substrate readout face-to-face, eliminating the need for wire bonding. In order to make conductive links between the two parts, a solder material is used between the bond pads on each side. Solder bumps, composed of indium metal, are typically deposited by thermal evaporation onto the active regions of the device and substrate. While indium bump technology has been a part of the electronic interconnect process field for many years and has been extensively employed in the infrared imager industry, obtaining a reliable, high-yield process for high-density patterns of bumps can be quite difficult. Under the right conditions, a moderate hydrogen plasma exposure can raise the temperature of the indium bump to the point where it can flow. This flow can result in a desirable shape where indium will efficiently wet the metal contact pad to provide good electrical contact to the underlying readout or imager circuit. However, it is extremely important to carefully control this process as the intensity of the hydrogen plasma treatment dramatically affects the indium bump morphology. To ensure the fine-tuning of this reflow process, it is necessary to have realtime feedback on the status of the bumps. With an appropriately placed viewport in a plasma chamber, one can image a small field (a square of approximately 5 millimeters on each side) of the bumps (10-20 microns in size) during the hydrogen plasma reflow process. By monitoring the shape of the bumps in real time using a video camera mounted to a telescoping 12 magnifying zoom lens and associated optical elements, an engineer can precisely determine when the reflow of the bumps has occurred, and can shut off the plasma before evaporation or de-wetting takes place.

  10. Indium: Understanding its Behavior in Magmatic-Hydrothermal Systems Today to Meet Tomorrow's Demand

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Piccoli, P. M.; Kayser, S.; Candela, P. A.

    2014-12-01

    Indium is integral to modern electronic devices, and is an essential component in indium-tin oxide (ITO), an electrically conductive, and optically transparent material that forms the basis for touch screens and high-end LCDs. World-wide production of indium has increased almost seven-fold from 1990 to 2012. Continued increases in production can be aided by better models for the formation of indium-bearing ores, yet little is known about the behavior of indium in magmatic-hydrothermal systems. As a first step toward solving this problem, we performed experiments to evaluate the partitioning of indium between pyrrhotite (po) and silicate melt (m). Experiments were performed at 800 °C, 100 MPa, and fO2 ≈ NNO in a po-saturated, vapor-brine-rhyolite melt system for durations of 5 to15 days. Three separate series of experiments were conducted in which each series differed by the aqueous solution added. The first series of experiments were prepared with pure water, the second series of experiments with a 1.01 M chloride solution and the third series with a 0.35 M CuCl2-bearing starting aqueous solution. These changes in starting material produced changes in the composition of the run product po and glass. The partition coefficient D(po/m) for the pure-water series experiments is on the order of ≈ 10. The addition of chloride-bearing aqueous solution leads to a decrease in the partition coefficient to ≈ 1.5. The copper-bearing experiments yield a D ≈ 3. The lower values for D in the chloride-bearing experiments may be explained by indium-chloride interactions in the melt phase. Although the D does vary depending upon the composition of the starting aqueous solution, an order of magnitude estimate for D, for general modeling purposes, can be made by assuming a value of 4. By using reasonable estimates of the mass fraction of po that crystallizes in crustal magmatic systems, the proportion of indium sequestered by po, during fractional crystallization, can be

  11. Nanomechanical Characterization of Indium Nano/Microwires

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Nanomechanical properties of indium nanowires like structures fabricated on quartz substrate by trench template technique, measured using nanoindentation. The hardness and elastic modulus of wires were measured and compared with the values of indium thin film. Displacement burst observed while indenting the nanowire. ‘Wire-only hardness’ obtained using Korsunsky model from composite hardness. Nanowires have exhibited almost same modulus as indium thin film but considerable changes were observed in hardness value. PMID:20596474

  12. The oxidation of copper-indium diselenide surfaces

    SciTech Connect

    Diniz, A.S.A.C.

    1997-12-31

    The mechanisms, chemistry, structure and interface properties of native and grown oxides on CuInSe{sub 2} are presented. During thermal oxidation of this ternary semiconductor, the composition and the electrical properties are controlled, primarily by the temperature and duration of oxidation treatment. The oxygen reacts principally with In, leaving the Cu and Se to readjust at the interface to form a Cu{sub x}Se transition layer. The thermal oxide consists of an In{sub 2}O{sub 3} matrix and having either inclusion of Cu or SeO{sub 2} particles, depending on the precise formation conditions. The Cu{sub x}Se transition layer eventually acts as a barrier that prevents further oxidation of the underlying CuInSe{sub 2}.

  13. Lattice dynamics in copper indium diselenide by inelastic neutron scattering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Derollez, P.; Fouret, R.; Laamyem, A.; Hennion, B.; Gonzalez, J.

    1999-05-01

    The phonon dispersion curves along the [100] and [001] directions of CuInSe2 have been measured by inelastic neutron scattering. The neutron measurements reveal the uncertainty of optical measurements because of the large absorption of this material. The lattice dynamics is analysed with a rigid ion model: Born-von Karman short range interactions associated with long range electrostatic forces. The calculated dispersion curves are in good agreement with the experiment. The atomic displacements associated with each vibrational mode are used to discuss the optical phonons. The obtained results provide a strong experimental basis from which we can validate the ab initio methods.

  14. Ionization levels of doped copper indium sulfide chalcopyrites.

    PubMed

    Tablero, C

    2012-02-01

    The electronic structure of modified chalcopyrite CuInS(2) has been analyzed from first principles within the density functional theory. The host chalcopyrite has been modified by introducing atomic impurities M at substitutional sites in the lattice host with M = C, Si, Ge, Sn, Ti, V, Cr, Fe, Co, Ni, Rh, and Ir. Both substitutions M for In and M for Cu have been analyzed. The gap and ionization energies are obtained as a function of the M-S displacements. It is interesting for both spintronic and optoelectronic applications because it can provide significant information with respect to the pressure effect and the nonradiative recombination. PMID:22239718

  15. High efficiency thin film copper indium diselenide solar cell

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shah, Nitinkumar Maheshchandra

    The rapidly expanding oil sands of western Canada, the third largest reserves in the world, are creating serious challenges, such as ecological harm, labour shortages, and extensive natural gas consumption. This thesis develops three practical real options models to evaluate the feasibility of oil sands projects and to estimate the optimal rate of oil sands expansion, while accounting for the stated concerns. (Abstract shortened by UMI.).

  16. Copper transport.

    PubMed

    Linder, M C; Wooten, L; Cerveza, P; Cotton, S; Shulze, R; Lomeli, N

    1998-05-01

    In adult humans, the net absorption of dietary copper is approximately 1 mg/d. Dietary copper joins some 4-5 mg of endogenous copper flowing into the gastrointestinal tract through various digestive juices. Most of this copper returns to the circulation and to the tissues (including liver) that formed them. Much lower amounts of copper flow into and out of other major parts of the body (including heart, skeletal muscle, and brain). Newly absorbed copper is transported to body tissues in two phases, borne primarily by plasma protein carriers (albumin, transcuprein, and ceruloplasmin). In the first phase, copper goes from the intestine to the liver and kidney; in the second phase, copper usually goes from the liver (and perhaps also the kidney) to other organs. Ceruloplasmin plays a role in this second phase. Alternatively, liver copper can also exit via the bile, and in a form that is less easily reabsorbed. Copper is also present in and transported by other body fluids, including those bathing the brain and central nervous system and surrounding the fetus in the amniotic sac. Ceruloplasmin is present in these fluids and may also be involved in copper transport there. The concentrations of copper and ceruloplasmin in milk vary with lactational stage. Parallel changes occur in ceruloplasmin messenger RNA expression in the mammary gland (as determined in pigs). Copper in milk ceruloplasmin appears to be particularly available for absorption, at least in rats. PMID:9587137

  17. Adsorption of copper(II) by ``waste`` Fe(III)/Cr(III) hydroxide from aqueous solution and radiator manufacturing industry wastewater

    SciTech Connect

    Namasivayam, C.; Senthilkumar, S.

    1999-01-01

    Waste Fe(III)/Cr(III) hydroxide has been used as an adsorbent for the effective removal of copper from aqueous solution. The parameters studied include agitation time, Cu(II) concentration, adsorbent dose, temperature, and pH. The percent adsorption of Cu(II) increased with a decrease in the concentration of Cu(II) and an increase in temperature. Quantitative removal of Cu(II) by 50 mg/50 mL adsorbent was observed at pH 5.0 for a Cu(II) concentration of 40 mg/L. The equilibrium data fit well with the Langmuir isotherm. The adsorption capacity (Q{sub 0}) calculated from the Langmuir isotherm was 92.59 mg/g at an initial pH of 5.0 at 32 C. Desorption of Cu(II) from a Cu(II)-loaded adsorbent was 55.4% at pH 3.0. Application of the adsorbent for the removal of Cu(II) was successfully demonstrated using radiator manufacturing industry wastewater.

  18. Potato peels as solid waste for the removal of heavy metal copper(II) from waste water/industrial effluent.

    PubMed

    Aman, Tehseen; Kazi, Asrar Ahmad; Sabri, Muhammad Usman; Bano, Qudsia

    2008-05-01

    A new sorbent potato peels, which are normally discarded as solid waste for removing toxic metal ion Cu(II) from water/industrial waste water have been studied. Potato peels charcoal (PPC) was investigated as an adsorbent of Cu(II) from aqueous solutions. Kinetic and isotherm studies were carried out by studying the effects of various parameters such as temperature, pH and solid liquid ratios. The optimum pH value for Cu(II) adsorption onto potato peels charcoal (PPC) was found to be 6.0. The thermodynamic parameters such as standard Gibb's free energy (Delta G degrees ), standard enthalpy (Delta H degrees ) and standard entropy (DeltaS degrees ) were evaluated by applying the Van't Hoff equation. The thermodynamics of Cu(II) adsorption onto PPC indicates its spontaneous and exothermic nature. The equilibrium data at different temperatures were analyzed by Langmuir and Freundlich isotherms. PMID:18215510

  19. Recycling of indium from CIGS photovoltaic cells: potential of combining acid-resistant nanofiltration with liquid-liquid extraction.

    PubMed

    Zimmermann, Yannick-Serge; Niewersch, Claudia; Lenz, Markus; Kül, Zöhre Zohra; Corvini, Philippe F-X; Schäffer, Andreas; Wintgens, Thomas

    2014-11-18

    Electronic consumer products such as smartphones, TV, computers, light-emitting diodes, and photovoltaic cells crucially depend on metals and metalloids. So-called "urban mining" considers them as secondary resources since they may contain precious elements at concentrations many times higher than their primary ores. Indium is of foremost interest being widely used, expensive, scarce and prone to supply risk. This study first investigated the capability of different nanofiltration membranes of extracting indium from copper-indium-gallium- selenide photovoltaic cell (CIGS) leachates under low pH conditions and low transmembrane pressure differences (<3 bar). Retentates were then subjected to a further selective liquid-liquid extraction (LLE). Even at very acidic pH indium was retained to >98% by nanofiltration, separating it from parts of the Ag, Sb, Se, and Zn present. LLE using di-(2-ethylhexyl)phosphoric acid (D2EHPA) extracted 97% of the indium from the retentates, separating it from all other elements except for Mo, Al, and Sn. Overall, 95% (2.4 g m(-2) CIGS) of the indium could be extracted to the D2EHPA phase. Simultaneously, by nanofiltration the consumption of D2EHPA was reduced by >60% due to the metal concentration in the reduced retentate volume. These results show clearly the potential for efficient scarce metal recovery from secondary resources. Furthermore, since nanofiltration was applicable at very low pH (≥ 0.6), it may be applied in hydrometallurgy typically using acidic conditions. PMID:25310266

  20. Industry

    SciTech Connect

    Bernstein, Lenny; Roy, Joyashree; Delhotal, K. Casey; Harnisch, Jochen; Matsuhashi, Ryuji; Price, Lynn; Tanaka, Kanako; Worrell, Ernst; Yamba, Francis; Fengqi, Zhou; de la Rue du Can, Stephane; Gielen, Dolf; Joosen, Suzanne; Konar, Manaswita; Matysek, Anna; Miner, Reid; Okazaki, Teruo; Sanders, Johan; Sheinbaum Parado, Claudia

    2007-12-01

    This chapter addresses past, ongoing, and short (to 2010) and medium-term (to 2030) future actions that can be taken to mitigate GHG emissions from the manufacturing and process industries. Globally, and in most countries, CO{sub 2} accounts for more than 90% of CO{sub 2}-eq GHG emissions from the industrial sector (Price et al., 2006; US EPA, 2006b). These CO{sub 2} emissions arise from three sources: (1) the use of fossil fuels for energy, either directly by industry for heat and power generation or indirectly in the generation of purchased electricity and steam; (2) non-energy uses of fossil fuels in chemical processing and metal smelting; and (3) non-fossil fuel sources, for example cement and lime manufacture. Industrial processes also emit other GHGs, e.g.: (1) Nitrous oxide (N{sub 2}O) is emitted as a byproduct of adipic acid, nitric acid and caprolactam production; (2) HFC-23 is emitted as a byproduct of HCFC-22 production, a refrigerant, and also used in fluoroplastics manufacture; (3) Perfluorocarbons (PFCs) are emitted as byproducts of aluminium smelting and in semiconductor manufacture; (4) Sulphur hexafluoride (SF{sub 6}) is emitted in the manufacture, use and, decommissioning of gas insulated electrical switchgear, during the production of flat screen panels and semiconductors, from magnesium die casting and other industrial applications; (5) Methane (CH{sub 4}) is emitted as a byproduct of some chemical processes; and (6) CH{sub 4} and N{sub 2}O can be emitted by food industry waste streams. Many GHG emission mitigation options have been developed for the industrial sector. They fall into three categories: operating procedures, sector-wide technologies and process-specific technologies. A sampling of these options is discussed in Sections 7.2-7.4. The short- and medium-term potential for and cost of all classes of options are discussed in Section 7.5, barriers to the application of these options are addressed in Section 7.6 and the implication of

  1. Process for Patterning Indium for Bump Bonding

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Denis, Kevin

    2012-01-01

    An innovation was created for the Cosmology Large Angular Scale Surveyor for integration of low-temperature detector chips with a silicon backshort and a silicon photonic choke through flipchip bonding. Indium bumps are typically patterned using liftoff processes, which require thick resist. In some applications, it is necessary to locate the bumps close to high-aspect-ratio structures such as wafer through-holes. In those cases, liftoff processes are challenging, and require complicated and time-consuming spray coating technology if the high-aspect-ratio structures are delineated prior to the indium bump process. Alternatively, processing the indium bumps first is limited by compatibility of the indium with subsequent processing. The present invention allows for locating bumps arbitrarily close to multiple-level high-aspect-ratio structures, and for indium bumps to be formed without liftoff resist. The process uses the poor step coverage of indium deposited on a silicon wafer that has been previously etched to delineate the location of the indium bumps. The silicon pattern can be processed through standard lithography prior to adding the high-aspect-ratio structures. Typically, high-aspectratio structures require a thick resist layer so this layer can easily cover the silicon topography. For multiple levels of topography, the silicon can be easily conformally coated through standard processes. A blanket layer of indium is then deposited onto the full wafer; bump bonding only occurs at the high points of the topography.

  2. Production of ultrahigh purity copper using waste copper nitrate solution.

    PubMed

    Choi, J Y; Kim, D S

    2003-04-25

    The production of ultrahigh purity copper (99.9999%) by electrolysis in the presence of a cementation barrier has been attempted employing a waste nitric copper etching solution as the electrolyte. The amount of copper deposited on the cathode increased almost linearly with electrolysis time and the purity of copper was observed to increase as the electrolyte concentration was increased. At some point, however, as the electrolyte concentration increased, the purity of copper decreased slightly. As the total surface area of cementation barrier increased, the purity of product increased. The electrolyte temperature should be maintained below 35 degrees C in the range of investigated electrolysis conditions to obtain the ultrahigh purity copper. Considering that several industrial waste solutions contain valuable metallic components the result of present study may support a claim that electrowinning is a very desirable process for their treatment and recovery. PMID:12719148

  3. A Kinetic Study of Indium Leaching from Indium-Bearing Zinc Ferrite Under Microwave Heating

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Linye; Mo, Jiamei; Li, Xuanhai; Pan, Liuping; Liang, Xinyuan; Wei, Guangtao

    2013-12-01

    To obtain information about leaching reaction and kinetics of indium from indium-bearing materials under microwave heating (MH), leaching of indium from indium-bearing zinc ferrite (IBZF) has been investigated. IBZF samples under MH and under conventional heating (CH) were studied by X-ray diffraction and specific surface area. Compared with that of CH, the effect of MH and the effects of various control parameters on indium leaching were studied. The results showed that compared with CH, MH enhanced the indium leaching from IBZF and increased the leaching rate. The leaching behavior of indium from IBZF was analyzed by unreacted shrinking core model, and the regression of kinetic equations showed that leaching of indium from IBZF obeyed the model very well. The activation energies under MH and under CH were 77.374 kJ/mol and 53.555 kJ/mol, respectively; the ratio of frequency factor K 0(MH)/ K 0(CH) was 10,818.36. The activation mechanism involved in leaching of indium under MH was mainly the increase of reactant energy and effective collision, which caused by the thermal and nonthermal microwave effect. Compared with the activation energy, the effective collision played a more important role in the acceleration of leaching of indium.

  4. Indium Phosphide Window Layers for Indium Gallium Arsenide Solar Cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jain, Raj K.

    2005-01-01

    Window layers help in reducing the surface recombination at the emitter surface of the solar cells resulting in significant improvement in energy conversion efficiency. Indium gallium arsenide (In(x)Ga(1-x)As) and related materials based solar cells are quite promising for photovoltaic and thermophotovoltaic applications. The flexibility of the change in the bandgap energy and the growth of InGaAs on different substrates make this material very attractive for multi-bandgap energy, multi-junction solar cell approaches. The high efficiency and better radiation performance of the solar cell structures based on InGaAs make them suitable for space power applications. This work investigates the suitability of indium phosphide (InP) window layers for lattice-matched In(0.53)Ga(0.47)As (bandgap energy 0.74 eV) solar cells. We present the first data on the effects of the p-type InP window layer on p-on-n lattice-matched InGaAs solar cells. The modeled quantum efficiency results show a significant improvement in the blue region with the InP window. The bare InGaAs solar cell performance suffers due to high surface recombination velocity (10(exp 7) cm/s). The large band discontinuity at the InP/InGaAs heterojunction offers a great potential barrier to minority carriers. The calculated results demonstrate that the InP window layer effectively passivates the solar cell front surface, hence resulting in reduced surface recombination and therefore, significantly improving the performance of the InGaAs solar cell.

  5. Indium Antimonide Nanowires: Synthesis and Properties.

    PubMed

    Shafa, Muhammad; Akbar, Sadaf; Gao, Lei; Fakhar-E-Alam, Muhammad; Wang, Zhiming M

    2016-12-01

    This article summarizes some of the critical features of pure indium antimonide nanowires (InSb NWs) growth and their potential applications in the industry. In the first section, historical studies on the growth of InSb NWs have been presented, while in the second part, a comprehensive overview of the various synthesis techniques is demonstrated briefly. The major emphasis of current review is vapor phase deposition of NWs by manifold techniques. In addition, author review various protocols and methodologies employed to generate NWs from diverse material systems via self-organized fabrication procedures comprising chemical vapor deposition, annealing in reactive atmosphere, evaporation of InSb, molecular/ chemical beam epitaxy, solution-based techniques, and top-down fabrication method. The benefits and ill effects of the gold and self-catalyzed materials for the growth of NWs are explained at length. Afterward, in the next part, four thermodynamic characteristics of NW growth criterion concerning the expansion of NWs, growth velocity, Gibbs-Thomson effect, and growth model were expounded and discussed concisely. Recent progress in device fabrications is explained in the third part, in which the electrical and optical properties of InSb NWs were reviewed by considering the effects of conductivity which are diameter dependent and the applications of NWs in the fabrications of field-effect transistors, quantum devices, thermoelectrics, and detectors. PMID:27009531

  6. Indium Antimonide Nanowires: Synthesis and Properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shafa, Muhammad; Akbar, Sadaf; Gao, Lei; Fakhar-e-Alam, Muhammad; Wang, Zhiming M.

    2016-03-01

    This article summarizes some of the critical features of pure indium antimonide nanowires (InSb NWs) growth and their potential applications in the industry. In the first section, historical studies on the growth of InSb NWs have been presented, while in the second part, a comprehensive overview of the various synthesis techniques is demonstrated briefly. The major emphasis of current review is vapor phase deposition of NWs by manifold techniques. In addition, author review various protocols and methodologies employed to generate NWs from diverse material systems via self-organized fabrication procedures comprising chemical vapor deposition, annealing in reactive atmosphere, evaporation of InSb, molecular/ chemical beam epitaxy, solution-based techniques, and top-down fabrication method. The benefits and ill effects of the gold and self-catalyzed materials for the growth of NWs are explained at length. Afterward, in the next part, four thermodynamic characteristics of NW growth criterion concerning the expansion of NWs, growth velocity, Gibbs-Thomson effect, and growth model were expounded and discussed concisely. Recent progress in device fabrications is explained in the third part, in which the electrical and optical properties of InSb NWs were reviewed by considering the effects of conductivity which are diameter dependent and the applications of NWs in the fabrications of field-effect transistors, quantum devices, thermoelectrics, and detectors.

  7. Co-precipitation of Ni, Cr, Mn, Pb and Zn in industrial wastewater and sediment samples with copper(II) cyclo-hexylmethyldithiocarbamate for their flame atomic absorption spectrometric determination.

    PubMed

    Ipeaiyeda, Ayodele Rotimi; Odola, Adekunle Johnson

    2012-01-01

    A co-precipitation technique for nickel(II), chromium(II), manganese(II), lead(II) and zinc(II) with the aid of copper(II) cyclo-hexylmethyldithiocarbamate was established. The influences of some analytical parameters such as pH, sample volume, amounts of cyclo-hexylmethyldithiocarbamate and copper(II) on the recovery of metal ions were investigated. The heavy metals in the precipitate were determined by flame atomic absorption spectrophotometry. The range of detection limits for the heavy metals was 0.003-0.005 mg/L. The atomic spectrometric technique with co-precipitation procedure was successfully applied for the determination of Ni, Cr, Mn, Pb and Zn in industrial wastewater and sediment samples from Ladipo stream in Lagos, Nigeria. The mean concentrations for these metals using co-precipitation procedure were not significantly different from corresponding concentrations obtained using spectrometric techniques without co-precipitation procedure. PMID:22678206

  8. Mineral resource of the month: indium

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Tolcin, Amy C.

    2011-01-01

    Geologically, the occurrence of indium minerals is rare. The element most often occurs as a sulfide inclusion or substitutes in other base-metal minerals, including cassiterite, chalcopyrite, sphalerite and stannite. Indium’s abundance in the crust is estimated to be 0.05 parts per million, which makes it more abundant than silver, but it is so widely disseminated that it does not occur in high enough concentrations to form mineable deposits. Therefore, indium is most often recovered from byproduct residues produced during the refining of lead and zinc. But only about one-quarter of the indium mined worldwide is refined into metal, as many indium-bearing concentrates are sent to refineries that do not have the capability of recovering the metal.

  9. Advantages and challenges of increased antimicrobial copper use and copper mining.

    PubMed

    Elguindi, Jutta; Hao, Xiuli; Lin, Yanbing; Alwathnani, Hend A; Wei, Gehong; Rensing, Christopher

    2011-07-01

    Copper is a highly utilized metal for electrical, automotive, household objects, and more recently as an effective antimicrobial surface. Copper-containing solutions applied to fruits and vegetables can prevent bacterial and fungal infections. Bacteria, such as Salmonellae and Cronobacter sakazakii, often found in food contamination, are rapidly killed on contact with copper alloys. The antimicrobial effectiveness of copper alloys in the healthcare environment against bacteria causing hospital-acquired infections such as methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA), Escherichia coli O157:H7, and Clostridium difficile has been described recently. The use of copper and copper-containing materials will continue to expand and may lead to an increase in copper mining and production. However, the copper mining and manufacturing industry and the consumer do not necessarily enjoy a favorable relationship. Open pit mining, copper mine tailings, leaching products, and deposits of toxic metals in the environment often raises concerns and sometimes public outrage. In addition, consumers may fear that copper alloys utilized as antimicrobial surfaces in food production will lead to copper toxicity in humans. Therefore, there is a need to mitigate some of the negative effects of increased copper use and copper mining. More thermo-tolerant, copper ion-resistant microorganisms could improve copper leaching and lessen copper groundwater contamination. Copper ion-resistant bacteria associated with plants might be useful in biostabilization and phytoremediation of copper-contaminated environments. In this review, recent progress in microbiological and biotechnological aspects of microorganisms in contact with copper will be presented and discussed, exploring their role in the improvement for the industries involved as well as providing better environmental outcomes. PMID:21656137

  10. Indium Single-Ion Frequency Standard

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nagourney, Warren

    2001-01-01

    A single laser-cooled indium ion is a promising candidate for an ultimate resolution optical time or frequency standard. It can be shown that single ions from group IIIA of the periodic table (indium, thallium, etc.) can have extremely small systematic errors. In addition to being free from Doppler, transit-time and collisional shifts, these ions are also quite insensitive to perturbations from ambient magnetic and electric fields (mainly due to the use of a J=0-0 transition for spectroscopy). Of all group IIIA ions, indium seems to be the most practical, since it is heavy enough to have a tolerable intercombination cooling transition rate and (unlike thallium) has transitions which are easily accessible with frequency multiplied continuous-wave lasers. A single indium ion standard has a potential inaccuracy of one part in 10(exp 18) for integration times of 10(exp 6) seconds. We have made substantial progress during the grant period in constructing a frequency standard based upon a single indium ion. At the beginning of the grant period, single indium ions were being successfully trapped, but the lasers and optical systems were inadequate to achieve the desired goal. We have considerably improved the stability of the dye laser used to cool the ions and locked it to a molecular resonance line, making it possible to observe stable cooling-line fluorescence from a single indium ion for reasonable periods of time, as required by the demands of precision spectroscopy. We have substantially improved the single-ion fluorescence signal with significant benefits for the detection efficiency of forbidden transitions using the 'shelving' technique. Finally, we have constructed a compact, efficient UV 'clock' laser and observed 'clock' transitions in single indium ions using this laser system. We will elaborate on these accomplishments.

  11. Quantification of indium in steel using PIXE

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oliver, A.; Miranda, J.; Rickards, J.; Cheang, J. C.

    1989-04-01

    The quantitative analysis of steel for endodontics tools was carried out using low-energy protons (≤ 700 keV). A computer program for a thick-target analysis which includes enhancement due to secondary fluorescence was used. In this experiment the L-lines of indium are enhanced due to the proximity of other elements' K-lines to the indium absorption edge. The results show that the ionization cross section expression employed to evaluate this magnitude is important.

  12. Thermal conductance of pressed metallic contacts augmented with Indium foil or Apiezon-N (tm) grease at liquid helium temperatures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Salerno, Louis J.; Kittel, Peter; Spivak, Alan L.

    1993-01-01

    The thermal conductance of pressed contacts which have been augmented with Indium foil or Apiezon-N (tm) grease was measured over the temperature range of 1.6 to 6.0 K, with applied forces from 22 N to 670 N. The sample pairs were fabricated from OFHC copper, 6061-T6 aluminum, free-machining brass, and 304 stainless steel. Although the thermal conductance was found to increase with increasing applied contact force, the force dependence was less than in earlier work. The addition of Indium foil or Apiezon-NT grease between the contact surfaces resulted in an improvement over uncoated surfaces ranging from a factor of approximately 3 for stainless steel to an order of magnitude for copper contacts.

  13. Dispersion strengthened copper

    DOEpatents

    Sheinberg, Haskell; Meek, Thomas T.; Blake, Rodger D.

    1990-01-01

    A composition of matter comprised of copper and particles which are dispersed throughout the copper, where the particles are comprised of copper oxide and copper having a coating of copper oxide, and a method for making this composition of matter.

  14. Dispersion strengthened copper

    DOEpatents

    Sheinberg, Haskell; Meek, Thomas T.; Blake, Rodger D.

    1989-01-01

    A composition of matter comprised of copper and particles which are dispersed throughout the copper, where the particles are comprised of copper oxide and copper having a coating of copper oxide, and a method for making this composition of matter.

  15. Copper Metallochaperones

    PubMed Central

    Robinson, Nigel J.; Winge, Dennis R.

    2014-01-01

    The current state of knowledge on how copper metallochaperones support the maturation of cuproproteins is reviewed. Copper is needed within mitochondria to supply the CuA and intramembrane CuB sites of cytochrome oxidase, within the trans-Golgi network to supply secreted cuproproteins and within the cytosol to supply superoxide dismutase 1 (Sod1). Subpopulations of copper-zinc superoxide dismutase also localize to mitochondria, the secretory system, the nucleus and, in plants, the chloroplast, which also requires copper for plastocyanin. Prokaryotic cuproproteins are found in the cell membrane and in the periplasm of gram-negative bacteria. Cu(I) and Cu(II) form tight complexes with organic molecules and drive redox chemistry, which unrestrained would be destructive. Copper metallochaperones assist copper in reaching vital destinations without inflicting damage or becoming trapped in adventitious binding sites. Copper ions are specifically released from copper metallochaperones upon contact with their cognate cuproproteins and metal transfer is thought to proceed by ligand substitution. PMID:20205585

  16. 40 CFR 421.190 - Applicability: Description of the secondary indium subcategory.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... secondary indium subcategory. 421.190 Section 421.190 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION... CATEGORY Secondary Indium Subcategory § 421.190 Applicability: Description of the secondary indium... indium at secondary indium facilities processing spent electrolyte solutions and scrap indium metal...

  17. 40 CFR 421.190 - Applicability: Description of the secondary indium subcategory.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... secondary indium subcategory. 421.190 Section 421.190 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION... CATEGORY Secondary Indium Subcategory § 421.190 Applicability: Description of the secondary indium... indium at secondary indium facilities processing spent electrolyte solutions and scrap indium metal...

  18. 40 CFR 421.190 - Applicability: Description of the secondary indium subcategory.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... secondary indium subcategory. 421.190 Section 421.190 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION... CATEGORY Secondary Indium Subcategory § 421.190 Applicability: Description of the secondary indium... indium at secondary indium facilities processing spent electrolyte solutions and scrap indium metal...

  19. 40 CFR 421.190 - Applicability: Description of the secondary indium subcategory.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... secondary indium subcategory. 421.190 Section 421.190 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION... CATEGORY Secondary Indium Subcategory § 421.190 Applicability: Description of the secondary indium... indium at secondary indium facilities processing spent electrolyte solutions and scrap indium metal...

  20. 40 CFR 421.190 - Applicability: Description of the secondary indium subcategory.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... secondary indium subcategory. 421.190 Section 421.190 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION... CATEGORY Secondary Indium Subcategory § 421.190 Applicability: Description of the secondary indium... indium at secondary indium facilities processing spent electrolyte solutions and scrap indium metal...

  1. Thermal Stability of Chelated Indium Activable Tracers

    SciTech Connect

    Chrysikopoulos, Costas; Kruger, Paul

    1986-01-21

    The thermal stability of indium tracer chelated with organic ligands ethylenediaminetetraacetic acid (EDTA) and nitrilotriacetic acid (NTA) was measured for reservoir temperatures of 150, 200, and 240 C. Measurements of the soluble indium concentration was made as a function of time by neutron activation analysis. From the data, approximate thermal decomposition rates were estimated. At 150 C, both chelated tracers were stable over the experimental period of 20 days. At 200 C, the InEDTA concentration remained constant for 16 days, after which the thermal decomposition occurred at a measured rate constant of k = 0.09 d{sup -1}. The thermal decomposition of InNTA at 200 C showed a first order reaction with a measured rate constant of k = 0.16 d{sup -1}. At 240 C, both indium chelated tracers showed rapid decomposition with rate constants greater than 1.8 d{sup -1}. The data indicate that for geothermal reservoir with temperatures up to about 200 C, indium chelated tracers can be used effectively for transit times of at least 20 days. These experiments were run without reservoir rock media, and do not account for concomitant loss of indium tracer by adsorption processes.

  2. Indium oxide/n-silicon heterojunction solar cells

    DOEpatents

    Feng, Tom; Ghosh, Amal K.

    1982-12-28

    A high photo-conversion efficiency indium oxide/n-silicon heterojunction solar cell is spray deposited from a solution containing indium trichloride. The solar cell exhibits an Air Mass One solar conversion efficiency in excess of about 10%.

  3. Indium-111 leukocyte scanning and fracture healing

    SciTech Connect

    Mead, L.P.; Scott, A.C.; Bondurant, F.J.; Browner, B.D. )

    1990-01-01

    This study was undertaken to determine the specificity of indium-111 leukocyte scans for osteomyelitis when fractures are present. Midshaft tibial osteotomies were performed in 14 New Zealand white rabbits, seven of which were infected postoperatively with Staphylococcus aureus per Norden's protocol. All 14 rabbits were scanned following injection with 75 microCi of indium 111 at 72 h after osteotomy and at weekly intervals for 4 weeks. Before the rabbits were killed, the fracture sites were cultured to document the presence or absence of infection. The results of all infected osteotomy sites were positive, whereas no positive scans were found in the noninfected osteotomies. We concluded from this study that uncomplicated fracture healing does not result in a positive indium-111 leukocyte scan.

  4. Transport in indium-decorated graphene

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chandni, U.; Henriksen, Erik A.; Eisenstein, J. P.

    2015-06-01

    The electronic-transport properties of single-layer graphene that has a dilute coating of indium adatoms have been investigated. Our studies establish that isolated indium atoms donate electrons to graphene and become a source of charged impurity scattering, affecting the conductivity as well as magnetotransport properties of the pristine graphene. Notably, a positive magnetoresistance is observed over a wide density range after In doping. The low-field magnetoresistance carries signatures of quantum interference effects which are significantly altered by the adatoms.

  5. Bacterial stimulation of copper phytoaccumulation by bioaugmentation with rhizosphere bacteria.

    PubMed

    Andreazza, Robson; Okeke, Benedict C; Lambais, Márcio Rodrigues; Bortolon, Leandro; de Melo, George Wellington Bastos; Camargo, Flávio Anastácio de Oliveira

    2010-11-01

    Copper contaminated areas pose environmental health risk to living organisms. Remediation processes are thus required for both crop production and industrial activities. This study employed bioaugmentation with copper resistant bacteria to improve phytoremediation of vineyard soils and copper mining waste contaminated with high copper concentrations. Oatmeal plant (Avena sativa L.) was used for copper phytoextraction. Three copper resistant bacterial isolates from oatmeal rhizosphere (Pseudomonas putida A1; Stenotrophomonas maltophilia A2 and Acinetobacter calcoaceticus A6) were used for the stimulation of copper phytoextraction. Two long-term copper contaminated vineyard soils (Mollisol and Inceptisol) and copper mining waste from Southern Brazil were evaluated. Oatmeal plants substantially extracted copper from vineyard soils and copper mining waste. As much as 1549 mg of Cu kg⁻¹ dry mass was extracted from plants grown in Inceptisol soil. The vineyard Mollisol copper uptake (55 mg Cu kg⁻¹ of dry mass) in the shoots was significantly improved upon inoculation of oatmeal plants with isolate A2 (128 mg of Cu kg⁻¹ of shoot dry mass). Overall oatmeal plant biomass displayed higher potential of copper phytoextraction with inoculation of rhizosphere bacteria in vineyard soil to the extent that 404 and 327 g ha⁻¹ of copper removal were respectively observed in vineyard Mollisol bioaugmented with isolate A2 (S. maltophilia) and isolate A6 (A. calcoaceticus). Results suggest potential application of bacterial stimulation of phytoaccumulation of copper for biological removal of copper from contaminated areas. PMID:20937516

  6. Sinterless Formation Of Contacts On Indium Phosphide

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Weizer, Victor G.; Fatemi, Navid S.

    1995-01-01

    Improved technique makes it possible to form low-resistivity {nearly equal to 10(Sup-6) ohm cm(Sup2)} electrical contacts on indium phosphide semiconductor devices without damaging devices. Layer of AgP2 40 Angstrom thick deposited on InP before depositing metal contact. AgP2 interlayer sharply reduces contact resistance, without need for sintering.

  7. Study of the doping of thermally evaporated zinc oxide thin films with indium and indium oxide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Palimar, Sowmya; Bangera, Kasturi V.; Shivakumar, G. K.

    2013-12-01

    The present paper reports observations made on investigations carried out to study structural, optical and electrical properties of thermally evaporated ZnO thin films and their modulations on doping with metallic indium and indium oxide separately. ZnO thin film in the undoped state is found to have a very good conductivity of 90 Ω-1 cm-1 with an excellent transmittance of up to 90 % in the visible region. After doping with metallic indium, the conductivity of the film is found to be 580 Ω-1 cm-1, whereas the conductivity of indium oxide-doped films is increased up to 3.5 × 103 Ω-1 cm-1. Further, the optical band gap of the ZnO thin film is widened from 3.26 to 3.3 eV when doped with indium oxide and with metallic indium it decreases to 3.2 eV. There is no considerable change in the transmittance of the films after doping. All undoped and doped films were amorphous in nature with smooth and flat surface without significant modifications due to doping.

  8. The oxidation and surface speciation of indium and indium oxides exposed to atmospheric oxidants

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Detweiler, Zachary M.; Wulfsberg, Steven M.; Frith, Matthew G.; Bocarsly, Andrew B.; Bernasek, Steven L.

    2016-06-01

    Metallic indium and its oxides are useful in electronics applications, in transparent conducting electrodes, as well as in electrocatalytic applications. In order to understand more fully the speciation of the indium and oxygen composition of the indium surface exposed to atmospheric oxidants, XPS, HREELS, and TPD were used to study the indium surface exposed to water, oxygen, and carbon dioxide. Clean In and authentic samples of In2O3 and In(OH)3 were examined with XPS to provide standard spectra. Indium was exposed to O2 and H2O, and the ratio of O2 - to OH- in the O1s XPS region was used to monitor oxidation and speciation of the surface. HREELS and TPD indicate that water dissociates on the indium surface even at low temperature, and that In2O3 forms at higher temperatures. Initially, OH- is the major species at the surface. Pure In2O3 is also OH- terminated following water exposure. Ambient pressure XPS studies of water exposure to these surfaces suggest that high water pressures tend to passivate the surface, inhibiting extensive oxide formation.

  9. Copper cyanide

    Integrated Risk Information System (IRIS)

    Copper cyanide ; CASRN 544 - 92 - 3 Human health assessment information on a chemical substance is included in the IRIS database only after a comprehensive review of toxicity data , as outlined in the IRIS assessment development process . Sections I ( Health Hazard Assessments for Noncarcinogenic Ef

  10. Copper: a metal for the ages

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Doebrich, Jeff

    2009-01-01

    Copper was one of the first metals ever extracted and used by humans, and it has made vital contributions to sustaining and improving society since the dawn of civilization. Copper was first used in coins and ornaments starting about 8000 B.C., and at about 5500 B.C., copper tools helped civilization emerge from the Stone Age. The discovery that copper alloyed with tin produces bronze marked the beginning of the Bronze Age at about 3000 B.C. Copper is easily stretched, molded, and shaped; is resistant to corrosion; and conducts heat and electricity efficiently. As a result, copper was important to early humans and continues to be a material of choice for a variety of domestic, industrial, and high-technology applications today.

  11. Development of an Indium bump bond process for silicon pixel detectors at PSI

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Broennimann, Ch.; Glaus, F.; Gobrecht, J.; Heising, S.; Horisberger, M.; Horisberger, R.; Kästli, H. C.; Lehmann, J.; Rohe, T.; Streuli, S.

    2006-09-01

    The hybrid pixel detectors used in the high-energy physics experiments currently under construction use a vertical connection technique, the so-called bump bonding. As the pitch below 100 μm, required in these applications, cannot be fulfilled with standard industrial processes (e.g. the IBM C4 process), an in-house bump bond process using reflowed indium bumps was developed at PSI as part of the R&D for the CMS-pixel detector. The bump deposition on the sensor is performed in two subsequent lift-off steps. As the first photolithographic step a thin under bump metalization (UBM) is sputtered onto bump pads. It is wettable by indium and defines the diameter of the bump. The indium is evaporated via a second photolithographic step with larger openings and is reflowed afterwards. The height of the balls is defined by the volume of the indium. On the readout chip only one photolithographic step is carried out to deposit the UBM and a thin indium layer for better adhesion. After mating both parts a second reflow is performed for self-alignment and obtaining high mechanical strength. For the placement of the chips a manual and an automatic machine were constructed. The former is very flexible in handling different chip and module geometries but has a limited throughput while the latter features a much higher grade of automatization and is therefore much more suited for producing hundreds of modules with a well-defined geometry. The reliability of this process was proven by the successful construction of the PILATUS detector. The construction of PILATUS 6M (60 modules) and the CMS pixel barrel (roughly 800 modules) has started in early 2006.

  12. The n-type conduction of indium-doped Cu{sub 2}O thin films fabricated by direct current magnetron co-sputtering

    SciTech Connect

    Cai, Xing-Min; Su, Xiao-Qiang; Ye, Fan Wang, Huan; Tian, Xiao-Qing; Zhang, Dong-Ping; Fan, Ping; Luo, Jing-Ting; Zheng, Zhuang-Hao; Liang, Guang-Xing; Roy, V. A. L.

    2015-08-24

    Indium-doped Cu{sub 2}O thin films were fabricated on K9 glass substrates by direct current magnetron co-sputtering in an atmosphere of Ar and O{sub 2}. Metallic copper and indium disks were used as the targets. X-ray diffraction showed that the diffraction peaks could only be indexed to simple cubic Cu{sub 2}O, with no other phases detected. Indium atoms exist as In{sup 3+} in Cu{sub 2}O. Ultraviolet-visible spectroscopy showed that the transmittance of the samples was relatively high and that indium doping increased the optical band gaps. The Hall effect measurement showed that the samples were n-type semiconductors at room temperature. The Seebeck effect test showed that the films were n-type semiconductors near or over room temperature (<400 K), changing to p-type at relatively high temperatures. The conduction by the samples in the temperature range of the n-type was due to thermal band conduction and the donor energy level was estimated to be 620.2–713.8 meV below the conduction band. The theoretical calculation showed that indium doping can raise the Fermi energy level of Cu{sub 2}O and, therefore, lead to n-type conduction.

  13. The n-type conduction of indium-doped Cu2O thin films fabricated by direct current magnetron co-sputtering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cai, Xing-Min; Su, Xiao-Qiang; Ye, Fan; Wang, Huan; Tian, Xiao-Qing; Zhang, Dong-Ping; Fan, Ping; Luo, Jing-Ting; Zheng, Zhuang-Hao; Liang, Guang-Xing; Roy, V. A. L.

    2015-08-01

    Indium-doped Cu2O thin films were fabricated on K9 glass substrates by direct current magnetron co-sputtering in an atmosphere of Ar and O2. Metallic copper and indium disks were used as the targets. X-ray diffraction showed that the diffraction peaks could only be indexed to simple cubic Cu2O, with no other phases detected. Indium atoms exist as In3+ in Cu2O. Ultraviolet-visible spectroscopy showed that the transmittance of the samples was relatively high and that indium doping increased the optical band gaps. The Hall effect measurement showed that the samples were n-type semiconductors at room temperature. The Seebeck effect test showed that the films were n-type semiconductors near or over room temperature (<400 K), changing to p-type at relatively high temperatures. The conduction by the samples in the temperature range of the n-type was due to thermal band conduction and the donor energy level was estimated to be 620.2-713.8 meV below the conduction band. The theoretical calculation showed that indium doping can raise the Fermi energy level of Cu2O and, therefore, lead to n-type conduction.

  14. Indium-111 autologous leukocyte imaging in pancreatitis

    SciTech Connect

    Anderson, J.R.; Spence, R.A.; Laird, J.D.; Ferguson, W.R.; Kennedy, T.L.

    1986-03-01

    Thirty-nine patients with acute pancreatitis have been assessed using a prognostic factor grading system, abdominal ultrasound, and autologous leukocyte imaging. Both prognostic factor grading and leukocyte imaging can accurately assess the severity of the disease early in its course. All patients with a negative indium-labeled leukocyte image recovered without sequelae, whereas five of the 12 patients with a positive image developed complications, including two deaths. Abdominal ultrasound is of no value in assessing severity, but is a useful method of detecting those patients with gallstone-associated disease. In patients with suspected abscess formation following acute pancreatitis, indium leukocyte imaging does not differentiate between fat necrosis and abscess formation. In this situation, computerized tomography should be carried out before laparotomy is undertaken.

  15. Electroplated indium bump arrays and the bonding reliability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qiuping, Huang; Gaowei, Xu; Gang, Quan; Yuan, Yuan; Le, Luo

    2010-11-01

    A novel electroplating indium bumping process is described, as a result of which indium bump arrays with a pitch of 100 μm and a diameter of 40 μm were successfully prepared. UBM (under bump metallization) for indium bumping was investigated with an XRD technique. The experimental results indicate that Ti/Pt (300 Å / 200 Å) has an excellent barrier effect both at room temperature and at 200 °C. The bonding reliability of the indium bumps was evaluated by a shear test. Results show that the shear strength of the indium bump significantly increases after the first reflow and then changes slowly with increasing reflow times. Such a phenomenon may be caused by the change in textures of the indium after reflow. The corresponding flip-chip process is also discussed in this paper.

  16. The toxicology of indium tin oxide.

    PubMed

    Bomhard, Ernst M

    2016-07-01

    Indium tin oxide (ITO) is a technologically important semiconductor. An increasing number of cases of severe lung effects (characterized by pulmonary alveolar proteinosis and/or interstitial fibrosis) in ITO-exposed workers warrants a review of the toxicological hazards. Short- and long-term inhalation studies in rats and mice revealed persistent alveolar proteinosis, inflammation and fibrosis in the lungs down to concentrations as low as 0.01mg/m(3). In rats, the incidences of bronchiolo-alveolar adenomas and carcinomas were significantly increased at all concentrations. In mice, ITO was not carcinogenic. A few bronchiolo-alveolar adenomas occurring after repeated intratracheal instillation of ITO to hamsters have to be interpreted as treatment-related. In vitro and in vivo studies on the formation of reactive oxygen species suggest epigenetic effects as cause of the lung tumor development. Repeated intratracheal instillation of ITO to hamsters slightly affected the male sexual organs, which might be interpreted as a secondary effect of the lung damage. Epidemiological and medical surveillance studies, serum/blood indium levels in workers as well as data on the exposure to airborne indium concentrations indicate a need for measures to reduce exposure at ITO workplaces. PMID:27343753

  17. Dispersion strengthened copper

    DOEpatents

    Sheinberg, H.; Meek, T.T.; Blake, R.D.

    1990-01-09

    A composition of matter is described which is comprised of copper and particles which are dispersed throughout the copper, where the particles are comprised of copper oxide and copper having a coating of copper oxide. A method for making this composition of matter is also described. This invention relates to the art of powder metallurgy and, more particularly, it relates to dispersion strengthened metals.

  18. COPPER AND BRAIN FUNCTION

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Increasing evidence shows that brain development and function are impaired when the brain is deprived of copper either through dietary copper deficiency or through genetic defects in copper transport. A number of copper-dependent enzymes whose activities are lowered by copper deprivation form the ba...

  19. GEMAS: Concentrations and origin of indium in agricultural soil of Europe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ladenberger, Anna; Sadeghi, Martiya; Demetriades, Alecos; Reimann, Clemens; Birke, Manfred; Andersson, Madelen; Jonsson, Erik

    2014-05-01

    Indium is classified as a critical metal, urgently needed in the electronics industry, especially for the production of solar panels and LCD screens. It is a volatile chalcophile rare element and its primary sources are different types of sulphide ore deposits. Although sphalerite is the main host mineral for indium, chalcopyrite-rich ores usually contain the highest contents of this element. Apart from common sulphides, higher indium concentrations can occur in cassiterite, wolframite and magnetite, in addition to few known indium minerals such as roquesite. Indium is a very rare element and its determination needs a technique with very low detection limits. Data for In are hardly ever provided in geochemical data sets due to its function as an internal standard when using the ICP-MS for analysis. Within the GEMAS project, over 4000 samples of agricultural (Ap) and grazing land (Gr) soil have been collected, and indium concentrations have been measured by ICP-MS in an aqua regia extraction. The median value of aqua regia extractable In in European soil is 0.0176 mg/kg in the Ap and 0.0177 mg/kg in the Gr samples. The most striking pattern on an In distribution map of Europe in an aqua regia extraction is the large difference between northern (low - median 0.012 mg/kg In in the Ap samples) and southern Europe (high - median 0.021 mg/kg In in the Ap samples). The boundary between predominantly high and low concentrations follows exactly the southernmost limit of the last glaciation. In southern Scandinavia, clay-rich soil is indicated by In anomalies, as is the Oslo Rift and the old silver mine at Kongsberg (Norway). Generally, distinct In anomalies mark many of the famous old mining areas of the continent, typically those featuring relatively young hydrothermal deposits (northern Portugal, Iberian Pyrite Belt, Cornwall in the UK, Harz in Germany and Erzgebirge at the German/Czech border), and granitic intrusions (probably related to associated Sn and skarn

  20. Increased blood and urine copper after residential exposure to copper naphthenate

    SciTech Connect

    Bluhm, R.E.; Welch, L.; Branch, R.A. )

    1992-01-01

    Despite widespread industrial use of copper naphthenate, there are no reports of the relationship of copper naphthenate and copper absorption in humans or animals. We report a family of three individuals who lived in a home where copper naphthenate was sprayed on the inner foundation. Subsequently, these individuals developed non-specific complaints. In two of these individuals, serum copper levels were elevated when first measured months after copper naphthenate was sprayed in the home. A gradual decline over several years in urine and serum copper levels was observed in the individual who maintained follow-up. It is not known if symptoms reflected exposure to naphthenate, the solvent vehicle, volatilized copper, or the stress of exposure to a malodorous compound perceived as toxic. Exposure to copper naphthenate may be another cause of an elevated serum and urine copper level but the interpretation of these levels as normal' or toxic' requires additional study for clarification. This report suggests the need for further study of the absorption and relative toxicity of copper naphthenate.

  1. A multi-step solvent-free mechanochemical route to indium(iii) complexes.

    PubMed

    Wang, Jingyi; Ganguly, Rakesh; Yongxin, Li; Díaz, Jesus; Soo, Han Sen; García, Felipe

    2016-05-10

    Mechanochemistry is well-established in the solid-phase synthesis of inorganic materials but has rarely been employed for molecular syntheses. In recent years, there has been nascent interest in 'greener' synthetic methods with less solvent, higher yields, and shorter reaction times being especially appealing to the fine chemicals and inorganic catalyst industries. Herein, we demonstrate that main-group indium(iii) complexes featuring bis(imino)acenaphthene (BIAN) ligands are readily accessible through a mechanochemical milling approach. The synthetic methodology reported herein not only bypasses the use of large solvent quantities and transition metal reagents for ligand synthesis, but also reduces reaction times dramatically. These new main-group complexes exhibit the potential to be reduced to indium(i) compounds, which may be employed as photosensitizers in organic catalyses and functional materials. PMID:27112317

  2. Accumulation and hyperaccumulation of copper in plants

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Adam, V.; Trnkova, L.; Huska, D.; Babula, P.; Kizek, R.

    2009-04-01

    Copper is natural component of our environment. Flow of copper(II) ions in the environment depends on solubility of compounds containing this metal. Mobile ion coming from soil and rocks due to volcanic activity, rains and others are then distributed to water. Bio-availability of copper is substantially lower than its concentration in the aquatic environment. Copper present in the water reacts with other compounds and creates a complex, not available for organisms. The availability of copper varies depending on the environment, but moving around within the range from 5 to 25 % of total copper. Thus copper is stored in the sediments and the rest is transported to the seas and oceans. It is common knowledge that copper is essential element for most living organisms. For this reason this element is actively accumulated in the tissues. The total quantity of copper in soil ranges from 2 to 250 mg / kg, the average concentration is 30 mg / kg. Certain activities related to agriculture (the use of fungicides), possibly with the metallurgical industry and mining, tend to increase the total quantity of copper in the soil. This amount of copper in the soil is a problem particularly for agricultural production of food. The lack of copper causes a decrease in revenue and reduction in quality of production. In Europe, shows the low level of copper in total 18 million hectares of farmland. To remedy this adverse situation is the increasing use of copper fertilizers in agricultural soils. It is known that copper compounds are used in plant protection against various illnesses and pests. Mining of minerals is for the development of human society a key economic activity. An important site where the copper is mined in the Slovakia is nearby Smolníka. Due to long time mining in his area (more than 700 years) there are places with extremely high concentrations of various metals including copper. Besides copper, there are also detected iron, zinc and arsenic. Various plant species

  3. Systems and methods for solar cells with CIS and CIGS films made by reacting evaporated copper chlorides with selenium

    SciTech Connect

    Albin, David S.; Noufi, Rommel

    2015-06-09

    Systems and methods for solar cells with CIS and CIGS films made by reacting evaporated copper chlorides with selenium are provided. In one embodiment, a method for fabricating a thin film device comprises: providing a semiconductor film comprising indium (In) and selenium (Se) upon a substrate; heating the substrate and the semiconductor film to a desired temperature; and performing a mass transport through vapor transport of a copper chloride vapor and se vapor to the semiconductor film within a reaction chamber.

  4. Method to Improve Indium Bump Bonding via Indium Oxide Removal Using a Multi-Step Plasma Process

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Greer, H. Frank (Inventor); Jones, Todd J. (Inventor); Vasquez, Richard P. (Inventor); Hoenk, Michael E. (Inventor); Dickie, Matthew R. (Inventor); Nikzad, Shouleh (Inventor)

    2012-01-01

    A process for removing indium oxide from indium bumps in a flip-chip structure to reduce contact resistance, by a multi-step plasma treatment. A first plasma treatment of the indium bumps with an argon, methane and hydrogen plasma reduces indium oxide, and a second plasma treatment with an argon and hydrogen plasma removes residual organics. The multi-step plasma process for removing indium oxide from the indium bumps is more effective in reducing the oxide, and yet does not require the use of halogens, does not change the bump morphology, does not attack the bond pad material or under-bump metallization layers, and creates no new mechanisms for open circuits.

  5. Copper nanowire networks with transparent oxide shells that prevent oxidation without reducing transmittance.

    PubMed

    Chen, Zuofeng; Ye, Shengrong; Stewart, Ian E; Wiley, Benjamin J

    2014-09-23

    Transparent conducting films of solution-synthesized copper nanowires are an attractive alternative to indium tin oxide due to the relative abundance of Cu and the low cost of solution-phase nanowire coating processes. However, there has to date been no way to protect Cu nanowires with a solution-phase process that does not adversely affect the optoelectric performance of Cu nanowire films. This article reports that the electrodeposition of zinc, tin, or indium shells onto Cu nanowires, followed by oxidation of these shells, enables the protection of Cu nanowire films against oxidation without decreasing film performance. PMID:25180448

  6. The influence of random indium alloy fluctuations in indium gallium nitride quantum wells on the device behavior

    SciTech Connect

    Yang, Tsung-Jui; Wu, Yuh-Renn; Shivaraman, Ravi; Speck, James S.

    2014-09-21

    In this paper, we describe the influence of the intrinsic indium fluctuation in the InGaN quantum wells on the carrier transport, efficiency droop, and emission spectrum in GaN-based light emitting diodes (LEDs). Both real and randomly generated indium fluctuations were used in 3D simulations and compared to quantum wells with a uniform indium distribution. We found that without further hypothesis the simulations of electrical and optical properties in LEDs such as carrier transport, radiative and Auger recombination, and efficiency droop are greatly improved by considering natural nanoscale indium fluctuations.

  7. Some adverse effects of soil amendment with organic Materials-The case of soils polluted by copper industry phytostabilized with red fescue.

    PubMed

    Cuske, Mateusz; Karczewska, Anna; Gałka, Bernard; Dradrach, Agnieszka

    2016-08-01

    The study was aimed to examine the effects of soil amendment with organic waste materials on the growth of red fescue and the uptake of Cu and Zn by this grass, in view of its potential usage for phytostabilization of Cu-polluted soils. Five soils, containing 301-5180 mg/kg Cu, were collected from the surroundings of copper smelter Legnica, and amended with lignite (LG) and limed sewage sludge (SS). Plant growth and the concentrations of Cu and Zn in the shoots and roots of grass were measured in a pot experiment and related to the results of Pytotoxkit and Microtox® tests performed on soil solution. The effects of soil amendment with LG and SS differed greatly, and depended on soil properties. In some cases, the application of alkaline SS resulted in dramatic increase of Cu phytotoxicity and its enhanced uptake by plants, while application of LG to slightly acidic soil caused increased accumulation of Zn in plants, particularly in their roots. The study confirmed good suitability of red fescue for phytostabilization of Cu-contaminated soils except for those extremely polluted. Organic amendments to be used for metal immobilization should be thoroughly examined prior to application. PMID:26853183

  8. Characteristics and antimicrobial activity of copper-based materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Bowen

    In this study, copper vermiculite was synthesized, and the characteristics, antimicrobial effects, and chemical stability of copper vermiculite were investigated. Two types of copper vermiculite materials, micron-sized copper vermiculite (MCV) and exfoliated copper vermiculite (MECV), are selected for this research. Since most of the functional fillers used in industry products, such as plastics, paints, rubbers, papers, and textiles prefer micron-scaled particles, micron-sized copper vermiculite was prepared by jet-milling vermiculite. Meanwhile, since the exfoliated vermiculite has very unique properties, such as high porosity, specific surface area, high aspect ratio of laminates, and low density, and has been extensively utilized as a functional additives, exfoliated copper vermiculite also was synthesized and investigated. The antibacterial efficiency of copper vermiculite was qualitatively evaluated by the diffusion methods (both liquid diffusion and solid diffusion) against the most common pathogenic species: Escherichia coli (E. coli), Staphylococcus aureus (S. aureus), and Klebsiella pneumoniae (K. pneumoniae). The result showed that the release velocity of copper from copper vermiculite is very slow. However, copper vermiculite clearly has excellent antibacterial efficiency to S. aureus, K. pneumoniae and E. coli. The strongest antibacterial ability of copper vermiculite is its action on S. aureus. The antibacterial efficiency of copper vermiculite was also quantitatively evaluated by determining the reduction rate (death rate) of E. coli versus various levels of copper vermiculite. 10 ppm of copper vermiculite in solution is sufficient to reduce the cell population of E. coli, while the untreated vermiculite had no antibacterial activity. The slow release of copper revealed that the antimicrobial effect of copper vermiculite was due to the strong interactions between copper ions and bacteria cells. Exfoliated copper vermiculite has even stronger

  9. Copper Recycling in the United States in 2004

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Goonan, Thomas G.

    2009-01-01

    As one of a series of reports that describe the recycling of metal commodities in the United States, this report discusses the flow of copper from production through distribution and use, with particular emphasis on the recycling of industrial scrap (new scrap1) and used products (old scrap) in the year 2004. This materials flow study includes a description of copper supply and demand for the United States to illustrate the extent of copper recycling and to identify recycling trends. Understanding how materials flow from a source through disposition can aid in improving the management of natural resource delivery systems. In 2004, the U.S. refined copper supply was 2.53 million metric tons (Mt) of refined unalloyed copper. With adjustment for refined copper exports of 127,000 metric tons (t) of copper, the net U.S. refined copper supply was 2.14 Mt of copper. With this net supply and a consumer inventory decrease of 9,000 t of refined copper, 2.42 Mt of refined copper was consumed by U.S. semifabricators (brass mills, wire rod mills, ingot makers, and foundries and others) in 2004. In addition to the 2.42 Mt of refined copper consumed in 2004, U.S. copper semifabricators consumed 853,000 t of copper contained in recycled scrap. Furthermore, 61,000 t of copper contained in scrap was consumed by noncopper alloy makers, for example, steelmakers and aluminum alloy makers. Old scrap recycling efficiency for copper was estimated to be 43 percent of theoretical old scrap supply, the recycling rate for copper was 30 percent of apparent supply, and the new-scrap-to-old-scrap ratio for U.S. copper product production was 3.2 (76:24).

  10. Aqueous sol-gel routes to conducting films of indium oxide and indium-tin-oxide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Perry, Carole C.; McGiveron, J. K.; Harrison, Philip G.

    2000-05-01

    Thin films of indium tin oxide (ITO) are of interest because of their high transparency and low electrical resistivity. Applications include use as electrodes for liquid crystal display and as heat mirrors for solar energy devices. We have developed totally aqueous routes to indium oxide (IO) and ITO materials because, (1) the particulate sols afford a longer shelf life than for alkoxyide derived materials, (2) organics do not have to be removed from the films by baking, and (3) the starting materials are cheaper than the corresponding alkoxides. Indium and mixed indium/tin sols have been prepared form inorganic solutions and treated with alkali to produce white thixotropic sols ca. 0.64 in Mz+ ions. This films were prepared by spinning on low iron or pure silica slides previously cleaned with DECON and washed with distilled water. Films were subsequently heated at 773K in air, or 1173K in air or nitrogen. The film with the lowest resistivity contained ca. 5 percent Sn and had an average optical transmittance between 400 and 600nm of 95 percent. The film was non-porous, smooth in texture, approximately 300nm thick and had a band gap energy of 3.22eV.

  11. J/{psi} production in indium-indium collisions at SPS energies

    SciTech Connect

    Pillot, P.; Ducroux, L.; Guichard, A.; Tieulent, R.; Arnaldi, R.; Colla, A.; Cortese, P.; Ferretti, A.; Oppedisano, C.; Scomparin, E.; Averbeck, R.; Drees, A.; Banicz, K.; Keil, M.; Castor, J.; Devaux, A.; Force, P.; Manso, F.; Chaurand, B.; Cicalo, C.

    2006-01-12

    The NA60 experiment collected data on dimuon production in indium-indium collisions at 158 GeV/c per incident nucleon, in year 2003, to contribute to the clarification of several questions raised by previous experiments studying high-energy heavy-ion physics at the CERN SPS in search of the quark gluon plasma. Among these previous results stands the observation, by NA50, that the production yield of J/{psi} mesons is suppressed in central Pb-Pb collisions beyond the normal nuclear absorption defined by proton-nucleus data. By comparing the centrality dependence of the suppression pattern between different colliding systems, S-U, Pb-Pb and In-In, we should be able to identify the corresponding scaling variable, and the physics mechanism driving the suppression. In this paper, we will present the ratio of J/{psi} and Drell-Yan production cross-sections in indium-indium collisions, in three centrality bins, and how these values compare to previous measurements. We will also present a study of the transverse momentum distributions of the J/{psi} mesons, in seven centrality bins.

  12. Influence of indium concentration on the structural and optoelectronic properties of indium selenide thin films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yan, Yong; Li, Shasha; Yu, Zhou; Liu, Lian; Yan, Chuanpeng; Zhang, Yong; Zhao, Yong

    2014-12-01

    We have grown indium selenide thin films using magnetron sputtering method. The influence of indium concentration on the structural, optical and electrical properties was studied. The concentration of indium in indium selenide thin films was varied by adjusting the sputtering power from 40 to 80 W while keeping the substrate temperature and argon pressure constant. The β-phase, which only exists at elevated temperatures in bulk single crystals, can persist at room temperature in the In-rich films. The β-phase thin film with smaller band gap has an electrical resistivity about four orders of magnitude lower than that of the γ-In2Se3 thin film, which is also stable at room temperature. Furthermore, the single-phase γ-In2Se3 thin film was then assembled in visible-light photodetector which shows a fast, reversible, and stable response. These results indicate the possibility of using γ-In2Se3 thin film in various next-generation photoelectric and optical-memory applications.

  13. A Bright Future for copper electrowinning

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moats, Michael; Free, Michael

    2007-10-01

    Over the past 40 years, the copper mining industry has undergone a dramatic shift toward hydrometallurgical extraction of copper at the mine site. This has increased the importance of recovering high-purity copper by electrowinning. High-purity cathode production was achieved by implementing numerous technologies including superior lead-alloy anodes, improved cathode handling and/or stainless steel blanks, better electrolyte control, and advanced tankhouse automation. In the future, it is projected that tankhouses will produce high-quality copper at lower costs using technologies that could include dimensionally stable anodes, alternative anode reactions, innovative cell designs, novel electrolyte circulation systems, and more. This paper reviews existing commercial copper electrowinning technologies and discusses advances that need to be made to implement future technologies.

  14. Studies of indium amides and nitrides

    SciTech Connect

    Purdy, A.P.; Berry, A.D.

    1993-12-31

    A reaction between InI{sub 3} and 3 eq. of KNH{sub 2} in liquid NH{sub 3} forms indium(III) amide (In(NH{sub 2}){sub 3}) a white, nearly insoluble compound. Indium(III) amide readily combines with KNH{sub 2} in liquid NH{sub 3} to form the mixed metal amide K{sub 2}In(NH{sub 2}){sub 5}. Other potassium and sodium derivatives MxIn(NH{sub 2}){sub 3+x} derivatives were prepared in a similar manner, but not all were obtained pure in the solid state. An impure tri-lithium derivative (Li{sub 3}In(NH{sub 2}){sub 6}) was obtained by adding a KNH{sub 2} solution (6 eq) to a solution of InI{sub 3} and 3 eq of LiI. Pyrolysis (in vacuo 25-300{degrees}C, under N{sub 2} 300-400{degrees}C) of In(NH{sub 2}){sub 3} or MxIn(NH{sub 2}){sub x+3} (M = Na, K) to 400{degrees}C results in the formation of InN, but indium metal is also formed from some of the mixed metal amides. The product from thermal decomposition of Li{sub 3}In(NH{sub 2}){sub 6} under vacuum was tentatively identified as the ternary nitride Li{sub 3}InN{sub 2}. Products were characterized by elemental analysis, IR spectroscopy, and powder x-ray diffraction experiments.

  15. Two-Step Plasma Process for Cleaning Indium Bonding Bumps

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Greer, Harold F.; Vasquez, Richard P.; Jones, Todd J.; Hoenk, Michael E.; Dickie, Matthew R.; Nikzad, Shouleh

    2009-01-01

    A two-step plasma process has been developed as a means of removing surface oxide layers from indium bumps used in flip-chip hybridization (bump bonding) of integrated circuits. The two-step plasma process makes it possible to remove surface indium oxide, without incurring the adverse effects of the acid etching process.

  16. Rapid solidification of indium: Modeling subcooling

    SciTech Connect

    Le Bot, C. Delaunay, D.

    2008-05-15

    This paper deals with the study of crystallization kinetics. A pure metal - indium - is subjected to different cooling rates by analyzing phenomena with a differential scanning calorimeter. Thanks to the thermal flux obtained by this device and to the temperature determined with a thermocouple inside the metal sample, and according to the modified Avrami theory, the aim was to determine a temperature dependent function K which links thermodynamic properties to a macroscopic model of crystallization kinetics. Experiments highlight the recalescence phenomenon and show that this function has a shape similar to that of the nucleation rate.

  17. Fabrication, structure and mechanical properties of indium nanopillars

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, Gyuhyon; Kim, Ju-Young; Budiman, Arief Suriadi; Tamura, Nobumichi; Kunz, Martin; Chen, Kai; Burek, Michael J.; Greer, Julia R.; Tsui, Ting Y.

    2010-01-01

    Solid and hollow cylindrical indium pillars with nanoscale diameters were prepared using electron beam lithography followed by the electroplating fabrication method. The microstructure of the solid-core indium pillars was characterized by scanning micro-X-ray diffraction, which shows that the indium pillars were annealed at room temperature with very few dislocations remaining in the samples. The mechanical properties of the solid pillars were characterized using a uniaxial microcompression technique, which demonstrated that the engineering yield stress is {approx}9 times greater than bulk and is {approx}1/28 of the indium shear modulus, suggesting that the attained stresses are close to theoretical strength. Microcompression of hollow indium nanopillars showed evidence of brittle fracture. This may suggest that the failure mode for one of the most ductile metals can become brittle when the feature size is sufficiently small.

  18. Laser microstructured metal thin films as promising alternative for indium based transparent electrodes.

    PubMed

    Eckhardt, Sebastian; Siebold, Mathias; Lasagni, Andrés Fabián

    2016-03-21

    In the search for alternative materials to replace indium-tin-oxide in transparent electrodes we have structured copper and aluminum thin films (between 5 an 40 nm) for tailoring their optical properties. Micrometer scaled holes were produced using the direct laser interference patterning (DLIP) technique. We compared the optical and electrical parameters of nanosecond and picosecond processed thin films. It was found that the optical transmittance of the structured layers was relatively increased between 25 to 125% while the electrical resistance was marginally influenced. In addition, the laser treatment enhanced the diffuse to total transmission ratio (HAZE) by values ranging from 30 to 82% (relative) as a potential advantage of μm structuring. The results also show that both of the studied metals succeed to match the target which is set by typical applications of indium thin oxide (ITO) films. Furthermore, numerical simulations are performed in order to understand the ablation process of thin film material for ps and ns pulses. PMID:27136876

  19. Dynamic of active microorganisms inhabiting a bioleaching industrial heap of low‐grade copper sulfide ore monitored by real‐time PCR and oligonucleotide prokaryotic acidophile microarray

    PubMed Central

    Remonsellez, Francisco; Galleguillos, Felipe; Moreno‐Paz, Mercedes; Parro, Víctor; Acosta, Mauricio; Demergasso, Cecilia

    2009-01-01

    Summary The bioleaching of metal sulfide has developed into a very important industrial process and understanding the microbial dynamic is key to advancing commercial bioleaching operations. Here we report the first quantitative description of the dynamic of active communities in an industrial bioleaching heap. Acidithiobacillus ferrooxidans was the most abundant during the first part of the leaching cycle, while the abundance of Leptospirillum ferriphilum and Ferroplasma acidiphilum increased with age of the heap. Acidithiobacillus thiooxidans kept constant throughout the leaching cycle, and Firmicutes group showed a low and a patchy distribution in the heap. The Acidiphilium‐like bacteria reached their highest abundance corresponding to the amount of autotrophs. The active microorganisms in the leaching system were determined using two RNA‐based sensitive techniques. In most cases, the 16S rRNA copy numbers of At. ferrooxidans, L. ferriphilum, At. thiooxidans and F. acidiphilum, was concomitant with the DNA copy numbers, whereas Acidiphilium‐like bacteria and some Firmicutes members did not show a clear correlation between 16S rRNA accumulation and DNA copy numbers. However, the prokaryotic acidophile microarray (PAM) analysis showed active members of Alphaproteobacteria in all samples and of Sulfobacillus genus in older ones. Also, new active groups such as Actinobacteria and Acidobacterium genus were detected by PAM. The results suggest that changes during the leaching cycle in chemical and physical conditions, such as pH and Fe3+/Fe2+ ion rate, are primary factors shaping the microbial dynamic in the heap. PMID:21255296

  20. Nanosecond pulsed laser blackening of copper

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tang, Guang; Hourd, Andrew C.; Abdolvand, Amin

    2012-12-01

    Nanosecond (12 ns) pulsed laser processing of copper at 532 nm resulted in the formation of homogenously distributed, highly organized microstructures. This led to the fabrication of large area black copper substrates with absorbance of over 97% in the spectral range from 250 nm to 750 nm, and a broadband absorbance of over 80% between 750 nm and 2500 nm. Optical and chemical analyses of the fabricated black metal are presented and discussed. The employed laser is an industrially adaptable source and the presented technique for fabrication of black copper could find applications in broadband thermal radiation sources, solar energy absorbers, irradiative heat transfer devices, and thermophotovoltaics.

  1. Passivation coating on electrospun copper nanofibers for stable transparent electrodes.

    PubMed

    Hsu, Po-Chun; Wu, Hui; Carney, Thomas J; McDowell, Matthew T; Yang, Yuan; Garnett, Erik C; Li, Michael; Hu, Liangbing; Cui, Yi

    2012-06-26

    Copper nanofiber networks, which possess the advantages of low cost, moderate flexibility, small sheet resistance, and high transmittance, are one of the most promising candidates to replace indium tin oxide films as the premier transparent electrode. However, the chemical activity of copper nanofibers causes a substantial increase in the sheet resistance after thermal oxidation or chemical corrosion of the nanofibers. In this work, we utilize atomic layer deposition to coat a passivation layer of aluminum-doped zinc oxide (AZO) and aluminum oxide onto electrospun copper nanofibers and remarkably enhance their durability. Our AZO-copper nanofibers show resistance increase of remarkably only 10% after thermal oxidation at 160 °C in dry air and 80 °C in humid air with 80% relative humidity, whereas bare copper nanofibers quickly become insulating. In addition, the coating and baking of the acidic PEDOT:PSS layer on our fibers increases the sheet resistance of bare copper nanofibers by 6 orders of magnitude, while the AZO-Cu nanofibers show an 18% increase. PMID:22548313

  2. Surface modifications on InAs decrease indium and arsenic leaching under physiological conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jewett, Scott A.; Yoder, Jeffrey A.; Ivanisevic, Albena

    2012-11-01

    Devices containing III-V semiconductors such as InAs are increasingly being used in the electronic industry for a variety of optoelectronic applications. Furthermore, the attractive chemical, material, electronic properties make such materials appealing for use in devices designed for biological applications, such as biosensors. However, in biological applications the leaching of toxic materials from these devices could cause harm to cells or tissue. Additionally, after disposal, toxic inorganic materials can leach from devices and buildup in the environment, causing long-term ecological harm. Therefore, the toxicity of these materials along with their stability in physiological conditions are important factors to consider. Surface modifications are one common method of stabilizing semiconductor materials in order to chemically and electronically passivate them. Such surface modifications could also prevent the leaching of toxic materials by preventing the regrowth of the unstable surface oxide layer and by creating an effective barrier between the semiconductor surface and the surrounding environment. In this study, various surface modifications on InAs are developed with the goal of decreasing the leaching of indium and arsenic. The leaching of indium and arsenic from modified substrates was assessed in physiological conditions using inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (ICP-MS). Substrates modified with 11-mercapto-1-undecanol (MU) and graft polymerized with poly(ethylene) glycol (PEG) were most effective at preventing indium and arsenic leaching. These surfaces were characterized using contact angle analysis, ellipsometry, atomic force microscopy (AFM), and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS). Substrates modified with collagen and synthetic polyelectrolytes were least effective, due to the destructive nature of acidic environments on InAs. The toxicity of modified and unmodified InAs, along with raw indium, arsenic, and PEG components was assessed

  3. On the correlation between surface morphology and electron work function of indium tin oxide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xue, Mingshan; Wu, Hainan; Ou, Junfei; Wang, Fajun; Li, Xibao; Li, Wen; Jiang, Zhonghao

    2012-06-01

    The electron work function (EWF) is an important parameter of a semiconductor. The understanding of the correlation between the EWF and surface morphology is of much significance for revealing related photoelectric mechanisms. In this study, the surface of indium tin oxide (ITO) was treated by chemical corrosion or absorption of copper phthalocyanine molecules, and their changes in EWF were systematically investigated using scanning Kelvin probe. The decrease of the EWF with the increase of surface roughness was found. Based on a microcapacitor model, the correlation between the EWF and surface microstructures was built up, which was well consistent with the experimental results. These data are of help for improving the photoelectric behaviors of ITO-based devices by adjusting surface/interface structures.

  4. Copper and Copper Proteins in Parkinson's Disease

    PubMed Central

    Rivera-Mancia, Susana; Diaz-Ruiz, Araceli; Tristan-Lopez, Luis; Rios, Camilo

    2014-01-01

    Copper is a transition metal that has been linked to pathological and beneficial effects in neurodegenerative diseases. In Parkinson's disease, free copper is related to increased oxidative stress, alpha-synuclein oligomerization, and Lewy body formation. Decreased copper along with increased iron has been found in substantia nigra and caudate nucleus of Parkinson's disease patients. Copper influences iron content in the brain through ferroxidase ceruloplasmin activity; therefore decreased protein-bound copper in brain may enhance iron accumulation and the associated oxidative stress. The function of other copper-binding proteins such as Cu/Zn-SOD and metallothioneins is also beneficial to prevent neurodegeneration. Copper may regulate neurotransmission since it is released after neuronal stimulus and the metal is able to modulate the function of NMDA and GABA A receptors. Some of the proteins involved in copper transport are the transporters CTR1, ATP7A, and ATP7B and the chaperone ATOX1. There is limited information about the role of those biomolecules in the pathophysiology of Parkinson's disease; for instance, it is known that CTR1 is decreased in substantia nigra pars compacta in Parkinson's disease and that a mutation in ATP7B could be associated with Parkinson's disease. Regarding copper-related therapies, copper supplementation can represent a plausible alternative, while copper chelation may even aggravate the pathology. PMID:24672633

  5. Tumour scanning with indium-111 dihaematoporphyrin ether.

    PubMed Central

    Quastel, M. R.; Richter, A. M.; Levy, J. G.

    1990-01-01

    Photofrin II (dihaematoporphyrin ether/ester, DHE) was labelled with indium-111 and its biodistribution in tumour bearing mice compared with that of 111In chloride. The uptake and clearance of 111In labelled DHE differed markedly from that of indium-111 chloride in that the former was not taken up by the tissues as much as the latter. Scintillation scanning with a gamma-camera showed marked uptake of both 111In agents at the site of the tumour, but a much lower tissue background (excluding the abdominal organs) for the mice given 111In DHE. Tumour:muscle ratios of dissected tissues were 2-3 times higher in 111In DHE treated animals as compared to the uptake of 111In chloride. There was a distinct difference in the pattern of distribution of the two 111In preparations in the tissues. The major accumulation of 111In chloride was in the kidneys, whereas the highest uptake of 111In DHE was in the liver, the organ in which unlabelled porphyrins accumulate. Extraction and testing of materials from tumours of 111In DHE treated animals indicated that most of the tumour extractable 111In had remained associated with the porphyrin in vivo up to 4 days after injection. Images Figure 1 PMID:2147858

  6. Indium antimonide large-format detector arrays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Davis, Mike; Greiner, Mark

    2011-06-01

    Large format infrared imaging sensors are required to achieve simultaneously high resolution and wide field of view image data. Infrared sensors are generally required to be cooled from room temperature to cryogenic temperatures in less than 10 min thousands of times during their lifetime. The challenge is to remove mechanical stress, which is due to different materials with different coefficients of expansion, over a very wide temperature range and at the same time, provide a high sensitivity and high resolution image data. These challenges are met by developing a hybrid where the indium antimonide detector elements (pixels) are unconnected islands that essentially float on a silicon substrate and form a near perfect match to the silicon read-out circuit. Since the pixels are unconnected and isolated from each other, the array is reticulated. This paper shows that the front side illuminated and reticulated element indium antimonide focal plane developed at L-3 Cincinnati Electronics are robust, approach background limited sensitivity limit, and provide the resolution expected of the reticulated pixel array.

  7. Discovery of Cadmium, Indium, and Tin Isotopes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Amos, Stephanie; Thoennessen, Michael

    2009-10-01

    As of today, no comprehensive study has been made covering the initial observations and identifications of isotopes. A project has been undertaken at MSU to document the discovery of all the known isotopes. The criteria defining discovery of a given isotope is the publication of clear mass and element assignment in a refereed journal. Prior to the current work the documentation of the discovery of eleven elements had been completed^1. These elements are cerium^2, arsenic, gold, tungsten, krypton, silver, vanadium, einsteinium, iron, barium, and cobalt. We will present the new documentation for the cadmium, indium, and tin isotopes. Thirty-seven cadmium isotopes, thirty-eight indium isotopes, and thirty-eight tin isotopes have been discovered so far. The description for each discovered isotope includes the year of discovery, the article published on the discovery, the article's author, the method of production, the method of identification, and any previous information concerning the isotope discovery. A summary and overview of all ˜500 isotopes documented so far as a function of discovery year, method and place will also be presented. ^1http://www.nscl.msu.edu/˜thoennes/2009/discovery.htm ^2J.Q. Ginepro, J. Snyder, and M. Thoennessen, At. Data Nucl. Data. Tables, in press (2009), doi:10.1016/j.adt.2009.06.002

  8. Patterning of Indium Tin Oxide Films

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Immer, Christopher

    2008-01-01

    A relatively rapid, economical process has been devised for patterning a thin film of indium tin oxide (ITO) that has been deposited on a polyester film. ITO is a transparent, electrically conductive substance made from a mixture of indium oxide and tin oxide that is commonly used in touch panels, liquid-crystal and plasma display devices, gas sensors, and solar photovoltaic panels. In a typical application, the ITO film must be patterned to form electrodes, current collectors, and the like. Heretofore it has been common practice to pattern an ITO film by means of either a laser ablation process or a photolithography/etching process. The laser ablation process includes the use of expensive equipment to precisely position and focus a laser. The photolithography/etching process is time-consuming. The present process is a variant of the direct toner process an inexpensive but often highly effective process for patterning conductors for printed circuits. Relative to a conventional photolithography/ etching process, this process is simpler, takes less time, and is less expensive. This process involves equipment that costs less than $500 (at 2005 prices) and enables patterning of an ITO film in a process time of less than about a half hour.

  9. Additive monitoring and interactions during copper electroprocessing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Collins, Dale Wade

    The electrochemical deposition of copper has been a major focus of research for decades. Renewed interest in copper electroplating is not limited to the copper producers but is also a major concern of semiconductor manufacturers. The focus on copper electrochemistry by the semiconductor manufacturers has increased since IBM's announcement in 1997 that copper will be used for metallization in high speed/power semiconductors [1--3]. The desire to use copper instead of aluminum is simply a reflection on copper's superior conductivity (lower RC time constants) and resistance to electromigration (generally proportional to the melting point). This dissertation is the compilation of the research into analytical techniques for monitoring surface-active additives in common sulfuric acid/copper sulfate plating baths. Chronopotentiometric, DC and AC voltammetry were the major analytical techniques used in this research. Several interactions between the additives will also be presented along with their apparent decline in activity. The decline in activity is well known in the industry and is also detected by these methods as presented in chapters 4 and 5. Finally, a systemic approach for monitoring the additive Galactosal, which is commonly used in electrowinning, will be outlined. The monitoring system proposed herein would have to be adjusted for each electrowinning facility because each has a unique chemistry and cell configuration.

  10. Estimating Dermal Transfer of Copper Particles from the Surfaces of Pressure-Treated Lumber and Implications for Exposure

    EPA Science Inventory

    Lumber pressure-treated with micronized copper was examined for the release of copper and copper micro/nanoparticles using a surface wipe method to simulate dermal transfer. In 2003, the wood industry began replacing CCA treated lumber products for residential use with copper ba...

  11. Kinetics and mechanisms of reactions between H2O2 and copper and copper oxides.

    PubMed

    Björkbacka, Åsa; Yang, Miao; Gasparrini, Claudia; Leygraf, Christofer; Jonsson, Mats

    2015-09-28

    One of the main challenges for the nuclear power industry today is the disposal of spent nuclear fuel. One of the most developed methods for its long term storage is the Swedish KBS-3 concept where the spent fuel is sealed inside copper canisters and placed 500 meters down in the bedrock. Gamma radiation will penetrate the canisters and be absorbed by groundwater thereby creating oxidative radiolysis products such as hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) and hydroxyl radicals (HO˙). Both H2O2 and HO˙ are able to initiate corrosion of the copper canisters. In this work the kinetics and mechanism of reactions between the stable radiolysis product, H2O2, and copper and copper oxides were studied. Also the dissolution of copper into solution after reaction with H2O2 was monitored by ICP-OES. The experiments show that both H2O2 and HO˙ are present in the systems with copper and copper oxides. Nevertheless, these species do not appear to influence the dissolution of copper to the same extent as observed in recent studies in irradiated systems. This strongly suggests that aqueous radiolysis can only account for a very minor part of the observed radiation induced corrosion of copper. PMID:26287519

  12. Convection sensitivity and thermal analyses for indium and indium-lead mixing experiment (74-18)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bourgeois, S. V.; Doty, J. P.

    1976-01-01

    Sounding rocket Experiment 74-18 was designed to demonstrate the effects of the Black Brandt rocket acceleration levels (during the low-g coast phase of its flight) on the motion of a liquid metal system to assist in preflight design. Some post flight analyses were also conducted. Preflight studies consisted of heat transfer analysis and convection sensitivity and convection modeling analyses which aided in the: (1) final selection of fluid materials (indium-lead melts rather than paraffins); (2) design and timing of heater and quench system; and (3) preflight predictions of the degree of lead penetration into the pure indium segment of the fluid. Postflight studies involved: (1) updating the convection sensitivity calculations by utilizing actual flight gravity levels; and (2) modeling the mixing in the flight samples.

  13. High-efficiency indium tin oxide/indium phosphide solar cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Li, X.; Wanlass, M. W.; Gessert, T. A.; Emery, K. A.; Coutts, T. J.

    1989-01-01

    Improvements in the performance of indium tin oxide (ITO)/indium phosphide solar cells have been realized by the dc magnetron sputter deposition of n-ITO onto an epitaxial p/p(+) structure grown on commercial p(+) bulk substrates. The highest efficiency cells were achieved when the surface of the epilayer was exposed to an Ar/H2 plasma before depositing the bulk of the ITO in a more typical Ar/O2 plasma. With H2 processing, global efficiencies of 18.9 percent were achieved. It is suggested that the excellent performance of these solar cells results from the optimization of the doping, thickness, transport, and surface properties of the p-type base, as well as from better control over the ITO deposition procedure.

  14. The effect of prenatal indium chloride exposure on chondrogenic ossification.

    PubMed

    Ungváry, G; Tátrai, E; Szakmáry, E; Náray, M

    2001-03-01

    Daily indium chloride doses of control (0) or 400 mg/kg were administered orally to pregnant Sprague-Dawley (SD) rats by gavage, on d 20 of gestation. Indium concentration was determined in the maternal and fetal blood, livers, kidneys, skulls, and femurs by atomic absorption spectrometry. Further groups of pregnant rats were treated with control (0) or 400 mg/kg indium chloride orally, during the whole gestation period. The fetuses were examined on d 21 of gestation, using histological and histochemical methods. Four hours after the administration indium concentration was found to be significant in the blood, liver, and kidneys of the dams. Twenty-four hours later it increased in the blood but not in the liver and kidney. Fetal indium concentrations were 40-50% of the maternal levels due to a barrier of the placenta. In the skull and the femur, indium was already detectable at 4 h after the administration, and by the end of 24 h, metal concentration was several times higher than that at 4 h, indicating accumulation. Furthermore, it was found that the birefringency of collagen detectable by picrosirius red staining in polarized light around the chondrocytes disappeared and became irregular. In the matrix of the epiphyseal cartilage, the regular, birefringent network demonstrable by Rivanol reaction became irregular and hardly recognizable. In the cytoplasm of the chondrocytes, the diffuse, evenly distributed positive Ricinus communis agglutinin reaction became irregular or disappeared. Similar but much weaker changes were observed with concanavalin A and wheat germ agglutinin stainings. It was concluded that the missing femur and micromelia diagnosed by alizarin staining is the consequence of a specific toxic effect of indium that inhibits chondrogenic ossification. No similar histochemical changes were observed in the bones of the skull developing by desmogenic ossification, despite the presence of indium. Data indicate that the mechanisms of the effects of indium

  15. Body of Knowledge (BOK) for Copper Wire Bonds

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rutkowski, E.; Sampson, M. J.

    2015-01-01

    Copper wire bonds have replaced gold wire bonds in the majority of commercial semiconductor devices for the latest technology nodes. Although economics has been the driving mechanism to lower semiconductor packaging costs for a savings of about 20% by replacing gold wire bonds with copper, copper also has materials property advantages over gold. When compared to gold, copper has approximately: 25% lower electrical resistivity, 30% higher thermal conductivity, 75% higher tensile strength and 45% higher modulus of elasticity. Copper wire bonds on aluminum bond pads are also more mechanically robust over time and elevated temperature due to the slower intermetallic formation rate - approximately 1/100th that of the gold to aluminum intermetallic formation rate. However, there are significant tradeoffs with copper wire bonding - copper has twice the hardness of gold which results in a narrower bonding manufacturing process window and requires that the semiconductor companies design more mechanically rigid bonding pads to prevent cratering to both the bond pad and underlying chip structure. Furthermore, copper is significantly more prone to corrosion issues. The semiconductor packaging industry has responded to this corrosion concern by creating a palladium coated copper bonding wire, which is more corrosion resistant than pure copper bonding wire. Also, the selection of the device molding compound is critical because use of environmentally friendly green compounds can result in internal CTE (Coefficient of Thermal Expansion) mismatches with the copper wire bonds that can eventually lead to device failures during thermal cycling. Despite the difficult problems associated with the changeover to copper bonding wire, there are billions of copper wire bonded devices delivered annually to customers. It is noteworthy that Texas Instruments announced in October of 2014 that they are shipping microcircuits containing copper wire bonds for safety critical automotive applications

  16. Removal of Pb(II) ions from aqueous solution by a waste mud from copper mine industry: equilibrium, kinetic and thermodynamic study.

    PubMed

    Ozdes, Duygu; Gundogdu, Ali; Kemer, Baris; Duran, Celal; Senturk, Hasan Basri; Soylak, Mustafa

    2009-07-30

    The objective of this study was to assess the adsorption potential of a waste mud (WM) for the removal of lead (Pb(II)) ions from aqueous solutions. The WM was activated with NaOH in order to increase its adsorption capacity. Adsorption studies were conducted in a batch system as a function of solution pH, contact time, initial Pb(II) concentration, activated-waste mud (a-WM) concentration, temperature, etc. Optimum pH was specified as 4.0. The adsorption kinetic studies indicated that the overall adsorption process was best described by pseudo-second-order kinetics. The equilibrium adsorption capacity of a-WM was obtained by using Langmuir and Freundlich isotherm models and both models fitted well. Adsorption capacity for Pb(II) was found to be 24.4 mg g(-1) for 10 g L(-1) of a-WM concentration. Thermodynamic parameters including the Gibbs free energy (Delta G degrees), enthalpy (Delta H degrees), and entropy (DeltaS degrees) indicated that the adsorption of Pb(II) ions on the a-WM was feasible, spontaneous and endothermic, at temperature range of 0-40 degrees C. Desorption studies were carried out successfully with diluted HCl solutions. The results indicate that a-WM can be used as an effective and no-cost adsorbent for the treatment of industrial wastewaters contaminated with Pb(II) ions. PMID:19167162

  17. Reflectance of metallic indium for solar energy applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bouquet, F. L.; Hasegawa, T.

    1984-01-01

    An investigation has been conducted in order to compile quantitative data on the reflective properties of metallic indium. The fabricated samples were of sufficiently high quality that differences from similar second-surface silvered mirrors were not apparent to the human eye. Three second-surface mirror samples were prepared by means of vacuum deposition techniques, yielding indium thicknesses of approximately 1000 A. Both hemispherical and specular measurements were made. It is concluded that metallic indium possesses a sufficiently high specular reflectance to be potentially useful in many solar energy applications.

  18. Determination of indium in rocks by substoichiometric radioisotope dilution analysis

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Greenland, L. Paul; Campbell, E.Y.

    1973-01-01

    Rocks containing 10-140 ng of indium per g are decomposed with hydrofluoric and nitric acids in the presence of 114In. Indium is separated from other constituents by sequential extractions of the bromide, cupferronate, and acetylacetonate, and is then reacted with a substoichiometric amont of EDTA. Excess of indium is removed by acetylacetone extraction and the specific activity of the complexed fraction is determined by counting 114In. Analyses of the U.S.G.S. standard rocks are reported. These show good agreement with previous neutron activation analyses. Repetitive rock analyses indicated an analytical precision of ??4-7%. ?? 1973.

  19. Electrodeposition of Indium Bumps for Ultrafine Pitch Interconnection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tian, Yingtao; Liu, Changqing; Hutt, David; Stevens, Bob

    2014-02-01

    Electroplating is a promising method to produce ultrafine pitch indium bumps for assembly of pixel detectors in imaging applications. In this work, the process of indium bumping through electrodeposition was demonstrated and the influences of various current waveforms on the bump morphology, microstructure and height uniformity were investigated. Electron microscopy was used to study the microstructure of electroplated indium bumps and a Zygo white light interferometer was utilised to evaluate the height uniformity. The results indicated that the bump uniformities on wafer, pattern and feature scales were improved by using unipolar pulse and bipolar pulse reverse current waveforms.

  20. [Copper transport and metabolism].

    PubMed

    Kurasaki, Masaaki; Saito, Takeshi

    2016-07-01

    In this review, copper metabolism and transport in mammalian tissues are introduced and discussed. Firstly, the copper required amounts and LD50 levels are shown to explain the difficult balances of copper in the cells between necessity and toxicity. Furthermore, on the basis of literatures published, relationship between copper-binding metallothioneins and mechanisms for the absorption and excretion of copper or hereditary copper metabolic disorders metabolism abnormality symptom are explained. Finally it has been indicated that apoptosis induced by heavy metals, especially copper was initiated by production of reactive oxygen species and oxidative stress in the cells. To understand precise mechanism for copper homeostasis in mammalian cells, further investigation will be needed to clarify the copper behaviors in normal and abnormal situations. PMID:27455798

  1. Indium antimonide based HEMT for RF applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Subash, T. D.; Gnanasekaran, T.

    2014-11-01

    We report on an indium antimonide high electron mobility transistor with record cut-off frequency characteristics. For high frequency response it is important to minimize parasitic resistance and capacitance to improve short-channel effects. For analog applications adequate pinch-off behavior is demonstrated. For proper device scaling we need high electron mobility and high electron density. Toward this end, the device design features and simulation are carried out by the Synopsys TCAD tool. A 30 nm InSb HEMT exhibits an excellent cut-off frequency of 586 GHz. To the knowledge of the authors, the obtained cut-off frequency is the highest ever reported in any FET on any material system.

  2. High quality factor indium oxide mechanical microresonators

    SciTech Connect

    Bartolomé, Javier Cremades, Ana; Piqueras, Javier

    2015-11-09

    The mechanical resonance behavior of as-grown In{sub 2}O{sub 3} microrods has been studied in this work by in-situ scanning electron microscopy (SEM) electrically induced mechanical oscillations. Indium oxide microrods grown by a vapor–solid method are naturally clamped to an aluminum oxide ceramic substrate, showing a high quality factor due to reduced energy losses during mechanical vibrations. Quality factors of more than 10{sup 5} and minimum detectable forces of the order of 10{sup −16} N/Hz{sup 1/2} demonstrate their potential as mechanical microresonators for real applications. Measurements at low-vacuum using the SEM environmental operation mode were performed to study the effect of extrinsic damping on the resonators behavior. The damping coefficient has been determined as a function of pressure.

  3. Investigation of Post-Etch Copper Residue on Direct Bonded Copper (DBC) Substrates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mei, Yunhui; Lu, Guo-Quan; Chen, Xu; Gang, Chen; Luo, Shufang; Ibitayo, Dimeji

    2011-10-01

    For many years, direct bonded copper (DBC) substrates have proved to be an excellent solution for electrical isolation and thermal management of high-power semiconductor modules. However, in this study we detected a copper residue on the surface of DBC alumina, presumably a result of pattern etching even in industry. As is known, growth of metal dendrites could be observed with the assistance of electric field, temperature, and humidity. Metal dendrites normally grow from the cathode to anode. Silver and copper are two kinds of metals susceptible to migration. In this work, copper dendrites could be formed at 400°C and 50 V/mm between conductors. These dendrites may impact the reliability of DBC in power electronic applications. Therefore, the formation of copper residue is an interesting phenomenon for etched DBC and warrants further attention in the future.

  4. Effects of Copper Nanomaterials on Marine Benthic Communities

    EPA Science Inventory

    Copper nanomaterials (CuNMs) are used as an anti-bacterial and anti-fouling agent in numerous commercial and industrial products, including water purifiers, fungicides, wood and touch surfaces. The widespread popularity of copper nanomaterials in consumer products increases the r...

  5. The safety of copper sulfate to channel catfish eggs

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Copper sulfate (CuSO4) is an economical treatment to control fungus (Saprolegnia spp.) on channel catfish eggs and is widely used by the industry. The purpose of this study was to determine the safety of copper sulfate to channel catfish eggs when treated at the therapeutic rate (10 mg/L), and also...

  6. Indium foil with beryllia washer improves transistor heat dissipation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hilliard, J.; John, J. E. A.

    1964-01-01

    Indium foil, used as an interface material in transistor mountings, greatly reduces the thermal resistance of beryllia washers. This method improves the heat dissipation of power transistors in a vacuum environment.

  7. Clinical imaging with indium-111 leukocytes: uptake in bowel infarction

    SciTech Connect

    Gray, H.W.; Cuthbert, I.; Richards, J.R.

    1981-08-01

    Leukocytes labeled with indium-111 accumulated in an area of small-bowel infarction, mimicking a paracolic abscess. Evidence of subacute bowel obstruction should alert the nuclear medicine physician to the former possibility.

  8. Doping of indium phosphide with group IV elements

    SciTech Connect

    Zakharenkov, L.F.; Samorukov, B.E.; Zykov, A.M.

    1985-06-01

    This paper studies the doping of single crystals of indium phosphide (InP) with group IV elements using data obtained by measuring the total charge concentration of additives and carriers. Single crystals of indium phosphide were grown by the Czochralski method from liquid melts with a liquid hermetic seal in quartz cubicles. The total impurity concentration was determined by atomic-absorption analysis with + or - 10% error. In order to explain the behavior of germanium and tin in indium phosphide, the authors consider the bond energies of additives in indium phosphide and their tetrahedral radii. The authors conclude that the established higher amphoteric character of germanium with respect to tin is probably explained by the moduli of elasticity of the doped crystal.

  9. Low temperature solder process to join a copper tube to a silicon wafer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Versteeg, Christo; Scarpim de Souza, Marcio

    2014-06-01

    With the application for wafer level packages, which could be Complementary Metal-Oxide-Semiconductor (CMOS) based, and which requires a reduced atmosphere, a copper tube connection to a vacuum pump and the package is proposed. The method evaluated uses laser assisted brazing of a solder, to join the copper tube to a silicon wafer. The method was applied to a silicon wafer coated with a metallic interface to bond to the solder. The hermeticity of the joint was tested with a helium leak rate tester and the bonding energy thermal extent was verified with a thin layer of indium that melted wherever the substrate temperature rose above its melting temperature.

  10. Determination of indium in standard rocks by neutron activation analysis.

    PubMed

    Johansen, O; Steinnes, E

    1966-08-01

    A rapid neutron activation method for the determination of indium in rocks, based on 54 min (116m)In, is described. The method has been applied to a series of geochemical standards including granite G-1 and diabase W-1. The precision is better than +/- 5% for samples containing more than 5 x 10(-10)g indium. Good agreement with previously published values for G-1 and W-1 has been obtained. PMID:18959988

  11. Status of indium phosphide solar cell development at Spire

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Spitzer, M. B.; Keavney, C. J.; Vernon, S. M.

    1987-01-01

    On-going development of indium phosphide solar cells for space applications is presented. The development is being carried out with a view towards both high conversion efficiency and simplicity of manufacture. The cell designs comprise the ion-implanted cell, the indium tin oxide top contact cell, and the epitaxial cell grown by metal organic chemical vapor deposition. Modelling data on the limit to the efficiency are presented and comparison is made to measured performance data.

  12. Development of indium bumping technology through AZ9260 resist electroplating

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Qiuping; Xu, Gaowei; Yuan, Yuan; Cheng, Xiao; Luo, Le

    2010-05-01

    Indium bumping is very critical technology in the application of high-density interconnection between a FPA (focal plane array) and a Si ROIC (read-out integrated circuit) by flip-chip bonding. In this paper, the indium BGA (ball grid array) chips are prepared with an electroplating method on the Si substrate. With such a method, the first difficulty arises in removing the seed layer. Two ways, including IBE (ion beam etching) and lift-off, are adopted to overcome it. The results show that the lift-off process is effective but not IBE. During the reflow process, many indium bumps fall off the substrate. Two ways are tried to solve this problem: one is to optimize the reflow profile and the other is to thicken the wetting layer. The results show that these two ways can effectively improve such status. The barrier effects of the UBM (under bump metallization) for indium, which are Ti/Pt (300 Å/200 Å) and Ti/Pt/Au/Ep Au (300 Å/200 Å/1000 Å/4 µm), are also investigated. Experimental results indicate that both of them can be used in application of integration of the FPA and ROIC. Reliability of indium bumps with these two kinds of UBM is evaluated by the shear test. The results show that their shear strength has a significant increase after reflow. For the indium bump with UBM of Ti/Pt/Au/Ep Au (300 Å/200 Å/1000 Å/4 µm), IMC (intermetallic compounds) at the interface of Au-In can strengthen the indium bump but may change the plasticity of indium.

  13. Analysis of the production of ATLAS indium bonded pixel modules

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alimonti, G.; Andreazza, A.; Bulgheroni, A.; Corda, G.; Di Gioia, S.; Fiorello, A.; Gemme, C.; Koziel, M.; Manca, F.; Meroni, C.; Nechaeva, P.; Paoloni, A.; Rossi, L.; Rovani, A.; Ruscino, E.

    2006-09-01

    The ATLAS collaboration is currently building 1500 pixel modules using the indium bump bonding technique developed by SELEX Sistemi Integrati (former AMS). The indium deposition and flip-chip process are described together with an overview of the chip stripping machine that allows defective modules to be reworked. The production is half-way through at the time of this writing. This paper also discusses the problems encountered during production and the adopted solutions.

  14. Recovery of indium from LCD screens of discarded cell phones.

    PubMed

    Silveira, A V M; Fuchs, M S; Pinheiro, D K; Tanabe, E H; Bertuol, D A

    2015-11-01

    Advances in technological development have resulted in high consumption of electrical and electronic equipment (EEE), amongst which are cell phones, which have LCD (liquid crystal display) screens as one of their main components. These multilayer screens are composed of different materials, some with high added value, as in the case of the indium present in the form of indium tin oxide (ITO, or tin-doped indium oxide). Indium is a precious metal with relatively limited natural reserves (Dodbida et al., 2012), so it can be profitable to recover it from discarded LCD screens. The objective of this study was to develop a complete process for recovering indium from LCD screens. Firstly, the screens were manually removed from cell phones. In the next step, a pretreatment was developed for removal of the polarizing film from the glass of the LCD panels, because the adherence of this film to the glass complicated the comminution process. The choice of mill was based on tests using different equipment (knife mill, hammer mill, and ball mill) to disintegrate the LCD screens, either before or after removal of the polarizing film. In the leaching process, it was possible to extract 96.4 wt.% of the indium under the following conditions: 1.0M H2SO4, 1:50 solid/liquid ratio, 90°C, 1h, and stirring at 500 rpm. The results showed that the best experimental conditions enabled extraction of 613 mg of indium/kg of LCD powder. Finally, precipitation of the indium with NH4OH was tested at different pH values, and 99.8 wt.% precipitation was achieved at pH 7.4. PMID:25922168

  15. Copper in diet

    MedlinePlus

    ... please enable JavaScript. Copper is an essential trace mineral present in all body tissues. Function Copper works ... nih.gov/pubmed/25057538 . Mason JB. Vitamins, trace minerals, and other micronutrients. In: Goldman L, Schafer AI, ...

  16. Copper-tantalum alloy

    DOEpatents

    Schmidt, Frederick A.; Verhoeven, John D.; Gibson, Edwin D.

    1986-07-15

    A tantalum-copper alloy can be made by preparing a consumable electrode consisting of an elongated copper billet containing at least two spaced apart tantalum rods extending longitudinally the length of the billet. The electrode is placed in a dc arc furnace and melted under conditions which co-melt the copper and tantalum to form the alloy.

  17. Demystifying Controlling Copper Corrosion

    EPA Science Inventory

    The LCR systematically misses the highest health and corrosion risk sites for copper. Additionally, there are growing concerns for WWTP copper in sludges and discharge levels. There are many corrosion control differences between copper and lead. This talk explains the sometimes c...

  18. On copper peroxide

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Moser, L.

    1988-01-01

    The action of hydrogen superoxide on copper salts in alcoholic solutions is studied. The action of hydrogen peroxide on copper hydroxide in alcoholic suspensions, and the action of ethereal hydrogen peroxide on copper hydroxide are discussed. It is concluded that using the procedure proposed excludes almost entirely the harmful effect of hydrolysis.

  19. Highly Stable Transparent Electrodes Made from Copper Nanotrough Coated with AZO/Al2O3.

    PubMed

    Li, Peng; Yan, Xingzhen; Ma, Jiangang; Xu, Haiyang; Liu, Yichun

    2016-04-01

    Due to their high flexibility, high conductivity and high transparency in a wide spectrum range, metal nanowires and meshes are considered to be two of the most promising candidates to replace the traditional transparent conducting films, such as tin doped indium oxide. In this paper, transparent conducting films made from copper nanotroughs are prepared by the electrospinning of polymer fibers and subsequent thermal evaporation of copper. The advantages of the technique include low junction resistance, low cost and low preparation temperature. Although the copper nanotrough transparent conducting films exhibited a low sheet resistance (19.2 Ω/sq), with a high transmittance (88% at 550 nm), the instability of copper in harsh environments seriously hinders its applications. In order to improve the stability of the metal transparent conducting films, copper nanotroughs were coated with 39 nm thick aluminum-doped zinc oxide and 1 nm thick aluminum oxide films by atomic layer deposition. The optical and electrical measurements show that coating copper nanotrough with oxides barely reduces the transparency of the films. It is worth noting that conductive oxide coating can effectively protect copper nanotroughs from thermal oxidation or acidic corrosion, whilst maintaining the same flexibility as copper nanotroughs on its own. PMID:27451715

  20. A Simulator for Copper Ore Leaching

    SciTech Connect

    Travis, B.

    1999-05-14

    This is the final report of a one-year, Laboratory Directed Research and Development (LDRD) project at Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL). Copper is a strategic metal and the nation needs a secure supply both for industrial use and military needs. However, demand is growing worldwide and is outstripping the ability of the mining industry to keep up. Improved recovery methods are critically needed to maintain the balance of supply and demand. The goal of any process design should be to increase the amount of copper recovered, control movement of acid and other environmentally harmful chemicals, and reduce energy requirements. To achieve these ends, several improvements in current technology are required, the most important of which is a better understanding of, and the ability to quantify, how fluids move through heterogeneous materials in a complex chemical environment. The goal of this project is create a new modeling capability that couples hydrology with copper leaching chemistry . once the model has been verified and validated, we can apply the model to specific problems associated with heap leaching (flow channeling due to non-uniformities in heap structure, precipitation/dissolution reactions, and bacterial action), to understand the causes of inefficiencies, and to design better recovery systems. We also intend to work with representatives of the copper mining industry to write a coordinated plan for further model development and application that will provide economic benefits to the industry and the nation.

  1. Fabrication challenges for indium phosphide microsystems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Siwak, N. P.; Fan, X. Z.; Ghodssi, R.

    2015-04-01

    From the inception of III-V microsystems, monolithically integrated device designs have been the motivating drive for this field, bringing together the utility of single-chip microsystems and conventional fabrication techniques. Indium phosphide (InP) has a particular advantage of having a direct bandgap within the low loss telecommunication wavelength (1550 nm) range, able to support passive waveguiding and optical amplification, detection, and generation depending on the exact alloy of In, P, As, Ga, or Al materials. Utilizing epitaxy, one can envision the growth of a substrate that contains all of the components needed to establish a single-chip optical microsystem, containing detectors, sources, waveguides, and mechanical structures. A monolithic InP MEMS system has, to our knowledge, yet to be realized due to the significant difficulties encountered when fabricating the integrated devices. In this paper we present our own research and consolidate findings from other research groups across the world to give deeper insight into the practical aspects of InP monolithic microsystem development: epitaxial growth of InP-based alloys, etching techniques, common MEMS structures realized in InP, and future applications. We pay special attention to shedding light on considerations that must be taken when designing and fabricating a monolithic InP MEMS device.

  2. Thermal contact resistance across a copper-silicon interface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khounsary, Ali M.; Chojnowski, David; Assoufid, Lahsen; Worek, William M.

    1997-12-01

    An experimental setup to measure the thermal contact conductance across a silicon-copper (Si-Cu) interface is described, and the results obtained are presented. The resulting thermal contact resistance data are used in estimating the thermo-mechanical and optical performance of optical substrates cooled by interfaced copper cooling blocks. Several factors influence the heat transfer across solid interfaces. These include the material properties, interface pressure, flatness and roughness of the contacting surfaces, temperature, and interstitial material, if any. Results presented show the variation of thermal contact conductance as a function of applied interface pressure for a Cu-Si interface. Various interstitial materials investigated include indium foil, silver foil and a liquid eutectic (Ga-In-Sn). As expected, thermal contact resistance decreases as interface pressure increases, except in the case of the eutectic, in which it was nearly constant. The softer the interstitial material, the lower the thermal contact resistance. Liquid metal provides the lowest thermal contact resistance across the Cu-Si interface, followed by the indium foil, and then the silver foil.

  3. Independent Composition and Size Control for Highly Luminescent Indium-Rich Silver Indium Selenide Nanocrystals.

    PubMed

    Yarema, Olesya; Yarema, Maksym; Bozyigit, Deniz; Lin, Weyde M M; Wood, Vanessa

    2015-11-24

    Ternary I-III-VI nanocrystals, such as silver indium selenide (AISe), are candidates to replace cadmium- and lead-based chalcogenide nanocrystals as efficient emitters in the visible and near IR, but, due to challenges in controlling the reactivities of the group I and III cations during synthesis, full compositional and size-dependent behavior of I-III-VI nanocrystals is not yet explored. We report an amide-promoted synthesis of AISe nanocrystals that enables independent control over nanocrystal size and composition. By systematically varying reaction time, amide concentration, and Ag- and In-precursor concentrations, we develop a predictive model for the synthesis and show that AISe sizes can be tuned from 2.4 to 6.8 nm across a broad range of indium-rich compositions from AgIn11Se17 to AgInSe2. We perform structural and optical characterization for representative AISe compositions (Ag0.85In1.05Se2, Ag3In5Se9, AgIn3Se5, and AgIn11Se17) and relate the peaks in quantum yield to stoichiometries exhibiting defect ordering in the bulk. We optimize luminescence properties to achieve a record quantum yield of 73%. Finally, time-resolved photoluminescence measurements enable us to better understand the physics of donor-acceptor emission and the role of structure and composition in luminescence. PMID:26370776

  4. Cobalt distribution during copper matte smelting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kho, T. S.; Swinbourne, D. R.; Lehner, T.

    2006-04-01

    Many smelter operators subscribe to the “precautionary principle” and wish to understand the behavior of the metals and impurities during smelting, especially how they distribute between product and waste phases and whether these phases lead to environmental, health, or safety issues. In copper smelting, copper and other elements are partitioned between copper matte, iron silicate slag, and possibly the waste gas. Many copper concentrates contain small amounts of cobalt, a metal of considerable value but also of some environmental interest. In this work, the matte/slag distribution ratio (weight percent) of cobalt between copper matte (55 wt pct) and iron silicate slag was thermodynamically modeled and predicted to be approximately 5. Experiments were performed using synthetic matte and slag at 1250 °C under a low oxygen partial pressure and the distribution ratio was found to be 4.3, while between industrial matte and slag, the ratio was found to be 1.8. Both values are acceptably close to each other and to the predicted value, given the errors inherent in such measurements. The implications of these results for increasingly sustainable copper production are discussed.

  5. Indium-granulocyte scanning in the painful prosthetic joint

    SciTech Connect

    Pring, D.J.; Henderson, R.G.; Keshavarzian, A.; Rivett, A.G.; Krausz, T.; Coombs, R.R.; Lavender, J.P.

    1986-07-01

    The value of indium-111-labeled granulocyte scanning to determine the presence of infection was assessed in 50 prosthetic joints (41 of which were painful) in 40 patients. Granulocytes were obtained from the patients' blood and labeled in plasma with indium 111 tropolonate. Abnormal accumulation of indium 111 in the region of the prosthesis was noted. Proven infection occurred in 11 prostheses, and all of the infections were detected by indium-111-labeled granulocyte scanning. Nineteen were not infected (including nine asymptomatic controls) and only two produced false-positive scans. This represents a specificity of 89.5%, sensitivity of 100%, and overall accuracy of 93.2%. These results compare favorably with plain radiography. There was no radiologic evidence of infection in three of the infected prostheses, and 10 of the noninfected prostheses had some radiologic features that suggested sepsis. We conclude that indium-granulocyte scanning can reliably detect or exclude infection in painful prosthetic joints and should prove useful in clinical management.

  6. Highly Conducting Transparent Indium-Doped Zinc Oxide Thin Films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Singh, Budhi; Ghosh, Subhasis

    2014-09-01

    Highly conducting transparent indium-doped zinc oxide (IZO) thin films have been achieved by controlling different growth parameters using radio frequency magnetron sputtering. The structural, electrical, and optical properties of the IZO thin films have been investigated for varied indium content and growth temperature ( T G) in order to find out the optimum level of doping to achieve the highest conducting transparent IZO thin films. The highest mobility and carrier concentration of 11.5 cm2/V-s and 3.26 × 1020 cm-3, respectively, have been achieved in IZO doped with 2% indium. It has been shown that as T G of the 2% IZO thin films increase, more and more indium atoms are substituted into Zn sites leading to shift in (002) peaks towards higher angles which correspond to releasing the stress within the IZO thin film. The minimum resistivity of 5.3 × 10-4 Ω-cm has been achieved in 2% indium-doped IZO grown at 700°C.

  7. Method for forming indium oxide/n-silicon heterojunction solar cells

    DOEpatents

    Feng, Tom; Ghosh, Amal K.

    1984-03-13

    A high photo-conversion efficiency indium oxide/n-silicon heterojunction solar cell is spray deposited from a solution containing indium trichloride. The solar cell exhibits an Air Mass One solar conversion efficiency in excess of about 10%.

  8. Characteristics and antimicrobial activity of copper-based materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Bowen

    In this study, copper vermiculite was synthesized, and the characteristics, antimicrobial effects, and chemical stability of copper vermiculite were investigated. Two types of copper vermiculite materials, micron-sized copper vermiculite (MCV) and exfoliated copper vermiculite (MECV), are selected for this research. Since most of the functional fillers used in industry products, such as plastics, paints, rubbers, papers, and textiles prefer micron-scaled particles, micron-sized copper vermiculite was prepared by jet-milling vermiculite. Meanwhile, since the exfoliated vermiculite has very unique properties, such as high porosity, specific surface area, high aspect ratio of laminates, and low density, and has been extensively utilized as a functional additives, exfoliated copper vermiculite also was synthesized and investigated. The antibacterial efficiency of copper vermiculite was qualitatively evaluated by the diffusion methods (both liquid diffusion and solid diffusion) against the most common pathogenic species: Escherichia coli (E. coli), Staphylococcus aureus (S. aureus), and Klebsiella pneumoniae (K. pneumoniae). The result showed that the release velocity of copper from copper vermiculite is very slow. However, copper vermiculite clearly has excellent antibacterial efficiency to S. aureus, K. pneumoniae and E. coli. The strongest antibacterial ability of copper vermiculite is its action on S. aureus. The antibacterial efficiency of copper vermiculite was also quantitatively evaluated by determining the reduction rate (death rate) of E. coli versus various levels of copper vermiculite. 10 ppm of copper vermiculite in solution is sufficient to reduce the cell population of E. coli, while the untreated vermiculite had no antibacterial activity. The slow release of copper revealed that the antimicrobial effect of copper vermiculite was due to the strong interactions between copper ions and bacteria cells. Exfoliated copper vermiculite has even stronger

  9. Indium-111-Photofrin-II scintillation scan

    SciTech Connect

    Origitano, T.C.; Karesh, S.M.; Reichman, O.H.; Henkin, R.E.; Caron, M.J.

    1989-04-01

    Photodynamic therapy is under intense investigation as an adjuvant treatment for malignant glial tumors of the central nervous system. Photofrin-II (HpD-II) is currently the most actively investigated photosensitizing agent. A crucial issue regarding the safe and efficacious usage of HpD-II-based photodynamic therapy is the individual in vivo kinetics of tumor uptake and retention, compared with normal brain clearance. The optimal time for photoactivation of sensitized tumor must be known to ensure a high target-to-nontarget ratio, resulting in the maximal tumor destruction while preserving normal brain. Our laboratory developed a radionuclide scan based on 111indium (111In)-labeled HpD-II to evaluate HpD-II localization and clearance noninvasively within a canine model of intracerebral gliosarcoma. Synthesis of the 111In-HpD-II complex in greater than 90% yield is achieved by a simple, rapid labeling method. Radiochemical purity and stability were verified by high-performance liquid chromatography. Using the canine model of intracerebral gliosarcoma, we followed the uptake of 111In-HpD-II in tumors with serial scintillation scanning. Localization of the tumor by 111In-HpD-II has been verified by contrast-enhanced computed tomographic scan followed by gross and histological examination of the enhancing brain region. Total body biodistribution of 111In-HpD-II at various times after injection has been evaluated. The ratio of uptake in tumor compared with surrounding brain peaked at 72 hours after injection. The knowledge of regional distribution and concentration of a photosensitizing agent within a tumor mass and surrounding brain allows for the most efficacious timing and localization of a photoactivating source.

  10. Copper Tolerance and Biosorption of Saccharomyces cerevisiae during Alcoholic Fermentation

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Ling-ling; Jia, Bo; Zhao, Fang; Huang, Wei-dong; Zhan, Ji-cheng

    2015-01-01

    At high levels, copper in grape mash can inhibit yeast activity and cause stuck fermentations. Wine yeast has limited tolerance of copper and can reduce copper levels in wine during fermentation. This study aimed to understand copper tolerance of wine yeast and establish the mechanism by which yeast decreases copper in the must during fermentation. Three strains of Saccharomyces cerevisiae (lab selected strain BH8 and industrial strains AWRI R2 and Freddo) and a simple model fermentation system containing 0 to 1.50 mM Cu2+ were used. ICP-AES determined Cu ion concentration in the must decreasing differently by strains and initial copper levels during fermentation. Fermentation performance was heavily inhibited under copper stress, paralleled a decrease in viable cell numbers. Strain BH8 showed higher copper-tolerance than strain AWRI R2 and higher adsorption than Freddo. Yeast cell surface depression and intracellular structure deformation after copper treatment were observed by scanning electron microscopy and transmission electron microscopy; electronic differential system detected higher surface Cu and no intracellular Cu on 1.50 mM copper treated yeast cells. It is most probably that surface adsorption dominated the biosorption process of Cu2+ for strain BH8, with saturation being accomplished in 24 h. This study demonstrated that Saccharomyces cerevisiae strain BH8 has good tolerance and adsorption of Cu, and reduces Cu2+ concentrations during fermentation in simple model system mainly through surface adsorption. The results indicate that the strain selected from China’s stress-tolerant wine grape is copper tolerant and can reduce copper in must when fermenting in a copper rich simple model system, and provided information for studies on mechanisms of heavy metal stress. PMID:26030864

  11. Materials flow of indium in the United States in 2008 and 2009

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Goonan, Thomas G.

    2012-01-01

    Indium is a material that has many applications. It is used by anyone who watches television or views a computer screen. It is found in solar energy arrays and in soldering applications that are required to be lead free. In 2009, about 550 metric tons (t) of indium metal was produced from primary sources world-wide; it was estimated that the United States consumed about 110 t of indium metal (20 percent of world primary production). However, when imports of consumer products that contain indium are considered, the United States consumed about 200 t of indium (36 percent of world primary production). When one considers the recovery from the low-efficiency sputtering process that coats indium-tin oxide onto glass and other surfaces, the recycling rate (within the manufacturing process that uses indium-tin oxide in flat panel displays approaches 36 percent. However, indium recovery from old scrap generated from end-of-life consumer products is not sufficiently economic to add significantly to secondary production. Between 1988 and 2010, indium prices averaged $381 per kilogram (in constant 2000 dollars). However, prices have been quite volatile (deviating from the average of $381 per kilogram by ±$199 per kilogram, a 52 percent difference from the average), reflecting short-term disequilibrium of supply and demand but also responsiveness of supply to demand. The dynamics of zinc smelting govern the primary supply of indium because indium is a byproduct of zinc smelting. Secondary indium supply, which accounts for about one-half of total indium supply, is governed by indium prices and technological advances in recovery. Indium demand is expected to grow because the number and volume of cutting edge technology applications that depend on indium are expected to grow.

  12. Synthesis and conductivity of indium-doped tin pyrophosphates

    SciTech Connect

    Garzon, Fernando H; Mukundan, Rangachary; Brosha, Eric L

    2008-01-01

    We have synthesized indium-doped tin pyrophosphates as high-temperature anhydrous proton conductors. The ratio of tin to indium was varied using two different synthetic methods. The first is a high-temperature reaction in which a paste containing the reactants in excess phosphoric acid was heated for various amounts of time at various temperatures. The second method is a solution precipitation procedure followed by calcination, which offers several advantages over traditional synthetic techniques. These advantages inc 1 ude better stoichiometric control, lower temperature requirements, and chemically uniform products. Several phosphate sources were investigated, including phosphoric acid, pyrophosphoric acid, and potassium pyrophosphate. The resulting indium-doped tin pyrophosphates had good proton conductivity over a wide temperature range with no humidification.

  13. Indium oxide inverse opal films synthesized by structure replication method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Amrehn, Sabrina; Berghoff, Daniel; Nikitin, Andreas; Reichelt, Matthias; Wu, Xia; Meier, Torsten; Wagner, Thorsten

    2016-04-01

    We present the synthesis of indium oxide (In2O3) inverse opal films with photonic stop bands in the visible range by a structure replication method. Artificial opal films made of poly(methyl methacrylate) (PMMA) spheres are utilized as template. The opal films are deposited via sedimentation facilitated by ultrasonication, and then impregnated by indium nitrate solution, which is thermally converted to In2O3 after drying. The quality of the resulting inverse opal film depends on many parameters; in this study the water content of the indium nitrate/PMMA composite after drying is investigated. Comparison of the reflectance spectra recorded by vis-spectroscopy with simulated data shows a good agreement between the peak position and calculated stop band positions for the inverse opals. This synthesis is less complex and highly efficient compared to most other techniques and is suitable for use in many applications.

  14. Mobility of indium on the ZnO(0001) surface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heinhold, R.; Reeves, R. J.; Williams, G. T.; Evans, D. A.; Allen, M. W.

    2015-02-01

    The mobility of indium on the Zn-polar (0001) surface of single crystal ZnO wafers was investigated using real-time x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy. A sudden transition in the wettability of the ZnO(0001) surface was observed at ˜520 °C, with indium migrating from the ( 000 1 ¯ ) underside of the wafer, around the non-polar ( 1 1 ¯ 00 ) and ( 11 2 ¯ 0 ) sidewalls, to form a uniform self-organized (˜20 Å) adlayer. The In adlayer was oxidized, in agreement with the first principles calculations of Northrup and Neugebauer that In2O3 precipitation can only be avoided under a combination of In-rich and Zn-rich conditions. These findings suggest that unintentional In adlayers may form during the epitaxial growth of ZnO on indium-bonded substrates.

  15. Mobility of indium on the ZnO(0001) surface

    SciTech Connect

    Heinhold, R.; Reeves, R. J.; Allen, M. W.; Williams, G. T.; Evans, D. A.

    2015-02-02

    The mobility of indium on the Zn-polar (0001) surface of single crystal ZnO wafers was investigated using real-time x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy. A sudden transition in the wettability of the ZnO(0001) surface was observed at ∼520 °C, with indium migrating from the (0001{sup ¯}) underside of the wafer, around the non-polar (11{sup ¯}00) and (112{sup ¯}0) sidewalls, to form a uniform self-organized (∼20 Å) adlayer. The In adlayer was oxidized, in agreement with the first principles calculations of Northrup and Neugebauer that In{sub 2}O{sub 3} precipitation can only be avoided under a combination of In-rich and Zn-rich conditions. These findings suggest that unintentional In adlayers may form during the epitaxial growth of ZnO on indium-bonded substrates.

  16. Copper Wire Bonding Concerns and Best Practices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chauhan, Preeti; Zhong, Z. W.; Pecht, Michael

    2013-08-01

    Copper wire bonding of microelectronic parts has developed as a means to cut the costs of using the more mature technology of gold wire bonding. However, with this new technology, changes in the bonding processes as well as bonding metallurgy can affect product reliability. This paper discusses the challenges associated with copper wire bonding and the solutions that the industry has been implementing. The paper also provides information to enable customers to conduct qualification and reliability tests on microelectronic packages to facilitate adoption in their target applications.

  17. Mineral resource of the month: copper

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    U.S. Geological Survey

    2011-01-01

    The article provides information on copper and its various uses. It was the first metal used by humans and is considered as one of the materials that played an important role in the development of civilization. It is a major industrial metal because of its low cost, availability, electrical conductivity, high ductility and thermal conductivity. Copper has long been used in the circuitry of electronics and the distribution of electricity and is now being used in silicon-based computer chips, solar and wind power generation, and coinage.

  18. Contact heat conductance at a diamond-OFHC copper interface with GaIn eutectic as a heat transfer medium

    SciTech Connect

    Assoufid, L.; Khounsary, A.

    1996-09-01

    The results of an experimental study of the contact heat conductance across a single diamond crystal interface with OFHC copper (Cu) are reported. Gallium-indium (GaIn) eutectic was used as an interstitial material. Contact conductance data are important in the design and the prediction of the performance of x-ray optics under high-heat-load conditions. Two sets of experiments were carried out. In one, the copper surface in contact with diamond was polished and then electroless plated with 1 {mu}m of nickel, while in the other, the copper contact surface was left as machined. The measured average interface heat conductances are 44.7{plus_minus}8 W/cm{sup 2}-K for nonplated copper and 23.0{plus_minus}8 W/cm{sup 2}-K for nickel-plated copper. For reference, the thermal contact conductances at a copper-copper interface (without diamond) were also measured, and the results are reported. A typical diamond monochromator, 0.2 mm thick, will absorb about 44 W under a standard undulator beam at the Advanced Photon Source. The measured conductance for nickel-plated copper suggests that the temperature drop across the interface of diamond and nickel-plated copper, with a 20 mm {sup 2}contact area, will be about 10{degree}C. Therefore temperature rises are rather modest, and the accuracy of the measured contact conductances presented here are sufficient for design purposes. {copyright} {ital 1996 American Institute of Physics.}

  19. Contact heat conductance at a diamond-OFHC copper interface with GaIn eutectic as a heat transfer medium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Assoufid, L.; Khounsary, A. M.

    1996-09-01

    The results of an experimental study of the contact heat conductance across a single diamond crystal interface with OFHC copper (Cu) are reported. Gallium-indium (GaIn) eutectic was used as an interstitial material. Contact conductance data are important in the design and the prediction of the performance of x-ray optics under high-heat-load conditions. Two sets of experiments were carried out. In one, the copper surface in contact with diamond was polished and then electroless plated with 1 μm of nickel, while in the other, the copper contact surface was left as machined. The measured average interface heat conductances are 44.7±8 W/cm2-K for nonplated copper and 23.0±8 W/cm2-K for nickel-plated copper. For reference, the thermal contact conductances at a copper-copper interface (without diamond) were also measured, and the results are reported. A typical diamond monochromator, 0.2 mm thick, will absorb about 44 W under a standard undulator beam at the Advanced Photon Source. The measured conductance for nickel-plated copper suggests that the temperature drop across the interface of diamond and nickel-plated copper, with a 20 mm 2 contact area, will be about 10°C. Therefore temperature rises are rather modest, and the accuracy of the measured contact conductances presented here are sufficient for design purposes.

  20. United States copper metal and scrap use and trade patterns, 1995‒2014

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Goonan, Thomas G.

    2016-01-01

    This report considers changes to the copper and copper scrap industries of the United States. For the study period, 1995 through 2014, U.S. refined copper production from all sources (primary and secondary materials) decreased from 2.28 million metric tons (Mt) of copper to 1.05 Mt (a 54 percent decrease). During the same period, U.S. copper scrap net exports increased from 0.203 Mt to 0.737 Mt (a 263 percent increase and a compound annual growth rate of about 7.0 percent per year). Copper and copper scrap prices (in constant 2014 dollars) rose such that 2014 prices were about 48 percent greater than 1995 prices. From 1995 through 2014, Chinese imports of copper scrap from the United States grew from 0.061 Mt to 0.569 Mt (an increase of about 830 percent and a compound annual growth rate of about 12.5 percent per year). In 2011, Chinese imports of U.S. copper scrap peaked at 0.745 Mt of contained copper. In 1995, Chinese imports of U.S. copper scrap accounted for 17 percent of U.S. copper scrap exports. By 2014, Chinese imports accounted for 69 percent of U.S. copper scrap exports (by weight), and Chinese imports of U.S. copper scrap were valued at $1.45 billion.

  1. Diffusion parameters of indium for silicon process modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kizilyalli, I. C.; Rich, T. L.; Stevie, F. A.; Rafferty, C. S.

    1996-11-01

    The diffusion parameters of indium in silicon are investigated. Systematic diffusion experiments in dry oxidizing ambients at temperatures ranging from 800 to 1050 °C are conducted using silicon wafers implanted with indium. Secondary-ion-mass spectrometry (SIMS) is used to analyze the dopant distribution before and after heat treatment. The oxidation-enhanced diffusion parameter [R. B. Fair, in Semiconductor Materials and Process Technology Handbook, edited by G. E. McGuire (Noyes, Park Ridge, NJ, 1988); A. M. R. Lin, D. A. Antoniadis, and R. W. Dutton, J. Electrochem. Soc. Solid-State Sci. Technol. 128, 1131 (1981); D. A. Antoniadis and I. Moskowitz, J. Appl. Phys. 53, 9214 (1982)] and the segregation coefficient at the Si/SiO2 interface [R. B. Fair and J. C. C. Tsai, J. Electrochem. Soc. Solid-State Sci. Technol. 125, 2050 (1978)] (ratio of indium concentration in silicon to that in silicon dioxide) are extracted as a function of temperature using SIMS depth profiles and the silicon process simulator PROPHET [M. Pinto, D. M. Boulin, C. S. Rafferty, R. K. Smith, W. M. Coughran, I. C. Kizilyalli, and M. J. Thoma, in IEDM Technical Digest, 1992, p. 923]. It is observed that the segregation coefficient of indium at the Si/SiO2 interface is mIn≪1, similar to boron; however, unlike boron, the segregation coefficient of indium at the Si/SiO2 interface decreases with increasing temperature. Extraction results are summarized in analytical forms suitable for incorporation into other silicon process simulators. Finally, the validity of the extracted parameters is verified by comparing the simulated and measured SIMS profiles for an indium implanted buried-channel p-channel metal-oxide-semiconductor field-effect-transistor [I. C. Kizilyalli, F. A. Stevie, and J. D. Bude, IEEE Electron Device Lett. (1996)] process that involves a gate oxidation and various other thermal processes.

  2. Equation of state of liquid Indium under high pressure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Huaming; Sun, Yongli; Li, Mo

    2015-09-01

    We apply an equation of state of a power law form to liquid Indium to study its thermodynamic properties under high temperature and high pressure. Molar volume of molten indium is calculated along the isothermal line at 710K within good precision as compared with the experimental data in an externally heated diamond anvil cell. Bulk modulus, thermal expansion and internal pressure are obtained for isothermal compression. Other thermodynamic properties are also calculated along the fitted high pressure melting line. While our results suggest that the power law form may be a better choice for the equation of state of liquids, these detailed predictions are yet to be confirmed by further experiment.

  3. Transition properties of low-lying states in atomic indium

    SciTech Connect

    Sahoo, B. K.; Das, B. P.

    2011-07-15

    We present here the results of our relativistic many-body calculations of various properties of the first six low-lying excited states of indium. The calculations were performed using the relativistic coupled-cluster method in the framework of the singles, doubles, and partial triples approximation. The lifetime of the [4p{sup 6}]5s{sup 2}5p{sub 3/2} state in this atom is determined. Our results could be used to shed light on the reliability of the lifetime measurements of the excited states of atomic indium that we have considered in the present work.

  4. Equation of state of liquid Indium under high pressure

    SciTech Connect

    Li, Huaming E-mail: mo.li@gatech.edu; Li, Mo E-mail: mo.li@gatech.edu; Sun, Yongli

    2015-09-15

    We apply an equation of state of a power law form to liquid Indium to study its thermodynamic properties under high temperature and high pressure. Molar volume of molten indium is calculated along the isothermal line at 710K within good precision as compared with the experimental data in an externally heated diamond anvil cell. Bulk modulus, thermal expansion and internal pressure are obtained for isothermal compression. Other thermodynamic properties are also calculated along the fitted high pressure melting line. While our results suggest that the power law form may be a better choice for the equation of state of liquids, these detailed predictions are yet to be confirmed by further experiment.

  5. Uptake of indium-111-labeled leukocytes by brain metastasis

    SciTech Connect

    Balachandran, S.; Husain, M.M.; Adametz, J.R.; Pallin, J.S.; Angtuaco, T.L.; Boyd, C.M.

    1987-04-01

    Uptake of indium-labeled leukocytes was seen in two cases of histologically proven brain metastasis. In one, this led to misdiagnosis of the lesion as an abscess. On histological evaluation, a large number of white blood cells or macrophages was seen at the neoplastic sites. Reasons for leukocyte accumulation around metastatic brain neoplasms are discussed. In contrast to the current reports that indium-labeled leukocyte scans can differentiate intracranial infection from tumor, these cases demonstrate their lack of specificity in the detection of brain abscess.

  6. Method for labelling leucocytes with indium In-111 oxine

    SciTech Connect

    Kaminsky, D.

    1992-03-03

    This patent describes an improved method for radio-labelling leucocytes with Indium In-111 oxine. It comprises separating the leucocytes from whole blood for obtaining separated leucocytes mixed with residual red blood cells; and then labelling the separated leucocytes with Indium In-111 oxine; wherein the improvement comprises the following further step: depleting residual red blood cells from the separated leucocytes by resuspending the leucocytes in an isotonic saline solution, then rocking the resuspended leucocytes for causing the leucocytes to preferentially settle out, and then removing residual red blood cells which remain suspended within the supernatant isotonic saline solution.

  7. Indium tin oxide and indium phosphide heterojunction nanowire array solar cells

    SciTech Connect

    Yoshimura, Masatoshi Nakai, Eiji; Fukui, Takashi; Tomioka, Katsuhiro

    2013-12-09

    Heterojunction solar cells were formed with a position-controlled InP nanowire array sputtered with indium tin oxide (ITO). The ITO not only acted as a transparent electrode but also as forming a photovoltaic junction. The devices exhibited an open-circuit voltage of 0.436 V, short-circuit current of 24.8 mA/cm{sup 2}, and fill factor of 0.682, giving a power conversion efficiency of 7.37% under AM1.5 G illumination. The internal quantum efficiency of the device was higher than that of the world-record InP cell in the short wavelength range.

  8. Deep Subgap Feature in Amorphous Indium Gallium Zinc Oxide. Evidence Against Reduced Indium

    SciTech Connect

    Sallis, Shawn; Quackenbush, Nicholas F.; Williams, Deborah S.; Senger, Mikell; Woicik, Joseph C.; White, Bruce E.; Piper, Louis F.

    2015-01-14

    Amorphous indium gallium zinc oxide (a-IGZO) is the archetypal transparent amorphous oxide semiconductor. In spite of the gains made with a-IGZO over amorphous silicon in the last decade, the presence of deep subgap states in a-IGZO active layers facilitate instabilities in thin film transistor properties under negative bias illumination stress. Several candidates could contribute to the formation of states within the band gap. We present evidence against In+ lone pair active electrons as the origin of the deep subgap features. No In+ species are observed, only In0 nano-crystallites under certain oxygen deficient growth conditions. Our results further support under coordinated oxygen as the source of the deep subgap states.

  9. Evaluation of critical materials for five advanced design photovoltaic cells with an assessment of indium and gallium

    SciTech Connect

    Watts, R.L.; Gurwell, W.E.; Jamieson, W.M.; Long, L.W.; Pawlewicz, W.T.; Smith, S.A.; Teeter, R.R.

    1980-05-01

    The objective of this study is to identify potential material supply constraints due to the large-scale deployment of five advanced photovoltaic (PV) cell designs, and to suggest strategies to reduce the impacts of these production capacity limitations and potential future material shortages. This report presents the results of the screening of the five following advanced PV cell designs: polycrystalline silicon, amorphous silicon, cadmium sulfide/copper sulfide frontwall, polycrystalline gallium arsenide MIS, and advanced concentrator-500X. Each of these five cells is screened individually assuming that they first come online in 1991, and that 25 GWe of peak capacity is online by the year 2000. A second computer screening assumes that each cell first comes online in 1991 and that each cell has 5 GWe of peak capacity by the year 2000, so that the total online cpacity for the five cells is 25 GWe. Based on a review of the preliminary basline screening results, suggestions were made for varying such parameters as the layer thickness, cell production processes, etc. The resulting PV cell characterizations were then screened again by the CMAP computer code. Earlier DOE sponsored work on the assessment of critical materials in PV cells conclusively identtified indium and gallium as warranting further investigation as to their availability. Therefore, this report includes a discussion of the future availability of gallium and indium. (WHK)

  10. High adherence copper plating process

    DOEpatents

    Nignardot, Henry

    1993-01-01

    A process for applying copper to a substrate of aluminum or steel by electrodeposition and for preparing an aluminum or steel substrate for electrodeposition of copper. Practice of the invention provides good adhesion of the copper layer to the substrate.