Science.gov

Sample records for inelastic thermal spike

  1. Track formation in two amorphous insulators, vitreous silica and diamond like carbon: Experimental observations and description by the inelastic thermal spike model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rotaru, C.; Pawlak, F.; Khalfaoui, N.; Dufour, C.; Perrière, J.; Laurent, A.; Stoquert, J. P.; Lebius, H.; Toulemonde, M.

    2012-02-01

    Vitreous silica thin film (a-SiO 2) and mixed deuterated and hydrogenated amorphous carbon thin film (a-C:D,H), grown or deposited, respectively, on silicon, have been irradiated at GANIL in the MeV/u energy range with ions between C and U in order to reach electronic energy loss between 0.7 and 25 keV/nm. The evolution of Si-O bonds and C-D bonds contents was determined by infrared absorption spectroscopy. Complementary physico-chemical characterization was performed for a-C:D,H using Rutherford backscattering spectrometry (RBS) and elastic recoil detection analysis (ERDA). For a-SiO 2, the band at 1076 cm -1 decreases with the appearance of a band at 1046 cm -1. In the case of the diamond like amorphous carbon, the main effects due to MeV/u ion irradiations are the decrease of sp 3 bonding content and of deuterium relative concentration (D/C atomic ratio) as a function of fluence with the appearance of the sp 1 bond. The cylinder radii in which these physical phenomena are confined can be deduced from a statistical analysis. Using the inelastic thermal spike model (i-TS) these track radii can be described using the electron-phonon mean free path which takes values equal to 3 and 0.9 nm for a-SiO 2 and a-C:D, respectively. Extrapolation to low energy range (˜1 MeV in total or ˜0.02 MeV/u) will be made.

  2. Eliminating thermal violin spikes from LIGO noise

    SciTech Connect

    Santamore, D. H.; Levin, Yuri

    2001-08-15

    We have developed a scheme for reducing LIGO suspension thermal noise close to violin-mode resonances. The idea is to monitor directly the thermally induced motion of a small portion of (a 'point' on) each suspension fiber, thereby recording the random forces driving the test-mass motion close to each violin-mode frequency. One can then suppress the thermal noise by optimally subtracting the recorded fiber motions from the measured motion of the test mass, i.e., from the LIGO output. The proposed method is a modification of an analogous but more technically difficult scheme by Braginsky, Levin and Vyatchanin for reducing broad-band suspension thermal noise. The efficiency of our method is limited by the sensitivity of the sensor used to monitor the fiber motion. If the sensor has no intrinsic noise (i.e. has unlimited sensitivity), then our method allows, in principle, a complete removal of violin spikes from the thermal-noise spectrum. We find that in LIGO-II interferometers, in order to suppress violin spikes below the shot-noise level, the intrinsic noise of the sensor must be less than {approx}2 x 10{sup -13} cm/Hz. This sensitivity is two orders of magnitude greater than that of currently available sensors.

  3. Discovering inelastic thermal relic dark matter at colliders

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Izaguirre, Eder; Krnjaic, Gordan; Shuve, Brian

    2016-03-01

    Dark Matter particles with inelastic interactions are ubiquitous in extensions of the Standard Model, yet remain challenging to fully probe with existing strategies. We propose a series of powerful searches at hadron and lepton colliders that are sensitive to inelastic dark matter dynamics. In representative models featuring either a massive dark photon or a magnetic dipole interaction, we find that the LHC and BABAR could offer strong sensitivity to the thermal relic dark matter parameter space for dark matter masses between ˜100 MeV and 100 GeV and fractional mass-splittings above the percent level; future searches at Belle II with a dedicated monophoton trigger could also offer sensitivity to thermal relic scenarios with masses below a few GeV. Thermal scenarios with either larger masses or splittings are largely ruled out; lower masses remain viable yet may be accessible with other search strategies.

  4. Simulation of collision cascades and thermal spikes in ceramics

    SciTech Connect

    Devanathan, Ramaswami; Weber, William J.

    2010-10-01

    Classical molecular dynamics simulations have been employed to examine defect production by energetic recoils in UO2, Gd2Ti2O7, Gd2Zr2O7 and ZrSiO4. These atomistic simulations provide details of the nature and size distribution of defect clusters produced in collision cascades. The accommodation of recoil damage by lower energy cation exchange and greater occupation of anion structural vacancies is a contributing factor for the greater radiation tolerance of Gd2Zr2O7 relative to Gd2Ti2O7. In addition, electronic energy loss processes in UO2 has been modeled in the form of a thermal spike to study the details of track formation and track structure. For thermal spikes with energy deposition of 4 keV/nm in UO2, a track was not formed and mainly isolated Frenkel pairs are produced.

  5. Modern Techniques for Inelastic Thermal Neutron Scattering Analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hawari, A. I.

    2014-04-01

    A predictive approach based on ab initio quantum mechanics and/or classical molecular dynamics simulations has been formulated to calculate the scattering law, S(κ⇀,ω), and the thermal neutron scattering cross sections of materials. In principle, these atomistic methods make it possible to generate the inelastic thermal neutron scattering cross sections of any material and to accurately reflect the physical conditions of the medium (i.e, temperature, pressure, etc.). In addition, the generated cross sections are free from assumptions such as the incoherent approximation of scattering theory and, in the case of solids, crystalline perfection. As a result, new and improved thermal neutron scattering data libraries have been generated for a variety of materials. Among these are materials used for reactor moderators and reflectors such as reactor-grade graphite and beryllium (including the coherent inelastic scattering component), silicon carbide, cold neutron media such as solid methane, and neutron beam filters such as sapphire and bismuth. Consequently, it is anticipated that the above approach will play a major role in providing the nuclear science and engineering community with its needs of thermal neutron scattering data especially when considering new materials where experimental information may be scarce or nonexistent.

  6. Thermal spike model of ion-induced grain growth

    SciTech Connect

    Alexander, D.E. ); Was, G.S. . Dept. of Nuclear Engineering)

    1990-11-01

    A thermal spike model has been developed to describe the phenomenon of ion irradiation-induced grain growth in metal alloy thin films. In single phase films where the driving force for grain growth is the reduction of grain boundary curvature, the model shows that ion-induced grain boundary mobility, M{sub ion}, is proportional to the quantity F{sub D}{sup 2}/{Delta}H{sub coh}{sup 3}, where F{sub D} is the deposited ion damage energy and {Delta}H{sub coh} is the cohesive energy of the element or alloy. Experimental strain growth results from ion irradiated coevaporated binary alloy films compare favorably with model predictions. 11 refs., 1 fig., 1 tab.

  7. A model of the thermal-spike mechanism in graphite/epoxy laminates

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Adamson, M. J.

    1982-01-01

    The influence of a thermal spike on a moisture-saturated graphite/epoxy composite was studied in detail. A single thermal spike from 25 C to 132 C was found to produce damage as evidenced by a significant increase in the level of moisture saturation in the composite. Approximately half of this increase remained after a vacuum anneal at 150 C for 7 days, suggesting the presence of an irreversible damage component. Subsequent thermal spikes created less and less additional moisture absorption, with the cumulative effect being a maximum or limiting moisture capacity of the composite. These observations are explained in terms of a model previously developed to explain the reverse thermal effect of moisture absorption in epoxy and epoxy matrix composites. This model, based on the inverse temperature dependence of free volume, contributes an improved understanding of thermal-spike effects in graphite/epoxy composites.

  8. Inelastic deformation and dislocation structure of a nickel alloy - Effects of deformation and thermal histories

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chan, K. S.; Page, R. A.

    1988-01-01

    Inelastic deformation behavior of the cast Ni-base alloy, B1900 + Hf, was investigated using data from step-temperature tensile tests and thermomechanical cyclic tests in the temperature ranges 538-760 C and 760-982 C. The deformation results were correlated with the dislocation structures of deformed specimens, identified by TEM. It was found that, in the 760-982 C temperature range, there are no thermal history effects in the inelastic deformation behavior of B1900 + Hf. In the 538-760 range, anomalous cyclic hardening and, possibly, thermal history effects were observed in thermomechanically deformed alloy, caused by sessile (010) dislocations in the gamma-prime phase.

  9. Experimental observations of thermal spikes in microwave processing of ceramic oxide fibers

    SciTech Connect

    Vogt, G.J.; Unruh, W.P.; Thomas, J.R. Jr.

    1994-04-01

    Microwave heating of alumina/silica fiber tows in a single-mode microwave cavity at 2.45 GHz have produced a surprising thermal spike behavior on the fiber bundles. During a thermal spike, a ``hot spot`` on the tow brightens rapidly, persists for a few seconds, and rapidly extinguishs. A hot spot can encompass the entire tow in the cavity or just a localized portion of the tow. Some local hot spots propagate along the fiber. Thermal spikes are triggered by relatively small (<15%) increases in power, thus having obvious implications for the development of practical microwave fiber processing systems. A tow can be heated through several successive thermal spikes, after which the tow is left substantially cooler than it was originally, although the applied microwave electric field is much larger. X-ray diffraction studies show that after each temperature spike there is a partial phase transformation of the tow material into mullite. After several excursions the tow has been largely transformed to the new, less lossy phase and is more difficult to heat. Heating experiments with Nextel 550 tows are examined for a pausible explanation of this microwave heating behavior.

  10. Monte Carlo Calculation of Thermal Neutron Inelastic Scattering Cross Section Uncertainties by Sampling Perturbed Phonon Spectra

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Holmes, Jesse Curtis

    Nuclear data libraries provide fundamental reaction information required by nuclear system simulation codes. The inclusion of data covariances in these libraries allows the user to assess uncertainties in system response parameters as a function of uncertainties in the nuclear data. Formats and procedures are currently established for representing covariances for various types of reaction data in ENDF libraries. This covariance data is typically generated utilizing experimental measurements and empirical models, consistent with the method of parent data production. However, ENDF File 7 thermal neutron scattering library data is, by convention, produced theoretically through fundamental scattering physics model calculations. Currently, there is no published covariance data for ENDF File 7 thermal libraries. Furthermore, no accepted methodology exists for quantifying or representing uncertainty information associated with this thermal library data. The quality of thermal neutron inelastic scattering cross section data can be of high importance in reactor analysis and criticality safety applications. These cross sections depend on the material's structure and dynamics. The double-differential scattering law, S(alpha, beta), tabulated in ENDF File 7 libraries contains this information. For crystalline solids, S(alpha, beta) is primarily a function of the material's phonon density of states (DOS). Published ENDF File 7 libraries are commonly produced by calculation and processing codes, such as the LEAPR module of NJOY, which utilize the phonon DOS as the fundamental input for inelastic scattering calculations to directly output an S(alpha, beta) matrix. To determine covariances for the S(alpha, beta) data generated by this process, information about uncertainties in the DOS is required. The phonon DOS may be viewed as a probability density function of atomic vibrational energy states that exist in a material. Probable variation in the shape of this spectrum may be

  11. Phase transformation of ZnMoO{sub 4} by localized thermal spike

    SciTech Connect

    Agarwal, D. C.; Avasthi, D. K.; Kabiraj, D.; Varma, S.; Kremer, Felipe; Ridgway, M. C.

    2014-04-28

    We show that ZnMoO{sub 4} remains in stable phase under thermal annealing up to 1000 °C, whereas it decomposes to ZnO and MoO{sub 3} under transient thermal spike induced by 100 MeV Ag irradiation. The transformation is evidenced by X-ray diffraction (XRD), Raman spectroscopy, and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS). Thin films of ZnMoO{sub 4} were synthesized by thermal evaporation and subsequent annealing in oxygen ambient at 600 °C for 4 h. XRD results show that as the irradiation fluence increases, the peak related to ZnMoO{sub 4} decreases gradually and eventually disappear, whereas peaks related to ZnO grow steadily up to fluence of 3 × 10{sup 12} ions/cm{sup 2} and thereafter remain stable till highest fluence. This indicates that polycrystalline ZnMoO{sub 4} film has transformed to polycrystalline ZnO thin film. The Raman lines related to ZnMoO{sub 4} are observed to have disappeared with increasing irradiation fluence. XPS results show modification in bonding and depletion of Mo from near surface region after the ion irradiation. Cross-sectional transmission electron microscopy result shows the formation of ion track of diameter 12–16 nm. These results demonstrate that ion beam methods provide the means to control phase splitting of ZnMoO{sub 4} to ZnO and MoO{sub 3} within nanometric dimension along the ion track. The observation of phase splitting and Mo loss are explained in the framework of ion beam induced thermal spike formalism.

  12. Thermal Manipulation of Block Copolymer Morphology by Focused Laser Spike (FLaSk) Annealing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Singer, Jonathan; Gotrik, Kevin; Kooi, Steven; Ross, Caroline; Thomas, Edwin

    2011-03-01

    Block copolymer (BCP) thin films have a high potential as a pattern transfer medium for ultra-fine (<10nm) features. We introduce a novel technique for performing rapid local annealing of BCP films by focused laser spike (FLaSk) heating using visible wavelengths. This process may be viewed as imposing a local instantaneous landscape in both block mobilities and interaction parameters corresponding to the temperature profile. By controlling the duration and intensity of the dose, either the rapid local perfection of the equilibrium microdomain morphology or the controlled incorporation of metastable architectures is possible. Moreover, the ultra-short FLaSk process can limit polymer degradation, allowing faster microdomain manipulation by enabling higher temperature anneals. Utilization of a direct write stage allows for deliberate control of arbitrary thermal patterns and subsequent BCP ordering, with line width near the diffraction limit. FLaSk can be applied to nearly any BCP system and performed with other ordering techniques. Direct write experiments were combined with thermal finite elements simulations to probe the various material and process parameters necessary to enhance control of spherical and cylindrical BCPs and address challenges such as the use of thicker films. This research was supported in part by ARO contract W911NF-07-D-0004. JS was supported by the DOD through the NDSEG Program.

  13. Thermal-spikes temperature measurement in pure metals under argon ion irradiation (E = 5-15 keV)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ovchinnikov, V. V.; Makhin'ko, F. F.; Solomonov, V. I.

    2015-11-01

    A method for determining the parameters of energy release in dense cascades of atomic displacements and for estimating the temperature and the level of pressures in thermalized cascade regions (thermal spikes) is proposed. It is based on the measurement and analysis of the spectral composition of the surface glow of condensed media in the course of irradiation with Ar+ 5-15 keV accelerated ions, under the assumption of the presence of a thermal component of glow defined by the presence of thermalized cascade regions.

  14. Some inelastic effects of thermal cycling on yttria-stabilized zirconia

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hendricks, R. C.; Mcdonald, G.; Bill, R. C.

    1982-01-01

    The effects of inelastic behavior of yttria-stabilized zirconia (YSZ) materials were analyzed. The results show these materials to be sensitive to small changes in temperature and are supported by measurements of inelastic behavior in disc and bar specimens at temperatures as low as 1010 C (1850 F). At higher thermomechanical loadings, the test specimens can deform to strains above 1 percent.

  15. Encapsulation of paclitaxel into a bio-nanocomposite. A study combining inelastic neutron scattering to thermal analysis and infrared spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martins, Murillo L.; Orecchini, Andrea; Aguilera, Luis; Eckert, Juergen; Embs, Jan; Matic, Aleksander; Saeki, Margarida J.; Bordallo, Heloisa N.

    2015-01-01

    The anticancer drug paclitaxel was encapsulated into a bio-nanocomposite formed by magnetic nanoparticles, chitosan and apatite. The aim of this drug carrier is to provide a new perspective against breast cancer. The dynamics of the pure and encapsulated drug were investigated in order to verify possible molecular changes caused by the encapsulation, as well as to follow which interactions may occur between paclitaxel and the composite. Fourier transformed infrared spectroscopy, thermal analysis, inelastic and quasi-elastic neutron scattering experiments were performed. These very preliminary results suggest the successful encapsulation of the drug.

  16. Effect of Random Thermal Spikes on Stirling Convertor Heater Head Reliability

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shah, Ashwin R.; Korovaichuk, Igor; Halford, Gary R.

    2004-01-01

    Onboard radioisotope power systems being developed to support future NASA exploration missions require reliable design lifetimes of up to 14 yr and beyond. The structurally critical heater head of the high-efficiency developmental Stirling power convertor has undergone extensive computational analysis of operating temperatures (up to 650 C), stresses, and creep resistance of the thin-walled Inconel 718 bill of material. Additionally, assessment of the effect of uncertainties in the creep behavior of the thin-walled heater head, the variation in the manufactured thickness, variation in control temperature, and variation in pressure on the durability and reliability were performed. However, it is possible for the heater head to experience rare incidences of random temperature spikes (excursions) of short duration. These incidences could occur randomly with random magnitude and duration during the desired mission life. These rare incidences could affect the creep strain rate and therefore the life. The paper accounts for these uncertainties and includes the effect of such rare incidences, random in nature, on the reliability. The sensitivities of variables affecting the reliability are quantified and guidelines developed to improve the reliability are outlined. Furthermore, the quantified reliability is being verified with test data from the accelerated benchmark tests being conducted at the NASA Glenn Research Center.

  17. Effect of Random Thermal Spikes on Stirling Convertor Heater Head Reliability

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shah, Ashwin R.; Korovaichuk, Igor; Halford, Gary R.

    2004-01-01

    Onboard radioisotope power systems being developed to support future NASA exploration missions require reliable design lifetimes of up to 14 yr and beyond. The structurally critical heater head of the high-efficiency developmental Stirling power converter has undergone extensive computational analysis of operating temperatures (up to 650 C), stresses, and creep resistance of the thin-walled Inconel 718 bill of material. Additionally assessment of the effect of uncertainties in the creep behavior of the thin-walled heater head, the variation in the manufactured thickness, variation in control temperature, and variation in pressure on the durability and reliability were performed. However, it is possible for the heater head to experience rare incidences of random temperature spikes (excursions) of short duration. These incidences could occur randomly with random magnitude and duration during the desired mission life. These rare incidences could affect the creep strain rate and therefore the life. The paper accounts for these uncertainties and includes the effect of such rare incidences, random in nature, on the reliability. The sensitivities of variables affecting the reliability are quantified and guidelines developed to improve the reliability are outlined. Furthermore, the quantified reliability is being verified with test data from the accelerated benchmark tests being conducted at the NASA Glenn Research Center.

  18. Synergy of inelastic and elastic energy loss. Temperature effects and electronic stopping power dependence

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Zarkadoula, Eva; Xue, Haizhou; Zhang, Yanwen; Weber, William J.

    2015-06-16

    A combination of an inelastic thermal spike model suitable for insulators and molecular dynamics simulations is used to study the effects of temperature and electronic energy loss on ion track formation, size and morphology in SrTiO3 systems with pre-existing disorder. We find temperature dependence of the ion track size. In addition, we find a threshold in the electronic energy loss for a given pre-existing defect concentration, which indicates a threshold in the synergy between the inelastic and elastic energy loss.

  19. Synergy of inelastic and elastic energy loss. Temperature effects and electronic stopping power dependence

    SciTech Connect

    Zarkadoula, Eva; Xue, Haizhou; Zhang, Yanwen; Weber, William J.

    2015-06-16

    A combination of an inelastic thermal spike model suitable for insulators and molecular dynamics simulations is used to study the effects of temperature and electronic energy loss on ion track formation, size and morphology in SrTiO3 systems with pre-existing disorder. We find temperature dependence of the ion track size. In addition, we find a threshold in the electronic energy loss for a given pre-existing defect concentration, which indicates a threshold in the synergy between the inelastic and elastic energy loss.

  20. Modeling non-harmonic behavior of materials from experimental inelastic neutron scattering and thermal expansion measurements

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Bansal, Dipanshu; Aref, Amjad; Dargush, Gary; Delaire, Olivier A.

    2016-07-20

    Based on thermodynamic principles, we derive expressions quantifying the non-harmonic vibrational behavior of materials, which are rigorous yet easily evaluated from experimentally available data for the thermal expansion coefficient and the phonon density of states. These experimentally-derived quantities are valuable to benchmark first-principles theoretical predictions of harmonic and non-harmonic thermal behaviors using perturbation theory, ab initio molecular-dynamics, or Monte-Carlo simulations. In this study, we illustrate this analysis by computing the harmonic, dilational, and anharmonic contributions to the entropy, internal energy, and free energy of elemental aluminum and the ordered compound FeSi over a wide range of temperature. Our results agreemore » well with previous data in the literature and provide an efficient approach to estimate anharmonic effects in materials.« less

  1. Modeling non-harmonic behavior of materials from experimental inelastic neutron scattering and thermal expansion measurements.

    PubMed

    Bansal, Dipanshu; Aref, Amjad; Dargush, Gary; Delaire, Olivier

    2016-09-28

    Based on thermodynamic principles, we derive expressions quantifying the non-harmonic vibrational behavior of materials, which are rigorous yet easily evaluated from experimentally available data for the thermal expansion coefficient and the phonon density of states. These experimentally-derived quantities are valuable to benchmark first-principles theoretical predictions of harmonic and non-harmonic thermal behaviors using perturbation theory, ab initio molecular-dynamics, or Monte-Carlo simulations. We illustrate this analysis by computing the harmonic, dilational, and anharmonic contributions to the entropy, internal energy, and free energy of elemental aluminum and the ordered compound [Formula: see text] over a wide range of temperature. Results agree well with previous data in the literature and provide an efficient approach to estimate anharmonic effects in materials. PMID:27438881

  2. Modeling non-harmonic behavior of materials from experimental inelastic neutron scattering and thermal expansion measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bansal, Dipanshu; Aref, Amjad; Dargush, Gary; Delaire, Olivier

    2016-09-01

    Based on thermodynamic principles, we derive expressions quantifying the non-harmonic vibrational behavior of materials, which are rigorous yet easily evaluated from experimentally available data for the thermal expansion coefficient and the phonon density of states. These experimentally-derived quantities are valuable to benchmark first-principles theoretical predictions of harmonic and non-harmonic thermal behaviors using perturbation theory, ab initio molecular-dynamics, or Monte-Carlo simulations. We illustrate this analysis by computing the harmonic, dilational, and anharmonic contributions to the entropy, internal energy, and free energy of elemental aluminum and the ordered compound \\text{FeSi} over a wide range of temperature. Results agree well with previous data in the literature and provide an efficient approach to estimate anharmonic effects in materials.

  3. The Effect of Interface Roughness and Oxide Film Thickness on the Inelastic Response of Thermal Barrier Coatings to Thermal Cycling

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pindera, Marek-Jerzy; Aboudi, Jacob; Arnold, Steven M.

    1999-01-01

    The effects of interfacial roughness and oxide film thickness on thermally-induced stresses in plasma-sprayed thermal barrier coatings subjected to thermal cycling are investigated using the recently developed higher-order theory for functionally graded materials. The higher-order theory is shown to be a viable alternative to the finite-element approach, capable of modeling different interfacial roughness architectures in the presence of an aluminum oxide layer and capturing the high stress gradients that occur at the top coat/bond coat interface. The oxide layer thickness is demonstrated to have a substantially greater effect on the evolution of residual stresses than local variations in interfacial roughness. Further, the location of delamination initiation in the top coat is predicted to change with increasing oxide layer thickness. This result can be used to optimize the thickness of a pre-oxidized layer introduced at the top coat/bond coat interface in order to enhance TBC durability as suggested by some researchers. The results of our investigation also support a recently proposed hypothesis regarding delamination initiation and propagation in the presence of an evolving bond coat oxidation, while pointing to the importance of interfacial roughness details and specimen geometry in modeling this phenomenon.

  4. Advanced development of the boundary element method for elastic and inelastic thermal stress analysis. Ph.D. Thesis, 1987 Final Report

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Henry, Donald P., Jr.

    1991-01-01

    The focus of this dissertation is on advanced development of the boundary element method for elastic and inelastic thermal stress analysis. New formulations for the treatment of body forces and nonlinear effects are derived. These formulations, which are based on particular integral theory, eliminate the need for volume integrals or extra surface integrals to account for these effects. The formulations are presented for axisymmetric, two and three dimensional analysis. Also in this dissertation, two dimensional and axisymmetric formulations for elastic and inelastic, inhomogeneous stress analysis are introduced. The derivatives account for inhomogeneities due to spatially dependent material parameters, and thermally induced inhomogeneities. The nonlinear formulation of the present work are based on an incremental initial stress approach. Two inelastic solutions algorithms are implemented: an iterative; and a variable stiffness type approach. The Von Mises yield criterion with variable hardening and the associated flow rules are adopted in these algorithms. All formulations are implemented in a general purpose, multi-region computer code with the capability of local definition of boundary conditions. Quadratic, isoparametric shape functions are used to model the geometry and field variables of the boundary (and domain) of the problem. The multi-region implementation permits a body to be modeled in substructured parts, thus dramatically reducing the cost of analysis. Furthermore, it allows a body consisting of regions of different (homogeneous) material to be studied. To test the program, results obtained for simple test cases are checked against their analytic solutions. Thereafter, a range of problems of practical interest are analyzed. In addition to displacement and traction loads, problems with body forces due to self-weight, centrifugal, and thermal loads are considered.

  5. Evidence for inhomogeneous thermal sources of two similar solar spike event of 1978, May 5 and December 4

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wiehl, H. J.; Desai, U.

    1982-01-01

    Two short duration single spike events of 1978 May 5 and December 4 exhibit similar time profiles in the microwave and hard X-ray ranges, indicating emission from compact sources. Microwave spectral observations exhibit inhomogeneities present in the source parameters. The existence of fine time structures in the microwave time profiles at 10.4 GHz from Berne are interpreted as a signature of the dynamics of a disturbance travelling through the souce at the ion-sound speed. Stereoscopic observations with the hard X-ray detector on the solar orbiter, Helios-2, and the Berne microwave antennae do not indicate any time lag or differences in the time profiles during the impulsive phase. This is taken as evidence for the absence of directionality of emission making beam models unlikely for short duration single spike events.

  6. NUBOW-2D Inelastic

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center (ESTSC)

    2002-01-31

    This program solves the two-dimensional mechanical equilbrium configuration of a core restraint system, which is subjected to radial temperature and flux gradients, on a time increment basis. At each time increment, the code calculates the irradiation creep and swelling strains for each duct from user-specified creep and swelling correlations. Using the calculated thermal bowing, inelastic bowing and the duct dilation, the corresponding equilibrium forces, beam deflections, total beam displacements, and structural reactivity changes are calculated.

  7. Fusion of time-dependent gamma production spectra from thermal neutron capture and fast neutron inelastic scattering to improve material detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gozani, T.; Elsalim, M.; Strellis, D.; Brown, D.

    2003-06-01

    Neutron-based inspection techniques are unique in their ability to provide material specific signatures, thus offering very high performance and automatic detection of explosives and other contraband. Thermal neutron capture gamma spectroscopy provides excellent sensitivities to hydrogen, nitrogen, chlorine, and other elements, which are characteristic to most explosives, drugs and other contraband that may be smuggled into the country. Fast neutron gamma production (mostly through inelastic scattering) provides good sensitivity to carbon and oxygen. When necessary, these two types of complementary interactions can be combined to yield a more accurate material determination inside small to medium size containers. Standard pulsed 14 MeV electronic neutron generators offer an efficient way to obtain these two types of interactions. Fast (14 MeV) neutrons are produced during the pulse. After the pulse, only the decaying thermal neutron population exists, and thus pure neutron capture gamma-rays are produced. Unfortunately, during the pulse (which is normally much longer than the neutron thermalization time) the fast neutron interactions are highly "contaminated" by the interactions of thermal neutrons within the object and the nearby gamma-ray detectors. This creates high background and spectral interferences in the common medium resolution detectors, such as NaI, BGO, etc. The use of an appropriate shielding, neutron spectrum tailoring, full spectral feature analysis as well as temporal information ("die-away" time) resulted in significant performance enhancements in detection of explosives, drugs and other contraband in difficult geometries.

  8. Role of heavy ion co-implantation and thermal spikes on the development of dislocation loops in nanoengineered silicon light emitting diodes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Milosavljević, M.; Lourenço, M. A.; Gwilliam, R. M.; Homewood, K. P.

    2011-08-01

    Microstructural and electroluminescence measurements are carried out on boron implanted dislocation engineered silicon light emitting diodes (LEDs) co-implanted with the rare earth thulium to provide wavelength tuning in the infra-red. Silicon LEDs operating in the range from 1.1-1.35 μm are fabricated by co-implantation of boron and thulium into n-type Si (100) wafers and subsequently rapid thermally annealed to activate the implants and to engineer the dislocation loop array that is crucial in allowing light emission. Ohmic contacts are applied to the p and n regions to form conventional p-n junction LEDs. Electroluminescence is obtained under normal forward biasing of the devices. The influence of implantation sequence (B or Tm first), ion dose, and the post-implantation annealing on the microstructure and electroluminescence from the devices is studied. A clear role of the heavy-ion Tm co-implant in significantly modifying the boron induced dislocation loop array distribution is demonstrated. We also identify the development of dislocation loops under thermal spikes upon heavy ion (Tm) implantation into Si. The results contribute to a better understanding of the basic processes involved in fabrication and functioning of co-implanted devices, toward achieving higher light emission efficiency.

  9. Thermal electron acceleration by electric field spikes in the outer radiation belt: Generation of field-aligned pitch angle distributions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vasko, I. Y.; Agapitov, O. V.; Mozer, F. S.; Artemyev, A. V.

    2015-10-01

    Van Allen Probes observations in the outer radiation belt have demonstrated an abundance of electrostatic electron-acoustic double layers (DL). DLs are frequently accompanied by field-aligned (bidirectional) pitch angle distributions (PAD) of electrons with energies from hundred eVs up to several keV. We perform numerical simulations of the DL interaction with thermal electrons making use of the test particle approach. DL parameters assumed in the simulations are adopted from observations. We show that DLs accelerate thermal electrons parallel to the magnetic field via the electrostatic Fermi mechanism, i.e., due to reflections from DL potential humps. The electron energy gain is larger for larger DL scalar potential amplitudes and higher propagation velocities. In addition to the Fermi mechanism, electrons can be trapped by DLs in their generation region and accelerated due to transport to higher latitudes. Both mechanisms result in formation of field-aligned PADs for electrons with energies comparable to those found in observations. The Fermi mechanism provides field-aligned PADs for <1 keV electrons, while the trapping mechanism extends field-aligned PADs to higher-energy electrons. It is shown that the Fermi mechanism can result in scattering into the loss cone of up to several tenths of percent of electrons with flux peaking at energies up to several hundred eVs.

  10. A "Last Word" on Ice Spikes.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Perry, Helene F.

    1995-01-01

    Attempts an explanation of how "ice spikes" are formed. The spikes are upward protrusions of ice that occur when water expands as it cools in a rigid container of low thermal conductivity. Describes the results of an investigation and includes color photos. (LZ)

  11. A New On-the-Fly Sampling Method for Incoherent Inelastic Thermal Neutron Scattering Data in MCNP6

    SciTech Connect

    Pavlou, Andrew Theodore; Brown, Forrest B.; Ji, Wei

    2014-09-02

    At thermal energies, the scattering of neutrons in a system is complicated by the comparable velocities of the neutron and target, resulting in competing upscattering and downscattering events. The neutron wavelength is also similar in size to the target's interatomic spacing making the scattering process a quantum mechanical problem. Because of the complicated nature of scattering at low energies, the thermal data files in ACE format used in continuous-energy Monte Carlo codes are quite large { on the order of megabytes for a single temperature and material. In this paper, a new storage and sampling method is introduced that is orders of magnitude less in size and is used to sample scattering parameters at any temperature on-the-fly. In addition to the reduction in storage, the need to pre-generate thermal scattering data tables at fine temperatures has been eliminated. This is advantageous for multiphysics simulations which may involve temperatures not known in advance. A new module was written for MCNP6 that bypasses the current S(α,β) table lookup in favor of the new format. The new on-the-fly sampling method was tested for graphite for two benchmark problems at ten temperatures: 1) an eigenvalue test with a fuel compact of uranium oxycarbide fuel homogenized into a graphite matrix, 2) a surface current test with a \\broomstick" problem with a monoenergetic point source. The largest eigenvalue difference was 152pcm for T= 1200K. For the temperatures and incident energies chosen for the broomstick problem, the secondary neutron spectrum showed good agreement with the traditional S(α,β) sampling method. These preliminary results show that sampling thermal scattering data on-the-fly is a viable option to eliminate both the storage burden of keeping thermal data at discrete temperatures and the need to know temperatures before simulation runtime.

  12. Temperature dependent electron-phonon coupling and heat capacity in thin slabs of topological insulator Bi2Te3 as pertinent to the thermal spike model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Patra, Paramita; Srivastava, S. K.

    2016-07-01

    Electron-phonon coupling strength and electronic heat capacity are essential ingredients of the widely accepted thermal spike model of swift heavy ion matter interaction. The concept, although applicable very well in metals, loses its validity in materials with a band gap, wherein it is customary to take the two quantities merely as adjustable parameters to fit the experimental results. Topological insulators, like Bi2Te3, are quite interesting in this regard because they are also metallic albeit near the surface. In this work, we compute by first-principles the electron density of states of ∼16 Å thick Bi2Te3 slabs of different orientations and demonstrate an unusually high metallicity for the [0 0 1] slab. The density of states is then used to calculate the electron-phonon coupling strength and electronic heat capacity as a function of electron temperature. Strongly electron temperature dependent but weak electron-phonon coupling has been observed, along with systematic deviations of the electronic heat capacity from the linear free-electron metal values.

  13. The electromagnetic spike solutions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nungesser, Ernesto; Lim, Woei Chet

    2013-12-01

    The aim of this paper is to use the existing relation between polarized electromagnetic Gowdy spacetimes and vacuum Gowdy spacetimes to find explicit solutions for electromagnetic spikes by a procedure which has been developed by one of the authors for gravitational spikes. We present new inhomogeneous solutions which we call the EME and MEM electromagnetic spike solutions.

  14. Monitoring spike train synchrony.

    PubMed

    Kreuz, Thomas; Chicharro, Daniel; Houghton, Conor; Andrzejak, Ralph G; Mormann, Florian

    2013-03-01

    Recently, the SPIKE-distance has been proposed as a parameter-free and timescale-independent measure of spike train synchrony. This measure is time resolved since it relies on instantaneous estimates of spike train dissimilarity. However, its original definition led to spuriously high instantaneous values for eventlike firing patterns. Here we present a substantial improvement of this measure that eliminates this shortcoming. The reliability gained allows us to track changes in instantaneous clustering, i.e., time-localized patterns of (dis)similarity among multiple spike trains. Additional new features include selective and triggered temporal averaging as well as the instantaneous comparison of spike train groups. In a second step, a causal SPIKE-distance is defined such that the instantaneous values of dissimilarity rely on past information only so that time-resolved spike train synchrony can be estimated in real time. We demonstrate that these methods are capable of extracting valuable information from field data by monitoring the synchrony between neuronal spike trains during an epileptic seizure. Finally, the applicability of both the regular and the real-time SPIKE-distance to continuous data is illustrated on model electroencephalographic (EEG) recordings. PMID:23221419

  15. Synergy of elastic and inelastic energy loss on ion track formation in SrTiO₃.

    PubMed

    Weber, William J; Zarkadoula, Eva; Pakarinen, Olli H; Sachan, Ritesh; Chisholm, Matthew F; Liu, Peng; Xue, Haizhou; Jin, Ke; Zhang, Yanwen

    2015-01-01

    While the interaction of energetic ions with solids is well known to result in inelastic energy loss to electrons and elastic energy loss to atomic nuclei in the solid, the coupled effects of these energy losses on defect production, nanostructure evolution and phase transformations in ionic and covalently bonded materials are complex and not well understood due to dependencies on electron-electron scattering processes, electron-phonon coupling, localized electronic excitations, diffusivity of charged defects, and solid-state radiolysis. Here we show that a colossal synergy occurs between inelastic energy loss and pre-existing atomic defects created by elastic energy loss in single crystal strontium titanate (SrTiO₃), resulting in the formation of nanometer-sized amorphous tracks, but only in the narrow region with pre-existing defects. These defects locally decrease the electronic and atomic thermal conductivities and increase electron-phonon coupling, which locally increase the intensity of the thermal spike for each ion. This work identifies a major gap in understanding on the role of defects in electronic energy dissipation and electron-phonon coupling; it also provides insights for creating novel interfaces and nanostructures to functionalize thin film structures, including tunable electronic, ionic, magnetic and optical properties. PMID:25578009

  16. Temporal spike pattern learning

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Talathi, Sachin S.; Abarbanel, Henry D. I.; Ditto, William L.

    2008-09-01

    Sensory systems pass information about an animal’s environment to higher nervous system units through sequences of action potentials. When these action potentials have essentially equivalent wave forms, all information is contained in the interspike intervals (ISIs) of the spike sequence. How do neural circuits recognize and read these ISI sequences? We address this issue of temporal sequence learning by a neuronal system utilizing spike timing dependent plasticity (STDP). We present a general architecture of neural circuitry that can perform the task of ISI recognition. The essential ingredients of this neural circuit, which we refer to as “interspike interval recognition unit” (IRU) are (i) a spike selection unit, the function of which is to selectively distribute input spikes to downstream IRU circuitry; (ii) a time-delay unit that can be tuned by STDP; and (iii) a detection unit, which is the output of the IRU and a spike from which indicates successful ISI recognition by the IRU. We present two distinct configurations for the time-delay circuit within the IRU using excitatory and inhibitory synapses, respectively, to produce a delayed output spike at time t0+τ(R) in response to the input spike received at time t0 . R is the tunable parameter of the time-delay circuit that controls the timing of the delayed output spike. We discuss the forms of STDP rules for excitatory and inhibitory synapses, respectively, that allow for modulation of R for the IRU to perform its task of ISI recognition. We then present two specific implementations for the IRU circuitry, derived from the general architecture that can both learn the ISIs of a training sequence and then recognize the same ISI sequence when it is presented on subsequent occasions.

  17. Temporal spike pattern learning.

    PubMed

    Talathi, Sachin S; Abarbanel, Henry D I; Ditto, William L

    2008-09-01

    Sensory systems pass information about an animal's environment to higher nervous system units through sequences of action potentials. When these action potentials have essentially equivalent wave forms, all information is contained in the interspike intervals (ISIs) of the spike sequence. How do neural circuits recognize and read these ISI sequences? We address this issue of temporal sequence learning by a neuronal system utilizing spike timing dependent plasticity (STDP). We present a general architecture of neural circuitry that can perform the task of ISI recognition. The essential ingredients of this neural circuit, which we refer to as "interspike interval recognition unit" (IRU) are (i) a spike selection unit, the function of which is to selectively distribute input spikes to downstream IRU circuitry; (ii) a time-delay unit that can be tuned by STDP; and (iii) a detection unit, which is the output of the IRU and a spike from which indicates successful ISI recognition by the IRU. We present two distinct configurations for the time-delay circuit within the IRU using excitatory and inhibitory synapses, respectively, to produce a delayed output spike at time t_{0}+tau(R) in response to the input spike received at time t_{0} . R is the tunable parameter of the time-delay circuit that controls the timing of the delayed output spike. We discuss the forms of STDP rules for excitatory and inhibitory synapses, respectively, that allow for modulation of R for the IRU to perform its task of ISI recognition. We then present two specific implementations for the IRU circuitry, derived from the general architecture that can both learn the ISIs of a training sequence and then recognize the same ISI sequence when it is presented on subsequent occasions. PMID:18851076

  18. Spiking the Geomagnetic Field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Constable, C.; Davies, C. J.

    2015-12-01

    Geomagnetic field intensities corresponding to virtual axial dipole moments of up to 200 ZAm2, more than twice the modern value, have been inferred from archeomagnetic measurements on artifacts dated at or shortly after 1000 BC. Anomalously high values occur in the Levant and Georgia, but not in Bulgaria. The origin of this spike is believed to lie in Earth's core: however, its spatio-temporal characteristics and the geomagnetic processes responsible for such a feature remain a mystery. We show that a localized spike in the radial magnetic field at the core-mantle boundary (CMB) must necessarily contribute to the largest scale changes in Earth's surface field, namely the dipole. Even the limiting spike of a delta function at the CMB produces a minimum surface cap size of 60 degrees for a factor of two increase in paleointensity. Combined evidence from modern satellite and millennial scale field modeling suggests that the Levantine Spike is intimately associated with a strong increase in dipole moment prior to 1000 BC and likely the product of north-westward motion of concentrated near equatorial Asian flux patches like those seen in the modern field. New archeomagnetic studies are needed to confirm this interpretation. Minimum estimates of the power dissipated by the spike are comparable to independent estimates of the dissipation associated with the entire steady state geodynamo. This suggests that geomagnetic spikes are either associated with rapid changes in magnetic energy or strong Lorentz forces.

  19. Inelastic tunnel diodes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Anderson, L. M. (Inventor)

    1984-01-01

    Power is extracted from plasmons, photons, or other guided electromagnetic waves at infrared to midultraviolet frequencies by inelastic tunneling in metal-insulator-semiconductor-metal diodes. Inelastic tunneling produces power by absorbing plasmons to pump electrons to higher potential. Specifically, an electron from a semiconductor layer absorbs a plasmon and simultaneously tunnels across an insulator into metal layer which is at higher potential. The diode voltage determines the fraction of energy extracted from the plasmons; any excess is lost to heat.

  20. Elastic and Inelastic Collisions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gluck, Paul

    2010-01-01

    There have been two articles in this journal that described a pair of collision carts used to demonstrate vividly the difference between elastic and inelastic collisions. One cart had a series of washers that were mounted rigidly on a rigid wooden framework, the other had washers mounted on rubber bands stretched across a framework. The rigidly…

  1. Deep inelastic phenomena

    SciTech Connect

    Prescott, C.Y.

    1980-10-01

    Nucleon structure as seen in the context of deep inelastic scattering is discussed. The lectures begin with consideration of the quark-parton model. The model forms the basis of understanding lepton-nucleon inelastic scattering. As improved data in lepton-nucleon scattering at high energies became available, the quark-parton model failed to explain some crucial features of these data. At approximately the same time a candidate theory of strong interactions based on a SU(3) gauge theory of color was being discussed in the literature, and new ideas on the explanation of inelastic scattering data became popular. A new theory of strong interactions, now called quantum chromodynamics provides a new framework for understanding the data, with a much stronger theoretical foundation, and seems to explain well the features of the data. The lectures conclude with a look at some recent experiments which provide new data at very high energies. These lectures are concerned primarily with charged lepton inelastic scattering and to a lesser extent with neutrino results. Furthermore, due to time and space limitations, topics such as final state hadron studies, and multi-muon production are omitted here. The lectures concentrate on the more central issues: the quark-parton model and concepts of scaling, scale breaking and the ideas of quantum chromodynamics, the Q/sup 2/ dependence of structure function, moments, and the important parameter R.

  2. Inelastic Scattering Form Factors

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center (ESTSC)

    1992-01-01

    ATHENA-IV computes form factors for inelastic scattering calculations, using single-particle wave functions that are eigenstates of motion in either a Woods-Saxon potential well or a harmonic oscillator well. Two-body forces of Gauss, Coulomb, Yukawa, and a sum of cut-off Yukawa radial dependences are available.

  3. Synergy of elastic and inelastic energy loss on ion track formation in SrTiO3

    SciTech Connect

    Weber, William J.; Zarkadoula, Eva; Pakarinen, Olli H.; Sachan, Ritesh; Chisholm, Matthew F.; Liu, Peng; Xue, Haizhou; Jin, Ke; Zhang, Yanwen

    2015-01-12

    While the interaction of energetic ions with solids is well known to result in inelastic energy loss to electrons and elastic energy loss to atomic nuclei in the solid, the coupled effects of these energy losses on defect production, nanostructure evolution and phase transformations in ionic and covalently bonded materials are complex and not well understood due to dependencies on electron-electron scattering processes, electron-phonon coupling, localized electronic excitations, diffusivity of charged defects, and solid-state radiolysis. Here we show that a colossal synergy occurs between inelastic energy loss and pre-existing atomic defects created by elastic energy loss in single crystal strontium titanate (SrTiO3), resulting in the formation of nanometer-sized amorphous tracks, but only in the narrow region with pre-existing defects. These defects locally decrease the electronic and atomic thermal conductivities and increase electron-phonon coupling, which locally increase the intensity of the thermal spike for each ion. This work identifies a major gap in understanding on the role of defects in electronic energy dissipation and electron-phonon coupling; it also provides insights for creating novel interfaces and nanostructures to functionalize thin film structures, including tunable electronic, ionic, magnetic and optical properties.

  4. Synergy of elastic and inelastic energy loss on ion track formation in SrTiO3

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Weber, William J.; Zarkadoula, Eva; Pakarinen, Olli H.; Sachan, Ritesh; Chisholm, Matthew F.; Liu, Peng; Xue, Haizhou; Jin, Ke; Zhang, Yanwen

    2015-01-12

    While the interaction of energetic ions with solids is well known to result in inelastic energy loss to electrons and elastic energy loss to atomic nuclei in the solid, the coupled effects of these energy losses on defect production, nanostructure evolution and phase transformations in ionic and covalently bonded materials are complex and not well understood due to dependencies on electron-electron scattering processes, electron-phonon coupling, localized electronic excitations, diffusivity of charged defects, and solid-state radiolysis. Here we show that a colossal synergy occurs between inelastic energy loss and pre-existing atomic defects created by elastic energy loss in single crystal strontiummore » titanate (SrTiO3), resulting in the formation of nanometer-sized amorphous tracks, but only in the narrow region with pre-existing defects. These defects locally decrease the electronic and atomic thermal conductivities and increase electron-phonon coupling, which locally increase the intensity of the thermal spike for each ion. This work identifies a major gap in understanding on the role of defects in electronic energy dissipation and electron-phonon coupling; it also provides insights for creating novel interfaces and nanostructures to functionalize thin film structures, including tunable electronic, ionic, magnetic and optical properties.« less

  5. Spikes in quantum trajectories

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tilloy, Antoine; Bauer, Michel; Bernard, Denis

    2015-11-01

    A quantum system subjected to a strong continuous monitoring undergoes quantum jumps. This very-well-known fact hides a neglected subtlety: sharp scale-invariant fluctuations invariably decorate the jump process, even in the limit where the measurement rate is very large. This article is devoted to the quantitative study of these remaining fluctuations, which we call spikes, and to a discussion of their physical status. We start by introducing a classical model where the origin of these fluctuations is more intuitive, and then jump to the quantum realm where their existence is less intuitive. We compute the exact distribution of the spikes for a continuously monitored qubit. We conclude by discussing their physical and operational relevance.

  6. Spike sorting of synchronous spikes from local neuron ensembles.

    PubMed

    Franke, Felix; Pröpper, Robert; Alle, Henrik; Meier, Philipp; Geiger, Jörg R P; Obermayer, Klaus; Munk, Matthias H J

    2015-10-01

    Synchronous spike discharge of cortical neurons is thought to be a fingerprint of neuronal cooperativity. Because neighboring neurons are more densely connected to one another than neurons that are located further apart, near-synchronous spike discharge can be expected to be prevalent and it might provide an important basis for cortical computations. Using microelectrodes to record local groups of neurons does not allow for the reliable separation of synchronous spikes from different cells, because available spike sorting algorithms cannot correctly resolve the temporally overlapping waveforms. We show that high spike sorting performance of in vivo recordings, including overlapping spikes, can be achieved with a recently developed filter-based template matching procedure. Using tetrodes with a three-dimensional structure, we demonstrate with simulated data and ground truth in vitro data, obtained by dual intracellular recording of two neurons located next to a tetrode, that the spike sorting of synchronous spikes can be as successful as the spike sorting of nonoverlapping spikes and that the spatial information provided by multielectrodes greatly reduces the error rates. We apply the method to tetrode recordings from the prefrontal cortex of behaving primates, and we show that overlapping spikes can be identified and assigned to individual neurons to study synchronous activity in local groups of neurons. PMID:26289473

  7. Lattice dynamics and thermal expansion behavior in the metal cyanides M CN (M =Cu , Ag, Au): Neutron inelastic scattering and first-principles calculations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gupta, M. K.; Singh, Baltej; Mittal, R.; Rols, S.; Chaplot, S. L.

    2016-04-01

    We report measurement of temperature dependence of phonon spectra in quasi-one-dimensional metal cyanides M CN (M =Cu , Ag, Au). Ab initio lattice dynamics calculations have been performed to interpret the phonon spectra as well as to understand the anomalous anisotropic thermal expansion behavior in these compounds. We bring out the differences in the phonon mode behavior to explain the differences in the thermal expansion behavior among the three compounds. The chain-sliding modes are found to contribute maximum to the negative thermal expansion along the "c " axis in the Cu and Ag compounds, while the same modes contribute to positive thermal expansion in the Au compound. Several low-energy transverse modes lead to positive thermal expansion in the a -b plane in all the compounds. The calculated Born-effective charges show that AuCN has a covalent nature of bonding, which results in least distortion as well as the least number of unstable modes among the three cyanides. This result is well correlated with the fact that the coefficient of negative thermal expansion along the c axis in AuCN is the smallest.

  8. Spiking optical patterns and synchronization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rosenbluh, Michael; Aviad, Yaara; Cohen, Elad; Khaykovich, Lev; Kinzel, Wolfgang; Kopelowitz, Evi; Yoskovits, Pinhas; Kanter, Ido

    2007-10-01

    We analyze the time resolved spike statistics of a solitary and two mutually interacting chaotic semiconductor lasers whose chaos is characterized by apparently random, short intensity spikes. Repulsion between two successive spikes is observed, resulting in a refractory period, which is largest at laser threshold. For time intervals between spikes greater than the refractory period, the distribution of the intervals follows a Poisson distribution. The spiking pattern is highly periodic over time windows corresponding to the optical length of the external cavity, with a slow change of the spiking pattern as time increases. When zero-lag synchronization between two lasers is established, the statistics of the nearly perfectly matched spikes are not altered. The similarity of these features to those found in complex interacting neural networks, suggests the use of laser systems as simpler physical models for neural networks.

  9. Inelastic electron tunneling spectroscopy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Khanna, S. K.; Lambe, J.

    1983-01-01

    Inelastic electron tunneling spectroscopy is a useful technique for the study of vibrational modes of molecules adsorbed on the surface of oxide layers in a metal-insulator-metal tunnel junction. The technique involves studying the effects of adsorbed molecules on the tunneling spectrum of such junctions. The data give useful information about the structure, bonding, and orientation of adsorbed molecules. One of the major advantages of inelastic electron tunneling spectroscopy is its sensitivity. It is capable of detecting on the order of 10 to the 10th molecules (a fraction of a monolayer) on a 1 sq mm junction. It has been successfully used in studies of catalysis, biology, trace impurity detection, and electronic excitations. Because of its high sensitivity, this technique shows great promise in the area of solid-state electronic chemical sensing.

  10. Radioxenon spiked air.

    PubMed

    Watrous, Matthew G; Delmore, James E; Hague, Robert K; Houghton, Tracy P; Jenson, Douglas D; Mann, Nick R

    2015-12-01

    Four of the radioactive xenon isotopes ((131m)Xe, (133m)Xe, (133)Xe and (135)Xe) with half-lives ranging from 9 h to 12 days are produced from nuclear fission and can be detected from days to weeks following their production and release. Being inert gases, they are readily transported through the atmosphere. Sources for release of radioactive xenon isotopes include operating nuclear reactors via leaks in fuel rods, medical isotope production facilities, and nuclear weapons' detonations. They are not normally released from fuel reprocessing due to the short half-lives. The Comprehensive Nuclear-Test-Ban Treaty has led to creation of the International Monitoring System. The International Monitoring System, when fully implemented, will consist of one component with 40 stations monitoring radioactive xenon around the globe. Monitoring these radioactive xenon isotopes is important to the Comprehensive Nuclear-Test-Ban Treaty in determining whether a seismically detected event is or is not a nuclear detonation. A variety of radioactive xenon quality control check standards, quantitatively spiked into various gas matrices, could be used to demonstrate that these stations are operating on the same basis in order to bolster defensibility of data across the International Monitoring System. This paper focuses on Idaho National Laboratory's capability to produce three of the xenon isotopes in pure form and the use of the four xenon isotopes in various combinations to produce radioactive xenon spiked air samples that could be subsequently distributed to participating facilities. PMID:26318775

  11. Radioxenon spiked air

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Watrous, Matthew G.; Delmore, James E.; Hague, Robert K.; Houghton, Tracy P.; Jenson, Douglas D.; Mann, Nick R.

    2015-08-27

    Four of the radioactive xenon isotopes (131mXe, 133mXe, 133Xe and 135Xe) with half-lives ranging from 9 h to 12 days are produced from nuclear fission and can be detected from days to weeks following their production and release. Being inert gases, they are readily transported through the atmosphere. Sources for release of radioactive xenon isotopes include operating nuclear reactors via leaks in fuel rods, medical isotope production facilities, and nuclear weapons' detonations. They are not normally released from fuel reprocessing due to the short half-lives. The Comprehensive Nuclear-Test-Ban Treaty has led to creation of the International Monitoring System. The Internationalmore » Monitoring System, when fully implemented, will consist of one component with 40 stations monitoring radioactive xenon around the globe. Monitoring these radioactive xenon isotopes is important to the Comprehensive Nuclear-Test-Ban Treaty in determining whether a seismically detected event is or is not a nuclear detonation. A variety of radioactive xenon quality control check standards, quantitatively spiked into various gas matrices, could be used to demonstrate that these stations are operating on the same basis in order to bolster defensibility of data across the International Monitoring System. This study focuses on Idaho National Laboratory's capability to produce three of the xenon isotopes in pure form and the use of the four xenon isotopes in various combinations to produce radioactive xenon spiked air samples that could be subsequently distributed to participating facilities.« less

  12. Fractal dimension analysis for spike detection in low SNR extracellular signals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Salmasi, Mehrdad; Büttner, Ulrich; Glasauer, Stefan

    2016-06-01

    Objective. Many algorithms have been suggested for detection and sorting of spikes in extracellular recording. Nevertheless, it is still challenging to detect spikes in low signal-to-noise ratios (SNR). We propose a spike detection algorithm that is based on the fractal properties of extracellular signals and can detect spikes in low SNR regimes. Semi-intact spikes are low-amplitude spikes whose shapes are almost preserved. The detection of these spikes can significantly enhance the performance of multi-electrode recording systems. Approach. Semi-intact spikes are simulated by adding three noise components to a spike train: thermal noise, inter-spike noise, and spike-level noise. We show that simulated signals have fractal properties which make them proper candidates for fractal analysis. Then we use fractal dimension as the main core of our spike detection algorithm and call it fractal detector. The performance of the fractal detector is compared with three frequently used spike detectors. Main results. We demonstrate that in low SNR, the fractal detector has the best performance and results in the highest detection probability. It is shown that, in contrast to the other three detectors, the performance of the fractal detector is independent of inter-spike noise power and that variations in spike shape do not alter its performance. Finally, we use the fractal detector for spike detection in experimental data and similar to simulations, it is shown that the fractal detector has the best performance in low SNR regimes. Significance. The detection of low-amplitude spikes provides more information about the neural activity in the vicinity of the recording electrodes. Our results suggest using the fractal detector as a reliable and robust method for detecting semi-intact spikes in low SNR extracellular signals.

  13. Rayleigh--Taylor spike evaporation

    SciTech Connect

    Schappert, G. T.; Batha, S. H.; Klare, K. A.; Hollowell, D. E.; Mason, R. J.

    2001-09-01

    Laser-based experiments have shown that Rayleigh--Taylor (RT) growth in thin, perturbed copper foils leads to a phase dominated by narrow spikes between thin bubbles. These experiments were well modeled and diagnosed until this '' spike'' phase, but not into this spike phase. Experiments were designed, modeled, and performed on the OMEGA laser [T. R. Boehly, D. L. Brown, R. S. Craxton , Opt. Commun. 133, 495 (1997)] to study the late-time spike phase. To simulate the conditions and evolution of late time RT, a copper target was fabricated consisting of a series of thin ridges (spikes in cross section) 150 {mu}m apart on a thin flat copper backing. The target was placed on the side of a scale-1.2 hohlraum with the ridges pointing into the hohlraum, which was heated to 190 eV. Side-on radiography imaged the evolution of the ridges and flat copper backing into the typical RT bubble and spike structure including the '' mushroom-like feet'' on the tips of the spikes. RAGE computer models [R. M. Baltrusaitis, M. L. Gittings, R. P. Weaver, R. F. Benjamin, and J. M. Budzinski, Phys. Fluids 8, 2471 (1996)] show the formation of the '' mushrooms,'' as well as how the backing material converges to lengthen the spike. The computer predictions of evolving spike and bubble lengths match measurements fairly well for the thicker backing targets but not for the thinner backings.

  14. Radioxenon spiked air

    SciTech Connect

    Watrous, Matthew G.; Delmore, James E.; Hague, Robert K.; Houghton, Tracy P.; Jenson, Douglas D.; Mann, Nick R.

    2015-08-27

    Four of the radioactive xenon isotopes (131mXe, 133mXe, 133Xe and 135Xe) with half-lives ranging from 9 h to 12 days are produced from nuclear fission and can be detected from days to weeks following their production and release. Being inert gases, they are readily transported through the atmosphere. Sources for release of radioactive xenon isotopes include operating nuclear reactors via leaks in fuel rods, medical isotope production facilities, and nuclear weapons' detonations. They are not normally released from fuel reprocessing due to the short half-lives. The Comprehensive Nuclear-Test-Ban Treaty has led to creation of the International Monitoring System. The International Monitoring System, when fully implemented, will consist of one component with 40 stations monitoring radioactive xenon around the globe. Monitoring these radioactive xenon isotopes is important to the Comprehensive Nuclear-Test-Ban Treaty in determining whether a seismically detected event is or is not a nuclear detonation. A variety of radioactive xenon quality control check standards, quantitatively spiked into various gas matrices, could be used to demonstrate that these stations are operating on the same basis in order to bolster defensibility of data across the International Monitoring System. This study focuses on Idaho National Laboratory's capability to produce three of the xenon isotopes in pure form and the use of the four xenon isotopes in various combinations to produce radioactive xenon spiked air samples that could be subsequently distributed to participating facilities.

  15. Inelastic and Dynamic Fracture and Stress Analyses

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Atluri, S. N.

    1984-01-01

    Large deformation inelastic stress analysis and inelastic and dynamic crack propagation research work is summarized. The salient topics of interest in engine structure analysis that are discussed herein include: (1) a path-independent integral (T) in inelastic fracture mechanics, (2) analysis of dynamic crack propagation, (3) generalization of constitutive relations of inelasticity for finite deformations , (4) complementary energy approaches in inelastic analyses, and (5) objectivity of time integration schemes in inelastic stress analysis.

  16. Ringlike inelastic events in cosmic rays and accelerators

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dremin, I. M.; Orlov, A. M.; Tretyakova, M. I.

    1985-01-01

    In cosmic rays and in accelerators there were observed single inelastic processes with densely produced (azimuthally isotropic) groups of particles exhibiting spikes in the pseudorapidity plot of an individual event (i.e. ringlike events). Theoretically the existence of such processes was predicted as a consequence of Cerenkov gluon radiation or, more generally, of deconfinement radiation. Nowadays some tens of such events have been accumulated at 400 GeV and at 150 TeV. Analyzing ringlike events in proton-nucleon interactions at 400 GeV/c it is shown that they exhibit striking irregularity in the positions of pseudorapidity spikes' centers which tend to lie mostly at 55,90 and 125 deg in cms. It implies rather small deconfinement lengths of the order of some fermi.

  17. An online spike detection and spike classification algorithm capable of instantaneous resolution of overlapping spikes

    PubMed Central

    Natora, Michal; Boucsein, Clemens; Munk, Matthias H. J.; Obermayer, Klaus

    2009-01-01

    For the analysis of neuronal cooperativity, simultaneously recorded extracellular signals from neighboring neurons need to be sorted reliably by a spike sorting method. Many algorithms have been developed to this end, however, to date, none of them manages to fulfill a set of demanding requirements. In particular, it is desirable to have an algorithm that operates online, detects and classifies overlapping spikes in real time, and that adapts to non-stationary data. Here, we present a combined spike detection and classification algorithm, which explicitly addresses these issues. Our approach makes use of linear filters to find a new representation of the data and to optimally enhance the signal-to-noise ratio. We introduce a method called “Deconfusion” which de-correlates the filter outputs and provides source separation. Finally, a set of well-defined thresholds is applied and leads to simultaneous spike detection and spike classification. By incorporating a direct feedback, the algorithm adapts to non-stationary data and is, therefore, well suited for acute recordings. We evaluate our method on simulated and experimental data, including simultaneous intra/extra-cellular recordings made in slices of a rat cortex and recordings from the prefrontal cortex of awake behaving macaques. We compare the results to existing spike detection as well as spike sorting methods. We conclude that our algorithm meets all of the mentioned requirements and outperforms other methods under realistic signal-to-noise ratios and in the presence of overlapping spikes. PMID:19499318

  18. Mapping Spikes to Sensations

    PubMed Central

    Stüttgen, Maik C.; Schwarz, Cornelius; Jäkel, Frank

    2011-01-01

    Single-unit recordings conducted during perceptual decision-making tasks have yielded tremendous insights into the neural coding of sensory stimuli. In such experiments, detection or discrimination behavior (the psychometric data) is observed in parallel with spike trains in sensory neurons (the neurometric data). Frequently, candidate neural codes for information read-out are pitted against each other by transforming the neurometric data in some way and asking which code’s performance most closely approximates the psychometric performance. The code that matches the psychometric performance best is retained as a viable candidate and the others are rejected. In following this strategy, psychometric data is often considered to provide an unbiased measure of perceptual sensitivity. It is rarely acknowledged that psychometric data result from a complex interplay of sensory and non-sensory processes and that neglect of these processes may result in misestimating psychophysical sensitivity. This again may lead to erroneous conclusions regarding the adequacy of candidate neural codes. In this review, we first discuss requirements on the neural data for a subsequent neurometric-psychometric comparison. We then focus on different psychophysical tasks for the assessment of detection and discrimination performance and the cognitive processes that may underlie their execution. We discuss further factors that may compromise psychometric performance and how they can be detected or avoided. We believe that these considerations point to shortcomings in our understanding of the processes underlying perceptual decisions, and therefore offer potential for future research. PMID:22084627

  19. Geophone with depth sensitive spikes

    SciTech Connect

    Rice, J.A.; Houston, L.M.; Arevalo, R.

    1992-06-23

    This patent describes a geophone. It comprises a seismic sensitive element for sensing elastic motion and converting the motion to an electrical signal, a housing for enclosing the seismic element, and an elongated spike attachable to the housing.

  20. Wavelet analysis of epileptic spikes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Latka, Miroslaw; Was, Ziemowit; Kozik, Andrzej; West, Bruce J.

    2003-05-01

    Interictal spikes and sharp waves in human EEG are characteristic signatures of epilepsy. These potentials originate as a result of synchronous pathological discharge of many neurons. The reliable detection of such potentials has been the long standing problem in EEG analysis, especially after long-term monitoring became common in investigation of epileptic patients. The traditional definition of a spike is based on its amplitude, duration, sharpness, and emergence from its background. However, spike detection systems built solely around this definition are not reliable due to the presence of numerous transients and artifacts. We use wavelet transform to analyze the properties of EEG manifestations of epilepsy. We demonstrate that the behavior of wavelet transform of epileptic spikes across scales can constitute the foundation of a relatively simple yet effective detection algorithm.

  1. Atomic collisions, inelastic indeed

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bercegol, Herve; Ferrando, Gwenael; Lehoucq, Roland

    At the turn of the twentieth century, a hot controversy raged about the ability of Boltzmann's framework to take care of irreversibility. The so-called Loschmidt's paradox progressively faded with time during the last hundred years, due to the predictive efficiency of statistical mechanics. However, one detail at the origin of the controversy - the elasticity of atomic collisions - was not completely challenged. A semi-classical treatment of two atoms interacting with the vacuum zero-point field permits to predict a friction force acting against the rotation of the pair of atoms. By its form and its level, the calculated torque is a candidate as a physical cause for diffusion of energy and angular momentum, and consequently for entropy growth. It opens the way to a revision of the standard vision of irreversibility. This presentation will focus on two points. First we will discuss the recent result in a broader context of electromagnetic interactions during microscopic collisions. The predicted friction phenomenon can be compared to and distinguished from Collision-Induced Emission and other types of inelastic collisions. Second we will investigate the consequences of the friction torque on calculated trajectories of colliding atoms, quantifying the generation of dimers linked by dispersion forces.

  2. Comparison of magnetoencephalographic spikes with and without concurrent electroencephalographic spikes in extratemporal epilepsy.

    PubMed

    Park, Hyeon-Mi; Nakasato, Nobukazu; Iwasaki, Masaki; Shamoto, Hiroshi; Tominaga, Teiji; Yoshimoto, Takashi

    2004-07-01

    Interictal spikes in patients with epilepsy may be detected by either electroencephalography (EEG) (E-spikes) or magnetoencephalography (MEG) (M-spikes), or both MEG and EEG (E/M-spikes). Localization and amplitude were compared between E/M-spikes and M-spikes in 7 adult patients with extratemporal epilepsy to evaluate the clinical significance of MEG spikes. MEG and EEG were simultaneously measured using a helmet-shaped MEG system with planar-type gradiometers and scalp electrodes of the international 10-20 system. Sources of E/M-spikes and M-spikes were estimated by an equivalent current dipole (ECD) model for MEG at peak latency. Each subject showed 9 to 20 (mean 13.4) E/M-spikes and 9 to 31 (mean 16.3) M-spikes. No subjects showed significant differences in the ECD locations between E/M- and M-spikes. ECD moments of the E/M-spikes were significantly larger in 2 patients and not significantly different in the other 5 patients. The similar localizations of E/M-spikes and M-spikes suggest that combination of MEG and EEG is useful to detect more interictal spikes in patients with extratemporal epilepsy. The smaller tendency of ECD amplitude of the M-spikes than E/M-spikes suggests that scalp EEG may overlook small tangential spikes due to background brain noise. Localization value of M-spikes is clinically equivalent to that of E/M-spikes. PMID:15240925

  3. Electron Inelastic-Mean-Free-Path Database

    National Institute of Standards and Technology Data Gateway

    SRD 71 NIST Electron Inelastic-Mean-Free-Path Database (PC database, no charge)   This database provides values of electron inelastic mean free paths (IMFPs) for use in quantitative surface analyses by AES and XPS.

  4. Learning Universal Computations with Spikes

    PubMed Central

    Thalmeier, Dominik; Uhlmann, Marvin; Kappen, Hilbert J.; Memmesheimer, Raoul-Martin

    2016-01-01

    Providing the neurobiological basis of information processing in higher animals, spiking neural networks must be able to learn a variety of complicated computations, including the generation of appropriate, possibly delayed reactions to inputs and the self-sustained generation of complex activity patterns, e.g. for locomotion. Many such computations require previous building of intrinsic world models. Here we show how spiking neural networks may solve these different tasks. Firstly, we derive constraints under which classes of spiking neural networks lend themselves to substrates of powerful general purpose computing. The networks contain dendritic or synaptic nonlinearities and have a constrained connectivity. We then combine such networks with learning rules for outputs or recurrent connections. We show that this allows to learn even difficult benchmark tasks such as the self-sustained generation of desired low-dimensional chaotic dynamics or memory-dependent computations. Furthermore, we show how spiking networks can build models of external world systems and use the acquired knowledge to control them. PMID:27309381

  5. Automatic Spike Sorting Using Tuning Information

    PubMed Central

    Ventura, Valérie

    2011-01-01

    Current spike sorting methods focus on clustering neurons’ characteristic spike waveforms. The resulting spike-sorted data are typically used to estimate how covariates of interest modulate the firing rates of neurons. However, when these covariates do modulate the firing rates, they provide information about spikes’ identities, which thus far have been ignored for the purpose of spike sorting. This letter describes a novel approach to spike sorting, which incorporates both waveform information and tuning information obtained from the modulation of firing rates. Because it efficiently uses all the available information, this spike sorter yields lower spike misclassification rates than traditional automatic spike sorters. This theoretical result is verified empirically on several examples. The proposed method does not require additional assumptions; only its implementation is different. It essentially consists of performing spike sorting and tuning estimation simultaneously rather than sequentially, as is currently done. We used an expectation-maximization maximum likelihood algorithm to implement the new spike sorter. We present the general form of this algorithm and provide a detailed implementable version under the assumptions that neurons are independent and spike according to Poisson processes. Finally, we uncover a systematic flaw of spike sorting based on waveform information only. PMID:19548802

  6. Prospective Coding by Spiking Neurons

    PubMed Central

    Brea, Johanni; Gaál, Alexisz Tamás; Senn, Walter

    2016-01-01

    Animals learn to make predictions, such as associating the sound of a bell with upcoming feeding or predicting a movement that a motor command is eliciting. How predictions are realized on the neuronal level and what plasticity rule underlies their learning is not well understood. Here we propose a biologically plausible synaptic plasticity rule to learn predictions on a single neuron level on a timescale of seconds. The learning rule allows a spiking two-compartment neuron to match its current firing rate to its own expected future discounted firing rate. For instance, if an originally neutral event is repeatedly followed by an event that elevates the firing rate of a neuron, the originally neutral event will eventually also elevate the neuron’s firing rate. The plasticity rule is a form of spike timing dependent plasticity in which a presynaptic spike followed by a postsynaptic spike leads to potentiation. Even if the plasticity window has a width of 20 milliseconds, associations on the time scale of seconds can be learned. We illustrate prospective coding with three examples: learning to predict a time varying input, learning to predict the next stimulus in a delayed paired-associate task and learning with a recurrent network to reproduce a temporally compressed version of a sequence. We discuss the potential role of the learning mechanism in classical trace conditioning. In the special case that the signal to be predicted encodes reward, the neuron learns to predict the discounted future reward and learning is closely related to the temporal difference learning algorithm TD(λ). PMID:27341100

  7. Measuring multiple spike train synchrony.

    PubMed

    Kreuz, Thomas; Chicharro, Daniel; Andrzejak, Ralph G; Haas, Julie S; Abarbanel, Henry D I

    2009-10-15

    Measures of multiple spike train synchrony are essential in order to study issues such as spike timing reliability, network synchronization, and neuronal coding. These measures can broadly be divided in multivariate measures and averages over bivariate measures. One of the most recent bivariate approaches, the ISI-distance, employs the ratio of instantaneous interspike intervals (ISIs). In this study we propose two extensions of the ISI-distance, the straightforward averaged bivariate ISI-distance and the multivariate ISI-diversity based on the coefficient of variation. Like the original measure these extensions combine many properties desirable in applications to real data. In particular, they are parameter-free, time scale independent, and easy to visualize in a time-resolved manner, as we illustrate with in vitro recordings from a cortical neuron. Using a simulated network of Hindemarsh-Rose neurons as a controlled configuration we compare the performance of our methods in distinguishing different levels of multi-neuron spike train synchrony to the performance of six other previously published measures. We show and explain why the averaged bivariate measures perform better than the multivariate ones and why the multivariate ISI-diversity is the best performer among the multivariate methods. Finally, in a comparison against standard methods that rely on moving window estimates, we use single-unit monkey data to demonstrate the advantages of the instantaneous nature of our methods. PMID:19591867

  8. iSpike: a spiking neural interface for the iCub robot.

    PubMed

    Gamez, D; Fidjeland, A K; Lazdins, E

    2012-06-01

    This paper presents iSpike: a C++ library that interfaces between spiking neural network simulators and the iCub humanoid robot. It uses a biologically inspired approach to convert the robot's sensory information into spikes that are passed to the neural network simulator, and it decodes output spikes from the network into motor signals that are sent to control the robot. Applications of iSpike range from embodied models of the brain to the development of intelligent robots using biologically inspired spiking neural networks. iSpike is an open source library that is available for free download under the terms of the GPL. PMID:22617339

  9. Inelastic behavior of structural components

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hussain, N.; Khozeimeh, K.; Toridis, T. G.

    1980-01-01

    A more accurate procedure was developed for the determination of the inelastic behavior of structural components. The actual stress-strain curve for the mathematical of the structure was utilized to generate the force-deformation relationships for the structural elements, rather than using simplified models such as elastic-plastic, bilinear and trilinear approximations. relationships were generated for beam elements with various types of cross sections. In the generational of these curves, stress or load reversals, kinematic hardening and hysteretic behavior were taken into account. Intersections between loading and unloading branches were determined through an iterative process. Using the inelastic properties obtained, the plastic static response of some simple structural systems composed of beam elements was computed. Results were compared with known solutions, indicating a considerable improvement over response predictions obtained by means of simplified approximations used in previous investigations.

  10. Spike voltage topography in temporal lobe epilepsy.

    PubMed

    Asadi-Pooya, Ali A; Asadollahi, Marjan; Shimamoto, Shoichi; Lorenzo, Matthew; Sperling, Michael R

    2016-07-15

    We investigated the voltage topography of interictal spikes in patients with temporal lobe epilepsy (TLE) to see whether topography was related to etiology for TLE. Adults with TLE, who had epilepsy surgery for drug-resistant seizures from 2011 until 2014 at Jefferson Comprehensive Epilepsy Center were selected. Two groups of patients were studied: patients with mesial temporal sclerosis (MTS) on MRI and those with other MRI findings. The voltage topography maps of the interictal spikes at the peak were created using BESA software. We classified the interictal spikes as polar, basal, lateral, or others. Thirty-four patients were studied, from which the characteristics of 340 spikes were investigated. The most common type of spike orientation was others (186 spikes; 54.7%), followed by lateral (146; 42.9%), polar (5; 1.5%), and basal (3; 0.9%). Characteristics of the voltage topography maps of the spikes between the two groups of patients were somewhat different. Five spikes in patients with MTS had polar orientation, but none of the spikes in patients with other MRI findings had polar orientation (odds ratio=6.98, 95% confidence interval=0.38 to 127.38; p=0.07). Scalp topographic mapping of interictal spikes has the potential to offer different information than visual inspection alone. The present results do not allow an immediate clinical application of our findings; however, detecting a polar spike in a patient with TLE may increase the possibility of mesial temporal sclerosis as the underlying etiology. PMID:27288809

  11. Evaluation of Inelastic Constitutive Models for Nonlinear Structural Analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kaufman, A.

    1983-01-01

    The influence of inelastic material models on computed stress-strain states, and therefore predicted lives, was studied for thermomechanically loaded structures. Nonlinear structural analyses were performed on a fatigue specimen which was subjected to thermal cycling in fluidized beds and on a mechanically load cycled benchmark notch specimen. Four incremental plasticity creep models (isotropic, kinematic, combined isotropic-kinematic, combined plus transient creep) were exercised. Of the plasticity models, kinematic hardening gave results most consistent with experimental observations. Life predictions using the computed strain histories at the critical location with a Strainrange Partitioning approach considerably overpredicted the crack initiation life of the thermal fatigue specimen.

  12. Inelastic Heat Transfer in Molecular Quantum Dots

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dyrkacz, Joanna; Walczak, Kamil

    We examine electronic heat conduction via molecular complexes in the presence of local electron-phonon coupling effects. In off-resonance transport regime, even weak electron-phonon interactions lead to phonon-mediated changes of transport characteristics. In the nearly resonance conditions, the strong electron-phonon coupling reduces the height of the main conductance peak, generating additional satellites (phonon sidebands) in transport characteristics and shifting molecular energy spectrum via reorganization (polaron) energy. In the past, it was shown that inclusion of electron-phonon coupling effects into computational scheme reduces discrepancy between theoretical results and experimental data. The aim of this project is to study electron-phonon coupling effects on electronic heat transfer at molecular level. For that purpose, we use non-perturbative computational scheme based on inelastic version of Landauer formula, where the Green's functions technique combined with polaron transformation was used to calculate multi-channel transmission probability function, while accessibility of individual conduction channels is governed by Boltzmann statistics. Our analysis is based on the hypothesis that the dynamics created by electron-phonon interaction onto the molecular quantum dot asymmetrically connected to two thermal reservoirs will lead to thermal rectification effect. Our results will be discussed in a few aspects: electron-phonon coupling strength, phonon dispersion relationship, and heat fluxes generated by temperature difference as well as bias voltage.

  13. Multiscale analysis of neural spike trains.

    PubMed

    Ramezan, Reza; Marriott, Paul; Chenouri, Shojaeddin

    2014-01-30

    This paper studies the multiscale analysis of neural spike trains, through both graphical and Poisson process approaches. We introduce the interspike interval plot, which simultaneously visualizes characteristics of neural spiking activity at different time scales. Using an inhomogeneous Poisson process framework, we discuss multiscale estimates of the intensity functions of spike trains. We also introduce the windowing effect for two multiscale methods. Using quasi-likelihood, we develop bootstrap confidence intervals for the multiscale intensity function. We provide a cross-validation scheme, to choose the tuning parameters, and study its unbiasedness. Studying the relationship between the spike rate and the stimulus signal, we observe that adjusting for the first spike latency is important in cross-validation. We show, through examples, that the correlation between spike trains and spike count variability can be multiscale phenomena. Furthermore, we address the modeling of the periodicity of the spike trains caused by a stimulus signal or by brain rhythms. Within the multiscale framework, we introduce intensity functions for spike trains with multiplicative and additive periodic components. Analyzing a dataset from the retinogeniculate synapse, we compare the fit of these models with the Bayesian adaptive regression splines method and discuss the limitations of the methodology. Computational efficiency, which is usually a challenge in the analysis of spike trains, is one of the highlights of these new models. In an example, we show that the reconstruction quality of a complex intensity function demonstrates the ability of the multiscale methodology to crack the neural code. PMID:23996238

  14. Improved constraints on inelastic dark matter

    SciTech Connect

    Schmidt-Hoberg, Kai; Winkler, Martin Wolfgang E-mail: mwinkler@ph.tum.de

    2009-09-01

    We perform an extensive study of the DAMA annual modulation data in the context of inelastic dark matter. We find that inelastic dark matter with mass m{sub χ}∼>15 GeV is excluded at the 95% confidence level by the combination of DAMA spectral information and results from other direct detection experiments. However, at smaller m{sub χ}, inelastic dark matter constitutes a possible solution to the DAMA puzzle.

  15. Dark matter density spikes around primordial black holes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eroshenko, Yu. N.

    2016-06-01

    We show that density spikes begin to form from dark matter particles around primordial black holes immediately after their formation at the radiation-dominated cosmological stage. This stems from the fact that in the thermal velocity distribution of particles there are particles with low velocities that remain in finite orbits around black holes and are not involved in the cosmological expansion. The accumulation of such particles near black holes gives rise to density spikes. These spikes are considerably denser than those that are formed later by the mechanism of secondary accretion. The density spikes must be bright gamma-ray sources. Comparison of the calculated signal from particle annihilation with the Fermi-LAT data constrains the present-day cosmological density parameter for primordial black holes with masses M BH ≥ 10-8 M ⊙ from above by values from ΩBH ≤ 1 to ΩBH ≤ 10-8, depending on MBH. These constraints are several orders of magnitude more stringent than other known constraints.

  16. Learning Precise Spike Train-to-Spike Train Transformations in Multilayer Feedforward Neuronal Networks.

    PubMed

    Banerjee, Arunava

    2016-05-01

    We derive a synaptic weight update rule for learning temporally precise spike train-to-spike train transformations in multilayer feedforward networks of spiking neurons. The framework, aimed at seamlessly generalizing error backpropagation to the deterministic spiking neuron setting, is based strictly on spike timing and avoids invoking concepts pertaining to spike rates or probabilistic models of spiking. The derivation is founded on two innovations. First, an error functional is proposed that compares the spike train emitted by the output neuron of the network to the desired spike train by way of their putative impact on a virtual postsynaptic neuron. This formulation sidesteps the need for spike alignment and leads to closed-form solutions for all quantities of interest. Second, virtual assignment of weights to spikes rather than synapses enables a perturbation analysis of individual spike times and synaptic weights of the output, as well as all intermediate neurons in the network, which yields the gradients of the error functional with respect to the said entities. Learning proceeds via a gradient descent mechanism that leverages these quantities. Simulation experiments demonstrate the efficacy of the proposed learning framework. The experiments also highlight asymmetries between synapses on excitatory and inhibitory neurons. PMID:26942750

  17. Inelastic Strain Analysis of Solder Joint in NASA Fatigue Specimen

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dasgupta, Abhijit; Oyan, Chen

    1991-01-01

    The solder fatigue specimen designed by NASA-GSFC/UNISYS is analyzed in order to obtain the inelastic strain history during two different representative temperature cycles specified by UNISYS. In previous reports (dated July 25, 1990, and November 15, 1990), results were presented of the elastic-plastic and creep analysis for delta T = 31 C cycle, respectively. Subsequent results obtained during the current phase, from viscoplastic finite element analysis of the solder fatigue specimen for delta T = 113 C cycle are summarized. Some common information is repeated for self-completeness. Large-deformation continuum formulations in conjunction with a standard linear solid model is utilized for modeling the solder constitutive creep-plasticity behavior. Relevant material properties are obtained from the literature. Strain amplitudes, mean strains, and residual strains (as well as stresses) accumulated due to a representative complete temperature cycle are obtained as a result of this analysis. The partitioning between elastic strains, time-independent inelastic (plastic) strains, and time-dependent inelastic (creep) strains is also explicitly obtained for two representative cycles. Detailed plots are presented for two representative temperature cycles. This information forms an important input for fatigue damage models, when predicting the fatigue life of solder joints under thermal cycling

  18. Spike Decomposition Technique: Modeling and Performance Tests

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nita, Gelu M.; Fleishman, Gregory D.; Gary, Dale E.

    2008-12-01

    We develop an automated technique for fitting the spectral components of solar microwave spike bursts, which are characterized by narrowband spectral features. The algorithm is especially useful for periods when the spikes occur in densely packed clusters, where the algorithm is capable of decomposing overlapping spike structures into individual spectral components. To test the performance and applicability limits of this data reduction tool, we perform comprehensive modeling of spike clusters characterized by various typical bandwidths, spike densities, and amplitude distributions. We find that, for a wide range of favorable combinations of input parameters, the algorithm is able to recover the characteristic features of the modeled distributions within reasonable confidence intervals. Having model-tested the algorithm against spike overlap, broadband spectral background, noise contamination, and possible malfunction of some spectral channels, we apply the technique to a spike cluster recorded by the Chinese Purple Mountain Observatory (PMO) spectrometer, operating above 4.5 GHz. We study the variation of the spike distribution parameters, such as amplitude, bandwidth, and related derived physical parameters, as a function of time. The method can be further applied to observations from other instruments and to other types of fine structures.

  19. Stochastic variational learning in recurrent spiking networks

    PubMed Central

    Jimenez Rezende, Danilo; Gerstner, Wulfram

    2014-01-01

    The ability to learn and perform statistical inference with biologically plausible recurrent networks of spiking neurons is an important step toward understanding perception and reasoning. Here we derive and investigate a new learning rule for recurrent spiking networks with hidden neurons, combining principles from variational learning and reinforcement learning. Our network defines a generative model over spike train histories and the derived learning rule has the form of a local Spike Timing Dependent Plasticity rule modulated by global factors (neuromodulators) conveying information about “novelty” on a statistically rigorous ground. Simulations show that our model is able to learn both stationary and non-stationary patterns of spike trains. We also propose one experiment that could potentially be performed with animals in order to test the dynamics of the predicted novelty signal. PMID:24772078

  20. Spiking dynamics of interacting oscillatory neurons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kazantsev, V. B.; Nekorkin, V. I.; Binczak, S.; Jacquir, S.; Bilbault, J. M.

    2005-06-01

    Spiking sequences emerging from dynamical interaction in a pair of oscillatory neurons are investigated theoretically and experimentally. The model comprises two unidirectionally coupled FitzHugh-Nagumo units with modified excitability (MFHN). The first (master) unit exhibits a periodic spike sequence with a certain frequency. The second (slave) unit is in its excitable mode and responds on the input signal with a complex (chaotic) spike trains. We analyze the dynamic mechanisms underlying different response behavior depending on interaction strength. Spiking phase maps describing the response dynamics are obtained. Complex phase locking and chaotic sequences are investigated. We show how the response spike trains can be effectively controlled by the interaction parameter and discuss the problem of neuronal information encoding.

  1. Millisecond Radio Spikes in the Decimetric Band

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    dąbrowski, B. P.; Rudawy, P.; Karlický, M.

    2011-11-01

    We present the results of the analysis of thirteen events consisting of dm-spikes observed in Toruń between 15 March 2000 and 30 October 2001. The events were obtained with a very high time resolution (80 microseconds) radio spectrograph in the 1352 - 1490 MHz range. These data were complemented with observations from the radio spectrograph at Ondřejov in the 0.8 - 2.0 GHz band. We evaluated the basic characteristics of the individual spikes (duration, spectral width, and frequency drifts), as well as their groups and chains, the location of their emission sources, and the temporal correlations of the emissions with various phases of the associated solar flares. We found that the mean duration and spectral width of the radio spikes are equal to 0.036 s and 9.96 MHz, respectively. Distributions of the duration and spectral widths of the spikes have positive skewness for all investigated events. Each spike shows positive or negative frequency drift. The mean negative and positive drifts of the investigated spikes are equal to -776 MHz s-1 and 1608 MHz s-1, respectively. The emission sources of the dm-spikes are located mainly at disk center. We have noticed two kinds of chains, with and without frequency drifts. The mean durations of the chains vary between 0.067 s and 0.509 s, while their spectral widths vary between 7.2 MHz and 17.25 MHz. The mean duration of an individual spike observed in a chain was equal to 0.03 s. While we found some agreement between the global characteristics of the groups of spikes recorded with the two instruments located in Toruń and Ondřejov, we did not find any one-to-one relation between individual spikes.

  2. Millisecond Radio Spikes in the Decimetric Band

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dąbrowski, B. P.; Rudawy, P.; Karlický, M.

    We present the results of the analysis of thirteen events consisting of dm-spikes observed in Toruń between 15 March 2000 and 30 October 2001. The events were obtained with a very high time resolution (80 microseconds) radio spectrograph in the 1352 - 1490 MHz range. These data were complemented with observations from the radio spectrograph at Ondřejov in the 0.8 - 2.0 GHz band. We evaluated the basic characteristics of the individual spikes (duration, spectral width, and frequency drifts), as well as their groups and chains, the location of their emission sources, and the temporal correlations of the emissions with various phases of the associated solar flares. We found that the mean duration and spectral width of the radio spikes are equal to 0.036 s and 9.96 MHz, respectively. Distributions of the duration and spectral widths of the spikes have positive skewness for all investigated events. Each spike shows positive or negative frequency drift. The mean negative and positive drifts of the investigated spikes are equal to -776 MHz s-1 and 1608 MHz s-1, respectively. The emission sources of the dm-spikes are located mainly at disk center. We have noticed two kinds of chains, with and without frequency drifts. The mean durations of the chains vary between 0.067 s and 0.509 s, while their spectral widths vary between 7.2 MHz and 17.25 MHz. The mean duration of an individual spike observed in a chain was equal to 0.03 s. While we found some agreement between the global characteristics of the groups of spikes recorded with the two instruments located in Toruń and Ondřejov, we did not find any one-to-one relation between individual spikes.

  3. 3D inelastic analysis methods for hot section components

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dame, L. T.; Chen, P. C.; Hartle, M. S.; Huang, H. T.

    1985-01-01

    The objective is to develop analytical tools capable of economically evaluating the cyclic time dependent plasticity which occurs in hot section engine components in areas of strain concentration resulting from the combination of both mechanical and thermal stresses. Three models were developed. A simple model performs time dependent inelastic analysis using the power law creep equation. The second model is the classical model of Professors Walter Haisler and David Allen of Texas A and M University. The third model is the unified model of Bodner, Partom, et al. All models were customized for linear variation of loads and temperatures with all material properties and constitutive models being temperature dependent.

  4. The Global Spike: Conserved Dendritic Properties Enable Unique Ca2+ Spike Generation in Low-Threshold Spiking Neurons

    PubMed Central

    Connelly, William M.; Crunelli, Vincenzo

    2015-01-01

    Low-threshold Ca2+ spikes (LTS) are an indispensible signaling mechanism for neurons in areas including the cortex, cerebellum, basal ganglia, and thalamus. They have critical physiological roles and have been strongly associated with disorders including epilepsy, Parkinson's disease, and schizophrenia. However, although dendritic T-type Ca2+ channels have been implicated in LTS generation, because the properties of low-threshold spiking neuron dendrites are unknown, the precise mechanism has remained elusive. Here, combining data from fluorescence-targeted dendritic recordings and Ca2+ imaging from low-threshold spiking cells in rat brain slices with computational modeling, the cellular mechanism responsible for LTS generation is established. Our data demonstrate that key somatodendritic electrical conduction properties are highly conserved between glutamatergic thalamocortical neurons and GABAergic thalamic reticular nucleus neurons and that these properties are critical for LTS generation. In particular, the efficiency of soma to dendrite voltage transfer is highly asymmetric in low-threshold spiking cells, and in the somatofugal direction, these neurons are particularly electrotonically compact. Our data demonstrate that LTS have remarkably similar amplitudes and occur synchronously throughout the dendritic tree. In fact, these Ca2+ spikes cannot occur locally in any part of the cell, and hence we reveal that LTS are generated by a unique whole-cell mechanism that means they always occur as spatially global spikes. This all-or-none, global electrical and biochemical signaling mechanism clearly distinguishes LTS from other signals, including backpropagating action potentials and dendritic Ca2+/NMDA spikes, and has important consequences for dendritic function in low-threshold spiking neurons. SIGNIFICANCE STATEMENT Low-threshold Ca2+ spikes (LTS) are critical for important physiological processes, including generation of sleep-related oscillations, and are

  5. Cluster-based spike detection algorithm adapts to interpatient and intrapatient variation in spike morphology.

    PubMed

    Nonclercq, Antoine; Foulon, Martine; Verheulpen, Denis; De Cock, Cathy; Buzatu, Marga; Mathys, Pierre; Van Bogaert, Patrick

    2012-09-30

    Visual quantification of interictal epileptiform activity is time consuming and requires a high level of expert's vigilance. This is especially true for overnight recordings of patient suffering from epileptic encephalopathy with continuous spike and waves during slow-wave sleep (CSWS) as they can show tens of thousands of spikes. Automatic spike detection would be attractive for this condition, but available algorithms have methodological limitations related to variation in spike morphology both between patients and within a single recording. We propose a fully automated method of interictal spike detection that adapts to interpatient and intrapatient variation in spike morphology. The algorithm works in five steps. (1) Spikes are detected using parameters suitable for highly sensitive detection. (2) Detected spikes are separated into clusters. (3) The number of clusters is automatically adjusted. (4) Centroids are used as templates for more specific spike detections, therefore adapting to the types of spike morphology. (5) Detected spikes are summed. The algorithm was evaluated on EEG samples from 20 children suffering from epilepsy with CSWS. When compared to the manual scoring of 3 EEG experts (3 records), the algorithm demonstrated similar performance since sensitivity and selectivity were 0.3% higher and 0.4% lower, respectively. The algorithm showed little difference compared to the manual scoring of another expert for the spike-and-wave index evaluation in 17 additional records (the mean absolute difference was 3.8%). This algorithm is therefore efficient for the count of interictal spikes and determination of a spike-and-wave index. PMID:22850558

  6. Spike Decomposition Technique: Modeling and Performance Tests

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nita, G. M.; Fleishman, G. D.; Gary, D. E.

    2008-05-01

    We develop an automated technique for fitting the spectral components of solar microwave spike bursts characterized by narrow-band (1-50~MHz) features of 1-10~ms duration, which are thought to be due to Electron-Cyclotron Maser emission. The algorithm is especially useful for periods when the spikes occur in densely packed clusters, where the algorithm is capable of decomposing overlapping spike structures into individual spectral components. To test the performance and applicability limits of this forward fitting algorithm, we perform comprehensive modeling of spike clusters characterized by various typical bandwidths, spike densities, and amplitude distributions. We find that, for a wide range of input parameters, the algorithm is able to recover the characteristic features of the modeled distributions within reasonable confidence intervals. Having model-tested the algorithm comprehensively against spike overlap, broadband spectral background, noise contamination, and possible contamination of cross-channel polarization, we apply the technique to observational data obtained from different instruments in different frequency ranges. Specifically, we studied spike clusters recorded by a Chinese Purple Mountain Observatory (PMO) spectrometer above 4.5 GHz and by Owens Valley Solar Array's FASR Subsystem Testbed instrument above 1 GHz. We study variation of the spike distribution parameters, such as amplitude, bandwidth and related derived physical parameters as a function of frequency and time. We discuss the implications of our results for the choice between competing models of spike generation and underlying physical processes. The method can be further applied to observations from other instruments and to other types of radio spectral fine structures. This work was supported in part by NSF grants AST-0607544 and ATM-0707319 and NASA grant NNG06GJ40G to New Jersey Institute of Technology.

  7. Decoding of intracellular calcium spike trains

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Prank, K.; Läer, L.; von zur Mühlen, A.; Brabant, G.; Schöfl, C.

    1998-04-01

    Cells respond to external signals, such as hormonal stimuli, by generating repetitive spikes in the intracellular free-calcium concentration ([Ca2+]i). These [Ca2+]i spikes, which can be modulated in their frequency and amplitude, regulate diverse cellular processes. Experimentally, [Ca2+]i can be assessed continuously in contrast to cellular responses represented by the activation of proteins. We propose a mathematical model that allows for the on-line decoding of [Ca2+]i spike trains into cellular responses represented by the activation of proteins.

  8. Spike detection using the continuous wavelet transform.

    PubMed

    Nenadic, Zoran; Burdick, Joel W

    2005-01-01

    This paper combines wavelet transforms with basic detection theory to develop a new unsupervised method for robustly detecting and localizing spikes in noisy neural recordings. The method does not require the construction of templates, or the supervised setting of thresholds. We present extensive Monte Carlo simulations, based on actual extracellular recordings, to show that this technique surpasses other commonly used methods in a wide variety of recording conditions. We further demonstrate that falsely detected spikes corresponding to our method resemble actual spikes more than the false positives of other techniques such as amplitude thresholding. Moreover, the simplicity of the method allows for nearly real-time execution. PMID:15651566

  9. Spiking sediment with organochlorines for toxicity testing

    SciTech Connect

    Murdoch, M.H.; Chapman, P.M.; Norman, D.M.; Quintino, V.M.

    1997-07-01

    Sediment toxicity testing integrates responses to sediment variables and hence does not directly indicate cause and effect. One tool for determining cause and effect is sediment spiking, in which relatively uncontaminated sediment is amended with known amounts of contaminants, then tested for toxicity. However, sediment spiking methods vary considerably. The present study details appropriate methodologies (dry and wet spiking) for amending sediments with a range of organic contaminant concentrations, i.e., polychlorinated biphenyl (PCB). Target and actual concentrations were similar. A dose-response was determined, but PCB was not toxic in an acute sediment toxicity test. Chronic testing of these same sediments is reported in a companion article in this issue.

  10. Vibration (?) spikes during natural rain events

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Short, David A.

    1994-01-01

    Limited analysis of optical rain gauge (ORG) data from shipboard and ground based sensors has shown the existence of spikes, possibly attributable to sensor vibration, while rain is occurring. An extreme example of this behavior was noted aboard the PRC#5 on the evening of December 24, 1992 as the ship began repositioning during a rain event in the TOGA/COARE IFA. The spikes are readily evident in the one-second resolution data, but may be indistinguishable from natural rain rate fluctuations in subsampled or averaged data. Such spikes result in increased rainfall totals.

  11. The Second Spiking Threshold: Dynamics of Laminar Network Spiking in the Visual Cortex

    PubMed Central

    Forsberg, Lars E.; Bonde, Lars H.; Harvey, Michael A.; Roland, Per E.

    2016-01-01

    Most neurons have a threshold separating the silent non-spiking state and the state of producing temporal sequences of spikes. But neurons in vivo also have a second threshold, found recently in granular layer neurons of the primary visual cortex, separating spontaneous ongoing spiking from visually evoked spiking driven by sharp transients. Here we examine whether this second threshold exists outside the granular layer and examine details of transitions between spiking states in ferrets exposed to moving objects. We found the second threshold, separating spiking states evoked by stationary and moving visual stimuli from the spontaneous ongoing spiking state, in all layers and zones of areas 17 and 18 indicating that the second threshold is a property of the network. Spontaneous and evoked spiking, thus can easily be distinguished. In addition, the trajectories of spontaneous ongoing states were slow, frequently changing direction. In single trials, sharp as well as smooth and slow transients transform the trajectories to be outward directed, fast and crossing the threshold to become evoked. Although the speeds of the evolution of the evoked states differ, the same domain of the state space is explored indicating uniformity of the evoked states. All evoked states return to the spontaneous evoked spiking state as in a typical mono-stable dynamical system. In single trials, neither the original spiking rates, nor the temporal evolution in state space could distinguish simple visual scenes. PMID:27582693

  12. The Second Spiking Threshold: Dynamics of Laminar Network Spiking in the Visual Cortex.

    PubMed

    Forsberg, Lars E; Bonde, Lars H; Harvey, Michael A; Roland, Per E

    2016-01-01

    Most neurons have a threshold separating the silent non-spiking state and the state of producing temporal sequences of spikes. But neurons in vivo also have a second threshold, found recently in granular layer neurons of the primary visual cortex, separating spontaneous ongoing spiking from visually evoked spiking driven by sharp transients. Here we examine whether this second threshold exists outside the granular layer and examine details of transitions between spiking states in ferrets exposed to moving objects. We found the second threshold, separating spiking states evoked by stationary and moving visual stimuli from the spontaneous ongoing spiking state, in all layers and zones of areas 17 and 18 indicating that the second threshold is a property of the network. Spontaneous and evoked spiking, thus can easily be distinguished. In addition, the trajectories of spontaneous ongoing states were slow, frequently changing direction. In single trials, sharp as well as smooth and slow transients transform the trajectories to be outward directed, fast and crossing the threshold to become evoked. Although the speeds of the evolution of the evoked states differ, the same domain of the state space is explored indicating uniformity of the evoked states. All evoked states return to the spontaneous evoked spiking state as in a typical mono-stable dynamical system. In single trials, neither the original spiking rates, nor the temporal evolution in state space could distinguish simple visual scenes. PMID:27582693

  13. Rovibrationally Inelastic Collisions of Ultracold Lithium Dimer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jasmine, William; Stewart, Brian

    2016-05-01

    We have calculated cross sections for rovibrationally inelastic collisions of Li2 A(1) 1Σu+ colliding with neon and xenon on ab initio potentials. We find that the inelastic cross section can be very large and increasing at low collision velocity. This behavior is very well modeled as a Langevin process. The total inelastic cross section is a sizable fraction of the total capture cross section, typically about a third. For Li2 - Xe, the total inelastic rate constants are several thousand square angstroms, and level-to-level rate constants are several hundred square angstroms at collision speeds below 1000 cm/s, implying that such collisions might be observable in photoassociated lithium dimer.

  14. Exponential trend to equilibrium for the inelastic Boltzmann equation driven by a particle bath

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cañizo, José A.; Lods, Bertrand

    2016-05-01

    We consider the spatially homogeneous Boltzmann equation for inelastic hard spheres (with constant restitution coefficient α \\in (0,1) ) under the thermalization induced by a host medium with a fixed Maxwellian distribution. We prove that the solution to the associated initial-value problem converges exponentially fast towards the unique equilibrium solution. The proof combines a careful spectral analysis of the linearised semigroup as well as entropy estimates. The trend towards equilibrium holds in the weakly inelastic regime in which α is close to 1, and the rate of convergence is explicit and depends solely on the spectral gap of the elastic linear collision operator.

  15. Fitting Neuron Models to Spike Trains

    PubMed Central

    Rossant, Cyrille; Goodman, Dan F. M.; Fontaine, Bertrand; Platkiewicz, Jonathan; Magnusson, Anna K.; Brette, Romain

    2011-01-01

    Computational modeling is increasingly used to understand the function of neural circuits in systems neuroscience. These studies require models of individual neurons with realistic input–output properties. Recently, it was found that spiking models can accurately predict the precisely timed spike trains produced by cortical neurons in response to somatically injected currents, if properly fitted. This requires fitting techniques that are efficient and flexible enough to easily test different candidate models. We present a generic solution, based on the Brian simulator (a neural network simulator in Python), which allows the user to define and fit arbitrary neuron models to electrophysiological recordings. It relies on vectorization and parallel computing techniques to achieve efficiency. We demonstrate its use on neural recordings in the barrel cortex and in the auditory brainstem, and confirm that simple adaptive spiking models can accurately predict the response of cortical neurons. Finally, we show how a complex multicompartmental model can be reduced to a simple effective spiking model. PMID:21415925

  16. Intramuscular pressures beneath elastic and inelastic leggings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Murthy, G.; Ballard, R. E.; Breit, G. A.; Watenpaugh, D. E.; Hargens, A. R.

    1994-01-01

    Leg compression devices have been used extensively by patients to combat chronic venous insufficiency and by astronauts to counteract orthostatic intolerance following spaceflight. However, the effects of elastic and inelastic leggings on the calf muscle pump have not been compared. The purpose of this study was to compare in normal subjects the effects of elastic and inelastic compression on leg intramuscular pressure (IMP), an objective index of calf muscle pump function. IMP in soleus and tibialis anterior muscles was measured with transducer-tipped catheters. Surface compression between each legging and the skin was recorded with an air bladder. Subjects were studied under three conditions: (1) control (no legging), (2) elastic legging, and (3) inelastic legging. Pressure data were recorded for each condition during recumbency, sitting, standing, walking, and running. Elastic leggings applied significantly greater surface compression during recumbency (20 +/- 1 mm Hg, mean +/- SE) than inelastic leggings (13 +/- 2 mm Hg). During recumbency, elastic leggings produced significantly higher soleus IMP of 25 +/- 1 mm Hg and tibialis anterior IMP of 28 +/- 1 mm Hg compared to 17 +/- 1 mm Hg and 20 +/- 2 mm Hg, respectively, generated by inelastic leggings and 8 +/- 1 mm Hg and 11 +/- 1 mm Hg, respectively, without leggings. During sitting, walking, and running, however, peak IMPs generated in the muscular compartments by elastic and inelastic leggings were similar. Our results suggest that elastic leg compression applied over a long period in the recumbent posture may impede microcirculation and jeopardize tissue viability.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS).

  17. Deep and shallow inelastic scattering

    SciTech Connect

    Ray, Heather

    2015-05-15

    In this session we focused on the higher energy deep and shallow inelastic particle interactions, DIS and SIS. DIS interactions occur when the energy of the incident particle beam is so large that the beam is able to penetrate the nucleons inside of the target nuclei. These interactions occur at the smallest level possible, that of the quark-gluon, or parton, level. SIS interactions occur in an intermediate energy range, just below the energy required for DIS interactions. The DIS cross section formula contains structure functions that describe our understanding of the underlying parton structure of nature. The full description of DIS interactions requires three structure functions: two may be measured in charged lepton or neutrino scattering, but one can only be extracted from neutrino DIS data. There are reasons to expect that the impact of nuclear effects could be different for neutrinos engaging in the DIS interaction, vs those felt by leptons. In fact, fits by the nCTEQ collaboration have found that the neutrino-Fe structure functions appear to differ from those extracted from lepton scattering data [1]. To better understand the global picture of DIS and SIS, we chose a three-pronged attack that examined recent experimental results, data fits, and latest theory predictions. Experimental results from neutrino and lepton scattering, as well as collider experiments, were presented.

  18. Inelastic final-state interaction

    SciTech Connect

    Suzuki, Mahiko; Suzuki, Mahiko

    2007-10-29

    The final-state interaction in multichannel decay processes is systematically studied with application to B decay in mind. Since the final-state interaction is intrinsically interwoven with the decay interaction in this case, no simple phase theorem like"Watson's theorem" holds for experimentally observed final states. We first examine in detail the two-channel problem as a toy-model to clarify the issues and to remedy common mistakes made in earlier literature. Realistic multichannel problems are too challenging for quantitative analysis. To cope with mathematical complexity, we introduce a method of approximation that is applicable to the case where one prominent inelastic channel dominates over all others. We illustrate this approximation method in the amplitude of the decay B to pi K fed by the intermediate states of a charmed meson pair. Even with our approximation we need more accurate information of strong interactions than we have now. Nonetheless we are able to obtain some insight in the issue and draw useful conclusions on general features on the strong phases.

  19. Retractable spiked barrier strip for law enforcement

    SciTech Connect

    Marts, D.J.; Barker, S.G.

    1995-03-01

    The Idaho National Engineering Laboratory has designed an laboratory tested a prototype retractable spiked barrier strip for law enforcement. The proposed system, which is ready for controlled field testing, expands the functionality of existing spiked barrier strips. A retractable barrier strip, one that can place the spikes in either the active (vertical) or passive (horizontal) position, would allow law enforcement personnel to lay the unobtrusive strip across a road far in advance of a fleeing vehicle. No damage occurs to passing vehicles until the spikes are activated, and that can be done from a safe distance and at a strategic location when the offending vehicle is close to the strip. The concept also allows the strips to be place safely across several roadways that are potential paths of a fleeing vehicle. Since they are not activated until needed, they are harmless to nonoffending vehicles. The laboratory tests conducted on the system indicate that it will puncture tires only when the spikes are rotated to the active position and is safe to travel over when the spikes are in the down position. The strip itself will not cause instability to a vehicle driving over it, nor is the strip disturbed or adversely affected by vehicles driving over it. The spikes can be quickly rotated between the active (vertical) and passive (horizontal) position. However, the laboratory tests have only demonstrated that the retractable spiked barrier strip can perform its intended function in a laboratory environment. Field tests are needed to finalize the design and develop the system into a functional law enforcement tool.

  20. Automated stationary source dynamic spiking. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    McGaughey, J.F.

    1998-06-17

    Methods of collection and analysis for monitoring stationary sources must demonstrate conclusively that the methodology is functioning properly and according to specified EPA criteria. The appropriate procedure for demonstrating proper operation of the method is to perform dynamic spiking of the analyte in the field, at the specified source being monitored. Gaseous dynamic spiking, using certified gas mixtures as the spiking medium has been used in previous EPA stationary source sampling methods and documented in EPA reports. Liquid dynamic spiking, using mixtures of liquid and solid analytes in an organic or aqueous solvent has also been used in previous EPA field tests. To remove, as much as possible, the potential for human error, the EPA has developed a prototype liquid dynamic spiking system employing computerized operation of the analyte spiking procedure with video monitoring and control of the liquid droplet frequency and size. This report describes development of the system applicability to stationary source sampling, the individual parts incorporated into the system, and the standard operating procedures.

  1. Macroscopic Description for Networks of Spiking Neurons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Montbrió, Ernest; Pazó, Diego; Roxin, Alex

    2015-04-01

    A major goal of neuroscience, statistical physics, and nonlinear dynamics is to understand how brain function arises from the collective dynamics of networks of spiking neurons. This challenge has been chiefly addressed through large-scale numerical simulations. Alternatively, researchers have formulated mean-field theories to gain insight into macroscopic states of large neuronal networks in terms of the collective firing activity of the neurons, or the firing rate. However, these theories have not succeeded in establishing an exact correspondence between the firing rate of the network and the underlying microscopic state of the spiking neurons. This has largely constrained the range of applicability of such macroscopic descriptions, particularly when trying to describe neuronal synchronization. Here, we provide the derivation of a set of exact macroscopic equations for a network of spiking neurons. Our results reveal that the spike generation mechanism of individual neurons introduces an effective coupling between two biophysically relevant macroscopic quantities, the firing rate and the mean membrane potential, which together govern the evolution of the neuronal network. The resulting equations exactly describe all possible macroscopic dynamical states of the network, including states of synchronous spiking activity. Finally, we show that the firing-rate description is related, via a conformal map, to a low-dimensional description in terms of the Kuramoto order parameter, called Ott-Antonsen theory. We anticipate that our results will be an important tool in investigating how large networks of spiking neurons self-organize in time to process and encode information in the brain.

  2. Neuronal Spike Trains and Stochastic Point Processes

    PubMed Central

    Perkel, Donald H.; Gerstein, George L.; Moore, George P.

    1967-01-01

    In a growing class of neurophysiological experiments, the train of impulses (“spikes”) produced by a nerve cell is subjected to statistical treatment involving the time intervals between spikes. The statistical techniques available for the analysis of single spike trains are described and related to the underlying mathematical theory, that of stochastic point processes, i.e., of stochastic processes whose realizations may be described as series of point events occurring in time, separated by random intervals. For single stationary spike trains, several orders of complexity of statistical treatment are described; the major distinction is that between statistical measures that depend in an essential way on the serial order of interspike intervals and those that are order-independent. The interrelations among the several types of calculations are shown, and an attempt is made to ameliorate the current nomenclatural confusion in this field. Applications, interpretations, and potential difficulties of the statistical techniques are discussed, with special reference to types of spike trains encountered experimentally. Next, the related types of analysis are described for experiments which involve repeated presentations of a brief, isolated stimulus. Finally, the effects of nonstationarity, e.g. long-term changes in firing rate, on the various statistical measures are discussed. Several commonly observed patterns of spike activity are shown to be differentially sensitive to such changes. A companion paper covers the analysis of simultaneously observed spike trains. PMID:4292791

  3. Propagation of Spiking and Burst-Spiking Synchronous States in a Feed-Forward Neuronal Network

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Xi; Huang, Hong-Bin; Li, Pei-Jun; Wu, Fang-Ping; Wu, Wang-Jie; Jiang, Min

    2012-12-01

    Neuronal firing that carries information can propagate stably in neuronal networks. One important feature of the stable states is their spatiotemporal correlation (STC) developed in the propagation. The propagation of synchronous states of spiking and burst-spiking neuronal activities in a feed-forward neuronal network with high STC is studied. Different dynamic regions and synchronous regions of the second layer are clarified for spiking and burst-spiking neuronal activities. By calculating correlation, it is found that five layers are needed for stable propagation. Synchronous regions of the 4th layer and the 10th layer are compared.

  4. Implications of stress range for inelastic analysis. [CRBRP flued head containment penetration

    SciTech Connect

    Karabin, M.E.; Dhalla, A.K.

    1981-01-01

    The elastic stress range over a complete load cycle is routinely used to formulate simplified rules regarding the inelastic behavior of structures operating at elevated temperature. For example, a 300 series stainless steel structure operating at elevated temperature, in all probability, would satisfy the ASME Boiler and Pressure Vessel Code criteria if the linearized elastic stress range is less than three times the material yield strength. However, at higher elastic stress ranges it is difficult to judge, a priori, that a structural component would comply with inelastic Code criteria after a detailed inelastic analysis. The purpose of this paper is to illustrate that it is not the elastic stress range but the stress intensities at specific times during a thermal transient which provide a better insight into the inelastic response of the structure. The specific example of the CRBRP flued head design demonstrates that the temperature differential between various parts of the structure can be changed by modifying the insulation pattern and heat flow path in the structure, without significantly altering the elastic stress range over a complete load cycle. However, the modified design did reduce the stress intensity during steady state elevated temperature operation. This modified design satisfied the inelastic Code criteria whereas the initial design failed to comply with the strain accumulation criterion.

  5. Thermal Fatigue and Fracture Behavior of Ceramic Thermal Barrier Coatings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zhu, Dong-Ming; Choi, Sung R.; Miller, Robert A.

    2001-01-01

    Thermal fatigue and fracture behavior of plasma-sprayed ceramic thermal barrier coatings has been investigated under high heat flux and thermal cyclic conditions. The coating crack propagation is studied under laser heat flux cyclic thermal loading, and is correlated with dynamic fatigue and strength test results. The coating stress response and inelasticity, fatigue and creep interactions, and interface damage mechanisms during dynamic thermal fatigue processes are emphasized.

  6. Stability and Competition in Multi-spike Models of Spike-Timing Dependent Plasticity.

    PubMed

    Babadi, Baktash; Abbott, L F

    2016-03-01

    Spike-timing dependent plasticity (STDP) is a widespread plasticity mechanism in the nervous system. The simplest description of STDP only takes into account pairs of pre- and postsynaptic spikes, with potentiation of the synapse when a presynaptic spike precedes a postsynaptic spike and depression otherwise. In light of experiments that explored a variety of spike patterns, the pair-based STDP model has been augmented to account for multiple pre- and postsynaptic spike interactions. As a result, a number of different "multi-spike" STDP models have been proposed based on different experimental observations. The behavior of these models at the population level is crucial for understanding mechanisms of learning and memory. The challenging balance between the stability of a population of synapses and their competitive modification is well studied for pair-based models, but it has not yet been fully analyzed for multi-spike models. Here, we address this issue through numerical simulations of an integrate-and-fire model neuron with excitatory synapses subject to STDP described by three different proposed multi-spike models. We also analytically calculate average synaptic changes and fluctuations about these averages. Our results indicate that the different multi-spike models behave quite differently at the population level. Although each model can produce synaptic competition in certain parameter regions, none of them induces synaptic competition with its originally fitted parameters. The dichotomy between synaptic stability and Hebbian competition, which is well characterized for pair-based STDP models, persists in multi-spike models. However, anti-Hebbian competition can coexist with synaptic stability in some models. We propose that the collective behavior of synaptic plasticity models at the population level should be used as an additional guideline in applying phenomenological models based on observations of single synapses. PMID:26939080

  7. Spike timing precision changes with spike rate adaptation in the owl's auditory space map.

    PubMed

    Keller, Clifford H; Takahashi, Terry T

    2015-10-01

    Spike rate adaptation (SRA) is a continuing change of responsiveness to ongoing stimuli, which is ubiquitous across species and levels of sensory systems. Under SRA, auditory responses to constant stimuli change over time, relaxing toward a long-term rate often over multiple timescales. With more variable stimuli, SRA causes the dependence of spike rate on sound pressure level to shift toward the mean level of recent stimulus history. A model based on subtractive adaptation (Benda J, Hennig RM. J Comput Neurosci 24: 113-136, 2008) shows that changes in spike rate and level dependence are mechanistically linked. Space-specific neurons in the barn owl's midbrain, when recorded under ketamine-diazepam anesthesia, showed these classical characteristics of SRA, while at the same time exhibiting changes in spike timing precision. Abrupt level increases of sinusoidally amplitude-modulated (SAM) noise initially led to spiking at higher rates with lower temporal precision. Spike rate and precision relaxed toward their long-term values with a time course similar to SRA, results that were also replicated by the subtractive model. Stimuli whose amplitude modulations (AMs) were not synchronous across carrier frequency evoked spikes in response to stimulus envelopes of a particular shape, characterized by the spectrotemporal receptive field (STRF). Again, abrupt stimulus level changes initially disrupted the temporal precision of spiking, which then relaxed along with SRA. We suggest that shifts in latency associated with stimulus level changes may differ between carrier frequency bands and underlie decreased spike precision. Thus SRA is manifest not simply as a change in spike rate but also as a change in the temporal precision of spiking. PMID:26269555

  8. Spike timing control in retinal prosthetic

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Werblin, Frank

    2005-03-01

    To restore meaningful vision to blind patients requires a retinal prosthetic device that can generate precise spiking patterns in retinal ganglion cells. We sought to develop a stimulus protocol that could reliably elicit one ganglion cell spike for every stimulation pulse over a broad frequency range. Small tipped platinum-iridium epiretinal electrodes were used to deliver biphasic cathodal electrical stimulus pulses at frequencies ranging from 10 to 125 Hz. We measured spiking responses with on-cell patch clamp from ganglion cells in the flat mount rabbit retina, identified by light response and morphology. Single electrical 30 pA cathodal pulses of 1 msec duration elicited both by direct electrical activation of ganglion cells and synaptic excitation and inhibition. Direct activation elicited a single spike that followed the onset of the cathodic pulse by about 100 μsec; presynaptic activation typically elicited multiple spikes which began after 10 msec and could persist for more than 50 ms depending on pulse amplitude levels. Limiting the pulse duration to 100 μsec eliminated all presynaptic activity: only ganglion cells were driven. Each pulse elicited a single pike for stimulation frequencies tested from 10 to125 Hz. Our ability to elicit one spike per pulse provides many important advantages: This protocol can be used to generate temporal patterns of activity in ganglion cells with precision. We can now mimic normal light evoked responses for either transient or sustained cells, and we can modulate spike frequency to simulate changes in intensity, contrast, motion and other essential cues in the visual environment.

  9. Visually Evoked Spiking Evolves While Spontaneous Ongoing Dynamics Persist

    PubMed Central

    Huys, Raoul; Jirsa, Viktor K.; Darokhan, Ziauddin; Valentiniene, Sonata; Roland, Per E.

    2016-01-01

    Neurons in the primary visual cortex spontaneously spike even when there are no visual stimuli. It is unknown whether the spiking evoked by visual stimuli is just a modification of the spontaneous ongoing cortical spiking dynamics or whether the spontaneous spiking state disappears and is replaced by evoked spiking. This study of laminar recordings of spontaneous spiking and visually evoked spiking of neurons in the ferret primary visual cortex shows that the spiking dynamics does not change: the spontaneous spiking as well as evoked spiking is controlled by a stable and persisting fixed point attractor. Its existence guarantees that evoked spiking return to the spontaneous state. However, the spontaneous ongoing spiking state and the visual evoked spiking states are qualitatively different and are separated by a threshold (separatrix). The functional advantage of this organization is that it avoids the need for a system reorganization following visual stimulation, and impedes the transition of spontaneous spiking to evoked spiking and the propagation of spontaneous spiking from layer 4 to layers 2–3. PMID:26778982

  10. Spike Detection Based on Normalized Correlation with Automatic Template Generation

    PubMed Central

    Hwang, Wen-Jyi; Wang, Szu-Huai; Hsu, Ya-Tzu

    2014-01-01

    A novel feedback-based spike detection algorithm for noisy spike trains is presented in this paper. It uses the information extracted from the results of spike classification for the enhancement of spike detection. The algorithm performs template matching for spike detection by a normalized correlator. The detected spikes are then sorted by the OSortalgorithm. The mean of spikes of each cluster produced by the OSort algorithm is used as the template of the normalized correlator for subsequent detection. The automatic generation and updating of templates enhance the robustness of the spike detection to input trains with various spike waveforms and noise levels. Experimental results show that the proposed algorithm operating in conjunction with OSort is an efficient design for attaining high detection and classification accuracy for spike sorting. PMID:24960082

  11. Spiking Neurons for Analysis of Patterns

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Huntsberger, Terrance

    2008-01-01

    Artificial neural networks comprising spiking neurons of a novel type have been conceived as improved pattern-analysis and pattern-recognition computational systems. These neurons are represented by a mathematical model denoted the state-variable model (SVM), which among other things, exploits a computational parallelism inherent in spiking-neuron geometry. Networks of SVM neurons offer advantages of speed and computational efficiency, relative to traditional artificial neural networks. The SVM also overcomes some of the limitations of prior spiking-neuron models. There are numerous potential pattern-recognition, tracking, and data-reduction (data preprocessing) applications for these SVM neural networks on Earth and in exploration of remote planets. Spiking neurons imitate biological neurons more closely than do the neurons of traditional artificial neural networks. A spiking neuron includes a central cell body (soma) surrounded by a tree-like interconnection network (dendrites). Spiking neurons are so named because they generate trains of output pulses (spikes) in response to inputs received from sensors or from other neurons. They gain their speed advantage over traditional neural networks by using the timing of individual spikes for computation, whereas traditional artificial neurons use averages of activity levels over time. Moreover, spiking neurons use the delays inherent in dendritic processing in order to efficiently encode the information content of incoming signals. Because traditional artificial neurons fail to capture this encoding, they have less processing capability, and so it is necessary to use more gates when implementing traditional artificial neurons in electronic circuitry. Such higher-order functions as dynamic tasking are effected by use of pools (collections) of spiking neurons interconnected by spike-transmitting fibers. The SVM includes adaptive thresholds and submodels of transport of ions (in imitation of such transport in biological

  12. Nonsmooth dynamics in spiking neuron models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Coombes, S.; Thul, R.; Wedgwood, K. C. A.

    2012-11-01

    Large scale studies of spiking neural networks are a key part of modern approaches to understanding the dynamics of biological neural tissue. One approach in computational neuroscience has been to consider the detailed electrophysiological properties of neurons and build vast computational compartmental models. An alternative has been to develop minimal models of spiking neurons with a reduction in the dimensionality of both parameter and variable space that facilitates more effective simulation studies. In this latter case the single neuron model of choice is often a variant of the classic integrate-and-fire model, which is described by a nonsmooth dynamical system. In this paper we review some of the more popular spiking models of this class and describe the types of spiking pattern that they can generate (ranging from tonic to burst firing). We show that a number of techniques originally developed for the study of impact oscillators are directly relevant to their analysis, particularly those for treating grazing bifurcations. Importantly we highlight one particular single neuron model, capable of generating realistic spike trains, that is both computationally cheap and analytically tractable. This is a planar nonlinear integrate-and-fire model with a piecewise linear vector field and a state dependent reset upon spiking. We call this the PWL-IF model and analyse it at both the single neuron and network level. The techniques and terminology of nonsmooth dynamical systems are used to flesh out the bifurcation structure of the single neuron model, as well as to develop the notion of Lyapunov exponents. We also show how to construct the phase response curve for this system, emphasising that techniques in mathematical neuroscience may also translate back to the field of nonsmooth dynamical systems. The stability of periodic spiking orbits is assessed using a linear stability analysis of spiking times. At the network level we consider linear coupling between voltage

  13. Enhancement of Spike-Timing-Dependent Plasticity in Spiking Neural Systems with Noise.

    PubMed

    Nobukawa, Sou; Nishimura, Haruhiko

    2016-08-01

    Synaptic plasticity is widely recognized to support adaptable information processing in the brain. Spike-timing-dependent plasticity, one subtype of plasticity, can lead to synchronous spike propagation with temporal spiking coding information. Recently, it was reported that in a noisy environment, like the actual brain, the spike-timing-dependent plasticity may be made efficient by the effect of stochastic resonance. In the stochastic resonance, the presence of noise helps a nonlinear system in amplifying a weak (under barrier) signal. However, previous studies have ignored the full variety of spiking patterns and many relevant factors in neural dynamics. Thus, in order to prove the physiological possibility for the enhancement of spike-timing-dependent plasticity by stochastic resonance, it is necessary to demonstrate that this stochastic resonance arises in realistic cortical neural systems. In this study, we evaluate this stochastic resonance phenomenon in the realistic cortical neural system described by the Izhikevich neuron model and compare the characteristics of typical spiking patterns of regular spiking, intrinsically bursting and chattering experimentally observed in the cortex. PMID:26678248

  14. Competitive STDP-based spike pattern learning.

    PubMed

    Masquelier, Timothée; Guyonneau, Rudy; Thorpe, Simon J

    2009-05-01

    Recently it has been shown that a repeating arbitrary spatiotemporal spike pattern hidden in equally dense distracter spike trains can be robustly detected and learned by a single neuron equipped with spike-timing-dependent plasticity (STDP) (Masquelier, Guyonneau, & Thorpe, 2008). To be precise, the neuron becomes selective to successive coincidences of the pattern. Here we extend this scheme to a more realistic scenario with multiple repeating patterns and multiple STDP neurons "listening" to the incoming spike trains. These "listening" neurons are in competition: as soon as one fires, it strongly inhibits the others through lateral connections (one-winner-take-all mechanism). This tends to prevent the neurons from learning the same (parts of the) repeating patterns, as shown in simulations. Instead, the population self-organizes, trying to cover the different patterns or coding one pattern by the successive firings of several neurons, and a powerful distributed coding scheme emerges. Taken together, these results illustrate how the brain could easily encode and decode information in the spike times, a theory referred to as temporal coding, and how STDP could play a key role by detecting repeating patterns and generating selective response to them. PMID:19718815

  15. Spike Code Flow in Cultured Neuronal Networks.

    PubMed

    Tamura, Shinichi; Nishitani, Yoshi; Hosokawa, Chie; Miyoshi, Tomomitsu; Sawai, Hajime; Kamimura, Takuya; Yagi, Yasushi; Mizuno-Matsumoto, Yuko; Chen, Yen-Wei

    2016-01-01

    We observed spike trains produced by one-shot electrical stimulation with 8 × 8 multielectrodes in cultured neuronal networks. Each electrode accepted spikes from several neurons. We extracted the short codes from spike trains and obtained a code spectrum with a nominal time accuracy of 1%. We then constructed code flow maps as movies of the electrode array to observe the code flow of "1101" and "1011," which are typical pseudorandom sequence such as that we often encountered in a literature and our experiments. They seemed to flow from one electrode to the neighboring one and maintained their shape to some extent. To quantify the flow, we calculated the "maximum cross-correlations" among neighboring electrodes, to find the direction of maximum flow of the codes with lengths less than 8. Normalized maximum cross-correlations were almost constant irrespective of code. Furthermore, if the spike trains were shuffled in interval orders or in electrodes, they became significantly small. Thus, the analysis suggested that local codes of approximately constant shape propagated and conveyed information across the network. Hence, the codes can serve as visible and trackable marks of propagating spike waves as well as evaluating information flow in the neuronal network. PMID:27217825

  16. Spike Code Flow in Cultured Neuronal Networks

    PubMed Central

    Tamura, Shinichi; Nishitani, Yoshi; Miyoshi, Tomomitsu; Sawai, Hajime; Kamimura, Takuya; Yagi, Yasushi; Mizuno-Matsumoto, Yuko; Chen, Yen-Wei

    2016-01-01

    We observed spike trains produced by one-shot electrical stimulation with 8 × 8 multielectrodes in cultured neuronal networks. Each electrode accepted spikes from several neurons. We extracted the short codes from spike trains and obtained a code spectrum with a nominal time accuracy of 1%. We then constructed code flow maps as movies of the electrode array to observe the code flow of “1101” and “1011,” which are typical pseudorandom sequence such as that we often encountered in a literature and our experiments. They seemed to flow from one electrode to the neighboring one and maintained their shape to some extent. To quantify the flow, we calculated the “maximum cross-correlations” among neighboring electrodes, to find the direction of maximum flow of the codes with lengths less than 8. Normalized maximum cross-correlations were almost constant irrespective of code. Furthermore, if the spike trains were shuffled in interval orders or in electrodes, they became significantly small. Thus, the analysis suggested that local codes of approximately constant shape propagated and conveyed information across the network. Hence, the codes can serve as visible and trackable marks of propagating spike waves as well as evaluating information flow in the neuronal network. PMID:27217825

  17. Mikkelson sweep/spike chisel plow shovel

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1992-01-01

    Profitability comparisons are reported between the Mikkelson Sweep/Spike Chisel Plow Shovel standard sweeps. This evaluation covers the first year of testing of the new Sweep/Spike design. The data are not averaged over treatments due to significant interaction between treatments and environmental factors. The cost of fuel, fall and spring, to perform the various treatments ranged from $1.27 to $3.36 per acre. Use of the sweep/spike shovel always reduced total fuel cost. Savings varied from $0.11 to $0.71 per acre depending on prior treatment. This means there will be money saved, to off-set expenses, when converting present chisel plows or for special options on new chisel plows, needed for use of the sweep/spike shovel. A summary of 1991--1992 energy measurements. They indicate that more power will be required to pull a chisel plow equipped with the sweep/spike shovel. A larger tractor, narrower chisel plow and/or slower speed will be required to avoid the wheel slippage problems encountered on soft or wet field surfaces.

  18. Stability and Competition in Multi-spike Models of Spike-Timing Dependent Plasticity

    PubMed Central

    Babadi, Baktash; Abbott, L. F.

    2016-01-01

    Spike-timing dependent plasticity (STDP) is a widespread plasticity mechanism in the nervous system. The simplest description of STDP only takes into account pairs of pre- and postsynaptic spikes, with potentiation of the synapse when a presynaptic spike precedes a postsynaptic spike and depression otherwise. In light of experiments that explored a variety of spike patterns, the pair-based STDP model has been augmented to account for multiple pre- and postsynaptic spike interactions. As a result, a number of different “multi-spike” STDP models have been proposed based on different experimental observations. The behavior of these models at the population level is crucial for understanding mechanisms of learning and memory. The challenging balance between the stability of a population of synapses and their competitive modification is well studied for pair-based models, but it has not yet been fully analyzed for multi-spike models. Here, we address this issue through numerical simulations of an integrate-and-fire model neuron with excitatory synapses subject to STDP described by three different proposed multi-spike models. We also analytically calculate average synaptic changes and fluctuations about these averages. Our results indicate that the different multi-spike models behave quite differently at the population level. Although each model can produce synaptic competition in certain parameter regions, none of them induces synaptic competition with its originally fitted parameters. The dichotomy between synaptic stability and Hebbian competition, which is well characterized for pair-based STDP models, persists in multi-spike models. However, anti-Hebbian competition can coexist with synaptic stability in some models. We propose that the collective behavior of synaptic plasticity models at the population level should be used as an additional guideline in applying phenomenological models based on observations of single synapses. PMID:26939080

  19. Multiple Scattering Theory for Inelastic Processes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Braun, V. M.; Shabelski, Yu. M.

    The review is devoted to the description of inelastic interactions of composite systems in the framework of the multiple scattering approach. Quasielastic scattering and multiple hadron production processes are considered for hadron-hadron, hadron-nucleus, and nucleus-nucleus collisions at high energies. We show that important information on inelastic processes follows on very general grounds from the classification of various intermediate states in the elastic amplitude, as similarly AGK cutting rules arise for reggeon diagrams. Attention is mainly given to the appropriate technique, which is illustrated with several examples of increasing complexity. The general formalism for the inelastic screening corrections is presented and its particular applications to various reactions. The review does not aim at the systematic study of numerous versions of the multiple scattering calculus confronting each other and to the extensive experimental data. Instead, we concentrate on a few simple examples to make clear the underlying physics and to work out the needed machinery employed in practical calculations.

  20. The Cosmology of Composite Inelastic Dark Matter

    SciTech Connect

    Spier Moreira Alves, Daniele; Behbahani, Siavosh R.; Schuster, Philip; Wacker, Jay G.; /SLAC

    2011-08-19

    Composite dark matter is a natural setting for implementing inelastic dark matter - the O(100 keV) mass splitting arises from spin-spin interactions of constituent fermions. In models where the constituents are charged under an axial U(1) gauge symmetry that also couples to the Standard Model quarks, dark matter scatters inelastically off Standard Model nuclei and can explain the DAMA/LIBRA annual modulation signal. This article describes the early Universe cosmology of a minimal implementation of a composite inelastic dark matter model where the dark matter is a meson composed of a light and a heavy quark. The synthesis of the constituent quarks into dark hadrons results in several qualitatively different configurations of the resulting dark matter composition depending on the relative mass scales in the system.

  1. Spiking models for level-invariant encoding.

    PubMed

    Brette, Romain

    2011-01-01

    Levels of ecological sounds vary over several orders of magnitude, but the firing rate and membrane potential of a neuron are much more limited in range. In binaural neurons of the barn owl, tuning to interaural delays is independent of level differences. Yet a monaural neuron with a fixed threshold should fire earlier in response to louder sounds, which would disrupt the tuning of these neurons. How could spike timing be independent of input level? Here I derive theoretical conditions for a spiking model to be insensitive to input level. The key property is a dynamic change in spike threshold. I then show how level invariance can be physiologically implemented, with specific ionic channel properties. It appears that these ingredients are indeed present in monaural neurons of the sound localization pathway of birds and mammals. PMID:22291634

  2. High temperature inelastic deformation under uniaxial loading - Theory and experiment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chan, K. S.; Lindholm, U. S.; Bodner, S. R.; Walker, K. P.

    1989-01-01

    The elevated-temperature uniaxial inelastic deformation behavior of an Ni-base alloy, B1900 + Hf, is investigated by performing isothermal tensile, creep, cyclic, stress relaxation, and thermomechanical fatigue tests. The range of strain rates examined is from 10 to the -7th to 100 per sec, while the test temperatures range from 25 to 1093 C. This extensive constitutive data base has been used for evaluating the unified constitutive models of Bodner and Partom (1972) and of Walker (1972) which apply for the small-strain regime. Comparison of test results with independent model predictions indicates good agreement over a broad range of loading conditions, demonstrating the applicability of the unified-constitutive-equation approach for describing the strongly nonlinear and temperature-dependent response of meals under a wide range of deformation and thermal histories. Thus the results give confidence that the unified approach is an effective and efficient approach in which complex history-dependent thermoviscoplastic flow can be represented within a single inelastic strain-rate term.

  3. Temporal Correlations and Neural Spike Train Entropy

    SciTech Connect

    Schultz, Simon R.; Panzeri, Stefano

    2001-06-18

    Sampling considerations limit the experimental conditions under which information theoretic analyses of neurophysiological data yield reliable results. We develop a procedure for computing the full temporal entropy and information of ensembles of neural spike trains, which performs reliably for limited samples of data. This approach also yields insight to the role of correlations between spikes in temporal coding mechanisms. The method, when applied to recordings from complex cells of the monkey primary visual cortex, results in lower rms error information estimates in comparison to a {open_quotes}brute force{close_quotes} approach.

  4. Inelastic Neutron Scattering from Glass Formers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Buchenau, U.

    Neutron spectra below and above the glass transition temperature show a pronounced difference between strong and fragile glass formers in Angell's fragility scheme. The strong anharmonic increase of the inelastic scattering with increasing temperature in fragile substances is absent in the strongest glass former SiO2. That difference is reflected in the temperature dependence of Brillouin sound velocities above the glass transition. Coherent inelastic neutron scattering data indicate a mixture of sound waves and local modes at the low frequency boson peak. A relation between the fragility and the temperature dependence of the transverse hypersound velocity at the glass temperature is derived.

  5. Comparison of electrodialytic removal of Cu from spiked kaolinite, spiked soil and industrially polluted soil.

    PubMed

    Ottosen, Lisbeth M; Lepkova, Katarina; Kubal, Martin

    2006-09-01

    Electrokinetic remediation methods for removal of heavy metals from polluted soils have been subjected for quite intense research during the past years since these methods are well suitable for fine-grained soils where other remediation methods fail. Electrodialytic remediation is an electrokinetic remediation method which is based on applying an electric dc field and the use of ion exchange membranes that ensures the main transport of heavy metals to be out of the pollutes soil. An experimental investigation was made with electrodialytic removal of Cu from spiked kaolinite, spiked soil and industrially polluted soil under the same operational conditions (constant current density 0.2 mA/cm(2) and duration 28 days). The results of the present paper show that caution must be taken when generalising results obtained in spiked kaolinite to remediation of industrially polluted soils, as it was shown that the removal rate was higher in kaolinite than in both spiked soil and industrial polluted soil. The duration of spiking was found to be an important factor too, when attempting to relate remediation of spiked soil or kaolinite to remediation of industrially polluted soils. Spiking for 2 days was too short. However, spiking for 30 days resulted in a pattern that was more similar to that of industrially polluted soils with similar compositions both regarding sequential extraction and electrodialytic remediation result, though the remediation still progressed slightly faster in the spiked soil. Generalisation of remediation results to a variety of soil types must on the other hand be done with caution since the remediation results of different industrially polluted soils were very different. In one soil a total of 76% Cu was removed and in another soil no Cu was removed only redistributed within the soil. The factor with the highest influence on removal success was soil pH, which must be low in order to mobilize Cu, and thus the buffering capacity against acidification was

  6. An Unsupervised Online Spike-Sorting Framework.

    PubMed

    Knieling, Simeon; Sridharan, Kousik S; Belardinelli, Paolo; Naros, Georgios; Weiss, Daniel; Mormann, Florian; Gharabaghi, Alireza

    2016-08-01

    Extracellular neuronal microelectrode recordings can include action potentials from multiple neurons. To separate spikes from different neurons, they can be sorted according to their shape, a procedure referred to as spike-sorting. Several algorithms have been reported to solve this task. However, when clustering outcomes are unsatisfactory, most of them are difficult to adjust to achieve the desired results. We present an online spike-sorting framework that uses feature normalization and weighting to maximize the distinctiveness between different spike shapes. Furthermore, multiple criteria are applied to either facilitate or prevent cluster fusion, thereby enabling experimenters to fine-tune the sorting process. We compare our method to established unsupervised offline (Wave_Clus (WC)) and online (OSort (OS)) algorithms by examining their performance in sorting various test datasets using two different scoring systems (AMI and the Adamos metric). Furthermore, we evaluate sorting capabilities on intra-operative recordings using established quality metrics. Compared to WC and OS, our algorithm achieved comparable or higher scores on average and produced more convincing sorting results for intra-operative datasets. Thus, the presented framework is suitable for both online and offline analysis and could substantially improve the quality of microelectrode-based data evaluation for research and clinical application. PMID:26711713

  7. Spiking neuron computation with the time machine.

    PubMed

    Garg, Vaibhav; Shekhar, Ravi; Harris, John G

    2012-04-01

    The Time Machine (TM) is a spike-based computation architecture that represents synaptic weights in time. This choice of weight representation allows the use of virtual synapses, providing an excellent tradeoff in terms of flexibility, arbitrary weight connections and hardware usage compared to dedicated synapse architectures. The TM supports an arbitrary number of synapses and is limited only by the number of simultaneously active synapses to each neuron. SpikeSim, a behavioral hardware simulator for the architecture, is described along with example algorithms for edge detection and objection recognition. The TM can implement traditional spike-based processing as well as recently developed time mode operations where step functions serve as the input and output of each neuron block. A custom hybrid digital/analog implementation and a fully digital realization of the TM are discussed. An analog chip with 32 neurons, 1024 synapses and an address event representation (AER) block has been fabricated in 0.5 μm technology. A fully digital field-programmable gate array (FPGA)-based implementation of the architecture has 6,144 neurons and 100,352 simultaneously active synapses. Both implementations utilize a digital controller for routing spikes that can process up to 34 million synapses per second. PMID:23852979

  8. JFK in Blackface: Spike Lee's "Malcolm X."

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Walker, Clarence E.

    1993-01-01

    Discusses the failure of filmmaker Spike Lee to grapple with the real politics of Malcolm X before and after he left the Nation of Islam. Acknowledging the complexity of the man and his context would avoid creating a mythical figure similar to Oliver Stone's movie "JFK." (SLD)

  9. Structural evaluation of deployable aerodynamic spike booms

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Richter, B. J.

    1975-01-01

    An extendable boom consisting of a series of telescopic cylindrical tube segments and overlapping lock joints developed for use as an aerodynamic spike mounted atop a missile is described. Two candidate design concepts differing mainly in the particular overlapping lock joint designs are undergoing a combined analytical/experimental evaluation. Some of the results of this evaluation are presented.

  10. Time-free spiking neural P systems.

    PubMed

    Pan, Linqiang; Zeng, Xiangxiang; Zhang, Xingyi

    2011-05-01

    Different biological processes take different times to be completed, which can also be influenced by many environmental factors. In this work, a realistic definition of nonsynchronized spiking neural P systems (SN P systems, for short) is considered: during the work of an SN P system, the execution times of spiking rules cannot be known exactly (i.e., they are arbitrary). In order to establish robust systems against the environmental factors, a special class of SN P systems, called time-free SN P systems, is introduced, which always produce the same computation result independent of the execution times of the rules. The universality of time-free SN P systems is investigated. It is proved that these P systems with extended rules (several spikes can be produced by a rule) are equivalent to register machines. However, if the number of spikes present in the system is bounded, then the power of time-free SN P systems falls, and in this case, a characterization of semilinear sets of natural numbers is obtained. PMID:21299423

  11. Spike processing with a graphene excitable laser.

    PubMed

    Shastri, Bhavin J; Nahmias, Mitchell A; Tait, Alexander N; Rodriguez, Alejandro W; Wu, Ben; Prucnal, Paul R

    2016-01-01

    Novel materials and devices in photonics have the potential to revolutionize optical information processing, beyond conventional binary-logic approaches. Laser systems offer a rich repertoire of useful dynamical behaviors, including the excitable dynamics also found in the time-resolved "spiking" of neurons. Spiking reconciles the expressiveness and efficiency of analog processing with the robustness and scalability of digital processing. We demonstrate a unified platform for spike processing with a graphene-coupled laser system. We show that this platform can simultaneously exhibit logic-level restoration, cascadability and input-output isolation--fundamental challenges in optical information processing. We also implement low-level spike-processing tasks that are critical for higher level processing: temporal pattern detection and stable recurrent memory. We study these properties in the context of a fiber laser system and also propose and simulate an analogous integrated device. The addition of graphene leads to a number of advantages which stem from its unique properties, including high absorption and fast carrier relaxation. These could lead to significant speed and efficiency improvements in unconventional laser processing devices, and ongoing research on graphene microfabrication promises compatibility with integrated laser platforms. PMID:26753897

  12. Spike-Timing Theory of Working Memory

    PubMed Central

    Szatmáry, Botond; Izhikevich, Eugene M.

    2010-01-01

    Working memory (WM) is the part of the brain's memory system that provides temporary storage and manipulation of information necessary for cognition. Although WM has limited capacity at any given time, it has vast memory content in the sense that it acts on the brain's nearly infinite repertoire of lifetime long-term memories. Using simulations, we show that large memory content and WM functionality emerge spontaneously if we take the spike-timing nature of neuronal processing into account. Here, memories are represented by extensively overlapping groups of neurons that exhibit stereotypical time-locked spatiotemporal spike-timing patterns, called polychronous patterns; and synapses forming such polychronous neuronal groups (PNGs) are subject to associative synaptic plasticity in the form of both long-term and short-term spike-timing dependent plasticity. While long-term potentiation is essential in PNG formation, we show how short-term plasticity can temporarily strengthen the synapses of selected PNGs and lead to an increase in the spontaneous reactivation rate of these PNGs. This increased reactivation rate, consistent with in vivo recordings during WM tasks, results in high interspike interval variability and irregular, yet systematically changing, elevated firing rate profiles within the neurons of the selected PNGs. Additionally, our theory explains the relationship between such slowly changing firing rates and precisely timed spikes, and it reveals a novel relationship between WM and the perception of time on the order of seconds. PMID:20808877

  13. Physics of volleyball: Spiking with a purpose

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Behroozi, F.

    1998-05-01

    A few weeks ago our volleyball coach telephoned me with a problem: How high should a player jump to "spike" a "set" ball so it would clear the net and land at a known distance on the other side of the net?

  14. The dynamic inelastic response of delaminated plates

    SciTech Connect

    Addessio, F.L.; Williams, T.O.

    1996-12-01

    A generalized theory for laminated plates with delaminations is used to consider the influence of inelastic deformations on the dynamic behavior of composite plates with delaminations. The laminate model is based on a generalized displacement formulation implemented at the layer level. The delamination behavior can be modeled using any general interfacial fracture law: however, for the current work a linear model is employed. The interfacial displacement jumps are expressed in an internally consistent fashion in terms of the fundamental unknown interfacial tractions. The current theory imposes no restrictions on the size, location, distribution, or direction of growth of the delaminations. The proposed theory is used to consider the inelastic, dynamic response of delaminated plates in cylindrical bending subjected to a ramp and hold type of loading. The individual layers in the current study are assumed to be either titanium or aluminum. The inelastic response of both materials is modeled using the unified viscoplastic theory of Bodner and Partom. It is shown that the presence of both inelastic behavior and delamination can have a significant influence on the plate response. In particular it is shown that these mechanisms are strongly interactive. This result emphasizes the need to consider both mechanisms simultaneously.

  15. Neutron inelastic scattering by amino acids

    SciTech Connect

    Thaper, C.L.; Sinha, S.K.; Dasannacharya, B.A.

    1982-01-01

    Inelastic neutron scattering experiments on normal, N-deuterated glycine, normal and N-deuterated alanine, L-valine, L-tyrosine and, L-phenylalanine at 100 K, are reported. Coupling of the external modes to different hydrogens is discussed.

  16. Deep inelastic scattering near the Coulomb barrier

    SciTech Connect

    Gehring, J.; Back, B.; Chan, K.

    1995-08-01

    Deep inelastic scattering was recently observed in heavy ion reactions at incident energies near and below the Coulomb barrier. Traditional models of this process are based on frictional forces and are designed to predict the features of deep inelastic processes at energies above the barrier. They cannot be applied at energies below the barrier where the nuclear overlap is small and friction is negligible. The presence of deep inelastic scattering at these energies requires a different explanation. The first observation of deep inelastic scattering near the barrier was in the systems {sup 124,112}Sn + {sup 58,64}Ni by Wolfs et al. We previously extended these measurements to the system {sup 136}Xe + {sup 64}Ni and currently measured the system {sup 124}Xe + {sup 58}Ni. We obtained better statistics, better mass and energy resolution, and more complete angular coverage in the Xe + Ni measurements. The cross sections and angular distributions are similar in all of the Sn + Ni and Xe + Ni systems. The data are currently being analyzed and compared with new theoretical calculations. They will be part of the thesis of J. Gehring.

  17. Parity violation in deep inelastic scattering

    SciTech Connect

    Souder, P.

    1994-04-01

    AA beam of polarized electrons at CEBAF with an energy of 8 GeV or more will be useful for performing precision measurements of parity violation in deep inelastic scattering. Possible applications include precision tests of the Standard Model, model-independent measurements of parton distribution functions, and studies of quark correlations.

  18. Mechanical Energy Changes in Perfectly Inelastic Collisions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mungan, Carl E.

    2013-01-01

    Suppose a block of mass "m"[subscript 1] traveling at speed "v"[subscript 1] makes a one-dimensional perfectly inelastic collision with another block of mass "m"[subscript 2]. What else does one need to know to calculate the fraction of the mechanical energy that is dissipated in the collision? (Contains 1 figure.)

  19. Inelastic X-ray Scattering Studies of Zeolite Collapse

    SciTech Connect

    Greaves, G. Neville; Kargl, Florian; Ward, David; Holliman, Peter; Meneau, Florian

    2009-01-29

    In situ inelastic x-ray scattering (IXS) experiments have been used to probe heterogeneity and deformability in zeolte Y as this thermally collapses to a high density amorphous (HDA) aluminosilicate phase. The Landau-Placzek ratio R{sub LP} falls slowly as amorphisation advances, increasing in the later stages of collapse clearly showing how homogeneity improves non-linearly--behaviour linked closely with the decline in molar volume V{sub Molar}. The Brillouin frequency {omega}{sub Q} also decreases with amorphisation in a similar fashion, signifying a non-uniform decrease in the speed of sound v{sub l}. All of these changes with zeolite amorphisation infer formation of an intermediate low density amorphous (LDA) phase. This low entropy or 'perfect glass' has mechanical properties which are closer to the zeolite rather to the HDA glass--notably a very small value of Poisson's Ratio signifying unusually low resistance to deformation.

  20. The 3D inelastic analysis methods for hot section components

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dame, L. T.; Mcknight, R. L.

    1983-01-01

    The objective of this research is to develop an analytical tool capable of economically evaluating the cyclic time dependent plasticity which occurs in hot section engine components in areas of strain concentration resulting from the combination of both mechanical and thermal stresses. The techniques developed must be capable of accommodating large excursions in temperatures with the associated variations in material properties including plasticity and creep. The overall objective of this proposed program is to develop advanced 3-D inelastic structural/stress analysis methods and solution strategies for more accurate and yet more cost effective analysis of combustors, turbine blades, and vanes. The approach will be to develop four different theories, one linear and three higher order with increasing complexities including embedded singularities.

  1. Impact of spike train autostructure on probability distribution of joint spike events.

    PubMed

    Pipa, Gordon; Grün, Sonja; van Vreeswijk, Carl

    2013-05-01

    The discussion whether temporally coordinated spiking activity really exists and whether it is relevant has been heated over the past few years. To investigate this issue, several approaches have been taken to determine whether synchronized events occur significantly above chance, that is, whether they occur more often than expected if the neurons fire independently. Most investigations ignore or destroy the autostructure of the spiking activity of individual cells or assume Poissonian spiking as a model. Such methods that ignore the autostructure can significantly bias the coincidence statistics. Here, we study the influence of the autostructure on the probability distribution of coincident spiking events between tuples of mutually independent non-Poisson renewal processes. In particular, we consider two types of renewal processes that were suggested as appropriate models of experimental spike trains: a gamma and a log-normal process. For a gamma process, we characterize the shape of the distribution analytically with the Fano factor (FFc). In addition, we perform Monte Carlo estimations to derive the full shape of the distribution and the probability for false positives if a different process type is assumed as was actually present. We also determine how manipulations of such spike trains, here dithering, used for the generation of surrogate data change the distribution of coincident events and influence the significance estimation. We find, first, that the width of the coincidence count distribution and its FFc depend critically and in a nontrivial way on the detailed properties of the structure of the spike trains as characterized by the coefficient of variation CV. Second, the dependence of the FFc on the CV is complex and mostly nonmonotonic. Third, spike dithering, even if as small as a fraction of the interspike interval, can falsify the inference on coordinated firing. PMID:23470124

  2. Magnetic Tunnel Junction Mimics Stochastic Cortical Spiking Neurons

    PubMed Central

    Sengupta, Abhronil; Panda, Priyadarshini; Wijesinghe, Parami; Kim, Yusung; Roy, Kaushik

    2016-01-01

    Brain-inspired computing architectures attempt to mimic the computations performed in the neurons and the synapses in the human brain in order to achieve its efficiency in learning and cognitive tasks. In this work, we demonstrate the mapping of the probabilistic spiking nature of pyramidal neurons in the cortex to the stochastic switching behavior of a Magnetic Tunnel Junction in presence of thermal noise. We present results to illustrate the efficiency of neuromorphic systems based on such probabilistic neurons for pattern recognition tasks in presence of lateral inhibition and homeostasis. Such stochastic MTJ neurons can also potentially provide a direct mapping to the probabilistic computing elements in Belief Networks for performing regenerative tasks. PMID:27443913

  3. Interpretation of "fungal spikes" in Permian-Triassic boundary sections

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hochuli, Peter A.

    2016-09-01

    Abundant occurrences of the palynomorph Reduviasporonites have been described as "fungal spike" from several Permian/Triassic boundary sections and related to the supposed destruction of woody vegetation by fungal pathogens during the Permian/Triassic extinction event. The biological affinity of this taxa considered by some authors of fungal origin is still controversially discussed since there is geochemical evidence that it is most probably related to algae. The abundance peak of this species is used by some authors as a stratigraphic marker, notably in terrestrial Permian/Triassic boundary sections from South China. Illustrations of the reported fungal remains however show potentially erroneous taxonomic identification of Reduviasporonites, and, based on differences in thermal maturation, they may represent recent contamination. Here Reduviasporonites chalastus of Early Triassic age is illustrated together with recent fungal remains originating from a strongly weathered and otherwise barren sample from a Middle Triassic section.

  4. Magnetic Tunnel Junction Mimics Stochastic Cortical Spiking Neurons.

    PubMed

    Sengupta, Abhronil; Panda, Priyadarshini; Wijesinghe, Parami; Kim, Yusung; Roy, Kaushik

    2016-01-01

    Brain-inspired computing architectures attempt to mimic the computations performed in the neurons and the synapses in the human brain in order to achieve its efficiency in learning and cognitive tasks. In this work, we demonstrate the mapping of the probabilistic spiking nature of pyramidal neurons in the cortex to the stochastic switching behavior of a Magnetic Tunnel Junction in presence of thermal noise. We present results to illustrate the efficiency of neuromorphic systems based on such probabilistic neurons for pattern recognition tasks in presence of lateral inhibition and homeostasis. Such stochastic MTJ neurons can also potentially provide a direct mapping to the probabilistic computing elements in Belief Networks for performing regenerative tasks. PMID:27443913

  5. Magnetic Tunnel Junction Mimics Stochastic Cortical Spiking Neurons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sengupta, Abhronil; Panda, Priyadarshini; Wijesinghe, Parami; Kim, Yusung; Roy, Kaushik

    2016-07-01

    Brain-inspired computing architectures attempt to mimic the computations performed in the neurons and the synapses in the human brain in order to achieve its efficiency in learning and cognitive tasks. In this work, we demonstrate the mapping of the probabilistic spiking nature of pyramidal neurons in the cortex to the stochastic switching behavior of a Magnetic Tunnel Junction in presence of thermal noise. We present results to illustrate the efficiency of neuromorphic systems based on such probabilistic neurons for pattern recognition tasks in presence of lateral inhibition and homeostasis. Such stochastic MTJ neurons can also potentially provide a direct mapping to the probabilistic computing elements in Belief Networks for performing regenerative tasks.

  6. 16 CFR 1507.7 - Handles and spikes.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... FIREWORKS DEVICES § 1507.7 Handles and spikes. (a) Fireworks devices which are intended to be hand-held and...) Spikes provided with fireworks devices shall protrude at least 2 inches from the base of the device...

  7. 16 CFR 1507.7 - Handles and spikes.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... FIREWORKS DEVICES § 1507.7 Handles and spikes. (a) Fireworks devices which are intended to be hand-held and...) Spikes provided with fireworks devices shall protrude at least 2 inches from the base of the device...

  8. 16 CFR 1507.7 - Handles and spikes.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... FIREWORKS DEVICES § 1507.7 Handles and spikes. (a) Fireworks devices which are intended to be hand-held and...) Spikes provided with fireworks devices shall protrude at least 2 inches from the base of the device...

  9. 16 CFR 1507.7 - Handles and spikes.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... FIREWORKS DEVICES § 1507.7 Handles and spikes. (a) Fireworks devices which are intended to be hand-held and...) Spikes provided with fireworks devices shall protrude at least 2 inches from the base of the device...

  10. 16 CFR 1507.7 - Handles and spikes.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... FIREWORKS DEVICES § 1507.7 Handles and spikes. (a) Fireworks devices which are intended to be hand-held and...) Spikes provided with fireworks devices shall protrude at least 2 inches from the base of the device...

  11. Europa's Opposition Spike: Preliminary Results from Galileo E14 Observations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kreslavsky, M. A.; Helfenstein, P.; Shkuratov, Yu. G.

    2000-01-01

    The phase function at 0-0.3deg phase angle is studied using high-resolution SSI images. The opposition spike is very sharp, especially for dark material. Some stratigraphically young terrains show anomalously weak opposition spike.

  12. Saturation current spikes eliminated in saturable core transformers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schwarz, F. C.

    1971-01-01

    Unsaturating composite magnetic core transformer, consisting of two separate parallel cores designed so impending core saturation causes signal generation, terminates high current spike in converter primary circuit. Simplified waveform, demonstrates transformer effectiveness in eliminating current spikes.

  13. Interictal spikes and epileptic seizures: their relationship and underlying rhythmicity.

    PubMed

    Karoly, Philippa J; Freestone, Dean R; Boston, Ray; Grayden, David B; Himes, David; Leyde, Kent; Seneviratne, Udaya; Berkovic, Samuel; O'Brien, Terence; Cook, Mark J

    2016-04-01

    We report on a quantitative analysis of electrocorticography data from a study that acquired continuous ambulatory recordings in humans over extended periods of time. The objectives were to examine patterns of seizures and spontaneous interictal spikes, their relationship to each other, and the nature of periodic variation. The recorded data were originally acquired for the purpose of seizure prediction, and were subsequently analysed in further detail. A detection algorithm identified potential seizure activity and a template matched filter was used to locate spikes. Seizure events were confirmed manually and classified as either clinically correlated, electroencephalographically identical but not clinically correlated, or subclinical. We found that spike rate was significantly altered prior to seizure in 9 out of 15 subjects. Increased pre-ictal spike rate was linked to improved predictability; however, spike rate was also shown to decrease before seizure (in 6 out of the 9 subjects). The probability distribution of spikes and seizures were notably similar, i.e. at times of high seizure likelihood the probability of epileptic spiking also increased. Both spikes and seizures showed clear evidence of circadian regulation and, for some subjects, there were also longer term patterns visible over weeks to months. Patterns of spike and seizure occurrence were highly subject-specific. The pre-ictal decrease in spike rate is not consistent with spikes promoting seizures. However, the fact that spikes and seizures demonstrate similar probability distributions suggests they are not wholly independent processes. It is possible spikes actively inhibit seizures, or that a decreased spike rate is a secondary symptom of the brain approaching seizure. If spike rate is modulated by common regulatory factors as seizures then spikes may be useful biomarkers of cortical excitability.media-1vid110.1093/brain/aww019_video_abstractaww019_video_abstract. PMID:26912639

  14. Intra-spike crosslinking overcomes antibody evasion by HIV-1.

    PubMed

    Galimidi, Rachel P; Klein, Joshua S; Politzer, Maria S; Bai, Shiyu; Seaman, Michael S; Nussenzweig, Michel C; West, Anthony P; Bjorkman, Pamela J

    2015-01-29

    Antibodies developed during HIV-1 infection lose efficacy as the viral spike mutates. We postulated that anti-HIV-1 antibodies primarily bind monovalently because HIV's low spike density impedes bivalent binding through inter-spike crosslinking, and the spike structure prohibits bivalent binding through intra-spike crosslinking. Monovalent binding reduces avidity and potency, thus expanding the range of mutations permitting antibody evasion. To test this idea, we engineered antibody-based molecules capable of bivalent binding through intra-spike crosslinking. We used DNA as a "molecular ruler" to measure intra-epitope distances on virion-bound spikes and construct intra-spike crosslinking molecules. Optimal bivalent reagents exhibited up to 2.5 orders of magnitude increased potency (>100-fold average increases across virus panels) and identified conformational states of virion-bound spikes. The demonstration that intra-spike crosslinking lowers the concentration of antibodies required for neutralization supports the hypothesis that low spike densities facilitate antibody evasion and the use of molecules capable of intra-spike crosslinking for therapy or passive protection. PMID:25635457

  15. SPIKE: AI scheduling techniques for Hubble Space Telescope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Johnston, Mark D.

    1991-09-01

    AI (Artificial Intelligence) scheduling techniques for HST are presented in the form of the viewgraphs. The following subject areas are covered: domain; HST constraint timescales; HTS scheduling; SPIKE overview; SPIKE architecture; constraint representation and reasoning; use of suitability functions by scheduling agent; SPIKE screen example; advantages of suitability function framework; limiting search and constraint propagation; scheduling search; stochastic search; repair methods; implementation; and status.

  16. Collision-spike Sputtering of Au Nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Sandoval, Luis; Urbassek, Herbert M

    2015-12-01

    Ion irradiation of nanoparticles leads to enhanced sputter yields if the nanoparticle size is of the order of the ion penetration depth. While this feature is reasonably well understood for collision-cascade sputtering, we explore it in the regime of collision-spike sputtering using molecular-dynamics simulation. For the particular case of 200-keV Xe bombardment of Au particles, we show that collision spikes lead to abundant sputtering with an average yield of 397 ± 121 atoms compared to only 116 ± 48 atoms for a bulk Au target. Only around 31 % of the impact energy remains in the nanoparticles after impact; the remainder is transported away by the transmitted projectile and the ejecta. The sputter yield of supported nanoparticles is estimated to be around 80 % of that of free nanoparticles due to the suppression of forward sputtering. PMID:26245857

  17. Collision-spike sputtering of Au nanoparticles

    SciTech Connect

    Sandoval, Luis; Urbassek, Herbert M.

    2015-08-06

    Ion irradiation of nanoparticles leads to enhanced sputter yields if the nanoparticle size is of the order of the ion penetration depth. While this feature is reasonably well understood for collision-cascade sputtering, we explore it in the regime of collision-spike sputtering using molecular-dynamics simulation. For this specific case of 200-keV Xe bombardment of Au particles, we show that collision spikes lead to abundant sputtering with an average yield of 397 ± 121 atoms compared to only 116 ± 48 atoms for a bulk Au target. Only around 31% of the impact energy remains in the nanoparticles after impact; the remainder is transported away by the transmitted projectile and the ejecta. The sputter yield of supported nanoparticles is estimated to be around 80% of that of free nanoparticles due to the suppression of forward sputtering.

  18. Collision-spike sputtering of Au nanoparticles

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Sandoval, Luis; Urbassek, Herbert M.

    2015-08-06

    Ion irradiation of nanoparticles leads to enhanced sputter yields if the nanoparticle size is of the order of the ion penetration depth. While this feature is reasonably well understood for collision-cascade sputtering, we explore it in the regime of collision-spike sputtering using molecular-dynamics simulation. For this specific case of 200-keV Xe bombardment of Au particles, we show that collision spikes lead to abundant sputtering with an average yield of 397 ± 121 atoms compared to only 116 ± 48 atoms for a bulk Au target. Only around 31% of the impact energy remains in the nanoparticles after impact; the remaindermore » is transported away by the transmitted projectile and the ejecta. The sputter yield of supported nanoparticles is estimated to be around 80% of that of free nanoparticles due to the suppression of forward sputtering.« less

  19. Spikes and ribbon synapses in early vision.

    PubMed

    Baden, Tom; Euler, Thomas; Weckström, Matti; Lagnado, Leon

    2013-08-01

    Image processing begins in the retina, where neurons respond with graded voltage changes that must be converted into spikes. This conversion from 'analog' to 'digital' coding is a fundamental transformation carried out by the visual system, but the mechanisms are still not well understood. Recent work demonstrates that, in vertebrates, graded-to-spiking conversion of the visual signal begins in the axonal system of bipolar cells (BCs), which transmit visual information through ribbon-type synapses specialized for responding to graded voltage signals. Here, we explore the evidence for and against the idea that ribbon synapses also transmit digital information. We then discuss the potential costs and benefits of digitization at different stages of visual pathways in vertebrates and invertebrates. PMID:23706152

  20. Evolving spiking networks with variable resistive memories.

    PubMed

    Howard, Gerard; Bull, Larry; de Lacy Costello, Ben; Gale, Ella; Adamatzky, Andrew

    2014-01-01

    Neuromorphic computing is a brainlike information processing paradigm that requires adaptive learning mechanisms. A spiking neuro-evolutionary system is used for this purpose; plastic resistive memories are implemented as synapses in spiking neural networks. The evolutionary design process exploits parameter self-adaptation and allows the topology and synaptic weights to be evolved for each network in an autonomous manner. Variable resistive memories are the focus of this research; each synapse has its own conductance profile which modifies the plastic behaviour of the device and may be altered during evolution. These variable resistive networks are evaluated on a noisy robotic dynamic-reward scenario against two static resistive memories and a system containing standard connections only. The results indicate that the extra behavioural degrees of freedom available to the networks incorporating variable resistive memories enable them to outperform the comparative synapse types. PMID:23614774

  1. Spike-dip transformation of Setaria viridis.

    PubMed

    Saha, Prasenjit; Blumwald, Eduardo

    2016-04-01

    Traditional method of Agrobacterium-mediated transformation through the generation of tissue culture had limited success for Setaria viridis, an emerging C4 monocot model. Here we present an efficient in planta method for Agrobacterium-mediated genetic transformation of S. viridis using spike dip. Pre-anthesis developing spikes were dipped into a solution of Agrobacterium tumefaciens strain AGL1 harboring the β-glucuronidase (GUS) reporter gene driven by the cauliflower mosaic virus 35S (CaMV35S) promoter to standardize and optimize conditions for transient as well as stable transformations. A transformation efficiency of 0.8 ± 0.1% was obtained after dipping of 5-day-old S3 spikes for 20 min in Agrobacterium cultures containing S. viridis spike-dip medium supplemented with 0.025% Silwet L-77 and 200 μm acetosyringone. Reproducibility of this method was demonstrated by generating stable transgenic lines expressing β-glucuronidase plus (GUSplus), green fluorescent protein (GFP) and Discosoma sp. red fluorescent protein (DsRed) reporter genes driven by either CaMV35S or intron-interrupted maize ubiquitin (Ubi) promoters from three S. viridis genotypes. Expression of these reporter genes in transient assays as well as in T1 stable transformed plants was monitored using histochemical, fluorometric GUS activity and fluorescence microscopy. Molecular analysis of transgenic lines revealed stable integration of transgenes into the genome, and inherited transgenes expressed in the subsequent generations. This approach provides opportunities for the high-throughput transformation and potentially facilitates translational research in a monocot model plant. PMID:26932666

  2. Stochastically Gating Ion Channels Enable Patterned Spike Firing through Activity-Dependent Modulation of Spike Probability

    PubMed Central

    Dudman, Joshua T.; Nolan, Matthew F.

    2009-01-01

    The transformation of synaptic input into patterns of spike output is a fundamental operation that is determined by the particular complement of ion channels that a neuron expresses. Although it is well established that individual ion channel proteins make stochastic transitions between conducting and non-conducting states, most models of synaptic integration are deterministic, and relatively little is known about the functional consequences of interactions between stochastically gating ion channels. Here, we show that a model of stellate neurons from layer II of the medial entorhinal cortex implemented with either stochastic or deterministically gating ion channels can reproduce the resting membrane properties of stellate neurons, but only the stochastic version of the model can fully account for perithreshold membrane potential fluctuations and clustered patterns of spike output that are recorded from stellate neurons during depolarized states. We demonstrate that the stochastic model implements an example of a general mechanism for patterning of neuronal output through activity-dependent changes in the probability of spike firing. Unlike deterministic mechanisms that generate spike patterns through slow changes in the state of model parameters, this general stochastic mechanism does not require retention of information beyond the duration of a single spike and its associated afterhyperpolarization. Instead, clustered patterns of spikes emerge in the stochastic model of stellate neurons as a result of a transient increase in firing probability driven by activation of HCN channels during recovery from the spike afterhyperpolarization. Using this model, we infer conditions in which stochastic ion channel gating may influence firing patterns in vivo and predict consequences of modifications of HCN channel function for in vivo firing patterns. PMID:19214199

  3. Millisecond Precision Spike Timing Shapes Tactile Perception

    PubMed Central

    Mackevicius, Emily L.; Best, Matthew D.; Saal, Hannes P.

    2012-01-01

    In primates, the sense of touch has traditionally been considered to be a spatial modality, drawing an analogy to the visual system. In this view, stimuli are encoded in spatial patterns of activity over the sheet of receptors embedded in the skin. We propose that the spatial processing mode is complemented by a temporal one. Indeed, the transduction and processing of complex, high-frequency skin vibrations have been shown to play an important role in tactile texture perception, and the frequency composition of vibrations shapes the evoked percept. Mechanoreceptive afferents innervating the glabrous skin exhibit temporal patterning in their responses, but the importance and behavioral relevance of spike timing, particularly for naturalistic stimuli, remains to be elucidated. Based on neurophysiological recordings from Rhesus macaques, we show that spike timing conveys information about the frequency composition of skin vibrations, both for individual afferents and for afferent populations, and that the temporal fidelity varies across afferent class. Furthermore, the perception of skin vibrations, measured in human subjects, is better predicted when spike timing is taken into account, and the resolution that predicts perception best matches the optimal resolution of the respective afferent classes. In light of these results, the peripheral representation of complex skin vibrations draws a powerful analogy with the auditory and vibrissal systems. PMID:23115169

  4. Spike encoding of olfactory receptor cells.

    PubMed

    Narusuye, Kenji; Kawai, Fusao; Miyachi, Ei-ichi

    2003-08-01

    Olfaction begins with the transduction of the information carried by odorants into electrical signals in olfactory receptor cells (ORCs). The binding of odor molecules to specific receptor proteins on the ciliary surface of ORCs induces the receptor potentials. This initial excitation causes a slow and graded depolarizing voltage change, which is encoded into a train of action potentials. Action potentials of ORCs are generated by voltage-gated Na+ currents and T-type Ca2+ currents in the somatic membrane. Isolated ORCs, which have lost their cilia during the dissociation procedure, are known to exhibit spike frequency accommodation by injecting the steady current. This raises the possibility that somatic ionic channels in ORCs may serve for odor adaptation at the level of spike encoding, although odor adaptation is mainly accomplished by the ciliary transduction machinery. This review discusses current knowledge concerning the mechanisms of spike generation in ORCs. It also reviews how neurotransmitters and hormones modulate ionic currents and action potentials in ORCs. PMID:12871762

  5. Analysis of Neuronal Spike Trains, Deconstructed.

    PubMed

    Aljadeff, Johnatan; Lansdell, Benjamin J; Fairhall, Adrienne L; Kleinfeld, David

    2016-07-20

    As information flows through the brain, neuronal firing progresses from encoding the world as sensed by the animal to driving the motor output of subsequent behavior. One of the more tractable goals of quantitative neuroscience is to develop predictive models that relate the sensory or motor streams with neuronal firing. Here we review and contrast analytical tools used to accomplish this task. We focus on classes of models in which the external variable is compared with one or more feature vectors to extract a low-dimensional representation, the history of spiking and other variables are potentially incorporated, and these factors are nonlinearly transformed to predict the occurrences of spikes. We illustrate these techniques in application to datasets of different degrees of complexity. In particular, we address the fitting of models in the presence of strong correlations in the external variable, as occurs in natural sensory stimuli and in movement. Spectral correlation between predicted and measured spike trains is introduced to contrast the relative success of different methods. PMID:27477016

  6. Spike processing with a graphene excitable laser

    PubMed Central

    Shastri, Bhavin J.; Nahmias, Mitchell A.; Tait, Alexander N.; Rodriguez, Alejandro W.; Wu, Ben; Prucnal, Paul R.

    2016-01-01

    Novel materials and devices in photonics have the potential to revolutionize optical information processing, beyond conventional binary-logic approaches. Laser systems offer a rich repertoire of useful dynamical behaviors, including the excitable dynamics also found in the time-resolved “spiking” of neurons. Spiking reconciles the expressiveness and efficiency of analog processing with the robustness and scalability of digital processing. We demonstrate a unified platform for spike processing with a graphene-coupled laser system. We show that this platform can simultaneously exhibit logic-level restoration, cascadability and input-output isolation—fundamental challenges in optical information processing. We also implement low-level spike-processing tasks that are critical for higher level processing: temporal pattern detection and stable recurrent memory. We study these properties in the context of a fiber laser system and also propose and simulate an analogous integrated device. The addition of graphene leads to a number of advantages which stem from its unique properties, including high absorption and fast carrier relaxation. These could lead to significant speed and efficiency improvements in unconventional laser processing devices, and ongoing research on graphene microfabrication promises compatibility with integrated laser platforms. PMID:26753897

  7. The microwave spectrum of solar millisecond spikes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Staehli, M.; Magun, A.

    1986-01-01

    The microwave radiation from solar flares sometimes shows short and intensive spikes which are superimposed on the burst continuum. In order to determine the upper frequency limit of their occurrence and the circular polarization, a statistical analysis was performed on digital microwave observations from 3.2 to 92.5 GHz. Additionally, fine structures were investigated with a fast 32-channel spectrometer at 3.47 GHz. It was found that about 10 percent of the bursts show fine structures at 3.2 and 5.2 GHz, whereas none occurred above 8.4 GHz. Most of the observed spikes were very short and their bandwidth varied from below 0.5 MHz to more than 200 MHz. Simultaneous observations at two further frequencies showed no coincident spikes at the second and third harmonic. The observations can be explained by the theory of electron cyclotron masering if the observed bandwidths are determined by magnetic field inhomogeneities or if the rise times are independent of the source diameters. The latter would imply source sizes between 50 and 100 km.

  8. Spike processing with a graphene excitable laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shastri, Bhavin J.; Nahmias, Mitchell A.; Tait, Alexander N.; Rodriguez, Alejandro W.; Wu, Ben; Prucnal, Paul R.

    2016-01-01

    Novel materials and devices in photonics have the potential to revolutionize optical information processing, beyond conventional binary-logic approaches. Laser systems offer a rich repertoire of useful dynamical behaviors, including the excitable dynamics also found in the time-resolved “spiking” of neurons. Spiking reconciles the expressiveness and efficiency of analog processing with the robustness and scalability of digital processing. We demonstrate a unified platform for spike processing with a graphene-coupled laser system. We show that this platform can simultaneously exhibit logic-level restoration, cascadability and input-output isolation—fundamental challenges in optical information processing. We also implement low-level spike-processing tasks that are critical for higher level processing: temporal pattern detection and stable recurrent memory. We study these properties in the context of a fiber laser system and also propose and simulate an analogous integrated device. The addition of graphene leads to a number of advantages which stem from its unique properties, including high absorption and fast carrier relaxation. These could lead to significant speed and efficiency improvements in unconventional laser processing devices, and ongoing research on graphene microfabrication promises compatibility with integrated laser platforms.

  9. Estimating spiking irregularities under changing environments.

    PubMed

    Miura, Keiji; Okada, Masato; Amari, Shun-Ichi

    2006-10-01

    We considered a gamma distribution of interspike intervals as a statistical model for neuronal spike generation. A gamma distribution is a natural extension of the Poisson process taking the effect of a refractory period into account. The model is specified by two parameters: a time-dependent firing rate and a shape parameter that characterizes spiking irregularities of individual neurons. Because the environment changes over time, observed data are generated from a model with a time-dependent firing rate, which is an unknown function. A statistical model with an unknown function is called a semiparametric model and is generally very difficult to solve. We used a novel method of estimating functions in information geometry to estimate the shape parameter without estimating the unknown function. We obtained an optimal estimating function analytically for the shape parameter independent of the functional form of the firing rate. This estimation is efficient without Fisher information loss and better than maximum likelihood estimation. We suggest a measure of spiking irregularity based on the estimating function, which may be useful for characterizing individual neurons in changing environments. PMID:16907630

  10. Inelastic electron scattering from a moving nucleon

    SciTech Connect

    Kuhn, S.E.; Griffioen, K.

    1994-04-01

    The authors propose to measure inelastically scattered electrons in coincidence with spectator protons emitted backwards relative to the virtual photon direction in the reaction d(e, e{prime}p{sub s})X. In a simple spectator model, the backward proton has equal and opposite momentum to the neutron before it is struck, allowing the authors to study the dependence on kinematics and off-shell behaviour of the electron-nucleon inelastic cross section. If the photon couples to a quark in a 6-quark bag, a different dependence of the cross section on the kinematic variables (x, Q{sup 2}, and p{sub s}) can be observed. This proposed experiment requires large acceptance and beam energies above 6 GeV. It is ideally suited for the CEBAF Large Acceptance Spectrometer (CLAS).

  11. Constitutive modeling of inelastic anisotropic material response

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stouffer, D. C.

    1984-01-01

    A constitutive equation was developed to predict the inelastic thermomechanical response of single crystal turbine blades. These equations are essential for developing accurate finite element models of hot section components and contribute significantly to the understanding and prediction of crack initiation and propagation. The method used was limited to unified state variable constitutive equations. Two approaches to developing an anisotropic constitutive equation were reviewed. One approach was to apply the Stouffer-Bodner representation for deformation induced anisotropy to materials with an initial anisotropy such as single crystals. The second approach was to determine the global inelastic strain rate from the contribution of the slip in each of the possible crystallographic slip systems. A three dimensional finite element is being developed with a variable constitutive equation link that can be used for constitutive equation development and to predict the response of an experiment using the actual specimen geometry and loading conditions.

  12. Deep Inelastic Scattering at the Amplitude Level

    SciTech Connect

    Brodsky, Stanley J.; /SLAC

    2005-08-04

    The deep inelastic lepton scattering and deeply virtual Compton scattering cross sections can be interpreted in terms of the fundamental wavefunctions defined by the light-front Fock expansion, thus allowing tests of QCD at the amplitude level. The AdS/CFT correspondence between gauge theory and string theory provides remarkable new insights into QCD, including a model for hadronic wavefunctions which display conformal scaling at short distances and color confinement at large distances.

  13. Coulomb Distortion in the Inelastic Regime

    SciTech Connect

    Patricia Solvignon, Dave Gaskell, John Arrington

    2009-09-01

    The Coulomb distortion effects have been for a long time neglected in deep inelastic scattering for the good reason that the incident energies were very high. But for energies in the range of earlier data from SLAC or at JLab, the Coulomb distortion could have the potential consequence of affecting the A-dependence of the EMC effect and of the longitudinal to transverse virtual photon absorption cross section ratio $R(x,Q^2)$.

  14. Sivers effect in semiinclusive deeply inelastic scattering

    SciTech Connect

    Collins, J.C.; Efremov, A. V.; Goeke, K.; Menzel, S.; Metz, A.; Schweitzer, P.

    2006-01-01

    The Sivers function is extracted from HERMES data on single spin asymmetries in semi-inclusive deeply inelastic scattering. Our analysis use a simple Gaussian model for the distribution of transverse parton momenta, together with the flavor dependence given by the leading 1/N{sub c} approximation and a neglect of the Sivers antiquark distribution. We find that within the errors of the data these approximations are sufficient.

  15. Crash Videos Spark Inelastic Collisions Interest

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bart, George R.

    2006-12-01

    There are many popular dramatic crash videos available on the Internet. Introductory physics student interest about the details of inelastic collisions can be significantly aroused by the use of these videos. Sources of the videos will be provided and some of truck crashes will be shown. One dramatic one will be analyzed. It involves MJ of kinetic energy and MN of force. More detail with references is found at http://faculty.ccc.edu/gbart/crashvideo/.

  16. Deep Inelastic Scattering and Related Phenomena

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    D'Agostini, G.; Nigro, A.

    1997-03-01

    The Table of Contents for the book is as follows: * Organization * Foreword * Welcome Address * PLENARY SESSION: "From Paris to Rome" * Deep Inelastic Physics with H1 * Recent Results from ZEUS * Overview of the Status of Polarised Structure Functions * Quarks and Gluons at Hadron Colliders * Deep Inelastic Scattering - Theory and Phenomenology * WORKING GROUP 1: Structure Functions * Inclusive Jet Cross Section Measurement at CDF * Measurement of Direct Photons by the DØ Experiment * MRS Parton Distributions * Global QCD Analysis, the Gluon Distribution, and High Et Inclusive Jet Data * F2 Measurement and QCD Analysis on 94 H1 Data * The ZEUS 1994 F2 Measurement * Measurement of the Total γ*p Cross Section at very Low x and Q2 at HERA * New Results on F2 Structure Functions * Proton Structure Function and Gluon Distribution Functions from Fermilab Experiment E665 * The Transition from the Photoproduction to the DIS Region * The BFKL Pomeron: Can It Be Detected? * BFKL/CCFM Phenomenology * Physics and Mathematics of Dynamical Partons * k⊥-Factorization and Perturbative Invariants at Small x * Double Scaling Violations * On the Asymptotic Behaviour of F2(x, Q2) * Double Logarithmic Scaling of F2 * Differential Charged Current Cross-Sections at HERA * Neutral Current ep Deep Inelastic Scattering at High Q2 and Limits on New Physics * Charm Production in Charged-Current DIS and Extraction of the Strange Sea Density * Extraction of the Gluon Density * On Problems in Extracting the Gluon Density from the Nucleon Structure Function Measurements * Inclusive Measurement of the Strong Coupling at HERA * A Measurement of R = σL/σT in Deep Inelastic Neutrino-Nucleon Scattering at the Tevatron * A Measurement of R = σL/σT in Deep Inelastic μ - p and μ - d Scattering * A Determination of the Longitudinal Proton Structure Function FL(x, Q2) at Low x at HERA * Prospects for Measuring R = σL/σT at HERA in 1966 Low-Energy Running * A Leading Order, in ln(1/x) as well as

  17. Branching Shoots and Spikes from Lateral Meristems in Bread Wheat

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Ying; Miao, Fang; Yan, Liuling

    2016-01-01

    Wheat grain yield consists of three components: spikes per plant, grains per spike (i.e. head or ear), and grain weight; and the grains per spike can be dissected into two subcomponents: spikelets per spike and grains per spikelet. An increase in any of these components will directly contribute to grain yield. Wheat morphology biology tells that a wheat plant has no lateral meristem that forms any branching shoot or spike. In this study, we report two novel shoot and spike traits that were produced from lateral meristems in bread wheat. One is supernumerary shoot that was developed from an axillary bud at the axil of leaves on the elongated internodes of the main stem. The other is supernumerary spike that was generated from a spikelet meristem on a spike. In addition, supernumerary spikelets were generated on the same rachis node of the spike in the plant that had supernumerary shoot and spikes. All of these supernumerary shoots/spikes/spikelets found in the super wheat plants produced normal fertility and seeds, displaying huge yield potential in bread wheat. PMID:26986738

  18. Spikes and matter inhomogeneities in massless scalar field models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Coley, A. A.; Lim, W. C.

    2016-01-01

    We shall discuss the general relativistic generation of spikes in a massless scalar field or stiff perfect fluid model. We first investigate orthogonally transitive (OT) G 2 stiff fluid spike models both heuristically and numerically, and give a new exact OT G 2 stiff fluid spike solution. We then present a new two-parameter family of non-OT G 2 stiff fluid spike solutions, obtained by the generalization of non-OT G 2 vacuum spike solutions to the stiff fluid case by applying Geroch's transformation on a Jacobs seed. The dynamics of these new stiff fluid spike solutions is qualitatively different from that of the vacuum spike solutions in that the matter (stiff fluid) feels the spike directly and the stiff fluid spike solution can end up with a permanent spike. We then derive the evolution equations of non-OT G 2 stiff fluid models, including a second perfect fluid, in full generality, and briefly discuss some of their qualitative properties and their potential numerical analysis. Finally, we discuss how a fluid, and especially a stiff fluid or massless scalar field, affects the physics of the generation of spikes.

  19. Evaluation of inelastic constitutive models for nonlinear structural analysis. [for aircraft turbine engines

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kaufman, A.

    1982-01-01

    The influence of inelastic material models on computed stress-strain states, and therefore predicted lives, was studied for thermomechanically loaded structures. Nonlinear structural analyses were performed on a fatigue specimen which had been subjected to thermal cycling in fluidized beds and on a mechanically load cycled benchmark notch specimen. Four incremental plasticity creep models (isotropic, kinematic, combined isotropic kinematic, combined plus transient creep) were exercised using the MARC program. Of the plasticity models, kinematic hardening gave results most consistent with experimental observations. Life predictions using the computed strain histories at the critical location with a strainrange partitioning approach considerably overpredicted the crack initiation life of the thermal fatigue specimen.

  20. Millisecond solar radio spikes observed at 1420 MHz

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dabrowski, B. P.; Kus, A. J.

    We present results from observations of narrowband solar millisecond radio spikes at 1420 MHz. Observing data were collected between February 2000 and December 2001 with the 15-m radio telescope at the Centre for Astronomy Nicolaus Copernicus University in Torun, Poland, equipped with a radio spectrograph that covered the 1352-1490 MHz frequency band. The radio spectrograph has 3 MHz frequency resolution and 80 microsecond time resolution. We analyzed the individual radio spike duration, bandwidth and rate of frequency drift. A part of the observed spikes showed well-outlined subtle structures. On dynamic radio spectrograms of the investigated events we notice complex structures formed by numerous individual spikes known as chains of spikes and distinctly different structure of columns. Positions of active regions connected with radio spikes emission were investigated. It turns out that most of them are located near the center of the solar disk, suggesting strong beaming of the spikes emission.

  1. Analyzing multiple spike trains with nonparametric Granger causality.

    PubMed

    Nedungadi, Aatira G; Rangarajan, Govindan; Jain, Neeraj; Ding, Mingzhou

    2009-08-01

    Simultaneous recordings of spike trains from multiple single neurons are becoming commonplace. Understanding the interaction patterns among these spike trains remains a key research area. A question of interest is the evaluation of information flow between neurons through the analysis of whether one spike train exerts causal influence on another. For continuous-valued time series data, Granger causality has proven an effective method for this purpose. However, the basis for Granger causality estimation is autoregressive data modeling, which is not directly applicable to spike trains. Various filtering options distort the properties of spike trains as point processes. Here we propose a new nonparametric approach to estimate Granger causality directly from the Fourier transforms of spike train data. We validate the method on synthetic spike trains generated by model networks of neurons with known connectivity patterns and then apply it to neurons simultaneously recorded from the thalamus and the primary somatosensory cortex of a squirrel monkey undergoing tactile stimulation. PMID:19137420

  2. Generalized transport coefficients for inelastic Maxwell mixtures under shear flow.

    PubMed

    Garzó, Vicente; Trizac, Emmanuel

    2015-11-01

    The Boltzmann equation framework for inelastic Maxwell models is considered to determine the transport coefficients associated with the mass, momentum, and heat fluxes of a granular binary mixture in spatially inhomogeneous states close to the simple shear flow. The Boltzmann equation is solved by means of a Chapman-Enskog-type expansion around the (local) shear flow distributions f(r)(0) for each species that retain all the hydrodynamic orders in the shear rate. Due to the anisotropy induced by the shear flow, tensorial quantities are required to describe the transport processes instead of the conventional scalar coefficients. These tensors are given in terms of the solutions of a set of coupled equations, which can be analytically solved as functions of the shear rate a, the coefficients of restitution α(rs), and the parameters of the mixture (masses, diameters, and composition). Since the reference distribution functions f(r)(0) apply for arbitrary values of the shear rate and are not restricted to weak dissipation, the corresponding generalized coefficients turn out to be nonlinear functions of both a and α(rs). The dependence of the relevant elements of the three diffusion tensors on both the shear rate and dissipation is illustrated in the tracer limit case, the results showing that the deviation of the generalized transport coefficients from their forms for vanishing shear rates is in general significant. A comparison with the previous results obtained analytically for inelastic hard spheres by using Grad's moment method is carried out, showing a good agreement over a wide range of values for the coefficients of restitution. Finally, as an application of the theoretical expressions derived here for the transport coefficients, thermal diffusion segregation of an intruder immersed in a granular gas is also studied. PMID:26651684

  3. Generalized transport coefficients for inelastic Maxwell mixtures under shear flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Garzó, Vicente; Trizac, Emmanuel

    2015-11-01

    The Boltzmann equation framework for inelastic Maxwell models is considered to determine the transport coefficients associated with the mass, momentum, and heat fluxes of a granular binary mixture in spatially inhomogeneous states close to the simple shear flow. The Boltzmann equation is solved by means of a Chapman-Enskog-type expansion around the (local) shear flow distributions fr(0 ) for each species that retain all the hydrodynamic orders in the shear rate. Due to the anisotropy induced by the shear flow, tensorial quantities are required to describe the transport processes instead of the conventional scalar coefficients. These tensors are given in terms of the solutions of a set of coupled equations, which can be analytically solved as functions of the shear rate a , the coefficients of restitution αr s, and the parameters of the mixture (masses, diameters, and composition). Since the reference distribution functions fr(0 ) apply for arbitrary values of the shear rate and are not restricted to weak dissipation, the corresponding generalized coefficients turn out to be nonlinear functions of both a and αr s. The dependence of the relevant elements of the three diffusion tensors on both the shear rate and dissipation is illustrated in the tracer limit case, the results showing that the deviation of the generalized transport coefficients from their forms for vanishing shear rates is in general significant. A comparison with the previous results obtained analytically for inelastic hard spheres by using Grad's moment method is carried out, showing a good agreement over a wide range of values for the coefficients of restitution. Finally, as an application of the theoretical expressions derived here for the transport coefficients, thermal diffusion segregation of an intruder immersed in a granular gas is also studied.

  4. Inelastic strain analogy for piecewise linear computation of creep residues in built-up structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jenkins, Jerald M.

    1987-01-01

    An analogy between inelastic strains caused by temperature and those caused by creep is presented in terms of isotropic elasticity. It is shown how the theoretical aspects can be blended with existing finite-element computer programs to exact a piecewise linear solution. The creep effect is determined by using the thermal stress computational approach, if appropriate alterations are made to the thermal expansion of the individual elements. The overall transient solution is achieved by consecutive piecewise linear iterations. The total residue caused by creep is obtained by accumulating creep residues for each iteration and then resubmitting the total residues for each element as an equivalent input. A typical creep law is tested for incremental time convergence. The results indicate that the approach is practical, with a valid indication of the extent of creep after approximately 20 hr of incremental time. The general analogy between body forces and inelastic strain gradients is discussed with respect to how an inelastic problem can be worked as an elastic problem.

  5. Inelastic and reactive scattering of hyperthermal atomic oxygen from amorphous carbon

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Minton, Timothy K.; Nelson, Christine M.; Brinza, David E.; Liang, Ranty H.

    1991-01-01

    The reaction of hyperthermal oxygen atoms with an amorphous carbon-13 surface was studied using a modified universal crossed molecular beams apparatus. Time-of-flight distributions of inelastically scattered O-atoms and reactively scattered CO-13 and CO2-13 were measured with a rotatable mass spectrometer detector. Two inelastic scattering channels were observed, corresponding to a direct inelastic process in which the scattered O-atoms retain 20 to 30 percent of their initial kinetic energy and to a trapping desorption process whereby O-atoms emerge from the surface at thermal velocities. Reactive scattering data imply the formation of two kinds of CO products, slow products whose translational energies are determined by the surface temperature and hyperthermal (Approx. 3 eV) products with translational energies comprising roughly 30 percent of the total available energy (E sub avl), where E sub avl is the sum of the collision energy and the reaction exothermicity. Angular data show that the hyperthermal CO is scattered preferentially in the specular direction. CO2 product was also observed, but at much lower intensities than CO and with only thermal velocities.

  6. A comparison of learning abilities of spiking networks with different spike timing-dependent plasticity forms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sboev, Alexander; Vlasov, Danila; Serenko, Alexey; Rybka, Roman; Moloshnikov, Ivan

    2016-02-01

    A study of possibility to model the learning process on base of different forms of timing-dependent plasticity (STDP) was performed. It is shown that the learning ability depends on the choice of spike pairing scheme and the type of input signal used for learning. The comparison of performance of several STDP rules along with several neuron models (leaky integrate-and-fire, static, Izhikevich and Hodgkin-Huxley) was carried out using the NEST simulator. The combinations of input signal and STDP spike pairing scheme, which demonstrate the best learning abilities, were extracted.

  7. Spike-timing-dependent plasticity in spiking neuron networks for robot navigation control

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arena, Paolo; Danieli, Fabio; Fortuna, Luigi; Frasca, Mattia; Patane, Luca

    2005-06-01

    In this paper a biologically-inspired network of spiking neurons is used for robot navigation control. The implemented scheme is able to process information coming from the robot contact sensors in order to avoid obstacles and on the basis of these actions to learn how to respond to stimuli coming from range finder sensors. The implemented network is therefore able of reinforcement learning through a mechanism based on operant conditioning. This learning takes place according to a plasticity law in the synapses, based on spike timing. Simulation results discussed in the paper show the suitability of the approach and interesting adaptive properties of the network.

  8. Self-dynamics of hydrogen gas as probed by means of inelastic neutron scattering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guarini, Eleonora; Orecchini, Andrea; Formisano, Ferdinando; Demmel, Franz; Petrillo, Caterina; Sacchetti, Francesco; Bafile, Ubaldo; Barocchi, Fabrizio

    2005-12-01

    The neutron double-differential cross-section of molecular hydrogen at low density has been measured at two rather low scattering angles and different final neutron energies by means of three-axis spectrometry. This first inelastic scattering determination of the single-particle roto-translational dynamics of room temperature H2 allows for a detailed test of the theoretical modelling of the spectral line-shapes of such a fundamental molecule, performed by referring both to a careful quantum-mechanical treatment and to a simpler semi-classical approximation. A comprehensive report on the neutron measurements and data analysis is presented, along with an overview of the theories used for comparison with the experimental results. An encouraging picture of the present capabilities in the calculation of the true dynamic response of hydrogen gas to slow and thermal neutrons is obtained, opening new perspectives for accurate data calibration in inelastic neutron spectroscopy, with special relevance for small-angle experiments.

  9. Modeling of inelastic collisions in a multifluid plasma: Excitation and deexcitation

    SciTech Connect

    Le, Hai P.; Cambier, Jean-Luc

    2015-09-15

    We describe here a model for inelastic collisions for electronic excitation and deexcitation processes in a general, multifluid plasma. The model is derived from kinetic theory, and applicable to any mixture and mass ratio. The principle of detailed balance is strictly enforced, and the model is consistent with all asymptotic limits. The results are verified with direct Monte Carlo calculations, and various numerical tests are conducted for the case of an electron-hydrogen two-fluid system, using a generic, semi-classical model of collision cross sections. We find that in some cases, the contribution of inelastic collisions to the momentum and thermal resistance coefficients is not negligible, in contrast to the assumptions of current multifluid models. This fundamental model is also applied to ionization and recombination processes, the studies on which are currently underway.

  10. Information-geometric measure for neural spikes.

    PubMed

    Nakahara, Hiroyuki; Amari, Shun-ichi

    2002-10-01

    This study introduces information-geometric measures to analyze neural firing patterns by taking not only the second-order but also higher-order interactions among neurons into account. Information geometry provides useful tools and concepts for this purpose, including the orthogonality of coordinate parameters and the Pythagoras relation in the Kullback-Leibler divergence. Based on this orthogonality, we show a novel method for analyzing spike firing patterns by decomposing the interactions of neurons of various orders. As a result, purely pairwise, triple-wise, and higher-order interactions are singled out. We also demonstrate the benefits of our proposal by using several examples. PMID:12396564

  11. State-Space Analysis of Time-Varying Higher-Order Spike Correlation for Multiple Neural Spike Train Data

    PubMed Central

    Shimazaki, Hideaki; Amari, Shun-ichi; Brown, Emery N.; Grün, Sonja

    2012-01-01

    Precise spike coordination between the spiking activities of multiple neurons is suggested as an indication of coordinated network activity in active cell assemblies. Spike correlation analysis aims to identify such cooperative network activity by detecting excess spike synchrony in simultaneously recorded multiple neural spike sequences. Cooperative activity is expected to organize dynamically during behavior and cognition; therefore currently available analysis techniques must be extended to enable the estimation of multiple time-varying spike interactions between neurons simultaneously. In particular, new methods must take advantage of the simultaneous observations of multiple neurons by addressing their higher-order dependencies, which cannot be revealed by pairwise analyses alone. In this paper, we develop a method for estimating time-varying spike interactions by means of a state-space analysis. Discretized parallel spike sequences are modeled as multi-variate binary processes using a log-linear model that provides a well-defined measure of higher-order spike correlation in an information geometry framework. We construct a recursive Bayesian filter/smoother for the extraction of spike interaction parameters. This method can simultaneously estimate the dynamic pairwise spike interactions of multiple single neurons, thereby extending the Ising/spin-glass model analysis of multiple neural spike train data to a nonstationary analysis. Furthermore, the method can estimate dynamic higher-order spike interactions. To validate the inclusion of the higher-order terms in the model, we construct an approximation method to assess the goodness-of-fit to spike data. In addition, we formulate a test method for the presence of higher-order spike correlation even in nonstationary spike data, e.g., data from awake behaving animals. The utility of the proposed methods is tested using simulated spike data with known underlying correlation dynamics. Finally, we apply the methods

  12. State-space analysis of time-varying higher-order spike correlation for multiple neural spike train data.

    PubMed

    Shimazaki, Hideaki; Amari, Shun-Ichi; Brown, Emery N; Grün, Sonja

    2012-01-01

    Precise spike coordination between the spiking activities of multiple neurons is suggested as an indication of coordinated network activity in active cell assemblies. Spike correlation analysis aims to identify such cooperative network activity by detecting excess spike synchrony in simultaneously recorded multiple neural spike sequences. Cooperative activity is expected to organize dynamically during behavior and cognition; therefore currently available analysis techniques must be extended to enable the estimation of multiple time-varying spike interactions between neurons simultaneously. In particular, new methods must take advantage of the simultaneous observations of multiple neurons by addressing their higher-order dependencies, which cannot be revealed by pairwise analyses alone. In this paper, we develop a method for estimating time-varying spike interactions by means of a state-space analysis. Discretized parallel spike sequences are modeled as multi-variate binary processes using a log-linear model that provides a well-defined measure of higher-order spike correlation in an information geometry framework. We construct a recursive Bayesian filter/smoother for the extraction of spike interaction parameters. This method can simultaneously estimate the dynamic pairwise spike interactions of multiple single neurons, thereby extending the Ising/spin-glass model analysis of multiple neural spike train data to a nonstationary analysis. Furthermore, the method can estimate dynamic higher-order spike interactions. To validate the inclusion of the higher-order terms in the model, we construct an approximation method to assess the goodness-of-fit to spike data. In addition, we formulate a test method for the presence of higher-order spike correlation even in nonstationary spike data, e.g., data from awake behaving animals. The utility of the proposed methods is tested using simulated spike data with known underlying correlation dynamics. Finally, we apply the methods

  13. Inelastic scattering of atoms in a double well

    SciTech Connect

    Annibale, E. S.; Fialko, O.; Ziegler, K.

    2011-04-15

    We study a mixture of two light spin-1/2 fermionic atoms and two heavy atoms in a double-well potential. Inelastic scattering processes between both atomic species excite the heavy atoms and renormalize the tunneling rate and the interaction of the light atoms (polaron effect). The effective interaction of the light atoms changes its sign and becomes attractive for strong inelastic scattering. This is accompanied by a crossing of the energy levels from singly occupied sites at weak inelastic scattering to a doubly occupied and an empty site for stronger inelastic scattering. We are able to identify the polaron effect and the level crossing in the quantum dynamics.

  14. Consensus-Based Sorting of Neuronal Spike Waveforms

    PubMed Central

    Fournier, Julien; Mueller, Christian M.; Shein-Idelson, Mark; Hemberger, Mike

    2016-01-01

    Optimizing spike-sorting algorithms is difficult because sorted clusters can rarely be checked against independently obtained “ground truth” data. In most spike-sorting algorithms in use today, the optimality of a clustering solution is assessed relative to some assumption on the distribution of the spike shapes associated with a particular single unit (e.g., Gaussianity) and by visual inspection of the clustering solution followed by manual validation. When the spatiotemporal waveforms of spikes from different cells overlap, the decision as to whether two spikes should be assigned to the same source can be quite subjective, if it is not based on reliable quantitative measures. We propose a new approach, whereby spike clusters are identified from the most consensual partition across an ensemble of clustering solutions. Using the variability of the clustering solutions across successive iterations of the same clustering algorithm (template matching based on K-means clusters), we estimate the probability of spikes being clustered together and identify groups of spikes that are not statistically distinguishable from one another. Thus, we identify spikes that are most likely to be clustered together and therefore correspond to consistent spike clusters. This method has the potential advantage that it does not rely on any model of the spike shapes. It also provides estimates of the proportion of misclassified spikes for each of the identified clusters. We tested our algorithm on several datasets for which there exists a ground truth (simultaneous intracellular data), and show that it performs close to the optimum reached by a support vector machine trained on the ground truth. We also show that the estimated rate of misclassification matches the proportion of misclassified spikes measured from the ground truth data. PMID:27536990

  15. Consensus-Based Sorting of Neuronal Spike Waveforms.

    PubMed

    Fournier, Julien; Mueller, Christian M; Shein-Idelson, Mark; Hemberger, Mike; Laurent, Gilles

    2016-01-01

    Optimizing spike-sorting algorithms is difficult because sorted clusters can rarely be checked against independently obtained "ground truth" data. In most spike-sorting algorithms in use today, the optimality of a clustering solution is assessed relative to some assumption on the distribution of the spike shapes associated with a particular single unit (e.g., Gaussianity) and by visual inspection of the clustering solution followed by manual validation. When the spatiotemporal waveforms of spikes from different cells overlap, the decision as to whether two spikes should be assigned to the same source can be quite subjective, if it is not based on reliable quantitative measures. We propose a new approach, whereby spike clusters are identified from the most consensual partition across an ensemble of clustering solutions. Using the variability of the clustering solutions across successive iterations of the same clustering algorithm (template matching based on K-means clusters), we estimate the probability of spikes being clustered together and identify groups of spikes that are not statistically distinguishable from one another. Thus, we identify spikes that are most likely to be clustered together and therefore correspond to consistent spike clusters. This method has the potential advantage that it does not rely on any model of the spike shapes. It also provides estimates of the proportion of misclassified spikes for each of the identified clusters. We tested our algorithm on several datasets for which there exists a ground truth (simultaneous intracellular data), and show that it performs close to the optimum reached by a support vector machine trained on the ground truth. We also show that the estimated rate of misclassification matches the proportion of misclassified spikes measured from the ground truth data. PMID:27536990

  16. Spike count, spike timing and temporal information in the cortex of awake, freely moving rats

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Scaglione, Alessandro; Foffani, Guglielmo; Moxon, Karen A.

    2014-08-01

    Objective. Sensory processing of peripheral information is not stationary but is, in general, a dynamic process related to the behavioral state of the animal. Yet the link between the state of the behavior and the encoding properties of neurons is unclear. This report investigates the impact of the behavioral state on the encoding mechanisms used by cortical neurons for both detection and discrimination of somatosensory stimuli in awake, freely moving, rats. Approach. Neuronal activity was recorded from the primary somatosensory cortex of five rats under two different behavioral states (quiet versus whisking) while electrical stimulation of increasing stimulus strength was delivered to the mystacial pad. Information theoretical measures were then used to measure the contribution of different encoding mechanisms to the information carried by neurons in response to the whisker stimulation. Main results. We found that the behavioral state of the animal modulated the total amount of information conveyed by neurons and that the timing of individual spikes increased the information compared to the total count of spikes alone. However, the temporal information, i.e. information exclusively related to when the spikes occur, was not modulated by behavioral state. Significance. We conclude that information about somatosensory stimuli is modulated by the behavior of the animal and this modulation is mainly expressed in the spike count while the temporal information is more robust to changes in behavioral state.

  17. Communication through resonance in spiking neuronal networks.

    PubMed

    Hahn, Gerald; Bujan, Alejandro F; Frégnac, Yves; Aertsen, Ad; Kumar, Arvind

    2014-08-01

    The cortex processes stimuli through a distributed network of specialized brain areas. This processing requires mechanisms that can route neuronal activity across weakly connected cortical regions. Routing models proposed thus far are either limited to propagation of spiking activity across strongly connected networks or require distinct mechanisms that create local oscillations and establish their coherence between distant cortical areas. Here, we propose a novel mechanism which explains how synchronous spiking activity propagates across weakly connected brain areas supported by oscillations. In our model, oscillatory activity unleashes network resonance that amplifies feeble synchronous signals and promotes their propagation along weak connections ("communication through resonance"). The emergence of coherent oscillations is a natural consequence of synchronous activity propagation and therefore the assumption of different mechanisms that create oscillations and provide coherence is not necessary. Moreover, the phase-locking of oscillations is a side effect of communication rather than its requirement. Finally, we show how the state of ongoing activity could affect the communication through resonance and propose that modulations of the ongoing activity state could influence information processing in distributed cortical networks. PMID:25165853

  18. Assessing the global meltwater spike*1

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jones, Glenn A.; Ruddiman, William F.

    1982-03-01

    L. V. Worthington (1968, Meteorological Monographs8, 63-67) hypothesized that a low-salinity lid covered the entire world ocean. By deconvolving isotopic curves from the western equatorial Pacific and equatorial Atlantic, W. H. Berger, R. F. Johnson, and J. S. Killingley (1977), Nature (London)269, 661-663) and W. H. Berger (1978, Deep-Sea Research25, 473-480) reconstructed "meltwater spikes" similar to those actually observed in the Gulf of Mexico and thus apparently confirmed the Worthington hypothesis. It is shown that this conclusion is unwarranted. The primary flaw in the reconstructed meltwater spikes is that the mixing intensity used in the deconvolution operation is overestimated. As a result, structure recorded in the mixed isotopic record becomes exaggerated in the attempt to restore the original unmixed record. This structure can be attributed to variable ice-volume decay during deglaciation, effects of differential solution on planktonic foraminifera, temporal changes in abundance of the foraminifera carrying the isotopic signal, and analytical error. An alternative geographic view to the global low-salinity lid is offered: a map showing portions of the ocean potentially affected by increased deglacial meltwater at middle and high latitudes and by increased precipitation-induced runoff at low and middle latitudes.

  19. Precise neutron inelastic cross section measurements

    SciTech Connect

    Negret, Alexandru

    2012-11-20

    The design of a new generation of nuclear reactors requires the development of a very precise neutron cross section database. Ongoing experiments performed at dedicated facilities aim to the measurement of such cross sections with an unprecedented uncertainty of the order of 5% or even smaller. We give an overview of such a facility: the Gamma Array for Inelastic Neutron Scattering (GAINS) installed at the GELINA neutron source of IRMM, Belgium. Some of the most challenging difficulties of the experimental approach are emphasized and recent results are shown.

  20. Inelastic Scattering Of Electrons By Protons

    DOE R&D Accomplishments Database

    Cone, A. A.; Chen, K. W.; Dunning, J. R. Jr.; Hartwig, G.; Ramsey, N. F.; Walker, J. K.; Wilson, R.

    1966-12-01

    The inelastic scattering of electrons by protons has been measured at incident electron energies up to 5 BeV/c and momentum transfers q{sup 2}=4(BeV/c){sup 2}. Excitation of known nucleon resonances at M=1238, 1512, 1688 and possibly 1920 MeV have been observed. The calculations for the resonance at M=1238 MeV have been compared with calculations by Adler based on the dispersion theory of Chew, Goldberger, Low and Nambu. The agreement is good. Qualitative models are discussed for the other resonances.

  1. Strain accommodation in inelastic deformation of glasses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Murali, P.; Ramamurty, U.; Shenoy, Vijay B.

    2007-01-01

    Motivated by recent experiments on metallic glasses, we examine the micromechanisms of strain accommodation including crystallization and void formation during inelastic deformation of glasses by employing molecular statics simulations. Our atomistic simulations with Lennard-Jones-like potentials suggests that a softer short range interaction between atoms favors crystallization. Compressive hydrostatic strain in the presence of a shear strain promotes crystallization whereas a tensile hydrostatic strain is found to induce voids. The deformation subsequent to the onset of crystallization includes partial reamorphization and recrystallization, suggesting important atomistic mechanisms of plastic dissipation in glasses.

  2. On rainbow scattering in inelastic molecular collisions

    SciTech Connect

    Thomas, Lowell D.

    1980-01-01

    The purpose of this letter is to call attention to a growing misinterpretation in the literature on rainbow scattering in inelastic molecular collisions. The importance of rainbow structures in the angular distributions of elastic scattering cross sections is well established. However, use of approximate cross section formulas has led to an incorrect classification of the types of rainbows which are possible. Actually, however, it is possible to identify two classes of rainbows. If the relevant distributions and classifications are clearly stated, there should be little chance of confusion,

  3. Effects of Spike Anticipation on the Spiking Dynamics of Neural Networks

    PubMed Central

    de Santos-Sierra, Daniel; Sanchez-Jimenez, Abel; Garcia-Vellisca, Mariano A.; Navas, Adrian; Villacorta-Atienza, Jose A.

    2015-01-01

    Synchronization is one of the central phenomena involved in information processing in living systems. It is known that the nervous system requires the coordinated activity of both local and distant neural populations. Such an interplay allows to merge different information modalities in a whole processing supporting high-level mental skills as understanding, memory, abstraction, etc. Though, the biological processes underlying synchronization in the brain are not fully understood there have been reported a variety of mechanisms supporting different types of synchronization both at theoretical and experimental level. One of the more intriguing of these phenomena is the anticipating synchronization, which has been recently reported in a pair of unidirectionally coupled artificial neurons under simple conditions (Pyragiene and Pyragas, 2013), where the slave neuron is able to anticipate in time the behavior of the master one. In this paper, we explore the effect of spike anticipation over the information processing performed by a neural network at functional and structural level. We show that the introduction of intermediary neurons in the network enhances spike anticipation and analyse how these variations in spike anticipation can significantly change the firing regime of the neural network according to its functional and structural properties. In addition we show that the interspike interval (ISI), one of the main features of the neural response associated with the information coding, can be closely related to spike anticipation by each spike, and how synaptic plasticity can be modulated through that relationship. This study has been performed through numerical simulation of a coupled system of Hindmarsh–Rose neurons. PMID:26648863

  4. Effects of Spike Anticipation on the Spiking Dynamics of Neural Networks.

    PubMed

    de Santos-Sierra, Daniel; Sanchez-Jimenez, Abel; Garcia-Vellisca, Mariano A; Navas, Adrian; Villacorta-Atienza, Jose A

    2015-01-01

    Synchronization is one of the central phenomena involved in information processing in living systems. It is known that the nervous system requires the coordinated activity of both local and distant neural populations. Such an interplay allows to merge different information modalities in a whole processing supporting high-level mental skills as understanding, memory, abstraction, etc. Though, the biological processes underlying synchronization in the brain are not fully understood there have been reported a variety of mechanisms supporting different types of synchronization both at theoretical and experimental level. One of the more intriguing of these phenomena is the anticipating synchronization, which has been recently reported in a pair of unidirectionally coupled artificial neurons under simple conditions (Pyragiene and Pyragas, 2013), where the slave neuron is able to anticipate in time the behavior of the master one. In this paper, we explore the effect of spike anticipation over the information processing performed by a neural network at functional and structural level. We show that the introduction of intermediary neurons in the network enhances spike anticipation and analyse how these variations in spike anticipation can significantly change the firing regime of the neural network according to its functional and structural properties. In addition we show that the interspike interval (ISI), one of the main features of the neural response associated with the information coding, can be closely related to spike anticipation by each spike, and how synaptic plasticity can be modulated through that relationship. This study has been performed through numerical simulation of a coupled system of Hindmarsh-Rose neurons. PMID:26648863

  5. State-Space Algorithms for Estimating Spike Rate Functions

    PubMed Central

    Smith, Anne C.; Scalon, Joao D.; Wirth, Sylvia; Yanike, Marianna; Suzuki, Wendy A.; Brown, Emery N.

    2010-01-01

    The accurate characterization of spike firing rates including the determination of when changes in activity occur is a fundamental issue in the analysis of neurophysiological data. Here we describe a state-space model for estimating the spike rate function that provides a maximum likelihood estimate of the spike rate, model goodness-of-fit assessments, as well as confidence intervals for the spike rate function and any other associated quantities of interest. Using simulated spike data, we first compare the performance of the state-space approach with that of Bayesian adaptive regression splines (BARS) and a simple cubic spline smoothing algorithm. We show that the state-space model is computationally efficient and comparable with other spline approaches. Our results suggest both a theoretically sound and practical approach for estimating spike rate functions that is applicable to a wide range of neurophysiological data. PMID:19911062

  6. A spiking neuron circuit based on a carbon nanotube transistor.

    PubMed

    Chen, C-L; Kim, K; Truong, Q; Shen, A; Li, Z; Chen, Y

    2012-07-11

    A spiking neuron circuit based on a carbon nanotube (CNT) transistor is presented in this paper. The spiking neuron circuit has a crossbar architecture in which the transistor gates are connected to its row electrodes and the transistor sources are connected to its column electrodes. An electrochemical cell is incorporated in the gate of the transistor by sandwiching a hydrogen-doped poly(ethylene glycol)methyl ether (PEG) electrolyte between the CNT channel and the top gate electrode. An input spike applied to the gate triggers a dynamic drift of the hydrogen ions in the PEG electrolyte, resulting in a post-synaptic current (PSC) through the CNT channel. Spikes input into the rows trigger PSCs through multiple CNT transistors, and PSCs cumulate in the columns and integrate into a 'soma' circuit to trigger output spikes based on an integrate-and-fire mechanism. The spiking neuron circuit can potentially emulate biological neuron networks and their intelligent functions. PMID:22710137

  7. An Overview of Bayesian Methods for Neural Spike Train Analysis

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Neural spike train analysis is an important task in computational neuroscience which aims to understand neural mechanisms and gain insights into neural circuits. With the advancement of multielectrode recording and imaging technologies, it has become increasingly demanding to develop statistical tools for analyzing large neuronal ensemble spike activity. Here we present a tutorial overview of Bayesian methods and their representative applications in neural spike train analysis, at both single neuron and population levels. On the theoretical side, we focus on various approximate Bayesian inference techniques as applied to latent state and parameter estimation. On the application side, the topics include spike sorting, tuning curve estimation, neural encoding and decoding, deconvolution of spike trains from calcium imaging signals, and inference of neuronal functional connectivity and synchrony. Some research challenges and opportunities for neural spike train analysis are discussed. PMID:24348527

  8. The Role of Spike Temporal Latencies in Artificial Olfaction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Polese, D.; Martinelli, E.; Dini, F.; Paolesse, R.; Filippini, D.; Lundström, I.; Di Natale, C.

    2011-09-01

    In this paper we investigate the recognition power of spike time latencies in an artificial olfactory system. For the scope we used a recently introduced platform for artificial olfaction implementing an artificial olfactory epithelium, formed by thousands sensors, and an abstract olfactory bulb1. Results show that correct volatile compounds classification can be achieved considering only the first two spikes of the neural network output evidencing that the latency of the first spikes contains actually enough information for odor identification.

  9. Solving Constraint Satisfaction Problems with Networks of Spiking Neurons.

    PubMed

    Jonke, Zeno; Habenschuss, Stefan; Maass, Wolfgang

    2016-01-01

    Network of neurons in the brain apply-unlike processors in our current generation of computer hardware-an event-based processing strategy, where short pulses (spikes) are emitted sparsely by neurons to signal the occurrence of an event at a particular point in time. Such spike-based computations promise to be substantially more power-efficient than traditional clocked processing schemes. However, it turns out to be surprisingly difficult to design networks of spiking neurons that can solve difficult computational problems on the level of single spikes, rather than rates of spikes. We present here a new method for designing networks of spiking neurons via an energy function. Furthermore, we show how the energy function of a network of stochastically firing neurons can be shaped in a transparent manner by composing the networks of simple stereotypical network motifs. We show that this design approach enables networks of spiking neurons to produce approximate solutions to difficult (NP-hard) constraint satisfaction problems from the domains of planning/optimization and verification/logical inference. The resulting networks employ noise as a computational resource. Nevertheless, the timing of spikes plays an essential role in their computations. Furthermore, networks of spiking neurons carry out for the Traveling Salesman Problem a more efficient stochastic search for good solutions compared with stochastic artificial neural networks (Boltzmann machines) and Gibbs sampling. PMID:27065785

  10. Hierarchical spike clustering analysis for investigation of interneuron heterogeneity.

    PubMed

    Boehlen, Anne; Heinemann, Uwe; Henneberger, Christian

    2016-04-21

    Action potentials represent the output of a neuron. Especially interneurons display a variety of discharge patterns ranging from regular action potential firing to prominent spike clustering or stuttering. The mechanisms underlying this heterogeneity remain incompletely understood. We established hierarchical cluster analysis of spike trains as a measure of spike clustering. A clustering index was calculated from action potential trains recorded in the whole-cell patch clamp configuration from hippocampal (CA1, stratum radiatum) and entorhinal (medial entorhinal cortex, layer 2) interneurons in acute slices and simulated data. Prominent, region-dependent, but also variable spike clustering was detected using this measure. Further analysis revealed a strong positive correlation between spike clustering and membrane potentials oscillations but an inverse correlation with neuronal resonance. Furthermore, clustering was more pronounced when the balance between fast-activating K(+) currents, assessed by the spike repolarisation time, and hyperpolarization-activated currents, gauged by the size of the sag potential, was shifted in favour of fast K(+) currents. Simulations of spike clustering confirmed that variable ratios of fast K(+) and hyperpolarization-activated currents could underlie different degrees of spike clustering and could thus be crucial for temporally structuring interneuron spike output. PMID:26987719

  11. Feedback stabilizes propagation of synchronous spiking in cortical neural networks.

    PubMed

    Moldakarimov, Samat; Bazhenov, Maxim; Sejnowski, Terrence J

    2015-02-24

    Precisely timed action potentials related to stimuli and behavior have been observed in the cerebral cortex. However, information carried by the precise spike timing has to propagate through many cortical areas, and noise could disrupt millisecond precision during the transmission. Previous studies have demonstrated that only strong stimuli that evoke a large number of spikes with small dispersion of spike times can propagate through multilayer networks without degrading the temporal precision. Here we show that feedback projections can increase the number of spikes in spike volleys without degrading their temporal precision. Feedback also increased the range of spike volleys that can propagate through multilayer networks. Our work suggests that feedback projections could be responsible for the reliable propagation of information encoded in spike times through cortex, and thus could serve as an attentional mechanism to regulate the flow of information in the cortex. Feedback projections may also participate in generating spike synchronization that is engaged in cognitive behaviors by the same mechanisms described here for spike propagation. PMID:25675531

  12. Solving Constraint Satisfaction Problems with Networks of Spiking Neurons

    PubMed Central

    Jonke, Zeno; Habenschuss, Stefan; Maass, Wolfgang

    2016-01-01

    Network of neurons in the brain apply—unlike processors in our current generation of computer hardware—an event-based processing strategy, where short pulses (spikes) are emitted sparsely by neurons to signal the occurrence of an event at a particular point in time. Such spike-based computations promise to be substantially more power-efficient than traditional clocked processing schemes. However, it turns out to be surprisingly difficult to design networks of spiking neurons that can solve difficult computational problems on the level of single spikes, rather than rates of spikes. We present here a new method for designing networks of spiking neurons via an energy function. Furthermore, we show how the energy function of a network of stochastically firing neurons can be shaped in a transparent manner by composing the networks of simple stereotypical network motifs. We show that this design approach enables networks of spiking neurons to produce approximate solutions to difficult (NP-hard) constraint satisfaction problems from the domains of planning/optimization and verification/logical inference. The resulting networks employ noise as a computational resource. Nevertheless, the timing of spikes plays an essential role in their computations. Furthermore, networks of spiking neurons carry out for the Traveling Salesman Problem a more efficient stochastic search for good solutions compared with stochastic artificial neural networks (Boltzmann machines) and Gibbs sampling. PMID:27065785

  13. Adaptive time-frequency parametrization of epileptic spikes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Durka, Piotr J.

    2004-05-01

    Adaptive time-frequency approximations of signals have proven to be a valuable tool in electroencephalogram (EEG) analysis and research, where it is believed that oscillatory phenomena play a crucial role in the brain’s information processing. This paper extends this paradigm to the nonoscillating structures such as the epileptic EEG spikes, and presents the advantages of their parametrization in general terms such as amplitude and half-width. A simple detector of epileptic spikes in the space of these parameters, tested on a limited data set, gives very promising results. It also provides a direct distinction between randomly occurring spikes or spike/wave complexes and rhythmic discharges.

  14. Inelastic deformation of metal matrix composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lissenden, C. J.; Herakovich, C. T.; Pindera, M-J.

    1993-01-01

    A theoretical model capable of predicting the thermomechanical response of continuously reinforced metal matrix composite laminates subjected to multiaxial loading was developed. A micromechanical model is used in conjunction with nonlinear lamination theory to determine inelastic laminae response. Matrix viscoplasticity, residual stresses, and damage to the fiber/matrix interfacial zone are explicitly included in the model. The representative cell of the micromechanical model is considered to be in a state of generalized plane strain, enabling a quasi two-dimensional analysis to be performed. Constant strain finite elements are formulated with elastic-viscoplastic constitutive equations. Interfacial debonding is incorporated into the model through interface elements based on the interfacial debonding theory originally presented by Needleman, and modified by Tvergaard. Nonlinear interfacial constitutive equations relate interfacial tractions to displacement discontinuities at the interface. Theoretical predictions are compared with the results of an experimental program conducted on silicon carbide/titanium (SiC/Ti) unidirectional, (O4), and angle-ply, (+34)(sub s), tubular specimens. Multiaxial loading included increments of axial tension, compression, torque, and internal pressure. Loadings were chosen in an effort to distinguish inelastic deformation due to damage from matrix plasticity and separate time-dependent effects from time-independent effects. Results show that fiber/matrix debonding is nonuniform throughout the composite and is a major factor in the effective response. Also, significant creep behavior occurs at relatively low applied stress levels at room temperature.

  15. Field-theoretical description of deep inelastic scattering

    SciTech Connect

    Geyer, B.; Robaschik, D.; Wieczorek, E.

    1980-01-01

    The most important theoretical notions concerning deep inelastic scattering are reviewed. Topics discussed are the model-independent approach, which is based on the general principles of quantum field theory, the application of quantum chromodynamics to deep inelastic scattering, approaches based on the quark--parton model, the light cone algebra, and conformal invariance, and also investigations in the framework of perturbation theory.

  16. High energy-resolution inelastic x-ray scattering

    SciTech Connect

    Hastings, J.B.; Moncton, D.E.; Fujii

    1984-01-01

    A brief review is presented of various aspects of high energy-resolution inelastic x-ray scattering based on synchrotron sources. We show what kinematical advantages are provided by the photon probe and propose mirror and monochromator designs to achieve an optically efficient beam line for inelastic x-ray scattering.

  17. [Wide QRS tachycardia preceded by pacemaker spikes].

    PubMed

    Romero, M; Aranda, A; Gómez, F J; Jurado, A

    2014-04-01

    The differential diagnosis and therapeutic management of wide QRS tachycardia preceded by pacemaker spike is presented. The pacemaker-mediated tachycardia, tachycardia fibrillo-flutter in patients with pacemakers, and runaway pacemakers, have a similar surface electrocardiogram, but respond to different therapeutic measures. The tachycardia response to the application of a magnet over the pacemaker could help in the differential diagnosis, and in some cases will be therapeutic, as in the case of a tachycardia-mediated pacemaker. Although these conditions are diagnosed and treated in hospitals with catheterization laboratories using the application programmer over the pacemaker, patients presenting in primary care clinic and emergency forced us to make a diagnosis and treat the haemodynamically unstable patient prior to referral. PMID:23768570

  18. Evolving unipolar memristor spiking neural networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Howard, David; Bull, Larry; De Lacy Costello, Ben

    2015-10-01

    Neuromorphic computing - brain-like computing in hardware - typically requires myriad complimentary metal oxide semiconductor spiking neurons interconnected by a dense mesh of nanoscale plastic synapses. Memristors are frequently cited as strong synapse candidates due to their statefulness and potential for low-power implementations. To date, plentiful research has focused on the bipolar memristor synapse, which is capable of incremental weight alterations and can provide adaptive self-organisation under a Hebbian learning scheme. In this paper, we consider the unipolar memristor synapse - a device capable of non-Hebbian switching between only two states (conductive and resistive) through application of a suitable input voltage - and discuss its suitability for neuromorphic systems. A self-adaptive evolutionary process is used to autonomously find highly fit network configurations. Experimentation on two robotics tasks shows that unipolar memristor networks evolve task-solving controllers faster than both bipolar memristor networks and networks containing constant non-plastic connections whilst performing at least comparably.

  19. Vibration driven vehicle inspired from grass spike

    PubMed Central

    Bai, Suo; Xu, Qi; Qin, Yong

    2013-01-01

    Searching and detecting in some harsh environments such as collapsed buildings, pipes, small cracks are crucial for human rescue and industrial detection, military surveillance etc. However, the drawbacks of traditional moving modes of current vehicles make them difficult to perform such tasks. So developing some new vehicles is urgent. Here, we report a Setaria viridis spike's interesting behavior on a vibrating track, and inspired by that phenomena we develop a concept for cargo delivery, and give a detailed discussion about its working mechanism. This vehicle can move on a wide range of smooth and rough surfaces. Moreover, its climbing capability in tilted and even vertical smooth pipe is also outstanding. These features make it suitable for search-rescue, military reconnaissance, etc. Finally, this vehicle can be reduced into micro/nano-scale, which makes it would play an important role in target-drug delivery, micro-electromechanical systems (MEMS). PMID:23677337

  20. High-resolution adaptive spiking sonar.

    PubMed

    Alvarez, Fernando J; Kuc, Roman

    2009-05-01

    A new sonar system based on the conventional 6500 ranging module is presented that generates a sequence of spikes whose temporal density is related to the strength of the received echo. This system notably improves the resolution of a previous system by shortening the discharge cycle of the integrator included in the module. The operation is controlled by a PIC18F452 device, which can adapt the duration of the discharge to changing features of the echo, providing the system with a novel adaptive behavior. The performance of the new sensor is characterized and compared with that of the previous system by performing rotational scans of simple objects with different reflecting strengths. Some applications are suggested that exploit the high resolution and adaptability of this sensor. PMID:19473919

  1. Damage-induced nonassociated inelastic flow in rock salt

    SciTech Connect

    Chan, K.S.; Bodner, S.R.; Brodsky, N.S.; Fossum, A.F.

    1993-06-01

    The multi-mechanism deformation coupled fracture model recently developed by CHAN, et al. (1992), for describing time-dependent, pressure-sensitive inelastic flow and damage evolution in crystalline solids was evaluated against triaxial creep experiments on rock salt. Guided by experimental observations, the kinetic equation and the flow law for damage-induced inelastic flow in the model were modified to account for the development of damage and inelastic dilatation in the transient creep regime. The revised model was then utilized to obtain the creep response and damage evolution in rock salt as a function of confining pressure and stress difference. Comparison between model calculation and experiment revealed that damage-induced inelastic flow is nonassociated, dilatational, and contributes significantly to the macroscopic strain rate observed in rock salt deformed at low confining pressures. The inelastic strain rate and volumetric strain due to damage decrease with increasing confining pressures, and all are suppressed at sufficiently high confining pressures.

  2. Population dynamics of interacting spiking neurons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mattia, Maurizio; del Giudice, Paolo

    2002-11-01

    A dynamical equation is derived for the spike emission rate ν(t) of a homogeneous network of integrate-and-fire (IF) neurons in a mean-field theoretical framework, where the activity of the single cell depends both on the mean afferent current (the ``field'') and on its fluctuations. Finite-size effects are taken into account, by a stochastic extension of the dynamical equation for the ν their effect on the collective activity is studied in detail. Conditions for the local stability of the collective activity are shown to be naturally and simply expressed in terms of (the slope of) the single neuron, static, current-to-rate transfer function. In the framework of the local analysis, we studied the spectral properties of the time-dependent collective activity of the finite network in an asynchronous state; finite-size fluctuations act as an ongoing self-stimulation, which probes the spectral structure of the system on a wide frequency range. The power spectrum of ν exhibits modes ranging from very high frequency (depending on spike transmission delays), which are responsible for instability, to oscillations at a few Hz, direct expression of the diffusion process describing the population dynamics. The latter ``diffusion'' slow modes do not contribute to the stability conditions. Their characteristic times govern the transient response of the network; these reaction times also exhibit a simple dependence on the slope of the neuron transfer function. We speculate on the possible relevance of our results for the change in the characteristic response time of a neural population during the learning process which shapes the synaptic couplings, thereby affecting the slope of the transfer function. There is remarkable agreement of the theoretical predictions with simulations of a network of IF neurons with a constant leakage term for the membrane potential.

  3. Spike sorting for polytrodes: a divide and conquer approach

    PubMed Central

    Swindale, Nicholas V.; Spacek, Martin A.

    2014-01-01

    In order to determine patterns of neural activity, spike signals recorded by extracellular electrodes have to be clustered (sorted) with the aim of ensuring that each cluster represents all the spikes generated by an individual neuron. Many methods for spike sorting have been proposed but few are easily applicable to recordings from polytrodes which may have 16 or more recording sites. As with tetrodes, these are spaced sufficiently closely that signals from single neurons will usually be recorded on several adjacent sites. Although this offers a better chance of distinguishing neurons with similarly shaped spikes, sorting is difficult in such cases because of the high dimensionality of the space in which the signals must be classified. This report details a method for spike sorting based on a divide and conquer approach. Clusters are initially formed by assigning each event to the channel on which it is largest. Each channel-based cluster is then sub-divided into as many distinct clusters as possible. These are then recombined on the basis of pairwise tests into a final set of clusters. Pairwise tests are also performed to establish how distinct each cluster is from the others. A modified gradient ascent clustering (GAC) algorithm is used to do the clustering. The method can sort spikes with minimal user input in times comparable to real time for recordings lasting up to 45 min. Our results illustrate some of the difficulties inherent in spike sorting, including changes in spike shape over time. We show that some physiologically distinct units may have very similar spike shapes. We show that RMS measures of spike shape similarity are not sensitive enough to discriminate clusters that can otherwise be separated by principal components analysis (PCA). Hence spike sorting based on least-squares matching to templates may be unreliable. Our methods should be applicable to tetrodes and scalable to larger multi-electrode arrays (MEAs). PMID:24574979

  4. Influence of spiking activity on cortical local field potentials

    PubMed Central

    Waldert, Stephan; Lemon, Roger N; Kraskov, Alexander

    2013-01-01

    The intra-cortical local field potential (LFP) reflects a variety of electrophysiological processes including synaptic inputs to neurons and their spiking activity. It is still a common assumption that removing high frequencies, often above 300 Hz, is sufficient to exclude spiking activity from LFP activity prior to analysis. Conclusions based on such supposedly spike-free LFPs can result in false interpretations of neurophysiological processes and erroneous correlations between LFPs and behaviour or spiking activity. Such findings might simply arise from spike contamination rather than from genuine changes in synaptic input activity. Although the subject of recent studies, the extent of LFP contamination by spikes is unclear, and the fundamental problem remains. Using spikes recorded in the motor cortex of the awake monkey, we investigated how different factors, including spike amplitude, duration and firing rate, together with the noise statistic, can determine the extent to which spikes contaminate intra-cortical LFPs. We demonstrate that such contamination is realistic for LFPs with a frequency down to ∼10 Hz. For LFP activity below ∼10 Hz, such as movement-related potential, contamination is theoretically possible but unlikely in real situations. Importantly, LFP frequencies up to the (high-) gamma band can remain unaffected. This study shows that spike–LFP crosstalk in intra-cortical recordings should be assessed for each individual dataset to ensure that conclusions based on LFP analysis are valid. To this end, we introduce a method to detect and to visualise spike contamination, and provide a systematic guide to assess spike contamination of intra-cortical LFPs. PMID:23981719

  5. Three dimensional inelastic finite element analysis of laminated composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Griffin, O. H., Jr.; Kamat, M. P.

    1980-01-01

    Formulations of the inelastic response of laminated composites to thermal and mechanical loading are used as the basis for development of the computer NALCOM (Nonlinear Analysis of Laminated Composites) computer program which uses a fully three dimensional isoparametric finite element with 24 nodes and 72 degrees of freedom. An incremental solution is performed with nonlinearities introduced as pseudoloads computed for initial strains. Equilibrium iteration may be performed at every step. Elastic and elastic-plastic response of boron/epoxy and graphite/epoxy graphite/epoxy and problems of curing 0/90 sub s Gr/Ep laminates with and without circular holes are analyzed. Mechanical loading of + or - 45sub s Gr/Ep laminates is modeled and symmetry conditions which exist in angle-ply laminates are discussed. Results are compared to experiments and other analytical models when possible. All models are seen to agree reasonably well with experimetnal results for off-axis tensile coupons. The laminate analyses show the three dimensional effects which are present near holes and free corners.

  6. Spatio-temporal pattern recognizers using spiking neurons and spike-timing-dependent plasticity.

    PubMed

    Humble, James; Denham, Susan; Wennekers, Thomas

    2012-01-01

    It has previously been shown that by using spike-timing-dependent plasticity (STDP), neurons can adapt to the beginning of a repeating spatio-temporal firing pattern in their input. In the present work, we demonstrate that this mechanism can be extended to train recognizers for longer spatio-temporal input signals. Using a number of neurons that are mutually connected by plastic synapses and subject to a global winner-takes-all mechanism, chains of neurons can form where each neuron is selective to a different segment of a repeating input pattern, and the neurons are feed-forwardly connected in such a way that both the correct input segment and the firing of the previous neurons are required in order to activate the next neuron in the chain. This is akin to a simple class of finite state automata. We show that nearest-neighbor STDP (where only the pre-synaptic spike most recent to a post-synaptic one is considered) leads to "nearest-neighbor" chains where connections only form between subsequent states in a chain (similar to classic "synfire chains"). In contrast, "all-to-all spike-timing-dependent plasticity" (where all pre- and post-synaptic spike pairs matter) leads to multiple connections that can span several temporal stages in the chain; these connections respect the temporal order of the neurons. It is also demonstrated that previously learnt individual chains can be "stitched together" by repeatedly presenting them in a fixed order. This way longer sequence recognizers can be formed, and potentially also nested structures. Robustness of recognition with respect to speed variations in the input patterns is shown to depend on rise-times of post-synaptic potentials and the membrane noise. It is argued that the memory capacity of the model is high, but could theoretically be increased using sparse codes. PMID:23087641

  7. Spike Sorting by Joint Probabilistic Modeling of Neural Spike Trains and Waveforms

    PubMed Central

    Matthews, Brett A.; Clements, Mark A.

    2014-01-01

    This paper details a novel probabilistic method for automatic neural spike sorting which uses stochastic point process models of neural spike trains and parameterized action potential waveforms. A novel likelihood model for observed firing times as the aggregation of hidden neural spike trains is derived, as well as an iterative procedure for clustering the data and finding the parameters that maximize the likelihood. The method is executed and evaluated on both a fully labeled semiartificial dataset and a partially labeled real dataset of extracellular electric traces from rat hippocampus. In conditions of relatively high difficulty (i.e., with additive noise and with similar action potential waveform shapes for distinct neurons) the method achieves significant improvements in clustering performance over a baseline waveform-only Gaussian mixture model (GMM) clustering on the semiartificial set (1.98% reduction in error rate) and outperforms both the GMM and a state-of-the-art method on the real dataset (5.04% reduction in false positive + false negative errors). Finally, an empirical study of two free parameters for our method is performed on the semiartificial dataset. PMID:24829568

  8. Causal Inference and Explaining Away in a Spiking Network

    PubMed Central

    Moreno-Bote, Rubén; Drugowitsch, Jan

    2015-01-01

    While the brain uses spiking neurons for communication, theoretical research on brain computations has mostly focused on non-spiking networks. The nature of spike-based algorithms that achieve complex computations, such as object probabilistic inference, is largely unknown. Here we demonstrate that a family of high-dimensional quadratic optimization problems with non-negativity constraints can be solved exactly and efficiently by a network of spiking neurons. The network naturally imposes the non-negativity of causal contributions that is fundamental to causal inference, and uses simple operations, such as linear synapses with realistic time constants, and neural spike generation and reset non-linearities. The network infers the set of most likely causes from an observation using explaining away, which is dynamically implemented by spike-based, tuned inhibition. The algorithm performs remarkably well even when the network intrinsically generates variable spike trains, the timing of spikes is scrambled by external sources of noise, or the network is mistuned. This type of network might underlie tasks such as odor identification and classification. PMID:26621426

  9. SPIKY: a graphical user interface for monitoring spike train synchrony

    PubMed Central

    Mulansky, Mario; Bozanic, Nebojsa

    2015-01-01

    Techniques for recording large-scale neuronal spiking activity are developing very fast. This leads to an increasing demand for algorithms capable of analyzing large amounts of experimental spike train data. One of the most crucial and demanding tasks is the identification of similarity patterns with a very high temporal resolution and across different spatial scales. To address this task, in recent years three time-resolved measures of spike train synchrony have been proposed, the ISI-distance, the SPIKE-distance, and event synchronization. The Matlab source codes for calculating and visualizing these measures have been made publicly available. However, due to the many different possible representations of the results the use of these codes is rather complicated and their application requires some basic knowledge of Matlab. Thus it became desirable to provide a more user-friendly and interactive interface. Here we address this need and present SPIKY, a graphical user interface that facilitates the application of time-resolved measures of spike train synchrony to both simulated and real data. SPIKY includes implementations of the ISI-distance, the SPIKE-distance, and the SPIKE-synchronization (an improved and simplified extension of event synchronization) that have been optimized with respect to computation speed and memory demand. It also comprises a spike train generator and an event detector that makes it capable of analyzing continuous data. Finally, the SPIKY package includes additional complementary programs aimed at the analysis of large numbers of datasets and the estimation of significance levels. PMID:25744888

  10. A new class of metrics for spike trains.

    PubMed

    Rusu, Cătălin V; Florian, Răzvan V

    2014-02-01

    The distance between a pair of spike trains, quantifying the differences between them, can be measured using various metrics. Here we introduce a new class of spike train metrics, inspired by the Pompeiu-Hausdorff distance, and compare them with existing metrics. Some of our new metrics (the modulus-metric and the max-metric) have characteristics that are qualitatively different from those of classical metrics like the van Rossum distance or the Victor and Purpura distance. The modulus-metric and the max-metric are particularly suitable for measuring distances between spike trains where information is encoded in bursts, but the number and the timing of spikes inside a burst do not carry information. The modulus-metric does not depend on any parameters and can be computed using a fast algorithm whose time depends linearly on the number of spikes in the two spike trains. We also introduce localized versions of the new metrics, which could have the biologically relevant interpretation of measuring the differences between spike trains as they are perceived at a particular moment in time by a neuron receiving these spike trains. PMID:24206385

  11. The Structure and Precision of Retinal Spike Trains

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Berry, Michael J.; Warland, David K.; Meister, Markus

    1997-05-01

    Assessing the reliability of neuronal spike trains is fundamental to an understanding of the neural code. We measured the reproducibility of retinal responses to repeated visual stimuli. In both tiger salamander and rabbit, the retinal ganglion cells responded to random flicker with discrete, brief periods of firing. For any given cell, these firing events covered only a small fraction of the total stimulus time, often less than 5%. Firing events were very reproducible from trial to trial: the timing jitter of individual spikes was as low as 1 msec, and the standard deviation in spike count was often less than 0.5 spikes. Comparing the precision of spike timing to that of the spike count showed that the timing of a firing event conveyed several times more visual information than its spike count. This sparseness and precision were general characteristics of ganglion cell responses, maintained over the broad ensemble of stimulus waveforms produced by random flicker, and over a range of contrasts. Thus, the responses of retinal ganglion cells are not properly described by a firing probability that varies continuously with the stimulus. Instead, these neurons elicit discrete firing events that may be the fundamental coding symbols in retinal spike trains.

  12. 27 CFR 21.130 - Spike lavender oil, natural.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 27 Alcohol, Tobacco Products and Firearms 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Spike lavender oil, natural. 21.130 Section 21.130 Alcohol, Tobacco Products and Firearms ALCOHOL AND TOBACCO TAX AND TRADE... Denaturants § 21.130 Spike lavender oil, natural. (a) Alcohol content (as borneol). Not less than 30...

  13. 27 CFR 21.130 - Spike lavender oil, natural.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 27 Alcohol, Tobacco Products and Firearms 1 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Spike lavender oil, natural. 21.130 Section 21.130 Alcohol, Tobacco Products and Firearms ALCOHOL AND TOBACCO TAX AND TRADE... Denaturants § 21.130 Spike lavender oil, natural. (a) Alcohol content (as borneol). Not less than 30...

  14. 27 CFR 21.130 - Spike lavender oil, natural.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 27 Alcohol, Tobacco Products and Firearms 1 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Spike lavender oil, natural. 21.130 Section 21.130 Alcohol, Tobacco Products and Firearms ALCOHOL AND TOBACCO TAX AND TRADE... Denaturants § 21.130 Spike lavender oil, natural. (a) Alcohol content (as borneol). Not less than 30...

  15. 27 CFR 21.130 - Spike lavender oil, natural.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 27 Alcohol, Tobacco Products and Firearms 1 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Spike lavender oil, natural. 21.130 Section 21.130 Alcohol, Tobacco Products and Firearms ALCOHOL AND TOBACCO TAX AND TRADE... Denaturants § 21.130 Spike lavender oil, natural. (a) Alcohol content (as borneol). Not less than 30...

  16. 27 CFR 21.130 - Spike lavender oil, natural.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 27 Alcohol, Tobacco Products and Firearms 1 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Spike lavender oil, natural. 21.130 Section 21.130 Alcohol, Tobacco Products and Firearms ALCOHOL AND TOBACCO TAX AND TRADE... Denaturants § 21.130 Spike lavender oil, natural. (a) Alcohol content (as borneol). Not less than 30...

  17. Spike-timing-dependent BDNF secretion and synaptic plasticity.

    PubMed

    Lu, Hui; Park, Hyungju; Poo, Mu-Ming

    2014-01-01

    In acute hippocampal slices, we found that the presence of extracellular brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) is essential for the induction of spike-timing-dependent long-term potentiation (tLTP). To determine whether BDNF could be secreted from postsynaptic dendrites in a spike-timing-dependent manner, we used a reduced system of dissociated hippocampal neurons in culture. Repetitive pairing of iontophoretically applied glutamate pulses at the dendrite with neuronal spikes could induce persistent alterations of glutamate-induced responses at the same dendritic site in a manner that mimics spike-timing-dependent plasticity (STDP)-the glutamate-induced responses were potentiated and depressed when the glutamate pulses were applied 20 ms before and after neuronal spiking, respectively. By monitoring changes in the green fluorescent protein (GFP) fluorescence at the dendrite of hippocampal neurons expressing GFP-tagged BDNF, we found that pairing of iontophoretic glutamate pulses with neuronal spiking resulted in BDNF secretion from the dendrite at the iontophoretic site only when the glutamate pulses were applied within a time window of approximately 40 ms prior to neuronal spiking, consistent with the timing requirement of synaptic potentiation via STDP. Thus, BDNF is required for tLTP and BDNF secretion could be triggered in a spike-timing-dependent manner from the postsynaptic dendrite. PMID:24298135

  18. Behavior-related pauses in simple-spike activity of mouse Purkinje cells are linked to spike rate modulation.

    PubMed

    Cao, Ying; Maran, Selva K; Dhamala, Mukesh; Jaeger, Dieter; Heck, Detlef H

    2012-06-20

    Purkinje cells (PCs) in the mammalian cerebellum express high-frequency spontaneous activity with average spike rates between 30 and 200 Hz. Cerebellar nuclear (CN) neurons receive converging input from many PCs, resulting in a continuous barrage of inhibitory inputs. It has been hypothesized that pauses in PC activity trigger increases in CN spiking activity. A prediction derived from this hypothesis is that pauses in PC simple-spike activity represent relevant behavioral or sensory events. Here, we asked whether pauses in the simple-spike activity of PCs related to either fluid licking or respiration, play a special role in representing information about behavior. Both behaviors are widely represented in cerebellar PC simple-spike activity. We recorded PC activity in the vermis and lobus simplex of head-fixed mice while monitoring licking and respiratory behavior. Using cross-correlation and Granger causality analysis, we examined whether short interspike intervals (ISIs) had a different temporal relationship to behavior than long ISIs or pauses. Behavior-related simple-spike pauses occurred during low-rate simple-spike activity in both licking- and breathing-related PCs. Granger causality analysis revealed causal relationships between simple-spike pauses and behavior. However, the same results were obtained from an analysis of surrogate spike trains with gamma ISI distributions constructed to match rate modulations of behavior-related Purkinje cells. Our results therefore suggest that the occurrence of pauses in simple-spike activity does not represent additional information about behavioral or sensory events that goes beyond the simple-spike rate modulations. PMID:22723707

  19. Inelastic magnetic X-ray scattering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Platzman, P. M.; Tzoar, N.

    1985-04-01

    The theory of magnetic X-ray scattering is used to discuss the possibilities for employing inelastic scattering to probe the magnetic properties of condensed matter systems. In particular, it is shown how the interference between the nonmagnetic (Compton) and magnetic scattering arising from the use of circularly polarized X-rays is absolutely essential in such experiments. The very beautiful preliminary experiments by Sakai and Ono (1976) on Fe which use circularly polarized Moessbauer gamma-rays will be discussed. They already show the sensitivity of the technique to the 'magnetic form factor'. In addition, the physics of a unique quarter wave plate employed in obtaining circularly polarized X-rays is considered, and the implications of this advance for doing such experiments on existing synchrotron X-ray sources are discussed.

  20. Nonlinear, inelastic fast reactor subassembly interaction analyses

    SciTech Connect

    Sutherland, W.H.; Bard, F.E.

    1983-01-01

    Liquid Metal Fast Breeder Reactor (LMFBR) core structural design is complicated by the trade-offs associated with keeping the subassemblies closely packed for the neutronic considerations and accommodating the volumetric changes associated with irradiation swelling. The environmental variation across the reactor core results in temperature and neutron flux gradients across the subassemblies which in turn cause the subassemblies to bow as well as dilate and grow volumetrically. These deformations in a tightly packed reactor core cause the subassemblies to interact and can potentially result in excessive withdrawal loads during the refueling operations. ABADAN, a general purpose, nonlinear, inelastic, multi-dimensional finite element structural analysis computer code, was developed for the express purpose of solving large nonlinear problems as typified by the above interaction problems. For the subassembly interaction problem ABADAN has been applied to the solution of an interacting radial row of Fast Flux Test Facility (FFTF) fuel assemblies.

  1. Inelastic spin depolarization spectroscopy in silicon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Jing; Appelbaum, Ian

    2013-07-01

    In ballistic injection spin transport devices, a tunnel junction emitter bias voltage determines the energy at which spin-polarized hot electrons cross a Schottky barrier into the conduction band of a semiconductor collector. Fast energy relaxation via phonon emission restores equilibrium for subsequent transport at the band edge. Through an analysis incorporating voltage-dependent measurement of magnetocurrent polarization in silicon spin transport devices along with magnetic-tunnel- and spin-valve-transistor configurations, the contribution to total spin depolarization caused by this inelastic scattering in the presence of spin-orbit interaction is quantified. From the shape of this spectroscopy, it is found that all measured spin depolarization can be accounted for solely by considering spin relaxation during bulk transport in quasi-equilibrium near the conduction band edge; the relaxation of initial spin state is irrelevant to the spin-dependent device characteristics.

  2. Medical applications of neutron inelastic scattering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kehayias, Joseph J.; Banuk-Waitekus, Anathea; Valtuena, Silvia; Sheahan, Charles A.

    1999-10-01

    A sealed, D-T, pulsed neutron generator is used for the in vivo measurement of body carbon and oxygen by neutron inelastic scattering. The generator is operated at 10 KHz, at a neutron output of about 2 X 107 n/s/4(pi) . Gamma ray spectra are collected with two B4Ge3O12 crystal detectors. The measurements are used to measure fat and lean content and distribution in the body, with minimal radiation exposure (0.08 mSv). When combined with other measurements (such as total body potassium), this whole body scanning device provides us with the `quality of lean mass', a measurable outcome of treatments designed to improve nutritional status and function. The method is used in studies of human nutrition and for assessing the efficacy of new anti-obesity and anti-cachexia pharmaceuticals.

  3. Inclusive Inelastic Electron Scattering from Nuclei

    SciTech Connect

    Fomin, Nadia

    2007-10-26

    Inclusive electron scattering from nuclei at large x and Q{sup 2} is the result of a reaction mechanism that includes both quasi-elastic scattering from nucleons and deep inelastic scattering from the quark consitituents of the nucleons. Data in this regime can be used to study a wide variety of topics, including the extraction of nuclear momentum distributions, the infiuence of final state interactions and the approach to y-scaling, the strength of nucleon-nucleon correlations, and the approach to x-scaling, to name a few. Selected results from the recent experiment E02-019 at the Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility will be shown and their relevance discussed.

  4. Inelastic guiding of electrons in polymer nanocapillaries

    SciTech Connect

    Das, S.; Dassanayake, B. S.; Winkworth, M.; Baran, J. L.; Tanis, J. A.; Stolterfoht, N.

    2007-10-15

    Electron transmission through insulating polymer nanocapillary (diameter 200 nm and aspect ratio 50) foils has been investigated for incident energies 500 and 1000 eV. Significant intensities of transmitted electrons were observed for foil tilt angles up to {approx}10 deg., and corresponding observation angles with respect to the incident beam direction, a phenomenon referred to as guiding. The transmitted electron spectra show substantial energy losses that increase with the capillary tilt angle, in sharp contrast to previous results for slow positive ions and lower energy electrons. Despite apparent close encounters with the capillary walls, inelastically scattered electrons are found to be guided at angles coinciding with elastically scattered electrons. These results suggest a means to study the dynamics of electron interactions with insulating materials, which is complicated by charge buildup in conventional surface scattering studies.

  5. Inelastic response of silicon to shock compression

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Higginbotham, A.; Stubley, P. G.; Comley, A. J.; Eggert, J. H.; Foster, J. M.; Kalantar, D. H.; McGonegle, D.; Patel, S.; Peacock, L. J.; Rothman, S. D.; Smith, R. F.; Suggit, M. J.; Wark, J. S.

    2016-04-01

    The elastic and inelastic response of [001] oriented silicon to laser compression has been a topic of considerable discussion for well over a decade, yet there has been little progress in understanding the basic behaviour of this apparently simple material. We present experimental x-ray diffraction data showing complex elastic strain profiles in laser compressed samples on nanosecond timescales. We also present molecular dynamics and elasticity code modelling which suggests that a pressure induced phase transition is the cause of the previously reported ‘anomalous’ elastic waves. Moreover, this interpretation allows for measurement of the kinetic timescales for transition. This model is also discussed in the wider context of reported deformation of silicon to rapid compression in the literature.

  6. GiBUU and shallow inelastic scattering

    SciTech Connect

    Lalakulich, O.; Mosel, U.

    2015-05-15

    In this talk we shortly describe the physics contents of the GiBUU transport code, used to describe lepton scattering off nuclei. Particular attention will be given to validation of the GiBUU in pion-, electron- and photon-induced reactions, which serve as a benchmark for neutrino-induced ones. We mainly concentrate on those properties of benchmark reactions, which are relevant to the region of Shallow Inelastic Scattering (SIS). Our results in this region are presented for integrated and differential cross sections. Comparison with recent MINOS inclusive data, as well as predictions for the differential cross sections measurable in Minerνa and NoνA experiments are made.

  7. Inelastic response of silicon to shock compression

    PubMed Central

    Higginbotham, A.; Stubley, P. G.; Comley, A. J.; Eggert, J. H.; Foster, J. M.; Kalantar, D. H.; McGonegle, D.; Patel, S.; Peacock, L. J.; Rothman, S. D.; Smith, R. F.; Suggit, M. J.; Wark, J. S.

    2016-01-01

    The elastic and inelastic response of [001] oriented silicon to laser compression has been a topic of considerable discussion for well over a decade, yet there has been little progress in understanding the basic behaviour of this apparently simple material. We present experimental x-ray diffraction data showing complex elastic strain profiles in laser compressed samples on nanosecond timescales. We also present molecular dynamics and elasticity code modelling which suggests that a pressure induced phase transition is the cause of the previously reported ‘anomalous’ elastic waves. Moreover, this interpretation allows for measurement of the kinetic timescales for transition. This model is also discussed in the wider context of reported deformation of silicon to rapid compression in the literature. PMID:27071341

  8. Inelastic response of silicon to shock compression.

    PubMed

    Higginbotham, A; Stubley, P G; Comley, A J; Eggert, J H; Foster, J M; Kalantar, D H; McGonegle, D; Patel, S; Peacock, L J; Rothman, S D; Smith, R F; Suggit, M J; Wark, J S

    2016-01-01

    The elastic and inelastic response of [001] oriented silicon to laser compression has been a topic of considerable discussion for well over a decade, yet there has been little progress in understanding the basic behaviour of this apparently simple material. We present experimental x-ray diffraction data showing complex elastic strain profiles in laser compressed samples on nanosecond timescales. We also present molecular dynamics and elasticity code modelling which suggests that a pressure induced phase transition is the cause of the previously reported 'anomalous' elastic waves. Moreover, this interpretation allows for measurement of the kinetic timescales for transition. This model is also discussed in the wider context of reported deformation of silicon to rapid compression in the literature. PMID:27071341

  9. Inelastic response of silicon to shock compression

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Higginbotham, Andrew; Stubley, P. G.; Comley, A. J.; Eggert, J. H.; Foster, J. M.; Kalantar, D. H.; McGonegle, D.; Patel, S.; Peacock, L. J.; Rothman, S. D.; et al

    2016-04-13

    The elastic and inelastic response of [001] oriented silicon to laser compression has been a topic of considerable discussion for well over a decade, yet there has been little progress in understanding the basic behaviour of this apparently simple material. We present experimental x-ray diffraction data showing complex elastic strain profiles in laser compressed samples on nanosecond timescales. We also present molecular dynamics and elasticity code modelling which suggests that a pressure induced phase transition is the cause of the previously reported ‘anomalous’ elastic waves. Moreover, this interpretation allows for measurement of the kinetic timescales for transition. Lastly, this modelmore » is also discussed in the wider context of reported deformation of silicon to rapid compression in the literature.« less

  10. INELASTIC DIFFRACTION AT HEAVY ION COLLIDERS.

    SciTech Connect

    WHITE, S.

    2005-01-01

    The heavy ion physics approach to global event characterization has led us to instrument the forward region in the PHENIX experiment at RHIC. In heavy ion collisions this coverage yields a measurement of the ''spectator'' energy and its distribution about the beam direction. This energy flow is the basis of event-by-event determination of the centrality and reaction plane which are key to analyzing particle production in heavy ion collisions. These same tools have also enabled a unique set of measurements on inelastic diffraction with proton, deuteron and gold ion beams in the PHENIX experiment. We present first new results on this topic and discuss briefly the opportunity for diffractive physics with Heavy Ion beams at the LHC.

  11. Inelastic Neutron Scattering Study of Mn

    SciTech Connect

    Zhong, Y.; Sarachik, M.P.; Friedman, J.R.; Robinson, R.A.; Kelley, T.M.; Nakotte, H.; Christianson, A.C.; Trouw, F.; Aubin, S.M.J.; Hendrickson, D.N.

    1998-11-09

    The authors report zero-field inelastic neutron scattering experiments on a 14-gram deuterated sample of Mn{sub 12}-Acetate consisting of a large number of identical spin-10 magnetic clusters. Their resolution enables them to see a series of peaks corresponding to transitions between the anisotropy levels within the spin-10 manifold. A fit to the spin Hamiltonian H = {minus}DS{sub z}{sup 2} + {mu}{sub B}B{center_dot}g{center_dot}S-BS{sub z}{sup 4} + C(S{sub +}{sup 4} + S{sub {minus}}{sup 4}) yields an anisotropy constant D = (0.54 {+-} 0.02) K and a fourth-order diagonal anisotropy coefficient B = (1.2 {+-} 0.1) x 10{sup {minus}3}K. Unlike EPR measurements, their experiments do not require a magnetic field and yield parameters that do not require knowledge of the g-value.

  12. Intrinsic radial sensitivity of nucleon inelastic scattering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kelly, J. J.

    1988-02-01

    A linear expansion analysis of the folding model transition amplitude is used to study the intrinsic sensitivity of the inelastic scattering of intermediate energy nucleons to the radial form of the neutron transition density, given known proton transition densities from electron scattering. Realistic density-dependent effective interactions are used to construct pseudodata. These pseudodata are then reanalyzed and the error matrix is used to calculate an error band for the radial transition density. This approach reveals the sensitivity of the extracted transition density to absorption, medium modifications of the interaction, and the extent and quality of the data in a manner that is largely free of the residual inaccuracies in reaction theory that complicate the analysis of real data. We find that the intrinsic radial sensitivity of nucleon inelastic scattering is best for projectile energies between 200 and 500 MeV, but is adequate to resolve the radial dependence of neutron transition densities even in the interior of heavy nuclei throughout the energy regime 100-800 MeV. We have also compared our method with scale-factor analyses which assume proportionality between neutron and proton densities. For states whose transition densities are similar in the surface, we find scaling to be accurate at the 20% level. However, for light nuclei substantial deviations beyond the first peak of the differential cross section reveal sensitivity to shape differences. This sensitivity is reduced for heavy nuclei. The model dependence of radial densities is also studied. A high-q constraint is used to analyze the contribution of incompleteness error to the deduced error bands and to reduce the model dependence.

  13. Sharpness of Spike Initiation in Neurons Explained by Compartmentalization

    PubMed Central

    Brette, Romain

    2013-01-01

    In cortical neurons, spikes are initiated in the axon initial segment. Seen at the soma, they appear surprisingly sharp. A standard explanation is that the current coming from the axon becomes sharp as the spike is actively backpropagated to the soma. However, sharp initiation of spikes is also seen in the input–output properties of neurons, and not only in the somatic shape of spikes; for example, cortical neurons can transmit high frequency signals. An alternative hypothesis is that Na channels cooperate, but it is not currently supported by direct experimental evidence. I propose a simple explanation based on the compartmentalization of spike initiation. When Na channels are placed in the axon, the soma acts as a current sink for the Na current. I show that there is a critical distance to the soma above which an instability occurs, so that Na channels open abruptly rather than gradually as a function of somatic voltage. PMID:24339755

  14. A spiking neural network architecture for nonlinear function approximation.

    PubMed

    Iannella, N; Back, A D

    2001-01-01

    Multilayer perceptrons have received much attention in recent years due to their universal approximation capabilities. Normally, such models use real valued continuous signals, although they are loosely based on biological neuronal networks that encode signals using spike trains. Spiking neural networks are of interest both from a biological point of view and in terms of a method of robust signaling in particularly noisy or difficult environments. It is important to consider networks based on spike trains. A basic question that needs to be considered however, is what type of architecture can be used to provide universal function approximation capabilities in spiking networks? In this paper, we propose a spiking neural network architecture using both integrate-and-fire units as well as delays, that is capable of approximating a real valued function mapping to within a specified degree of accuracy. PMID:11665783

  15. Energy calibration of a high-resolution inelastic x-ray scattering spectrometer.

    PubMed

    Verbeni, Roberto; D'Astuto, Matteo; Krisch, Michael; Lorenzen, Maren; Mermet, Alain; Monaco, Giulio; Requardt, Herwig; Sette, Francesco

    2008-08-01

    The energy scale of a triple-axis x-ray spectrometer with meV energy resolution based on perfect silicon crystal optics is calibrated, utilizing the most recent determination of the silicon lattice parameter and its thermal expansion coefficient and recording the dispersion of longitudinal acoustic and optical phonons in a diamond single crystal and the molecular vibration mode in liquid nitrogen. Comparison of the x-ray results with previous inelastic neutron and Raman scattering results as well as with ab initio phonon dispersion calculations yields an overall agreement better than 2%. PMID:19044359

  16. Energy calibration of a high-resolution inelastic x-ray scattering spectrometer

    SciTech Connect

    Verbeni, Roberto; D'Astuto, Matteo; Krisch, Michael; Lorenzen, Maren; Mermet, Alain; Monaco, Giulio; Requardt, Herwig; Sette, Francesco

    2008-08-15

    The energy scale of a triple-axis x-ray spectrometer with meV energy resolution based on perfect silicon crystal optics is calibrated, utilizing the most recent determination of the silicon lattice parameter and its thermal expansion coefficient and recording the dispersion of longitudinal acoustic and optical phonons in a diamond single crystal and the molecular vibration mode in liquid nitrogen. Comparison of the x-ray results with previous inelastic neutron and Raman scattering results as well as with ab initio phonon dispersion calculations yields an overall agreement better than 2%.

  17. On 3-D inelastic analysis methods for hot section components (base program)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wilson, R. B.; Bak, M. J.; Nakazawa, S.; Banerjee, P. K.

    1986-01-01

    A 3-D Inelastic Analysis Method program is described. This program consists of a series of new computer codes embodying a progression of mathematical models (mechanics of materials, special finite element, boundary element) for streamlined analysis of: (1) combustor liners, (2) turbine blades, and (3) turbine vanes. These models address the effects of high temperatures and thermal/mechanical loadings on the local (stress/strain)and global (dynamics, buckling) structural behavior of the three selected components. Three computer codes, referred to as MOMM (Mechanics of Materials Model), MHOST (Marc-Hot Section Technology), and BEST (Boundary Element Stress Technology), have been developed and are briefly described in this report.

  18. Density of phonon states in solid parahydrogen from inelastic neutron scattering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Colognesi, D.; Celli, M.; Zoppi, M.

    2004-03-01

    We have measured the inelastic neutron scattering spectrum of solid parahydrogen (at low pressure and T=13.3 K) using the thermal original spectrometer with cylindrical analyzers spectrometer at the ISIS pulsed neutron source (UK). From the experimental spectrum we have obtained the parahydrogen density of phonon states which has been compared with the estimates available in the literature. The present determination improves substantially the previous experimental scenario from the point of view of both statistics and accuracy. The comparison with the most recent estimate obtained from a quantum mechanical simulation of the molecular dynamics calls for an improvement of the computational methods.

  19. Spike Penetration in Blast-wave-driven Instabilities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Drake, R. P.

    2012-01-01

    The problem of interest is the unstable growth of structure at density transitions affected by blast waves, which arise in natural environments such as core-collapse supernovae and in laboratory experiments. The resulting spikes of dense material, which penetrate the less dense material, develop broadened tips, but the degree of broadening varies substantially across both experiments and simulations. The variable broadening presumably produces variations in the drag experienced by the spike tips as they penetrate the less dense material. The present work has used semianalytic theory to address the question of how the variation in drag might affect the spike penetration, for cases in which the post-shock interface deceleration can be described by a power law in a normalized time variable. It did so by following the evolution of structure on the interface through the initial shock passage, the subsequent small-amplitude phase of Rayleigh-Taylor instability growth, and the later phase in which the spike growth involves the competition of buoyancy and drag. In all phases, the expansion of the system during its evolution was accounted for and was important. The calculated spike length is strongly affected by the drag attributed to spike tip broadening. One finds from such a calculation that it is not unreasonable for narrow spikes to keep up with the shock front of the blast wave. The implication is that the accuracy of prediction of spike penetration and consequent structure by simulations very likely depends on how accurately they treat the broadening of the spike tips and the associated drag. Experimental validation of spike morphology in simulations would be useful.

  20. SPIKE PENETRATION IN BLAST-WAVE-DRIVEN INSTABILITIES

    SciTech Connect

    Drake, R. P.

    2012-01-10

    The problem of interest is the unstable growth of structure at density transitions affected by blast waves, which arise in natural environments such as core-collapse supernovae and in laboratory experiments. The resulting spikes of dense material, which penetrate the less dense material, develop broadened tips, but the degree of broadening varies substantially across both experiments and simulations. The variable broadening presumably produces variations in the drag experienced by the spike tips as they penetrate the less dense material. The present work has used semianalytic theory to address the question of how the variation in drag might affect the spike penetration, for cases in which the post-shock interface deceleration can be described by a power law in a normalized time variable. It did so by following the evolution of structure on the interface through the initial shock passage, the subsequent small-amplitude phase of Rayleigh-Taylor instability growth, and the later phase in which the spike growth involves the competition of buoyancy and drag. In all phases, the expansion of the system during its evolution was accounted for and was important. The calculated spike length is strongly affected by the drag attributed to spike tip broadening. One finds from such a calculation that it is not unreasonable for narrow spikes to keep up with the shock front of the blast wave. The implication is that the accuracy of prediction of spike penetration and consequent structure by simulations very likely depends on how accurately they treat the broadening of the spike tips and the associated drag. Experimental validation of spike morphology in simulations would be useful.

  1. Prospects for dark matter detection with inelastic transitions of xenon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McCabe, Christopher

    2016-05-01

    Dark matter can scatter and excite a nucleus to a low-lying excitation in a direct detection experiment. This signature is distinct from the canonical elastic scattering signal because the inelastic signal also contains the energy deposited from the subsequent prompt de-excitation of the nucleus. A measurement of the elastic and inelastic signal will allow a single experiment to distinguish between a spin-independent and spin-dependent interaction. For the first time, we characterise the inelastic signal for two-phase xenon detectors in which dark matter inelastically scatters off the 129Xe or 131Xe isotope. We do this by implementing a realistic simulation of a typical tonne-scale two-phase xenon detector and by carefully estimating the relevant background signals. With our detector simulation, we explore whether the inelastic signal from the axial-vector interaction is detectable with upcoming tonne-scale detectors. We find that two-phase detectors allow for some discrimination between signal and background so that it is possible to detect dark matter that inelastically scatters off either the 129Xe or 131Xe isotope for dark matter particles that are heavier than approximately 010 GeV . If, after two years of data, the XENON1T search for elastic scattering nuclei finds no evidence for dark matter, the possibility of ever detecting an inelastic signal from the axial-vector interaction will be almost entirely excluded.

  2. Inclusive inelastic scattering of heavy ions and nuclear correlations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cucinotta, Francis A.; Townsend, Lawrence W.; Wilson, John W.; Khandelwal, Govind S.

    1990-01-01

    Calculations of inclusive inelastic scattering distributions for heavy ion collisions are considered within the high energy optical model. Using ground state sum rules, the inclusive projectile and complete projectile-target inelastic angular distributions are treated in both independent particle and correlated nuclear models. Comparisons between the models introduced are made for alpha particles colliding with He-4, C-12, and O-16 targets and protons colliding with O-16. Results indicate that correlations contribute significantly, at small momentum transfers, to the inelastic sum. Correlation effects are hidden, however, when total scattering distributions are considered because of the dominance of elastic scattering at small momentum transfers.

  3. Recurrent Spiking Networks Solve Planning Tasks.

    PubMed

    Rueckert, Elmar; Kappel, David; Tanneberg, Daniel; Pecevski, Dejan; Peters, Jan

    2016-01-01

    A recurrent spiking neural network is proposed that implements planning as probabilistic inference for finite and infinite horizon tasks. The architecture splits this problem into two parts: The stochastic transient firing of the network embodies the dynamics of the planning task. With appropriate injected input this dynamics is shaped to generate high-reward state trajectories. A general class of reward-modulated plasticity rules for these afferent synapses is presented. The updates optimize the likelihood of getting a reward through a variant of an Expectation Maximization algorithm and learning is guaranteed to convergence to a local maximum. We find that the network dynamics are qualitatively similar to transient firing patterns during planning and foraging in the hippocampus of awake behaving rats. The model extends classical attractor models and provides a testable prediction on identifying modulating contextual information. In a real robot arm reaching and obstacle avoidance task the ability to represent multiple task solutions is investigated. The neural planning method with its local update rules provides the basis for future neuromorphic hardware implementations with promising potentials like large data processing abilities and early initiation of strategies to avoid dangerous situations in robot co-worker scenarios. PMID:26888174

  4. Memory recall and spike-frequency adaptation

    PubMed Central

    Roach, James P.; Sander, Leonard M.; Zochowski, Michal R.

    2016-01-01

    The brain can reproduce memories from partial data; this ability is critical for memory recall. The process of memory recall has been studied using autoassociative networks such as the Hopfield model. This kind of model reliably converges to stored patterns that contain the memory. However, it is unclear how the behavior is controlled by the brain so that after convergence to one configuration, it can proceed with recognition of another one. In the Hopfield model, this happens only through unrealistic changes of an effective global temperature that destabilizes all stored configurations. Here we show that spike-frequency adaptation (SFA), a common mechanism affecting neuron activation in the brain, can provide state-dependent control of pattern retrieval. We demonstrate this in a Hopfield network modified to include SFA, and also in a model network of biophysical neurons. In both cases, SFA allows for selective stabilization of attractors with different basins of attraction, and also for temporal dynamics of attractor switching that is not possible in standard autoassociative schemes. The dynamics of our models give a plausible account of different sorts of memory retrieval. PMID:27300910

  5. Recurrent Spiking Networks Solve Planning Tasks

    PubMed Central

    Rueckert, Elmar; Kappel, David; Tanneberg, Daniel; Pecevski, Dejan; Peters, Jan

    2016-01-01

    A recurrent spiking neural network is proposed that implements planning as probabilistic inference for finite and infinite horizon tasks. The architecture splits this problem into two parts: The stochastic transient firing of the network embodies the dynamics of the planning task. With appropriate injected input this dynamics is shaped to generate high-reward state trajectories. A general class of reward-modulated plasticity rules for these afferent synapses is presented. The updates optimize the likelihood of getting a reward through a variant of an Expectation Maximization algorithm and learning is guaranteed to convergence to a local maximum. We find that the network dynamics are qualitatively similar to transient firing patterns during planning and foraging in the hippocampus of awake behaving rats. The model extends classical attractor models and provides a testable prediction on identifying modulating contextual information. In a real robot arm reaching and obstacle avoidance task the ability to represent multiple task solutions is investigated. The neural planning method with its local update rules provides the basis for future neuromorphic hardware implementations with promising potentials like large data processing abilities and early initiation of strategies to avoid dangerous situations in robot co-worker scenarios. PMID:26888174

  6. Recurrent Spiking Networks Solve Planning Tasks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rueckert, Elmar; Kappel, David; Tanneberg, Daniel; Pecevski, Dejan; Peters, Jan

    2016-02-01

    A recurrent spiking neural network is proposed that implements planning as probabilistic inference for finite and infinite horizon tasks. The architecture splits this problem into two parts: The stochastic transient firing of the network embodies the dynamics of the planning task. With appropriate injected input this dynamics is shaped to generate high-reward state trajectories. A general class of reward-modulated plasticity rules for these afferent synapses is presented. The updates optimize the likelihood of getting a reward through a variant of an Expectation Maximization algorithm and learning is guaranteed to convergence to a local maximum. We find that the network dynamics are qualitatively similar to transient firing patterns during planning and foraging in the hippocampus of awake behaving rats. The model extends classical attractor models and provides a testable prediction on identifying modulating contextual information. In a real robot arm reaching and obstacle avoidance task the ability to represent multiple task solutions is investigated. The neural planning method with its local update rules provides the basis for future neuromorphic hardware implementations with promising potentials like large data processing abilities and early initiation of strategies to avoid dangerous situations in robot co-worker scenarios.

  7. Asynchronous Rate Chaos in Spiking Neuronal Circuits.

    PubMed

    Harish, Omri; Hansel, David

    2015-07-01

    The brain exhibits temporally complex patterns of activity with features similar to those of chaotic systems. Theoretical studies over the last twenty years have described various computational advantages for such regimes in neuronal systems. Nevertheless, it still remains unclear whether chaos requires specific cellular properties or network architectures, or whether it is a generic property of neuronal circuits. We investigate the dynamics of networks of excitatory-inhibitory (EI) spiking neurons with random sparse connectivity operating in the regime of balance of excitation and inhibition. Combining Dynamical Mean-Field Theory with numerical simulations, we show that chaotic, asynchronous firing rate fluctuations emerge generically for sufficiently strong synapses. Two different mechanisms can lead to these chaotic fluctuations. One mechanism relies on slow I-I inhibition which gives rise to slow subthreshold voltage and rate fluctuations. The decorrelation time of these fluctuations is proportional to the time constant of the inhibition. The second mechanism relies on the recurrent E-I-E feedback loop. It requires slow excitation but the inhibition can be fast. In the corresponding dynamical regime all neurons exhibit rate fluctuations on the time scale of the excitation. Another feature of this regime is that the population-averaged firing rate is substantially smaller in the excitatory population than in the inhibitory population. This is not necessarily the case in the I-I mechanism. Finally, we discuss the neurophysiological and computational significance of our results. PMID:26230679

  8. Phase diagram of spiking neural networks

    PubMed Central

    Seyed-allaei, Hamed

    2015-01-01

    In computer simulations of spiking neural networks, often it is assumed that every two neurons of the network are connected by a probability of 2%, 20% of neurons are inhibitory and 80% are excitatory. These common values are based on experiments, observations, and trials and errors, but here, I take a different perspective, inspired by evolution, I systematically simulate many networks, each with a different set of parameters, and then I try to figure out what makes the common values desirable. I stimulate networks with pulses and then measure their: dynamic range, dominant frequency of population activities, total duration of activities, maximum rate of population and the occurrence time of maximum rate. The results are organized in phase diagram. This phase diagram gives an insight into the space of parameters – excitatory to inhibitory ratio, sparseness of connections and synaptic weights. This phase diagram can be used to decide the parameters of a model. The phase diagrams show that networks which are configured according to the common values, have a good dynamic range in response to an impulse and their dynamic range is robust in respect to synaptic weights, and for some synaptic weights they oscillates in α or β frequencies, independent of external stimuli. PMID:25788885

  9. Memory recall and spike-frequency adaptation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roach, James P.; Sander, Leonard M.; Zochowski, Michal R.

    2016-05-01

    The brain can reproduce memories from partial data; this ability is critical for memory recall. The process of memory recall has been studied using autoassociative networks such as the Hopfield model. This kind of model reliably converges to stored patterns that contain the memory. However, it is unclear how the behavior is controlled by the brain so that after convergence to one configuration, it can proceed with recognition of another one. In the Hopfield model, this happens only through unrealistic changes of an effective global temperature that destabilizes all stored configurations. Here we show that spike-frequency adaptation (SFA), a common mechanism affecting neuron activation in the brain, can provide state-dependent control of pattern retrieval. We demonstrate this in a Hopfield network modified to include SFA, and also in a model network of biophysical neurons. In both cases, SFA allows for selective stabilization of attractors with different basins of attraction, and also for temporal dynamics of attractor switching that is not possible in standard autoassociative schemes. The dynamics of our models give a plausible account of different sorts of memory retrieval.

  10. Perineuronal Nets Enhance the Excitability of Fast-Spiking Neurons.

    PubMed

    Balmer, Timothy S

    2016-01-01

    Perineuronal nets (PNNs) are specialized complexes of extracellular matrix molecules that surround the somata of fast-spiking neurons throughout the vertebrate brain. PNNs are particularly prevalent throughout the auditory brainstem, which transmits signals with high speed and precision. It is unknown whether PNNs contribute to the fast-spiking ability of the neurons they surround. Whole-cell recordings were made from medial nucleus of the trapezoid body (MNTB) principal neurons in acute brain slices from postnatal day 21 (P21) to P27 mice. PNNs were degraded by incubating slices in chondroitinase ABC (ChABC) and were compared to slices that were treated with a control enzyme (penicillinase). ChABC treatment did not affect the ability of MNTB neurons to fire at up to 1000 Hz when driven by current pulses. However, f-I (frequency-intensity) curves constructed by injecting Gaussian white noise currents superimposed on DC current steps showed that ChABC treatment reduced the gain of spike output. An increase in spike threshold may have contributed to this effect, which is consistent with the observation that spikes in ChABC-treated cells were delayed relative to control-treated cells. In addition, parvalbumin-expressing fast-spiking cortical neurons in >P70 slices that were treated with ChABC also had reduced excitability and gain. The development of PNNs around somata of fast-spiking neurons may be essential for fast and precise sensory transmission and synaptic inhibition in the brain. PMID:27570824

  11. Controlling chaos in balanced neural circuits with input spike trains

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Engelken, Rainer; Wolf, Fred

    The cerebral cortex can be seen as a system of neural circuits driving each other with spike trains. Here we study how the statistics of these spike trains affects chaos in balanced target circuits.Earlier studies of chaos in balanced neural circuits either used a fixed input [van Vreeswijk, Sompolinsky 1996, Monteforte, Wolf 2010] or white noise [Lajoie et al. 2014]. We study dynamical stability of balanced networks driven by input spike trains with variable statistics. The analytically obtained Jacobian enables us to calculate the complete Lyapunov spectrum. We solved the dynamics in event-based simulations and calculated Lyapunov spectra, entropy production rate and attractor dimension. We vary correlations, irregularity, coupling strength and spike rate of the input and action potential onset rapidness of recurrent neurons.We generally find a suppression of chaos by input spike trains. This is strengthened by bursty and correlated input spike trains and increased action potential onset rapidness. We find a link between response reliability and the Lyapunov spectrum. Our study extends findings in chaotic rate models [Molgedey et al. 1992] to spiking neuron models and opens a novel avenue to study the role of projections in shaping the dynamics of large neural circuits.

  12. Changes in complex spike activity during classical conditioning.

    PubMed

    Rasmussen, Anders; Jirenhed, Dan-Anders; Wetmore, Daniel Z; Hesslow, Germund

    2014-01-01

    The cerebellar cortex is necessary for adaptively timed conditioned responses (CRs) in eyeblink conditioning. During conditioning, Purkinje cells acquire pause responses or "Purkinje cell CRs" to the conditioned stimuli (CS), resulting in disinhibition of the cerebellar nuclei (CN), allowing them to activate motor nuclei that control eyeblinks. This disinhibition also causes inhibition of the inferior olive (IO), via the nucleo-olivary pathway (N-O). Activation of the IO, which relays the unconditional stimulus (US) to the cortex, elicits characteristic complex spikes in Purkinje cells. Although Purkinje cell activity, as well as stimulation of the CN, is known to influence IO activity, much remains to be learned about the way that learned changes in simple spike firing affects the IO. In the present study, we analyzed changes in simple and complex spike firing, in extracellular Purkinje cell records, from the C3 zone, in decerebrate ferrets undergoing training in a conditioning paradigm. In agreement with the N-O feedback hypothesis, acquisition resulted in a gradual decrease in complex spike activity during the conditioned stimulus, with a delay that is consistent with the long N-O latency. Also supporting the feedback hypothesis, training with a short interstimulus interval (ISI), which does not lead to acquisition of a Purkinje cell CR, did not cause a suppression of complex spike activity. In contrast, observations that extinction did not lead to a recovery in complex spike activity and the irregular patterns of simple and complex spike activity after the conditioned stimulus are less conclusive. PMID:25140129

  13. Quantitative Analysis of Calcium Spikes in Noisy Fluorescent Background

    PubMed Central

    Janicek, Radoslav; Hotka, Matej; Zahradníková, Alexandra; Zahradníková, Alexandra; Zahradník, Ivan

    2013-01-01

    Intracellular calcium signals are studied by laser-scanning confocal fluorescence microscopy. The required spatio-temporal resolution makes description of calcium signals difficult because of the low signal-to-noise ratio. We designed a new procedure of calcium spike analysis based on their fitting with a model. The accuracy and precision of calcium spike description were tested on synthetic datasets generated either with randomly varied spike parameters and Gaussian noise of constant amplitude, or with constant spike parameters and Gaussian noise of various amplitudes. Statistical analysis was used to evaluate the performance of spike fitting algorithms. The procedure was optimized for reliable estimation of calcium spike parameters and for dismissal of false events. A new algorithm was introduced that corrects the acquisition time of pixels in line-scan images that is in error due to sequential acquisition of individual pixels along the space coordinate. New software was developed in Matlab and provided for general use. It allows interactive dissection of temporal profiles of calcium spikes from x-t images, their fitting with predefined function(s) and acceptance of results on statistical grounds, thus allowing efficient analysis and reliable description of calcium signaling in cardiac myocytes down to the in situ function of ryanodine receptors. PMID:23741324

  14. Perineuronal Nets Enhance the Excitability of Fast-Spiking Neurons

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Perineuronal nets (PNNs) are specialized complexes of extracellular matrix molecules that surround the somata of fast-spiking neurons throughout the vertebrate brain. PNNs are particularly prevalent throughout the auditory brainstem, which transmits signals with high speed and precision. It is unknown whether PNNs contribute to the fast-spiking ability of the neurons they surround. Whole-cell recordings were made from medial nucleus of the trapezoid body (MNTB) principal neurons in acute brain slices from postnatal day 21 (P21) to P27 mice. PNNs were degraded by incubating slices in chondroitinase ABC (ChABC) and were compared to slices that were treated with a control enzyme (penicillinase). ChABC treatment did not affect the ability of MNTB neurons to fire at up to 1000 Hz when driven by current pulses. However, f–I (frequency–intensity) curves constructed by injecting Gaussian white noise currents superimposed on DC current steps showed that ChABC treatment reduced the gain of spike output. An increase in spike threshold may have contributed to this effect, which is consistent with the observation that spikes in ChABC-treated cells were delayed relative to control-treated cells. In addition, parvalbumin-expressing fast-spiking cortical neurons in >P70 slices that were treated with ChABC also had reduced excitability and gain. The development of PNNs around somata of fast-spiking neurons may be essential for fast and precise sensory transmission and synaptic inhibition in the brain. PMID:27570824

  15. GC/AT-content spikes as genomic punctuation marks.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Lingang; Kasif, Simon; Cantor, Charles R; Broude, Natalia E

    2004-11-30

    Large-scale analysis of the GC-content distribution at the gene level reveals both common features and basic differences in genomes of different groups of species. Sharp changes in GC content are detected at the transcription boundaries for all species analyzed, including human, mouse, rat, chicken, fruit fly, and worm. However, two substantially distinct groups of GC-content profiles can be recognized: warm-blooded vertebrates including human, mouse, rat, and chicken, and invertebrates including fruit fly and worm. In vertebrates, sharp positive and negative spikes of GC content are observed at the transcription start and stop sites, respectively, and there is also a progressive decrease in GC content from the 5' untranslated region to the 3' untranslated region along the gene. In invertebrates, the positive and negative GC-content spikes at the transcription start and stop sites are preceded by spikes of opposite value, and the highest GC content is found in the coding regions of the genes. Cross-correlation analysis indicates high frequencies of GC-content spikes at transcription start and stop sites. The strong conservation of this genomic feature seen in comparisons of the human/mouse and human/rat orthologs, and the clustering of genes with GC-content spikes on chromosomes imply a biological function. The GC-content spikes at transcription boundaries may reflect a general principle of genomic punctuation. Our analysis also provides means for identifying these GC-content spikes in individual genomic sequences. PMID:15548610

  16. Spatiotemporal spike encoding of a continuous external signal.

    PubMed

    Masuda, Naoki; Aihara, Kazuyuki

    2002-07-01

    Interspike intervals of spikes emitted from an integrator neuron model of sensory neurons can encode input information represented as a continuous signal from a deterministic system. If a real brain uses spike timing as a means of information processing, other neurons receiving spatiotemporal spikes from such sensory neurons must also be capable of treating information included in deterministic interspike intervals. In this article, we examine functions of neurons modeling cortical neurons receiving spatiotemporal spikes from many sensory neurons. We show that such neuron models can encode stimulus information passed from the sensory model neurons in the form of interspike intervals. Each sensory neuron connected to the cortical neuron contributes equally to the information collection by the cortical neuron. Although the incident spike train to the cortical neuron is a superimposition of spike trains from many sensory neurons, it need not be decomposed into spike trains according to the input neurons. These results are also preserved for generalizations of sensory neurons such as a small amount of leak, noise, inhomogeneity in firing rates, or biases introduced in the phase distributions. PMID:12079548

  17. Generalized analog thresholding for spike acquisition at ultralow sampling rates.

    PubMed

    He, Bryan D; Wein, Alex; Varshney, Lav R; Kusuma, Julius; Richardson, Andrew G; Srinivasan, Lakshminarayan

    2015-07-01

    Efficient spike acquisition techniques are needed to bridge the divide from creating large multielectrode arrays (MEA) to achieving whole-cortex electrophysiology. In this paper, we introduce generalized analog thresholding (gAT), which achieves millisecond temporal resolution with sampling rates as low as 10 Hz. Consider the torrent of data from a single 1,000-channel MEA, which would generate more than 3 GB/min using standard 30-kHz Nyquist sampling. Recent neural signal processing methods based on compressive sensing still require Nyquist sampling as a first step and use iterative methods to reconstruct spikes. Analog thresholding (AT) remains the best existing alternative, where spike waveforms are passed through an analog comparator and sampled at 1 kHz, with instant spike reconstruction. By generalizing AT, the new method reduces sampling rates another order of magnitude, detects more than one spike per interval, and reconstructs spike width. Unlike compressive sensing, the new method reveals a simple closed-form solution to achieve instant (noniterative) spike reconstruction. The base method is already robust to hardware nonidealities, including realistic quantization error and integration noise. Because it achieves these considerable specifications using hardware-friendly components like integrators and comparators, generalized AT could translate large-scale MEAs into implantable devices for scientific investigation and medical technology. PMID:25904712

  18. Generalized analog thresholding for spike acquisition at ultralow sampling rates

    PubMed Central

    He, Bryan D.; Wein, Alex; Varshney, Lav R.; Kusuma, Julius; Richardson, Andrew G.

    2015-01-01

    Efficient spike acquisition techniques are needed to bridge the divide from creating large multielectrode arrays (MEA) to achieving whole-cortex electrophysiology. In this paper, we introduce generalized analog thresholding (gAT), which achieves millisecond temporal resolution with sampling rates as low as 10 Hz. Consider the torrent of data from a single 1,000-channel MEA, which would generate more than 3 GB/min using standard 30-kHz Nyquist sampling. Recent neural signal processing methods based on compressive sensing still require Nyquist sampling as a first step and use iterative methods to reconstruct spikes. Analog thresholding (AT) remains the best existing alternative, where spike waveforms are passed through an analog comparator and sampled at 1 kHz, with instant spike reconstruction. By generalizing AT, the new method reduces sampling rates another order of magnitude, detects more than one spike per interval, and reconstructs spike width. Unlike compressive sensing, the new method reveals a simple closed-form solution to achieve instant (noniterative) spike reconstruction. The base method is already robust to hardware nonidealities, including realistic quantization error and integration noise. Because it achieves these considerable specifications using hardware-friendly components like integrators and comparators, generalized AT could translate large-scale MEAs into implantable devices for scientific investigation and medical technology. PMID:25904712

  19. Robust spike classification based on frequency domain neural waveform features

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Chenhui; Yuan, Yuan; Si, Jennie

    2013-12-01

    Objective. We introduce a new spike classification algorithm based on frequency domain features of the spike snippets. The goal for the algorithm is to provide high classification accuracy, low false misclassification, ease of implementation, robustness to signal degradation, and objectivity in classification outcomes. Approach. In this paper, we propose a spike classification algorithm based on frequency domain features (CFDF). It makes use of frequency domain contents of the recorded neural waveforms for spike classification. The self-organizing map (SOM) is used as a tool to determine the cluster number intuitively and directly by viewing the SOM output map. After that, spike classification can be easily performed using clustering algorithms such as the k-Means. Main results. In conjunction with our previously developed multiscale correlation of wavelet coefficient (MCWC) spike detection algorithm, we show that the MCWC and CFDF detection and classification system is robust when tested on several sets of artificial and real neural waveforms. The CFDF is comparable to or outperforms some popular automatic spike classification algorithms with artificial and real neural data. Significance. The detection and classification of neural action potentials or neural spikes is an important step in single-unit-based neuroscientific studies and applications. After the detection of neural snippets potentially containing neural spikes, a robust classification algorithm is applied for the analysis of the snippets to (1) extract similar waveforms into one class for them to be considered coming from one unit, and to (2) remove noise snippets if they do not contain any features of an action potential. Usually, a snippet is a small 2 or 3 ms segment of the recorded waveform, and differences in neural action potentials can be subtle from one unit to another. Therefore, a robust, high performance classification system like the CFDF is necessary. In addition, the proposed algorithm

  20. Computing Complex Visual Features with Retinal Spike Times

    PubMed Central

    Sompolinsky, Haim; Meister, Markus

    2013-01-01

    Neurons in sensory systems can represent information not only by their firing rate, but also by the precise timing of individual spikes. For example, certain retinal ganglion cells, first identified in the salamander, encode the spatial structure of a new image by their first-spike latencies. Here we explore how this temporal code can be used by downstream neural circuits for computing complex features of the image that are not available from the signals of individual ganglion cells. To this end, we feed the experimentally observed spike trains from a population of retinal ganglion cells to an integrate-and-fire model of post-synaptic integration. The synaptic weights of this integration are tuned according to the recently introduced tempotron learning rule. We find that this model neuron can perform complex visual detection tasks in a single synaptic stage that would require multiple stages for neurons operating instead on neural spike counts. Furthermore, the model computes rapidly, using only a single spike per afferent, and can signal its decision in turn by just a single spike. Extending these analyses to large ensembles of simulated retinal signals, we show that the model can detect the orientation of a visual pattern independent of its phase, an operation thought to be one of the primitives in early visual processing. We analyze how these computations work and compare the performance of this model to other schemes for reading out spike-timing information. These results demonstrate that the retina formats spatial information into temporal spike sequences in a way that favors computation in the time domain. Moreover, complex image analysis can be achieved already by a simple integrate-and-fire model neuron, emphasizing the power and plausibility of rapid neural computing with spike times. PMID:23301021

  1. Philosophy of the Spike: Rate-Based vs. Spike-Based Theories of the Brain

    PubMed Central

    Brette, Romain

    2015-01-01

    Does the brain use a firing rate code or a spike timing code? Considering this controversial question from an epistemological perspective, I argue that progress has been hampered by its problematic phrasing. It takes the perspective of an external observer looking at whether those two observables vary with stimuli, and thereby misses the relevant question: which one has a causal role in neural activity? When rephrased in a more meaningful way, the rate-based view appears as an ad hoc methodological postulate, one that is practical but with virtually no empirical or theoretical support. PMID:26617496

  2. Parity violation in composite inelastic dark matter models

    SciTech Connect

    Lisanti, Mariangela; Wacker, Jay G.

    2010-09-01

    Recent experimental results indicate that the dark matter sector may have a nonminimal structure with a spectrum of states and interactions. Inelastic scattering has received particular attention in light of DAMA's annual modulation signal. Composite inelastic dark matter (CiDM) provides a dynamical origin for the mass splittings in inelastic dark matter models. We show that higher dimensional operators in the CiDM Lagrangian lead to an admixture of inelastic and elastic scattering in the presence of parity violation. This scenario is consistent with direct detection experiments, even when parity violation is nearly maximal. We present an effective field theory description of such models and discuss the constraints from direct detection experiments. The CiDM model with parity violation has nontrivial phenomenology because of the multiple scattering channels that are allowed.

  3. Parity Violation in Composite Inelastic Dark Matter Models

    SciTech Connect

    Lisanti, Mariangela; Wacker, Jay G.; /SLAC

    2010-08-26

    Recent experimental results indicate that the dark matter sector may have a non-minimal structure with a spectrum of states and interactions. Inelastic scattering has received particular attention in light of DAMA's annual modulation signal. Composite inelastic dark matter (CiDM) provides a dynamical origin for the mass splittings in inelastic dark matter models. We show that higher dimensional operators in the CiDM Lagrangian lead to an admixture of inelastic and elastic scattering in the presence of parity violation. This scenario is consistent with direct detection experiments, even when parity violation is nearly maximal. We present an effective field theory description of such models and discuss the constraints from direct detection experiments. The CiDM model with parity violation has non-trivial phenomenology because of the multiple scattering channels that are allowed.

  4. Deep inelastic lepton scattering from nucleons and nuclei

    SciTech Connect

    Berger, E.L.

    1986-02-01

    A pedagogical review is presented of results obtained from inclusive deep inelastic scattering of leptons from nucleons and nuclei, with particular emphasis on open questions to be explored in future experiments.

  5. Integrated workflows for spiking neuronal network simulations

    PubMed Central

    Antolík, Ján; Davison, Andrew P.

    2013-01-01

    The increasing availability of computational resources is enabling more detailed, realistic modeling in computational neuroscience, resulting in a shift toward more heterogeneous models of neuronal circuits, and employment of complex experimental protocols. This poses a challenge for existing tool chains, as the set of tools involved in a typical modeler's workflow is expanding concomitantly, with growing complexity in the metadata flowing between them. For many parts of the workflow, a range of tools is available; however, numerous areas lack dedicated tools, while integration of existing tools is limited. This forces modelers to either handle the workflow manually, leading to errors, or to write substantial amounts of code to automate parts of the workflow, in both cases reducing their productivity. To address these issues, we have developed Mozaik: a workflow system for spiking neuronal network simulations written in Python. Mozaik integrates model, experiment and stimulation specification, simulation execution, data storage, data analysis and visualization into a single automated workflow, ensuring that all relevant metadata are available to all workflow components. It is based on several existing tools, including PyNN, Neo, and Matplotlib. It offers a declarative way to specify models and recording configurations using hierarchically organized configuration files. Mozaik automatically records all data together with all relevant metadata about the experimental context, allowing automation of the analysis and visualization stages. Mozaik has a modular architecture, and the existing modules are designed to be extensible with minimal programming effort. Mozaik increases the productivity of running virtual experiments on highly structured neuronal networks by automating the entire experimental cycle, while increasing the reliability of modeling studies by relieving the user from manual handling of the flow of metadata between the individual workflow stages. PMID

  6. Design of controlled elastic and inelastic structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reinhorn, A. M.; Lavan, O.; Cimellaro, G. P.

    2009-12-01

    One of the founders of structural control theory and its application in civil engineering, Professor Emeritus Tsu T. Soong, envisioned the development of the integral design of structures protected by active control devices. Most of his disciples and colleagues continuously attempted to develop procedures to achieve such integral control. In his recent papers published jointly with some of the authors of this paper, Professor Soong developed design procedures for the entire structure using a design — redesign procedure applied to elastic systems. Such a procedure was developed as an extension of other work by his disciples. This paper summarizes some recent techniques that use traditional active control algorithms to derive the most suitable (optimal, stable) control force, which could then be implemented with a combination of active, passive and semi-active devices through a simple match or more sophisticated optimal procedures. Alternative design can address the behavior of structures using Liapunov stability criteria. This paper shows a unified procedure which can be applied to both elastic and inelastic structures. Although the implementation does not always preserve the optimal criteria, it is shown that the solutions are effective and practical for design of supplemental damping, stiffness enhancement or softening, and strengthening or weakening.

  7. Pion inelastic scattering from sup 20 Ne

    SciTech Connect

    Burlein, M. . Dept. of Physics)

    1989-12-01

    Angular distributions for {sup 20}Ne({pi}{sup {plus minus}}, {pi}{sup {plus minus}}{prime}) were measured on the Energetic Pion Channel and Spectrometer (EPICS) at the Clinton P. Anderson Meson Physics Facility (LAMPF). Data were taken with both {pi}{sup {plus}} and {pi}{sup {minus}} over an angular range of 12{degree} to 90{degree} for T{sub {pi}}=180 MeV and with {pi}{sup +} from 15{degree} to 90{degree} for T{sub {pi}}=120 MeV. The data were analyzed using both the distorted-wave impulse approximation (DWIA) and the coupled-channels impulse approximation (CCIA) with collective transition densities. In addition, microscopic transition densities were used in the DWIA analysis for states in the lowest rotational bands. The transitions to the 6.73-MeV 0{sup +} and several 1{sup {minus}} states, including the states at 5.79 MeV and 8.71 MeV, were studied using several models for the transition density. Strong evidence for the importance of two-step routes in pion inelastic scattering was seen in several angular distributions, including the 5.79-MeV 1{sup {minus}}, the first three 4{sup +} states, and the 8.78-MeV 6{sup +}. 100 refs., 81 figs., 33 tabs.

  8. Hard diffraction and deep inelastic scattering

    SciTech Connect

    Bjorken, J.D.

    1994-04-01

    Since the advent of hard-collision physics, the study of diffractive processes - shadow physics - has been less prominent than before. However, there is now a renewed interest in the subject, especially in that aspect which synthesizes the short-distance, hard-collision phenomena with the classical physics of large rapidity-gaps. This is especially stimulated by the recent data on deep-inelastic scattering from HERA, as well as the theoretical work which relates to it. The word diffraction is sometimes used by high-energy physicists in a loose way. The author defines this term to mean: A diffractive process occurs if and only if there is a large rapidity gap in the produced-particle phase space which is not exponentially suppressed. Here a rapidity gap means essentially no hadrons produced into the rapidity gap (which operates in the {open_quotes}lego{close_quotes} phase-space of pseudo-rapidity and azimuthal angle). And non-exponential suppression implies that the cross-section for creating a gap with width {Delta}{eta} does not have a power-law decrease with increasing subenergy s=e{sup {Delta}{eta}}, but behaves at most like some power of pseudorapidity {Delta}{eta}{approx}log(s). The term hard diffraction shall simply refer to those diffractive process which have jets in the final-state phase-space.

  9. A microcomputer program for automated neuronal spike detection and analysis.

    PubMed

    Soto, E; Manjarrez, E; Vega, R

    1997-05-01

    A system for on-line spike detection and analysis based on an IBM PC/AT compatible computer, written in TURBO PASCAL 6.0 and using commercially available analog-to-digital hardware is described here. Spikes are detected by an adaptive threshold which varies as a function of signal mean and its variability. Since the threshold value is determined automatically by the signal-to-noise ratio analysis, the user is not actively involved in controlling its level. This program has been reliably used for the detection and analysis of the spike discharge of vestibular system afferent neurons. It generates the interval-joint distribution graph, the interval histogram, the autocorrelation function, the autocorrelation histogram, and phase-space graphs, thus, providing a complete set of graphical and statistical data for the characterization of the dynamics of neuronal spike activity. Data can be exported to other software such as Excel, Sigmaplot and MatLab, for example. PMID:9291011

  10. Cold Weather Can Spike Football Injuries, Study Finds

    MedlinePlus

    ... news/fullstory_158070.html Cold Weather Can Spike Football Injuries, Study Finds NFL concussions and ankle injuries ... most common injuries that occurred during two National Football League seasons between 2012 and 2014. Players had ...

  11. Benchmarking Spike Rate Inference in Population Calcium Imaging.

    PubMed

    Theis, Lucas; Berens, Philipp; Froudarakis, Emmanouil; Reimer, Jacob; Román Rosón, Miroslav; Baden, Tom; Euler, Thomas; Tolias, Andreas S; Bethge, Matthias

    2016-05-01

    A fundamental challenge in calcium imaging has been to infer spike rates of neurons from the measured noisy fluorescence traces. We systematically evaluate different spike inference algorithms on a large benchmark dataset (>100,000 spikes) recorded from varying neural tissue (V1 and retina) using different calcium indicators (OGB-1 and GCaMP6). In addition, we introduce a new algorithm based on supervised learning in flexible probabilistic models and find that it performs better than other published techniques. Importantly, it outperforms other algorithms even when applied to entirely new datasets for which no simultaneously recorded data is available. Future data acquired in new experimental conditions can be used to further improve the spike prediction accuracy and generalization performance of the model. Finally, we show that comparing algorithms on artificial data is not informative about performance on real data, suggesting that benchmarking different methods with real-world datasets may greatly facilitate future algorithmic developments in neuroscience. PMID:27151639

  12. Asymptotic Linear Spectral Statistics for Spiked Hermitian Random Matrices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Passemier, Damien; McKay, Matthew R.; Chen, Yang

    2015-07-01

    Using the Coulomb Fluid method, this paper derives central limit theorems (CLTs) for linear spectral statistics of three "spiked" Hermitian random matrix ensembles. These include Johnstone's spiked model (i.e., central Wishart with spiked correlation), non-central Wishart with rank-one non-centrality, and a related class of non-central matrices. For a generic linear statistic, we derive simple and explicit CLT expressions as the matrix dimensions grow large. For all three ensembles under consideration, we find that the primary effect of the spike is to introduce an correction term to the asymptotic mean of the linear spectral statistic, which we characterize with simple formulas. The utility of our proposed framework is demonstrated through application to three different linear statistics problems: the classical likelihood ratio test for a population covariance, the capacity analysis of multi-antenna wireless communication systems with a line-of-sight transmission path, and a classical multiple sample significance testing problem.

  13. Spike-timing error backpropagation in theta neuron networks.

    PubMed

    McKennoch, Sam; Voegtlin, Thomas; Bushnell, Linda

    2009-01-01

    The main contribution of this letter is the derivation of a steepest gradient descent learning rule for a multilayer network of theta neurons, a one-dimensional nonlinear neuron model. Central to our model is the assumption that the intrinsic neuron dynamics are sufficient to achieve consistent time coding, with no need to involve the precise shape of postsynaptic currents; this assumption departs from other related models such as SpikeProp and Tempotron learning. Our results clearly show that it is possible to perform complex computations by applying supervised learning techniques to the spike times and time response properties of nonlinear integrate and fire neurons. Networks trained with our multilayer training rule are shown to have similar generalization abilities for spike latency pattern classification as Tempotron learning. The rule is also able to train networks to perform complex regression tasks that neither SpikeProp or Tempotron learning appears to be capable of. PMID:19431278

  14. Efficiently passing messages in distributed spiking neural network simulation

    PubMed Central

    Thibeault, Corey M.; Minkovich, Kirill; O'Brien, Michael J.; Harris, Frederick C.; Srinivasa, Narayan

    2013-01-01

    Efficiently passing spiking messages in a neural model is an important aspect of high-performance simulation. As the scale of networks has increased so has the size of the computing systems required to simulate them. In addition, the information exchange of these resources has become more of an impediment to performance. In this paper we explore spike message passing using different mechanisms provided by the Message Passing Interface (MPI). A specific implementation, MVAPICH, designed for high-performance clusters with Infiniband hardware is employed. The focus is on providing information about these mechanisms for users of commodity high-performance spiking simulators. In addition, a novel hybrid method for spike exchange was implemented and benchmarked. PMID:23772213

  15. Information geometry of interspike intervals in spiking neurons.

    PubMed

    Ikeda, Kazushi

    2005-12-01

    An information geometrical method is developed for characterizing or classifying neurons in cortical areas, whose spike rates fluctuate in time. Under the assumption that the interspike intervals of a spike sequence of a neuron obey a gamma process with a time-variant spike rate and a fixed shape parameter, we formulate the problem of characterization as a semiparametric statistical estimation, where the spike rate is a nuisance parameter. We derive optimal criteria from the information geometrical viewpoint when certain assumptions are added to the formulation, and we show that some existing measures, such as the coefficient of variation and the local variation, are expressed as estimators of certain functions under the same assumptions. PMID:16212769

  16. Quiet Spike (TM) Build-Up Ground Vibration Testing Approach

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Spivey, Natalie D.; Herrera, Claudia; Truax, Roger; Pak, Chan-gi; Freund, Donald

    2007-01-01

    Flight tests of Gulfstream Aerospace Corporation s Quiet Spike(TM) hardware were recently completed on the NASA Dryden Flight Research Center F-15B airplane. NASA Dryden uses a modified F-15B airplane as a testbed aircraft to cost-effectively fly flight research experiments that are typically mounted underneath the F-15B airplane, along the fuselage centerline. For the Quiet Spike(TM) experiment, however, instead of a centerline mounting, a relatively long forward-pointing boom was attached to the radar bulkhead of the F-15B airplane. The Quiet Spike(TM) experiment is a stepping-stone to airframe structural morphing technologies designed to mitigate the sonic-boom strength of business jets over land. The Quiet Spike(TM) boom is a concept in which an aircraft's noseboom would be extended prior to supersonic acceleration. This morphing effectively lengthens the aircraft, thus reducing the peak sonic-boom amplitude, but is also expected to partition the otherwise strong bow shock into a series of reduced-strength, noncoalescing shocklets. Prior to flying the Quiet Spike(TM) experiment on the F-15B airplane several ground vibration tests were required to understand the Quiet Spike(TM) modal characteristics and coupling effects with the F-15B airplane. However, due to the flight hardware availability and compressed schedule requirements, a "traditional" ground vibration test of the mated F-15B Quiet Spike(TM) ready-for-flight configuration did not leave sufficient time available for the finite element model update and flutter analyses before flight testing. Therefore, a "nontraditional" ground vibration testing approach was taken. This paper provides an overview of each phase of the "nontraditional" ground vibration testing completed for the Quiet Spike(TM) project which includes the test setup details, instrumentation layout, and modal results obtained in support of the structural dynamic modeling and flutter analyses.

  17. Graph structure modeling for multi-neuronal spike data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Akaho, Shotaro; Higuchi, Sho; Iwasaki, Taishi; Hino, Hideitsu; Tatsuno, Masami; Murata, Noboru

    2016-03-01

    We propose a method to extract connectivity between neurons for extracellularly recorded multiple spike trains. The method removes pseudo-correlation caused by propagation of information along an indirect pathway, and is also robust against the influence from unobserved neurons. The estimation algorithm consists of iterations of a simple matrix inversion, which is scalable to large data sets. The performance is examined by synthetic spike data.

  18. Spike Inference from Calcium Imaging Using Sequential Monte Carlo Methods

    PubMed Central

    Vogelstein, Joshua T.; Watson, Brendon O.; Packer, Adam M.; Yuste, Rafael; Jedynak, Bruno; Paninski, Liam

    2009-01-01

    Abstract As recent advances in calcium sensing technologies facilitate simultaneously imaging action potentials in neuronal populations, complementary analytical tools must also be developed to maximize the utility of this experimental paradigm. Although the observations here are fluorescence movies, the signals of interest—spike trains and/or time varying intracellular calcium concentrations—are hidden. Inferring these hidden signals is often problematic due to noise, nonlinearities, slow imaging rate, and unknown biophysical parameters. We overcome these difficulties by developing sequential Monte Carlo methods (particle filters) based on biophysical models of spiking, calcium dynamics, and fluorescence. We show that even in simple cases, the particle filters outperform the optimal linear (i.e., Wiener) filter, both by obtaining better estimates and by providing error bars. We then relax a number of our model assumptions to incorporate nonlinear saturation of the fluorescence signal, as well external stimulus and spike history dependence (e.g., refractoriness) of the spike trains. Using both simulations and in vitro fluorescence observations, we demonstrate temporal superresolution by inferring when within a frame each spike occurs. Furthermore, the model parameters may be estimated using expectation maximization with only a very limited amount of data (e.g., ∼5–10 s or 5–40 spikes), without the requirement of any simultaneous electrophysiology or imaging experiments. PMID:19619479

  19. A Spiking Neural Network System for Robust Sequence Recognition.

    PubMed

    Yu, Qiang; Yan, Rui; Tang, Huajin; Tan, Kay Chen; Li, Haizhou

    2016-03-01

    This paper proposes a biologically plausible network architecture with spiking neurons for sequence recognition. This architecture is a unified and consistent system with functional parts of sensory encoding, learning, and decoding. This is the first systematic model attempting to reveal the neural mechanisms considering both the upstream and the downstream neurons together. The whole system is a consistent temporal framework, where the precise timing of spikes is employed for information processing and cognitive computing. Experimental results show that the system is competent to perform the sequence recognition, being robust to noisy sensory inputs and invariant to changes in the intervals between input stimuli within a certain range. The classification ability of the temporal learning rule used in the system is investigated through two benchmark tasks that outperform the other two widely used learning rules for classification. The results also demonstrate the computational power of spiking neurons over perceptrons for processing spatiotemporal patterns. In summary, the system provides a general way with spiking neurons to encode external stimuli into spatiotemporal spikes, to learn the encoded spike patterns with temporal learning rules, and to decode the sequence order with downstream neurons. The system structure would be beneficial for developments in both hardware and software. PMID:25879976

  20. The omega-infinity limit of single spikes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Axenides, Minos; Floratos, Emmanuel; Linardopoulos, Georgios

    2016-06-01

    A new infinite-size limit of strings in R ×S2 is presented. The limit is obtained from single spike strings by letting the angular velocity parameter ω become infinite. We derive the energy-momenta relation of ω = ∞ single spikes as their linear velocity v → 1 and their angular momentum J → 1. Generally, the v → 1, J → 1 limit of single spikes is singular and has to be excluded from the spectrum and be studied separately. We discover that the dispersion relation of omega-infinity single spikes contains logarithms in the limit J → 1. This result is somewhat surprising, since the logarithmic behavior in the string spectra is typically associated with their motion in non-compact spaces such as AdS. Omega-infinity single spikes seem to completely cover the surface of the 2-sphere they occupy, so that they may essentially be viewed as some sort of "brany strings". A proof of the sphere-filling property of omega-infinity single spikes is given in the appendix.

  1. Joint analysis of spikes and local field potentials using copula.

    PubMed

    Hu, Meng; Li, Mingyao; Li, Wu; Liang, Hualou

    2016-06-01

    Recent technological advances, which allow for simultaneous recording of spikes and local field potentials (LFPs) at multiple sites in a given cortical area or across different areas, have greatly increased our understanding of signal processing in brain circuits. Joint analysis of simultaneously collected spike and LFP signals is an important step to explicate how the brain orchestrates information processing. In this contribution, we present a novel statistical framework based on Gaussian copula to jointly model spikes and LFP. In our approach, we use copula to link separate, marginal regression models to construct a joint regression model, in which the binary-valued spike train data are modeled using generalized linear model (GLM) and the continuous-valued LFP data are modeled using linear regression. Model parameters can be efficiently estimated via maximum-likelihood. In particular, we show that our model offers a means to statistically detect directional influence between spikes and LFP, akin to Granger causality measure, and that we are able to assess its statistical significance by conducting a Wald test. Through extensive simulations, we also show that our method is able to reliably recover the true model used to generate the data. To demonstrate the effectiveness of our approach in real setting, we further apply the method to a mixed neural dataset, consisting of spikes and LFP simultaneously recorded from the visual cortex of a monkey performing a contour detection task. PMID:27012500

  2. Designing optimal stimuli to control neuronal spike timing.

    PubMed

    Ahmadian, Yashar; Packer, Adam M; Yuste, Rafael; Paninski, Liam

    2011-08-01

    Recent advances in experimental stimulation methods have raised the following important computational question: how can we choose a stimulus that will drive a neuron to output a target spike train with optimal precision, given physiological constraints? Here we adopt an approach based on models that describe how a stimulating agent (such as an injected electrical current or a laser light interacting with caged neurotransmitters or photosensitive ion channels) affects the spiking activity of neurons. Based on these models, we solve the reverse problem of finding the best time-dependent modulation of the input, subject to hardware limitations as well as physiologically inspired safety measures, that causes the neuron to emit a spike train that with highest probability will be close to a target spike train. We adopt fast convex constrained optimization methods to solve this problem. Our methods can potentially be implemented in real time and may also be generalized to the case of many cells, suitable for neural prosthesis applications. With the use of biologically sensible parameters and constraints, our method finds stimulation patterns that generate very precise spike trains in simulated experiments. We also tested the intracellular current injection method on pyramidal cells in mouse cortical slices, quantifying the dependence of spiking reliability and timing precision on constraints imposed on the applied currents. PMID:21511704

  3. Estimating nonstationary input signals from a single neuronal spike train

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Hideaki; Shinomoto, Shigeru

    2012-11-01

    Neurons temporally integrate input signals, translating them into timed output spikes. Because neurons nonperiodically emit spikes, examining spike timing can reveal information about input signals, which are determined by activities in the populations of excitatory and inhibitory presynaptic neurons. Although a number of mathematical methods have been developed to estimate such input parameters as the mean and fluctuation of the input current, these techniques are based on the unrealistic assumption that presynaptic activity is constant over time. Here, we propose tracking temporal variations in input parameters with a two-step analysis method. First, nonstationary firing characteristics comprising the firing rate and non-Poisson irregularity are estimated from a spike train using a computationally feasible state-space algorithm. Then, information about the firing characteristics is converted into likely input parameters over time using a transformation formula, which was constructed by inverting the neuronal forward transformation of the input current to output spikes. By analyzing spike trains recorded in vivo, we found that neuronal input parameters are similar in the primary visual cortex V1 and middle temporal area, whereas parameters in the lateral geniculate nucleus of the thalamus were markedly different.

  4. Estimating membrane voltage correlations from extracellular spike trains.

    PubMed

    Dorn, Jessy D; Ringach, Dario L

    2003-04-01

    The cross-correlation coefficient between neural spike trains is a commonly used tool in the study of neural interactions. Two well-known complications that arise in its interpretation are 1) modulations in the correlation coefficient may result solely from changes in the mean firing rate of the cells and 2) the mean firing rates of the neurons impose upper and lower bounds on the correlation coefficient whose absolute values differ by an order of magnitude or more. Here, we propose a model-based approach to the interpretation of spike train correlations that circumvents these problems. The basic idea of our proposal is to estimate the cross-correlation coefficient between the membrane voltages of two cells from their extracellular spike trains and use the resulting value as the degree of correlation (or association) of neural activity. This is done in the context of a model that assumes the membrane voltages of the cells have a joint normal distribution and spikes are generated by a simple thresholding operation. We show that, under these assumptions, the estimation of the correlation coefficient between the membrane voltages reduces to the calculation of a tetrachoric correlation coefficient (a measure of association in nominal data introduced by Karl Pearson) on a contingency table calculated from the spike data. Simulations of conductance-based leaky integrate-and-fire neurons indicate that, despite its simplicity, the technique yields very good estimates of the intracellular membrane voltage correlation from the extracellular spike trains in biologically realistic models. PMID:12686584

  5. Spike correlations - what can they tell about synchrony?

    PubMed

    Tchumatchenko, Tatjana; Geisel, Theo; Volgushev, Maxim; Wolf, Fred

    2011-01-01

    Sensory and cognitive processing relies on the concerted activity of large populations of neurons. The advent of modern experimental techniques like two-photon population calcium imaging makes it possible to monitor the spiking activity of multiple neurons as they are participating in specific cognitive tasks. The development of appropriate theoretical tools to quantify and interpret the spiking activity of multiple neurons, however, is still in its infancy. One of the simplest and widely used measures of correlated activity is the pairwise correlation coefficient. While spike correlation coefficients are easy to compute using the available numerical toolboxes, it has remained largely an open question whether they are indeed a reliable measure of synchrony. Surprisingly, despite the intense use of correlation coefficients in the design of synthetic spike trains, the construction of population models and the assessment of the synchrony level in live neuronal networks very little was known about their computational properties. We showed that many features of pairwise spike correlations can be studied analytically in a tractable threshold model. Importantly, we demonstrated that under some circumstances the correlation coefficients can vanish, even though input and also pairwise spike cross correlations are present. This finding suggests that the most popular and frequently used measures can, by design, fail to capture the neuronal synchrony. PMID:21617732

  6. Inelastic x-ray scattering measurements of phonon dynamics in URu2Si2

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Gardner, D. R.; Bonnoit, C. J.; Chisnell, R.; Said, A. H.; Leu, B. M.; Williams, Travis J.; Luke, G. M.; Lee, Y. S.

    2016-02-11

    In this paper, we study high-resolution inelastic x-ray scattering measurements of the acoustic phonons of URu2Si2. At all temperatures, the longitudinal acoustic phonon linewidths are anomalously broad at small wave vectors revealing a previously unknown anharmonicity. The phonon modes do not change significantly upon cooling into the hidden order phase. In addition, our data suggest that the increase in thermal conductivity in the hidden order phase cannot be driven by a change in phonon dispersions or lifetimes. Hence, the phonon contribution to the thermal conductivity is likely much less significant compared to that of the magnetic excitations in the lowmore » temperature phase.« less

  7. Materials constitutive models for nonlinear analysis of thermally cycled structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kaufman, A.; Hunt, L. E.

    1982-01-01

    Effects of inelastic materials models on computed stress-strain solutions for thermally loaded structures were studied by performing nonlinear (elastoplastic creep) and elastic structural analyses on a prismatic, double edge wedge specimen of IN 100 alloy that was subjected to thermal cycling in fluidized beds. Four incremental plasticity creep models (isotropic, kinematic, combined isotropic kinematic, and combined plus transient creep) were exercised for the problem by using the MARC nonlinear, finite element computer program. Maximum total strain ranges computed from the elastic and nonlinear analyses agreed within 5 percent. Mean cyclic stresses, inelastic strain ranges, and inelastic work were significantly affected by the choice of inelastic constitutive model. The computing time per cycle for the nonlinear analyses was more than five times that required for the elastic analysis.

  8. Spike Pattern Structure Influences Synaptic Efficacy Variability under STDP and Synaptic Homeostasis. II: Spike Shuffling Methods on LIF Networks.

    PubMed

    Bi, Zedong; Zhou, Changsong

    2016-01-01

    Synapses may undergo variable changes during plasticity because of the variability of spike patterns such as temporal stochasticity and spatial randomness. Here, we call the variability of synaptic weight changes during plasticity to be efficacy variability. In this paper, we investigate how four aspects of spike pattern statistics (i.e., synchronous firing, burstiness/regularity, heterogeneity of rates and heterogeneity of cross-correlations) influence the efficacy variability under pair-wise additive spike-timing dependent plasticity (STDP) and synaptic homeostasis (the mean strength of plastic synapses into a neuron is bounded), by implementing spike shuffling methods onto spike patterns self-organized by a network of excitatory and inhibitory leaky integrate-and-fire (LIF) neurons. With the increase of the decay time scale of the inhibitory synaptic currents, the LIF network undergoes a transition from asynchronous state to weak synchronous state and then to synchronous bursting state. We first shuffle these spike patterns using a variety of methods, each designed to evidently change a specific pattern statistics; and then investigate the change of efficacy variability of the synapses under STDP and synaptic homeostasis, when the neurons in the network fire according to the spike patterns before and after being treated by a shuffling method. In this way, we can understand how the change of pattern statistics may cause the change of efficacy variability. Our results are consistent with those of our previous study which implements spike-generating models on converging motifs. We also find that burstiness/regularity is important to determine the efficacy variability under asynchronous states, while heterogeneity of cross-correlations is the main factor to cause efficacy variability when the network moves into synchronous bursting states (the states observed in epilepsy). PMID:27555816

  9. Enhanced high-frequency membrane potential fluctuations control spike output in striatal fast-spiking interneurones in vivo.

    PubMed

    Schulz, Jan M; Pitcher, Toni L; Savanthrapadian, Shakuntala; Wickens, Jeffery R; Oswald, Manfred J; Reynolds, John N J

    2011-09-01

    Fast-spiking interneurones (FSIs) constitute a prominent part of the inhibitory microcircuitry of the striatum; however, little is known about their recruitment by synaptic inputs in vivo. Here, we report that, in contrast to cholinergic interneurones (CINs), FSIs (n = 9) recorded in urethane-anaesthetized rats exhibit Down-to-Up state transitions very similar to spiny projection neurones (SPNs). Compared to SPNs, the FSI Up state membrane potential was noisier and power spectra exhibited significantly larger power at frequencies in the gamma range (55-95 Hz). The membrane potential exhibited short and steep trajectories preceding spontaneous spike discharge, suggesting that fast input components controlled spike output in FSIs. Spontaneous spike data contained a high proportion (43.6 ± 32.8%) of small inter-spike intervals (ISIs) of <30 ms, setting FSIs clearly apart from SPNs and CINs. Cortical-evoked inputs had slower dynamics in SPNs than FSIs, and repetitive stimulation entrained SPN spike output only if the stimulation was delivered at an intermediate frequency (20 Hz), but not at a high frequency (100 Hz). Pharmacological induction of an activated ECoG state, known to promote rapid FSI spiking, mildly increased the power (by 43 ± 55%, n = 13) at gamma frequencies in the membrane potential of SPNs, but resulted in few small ISIs (<30 ms; 4.3 ± 6.4%, n = 8). The gamma frequency content did not change in CINs (n = 8). These results indicate that FSIs are uniquely responsive to high-frequency input sequences. By controlling the spike output of SPNs, FSIs could serve gating of top-down signals and long-range synchronisation of gamma-oscillations during behaviour. PMID:21746788

  10. Spike Pattern Structure Influences Synaptic Efficacy Variability under STDP and Synaptic Homeostasis. II: Spike Shuffling Methods on LIF Networks

    PubMed Central

    Bi, Zedong; Zhou, Changsong

    2016-01-01

    Synapses may undergo variable changes during plasticity because of the variability of spike patterns such as temporal stochasticity and spatial randomness. Here, we call the variability of synaptic weight changes during plasticity to be efficacy variability. In this paper, we investigate how four aspects of spike pattern statistics (i.e., synchronous firing, burstiness/regularity, heterogeneity of rates and heterogeneity of cross-correlations) influence the efficacy variability under pair-wise additive spike-timing dependent plasticity (STDP) and synaptic homeostasis (the mean strength of plastic synapses into a neuron is bounded), by implementing spike shuffling methods onto spike patterns self-organized by a network of excitatory and inhibitory leaky integrate-and-fire (LIF) neurons. With the increase of the decay time scale of the inhibitory synaptic currents, the LIF network undergoes a transition from asynchronous state to weak synchronous state and then to synchronous bursting state. We first shuffle these spike patterns using a variety of methods, each designed to evidently change a specific pattern statistics; and then investigate the change of efficacy variability of the synapses under STDP and synaptic homeostasis, when the neurons in the network fire according to the spike patterns before and after being treated by a shuffling method. In this way, we can understand how the change of pattern statistics may cause the change of efficacy variability. Our results are consistent with those of our previous study which implements spike-generating models on converging motifs. We also find that burstiness/regularity is important to determine the efficacy variability under asynchronous states, while heterogeneity of cross-correlations is the main factor to cause efficacy variability when the network moves into synchronous bursting states (the states observed in epilepsy). PMID:27555816

  11. 3-D inelastic analysis methods for hot section components (base program). [turbine blades, turbine vanes, and combustor liners

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wilson, R. B.; Bak, M. J.; Nakazawa, S.; Banerjee, P. K.

    1984-01-01

    A 3-D inelastic analysis methods program consists of a series of computer codes embodying a progression of mathematical models (mechanics of materials, special finite element, boundary element) for streamlined analysis of combustor liners, turbine blades, and turbine vanes. These models address the effects of high temperatures and thermal/mechanical loadings on the local (stress/strain) and global (dynamics, buckling) structural behavior of the three selected components. These models are used to solve 3-D inelastic problems using linear approximations in the sense that stresses/strains and temperatures in generic modeling regions are linear functions of the spatial coordinates, and solution increments for load, temperature and/or time are extrapolated linearly from previous information. Three linear formulation computer codes, referred to as MOMM (Mechanics of Materials Model), MHOST (MARC-Hot Section Technology), and BEST (Boundary Element Stress Technology), were developed and are described.

  12. Spike-Interval Triggered Averaging Reveals a Quasi-Periodic Spiking Alternative for Stochastic Resonance in Catfish Electroreceptors

    PubMed Central

    Lankheet, Martin J. M.; Klink, P. Christiaan; Borghuis, Bart G.; Noest, André J.

    2012-01-01

    Catfish detect and identify invisible prey by sensing their ultra-weak electric fields with electroreceptors. Any neuron that deals with small-amplitude input has to overcome sensitivity limitations arising from inherent threshold non-linearities in spike-generation mechanisms. Many sensory cells solve this issue with stochastic resonance, in which a moderate amount of intrinsic noise causes irregular spontaneous spiking activity with a probability that is modulated by the input signal. Here we show that catfish electroreceptors have adopted a fundamentally different strategy. Using a reverse correlation technique in which we take spike interval durations into account, we show that the electroreceptors generate a supra-threshold bias current that results in quasi-periodically produced spikes. In this regime stimuli modulate the interval between successive spikes rather than the instantaneous probability for a spike. This alternative for stochastic resonance combines threshold-free sensitivity for weak stimuli with similar sensitivity for excitations and inhibitions based on single interspike intervals. PMID:22403709

  13. Spike-interval triggered averaging reveals a quasi-periodic spiking alternative for stochastic resonance in catfish electroreceptors.

    PubMed

    Lankheet, Martin J M; Klink, P Christiaan; Borghuis, Bart G; Noest, André J

    2012-01-01

    Catfish detect and identify invisible prey by sensing their ultra-weak electric fields with electroreceptors. Any neuron that deals with small-amplitude input has to overcome sensitivity limitations arising from inherent threshold non-linearities in spike-generation mechanisms. Many sensory cells solve this issue with stochastic resonance, in which a moderate amount of intrinsic noise causes irregular spontaneous spiking activity with a probability that is modulated by the input signal. Here we show that catfish electroreceptors have adopted a fundamentally different strategy. Using a reverse correlation technique in which we take spike interval durations into account, we show that the electroreceptors generate a supra-threshold bias current that results in quasi-periodically produced spikes. In this regime stimuli modulate the interval between successive spikes rather than the instantaneous probability for a spike. This alternative for stochastic resonance combines threshold-free sensitivity for weak stimuli with similar sensitivity for excitations and inhibitions based on single interspike intervals. PMID:22403709

  14. A photon thermal diode.

    PubMed

    Chen, Zhen; Wong, Carlaton; Lubner, Sean; Yee, Shannon; Miller, John; Jang, Wanyoung; Hardin, Corey; Fong, Anthony; Garay, Javier E; Dames, Chris

    2014-01-01

    A thermal diode is a two-terminal nonlinear device that rectifies energy carriers (for example, photons, phonons and electrons) in the thermal domain, the heat transfer analogue to the familiar electrical diode. Effective thermal rectifiers could have an impact on diverse applications ranging from heat engines to refrigeration, thermal regulation of buildings and thermal logic. However, experimental demonstrations have lagged far behind theoretical proposals. Here we present the first experimental results for a photon thermal diode. The device is based on asymmetric scattering of ballistic energy carriers by pyramidal reflectors. Recent theoretical work has predicted that this ballistic mechanism also requires a nonlinearity in order to yield asymmetric thermal transport, a requirement of all thermal diodes arising from the second Law of Thermodynamics, and realized here using an 'inelastic thermal collimator' element. Experiments confirm both effects: with pyramids and collimator the thermal rectification is 10.9 ± 0.8%, while without the collimator no rectification is detectable (<0.3%). PMID:25399761

  15. Dual Roles for Spike Signaling in Cortical Neural Populations

    PubMed Central

    Ballard, Dana H.; Jehee, Janneke F. M.

    2011-01-01

    A prominent feature of signaling in cortical neurons is that of randomness in the action potential. The output of a typical pyramidal cell can be well fit with a Poisson model, and variations in the Poisson rate repeatedly have been shown to be correlated with stimuli. However while the rate provides a very useful characterization of neural spike data, it may not be the most fundamental description of the signaling code. Recent data showing γ frequency range multi-cell action potential correlations, together with spike timing dependent plasticity, are spurring a re-examination of the classical model, since precise timing codes imply that the generation of spikes is essentially deterministic. Could the observed Poisson randomness and timing determinism reflect two separate modes of communication, or do they somehow derive from a single process? We investigate in a timing-based model whether the apparent incompatibility between these probabilistic and deterministic observations may be resolved by examining how spikes could be used in the underlying neural circuits. The crucial component of this model draws on dual roles for spike signaling. In learning receptive fields from ensembles of inputs, spikes need to behave probabilistically, whereas for fast signaling of individual stimuli, the spikes need to behave deterministically. Our simulations show that this combination is possible if deterministic signals using γ latency coding are probabilistically routed through different members of a cortical cell population at different times. This model exhibits standard features characteristic of Poisson models such as orientation tuning and exponential interval histograms. In addition, it makes testable predictions that follow from the γ latency coding. PMID:21687798

  16. An Efficient Supervised Training Algorithm for Multilayer Spiking Neural Networks

    PubMed Central

    Xie, Xiurui; Qu, Hong; Liu, Guisong; Zhang, Malu; Kurths, Jürgen

    2016-01-01

    The spiking neural networks (SNNs) are the third generation of neural networks and perform remarkably well in cognitive tasks such as pattern recognition. The spike emitting and information processing mechanisms found in biological cognitive systems motivate the application of the hierarchical structure and temporal encoding mechanism in spiking neural networks, which have exhibited strong computational capability. However, the hierarchical structure and temporal encoding approach require neurons to process information serially in space and time respectively, which reduce the training efficiency significantly. For training the hierarchical SNNs, most existing methods are based on the traditional back-propagation algorithm, inheriting its drawbacks of the gradient diffusion and the sensitivity on parameters. To keep the powerful computation capability of the hierarchical structure and temporal encoding mechanism, but to overcome the low efficiency of the existing algorithms, a new training algorithm, the Normalized Spiking Error Back Propagation (NSEBP) is proposed in this paper. In the feedforward calculation, the output spike times are calculated by solving the quadratic function in the spike response model instead of detecting postsynaptic voltage states at all time points in traditional algorithms. Besides, in the feedback weight modification, the computational error is propagated to previous layers by the presynaptic spike jitter instead of the gradient decent rule, which realizes the layer-wised training. Furthermore, our algorithm investigates the mathematical relation between the weight variation and voltage error change, which makes the normalization in the weight modification applicable. Adopting these strategies, our algorithm outperforms the traditional SNN multi-layer algorithms in terms of learning efficiency and parameter sensitivity, that are also demonstrated by the comprehensive experimental results in this paper. PMID:27044001

  17. An Efficient Supervised Training Algorithm for Multilayer Spiking Neural Networks.

    PubMed

    Xie, Xiurui; Qu, Hong; Liu, Guisong; Zhang, Malu; Kurths, Jürgen

    2016-01-01

    The spiking neural networks (SNNs) are the third generation of neural networks and perform remarkably well in cognitive tasks such as pattern recognition. The spike emitting and information processing mechanisms found in biological cognitive systems motivate the application of the hierarchical structure and temporal encoding mechanism in spiking neural networks, which have exhibited strong computational capability. However, the hierarchical structure and temporal encoding approach require neurons to process information serially in space and time respectively, which reduce the training efficiency significantly. For training the hierarchical SNNs, most existing methods are based on the traditional back-propagation algorithm, inheriting its drawbacks of the gradient diffusion and the sensitivity on parameters. To keep the powerful computation capability of the hierarchical structure and temporal encoding mechanism, but to overcome the low efficiency of the existing algorithms, a new training algorithm, the Normalized Spiking Error Back Propagation (NSEBP) is proposed in this paper. In the feedforward calculation, the output spike times are calculated by solving the quadratic function in the spike response model instead of detecting postsynaptic voltage states at all time points in traditional algorithms. Besides, in the feedback weight modification, the computational error is propagated to previous layers by the presynaptic spike jitter instead of the gradient decent rule, which realizes the layer-wised training. Furthermore, our algorithm investigates the mathematical relation between the weight variation and voltage error change, which makes the normalization in the weight modification applicable. Adopting these strategies, our algorithm outperforms the traditional SNN multi-layer algorithms in terms of learning efficiency and parameter sensitivity, that are also demonstrated by the comprehensive experimental results in this paper. PMID:27044001

  18. NHEXAS PHASE I ARIZONA STUDY--QA ANALYTICAL RESULTS FOR PESTICIDE METABOLITES IN SPIKE SAMPLES

    EPA Science Inventory

    The Pesticide Metabolites in Spike Samples data set contains the analytical results of measurements of up to 4 pesticide metabolites in 3 control samples (spikes) from 3 households. Measurements were made in spiked samples of urine. Spiked samples were used to assess recovery o...

  19. NHEXAS PHASE I ARIZONA STUDY--QA ANALYTICAL RESULTS FOR METALS IN SPIKE SAMPLES

    EPA Science Inventory

    The Metals in Spike Samples data set contains the analytical results of measurements of up to 11 metals in 38 control samples (spikes) from 18 households. Measurements were made in spiked samples of dust, food, beverages, blood, urine, and dermal wipe residue. Spiked samples we...

  20. NHEXAS PHASE I ARIZONA STUDY--QA ANALYTICAL RESULTS FOR PESTICIDES IN SPIKE SAMPLES

    EPA Science Inventory

    The Pesticides in Spike Samples data set contains the analytical results of measurements of up to 4 pesticides in 26 control samples (spikes) from 19 households. Measurements were made in spiked samples of indoor air, food, beverages, and dermal wipe residue. Spiked samples wer...

  1. Spikes in the mixmaster regime of G{sub 2} cosmologies

    SciTech Connect

    Lim, Woei Chet; Andersson, Lars; Garfinkle, David; Pretorius, Frans

    2009-06-15

    We produce numerical evidence that spikes in the mixmaster regime of G{sub 2} cosmologies are transient and recurring, supporting the conjecture that the generalized mixmaster behavior is asymptotically nonlocal where spikes occur. Higher-order spike transitions are observed to split into separate first-order spike transitions.

  2. Inelastic compaction, dilation and hysteresis of sandstones under hydrostatic conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shalev, Eyal; Lyakhovsky, Vladimir; Ougier-Simonin, Audrey; Hamiel, Yariv; Zhu, Wenlu

    2014-05-01

    Sandstones display non-linear and inelastic behaviour such as hysteresis when subjected to cyclic loading. We present three hydrostatic compaction experiments with multiple loading-unloading cycles on Berea and Darley Dale sandstones and explain their hysteretic behaviour using non-linear inelastic compaction and dilation. Each experiment included eight to nine loading-unloading cycles with increasing maximum pressure in each subsequent cycle. Different pressure-volumetric strain relations during loading and unloading were observed. During the first cycles, under relatively low pressures, not all of the volumetric strain is recovered at the end of each cycle whereas at the last cycles, under relatively high pressures, the strain is recovered and the pressure-volumetric strain hysteresis loops are closed. The observed pressure-volumetric strain relations are non-linear and the effective bulk modulus of the sandstones changes between cycles. Observations are modelled with two inelastic deformation processes: irreversible compaction caused by changes in grain packing and recoverable compaction associated with grain contact adhesion, frictional sliding on grains or frictional sliding on cracks. The irreversible compaction is suggested to reflect rearrangement of grains into a more compact mode as the maximum pressure increases. Our model describes the `inelastic compaction envelope' in which sandstone sample will follow during hydrostatic loading. Irreversible compaction occurs when pressure is greater than a threshold value defined by the `inelastic compaction envelope'.

  3. The dynamic response of inelastic, delaminated composite plates

    SciTech Connect

    Williams, T.O.; Addessio, F.L.

    1997-04-01

    The dynamic behavior of metal matrix composite (MMC) plates is considered. In particular, the influence of inelastic deformations and delamination at the interfaces of the lamina on the macroscopic and local response of Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}/Al plates are studied. The work is carried out using a recently developed plate theory which models both delamination and localized history-dependent effects such, as inelasticity. A linear debonding model for the interface is employed for the current work. The theory models both the initiation and growth of delaminations without imposing any restrictions on the location, size, or direction of growth of the delamination. In the current work the response of the individual lamina in the plate are modeled using the Method of Cells (MOC) micromechanical model. The inelastic behavior in the matrix is modeled using the unified viscoplastic theory of Bodner and Partom. The behavior of a Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}/Al plate under dynamic cylindrical bending subjected to a ramp and hold type of loading is examined. For simplicity, the plate is assumed to be composed of a cross-ply layup. It is shown that both inelastic deformations and delamination have a strong influence on dynamic plate behavior. The inelastic deformations have strong effect on the axial displacement while delamination has greater influence on the deflection.

  4. Inelastic neutron scattering in valence fluctuation compounds

    SciTech Connect

    Jon M Lawrence

    2011-02-15

    The valence fluctuation compounds are rare earth intermetallics where hybridization of the nearly-localized 4f electrons with the conduction electrons leads to incorporation of the 4f's into the itinerant states. This hybridization slows down the conduction electrons and hence gives them a heavy effective mass, justifying application of the term 'heavy Fermion' (HF) to these materials. During the project period, we grew large single crystals of several such compounds and measured their properties using both standard thermodynamic probes and state-of-the-art inelastic neutron scattering. We obtained three main results. For the intermediate valence compounds CePd{sub 3} and YbAl{sub 3}, we showed that the scattering of neutrons by the fluctuations of the 4f magnetic moment does not have the momentum dependence expected for the itinerant heavy mass state; rather, the scattering is more typical of a localized spin fluctuation. We believe that incoherent scattering localizes the excitation. For the heavy Fermion compound Ce(Ni{sub 0.935}Pd{sub 0.065}){sub 2}Ge{sub 2}, which sits at a T = 0 critical point for transformation into an antiferromagnetic (AF) phase, we showed that the scattering from the AF fluctuations does not exhibit any of the divergences that are expected at a phase transition. We speculate that alloy disorder profoundly suppresses the growth of the fluctuating AF regions, leading to short range clusters rather than regions of infinite size. Finally, we explored the applicability of key concepts used to describe the behavior of rare earth heavy Fermions to uranium based HF compounds where the 5f electrons are itinerant as opposed to localized. We found that scaling laws relating the spin fluctuation energy measured in neutron scattering to the low temperature specific heat and susceptibility are valid for the uranium compounds, once corrections are made for AF fluctuations; however, the degeneracy of the high temperature moment is smaller than expected

  5. Inter-Laboratory Uranium Double-Spike Experiment

    SciTech Connect

    Russ, G. P

    1999-11-11

    In environmental samples, the major analytical limitation on the use of uranium {sup 238}U/{sup 235}U determinations as an indicator of uranium enrichment is mass dependent bias occurring during the measurement. The double-spike technique can be used to correct the data for this effect. The purpose of this experiment was to evaluate the variation of mass bias among several laboratories and to determine the extent to which the double-spike could be used to reduce analytical uncertainty. Four laboratories performed replicate analyses on each of three samples. Generally mass bias was determined to be small compared to the random scatter of the measurements, but in at least one case, the bias was > 1%. In 8 of 12 cases, intra-laboratory variance was reduced when the double-spike correction was applied. For all three samples, the inter-laboratory variance was decreased, though the decrease was small. Based on a reasonable assumption about the true isotopic compositions of the samples, the accuracy of 11 of the twelve analyses was improved by applying the double spike correction. When the double spike is used to correct for mass bias, the {sup 238}U/{sup 235}U accuracy is better than 1% even for samples as small as 1 ng. For 50 ng of uranium, 0.1% accuracy was achieved.

  6. Financial Time Series Prediction Using Spiking Neural Networks

    PubMed Central

    Reid, David; Hussain, Abir Jaafar; Tawfik, Hissam

    2014-01-01

    In this paper a novel application of a particular type of spiking neural network, a Polychronous Spiking Network, was used for financial time series prediction. It is argued that the inherent temporal capabilities of this type of network are suited to non-stationary data such as this. The performance of the spiking neural network was benchmarked against three systems: two “traditional”, rate-encoded, neural networks; a Multi-Layer Perceptron neural network and a Dynamic Ridge Polynomial neural network, and a standard Linear Predictor Coefficients model. For this comparison three non-stationary and noisy time series were used: IBM stock data; US/Euro exchange rate data, and the price of Brent crude oil. The experiments demonstrated favourable prediction results for the Spiking Neural Network in terms of Annualised Return and prediction error for 5-Step ahead predictions. These results were also supported by other relevant metrics such as Maximum Drawdown and Signal-To-Noise ratio. This work demonstrated the applicability of the Polychronous Spiking Network to financial data forecasting and this in turn indicates the potential of using such networks over traditional systems in difficult to manage non-stationary environments. PMID:25170618

  7. Scaling of spiking and humping in keyhole welding

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wei, P. S.; Chuang, K. C.; DebRoy, T.; Ku, J. S.

    2011-06-01

    Spiking, rippling and humping seriously reduce the strength of welds. The effects of beam focusing, volatile alloying element concentration and welding velocity on spiking, coarse rippling and humping in keyhole mode electron-beam welding are examined through scale analysis. Although these defects have been studied in the past, the mechanisms for their formation are not fully understood. This work relates the average amplitudes of spikes to fusion zone depth for the welding of Al 6061, SS 304 and carbon steel, and Al 5083. The scale analysis introduces welding and melting efficiencies and an appropriate power distribution to account for the focusing effects, and the energy which is reflected and escapes through the keyhole opening to the surroundings. The frequency of humping and spiking can also be predicted from the scale analysis. The analysis also reveals the interrelation between coarse rippling and humping. The data and the mechanistic findings reported in this study are useful for understanding and preventing spiking and humping during keyhole mode electron and laser beam welding.

  8. Spike morphology in blast-wave-driven instability experiments

    SciTech Connect

    Kuranz, C. C.; Drake, R. P.; Grosskopf, M. J.; Fryxell, B.; Budde, A.; Hansen, J. F.; Miles, A. R.; Plewa, T.; Hearn, N.; Knauer, J.

    2010-05-15

    The laboratory experiments described in the present paper observe the blast-wave-driven Rayleigh-Taylor instability with three-dimensional (3D) initial conditions. About 5 kJ of energy from the Omega laser creates conditions similar to those of the He-H interface during the explosion phase of a supernova. The experimental target is a 150 {mu}m thick plastic disk followed by a low-density foam. The plastic piece has an embedded, 3D perturbation. The basic structure of the pattern is two orthogonal sine waves where each sine wave has an amplitude of 2.5 {mu}m and a wavelength of 71 {mu}m. In some experiments, an additional wavelength is added to explore the interaction of modes. In experiments with 3D initial conditions the spike morphology differs from what has been observed in other Rayleigh-Taylor experiments and simulations. Under certain conditions, experimental radiographs show some mass extending from the interface to the shock front. Current simulations show neither the spike morphology nor the spike penetration observed in the experiments. The amount of mass reaching the shock front is analyzed and potential causes for the spike morphology and the spikes reaching the shock are discussed. One such hypothesis is that these phenomena may be caused by magnetic pressure, generated by an azimuthal magnetic field produced by the plasma dynamics.

  9. Guaranteed Blind Sparse Spikes Deconvolution via Lifting and Convex Optimization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chi, Yuejie

    2016-06-01

    Neural recordings, returns from radars and sonars, images in astronomy and single-molecule microscopy can be modeled as a linear superposition of a small number of scaled and delayed copies of a band-limited or diffraction-limited point spread function, which is either determined by the nature or designed by the users; in other words, we observe the convolution between a point spread function and a sparse spike signal with unknown amplitudes and delays. While it is of great interest to accurately resolve the spike signal from as few samples as possible, however, when the point spread function is not known a priori, this problem is terribly ill-posed. This paper proposes a convex optimization framework to simultaneously estimate the point spread function as well as the spike signal, by mildly constraining the point spread function to lie in a known low-dimensional subspace. By applying the lifting trick, we obtain an underdetermined linear system of an ensemble of signals with joint spectral sparsity, to which atomic norm minimization is applied. Under mild randomness assumptions of the low-dimensional subspace as well as a separation condition of the spike signal, we prove the proposed algorithm, dubbed as AtomicLift, is guaranteed to recover the spike signal up to a scaling factor as soon as the number of samples is large enough. The extension of AtomicLift to handle noisy measurements is also discussed. Numerical examples are provided to validate the effectiveness of the proposed approaches.

  10. Financial time series prediction using spiking neural networks.

    PubMed

    Reid, David; Hussain, Abir Jaafar; Tawfik, Hissam

    2014-01-01

    In this paper a novel application of a particular type of spiking neural network, a Polychronous Spiking Network, was used for financial time series prediction. It is argued that the inherent temporal capabilities of this type of network are suited to non-stationary data such as this. The performance of the spiking neural network was benchmarked against three systems: two "traditional", rate-encoded, neural networks; a Multi-Layer Perceptron neural network and a Dynamic Ridge Polynomial neural network, and a standard Linear Predictor Coefficients model. For this comparison three non-stationary and noisy time series were used: IBM stock data; US/Euro exchange rate data, and the price of Brent crude oil. The experiments demonstrated favourable prediction results for the Spiking Neural Network in terms of Annualised Return and prediction error for 5-Step ahead predictions. These results were also supported by other relevant metrics such as Maximum Drawdown and Signal-To-Noise ratio. This work demonstrated the applicability of the Polychronous Spiking Network to financial data forecasting and this in turn indicates the potential of using such networks over traditional systems in difficult to manage non-stationary environments. PMID:25170618

  11. Adaptive Spike Threshold Enables Robust and Temporally Precise Neuronal Encoding

    PubMed Central

    Resnik, Andrey; Celikel, Tansu; Englitz, Bernhard

    2016-01-01

    Neural processing rests on the intracellular transformation of information as synaptic inputs are translated into action potentials. This transformation is governed by the spike threshold, which depends on the history of the membrane potential on many temporal scales. While the adaptation of the threshold after spiking activity has been addressed before both theoretically and experimentally, it has only recently been demonstrated that the subthreshold membrane state also influences the effective spike threshold. The consequences for neural computation are not well understood yet. We address this question here using neural simulations and whole cell intracellular recordings in combination with information theoretic analysis. We show that an adaptive spike threshold leads to better stimulus discrimination for tight input correlations than would be achieved otherwise, independent from whether the stimulus is encoded in the rate or pattern of action potentials. The time scales of input selectivity are jointly governed by membrane and threshold dynamics. Encoding information using adaptive thresholds further ensures robust information transmission across cortical states i.e. decoding from different states is less state dependent in the adaptive threshold case, if the decoding is performed in reference to the timing of the population response. Results from in vitro neural recordings were consistent with simulations from adaptive threshold neurons. In summary, the adaptive spike threshold reduces information loss during intracellular information transfer, improves stimulus discriminability and ensures robust decoding across membrane states in a regime of highly correlated inputs, similar to those seen in sensory nuclei during the encoding of sensory information. PMID:27304526

  12. Magnetoencephalographic signatures of insular epileptic spikes based on functional connectivity.

    PubMed

    Zerouali, Younes; Pouliot, Philippe; Robert, Manon; Mohamed, Ismail; Bouthillier, Alain; Lesage, Frédéric; Nguyen, Dang K

    2016-09-01

    Failure to recognize insular cortex seizures has recently been identified as a cause of epilepsy surgeries targeting the temporal, parietal, or frontal lobe. Such failures are partly due to the fact that current noninvasive localization techniques fare poorly in recognizing insular epileptic foci. Our group recently demonstrated that magnetoencephalography (MEG) is sensitive to epileptiform spikes generated by the insula. In this study, we assessed the potential of distributed source imaging and functional connectivity analyses to distinguish insular networks underlying the generation of spikes. Nineteen patients with operculo-insular epilepsy were investigated. Each patient underwent MEG as well as T1-weighted magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) as part of their standard presurgical evaluation. Cortical sources of MEG spikes were reconstructed with the maximum entropy on the mean algorithm, and their time courses served to analyze source functional connectivity. The results indicate that the anterior and posterior subregions of the insula have specific patterns of functional connectivity mainly involving frontal and parietal regions, respectively. In addition, while their connectivity patterns are qualitatively similar during rest and during spikes, couplings within these networks are much stronger during spikes. These results show that MEG can establish functional connectivity-based signatures that could help in the diagnosis of different subtypes of insular cortex epilepsy. Hum Brain Mapp 37:3250-3261, 2016. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:27220112

  13. Bifurcation and Spike Adding Transition in Chay-Keizer Model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lu, Bo; Liu, Shenquan; Liu, Xuanliang; Jiang, Xiaofang; Wang, Xiaohui

    Electrical bursting is an activity which is universal in excitable cells such as neurons and various endocrine cells, and it encodes rich physiological information. As burst delay identifies that the signal integration has reached the threshold at which it can generate an action potential, the number of spikes in a burst may have essential physiological implications, and the transition of bursting in excitable cells is associated with the bifurcation phenomenon closely. In this paper, we focus on the transition of the spike count per burst of the pancreatic β-cells within a mathematical model and bifurcation phenomenon in the Chay-Keizer model, which is utilized to simulate the pancreatic β-cells. By the fast-slow dynamical bifurcation analysis and the bi-parameter bifurcation analysis, the local dynamics of the Chay-Keizer system around the Bogdanov-Takens bifurcation is illustrated. Then the variety of the number of spikes per burst is discussed by changing the settings of a single parameter and bi-parameter. Moreover, results on the number of spikes within a burst are summarized in ISIs (interspike intervals) sequence diagrams, maximum and minimum, and the number of spikes under bi-parameter value changes.

  14. Spike Pattern Structure Influences Synaptic Efficacy Variability under STDP and Synaptic Homeostasis. I: Spike Generating Models on Converging Motifs

    PubMed Central

    Bi, Zedong; Zhou, Changsong

    2016-01-01

    In neural systems, synaptic plasticity is usually driven by spike trains. Due to the inherent noises of neurons and synapses as well as the randomness of connection details, spike trains typically exhibit variability such as spatial randomness and temporal stochasticity, resulting in variability of synaptic changes under plasticity, which we call efficacy variability. How the variability of spike trains influences the efficacy variability of synapses remains unclear. In this paper, we try to understand this influence under pair-wise additive spike-timing dependent plasticity (STDP) when the mean strength of plastic synapses into a neuron is bounded (synaptic homeostasis). Specifically, we systematically study, analytically and numerically, how four aspects of statistical features, i.e., synchronous firing, burstiness/regularity, heterogeneity of rates and heterogeneity of cross-correlations, as well as their interactions influence the efficacy variability in converging motifs (simple networks in which one neuron receives from many other neurons). Neurons (including the post-synaptic neuron) in a converging motif generate spikes according to statistical models with tunable parameters. In this way, we can explicitly control the statistics of the spike patterns, and investigate their influence onto the efficacy variability, without worrying about the feedback from synaptic changes onto the dynamics of the post-synaptic neuron. We separate efficacy variability into two parts: the drift part (DriftV) induced by the heterogeneity of change rates of different synapses, and the diffusion part (DiffV) induced by weight diffusion caused by stochasticity of spike trains. Our main findings are: (1) synchronous firing and burstiness tend to increase DiffV, (2) heterogeneity of rates induces DriftV when potentiation and depression in STDP are not balanced, and (3) heterogeneity of cross-correlations induces DriftV together with heterogeneity of rates. We anticipate our work

  15. Inelastic billiard ball in a spacetime with a time machine

    SciTech Connect

    Mikheeva, E.V. ); Novikov, I.D. NORDITA, Blegdamsvej 17, DK-2100 Copenhagen Astro Space Center of the P. N. Lebedev Physical Institute, Moscow )

    1993-02-15

    The nonrelativistic motion with self-collision of an inelastic billiard ball in spacetime with a time machine is discussed. We consider the wormhole-type time machine, assuming that [epsilon][equivalent to](radius of wormhole mouth)/(distance between mouths)[much lt]1, and that (radius of ball)/(distance between wormhole mouths)=[ital O]([epsilon][sup 2]). The coefficient of friction of the balls is of order [epsilon], and the balls can have an arbitrary amount of inelasticity. Solutions are sought with an accuracy up through order [epsilon][sup 4]. We demonstrate that the generic class of initial data has self-consistent solutions of the equations of motion. Up to the order studied the friction does have an effect, but the inelasticity has no effect whatsoever.

  16. Halo-independent methods for inelastic dark matter scattering

    SciTech Connect

    Bozorgnia, Nassim; Schwetz, Thomas; Herrero-Garcia, Juan; Zupan, Jure E-mail: juan.a.herrero@uv.es E-mail: jure.zupan@cern.ch

    2013-07-01

    We present halo-independent methods to analyze the results of dark matter direct detection experiments assuming inelastic scattering. We focus on the annual modulation signal reported by DAMA/LIBRA and present three different halo-independent tests. First, we compare it to the upper limit on the unmodulated rate from XENON100 using (a) the trivial requirement that the amplitude of the annual modulation has to be smaller than the bound on the unmodulated rate, and (b) a bound on the annual modulation amplitude based on an expansion in the Earth's velocity. The third test uses the special predictions of the signal shape for inelastic scattering and allows for an internal consistency check of the data without referring to any astrophysics. We conclude that a strong conflict between DAMA/LIBRA and XENON100 in the framework of spin-independent inelastic scattering can be established independently of the local properties of the dark matter halo.

  17. Deep-inelastic muon scattering from nuclei with hadron detection

    SciTech Connect

    Geesaman, D.; Jackson, H.; Kaufman, S.

    1995-08-01

    Deep-inelastic lepton scattering from nuclei provides a direct look at the quark structure of nuclear matter. These reactions revealed the first convincing evidence that the structure of nucleons is modified in the nuclear medium and had profound implications on the understanding of nuclear dynamics. FNAL experiment E665, using the 490-GeV muon beams at Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory, provides new information on the nuclear effects on nucleon properties by studying deep-inelastic muon scattering with coincident hadron detection. The high beam energy makes the experiment particularly suited to the study of the region of x < 0.1 (where x is the fraction of the momentum of the nucleon carried by the struck quark in the infinite momentum frame), and total center-of-mass hadronic energy > 25 GeV, where hard QCD processes are expected to become evident and there are little data from other deep-inelastic measurements.

  18. Constraints on inelastic dark matter from XENON10

    SciTech Connect

    Angle, J; Aprile, E; Arneodo, F; Baudis, L; Bernstein, A; Bolozdynya, A; Coelho, L C; Dahl, C E; DeViveiros, L; Ferella, A D; Fernandes, L P; Fiorucci, S; Gaitskell, R J; Giboni, K L; Gomez, R; Hasty, R; Kastens, L; Kwong, J; Lopes, J M; Madden, N; Manalaysay, A; Manzur, A; McKinsey, D N; Monzani, M E; Ni, K; Oberlack, U; Orboeck, J; Plante, G; Santorelli, R; dos Santos, J; Shagin, P; Shutt, T; Sorensen, P; Schulte, S; Winant, C; Yamashita, M

    2009-11-23

    It has been suggested that dark matter particles which scatter inelastically from detector target nuclei could explain the apparent incompatibility of the DAMA modulation signal (interpreted as evidence for particle dark matter) with the null results from CDMS-II and XENON10. Among the predictions of inelastically interacting dark matter are a suppression of low-energy events, and a population of nuclear recoil events at higher nuclear recoil equivalent energies. This is in stark contrast to the well-known expectation of a falling exponential spectrum for the case of elastic interactions. We present a new analysis of XENON10 dark matter search data extending to E{sub nr} = 75 keV nuclear recoil equivalent energy. Our results exclude a significant region of previously allowed parameter space in the model of inelastically interacting dark matter. In particular, it is found that dark matter particle masses m{sub x} {approx}> 150 GeV are disfavored.

  19. Ground state potential energy surfaces around selected atoms from resonant inelastic x-ray scattering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schreck, Simon; Pietzsch, Annette; Kennedy, Brian; Såthe, Conny; Miedema, Piter S.; Techert, Simone; Strocov, Vladimir N.; Schmitt, Thorsten; Hennies, Franz; Rubensson, Jan-Erik; Föhlisch, Alexander

    2016-01-01

    Thermally driven chemistry as well as materials’ functionality are determined by the potential energy surface of a systems electronic ground state. This makes the potential energy surface a central and powerful concept in physics, chemistry and materials science. However, direct experimental access to the potential energy surface locally around atomic centers and to its long-range structure are lacking. Here we demonstrate how sub-natural linewidth resonant inelastic soft x-ray scattering at vibrational resolution is utilized to determine ground state potential energy surfaces locally and detect long-range changes of the potentials that are driven by local modifications. We show how the general concept is applicable not only to small isolated molecules such as O2 but also to strongly interacting systems such as the hydrogen bond network in liquid water. The weak perturbation to the potential energy surface through hydrogen bonding is observed as a trend towards softening of the ground state potential around the coordinating atom. The instrumental developments in high resolution resonant inelastic soft x-ray scattering are currently accelerating and will enable broad application of the presented approach. With this multidimensional potential energy surfaces that characterize collective phenomena such as (bio)molecular function or high-temperature superconductivity will become accessible in near future.

  20. Ground state potential energy surfaces around selected atoms from resonant inelastic x-ray scattering.

    PubMed

    Schreck, Simon; Pietzsch, Annette; Kennedy, Brian; Såthe, Conny; Miedema, Piter S; Techert, Simone; Strocov, Vladimir N; Schmitt, Thorsten; Hennies, Franz; Rubensson, Jan-Erik; Föhlisch, Alexander

    2016-01-01

    Thermally driven chemistry as well as materials' functionality are determined by the potential energy surface of a systems electronic ground state. This makes the potential energy surface a central and powerful concept in physics, chemistry and materials science. However, direct experimental access to the potential energy surface locally around atomic centers and to its long-range structure are lacking. Here we demonstrate how sub-natural linewidth resonant inelastic soft x-ray scattering at vibrational resolution is utilized to determine ground state potential energy surfaces locally and detect long-range changes of the potentials that are driven by local modifications. We show how the general concept is applicable not only to small isolated molecules such as O2 but also to strongly interacting systems such as the hydrogen bond network in liquid water. The weak perturbation to the potential energy surface through hydrogen bonding is observed as a trend towards softening of the ground state potential around the coordinating atom. The instrumental developments in high resolution resonant inelastic soft x-ray scattering are currently accelerating and will enable broad application of the presented approach. With this multidimensional potential energy surfaces that characterize collective phenomena such as (bio)molecular function or high-temperature superconductivity will become accessible in near future. PMID:26821751

  1. Ground state potential energy surfaces around selected atoms from resonant inelastic x-ray scattering

    PubMed Central

    Schreck, Simon; Pietzsch, Annette; Kennedy, Brian; Såthe, Conny; Miedema, Piter S.; Techert, Simone; Strocov, Vladimir N.; Schmitt, Thorsten; Hennies, Franz; Rubensson, Jan-Erik; Föhlisch, Alexander

    2016-01-01

    Thermally driven chemistry as well as materials’ functionality are determined by the potential energy surface of a systems electronic ground state. This makes the potential energy surface a central and powerful concept in physics, chemistry and materials science. However, direct experimental access to the potential energy surface locally around atomic centers and to its long-range structure are lacking. Here we demonstrate how sub-natural linewidth resonant inelastic soft x-ray scattering at vibrational resolution is utilized to determine ground state potential energy surfaces locally and detect long-range changes of the potentials that are driven by local modifications. We show how the general concept is applicable not only to small isolated molecules such as O2 but also to strongly interacting systems such as the hydrogen bond network in liquid water. The weak perturbation to the potential energy surface through hydrogen bonding is observed as a trend towards softening of the ground state potential around the coordinating atom. The instrumental developments in high resolution resonant inelastic soft x-ray scattering are currently accelerating and will enable broad application of the presented approach. With this multidimensional potential energy surfaces that characterize collective phenomena such as (bio)molecular function or high-temperature superconductivity will become accessible in near future. PMID:26821751

  2. Heat diffusion in the disordered Fermi and electron liquids: the role of inelastic processes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schwiete, Georg; Finkel'Stein, Alexander

    2015-03-01

    We study thermal transport in the disordered Fermi and electron liquids at low temperatures. Gravitational potentials are used as sources for finding the heat density and its correlation function. For a comprehensive study, we extend the renormalization group (RG) analysis developed for electric transport by including the gravitational potentials into the RG scheme. The analysis reveals that for the disordered Fermi liquid the Wiedemann-Franz law remains valid even in the presence of quantum corrections caused by the interplay of diffusion modes and the electron-electron interaction. In the present scheme this fundamental relation is closely connected with a fixed point in the multi-parametric RG flow of the gravitational potentials. For the disordered electron liquid we additionally analyze inelastic processes induced by the Coulomb interaction at sub-temperature energies. While the general form of the correlation function has to be compatible with energy conservation, these inelastic processes are at the origin of logarithmic corrections violating the Wiedemann-Franz law. The interplay of various terms in the heat density-heat density correlation function therefore differs from that for densities of other conserved quantities, such as total number of particles or spin. A. F. and G. S. acknowledge support by the Alexander von Humboldt foundation. A.F. is supported by the National Science Foundation Grant NSF-DMR-1006752.

  3. Inelastic electron tunneling spectroscopy of local "spin accumulation" devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tinkey, Holly N.; Li, Pengke; Appelbaum, Ian

    2014-06-01

    We investigate the origin of purported "spin accumulation" signals observed in local "three-terminal" (3T) measurements of ferromagnet/insulator/n-Si tunnel junctions using inelastic electron tunneling spectroscopy (IETS). Voltage bias and magnetic field dependences of the IET spectra were found to account for the dominant contribution to 3T magnetoresistance, thus indicating that it arises from inelastic tunneling through impurities and defects at junction interfaces and within the barrier, rather than from spin accumulation due to pure elastic tunneling into bulk Si as has been previously assumed.

  4. Elastic and inelastic scattering of He atoms from Bi(111)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tamtögl, A.; Mayrhofer-Reinhartshuber, M.; Balak, N.; Ernst, W. E.; Rieder, K. H.

    2010-08-01

    Elastic and inelastic scattering of helium atoms has been used to study the Bi(111) surface. Sharp diffraction peaks are found with results in excellent agreement with previous structure determinations of the Bi(111) surface. The rather large first order peaks with respect to the zero order peak indicate a stronger surface corrugation than observed in helium scattering from other metallic surfaces. Time-of-flight spectra of scattered He atoms clearly reveal two inelastic scattering maxima, which allow a first report on phonon creation and annihilation events on the Bi(111) surface. An estimate of the group velocity shows that the phonon creation peak is likely to correspond to a Rayleigh mode.

  5. Inelastic x-ray scattering from phonons under multibeam conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bosak, Alexey; Krisch, Michael

    2007-03-01

    We report on an experimental observation of a previously neglected multibeam contribution to the inelastic x-ray scattering cross section. Its manifestation is a substantial modification of the apparent phonon selection rules when two (or more) reciprocal lattice points are simultaneously intercepted by the Ewald sphere. The observed multibeam contributions can be treated semi-quantitatively in the frame of Renninger’s “simplest approach.” A few corollaries, relevant for experimental work on inelastic scattering from phonons, are presented.

  6. Fusion, deep-inelastic collisions, and neck formation

    SciTech Connect

    Aguiar, C.E.; Barbosa, V.C.; Canto, L.F.; Donangelo, R.

    1988-07-01

    We use the liquid drop model to calculate the cross section for neck formation in a heavy-ion collision and show that for the recently measured /sup 58/Ni+/sup 124/Sn case this cross section is strongly related to the sum of the fusion and deep-inelastic cross sections. We note that the observation of deep-inelastic collisions at sub-Coulomb barrier energies may be classically understood by the effective barrier lowering obtained when the neck degree of freedom is considered.

  7. Inelastic deformation mechanisms in a transverse MMC lamina under compression

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Newaz, Golam M.; Majumdar, Bhaskar S.

    1992-01-01

    An investigation was undertaken to study the inelastic deformation mechanisms in (90)(sub 8) Ti 15-3/SCS-6 lamina subjected to pure compression. Both mechanical behavior and microstructural evaluation were undertaken at room temperature, 538 and 650 C. Results indicate that mechanical response and deformation characteristics are significantly different in monotonic tension and compression. The inelastic deformation mechanisms in compression are controlled by radial fiber fracture, matrix plasticity and fiber-matrix debonding. The radial fiber fracture is a new damage mode observed for metal-matrix composites (MMC).

  8. Spike phase precession persists after transient intrahippocampal perturbation

    PubMed Central

    Zugaro, Michaël B; Monconduit, Lénaïc; Buzsáki, György

    2007-01-01

    Oscillatory spike timing in the hippocampus is regarded as a temporal coding mechanism for space, but the underlying mechanisms are poorly understood. To contrast the predictions of the different models of phase precession, we transiently turned off neuronal discharges for up to 250 ms and reset the phase of theta oscillations by stimulating the commissural pathway in rats. After recovery from silence, phase precession continued. The phase of spikes for the first theta cycle after the perturbation was more advanced than the phase of spikes for the last theta cycle just before the perturbation. These findings indicate that phase advancement that emerges within hippocampal circuitry may be updated at the beginning of each theta cycle by extrahippocampal inputs. PMID:15592464

  9. Implementation and evaluation of an interictal spike detector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Horak, Peter C.; Meisenhelter, Stephen; Testorf, Markus E.; Connolly, Andrew C.; Davis, Kathryn A.; Jobst, Barbara C.

    2015-09-01

    The detection of epileptiform activity, such as interictal spikes, in electrical brain recordings has important clinical and research applications. Identification of interictal spikes is often carried out manually by trained neurologists. It is a time-consuming process and can exhibit variability between experts. In this work, we develop and evaluate an automated spike detector. We implement a template-matching approach and improve its accuracy on one set of recordings using a supervised machine-learning algorithm. Evaluation with two independent datasets shows the template-matching detector to perform comparably with experts and the version augmented with a classifier. In one test dataset, variations of the detection threshold partially explain discrepancies between experts. In the other, the detector demonstrates similar behavior to an existing algorithm developed with this dataset.

  10. Automatic classification of penicillin-induced epileptic EEG spikes.

    PubMed

    Kortelainen, Jukka; Silfverhuth, Minna; Suominen, Kalervo; Sonkajarvi, Eila; Alahuhta, Seppo; Jantti, Ville; Seppanen, Tapio

    2010-01-01

    Penicillin-induced focal epilepsy is a well-known model in epilepsy research. In this model, epileptic activity is generated by delivering penicillin focally to the cortex. The drug induces interictal electroencephalographic (EEG) spikes which evolve in time and may later change to ictal discharges. This paper proposes a method for automatic classification of these interictal epileptic spikes using iterative K-means clustering. The method is shown to be able to detect different spike waveforms and describe their characteristic occurrence in time during penicillin-induced focal epilepsy. The study offers potential for future research by providing a method to objectively and quantitatively analyze the time sequence of interictal epileptic activity. PMID:21096740

  11. Shifting Spike Times or Adding and Deleting Spikes-How Different Types of Noise Shape Signal Transmission in Neural Populations.

    PubMed

    Voronenko, Sergej O; Stannat, Wilhelm; Lindner, Benjamin

    2015-12-01

    We study a population of spiking neurons which are subject to independent noise processes and a strong common time-dependent input. We show that the response of output spikes to independent noise shapes information transmission of such populations even when information transmission properties of single neurons are left unchanged. In particular, we consider two Poisson models in which independent noise either (i) adds and deletes spikes (AD model) or (ii) shifts spike times (STS model). We show that in both models suprathreshold stochastic resonance (SSR) can be observed, where the information transmitted by a neural population is increased with addition of independent noise. In the AD model, the presence of the SSR effect is robust and independent of the population size or the noise spectral statistics. In the STS model, the information transmission properties of the population are determined by the spectral statistics of the noise, leading to a strongly increased effect of SSR in some regimes, or an absence of SSR in others. Furthermore, we observe a high-pass filtering of information in the STS model that is absent in the AD model. We quantify information transmission by means of the lower bound on the mutual information rate and the spectral coherence function. To this end, we derive the signal-output cross-spectrum, the output power spectrum, and the cross-spectrum of two spike trains for both models analytically. PMID:26458900

  12. A point process framework for relating neural spiking activity to spiking history, neural ensemble, and extrinsic covariate effects.

    PubMed

    Truccolo, Wilson; Eden, Uri T; Fellows, Matthew R; Donoghue, John P; Brown, Emery N

    2005-02-01

    Multiple factors simultaneously affect the spiking activity of individual neurons. Determining the effects and relative importance of these factors is a challenging problem in neurophysiology. We propose a statistical framework based on the point process likelihood function to relate a neuron's spiking probability to three typical covariates: the neuron's own spiking history, concurrent ensemble activity, and extrinsic covariates such as stimuli or behavior. The framework uses parametric models of the conditional intensity function to define a neuron's spiking probability in terms of the covariates. The discrete time likelihood function for point processes is used to carry out model fitting and model analysis. We show that, by modeling the logarithm of the conditional intensity function as a linear combination of functions of the covariates, the discrete time point process likelihood function is readily analyzed in the generalized linear model (GLM) framework. We illustrate our approach for both GLM and non-GLM likelihood functions using simulated data and multivariate single-unit activity data simultaneously recorded from the motor cortex of a monkey performing a visuomotor pursuit-tracking task. The point process framework provides a flexible, computationally efficient approach for maximum likelihood estimation, goodness-of-fit assessment, residual analysis, model selection, and neural decoding. The framework thus allows for the formulation and analysis of point process models of neural spiking activity that readily capture the simultaneous effects of multiple covariates and enables the assessment of their relative importance. PMID:15356183

  13. Upper Limb Biomechanics During the Volleyball Serve and Spike

    PubMed Central

    Reeser, Jonathan C.; Fleisig, Glenn S.; Bolt, Becky; Ruan, Mianfang

    2010-01-01

    Background: The shoulder is the third-most commonly injured body part in volleyball, with the majority of shoulder problems resulting from chronic overuse. Hypothesis: Significant kinetic differences exist among specific types of volleyball serves and spikes. Study Design: Controlled laboratory study. Methods: Fourteen healthy female collegiate volleyball players performed 5 successful trials of 4 skills: 2 directional spikes, an off-speed roll shot, and the float serve. Volunteers who were competent in jump serves (n, 5) performed 5 trials of that skill. A 240-Hz 3-dimensional automatic digitizing system captured each trial. Multivariate analysis of variance and post hoc paired t tests were used to compare kinetic parameters for the shoulder and elbow across all the skills (except the jump serve). A similar statistical analysis was performed for upper extremity kinematics. Results: Forces, torques, and angular velocities at the shoulder and elbow were lowest for the roll shot and second-lowest for the float serve. No differences were detected between the cross-body and straight-ahead spikes. Although there was an insufficient number of participants to statistically analyze the jump serve, the data for it appear similar to those of the cross-body and straight-ahead spikes. Shoulder abduction at the instant of ball contact was approximately 130° for all skills, which is substantially greater than that previously reported for female athletes performing tennis serves or baseball pitches. Conclusion: Because shoulder kinetics were greatest during spiking, the volleyball player with symptoms of shoulder overuse may wish to reduce the number of repetitions performed during practice. Limiting the number of jump serves may also reduce the athlete’s risk of overuse-related shoulder dysfunction. Clinical Relevance: Volleyball-specific overhead skills, such as the spike and serve, produce considerable upper extremity force and torque, which may contribute to the risk of

  14. Highly connected neurons spike less frequently in balanced networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pyle, Ryan; Rosenbaum, Robert

    2016-04-01

    Biological neuronal networks exhibit highly variable spiking activity. Balanced networks offer a parsimonious model of this variability in which strong excitatory synaptic inputs are canceled by strong inhibitory inputs on average, and irregular spiking activity is driven by fluctuating synaptic currents. Most previous studies of balanced networks assume a homogeneous or distance-dependent connectivity structure, but connectivity in biological cortical networks is more intricate. We use a heterogeneous mean-field theory of balanced networks to show that heterogeneous in-degrees can break balance. Moreover, heterogeneous architectures that achieve balance promote lower firing rates in neurons with larger in-degrees, consistent with some recent experimental observations.

  15. MASPINN: novel concepts for a neuroaccelerator for spiking neural networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schoenauer, T.; Mehrtash, N.; Jahnke, Andreas; Klar, H.

    1999-03-01

    We present the basic architecture of a Memory Optimized Accelerator for Spiking Neural Networks. The accelerator architecture exploits two novel concepts for an efficient computation of spiking neural networks: weight caching and a compressed memory organization. These concepts allow a further parallelization in processing and reduce bandwidth requirements on accelerator's components. Therefore, they pave the way to dedicated digital hardware for real-time computation of more complex networks of pulse-coded neurons in the order of 106 neurons. The programmable neuron model which the accelerator is based on is described extensively. This shall encourage a discussion and suggestions on features which would be desirable to add to the current model.

  16. Spike timing and visual processing in the retinogeniculocortical pathway.

    PubMed Central

    Usrey, W Martin

    2002-01-01

    Although the visual response properties of neurons along the retinogeniculocortical pathway have been studied for decades, relatively few studies have examined how individual neurons along the pathway communicate with each other. Recent studies in the cat (Felis domestica) now show that the strength of these connections is very dynamic and spike timing plays an important part in determining whether action potentials will be transferred from pre- to postsynaptic cells. This review explores recent progress in our understanding of what role spike timing has in establishing different patterns of geniculate activity and how these patterns ultimately drive the cortex. PMID:12626007

  17. Saturation of the leading spike growth in backward Raman amplifiers

    SciTech Connect

    Malkin, V. M.; Fisch, N. J.; Toroker, Z.

    2014-09-15

    Backward Raman amplification of laser pulses in plasmas can produce nearly relativistic unfocused output intensities and multi-exawatt powers in compact devices. The largest achievable intensity depends on which of major competitive processes set this limit. It is shown here that the relativistic electron nonlinearity can cause saturation of the leading amplified spike intensity before filamentation instabilities develop. A simple analytical model for the saturation, which supports numerical simulations, is suggested. The upper limit for the leading output spike unfocused intensity is calculated.

  18. Local Variation of Hashtag Spike Trains and Popularity in Twitter

    PubMed Central

    Sanlı, Ceyda; Lambiotte, Renaud

    2015-01-01

    We draw a parallel between hashtag time series and neuron spike trains. In each case, the process presents complex dynamic patterns including temporal correlations, burstiness, and all other types of nonstationarity. We propose the adoption of the so-called local variation in order to uncover salient dynamical properties, while properly detrending for the time-dependent features of a signal. The methodology is tested on both real and randomized hashtag spike trains, and identifies that popular hashtags present regular and so less bursty behavior, suggesting its potential use for predicting online popularity in social media. PMID:26161650

  19. Local Variation of Hashtag Spike Trains and Popularity in Twitter.

    PubMed

    Sanlı, Ceyda; Lambiotte, Renaud

    2015-01-01

    We draw a parallel between hashtag time series and neuron spike trains. In each case, the process presents complex dynamic patterns including temporal correlations, burstiness, and all other types of nonstationarity. We propose the adoption of the so-called local variation in order to uncover salient dynamical properties, while properly detrending for the time-dependent features of a signal. The methodology is tested on both real and randomized hashtag spike trains, and identifies that popular hashtags present regular and so less bursty behavior, suggesting its potential use for predicting online popularity in social media. PMID:26161650

  20. SPIKE: Application for ASTRO-D mission planning

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Isobe, T.; Johnston, M.; Morgan, E.; Clark, G.

    1992-01-01

    SPIKE is a mission planning software system developed by a team of programmers at the STScI for use with the Hubble Space Telescope (HST). SPIKE has been developed for the purpose of automating observatory scheduling to increase the effective utilization and ultimately, scientific return from orbiting telescopes. High-level scheduling strategies using both rule-based and neural network approaches have been incorporated. Graphical displays of activities, constraints, and schedules are an important feature of the system. Although SPIKE was originally developed for the HST, it can be used for other astronomy missions including ground-based observatories. One of the missions that has decided to use SPIKE is ASTRO-D, a Japanese X-ray satellite for which the U.S. is providing a part of the scientific payload. Scheduled to fly in Feb. 1993, its four telescopes will focus X-rays over a wide energy range onto CCD's and imaging gas proportional counters. ASTRO-D will be the first X-ray imaging mission operating over the 0.5-12 keV band with high energy resolution. This combination of capabilities will enable a varied and exciting program of astronomical research to be carried out. ASTRO-D is expected to observe 5 to 20 objects per day and a total of several thousands per year. This requires the implementation of an efficient planning and scheduling system which SPIKE can provide. Although the version of SPIKE that will be used for ASTRO-D mission is almost identical to that used for the HST, there are a few differences. For example, ASTRO-D will use two ground stations for data downlinks, instead of the TDRSS system for data transmission. As a consequence ASTRO-D is constrained by limited on-board data storage capacity to schedule high data-rate observations during periods of frequent high bit rate observations accordingly. We will demonstrate the ASTRO-D version of SPIKE to show what SPIKE can provide and how efficiently it creates an observational schedule.

  1. A Spiking Neural Network in sEMG Feature Extraction.

    PubMed

    Lobov, Sergey; Mironov, Vasiliy; Kastalskiy, Innokentiy; Kazantsev, Victor

    2015-01-01

    We have developed a novel algorithm for sEMG feature extraction and classification. It is based on a hybrid network composed of spiking and artificial neurons. The spiking neuron layer with mutual inhibition was assigned as feature extractor. We demonstrate that the classification accuracy of the proposed model could reach high values comparable with existing sEMG interface systems. Moreover, the algorithm sensibility for different sEMG collecting systems characteristics was estimated. Results showed rather equal accuracy, despite a significant sampling rate difference. The proposed algorithm was successfully tested for mobile robot control. PMID:26540060

  2. Highly connected neurons spike less frequently in balanced networks.

    PubMed

    Pyle, Ryan; Rosenbaum, Robert

    2016-04-01

    Biological neuronal networks exhibit highly variable spiking activity. Balanced networks offer a parsimonious model of this variability in which strong excitatory synaptic inputs are canceled by strong inhibitory inputs on average, and irregular spiking activity is driven by fluctuating synaptic currents. Most previous studies of balanced networks assume a homogeneous or distance-dependent connectivity structure, but connectivity in biological cortical networks is more intricate. We use a heterogeneous mean-field theory of balanced networks to show that heterogeneous in-degrees can break balance. Moreover, heterogeneous architectures that achieve balance promote lower firing rates in neurons with larger in-degrees, consistent with some recent experimental observations. PMID:27176240

  3. Stochastic optimal control of single neuron spike trains

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Iolov, Alexandre; Ditlevsen, Susanne; Longtin, André

    2014-08-01

    Objective. External control of spike times in single neurons can reveal important information about a neuron's sub-threshold dynamics that lead to spiking, and has the potential to improve brain-machine interfaces and neural prostheses. The goal of this paper is the design of optimal electrical stimulation of a neuron to achieve a target spike train under the physiological constraint to not damage tissue. Approach. We pose a stochastic optimal control problem to precisely specify the spike times in a leaky integrate-and-fire (LIF) model of a neuron with noise assumed to be of intrinsic or synaptic origin. In particular, we allow for the noise to be of arbitrary intensity. The optimal control problem is solved using dynamic programming when the controller has access to the voltage (closed-loop control), and using a maximum principle for the transition density when the controller only has access to the spike times (open-loop control). Main results. We have developed a stochastic optimal control algorithm to obtain precise spike times. It is applicable in both the supra-threshold and sub-threshold regimes, under open-loop and closed-loop conditions and with an arbitrary noise intensity; the accuracy of control degrades with increasing intensity of the noise. Simulations show that our algorithms produce the desired results for the LIF model, but also for the case where the neuron dynamics are given by more complex models than the LIF model. This is illustrated explicitly using the Morris-Lecar spiking neuron model, for which an LIF approximation is first obtained from a spike sequence using a previously published method. We further show that a related control strategy based on the assumption that there is no noise performs poorly in comparison to our noise-based strategies. The algorithms are numerically intensive and may require efficiency refinements to achieve real-time control; in particular, the open-loop context is more numerically demanding than the closed

  4. A Spiking Neural Network in sEMG Feature Extraction

    PubMed Central

    Lobov, Sergey; Mironov, Vasiliy; Kastalskiy, Innokentiy; Kazantsev, Victor

    2015-01-01

    We have developed a novel algorithm for sEMG feature extraction and classification. It is based on a hybrid network composed of spiking and artificial neurons. The spiking neuron layer with mutual inhibition was assigned as feature extractor. We demonstrate that the classification accuracy of the proposed model could reach high values comparable with existing sEMG interface systems. Moreover, the algorithm sensibility for different sEMG collecting systems characteristics was estimated. Results showed rather equal accuracy, despite a significant sampling rate difference. The proposed algorithm was successfully tested for mobile robot control. PMID:26540060

  5. Spiked Alloy Production for Accelerated Aging of Plutonium

    SciTech Connect

    Wilk, P A; McNeese, J A; Dodson, K E; Williams, W L; Krikorian, O H; Blau, M S; Schmitz, J E; Bajao, F G; Mew, D A; Matz, T E; Torres, R A; Holck, D M; Moody, K J; Kenneally, J M

    2009-07-10

    The accelerated aging effects on weapons grade plutonium alloys are being studied using {sup 238}Pu-enriched plutonium metal to increase the rate of formation of defect structures. Pyrochemical processing methods have been used to produce two {sup 238}Pu-spiked plutonium alloys with nominal compositions of 7.5 wt% {sup 238}Pu. Processes used in the preparation of the alloys include direct oxide reduction of PuO{sub 2} with calcium and electrorefining. Rolled disks were prepared from the spiked alloys for sampling. Test specimens were cut out of the disks for physical property measurements.

  6. The Inelastic Instrument suite at the SNS

    SciTech Connect

    Granroth, Garrett E; Abernathy, Douglas L; Ehlers, Georg; Hagen, Mark E; Herwig, Kenneth W; Mamontov, Eugene; Ohl, Michael E; Wildgruber, Christoph U

    2008-01-01

    Abstract The instruments in the extensive suite of spectrometers at the SNS are in various stages of installation and commissioning. The Back Scattering Spectrometer (BASIS) is installed and is in commissioning. It's near backscattering analyzer crystals provide the 3 eV resolution as expected. BASIS will enter the user program in the fall of 2007. The ARCS wide angular-range thermal to epithermal neutron spectrometer will come on line in the fall of 2007 followed shortly by the Cold Neutron Chopper Spectrometer. These two direct geometry instruments provide moderate resolution and the ability to trade resolution for flux. In addition both instruments have detector coverage out to 140o to provide a large Q range. The SEQUOIA spectrometer, complete in 2008, is the direct geometry instrument that will provide fine resolution in the thermal to epithermal range. The Spin-Echo spectrometer, to be completed on a similar time scale, will provide the finest energy resolution worldwide. The HYSPEC spectrometer, available no later than 2011, will provide polarized capabilities and optimized flux in the thermal energy range. Finally, the Vision chemical spectrometer will use crystal analyzers to study energy transfers into the epithermal range

  7. Toxicity of nickel-spiked freshwater sediments to benthic invertebrates-Spiking methodology, species sensitivity, and nickel bioavailability

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Besser, John M.; Brumbaugh, William G.; Kemble, Nile E.; Ivey, Chris D.; Kunz, James L.; Ingersoll, Christopher G.; Rudel, David

    2011-01-01

    This report summarizes data from studies of the toxicity and bioavailability of nickel in nickel-spiked freshwater sediments. The goal of these studies was to generate toxicity and chemistry data to support development of broadly applicable sediment quality guidelines for nickel. The studies were conducted as three tasks, which are presented here as three chapters: Task 1, Development of methods for preparation and toxicity testing of nickel-spiked freshwater sediments; Task 2, Sensitivity of benthic invertebrates to toxicity of nickel-spiked freshwater sediments; and Task 3, Effect of sediment characteristics on nickel bioavailability. Appendices with additional methodological details and raw chemistry and toxicity data for the three tasks are available online at http://pubs.usgs.gov/sir/2011/5225/downloads/.

  8. Analysis of the effects of periodic forcing in the spike rate and spike correlation's in semiconductor lasers with optical feedback

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Quintero-Quiroz, C.; Sorrentino, Taciano; Torrent, M. C.; Masoller, Cristina

    2016-04-01

    We study the dynamics of semiconductor lasers with optical feedback and direct current modulation, operating in the regime of low frequency fluctuations (LFFs). In the LFF regime the laser intensity displays abrupt spikes: the intensity drops to zero and then gradually recovers. We focus on the inter-spike-intervals (ISIs) and use a method of symbolic time-series analysis, which is based on computing the probabilities of symbolic patterns. We show that the variation of the probabilities of the symbols with the modulation frequency and with the intrinsic spike rate of the laser allows to identify different regimes of noisy locking. Simulations of the Lang-Kobayashi model are in good qualitative agreement with experimental observations.

  9. HCN channels enhance spike phase coherence and regulate the phase of spikes and LFPs in the theta-frequency range.

    PubMed

    Sinha, Manisha; Narayanan, Rishikesh

    2015-04-28

    What are the implications for the existence of subthreshold ion channels, their localization profiles, and plasticity on local field potentials (LFPs)? Here, we assessed the role of hyperpolarization-activated cyclic-nucleotide-gated (HCN) channels in altering hippocampal theta-frequency LFPs and the associated spike phase. We presented spatiotemporally randomized, balanced theta-modulated excitatory and inhibitory inputs to somatically aligned, morphologically realistic pyramidal neuron models spread across a cylindrical neuropil. We computed LFPs from seven electrode sites and found that the insertion of an experimentally constrained HCN-conductance gradient into these neurons introduced a location-dependent lead in the LFP phase without significantly altering its amplitude. Further, neurons fired action potentials at a specific theta phase of the LFP, and the insertion of HCN channels introduced large lags in this spike phase and a striking enhancement in neuronal spike-phase coherence. Importantly, graded changes in either HCN conductance or its half-maximal activation voltage resulted in graded changes in LFP and spike phases. Our conclusions on the impact of HCN channels on LFPs and spike phase were invariant to changes in neuropil size, to morphological heterogeneity, to excitatory or inhibitory synaptic scaling, and to shifts in the onset phase of inhibitory inputs. Finally, we selectively abolished the inductive lead in the impedance phase introduced by HCN channels without altering neuronal excitability and found that this inductive phase lead contributed significantly to changes in LFP and spike phase. Our results uncover specific roles for HCN channels and their plasticity in phase-coding schemas and in the formation and dynamic reconfiguration of neuronal cell assemblies. PMID:25870302

  10. A Model-Based Spike Sorting Algorithm for Removing Correlation Artifacts in Multi-Neuron Recordings

    PubMed Central

    Chichilnisky, E. J.; Simoncelli, Eero P.

    2013-01-01

    We examine the problem of estimating the spike trains of multiple neurons from voltage traces recorded on one or more extracellular electrodes. Traditional spike-sorting methods rely on thresholding or clustering of recorded signals to identify spikes. While these methods can detect a large fraction of the spikes from a recording, they generally fail to identify synchronous or near-synchronous spikes: cases in which multiple spikes overlap. Here we investigate the geometry of failures in traditional sorting algorithms, and document the prevalence of such errors in multi-electrode recordings from primate retina. We then develop a method for multi-neuron spike sorting using a model that explicitly accounts for the superposition of spike waveforms. We model the recorded voltage traces as a linear combination of spike waveforms plus a stochastic background component of correlated Gaussian noise. Combining this measurement model with a Bernoulli prior over binary spike trains yields a posterior distribution for spikes given the recorded data. We introduce a greedy algorithm to maximize this posterior that we call “binary pursuit”. The algorithm allows modest variability in spike waveforms and recovers spike times with higher precision than the voltage sampling rate. This method substantially corrects cross-correlation artifacts that arise with conventional methods, and substantially outperforms clustering methods on both real and simulated data. Finally, we develop diagnostic tools that can be used to assess errors in spike sorting in the absence of ground truth. PMID:23671583

  11. Some comments about polarization in deep inelastic processes

    SciTech Connect

    Bajpai, R.P.

    1983-01-01

    One can fit baryon production in deep inelastic processes in terms of baryon fragmentation functions. It appears that for z > 0.3, the individual quark materializes into a baryon by picking up the appropriate diquark. The spin and isospin properties of the diquark will give definite asymmetry in baryon production in terms of only three unknown parameters. 4 references, 1 table.

  12. Benchmarking the inelastic neutron scattering soil carbon method

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The herein described inelastic neutron scattering (INS) method of measuring soil carbon was based on a new procedure for extracting the net carbon signal (NCS) from the measured gamma spectra and determination of the average carbon weight percent (AvgCw%) in the upper soil layer (~8 cm). The NCS ext...

  13. [12th International workshop on Inelastic Ion-Surface Collisions

    SciTech Connect

    Rabalais, J.W.; Nordlander, P.

    1999-10-15

    The twelfth international workshop on inelastic ion surface collisions was held at the Bahia Mar Resort and Conference Center on South Padre Island, Texas (USA) from January 24-29, 1999. The workshop brought together most of the leading researchers from around the world to focus on both the theoretical and experimental aspects of particle - surface interactions and related topics.

  14. In-situ soil carbon analysis using inelastic neutron scattering

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    In situ soil carbon analysis using inelastic neutron scattering (INS) is based on the emission of 4.43 MeV gamma rays from carbon nuclei excited by fast neutrons. This in-situ method has excellent potential for easily measuring soil carbon since it does not require soil core sampling and processing ...

  15. Advanced Undergraduate Laboratory Experiment in Inelastic Electron Tunneling Spectroscopy.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    White, H. W.; Graves, R. J.

    1982-01-01

    An advanced undergraduate laboratory experiment in inelastic electron tunneling spectroscopy is described. Tunnel junctions were fabricated, the tunneling spectra of several molecules absorbed on the surface of aluminum oxide measured, and mode assignments made for several of the prominent peaks in spectra using results obtained from optical…

  16. Energy dependence of pion inelastic scattering from sup 208 Pb

    SciTech Connect

    Oakley, D.S. Lewis and Clark College, Portland, Oregon ); Peterson, R.J. ); Seestrom, S.J.; Morris, C.L.; Plum, M.A. ); Zumbro, J.D. ); Williams, A.L.; Bryan, M.A.; McDonald, J.W.; Moore, C.F. )

    1991-11-01

    Differential cross sections were measured for pion elastic and inelastic scattering from {sup 208}Pb at {ital T}{sub {pi}}=120 and 250 MeV. Energy-dependent neutron- and proton-transition matrix elements for a range of excited states were extracted and tested for consistency, using several structure models.

  17. Large volume high-pressure cell for inelastic neutron scattering.

    PubMed

    Wang, W; Sokolov, D A; Huxley, A D; Kamenev, K V

    2011-07-01

    Inelastic neutron scattering measurements typically require two orders of magnitude longer data collection times and larger sample sizes than neutron diffraction studies. Inelastic neutron scattering measurements on pressurised samples are particularly challenging since standard high-pressure apparatus restricts sample volume, attenuates the incident and scattered beams, and contributes background scattering. Here, we present the design of a large volume two-layered piston-cylinder pressure cell with optimised transmission for inelastic neutron scattering experiments. The design and the materials selected for the construction of the cell enable its safe use to a pressure of 1.8 GPa with a sample volume in excess of 400 mm(3). The design of the piston seal eliminates the need for a sample container, thus providing a larger sample volume and reduced absorption. The integrated electrical plug with a manganin pressure gauge offers an accurate measurement of pressure over the whole range of operational temperatures. The performance of the cell is demonstrated by an inelastic neutron scattering study of UGe(2). PMID:21806195

  18. Inelastically scattering particles and wealth distribution in an open economy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Slanina, František

    2004-04-01

    Using the analogy with inelastic granular gases we introduce a model for wealth exchange in society. The dynamics is governed by a kinetic equation, which allows for self-similar solutions. The scaling function has a power-law tail, the exponent being given by a transcendental equation. In the limit of continuous trading, a closed form of the wealth distribution is calculated analytically.

  19. Azimuthal decorrelation of forward jets in deep inelastic scattering

    SciTech Connect

    Sabio Vera, Agustin; Schwennsen, Florian

    2008-01-01

    We study the azimuthal angle decorrelation of forward jets in deep inelastic scattering. We make predictions for this observable at HERA describing the high energy limit of the relevant scattering amplitudes with quasi-multi-Regge kinematics together with a collinearly-improved evolution kernel for multiparton emissions.

  20. Resonant inelastic x-ray scattering from molecules and atoms

    SciTech Connect

    Arp, U.; Deslattes, R.D.; Miyano, K.E.; Southworth, S.H.

    1995-12-31

    X-ray fluorescence spectroscopy is one of the most powerful methods for the understanding of the electronic structure of matter. We report here on fluorescence experiments in the 2 to 6 keV photon energy range using tunable synchrotron radiation and the resulting experimental programs on resonant inelastic scattering in atoms and on polarization measurements in resonant molecular excitations.

  1. Inelastic X-ray Scattering Studies of Electronic Excitations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ishii, Kenji; Tohyama, Takami; Mizuki, Jun'ichiro

    2013-02-01

    Inelastic x-ray scattering (IXS) has developed into one of the most powerful momentum-resolved spectroscopies. Especially in the last decade, it has achieved significant progress utilizing brilliant x-rays from third-generation synchrotron radiation facilities. Simultaneously, theoretical efforts have been made to predict or interpret the experimental spectra. One of the scientific fields studied intensively by IXS is strongly correlated electron systems, where the interplay of charge, spin, and orbital degrees of freedom determines their physical properties. IXS can provide a new insight into the electron dynamics of the systems through the observation of charge, spin, and orbital excitations. Focusing on the momentum-resolved electronic excitations in strongly correlated electron systems, we review IXS studies and the present capabilities of IXS for the study of the dynamics of materials. With nonresonant inelastic x-ray scattering (NIXS), one can directly obtain dynamical charge correlation and we discuss its complementary aspects with inelastic neutron scattering. NIXS also has a unique capability of measuring higher multipole transitions, which are usually forbidden in conventional optical absorption. Resonant inelastic x-ray scattering (RIXS) is now established as a valuable tool for measuring charge, spin, and orbital excitations in a momentum-resolved manner. We describe RIXS works on cuprates in detail and show what kind of electronic excitations have been observed. We also discuss RIXS studies on other transition-metal compounds. Finally, we conclude with an outlook on IXS using next-generation x-ray sources.

  2. Advanced methods for 3-D inelastic structural analysis for hot engine structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chamis, C. C.

    1989-01-01

    Three-dimensional Inelastic Analysis Methods are described. These methods were incorporated into a series of new computer codes embodying a progression of mathematical models (mechanics of materials, specialty finite element, boundary element) for streamlined analysis of hot engine structures such as: (1) combustor liners, (2) turbine blades, and (3) turbine vanes. These models address the effects of high temperatures and thermal/mechanical loadings on the local (stress/strain) and global (displacements, frequencies, amplitudes, buckling) structural behavior of the three respective components. The methods and the three computer codes, referred to as MOMM (Mechanics Of Materials Model), MHOST (MARC-Hot Section Technology), and BEST3D (Boundary Element Stress Technology), have been developed and are briefly described.

  3. Antimony vibrations in skutterudites probed by 121Sb nuclear inelastic scattering

    SciTech Connect

    Wille, H. -C.; Hermann, R. P.; Sergueev, I.; Leupold, O.; van der Linden, P.; Sales, Brian C; Grandjean, F.; Long, G. J.; Ruffer, R.; Shvyd'ko, Yu. V.

    2007-01-01

    The antimony specific lattice dynamic properties in the unfilled and filled EuFe4Sb12 skutterudites have been determined by nuclear inelastic scattering at the 121Sb nuclear resonance energy of 37.1298(2) keV with a 4.5 meV high-resolution backscattering sapphire monochromator. The Sb partial vibrational density of states, DOS, shows a maximum centered at 17 and 16 meV in CoSb3 and EuFe4Sb12, respectively. The difference in the Sb DOS of CoSb3 and EuFe4Sb12 reveals that upon filling a transfer of 10% of the vibrational states towards lower energy occurs. Further, a likely indication of the coupling between the guest and the host lattice in rattler systems is observed, a coupling that is required to reduce the lattice thermal conductivity.

  4. Model of a thermo-elastic-inelastic process with large deformations and structural changes in material

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rogovoi, A. A.

    2015-09-01

    The dependence of a scalar measure of the structural changes occurring in a material under plastic deformation on a plastic strain measure and the dependence of a free energy measure on a structural change measure are constructed using experimental data that allow the expended plastic work to be divided into a latent part and a thermal part. The obtained dependences, kinematic relations, a constitutive equation, and a heat-conduction equation that satisfy the principles of thermodynamics and objectivity are used to construct a model of thermo-elastic-inelastic processes in the presence of finite deformations and structural changes in the material. The model is tested on the problem of temperature changes in the process of adiabatic elastic-plastic compression, which has experimental support.

  5. Experimental and Computational Studies on Collective Hydrogen Dynamics in Ammonia Borane: Incoherent Inelastic Neutron Scattering

    SciTech Connect

    Kathmann, Shawn M.; Parvanov, Vencislav M.; Schenter, Gregory K.; Stowe, Ashley C.; Daemen, Luke L.; Hartl, Monika A.; Linehan, John C.; Hess, Nancy J.; Karkamkar, Abhijeet J.; Autrey, Thomas

    2009-02-26

    Incoherent inelastic neutron scattering can be used as a sensitive probe of the vibrational dynamics in chemical hydrogen storage materials. Thermal neutron energy loss measurements at 10K are presented and compared to the vibrational power spectrum calculated using ab initio molecular dynamics of pure and deuterated ammonia borane (NH3BH3, NH3BD3, and ND3BH3). A harmonic vibrational analysis on NH3BH3 clusters was also explored to check for consistency with experiment and the power spectrum. The measured neutron spectra and computed ab initio power spectrum compare extremely well (50 to 500 cm-1) and some assignment of modes to simple motion is possible, however, it is found that the lowest modes (below 250 cm-1) are dominated by collective motion. This work was supported by the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE) Office of Basic Energy Sciences, Chemical Sciences program. The Pacific Northwest National Laboratory is operated by Battelle for DOE.

  6. Phonon density of states of α - and δ -plutonium by inelastic x-ray scattering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Manley, M. E.; Said, A. H.; Fluss, M. J.; Wall, M.; Lashley, J. C.; Alatas, A.; Moore, K. T.; Shvyd'Ko, Yu.

    2009-02-01

    Inelastic x-ray scattering measurements of the phonon density of states (DOS) were performed on polycrystalline samples of pure α-Pu and δ-Pu0.98Ga0.02 at room temperature. The heat capacity of α-Pu is well reproduced by contributions calculated from the measured phonon DOS plus conventional thermal-expansion and electronic contributions, showing that α-Pu is a “well-behaved” metal in this regard. A comparison of the phonon DOS of the two phases at room temperature showed that the vibrational entropy difference between them is only a quarter of the total entropy difference expected from known thermodynamic measurements. The missing entropy is too large to be accounted for by conventional electronic entropy and evidence from the literature rules out a contribution from spin fluctuations. Possible alternative sources for the missing entropy are discussed.

  7. Inelastic, nonlinear analysis of stiffened shells of revolution by numerical integration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Levine, H. S.; Svalbonas, V.

    1974-01-01

    This paper describes the latest addition to the STARS system of computer programs, STARS-2P, for the plastic, large deflection analysis of axisymmetrically loaded shells of revolution. The STARS system uses a numerical integration scheme to solve the governing differential equations. Several unique features for shell of revolution programs that are included in the STARS-2P program are described. These include orthotropic nonlinear kinematic hardening theory, a variety of shell wall cross sections and discrete ring stiffeners, cyclic and nonproportional mechanical and thermal loading capability, the coupled axisymmetric large deflection elasto-plastic torsion problem, an extensive restart option, arbitrary branching capability, and the provision for the inelastic treatment of smeared stiffeners, isogrid, and waffle wall constructions. To affirm the validity of the results, comparisons with available theoretical and experimental data are presented.

  8. Inelastic neutron scatter iron concentrations of the moon from orbital gamma ray data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Davis, P. A., Jr.; Bielefeld, M. J.

    1981-01-01

    The considered investigation is concerned with the relation between KREEP and thermal neutron flux depression. The Fe(n, n-prime gamma) concentrations of selected lunar regions were calculated by energy-band analysis of the 0.803-0.872 MeV band. The result of the investigation will be used to evaluate the reliability of the previously determined Fe(n, gamma) values. A 0.803-0.872 MeV band was isolated from the Apollo 15 and 16 orbital gamma ray spectra. Preliminary regression analysis of regional ground truth count rates and Fe concentrations showed this energy interval to be optimum for the 0.8467 MeV inelastic scatter (n, n-prime gamma)Fe peak.

  9. Dendritic spikes enhance stimulus selectivity in cortical neurons in vivo.

    PubMed

    Smith, Spencer L; Smith, Ikuko T; Branco, Tiago; Häusser, Michael

    2013-11-01

    Neuronal dendrites are electrically excitable: they can generate regenerative events such as dendritic spikes in response to sufficiently strong synaptic input. Although such events have been observed in many neuronal types, it is not well understood how active dendrites contribute to the tuning of neuronal output in vivo. Here we show that dendritic spikes increase the selectivity of neuronal responses to the orientation of a visual stimulus (orientation tuning). We performed direct patch-clamp recordings from the dendrites of pyramidal neurons in the primary visual cortex of lightly anaesthetized and awake mice, during sensory processing. Visual stimulation triggered regenerative local dendritic spikes that were distinct from back-propagating action potentials. These events were orientation tuned and were suppressed by either hyperpolarization of membrane potential or intracellular blockade of NMDA (N-methyl-d-aspartate) receptors. Both of these manipulations also decreased the selectivity of subthreshold orientation tuning measured at the soma, thus linking dendritic regenerative events to somatic orientation tuning. Together, our results suggest that dendritic spikes that are triggered by visual input contribute to a fundamental cortical computation: enhancing orientation selectivity in the visual cortex. Thus, dendritic excitability is an essential component of behaviourally relevant computations in neurons. PMID:24162850

  10. Serotonin shifts first-spike latencies of inferior colliculus neurons.

    PubMed

    Hurley, Laura M; Pollak, George D

    2005-08-24

    Many studies of neuromodulators have focused on changes in the magnitudes of neural responses, but fewer studies have examined neuromodulator effects on response latency. Across sensory systems, response latency is important for encoding not only the temporal structure but also the identity of stimuli. In the auditory system, latency is a fundamental response property that varies with many features of sound, including intensity, frequency, and duration. To determine the extent of neuromodulatory regulation of latency within the inferior colliculus (IC), a midbrain auditory nexus, the effects of iontophoretically applied serotonin on first-spike latencies were characterized in the IC of the Mexican free-tailed bat. Serotonin significantly altered the first-spike latencies in response to tones in 24% of IC neurons, usually increasing, but sometimes decreasing, latency. Serotonin-evoked changes in latency and spike count were not always correlated but sometimes occurred independently within individual neurons. Furthermore, in some neurons, the size of serotonin-evoked latency shifts depended on the frequency or intensity of the stimulus, as reported previously for serotonin-evoked changes in spike count. These results support the general conclusion that changes in latency are an important part of the neuromodulatory repertoire of serotonin within the auditory system and show that serotonin can change latency either in conjunction with broad changes in other aspects of neuronal excitability or in highly specific ways. PMID:16120790

  11. TOXICITY OF COPPER-SPIKED SEDIMENTS TO FRESHWATER INVERTEBRATES

    EPA Science Inventory

    Natural freshwater sediments from two Oregon sites were spiked with copper in the laboratory and two static toxicity tests were conducted with series of copper concentrations ranging from 59 to 10,600 mg/kg of dry sediment. Water (800 ml) was added to 1-liter test beakers over th...

  12. Quantifying Spike Train Oscillations: Biases, Distortions and Solutions

    PubMed Central

    Matzner, Ayala; Bar-Gad, Izhar

    2015-01-01

    Estimation of the power spectrum is a common method for identifying oscillatory changes in neuronal activity. However, the stochastic nature of neuronal activity leads to severe biases in the estimation of these oscillations in single unit spike trains. Different biological and experimental factors cause the spike train to differentially reflect its underlying oscillatory rate function. We analyzed the effect of factors, such as the mean firing rate and the recording duration, on the detectability of oscillations and their significance, and tested these theoretical results on experimental data recorded in Parkinsonian non-human primates. The effect of these factors is dramatic, such that in some conditions, the detection of existing oscillations is impossible. Moreover, these biases impede the comparison of oscillations across brain regions, neuronal types, behavioral states and separate recordings with different underlying parameters, and lead inevitably to a gross misinterpretation of experimental results. We introduce a novel objective measure, the "modulation index", which overcomes these biases, and enables reliable detection of oscillations from spike trains and a direct estimation of the oscillation magnitude. The modulation index detects a high percentage of oscillations over a wide range of parameters, compared to classical spectral analysis methods, and enables an unbiased comparison between spike trains recorded from different neurons and using different experimental protocols. PMID:25909328

  13. Quantifying spike train oscillations: biases, distortions and solutions.

    PubMed

    Matzner, Ayala; Bar-Gad, Izhar

    2015-04-01

    Estimation of the power spectrum is a common method for identifying oscillatory changes in neuronal activity. However, the stochastic nature of neuronal activity leads to severe biases in the estimation of these oscillations in single unit spike trains. Different biological and experimental factors cause the spike train to differentially reflect its underlying oscillatory rate function. We analyzed the effect of factors, such as the mean firing rate and the recording duration, on the detectability of oscillations and their significance, and tested these theoretical results on experimental data recorded in Parkinsonian non-human primates. The effect of these factors is dramatic, such that in some conditions, the detection of existing oscillations is impossible. Moreover, these biases impede the comparison of oscillations across brain regions, neuronal types, behavioral states and separate recordings with different underlying parameters, and lead inevitably to a gross misinterpretation of experimental results. We introduce a novel objective measure, the "modulation index", which overcomes these biases, and enables reliable detection of oscillations from spike trains and a direct estimation of the oscillation magnitude. The modulation index detects a high percentage of oscillations over a wide range of parameters, compared to classical spectral analysis methods, and enables an unbiased comparison between spike trains recorded from different neurons and using different experimental protocols. PMID:25909328

  14. Learning anticipation via spiking networks: application to navigation control.

    PubMed

    Arena, Paolo; Fortuna, Luigi; Frasca, Mattia; Patané, Luca

    2009-02-01

    In this paper, we introduce a network of spiking neurons devoted to navigation control. Three different examples, dealing with stimuli of increasing complexity, are investigated. In the first one, obstacle avoidance in a simulated robot is achieved through a network of spiking neurons. In the second example, a second layer is designed aiming to provide the robot with a target approaching system, making it able to move towards visual targets. Finally, a network of spiking neurons for navigation based on visual cues is introduced. In all cases, the robot was assumed to rely on some a priori known responses to low-level sensors (i.e., to contact sensors in the case of obstacles, to proximity target sensors in the case of visual targets, or to the visual target for navigation with visual cues). Based on their knowledge, the robot has to learn the response to high-level stimuli (i.e., range finder sensors or visual input). The biologically plausible paradigm of spike-timing-dependent plasticity (STDP) is included in the network to make the system able to learn high-level responses that guide navigation through a simple unstructured environment. The learning procedure is based on classical conditioning. PMID:19150797

  15. Composting of swine manure spiked with sulfadiazine, chlortetracycline and ciprofloxacin.

    PubMed

    Selvam, Ammaiyappan; Zhao, Zhenyong; Wong, Jonathan W C

    2012-12-01

    The fate of chlortetracycline (CTC), sulfadiazine (SDZ) and ciprofloxacin (CIP) during composting of swine manure and their effect on composting process were investigated. Swine manure was spiked with antibiotics, mixed with saw dust (1:1 on DW basis) and composted for 56 d. Antibiotics were spiked to a final concentration of 50 mg/kg CTC+10 mg/kg SDZ+10 mg/kg CIP (High-level) or 5 mg/kg CTC+1 mg/kg SDZ+1 mg/kg CIP (Low-level), and a control without antibiotics. Antibiotics at high concentrations delayed the initial decomposition that also affected the nitrogen mineralization. CTC and SDZ were completely removed from the composting mass within 21 and 3d, respectively; whereas, 17-31% of the spiked CIP remained in the composting mass. Therefore, composting could effectively remove the CTC and SDZ spiked even at high concentrations, but the removal of ciprofloxacin (belonging to fluoroquinolone) needs to be improved, indicating this antibiotic may get into the ecosystem through land application of livestock compost. PMID:22261658

  16. A memristive spiking neuron with firing rate coding

    PubMed Central

    Ignatov, Marina; Ziegler, Martin; Hansen, Mirko; Petraru, Adrian; Kohlstedt, Hermann

    2015-01-01

    Perception, decisions, and sensations are all encoded into trains of action potentials in the brain. The relation between stimulus strength and all-or-nothing spiking of neurons is widely believed to be the basis of this coding. This initiated the development of spiking neuron models; one of today's most powerful conceptual tool for the analysis and emulation of neural dynamics. The success of electronic circuit models and their physical realization within silicon field-effect transistor circuits lead to elegant technical approaches. Recently, the spectrum of electronic devices for neural computing has been extended by memristive devices, mainly used to emulate static synaptic functionality. Their capabilities for emulations of neural activity were recently demonstrated using a memristive neuristor circuit, while a memristive neuron circuit has so far been elusive. Here, a spiking neuron model is experimentally realized in a compact circuit comprising memristive and memcapacitive devices based on the strongly correlated electron material vanadium dioxide (VO2) and on the chemical electromigration cell Ag/TiO2−x/Al. The circuit can emulate dynamical spiking patterns in response to an external stimulus including adaptation, which is at the heart of firing rate coding as first observed by E.D. Adrian in 1926. PMID:26539074

  17. Solar microwave millisecond spike at 2.84 GHz

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fu, Qi-Jun; Jin, Sheng-Zhen; Zhao, Ren-Yang; Zheng, Le-Ping; Liu, Yu-Ying; Li, Xiao-Cong; Wang, Shu-Lan; Chen, Zhi-Jun; Hu, Chu-Min

    1986-01-01

    Using the high time resolution of 1 ms, the data of solar microwave millisecond spike (MMS) event was recorded more than two hundred times at the frequency of 2.84 GHz at Beijing (Peking) Observatory since May 1981. A preliminary analysis was made. It can be seen from the data that the MMS-events have a variety of the fast activities such as the dispersed and isolated spikes, the clusters of the crowded spikes, the weak spikes superimposed on the noise background, and the phenomena of absorption. The marked differences from that observed with lower time resolution are presented. Using the data, a valuable statistical analysis was made. There are close correlations between MMS-events and hard X-ray bursts, and fast drifting bursts. The MMS events are highly dependent on the type of active regions and the magnetic field configuration. It seems to be crucial to find out the accurate positions on the active region where the MMS-events happen and to make co-operative observations at different bands during the special period when specific active regions appear on the solar disk.

  18. Uncovering representations of sleep-associated hippocampal ensemble spike activity.

    PubMed

    Chen, Zhe; Grosmark, Andres D; Penagos, Hector; Wilson, Matthew A

    2016-01-01

    Pyramidal neurons in the rodent hippocampus exhibit spatial tuning during spatial navigation, and they are reactivated in specific temporal order during sharp-wave ripples observed in quiet wakefulness or slow wave sleep. However, analyzing representations of sleep-associated hippocampal ensemble spike activity remains a great challenge. In contrast to wake, during sleep there is a complete absence of animal behavior, and the ensemble spike activity is sparse (low occurrence) and fragmental in time. To examine important issues encountered in sleep data analysis, we constructed synthetic sleep-like hippocampal spike data (short epochs, sparse and sporadic firing, compressed timescale) for detailed investigations. Based upon two Bayesian population-decoding methods (one receptive field-based, and the other not), we systematically investigated their representation power and detection reliability. Notably, the receptive-field-free decoding method was found to be well-tuned for hippocampal ensemble spike data in slow wave sleep (SWS), even in the absence of prior behavioral measure or ground truth. Our results showed that in addition to the sample length, bin size, and firing rate, number of active hippocampal pyramidal neurons are critical for reliable representation of the space as well as for detection of spatiotemporal reactivated patterns in SWS or quiet wakefulness. PMID:27573200

  19. How Can Monosynaptic Spike Transmission Be So Fast?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Platkiewicz, Jonathan; Amarasingham, Asohan

    There has been recently a great deal of interest in ``mapping the brain'', namely in establishing the precise structural organization of neural microcircuits. High-density extracellular recordings offer the unique opportunity to observe simultaneously the activity of hundreds of neurons with millisecond precision in the behaving mammal. Neural connectivity is typically inferred from this recording type by seeking the cell pairs that exhibit finely-timed spike correlation. There is however no widely-accepted biophysical justification for this procedure, nor is there much in the way of ``ground truth'' data that might validate these inferences. First, we showed that a millisecond spike correlation can be observed between monosynaptically connected neurons regardless of the timescale of the postsynaptic potential response. The demonstration is based on the theory of stochastic processes - in particular on an escape noise model - and numerical simulations of biophysical models of monosynaptic spike transfer. Second, using the developed biophysical models, we highlighted the relevance of nonparametric statistical methods, called ``jitter methods'', in connectivity analysis from spike trains, even in the face of extreme firing nonstationarity. Supported by NIH Grant R01MH102840 and DoD (HBCU/MI) Grant W911NF-15-R-0002.

  20. Spike-Timing-Based Computation in Sound Localization

    PubMed Central

    Goodman, Dan F. M.; Brette, Romain

    2010-01-01

    Spike timing is precise in the auditory system and it has been argued that it conveys information about auditory stimuli, in particular about the location of a sound source. However, beyond simple time differences, the way in which neurons might extract this information is unclear and the potential computational advantages are unknown. The computational difficulty of this task for an animal is to locate the source of an unexpected sound from two monaural signals that are highly dependent on the unknown source signal. In neuron models consisting of spectro-temporal filtering and spiking nonlinearity, we found that the binaural structure induced by spatialized sounds is mapped to synchrony patterns that depend on source location rather than on source signal. Location-specific synchrony patterns would then result in the activation of location-specific assemblies of postsynaptic neurons. We designed a spiking neuron model which exploited this principle to locate a variety of sound sources in a virtual acoustic environment using measured human head-related transfer functions. The model was able to accurately estimate the location of previously unknown sounds in both azimuth and elevation (including front/back discrimination) in a known acoustic environment. We found that multiple representations of different acoustic environments could coexist as sets of overlapping neural assemblies which could be associated with spatial locations by Hebbian learning. The model demonstrates the computational relevance of relative spike timing to extract spatial information about sources independently of the source signal. PMID:21085681

  1. Event-driven contrastive divergence for spiking neuromorphic systems

    PubMed Central

    Neftci, Emre; Das, Srinjoy; Pedroni, Bruno; Kreutz-Delgado, Kenneth; Cauwenberghs, Gert

    2014-01-01

    Restricted Boltzmann Machines (RBMs) and Deep Belief Networks have been demonstrated to perform efficiently in a variety of applications, such as dimensionality reduction, feature learning, and classification. Their implementation on neuromorphic hardware platforms emulating large-scale networks of spiking neurons can have significant advantages from the perspectives of scalability, power dissipation and real-time interfacing with the environment. However, the traditional RBM architecture and the commonly used training algorithm known as Contrastive Divergence (CD) are based on discrete updates and exact arithmetics which do not directly map onto a dynamical neural substrate. Here, we present an event-driven variation of CD to train a RBM constructed with Integrate & Fire (I&F) neurons, that is constrained by the limitations of existing and near future neuromorphic hardware platforms. Our strategy is based on neural sampling, which allows us to synthesize a spiking neural network that samples from a target Boltzmann distribution. The recurrent activity of the network replaces the discrete steps of the CD algorithm, while Spike Time Dependent Plasticity (STDP) carries out the weight updates in an online, asynchronous fashion. We demonstrate our approach by training an RBM composed of leaky I&F neurons with STDP synapses to learn a generative model of the MNIST hand-written digit dataset, and by testing it in recognition, generation and cue integration tasks. Our results contribute to a machine learning-driven approach for synthesizing networks of spiking neurons capable of carrying out practical, high-level functionality. PMID:24574952

  2. Higher Order Spike Synchrony in Prefrontal Cortex during Visual Memory

    PubMed Central

    Pipa, Gordon; Munk, Matthias H. J.

    2009-01-01

    Precise temporal synchrony of spike firing has been postulated as an important neuronal mechanism for signal integration and the induction of plasticity in neocortex. As prefrontal cortex plays an important role in organizing memory and executive functions, the convergence of multiple visual pathways onto PFC predicts that neurons should preferentially synchronize their spiking when stimulus information is processed. Furthermore, synchronous spike firing should intensify if memory processes require the induction of neuronal plasticity, even if this is only for short-term. Here we show with multiple simultaneously recorded units in ventral prefrontal cortex that neurons participate in 3 ms precise synchronous discharges distributed across multiple sites separated by at least 500 μm. The frequency of synchronous firing is modulated by behavioral performance and is specific for the memorized visual stimuli. In particular, during the memory period in which activity is not stimulus driven, larger groups of up to seven sites exhibit performance dependent modulation of their spike synchronization. PMID:21713065

  3. Uncovering representations of sleep-associated hippocampal ensemble spike activity

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Zhe; Grosmark, Andres D.; Penagos, Hector; Wilson, Matthew A.

    2016-01-01

    Pyramidal neurons in the rodent hippocampus exhibit spatial tuning during spatial navigation, and they are reactivated in specific temporal order during sharp-wave ripples observed in quiet wakefulness or slow wave sleep. However, analyzing representations of sleep-associated hippocampal ensemble spike activity remains a great challenge. In contrast to wake, during sleep there is a complete absence of animal behavior, and the ensemble spike activity is sparse (low occurrence) and fragmental in time. To examine important issues encountered in sleep data analysis, we constructed synthetic sleep-like hippocampal spike data (short epochs, sparse and sporadic firing, compressed timescale) for detailed investigations. Based upon two Bayesian population-decoding methods (one receptive field-based, and the other not), we systematically investigated their representation power and detection reliability. Notably, the receptive-field-free decoding method was found to be well-tuned for hippocampal ensemble spike data in slow wave sleep (SWS), even in the absence of prior behavioral measure or ground truth. Our results showed that in addition to the sample length, bin size, and firing rate, number of active hippocampal pyramidal neurons are critical for reliable representation of the space as well as for detection of spatiotemporal reactivated patterns in SWS or quiet wakefulness. PMID:27573200

  4. Inhomogeneous quasistationary state of dense fluids of inelastic hard spheres.

    PubMed

    Fouxon, Itzhak

    2014-05-01

    We study closed dense collections of freely cooling hard spheres that collide inelastically with constant coefficient of normal restitution. We find inhomogeneous states (ISs) where the density profile is spatially nonuniform but constant in time. The states are exact solutions of nonlinear partial differential equations that describe the coupled distributions of density and temperature valid when inelastic losses of energy per collision are small. The derivation is performed without modeling the equations' coefficients that are unknown in the dense limit (such as the equation of state) using only their scaling form specific for hard spheres. Thus the IS is the exact state of this dense many-body system. It captures a fundamental property of inelastic collections of particles: the possibility of preserving nonuniform temperature via the interplay of inelastic cooling and heat conduction that generalizes previous results. We perform numerical simulations to demonstrate that arbitrary initial state evolves to the IS in the limit of long times where the container has the geometry of the channel. The evolution is like a gas-liquid transition. The liquid condenses in a vanishing part of the total volume but takes most of the mass of the system. However, the gaseous phase, which mass grows only logarithmically with the system size, is relevant because its fast particles carry most of the energy of the system. Remarkably, the system self-organizes to dissipate no energy: The inelastic decay of energy is a power law [1+t/t(c)](-2), where t(c) diverges in the thermodynamic limit. This is reinforced by observing that for supercritical systems the IS coincide in most of the space with the steady states of granular systems heated at one of the walls. We discuss the relation of our results to the recently proposed finite-time singularity in other container's geometries. PMID:25353790

  5. Demonstrating Photoluminescence from Au is Electronic Inelastic Light Scattering of a Plasmonic Metal: The Origin of SERS Backgrounds

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Temperature-dependent surface-enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) is used to investigate the photoluminescence and background continuum always present in SERS but whose origin remains controversial. Both the Stokes and anti-Stokes background is found to be dominated by inelastic light scattering (ILS) from the electrons in the noble metal nanostructures supporting the plasmon modes. The anti-Stokes background is highly temperature dependent and is shown to be related to the thermal occupation of electronic states within the metal via a simple model. This suggests new routes to enhance SERS sensitivities, as well as providing ubiquitous and calibrated real-time temperature measurements of nanostructures. PMID:25734469

  6. Supervised Learning in Spiking Neural Networks for Precise Temporal Encoding

    PubMed Central

    Gardner, Brian; Grüning, André

    2016-01-01

    Precise spike timing as a means to encode information in neural networks is biologically supported, and is advantageous over frequency-based codes by processing input features on a much shorter time-scale. For these reasons, much recent attention has been focused on the development of supervised learning rules for spiking neural networks that utilise a temporal coding scheme. However, despite significant progress in this area, there still lack rules that have a theoretical basis, and yet can be considered biologically relevant. Here we examine the general conditions under which synaptic plasticity most effectively takes place to support the supervised learning of a precise temporal code. As part of our analysis we examine two spike-based learning methods: one of which relies on an instantaneous error signal to modify synaptic weights in a network (INST rule), and the other one relying on a filtered error signal for smoother synaptic weight modifications (FILT rule). We test the accuracy of the solutions provided by each rule with respect to their temporal encoding precision, and then measure the maximum number of input patterns they can learn to memorise using the precise timings of individual spikes as an indication of their storage capacity. Our results demonstrate the high performance of the FILT rule in most cases, underpinned by the rule’s error-filtering mechanism, which is predicted to provide smooth convergence towards a desired solution during learning. We also find the FILT rule to be most efficient at performing input pattern memorisations, and most noticeably when patterns are identified using spikes with sub-millisecond temporal precision. In comparison with existing work, we determine the performance of the FILT rule to be consistent with that of the highly efficient E-learning Chronotron rule, but with the distinct advantage that our FILT rule is also implementable as an online method for increased biological realism. PMID:27532262

  7. On some classes of sequential spiking neural p systems.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Xingyi; Zeng, Xiangxiang; Luo, Bin; Pan, Linqiang

    2014-05-01

    Spiking neural P systems (SN P systems) are a class of distributed parallel computing devices inspired by the way neurons communicate by means of spikes; neurons work in parallel in the sense that each neuron that can fire should fire, but the work in each neuron is sequential in the sense that at most one rule can be applied at each computation step. In this work, with biological inspiration, we consider SN P systems with the restriction that at each step, one of the neurons (i.e., sequential mode) or all neurons (i.e., pseudo-sequential mode) with the maximum (or minimum) number of spikes among the neurons that are active (can spike) will fire. If an active neuron has more than one enabled rule, it nondeterministically chooses one of the enabled rules to be applied, and the chosen rule is applied in an exhaustive manner (a kind of local parallelism): the rule is used as many times as possible. This strategy makes the system sequential or pseudo-sequential from the global view of the whole network and locally parallel at the level of neurons. We obtain four types of SN P systems: maximum/minimum spike number induced sequential/pseudo-sequential SN P systems with exhaustive use of rules. We prove that SN P systems of these four types are all Turing universal as number-generating computation devices. These results illustrate that the restriction of sequentiality may have little effect on the computation power of SN P systems. PMID:24555456

  8. Supervised Learning in Spiking Neural Networks for Precise Temporal Encoding.

    PubMed

    Gardner, Brian; Grüning, André

    2016-01-01

    Precise spike timing as a means to encode information in neural networks is biologically supported, and is advantageous over frequency-based codes by processing input features on a much shorter time-scale. For these reasons, much recent attention has been focused on the development of supervised learning rules for spiking neural networks that utilise a temporal coding scheme. However, despite significant progress in this area, there still lack rules that have a theoretical basis, and yet can be considered biologically relevant. Here we examine the general conditions under which synaptic plasticity most effectively takes place to support the supervised learning of a precise temporal code. As part of our analysis we examine two spike-based learning methods: one of which relies on an instantaneous error signal to modify synaptic weights in a network (INST rule), and the other one relying on a filtered error signal for smoother synaptic weight modifications (FILT rule). We test the accuracy of the solutions provided by each rule with respect to their temporal encoding precision, and then measure the maximum number of input patterns they can learn to memorise using the precise timings of individual spikes as an indication of their storage capacity. Our results demonstrate the high performance of the FILT rule in most cases, underpinned by the rule's error-filtering mechanism, which is predicted to provide smooth convergence towards a desired solution during learning. We also find the FILT rule to be most efficient at performing input pattern memorisations, and most noticeably when patterns are identified using spikes with sub-millisecond temporal precision. In comparison with existing work, we determine the performance of the FILT rule to be consistent with that of the highly efficient E-learning Chronotron rule, but with the distinct advantage that our FILT rule is also implementable as an online method for increased biological realism. PMID:27532262

  9. Kinetic Control of Multiple Forms of Ca2+ Spikes by Inositol Trisphosphate in Pancreatic Acinar Cells

    PubMed Central

    Ito, Koichi; Miyashita, Yasushi; Kasai, Haruo

    1999-01-01

    The mechanisms of agonist-induced Ca2+ spikes have been investigated using a caged inositol 1,4,5-trisphosphate (IP3) and a low-affinity Ca2+ indicator, BTC, in pancreatic acinar cells. Rapid photolysis of caged IP3 was able to reproduce acetylcholine (ACh)-induced three forms of Ca2+ spikes: local Ca2+ spikes and submicromolar (<1 μM) and micromolar (1–15 μM) global Ca2+ spikes (Ca2+ waves). These observations indicate that subcellular gradients of IP3 sensitivity underlie all forms of ACh-induced Ca2+ spikes, and that the amplitude and extent of Ca2+ spikes are determined by the concentration of IP3. IP3-induced local Ca2+ spikes exhibited similar time courses to those generated by ACh, supporting a role for Ca2+-induced Ca2+ release in local Ca2+ spikes. In contrast, IP3- induced global Ca2+ spikes were consistently faster than those evoked with ACh at all concentrations of IP3 and ACh, suggesting that production of IP3 via phospholipase C was slow and limited the spread of the Ca2+ spikes. Indeed, gradual photolysis of caged IP3 reproduced ACh-induced slow Ca2+ spikes. Thus, local and global Ca2+ spikes involve distinct mechanisms, and the kinetics of global Ca2+ spikes depends on that of IP3 production particularly in those cells such as acinar cells where heterogeneity in IP3 sensitivity plays critical role. PMID:10427093

  10. Solar Flare Hard X-ray Spikes Observed by RHESSI: a Statistical Study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cheng, Jianxia; Qiu, J.; Ding, M.; Wang, H.

    2013-07-01

    Hard X-ray (HXR) spikes refer to fine time structures on timescales of seconds to milliseconds in high-energy HXR emission profiles during solar flare eruptions. We present a preliminary statistical investigation of temporal and spectral properties of HXR spikes. Using a three-sigma spike selection rule, we detected 184 spikes in 94 out of 322 flares with significant counts at given photon energies, which were detected from demodulated HXR light curves obtained by the Reuven Ramaty High Energy Solar Spectroscopic Imager (RHESSI). About one fifth of these spikes are also detected at photon energies higher than 100 keV. The statistical properties of the spikes are as follows. (1) HXR spikes are produced in both impulsive flares and long-duration flares with nearly the same occurrence rates. Ninety percent of the spikes occur during the rise phase of the flares, and about 70% occur around the peak times of the flares. (2) The time durations of the spikes vary from 0.2 to 2 s, with the mean being 1.0 s, which is not dependent on photon energies. The spikes exhibit symmetric time profiles with no significant difference between rise and decay times.(3) Among the most energetic spikes, nearly all of them have harder count spectra than their underlying slow-varying components. There is also a weak indication that spikes exhibiting time lags in high-energy emissions tend to have harder spectra than spikes with time lags in low-energy emissions.

  11. Inelastic micromechanics of curing stresses in composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Foye, R. L.

    1975-01-01

    The combined finite element/laminate analysis method is used to study the thermal curing stresses in composite materials with a nonlinearly elastic matrix subject to creep. The application of this analysis to boron/epoxy composites shows that curing stress levels in the laminate are of sufficient magnitude to cause widespread yielding in the matrix. The stress levels, based on the creep analysis of a typical laminate cure cycle, indicate that the residual stresses can vary from 80 to 100% of the residual stress estimates based on linear thermoelastic analysis. It is shown that there is virtually no change in the static longitudinal or shear response of unidirectional and cross-ply boron/epoxy laminates as a result of curing stresses. Results of a series of constant-stress, high temperature creep tests are presented.

  12. Multiple energetic injections in a strong spike-like solar burst

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kaufmann, P.; Correia, E.; Costa, J. E. R.; Dennis, B. R.; Hurford, G. H.; Brown, J. C.

    1983-01-01

    An intense and fast spike-like solar burst was built up of short time scale structures superimposed on an underlying gradual emission, the time evolution of which shows remarkable proportionality between hard X-ray and microwave fluxes. The finer time structure were best defined at mm-microwaves. At the peak of the event, the finer structures repeat every 30x60ms. The more slowly varying component with a time scale of about 1 second was identified in microwave hard X-rays throughout the burst duration. It is suggested that X-ray fluxes might also be proportional to the repetition rate of basic units of energy injection (quasi-quantized). The relevant parameters of one primary energy release site are estimated both in the case where hard X-rays are produced primarily by thick-target bremsstrahlung, and when they are purely thermal. The relation of this figure to global energy considerations is discussed.

  13. Reversing Flows and Heat Spike: Caused by Solar g-Modes?

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mayr, Hans G.; Wolff, Charles L.

    2003-01-01

    The Quasi Biennial Oscillation in the Earth s upper atmosphere has an analog deep inside the Sun. As on Earth, the flow is east or west, it is at low latitude, and it reverses direction in a roughly periodic manner. The period in the solar case is 1.3 years. It was detected using solar oscillations similar to the way earthquakes are used to study the Earth's interior. But its cause was not known. We showed that global oscillations (g-modes) can supply enough angular momentum to drive zonal flows with the observed reversal period. This required a calculation of wave dissipation rates inside each flow and in the turbulent layer that separates any two flows of opposite sign. Heat that this process leaves behind causes a thermal spike inside the Sun at the same depth. This may explain an anomaly in observed sound speed that has had no sure explanation.

  14. Investigation of Current Spike Phenomena During Heavy Ion Irradiation of NAND Flash Memories

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Oldham, Timothy R.; Berg, Melanie; Friendlich, Mark; Wilcox, Ted; Seidleck, Christina; LaBel, Kenneth A.; Irom, Farokh; Buchner, Steven P.; McMorrow, Dale; Mavis, David G.; Eaton, Paul H.; Castillo, James

    2011-01-01

    A series of heavy ion and laser irradiations were performed to investigate previously reported current spikes in flash memories. High current events were observed, however, none matches the previously reported spikes. Plausible mechanisms are discussed.

  15. Theory of inelastic multiphonon scattering and carrier capture by defects in semiconductors: Application to capture cross sections

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barmparis, Georgios D.; Puzyrev, Yevgeniy S.; Zhang, X.-G.; Pantelides, Sokrates T.

    2015-12-01

    Inelastic scattering and carrier capture by defects in semiconductors are the primary causes of hot-electron-mediated degradation of power devices, which holds up their commercial development. At the same time, carrier capture is a major issue in the performance of solar cells and light-emitting diodes. A theory of nonradiative (multiphonon) inelastic scattering by defects, however, is nonexistent, while the theory for carrier capture by defects has had a long and arduous history. Here we report the construction of a comprehensive theory of inelastic scattering by defects, with carrier capture being a special case. We distinguish between capture under thermal equilibrium conditions and capture under nonequilibrium conditions, e.g., in the presence of an electrical current or hot carriers where carriers undergo scattering by defects and are described by a mean free path. In the thermal-equilibrium case, capture is mediated by a nonadiabatic perturbation Hamiltonian, originally identified by Huang and Rhys and by Kubo, which is equal to linear electron-phonon coupling to first order. In the nonequilibrium case, we demonstrate that the primary capture mechanism is within the Born-Oppenheimer approximation (adiabatic transitions), with coupling to the defect potential inducing Franck-Condon electronic transitions, followed by multiphonon dissipation of the transition energy, while the nonadiabatic terms are of secondary importance (they scale with the inverse of the mass of typical atoms in the defect complex). We report first-principles density-functional-theory calculations of the capture cross section for a prototype defect using the projector-augmented wave, which allows us to employ all-electron wave functions. We adopt a Monte Carlo scheme to sample multiphonon configurations and obtain converged results. The theory and the results represent a foundation upon which to build engineering-level models for hot-electron degradation of power devices and the performance

  16. Molecular and comparative mapping of genes governing spike compactness inherited from wild emmer wheat

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The development and morphology of the wheat spike is important because the spike is where reproduction occurs and it holds the grains until harvest. Therefore, genes that influence spike morphology are of interest from both theoretical and practical stand points. When substituted for the native ch...

  17. Description of a small commutation spike filter for d. c. magnet power supplies

    SciTech Connect

    Visser, A.T.

    1990-10-01

    This note describes a small spike filter used to remove SCR commutation spikes from the dc output voltage of magnet power supplies. Removal of these spikes reduces the noise problems in electronic detectors installed in the same area. The filter is small enough to be mounted inside a power supply.

  18. Elimination of current spikes in buck power converters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mclyman, W. T. (Inventor)

    1981-01-01

    Current spikes in a buck power converter due to commutating diode turn-off time are eliminated by using a tapped inductor in the converter with the tap connected to the switching transistor. The commutating diode is not in the usual place, but is instead connected to conduct current from one end of the tapped inductor remote from the load during the interval in which the transistor is not conducting. In the case of a converter having a center-tapped (primary and secondary) transformer between two switching power transistors operated in a push-pull mode and two rectifying diodes in the secondary circuit, current spikes due to transformer saturation are also eliminated by using a tapped inductor in the converter with the tap connected to the rectifying diodes and a diode connected to conduct current from one end of the tapped inductor remote from the load during the interval in which the transistors are not conducting.

  19. Spin-orbit torque induced spike-timing dependent plasticity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sengupta, Abhronil; Al Azim, Zubair; Fong, Xuanyao; Roy, Kaushik

    2015-03-01

    Nanoelectronic devices that mimic the functionality of synapses are a crucial requirement for performing cortical simulations of the brain. In this work, we propose a ferromagnet-heavy metal heterostructure that employs spin-orbit torque to implement spike-timing dependent plasticity. The proposed device offers the advantage of decoupled spike transmission and programming current paths, thereby leading to reliable operation during online learning. Possible arrangement of such devices in a crosspoint architecture can pave the way for ultra-dense neural networks. Simulation studies indicate that the device has the potential of achieving pico-Joule level energy consumption (maximum 2 pJ per synaptic event) which is comparable to the energy consumption for synaptic events in biological synapses.

  20. A Spiking Network Model of Decision Making Employing Rewarded STDP

    PubMed Central

    Bazhenov, Maxim

    2014-01-01

    Reward-modulated spike timing dependent plasticity (STDP) combines unsupervised STDP with a reinforcement signal that modulates synaptic changes. It was proposed as a learning rule capable of solving the distal reward problem in reinforcement learning. Nonetheless, performance and limitations of this learning mechanism have yet to be tested for its ability to solve biological problems. In our work, rewarded STDP was implemented to model foraging behavior in a simulated environment. Over the course of training the network of spiking neurons developed the capability of producing highly successful decision-making. The network performance remained stable even after significant perturbations of synaptic structure. Rewarded STDP alone was insufficient to learn effective decision making due to the difficulty maintaining homeostatic equilibrium of synaptic weights and the development of local performance maxima. Our study predicts that successful learning requires stabilizing mechanisms that allow neurons to balance their input and output synapses as well as synaptic noise. PMID:24632858

  1. Spiking Neural P Systems with Neuron Division and Dissolution.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Yuzhen; Liu, Xiyu; Wang, Wenping

    2016-01-01

    Spiking neural P systems are a new candidate in spiking neural network models. By using neuron division and budding, such systems can generate/produce exponential working space in linear computational steps, thus provide a way to solve computational hard problems in feasible (linear or polynomial) time with a "time-space trade-off" strategy. In this work, a new mechanism called neuron dissolution is introduced, by which redundant neurons produced during the computation can be removed. As applications, uniform solutions to two NP-hard problems: SAT problem and Subset Sum problem are constructed in linear time, working in a deterministic way. The neuron dissolution strategy is used to eliminate invalid solutions, and all answers to these two problems are encoded as indices of output neurons. Our results improve the one obtained in Science China Information Sciences, 2011, 1596-1607 by Pan et al. PMID:27627104

  2. The ripple pond: enabling spiking networks to see

    PubMed Central

    Afshar, Saeed; Cohen, Gregory K.; Wang, Runchun M.; Van Schaik, André; Tapson, Jonathan; Lehmann, Torsten; Hamilton, Tara J.

    2013-01-01

    We present the biologically inspired Ripple Pond Network (RPN), a simply connected spiking neural network which performs a transformation converting two dimensional images to one dimensional temporal patterns (TP) suitable for recognition by temporal coding learning and memory networks. The RPN has been developed as a hardware solution linking previously implemented neuromorphic vision and memory structures such as frameless vision sensors and neuromorphic temporal coding spiking neural networks. Working together such systems are potentially capable of delivering end-to-end high-speed, low-power and low-resolution recognition for mobile and autonomous applications where slow, highly sophisticated and power hungry signal processing solutions are ineffective. Key aspects in the proposed approach include utilizing the spatial properties of physically embedded neural networks and propagating waves of activity therein for information processing, using dimensional collapse of imagery information into amenable TP and the use of asynchronous frames for information binding. PMID:24298234

  3. Calcium Spikes in Epithelium: study on Drosophila early embryos.

    PubMed

    Markova, Olga; Sénatore, Sébastien; Chardès, Claire; Lenne, Pierre-François

    2015-01-01

    Calcium ion acts in nearly every aspect of cellular life. The versatility and specificity required for such a ubiquitous role is ensured by the spatio-temporal dynamics of calcium concentration variations. While calcium signal dynamics has been extensively studied in cell cultures and adult tissues, little is known about calcium activity during early tissue morphogenesis. We monitored intracellular calcium concentration in Drosophila gastrula and revealed single cell calcium spikes that were short-lived, rare and showed strong variability among embryos. We quantitatively described the spatio-temporal dynamics of these spikes and analyzed their potential origins and nature by introducing physical and chemical perturbations. Our data highlight the inter- and intra-tissue variability of calcium activity during tissue morphogenesis. PMID:26198871

  4. Calcium Spikes in Epithelium: study on Drosophila early embryos

    PubMed Central

    Markova, Olga; Sénatore, Sébastien; Chardès, Claire; Lenne, Pierre-François

    2015-01-01

    Calcium ion acts in nearly every aspect of cellular life. The versatility and specificity required for such a ubiquitous role is ensured by the spatio-temporal dynamics of calcium concentration variations. While calcium signal dynamics has been extensively studied in cell cultures and adult tissues, little is known about calcium activity during early tissue morphogenesis. We monitored intracellular calcium concentration in Drosophila gastrula and revealed single cell calcium spikes that were short-lived, rare and showed strong variability among embryos. We quantitatively described the spatio-temporal dynamics of these spikes and analyzed their potential origins and nature by introducing physical and chemical perturbations. Our data highlight the inter- and intra-tissue variability of calcium activity during tissue morphogenesis. PMID:26198871

  5. Spin-orbit torque induced spike-timing dependent plasticity

    SciTech Connect

    Sengupta, Abhronil Al Azim, Zubair; Fong, Xuanyao; Roy, Kaushik

    2015-03-02

    Nanoelectronic devices that mimic the functionality of synapses are a crucial requirement for performing cortical simulations of the brain. In this work, we propose a ferromagnet-heavy metal heterostructure that employs spin-orbit torque to implement spike-timing dependent plasticity. The proposed device offers the advantage of decoupled spike transmission and programming current paths, thereby leading to reliable operation during online learning. Possible arrangement of such devices in a crosspoint architecture can pave the way for ultra-dense neural networks. Simulation studies indicate that the device has the potential of achieving pico-Joule level energy consumption (maximum 2 pJ per synaptic event) which is comparable to the energy consumption for synaptic events in biological synapses.

  6. Analysis of voltage spikes in superconducting Nb3Sn magnets

    SciTech Connect

    Rahimzadeh-Kalaleh, S.; Ambrosio, G.; Chlachidze, G.; Donnelly, C.; Tartaglia, M.; /Fermilab

    2008-08-01

    Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory has been developing a new generation of superconducting accelerator magnets based on Niobium Tin (Nb{sub 3}Sn). The performance of these magnets is influenced by thermo-magnetic instabilities, known as flux jumps, which can lead to premature trips of the quench detection system due to large voltage transients or quenches at low current. In an effort to better characterize and understand these instabilities, a system for capturing fast voltage transients was developed and used in recent tests of R&D model magnets. A new automated voltage spike analysis program was developed for the analysis of large amount of voltage-spike data. We report results from the analysis of large statistics data samples for short model magnets that were constructed using MJR and RRP strands having different sub-element size and structure. We then assess the implications for quench protection of Nb{sub 3}Sn magnets.

  7. Network Structures Arising from Spike-Timing Dependent Plasticity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Babadi, Baktash

    Spike-timing dependent plasticity (STDP), a widespread synaptic modification mechanism, is sensitive to correlations between presynaptic spike trains, and organizes neural circuits in functionally useful ways. In this dissertation, I study the structures arising from STDP in a population of synapses with an emphasis on the interplay between synaptic stability and Hebbian competition, explained in Chapter 1. Starting from the simplest description of STDP which relates synaptic modification to the intervals between pairs of pre- and postsynaptic spikes, I show in Chapter 2 that stability and Hebbian competition are incompatible in this class of "pair-based" STDP models, either when hard bounds or soft bounds are imposed to the synapses. In chapter 3, I propose an alternative biophysically inspired method for imposing bounds to synapses, i.e. introducing a small temporal shift in the STDP window. Shifted STDP overcomes the incompatibility of synaptic stability and competition and can implement both Hebbian and anti-Hebbian forms of competitive plasticity. In light of experiments the explored a variety of spike patterns, STDP models have been augmented to account for interactions between multiple pre- and postsynaptic action potentials. In chapter 4, I study the stability/competition interplay in three different proposed multi-spike models of STDP. I show that the "triplet model" leads to a partially steady-state distribution of synaptic weights and induces Hebbian competition. The "suppression model" develops a stable distribution of weights when the average weight is high and shows predominantly anti-Hebbian competition. The "NMDAR-based" model can lead to either stable or partially stable synaptic weight distribution and exhibits both Hebbian and anti-Hebbian competition, depending on the parameters. I conclude that multi-spike STDP models can produce radically different effects at the population level depending on how they implement multi-spike interactions

  8. Spikes matter for phase-locked bursting in inhibitory neurons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jalil, Sajiya; Belykh, Igor; Shilnikov, Andrey

    2012-03-01

    We show that inhibitory networks composed of two endogenously bursting neurons can robustly display several coexistent phase-locked states in addition to stable antiphase and in-phase bursting. This work complements and enhances our recent result [Jalil, Belykh, and Shilnikov, Phys. Rev. EPLEEE81539-375510.1103/PhysRevE.81.045201 81, 045201(R) (2010)] that fast reciprocal inhibition can synchronize bursting neurons due to spike interactions. We reveal the role of spikes in generating multiple phase-locked states and demonstrate that this multistability is generic by analyzing diverse models of bursting networks with various fast inhibitory synapses; the individual cell models include the reduced leech heart interneuron, the Sherman model for pancreatic beta cells, and the Purkinje neuron model.

  9. Past, present and future of spike sorting techniques

    PubMed Central

    Rey, Hernan Gonzalo; Pedreira, Carlos; Quian Quiroga, Rodrigo

    2015-01-01

    Spike sorting is a crucial step to extract information from extracellular recordings. With new recording opportunities provided by the development of new electrodes that allow monitoring hundreds of neurons simultaneously, the scenario for the new generation of algorithms is both exciting and challenging. However, this will require a new approach to the problem and the development of a common reference framework to quickly assess the performance of new algorithms. In this work, we review the basic concepts of spike sorting, including the requirements for different applications, together with the problems faced by presently available algorithms. We conclude by proposing a roadmap stressing the crucial points to be addressed to support the neuroscientific research of the near future. PMID:25931392

  10. Control of a brain-computer interface without spike sorting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fraser, George W.; Chase, Steven M.; Whitford, Andrew; Schwartz, Andrew B.

    2009-10-01

    Two rhesus monkeys were trained to move a cursor using neural activity recorded with silicon arrays of 96 microelectrodes implanted in the primary motor cortex. We have developed a method to extract movement information from the recorded single and multi-unit activity in the absence of spike sorting. By setting a single threshold across all channels and fitting the resultant events with a spline tuning function, a control signal was extracted from this population using a Bayesian particle-filter extraction algorithm. The animals achieved high-quality control comparable to the performance of decoding schemes based on sorted spikes. Our results suggest that even the simplest signal processing is sufficient for high-quality neuroprosthetic control.

  11. Structural basis for membrane anchoring of HIV-1 envelope spike.

    PubMed

    Dev, Jyoti; Park, Donghyun; Fu, Qingshan; Chen, Jia; Ha, Heather Jiwon; Ghantous, Fadi; Herrmann, Tobias; Chang, Weiting; Liu, Zhijun; Frey, Gary; Seaman, Michael S; Chen, Bing; Chou, James J

    2016-07-01

    HIV-1 envelope spike (Env) is a type I membrane protein that mediates viral entry. We used nuclear magnetic resonance to determine an atomic structure of the transmembrane (TM) domain of HIV-1 Env reconstituted in bicelles that mimic a lipid bilayer. The TM forms a well-ordered trimer that protects a conserved membrane-embedded arginine. An amino-terminal coiled-coil and a carboxyl-terminal hydrophilic core stabilize the trimer. Individual mutations of conserved residues did not disrupt the TM trimer and minimally affected membrane fusion and infectivity. Major changes in the hydrophilic core, however, altered the antibody sensitivity of Env. These results show how a TM domain anchors, stabilizes, and modulates a viral envelope spike and suggest that its influence on Env conformation is an important consideration for HIV-1 immunogen design. PMID:27338706

  12. Upward synaptic scaling is dependent on neurotransmission rather than spiking

    PubMed Central

    Fong, Ming-fai; Newman, Jonathan P.; Potter, Steve M.; Wenner, Peter

    2015-01-01

    Homeostatic plasticity encompasses a set of mechanisms that are thought to stabilize firing rates in neural circuits. The most widely studied form of homeostatic plasticity is upward synaptic scaling (upscaling), characterized by a multiplicative increase in the strength of excitatory synaptic inputs to a neuron as a compensatory response to chronic reductions in firing rate. While reduced spiking is thought to trigger upscaling, an alternative possibility is that reduced glutamatergic transmission generates this plasticity directly. However, spiking and neurotransmission are tightly coupled, so it has been difficult to determine their independent roles in the scaling process. Here we combined chronic multielectrode recording, closed-loop optogenetic stimulation, and pharmacology to show that reduced glutamatergic transmission directly triggers cell-wide synaptic upscaling. This work highlights the importance of synaptic activity in initiating signalling cascades that mediate upscaling. Moreover, our findings challenge the prevailing view that upscaling functions to homeostatically stabilize firing rates. PMID:25751516

  13. Optimal Estimation and Rank Detection for Sparse Spiked Covariance Matrices

    PubMed Central

    Cai, Tony; Ma, Zongming; Wu, Yihong

    2014-01-01

    This paper considers a sparse spiked covariancematrix model in the high-dimensional setting and studies the minimax estimation of the covariance matrix and the principal subspace as well as the minimax rank detection. The optimal rate of convergence for estimating the spiked covariance matrix under the spectral norm is established, which requires significantly different techniques from those for estimating other structured covariance matrices such as bandable or sparse covariance matrices. We also establish the minimax rate under the spectral norm for estimating the principal subspace, the primary object of interest in principal component analysis. In addition, the optimal rate for the rank detection boundary is obtained. This result also resolves the gap in a recent paper by Berthet and Rigollet [2] where the special case of rank one is considered. PMID:26257453

  14. Voltage spike detection in high field superconducting accelerator magnets

    SciTech Connect

    Orris, D.F.; Carcagno, R.; Feher, S.; Makulski, A.; Pischalnikov, Y.M.; /Fermilab

    2004-12-01

    A measurement system for the detection of small magnetic flux changes in superconducting magnets, which are due to either mechanical motion of the conductor or flux jump, has been developed at Fermilab. These flux changes are detected as small amplitude, short duration voltage spikes, which are {approx}15mV in magnitude and lasts for {approx}30 {micro}sec. The detection system combines an analog circuit for the signal conditioning of two coil segments and a fast data acquisition system for digitizing the results, performing threshold detection, and storing the resultant data. The design of the spike detection system along with the modeling results and noise analysis will be presented. Data from tests of high field Nb{sub 3}Sn magnets at currents up to {approx}20KA will also be shown.

  15. Efficient Identification of Assembly Neurons within Massively Parallel Spike Trains

    PubMed Central

    Berger, Denise; Borgelt, Christian; Louis, Sebastien; Morrison, Abigail; Grün, Sonja

    2010-01-01

    The chance of detecting assembly activity is expected to increase if the spiking activities of large numbers of neurons are recorded simultaneously. Although such massively parallel recordings are now becoming available, methods able to analyze such data for spike correlation are still rare, as a combinatorial explosion often makes it infeasible to extend methods developed for smaller data sets. By evaluating pattern complexity distributions the existence of correlated groups can be detected, but their member neurons cannot be identified. In this contribution, we present approaches to actually identify the individual neurons involved in assemblies. Our results may complement other methods and also provide a way to reduce data sets to the “relevant” neurons, thus allowing us to carry out a refined analysis of the detailed correlation structure due to reduced computation time. PMID:19809521

  16. Fingerprints of the superconducting pairing glue via inelastic tunneling spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hlobil, Patrik; Schmalian, Jörg; Jandke, Jasmin; Wulfhekel, Wulf

    In the past, tunneling spectroscopy has been interpreted as a direct probe of the fermionic density of states in superconductors. However, in this talk we discuss the impact of inelastic tunneling on tunnel spectra and show that depending on the actual system these interpretations have to be revisited. We show how such inelastic tunneling processes can occur in bulk systems and how they affect the analysis of the experimental data. Considering the spin-gap for spin excitations in the high-Tc superconductors we can trace back the peak-dip-hump features observed in many unconventional superconductors to the shift of the spin spectral weight to higher energies below the critical temperature Tc .

  17. Deep inelastic scattering at energies near the Coulomb barrier

    SciTech Connect

    Gehring, J.; Rehm, K.E.; Schiffer, J.P.

    1993-10-01

    A large yield for a process that appears to have many of the features of deep inelastic scattering has been observed at energies, near the Coulomb barrier in the systems {sup 112,124}Sn + {sup 58}Ni by Wolfs et al. In order to better understand the mechanisms by which energy dissipation takes place close to the barrier, we have extended the measurements of Wolfs to the system {sup 136}Xe + {sup 64}Ni. The use of inverse kinematics in the present measurements resulted in better mass and energy resolution due to reduced target effects and in more complete angular coverage. We have obtained angular distributions, mass distributions, and total cross sections for deep inelastic scattering at two energies near the barrier. The results on the closed neutron shell nucleus {sup 136}Xe complement those from the closed proton shell Sn nuclei.

  18. Probabilistic description of particle transport. III. Inelastic scattering

    SciTech Connect

    Goulet, T.; Keszei, E.; Jay-Gerin, J. Departement de Medecine Nucleaire et de Radiobiologie, Faculte de Medecine, Universite de Sherbrooke, Sherbrooke, PQ )

    1990-06-01

    We extend our probabilistic model of quasielastic particle transport to include possible inelastic scatterings of the particles in the bulk of the studied media. We show that this extended model can be used to describe different types of experiments involving electrons that go through or are reflected by a plane-parallel layer deposited on a substrate. In particular, we reanalyze the experimental results of low-energy ({approx lt}10 eV) electron transmission through solid xenon and solid molecular nitrogen. This analysis shows that the extended model is consistent with the quasielastic one, but is more powerful since we can now determine both the elastic and inelastic electron mean free paths. The analysis allows one to study the threshold creation of excitons that can be observed at about 8.5 and 9.5 eV in solid xenon, and around 7.5 eV in solid molecular nitrogen.

  19. Inelastic vibrational signals in electron transport across graphene nanoconstrictions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gunst, Tue; Markussen, Troels; Stokbro, Kurt; Brandbyge, Mads

    2016-06-01

    We present calculations of the inelastic vibrational signals in the electrical current through a graphene nanoconstriction. We find that the inelastic signals are only present when the Fermi-level position is tuned to electron transmission resonances, thus, providing a fingerprint which can link an electron transmission resonance to originate from the nanoconstriction. The calculations are based on a novel first-principles method which includes the phonon broadening due to coupling with phonons in the electrodes. We find that the signals are modified due to the strong coupling to the electrodes, however, still remain as robust fingerprints of the vibrations in the nanoconstriction. We investigate the effect of including the full self-consistent potential drop due to finite bias and gate doping on the calculations and find this to be of minor importance.

  20. Inelastic transitions in slow heavy-particle atomic collisions

    SciTech Connect

    Krstic, P. S.; Reinhold, C. O.; Burgdo''rfer, J.

    2001-05-01

    It is a generally held belief that inelastic transition probabilities and cross sections in slow, nearly adiabatic atomic collisions decrease exponentially with the inverse of the collision velocity v [i.e., {sigma}{proportional_to}exp(-const/v)]. This notion is supported by the Landau-Zener approximation and the hidden crossings approximation. We revisit the adiabatic limit of ion-atom collisions and show that for very slow collisions radial transitions are dominated by the topology of the branch points of the radial velocity rather than the branch points of the energy eigensurface. This can lead to a dominant power-law dependence of inelastic cross sections, {sigma}{proportional_to}v{sup n}. We illustrate the interplay between different contributions to the transition probabilities in a one-dimensional collision system for which the exact probabilities can be obtained from a direct numerical solution of the time-dependent Scho''dinger equation.

  1. Ribbon Reduces Spiking in Electron-Beam Welding

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Olson, R. E.

    1984-01-01

    Spiking in electron-beam welding reduced by placing high-vapor-pressure substance along path of electron beam. Strip of metal having vapor pressure higher than base metal at same temperature placed in slot machined along weld line. Strip vaporizes as beam strikes it, and vapor pressure keeps surface tension from closing off top of channel. Technique used successfully on nickel alloys and aluminum alloys and effective on steel and titanium.

  2. Spike-like Bursts as Fine Structure of Zebras

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zlobec, P.; Karlický, M.

    2007-12-01

    We studied the characteristics of the zebra-associated spike-like bursts that were recorded with high time resolution at 1420 MHz in four intervals (from 12:45 to 12:48 UT) during 5 August 2003. Our detailed analysis is based on the selection of more than 500 such spike-like bursts and it is, at least to our knowledge, the first study devoted to such short-lived bursts. Their characteristics are different from those pertinent to “normal” spike bursts, as presented in the paper by Güdel and Benz ( Astron. Astrophys. 231, 202, 1990); in particular, their duration (about 7.4 ms at half power) is shorter, so they should be members of the SSS (super short structures) family (Magdalenić et al., Astrophys. J. 642, L77, 2006). The bursts were generally strongly R-polarized; however, during the decaying part of interval I a low R-polarized and L-polarized bursts were also present. This change of polarization shows a trend that resembles the peculiar form of the zebra lines in the spectral dominion (“V” like). A global statistical analysis on the bursts observed in the two polarimetric channels shows that the highest cross-correlation coefficient (about 0.5) was pertinent to interval I. The zebras and the bursts can be interpreted by the same double plasma resonance process as proposed by Bárta and Karlický ( Astron. Astrophys. 379, 1045, 2001) and Karlický et al. ( Astron. Astrophys. 375, 638, 2001); in particular, the spikes are generated by the interruption of this process by assumed turbulence (density or magnetic field variations). This process should be present in the region close to the reconnection site ( e.g., in the plasma reconnection outflows) where the density and the magnetic field vary strongly.

  3. Recovery of spiked troponin I in four routine assays

    PubMed Central

    Loh, Tze Ping; Lim, Xiong Chang; Kieu, Karize; Sajiir, Haressh; Neo, Siew Fong; Cheng, Wan Ling; Sethi, Sunil Kumar

    2016-01-01

    Introduction This study aimed to examine the recovery of spiked human cardiac troponin I (cTnI) results measured by four routine assays, and investigate possible interference from microclots. Materials and methods 457 consecutive samples with cTnI concentration below limit of quantitation (12 ng/L), declared by the Vitros TnI ES assay (reference assay), were measured on Beckman Coulter Accu TnI+3, Siemens TnI-Ultra and Roche TnI STAT assays. These samples were enriched with native full-length cTnI to a concentration of 100 ng/L and retested. A post-spiking result that exceeded the critical difference at a predefined probability of 0.0005 of the target concentration (the median post-spiking result for each individual assay) was considered as outlier. To determine whether microclots were a significant cause of critically discrepant outlier results, a separate 50 samples were centrifuged twice between two post-spiking measurements using the Vitros TnI ES assay. Results The median recovery of the enriched cTnI was highest with the Roche assay (271 ng/L) and lowest with the Vitros assay (29 ng/L). The Vitros assay had the highest percentage of results that exceeded the critical difference (49%), followed by the Siemens (38%), Roche (18%) and Beckman Coulter (7%) assays. None of the 50 additional samples produced a critically lower cTnI result after re-centrifugation. Conclusions Our findings underscored the variability of cTnI assays in measuring native cTnI. The lack of cTnI results that became significantly lower after re-centrifugation suggested that microclots are unlikely to be a major cause of the outlier results. PMID:27346968

  4. Advanced Elastic/Inelastic Nuclear Data Development Project

    SciTech Connect

    Harmon, Frank; Chowdhury, Partha; Greife, Uwe; Fisher Hicks, Sally; Tsvetkov, Pavel; Rahn Vanhoy, Jeffrey; Hill, Tony; Kawano, Toshihiko; Slaughter, David

    2015-06-08

    The optical model is used to analyze the elastic and inelastic scattering of nucleons, deuterons, hellions, tritons, and alpha particles by the nuclei. Since this paper covers primarily neutron-nucleus scattering, the focus will be limited to only that interaction. For the sake of this model, the nucleus is described as a blob of nuclear matter with properties based upon its number of nucleons. This infers that a single potential can describe the interaction of particles with different energies with different nuclei.

  5. The 3-D inelastic analyses for computational structural mechanics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hopkins, D. A.; Chamis, C. C.

    1989-01-01

    The 3-D inelastic analysis method is a focused program with the objective to develop computationally effective analysis methods and attendant computer codes for three-dimensional, nonlinear time and temperature dependent problems present in the hot section of turbojet engine structures. Development of these methods was a major part of the Hot Section Technology (HOST) program over the past five years at Lewis Research Center.

  6. Measurement of azimuthal asymmetries in deep inelastic scattering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Breitweg, J.; Chekanov, S.; Derrick, M.; Krakauer, D.; Magill, S.; Musgrave, B.; Pellegrino, A.; Repond, J.; Stanek, R.; Yoshida, R.; Mattingly, M. C. K.; Abbiendi, G.; Anselmo, F.; Antonioli, P.; Bari, G.; Basile, M.; Bellagamba, L.; Boscherini, D.; Bruni, A.; Bruni, G.; Cara Romeo, G.; Castellini, G.; Cifarelli, L.; Cindolo, F.; Contin, A.; Coppola, N.; Corradi, M.; De Pasquale, S.; Giusti, P.; Iacobucci, G.; Laurenti, G.; Levi, G.; Margotti, A.; Massam, T.; Nania, R.; Palmonari, F.; Pesci, A.; Polini, A.; Sartorelli, G.; Zamora Garcia, Y.; Zichichi, A.; Amelung, C.; Bornheim, A.; Brock, I.; Coböken, K.; Crittenden, J.; Deffner, R.; Hartmann, H.; Heinloth, K.; Hilger, E.; Irrgang, P.; Jakob, H.-P.; Kappes, A.; Katz, U. F.; Kerger, R.; Paul, E.; Schnurbusch, H.; Stifutkin, A.; Tandler, J.; Voss, K. C.; Weber, A.; Wieber, H.; Bailey, D. S.; Barret, O.; Brook, N. H.; Foster, B.; Heath, G. P.; Heath, H. F.; McFall, J. D.; Piccioni, D.; Rodrigues, E.; Scott, J.; Tapper, R. J.; Capua, M.; Mastroberardino, A.; Schioppa, M.; Susinno, G.; Jeoung, H. Y.; Kim, J. Y.; Lee, J. H.; Lim, I. T.; Ma, K. J.; Pac, M. Y.; Caldwell, A.; Liu, W.; Liu, X.; Mellado, B.; Paganis, S.; Sampson, S.; Schmidke, W. B.; Sciulli, F.; Chwastowski, J.; Eskreys, A.; Figiel, J.; Klimek, K.; Olkiewicz, K.; Piotrzkowski, K.; Przybycień, M. B.; Stopa, P.; Zawiejski, L.; Bednarek, B.; Jeleń, K.; Kisielewska, D.; Kowal, A. M.; Kowalski, T.; Przybycień, M.; Rulikowska-Zarȩbska, E.; Suszycki, L.; Szuba, D.; Kotański, A.; Bauerdick, L. A. T.; Behrens, U.; Bienlein, J. K.; Burgard, C.; Dannheim, D.; Desler, K.; Drews, G.; Fox-Murphy, A.; Fricke, U.; Goebel, F.; Göttlicher, P.; Graciani, R.; Haas, T.; Hain, W.; Hartner, G. F.; Hasell, D.; Hebbel, K.; Johnson, K. F.; Kasemann, M.; Koch, W.; Kötz, U.; Kowalski, H.; Lindemann, L.; Löhr, B.; Martínez, M.; Milite, M.; Monteiro, T.; Moritz, M.; Notz, D.; Pelucchi, F.; Petrucci, M. C.; Rohde, M.; Saull, P. R. B.; Savin, A. A.; Schneekloth, U.; Selonke, F.; Sievers, M.; Stonjek, S.; Tassi, E.; Wolf, G.; Wollmer, U.; Youngman, C.; Zeuner, W.; Coldewey, C.; Lopez-Duran Viani, A.; Meyer, A.; Schlenstedt, S.; Straub, P. B.; Barbagli, G.; Gallo, E.; Pelfer, P.; Maccarrone, G.; Votano, L.; Bamberger, A.; Benen, A.; Eisenhardt, S.; Markun, P.; Raach, H.; Wölfle, S.; Bussey, P. J.; Doyle, A. T.; Lee, S. W.; Macdonald, N.; McCance, G. J.; Saxon, D. H.; Sinclair, L. E.; Skillicorn, I. O.; Waugh, R.; Bohnet, I.; Gendner, N.; Holm, U.; Meyer-Larsen, A.; Salehi, H.; Wick, K.; Garfagnini, A.; Gialas, I.; Gladilin, L. K.; Kçira, D.; Klanner, R.; Lohrmann, E.; Poelz, G.; Zetsche, F.; Goncalo, R.; Long, K. R.; Miller, D. B.; Tapper, A. D.; Walker, R.; Mallik, U.; Cloth, P.; Filges, D.; Ishii, T.; Kuze, M.; Nagano, K.; Tokushuku, K.; Yamada, S.; Yamazaki, Y.; Ahn, S. H.; Lee, S. B.; Park, S. K.; Lim, H.; Park, I. H.; Son, D.; Barreiro, F.; García, G.; Glasman, C.; Gonzalez, O.; Labarga, L.; del Peso, J.; Redondo, I.; Terrón, J.; Barbi, M.; Corriveau, F.; Hanna, D. S.; Ochs, A.; Padhi, S.; Riveline, M.; Stairs, D. G.; Wing, M.; Tsurugai, T.; Bashkirov, V.; Dolgoshein, B. A.; Dementiev, R. K.; Ermolov, P. F.; Golubkov, Y. A.; Katkov, I. I.; Khein, L. A.; Korotkova, N. A.; Korzhavina, I. A.; Kuzmin, V. A.; Lukina, O. Y.; Proskuryakov, A. S.; Shcheglova, L. M.; Solomin, A. N.; Vlasov, N. N.; Zotkin, S. A.; Bokel, C.; Botje, M.; Brümmer, N.; Engelen, J.; Grijpink, S.; Koffeman, E.; Kooijman, P.; Schagen, S.; van Sighem, A.; Tiecke, H.; Tuning, N.; Velthuis, J. J.; Vossebeld, J.; Wiggers, L.; de Wolf, E.; Acosta, D.; Bylsma, B.; Durkin, L. S.; Gilmore, J.; Ginsburg, C. M.; Kim, C. L.; Ling, T. Y.; Boogert, S.; Cooper-Sarkar, A. M.; Devenish, R. C. E.; Große-Knetter, J.; Matsushita, T.; Ruske, O.; Sutton, M. R.; Walczak, R.; Bertolin, A.; Brugnera, R.; Carlin, R.; Dal Corso, F.; Dosselli, U.; Dusini, S.; Limentani, S.; Morandin, M.; Posocco, M.; Stanco, L.; Stroili, R.; Voci, C.; Adamczyk, L.; Iannotti, L.; Oh, B. Y.; Okrasiński, J. R.; Toothacker, W. S.; Whitmore, J. J.; Iga, Y.; D'Agostini, G.; Marini, G.; Nigro, A.; Cormack, C.; Hart, J. C.; McCubbin, N. A.; Shah, T. P.; Epperson, D.; Heusch, C.; Sadrozinski, H. F.-W.; Seiden, A.; Wichmann, R.; Williams, D. C.; Pavel, N.; Abramowicz, H.; Dagan, S.; Kananov, S.; Kreisel, A.; Levy, A.; Abe, T.; Fusayasu, T.; Umemori, K.; Yamashita, T.; Hamatsu, R.; Hirose, T.; Inuzuka, M.; Kitamura, S.; Nishimura, T.; Arneodo, M.; Cartiglia, N.; Cirio, R.; Costa, M.; Ferrero, M. I.; Maselli, S.; Monaco, V.; Peroni, C.; Ruspa, M.; Sacchi, R.; Solano, A.; Staiano, A.; Dardo, M.; Bailey, D. C.; Fagerstroem, C.-P.; Galea, R.; Koop, T.; Levman, G. M.; Martin, J. F.; Orr, R. S.; Polenz, S.; Sabetfakhri, A.; Simmons, D.; Butterworth, J. M.; Catterall, C. D.; Hayes, M. E.; Heaphy, E. A.; Jones, T. W.; Lane, J. B.; West, B. J.; Ciborowski, J.; Ciesielski, R.; Grzelak, G.; Nowak, R. J.; Pawlak, J. M.; Pawlak, R.; Smalska, B.; Tymieniecka, T.; Wróblewski, A. K.; Zakrzewski, J. A.; Z˙arnecki, A. F.; Adamus, M.; Gadaj, T.; Deppe, O.; Eisenberg, Y.; Hochman, D.; Karshon, U.; Badgett, W. F.; Chapin, D.; Cross, R.; Foudas, C.; Mattingly, S.; Reeder, D. D.; Smith, W. H.; Vaiciulis, A.; Wildschek, T.; Wodarczyk, M.; Deshpande, A.; Dhawan, S.; Hughes, V. W.; Bhadra, S.; Catterall, C.; Cole, J. E.; Frisken, W. R.; Hall-Wilton, R.; Khakzad, M.; Menary, S.

    2000-05-01

    The distribution of the azimuthal angle for the charged hadrons has been studied in the hadronic centre-of-mass system for neutral current deep inelastic positron-proton scattering with the ZEUS detector at HERA. Measurements of the dependence of the moments of this distribution on the transverse momenta of the charged hadrons are presented. Asymmetries that can be unambiguously attributed to perturbative QCD processes have been observed for the first time.

  7. Inelastic electron scattering on C{sub 60} clusters

    SciTech Connect

    Yabana, K.; Bertsch, G.F.

    1993-12-31

    We calculate the electronic excitation of C{sub 60} by inelastic electron scattering or electron energy loss spectroscopy (EELS). The scattering process is treated in the distorted-wave Born approximation, and the electronic excitations are calculated in a spherical basis model. We find that low energy electrons excite some non-photoactive modes, in agreement with experiment. Spin triplet modes are poorly excited, even at the lowest electron energies.

  8. Relativistic mechanical-thermodynamical formalism—description of inelastic collisions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Güémez, J.; Fiolhais, M.; Fernández, L. A.

    2016-01-01

    We present a relativistic formalism inspired by the Minkowski four-vectors that also includes conservation laws such as the first law of thermodynamics. It remains close to the relativistic four-vector formalism developed for a single particle, but is also related to the classical treatment of problems that require both Newton's second law and the energy conservation law. We apply the developed formalism to inelastic collisions to better show how it works.

  9. Inelastic collisions of positrons with one-valence-electron targets

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Abdel-Raouf, Mohamed Assad

    1990-01-01

    The total elastic and positronium formation cross sections of the inelastic collisions between positrons and various one-valence-electron atoms, (namely hydrogen, lithium, sodium, potassium and rubidium), and one-valence-electron ions, (namely hydrogen-like, lithium-like and alkaline-earth positive ions) are determined using an elaborate modified coupled-static approximation. Special attention is devoted to the behavior of the Ps cross sections at the energy regions lying above the Ps formation thresholds.

  10. Hadron mass corrections in semi-inclusive deep inelastic scattering

    SciTech Connect

    A. Accardi, T. Hobbs, W. Melnitchouk

    2009-11-01

    We derive mass corrections for semi-inclusive deep inelastic scattering of leptons from nucleons using a collinear factorization framework which incorporates the initial state mass of the target nucleon and the final state mass of the produced hadron $h$. The hadron mass correction is made by introducing a generalized, finite-$Q^2$ scaling variable $\\zeta_h$ for the hadron fragmentation function, which approaches the usual energy fraction $z_h = E_h/\

  11. Inelastic and Reactive Scattering Dynamics of Hyperthermal Oxygen Atoms on Ionic Liquid Surfaces: [emim][NTf{sub 2}] and [C{sub 12}mim][NTf{sub 2}

    SciTech Connect

    Wu Bohan; Zhang Jianming; Minton, Timothy K.; McKendrick, Kenneth G.; Slattery, John M.; Yockel, Scott; Schatz, George C.

    2011-05-20

    Collisions of hyperthermal oxygen atoms, with an average translational energy of 520 kJ mol{sup -1}, on continuously refreshed ionic liquids, 1-ethyl-3-methylimidazolium bis(trifluoromethylsulfonyl) imide ([emim][NTf{sub 2}]) and 1-dodecyl-3-methylimidazolium bis(trifluoromethylsulfonyl) imide ([C{sub 12}mim][NTf{sub 2}]), were studied with the use of a beam-surface scattering technique. Time-of-flight and angular distributions of inelastically scattered O and reactively scattered OH and H{sub 2}O were collected for various angles of incidence with the use of a rotatable mass spectrometer detector. For both O and OH, two distinct scattering processes were identified, which can be empirically categorized as thermal and non-thermal. Non-thermal scattering is more probable for both O and OH products. The observation of OH confirms that at least some reactive sites, presumably alkyl groups, must be exposed at the surface. The ionic liquid with the longer alkyl chain, [C{sub 12}mim][NTf{sub 2}], is substantially more reactive than the liquid with the shorter alkyl chain, [emim][NTf{sub 2}], and proportionately much more so than would be predicted simply from stoichiometry based on the number of abstractable hydrogen atoms. Molecular dynamics models of these surfaces shed light on this change in reactivity. The scattering behavior of O is distinctly different from that of OH. However, no such differences between inelastic and reactive scattering dynamics have been seen in previous work on pure hydrocarbon liquids, in particular the benchmark, partially branched hydrocarbon, squalane (C{sub 30}H{sub 62}). The comparison between inelastic and reactive scattering dynamics indicates that inelastic scattering from the ionic liquid surfaces takes place predominantly at non-reactive sites that are effectively stiffer than the reactive alkyl chains, with a higher proportion of collisions sampling such sites for [emim][NTf{sub 2}] than for [C{sub 12}mim][NTf{sub 2}].

  12. Repertoires of Spike Avalanches Are Modulated by Behavior and Novelty.

    PubMed

    Ribeiro, Tiago L; Ribeiro, Sidarta; Copelli, Mauro

    2016-01-01

    Neuronal avalanches measured as consecutive bouts of thresholded field potentials represent a statistical signature that the brain operates near a critical point. In theory, criticality optimizes stimulus sensitivity, information transmission, computational capability and mnemonic repertoires size. Field potential avalanches recorded via multielectrode arrays from cortical slice cultures are repeatable spatiotemporal activity patterns. It remains unclear whether avalanches of action potentials observed in forebrain regions of freely-behaving rats also form recursive repertoires, and whether these have any behavioral relevance. Here, we show that spike avalanches, recorded from hippocampus (HP) and sensory neocortex of freely-behaving rats, constitute distinct families of recursive spatiotemporal patterns. A significant number of those patterns were specific to a behavioral state. Although avalanches produced during sleep were mostly similar to others that occurred during waking, the repertoire of patterns recruited during sleep differed significantly from that of waking. More importantly, exposure to novel objects increased the rate at which new patterns arose, also leading to changes in post-exposure repertoires, which were significantly different from those before the exposure. A significant number of families occurred exclusively during periods of whisker contact with objects, but few were associated with specific objects. Altogether, the results provide original evidence linking behavior and criticality at the spike level: spike avalanches form repertoires that emerge in waking, recur during sleep, are diversified by novelty and contribute to object representation. PMID:27047341

  13. Spike penetration in blast-wave-driven instabilities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Drake, R. P.

    2009-11-01

    Recent experiments by C. Kuranz and collaborators, motivated by structure in supernovae, have studied systems in which planar blast waves encounter interfaces where the density decreases. During the Rayleigh-Taylor (RT) phase of such experiments, they observed greater penetration of the RT spikes than tends to be seen in simulations. Here we seek to employ semi-analytic theory to understand the general nature and regimes of spike penetration for blast-wave-driven instabilities. This problem is not trivial as one must account for the initial vorticity deposition at the interface, for its time-dependent deceleration, for the expansion of the shocked material in time and space, and for the drag on the broadened tips of the spikes. One can hope that such models will increase our ability to interpret the behavior of simulations of such systems, in both the laboratory and astrophysics. Supported by the US DOE NNSA under the Predictive Sci. Academic Alliance Program by grant DE-FC52-08NA28616, the Stewardship Sci. Academic Alliances program by grant DE-FG52-04NA00064, and the Nat. Laser User Facility by grant DE-FG03--00SF22021.

  14. Spike Penetration in Blast-Wave-Driven Instabilities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Drake, R. Paul

    2010-05-01

    Recent experiments by C. Kuranz and collaborators, motivated by structure in supernovae, have studied systems in which planar blast waves encounter interfaces where the density decreases. During the Rayleigh-Taylor (RT) phase of such experiments, they observed greater penetration of the RT spikes than tends to be seen in simulations. Here we seek to employ semi-analytic theory to understand the general nature and regimes of spike penetration for blast-wave-driven instabilities. This problem is not trivial as one must account for the initial vorticity deposition at the interface, for its time-dependent deceleration, for the expansion of the shocked material in time and space, and for the drag on the broadened tips of the spikes. We offer here an improved evaluation of the material expansion in comparison to past work. The goal is to use such models to increase our ability to interpret the behavior of simulations of such systems, in both the laboratory and astrophysics. Supported by the US DOE NNSA under the Predictive Sci. Academic Alliance Program by grant DE-FC52-08NA28616, the Stewardship Sci. Academic Alliances program by grant DE-FG52-04NA00064, and the Nat. Laser User Facility by grant DE-FG03-00SF22021.

  15. How adaptation shapes spike rate oscillations in recurrent neuronal networks

    PubMed Central

    Augustin, Moritz; Ladenbauer, Josef; Obermayer, Klaus

    2012-01-01

    Neural mass signals from in-vivo recordings often show oscillations with frequencies ranging from <1 to 100 Hz. Fast rhythmic activity in the beta and gamma range can be generated by network-based mechanisms such as recurrent synaptic excitation-inhibition loops. Slower oscillations might instead depend on neuronal adaptation currents whose timescales range from tens of milliseconds to seconds. Here we investigate how the dynamics of such adaptation currents contribute to spike rate oscillations and resonance properties in recurrent networks of excitatory and inhibitory neurons. Based on a network of sparsely coupled spiking model neurons with two types of adaptation current and conductance-based synapses with heterogeneous strengths and delays we use a mean-field approach to analyze oscillatory network activity. For constant external input, we find that spike-triggered adaptation currents provide a mechanism to generate slow oscillations over a wide range of adaptation timescales as long as recurrent synaptic excitation is sufficiently strong. Faster rhythms occur when recurrent inhibition is slower than excitation and oscillation frequency increases with the strength of inhibition. Adaptation facilitates such network-based oscillations for fast synaptic inhibition and leads to decreased frequencies. For oscillatory external input, adaptation currents amplify a narrow band of frequencies and cause phase advances for low frequencies in addition to phase delays at higher frequencies. Our results therefore identify the different key roles of neuronal adaptation dynamics for rhythmogenesis and selective signal propagation in recurrent networks. PMID:23450654

  16. Epileptic spike recognition in electroencephalogram using deterministic finite automata.

    PubMed

    Keshri, Anup Kumar; Sinha, Rakesh Kumar; Hatwal, Rajesh; Das, Barda Nand

    2009-06-01

    This Paper presents an automated method of Epileptic Spike detection in Electroencephalogram (EEG) using Deterministic Finite Automata (DFA). It takes prerecorded single channel EEG data file as input and finds the occurrences of Epileptic Spikes data in it. The EEG signal was recorded at 256 Hz in two minutes separate data files using the Visual Lab-M software (ADLink Technology Inc., Taiwan). It was preprocessed for removal of baseline shift and band pass filtered using an infinite impulse response (IIR) Butterworth filter. A system, whose functionality was modeled with DFA, was designed. The system was tested with 10 EEG signal data files. The recognition rate of Epileptic Spike as on average was 95.68%. This system does not require any human intrusion. Also it does not need any short of training. The result shows that the application of DFA can be useful in detection of different characteristics present in EEG signals. This approach could be extended to a continuous data processing system. PMID:19408450

  17. Separating Spike Count Correlation from Firing Rate Correlation

    PubMed Central

    Vinci, Giuseppe; Ventura, Valérie; Smith, Matthew A.; Kass, Robert E.

    2016-01-01

    Populations of cortical neurons exhibit shared fluctuations in spiking activity over time. When measured for a pair of neurons over multiple repetitions of an identical stimulus, this phenomenon emerges as correlated trial-to-trial response variability via spike count correlation (SCC). However, spike counts can be viewed as noisy versions of firing rates, which can vary from trial to trial. From this perspective, the SCC for a pair of neurons becomes a noisy version of the corresponding firing-rate correlation (FRC). Furthermore, the magnitude of the SCC is generally smaller than that of the FRC, and is likely to be less sensitive to experimental manipulation. We provide statistical methods for disambiguating time-averaged drive from within-trial noise, thereby separating FRC from SCC. We study these methods to document their reliability, and we apply them to neurons recorded in vivo from area V4, in an alert animal. We show how the various effects we describe are reflected in the data: within-trial effects are largely negligible, while attenuation due to trial-to-trial variation dominates, and frequently produces comparisons in SCC that, because of noise, do not accurately reflect those based on the underlying FRC. PMID:26942746

  18. Higher-order spike triggered analysis of neural oscillators.

    PubMed

    Ota, Keisuke; Omori, Toshiaki; Miyakawa, Hiroyoshi; Okada, Masato; Aonishi, Toru

    2012-01-01

    For the purpose of elucidating the neural coding process based on the neural excitability mechanism, researchers have recently investigated the relationship between neural dynamics and the spike triggered stimulus ensemble (STE). Ermentrout et al. analytically derived the relational equation between the phase response curve (PRC) and the spike triggered average (STA). The STA is the first cumulant of the STE. However, in order to understand the neural function as the encoder more explicitly, it is necessary to elucidate the relationship between the PRC and higher-order cumulants of the STE. In this paper, we give a general formulation to relate the PRC and the nth moment of the STE. By using this formulation, we derive a relational equation between the PRC and the spike triggered covariance (STC), which is the covariance of the STE. We show the effectiveness of the relational equation through numerical simulations and use the equation to identify the feature space of the rat hippocampal CA1 pyramidal neurons from their PRCs. Our result suggests that the hippocampal CA1 pyramidal neurons oscillating in the theta frequency range are commonly sensitive to inputs composed of theta and gamma frequency components. PMID:23226249

  19. NMDA spike/plateau potentials in dendrites of thalamocortical neurons.

    PubMed

    Augustinaite, Sigita; Kuhn, Bernd; Helm, Paul Johannes; Heggelund, Paul

    2014-08-13

    Dendritic NMDA spike/plateau potentials, first discovered in cortical pyramidal neurons, provide supralinear integration of synaptic inputs on thin and distal dendrites, thereby increasing the impact of these inputs on the soma. The more specific functional role of these potentials has been difficult to clarify, partly due to the complex circuitry of cortical neurons. Thalamocortical (TC) neurons in the dorsal lateral geniculate nucleus participate in simpler circuits. They receive their primary afferent input from retina and send their output to visual cortex. Cortex, in turn, regulates this output through massive feedback to distal dendrites of the TC neurons. The TC neurons can operate in two modes related to behavioral states: burst mode prevailing during sleep, when T-type calcium bursts largely disrupt the transfer of signals from retina to cortex, and tonic mode, which provides reliable transfer of retinal signals to cortex during wakefulness. We studied dendritic potentials in TC neurons with combined two-photon calcium imaging and whole-cell recording of responses to local dendritic glutamate iontophoresis in acute brain slices from mice. We found that NMDA spike/plateaus can be elicited locally at distal dendrites of TC neurons. We suggest that these dendritic potentials have important functions in the cortical regulation of thalamocortical transmission. NMDA spike/plateaus can induce shifts in the functional mode from burst to tonic by blockade of T-type calcium conductances. Moreover, in tonic mode, they can facilitate the transfer of retinal signals to cortex by depolarization of TC neurons. PMID:25122891

  20. Sparse Data Analysis Strategy for Neural Spike Classification

    PubMed Central

    Vigneron, Vincent; Chen, Hsin

    2014-01-01

    Many of the multichannel extracellular recordings of neural activity consist of attempting to sort spikes on the basis of shared characteristics with some feature detection techniques. Then spikes can be sorted into distinct clusters. There are in general two main statistical issues: firstly, spike sorting can result in well-sorted units, but by with no means one can be sure that one is dealing with single units due to the number of neurons adjacent to the recording electrode. Secondly, the waveform dimensionality is reduced in a small subset of discriminating features. This shortening dimension effort was introduced as an aid to visualization and manual clustering, but also to reduce the computational complexity in automatic classification. We introduce a metric based on common neighbourhood to introduce sparsity in the dataset and separate data into more homogeneous subgroups. The approach is particularly well suited for clustering when the individual clusters are elongated (that is nonspherical). In addition it does need not to select the number of clusters, it is very efficient to visualize clusters in a dataset, it is robust to noise, it can handle imbalanced data, and it is fully automatic and deterministic. PMID:25101122

  1. Poisson-like spiking in circuits with probabilistic synapses.

    PubMed

    Moreno-Bote, Rubén

    2014-07-01

    Neuronal activity in cortex is variable both spontaneously and during stimulation, and it has the remarkable property that it is Poisson-like over broad ranges of firing rates covering from virtually zero to hundreds of spikes per second. The mechanisms underlying cortical-like spiking variability over such a broad continuum of rates are currently unknown. We show that neuronal networks endowed with probabilistic synaptic transmission, a well-documented source of variability in cortex, robustly generate Poisson-like variability over several orders of magnitude in their firing rate without fine-tuning of the network parameters. Other sources of variability, such as random synaptic delays or spike generation jittering, do not lead to Poisson-like variability at high rates because they cannot be sufficiently amplified by recurrent neuronal networks. We also show that probabilistic synapses predict Fano factor constancy of synaptic conductances. Our results suggest that synaptic noise is a robust and sufficient mechanism for the type of variability found in cortex. PMID:25032705

  2. Learning in neural networks by reinforcement of irregular spiking

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xie, Xiaohui; Seung, H. Sebastian

    2004-04-01

    Artificial neural networks are often trained by using the back propagation algorithm to compute the gradient of an objective function with respect to the synaptic strengths. For a biological neural network, such a gradient computation would be difficult to implement, because of the complex dynamics of intrinsic and synaptic conductances in neurons. Here we show that irregular spiking similar to that observed in biological neurons could be used as the basis for a learning rule that calculates a stochastic approximation to the gradient. The learning rule is derived based on a special class of model networks in which neurons fire spike trains with Poisson statistics. The learning is compatible with forms of synaptic dynamics such as short-term facilitation and depression. By correlating the fluctuations in irregular spiking with a reward signal, the learning rule performs stochastic gradient ascent on the expected reward. It is applied to two examples, learning the XOR computation and learning direction selectivity using depressing synapses. We also show in simulation that the learning rule is applicable to a network of noisy integrate-and-fire neurons.

  3. Emergent Properties of Interacting Populations of Spiking Neurons

    PubMed Central

    Cardanobile, Stefano; Rotter, Stefan

    2011-01-01

    Dynamic neuronal networks are a key paradigm of increasing importance in brain research, concerned with the functional analysis of biological neuronal networks and, at the same time, with the synthesis of artificial brain-like systems. In this context, neuronal network models serve as mathematical tools to understand the function of brains, but they might as well develop into future tools for enhancing certain functions of our nervous system. Here, we present and discuss our recent achievements in developing multiplicative point processes into a viable mathematical framework for spiking network modeling. The perspective is that the dynamic behavior of these neuronal networks is faithfully reflected by a set of non-linear rate equations, describing all interactions on the population level. These equations are similar in structure to Lotka-Volterra equations, well known by their use in modeling predator-prey relations in population biology, but abundant applications to economic theory have also been described. We present a number of biologically relevant examples for spiking network function, which can be studied with the help of the aforementioned correspondence between spike trains and specific systems of non-linear coupled ordinary differential equations. We claim that, enabled by the use of multiplicative point processes, we can make essential contributions to a more thorough understanding of the dynamical properties of interacting neuronal populations. PMID:22207844

  4. Repertoires of Spike Avalanches Are Modulated by Behavior and Novelty

    PubMed Central

    Ribeiro, Tiago L.; Ribeiro, Sidarta; Copelli, Mauro

    2016-01-01

    Neuronal avalanches measured as consecutive bouts of thresholded field potentials represent a statistical signature that the brain operates near a critical point. In theory, criticality optimizes stimulus sensitivity, information transmission, computational capability and mnemonic repertoires size. Field potential avalanches recorded via multielectrode arrays from cortical slice cultures are repeatable spatiotemporal activity patterns. It remains unclear whether avalanches of action potentials observed in forebrain regions of freely-behaving rats also form recursive repertoires, and whether these have any behavioral relevance. Here, we show that spike avalanches, recorded from hippocampus (HP) and sensory neocortex of freely-behaving rats, constitute distinct families of recursive spatiotemporal patterns. A significant number of those patterns were specific to a behavioral state. Although avalanches produced during sleep were mostly similar to others that occurred during waking, the repertoire of patterns recruited during sleep differed significantly from that of waking. More importantly, exposure to novel objects increased the rate at which new patterns arose, also leading to changes in post-exposure repertoires, which were significantly different from those before the exposure. A significant number of families occurred exclusively during periods of whisker contact with objects, but few were associated with specific objects. Altogether, the results provide original evidence linking behavior and criticality at the spike level: spike avalanches form repertoires that emerge in waking, recur during sleep, are diversified by novelty and contribute to object representation. PMID:27047341

  5. Spike: Artificial intelligence scheduling for Hubble space telescope

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johnston, Mark; Miller, Glenn; Sponsler, Jeff; Vick, Shon; Jackson, Robert

    1990-01-01

    Efficient utilization of spacecraft resources is essential, but the accompanying scheduling problems are often computationally intractable and are difficult to approximate because of the presence of numerous interacting constraints. Artificial intelligence techniques were applied to the scheduling of the NASA/ESA Hubble Space Telescope (HST). This presents a particularly challenging problem since a yearlong observing program can contain some tens of thousands of exposures which are subject to a large number of scientific, operational, spacecraft, and environmental constraints. New techniques were developed for machine reasoning about scheduling constraints and goals, especially in cases where uncertainty is an important scheduling consideration and where resolving conflicts among conflicting preferences is essential. These technique were utilized in a set of workstation based scheduling tools (Spike) for HST. Graphical displays of activities, constraints, and schedules are an important feature of the system. High level scheduling strategies using both rule based and neural network approaches were developed. While the specific constraints implemented are those most relevant to HST, the framework developed is far more general and could easily handle other kinds of scheduling problems. The concept and implementation of the Spike system are described along with some experiments in adapting Spike to other spacecraft scheduling domains.

  6. Learning Spike Time Codes Through Morphological Learning With Binary Synapses.

    PubMed

    Roy, Subhrajit; San, Phyo Phyo; Hussain, Shaista; Wei, Lee Wang; Basu, Arindam

    2016-07-01

    In this brief, a neuron with nonlinear dendrites (NNLDs) and binary synapses that is able to learn temporal features of spike input patterns is considered. Since binary synapses are considered, learning happens through formation and elimination of connections between the inputs and the dendritic branches to modify the structure or morphology of the NNLD. A morphological learning algorithm inspired by the tempotron, i.e., a recently proposed temporal learning algorithm is presented in this brief. Unlike tempotron, the proposed learning rule uses a technique to automatically adapt the NNLD threshold during training. Experimental results indicate that our NNLD with 1-bit synapses can obtain accuracy similar to that of a traditional tempotron with 4-bit synapses in classifying single spike random latency and pairwise synchrony patterns. Hence, the proposed method is better suited for robust hardware implementation in the presence of statistical variations. We also present results of applying this rule to real-life spike classification problems from the field of tactile sensing. PMID:26173221

  7. Separating Spike Count Correlation from Firing Rate Correlation.

    PubMed

    Vinci, Giuseppe; Ventura, Valérie; Smith, Matthew A; Kass, Robert E

    2016-05-01

    Populations of cortical neurons exhibit shared fluctuations in spiking activity over time. When measured for a pair of neurons over multiple repetitions of an identical stimulus, this phenomenon emerges as correlated trial-to-trial response variability via spike count correlation (SCC). However, spike counts can be viewed as noisy versions of firing rates, which can vary from trial to trial. From this perspective, the SCC for a pair of neurons becomes a noisy version of the corresponding firing rate correlation (FRC). Furthermore, the magnitude of the SCC is generally smaller than that of the FRC and is likely to be less sensitive to experimental manipulation. We provide statistical methods for disambiguating time-averaged drive from within-trial noise, thereby separating FRC from SCC. We study these methods to document their reliability, and we apply them to neurons recorded in vivo from area V4 in an alert animal. We show how the various effects we describe are reflected in the data: within-trial effects are largely negligible, while attenuation due to trial-to-trial variation dominates and frequently produces comparisons in SCC that, because of noise, do not accurately reflect those based on the underlying FRC. PMID:26942746

  8. Inelastic pion scattering by /sup 13/C at low energies

    SciTech Connect

    Mitchell, J.H.

    1987-03-01

    Angular distributions for inelastically scattered pions were obtained for several states in /sup 13/C at an incident energy of 65 MeV. The data include results from both ..pi../sup +/ and ..pi../sup -/ measurements. In addition, ..pi../sup -/ measurements were made at T/sub ..pi../ = 50 MeV at one angle to give a two point fixed-q excitation function. The data are compared to theory and the data of others. As might be expected, medium corrections are shown to be considerably more important at low energies than at resonance. This is true for inelastic transitions of multipolarity 0,2 and 3. Parameters derived from an analysis of elastic pion scattering and SCX data also provide an adequate description of the inelastic transitions. The charge asymmetry in the cross sections for the 9/2/sup +/ state that was seen at resonance persists at these energies. This result is consistent with an impulse approximation treatment of the spin-flip amplitude. This is true even though the incoming energy of the pions is far below the range where the validity of an impulse treatment is expected. 65 refs., 45 figs.

  9. Inelastic scattering at the B K edge of hexagonal BN

    SciTech Connect

    Jia, J.J.; Callcott, T.A.; Zhou, L.

    1997-04-01

    Many recent soft x-ray fluorescence (SXF) studies have shown that inelastic scattering processes make important contributions to the observed spectra for excitation near the x-ray threshold. These effects are all attributed to a process, usually called an electronic Raman scattering (ERS) process, in which energy is lost to an electronic excitation. The theory has been described using second order perturbation theory by Tulkki and Aberg. In different materials, the detailed nature of the electronic excitation producing the energy loss may be very different. In crystalline Si, diamond and graphite, changes in spectral shape and dispersion of spectral features with variation of the excitation energy are observed, which are attributed to k conservation between the photoelectron generated in the excitation process and the valence hole remaining after the coupled emission process. Hence the process is strongly localized in k-space. In haxagonal boron nitride, which has a lattice and band structure very similar to graphite, inelastic scattering produces very different effects on the observed spectra. Here, the inelastic losses are coupled to a strong resonant elastic scattering process, in which the intermediate state is a localized core exciton and the final state is a localized valence exciton, so that the electronic excitation is strongly localized in real rather than reciprocal space.

  10. Elastic and inelastic deformation of fluid-saturated rock.

    PubMed

    Makhnenko, Roman Y; Labuz, Joseph F

    2016-10-13

    In situ rock is often saturated with fluid, the presence of which affects both elastic parameters and inelastic deformation processes. Techniques were developed for testing fluid-saturated porous rock under the limiting conditions of drained (long-term), undrained (short-term) and unjacketed (solid matrix) response in hydrostatic, axisymmetric and plane-strain compression. Drained and undrained poroelastic parameters, including bulk modulus, Biot and Skempton coefficients, of Berea sandstone were found to be stress dependent up to 35 MPa mean stress, and approximately constant at higher levels of loading. The unjacketed bulk modulus was measured to be constant for pressure up to 60 MPa, and it appears to be larger than the unjacketed pore bulk modulus. An elasto-plastic constitutive model calibrated with parameters from drained tests provided a first-order approximation of undrained inelastic deformation: dilatant hardening was observed due to pore pressure decrease during inelastic deformation of rock specimens with constant fluid content.This article is part of the themed issue 'Energy and the subsurface'. PMID:27597783

  11. The interpretation of polycrystalline coherent inelastic neutron scattering from aluminium

    PubMed Central

    Roach, Daniel L.; Ross, D. Keith; Gale, Julian D.; Taylor, Jon W.

    2013-01-01

    A new approach to the interpretation and analysis of coherent inelastic neutron scattering from polycrystals (poly-CINS) is presented. This article describes a simulation of the one-phonon coherent inelastic scattering from a lattice model of an arbitrary crystal system. The one-phonon component is characterized by sharp features, determined, for example, by boundaries of the (Q, ω) regions where one-phonon scattering is allowed. These features may be identified with the same features apparent in the measured total coherent inelastic cross section, the other components of which (multiphonon or multiple scattering) show no sharp features. The parameters of the model can then be relaxed to improve the fit between model and experiment. This method is of particular interest where no single crystals are available. To test the approach, the poly-CINS has been measured for polycrystalline aluminium using the MARI spectrometer (ISIS), because both lattice dynamical models and measured dispersion curves are available for this material. The models used include a simple Lennard-Jones model fitted to the elastic constants of this material plus a number of embedded atom method force fields. The agreement obtained suggests that the method demonstrated should be effective in developing models for other materials where single-crystal dispersion curves are not available. PMID:24282332

  12. SNCR De-NOx within a moderate temperature range using urea-spiked hydrazine hydrate as reductant.

    PubMed

    Chen, H; Chen, D Z; Fan, S; Hong, L; Wang, D

    2016-10-01

    In this research, urea-spiked hydrazine hydrate solutions are used as reductants for the Selective Non-Catalytic Reduction (SNCR) De-NOx process below 650 °C. The urea concentration in the urea/hydrazine hydrate solutions is chosen through experimental and theoretical studies. To determine the mechanism of the De-NOx process, thermogravimetric analysis (TGA) of the urea/hydrazine hydrate solutions and their thermal decomposition in air and nitrogen atmospheres were studied to understand their decomposition behaviours and redox characteristics. Then a plug flow reactor (PFR) model was adopted to simulate the De-NOx processes in a pilot scale tubular reactor, and the calculated De-NOx efficiency vs. temperature profiles were compared with experimental results to support the mechanism and choose the proper reductant and its reaction temperature. Both the experimental and calculated results show that when the urea is spiked into hydrazine hydrate solution to make the urea-N content approximately 16.7%-25% of the total N content in the solution, better De-NOx efficiencies can be obtained in the temperature range of 550-650 °C, under which NH3 is inactive in reducing NOx. And it is also proved that for these urea-spiked hydrazine hydrate solutions, the hydrazine decomposition through the pathway N2H4 + M = N2H3 + H + M is enhanced to provide radical H, which is active to reduce NO. Finally, the reaction routes for SNCR De-NOx process based on urea-spiked hydrazine hydrate at the proper temperature are proposed. PMID:27427778

  13. Interictal Hippocampal Spiking Influences the Occurrence of Hippocampal Sleep Spindles

    PubMed Central

    Frauscher, Birgit; Bernasconi, Neda; Caldairou, Benoit; von Ellenrieder, Nicolás; Bernasconi, Andrea; Gotman, Jean; Dubeau, François

    2015-01-01

    Objectives: The significance of hippocampal sleep spindles and their relation to epileptic activity is still a matter of controversy. Hippocampal spindles have been considered a physiological phenomenon, an evoked response to afferent epileptic discharges, or even the expression of an epileptic manifestation. To address this question, we investigated the presence and rate of hippocampal spindles in focal pharmacoresistant epilepsy patients undergoing scalp-intracerebral electroencephalography (EEG). Design: Sleep recording with scalp-intracerebral EEG. Setting: Tertiary referral epilepsy center. Patients: Twenty-five epilepsy patients (extratemporal: n = 6, temporal: n = 15, and multifocal including the temporal lobe: n = 4). Interventions: N/A. Measurements and Results: We analyzed associations between hippocampal spindles and hippocampal electrophysiological findings (interictal spiking, seizure onset zone) and magnetic resonance imaging volumetry. Sixteen of 25 patients (64%) had hippocampal spindles (extratemporal epilepsy: 6/6; temporal epilepsy: 10/15; and multifocal epilepsy: 0/4; P = 0.005). Median spindle rate was 0.6 (range, 0.1–8.6)/min in nonrapid eye movement sleep. Highest spindle rates were found in hippocampi of patients with extratemporal epilepsy (P < 0.001). A negative association was found between hippocampal spiking activity and spindle rate (P = 0.003). We found no association between the presence (n = 21) or absence (n = 17) of hippocampal seizure onset zone and hippocampal spindle rate (P = 0.114), and between a normal (n = 30) or atrophic (n = 8) hippocampus and hippocampal spindle rate (P = 0.195). Conclusions: Hippocampal spindles represent a physiological phenomenon, with an expression that is diminished in epilepsy affecting the temporal lobe. Hippocampal spiking lowered the rate of hippocampal spindles, suggesting that epileptic discharges may at least in part be a transformation of these physiological events, similar to the

  14. Controllable spiking patterns in long-wavelength vertical cavity surface emitting lasers for neuromorphic photonics systems

    SciTech Connect

    Hurtado, Antonio; Javaloyes, Julien

    2015-12-14

    Multiple controllable spiking patterns are achieved in a 1310 nm Vertical-Cavity Surface Emitting Laser (VCSEL) in response to induced perturbations and for two different cases of polarized optical injection, namely, parallel and orthogonal. Furthermore, reproducible spiking responses are demonstrated experimentally at sub-nanosecond speed resolution and with a controlled number of spikes fired. This work opens therefore exciting research avenues for the use of VCSELs in ultrafast neuromorphic photonic systems for non-traditional computing applications, such as all-optical binary-to-spiking format conversion and spiking information encoding.

  15. Superposition of many independent spike trains is generally not a Poisson process

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lindner, Benjamin

    2006-02-01

    We study the sum of many independent spike trains and ask whether the resulting spike train has Poisson statistics or not. It is shown that for a non-Poissonian statistics of the single spike train, the resulting sum of spikes has exponential interspike interval (ISI) distributions, vanishing the ISI correlation at a finite lag but exhibits exactly the same power spectrum as the original spike train does. This paradox is resolved by considering what happens to ISI correlations in the limit of an infinite number of superposed trains. Implications of our findings for stochastic models in the neurosciences are briefly discussed.

  16. Correlations Decrease with Propagation of Spiking Activity in the Mouse Barrel Cortex

    PubMed Central

    Ranganathan, Gayathri Nattar; Koester, Helmut Joachim

    2011-01-01

    Propagation of suprathreshold spiking activity through neuronal populations is important for the function of the central nervous system. Neural correlations have an impact on cortical function particularly on the signaling of information and propagation of spiking activity. Therefore we measured the change in correlations as suprathreshold spiking activity propagated between recurrent neuronal networks of the mammalian cerebral cortex. Using optical methods we recorded spiking activity from large samples of neurons from two neural populations simultaneously. The results indicate that correlations decreased as spiking activity propagated from layer 4 to layer 2/3 in the rodent barrel cortex. PMID:21629764

  17. A Smorgasbord of Double Spikes for the Discerning Gourmet

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Galer, S. J.

    2008-12-01

    The natural mass-dependent isotope fractionation (MDF) of many elements can be quantified by addition of a tracer consisting of two artificially enriched isotope spikes prior to analysis. The double spike (DS) technique is the method of choice whenever possible, in terms of simplicity and accuracy, since it is free of nearly all instrumental artifacts, including the instrumental mass bias. Moreover, the elemental concentration is obtained by isotope dilution as a by-product. A more widespread use of double spikes has been hampered by several issues. The first of these is the erroneous idea that post-analysis data reduction for the MDF originally in the sample is difficult, which it is not. More serious is the choice of DS and mixing proportions to use for a given element, whereby the aim is to minimize uncertainties on the calculated MDF. This DS choice is not straightforward, not least because it is unclear what constitutes a "good" versus a "bad" DS. A more troublesome practical issue is the sheer number of candidate DS to look into for some elements. Here, I remedy the situation by providing a comprehensive catalogue of optimized, "good" DS compositions to use, and how much to mix in, based upon some simple objective criteria. The natural fractionation is solved for via mass balance of 3 independent isotope ratios (effectively a 3D isotope space). Thus, the DS technique can be used for any element with four or more isotopes - or 33 elements in all. In the case of Fe, having 4 isotopes. there are only 4 isotope spaces to consider, while for Sn (10 isotopes) there are 840 possible isotope spaces. In all, there are 33 elements that can be double spiked, and a total of 3868 potential isotope spaces to examine. The "optimization" was performed by considering a penalty function which depends on the normal N (unspiked), mixture M and spike S compositions in a given 3D isotope space. Normal compositions (N) were taken from IUPAC. Four criteria are built into the penalty

  18. Adaptive coupling optimized spiking coherence and synchronization in Newman-Watts neuronal networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gong, Yubing; Xu, Bo; Wu, Ya'nan

    2013-09-01

    In this paper, we have numerically studied the effect of adaptive coupling on the temporal coherence and synchronization of spiking activity in Newman-Watts Hodgkin-Huxley neuronal networks. It is found that random shortcuts can enhance the spiking synchronization more rapidly when the increment speed of adaptive coupling is increased and can optimize the temporal coherence of spikes only when the increment speed of adaptive coupling is appropriate. It is also found that adaptive coupling strength can enhance the synchronization of spikes and can optimize the temporal coherence of spikes when random shortcuts are appropriate. These results show that adaptive coupling has a big influence on random shortcuts related spiking activity and can enhance and optimize the temporal coherence and synchronization of spiking activity of the network. These findings can help better understand the roles of adaptive coupling for improving the information processing and transmission in neural systems.

  19. Competition of Brazil nut effect, buoyancy, and inelasticity induced segregation in a granular mixture

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brito, R.; Soto, R.

    2009-12-01

    It has been recently reported that a granular mixture in which grains differ in their restitution coefficients presents segregation: the more inelastic particles sink to the bottom. When other segregation mechanisms as buoyancy and the Brazil nut effect are present, the inelasticity induced segregation can compete with them. First, a detailed analysis, based on numerical simulations of two dimensional systems, of the competition between buoyancy and the inelasticity induced segregation is presented, finding that there is a transition line in the parameter space that determines which mechanism is dominant. In the case of neutrally buoyant particles having different sizes the inelasticity induced segregation can compete with the Brazil nut effect (BNE). Reverse Brazil nut effect (RBNE) could be obtained at large inelasticities of the intruder. At intermediate values, BNE and RBNE coexist and large inelastic particles are found both near the bottom and at the top of the system.

  20. Climate Change Effect on Thermal Power Cooling in the U.S.

    EPA Science Inventory

    Maintaining reasonable surface-water temperatures is paramount for aquatic ecosystem health. Thermal pollution from power plant effluent can result in unnatural river temperature spikes locally, as well as cause damaging breaches to river temperature. The threat of a nonstationar...

  1. A stimulus-dependent spike threshold is an optimal neural coder

    PubMed Central

    Jones, Douglas L.; Johnson, Erik C.; Ratnam, Rama

    2015-01-01

    A neural code based on sequences of spikes can consume a significant portion of the brain's energy budget. Thus, energy considerations would dictate that spiking activity be kept as low as possible. However, a high spike-rate improves the coding and representation of signals in spike trains, particularly in sensory systems. These are competing demands, and selective pressure has presumably worked to optimize coding by apportioning a minimum number of spikes so as to maximize coding fidelity. The mechanisms by which a neuron generates spikes while maintaining a fidelity criterion are not known. Here, we show that a signal-dependent neural threshold, similar to a dynamic or adapting threshold, optimizes the trade-off between spike generation (encoding) and fidelity (decoding). The threshold mimics a post-synaptic membrane (a low-pass filter) and serves as an internal decoder. Further, it sets the average firing rate (the energy constraint). The decoding process provides an internal copy of the coding error to the spike-generator which emits a spike when the error equals or exceeds a spike threshold. When optimized, the trade-off leads to a deterministic spike firing-rule that generates optimally timed spikes so as to maximize fidelity. The optimal coder is derived in closed-form in the limit of high spike-rates, when the signal can be approximated as a piece-wise constant signal. The predicted spike-times are close to those obtained experimentally in the primary electrosensory afferent neurons of weakly electric fish (Apteronotus leptorhynchus) and pyramidal neurons from the somatosensory cortex of the rat. We suggest that KCNQ/Kv7 channels (underlying the M-current) are good candidates for the decoder. They are widely coupled to metabolic processes and do not inactivate. We conclude that the neural threshold is optimized to generate an energy-efficient and high-fidelity neural code. PMID:26082710

  2. Cross section for inelastic neutron ''acceleration'' by {sup 178}Hf{sup m2}

    SciTech Connect

    Karamian, S. A.; Carroll, J. J.

    2011-02-15

    The scattering of thermal neutrons from isomeric nuclei may include events in which the outgoing neutrons have increased kinetic energy. This process has been called inelastic neutron acceleration, or INNA, and occurs when the final nucleus, after emission of the neutron, is left in a state with lower energy than that of the isomer. The result, therefore, is an induced depletion of the isomer to the ground state. A cascade of several {gamma}'s must accompany the neutron emission to release the high angular momentum of the initial isomeric state. INNA was previously observed in a few cases, and the measured cross sections were only in modest agreement with theoretical estimates. The most recent measurement of an INNA cross section was {sigma}{sub INNA}=258{+-}58 b for neutron scattering by {sup 177}Lu{sup m}. In the present work, an INNA cross section of {sigma}{sub INNA}=168 {+-} 33 b was deduced from measurements of the total burnup of the high-spin, four-quasiparticle isomer {sup 178}Hf{sup m2} during irradiation by thermal neutrons. Statistical estimates for the probability of different reaction channels past neutron absorption were used in the analysis, and the deduced {sigma}{sub INNA} was compared to the theoretically predicted cross section.

  3. Micromechanical analysis of thermo-inelastic multiphase short-fiber composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Aboudi, Jacob

    1994-01-01

    A micromechanical formulation is presented for the prediction of the overall thermo-inelastic behavior of multiphase composites which consist of short fibers. The analysis is an extension of the generalized method of cells that was previously derived for inelastic composites with continuous fibers, and the reliability of which was critically examined in several situations. The resulting three dimensional formulation is extremely general, wherein the analysis of thermo-inelastic composites with continuous fibers as well as particulate and porous inelastic materials are merely special cases.

  4. Spike-timing dependent plasticity in the striatum.

    PubMed

    Fino, Elodie; Venance, Laurent

    2010-01-01

    The striatum is the major input nucleus of basal ganglia, an ensemble of interconnected sub-cortical nuclei associated with fundamental processes of action-selection and procedural learning and memory. The striatum receives afferents from the cerebral cortex and the thalamus. In turn, it relays the integrated information towards the basal ganglia output nuclei through which it operates a selected activation of behavioral effectors. The striatal output neurons, the GABAergic medium-sized spiny neurons (MSNs), are in charge of the detection and integration of behaviorally relevant information. This property confers to the striatum the ability to extract relevant information from the background noise and select cognitive-motor sequences adapted to environmental stimuli. As long-term synaptic efficacy changes are believed to underlie learning and memory, the corticostriatal long-term plasticity provides a fundamental mechanism for the function of the basal ganglia in procedural learning. Here, we reviewed the different forms of spike-timing dependent plasticity (STDP) occurring at corticostriatal synapses. Most of the studies have focused on MSNs and their ability to develop long-term plasticity. Nevertheless, the striatal interneurons (the fast-spiking GABAergic, NO-synthase and cholinergic interneurons) also receive monosynaptic afferents from the cortex and tightly regulated corticostriatal information processing. Therefore, it is important to take into account the variety of striatal neurons to fully understand the ability of striatum to develop long-term plasticity. Corticostriatal STDP with various spike-timing dependence have been observed depending on the neuronal sub-populations and experimental conditions. This complexity highlights the extraordinary potentiality in term of plasticity of the corticostriatal pathway. PMID:21423492

  5. Mechanisms of Firing Patterns in Fast-Spiking Cortical Interneurons

    PubMed Central

    Golomb, David; Donner, Karnit; Shacham, Liron; Shlosberg, Dan; Amitai, Yael; Hansel, David

    2007-01-01

    Cortical fast-spiking (FS) interneurons display highly variable electrophysiological properties. Their spike responses to step currents occur almost immediately following the step onset or after a substantial delay, during which subthreshold oscillations are frequently observed. Their firing patterns include high-frequency tonic firing and rhythmic or irregular bursting (stuttering). What is the origin of this variability? In the present paper, we hypothesize that it emerges naturally if one assumes a continuous distribution of properties in a small set of active channels. To test this hypothesis, we construct a minimal, single-compartment conductance-based model of FS cells that includes transient Na+, delayed-rectifier K+, and slowly inactivating d-type K+ conductances. The model is analyzed using nonlinear dynamical system theory. For small Na+ window current, the neuron exhibits high-frequency tonic firing. At current threshold, the spike response is almost instantaneous for small d-current conductance, gd, and it is delayed for larger gd. As gd further increases, the neuron stutters. Noise substantially reduces the delay duration and induces subthreshold oscillations. In contrast, when the Na+ window current is large, the neuron always fires tonically. Near threshold, the firing rates are low, and the delay to firing is only weakly sensitive to noise; subthreshold oscillations are not observed. We propose that the variability in the response of cortical FS neurons is a consequence of heterogeneities in their gd and in the strength of their Na+ window current. We predict the existence of two types of firing patterns in FS neurons, differing in the sensitivity of the delay duration to noise, in the minimal firing rate of the tonic discharge, and in the existence of subthreshold oscillations. We report experimental results from intracellular recordings supporting this prediction. PMID:17696606

  6. Topological analysis of chaos in neural spike train bursts

    SciTech Connect

    Gilmore, R. ); Pei, X.; Moss, F. )

    1999-09-01

    We show how a topological model which describes the stretching and squeezing mechanisms responsible for creating chaotic behavior can be extracted from the neural spike train data. The mechanism we have identified is the same one ([open quotes]gateau roul[acute e],[close quotes] or jelly-roll) which has previously been identified in the Duffing oscillator [Gilmore and McCallum, Phys. Rev. E [bold 51], 935 (1995)] and in a YAG laser [Boulant [ital et al.], Phys. Rev. E [bold 55], 5082 (1997)]. [copyright] [ital 1999 American Institute of Physics.

  7. Monitoring Spiking Activity of Many Individual Neurons in Invertebrate Ganglia

    PubMed Central

    Brandon, C.J.; Bruno, A.M.; Humphries, M.D.; Moore-Kochlacs, C.; Sejnowski, T.J.; Wang, J.; Hill, E.S.

    2015-01-01

    Optical recording with fast voltage sensitive dyes makes it possible, in suitable preparations, to simultaneously monitor the action potentials of large numbers of individual neurons. Here we describe methods for doing this, including considerations of different dyes and imaging systems, methods for correlating the optical signals with their source neurons, procedures for getting good signals, and the use of Independent Component Analysis for spike-sorting raw optical data into single neuron traces. These combined tools represent a powerful approach for large-scale recording of neural networks with high temporal and spatial resolution. PMID:26238051

  8. Pulse Shaped 8-PSK Bandwidth Efficiency and Spectral Spike Elimination

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tao, Jian-Ping

    1998-01-01

    The most bandwidth-efficient communication methods are imperative to cope with the congested frequency bands. Pulse shaping methods have excellent effects on narrowing bandwidth and increasing band utilization. The position of the baseband filters for the pulse shaping is crucial. Post-modulation pulse shaping (a low pass filter is located after the modulator) can change signals from constant envelope to non-constant envelope, and non-constant envelope signals through non-linear device (a SSPA or TWT) can further spread the power spectra. Pre-modulation pulse shaping (a filter is located before the modulator) will have constant envelope. These two pulse shaping methods have different effects on narrowing the bandwidth and producing bit errors. This report studied the effect of various pre-modulation pulse shaping filters with respect to bandwidth, spectral spikes and bit error rate. A pre-modulation pulse shaped 8-ary Phase Shift Keying (8PSK) modulation was used throughout the simulations. In addition to traditional pulse shaping filters, such as Bessel, Butterworth and Square Root Raised Cosine (SRRC), other kinds of filters or pulse waveforms were also studied in the pre-modulation pulse shaping method. Simulations were conducted by using the Signal Processing Worksystem (SPW) software package on HP workstations which simulated the power spectral density of pulse shaped 8-PSK signals, end to end system performance and bit error rates (BERS) as a function of Eb/No using pulse shaping in an AWGN channel. These results are compared with the post-modulation pulse shaped 8-PSK results. The simulations indicate traditional pulse shaping filters used in pre-modulation pulse shaping may produce narrower bandwidth, but with worse BER than those in post-modulation pulse shaping. Theory and simulations show pre- modulation pulse shaping could also produce discrete line power spectra (spikes) at regular frequency intervals. These spikes may cause interference with adjacent

  9. Inelastic compaction of a quartz-rich limestone (Invited)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baud, P.; Schubnel, A.; rolland, A.; Heap, M. J.

    2013-12-01

    The analysis of deformation and failure in many sedimentary settings hinges upon a fundamental understanding of inelastic behavior and failure mode of porous carbonate rocks. Previous studies on porous carbonate focused primarily on relatively pure limestone (composed in majority of calcite). Inelastic compaction in these carbonates was reported to be associated to cataclastic pore collapse and in most cases homogeneous cataclastic flow. Recent experimental results however revealed the development of compaction localization in the more porous end-members. The analysis of strain localization and complex failure modes in limestone has proved to be significantly more challenging than in sandstone because acoustic emissions (AE) cannot usually be used to guide systematic microstructural analysis. Recent studies have therefore relied on X-ray Computed Tomography, a technique that can to date only be used in situ in relatively limited systems. In this study we investigated the development of inelastic damage in a quartz-rich limestone with two main objectives: (1) quantify the impact of a secondary mineral such as quartz on the strength and strain localization in porous carbonate, (2) try to follow the development of inelastic damage using AE in such a quartz-rich rock. Saint-Maximin limestone of 37% porosity and composed of 80% calcite and 20% quartz was selected for this study. Two series of conventional triaxial experiments were performed in parallel at room temperature, constant strain rate in both nominally dry and wet conditions at confining pressures between 3 and 50 MPa. Wet experiments were carried out with water in drained conditions at 10 MPa of pore pressure. The first series of experiments were performed at IPG Strasbourg on relatively small samples. The failure modes and spatial distribution of damage were studied systematically in these samples. The second series of experiments were performed on larger samples at ENS Paris. Acoustic emission activity was

  10. Inelastic neutron scattering studies of novel quantum magnets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Plumb, Kemp W.

    Inelastic neutron scattering was used to study the magnetic excitation spectrum of three quantum magnets: (i) the double perovskite Ba2FeReO 6; (ii) the two-dimensional square lattice Heisenberg antiferromagnet Sr2CuO2Cl2; and (iii) the quasi-two-dimensional frustrated two-leg ladder BiCu2PO6. We have conducted inelastic neutron scattering measurements on powder samples of the double perovskite compound Ba2FeReO6. The measurements revealed two well defined dispersing spin wave modes. No excitation gap was observable and the spectrum can be explained with a local moment model incorporating the interactions of Fe spins with spin-orbital locked degrees of freedom on the Re site. The results reveal that both significant electronic correlations and spin-orbit coupling on the Re site play a significant role in the spin dynamics of Ba2FeReO6. High resolution neutron scattering measurements of magnetic excitations in the parent cuprate Sr2CuO2Cl2 reveal a significant dispersion and momentum dependent damping of the zone boundary magnons. We directly compare our measurements with previous resonant inelastic x-ray scattering measurements and find a ~25 meV discrepancy between the two techniques for the measured zone boundary energy at (1/2, 0). The deviations are greatest precisely in the region of phase space where the magnon damping is strongest. This comparison shows that the inelastic x-ray spectrum must contain significant contributions from higher energy excitations not previously considered. Our measurements demonstrate that the high energy continuum of magnetic fluctuations is a ubiquitous feature of the magnetic spectrum among insulating monolayer cuprates, and that these excitations couple to both inelastic neutron and light scattering. A comprehensive series of inelastic neutron scattering measurements was used to investigate spin excitations in the frustrated two-leg ladder compound BiCu2PO6. The measurements revealed six branches of steeply dispersing triplon

  11. LABORATORY STUDY OF RATE COEFFICIENTS FOR H{sub 2}O:He INELASTIC COLLISIONS BETWEEN 20 AND 120 K

    SciTech Connect

    Tejeda, G.; Moreno, E.; Fernández, J. M.; Montero, S.; Carmona-Novillo, E.; Hernández, M. I.

    2015-01-01

    State-to-state rate coefficients for ortho-H{sub 2}O:He and para-H{sub 2}O:He inelastic collisions in the 20-120 K thermal range are investigated by means of an improved experimental procedure. This procedure is based on the use of a kinetic master equation (MEQ) which describes the evolution of populations of H{sub 2}O rotational levels along a supersonic jet of H{sub 2}O highly diluted in helium. The MEQ is expressed in terms of experimental observables and rate coefficients for H{sub 2}O:He inelastic collisions. The primary experimental observables are the local number density and the populations of the rotational energy levels of H{sub 2}O, quantities which are determined along the jet with unprecedented accuracy by means of Raman spectroscopy with high space resolution. Sets of rate coefficients from the literature and from present close-coupling calculations using two different potential energy surfaces (PESs) have been tested against the experiment. The Green et al. rate coefficients are up to 50% too low compared to the experiment, while most rates calculated here from the Hodges et al. PES and the Patkowski et al. PES are much closer to the experimental values. Experimental rates with an estimated accuracy on the order of 10% have been obtained for ortho-H{sub 2}O:He and para-H{sub 2}O:He inelastic collisions between 20 and 120 K by scaling and averaging the theoretical rates to the experiment.

  12. Inelastic response of metal matrix composites under biaxial loading

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mirzadeh, F.; Pindera, Marek-Jerzy; Herakovich, Carl T.

    1990-01-01

    Elements of the analytical/experimental program to characterize the response of silicon carbide titanium (SCS-6/Ti-15-3) composite tubes under biaxial loading are outlined. The analytical program comprises prediction of initial yielding and subsequent inelastic response of unidirectional and angle-ply silicon carbide titanium tubes using a combined micromechanics approach and laminate analysis. The micromechanics approach is based on the method of cells model and has the capability of generating the effective thermomechanical response of metal matrix composites in the linear and inelastic region in the presence of temperature and time-dependent properties of the individual constituents and imperfect bonding on the initial yield surfaces and inelastic response of (0) and (+ or - 45)sub s SCS-6/Ti-15-3 laminates loaded by different combinations of stresses. The generated analytical predictions will be compared with the experimental results. The experimental program comprises generation of initial yield surfaces, subsequent stress-strain curves and determination of failure loads of the SCS-6/Ti-15-3 tubes under selected loading conditions. The results of the analytical investigation are employed to define the actual loading paths for the experimental program. A brief overview of the experimental methodology is given. This includes the test capabilities of the Composite Mechanics Laboratory at the University of Virginia, the SCS-6/Ti-15-3 composite tubes secured from McDonnell Douglas Corporation, a text fixture specifically developed for combined axial-torsional loading, and the MTS combined axial-torsion loader that will be employed in the actual testing.

  13. Transition from quasi-elastic to deep-inelastic reactions

    SciTech Connect

    Rehm, K.E.

    1986-01-01

    Heavy ion induced transfer reactions are usually considered to fall into two categories. Quasi-elastic processes, on one hand, are characterized by small energy transfers, with one-nucleon transfer reactions being a typical example. These processes are dominant for grazing collisions, and are generally described within simple one-step DWBA calculations. Deep inelastic reactions, on the other hand, occur for more central collisions where the interaction time is longer and subsequently more energy and particles can be exchanged. Quasi-elastic collisions dominate transfer reactions induced by light heavy ions (e.g., /sup 16/O) at energies not too high above the barrier, while deep inelastic collisions are observed mainly in reactions induced by heavier projectiles (Kr, Xe). In this contribution, we discuss the transition between these two processes for the system /sup 48/Ti + /sup 208/Pb. /sup 48/Ti is located between light (/sup 16/O) and heavy (Kr) projectiles and should be well suited for a study of the interrelation between quasi- and deep-inelastic reactions. The experiments were performed with a 300 MeV /sup 48/Ti beam obtained from the Argonne National Laboratory superconducting linac. The outgoing particles were momentum analyzed in a split pole magnetic spectrograph and detected in the focal plane by a position sensitive ionization chamber. The specific energy loss, the magnetic rigidity and the total energy of the outgoing particles were measured enabling mass and Z-identification. The energy resolution was about 3 MeV, determined by the thickness of the /sup 208/Pb target, and thus excluded study of transfer reactions to discrete final states. Angular distributions were measured in the range theta/sub lab/ = 20/sup 0/ to 80/sup 0/ in steps of 5/sup 0/. 8 refs.

  14. CHEMICAL APPLICATIONS OF INELASTIC X-RAY SCATTERING

    SciTech Connect

    HAYASHI,H.; UDAGAWA,Y.; GILLET,J.M.; CALIEBE,W.A.; KAO,C.C.

    2001-08-01

    Inelastic x-ray scattering (IXS), complementary to other more established inelastic scattering probes, such as light scattering, electron scattering, and neutron scattering, is becoming an important experimental technique in the study of elementary excitations in condensed matters. Over the past decade, IXS with total energy resolution of few meV has been achieved, and is being used routinely in the study of phonon dispersions in solids and liquids as well as dynamics in disordered and biological systems. In the study of electronic excitations, IXS with total energy resolution on the order of 100 meV to 1 eV is gaining wider applications also. For example, IXS has been used to study collective excitations of valence electrons, single electron excitations of valence electrons, as well as core electron excitations. In comparison with the alternative scattering techniques mentioned above, IXS has several advantages. First, IXS probes the full momentum transfer range of the dielectric response of the sample, whereas light scattering is limited to very small momentum transfers, and electron scattering suffers the effects of multiple scattering at large momentum transfers. Second, since IXS measures the bulk properties of the sample it is not surface sensitive, therefore it does not require special preparation of the sample. The greater flexibility in sample conditions and environments makes IXS an ideal probe in the study of liquids and samples under extreme temperature, pressure, and magnetic field. Third, the tunability of synchrotron radiation sources enables IXS to exploit element specificity and resonant enhancement of scattering cross sections. Fourth, IXS is unique in the study of dynamics of liquids and amorphous solids because it can probe the particular region of energy-momentum transfer phase space, which is inaccessible to inelastic neutron scattering. On the other hand, the main disadvantages of IXS are the small cross sections and the strong absorption of

  15. The Minimum bandwidth of narrowband spikes in solar flare decimetric radio waves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Messmer, Peter; Benz, Arnold O.

    2000-02-01

    The minimum and the mean bandwidth of individual narrowband spikes in two events in decimetric radio waves is determined by means of multi-resolution analysis. Spikes of a few tens of millisecond duration occur at decimetric/microwave wavelength in the particle acceleration phase of solar flares. A first method determines the dominant spike bandwidth scale based on their scalegram, the mean squared wavelet coefficient at each frequency scale. This allows to measure the scale bandwidth independently of heuristic spike selection criteria, e.g. manual selection. The major drawback is a low resolution in the bandwidth. To overcome this uncertainty, a feature detection algorithm and a criterion for spike shape in the time-frequency plane is applied to locate the spikes. In that case, the bandwidth is measured by fitting an assumed spike profile into the denoised data. The smallest FWHM bandwidth of spikes was found at 0.17% and 0.41% of the center frequency in the two events. Knowing the shortest relevant bandwidth of spikes, the slope of the Fourier power spectrum of this two events was determined and no resemblance to a Kolmogorov spectrum detected. Additionally the correlation between spike peak flux and bandwidth was examined.

  16. U.S.-MEXICO BORDER PROGRAM ARIZONA BORDER STUDY--QA ANALYTICAL RESULTS FOR METALS IN SPIKE SAMPLES

    EPA Science Inventory

    The Metals in Spike Samples data set contains the analytical results of measurements of up to 11 metals in 15 control samples (spikes) from 11 households. Measurements were made in spiked samples of dust, food, and dermal wipe residue. Spiked samples were used to assess recover...

  17. U.S.-MEXICO BORDER PROGRAM ARIZONA BORDER STUDY--QA ANALYTICAL RESULTS FOR PESTICIDES IN SPIKE SAMPLES

    EPA Science Inventory

    The Pesticides in Spike Samples data set contains the analytical results of measurements of up to 20 pesticides in 13 control samples (spikes) from 9 households. Measurements were made in spiked samples of indoor air, food, and dermal wipe residue. Spiked samples were used to a...

  18. U.S.-MEXICO BORDER PROGRAM ARIZONA BORDER STUDY--QA ANALYTICAL RESULTS FOR VOCS IN SPIKE SAMPLES

    EPA Science Inventory

    The VOCs in Spike Samples data set contains the analytical results of measurements of up to 45 volatile organic compounds (VOCs) in 9 control samples (spikes) from 9 households. Measurements were made in spiked samples of indoor and outdoor air. Spiked samples were used to asse...

  19. U.S.-MEXICO BORDER PROGRAM ARIZONA BORDER STUDY--QA ANALYTICAL RESULTS FOR PAHS IN SPIKE SAMPLES

    EPA Science Inventory

    The PAHs in Spikes data set contains the analytical results for measurements of up to 26 polynuclear aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) in 11 control samples (spikes) of indoor air and food over 8 households of PAHs concentrations in spike samples. Measurements were made in spiked sam...

  20. Estimating Extracellular Spike Waveforms from CA1 Pyramidal Cells with Multichannel Electrodes

    PubMed Central

    Molden, Sturla; Moldestad, Olve; Storm, Johan F.

    2013-01-01

    Extracellular (EC) recordings of action potentials from the intact brain are embedded in background voltage fluctuations known as the “local field potential” (LFP). In order to use EC spike recordings for studying biophysical properties of neurons, the spike waveforms must be separated from the LFP. Linear low-pass and high-pass filters are usually insufficient to separate spike waveforms from LFP, because they have overlapping frequency bands. Broad-band recordings of LFP and spikes were obtained with a 16-channel laminar electrode array (silicone probe). We developed an algorithm whereby local LFP signals from spike-containing channel were modeled using locally weighted polynomial regression analysis of adjoining channels without spikes. The modeled LFP signal was subtracted from the recording to estimate the embedded spike waveforms. We tested the method both on defined spike waveforms added to LFP recordings, and on in vivo-recorded extracellular spikes from hippocampal CA1 pyramidal cells in anaesthetized mice. We show that the algorithm can correctly extract the spike waveforms embedded in the LFP. In contrast, traditional high-pass filters failed to recover correct spike shapes, albeit produceing smaller standard errors. We found that high-pass RC or 2-pole Butterworth filters with cut-off frequencies below 12.5 Hz, are required to retrieve waveforms comparable to our method. The method was also compared to spike-triggered averages of the broad-band signal, and yielded waveforms with smaller standard errors and less distortion before and after the spike. PMID:24391714