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Sample records for inert gas condensation

  1. Micro-hardness of nanocrystalline palladium and copper produced by inert-gas condensation

    SciTech Connect

    Nieman, G.W.; Weertman, J.R. . Dept. of Materials Science and Engineering); Siegel, R.W. )

    1989-12-01

    This report describes the major results of a Vickers microhardness study of nanocrystalline palladium and copper produced by the inert-gas condensation method. Small grain size is known to have a strong influence on mechanical properties at low and intermediate temperatures, as observed in the Hall--Petch effect, Coble creep, and superplasticity. Until recently, the mechanical properties of nanocrystalline materials with mean grain diameters of 5 to 50 nm have not been explored. A microhardness study on conventional compacted tungsten powder indicated that the Hall--Petch effect extends to the 150 nm range; and effects of nanocrystalline grain size on mechanical properties of TiO{sub 2} have been investigated.

  2. Deposition of Size-Selected Cu Nanoparticles by Inert Gas Condensation

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Nanometer size-selected Cu clusters in the size range of 1–5 nm have been produced by a plasma-gas-condensation-type cluster deposition apparatus, which combines a grow-discharge sputtering with an inert gas condensation technique. With this method, by controlling the experimental conditions, it was possible to produce nanoparticles with a strict control in size. The structure and size of Cu nanoparticles were determined by mass spectroscopy and confirmed by atomic force microscopy (AFM) and scanning electron transmission microscopy (STEM) measurements. In order to preserve the structural and morphological properties, the energy of cluster impact was controlled; the energy of acceleration of the nanoparticles was in near values at 0.1 ev/atom for being in soft landing regime. From SEM measurements developed in STEM-HAADF mode, we found that nanoparticles are near sized to those values fixed experimentally also confirmed by AFM observations. The results are relevant, since it demonstrates that proper optimization of operation conditions can lead to desired cluster sizes as well as desired cluster size distributions. It was also demonstrated the efficiency of the method to obtain size-selected Cu clusters films, as a random stacking of nanometer-size crystallites assembly. The deposition of size-selected metal clusters represents a novel method of preparing Cu nanostructures, with high potential in optical and catalytic applications. PMID:20652132

  3. Formation Mechanism of Fe Nanocubes by Magnetron Sputtering Inert Gas Condensation.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Junlei; Baibuz, Ekaterina; Vernieres, Jerome; Grammatikopoulos, Panagiotis; Jansson, Ville; Nagel, Morten; Steinhauer, Stephan; Sowwan, Mukhles; Kuronen, Antti; Nordlund, Kai; Djurabekova, Flyura

    2016-04-26

    In this work, we study the formation mechanisms of iron nanoparticles (Fe NPs) grown by magnetron sputtering inert gas condensation and emphasize the decisive kinetics effects that give rise specifically to cubic morphologies. Our experimental results, as well as computer simulations carried out by two different methods, indicate that the cubic shape of Fe NPs is explained by basic differences in the kinetic growth modes of {100} and {110} surfaces rather than surface formation energetics. Both our experimental and theoretical investigations show that the final shape is defined by the combination of the condensation temperature and the rate of atomic deposition onto the growing nanocluster. We, thus, construct a comprehensive deposition rate-temperature diagram of Fe NP shapes and develop an analytical model that predicts the temporal evolution of these properties. Combining the shape diagram and the analytical model, morphological control of Fe NPs during formation is feasible; as such, our method proposes a roadmap for experimentalists to engineer NPs of desired shapes for targeted applications. PMID:26962973

  4. Size-controlled, magnetic, and core-shell nanoparticles synthesized by inert-gas condensation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koten, Mark A.

    Interest in nanoparticles (2 to 100 nm in diameter) and clusters of atoms (0.5 to 2 nm in diameter) has heightened over the past two and a half decades on both fundamental and functional levels. Nanoparticles and clusters of atoms are an exciting branch of materials science because they do not behave like normal bulk matter, nor do they act like molecules. They can have shockingly different physical, chemical, optical, or magnetic properties from the same material at a larger scale. In the case of nanoparticles, the surface-to-volume ratio can change fundamental properties like melting temperature, binding energy, or electron affinity. The definitions of markers used to distinguish between metallic, semiconducting, and insulating bulk condensed matter, such as the band gap and polarizability, can even be blurred or confused on the nanoscale. Similarly, clusters of atoms can form in structures that are only stable at finite sizes, and do not translate to bulk condensed matter. Thermodynamics of finite systems changes dramatically in nanovolumes such as wires, rods, cubes, and spheres, which can lead to complex core-shell and onion-like nanostructures. Consequently, these changes in properties and structure have led to many new possibilities in the field of materials engineering. Inert-gas condensation (IGC) is a well-established method of producing nanoparticles that condense from the gas phase. Its first use dates back to the early 1990s, and it has been used to fabricate nanoparticles both commercially and in research and development for applications in magnetism, biomedicine, and catalysts. In this dissertation, IGC was used to produce a wide variety of nanoparticles. First, control over the size distributions of Cu nanoparticles and how it relates to the plasma properties inside the nucleation chamber was investigated. Next, the formation of phase pure WFe2 nanoparticles revealed that this Laves phase is ferromagnetic instead of non-magnetic. Finally, core

  5. Characterization of InSb Nanoparticles Synthesized Using Inert Gas Condensation.

    PubMed

    Pandya, Sneha G; Kordesch, Martin E

    2015-12-01

    Nanoparticles (NPs) of indium antimonide (InSb) were synthesized using a vapor phase synthesis technique known as inert gas condensation (IGC). NPs were directly deposited, at room temperature and under high vacuum, on glass cover slides, TEM grids and (111) p-type silicon wafers. TEM studies showed a bimodal distribution in the size of the NPs with average particle size of 13.70 nm and 33.20 nm. The Raman spectra of InSb NPs exhibited a peak centered at 184.27 cm(-1), which corresponds to the longitudinal optical (LO) modes of phonon vibration in InSb. A 1:1 In-to-Sb composition ratio was confirmed by energy dispersive X-ray (EDX). X-ray diffractometer (XRD) and high-resolution transmission electron microscopy (HRTEM) studies revealed polycrystalline behavior of these NPs with lattice spacing around 0.37 and 0.23 nm corresponding to the growth directions of (111) and (220), respectively. The average crystallite size of the NPs obtained using XRD peak broadening results and the Debye-Scherrer formula was 25.62 nm, and the value of strain in NPs was found to be 0.0015. NP's band gap obtained using spectroscopy and Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy was around 0.43-0.52 eV at 300 K, which is a blue shift of 0.26-0.35 eV. The effects of increased particle density resulting into aggregation of NPs are also discussed in this paper. PMID:26061444

  6. Characterization of InSb Nanoparticles Synthesized Using Inert Gas Condensation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pandya, Sneha G.; Kordesch, Martin E.

    2015-06-01

    Nanoparticles (NPs) of indium antimonide (InSb) were synthesized using a vapor phase synthesis technique known as inert gas condensation (IGC). NPs were directly deposited, at room temperature and under high vacuum, on glass cover slides, TEM grids and (111) p-type silicon wafers. TEM studies showed a bimodal distribution in the size of the NPs with average particle size of 13.70 nm and 33.20 nm. The Raman spectra of InSb NPs exhibited a peak centered at 184.27 cm-1, which corresponds to the longitudinal optical (LO) modes of phonon vibration in InSb. A 1:1 In-to-Sb composition ratio was confirmed by energy dispersive X-ray (EDX). X-ray diffractometer (XRD) and high-resolution transmission electron microscopy (HRTEM) studies revealed polycrystalline behavior of these NPs with lattice spacing around 0.37 and 0.23 nm corresponding to the growth directions of (111) and (220), respectively. The average crystallite size of the NPs obtained using XRD peak broadening results and the Debye-Scherrer formula was 25.62 nm, and the value of strain in NPs was found to be 0.0015. NP's band gap obtained using spectroscopy and Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy was around 0.43-0.52 eV at 300 K, which is a blue shift of 0.26-0.35 eV. The effects of increased particle density resulting into aggregation of NPs are also discussed in this paper.

  7. Inert-Gas Condensed Co-W Nanoclusters: Formation, Structure and Magnetic Properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Golkar-Fard, Farhad Reza

    Rare-earth permanent magnets are used extensively in numerous technical applications, e.g. wind turbines, audio speakers, and hybrid/electric vehicles. The demand and production of rare-earth permanent magnets in the world has in the past decades increased significantly. However, the decrease in export of rare-earth elements from China in recent time has led to a renewed interest in developing rare-earth free permanent magnets. Elements such as Fe and Co have potential, due to their high magnetization, to be used as hosts in rare-earth free permanent magnets but a major challenge is to increase their magnetocrystalline anisotropy constant, K1, which largely drives the coercivity. Theoretical calculations indicate that dissolving the 5d transition metal W in Fe or Co increases the magnetocrystalline anisotropy. The challenge, though, is in creating a solid solution in hcp Co or bcc Fe, which under equilibrium conditions have negligible solubility. In this dissertation, the formation, structure, and magnetic properties of sub-10 nm Co-W clusters with W content ranging from 4 to 24 atomic percent were studied. Co-W alloy clusters with extended solubility of W in hcp Co were produced by inert gas condensation. The different processing conditions such as the cooling scheme and sputtering power were found to control the structural state of the as-deposited Co-W clusters. For clusters formed in the water-cooled formation chamber, the mean size and the fraction crystalline clusters increased with increasing power, while the fraction of crystalline clusters formed in the liquid nitrogen-cooled formation chamber was not as affected by the sputtering power. For the low W content clusters, the structural characterization revealed clusters predominantly single crystalline hcp Co(W) structure, a significant extension of W solubility when compared to the equilibrium solubility, but fcc Co(W) and Co3W structures were observed in very small and large clusters, respectively. At high

  8. Sn and Cu oxide nanoparticles deposited on TiO2 nanoflower 3D substrates by Inert Gas Condensation technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kusior, A.; Kollbek, K.; Kowalski, K.; Borysiewicz, M.; Wojciechowski, T.; Adamczyk, A.; Trenczek-Zajac, A.; Radecka, M.; Zakrzewska, K.

    2016-09-01

    Sn and Cu oxide nanoparticles were deposited by Inert Gas Condensation (IGC) technique combined with dc magnetron sputtering onto nanoflower TiO2 3D substrates obtained in the oxidation process of Ti-foil in 30% H2O2. Sputtering parameters such as insertion length and Ar/He flow rates were optimized taking into account the nanostructure morphology. Comparative studies with hydrothermal method were carried out. Surface properties of the synthesized nanomaterials were studied by Scanning Electron Microscopy, SEM, Atomic Force Microscopy, AFM, and X-ray Photoelectron Spectroscopy, XPS. X-ray diffraction, XRD and Raman spectroscopy were performed in order to determine phase composition. Impedance spectroscopy demonstrated the influence of nanoparticles on the electrical conductivity.

  9. Low Temperature Cathodoluminescence Spectroscopy of Amorphous Aluminum Nitride Nanoparticles doped with Erbium, synthesized using Inert Gas Condensation Technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pandya, Sneha; Wang, Jingzhou; Wojciech, Jadwisienczak; Kordesch, Martin

    2015-03-01

    Free standing Aluminum Nitride Nanoparticles (NPs) doped in situwith Erbium (AlN:Er), ranging from 3-30nm in size, were synthesized using a vapor phase deposition technique known as Inert Gas Condensation (IGC). Amorphous behavior of these NPs was inferred from the wide-angle X-ray spectroscopy studies. Raman spectra analysis for these AlN:Er NPs showed characteristic peaks for A1(TO) and E2(high) phonon modes of AlN. Detailed structural characterization of these Er doped AlN NPs will be carried out using a High-Resolution TEM, results of which will be included in my talk. Low temperature Cathodoluminescence (CL) measurements were carried out for these a-AlN:Er NPs. The corresponding Er+3 ion emission peaks were compared to the CL emission spectra obtained for a-AlN:Er thin films, and for commercially obtained Erbium-Oxide NPs. These spectroscopic results will be discussed in detail. I will also present the CL results obtained for in-air and in-nitrogen atmosphere annealed a-AlN:Er NPs. In addition to this, I will illustrate how these Er doped NPs can be used as nano-scale temperature sensors. The SNOM help provided by Prof. Hugh Richardson is gratefully acknowledged.

  10. Inert gas thrusters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kaufman, H. R.; Robinson, R. S.

    1979-01-01

    Inert gas thrusters considered for space propulsion systems were investigated. Electron diffusion across a magnetic field was examined utilizing a basic model. The production of doubly charged ions was correlated using only overall performance parameters. The use of this correlation is therefore possible in the design stage of large gas thrusters, where detailed plasma properties are not available. Argon hollow cathode performance was investigated over a range of emission currents, with the positions of the inert, keeper, and anode varied. A general trend observed was that the maximum ratio of emission to flow rate increased at higher propellant flow rates. It was also found that an enclosed keeper enhances maximum cathode emission at high flow rates. The maximum cathode emission at a given flow rate was associated with a noisy high voltage mode. Although this mode has some similarities to the plume mode found at low flows and emissions, it is encountered by being initially in the spot mode and increasing emission. A detailed analysis of large, inert-gas thruster performance was carried out. For maximum thruster efficiency, the optimum beam diameter increases from less than a meter at under 2000 sec specific impulse to several meters at 10,000 sec. The corresponding range in input power ranges from several kilowatts to megawatts.

  11. Inert gas thrusters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kaufman, H. R.

    1977-01-01

    Inert gases, particularly argon and xenon, are of interest as possible alternatives to the usual electric thruster propellants of mercury and cesium. Hollow cathode data were obtained for a wide range of operating conditions. Some test conditions gave plasma coupling voltages at or below the sputtering threshold, hence should permit long operating lifetimes. All observations of hollow cathode operation were consistent with a single theory of operation, in which a significant amount of the total electron emission is from localized areas within the orifice. This mode of emission is also supported by scanning electron microscope photographs that indicate local temperatures at or near the melting temperature of the tungsten tip. Experimental hollow cathode performance was correlated for two orifice diameters, three inert gas propellants, and a range of flow rates for each propellant. The basic theory for the production of doubly ionized argon and xenon was completed. Experimental measurements of the doubly ionized fraction agree with theory within about plus or minus 20 percent. High voltage isolators were studied for the propellant feed line. The breakdown voltage per segment ranged from 300 to over 500 V with argon.

  12. Inert gas thrusters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kaufman, H. R.; Robinson, R. S.

    1980-01-01

    Some advances in component technology for inert gas thrusters are described. The maximum electron emission of a hollow cathode with Ar was increased 60-70% by the use of an enclosed keeper configuration. Operation with Ar, but without emissive oxide, was also obtained. A 30 cm thruster operated with Ar at moderate discharge voltages give double-ion measurements consistent with a double ion correlation developed previously using 15 cm thruster data. An attempt was made to reduce discharge losses by biasing anodes positive of the discharge plasma. The reason this attempt was unsuccessful is not yet clear. The performance of a single-grid ion-optics configuration was evaluated. The ion impingement on the single grid accelerator was found to approach the value expected from the projected blockage when the sheath thickness next to the accelerator was 2-3 times the aperture diameter.

  13. Inert gas ion thruster

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ramsey, W. D.

    1980-01-01

    Inert gas performance with three types of 12 cm diameter magnetoelectrostatic containment (MESC) ion thrusters was tested. The types tested included: (1) a hemispherical shaped discharge chamber with platinum cobalt magnets; (2) three different lengths of the hemispherical chambers with samarium cobalt magnets; and (3) three lengths of the conical shaped chambers with aluminum nickel cobalt magnets. The best argon performance was produced by a 8.0 cm long conical chamber with alnico magnets. The best xenon high mass utilization performance was obtained with the same 8.0 cm long conical thruster. The hemispherical thruster obtained 75 to 87% mass utilization at 185 to 205 eV/ion of singly charged ion equivalent beam.

  14. Inert gas thrusters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kaufman, H. R.

    1978-01-01

    Inert gas thrusters have continued to be of interest for space propulsion applications. Xenon is of interest in that its physical characteristics are well suited to propulsion. High atomic weight and low tankage fraction were major factors in this choice. If a large amount of propellant was required, so that cryogenic storage was practical, argon is a more economical alternative. Argon was also the preferred propellant for ground applications of thruster technology, such as sputter etching and deposition. Additional magnetic field measurements are reported. These measurements should be of use in magnetic field design. The diffusion of electrons through the magnetic field above multipole anodes was studied in detail. The data were consistent with Bohm diffusion across a magnetic field. The theory based on Bohm diffusion was simple and easily used for diffusion calculations. Limited startup data were obtained for multipole discharge chambers. These data were obtained with refractory cathodes, but should be useful in predicting the upper limits for starting with hollow cathodes.

  15. INERT GAS SHIELD FOR WELDING

    DOEpatents

    Jones, S.O.; Daly, F.V.

    1958-10-14

    S>An inert gas shield is presented for arc-welding materials such as zirconium that tend to oxidize rapidly in air. The device comprises a rectangular metal box into which the welding electrode is introduced through a rubber diaphragm to provide flexibility. The front of the box is provided with a wlndow having a small hole through which flller metal is introduced. The box is supplied with an inert gas to exclude the atmosphere, and with cooling water to promote the solidification of the weld while in tbe inert atmosphere. A separate water-cooled copper backing bar is provided underneath the joint to be welded to contain the melt-through at the root of the joint, shielding the root of the joint with its own supply of inert gas and cooling the deposited weld metal. This device facilitates the welding of large workpieces of zirconium frequently encountered in reactor construction.

  16. Inert gas thrusters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kaufman, H. R.

    1976-01-01

    Inert gases are of interest as possible alternatives to the usual electric thruster propellants of mercury and cesium. The multipole discharge chamber investigated was shown capable of low discharge chamber losses and flat ion beam profiles with a minimum of optimization. Minimum discharge losses were 200 to 250 eV/ion for xenon and 300 to 350 eV/ion for argon, while flatness parameters in the plane of the accelerator grid were 0.85 to 0.95. The design used employs low magnetic field strengths, which permits the use of sheet-metal parts. The corner problem of the discharge chamber was resolved with recessed corner anodes, which approximately equalized both the magnetic field above the anodes and the electron currents to these anodes. Argon hollow cathodes were investigated at currents up to about 5 amperes using internal thermionic emitters. Cathode chamber diameter optimized in the 1.0 to 2.5 cm range, while orifices diameter optimized in the 0.5 to 5 mm range. The use of a bias voltage for the internal emitter extended the operating range and facilitated starting. The masses of 15 and 30 cm flight type thrusters were estimated at about 4.2 and 10.8 kg.

  17. Welding Using Chilled-Inert-Gas Purging

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mcgee, William F.; Rybicki, Daniel J.

    1995-01-01

    Report describes study of fusion welding using chilled inert gas. Marked improvement shown in welding of aluminum using chilled helium gas. Chilling inert gas produces two additional benefits: 1) creation of ultradense inert atmosphere around welds; 2) chilled gas cools metal more quickly down to temperature at which metals not reactive.

  18. Structural characterization and X-ray analysis by Williamson-Hall method for Erbium doped Aluminum Nitride nanoparticles, synthesized using inert gas condensation technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pandya, Sneha G.; Corbett, Joseph P.; Jadwisienczak, Wojciech M.; Kordesch, Martin E.

    2016-05-01

    We have synthesized AlN nanoparticles (NPs) doped in-situ with Er (AlN:Er) using inert gas condensation technique. Using x-ray diffraction (XRD) peak broadening analysis with the Williamson-Hall (W-H) Uniform Deformation Model (UDM) the crystallite size of the NPs and the strain in NPs were found to be 80±38 nm and 3.07×10-3±0.9×10-3 respectively. In comparison, using the Debye-Scherrer's (DS) formula, we have inferred that the crystallite size of the NPs was 23±6 nm and the average strain was 4.3×10-3±0.4×10-3. The scanning electron microscopy images show that the NPs are spherical and have an average diameter of ∼300 nm. The crystallite size is smaller than the size of the NPs revealing their polycrystalline behavior. In addition, the NPs strain, stress and energy density were also calculated using W-H analysis combined with the Uniform Deformation Stress Model (UDSM) and the Uniform Deformation Energy Density Model (UDEDM). Suggested by the spherical geometry and polycrystalline nature of the AlN NPs, the strain computed from UDM, UDSM and UDEDM were in agreement confirming an isotropic mechanical nature of the particle. Luminescence measurements revealed the temperature dependence of the optical emission of the Er3+ ions, confirming the use of AlN:Er NPs for nano-scale temperature sensing.

  19. Symmetry and inert states of spin Bose-Einstein condensates

    SciTech Connect

    Yip, S.-K.

    2007-02-15

    We construct the list of all possible inert states of spin Bose-Einstein condensates for S{<=}4. In doing so, we also obtain their symmetry properties. These results are applied to classify line defects of spin condensates in zero magnetic field.

  20. Mechanisms of inert gas narcosis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1973-01-01

    Experiments describing the mechanism of inert gas narcosis are reported. A strain of mice, genetically altered to increase susceptibility to botulin poisoning (synaptic response) appears to increase metabolic rates while breathing argon; this infers a genetically altered synaptic response to both botulin toxin and narcotic gases. Studies of metabolic depression in human subjects breathing either air or a 30% mixture of nitrous oxide indicate that nitrous oxide narcosis does not produce pronounced metabolic depression. Tests on mice for relative susceptibilities to narcosis and oxygen poisoning as a function of fatty membrane composition show that alteration of the fatty acid composition of phospholipids increases resistance to metabolically depressant effects of argon but bas no effect on nitrous oxide narcosis. Another study suggests that acclimatization to low tension prior to high pressure oxygen treatment enhances susceptibility of mice to convulsions and death; developing biochemical lesions cause CNS metabolite reductions and pulmonary damage.

  1. Fast, Nonspattering Inert-Gas Welding

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gilbert, Jeffrey L.

    1991-01-01

    Proposed welding technique combines best features of metal (other than tungsten)/inert-gas welding, plasma arc welding, and tungsten/inert-gas welding. Advantages include: wire fed to weld joint preheated, therefore fed at high speed without spattering; high-frequency energy does not have to be supplied to workpiece to initiate welding; size of arc gap not critical, power-supply control circuit adjusts voltage across gap to compensate for changes; only low gas-flow rate needed; welding electrode replaced easily as prefabricated assembly; external wire-feeding manipulator not needed; and welding process relatively forgiving of operator error.

  2. Inert gas effects on embryonic development.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Weiss, H. S.; Grimard, M.

    1972-01-01

    It had been found in previous investigations that hatchability of fertile chicken eggs is reduced to 50% or less of controls if incubation takes place in a low nitrogen atmosphere containing He. Although these results suggest some role for nitrogen in embryogenesis, it is possible that a requirement exists for an inert molecule closer in physical characteristics to nitrogen than is He. An investigation is conducted involving incubation at ground level pressure in a gas mixture in which the 79% inert component was either neon or argon. The effect of varying combinations of nitrogen, helium, and oxygen was also studied.

  3. Production of light oil by injection of hot inert gas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ruidas, Bidhan C.; Ganguly, Somenath

    2016-05-01

    Hot inert gas, when injected into an oil reservoir is capable of generating a vaporization-condensation drive and as a consequence, a preferential movement of the lighter components to the production well. This form of displacement is an important unit mechanism in hot flue-gas injection, or in thermal recovery from a watered-out oil reservoir. This article presents the movement of heat front vis-à-vis the changes in the saturation profile, and the gas-phase composition. The plateau in the temperature profile due to the exchange of latent heat, and the formation of water bank at the downstream are elaborated. The broadening of the vaporization-condensation zone with continued progression is discussed. The effect of inert gas temperature on the cumulative production of oil is reviewed. The results provide insight to the vaporization-condensation drive as a stand-alone mechanism. The paper underscores the relative importance of this mechanism, when operated in tandem with other processes in improved oil recovery and CO2 sequestration.

  4. 46 CFR 154.904 - Inert gas system: Controls.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... STANDARDS FOR SELF-PROPELLED VESSELS CARRYING BULK LIQUEFIED GASES Design, Construction and Equipment Atmospheric Control in Cargo Containment Systems § 154.904 Inert gas system: Controls. The inert gas...

  5. Portable spectrometer monitors inert gas shield in welding process

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Grove, E. L.

    1967-01-01

    Portable spectrometer using photosensitive readouts, monitors the amount of oxygen and hydrogen in the inert gas shield of a tungsten-inert gas welding process. A fiber optic bundle transmits the light from the welding arc to the spectrometer.

  6. 46 CFR 154.904 - Inert gas system: Controls.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... STANDARDS FOR SELF-PROPELLED VESSELS CARRYING BULK LIQUEFIED GASES Design, Construction and Equipment Atmospheric Control in Cargo Containment Systems § 154.904 Inert gas system: Controls. The inert gas...

  7. 46 CFR 153.500 - Inert gas systems.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... have a permanent inert gas system that: (a) Maintains the vapor space of the containment system in an inert state by filling the vapor space with a gas that is neither reactive with the cargo nor...

  8. 46 CFR 153.500 - Inert gas systems.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... have a permanent inert gas system that: (a) Maintains the vapor space of the containment system in an inert state by filling the vapor space with a gas that is neither reactive with the cargo nor...

  9. 46 CFR 154.910 - Inert gas piping: Location.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 5 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Inert gas piping: Location. 154.910 Section 154.910... STANDARDS FOR SELF-PROPELLED VESSELS CARRYING BULK LIQUEFIED GASES Design, Construction and Equipment Atmospheric Control in Cargo Containment Systems § 154.910 Inert gas piping: Location. Inert gas piping...

  10. 46 CFR 154.904 - Inert gas system: Controls.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 5 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Inert gas system: Controls. 154.904 Section 154.904... STANDARDS FOR SELF-PROPELLED VESSELS CARRYING BULK LIQUEFIED GASES Design, Construction and Equipment Atmospheric Control in Cargo Containment Systems § 154.904 Inert gas system: Controls. The inert gas...

  11. 46 CFR 154.910 - Inert gas piping: Location.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 5 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Inert gas piping: Location. 154.910 Section 154.910... STANDARDS FOR SELF-PROPELLED VESSELS CARRYING BULK LIQUEFIED GASES Design, Construction and Equipment Atmospheric Control in Cargo Containment Systems § 154.910 Inert gas piping: Location. Inert gas piping...

  12. 46 CFR 154.904 - Inert gas system: Controls.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 5 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Inert gas system: Controls. 154.904 Section 154.904... STANDARDS FOR SELF-PROPELLED VESSELS CARRYING BULK LIQUEFIED GASES Design, Construction and Equipment Atmospheric Control in Cargo Containment Systems § 154.904 Inert gas system: Controls. The inert gas...

  13. 46 CFR 154.904 - Inert gas system: Controls.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 5 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Inert gas system: Controls. 154.904 Section 154.904... STANDARDS FOR SELF-PROPELLED VESSELS CARRYING BULK LIQUEFIED GASES Design, Construction and Equipment Atmospheric Control in Cargo Containment Systems § 154.904 Inert gas system: Controls. The inert gas...

  14. 46 CFR 154.910 - Inert gas piping: Location.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 5 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Inert gas piping: Location. 154.910 Section 154.910... STANDARDS FOR SELF-PROPELLED VESSELS CARRYING BULK LIQUEFIED GASES Design, Construction and Equipment Atmospheric Control in Cargo Containment Systems § 154.910 Inert gas piping: Location. Inert gas piping...

  15. 46 CFR 154.903 - Inert gas systems: General.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... Atmospheric Control in Cargo Containment Systems § 154.903 Inert gas systems: General. (a) Inert gas carried... tanks, hold and interbarrier spaces, and insulation. (b) The boiling point and dew point at atmospheric pressure of the inert gas must be below the temperature of any surface in those spaces or −45 °C (−49...

  16. 46 CFR 154.903 - Inert gas systems: General.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... Atmospheric Control in Cargo Containment Systems § 154.903 Inert gas systems: General. (a) Inert gas carried... tanks, hold and interbarrier spaces, and insulation. (b) The boiling point and dewpoint at atmospheric pressure of the inert gas must be below the temperature of any surface in those spaces or −45 °C (−49...

  17. 46 CFR 154.903 - Inert gas systems: General.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... Atmospheric Control in Cargo Containment Systems § 154.903 Inert gas systems: General. (a) Inert gas carried... tanks, hold and interbarrier spaces, and insulation. (b) The boiling point and dewpoint at atmospheric pressure of the inert gas must be below the temperature of any surface in those spaces or −45 °C (−49...

  18. 46 CFR 154.903 - Inert gas systems: General.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... Atmospheric Control in Cargo Containment Systems § 154.903 Inert gas systems: General. (a) Inert gas carried... tanks, hold and interbarrier spaces, and insulation. (b) The boiling point and dewpoint at atmospheric pressure of the inert gas must be below the temperature of any surface in those spaces or −45 °C (−49...

  19. 46 CFR 154.903 - Inert gas systems: General.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... Atmospheric Control in Cargo Containment Systems § 154.903 Inert gas systems: General. (a) Inert gas carried... tanks, hold and interbarrier spaces, and insulation. (b) The boiling point and dewpoint at atmospheric pressure of the inert gas must be below the temperature of any surface in those spaces or −45 °C (−49...

  20. 46 CFR 154.910 - Inert gas piping: Location.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 5 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Inert gas piping: Location. 154.910 Section 154.910 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) CERTAIN BULK DANGEROUS CARGOES SAFETY... Atmospheric Control in Cargo Containment Systems § 154.910 Inert gas piping: Location. Inert gas piping...

  1. 46 CFR 154.906 - Inert gas generators.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 5 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Inert gas generators. 154.906 Section 154.906 Shipping... Atmospheric Control in Cargo Containment Systems § 154.906 Inert gas generators. The inert gas generator must... sample the discharge of the generator for oxygen content; and (c) Have an audible and visual alarm in...

  2. 46 CFR 154.908 - Inert gas generator: Location.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 5 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Inert gas generator: Location. 154.908 Section 154.908... Atmospheric Control in Cargo Containment Systems § 154.908 Inert gas generator: Location. (a) Except as allowed in paragraph (b) of this section, an inert gas generator must be located in the main...

  3. 46 CFR 154.908 - Inert gas generator: Location.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 5 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Inert gas generator: Location. 154.908 Section 154.908... Atmospheric Control in Cargo Containment Systems § 154.908 Inert gas generator: Location. (a) Except as allowed in paragraph (b) of this section, an inert gas generator must be located in the main...

  4. 46 CFR 154.906 - Inert gas generators.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 5 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Inert gas generators. 154.906 Section 154.906 Shipping... Atmospheric Control in Cargo Containment Systems § 154.906 Inert gas generators. The inert gas generator must... sample the discharge of the generator for oxygen content; and (c) Have an audible and visual alarm in...

  5. 46 CFR 154.908 - Inert gas generator: Location.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 5 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Inert gas generator: Location. 154.908 Section 154.908... Atmospheric Control in Cargo Containment Systems § 154.908 Inert gas generator: Location. (a) Except as allowed in paragraph (b) of this section, an inert gas generator must be located in the main...

  6. 46 CFR 154.906 - Inert gas generators.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 5 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Inert gas generators. 154.906 Section 154.906 Shipping... Atmospheric Control in Cargo Containment Systems § 154.906 Inert gas generators. The inert gas generator must... sample the discharge of the generator for oxygen content; and (c) Have an audible and visual alarm in...

  7. 46 CFR 154.906 - Inert gas generators.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 5 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Inert gas generators. 154.906 Section 154.906 Shipping... Atmospheric Control in Cargo Containment Systems § 154.906 Inert gas generators. The inert gas generator must... sample the discharge of the generator for oxygen content; and (c) Have an audible and visual alarm in...

  8. 46 CFR 154.906 - Inert gas generators.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 5 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Inert gas generators. 154.906 Section 154.906 Shipping... Atmospheric Control in Cargo Containment Systems § 154.906 Inert gas generators. The inert gas generator must... sample the discharge of the generator for oxygen content; and (c) Have an audible and visual alarm in...

  9. 46 CFR 154.908 - Inert gas generator: Location.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 5 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Inert gas generator: Location. 154.908 Section 154.908... Atmospheric Control in Cargo Containment Systems § 154.908 Inert gas generator: Location. (a) Except as allowed in paragraph (b) of this section, an inert gas generator must be located in the main...

  10. 46 CFR 154.908 - Inert gas generator: Location.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 5 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Inert gas generator: Location. 154.908 Section 154.908... Atmospheric Control in Cargo Containment Systems § 154.908 Inert gas generator: Location. (a) Except as allowed in paragraph (b) of this section, an inert gas generator must be located in the main...

  11. A new understanding of inert gas narcosis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meng, Zhang; Yi, Gao; Haiping, Fang

    2016-01-01

    Anesthetics are extremely important in modern surgery to greatly reduce the patient’s pain. The understanding of anesthesia at molecular level is the preliminary step for the application of anesthetics in clinic safely and effectively. Inert gases, with low chemical activity, have been found to cause anesthesia for centuries, but the mechanism is unclear yet. In this review, we first summarize the progress of theories about general anesthesia, especially for inert gas narcosis, and then propose a new hypothesis that the aggregated rather than the dispersed inert gas molecules are the key to trigger the narcosis to explain the steep dose-response relationship of anesthesia. Project supported by the Supercomputing Center of Chinese Academy of Sciences in Beijing, China, the Shanghai Supercomputer Center, China, the National Natural Science Foundation of China (Grant Nos. 21273268, 11290164, and 11175230), the Startup Funding from Shanghai Institute of Applied Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences (Grant No. Y290011011), “Hundred People Project” from Chinese Academy of Sciences, and “Pu-jiang Rencai Project” from Science and Technology Commission of Shanghai Municipality, China (Grant No. 13PJ1410400).

  12. Refractory metals welded or brazed with tungsten inert gas equipment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wisner, J. P.

    1965-01-01

    Appropriate brazing metals and temperatures facilitate the welding or brazing of base metals with tungsten inert gas equipment. The highest quality bond is obtained when TIG welding is performed in an inert atmosphere.

  13. 46 CFR 153.500 - Inert gas systems.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 5 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Inert gas systems. 153.500 Section 153.500 Shipping... BULK LIQUID, LIQUEFIED GAS, OR COMPRESSED GAS HAZARDOUS MATERIALS Design and Equipment Special Requirements § 153.500 Inert gas systems. When Table 1 refers to this section, a cargo containment system...

  14. 46 CFR 153.500 - Inert gas systems.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 5 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Inert gas systems. 153.500 Section 153.500 Shipping... BULK LIQUID, LIQUEFIED GAS, OR COMPRESSED GAS HAZARDOUS MATERIALS Design and Equipment Special Requirements § 153.500 Inert gas systems. When Table 1 refers to this section, a cargo containment system...

  15. 46 CFR 153.500 - Inert gas systems.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 5 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Inert gas systems. 153.500 Section 153.500 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) CERTAIN BULK DANGEROUS CARGOES SHIPS CARRYING BULK LIQUID, LIQUEFIED GAS, OR COMPRESSED GAS HAZARDOUS MATERIALS Design and Equipment Special Requirements § 153.500 Inert gas systems. When Table...

  16. Inert gas bubbles in bcc Fe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gai, Xiao; Smith, Roger; Kenny, S. D.

    2016-03-01

    The properties of inert gas bubbles in bcc Fe is examined using a combination of static energy minimisation, molecular dynamics and barrier searching methods with empirical potentials. Static energy minimisation techniques indicate that for small Ar and Xe bubbles, the preferred gas to vacancy ratio at 0 K is about 1:1 for Ar and varies between 0.5:1 and 0.9:1 for Xe. In contrast to interstitial He atoms and small He interstitial clusters, which are highly mobile in the lattice, Ar and Xe atoms prefer to occupy substitutional sites and any interstitials present in the lattice soon displace Fe atoms and become substitutional. If a pre-existing bubble is present then there is a capture radius around a bubble which extends up to the 6th neighbour position. Collision cascades can also enlarge an existing bubble by the capture of vacancies. Ar and Xe can diffuse through the lattice through vacancy driven mechanisms but with relatively high energy barriers of 1.8 and 2.0 eV respectively. This indicates that Ar and Xe bubbles are much harder to form than bubbles of He and that such gases produced in a nuclear reaction would more likely be dispersed at substitutional sites without the help of increased temperature or radiation-driven mechanisms.

  17. Inert gas spraying device aids in repair of hazardous systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Teleha, S.

    1965-01-01

    Inert gas spraying device aids in safely making mechanical repairs to a cryogenic fluid system without prior emptying of the system. This method can be applied to any natural or bottled gas system and with modifications to gasoline transports.

  18. Inert-Gas Diffuser For Plasma Or Arc Welding

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gilbert, Jeffrey L.; Spencer, Carl N.; Hosking, Timothy J.

    1994-01-01

    Inert-gas diffuser provides protective gas cover for weld bead as it cools. Follows welding torch, maintaining continuous flow of argon over newly formed joint and prevents it from oxidizing. Helps to ensure welds of consistently high quality. Devised for plasma arc keyhole welding of plates of 0.25-in. or greater thickness, also used in tungsten/inert-gas and other plasma or arc welding processes.

  19. A sensitive image intensifier which uses inert gas

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kerns, Q. A.; Miller, H. M.

    1972-01-01

    High gain optical image intensifier utilizes inert gas cavity with copper electrodes to form electron avalanches without excessive pulse voltages. Estimated optical gain for device is two times 10 to the power of seven.

  20. Apparatus For Metal/Inert-Gas Welding In Vacuum

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stocks, C. O.

    1994-01-01

    Metal/inert-gas welding-torch assembly operates in vacuum. Plasma generated in interior chamber and focused onto workpiece in vacuum. Pinch rollers feed wire to weld puddle. Controlled flow of plasma reduces dispersal in vacuum, preventing extinction.

  1. 46 CFR 153.501 - Requirement for dry inert gas.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 5 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Requirement for dry inert gas. 153.501 Section 153.501 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) CERTAIN BULK DANGEROUS CARGOES SHIPS CARRYING BULK LIQUID, LIQUEFIED GAS, OR COMPRESSED GAS HAZARDOUS MATERIALS Design and Equipment Special Requirements § 153.501 Requirement for...

  2. 46 CFR 153.501 - Requirement for dry inert gas.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 5 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Requirement for dry inert gas. 153.501 Section 153.501 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) CERTAIN BULK DANGEROUS CARGOES SHIPS CARRYING BULK LIQUID, LIQUEFIED GAS, OR COMPRESSED GAS HAZARDOUS MATERIALS Design and Equipment Special Requirements § 153.501 Requirement for...

  3. Nonchamber, Root-Side, Inert-Gas Purging During Welding

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mcgee, William F.; Rybicki, Daniel J.

    1995-01-01

    Improved apparatus distributes inert gas to protect against oxidation on root side of weld during welding and after welding while joint remains hot. Simple and lightweight; readily moved along weld path in synchronism with torch. Because it concentrates inert gas where needed, consumes gas at relatively low rate, and not necessary to monitor oxygen content of protective atmosphere. Apparatus does not obscure view of root side of weld. Used for full-penetration plasma-arc welding of such reactive metals as aluminum/lithium alloys and titanium.

  4. Experimental study of steam condensation on water in countercurrent flow in presence of inert gases

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bharathan, D.; Althof, J.

    1984-08-01

    Experimental results of investigating steam condensation on water in the presence of (noncondensable) inert gases at low temperatures and pressures relevant to open-cycle ocean thermal energy conversion (OTEC) systems are reported. Seven different condenser configurations were tested. The experimental data are correlated using a liquid flow fraction and a vent fraction to yield simple relationships of condenser performance over a wide range of test conditions. Performance maps and envelopes are provided for evaluating the relative merits of tested configurations. The height of transfer unit (HTU) for condensation ranges from 0.2 to 0.3 m among the various condenser geometries. Also reported are the pressure-loss coefficients for all the tested geometries.

  5. Analysis and Comparison of Aluminum Alloy Welded Joints Between Metal Inert Gas Welding and Tungsten Inert Gas Welding

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Lei; Guan, Yingchun; Wang, Qiang; Cong, Baoqiang; Qi, Bojin

    2015-09-01

    Surface contamination usually occurs during welding processing and it affects the welds quality largely. However, the formation of such contaminants has seldom been studied. Effort was made to study the contaminants caused by metal inert gas (MIG) welding and tungsten inert gas (TIG) welding processes of aluminum alloy, respectively. SEM, FTIR and XPS analysis was carried out to investigate the microstructure as well as surface chemistry. These contaminants were found to be mainly consisting of Al2O3, MgO, carbide and chromium complexes. The difference of contaminants between MIG and TIG welds was further examined. In addition, method to minimize these contaminants was proposed.

  6. 33 CFR 157.164 - Use of inert gas system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... Crude Oil Washing (COW) System on Tank Vessels Cow Operations § 157.164 Use of inert gas system. (a) The... ensure the following: (1) Before each cargo tank is crude oil washed, the oxygen content in the tank is... the ullage space. (2) Before each cargo tank with partial bulkheads is crude oil washed, each area...

  7. Synthesis and deposition of metal nanoparticles by gas condensation process

    SciTech Connect

    Maicu, Marina Glöß, Daniel; Frach, Peter; Schmittgens, Ralph; Gerlach, Gerald; Hecker, Dominic

    2014-03-15

    In this work, the synthesis of Pt and Ag nanoparticles by means of the inert gas phase condensation of sputtered atomic vapor is presented. The process parameters (power, sputtering time, and gas flow) were varied in order to study the relationship between deposition conditions and properties of the nanoparticles such as their quantity, size, and size distribution. Moreover, the gas phase condensation process can be combined with a plasma enhanced chemical vapor deposition procedure in order to deposit nanocomposite coatings consisting of metallic nanoparticles embedded in a thin film matrix material. Selected examples of application of the generated nanoparticles and nanocomposites are discussed.

  8. Fog inerting effects on hydrogen combustion in a PWR ice condenser contaminant

    SciTech Connect

    Luangdilok, W.; Bennett, R.B.

    1995-05-01

    A mechanistic fog inerting model has been developed to account for the effects of fog on the upward lean flammability limits of a combustible mixture based on the thermal theory of flame propagation. Benchmarking of this model with test data shows reasonably good agreement between the theory and the experiment. Applications of the model and available fog data to determine the upward lean flammability limits of the H{sub 2}-air-steam mixture in the ice condenser upper plenum region of a pressurized water reactor (PWR) ice condenser contaminant during postulated large loss of coolant accident (LOCA) conditions indicate that combustion may be suppressed beyond the downward flammability limit (8 percent H{sub 2} by volume). 18 refs., 3 tabs.

  9. Moving in extreme environments: inert gas narcosis and underwater activities.

    PubMed

    Clark, James E

    2015-01-01

    Exposure to the underwater environment for pleasure or work poses many challenges on the human body including thermal stress, barotraumas, decompression sickness as well as the acute effects of breathing gases under pressure. With the popularity of recreational self-contained underwater breathing apparatus (SCUBA) diving on the increase and deep inland dive sites becoming more accessible, it is important that we understand the effects of breathing pressurised gas at depth can have on the body. One of the common consequences of hyperbaric gas is the narcotic effect of inert gas. Nitrogen (a major component of air) under pressure can impede mental function and physical performance at depths of as little as 10 m underwater. With increased depth, symptoms can worsen to include confusion, disturbed coordination, lack of concentration, hallucinations and unconsciousness. Narcosis has been shown to contribute directly to up to 6% of deaths in divers and is likely to be indirectly associated with other diving incidents at depth. This article explores inert gas narcosis, the effect on divers' movement and function underwater and the proposed physiological mechanisms. Also discussed are some of the factors that affect the susceptibility of divers to the condition. In conclusion, understanding the cause of this potentially debilitating problem is important to ensure that safe diving practices continue. PMID:25713701

  10. 46 CFR 153.462 - Static discharges from inert gas systems.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 5 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Static discharges from inert gas systems. 153.462... Equipment Special Requirements for Flammable Or Combustible Cargoes § 153.462 Static discharges from inert... create static arcing as the inert gas is injected into the tank....

  11. 46 CFR 153.462 - Static discharges from inert gas systems.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 5 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Static discharges from inert gas systems. 153.462... Equipment Special Requirements for Flammable Or Combustible Cargoes § 153.462 Static discharges from inert... create static arcing as the inert gas is injected into the tank....

  12. 46 CFR 153.462 - Static discharges from inert gas systems.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... gas systems. An inert gas system on a tank that carries a flammable or combustible cargo must not... 46 Shipping 5 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Static discharges from inert gas systems. 153.462... CARGOES SHIPS CARRYING BULK LIQUID, LIQUEFIED GAS, OR COMPRESSED GAS HAZARDOUS MATERIALS Design...

  13. 46 CFR 153.462 - Static discharges from inert gas systems.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... gas systems. An inert gas system on a tank that carries a flammable or combustible cargo must not... 46 Shipping 5 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Static discharges from inert gas systems. 153.462... CARGOES SHIPS CARRYING BULK LIQUID, LIQUEFIED GAS, OR COMPRESSED GAS HAZARDOUS MATERIALS Design...

  14. 46 CFR 153.462 - Static discharges from inert gas systems.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... gas systems. An inert gas system on a tank that carries a flammable or combustible cargo must not... 46 Shipping 5 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Static discharges from inert gas systems. 153.462... CARGOES SHIPS CARRYING BULK LIQUID, LIQUEFIED GAS, OR COMPRESSED GAS HAZARDOUS MATERIALS Design...

  15. Nuclear Technology. Course 28: Welding Inspection. Module 28-3, Tungsten Inert Gas (TIG), Metal Inert Gas (MIG) and Submerged Arc Welding.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Espy, John

    This third in a series of ten modules for a course titled Welding Inspection presents the apparatus, process techniques, procedures, applications, associated defects, and inspection for the tungsten inert gas, metal inert gas, and submerged arc welding processes. The module follows a typical format that includes the following sections: (1)…

  16. Cytogenetic studies of stainless steel welders using the tungsten inert gas and metal inert gas methods for welding.

    PubMed

    Jelmert, O; Hansteen, I L; Langård, S

    1995-03-01

    Cytogenetic damage was studied in lymphocytes from 23 welders using the Tungsten Inert Gas (TIG), and 21 welders using the Metal Inert Gas (MIG) and/or Metal Active Gas (MAG) methods on stainless steel (SS). A matched reference group I, and a larger reference group II of 94 subjects studied during the same time period, was established for comparison. Whole blood conventional cultures (CC), cultures in which DNA synthesis and repair were inhibited (IC), and the sister chromatid exchange (SCE) assay were applied in the study. For the CC a statistically significant decrease in chromosome breaks and cells with aberrations was found for both TIG/SS and MIG/MAG/SS welders when compared with reference group II. A non-significant decrease was found for the corresponding parameters for the two groups of welders when compared with their matched referents. A statistically significant negative association was found between measurements of total chromium (Cr) in inhaled air and SCE, and a weaker negative correlation with hexavalent Cr (Cr(VI)) in air. In conclusion, no cytogenetic damage was found in welders exposed to the TIG/SS and MIG/MAG/SS welding fumes with low content of Cr and Ni. On the contrary, a decline in the prevalence of chromosomal aberrations was indicated in the TIG/SS and MIG/MAG/SS welders, possibly related to the suggested enhancement of DNA repair capacity at slightly elevated exposures. PMID:7885396

  17. Development of advanced inert-gas ion thrusters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Poeschel, R. L.

    1983-01-01

    Inert gas ion thruster technology offers the greatest potential for providing high specific impulse, low thrust, electric propulsion on large, Earth orbital spacecraft. The development of a thruster module that can be operated on xenon or argon propellant to produce 0.2 N of thrust at a specific impulse of 3000 sec with xenon propellant and at 6000 sec with argon propellant is described. The 30 cm diameter, laboratory model thruster is considered to be scalable to produce 0.5 N thrust. A high efficiency ring cusp discharge chamber was used to achieve an overall thruster efficiency of 77% with xenon propellant and 66% with argon propellant. Measurements were performed to identify ion production and loss processes and to define critical design criteria (at least on a preliminary basis).

  18. The intelligent control of an inert-gas atomization process

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Osella, S. A.; Ridder, S. D.; Biancaniello, F. S.; Espina, P. I.

    1991-01-01

    Intelligent control is an attempt to specify the function of a controller in ways which mimic the decision-making capabilities of humans. Traditionally, issues relating to the emulation of human-like capabilities have fallen in the domain of artificial intelligence. Intelligent processing is a specific form of intelligent control in which the system to be controlled is a process rather than the more conventional mechanical or electrical system. The National Institute of Standards and Technology's program on intelligent processing of metal powders is a multi-disciplinary research initiative investigating the application of intelligent control technologies to improve the state of the art of metal powder manufacturing. This paper reviews the design of the institute's supersonic inert-gas metal-atomizer control system.

  19. Inert-gas welding and brazing enclosure fabricated from sheet plastic

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wisner, J. P.

    1965-01-01

    Custom-fabricated plastic bag maintains an inert-gas atmosphere for welding and brazing certain metals. The bag fits over part of the workpieces and the welding and brazing tools. It is also used for metal brazing and fusion plating which require an inert-gas atmosphere.

  20. 3-D simulation of gases transport under condition of inert gas injection into goaf

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Mao-Xi; Shi, Guo-Qing; Guo, Zhixiong; Wang, Yan-Ming; Ma, Li-Yang

    2016-02-01

    To prevent coal spontaneous combustion in mines, it is paramount to understand O2 gas distribution under condition of inert gas injection into goaf. In this study, the goaf was modeled as a 3-D porous medium based on stress distribution. The variation of O2 distribution influenced by CO2 or N2 injection was simulated based on the multi-component gases transport and the Navier-Stokes equations using Fluent. The numerical results without inert gas injection were compared with field measurements to validate the simulation model. Simulations with inert gas injection show that CO2 gas mainly accumulates at the goaf floor level; however, a notable portion of N2 gas moves upward. The evolution of the spontaneous combustion risky zone with continuous inert gas injection can be classified into three phases: slow inerting phase, rapid accelerating inerting phase, and stable inerting phase. The asphyxia zone with CO2 injection is about 1.25-2.4 times larger than that with N2 injection. The efficacy of preventing and putting out mine fires is strongly related with the inert gas injecting position. Ideal injections are located in the oxidation zone or the transitional zone between oxidation zone and heat dissipation zone.

  1. Visual/vestibular effects of inert gas narcosis.

    PubMed

    Hamilton, K; Laliberte, M F; Heslegrave, R; Khan, S

    1993-08-01

    Divers breathing compressed air at depths beyond 30 m experience a type of behavioural impairment known as inert gas narcosis. This condition degrades performance on a wide range of tasks and has the potential to compromise safety. Symptoms associated with narcosis include slowed response time, amnesia, and euphoria. Studies have also found disturbances to mechanisms regulating ocular control in response to vestibular stimulation; however, these experiments have been limited to very low frequency head movement (0.2 Hz). Thus, to further examine the effects of narcosis on visual/vestibular mechanisms, the vestibular ocular reflex (VOR) was assessed across a range of higher frequencies more representative of natural head movement (2.0-4.7 Hz). Seven subjects were tested prior to, during and after exposure to narcosis which was induced using 30% nitrous oxide. Standard room air was breathed as a control. The results indicated that narcosis decreased the velocity of compensatory eye movements in response to head rotation (decrease in VOR-gain), with more pronounced decreases occurring at the higher frequencies. The lag between eye and head position (phase lag) was also decreased by nitrous oxide; an effect that was again more pronounced at higher frequencies. These results indicate that narcosis disrupts ocular regulatory mechanisms which help to stabilize images on the retina during head movement. PMID:8365388

  2. Automated measurement of respiratory gas exchange by an inert gas dilution technique

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sawin, C. F.; Rummel, J. A.; Michel, E. L.

    1974-01-01

    A respiratory gas analyzer (RGA) has been developed wherein a mass spectrometer is the sole transducer required for measurement of respiratory gas exchange. The mass spectrometer maintains all signals in absolute phase relationships, precluding the need to synchronize flow and gas composition as required in other systems. The RGA system was evaluated by comparison with the Douglas bag technique. The RGA system established the feasibility of the inert gas dilution method for measuring breath-by-breath respiratory gas exchange. This breath-by-breath analytical capability permits detailed study of transient respiratory responses to exercise.

  3. Impact of Airway Gas Exchange on the Multiple Inert Gas Elimination Technique: Theory

    PubMed Central

    Anderson, Joseph C.; Hlastala, Michael P.

    2011-01-01

    The multiple inert gas elimination technique (MIGET) provides a method for estimating alveolar gas exchange efficiency. Six soluble inert gases are infused into a peripheral vein. Measurements of these gases in breath, arterial blood, and venous blood are interpreted using a mathematical model of alveolar gas exchange (MIGET model) that neglects airway gas exchange. A mathematical model describing airway and alveolar gas exchange predicts that two of these gases, ether and acetone, exchange primarily within the airways. To determine the effect of airway gas exchange on the MIGET, we selected two additional gases, toluene and m-dichlorobenzene, that have the same blood solubility as ether and acetone and minimize airway gas exchange via their low water solubility. The airway-alveolar gas exchange model simulated the exchange of toluene, m-dichlorobenzene, and the six MIGET gases under multiple conditions of alveolar ventilation-to-perfusion, V̇A/Q̇, heterogeneity. We increased the importance of airway gas exchange by changing bronchial blood flow, Q̇br. From these simulations, we calculated the excretion and retention of the eight inert gases and divided the results into two groups: 1) the standard MIGET gases which included acetone and ether and 2) the modified MIGET gases which included toluene and m-dichlorobenzene. The MIGET mathematical model predicted distributions of ventilation and perfusion for each grouping of gases and multiple perturbations of V̇A/Q̇ and Q̇br. Using the modified MIGET gases, MIGET predicted a smaller dead space fraction, greater mean V̇A, greater log(SDVA), and more closely matched the imposed V̇A distribution than that using the standard MIGET gases. Perfusion distributions were relatively unaffected. PMID:20336837

  4. Impact of airway gas exchange on the multiple inert gas elimination technique: theory.

    PubMed

    Anderson, Joseph C; Hlastala, Michael P

    2010-03-01

    The multiple inert gas elimination technique (MIGET) provides a method for estimating alveolar gas exchange efficiency. Six soluble inert gases are infused into a peripheral vein. Measurements of these gases in breath, arterial blood, and venous blood are interpreted using a mathematical model of alveolar gas exchange (MIGET model) that neglects airway gas exchange. A mathematical model describing airway and alveolar gas exchange predicts that two of these gases, ether and acetone, exchange primarily within the airways. To determine the effect of airway gas exchange on the MIGET, we selected two additional gases, toluene and m-dichlorobenzene, that have the same blood solubility as ether and acetone and minimize airway gas exchange via their low water solubility. The airway-alveolar gas exchange model simulated the exchange of toluene, m-dichlorobenzene, and the six MIGET gases under multiple conditions of alveolar ventilation-to-perfusion, VA/Q, heterogeneity. We increased the importance of airway gas exchange by changing bronchial blood flow, Qbr. From these simulations, we calculated the excretion and retention of the eight inert gases and divided the results into two groups: (1) the standard MIGET gases which included acetone and ether and (2) the modified MIGET gases which included toluene and m-dichlorobenzene. The MIGET mathematical model predicted distributions of ventilation and perfusion for each grouping of gases and multiple perturbations of VA/Q and Qbr. Using the modified MIGET gases, MIGET predicted a smaller dead space fraction, greater mean VA, greater log(SDVA), and more closely matched the imposed VA distribution than that using the standard MIGET gases. Perfusion distributions were relatively unaffected. PMID:20336837

  5. Operation of the J-series thruster using inert gas

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rawlin, V. K.

    1982-01-01

    Electron bombardment ion thrusters using inert gases are candidates for large space systems. The J-Series 30 cm diameter thruster, designed for operation up to 3 k-W with mercury, is at a state of technology readiness. The characteristics of operation with xenon, krypton, and argon propellants in a J-Series thruster with that obtained with mercury are compared. The performance of the discharge chamber, ion optics, and neutralizer and the overall efficiency as functions of input power and specific impulse and thruster lifetime were evaluated. As expected, the discharge chamber performance with inert gases decreased with decreasing atomic mass. Aspects of the J-Series thruster design which would require modification to provide operation at high power with insert gases were identified.

  6. Diagnostics of metal inert gas and metal active gas welding processes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Uhrlandt, D.

    2016-08-01

    The paper gives a review on studies on metal inert gas (MIG) and metal active gas (MAG) welding processes with the focus on diagnostics of the arc, the material transfer, and the temporal process behaviour in welding experiments. Recent findings with respect to an improved understanding of the main mechanisms in the welding arc and the welding process are summarized. This is linked to actual developments in welding arc and welding process modelling where measurements are indispensable for validation. Challenges of forthcoming studies are illustrated by means of methods under development for welding process control as well as remaining open questions with respect to arc-surface interaction and arc power balance.

  7. Parameters, limits, attenuation, and suppression of detonation in mixtures of an explosive gas with chemically inert microparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fedorov, A. V.; Fomin, P. A.; Tropin, D. A.; Chen, Z.-R.

    2012-03-01

    Chapman-Jouguet parameters and the cell size of a detonation wave in mixtures of an explosive gas with chemically inert particles have been calculated. The algorithm of calculation of the minimum mass and characteristic dimension of a particle cloud ensuring successful suppression of detonation in the gas has been proposed. The calculation results are in good agreement with the available experimental data. The influence of the initial composition of the gas on the efficiency of suppression of the detonation wave has been analyzed. The issue of the dependence of the concentration limits of detonation on the mass fraction of particles has been investigated. It has been established that the increase in the concentration of the condensed phase leads to a narrowing of the existence domain of detonation and that the propagation of the detonation wave becomes impossible when the concentration of the particles is fairly high.

  8. Investigation on the Oscillating Gas Flow Along AN Inertance Tube by Experimental and Cfd Methods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Houlei; Zhao, Miguang; Yang, Luwei; Cai, Jinghui; Hong, Guotong; Liang, Jingtao

    2010-04-01

    To investigate the oscillating gas flow along an inertance tube used in pulse tube coolers, a CFD model is set up for FLUENT and an experimental measuring cell is designed and optimized by CFD results. Some characteristics of oscillating flow are demonstrated and discussed. Then, the flow status along an inertance tube is measured by the optimized measuring cell. The experimental results validate the simulating results.

  9. INVESTIGATION ON THE OSCILLATING GAS FLOW ALONG AN INERTANCE TUBE BY EXPERIMENTAL AND CFD METHODS

    SciTech Connect

    Chen Houlei; Zhao Miguang; Yang Luwei; Cai Jinghui; Hong Guotong; Liang Jingtao

    2010-04-09

    To investigate the oscillating gas flow along an inertance tube used in pulse tube coolers, a CFD model is set up for FLUENT and an experimental measuring cell is designed and optimized by CFD results. Some characteristics of oscillating flow are demonstrated and discussed. Then, the flow status along an inertance tube is measured by the optimized measuring cell. The experimental results validate the simulating results.

  10. Effect of Varying Inert Gas and Acetylene Concentration on the Synthesis of Carbon Nanotubes.

    PubMed

    Afrin, Rahat; Abbas, Syed Mustansar; Shah, Nazar Abbas; Mustafa, Muhammad Farooq; Ali, Zulfiqar; Ahmad, Nisar

    2016-03-01

    The multiwalled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs) with small diameter and high purity were achieved by chemical vapor deposition technique using silicon substrate. The introduction of specific concentration of inert gas with hydrocarbon played a key role in controlling morphology and diameter of MWCNTs. Nickel mixed ferrite nanoparticles were used as a catalyst for the growth of MWCNTs. Growth parameters like concentration of hydrocarbon source and inert gas flow, composition of catalyst particles and growth temperature were studied. In this work smaller diameter and twisted MWCNTs were formed by dilution of acetylene with argon gas. Electrical properties suggest a semimetallic behavior of synthesized MWCNTs. PMID:27455741

  11. The size-dependent morphology of Pd nanoclusters formed by gas condensation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pearmain, D.; Park, S. J.; Abdela, A.; Palmer, R. E.; Li, Z. Y.

    2015-11-01

    Size-selected Pd nanoclusters in the size range from 887 to 10 000 atoms were synthesized in a magnetron sputtering, inert gas condensation cluster beam source equipped with a time of flight mass filter. Their morphologies were investigated using scanning transmission electron microscopy (STEM) and shown to be strongly size-dependent. The larger clusters exhibited elongated structures, which we attribute to the aggregation, through multiple collisions, of smaller clusters during the gas phase condensation process. This was confirmed from the atomically resolved STEM images of the Pd nanoclusters, which showed smaller primary clusters with their own crystalline structures.

  12. The size-dependent morphology of Pd nanoclusters formed by gas condensation

    PubMed Central

    Pearmain, D.; Park, S. J.; Abdela, A.; Palmer, R. E.

    2015-01-01

    Size-selected Pd nanoclusters in the size range from 887 to 10 000 atoms were synthesized in a magnetron sputtering, inert gas condensation cluster beam source equipped with a time of flight mass filter. Their morphologies were investigated using scanning transmission electron microscopy (STEM) and shown to be strongly size-dependent. The larger clusters exhibited elongated structures, which we attribute to the aggregation, through multiple collisions, of smaller clusters during the gas phase condensation process. This was confirmed from the atomically resolved STEM images of the Pd nanoclusters, which showed smaller primary clusters with their own crystalline structures. PMID:26549633

  13. The size-dependent morphology of Pd nanoclusters formed by gas condensation.

    PubMed

    Pearmain, D; Park, S J; Abdela, A; Palmer, R E; Li, Z Y

    2015-12-14

    Size-selected Pd nanoclusters in the size range from 887 to 10,000 atoms were synthesized in a magnetron sputtering, inert gas condensation cluster beam source equipped with a time of flight mass filter. Their morphologies were investigated using scanning transmission electron microscopy (STEM) and shown to be strongly size-dependent. The larger clusters exhibited elongated structures, which we attribute to the aggregation, through multiple collisions, of smaller clusters during the gas phase condensation process. This was confirmed from the atomically resolved STEM images of the Pd nanoclusters, which showed smaller primary clusters with their own crystalline structures. PMID:26549633

  14. Noble gas trapping by laboratory carbon condensates

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Niemeyer, S.; Marti, K.

    1982-01-01

    Trapping of noble gases by carbon-rich matter was investigated by synthesizing carbon condensates in a noble gas atmosphere. Laser evaporation of a solid carbon target yielded submicron grains which proved to be efficient noble gas trappers (Xe distribution coefficients up to 13 cu cm STP/g-atm). The carbon condensates are better noble gas trappers than previously reported synthetic samples, except one, but coefficients inferred for meteoritic acid-residues are still orders of magnitude higher. The trapped noble gases are loosely bound and elementally strongly fractionated, but isotopic fractionations were not detected. Although this experiment does not simulate nebular conditions, the results support the evidence that carbon-rich phases in meteorites may be carriers of noble gases from early solar system reservoirs. The trapped elemental noble gas fractionations are remarkably similar to both those inferred for meteorites and those of planetary atmospheres for earth, Mars and Venus.

  15. Continuous injection of an inert gas through a drill rig for drilling into potentially hazardous areas

    DOEpatents

    McCormick, Steve H.; Pigott, William R.

    1997-01-01

    A drill rig for drilling in potentially hazardous areas includes a drill having conventional features such as a frame, a gear motor, gear box, and a drive. A hollow rotating shaft projects through the drive and frame. An auger, connected to the shaft is provided with a multiplicity of holes. An inert gas is supplied to the hollow shaft and directed from the rotating shaft to the holes in the auger. The inert gas flows down the hollow shaft, and then down the hollow auger and out through the holes in the bottom of the auger into the potentially hazardous area.

  16. Continuous injection of an inert gas through a drill rig for drilling into potentially hazardous areas

    DOEpatents

    McCormick, S.H.; Pigott, W.R.

    1997-12-30

    A drill rig for drilling in potentially hazardous areas includes a drill having conventional features such as a frame, a gear motor, gear box, and a drive. A hollow rotating shaft projects through the drive and frame. An auger, connected to the shaft is provided with a multiplicity of holes. An inert gas is supplied to the hollow shaft and directed from the rotating shaft to the holes in the auger. The inert gas flows down the hollow shaft, and then down the hollow auger and out through the holes in the bottom of the auger into the potentially hazardous area. 3 figs.

  17. Continuous injection of an inert gas through a drill rig for drilling into potentially hazardous areas

    SciTech Connect

    McCormick, S.H.; Pigott, W.R.

    1998-04-01

    A drill rig for drilling in potentially hazardous areas includes a drill having conventional features such as a frame, a gear motor, gear box, and a drive. A hollow rotating shaft projects through the drive and frame. An auger, connected to the shaft is provided with a multiplicity of holes. An inert gas is supplied to the hollow shaft and directed from the rotating shaft to the holes in the auger. The inert gas flows down the hollow shaft, and then down the hollow auger, and out through the holes in the bottom of the auger into the potentially hazardous area.

  18. Vacuum rated flow controllers for inert gas ion engines

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pless, L. C.

    1987-01-01

    Electrical propulsion systems which use a gas as a propellant require a gas flowmeter/controller which is capable of operating in a vacuum environment. The presently available instruments in the required flow ranges are designed and calibrated for use at ambient pressure. These instruments operate by heating a small diameter tube through which the gas is flowing and then sensing the change in temperature along the length of the tube. This temperature change is a function of the flow rate and the gas heat capacity. When installed in a vacuum, the change in the external thermal characteristics cause the tube to overheat and the temperature sensors are then operating outside their calibrated range. In addition, the variation in heat capacity with temperature limit the accuracy obtainable. These problems and the work in progress to solve them are discussed.

  19. Inert gas rejection device for zinc-halogen battery systems

    DOEpatents

    Hammond, Michael J.; Arendell, Mark W.

    1981-01-01

    An electrolytic cell for separating chlorine gas from other (foreign) gases, having an anode, a cathode assembly, an aqueous electrolyte, a housing, and a constant voltage power supply. The cathode assembly is generally comprised of a dense graphite electrode having a winding channel formed in the face opposing the anode, a gas impermeable (but liquid permeable) membrane sealed into the side of the cathode electrode over the channel, and a packing of graphite particles contained in the channel of the cathode electrode. The housing separates and parallelly aligns the anode and cathode assembly, and provides a hermetic seal for the cell. In operation, a stream of chlorine and foreign gases enters the cell at the beginning of the cathode electrode channel. The chlorine gas is dissolved into the electrolyte and electrochemically reduced into chloride ions. The chloride ions disfuse through the gas impermeable membrane, and are electrochemically oxidized at the anode into purified chlorine gas. The foreign gases do not participate in the above electrochemical reactions, and are vented from the cell at the end of the cathode electrode channel.

  20. Clinical relevance of ventilation-perfusion inequality determined by inert gas elimination.

    PubMed

    Rodriguez-Roisin, R; Wagner, P D

    1990-04-01

    The first part of this review deals with the basic mechanisms and factors determining hypoxaemia and hypercapnia and the different approaches used in clinical practice and in clinical research to assess the presence of ventilation-perfusion mismatching, shunt and diffusion limitation for oxygen, and more specifically the multiple inert gas elimination technique (MIGET), in pulmonary medicine. The second part reviews three different respiratory disorders where the complex interplay between intrapulmonary and extrapulmonary factors regulating oxygen are essentially interpreted through the results afforded by the MIGET over the last decade. The gas exchange response to bronchodilators in bronchial asthma, an airway disease, and then the major determinants governing abnormal gas exchange in acute pulmonary embolism, a pulmonary vascular disorder, and during haemodialysis, a respiratory entity of extrapulmonary origin, are successively explored in the light of the inert gas method. PMID:2163880

  1. Heat Transfer and Pressure Drop in Concentric Annular Flows of Binary Inert Gas Mixtures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Reid, R. S.; Martin, J. J.; Yocum, D. J.; Stewart, E. T.

    2007-01-01

    Studies of heat transfer and pressure drop of binary inert gas mixtures flowing through smooth concentric circular annuli, tubes with fully developed velocity profiles, and constant heating rate are described. There is a general lack of agreement among the constant property heat transfer correlations for such mixtures. No inert gas mixture data exist for annular channels. The intent of this study was to develop highly accurate and benchmarked pressure drop and heat transfer correlations that can be used to size heat exchangers and cores for direct gas Brayton nuclear power plants. The inside surface of the annular channel is heated while the outer surface of the channel is insulated. Annulus ratios range 0.5 < r* < 0.83. These smooth tube data may serve as a reference to the heat transfer and pressure drop performance in annuli, tubes, and channels having helixes or spacer ribs, or other surfaces.

  2. Onboard Inert Gas Generation System/Onboard Oxygen Gas Generation System (OBIGGS/OBOGS) Study. Part 1; Aircraft System Requirements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Reynolds, Thomas L.; Bailey, Delbert B.; Lewinski, Daniel F.; Roseburg, Conrad M.; Palaszewski, Bryan (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    The purpose of this technology assessment is to define a multiphase research study program investigating Onboard Inert Gas Generation Systems (OBIGGS) and Onboard Oxygen Generation Systems (OBOGS) that would identify current airplane systems design and certification requirements (Subtask 1); explore state-of-the-art technology (Subtask 2); develop systems specifications (Subtask 3); and develop an initial system design (Subtask 4). If feasible, consideration may be given to the development of a prototype laboratory test system that could potentially be used in commercial transport aircraft (Subtask 5). These systems should be capable of providing inert nitrogen gas for improved fire cargo compartment fire suppression and fuel tank inerting and emergency oxygen for crew and passenger use. Subtask I of this research study, presented herein, defines current production aircraft certification requirements and design objectives necessary to meet mandatory FAA certification requirements and Boeing design and performance specifications. These requirements will be utilized for baseline comparisons for subsequent OBIGGS/OBOGS application evaluations and assessments.

  3. Green spherules from Apollo 15 - Inferences about their origin from inert gas measurements.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lakatos, S.; Yaniv, A.; Heymann, D.

    1973-01-01

    Green spherules from the 'clod' 15426 and from fines 15421 contain about 100 times less trapped inert gases than normal bulk fines from Apollo 15. These spherules have apparently never been directly exposed to the solar wind. Spherules from other fines contain about 10 times more trapped gas than those from the 'clod.' The gas in the former is surface correlated. However, spherules from fines 15401 are exceptionally gas-poor. The trapped gases can be of solar-wind origin, but this origin requires a two-stage model for the spherules from the clods. Another possibility is that the gases were absorbed from an ambient gas phase. The trapped gases may also be assumed to represent primordial lunar gas. The composition of this gas is then similar to the 'solar' or 'unfractionated' component of gas-rich meteorites, but unlike that in most of the carbonaceous chondrites.

  4. Research on inert gas narcosis and air velocity effects on metabolic performance

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1974-01-01

    The effects of air velocity on metabolic performance are studied by using high forced airflow in a closed environment as a mechanism to control the concentration of volatile animal wastes. Air velocities between 100 and 200 ft/min are without significant effects on the metabolism of rats. At velocities of 200 ft/min and above, oxygen consumption and CO2 production as well as food consumption increase. In most instances, the changes are on the order of 5-10%. At the same time, the RQ for the animals increases slightly and generally correlates well with oxygen consumption and CO2 production. Experiments on the nature of inert gas narcosis show that halothane and methoxyflurane are rather potent inhibitors of the NADH:O2 oxidoreductase system in rats. These experiments suggest that the mechanism of inert gas narcosis is not mandatorily related to a membrane surface phenomenon.

  5. Probing Toluene and Ethylbenzene Stable Glass Formation using Inert Gas Permeation

    SciTech Connect

    Smith, R. Scott; May, Robert A.; Kay, Bruce D.

    2015-09-01

    Inert gas permeation is used to investigate the formation of stable glasses of toluene and ethylbenzene. The effect of deposition temperature (Tdep) on the kinetic stability of the vapor deposited glasses is determined using Kr desorption spectra from within sandwich layers of either toluene or ethylbenzene. The results for toluene show that the most stable glass is formed at Tdep = 0.92 Tg, although glasses with a kinetic stability within 50% of the most stable glass were found with deposition temperatures from 0.85 to 0.95 Tg. Similar results were found for ethylbenzene, which formed its most stable glass at 0.91 Tg and formed stable glasses from 0.81 to 0.96 Tg. These results are consistent with recent calorimetric studies and demonstrate that the inert gas permeation technique provides a direct method to observe the onset of molecular translation motion that accompanies the glass to supercooled liquid transition.

  6. GAS CONDENSATION IN THE GALACTIC HALO

    SciTech Connect

    Joung, M. Ryan; Bryan, Greg L.; Putman, Mary E.

    2012-02-01

    Using adaptive mesh refinement (AMR) hydrodynamic simulations of vertically stratified hot halo gas, we examine the conditions under which clouds can form and condense out of the hot halo medium to potentially fuel star formation in the gaseous disk. We find that halo clouds do not develop from linear isobaric perturbations. This is a regime where the cooling time is longer than the Brunt-Vaeisaelae time, confirming previous linear analysis. We extend the analysis into the nonlinear regime by considering mildly or strongly nonlinear perturbations with overdensities up to 100, also varying the initial height, the cloud size, and the metallicity of the gas. Here, the result depends on the ratio of cooling time to the time required to accelerate the cloud to the sound speed (similar to the dynamical time). If the ratio exceeds a critical value near unity, the cloud is accelerated without further cooling and gets disrupted by Kelvin-Helmholtz and/or Rayleigh-Taylor instabilities. If it is less than the critical value, the cloud cools and condenses before disruption. Accreting gas with overdensities of 10-20 is expected to be marginally unstable; the cooling fraction will depend on the metallicity, the size of the incoming cloud, and the distance to the galaxy. Locally enhanced overdensities within cold streams have a higher likelihood of cooling out. Our results have implications on the evolution of clouds seeded by cold accretion that are barely resolved in current cosmological hydrodynamic simulations and absorption line systems detected in galaxy halos.

  7. Resonant gas oscillation with evaporation and condensation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Inaba, Masashi; Yano, Takeru; Watanabe, Masao; Kobayashi, Kazumichi; Fujikawa, Shigeo

    2012-09-01

    Resonant gas oscillation in a closed tube bounded by an oscillating plate and a vaporliquid interface is theoretically analyzed by applying the asymptotic theory to the ES-BGK Boltzmann equation for the case of M2≃Kn≪1 and a small evaporation coefficient α = O(Kn), where M and Kn are the typical Mach number and the Knudsen number, respectively. As a result, we derive a nonlinear integro-differential equation for determining the wave profile with the evaporation and condensation in the form including α.

  8. Physical Modeling of Slag `Eye' in an Inert Gas-Shrouded Tundish Using Dimensional Analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chatterjee, Saikat; Chattopadhyay, Kinnor

    2016-02-01

    The formation of an exposed eye in the gas-stirred metallurgical vessels such as ladle or tundish is a common observation. Although gas stirring results in proper homogenization of melt composition and temperature, the resulting exposed eye leads to higher heat losses, re-oxidation of liquid steel, and formation of inclusions. Most of the previous research related to slag eye were carried out explicitly for ladles. In the present work, a large number of experiments were performed to measure the slag eye area in full scale and one-third scale water models of an inert gas-shrouded tundish under various operating conditions. Based on the polynomial regression of experimental data, and the method of dimensional analysis, correlations for diameter of gas bubbles and plume velocity were developed. Subsequently, these results were used to obtain correlations for the slag eye area, and critical gas flow rate in an inert gas-shrouded tundish in terms of the operational parameters viz., gas flow rate, thickness of the slag and melt baths, along with the physical properties of the liquids viz., kinematic viscosity and density. It was observed that the dimensionless slag eye area can be expressed in terms of dimensionless numbers such as the density ratio, Froude number, and Reynolds number.

  9. TIG WELDER LOCATED IN THE CLEAN ROOM OF THE TECHNICAL SERVICES BUILDING TSB - THE INERT GAS WELDING

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1963-01-01

    TIG WELDER LOCATED IN THE CLEAN ROOM OF THE TECHNICAL SERVICES BUILDING TSB - THE INERT GAS WELDING FACILITY IS USED FOR WELDING REFRACTORY METALS IN CONNECTION WITH THE COLUMBIUM LIQUID SODIUM LOOP PROJECT

  10. A Model for Surface Induced Growth of Inert Gas Bubbles in Irradiated Copper-Boron Alloys

    SciTech Connect

    Tiwari, G.P.; Ramadasan, E.

    2006-07-01

    A matrix containing inert gas bubbles dilates in direct proportion to the growth experienced by the gas bubbles. This phenomenon is termed as swelling. A model for the swelling induced by the growth of the helium gas bubbles in irradiated copper-boron alloys is presented. The bubbles grow by acquiring vacancies from the external surface, which acts as a source of vacancies. The vacancies reach the surface of the bubbles mainly via lattice diffusion and to a limited extent via diffusion through short-circuiting paths such as grain boundaries and dislocation pipes. The model predicts that overall swelling of the matrix varies as 1.5 power of time. Another consequence of the present model is that the growth rate of a gas bubble varies inversely as the cube of its distance from the external surface. The model has been applied to the data on irradiated copper-boron alloys and found to be in accord with the experimental results. The model is general and can be applied to the growth of all kinds of stationary inert gas bubbles trapped within a crystalline matrix. (authors)

  11. Multiple inert gas elimination technique by micropore membrane inlet mass spectrometry--a comparison with reference gas chromatography.

    PubMed

    Kretzschmar, Moritz; Schilling, Thomas; Vogt, Andreas; Rothen, Hans Ulrich; Borges, João Batista; Hachenberg, Thomas; Larsson, Anders; Baumgardner, James E; Hedenstierna, Göran

    2013-10-15

    The mismatching of alveolar ventilation and perfusion (VA/Q) is the major determinant of impaired gas exchange. The gold standard for measuring VA/Q distributions is based on measurements of the elimination and retention of infused inert gases. Conventional multiple inert gas elimination technique (MIGET) uses gas chromatography (GC) to measure the inert gas partial pressures, which requires tonometry of blood samples with a gas that can then be injected into the chromatograph. The method is laborious and requires meticulous care. A new technique based on micropore membrane inlet mass spectrometry (MMIMS) facilitates the handling of blood and gas samples and provides nearly real-time analysis. In this study we compared MIGET by GC and MMIMS in 10 piglets: 1) 3 with healthy lungs; 2) 4 with oleic acid injury; and 3) 3 with isolated left lower lobe ventilation. The different protocols ensured a large range of normal and abnormal VA/Q distributions. Eight inert gases (SF6, krypton, ethane, cyclopropane, desflurane, enflurane, diethyl ether, and acetone) were infused; six of these gases were measured with MMIMS, and six were measured with GC. We found close agreement of retention and excretion of the gases and the constructed VA/Q distributions between GC and MMIMS, and predicted PaO2 from both methods compared well with measured PaO2. VA/Q by GC produced more widely dispersed modes than MMIMS, explained in part by differences in the algorithms used to calculate VA/Q distributions. In conclusion, MMIMS enables faster measurement of VA/Q, is less demanding than GC, and produces comparable results. PMID:23869066

  12. Spark gap switch system with condensable dielectric gas

    DOEpatents

    Thayer, III, William J.

    1991-01-01

    A spark gap switch system is disclosed which is capable of operating at a high pulse rate comprising an insulated switch housing having a purging gas entrance port and a gas exit port, a pair of spaced apart electrodes each having one end thereof within the housing and defining a spark gap therebetween, an easily condensable and preferably low molecular weight insulating gas flowing through the switch housing from the housing, a heat exchanger/condenser for condensing the insulating gas after it exits from the housing, a pump for recirculating the condensed insulating gas as a liquid back to the housing, and a heater exchanger/evaporator to vaporize at least a portion of the condensed insulating gas back into a vapor prior to flowing the insulating gas back into the housing.

  13. Inert gas a-A differences: a direct reflection of V/Q distribution.

    PubMed

    Neufeld, G R; Williams, J J; Klineberg, P L; Marshall, B E

    1978-02-01

    A computer model was developed to study the relationship between ventilation-to-perfusion (V/Q) mismatch and the development of inert gas arterial-to-alveolar partial pressure differences (a-A differences). Increasing inhomogeneity of V/Q ratio is revealed directly as an increase in the a-A difference of each gas. The quantitative relationships between the Q vs. V/Q distribution and the fractional a-A difference solubility plot (a-A difference plot) were studied and described. These studies demonstrated that for log normally distributed V/Q ratios, the area under the a-A difference plot is linearly related to the log variance of the V/Q distribution and can be estimated directly from the values obtained from six gases. The maximum a-A difference occurs for a gas whose solubility is numerically equal to the mean V/Q. The effects of departure from log normality and multimodality are discussed. We conclude from these studies that quantitative information regarding the degree of inhomogeneity of V/Q for log normal distribution is available from direct calculations of inert gas retention and excretion data. Qualitative information is also available indicating the departure from log normality and the region toward which the distribution is skewed. PMID:204618

  14. Effects of SO2 and pH on blood-gas partition coefficients of inert gases.

    PubMed

    Yamaguchi, K; Mori, M; Kawai, A; Asano, K; Takasugi, T; Umeda, A; Yokoyama, T

    1990-01-01

    Potential effects of SO2 and of pH on blood-gas partition coefficients, lambda, for inert gases, including SF6, ethane, cyclopropane, halothane, diethyl ether, acetone and N2, were systematically investigated using human blood. Measurements on lambda were performed at 37 degrees C in conditions of varied SO2 and pH using gas chromatography. Incorporating the experimental data on lambda, multiple inert gas elimination was applied to 18 patients with varied chronic lung diseases, in order to estimate the effects of SO2 and of pH on both inert gas exchange and resultant recovery of VA/Q distribution in the lung. For this purpose, the data obtained by the procedure of multiple inert gas elimination were analyzed with the classical approach but allowance was made for lambda of the indicator gas to vary according to exchange of O2 and of CO2 in the pulmonary capillary. Among the gases studied, ethane, cyclopropane, halothane and diethyl ether showed significantly smaller lambda values in the oxygenated blood than in deoxygenated blood, whereas SF6, acetone and N2 were little dependent on SO2. An increase in lambda was found for ethane and a decrease for halothane with increasing pH in the blood. The other gases were not significantly influenced by pH. In spite of these experimental findings, regional difference of either SO2 or pH in the lung did not exert important influence on the inert gas exchange or on the predicted VA/Q distribution. In conclusion, blood-gas partition coefficients of some inert gases are consistently altered by SO2 and pH, but their possible effects on inert gas exchange seem to be negligible. PMID:1965757

  15. CFD simulation of water vapour condensation in the presence of non-condensable gas in vertical cylindrical condensers

    PubMed Central

    Li, Jun-De

    2013-01-01

    This paper presents the simulation of the condensation of water vapour in the presence of non-condensable gas using computational fluid dynamics (CFD) for turbulent flows in a vertical cylindrical condenser tube. The simulation accounts for the turbulent flow of the gas mixture, the condenser wall and the turbulent flow of the coolant in the annular channel with no assumptions of constant wall temperature or heat flux. The condensate film is assumed to occupy a negligible volume and its effect on the condensation of the water vapour has been taken into account by imposing a set of boundary conditions. A new strategy is used to overcome the limitation of the currently available commercial CFD package to solve the simultaneous simulation of flows involving multispecies and fluids of gas and liquid in separate channels. The results from the CFD simulations are compared with the experimental results from the literature for the condensation of water vapour with air as the non-condensable gas and for inlet mass fraction of the water vapour from 0.66 to 0.98. The CFD simulation results in general agree well with the directly measured quantities and it is found that the variation of heat flux in the condenser tube is more complex than a simple polynomial curve fit. The CFD results also show that, at least for flows involving high water vapour content, the axial velocity of the gas mixture at the interface between the gas mixture and the condensate film is in general not small and cannot be neglected. PMID:24850953

  16. CFD simulation of water vapour condensation in the presence of non-condensable gas in vertical cylindrical condensers.

    PubMed

    Li, Jun-De

    2013-02-01

    This paper presents the simulation of the condensation of water vapour in the presence of non-condensable gas using computational fluid dynamics (CFD) for turbulent flows in a vertical cylindrical condenser tube. The simulation accounts for the turbulent flow of the gas mixture, the condenser wall and the turbulent flow of the coolant in the annular channel with no assumptions of constant wall temperature or heat flux. The condensate film is assumed to occupy a negligible volume and its effect on the condensation of the water vapour has been taken into account by imposing a set of boundary conditions. A new strategy is used to overcome the limitation of the currently available commercial CFD package to solve the simultaneous simulation of flows involving multispecies and fluids of gas and liquid in separate channels. The results from the CFD simulations are compared with the experimental results from the literature for the condensation of water vapour with air as the non-condensable gas and for inlet mass fraction of the water vapour from 0.66 to 0.98. The CFD simulation results in general agree well with the directly measured quantities and it is found that the variation of heat flux in the condenser tube is more complex than a simple polynomial curve fit. The CFD results also show that, at least for flows involving high water vapour content, the axial velocity of the gas mixture at the interface between the gas mixture and the condensate film is in general not small and cannot be neglected. PMID:24850953

  17. Monte Carlo Simulation of Laser-Ablated Particle Splitting Dynamic in a Low Pressure Inert Gas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ding, Xuecheng; Zhang, Zicai; Liang, Weihua; Chu, Lizhi; Deng, Zechao; Wang, Yinglong

    2016-06-01

    A Monte Carlo simulation method with an instantaneous density dependent mean-free-path of the ablated particles and the Ar gas is developed for investigating the transport dynamics of the laser-ablated particles in a low pressure inert gas. The ablated-particle density and velocity distributions are analyzed. The force distributions acting on the ablated particles are investigated. The influence of the substrate on the ablated-particle velocity distribution and the force distribution acting on the ablated particles are discussed. The Monte Carlo simulation results approximately agree with the experimental data at the pressure of 8 Pa to 17 Pa. This is helpful to investigate the gas phase nucleation and growth mechanism of nanoparticles. supported by the Natural Science Foundation of Hebei Province, China (No. A2015201166) and the Natural Science Foundation of Hebei University, China (No. 2013-252)

  18. Contribution of multiple inert gas elimination technique to pulmonary medicine. 1. Principles and information content of the multiple inert gas elimination technique.

    PubMed Central

    Roca, J.; Wagner, P. D.

    1994-01-01

    This introductory review summarises four different aspects of the multiple inert gas elimination technique (MIGET). Firstly, the historical background that facilitated, in the mid 1970s, the development of the MIGET as a tool to obtain more information about the entire spectrum of VA/Q distribution in the lung by measuring the exchange of six gases of different solubility in trace concentrations. Its principle is based on the observation that the retention (or excretion) of any gas is dependent on the solubility (lambda) of that gas and the VA/Q distribution. A second major aspect is the analysis of the information content and limitations of the technique. During the last 15 years a substantial amount of clinical research using the MIGET has been generated by several groups around the world. The technique has been shown to be adequate in understanding the mechanisms of hypoxaemia in different forms of pulmonary disease and the effects of therapeutic interventions, but also in separately determining the quantitative role of each extrapulmonary factor on systemic arterial PO2 when they change between two conditions of MIGET measurement. This information will be extensively reviewed in the forthcoming articles of this series. Next, the different modalities of the MIGET, practical considerations involved in the measurements and the guidelines for quality control have been indicated. Finally, a section has been devoted to the analysis of available data in healthy subjects under different conditions. The lack of systematic information on the VA/Q distributions of older healthy subjects is emphasised, since it will be required to fully understand the changes brought about by diseases that affect the older population. PMID:8091330

  19. Experimental study on steam condensation with non-condensable gas in horizontal microchannels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ma, Xuehu; Fan, Xiaoguang; Lan, Zhong; Jiang, Rui; Tao, Bai

    2013-07-01

    This paper experimentally studied steam condensation with non-condensable gas in trapezoidal microchannels. The effect of noncondensable gas on condensation two-phase flow patterns and the characteristics of heat transfer and frictional pressure drop were investigated. The visualization study results showed that the special intermittent annular flow was found in the microchannel under the condition of larger mole fraction of noncondensable gas and lower steam mass flux; the apical area of injection was much larger and the neck of injection was longer for mixture gas with lower mole fraction of noncondensable gas in comparison with pure steam condensation; meanwhile, the noncondensable gas resulted in the decrease of flow patterns transitional steam mass flux and quality. The experimental results also indicated that the frictional pressure drop increased with the increasing mole fraction of noncondensable gas when the steam mass flux was fixed. Unlike nature convective condensation heat transfer, the mole fraction of noncondensable gas had little effect on Nusselt number. Based on experimental data, the predictive correlation of Nusselt number for mixture gas condensation in microchannels was established showed good agreement with experimental data.

  20. Experimental observations of effects of inert gas on cavity formation during irradiation

    SciTech Connect

    Farrell, K.

    1980-04-01

    Cavity (void) formation and swelling in non-fissile materials during neutron irradiation and charged particle bombardments are reviewed. Helium is the most important inert gas and is primarily active as a cavity nucleant. It also enhances formation of dislocation structure. Preimplantation of helium overstimulates cavity nucleation and gives a different temperature response of swelling than when helium is coimplanted during the damage process. Helium affects, and is affected by, radiation-induced phase instability. Many of these effects are explainable in terms of cavity nucleation on submicroscopic critical size gas bubbles, and on the influence of the neutral sink strength of such bubbles. Titanium and zirconium resist cavity formation when vacancy loops are present.

  1. Condensation heat transfer in rotating heat pipes in the presence of a non-condensable gas

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Daniels, T. C.; Medwell, J. O.; Williams, R. J.

    1977-01-01

    An analysis of condensation problems in rotating heat pipes containing vapors with different concentrations of non-condensable gases is given. In situations such as this, temperature and concentration gradients are set up in the vapor-gas mixture. There is a transport of mass due to temperature gradients accompanied by an energy transport phenomena due to a concentration gradient. A Nusselt type analysis is not suited to this type of problem; however, a boundary layer type approach has successfully been used to analyze stationary condensation systems with non-condensable gases present. The present boundary layer analysis is presented for condensation processes on the inside of a rotating heat pipe in the presence of non-condensable gases.

  2. Neurochemistry of Pressure-Induced Nitrogen and Metabolically Inert Gas Narcosis in the Central Nervous System.

    PubMed

    Rostain, Jean-Claude; Lavoute, Cécile

    2016-01-01

    Gases that are not metabolized by the organism are thus chemically inactive under normal conditions. Such gases include the "noble gases" of the Periodic Table as well as hydrogen and nitrogen. At increasing pressure, nitrogen induces narcosis at 4 absolute atmospheres (ATAs) and more in humans and at 11 ATA and more in rats. Electrophysiological and neuropharmacological studies suggest that the striatum is a target of nitrogen narcosis. Glutamate and dopamine release from the striatum in rats are decreased by exposure to nitrogen at a pressure of 31 ATA (75% of the anesthetic threshold). Striatal dopamine levels decrease during exposure to compressed argon, an inert gas more narcotic than nitrogen, or to nitrous oxide, an anesthetic gas. Inversely, striatal dopamine levels increase during exposure to compressed helium, an inert gas with a very low narcotic potency. Exposure to nitrogen at high pressure does not change N-methyl-d-aspartate (NMDA) glutamate receptor activities in Substantia Nigra compacta and striatum but enhances gama amino butyric acidA (GABAA) receptor activities in Substantia Nigra compacta. The decrease in striatal dopamine levels in response to hyperbaric nitrogen exposure is suppressed by recurrent exposure to nitrogen narcosis, and dopamine levels increase after four or five exposures. This change, the lack of improvement of motor disturbances, the desensitization of GABAA receptors on dopamine cells during recurrent exposures and the long-lasting decrease of glutamate coupled with the higher sensitivity of NMDA receptors, suggest a nitrogen toxicity induced by repetitive exposures to narcosis. These differential changes in different neurotransmitter receptors would support the binding protein theory. © 2016 American Physiological Society. Compr Physiol 6:1579-1590, 2016. PMID:27347903

  3. Comparison of inert-gas-fusion and modified Kjeldahl techniques for determination of nitrogen in niobium alloys

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Merkle, E. J.; Graab, J. W.; Davis, W. F.

    1974-01-01

    This report compares results obtained for the determination of nitrogen in a selected group of niobium-base alloys by the inert-gas-fusion and the Kjeldahl procedures. In the inert-gas-fusion procedure the sample is heated to approximately 2700 C in a helium atmosphere in a single-use graphite crucible. A platinum flux is used to facilitate melting of the sample. The Kjeldahl method consisted of a rapid decomposition with a mixture of hydrofluoric acid, phosphoric acid, and potassium chromate; distillation in the presence of sodium hydroxide; and highly sensitive spectrophotometry with nitroprusside-catalyzed indophenol. In the 30- to 80-ppm range, the relative standard deviation was 5 to 7 percent for the inert-gas-fusion procedure and 2 to 8 percent for the Kjeldahl procedure. The agreement of the nitrogen results obtained by the two techniques is considered satisfactory.

  4. Mathematical simulation of the process of condensing natural gas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tastandieva, G. M.

    2015-01-01

    Presents a two-dimensional unsteady model of heat transfer in terms of condensation of natural gas at low temperatures. Performed calculations of the process heat and mass transfer of liquefied natural gas (LNG) storage tanks of cylindrical shape. The influence of model parameters on the nature of heat transfer. Defined temperature regimes eliminate evaporation by cooling liquefied natural gas. The obtained dependence of the mass flow rate of vapor condensation gas temperature. Identified the possibility of regulating the process of "cooling down" liquefied natural gas in terms of its partial evaporation with low cost energy.

  5. Diffusion-perfusion relationships in skeletal muscle: models and experimental evidence from inert gas washout.

    PubMed

    Piiper, J; Meyer, M

    1984-01-01

    In order to study the dependence of blood-tissue gas exchange upon diffusion, the simultaneous washout of two inert gases of differing diffusivity was investigated in isolated-perfused dog gastrocnemius preparations. The muscles were equilibrated with CH4 and SF6 via arterial blood. The washout kinetics were determined from venous blood samples analyzed by gas chromatography. The results revealed the following features: The washout of the test gases was pronouncedly multi-exponential, and could be described by three exponential components when analyzed to 5% of the initial value. The non-exponential washout was attributed to unequal distribution of capillary blood flow to tissue volume. The mean ratio of washout rate constants CH4/SF6 was within 1.10-1.25 and was even smaller than the ratio expected for pure perfusion limitation (1.46). Therefore, no evidence for effective tissue-blood diffusion limitation was obtained. The observed washout rate constant ratio could be explained by a model with veno-arterial back diffusion which more strongly retards washout kinetics of the better diffusible gas (CH4) as compared to the less diffusible gas (SF6). PMID:6731103

  6. Note: development of fast heating inert gas annealing apparatus operated at atmospheric pressure.

    PubMed

    Das, S C; Majumdar, A; Shripathi, T; Hippler, R

    2012-04-01

    Here, we report the development of a simple, small, fast heating, and portable, homemade, inert gas (Ar) atmospheric annealing setup. Instead of using a conventional heating element, a commercial soldering rod having an encapsulated fast heating heater is used here. The sample holder is made of a block of stainless steel. It takes 200 s to reach 700 °C, and 10 min to cool down. The probability of oxidation or surface contamination has been examined by means of x ray photoelectron spectroscopy of virgin Cu sample after annealing at 600 °C. In addition, we compare the annealing of a hydrogenated carbon nitride film (HCN(x)) in both a conventional vacuum and our newly developed ambient Ar atmosphere setup. PMID:22559595

  7. Pulmonary shunt: a comparison between oxygen and inert gas infusion methods.

    PubMed

    Hlastala, M P; Colley, P S; Cheney, F W

    1975-12-01

    Pulmonary shunt measurement was compared using the standard oxygen (Berggren) technique and a new multiple inert gas infusion (Wagner et al.) technique in 11 mongrel dogs with either regional atelectasis or diffuse pulmonary edema. Relative retentions of sulfur hexafluoride, ethane, cyclopropane, halothane, diethyl ether, and acetone were used to calculate intrapulmonary shunt. Relative dilution of oxygen (Berggren method) was used to calculate total right to left shunt. The two methods gave similar results in the range of 20-80%. At low shunts the oxygen method measured higher values. This is because of the greater relative importance of fixed extrapulmonary shunts at this level and, as well, error in the measurement of PO2. Both techniques are suitable for normal clinical use. PMID:175043

  8. Condensation of natural gas or methane into gasoline range hydrocarbons

    SciTech Connect

    Olah, G. A.

    1985-04-23

    This invention relates to a new process for the direct conversion of natural gas or methane into gasoline-range hydrocarbons (i.e., synthetic transportation fuels or lower olefins) via catalytic condensation using superacid catalysts.

  9. Electron temperature and density measurement of tungsten inert gas arcs with Ar-He shielding gas mixture

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kühn-Kauffeldt, M.; Marques, J.-L.; Forster, G.; Schein, J.

    2013-10-01

    The diagnostics of atmospheric welding plasma is a well-established technology. In most cases the measurements are limited to processes using pure shielding gas. However in many applications shielding gas is a mixture of various components including metal vapor in gas metal arc welding (GMAW). Shielding gas mixtures are intentionally used for tungsten inert gas (TIG) welding in order to improve the welding performance. For example adding Helium to Argon shielding gas allows the weld geometry and porosity to be influenced. Yet thermal plasmas produced with gas mixtures or metal vapor still require further experimental investigation. In this work coherent Thomson scattering is used to measure electron temperature and density in these plasmas, since this technique allows independent measurements of electron and ion temperature. Here thermal plasmas generated by a TIG process with 50% Argon and 50% Helium shielding gas mixture have been investigated. Electron temperature and density measured by coherent Thomson scattering have been compared to the results of spectroscopic measurements of the plasma density using Stark broadening of the 696.5 nm Argon spectral line. Further investigations of MIG processes using Thomson scattering technique are planned.

  10. Steam condensation inside a vertical tube with noncondensable gas

    SciTech Connect

    Araki, Hidefumi; Kataoka, Yoshiyuki; Murase, Michio

    1994-12-31

    Passive containment cooling systems are being studied extensively in order to enhance reactor simplicity. One promising concept is a system equipped with condensers submerged in pools located outside the primary containment vessel (PCV). Assuming a loss-of-coolant accident, steam flows into the condensers together with nitrogen, which fills the containment drywell. Then steam is condensed in the tubes, and the decay heat is released to the atmosphere by vaporization of the pool water, suppressing and pressure of the PCV below the design pressure. In the foregoing process, the noncondensable gas greatly lowers the heat transfer coefficient (HTC) inside the condenser tubes. Therefore the effect of noncondensable gases should be clarified to predict HTCs under such conditions. The objective of this study are to measure local HTCs inside a condenser tube and to develop their evaluation methods in the presence of noncondensable gas.

  11. Inert gas enhanced laser-assisted purification of platinum electron-beam-induced deposits

    SciTech Connect

    Stanford, Michael G.; Lewis, Brett B.; Noh, Joo Hyon; Fowlkes, Jason Davidson; Rack, Philip D.

    2015-06-30

    Electron-beam-induced deposition patterns, with composition of PtC5, were purified using a pulsed laser-induced purification reaction to erode the amorphous carbon matrix and form pure platinum deposits. Enhanced mobility of residual H2O molecules via a localized injection of inert Ar–H2 (4%) is attributed to be the reactive gas species for purification of the deposits. Surface purification of deposits was realized at laser exposure times as low as 0.1 s. The ex situ purification reaction in the deposit interior was shown to be rate-limited by reactive gas diffusion into the deposit, and deposit contraction associated with the purification process caused some loss of shape retention. To circumvent the intrinsic flaws of the ex situ anneal process, in situ deposition and purification techniques were explored that resemble a direct write atomic layer deposition (ALD) process. First, we explored a laser-assisted electron-beam-induced deposition (LAEBID) process augmented with reactive gas that resulted in a 75% carbon reduction compared to standard EBID. Lastly, a sequential deposition plus purification process was also developed and resulted in deposition of pure platinum deposits with high fidelity and shape retention.

  12. Inert gas enhanced laser-assisted purification of platinum electron-beam-induced deposits

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Stanford, Michael G.; Lewis, Brett B.; Noh, Joo Hyon; Fowlkes, Jason Davidson; Rack, Philip D.

    2015-06-30

    Electron-beam-induced deposition patterns, with composition of PtC5, were purified using a pulsed laser-induced purification reaction to erode the amorphous carbon matrix and form pure platinum deposits. Enhanced mobility of residual H2O molecules via a localized injection of inert Ar–H2 (4%) is attributed to be the reactive gas species for purification of the deposits. Surface purification of deposits was realized at laser exposure times as low as 0.1 s. The ex situ purification reaction in the deposit interior was shown to be rate-limited by reactive gas diffusion into the deposit, and deposit contraction associated with the purification process caused some lossmore » of shape retention. To circumvent the intrinsic flaws of the ex situ anneal process, in situ deposition and purification techniques were explored that resemble a direct write atomic layer deposition (ALD) process. First, we explored a laser-assisted electron-beam-induced deposition (LAEBID) process augmented with reactive gas that resulted in a 75% carbon reduction compared to standard EBID. Lastly, a sequential deposition plus purification process was also developed and resulted in deposition of pure platinum deposits with high fidelity and shape retention.« less

  13. Controlling the Neutron Yield from a Small Dense Plasma Focus using Deuterium-Inert Gas Mixtures

    SciTech Connect

    Bures, B. L.; Krishnan, M.; Eshaq, Y.

    2009-01-21

    The dense plasma focus (DPF) is a well known source of neutrons when operating with deuterium. The DPF is demonstrated to scale from 10{sup 4} n/pulse at 40 kA to >10{sup 12} n/pulse at 2 MA by non-linear current scaling as described in [1], which is itself based on the simple yet elegant model developed by Lee [2]. In addition to the peak current, the gas pressure controls the neutron yield. Recent published results suggest that mixing 1-5% mass fractions of Krypton increase the neutron yield per pulse by more than 10x. In this paper we present results obtained by mixing deuterium with Helium, Neon and Argon in a 500 J dense plasma focus operating at 140 kA with a 600 ns rise time. The mass density was held constant in these experiments at the optimum (pure) deuterium mass density for producing neutrons. A typical neutron yield for a pure deuterium gas charge is 2x10{sup 6}{+-}15% n/pulse. Neutron yields in excess of 10{sup 7}{+-}10% n/pulse were observed with low mass fractions of inert gas. Time integrated optical images of the pinch, soft x-ray measurements and optical emission spectroscopy where used to examine the pinch in addition to the neutron yield monitor and the fast scintillation detector. Work supported by Domestic Nuclear Detection Office under contract HSHQDC-08-C-00020.

  14. Inert Gas Enhanced Laser-Assisted Purification of Platinum Electron-Beam-Induced Deposits.

    PubMed

    Stanford, Michael G; Lewis, Brett B; Noh, Joo Hyon; Fowlkes, Jason D; Rack, Philip D

    2015-09-01

    Electron-beam-induced deposition patterns, with composition of PtC5, were purified using a pulsed laser-induced purification reaction to erode the amorphous carbon matrix and form pure platinum deposits. Enhanced mobility of residual H2O molecules via a localized injection of inert Ar-H2 (4%) is attributed to be the reactive gas species for purification of the deposits. Surface purification of deposits was realized at laser exposure times as low as 0.1 s. The ex situ purification reaction in the deposit interior was shown to be rate-limited by reactive gas diffusion into the deposit, and deposit contraction associated with the purification process caused some loss of shape retention. To circumvent the intrinsic flaws of the ex situ anneal process, in situ deposition and purification techniques were explored that resemble a direct write atomic layer deposition (ALD) process. First, we explored a laser-assisted electron-beam-induced deposition (LAEBID) process augmented with reactive gas that resulted in a 75% carbon reduction compared to standard EBID. A sequential deposition plus purification process was also developed and resulted in deposition of pure platinum deposits with high fidelity and shape retention. PMID:26126173

  15. Condensing Magnons in a Degenerate Ferromagnetic Spinor Bose Gas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fang, Fang; Olf, Ryan; Wu, Shun; Kadau, Holger; Stamper-Kurn, Dan M.

    2016-03-01

    We observe the quasicondensation of magnon excitations within an F =1 87Rb spinor Bose-Einstein condensed gas. Magnons are pumped into a ferromagnetically ordered gas, allowed to equilibrate to a nondegenerate distribution, and then cooled evaporatively at near-constant net longitudinal magnetization, whereupon they condense. The critical magnon number, spatial distribution, and momentum distribution indicate that magnons condense in a potential that is uniform within the volume of the ferromagnetic condensate. The macroscopic transverse magnetization produced by the degenerate magnon gas remains inhomogeneous within the ˜10 s equilibration time accessed in our experiment, and includes signatures of Mermin-Ho spin textures that appear as phase singularities in the magnon quasicondensate wave function.

  16. Condensing Magnons in a Degenerate Ferromagnetic Spinor Bose Gas.

    PubMed

    Fang, Fang; Olf, Ryan; Wu, Shun; Kadau, Holger; Stamper-Kurn, Dan M

    2016-03-01

    We observe the quasicondensation of magnon excitations within an F=1 ^{87}Rb spinor Bose-Einstein condensed gas. Magnons are pumped into a ferromagnetically ordered gas, allowed to equilibrate to a nondegenerate distribution, and then cooled evaporatively at near-constant net longitudinal magnetization, whereupon they condense. The critical magnon number, spatial distribution, and momentum distribution indicate that magnons condense in a potential that is uniform within the volume of the ferromagnetic condensate. The macroscopic transverse magnetization produced by the degenerate magnon gas remains inhomogeneous within the ∼10  s equilibration time accessed in our experiment, and includes signatures of Mermin-Ho spin textures that appear as phase singularities in the magnon quasicondensate wave function. PMID:26991184

  17. Requirements for long-life operation of inert gas hollow cathodes - Preliminary results

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Verhey, Timothy R.; Macrae, Gregory S.

    1990-01-01

    An experimental investigation was initiated to establish conditioning procedures for reliable hollow cathode operation via the characterization of critical parameters in a representative cathode test facility. From vacuum pumpdown rates, it was found that approximately 1.5 hours were required to achieve pressure levels within 5 percent of the lowest attainable pressure for this facility, depending on the purge conditions. The facility atmosphere was determined by a residual gas analyzer to be composed of primarily air and water vapor. The effects of vacuum pumping and inert gas purging were evaluated. A maximum effective leakage rate of 2.0 x 10 (exp -3) sccm was observed and its probable causes were examined. An extended test of a 0.64 cm diameter Mo-Re hollow cathode was successfully completed. This test ran for 504 hours at an emission current of 23.0 amperes and a xenon flow rate of 6.1 sccm. Discharge voltage rose continuously from 15 to 21 volts over the course of the test. The temperature of the cathode body during the test was relatively stable at 1160 C. Post-test examination revealed ion-bombardment texturing of the orifice plate to be the only detectable sign of wear on the hollow cathode.

  18. Inert gas purgebox for Fourier transform ion cyclotron resonance mass spectrometry of air-sensitive solids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    May, Michael A.; Marshall, Alan G.

    1994-03-01

    A sealed rigid ``purgebox'' makes it possible to load air- and/or moisture-sensitive solids into the solids probe inlet of a Fourier transform ion cyclotron resonance (FT/ICR) mass spectrometer. A pelletized sample is transferred (in a sealed canister) from a commercial drybox to a Lucite(R) purgebox. After the box is purged with inert gas, an attached glove manipulator is used to transfer the sample from the canister to the solids probe of the mass spectrometer. Once sealed inside the inlet, the sample is pre-evacuated and then passed into the high vacuum region of the instrument at ˜10-7 Torr. The purgebox is transparent, portable, and readily assembled/disassembled. Laser desorption FT/ICR mass spectra of the air- and moisture-sensitive solids, NbCl5. NbCl2(C5H5)2, and Zr(CH3)2(C5H5)2 are obtained without significant oxidation. The residual water vapor concentration inside the purgebox was measured as 100±20 ppm after a 90-min purge with dry nitrogen gas. High-resolution laser desorption/ionization mass spectrometry of air-sensitive solids becomes feasible with the present purgebox interface. With minor modification of the purgebox geometry, the present method could be adapted to any mass spectrometer equipped with a solid sample inlet.

  19. Requirements for long-life operation of inert gas hollow cathodes: Preliminary report

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Verhey, Timothy R.; Macrae, Gregory S.

    1990-01-01

    An experimental investigation was initiated to establish conditioning procedures for reliable hollow cathode operation via the characterization of critical parameters in a representative cathode test facility. From vacuum pumpdown rates, it was found that approximately 1.5 hours were required to achieve pressure levels within 5 percent of the lowest attainable pressure for this facility, depending on the purge conditions. The facility atmosphere was determined by a residual gas analyzer to be composed of primarily air and water vapor. The effects of vacuum pumping and inert gas purging were evaluated. A maximum effective leakage rate of 2.0 x 10(exp -3)sccm was observed and its probable causes were examined. An extended test of a 0.64 cm diameter Mo-Re hollow cathode was successfully completed. This test ran for 504 hours at an emission current of 23.0 amperes and a xenon flow rate of 6.1 sccm. Discharge voltage rose continuously from 15 to 21 volts over the course of the test. The temperature of the cathode body during the test was relatively stable at 1160 C. Post-test examination revealed ion-bombardment texturing of the orifice plate to be the only detectable sign of wear on the hollow cathode.

  20. Bénard instabilities in a binary-liquid layer evaporating into an inert gas.

    PubMed

    Machrafi, H; Rednikov, A; Colinet, P; Dauby, P C

    2010-09-01

    A linear stability analysis is performed for a horizontal layer of a binary liquid of which solely the solute evaporates into an inert gas, the latter being assumed to be insoluble in the liquid. In particular, a water-ethanol system in contact with air is considered, with the evaporation of water being neglected (which can be justified for a certain humidity of the air). External constraints on the system are introduced by imposing fixed "ambient" mass fraction and temperature values at a certain effective distance above the free liquid-gas interface. The temperature is the same as at the bottom of the liquid layer, where, besides, a fixed mass fraction of the solute is presumed to be maintained. Proceeding from a (quasi-)stationary reference solution, neutral (monotonic) stability curves are calculated in terms of solutal/thermal Marangoni/Rayleigh numbers as functions of the wavenumber for different values of the ratio of the gas and liquid layer thicknesses. The results are also presented in terms of the critical values of the liquid layer thickness as a function of the thickness of the gas layer. The solutal and thermal Rayleigh and Marangoni effects are compared to one another. For a water-ethanol mixture of 10wt.% ethanol, it appears that the solutal Marangoni effect is by far the most important instability mechanism. Furthermore, its global action can be described within a Pearson-like model, with an appropriately defined Biot number depending on the wavenumber. On the other hand, it is also shown that, if taken into account, water evaporation has only minor quantitative consequences upon the results for this predominant, solutal Marangoni mechanism. PMID:20557893

  1. Semiconductor nanocrystallite formation using inert gas ambient pulsed laser ablation and its application to light-emitting devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yoshida, Takehito; Yamada, Yuka; Suzuki, Nobuyasu; Makino, Toshiharu; Orii, Takaaki; Onai, Seinosuke

    1999-07-01

    Pulsed laser ablation (PLA) in inert background gases can synthesize the nanoscaled silicon (Si), for studying its material properties as one of the quantum confinement effects. We report an optimized condition in Si nanocrystalline formation by the PLA in inert background gas, varying processing parameters: pulse energy and width, inert background gas pressure. The optimized process can prepare well-dispersed Si nanocrystallites without any droplets and debris. Furthermore, we investigate the influence of the processing parameters Si nanocrystallites without any droplets and debris. Furthermore, we investigate the influence of the processing parameters on transition from amorphous-like Si thin films to nanocrystallites. It was found that there is a processing window of the inert background gas pressure where the carrier confinement effects become apparent. Next, we have fabricated electroluminescent (EL), diodes with active layers of the Si nanocrystallites. The structure of the EL diodes was semitransparent platinum electrode/Si nanocrystallite layer/p-type Si/Pt electrode. We have observed visible spectra of not only green photoluminescence, but also red EL, at room temperature. Furthermore, we have found that the EL diodes showed strong nonlinear dependence of EL intensity on current density.

  2. Analysis of cracks in stainless steel TIG (tungsten inert gas) welds

    SciTech Connect

    Nakagaki, M.; Marschall, C.; Brust, F.

    1986-12-01

    This report contains the results of a combined experimental and analytical study of ductile crack growth in tungsten inert gas (TIG) weldments of austenitic stainless steel specimens. The substantially greater yield strength of the weld metal relative to the base metal causes more plastic deformation in the base metal adjacent to the weld than in the weld metal. Accordingly, the analytical studies focused on the stress-strain interaction between the crack tip and the weld/base-metal interface. Experimental work involved tests using compact (tension) specimens of three different sizes and pipe bend experiments. The compact specimens were machined from a TIG weldment in Type 304 stainless steel plate. The pipe specimens were also TIG welded using the same welding procedures. Elastic-plastic finite element methods were used to model the experiments. In addition to the J-integral, different crack-tip integral parameters such as ..delta..T/sub p/* and J were evaluated. Also, engineering J-estimation methods were employed to predict the load-carrying capacity of the welded pipe with a circumferential through-wall crack under bending.

  3. Tensile properties of vanadium-base alloys with a tungsten/inert-gas weld zone

    SciTech Connect

    Loomis, B.A.; Konicek, C.F.; Nowicki, L.J.; Smith, D.L.

    1992-12-31

    The tensile properties of V-(0-20)Ti and V-(O-15)Cr-5Ti alloys after butt-joining by tungsten/inert-gas (TIG) welding were determined from tests at 25{degrees}C. Tensile tests were conducted on both annealed and cold-worked materials with a TIG weld zone. The tensile properties of these materials were strongly influenced by the microstructure in the heat-affected zone adjacent to the weld zone and by the intrinsic fracture toughness of the alloys. TIG weld zones in these vanadium-base alloys had tensile properties comparable to those of recrystallized alloys without a weld zone. Least affected by the TIG welding were tensile properties of the V-5Ti and V-5Cr-5Ti alloys. Although the tensile properties of the V-5Ti and V- 5Cr-5Ti alloys with a TIG weld zone were acceptable for structural material, these properties would be improved by optimization of the welding parameters for minimum grain size in the heat-affected zone.

  4. Joining titanium materials with tungsten inert gas welding, laser welding, and infrared brazing.

    PubMed

    Wang, R R; Welsch, G E

    1995-11-01

    Titanium has a number of desirable properties for dental applications that include low density, excellent biocompatibility, and corrosion resistance. However, joining titanium is one of the practical problems with the use of titanium prostheses. Dissolved oxygen and hydrogen may cause severe embrittlement in titanium materials. Therefore the conventional dental soldering methods that use oxygen flame or air torch are not indicated for joining titanium materials. This study compared laser, tungsten inert gas, and infrared radiation heating methods for joining both pure titanium and Ti-6Al-4V alloy. Original rods that were not subjected to joining procedures were used as a control method. Mechanical tests and microstructure analysis were used to evaluate joined samples. Mechanical tests included Vickers microhardness and uniaxial tensile testing of the strength of the joints and percentage elongation. Two-way analysis of variance and Duncan's multiple range test were used to compare mean values of tensile strength and elongation for significant differences (p < or = 0.05). Tensile rupture occurred in the joint region of all specimens by cohesive failure. Ti-6Al-4V samples exhibited significantly greater tensile strength than pure titanium samples. Samples prepared by the three joining methods had markedly lower tensile elongation than the control titanium and Ti-6Al-4V rods. The changes in microstructure and microhardness were studied in the heat-affected and unaffected zones. Microhardness values increased in the heat-affected zone for all the specimens tested. PMID:8809260

  5. Multiproperty empirical isotropic interatomic potentials for CH4-inert gas mixtures.

    PubMed

    El-Kader, M S A

    2013-11-01

    An approximate empirical isotropic interatomic potentials for CH4-inert gas mixtures are developed by simultaneously fitting the Exponential-Spline-Morse-Spline-van der Waals (ESMSV) potential form to viscosity, thermal conductivity, thermal diffusion factors, diffusion coefficient, interaction second pressure virial coefficient and scattering cross-section data. Quantum mechanical lineshapes of collision-induced absorption (CIA) at different temperatures for CH4-He and at T = 87 K for CH4-Ar are computed using theoretical values for overlap, octopole and hexadecapole mechanisms and interaction potential as input. Also, the quantum mechanical lineshapes of collision-induced light scattering (CILS) for the mixtures CH4-Ar and CH4-Xe at room temperature are calculated. The spectra of scattering consist essentially of an intense, purely translational component which includes scattering due to free pairs and bound dimers, and the other is due to the induced rotational scattering. These spectra have been interpreted by means of pair-polarizability terms, which arise from a long-range dipole-induced-dipole (DID) with small dispersion corrections and a short-range interaction mechanism involving higher-order dipole-quadrupole A and dipole-octopole E multipole polarizabilities. Good agreement between computed and experimental lineshapes of both absorption and scattering is obtained when the models of potential, interaction-induced dipole and polarizability components are used. PMID:25685458

  6. Inert Gas Buffered Milling and Particle Size Separation of μm-Scale Superconducting Precursor Powders

    SciTech Connect

    Seshadri, S.; McIntyre, P.

    2008-06-20

    The project developed an aerosol system for the met milling and particle size separation of the precursor powders used in fabrication of powder-in-tube superconductors. The work builds upon the results of a previous SBIR-funded development that proved the basic principles of the virtual impactor (VI) technology and its efficacy for the powders of interest. The new project extended that work in three respects: it integrated provisions for recirculating the aerosol flow using inert gas to avoid contamination from O2, CO2 and water in ambient air; a quad configuration of VI subassemblies to support kg/hr throughput; and it incorporated design features that eliminate error trajectories which would introduce trace contamination of larger particles into the separated flow. The project demonstrated the technical effectiveness of the process and established its economic feasibility by achieving kg/hr throughput within a cost profile that would be profitable within the range of competitive toll fees. The project is beneficial to the public through its potential to improve the performance of superconducting materials for research and for biomedicine. It also conveys potential benefits for powders used in high-performance ceramics (for example for engines for automobiles and for aircraft) and for high-performance electrical insulators for telecommunications circuitry.

  7. Tungsten inert gas (TIG) welding of Ni-rich NiTi plates: functional behavior

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oliveira, J. P.; Barbosa, D.; Braz Fernandes, F. M.; Miranda, R. M.

    2016-03-01

    It is often reported that, to successfully join NiTi shape memory alloys, fusion-based processes with reduced thermal affected regions (as in laser welding) are required. This paper describes an experimental study performed on the tungsten inert gas (TIG) welding of 1.5 mm thick plates of Ni-rich NiTi. The functional behavior of the joints was assessed. The superelasticity was analyzed by cycling tests at maximum imposed strains of 4, 8 and 12% and for a total of 600 cycles, without rupture. The superelastic plateau was observed, in the stress-strain curves, 30 MPa below that of the base material. Shape-memory effect was evidenced by bending tests with full recovery of the initial shape of the welded joints. In parallel, uniaxial tensile tests of the joints showed a tensile strength of 700 MPa and an elongation to rupture of 20%. The elongation is the highest reported for fusion-welding of NiTi, including laser welding. These results can be of great interest for the wide-spread inclusion of NiTi in complex shaped components requiring welding, since TIG is not an expensive process and is simple to operate and implement in industrial environments.

  8. Thorium-232 exposure during tungsten inert gas arc welding and electrode sharpening.

    PubMed

    Saito, Hiroyuki; Hisanaga, Naomi; Okada, Yukiko; Hirai, Shoji; Arito, Heihachiro

    2003-07-01

    To assess the exposure of welders to thorium-232 (232Th) during tungsten inert gas arc (TIG) welding, airborne concentrations of 232Th in the breathing zone of the welder and background levels were measured. The radioactive concentrations were 1.11 x 10(-2) Bq/m3 during TIG welding of aluminum (TIG/Al), 1.78 x 10(-4) Bq/m3 during TIG welding of stainless steel (TIG/SS), and 1.93 x 10(-1) Bq/m3 during electrode sharpening, with 5.82 x 10(-5) Bq/m3 background concentration. Although the annual intake of 232Th estimated using these values did not exceed the annual limit intake (ALI, 1.6 x 10(2) Bq), we recommend reducing 232Th exposure by substituting thoriated electrodes with a thorium-free electrodes, setting up local ventilation systems, and by using respiratory protective equipment. It is also necessary to inform workers that thoriated tungsten electrodes contain radioactive material. PMID:12916759

  9. MOX and MOX with 237Np/241Am Inert Fission Gas Generation Comparison in ATR

    SciTech Connect

    G. S. Chang; M. Robel; W. J. Carmack; D. J. Utterbeck

    2006-06-01

    The treatment of spent fuel produced in nuclear power generation is one of the most important issues to both the nuclear community and the general public. One of the viable options to long-term geological disposal of spent fuel is to extract plutonium, minor actinides (MA), and potentially long-lived fission products from the spent fuel and transmute them into short-lived or stable radionuclides in currently operating light-water reactors (LWR), thus reducing the radiological toxicity of the nuclear waste stream. One of the challenges is to demonstrate that the burnup-dependent characteristic differences between Reactor-Grade Mixed Oxide (RG-MOX) fuel and RG-MOX fuel with MA Np-237 and Am 241 are minimal, particularly, the inert gas generation rate, such that the commercial MOX fuel experience base is applicable. Under the Advanced Fuel Cycle Initiative (AFCI), developmental fuel specimens in experimental assembly LWR-2 are being tested in the northwest (NW) I-24 irradiation position of the Advanced Test Reactor (ATR). The experiment uses MOX fuel test hardware, and contains capsules with MOX fuel consisting of mixed oxide manufactured fuel using reactor grade plutonium (RG-Pu) and mixed oxide manufactured fuel using RG-Pu with added Np/Am. This study will compare the fuel neutronics depletion characteristics of Case-1 RG-MOX and Case-2 RG-MOX with Np/Am.

  10. Effect of Inert Cover Gas on Performance of Radioisotope Stirling Space Power System

    SciTech Connect

    Carpenter, Robert; Kumar, V; Ore, C; Schock, Alfred

    2001-01-01

    This paper describes an updated Orbital design of a radioisotope Stirling power system and its predicted performance at the beginning and end of a six-year mission to the Jovian moon Europa. The design is based on General Purpose Heat Source (GPHS) modules identical to those previously developed and safety-qualified by the Department of Energy (DOE) which were successfully launched to Jupiter and Saturn by the Jet Propulsion Laboratory (JPL). In each generator, the heat produced by the decay of the Pu-238 isotope is converted to electric power by two free-piston Stirling engines and linear alternators developed by Stirling Technology Company (STC), and their rejected waste heat is transported to radiators by heat pipes. The principal difference between the proposed system design and previous Orbital designs (Or et al. 2000) is the thermal insulation between the heat source and the generator's housing. Previous designs had employed multifoil insulation, whereas the design described here employs Min-K-1800 thermal insulation. Such insulation had been successfully used by Teledyne and GE in earlier RTGs (Radioisotope Thermoelectric Generators). Although Min-K is a much poorer insulator than multifoil in vacuum and requires a substantially greater thickness for equivalent performance, it offers compensating advantages. Specifically it makes it possible to adjust the generator's BOM temperatures by filling its interior volume with inert cover gas. This makes it possible to meet the generator's BOM and EOM performance goals without exceeding its allowable temperature at the beginning of the mission.

  11. Effect of inert cover gas on performance of radioisotope Stirling space power system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carpenter, R.; Kumar, V.; Or, C.; Schock, A.

    2001-02-01

    This paper describes an updated Orbital design of a radioisotope Stirling power system and its predicted performance at the beginning and end of a six-year mission to the Jovian moon Europa. The design is based on General Purpose Heat Source (GPHS) modules identical to those previously developed and safety-qualified by the Department of Energy (DOE) which were successfully launched on missions to Jupiter and Saturn by the Jet Propulsion Laboratory (JPL). In each generator, the heat produced by the decay of the Pu-238 isotope is converted to electric power by two free-piston Stirling engines and linear alternators developed by Stirling Technology Company (STC), and their rejected waste heat is transported to radiators by heat pipes. The principal difference between the proposed system design and previous Orbital designs (Or et al., 2000) is the thermal insulation between the heat source and the generator's housing. Previous designs had employed multifoil insulation, whereas the design described here employs Min-K-1800 thermal insulation. Such insulation had been successfully used by Teledyne and GE in earlier RTGs (Radioisotope Thermoelectric Generators). Although Min-K is a much poorer insulator than multifoil in vacuum and requires a substantially greater thickness for equivalent performance, it offers compensating advantages. Specifically it makes it possible to adjust the generator's BOM temperatures by filling its interior volume with inert cover gas. This makes it possible to meet the generator's BOM and EOM performance goals without exceeding its allowable temperature at the beginning of the mission. .

  12. Tensile and flexural strength of commercially pure titanium submitted to laser and tungsten inert gas welds.

    PubMed

    Atoui, Juliana Abdallah; Felipucci, Daniela Nair Borges; Pagnano, Valéria Oliveira; Orsi, Iara Augusta; Nóbilo, Mauro Antônio de Arruda; Bezzon, Osvaldo Luiz

    2013-01-01

    This study evaluated the tensile and flexural strength of tungsten inert gas (TIG) welds in specimens made of commercially pure titanium (CP Ti) compared with laser welds. Sixty cylindrical specimens (2 mm diameter x 55 mm thick) were randomly assigned to 3 groups for each test (n=10): no welding (control), TIG welding (10 V, 36 A, 8 s) and Nd:YAG laser welding (380 V, 8 ms). The specimens were radiographed and subjected to tensile and flexural strength tests at a crosshead speed of 1.0 mm/min using a load cell of 500 kgf applied on the welded interface or at the middle point of the non-welded specimens. Tensile strength data were analyzed by ANOVA and Tukey's test, and flexural strength data by the Kruskal-Wallis test (α=0.05). Non-welded specimens presented significantly higher tensile strength (control=605.84 ± 19.83) (p=0.015) and flexural strength (control=1908.75) (p=0.000) than TIG- and laser-welded ones. There were no significant differences (p>0.05) between the welding types for neither the tensile strength test (TIG=514.90 ± 37.76; laser=515.85 ± 62.07) nor the flexural strength test (TIG=1559.66; laser=1621.64). As far as tensile and flexural strengths are concerned, TIG was similar to laser and could be suitable to replace laser welding in implant-supported rehabilitations. PMID:24474361

  13. Multiproperty empirical isotropic interatomic potentials for CH4–inert gas mixtures

    PubMed Central

    El-Kader, M.S.A.

    2012-01-01

    An approximate empirical isotropic interatomic potentials for CH4–inert gas mixtures are developed by simultaneously fitting the Exponential-Spline-Morse-Spline-van der Waals (ESMSV) potential form to viscosity, thermal conductivity, thermal diffusion factors, diffusion coefficient, interaction second pressure virial coefficient and scattering cross-section data. Quantum mechanical lineshapes of collision-induced absorption (CIA) at different temperatures for CH4–He and at T = 87 K for CH4–Ar are computed using theoretical values for overlap, octopole and hexadecapole mechanisms and interaction potential as input. Also, the quantum mechanical lineshapes of collision-induced light scattering (CILS) for the mixtures CH4–Ar and CH4–Xe at room temperature are calculated. The spectra of scattering consist essentially of an intense, purely translational component which includes scattering due to free pairs and bound dimers, and the other is due to the induced rotational scattering. These spectra have been interpreted by means of pair-polarizability terms, which arise from a long-range dipole-induced-dipole (DID) with small dispersion corrections and a short-range interaction mechanism involving higher-order dipole–quadrupole A and dipole–octopole E multipole polarizabilities. Good agreement between computed and experimental lineshapes of both absorption and scattering is obtained when the models of potential, interaction-induced dipole and polarizability components are used. PMID:25685458

  14. Correlations predict gas-condensate flow through chokes

    SciTech Connect

    Osman, M.E.; Dokla, M.E. )

    1992-03-16

    Empirical correlations have developed to describe the behavior of gas-condensate flow through surface chokes. The field data were obtained from a Middle East gas-condensate reservoir and cover a wide range of flow rates and choke sizes. Correlations for gas-condensate systems have not been previously available. These new correlations will help the production engineer to size chokes for controlling production of gas-condensate wells and predicting the performance of flowing wells under various conditions. Four forms of the correlation were developed and checked against data. One form correlates choke upstream pressure with liquid production rate, gas/liquid ratio, and choke size. The second form uses gas production rate instead of the liquid rate. The other two forms use the pressure drop across the choke instead of upstream pressure. All four of the correlations are presented in this paper as nomograms. Accuracy of the different forms was checked with five error parameters: root-mean-square error, mean-absolute error, simple-mean error, mean-percent-age-absolute error, and mean-percentage error. The correlation was found to be the most accurate when pressure-drop data are used instead of choke upstream pressure.

  15. Two-dimensional expansion of a condensed dense Bose gas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Annibale, E. S.; Gammal, A.; Ziegler, K.

    2015-07-01

    We study the expansion dynamics of a condensate in a strongly interacting Bose gas in the presence of an obstacle. Our focus is on the generation of shock waves after the Bose gas has passed the obstacle. The strongly interacting Bose gas is described in the slave-boson representation. A saddle-point approximation provides a nonlinear equation of motion for the macroscopic wave function, analogous to the Gross-Pitaevskii equation of a weakly interacting Bose gas but with different nonlinearity. We compare the results with the Gross-Pitaevskii dynamics of a weakly interacting Bose gas and find a similar behavior with a slower behavior of the strongly interacting system.

  16. Reactive Transport Modeling of Acid Gas Generation and Condensation

    SciTech Connect

    G. Zhahg; N. Spycher; E. Sonnenthal; C. Steefel

    2005-01-25

    Pulvirenti et al. (2004) recently conducted a laboratory evaporation/condensation experiment on a synthetic solution of primarily calcium chloride. This solution represents one potential type of evaporated pore water at Yucca Mountain, Nevada, a site proposed for geologic storage of high-level nuclear waste. These authors reported that boiling this solution to near dryness (a concentration factor >75,000 relative to actual pore waters) leads to the generation of acid condensate (pH 4.5) presumably due to volatilization of HCl (and minor HF and/or HNO{sub 3}). To investigate the various processes taking place, including boiling, gas transport, and condensation, their experiment was simulated by modifying an existing multicomponent and multiphase reactive transport code (TOUGHREACT). This code was extended with a Pitzer ion-interaction model to deal with high ionic strength. The model of the experiment was set-up to capture the observed increase in boiling temperature (143 C at {approx}1 bar) resulting from high concentrations of dissolved salts (up to 8 m CaCl{sub 2}). The computed HCI fugacity ({approx} 10{sup -4} bars) generated by boiling under these conditions is not sufficient to lower the pH of the condensate (cooled to 80 and 25 C) down to observed values unless the H{sub 2}O mass fraction in gas is reduced below {approx}10%. This is because the condensate becomes progressively diluted by H{sub 2}O gas condensation. However, when the system is modeled to remove water vapor, the computed pH of instantaneous condensates decreases to {approx}1.7, consistent with the experiment (Figure 1). The results also show that the HCl fugacity increases, and calcite, gypsum, sylvite, halite, MgCl{sub 2}4H{sub 2}O and CaCl{sub 2} precipitate sequentially with increasing concentration factors.

  17. Calorimetry of a Bose-Einstein-condensed photon gas.

    PubMed

    Damm, Tobias; Schmitt, Julian; Liang, Qi; Dung, David; Vewinger, Frank; Weitz, Martin; Klaers, Jan

    2016-01-01

    Phase transitions, as the condensation of a gas to a liquid, are often revealed by a discontinuous behaviour of thermodynamic quantities. For liquid helium, for example, a divergence of the specific heat signals the transition from the normal fluid to the superfluid state. Apart from liquid helium, determining the specific heat of a Bose gas has proven to be a challenging task, for example, for ultracold atomic Bose gases. Here we examine the thermodynamic behaviour of a trapped two-dimensional photon gas, a system that allows us to spectroscopically determine the specific heat and the entropy of a nearly ideal Bose gas from the classical high temperature to the Bose-condensed quantum regime. The critical behaviour at the phase transition is clearly revealed by a cusp singularity of the specific heat. Regarded as a test of quantum statistical mechanics, our results demonstrate a quantitative agreement with its predictions at the microscopic level. PMID:27090978

  18. Calorimetry of a Bose-Einstein-condensed photon gas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Damm, Tobias; Schmitt, Julian; Liang, Qi; Dung, David; Vewinger, Frank; Weitz, Martin; Klaers, Jan

    2016-04-01

    Phase transitions, as the condensation of a gas to a liquid, are often revealed by a discontinuous behaviour of thermodynamic quantities. For liquid helium, for example, a divergence of the specific heat signals the transition from the normal fluid to the superfluid state. Apart from liquid helium, determining the specific heat of a Bose gas has proven to be a challenging task, for example, for ultracold atomic Bose gases. Here we examine the thermodynamic behaviour of a trapped two-dimensional photon gas, a system that allows us to spectroscopically determine the specific heat and the entropy of a nearly ideal Bose gas from the classical high temperature to the Bose-condensed quantum regime. The critical behaviour at the phase transition is clearly revealed by a cusp singularity of the specific heat. Regarded as a test of quantum statistical mechanics, our results demonstrate a quantitative agreement with its predictions at the microscopic level.

  19. Calorimetry of a Bose–Einstein-condensed photon gas

    PubMed Central

    Damm, Tobias; Schmitt, Julian; Liang, Qi; Dung, David; Vewinger, Frank; Weitz, Martin; Klaers, Jan

    2016-01-01

    Phase transitions, as the condensation of a gas to a liquid, are often revealed by a discontinuous behaviour of thermodynamic quantities. For liquid helium, for example, a divergence of the specific heat signals the transition from the normal fluid to the superfluid state. Apart from liquid helium, determining the specific heat of a Bose gas has proven to be a challenging task, for example, for ultracold atomic Bose gases. Here we examine the thermodynamic behaviour of a trapped two-dimensional photon gas, a system that allows us to spectroscopically determine the specific heat and the entropy of a nearly ideal Bose gas from the classical high temperature to the Bose-condensed quantum regime. The critical behaviour at the phase transition is clearly revealed by a cusp singularity of the specific heat. Regarded as a test of quantum statistical mechanics, our results demonstrate a quantitative agreement with its predictions at the microscopic level. PMID:27090978

  20. A study of thorium exposure during tungsten inert gas welding in an airline engineering population.

    PubMed

    McElearney, N; Irvine, D

    1993-07-01

    To investigate the theoretic possibility of excessive exposure to thorium during the process of tungsten inert gas (TIG) welding using thoriated rods we carried out a cross-sectional study of TIG welders and an age- and skill-matched group. We measured the radiation doses from inhaled thorium that was retained in the body and investigated whether any differences in health or biologic indices could have been attributable to the welding and tip-grinding process. Sixty-four TIG welders, 11 non-TIG welders, and 61 control subjects from an airline engineering population participated. All of the subjects were interviewed for biographic, occupational history and morbidity details. All of the welders and eight control subjects carried out large-volume urine sampling to recover thorium 232 and thorium 228; this group also had chest radiographs. All of the subjects had a blood sample taken to estimate liver enzymes, and they provided small-volume urine samples for the estimation of retinol-binding protein and beta 2-microglobulin. We found no excess of morbidity among the TIG or non-TIG welding groups, and the levels of retinol-binding protein and beta 2-microglobulin were the same for both groups. There was a higher aspartate aminotransferase level in the control group. The internal radiation doses were estimated at less than an annual level of intake in all cases, and considerably less if the exposure (as was the case) was assumed to be chronic over many years. Some additional precautionary measures are suggested to reduce further any potential hazard from this process. PMID:8396174

  1. Characterization of Tungsten Inert Gas (TIG) Welding Fume Generated by Apprentice Welders

    PubMed Central

    Graczyk, Halshka; Lewinski, Nastassja; Zhao, Jiayuan; Concha-Lozano, Nicolas; Riediker, Michael

    2016-01-01

    Tungsten inert gas welding (TIG) represents one of the most widely used metal joining processes in industry. Its propensity to generate a greater portion of welding fume particles at the nanoscale poses a potential occupational health hazard for workers. However, current literature lacks comprehensive characterization of TIG welding fume particles. Even less is known about welding fumes generated by welding apprentices with little experience in welding. We characterized TIG welding fume generated by apprentice welders (N = 20) in a ventilated exposure cabin. Exposure assessment was conducted for each apprentice welder at the breathing zone (BZ) inside of the welding helmet and at a near-field (NF) location, 60cm away from the welding task. We characterized particulate matter (PM4), particle number concentration and particle size, particle morphology, chemical composition, reactive oxygen species (ROS) production potential, and gaseous components. The mean particle number concentration at the BZ was 1.69E+06 particles cm−3, with a mean geometric mean diameter of 45nm. On average across all subjects, 92% of the particle counts at the BZ were below 100nm. We observed elevated concentrations of tungsten, which was most likely due to electrode consumption. Mean ROS production potential of TIG welding fumes at the BZ exceeded average concentrations previously found in traffic-polluted air. Furthermore, ROS production potential was significantly higher for apprentices that burned their metal during their welding task. We recommend that future exposure assessments take into consideration welding performance as a potential exposure modifier for apprentice welders or welders with minimal training. PMID:26464505

  2. Inert gas narcosis disrupts encoding but not retrieval of long term memory.

    PubMed

    Hobbs, Malcolm; Kneller, Wendy

    2015-05-15

    Exposure to increased ambient pressure causes inert gas narcosis of which one symptom is long-term memory (LTM) impairment. Narcosis is posited to impair LTM by disrupting information encoding, retrieval (self-guided search), or both. The effect of narcosis on the encoding and retrieval of LTM was investigated by testing the effect of learning-recall pressure and levels of processing (LoP) on the free-recall of word lists in divers underwater. All participants (n=60) took part in four conditions in which words were learnt and then recalled at either low pressure (1.4-1.9atm/4-9msw) or high pressure (4.4-5.0atm/34-40msw), as manipulated by changes in depth underwater: low-low (LL), low-high(LH), high-high (HH), and high-low (HL). In addition, participants were assigned to either a deep or shallow processing condition, using LoP methodology. Free-recall memory ability was significantly impaired only when words were initially learned at high pressure (HH & HL conditions). When words were learned at low pressure and then recalled at low pressure (LL condition) or high pressure (LH condition) free-recall was not impaired. Although numerically superior in several conditions, deeper processing failed to significantly improve free-recall ability in any of the learning-recall conditions. This pattern of results support the hypothesis that narcosis disrupts encoding of information into LTM, while retrieval appears to be unaffected. These findings are discussed in relation to similar effects reported by some memory impairing drugs and the practical implications for workers in pressurised environments. PMID:25725120

  3. Characterization of Tungsten Inert Gas (TIG) Welding Fume Generated by Apprentice Welders.

    PubMed

    Graczyk, Halshka; Lewinski, Nastassja; Zhao, Jiayuan; Concha-Lozano, Nicolas; Riediker, Michael

    2016-03-01

    Tungsten inert gas welding (TIG) represents one of the most widely used metal joining processes in industry. Its propensity to generate a greater portion of welding fume particles at the nanoscale poses a potential occupational health hazard for workers. However, current literature lacks comprehensive characterization of TIG welding fume particles. Even less is known about welding fumes generated by welding apprentices with little experience in welding. We characterized TIG welding fume generated by apprentice welders (N = 20) in a ventilated exposure cabin. Exposure assessment was conducted for each apprentice welder at the breathing zone (BZ) inside of the welding helmet and at a near-field (NF) location, 60cm away from the welding task. We characterized particulate matter (PM4), particle number concentration and particle size, particle morphology, chemical composition, reactive oxygen species (ROS) production potential, and gaseous components. The mean particle number concentration at the BZ was 1.69E+06 particles cm(-3), with a mean geometric mean diameter of 45nm. On average across all subjects, 92% of the particle counts at the BZ were below 100nm. We observed elevated concentrations of tungsten, which was most likely due to electrode consumption. Mean ROS production potential of TIG welding fumes at the BZ exceeded average concentrations previously found in traffic-polluted air. Furthermore, ROS production potential was significantly higher for apprentices that burned their metal during their welding task. We recommend that future exposure assessments take into consideration welding performance as a potential exposure modifier for apprentice welders or welders with minimal training. PMID:26464505

  4. Gas condensate reservoir characterisation for CO2 geological storage

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ivakhnenko, A. P.

    2012-04-01

    During oil and gas production hydrocarbon recovery efficiency is significantly increased by injecting miscible CO2 gas in order to displace hydrocarbons towards producing wells. This process of enhanced oil recovery (EOR) might be used for the total CO2 storage after complete hydrocarbon reservoir depletion. This kind of potential storage sites was selected for detailed studies, including generalised development study to investigate the applicability of CO2 for storages. The study is focused on compositional modelling to predict the miscibility pressures. We consider depleted gas condensate field in Kazakhstan as important target for CO2 storage and EOR. This reservoir being depleted below the dew point leads to retrograde condensate formed in the pore system. CO2 injection in the depleted gas condensate reservoirs may allow enhanced gas recovery by reservoir pressurisation and liquid re-vaporisation. In addition a number of geological and petrophysical parameters should satisfy storage requirements. Studied carbonate gas condensate and oil field has strong seal, good petrophysical parameters and already proven successful containment CO2 and sour gas in high pressure and high temperature (HPHT) conditions. The reservoir is isolated Lower Permian and Carboniferous carbonate platform covering an area of about 30 km. The reservoir contains a gas column about 1.5 km thick. Importantly, the strong massive sealing consists of the salt and shale seal. Sour gas that filled in the oil-saturated shale had an active role to form strong sealing. Two-stage hydrocarbon saturation of oil and later gas within the seal frame were accompanied by bitumen precipitation in shales forming a perfect additional seal. Field hydrocarbon production began three decades ago maintaining a strategy in full replacement of gas in order to maintain pressure of the reservoir above the dew point. This was partially due to the sour nature of the gas with CO2 content over 5%. Our models and

  5. Can the ordinary chondrites have condensed from a gas phase

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Herndon, J. M.; Suess, H. E.

    1977-01-01

    The conditions under which ordinary chondrites containing iron in three different chemical states can form in thermodynamic equilibrium with a gas phase are calculated. Hydrogen depletion factors of 100-1000 are obtained and the formation of liquid condensates from residual gases occurs at pressures (prior to hydrogen depletion) of roughly equal to or greater than 1 atm.

  6. Mobility of Supercooled liquid Toluene, Ethylbenzene, and Benzene near their Glass Transition Temperatures Investigated using Inert Gas Permeation

    SciTech Connect

    May, Robert A.; Smith, R. Scott; Kay, Bruce D.

    2013-11-21

    We investigate the mobility of supercooled liquid toluene, ethylbenzene, and benzene near their respective glass transition temperatures (Tg). The permeation rate of Ar, Kr, and Xe through the supercooled liquid created when initially amorphous overlayers heated above their glass transition temperature is used to determine the diffusivity. Amorphous benzene crystallizes at temperatures well below its Tg and as a result the inert gas underlayer remains trapped until the onset of benzene desorption. In contrast, for toluene and ethylbenzene the onset of inert gas permeation is observed at temperatues near Tg. The inert gas desorption peak temperature as a function of the heating rate and overlayer thickness is used to quantify the diffusivity of supercooled liquid toluene and ethylbenzene from 115 K to 135 K. In this temperature range, diffusivities are found to vary across five orders of magnitude (~10-14 to 10-9 cm2/s). These data are compared to viscosity measurements and used to determine the low temperature fractional Stokes-Einstein exponent. Efforts to determine the diffusivity of a mixture of benzene and ethylbenzene are detailed, and the effect of mixing these materials on benzene crystallization is explored using infrared spectroscopy.

  7. Industrial Research of Condensing Unit for Natural Gas Boiler House

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ziemele, Jelena; Blumberga, Dagnija; Talcis, Normunds; Laicane, Ilze

    2012-12-01

    In the course of work industrial research was carried out at the boiler plant A/S "Imanta" where a 10MW passive condensing economizer working on natural gas was installed after the 116MW water boiler. The work describes the design of the condensing economizer and wiring diagram. During the industrial experiment, the following measurements were made: the temperature of water before and after the economizer; the ambient temperature; the quantity of water passing through the economizer; heat, produced by the economizer and water boilers. The work summarizes the data from 2010-2011.

  8. Nonequilibrium condensation in high-speed gas flows

    SciTech Connect

    Ryzhov, Y.A.; Pirumov, U.G.; Gorbunov, V.N. )

    1989-01-01

    Nonequilibrium condensation is an important aspect of weather forecasting, aerosol formation, and the design of jet propulsion engines, steam turbines and nuclear reactors. It has recently taken on a new significance with the development of technologies such as the production of fine powders, cluster spraying, the development of laser media and isotope separation. This book discusses the general theory of condensation in high speed gas flows, and the new theoretical, experimental and numerical methods necessary for solving the partial differential equations governing the flows.

  9. Dynamic mechanism of the velocity splitting of ablated particles produced by pulsed-laser deposition in an inert gas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ding, X. C.; Wang, Y. L.; Chu, L. Z.; Deng, Z. C.; Liang, W. H.; Galalaldeen, I. I. A.; Fu, G. S.

    2011-12-01

    The transport dynamics of ablated particles produced by pulsed-laser deposition in an inert gas is investigated via the Monte Carlo simulation method. The splitting mechanism of ablated particles is discussed by tracking every ablated particle with their forces, velocities and locations. The force analysis demonstrates that whether the splitting appears or not is decided by the releasing way of the driving force acting on the ablated particles. The "average" drag force, which is related to the mass and radius of the ambient gas, determines the releasing way of the driving force. Our simulated results are approximately in agreement with the previous experimental data.

  10. Compatibility of Space Nuclear Power Plant Materials in an Inert He/Xe Working Gas Containing Reactive Impurities

    SciTech Connect

    MM Hall

    2006-01-31

    A major materials selection and qualification issue identified in the Space Materials Plan is the potential for creating materials compatibility problems by combining dissimilar reactor core, Brayton Unit and other power conversion plant materials in a recirculating, inert He/Xe gas loop containing reactive impurity gases. Reported here are results of equilibrium thermochemical analyses that address the compatibility of space nuclear power plant (SNPP) materials in high temperature impure He gas environments. These studies provide early information regarding the constraints that exist for SNPP materials selection and provide guidance for establishing test objectives and environments for SNPP materials qualification testing.

  11. Temperature variability of the last 1000 years in Antarctica from inert gas isotopes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Orsi, Anais; Landais, Amaelle; Severinghaus, Jeffrey P.

    2015-04-01

    A large effort has been made to document the climate history of the last two thousand years, but there are still substantial gaps in the Southern Hemisphere, especially at high latitudes, where the changes in the climate are the largest. These gaps limit our understanding of the most fundamental driving mechanisms of the climate. In particular, the impact of solar minima on surface temperature is not fully understood. Here, we investigate the spatial structure of multi decadal climate variability in Antarctica, assess the significance of the Little Ice Age minimum documented elsewhere. We present a 1000 year temperature record at two sites in Antarctica: WAIS Divide (79°S, 112°W, 1766 m a.s.l), and Talos Dome (72°S, 159°E, 2315 m a.s.l), reconstructed from the combination of inert gas isotopes from the ice core and borehole temperature measurements. Borehole temperature provides an absolute estimate of long-term trends, while noble gases track decadal to centennial scale changes. This method provides a temperature reconstruction that is independent of water isotopes, and allows us to improve our understanding of water isotopes as a temperature proxy, and use them to track circulation changes. We find that there is a pronounced cooling trend over the last millennium at both sites, but it is stronger in East Antarctica (Talos Dome) than West Antarctica (WAIS-D). At WAIS Divide, we find that "Little Ice Age" cold period of 1400-1800 was 0.52°C colder than the last century, and that the recent warming trend (0.23°C/decade since 1960) has past analogs about every 200 years. At Talos Dome, the pronounced cooling trend over the whole record is not visible in the water isotope record, which suggests that there is a compensation of several sources of fractionation. Overall, both records are consistent with the idea that the solar minima and persistent volcanic activity of the Little Ice Age (1400-1850 A.D.) had a significant impact on the surface temperature in

  12. Flue gases conditioning in gas-fired condensing boilers to avoid water vapor condensing in flue ducts

    SciTech Connect

    Rosa, L.; Tosato, R.

    1984-08-01

    This paper presents experimental results of a new gas-fired condensing boiler designed for domestic applications (output 23 kW). It is an advanced boiler based on a light weight cast-iron heat exchanger with low water content. Return water, coming from hot water plant, first flows through an additional heat exchanger (condenser) before entering the main zone of the boiler. Two solutions are suggested in order to reduce or avoid the condensing problems on the flue surfaces, either by mixing flue gases exiting the condenser with new pre-heated air, or, by mixing them with hot flue gases by-passing the condenser.

  13. 46 CFR 154.1848 - Inerting.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... flammable vapors are purged from the tank by inert gas before air is admitted; and (4) When gas free cargo tanks are to be filled with a flammable cargo, air is purged from the tank by inert gas until the...

  14. Onboard Inert Gas Generation System/Onboard Oxygen Gas Generation System (OBIGGS/OBOGS) Study. Part 2; Gas Separation Technology--State of the Art

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Reynolds, Thomas L.; Eklund, Thor I.; Haack, Gregory A.

    2001-01-01

    This purpose of this contract study task was to investigate the State of the Art in Gas Separation Technologies utilized for separating air into both nitrogen and oxygen gases for potential applications on commercial aircraft. The intended applications included: nitrogen gas for fuel tank inerting, cargo compartment fire protection, and emergency oxygen for passenger and crew use in the event of loss of cabin pressure. The approach was to investigate three principle methods of gas separation: Hollow Fiber Membrane (HFM), Ceramic Membrane (CM), and liquefaction: Total Atmospheric Liquefaction of Oxygen and Nitrogen (TALON). Additional data on the performance of molecular sieve pressure swing adsorption (PSA) systems was also collected and discussed. Performance comparisons of these technologies are contained in the body of the report.

  15. Integrated flue gas treatment condensing heat exchanger for pollution control

    SciTech Connect

    Johnson, D.W.; Warchol, J.J.; Schulze, K.H.; Carrigan, J.F.

    1994-12-31

    Condensing heat exchangers recover both sensible and latent heat from flue gases. Using Teflon{reg_sign} to cover the heat exchanger tubes and inside surfaces that are exposed to the flue gas ensures adequate material lifetime in the corrosive environment encountered when the flue gas temperature drops below the acid dew point. A recent design improvement, called the integrated flue gas treatment (IFGT) concept, offers the ability to remove pollutants from the flue gas, as well as recover waste heat. It has been shown to remove SO{sub 2}, SO{sub 3}, particulates, and trace emissions. Babcock and Wilcox (B and W) is undertaking an extensive program to optimize this technology for a variety of flue gas applications. This paper summarizes the current status of IFGT technology and the development activities that are in progress.

  16. Well test analysis for gas-condensate reservoirs

    SciTech Connect

    Vo, D.T.

    1989-01-01

    This dissertation provides a detailed description of the performance of gas condensate producing wells and proposes well test analysis procedures for such systems as well as far volatile oil and black-oil reservoirs. Synthetic well test data generated from a compositional simulator are used in the analysis of drawdown and buildup tests. For wells producing at constant rate during the transient flow period, the use of the pseudopressure approach is reviewed. Several existing analysis methods are compared. These include the single-phase gas pseudopressure, the steady-state analogue, the pressure-squared function, and the GOR method. A new method, based on pressure derivatives, for computing the appropriate pseudopressure function is introduced. For wells producing multiple phases at constant pressure during the transient flow period, a new method for approximating the pseudopressure is introduced. The advantage of this approach is that relative permeability data are not required. The method allows for approximate procedures to calculate sandface effective permeability and skin factor from either the semilog method or the use of constant pressure type curves. For multiphase flow during the boundary-dominated flow period, the procedure of plotting p/Z versus cumulative production is extended for a wide range of fluid systems. Appropriate pseudopressure and pseudotimes are introduced to correlate the responses of gas condensate producing wells to the constant rate liquid solution for the depletion period. Analysis of the isochronal testing for gas condensate producing wells is briefly examined. The effects of liquid condensation, rate sequence, rock and fluid properties, and near-well skin damage on the slope of the back-pressure curves and AOF estimate are investigated.

  17. Development of a Market Optimized Condensing Gas Water Heater

    SciTech Connect

    Peter Pescatore

    2006-01-11

    This program covered the development of a market optimized condensing gas water heater for residential applications. The intent of the program was to develop a condensing design that minimized the large initial cost premium associated with traditional condensing water heater designs. Equally important was that the considered approach utilizes design and construction methods that deliver the desired efficiency without compromising product reliability. Standard condensing water heater approaches in the marketplace utilize high cost materials such as stainless steel tanks and heat exchangers as well as expensive burner systems to achieve the higher efficiencies. The key in this program was to develop a water heater design that uses low-cost, available components and technologies to achieve higher efficiency at a modest cost premium. By doing this, the design can reduce the payback to a more reasonable length, increasing the appeal of the product to the marketplace. Condensing water heaters have been in existence for years, but have not been able to significantly penetrate the market. The issue has typically been cost. The high purchase price associated with existing condensing water heaters, sometimes as much as $2000, has been a very difficult hurdle to overcome in the marketplace. The design developed under this program has the potential to reduce the purchase price of this condensing design by as much as $1000 as compared to traditional condensing units. The condensing water heater design developed over the course of this program led to an approach that delivered the following performance attributes: 90%+ thermal efficiency; 76,000 Btu/hr input rate in a 50 gallon tank; First hour rating greater than 180 gph; Rapid recovery time; and Overall operating condition well matched to combination heat and hot water applications. Over the final three years of the program, TIAX worked very closely with A.O. Smith Water Products Company as our commercial partner to optimize

  18. Determination of water in hydrogen chloride gas by a condensation technique

    SciTech Connect

    Flaherty, E.; Herold, C.; Murray, D.; Thompson, S.R.

    1986-07-01

    The determination of trace amounts of water in gaseous hydrogen chloride has been of considerable interest to manufacturers of semiconductor materials. Many different methods have been postulated in the detection of water in hydrogen chloride, including Karl Fischer titrations, infrared spectrometric techniques, and gravimetric procedures using desiccants. Despite varying degrees of success at high-moisture concentration ranges, 1000 ppm (v/v) and up, these methods become tedious and unreliable for measuring water in hydrogen chloride in the 1-1000 ppm range. We have found a method for moisture in hydrogen chloride, analogous to dew point determinations used for inert gases, that is rapid and reproducible. A calibration curve of parts per million (v/v) water in hydrogen chloride vs. condensation temperature was constructed by dynamically blending a low part per million moisture balance nitrogen standard with dried hydrogen chloride gas. In addition, variation of the condensation temperature was monitored as the dried hydrogen chloride was diluted with dried gaseous nitrogen.

  19. Cooling and condensing of sulfur and water from claus process gas

    SciTech Connect

    Palm, J. W.; Kunkel, L. V.

    1985-07-02

    The Claus process gas is cooled in a condenser to condense most of the sulfur vapor in solid form. The gas leaving the condenser is then further cooled to condense water without producing substantially any sulfur in an undesirable form. The resulting gas of reduced water content is useful in Claus reaction, particularly the low temperature Claus reaction in which the product sulfur is adsorbed on the catalyst.

  20. Method for extending the useful shelf-life of refrigerated red blood cells by flushing with inert gas

    DOEpatents

    Bitensky, Mark W.; Yoshida, Tatsuro

    1997-01-01

    Method using oxygen removal for extending the useful shelf-life of refrigerated red blood cells. A cost-effective, 4.degree. C. storage procedure that preserves red cell quality and prolongs post-transfusion in vivo survival is described. Preservation of adenosine triphosphate levels and reduction in hemolysis and in membrane vesicle production of red blood cells stored at 4.degree. C. for prolonged periods of time is achieved by removing oxygen therefrom at the time of storage; in particular, by flushing with an inert gas. Adenosine triphosphate levels of the stored red blood cells are boosted in some samples by addition of ammonium phosphate.

  1. Method for extending the useful shelf-life of refrigerated red blood cells by flushing with inert gas

    DOEpatents

    Bitensky, M.W.; Yoshida, Tatsuro

    1997-04-29

    A method is disclosed using oxygen removal for extending the useful shelf-life of refrigerated red blood cells. A cost-effective, 4 C storage procedure that preserves red cell quality and prolongs post-transfusion in vivo survival is described. Preservation of adenosine triphosphate levels and reduction in hemolysis and in membrane vesicle production of red blood cells stored at 4 C for prolonged periods of time is achieved by removing oxygen from the red blood cells at the time of storage; in particular, by flushing with an inert gas. Adenosine triphosphate levels of the stored red blood cells are boosted in some samples by addition of ammonium phosphate. 4 figs.

  2. Efficiency of excimer molecule formation in plasma jets of inert gas mixtures with SF6 and CCl4

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rogulich, V. S.; Starodub, V. P.; Shevera, V. S.

    1988-10-01

    The formation of krypton and xenon monofluorides and monochlorides in continuous plasma jets of inert gas mixtures with SF6 and CCl4 molecules is investigated experimentally. Absolute concentrations of KrF, XeF, KrCl, and XeCl excimer molecules in the jet are determined. The energy efficiency of specific input power conversion to the spontaneous B-X emission in the KrF band is estimated at 2-4 percent. Ways of increasing the concentration of excimer molecules in the plasma jet are analyzed.

  3. Performance and emission characteristics of the thermal barrier coated SI engine by adding argon inert gas to intake mixture

    PubMed Central

    Karthikeya Sharma, T.

    2014-01-01

    Dilution of the intake air of the SI engine with the inert gases is one of the emission control techniques like exhaust gas recirculation, water injection into combustion chamber and cyclic variability, without scarifying power output and/or thermal efficiency (TE). This paper investigates the effects of using argon (Ar) gas to mitigate the spark ignition engine intake air to enhance the performance and cut down the emissions mainly nitrogen oxides. The input variables of this study include the compression ratio, stroke length, and engine speed and argon concentration. Output parameters like TE, volumetric efficiency, heat release rates, brake power, exhaust gas temperature and emissions of NOx, CO2 and CO were studied in a thermal barrier coated SI engine, under variable argon concentrations. Results of this study showed that the inclusion of Argon to the input air of the thermal barrier coated SI engine has significantly improved the emission characteristics and engine’s performance within the range studied. PMID:26644918

  4. Performance and emission characteristics of the thermal barrier coated SI engine by adding argon inert gas to intake mixture.

    PubMed

    Karthikeya Sharma, T

    2015-11-01

    Dilution of the intake air of the SI engine with the inert gases is one of the emission control techniques like exhaust gas recirculation, water injection into combustion chamber and cyclic variability, without scarifying power output and/or thermal efficiency (TE). This paper investigates the effects of using argon (Ar) gas to mitigate the spark ignition engine intake air to enhance the performance and cut down the emissions mainly nitrogen oxides. The input variables of this study include the compression ratio, stroke length, and engine speed and argon concentration. Output parameters like TE, volumetric efficiency, heat release rates, brake power, exhaust gas temperature and emissions of NOx, CO2 and CO were studied in a thermal barrier coated SI engine, under variable argon concentrations. Results of this study showed that the inclusion of Argon to the input air of the thermal barrier coated SI engine has significantly improved the emission characteristics and engine's performance within the range studied. PMID:26644918

  5. Non-condensable gas in a Mars General Circulation Model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guo, X.; Richardson, M. I.; Newman, C.; Sprague, A. L.; Boynton, W. V.

    2007-12-01

    We model the variation of non-condensable trace gases that results from the seasonal cycle of CO2 on Mars. A simple condensation scheme has been incorporated into MarsWRF, a 3-dimensional numerical model for the atmospheres of Mars. Non-condensable trace gas (mostly N2 and Ar) mass mixing ratios are affected by the phase change of CO2 and by transport. The distribution of Ar abundance has been observed by the Gamma Ray Spectrometer on the Mars 2001 Odyssey spacecraft. We are able to qualitatively reproduce the Ar observations, including the seasonal evolving latitudinal distribution. However, the modeled magnitudes of maximum enrichment are lower than observed. Smoothing Ar enrichment in the vertical reduces susceptibility to transport by near-surface, off-cap circulation, therefore gives further enhancement of non-condensable tracer in the winter pole. We suggest that a missing process in the model may account for the underestimation. An extra buoyancy term in the dynamics should result from the vertical gradient in mean molecular mass as Ar mass mixing ratio increases.

  6. Inert gas jets for growth control in electron beam induced deposition

    SciTech Connect

    Henry, M. R.; Kim, S.; Rykaczewski, K.; Fedorov, A. G.

    2011-06-27

    An inert, precursor free, argon jet is used to control the growth rate of electron beam induced deposition. Adjustment of the jet kinetic energy/inlet temperature can selectively increase surface diffusion to greatly enhance the deposition rate or deplete the surface precursor due to impact-stimulated desorption to minimize the deposition or completely clean the surface. Physical mechanisms for this process are described. While the electron beam is also observed to generate plasma upon interaction with an argon jet, our results indicate that plasma does not substantially contribute to the enhanced deposition rate.

  7. Calculation of hydrocarbon-in-place in gas and gas-condensate reservoirs - Carbon dioxide sequestration

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Verma, Mahendra K.

    2012-01-01

    The Energy Independence and Security Act of 2007 (Public Law 110-140) authorized the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) to conduct a national assessment of geologic storage resources for carbon dioxide (CO2), requiring estimation of hydrocarbon-in-place volumes and formation volume factors for all the oil, gas, and gas-condensate reservoirs within the U.S. sedimentary basins. The procedures to calculate in-place volumes for oil and gas reservoirs have already been presented by Verma and Bird (2005) to help with the USGS assessment of the undiscovered resources in the National Petroleum Reserve, Alaska, but there is no straightforward procedure available for calculating in-place volumes for gas-condensate reservoirs for the carbon sequestration project. The objective of the present study is to propose a simple procedure for calculating the hydrocarbon-in-place volume of a condensate reservoir to help estimate the hydrocarbon pore volume for potential CO2 sequestration.

  8. Temperature Programmed Desorption of Quench-condensed Krypton and Acetone in Air; Selective Concentration of Ultra-trace Gas Components.

    PubMed

    Suzuki, Taku T; Sakaguchi, Isao

    2016-01-01

    Selective concentration of ultra-trace components in air-like gases has an important application in analyzing volatile organic compounds in the gas. In the present study, we examined quench-condensation of the sample gas on a ZnO substrate below 50 K followed by temperature programmed desorption (TPD) (low temperature TPD) as a selective gas concentration technique. We studied two specific gases in the normal air; krypton as an inert gas and acetone as a reactive gas. We evaluated the relationship between the operating condition of low temperature TPD and the lowest detection limit. In the case of krypton, we observed the selective concentration by exposing at 6 K followed by thermal desorption at about 60 K. On the other hand, no selectivity appeared for acetone although trace acetone was successfully concentrated. This is likely due to the solvent effect by a major component in the air, which is suggested to be water. We suggest that pre-condensation to remove the water component may improve the selectivity in the trace acetone analysis by low temperature TPD. PMID:27063719

  9. Synthesis of Cu nanopowders by condensation from the gas phase

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chepkasov, IV; Gafner, Yu Ya; Zobov, K. V.; Batoroev, S. B.; Bardakhanov, S. P.

    2016-02-01

    In order to determine the most efficient regimes of copper nanoparticles synthesis, a series of experiments were conducted by evaporation and subsequent condensation of the raw material in an argon atmosphere. During the tests it was found that an increase of evaporation rate increases significantly the average size of the synthesized particles. However, the study of the dependence of dimensional parameters of the produced clusters on the intensity of the buffer gas flow rate has encountered significant difficulties associated because the results significantly divergent from the previously conducted experiments on the synthesis of transition metal oxides. In order to solve this contradiction the computer simulation was held of copper atoms condensation from the gas phase for the three different cooling rates and for the two final temperatures T = 373 K and T = 77 K. It was found after analysis that the rate of cooling of the gas mixture and the final temperature directly influences the number and the size of particles produced. For instance, with the 10 times of cooling rate decreases the average size of the particles obtained had increased by 2.7 times at a final temperature of 77 K and by 3.1 times at Tf = 373 K.

  10. Investigation of condensed and early stage gas phase hypergolic reactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dennis, Jacob Daniel

    Traditional hypergolic propellant combinations, such as those used on the space shuttle orbital maneuvering system first flown in 1981, feature hydrazine based fuels and nitrogen tetroxide (NTO) based oxidizers. Despite the long history of hypergolic propellant implementation, the processes that govern hypergolic ignition are not well understood. In order to achieve ignition, condensed phase fuel and oxidizer must undergo simultaneous physical mixing and chemical reaction. This process generates heat, intermediate condensed phase species, and gas phase species, which then may continue to react and generate more heat until ignition is achieved. The process is not well understood because condensed and gas phase reactions occur rapidly, typically in less than 200 μs, on much faster timescales than traditional diagnostic methods can observe. A detailed understanding of even the gas phase chemistry is lacking, but is critical for model development. Initial research has provided confidence that a study of condensed phase hypergolic reactions is useful and possible. Results obtained using an impinging jet apparatus have shown a critical residence time of 0.3 ms is required for the reaction between monomethylhydrazine (MMH) and red fuming nitric acid (RFNA, ~85% HNO3 + 15% N2O4) to achieve conditions favorable for ignition. This critical residence time spans the time required for liquid phase reactions to occur at the fuel/oxidizer interface and can give some insight into the reaction rates for this propellant combination. Experiments performed in a forced mixing constant volume reactor have demonstrated that the chamber pressurization rate for MMH/RFNA can be significantly reduced by diluting the MMH with deionized water. This result indicates that propellant dilution can slow the chemical reaction rates to occur over observable time scales. The research described in this document consists of two efforts that contribute knowledge to the propulsion community regarding the

  11. Vibrational-translational/rotational and vibrational-vibrational processes in methane/inert-gas mixtures: Optoacoustic phase measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Avramides, Elizabeth; Hunter, Tom F.

    1983-01-01

    V-R.T and V-V processes in methane-inert-gas mixtures are studied optoacoustically following excitation of the CH 4 ν 3 level with a HeNe laser at 2947.9 cm -1. The dominant route of deactivation, after fast equilibration of levels ν 3 and ν 1. is (ν 3. ν 1) → 2ν 4 → ν 4 + ν 4: the bending modes ν 4 and ν 2 then come to equilibrium and rela??? to the rotational, translational modes. Rate constants are reported with inert gases He, Ne and Xe, for (a) (ν 3. ν 1) → 2ν 4. (b) ν 2 → ν 4 and (c) the single-quantum step (ν 3. ν 1) → (ν 2. ν 4). In addition the intermolecular process in CH 4 collisions. 2ν 4 → ν 4 + ν 4. is shown to have a rate constant of 1.0±0.25 ns -1 atm -1.

  12. Nucleation and growth of Nb nanoclusters during plasma gas condensation

    SciTech Connect

    Bray, K. R.; Jiao, C. Q.; DeCerbo, J. N.

    2013-06-21

    Niobium nanoclusters were produced using a plasma gas condensation process. The influence of gas flow rate, aggregation length, and source current on the nanocluster nucleation and growth were analyzed. Nanoclusters with an average diameter from 4 nm to 10 nm were produced. Cluster size and concentration were tuned by controlling the process inputs. The effects of each parameter on the nucleation zone, growth length, and residence time was examined. The parameters do not affect the cluster formation and growth independently; their influence on cluster formation can be either cumulative or competing. Examining the nucleation and growth over a wide combination of parameters provided insight into their interactions and the impact on the growth process. These results provide the opportunity for a broader understanding into the nucleation and growth of nanoclusters and some insights into how process parameters interact during deposition. This knowledge will enhance the ability to create nanoclusters with desired size dispersions.

  13. Gas condensate and oil from Verkhnechonsk field of eastern Siberia

    SciTech Connect

    Bezhanidze, A.M.; Titkina, G.I.; Krylova, S.M.; Kolevatova, V.P.

    1988-05-01

    Two condensates and three crudes from different sectors and depths of the Verkhnechonsk oil and gas field were assessed for their viscosities, molecular weights, densities, flash and solid and boiling points, cetane and octane numbers, and chemical compositions, including sulfur, nitrogen, nickel, vanadium, wax, resin, and asphaltene contents. The samples were distilled into 10-20 C fractions, reblended in proportion to their contents in the original feedstock, and analyzed by gas-liquid chromatography for product quality and hydrocarbon group composition. Distillation requirements were calculated for generating kerosene, gasoline, and diesel, jet engine, and boiler fuels from the feedstocks. Potential yields of these cuts, as well as yields of lubricating oils and paving asphalts, were evaluated for the five samples.

  14. Parametric Studies Of Weld Quality Of Tungsten Inert Gas Arc Welding Of Stainless Steel

    SciTech Connect

    Kumar Pal, Pradip; Nandi, Goutam; Ghosh, Nabendu

    2011-01-17

    Effect of current and gas flow rate on quality of weld in tungsten inter gas arc welding of austenitic stainless steel has been studied in the present work through experiments and analyses. Butt welded joints have been made by using several levels of current and gas flow rate. The quality of the weld has been evaluated in terms of ultimate and breaking strengths of the welded specimens. The observed data have been interpreted, discussed and analyzed by using Grey--Taguchi methodology. Optimum parametric setting has been predicted and validated as well.

  15. In Vivo Measurements Of Coronary Blood Volumi By Dye And Inert Gas Dilution Technic

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hoeft, A.; Korb, H.; Wolpers, H. G.

    1984-10-01

    The application of a double fiberoptic device for measurements of arterial and coronary venous dye dilution curves facilitates the determination of coronary mean transit times even under clinical conditions. Since the dye, indocyanine green, is an intravascular tracer, the calculation of tissue blood flow would be possible if the intracoronary blood volume per unit of muscular weight is known. This study was therefore designed to investigate the physiologic range and the influence of coronary vasodilation and different hemodynamic conditions on the amount of myocardial blood volume. All experiments were carried out on anaesthetized close chest mongrel dogs in heart catheterization technic. Myocardial preload, afterload and inotropism and coronary vascular tone were varied by induction of hypo-, normo- and hypervolemia as well as by intravenous application of catecholamines, 13-blocking agents and vasodilating drugs. The determination of coronary blood volume was based on arterial and coronary venous kinetics of the intravascular tracer indocyanine green and the freely diffusible tracers helium and argon. Simultaneous measurements of the dye and the inert gases were obtained by a double fiberoptic system and a twin mass spectrometer, respectively. The intravascular and the tissue mean transit times as well as the coronary blood volume per unit of tissue weight were computed from the impulse response functions obtained by numerical deconvolution of the arterial and coronary venous indicator dilution curves. In contrast to reports of other authors coronary blood volume did not increase to a major extend during coronary vasodilation or elevated afterload. These new results suggest that the variation of coronary blood volume described in the literature is mainly due to methodological errors resulting from monoexponential extrapolation and distortion of the dye signal by the sampling catheter. These systematic errors, which, in particular, lead to an overestimation of

  16. Federal helium program: The reaction over an inert gas. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Mielke, J.E.

    1996-10-09

    Helium, present in relatively high concentrations in only a few natural gas fields, is released to the atmosphere and wasted when the natural gas is burned as fuel. Government involvement in helium conservation dates to the Helium Act of 1925 which authorized the Bureau of Mines to build and operate a large-scale helium extraction and purification plant. From 1929 until 1960 the federal government was the only domestic helium producer. In 1960, Congress amended the Helium Act to provide incentives to natural gas producers for stripping natural gas of its helium, for purchase of the separated helium by the government, and for its long-term storage. With over 960 million cubic meters (34.6 billion cubic feet) of helium in government storage and a large private helium recovery industry, questions arise as to the need for either the federal helium extraction program or the federally maintained helium stockpile.

  17. Inert gas stratigraphy of Apollo 15 drill core sections 15001 and 15003

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Huebner, W.; Kirsten, T.; Heymann, D.

    1973-01-01

    Rare gase contents were studied in Apollo 15 drill core sections corresponding to 207 to 238 and 125 to 161-cm depths, with respect to layering of the core, turnover on a centimeter scale, and cosmic proton bombardment history. Trapped gas abundance was established in all samples, the mean grain size being a major factor influencing the absolute rare gas contents. Analysis of the results suggests that the regolith materials were exposed to galactic and solar cosmic rays long before their deposition.

  18. Modeled heating and surface erosion comparing motile (gas borne) and stationary (surface coating) inert particle additives

    SciTech Connect

    Buckingham, A.C.; Siekhaus, W.J.

    1982-09-27

    The unsteady, non-similar, chemically reactive, turbulent boundary layer equations are modified for gas plus dispersed solid particle mixtures, for gas phase turbulent combustion reactions and for heterogeneous gas-solid surface erosive reactions. The exterior (ballistic core) edge boundary conditions for the solutions are modified to include dispersed particle influences on core propellant combustion-generated turbulence levels, combustion reactants and products, and reaction-induced, non-isentropic mixture states. The wall surface (in this study it is always steel) is considered either bare or coated with a fixed particle coating which is conceptually non-reactive, insulative, and non-ablative. Two families of solutions are compared. These correspond to: (1) consideration of gas-borne, free-slip, almost spontaneously mobile (motile) solid particle additives which influence the turbulent heat transfer at the uncoated steel surface and, in contrast, (2) consideration of particle-free, gas phase turbulent heat transfer to the insulated surface coated by stationary particles. Significant differences in erosive heat transfer are found in comparing the two families of solutions over a substantial range of interior ballistic flow conditions. The most effective influences on reducing erosive heat transfer appear to favor mobile, gas-borne particle additives.

  19. Oxidation Behavior and Cracking Susceptibility of Ni-Cr Alloys in Dry Steam and Inert Gas under Extremely-Low Oxygen Partial Pressure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abe, Hiroshi; Kenmoku, Yasuhiro; Endo, Takayuki; Miyazaki, Takamichi; Watanabe, Yutaka

    In order to investigate oxidation behavior and cracking susceptibility of the Ni-Cr alloys under extremely-low oxygen partial pressure, three Ni-Cr alloys (Ni-14Cr, Ni-22Cr and Ni-30Cr) were used as plate specimen and reverse U-bend specimen for oxidation experiments for 750 hours at 400 °C in two kinds of gas system (inert gas and dry steam) under various oxygen potential (Ni stable, Ni/NiO equilibrium and NiO stable). The Ni-Cr alloys cracked along grain boundary both in inert gas system (with trace O2, without H2O) and in hydrogenated steam. In the inert gas system, the cracking susceptibility was confirmed in near NiO stable condition. On the other hand, no crack was found in near Ni stable condition. In the dry steam system, the cracking susceptibility was confirmed in near Ni/NiO equilibrium. In contrast, no crack was found in near NiO stable condition. The cracking susceptibility was confirmed in near Ni/NiO equilibrium in hydrogenated steam as contrasted with higher oxygen potential in inert gas system. This result shows that potential range for the cracking susceptibility seemed to be different between the two kinds of gas system. Cracking severity was highest for Ni-14Cr and lowest for Ni-30Cr both in inert gas and steam; however, even Ni-30Cr was not immune to intergranular cracking in steam near Ni/NiO equilibrium.

  20. Spectroscopy of Cosmic Carbon Analogs in Inert-Gas Matrices and in the Gas-Phase: Comparative Results and Perspectives for Astrophysics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Salama, Farid; DeVincenzi, Donald L. (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    Recent studies of the spectroscopy of large (up to approx. 50 carbon atoms) neutral and Ionized polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) and Fullerenes isolated in inert gas matrices will be presented. The advantages and the limitations of matrix isolation spectroscopy for the study of the molecular spectroscopy of interstellar dust analogs will be discussed. The laboratory data will be compared to the astronomical spectra (the interstellar extinction, the diffuse interstellar bands). Finally, the spectra of PAH ions isolated in neon/argon matrices will be compared to the spectra obtained for PAH ion seeded in a supersonic expansion. The astrophysical implications and future perspectives will be discussed.

  1. Fractional ventilation mapping using inert fluorinated gas MRI in rat models of inflammation and fibrosis.

    PubMed

    Couch, Marcus J; Fox, Matthew S; Viel, Chris; Gajawada, Gowtham; Li, Tao; Ouriadov, Alexei V; Albert, Mitchell S

    2016-05-01

    The purpose of this study was to extend established methods for fractional ventilation mapping using (19) F MRI of inert fluorinated gases to rat models of pulmonary inflammation and fibrosis. In this study, five rats were instilled with lipopolysaccharide (LPS) in the lungs two days prior to imaging, six rats were instilled with bleomycin in the lungs two weeks prior to imaging and an additional four rats were used as controls. (19) F MR lung imaging was performed at 3 T with rats continuously breathing a mixture of sulfur hexafluoride and O2 . Fractional ventilation maps were obtained using a wash-out approach, by switching the breathing mixture to pure O2 , and acquiring images following each successive wash-out breath. The mean fractional ventilation (r) was 0.29 ± 0.05 for control rats, 0.23 ± 0.10 for LPS-instilled rats and 0.19 ± 0.03 for bleomycin-instilled rats. Bleomycin-instilled rats had a significantly decreased mean r value compared with controls (P = 0.010). Although LPS-instilled rats had a slightly reduced mean r value, this trend was not statistically significant (P = 0.556). Fractional ventilation gradients were calculated in the anterior/posterior (A/P) direction, and the mean A/P gradient was -0.005 ± 0.008 cm(-1) for control rats, 0.013 ± 0.005 cm(-1) for LPS-instilled rats and 0.009 ± 0.018 cm(-1) for bleomycin-instilled rats. Fractional ventilation gradients were significantly different for control rats compared with LPS-instilled rats only (P = 0.016). The ventilation gradients calculated from control rats showed the expected gravitational relationship, while ventilation gradients calculated from LPS- and bleomycin-instilled rats showed the opposite trend. Histology confirmed that LPS-instilled rats had a significantly elevated alveolar wall thickness, while bleomycin-instilled rats showed signs of substantial fibrosis. Overall, (19) F MRI may be able to detect the effects of pulmonary

  2. EFFECT OF VENTILATION AND PERFUSION IMBALANCE ON INERT GAS REBREATHING VARIABLES

    EPA Science Inventory

    The effects of ventilation-to-perfusion (Va/Qc) maldistribution within the lungs on measured multiple gas rebreathing variables were studied in 14 dogs. The rebreathing method (using He, C18C, and C2H2) allows for measurements of pulmonary capillary blood flow (Qc), diffusing cap...

  3. Assessment of the biological effects of welding fumes emitted from metal inert gas welding processes of aluminium and zinc-plated materials in humans.

    PubMed

    Hartmann, L; Bauer, M; Bertram, J; Gube, M; Lenz, K; Reisgen, U; Schettgen, T; Kraus, T; Brand, P

    2014-03-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate biological effects and potential health risks due to two different metal-inert-gas (MIG) welding fumes (MIG welding of aluminium and MIG soldering of zinc coated steel) in healthy humans. In a threefold cross-over design study 12 male subjects were exposed to three different exposure scenarios. Exposures were performed under controlled conditions in the Aachener Workplace Simulation Laboratory (AWSL). On three different days the subjects were either exposed to filtered ambient air, to welding fumes from MIG welding of aluminium, or to fumes from MIG soldering of zinc coated materials. Exposure was performed for 6 h and the average fume concentration was 2.5 mg m(-3). Before, directly after, 1 day after, and 7 days after exposure spirometric and impulse oscillometric measurements were performed, exhaled breath condensate (EBC) was collected and blood samples were taken and analyzed for inflammatory markers. During MIG welding of aluminium high ozone concentrations (up to 250 μg m(-3)) were observed, whereas ozone was negligible for MIG soldering. For MIG soldering, concentrations of high-sensitivity CRP (hsCRP) and factor VIII were significantly increased but remained mostly within the normal range. The concentration of neutrophils increased in tendency. For MIG welding of aluminium, the lung function showed significant decreases in Peak Expiratory Flow (PEF) and Mean Expiratory Flow at 75% vital capacity (MEF 75) 7 days after exposure. The concentration of ristocetin cofactor was increased. The observed increase of hsCRP during MIG-soldering can be understood as an indicator for asymptomatic systemic inflammation probably due to zinc (zinc concentration 1.5 mg m(-3)). The change in lung function observed after MIG welding of aluminium may be attributed to ozone inhalation, although the late response (7 days after exposure) is surprising. PMID:23790592

  4. Tundish Open Eye Formation in Inert Gas-Shrouded Tundishes: A Macroscopic Model from First Principles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chatterjee, Saikat; Chattopadhyay, Kinnor

    2016-07-01

    Open eye formation in tundishes can result in reoxidation of liquid steel leading to the formation of harmful inclusions. Moreover, it is also a site for heat loss, gas absorption, and slag emulsification. All these factors make it necessary to understand the fundamentals of open eye formation, which in turn will allow us to prevent or control its harmful effects. In the present study, the bubble plume regions in a ladle and tundish were compared, and it was observed that there are significant differences between the two. Moreover, a simplistic model for predicting the open eye area in tundishes for `thin slag' practices was derived using the principles of conservation of mass and momentum. The proposed model was able to predict open eye areas in tundish reasonably well and was compared with other models, and experimental results.

  5. Synchrotron X-ray measurement and finite element analysis of residual strain in tungsten inert gas welded aluminum alloy 2024

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Preston, R. V.; Shercliff, H. R.; Withers, P. J.; Hughes, D. J.; Smith, S. D.; Webster, P. J.

    2006-12-01

    Residual strains have been measured in a tungsten inert gas (TIG) butt-welded 2024 aluminum alloy plate using synchrotron X-ray diffraction. Novel two-dimensional strain maps spanning the entire plate reveal steep gradients in residual stress and provide detailed validation data for finite element (FE) analysis. Two variants of a FE model have been used to predict the residual strain distributions, incorporating different levels of plate constraint. The model uses decoupled thermal and elastic-plastic mechanical analyses and successfully predicts the longitudinal and transverse residual strain field over the entire weld. For butt weld geometries, the degree of transverse constraint is shown to be a significant boundary condition, compared to simpler bead-on-plate analyses. The importance of transverse residual strains for detailed model validation is highlighted, together with the need for care in selecting the location for line scans. The residual stress is largest in the heat-affected zone (HAZ), being equal to the local postweld yield stress, though the strength increases subsequently by natural aging. In addition, a halving of the diffraction line width has been observed local to the weld, and this correlates with the microstructural changes in the region.

  6. Abnormal distribution of microhardness in tungsten inert gas arc butt-welded AZ61 magnesium alloy plates

    SciTech Connect

    Xu Nan; Shen Jun; Xie Weidong; Wang Linzhi; Wang Dan; Min Dong

    2010-07-15

    In this study, the effects of heat input on the distribution of microhardness of tungsten inert gas (TIG) arc welded hot-extruded AZ61 magnesium alloy joints were investigated. The results show that with an increase of heat input, the distributions of microhardness at the top and bottom of the welded joints are different because they are determined by both the effect of grain coarsening and the effect of dispersion strengthening. With an increase of the heat input, the microhardness of the heat-affected zone (HAZ) at the top and bottom of welded joints and the fusion zone (FZ) at the bottom of welded joints decreased gradually, while the microhardness of the FZ at the top of welded joints decreased initially and then increased sharply. The reason for the abnormal distribution of microhardness of the FZ at the top of the welded joints is that this area is close to the heat source during welding and then large numbers of hard {beta}-Mg{sub 17}(Al,Zn){sub 12} particles are precipitated. Hence, in this case, the effect of dispersion strengthening dominated the microhardness.

  7. Influence of TIG welding thermal cycles on HSLA-100 steel plate. Technical report. [TIG (tungsten-inert gas)

    SciTech Connect

    Fox, A.G.; Bhole, S.D.

    1993-11-01

    A series of five bead on plate autogenous tungsten-inert-gas (TIG) welds were performed on U.S. Navy HSLA-100 steel. Power variations in these welds was achieved by altering the welding speed, voltage and current and were as follows (in kJ/mm); 0.7, 1.1, 1.2, 1.6 and 2.2. No evidence was found of either weld metal or underbead HAZ cracking in any of the welds illustrating the advantage of low carbon steel for both weld wire and base plate. Microhardness traverses across both the weld metals and HAZs gave a maximum. Vickers diamond pyramid hardness of 345 HV in the coarse grain HAZ next to the fusion line in the lowest power weld; for the highest power weld this was somewhat lower at 328 HV. These are well below 375 which is usually considered to be the lowest Vickers Hardness value for which severe hydrogen induced cold cracking is observed in this type of steel. Optical, scanning and transmission electron microscopy studies of the coarse grain HAZ microstructure in the regions of maximum hardness was correlated with the continuous cooling transformation diagram for this steel and good agreement between observed and predicted microstructures was obtained.

  8. Fermion-fermion interaction in a dilute gas-mixture Bose condensate

    SciTech Connect

    Mogilyuk, T. I.

    2011-11-15

    A mixture of a one-component Bose gas and two-component Fermi gas is considered at temperatures at which the Bose gas is completely condensed. Two fermions in such a mixture can interact with each other exchanging bosons from the condensate or supercondensate. The interaction potential, a change in the effective mass, the decay, and fermion spectrum are calculated in this quantum Fermi-Bose mixture.

  9. Horizontal gas-condensate find brightens Louisiana chalk outlook

    SciTech Connect

    Petzet, G.A.

    1994-12-19

    A ray of hope may have appeared in the Louisiana portion of the Cretaceous Austin chalk trend after several years of expensive disappointment. OXY USA Inc. plans to use dual leg horizontal wells to develop a fracture chalk reservoir named Masters Creek field in Rapides Parish. The state has approved four 1,920 acre spacing units, one of which contains OXY's A1 Monroe well. The A1 Monroe flowed 6.6 MMcfd of gas with 2,162 b/d of 48[degree] gravity condensate, not oil as previously reported, through a 26/64 in. choke with 6,196 psi flowing tubing pressure from a single southward 4,000 ft horizontal leg at 14,803 ft true vertical depth. Bottomhole pressure is 13,100 psi. OXY called A1 Monroe a significant discovery and said it has additional exploration acreage blocks along the trend. Louisiana exempts production from horizontal wells from state severance tax until all project costs are returned. The paper briefly discusses OXY's program.

  10. Cylindrical Couette flows of a rarefied gas with evaporation and condensation: Reversal and bifurcation of flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sone, Yoshio; Sugimoto, Hiroshi; Aoki, Kazuo

    1999-02-01

    A rarefied gas between two coaxial circular cylinders made of the condensed phase of the gas is considered, where each cylinder is kept at a uniform temperature and is rotating at a constant angular velocity around its axis (cylindrical Couette flows of a rarefied gas with evaporation or condensation on the cylinders). The steady behavior of the gas, with special interest in bifurcation of a flow, is studied on the basis of kinetic theory from the continuum to the Knudsen limit. The solution shows profound variety: reversal of direction of evaporation-condensation with variation of the speed of rotation of the cylinders; contrary to the conventional cylindrical Couette flow without evaporation and condensation, bifurcation of a flow in a simple case where the state of the gas is circumferentially and axially uniform.

  11. AVO in North of Paria, Venezuela: Gas methane versus condensate reservoirs

    SciTech Connect

    Regueiro, J.; Pena, A.

    1996-07-01

    The gas fields of North of Paria, offshore eastern Venezuela, present a unique opportunity for amplitude variations with offset (AVO) characterization of reservoirs containing different fluids: gas-condensate, gas (methane) and water (brine). AVO studies for two of the wells in the area, one with gas-condensate and the other with gas (methane) saturated reservoirs, show interesting results. Water sands and a fluid contact (condensate-water) are present in one of these wells, thus providing a control point on brine-saturated properties. The reservoirs in the second well consist of sands highly saturated with methane. Clear differences in AVO response exist between hydrocarbon-saturated reservoirs and those containing brine. However, it is also interesting that subtle but noticeable differences can be interpreted between condensate-and methane-saturated sands. These differences are attributed to differences in both in-situ fluid density and compressibility, and rock frame properties.

  12. Corrosion of muffler materials in automotive exhaust gas condensates

    SciTech Connect

    Ujiro, Takumi; Kitazawa, Makoto; Togashi, Fusao . Iron and Steel Research Lab.)

    1994-12-01

    The corrosion of automotive mufflers collected in North America was investigated. Aluminum (Al)-plated steels corroded severely in the substrate under the Al plating. Type 409 (UNS S40900) stainless steels sustained a large number of pits. The effects of ions in the condensate and activated carbon on the corrosion resistance of muffler materials were studied with a newly developed condensate corrosion test.

  13. 46 CFR 153.923 - Inerting systems.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 5 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Inerting systems. 153.923 Section 153.923 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) CERTAIN BULK DANGEROUS CARGOES SHIPS CARRYING BULK... Requirements § 153.923 Inerting systems. The master shall ensure that the inert gas systems for any cargo...

  14. 46 CFR 153.923 - Inerting systems.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 5 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Inerting systems. 153.923 Section 153.923 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) CERTAIN BULK DANGEROUS CARGOES SHIPS CARRYING BULK... Requirements § 153.923 Inerting systems. The master shall ensure that the inert gas systems for any cargo...

  15. Non-Condensable Gas Absorption by Capillary Waves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Andre, Matthieu A.; Bardet, Philippe M.

    2013-03-01

    Oceans and atmosphere are constantly exchanging heat and mass; this has a direct consequence on the climate. While these exchanges are inherently multi-scales, in non-breaking waves the smallest scales strongly govern the transfer rates at the ocean-atmosphere interface. The present experimental study aims at characterizing and quantifying the exchanges of non-condensable gas at a sub-millimeter scale, in the presence of capillary waves. In oceans, capillaries are generated by high winds and are also present on the forward face of short gravity waves. Capillary waves are thus present over a large fraction of the ocean surface, but their effect on interphase phenomena is little known. In the experiment, 2D capillary waves are generated by the relaxation of a shear layer at the surface of a laminar water slab jet. Wave profile is measured with Planar Laser Induced Fluorescence (PLIF) and 2D velocity field of the water below the surface is resolved with Particle Image Velocimetry (PIV). Special optical arrangements coupled with high speed imaging allow 0.1 mm- and 0.1 ms- resolution. These data reveal the interaction of vorticity and free surface in the formation and evolution of capillaries. The effect of the capillaries on the transfer of oxygen from the ambient air to anoxic water is measured with another PLIF system. In this diagnostic, dissolved oxygen concentration field is indirectly measured using fluorescence quenching of Pyrenebutyric Acid (PBA). The three measurements performed simultaneously -surface profile, velocity field, and oxygen concentration- give deep physical insights into oxygen transfer mechanisms under capillary waves.

  16. Condensate fraction of a two-dimensional attractive Fermi gas

    SciTech Connect

    Salasnich, Luca

    2007-07-15

    We investigate the Bose-Einstein condensation of fermionic pairs in a two-dimensional uniform two-component Fermi superfluid obtaining an explicit formula for the condensate density as a function of the chemical potential and the energy gap. By using the mean-field extended Bardeen-Cooper-Schrieffer theory, we analyze, as a function of the bound-state energy, the off-diagonal long-range order in the crossover from the Bardeen-Cooper-Schrieffer state of weakly bound Cooper pairs to the Bose-Einstein condensate of strongly-bound molecular dimers.

  17. Continual Non-Condensable Gas Removal Testing -- Performance and Lessons Learned

    SciTech Connect

    Charles Mohr; Greg Mines

    2005-09-01

    The operating experience and plant benefit analysis of a membrane-based continuous non-condensable gas (NCG) removal system is discussed. Results from testing at the Mammoth Pacific (Ormat) geothermal plant provide the basis for the benefit analysis.

  18. Gas storage in northern Michigan's gas-condensate reefs: an update

    SciTech Connect

    Whims, M.J.

    1981-01-01

    ANR's first underground-storage project, which received certification from the US Federal Energy Regulatory Commission in July 1979, involved converting two pinnacle-reef gas-condensate reservoirs in northern Michigan and designing and constructing the gathering systems, compressor stations, and transmission lines to provide the 38.3 billion CF working storage capacity. ANR's second project, a similar two-field development certified in August 1980, began service in April 1981 with an 11.9 billion CF capacity. This record clearly illustrates ANR's ability to speedily complete inexpensive storage facilities on short notice.

  19. Modeling metallic nanoparticle synthesis in a magnetron-based nanocluster source by gas condensation of a sputtered vapor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Quesnel, E.; Pauliac-Vaujour, E.; Muffato, V.

    2010-03-01

    Copper nanoparticles (NPs) were synthesized by inert-gas condensation of a sputtered metallic vapor using a dedicated commercial reactor. By controlling the time of residence of NPs in the carrier gas phase via the tuning of the collision path length, Cu NPs were produced. They exhibit various and well controlled diameters (3-10 nm) and a relatively narrow size dispersion. On the basis of these experimental results, a detailed modeling of NP nucleation and growth based on the classical nucleation theory was developed. It takes into account the peculiar geometry and thermal profile of the NP reactor. The simulated curves, calculated by a MATLAB® program developed for that purpose, exhibit a good qualitative agreement with experiment. Moreover, they highlight the role of process parameters and the strong influence of the reactor temperature profile on the NP size distribution. In the future, such calculations could be used for the optimization of the NP source design in order to increase its efficiency and reproducibility.

  20. Economic analysis of condensers for water recovery in steam injected gas turbines

    SciTech Connect

    De Paepe, M.; Huvenne, P.; Dick, E.

    1998-07-01

    Steam injection cycles are interesting for small power ranges because of the high efficiency and the relatively low investment costs. A big disadvantage is the consumption of water by the cycle. Water recovery is seldom realized in industrial practice. In this paper an analysis of the technical and economical possibilities of water recovery by condensation of water out of the exhaust gases is made. Three gas turbines are considered : the Kawasaki M1A-13CC (2.3 MWe), the Allison 501KH (6.8 MWe) and the General Electric LM1600 (17 MWe). For every gas turbine two types of condensers are designed. In the water cooled condenser finned tubes are used to cool the exhaust gases, flowing at the outside of the tubes. The water itself flows at the inside of the tubes and is cooled by a water to air cooler. In the air cooled condenser the exhaust gases flow at the inside of the tubes and the cooling air at the outside. The investment costs of the condensers is compared to the costs of the total installation. The investment costs are relatively smaller if the produced power goes up. The water cooled condenser with water to air cooler is cheaper than the air cooled condenser. Using a condenser results in higher exploitation costs due to the fans and pumps. It is shown that the air cooled condenser has lower exploitation costs than the water cooled one. Pay back time of the total installation does not significantly vary compared to the installation without recovery. Water prices are determined for which water recovery is profitable. For the water cooled condenser the turning point lies at 2.2 Euro/m; for the air cooled condenser this is 0.6 Euro/m.

  1. The role of causality in tunable Fermi gas condensates.

    PubMed

    Hsiang, Jen-Tsung; Lin, Chi-Yong; Lee, Da-Shin; Rivers, Ray J

    2013-10-01

    We develop a new formalism for the description of the condensates of cold Fermi atoms whose speed of sound can be tuned with the aid of a narrow Feshbach resonance. We use this to look for spontaneous phonon creation that mimics spontaneous particle creation in curved space-time in Friedmann-Robertson-Walker and other model universes. PMID:24025481

  2. Some effects of non-condensible gas in geothermal reservoirs with steam-water counterflow

    SciTech Connect

    McKibbin, R.; Pruess, K.

    1988-01-01

    A mathematical model is developed for fluid and heat flow in two-phase geothermal reservoirs containing non-condensible gas (CO{sub 2}). Vertical profiles of temperature, pressures and phase saturations in steady-state conditions are obtained by numerically integrating the coupled ordinary differential equations describing conservation of water, CO{sub 2}, and energy. Solutions including binary diffusion effects in the gas phase are generated for cases with net mass throughflow as well as for balanced liquid-vapor counterflow. Calculated examples illustrate some fundamental characteristics of two-phase heat transmission systems with non-condensible gas. 14 refs., 3 figs.

  3. Some effects of non-condensible gas in geothermal reservoirs with steam-water counterflow

    SciTech Connect

    McKibbin, Robert; Pruess, Karsten

    1988-01-01

    A mathematical model is developed for fluid and heat flow in two-phase geothermal reservoirs containing non-condensible gas (CO{sub 2}). Vertical profiles of temperature, pressures and phase saturations in steady-state conditions are obtained by numerically integrating the coupled ordinary differential equations describing conservation of water, CO{sub 2}, and energy. Solutions including binary diffusion effects in the gas phase are generated for cases with net mass throughflow as well as for balanced liquid-vapor counterflow. Calculated examples illustrate some fundamental characteristics of two-phase heat transmission systems with non-condensible gas.

  4. Phase Separation and Pair Condensation in a Spin-Imbalanced 2D Fermi Gas.

    PubMed

    Mitra, Debayan; Brown, Peter T; Schauß, Peter; Kondov, Stanimir S; Bakr, Waseem S

    2016-08-26

    We study a two-component quasi-two-dimensional Fermi gas with imbalanced spin populations. We probe the gas at different interaction strengths and polarizations by measuring the density of each spin component in the trap and the pair momentum distribution after time of flight. For a wide range of experimental parameters, we observe in-trap phase separation characterized by the appearance of a spin-balanced core surrounded by a polarized gas. Our momentum space measurements indicate pair condensation in the imbalanced gas even for large polarizations where phase separation vanishes, pointing to the presence of a polarized pair condensate. Our observation of zero momentum pair condensates in 2D spin-imbalanced gases opens the way to explorations of more exotic superfluid phases that occupy a large part of the phase diagram in lower dimensions. PMID:27610853

  5. WVNS Tank Farm Process Support: Experimental evaluation of an inert gas (nitrogen) to mitigate external corrosion of high-level waste storage tanks

    SciTech Connect

    Elmore, M.R.

    1996-02-01

    Corrosion of the carbon steel waste storage tanks at West Valley Nuclear Services continues to be of concern, especially as the planned duration of waste storage time increases and sludge washing operations are conducted. The external surfaces of Tanks 8D-1 and 8D-2 have been exposed for more than 10 years to water that has intruded into the tank vaults. Visual inspection of the external tank surfaces using a remote video camera has shown indications of heavy corrosion in localized areas on the tank walls. Tests on mild steel specimens under simulated tank vault conditions showed that corrosion is related to the availability of oxygen for the corrosion reactions; consequently, removing oxygen as one of the reactants should effectively eliminate corrosion. In terms of the waste tanks, excluding oxygen from the annular vault space, such as by continuous flushing with an inert gas, should substantially decrease corrosion of the external surfaces of the mild steel tanks (100% exclusion of oxygen is probably not practicable). Laboratory corrosion testing was conducted at Pacific Northwest National Laboratory to give a preliminary assessment of the ability of nitrogen-inerting to reduce steel corrosion. This report summarizes test results obtained after 18-month corrosion tests comparing {open_quotes}nitrogen-inerted{close_quotes} corrosion with {open_quotes}air-equilibrated{close_quotes} corrosion under simulated tank vault conditions.

  6. Spinor condensate of {sup 87}Rb as a dipolar gas

    SciTech Connect

    Swislocki, Tomasz; Gajda, Mariusz; RzaPzewski, Kazimierz

    2010-03-15

    We consider a spinor condensate of {sup 87}Rb atoms in the F=1 hyperfine state confined in an optical dipole trap. Putting initially all atoms in the m{sub F}=0 component, we find that the system evolves toward a state of thermal equilibrium with kinetic energy equally distributed among all magnetic components. We show that this process is dominated by the dipolar interaction of magnetic spins rather than spin-mixing contact potential. Our results show that because of a dynamical separation of magnetic components, the spin-mixing dynamics in the {sup 87}Rb condensate is governed by the dipolar interaction which plays no role in a single-component rubidium system in a magnetic trap.

  7. Fluid-dynamical and poro-elastic coupling of gas permeability of inert and sorbing gases on an Australian sub-bituminous coal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gensterblum, Y.; Krooss, B. M.

    2013-12-01

    The interaction and the coupling of slip-flow, a fluid dynamic phenomenon, and the cleat volume compressibility which is a poroelastic phenomenon has been investigated on two samples from the Taroom coal measure, Surat Basin, Queensland Australia. Measurements were performed using inert (helium and argon) and sorbing gases (nitrogen, methane and carbon dioxide) at controlled effective stress. We observed the following regular sequence of permeability coefficients for the different gases: Helium >> argon => nitrogen > methane >> CO2 Even after slip-flow correction, different intrinsic permeability coefficients are obtained for the same sample if different gases are used in the tests. The permeability values determined with helium are largest while those measured with CO2 are lowest. Inert gases like helium and argon show higher apparent- and even slip flow-corrected permeability coefficients than sorbing gases like methane or carbon dioxide. This observation is contrary to the prediction that the slip-flow corrected permeability have to be the same for all gases. The cleat volume compressibility cf was evaluated using the 'matchstick approach' [1, 2]. The cleat volume compressibility coefficients cf are almost identical for the two samples taken from the same well. However, for one sample a strong dependence of the cf with the mean pore pressure was observed. This is attributed to a strong slip-flow effect caused by a narrow cleat system as compared to the sister sample. The cleat volume compressibility coefficient cf is almost the same for inert and sorbing gases. We conclude that the occurrence of slip-flow in coals is able to compensate the permeability reduction resulting from increasing effective stress. This should lead to a much higher productivity of coal bed methane reservoirs in the third production phase (pseudo-steady state phase; [3]). This conclusion appears to be also valid for shale gas and tight gas reservoirs, where the gas transport takes place in

  8. Gas and condensate composition in the deep Tuscaloosa trend, southern Louisiana - influence of oil and wet gas cracking

    SciTech Connect

    Claypool, G.E.; Rooney, M.A.; Vuletich, A.K. )

    1996-01-01

    Natural gas and condensate samples from 34 wells in six fields producing from deep Tuscaloosa sandstones show regular changes in chemical and isotopic composition with increasing depth of burial. A gas-condensate system at 5.2 km (17,000 ft) changes to dry gas at 6.1 km (20,500 ft). Carbon isotopic compositions of ethane and propane become heavier ([delta] [sup 13]C[sub 2] increases from -31 to -23 permil); ([delta][sup 13]C[sub 3] increases from -29 to -21 permil), while methane becomes lighter ([delta][sup 13]C[sub 1] decreases from -38 to -42 permil). Depletion of condensate liquids relative to gas over this same depth interval (condensate/gas ratios decrease from 120 to 1 bbl/mmcf) is accompanied by systematic molecular and isotopic changes in the residual liquids. Higher molecular-weight (>C[sub 20]) hydrocarbons are progressively depleted, and isoprenoids are lost relative to adjacent normal alkanes. The liquids shift to heavier [delta][sup 13]C values (from -27 to -23 permil). These changes are believed to be caused by thermal cracking and progressive conversion of oil and wet gas hydrocarbons to dry gas in Tuscaloosa reservoirs at temperatures of 165 to 195[degrees]C.

  9. Economics of Condensing Gas Furnaces and Water Heaters Potential in Residential Single Family Homes

    SciTech Connect

    Lekov, Alex; Franco, Victor; Meyers, Steve

    2010-05-14

    Residential space and water heating accounts for over 90percent of total residential primary gas consumption in the United States. Condensing space and water heating equipment are 10-30percent more energy-efficient than conventional space and water heating. Currently, condensing gas furnaces represent 40 percent of shipments and are common in the Northern U.S. market. Meanwhile, manufacturers are planning to develop condensing gas storage water heaters to qualify for Energy Star? certification. Consumers, installers, and builders who make decisions about installing space and water heating equipment generally do not perform an analysis to assess the economic impacts of different combinations and efficiencies of space and water heating equipment. Thus, equipment is often installed without taking into consideration the potential life-cycle economic and energy savings of installing space and water heating equipment combinations. Drawing on previous and current analysis conducted for the United States Department of Energy rulemaking on amended standards for furnaces and water heaters, this paper evaluates the extent to which condensing equipment can provide life-cycle cost-effectiveness in a representative sample of single family American homes. The economic analyses indicate that significant energy savings and consumer benefits may result from large-scale introduction of condensing water heaters combined with condensing furnaces in U.S. residential single-family housing, particularly in the Northern region. The analyses also shows that important benefits may be overlooked when policy analysts evaluate the impact of space and water heating equipment separately.

  10. The Production of Polycyclic Aromatic Hydrocarbon Anions in Inert Gas Matrices Doped with Alkali Metals. Electronic Absorption Spectra of the Pentacene Anion (C22H14(-))

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Halasinski, Thomas M.; Hudgins, Douglas M.; Salama, Farid; Allamandola, Louis J.; Mead, Susan (Technical Monitor)

    1999-01-01

    The absorption spectra of pentacene (C22H14) and its radical cation (C22H14(+)) and anion (C22H14(-)) isolated in inert-gas matrices of Ne, Ar, and Kr are reported from the ultraviolet to the near-infrared. The associated vibronic band systems and their spectroscopic assignments are discussed together with the physical and chemical conditions governing ion (and counterion) production in the solid matrix. In particular, the formation of isolated pentacene anions is found to be optimized in matrices doped with alkali metal (Na and K).

  11. Recovery of Water from Boiler Flue Gas Using Condensing Heat Exchangers

    SciTech Connect

    Edward Levy; Harun Bilirgen; John DuPoint

    2011-03-31

    Most of the water used in a thermoelectric power plant is used for cooling, and DOE has been focusing on possible techniques to reduce the amount of fresh water needed for cooling. DOE has also been placing emphasis on recovery of usable water from sources not generally considered, such as mine water, water produced from oil and gas extraction, and water contained in boiler flue gas. This report deals with development of condensing heat exchanger technology for recovering moisture from flue gas from coal-fired power plants. The report describes: (1) An expanded data base on water and acid condensation characteristics of condensing heat exchangers in coal-fired units. This data base was generated by performing slip stream tests at a power plant with high sulfur bituminous coal and a wet FGD scrubber and at a power plant firing high-moisture, low rank coals. (2) Data on typical concentrations of HCl, HNO{sub 3} and H{sub 2}SO{sub 4} in low temperature condensed flue gas moisture, and mercury capture efficiencies as functions of process conditions in power plant field tests. (3) Theoretical predictions for sulfuric acid concentrations on tube surfaces at temperatures above the water vapor dewpoint temperature and below the sulfuric acid dew point temperature. (4) Data on corrosion rates of candidate heat exchanger tube materials for the different regions of the heat exchanger system as functions of acid concentration and temperature. (5) Data on effectiveness of acid traps in reducing sulfuric acid concentrations in a heat exchanger tube bundle. (6) Condensed flue gas water treatment needs and costs. (7) Condensing heat exchanger designs and installed capital costs for full-scale applications, both for installation immediately downstream of an ESP or baghouse and for installation downstream of a wet SO{sub 2} scrubber. (8) Results of cost-benefit studies of condensing heat exchangers.

  12. Recovery of Water from Boiler Flue Gas Using Condensing Heat Exchangers

    SciTech Connect

    Levy, Edward; Bilirgen, Harun; DuPont, John

    2011-03-31

    Most of the water used in a thermoelectric power plant is used for cooling, and DOE has been focusing on possible techniques to reduce the amount of fresh water needed for cooling. DOE has also been placing emphasis on recovery of usable water from sources not generally considered, such as mine water, water produced from oil and gas extraction, and water contained in boiler flue gas. This report deals with development of condensing heat exchanger technology for recovering moisture from flue gas from coal-fired power plants. The report describes: • An expanded data base on water and acid condensation characteristics of condensing heat exchangers in coal-fired units. This data base was generated by performing slip stream tests at a power plant with high sulfur bituminous coal and a wet FGD scrubber and at a power plant firing highmoisture, low rank coals. • Data on typical concentrations of HCl, HNO{sub 3} and H{sub 2}SO{sub 4} in low temperature condensed flue gas moisture, and mercury capture efficiencies as functions of process conditions in power plant field tests. • Theoretical predictions for sulfuric acid concentrations on tube surfaces at temperatures above the water vapor dewpoint temperature and below the sulfuric acid dew point temperature. • Data on corrosion rates of candidate heat exchanger tube materials for the different regions of the heat exchanger system as functions of acid concentration and temperature. • Data on effectiveness of acid traps in reducing sulfuric acid concentrations in a heat exchanger tube bundle. • Condensed flue gas water treatment needs and costs. • Condensing heat exchanger designs and installed capital costs for full-scale applications, both for installation immediately downstream of an ESP or baghouse and for installation downstream of a wet SO{sub 2} scrubber. • Results of cost-benefit studies of condensing heat exchangers.

  13. Correlation of leak rates of various fluids with the leak rate of an inert gas in the same configuration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schleier, Howard

    1990-01-01

    NASA is interested in field testing for possible leakage in their fueling systems; however, many fuels are hazardous to the extent that personnel cannot be on hand when the system is being monitored. It is proposed that an inert material such as helium be used on the field test, and that those results be calibrated to simulate the actual process. A technique such as this would allow personnel to be on site during the testing and use techniques to determine the behavior of the system that could not be used otherwise. This endeavor attempts to develop such a correlation. The results show promise, but more refinement and data are needed.

  14. [Effect of inert gas xenon on the functional state of nucleated cells of peripheral blood during freezing].

    PubMed

    Laptev, D S; Polezhaeva, T V; Zaitseva, O O; Khudyakov, A N; Utemov, S V; Knyazev, M G; Kostyaev, A A

    2015-01-01

    A new method of preservation of nucleated cells in the electric refrigerator with xenon. After slow freezing and storage is even one day at -80 °C persists for more than 60% leukocytes. Cell membranes are resistant to the vital dye. In 85% of granulocytes stored baseline lysosomal-cationic protein, reduced lipid peroxidation and antioxidant activity. Cryopreservation of biological objects in inert gases is a promising direction in the practice of medicine and can be an alternative to the traditional method using liquid nitrogen. PMID:26027341

  15. Formation of Polycyclic Aromatic Hydrocarbons and Carbonaceous Solids in Gas-Phase Condensation Experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jäger, C.; Huisken, F.; Mutschke, H.; Jansa, I. Llamas; Henning, Th.

    2009-05-01

    Carbonaceous grains represent a major component of cosmic dust. In order to understand their formation pathways, they have been prepared in the laboratory by gas-phase condensation reactions such as laser pyrolysis and laser ablation. Our studies demonstrate that the temperature in the condensation zone determines the formation pathway of carbonaceous particles. At temperatures lower than 1700 K, the condensation by-products are mainly polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) that are also the precursors or building blocks for the condensing soot grains. The low-temperature condensates contain PAH mixtures that are mainly composed of volatile three to five ring systems. At condensation temperatures higher than 3500 K, fullerene-like carbon grains and fullerene compounds are formed. Fullerene fragments or complete fullerenes equip the nucleating particles. Fullerenes can be identified as soluble components. Consequently, condensation products in cool and hot astrophysical environments such as cool and hot asymptotic giant branch stars or Wolf-Rayet stars should be different and should have distinct spectral properties.

  16. Numerical modeling of condensation from vapor-gas mixtures for forced down flow inside a tube

    SciTech Connect

    Yuann, R Y; Schrock, V E; Chen, Xiang

    1995-09-01

    Laminar film condensation is the dominant heat transfer mode inside tubes. In the present paper direct numerical simulation of the detailed transport process within the steam-gas core flow and in the condensate film is carried out. The problem was posed as an axisymmetric two dimensional (r, z) gas phase inside an annular condensate film flow with an assumed smooth interface. The fundamental conservation equations were written for mass, momentum, species concentration and energy in the gaseous phase with effective diffusion parameters characterizing the turbulent region. The low Reynolds number two equation {kappa}-{epsilon} model was employed to determine the eddy diffusion coefficients. The liquid film was described by similar formulation without the gas species equation. An empirical correlation was employed to correct for the effect of film waviness on the interfacial shear. A computer code named COAPIT (Condensation Analysis Program Inside Tube) was developed to implement numerical solution of the fundamental equations. The equations were solved by a marching technique working downstream from the entrance of the condensing section. COAPIT was benchmarked against experimental data and overall reasonable agreement was found for the key parameters such as heat transfer coefficient and tube inner wall temperature. The predicted axial development of radial profiles of velocity, composition and temperature and occurrence of metastable vapor add insight to the physical phenomena.

  17. Emergence of coherence via transverse condensation in a uniform quasi-two-dimensional Bose gas.

    PubMed

    Chomaz, Lauriane; Corman, Laura; Bienaimé, Tom; Desbuquois, Rémi; Weitenberg, Christof; Nascimbène, Sylvain; Beugnon, Jérôme; Dalibard, Jean

    2015-01-01

    Phase transitions are ubiquitous in our three-dimensional world. By contrast, most conventional transitions do not occur in infinite uniform low-dimensional systems because of the increased role of thermal fluctuations. The crossover between these situations constitutes an important issue, dramatically illustrated by Bose-Einstein condensation: a gas strongly confined along one direction of space may condense along this direction without exhibiting true long-range order in the perpendicular plane. Here we explore transverse condensation for an atomic gas confined in a novel trapping geometry, with a flat in-plane bottom, and we relate it to the onset of an extended (yet of finite-range) in-plane coherence. By quench crossing the transition, we observe topological defects with a mean number satisfying the universal scaling law predicted by Kibble-Zurek mechanism. The approach described can be extended to investigate the topological phase transitions that take place in planar quantum fluids. PMID:25635999

  18. The Dynamics of Partial Cavities and Effect of Non-Condensable Gas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Makiharju, Simo A.; Ganesh, Harish; Ceccio, Steven L.

    2015-11-01

    Partial cavitation is encountered in a variety of common applications, from fuel injectors to lifting surfaces, and in general it has detrimental effects on the system wear and performance. Partial cavities undergoing auto-oscillation can cause large pressure oscillations, unsteady hydrodynamic loading, and significant noise. In the present study, experiments were conducted focusing on the dynamics of shedding cavities forming in a canonical geometry (downstream of a wedge apex). The inlet cavitation number was fixed at 2.0 and the Reynolds number based on the hydraulic diameter was 6x105. The effects of dissolved gas content and of non-condensable gas injection into the cavity were carefully studied utilizing dynamic pressure transducers and x-ray densitometry. Gas was injected either immediately downstream of the wedge's apex or further downstream into mid-cavity. The gas injected near the wedge apex was found to end up in the separated shear layer, and relatively miniscule amounts of gas were enough to significantly reduce the vapor production rate and dampen the cavity's auto-oscillations. In addition, the results suggest that non-condensable gas injection can cause the shedding mechanism to switch from one dominated by condensation shock to one dominated by re-entrant liquid jet. Work supported by the Office of Naval Research Grant N00014-14-1-0292, program manager Dr. Ki-Han Kim.

  19. Confined Phase Envelope of Gas-Condensate Systems in Shale Rocks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nagy, Stanislaw; Siemek, Jakub

    2014-12-01

    Natural gas from shales (NGS) and from tight rocks are one of the most important fossil energy resource in this and next decade. Significant increase in gas consumption, in all world regions, will be marked in the energy sector. The exploration of unconventional natural gas & oil reservoirs has been discussed recently in many conferences. This paper describes the complex phenomena related to the impact of adsorption and capillary condensation of gas-condensate systems in nanopores. New two phase saturation model and new algorithm for search capillary condensation area is discussed. The algorithm is based on the Modified Tangent Plane Criterion for Capillary Condensation (MTPCCC) is presented. The examples of shift of phase envelopes are presented for selected composition of gas-condensate systems. Gaz ziemny z łupków (NGS) oraz z ze złóż niskoprzepuszczalnych (typu `tight') staje się jednym z najważniejszych zasobów paliw kopalnych, w tym i następnym dziesięcioleciu. Znaczący wzrost zużycia gazu we wszystkich regionach świata zaznacza się głównie w sektorze energetycznym. Rozpoznawanie niekonwencjonalnych złóż gazu ziemnego i ropy naftowej w ostatnim czasie jest omawiane w wielu konferencjach. Niniejszy artykuł opisuje złożone zjawiska związane z wpływem adsorpcji i kapilarnej kondensacji w nanoporach w złożach gazowo-kondensatowych. Pokazano nowy dwufazowy model równowagowy dwufazowy i nowy algorytm wyznaczania krzywej nasycenia w obszarze kondensacji kapilarnej. Algorytm bazuje na kryterium zmodyfikowanym płaszczyzny stycznej dla kapilarnej kondensacji (MTPCCC). Przykłady zmiany krzywych nasycenia są przedstawiane w wybranym składzie systemów gazowo- kondensatowych

  20. Numerical analysis of filmwise condensation in a plate fin-and-tube heat exchanger in presence of non-condensable gas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Benelmir, Riad; Mokraoui, Salim; Souayed, Ali

    2009-10-01

    In the present paper, a numerical model of a fin-and-tube heat exchanger is proposed. The simulation of water vapor condensation in presence of non-condensable gas (air) between two vertical plane plates and in a plate fin-and-tube heat exchanger in a stationary mode is performed using Fluent software. The differential equations that describe the heat and mass transfer were integrated by the finite volume method, in two and three dimensions.

  1. Evolution of non-condensable gas in ammonia heat pipes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Richter, Robert

    1990-01-01

    Accumulation of noncondensible gas (NCG) has been observed in ammonia heat pipes. NCG has been found to be detrimental to the performance of heat pipes and can result in complete operational failure. A kinetic and thermodynamic analysis has been performed that evaluates the dissociation of ammonia under various conditions and predicts the amount of NCG present in heat pipes. The analysis indicates that the observed NCG in ammonia heat pipes can be attributed to the dissociation of ammonia into its constituents, hydrogen and nitrogen. It shows time and temperature to be the important parameters, in conjunction with the catalytic characteristic of the container material.

  2. Controls on the distribution of oil, gas, and gas-condensate pools in the Timan-Pechora basin

    SciTech Connect

    Bogatsky, V.; Pankratov, J. )

    1993-09-01

    The distribution of hydrocarbon pool in the Timan Pechora basin is controlled by various aspects of the geological structure and stratigraphy. Oil pools are confined to tectonically stable areas, and there are often stratigraphically trapped (Omra-Lizha saddle in the Izhma Pechora basin, Khoreyyer depression). Structures in more active tectonic areas (Pechora-Kolva aulacogen and Ukhta-Izhma swell) usually contain complex accumulations of oil, gas, and condensate. The mixed character of these pools proves their multistaged origin involving further gas charge during stages of increased subsidence in the kitchen areas and degassing of oil during later stages of uplift. However, active tectonics led not only to gas-cap development but also, in places, to complete loss of hydrocarbons at the surface. The Varandey Adzhva zone is an example, with its considerable volume of heavy and medium-heavy oils. In the Ural foredeep basins, older oil and gas accumulations at the outer edge and on transverse uplifts were enriched later by gas generated from deeply buried formation the axial part of the orogenic trough and its eastern border. Younger fold structures contain gas and gas-condensate pools charged by gas generated in both orogenic and preorogenic formations and by residual oils re-migrated from preorogenic accumulations that once existed in the pericratonic region.

  3. Chemical stimulation of gas condensate reservoirs: An experimental and simulation study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kumar, Viren

    Well productivity in gas condensate reservoirs is reduced by condensate banking when the bottom hole flowing pressure drops below the dewpoint pressure. Several methods have been proposed to restore gas production rates after a decline due to condensate blocking. Gas injection, hydraulic fracturing, horizontal wells and methanol injection have been tried with limited success. These methods of well stimulation either offer only temporary productivity restoration or are applicable only in some situations. Wettability alteration of the rock in the near well bore region is an economic and efficient method for the enhancement of gas-well deliverability. Altering the wettability of porous media from strongly water-wet or oil-wet to intermediate-wet decreases the residual liquid saturations and results in an increase in the relative permeability to gas. Such treatments also increase the mobility and recovery of condensate from the reservoir. This study validates the above hypothesis and provides a simple and cost-efficient solution to the condensate blocking problem. Screening studies were carried out to identify the chemicals based on structure, solubility and reactivity at reservoir temperature and pressure. Experiments were performed to evaluate these chemicals to improve gas and condensate relative permeabilities. The improvement in relative permeability after chemical treatment was quantified by performing high pressure and high temperature coreflood experiments in Berea sandstone, Texas Cream limestone and reservoir cores using synthetic gas mixtures at reservoir conditions. Experiments were done at high flow rates and for long time periods to evaluate the durability of the treatment. Single well simulation studies were conducted to demonstrate the performance of the chemical treatment in the field. The experimental relative permeability data was modeled using a trapping number dependent relative permeability model and incorporated in the simulations. Effect of

  4. A new technique for the strengthening of aluminum tungsten inert gas weld metals: using carbon nanotube/aluminum composite as a filler metal.

    PubMed

    Fattahi, M; Nabhani, N; Rashidkhani, E; Fattahi, Y; Akhavan, S; Arabian, N

    2013-01-01

    The effect of multi-walled carbon nanotube (MWCNT) on the mechanical properties of aluminum multipass weld metal prepared by the tungsten inert gas (TIG) welding process was investigated. High energy ball milling was used to disperse MWCNT in the aluminum powder. Carbon nanotube/aluminum composite filler metal was fabricated for the first time by hot extrusion of ball-milled powders. After welding, the tensile strength, microhardness and MWCNT distribution in the weld metal were investigated. The test results showed that the tensile strength and microhardness of weld metal was greatly increased when using the filler metal containing 1.5 wt.% MWCNT. Therefore, according to the results presented in this paper, it can be concluded that the filler metal containing MWCNT can serve as a super filler metal to improve the mechanical properties of TIG welds of Al and its alloys. PMID:23948441

  5. Dispersion coefficients for the interactions of the alkali-metal and alkaline-earth-metal ions and inert-gas atoms with a graphene layer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kaur, Kiranpreet; Arora, Bindiya; Sahoo, B. K.

    2015-09-01

    Largely motivated by a number of applications, the van der Waals dispersion coefficients C3 of the alkali-metal ions Li+,Na+,K+, and Rb+, the alkaline-earth-metal ions Ca+,Sr+,Ba+, and Ra+, and the inert-gas atoms He, Ne, Ar, and Kr with a graphene layer are determined precisely within the framework of the Dirac model. For these calculations, we evaluate the dynamic polarizabilities of the above atomic systems very accurately by evaluating the transition matrix elements employing relativistic many-body methods and using the experimental values of the excitation energies. The dispersion coefficients are given as functions of the separation distance of an atomic system from the graphene layer and the ambiance temperature during the interactions. For easy extraction of these coefficients, we give a logistic fit to the functional forms of the dispersion coefficients in terms of the separation distances at room temperature.

  6. Reflux condensation of pure vapors with and without a noncondensable gas inside plain and enhanced tubes

    SciTech Connect

    Abdelmessih, A.N.; Rabas, T.J.; Panchal, C.B.

    1997-06-01

    Estimates of the surface-area and vapor-release reductions are obtained when commercially available enhanced tubes (spirally ribbed) replace plain tubes in a reflux unit condensing pure organic vapors with different concentrations of a noncondensable gas. This investigation was undertaken because there are no existing data and/or prediction methods that are applicable for these shell-and-tube condensers commonly used in the process industries. To obtain these estimates, existing design methods published in the open literature were used. The major findings are that (1) surface-area reductions can almost approach the single-phase heat transfer enhancement level, and (2) vapor-release reductions can approach a factor of four. The important implication is that enhanced tubes appear to be very cost effective for addressing the recovery of volatile organic vapors (VOCs), and for a vast number of different reflux-condenser applications.

  7. Gas chromatographic analysis of petroleum associated condensate oil with simultaneous determination of some characteristic physical parameters.

    PubMed

    Moustafa, N E

    2008-01-01

    A method is developed for the analysis of associated condensate by capillary gas chromatography (GC) with simultaneous determination of its major physical characteristic parameters. The method aims at the qualitative and quantitative determination of C(2)-C(36) alkanes, methylcyclopentane, cyclohexane, methylcyclohexane, benzene, toluene, ethylbenzene, xylenes, and 1,2,4-trimethylbenzene. This composition is according to the petroleum companies demand. The method is used for the simultaneous determination of the condensate average molecular weight, density, carbon-to-hydrogen ratio, and boiling range. The data obtained by the method has a good agreement with those obtained by other methods. The literature methods cited later used a simulated distillation method to obtain the hydrocarbon distribution spectrum of the given condensate sample. The obtained results revealed that the GC capillary method used is most rapid and accurate for achieving the demanded analytical report. PMID:18492346

  8. Effect of Alternate Supply of Shielding Gases of Tungsten Inert Gas Welding on Mechanical Properties of Austenitic Stainless Steel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shinde, Neelam Vilas; Telsang, Martand Tamanacharya

    2016-07-01

    In the present study, an attempt is made to study the effect of alternate supply of the shielding gas in comparison with the conventional method of TIG welding with pure argon gas. The two sets of combination are used as 10-10 and 40-20 s for alternate supply of the Argon and Helium shielding gas respectively. The effect of alternate supply of shielding gas is studied on the mechanical properties like bend test, tensile test and impact test. The full factorial experimental design is applied for three set of combinations. The ANOVA is used to find significant parameters for the process and regression analysis used to develop the mathematical model. The result shows that the alternate supply of the shielding gas for 10-10 s provides better result for the bend, tensile and impact test as compared with the conventional argon gas and the alternate supply of 40-20 s argon and helium gas respectively. Welding speed can be increased for alternate supply of the shielding gas that can reduce the total welding cost.

  9. Effect of Alternate Supply of Shielding Gases of Tungsten Inert Gas Welding on Mechanical Properties of Austenitic Stainless Steel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shinde, Neelam Vilas; Telsang, Martand Tamanacharya

    2016-03-01

    In the present study, an attempt is made to study the effect of alternate supply of the shielding gas in comparison with the conventional method of TIG welding with pure argon gas. The two sets of combination are used as 10-10 and 40-20 s for alternate supply of the Argon and Helium shielding gas respectively. The effect of alternate supply of shielding gas is studied on the mechanical properties like bend test, tensile test and impact test. The full factorial experimental design is applied for three set of combinations. The ANOVA is used to find significant parameters for the process and regression analysis used to develop the mathematical model. The result shows that the alternate supply of the shielding gas for 10-10 s provides better result for the bend, tensile and impact test as compared with the conventional argon gas and the alternate supply of 40-20 s argon and helium gas respectively. Welding speed can be increased for alternate supply of the shielding gas that can reduce the total welding cost.

  10. Experimental determination of Henry's law constant of perfluorooctanoic acid (PFOA) at 298 K by means of an inert-gas stripping method with a helical plate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kutsuna, Shuzo; Hori, Hisao

    The Henry's law constant ( KH) of perfluorooctanoic acid (PFOA, C 7F 15C(O)OH) was determined at 298 K in aqueous sulfuric acid solutions and in aqueous sodium chloride and sulfuric acid mixtures by an inert-gas stripping method in which a helical plate was used to increase the residence time of the gas bubbles in the solutions. The partial pressures of C 7F 15C(O)OH in the purge gas ( PPFOA) were determined by means of Fourier-transform infrared spectroscopy. Time-courses of PPFOA and concentrations of PFOA in the test solutions ( CPFOA) differed from those typically obtained by an inert-gas stripping, indicating both the presence of C 7F 15C(O)OH aggregates, even at low concentrations of C 7F 15C(O)OH in aqueous sulfuric acid solutions, and the adsorption of gaseous C 7F 15C(O)OH on the walls of the experimental apparatus. We derived overall gas-to-water partition coefficients ( KH') by simulating the time-courses of PPFOA and CPFOA simultaneously to optimize parameters of the model relating to the partitioning, the aggregation, and the adsorption. The KH' value for 0.31 mol dm -3 sulfuric acid solutions at 298 K was determined at 3.8 ± 0.1 mol dm -3 atm -1. From the relationship between KH' and the ionic strength of aqueous sulfuric acid solutions, the KH values of C 7F 15C(O)OH at 298 K were determined at 9.9 ± 1.5 mol dm -3 atm -1 for p Ka = 2.8 and 5.0 ± 0.2 mol dm -3 atm -1 for p Ka = 1.3. The p Ka value of 1.3 seems to be most probable among the reported three values for C 7F 15C(O)OH, taking into account dependence of KH' on sulfuric acid concentrations for aqueous sodium chloride and sulfuric acid mixtures. Despite the low p Ka value, the relatively small KH of C 7F 15C(O)OH obtained at 298 K suggests a substantial partitioning of C 7F 15C(O)OH in air in the environment.