Science.gov

Sample records for inert gas dilution

  1. Automated measurement of respiratory gas exchange by an inert gas dilution technique

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sawin, C. F.; Rummel, J. A.; Michel, E. L.

    1974-01-01

    A respiratory gas analyzer (RGA) has been developed wherein a mass spectrometer is the sole transducer required for measurement of respiratory gas exchange. The mass spectrometer maintains all signals in absolute phase relationships, precluding the need to synchronize flow and gas composition as required in other systems. The RGA system was evaluated by comparison with the Douglas bag technique. The RGA system established the feasibility of the inert gas dilution method for measuring breath-by-breath respiratory gas exchange. This breath-by-breath analytical capability permits detailed study of transient respiratory responses to exercise.

  2. 33 CFR 154.824 - Inerting, enriching, and diluting systems.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... Systems § 154.824 Inerting, enriching, and diluting systems. (a) A vapor control system which uses... vapor control system which uses an inerting, enriching, or diluting system must be equipped with a gas... the injection point; (c) A vapor control system that uses an inerting or enriching system may not...

  3. 33 CFR 154.2107 - Inerting, enriching, and diluting systems.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... activates an alarm that satisfies the requirements of 33 CFR 154.2100(e) when the amount of enriching gas... diluting system must be equipped, except as permitted by 33 CFR 154.2105(a), with a gas injection and... point, if a combustion device is used to produce the inert gas; and (5) Have an alarm value in...

  4. Inert gas thrusters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kaufman, H. R.; Robinson, R. S.

    1979-01-01

    Inert gas thrusters considered for space propulsion systems were investigated. Electron diffusion across a magnetic field was examined utilizing a basic model. The production of doubly charged ions was correlated using only overall performance parameters. The use of this correlation is therefore possible in the design stage of large gas thrusters, where detailed plasma properties are not available. Argon hollow cathode performance was investigated over a range of emission currents, with the positions of the inert, keeper, and anode varied. A general trend observed was that the maximum ratio of emission to flow rate increased at higher propellant flow rates. It was also found that an enclosed keeper enhances maximum cathode emission at high flow rates. The maximum cathode emission at a given flow rate was associated with a noisy high voltage mode. Although this mode has some similarities to the plume mode found at low flows and emissions, it is encountered by being initially in the spot mode and increasing emission. A detailed analysis of large, inert-gas thruster performance was carried out. For maximum thruster efficiency, the optimum beam diameter increases from less than a meter at under 2000 sec specific impulse to several meters at 10,000 sec. The corresponding range in input power ranges from several kilowatts to megawatts.

  5. Inert gas thrusters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kaufman, H. R.

    1977-01-01

    Inert gases, particularly argon and xenon, are of interest as possible alternatives to the usual electric thruster propellants of mercury and cesium. Hollow cathode data were obtained for a wide range of operating conditions. Some test conditions gave plasma coupling voltages at or below the sputtering threshold, hence should permit long operating lifetimes. All observations of hollow cathode operation were consistent with a single theory of operation, in which a significant amount of the total electron emission is from localized areas within the orifice. This mode of emission is also supported by scanning electron microscope photographs that indicate local temperatures at or near the melting temperature of the tungsten tip. Experimental hollow cathode performance was correlated for two orifice diameters, three inert gas propellants, and a range of flow rates for each propellant. The basic theory for the production of doubly ionized argon and xenon was completed. Experimental measurements of the doubly ionized fraction agree with theory within about plus or minus 20 percent. High voltage isolators were studied for the propellant feed line. The breakdown voltage per segment ranged from 300 to over 500 V with argon.

  6. Inert gas thrusters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kaufman, H. R.; Robinson, R. S.

    1980-01-01

    Some advances in component technology for inert gas thrusters are described. The maximum electron emission of a hollow cathode with Ar was increased 60-70% by the use of an enclosed keeper configuration. Operation with Ar, but without emissive oxide, was also obtained. A 30 cm thruster operated with Ar at moderate discharge voltages give double-ion measurements consistent with a double ion correlation developed previously using 15 cm thruster data. An attempt was made to reduce discharge losses by biasing anodes positive of the discharge plasma. The reason this attempt was unsuccessful is not yet clear. The performance of a single-grid ion-optics configuration was evaluated. The ion impingement on the single grid accelerator was found to approach the value expected from the projected blockage when the sheath thickness next to the accelerator was 2-3 times the aperture diameter.

  7. Inert gas ion thruster

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ramsey, W. D.

    1980-01-01

    Inert gas performance with three types of 12 cm diameter magnetoelectrostatic containment (MESC) ion thrusters was tested. The types tested included: (1) a hemispherical shaped discharge chamber with platinum cobalt magnets; (2) three different lengths of the hemispherical chambers with samarium cobalt magnets; and (3) three lengths of the conical shaped chambers with aluminum nickel cobalt magnets. The best argon performance was produced by a 8.0 cm long conical chamber with alnico magnets. The best xenon high mass utilization performance was obtained with the same 8.0 cm long conical thruster. The hemispherical thruster obtained 75 to 87% mass utilization at 185 to 205 eV/ion of singly charged ion equivalent beam.

  8. Inert gas thrusters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kaufman, H. R.

    1978-01-01

    Inert gas thrusters have continued to be of interest for space propulsion applications. Xenon is of interest in that its physical characteristics are well suited to propulsion. High atomic weight and low tankage fraction were major factors in this choice. If a large amount of propellant was required, so that cryogenic storage was practical, argon is a more economical alternative. Argon was also the preferred propellant for ground applications of thruster technology, such as sputter etching and deposition. Additional magnetic field measurements are reported. These measurements should be of use in magnetic field design. The diffusion of electrons through the magnetic field above multipole anodes was studied in detail. The data were consistent with Bohm diffusion across a magnetic field. The theory based on Bohm diffusion was simple and easily used for diffusion calculations. Limited startup data were obtained for multipole discharge chambers. These data were obtained with refractory cathodes, but should be useful in predicting the upper limits for starting with hollow cathodes.

  9. INERT GAS SHIELD FOR WELDING

    DOEpatents

    Jones, S.O.; Daly, F.V.

    1958-10-14

    S>An inert gas shield is presented for arc-welding materials such as zirconium that tend to oxidize rapidly in air. The device comprises a rectangular metal box into which the welding electrode is introduced through a rubber diaphragm to provide flexibility. The front of the box is provided with a wlndow having a small hole through which flller metal is introduced. The box is supplied with an inert gas to exclude the atmosphere, and with cooling water to promote the solidification of the weld while in tbe inert atmosphere. A separate water-cooled copper backing bar is provided underneath the joint to be welded to contain the melt-through at the root of the joint, shielding the root of the joint with its own supply of inert gas and cooling the deposited weld metal. This device facilitates the welding of large workpieces of zirconium frequently encountered in reactor construction.

  10. Inert gas thrusters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kaufman, H. R.

    1976-01-01

    Inert gases are of interest as possible alternatives to the usual electric thruster propellants of mercury and cesium. The multipole discharge chamber investigated was shown capable of low discharge chamber losses and flat ion beam profiles with a minimum of optimization. Minimum discharge losses were 200 to 250 eV/ion for xenon and 300 to 350 eV/ion for argon, while flatness parameters in the plane of the accelerator grid were 0.85 to 0.95. The design used employs low magnetic field strengths, which permits the use of sheet-metal parts. The corner problem of the discharge chamber was resolved with recessed corner anodes, which approximately equalized both the magnetic field above the anodes and the electron currents to these anodes. Argon hollow cathodes were investigated at currents up to about 5 amperes using internal thermionic emitters. Cathode chamber diameter optimized in the 1.0 to 2.5 cm range, while orifices diameter optimized in the 0.5 to 5 mm range. The use of a bias voltage for the internal emitter extended the operating range and facilitated starting. The masses of 15 and 30 cm flight type thrusters were estimated at about 4.2 and 10.8 kg.

  11. Welding Using Chilled-Inert-Gas Purging

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mcgee, William F.; Rybicki, Daniel J.

    1995-01-01

    Report describes study of fusion welding using chilled inert gas. Marked improvement shown in welding of aluminum using chilled helium gas. Chilling inert gas produces two additional benefits: 1) creation of ultradense inert atmosphere around welds; 2) chilled gas cools metal more quickly down to temperature at which metals not reactive.

  12. Mechanisms of inert gas narcosis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1973-01-01

    Experiments describing the mechanism of inert gas narcosis are reported. A strain of mice, genetically altered to increase susceptibility to botulin poisoning (synaptic response) appears to increase metabolic rates while breathing argon; this infers a genetically altered synaptic response to both botulin toxin and narcotic gases. Studies of metabolic depression in human subjects breathing either air or a 30% mixture of nitrous oxide indicate that nitrous oxide narcosis does not produce pronounced metabolic depression. Tests on mice for relative susceptibilities to narcosis and oxygen poisoning as a function of fatty membrane composition show that alteration of the fatty acid composition of phospholipids increases resistance to metabolically depressant effects of argon but bas no effect on nitrous oxide narcosis. Another study suggests that acclimatization to low tension prior to high pressure oxygen treatment enhances susceptibility of mice to convulsions and death; developing biochemical lesions cause CNS metabolite reductions and pulmonary damage.

  13. Fast, Nonspattering Inert-Gas Welding

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gilbert, Jeffrey L.

    1991-01-01

    Proposed welding technique combines best features of metal (other than tungsten)/inert-gas welding, plasma arc welding, and tungsten/inert-gas welding. Advantages include: wire fed to weld joint preheated, therefore fed at high speed without spattering; high-frequency energy does not have to be supplied to workpiece to initiate welding; size of arc gap not critical, power-supply control circuit adjusts voltage across gap to compensate for changes; only low gas-flow rate needed; welding electrode replaced easily as prefabricated assembly; external wire-feeding manipulator not needed; and welding process relatively forgiving of operator error.

  14. Inert gas effects on embryonic development.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Weiss, H. S.; Grimard, M.

    1972-01-01

    It had been found in previous investigations that hatchability of fertile chicken eggs is reduced to 50% or less of controls if incubation takes place in a low nitrogen atmosphere containing He. Although these results suggest some role for nitrogen in embryogenesis, it is possible that a requirement exists for an inert molecule closer in physical characteristics to nitrogen than is He. An investigation is conducted involving incubation at ground level pressure in a gas mixture in which the 79% inert component was either neon or argon. The effect of varying combinations of nitrogen, helium, and oxygen was also studied.

  15. 46 CFR 154.904 - Inert gas system: Controls.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... STANDARDS FOR SELF-PROPELLED VESSELS CARRYING BULK LIQUEFIED GASES Design, Construction and Equipment Atmospheric Control in Cargo Containment Systems § 154.904 Inert gas system: Controls. The inert gas...

  16. Portable spectrometer monitors inert gas shield in welding process

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Grove, E. L.

    1967-01-01

    Portable spectrometer using photosensitive readouts, monitors the amount of oxygen and hydrogen in the inert gas shield of a tungsten-inert gas welding process. A fiber optic bundle transmits the light from the welding arc to the spectrometer.

  17. 46 CFR 153.501 - Requirement for dry inert gas.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 5 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Requirement for dry inert gas. 153.501 Section 153.501 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) CERTAIN BULK DANGEROUS CARGOES SHIPS... Requirements § 153.501 Requirement for dry inert gas. When Table 1 refers to this section, an inert gas...

  18. 46 CFR 154.903 - Inert gas systems: General.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... Atmospheric Control in Cargo Containment Systems § 154.903 Inert gas systems: General. (a) Inert gas carried... tanks, hold and interbarrier spaces, and insulation. (b) The boiling point and dewpoint at atmospheric pressure of the inert gas must be below the temperature of any surface in those spaces or −45 °C (−49...

  19. 46 CFR 154.903 - Inert gas systems: General.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... Atmospheric Control in Cargo Containment Systems § 154.903 Inert gas systems: General. (a) Inert gas carried... tanks, hold and interbarrier spaces, and insulation. (b) The boiling point and dewpoint at atmospheric pressure of the inert gas must be below the temperature of any surface in those spaces or −45 °C (−49...

  20. 46 CFR 154.910 - Inert gas piping: Location.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 5 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Inert gas piping: Location. 154.910 Section 154.910... STANDARDS FOR SELF-PROPELLED VESSELS CARRYING BULK LIQUEFIED GASES Design, Construction and Equipment Atmospheric Control in Cargo Containment Systems § 154.910 Inert gas piping: Location. Inert gas piping...

  1. 46 CFR 154.904 - Inert gas system: Controls.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 5 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Inert gas system: Controls. 154.904 Section 154.904... STANDARDS FOR SELF-PROPELLED VESSELS CARRYING BULK LIQUEFIED GASES Design, Construction and Equipment Atmospheric Control in Cargo Containment Systems § 154.904 Inert gas system: Controls. The inert gas...

  2. 46 CFR 154.904 - Inert gas system: Controls.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 5 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Inert gas system: Controls. 154.904 Section 154.904... STANDARDS FOR SELF-PROPELLED VESSELS CARRYING BULK LIQUEFIED GASES Design, Construction and Equipment Atmospheric Control in Cargo Containment Systems § 154.904 Inert gas system: Controls. The inert gas...

  3. 46 CFR 154.903 - Inert gas systems: General.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 5 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Inert gas systems: General. 154.903 Section 154.903... STANDARDS FOR SELF-PROPELLED VESSELS CARRYING BULK LIQUEFIED GASES Design, Construction and Equipment Atmospheric Control in Cargo Containment Systems § 154.903 Inert gas systems: General. (a) Inert gas...

  4. 46 CFR 154.910 - Inert gas piping: Location.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 5 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Inert gas piping: Location. 154.910 Section 154.910... STANDARDS FOR SELF-PROPELLED VESSELS CARRYING BULK LIQUEFIED GASES Design, Construction and Equipment Atmospheric Control in Cargo Containment Systems § 154.910 Inert gas piping: Location. Inert gas piping...

  5. 46 CFR 154.904 - Inert gas system: Controls.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 5 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Inert gas system: Controls. 154.904 Section 154.904... STANDARDS FOR SELF-PROPELLED VESSELS CARRYING BULK LIQUEFIED GASES Design, Construction and Equipment Atmospheric Control in Cargo Containment Systems § 154.904 Inert gas system: Controls. The inert gas...

  6. 46 CFR 154.903 - Inert gas systems: General.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 5 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Inert gas systems: General. 154.903 Section 154.903... STANDARDS FOR SELF-PROPELLED VESSELS CARRYING BULK LIQUEFIED GASES Design, Construction and Equipment Atmospheric Control in Cargo Containment Systems § 154.903 Inert gas systems: General. (a) Inert gas...

  7. 46 CFR 154.903 - Inert gas systems: General.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 5 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Inert gas systems: General. 154.903 Section 154.903... STANDARDS FOR SELF-PROPELLED VESSELS CARRYING BULK LIQUEFIED GASES Design, Construction and Equipment Atmospheric Control in Cargo Containment Systems § 154.903 Inert gas systems: General. (a) Inert gas...

  8. 46 CFR 154.910 - Inert gas piping: Location.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 5 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Inert gas piping: Location. 154.910 Section 154.910... STANDARDS FOR SELF-PROPELLED VESSELS CARRYING BULK LIQUEFIED GASES Design, Construction and Equipment Atmospheric Control in Cargo Containment Systems § 154.910 Inert gas piping: Location. Inert gas piping...

  9. 46 CFR 147.66 - Inert gas fire extinguishing systems.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 5 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Inert gas fire extinguishing systems. 147.66 Section 147.66 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) DANGEROUS CARGOES HAZARDOUS SHIPS' STORES Stowage and Other Special Requirements for Particular Materials § 147.66 Inert gas fire extinguishing systems. (a) Inert gas...

  10. 46 CFR 154.906 - Inert gas generators.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 5 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Inert gas generators. 154.906 Section 154.906 Shipping... Atmospheric Control in Cargo Containment Systems § 154.906 Inert gas generators. The inert gas generator must... sample the discharge of the generator for oxygen content; and (c) Have an audible and visual alarm in...

  11. 46 CFR 154.908 - Inert gas generator: Location.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 5 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Inert gas generator: Location. 154.908 Section 154.908... Atmospheric Control in Cargo Containment Systems § 154.908 Inert gas generator: Location. (a) Except as allowed in paragraph (b) of this section, an inert gas generator must be located in the main...

  12. 46 CFR 154.908 - Inert gas generator: Location.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 5 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Inert gas generator: Location. 154.908 Section 154.908... Atmospheric Control in Cargo Containment Systems § 154.908 Inert gas generator: Location. (a) Except as allowed in paragraph (b) of this section, an inert gas generator must be located in the main...

  13. 46 CFR 154.906 - Inert gas generators.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 5 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Inert gas generators. 154.906 Section 154.906 Shipping... Atmospheric Control in Cargo Containment Systems § 154.906 Inert gas generators. The inert gas generator must... sample the discharge of the generator for oxygen content; and (c) Have an audible and visual alarm in...

  14. 46 CFR 154.908 - Inert gas generator: Location.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 5 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Inert gas generator: Location. 154.908 Section 154.908... Atmospheric Control in Cargo Containment Systems § 154.908 Inert gas generator: Location. (a) Except as allowed in paragraph (b) of this section, an inert gas generator must be located in the main...

  15. 46 CFR 154.906 - Inert gas generators.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 5 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Inert gas generators. 154.906 Section 154.906 Shipping... Atmospheric Control in Cargo Containment Systems § 154.906 Inert gas generators. The inert gas generator must... sample the discharge of the generator for oxygen content; and (c) Have an audible and visual alarm in...

  16. 46 CFR 154.906 - Inert gas generators.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 5 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Inert gas generators. 154.906 Section 154.906 Shipping... Atmospheric Control in Cargo Containment Systems § 154.906 Inert gas generators. The inert gas generator must... sample the discharge of the generator for oxygen content; and (c) Have an audible and visual alarm in...

  17. 46 CFR 154.908 - Inert gas generator: Location.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 5 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Inert gas generator: Location. 154.908 Section 154.908... Atmospheric Control in Cargo Containment Systems § 154.908 Inert gas generator: Location. (a) Except as allowed in paragraph (b) of this section, an inert gas generator must be located in the main...

  18. 46 CFR 154.906 - Inert gas generators.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 5 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Inert gas generators. 154.906 Section 154.906 Shipping... Atmospheric Control in Cargo Containment Systems § 154.906 Inert gas generators. The inert gas generator must... sample the discharge of the generator for oxygen content; and (c) Have an audible and visual alarm in...

  19. 46 CFR 154.908 - Inert gas generator: Location.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 5 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Inert gas generator: Location. 154.908 Section 154.908... Atmospheric Control in Cargo Containment Systems § 154.908 Inert gas generator: Location. (a) Except as allowed in paragraph (b) of this section, an inert gas generator must be located in the main...

  20. A new understanding of inert gas narcosis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meng, Zhang; Yi, Gao; Haiping, Fang

    2016-01-01

    Anesthetics are extremely important in modern surgery to greatly reduce the patient’s pain. The understanding of anesthesia at molecular level is the preliminary step for the application of anesthetics in clinic safely and effectively. Inert gases, with low chemical activity, have been found to cause anesthesia for centuries, but the mechanism is unclear yet. In this review, we first summarize the progress of theories about general anesthesia, especially for inert gas narcosis, and then propose a new hypothesis that the aggregated rather than the dispersed inert gas molecules are the key to trigger the narcosis to explain the steep dose-response relationship of anesthesia. Project supported by the Supercomputing Center of Chinese Academy of Sciences in Beijing, China, the Shanghai Supercomputer Center, China, the National Natural Science Foundation of China (Grant Nos. 21273268, 11290164, and 11175230), the Startup Funding from Shanghai Institute of Applied Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences (Grant No. Y290011011), “Hundred People Project” from Chinese Academy of Sciences, and “Pu-jiang Rencai Project” from Science and Technology Commission of Shanghai Municipality, China (Grant No. 13PJ1410400).

  1. Refractory metals welded or brazed with tungsten inert gas equipment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wisner, J. P.

    1965-01-01

    Appropriate brazing metals and temperatures facilitate the welding or brazing of base metals with tungsten inert gas equipment. The highest quality bond is obtained when TIG welding is performed in an inert atmosphere.

  2. 46 CFR 153.500 - Inert gas systems.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... inert state by filling the vapor space with a gas that is neither reactive with the cargo nor flammable... inert condition (e.g. through tank breathing and relief valve leakage), but in no case an amount...

  3. 46 CFR 153.500 - Inert gas systems.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 5 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Inert gas systems. 153.500 Section 153.500 Shipping... BULK LIQUID, LIQUEFIED GAS, OR COMPRESSED GAS HAZARDOUS MATERIALS Design and Equipment Special Requirements § 153.500 Inert gas systems. When Table 1 refers to this section, a cargo containment system...

  4. 46 CFR 153.500 - Inert gas systems.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 5 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Inert gas systems. 153.500 Section 153.500 Shipping... BULK LIQUID, LIQUEFIED GAS, OR COMPRESSED GAS HAZARDOUS MATERIALS Design and Equipment Special Requirements § 153.500 Inert gas systems. When Table 1 refers to this section, a cargo containment system...

  5. 46 CFR 153.500 - Inert gas systems.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 5 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Inert gas systems. 153.500 Section 153.500 Shipping... BULK LIQUID, LIQUEFIED GAS, OR COMPRESSED GAS HAZARDOUS MATERIALS Design and Equipment Special Requirements § 153.500 Inert gas systems. When Table 1 refers to this section, a cargo containment system...

  6. Inert gas bubbles in bcc Fe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gai, Xiao; Smith, Roger; Kenny, S. D.

    2016-03-01

    The properties of inert gas bubbles in bcc Fe is examined using a combination of static energy minimisation, molecular dynamics and barrier searching methods with empirical potentials. Static energy minimisation techniques indicate that for small Ar and Xe bubbles, the preferred gas to vacancy ratio at 0 K is about 1:1 for Ar and varies between 0.5:1 and 0.9:1 for Xe. In contrast to interstitial He atoms and small He interstitial clusters, which are highly mobile in the lattice, Ar and Xe atoms prefer to occupy substitutional sites and any interstitials present in the lattice soon displace Fe atoms and become substitutional. If a pre-existing bubble is present then there is a capture radius around a bubble which extends up to the 6th neighbour position. Collision cascades can also enlarge an existing bubble by the capture of vacancies. Ar and Xe can diffuse through the lattice through vacancy driven mechanisms but with relatively high energy barriers of 1.8 and 2.0 eV respectively. This indicates that Ar and Xe bubbles are much harder to form than bubbles of He and that such gases produced in a nuclear reaction would more likely be dispersed at substitutional sites without the help of increased temperature or radiation-driven mechanisms.

  7. Inert-Gas Diffuser For Plasma Or Arc Welding

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gilbert, Jeffrey L.; Spencer, Carl N.; Hosking, Timothy J.

    1994-01-01

    Inert-gas diffuser provides protective gas cover for weld bead as it cools. Follows welding torch, maintaining continuous flow of argon over newly formed joint and prevents it from oxidizing. Helps to ensure welds of consistently high quality. Devised for plasma arc keyhole welding of plates of 0.25-in. or greater thickness, also used in tungsten/inert-gas and other plasma or arc welding processes.

  8. A sensitive image intensifier which uses inert gas

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kerns, Q. A.; Miller, H. M.

    1972-01-01

    High gain optical image intensifier utilizes inert gas cavity with copper electrodes to form electron avalanches without excessive pulse voltages. Estimated optical gain for device is two times 10 to the power of seven.

  9. Apparatus For Metal/Inert-Gas Welding In Vacuum

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stocks, C. O.

    1994-01-01

    Metal/inert-gas welding-torch assembly operates in vacuum. Plasma generated in interior chamber and focused onto workpiece in vacuum. Pinch rollers feed wire to weld puddle. Controlled flow of plasma reduces dispersal in vacuum, preventing extinction.

  10. 46 CFR 153.501 - Requirement for dry inert gas.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 5 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Requirement for dry inert gas. 153.501 Section 153.501 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) CERTAIN BULK DANGEROUS CARGOES SHIPS CARRYING BULK LIQUID, LIQUEFIED GAS, OR COMPRESSED GAS HAZARDOUS MATERIALS Design and Equipment Special Requirements § 153.501 Requirement for...

  11. 46 CFR 153.501 - Requirement for dry inert gas.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 5 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Requirement for dry inert gas. 153.501 Section 153.501 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) CERTAIN BULK DANGEROUS CARGOES SHIPS CARRYING BULK LIQUID, LIQUEFIED GAS, OR COMPRESSED GAS HAZARDOUS MATERIALS Design and Equipment Special Requirements § 153.501 Requirement for...

  12. Nonchamber, Root-Side, Inert-Gas Purging During Welding

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mcgee, William F.; Rybicki, Daniel J.

    1995-01-01

    Improved apparatus distributes inert gas to protect against oxidation on root side of weld during welding and after welding while joint remains hot. Simple and lightweight; readily moved along weld path in synchronism with torch. Because it concentrates inert gas where needed, consumes gas at relatively low rate, and not necessary to monitor oxygen content of protective atmosphere. Apparatus does not obscure view of root side of weld. Used for full-penetration plasma-arc welding of such reactive metals as aluminum/lithium alloys and titanium.

  13. Analysis and Comparison of Aluminum Alloy Welded Joints Between Metal Inert Gas Welding and Tungsten Inert Gas Welding

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Lei; Guan, Yingchun; Wang, Qiang; Cong, Baoqiang; Qi, Bojin

    2015-09-01

    Surface contamination usually occurs during welding processing and it affects the welds quality largely. However, the formation of such contaminants has seldom been studied. Effort was made to study the contaminants caused by metal inert gas (MIG) welding and tungsten inert gas (TIG) welding processes of aluminum alloy, respectively. SEM, FTIR and XPS analysis was carried out to investigate the microstructure as well as surface chemistry. These contaminants were found to be mainly consisting of Al2O3, MgO, carbide and chromium complexes. The difference of contaminants between MIG and TIG welds was further examined. In addition, method to minimize these contaminants was proposed.

  14. 46 CFR 154.904 - Inert gas system: Controls.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 5 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Inert gas system: Controls. 154.904 Section 154.904 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) CERTAIN BULK DANGEROUS CARGOES SAFETY STANDARDS FOR SELF-PROPELLED VESSELS CARRYING BULK LIQUEFIED GASES Design, Construction and Equipment Atmospheric Control in Cargo Containment...

  15. 46 CFR 154.910 - Inert gas piping: Location.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 5 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Inert gas piping: Location. 154.910 Section 154.910 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) CERTAIN BULK DANGEROUS CARGOES SAFETY STANDARDS FOR SELF-PROPELLED VESSELS CARRYING BULK LIQUEFIED GASES Design, Construction and Equipment Atmospheric Control in Cargo Containment...

  16. Heaterless ignition of inert gas ion thruster hollow cathodes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schatz, M. F.

    1985-01-01

    Heaterless inert gas ion thruster hollow cathodes were investigated with the aim of reducing ion thruster complexity and increasing ion thruster reliability. Cathodes heated by glow discharges are evaluated for power requirements, flowrate requirements, and life limiting mechanisms. An accelerated cyclic life test is presented.

  17. Permeabilization of adhered cells using an inert gas jet.

    PubMed

    Cooper, Scott; Jonak, Paul; Chouinard-Pelletier, Guillaume; Coulombe, Sylvain; Jones, Elizabeth; Leask, Richard L

    2013-01-01

    Various cell transfection techniques exist and these can be broken down to three broad categories: viral, chemical and mechanical. This protocol describes a mechanical method to temporally permeabilize adherent cells using an inert gas jet that can facilitate the transfer of normally non-permeable macromolecules into cells. We believe this technique works by imparting shear forces on the plasma membrane of adherent cells, resulting in the temporary formation of micropores. Once these pores are created, the cells are then permeable to genetic material and other biomolecules. The mechanical forces involved do run the risk of permanently damaging or detaching cells from their substrate. There is, therefore, a narrow range of inert gas dynamics where the technique is effective. An inert gas jet has proven efficient at permeabilizing various adherent cell lines including HeLa, HEK293 and human abdominal aortic endothelial cells. This protocol is appropriate for the permeabilization of adherent cells both in vitro and, as we have demonstrated, in vivo, showing it may be used for research and potentially in future clinical applications. It also has the advantage of permeabilizing cells in a spatially restrictive manner, which could prove to be a valuable research tool. PMID:24056895

  18. Plasma induced by resonance enhanced multiphoton ionization in inert gas

    SciTech Connect

    Shneider, Mikhail N.; Zhang Zhili; Miles, Richard B.

    2007-12-15

    We present a detailed model for the evolution of resonance enhanced multiphoton ionization (REMPI) produced plasma during and after the ionizing laser pulse in inert gas (argon, as an example) at arbitrary pressures. Our theory includes the complete process of the REMPI plasma generation and losses, together with the changing gas thermodynamic parameters. The model shows that the plasma expansion follows a classical ambipolar diffusion and that gas heating results in a weak shock or acoustic wave. The gas becomes involved in the motion not only from the pressure gradient due to the heating, but also from the momentum transfer from the charged particles to gas atoms. The time dependence of the total number of electrons computed in theory matches closely with the results of coherent microwave scattering experiments.

  19. Production of light oil by injection of hot inert gas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ruidas, Bidhan C.; Ganguly, Somenath

    2016-05-01

    Hot inert gas, when injected into an oil reservoir is capable of generating a vaporization-condensation drive and as a consequence, a preferential movement of the lighter components to the production well. This form of displacement is an important unit mechanism in hot flue-gas injection, or in thermal recovery from a watered-out oil reservoir. This article presents the movement of heat front vis-à-vis the changes in the saturation profile, and the gas-phase composition. The plateau in the temperature profile due to the exchange of latent heat, and the formation of water bank at the downstream are elaborated. The broadening of the vaporization-condensation zone with continued progression is discussed. The effect of inert gas temperature on the cumulative production of oil is reviewed. The results provide insight to the vaporization-condensation drive as a stand-alone mechanism. The paper underscores the relative importance of this mechanism, when operated in tandem with other processes in improved oil recovery and CO2 sequestration.

  20. Moving in extreme environments: inert gas narcosis and underwater activities.

    PubMed

    Clark, James E

    2015-01-01

    Exposure to the underwater environment for pleasure or work poses many challenges on the human body including thermal stress, barotraumas, decompression sickness as well as the acute effects of breathing gases under pressure. With the popularity of recreational self-contained underwater breathing apparatus (SCUBA) diving on the increase and deep inland dive sites becoming more accessible, it is important that we understand the effects of breathing pressurised gas at depth can have on the body. One of the common consequences of hyperbaric gas is the narcotic effect of inert gas. Nitrogen (a major component of air) under pressure can impede mental function and physical performance at depths of as little as 10 m underwater. With increased depth, symptoms can worsen to include confusion, disturbed coordination, lack of concentration, hallucinations and unconsciousness. Narcosis has been shown to contribute directly to up to 6% of deaths in divers and is likely to be indirectly associated with other diving incidents at depth. This article explores inert gas narcosis, the effect on divers' movement and function underwater and the proposed physiological mechanisms. Also discussed are some of the factors that affect the susceptibility of divers to the condition. In conclusion, understanding the cause of this potentially debilitating problem is important to ensure that safe diving practices continue. PMID:25713701

  1. Production of light oil by injection of hot inert gas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ruidas, Bidhan C.; Ganguly, Somenath

    2015-07-01

    Hot inert gas, when injected into an oil reservoir is capable of generating a vaporization-condensation drive and as a consequence, a preferential movement of the lighter components to the production well. This form of displacement is an important unit mechanism in hot flue-gas injection, or in thermal recovery from a watered-out oil reservoir. This article presents the movement of heat front vis-à-vis the changes in the saturation profile, and the gas-phase composition. The plateau in the temperature profile due to the exchange of latent heat, and the formation of water bank at the downstream are elaborated. The broadening of the vaporization-condensation zone with continued progression is discussed. The effect of inert gas temperature on the cumulative production of oil is reviewed. The results provide insight to the vaporization-condensation drive as a stand-alone mechanism. The paper underscores the relative importance of this mechanism, when operated in tandem with other processes in improved oil recovery and CO2 sequestration.

  2. Closed-Loop System Removes Contaminants From Inert Gas

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sharma, Pramod K.

    1995-01-01

    Concentration of oxygen in this closed-loop system kept low by use of heated catalytic sorbent bed in cartridge. Proposed to keep concentration of water vapor low by use of predried zeolite sorbent bed in another cartridge, and to remove particles smaller than 0.1 micrometer by use of porous metal filters. In specific application, chamber is one in which semiconducting materials processed. By virtue of closed-loop operation, limited supply of inert gas adequate to provide atmosphere for industrial processing of semiconductors.

  3. Laboratory scale inert gas atomizer for producing rapidly solidified powders

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Korth, G. E.; Storhok, V. W.; Burch, J. V.

    An inert gas atomizer was constructed to produce rapidly solidified metal powders in batches of up to 3 kg. The atomizing tank assembly is 0.5 m in diameter x 1.8 m high. Various nozzle/crucible designs and processing parameters were evaluated for their effect on the powder product. The apparatus was used to produce tin, copper, and stainless steel powders with nozzle pressures no greater than 3 MPa and yielding spherical powders ranging from 200 to less than 1 micron. Various nozzle designs were evaluated and preliminary studies were initiated to investigate the process parameters as they pertain to the final powder product.

  4. Electroionization lasers using electron transitions in inert gas atoms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Basov, N. G.; Danilychev, V. A.; Kholin, I. V.

    1986-04-01

    Recent developments in high-power quasi-continuous-wave lasers based on electron transitions in inert gas atoms and pumped by fast electrons or by the electroionization method are reviewed. In particular, attention is given to high-pressure lasers using atomic transitions in XeI, KrI, ArI, and NeI which generate in the visible and near-infrared regions of the spectrum. The advantages of these lasers over other high-power lasers and, particularly, over the CO2 laser are examined.

  5. Nuclear Technology. Course 28: Welding Inspection. Module 28-3, Tungsten Inert Gas (TIG), Metal Inert Gas (MIG) and Submerged Arc Welding.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Espy, John

    This third in a series of ten modules for a course titled Welding Inspection presents the apparatus, process techniques, procedures, applications, associated defects, and inspection for the tungsten inert gas, metal inert gas, and submerged arc welding processes. The module follows a typical format that includes the following sections: (1)…

  6. Nuclear Technology. Course 28: Welding Inspection. Module 28-3, Tungsten Inert Gas (TIG), Metal Inert Gas (MIG) and Submerged Arc Welding.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Espy, John

    This third in a series of ten modules for a course titled Welding Inspection presents the apparatus, process techniques, procedures, applications, associated defects, and inspection for the tungsten inert gas, metal inert gas, and submerged arc welding processes. The module follows a typical format that includes the following sections: (1)

  7. 46 CFR 153.462 - Static discharges from inert gas systems.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... gas systems. An inert gas system on a tank that carries a flammable or combustible cargo must not... 46 Shipping 5 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Static discharges from inert gas systems. 153.462... CARGOES SHIPS CARRYING BULK LIQUID, LIQUEFIED GAS, OR COMPRESSED GAS HAZARDOUS MATERIALS Design...

  8. 46 CFR 153.462 - Static discharges from inert gas systems.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... gas systems. An inert gas system on a tank that carries a flammable or combustible cargo must not... 46 Shipping 5 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Static discharges from inert gas systems. 153.462... CARGOES SHIPS CARRYING BULK LIQUID, LIQUEFIED GAS, OR COMPRESSED GAS HAZARDOUS MATERIALS Design...

  9. 46 CFR 153.462 - Static discharges from inert gas systems.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... gas systems. An inert gas system on a tank that carries a flammable or combustible cargo must not... 46 Shipping 5 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Static discharges from inert gas systems. 153.462... CARGOES SHIPS CARRYING BULK LIQUID, LIQUEFIED GAS, OR COMPRESSED GAS HAZARDOUS MATERIALS Design...

  10. 46 CFR 153.462 - Static discharges from inert gas systems.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... gas systems. An inert gas system on a tank that carries a flammable or combustible cargo must not... 46 Shipping 5 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Static discharges from inert gas systems. 153.462... CARGOES SHIPS CARRYING BULK LIQUID, LIQUEFIED GAS, OR COMPRESSED GAS HAZARDOUS MATERIALS Design...

  11. 46 CFR 153.462 - Static discharges from inert gas systems.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... gas systems. An inert gas system on a tank that carries a flammable or combustible cargo must not... 46 Shipping 5 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Static discharges from inert gas systems. 153.462... CARGOES SHIPS CARRYING BULK LIQUID, LIQUEFIED GAS, OR COMPRESSED GAS HAZARDOUS MATERIALS Design...

  12. Cytogenetic studies of stainless steel welders using the tungsten inert gas and metal inert gas methods for welding.

    PubMed

    Jelmert, O; Hansteen, I L; Langård, S

    1995-03-01

    Cytogenetic damage was studied in lymphocytes from 23 welders using the Tungsten Inert Gas (TIG), and 21 welders using the Metal Inert Gas (MIG) and/or Metal Active Gas (MAG) methods on stainless steel (SS). A matched reference group I, and a larger reference group II of 94 subjects studied during the same time period, was established for comparison. Whole blood conventional cultures (CC), cultures in which DNA synthesis and repair were inhibited (IC), and the sister chromatid exchange (SCE) assay were applied in the study. For the CC a statistically significant decrease in chromosome breaks and cells with aberrations was found for both TIG/SS and MIG/MAG/SS welders when compared with reference group II. A non-significant decrease was found for the corresponding parameters for the two groups of welders when compared with their matched referents. A statistically significant negative association was found between measurements of total chromium (Cr) in inhaled air and SCE, and a weaker negative correlation with hexavalent Cr (Cr(VI)) in air. In conclusion, no cytogenetic damage was found in welders exposed to the TIG/SS and MIG/MAG/SS welding fumes with low content of Cr and Ni. On the contrary, a decline in the prevalence of chromosomal aberrations was indicated in the TIG/SS and MIG/MAG/SS welders, possibly related to the suggested enhancement of DNA repair capacity at slightly elevated exposures. PMID:7885396

  13. Molecular dissociation in dilute gas

    SciTech Connect

    Renfrow, S.N.; Duggan, J.L.; McDaniel, F.D. |

    1999-06-01

    The charge state distributions (CSD) produced during molecular dissociation are important to both Trace Element Accelerator Mass Spectrometry (TEAMS) and the ion implantation industry. The CSD of 1.3{endash}1.7 MeV SiN{sup +}, SiMg{sup +}, SiMn{sup +}, and SiZn{sup +} molecules have been measured for elements that do not form atomic negative ions (N, Mg, Mn, and Zn) using a NEC Tandem Pelletron accelerator. The molecules were produced in a Cs sputter negative ion source, accelerated, magnetically analyzed, and then passed through an N{sub 2} gas cell. The neutral and charged breakups where analyzed using an electrostatic deflector and measured with particle detectors. Equilibrium CSD were determined and comparisons made between molecular and atomic ion data. {copyright} {ital 1999 American Institute of Physics.}

  14. Development of advanced inert-gas ion thrusters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Poeschel, R. L.

    1983-01-01

    Inert gas ion thruster technology offers the greatest potential for providing high specific impulse, low thrust, electric propulsion on large, Earth orbital spacecraft. The development of a thruster module that can be operated on xenon or argon propellant to produce 0.2 N of thrust at a specific impulse of 3000 sec with xenon propellant and at 6000 sec with argon propellant is described. The 30 cm diameter, laboratory model thruster is considered to be scalable to produce 0.5 N thrust. A high efficiency ring cusp discharge chamber was used to achieve an overall thruster efficiency of 77% with xenon propellant and 66% with argon propellant. Measurements were performed to identify ion production and loss processes and to define critical design criteria (at least on a preliminary basis).

  15. The intense VUV narrow band emission from an inert gas mixture discharge

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gerasimov, G.; Hallin, R.; Krylov, B.; Treshchalov, A.; Morozov, A.; Lissovski, A.; Zwereva, G.; Arnesen, A.

    2006-05-01

    Theoretical and experimental studies of low temperature plasmas of inert gas mixtures show a very high efficiency for energy transfer from broad vacuum ultravio let (VUV) continua to narrow spectra. The process of energy transfer can not be explained as an ordinary particle collision mechanism. Narrow band light amplification in plasmas of inert gas mixtures is discussed as a possible process of energy transfer.

  16. Inert-gas welding and brazing enclosure fabricated from sheet plastic

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wisner, J. P.

    1965-01-01

    Custom-fabricated plastic bag maintains an inert-gas atmosphere for welding and brazing certain metals. The bag fits over part of the workpieces and the welding and brazing tools. It is also used for metal brazing and fusion plating which require an inert-gas atmosphere.

  17. 3-D simulation of gases transport under condition of inert gas injection into goaf

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Mao-Xi; Shi, Guo-Qing; Guo, Zhixiong; Wang, Yan-Ming; Ma, Li-Yang

    2016-02-01

    To prevent coal spontaneous combustion in mines, it is paramount to understand O2 gas distribution under condition of inert gas injection into goaf. In this study, the goaf was modeled as a 3-D porous medium based on stress distribution. The variation of O2 distribution influenced by CO2 or N2 injection was simulated based on the multi-component gases transport and the Navier-Stokes equations using Fluent. The numerical results without inert gas injection were compared with field measurements to validate the simulation model. Simulations with inert gas injection show that CO2 gas mainly accumulates at the goaf floor level; however, a notable portion of N2 gas moves upward. The evolution of the spontaneous combustion risky zone with continuous inert gas injection can be classified into three phases: slow inerting phase, rapid accelerating inerting phase, and stable inerting phase. The asphyxia zone with CO2 injection is about 1.25-2.4 times larger than that with N2 injection. The efficacy of preventing and putting out mine fires is strongly related with the inert gas injecting position. Ideal injections are located in the oxidation zone or the transitional zone between oxidation zone and heat dissipation zone.

  18. Simplified power processing for inert gas ion thrusters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rawlin, V. K.; Pinero, L. R.; Hamley, J. A.

    1993-06-01

    Significant simplifications to power processors for inert gas ion thrusters in the 1 to 5 kW range have been identified. They include elimination of all but three power supplies - one each for the neutralizer, main discharge, and beam. The neutralizer and discharge power supplies would provide both cathode heating and plasma generating functions. This dual-use power supply concept was validated via integration tests with a 30 cm diameter xenon ion thruster. The beam/accelerator power supply would have positive and negative outputs to allow a single power supply to provide both functions. The discharge and beam power supplies would incorporate full-bridge inverters similar to those proven for flight-ready arcjet propulsion systems. Operation of this simplified power processing scheme at an inverter frequency of 50 kHz results in a projected power processor design with low mass and high efficiency. A 2 kW reference point design has estimated values of specific mass of 5.4 kg/kW and an efficiency of 93 percent.

  19. Simplified power processing for inert gas ion thrusters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rawlin, V. K.; Pinero, L. R.; Hamley, J. A.

    1993-01-01

    Significant simplifications to power processors for inert gas ion thrusters in the 1 to 5 kW range have been identified. They include elimination of all but three power supplies - one each for the neutralizer, main discharge, and beam. The neutralizer and discharge power supplies would provide both cathode heating and plasma generating functions. This dual-use power supply concept was validated via integration tests with a 30 cm diameter xenon ion thruster. The beam/accelerator power supply would have positive and negative outputs to allow a single power supply to provide both functions. The discharge and beam power supplies would incorporate full-bridge inverters similar to those proven for flight-ready arcjet propulsion systems. Operation of this simplified power processing scheme at an inverter frequency of 50 kHz results in a projected power processor design with low mass and high efficiency. A 2 kW reference point design has estimated values of specific mass of 5.4 kg/kW and an efficiency of 93 percent.

  20. Visual/vestibular effects of inert gas narcosis.

    PubMed

    Hamilton, K; Laliberte, M F; Heslegrave, R; Khan, S

    1993-08-01

    Divers breathing compressed air at depths beyond 30 m experience a type of behavioural impairment known as inert gas narcosis. This condition degrades performance on a wide range of tasks and has the potential to compromise safety. Symptoms associated with narcosis include slowed response time, amnesia, and euphoria. Studies have also found disturbances to mechanisms regulating ocular control in response to vestibular stimulation; however, these experiments have been limited to very low frequency head movement (0.2 Hz). Thus, to further examine the effects of narcosis on visual/vestibular mechanisms, the vestibular ocular reflex (VOR) was assessed across a range of higher frequencies more representative of natural head movement (2.0-4.7 Hz). Seven subjects were tested prior to, during and after exposure to narcosis which was induced using 30% nitrous oxide. Standard room air was breathed as a control. The results indicated that narcosis decreased the velocity of compensatory eye movements in response to head rotation (decrease in VOR-gain), with more pronounced decreases occurring at the higher frequencies. The lag between eye and head position (phase lag) was also decreased by nitrous oxide; an effect that was again more pronounced at higher frequencies. These results indicate that narcosis disrupts ocular regulatory mechanisms which help to stabilize images on the retina during head movement. PMID:8365388

  1. Hepatic blood flow measurement with inert gas clearance

    SciTech Connect

    Mathie, R.T.

    1986-07-01

    Inert gas clearance has been used for 20 years to measure hepatic blood flow. Injection of a saline solution of /sup 85/Kr or /sup 133/Xe is usually made via the PV, and the resulting hepatic clearance is monitored with a Geiger-Mueller tube, scintillation crystal, or gamma camera. Complex slow components in /sup 133/Xe clearance curves, once believed to indicate a correspondingly complex hepatic microcirculation, are now considered to be caused by nonhepatic radioactivity. Normal liver is therefore believed to receive a homogeneous perfusion throughout the depth of tissue in any given region. HA blood and PV blood are normally completely mixed in the hepatic sinusoids. Macroscopic variations in tissue perfusion may exist in different lobes of the liver in both animals and man. The technique expresses flow in units of milliliters per minute per 100 g. Accurate and acceptably reproducible results have been obtained after PV injection of isotope; fast component analysis of /sup 133/Xe clearance is most appropriate, while beta detection of /sup 85/Kr yields a simple monoexponential curve. Normal hepatic blood flow in dogs and in man is 100-130 ml min-1 100 g-1. Employing sites of isotope administration other than the PV produces inaccurate results unless appropriate corrections are made. Accuracy of flow measurement is critically dependent on a knowledge of the partition coefficient of the gas used. Liver disease per se does not affect measurement accuracy, and many practical features make the technique an attractive tool for the measurement of hepatic hemodynamics in man. Nevertheless, it is essential that the investigator be aware of certain limitations of the method, and carefully apply current concepts of clearance curve analysis and interpretation, in order to derive maximum advantage.

  2. Gas flow measurements with a gas dilution technique.

    PubMed

    Karlmark, B; Ellingsen, J; Englesson, S

    1981-10-01

    A new method for gas flow measurements, based on a gas dilution technique, is described. A known amount of fresh room air is injected as a tracer gas into a carrier gas stream. The downstream concentration profile of the tracer gas is recorded with a portable mass-spectrometer. The flow rate of the carrier gas is calculated from the area under the tracer gas curve as electronically integrated. The method was tested against precision spirometers, one of the rolling seal type and one of the fluidistor type. It was shown that any rapid gas analyser might be used for the analyses, either of the tracer gas or of the carrier gas. The applicability of this method during general anaesthesia and in other clinical situations is discussed. PMID:7041508

  3. Impact of airway gas exchange on the multiple inert gas elimination technique: theory.

    PubMed

    Anderson, Joseph C; Hlastala, Michael P

    2010-03-01

    The multiple inert gas elimination technique (MIGET) provides a method for estimating alveolar gas exchange efficiency. Six soluble inert gases are infused into a peripheral vein. Measurements of these gases in breath, arterial blood, and venous blood are interpreted using a mathematical model of alveolar gas exchange (MIGET model) that neglects airway gas exchange. A mathematical model describing airway and alveolar gas exchange predicts that two of these gases, ether and acetone, exchange primarily within the airways. To determine the effect of airway gas exchange on the MIGET, we selected two additional gases, toluene and m-dichlorobenzene, that have the same blood solubility as ether and acetone and minimize airway gas exchange via their low water solubility. The airway-alveolar gas exchange model simulated the exchange of toluene, m-dichlorobenzene, and the six MIGET gases under multiple conditions of alveolar ventilation-to-perfusion, VA/Q, heterogeneity. We increased the importance of airway gas exchange by changing bronchial blood flow, Qbr. From these simulations, we calculated the excretion and retention of the eight inert gases and divided the results into two groups: (1) the standard MIGET gases which included acetone and ether and (2) the modified MIGET gases which included toluene and m-dichlorobenzene. The MIGET mathematical model predicted distributions of ventilation and perfusion for each grouping of gases and multiple perturbations of VA/Q and Qbr. Using the modified MIGET gases, MIGET predicted a smaller dead space fraction, greater mean VA, greater log(SDVA), and more closely matched the imposed VA distribution than that using the standard MIGET gases. Perfusion distributions were relatively unaffected. PMID:20336837

  4. Oxygen carrier for gas chromatographic analysis of inert gases in propellants

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cannon, W. A.

    1972-01-01

    Gas chromatographic determination of small quantities of inert gases in reactive propellants is discussed. Operating conditions used for specific analyses of helium in diborane and nitrogen in oxygen difluoride are presented in tabular form.

  5. Stimulated Emission of Inert Gas Mixtures in the VUV Range

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gerasimov, G. N.; Krylov, B. E.; Hallin, R.; Morozov, A. O.; Arnesen, A.; Heijkenskjold, F.

    2002-02-01

    Amplification properties of continuous VUV emission of cooled discharge in mixtures of heavy inert gases are studied experimentally. The discharge current is 10 50 mA, the pressure is 100 GPa. Results pointing to amplification near the resonance line of xenon λ=146.96 nm are obtained. The amplification coefficient is measured to be κ=0.1 cm-1. The problem of radiation outcoupling from the active medium remains to be solved for practical implementation of a VUV laser.

  6. Performance and emission characteristics of the thermal barrier coated SI engine by adding argon inert gas to intake mixture.

    PubMed

    Karthikeya Sharma, T

    2015-11-01

    Dilution of the intake air of the SI engine with the inert gases is one of the emission control techniques like exhaust gas recirculation, water injection into combustion chamber and cyclic variability, without scarifying power output and/or thermal efficiency (TE). This paper investigates the effects of using argon (Ar) gas to mitigate the spark ignition engine intake air to enhance the performance and cut down the emissions mainly nitrogen oxides. The input variables of this study include the compression ratio, stroke length, and engine speed and argon concentration. Output parameters like TE, volumetric efficiency, heat release rates, brake power, exhaust gas temperature and emissions of NOx, CO2 and CO were studied in a thermal barrier coated SI engine, under variable argon concentrations. Results of this study showed that the inclusion of Argon to the input air of the thermal barrier coated SI engine has significantly improved the emission characteristics and engine's performance within the range studied. PMID:26644918

  7. Performance and emission characteristics of the thermal barrier coated SI engine by adding argon inert gas to intake mixture

    PubMed Central

    Karthikeya Sharma, T.

    2014-01-01

    Dilution of the intake air of the SI engine with the inert gases is one of the emission control techniques like exhaust gas recirculation, water injection into combustion chamber and cyclic variability, without scarifying power output and/or thermal efficiency (TE). This paper investigates the effects of using argon (Ar) gas to mitigate the spark ignition engine intake air to enhance the performance and cut down the emissions mainly nitrogen oxides. The input variables of this study include the compression ratio, stroke length, and engine speed and argon concentration. Output parameters like TE, volumetric efficiency, heat release rates, brake power, exhaust gas temperature and emissions of NOx, CO2 and CO were studied in a thermal barrier coated SI engine, under variable argon concentrations. Results of this study showed that the inclusion of Argon to the input air of the thermal barrier coated SI engine has significantly improved the emission characteristics and engine’s performance within the range studied. PMID:26644918

  8. INVESTIGATION ON THE OSCILLATING GAS FLOW ALONG AN INERTANCE TUBE BY EXPERIMENTAL AND CFD METHODS

    SciTech Connect

    Chen Houlei; Zhao Miguang; Yang Luwei; Cai Jinghui; Hong Guotong; Liang Jingtao

    2010-04-09

    To investigate the oscillating gas flow along an inertance tube used in pulse tube coolers, a CFD model is set up for FLUENT and an experimental measuring cell is designed and optimized by CFD results. Some characteristics of oscillating flow are demonstrated and discussed. Then, the flow status along an inertance tube is measured by the optimized measuring cell. The experimental results validate the simulating results.

  9. Carbothermic Reduction of Chromite Ore Under Different Flow Rates of Inert Gas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chakraborty, Dolly; Ranganathan, S.; Sinha, S. N.

    2010-02-01

    The reduction of chromite ore with carbon has been studied extensively in many laboratories. Inert gases have been used in these investigations to control the experimental conditions. However, little information is available in the literature on the influence of the gas flow rate on the rate of reduction. Experiments were carried out to study the influence of the flow rate of inert gas on the reducibility of chromite ore. The experiments showed that the rate of reduction increased with the increasing flow rate of argon up to an optimum flow rate. At higher flow rates, the rate of reduction decreased. The influence of the proportion of reductant on the extent of reduction depended on the rate of flow rate of inert gas. The experimental results are interpreted on the basis of a model that postulates that the mechanism of reduction changes with the flow rate of argon.

  10. Continuous injection of an inert gas through a drill rig for drilling into potentially hazardous areas

    DOEpatents

    McCormick, Steve H.; Pigott, William R.

    1997-01-01

    A drill rig for drilling in potentially hazardous areas includes a drill having conventional features such as a frame, a gear motor, gear box, and a drive. A hollow rotating shaft projects through the drive and frame. An auger, connected to the shaft is provided with a multiplicity of holes. An inert gas is supplied to the hollow shaft and directed from the rotating shaft to the holes in the auger. The inert gas flows down the hollow shaft, and then down the hollow auger and out through the holes in the bottom of the auger into the potentially hazardous area.

  11. Continuous injection of an inert gas through a drill rig for drilling into potentially hazardous areas

    DOEpatents

    McCormick, S.H.; Pigott, W.R.

    1997-12-30

    A drill rig for drilling in potentially hazardous areas includes a drill having conventional features such as a frame, a gear motor, gear box, and a drive. A hollow rotating shaft projects through the drive and frame. An auger, connected to the shaft is provided with a multiplicity of holes. An inert gas is supplied to the hollow shaft and directed from the rotating shaft to the holes in the auger. The inert gas flows down the hollow shaft, and then down the hollow auger and out through the holes in the bottom of the auger into the potentially hazardous area. 3 figs.

  12. Continuous injection of an inert gas through a drill rig for drilling into potentially hazardous areas

    SciTech Connect

    McCormick, S.H.; Pigott, W.R.

    1998-04-01

    A drill rig for drilling in potentially hazardous areas includes a drill having conventional features such as a frame, a gear motor, gear box, and a drive. A hollow rotating shaft projects through the drive and frame. An auger, connected to the shaft is provided with a multiplicity of holes. An inert gas is supplied to the hollow shaft and directed from the rotating shaft to the holes in the auger. The inert gas flows down the hollow shaft, and then down the hollow auger, and out through the holes in the bottom of the auger into the potentially hazardous area.

  13. Process modeling and control of inert gas atomization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ridder, S. D.; Osella, S. A.; Espina, P. I.; Biancaniello, F. S.

    Research at the National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST, formerly NBS) on gas atomization has focused on providing this process the ability to monitor and control particle size during atomization. Studies included gas and liquid flow imaging, gas flow modeling, real-time particle size measurement and process control. The process controller incorporates a multi-level expert system shell and a novel real-time particle size measurement sensor (incorporating an adaptive pattern recognition scheme). The modular nature of both the hardware and software design is adaptable to other particulate producing equipment.

  14. Vacuum rated flow controllers for inert gas ion engines

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pless, L. C.

    1987-01-01

    Electrical propulsion systems which use a gas as a propellant require a gas flowmeter/controller which is capable of operating in a vacuum environment. The presently available instruments in the required flow ranges are designed and calibrated for use at ambient pressure. These instruments operate by heating a small diameter tube through which the gas is flowing and then sensing the change in temperature along the length of the tube. This temperature change is a function of the flow rate and the gas heat capacity. When installed in a vacuum, the change in the external thermal characteristics cause the tube to overheat and the temperature sensors are then operating outside their calibrated range. In addition, the variation in heat capacity with temperature limit the accuracy obtainable. These problems and the work in progress to solve them are discussed.

  15. Inert gas rejection device for zinc-halogen battery systems

    DOEpatents

    Hammond, Michael J.; Arendell, Mark W.

    1981-01-01

    An electrolytic cell for separating chlorine gas from other (foreign) gases, having an anode, a cathode assembly, an aqueous electrolyte, a housing, and a constant voltage power supply. The cathode assembly is generally comprised of a dense graphite electrode having a winding channel formed in the face opposing the anode, a gas impermeable (but liquid permeable) membrane sealed into the side of the cathode electrode over the channel, and a packing of graphite particles contained in the channel of the cathode electrode. The housing separates and parallelly aligns the anode and cathode assembly, and provides a hermetic seal for the cell. In operation, a stream of chlorine and foreign gases enters the cell at the beginning of the cathode electrode channel. The chlorine gas is dissolved into the electrolyte and electrochemically reduced into chloride ions. The chloride ions disfuse through the gas impermeable membrane, and are electrochemically oxidized at the anode into purified chlorine gas. The foreign gases do not participate in the above electrochemical reactions, and are vented from the cell at the end of the cathode electrode channel.

  16. Inert gas clearance from tissue by co-currently and counter-currently arranged microvessels

    PubMed Central

    Lu, Y.; Michel, C. C.

    2012-01-01

    To elucidate the clearance of dissolved inert gas from tissues, we have developed numerical models of gas transport in a cylindrical block of tissue supplied by one or two capillaries. With two capillaries, attention is given to the effects of co-current and counter-current flow on tissue gas clearance. Clearance by counter-current flow is compared with clearance by a single capillary or by two co-currently arranged capillaries. Effects of the blood velocity, solubility, and diffusivity of the gas in the tissue are investigated using parameters with physiological values. It is found that under the conditions investigated, almost identical clearances are achieved by a single capillary as by a co-current pair when the total flow per tissue volume in each unit is the same (i.e., flow velocity in the single capillary is twice that in each co-current vessel). For both co-current and counter-current arrangements, approximate linear relations exist between the tissue gas clearance rate and tissue blood perfusion rate. However, the counter-current arrangement of capillaries results in less-efficient clearance of the inert gas from tissues. Furthermore, this difference in efficiency increases at higher blood flow rates. At a given blood flow, the simple conduction-capacitance model, which has been used to estimate tissue blood perfusion rate from inert gas clearance, underestimates gas clearance rates predicted by the numerical models for single vessel or for two vessels with co-current flow. This difference is accounted for in discussion, which also considers the choice of parameters and possible effects of microvascular architecture on the interpretation of tissue inert gas clearance. PMID:22604885

  17. Molecular dynamics simulations of cluster nucleation during inert gas condensation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krasnochtchekov, Pavel; Averback, R. S.

    2005-01-01

    Molecular dynamics simulations of vapor-phase nucleation of germanium in an argon atmosphere were performed and a unexpected channel of nucleation was observed. This channel, vapor-induced cluster splitting, is important for more refractory materials since the critical nucleus size can fall below the size of a dimer. As opposed to conventional direct vapor nucleation of the dimer, which occurs by three-body collisions, cluster-splitting nucleation is a second-order reaction. The most important cluster-splitting reaction is the collision of a vapor atom and a trimer that leads to the formation of two dimers. The importance of the cluster-splitting nucleation channel relative to the direct vapor nucleation channel is observed to increase with decreasing vapor density and increasing ratio of vapor to carrier gas atoms.

  18. Drift velocities of electrons in methane-inert-gas mixtures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Foreman, L.; Kleban, P.; Schmidt, L. D.; Davis, H. T.

    1981-03-01

    The drift of electrons in mixtures of methane with argon and helium is measured with a double shutter drift tube as a function of methane composition and electric field-pressure ratio Ep. At certain concentrations, inelastic scattering by methane causes a maximum in the drift velocity as a function of Ep. As the methane mole fraction decreases, the drift velocity maximum decreases and moves to lower values of Ep. In the argon mixtures, the drift velocity at low Ep is greater than it is in either pure gas. Comparision is made with direct numerical solutions of the Boltzmann equation for the mixtures. When the methane mole fractions are appropriately chosen, the data obey roughly a scaling law relating the electron drift velocity versus Ep in a methane-argon mixture with VD versus Ep in a methane-helium mixture.

  19. Heat Transfer and Pressure Drop in Concentric Annular Flows of Binary Inert Gas Mixtures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Reid, R. S.; Martin, J. J.; Yocum, D. J.; Stewart, E. T.

    2007-01-01

    Studies of heat transfer and pressure drop of binary inert gas mixtures flowing through smooth concentric circular annuli, tubes with fully developed velocity profiles, and constant heating rate are described. There is a general lack of agreement among the constant property heat transfer correlations for such mixtures. No inert gas mixture data exist for annular channels. The intent of this study was to develop highly accurate and benchmarked pressure drop and heat transfer correlations that can be used to size heat exchangers and cores for direct gas Brayton nuclear power plants. The inside surface of the annular channel is heated while the outer surface of the channel is insulated. Annulus ratios range 0.5 < r* < 0.83. These smooth tube data may serve as a reference to the heat transfer and pressure drop performance in annuli, tubes, and channels having helixes or spacer ribs, or other surfaces.

  20. Onboard Inert Gas Generation System/Onboard Oxygen Gas Generation System (OBIGGS/OBOGS) Study. Part 1; Aircraft System Requirements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Reynolds, Thomas L.; Bailey, Delbert B.; Lewinski, Daniel F.; Roseburg, Conrad M.; Palaszewski, Bryan (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    The purpose of this technology assessment is to define a multiphase research study program investigating Onboard Inert Gas Generation Systems (OBIGGS) and Onboard Oxygen Generation Systems (OBOGS) that would identify current airplane systems design and certification requirements (Subtask 1); explore state-of-the-art technology (Subtask 2); develop systems specifications (Subtask 3); and develop an initial system design (Subtask 4). If feasible, consideration may be given to the development of a prototype laboratory test system that could potentially be used in commercial transport aircraft (Subtask 5). These systems should be capable of providing inert nitrogen gas for improved fire cargo compartment fire suppression and fuel tank inerting and emergency oxygen for crew and passenger use. Subtask I of this research study, presented herein, defines current production aircraft certification requirements and design objectives necessary to meet mandatory FAA certification requirements and Boeing design and performance specifications. These requirements will be utilized for baseline comparisons for subsequent OBIGGS/OBOGS application evaluations and assessments.

  1. Gas dilution system results and application to acid rain utilities

    SciTech Connect

    Jolley-Souders, K.; Geib, R.; Dunn, C.

    1997-12-31

    In 1997, the United States EPA will remove restrictions preventing acid rain utilities from using gas dilution systems for calibration or linearity studies for continuous emissions monitoring, Test Method 205 in 40CFR51 requires that a gas dilution system must produce calibration gases whose measured values are within {+-}2% of predicted values. This paper presents the evaluation of the Environics/CalMat 2020 Dilution System for use in calibration studies. Internal studies show that concentrations generated by this unit are within {+-}0.5% of predicted values. Studies are being conducted by several acid rain utilities to evaluate the Environics/CalMat system using single minor component calibration standards. In addition, an internally generated study is being performed to demonstrate the system`s accuracy using a multi-component gas mixture. Data from these tests will be presented in the final version of the paper.

  2. Evaluation of two gas-dilution methods for instrument calibration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Evans, A., Jr.

    1977-01-01

    Two gas dilution methods were evaluated for use in the calibration of analytical instruments used in air pollution studies. A dual isotope fluorescence carbon monoxide analyzer was used as the transfer standard. The methods are not new but some modifications are described. The rotary injection gas dilution method was found to be more accurate than the closed loop method. Results by the two methods differed by 5 percent. This could not be accounted for by the random errors in the measurements. The methods avoid the problems associated with pressurized cylinders. Both methods have merit and have found a place in instrument calibration work.

  3. Green spherules from Apollo 15 - Inferences about their origin from inert gas measurements.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lakatos, S.; Yaniv, A.; Heymann, D.

    1973-01-01

    Green spherules from the 'clod' 15426 and from fines 15421 contain about 100 times less trapped inert gases than normal bulk fines from Apollo 15. These spherules have apparently never been directly exposed to the solar wind. Spherules from other fines contain about 10 times more trapped gas than those from the 'clod.' The gas in the former is surface correlated. However, spherules from fines 15401 are exceptionally gas-poor. The trapped gases can be of solar-wind origin, but this origin requires a two-stage model for the spherules from the clods. Another possibility is that the gases were absorbed from an ambient gas phase. The trapped gases may also be assumed to represent primordial lunar gas. The composition of this gas is then similar to the 'solar' or 'unfractionated' component of gas-rich meteorites, but unlike that in most of the carbonaceous chondrites.

  4. Probing Toluene and Ethylbenzene Stable Glass Formation using Inert Gas Permeation

    SciTech Connect

    Smith, R. Scott; May, Robert A.; Kay, Bruce D.

    2015-09-01

    Inert gas permeation is used to investigate the formation of stable glasses of toluene and ethylbenzene. The effect of deposition temperature (Tdep) on the kinetic stability of the vapor deposited glasses is determined using Kr desorption spectra from within sandwich layers of either toluene or ethylbenzene. The results for toluene show that the most stable glass is formed at Tdep = 0.92 Tg, although glasses with a kinetic stability within 50% of the most stable glass were found with deposition temperatures from 0.85 to 0.95 Tg. Similar results were found for ethylbenzene, which formed its most stable glass at 0.91 Tg and formed stable glasses from 0.81 to 0.96 Tg. These results are consistent with recent calorimetric studies and demonstrate that the inert gas permeation technique provides a direct method to observe the onset of molecular translation motion that accompanies the glass to supercooled liquid transition.

  5. On-line determination of pulmonary blood flow using respiratory inert gas analysis.

    PubMed

    Gan, K; Nishi, I; Chin, I; Slutsky, A S

    1993-12-01

    An inert gas analysis method has been developed to perform on-line real time determination of pulmonary blood flow using a nonrebreathing approach. This technique is based on a mathematical model describing mass balance of two inert gases which are breathed using an open gas circuit. The measurements using this method are noninvasive, easy to peform, and do not disturb normal physiological processes. As well, since data are collected on a breath-by-breath basis, it is possible to estimate other respiratory, cardiopulmonary, and metabolic parameters simultaneously in a breath-by-breath manner. Special consideration was given to developing effective data processing algorithms to minimize the influence of measurement noise and respiratory variations. Experimental studies to compare this method with other accepted techniques were conducted to validate the present technique. PMID:8125501

  6. Research on inert gas narcosis and air velocity effects on metabolic performance

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1974-01-01

    The effects of air velocity on metabolic performance are studied by using high forced airflow in a closed environment as a mechanism to control the concentration of volatile animal wastes. Air velocities between 100 and 200 ft/min are without significant effects on the metabolism of rats. At velocities of 200 ft/min and above, oxygen consumption and CO2 production as well as food consumption increase. In most instances, the changes are on the order of 5-10%. At the same time, the RQ for the animals increases slightly and generally correlates well with oxygen consumption and CO2 production. Experiments on the nature of inert gas narcosis show that halothane and methoxyflurane are rather potent inhibitors of the NADH:O2 oxidoreductase system in rats. These experiments suggest that the mechanism of inert gas narcosis is not mandatorily related to a membrane surface phenomenon.

  7. Physical Modeling of Slag `Eye' in an Inert Gas-Shrouded Tundish Using Dimensional Analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chatterjee, Saikat; Chattopadhyay, Kinnor

    2016-02-01

    The formation of an exposed eye in the gas-stirred metallurgical vessels such as ladle or tundish is a common observation. Although gas stirring results in proper homogenization of melt composition and temperature, the resulting exposed eye leads to higher heat losses, re-oxidation of liquid steel, and formation of inclusions. Most of the previous research related to slag eye were carried out explicitly for ladles. In the present work, a large number of experiments were performed to measure the slag eye area in full scale and one-third scale water models of an inert gas-shrouded tundish under various operating conditions. Based on the polynomial regression of experimental data, and the method of dimensional analysis, correlations for diameter of gas bubbles and plume velocity were developed. Subsequently, these results were used to obtain correlations for the slag eye area, and critical gas flow rate in an inert gas-shrouded tundish in terms of the operational parameters viz., gas flow rate, thickness of the slag and melt baths, along with the physical properties of the liquids viz., kinematic viscosity and density. It was observed that the dimensionless slag eye area can be expressed in terms of dimensionless numbers such as the density ratio, Froude number, and Reynolds number.

  8. Continuous crafting of uniform colloidal nanocrystals using an inert-gas-driven microflow reactor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tang, Hailong; He, Yanjie; Li, Bo; Jung, Jaehan; Zhang, Chuchu; Liu, Xiaobo; Lin, Zhiqun

    2015-05-01

    Recent research has witnessed rapid advances in synthesis of nanocrystals, which has led to the development of a large variety of approaches for producing nanocrystals with controlled dimensions. However, most of these techniques lack the high-throughput production. Herein, we report on a viable and robust strategy based on an inert-gas-driven microflow reactor for continuous crafting of high-quality colloidal nanocrystals. With the judicious introduction of the inert-gas driven capability, the microflow reactor provides an attractive platform for continuous production of colloidal nanocrystals in large quantities, including easily-oxidized nanocrystals. The as-synthesized nanocrystals possessed a uniform size and shape. Intriguingly, the size of nanocrystals can be effectively tailored by varying the flow rate and the precursor concentration. We envision that the microflow reactor strategy is general and offers easy access to a wide range of scalable nanocrystals for potential applications in sensors, optics, optoelectronics, solar energy conversion, batteries, photocatalysis, and electronic devices.Recent research has witnessed rapid advances in synthesis of nanocrystals, which has led to the development of a large variety of approaches for producing nanocrystals with controlled dimensions. However, most of these techniques lack the high-throughput production. Herein, we report on a viable and robust strategy based on an inert-gas-driven microflow reactor for continuous crafting of high-quality colloidal nanocrystals. With the judicious introduction of the inert-gas driven capability, the microflow reactor provides an attractive platform for continuous production of colloidal nanocrystals in large quantities, including easily-oxidized nanocrystals. The as-synthesized nanocrystals possessed a uniform size and shape. Intriguingly, the size of nanocrystals can be effectively tailored by varying the flow rate and the precursor concentration. We envision that the microflow reactor strategy is general and offers easy access to a wide range of scalable nanocrystals for potential applications in sensors, optics, optoelectronics, solar energy conversion, batteries, photocatalysis, and electronic devices. Electronic supplementary information (ESI) available: The schematic illustration of five functional sections and a digital image of the inert-gas-driven continuous microflow reactor are shown in Fig. S1. The digital images and PL spectrum of the Cu2S nanocrystals are shown in Fig. S2 and S3, respectively. TEM images of 2-D and 3-D self-assemblies of Cu2S nanocrystals are shown in Fig. S4. The experimental procedures for synthesis of Ag nanocrystals are provided, together with a TEM image, size distribution histogram and UV-vis spectrum (Fig. S5). See DOI: 10.1039/c5nr01492a

  9. TIG WELDER LOCATED IN THE CLEAN ROOM OF THE TECHNICAL SERVICES BUILDING TSB - THE INERT GAS WELDING

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1963-01-01

    TIG WELDER LOCATED IN THE CLEAN ROOM OF THE TECHNICAL SERVICES BUILDING TSB - THE INERT GAS WELDING FACILITY IS USED FOR WELDING REFRACTORY METALS IN CONNECTION WITH THE COLUMBIUM LIQUID SODIUM LOOP PROJECT

  10. Multiple inert gas elimination technique by micropore membrane inlet mass spectrometry--a comparison with reference gas chromatography.

    PubMed

    Kretzschmar, Moritz; Schilling, Thomas; Vogt, Andreas; Rothen, Hans Ulrich; Borges, João Batista; Hachenberg, Thomas; Larsson, Anders; Baumgardner, James E; Hedenstierna, Göran

    2013-10-15

    The mismatching of alveolar ventilation and perfusion (VA/Q) is the major determinant of impaired gas exchange. The gold standard for measuring VA/Q distributions is based on measurements of the elimination and retention of infused inert gases. Conventional multiple inert gas elimination technique (MIGET) uses gas chromatography (GC) to measure the inert gas partial pressures, which requires tonometry of blood samples with a gas that can then be injected into the chromatograph. The method is laborious and requires meticulous care. A new technique based on micropore membrane inlet mass spectrometry (MMIMS) facilitates the handling of blood and gas samples and provides nearly real-time analysis. In this study we compared MIGET by GC and MMIMS in 10 piglets: 1) 3 with healthy lungs; 2) 4 with oleic acid injury; and 3) 3 with isolated left lower lobe ventilation. The different protocols ensured a large range of normal and abnormal VA/Q distributions. Eight inert gases (SF6, krypton, ethane, cyclopropane, desflurane, enflurane, diethyl ether, and acetone) were infused; six of these gases were measured with MMIMS, and six were measured with GC. We found close agreement of retention and excretion of the gases and the constructed VA/Q distributions between GC and MMIMS, and predicted PaO2 from both methods compared well with measured PaO2. VA/Q by GC produced more widely dispersed modes than MMIMS, explained in part by differences in the algorithms used to calculate VA/Q distributions. In conclusion, MMIMS enables faster measurement of VA/Q, is less demanding than GC, and produces comparable results. PMID:23869066

  11. Modelling the transient behaviour of pulsed current tungsten-inert-gas weldpools

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, C. S.; Zheng, W.; Wu, L.

    1999-01-01

    A three-dimensional model is established to simulate the pulsed current tungsten-inert-gas (TIG) welding process. The goal is to analyse the cyclic variation of fluid flow and heat transfer in weldpools under periodic arc heat input. To this end, an algorithm, which is capable of handling the transience, nonlinearity, multiphase and strong coupling encountered in this work, is developed. The numerical simulations demonstrate the transient behaviour of weldpools under pulsed current. Experimental data are compared with numerical results to show the effectiveness of the developed model.

  12. Structure and magnetic properties of Co-W clusters produced by inert gas condensation

    SciTech Connect

    Golkar, Farhad; Kramer, M. J.; Zhang, Y.; McCallum, R. W.; Skomski, R.; Sellmyer, D. J.; Shield, J. E.

    2012-04-01

    In this article, inert-gas condensation was used to synthesize Co-W clusters. The formation, structure, and magnetic properties of the clusters were investigated. Sub-10-nm clusters were obtained, and the structures and average sizes were strongly dependent on sputtering power. At low sputtering powers, the clusters were predominantly amorphous, while, at high sputtering power, the clusters were crystalline. X ray diffraction and transmission electron microscopy revealed clusters with hcp structure at high sputtering power. The magnetic properties were dependent on the sputtering power and temperature, with the highest coercivity of 810 Oe at 10 K for high sputtering power.

  13. Three-dimensional absorption process in aqua-ammonia absorption refrigerators using helium as inert gas

    SciTech Connect

    Kouremenos, D.A.; Stegou-Sagia, A.; Antonopoulos, K.A.

    1996-12-31

    In order to eliminate the danger of a possible explosion in neutral gas NH{sub 3}/H{sub 2}O absorption refrigerators using hydrogen as the inert gas, helium can be used as a substitute. A numerical procedure is presented for the calculation of the absorption process. In previous studies the problem was simplified by considering the circular absorption tube in a vertical position with the liquid NH{sub 3}/H{sub 2}O stream being of annular cross section, thus resulting in a two-dimensional situation. In the present study the three-dimensional heat and mass transfer process is considered, in which the absorption tube is nearly horizontal and the liquid NH{sub 3}/H{sub 2}O stream has a circular meniscus cross-section. The developed procedure which is based on a finite-difference solution of the three-dimensional momentum, energy and mass transport differential equations, may be used in the design of absorbers for inert gas absorption refrigeration units. It is concluded that helium behaves similarly to hydrogen and therefore it can replace it, in order to eliminate the danger of an explosion.

  14. Contribution of multiple inert gas elimination technique to pulmonary medicine. 1. Principles and information content of the multiple inert gas elimination technique.

    PubMed Central

    Roca, J.; Wagner, P. D.

    1994-01-01

    This introductory review summarises four different aspects of the multiple inert gas elimination technique (MIGET). Firstly, the historical background that facilitated, in the mid 1970s, the development of the MIGET as a tool to obtain more information about the entire spectrum of VA/Q distribution in the lung by measuring the exchange of six gases of different solubility in trace concentrations. Its principle is based on the observation that the retention (or excretion) of any gas is dependent on the solubility (lambda) of that gas and the VA/Q distribution. A second major aspect is the analysis of the information content and limitations of the technique. During the last 15 years a substantial amount of clinical research using the MIGET has been generated by several groups around the world. The technique has been shown to be adequate in understanding the mechanisms of hypoxaemia in different forms of pulmonary disease and the effects of therapeutic interventions, but also in separately determining the quantitative role of each extrapulmonary factor on systemic arterial PO2 when they change between two conditions of MIGET measurement. This information will be extensively reviewed in the forthcoming articles of this series. Next, the different modalities of the MIGET, practical considerations involved in the measurements and the guidelines for quality control have been indicated. Finally, a section has been devoted to the analysis of available data in healthy subjects under different conditions. The lack of systematic information on the VA/Q distributions of older healthy subjects is emphasised, since it will be required to fully understand the changes brought about by diseases that affect the older population. PMID:8091330

  15. Using fumarolic inert gas composition to investigate magma dynamics at Campi Flegrei (Italy)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chiodini, G.; Caliro, S.; Paonita, A.; Cardellini, C.

    2013-12-01

    Since 2000 the Campi Flegrei caldera sited in Neapolitan area (Italy), has showed signs of reactivation, marked by ground uplift, seismic activity, compositional variations of fumarolic effluents from La Solfatara, an increase of the fumarolic activity as well as of soil CO2 fluxes. Comparing long time series of geochemical signals with ground deformation and seismicity, we show that these changes are at least partially caused by repeated injections of magmatic fluid into the hydrothermal system. The frequency of these degassing episodes has increased in the last years, causing pulsed uplift episodes and swarms of low magnitude earthquakes. We focus here in the inert gas species (CO2-He-Ar-N2) of Solfatara fumaroles which displayed in the time spectacular and persistent variation trends affecting all the monitored vents. The observed variations, which include a continuous decrease of both N2/He and N2/CO2 ratios since 1985, paralleled by an increase of He/CO2, can not be explained neither with changes in processes of boiling-condensation in the local hydrothermal system nor with changes in the mixing proportions between a magmatic vapour and hydrothermal fluids. Consequently we investigated the possibility that the trends of inert gas species are governed by changes in the conditions controlling magma degassing at depth. We applied a magma degassing model, with the most recent updates for inert gas solubilities, after to have included petrologic constraints from the ranges of melt composition and reservoir pressure at Campi Flegrei. The model simulations for mafic melts (trachybasalt and shoshonite) show a surprising agreement with the measured data. Both decompressive degassing of an ascending magma and mixing between magmatic fluids exsolved at various levels along the ascent path can explain the long-time geochemical changes. Our work highlights that, in caldera systems where the presence of hydrothermal aquifers commonly masks the magmatic signature of reactive volatiles, inert gases are the preferred species to achieve information on the dynamics and structure of the magma plumbing systems.

  16. Continuous crafting of uniform colloidal nanocrystals using an inert-gas-driven microflow reactor.

    PubMed

    Tang, Hailong; He, Yanjie; Li, Bo; Jung, Jaehan; Zhang, Chuchu; Liu, Xiaobo; Lin, Zhiqun

    2015-06-01

    Recent research has witnessed rapid advances in synthesis of nanocrystals, which has led to the development of a large variety of approaches for producing nanocrystals with controlled dimensions. However, most of these techniques lack the high-throughput production. Herein, we report on a viable and robust strategy based on an inert-gas-driven microflow reactor for continuous crafting of high-quality colloidal nanocrystals. With the judicious introduction of the inert-gas driven capability, the microflow reactor provides an attractive platform for continuous production of colloidal nanocrystals in large quantities, including easily-oxidized nanocrystals. The as-synthesized nanocrystals possessed a uniform size and shape. Intriguingly, the size of nanocrystals can be effectively tailored by varying the flow rate and the precursor concentration. We envision that the microflow reactor strategy is general and offers easy access to a wide range of scalable nanocrystals for potential applications in sensors, optics, optoelectronics, solar energy conversion, batteries, photocatalysis, and electronic devices. PMID:25958783

  17. Experimental observations of effects of inert gas on cavity formation during irradiation

    SciTech Connect

    Farrell, K.

    1980-04-01

    Cavity (void) formation and swelling in non-fissile materials during neutron irradiation and charged particle bombardments are reviewed. Helium is the most important inert gas and is primarily active as a cavity nucleant. It also enhances formation of dislocation structure. Preimplantation of helium overstimulates cavity nucleation and gives a different temperature response of swelling than when helium is coimplanted during the damage process. Helium affects, and is affected by, radiation-induced phase instability. Many of these effects are explainable in terms of cavity nucleation on submicroscopic critical size gas bubbles, and on the influence of the neutral sink strength of such bubbles. Titanium and zirconium resist cavity formation when vacancy loops are present.

  18. Measuring Diffusivity in Supercooled Liquid Nanoscale Films using Inert Gas Permeation: I. Kinetic Model and Scaling Methods

    SciTech Connect

    Smith, R. Scott; Matthiesen, Jesper; Kay, Bruce D.

    2010-11-07

    We describe in detail a diffusion model used to simulate inert gas transport through supercooled liquid overlayers. In recent work, the transport of the inert gas has been shown to be an effective probe of the diffusivity of supercooled liquid methanol in the experimentally challenging regime near the glass transition temperature. The model simulations accurately and quantitatively describe the inert gas permeation desorption spectra. The simulation results are used to validate universal scaling relationships between the diffusivity, overlayer thickness, and the temperature ramp rate for isothermal and temperature programmed desorption. From these scaling relationships we derive simple equations from which the diffusivity can be obtained using the peak desorption time or temperature for an isothermal or set of TPD experiments respectively without numerical simulation. The results presented here demonstrate that the permeation of gases through amorphous overlayers has the potential to be a powerful technique to obtain diffusivity data in deeply supercooled liquids.

  19. Comparison of inert-gas-fusion and modified Kjeldahl techniques for determination of nitrogen in niobium alloys

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Merkle, E. J.; Graab, J. W.; Davis, W. F.

    1974-01-01

    This report compares results obtained for the determination of nitrogen in a selected group of niobium-base alloys by the inert-gas-fusion and the Kjeldahl procedures. In the inert-gas-fusion procedure the sample is heated to approximately 2700 C in a helium atmosphere in a single-use graphite crucible. A platinum flux is used to facilitate melting of the sample. The Kjeldahl method consisted of a rapid decomposition with a mixture of hydrofluoric acid, phosphoric acid, and potassium chromate; distillation in the presence of sodium hydroxide; and highly sensitive spectrophotometry with nitroprusside-catalyzed indophenol. In the 30- to 80-ppm range, the relative standard deviation was 5 to 7 percent for the inert-gas-fusion procedure and 2 to 8 percent for the Kjeldahl procedure. The agreement of the nitrogen results obtained by the two techniques is considered satisfactory.

  20. Note: development of fast heating inert gas annealing apparatus operated at atmospheric pressure.

    PubMed

    Das, S C; Majumdar, A; Shripathi, T; Hippler, R

    2012-04-01

    Here, we report the development of a simple, small, fast heating, and portable, homemade, inert gas (Ar) atmospheric annealing setup. Instead of using a conventional heating element, a commercial soldering rod having an encapsulated fast heating heater is used here. The sample holder is made of a block of stainless steel. It takes 200 s to reach 700 °C, and 10 min to cool down. The probability of oxidation or surface contamination has been examined by means of x ray photoelectron spectroscopy of virgin Cu sample after annealing at 600 °C. In addition, we compare the annealing of a hydrogenated carbon nitride film (HCN(x)) in both a conventional vacuum and our newly developed ambient Ar atmosphere setup. PMID:22559595

  1. Characterization of Pb24Te76 quantum dot thin film synthesized by inert gas condensation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mahdy, Manal A.; Mahdy, Iman A.; El Zawawi, I. K.

    2015-01-01

    Air-stable and thermal-stable lead telluride quantum dot was successfully prepared on glass substrate by inert gas condensation (IGC) method. Argon (Ar) is the inert gas used during deposition process with a constant flow rate of 3 × 10-3 Torr. The effect of heat-treatment process at different times was studies for structure, optical and electrical properties for nanocrystalline thin films. The structures of the as deposited and heat-treated films were investigated using grazing incident in-plane X-ray diffraction (GIIXD). The GIIXD pattern showed nanostructure face centered cubic structure of PbTe thin films. The energy dispersive X-ray analysis (EDX) of as deposited PbTe thin film was carried out and showed that the atomic ratio of Pb/Te was 24/76. The particle size of the as deposited PbTe film and after stored it in an unhumid atmosphere are 6.8 ± 0.3 nm and 7.2 ± 0.3 nm respectively as estimated form TEM image (i.e. in the same level of particle size). However, the particle size was changed to be 11.8 ± 0.3 nm after heat-treated for 5 h at 473 K. These particle size values of PbTe thin film are smaller than its Bohr radius. The estimated value of optical band gap Eg decreased from 1.71 eV for the as deposited film to 1.62 eV for film heat-treated (5 h at 473 K). The dc electrical conductivity is increased with raising temperature in the range (303-473 K) for all thin films under investigation. The deduced activation energy decreased from 0.222 eV for as deposited sample to 0.125 eV after heat-treated at 473 K for 5 h.

  2. Characterization of Pb₂₄Te₇₆ quantum dot thin film synthesized by inert gas condensation.

    PubMed

    Mahdy, Manal A; Mahdy, Iman A; El Zawawi, I K

    2015-01-01

    Air-stable and thermal-stable lead telluride quantum dot was successfully prepared on glass substrate by inert gas condensation (IGC) method. Argon (Ar) is the inert gas used during deposition process with a constant flow rate of 3 × 10(-3)Torr. The effect of heat-treatment process at different times was studies for structure, optical and electrical properties for nanocrystalline thin films. The structures of the as deposited and heat-treated films were investigated using grazing incident in-plane X-ray diffraction (GIIXD). The GIIXD pattern showed nanostructure face centered cubic structure of PbTe thin films. The energy dispersive X-ray analysis (EDX) of as deposited PbTe thin film was carried out and showed that the atomic ratio of Pb/Te was 24/76. The particle size of the as deposited PbTe film and after stored it in an unhumid atmosphere are 6.8 ± 0.3 nm and 7.2 ± 0.3 nm respectively as estimated form TEM image (i.e. in the same level of particle size). However, the particle size was changed to be 11.8 ± 0.3 nm after heat-treated for 5h at 473K. These particle size values of PbTe thin film are smaller than its Bohr radius. The estimated value of optical band gap Eg decreased from 1.71 eV for the as deposited film to 1.62 eV for film heat-treated (5 h at 473K). The dc electrical conductivity is increased with raising temperature in the range (303-473K) for all thin films under investigation. The deduced activation energy decreased from 0.222 eV for as deposited sample to 0.125 eV after heat-treated at 473K for 5 h. PMID:25022502

  3. Electron temperature and density measurement of tungsten inert gas arcs with Ar-He shielding gas mixture

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kühn-Kauffeldt, M.; Marques, J.-L.; Forster, G.; Schein, J.

    2013-10-01

    The diagnostics of atmospheric welding plasma is a well-established technology. In most cases the measurements are limited to processes using pure shielding gas. However in many applications shielding gas is a mixture of various components including metal vapor in gas metal arc welding (GMAW). Shielding gas mixtures are intentionally used for tungsten inert gas (TIG) welding in order to improve the welding performance. For example adding Helium to Argon shielding gas allows the weld geometry and porosity to be influenced. Yet thermal plasmas produced with gas mixtures or metal vapor still require further experimental investigation. In this work coherent Thomson scattering is used to measure electron temperature and density in these plasmas, since this technique allows independent measurements of electron and ion temperature. Here thermal plasmas generated by a TIG process with 50% Argon and 50% Helium shielding gas mixture have been investigated. Electron temperature and density measured by coherent Thomson scattering have been compared to the results of spectroscopic measurements of the plasma density using Stark broadening of the 696.5 nm Argon spectral line. Further investigations of MIG processes using Thomson scattering technique are planned.

  4. Monte Carlo Simulation of Wave Damping in a Dilute Gas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Clary, Ryan; Spencer, Ross

    2003-10-01

    A computer simulation has been written that simulates the evolution of a perturbed dilute gas using the Direct-Simulation Monte Carlo method, with the ultimate goal of adding collisions to a simulation of ultra-cold plasmas. As a test, it has been used to study fluid dynamic affects in one dimension using a small velocity perturbation so that comparison with standard gas-dynamic theory is possible. This comparison has been used to investigate the limitations on certain simulation parameters such as cell size, size of each time step, number of simulation particles, and mean-free-path. The simulation and the theory agree well when the mean-free path is a small fraction of the sound wavelength, but for long mean free paths the simulation and the theory diverge. As an illustration, the famous ``bell in a bell jar'' demonstration will be examined to see if wave damping might play a role.

  5. Controlling the Neutron Yield from a Small Dense Plasma Focus using Deuterium-Inert Gas Mixtures

    SciTech Connect

    Bures, B. L.; Krishnan, M.; Eshaq, Y.

    2009-01-21

    The dense plasma focus (DPF) is a well known source of neutrons when operating with deuterium. The DPF is demonstrated to scale from 10{sup 4} n/pulse at 40 kA to >10{sup 12} n/pulse at 2 MA by non-linear current scaling as described in [1], which is itself based on the simple yet elegant model developed by Lee [2]. In addition to the peak current, the gas pressure controls the neutron yield. Recent published results suggest that mixing 1-5% mass fractions of Krypton increase the neutron yield per pulse by more than 10x. In this paper we present results obtained by mixing deuterium with Helium, Neon and Argon in a 500 J dense plasma focus operating at 140 kA with a 600 ns rise time. The mass density was held constant in these experiments at the optimum (pure) deuterium mass density for producing neutrons. A typical neutron yield for a pure deuterium gas charge is 2x10{sup 6}{+-}15% n/pulse. Neutron yields in excess of 10{sup 7}{+-}10% n/pulse were observed with low mass fractions of inert gas. Time integrated optical images of the pinch, soft x-ray measurements and optical emission spectroscopy where used to examine the pinch in addition to the neutron yield monitor and the fast scintillation detector. Work supported by Domestic Nuclear Detection Office under contract HSHQDC-08-C-00020.

  6. Inert gas enhanced laser-assisted purification of platinum electron-beam-induced deposits

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Stanford, Michael G.; Lewis, Brett B.; Noh, Joo Hyon; Fowlkes, Jason Davidson; Rack, Philip D.

    2015-06-30

    Electron-beam-induced deposition patterns, with composition of PtC5, were purified using a pulsed laser-induced purification reaction to erode the amorphous carbon matrix and form pure platinum deposits. Enhanced mobility of residual H2O molecules via a localized injection of inert Ar–H2 (4%) is attributed to be the reactive gas species for purification of the deposits. Surface purification of deposits was realized at laser exposure times as low as 0.1 s. The ex situ purification reaction in the deposit interior was shown to be rate-limited by reactive gas diffusion into the deposit, and deposit contraction associated with the purification process caused some lossmore » of shape retention. To circumvent the intrinsic flaws of the ex situ anneal process, in situ deposition and purification techniques were explored that resemble a direct write atomic layer deposition (ALD) process. First, we explored a laser-assisted electron-beam-induced deposition (LAEBID) process augmented with reactive gas that resulted in a 75% carbon reduction compared to standard EBID. Lastly, a sequential deposition plus purification process was also developed and resulted in deposition of pure platinum deposits with high fidelity and shape retention.« less

  7. Inert gas enhanced laser-assisted purification of platinum electron-beam-induced deposits

    SciTech Connect

    Stanford, Michael G.; Lewis, Brett B.; Noh, Joo Hyon; Fowlkes, Jason Davidson; Rack, Philip D.

    2015-06-30

    Electron-beam-induced deposition patterns, with composition of PtC5, were purified using a pulsed laser-induced purification reaction to erode the amorphous carbon matrix and form pure platinum deposits. Enhanced mobility of residual H2O molecules via a localized injection of inert Ar–H2 (4%) is attributed to be the reactive gas species for purification of the deposits. Surface purification of deposits was realized at laser exposure times as low as 0.1 s. The ex situ purification reaction in the deposit interior was shown to be rate-limited by reactive gas diffusion into the deposit, and deposit contraction associated with the purification process caused some loss of shape retention. To circumvent the intrinsic flaws of the ex situ anneal process, in situ deposition and purification techniques were explored that resemble a direct write atomic layer deposition (ALD) process. First, we explored a laser-assisted electron-beam-induced deposition (LAEBID) process augmented with reactive gas that resulted in a 75% carbon reduction compared to standard EBID. Lastly, a sequential deposition plus purification process was also developed and resulted in deposition of pure platinum deposits with high fidelity and shape retention.

  8. Inert gas electric heater for elevated temperature testing of small propulsion components

    SciTech Connect

    Whitehead, J.C.; Lanning, R.K.; Evans, M.C.; Barabas, N.J.

    1992-06-25

    An electric heater for inert gas has been developed to enable safe, nontoxic, indoor, low cost testing of miniature propulsion components which operate on warm gas. High pressure helium regulated to 7 MPa (1000 psi) is passed through in 8-kW electric heating element to raise its temperature to 700{degree}C (1300 {degree}F) at mass flow rates up to 2 grams/sec. The pressure and temperature are independently adjustable to lower values, and the temperature controller rapidly varies the electric power in response to changes in flow rate, so that pulsed-flow as well as be tested. The heating element is a 3.2 mm (1/8 inch) diameter nickel alloy tube, which carries the helium internally and up to 80 amperes of electric current in its wall. A transparent polycarbonate safety shield ensures personnel safety while permitting direct visual and auditory observations. Digital displays of time, pressure, and temperatures are adjacent to the test hardware, to facillitate realtime interpretation of test results and video documentation. Equations for pressure drop, heat transfer, electrical resistance, stress, and thermal response time are presented to facillitate designing similar systems.

  9. Requirements for long-life operation of inert gas hollow cathodes: Preliminary report

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Verhey, Timothy R.; Macrae, Gregory S.

    1990-01-01

    An experimental investigation was initiated to establish conditioning procedures for reliable hollow cathode operation via the characterization of critical parameters in a representative cathode test facility. From vacuum pumpdown rates, it was found that approximately 1.5 hours were required to achieve pressure levels within 5 percent of the lowest attainable pressure for this facility, depending on the purge conditions. The facility atmosphere was determined by a residual gas analyzer to be composed of primarily air and water vapor. The effects of vacuum pumping and inert gas purging were evaluated. A maximum effective leakage rate of 2.0 x 10(exp -3)sccm was observed and its probable causes were examined. An extended test of a 0.64 cm diameter Mo-Re hollow cathode was successfully completed. This test ran for 504 hours at an emission current of 23.0 amperes and a xenon flow rate of 6.1 sccm. Discharge voltage rose continuously from 15 to 21 volts over the course of the test. The temperature of the cathode body during the test was relatively stable at 1160 C. Post-test examination revealed ion-bombardment texturing of the orifice plate to be the only detectable sign of wear on the hollow cathode.

  10. Requirements for long-life operation of inert gas hollow cathodes - Preliminary results

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Verhey, Timothy R.; Macrae, Gregory S.

    1990-01-01

    An experimental investigation was initiated to establish conditioning procedures for reliable hollow cathode operation via the characterization of critical parameters in a representative cathode test facility. From vacuum pumpdown rates, it was found that approximately 1.5 hours were required to achieve pressure levels within 5 percent of the lowest attainable pressure for this facility, depending on the purge conditions. The facility atmosphere was determined by a residual gas analyzer to be composed of primarily air and water vapor. The effects of vacuum pumping and inert gas purging were evaluated. A maximum effective leakage rate of 2.0 x 10 (exp -3) sccm was observed and its probable causes were examined. An extended test of a 0.64 cm diameter Mo-Re hollow cathode was successfully completed. This test ran for 504 hours at an emission current of 23.0 amperes and a xenon flow rate of 6.1 sccm. Discharge voltage rose continuously from 15 to 21 volts over the course of the test. The temperature of the cathode body during the test was relatively stable at 1160 C. Post-test examination revealed ion-bombardment texturing of the orifice plate to be the only detectable sign of wear on the hollow cathode.

  11. Bénard instabilities in a binary-liquid layer evaporating into an inert gas.

    PubMed

    Machrafi, H; Rednikov, A; Colinet, P; Dauby, P C

    2010-09-01

    A linear stability analysis is performed for a horizontal layer of a binary liquid of which solely the solute evaporates into an inert gas, the latter being assumed to be insoluble in the liquid. In particular, a water-ethanol system in contact with air is considered, with the evaporation of water being neglected (which can be justified for a certain humidity of the air). External constraints on the system are introduced by imposing fixed "ambient" mass fraction and temperature values at a certain effective distance above the free liquid-gas interface. The temperature is the same as at the bottom of the liquid layer, where, besides, a fixed mass fraction of the solute is presumed to be maintained. Proceeding from a (quasi-)stationary reference solution, neutral (monotonic) stability curves are calculated in terms of solutal/thermal Marangoni/Rayleigh numbers as functions of the wavenumber for different values of the ratio of the gas and liquid layer thicknesses. The results are also presented in terms of the critical values of the liquid layer thickness as a function of the thickness of the gas layer. The solutal and thermal Rayleigh and Marangoni effects are compared to one another. For a water-ethanol mixture of 10wt.% ethanol, it appears that the solutal Marangoni effect is by far the most important instability mechanism. Furthermore, its global action can be described within a Pearson-like model, with an appropriately defined Biot number depending on the wavenumber. On the other hand, it is also shown that, if taken into account, water evaporation has only minor quantitative consequences upon the results for this predominant, solutal Marangoni mechanism. PMID:20557893

  12. Axion cosmology, lattice QCD and the dilute instanton gas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Borsanyi, Sz.; Dierigl, M.; Fodor, Z.; Katz, S. D.; Mages, S. W.; Nogradi, D.; Redondo, J.; Ringwald, A.; Szabo, K. K.

    2016-01-01

    Axions are one of the most attractive dark matter candidates. The evolution of their number density in the early universe can be determined by calculating the topological susceptibility χ (T) of QCD as a function of the temperature. Lattice QCD provides an ab initio technique to carry out such a calculation. A full result needs two ingredients: physical quark masses and a controlled continuum extrapolation from non-vanishing to zero lattice spacings. We determine χ (T) in the quenched framework (infinitely large quark masses) and extrapolate its values to the continuum limit. The results are compared with the prediction of the dilute instanton gas approximation (DIGA). A nice agreement is found for the temperature dependence, whereas the overall normalization of the DIGA result still differs from the non-perturbative continuum extrapolated lattice results by a factor of order ten. We discuss the consequences of our findings for the prediction of the amount of axion dark matter.

  13. Semiconductor nanocrystallite formation using inert gas ambient pulsed laser ablation and its application to light-emitting devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yoshida, Takehito; Yamada, Yuka; Suzuki, Nobuyasu; Makino, Toshiharu; Orii, Takaaki; Onai, Seinosuke

    1999-07-01

    Pulsed laser ablation (PLA) in inert background gases can synthesize the nanoscaled silicon (Si), for studying its material properties as one of the quantum confinement effects. We report an optimized condition in Si nanocrystalline formation by the PLA in inert background gas, varying processing parameters: pulse energy and width, inert background gas pressure. The optimized process can prepare well-dispersed Si nanocrystallites without any droplets and debris. Furthermore, we investigate the influence of the processing parameters Si nanocrystallites without any droplets and debris. Furthermore, we investigate the influence of the processing parameters on transition from amorphous-like Si thin films to nanocrystallites. It was found that there is a processing window of the inert background gas pressure where the carrier confinement effects become apparent. Next, we have fabricated electroluminescent (EL), diodes with active layers of the Si nanocrystallites. The structure of the EL diodes was semitransparent platinum electrode/Si nanocrystallite layer/p-type Si/Pt electrode. We have observed visible spectra of not only green photoluminescence, but also red EL, at room temperature. Furthermore, we have found that the EL diodes showed strong nonlinear dependence of EL intensity on current density.

  14. Multiproperty empirical isotropic interatomic potentials for CH4–inert gas mixtures

    PubMed Central

    El-Kader, M.S.A.

    2012-01-01

    An approximate empirical isotropic interatomic potentials for CH4–inert gas mixtures are developed by simultaneously fitting the Exponential-Spline-Morse-Spline-van der Waals (ESMSV) potential form to viscosity, thermal conductivity, thermal diffusion factors, diffusion coefficient, interaction second pressure virial coefficient and scattering cross-section data. Quantum mechanical lineshapes of collision-induced absorption (CIA) at different temperatures for CH4–He and at T = 87 K for CH4–Ar are computed using theoretical values for overlap, octopole and hexadecapole mechanisms and interaction potential as input. Also, the quantum mechanical lineshapes of collision-induced light scattering (CILS) for the mixtures CH4–Ar and CH4–Xe at room temperature are calculated. The spectra of scattering consist essentially of an intense, purely translational component which includes scattering due to free pairs and bound dimers, and the other is due to the induced rotational scattering. These spectra have been interpreted by means of pair-polarizability terms, which arise from a long-range dipole-induced-dipole (DID) with small dispersion corrections and a short-range interaction mechanism involving higher-order dipole–quadrupole A and dipole–octopole E multipole polarizabilities. Good agreement between computed and experimental lineshapes of both absorption and scattering is obtained when the models of potential, interaction-induced dipole and polarizability components are used. PMID:25685458

  15. Effect of Inert Cover Gas on Performance of Radioisotope Stirling Space Power System

    SciTech Connect

    Carpenter, Robert; Kumar, V; Ore, C; Schock, Alfred

    2001-01-01

    This paper describes an updated Orbital design of a radioisotope Stirling power system and its predicted performance at the beginning and end of a six-year mission to the Jovian moon Europa. The design is based on General Purpose Heat Source (GPHS) modules identical to those previously developed and safety-qualified by the Department of Energy (DOE) which were successfully launched to Jupiter and Saturn by the Jet Propulsion Laboratory (JPL). In each generator, the heat produced by the decay of the Pu-238 isotope is converted to electric power by two free-piston Stirling engines and linear alternators developed by Stirling Technology Company (STC), and their rejected waste heat is transported to radiators by heat pipes. The principal difference between the proposed system design and previous Orbital designs (Or et al. 2000) is the thermal insulation between the heat source and the generator's housing. Previous designs had employed multifoil insulation, whereas the design described here employs Min-K-1800 thermal insulation. Such insulation had been successfully used by Teledyne and GE in earlier RTGs (Radioisotope Thermoelectric Generators). Although Min-K is a much poorer insulator than multifoil in vacuum and requires a substantially greater thickness for equivalent performance, it offers compensating advantages. Specifically it makes it possible to adjust the generator's BOM temperatures by filling its interior volume with inert cover gas. This makes it possible to meet the generator's BOM and EOM performance goals without exceeding its allowable temperature at the beginning of the mission.

  16. Thorium-232 exposure during tungsten inert gas arc welding and electrode sharpening.

    PubMed

    Saito, Hiroyuki; Hisanaga, Naomi; Okada, Yukiko; Hirai, Shoji; Arito, Heihachiro

    2003-07-01

    To assess the exposure of welders to thorium-232 (232Th) during tungsten inert gas arc (TIG) welding, airborne concentrations of 232Th in the breathing zone of the welder and background levels were measured. The radioactive concentrations were 1.11 x 10(-2) Bq/m3 during TIG welding of aluminum (TIG/Al), 1.78 x 10(-4) Bq/m3 during TIG welding of stainless steel (TIG/SS), and 1.93 x 10(-1) Bq/m3 during electrode sharpening, with 5.82 x 10(-5) Bq/m3 background concentration. Although the annual intake of 232Th estimated using these values did not exceed the annual limit intake (ALI, 1.6 x 10(2) Bq), we recommend reducing 232Th exposure by substituting thoriated electrodes with a thorium-free electrodes, setting up local ventilation systems, and by using respiratory protective equipment. It is also necessary to inform workers that thoriated tungsten electrodes contain radioactive material. PMID:12916759

  17. MOX and MOX with 237Np/241Am Inert Fission Gas Generation Comparison in ATR

    SciTech Connect

    G. S. Chang; M. Robel; W. J. Carmack; D. J. Utterbeck

    2006-06-01

    The treatment of spent fuel produced in nuclear power generation is one of the most important issues to both the nuclear community and the general public. One of the viable options to long-term geological disposal of spent fuel is to extract plutonium, minor actinides (MA), and potentially long-lived fission products from the spent fuel and transmute them into short-lived or stable radionuclides in currently operating light-water reactors (LWR), thus reducing the radiological toxicity of the nuclear waste stream. One of the challenges is to demonstrate that the burnup-dependent characteristic differences between Reactor-Grade Mixed Oxide (RG-MOX) fuel and RG-MOX fuel with MA Np-237 and Am 241 are minimal, particularly, the inert gas generation rate, such that the commercial MOX fuel experience base is applicable. Under the Advanced Fuel Cycle Initiative (AFCI), developmental fuel specimens in experimental assembly LWR-2 are being tested in the northwest (NW) I-24 irradiation position of the Advanced Test Reactor (ATR). The experiment uses MOX fuel test hardware, and contains capsules with MOX fuel consisting of mixed oxide manufactured fuel using reactor grade plutonium (RG-Pu) and mixed oxide manufactured fuel using RG-Pu with added Np/Am. This study will compare the fuel neutronics depletion characteristics of Case-1 RG-MOX and Case-2 RG-MOX with Np/Am.

  18. Formation Mechanism of Fe Nanocubes by Magnetron Sputtering Inert Gas Condensation.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Junlei; Baibuz, Ekaterina; Vernieres, Jerome; Grammatikopoulos, Panagiotis; Jansson, Ville; Nagel, Morten; Steinhauer, Stephan; Sowwan, Mukhles; Kuronen, Antti; Nordlund, Kai; Djurabekova, Flyura

    2016-04-26

    In this work, we study the formation mechanisms of iron nanoparticles (Fe NPs) grown by magnetron sputtering inert gas condensation and emphasize the decisive kinetics effects that give rise specifically to cubic morphologies. Our experimental results, as well as computer simulations carried out by two different methods, indicate that the cubic shape of Fe NPs is explained by basic differences in the kinetic growth modes of {100} and {110} surfaces rather than surface formation energetics. Both our experimental and theoretical investigations show that the final shape is defined by the combination of the condensation temperature and the rate of atomic deposition onto the growing nanocluster. We, thus, construct a comprehensive deposition rate-temperature diagram of Fe NP shapes and develop an analytical model that predicts the temporal evolution of these properties. Combining the shape diagram and the analytical model, morphological control of Fe NPs during formation is feasible; as such, our method proposes a roadmap for experimentalists to engineer NPs of desired shapes for targeted applications. PMID:26962973

  19. Tungsten inert gas (TIG) welding of Ni-rich NiTi plates: functional behavior

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oliveira, J. P.; Barbosa, D.; Braz Fernandes, F. M.; Miranda, R. M.

    2016-03-01

    It is often reported that, to successfully join NiTi shape memory alloys, fusion-based processes with reduced thermal affected regions (as in laser welding) are required. This paper describes an experimental study performed on the tungsten inert gas (TIG) welding of 1.5 mm thick plates of Ni-rich NiTi. The functional behavior of the joints was assessed. The superelasticity was analyzed by cycling tests at maximum imposed strains of 4, 8 and 12% and for a total of 600 cycles, without rupture. The superelastic plateau was observed, in the stress-strain curves, 30 MPa below that of the base material. Shape-memory effect was evidenced by bending tests with full recovery of the initial shape of the welded joints. In parallel, uniaxial tensile tests of the joints showed a tensile strength of 700 MPa and an elongation to rupture of 20%. The elongation is the highest reported for fusion-welding of NiTi, including laser welding. These results can be of great interest for the wide-spread inclusion of NiTi in complex shaped components requiring welding, since TIG is not an expensive process and is simple to operate and implement in industrial environments.

  20. Joining titanium materials with tungsten inert gas welding, laser welding, and infrared brazing.

    PubMed

    Wang, R R; Welsch, G E

    1995-11-01

    Titanium has a number of desirable properties for dental applications that include low density, excellent biocompatibility, and corrosion resistance. However, joining titanium is one of the practical problems with the use of titanium prostheses. Dissolved oxygen and hydrogen may cause severe embrittlement in titanium materials. Therefore the conventional dental soldering methods that use oxygen flame or air torch are not indicated for joining titanium materials. This study compared laser, tungsten inert gas, and infrared radiation heating methods for joining both pure titanium and Ti-6Al-4V alloy. Original rods that were not subjected to joining procedures were used as a control method. Mechanical tests and microstructure analysis were used to evaluate joined samples. Mechanical tests included Vickers microhardness and uniaxial tensile testing of the strength of the joints and percentage elongation. Two-way analysis of variance and Duncan's multiple range test were used to compare mean values of tensile strength and elongation for significant differences (p < or = 0.05). Tensile rupture occurred in the joint region of all specimens by cohesive failure. Ti-6Al-4V samples exhibited significantly greater tensile strength than pure titanium samples. Samples prepared by the three joining methods had markedly lower tensile elongation than the control titanium and Ti-6Al-4V rods. The changes in microstructure and microhardness were studied in the heat-affected and unaffected zones. Microhardness values increased in the heat-affected zone for all the specimens tested. PMID:8809260

  1. Tensile properties of vanadium-base alloys with a tungsten/inert-gas weld zone

    SciTech Connect

    Loomis, B.A.; Konicek, C.F.; Nowicki, L.J.; Smith, D.L.

    1992-12-31

    The tensile properties of V-(0-20)Ti and V-(O-15)Cr-5Ti alloys after butt-joining by tungsten/inert-gas (TIG) welding were determined from tests at 25{degrees}C. Tensile tests were conducted on both annealed and cold-worked materials with a TIG weld zone. The tensile properties of these materials were strongly influenced by the microstructure in the heat-affected zone adjacent to the weld zone and by the intrinsic fracture toughness of the alloys. TIG weld zones in these vanadium-base alloys had tensile properties comparable to those of recrystallized alloys without a weld zone. Least affected by the TIG welding were tensile properties of the V-5Ti and V-5Cr-5Ti alloys. Although the tensile properties of the V-5Ti and V- 5Cr-5Ti alloys with a TIG weld zone were acceptable for structural material, these properties would be improved by optimization of the welding parameters for minimum grain size in the heat-affected zone.

  2. Analysis of cracks in stainless steel TIG (tungsten inert gas) welds

    SciTech Connect

    Nakagaki, M.; Marschall, C.; Brust, F.

    1986-12-01

    This report contains the results of a combined experimental and analytical study of ductile crack growth in tungsten inert gas (TIG) weldments of austenitic stainless steel specimens. The substantially greater yield strength of the weld metal relative to the base metal causes more plastic deformation in the base metal adjacent to the weld than in the weld metal. Accordingly, the analytical studies focused on the stress-strain interaction between the crack tip and the weld/base-metal interface. Experimental work involved tests using compact (tension) specimens of three different sizes and pipe bend experiments. The compact specimens were machined from a TIG weldment in Type 304 stainless steel plate. The pipe specimens were also TIG welded using the same welding procedures. Elastic-plastic finite element methods were used to model the experiments. In addition to the J-integral, different crack-tip integral parameters such as ..delta..T/sub p/* and J were evaluated. Also, engineering J-estimation methods were employed to predict the load-carrying capacity of the welded pipe with a circumferential through-wall crack under bending.

  3. Formation of inorganic electride thin films via site-selective extrusion by energetic inert gas ions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miyakawa, Masashi; Toda, Yoshitake; Hayashi, Katsuro; Hirano, Masahiro; Kamiya, Toshio; Matsunami, Noriaki; Hosono, Hideo

    2005-01-01

    Inert gas ion implantation (acceleration voltage 300kV) into polycrystalline 12CaO.7Al2O3 (C12A7) films was investigated with fluences from 1×1016 to 1×1017cm-2 at elevated temperatures. Upon hot implantation at 600°C with fluences greater than 1×1017cm-2, the obtained films were colored and exhibited high electrical conductivity in the as-implanted state. The extrusion of O2- ions encaged in the crystallographic cages of C12A7 crystal, which leaves electrons in the cages at concentrations up to ˜1.4×1021cm-3, may cause the high electrical conductivity. On the other hand, when the fluence is less than 1×1017cm-2, the as-implanted films are optically transparent and electrically insulating. The conductivity is enhanced and the films become colored by irradiating with ultraviolet light due to the formation of F +-like centers. The electrons forming the F+-like centers are photo released from the encaged H- ions, which are presumably derived from the preexisting OH- groups. The induced electron concentration is proportional to the calculated displacements per atom, which suggests that nuclear collision effects of the implanted ions play a dominant role in forming the electron and H- ion in the films. The hot ion implantation technique provides a nonchemical process for preparing electronic conductive C12A7 films.

  4. Tensile and flexural strength of commercially pure titanium submitted to laser and tungsten inert gas welds.

    PubMed

    Atoui, Juliana Abdallah; Felipucci, Daniela Nair Borges; Pagnano, Valéria Oliveira; Orsi, Iara Augusta; Nóbilo, Mauro Antônio de Arruda; Bezzon, Osvaldo Luiz

    2013-01-01

    This study evaluated the tensile and flexural strength of tungsten inert gas (TIG) welds in specimens made of commercially pure titanium (CP Ti) compared with laser welds. Sixty cylindrical specimens (2 mm diameter x 55 mm thick) were randomly assigned to 3 groups for each test (n=10): no welding (control), TIG welding (10 V, 36 A, 8 s) and Nd:YAG laser welding (380 V, 8 ms). The specimens were radiographed and subjected to tensile and flexural strength tests at a crosshead speed of 1.0 mm/min using a load cell of 500 kgf applied on the welded interface or at the middle point of the non-welded specimens. Tensile strength data were analyzed by ANOVA and Tukey's test, and flexural strength data by the Kruskal-Wallis test (α=0.05). Non-welded specimens presented significantly higher tensile strength (control=605.84 ± 19.83) (p=0.015) and flexural strength (control=1908.75) (p=0.000) than TIG- and laser-welded ones. There were no significant differences (p>0.05) between the welding types for neither the tensile strength test (TIG=514.90 ± 37.76; laser=515.85 ± 62.07) nor the flexural strength test (TIG=1559.66; laser=1621.64). As far as tensile and flexural strengths are concerned, TIG was similar to laser and could be suitable to replace laser welding in implant-supported rehabilitations. PMID:24474361

  5. Inert Gas Buffered Milling and Particle Size Separation of μm-Scale Superconducting Precursor Powders

    SciTech Connect

    Seshadri, S.; McIntyre, P.

    2008-06-20

    The project developed an aerosol system for the met milling and particle size separation of the precursor powders used in fabrication of powder-in-tube superconductors. The work builds upon the results of a previous SBIR-funded development that proved the basic principles of the virtual impactor (VI) technology and its efficacy for the powders of interest. The new project extended that work in three respects: it integrated provisions for recirculating the aerosol flow using inert gas to avoid contamination from O2, CO2 and water in ambient air; a quad configuration of VI subassemblies to support kg/hr throughput; and it incorporated design features that eliminate error trajectories which would introduce trace contamination of larger particles into the separated flow. The project demonstrated the technical effectiveness of the process and established its economic feasibility by achieving kg/hr throughput within a cost profile that would be profitable within the range of competitive toll fees. The project is beneficial to the public through its potential to improve the performance of superconducting materials for research and for biomedicine. It also conveys potential benefits for powders used in high-performance ceramics (for example for engines for automobiles and for aircraft) and for high-performance electrical insulators for telecommunications circuitry.

  6. Electron-beam generation in a wide-aperture open gas discharge: A comparative study for different inert gases

    SciTech Connect

    Bokhan, P. A.; Zakrevsky, Dm. E.

    2010-08-30

    In the present study, electron-beam generation by open discharges was examined. The study was performed at gas pressures up to 20 Torr, and covered all inert gases. At voltages up to 8 kV, electron-beam currents up to 1600 A with current density {approx}130 A/cm{sup 2} and a beam generation efficiency in excess of 93% were obtained. The production of electrons from cold cathode was concluded to be of photoemissive nature, enabling the production of high-intensity electron beams in any noble gas or in a mixture of a noble gas with molecular gases irrespective of cathode material.

  7. Quantum hydrodynamics in dilute-gas Bose-Einstein condensates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Engels, Peter

    2012-10-01

    The peculiar dynamics of superfluids are a fascinating research topic. Since the first generation of a dilute gas Bose-Einstein condensate (BEC) in 1995, quantum degenerate atomic gases have taken the investigation of quantum hydrodynamics to a new level. The atomic physics toolbox has grown tremendously and now provides unique and powerful ways to explore nonlinear quantum systems. As an example, pioneering results have recently revealed that the counterflow between two superfluids can be used as a well controlled tool to access the rich dynamics of vector systems. New structures, such as beating dark-dark solitons which only exist in multicomponent systems and have never been observed before, can now be realized in the lab for the first time. Furthermore, the field of nonlinear quantum hydrodynamics is entering new regimes by exploiting Raman dressing as a tool to directly modify the dispersion relation. This leads to the generation of spin-orbit coupled BECs, artificial gauge fields, etc. that are currently receiving tremendous interest due to their parallels to complex condensed-matter systems. Studies of quantum hydrodynamics help to develop a profound understanding of nonlinear quantum dynamics, which is not only of fundamental interest but also of eminent importance for future technological applications, e.g. in telecommunication applications using optical solitons in fibers. This talk will showcase some ``classic'' hallmark results and highlight recent advances from the forefront of the field.

  8. Characterization of Tungsten Inert Gas (TIG) Welding Fume Generated by Apprentice Welders

    PubMed Central

    Graczyk, Halshka; Lewinski, Nastassja; Zhao, Jiayuan; Concha-Lozano, Nicolas; Riediker, Michael

    2016-01-01

    Tungsten inert gas welding (TIG) represents one of the most widely used metal joining processes in industry. Its propensity to generate a greater portion of welding fume particles at the nanoscale poses a potential occupational health hazard for workers. However, current literature lacks comprehensive characterization of TIG welding fume particles. Even less is known about welding fumes generated by welding apprentices with little experience in welding. We characterized TIG welding fume generated by apprentice welders (N = 20) in a ventilated exposure cabin. Exposure assessment was conducted for each apprentice welder at the breathing zone (BZ) inside of the welding helmet and at a near-field (NF) location, 60cm away from the welding task. We characterized particulate matter (PM4), particle number concentration and particle size, particle morphology, chemical composition, reactive oxygen species (ROS) production potential, and gaseous components. The mean particle number concentration at the BZ was 1.69E+06 particles cm−3, with a mean geometric mean diameter of 45nm. On average across all subjects, 92% of the particle counts at the BZ were below 100nm. We observed elevated concentrations of tungsten, which was most likely due to electrode consumption. Mean ROS production potential of TIG welding fumes at the BZ exceeded average concentrations previously found in traffic-polluted air. Furthermore, ROS production potential was significantly higher for apprentices that burned their metal during their welding task. We recommend that future exposure assessments take into consideration welding performance as a potential exposure modifier for apprentice welders or welders with minimal training. PMID:26464505

  9. Characterization of InSb Nanoparticles Synthesized Using Inert Gas Condensation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pandya, Sneha G.; Kordesch, Martin E.

    2015-06-01

    Nanoparticles (NPs) of indium antimonide (InSb) were synthesized using a vapor phase synthesis technique known as inert gas condensation (IGC). NPs were directly deposited, at room temperature and under high vacuum, on glass cover slides, TEM grids and (111) p-type silicon wafers. TEM studies showed a bimodal distribution in the size of the NPs with average particle size of 13.70 nm and 33.20 nm. The Raman spectra of InSb NPs exhibited a peak centered at 184.27 cm-1, which corresponds to the longitudinal optical (LO) modes of phonon vibration in InSb. A 1:1 In-to-Sb composition ratio was confirmed by energy dispersive X-ray (EDX). X-ray diffractometer (XRD) and high-resolution transmission electron microscopy (HRTEM) studies revealed polycrystalline behavior of these NPs with lattice spacing around 0.37 and 0.23 nm corresponding to the growth directions of (111) and (220), respectively. The average crystallite size of the NPs obtained using XRD peak broadening results and the Debye-Scherrer formula was 25.62 nm, and the value of strain in NPs was found to be 0.0015. NP's band gap obtained using spectroscopy and Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy was around 0.43-0.52 eV at 300 K, which is a blue shift of 0.26-0.35 eV. The effects of increased particle density resulting into aggregation of NPs are also discussed in this paper.

  10. A study of thorium exposure during tungsten inert gas welding in an airline engineering population.

    PubMed

    McElearney, N; Irvine, D

    1993-07-01

    To investigate the theoretic possibility of excessive exposure to thorium during the process of tungsten inert gas (TIG) welding using thoriated rods we carried out a cross-sectional study of TIG welders and an age- and skill-matched group. We measured the radiation doses from inhaled thorium that was retained in the body and investigated whether any differences in health or biologic indices could have been attributable to the welding and tip-grinding process. Sixty-four TIG welders, 11 non-TIG welders, and 61 control subjects from an airline engineering population participated. All of the subjects were interviewed for biographic, occupational history and morbidity details. All of the welders and eight control subjects carried out large-volume urine sampling to recover thorium 232 and thorium 228; this group also had chest radiographs. All of the subjects had a blood sample taken to estimate liver enzymes, and they provided small-volume urine samples for the estimation of retinol-binding protein and beta 2-microglobulin. We found no excess of morbidity among the TIG or non-TIG welding groups, and the levels of retinol-binding protein and beta 2-microglobulin were the same for both groups. There was a higher aspartate aminotransferase level in the control group. The internal radiation doses were estimated at less than an annual level of intake in all cases, and considerably less if the exposure (as was the case) was assumed to be chronic over many years. Some additional precautionary measures are suggested to reduce further any potential hazard from this process. PMID:8396174

  11. Characterization of Tungsten Inert Gas (TIG) Welding Fume Generated by Apprentice Welders.

    PubMed

    Graczyk, Halshka; Lewinski, Nastassja; Zhao, Jiayuan; Concha-Lozano, Nicolas; Riediker, Michael

    2016-03-01

    Tungsten inert gas welding (TIG) represents one of the most widely used metal joining processes in industry. Its propensity to generate a greater portion of welding fume particles at the nanoscale poses a potential occupational health hazard for workers. However, current literature lacks comprehensive characterization of TIG welding fume particles. Even less is known about welding fumes generated by welding apprentices with little experience in welding. We characterized TIG welding fume generated by apprentice welders (N = 20) in a ventilated exposure cabin. Exposure assessment was conducted for each apprentice welder at the breathing zone (BZ) inside of the welding helmet and at a near-field (NF) location, 60cm away from the welding task. We characterized particulate matter (PM4), particle number concentration and particle size, particle morphology, chemical composition, reactive oxygen species (ROS) production potential, and gaseous components. The mean particle number concentration at the BZ was 1.69E+06 particles cm(-3), with a mean geometric mean diameter of 45nm. On average across all subjects, 92% of the particle counts at the BZ were below 100nm. We observed elevated concentrations of tungsten, which was most likely due to electrode consumption. Mean ROS production potential of TIG welding fumes at the BZ exceeded average concentrations previously found in traffic-polluted air. Furthermore, ROS production potential was significantly higher for apprentices that burned their metal during their welding task. We recommend that future exposure assessments take into consideration welding performance as a potential exposure modifier for apprentice welders or welders with minimal training. PMID:26464505

  12. Characterization of InSb Nanoparticles Synthesized Using Inert Gas Condensation.

    PubMed

    Pandya, Sneha G; Kordesch, Martin E

    2015-12-01

    Nanoparticles (NPs) of indium antimonide (InSb) were synthesized using a vapor phase synthesis technique known as inert gas condensation (IGC). NPs were directly deposited, at room temperature and under high vacuum, on glass cover slides, TEM grids and (111) p-type silicon wafers. TEM studies showed a bimodal distribution in the size of the NPs with average particle size of 13.70 nm and 33.20 nm. The Raman spectra of InSb NPs exhibited a peak centered at 184.27 cm(-1), which corresponds to the longitudinal optical (LO) modes of phonon vibration in InSb. A 1:1 In-to-Sb composition ratio was confirmed by energy dispersive X-ray (EDX). X-ray diffractometer (XRD) and high-resolution transmission electron microscopy (HRTEM) studies revealed polycrystalline behavior of these NPs with lattice spacing around 0.37 and 0.23 nm corresponding to the growth directions of (111) and (220), respectively. The average crystallite size of the NPs obtained using XRD peak broadening results and the Debye-Scherrer formula was 25.62 nm, and the value of strain in NPs was found to be 0.0015. NP's band gap obtained using spectroscopy and Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy was around 0.43-0.52 eV at 300 K, which is a blue shift of 0.26-0.35 eV. The effects of increased particle density resulting into aggregation of NPs are also discussed in this paper. PMID:26061444

  13. Mobility of Supercooled liquid Toluene, Ethylbenzene, and Benzene near their Glass Transition Temperatures Investigated using Inert Gas Permeation

    SciTech Connect

    May, Robert A.; Smith, R. Scott; Kay, Bruce D.

    2013-11-21

    We investigate the mobility of supercooled liquid toluene, ethylbenzene, and benzene near their respective glass transition temperatures (Tg). The permeation rate of Ar, Kr, and Xe through the supercooled liquid created when initially amorphous overlayers heated above their glass transition temperature is used to determine the diffusivity. Amorphous benzene crystallizes at temperatures well below its Tg and as a result the inert gas underlayer remains trapped until the onset of benzene desorption. In contrast, for toluene and ethylbenzene the onset of inert gas permeation is observed at temperatues near Tg. The inert gas desorption peak temperature as a function of the heating rate and overlayer thickness is used to quantify the diffusivity of supercooled liquid toluene and ethylbenzene from 115 K to 135 K. In this temperature range, diffusivities are found to vary across five orders of magnitude (~10-14 to 10-9 cm2/s). These data are compared to viscosity measurements and used to determine the low temperature fractional Stokes-Einstein exponent. Efforts to determine the diffusivity of a mixture of benzene and ethylbenzene are detailed, and the effect of mixing these materials on benzene crystallization is explored using infrared spectroscopy.

  14. Size-controlled, magnetic, and core-shell nanoparticles synthesized by inert-gas condensation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koten, Mark A.

    Interest in nanoparticles (2 to 100 nm in diameter) and clusters of atoms (0.5 to 2 nm in diameter) has heightened over the past two and a half decades on both fundamental and functional levels. Nanoparticles and clusters of atoms are an exciting branch of materials science because they do not behave like normal bulk matter, nor do they act like molecules. They can have shockingly different physical, chemical, optical, or magnetic properties from the same material at a larger scale. In the case of nanoparticles, the surface-to-volume ratio can change fundamental properties like melting temperature, binding energy, or electron affinity. The definitions of markers used to distinguish between metallic, semiconducting, and insulating bulk condensed matter, such as the band gap and polarizability, can even be blurred or confused on the nanoscale. Similarly, clusters of atoms can form in structures that are only stable at finite sizes, and do not translate to bulk condensed matter. Thermodynamics of finite systems changes dramatically in nanovolumes such as wires, rods, cubes, and spheres, which can lead to complex core-shell and onion-like nanostructures. Consequently, these changes in properties and structure have led to many new possibilities in the field of materials engineering. Inert-gas condensation (IGC) is a well-established method of producing nanoparticles that condense from the gas phase. Its first use dates back to the early 1990s, and it has been used to fabricate nanoparticles both commercially and in research and development for applications in magnetism, biomedicine, and catalysts. In this dissertation, IGC was used to produce a wide variety of nanoparticles. First, control over the size distributions of Cu nanoparticles and how it relates to the plasma properties inside the nucleation chamber was investigated. Next, the formation of phase pure WFe2 nanoparticles revealed that this Laves phase is ferromagnetic instead of non-magnetic. Finally, core-shell nanoparticles were produced using three thermodynamically different systems, which showed that IGC could be used to produce a wide variety of core-shell particles. These three projects are presented in the context of size-dependent structural and magnetic properties.

  15. Compatibility of Space Nuclear Power Plant Materials in an Inert He/Xe Working Gas Containing Reactive Impurities

    SciTech Connect

    MM Hall

    2006-01-31

    A major materials selection and qualification issue identified in the Space Materials Plan is the potential for creating materials compatibility problems by combining dissimilar reactor core, Brayton Unit and other power conversion plant materials in a recirculating, inert He/Xe gas loop containing reactive impurity gases. Reported here are results of equilibrium thermochemical analyses that address the compatibility of space nuclear power plant (SNPP) materials in high temperature impure He gas environments. These studies provide early information regarding the constraints that exist for SNPP materials selection and provide guidance for establishing test objectives and environments for SNPP materials qualification testing.

  16. Temperature variability of the last 1000 years in Antarctica from inert gas isotopes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Orsi, Anais; Landais, Amaelle; Severinghaus, Jeffrey P.

    2015-04-01

    A large effort has been made to document the climate history of the last two thousand years, but there are still substantial gaps in the Southern Hemisphere, especially at high latitudes, where the changes in the climate are the largest. These gaps limit our understanding of the most fundamental driving mechanisms of the climate. In particular, the impact of solar minima on surface temperature is not fully understood. Here, we investigate the spatial structure of multi decadal climate variability in Antarctica, assess the significance of the Little Ice Age minimum documented elsewhere. We present a 1000 year temperature record at two sites in Antarctica: WAIS Divide (79°S, 112°W, 1766 m a.s.l), and Talos Dome (72°S, 159°E, 2315 m a.s.l), reconstructed from the combination of inert gas isotopes from the ice core and borehole temperature measurements. Borehole temperature provides an absolute estimate of long-term trends, while noble gases track decadal to centennial scale changes. This method provides a temperature reconstruction that is independent of water isotopes, and allows us to improve our understanding of water isotopes as a temperature proxy, and use them to track circulation changes. We find that there is a pronounced cooling trend over the last millennium at both sites, but it is stronger in East Antarctica (Talos Dome) than West Antarctica (WAIS-D). At WAIS Divide, we find that "Little Ice Age" cold period of 1400-1800 was 0.52°C colder than the last century, and that the recent warming trend (0.23°C/decade since 1960) has past analogs about every 200 years. At Talos Dome, the pronounced cooling trend over the whole record is not visible in the water isotope record, which suggests that there is a compensation of several sources of fractionation. Overall, both records are consistent with the idea that the solar minima and persistent volcanic activity of the Little Ice Age (1400-1850 A.D.) had a significant impact on the surface temperature in Antarctica. The feedbacks amplifying the forcing were likely stronger on the East Antarctic plateau than on the more marine-influenced West Antarctica.

  17. Onboard Inert Gas Generation System/Onboard Oxygen Gas Generation System (OBIGGS/OBOGS) Study. Part 2; Gas Separation Technology--State of the Art

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Reynolds, Thomas L.; Eklund, Thor I.; Haack, Gregory A.

    2001-01-01

    This purpose of this contract study task was to investigate the State of the Art in Gas Separation Technologies utilized for separating air into both nitrogen and oxygen gases for potential applications on commercial aircraft. The intended applications included: nitrogen gas for fuel tank inerting, cargo compartment fire protection, and emergency oxygen for passenger and crew use in the event of loss of cabin pressure. The approach was to investigate three principle methods of gas separation: Hollow Fiber Membrane (HFM), Ceramic Membrane (CM), and liquefaction: Total Atmospheric Liquefaction of Oxygen and Nitrogen (TALON). Additional data on the performance of molecular sieve pressure swing adsorption (PSA) systems was also collected and discussed. Performance comparisons of these technologies are contained in the body of the report.

  18. 46 CFR 154.1848 - Inerting.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... flammable vapors are purged from the tank by inert gas before air is admitted; and (4) When gas free cargo tanks are to be filled with a flammable cargo, air is purged from the tank by inert gas until the...

  19. 46 CFR 154.1848 - Inerting.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... flammable vapors are purged from the tank by inert gas before air is admitted; and (4) When gas free cargo tanks are to be filled with a flammable cargo, air is purged from the tank by inert gas until the...

  20. 46 CFR 154.1848 - Inerting.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... flammable vapors are purged from the tank by inert gas before air is admitted; and (4) When gas free cargo tanks are to be filled with a flammable cargo, air is purged from the tank by inert gas until the...

  1. 46 CFR 154.1848 - Inerting.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... flammable vapors are purged from the tank by inert gas before air is admitted; and (4) When gas free cargo tanks are to be filled with a flammable cargo, air is purged from the tank by inert gas until the...

  2. 46 CFR 154.1848 - Inerting.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... flammable vapors are purged from the tank by inert gas before air is admitted; and (4) When gas free cargo tanks are to be filled with a flammable cargo, air is purged from the tank by inert gas until the...

  3. Inert-Gas Condensed Co-W Nanoclusters: Formation, Structure and Magnetic Properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Golkar-Fard, Farhad Reza

    Rare-earth permanent magnets are used extensively in numerous technical applications, e.g. wind turbines, audio speakers, and hybrid/electric vehicles. The demand and production of rare-earth permanent magnets in the world has in the past decades increased significantly. However, the decrease in export of rare-earth elements from China in recent time has led to a renewed interest in developing rare-earth free permanent magnets. Elements such as Fe and Co have potential, due to their high magnetization, to be used as hosts in rare-earth free permanent magnets but a major challenge is to increase their magnetocrystalline anisotropy constant, K1, which largely drives the coercivity. Theoretical calculations indicate that dissolving the 5d transition metal W in Fe or Co increases the magnetocrystalline anisotropy. The challenge, though, is in creating a solid solution in hcp Co or bcc Fe, which under equilibrium conditions have negligible solubility. In this dissertation, the formation, structure, and magnetic properties of sub-10 nm Co-W clusters with W content ranging from 4 to 24 atomic percent were studied. Co-W alloy clusters with extended solubility of W in hcp Co were produced by inert gas condensation. The different processing conditions such as the cooling scheme and sputtering power were found to control the structural state of the as-deposited Co-W clusters. For clusters formed in the water-cooled formation chamber, the mean size and the fraction crystalline clusters increased with increasing power, while the fraction of crystalline clusters formed in the liquid nitrogen-cooled formation chamber was not as affected by the sputtering power. For the low W content clusters, the structural characterization revealed clusters predominantly single crystalline hcp Co(W) structure, a significant extension of W solubility when compared to the equilibrium solubility, but fcc Co(W) and Co3W structures were observed in very small and large clusters, respectively. At high W content, clusters with hcp Co(W), fcc Co(W) or Co3W structures were observed. The magnetic measurements at 10 K and 300 K revealed that the coercivity, saturation magnetization and magnetocrystalline anisotropy of the clusters formed in the water-cooled formation chamber were higher than for clusters formed in the liquid nitrogen-cooled formation chamber. The coercivity and magnetocrystalline anisotropy of the clusters increased as long as W was dissolved into the hcp Co structure. With increasing fraction of Co3W and fcc Co(W) clusters, as observed in the high-W content sample, the magnetic properties deteriorated significantly. The highest coercivity and magnetocrystalline anisotropy of 893 Oe and 3.9 x 106 ergs/cm3, respectively, was obtained at 10 K for the 5 at.% W clusters sputtered at 150 W in the water-cooled formation chamber.

  4. Method for extending the useful shelf-life of refrigerated red blood cells by flushing with inert gas

    DOEpatents

    Bitensky, Mark W.; Yoshida, Tatsuro

    1997-01-01

    Method using oxygen removal for extending the useful shelf-life of refrigerated red blood cells. A cost-effective, 4.degree. C. storage procedure that preserves red cell quality and prolongs post-transfusion in vivo survival is described. Preservation of adenosine triphosphate levels and reduction in hemolysis and in membrane vesicle production of red blood cells stored at 4.degree. C. for prolonged periods of time is achieved by removing oxygen therefrom at the time of storage; in particular, by flushing with an inert gas. Adenosine triphosphate levels of the stored red blood cells are boosted in some samples by addition of ammonium phosphate.

  5. Method for extending the useful shelf-life of refrigerated red blood cells by flushing with inert gas

    DOEpatents

    Bitensky, M.W.; Yoshida, Tatsuro

    1997-04-29

    A method is disclosed using oxygen removal for extending the useful shelf-life of refrigerated red blood cells. A cost-effective, 4 C storage procedure that preserves red cell quality and prolongs post-transfusion in vivo survival is described. Preservation of adenosine triphosphate levels and reduction in hemolysis and in membrane vesicle production of red blood cells stored at 4 C for prolonged periods of time is achieved by removing oxygen from the red blood cells at the time of storage; in particular, by flushing with an inert gas. Adenosine triphosphate levels of the stored red blood cells are boosted in some samples by addition of ammonium phosphate. 4 figs.

  6. Effects of oxygen cover gas and NaOH dilution on gas generation in tank 241-SY-101 waste

    SciTech Connect

    Person, J.C.

    1996-05-30

    Laboratory studies are reported of gas generation in heated waste from tank 241-SY-101. The rates of gas generation and the compositions of product gas were measured. Three types of tests are compared. The tests use: undiluted waste, waste diluted by a 54% addition of 2.5 M NaOH, and undiluted waste with a reactive cover gas of 30% Oxygen in He. The gas generation rate is reduced by dilution, increased by higher temperatures (which determines activation energies), and increased by reactions of Oxygen (these primarily produce H{sub 2}). Gases are generated as reduction products oxidation of organic carbon species by nitrite and oxygen.

  7. Surface Remelting Treated High Velocity arc Sprayed FeNiCrAlBRE Coating by Tungsten Inert Gas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tian, H. L.; Wei, S. C.; Chen, Y. X.; Tong, H.; Liu, Y.; Xu, B. S.

    This study aims at evaluating the effect of the TIG (Tungsten Inert Gas) remelting treatment of self-fluxing FeNiCrAlBRE alloy coatings, formed by means of high velocity arc spraying on steel surfaces. The treated and untreated samples were subjected to comparative structural examination using scanning electron microscopes. For quantitative investigation of porosity, a computer image analyser was used. Additionally, the wear resistance and wear volume loss of the worn tracks before and after the remelting process were contrastively evaluated in details. After the sprayed coatings were treated by TIG remelting in a proper conditions, the microstructure examination of the remelted coatings showed that a change of the microstructure from lamellar to cellular structure. Also, the results show that the remelting process decrease the coating defects and make the coating more wearable.

  8. Examination of laser-triggered discharge using a virtual gas model and the similarity of its Paschen curve with those of inert gases

    SciTech Connect

    Hoshi, Y.; Yoshida, H.

    2009-09-15

    We examined laser-triggered discharge (LTD) under asymmetric electric fields in air. Upon introducing a virtual gas with npd (n=2.8-3) instead of pd in Paschen's law [Ann. Phys. Chem. 37, 69 (1889)], the results of LTD in air coincided with the Paschen curve. A Paschen curve similar to those of inert gases, i.e., Ne and He, can be obtained even in air. This implies that in LTD, the number of gas molecules between electrodes appears to be n times higher than that in air. In LTD in air, the gamma effect is presumed to be significant, similar to in inert gases.

  9. The effect of dilution on the gas retention behavior of Tank 241-SY- 103 waste

    SciTech Connect

    Bredt, P.R.; Tingey, S.M.

    1996-01-01

    Twenty-five of the 177 underground waste storage tanks on the Hanford Site have been placed on the Flammable Gas watch list. These 25 tanks, containing high-level waste generated during plutonium and uranium processing, have been identified as potentially capable of accumulating flammable gases above the lower flammability limit (Babad et al. 1991). In the case of Tanks 241-SY-101 and 241-SY-103, it has been proposed that diluting the tank waste may mitigate this hazard (Hudson et al. 1995; Stewart et al. 1994). The effect of dilution on the ability of waste from Tank 241-SY-103 to accumulate gas was studied at Pacific Northwest National Laboratory. A similar study has been completed for waste from Tank 241-SY-101 (Bredt et al. 1995). Because of the additional waste-storage volume available in Tank 241-SY-103 and because the waste is assumed to be similar to that currently in Tank 241-SY-101, Tank 241-SY-103 became the target for a demonstration of passive mitigation through in-tank dilution. In 1994, plans for the in-tank dilution demonstration were deferred pending a decision on whether to pursue dilution as a mitigation strategy. However, because Tank 241-SY-103 is an early retrieval target, determination of how waste properties vary with dilution will still be required.

  10. Bose-Einstein condensation in a dilute rubidium-87 gas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hong, Seokchan

    We present an apparatus for the study of Bose-Einstein condensation (BEC), and discuss an experiment performed with it. The apparatus is constructed for the creation of dilute gaseous rubidium BEC using various cooling and trapping techniques such as magneto-optical trap, moving molasses, polarization gradient cooling and evaporation cooling forced by microwave transition. A BEC of 1x105 87Rb atoms can be created in 45 seconds with this apparatus. Then we discuss an experiment of rotating BEC with small number of atoms in a newly configured optical lattice. In this optical lattice, there are many identical and independent 2D disk-shaped potential wells, each of which can be deformed elliptic and rotated around the symmetric axis of it. Compare to the other rotating BEC experiment, the ratio of the number of atoms to the number of angular momentum per atom can be much smaller and approach to order of one. This may lead us to the regime of the fractional quantum Hall effect.

  11. Parametric Studies Of Weld Quality Of Tungsten Inert Gas Arc Welding Of Stainless Steel

    SciTech Connect

    Kumar Pal, Pradip; Nandi, Goutam; Ghosh, Nabendu

    2011-01-17

    Effect of current and gas flow rate on quality of weld in tungsten inter gas arc welding of austenitic stainless steel has been studied in the present work through experiments and analyses. Butt welded joints have been made by using several levels of current and gas flow rate. The quality of the weld has been evaluated in terms of ultimate and breaking strengths of the welded specimens. The observed data have been interpreted, discussed and analyzed by using Grey--Taguchi methodology. Optimum parametric setting has been predicted and validated as well.

  12. Federal helium program: The reaction over an inert gas. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Mielke, J.E.

    1996-10-09

    Helium, present in relatively high concentrations in only a few natural gas fields, is released to the atmosphere and wasted when the natural gas is burned as fuel. Government involvement in helium conservation dates to the Helium Act of 1925 which authorized the Bureau of Mines to build and operate a large-scale helium extraction and purification plant. From 1929 until 1960 the federal government was the only domestic helium producer. In 1960, Congress amended the Helium Act to provide incentives to natural gas producers for stripping natural gas of its helium, for purchase of the separated helium by the government, and for its long-term storage. With over 960 million cubic meters (34.6 billion cubic feet) of helium in government storage and a large private helium recovery industry, questions arise as to the need for either the federal helium extraction program or the federally maintained helium stockpile.

  13. Modeled heating and surface erosion comparing motile (gas borne) and stationary (surface coating) inert particle additives

    SciTech Connect

    Buckingham, A.C.; Siekhaus, W.J.

    1982-09-27

    The unsteady, non-similar, chemically reactive, turbulent boundary layer equations are modified for gas plus dispersed solid particle mixtures, for gas phase turbulent combustion reactions and for heterogeneous gas-solid surface erosive reactions. The exterior (ballistic core) edge boundary conditions for the solutions are modified to include dispersed particle influences on core propellant combustion-generated turbulence levels, combustion reactants and products, and reaction-induced, non-isentropic mixture states. The wall surface (in this study it is always steel) is considered either bare or coated with a fixed particle coating which is conceptually non-reactive, insulative, and non-ablative. Two families of solutions are compared. These correspond to: (1) consideration of gas-borne, free-slip, almost spontaneously mobile (motile) solid particle additives which influence the turbulent heat transfer at the uncoated steel surface and, in contrast, (2) consideration of particle-free, gas phase turbulent heat transfer to the insulated surface coated by stationary particles. Significant differences in erosive heat transfer are found in comparing the two families of solutions over a substantial range of interior ballistic flow conditions. The most effective influences on reducing erosive heat transfer appear to favor mobile, gas-borne particle additives.

  14. Effects of inert species in the gas phase in a model for the catalytic oxidation of CO

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Buendía, G. M.; Rikvold, P. A.

    2012-03-01

    We study by kinetic Monte Carlo simulations the catalytic oxidation of carbon monoxide on a surface in the presence of contaminants in the gas phase. The process is simulated by a Ziff-Gulari-Barshad (ZGB) model that has been modified to include the effect of the contaminants and to eliminate an unphysical oxygen poisoned phase at very low CO partial pressures. The impurities can adsorb and desorb on the surface but otherwise remain inert. We find that if the impurities cannot desorb, no matter how small their proportion in the gas mixture, the reactive window and discontinuous transition to a CO poisoned phase at high CO pressures that characterize the original ZGB model disappear. The coverages become continuous, and once the surface has reached a steady state there is no production of CO2. This is quite different from the behavior of systems in which the surface presents a fixed percentage of impurities. When the contaminants are allowed to desorb, the reactive phase appears again for CO pressures below a value that depends on the proportion of contaminants in the gas and on their desorption rate.

  15. Spectroscopy of Cosmic Carbon Analogs in Inert-Gas Matrices and in the Gas-Phase: Comparative Results and Perspectives for Astrophysics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Salama, Farid; DeVincenzi, Donald L. (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    Recent studies of the spectroscopy of large (up to approx. 50 carbon atoms) neutral and Ionized polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) and Fullerenes isolated in inert gas matrices will be presented. The advantages and the limitations of matrix isolation spectroscopy for the study of the molecular spectroscopy of interstellar dust analogs will be discussed. The laboratory data will be compared to the astronomical spectra (the interstellar extinction, the diffuse interstellar bands). Finally, the spectra of PAH ions isolated in neon/argon matrices will be compared to the spectra obtained for PAH ion seeded in a supersonic expansion. The astrophysical implications and future perspectives will be discussed.

  16. Fractional ventilation mapping using inert fluorinated gas MRI in rat models of inflammation and fibrosis.

    PubMed

    Couch, Marcus J; Fox, Matthew S; Viel, Chris; Gajawada, Gowtham; Li, Tao; Ouriadov, Alexei V; Albert, Mitchell S

    2016-05-01

    The purpose of this study was to extend established methods for fractional ventilation mapping using (19) F MRI of inert fluorinated gases to rat models of pulmonary inflammation and fibrosis. In this study, five rats were instilled with lipopolysaccharide (LPS) in the lungs two days prior to imaging, six rats were instilled with bleomycin in the lungs two weeks prior to imaging and an additional four rats were used as controls. (19) F MR lung imaging was performed at 3 T with rats continuously breathing a mixture of sulfur hexafluoride and O2 . Fractional ventilation maps were obtained using a wash-out approach, by switching the breathing mixture to pure O2 , and acquiring images following each successive wash-out breath. The mean fractional ventilation (r) was 0.29 ± 0.05 for control rats, 0.23 ± 0.10 for LPS-instilled rats and 0.19 ± 0.03 for bleomycin-instilled rats. Bleomycin-instilled rats had a significantly decreased mean r value compared with controls (P = 0.010). Although LPS-instilled rats had a slightly reduced mean r value, this trend was not statistically significant (P = 0.556). Fractional ventilation gradients were calculated in the anterior/posterior (A/P) direction, and the mean A/P gradient was -0.005 ± 0.008 cm(-1) for control rats, 0.013 ± 0.005 cm(-1) for LPS-instilled rats and 0.009 ± 0.018 cm(-1) for bleomycin-instilled rats. Fractional ventilation gradients were significantly different for control rats compared with LPS-instilled rats only (P = 0.016). The ventilation gradients calculated from control rats showed the expected gravitational relationship, while ventilation gradients calculated from LPS- and bleomycin-instilled rats showed the opposite trend. Histology confirmed that LPS-instilled rats had a significantly elevated alveolar wall thickness, while bleomycin-instilled rats showed signs of substantial fibrosis. Overall, (19) F MRI may be able to detect the effects of pulmonary inflammation and fibrosis using a simple and inexpensive imaging approach that can potentially be translated to humans. Copyright © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. PMID:26866511

  17. Heat transfer coefficients of dilute flowing gas-solids suspensions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kane, R. S.; Pfeffer, R.

    1973-01-01

    Heat transfer coefficients of air-glass, argon-glass, and argon-aluminum suspensions were measured in horizontal and vertical tubes. The glass, 21.6 and 36.0 micron diameter particles, was suspended at gas Reynolds numbers between 11,000 and 21,000 and loading ratios between 0 and 2.5. The presence of particles generally reduced the heat transfer coefficient. The circulation of aluminum powder in the 0.870 inch diameter closed loop system produced tenacious deposits on protuberances into the stream. In the vertical test section, the Nusselt number reduction was attributed to viscous sublayer thickening; in the horizontal test section to particle deposition.

  18. Dilute gas Couette flow: Theory and molecular dynamics simulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Risso, Dino; Cordero, Patricio

    1997-07-01

    Explicit analytic nonlinear laws of heat transport and of viscous flow are derived from Grad's approximate solution of Boltzmann's equation and they are shown to describe quite well the observations made in molecular dynamics simulations. With this aim a planar Couette flow is studied analytically and by means of microscopic molecular dynamics techniques for the case of a bidimensional gas of hard disks. The fluid develops a nonuniform temperature profile, shows a non-Newtonian behavior, and there is a heat current which obeys Fourier's law with a tensorial shear rate-dependent thermal conductivity.

  19. Dynamics of water desorption from a zeolite by a heated stream of inert gas

    SciTech Connect

    Bogoslovskaya, N.S.; Ustinova, E.A.; Seballo, A.A.

    1988-05-20

    Drying of gases, such as natural gas or air, by zeolites before low-temperature separation is now widely used in the national economy. A quart-glass adsorption-desorption apparatus was constructed for experimental study of gas drying and zeolite regeneration. The existence of a zone of water condensation was confirmed as the result of laboratory experiments conducted for study of thermal desorption of water from a zeolite by hot dry air, followed by calculations with the aid of a mathematical model of this process. Good agreement was found between the results of numerical calculations and laboratory experiments.

  20. A van der Waals Equation of State for a Dilute Boson Gas

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Deeney, F. A.; O'Leary, J. P.

    2012-01-01

    An equation of state of a system is a relationship that connects the thermodynamic variables of the system such as pressure and temperature. Such equations are well known for classical gases but less so for quantum systems. In this paper we develop a van der Waals equation of state for a dilute boson gas that may be used to explain the occurrence

  1. A van der Waals Equation of State for a Dilute Boson Gas

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Deeney, F. A.; O'Leary, J. P.

    2012-01-01

    An equation of state of a system is a relationship that connects the thermodynamic variables of the system such as pressure and temperature. Such equations are well known for classical gases but less so for quantum systems. In this paper we develop a van der Waals equation of state for a dilute boson gas that may be used to explain the occurrence…

  2. EFFECT OF VENTILATION AND PERFUSION IMBALANCE ON INERT GAS REBREATHING VARIABLES

    EPA Science Inventory

    The effects of ventilation-to-perfusion (Va/Qc) maldistribution within the lungs on measured multiple gas rebreathing variables were studied in 14 dogs. The rebreathing method (using He, C18C, and C2H2) allows for measurements of pulmonary capillary blood flow (Qc), diffusing cap...

  3. Reaction of trace mercury in natural gas with dilute polysulfide solutions in a packed column

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1991-12-01

    This paper reports that the natural gas produced around the world can contain traces of mercury which have to be removed. It is difficult to purify gas to desired mercury levels using conventional techniques. By scrubbing with dilute polysulfide solution, the residual mercury in the gas can be removed from about 0.1 to below 0.01 ppb, a reduction of 90%. In this system, the gas is passed through a packed tower wetted with a solution containing 3 ppm of polysulfide salt. Stainless steel packings are effective for this application. In addition to promoting gas-liquid contact, the stainless steel packings adsorb and concentrate polysulfides which react with Hg in the gas to form insoluble HgS, and thus remove Hg from the gas.

  4. High-density magnetohydrodynamic energy conversion in a high-temperature inert gas

    SciTech Connect

    Murakami, Tomoyuki; Okuno, Yoshihiro

    2008-07-28

    We describe high-density magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) energy conversion in a high-temperature seed-free argon plasma, for which a compact disk-shaped Hall-type radial-flow MHD electrical power generator is used. The state of the MHD power-generating plasma changes with increasing total inflow temperature from 8200 to 9400 K; unstable behavior accompanied by the appearance of fine structures is transformed to a homogeneous and stable state. The attained enthalpy extraction efficiency is comparable to previous results using a conventional seeded gas. Furthermore, a high power output density is achieved even in relatively low-density magnetic flux.

  5. Molecular-dynamics study of the density scaling of inert gas condensation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krasnochtchekov, P.; Albe, K.; Ashkenazy, Y.; Averback, R. S.

    2005-10-01

    The initial stages of vapor condensation of Ge in the presence of a cold Ar atmosphere were studied by molecular-dynamics simulations. The state variables of interest included the densities of condensing vapor and gas, the density of clusters, and the average cluster size, while the temperatures of the vapor and the clusters were separately monitored with time. Three condensation processes were explicitly identified: nucleation, monomeric growth, and cluster aggregation. Our principal finding is that both the average cluster size and the number of clusters scale with the linear dimension of the computation cell, L, and Ln, with the scaling parameter n ?4, corresponding to a reaction order of ? ?2.33. This small value of n is explained by an unexpected nucleation path involving the formation of Ge dimers via two-body collisions.

  6. Synchrotron X-ray measurement and finite element analysis of residual strain in tungsten inert gas welded aluminum alloy 2024

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Preston, R. V.; Shercliff, H. R.; Withers, P. J.; Hughes, D. J.; Smith, S. D.; Webster, P. J.

    2006-12-01

    Residual strains have been measured in a tungsten inert gas (TIG) butt-welded 2024 aluminum alloy plate using synchrotron X-ray diffraction. Novel two-dimensional strain maps spanning the entire plate reveal steep gradients in residual stress and provide detailed validation data for finite element (FE) analysis. Two variants of a FE model have been used to predict the residual strain distributions, incorporating different levels of plate constraint. The model uses decoupled thermal and elastic-plastic mechanical analyses and successfully predicts the longitudinal and transverse residual strain field over the entire weld. For butt weld geometries, the degree of transverse constraint is shown to be a significant boundary condition, compared to simpler bead-on-plate analyses. The importance of transverse residual strains for detailed model validation is highlighted, together with the need for care in selecting the location for line scans. The residual stress is largest in the heat-affected zone (HAZ), being equal to the local postweld yield stress, though the strength increases subsequently by natural aging. In addition, a halving of the diffraction line width has been observed local to the weld, and this correlates with the microstructural changes in the region.

  7. Dissociation of the effects of alcohol and amphetamine on inert gas narcosis using reaction time and P300 latency.

    PubMed

    Fowler, B; Adams, J

    1993-06-01

    Alcohol exacerbates and amphetamine ameliorates the slowing of reaction time (RT) produced by inert gas narcosis. The event-related brain potential P300 was used to determine whether these drug effects involve stimulus- or response-related processes, since P300 largely reflects the time to evaluate a stimulus while RT reflects this time plus the time to select and execute a response. Subjects breathed nitrous oxide (N2O) alone and in combination with ethyl alcohol or dextroamphetamine while responding to visually presented names that differed in probability (the oddball paradigm). N2O slowed P300, but this measure was comparatively insensitive to the exacerbation and amelioration that were indexed by RT. Relative to N2O alone, an RT-P300 difference was found for amphetamine + N2O but not for alcohol + N2O. We conclude that exacerbation involves both stimulus- and response-related processes but amelioration involves only the latter. This pattern of results can be explained by a model in which the drugs modulate slowing via the two energetical dimensions of arousal and activation, which influence stimulus- and response-related processes, respectively. PMID:8338494

  8. Low Temperature Cathodoluminescence Spectroscopy of Amorphous Aluminum Nitride Nanoparticles doped with Erbium, synthesized using Inert Gas Condensation Technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pandya, Sneha; Wang, Jingzhou; Wojciech, Jadwisienczak; Kordesch, Martin

    2015-03-01

    Free standing Aluminum Nitride Nanoparticles (NPs) doped in situwith Erbium (AlN:Er), ranging from 3-30nm in size, were synthesized using a vapor phase deposition technique known as Inert Gas Condensation (IGC). Amorphous behavior of these NPs was inferred from the wide-angle X-ray spectroscopy studies. Raman spectra analysis for these AlN:Er NPs showed characteristic peaks for A1(TO) and E2(high) phonon modes of AlN. Detailed structural characterization of these Er doped AlN NPs will be carried out using a High-Resolution TEM, results of which will be included in my talk. Low temperature Cathodoluminescence (CL) measurements were carried out for these a-AlN:Er NPs. The corresponding Er+3 ion emission peaks were compared to the CL emission spectra obtained for a-AlN:Er thin films, and for commercially obtained Erbium-Oxide NPs. These spectroscopic results will be discussed in detail. I will also present the CL results obtained for in-air and in-nitrogen atmosphere annealed a-AlN:Er NPs. In addition to this, I will illustrate how these Er doped NPs can be used as nano-scale temperature sensors. The SNOM help provided by Prof. Hugh Richardson is gratefully acknowledged.

  9. Influence of TIG welding thermal cycles on HSLA-100 steel plate. Technical report. [TIG (tungsten-inert gas)

    SciTech Connect

    Fox, A.G.; Bhole, S.D.

    1993-11-01

    A series of five bead on plate autogenous tungsten-inert-gas (TIG) welds were performed on U.S. Navy HSLA-100 steel. Power variations in these welds was achieved by altering the welding speed, voltage and current and were as follows (in kJ/mm); 0.7, 1.1, 1.2, 1.6 and 2.2. No evidence was found of either weld metal or underbead HAZ cracking in any of the welds illustrating the advantage of low carbon steel for both weld wire and base plate. Microhardness traverses across both the weld metals and HAZs gave a maximum. Vickers diamond pyramid hardness of 345 HV in the coarse grain HAZ next to the fusion line in the lowest power weld; for the highest power weld this was somewhat lower at 328 HV. These are well below 375 which is usually considered to be the lowest Vickers Hardness value for which severe hydrogen induced cold cracking is observed in this type of steel. Optical, scanning and transmission electron microscopy studies of the coarse grain HAZ microstructure in the regions of maximum hardness was correlated with the continuous cooling transformation diagram for this steel and good agreement between observed and predicted microstructures was obtained.

  10. Abnormal distribution of microhardness in tungsten inert gas arc butt-welded AZ61 magnesium alloy plates

    SciTech Connect

    Xu Nan; Shen Jun; Xie Weidong; Wang Linzhi; Wang Dan; Min Dong

    2010-07-15

    In this study, the effects of heat input on the distribution of microhardness of tungsten inert gas (TIG) arc welded hot-extruded AZ61 magnesium alloy joints were investigated. The results show that with an increase of heat input, the distributions of microhardness at the top and bottom of the welded joints are different because they are determined by both the effect of grain coarsening and the effect of dispersion strengthening. With an increase of the heat input, the microhardness of the heat-affected zone (HAZ) at the top and bottom of welded joints and the fusion zone (FZ) at the bottom of welded joints decreased gradually, while the microhardness of the FZ at the top of welded joints decreased initially and then increased sharply. The reason for the abnormal distribution of microhardness of the FZ at the top of the welded joints is that this area is close to the heat source during welding and then large numbers of hard {beta}-Mg{sub 17}(Al,Zn){sub 12} particles are precipitated. Hence, in this case, the effect of dispersion strengthening dominated the microhardness.

  11. Techniques for optimizing inerting in electron processors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rangwalla, I. J.; Korn, D. J.; Nablo, S. V.

    1993-07-01

    The design of an "inert gas" distribution system in an electron processor must satisfy a number of requirements. The first of these is the elimination or control of beam produced ozone and NO x which can be transported from the process zone by the product into the work area. Since the tolerable levels for O 3 in occupied areas around the processor are <0.1 ppm, good control techniques are required involving either recombination of the O 3 in the beam heated process zone, or exhausting and dilution of the gas at the processor exit. The second requirement of the inerting system is to provide a suitable environment for completing efficient, free radical initiated addition polymerization. In this case, the competition between radical loss through de-excitation and that from O 2 quenching must be understood. This group has used gas chromatographic analysis of electron cured coatings to study the trade-offs of delivered dose, dose rate and O 2 concentrations in the process zone to determine the tolerable ranges of parameter excursions can be determined for production quality control purposes. These techniques are described for an ink:coating system on paperboard, where a broad range of process parameters have been studied (D, Ġ, O 2. It is then shown how the technique is used to optimize the use of higher purity (10-100 ppm O 2) nitrogen gas for inerting, in combination with lower purity (2-20, 000 ppm O 2) non-cryogenically produced gas, as from a membrane or pressure swing adsorption generators.

  12. INVESTIGATING THE POTENTIAL DILUTION OF THE METAL CONTENT OF HOT GAS IN EARLY-TYPE GALAXIES BY ACCRETED COLD GAS

    SciTech Connect

    Su, Yuanyuan; Irwin, Jimmy A.

    2013-03-20

    The measured emission-weighted metal abundance of the hot gas in early-type galaxies has been known to be lower than theoretical expectations for 20 years. In addition, both X-ray luminosity and metal abundance vary significantly among galaxies of similar optical luminosities. This suggests some missing factors in the galaxy evolution process, especially the metal enrichment process. With Chandra and XMM-Newton, we studied 32 early-type galaxies (kT {approx}< 1 keV) covering a span of two orders of L{sub X,gas}/L{sub K} to investigate these missing factors. Contrary to previous studies that X-ray faint galaxies show extremely low Fe abundance ({approx}0.1 Z{sub Sun }), nearly all galaxies in our sample show an Fe abundance at least 0.3 Z{sub Sun }, although the measured Fe abundance difference between X-ray faint and X-ray bright galaxies remains remarkable. We investigated whether this dichotomy of hot gas Fe abundances can be related to the dilution of hot gas by mixing with cold gas. With a subset of 24 galaxies in this sample, we find that there is virtually no correlation between hot gas Fe abundances and their atomic gas content, which disproves the scenario that the low metal abundance of X-ray faint galaxies might be a result of the dilution of the remaining hot gas by pristine atomic gas. In contrast, we demonstrate a negative correlation between the measured hot gas Fe abundance and the ratio of molecular gas mass to hot gas mass, although it is unclear what is responsible for this apparent anti-correlation. We discuss several possibilities including that externally originated molecular gas might be able to dilute the hot gas metal content. Alternatively, the measured hot gas Fe abundance may be underestimated due to more complex temperature and abundance structures and even a two-temperature model might be insufficient to reflect the true value of the emission weighted mean Fe abundance.

  13. Time-dependent gas phase kinetics in a hydrogen diluted silane plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nunomura, S.; Yoshida, I.; Kondo, M.

    2009-02-01

    The gas phase kinetics in a high-pressure hydrogen diluted silane plasma has been studied at time scales of 10-2-6×102 s. The time-resolved gas phase composition shows the following kinetics at different time scales: silane decomposition and polysilane generation in ≲2×10-1 s, nanoparticle formation and plasma density reduction in 10-1-100 s, polysilane accumulation in 100-102 s, and silane depletion and electrode heating in ≳101 s. Disilane radicals are implied to be the dominant film precursors in addition to silyl radicals.

  14. Time-dependent gas phase kinetics in a hydrogen diluted silane plasma

    SciTech Connect

    Nunomura, S.; Kondo, M.; Yoshida, I.

    2009-02-16

    The gas phase kinetics in a high-pressure hydrogen diluted silane plasma has been studied at time scales of 10{sup -2}-6x10{sup 2} s. The time-resolved gas phase composition shows the following kinetics at different time scales: silane decomposition and polysilane generation in < or approx. 2x10{sup -1} s, nanoparticle formation and plasma density reduction in 10{sup -1}-10{sup 0} s, polysilane accumulation in 10{sup 0}-10{sup 2} s, and silane depletion and electrode heating in > or approx. 10{sup 1} s. Disilane radicals are implied to be the dominant film precursors in addition to silyl radicals.

  15. Ground-state properties of a dilute homogeneous Bose gas of hard disks in two dimensions

    SciTech Connect

    Mazzanti, F.; Polls, A.; Fabrocini, A.

    2005-03-01

    The energy and structure of a dilute hard-disks Bose gas are studied in the framework of a variational many-body approach based on a Jastrow correlated ground-state wave function. The asymptotic behaviors of the radial distribution function and the one-body density matrix are analyzed after solving the Euler equation obtained by a free minimization of the hypernetted chain energy functional. Our results show important deviations from those of the available low density expansions, already at gas parameter values x{approx}0.001. The condensate fraction in 2D is also computed and found generally lower than the 3D one at the same x.

  16. 46 CFR 153.923 - Inerting systems.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 5 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Inerting systems. 153.923 Section 153.923 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) CERTAIN BULK DANGEROUS CARGOES SHIPS CARRYING BULK... Requirements § 153.923 Inerting systems. The master shall ensure that the inert gas systems for any cargo...

  17. 46 CFR 153.923 - Inerting systems.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 5 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Inerting systems. 153.923 Section 153.923 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) CERTAIN BULK DANGEROUS CARGOES SHIPS CARRYING BULK... Requirements § 153.923 Inerting systems. The master shall ensure that the inert gas systems for any cargo...

  18. 46 CFR 153.923 - Inerting systems.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 5 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Inerting systems. 153.923 Section 153.923 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) CERTAIN BULK DANGEROUS CARGOES SHIPS CARRYING BULK... Requirements § 153.923 Inerting systems. The master shall ensure that the inert gas systems for any cargo...

  19. 46 CFR 153.923 - Inerting systems.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 5 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Inerting systems. 153.923 Section 153.923 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) CERTAIN BULK DANGEROUS CARGOES SHIPS CARRYING BULK... Requirements § 153.923 Inerting systems. The master shall ensure that the inert gas systems for any cargo...

  20. Richtmyer-Meshkov instability in dilute gas-particle mixtures with re-shock

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schulz, J. C.; Gottiparthi, K. C.; Menon, S.

    2013-11-01

    The Richtmyer-Meshkov instability (RMI) is investigated in a dilute gas-particle mixture using three-dimensional numerical simulations. This work extends an earlier two-dimensional study [S. Ukai, K. Balakrishnan, and S. Menon, "On Richtmyer-Meshkov instability in dilute gas-particle mixtures," Phys. Fluids 22, 104103 (2010)] to a larger parameter space consisting of variations in the mass loading and the particle size as well as considering both single-mode and multi-mode interface initializations. In addition, the effect of the presence of particles on re-shock RMI is also investigated. Single-phase numerical predictions of the mixing layer growth-rate are shown to compare well to both experimental and theoretical results. In a dilute gas-particle mixture, the initial growth-rate of RMI shows similar trends compared to previous work; however, the current numerical predictions show that there is an observable increase, not previously predicted, in the growth of the mixing layer at higher mass loadings. For the range of cases considered, an increase as much as 56% is observed. This increase is attributed to additional vorticity production in the mixing layer resulting from inter-phase momentum coupling. Moreover, the presence of particles introduces a continuous drag on the gas-phase resulting in a delay in the time at which re-shock occurs. This delay, which is observed to be as much as 6%, is largest for higher initial mass loadings and smaller particle radii and has a corresponding effect on both the growth-rate of the mixing-layer after re-shock and the final width of the mixing layer. A new semi-analytical correlation is developed and verified against the numerical data to predict the re-shocked RMI growth-rate in dilute gas-particle flows. The correlation shows that the re-shock RMI growth-rate is linearly proportional to the velocity jump at re-shock, the molecular mixing fraction, and the multi-phase Atwood number. Depending on the initial mass loading and particle radii, the re-shock RMI growth-rates were observed to be reduced by as much as 48% in some cases with variations of around 26% in the width of the mixing layer after re-shock.

  1. Evidence of bias in air-water Henry's law constants for semivolatile organic compounds measured by inert gas stripping.

    PubMed

    Shunthirasingham, Chubashini; Lei, Ying Duan; Wania, Frank

    2007-06-01

    Accurate knowledge of the air-water Henry's law constant (H) is crucial for understanding an organic compound's environmental behavior. The inert gas stripping (IGS) method, widely used to measure H of semivolatile organic compounds (SOCs), may yield erroneously high values for compounds with a high water surface adsorption coefficient, K(IA), because chemical adsorbed to the bubble surface may be transferred to the head space upon bursting at the top of the stripping column. Experiments with alkanols of variable chain length identified a K(IA) threshold of approximately 10(-3) m, above which IGS is susceptible to this artifact. Most SOCs are predicted to have K(IA) values well above that threshold. IGS-determined H-values for chemicals belonging to various groups of SOCs were evaluated by comparison with H-values either calculated from reliable vapor pressure and solubility data or derived from data compilations that achieve thermodynamic consistency through optimized adjustment of measured physical-chemical property data. The investigated deviations were found to be generally consistent with what would be expected from a surface adsorption artifact. Namely, the apparent bias in IGS-determined H-values, if it occurs, (1) is positive, (2) increases with increasing size of an SOC, and (3) increases with decreasing temperature. It generally is also of a magnitude predicted using estimated K(IA) values. However, different studies display different K(IA) threshold values, beyond which the artifact becomes notable, and some studies appear to succeed in avoiding the artifact altogether. Whereas the use of aerosol traps cannot explain the absence of a surface adsorption artifact, it may be related to higher flow rates used by some investigators. For large compounds or those with more than one functional group, the predicted deviation is too large when compared to observations, suggesting that the estimated K(IA) values for those compounds are too high. A full quantitative understanding of the artifact requires more accurate predictions of the adsorption of SOCs to the water surface. PMID:17612153

  2. Coupled-cluster theory of a gas of strongly-interacting electrons in the dilute limit

    SciTech Connect

    Mihaila, Bodgan; Cardenas, Andres L

    2008-01-01

    We study the ground-state properties of a dilute gas of strongly-interacting fermions in the framework of the coupled-cluster expansion (CCE). We demonstrate that properties such as universality, opening of a gap in the excitation spectrum and applicability of s-wave approximations appear naturally in the CCE approach. In the zero-density limit, we show that the ground-state energy density depends on only one parameter which in turn may depend at most on the spatial dimensionality of the system.

  3. Characteristics of dilute gas-solids suspensions in drag reducing flow

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kane, R. S.; Pfeffer, R.

    1973-01-01

    Measurements were performed on dilute flowing gas-solids suspensions and included data, with particles present, on gas friction factors, velocity profiles, turbulence intensity profiles, turbulent spectra, and particle velocity profiles. Glass beads of 10 to 60 micron diameter were suspended in air at Reynolds numbers of 10,000 to 25,000 and solids loading ratios from 0 to 4. Drag reduction was achieved for all particle sizes in vertical flow and for the smaller particle sizes in horizontal flow. The profile measurements in the vertical tube indicated that the presence of particles thickened the viscous sublayer. A quantitative theory based on particle-eddy interaction and viscous sublayer thickening has been proposed.

  4. Superscaling in a dilute Fermi gas and the nucleon momentum distribution in nuclei

    SciTech Connect

    Antonov, A. N.; Ivanov, M. V.; Gaidarov, M. K.; Guerra, E. Moya de

    2007-03-15

    The superscaling observed in inclusive electron scattering is described within the dilute Fermi gas model with interaction between the particles. The comparison with the relativistic Fermi gas (RFG) model without interaction shows an improvement in the explanation of the scaling function f({psi}{sup '}) in the region {psi}{sup '}<-1, where the RFG result is f({psi}{sup '})=0. It is found that the behavior of f({psi}{sup '}) for {psi}{sup '}<-1 depends on the particular form of the general power-law asymptotics of the momentum distribution n(k){approx}1/k{sup 4+m} at large k. The best agreement with the empirical scaling function is found for m{approx_equal}4.5 in agreement with the asymptotics of n(k) in the coherent density fluctuation model where m=4. Thus, superscaling gives information about the asymptotics of n(k) and the NN forces.

  5. Modeling and Scaling Electrostatic Effects in Dilute Solid-Gas Suspensions.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nieh, Sen

    The motion of fully developed turbulent pipe flow of dilute solid-gas suspensions in the presence of significant interaction between gravity and electrostatic effect was examined in detail. The multiple-parameter modeling law was rigorously deduced from the theoretical analysis. Four modeling parameters, namely, Froude number, inertia parameter, pseudo particle Reynolds number and electro-diffusion number were shown to be sufficient in characterizing the dynamic behavior of dilute particulate suspensions. The role of particle charge distribution in modeling electrostatic effects of solid-gas suspensions was investigated. It was demonstrated that modeling based on a pertinent mean particle charge is feasible except when the particle charge has a biomodal distribution of wide separation or when the electro-diffusion number and diffusion response number are large. The scaling relations have been experimentally tested in two horizontal pipe loops, a 50.8 mm ID model and a 127 mm ID prototype. Measurements of air velocity, particle mass flux, particle velocity, and particle charge distribution were made. The scaling laws were proved to be adequate for the range of experimental conditions considered. The experimental results were compared with analytical solutions and discussed. A continuous flow loop with a cyclone-venturi configuration was designed to avoid particle breakage and to maintain a steady suspension flow. It may evolve as a standard facility for testing particle material behavior as well as for basic research and instrumentation development. Special instruments for measuring particle velocity and particle charge distribution in pipe flow were also successfully developed.

  6. Determination of phthalate esters in Chinese spirits using isotope dilution gas chromatography with tandem mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Wang, Jing; Li, Xiaomin; Zhang, Qinghe; Xiong, Jinping; Li, Hongmei

    2015-05-01

    Phthalate esters are additives used in polyvinylchloride and are found as contaminants in many food products. An isotope dilution mass spectrometry technique has been developed for accurate analysis of 16 phthalate esters in Chinese spirits by adopting the 16 corresponding isotope-labeled phthalate esters. The ethanol in the spirit sample was first removed by heating with a water bath at 100°C with a stream of nitrogen, after which the residue was extracted with n-hexane twice. The phthalates collected were identified and quantified by gas chromatography with tandem mass spectrometry in multiple reaction monitoring mode. The spiking recoveries of 16 analytes ranged from 94.3 to 105.3% with relative standard deviation values of <6.5%. The detection limits for 16 analytes were <10.0 ng/g. The expanded relative uncertainties were from 3.0 to 14%. A survey was performed on Chinese spirits from the market. Six of the nine analyzed samples were contaminated by phthalates. Di-n-butyl phthalate and di-2-ethylhexyl phthalate showed higher detection frequency and concentrations. This isotope dilution gas chromatography with tandem mass spectrometry method is simple, rapid, accurate, and highly sensitive, which qualifies as a candidate reference method for the determination of phthalates in spirits. PMID:25755215

  7. WVNS Tank Farm Process Support: Experimental evaluation of an inert gas (nitrogen) to mitigate external corrosion of high-level waste storage tanks

    SciTech Connect

    Elmore, M.R.

    1996-02-01

    Corrosion of the carbon steel waste storage tanks at West Valley Nuclear Services continues to be of concern, especially as the planned duration of waste storage time increases and sludge washing operations are conducted. The external surfaces of Tanks 8D-1 and 8D-2 have been exposed for more than 10 years to water that has intruded into the tank vaults. Visual inspection of the external tank surfaces using a remote video camera has shown indications of heavy corrosion in localized areas on the tank walls. Tests on mild steel specimens under simulated tank vault conditions showed that corrosion is related to the availability of oxygen for the corrosion reactions; consequently, removing oxygen as one of the reactants should effectively eliminate corrosion. In terms of the waste tanks, excluding oxygen from the annular vault space, such as by continuous flushing with an inert gas, should substantially decrease corrosion of the external surfaces of the mild steel tanks (100% exclusion of oxygen is probably not practicable). Laboratory corrosion testing was conducted at Pacific Northwest National Laboratory to give a preliminary assessment of the ability of nitrogen-inerting to reduce steel corrosion. This report summarizes test results obtained after 18-month corrosion tests comparing {open_quotes}nitrogen-inerted{close_quotes} corrosion with {open_quotes}air-equilibrated{close_quotes} corrosion under simulated tank vault conditions.

  8. Fluid-dynamical and poro-elastic coupling of gas permeability of inert and sorbing gases on an Australian sub-bituminous coal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gensterblum, Y.; Krooss, B. M.

    2013-12-01

    The interaction and the coupling of slip-flow, a fluid dynamic phenomenon, and the cleat volume compressibility which is a poroelastic phenomenon has been investigated on two samples from the Taroom coal measure, Surat Basin, Queensland Australia. Measurements were performed using inert (helium and argon) and sorbing gases (nitrogen, methane and carbon dioxide) at controlled effective stress. We observed the following regular sequence of permeability coefficients for the different gases: Helium >> argon => nitrogen > methane >> CO2 Even after slip-flow correction, different intrinsic permeability coefficients are obtained for the same sample if different gases are used in the tests. The permeability values determined with helium are largest while those measured with CO2 are lowest. Inert gases like helium and argon show higher apparent- and even slip flow-corrected permeability coefficients than sorbing gases like methane or carbon dioxide. This observation is contrary to the prediction that the slip-flow corrected permeability have to be the same for all gases. The cleat volume compressibility cf was evaluated using the 'matchstick approach' [1, 2]. The cleat volume compressibility coefficients cf are almost identical for the two samples taken from the same well. However, for one sample a strong dependence of the cf with the mean pore pressure was observed. This is attributed to a strong slip-flow effect caused by a narrow cleat system as compared to the sister sample. The cleat volume compressibility coefficient cf is almost the same for inert and sorbing gases. We conclude that the occurrence of slip-flow in coals is able to compensate the permeability reduction resulting from increasing effective stress. This should lead to a much higher productivity of coal bed methane reservoirs in the third production phase (pseudo-steady state phase; [3]). This conclusion appears to be also valid for shale gas and tight gas reservoirs, where the gas transport takes place in meso- and micropores, as well.

  9. The Production of Polycyclic Aromatic Hydrocarbon Anions in Inert Gas Matrices Doped with Alkali Metals. Electronic Absorption Spectra of the Pentacene Anion (C22H14(-))

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Halasinski, Thomas M.; Hudgins, Douglas M.; Salama, Farid; Allamandola, Louis J.; Mead, Susan (Technical Monitor)

    1999-01-01

    The absorption spectra of pentacene (C22H14) and its radical cation (C22H14(+)) and anion (C22H14(-)) isolated in inert-gas matrices of Ne, Ar, and Kr are reported from the ultraviolet to the near-infrared. The associated vibronic band systems and their spectroscopic assignments are discussed together with the physical and chemical conditions governing ion (and counterion) production in the solid matrix. In particular, the formation of isolated pentacene anions is found to be optimized in matrices doped with alkali metal (Na and K).

  10. [Effect of inert gas xenon on the functional state of nucleated cells of peripheral blood during freezing].

    PubMed

    Laptev, D S; Polezhaeva, T V; Zaitseva, O O; Khudyakov, A N; Utemov, S V; Knyazev, M G; Kostyaev, A A

    2015-01-01

    A new method of preservation of nucleated cells in the electric refrigerator with xenon. After slow freezing and storage is even one day at -80 °C persists for more than 60% leukocytes. Cell membranes are resistant to the vital dye. In 85% of granulocytes stored baseline lysosomal-cationic protein, reduced lipid peroxidation and antioxidant activity. Cryopreservation of biological objects in inert gases is a promising direction in the practice of medicine and can be an alternative to the traditional method using liquid nitrogen. PMID:26027341

  11. Isotope dilution gas chromatography/mass spectrometry for cadmium determination in urine.

    PubMed

    Aggarwal, S K; Orth, R G; Wendling, J; Kinter, M; Herold, D A

    1993-01-01

    A stable isotope dilution gas chromatographic/mass spectrometric method using 106Cd as an internal standard is described for determining Cd in urine. In this method, the urine matrix is digested with HNO3 + H2O2 and the Cd is chelated with lithium bis(trifluoroethyl)dithiocarbamate. All isotope ratio measurements are made with an organic mass spectrometer. Overall precision values for the five major isotopes relative to 114Cd are 1 to 3% when 10-ng samples of chelated Cd are analyzed. Accuracy of the method is established by measuring Cd in the NIST freeze-dried urine reference material. A small memory effect is observed when measuring isotope ratios differing by a factor of 10. This can, however, be minimized by optimum addition of the internal standard solution. PMID:8381496

  12. Transport coefficients of dilute hydrogen gas, calculations and comparisons with experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schaefer, J.

    2010-02-01

    The paper presents quantum mechanical ab initio calculations of transport coefficients of dilute H 2 gas, derived from an empirically corrected ab initio interaction potential used in so-called close-coupled channel calculations which provided scattering matrices and subsequently differential scattering cross sections of the elastic and inelastic rotational interactions, for grids of relative kinetic energies sufficient to obtain converged results of transport coefficients at temperatures up to 300 K. The formalism of the Waldmann-Snider theory of the Boltzmann equation has been used following previous work in this field. Results are presented for the pure para- and ortho-H 2 gas as well as for their mixtures. Excellent agreement has been found in comparisons with measured results of pure para-H 2 gas thus providing proof of the proper input used in the calculations. The comparison with measured normal H 2 transport coefficients was also successful for the calculated normal H 2 shear viscosity (±2%) and the calculated translational heat conductivity coefficient (±2%). Deviations from experiments of up to ≈10% have been found for the total normal H 2 heat conductivity in the temperature range between 75 and 225 K.

  13. Perfect-fluid behavior of a dilute Fermi gas near unitary

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wlaz?owski, Gabriel; Quan, Wei; Bulgac, Aurel

    2015-12-01

    We present an ab initio calculation of the shear viscosity as a function of interaction strength in a two-component unpolarized Fermi gas near the unitary limit, within a finite temperature quantum Monte Carlo (QMC) framework and using the Kubo linear-response formalism. The shear viscosity decreases as we tune the interaction strength 1/a kF from the Bardeen-Cooper-Schrieffer side of the Feshbach resonance towards Bose-Einstein condensation limit and it acquires the smallest value for 1/a kF ?0.4 , with a minimum value of |?/s|?/s min?0.2 ?/kB , which is about twice as small as the value reported for experiments in quark-gluon plasma QGP ?0.4 ?/kB . The Fermi gas near unitarity thus emerges as the most "perfect fluid" observed so far in nature. The clouds of dilute Fermi gas near unitarity exhibit the unusual attribute that, for the sizes realized so far in the laboratory, or larger (less than 109 atoms), can sustain quantum turbulence below the critical temperature, but at the same time the classical turbulence is suppressed in the normal phase.

  14. Density functional theory of gas-liquid phase separation in dilute binary mixtures.

    PubMed

    Okamoto, Ryuichi; Onuki, Akira

    2016-06-22

    We examine statics and dynamics of phase-separated states of dilute binary mixtures using density functional theory. In our systems, the difference of the solvation chemical potential between liquid and gas [Formula: see text] (the Gibbs energy of transfer) is considerably larger than the thermal energy [Formula: see text] for each solute particle and the attractive interaction among the solute particles is weaker than that among the solvent particles. In these conditions, the saturated vapor pressure increases by [Formula: see text], where [Formula: see text] is the solute density added in liquid. For [Formula: see text], phase separation is induced at low solute densities in liquid and the new phase remains in gaseous states, even when the liquid pressure is outside the coexistence curve of the solvent. This explains the widely observed formation of stable nanobubbles in ambient water with a dissolved gas. We calculate the density and stress profiles across planar and spherical interfaces, where the surface tension decreases with increasing interfacial solute adsorption. We realize stable solute-rich bubbles with radius about 30 nm, which minimize the free energy functional. We then study dynamics around such a bubble after a decompression of the surrounding liquid, where the bubble undergoes a damped oscillation. In addition, we present some exact and approximate expressions for the surface tension and the interfacial stress tensor. PMID:27115676

  15. A simple thermodynamic model of diluted hydrogen gas/plasma for CFD applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Quartapelle, L.; Muzzio, A.

    2015-06-01

    This work describes a simple thermodynamic model of the hydrogen gas at low densities and for temperatures going from those involving quantum rotations of ortho- and para-hydrogen up to the fully ionized state. The closed-form energy levels of Morse rotating oscillator given [D.C. Harris, M.D. Bertolucci, Symmetry and Spectroscopy (Dover, New York, 1989)] (but not those in Morse's original paper) are shown to provide an internal partition function of H2 that is a sufficiently accurate representation of that exploiting the state-of-the-art spectrum of roto-vibrational levels calculated by Pachucki and Komasa [K. Pachucki, J. Komasa, J. Chem. Phys. 130, 164113 (2009)]. A system of two coupled quadratic equations for molecular dissociation and atomic ionization at thermodynamical and chemical equilibrium is derived according to the statistical mechanics by assuming that the system is an ideal mixture containing molecules, neutral atoms and noninteracting protons and electrons. The system of two equations reduces to a single quartic equation for the ionization unknown, with the coefficients dependent on the temperature and the specific volume. Explicit relations for specific energy and entropy of the hydrogen ideal gas/plasma model are derived. These fully compatible equations of state provide a complete thermodynamic description of the system, uniformly valid from low temperatures up to a fully ionized state, with electrons and ions relaxed to one and the same temperature. The comparison with results of other models developed in the framework of the physical and chemical pictures shows that the proposed elementary model is adequate for computational fluid dynamics purposes, in applications with the hydrogen gas under diluted conditions and when the dissociation and ionization can be assumed at thermodynamical and chemical equilibrium.

  16. Quantifying gross fluxes of nitrous oxide and dinitrogen gas using a novel isotope pool dilution technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arn Teh, Yit; Yang, Wendy; Silver, Whendee L.

    2010-05-01

    One of the existing challenges in trace gas biogeochemistry lies in understanding the environmental controls on the net and gross fluxes of soil-derived compounds. This is because gross production and consumption fluxes of these gases often occur simultaneously or in close spatial proximity, making it difficult to make inferences about the effects of environmental variables (e.g. temperature, soil water content, porosity, redox, etc.) on gross fluxes based on bulk concentration measurements alone. One novel approach for quantifying gross fluxes of N2O and N2 is 'stable isotope pool dilution;' a technique that has been successfully applied to study bidirectional fluxes of other biogenic compounds, such as CH4 and halocarbons. To evaluate the efficacy of this method for quantifying gross N2O and N2 fluxes, we conducted a combined field and laboratory test of the pool dilution technique along side conventional measures of nitrification and denitrification. Experiments were conducted in a N-rich managed peatland pasture in the Sacramento-San Joaquin Delta, California, USA. Field and laboratory measurements were performed in a broad range of microforms and microtopes spanning a range of hydrologic and environmental conditions. Field experiments focussed on gross fluxes of N2O and N2 in upper soil horizons; the soil layers that exchange most rapidly with the atmosphere. Laboratory experiments indicated that 15N pool dilution compares favourably with more conventional measures of N2O and N2 flux, such as acetylene inhibition or the 15NO3- pulse-trace approach. Gross N2O fluxes greatly exceeded N2 fluxes by as much as an order of magnitude or more, and averaged 6.1 ± 2.2 mg N m-2 d-1, with a range from 0.06 to 63.13 mg N m-2 d-1. N2O:N2 emissions ratios generally exceeded 1 except along slopes, with an overall range of 0.2 to 30.9. NH4+ concentrations and denitrifying enzyme activity were the best predictors of gross N2O fluxes in the field (r2 = 0.65). Net N2O production rates explained 53 percent of the variability in gross N2 fluxes, whereas N2O:N2 ratios were best predicted by the combination of water-filled pore space and mineral N concentration (r2 = 0.44). This research highlights the potential of the pool dilution approach for quantifying gross fluxes of N2O and N2 from surface soils under both field and laboratory conditions. Future experiments will couple these measures of soil surface fluxes with push-pull methods for determining gross N2O and N2 fluxes at depth, and natural abundance isotopomer measurements to determine sources of N2O.

  17. Dispersion coefficients for the interactions of the alkali-metal and alkaline-earth-metal ions and inert-gas atoms with a graphene layer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kaur, Kiranpreet; Arora, Bindiya; Sahoo, B. K.

    2015-09-01

    Largely motivated by a number of applications, the van der Waals dispersion coefficients C3 of the alkali-metal ions Li+,Na+,K+, and Rb+, the alkaline-earth-metal ions Ca+,Sr+,Ba+, and Ra+, and the inert-gas atoms He, Ne, Ar, and Kr with a graphene layer are determined precisely within the framework of the Dirac model. For these calculations, we evaluate the dynamic polarizabilities of the above atomic systems very accurately by evaluating the transition matrix elements employing relativistic many-body methods and using the experimental values of the excitation energies. The dispersion coefficients are given as functions of the separation distance of an atomic system from the graphene layer and the ambiance temperature during the interactions. For easy extraction of these coefficients, we give a logistic fit to the functional forms of the dispersion coefficients in terms of the separation distances at room temperature.

  18. A new technique for the strengthening of aluminum tungsten inert gas weld metals: using carbon nanotube/aluminum composite as a filler metal.

    PubMed

    Fattahi, M; Nabhani, N; Rashidkhani, E; Fattahi, Y; Akhavan, S; Arabian, N

    2013-01-01

    The effect of multi-walled carbon nanotube (MWCNT) on the mechanical properties of aluminum multipass weld metal prepared by the tungsten inert gas (TIG) welding process was investigated. High energy ball milling was used to disperse MWCNT in the aluminum powder. Carbon nanotube/aluminum composite filler metal was fabricated for the first time by hot extrusion of ball-milled powders. After welding, the tensile strength, microhardness and MWCNT distribution in the weld metal were investigated. The test results showed that the tensile strength and microhardness of weld metal was greatly increased when using the filler metal containing 1.5 wt.% MWCNT. Therefore, according to the results presented in this paper, it can be concluded that the filler metal containing MWCNT can serve as a super filler metal to improve the mechanical properties of TIG welds of Al and its alloys. PMID:23948441

  19. Measuring Diffusivity in Supercooled Liquid Nanoscale Films using Inert Gas Permeation: II. Diffusion of AR, KR, Xe, and CH4 through Methanol

    SciTech Connect

    Matthiesen, Jesper; Smith, R. Scott; Kay, Bruce D.

    2010-11-07

    We present an experimental technique to measure the diffusivity of supercooled liquids at temperatures near their Tg. The approach uses the permeation of inert gases through supercooled liquid overlayers as a measure of the diffusivity of the supercooled liquid itself. The desorption spectra of the probe gas is used to extract the low temperature supercooled liquid diffusivities. In the preceding companion paper, we derived equations using ideal model simulations from which the diffusivity could be extracted using the desorption peak times for isothermal or peak temperatures for TPD experiments. Here, we discuss the experimental conditions for which these equations are valid and demonstrate their utility using amorphous methanol with Ar, Kr, Xe, and CH4 as probe gases. The approach offers a new method by which the diffusivities of supercooled liquids can be measured in the experimentally challenging temperature regime near the glass transition temperature.

  20. Effect of Alternate Supply of Shielding Gases of Tungsten Inert Gas Welding on Mechanical Properties of Austenitic Stainless Steel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shinde, Neelam Vilas; Telsang, Martand Tamanacharya

    2016-03-01

    In the present study, an attempt is made to study the effect of alternate supply of the shielding gas in comparison with the conventional method of TIG welding with pure argon gas. The two sets of combination are used as 10-10 and 40-20 s for alternate supply of the Argon and Helium shielding gas respectively. The effect of alternate supply of shielding gas is studied on the mechanical properties like bend test, tensile test and impact test. The full factorial experimental design is applied for three set of combinations. The ANOVA is used to find significant parameters for the process and regression analysis used to develop the mathematical model. The result shows that the alternate supply of the shielding gas for 10-10 s provides better result for the bend, tensile and impact test as compared with the conventional argon gas and the alternate supply of 40-20 s argon and helium gas respectively. Welding speed can be increased for alternate supply of the shielding gas that can reduce the total welding cost.

  1. [Determination of trace organochlorine pesticides in soil using isotope dilution-high resolution gas chromatography].

    PubMed

    Huang, Wenjun; Gao, Lirong; Gong, Aijun; Li, Cheng; Wang, Pu; Fu, Shan; Xiao, Ke; Zhang, Bing; Liu, Wenbin

    2010-05-01

    A method for the determination of trace organochlorine pesticides (OCPs) in soil using isotope dilution and high resolution gas chromatography-high resolution mass spectrometry (ID-HRGC-HRMS) was developed. The sample was extracted by accelerated solvent extractor (ASE) and cleaned-up by a Florisil solid phase extraction (SPE) cartridge. The analytes were separated by HRGC on a DB-5MS column (30 mx 0.25 mm x 0.25 microm) and determined by HRMS. The identifications of OCPs were based on the retention time of 13C-labelled standard and the abundance ratio of the two exact mass-to-charge ratios. The quantitative analysis was performed using the ratios of the integrated areas of the 13C-labelled standards. This method has the recoveries ranging from 77.3% to 114.5% and the relative standard deviations (RSD) less than 10.81% (n=5). The limits of detection (LODs) of this method for all OCPs were lower than 0.04 pg/g. The results indicated that the method is rapid, selective and sensitive for precise determination requirements of organochlorine pesticides at trace level in soil. PMID:20812621

  2. A modified helium dilution technique for measuring small lung gas volumes.

    PubMed

    Roy, C H; Barnes, R J; Heath, M F; Sensky, P L

    1992-02-01

    The present study was undertaken to devise an accurate method for measuring functional residual capacity, FRC, in small and lively newborn animals such as lambs and piglets under flexible laboratory conditions using relatively simple equipment. This was achieved by adapting the standard helium dilution method so that FRC could be calculated from the helium equilibration concentration reached when the subject, having breathed a gas mixture with a high helium concentration, rebreathed from an air-filled spirometer. Using this technique, typical results for test volumes of 10, 20, 30 and 40 ml were measured as 10.7 +/- 0.34, 20.2 +/- 0.19, 30.5 +/- 0.40 and 40.6 +/- 0.75 ml respectively with corresponding coefficients of variation of 6.4%, 1.9%, 2.6% and 3.7%. Repeat measurements made on each of 3 urethane anaesthetised rabbits gave values for FRC of 45.64 +/- 0.9 ml (5 measurements), 37.22 +/- 0.8 ml (8 measurements) and 48.95 +/- 0.99 ml (8 measurements) confirming the reproducibility of results from animal preparations. The FRC of newborn lambs (12 animals) was 81.4 +/- 9.2 ml. The technique also allowed clear recordings of respiratory pattern essential to the analysis of variations in FRC. PMID:1500637

  3. Influence of a magnetic field on the viscosity of a dilute gas consisting of linear molecules.

    PubMed

    Hellmann, Robert; Vesovic, Velisa

    2015-12-01

    The viscomagnetic effect for two linear molecules, N2 and CO2, has been calculated in the dilute-gas limit directly from the most accurate ab initio intermolecular potential energy surfaces presently available. The calculations were performed by means of the classical trajectory method in the temperature range from 70 K to 3000 K for N2 and 100 K to 2000 K for CO2, and agreement with the available experimental data is exceptionally good. Above room temperature, where no experimental data are available, the calculations provide the first quantitative information on the magnitude and the behavior of the viscomagnetic effect for these gases. In the presence of a magnetic field, the viscosities of nitrogen and carbon dioxide decrease by at most 0.3% and 0.7%, respectively. The results demonstrate that the viscomagnetic effect is dominated by the contribution of the jj polarization at all temperatures, which shows that the alignment of the rotational axes of the molecules in the presence of a magnetic field is primarily responsible for the viscomagnetic effect. PMID:26646878

  4. Influence of a magnetic field on the viscosity of a dilute gas consisting of linear molecules

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hellmann, Robert; Vesovic, Velisa

    2015-12-01

    The viscomagnetic effect for two linear molecules, N2 and CO2, has been calculated in the dilute-gas limit directly from the most accurate ab initio intermolecular potential energy surfaces presently available. The calculations were performed by means of the classical trajectory method in the temperature range from 70 K to 3000 K for N2 and 100 K to 2000 K for CO2, and agreement with the available experimental data is exceptionally good. Above room temperature, where no experimental data are available, the calculations provide the first quantitative information on the magnitude and the behavior of the viscomagnetic effect for these gases. In the presence of a magnetic field, the viscosities of nitrogen and carbon dioxide decrease by at most 0.3% and 0.7%, respectively. The results demonstrate that the viscomagnetic effect is dominated by the contribution of the jj polarization at all temperatures, which shows that the alignment of the rotational axes of the molecules in the presence of a magnetic field is primarily responsible for the viscomagnetic effect.

  5. Experimental determination of Henry's law constant of perfluorooctanoic acid (PFOA) at 298 K by means of an inert-gas stripping method with a helical plate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kutsuna, Shuzo; Hori, Hisao

    The Henry's law constant ( KH) of perfluorooctanoic acid (PFOA, C 7F 15C(O)OH) was determined at 298 K in aqueous sulfuric acid solutions and in aqueous sodium chloride and sulfuric acid mixtures by an inert-gas stripping method in which a helical plate was used to increase the residence time of the gas bubbles in the solutions. The partial pressures of C 7F 15C(O)OH in the purge gas ( PPFOA) were determined by means of Fourier-transform infrared spectroscopy. Time-courses of PPFOA and concentrations of PFOA in the test solutions ( CPFOA) differed from those typically obtained by an inert-gas stripping, indicating both the presence of C 7F 15C(O)OH aggregates, even at low concentrations of C 7F 15C(O)OH in aqueous sulfuric acid solutions, and the adsorption of gaseous C 7F 15C(O)OH on the walls of the experimental apparatus. We derived overall gas-to-water partition coefficients ( KH') by simulating the time-courses of PPFOA and CPFOA simultaneously to optimize parameters of the model relating to the partitioning, the aggregation, and the adsorption. The KH' value for 0.31 mol dm -3 sulfuric acid solutions at 298 K was determined at 3.8 ± 0.1 mol dm -3 atm -1. From the relationship between KH' and the ionic strength of aqueous sulfuric acid solutions, the KH values of C 7F 15C(O)OH at 298 K were determined at 9.9 ± 1.5 mol dm -3 atm -1 for p Ka = 2.8 and 5.0 ± 0.2 mol dm -3 atm -1 for p Ka = 1.3. The p Ka value of 1.3 seems to be most probable among the reported three values for C 7F 15C(O)OH, taking into account dependence of KH' on sulfuric acid concentrations for aqueous sodium chloride and sulfuric acid mixtures. Despite the low p Ka value, the relatively small KH of C 7F 15C(O)OH obtained at 298 K suggests a substantial partitioning of C 7F 15C(O)OH in air in the environment.

  6. Inert electrode connection

    DOEpatents

    Weyand, John D.; Woods, Robert W.; DeYoung, David H.; Ray, Siba P.

    1985-01-01

    An inert electrode connection is disclosed wherein a layer of inert electrode material is bonded to a layer of conductive material by providing at least one intermediate layer of material therebetween comprising a predetermined ratio of inert material to conductive material. In a preferred embodiment, the connection is formed by placing in a die a layer of powdered inert material, at least one layer of a mixture of powdered inert material and conductive material, and a layer of powdered conductive material. The connection is then formed by pressing the material at 15,000-20,000 psi to form a powder compact and then densifying the powder compact in an inert or reducing atmosphere at a temperature of 1200.degree.-1500.degree. C.

  7. Development of traceable precision dynamic dilution method to generate dimethyl sulphide gas mixtures at sub-nanomole per mole levels for ambient measurement.

    PubMed

    Kim, Mi Eon; Kim, Yong Doo; Kang, Ji Hwan; Heo, Gwi Suk; Lee, Dong Soo; Lee, Sangil

    2016-04-01

    Dimethyl sulphide (DMS) is an important compound in global atmospheric chemistry and climate change. Traceable international standards are essential for measuring accurately the long-term global trend in ambient DMS. However, developing accurate gas standards for sub-nanomole per mole (nmol/mol) mole fractions of DMS in a cylinder is challenging, because DMS is reactive and unstable. In this study, a dynamic dilution method that is traceable and precise was developed to generate sub-nmol/mol DMS gas mixtures with a dynamic dilution system based on sonic nozzles and a long-term (>5 years) stable 10μmol/mol parent DMS primary standard gas mixtures (PSMs). The dynamic dilution system was calibrated with traceable methane PSMs, and its estimated dilution factors were used to calculate the mole fractions of the dynamically generated DMS gas mixtures. A dynamically generated DMS gas mixture and a 6nmol/mol DMS PSM were analysed against each other by gas chromatography with flame-ionisation detection (GC/FID) to evaluate the dilution system. The mole fractions of the dynamically generated DMS gas mixture determined against a DMS PSM and calculated with the dilution factor agreed within 1% at 6nmol/mol. In addition, the dynamically generated DMS gas mixtures at various mole fractions between 0.4 and 11.7nmol/mol were analysed by GC/FID and evaluated for their linearity. The analytically determined mole fractions showed good linearity with the mole fractions calculated with the dilution factors. Results showed that the dynamic dilution method generates DMS gas mixtures ranging between 0.4nmol/mol and 12nmol/mol with relative expanded uncertainties of less than 2%. Therefore, the newly developed dynamic dilution method is a promising reference method for generating sub-nmol/mol DMS gas standards for accurate ambient measurements. PMID:26838438

  8. Characterisation of the surface thermodynamic properties of cement components by inverse gas chromatography at infinite dilution

    SciTech Connect

    Perruchot, Christian; Chehimi, Mohamed M.; Vaulay, Marie-Josephe; Benzarti, Karim . E-mail: benzarti@lcpc.fr

    2006-02-15

    The surface thermodynamic properties of three main inorganic compounds formed during hydration of Portland cement: calcium hydroxide (Ca(OH){sub 2}), ettringite (3CaO.Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}.3CaSO{sub 4}.32H{sub 2}O) and calcium-silicate-hydrates (C-S-H), respectively, and one mineral filler: calcium carbonate (CaCO{sub 3}), have been characterised by inverse gas chromatography at infinite dilution (IGC-ID) at 35 deg. C. The thermodynamic properties have been investigated using a wide range of non-polar (n-alkane series), Lewis acidic (CH{sub 2}Cl{sub 2} and CHCl{sub 3}), Lewis basic (diethyl ether) and aromatic (benzene) and n-alkene series molecular probes, respectively. The tested samples are fairly high surface energy materials as judged by the high dispersive contribution to the total surface energy (the dispersive components {gamma} {sub s} {sup d} range from 45.6 up to 236.2 mJ m{sup -2} at 35 deg. C) and exhibit amphoteric properties, with a predominant acidic character. In the case of hydrated components (i.e. ettringite and C-S-H), the surface thermodynamic properties have been determined at various temperatures (from 35 up to 120 deg. C) in order to examine the influence of the water content. The changes of both dispersive and specific components clearly demonstrate that the material surface properties are activated with temperature. The changes in the acid-base properties are correlated with the extent of the overall water loss induced by the thermal treatment as demonstrated by thermogravimetric analysis (TGA). The elemental surface composition of these compounds has been determined by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS)

  9. The relation between the Gross Pitaevskii and Bogoliubov descriptions of a dilute Bose gas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leggett, A. J.

    2003-07-01

    I formulate a 'pseudo-paradox' in the theory of a dilute Bose gas with repulsive interactions: the standard expression for the ground state energy within the Gross Pitaevskii (GP) approximation is lower than that in the Bogoliubov approximation, and hence, by the standard variational argument, the former should prima facie be a better approximation than the latter to the true ground state—a conclusion which is of course opposite to the established wisdom concerning this problem. It is shown that the pseudo-paradox is (unsurprisingly) resolved by a correct transcription of the two-body scattering theory to the many-body case; however, contrary to what appears to be a widespread belief, the resolution has nothing to do with any spurious ultraviolet divergences which result from the replacement of the true interatomic potential by a delta-function pseudopotential. Rather, it relates to an infrared divergence which has the consequence that (a) the most obvious form of the GP 'approximation' actually does not correspond to any well-defined ansatz for the many-body wavefunction, and (b) that the 'best shot' at such a wavefunction always produces an energy which exceeds, or at best equals, that calculated in the Bogoliubov approximation. In fact, the necessity of the latter may be seen as a consequence of the need to reduce the Fock term in the energy, which is absent in the two-particle problem but dominant in the many-body case; it does this by increasing the density correlations, at distances less than or approximately equal to the correlation length xi, above the value extrapolated from the two-body case. As a by-product I devise an alternative formulation of the Bogoliubov approximation which does not require the explicit replacement of the true interatomic potential by a delta-function pseudopotential.

  10. Investigation of At-Vent Dynamics and Dilution of Gas Puffing Using Thermal Infrared Radiometers at Masaya Volcano, Nicaragua

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Branan, Y. K.; Harris, A.; Watson, I.; Phillips, J.; Horton, K.; Williams-Jones, G.; Garbeil, H.

    2006-12-01

    In order to develop a detailed understanding of the dynamics of gas puffing (gas release as a series of discrete clouds) and more sustained degassing (steady plumes of gas) during persistent volcanic degassing, measurements of gas mass flux are required in the vicinity of the volcanic vent. Masaya Volcano (Nicaragua), a persistently degassing system, is an ideal location for measuring the dynamics of releases of volcanic gas in the first few seconds of their propagation. We carried out two field experiments during February 2002 and March 2003, during which thermal infrared thermometers were targeted into the degassing vent at Masaya to record thermal variations related to variations in the at-vent gas emission over short (on the order of seconds) timescales. The thermometers recorded an oscillating signal as gas puffs passed through the field of view, detailing variations in the degassing process developing over time scales of seconds. These data were processed to extract puff frequencies, amplitudes, durations, emission velocities and volumes. These data showed that, over time periods of hours, the total gas flux was stable with little variation in the puffing frequency. However, between 2002 and 2003 we noted a systematic increase in mean plume temperature, puffing frequency, puff emission velocity and puff volume, as well as a decrease in mean puff duration. While the first 4 parameters respectively increased from 105 to 157°C, 6 to 7 puffs per minute, 2 to 3 m s^{- 1} and ~2300 to ~2900 m3, puff duration decreased from 10 to 8.5 seconds. These changes were consistent with a thermal-data-derived increase in emitted gas volume from 1.1 x 107 m3 d-1 to 1.6 x 107 m3 d-1 between 2002 and 2003. Turbulent gas puffs entrain surrounding air, and quantifying the magnitude of air entrainment, or dilution, represents a major challenge for the measurement of total volcanic gas emissions. Our observations of small gas puffs suggest that they behave as turbulent buoyant thermals, and we use equations for mass, momentum and buoyancy, coupled with the standard entrainment assumption for turbulent buoyant flows, to estimate the gas puff dilution. The theoretically calculated entrainment rate of 40% dilution between emission and detection yields total SO2 mass fluxes of 450 t d-1 and 640 t d-1 for 2002 and 2003, respectively. This compares well with UV-spectrometer SO2 fluxes of 470 and 680 t d-1 for February 2002 and March 2003, respectively.

  11. 30 CFR 36.49 - Tests of exhaust-gas dilution system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ..., EVALUATION, AND APPROVAL OF MINING PRODUCTS APPROVAL REQUIREMENTS FOR PERMISSIBLE MOBILE DIESEL-POWERED... carbon dioxide, carbon monoxide, oxides of nitrogen, and aldehydes in the diluted exhaust shall be...

  12. 30 CFR 36.49 - Tests of exhaust-gas dilution system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ..., EVALUATION, AND APPROVAL OF MINING PRODUCTS APPROVAL REQUIREMENTS FOR PERMISSIBLE MOBILE DIESEL-POWERED... carbon dioxide, carbon monoxide, oxides of nitrogen, and aldehydes in the diluted exhaust shall be...

  13. 30 CFR 36.49 - Tests of exhaust-gas dilution system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ..., EVALUATION, AND APPROVAL OF MINING PRODUCTS APPROVAL REQUIREMENTS FOR PERMISSIBLE MOBILE DIESEL-POWERED... carbon dioxide, carbon monoxide, oxides of nitrogen, and aldehydes in the diluted exhaust shall be...

  14. 30 CFR 36.49 - Tests of exhaust-gas dilution system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ..., EVALUATION, AND APPROVAL OF MINING PRODUCTS APPROVAL REQUIREMENTS FOR PERMISSIBLE MOBILE DIESEL-POWERED... carbon dioxide, carbon monoxide, oxides of nitrogen, and aldehydes in the diluted exhaust shall be...

  15. 30 CFR 36.49 - Tests of exhaust-gas dilution system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ..., EVALUATION, AND APPROVAL OF MINING PRODUCTS APPROVAL REQUIREMENTS FOR PERMISSIBLE MOBILE DIESEL-POWERED... carbon dioxide, carbon monoxide, oxides of nitrogen, and aldehydes in the diluted exhaust shall be...

  16. Laws of the DC arc in an inert gas during melting in furnaces with a tungsten electrode

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Belyanchikov, L. N.

    2012-06-01

    The I-V and voltage-baric characteristics of the dc arc glowing in argon between a tungsten cathode and a molten anode made of titanium, chromium, or manganese are studied at various gas pressures, arc currents, and arc lengths. The arc is probed to establish the relation between the voltage drop across the arc and its regions on the anode material and the melting conditions.

  17. Effect of heat input on the microstructure and mechanical properties of tungsten inert gas arc butt-welded AZ61 magnesium alloy plates

    SciTech Connect

    Min Dong; Shen Jun; Lai Shiqiang; Chen Jie

    2009-12-15

    In this paper, the effects of heat input on the microstructures and mechanical properties of tungsten inert gas arc butt-welded AZ61 magnesium alloy plates were investigated by microstructural observations, microhardness tests and tensile tests. The results show that with an increase of the heat input, the grains both in the fusion zone and the heat-affected zone coarsen and the width of the heat-affected zone increased. Moreover, an increase of the heat input resulted in a decrease of the continuous {beta}-Mg{sub 17}Al{sub 12} phase and an increase of the granular {beta}-Mg{sub 17}Al{sub 12} phase in both the fusion zone and the heat-affected zone. The ultimate tensile strength of the welded joint increased with an increase of the heat input, while, too high a heat input resulted in a decrease of the ultimate tensile strength of the welded joint. In addition, the average microhardness of the heat-affected zone and fusion zone decreased sharply with an increase of the heat input and then decreased slowly at a relatively high heat input.

  18. Controlled inert gas environment for enhanced chlorine and fluorine detection in the visible and near-infrared by laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Asimellis, George; Hamilton, Stephen; Giannoudakos, Aggelos; Kompitsas, Michael

    2005-08-01

    Efficient quantitative detection for halogens is necessary in a wide range of applications, ranging from pharmaceutical products to air polluting hazardous gases or organic compounds used as chemical weapons. Detection of the non-metallic elements such as fluorine (F) and chlorine (Cl) presents particular difficulty, because strong emission lines originating from their resonance states lie in the VUV spectral range (110-190 nm). In the present work we detect F and Cl in the upper visible and in the near IR (650-850 nm) under controlled inert gas ambient atmosphere. Investigation of the controlled atmosphere effects suggests that there exists an optimum pressure range that optimizes signal strength and quality. Ablation and ionization were achieved with a UV laser at 355 nm, and a gated GaAs photocathode-based detector was used for detection with quantum efficiency in the range of 20% in the wavelengths of interest. Our results indicate that our approach provides quantitative detection with linearity over at least two orders of magnitude that is achieved without the need for Internal Standardization Method, and improved limits of detection. In particular, fluorine has been detected for concentration values down to 0.03 wt.% Definite spectral assignment revealing all major emission lines centered around 837 nm for F and 687 nm for Cl has been obtained for the first time in Laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy application.

  19. Structural characterization and X-ray analysis by Williamson-Hall method for Erbium doped Aluminum Nitride nanoparticles, synthesized using inert gas condensation technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pandya, Sneha G.; Corbett, Joseph P.; Jadwisienczak, Wojciech M.; Kordesch, Martin E.

    2016-05-01

    We have synthesized AlN nanoparticles (NPs) doped in-situ with Er (AlN:Er) using inert gas condensation technique. Using x-ray diffraction (XRD) peak broadening analysis with the Williamson-Hall (W-H) Uniform Deformation Model (UDM) the crystallite size of the NPs and the strain in NPs were found to be 80±38 nm and 3.07×10-3±0.9×10-3 respectively. In comparison, using the Debye-Scherrer's (DS) formula, we have inferred that the crystallite size of the NPs was 23±6 nm and the average strain was 4.3×10-3±0.4×10-3. The scanning electron microscopy images show that the NPs are spherical and have an average diameter of ∼300 nm. The crystallite size is smaller than the size of the NPs revealing their polycrystalline behavior. In addition, the NPs strain, stress and energy density were also calculated using W-H analysis combined with the Uniform Deformation Stress Model (UDSM) and the Uniform Deformation Energy Density Model (UDEDM). Suggested by the spherical geometry and polycrystalline nature of the AlN NPs, the strain computed from UDM, UDSM and UDEDM were in agreement confirming an isotropic mechanical nature of the particle. Luminescence measurements revealed the temperature dependence of the optical emission of the Er3+ ions, confirming the use of AlN:Er NPs for nano-scale temperature sensing.

  20. The Role of Spraying Parameters and Inert Gas Shrouding in Hybrid Water-Argon Plasma Spraying of Tungsten and Copper for Nuclear Fusion Applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mat?j?ek, J.; Kavka, T.; Bertolissi, G.; Ctibor, P.; Vilmov, M.; Mulek, R.; Nevrl, B.

    2013-06-01

    Tungsten-based coatings have potential application in the plasma-facing components in future nuclear fusion reactors. By the combination of refractory tungsten with highly thermal conducting copper, or steel as a construction material, functionally graded coatings can be easily obtained by plasma spraying, and may result in the development of a material with favorable properties. During plasma spraying of these materials in the open atmosphere, oxidation is an important issue, which could have adverse effects on their properties. Among the means to control it is the application of inert gas shrouding, which forms the subject of this study and represents a lower-cost alternative to vacuum or low-pressure plasma spraying, potentially applicable also for spraying of large surfaces or spacious components. It is a continuation of recent studies focused on the effects of various parameters of the hybrid water-argon torch on the in-flight behavior of copper and tungsten powders and the resultant coatings. In the current study, argon shrouding with various configurations of the shroud was applied. The effects of torch parameters, such as power and argon flow rate, and powder morphology were also investigated. Their influence on the particle in-flight behavior as well as the structure, composition and properties of the coatings were quantified. With the help of auxiliary calculations, the mass changes of the powder particles, associated with oxidation and evaporation, were assessed.

  1. Effects of CaF2 Coating on the Microstructures and Mechanical Properties of Tungsten Inert Gas Welded AZ31 Magnesium Alloy Joints

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shen, Jun; Wang, Linzhi; Peng, Dong; Wang, Dan

    2012-11-01

    The effects of CaF2 coating on the macromorphologies of the welded seams were studied by morphological analysis. Microstructures and mechanical properties of butt joints welded with different amounts of CaF2 coatings were investigated using optical microscopy and tensile tests. The welding defects formed in the welded seams and the fracture surfaces were analyzed by scanning electron microscopy. An increase in the amount of CaF2 coating deteriorated the appearances of the welded seams but it improved the weld penetration depth and the depth/width ( D/ W) ratio of the tungsten inert gas (TIG) welded joints. The α-Mg grains and Mg17(Al,Zn)12 intermetallic compound (IMC) were coarser in the case of a higher amount of CaF2 coating. The increase in the amount of CaF2 coating reduced the porosities and total length of solidification cracks in the fusion zone (FZ). The ultimate tensile strength (UTS) value and elongation increased at first and then decreased sharply.

  2. Influence of the growing parameters on the size distribution of PbTe nanoparticles produced by laser ablation under inert gas atmosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Almeida, D. B.; Rodriguez, E.; Agouram, S.; Moreira, R. S.; Cesar, C. L.; Jimenez, E.; Barbosa, L. C.

    2012-03-01

    We report the fabrication of PbTe quantum dots grown under inert gas (Ar and He) atmosphere by pulsed laser deposition using the second harmonic of a Q-Switched Quantel Nd:YAG laser. For characterization, samples were prepared onto a 40Å carbon film deposited on a copper grid. The influence of background pressure, and number of laser pulses on the size distribution of the PbTe nanoparticles was investigated by transmission electron microscopy using a 200 kV TECNAI G2 F20 electron microscope with 0.27 nm point resolution. The size distribution was obtained by manually outlining the particles from several dozens of low- and high-resolution TEM images. Once digitized and saved in a proper format, the image was processed using the J-image software. Characterizations reveal an increase of the nanoparticle size both with the amount of material deposited (number of laser pulses) and the background pressure. Furthermore, measurements reveal a narrower nanoparticle size distribution by increasing the number of laser pulses or by decreasing the background pressure. HRTEM studies of the influence of different ambient gases on the structural properties of the PbTe nanoparticles are being conducted.

  3. Tungsten Inert Gas and Friction Stir Welding Characteristics of 4-mm-Thick 2219-T87 Plates at Room Temperature and -196 °C

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lei, Xuefeng; Deng, Ying; Yin, Zhimin; Xu, Guofu

    2014-06-01

    2219-T87 aluminum alloy is widely used for fabricating liquid rocket propellant storage tank, due to its admirable cryogenic property. Welding is the dominant joining method in the manufacturing process of aerospace components. In this study, the tungsten inert gas welding and friction stir welding (FSW) characteristics of 4-mm-thick 2219-T87 alloy plate at room temperature (25 °C) and deep cryogenic temperature (-196 °C) were investigated by property measurements and microscopy methods. The studied 2219 base alloy exhibits a low strength plane anisotropy and excellent room temperature and cryogenic mechanical properties. The ultimate tensile strength values of TIG and FSW welding joints can reach 265 and 353 MPa at room temperature, and 342 and 438 MPa at -196 °C, respectively. The base metal consists of elongated deformed grains and many nano-scaled θ (Al2Cu) aging precipitates. Fusion zone and heat-affected zone (HAZ) of the TIG joint are characterized by coarsening dendritic grains and equiaxed recrystallized grains, respectively. The FSW-welded joint consists of the weld nugget zone, thermo-mechanically affected zone (TMAZ), and HAZ. In the weld nugget zone, a micro-scaled sub-grain structure is the main microstructure characteristic. The TMAZ and HAZ are both characterized by coarsened aging precipitates and elongated deformed grains. The excellent FSW welding properties are attributed to the preservation of the working structures and homogenous chemical compositions.

  4. Inert gas ion thruster development

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ramsey, W. D.

    1980-01-01

    Two 12 cm magneto-electrostatic containment (MESC) ion thrusters were performance mapped with argon and xenon. The first, hexagonal, thruster produced optimized performance of 48.5to 79 percent argon mass utilization efficiencies at discharge energies of 240 to 425 eV/ion, respectively, Xenon mass utilization efficiencies of 78 to 95 percent were observed at discharge energies of 220 to 290 eV/ion with the same optimized hexagonal thruster. Changes to the cathode baffle reduced the discharge anode potential during xenon operation from approximately 40 volts to about 30 volts. Preliminary tests conducted with the second, hemispherical, MESC thruster showed a nonuniform anode magnetic field adversely affected thruster performance. This performance degradation was partially overcome by changes in the boundary anode placement. Conclusions drawn the hemispherical thruster tests gave insights into the plasma processes in the MESC discharge that will aid in the design of future thrusters.

  5. Inert gas ion source program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ramsey, W. D.

    1978-01-01

    THe original 12 cm hexagonal magneto-electrostatic containment discharge chamber has been optimized for argon and xenon operation. Argon mass utilization efficiencies of 65 to 77 percent were achieved at keeper-plus-main discharge energy consumptions of 200 to 458 eV/ion, respectively. Xenon performance of 84 to 96 percent mass utilization was realized at 203 to 350 eV/ion. The optimization process and test results are discussed.

  6. Assessment of the biological effects of welding fumes emitted from metal inert gas welding processes of aluminium and zinc-plated materials in humans.

    PubMed

    Hartmann, L; Bauer, M; Bertram, J; Gube, M; Lenz, K; Reisgen, U; Schettgen, T; Kraus, T; Brand, P

    2014-03-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate biological effects and potential health risks due to two different metal-inert-gas (MIG) welding fumes (MIG welding of aluminium and MIG soldering of zinc coated steel) in healthy humans. In a threefold cross-over design study 12 male subjects were exposed to three different exposure scenarios. Exposures were performed under controlled conditions in the Aachener Workplace Simulation Laboratory (AWSL). On three different days the subjects were either exposed to filtered ambient air, to welding fumes from MIG welding of aluminium, or to fumes from MIG soldering of zinc coated materials. Exposure was performed for 6 h and the average fume concentration was 2.5 mg m(-3). Before, directly after, 1 day after, and 7 days after exposure spirometric and impulse oscillometric measurements were performed, exhaled breath condensate (EBC) was collected and blood samples were taken and analyzed for inflammatory markers. During MIG welding of aluminium high ozone concentrations (up to 250 μg m(-3)) were observed, whereas ozone was negligible for MIG soldering. For MIG soldering, concentrations of high-sensitivity CRP (hsCRP) and factor VIII were significantly increased but remained mostly within the normal range. The concentration of neutrophils increased in tendency. For MIG welding of aluminium, the lung function showed significant decreases in Peak Expiratory Flow (PEF) and Mean Expiratory Flow at 75% vital capacity (MEF 75) 7 days after exposure. The concentration of ristocetin cofactor was increased. The observed increase of hsCRP during MIG-soldering can be understood as an indicator for asymptomatic systemic inflammation probably due to zinc (zinc concentration 1.5 mg m(-3)). The change in lung function observed after MIG welding of aluminium may be attributed to ozone inhalation, although the late response (7 days after exposure) is surprising. PMID:23790592

  7. Effect of dilution gas on hardness of hydrogenated amorphous carbon-based films synthesized by atmospheric pressure plasma enhanced CVD

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Noborisaka, M.; Tachimoto, Y.; Horikoshi, R.; Shirakura, A.; Suzuki, T.

    2013-03-01

    The deposition of hydrogenated amorphous carbon (a-C:H)-based films at atmospheric pressure is a cost-effective process without using a high-vacuum technique. In this study, we synthesized a-C:H-based films by atmospheric pressure-plasma enhanced CVD method from C2H2/He and C2H2/N2 mixture gas and investigated the effect of dilution gas on the hardness of the films. The film deposited from C2H2/N2 contained nitrogen elements with forming C-N bonds and the film was softer than a-C:H film deposited from C2H2/He. The hardness of the film deposited from C2H2/He was 1.1 GPa and twice higher than that from C2H2/N2.

  8. EFFICIENCY OF GAS-WALL REACTIONS IN A CYLINDRICAL FLOW REACTOR

    EPA Science Inventory

    Expressions are given for the concentration of a dilute reactive gas mixed with an inert carrier gas as a function of the radial and longitudinal distances in a cylindrical reactor and the reaction efficiency. The reaction efficiency is defined as the fraction of gas-wall collisi...

  9. Approaches of aroma extraction dilution analysis (AEDA) for headspace solid phase microextraction and gas chromatography-olfactometry (HS-SPME-GC-O): Altering sample amount, diluting the sample or adjusting split ratio?

    PubMed

    Feng, Yunzi; Cai, Yu; Sun-Waterhouse, Dongxiao; Cui, Chun; Su, Guowan; Lin, Lianzhu; Zhao, Mouming

    2015-11-15

    Aroma extract dilution analysis (AEDA) is widely used for the screening of aroma-active compounds in gas chromatography-olfactometry (GC-O). In this study, three aroma dilution methods, (I) using different test sample volumes, (II) diluting samples, and (III) adjusting the GC injector split ratio, were compared for the analysis of volatiles by using HS-SPME-AEDA. Results showed that adjusting the GC injector split ratio (III) was the most desirable approach, based on the linearity relationships between Ln (normalised peak area) and Ln (normalised flavour dilution factors). Thereafter this dilution method was applied in the analysis of aroma-active compounds in Japanese soy sauce and 36 key odorants were found in this study. The most intense aroma-active components in Japanese soy sauce were: ethyl 2-methylpropanoate, ethyl 2-methylbutanoate, ethyl 3-methylbutanoate, ethyl 4-methylpentanoate, 3-(methylthio)propanal, 1-octen-3-ol, 2-methoxyphenol, 4-ethyl-2-methoxyphenol, 2-methoxy-4-vinylphenol, 2-phenylethanol, and 4-hydroxy-5-ethyl-2-methyl-3(2H)-furanone. PMID:25976996

  10. Methanol Droplet Combustion in Oxygen-Inert Environments in Microgravity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nayagam, Vedha; Dietrich, Daniel L.; Hicks, Michael C.; Williams, Forman A.

    2013-01-01

    The Flame Extinguishment (FLEX) experiment that is currently underway in the Combustion Integrated Rack facility onboard the International Space Station is aimed at understanding the effects of inert diluents on the flammability of condensed phase fuels. To this end, droplets of various fuels, including alkanes and alcohols, are burned in a quiescent microgravity environment with varying amounts of oxygen and inert diluents to determine the limiting oxygen index (LOI) for these fuels. In this study we report experimental observations of methanol droplets burning in oxygen-nitrogen-carbon dioxide and oxygen-nitrogen-helium gas mixtures at 0.7 and 1 atmospheric pressures. The initial droplet size varied between approximately 1.5 mm and 4 mm to capture both diffusive extinction brought about by insufficient residence time at the flame and radiative extinction caused by excessive heat loss from the flame zone. The ambient oxygen concentration varied from a high value of 30% by volume to as low as 12%, approaching the limiting oxygen index for the fuel. The inert dilution by carbon dioxide and helium varied over a range of 0% to 70% by volume. In these experiments, both freely floated and tethered droplets were ignited using symmetrically opposed hot-wire igniters and the burning histories were recorded onboard using digital cameras, downlinked later to the ground for analysis. The digital images yielded droplet and flame diameters as functions of time and subsequently droplet burning rate, flame standoff ratio, and initial and extinction droplet diameters. Simplified theoretical models correlate the measured burning rate constant and the flame standoff ratio reasonably well. An activation energy asymptotic theory accounting for time-dependent water dissolution or evaporation from the droplet is shown to predict the measured diffusive extinction conditions well. The experiments also show that the limiting oxygen index for methanol in these diluent gases is around 12% to 13% oxygen by volume.

  11. Efficient gas-separation process to upgrade dilute methane stream for use as fuel

    DOEpatents

    Wijmans, Johannes G.; Merkel, Timothy C.; Lin, Haiqing; Thompson, Scott; Daniels, Ramin

    2012-03-06

    A membrane-based gas separation process for treating gas streams that contain methane in low concentrations. The invention involves flowing the stream to be treated across the feed side of a membrane and flowing a sweep gas stream, usually air, across the permeate side. Carbon dioxide permeates the membrane preferentially and is picked up in the sweep air stream on the permeate side; oxygen permeates in the other direction and is picked up in the methane-containing stream. The resulting residue stream is enriched in methane as well as oxygen and has an EMC value enabling it to be either flared or combusted by mixing with ordinary air.

  12. Inert Anode Report

    SciTech Connect

    none,

    1999-07-01

    This ASME report provides a broad assessment of open literature and patents that exist in the area of inert anodes and their related cathode systems and cell designs, technologies that are relevant for the advanced smelting of aluminum. The report also discusses the opportunities, barriers, and issues associated with these technologies from a technical, environmental, and economic viewpoint.

  13. Activity coefficients at infinite dilution of organic compounds in 1-(meth)acryloyloxyalkyl-3-methylimidazolium bromide using inverse gas chromatography.

    PubMed

    Mutelet, Fabrice; Jaubert, Jean-Noël; Rogalski, Marek; Harmand, Julie; Sindt, Michèle; Mieloszynski, Jean-Luc

    2008-03-27

    Activity coefficients at infinite dilution, gammainfinity, of organic compounds in two new room-temperature ionic liquids (n-methacryloyloxyhexyl-N-methylimidazolium bromide (C10H17O2MIM)(Br) at 313.15 and 323.15 K and n-acryloyloxypropyl-N-methylimidazolium bromide(C6H11O2MIM)(Br)) were determined using inverse gas chromatography. Phase loading studies of the net retention volume per gram of packing as a function of the percent phase loading were used to estimate the influence of concurrent retention mechanisms on the accuracy of activity coefficients at infinite dilution of solutes in both ionic liquids. It was found that most of the solutes were retained largely by partition with a small contribution from adsorption and that n-alkanes were retained predominantly by interfacial adsorption on ionic liquids studied in this work. The solvation characteristics of the two ionic liquids were evaluated using the Abraham solvation parameter model. PMID:18318530

  14. Effect of Kr Gas Dilution on O Atom Density in Inductively Coupled Kr/O2 Plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hori, Masaru; Ikuma, Soichi; Goto, Toshio

    2003-10-01

    Oxygen-based plasmas have been used for the low temperature oxidation of materials. It has been reported that the high quality SiO2 film was formed at a low temperature by Kr dilution O2 plasma. From the viewpoint of developing the low temperature oxidation processes used for the gate dielectric film in LCD devices, a quantitative study on the behavior of O atom in the Kr/O2 mixture plasma is strongly required. In this study, we measured the absolute O atom and metastable Kr atom densities in an inductively coupled Kr/O2 plasma using vacuum ultraviolet absorption spectroscopy technique. The transition lines used for absorption measurements were ^3S0 - ^3P_2, ^3S0 - ^3P1 and ^3S0 - ^3P0 at 130.2 nm for O atom and ^3D3 - ^3P2 at 811.3 nm for metastable Kr atom. The absolute O atom density was almost constant on 4×10^13 cm-3 although the Kr dilution ratio was increased from 0 to 99% at an RF power of 200W, a pressure of 107 Pa, and a total gas flow rate of 100 sccm. The effect of metastable Kr atom on the production of the O atom has been discussed.

  15. Simultaneous determination of alachlor, metolachlor, atrazine, and simazine in water and soil by isotope dilution gas chromatography/mass spectrometry

    SciTech Connect

    Huang, L.Q.

    1989-03-01

    A multiresidue method was developed for the simultaneous determination of low parts per billion (ppb) concentrations of the herbicides alachlor, metolachlor, atrazine, and simazine in water and soil using isotope dilution gas chromatography/mass spectrometry (GC/MS). Known amounts of /sup 15/N,/sup 13/C-alachlor and /sup 2/H/sub 5/-atrazine were added to each sample as internal standards. The samples were then prepared by a solid phase extraction with no further cleanup. A high resolution GC/low resolution MS system with data acquisition in selected ion monitoring mode was used to quantitate herbicides in the extract. The limit of detection was 0.05 ppb for water and 0.5 ppb for soil. Accuracy greater than 80% and precision better than 4% was demonstrated with spiked samples.

  16. [Determination of polychlorinated naphthalenes in environmental samples by isotope dilution gas chromatography-triple quadrupole mass spectrometry].

    PubMed

    Liu, Zhitong; Zhang, Bing; Wang, Wenwen; Liu, Guorui; Gao, Lirong; Zheng, Minghui

    2013-09-01

    An isotope dilution gas chromatography combined with triple quadrupole mass spectrometry (GC-MS/MS) method was established for the analysis of twenty polychlorinated naphthalenes (PCNs) congeners in environmental samples. The linear correlation coefficients (R2) of calibration curves were greater than 0.99 in the concentration range of 0.5 - 200 microg/L for all the twenty PCN congeners. The average relative response factors (RRF) were calculated based on a seven-point calibration for the twenty PCN congeners. The relative standard deviations (RSDs) of all the congeners were below 15% (n = 7). The limits of detection (LOD) of the established method ranged from 0.04 to 0.48 microg/L for the twenty PCN congeners. The recoveries of matrix spiked samples ranged from 45.2% to 87.9%, and the RSDs ranged from 0.4% to 21.2%. The sediment samples and stack gas samples collected from secondary aluminum smelting were analyzed by the established method. The obtained results were also compared with the data analyzed by high resolution gas chromatography/high resolution mass spectrometry (HRGC/HRMS) method. The comparison indicated that the data of the established method was in good agreement with those of HRGC/HRMS method with the RSDs of 0.5% - 41.4%. Consequently, the established GC-MS/MS method can be applied to the determination of PCNs in environmental samples. PMID:24392626

  17. Origins of inert Higgs doublets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kephart, Thomas W.; Yuan, Tzu-Chiang

    2016-05-01

    We consider beyond the standard model embedding of inert Higgs doublet fields. We argue that inert Higgs doublets can arise naturally in grand unified theories where the necessary associated Z2 symmetry can occur automatically. Several examples are discussed.

  18. Method of producing hydrogen, and rendering a contaminated biomass inert

    DOEpatents

    Bingham, Dennis N. [Idaho Falls, ID; Klingler, Kerry M. [Idaho Falls, ID; Wilding, Bruce M. [Idaho Falls, ID

    2010-02-23

    A method for rendering a contaminated biomass inert includes providing a first composition, providing a second composition, reacting the first and second compositions together to form an alkaline hydroxide, providing a contaminated biomass feedstock and reacting the alkaline hydroxide with the contaminated biomass feedstock to render the contaminated biomass feedstock inert and further producing hydrogen gas, and a byproduct that includes the first composition.

  19. Contribution of Liquid/Gas Mass-Transfer Limitations to Dissolved Methane Oversaturation in Anaerobic Treatment of Dilute Wastewater.

    PubMed

    Yeo, Hyeongu; An, Junyeong; Reid, Robertson; Rittmann, Bruce E; Lee, Hyung-Sool

    2015-09-01

    The mechanisms controlling the accumulation of dissolved methane in anaerobic membrane bioreactors (AnMBRs) treating a synthetic dilute wastewater (a glucose medium) were assessed experimentally and theoretically. The AnMBR was maintained at a temperature of 24-26 °C as the organic loading rate increased from 0.39 to 1.1 kg COD/m(3)-d. The measured concentration of dissolved methane was consistently 2.2- to 2.5-fold larger than the concentration of dissolved methane at thermodynamic equilibrium with the measured CH4 partial pressure, and the fraction of dissolved methane was as high as 76% of the total methane produced. The low gas production rate in the AnMBR significantly slowed the mass transport of dissolved methane to the gas phase. Although the production rate of total methane increased linearly with the COD loading rate, the concentration of dissolved methane only slightly increased with an increasing organic loading rate, because the mass-transfer rate increased by almost 5-fold as the COD loading increased from 0.39 to 1.1 kg COD/m(3)-d. Thus, slow mass transport kinetics exacerbated the situation in which dissolved methane accounted for a substantial fraction of the total methane generated from the AnMBR. PMID:26238158

  20. An improved multiscale model for dilute turbulent gas particle flows based on the equilibration of energy concept

    SciTech Connect

    Xu, Ying

    2005-05-01

    Many particle-laden flows in engineering applications involve turbulent gas flows. Modeling multiphase turbulent flows is an important research topic with applications in fluidized beds and particle conveying. A predictive multiphase turbulence model can help CFD codes to be more useful for engineering applications, such as the scale-up in the design of circulating fluidized combustor and coal gasifications. In engineering applications, the particle volume fraction can vary from dilute (<10{sup -4}) to dense ({approx} 50%). It is reasonable to expect that multiphase turbulence models should at least satisfy some basic modeling and performance criteria and give reasonable predictions for the canonical problems in dilute particle-laden turbulent flows. In this research, a comparative assessment of predictions from Simonin and Ahmadi's turbulence models is performed with direct numerical simulation (DNS) for two canonical problems in particle-laden turbulent flows. Based on the comparative assessment, some criteria and the areas for model improvement are identified: (1) model for interphase TKE transfer, especially the time scale of interphase TKE transfer, and (2) correct prediction of TKE evolution with variation of particle Stokes number. Some deficiencies that are identified in the Simonin and Ahmadi models, limit the applicability. A new multiphase turbulence model, the Equilibration of Energy Model (EEM), is proposed in this work. In EEM, a multiscale interaction time scale is proposed to account for the interaction of a particle with a range of eddy sizes. EEM shows good agreement with the DNS results for particle-laden isotropic turbulence. For particle-laden homogeneous shear flows, model predictions from EEM can be further improved if the dissipation rate in fluid phase is modeled with more accuracy.

  1. Determination of thermodynamic properties of isotactic poly(1-butene) at infinite dilution using density and inverse gas chromatography.

    PubMed

    Kozłowska, Marta Karolina; Domańska, Urszula; Lempert, Małgorzata; Rogalski, Marek

    2005-03-18

    The partial molar volumes, V1(M), and the molar volume of isotactic crystalline low-molecular-weight poly(1-butene), iPBu-1, V1, have been calculated from the measured density of {iPBu-1 + solvent (n-hexane, n-heptane, n-nonane, n-decane, p-xylene, cyclohexane and chloroform)} systems. Some of the thermodynamic quantities were also obtained for the iPBu-1 with eight hydrocarbons (n-octane, n-decane, n-undecane, n-dodecane, n-tridecane, o-xylene, m-xylene, p-xylene) by the method of inverse gas chromatography at various temperatures. The weight fraction activity coefficients of the solvent at infinite dilution, omega2(infinity) and the Flory-Huggins thermodynamic interaction parameters, chi21(infinity), between polymer and solvents were determined. The partial molar free energy, deltaG2(infinity), the partial molar heat of mixing, deltaH2(infinity), at infinite dilution and the polymer solubility parameter, delta1, were calculated. Additionally, the (solid + liquid) binary mixtures equilibria, SLE, of iPBu-1 with three hydrocarbons (n-octane, n-decane and m-xylene) were studied by a dynamic method. By performing these experiments over a large concentration range, the T-x phase diagrams of the polymer-solvent systems were constructed. The excess Gibbs energy models were used to describe the nonideal behaviour of the liquid phase. The omega2(infinity) were determined from the solubility measurements and were predicted by using the UNIFAC FV model. PMID:15830936

  2. Calculated cross sections for transport coefficients of H 2 dilute in He and HI gas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schaefer, J.

    2010-08-01

    Relaxation cross sections determining transport coefficients of the binary systems He-H 2 and HI-H 2 have been calculated by using the Waldmann-Snider formalism of the linearized collision operator. After starting with the rotational relaxation times, which are determined by inelastic rotational transitions only, all the following contributions of relaxation cross sections to the binary transport coefficients of the viscosity, heat conductivity, and diffusion have been confined to the valid isotropic approximations, i.e. containing results of elastic collisions, which are only slightly corrected by inelastic effects. Cross sections of the pure gas components have not been done in this paper. The prepared input data have been differential cross sections of a sufficient number of energies and enough initial rotational j states of the molecules to produce converged results at temperatures from 5 K up to 1000 K. Convergence with regard to the contributed j states are shown in figures, the resulting numbers of the cross sections are printed in tables for temperatures up to 600 K. The results show almost identical cross sections for the ortho-H 2 and para-H 2 gas components in relaxation cross sections of purely translational motion, whereas cross sections pertaining purely internal rotational motion are significantly different for para-H 2 and ortho-H 2, and cross sections pertaining coupling of rotational-translational motion could be shown to be negligible as demonstrated in figures.

  3. Activity Coefficients at Infinite Dilution of Organic Compounds in Trihexyl(tetradecyl)phophonium Bis(trifluoromethylsulfonyl)imide Using Inverse Gas Chromatography

    SciTech Connect

    Revelli, Anne-Laure; Sprunger, Laura; Gibbs, Jennifer; Acree, William; Baker, Gary A; Mutelet, Fabrice

    2009-01-01

    Activity coefficients at infinite dilution of organic compounds in the ionic liquid (IL) trihexyl(tetradecyl) phosphonium bis(trifluoromethylsulfonyl)imide were determined using inverse gas chromatography at three temperatures, T ) (302.45, 322.35, and 342.45) K. Linear free energy relationship (LFER) correlations have been obtained for describing the gas-to-IL and water-to-IL partition coefficients.

  4. Molecular simulation study of the surface barrier effect. Dilute gas limit

    SciTech Connect

    Ford, D.M.; Glandt, E.D.

    1995-07-20

    The mass transfer resistance associated with penetrating the mouth of a very small pore is evaluated using classical molecular dynamics simulation techniques. The effects of temperature, pore size, and thermal motion of the adsorbent atoms are studied for a slit pore mouth model. Adsorption followed by surface diffusion to the pore mouth makes a significant contribution to the mass transfer when the temperature is low or, equivalently, when the adsorptive potential is strong. Thermal vibrations of the adsorbent atoms have little effect on the adsorption/surface diffusion mechanisms but cause fluctuations in the effective pore mouth area which can significantly affect transport rates. Perhaps the most important observation is that when the pore size approaches the kinetic diameter of the gas molecules, changes of a few percent in the pore size cause order-of-magnitude changes in the resistance. Therefore, it is possible that the surface barrier effect observed in zeolites and carbon molecular sieves is governed by highly localized (single atomic layer) structural details. 19 refs., 7 figs., 1 tab.

  5. Ultra-cold dilute gas Bose-Fermi mixture with ^87Rb and ^40K

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goldwin, J.; Olsen, M. L.; Inouye, S.; Jin, D. S.

    2003-05-01

    Sympathetic cooling experiments with Bose-Fermi mixtures offer a way to cool Fermi gases to quantum degeneracy with relatively little loss in atom number, as well as offering interesting new systems for study with the control and precision typical of atomic physics experiments. Here we report on the sympathetic cooling of fermionic ^40K with bosonic ^87Rb. We first trap and cool ^87Rb atoms in a two-species MOT together with ^40K. After loading into a purely magnetic quadrupole configuration trap, the gas is transferred mechanically nearly a meter to a Ioffe-Pritchard type magnetic trap in an ultra-high vacuum cell. radio-frequency induced evaporation of the ^87Rb atoms results in pure Bose-Einstein condensates of 2 10^5 atoms. In the process ^40K atoms are cooled by virtue of thermal contact with the ^87Rb reservoir resulting in cooling of ^40K, with 1 10^4 atoms at temperatures below 100 nK. We present results from the experiment demonstrating the efficiency of the cooling, and describe ongoing investigations into the limits of the cooling and the strong inter-species interactions in the mixture. Finally, future directions for the experiment are discussed.

  6. Analysis of N-nitrosamines in water by isotope dilution gas chromatography-electron ionisation tandem mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    McDonald, James A; Harden, Nick B; Nghiem, Long D; Khan, Stuart J

    2012-09-15

    A method has been developed for the determination of eight N-nitrosamines in drinking water and treated municipal effluent. The method uses solid phase extraction (SPE), gas chromatography (GC) and analysis by tandem mass spectrometry (MS-MS) with electron ionization (EI). The target compounds are N-nitrosodimethylamine (NDMA), N-nitrosomethyethylamine (NMEA), N-nitrosodiethylamine NDEA), N-nitrosodipropylamine (NDPA), N-nitrosodi-n-butylamine (NDBuA), N-nitrosodiphenylamine (NDPhA), N-nitrosopyrrolidine (NPyr), N-nitrosopiperidine (NPip), N-nitrosomorpholine (NMorph). The use of direct isotope analogues for isotope dilution analysis of all analytes ensures accurate quantification, accounting for analytical variabilities that may occur during sample processing, extraction and instrumental analysis. Method detection levels (MDLs) were determined to describe analyte concentrations sufficient to provide a signal with 99% certainty of detection. The established MDLs for all analytes were 0.4-4 ng L(-1) in a variety of aqueous matrices. Sample matrices were observed to have only a minor impact on MDLs and the method validation confirmed satisfactory method stability over intra-day and inter-day analyses of tap water and tertiary treated effluent samples. PMID:22967534

  7. 33 CFR 154.824 - Inerting, enriching, and diluting systems.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... this section; (2) When hydrocarbon analyzers are used, the lower hydrocarbon concentration reading... (i) or (k)(1) of this section; and (3) When hydrocarbon analyzers are used, the higher hydrocarbon... section. (f) Each oxygen or hydrocarbon analyzer required by this section must: (1) Be installed...

  8. 33 CFR 154.824 - Inerting, enriching, and diluting systems.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... this section; (2) When hydrocarbon analyzers are used, the lower hydrocarbon concentration reading... (i) or (k)(1) of this section; and (3) When hydrocarbon analyzers are used, the higher hydrocarbon... section. (f) Each oxygen or hydrocarbon analyzer required by this section must: (1) Be installed...

  9. 33 CFR 154.824 - Inerting, enriching, and diluting systems.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... this section; (2) When hydrocarbon analyzers are used, the lower hydrocarbon concentration reading... (i) or (k)(1) of this section; and (3) When hydrocarbon analyzers are used, the higher hydrocarbon... section. (f) Each oxygen or hydrocarbon analyzer required by this section must: (1) Be installed...

  10. Simultaneous detection of multiple hydroxylated polychlorinated biphenyls from a complex tissue matrix using gas chromatography/isotope dilution mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Eguchi, Akifumi; Nomiyama, Kei; Ochiai, Mari; Mizukawa, Hazuki; Nagano, Yasuko; Nakagawa, Katsuhiro; Tanaka, Kouki; Miyagawa, Haruhiko; Tanabe, Shinsuke

    2014-01-01

    In this study, we developed a comprehensive, highly sensitive, and robust method for determining 53 congeners of three to eight chlorinated OH-PCBs in liver and brain samples by using isotope dilution gas chromatography (GC) coupled with electron capture negative ionization mass spectrometry (ECNI-MS). These results were compared with those from GC coupled with electron ionization high-resolution mass spectrometry (EI-HRMS). Clean-up procedures for analysis of OH-PCBs homologs in liver and brain samples involve a pretreatment step consisting of acetonitrile partition and 5% hydrated silica-gel chromatography before derivatization. Recovery rates of tri- and tetra-chlorinated OH-PCBs in the acetonitrile partition method followed by the 5% hydrated silica-gel column (82% and 91%) were higher than conventional sulfuric acid treatment (2.0% and 3.5%). The method detection limits of OH-PCBs for each matrix obtained by GC/ECNI-MS and GC/EI-HRMS were 0.58-2.6 pg g(-1) and 0.36-1.6 pg g(-1) wet wt, respectively. Recovery rates of OH-PCB congeners in spike tests using sample matrices (10 and 50 pg) were 64.7-117% (CV: 4.7-14%) and 70.4-120% (CV: 2.3-12%), respectively. This analytical method may enable the simultaneous detection of various OH-PCBs from complex tissue matrices. Furthermore, this method allows more comprehensive assessment of the biological effects of OH-PCB exposure on critical organs. PMID:24274296

  11. Signature of the existence of a coherently condensed state in a dilute gas above the Bose-Einstein-condensate transition temperature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Yinbiao; Wang, Wen-ge

    2015-01-01

    We study quantum coherence properties of a dilute gas at temperatures above, but not much above, the transition temperature of Bose-Einstein condensation. In such a gas, a small proportion of the atoms may possess coherence lengths longer than the mean neighboring-atomic distance, implying the existence of quantum coherence greater than that expected for thermal atoms. Conjecturing that a part of this proportion of the atoms may lie in a coherently condensed state, some unexplained experimental results [D. E. Miller et al., Phys. Rev. A 71, 043615 (2005), 10.1103/PhysRevA.71.043615] can be explained.

  12. Profiling oestrogens and testosterone in human urine by stable isotope dilution/benchtop gas chromatography-mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Hoffmann, Philipp; Hartmann, Michaela F; Remer, Thomas; Zimmer, Klaus-Peter; Wudy, Stefan A

    2010-12-12

    Oestrogens, such as oestrone (E(1)), 17β-oestradiol (E(2)), oestriol (E(3)) and their biologically active metabolites 2-methoxyoestrone (2-MeOE(1)), 2-hydroxyoestradiol (2-OHE(2)) 16-ketooestradiol (16-OE(2)), 16-epioestriol (16-epiE(3)), as well as testosterone (T) play an important role in physiological and pathological developmental processes during human development. We therefore aimed at developing an isotope dilution/bench top gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (ID/GC-MS) method, based on benchtop GC-MS, for the simultaneous determination ('profiling') of the above analytes in children. The method consisted of equilibration of urine (5 ml) with a cocktail containing stable isotope-labelled analogues of the analytes as internal standards ([2,4-(2)H(2)]E(1), [2,4,16,16-(2)H(4)]E(2), [2,4,17-(2)H(3)]E(3), [16,16,17-(2)H(3)]T, [1,4,16,16-(2)H(4)]2-MeOE(1), [1,4,16,16,17-(2)H(5)]2-OHE(2), [2,4,15,15,17-(2)H(5)]16-OE(2) and [2,4-(2)H(2)]16-epiE(3)). Then, solid-phase extraction (C(18) cartridges), enzymatic hydrolysis (sulphatase from Helix pomatia (type H-1)), re-extraction, purification by anion exchange chromatography and derivatisation to trimethylsilyl ethers followed. The samples were analysed by GC-MS (Agilent GC 6890N/5975MSD; fused silica capillary column 25 m × 0.2 mm i.d., film 0.10 μm). Calibration plots were linear and showed excellent reproducibility with coefficients of determination (r(2)) between 0.999 and 1.000. Intra- and inter-assay coefficients of variation (CV) were <2.21% for all quantified metabolites. Sensitivity was highest for 2-OHE(2) (0.25 pg per absolute injection: signal-to-noise ratio (S/N)=3) and lowest for 16-epiE(3) (2 pg per absolute injection: S/N=2.6), translating into corresponding urine sample analyte concentrations of 0.025 ng ml(-1) and 0.2 ng ml(-1), respectively. Accuracy - determined in a two-level spike experiment - showed relative errors ranging between 0.15% for 16-OE(2) and 11.63% for 2-OHE(2). Chromatography showed clear peak shapes for the components analysed. In summary, we describe a practical, sensitive and specific ID/GC-MS assay capable of profiling the above-mentioned steroids in human urine from childhood onwards. PMID:20619283

  13. Compressing the inert doublet model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blinov, Nikita; Kozaczuk, Jonathan; Morrissey, David E.; de la Puente, Alejandro

    2016-02-01

    The inert doublet model relies on a discrete symmetry to prevent couplings of the new scalars to Standard Model fermions. This stabilizes the lightest inert state, which can then contribute to the observed dark matter density. In the presence of additional approximate symmetries, the resulting spectrum of exotic scalars can be compressed. Here, we study the phenomenological and cosmological implications of this scenario. We derive new limits on the compressed inert doublet model from LEP, and outline the prospects for exclusion and discovery of this model at dark matter experiments, the LHC, and future colliders.

  14. Compressing the Inert Doublet Model

    SciTech Connect

    Blinov, Nikita; Morrissey, David E.; de la Puente, Alejandro

    2015-10-29

    The Inert Doublet Model relies on a discrete symmetry to prevent couplings of the new scalars to Standard Model fermions. We found that this stabilizes the lightest inert state, which can then contribute to the observed dark matter density. In the presence of additional approximate symmetries, the resulting spectrum of exotic scalars can be compressed. Here, we study the phenomenological and cosmological implications of this scenario. Furthermore, we derive new limits on the compressed Inert Doublet Model from LEP, and outline the prospects for exclusion and discovery of this model at dark matter experiments, the LHC, and future colliders.

  15. Odorant Screening and Quantitation of Thiols in Carmenere Red Wine by Gas Chromatography-Olfactometry and Stable Isotope Dilution Assays.

    PubMed

    Pavez, Carolina; Agosin, Eduardo; Steinhaus, Martin

    2016-05-01

    The sensory impact of thiols in Vitis vinifera 'Carmenere' red wines was evaluated. For this purpose, aroma extract dilution analysis was applied to the thiols isolated from a Carmenere red wine by affinity chromatography with a mercurated agarose gel. Results revealed the presence of four odorants, identified as 2-furanylmethanethiol, 3-sulfanylhexyl acetate, 3-sulfanyl-1-hexanol, and 2-methyl-3-sulfanyl-1-butanol, with the latter being described here for the first time in Carmenere red wines. Quantitation of the four thiols in the Carmenere wine screened by aroma extract dilution analysis and in three additional Carmenere wines by stable isotope dilution assays resulted in concentrations above the respective orthonasal odor detection threshold values. Triangle tests applied to wine model solutions with and without the addition of the four thiols showed significant differences, thus suggesting that the compounds do have the potential to influence the overall aroma of red wine. PMID:27070203

  16. Inerting of magnesium dust cloud with Ar, N2 and CO2.

    PubMed

    Li, G; Yuan, C M; Fu, Y; Zhong, Y P; Chen, B Z

    2009-10-15

    Experiments were conducted on the inerting of magnesium dust with N(2), CO(2), and Ar. Comparing the maximum explosion pressure, maximum rate of pressure rise, and limiting oxygen concentration with different inertants, it was determined that Ar is not the best inert gas under all conditions as commonly believed. N(2) was more effective than Ar as an inertant. CO(2) provided more inerting effect than either Ar and N(2) in low magnesium dust concentrations, although explosibility was increased at higher dust concentrations. Both N(2) and CO(2) as inerting agents showed higher LOC values than Ar. These results indicated that N(2) is a more economical inerting gas than Ar for the tested coarse magnesium dust. PMID:19487075

  17. Pressurized pyrolysis of rice husk in an inert gas sweeping fixed-bed reactor with a focus on bio-oil deoxygenation.

    PubMed

    Qian, Yangyang; Zhang, Jie; Wang, Jie

    2014-12-01

    The pyrolysis of rice husk was conducted in a fixed-bed reactor with a sweeping nitrogen gas to investigate the effects of pressure on the pyrolytic behaviors. The release rates of main gases during the pyrolysis, the distributions of four products (char, bio-oil, water and gas), the elemental compositions of char, bio-oil and gas, and the typical compounds in bio-oil were determined. It was found that the elevation of pressure from 0.1MPa to 5.0MPa facilitated the dehydration and decarboxylation of bio-oil, and the bio-oils obtained under the elevated pressures had significantly less oxygen and higher calorific value than those obtained under atmospheric pressure. The former bio-oils embraced more acetic acid, phenols and guaiacols. The elevation of pressure increased the formation of CH4 partially via the gas-phase reactions. An attempt is made in this study to clarify "the pure pressure effect" and "the combined effect with residence time". PMID:25463787

  18. Dilute Nitride GaNP Wide Bandgap Solar Cells Grown by Gas-Source Molecular Beam Epitaxy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sukrittanon, Supanee

    Integration of III-V semiconductors and Si is a very attractive means to achieve low-cost high-efficiency solar cells. A promising configuration is to utilize a dual-junction solar cell, in which Si is employed as the bottom junction and a wide-bandgap III-V semiconductor as the top junction. The use of a III-V semiconductor as a top junction offers the potential to achieve higher efficiencies than today's best Si solar cell. Dilute nitride GaNP is a promising candidate for the top cell in dual-junction solar cells because it possesses several extremely important attributes: a direct-bandgap that is also tunable as well as easily-attained lattice-match with Si. As a first step towards integration of GaNP solar cells onto Si, the goal of this dissertation is to optimize and demonstrate GaNP solar cells grown by gas-source molecular beam epitaxy (GSMBE) on GaP (001) substrate. The dissertation is divided into three major parts. In the first part, we demonstrate ˜ 2.05 eV ([N]˜ 1.8%) dilute nitride GaNP thin film solar cells, in which the GaNP is closely lattice-matched to Si, on GaP substrates. From transmission electron microscopy (TEM), the device exhibits defects only at the GaNP/GaP interface, and no threading dislocations in an active layer are observed. Our best GaNP solar cell achieved an efficiency of 7.9% with anti-reflection (AR) coating and no window layer. This GaNP solar cell's efficiency is higher than the most efficient GaP solar cell to date and higher than other solar cells with similar direct bandgap (InGaP, GaAsP). Through a systematic study of the structural, electrical, and optical properties of the device, efficient broadband optical absorption and enhanced solar cell performance using GaNP are demonstrated. In the second part, we demonstrate the successful fabrication of GaP/GaNP core/shell microwires utilizing a novel technique: top-down reactive-ion etching (RIE) to create the cores and MBE to create the shells. Systematic studies have been performed over a series of microwire lengths, array periods, and microwire sidewall morphology. For a fixed length, short circuit current (J sc) increases as physical fill factor (PFF) of microwires increases, while, for a fixed array period, Jsc increases as microwire length increases. Our studies show that the open circuit voltage (Voc) is degraded primarily due to defects at the GaP/GaNP interface and in the shells, not surface recombination. The best efficiency we achieved using our microwire solar cell is 3.2% using an AR coating. Compared to thin film solar cells in the same growth run, the microwire solar cells exhibit greater J sc but poorer Voc. This results from greater light absorption and a greater number of defects in the microwire structure, respectively. In the final part, vertical self-catalyzed GaP, GaNP, and GaNP/GaNP core/shell nanowires are demonstrated. The growth window of GaP nanowires is comparable to the growth window of GaNP nanowires. The diameter of nanowires (cores) can be controlled by adjusting substrate temperature (Tsub). The shells can be grown by decreasing Tsub and increasing the V/III incorporation ratio to reduce adatom mobility. The crystal structures of GaP and GaNP nanowires are mixtures of cubic zincblend phase and hexagonal wurtzite phase along the [111] growth direction. According to photoluminescence measurements, the broad spectrum of nanowire arrays do not result from the variation of N composition among nanowires, but from the mechanism of light emission of GaNP.

  19. Quantitative gas chromatography-olfactometry carried out at different dilutions of an extract. Key differences in the odor profiles of four high-quality Spanish aged red wines.

    PubMed

    Ferreira, V; Aznar, M; López, R; Cacho, J

    2001-10-01

    Four Spanish aged red wines made in different wine-making areas have been extracted, and the extracts and their 1:5, 1:50, and 1:500 dilutions have been analyzed by a gas chromatography-olfactometry (GC-O) approach in which three judges evaluated odor intensity on a four-point scale. Sixty-nine different odor regions were detected in the GC-O profiles of wines, 63 of which could be identified. GC-O data have been processed to calculate averaged flavor dilution factors (FD). Different ANOVA strategies have been further applied on FD and on intensity data to check for significant differences among wines and to assess the effects of dilution and the judge. Data show that FD and the average intensity of the odorants are strongly correlated (r(2) = 0.892). However, the measurement of intensity represents a quantitative advantage in terms of detecting differences. For some odorants, dilution exerts a critical role in the detection of differences. Significant differences among wines have been found in 30 of the 69 odorants detected in the experiment. Most of these differences are introduced by grape compounds such as methyl benzoate and terpenols, by compounds released by the wood, such as furfural, (Z)-whiskey lactone, Furaneol, 4-propylguaiacol, eugenol, 4-ethylphenol, 2,6-dimethoxyphenol, isoeugenol, and ethyl vanillate, by compounds formed by lactic acid bacteria, such as 2,3-butanedione and acetoine, or by compounds formed during the oxidative storage of wines, such as methional, sotolon, o-aminoacetophenone, and phenylacetic acid. The most important differences from a quantitative point of view are due to 2-methyl-3-mercaptofuran, 4-propylguaiacol, 2,6-dimethoxyphenol, and isoeugenol. PMID:11600028

  20. Cross-correlation focus method with an electrostatic sensor array for local particle velocity measurement in dilute gas-solid two-phase flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Chao; Zhang, Jingyu; Gao, Wenbin; Ding, Hongbing; Wu, Weiping

    2015-11-01

    The gas-solid two-phase flow has been widely applied in the power, chemical and metallurgical industries. It is of great significance in the research of gas-solid two-phase flow to measure particle velocity at different locations in the pipeline. Thus, an electrostatic sensor array comprising eight arc-shaped electrodes was designed. The relationship between the cross-correlation (CC) velocity and the distribution of particle velocity, charge density and electrode spatial sensitivity was analysed. Then the CC sensitivity and its calculation method were proposed. According to the distribution of CC sensitivity, it was found that, between different electrode pairs, it had different focus areas. The CC focus method was proposed for particle velocity measurement at different locations and validated by a belt-style electrostatic induction experiment facility. Finally, the particle velocities at different locations with different flow conditions were measured to research the particle velocity distribution in a dilute horizontal pneumatic conveying pipeline.

  1. Dilution Confusion: Conventions for Defining a Dilution

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fishel, Laurence A.

    2010-01-01

    Two conventions for preparing dilutions are used in clinical laboratories. The first convention defines an "a:b" dilution as "a" volumes of solution A plus "b" volumes of solution B. The second convention defines an "a:b" dilution as "a" volumes of solution A diluted into a final volume of "b". Use of the incorrect dilution convention could affect

  2. Dilution Confusion: Conventions for Defining a Dilution

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fishel, Laurence A.

    2010-01-01

    Two conventions for preparing dilutions are used in clinical laboratories. The first convention defines an "a:b" dilution as "a" volumes of solution A plus "b" volumes of solution B. The second convention defines an "a:b" dilution as "a" volumes of solution A diluted into a final volume of "b". Use of the incorrect dilution convention could affect…

  3. Bénard instabilities in a binary-liquid layer evaporating into an inert gas: Stability of quasi-stationary and time-dependent reference profiles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Machrafi, H.; Rednikov, A.; Colinet, P.; Dauby, P. C.

    2011-02-01

    This study treats an evaporating horizontal binary-liquid layer in contact with the air with an imposed transfer distance. The liquid is an aqueous solution of ethanol (10% wt). Due to evaporation, the ethanol mass fraction can change and a cooling occurs at the liquid-gas interface. This can trigger solutal and thermal Rayleigh-Bénard-Marangoni instabilities in the system, the modes of which corresponding to an undeformable interface form the subject of the present work. The decrease of the liquid-layer thickness is assumed to be slow on the diffusive time scales (quasi-stationarity). First we analyse the stability of quasi-stationary reference profiles for a model case within which the mass fraction of ethanol is assumed to be fixed at the bottom of the liquid. Then this consideration is generalized by letting the diffusive reference profile for the mass fraction in the liquid be transient (starting from a uniform state), while following the frozen-time approach for perturbations. The critical liquid thickness below which the system is stable at all times quite expectedly corresponds to the one obtained for the quasi-stationary profile. As a next step, a more realistic, zero-flux condition is used at the bottom in lieu of the fixed-concentration one. The critical thickness is found not to change much between these two cases. At larger thicknesses, the critical time at which the instability first appears proves, as can be expected, to be independent of the type of the concentration condition at the bottom. It is shown that solvent (water) evaporation plays a stabilizing role as compared to the case of a non-volatile solvent. At last, an effective approximate Pearson-like model is invoked making use in particular of the fact that the solutal Marangoni is by far the strongest as an instability mechanism here.

  4. METAL SPRAYER FOR USE IN VACUUM OR INERT ATMOSPHERE

    DOEpatents

    Monroe, R.E.

    1958-10-14

    A metal sprayer is described for use in a vacuum or inert atmosphere with a straight line wire feed and variable electrode contact angle. This apparatus comprises two wires which are fed through straight tubes of two mechanisms positioned on opposite sides of a central tube to which an inert gas is fed. The two mechanisms and the wires being fed constitute electrodes to which electrical current is supplied so that the wires are melted by the electric are formed at their contacting region and sprayed by the gas supplied by the central tube. This apparatus is designed specifically to apply a zirconium coating to uranium in an inert atmosphere and without the use of an oxidizing flame.

  5. -Based Cermet Inert Anodes for Aluminum Electrolysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tian, ZhongLiang; Lai, YanQing; Li, ZhiYou; Chai, DengPeng; Li, Jie; Liu, YeXiang

    2014-11-01

    The new aluminum electrolysis technology based on inert electrodes has received much interest for several decades because of the environment and energy advantages. The key to realize this technique is the inert anode. This article presents China's recent developments of NiFe2O4-based cermet inert anodes, which include the optimization of material performance, the joint between the cermet inert anode and metallic bar, as well as the results of 20 kA pilot testing for a large-size inert anode group. The problems NiFe2O4-based cermet inert anodes face are also discussed.

  6. Bose-Einstein condensation in a dilute gas: the first 70 years and some recent experiments (Nobel Lecture).

    PubMed

    Cornell, Eric A; Wieman, Carl E

    2002-06-17

    Bose-Einstein condensates of dilute gases offer a rich field to study fundamental quantum-mechanical processes, manipulation of the speed at which light propogates, observation of atomic pair-formation and superfluidity, or even simulating white dwarf stars. Still more radical applications are on the horizon. However, their initial creation was a masterpiece of experimental physics. After an initial process of laser cooling (which itself won its developers the 1997 Nobel Prize), atoms in a magnetic-optical trap must be safely transferred into a purely magnetic trap, where the condensation process begins at 170 nK and 20 nK a pure condensate of 2000 atoms could be created. More astonishingly, Wieman and Cornell showed these low temperatures could be achieved in "bench scale" equipment rather than the massive pieces normally demanded by cryoscience. For their 1995 discovery of this new state of matter, they were awarded the 2001 Nobel Prize in Physics. PMID:12465486

  7. Determination of the alkylpyrazine composition of coffee using stable isotope dilution-gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (SIDA-GC-MS).

    PubMed

    Pickard, Stephanie; Becker, Irina; Merz, Karl-Heinz; Richling, Elke

    2013-07-01

    A stable isotope dilution analysis based on gas chromatography-mass spectrometry analysis (SIDA-GC-MS) was developed for the quantitative analysis of 12 alkylpyrazines found in commercially available coffee samples. These compounds contribute to coffee flavor. The accuracy of this method was tested by analyzing model mixtures of alkylpyrazines. Comparisons of alkylpyrazine-concentrations suggested that water as extraction solvent was superior to dichloromethane. The distribution patterns of alkylpyrazines in different roasted coffees were quite similar. The most abundant alkylpyrazine in each coffee sample was 2-methylpyrazine, followed by 2,6-dimethylpyrazine, 2,5-dimethylpyrazine, 2-ethylpyrazine, 2-ethyl-6-methylpyrazine, 2-ethyl-5-methylpyrazine, and 2,3,5-trimethylpyrazine, respectively. Among the alkylpyrazines tested, 2,3-dimethylpyrazine, 2-ethyl-3-methylpyrazine, 2-ethyl-3,6-dimethylpyrazine, and 2-ethyl-3,5-dimethylpyrazine revealed the lowest concentrations in roasted coffee. By the use of isotope dilution analysis, the total concentrations of alkylpyrazines in commercially available ground coffee ranged between 82.1 and 211.6 mg/kg, respectively. Decaffeinated coffee samples were found to contain lower amounts of alkylpyrazines than regular coffee samples by a factor of 0.3-0.7, which might be a result of the decaffeination procedure. PMID:23745606

  8. Modification of a commercial gas chromatography isotope ratio mass spectrometer for on-line carbon isotope dilution: Evaluation of its analytical characteristics for the quantification of organic compounds.

    PubMed

    Alonso Sobrado, Laura; Robledo Fernández, Mario; Cueto Díaz, Sergio; Ruiz Encinar, Jorge; García Alonso, J Ignacio

    2015-11-01

    We describe the instrumental modification of a commercial gas chromatography isotope ratio mass spectrometer (GC-IRMS) and its application for on-line carbon isotope dilution. The main modification consisted in the addition of a constant flow of enriched (13)CO2 diluted in helium after the chromatographic column through the splitter holder located inside the chromatographic oven of the instrument. In addition, and in contrast to the conventional mode of operation of GC-IRMS instruments where the signal at m/z 45 is amplified 100-fold with respect to the signal at m/z 44, the same signal amplification was used in both Faraday cups at m/z 44 and 45. Under these conditions isotope ratio precision for the ratio 44/45 was around 0.05% RSD (n=50). The evaluation of the instrument was performed with mixtures of organic compounds including 11 n-alkanes, 16 PAHs, 12 PCBs and 3 benzothiophenes. It was observed that compounds of very different boiling points could be analysed without discrimination in the injector when a Programmable Temperature Vaporizer (PTV) injector was employed. Moreover, the presence of heteroatoms (Cl or S) in the structure of the organic compounds did not affect their combustion efficiency and therefore the trueness of the results. Quantitative results obtained for all the analytes assayed were excellent in terms of precision (<3% RSD) and accuracy (average relative error≤4%) and what is more important using a single and simple generic internal standard for quantification. PMID:26435309

  9. Infrared reflectivity spectra of gas-source molecular beam epitaxy grown dilute InN{sub x}As{sub 1-x}/InP (001)

    SciTech Connect

    Talwar, Devki N.; Yang, Tzuen-Rong; Hsiung Lin, Hao; Chuan Feng, Zhe

    2013-02-04

    Vibrational spectra of gas-source molecular beam epitaxy grown dilute InN{sub x}As{sub 1-x}/InP (001) alloys are obtained using a Fourier-transform infrared (IR) spectroscopy. A triply degenerate N{sub As} local vibrational mode of T{sub d}-symmetry is observed near 438 cm{sup -1} corresponding to the In-N bond energy. The analysis of composition dependent infrared reflectivity spectra in InNAs has predicted a two-phonon-mode behavior. In In(Ga)-rich GaInNAs alloys the observed splitting of the N{sub As} local mode into a doublet for the N{sub As}-Ga{sub 1}(In{sub 1})In{sub 3}(Ga{sub 3}) pair-defect of C{sub 3v}-symmetry is consistent with our simulated results based on a sophisticated Green's function theory.

  10. Kaluza's kinetic theory description of the classical Hall effect in a single component dilute gas within the Chapman-Enskog approximation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sandoval-Villalbazo, A.; Garcia-Perciante, A. L.; Sagaceta-Mejia, A. R.

    2015-11-01

    Kinetic theory is used to establish the explicit form of the particle flux associated to the Hall effect for the case of a dilute single component charged gas, using the Chapman-Enskog method and the BGK approximation for the collision Kernel. It is shown that when the system evolves towards mechanical equilibrium, the standard treatment using the concept of external force fails to describe the Hall effect. It is also shown that the use of a five-dimensional curved space-time in the description of the dynamics of the charged particle in the kinetic treatment (Kaluza's theory) formally solves the problem. The implications of this result are briefly discussed. The authors acknowledge support from CONACyT (Mexico) through grant CB2011/167563.

  11. Inert wastes -- A live issue

    SciTech Connect

    Molus, P.; Rieley, D.; Sherlock, G.; Walmsley, K.

    1996-12-31

    This paper demonstrates why one county council in the UK has adopted a very proactive position towards inert waste and its reuse and recycling, and how that council is attempting to increase the use of this material. It describes how Babtie has worked with Berkshire County Council and gives an outline of Berkshire and the County`s responsibilities. The environmental/planning issues affecting minerals and waste in Berkshire and the approach the Council is adopting via policy documents and its role as a corporate body are discussed. The actions of the County Council are described with regard to increasing the reuse and recycling of inert wastes on the road network and the roles of specifications and contractors. The impact of some of the more relevant issues (markets, practical issues, planning, and supply and demand) is assessed.

  12. Developing a scalable inert gas ion thruster

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    James, E.; Ramsey, W.; Steiner, G.

    1982-01-01

    Analytical studies to identify and then design a high performance scalable ion thruster operating with either argon or xenon for use in large space systems are presented. The magnetoelectrostatic containment concept is selected for its efficient ion generation capabilities. The iterative nature of the bounding magnetic fields allows the designer to scale both the diameter and length, so that the thruster can be adapted to spacecraft growth over time. Three different thruster assemblies (conical, hexagonal and hemispherical) are evaluated for a 12 cm diameter thruster and performance mapping of the various thruster configurations shows that conical discharge chambers produce the most efficient discharge operation, achieving argon efficiencies of 50-80% mass utilization at 240-310 eV/ion and xenon efficiencies of 60-97% at 240-280 eV/ion. Preliminary testing of the large 30 cm thruster, using argon propellant, indicates a 35% improvement over the 12 cm thruster in mass utilization efficiency. Since initial performance is found to be better than projected, a larger 50 cm thruster is already in the development stage.

  13. Inert anodes for aluminum smelting

    SciTech Connect

    Weyand, J.D.; Ray, S.P.; Baker, F.W.; DeYoung, D.H.; Tarcy, G.P.

    1986-02-01

    The use of nonconsumable or inert anodes for replacement of consumable carbon anodes in Hall electrolysis cells for the production of aluminum has been a technical and commercial goal of the aluminum industry for many decades. This report summarizes the technical success realized in the development of an inert anode that can be used to produce aluminum of acceptable metal purity in small scale Hall electrolysis cells. The inert anode material developed consists of a cermet composition containing the phases: copper, nickel ferrite and nickel oxide. This anode material has an electrical conductivity comparable to anode carbon used in Hall cells, i.e., 150 ohm {sup {minus}1}cm{sup {minus}1}. Metal purity of 99.5 percent aluminum has been produced using this material. The copper metal alloy present in the anode is not removed by anodic dissolution as does occur with cermet anodes containing a metallic nickel alloy. Solubility of the oxide phases in the cryolite electrolyte is reduced by: (1) saturated concentration of alumina, (2) high nickel oxide content in the NiO-NiFe{sub 2}O{sub 4} composition, (3) lowest possible cell operating temperature, (4) additions of alkaline or alkaline earth fluorides to the bath to reduce solubilities of the anode components, and (5) avoiding bath contaminants such as silica. Dissolution rate measurements indicate first-order kinetics and that the rate limiting step for dissolution is mass transport controlled. 105 refs., 234 figs., 73 tabs.

  14. Dilution-based emissions sampling from stationary sources: part 2 - gas-fired combustors compared with other fuel-fired systems

    SciTech Connect

    England, G.C.; Watson, J.G.; Chow, J.C.; Zielinska, B.; Chang, M.C.O.; Loos, K.R.; Hidy. G.M.

    2007-01-15

    With the recent focus on fine particle matter (PM2.5), new, self- consistent data are needed to characterize emissions from combustion sources. Emissions data for gas-fired combustors are presented, using dilution sampling as the reference. The sampling and analysis of the collected particles in the presence of precursor gases, SO{sub 2}, nitrogen oxide, volatile organic compound, and NH{sub 3} is discussed; the results include data from eight gas fired units, including a dual- fuel institutional boiler and a diesel engine powered electricity generator. These data are compared with results in the literature for heavy-duty diesel vehicles and stationary sources using coal or wood as fuels. The results show that the gas-fired combustors have very low PM2.5 mass emission rates in the range of {approximately}10{sup -4} lb/million Btu (MMBTU) compared with the diesel backup generator with particle filter, with {approximately} 5 x 10{sup -3} lb/MMBTU. Even higher mass emission rates are found in coal-fired systems, with rates of {approximately} 0.07 lb/MMBTU for a bag-filter-controlled pilot unit burning eastern bituminous coal. The characterization of PM2.5 chemical composition from the gas-fired units indicates that much of the measured primary particle mass in PM2.5 samples is organic or elemental carbon and, to a much less extent, sulfate. Metal emissions are low compared with the diesel engines and the coal- or wood-fueled combustors. The metals found in the gas- fired combustor particles are low in concentration. The interpretation of the particulate carbon emissions is complicated by the fact that an approximately equal amount of particulate carbon is found on the particle collector and a backup filter. It is likely that measurement artifacts are positively biasing 'true' particulate carbon emissions results. 49 refs., 1 fig., 12 tabs.

  15. 7 CFR 201.19 - Inert matter.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 3 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Inert matter. 201.19 Section 201.19 Agriculture... REGULATIONS Labeling Agricultural Seeds § 201.19 Inert matter. The label shall show the percentage by weight of inert matter....

  16. 7 CFR 201.19 - Inert matter.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 3 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Inert matter. 201.19 Section 201.19 Agriculture... REGULATIONS Labeling Agricultural Seeds § 201.19 Inert matter. The label shall show the percentage by weight of inert matter....

  17. 7 CFR 201.19 - Inert matter.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 3 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Inert matter. 201.19 Section 201.19 Agriculture... REGULATIONS Labeling Agricultural Seeds § 201.19 Inert matter. The label shall show the percentage by weight of inert matter....

  18. Determination of ultratrace levels of tributyltin in waters by isotope dilution and gas chromatography coupled to tandem mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Rodríguez-Cea, Andrés; Rodríguez-González, Pablo; Font Cardona, Nuria; Aranda Mares, José Luís; Ballester Nebot, Salomé; García Alonso, J Ignacio

    2015-12-18

    The current EU legislation lays down the Environmental Quality Standards (EQS) of 45 priority substances in surface water bodies. In particular, the concentration of tributyltin (TBT) must not exceed 0.2ngL(-1) and analytical methodologies with a Limit of Quantification (LOQ) equal or below 0.06ngL(-1) are urged to be developed. This work presents a procedure for the determination of ultratrace levels of TBT in water samples by Isotope Dilution and GC-MS/MS operating in Selected Reaction Monitoring (SRM) mode which meets current EU requirements. The method requires the monitorization of five consecutive transitions (287>175 to 291>179) for the sensitive and selective detection of TBT. The measured isotopic distribution of TBT fragment ions was in agreement with the theoretical values computed by a polynomial expansion algorithm. The combined use of Tandem Mass Spectrometry, a sample volume of 250mL, the preconcentration of 1mL of organic phase to 30μL and an injection volume of 25μL by Programmed Temperature Vaporization provided a LOQ of 0.0426ngL(-1) for TBT (calculated as ten times the standard deviation of nine independent blanks). The recovery for TBT calculated in Milli-Q water at the EQS level was 106.3±4%. A similar procedure was also developed for the quantification of dibutyltin (DBT) and monobutyltin (MBT) in water samples showing satisfactory results. The method was finally implemented in a routine testing laboratory to demonstrate its applicability to real samples obtaining quantitative recoveries for TBT at the EQS level in mineral water, river water and seawater. PMID:26614170

  19. Inert doublet model and LEP II limits

    SciTech Connect

    Lundstroem, Erik; Gustafsson, Michael; Edsjoe, Joakim

    2009-02-01

    The inert doublet model is a minimal extension of the standard model introducing an additional SU(2) doublet with new scalar particles that could be produced at accelerators. While there exists no LEP II analysis dedicated for these inert scalars, the absence of a signal within searches for supersymmetric neutralinos can be used to constrain the inert doublet model. This translation however requires some care because of the different properties of the inert scalars and the neutralinos. We investigate what restrictions an existing DELPHI Collaboration study of neutralino pair production can put on the inert scalars and discuss the result in connection with dark matter. We find that although an important part of the inert doublet model parameter space can be excluded by the LEP II data, the lightest inert particle still constitutes a valid dark matter candidate.

  20. Identification of odorants in frankincense (Boswellia sacra Flueck.) by aroma extract dilution analysis and two-dimensional gas chromatography-mass spectrometry/olfactometry.

    PubMed

    Niebler, Johannes; Buettner, Andrea

    2015-01-01

    Frankincense has been known, traded and used throughout the ages for its exceptional aroma properties, and is still commonly used in both secular and religious settings to convey a pleasant odor. Surprisingly, the odoriferous principle(s) underlying its unique odor profile have never been published. In this study, resin samples of Boswellia sacra Flueck. from both Somalia and Oman were investigated by aroma extract dilution analysis. In a comprehensive, odor-activity guided approach both chemo-analytical and human-sensory parameters were used to identify odor active constituents of the volatile fraction of B. sacra. Among the key odorants found were α-pinene, β-myrcene, linalool, p-cresol and two unidentified sesquiterpenoids. Overall, a total of 23 odorants were detected and analyzed by gas chromatography-olfactometry and heart-cut two-dimensional gas chromatography-mass spectrometry/olfactometry. The majority of the identified odorant compounds were oxygenated monoterpenes, along with some relevant mono- and sesquiterpenes and only one diterpenoid substance. Several of these compounds were reported here for the first time as odorous constituents in B. sacra. Identifying bioactive compounds might support a better understanding with regard to the potential benefits of frankincense, for example in aromatherapy or ecclesial settings. PMID:25468535

  1. Validation of an isotope dilution gas chromatography-mass spectrometry method for combined analysis of oxysterols and oxyphytosterols in serum samples.

    PubMed

    Schtt, Hans-Frieder; Ltjohann, Dieter

    2015-07-01

    We describe the validation of a method for the analysis of oxysterols, i.e. oxycholesterols and oxyphytosterols, in human serum using gas chromatography-mass spectrometry selected ion monitoring (GC-MS-SIM). Concentrations of 7?- and 7?-hydroxy-, and 7oxo-cholesterol, -campesterol, and -sitosterol as well as 4?-hydroxycholesterol and side-chain oxygenated 24S-, 25-, and 27-hydroxycholesterol were determined by isotope dilution methodology. After saponification at room temperature the oxysterols were extracted, separated from their substrates, cholesterol, campesterol, and sitosterol, by solid phase extraction, and subsequently derivatised to their corresponding trimethylsilyl-ethers prior to GC-MS-SIM. In order to prevent artificial autoxidation butylated hydroxytoluene and ethylenediaminetetraacetic acid were added. The validation of the method was performed according to the International Conference on Harmonisation guidance, including limits of detection and quantification, ranges, recovery and precision. Due to improved instrumental settings and work-up procedure, limits of detection and quantification ranged between 8.0-202.0pg/mL and 28.0-674pg/mL, respectively. Recovery data in five calibration points varied between 91.9% and 116.8% and in serum samples between 93.1% and 118.1%. The mean coefficient of variation (CV) for the recovery of all compounds was <10%. Well satisfying CVs for within-day precision (2.1-10.8%) and for between-day precision (2.3-12.1%) were obtained. More than 20 samples could be processed in a single routine day and test series of about 300 samples can be realised without impairment of the validation parameters during a sequence. Comparison of oxysterol and oxyphytosterol content in serum and plasma revealed no difference. A fully validated isotope dilution methodology for the quantification of oxycholesterols and oxyphytosterols from human serum or plasma is presented. PMID:25701095

  2. Quantification of carcinogenic 4- to 6-ring polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons in human urine by solid-phase microextraction gas chromatography-isotope dilution mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Campo, Laura; Fustinoni, Silvia; Bertazzi, Pieralberto

    2011-08-01

    Polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) are pollutants found in living and working environments. The aim of this study was to develop a solid-phase microextraction (SPME) gas chromatography (GC)-isotope dilution mass spectrometry method for the quantification of 10 four- to six-ring PAHs in urine samples. Seven of the selected PAHs have been classified as carcinogenic. Under the final conditions, analytes were sampled with a 100-?m polydimethylsiloxane SPME fibre for 60 min at 80 C and desorbed in the injection port of the GC at 270 C. Fluoranthene, pyrene, benz[a]anthracene, chrysene, benzo[b]fluoranthene, benzo[k]fluoranthene, benzo[a]pyrene, dibenzo[a,h]anthracene, indeno[1,2,3-cd]pyrene and benzo[ghi]perylene were separated using a highly arylene-modified phase capillary column and quantified by MS using eight deuterated PAHs as surrogate internal standards. Limits of quantification (LOQ) were in the 0.5- to 2.2-ng/L range. Validation showed linear dynamic ranges up to 340 ng/L, inter- and intra-run precisions <20%, and accuracies within 20% of spiked concentrations. Matrix effect evaluation and the use of control charts to monitor process performances showed that the isotope dilution approach allowed for the control of bias sources. Urinary PAHs were above or equal to LOQ, depending on different compounds, in 58-100% (min-max), 40-100% and 5-39% of samples from coke oven workers (n?=?12), asphalt workers (n?=?10) and individuals not occupationally exposed to PAHs (n?=?18), respectively. Chrysene was the most abundant PAH determined with median levels of 62.6, 6.9 and <0.6 ng/L, respectively. These results show that the method is suitable for quantifying carcinogenic PAHs in specimens from individuals with different levels of PAH exposure. PMID:21626187

  3. Airborne measurements of sulfur dioxide, dimethyl sulfide, carbon disulfide, and carbonyl sulfide by isotope dilution gas chromatography/mass spectrometry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bandy, Alan R.; Thornton, Donald C.; Driedger, Arthur R., III

    1993-01-01

    A gas chromatograph/mass spectrometer is described for determining atmospheric sulfur dioxide, carbon disulfide, dimethyl sulfide, and carbonyl sulfide from aircraft and ship platforms. Isotopically labelled variants of each analyte were used as internal standards to achieve high precision. The lower limit of detection for each species for an integration time of 3 min was 1 pptv for sulfur dioxide and dimethyl sulfide and 0.2 pptv for carbon disulfide and carbonyl sulfide. All four species were simultaneously determined with a sample frequency of one sample per 6 min or greater. When only one or two species were determined, a frequency of one sample per 4 min was achieved. Because a calibration is included in each sample, no separate calibration sequence was needed. Instrument warmup was only a few minutes. The instrument was very robust in field deployments, requiring little maintenance.

  4. Inert gases in a terra sample - Measurements in six grain-size fractions and two single particles from Lunar 20.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Heymann, D.; Lakatos, S.; Walton, J. R.

    1973-01-01

    Review of the results of inert gas measurements performed on six grain-size fractions and two single particles from four samples of Luna 20 material. Presented and discussed data include the inert gas contents, element and isotope systematics, radiation ages, and Ar-36/Ar-40 systematics.

  5. Quantification of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons based on comprehensive two-dimensional gas chromatography-isotope dilution mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Amador-Muñoz, Omar; Villalobos-Pietrini, Rafael; Aragón-Piña, Antonio; Tran, Tin C; Morrison, P; Marriott, Philip J

    2008-08-01

    Comprehensive two-dimensional gas chromatography (GCxGC) offers favourable resolution and sensitivity compared with conventional one-dimensional gas chromatography (1D-GC), as reported in many studies. These characteristics are of major interest when analytes are in trace concentration, and are present in complex mixtures, as is the case of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) in atmospheric particulate samples. Whilst GCxGC has been widely applied to identification of different types of analytes in several matrices, less seldom has it been used for quantification of these analytes. Although several quantitative methods have been proposed, they may be tedious and/or require considerable user development. Whereas quantification in 1D-GC is a routine and well-established procedure, in GCxGC, it is not so straightforward, especially where novel or untested procedures have yet to be incorporated into software packages. In the present study, it is proposed that a subset of the modulated peaks generated for each solute may be summed, based on the specific target ion mass of each compound present in a certified standard reference material (SRM) 1649a (urban dust). The ratio between a PAH and its corresponding deuterated (PAH-d) form showed that there is no statistical loss of sensitivity when this ratio is calculated based on whether the total sum of modulated peaks, or if only the two or the three most intense modulated peaks, are employed. Manual integration may be required, and here was found to give more acceptable values than automatic integration. Automated integration has been shown here to underestimate the modulated peak responses when low concentrations of PAHs were analyzed. Although for most PAHs good agreement with the certified values were observed, the analytical method needs to be further optimized for some of the other PAH, as can be see with those PAH with high variability in the range of urban dust analyzed. PMID:18620359

  6. Finite Dilution Inverse Gas Chromatography as a Versatile Tool To Determine the Surface Properties of Biofillers for Plastic Composite Applications.

    PubMed

    Yao, Zhitong; Ge, Liuqin; Yang, Wenye; Xia, Meisheng; Ji, Xiaosheng; Jin, Meiqing; Tang, Junhong; Dienstmaier, Jürgen

    2015-07-01

    An improved understanding of a filler’s surface properties is important for determining the most effective polymer reinforcement fillers. In this work, the surface characteristics of two biofillers, namely, clam shell modified by hydrochloric acid (AMF) and furfural (FMF), were investigated using inverse gas chromatography (IGC). The IGC results showed that the dispersive surface energy (γ(S)(D)) contributed the major part to the total surface energy for the biofillers. The values changed as a function of surface coverages, meaning that both samples were energetically fairly heterogeneous. The γ(S)(D) calculated with the Dorris–Gray method was larger than that calculated with the Schultz method, with a γ(S,Dorris–Gray)(D)/γ(S,Schultz)(D) ratio of 1.10. Compared to AMF, FMF possessed higher γ(S)(D) value; however, this difference was compensated by specific (acid–base) surface energy (γ(S)(AB)). Both samples predominantly interacted with ethanol and acetonitrile, implying an amphoteric nature of the material surfaces. Gutmann acid and base number profiles indicated that the surfaces of both samples were more basic in nature. The FMF showed a lower total work of cohesion (W(Coh)(total)) value compared to the AMF, which could lead to an increase in composite performance. PMID:26017338

  7. Analysis of nitromethane from samples exposed in vitro to chloropicrin by stable isotope dilution headspace gas chromatography with mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Halme, Mia; Pesonen, Maija; Grandell, Toni; Kuula, Matti; Pasanen, Markku; Vähäkangas, Kirsi; Vanninen, Paula

    2015-10-01

    Chloropicrin (trichloronitromethane) is a widely used soil fumigant and an old chemical warfare agent. The metabolism of chloropicrin is not well known in mammals but nitromethane has been shown to be one of its main metabolites. Here, a fast and simple headspace gas chromatography with mass spectrometry method was applied for the measurement of nitromethane from aqueous samples. The analytical method was validated using stable isotope labeled internal standard and a small sample volume of 260 μL. No conventional sample preparation steps were needed. The method was accurate (relative standard deviations ≤1.5%) and linear (R(2) = 0.9996) within the concentration range of 0.1-6.0 μg/mL. This method was used to measure nitromethane in in vitro incubations with human and pig liver cell fractions containing enzymes for xenobiotic metabolism, exposed to chloropicrin. The results indicate that the presence of glutathione is necessary for the formation of nitromethane from chloropicrin. Also, nitromethane was formed mostly in liver cytosol fractions, but not in microsomal fractions after the incubation with chloropicrin. Our results suggest that although nitromethane is not the unequivocal biomarker of chloropicrin exposure, this method could be applied for screening the elevated levels in humans after chloropicrin exposure. PMID:26255649

  8. Methadone concentrations in blood, plasma, and oral fluid determined by isotope-dilution gas chromatography-mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Hsu, Ya-Ching; Chen, Bud-Gen; Yang, Shu-Ching; Wang, Yu-Shan; Huang, Shiao-Ping; Huang, Mei-Han; Chen, Tai-Jui; Liu, Hsu-Chun; Lin, Dong-Liang; Liu, Ray H; Jones, A Wayne

    2013-05-01

    Methadone (MTD) is widely used for detoxification of heroin addicts and also in pain management programs. Information about the distribution of methadone between blood, plasma, and alternative specimens, such as oral fluid (OF), is needed in clinical, forensic, and traffic medicine when analytical results are interpreted. We determined MTD and its metabolite 2-ethylidene-1,5-dimethyl-3,3-diphenylpyrrolidine (EDDP) in blood, plasma, blood cells, and OF by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS) after adding deuterium-labeled internal standards. The analytical limits of quantitation for MTD and EDDP by this method were 20 and 3 ng/mL, respectively. The amounts of MTD and EDDP were higher in plasma (80.4 % and 76.5 %) compared with blood cells (19.6 % and 23.5 %) and we found that repeated washing of blood cells with phosphate-buffered saline increased the amounts in plasma (93.6 % and 88.6 %). Mean plasma/blood concentration ratios of MTD and EDDP in spiked samples (N = 5) were 1.27 and 1.21, respectively. In clinical samples from patients (N = 46), the concentrations of MTD in plasma and whole blood were highly correlated (r = 0.92, p < 0.001) and mean (median) plasma/blood distribution ratios were 1.43 (1.41). The correlations between MTD in OF and plasma (r = 0.46) and OF and blood (r = 0.52) were also statistically significant (p < 0.001) and the mean OF/plasma and OF/blood distribution ratios were 0.55 and 0.77, respectively. The MTD concentration in OF decreased as salivary pH increased (more basic). These results will prove useful in clinical and forensic medicine when MTD concentrations in alternative specimens are compared and contrasted. PMID:23090648

  9. Dilution in single pass arc welds

    SciTech Connect

    DuPont, J.N.; Marder, A.R.

    1996-06-01

    A study was conducted on dilution of single pass arc welds of type 308 stainless steel filler metal deposited onto A36 carbon steel by the plasma arc welding (PAW), gas tungsten arc welding (GTAW), gas metal arc welding (GMAW), and submerged arc welding (SAW) processes. Knowledge of the arc and melting efficiency was used in a simple energy balance to develop an expression for dilution as a function of welding variables and thermophysical properties of the filler metal and substrate. Comparison of calculated and experimentally determined dilution values shows the approach provides reasonable predictions of dilution when the melting efficiency can be accurately predicted. The conditions under which such accuracy is obtained are discussed. A diagram is developed from the dilution equation which readily reveals the effect of processing parameters on dilution to aid in parameter optimization.

  10. Regional water-quality analysis of 2,4-D and dicamba in river water using gas chromatography-isotope dilution mass spectrometry

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Thurman, E.M.; Zimmerman, L.R.; Aga, D.S.; Gilliom, R.J.

    2001-01-01

    Gas chromatography with isotope dilution mass spectrometry (GC-MS) and enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) were used in regional National Water Quality Assessment studies of the herbicides, 2,4-D and dicamba, in river water across the United States. The GC-MS method involved solid-phase extraction, derivatized with deutemted 2,4-D, and analysis by selected ion monitoring. The ELISA method was applied after preconcentration with solid-phase extraction. The ELISA method was unreliable because of interference from humic substances that were also isolated by solid-phase extraction. Therefore, GC-MS was used to analyzed 80 samples from river water from 14 basins. The frequency of detection of dicamba (28%) was higher than that for 2,4-D (16%). Concentrations were higher for dicamba than for 2,4-D, ranging from less than the detection limit (<0.05 ??g/L) to 3.77 ??g/L, in spite of 5 times more annual use of 2,4-D as compared to dicamba. These results suggest that 2,4-D degrades more rapidly in the environment than dicamba.

  11. [Determination of atmospheric polybrominated diphenyl ethers and polybrominated biphenyl 153 using isotope dilution-high resolution gas chromatography/high resolution mass spectrometry].

    PubMed

    Zheng, Xiaoyan; Yu, Jianzhao; Xu, Xiuyan; Yu, Haibin; Chen, Ye; Tan, Li; Lü, Yibing

    2015-10-01

    Considering the features and demands of the environmental monitoring, an isotope dilution-high resolution gas chromatography/high resolution mass spectrometry method was developed for the determination of polybrominated diphenyl ethers (PBDEs) and polybrominated biphenyls 153 (BB153) in the ambient air. PBDEs and BB153 were extracted using an accelerated solvent extraction apparatus with a mixture of hexane-dichloromethane (v/v, 1:1) and hexane, respectively. The concentrated extracts were loaded on the composite silica gel column for cleanup. The mean recoveries of native compounds at 10% and 90% of the highest levels of calibration curves were 100% and 104% with 5% and 6% of the mean relative standard deviations (n = 7), respectively. The recoveries of 13C labeled surrogates for di- to deca-brominated diphenyl ethers and BB153 were in the range of 36.5%-133%. However, the recoveries of 13C-monobrominated diphenyl ethers were relatively low, maybe due to the different physicochemical properties compared with the other homologues. No breakthrough of pollutants was estimated under real sampling volume of 300 m3. The limits of detection were lower than 2 x 10(-4) ng/Nm3. The recoveries of 13C labeled surrogates were between 56% and 126%, except monoBDEs. The results demonstrated that the method is suitable for the analysis of di- to decabrominated diphenyl ethers and BB153 in the ambient air with precise quantification. PMID:26930965

  12. Determination of nerve agent metabolites in human urine by isotope-dilution gas chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry after solid phase supported derivatization.

    PubMed

    Lin, Ying; Chen, Jia; Yan, Long; Guo, Lei; Wu, Bidong; Li, Chunzheng; Feng, Jianlin; Liu, Qin; Xie, Jianwei

    2014-08-01

    A simple and sensitive method has been developed and validated for determining ethyl methylphosphonic acid (EMPA), isopropyl methylphosphonic acid (IMPA), isobutyl methylphosphonic acid (iBuMPA), and pinacolyl methylphosphonic acid (PMPA) in human urine using gas chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry (GC-MS/MS) coupled with solid phase derivatization (SPD). These four alkyl methylphosphonic acids (AMPAs) are specific hydrolysis products and biomarkers of exposure to classic organophosphorus (OP) nerve agents VX, sarin, RVX, and soman. The AMPAs in urine samples were directly derivatized with pentafluorobenzyl bromide on a solid support and then extracted by liquid-liquid extraction. The analytes were quantified with isotope-dilution by negative chemical ionization (NCI) GC-MS/MS in a selected reaction monitoring (SRM) mode. This method is highly sensitive, with the limits of detection of 0.02 ng/mL for each compound in a 0.2 mL sample of human urine, and an excellent linearity from 0.1 to 50 ng/mL. It is proven to be very suitable for the qualitative and quantitative analyses of degradation markers of OP nerve agents in biomedical samples. PMID:24633564

  13. Simultaneous analysis of phthalates, adipate and polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons in edible oils using isotope dilution-gas chromatography-mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Oh, Min-Seok; Lee, Seon-Hwa; Moon, Myeong Hee; Lee, Dong Soo; Park, Hyun-Mee

    2014-01-01

    A method for simultaneous determination of 12 priority phthalates, adipate and polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) in edible oils by isotope dilution-gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (ID-GC-MS) was developed for fast, accurate and trace analysis. The extraction and clean-up procedures were optimised, and using stable isotope-labelled internal standards for each analyte, relative standard deviations (RSDs) of 0.92-10.6% and spiked sample recoveries of 80.6-97.8% were obtained. Limits of detection for PAHs were in the range of 0.15-0.77 µg/kg and those for phthalates were in the range of 4.6-10.0 µg/kg. The calibration curves exhibited good linearities with regression coefficients of R(2) ≥ 0.99. Twelve edible oils were examined to evaluate the efficiency of this method. Among the 12 analytes, dibutyl phthalates (DBP), diethylhexyl phthalates (DEHP), diethylhexyl adipate (DEHA), benzo[a]anthracene (B[a]A), chrysene (Chry) and benzo[b]fluoranthene (B[b]F) were detected in the range of 1.17-806 µg/kg. PMID:25029399

  14. Isotope dilution gas chromatography with mass spectrometry for the analysis of 4-octyl phenol, 4-nonylphenol, and bisphenol A in vegetable oils.

    PubMed

    Wu, Pinggu; Zhang, Liqun; Yang, Dajin; Zhang, Jing; Hu, Zhengyan; Wang, Liyuan; Ma, Bingjie

    2016-03-01

    By the combination of solid-phase extraction as well as isotope dilution gas chromatography with mass spectrometry, a sensitive and reliable method for the determination of endocrine-disrupting chemicals including bisphenol A, 4-octylphenol, and 4-nonylphenol in vegetable oils was established. The application of a silica/N-(n-propyl)ethylenediamine mixed solid-phase extraction cartridge achieved relatively low matrix effects for bisphenol A, 4-octylphenol, and 4-nonylphenol in vegetable oils. Experiments were designed to evaluate the effects of derivatization, and the extraction parameters were optimized. The estimated limits of detection and quantification for bisphenol A, 4-octylphenol, and 4-nonylphenol were 0.83 and 2.5 μg/kg, respectively. In a spiked experiment in vegetable oils, the recovery of the added bisphenol A was 97.5-110.3%, recovery of the added 4-octylphenol was 64.4-87.4%, and that of 4-nonylphenol was 68.2-89.3%. This sensitive method was then applied to real vegetable oil samples from Zhejiang Province of China, and none of the target compounds were detected. PMID:26698324

  15. Development of an equilibrium headspace gas chromatographic method for the measurement of noncovalent association and partitioning of n-alkylbenzenes at infinite dilution in fulvic acid pseudophase.

    PubMed

    Eljack, Mahmoud D; Wilson, Rachael E; Hussam, Abul; Khan, Shahamat U

    2015-02-27

    Fulvic acid (FA), the most important water soluble fraction of humic substances in nature, is known to form aggregate pseudophase and complexes with organic and inorganic species. Here, we report a novel equilibrium headspace gas chromatography (eHSGC) and a two-step reaction model to measure n-alkylbenzene-FA association constant (K11) and n-alkylbenzene-pseudophase FAn association constant (Kn1) without solute concentration and response factor. The K11 and Kn1 values were 2-3 orders of magnitude higher than those for sodium dodecylsulfate. Changes in peak area were used to calculate the critical FA-aggregation concentration (cfc), mole fraction based partition coefficients (Kx), activity coefficients of solute inside the aggregate pseudophase (γm(∞)), and transfer free energies of alkyl CH2 at infinite dilution. The cfc was found to be 10±0.5μM. The Kx values are of the order of 10(7) in the FA-aggregate pseudophase. The data shows that benzene has the lowest (0.0002) and n-butylbenzene has the highest (0.01) γm(∞) values, which are seven orders of magnitude smaller than γw(∞) in water. The transfer free energy of association of a CH2 group, -155cal/mol, compared to that of benzene, -9722cal/mol, indicates that the FA-aggregate pseudophase is more polarizable benzene-like and less n-alkane aliphatic-like. PMID:25622521

  16. Application of the carbon dioxide-barium hydroxide hydrate gas-solid reaction for the treatment of dilute carbon dioxide-bearing gas streams

    SciTech Connect

    Haag, G.L.

    1983-09-01

    The removal of trace components from gas streams via irreversible gas-solid reactions in an area of interest to the chemical engineering profession. This research effort addresses the use of fixed beds of Ba(OH)/sub 2/ hydrate flakes for the removal of an acid gas, CO/sub 2/, from air that contains approx. 330 ppM/sub v/ CO/sub 2/. Areas of investigation encompassed: (1) an extensive literature review of Ba(OH)/sub 2/ hydrate chemistry, (2) microscale studies on 0.150-g samples to develop a better understanding of the reaction, (3) process studies at the macroscale level with 10.2-cm-ID fixed-bed reactors, and (4) the development of a model for predicting fixed-bed performance. Experimental studies indicated fixed beds of commercial Ba(OH)/sub 2/.8H/sub 2/O flakes at ambient temperatures to be capable of high CO/sub 2/-removal efficiencies (effluent concentrations <100 ppB), high reactant utilization (>99%), and an acceptable pressure drop (1.8 kPa/m at a superficial gas velocity of 13 cm/s). Ba(OH)/sub 2/.8H/sub 2/O was determined to be more reactive toward CO/sub 2/ than either Ba(OH)/sub 2/.3H/sub 2/O or Ba(OH)/sub 2/.1H/sub 2/O. A key variable in the development of this fixed-bed process was relative humidity. Operation at conditions with effluent relative humidities >60% resulted in significant recrystallization and restructuring of the flake and subsequent pressure-drop problems.

  17. Inert blanketing of a hydride bed using typical grade protium

    SciTech Connect

    Klein, J.E.

    2015-03-15

    This paper describes the impact of 500 ppm (0.05%) impurities in protium on the absorption rate of a 9.66 kg LaNi{sub 4.25}Al{sub 0.75} (LANA0.75) metal hydride bed. The presence of 500 ppm or less inerts (i.e. non-hydrogen isotopes) can significantly impact hydrogen bed absorption rates. The impact on reducing absorption rates is significantly greater than predicted assuming uniform temperature, pressure, and compositions throughout the bed. Possible explanations are discussed. One possibility considered was the feed gas contained impurity levels higher than 500 ppm. It was shown that a level of 5000 ppm of inerts would have been necessary to fit the experimental result so this possibility wa dismissed. Another possibility is that the impurities in the protium supply reacted with the hydride material and partially poisoned the hydride. If the hydride were poisoned with CO or another impurity, the removal of the over-pressure gas in the bed would not be expected to allow the hydride loading of the bed to continue as the experimental results showed, so this possibility was also dismissed. The last possibility questions the validity of the calculations. It is assumed in all the calculations that the gas phase composition, temperature, and pressure are uniform throughout the bed. These assumptions are less valid for large beds where there can be large temperature, pressure, and composition gradients throughout the bed. Eventually the impact of 0.05% inerts in protium on bed absorption rate is shown and explained in terms of an increase in inert partial pressure as the bed was loaded.

  18. A dynamic inert metal anode.

    SciTech Connect

    Hryn, J. N.

    1998-11-09

    A new concept for a stable anode for aluminum electrowinning is described. The anode consists of a cup-shaped metal alloy container filled with a molten salt that contains dissolved aluminum. The metal alloy can be any of a number of alloys, but it must contain aluminum as a secondary alloying metal. A possible alloy composition is copper with 5 to 15 weight percent aluminum. In the presence of oxygen, aluminum on the metal anode's exterior surface forms a continuous alumina film that is thick enough to protect the anode from chemical attack by cryolite during electrolysis and thin enough to maintain electrical conductivity. However, the alumina film is soluble in cryolite, so it must be regenerated in situ. Film regeneration is achieved by the transport of aluminum metal from the anode's molten salt interior through the metal wall to the anode's exterior surface, where the transported aluminum oxidizes to alumina in the presence of evolving oxygen to maintain the protective alumina film. Periodic addition of aluminum metal to the anode's interior keeps the aluminum activity in the molten salt at the desired level. This concept for an inert anode is viable as long as the amount of aluminum produced at the cathode greatly exceeds the amount of aluminum required to maintain the anode's protective film.

  19. Application of the reference method isotope dilution gas chromatography mass spectrometry (ID/GC/MS) to establish metrological traceability for calibration and control of blood glucose test systems.

    PubMed

    Andreis, Elisabeth; Kllmer, Kai; Appel, Matthias

    2014-05-01

    Self-monitoring of blood glucose (BG) by means of handheld BG systems is a cornerstone in diabetes therapy. The aim of this article is to describe a procedure with proven traceability for calibration and evaluation of BG systems to guarantee reliable BG measurements. Isotope dilution gas chromatography mass spectrometry (ID/GC/MS) is a method that fulfills all requirements to be used in a higher-order reference measurement procedure. However, this method is not applicable for routine measurements because of the time-consuming sample preparation. A hexokinase method with perchloric acid (PCA) sample pretreatment is used in a measurement procedure for such purposes. This method is directly linked to the ID/GC/MS method by calibration with a glucose solution that has an ID/GC/MS-determined target value. BG systems are calibrated with whole blood samples. The glucose levels in such samples are analyzed by this ID/GC/MS-linked hexokinase method to establish traceability to higher-order reference material. For method comparison, the glucose concentrations in 577 whole blood samples were measured using the PCA-hexokinase method and the ID/GC/MS method; this resulted in a mean deviation of 0.1%. The mean deviation between BG levels measured in >500 valid whole blood samples with BG systems and the ID/GC/MS was 1.1%. BG systems allow a reliable glucose measurement if a true reference measurement procedure, with a noninterrupted traceability chain using ID/GC/MS linked hexokinase method for calibration of BG systems, is implemented. Systems should be calibrated by means of a traceable and defined measurement procedure to avoid bias. PMID:24876614

  20. Determination of 43 polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons in air particulate matter by use of direct elution and isotope dilution gas chromatography/mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Li, Zheng; Pittman, Erin N; Trinidad, Debra A; Romanoff, Lovisa C; Mulholland, James; Sjödin, Andreas

    2010-02-01

    We are reporting a method for measuring 43 polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAH) and their methylated derivatives (Me-PAHs) in air particulate matter (PM) samples using isotope dilution gas chromatography/high-resolution mass spectrometry (GC/HRMS). In this method, PM samples were spiked with internal standards, loaded into solid phase extraction cartridges, and eluted by dichloromethane. The extracts were concentrated, spiked with a recovery standard, and analyzed by GC/HRMS at 10,000 resolution. Sixteen (13)C-labeled PAHs and two deuterated Me-PAHs were used as internal standards to account for instrument variability and losses during sample preparation. Recovery of labeled internal standards was in the range of 86-115%. The proposed method is less time-consuming than commonly used extraction methods, such as sonication and accelerated solvent extraction (ASE), and it eliminates the need for a filtration step required after the sonication extraction method. Limits of detection ranged from 41 to 332 pg/sample for the 43 analytes. This method was used to analyze reference materials from the National Institute of Standards and Technology. The results were consistent with those from ASE and sonication extraction, and these results were also in good agreement with the certified or reference concentrations. The proposed method was then used to measure PAHs on PM(2.5) samples collected at three sites (urban, suburban, and rural) in Atlanta, GA. The results showed distinct seasonal and spatial variation and were consistent with an earlier study measuring PM(2.5) samples using an ASE method, further demonstrating the compatibility of this method and the commonly used ASE method. PMID:19936717

  1. Relativistic Quantum Chemistry of Heavy Elements: Interatomic potentials and Lines Shift for Systems 'Alkali Elements-Inert Gases'

    SciTech Connect

    Glushkov, A. V.; Khetselius, O.; Gurnitskaya, E.; Loboda, A.; Mischenko, E.

    2009-03-09

    New relativistic approach, based on the gauge-invariant perturbation theory (PT) with using the optimized wave functions basis's, is applied to calculating the inter atomic potentials, hyper fine structure (hfs) collision shift for alkali atoms in atmosphere of inert gases. Data for inter atomic potentials, collision shifts of the Rb and Cs atoms in atmosphere of the inert gas He are presented.

  2. Measurement of methyl tert-butyl ether and tert-butyl alcohol in human blood by purge-and-trap gas chromatography-mass spectrometry using an isotope-dilution method.

    PubMed

    Bonin, M A; Ashley, D L; Cardinali, F L; McCraw, J M; Wooten, J V

    1995-01-01

    We developed an isotope-dilution method for measuring methyl tert-butyl ether (MTBE) and tert-butyl alcohol (TBA) in whole human blood using a purge-and-trap gas chromatographic-mass spectrometric method. The labeled analogues for MTBE and TBA were [2H12]methyl tert-butyl ether and [2H9]-tert-butyl alcohol, respectively. Volatiles were removed from the blood by direct helium purging of the liquid; were trapped on a Tenax trap; and were desorbed, cryofocused, and chromatographed on a DB-624 capillary column that was connected directly to the ion source of a mass spectrometer. Detection was by mass analysis using a double-focusing magnetic-sector mass spectrometer operating in the full-scan mode at the medium mass resolution of 3000. For the isotope-dilution method, the minimum detection limits in blood (5-10 mL) are 0.01 microgram/L for MTBE and 0.06 microgram/L for TBA. The isotope-dilution method proved to be a big improvement in recovery, reproducibility, and sensitivity over our previous analytical method, which used the labeled ketone, [4-2H3]-2-butanone, as the internal standard for both MTBE and TBA. The isotope-dilution method has sufficient sensitivity for monitoring blood levels of MTBE and TBA in populations exposed to oxygenated fuels containing MTBE. PMID:7564298

  3. 7 CFR 201.19 - Inert matter.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ..., Inspections, Marketing Practices), DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE (CONTINUED) FEDERAL SEED ACT FEDERAL SEED ACT REGULATIONS Labeling Agricultural Seeds § 201.19 Inert matter. The label shall show the percentage by...

  4. 7 CFR 201.19 - Inert matter.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ..., Inspections, Marketing Practices), DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE (CONTINUED) FEDERAL SEED ACT FEDERAL SEED ACT REGULATIONS Labeling Agricultural Seeds § 201.19 Inert matter. The label shall show the percentage by...

  5. Serial Dilution Simulation Lab

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Keler, Cynthia; Balutis, Tabitha; Bergen, Kim; Laudenslager, Bryanna; Rubino, Deanna

    2010-01-01

    Serial dilution is often a difficult concept for students to understand. In this short dry lab exercise, students perform serial dilutions using seed beads. This exercise helps students gain skill at performing dilutions without using reagents, bacterial cultures, or viral cultures, while being able to visualize the process.

  6. Monitoring urinary metabolites resulting from sulfur mustard exposure in rabbits, using highly sensitive isotope-dilution gas chromatography-mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Nie, Zhiyong; Zhang, Yajiao; Chen, Jia; Lin, Ying; Wu, Bidong; Dong, Yuan; Feng, Jianlin; Liu, Qin; Xie, Jianwei

    2014-08-01

    A highly sensitive method for the determination of sulfur mustard (SM) metabolites thiodiglycol (TDG) and thiodiglycol sulfoxide (TDGO) in urine was established and validated using isotope-dilution negative-ion chemical ionization (NICI) gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS). TDGO in the samples was reduced with TiCl3, and then determined together with TDG as a single analyte. The sample preparation procedures, including two solid-phase-extraction (SPE) clean-up steps, were optimized to improve the sensitivity of the method. The limits of detection (LOD) for both TDG and TDG plus TDGO (TDG + TDGO) were 0.1 ng mL(-1), and the limits of quantitation (LOQ) for both were 0.3 ng mL(-1). The method was used in a rabbit cutaneous SM exposure model. Domestic rabbits were exposed to neat liquid SM at three dosage levels (0.02, 0.05, and 0.15 LD50), and the urinary excretion of four species of hydrolysis metabolites, namely free TDG, free plus conjugated TDG (total TDG), free TDG + TDGO, and free plus conjugated TDG + TDGO (total TDG + TDGO), was evaluated to investigate the metabolic processes. The total urinary excretion profiles of the metabolites, including the peak time, time window, and dose-response and time-response relationships, were clarified. The results revealed that the concentrations of TDG and TDG + TDGO in the urine increased quickly and then decreased rapidly in the first two days after SM exposure. The cumulative amount of total TDG + TDGO excreted in urine during the first five days accounted for 0.5-1% of the applied dose of SM. It is also concluded that TDG and TDGO in urine existed mainly in free form, the levels of glucuronide and of sulfate conjugates of TDG or TDGO were very low, and most hydrolysis metabolites were present in the oxidized form (TDGO). The study indicates that the abnormal increase of TDG and TDGO excretion levels can be used as a diagnostic indicator and establishes a reference time-window for retrospective analysis and sampling after SM exposure. PMID:24924210

  7. Discovery and microassay of a nitrite-dependent carbonic anhydrase activity by stable-isotope dilution gas chromatography-mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Zinke, Maximilian; Hanff, Erik; Böhmer, Anke; Supuran, Claudiu T; Tsikas, Dimitrios

    2016-01-01

    The intrinsic activity of carbonic anhydrase (CA) is the hydration of CO2 to carbonic acid and its dehydration to CO2. CA may also function as esterase and phosphatase. Recently, we demonstrated that renal CA is mainly responsible for the reabsorption of nitrite (NO2 (-)) which is the most abundant reservoir of the biologically highly potent nitric oxide (NO). By means of a stable-isotope dilution GC-MS method, we discovered a novel CA activity which strictly depends upon nitrite. We found that bovine erythrocytic CAII (beCAII) catalyses the incorporation of (18)O from H 2 (18) O into nitrite at pH 7.4. After derivatization with pentafluorobenzyl bromide, gas chromatographic separation and mass spectrometric analysis, we detected ions at m/z 48 for singly (18)O-labelled nitrite ((16)O=N-(18)O(-)/(18)O=N-(16)O(-)) and at m/z 50 for doubly (18)O-labelled nitrite ((18)O=N-(18)O(-)) in addition to m/z 46 for unlabelled nitrite. Using (15)N-labelled nitrite ((15)NO2 (-), m/z 47) as an internal standard and selected-ion monitoring of m/z 46, m/z 48, m/z 50 and m/z 47, we developed a GC-MS microassay for the quantitative determination of the nitrite-dependent beCAII activity. The CA inhibitors acetazolamide and FC5 207A did not alter beCAII-catalysed formation of singly and doubly (18)O-labelled nitrite. Cysteine and the experimental CA inhibitor DIDS (a diisothiocyanate) increased several fold the beCAII-catalysed formation of the (18)O-labelled nitrite species. Cysteine, acetazolamide, FC5 207A, and DIDS by themselves had no effect on the incorporation of (18)O from H 2 (18) O into nitrite. We conclude that erythrocytic CA possesses a nitrite-dependent activity which can only be detected when nitrite is used as the substrate and the reaction is performed in buffers of neutral pH values prepared in H 2 (18) O. This novel CA activity, i.e., the nitrous acid anhydrase activity, represents a bioactivation of nitrite and may have both beneficial (via S-nitrosylation and subsequent NO release) and possibly adverse (via C- and N-nitrosylation) effects in living organisms. PMID:26334347

  8. Dynamics of galloping detonations: inert hydrodynamics with pulsed energy release

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Radulescu, Matei I.; Shepherd, Joseph E.

    2015-11-01

    Previous models for galloping and cellular detonations of Ulyanitski, Vasil'ev and Higgins assume that the unit shock decay or cell can be modeled by Taylor-Sedov blast waves. We revisit this concept for galloping detonations, which we model as purely inert hydrodynamics with periodically pulsed energy deposition. At periodic time intervals, the chemical energy of the non-reacted gas accumulating between the lead shock and the contact surface separating reacted and non reacted gas is released nearly instantaneously. In between these pulses, the gas evolves as an inert medium. The resulting response of the gas to the periodic forcing is a sudden gain in pressure followed by mechanical relaxation accompanied by strong shock waves driven both forward and backwards. It is shown that the decay of the lead shock in-between pulses follows an exponential decay, whose time constant is controlled by the frequency of the energy deposition. More-over, the average speed of the lead shock is found to agree within 2 percent to the ideal Chapman-Jouguet value, while the large scale dynamics of the wave follows closely the ideal wave form of a CJ wave trailed by a Taylor expansion. When friction and heat losses are accounted for, velocity deficits are predicted, consistent with experiment. Work performed while MIR was on sabbatical at Caltech.

  9. The intercombination Cd line 326.1 nm and van der Waals potential coefficients ΔC60andΔC61 for pure Cd and Cd-inert gas systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roston, G. D.; Helmi, M. S.

    2009-03-01

    The absorption profiles of the Cd 326.1 nm line for pure Cd and Cd-inert gases (Xe, Kr, Ar, Ne and He) have been carefully studied from the line center to 700 cm -1 in the red wing using a high resolution double beam spectrometer. The density of Cd was about 5.108 × 10 18 atoms cm -3. The temperature dependences of the red wings of these profiles were analysed in the frame work of the Unified Frank Condon (UFC) treatment of pressure broadening of spectral lines developed by Szudy and Baylis. The van der Waals potential coefficient differences ΔC60 and ΔC61 between the ground 10 + state and the two excited states 30 + and 31 were obtained using Kuhn's law.

  10. The van der Waals Potential Coefficients ΔC60 and ΔC61 of the Intercombination Cd Line 326.1 nm for Pure Cd and Cd-Inert Gas Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roston, G. D.; Helmi, M. S.

    2008-10-01

    The absorption profiles of the Cd 326.1 nm line for pure Cd and Cd-inert gases (Xe, Kr, Ar, Ne and He) have been carefully studied from the line center to 700 cm-1 in the red wing using a high resolution double beam spectrometer. The density of Cd was about 5.108×1018 atoms cm-3. The temperature dependences of the red wings of these profiles were analysed in the frame work of the unified Frank Condon (UFC) treatment of pressure broadening of spectral lines developed by Szudy and Baylis. The van der Waals potential coefficient differences ΔC60 and ΔC61 between the ground 30+ state and the two exited states 30+ and 31 were obtained using Kuhn's law.

  11. Performance of an adjustable, threaded inertance tube

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, W. J.; Pfotenhauer, J. M.; Nellis, G. F.; Liu, S. Y.

    2015-12-01

    The performance of the Stirling type pulse tube cryocooler depends strongly on the design of the inertance tube. The phase angle produced by the inertance tube is very sensitive to its diameter and length. Recent developments are reported here regarding an adjustable inertance device that can be adjusted in real time. The inertance passage is formed by the root of a concentric cylindrical threaded device. The depth of the threads installed on the outer screw varies. In this device, the outer screw can be rotated four and half turns. At the zero turn position the length of the passage is 1.74 m and the hydraulic diameter is 7 mm. By rotating the outer screw, the inner threaded rod engages with additional, larger depth threads. Therefore, at its upper limit of rotation, the inertance passage includes both the original 1.74 m length with 7mm hydraulic diameter plus an additional 1.86 m length with a 10 mm hydraulic diameter. A phase shift change of 24° has been experimentally measured by changing the position of outer screw while operating the device at a frequency of 60 Hz. This phase angle shift is less than the theoretically predicted value due to the presence of a relatively large leak through the thread clearance. Therefore, the distributed component model of the inertance tube was modified to account for the leak path causing the data to agree with the model. Further, the application of vacuum grease to the threads causes the performance of the device to improve substantially.

  12. Inert strength of pristine silica glass fibers

    SciTech Connect

    Smith, W.L.; Michalske, T.A.

    1993-11-01

    Silica glass fibers have been produced and tested under ultra high vacuum (UHV) conditions to investigate the inert strength of pristine fibers in absence of reactive agents. Analysis of the coefficient of variation in diameter ({upsilon}{sub d}) vs the coefficient of variation of breaking strength ({upsilon}{sub {sigma}}) does not adequately explain the variation of breaking stress. Distribution of fiber tensile strength data suggests that the inert strength of such fibers is not single valued and that the intrinsic strength is controlled by defects in the glass. Furthermore, comparison of room temperature UHV data with LN{sub 2} data indicates that these intrinsic strengths are not temperature dependent.

  13. Two systems developed for purifying inert atmospheres

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Foster, M. S.; Johnson, C. E.; Kyle, M. L.

    1969-01-01

    Two systems, one for helium and one for argon, are used for purifying inert atmospheres. The helium system uses an activated charcoal bed at liquid nitrogen temperature to remove oxygen and nitrogen. The argon system uses heated titanium sponge to remove nitrogen and copper wool beds to remove oxygen. Both use molecular sieves to remove water vapor.

  14. 7 CFR 201.51 - Inert matter.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... the embryo missing. (2) Grass florets and caryopses classed as inert: (i) Glumes and empty florets of... axis missing (the scutellum excluded); (iii) Immature free caryopses devoid of embryo and/or endosperm... Brassica with the seed coats entirely removed. (4) Immature seed units, devoid of both embryo and...

  15. 7 CFR 201.51 - Inert matter.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... the embryo missing. (2) Grass florets and caryopses classed as inert: (i) Glumes and empty florets of... axis missing (the scutellum excluded); (iii) Immature free caryopses devoid of embryo and/or endosperm... Brassica with the seed coats entirely removed. (4) Immature seed units, devoid of both embryo and...

  16. Growth process of hydrogenated amorphous carbon films synthesized by atmospheric pressure plasma enhanced CVD using nitrogen and helium as a dilution gas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mori, Takanori; Sakurai, Takachika; Sato, Taiki; Shirakura, Akira; Suzuki, Tetsuya

    2016-04-01

    Hydrogenated amorphous carbon films with various thicknesses were synthesized by dielectric barrier discharge-based plasma deposition under atmospheric pressure diluted with nitrogen (N2) and helium (He) at various pulse frequencies. The C2H2/N2 film showed cauliflower-like-particles that grew bigger with the increase in film’s thickness. At 5 kHz, the film with a thickness of 2.7 µm and smooth surface was synthesized. On the other hand, the films synthesized from C2H2/He had a smooth surface and was densely packed with domed particles. The domed particles extended with the increase in the film thickness, enabling it to grow successfully to 37 µm with a smooth surface.

  17. Determination of tellurium in urine by isotope dilution gas chromatography/mass spectrometry using (4-fluorophenyl)magnesium bromide as a derivatizing agent and a comparison with electrothermal atomic absorption spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Aggarwal, S K; Kinter, M; Nicholson, J; Herold, D A

    1994-04-15

    The antitumor drug AS-101 [ammoniumtrichloro (dioxoethylene-O,O')tellurate(IV)] is the first tellurium-containing compound that has been identified as possessing immunomodulating properties and minimal toxicity. We have developed a stable isotope dilution gas chromatography/mass spectrometry method using 120Te as an internal standard and (4-fluorophenyl)magnesium bromide as a derivatizing agent for Te determination in urine. The urine samples were digested using HNO3 + H2O2 prior to derivatization with lithium bis(trifluoroethyl)dithiocarbamate at a pH of 3. The trifluorodiethyldithiocarbamate of tellurium was reacted with the Grignard reagent in anhydrous diethyl ether to obtain Te-(FC6H4)2 for GC/MS analysis. All isotope ratio measurements were made by selected ion monitoring with a Finnigan MAT 8230 organic mass spectrometer using a 10-m fused silica capillary column. Overall percision values for the five major Te isotopes relative to 130Te were 0.6-3.1% when 10-ng samples of chelated Te were analyzed. No appreciable memory or carry-over effect was observed when two synthetic mixtures differing in 120Te:130Te ratios by a factor of 50 were sequentially analyzed. The isotope dilution GC/MS method was validated by determining Te in urine samples and comparing the values with electrothermal atomic absorption spectrometry. Te concentrations were determined in the 100-500 micrograms/L range with CVs of 1-4%. PMID:8210046

  18. 46 CFR 154.912 - Inerted spaces: Relief devices.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 5 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Inerted spaces: Relief devices. 154.912 Section 154.912 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) CERTAIN BULK DANGEROUS CARGOES SAFETY... Atmospheric Control in Cargo Containment Systems § 154.912 Inerted spaces: Relief devices. Inerted spaces...

  19. 46 CFR 154.912 - Inerted spaces: Relief devices.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 5 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Inerted spaces: Relief devices. 154.912 Section 154.912 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) CERTAIN BULK DANGEROUS CARGOES SAFETY... Atmospheric Control in Cargo Containment Systems § 154.912 Inerted spaces: Relief devices. Inerted spaces...

  20. 46 CFR 154.912 - Inerted spaces: Relief devices.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 5 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Inerted spaces: Relief devices. 154.912 Section 154.912 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) CERTAIN BULK DANGEROUS CARGOES SAFETY... Atmospheric Control in Cargo Containment Systems § 154.912 Inerted spaces: Relief devices. Inerted spaces...

  1. 46 CFR 154.912 - Inerted spaces: Relief devices.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 5 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Inerted spaces: Relief devices. 154.912 Section 154.912 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) CERTAIN BULK DANGEROUS CARGOES SAFETY... Atmospheric Control in Cargo Containment Systems § 154.912 Inerted spaces: Relief devices. Inerted spaces...

  2. 46 CFR 154.912 - Inerted spaces: Relief devices.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 5 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Inerted spaces: Relief devices. 154.912 Section 154.912... Atmospheric Control in Cargo Containment Systems § 154.912 Inerted spaces: Relief devices. Inerted spaces must be fitted with relief valves, rupture discs, or other devices specially approved by the...

  3. Report on the source of the electrochemical impedance on cermet inert anodes

    SciTech Connect

    Windisch, C.F. Jr.; Stice, N.D.

    1991-02-01

    the Inert Electrode Program at Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL) is supported by the Office of Industrial Processes of the US Department of Energy and is aimed at improving the energy efficiency of Hall-Heroult cells through the development of inert anodes. The inert anodes currently under study are composed of a cermet material of the general composition NiO-NiFe{sub 2}O{sub 4}-Cu. The program has three primary objectives: (a) to evaluate the anode material in a scaled-up, pilot cell facility, (b) to investigate the mechanisms of the electrochemical reactions at the anode surface, and (c) to develop sensors for monitoring anode and/or electrolyte conditions. This report covers the results of a portion of the studies on anode reaction mechanisms. The electrochemical impedances of cermet inert anodes in alumina-saturated molten cryolite as a function of frequency, current density, and time indicated that a significant component of the impedance is due to the gas bubbles produced at the anode during electrolysis. The data also showed a connection between surface structure and impedance that appears to be related to the effects of surface structure on bubble flow. Given the results of this work, it is doubtful that a resistive film contributes significantly to the electrochemical impedances on inert anodes. Properties previously assigned to such a film are more likely due to the bubbles and those factors that affect the properties and dynamics of the bubbles at the anode surface. 12 refs., 16 figs., 3 tabs.

  4. Automated high-speed analysis of selected organic compounds in urban air by on-line isotopic dilution cryofocusing gas chromatography/mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Davoli, E; Cappellini, L; Maggi, M; Fanelli, R

    1994-11-01

    An automated environmental air monitor has been developed to measure selected organic compounds in urban air. The instrument is based on a cryofocusing-thermal desorption gas chromatographic mass spectrometry technique where the mass spectrometer is a slightly modified residual gas analyzer (RGA). The RGA was chosen as a detector because the whole system must be robust for long periods, with 24-h continuous air monitoring. RCA are extremely simple and seemed the most reliable mass spectrometers for this purpose. Moreover, because they have no physically limited ion source, contamination is considerably reduced, so maintenance intervals are longer.The gas chromatograph is equipped with a computer-controlled six-way sampling valve, with a 100-mL sampling loop and thermal desorption cold trap injector. Environmental air is enriched with an isotopically labeled internal standard in the sampling line. This internal standard is added with a validated, custom-made, permeation tube device. The "on-line" internal standard provides for high quality quantitative data because all variations in instrument sensitivity in cryofocusing or in thermal desorption efficiency are taken into account. High repetition rates (down to 5 min for a full analytical cycle) are obtained with the use of an isothermal gas chromatography program, microbore capillary column, and environmental air sampling during the gas chromatography run. PMID:24226389

  5. Absorption removal of sulfur dioxide by falling water droplets in the presence of inert solid particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, I.-Hung; Chang, Ching-Yuan; Liu, Su-Chin; Chang, I.-Cheng; Shih, Shin-Min

    An experimental analysis of the absorption removal of sulfur dioxide by the free falling water droplets containing the inert solid particles is presented. The wheat flour powder is introduced as the inert solid particles. Tests with and without the flour powder in the water droplets are examined. The mass fluxes and mass transfer coefficients of SO 2 for the cases with and without the flour powder are compared to elucidate the effects of the inert solid particles contained in the water droplets on the gas absorption. The results indicate aignificant difference between the two cases for the concentrations of the flour powder in the absorbent droplets ( Cs) within the ranges of the experimental conditions, namely 0.1 to 10 wt% flour powder in the absorbent droplets. In general, the inert solid particles of the flour powder as the impurities in the water droplets tend to decrease the SO 2 absorption rate for the experimental absorption system under investigation. Various values of Cs cause various levels of the interfacial resistance and affect the gas absorption rate. The interfacial resistance is recognized by introducing an interfacial mass transfer coefficient ks with its reciprocal being proportional to the magnitude of the interfacial resistance. The values of 1/ ks may be computed by the use of the equation 1/ ks=(1/ KOLs-1/ KOL), where KOLs and KOL are the overall liquid-phase mass transfer coefficients with and without the inert solid particles, respectively. The values of ks with Cs of 0.1 to 10 wt% are about 0.295-0.032 cms -1 for absorbing 1000-3000 ppmv SO 2 with the water droplets. This kind of information is useful for the SO 2 removal and the information of acid rain that the impurities of the inert solid particles contaminate the water droplets.

  6. Muco-inert nanoparticle probes and drug carriers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Ying-Ying

    2011-12-01

    Mucus coats the exposed surfaces of the eyes and respiratory, gastrointestinal (GI) and cervicovaginal (CV) tracts, and protects mucosal tissues against pathogens and other foreign particulates. Most foreign particles are effectively trapped in mucus through steric and adhesive interactions, and are rapidly eliminated by different mucus clearance mechanisms. Nevertheless, mucus also immobilizes conventional drug and gene carriers, thereby precluding sustained and targeted drug delivery to mucosal sites. Synthetic particles engineered with muco-inert surfaces, and some viruses, can readily penetrate mucus gel, and may serve as useful probes to understand the biophysical barrier properties of mucus. Improved understanding of the mucus barrier could provide insights into methods to enhance drug and gene delivery at mucosal surfaces, as well as understanding the occasional failure of mucus to protect against infection or injury. Recently, muco-inert nanoparticles were developed by conjugating a dense layer of low MW polyethylene glycol to particle surfaces. Since they are slowed only by steric obstruction from the mucus mesh, various sized muco-inert nanoparticles can be used to probe the microstructure and microrheology of mucus. I applied this technique to determine whether the mucus barrier may be altered by exogenous factors, including the presence of detergent, pH changes and synthetic nanoparticles. I first studied the microrheology of native human cervicovaginal mucus (CVM), and found that CVM behaves as a viscoelastic solid at length scales ≥ 1 microm (preventing large particles from diffusing through) but as a viscoelastic liquid at length scales up to at least 500 nm (allowing smaller particles to diffuse through low viscosity fluid-filled pores). Treating CVM with a nonionic detergent, N9, shifted the viscoelastic liquid-solid transition point to < 200 nm, suggesting hydrophobic interactions between mucin fibers play an important role in regulating the mucus microstructure and consequently the microrheology. Indeed, N9 caused the average mucus pore size to decrease from ˜340 nm to 130 nm. I then looked at the effect of pH on mucus and found that the microstructure of CVM is essentially pH-independent over a broad range of physiological pH. Between pH 4 (the native pH of CVM) and 6--7, the average pore size in the mucus mesh remained unchanged, and between pH 1--2 and 8--9, there was at most a 2-fold drop in the average pore size (likely due to changes in electrostatic vs. hydrophobic interactions between mucin fibers). Finally, I found that mucoadhesive synthetic nanoparticles, at sufficiently high concentrations, can bundle mucin fibers and create large openings in the mucus microstructure. Disruption of the mucus barrier in this manner allowed a greater fraction of large (1 microm) muco-inert particles to diffuse through the mucus mesh. Muco-inert nanoparticles---also referred to as "mucus-penetrating particles" (MPP)---offer the potential for sustained and targeted drug delivery to mucosal surfaces. By penetrating luminal mucus layers, MPP may be able to reach the slowly cleared adherent mucus layer or deep folds of the epithelium and thereby achieve prolonged retention. I first measured the long range penetration of MPP compared to conventional mucoadhesive particles (CP) into CVM. With minimal dilution of CVM, MPP could penetrate up to 200 microm over 1 hr with ˜530 particles/mm2 penetrating 100 microm or more, while CP remained immobilized (note that physiological mucus layer thicknesses are no more than ˜200 microm). Furthermore, with 30% v/v dilution, MPP could penetrate up to 1.5 mm over 1 hr with ˜74,000 particles/mm2 penetrating 100 microm or more, while CP continued to remain stuck. I then studied the distribution and retention of MPP vs. CP in the mouse vagina to determine whether improved mucus penetration leads to more uniform distribution and prolonged retention. I found that MPP were not only more uniformly distributed in the vaginal lumen, but also penetrated deep into epithelial folds. In contrast, CP were aggregated by luminal mucus and failed to reach the epithelium. Several-fold more MPP were retained on the vaginal epithelial surface than CP over at least ˜1 day. Drug and gene carriers that provide more uniform and longer-lasting coverage of mucosal surfaces may greatly improve the treatment or prevention of diseases at mucosal sites.

  7. C(240)-----The most Chemically Inert Fullerene?

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Haddon, R. C.; Scuseria, G. E.; Smalley, R. E.

    1997-01-01

    The reactivity of the fullerenes is primarily a function of their strain, as measured by the pyramidalization angle or curvature of the conjugated carbon atoms. The development of faceting in the structure of large icosahedral fullerenes leads to a minimum in the value of the maximum fullerene pyramidalization angle that lies in the vicinity of C-240. On this basis it is argued that C-240 will be the most chemically inert fullerene. This observation explains the production of [10,10] single-walled nanotubes because a C-240 hemisphere is required for the nucleation of such tubes.

  8. Method for retarding dye fading during archival storage of developed color photographic film. [inert atmosphere

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hoover, R. B.; Rhodes, C. M. (Inventor)

    1981-01-01

    Dye fading during archival storage of developed color photographic film is retarded by placing the film in a sealed, opaque vault, introducing a dry, pressurized inert gas into the vault while the latter is vented, and sealing the vault after the air within the vault has been purged and replaced by the inert gas. Preferably, the gas is nitrogen; and the vault is stored at a temperature below room temperature to preserve the color photographic emulsions on the film contained within the vault. For short-term storage, sodium thiocyanate pads charged with water are placed within the vault. For long term storage, the interior of the vault is kept at a low relative humidity.

  9. Effect of adduct formation with molecular nitrogen on the measured collisional cross sections of transition metal-1,10-phenanthroline complexes in traveling wave ion-mobility spectrometry: N2 is not always an "inert" buffer gas.

    PubMed

    Rijs, Nicole J; Weiske, Thomas; Schlangen, Maria; Schwarz, Helmut

    2015-10-01

    The number of separations and analyses of molecular species using traveling wave ion-mobility spectrometry-mass spectrometry (TWIMS-MS) is increasing, including those extending the technique to analytes containing metal atoms. A critical aspect of such applications of TWIMS-MS is the validity of the collisional cross sections (CCSs) measured and whether they can be accurately calibrated against other ion-mobility spectrometry (IMS) techniques. Many metal containing species have potential reactivity toward molecular nitrogen, which is present in high concentration in the typical Synapt-G2 TWIMS cell. Here, we analyze the effect of nitrogen on the drift time of a series of cationic 1,10-phenanthroline complexes of the late transition metals, [(phen)M](+), (M = Ni, Pd, Pt, Cu, Ag, Au, Zn, Cd, and Hg) in order to understand potential deviations from expected drift time behaviors. These metal complexes were chosen for their metal open-coordination site and lack of rotameric species. The target species were generated via electrospray ionization (ESI), analyzed using TWIMS in N2 drift gas, and the observed drift time trends compared. Theoretically derived CCSs for all species (via both the projection approximation and trajectory method) were also compared. The results show that, indeed, for metal containing species in this size regime, reaction with molecular nitrogen has a dramatic effect on measured drift times and must not be ignored when comparing and interpreting TWIMS arrival time distributions. Density-functional theory (DFT) calculations are employed to analyze the periodic differences due to the metal's interaction with nitrogen (and background water) in detail. PMID:26378338

  10. Dilution, Concentration, and Flotation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Liang, Ling; Schmuckler, Joseph S.

    2004-01-01

    As both classroom teaching practice and literature show, many students have difficulties learning science concepts such as density. Here are some investigations that identify the relationship between density and floating through experimenting with successive dilution of a liquid, or the systematic change of concentration of a saltwater solution.…

  11. Helium dilution refrigeration system

    DOEpatents

    Roach, Patrick R.; Gray, Kenneth E.

    1988-01-01

    A helium dilution refrigeration system operable over a limited time period, and recyclable for a next period of operation. The refrigeration system is compact with a self-contained pumping system and heaters for operation of the system. A mixing chamber contains .sup.3 He and .sup.4 He liquids which are precooled by a coupled container containing .sup.3 He liquid, enabling the phase separation of a .sup.3 He rich liquid phase from a dilute .sup.3 He-.sup.4 He liquid phase which leads to the final stage of a dilution cooling process for obtaining low temperatures. The mixing chamber and a still are coupled by a fluid line and are maintained at substantially the same level with the still cross sectional area being smaller than that of the mixing chamber. This configuration provides maximum cooling power and efficiency by the cooling period ending when the .sup.3 He liquid is depleted from the mixing chamber with the mixing chamber nearly empty of liquid helium, thus avoiding unnecessary and inefficient cooling of a large amount of the dilute .sup.3 He-.sup.4 He liquid phase.

  12. Helium dilution refrigeration system

    DOEpatents

    Roach, P.R.; Gray, K.E.

    1988-09-13

    A helium dilution refrigeration system operable over a limited time period, and recyclable for a next period of operation is disclosed. The refrigeration system is compact with a self-contained pumping system and heaters for operation of the system. A mixing chamber contains [sup 3]He and [sup 4]He liquids which are precooled by a coupled container containing [sup 3]He liquid, enabling the phase separation of a [sup 3]He rich liquid phase from a dilute [sup 3]He-[sup 4]He liquid phase which leads to the final stage of a dilution cooling process for obtaining low temperatures. The mixing chamber and a still are coupled by a fluid line and are maintained at substantially the same level with the still cross sectional area being smaller than that of the mixing chamber. This configuration provides maximum cooling power and efficiency by the cooling period ending when the [sup 3]He liquid is depleted from the mixing chamber with the mixing chamber nearly empty of liquid helium, thus avoiding unnecessary and inefficient cooling of a large amount of the dilute [sup 3]He-[sup 4]He liquid phase. 2 figs.

  13. Determination of 1-methyl-1H-1,2,4-triazole in soils contaminated by rocket fuel using solid-phase microextraction, isotope dilution and gas chromatography-mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Yegemova, Saltanat; Bakaikina, Nadezhda V; Kenessov, Bulat; Koziel, Jacek A; Nauryzbayev, Mikhail

    2015-10-01

    Environmental monitoring of Central Kazakhstan territories where heavy space booster rockets land requires fast, efficient, and inexpensive analytical methods. The goal of this study was to develop a method for quantitation of the most stable transformation product of rocket fuel, i.e., highly toxic unsymmetrical dimethylhydrazine - 1-methyl-1H-1,2,4-triazole (MTA) in soils using solid-phase microextraction (SPME) in combination with gas chromatography-mass spectrometry. Quantitation of organic compounds in soil samples by SPME is complicated by a matrix effect. Thus, an isotope dilution method was chosen using deuterated analyte (1-(trideuteromethyl)-1H-1,2,4-triazole; MTA-d3) for matrix effect control. The work included study of the matrix effect, optimization of a sample equilibration stage (time and temperature) after spiking MTA-d3 and validation of the developed method. Soils of different type and water content showed an order of magnitude difference in SPME effectiveness of the analyte. Isotope dilution minimized matrix effects. However, proper equilibration of MTA-d3 in soil was required. Complete MTA-d3 equilibration at temperatures below 40°C was not observed. Increase of temperature to 60°C and 80°C enhanced equilibration reaching theoretical MTA/MTA-d3 response ratios after 13 and 3h, respectively. Recoveries of MTA depended on concentrations of spiked MTA-d3 during method validation. Lowest spiked MTA-d3 concentration (0.24 mg kg(-1)) provided best MTA recoveries (91-121%). Addition of excess water to soil sample prior to SPME increased equilibration rate, but it also decreased method sensitivity. Method detection limit depended on soil type, water content, and was always below 1 mg kg(-1). The newly developed method is fully automated, and requires much lower time, labor and financial resources compared to known methods. PMID:26078153

  14. Leptogenesis, radiative neutrino masses and inert Higgs triplet dark matter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lu, Wen-Bin; Gu, Pei-Hong

    2016-05-01

    We extend the standard model by three types of inert fields including Majorana fermion singlets/triplets, real Higgs singlets/triplets and leptonic Higgs doublets. In the presence of a softly broken lepton number and an exactly conserved Z2 discrete symmetry, these inert fields together can mediate a one-loop diagram for a Majorana neutrino mass generation. The heavier inert fields can decay to realize a successful leptogenesis while the lightest inert field can provide a stable dark matter candidate. As an example, we demonstrate the leptogenesis by the inert Higgs doublet decays. We also perform a systematic study on the inert Higgs triplet dark matter scenario where the interference between the gauge and Higgs portal interactions can significantly affect the dark matter properties.

  15. A model with two inert scalar doublets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Machado, A. C. B.; Pleitez, V.

    2016-01-01

    We consider an extension of the standard model (SM) with three SU(2) scalar doublets and discrete S3 ⊗Z2 symmetries. The irreducible representation of S3 has a singlet and a doublet, and here we show that the singlet corresponds to the SM-like Higgs and the two additional SU(2) doublets forming a S3 doublet are inert. In general, in a three scalar doublet model, with or without S3 symmetry, the diagonalization of the mass matrices implies arbitrary unitary matrices. However, we show that in our model these matrices are of the tri-bimaximal type. We also analyzed the scalar mass spectra and the conditions for the scalar potential is bounded from below at the tree level. We also discuss some phenomenological consequences of the model.

  16. a Non-Tube Inertance Device for Pulse Tube Cryocoolers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yuan, S. W. K.; Curran, D. G. T.; Cha, J. S.

    2010-04-01

    Inertance Pulse Tube Cryocoolers make use of a long tube for phase shifting and optimization of performance. This long tube presents a challenge for packaging in most applications, and is also a concern for environments where vibration is present (e.g., launch). In the present invention, a gap configuration is used in place of the tube, resulting in a more compact inertance device. Using the SAGE software, the performance of this new device is found to be comparable to that of an inertance tube. Significantly, this new invention offers the flexibility to change the inertance value during testing and operation, which cannot be done with the tube configuration.

  17. Continuous distributions of specific ventilation recovered from inert gas washout

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lewis, S. M.; Evans, J. W.; Jalowayski, A. A.

    1978-01-01

    A new technique is described for recovering continuous distributions of ventilation as a function of tidal ventilation/volume ratio from the nitrogen washout. The analysis yields a continuous distribution of ventilation as a function of tidal ventilation/volume ratio represented as fractional ventilations of 50 compartments plus dead space. The procedure was verified by recovering known distributions from data to which noise had been added. Using an apparatus to control the subject's tidal volume and FRC, mixed expired N2 data gave the following results: (a) the distributions of young, normal subjects were narrow and unimodal; (b) those of subjects over age 40 were broader with more poorly ventilated units; (c) patients with pulmonary disease of all descriptions showed enlarged dead space; (d) patients with cystic fibrosis showed multimodal distributions with the bulk of the ventilation going to overventilated units; and (e) patients with obstructive lung disease fell into several classes, three of which are illustrated.

  18. 33 CFR 157.164 - Use of inert gas system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... oxygen content of 8 percent or less by volume. (ii) A positive atmospheric pressure. (5) During COW operations, a crew member monitors the instrumentation under 46 CFR 32.53-60(a)(1), except if...

  19. 33 CFR 157.164 - Use of inert gas system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... oxygen content of 8 percent or less by volume. (ii) A positive atmospheric pressure. (5) During COW operations, a crew member monitors the instrumentation under 46 CFR 32.53-60(a)(1), except if...

  20. 33 CFR 157.164 - Use of inert gas system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... oxygen content of 8 percent or less by volume. (ii) A positive atmospheric pressure. (5) During COW operations, a crew member monitors the instrumentation under 46 CFR 32.53-60(a)(1), except if...

  1. 33 CFR 157.164 - Use of inert gas system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... operations, a crew member monitors the instrumentation under 46 CFR 32.53-60(a)(1), except if that instrumentation has an alarm that sounds in the cargo control room when the oxygen content exceeds 8 percent...

  2. 33 CFR 157.164 - Use of inert gas system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... operations, a crew member monitors the instrumentation under 46 CFR 32.53-60(a)(1), except if that instrumentation has an alarm that sounds in the cargo control room when the oxygen content exceeds 8 percent...

  3. Simple device facilitates inert-gas welding of tubes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Carrithers, K. V.; Kelley, W. B.

    1966-01-01

    Metal Y-tube simultaneously directs argon streams over weld areas on both sides of tubes being joined along a line on their outer periphery. The device is advanced along the junction in step with the welding operation.

  4. Inert Welding/Brazing Gas Filters and Dryers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Goudy, Jerry

    2009-01-01

    The use of hybridized carbon/silicon carbide (C/SiC) fabric to reinforce ceramic matrix composite face sheets and the integration of such face sheets with a foam core creates a sandwich structure capable of withstanding high-heat-flux environments (150 W/sq cm) in which the core provides a temperature drop of 1,000 C between the surface and the back face without cracking or delamination of the structure. The composite face sheet exhibits a bilinear response, which results from the SiC matrix not being cracked on fabrication. In addition, the structure exhibits damage tolerance under impact with projectiles, showing no penetration to the back face sheet. These attributes make the composite ideal for leading-edge structures and control surfaces in aerospace vehicles, as well as for acreage thermal protection systems and in high-temperature, lightweight stiffened structures. By tailoring the coefficient of thermal expansion (CTE) of a carbon fiber containing ceramic matrix composite (CMC) face sheet to match that of a ceramic foam core, the face sheet and the core can be integrally fabricated without any delamination. Carbon and SiC are woven together in the reinforcing fabric. Integral densification of the CMC and the foam core is accomplished with chemical vapor deposition, eliminating the need for bond-line adhesive. This means there is no need to separately fabricate the core and the face sheet, or to bond the two elements together, risking edge delamination during use. Fibers of two or more types are woven together on a loom. The carbon and ceramic fibers are pulled into the same "pick" location during the weaving process. Tow spacing may be varied to accommodate the increased volume of the combined fiber tows while maintaining a target fiber volume fraction in the composite. Foam pore size, strut thickness, and ratio of face sheet to core thickness can be used to tailor thermal and mechanical properties. The anticipated CTE for the hybridized composite is managed by the choice of constituents, varying fiber tow sizes and constituent part ratios. This structural concept provides high strength and stiffness at low density 1.06 g/cu cm in panels tested. Varieties of face sheet constructions are possible, including variations in fiber type and weave geometry. The integrated structures possible with this composite could eliminate the need for non-load-bearing thermal protection systems on top of a structural component. The back sheet can readily be integrated to substructures through the incorporation of ribs. This would eliminate weight and cost for aerospace missions.

  5. Total synthesis of isotopically enriched Si-29 silica NPs as potential spikes for isotope dilution quantification of natural silica NPs.

    PubMed

    Pálmai, Marcell; Szalay, Roland; Bartczak, Dorota; Varga, Zoltán; Nagy, Lívia Naszályi; Gollwitzer, Christian; Krumrey, Michael; Goenaga-Infante, Heidi

    2015-05-01

    A new method was developed for the preparation of highly monodisperse isotopically enriched Si-29 silica nanoparticles ((29)Si-silica NPs) with the purpose of using them as spikes for isotope dilution mass spectrometry (IDMS) quantification of silica NPs with natural isotopic distribution. Si-29 tetraethyl orthosilicate ((29)Si-TEOS), the silica precursor was prepared in two steps starting from elementary silicon-29 pellets. In the first step Si-29 silicon tetrachloride ((29)SiCl4) was prepared by heating elementary silicon-29 in chlorine gas stream. By using a multistep cooling system and the dilution of the volatile and moisture-sensitive (29)SiCl4 in carbon tetrachloride as inert medium we managed to reduce product loss caused by evaporation. (29)Si-TEOS was obtained by treating (29)SiCl4 with absolute ethanol. Structural characterisation of (29)Si-TEOS was performed by using (1)H and (13)C nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy and Fourier-transform infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy. For the NP preparation, a basic amino acid catalysis route was used and the resulting NPs were analysed using transmission electron microscopy (TEM), small angle X-ray scattering (SAXS), dynamic light scattering (DLS) and zeta potential measurements. Finally, the feasibility of using enriched NPs for on-line field-flow fractionation coupled with multi-angle light scattering and inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (FFF/MALS/ICP-MS) has been demonstrated. PMID:25617615

  6. Development of AN Analytical Method Based on Isotope Dilution Gas Chromatography - Mass Spectrometry for the Determination of Trace Quantities of Aqueous Dimethyl Sulfide and Dimethyl Sulfoxide: Application to Rain and Sea Water.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ridgeway, Robert Gordon

    1991-02-01

    This dissertation reports the development of a method for determining trace quantities of aqueous dimethyl sulfide (DMS) and dimethyl sulfoxide (DMSO) by isotope dilution gas chromatography - mass spectrometry (GC/MS). Dimethyl sulfide was determined directly, while DMSO was determined indirectly by first reducing DMSO to DMS in situ with sodium borohydride, and subsequently determining the DMS yield. A Purge and trap method was used to strip DMS from solution and cryogenically preconcentrate DMS in unpacked teflon traps. Samples were collected at remote locations and cryogenically preserved in liquid nitrogen for transport to and analysis in the GC/MS laboratory at Drexel University. Perdeuterated DMS (d_6-DMS) and DMSO (d _6-DMSO) were used as internal standards for the determination of DMS and DMSO, respectively. The standards were prepared as ethylene glycol solutions. The precision of this method for determining both DMS and DMSO was +/-2-3%. The relationship between DMS and DMSO isotopomer aqueous concentration ratios and DMS isotopomer MS signal ratios was determined by calibrating the signal ratios as a function of concentration ratios for samples collected from test solutions prepared by adding known quantities of each isotopomer to solution. The ability of this method for determining true solution phase DMS concentrations was demonstrated by plotting the DMS signal ratio as a function of the volume of purge gas passing through solution. Extrapolation of this curve to zero purge gas yielded an intercept ratio that was statistically equivalent to the signal obtained after only a small volume (10 1) of purge gas passed through solution. The detection limit of the DMSO determination was 15 pM. The detection limit of the DMS determination was <10 pM. These methods were applied to the determination of DMS and DMSO in sea water and the determination of DMSO in rain. Dimethyl sulfide determinations made during two research cruises are reported. In addition, sampling procedures such as sample storage and sample filtration were investigated. The DMSO concentration found in rain was ca. 2-4 nM for samples collected at inland locations (Phila. PA) and 8-10 nM for samples collected at coastal locations (Lewes DE).

  7. Electrolytic production of high purity aluminum using ceramic inert anodes

    DOEpatents

    Ray, Siba P.; Liu, Xinghua; Weirauch, Douglas A.; DiMilia, Robert A.; Dynys, Joseph M.; Phelps, Frankie E.; LaCamera, Alfred F.

    2002-01-01

    A method of producing commercial purity aluminum in an electrolytic reduction cell comprising ceramic inert anodes is disclosed. The method produces aluminum having acceptable levels of Fe, Cu and Ni impurities. The ceramic inert anodes used in the process may comprise oxides containing Fe and Ni, as well as other oxides, metals and/or dopants.

  8. Electrolytic production of high purity aluminum using inert anodes

    DOEpatents

    Ray, Siba P.; Liu, Xinghua; Weirauch, Jr., Douglas A.

    2001-01-01

    A method of producing commercial purity aluminum in an electrolytic reduction cell comprising inert anodes is disclosed. The method produces aluminum having acceptable levels of Fe, Cu and Ni impurities. The inert anodes used in the process preferably comprise a cermet material comprising ceramic oxide phase portions and metal phase portions.

  9. 46 CFR 154.1740 - Vinyl chloride: Inhibiting and inerting.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 5 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Vinyl chloride: Inhibiting and inerting. 154.1740... Operating Requirements § 154.1740 Vinyl chloride: Inhibiting and inerting. When a vessel is carrying vinyl chloride, the master shall ensure that: (a) Section 154.1818 is met; or (b) Section 154.1710 is met,...

  10. 46 CFR 154.1740 - Vinyl chloride: Inhibiting and inerting.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 5 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Vinyl chloride: Inhibiting and inerting. 154.1740... Operating Requirements § 154.1740 Vinyl chloride: Inhibiting and inerting. When a vessel is carrying vinyl chloride, the master shall ensure that: (a) Section 154.1818 is met; or (b) Section 154.1710 is met,...

  11. 46 CFR 154.1740 - Vinyl chloride: Inhibiting and inerting.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 5 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Vinyl chloride: Inhibiting and inerting. 154.1740... Operating Requirements § 154.1740 Vinyl chloride: Inhibiting and inerting. When a vessel is carrying vinyl chloride, the master shall ensure that: (a) Section 154.1818 is met; or (b) Section 154.1710 is met,...

  12. 46 CFR 154.1740 - Vinyl chloride: Inhibiting and inerting.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 5 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Vinyl chloride: Inhibiting and inerting. 154.1740... Operating Requirements § 154.1740 Vinyl chloride: Inhibiting and inerting. When a vessel is carrying vinyl chloride, the master shall ensure that: (a) Section 154.1818 is met; or (b) Section 154.1710 is met,...

  13. Diluted magnetic oxides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, XiaoLi; Qi, ShiFei; Jiang, FengXian; Quan, ZhiYong; Xu, XiaoHong

    2013-01-01

    In this review, we review the progress of research on ZnO- and In2O3-based diluted magnetic oxides (DMOs). Firstly, we present the preparation and characterization of DMOs. The former includes the preparation methods and conditions, and the latter includes the characterization techniques for measuring microstructures. Secondly, we introduce the magnetic and transport properties of DMOs, as well as the relationship between them. Thirdly, the origin and mechanism of the ferromagnetism are discussed. Fourthly, we introduce other related work, including computational work and pertinent heterogeneous structures, such as multilayers and magnetic tunnel junctions. Finally, we provide an overview and outlook for DMOs.

  14. Neutrinos from Inert Doublet dark matter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Andreas, Sarah; Tytgat, Michel H. G.; Swillens, Quentin

    2009-04-01

    We investigate the signatures of neutrinos produced in the annihilation of WIMP dark matter in the Earth, the Sun and at the Galactic centre within the framework of the Inert Doublet Model and extensions. We consider a dark matter candidate, that we take to be one of the neutral components of an extra Higgs doublet, in three distinct mass ranges, which have all been shown previously to be consistent with both WMAP abundance and direct detection experiments exclusion limits. Specifically, we consider a light WIMP with mass between 4 and 8 GeV (low), a WIMP with mass around 60-70 GeV (middle) and a heavy WIMP with mass above 500 GeV (high). In the first case, we show that capture in the Sun may be constrained using Super-Kamiokande data. In the last two cases, we argue that indirect detection through neutrinos is challenging but not altogether excluded. For middle masses, we try to make the most benefit of the proximity of the so-called 'iron resonance' that might enhance the capture of the dark matter candidate by the Earth. The signal from the Earth is further enhanced if light right-handed Majorana neutrinos are introduced, in which case the scalar dark matter candidate may annihilate into pairs of mono-energetic neutrinos. In the case of high masses, detection of neutrinos from the Galactic centre might be possible, provided the dark matter abundance is substantially boosted.

  15. Dilute oriented loop models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vernier, Eric; Lykke Jacobsen, Jesper; Saleur, Hubert

    2016-02-01

    We study a model of dilute oriented loops on the square lattice, where each loop is compatible with a fixed, alternating orientation of the lattice edges. This implies that loop strands are not allowed to go straight at vertices, and results in an enhancement of the usual {{O}}(n) symmetry to {{U}}(n). The corresponding transfer matrix acts on a number of representations (standard modules) that grows exponentially with the system size. We derive their dimension and those of the centralizer by both combinatorial and algebraic techniques. A mapping onto a field theory permits us to identify the conformal field theory governing the critical range, n≤slant 1. We establish the phase diagram and the critical exponents of low-energy excitations. For generic n, there is a critical line in the universality class of the dilute {{O}}(2n) model, terminating in an {{SU}}(n+1) point. The case n = 1 maps onto the critical line of the six-vertex model, along which exponents vary continuously.

  16. Probing the center-vortex area law in d=3: The role of inert vortices

    SciTech Connect

    Cornwall, John M.

    2006-03-15

    In center-vortex theory, beyond the simplest picture of confinement several conceptual problems arise that are the subject of this paper. Recall that confinement arises through configuration averaging of phase factors associated with the gauge center group, raised to powers depending on the total Gauss link number of a vortex ensemble with a given Wilson loop. The simplest approach to confinement counts this link number by counting the number of vortices, considered in d=3 as infinitely long closed self-avoiding random walks of fixed step length, piercing any surface spanning the Wilson loop. Problems arise because a given vortex may pierce a given spanning surface several times without being linked or without contributing a nontrivial phase factor, or it may contribute a nontrivial phase factor appropriate to a smaller number of pierce points. We estimate the dilution factor {alpha}, due to these inert or partially inert vortices, that reduces the ratio of fundamental string tension K{sub F} to the areal density {rho} of vortices from the ratio given by elementary approaches and find {alpha}=0.6{+-}0.1. Then we show how inert vortices resolve the problem that the link number of a given vortex-Wilson-loop configuration is the same for any spanning surface of whatever area, yet a unique area (of a minimal surface) appears in the area law. Third, we discuss semiquantitatively a configuration of two distinct Wilson loops separated by a variable distance, and show how inert vortices govern the transition between two possible forms of the area law (one at small loop separation, the other at large), and point out the different behaviors in SU(2) and higher groups, notably SU(3). The result is a finite-range van der Waals force between the two loops. Finally, in a problem related to the double-loop problem, we argue that the analogs of inert vortices do not affect the fact that, in the SU(3) baryonic area law, the mesonic string tension appears.

  17. Dilution jet mixing program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Srinivasan, R.; Coleman, E.; Johnson, K.

    1984-01-01

    Parametric tests were conducted to quantify the mixing of opposed rows of jets (two-sided injection) in a confined cross flow. Results show that jet penetrations for two sided injections are less than that for single-sided injections, but the jet spreading rates are faster for a given momentum ratio and orifice plate. Flow area convergence generally enhances mixing. Mixing characteristics with asymmetric and symmetric convergence are similar. For constant momentum ratio, the optimum S/H(0) with in-line injections is one half the optimum value for single sided injections. For staggered injections, the optimum S/H(0) is twice the optimum value for single-sided injection. The correlations developed predicted the temperature distributions within first order accuracy and provide a useful tool for predicting jet trajectory and temperature profiles in the dilution zone with two-sided injections.

  18. Growth and development in inert non-aqueous liquids. [of higher plants

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Siegel, S. M.

    1974-01-01

    A preview is presented of the survival and growth capabilities of higher plants in non-aqueous, inert liquids. The two media which were used are mineral (white) oil and fluorochemical inert liquid FC-75. Both liquids dissolve oxygen and carbon dioxide readily, but are insoluble in water. Consequently, plants submerged in these liquids are capable of gas exchange with the atmosphere, but possess a water impermeable coating the dimensions of which are determined by the size of the liquid holding container. In a sense, growing plants in a tank of mineral oil imparts on them a cuticle. Plants plus prescribed volumes of water were innoculated into mineral oil. Organisms with minimal water supplied could then be observed. Also, submersed plants covered with an oil slick were shown to be capable of growth in dessicating atmospheres.

  19. Distribution of inert gases in fines from the Cayley-Descartes region

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Walton, J. R.; Lakatos, S.; Heymann, D.

    1973-01-01

    The inert gases in 14 different fines and in one sample of 2 to 4 mm fines from Apollo 16 were measured by mass spectroscopy with respect to trapped solar wind gases, cosmogenic gases, and 'parentless' Ar-40. Such studies are helpful for the understanding of regolith evolution, of transport of regolith fines, and of the lunar atmosphere. The Apollo 16 soils are unique because they represent, after Luna 20, the second and much more extensive record from the lunar highlands. The landing site presents the problem of materials from the Cayley Formation vs those from the Descartes Formation. There are two large, relatively fresh craters in the area, North Ray and South Ray, whose ejecta patterns may be recognized in the inert-gas record.

  20. Effects of dilution on vehicle emissions of primary particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hayden, K. L.; Li, S.; Liggio, G.; McCurdy, M.; Chan, T.; Rostkowski, J.

    2009-12-01

    Dilution of primary aerosols from vehicles into the ambient atmosphere can change their physical and chemical characteristics. In order to study these processes, experiments were conducted in an engine testing facility at Environment Canada in Ottawa, Ontario. Exhaust from a light duty diesel engine was vented into a constant volume sampling (CVS) system where it underwent primary dilution at an ambient temperature of 25oC, leading to a primary dilution ratio of 10-15. From the CVS, the exhaust was further diluted using a combination of a Dekati ejection diluter and mixing with zero air in a flow tube, achieving secondary dilution ratios of up to 3000. Particle and gas measurements were made through multi-ports in the CVS and the flow tube using an SMPS, FMPS, AMS, and SP2, and instruments to measure CO, CO2, NOx, and total hydrocarbons (THC). Preliminary results indicate that regardless of dilution ratios, primary particles contain significant amounts of organic material that appear to reside on small black carbon cores. With increasing dilution ratios, the primary particle sizes become progressively smaller, suggesting volatilization of the adsorbed organic material. Results from various engine operating modes (simulating different driving conditions) will be presented.

  1. Technical basis for storage of Zircaloy-clad spent fuel in inert gases

    SciTech Connect

    Johnson, A.B. Jr.; Gilbert, E.R.

    1983-09-01

    This report summarizes the technical bases to establish safe conditions for dry storage of Zircaloy-clad fuel. Dry storage of fuel with zirconium alloy cladding has been licensed in Canada, the Federal Republic of Germany, and Switzerland. In addition, dry storage demonstrations, hot cell tests, and modeling have been conducted using Zircaloy-clad fuel. The demonstrations have included irradiated boiling water reactor, pressurized heavy-water reactor, and pressurized water reactor (PWR) fuel assemblies. Irradiated fuel has been emplaced in and retrieved from metal casks, dry wells, silos, and a vault. Dry storage tests and demonstrations have involved {similar_to}5,000 fuel rods, and {similar_to}600 rods have been monitored during dry storage in inert gases with maximum cladding temperatures ranging from 50 to 570{sup 0}C. Although some tests and demonstrations are still in progress, there is currently no evidence that any rods exposed to inert gases have failed (one PWR rod exposed to an air cover gas failed at {similar_to}70{sup 0}C). Based on this favorable experience, it is concluded that there is sufficient information on fuel rod behavior, storage conditions, and potential cladding failure mechanisms to support licensing of dry storage in the United States. This licensing position includes a requirement for inert cover gases and a maximum cladding temperature guideline of 380{sup 0}C for Zircaloy-clad fuel. Using an inert cover gas assures that even if fuel with cladding defects were placed in dry storage, or if defects develop during storage, the defects would not propagate. Tests and demonstrations involving Zircaloy-clad rods and assemblies with maximum cladding temperatures above 400{sup 0}C are in progress. When the results from these tests have been evaluated, the viability of higher temperature limits should be examined. Acceptable conditions for storage in air and dry storage of consolidated fuel are issues yet to be resolved.

  2. Novel type of tuned mass damper with inerter which enables changes of inertance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brzeski, P.; Kapitaniak, T.; Perlikowski, P.

    2015-08-01

    In this paper we propose the novel type of tuned mass damper and investigate its properties. Characteristic feature of the device is that it contains a special type of inerter equipped with a continuously variable transmission and gear-ratio control system which enables stepless and accurate changes of inertance. We examine the damping properties of the proposed tuned mass damper with respect to one-degree-of-freedom harmonically forced oscillator. To prove the potential of introduced device we test its four different embodiments characterized by four different sets of parameters. We generalize our investigation and show that proposed device has broad spectrum of applications, we consider three different stiffness characteristics of damped structure i.e. linear, softening and hardening. We use the frequency response curves to present how considered devices influence the dynamics of analyzed systems and demonstrate their capabilities. Moreover, we check how small perturbations introduced to the system by parametric and additive noise influence system's dynamics. Numerical results show excellent level of vibration reduction in an extremely wide range of forcing frequencies.

  3. Results from electrolysis test of a prototype inert anode: Inert Electrode Program

    SciTech Connect

    Strachan, D.M.; Windisch, C.F. Jr.; Koski, O.H.; Morgan, L.G. ); Peterson, R.D.; Richards, N.E.; Tabereaux, A.T. . Mfg. Technology Lab.)

    1990-05-01

    Nonconsumable or inert anodes are being developed at the Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL)({sup a}) for use in the electrolytic production of aluminum. A series of laboratory test on the laboratory scale (Hart et al. 1987; Strachan et al. 1989; Marschman 1989) has shown the technology to be potentially feasible. A series of larger-scale experiments are now being run to determine the viability of the technology on a commercial scale. The results reported here are from a test performed at the Reynolds Metals Company, Manufacturing Technology Laboratory, Sheffield, Alabama, using a prototype anode. The prototype anode was approximately 15 cm in diameter and 20 cm high (Figure 1.1). The objectives of the test were to determine if an anode, produced by a commercial vendor, could survive in a test under conditions approximating those found in a commercial electrolysis cell; to familiarize the Reynolds staff with the operation of such an anode in a subsequent pilot cell test of the inert anode technology; and to familiarize the PNL staff with the operations at the Reynolds Metals Company facility. 8 refs., 39 figs., 9 tabs.

  4. S1 certification of alpha-endosulfan, beta-endosulfan, and endosulfan sulfate in a candidate certified reference material (organochlorine pesticides in tea) by isotope dilution gas chromatography-mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Sin, Della Wai-Mei; Wong, Yee-Lok; Cheng, Eddie Chung-Chin; Lo, Man-Fung; Ho, Clare; Mok, Chuen-Shing; Wong, Siu-Kay

    2015-04-01

    This paper presents the certification of alpha-endosulfan, beta-endosulfan, and endosulfan sulfate in a candidate tea certified reference material (code: GLHK-11-03) according to the requirements of the ISO Guide 30 series. Certification of GLHK-11-03 was based on an analytical method purposely developed for the accurate measurement of the mass fraction of the target analytes in the material. An isotope dilution mass spectrometry (IDMS) method involving determination by (i) gas chromatography-negative chemical ionization-mass spectrometry (GC-NCI-MS) and (ii) gas chromatography-electron ionization-high-resolution mass spectrometry (GC-EI-HRMS) techniques was employed. The performance of the described method was demonstrated through participation in the key comparison CCQM-K95 "Mid-Polarity Analytes in Food Matrix: Mid-Polarity Pesticides in Tea" organized by the Consultative Committee for Amount of Substance-Metrology in Chemistry in 2012, where the study material was the same as the certified reference material (CRM). The values reported by using the developed method were in good agreement with the key comparison reference value (KCRV) assigned for beta-endosulfan (727 ± 14 μg kg(-1)) and endosulfan sulfate (505 ± 11 μg kg(-1)), where the degree of equivalence (DoE) values were 0.41 and 0.40, respectively. The certified values of alpha-endosulfan, beta-endosulfan, and endosulfan sulfate in dry mass fraction in GLHK-11-03 were 350, 730, and 502 μg kg(-1), respectively, and the respective expanded uncertainties, due to sample inhomogeneity, long-term and short-term stability, and variability in the characterization procedure, were 27 μg kg(-1) (7.8 %), 48 μg kg(-1) (6.6 %), and 33 μg kg(-1) (6.6 %). PMID:25619984

  5. 114. SMALL ARMS (BUILDINGS 9798) AND INERT STOREHOUSE (BLDGS. 1031040) ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    114. SMALL ARMS (BUILDINGS 97-98) AND INERT STOREHOUSE (BLDGS. 103-1040) PLAN AND ELEVATIONS, FULLER/SCOTT, MARCH 15, 1941. QP ACC 1791. - Quonset Point Naval Air Station, Roger Williams Way, North Kingstown, Washington County, RI

  6. Inert electrodes program: Fiscal Year 1987 Annual Report

    SciTech Connect

    Koski, O.H.; Marschman, S.C.; Schilling, C.H.; Windisch, C.F.

    1988-12-01

    The Inert Electrodes Program is being conducted at the Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL) for the US Department of Energy (DOE), Office of Industrial Programs (OIP). The purpose of the program is to develop long-lasting, energy-efficient anodes, cathodes, and ancillary equipment for Hall-Heroult cells used by aluminum industry. The program is divided into three tasks with the following objectives: Inert Anode Development - to improve the energy efficiency of Hall-Heroult cells by development of inert anodes; Stable Cathode Studies - to develop methods for retrofitting Hall-Heroult cells with TiB/sub 2/-based cathode materials; and Sensor Development - to devise sensors to control the chemistry of Hall-Heroult Cells using stable anodes and cathodes. This Inert Electrodes Program annual report highlights the major technical accomplishment of FY 1987. The accomplishments are presented in the following sections: Management, Materials Development and Testing, Materials Evaluation, Stable Cathode Studies, and Sensor Development. 50 refs., 47 figs.

  7. Stress in dilute suspensions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Passman, Stephen L.

    1989-01-01

    Generally, two types of theory are used to describe the field equations for suspensions. The so-called postulated equations are based on the kinetic theory of mixtures, which logically should give reasonable equations for solutions. The basis for the use of such theory for suspensions is tenuous, though it at least gives a logical path for mathematical arguments. It has the disadvantage that it leads to a system of equations which is underdetermined, in a sense that can be made precise. On the other hand, the so-called averaging theory starts with a determined system, but the very process of averaging renders the resulting system underdetermined. A third type of theory is proposed in which the kinetic theory of gases is used to motivate continuum equations for the suspended particles. This entails an interpretation of the stress in the particles that is different from the usual one. Classical theory is used to describe the motion of the suspending medium. The result is a determined system for a dilute suspension. Extension of the theory to more concentrated systems is discussed.

  8. Improved Back-Side Purge-Gas Chambers For Plasma Arc Welding

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ezell, Kenneth G.; Mcgee, William F.; Rybicki, Daniel J.

    1995-01-01

    Improved chambers for inert-gas purging of back sides of workpieces during plasma arc welding in keyhole (full-penetration) mode based on concept of directing flows of inert gases toward, and concentrating them on, hot weld zones. Tapered chamber concentrates flow of inert gas on plasma arc plume and surrounding metal.

  9. Process and apparatus for igniting a burner in an inert atmosphere

    DOEpatents

    Coolidge, Dennis W.; Rinker, Franklin G.

    1994-01-01

    According to this invention there is provided a process and apparatus for the ignition of a pilot burner in an inert atmosphere without substantially contaminating the inert atmosphere. The process includes the steps of providing a controlled amount of combustion air for a predetermined interval of time to the combustor then substantially simultaneously providing a controlled mixture of fuel and air to the pilot burner and to a flame generator. The controlled mixture of fuel and air to the flame generator is then periodically energized to produce a secondary flame. With the secondary flame the controlled mixture of fuel and air to the pilot burner and the combustion air is ignited to produce a pilot burner flame. The pilot burner flame is then used to ignited a mixture of main fuel and combustion air to produce a main burner flame. The main burner flame then is used to ignite a mixture of process derived fuel and combustion air to produce products of combustion for use as an inert gas in a heat treatment process.

  10. Effects of radiative heat transfer on the turbulence structure in inert and reacting mixing layers

    SciTech Connect

    Ghosh, Somnath; Friedrich, Rainer

    2015-05-15

    We use large-eddy simulation to study the interaction between turbulence and radiative heat transfer in low-speed inert and reacting plane temporal mixing layers. An explicit filtering scheme based on approximate deconvolution is applied to treat the closure problem arising from quadratic nonlinearities of the filtered transport equations. In the reacting case, the working fluid is a mixture of ideal gases where the low-speed stream consists of hydrogen and nitrogen and the high-speed stream consists of oxygen and nitrogen. Both streams are premixed in a way that the free-stream densities are the same and the stoichiometric mixture fraction is 0.3. The filtered heat release term is modelled using equilibrium chemistry. In the inert case, the low-speed stream consists of nitrogen at a temperature of 1000 K and the highspeed stream is pure water vapour of 2000 K, when radiation is turned off. Simulations assuming the gas mixtures as gray gases with artificially increased Planck mean absorption coefficients are performed in which the large-eddy simulation code and the radiation code PRISSMA are fully coupled. In both cases, radiative heat transfer is found to clearly affect fluctuations of thermodynamic variables, Reynolds stresses, and Reynolds stress budget terms like pressure-strain correlations. Source terms in the transport equation for the variance of temperature are used to explain the decrease of this variance in the reacting case and its increase in the inert case.

  11. Gas shielding apparatus

    DOEpatents

    Brandt, D.

    1984-06-05

    An apparatus for preventing oxidation by uniformly distributing inert shielding gas over the weld area of workpieces such as pipes being welded together. The apparatus comprises a chamber and a gas introduction element. The chamber has an annular top wall, an annular bottom wall, an inner side wall and an outer side wall connecting the top and bottom walls. One side wall is a screen and the other has a portion defining an orifice. The gas introduction element has a portion which encloses the orifice and can be one or more pipes. The gas introduction element is in fluid communication with the chamber and introduces inert shielding gas into the chamber. The inert gas leaves the chamber through the screen side wall and is dispersed evenly over the weld area.

  12. Gas shielding apparatus

    DOEpatents

    Brandt, Daniel

    1985-01-01

    An apparatus for preventing oxidation by uniformly distributing inert shielding gas over the weld area of workpieces such as pipes being welded together. The apparatus comprises a chamber and a gas introduction element. The chamber has an annular top wall, an annular bottom wall, an inner side wall and an outer side wall connecting the top and bottom walls. One side wall is a screen and the other has a portion defining an orifice. The gas introduction element has a portion which encloses the orifice and can be one or more pipes. The gas introduction element is in fluid communication with the chamber and introduces inert shielding gas into the chamber. The inert gas leaves the chamber through the screen side wall and is dispersed evenly over the weld area.

  13. Gas shielding apparatus

    DOEpatents

    Brandt, D.

    1985-12-31

    An apparatus is disclosed for preventing oxidation by uniformly distributing inert shielding gas over the weld area of workpieces such as pipes being welded together. The apparatus comprises a chamber and a gas introduction element. The chamber has an annular top wall, an annular bottom wall, an inner side wall and an outer side wall connecting the top and bottom walls. One side wall is a screen and the other has a portion defining an orifice. The gas introduction element has a portion which encloses the orifice and can be one or more pipes. The gas introduction element is in fluid communication with the chamber and introduces inert shielding gas into the chamber. The inert gas leaves the chamber through the screen side wall and is dispersed evenly over the weld area. 3 figs.

  14. Dilution physics modeling: Dissolution/precipitation chemistry

    SciTech Connect

    Onishi, Y.; Reid, H.C.; Trent, D.S.

    1995-09-01

    This report documents progress made to date on integrating dilution/precipitation chemistry and new physical models into the TEMPEST thermal-hydraulics computer code. Implementation of dissolution/precipitation chemistry models is necessary for predicting nonhomogeneous, time-dependent, physical/chemical behavior of tank wastes with and without a variety of possible engineered remediation and mitigation activities. Such behavior includes chemical reactions, gas retention, solids resuspension, solids dissolution and generation, solids settling/rising, and convective motion of physical and chemical species. Thus this model development is important from the standpoint of predicting the consequences of various engineered activities, such as mitigation by dilution, retrieval, or pretreatment, that can affect safe operations. The integration of a dissolution/precipitation chemistry module allows the various phase species concentrations to enter into the physical calculations that affect the TEMPEST hydrodynamic flow calculations. The yield strength model of non-Newtonian sludge correlates yield to a power function of solids concentration. Likewise, shear stress is concentration-dependent, and the dissolution/precipitation chemistry calculations develop the species concentration evolution that produces fluid flow resistance changes. Dilution of waste with pure water, molar concentrations of sodium hydroxide, and other chemical streams can be analyzed for the reactive species changes and hydrodynamic flow characteristics.

  15. Dilution refrigeration for space applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Israelsson, U. E.; Petrac, D.

    1990-01-01

    Dilution refrigerators are presently used routinely in ground based applications where temperatures below 0.3 K are required. The operation of a conventional dilution refrigerator depends critically on the presence of gravity. To operate a dilution refrigerator in space many technical difficulties must be overcome. Some of the anticipated difficulties are identified in this paper and possible solutions are described. A single cycle refrigerator is described conceptually that uses forces other than gravity to function and the stringent constraints imposed on the design by requiring the refrigerator to function on the earth without using gravity are elaborated upon.

  16. Praxair's dilute oxygen combustion technology for pyrometallurgical applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Riley, M. F.; Kobayashi, H.; Deneys, A. C.

    2001-05-01

    Dilute oxygen combustion (DOC) technology uses separate high-velocity fuel and oxygen jets to generate strong in-furnace gas recirculation, producing combustion between the fuel and a highly diluted oxygen and furnace-gas mixture. These very low NOx oxy-fuel burners have been developed and commercially demonstrated in steel reheating furnaces. The burner design meets industry needs for increased productivity and lower operating costs with minimal capital expense and low maintenance. The performance of DOC technology has been measured under laboratory and industrial conditions encompassing both natural gas and coke oven gas firing, and a wide range of furnace temperatures and nitrogen levels that simulate air infiltration. This paper describes the results of the tests using natural gas as the fuel and lists potential applications for DOC technology in the non-ferrous metals industry.

  17. Dark matter with topological defects in the Inert Doublet Model

    SciTech Connect

    Hindmarsh, Mark; Kirk, Russell; No, Jose Miguel; West, Stephen M.

    2015-05-26

    We examine the production of dark matter by decaying topological defects in the high mass region m{sub DM}≫m{sub W} of the Inert Doublet Model, extended with an extra U(1) gauge symmetry. The density of dark matter states (the neutral Higgs states of the inert doublet) is determined by the interplay of the freeze-out mechanism and the additional production of dark matter states from the decays of topological defects, in this case cosmic strings. These decays increase the predicted relic abundance compared to the standard freeze-out only case, and as a consequence the viable parameter space of the Inert Doublet Model can be widened substantially. In particular, for a given dark matter annihilation rate lower dark matter masses become viable. We investigate the allowed mass range taking into account constraints on the energy injection rate from the diffuse γ-ray background and Big Bang Nucleosynthesis, together with constraints on the dark matter properties coming from direct and indirect detection limits. For the Inert Doublet Model high-mass region, an inert Higgs mass as low as ∼200 GeV is permitted. There is also an upper limit on string mass per unit length, and hence the symmetry breaking scale, from the relic abundance in this scenario. Depending on assumptions made about the string decays, the limits are in the range 10{sup 12} GeV to 10{sup 13} GeV.

  18. Zirconia-magnesia inert matrix fuel and waste form: Synthesis, characterization and chemical performance in an advanced fuel cycle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Holliday, Kiel Steven

    There is a significant buildup in plutonium stockpiles throughout the world, because of spent nuclear fuel and the dismantling of weapons. The radiotoxicity of this material and proliferation risk has led to a desire for destroying excess plutonium. To do this effectively, it must be fissioned in a reactor as part of a uranium free fuel to eliminate the generation of more plutonium. This requires an inert matrix to volumetrically dilute the fissile plutonium. Zirconia-magnesia dual phase ceramic has been demonstrated to be a favorable material for this task. It is neutron transparent, zirconia is chemically robust, magnesia has good thermal conductivity and the ceramic has been calculated to conform to current economic and safety standards. This dissertation contributes to the knowledge of zirconia-magnesia as an inert matrix fuel to establish behavior of the material containing a fissile component. First, the zirconia-magnesia inert matrix is synthesized in a dual phase ceramic containing a fissile component and a burnable poison. The chemical constitution of the ceramic is then determined. Next, the material performance is assessed under conditions relevant to an advanced fuel cycle. Reactor conditions were assessed with high temperature, high pressure water. Various acid solutions were used in an effort to dissolve the material for reprocessing. The ceramic was also tested as a waste form under environmental conditions, should it go directly to a repository as a spent fuel. The applicability of zirconia-magnesia as an inert matrix fuel and waste form was tested and found to be a promising material for such applications.

  19. Dilute Oxygen Combustion Phase 3 Final Report

    SciTech Connect

    Riley, M.F.; Ryan, H.M.

    2000-05-31

    Dilute Oxygen Combustion (DOC) burners have been successfully installed and operated in the reheat furnace at Auburn Steel Co., Inc., Auburn, NY, under Phase 3 of the Dilute Oxygen Combustion project. Two new preheat zones were created employing a total of eight 6.5 MMBtu/hr capacity burners. The preheat zones provide a 30 percent increase in maximum furnace production rate, from 75 tph to 100 tph. The fuel rate is essentially unchanged, with the fuel savings expected from oxy-fuel combustion being offset by higher flue gas temperatures. When allowance is made for the high nitrogen level and high gas phase temperature in the furnace, measured NOx emissions are in line with laboratory data on DOC burners developed in Phase 1 of the project. Burner performance has been good and there have been no operating or maintenance problems. The DOC system continues to be used as part of Auburn Steel?s standard reheat furnace practice. High gas phase temperature is a result of the high firing density needed to achieve high production rates, and little opportunity exists for improvement in that area. However, fuel and NOx performance can be improved by further conversion of furnace zones to DOC burners, which will lower furnace nitrogen levels. Major obstacles are cost and concern about increased formation of oxide scale on the steel. Oxide scale formation may be enhanced by exposure of the steel to higher concentrations of oxidizing gas components (primarily products of combustion) in the higher temperature zones of the furnace. Phase 4 of the DOC project will examine the rate of oxide scale formation in these higher temperature zones and develop countermeasures that will allow DOC burners to be used successfully in these furnace zones.

  20. Dilute Oxygen Combustion - Phase 3 Report

    SciTech Connect

    Riley, Michael F.

    2000-05-31

    Dilute Oxygen Combustion (DOC) burners have been successfully installed and operated in the reheat furnace at Auburn Steel Co., Inc., Auburn, NY, under Phase 3 of the Dilute Oxygen Combustion project. Two new preheat zones were created employing a total of eight 6.5 MMBtu/hr capacity burners. The preheat zones provide a 30 percent increase in maximum furnace production rate, from 75 tph to 100 tph. The fuel rate is essentially unchanged, with the fuel savings expected from oxy-fuel combustion being offset by higher flue gas temperatures. When allowance is made for the high nitrogen level and high gas phase temperature in the furnace, measured NOx emissions are in line with laboratory data on DOC burners developed in Phase 1 of the project. Burner performance has been good, and there have been no operating or maintenance problems. The DOC system continues to be used as part of Auburn Steel's standard reheat furnace practice. High gas phase temperature is a result of the high firing density needed to achieve high production rates, and little opportunity exists for improvement in that area. However, fuel and NOx performance can be improved by further conversion on furnace zones to DOC burners, which will lower furnace nitrogen levels. Major obstacles are cost and concern about increased formation of oxide scale on the steel. Oxide scale formation may be enhanced by exposure of the steel to higher concentrations of oxidizing gas components (primarily products of combustion) in the higher temperature zones of the furnace. Phase 4 of the DOC project will examine the rate of oxide scale formation in these higher temperature zones and develop countermeasures that will allow DOC burners to be used successfully in these furnace zones.

  1. Explosion propagation in inert porous media.

    PubMed

    Ciccarelli, G

    2012-02-13

    Porous media are often used in flame arresters because of the high surface area to volume ratio that is required for flame quenching. However, if the flame is not quenched, the flow obstruction within the porous media can promote explosion escalation, which is a well-known phenomenon in obstacle-laden channels. There are many parallels between explosion propagation through porous media and obstacle-laden channels. In both cases, the obstructions play a duel role. On the one hand, the obstruction enhances explosion propagation through an early shear-driven turbulence production mechanism and then later by shock-flame interactions that occur from lead shock reflections. On the other hand, the presence of an obstruction can suppress explosion propagation through momentum and heat losses, which both impede the unburned gas flow and extract energy from the expanding combustion products. In obstacle-laden channels, there are well-defined propagation regimes that are easily distinguished by abrupt changes in velocity. In porous media, the propagation regimes are not as distinguishable. In porous media the entire flamefront is affected, and the effects of heat loss, turbulence and compressibility are smoothly blended over most of the propagation velocity range. At low subsonic propagation speeds, heat loss to the porous media dominates, whereas at higher supersonic speeds turbulence and compressibility are important. This blending of the important phenomena results in no clear transition in propagation mechanism that is characterized by an abrupt change in propagation velocity. This is especially true for propagation velocities above the speed of sound where many experiments performed with fuel-air mixtures show a smooth increase in the propagation velocity with mixture reactivity up to the theoretical detonation wave velocity. PMID:22213663

  2. Species-specific isotope dilution analysis of mono-, di, and tri-butyltin compounds in sediment using gas chromatography-inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry with synthesized 118Sn-enriched butyltins.

    PubMed

    Inagaki, Kazumi; Takatsu, Akiko; Watanabe, Takuro; Aoyagi, Yoshie; Okamoto, Kensaku

    2003-03-01

    A species-specific isotope dilution (ID) method is described for the determination of mono-, di, and tri-butyltin compounds in sediment by gas chromatography-inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (GC-ICP-MS), where the mixture of 118Sn-enriched butyltin compounds synthesized in our laboratory was used as a spike. A correction method for the mass bias, a quantitative extraction of the butyltins from sediment, and an assay for the concentration of the standard solution for the reverse ID procedure were investigated to achieve a reliable ID analysis. The spike solution was added with tri-propyltin (TPrT), and the butyltins were extracted by mechanical shaking into acetic acid-tropolone-toluene. The extracted butyltins were ethylated with sodium tetraethylborate and measured by GC-ICP-MS. The mass bias correction factor for the butyltins was calculated with the measured area ratio of 120Sn/118Sn of TPrT in each chromatographic run, and the correction was carried out. The mass bias was well corrected with this in-run correction (the standard uncertainties of the corrected 120Sn/118Sn for the butyltins were in the range 0.03-0.45%, typically 0.25%, with triplicate measurement corresponding to 0.02-0.37% mass bias). The extraction efficiency of mono-butyltin (MBT) from sediment was improved by using tropolone-toluene as the solvent. Well-defined standard solutions for the reverse-ID procedure could be obtained by an assay for the purities of the natural abundance butyltin chloride reagents used for preparing the standard solutions. Overall uncertainties associated with the present method were estimated, where the sediment certified reference materials, PACS-2 and BCR 646, were analyzed. The uncertainty arising from the extraction was the main contributor to the overall uncertainties for MBT and di-butyltin (DBT) determinations, while with the case of tri-butyltin (TBT) determination the uncertainties arising from the purity of TBT chloride reagent used for preparing the standard solution was a large contributor to the overall uncertainties although the uncertainty arising from the extraction was also a main contributor. The analytical results of MBT, DBT, and TBT in both reference materials, except for MBT results in PACS-2, were in good agreement with the certified values in each. The result of MBT in PACS-2 (0.677 +/- 0.049 microg g(-1) as tin, mean +/- expanded uncertainty) was significantly higher than the certified value (0.45 +/- 0.05 microg g(-1)), but closely matched with the lately reported values (Rajendran, Tao, Nakazato and Miyazaki, Analyst, 2000, 125, 1757: 0.62 +/- 0.02 microg g(-1); Chiron, Roy, Cottier and Jeannot, J. Chromatogr. A, 2000, 879, 137: 0.634 +/- 0.082 microg g(-1); Alonso, Encinar, Gonzalez and Sanz-Medal, Anal. Bioanal. Chem., 2002, 373, 432: 0.64 +/- 0.04 microg g(-1). The present method is concluded to be reliable for the determination of MBT, DBT, and TBT in sediment. PMID:12705386

  3. Quantification of the 2-deoxyribonolactone and nucleoside 5’-aldehyde products of 2-deoxyribose oxidation in DNA and cells by isotope-dilution gas chromatography mass spectrometry: Differential effects of γ-radiation and Fe2+-EDTA

    PubMed Central

    Chan, Wan; Chen, Bingzi; Wang, Lianrong; Taghizadeh, Koli; Demott, Michael S.; Dedon, Peter C.

    2010-01-01

    The oxidation of 2-deoxyribose in DNA has emerged as a critical determinant of the cellular toxicity of oxidative damage to DNA, with oxidation of each carbon producing a unique spectrum of electrophilic products. We have developed and validated an isotope-dilution gas chromatography-coupled mass spectrometry (GC-MS) method for the rigorous quantification of two major 2-deoxyribose oxidation products: the 2-deoxyribonolactone abasic site of 1’-oxidation and the nucleoside 5’-aldehyde of 5’-oxidation chemistry. The method entails elimination of these products as 5-methylene-2(5H)-furanone (5MF) and furfural, respectively, followed by derivatization with pentafluorophenylhydrazine (PFPH), addition of isotopically labeled PFPH derivatives as internal standards, extraction of the derivatives, and quantification by GC-MS analysis. The precision and accuracy of the method were validated with oligodeoxynucleotides containing the 2-deoxyribonolactone and nucleoside 5’-aldehyde lesions. Further, the well defined 2-deoxyribose oxidation chemistry of the enediyne antibiotics, neocarzinostatin and calicheamicin γ1I, was exploited in control studies, with neocarzinostatin producing 10 2-deoxyribonolactone and 300 nucleoside 5’-aldehyde per 106 nt per µM in accord with its established minor 1’- and major 5’-oxidation chemistry. Calicheamicin unexpectedly caused 1’-oxidation at a low level of 10 2-deoxyribonolactone per 106 nt per µM in addition to the expected predominance of 5’-oxidation at 560 nucleoside 5’-aldehyde per 106 nt per µM. The two hydroxyl radical-mediated DNA oxidants, γ-radiation and Fe2+-EDTA, produced nucleoside 5’-aldehyde at a frequency of 57 per 106 nt per Gy (G-value 74 nmol/J) and 3.5 per 106 nt per µM, respectively, which amounted to 40% and 35%, respectively, of total 2-deoxyribose oxidation as measured by a plasmid nicking assay. However, γ-radiation and Fe2+-EDTA produced different proportions of 2-deoxyribonolactone at 7% and 24% of total 2-deoxyribose oxidation, respectively, with frequencies of 10 lesions per 106 nt per Gy (G-value, 13 nmol/J) and 2.4 lesions per 106 nt per µM. Studies in TK6 human lymphoblastoid cells, in which the analytical data were corrected for losses sustained during DNA isolation, revealed background levels of 2-deoxyribonolactone and nucleoside 5’-aldehyde of 9.7 and 73 lesions per 106 nt, respectively. γ-Irradiation of the cells caused increases of 0.045 and 0.22 lesions per 106 nt per Gy, respectively, which represents a ~250-fold quenching effect of the cellular environment similar to that observed in previous studies. The proportions of the various 2-deoxyribose oxidation products generated by γ-radiation are similar for purified DNA and cells. These results are consistent with solvent exposure as a major determinant of hydroxyl radical reactivity with 2-deoxyribose in DNA, but the large differences between γ-radiation and Fe2+-EDTA suggest that factors other than hydroxyl radical reactivity govern DNA oxidation chemistry. PMID:20377226

  4. Quantification of the 2-deoxyribonolactone and nucleoside 5'-aldehyde products of 2-deoxyribose oxidation in DNA and cells by isotope-dilution gas chromatography mass spectrometry: differential effects of gamma-radiation and Fe2+-EDTA.

    PubMed

    Chan, Wan; Chen, Bingzi; Wang, Lianrong; Taghizadeh, Koli; Demott, Michael S; Dedon, Peter C

    2010-05-01

    The oxidation of 2-deoxyribose in DNA has emerged as a critical determinant of the cellular toxicity of oxidative damage to DNA, with oxidation of each carbon producing a unique spectrum of electrophilic products. We have developed and validated an isotope-dilution gas chromatography-coupled mass spectrometry (GC-MS) method for the rigorous quantification of two major 2-deoxyribose oxidation products: the 2-deoxyribonolactone abasic site of 1'-oxidation and the nucleoside 5'-aldehyde of 5'-oxidation chemistry. The method entails elimination of these products as 5-methylene-2(5H)-furanone (5MF) and furfural, respectively, followed by derivatization with pentafluorophenylhydrazine (PFPH), addition of isotopically labeled PFPH derivatives as internal standards, extraction of the derivatives, and quantification by GC-MS analysis. The precision and accuracy of the method were validated with oligodeoxynucleotides containing the 2-deoxyribonolactone and nucleoside 5'-aldehyde lesions. Further, the well-defined 2-deoxyribose oxidation chemistry of the enediyne antibiotics, neocarzinostatin and calicheamicin gamma(1)(I), was exploited in control studies, with neocarzinostatin producing 10 2-deoxyribonolactone and 300 nucleoside 5'-aldehyde per 10(6) nt per microM in accord with its established minor 1'- and major 5'-oxidation chemistry. Calicheamicin unexpectedly caused 1'-oxidation at a low level of 10 2-deoxyribonolactone per 10(6) nt per microM in addition to the expected predominance of 5'-oxidation at 560 nucleoside 5'-aldehyde per 10(6) nt per microM. The two hydroxyl radical-mediated DNA oxidants, gamma-radiation and Fe(2+)-EDTA, produced nucleoside 5'-aldehyde at a frequency of 57 per 10(6) nt per Gy (G-value 74 nmol/J) and 3.5 per 10(6) nt per microM, respectively, which amounted to 40% and 35%, respectively, of total 2-deoxyribose oxidation as measured by a plasmid nicking assay. However, gamma-radiation and Fe(2+)-EDTA produced different proportions of 2-deoxyribonolactone at 7% and 24% of total 2-deoxyribose oxidation, respectively, with frequencies of 10 lesions per 10(6) nt per Gy (G-value, 13 nmol/J) and 2.4 lesions per 10(6) nt per microM. Studies in TK6 human lymphoblastoid cells, in which the analytical data were corrected for losses sustained during DNA isolation, revealed background levels of 2-deoxyribonolactone and nucleoside 5'-aldehyde of 9.7 and 73 lesions per 10(6) nt, respectively. Gamma-irradiation of the cells caused increases of 0.045 and 0.22 lesions per 10(6) nt per Gy, respectively, which represents a approximately 250-fold quenching effect of the cellular environment similar to that observed in previous studies. The proportions of the various 2-deoxyribose oxidation products generated by gamma-radiation are similar for purified DNA and cells. These results are consistent with solvent exposure as a major determinant of hydroxyl radical reactivity with 2-deoxyribose in DNA, but the large differences between gamma-radiation and Fe(2+)-EDTA suggest that factors other than hydroxyl radical reactivity govern DNA oxidation chemistry. PMID:20377226

  5. 46 CFR 154.1740 - Vinyl chloride: Inhibiting and inerting.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 5 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Vinyl chloride: Inhibiting and inerting. 154.1740 Section 154.1740 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) CERTAIN BULK DANGEROUS CARGOES SAFETY STANDARDS FOR SELF-PROPELLED VESSELS CARRYING BULK LIQUEFIED GASES Special Design and Operating Requirements § 154.1740 Vinyl...

  6. Determination of Ethane-1,2-diamine in Inert Complexes.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Searle, Graeme H.

    1985-01-01

    Describes a procedure for determining ethane-1,2-diamine (EN) which is generally applicable for inert or labile complexes or for EN in its salts, although it cannot be used directly with ammonium or coordinated ammonia. It gives results with five percent accuracy or better and requires less than one hour laboratory time. (JN)

  7. Inert Electrodes Program fiscal year 1988 annual report

    SciTech Connect

    Strachan, D.M.; Marschman, S.C.; Davis, N.C.; Friley, J.R.; Schilling, C.H.

    1989-10-01

    The Inert Electrodes Program, being conducted by Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL), involves improving the Hall-Heroult cells used by the Aluminum Industry for the electrochemical production of aluminum. The PNL research centers on developing more energy efficient, longer-lasting anodes and cathodes and ancillary equipment. Major accomplishments for Fiscal Year 1988 are summarized below. 14 refs., 56 figs., 9 tabs.

  8. Passive vehicle suspensions employing inerters with multiple performance requirements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hu, Yinlong; Chen, Michael Z. Q.; Shu, Zhan

    2014-04-01

    This paper investigates passive vehicle suspensions with inerters by considering multiple performance requirements including ride comfort, suspension deflection and tyre grip, where suspension deflection performance is novelly considered which is formulated as a part of objective functions and a constraint separately. Six suspension configurations are analyzed and the analytical solutions for each performance measure are derived. The conditions for each configuration to be strictly better than the simpler ones are obtained by presenting the analytical solutions of each configuration based on those of the simpler ones. Then, two stages of comparisons are given to show the performance limitations of suspension deflection for passive suspensions with inerters. In the first stage, it is shown that although the configurations with inerters can improve the mixed performance of ride comfort and tyre grip, the suspension deflection performance is significantly decreased simultaneously. In the second stage, it is shown that for passive suspensions with inerters, suspension deflection is the more basic limitation for both ride comfort and tyre grip performance by doing comparisons among mixed ride comfort and suspension deflection optimization, mixed ride comfort and tyre grip optimization, and mixed suspension deflection and tyre grip optimization. Finally, the problem of mixed ride comfort and tyre grip performance optimization with equal suspension deflection is investigated. The limitations of suspension deflection for each configuration are further highlighted.

  9. Effects of Dilution, Polarization Ratio, and Energy Transfer on Photoalignment of Liquid Crystals Using Coumarin-Containing Polymer Films

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, C.; Wallace, J.U.; Chen, S.H.; Merkel, P.B.

    2008-05-27

    Orientation of a nematic liquid crystal, E-7, was investigated using coumarin-containing polymethacrylates to elucidate the roles played by the dilution of coumarin and the polarization ratio of irradiation. Dilution of coumarin by inert moieties had adverse effects on a nematic cell’s number density of disclinations and its orientational order parameter in the parallel but not the perpendicular regime. In addition, both dilution of coumarin and a decreasing polarization ratio resulted in a lower extent of coumarin dimerization at crossover, Xc. The significantly reduced Xc in a homopolymer comprising triphenylamine and coumarin was attributed to the dilution of coumarin and the diminished polarization ratio caused by competing absorption with simultaneous triplet energy transfer from triphenylamine to coumarin moieties.

  10. Heavy-Duty Waste Hauler with Chemically Correct Natural Gas Engine Diluted with EGR and Using a Three-Way Catalyst: Final Report, 24 February 2004 -- 23 February 2006

    SciTech Connect

    Reppert, T.; Chiu, J.

    2005-09-01

    This report discusses the development of a E7G 12-liter, lean-burn natural gas engine--using stoichiometric combustion, cooled exhaust gas recirculation, and three-way catalyst technologies--for refuse haulers.

  11. Influence of inert gases on the reactive high power pulsed magnetron sputtering process of carbon-nitride thin films

    SciTech Connect

    Schmidt, Susann; Czigany, Zsolt; Greczynski, Grzegorz; Jensen, Jens; Hultman, Lars

    2013-01-15

    The influence of inert gases (Ne, Ar, Kr) on the sputter process of carbon and carbon-nitride (CN{sub x}) thin films was studied using reactive high power pulsed magnetron sputtering (HiPIMS). Thin solid films were synthesized in an industrial deposition chamber from a graphite target. The peak target current during HiPIMS processing was found to decrease with increasing inert gas mass. Time averaged and time resolved ion mass spectroscopy showed that the addition of nitrogen, as reactive gas, resulted in less energetic ion species for processes employing Ne, whereas the opposite was noticed when Ar or Kr were employed as inert gas. Processes in nonreactive ambient showed generally lower total ion fluxes for the three different inert gases. As soon as N{sub 2} was introduced into the process, the deposition rates for Ne and Ar-containing processes increased significantly. The reactive Kr-process, in contrast, showed slightly lower deposition rates than the nonreactive. The resulting thin films were characterized regarding their bonding and microstructure by x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy and transmission electron microscopy. Reactively deposited CN{sub x} thin films in Ar and Kr ambient exhibited an ordering toward a fullerene-like structure, whereas carbon and CN{sub x} films deposited in Ne atmosphere were found to be amorphous. This is attributed to an elevated amount of highly energetic particles observed during ion mass spectrometry and indicated by high peak target currents in Ne-containing processes. These results are discussed with respect to the current understanding of the structural evolution of a-C and CN{sub x} thin films.

  12. Dilution and the elusive baseline.

    PubMed

    Likens, Gene E; Buso, Donald C

    2012-04-17

    Knowledge of baseline conditions is critical for evaluating quantitatively the effect of human activities on environmental conditions, such as the impact of acid deposition. Efforts to restore ecosystems to prior, "pristine" condition require restoration targets, often based on some presumed or unknown baseline condition. Here, we show that rapid and relentless dilution of surface water chemistry is occurring in the White Mountains of New Hampshire, following decades of acid deposition. Extrapolating measured linear trends using a unique data set of up to 47 years, suggest that both precipitation and streamwater chemistry (r(2) >0.84 since 1985) in the Hubbard Brook Experimental Forest (HBEF) will approximate demineralized water within one to three decades. Because such dilute chemistry is unrealistic for surface waters, theoretical baseline compositions have been calculated for precipitation and streamwater: electrical conductivity of 3 and 5 μS/cm, base cation concentrations of 7 and 39 μeq/liter, acid-neutralizing capacity values of <1 and 14 μeq/liter, respectively; and pH 5.5 for both. Significantly large and rapid dilution of surface waters to values even more dilute than proposed for Pre-Industrial Revolution (PIR) conditions has important ecological, biogeochemical and water resource management implications, such as for the success of early reproductive stages of aquatic organisms. PMID:22455659

  13. Quantitative Analysis by Isotopic Dilution Using Mass Spectroscopy: The Determination of Caffeine by GC-MS.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hill, Devon W.; And Others

    1988-01-01

    Describes a laboratory technique for quantitative analysis of caffeine by an isotopic dilution method for coupled gas chromatography-mass spectroscopy. Discusses caffeine analysis and experimental methodology. Lists sample caffeine concentrations found in common products. (MVL)

  14. Application of Cryocoolers to a Vintage Dilution Refrigerator

    SciTech Connect

    Schmitt, Richard; Smith, Gary; Ruschman, Mark; Beaty, Jim; /Minnesota U.

    2011-06-06

    A dilution refrigerator is required for 50mK detector operation of CDMS (Cryogenic Dark Matter Search). Besides shielding the dilution refrigerator itself, the liquid nitrogen shield and liquid helium bath in the refrigerator cool the detector cryostat heat shields and cool electronics, resulting in significant external heat loads at 80K and at 4K. An Oxford Instruments Kelvinox 400 has served this role for ten years but required daily transfers of liquid nitrogen and liquid helium. Complicating the cryogen supply is the location 800 meters below ground in an RF shielded, class 10000 clean room at Soudan, MN. Nitrogen and helium re-liquefiers using cryocoolers were installed outside the clean room and continuously condense room temperature gas and return the liquids to the dilution refrigerator through a transfer line. This paper will describe the design, installation, controls and performance of liquefaction systems.

  15. Entropic Heat Effects in Aluminum Electrolysis Cells with Inert Anodes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Solheim, Asbjørn

    2016-04-01

    While the overall energy requirement for the aluminum electrolysis is well known and can be calculated from readily available thermodynamic data, the distribution of the different types of energy to the anode, the cathode, and the electrolyte is not straightforward. The present attempt is based on the application of activity data including partial entropies on the electrode reactions in a cell operating with inert anodes. The calculations indicate that the cell reaction implies a relatively strong cooling of the anode, a moderate heating of the cathode, and a moderate cooling of the electrolyte. The mass- and heat transfer coefficients at the anode in a cell with inert anodes were estimated. The electrolyte at the anode will be higher in aluminum fluoride, lower in alumina, and colder than the bulk of the electrolyte. The cooling and heating effects are only marginally different from the situation prevailing in traditional aluminum electrolysis cells with carbon anodes.

  16. The electroweak phase transition in the Inert Doublet Model

    SciTech Connect

    Blinov, Nikita; Profumo, Stefano; Stefaniak, Tim

    2015-07-21

    We study the strength of a first-order electroweak phase transition in the Inert Doublet Model (IDM), where particle dark matter (DM) is comprised of the lightest neutral inert Higgs boson. We improve over previous studies in the description and treatment of the finite-temperature effective potential and of the electroweak phase transition. We focus on a set of benchmark models inspired by the key mechanisms in the IDM leading to a viable dark matter particle candidate, and illustrate how to enhance the strength of the electroweak phase transition by adjusting the masses of the yet undiscovered IDM Higgs states. We argue that across a variety of DM masses, obtaining a strong enough first-order phase transition is a generic possibility in the IDM. We find that due to direct dark matter searches and collider constraints, a sufficiently strong transition and a thermal relic density matching the universal DM abundance is possible only in the Higgs funnel regime.

  17. 40 CFR 174.705 - Inert ingredients from sexually compatible plant.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... genetic material that encodes the inert ingredient or leads to the production of the inert ingredient is derived from a plant sexually compatible with the recipient food plant. (b) The genetic material has...

  18. 40 CFR 174.705 - Inert ingredients from sexually compatible plant.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... genetic material that encodes the inert ingredient or leads to the production of the inert ingredient is derived from a plant sexually compatible with the recipient food plant. (b) The genetic material has...

  19. 40 CFR 174.705 - Inert ingredients from sexually compatible plant.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... genetic material that encodes the inert ingredient or leads to the production of the inert ingredient is derived from a plant sexually compatible with the recipient food plant. (b) The genetic material has...

  20. 40 CFR 174.705 - Inert ingredients from sexually compatible plant.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... genetic material that encodes the inert ingredient or leads to the production of the inert ingredient is derived from a plant sexually compatible with the recipient food plant. (b) The genetic material has...

  1. 40 CFR 174.705 - Inert ingredients from sexually compatible plant.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... genetic material that encodes the inert ingredient or leads to the production of the inert ingredient is derived from a plant sexually compatible with the recipient food plant. (b) The genetic material has...

  2. METHOD OF OBTAINING AN IMPROVED WELD IN INERT ARC WELDING

    DOEpatents

    Correy, T.B.

    1962-12-11

    A method is reported for inert arc welding. An a-c welding current is applied to the workpiece and welding electrode such that the positive portion of each cycle thereof, with the electrode positive, has only sufficient energy to clean the surface of the workpiece and the negative portion of each cycle thereof, with the electrode negative, contains the energy required to weld. (AEC)

  3. Evolution of weak disturbances in inert binary mixtures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rasmussen, M. L.

    1977-01-01

    The evolution of weak disturbances in inert binary mixtures is determined for the one-dimensional piston problem. The interaction of the dissipative and nonlinear mechanisms is described by Burgers' equation. The binary mixture diffusion mechanisms enter as an additive term in an effective diffusivity. Results for the impulsive motion of a piston moving into an ambient medium and the sinusoidally oscillating piston are used to illustrate the results and elucidate the incorrect behavior pertaining to the associated linear theory.

  4. Kinetics of switch grass pellet thermal decomposition under inert and oxidizing atmospheres.

    PubMed

    Chandrasekaran, Sriraam R; Hopke, Philip K

    2012-12-01

    Grass pellets are a renewable resource that have energy content similar to that of wood. However, the higher ash and chlorine content affects combustion. Thermal degradation analysis of a fuel is useful in developing effective combustion. Thermogravimetric analysis (TGA) of the thermal degradation of grass pellets under inert (nitrogen) and oxidizing (air) atmospheres was conducted. Non-isothermal conditions were employed with 4 different heating rates. Kinetic parameters (activation energy and pre-exponential factors) were estimated using the iso-conversional method. Both pyrolysis and oxidative atmospheric thermal degradation exhibited two major loss process: volatilization of cellulose, hemicelluloses and lignin and burning or slow oxidation of the residual char. The activation energy and pre-exponential factors were high for the oxidizing environment. During pyrolysis, major decomposition occurred with 40% to 75% conversion of the mass to gas with an activation energy of 314 kJ/mol. In air the decomposition occurred with 30% to 55% conversion with an activation energy of 556 kJ/mol. There was a substantial effect of heating rate on mass loss and mass loss rate. The TG shifted to higher temperature ranges on increasing the heating rate. In both pyrolyzing and oxidizing conditions, average combustion and devolatilization rates increased. Enhanced combustion takes place with higher activation energy in oxidizing atmosphere compared to the inert atmosphere due to presence of air. PMID:23026316

  5. Advances towards the qualification of an aircraft fuel tank inert environment fiber optic oxygen sensor system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mendoza, Edgar A.; Esterkin, Yan; Kempen, Cornelia; Sun, Songjian; Susko, Kenneth; Goglia, John

    2011-06-01

    An all optical pressure and temperature compensated fiber optic oxygen sensor (FOxSenseTM) system is under qualification for use in the in-situ closed-loop-control of the inert atmosphere environment inside fuel tanks of military and commercial aircraft. The all-optical oxygen environment control sensor is a passive, intrinsically safe, fiber-optic sensor device with no electrical connections leading to the sensors installed within the fuel tanks of an aircraft. To control the fuel tank environment, an array of multiple sensors is deployed throughout the fuel tanks of an aircraft, and a remote multi-channel optoelectronic system is used to monitor the status of all the sensors in real time to provide feedback oxygen environment information to the on-board inert gas generating system (OBIGS). Qualification testing of the all optical sensor have demonstrated the ability to monitor the oxygen environment inside a simulated fuel tank environment in the oxygen range from 0% to 21% oxygen concentrations, temperatures from (-) 40°C to (+) 60°C, and altitudes from sea level to 40,000 feet. Fiber optic oxygen sensors with built-in temperature compensation as well as the conduit fiber optic cables have passed DO-160E including acoustic noise and burn test.

  6. Numerical modeling for dilute and dense sprays

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chen, C. P.; Kim, Y. M.; Shang, H. M.; Ziebarth, J. P.; Wang, T. S.

    1992-01-01

    We have successfully implemented a numerical model for spray-combustion calculations. In this model, the governing gas-phase equations in Eulerian coordinate are solved by a time-marching multiple pressure correction procedure based on the operator-splitting technique. The droplet-phase equations in Lagrangian coordinate are solved by a stochastic discrete particle technique. In order to simplify the calculation procedure for the circulating droplets, the effective conductivity model is utilized. The k-epsilon models are utilized to characterize the time and length scales of the gas phase in conjunction with turbulent modulation by droplets and droplet dispersion by turbulence. This method entails random sampling of instantaneous gas flow properties and the stochastic process requires a large number of computational parcels to produce the satisfactory dispersion distributions even for rather dilute sprays. Two major improvements in spray combustion modelings were made. Firstly, we have developed a probability density function approach in multidimensional space to represent a specific computational particle. Secondly, we incorporate the Taylor Analogy Breakup (TAB) model for handling the dense spray effects. This breakup model is based on the reasonable assumption that atomization and drop breakup are indistinguishable processes within a dense spray near the nozzle exit. Accordingly, atomization is prescribed by injecting drops which have a characteristic size equal to the nozzle exit diameter. Example problems include the nearly homogeneous and inhomogeneous turbulent particle dispersion, and the non-evaporating, evaporating, and burning dense sprays. Comparison with experimental data will be discussed in detail.

  7. Mobile Melt-Dilute Treatment for Russian Spent Nuclear Fuel

    SciTech Connect

    Peacock, H.

    2002-09-17

    Treatment of spent Russian fuel using a Melt-Dilute (MD) process is proposed to consolidate fuel assemblies into a form that is proliferation resistant and provides critically safety under storage and disposal configurations. Russian fuel elements contain a variety of fuel meat and cladding materials. The Melt-Dilute treatment process was initially developed for aluminum-based fuels so additional development is needed for several cladding and fuel meat combinations in the Russian fuel inventory (e.g. zirconium-clad, uranium-zirconium alloy fuel). A Mobile Melt-Dilute facility (MMD) is being proposed for treatment of spent fuels at reactor site storage locations in Russia; thereby, avoiding the costs of building separate treatment facilities at each site and avoiding shipment of enriched fuel assemblies over the road. The MMD facility concept is based on laboratory tests conducted at the Savannah River Technology Center (SRTC), and modular pilot-scale facilities constructed at the Savannah River Site for treatment of US spent fuel. SRTC laboratory tests have shown the feasibility of operating a Melt-Dilute treatment process with either a closed system or a filtered off-gas system. The proposed Mobile Melt-Dilute process is presented in this paper.

  8. 75 FR 30300 - Restricting the Mailing of Replica or Inert Explosive Devices

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-06-01

    ..., 2010 (75 FR 282-283), which added restrictions to the mailing of replica and inert explosive devices in... 111 Restricting the Mailing of Replica or Inert Explosive Devices AGENCY: Postal Service\\TM\\. ACTION... replica or inert explosive devices, such as simulated grenades that are not dangerous but bear a...

  9. Reduced temperature aluminum production in an electrolytic cell having an inert anode

    DOEpatents

    Dawless, Robert K. (Monroeville, PA); Ray, Siba P. (Murrysville, PA); Hosler, Robert B. (Sarver, PA); Kozarek, Robert L. (Apollo, PA); LaCamera, Alfred F. (Trafford, PA)

    2000-01-01

    Aluminum is produced by electrolytic reduction of alumina in a cell having a cathode, an inert anode and a molten salt bath containing metal fluorides and alumina. The inert anode preferably contains copper, silver and oxides of iron and nickel. Reducing the molten salt bath temperature to about 900-950.degree. C. lowers corrosion on the inert anode constituents.

  10. Development of a standard bench-scale cell for electrochemical studies on inert anodes. Inert Anode/Cathode Program

    SciTech Connect

    Windisch, C.F. Jr.; Boget, D.I.

    1986-07-01

    Objective of this work was to develop a standard bench-scale cell for performing short-term ac and dc polarization studies on inert anode candidate materials in molten cryolite. Two designs for electrochemical cells were developed and successfully evaluated in short-term experiments. Both cells consisted on the inert anode as a small cylindrical specimen partially sheathed in alumina, an Al/Al/sub 2/O/sub 3/ reference electrode, and a cryolite bath saturated in alumina. The difference between the two cells was in the design of the cathode. One cell used a bare solid metal cathode; the other used an aluminum pad similar to the Hall-Heroult configuration.

  11. Science Notes: Dilution of a Weak Acid

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Talbot, Christopher; Wai, Chooi Khee

    2014-01-01

    This "Science note" arose out of practical work involving the dilution of ethanoic acid, the measurement of the pH of the diluted solutions and calculation of the acid dissociation constant, K[subscript a], for each diluted solution. The students expected the calculated values of K[subscript a] to be constant but they found that the

  12. Science Notes: Dilution of a Weak Acid

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Talbot, Christopher; Wai, Chooi Khee

    2014-01-01

    This "Science note" arose out of practical work involving the dilution of ethanoic acid, the measurement of the pH of the diluted solutions and calculation of the acid dissociation constant, K[subscript a], for each diluted solution. The students expected the calculated values of K[subscript a] to be constant but they found that the…

  13. [Conditions for the development of isobaric counterdiffusion of inert gases and the criteria of its evaluation].

    PubMed

    Semko, V V; Bukharin, A I; Lastochkin, G I; Bardysheva, O F

    1991-01-01

    Investigation of superficial counterdiffusion of nitrogen against helium has been carried out to evaluate a possibility of its progress in divers (107 tests) under pressures equivalent to 32-450 m of sea water when breathing trimix being saturated in heliox at a constant ambient pressure without changing chamber environment. Breathing gas mixture contained 248-800 kPa of nitrogen, while chamber heliox media contained some additions of nitrogen (6-108 kPa). Clinical manifestations of breathing trimix (itching and gas bubble formation) were studied in divers. The development of counterdiffusion depends on the partial pressure of nitrogen not only in the breathing gas mixture but also in the chamber media. The breathing nitrogen level being increased and (or) decreased in the chamber media, the counterdiffusion symptoms grow relative to the number (%) of cases. Minimal critical values of nitrogen partial pressure gradients in the mixture which induce counterdiffusion skin lesions are 260-320 kPa on the average for the nitrogen concentration in the chamber mixture to 30 kPa. Isobaric supersaturation due to inert gases countertransport in body tissues as a result of gas-switching from heliox to trimix is responsible for the syndrome development. PMID:1778254

  14. In-pile studies of inert matrices with emphasis on magnesia and magnesium aluminate spinel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chauvin, N.; Albiol, T.; Mazoyer, R.; Noirot, J.; Lespiaux, D.; Dumas, J. C.; Weinberg, C.; Ménard, J. C.; Ottaviani, J. P.

    1999-08-01

    Various inert matrices - oxide, nitride and metallic - were irradiated in the French Phénix reactor in order to study their behaviour under a fast neutron fluence ( E > 0.1 MeV). This paper summarises the material selection criteria and the irradiation conditions of the MATrices for INcineration of Actinides (MATINA) 1 experiment. Emphasis is given on non-destructive examinations of the pins and on more complete examinations performed on (MgO + UO 2) and (MgAl 2O 4 + UO 2) pellets which were irradiated up to a fast neutron fluence of 2 × 10 26 m -2. For these pellets, dimensional examinations, scanning electronic microscopy pictures and electron-probe microanalyses, were performed before and after irradiation. Fission gas release was also studied. These preliminary results show a good behaviour of both magnesia and spinel under irradiation.

  15. Effect of Inert, Reducing, and Oxidizing Atmospheres on Friction and Wear of Metals to 1000 F

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Buckley, Donald H.; Johnson, Robert L.

    1961-01-01

    Experiments were conducted in inert, reducing, and oxidizing atmospheres to determine their influence on the friction and wear properties of various metals. Nitrogen, argon, forming gas (10 volume percent H2, 90 volume percent N2), and various concentrations of oxygen in nitrogen were used. A 3/16-inch-radius hemispherical rider under a load of 1000 grams contacted the flat surface of a rotating disk. The surface speed employed was 35 feet per minute. The presence of surface oxides is vitally important to the protection of metals in sliding contact. Extremely high friction and excessive wear were encountered in the absence of these oxides. In some instances (electrolytically pure copper), the removal of the surface oxides resulted in mass welding of the specimens in sliding contact. Extremely small quantities of oxygen are sufficient to provide protection of metal surfaces; for example, with 440-C stainless steel, 0.03 volume percent oxygen was found to be adequate.

  16. Developing Optimal Parameters for Hyperpolarized Noble Gas and Inert Fluorinated Gas MRI of Lung Disorders

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-04-19

    Lung Transplant; Lung Resection; Lung Cancer; Asthma; Cystic Fibrosis; Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease; Emphysema; Mesothelioma; Asbestosis; Pulmonary Embolism; Interstitial Lung Disease; Pulmonary Fibrosis; Bronchiectasis; Seasonal Allergies; Cold Virus; Lung Infection; Pulmonary Hypertension; Pulmonary Dysplasia; Obstructive Sleep Apnea

  17. 40 CFR 1065.240 - Dilution air and diluted exhaust flow meters.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 34 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Dilution air and diluted exhaust flow meters. 1065.240 Section 1065.240 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) AIR POLLUTION CONTROLS ENGINE-TESTING PROCEDURES Measurement Instruments Flow-Related Measurements § 1065.240 Dilution air and diluted...

  18. Neutrophils Generate Microparticles during Exposure to Inert Gases Due to Cytoskeletal Oxidative Stress*

    PubMed Central

    Thom, Stephen R.; Bhopale, Veena M.; Yang, Ming

    2014-01-01

    This investigation was to elucidate the mechanism for microparticle (MP) formation triggered by exposures to high pressure inert gases. Human neutrophils generate MPs at a threshold of ∼186 kilopascals with exposures of 30 min or more. Murine cells are similar, but MP production occurs at a slower rate and continues for ∼4 h, whether or not cells remain under pressure. Neutrophils exposed to elevated gas but not hydrostatic pressure produce MPs according to the potency series: argon ≃ nitrogen > helium. Following a similar pattern, gases activate type-2 nitric-oxide synthase (NOS-2) and NADPH oxidase (NOX). MP production does not occur with neutrophils exposed to a NOX inhibitor (Nox2ds) or a NOS-2 inhibitor (1400W) or with cells from mice lacking NOS-2. Reactive species cause S-nitrosylation of cytosolic actin that enhances actin polymerization. Protein cross-linking and immunoprecipitation studies indicate that increased polymerization occurs because of associations involving vasodilator-stimulated phosphoprotein, focal adhesion kinase, the H+/K+ ATPase β (flippase), the hematopoietic cell multidrug resistance protein ABC transporter (floppase), and protein-disulfide isomerase in proximity to short actin filaments. Using chemical inhibitors or reducing cell concentrations of any of these proteins with small inhibitory RNA abrogates NOS-2 activation, reactive species generation, actin polymerization, and MP production. These effects were also inhibited in cells exposed to UV light, which photoreverses S-nitrosylated cysteine residues and by co-incubations with the antioxidant ebselen or cytochalasin D. The autocatalytic cycle of protein activation is initiated by inert gas-mediated singlet O2 production. PMID:24867949

  19. Detailed Studies on Flame Extinction by Inert Particles in Normal- and Micro-gravity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Andac, M. G.; Egolfopoulos, F. N.; Campbell, C. S.

    2001-01-01

    The combustion of dusty flows has been studied to lesser extent than pure gas phase flows and sprays. Particles can have a strong effect by modifying the dynamic response and detailed structure of flames through the dynamic, thermal, and chemical couplings between the two phases. A rigorous understanding of the dynamics and structure of two-phase flows can be attained in stagnation flow configurations, which have been used by others to study spray combustion as well as reacting dusty flows. In earlier studies on reacting dusty flows, the thermal coupling between the two phases as well as the effect of gravity on the flame response were not considered. However, in Ref. 6, the thermal coupling between chemically inert particles and the gas was addressed in premixed flames. The effects of gravity was also studied showing that it can substantially affect the profiles of the particle velocity, number density, mass flux, and temperature. The results showed a strong dynamic and thermal dependence of reacting dusty flows to particle number density. However, the work was only numerical and limited to twin-flames, stagnation, premixed flames. In Ref. 7 the effects of chemically inert particle clouds on the extinction of strained premixed and non-premixed flames were studied both experimentally and numerically at 1-g. It was shown and explained that large particles can cause more effective flame cooling compared to smaller particles. The effects of flame configuration and particle injection orientation were also addressed. The complexity of the coupling between the various parameters in such flows was demonstrated and it was shown that it was impossible to obtain a simple and still meaningful scaling that captured all the pertinent physics.

  20. Neutrophils generate microparticles during exposure to inert gases due to cytoskeletal oxidative stress.

    PubMed

    Thom, Stephen R; Bhopale, Veena M; Yang, Ming

    2014-07-01

    This investigation was to elucidate the mechanism for microparticle (MP) formation triggered by exposures to high pressure inert gases. Human neutrophils generate MPs at a threshold of ∼186 kilopascals with exposures of 30 min or more. Murine cells are similar, but MP production occurs at a slower rate and continues for ∼4 h, whether or not cells remain under pressure. Neutrophils exposed to elevated gas but not hydrostatic pressure produce MPs according to the potency series: argon ≃ nitrogen > helium. Following a similar pattern, gases activate type-2 nitric-oxide synthase (NOS-2) and NADPH oxidase (NOX). MP production does not occur with neutrophils exposed to a NOX inhibitor (Nox2ds) or a NOS-2 inhibitor (1400W) or with cells from mice lacking NOS-2. Reactive species cause S-nitrosylation of cytosolic actin that enhances actin polymerization. Protein cross-linking and immunoprecipitation studies indicate that increased polymerization occurs because of associations involving vasodilator-stimulated phosphoprotein, focal adhesion kinase, the H(+)/K(+) ATPase β (flippase), the hematopoietic cell multidrug resistance protein ABC transporter (floppase), and protein-disulfide isomerase in proximity to short actin filaments. Using chemical inhibitors or reducing cell concentrations of any of these proteins with small inhibitory RNA abrogates NOS-2 activation, reactive species generation, actin polymerization, and MP production. These effects were also inhibited in cells exposed to UV light, which photoreverses S-nitrosylated cysteine residues and by co-incubations with the antioxidant ebselen or cytochalasin D. The autocatalytic cycle of protein activation is initiated by inert gas-mediated singlet O2 production. PMID:24867949

  1. Development of a compact dilution refrigerator for zero gravity operation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Roach, Pat R.; Helvensteijn, Ben

    1990-01-01

    A compact dilution refrigerator design based on internal charcoal adsorption is being tested for operation in zero gravity. This refrigerator is self-contained with no external pumps or gas handling system and provides reliable operation since it has no moving parts. All operations are performed with heaters and are completely computer controlled. The refrigerator is capable of providing many hours of operation at very low temperature before the charcoal pumps must be recycled.

  2. Development of a compact dilution refrigerator for zero gravity operation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roach, Pat R.; Helvensteijn, Ben

    A compact dilution refrigerator design based on internal charcoal adsorption is being tested for operation in zero gravity. This refrigerator is self-contained with no external pumps or gas handling system and provides reliable operation since it has no moving parts. All operations are performed with heaters and are completely computer controlled. The refrigerator is capable of providing many hours of operation at very low temperature before the charcoal pumps must be recycled.

  3. Inert Electrodes Program: Fiscal year 1990 annual report

    SciTech Connect

    Windisch, C.F. Jr; Strachan, D.M.

    1991-08-01

    The Inert Electrodes Program, conducted by Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL), involves improving the Hall-Heroult Cells used by the aluminum industry for the electrochemical production of aluminum. The PNL research centers on developing more energy-efficient, longer-lasting anodes, cathodes, and ancillary equipment. During the FY 1989 and FY 1990, preparations for the pilot cell test continued. Numerous unanticipated problems were encountered that delayed the test schedule. The delays resulted primarily from three factors: (1) modifications for anode design based on the results obtained from the prototype test (documented here); (2) difficulties in procuring a manufacturer for the cermet inert anodes to be used in the pilot cell; and (3) problems in the actual scale-up activities, both in the production of the ferrite powder and in the fabrication of the anodes themselves. Issues related to scaling up the fabrication of the anodes are still being addressed in FY 1991. Important accomplishments in FY 1989 and FY 1990 include the completion of laboratory cell tests in which the effects of current density, pre-corrosion, and silica content on anode performance were confirmed; the performance of tests that resulted in the identification of the reaction layer on cermet anodes; the initiation of electrochemical tests to determine the source of the anode impedance; the completion of studies to identify and summarize optimal fabrication conditions for the cermet inert anodes, including advanced compositions; the testing of anodes with advanced composition; the refinement of the electrical connection for the anode; and modeling the dynamics of the anode array to be used in the pilot cell. 15 refs., 23 figs.

  4. An electromagnetic inerter-based vibration suppression device

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gonzalez-Buelga, A.; Clare, L. R.; Neild, S. A.; Jiang, J. Z.; Inman, D. J.

    2015-05-01

    This paper describes how an inerter-based device for structural vibration suppression can be realized using an electromagnetic transducer such as a linear motor. When the motor shaft moves, a difference of voltage is generated across the transducer coil. The voltage difference is proportional to the relative velocity between its two terminals. The electromagnetic transducer will exert a force proportional to current following the Lorentz principle if the circuit is closed around the transducer coil. If an electronic circuit consisting of a capacitor, an inductance and a resistance with the appropriate configuration is connected, the resulting force reflected back into the mechanical domain is equivalent to that achieved by a mechanical inerter-based device. The proposed configuration is easy to implement and very versatile, provided a high quality conversion system with negligible losses. With the use of electromagnetic devices, a new generation of vibration absorbers can be realized, for example in the electrical domain it would be relatively uncomplicated to synthesize multi-frequency or real time tunable vibration absorbers by adding electrical components in parallel. In addition by using resistance emulators in the electrical circuits, part of the absorbed vibration energy can be converted into usable power. Here an electromagnetic tuned inerter damper (E-TID) is tested experimentally using real time dynamic substructuring. A voltage compensation unit was developed in order to compensate for coil losses. This voltage compensation unit requires power, which is acquired through harvesting from the vibration energy using a resistance emulator. A power balance analysis was developed in order to ensure the device can be self sufficient. Promising experimental results, using this approach, have been obtained and are presented in this paper. The ultimate goal of this research is the development of autonomous electromagnetic vibration absorbers, able to harvest energy, convert it into usable power, and use it for vibration control and health monitoring.

  5. Gas stream purifier

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Adam, Steven J.

    1994-01-01

    A gas stream purifier has been developed that is capable of removing corrosive acid, base, solvent, organic, inorganic, and water vapors as well as particulates from an inert mixed gas stream using only solid scrubbing agents. This small, lightweight purifier has demonstrated the ability to remove contaminants from an inert gas stream with a greater than 99 percent removal efficiency. The Gas Stream Purifier has outstanding market and sales potential in manufacturing, laboratory and science industries, medical, automotive, or any commercial industry where pollution, contamination, or gas stream purification is a concern. The purifier was developed under NASA contract NAS9-18200 Schedule A for use in the international Space Station. A patent application for the Gas Stream Purifier is currently on file with the United States Patent and Trademark Office.

  6. Separation of Nuclear Fuel Surrogates from Silicon Carbide Inert Matrix

    SciTech Connect

    Dr. Ronald Baney

    2008-12-15

    The objective of this project has been to identify a process for separating transuranic species from silicon carbide (SiC). Silicon carbide has become one of the prime candidates for the matrix in inert matrix fuels, (IMF) being designed to reduce plutonium inventories and the long half-lives actinides through transmutation since complete reaction is not practical it become necessary to separate the non-transmuted materials from the silicon carbide matrix for ultimate reprocessing. This work reports a method for that required process.l

  7. Testing New Inert Matrix and Thoria Fuels for Plutonium Incineration

    SciTech Connect

    Vettraino, F.; Padovan, E.; Tverberg, T.

    2002-07-01

    One major issue for nuclear power continues to be the public concern about rad-waste and proliferation risk induced by large plutonium stockpiles accumulated worldwide. In this context, nuclear fuels which exhibit no-plutonium production, and possibly allow for an efficient utilization of the plutonium to get rid of, are of great interest. This is the basic reason for the efforts that many international institutions are devoting to R and D on such new U-free fuel concepts as Inert Matrix (IMF) and Thorium fuels. At the moment the major merit of such innovative fuels is primarily related to the safe closure of the nuclear fuel cycle as especially expected from those new concepts like ADS (Accelerated Driven System) for the transmutation of plutonium, minor actinides and LLFP. Both ceramic inert matrix (IM) and thoria (T) fuels have been identified as suitable to the scope of burning weapon and civilian plutonium and to act also as possible carrier for transmutation of minor actinides. For testing the irradiation behaviour of these new materials, three kinds of fuels have been selected: inert matrix (IM) fuel, inert matrix thoria-doped (IMT) fuel, and thoria (T) fuel. A first experiment, IFA-652, 40 MWD/kg burnup target, including high enriched uranium (HEU) as fissile phase, instead of plutonium, is currently underway in the Halden HWBR. The reason for this choice was that manufacturing of Pu containing fuels is more complex and there was no fabrication facility available at the needed time for the Pu fuel. It is expected, however, that the relative behaviour of the different kind of matrices would be only slightly dependent on the adopted fissile material. So, the comparison of the in-pile performance of the three fuels will constitute a significant common database also for plutonium bearing fuels. The primary aim for the IFA-652 experiment is the measurement of basic characteristics under LWR irradiation conditions over a period of 4-5 years. The design of a second experiment, truly based on plutonium bearing fuel with 80 MWd/kg target burnup, is under preparation. Beyond exploitation in the future transmuters (ADS), the selected fuels are also considered promising candidates for a more effective burning of all kind of plutonium in the present commercial LWRs, what may represent their near term application especially for the weapon Pu stockpile reduction. Most likely this latter aspect is of interest for a wider number of countries which do exploit the benefits of nuclear energy. (authors)

  8. Polyvinyl alcohol battery separator containing inert filler. [alkaline batteries

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sheibley, D. W.; Hsu, L. C.; Manzo, M. A. (Inventor)

    1981-01-01

    A cross-linked polyvinyl alcohol battery separator is disclosed. A particulate filler, inert to alkaline electrolyte of an alkaline battery, is incorporated in the separator in an amount of 1-20% by weight, based on the weight of the polyvinyl alcohol, and is dispersed throughout the product. Incorporation of the filler enhances performance and increases cycle life of alkaline batteries when compared with batteries containing a similar separator not containing filler. Suitable fillers include titanates, silicates, zirconates, aluminates, wood floor, lignin, and titania. Particle size is not greater than about 50 microns.

  9. Inert Anode Life in Low Temperature Reduction Process

    SciTech Connect

    Bradford, Donald R.

    2005-06-30

    The production of aluminum metal by low temperature electrolysis utilizing metal non-consumable anodes and ceramic cathodes was extensively investigated. Tests were performed with traditional sodium fluoride--aluminum fluoride composition electrolytes, potassium fluoride-- aluminum fluoride electrolytes, and potassium fluoride--sodium fluoride--aluminum fluoride electrolytes. All of the Essential First-Tier Requirements of the joint DOE-Aluminum Industry Inert Anode Road Map were achieved and those items yet to be resolved for commercialization of this technology were identified. Methods for the fabrication and welding of metal alloy anodes were developed and tested. The potential savings of energy and energy costs were determined and potential environmental benefits verified.

  10. Inert scalar dark matter in an extra dimension inspired model

    SciTech Connect

    Lineros, R.A.; Santos, F.A. Pereira dos E-mail: fabio.alex@fis.puc-rio.br

    2014-10-01

    In this paper we analyze a dark matter model inspired by theories with extra dimensions. The dark matter candidate corresponds to the first KaluzaKlein mode of an real scalar added to the Standard Model. The tower of new particles enriches the calculation of the relic abundance. For large mass splitting, the model converges to the predictions of the inert singlet dark matter model. For nearly degenerate mass spectrum, coannihilations increase the cross-sections used for direct and indirect dark matter searches. Moreover, the KaluzaKlein zero mode can mix with the SM higgs and further constraints can be applied.

  11. Dynamics and Structure of Dusty Reacting Flows: Inert Particles in Strained, Laminar, Premixed Flames

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Egolfopoulos, Fokion N.; Campbell, Charles S.

    1999-01-01

    A detailed numerical study was conducted on the dynamics and thermal response of inert, spherical particles in strained, laminar, premixed hydrogen/air flames. The modeling included the solution of the steady conservation equations for both the gas and particle phases along and around the stagnation streamline of an opposed-jet configuration, and the use of detailed descriptions of chemical kinetics and molecular transport, For the gas phase, the equations of mass, momentum, energy, and species are considered, while for the particle phase, the model is based on conservation equations of the particle momentum balance in the axial and radial direction, the particle number density, and the particle thermal energy equation. The particle momentum equation includes the forces as induced by drag, thermophoresis, and gravity. The particle thermal energy equation includes the convective/conductive heat exchange between the two phases, as well as radiation emission and absorption by the particle. A one-point continuation method is also included in the code that allows for the description of turning points, typical of ignition and extinction behavior. As expected, results showed that the particle velocity can be substantially different than the gas phase velocity, especially in the presence of large temperature gradients and large strain rates. Large particles were also found to cross the gas stagnation plane, stagnate, and eventually reverse as a result of the opposing gas phase velocity. It was also shown that the particle number density varies substantially throughout the flowfield, as a result of the straining of the flow and the thermal expansion. Finally, for increased values of the particle number density, substantial flame cooling to extinction states and modification of the gas phase fluid mechanics were observed. As also expected, the effect of gravity was shown to be important for low convective velocities and heavy particles. Under such conditions, simulations indicate that the magnitude and direction of the gravitational force can substantially affect the profiles of the particle velocity, number density, mass flux, and temperature.

  12. Dynamics and Structure of Dusty Reacting Flows: Inert Particles in Strained, Laminar, Premixed Flames

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Egolfopoulos, Fokion N.; Campbell, Charles S.; Wu, Ming-Shin (Technical Monitor)

    1999-01-01

    A detailed numerical study was conducted on the dynamics and thermal response of inert spherical particles in strained, laminar, premixed hydrogen/air flames. The modeling included the solution of the steady conservation equations for both the gas and particle phases along and around the stagnation streamline of an opposed-jet configuration, and the use of detailed descriptions of chemical kinetics and molecular transport. For the gas phase, the equations of mass, momentum, energy, and species are considered, while for the particle phase, the model is based on conservation equations of the particle momentum balance in the axial and radial direction, the particle number density, and the particle thermal energy equation. The particle momentum equation includes the forces as induced by drag, thermophoresis, and gravity. The particle thermal energy equation includes the convective/conductive heat exchange between the two phases, as well as radiation emission and absorption by the particle. A one-point continuation method is also included in the code that allows for the description of turning points, typical of ignition and extinction behavior. As expected, results showed that the particle velocity can be substantially different than the gas phase velocity, especially in the presence of large temperature gradients and large strain rates. Large particles were also found to cross the gas stagnation plane, stagnate, and eventually reverse as a result of the opposing gas phase velocity. It was also shown that the particle number density varies substantially throughout the flowfield, as a result of the straining of the flow and the thermal expansion. Finally, for increased values of the particle number density, substantial flame cooling to extinction states and modification of the gas phase fluid mechanics were observed. As also expected, the effect of gravity was shown to be important for low convective velocities and heavy particles. Under such conditions, simulations indicate that the magnitude and direction of the gravitational force can substantially affect the profiles of the particle velocity, number density, mass flux, and temperature.

  13. Zirconia Inert Matrix Fuel for Plutonium and Minor Actinides Management in Reactors and as an Ultimate Waste Form

    SciTech Connect

    Degueldre, Claude; Wiesenack, Wolfgang

    2008-07-01

    An yttria stabilised zirconia doped with plutonia and erbia has been selected as inert matrix fuel (IMF) at PSI. The results of experimental irradiation tests on yttria-stabilised zirconia doped with plutonia and erbia pellets in the Halden research reactor as well as a study of zirconia solubility are presented. Zirconia must be stabilised by yttria to form a solid solution such as MAz(Y,Er){sub y}Pu{sub x}Zr{sub 1-y}O{sub 2-{xi}} where minor actinides (MA) oxides are also soluble. (Er,Y,Pu,Zr)O{sub 2-{xi}} (with Pu containing 5% Am) was successfully prepared at PSI and irradiated in the Halden reactor. Emphasis is given on the zirconia- IMF properties under in-pile irradiation, on the fuel material centre temperatures and on the fission gas release. The retention of fission products in zirconia may be stronger at similar temperature, compared to UO{sub 2}. The outstanding behaviour of plutonia-zirconia inert matrix fuel is compared to the classical (U,Pu)O{sub 2} fuels. The properties of the spent fuel pellets are presented focusing on the once-through strategy. For this strategy, low solubility of the inert matrix is required for geological disposal. This parameter was studied in detail for a range of solutions corresponding to groundwater under near field conditions. Under these conditions the IMF solubility is about 109 times smaller than glass, several orders of magnitude lower than UO{sub 2} in oxidising conditions (Yucca Mountain) and comparable in reducing conditions, which makes the zirconia material very attractive for deep geological disposal. The behaviour of plutonia-zirconia inert matrix fuel is discussed within a 'burn and bury' strategy. (authors)

  14. Gas mixtures for spark gap closing switches

    DOEpatents

    Christophorou, L.G.; McCorkle, D.L.; Hunter, S.R.

    1987-02-20

    Gas mixtures for use in spark gap closing switches comprised of fluorocarbons and low molecular weight, inert buffer gases. To this can be added a third gas having a low ionization potential relative to the buffer gas. The gas mixtures presented possess properties that optimized the efficiency spark gap closing switches. 6 figs.

  15. Gas mixtures for spark gap closing switches

    DOEpatents

    Christophorou, Loucas G.; McCorkle, Dennis L.; Hunter, Scott R.

    1988-01-01

    Gas mixtures for use in spark gap closing switches comprised of fluorocarbons and low molecular weight, inert buffer gases. To this can be added a third gas having a low ionization potential relative to the buffer gas. The gas mixtures presented possess properties that optimized the efficiency spark gap closing switches.

  16. Dilute acid and autohydrolysis pretreatment.

    PubMed

    Yang, Bin; Wyman, Charles E

    2009-01-01

    Exposure of cellulosic biomass to temperatures of about 120-210 degrees C can remove most of the hemicellulose and produce cellulose-rich solids from which high glucose yields are possible with cellulase enzymes. Furthermore, the use of dilute sulfuric acid in this pretreatment operation can increase recovery of hemicellulose sugars substantially to about 85-95% of the maximum possible versus only about 65% if no acid is employed. The use of small-diameter tubes makes it possible to employ high solids concentrations similar to those preferred for commercial operations, with rapid heat-up, good temperature control, and accurate closure of material balances. Mixed reactors can be employed to pretreat larger amounts of biomass than possible in such small-diameter tubes, but solids concentrations are limited to about 15% or less to provide uniform temperatures. Pretreatment of large amounts of biomass at high solids concentrations is best carried out using direct steam injection and rapid pressure release, but closure of material balances in such "steam gun" devices is more difficult. Although flow of water alone or containing dilute acid is not practical commercially, such flow-through configurations provide valuable insight into biomass deconstruction kinetics not possible in the batch tubes, mixed reactors, or steam gun systems. PMID:19768619

  17. A Microgravity Helium Dilution Cooler

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Roach, Pat R.; Sperans, Joel (Technical Monitor)

    1994-01-01

    We are developing a He-3-He-4 dilution cooler to operate in microgravity. It uses charcoal adsorption pumps and heaters for its operation; it has no moving parts. It currently operates cyclically to well below 0.1 K and we have designed a version to operate continuously. We expect that the continuous version will be able to provide the long-duration cooling that many experiments need at temperatures down to 0.040 K. More importantly, such a dilution cooler could provide the precooling that enables the use of adiabatic demagnetization techniques that can reach temperatures below 0.001 K. At temperatures below 0.002 K many fascinating microgravity experiments on superfluid He-3 become possible. Among the possibilities are: research into a superfluid He-3 gyroscope, study of the nucleation of the B-phase of superfluid He-3 when the sample is floating out of contact with walls, study of the anisotropy of the surface tension of the B-phase, and NMR experiments on tiny free-floating clusters of superfluid He-3 atoms that should model the shell structure of nuclei.

  18. Added sugars and micronutrient dilution.

    PubMed

    Livingstone, M B E; Rennie, K L

    2009-03-01

    There is increasing concern that high intakes of added sugars promote micronutrient dilution. However, the overall conclusion to emerge from the existing evidence base is that associations between reported intakes of added sugars and intakes of micronutrients are inconsistent and often non-linear, both across and within age groups, and between the genders. If a nutrient displacement effect does exist, a high consumption of added sugar does not necessarily compromise overall micronutrient intakes and similarly, consuming less added sugar is no guarantee that micronutrient intakes will be optimized. Clarification of this issue has been beset by methodological and conceptual difficulties. The observed associations between added sugars and micronutrient intake have been heavily contingent on both the definition of sugars chosen and the analytical approach used for adjusting for differences in reported energy intake. These issues have been further compounded by mis-reporting of food intake of unknown direction and magnitude and the cut-offs used to determine 'inadequate' micronutrient intakes which vary over time and between studies and countries. In the absence compelling evidence that micronutrient intakes are compromised by a high consumption of added sugars, it may now be appropriate to question the legitimacy of the nutrient dilution hypothesis as it is highly likely that it is oversimplifying more subtle and complex dietary issues. Recommendations for further research are made to help bring resolution to these issues. PMID:19207534

  19. Dilute Oxygen Combustion Phase 2 Final Report

    SciTech Connect

    Ryan, H.M.; Riley, M.F.; Kobayashi, H.

    2005-09-30

    A novel burner, in which fuel (natural gas) and oxidant (oxygen or air) are separately injected into a furnace, shows promise for achieving very low nitrogen oxide(s) (NOx) emissions for commercial furnace applications. The dilute oxygen combustion (DOC) burner achieves very low NOx through in-furnace dilution of the oxidant stream prior to combustion, resulting in low flame temperatures, thus inhibiting thermal NOx production. The results of a fundamental and applied research effort on the development of the DOC burner are presented. In addition, the results of a market survey detailing the potential commercial impact of the DOC system are disclosed. The fundamental aspects of the burner development project involved examining the flame characteristics of a natural gas turbulent jet in a high-temperature (~1366 K) oxidant (7-27% O2 vol. wet). Specifically, the mass entrainment rate, the flame lift-off height, the velocity field and major species field of the jet were evaluated as a function of surrounding-gas temperature and composition. The measured entrainment rate of the fuel jet decreased with increasing oxygen content in the surrounding high-temperature oxidant, and was well represented by the d+ scaling correlation found in the literature. The measured flame lift-off height decreased with increasing oxygen content and increasing temperature of the surrounding gas. An increase in surrounding-gas oxygen content and/or temperature inhibited the velocity decay within the jet periphery as a function of axial distance as compared to isothermal turbulent jets. However, the velocity measurements were only broadly represented by the d+ scaling correlation. Several DOC burner configurations were tested in a laboratory-scale furnace at a nominal firing rate of 185 kW (~0.63 MMBtu/h). The flue gas composition was recorded as a function of furnace nitrogen content, furnace temperature, burner geometric arrangement, firing rate, and fuel injection velocity. NOx emissions increased with increasing furnace nitrogen content and furnace temperature, but remained relatively insensitive to variations in fuel injection velocity and firing rate. NOx emissions below 5-10-3 g/MJ (10 ppm-air equivalent at 3% O2 dry) were obtained for furnace temperatures below 1533 K (2300?F) and furnace nitrogen levels between 1 and 40%. CO emissions were typically low (<35 ppm). Detailed in-furnace species measurements revealed the importance of the interior furnace circulation patterns, as influenced by fuel and oxidant injection schemes, on pollutant emissions. The combustion stability traits of several DOC burner arrangements were ascertained through furnace pressure measurements, wit6h increased stability occurring as furnace temperature increased and as the separation distance between fuel and oxidant inputs decreased. Based on current market conditions, oxy-fuel conversion of batch steel reheat furnaces with a DOC burner is justified on the basis of lower utility costs alone. However, conversion of continuous steel reheat furnaces, which are responsible for most steel production, required additional economic incentives, such as further fuel savings, increased furnace productivity, or emission credits.

  20. Dilute Oxygen Combustion Phase I Final Report

    SciTech Connect

    Ryan, H.M.; Riley, M.F.; Kobayashi, H.

    1997-10-31

    A novel burner, in which fuel (natural gas) and oxidant (oxygen or air) are separately injected into a furnace, shows promise for achieving very low nitrogen oxide(s) (NOx) emissions for commercial furnace applications. The dilute oxygen combustion (DOC) burner achieves very low NOx through in-furnace dilution of the oxidant stream prior to combustion, resulting in low flame temperatures, thus inhibiting thermal NOx production. The results of a fundamental and applied research effort on the development of the DOC burner are presented. In addition, the results of a market survey detailing the potential commercial impact of the DOC system are disclosed. The fundamental aspects of the burner development project involved examining the flame characteristics of a natural gas turbulent jet in a high-temperature (~1366 K) oxidant (7-27% O2 vol. wet). Specifically, the mass entrainment rate, the flame lift-off height, the velocity field and major species field of the jet were evaluated as a function of surrounding-gas temperature and composition. The measured entrainment rate of the fuel jet decreased with increasing oxygen content in the surrounding high-temperature oxidant, and was well represented by the d+ scaling correlation found in the literature. The measured flame lift-off height decreased with increasing oxygen content and increasing temperature of the surrounding gas. An increase in surrounding-gas oxygen content and/or temperature inhibited the velocity decay within the jet periphery as a function of axial distance as compared to isothermal turbulent jets. However, the velocity measurements were only broadly represented by the d+ scaling correlation. Several DOC burner configurations were tested in a laboratory-scale furnace at a nominal firing rate of 185 kW (~0.63 MMBtu/h). The flue gas composition was recorded as a function of furnace nitrogen content, furnace temperature, burner geometric arrangement, firing rate, and fuel injection velocity. NOx emissions increased with increasing furnace nitrogen content and furnace temperature, but remained relatively insensitive to variations in fuel injection velocity and firing rate. NOx emissions below 5-10-3 g/MJ (10 ppm-air equivalent at 3% O2 dry) were obtained for furnace temperatures below 1533 K (2300°F) and furnace nitrogen levels between 1 and 40%. CO emissions were typically low (<35 ppm). Detailed in-furnace species measurements revealed the importance of the interior furnace circulation patterns, as influenced by fuel and oxidant injection schemes, on pollutant emissions. The combustion stability traits of several DOC burner arrangements were ascertained through furnace pressure measurements, wit6h increased stability occurring as furnace temperature increased and as the separation distance between fuel and oxidant inputs decreased. Based on current market conditions, oxy-fuel conversion of batch steel reheat furnaces with a DOC burner is justified on the basis of lower utility costs alone. However, conversion of continuous steel reheat furnaces, which are responsible for most steel production, required additional economic incentives, such as further fuel savings, increased furnace productivity, or emission credits.

  1. Dilute oxygen combustion. Phase I report

    SciTech Connect

    1997-10-01

    A novel burner, in which fuel (natural gas) and oxidant (oxygen or air) are separately injected into a furnace, shows promise for achieving very low nitrogen oxide(s) (NO{sub x}) emissions for commercial furnace applications. The dilute oxygen combustion (DOC) burner achieves very low NO{sub x} through in-furnace dilution of the oxidant stream prior to combustion, resulting in low flame temperatures, thus inhibiting thermal NO{sub x} production. The results of a fundamental and applied research effort on the development of the DOC burner are presented. In addition, the results of a market survey detailing the potential commercial impact of the DOC system are disclosed. The fundamental aspects of the burner development project involved examining the flame characteristics of a natural gas turbulent jet in a high-temperature ({approximately}1366 K) oxidant (7-27% O{sub 2} vol. wet). Specifically, the mass entrainment rate, the flame lift-off height, the velocity field and major species field of the jet were evaluated as a function of surrounding-gas temperature and composition. The measured entrainment rate of the fuel jet decreased with increasing oxygen content in the surrounding high-temperature oxidant, and was well represented by the d{sup +} scaling correlation found in the literature. The measured flame lift-off height decreased with increasing oxygen content and increasing temperature of the surrounding gas. An increase in surrounding-gas oxygen content and/or temperature inhibited the velocity decay within the jet periphery as a function of axial distance as compared to isothermal turbulent jets. However, the velocity measurements were only broadly represented by the d{sup +} scaling correlation. Several DOC burner configurations were tested in a laboratory-scale furnace at a nominal firing rate of 185 kW ({approximately}0.63 MMBtu/h). The flue gas composition was recorded as a function of furnace nitrogen content, furnace temperature, burner geometric arrangement, firing rate, and fuel injection velocity. NO{sub x} emissions increased with increasing furnace nitrogen content and furnace temperature, but remained relatively insensitive to variations in fuel injection velocity and firing rate. NO{sub x} emissions below 5{times}10{sup -3} g/MJ (10 ppm-air equivalent at 3% O{sub 2} dry) were obtained for furnace temperatures below 1533 K (2300{degree}F) and furnace nitrogen levels between 1 and 40%. CO emissions were typically low (<35 ppm). Detailed in- furnace species measurements revealed the importance of the interior furnace circulation patterns, as influenced by fuel and oxidant injection schemes, on pollutant emissions. The combustion stability traits of several DOC burner arrangements were ascertained through furnace pressure measurements, with increased stability occurring as furnace temperature increased and as the separation distance between fuel and oxidant inputs decreased. Based on current market conditions, oxy-fuel conversion of batch steel reheat furnaces with a DOC burner is justified on the basis of utility costs alone. However, conversion of continuous steel reheat furnaces, which are responsible for most steel production, requires additional economic incentives, such as further fuel savings, increased furnace productivity, or emission credits.

  2. Asymptotic analysis of stationary adiabatic premixed flames in porous inert media

    SciTech Connect

    Pereira, Fernando M.; Oliveira, Amir A.M.; Fachini, Fernando F.

    2008-11-15

    The structure of adiabatic premixed flames within porous inert media is investigated using the asymptotic expansion method. For this, the flame structure is divided into three characteristic length scales. The two innermost length scales, the gas-phase diffusion length scale and the reaction length scale, are the same scales defined in the classical premixed flame structure analysis. The outermost length scale, the solid-phase diffusion length scale, is related to the heat conduction in the porous matrix. The differences among these three characteristic length-scales result in large temperature differences between the phases and justify the application of asymptotic expansions to determine an approximate (analytical) solution. Since the main focus of this work is the examination of the processes in the outer and the first inner regions, the simplest kinetic mechanism of one global step is adopted to represent the fuel and oxygen consumption. Then, the description of the reaction zone is obtained using the large activation energy asymptotic method. The description of the problem of the order of the gas-phase length scale is obtained using the boundary layer expansion. This work evaluates the influence of the equivalence ratio, the ratio of the solid to the gas thermal conductivities, the porosity of the medium and the fuel Lewis number on such flames. A parameter that universalizes the flame properties is then identified and discussed. (author)

  3. Asymptotic analysis of stationary adiabatic premixed flames in porous inert media

    SciTech Connect

    Pereira, Fernando M.; Oliveira, Amir A.M.; Fachini, Fernando F.

    2009-01-15

    The structure of adiabatic premixed flames within porous inert media is investigated using the asymptotic expansion method. For this, the flame structure is divided into three characteristic length scales. The two innermost length scales, the gas-phase diffusion length scale and the reaction length scale, are the same scales defined in the classical premixed flame structure analysis. The outermost length scale, the solid-phase diffusion length scale, is related to the heat conduction in the porous matrix. The differences among these three characteristic length-scales result in large temperature differences between the phases and justify the application of asymptotic expansions to determine an approximate (analytical) solution. Since the main focus of this work is the examination of the processes in the outer and the first inner regions, the simplest kinetic mechanism of one global step is adopted to represent the fuel and oxygen consumption. Then, the description of the reaction zone is obtained using the large activation energy asymptotic method. The description of the problem of the order of the gas-phase length scale is obtained using the boundary layer expansion. This work evaluates the influence of the equivalence ratio, the ratio of the solid to the gas thermal conductivities, the porosity of the medium and the fuel Lewis number on such flames. A parameter that universalizes the flame properties is then identified and discussed. (author)

  4. Probing the inert doublet dark matter model with Cherenkov telescopes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Garcia-Cely, Camilo; Gustafsson, Michael; Ibarra, Alejandro

    2016-02-01

    We present a detailed study of the annihilation signals of the inert dark matter doublet model in its high mass regime. Concretely, we study the prospects to observe gamma-ray signals of the model in current and projected Cherenkov telescopes taking into account the Sommerfeld effect and including the contribution to the spectrum from gamma-ray lines as well as from internal bremsstrahlung. We show that present observations of the galactic center by the H.E.S.S. instrument are able to exclude regions of the parameter space that give the correct dark matter relic abundance. In particular, models with the charged and the neutral components of the inert doublet nearly degenerate in mass have strong gamma-ray signals. Furthermore, for dark matter particle masses above 1 TeV, we find that the non-observation of the continuum of photons generated by the hadronization of the annihilation products typically give stronger constraints on the model parameters than the sharp spectral features associated to annihilation into monochromatic photons and the internal bremsstrahlung process. Lastly, we also analyze the interplay between indirect and direct detection searches for this model, concluding that the prospects for the former are more promising. In particular, we find that the upcoming Cherenkov Telescope Array will be able to probe a significant part of the high mass regime of the model.

  5. The CTA aims at the Inert Doublet Model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Queiroz, Farinaldo S.; Yaguna, Carlos E.

    2016-02-01

    We show that the Cherenkov Telescope Array (CTA) can realistically challenge the Inert Doublet Model, one of the simplest and best known models of dark matter. Specifically, the CTA may exclude its heavy regime up to dark matter masses of 800 GeV and probe a large fraction of the remaining viable parameter space at even higher masses. Two features of the Inert Doublet Model make it particularly suitable for CTA searches. First, the dark matter mass (in the heavy regime) must be larger than 500 GeV. Second, the dark matter annihilation cross section, σ v, is always larger than the thermal one, reaching values as high as 10‑25 cm3s‑1. This higher value of σv is the result of the unavoidable coannihilation effects that determine the relic density via thermal freeze-out in the early Universe. We find that with 100 hours of Galactic Center exposure, CTA's expected limit widely surpasses, even after the inclusion of systematic errors, current and projected bounds from Fermi-LAT and HESS on this model.

  6. Teflon films for chemically-inert microfluidic valves and pumps

    PubMed Central

    Grover, William H.; von Muhlen, Marcio G.; Manalis, Scott R.

    2014-01-01

    We present a simple method for fabricating chemically-inert Teflon microfluidic valves and pumps in glass microfluidic devices. These structures are modeled after monolithic membrane valves and pumps that utilize a featureless polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) membrane sandwiched between two etched glass wafers. The limited chemical compatibility of PDMS has necessitated research into alternative materials for microfluidic devices. Previous work has shown that spin-coated amorphous fluoropolymers and Teflon-fluoropolymer laminates can be fabricated and substituted for PDMS in monolithic membrane valves and pumps for space flight applications. However, the complex process for fabricating these spin-coated Teflon films and laminates may preclude their use in many research and manufacturing contexts. As an alternative, we show that commercially-available fluorinated ethylene-propylene (FEP) Teflon films can be used to fabricate chemically-inert monolithic membrane valves and pumps in glass microfluidic devices. The FEP Teflon valves and pumps presented here are simple to fabricate, function similarly to their PDMS counterparts, maintain their performance over extended use, and are resistant to virtually all chemicals. These structures should facilitate lab-on-a-chip research involving a vast array of chemistries that are incompatible with native PDMS microfluidic devices. PMID:18497911

  7. Non-inert refrigerant study for automotive applications

    SciTech Connect

    Dieckmann, J.T.; Bentley, J.; Varone, A.

    1991-11-01

    Alternatives to CFC-12 for automobile air conditioning were examined. The list of candidate fluids included flammable as well as non-flammable substances. HFC-134a was taken as the baseline alternative given current industry plans to convert automobile air conditioning systems to this fluid over the next several years. Three flammable (non-inert) altemative refrigerants -- BFC-152a, HC-290 (propane) and HC-270 (cyclopropane) were identified. Air conditioning cycle efficiency, ozone depletion potential, and global warming impacts of these three fluids and HFC-134a were compared, with the three non-inert fluids all having higher COP and lower global warming impact. The ozone depletion potential of each of these fluids is zero. The fire safety implications of the flammable alternatives being used in otherwise conventional automobile air conditioning systems were examined in preliminary fashion. The results, which are subject to more extensive verification indicate that the additional passenger compartment fire risk would be very small, while the incidence of engine compartment fires would increase modestly. The engine compartment fire hazard could be minimized by modest design changes to reduce the occurrence of ignition sources and condenser punctures in front end collisions.

  8. The Gaseous Explosive Reaction : The Effect of Inert Gases

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stevens, F W

    1928-01-01

    Attention is called in this report to previous investigations of gaseous explosive reactions carried out under constant volume conditions, where the effect of inert gases on the thermodynamic equilibrium was determined. The advantage of constant pressure methods over those of constant volume as applied to studies of the gaseous explosive reaction is pointed out and the possibility of realizing for this purpose a constant pressure bomb mentioned. The application of constant pressure methods to the study of gaseous explosive reactions, made possible by the use of a constant pressure bomb, led to the discovery of an important kinetic relation connecting the rate of propagation of the zone of explosive reaction within the active gases, with the initial concentrations of those gases: s = K(sub 1)(A)(sup n1)(B)(sup n2)(C)(sup n3)------. By a method analogous to that followed in determining the effect of inert gases on the equilibrium constant K, the present paper records an attempt to determine their kinetic effect upon the expression given above.

  9. IDMS: inert dark matter model with a complex singlet

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bonilla, Cesar; Sokolowska, Dorota; Darvishi, Neda; Diaz-Cruz, J. Lorenzo; Krawczyk, Maria

    2016-06-01

    We study an extension of the inert doublet model (IDM) that includes an extra complex singlet of the scalars fields, which we call the IDMS. In this model there are three Higgs particles, among them a SM-like Higgs particle, and the lightest neutral scalar, from the inert sector, remains a viable dark matter (DM) candidate. We assume a non-zero complex vacuum expectation value for the singlet, so that the visible sector can introduce extra sources of CP violation. We construct the scalar potential of IDMS, assuming an exact Z 2 symmetry, with the new singlet being Z 2-even, as well as a softly broken U(1) symmetry, which allows a reduced number of free parameters in the potential. In this paper we explore the foundations of the model, in particular the masses and interactions of scalar particles for a few benchmark scenarios. Constraints from collider physics, in particular from the Higgs signal observed at the Large Hadron Collider with {M}h≈ 125 {{GeV}}, as well as constraints from the DM experiments, such as relic density measurements and direct detection limits, are included in the analysis. We observe significant differences with respect to the IDM in relic density values from additional annihilation channels, interference and resonance effects due to the extended Higgs sector.

  10. XAFS in dilute magnetic semiconductors.

    PubMed

    Sun, Zhihu; Yan, Wensheng; Yao, Tao; Liu, Qinghua; Xie, Yi; Wei, Shiqiang

    2013-10-14

    X-Ray absorption fine structure (XAFS) spectroscopy has experienced a rapid development in the last four decades and has proved to be a powerful structure characterization technique in the study of local environments in condensed matter. In this article, we first introduce the XAFS basic principles including theory, data analysis and experiment in some detail. Then we attempt to make a review on the applications of XAFS to the study of atomic and electronic structure in dilute magnetic semiconductor (DMS) systems. The power of XAFS in characterizing this interesting material system, such as determining the occupation sites and distribution of the dopants, detecting the presence of metal clusters or secondary phases, as well as identifying the defect types and dopant valence, will be illuminated by selected examples. This review should be of interest both to newcomers in the DMS field and to an interdisciplinary community of researchers working in synthesis, characterization and utilization of DMS materials. PMID:23884341

  11. Residual Resistivity of Dilute Alloys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vora, Aditya M.

    The residual resistivity for 156 dilute alloys of 19 hosts of different groups of the periodic table has been studied on the basis of the single parametric model potential formalism. Ashcroft's empty core model (EMC) potential is explored for the first time with five different local field correction functions, viz, Hartree (H), Taylor (T), Ichimaru-Utsumi (IU), Farid et al. (F), and Sarkar et al. (S) to investigate the effect of the exchange and correlation on the aforesaid properties. The comparison of the presently computed outcomes with the available theoretical and experimental data is highly encouraging. The investigation of residual resistivity is found to be quite sensitive to the selection of local field correction function, showing a significant variation with the change in the function.

  12. Desynchronization in diluted neural networks

    SciTech Connect

    Zillmer, Ruediger; Livi, Roberto; Politi, Antonio; Torcini, Alessandro

    2006-09-15

    The dynamical behavior of a weakly diluted fully inhibitory network of pulse-coupled spiking neurons is investigated. Upon increasing the coupling strength, a transition from regular to stochasticlike regime is observed. In the weak-coupling phase, a periodic dynamics is rapidly approached, with all neurons firing with the same rate and mutually phase locked. The strong-coupling phase is characterized by an irregular pattern, even though the maximum Lyapunov exponent is negative. The paradox is solved by drawing an analogy with the phenomenon of 'stable chaos', i.e., by observing that the stochasticlike behavior is 'limited' to an exponentially long (with the system size) transient. Remarkably, the transient dynamics turns out to be stationary.

  13. Band anticrossing in dilute nitrides

    SciTech Connect

    Shan, W.; Yu, K.M.; Walukiewicz, W.; Wu, J.; Ager III, J.W.; Haller, E.E.

    2003-12-23

    Alloying III-V compounds with small amounts of nitrogen leads to dramatic reduction of the fundamental band-gap energy in the resulting dilute nitride alloys. The effect originates from an anti-crossing interaction between the extended conduction-band states and localized N states. The interaction splits the conduction band into two nonparabolic subbands. The downward shift of the lower conduction subband edge is responsible for the N-induced reduction of the fundamental band-gap energy. The changes in the conduction band structure result in significant increase in electron effective mass and decrease in the electron mobility, and lead to a large enhance of the maximum doping level in GaInNAs doped with group VI donors. In addition, a striking asymmetry in the electrical activation of group IV and group VI donors can be attributed to mutual passivation process through formation of the nearest neighbor group-IV donor nitrogen pairs.

  14. Fiber optic oxygen sensor using fluorescence quenching for aircraft inerting fuel tank applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Panahi, Allen

    2009-05-01

    On July 18, 2008, the FAA mandated that new aircraft are to include inerting technology to significantly reduce the potential for flammable vapor spaces in center wing fuel tanks. All passenger aircraft constructed since 1991 must also be retrofitted with this technology. This ruling is the result of 18 aircraft that have experienced fuel tank flammable vapor ignition incidents since 1960. Included in these are the TWA 800 and Avianca Flight 203 incidents that resulted in 337 total fatalities. Comprised of heavier hydrocarbon components, jet fuel is much less volatile, with Jet A having a flash point of approximately 100°F and JP-4 having a flash point of approximately 0°F. In contrast, straight-run gasoline has a flash point of approximately -40°F. The flash point is the minimum temperature where a liquid fuel can generate enough vapor to form a flammable mixture with air. If the temperature is below the flash point there isn't enough fuel evaporating to form a flammable fuel-air mixture. Since jet fuel and gasoline have similar flammable concentration limits, gasoline must produce much more vapor at a given temperature to have such a low flash point; hence gasoline is much more volatile than jet fuel. In this paper we explore Fluorescence Technology as applied to the design and development of O2 sensors that can be used for this application and discuss the various test and measurement techniques used to estimate the O2 gas concentration. We compare the various intensity based approaches and contrast them with the frequency domain techniques that measure phase to extract fluorescent lifetimes. The various inerting fuel tank requirements are explained and finally a novel compact measurement system using that uses the frequency heterodyning cross correlation technique that can be used for various applications is described in detail while the benefits are explored together with some test data collected.

  15. Flow characterization and dilution effects of N2 and CO2 on premixed CH4/air flames in a swirl-stabilized combustor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Han, Yue; Cai, Guo-Biao; Wang, Hai-Xing; Renou, Bruno; Boukhalfa, Abdelkrim

    2014-03-01

    Numerically-aided experimental studies are conducted on a swirl-stabilized combustor to investigate the dilution effects on flame stability, flame structure, and pollutant emissions of premixed CH4/air flames. Our goal is to provide a systematic assessment on combustion characteristics in diluted regimes for its application to environmentally-friendly approaches such as biogas combustion and exhaust-gas recirculation technology. Two main diluting species, N2 and CO2, are tested at various dilution rates. The results obtained by means of optical diagnostics show that five main flame regimes can be observed for N2-diluted flames by changing excess air and dilution rate. CO2-diluted flames follow the same pattern evolution except that all the domains are shifted to lower excess air. Both N2 and CO2 dilution affect the lean blowout (LBO) limits negatively. This behavior can be counter-balanced by reactant preheating which is able to broaden the flammability domain of the diluted flames. Flame reactivity is degraded by increasing dilution rate. Meanwhile, flames are thickened in the presence of both diluting species. NOx emissions are significantly reduced with dilution and proved to be relevant to flame stability diagrams: slight augmentation in NOx emission profiles is related to transitional flame states where instability occurs. Although dilution results in increase in CO emissions at certain levels, optimal dilution rates can still be proposed to achieve an ideal compromise.

  16. Dilute Surfactant Methods for Carbonate Formations

    SciTech Connect

    Kishore K. Mohanty

    2006-02-01

    There are many fractured carbonate reservoirs in US (and the world) with light oil. Waterflooding is effective in fractured reservoirs, if the formation is water-wet. Many fractured carbonate reservoirs, however, are mixed-wet and recoveries with conventional methods are low (less than 10%). The process of using dilute anionic surfactants in alkaline solutions has been investigated in this work for oil recovery from fractured oil-wet carbonate reservoirs both experimentally and numerically. This process is a surfactant-aided gravity drainage where surfactant diffuses into the matrix, lowers IFT and contact angle, which decrease capillary pressure and increase oil relative permeability enabling gravity to drain the oil up. Anionic surfactants have been identified which at dilute concentration of 0.05 wt% and optimal salinity can lower the interfacial tension and change the wettability of the calcite surface to intermediate/water-wet condition as well or better than the cationic surfactant DTAB with a West Texas crude oil. The force of adhesion in AFM of oil-wet regions changes after anionic surfactant treatment to values similar to those of water-wet regions. The AFM topography images showed that the oil-wetting material was removed from the surface by the anionic surfactant treatment. Adsorption studies indicate that the extent of adsorption for anionic surfactants on calcite minerals decreases with increase in pH and with decrease in salinity. Surfactant adsorption can be minimized in the presence of Na{sub 2}CO{sub 3}. Laboratory-scale surfactant brine imbibition experiments give high oil recovery (20-42% OOIP in 50 days; up to 60% in 200 days) for initially oil-wet cores through wettability alteration and IFT reduction. Small (<10%) initial gas saturation does not affect significantly the rate of oil recovery in the imbibition process, but larger gas saturation decreases the oil recovery rate. As the core permeability decreases, the rate of oil recovery reduces, and this reduction can be scaled by the gravitational dimensionless time. Mechanistic simulation of core-scale surfactant brine imbibition matches the experimentally observed imbibition data. In-situ distributions observed through simulation indicate that surfactant diffusion (which depends on temperature and molecular weight) is the rate limiting step. Most of the oil is recovered through gravitational forces. Oil left behind at the end of this process is at its residual oil saturation. The capillary and Bond numbers are not large enough to affect the residual oil saturation. At the field-scale, 50% of the recoverable oil is produced in about 3 years if the fracture spacing is 1 m and 25% if 10 m, in the example simulated. Decreasing fracture spacing and height, increasing permeability, and increasing the extent of wettability alteration increase the rate of oil recovery from surfactant-aided gravity drainage. This dilute surfactant aided gravity-drainage process is relatively cheap. The chemical cost for a barrel of oil produced is expected to be less than $1.

  17. Inert scalars and vacuum metastability around the electroweak scale

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Świeżewska, Bogumiła

    2015-07-01

    We analyse effective potential around the electroweak (EW) scale in the Standard Model (SM) extended with a heavy scalar doublet. We show that the additional scalars can have a strong impact on vacuum stability. Although the additional heavy scalars may improve the behaviour of running Higgs self-coupling at large field values, we prove that they can destabilise the vacuum due to EW-scale effects. A new EW symmetry conserving minimum of the effective potential can appear rendering the electroweak symmetry breaking (EWSB) minimum meta- or unstable. However, for the case of the inert doublet model (IDM) with a 125 GeV Higgs boson we demonstrate that the parameter space region where the vacuum is meta- or unstable cannot be reconciled with the constraints from perturbative unitarity, electroweak precision tests (EWPT) and dark matter relic abundance measurements.

  18. The confinement effect of inert materials on insensitive high explosives

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Yutao; Yu, Ming

    2013-06-01

    The paper aims at investing the confinement effect of inert materials on insensitive high explosives by means of shock polar curve and phenomenological reaction model. The confinement types are categorized by the shock polar theory, which built on the leading shock wave based on the detonation ZND model. If the sonic velocity of the confinement material is less than the CJ velocity of an explosive, the shock polar theory can be utilized. In general, there are several types of interactions that give a ``match'' of the pressure and streamline-deflection across the interface between IHE and confinement material. A two-dimensional Lagrangian hydrodynamic method with three-term Lee-Tarver rate law is used to numerically simulate all types of confinement interactions. The important character of confinement material include: compressibility, thickness, the representative assembled layers, such as bakelite-iron and iron-beryllium. Supported by NSFC No.11101046.

  19. Unidentified Inert Ingredients in Pesticides: Implications for Human and Environmental Health

    PubMed Central

    Cox, Caroline; Surgan, Michael

    2006-01-01

    Background By statute or regulation in the United States and elsewhere, pesticide ingredients are divided into two categories: active and inert (sometimes referred to as other ingredients, adjuvants, or coformulants). Despite their name, inert ingredients may be biologically or chemically active and are labeled inert only because of their function in the formulated product. Most of the tests required to register a pesticide are performed with the active ingredient alone, not the full pesticide formulation. Inert ingredients are generally not identified on product labels and are often claimed to be confidential business information. Objectives In this commentary, we describe the shortcomings of the current procedures for assessing the hazards of pesticide formulations and demonstrate that inert ingredients can increase the toxicity of and potential exposure to pesticide formulations. Discussion Inert ingredients can increase the ability of pesticide formulations to affect significant toxicologic end points, including developmental neurotoxicity, genotoxicity, and disruption of hormone function. They can also increase exposure by increasing dermal absorption, decreasing the efficacy of protective clothing, and increasing environmental mobility and persistence. Inert ingredients can increase the phytotoxicity of pesticide formulations as well as the toxicity to fish, amphibians, and microorganisms. Conclusions Pesticide registration should require full assessment of formulations. Evaluations of pesticides under the National Environmental Policy Act, the Endangered Species Act, and similar statutes should include impact assessment of formulations. Environmental monitoring for pesticides should include inert ingredients. To enable independent research and risk assessment, inert ingredients should be identified on product labels. PMID:17185266

  20. Cold Inertance Tube for 4 K Stirling Type Pulse Tube Cryocoolers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, ZhuoPei; Gan, ZhiHua; Qiu, LiMin

    The losses in the regenerator are minimized when the amplitude of the mass flow is minimized for a given acoustic power which requires that the mass flow lags the pressure by about 30° at the cold end of regenerator. The phase shift provided by an inertance tube is strongly influenced by the temperature of the inertance tube and the acoustic power at the cold end of the regenerator. For a 4 K Stirling type pulse tube cryocooler, the acoustic power at the cold end of the regenerator decreases significantly with the temperature thereby it's difficult to achieve ideal phase relationship with ambient inertance tube. While cold inertance tube provide a larger phase shift in that the viscosity of the working fluid decreases and the density increases as the temperature decreases. However, use of cold inertance tube increases additional heat load to the regenerator. Therefore it's of great significance to determine when a cold inertance tube should be used. In this paper effect of temperature of inertance tube is calculated for a 4 K Stirling type pulse tube cryocooler with different acoustic powers at the cold end. A comparison of ambient temperature inertance tube and cold inertance tube is made.

  1. DILUTE SURFACTANT METHODS FOR CARBONATE FORMATIONS

    SciTech Connect

    Kishore K. Mohanty

    2005-07-01

    There are many carbonate reservoirs in US (and the world) with light oil and fracture pressure below its minimum miscibility pressure (or reservoir may be naturally fractured). Many carbonate reservoirs are naturally fractured. Waterflooding is effective in fractured reservoirs, if the formation is water-wet. Many fractured carbonate reservoirs, however, are mixed-wet and recoveries with conventional methods are low (less than 10%). Thermal and miscible tertiary recovery techniques are not effective in these reservoirs. Surfactant flooding (or huff-n-puff) is the only hope, yet it was developed for sandstone reservoirs in the past. The goal of this research is to evaluate dilute (hence relatively inexpensive) surfactant methods for carbonate formations and identify conditions under which they can be effective. Laboratory imbibition tests show that imbibition rate is not very sensitive to the surfactant concentration (in the range of 0.05-0.2 wt%) and small amounts of trapped gas saturation. It is however very sensitive to oil permeability and water-oil-ratio. Less than 0.5 M Na2CO3 is needed for in situ soap generation and low adsorption; NaCl can be added to reach the necessary total salinity. The simulation result matches the laboratory imbibition experimental data. Small fracture spacing and high permeability would be needed for high rate of recovery.

  2. Dry dilution refrigerator with He-4 precool loop

    SciTech Connect

    Uhlig, Kurt

    2014-01-29

    He-3/He-4 dilution refrigerators (DR) are very common in sub-Kelvin temperature research. We describe a pulse tube precooled DR where a separate He-4 circuit condenses the He-3 of the dilution loop. Whereas in our previous work the dilution circuit and the He-4 circuit were separate, we show how the two circuits can be combined. Originally, the He-4 loop with a base temperature of ∼ 1 K was installed to make an additional cooling power of up to 100 mW available to cool cold amplifiers and electrical lines. In the new design, the dilution circuit is run through a heat exchanger in the vessel of the He-4 circuit so condensation of the He-3 stream of the DR is done by the He-4 stage. A much reduced condensation time (factor of 2) of the He-3/He-4 gas mixture at the beginning of an experiment is achieved. A compressor is no longer needed with the DR as the condensation pressure remains below atmospheric pressure at all times; thus the risk of losing expensive He-3 gas is small. The performance of the DR has been improved compared to previous work: The base temperature of the mixing chamber at a small He-3 flow rate is now 4.1 mK; at the highest He-3 flow rate of 1.2 mmol/s this temperature increases to 13 mK. Mixing chamber temperatures were measured with a cerium magnesium nitrate (CMN) thermometer which was calibrated with a superconducting fixed point device.

  3. Dry dilution refrigerator with He-4 precool loop

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Uhlig, Kurt

    2014-01-01

    He-3/He-4 dilution refrigerators (DR) are very common in sub-Kelvin temperature research. We describe a pulse tube precooled DR where a separate He-4 circuit condenses the He-3 of the dilution loop. Whereas in our previous work the dilution circuit and the He-4 circuit were separate, we show how the two circuits can be combined. Originally, the He-4 loop with a base temperature of ˜ 1 K was installed to make an additional cooling power of up to 100 mW available to cool cold amplifiers and electrical lines. In the new design, the dilution circuit is run through a heat exchanger in the vessel of the He-4 circuit so condensation of the He-3 stream of the DR is done by the He-4 stage. A much reduced condensation time (factor of 2) of the He-3/He-4 gas mixture at the beginning of an experiment is achieved. A compressor is no longer needed with the DR as the condensation pressure remains below atmospheric pressure at all times; thus the risk of losing expensive He-3 gas is small. The performance of the DR has been improved compared to previous work: The base temperature of the mixing chamber at a small He-3 flow rate is now 4.1 mK; at the highest He-3 flow rate of 1.2 mmol/s this temperature increases to 13 mK. Mixing chamber temperatures were measured with a cerium magnesium nitrate (CMN) thermometer which was calibrated with a superconducting fixed point device.

  4. Electrocoalescence based serial dilution of microfluidic droplets

    PubMed Central

    Bhattacharjee, Biddut; Vanapalli, Siva A.

    2014-01-01

    Dilution of microfluidic droplets where the concentration of a reagent is incrementally varied is a key operation in drop-based biological analysis. Here, we present an electrocoalescence based dilution scheme for droplets based on merging between moving and parked drops. We study the effects of fluidic and electrical parameters on the dilution process. Highly consistent coalescence and fine resolution in dilution factor are achieved with an AC signal as low as 10 V even though the electrodes are separated from the fluidic channel by insulator. We find that the amount of material exchange between the droplets per coalescence event is high for low capillary number. We also observe different types of coalescence depending on the flow and electrical parameters and discuss their influence on the rate of dilution. Overall, we find the key parameter governing the rate of dilution is the duration of coalescence between the moving and parked drop. The proposed design is simple incorporating the channel electrodes in the same layer as that of the fluidic channels. Our approach allows on-demand and controlled dilution of droplets and is simple enough to be useful for assays that require serial dilutions. The approach can also be useful for applications where there is a need to replace or wash fluid from stored drops. PMID:25379096

  5. The ring phenomenon of diluted blood droplets.

    PubMed

    Ramsthaler, Frank; Schlote, J; Wagner, C; Fiscina, J; Kettner, M

    2016-05-01

    Bloodstain pattern analysis is occasionally required in practical forensic casework. Misinterpretations may occur in cases in which diluted bloodstains are formed either within the course of the crime or during cleaning attempts after the original crime. The resulting pale or diluted aspect of the bloodstains may also be produced by passive serum separation. To differentiate between diluted and non-diluted stains and the artifacts of pure serum separation, dripping experiments were performed using droplets of multiple sizes and dilutions dripped onto common indoor and fabric surfaces. In addition, pools of blood of different volumes were applied to solid surfaces with different inclinations to determine the conditions and properties of serum separation. This study yielded morphological characteristics that enable differentiation between stains of diluted and non-diluted blood: a prominent ring phenomenon indicates dilution with water. To elucidate the underlying physical mechanism of particle distribution within a blood stain, photomicrographs were taken during the drying process. The so-called contact line pinning effect was identified as the formation mechanism of this ring phenomenon. Serum separation was highly dependent on the applied blood volume, the ambient temperature, the time elapsed since the initial deposition, and the degree of floor inclination. PMID:26718842

  6. Color-dilution alopecia in dogs.

    PubMed

    Kim, Jae Hoon; Kang, Kyung Il; Sohn, Hyun Joo; Woo, Gye Hyeong; Jean, Young Hwa; Hwang, Eui Kyung

    2005-09-01

    Color-dilution alopecia is a relatively uncommon hereditary skin disease seen in "Blue" and other color-diluted dogs. This syndrome is associated with a color-dilution gene. The initial clinical signs are the gradual onset of a dry, dull and poor hair coat quality. Hair shafts and hair regrowth are poor, and follicular papules may develop and progress to frank comedones. Hair loss and comedo formation are usually most severe on the trunk, especially color-diluted area on the skin. Six cases of color-dilution alopecia are reported in 3 months to 10 years old dogs. The breeds of dogs are blue Doberman Pinscher, Miniature Pinscher, Dachshund, and Schnauzer. Grossly, extensive partial hair loss was seen on the skin. Histopathologically, the epidermis is relatively normal but may be hyperplastic. Hair follicles are characterized by atrophy and distortion. Heavily clumped melanin is present in the epidermis, dermis and hair follicles. PMID:16131833

  7. Differential isospin-fractionation in dilute asymmetric nuclear matter

    SciTech Connect

    Li Baoan; Chen Liewen; Ma Hongru; Xu Jun; Yong Gaochan

    2007-11-15

    The differential isospin-fractionation (IsoF) during the liquid-gas phase transition in dilute asymmetric nuclear matter is studied as a function of nucleon momentum. Within a self-consistent thermal model it is shown that the neutron/proton ratio of the gas phase becomes smaller than that of the liquid phase for energetic nucleons, although the gas phase is overall more neutron-rich. Clear indications of the differential IsoF consistent with the thermal model predictions are demonstrated within a transport model for heavy-ion reactions. Future comparisons with experimental data will allow us to extract critical information about the momentum dependence of the isovector strong interaction.

  8. Clamp and Gas Nozzle for TIG Welding

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gue, G. B.; Goller, H. L.

    1982-01-01

    Tool that combines clamp with gas nozzle is aid to tungsten/inert-gas (TIG) welding in hard-to-reach spots. Tool holds work to be welded while directing a stream of argon gas at weld joint, providing an oxygen-free environment for tungsten-arc welding.

  9. Argon purge gas cooled by chill box

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Spiro, L. W.

    1966-01-01

    Cooling argon purge gas by routing it through a shop-fabricated chill box reduces charring of tungsten inert gas torch head components. The argon gas is in a cooled state as it enters the torch and prevents buildup of char caused by the high concentrations of heat in the weld area during welding operations.

  10. 46 CFR 194.15-17 - Compressed gases other than inert gases.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... shall be capped or otherwise protected in accordance with 49 CFR 173.301(g). (b) Cylinders temporarily... 46 Shipping 7 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Compressed gases other than inert gases. 194.15-17... Scientific Laboratory § 194.15-17 Compressed gases other than inert gases. (a) When, in consideration for...

  11. 46 CFR 194.15-17 - Compressed gases other than inert gases.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... shall be capped or otherwise protected in accordance with 49 CFR 173.301(g). (b) Cylinders temporarily... 46 Shipping 7 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Compressed gases other than inert gases. 194.15-17... Scientific Laboratory § 194.15-17 Compressed gases other than inert gases. (a) When, in consideration for...

  12. 46 CFR 194.15-17 - Compressed gases other than inert gases.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... shall be capped or otherwise protected in accordance with 49 CFR 173.301(g). (b) Cylinders temporarily... 46 Shipping 7 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Compressed gases other than inert gases. 194.15-17... Scientific Laboratory § 194.15-17 Compressed gases other than inert gases. (a) When, in consideration for...

  13. 75 FR 7560 - Public Availability of Identities of Inert Ingredients in Pesticides; Extension of Comment Period

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-02-22

    ... document extends the public comment period established in the Federal Register of December 23, 2009 (74 FR... AGENCY 40 CFR Part 156 Public Availability of Identities of Inert Ingredients in Pesticides; Extension of... identities of the inert ingredients in pesticide products. Two requests for a 90-day extension of the...

  14. Young Infants' Reasoning about Physical Events Involving Inert and Self-Propelled Objects

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Luo, Yuyan; Kaufman, Lisa; Baillargeon, Renee

    2009-01-01

    The present research examined whether 5- to 6.5-month-old infants would hold different expectations about various physical events involving a box after receiving evidence that it was either inert or self-propelled. Infants were surprised if the inert but not the self-propelled box: reversed direction spontaneously (Experiment 1); remained…

  15. The economics of inert anodes and wettable cathodes for aluminum reduction cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Keniry, Jeff

    2001-05-01

    Estimating the impact of inert-anode and wettable-cathode technologies on smelter costs must be speculative because no such technologies have yet been commercialized. Even so, some broad conclusions can be drawn about the economic merit of inert anodes in retrofit and greenfield smelter scenarios. Study suggests that retrofitting inert anodes to existing prebake cells generates insufficient economic benefit to justify this objective. Drained cathode cells offer potential for energy savings coupled with increased production, provided that the cell life is greater than three years. Unlocking the potential value of both inert anode and wettable cathode materials will require their use in vertical electrode configurations, where the impact on operating costs and, particularly, capital costs, is expected to be significant. To be economically and technically viable, vertical electrode cells will require wear rates of less than approximately 5 mm per year on the inert electrode surfaces, much less than has so far been reported.

  16. One-loop contributions to neutral minima in the inert doublet model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ferreira, P. M.; SwieŻewska, Bogumila

    2016-04-01

    The vacuum structure of the inert doublet model is analysed at the one-loop level using the effective potential formalism, to verify the validity of tree-level predictions for the properties of the global minimum. An inert minimum (with massive fermions) and an inert-like minimum (with massless fermions) can coexist at tree level. But the one-loop analysis reveals that the allowed parameter space for the coexistence of more than one minimum is larger than the tree-level expected one. It is also shown that for some choices of parameters, the global minimum found at the one-loop level may be inert (or inert-like), contrary to what the tree-level analysis indicates.

  17. Pulse Tube Coolers with an Inertance Tube: Theory, Modeling and Practice

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Roach, Pat R.; Kashani, Ali; McCreight, Craig R. (Technical Monitor)

    1997-01-01

    We have studied the advantages to be gained by replacing the conventional orifice of a pulse tube cooler by an inertance tube - a long thin tube that introduces the possibility for additional phase shift between pressure and mass flow in the pulse tube section. The case for the use of an inertance tube is most clearly made with an electrical analogy where the 'inductance' added by the inertance tube allows for optimal power transfer at the cold heat exchanger. Detailed modeling of a pulse tube system with an inertance tube confirms these advantages. Comparison between a laboratory cooler with an orifice and with an inertance tube will be presented and reasons wily it is difficult to realize all the expected gain will be given.

  18. Fiscal year 1989 annual report for the Sensors Development Program: Inert Electrodes Program

    SciTech Connect

    Windisch, C.F. Jr.; Koski, O.H.; Stice, N.D.; Morgan, L.G. ); Nikias, C.L. )

    1990-04-01

    The Sensors Development Program is conducted at the Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL) for the US Department of Energy (DOE), Office of Industrial Programs (OIP). The work is being performed in conjunction with the Inert Electrodes Program at PNL. The objectives of the Sensors Development Program are to (1) investigate and develop methods of process monitoring/control for operating electrolytic cells and (2) determine safe operating conditions for the inert anodes. The majority of work in FY 1989 involved (1) evaluating Digital Signal Analysis (DSA) methods to monitor inert anode operation and to determine alumina concentration in both PNL bench-scale laboratory cells and the Prototype Inert Anode Test and (2) developing the reference anode against which inert anode voltage signals could be measured by the DSA-based or other methods. 3 refs., 14 figs., 2 tabs.

  19. Development and Comparison of Two Types of Cryogen-Free Dilution Refrigerator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hata, T.; Matsumoto, T.; Obara, K.; Yano, H.; Ishikawa, O.; Handa, A.; Togitani, S.; Nishitani, T.

    2014-04-01

    Dilution refrigerators are an important tool used in solid state and quantum fluid physics for cooling to temperatures below 0.3 K. Conventional dilution refrigerators consume a lot of liquid helium, which has to be recharged in a helium bath every few days. Cryogen-free dilution refrigerators, however, do not use liquid helium and then automatic operation by electricity can be possible from room temperature to the mK region. In near future, therefore, most conventional dilution refrigerators will be replaced by cryogen-free refrigerators because they are easy to operate, do not require maintenance and do not consume helium. We have developed two types of cryogen-free dilution refrigerator. One is directly cooled by a pulse tube refrigerator in the same cryostat using copper thin wires as a thermal link, and the other is cooled by a separate Gifford McMahon refrigerator using circulating helium gas through a flexible syphon tube. The latter has been developed as a vibration-free cryogen-free dilution refrigerator. These two types of cryogen-free dilution refrigerator are compared considering several key points: base temperature, precooling time, minimum temperature and vibration amplitude.

  20. Investigation of materials for inert electrodes in aluminum electrodeposition cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haggerty, J. S.; Sadoway, D. R.

    1987-09-01

    Work was divided into major efforts. The first was the growth and characterization of specimens; the second was Hall cell performance testing. Cathode and anode materials were the subject of investigation. Preparation of specimens included growth of single crystals and synthesis of ultra high purity powders. Special attention was paid to ferrites as they were considered to be the most promising anode materials. Ferrite anode corrosion rates were studied and the electrical conductivities of a set of copper-manganese ferrites were measured. Float Zone, Pendant Drop Cryolite Experiments were undertaken because unsatisfactory choices of candidate materials were being made on the basis of a flawed set of selection criteria applied to an incomplete and sometimes inaccurate data base. This experiment was then constructed to determine whether the apparatus used for float zone crystal growth could be adapted to make a variety of important based melts and their interactions with candidate inert anode materials. Compositions), driven by our perception that the basis for prior selection of candidate materials was inadequate. Results are presented.