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Sample records for infantile malignant osteopetrosis

  1. Infantile or Malignant Osteopetrosis: Case Report of Two Siblings

    PubMed Central

    Rao P., Tarakeswara; V., Sunita; T.P., Gandhi; Harsha, Sri

    2013-01-01

    Infantile or Malignant osteopetrosis is a rare congenital disorder of bone resorption. It is caused by failure of osteoclasts to reabsorb immature bone. Severe infantile or malignant osteopetrosis present at birth or develops within the first few months of life. We are reporting here a case of two siblings with malignant osteopetrosis. Prominent clinical features included marked pallor, noisy respiration, progressive blindness and developmental delay. PMID:24086906

  2. Infantile malignant osteopetrosis: a rare cause of neonatal hypocalcemia.

    PubMed

    Engiz, Ozlem; Kara, Semra; Bagrul, Denizhan; Lahr, Georgia; Alioglu, Bulent; Arikan, Inci; Bilge, Yıldız Dallar

    2012-01-01

    Infantile malignant osteopetrosis (IMO; OMIM 259700) is a rare inherited bone disease characterized by reduced or dysregulated activity of osteoclasts, resulting in generalized osteosclerosis. The disease usually presents within the first few months of life with anemia, hepatosplenomegaly, frontal bossing, nystagmus, blindness, deafness, and bone fractures. Children with IMO are at risk of developing hypocalcemia, with attendant tetanic seizures. We report the case of a baby boy who presented with neonatal hypocalcemia. Skeletal radiographs demonstrated sclerotic bones and a dense base of the skull with typical "space alien" face confirming the diagnosis of IMO. Pancytopenia developed at 2 months of age. Visual evoked potential showed severe bilateral optic nerve damage. Genetic mutation study revealed a new mutation in exon 13 of the TCIRG1 gene. Neonatal hypocalcemia can occur as result of IMO, which is easily missed out by clinicians. This causes delay in establishing the diagnosis and starting necessary treatment. Therefore, osteopetrosis should be kept in mind as a rare cause of neonatal hypocalcemia. PMID:23329773

  3. Osteopetrosis.

    PubMed

    Kocher, Mininder S; Kasser, James R

    2003-05-01

    Osteopetrosis is a rare skeletal condition characterized by skeletal sclerosis caused by aberrant osteoclast-mediated bone resorption. Three clinically distinct forms of osteopetrosis are recognized--the infantile malignant autosomal recessive form, the intermediate autosomal recessive form, and the adult benign autosomal dominant form. The disease represents a spectrum of clinical variants because of the heterogeneity of genetic defects resulting in osteoclast dysfunction. The pathogenic defects may be intrinsic to either the osteoclast-monocyte lineage or the mesenchymal cells that constitute the microenvironment that supports osteoclast ontogeny and activation. Implicated factors include specific proto-oncogenes, growth factors, and immune regulators. A subset of patients with the intermediate autosomal recessive form has been characterized with carbonic anhydrase II isoenzyme deficiency. Management of patients with osteopetrosis requires a comprehensive approach to characteristic clinical problems including hematologic and metabolic abnormalities, fractures, deformity, back pain, bone pain, osteomyelitis, and neurologic sequelae. Medical treatment of osteopetrosis is based on efforts to stimulate host osteoclasts or provide an alternative source of osteoclasts. Stimulation of host osteoclasts has been attempted with calcium restriction, calcitrol, steroids, parathyroid hormone, and interferon. Bone marrow transplant has been used with cure for infantile malignant osteopetrosis. As osteopetrosis likely represents a spectrum of underlying etiologies resulting in osteoclast dysfunction, effective therapies most likely need to be individualized. PMID:12772872

  4. Neurological complications of infantile osteopetrosis.

    PubMed

    Lehman, R A; Reeves, J D; Wilson, W B; Wesenberg, R L

    1977-11-01

    Seven cases of infantile osteopetrosis are presented. Five of these were available for detailed clinical examination and 2 for retrospective review, including autopsy slides. Neurological deficits in these patients are reviewed. Involvement of the central nervous system parenchyma was suggested by observations of delayed development, ocular abnormalities, and reflex changes as well as radiographic and autopsy findings. Cerebral atrophy was present in several of our patients as well as some reported in the literature and may account for the ventricular enlargement found in many of these patients. Though hydrocephalus may be present, it is unclear that this is frequent or that it can occur without antecedent intracranial hemorrhage. The large head size is not accounted for by calvarial thickening or by hydrocephalus. Despite our patients' small stature, pituitary function appeared to be normal. Surgical decompression may stabilize cranial nerve function, particularly when the optic nerves are involved. PMID:617576

  5. A novel mutation and a known mutation in the CLCN7 gene associated with relatively stable infantile malignant osteopetrosis in a Chinese patient.

    PubMed

    Zeng, Binghui; Li, Ru; Hu, Yuelin; Hu, Bin; Zhao, Qiang; Liu, Huijiao; Yuan, Ping; Wang, Yiming

    2016-01-15

    Osteopetrosis is a group of heterogeneous disorders caused by the dysfunction of osteoclasts. The CLCN7 and TCIRG1 genes are the major obligate genes responsible for infantile malignant osteopetrosis (IMO). IMO patients usually die in infancy or before three years of age. In this study, we report a patient who was diagnosed with IMO at seven months of age. The patient presented with classical radiological features of IMO. She also exhibited erythropenia, thrombocytopenia, hepatosplenomegaly and neurodegeneration. The parents discontinued any medical treatment for the patient. Surprisingly, the patient's condition did not deteriorate when she was admitted a second time at the age of four years and nine months, despite not receiving any medical support during the untreated period. We sequenced the CLCN7 and TCIRG1 genes of the patient and her parents and identified a novel c.285+1G>A (IVS3+1G>A) mutation and the known c.896C>T (p.Ala299Val) mutation. The novel c.285+1G>A mutation occurred on the splice donor of the third intron of CLCN7. This mutation was predicted to interfere with normal splicing between exons 3 and 4, thereby truncating 711 amino acids from the C terminus and resulting in the loss of all of the functional domains of the encoded protein. The c.896C>T (p.Ala299Val) mutation was a previously known pathogenic mutation. We did not find any pathogenic mutations in the TCIRG1 gene. CLCN7-related osteopetrosis is known to have a high phenotype heterogeneity. Our study demonstrates a wide heterogeneity in the progression of the phenotypes and expanded the mutational spectrum for the CLCN7 gene. PMID:26477479

  6. Hematopoietic stem cell transplantation for infantile osteopetrosis.

    PubMed

    Orchard, Paul J; Fasth, Anders L; Le Rademacher, Jennifer; He, Wensheng; Boelens, Jaap Jan; Horwitz, Edwin M; Al-Seraihy, Amal; Ayas, Mouhab; Bonfim, Carmem M; Boulad, Farid; Lund, Troy; Buchbinder, David K; Kapoor, Neena; O'Brien, Tracey A; Perez, Miguel A Diaz; Veys, Paul A; Eapen, Mary

    2015-07-01

    We report the international experience in outcomes after related and unrelated hematopoietic transplantation for infantile osteopetrosis in 193 patients. Thirty-four percent of transplants used grafts from HLA-matched siblings, 13% from HLA-mismatched relatives, 12% from HLA-matched, and 41% from HLA-mismatched unrelated donors. The median age at transplantation was 12 months. Busulfan and cyclophosphamide was the most common conditioning regimen. Long-term survival was higher after HLA-matched sibling compared to alternative donor transplantation. There were no differences in survival after HLA-mismatched related, HLA-matched unrelated, or mismatched unrelated donor transplantation. The 5- and 10-year probabilities of survival were 62% and 62% after HLA-matched sibling and 42% and 39% after alternative donor transplantation (P = .01 and P = .002, respectively). Graft failure was the most common cause of death, accounting for 50% of deaths after HLA-matched sibling and 43% of deaths after alternative donor transplantation. The day-28 incidence of neutrophil recovery was 66% after HLA-matched sibling and 61% after alternative donor transplantation (P = .49). The median age of surviving patients is 7 years. Of evaluable surviving patients, 70% are visually impaired; 10% have impaired hearing and gross motor delay. Nevertheless, 65% reported performance scores of 90 or 100, and in 17%, a score of 80 at last contact. Most survivors >5 years are attending mainstream or specialized schools. Rates of veno-occlusive disease and interstitial pneumonitis were high at 20%. Though allogeneic transplantation results in long-term survival with acceptable social function, strategies to lower graft failure and hepatic and pulmonary toxicity are urgently needed. PMID:26012570

  7. Hematopoietic stem cell transplantation for infantile osteopetrosis

    PubMed Central

    Fasth, Anders L.; Le Rademacher, Jennifer; He, Wensheng; Boelens, Jaap Jan; Horwitz, Edwin M.; Al-Seraihy, Amal; Ayas, Mouhab; Bonfim, Carmem M.; Boulad, Farid; Lund, Troy; Buchbinder, David K.; Kapoor, Neena; O’Brien, Tracey A.; Perez, Miguel A. Diaz; Veys, Paul A.; Eapen, Mary

    2015-01-01

    We report the international experience in outcomes after related and unrelated hematopoietic transplantation for infantile osteopetrosis in 193 patients. Thirty-four percent of transplants used grafts from HLA-matched siblings, 13% from HLA-mismatched relatives, 12% from HLA-matched, and 41% from HLA-mismatched unrelated donors. The median age at transplantation was 12 months. Busulfan and cyclophosphamide was the most common conditioning regimen. Long-term survival was higher after HLA-matched sibling compared to alternative donor transplantation. There were no differences in survival after HLA-mismatched related, HLA-matched unrelated, or mismatched unrelated donor transplantation. The 5- and 10-year probabilities of survival were 62% and 62% after HLA-matched sibling and 42% and 39% after alternative donor transplantation (P = .01 and P = .002, respectively). Graft failure was the most common cause of death, accounting for 50% of deaths after HLA-matched sibling and 43% of deaths after alternative donor transplantation. The day-28 incidence of neutrophil recovery was 66% after HLA-matched sibling and 61% after alternative donor transplantation (P = .49). The median age of surviving patients is 7 years. Of evaluable surviving patients, 70% are visually impaired; 10% have impaired hearing and gross motor delay. Nevertheless, 65% reported performance scores of 90 or 100, and in 17%, a score of 80 at last contact. Most survivors >5 years are attending mainstream or specialized schools. Rates of veno-occlusive disease and interstitial pneumonitis were high at 20%. Though allogeneic transplantation results in long-term survival with acceptable social function, strategies to lower graft failure and hepatic and pulmonary toxicity are urgently needed. PMID:26012570

  8. The association of infantile osteopetrosis and neuronal storage disease in two brothers.

    PubMed

    Jagadha, V; Halliday, W C; Becker, L E; Hinton, D

    1988-01-01

    Neurological manifestations in infantile osteopetrosis are common and varied, and not always attributable to the skeletal pathology. An unusual association of osteopetrosis with neuronal storage of ceroid lipofuscin is reported in two infant brothers born of nonconsanguinous parents. The first child became symptomatic at age 5 days with weight loss and vomiting. He had poor head control, hypertonia, and persistent fisting, and died at age 2 months. In the second infant, the diagnosis of osteopetrosis was confirmed at age 2 days. His neurological symptoms included blindness, deafness, and recurrent seizures. The infant died at 7 months of age. In both cases, autopsy confirmed the diffuse bony sclerosis with hepatosplenomegaly and extramedullary hematopoiesis. Neuropathological examination revealed cerebral atrophy with ventricular dilation, neuronal loss, and astrogliosis. The most striking finding was widespread accumulation of neuronal ceroid lipofuscin associated with formation of axonal spheroids. The optic nerves were compressed at the optic foramina and showed loss of myelinated axons and gliosis. Rapid Golgi impregnations of neurons from the calcarine cortex in the second infant were analyzed quantitatively, showing a reduction in the total dendritic length and number of branches. The primary defect in osteopetrosis is thought to be a lysosomal dysfunction involving the monocyte cell line from which osteoclasts are derived. Thus, the association in two brothers of osteopetrosis with accumulation of neuronal ceroid lipofuscin may not be fortuitous. The neuronal storage disorder in this instance probably reflects lysosomal dysfunction. PMID:3348081

  9. [Juvenile malignant osteopetrosis. Clinico-radiological study of 7 cases].

    PubMed

    Vilalta, R; Ortega, J J; Herrera, M; Torán, N; Brossa, F

    1983-07-01

    Clinical and radiological studies of seven patients with autosomic recessive malignant osteopetrosis are presented. Diagnosis was established before the age of 3 months in six cases and at 7 months in one. In all cases the presenting signs were pallor and hepatosplenomegaly with associated neurological involvement in five. All patients had normocytic normochromic anemia, leucopenia and thrombocytopenia with features of extramedullary hematopoiesis. Radiological studies revealed increase in the density of bones with "mask" appearance of facial bones and diminished size of optic foramina. Long bones showed absence of normal trabeculae and anomalies in modeling with methaphiseal bands and "bone within bone" images. There was hypocalcemia and hypophosphatemia with slight increases in alkaline phosphatase; parathormone was normal. Clinical course was characterized by progressive pancytopenia, recurrent infections and neurological deterioration with convulsions, nistagmus and optic atrophy. Five out of the seven patients died after a median of 3 months, due to infections or haemorrhage. The patient diagnosed at 7 months of age presented bilateral optic atrophy and moderate anemia; no other complications appeared after 2 year follow-up. Histological findings included substitution of bone marrow by chondro-osseous tissue; focal obsteoblastic and osteoclastic activity in calcified cartilage, and myeloid metaplasia in liver, spleen, lymph nodes and kidneys. The lesions are in agreement with the concept of a defect in bone formation-resorbtion balance; dysfunction of both osteoclasts and osteocytes is implicated in the pathogenesis. Unlike experimental disease, osteopetrosis in man is probably an heterogeneous disease and appropriate therapy should be individualized. Nevertheless, at present, the only favorable results have been obtained with bone-marrow transplantation. PMID:6638710

  10. Osteopetrosis Overview

    MedlinePlus

    ... on Osteopetrosis, contact the: NIH Osteoporosis and Related Bone Diseases ~ National Resource Center Website: http://www.bones.nih. ... Pub. No. 15-7828 NIH Osteoporosis and Related Bone Diseases ~ National Resource Center 2 AMS Circle Bethesda, MD ...

  11. Osteopetrosis and Chiari type I malformation: a rare association

    PubMed Central

    Ekici, Mehmet Ali; Cıkla, Ulaş; Bauer, Andrew; Başkaya, Mustafa K.

    2015-01-01

    Osteopetrosis (OP) is hereditary X-linked, autosomal recessive (ARO), or autosomal dominant (ADO) skeletal disease. ARO has two subtypes, which are infantile malignant and intermediate type. ARO and X-linked OP have poor clinical outcome. ADO is called adult benign type because of the normal life expectancy, which has type I and type II. Here, the authors present an ADO patient with Chiari type I. Concomitant ADO with Chiari type I malformation is an extremely rare condition. Literature research yielded only one case report to date. PMID:26503583

  12. Genetics Home Reference: osteopetrosis

    MedlinePlus

    ... Open All Close All Description Osteopetrosis is a bone disease that makes bones abnormally dense and prone to ... Other Names for This Condition congenital osteopetrosis marble bone disease osteopetroses Related Information How are genetic conditions and ...

  13. Osteopetrosis-A rare entity with osteomyelitis

    PubMed Central

    Bedi, R. S.; Goel, Poonam; Pasricha, Navbir; Sachin; Goel, Ashish

    2011-01-01

    Osteopetrosis is a rare genetic disorder that causes generalized sclerosis of the bone due to defect in bone resorption and remodeling. Albergs-Schonberg disease or autosomal dominant osteopetrosis type II is a rare form of osteopetrosis. Osteomyelitis is a well-documented complication of osteopetrosis. Any associated dental abnormality may be attributed to the pathological changes in bone remodeling. This case report discusses a case of osteopetrosis with osteomyelitis as a complication in a 8-year-old boy. PMID:23482851

  14. 99Tcm-MDP Imaging of Osteopetrosis

    PubMed Central

    Zheng, Li-Chun; OuYang, Xiang-Liu; Liu, Gui-Chao; Zhang, Wen-Jun; Zhang, Xiao-Ming

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Osteopetrosis, also known as marble bone disease, is a clinically rare genetic disease, which represents a heterogeneous group of rare, inherited bone dysplasias that share the hallmark of abnormally increased bone density caused by osteoclast dysfunction. Hereby, the authors describe a case of osteopetrosis that showed increased diffuse radioactive uptake on whole body bone 99Tcm-methylene diphosphonate imaging in a 56-year-old man, which increased universal radioactive uptake on craniofacial bone imaging, and enlargement of the limb long bone near the joints with evenly symmetrical enriched distribution of radioactivity. Osteopetrosis was made which based on these features and characteristics shown on 99Tcm-MDP imaging. Skeletal scintigraphy with 99Tcm-methylene diphosphonate imaging is helpful to the diagnosis of osteopetrosis. There is a characteristic of osteopetrosis different from other bone metabolic diseases. PMID:26039130

  15. Osteopetrosis in pregnancy: a rare case report

    PubMed Central

    Peer, Michaela; O'Donoghue, Keelin

    2011-01-01

    Osteopetrosis is a genetic syndrome characterized by the failure of osteoclasts to resorb bone. This leads to skeletal fragility despite increased bone mass, with fractures, dental abscesses, osteoarthritis and scoliosis being the most common complications. There are few reports of patients with type II osteopetrosis undergoing pregnancy and delivery. This case outlines the management of pregnancy and a successful delivery in a woman with this rare condition.

  16. Autosomal recessive osteopetrosis in Arab children.

    PubMed

    Abdel-Al, Y K; Shabani, I S; Lubani, M M; al-Ghawabi, M A; Ibrahim, M D; al-Mohtaseb, S; Duodin, K I

    1994-01-01

    Nineteen Arab children including six boys and 13 girls in ten sibships were diagnosed as having osteopetrosis over a 5-year period in various hospitals in Kuwait. Eighteen patients had an isolated autosomal recessive form and one had autosomal recessive osteopetrosis associated with renal tubular acidosis. The mean age of diagnosis was 24 months. Parental consanguinity was high amongst them (68%). Anaemia, hepatosplenomegaly, failure to thrive, recurrent infections and neurological manifestations were common. Associated congenital abnormalities were found in 26%. Deafness, hydrocephalus and dental caries were relatively less common. A high mortality (37%) owing to infection was noted. The medical management and recommendations for patient care are discussed briefly. PMID:7516136

  17. 99Tcm-MDP Imaging of Osteopetrosis: Case Report.

    PubMed

    Zheng, Li-Chun; OuYang, Xiang-Liu; Liu, Gui-Chao; Zhang, Wen-Jun; Zhang, Xiao-Ming

    2015-06-01

    Osteopetrosis, also known as marble bone disease, is a clinically rare genetic disease, which represents a heterogeneous group of rare, inherited bone dysplasias that share the hallmark of abnormally increased bone density caused by osteoclast dysfunction. Hereby, the authors describe a case of osteopetrosis that showed increased diffuse radioactive uptake on whole body bone (99)Tc(m)-methylene diphosphonate imaging in a 56-year-old man, which increased universal radioactive uptake on craniofacial bone imaging, and enlargement of the limb long bone near the joints with evenly symmetrical enriched distribution of radioactivity. Osteopetrosis was made which based on these features and characteristics shown on (99)Tc(m)-MDP imaging.Skeletal scintigraphy with Tc-methylene diphosphonate imaging is helpful to the diagnosis of osteopetrosis. There is a characteristic of osteopetrosis different from other bone metabolic diseases. PMID:26039130

  18. Scintigraphy in a patient with complicated osteopetrosis

    SciTech Connect

    Adams, B.K.

    1989-05-01

    Skeletal, reticuloendothelial and renal images were obtained on a patient with osteopetrosis using Tc-99m MDP, Tc-99m HSA millimicrospheres and Tc-99m DTPA respectively. The bone scan showed increased uptake in multiple fracture sites, in the frontal bone, and in the splayed metaphyses of long bones while the remainder of the skeleton appeared normal. Reticuloendothelial images demonstrated an absence of bone marrow activity, hepatosplenomegaly and a site of extramedullary hematopoiesis. A renogram demonstrated a left kidney displaced and distorted by the massive splenomegaly.

  19. Buried in the Middle but Guilty: Intronic Mutations in the TCIRG1 Gene Cause Human Autosomal Recessive Osteopetrosis.

    PubMed

    Palagano, Eleonora; Blair, Harry C; Pangrazio, Alessandra; Tourkova, Irina; Strina, Dario; Angius, Andrea; Cuccuru, Gianmauro; Oppo, Manuela; Uva, Paolo; Van Hul, Wim; Boudin, Eveline; Superti-Furga, Andrea; Faletra, Flavio; Nocerino, Agostino; Ferrari, Matteo C; Grappiolo, Guido; Monari, Marta; Montanelli, Alessandro; Vezzoni, Paolo; Villa, Anna; Sobacchi, Cristina

    2015-10-01

    Autosomal recessive osteopetrosis (ARO) is a rare genetic bone disease with genotypic and phenotypic heterogeneity, sometimes translating into delayed diagnosis and treatment. In particular, cases of intermediate severity often constitute a diagnostic challenge and represent good candidates for exome sequencing. Here, we describe the tortuous path to identification of the molecular defect in two siblings, in which osteopetrosis diagnosed in early childhood followed a milder course, allowing them to reach the adult age in relatively good conditions with no specific therapy. No clearly pathogenic mutation was identified either with standard amplification and resequencing protocols or with exome sequencing analysis. While evaluating the possible impact of a 3'UTR variant on the TCIRG1 expression, we found a novel single nucleotide change buried in the middle of intron 15 of the TCIRG1 gene, about 150 nucleotides away from the closest canonical splice site. By sequencing a number of independent cDNA clones covering exons 14 to 17, we demonstrated that this mutation reduced splicing efficiency but did not completely abrogate the production of the normal transcript. Prompted by this finding, we sequenced the same genomic region in 33 patients from our unresolved ARO cohort and found three additional novel single nucleotide changes in a similar location and with a predicted disruptive effect on splicing, further confirmed in one of them at the transcript level. Overall, we identified an intronic region in TCIRG1 that seems to be particularly prone to splicing mutations, allowing the production of a small amount of protein sufficient to reduce the severity of the phenotype usually associated with TCIRG1 defects. On this basis, we would recommend including TCIRG1 not only in the molecular work-up of severe infantile osteopetrosis but also in intermediate cases and carefully evaluating the possible effects of intronic changes. PMID:25829125

  20. Oral Rehabilitation of an Osteopetrosis Patient with Osteomyelitis

    PubMed Central

    Celakil, Tamer; Dogan, Merve; Rohlig, Bilge Gokcen; Evlioglu, Gulumser; Keskin, Haluk

    2016-01-01

    Osteopetrosis is a congenital disorder characterized by increasing osteoclastic function resulting in osteomyelitis in the jaws. Orofacial findings in osteopetrosis patients are unerupted, malformed, or delayed teeth and many dental caries due to vulnerable enamel and dentin and osteomyelitis. Many reports have described that maxilla is an uncommon site of occurrence for osteomyelitis due to cortical bone morphology and collateral circulation. This report aims to discuss clinical features and prosthodontic management of a patient with clinical features of adult form of osteopetrosis and osteomyelitis in both jaws. The patient has reported better masticatory and speech efficiency with removable dentures in maxillary and mandibular jaw and also self-esteem improvement and family interaction. PMID:27148461

  1. Osteopetrosis of the mandible masquerading as tubercular osteomyelitis

    PubMed Central

    Sharma, Subramanya S; Saravanan, C; Sathyabama, V; Satish, C

    2013-01-01

    Osteopetrosis is a rare congenital (autosomal type) disorder of the skeletal system. Several variants have been described in the literature with grossly variant prognosis and clinical behaviour. Several reports of intractable osteomyelitis of the jaw bones secondary to osteopetrosis, particularly the mandible, have been published widely. However, there is no published report of the complete mandible sequestrating de novo, in the literature. An overview of this spectrum of sclerotic bone disease, its presentation in the oro-facial region, the diagnostic challenge it poses and the management dilemma it offers to the maxillofacial surgeon is discussed and a protocol for managing this disease effectively is presented. A clinical illustration of the complexities of management of osteopetrosis-induced osteomyelitis of jaw bones is demonstrated with a very rare case in which the entire mandible had sequestrated. PMID:23314447

  2. Characterization of anemia induced by avian osteopetrosis virus.

    PubMed Central

    Paterson, R W; Smith, R E

    1978-01-01

    Chickens infected intravenously at 8 days after hatching with an avian osteopetrosis virus developed a severe, progressive anemia in the absence of osteopetrosis. The anemia was characterized as a pancytopenia, in which erythrocytes, granulocytes, and thrombocytes decreased concomitantly. Serum bilirubin levels were normal, whereas erythrocytes from infected chickens demonstrated a slightly elevated osmotic fragility. A negative Coombs test indicated that there was no evidence for erythrocyte-bound antibody. Erythrocytes from infected animals had slightly decreased 51Cr-labeled erythrocyte survival time when compared with normal. Examination of marrow histological preparations, together with ferrokinetic studies with 59Fe, indicated that marrow failure occurred during the acute phase of the anemia. Circulating virus was present during the development and acute phases of the anemia, but disappeared during the recovery phase of the disease. Neutralizing antibody appeared after the disappearance of circulating virus. It is concluded that virus infection induced both marrow failure (aplastic crisis) and decreased erythrocyte survival. Images PMID:215554

  3. Clinical and Radiological Findings of Autosomal Dominant Osteopetrosis Type II: A Case Report

    PubMed Central

    Kant, Priyanka; Sharda, Neelkamal; Bhowate, Rahul R.

    2013-01-01

    Osteopetrosis is a rare inherited genetic disease characterized by sclerosis of the skeleton caused by the absence or malfunction of osteoclasts. Three distinct forms of the disease have been recognized, autosomal dominant osteopetrosis being the most common. Autosomal dominant osteopetrosis exhibits a heterogeneous trait with milder symptoms, often at later childhood or adulthood. The aim of this case report is to present the clinical and radiographic features of a 35-year-old female patient with autosomal dominant osteopetrosis type II who exhibited features of chronic generalised periodontitis, and the radiographs revealed generalised osteosclerosis and hallmark radiographic features of ADO type II, that is, “bone-within-bone appearance” and “Erlenmeyer-flask deformity.” PMID:24260721

  4. Ultrastructural Analyses of Alveolar Bone in a Patient With Osteomyelitis Secondary to Osteopetrosis: A Review of the Literature.

    PubMed

    Mikami, Toshinari; Miake, Yasuo; Bologna-Molina, Ronell; Takeda, Yasunori

    2016-08-01

    Osteopetrosis is a generic term for generalized sclerotic conditions caused by rare genetic disorders. Decreased osteoclastic activities disturb bone remodeling, resulting in greater mineral density and greater compressive strength; therefore, bone fracture is a major physical symptom of osteopetrosis. Osteomyelitis of the maxilla or mandible is a common and well-documented complication of osteopetrosis. Local infection, such as odontogenic infection, is more likely to lead to osteomyelitis, and treatment strategies can be challenging. However, detailed ultrastructural analyses of bone from patients with osteopetrosis and odontogenic infection are limited. This report describes a case of osteomyelitis of the maxilla and mandible secondary to osteopetrosis in an adult patient and presents ultrastructural data of alveolar bone tissue analyzed by contact microradiography, electron probe microanalysis, and x-ray diffraction. Cases of osteomyelitis of the jaw secondary to osteopetrosis also are reviewed. PMID:27000409

  5. Case Reports: Treatment of Subtrochanteric and Ipsilateral Femoral Neck Fractures in an Adult with Osteopetrosis

    PubMed Central

    Mchale, Kathleen A.

    2008-01-01

    We describe a patient with autosomal-dominant osteopetrosis, a subtrochanteric fracture, and an ipsilateral femoral neck fracture treated with a hip spica cast Although the fracture united with coxa vara and external rotation deformities, the patient successfully returned to his normal activities of daily living. Operative fracture treatment in patients with osteopetrosis is difficult, and our patient provides evidence that with nonoperative treatment these patients can return to a functional level when operative treatment is not an option. PMID:18431613

  6. A Deletion Mutation in Bovine SLC4A2 is Associated with Osteopetrosis in Red Angus Cattle

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Osteopetrosis is a skeletal disorder characterized by the formation of overly dense bones in affected humans and animals, resulting from a deficiency in the number and/or function of bone-resorbing osteoclast cells. In cattle, osteopetrosis can either be induced during gestation by viral infection ...

  7. Osteopetrosis and Its Relevance for the Discovery of New Functions Associated with the Skeleton

    PubMed Central

    Coudert, Amélie E.; de Vernejoul, Marie-Christine; Muraca, Maurizio

    2015-01-01

    Osteopetrosis is a rare genetic disorder characterized by an increase of bone mass due to defective osteoclast function. Patients typically displayed spontaneous fractures, anemia, and in the most severe forms hepatosplenomegaly and compression of cranial facial nerves leading to deafness and blindness. Osteopetrosis comprises a heterogeneous group of diseases as several forms are known with different models of inheritance and severity from asymptomatic to lethal. This review summarizes the genetic and clinical features of osteopetrosis, emphasizing how recent studies of this disease have contributed to understanding the central role of the skeleton in the whole body physiology. In particular, the interplay of bone with the stomach, insulin metabolism, male fertility, the immune system, bone marrow, and fat is described. PMID:25873953

  8. Novel CLCN7 mutation identified in a Han Chinese family with autosomal dominant osteopetrosis-2

    PubMed Central

    He, Dan; Rong, Pengfei; Xu, Hongbo; Yuan, Lamei; Li, Liu; Lu, Qian; Guo, Yi

    2016-01-01

    Osteopetrosis is a heritable bone condition featuring increased bone density due to defective osteoclastic bone resorption. Exome sequencing and Sanger sequencing were conducted in Han Chinese family members, some of whom had typical osteopetrosis, and a novel missense variant c.2350A>T (p.R784W) in the chloride channel 7 gene (CLCN7) was identified. This variant cosegregated with the disorder in the family but was not observed in 800 controls. The data indicate that exome sequencing is a powerful and effective molecular diagnostic tool for detecting mutations in osteopetrosis, which is a genetically and clinically heterogeneous disorder. This discovery broadens the CLCN7 gene mutation spectrum and has important implications for clinical therapeutic regimen decisions, prognosis evaluations, and antenatal diagnoses. PMID:27325559

  9. Novel CLCN7 mutation identified in a Han Chinese family with autosomal dominant osteopetrosis-2.

    PubMed

    Deng, Hao; He, Dan; Rong, Pengfei; Xu, Hongbo; Yuan, Lamei; Li, Liu; Lu, Qian; Guo, Yi

    2016-01-01

    Osteopetrosis is a heritable bone condition featuring increased bone density due to defective osteoclastic bone resorption. Exome sequencing and Sanger sequencing were conducted in Han Chinese family members, some of whom had typical osteopetrosis, and a novel missense variant c.2350A>T (p.R784W) in the chloride channel 7 gene (CLCN7) was identified. This variant cosegregated with the disorder in the family but was not observed in 800 controls. The data indicate that exome sequencing is a powerful and effective molecular diagnostic tool for detecting mutations in osteopetrosis, which is a genetically and clinically heterogeneous disorder. This discovery broadens the CLCN7 gene mutation spectrum and has important implications for clinical therapeutic regimen decisions, prognosis evaluations, and antenatal diagnoses. PMID:27325559

  10. Osteopetrosis and its relevance for the discovery of new functions associated with the skeleton.

    PubMed

    Coudert, Amélie E; de Vernejoul, Marie-Christine; Muraca, Maurizio; Del Fattore, Andrea

    2015-01-01

    Osteopetrosis is a rare genetic disorder characterized by an increase of bone mass due to defective osteoclast function. Patients typically displayed spontaneous fractures, anemia, and in the most severe forms hepatosplenomegaly and compression of cranial facial nerves leading to deafness and blindness. Osteopetrosis comprises a heterogeneous group of diseases as several forms are known with different models of inheritance and severity from asymptomatic to lethal. This review summarizes the genetic and clinical features of osteopetrosis, emphasizing how recent studies of this disease have contributed to understanding the central role of the skeleton in the whole body physiology. In particular, the interplay of bone with the stomach, insulin metabolism, male fertility, the immune system, bone marrow, and fat is described. PMID:25873953

  11. INFANTILE PARALYSIS

    PubMed Central

    1917-01-01

    At the recent Forty-fourth Annual Meetings of the American Public Health Association, Cincinnati, Ohio, there was held a Round Table Discussion on Infantile Paralysis, in which health authorities throughout the country took part. This discussion was held under the auspices of the Section on Public Health Administration. Dr. George W. Goler, Health Officer of Rochester, N. Y., Chairman of this Section, presided. We take great pleasure in being able to reproduce for readers of the Journal what took place at this most important session. PMID:18009618

  12. A Case of Cavernous Sinus Thrombophlebitis and Meningitis as a Complication in Osteopetrosis

    PubMed Central

    Chung, Hyun Chul; Park, So Hyun; Kim, Eun Sook; Kim, Young Il; Lee, Sun Ho

    2014-01-01

    Osteopetrosis is a rare genetic bone disease characterized by increased bone density but prone to breakage due to defective osteoclastic function. Among two primary types of autosomal dominant osteopetrosis (ADO), osteopetrosis type II is characterized by sclerosis of bones, predominantly involving the spine, the pelvis, and the skull base. Fragility of bones and dental abscess are leading complications. This report presents a case of osteopetrosis in a 52-years-old female, which was complicated by the development of cavernous sinus thrombophlebitis and meningitis. She was suffered from multiple fractures since one year ago. Laboratory data revealed elevated serum levels of tartrate resistant acid phosphatase (TRAP) without carbonic anhydrase II DNA mutation. A thoracolumbar spine X-ray showed, typical findings of ADO type II (ADO II; Albers-Schönberg disease), prominent vertebral endplates so called the 'rugger jersey spine'. Her older sister also showed same typical spine appearance. We report a case of ADO II with cavernous sinus thrombophlebitis and meningitis that was successfully treated with long-term antibiotics with right sphenoidotomy. PMID:25247162

  13. MT2013-31: Allo HCT for Metabolic Disorders and Severe Osteopetrosis

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-08-15

    Mucopolysaccharidosis I; Mucopolysaccharidosis II; Mucopolysaccharidosis VI; Mucopolysaccharidosis VII; Hurler Syndrome; Hunter Syndrome; Maroteaux Lamy Syndrome; Sly Syndrome; Glycoprotein Metabolic Disorders; Alpha Mannosidosis; Fucosidosis; Aspartylglucosaminuria; Adrenoleukodystrophy; Peroxisomal Disorders; Osteopetrosis; Sphingolipidosis; Gangliosidosis; Globoid Cell Leukodystrophy; Metachromatic Leukodystrophy; Niemann Pick B; Niemann Pick C Subtype 2; I-cell Disease

  14. A newly described mutation of the CLCN7 gene causes neuropathic autosomal recessive osteopetrosis in an Arab family.

    PubMed

    Al-Aama, Jumana Y; Dabbagh, Amal A; Edrees, Alaa Y

    2012-01-01

    Neurologic manifestations in osteopetrosis are usually secondary to sclerosis of the skull bones. However, a rare neuropathic subtype of osteopetrosis exists that resembles neurodegenerative storage disorders. Unlike other forms of osteopetrosis, this latter form does not respond to hematopoietic stem cell transplantation. Preliminary studies suggest that this neuropathic form is more likely to be caused by mutations in the CLCN7 gene in an autosomal recessive manner. This study provides further evidence for this phenotype-genotype correlation by presenting a previously unreported mutation in the CLCN7 gene in a Yemeni family with the neuropathic form. This is also the first study of any mutation in patients with osteopetrosis of Arabic ethnicity. As literature review suggests that this type may be more common in Arabs, cascade genetic screening of early onset of autosomal recessive-osteopetrosis in patients of Arabic ancestry may preferably start with the CLCN7 gene rather than the TCIRG gene as is routinely done in clinical laboratories. Identifying a mutation in the CLCN7 gene in a patient with early onset of autosomal recessive-osteopetrosis may also guide therapeutic decisions including the option of hematopoietic stem cell transplantation. PMID:21946807

  15. Infantilizing Autism.

    PubMed Central

    Stevenson, Jennifer L.; Harp, Bev; Gernsbacher, Morton Ann

    2014-01-01

    When members of the public envision the disability of autism, they most likely envision a child, rather than an adult. In this empirically based essay, three authors, one of whom is an autistic self-advocate, analyzed the role played by parents, charitable organizations, the popular media, and the news industry in infantilizing autism. Parents portrayed the face of autism to be that of a child 95% of the time on the homepages of regional and local support organizations. Nine of the top 12 autism charitable organizations restricted descriptions of autism to child-referential discourse. Characters depicted as autistic were children in 90% of fictional books and 68% of narrative films and television programs. The news industry featured autistic children four times as often as they featured autistic adults in contemporary news articles. The cyclical interaction between parent-driven autism societies, autism fundraising charities, popular media, and contemporary news silences adult self-advocates by denying their very existence. Society's overwhelming proclivity for depicting autism as a disability of childhood poses a formidable barrier to the dignity and well-being of autistic people of all ages. PMID:25520546

  16. Osteopetrosis Complicated by Osteomyelitis of the Maxilla and Mandible: Light and Electron Microscopic Findings

    PubMed Central

    Ribeiro, Michel Campos; Sverzut, Cassio Edvard; Bonucci, Ermanno; Nanci, Antonio; de Oliveira, Paulo Tambasco

    2009-01-01

    This report presents a case of osteopetrosis in a 25-year-old male, which was complicated by the development of osteomyelitis in the maxilla and mandible following traumatic injury and tooth extractions. The osteomyelitis in the mandible was refractory to marginal resection and antibiotic therapy. Partial resection with mandible reconstruction was then carried out. Light and backscattered electron scanning microscopy revealed sclerosis of spongy bone and variations in mineral density of the bone matrix. There was also a prominent periosteal bone formation in regions affected by osteomyelitis. An 18-month follow-up showed absence of active infections in the face and oral structures, with a focal area of bone exposure in the right parasymphysis. However, development of anemia and bone marrow deficiency will likely affect prognosis. The importance of preventive oral health care and dental/periodontal managements in osteopetrosis is emphasized. PMID:20596853

  17. Successful staged hip replacement in septic hip osteoarthritis in osteopetrosis: a case report

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Osteopetrosis is a rare, inherited, bone disorder, characterized by osteosclerosis, obliteration of the medullary cavity and calcified cartilage. The autosomal dominant form is compatible with a normal life span, although fractures often result from minimal trauma, due to the pathologic nature of bone. Osteomyelitis is common in patients with osteopetrosis because of a reduced resistance to infection, attributed to the lack of marrow vascularity and impairment of white cell function. Only one case of osteomyelitis of the proximal third of the femur has been previously reported, treated with several repeated debridements and finally with femoral head resection. Here we present for the first time a case of a staged implant of a cementless total hip prosthesis for the treatment of a septic hip in femoral neck nonunion in osteopetrosis. Case presentation A 36-years-old woman, affected by autosomal dominant osteopetrosis was referred to our department because of a septic hip arthritis associated with femoral neck septic non-union, with draining fistulas. The infection occurred early after a plate osteosynthesis for a closed perthrocanteric fracture of the femur and persisted in spite of osteosynthesis removal, surgical debridement and external fixation. In our hospital the patient underwent accurate debridement, femoral head and greater trochanter resection, preparation of the diaphyseal intramedullary canal and implant of an antibiotic-loaded cement spacer. The spacer was exchanged after one month, due to infection recurrence and four months later, a cementless total hip arthroplasty was implanted, with no clinical and laboratory signs of infection recurrence at two years follow-up. Conclusions In case of hip septic arthritis and proximal femur septic non-union, femoral head resection may not be the only option available and staged total hip arthroplasty can be considered. PMID:22472060

  18. Legg-Calvé-Perthes disease in a child with osteopetrosis

    PubMed Central

    Sims, Alex L.; Barwick, Thomas W.; Montgomery, Richard J.

    2011-01-01

    Osteopetrosis is a rare inherited disorder of bone causing increased bone density. Legg-Calvé-Perthes disease (LCPD), by contrast, is a more common idiopathic condition leading to variable avascular necrosis of the immature femoral head. We present a case of a 5-year-old boy presenting with these co-morbidities. We have found only one previous reference suggesting these two conditions can coexist in the literature. We discuss the basic principles of management of this interesting case. PMID:24765380

  19. Management of infantile spasms

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    West syndrome, or infantile spasms syndrome is a frequently catastrophic infantile epileptic encephalopathy with a variety of etiologies. Despite the heterogeneous nature of causes of infantile spasms, a careful diagnostic evaluation can lead to diagnosis in many patients and may guide treatment choices. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) brain remains the highest yield initial study in determining the etiology in infantile spasms. Treatment of infantile spasms has little class I data, but adrenocorticotropic hormone (ACTH), prednisolone and vigabatrin have the best evidence as first-line medications. Other therapies including the ketogenic diet and other anti-epileptics medications may also prove useful in the treatment of infantile spasms. In general, more studies are needed to determine the best treatment regimen for this condition. Prognosis is generally poor, with the majority of patients having some or profound neurocognitive delays. Patients without delays at diagnosis and without an identifiable etiology, if treated appropriately, have the greatest likelihood of a normal outcome. PMID:26835388

  20. Myeloid Deletion of Nemo Causes Osteopetrosis in Mice Owing to Upregulation of Transcriptional Repressors

    PubMed Central

    Swarnkar, Gaurav; Shim, Kyuhwan; Nasir, Amjad M.; Seehra, Kuljeet; Chen, Hung-Po (Tim); Mbalaviele, Gabriel; Abu-Amer, Yousef

    2016-01-01

    The transcription factor NF-κB is central to numerous physiologic processes including bone development, and its activation is controlled by IKKγ (also called NEMO), the regulatory subunit of IKK complex. NEMO is X-linked, and mutations in this gene result in Incontinentia Pigmenti in human hemizygous females. In mice, global deficiency causes embryonic lethality. In addition, certain point mutations in the NEMO (IKBKG) human gene manifest skeletal defects implicating NEMO in the regulation of bone homeostasis. To specifically investigate such role, we conditionally deleted Nemo from osteoclast and myeloid progenitors. Morphometric, histologic, and molecular analyses demonstrate that myeloid NEMO deletion causes osteopetrosis in mice. Mechanistically, NEMO deficiency hampered activation of IKK complex in osteoclast precursors, causing arrest of osteoclastogenesis and apoptosis. Interestingly, inhibiting apoptosis by genetic ablation of TNFr1 significantly increased cell survival, but failed to rescue osteoclastogenesis or reverse osteopetrosis. Based on this observation, we analyzed the expression of different regulators of osteoclastogenesis and discovered that NEMO deletion leads to increased RBPJ expression, resulting in a decrease of Blimp1 expression. Consequently, expression of IRF8 and Bcl6 which are targets of Blimp1 and potent osteoclastogenic transcriptional repressors, is increased. Thus, NEMO governs survival and osteoclast differentiation programs through serial regulation of multiple transcription factors. PMID:27435916

  1. Effective Small Interfering RNA Therapy to Treat CLCN7-dependent Autosomal Dominant Osteopetrosis Type 2

    PubMed Central

    Capulli, Mattia; Maurizi, Antonio; Ventura, Luca; Rucci, Nadia; Teti, Anna

    2015-01-01

    In about 70% of patients affected by autosomal dominant osteopetrosis type 2 (ADO2), osteoclast activity is reduced by heterozygous mutations of the CLCN7 gene, encoding the ClC-7 chloride/hydrogen antiporter. CLCN7G215R-, CLCN7R767W-, and CLCN7R286W-specific siRNAs silenced transfected mutant mRNA/EGFP in HEK293 cells, in RAW264.7 cells and in human osteoclasts, with no change of CLCN7WT mRNA and no effect of scrambled siRNA on the mutant transcripts. Osteoclasts from Clcn7G213R ADO2 mice showed reduced bone resorption, a condition rescued by Clcn7G213R-specific siRNA. Treatment of ADO2 mice with Clcn7G213R-specific siRNA induced increase of bone resorption variables and decrease of trabecular bone mass, leading to an overall improvement of the osteopetrotic bone phenotype. Treatment did not induce overt adverse effects and was effective also with siRNAs specific for other mutants. These results demonstrate that a siRNA-based experimental treatment of ADO2 is feasible, and underscore a translational impact for future strategy to cure this therapeutically neglected form of osteopetrosis. PMID:26325626

  2. Myeloid Deletion of Nemo Causes Osteopetrosis in Mice Owing to Upregulation of Transcriptional Repressors.

    PubMed

    Swarnkar, Gaurav; Shim, Kyuhwan; Nasir, Amjad M; Seehra, Kuljeet; Chen, Hung-Po Tim; Mbalaviele, Gabriel; Abu-Amer, Yousef

    2016-01-01

    The transcription factor NF-κB is central to numerous physiologic processes including bone development, and its activation is controlled by IKKγ (also called NEMO), the regulatory subunit of IKK complex. NEMO is X-linked, and mutations in this gene result in Incontinentia Pigmenti in human hemizygous females. In mice, global deficiency causes embryonic lethality. In addition, certain point mutations in the NEMO (IKBKG) human gene manifest skeletal defects implicating NEMO in the regulation of bone homeostasis. To specifically investigate such role, we conditionally deleted Nemo from osteoclast and myeloid progenitors. Morphometric, histologic, and molecular analyses demonstrate that myeloid NEMO deletion causes osteopetrosis in mice. Mechanistically, NEMO deficiency hampered activation of IKK complex in osteoclast precursors, causing arrest of osteoclastogenesis and apoptosis. Interestingly, inhibiting apoptosis by genetic ablation of TNFr1 significantly increased cell survival, but failed to rescue osteoclastogenesis or reverse osteopetrosis. Based on this observation, we analyzed the expression of different regulators of osteoclastogenesis and discovered that NEMO deletion leads to increased RBPJ expression, resulting in a decrease of Blimp1 expression. Consequently, expression of IRF8 and Bcl6 which are targets of Blimp1 and potent osteoclastogenic transcriptional repressors, is increased. Thus, NEMO governs survival and osteoclast differentiation programs through serial regulation of multiple transcription factors. PMID:27435916

  3. Histidinemia and Infantile Autism

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kotsopoulos, S.; Kutty, K. M.

    1979-01-01

    The article presents a case history of a boy with both infantile autism and histidenia (an inborn error of amino acid metabolism), and discusses the possible relationship between the two conditions. (DLS)

  4. Diagnosis of osteopetrosis in bilateral congenital aural atresia: Turning point in treatment strategy

    PubMed Central

    Verma, Ritu; Jana, Manisha; Bhalla, Ashu Seith; Kumar, Arvind; Kumar, Rakesh

    2016-01-01

    Aural atresia is a rare congenital malformation of the external and middle ear. There are several syndromic associations of this anomaly with those involving the first and second branchial arches. Occurrence of aural atresia with sclerosing skeletal dysplasia is unknown and has never been reported. The co-existence of a sclerosing dysplasia can make the surgical treatment in aural atresia difficult and risky; and the auditory improvement may not be as expected. Moreover, internal auditory canal narrowing and hence sensorineural hearing loss in sclerosing dysplasia might add to the already existing conductive hearing loss in such patients. In this case report we have described an unknown association of bilateral microtia with sclerosing skeletal dysplasia (autosomal dominant osteopetrosis) and clinical implications of these two conditions occurring together leading to a change in the management plan. PMID:27170934

  5. Diagnosis of osteopetrosis in bilateral congenital aural atresia: Turning point in treatment strategy.

    PubMed

    Verma, Ritu; Jana, Manisha; Bhalla, Ashu Seith; Kumar, Arvind; Kumar, Rakesh

    2016-05-01

    Aural atresia is a rare congenital malformation of the external and middle ear. There are several syndromic associations of this anomaly with those involving the first and second branchial arches. Occurrence of aural atresia with sclerosing skeletal dysplasia is unknown and has never been reported. The co-existence of a sclerosing dysplasia can make the surgical treatment in aural atresia difficult and risky; and the auditory improvement may not be as expected. Moreover, internal auditory canal narrowing and hence sensorineural hearing loss in sclerosing dysplasia might add to the already existing conductive hearing loss in such patients. In this case report we have described an unknown association of bilateral microtia with sclerosing skeletal dysplasia (autosomal dominant osteopetrosis) and clinical implications of these two conditions occurring together leading to a change in the management plan. PMID:27170934

  6. Hypercalcemia and altered biochemical bone markers in post-bone marrow transplantation osteopetrosis: a case report and literature review.

    PubMed

    Kulpiya, Alisa; Mahachoklertwattana, Pat; Pakakasama, Samart; Hongeng, Suradej; Poomthavorn, Preamrudee

    2012-08-01

    Autosomal recessive osteopetrosis is a rare disorder of bone resorption defect that results in generalized sclerotic bones and bone marrow failure. Allogeneic BMT is the only treatment for cure. One of the complications following a successful BMT is hypercalcemia that is a unique complication in this group of patients. We report a three-yr-old boy with osteopetrosis who developed hypercalcemia following the successful BMT. His maximal calcium level was 13.3 mg/dL. Markedly increased both bone formation and resorption markers were demonstrated along with hypercalcemia. These findings indicated an active donor-derived osteoclastic function and thus bone resorption following the successful donor engraftment in the patient. Treatment with hyperhydration, furosemide and bone resorption inhibitors, calcitonin, and bisphosphonate led to normalization of the serum calcium level. Bone resorption but not bone formation marker was persistently elevated despite having normocalcemia during a 16.5-month follow-up period. PMID:21323826

  7. Propranolol (Infantile Hemangioma)

    MedlinePlus

    Propranolol oral solution is used to treat proliferating infantile hemangioma (benign [noncancerous] growths or tumors appearing on or under the skin ... Propranolol comes as an oral solution (liquid) to take by mouth. ... is usually taken twice daily (9 hours apart) during or immediately after a ...

  8. As little as needed: the extraordinary case of a mild recessive osteopetrosis owing to a novel splicing hypomorphic mutation in the TCIRG1 gene.

    PubMed

    Sobacchi, Cristina; Pangrazio, Alessandra; Lopez, Antonio González-Meneses; Gomez, Diego Pascual-Vaca; Caldana, Maria Elena; Susani, Lucia; Vezzoni, Paolo; Villa, Anna

    2014-07-01

    Mutations in the TCIRG1 gene, coding for a subunit of the osteoclast proton pump, are responsible for more than 50% of cases of human malignant autosomal recessive osteopetrosis (ARO), a rare inherited bone disease with increased bone density owing to a failure in bone resorption. A wide variety of mutations has been described, including missense, nonsense, small deletions/insertions, splice-site mutations, and large genomic deletions, all leading to a similar severe presentation. So far, to the best of our knowledge, no report of a mild phenotype owing to recessive TCIRG1 mutations is present neither in our series of more than 100 TCIRG1-dependent ARO patients nor in the literature. Here we describe an 8-year-old patient referred to us with a clinical diagnosis of ARO, based on radiological findings; of note, no neurological or hematological defects were present in this girl. Surprisingly, we identified a novel nucleotide change in intron 15 of the TCIRG1 gene at the homozygous state, leading to the production of multiple aberrant transcripts, but also, more importantly, of a limited amount of the normal transcript. Our results show that a low level of normal TCIRG1 protein can dampen the clinical presentation of TCIRG1-dependent ARO. On this basis, a small amount of protein might be sufficient to rescue, at least partially, the severe ARO phenotype, and this is particularly important when gene therapy approaches are considered. In addition, we would also recommend that the TCIRG1 gene be included in the molecular diagnosis of mild forms of human ARO. PMID:24535816

  9. Infantile sexuality and Freud's legacy.

    PubMed

    Marion, Paola

    2016-06-01

    The topic of sexuality and infantile sexuality, though less frequently discussed by psychoanalysis in recent decades, has received renewed attention for some years. The intention of this paper is to share some reflections around the role of infantile sexuality in our thinking, how we encounter it in our work with patients and in clinical material. Through reference to questions put forward by Freud (1905) in Three Essays, this paper takes into consideration some areas of the debate that has developed on the subject of infantile sexuality, starting from Freud's original intuition, including various hypotheses on the genesis of the sexual drive. The author will concentrate on two specific points. Firstly, how infantile sexuality - as a permanent dimension of the subject's existence - unfolds in the relationship and is deeply influenced by it. And that is how in childhood and adolescence, infantile sexuality ushers in parental sexuality - just as, in the case of our patients, infantile sexuality ushers in the analyst's sexuality. The second point pertains to the temporal dimension within which infantile sexuality is inscribed. The hypothesis that the author proposes is that infantile sexuality may be understood in the specific time of psychoanalysis [Nachträglichkeit], distinct and different with respect to the linear, evolutionary dimension. PMID:25988723

  10. Neonatal Abdominal Hemangiomatosis: Propranolol beyond Infantile Hemangioma

    PubMed Central

    Nip, Siu Ying Angel; Hon, Kam Lun; Leung, Wing Kwan Alex; Leung, Alexander K. C.; Choi, Paul C. L.

    2016-01-01

    Hemangioma is the most common vascular tumor of infancy; presentation is often as cutaneous infantile hemangioma (IH). Cutaneous hemangioma is a clinical diagnosis. Most IHs follow a benign course, with complete involution without treatment in the majority of cases. Visceral hemangioma often involves the liver and manifests as a life-threatening disorder. Hepatic hemangiomas may be associated with high output cardiac failure, coagulopathy, and hepatomegaly which generally develop between 1 and 16 weeks of age. Mortality has been reportedly high without treatment. We report a rare case of a male infant with neonatal hemangiomatosis with diffuse peritoneal involvement, which mimicked a malignant-looking tumor on imaging, and discuss therapeutic options and efficacy. Propranolol is efficacious for IH but generally not useful for other forms of vascular hemangiomas, tumors, and malformations. In our case of neonatal peritoneal hemangiomatosis, propranolol appears to have halted the growth and possibly expedite the involution of the hemangiomatosis without other treatments. PMID:27110421

  11. Neonatal Abdominal Hemangiomatosis: Propranolol beyond Infantile Hemangioma.

    PubMed

    Nip, Siu Ying Angel; Hon, Kam Lun; Leung, Wing Kwan Alex; Leung, Alexander K C; Choi, Paul C L

    2016-01-01

    Hemangioma is the most common vascular tumor of infancy; presentation is often as cutaneous infantile hemangioma (IH). Cutaneous hemangioma is a clinical diagnosis. Most IHs follow a benign course, with complete involution without treatment in the majority of cases. Visceral hemangioma often involves the liver and manifests as a life-threatening disorder. Hepatic hemangiomas may be associated with high output cardiac failure, coagulopathy, and hepatomegaly which generally develop between 1 and 16 weeks of age. Mortality has been reportedly high without treatment. We report a rare case of a male infant with neonatal hemangiomatosis with diffuse peritoneal involvement, which mimicked a malignant-looking tumor on imaging, and discuss therapeutic options and efficacy. Propranolol is efficacious for IH but generally not useful for other forms of vascular hemangiomas, tumors, and malformations. In our case of neonatal peritoneal hemangiomatosis, propranolol appears to have halted the growth and possibly expedite the involution of the hemangiomatosis without other treatments. PMID:27110421

  12. Bone Mineral Density and Microarchitecture in Patients With Autosomal Dominant Osteopetrosis: A Report of Two Cases.

    PubMed

    Arruda, Mariana; Coelho, Maria Caroline Alves; Moraes, Aline Barbosa; de Paula Paranhos-Neto, Francisco; Madeira, Miguel; Farias, Maria Lucia Fleiuss; Neto, Leonardo Vieira

    2016-03-01

    The aim of this case study is to describe changes in areal bone mineral density (aBMD) by dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry (DXA) scan, as well as volumetric bone density and microarchitecture by high-resolution peripheral quantitative computed tomography (HR-pQCT) in two patients with autosomal dominant osteopetrosis (ADO) and compare with 20 healthy subjects. We describe a 44-year-old male patient with six low-impact fractures since he was age 16 years, and a 32-year-old female patient with four low-impact fractures on her past history. Radiographic changes were typical of ADO. Consistent with the much higher aBMD, total volumetric BMD (average bone density of the whole bone, including trabecular and cortical compartments) at distal radius and tibia (HR-pQCT) was more than twice the mean values found in healthy subjects in both patients. Trabecular number and thickness were higher, leading to an evident increase in trabecular bone volume to tissue volume. Also, an enormous increase in cortical thickness was found. Most important, a great heterogeneity in bone microstructure of the affected patients was evident on HR-pQCT images: islets of very dense bone were interposed with areas with apparent normal density. The increase in aBMD, volumetric BMD, and most indices of trabecular and cortical bone, associated with the great heterogeneity on bone tridimensional microarchitecture, reflect the accumulation of old and fragile bone randomly distributed along the skeleton. These alterations in bone microstructure probably compromise bone quality, which might justify the high prevalence of low-impact fractures in patients with ADO, despite abnormally elevated BMD. © 2015 American Society for Bone and Mineral Research. PMID:26387875

  13. Pathogenesis of infantile hemangiomas.

    PubMed

    Uihlein, Lily Changchien; Liang, Marilyn G; Mulliken, John B

    2012-08-01

    1.Review the key features of the life cycle of infantile hemangiomas.2.Highlight cellular and molecular pathways involved in hemangioma-genesis.3.Discuss theories that may account for hemangioma-genesis.In the past, it was believed that a mother's visual impressions or behavior during pregnancy caused the growth of infantile hemangioma in her unborn child. She might have had an excessive craving for strawberries, witnessed the slaughter of an animal, directly contacted human or animal blood, or mocked a child with a similar birthmark.1 This folklore began to slowly fade once hemangiomas were examined through the light microscope. In 1863, Virchow2 suggested that hemangiomas are composed of proliferating new blood vessels resulting from progressive irritation of tissue. In 1933, Laidlow and Murray3 proposed a phylogenetic origin for hemangiomas and hypothesized that hemangiomas are remnants of vascular tufts functioning as accessory lungs for primitive amphibia. Pack and Miller4 (1950) hypothesized that hemangiomas develop from embryonic islands of angioblastic cells that were isolated from the systemic vasculature during fetal development. PMID:22881413

  14. Classification of infantile nystagmus waveforms.

    PubMed

    Theodorou, Maria; Clement, Richard

    2016-06-01

    Classification of infantile nystagmus waveforms is an important problem because the characteristic waveforms can be used to distinguish between infantile and acquired nystagmus. A clear description of the nystagmus is also a necessary first stage in understanding its origin. Currently infantile nystagmus waveforms are classified into at least 12 different types. In this study we analyse a database of nystagmus recordings in order to investigate if this classification can be simplified. Application of principal components analysis revealed that 96.9% of the variance of the waveforms is described by a linear sum of two component waveforms. The components consist of sawtooth and pseudocycloid waveforms that account for 78.7% and 18.2% of the variance respectively for the most common single cycle waveforms. This simplified description of infantile nystagmus highlights the importance of identifying the origin of the jerk component and its synchronisation with the pseudocycloid component for the characterisation and treatment of the nystagmus. PMID:27125578

  15. Two novel mutations of CLCN7 gene in Chinese families with autosomal dominant osteopetrosis (type II).

    PubMed

    Zheng, Hui; Shao, Chong; Zheng, Yan; He, Jin-Wei; Fu, Wen-Zhen; Wang, Chun; Zhang, Zhen-Lin

    2016-07-01

    Autosomal dominant osteopetrosis type II (ADO-II) is a heritable bone disorder characterized by osteosclerosis, predominantly involving the spine (vertebral end-plate thickening, or rugger-jersey spine), the pelvis ("bone-within-bone" structures) and the skull base. Chloride channel 7 (CLCN7) has been reported to be the causative gene. In this study, we aimed to identify the pathogenic mutation in four Chinese families with ADO-II. All 25 exons of the CLCN7 gene, including the exon-intron boundaries, were amplified and sequenced directly in four probands from the Chinese families with ADO-II. The mutation site was then identified in other family members and 250 healthy controls. In family 1, a known missense mutation c.296A>G in exon 4 of CLCN7 was identified in the proband, resulting in a tyrosine (UAU) to cysteine (UGU) substitution at p.99 (Y99C); the mutation was also identified in his affected father. In family 2, a novel missense mutation c.865G>C in exon 10 was identified in the proband, resulting in a valine (GUC) to leucine (CUC) substitution at p.289 (V289L); the mutation was also identified in her healthy mother and sister. In family 3, a novel missense mutation c.1625C>T in exon 17 of CLCN7 was identified in the proband, resulting in an alanine (GCG) to valine (GUG) substitution at p.542 (A542V); the mutation was also identified in her father. In family 4, a hot spot, R767W (c.2299C>T, CGG>TGG), in exon 24 was found in the proband which once again proved the susceptibility of the site or the similar genetic background in different races. Moreover, two novel mutations, V289L and A542V, occurred at a highly conserved position, found by a comparison of the protein sequences from eight vertebrates, and were predicted to have a pathogenic effect by PolyPhen-2 software, which showed "probably damaging" with a score of approximately 1. These mutation sites were not identified in 250 healthy controls. Our present findings suggest that the novel missense

  16. Infantile scurvy: a historical perspective.

    PubMed

    Rajakumar, K

    2001-10-01

    Scurvy, a disease of dietary deficiency of vitamin C, is uncommon today. Among diseases, scurvy has a rich history and an ancient past. The Renaissance (14th to 16th centuries) witnessed several epidemics of scurvy among sea voyagers. In 1747, James Lind, a British Naval surgeon, performed a carefully designed clinical trial and concluded that oranges and lemons had the most antiscorbutic effect. Eventually, with the provision of lemon juice to the sea voyagers, scurvy became rare at sea. Infantile scurvy appeared almost as a new disease toward the end of the 19th century. The increased incidence of infantile scurvy during that period was attributed to the usage of heated milk and proprietary foods. Thomas Barlow described the classic clinical and pathologic features of infantile scurvy in 1883. Between 1907 and 1912, Holst and Frolich induced and cured scurvy in guinea pigs by dietary modification. In 1914, Alfred Hess established that pasteurization reduced the antiscorbutic value of milk and recommended supplementation of fresh fruit and vegetable juices to prevent scurvy. Such pioneering efforts led to the eradication of infantile scurvy in the United States. A brief history of infantile scurvy is provided. PMID:11581484

  17. Targeted disruption of the Cl−/HCO3− exchanger Ae2 results in osteopetrosis in mice

    PubMed Central

    Josephsen, Kaj; Praetorius, Jeppe; Frische, Sebastian; Gawenis, Lara R.; Kwon, Tae-Hwan; Agre, Peter; Nielsen, Søren; Fejerskov, Ole

    2009-01-01

    Osteoclasts are multinucleated bone-resorbing cells responsible for constant remodeling of bone tissue and for maintaining calcium homeostasis. The osteoclast creates an enclosed space, a lacuna, between their ruffled border membrane and the mineralized bone. They extrude H+ and Cl− into these lacunae by the combined action of vesicular H+-ATPases and ClC-7 exchangers to dissolve the hydroxyapatite of bone matrix. Along with intracellular production of H+ and HCO3− by carbonic anhydrase II, the H+-ATPases and ClC-7 exchangers seems prerequisite for bone resorption, because genetic disruption of either of these proteins leads to osteopetrosis. We aimed to complete the molecular model for lacunar acidification, hypothesizing that a HCO3− extruding and Cl− loading anion exchange protein (Ae) would be necessary to sustain bone resorption. The Ae proteins can provide both intracellular pH neutrality and serve as cellular entry mechanism for Cl− during bone resorption. Immunohistochemistry revealed that Ae2 is exclusively expressed at the contra-lacunar plasma membrane domain of mouse osteoclast. Severe osteopetrosis was encountered in Ae2 knockout (Ae2−/−) mice where the skeletal development was impaired with a higher diffuse radio-density on x-ray examination and the bone marrow cavity was occupied by irregular bone speculae. Furthermore, osteoclasts in Ae2−/− mice were dramatically enlarged and fail to form the normal ruffled border facing the lacunae. Thus, Ae2 is likely to be an essential component of the bone resorption mechanism in osteoclasts. PMID:19164575

  18. Infantile Hemangioma: A Brief Review

    PubMed Central

    BOTA, MADALINA; POPA, GHEORGHE; BLAG, CRISTINA; TATARU, ALEXANDRU

    2015-01-01

    Infantile hemangiomas as frequent infancy tumors have been a controversial issue of medical scientists worldwide. Their clinical aspects are various and their physiopathology is yet to be fully understood. Numerous publications outline the characteristics, causes, evolution possibilities and therapeutic approaches. Deciding whether to treat or not is the main question of this kind of pathology. Hemangiomas that have complications or can cause irreversible damage need therapy. This is a brief review of up-to-date information regarding the presentation of infantile hemangiomas and target-therapies. PMID:26528043

  19. Biology of Infantile Hemangioma

    PubMed Central

    Itinteang, Tinte; Withers, Aaron H. J.; Davis, Paul F.; Tan, Swee T.

    2014-01-01

    Infantile hemangioma (IH), the most common tumor of infancy, is characterized by an initial proliferation during infancy followed by spontaneous involution over the next 5–10 years, often leaving a fibro-fatty residuum. IH is traditionally considered a tumor of the microvasculature. However, recent data show the critical role of stem cells in the biology of IH with emerging evidence suggesting an embryonic developmental anomaly due to aberrant proliferation and differentiation of a hemogenic endothelium with a neural crest phenotype that possesses the capacity for endothelial, hematopoietic, mesenchymal, and neuronal differentiation. Current evidence suggests a putative placental chorionic mesenchymal core cell embolic origin of IH during the first trimester. This review outlines the emerging role of stem cells and their interplay with the cytokine niche that promotes a post-natal environment conducive for vasculogenesis involving VEGFR-2 and its ligand VEGF-A and the IGF-2 ligand in promoting cellular proliferation, and the TRAIL-OPG anti-apoptotic pathway in preventing cellular apoptosis in IH. The discovery of the role of the renin–angiotensin system in the biology of IH provides a plausible explanation for the programed biologic behavior and the β-blocker-induced accelerated involution of this enigmatic condition. This crucially involves the vasoactive peptide, angiotensin II, that promotes cellular proliferation in IH predominantly via its action on the ATIIR2 isoform. The role of the RAS in the biology of IH is further supported by the effect of captopril, an ACE inhibitor, in inducing accelerated involution of IH. The discovery of the critical role of RAS in IH represents a novel and fascinating paradigm shift in the understanding of human development, IH, and other tumors in general. PMID:25593962

  20. Biology of infantile hemangioma.

    PubMed

    Itinteang, Tinte; Withers, Aaron H J; Davis, Paul F; Tan, Swee T

    2014-01-01

    Infantile hemangioma (IH), the most common tumor of infancy, is characterized by an initial proliferation during infancy followed by spontaneous involution over the next 5-10 years, often leaving a fibro-fatty residuum. IH is traditionally considered a tumor of the microvasculature. However, recent data show the critical role of stem cells in the biology of IH with emerging evidence suggesting an embryonic developmental anomaly due to aberrant proliferation and differentiation of a hemogenic endothelium with a neural crest phenotype that possesses the capacity for endothelial, hematopoietic, mesenchymal, and neuronal differentiation. Current evidence suggests a putative placental chorionic mesenchymal core cell embolic origin of IH during the first trimester. This review outlines the emerging role of stem cells and their interplay with the cytokine niche that promotes a post-natal environment conducive for vasculogenesis involving VEGFR-2 and its ligand VEGF-A and the IGF-2 ligand in promoting cellular proliferation, and the TRAIL-OPG anti-apoptotic pathway in preventing cellular apoptosis in IH. The discovery of the role of the renin-angiotensin system in the biology of IH provides a plausible explanation for the programed biologic behavior and the β-blocker-induced accelerated involution of this enigmatic condition. This crucially involves the vasoactive peptide, angiotensin II, that promotes cellular proliferation in IH predominantly via its action on the ATIIR2 isoform. The role of the RAS in the biology of IH is further supported by the effect of captopril, an ACE inhibitor, in inducing accelerated involution of IH. The discovery of the critical role of RAS in IH represents a novel and fascinating paradigm shift in the understanding of human development, IH, and other tumors in general. PMID:25593962

  1. [Pathogenesis of infantile cerebral palsy].

    PubMed

    Semenova, K A

    1980-01-01

    Some causes of the pathological activity of postural reflexes and other motor disturbances underlying the clinical picture of infantile cerebral paralysis are considered. It is shown that disturbed metabolism of corticosteroids observed in that disease, as well as impaired functional activity of T lymphocytes promote the development of both inflammatory and neuroimmune processes in the brain, mainly in large hemispheres--and this may be one of the causes of the pathological postural activity. PMID:6969015

  2. Malignant mesothelioma

    PubMed Central

    Moore, Alastair J; Parker, Robert J; Wiggins, John

    2008-01-01

    Malignant mesothelioma is a fatal asbestos-associated malignancy originating from the lining cells (mesothelium) of the pleural and peritoneal cavities, as well as the pericardium and the tunica vaginalis. The exact prevalence is unknown but it is estimated that mesotheliomas represent less than 1% of all cancers. Its incidence is increasing, with an expected peak in the next 10–20 years. Pleural malignant mesothelioma is the most common form of mesothelioma. Typical presenting features are those of chest pain and dyspnoea. Breathlessness due to a pleural effusion without chest pain is reported in about 30% of patients. A chest wall mass, weight loss, sweating, abdominal pain and ascites (due to peritoneal involvement) are less common presentations. Mesothelioma is directly attributable to occupational asbestos exposure with a history of exposure in over 90% of cases. There is also evidence that mesothelioma may result from both para-occupational exposure and non-occupational "environmental" exposure. Idiopathic or spontaneous mesothelioma can also occur in the absence of any exposure to asbestos, with a spontaneous rate in humans of around one per million. A combination of accurate exposure history, along with examination radiology and pathology are essential to make the diagnosis. Distinguishing malignant from benign pleural disease can be challenging. The most helpful CT findings suggesting malignant pleural disease are 1) a circumferential pleural rind, 2) nodular pleural thickening, 3) pleural thickening of > 1 cm and 4) mediastinal pleural involvement. Involvement of a multidisciplinary team is recommended to ensure prompt and appropriate management, using a framework of radiotherapy, chemotherapy, surgery and symptom palliation with end of life care. Compensation issues must also be considered. Life expectancy in malignant mesothelioma is poor, with a median survival of about one year following diagnosis. PMID:19099560

  3. Retrovirus-induced osteopetrosis in mice. Effects of viral infection on osteogenic differentiation in skeletoblast cell cultures.

    PubMed Central

    Schmidt, J.; Casser-Bette, M.; Murray, A. B.; Luz, A.; Erfle, V.

    1987-01-01

    Newborn female strain NMRI mice were injected with a mouse retrovirus (OA MuLV) known to induce osteopetrosis. Primary skeletoblast cell cultures were established from humeri and calvaria of 3-day-old, 7-day-old, and 28-day-old animals. Infectious ecotropic MuLV was found in all humerus cultures from infected animals and in 7-day and 28-day calvaria cell cultures. Levels of alkaline phosphatase activity were markedly higher in cultures of calvaria and humeri from infected mice than in those from controls. In vitro infection of undifferentiated periosteal cells was followed by a decrease in cell growth and an increase in alkaline phosphatase activity. In contrast, differentiated osteoblast-like cells were barely susceptible to OA MuLV infection, and the virus did not influence their cell growth or differentiation. Electron-microscopic studies of skeletal tissue from infected old osteopetrotic mice showed virus particles associated with and budding from osteocytes and accumulated in devitalized osteocyte lacunae. The results indicate that progenitor cells of the osteoblastic lineage represent the target cells for OA MuLV in bone tissue, that virus infection induces an increase in osteoblastic activity, and that infected cells produce virus until full development of the disease. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 Figure 5 PMID:2827489

  4. Hematologic malignancies

    SciTech Connect

    Hoogstraten, B.

    1986-01-01

    The principle aim of this book is to give practical guidelines to the modern treatment of the six important hematologic malignancies. Topics considered include the treatment of the chronic leukemias; acute leukemia in adults; the myeloproliferative disorders: polycythemia vera, essential thrombocythemia, and idiopathic myelofibrosis/agnogenic myeloid metaplasia; Hodgkin's Disease; non-Hodgkin's lymphoma; and Multiple Myeloma.

  5. Osteopetrosis, femoral fracture, and chronic osteomyelitis caused by Staphylococcus aureus small colony variants (SCV) treated by girdlestone resection--6-year follow-up.

    PubMed

    Rolauffs, B; Bernhardt, T M; von Eiff, C; Hart, M L; Bettin, D

    2002-12-01

    Chronic osteomyelitis caused by Staphylococcus aureus small colony variants in combination with osteopetrosis is a unique combination of disorders that confronted us with major challenges. The therapeutic approach included four serial debridements and antimicrobial therapy. The aggressive treatment led to an instability of the brittle and hard osteopetrotic bone, and after 11 weeks, a fracture of the femoral neck occurred. A salvage procedure of the femur was performed, and the cultures obtained during this intervention remained negative. At a 6-year follow-up, the girdlestone situation still showed an acceptable functional outcome without any recurrence of osteomyelitis. PMID:12483342

  6. Infantile spasms: A prognostic evaluation

    PubMed Central

    Iype, Mary; Saradakutty, Geetha; Kunju, Puthuvathra Abdul Mohammed; Mohan, Devi; Nair, Muttathu Krishnapanicker Chandrasekharan; George, Babu; Ahamed, Shahanaz M.

    2016-01-01

    Background: Few papers address the comprehensive prognosis in infantile spasms and look into the seizure profile and psychomotor outcome. Objective: We aimed to follow up children with infantile spasms to study: a) the etiology, demographics, semiology, electroencephalogram (EEG), and radiological pattern; b) seizure control, psychomotor development, and EEG resolution with treatment; c) the effects of various factors on the control of spasms, resolution of EEG changes, and psychomotor development at 3-year follow-up. Materials and Methods: Fifty newly diagnosed cases with a 1-12 month age of onset and who had hypsarrhythmia in their EEG were recruited and 43 were followed up for 3 years. Results: Of the children followed up, 51% were seizure-free and 37% had a normal EEG at the 3-year follow-up. Autistic features were seen in 74% of the children. Only 22.7% among the seizure-free (11.6% of the total) children had normal vision and hearing, speech with narration, writing skills, gross and fine motor development, and no autism or hyperactivity. On multivariate analysis, two factors could predict bad seizure outcome — the occurrence of other seizures in addition to infantile spasms and no response to 28 days of adrenocorticotropic hormone (ACTH). No predictor could be identified for abnormal psychomotor development. Discussion and Conclusion: In our study, we could demonstrate two factors that predict seizure freedom. The cognitive outcome and seizure control in this group of children are comparable to the existing literature. However, the cognitive outcome revealed by our study and the survey of the literature are discouraging. PMID:27293335

  7. Infantile Colic: Recognition and Treatment.

    PubMed

    Johnson, Jeremy D; Cocker, Katherine; Chang, Elisabeth

    2015-10-01

    Infantile colic is a benign process in which an infant has paroxysms of inconsolable crying for more than three hours per day, more than three days per week, for longer than three weeks. It affects approximately 10% to 40% of infants worldwide and peaks at around six weeks of age, with symptoms resolving by three to six months of age. The incidence is equal between sexes, and there is no correlation with type of feeding (breast vs. bottle), gestational age, or socioeconomic status. The cause of infantile colic is not known; proposed causes include alterations in fecal microflora, intolerance to cow's milk protein or lactose, gastrointestinal immaturity or inflammation, increased serotonin secretion, poor feeding technique, and maternal smoking or nicotine replacement therapy. Colic is a diagnosis of exclusion after a detailed history and physical examination have ruled out concerning causes. Parental support and reassurance are key components of the management of colic. Simethicone and proton pump inhibitors are ineffective for the treatment of colic, and dicyclomine is contraindicated. Treatment options for breastfed infants include the probiotic Lactobacillus reuteri (strain DSM 17938) and reducing maternal dietary allergen intake. Switching to a hydrolyzed formula is an option for formula-fed infants. Evidence does not support chiropractic or osteopathic manipulation, infant massage, swaddling, acupuncture, or herbal supplements. PMID:26447441

  8. Early Infantile Autism and Autistic Psychopathy

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Van Krevelen, D. Arn

    1971-01-01

    The paper tries to assign to autistic psychopathy a definite place in psychiatric nosology and to delineate sharply the differences between the essential characteristics of it and of early infantile autism. (Author)

  9. Genetics Home Reference: infantile systemic hyalinosis

    MedlinePlus

    ... children with infantile systemic hyalinosis have severe physical limitations, mental development is typically normal. Affected individuals often ... Genetic Testing Registry (1 link) Hyaline fibromatosis syndrome Scientific articles on PubMed (1 link) PubMed OMIM (1 ...

  10. A Survey of Infantile Gastroenteritis

    PubMed Central

    Ironside, Alastair G.; Tuxford, Ann F.; Heyworth, Barrie

    1970-01-01

    In 1967 we admitted 339 cases of infantile gastroenteritis; one-third of these were dehydrated, and in this group the commonest biochemical abnormality found was hypernatraemia, sometimes with metabolic acidosis. A higher incidence of dehydration was found in the patients who had received oral glucose fluids before admission. Enteropathic Escherichia coli were isolated from the faeces of 16% of the cases. Associated infections, especially of the respiratory tract, were common. Treatment was aimed at the restoration of fluid and electrolyte balance. Usually this was achieved with oral fluids, though intravenous fluids were used in the most severely dehydrated cases. Recovery was complete in 320 cases and a further 14 cases were discharged as carriers of enteropathic E. coli. There were five deaths (1·5%) in the series; three occurred immediately after admission. PMID:4913493

  11. Infantile hemangiomas, complications and treatments.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Carol Erin; Friedlander, Sheila Fallon

    2016-03-01

    Infantile hemangiomas (IHs) are the most common vascular tumors of infancy. While the majority regress without the need for intervention, approximately 10%, often site dependent, can cause serious complications and require treatment. IH complications can be categorized as life threatening, obstructive, ulcerative or disfiguring. Life threatening complications include airway and hepatic IHs. Functional complications obstructing vital structures or impairing function include periocular, nasal, labial, parotid, auricular, and breast IHs. Local complications arise from ulceration or those in cosmetically sensitive areas. Therapeutic options for complicated IHs include pharmacologic (topical or systemic), surgical, or laser interventions. Topical agents are best employed for small, superficial, and localized IHs; while systemic therapy is reserved for larger IHs and those with more aggressive growth characteristics with propranolol as first-line therapy. PMID:27607318

  12. Malignant thymoma.

    PubMed

    Wang, L S; Huang, M H; Lin, T S; Huang, B S; Chien, K Y

    1992-07-15

    Sixty-one patients underwent operations for malignant thymomas between 1961 and 1989. Twenty-three patients had associated myasthenia gravis (MG), an incidence of 37.7%. Upon being admitted to the hospital, the patients' most common symptoms included chest pain, MG, cough, and dyspnea. Only 7 of 61 (11.5%) patients had no symptom. Tumor staging of 58 patients with invasive thymomas was performed according to Masaoka classification. The patients were classified as follows: Stage II disease, 5; Stage III, 41; Stage IVa, 8; and Stage IVb, 4. In addition, thymic carcinoma was present in three patients. The series had a resection rate of 55.7%. The incidence of operative complications was 16.3%. Only one patient died of myocardial infarction; the incidence of operative mortality was 1.6%. The patients with MG had a higher rate of resection (69.6%) and a higher incidence of complete thymectomy (14 of 23 patients; 60.9%). Mixed lymphoepithelial tumors and epithelial cell predominant tumors were the most frequent histologic patterns (45.9% and 34.4%, respectively). Fifty-two patients had postoperative radiation therapy, and 10 patients had chemotherapy. The overall cumulative survival rates in the series were 59% and 34% at 5 and 10 years, respectively. The results demonstrated that the factors affecting the prognosis may include resectability, postoperative irradiation or chemotherapy, MG, and tumor staging. The influence of histologic variation on survival rates could not be clearly defined in the series. Surgical resection, particularly complete thymectomy, followed by irradiation is the primary option of therapeutic management for malignant thymoma. PMID:1617594

  13. Considerations for the Treatment of Infantile Neuronal Ceroid Lipofuscinosis (Infantile Batten Disease)

    PubMed Central

    Sands, Mark S.

    2014-01-01

    The infantile form of neuronal ceroid lipofuscinosis (ie, infantile Batten disease) is the most rapidly progressing type and is caused by an inherited deficiency in the lysosomal enzyme palmitoyl protein thioesterase 1. The absence of enzyme activity leads to progressive accumulation of autofluorescent material in many cell types, particularly neurons of the central nervous system. Clinical signs of infantile neuronal ceroid lipofuscinosis appear between 6 months and 1 year of age and include vision loss, cognitive decline, motor deficits, seizures, and premature death, typically by 3 to 5 years of age. There is currently no effective treatment. However, preclinical experiments in the murine model of infantile neuronal ceroid lipofuscinosis have shown that gene therapy, enzyme replacement, stem cell transplantation, and small molecule drugs, alone or in combination, can significantly slow disease progression. A more thorough understanding of the underlying pathogenesis of infantile neuronal ceroid lipofuscinosis will identify new therapeutic targets. PMID:24014510

  14. Malignant hyperpyrexia

    PubMed Central

    Isaacs, Hyam; Barlow, M. B.

    1973-01-01

    The history, clinical presentation, and management of malignant hyperpyrexia are presented. The aetiology seems to be associated with some inherited abnormality which affects the movement and binding of calcium ions in the sarcoplasmic reticulum, sarcoplasm, and mitochondria. Whether this is a primary muscular defect or secondary to some trophic neural influence is yet to be established. The subjects carrying the abnormal trait show evidence of a myopathy which is subclinical in most instances and revealed only by estimation of serum CPK or biopsy. In some families where the myopathy is clinically obvious there may be, in addition, a variety of musculoskeletal abnormalities. A plea is made for routine monitoring of temperature during anaesthesia and for procainamide or procaine to be readily available in all operating theatres. A history of anaesthetic deaths in a family calls for special care, and, if the serum CPK is elevated, suxamethonium and halothane are to be avoided. Families with orthopaedic and muscular abnormalities are at increased risk and should have estimation of serum CPK before surgery. As a bonus of this study it is suggested that serum CPK estimations be used to screen pigs for selective breeding and so eliminate the disease, which causes soft exudative pork. Images PMID:4708457

  15. Whole-exome sequencing identifies mutations in the nucleoside transporter gene SLC29A3 in dysosteosclerosis, a form of osteopetrosis

    PubMed Central

    Campeau, Philippe M.; Lu, James T.; Sule, Gautam; Jiang, Ming-Ming; Bae, Yangjin; Madan, Simran; Högler, Wolfgang; Shaw, Nicholas J.; Mumm, Steven; Gibbs, Richard A.; Whyte, Michael P.; Lee, Brendan H.

    2012-01-01

    Dysosteosclerosis (DSS) is the form of osteopetrosis distinguished by the presence of skin findings such as red-violet macular atrophy, platyspondyly and metaphyseal osteosclerosis with relative radiolucency of widened diaphyses. At the histopathological level, there is a paucity of osteoclasts when the disease presents. In two patients with DSS, we identified homozygous or compound heterozygous missense mutations in SLC29A3 by whole-exome sequencing. This gene encodes a nucleoside transporter, mutations in which cause histiocytosis–lymphadenopathy plus syndrome, a group of conditions with little or no skeletal involvement. This transporter is essential for lysosomal function in mice. We demonstrate the expression of Slc29a3 in mouse osteoclasts in vivo. In monocytes from patients with DSS, we observed reduced osteoclast differentiation and function (demineralization of calcium surface). Our report highlights the pleomorphic consequences of dysfunction of this nucleoside transporter, and importantly suggests a new mechanism for the control of osteoclast differentiation and function. PMID:22875837

  16. Desmoplastic infantile and non-infantile ganglioglioma. Review of the literature.

    PubMed

    Gelabert-Gonzalez, Miguel; Serramito-García, Ramón; Arcos-Algaba, Andrea

    2010-04-01

    Desmoplastic gangliogliomas (DIG) are rare primary neoplasms that comprise 0.5-1.0% of all intracranial tumors. Clinically, there are two forms of DIG, the infantile and the non-infantile. These tumors invariably arise in the supratentorial region and commonly involve more than one lobe, preferentially the temporal and frontal. On neuroimaging are seen as large hypodense cystic masses with a solid isodense or slightly hyperdense superficial portion. The histologic diagnosis is characterized by the presence of three different cell lines: astrocytic, neuronal, and primitive neuroectodermal marker sites, which were demonstrable. The treatment of choice is radical surgical excision, and if this is done, achieved complete healing of the patient does not require additional treatment. A literature review of DIG was compiled through Medline/Ovid using the keywords "desmoplastic infantile ganglioglioma", "desmoplastic non-infantile ganglioglioma" covering the years 1984-2009. We present a review of a total of 113 cases of infantile (94) and non-infantile gangliogliomas (19) published to date, examining the clinical, radiologic, surgical, and pathological aspects, as well as the outcome. Desmoplastic gangliogliomas represent a rare tumor group with two well-defined age groups, the children and non-children. Desmoplastic infantile gangliogliomas are the most common and occur in children below 5 years of age, and the large majority of them present within the first year of life. Surgery is the treatment of choice and no complementary treatment is needed in cases of complete tumor resection. PMID:21246390

  17. Radiological features of infantile glioblastoma and desmoplastic infantile tumors: British Columbia's Children's Hospital experience.

    PubMed

    Bader, Ahmad; Heran, Manraj; Dunham, Christopher; Steinbok, Paul

    2015-08-01

    OBJECT Two of the more common infantile brain tumors, glioblastoma multiforme (GBM) and desmoplastic infantile tumors (DITs), can be difficult to distinguish on MRI. Both tumors occur in the supratentorial compartment and both have solid and cystic components. Differentiating between the 2 on MRI studies could assist the surgeon in discussions with family and child management. The authors report on their institutional experience with both tumors, focusing on radio-graphic features, especially the diffusion studies, which might be useful in distinguishing between infantile GBM and DIT. METHODS A retrospective review was undertaken of all infantile brain tumors treated at British Columbia's Children's Hospital between 1982 and 2012, and cases of GBM and DIT were recorded. Only cases that had imaging were included in the study. A literature review was completed to identify reported cases of infantile GBM and DIT. Only reports that described or included radiological studies (particularly MRI) of the tumors were included. Certain radiographic features of the tumors were reviewed, including location, size, consistency, pattern of enhancement, and features on MR diffusion studies. RESULTS Of 70 cases of infantile brain tumors, 2 GBM cases and 3 DIT cases (all 3 of which were desmoplastic infantile gangliogliomas [DIGs]) met the inclusion criteria. The radiological studies obtained in all 5 cases were reviewed by a neuroradiologist. All 5 patients had supratentorial tumors with cystic-solid consistency. Diffusion MRI studies showed restricted diffusion in the 2 GBM cases, but no evidence of restricted diffusion in the DIG tumors. The GBM tumors were heterogeneously enhancing, and the DIG tumors showed avid and homogeneous enhancement. The literature review revealed 29 cases of infantile GBM and 32 cases of DIG/DIT that met the inclusion criteria. The tumors were large in both groups. The tumors were cystic-solid in consistency in 10 of 30 (33%) of GBM cases and 28 of 32

  18. [Morbus Albers Schonberg osteopetrosis].

    PubMed

    Saracević, Ediba; Hasanbegović, Edo

    2005-01-01

    The patient presented has bone disease, so called "mramor disease". The disease is characterized by insuffiticnty of ostcoclasts which results n persisting of primary spongiosis without normal eroding and bone rebuilding. The discase is diagnosed by X rays where the bone density is increased. The medular space is completly closed by dense bone knitting which, with soft cortical space, seems like bone in bone. This is autosomal recessive disease with serious clinical picture in infants. PMID:15875483

  19. Malassezia furfur in infantile seborrheic dermatitis.

    PubMed

    Tollesson, A; Frithz, A; Stenlund, K

    1997-01-01

    Malassezia furfur is important in the pathogenesis of a number of dermatologic diseases including seborrheic dermatitis in adults. It has also recently been suggested that M. furfur might be the etiologic agent in infantile seborrheic dermatitis (ISD). We studied the presence of M. furfur in 21 children with the clinical diagnosis of infantile seborrheic dermatitis. Laboratory analyses showed aberrant patterns of essential fatty acids (EFA) in serum characterized by elevated levels of 18:1w9 and 20:2w6. Samples for M. furfur were taken from the foreheads and chests of children with infantile seborrheic dermatitis at the time of diagnosis, directly after treatment to complete healing, and after 1 year with no signs of infantile seborrheic dermatitis. All the patients were treated topically with borage oil containing 25% gammalinolenic acid (GLA). No reduced growth of M. furfur was seen on contact plates prepared with borage oil. The growth of M. furfur seems not to be related to the clinical symptoms in ISD. PMID:9436835

  20. Infantile Amnesia: Forgotten but Not Gone

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Li, Stella; Callaghan, Bridget L.; Richardson, Rick

    2014-01-01

    Unlike adult memories that can be remembered for many years, memories that are formed early in life are more fragile and susceptible to being forgotten (a phenomenon known as "infantile" or "childhood" amnesia). Nonetheless, decades of research in both humans and nonhuman animals demonstrate the importance of early life…

  1. Hirschsprung's disease with infantile nephropathic cystinosis.

    PubMed

    Mittal, Deepak; Bagga, Arvind; Tandon, Radhika; Sharma, Mehar Chand; Bhatnagar, Veereshwar

    2015-01-01

    The case of a 3-year-old boy diagnosed to have Hirschsprung's disease with infantile nephropathic cystinosis is being reported. Both these conditions are etiologically and genetically different as per current understanding and available information. The association is incidental and has not reported before in the English literature. PMID:26166990

  2. Malignant teratoma (image)

    MedlinePlus

    A malignant teratoma is a type of cancer consisting of cysts that contain one or more of the three primary embryonic germ layers: ectoderm, mesoderm, and endoderm. Because malignant teratomas have usually spread by the time of diagnosis, ...

  3. Pediatric Salivary Gland Malignancies.

    PubMed

    Ord, Robert A; Carlson, Eric R

    2016-02-01

    Pediatric malignant salivary gland tumors are extremely rare. The percentage of malignant tumors is higher than that seen in adults, although the outcomes in terms of survival are better in pediatric patients. The mainstay of treatment is surgical excision with negative margins. This article reviews current concepts in demographics, etiology, management, and outcomes of malignant salivary tumors in children. PMID:26614703

  4. Giant infantile hemangioendothelioma of the liver. Scintigraphic diagnosis.

    PubMed

    Park, C H; Hwang, H S; Hong, J; Pak, M S

    1996-04-01

    Infantile hemangioendothelioma of the liver is benign mesenchymal tumor composed of anastomosing vascular channels lined with plump endothelial cells. It is a congenital lesion noted at birth or during the first 6 months of life. The authors report a large infantile hemangioendothelioma that was imaged with anatomical modalities and Tc-99m RBC scintigraphy. An early "blush" on Tc-99m RBC hepatic scintigraphy is a diagnostic feature of infantile hemangioendothelioma. PMID:8925610

  5. Low-dose propranolol for infantile haemangioma.

    PubMed

    Tan, Swee T; Itinteang, Tinte; Leadbitter, Philip

    2011-03-01

    In 2008, propranolol was serendipitously observed to cause accelerated involution of infantile haemangioma. However, the mechanism by which it causes this dramatic effect is unknown, the dosage empirical and the optimal duration of treatment unexplored. This study determines the minimal dosage and duration of propranolol treatment to achieve accelerated involution of problematic infantile haemangioma. Consecutive patients with problematic proliferating infantile haemangioma treated with propranolol were culled from our prospective vascular anomalies database. The patients were initially managed as inpatients and commenced on propranolol at 0.25 mg kg(-1) twice daily, and closely monitored. The dosage was increased to 0.5 mg kg(-1) twice daily after 24 h, if there was no cardiovascular or metabolic side effect. The dosage was increased further by 0.5 mg kg(-1) day(-1) until a visible effect was noticed or up to a maximum of 2 mg kg(-1) day(-1), and was maintained until the lesion had fully involuted or the child was 12-months old. A total of 15 patients aged 3 weeks to 8.5 months (mean, 11 weeks) underwent propranolol treatment for problematic proliferating infantile haemangioma, which threatened life (n=1) or vision (n=2) or nasal obstruction (n=3) and/or caused ulceration (n=6) and/or bleeding (n=2) and/or significant tissue distortion (n=12). The minimal dosage required to achieve accelerated involution was 1.5-2.0 mg kg(-1) day(-1). Rebound growth occurred in the first patient when the dose was withdrawn at 7.5 months of age requiring reinstitution of treatment. No rebound growth was observed in the remaining patients. No other complications were observed. Propranolol at 1.5-2.0 mg kg(-1) day(-1), administered in divided doses with gradual increase in the dose, is effective and safe for treating problematic proliferating infantile haemangioma in our cohort of patients. Treatment should be maintained until the lesion is completely involuted or the child is 12

  6. Segmental neurofibromatosis and malignancy.

    PubMed

    Dang, Julie D; Cohen, Philip R

    2010-01-01

    Segmental neurofibromatosis is an uncommon variant of neurofibromatosis type I characterized by neurofibromas and/or café-au-lait macules localized to one sector of the body. Although patients with neurofibromatosis type I have an associated increased risk of certain malignancies, malignancy has only occasionally been reported in patients with segmental neurofibromatosis. The published reports of patients with segmental neurofibromatosis who developed malignancy were reviewed and the characteristics of these patients and their cancers were summarized. Ten individuals (6 women and 4 men) with segmental neurofibromatosis and malignancy have been reported. The malignancies include malignant peripheral nerve sheath tumor (3), malignant melanoma (2), breast cancer (1), colon cancer (1), gastric cancer (1), lung cancer (1), and Hodgkin lymphoma (1). The most common malignancies in patients with segmental neurofibromatosis are derived from neural crest cells: malignant peripheral nerve sheath tumor and malignant melanoma. The incidence of malignancy in patients with segmental neurofibromatosis may approach that of patients with neurofibromatosis type I. PMID:21137621

  7. Infantile systemic hyalinosis in identical twins

    PubMed Central

    Koonuru, Mahesh Kumar; Venugopal, Satya Prasad

    2015-01-01

    Summary Infantile systemic hyalinosis (ISH) is a rare disorder belonging to the heterogeneous group of genetic fibromatoses. It is a rare, progressive, fatal autosomal recessive condition characterized by widespread deposition of hyaline material in many tissues caused by mutations in the anthrax toxin receptor 2 gene - ANTXR2. It presents hyperpigmented skin over bony prominences. Characteristic purplish patches develop over the medial and lateral malleoli of the ankles, the metacarpophalangeal joints, spine and elbows, with progressive joint contractures, osteopenia, skin abnormalities and chronic severe pain. The present case reports the occurrence of infantile systemic hyalinosis in twin brothers five months of age who had come for early intervention for joint contractures representing characteristic brownish patches over bony prominences. ISH cases reported until this date have been less than 20 and the present case is unique in nature since this is the first time ISH is reported in twins globally and the symptoms have been identified at an early age. PMID:26668783

  8. Idiopathic infantile hypercalcaemia--a continuing enigma.

    PubMed Central

    Martin, N D; Snodgrass, G J; Cohen, R D

    1984-01-01

    Seventy six children with documented Fanconi-type idiopathic infantile hypercalcaemia were studied and compared with 41 with the Williams-Beuren syndrome. Clinical comparison showed, as expected, very close similarities but also considerable differences, particularly in the severity of feeding problems and the degree of failure to thrive. The estimated incidence of idiopathic infantile hypercalcaemia alone has remained constant for the past 20 years, at approximately 18 cases per year in the United Kingdom (1 per 47 000 total live births). Long term morbidity in these children is mainly due to mental handicap and arteriopathy, but hypertension (29%), kyphoscoliosis (19%), hyperacusis (75%), and obesity (50%) may be added complications. In one child, hypercalcaemia recurred during adolescence but this seems to be excessively rare. More detailed investigation before treatment is required to discover the aetiology of hypercalcaemia in this condition. Images Fig. 2 PMID:6465928

  9. Infantile systemic hyalinosis in identical twins.

    PubMed

    Koonuru, Mahesh Kumar; Venugopal, Satya Prasad

    2015-11-01

    Infantile systemic hyalinosis (ISH) is a rare disorder belonging to the heterogeneous group of genetic fibromatoses. It is a rare, progressive, fatal autosomal recessive condition characterized by widespread deposition of hyaline material in many tissues caused by mutations in the anthrax toxin receptor 2 gene - ANTXR2. It presents hyperpigmented skin over bony prominences. Characteristic purplish patches develop over the medial and lateral malleoli of the ankles, the metacarpophalangeal joints, spine and elbows, with progressive joint contractures, osteopenia, skin abnormalities and chronic severe pain. The present case reports the occurrence of infantile systemic hyalinosis in twin brothers five months of age who had come for early intervention for joint contractures representing characteristic brownish patches over bony prominences. ISH cases reported until this date have been less than 20 and the present case is unique in nature since this is the first time ISH is reported in twins globally and the symptoms have been identified at an early age. PMID:26668783

  10. Laparoscopic management of infantile hypertrophic pyloric stenosis.

    PubMed

    Gogolja, D; Visnjić, S; Maldini, B; Radesić, L; Roić, G; Zganjer, M; Fattorini, I

    2001-01-01

    Infantile hypertrophic pyloric stenosis is a common problem in pediatric surgery. Conventional management by the upper laparotomy was the method of choice over the last few decades. Advanced minimally invasive surgery allows successful endoscopic management of this entity too. We report on our initial experience with endoscopic surgery in the treatment of infantile hypertrophic pyloric stenosis with respect to some technical details. The operative procedure was well tolerated by the infant. After a short and uneventful postoperative course, the infant regained eating habits and was discharged from the hospital on the fifth postoperative day. Our favourable initial experience suggests that laparoscopic pyloromyotomy could be a safe and efficient alternative to the open surgery. PMID:11428282

  11. Infantile and acquired nystagmus in childhood.

    PubMed

    Ehrt, Oliver

    2012-11-01

    Nystagmus is an involuntary, periodic eye movement caused by a slow drift of fixation which is followed by a fast refixation saccade (jerk nystagmus) or a slow movement back to fixation (pendular nystagmus). In childhood most cases are benign forms of nystagmus: idiopathic infantile, ocular or latent nystagmus. They arise at the age of 3 months, without oscillopsia and show the absence of the physiologic opto-kinetic nystagmus. A full ophthalmologic evaluation is all that is needed in most cases: albinism, macular or optic nerve hypoplasia and congenital retinal dystrophies are the most common forms of ocular nystagmus. Idiopathic infantile nystagmus can be hereditary, the most common and best analyzed form being a mutation of the FRMD7 gene on chromosome Xq26.2. The mutation shows a mild genotype-phenotype correlation. In all female carriers the opto-kinetic nystagmus is absent and half had mild nystagmus. Latent nystagmus is part of the infantile esotropia syndrome and shows the unique feature of change of direction when the fixing eye changes: it is always beating to the side of the fixing eye. There is no cure for infantile nystagmus but therapeutic options include magnifying visual aids or eye muscle surgery at the age of 6-8 y in patients with head turn. Less than 20% of childhood nystagmus are acquired and need further neurological and imaging work-up. Alarming signs and symptoms are: onset after the age of 4 months, oscillopsia, dissociated (asymmetric) nystagmus, preserved opto-kinetic nystagmus, afferent pupillary defect, papilloedema and neurological symptoms like vertigo and nausea. The most common cause is due to pathology of the anterior optic pathway (e.g. optic nerve gliomas). It shows the same clinical feature of dissociated nystagmus as spasmus nutans but has a higher frequency as in INO. Other forms of acquired nystagmus are due to brainstem, cerebellar or metabolic diseases. PMID:22459007

  12. Changing trends in characteristics of infantile hydronephrosis

    PubMed Central

    Nickavar, Azar; Nasiri, Seyyed Javad; Lahouti Harahdashti, Arash

    2014-01-01

    Background: Hydronephrosis (HN) or calycial dilatation is the most common prenatal urologic abnormality. The aim of this study was to identify the possible changes in demographic and clinical manifestations of infantile HN in previously and recently diagnosed patients. Methods: 193 children with infantile HN admitted to Ali-asghar Children's Hospital in two different periods (group 1; 1997-2003, and group 2; 2005-2011) were evaluated in this cross-sectional study. Variables such as time at diagnosis, gender, clinical manifestations, etiology, laterality, grade, and associated anomalies were also evaluated. Results: The mean age at diagnosis was 32.3± 42.6 (group 1) and 21.4± 36.4 (group 2), respectively. 69.8% of patients were males. 75% of prenatally diagnosed patients were asymptomatic. Urinary tract infection was the most common symptom, followed by pain, hematuria, and decreased renal function. Obstruction in ureteropelvic junction was the most common etiology, accounting for 39.6% of all patients. Neurogenic bladder, vesicoureteral reflux, nephrolithiasis, and ureterovesical junction obstruction were the other common etiologies. 55.5% of all patients had unilateral HN, which was more common on the left side. No significant difference documented between two groups of patients, except for mild HN (23.7% vs. 39%), which was more common in newly diagnosed patients (p= 0.001). Conclusion: There was no changing trend in demographic and clinical manifestations of infantile HN. However, the severity of infantile HN has been decreased significantly in recently diagnosed patients. PMID:25250281

  13. Infantile refsum disease in four Amish sibs.

    PubMed

    Bader, P I; Dougherty, S; Cangany, N; Raymond, G; Jackson, C E

    2000-01-17

    Infantile Refsum disease (IRD) appears with varying degrees of impaired vision, hearing loss, developmental delays, and neuromotor deficiencies. We report on four Amish sibs with IRD from a consanguineous marriage; biochemical testing supported the diagnosis of IRD. Of particular interest in this sibship are characteristic poorly formed yellow-orange teeth in at least three of the four affected sibs and behavior problems in the affected females. PMID:10607947

  14. Youngest netherton patient with infantile asthma.

    PubMed

    Kutsal, Ebru; Gücüyener, Kivilcim; Bakirtaş, Arzu; Eldeş, Nilüfer; Oztaş, Murat; Dursun, Ayşe

    2008-01-01

    Netherton syndrome is a very rare disorder characterized with icthyosis, atopy, bamboo hair and intermittant aminoaciduria. The specifity of clinical and histopathological features of netherton syndrome is low in neonates and young infants who presents with predominating erythrodermia. Being the youngest infant presenting with the symptoms of infantile asthma we found it worth to report a six months old girl presenting with the feature of severe respiratory distress, generalized erythrodermia, and brittle hair. PMID:18330764

  15. [Clinical research progress in infantile nystagmus syndrome].

    PubMed

    Zong, Yao; Wang, Li-hua

    2013-07-01

    Infantile nystagmus syndrome (INS) is an ocular motor disorder that presents at birth or early infancy. It is clinically characterized by involuntary and conjugated oscillation of the eyes, which often causes several complications such as amblyopia, lateral view, strabismus and torticollis. The etiology of INS is not fully understood, and this disease cannot be cured completely. This paper reviews the progress of research on the concept, etiology and pathogenesis, clinical manifestations, common examination methods, diagnosis and treatment of INS. PMID:24257363

  16. Part Two: Infantile Spasms--The New Consensus

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pellock, John M.; O'Hara, Kathryn

    2011-01-01

    This article presents the conclusion made by the consensus group regarding infantile spasms. The consensus group concluded that "infantile spasms are a major form of severe epileptic encephalopathy of early childhood that results in neurodevelopmental regression and imposes a significant health burden." The entire group agrees that the best…

  17. Physiological Regulation and Infantile Anorexia: A Pilot Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chatoor, Irene; Ganiban, Jody; Surles, Jaclyn; Doussard-Roosevelt, Jane

    2004-01-01

    Objective: To examine whether infantile anorexia is associated with physiological dysregulation. Method: This study included eight toddlers with infantile anorexia and eight healthy eaters matched for age, race, socioeconomic status, and gender. Physiological measures of heart period and respiratory sinus arrhythmia were assessed across three…

  18. CSF B-Endorphin Levels in Patients with Infantile Autism.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nagamitsu, Shinichiro; And Others

    1997-01-01

    A Japanese study measured CSF (cerebrospinal fluid) levels of beta-endorphin in 19 children (ages 4-6) with infantile autism and in 3 children (ages 10-14) with Rett syndrome. In infantile autism, levels did not differ significantly from control participants (n=23). However, levels were significantly higher in those with Rett syndrome. (Author/CR)

  19. [Infantile hemangiomas: the revolution of beta-blockers].

    PubMed

    Leaute-Labreze, Christine

    2014-12-01

    Infantile hemangioma is the consequence of both postnatal vasculogenesis and angiogenesis. Hypoxia appears to play an important role as a contributory factor. Infantile hemangiomas have variable clinical features: superficial, deep or mixed. They can be localized or segmental involving a large skin area. Localized infantile hemangiomas are usually benign, unless they are located near a noble structure (airway orbit...), while segmental infantile hemangioma may be associated with complex underlying birth defects (PHACES and SACRAL syndromes). Clinical follow-up of infants with infantile hemangioma must be particularly careful in the first weeks of life since 80% of all infantile hemangiomas have reached their final size at age 5 months. A majority of infantile hemangiomas are mild and do not required any treatment. Main indications for treatment are: vital risk (heart failure, respiratory distress), functional risk (amblyopia, swallowing disorders...), painful ulceration and disfigurement (face involvement of nose, lips...). Propranolol, has been quickly adopted as the first line medical treatment for complicated infantile hemangioma; and it is the only treatment to have a marketing authorization in this indication. It is recommended to begin the treatment as early as possible before three months of age to minimize the risk of complications and sequelae. PMID:25665327

  20. Extending Childhood into the Teen Years: "Infantilization" and Its Consequences

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Skager, Rodney

    2009-01-01

    Young people sandwiched between childhood and adulthood often rebel when adults treat them like children rather than with the respect that acknowledges their intelligence and potential. Research and theory supporting the view of "infantilizing" adolescents has proliferated. The extent to which modern cultures infantilize youth is evident in…

  1. PRRT2 mutation in Japanese children with benign infantile epilepsy.

    PubMed

    Okumura, Akihisa; Shimojima, Keiko; Kubota, Tetsuo; Abe, Shinpei; Yamashita, Shintaro; Imai, Katsumi; Okanishi, Tohru; Enoki, Hideo; Fukasawa, Tatsuya; Tanabe, Takuya; Dibbens, Leanne M; Shimizu, Toshiaki; Yamamoto, Toshiyuki

    2013-08-01

    Mutations in PRRT2 genes have been identified as a major cause of benign infantile epilepsy and/or paroxysmal kinesigenic dyskinesia. We explored mutations in PRRT2 in Japanese patients with BIE as well as its related conditions including convulsion with mild gastroenteritis and benign early infantile epilepsy. We explored PRRT2 mutations in Japanese children who had had unprovoked infantile seizures or convulsion with mild gastroenteritis. The probands included 16 children with benign infantile epilepsy, 6 children with convulsions with mild gastroenteritis, and 2 siblings with benign early infantile epilepsy. In addition, we recruited samples from family members when PRRT2 mutation was identified in the proband. Statistical analyses were performed to identify differences in probands with benign infantile epilepsy according to the presence or absence of PRRT2 mutation. Among a total of 24 probands, PRRT2 mutations was identified only in 6 probands with benign infantile epilepsy. A common insertion mutation, c.649_650insC, was found in 5 families and a novel missense mutation, c.981C>G (I327M), in one. The family history of paroxysmal kinesigenic dyskinesia was more common in probands with PRRT2 mutations than in those without mutations. Our study revealed that PRRT2 mutations are common in Japanese patients with benign infantile epilepsy, especially in patients with a family history of paroxysmal kinesigenic dyskinesia. PMID:23131349

  2. Malignant Vagal Paraganglioma.

    PubMed

    Hamersley, Erin R S; Barrows, Amy; Perez, Angel; Schroeder, Ashley; Castle, James T

    2016-06-01

    Paragangliomas are rare, typically benign neuroendocrine tumors that represent a small portion of head and neck tumors. A small percentage of these are known to have malignant potential. They arise from the carotid body, jugular bulb or vagus nerves. There is limited literature discussing the management of malignant vagal paragangliomas. We present a case of a 25 year old female with a left malignant vagal paraganglioma. The following case presentation will describe the presentation, classic radiologic findings, and management of a malignant vagal paraganglioma along with a review of the literature. PMID:25712400

  3. History of the infantile hepatic hemangioma: From imaging to generating a differential diagnosis

    PubMed Central

    Gnarra, Maria; Behr, Gerald; Kitajewski, Alison; Wu, June K; Anupindi, Sudha A; Shawber, Carrie J; Zavras, Nick; Schizas, Dimitrios; Salakos, Chris; Economopoulos, Konstantinos P

    2016-01-01

    We aim to provide an up-to-date summary of infantile hepatic hemangioma (IHH) and its misnomers and to dialectically present the differential diagnosis of these rare entities of the liver. Eligible peer-reviewed articles on hepatic infantile hemangiomas, published between 2000 and 2015, were reviewed for this study. IHH is the most common hepatic vascular tumor in children. Once a liver mass is identified in an infant, the differential diagnosis ranges from vascular malformations to benign and malignant tumors including mesenchymal hamartoma, hepatoblastoma, metastatic neuroblastoma, so careful physical examination, imaging studies, and, if indicated, tumor markers and biopsy, are of pivotal importance to ascertain the correct diagnosis. Despite the benign nature of IHHs, some of these lesions may demand medical and/or surgical intervention, especially for multiple and diffuse IHH. Complications can include hepatomegaly, hypothyroidism and cardiac failure. Therefore, a close follow-up is required until complete involution of the lesions. We propose an algorithm to guide the physicians towards the proper management of hepatic lesions. PMID:27610342

  4. History of the infantile hepatic hemangioma: From imaging to generating a differential diagnosis.

    PubMed

    Gnarra, Maria; Behr, Gerald; Kitajewski, Alison; Wu, June K; Anupindi, Sudha A; Shawber, Carrie J; Zavras, Nick; Schizas, Dimitrios; Salakos, Chris; Economopoulos, Konstantinos P

    2016-08-01

    We aim to provide an up-to-date summary of infantile hepatic hemangioma (IHH) and its misnomers and to dialectically present the differential diagnosis of these rare entities of the liver. Eligible peer-reviewed articles on hepatic infantile hemangiomas, published between 2000 and 2015, were reviewed for this study. IHH is the most common hepatic vascular tumor in children. Once a liver mass is identified in an infant, the differential diagnosis ranges from vascular malformations to benign and malignant tumors including mesenchymal hamartoma, hepatoblastoma, metastatic neuroblastoma, so careful physical examination, imaging studies, and, if indicated, tumor markers and biopsy, are of pivotal importance to ascertain the correct diagnosis. Despite the benign nature of IHHs, some of these lesions may demand medical and/or surgical intervention, especially for multiple and diffuse IHH. Complications can include hepatomegaly, hypothyroidism and cardiac failure. Therefore, a close follow-up is required until complete involution of the lesions. We propose an algorithm to guide the physicians towards the proper management of hepatic lesions. PMID:27610342

  5. Malignancy after renal transplantation.

    PubMed

    Zeier, Martin; Hartschuh, Wolfgang; Wiesel, Manfred; Lehnert, Thomas; Ritz, Eberhard

    2002-01-01

    Malignancy following renal transplantation is an important medical problem during the long-term follow-up. The overall incidence of malignancy at this time is 3 to 5 times higher than in the general population. The most common malignancies are lymphoproliferative disorders (early after transplantation) and skin carcinomas (late after transplantation). The type of malignancy is different in various countries and dependent on genetic and environmental factors. Another important confounder for risk of malignancy after renal transplantation is the type of immunosuppression. Previous use of cytotoxic drugs (eg, cyclophosphamide) or a history of analgesic abuse are additional risk factors. Malignancy may even be transplanted by the graft. Previous cancer treatment in a uremic patient on the transplant waiting list is of great importance in relation to waiting time and postmalignancy screening. Finally, every dialysis patient on the waiting list should undergo a regular screening program before and after renal transplantation to detect a potentially malignant tumor in an early stage. In addition to specific oncological treatment, managing a malignancy after renal transplantation should include modification of immunosuppression. PMID:11774131

  6. Looking for new treatments of Infantile Colic.

    PubMed

    Savino, Francesco; Ceratto, Simone; De Marco, Angela; Cordero di Montezemolo, Luca

    2014-01-01

    Infantile colic is a common disturbance occurring in the first three months of life. It is a benign condition and one of the main causes of pediatric consultation in the early part of life because of its great impact on family life. Some pediatricians are prone to undervalue this issue mainly because of the lack of evidence based medicine guidelines. Up to now, there is no consensus concerning management and treatment. Literature reports growing evidence about the effectiveness of dietary, pharmacological, complementary and behavioral therapies as options for the management of infantile colic. Dietary approach, usually based on the avoidance of cow's milk proteins in breast-feeding mothers and bottle-fed infants, more recently has seen the rise of new special formulas, such as partially hydrolyzed proteins and low lactose added with prebiotics or probiotics: their efficacy needs to be further documented. Investigated pharmacological agents are Simethicone and Cimetropium Bromide: the first is able to reduce bloating while the second could reduce fussing crying, but it has been tested only for severe infantile colic. No other pain relieving agents have been proposed until now, but some clinical trials are ongoing for new drugs.There is limited evidence supporting the use of complementary and alternative treatments (herbal supplements, manipulative approach and acupuncture) or behavioral interventions.Recent studies have focused the role of microbiota in the pathogenesis of this disturb and so new treatments, such as probiotics, have been proposed, but only few strains have been tested.Further investigations are needed in order to provide evidence-based guidelines. PMID:24898541

  7. Probiotics for infantile colic: a systematic review

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Infantile colic is a common paediatric condition which causes significant parental distress. Increased intestinal coliform colonization in addition to alteration in Lactobacillus abundance and distribution may play an important role in its pathogenesis. The objectives of this systematic review are to evaluate the efficacy of probiotic supplementation in the reduction of crying time and successful treatment of infantile colic. Methods Literature searches were conducted of MEDLINE, EMBASE and the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials. Only randomized controlled trials enrolling term, healthy infants with colic were included. A meta-analysis of included trials was performed utilizing the Cochrane Collaboration methodology. Results Three trials that enrolled 220 breastfed infants met inclusion criteria, of which 209 infants were available for analysis. Two of the studies were assessed as good quality. Lactobacillus reuteri (strains-American Type Culture Collection Strain 55730 and DSM 17 938) was the only species utilized in the therapeutic intervention. Two of the trials were industry funded. Probiotic supplementation compared to simethicone or placebo significantly and progressively shortened crying times to 7 days reaching a plateau at three weeks post initiation of therapy [mean difference −56.03 minutes; 95% CI (−59.92, -52.15)]. Similarly, probiotics compared to placebo significantly increased the treatment success of infantile colic with a relative risk (RR) of 0.06; 95% CI (0.01, 0.25) and a number needed to treat of 2. Conclusions Although L. reuteri may be effective as a treatment strategy for crying in exclusively breastfed infants with colic, the evidence supporting probiotic use for the treatment of infant colic or crying in formula-fed infants remains unresolved. Results from larger rigorously designed studies will help draw more definitive conclusions. PMID:24238101

  8. Natural History of Infantile GM2 Gangliosidosis

    PubMed Central

    Bley, Annette E.; Giannikopoulos, Ourania A.; Hayden, Doug; Kubilus, Kim; Tifft, Cynthia J.

    2011-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: GM2 gangliosidoses are caused by an inherited deficiency of lysosomal β-hexosaminidase and result in ganglioside accumulation in the brain. Onset during infancy leads to rapid neurodegeneration and death before 4 years of age. We set out to quantify the rate of functional decline in infantile GM2 gangliosidosis on the basis of patient surveys and a comprehensive review of existing literature. METHODS: Patients with infantile GM2 gangliosidosis (N = 237) were surveyed via questionnaire by the National Tay Sachs & Allied Diseases Association (NTSAD). These data were supplemented by survival data from the NTSAD database and a literature survey. Detailed retrospective surveys from 97 patients were available. Five patients who had received hematopoietic stem cell transplantation were evaluated separately. The mortality rate of the remaining 92 patients was comparable to that of the 103 patients from the NTSAD database and 121 patients reported in the literature. RESULTS: Common symptoms at onset were developmental arrest (83%), startling (65%), and hypotonia (60%). All 55 patients who had learned to sit without support lost that ability within 1 year. Individual functional measures correlated with each other but not with survival. Gastric tube placement was associated with prolonged survival. Tay Sachs and Sandhoff variants did not differ. Hematopoietic stem cell transplantation was not associated with prolonged survival. CONCLUSIONS: We studied the timing of regression in 97 cases of infantile GM2 gangliosidosis and conclude that clinical disease progression does not correlate with survival, likely because of the impact of improved supportive care over time. However, functional measures are quantifiable and can inform power calculations and study design of future interventions. PMID:22025593

  9. Looking for new treatments of Infantile Colic

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Infantile colic is a common disturbance occurring in the first three months of life. It is a benign condition and one of the main causes of pediatric consultation in the early part of life because of its great impact on family life. Some pediatricians are prone to undervalue this issue mainly because of the lack of evidence based medicine guidelines. Up to now, there is no consensus concerning management and treatment. Literature reports growing evidence about the effectiveness of dietary, pharmacological, complementary and behavioral therapies as options for the management of infantile colic. Dietary approach, usually based on the avoidance of cow’s milk proteins in breast-feeding mothers and bottle-fed infants, more recently has seen the rise of new special formulas, such as partially hydrolyzed proteins and low lactose added with prebiotics or probiotics: their efficacy needs to be further documented. Investigated pharmacological agents are Simethicone and Cimetropium Bromide: the first is able to reduce bloating while the second could reduce fussing crying, but it has been tested only for severe infantile colic. No other pain relieving agents have been proposed until now, but some clinical trials are ongoing for new drugs. There is limited evidence supporting the use of complementary and alternative treatments (herbal supplements, manipulative approach and acupuncture) or behavioral interventions. Recent studies have focused the role of microbiota in the pathogenesis of this disturb and so new treatments, such as probiotics, have been proposed, but only few strains have been tested. Further investigations are needed in order to provide evidence-based guidelines. PMID:24898541

  10. Structure-based development of a receptor activator of nuclear factor-κB ligand (RANKL) inhibitor peptide and molecular basis for osteopetrosis

    PubMed Central

    Ta, Hai Minh; Nguyen, Giang Thi Tuyet; Jin, Hye Mi; Choi, Jongkeun; Park, Hyejin; Kim, Nacksung; Hwang, Hye-Yeon; Kim, Kyeong Kyu

    2010-01-01

    The receptor activator of nuclear factor-κB (RANK) and its ligand RANKL, which belong to the tumor necrosis factor (TNF) receptor-ligand family, mediate osteoclastogenesis. The crystal structure of the RANKL ectodomain (eRANKL) in complex with the RANK ectodomain (eRANK) combined with biochemical assays of RANK mutants indicated that three RANK loops (Loop1, Loop2, and Loop3) bind to the interface of a trimeric eRANKL. Loop3 is particularly notable in that it is structurally distinctive from other TNF-family receptors and forms extensive contacts with RANKL. The disulfide bond (C125-C127) at the tip of Loop3 is important for determining the unique topology of Loop3, and docking E126 close to RANKL, which was supported by the inability of C127A or E126A mutants of RANK to bind to RANKL. Inhibitory activity of RANK mutants, which contain loops of osteoprotegerin (OPG), a soluble decoy receptor to RANKL, confirmed that OPG shares the similar binding mode with RANK and OPG. Loop3 plays a key role in RANKL binding. Peptide inhibitors designed to mimic Loop3 blocked the RANKL-induced differentiation of osteoclast precursors, suggesting that they could be developed as therapeutic agents for the treatment of osteoporosis and bone-related diseases. Furthermore, some of the RANK mutations associated with autosomal recessive osteopetrosis (ARO) resulted in reduced RANKL-binding activity and failure to induce osteoclastogenesis. These results, together with structural interpretation of eRANK-eRANKL interaction, provided molecular understanding for pathogenesis of ARO. PMID:21059944

  11. Congenital infantile digital fibromatosis: a case report and review of the literature

    PubMed Central

    Failla, Valérie; Wauters, Odile; Nikkels-Tassoudji, Nazli; Carlier, Alain; André, Josette; Nikkels, Arjen F

    2009-01-01

    Infantile digital fibromatosis (IDF) is a rare benign fibroproliferative tumor of early childhood. IDF preferentially affects the fingers and the toes. Malignant transformation or metastases have never been reported. Surgical treatment has been advocated previously but local recurrences were observed frequently. Recent literature supports clinical surveillance without any medical or surgical intervention as spontaneous regression usually occurs after two to three years. A six-month-old Caucasian girl with IDF on the left fourth digit is presented here. The tumor progressively increased in size after birth. Topical imiquimod cream and diflucortolone valerate cream, both displaying antifibrotic properties, had no effect on tumor growth. Currently the lesion size remains stable without any treatment. Early recognition of IDF is important in order to avoid unnecessary surgical intervention that may prove to be potentially aggravating, unless serious functional or cosmetic concerns intervene. Parents should be reassured concerning the benign nature of IDF and be informed that spontaneous involution of IDF might be expected. PMID:21139926

  12. Congenital infantile digital fibromatosis: a case report and review of the literature.

    PubMed

    Failla, Valérie; Wauters, Odile; Nikkels-Tassoudji, Nazli; Carlier, Alain; André, Josette; Nikkels, Arjen F

    2009-01-01

    Infantile digital fibromatosis (IDF) is a rare benign fibroproliferative tumor of early childhood. IDF preferentially affects the fingers and the toes. Malignant transformation or metastases have never been reported. Surgical treatment has been advocated previously but local recurrences were observed frequently. Recent literature supports clinical surveillance without any medical or surgical intervention as spontaneous regression usually occurs after two to three years. A six-month-old Caucasian girl with IDF on the left fourth digit is presented here. The tumor progressively increased in size after birth. Topical imiquimod cream and diflucortolone valerate cream, both displaying antifibrotic properties, had no effect on tumor growth. Currently the lesion size remains stable without any treatment. Early recognition of IDF is important in order to avoid unnecessary surgical intervention that may prove to be potentially aggravating, unless serious functional or cosmetic concerns intervene. Parents should be reassured concerning the benign nature of IDF and be informed that spontaneous involution of IDF might be expected. PMID:21139926

  13. Primary malignant melanoma

    PubMed Central

    Mısır, A. Ferhat; Durmuşlar, Mustafa C.; Zerener, Tamer; Gün, Banu D.

    2016-01-01

    Malignant melanomas (MM) of the oral cavity are extremely rare, accounting for 0.2% to 8.0% of all malignant melanomas. Malignant melanomas is more frequently seen at the level of the hard palate and gingiva. Early diagnosis and treatment are important for reducing morbidity. Malignant melanoma cells stain positively with antibodies to human melanoma black 45, S-100 protein, and vimentin; therefore, immunohistochemistry can play an important role in evaluating the depth of invasion and the location of metastases. A 76-year-old man developed an oral malignant melanoma, which was originally diagnosed as a bluish reactive denture hyperplasia caused by an ill-fitting lower denture. The tumor was removed surgically, and histopathological examination revealed a nodular-type MM. There was no evidence of recurrence over a 4-year follow-up period. PMID:27052289

  14. Drugs Approved for Malignant Mesothelioma

    MedlinePlus

    ... Professionals Questions to Ask about Your Treatment Research Drugs Approved for Malignant Mesothelioma This page lists cancer ... in malignant mesothelioma that are not listed here. Drugs Approved for Malignant Mesothelioma Alimta (Pemetrexed Disodium) Pemetrexed ...

  15. Malignant melanoma maxilla

    PubMed Central

    Devi, Seema; Sinha, Richi; Singh, Rakesh Kumar

    2015-01-01

    A malignant melanoma is a highly lethal melanocytic neoplasm. A neoplasm usually affects the skin. Malignant melanomas in the head and neck region are rare, accounting for less than 1% of all melanomas. Malignant melanoma of the nose and paranasal sinuses is an aggressive disease typically presenting at an advanced stage, with a 5-year survival rate ranging 20-30%. Melanomas are tumors arising from melanocytes, which are neuroectodermally derived cells located in the basal layers of the skin. This is a case report of a 35-year-old male, who presented with very aggressive disease and developed liver metastasis. PMID:26668467

  16. Procaine in Malignant Hyperpyrexia

    PubMed Central

    Moulds, R. F. W.; Denborough, M. A.

    1972-01-01

    The caffeine contracture of normal human muscle, which has been used as a model for malignant hyperpyrexia, is greatly potentiated by halothane. Prior administration of procaine markedly reduces the halothane-potentiated caffeine contracture, and procaine given at the height of the contracture induces relaxation. Lignocaine, on the other hand, produces a variable response and sometimes increases the contracture. The muscle from a patient with an inherited susceptibility to malignant hyperpyrexia contracted spontaneously with halothane alone, and this contracture was reversed by procaine. These experiments support the therapeutic use of procaine in malignant hyperpyrexia. PMID:4642792

  17. Chemoembolization of hepatic malignancy.

    PubMed

    Gonsalves, Carin F; Brown, Daniel B

    2009-01-01

    Treatment of primary and secondary hepatic malignancies with transarterial chemoembolization represents an essential component of interventional oncology. This article discusses patient selection, procedure technique, results, and complications associated with transarterial chemoembolization. PMID:18668189

  18. [Rheumatoid arthritis and malignancy].

    PubMed

    Kameda, Tomohiro; Dobashi, Hiroaki

    2016-06-01

    Rheumatoid arthritis (RA) is associated with excess mortality. Especially, malignancy is a major cause of mortality. According to previous reports, the overall incidence of malignancies in RA patients has been reported to be comparable or slightly higher than that in general population. The increased incidence of malignant lymphoma and lung cancer has been reported to be consistent in most studies. The use of some csDMARD was also reported as risk factors for malignancy. Recently, MTX associated lymphoproliferative disorder(MTX-LPD) is one of the important complications in RA treatment. We revealed the mean MTX dose was demonstrated to be an independent risk factor regarding MTX-LPD onset in RA patients. This data suggest that the treatment with higher MTX dose promotes LPD onset in Japanese RA patients. PMID:27311195

  19. Gynecologic malignancy in pregnancy

    PubMed Central

    Ji, Yong Il

    2013-01-01

    Gynecologic malignancy during pregnancy is a stressful problem. For the diagnosis and treatment of malignancy during pregnancy, a multidisciplinary approach is needed. Patients should be advised about the benefits and risk of treatment. When selecting a treatment for malignancy during pregnancy, the physiologic changes that occur with the pregnancy should be considered. Various diagnostic procedures that do not harm the fetus can be used. Laparoscopic surgery or laparotomy may be safely performed. The staging approach and treatment should be standard. Systemic chemotherapy during the first trimester should be delayed if possible. Radiation therapy should preferably start postpartum. Although delivery should be delayed preferably until after 35 weeks of gestation, termination of pregnancy may be considered when immediate treatment is required. Subsequent pregnancies do not increase the risk of malignancy recurrence. PMID:24328018

  20. Panuveal malignant mesenchymoma.

    PubMed

    Pe'er, J; Neudorfer, M; Ron, N; Anteby, I; Lazar, M; Rosenmann, E

    1995-09-01

    Intraocular malignant mesenchymal tumors are very rare, and only a few case reports of such primary and metastatic tumors have been reported. We report a case of a malignant mesenchymoma involving the entire uveal tract. A 21-year-old woman presented with a tumor on the whole iris of the right eye, which caused intractable glaucoma. Upon enucleation of the eye, a very anaplastic tumor was found to occupy the whole uveal tract; its features were compatible with a tumor of mesenchymal origin, including rhabdomyosarcomatous and liposarcomatous characteristics. Choroidal osteoma was a coincidental finding. The histologic findings of the tumor were of two types of malignant mesenchymal tumors, and therefore the diagnosis of malignant mesenchymoma was made. This is to our knowledge the first tumor of its kind to be reported intraocularly. PMID:7668945

  1. Pathogenesis and therapies for infantile neuronal ceroid lipofuscinosis (infantile CLN1 disease).

    PubMed

    Hawkins-Salsbury, Jacqueline A; Cooper, Jonathan D; Sands, Mark S

    2013-11-01

    The neuronal ceroid lipofuscinoses (NCL, Batten disease) are a group of inherited neurodegenerative diseases. Infantile neuronal ceroid lipofuscinosis (INCL, infantile Batten disease, or infantile CLN1 disease) is caused by a deficiency in the soluble lysosomal enzyme palmitoyl protein thioesterase-1 (PPT1) and has the earliest onset and fastest progression of all the NCLs. Several therapeutic strategies including enzyme replacement, gene therapy, stem cell-mediated therapy, and small molecule drugs have resulted in minimal to modest improvements in the murine model of PPT1-deficiency. However, more recent studies using various combinations of these approaches have shown more promising results; in some instances more than doubling the lifespan of PPT1-deficient mice. These combination therapies that target different pathogenic mechanisms may offer the hope of treating this profoundly neurodegenerative disorder. Similar approaches may be useful when treating other forms of NCL caused by deficiencies in soluble lysosomal proteins. Different therapeutic targets will need to be identified and novel strategies developed in order to effectively treat forms of NCL caused by deficiencies in integral membrane proteins such as juvenile neuronal ceroid lipofuscinosis. Finally, the challenge with all of the NCLs will lie in early diagnosis, improving the efficacy of the treatments, and effectively translating them into the clinic. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled: The Neuronal Ceroid Lipofuscinoses or Batten Disease. PMID:23747979

  2. Pathogenesis and Therapies for Infantile Neuronal Ceroid Lipofuscinosis (infantile CLN1 disease)

    PubMed Central

    Hawkins-Salsbury, Jacqueline A.; Cooper, Jonathan D.; Sands, Mark S.

    2015-01-01

    The Neuronal Ceroid Lipofuscinoses (NCL, Batten Disease) are a group of inherited neurodegenerative diseases. Infantile Neuronal Ceroid lipofuscinosis (INCL, Infantile Batten Disease, or infantile CLN1 disease) is caused by a deficiency in the soluble lysosomal enzyme palmitoyl protein thioesterase-1 (PPT1) and has the earliest onset and fastest progression of all the NCLs. Several therapeutic strategies including enzyme replacement, gene therapy, stem cell-mediated therapy, and small molecule drugs have resulted in minimal to modest improvements in the murine model of PPT1-deficiency. However, more recent studies using various combinations of these approaches have shown more promising results; in some instances more than doubling the life span of PPT1-deficient mice. These combination therapies that target different pathogenic mechanisms may offer the hope of treating this profoundly neurodegenerative disorder. Similar approaches may be useful when treating other forms of NCL caused by deficiencies in soluble lysosomal proteins. Different therapeutic targets will need to be identified and novel strategies developed in order to effectively treat forms of NCL caused by deficiencies in integral membrane proteins such as Juvenile Neuronal Ceroid Lipofuscinosis. Finally, the challenge with all of the NCLs will lie in early diagnosis, improving the efficacy of the treatments, and effectively translating them into the clinic. PMID:23747979

  3. The Malignant Protein Puzzle.

    PubMed

    Walker, Lary C; Jucker, Mathias

    2016-01-01

    When most people hear the words malignant and brain, cancer immediately comes to mind. But our authors argue that proteins can be malignant too, and can spread harmfully through the brain in neurodegenerative diseases that include Alzheimer's, Parkinson's, CTE, and ALS. Studying how proteins such as PrP, amyloid beta, tau, and others aggregate and spread, and kill brain cells, represents a crucial new frontier in neuroscience. PMID:27408676

  4. Genetics Home Reference: X-linked infantile nystagmus

    MedlinePlus

    ... infantile nystagmus is a condition characterized by abnormal eye movements. Nystagmus is a term that refers to involuntary ... the first six months of life. The abnormal eye movements may worsen when an affected person is feeling ...

  5. Sorafenib Tosylate in Treating Patients With Malignant Mesothelioma.

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2013-06-04

    Epithelial Mesothelioma; Recurrent Malignant Mesothelioma; Sarcomatous Mesothelioma; Stage IA Malignant Mesothelioma; Stage IB Malignant Mesothelioma; Stage II Malignant Mesothelioma; Stage III Malignant Mesothelioma; Stage IV Malignant Mesothelioma

  6. Malignant Tourette syndrome.

    PubMed

    Cheung, Min-Yuen Cynthia; Shahed, Joohi; Jankovic, Joseph

    2007-09-15

    The aim of this work was to draw attention to potentially life-threatening symptoms associated with Tourette syndrome (TS) and to explore their relationship to TS comorbidities. Medical records of all patients with TS evaluated at our Movement Disorders Clinic between July 2003 and July 2006 were reviewed. Data on patients with malignant TS, defined as >or=2 emergency room (ER) visits or >or=1 hospitalizations for TS symptoms or its associated behavioral comorbidities, were entered into a dataset and analyzed. Five illustrative cases are described. Of 333 TS patients evaluated during the 3-year period, 17 (5.1%) met the criteria for malignant TS. Hospital admission or ER visits were for tic-related injuries, self-injurious behavior (SIB), uncontrollable violence and temper, and suicidal ideation/attempts. Compared with patients with nonmalignant TS, those with malignant TS were significantly more likely to have a personal history of obsessive compulsive behavior/disorder (OCB/OCD), complex phonic tics, coprolalia, copropraxia, SIB, mood disorder, suicidal ideation, and poor response to medications. Although TS is rarely a disabling disorder, about 5% of patients referred to a specialty clinic have life-threatening symptoms. Malignant TS is associated with greater severity of motor symptoms and the presence of >or=2 behavioral comorbidities. OCD/OCB in particular may play a central role in malignant TS; obsessive compulsive qualities were associated with life-threatening tics, SIB, and suicidal ideation. Malignant TS is more refractory to medical treatment than nonmalignant TS. PMID:17566119

  7. Neonatal hypoglycemic brain injury is a cause of infantile spasms

    PubMed Central

    YANG, GUANG; ZOU, LI-PING; WANG, JING; SHI, XIUYU; TIAN, SHUPING; YANG, XIAOFAN; JU, JUN; YAO, HONGXIANG; LIU, YUJIE

    2016-01-01

    Neonatal hypoglycemic brain injury is one of the causes of infantile spasms. In the present study, the clinical history and auxiliary examination results of 18 patients who developed infantile spasms several months after neonatal hypoglycemia were retrospectively analyzed. Among the 666 patients with infantile spasms admitted to two pediatric centers between January 2008 and October 2012, 18 patients developed infantile spasms after being diagnosed with neonatal hypoglycemia, defined as a whole blood glucose concentration of <2.6 mmol/l. These patients developed infantile spasms from between 2 and 10 months (mean, 4.9 months) following the diagnosis of neonatal hypoglycemia. All 18 patients had abnormal electroencephalographic findings with either classical or modified hypsarrhythmia. Upon examination using brain magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), 10 patients (55.6%) exhibited abnormalities. The MRI results principally showed a disproportional involvement of parietal and occipital cortices and sub-cortical white matter lesions. In conclusion, the results of this study indicate that neonatal hypoglycemic brain injury is associated with the subsequent development of infantile spasms. PMID:27168852

  8. [An epileptic syndrome in infantile cerebral palsy].

    PubMed

    Sumerkina, M L

    1997-01-01

    The results of examination of 102 patients with infantile cerebral paralysis (ICP) with epileptic syndrome (ES) at the age from 3 months to 14 years are presented. Epileptic fits predominated in patients with hemiparetic form of ICP (40.8%) and spastic diplegia (32.4%). ES manifestations were observed in ICP during the first 3 years of life (more than 80% of cases). The peculiarities of ES clinical course were revealed. There were determined the main types of seizures in patients with ICP which depended on age of their manifestation, as well as their further transformation and prognosis. Computer tomographic and EEG-correlations were established in different forms of ICP. They permitted to revealed pathogenetic mechanisms of ES development in patients with ICP and to determine therapeutic policy and prognosis of the disease. PMID:9163254

  9. Multifocal infantile haemangioma: a diagnostic challenge.

    PubMed

    Torres, Erica; Rosa, João; Leaute-Labreze, Christine; Soares-de-Almeida, Luis

    2016-01-01

    We describe a case of a newborn who presented with multiple dark red macules that developed into red-to-purple papules associated with thrombocytopaenia. Abdominal ultrasound showed multiple hyperechoic papules and nodules. Endothelial cells from a skin biopsy stained positively for endothelial cell glucose transporter 1, which was consistent with a diagnosis of multifocal infantile haemangioma. At the age of 2 months, the child developed intestinal bleeding and anaemia. Upper and lower endoscopies showed no intestinal haemangiomas. Oral treatment with propranolol (3 mg/kg/day) resulted in complete involution of the skin and hepatic haemangiomas over the period of treatment, which lasted until the child was aged 15 months. This is a rare case of multifocal cutaneous haemangioma with hepatic and probable intestinal involvement, successfully treated with propranolol. PMID:27317759

  10. Abnormal head position in infantile nystagmus syndrome.

    PubMed

    Noval, Susana; González-Manrique, Mar; Rodríguez-Del Valle, José María; Rodríguez-Sánchez, José María

    2011-01-01

    Infantile nystagmus is an involuntary, bilateral, conjugate, and rhythmic oscillation of the eyes which is present at birth or develops within the first 6 months of life. It may be pendular or jerk-like and, its intensity usually increases in lateral gaze, decreasing with convergence. Up to 64% of all patients with nystagmus also present strabismus, and even more patients have an abnormal head position. The abnormal head positions are more often horizontal, but they may also be vertical or take the form of a tilt, even though the nystagmus itself is horizontal. The aim of this article is to review available information about the origin and treatment of the abnormal head position associated to nystagmus, and to describe our treatment strategies. PMID:24533187

  11. Diagnosis and Management of Infantile Hemangioma.

    PubMed

    Darrow, David H; Greene, Arin K; Mancini, Anthony J; Nopper, Amy J

    2015-10-01

    Infantile hemangiomas (IHs) are the most common tumors of childhood. Unlike other tumors, they have the unique ability to involute after proliferation, often leading primary care providers to assume they will resolve without intervention or consequence. Unfortunately, a subset of IHs rapidly develop complications, resulting in pain, functional impairment, or permanent disfigurement. As a result, the primary clinician has the task of determining which lesions require early consultation with a specialist. Although several recent reviews have been published, this clinical report is the first based on input from individuals representing the many specialties involved in the treatment of IH. Its purpose is to update the pediatric community regarding recent discoveries in IH pathogenesis, treatment, and clinical associations and to provide a basis for clinical decision-making in the management of IH. PMID:26416931

  12. Flunarizine in therapy-resistant infantile epilepsies.

    PubMed

    Curatolo, P; Cusmai, R; Bruni, O; Pruna, D; Brindesi, I

    1986-01-01

    An open add-on trial with flunarizine has been carried out in 27 cases of therapy resistant infantile epilepsies: 15 partial and 12 generalized epilepsies. Etiology was an hypoxic-ischemic encephalopathy (HIE) in 13 cases, cerebral malformations in 10 cases and 4 various prenatal and perinatal cases. After a 2 months baseline period, flunarizine was given in addition to the previous therapy in a 5 mg once daily dose. A single blind versus placebo study was carried out in another series of 16 cases. Better results were found in HIE cases than in malformative cases, and in cases with perinatal HIE than in cases with prenatal hypoxic encephalopathy. The improvement in symptomatic generalized epilepsies was more evident than in symptomatic partial epilepsies. Drowsiness was the only side effect reported. PMID:3609883

  13. Mechanisms of propranolol action in infantile hemangioma

    PubMed Central

    Kum, Jina JY; Khan, Zia A

    2014-01-01

    Infantile hemangioma is a common tumor of infancy. Although most hemangiomas spontaneously regress, treatment is indicated based on complications, risk to organ development and function, and disfigurement. The serendipitous discovery of propranolol, a non-selective β-adrenergic receptor blocker, as an effective means to regress hemangiomas has made this a first-line therapy for hemangioma patients. Propranolol has shown remarkable response rates. There are, however, some adverse effects, which include changes in sleep, acrocyanosis, hypotension, and hypoglycemia. Over the last few years, researchers have focused on understanding the mechanisms by which propranolol causes hemangioma regression. This has entailed study of cultured vascular endothelial cells including endothelial cells isolated from hemangioma patients. In this article, we review recent studies offering potential mechanisms of how various cell types found in hemangioma may respond to propranolol. PMID:26413184

  14. Simulants of Malignant Melanoma

    PubMed Central

    Piérard-Franchimont, Claudine; Delvenne, Philippe

    2015-01-01

    During the recent period, dermoscopy has yielded improvement in the early disclosure of various atypical melanocytic neoplasms (AMN) of the skin. Beyond this clinical procedure, AMN histopathology remains mandatory for establishing their precise diagnosis. Of note, panels of experts in AMN merely report moderate agreement in various puzzling cases. Divergences in opinion and misdiagnosis are likely increased when histopathological criteria are not fine-tuned and when facing a diversity of AMN types. Furthermore, some AMN have been differently named in the literature including atypical Spitz tumor, metastasizing Spitz tumor, borderline and intermediate melanocytic tumor, malignant Spitz nevus, pigmented epithelioid melanocytoma or animal-type melanoma. Some acronyms have been further suggested such as MELTUMP (after melanocytic tumor of uncertain malignant potential) and STUMP (after Spitzoid melanocytic tumor of uncertain malignant potential). In this review, such AMN at the exclusion of cutaneous malignant melanoma (MM) variants, are grouped under the tentative broad heading skin melanocytoma. Such set of AMN frequently follows an indolent course, although they exhibit atypical and sometimes worrisome patterns or cytological atypia. Rare cases of skin melanocytomas progress to loco regional clusters of lesions (agminate melanocytomas), and even to regional lymph nodes. At times, the distinction between a skin melanocytoma and MM remains puzzling. However, multipronged immunohistochemistry and emerging molecular biology help profiling any malignancy risk if present. PMID:26779311

  15. Orbital masses: CT and MRI of common vascular lesions, benign tumors, and malignancies

    PubMed Central

    Khan, Sarah N.; Sepahdari, Ali R.

    2012-01-01

    A wide variety of space occupying lesions may be encountered in the orbit. CT and MR imaging frequently help confirm the presence of a mass and define its extent. Characteristic imaging features may help distinguish among lesions that have overlapping clinical presentations. This review focuses on some of the common orbital masses. Common vascular lesions that are reviewed include: capillary (infantile) hemangioma, cavernous hemangioma (solitary encapsulated venous-lymphatic malformation), and lymphangioma (venous-lymphatic malformation). Benign tumors that are reviewed include: optic nerve sheath meningioma, schwannoma, and neurofibroma. Malignancies that are reviewed include: lymphoma, metastasis, rhabdomyosarcoma, and optic glioma. Key imaging features that guide radiological diagnosis are discussed and illustrated. PMID:23961022

  16. Malignant Catarrhal Fever

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Malignant catarrhal fever (MCF) is a frequently fatal viral disease of ruminant species, particularly cattle, bison, and deer. Clinical signs vary between species. Two major epidemiologic types of MCF exist, and are defined by the ruminant species that serve as natural reservoir hosts for infection...

  17. [Malignant peritoneal mesothelioma].

    PubMed

    Scripcariu, V; Dajbog, Elena; Lefter, L; Ferariu, D; Pricop, Adriana; Grigoraş, M; Dragomir, Cr

    2006-01-01

    Mesothelioma is a neoplasm originating from the mesothelial surface lining cells of the serous human cavities. It may involve the pleura, less frequently the peritoneum rarely, the pericardium, the tunica vaginalis testis and ovarian epithelium. Asbestos has been widely used in industry. A causal relationship between asbestos exposure and pleural, peritoneal and pericardial malign mesothelioma was suggested, the risk of cancer being correlated to cumulate exposure. Studies from National Cancer Institute, USA, show that the malignant mesothelioma is a rare and aggressive asbestos related malignancy. The symptomatology is insidious and poses difficult problems in diagnosis and treatment. This paper presents the case of a 59 year old patient with malignant peritoneal mesothelioma who worked almost 40 years as an electrician, exposed to asbestos fibers. He was hospitalized for important weight loss, abdominal pain and tiredness being diagnosed after imaging tests with a giant tumor, localized at the abdominal upper level, which seems to originate from the spleen's superior pole. During surgery we discovered a tumor with cystic parts, intense vascularized, which turn to be adherent in the upper side to the lower face of the left midriff cupola, to the spleen superior pole and 1/3 middle level of the great gastric curve. It was performed surgical ablation of the tumor, splenectomy with favorable postoperative evolution, the patient being now under chemotherapy treatment. PMID:17283842

  18. Immunotherapy for malignant glioma

    PubMed Central

    Suryadevara, Carter M.; Verla, Terence; Sanchez-Perez, Luis; Reap, Elizabeth A.; Choi, Bryan D.; Fecci, Peter E.; Sampson, John H.

    2015-01-01

    Malignant gliomas (MG) are the most common type of primary malignant brain tumor. Most patients diagnosed with glioblastoma (GBM), the most common and malignant glial tumor, die within 12–15 months. Moreover, conventional treatment, which includes surgery followed by radiation and chemotherapy, can be highly toxic by causing nonspecific damage to healthy brain and other tissues. The shortcomings of standard-of-care have thus created a stimulus for the development of novel therapies that can target central nervous system (CNS)-based tumors specifically and efficiently, while minimizing off-target collateral damage to normal brain. Immunotherapy represents an investigational avenue with the promise of meeting this need, already having demonstrated its potential against B-cell malignancy and solid tumors in clinical trials. T-cell engineering with tumor-specific chimeric antigen receptors (CARs) is one proven approach that aims to redirect autologous patient T-cells to sites of tumor. This platform has evolved dramatically over the past two decades to include an improved construct design, and these modern CARs have only recently been translated into the clinic for brain tumors. We review here emerging immunotherapeutic platforms for the treatment of MG, focusing on the development and application of a CAR-based strategy against GBM. PMID:25722935

  19. Has infantile sexuality anything to do with infants?

    PubMed

    Salomonsson, Björn

    2012-06-01

    Classical psychoanalytic theory draws many concepts from mental processes that are assumed to arise in the infant and influence the adult mind. Still, psychoanalytic practice with mothers and infants has been integrated but little within general psychoanalytic theory. One reason is that only few analysts have utilized such practice to further theory. Another reason is that infant therapists tend to abandon classical psychoanalytic concepts in favour of attachment concepts. As a result the concept of infantile sexuality, so central to classical theory, plays an unobtrusive role in clinical discussions on infant therapy. The author argues that infantile sexuality plays an important role in many mother-infant disturbances. To function as a clinical concept, it needs to be delineated from attachment and be understood in the context of mother-infant interaction. Two examples are provided; one where the analyst's infantile sexuality emerged in a comment to the infant. Another is a case of breast-feeding problems with a little boy fretting at the breast. This is interpreted as reflecting the mother's infantile sexual conflicts as well as the boy's emerging internalization of them. Thus, to conceptualize such disorders we need to take into account the infantile sexuality in both mother and baby. PMID:22671253

  20. Malignant Melanoma of the Foot

    MedlinePlus

    ... Javascript in your browser. Malignant Melanoma of the Foot What is Malignant Melanoma? Melanoma is a cancer ... age groups, even the young. Melanoma in the Foot Melanoma that occurs in the foot or ankle ...

  1. [Accompanying symptoms in infantile spastic hemiplegia].

    PubMed

    Feldkamp, M; Schuknecht, C; Eisenkolb, T

    1985-01-01

    Various concomitant disorders in 535 children with infantile hemiplegia were evaluated; 159 of the cases were particularly well documented. The right/left distribution of the hemiplegia was 56 to 44, the ratio of boys to girls 59 to 41. Severe impairments of hand function (lack of function, first grip) were found more frequently in right hemiplegics than left; the ratio of severe to slight disorders was approx. 3 to 1 in right hemiplegics and 3 to 2 in left hemiplegics. Impairment of hand function was closely related to the quality of sensitivity, the tests of this being based on two-point discrimination and stereognosis. Sixty-two percent of the children were of normal intelligence; of the remainder, approximately equal-sized groups suffered from impairment of the learning faculty or were mentally retarded. There was a positive correlation between reduced intelligence and the severity of impairment of hand function. Impaired speech development was found in 7 percent of the children, right and left hemiplegics being equally affected. Thus, there was no evidence that the brain lesion had any special influence on development of speech. Observations of growth in the legs revealed average differences of length of 2 mm and up to 3.5 cm in isolated cases. After eight year of life there was practically no further increase in the differences in length. PMID:4050042

  2. Psychosocial predisposing factors for infantile colic.

    PubMed Central

    Rautava, P; Helenius, H; Lehtonen, L

    1993-01-01

    OBJECTIVE--To study associations between characteristics of families during the first pregnancy and after childbirth and the development of infantile colic. DESIGN--Randomised, stratified cluster sampling. Follow up from the first visit to a maternity health care clinic during pregnancy to three months after birth with confidential semistructured questionnaires. SETTING--Maternity health care clinics in primary health care centres in Finland. SUBJECTS--1443 nulliparous women and 1407 partners. Altogether 1333 women and 1279 men returned the questionnaires. When the infants were 3 months old 1208 women and 1115 men returned questionnaires. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES--Marital relationship; personal and social behaviour of parents during the pregnancy and their coping with the pregnancy; mothers' physical health and events, symptoms, and experiences in relation to pregnancy; self confidence and experiences of mothers and fathers in relation to childbirth; and parents' sociodemographic and educational variables. Measure of colic when the infant was 3 months old. RESULTS--Experience of stress and physical symptoms during the pregnancy, dissatisfaction with the sexual relationship, and negative experiences during childbirth were associated with the development of colic in the baby. None of the sociodemographic factors was associated with colic. CONCLUSIONS--Early preventive health work during pregnancy should attempt to improve parents' tolerance of symptoms of stress and ability to cope and increase their confidence in parenting abilities. PMID:8401016

  3. Visuo-vestibular eye movements: infantile strabismus in 3 dimensions.

    PubMed

    Brodsky, Michael C

    2005-06-01

    Infantile strabismus is accompanied by latent nystagmus, primary inferior oblique muscle overaction, and dissociated vertical divergence. If we examine the evolutionary underpinnings of these ocular rotations, we can construct a unifying mechanism for the sensorimotor abnormalities that arise in humans with infantile strabismus. Latent nystagmus, primary inferior oblique muscle overaction, and dissociated vertical divergence correspond to visual balancing reflexes that are operative in lateral-eyed animals in yaw, pitch, and roll, respectively. In humans with infantile strabismus, these subcortical visual reflexes are reactivated by a physiologic imbalance in binocular visual input, which resets central vestibular tone in 3-dimensional space. These visual reflexes reveal the evolutionary role of the eyes as sensory balance organs that can directly modulate central vestibular tone. Latent nystagmus, primary oblique muscle overaction, and dissociated vertical divergence should be reclassified as visuo-vestibular eye movements. PMID:15955986

  4. RARS2 mutations in a sibship with infantile spasms.

    PubMed

    Ngoh, Adeline; Bras, Jose; Guerreiro, Rita; Meyer, Esther; McTague, Amy; Dawson, Eleanor; Mankad, Kshitij; Gunny, Roxana; Clayton, Peter; Mills, Philippa B; Thornton, Rachel; Lai, Ming; Forsyth, Robert; Kurian, Manju A

    2016-05-01

    Pontocerebellar hypoplasia is a group of heterogeneous neurodevelopmental disorders characterized by reduced volume of the brainstem and cerebellum. We report two male siblings who presented with early infantile clonic seizures, and then developed infantile spasms associated with prominent isolated cerebellar hypoplasia/atrophy on magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). Using whole exome sequencing techniques, both were found to be compound heterozygotes for one previously reported and one novel mutation in the gene encoding mitochondrial arginyl-tRNA synthetase 2 (RARS2). Mutations in this gene have been classically described in pontocerebellar hypoplasia type six (PCH6), a phenotype characterized by early (often intractable) seizures, profound developmental delay, and progressive pontocerebellar atrophy. The electroclinical spectrum of PCH6 is broad and includes a number of seizure types: myoclonic, generalized tonic-clonic, and focal clonic seizures. Our report expands the characterization of the PCH6 disease spectrum and presents infantile spasms as an associated electroclinical phenotype. PMID:27061686

  5. Lymphoscintigraphy in malignant melanoma

    SciTech Connect

    Berman, C.G.; Norman, J.; Cruse, C.W.; Reintgen, D.S.; Clark, R.A. )

    1992-01-01

    The development and rationale for the use of lymphoscintigraphy in the preoperative evaluation of patients with malignant melanoma being considered for elective lymph node dissection is reviewed. This overview is updated by an analysis of 135 patients with early stage malignant melanoma involving the head, neck, shoulders, and trunk at Moffitt Cancer Center and Research Institute at the University of South Florida (Tampa, FL). High discordancy rates (overall, 41%) were seen between drainage patterns predicted from historical anatomical guidelines and those revealed by the lymphoscintigraphic examination. The high discordancy rate was most pronounced in the head (64%) and the neck (73%). Surgical management was changed in 33% of the patients, overall. A preoperative lymphoscintigram is recommended for all patients with melanoma with head, neck, and truncal lesions evaluated for elective lymph node dissection as the lymphatic drainage patterns are often unpredictable and variable.

  6. Hyaluronan in human malignancies

    SciTech Connect

    Sironen, R.K.; Tammi, M.; Tammi, R.; Auvinen, P.K.; Anttila, M.; Kosma, V-M.

    2011-02-15

    Hyaluronan, a major macropolysaccharide in the extracellular matrix of connective tissues, is intimately involved in the biology of cancer. Hyaluronan accumulates into the stroma of various human tumors and modulates intracellular signaling pathways, cell proliferation, motility and invasive properties of malignant cells. Experimental and clinicopathological evidence highlights the importance of hyaluronan in tumor growth and metastasis. A high stromal hyaluronan content is associated with poorly differentiated tumors and aggressive clinical behavior in human adenocarcinomas. Instead, the squamous cell carcinomas and malignant melanomas tend to have a reduced hyaluronan content. In addition to the stroma-cancer cell interaction, hyaluronan can influence stromal cell recruitment, tumor angiogenesis and epithelial-mesenchymal transition. Hyaluronan receptors, hyaluronan synthases and hyaluronan degrading enzymes, hyaluronidases, are involved in the modulation of cancer progression, depending on the tumor type. Furthermore, intracellular signaling and angiogenesis are affected by the degradation products of hyaluronan. Hyaluronan has also therapeutic implications since it is involved in multidrug resistance.

  7. Microbiome and Malignancy

    PubMed Central

    Plottel, Claudia S.; Blaser, Martin J.

    2011-01-01

    Current knowledge is insufficient to explain why only a proportion of individuals exposed to environmental carcinogens or carrying a genetic predisposition to cancer develop disease. Clearly, other factors must be important and one such element that has recently received attention is the human microbiome, the residential microbes including Bacteria, Archaea, Eukaryotes, and viruses that colonize humans. Here, we review principles and paradigms of microbiome-related malignancy, as illustrated by three specific microbial-host interactions. We review the effects of the microbiota on local and adjacent-neoplasia, present the estrobolome model of distant effects, and discuss the complex interactions with a latent virus leading to malignancy. These are separate facets of a complex biology interfacing all the microbial species we harbor from birth onward toward early reproductive success and eventual senescence. PMID:22018233

  8. Pembrolizumab in Treating Patients With Malignant Mesothelioma

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-05-10

    Biphasic Mesothelioma; Epithelioid Mesothelioma; Peritoneal Malignant Mesothelioma; Pleural Biphasic Mesothelioma; Pleural Epithelioid Mesothelioma; Pleural Malignant Mesothelioma; Pleural Sarcomatoid Mesothelioma; Recurrent Peritoneal Malignant Mesothelioma; Recurrent Pleural Malignant Mesothelioma; Sarcomatoid Mesothelioma

  9. Endometriosis-associated Malignancy

    PubMed Central

    Krawczyk, N.; Banys-Paluchowski, M.; Schmidt, D.; Ulrich, U.; Fehm, T.

    2016-01-01

    Endometriosis is a common condition in women of reproductive age. According to several epidemiological studies endometriosis may be associated with increased risk of various malignancies. However, endometriosis-associated malignancy (EAM) is defined by certain histological criteria. About 80 % of EAM have been found in the ovary, whereas 20 % are localized in extragonadal sites like intestine, rectovaginal septum, abdominal wall, pleura and others. Some authors suggest that EAM arise from atypical endometriosis as an intermediate lesion between endometriosis and cancer. Moreover, a number of genetic alterations, like loss of heterozygosity (LOH), PTEN, ARID1 A and p53 mutations have been found in both endometriosis and EAM. Endometriosis-associated ovarian cancer (EAOC) is mostly a well or intermediately differentiated tumor of endometrioid or clear cell histological sub-type. Women affected by EAOC are on average five to ten years younger than non-EAOC patients; in most of the cases EAOC is a low stage disease with favorable clinical outcome. Since EAM is a rare condition systematic data on EAM are still missing. A systematic retrospective study on endometriosis-associated malignancies (EAM study) is currently being conducted by the Endometriosis Research Foundation together with the study groups on ovarian and uterine tumors of the working group for gynecological oncology (AGO) (gyn@mlk-berlin.de). PMID:26941451

  10. Treatment of Malignant Pheochromocytoma

    PubMed Central

    Ajallé, R.; Plouin, P. F.; Pacak, K.; Lehnert, H.

    2013-01-01

    Pheochromocytoma (PCC) is a rare disease, mainly sporadic, but also associated with some familial disorders, with a malignancy frequency of approximately 10%. Only the presence of distant metastases, derived from large pleomorphic chromaffin cells, is widely accepted as a criterion of malignancy. Variable symptoms may be caused by production and release of catecholamines. Since there is no curative treatment for malignant PCC and due to its unfavorable prognosis, assuring quality of life is one of the main therapeutic objectives. Besides a long-term medical treatment of symptoms using selective α-1 blockers and nonselective, noncompetitive α- and / or β-blockers, debulking surgery is the first treatment step. In case of a sufficient uptake of 123I-MIBG treatment with targeted radiation therapy, use of 131I-MIBG is an option as an adjuvant therapy, following debulking surgery. Chemotherapy should be applied to patients without positive MIBG-scan, with no response to 131I-MIBG or progression after radionuclide treatment, and especially in cases with high proliferation index. The most effective chemotherapy regimen appears to be the CVD-scheme, including cyclophosphamide, vincristine, and dacarbazine. The so-called targeted molecular therapies with treatment combinations of temozolomide and thalidomide, or sunitinib monotherapy, and novel therapeutic somatostatin analogues have shown promising results and should thus encourage clinical trials to improve the prognosis of metastatic PCC. Within this review the current treatment modalities and novel molecular strategies in the management of this disease are discussed and a treatment algorithm is suggested. PMID:19672813

  11. Malignant Catatonia Mimicking Pheochromocytoma

    PubMed Central

    Li, Dailin

    2013-01-01

    Malignant catatonia is an unusual and highly fatal neuropsychiatric condition which can present with clinical and biochemical manifestations similar to those of pheochromocytoma. Differentiating between the two diseases is essential as management options greatly diverge. We describe a case of malignant catatonia in a 20-year-old male who presented with concurrent psychotic symptoms and autonomic instability, with markedly increased 24-hour urinary levels of norepinephrine at 1752 nmol/day (normal, 89–470 nmol/day), epinephrine at 1045 nmol/day (normal, <160 nmol/day), and dopamine at 7.9 μmol/day (normal, 0.4–3.3 μmol/day). The patient was treated with multiple sessions of electroconvulsive therapy, which led to complete clinical resolution. Repeat urine collections within weeks of this presenting event revealed normalization or near normalization of his catecholamine and metanephrine levels. Malignant catatonia should be considered in the differential diagnosis of the hypercatecholamine state, particularly in a patient who also exhibits concurrent catatonic features. PMID:24251048

  12. [Malignant biliary obstruction].

    PubMed

    Hucl, Tomáš

    2016-01-01

    Pancreatic cancer and cholangiocarcinoma are the most common causes of malignant biliary obstruction. They are diseases of increasing incidence and unfavorable prognosis. Only patients with localized disease indicated for surgery have a chance of long-term survival. These patients represent less than 20 % of all patients, despite the progress in our diagnostic abilities.Locally advanced and metastatic tumors are treated with palliative chemotherapy or chemoradiotherapy; the results of such treatments are unsatisfactory. The average survival of patients with unresectable disease is 6 months and only 5-10 % of patients survive 5 years.Biliary drainage is an integral part of palliative treatment. Endoscopically or percutaneosly placed stents improve quality of life, decrease cholestasis and pruritus, but do not significantly improve survival. Biliary stents get occluded over time, possibly resulting in acute cholangitis and require repeated replacement.Photodynamic therapy and radiofrequency ablation, locally active endoscopic methods, have been increasingly used in recent years in palliative treatment of patients with malignant biliary obstruction. In photodynamic therapy, photosensitizer accumulates in tumor tissue and is activated 48 hours later by light of a specific wave length. Application of low voltage high frequency current during radiofrequency ablation results in tissue destruction by heat. Local ablation techniques can have a significant impact in a large group of patients with malignant biliary obstruction, leading to improved prognosis, quality of life and stent patency. PMID:26898789

  13. Asbestos-related malignancy

    SciTech Connect

    Talcott, J.A.; Antman, K.H.

    1988-05-01

    Asbestos-associated malignancies have received significant attention in the lay and medical literature because of the increasing frequency of two asbestos-associated tumors, lung carcinoma and mesothelioma; the wide distribution of asbestos; its status as a prototype environmental carcinogen; and the many recent legal compensation proceedings, for which medical testimony has been required. The understanding of asbestos-associated carcinogenesis has increased through study of animal models, human epidemiology, and, recently, the application of modern molecular biological techniques. However, the detailed mechanisms of carcinogenesis remain unknown. A wide variety of malignancies have been associated with asbestos, although the strongest evidence for a causal association is confined to lung cancer and mesothelioma. Epidemiological studies have provided evidence that both the type of asbestos fiber and the industry in which the exposure occurs may affect the rates of asbestos-associated cancers. It has been shown that asbestos exerts a carcinogenic effect independent of exposure to cigarette smoking that, for lung cancers, is synergistically enhanced by smoking. Other questions remain controversial, such as whether pulmonary fibrosis necessarily precedes asbestos-associated lung cancer and whether some threshold level of exposure to asbestos (including low-dose exposures that may occur in asbestos-associated public buildings) may be safe. Mesothelioma, the most closely asbestos-associated malignancy, has a dismal natural history and has been highly resistant to therapy. However, investigational multi-modality therapy may offer benefit to some patients. 179 references.

  14. Epigenetics in the hematologic malignancies

    PubMed Central

    Fong, Chun Yew; Morison, Jessica; Dawson, Mark A.

    2014-01-01

    A wealth of genomic and epigenomic data has identified abnormal regulation of epigenetic processes as a prominent theme in hematologic malignancies. Recurrent somatic alterations in myeloid malignancies of key proteins involved in DNA methylation, post-translational histone modification and chromatin remodeling have highlighted the importance of epigenetic regulation of gene expression in the initiation and maintenance of various malignancies. The rational use of targeted epigenetic therapies requires a thorough understanding of the underlying mechanisms of malignant transformation driven by aberrant epigenetic regulators. In this review we provide an overview of the major protagonists in epigenetic regulation, their aberrant role in myeloid malignancies, prognostic significance and potential for therapeutic targeting. PMID:25472952

  15. The genetic landscape of infantile spasms.

    PubMed

    Michaud, Jacques L; Lachance, Mathieu; Hamdan, Fadi F; Carmant, Lionel; Lortie, Anne; Diadori, Paola; Major, Philippe; Meijer, Inge A; Lemyre, Emmanuelle; Cossette, Patrick; Mefford, Heather C; Rouleau, Guy A; Rossignol, Elsa

    2014-09-15

    Infantile spasms (IS) is an early-onset epileptic encephalopathy of unknown etiology in ∼40% of patients. We hypothesized that unexplained IS cases represent a large collection of rare single-gene disorders. We investigated 44 children with unexplained IS using comparative genomic hybridisation arrays (aCGH) (n = 44) followed by targeted sequencing of 35 known epilepsy genes (n = 8) or whole-exome sequencing (WES) of familial trios (n = 18) to search for rare inherited or de novo mutations. aCGH analysis revealed de novo variants in 7% of patients (n = 3/44), including a distal 16p11.2 duplication, a 15q11.1q13.1 tetrasomy and a 2q21.3-q22.2 deletion. Furthermore, it identified a pathogenic maternally inherited Xp11.2 duplication. Targeted sequencing was informative for ARX (n = 1/14) and STXBP1 (n = 1/8). In contrast, sequencing of a panel of 35 known epileptic encephalopathy genes (n = 8) did not identify further mutations. Finally, WES (n = 18) was very informative, with an excess of de novo mutations identified in genes predicted to be involved in neurodevelopmental processes and/or known to be intolerant to functional variations. Several pathogenic mutations were identified, including de novo mutations in STXBP1, CASK and ALG13, as well as recessive mutations in PNPO and ADSL, together explaining 28% of cases (5/18). In addition, WES identified 1-3 de novo variants in 64% of remaining probands, pointing to several interesting candidate genes. Our results indicate that IS are genetically heterogeneous with a major contribution of de novo mutations and that WES is significantly superior to targeted re-sequencing in identifying detrimental genetic variants involved in IS. PMID:24781210

  16. Part One: Infantile Spasms--The New Consensus

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pellock, John

    2011-01-01

    Infantile spasms (IS, West syndrome) represent a difficult to treat and sometimes not immediately recognized form of epilepsy which is relatively rare. West Syndrome or IS is one of the most recognized types of epileptic encephalopathy, a form of epilepsy usually associated with developmental regression and delay, frequently difficult to treat and…

  17. Infantile Autism and the Temporal Lobe of the Brain.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hetzler, Bruce E.; Griffin, Judith L.

    1981-01-01

    Studies are reviewed that support the hypothesis that infantile autism results from a neuropathology of the temporal lobes of the brain. It is concluded that the main autistic symptoms are most consistent with a neurological model involving bilateral dysfunction of the temporal lobes. (Author)

  18. Infantile Spasms and Cytomegalovirus Infection: Antiviral and Antiepileptic Treatment

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dunin-Wasowicz, Dorota; Kasprzyk-Obara, Jolanta; Jurkiewicz, Elzbieta; Kapusta, Monika; Milewska-Bobula, Bogumila

    2007-01-01

    From 1 January 1995 to 31 December 2004, 22 patients (13 males, nine females; age range 2-12mo) with infantile spasms and cytomegalovirus (CMV) infection were treated with intravenous ganciclovir (GCV) and antiepileptic drugs. GCV was given for 3 to 12 weeks with a 1-month interval (one, two, or three courses). Epileptic spasms occurred before…

  19. Genetics Home Reference: X-linked infantile spasm syndrome

    MedlinePlus

    ... A new paradigm for West syndrome based on molecular and cell biology. Epilepsy Res. 2006 Aug;70 Suppl 1:S87-95. Epub 2006 Jun 23. Review. Citation on PubMed Kossoff ... JL. Interneuron, interrupted: molecular pathogenesis of ARX mutations and X-linked infantile ...

  20. Infantile amnesia reflects a developmental critical period for hippocampal learning.

    PubMed

    Travaglia, Alessio; Bisaz, Reto; Sweet, Eric S; Blitzer, Robert D; Alberini, Cristina M

    2016-09-01

    Episodic memories formed during the first postnatal period are rapidly forgotten, a phenomenon known as 'infantile amnesia'. In spite of this memory loss, early experiences influence adult behavior, raising the question of which mechanisms underlie infantile memories and amnesia. Here we show that in rats an experience learned during the infantile amnesia period is stored as a latent memory trace for a long time; indeed, a later reminder reinstates a robust, context-specific and long-lasting memory. The formation and storage of this latent memory requires the hippocampus, follows a sharp temporal boundary and occurs through mechanisms typical of developmental critical periods, including the expression switch of the NMDA receptor subunits from 2B to 2A, which is dependent on brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) and metabotropic glutamate receptor 5 (mGluR5). Activating BDNF or mGluR5 after training rescues the infantile amnesia. Thus, early episodic memories are not lost but remain stored long term. These data suggest that the hippocampus undergoes a developmental critical period to become functionally competent. PMID:27428652

  1. Alexander disease with mild dorsal brainstem atrophy and infantile spasms.

    PubMed

    Torisu, Hiroyuki; Yoshikawa, Yoko; Yamaguchi-Takada, Yui; Yano, Tamami; Sanefuji, Masafumi; Ishizaki, Yoshito; Sawaishi, Yukio; Hara, Toshiro

    2013-05-01

    We present the case of a Japanese male infant with Alexander disease who developed infantile spasms at 8 months of age. The patient had a cluster of partial seizures at 4 months of age. He presented with mild general hypotonia and developmental delay. Macrocephaly was not observed. Brain magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) findings fulfilled all MRI-based criteria for the diagnosis of Alexander disease and revealed mild atrophy of the dorsal pons and medulla oblongata with abnormal intensities. DNA analysis disclosed a novel heterozygous missense mutation (c.1154 C>T, p.S385F) in the glial fibrillary acidic protein gene. At 8 months of age, tonic spasms occurred, and electroencephalography (EEG) revealed hypsarrhythmia. Lamotrigine effectively controlled the infantile spasms and improved the abnormal EEG findings. Although most patients with infantile Alexander disease have epilepsy, infantile spasms are rare. This comorbid condition may be associated with the distribution of the brain lesions and the age at onset of Alexander disease. PMID:22818990

  2. The Organic Etiology of Infantile Autism: Myth or Fact?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sanua, Victor D.

    The author reviews theories and research on the etiology of infantile autism, specifically regarding its organic basis. He cites controversies over its organic vs. environmental basis and over the family's impact on autism. Quotes from such theoriests as L. Kanner, B. Bettleheim, and B. Rimland are presented along with E. R. Ritvo and M. Coleman.…

  3. Intraoral malignant melanoma

    PubMed Central

    Babburi, Suresh; Subramanyam, R. V.; Aparna, V.; Sowjanya, P.

    2013-01-01

    Primary oral mucosal melanoma is a rare aggressive neoplasm and accounts for only 0.2-8% of all reported melanomas. It is a malignant neoplasm of melanocytes that may arise from a benign melanocytic lesion or de novo from melanocytes within normal skin or mucosa. It is considered to be the most deadly and biologically unpredictable of all human neoplasms, having the worst prognosis. In this article, we report a case of oral melanoma in a 52-year-old female patient with a chief complaint of black discolouration of the maxillary gingiva and palate. PMID:24249959

  4. Factors associated with infantile eczema in Hangzhou, China.

    PubMed

    Li, Yun-Ling; Zheng, Lei; Jin, Hai-Yan; Xu, Xia; Song, Li-Li

    2013-01-01

    The removal of aggravating factors is important to reduce the severity of infantile eczema, but there are few studies on the assessment and identification of the aggravating factors in infantile eczema. Parents of children with infantile eczema ages 1 to 10 months (N = 250) were recruited. Parents were required to complete a questionnaire. Two hundred forty-two (96.8%) children had skin dryness, 80% bathed with soap or shower gel, 82% often perspired, 84.8% wore tight-fitting clothes, 80.8% dressed in five layers of thick clothing, 85.6% were in contact with wool or feathers, and 59.2% were exposed to sunlight (>20 minutes/day). Eczema severity was greater after vaccination in 20%. Two hundred thirty-five mothers avoided eating potential food allergens (e.g., milk, egg whites, and fish), but this failed to improve the severity of symptoms in 93.6% of the children. Thirty patients had Neocate as a substitute for cow's milk, which resulted in symptom severity improvement in 10%. Thirty children were given food allergens, which exacerbated symptoms in 13.3%. One hundred twenty-eight (51.2%) of the children were treated with corticosteroid ointment; 62.5% had the ointment applied for only 2 to 3 days, and 6.2% had the corticosteroid ointment applied to weeping lesions. The vast majority of parents did not know about the aggravating factors for infantile eczema. The results demonstrated a strong need for educational programs to help parents understand and control infantile eczema. PMID:23106156

  5. From Infantile Citizens to Infantile Institutions: The Metaphoric Transformation of Political Economy in the 2008 Housing Market Crisis

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Foley, Megan

    2012-01-01

    The logic of political economy depends on a domestic metaphor, using the "oikos" or household as a model for the "polis." Historically, this metaphor has imagined citizens as the children of a paternal state. However during the 2008 housing crisis, this metaphor was turned upside down, depicting citizens as the parents of infantile state…

  6. Radiotherapy of malignant melanoma

    SciTech Connect

    Cooper, J.S.

    1985-04-01

    The role of radiotherapy in the treatment of malignant melanoma is limited, and surgery generally forms the mainstay of medical practice. However, there are some circumstances in which radiotherapy should be considered the treatment of choice. Symptomatic metastatic lesions in bone or brain can effectively be palliated in a substantial proportion of instances. At the current stage of our knowledge, conventionally fractionated treatment of such lesions forms the standard against which other treatments should be measured. In contrast, metastatic lesions to skin or lymph nodes that do not overlie critical normal structures probably are better treated by high-dose-per-fraction techniques. Radiotherapy may play a definitive role in the treatment of lentigo maligna. The precise optimal energy of the beam to be used remains to be defined. Slightly more penetrating radiation appears to be required for lentigo maligna melanomas. Here, too, the optimal energy remains to be defined. The treatment of nonlentigenous melanomas primarily by radiotherapy is unproved in my opinion. Certainly, the data from the Princess Margaret Hospital is exciting, but I believe it must be corroborated by a well-designed trial before it can be accepted without question. Future directions in treatment of malignant melanoma are likely to include further trials of unconventional fractionation and the use of radiosensitizing agents in conjunction with radiotherapy. The time for dermatologists and radiation therapists to cooperate in such studies is at hand.

  7. Radioimmunotherapy of malignancies

    SciTech Connect

    Reilly, R.M. )

    1991-05-01

    The critical issues in radioimmunotherapy are highlighted, and novel ways of improving the therapeutic indexes of radioimmunotherapeutic agents are outlined. The use of radioactively labeled monoclonal antibodies to treat malignant tumors has been investigated in animals and humans. Radionuclides suitable for labeling antibodies for such use include iodine 125, iodine 131, yttrium 90, rhenium 188, and copper 67. Radiobiological factors to be considered in radioimmunotherapy include the size and density of the tumor and the ability of a radiolabeled antibody to penetrate the tumor nodule. The dose of radiation required to destroy a tumor varies; however, the whole-body dose must not exceed 200 rads to avoid irreversible toxicity to the bone marrow. Despite the theoretical inadequacy of radiation doses to tumors indicated by conventional dosimetry, responses have been observed in animals and humans. More reliable and accurate dosimetric methods are under development. The induction of human antimouse antibodies can alter the pharmacokinetics of radiolabeled antibodies. Improving the therapeutic index of radioimmunotherapeutic agents may be achieved through regional therapy, administering a secondary antibody to improve clearance, combining radioimmunotherapy with external-beam irradiation, using an avidin-biotin conjugate system to deliver the radiolabeled antibodies, and addressing the problem of tumor antigen heterogeneity. Researchers are working to reduce or eliminate the clinical problems associated with radioimmunotherapy. Hematologic malignancies, such as lymphomas, are more likely than solid tumors to respond satisfactorily. 110 refs.

  8. Pleural malignancies including mesothelioma.

    PubMed

    Hillerdal, G

    1995-07-01

    Malignant mesothelioma is caused almost exclusively by occupational exposure to asbestos. During the past few years, however, increasing evidence has mounted that background exposure to asbestos could be sufficient to cause mesothelioma. Treatment of malignant mesothelioma remains a big problem. Some new approaches are on their way, and the most exciting ones are local immunotherapy in very early cases. Some success has been reported with local interferon treatment. As for treatment of metastatic pleural disease, the main purpose is symptomatic relief of dyspnea caused by fluid accumulation. The best way to achieve a lasting palliation is pleurodesis, and the most common way to do this, is by chemical means. The drug of choice in the United States has for many years been tetracycline, but since injectable tetracycline is no longer available, some substitute must be found. The substance that will "win" is not yet clear, but the two leading contestants are talc and doxycycline. Bleomycin also has its supporters, and a dark horse is quinacrine, which although not easily available in the United States, has been used in many European centers for decades. PMID:9363074

  9. [Keeping dogs indoor aggravates infantile atopic dermatitis].

    PubMed

    Endo, K; Hizawa, T; Fukuzumi, T; Kataoka, Y

    1999-12-01

    We had a two-month-old girl with severe dermatitis since birth. Her serum RAST to HD, Df and Dp were 1.06, 0.03 and 0.01 Ua/ml respectively. A Yorkshire terrier were kept at her mother's parents' home where the patient had lived for a month since birth. Her eczema, which became markedly aggravated whenever she visited there, improved after the elimination of the dog. We investigated the relationship between keeping dogs and infantile atopic dermatitis. We studied 368 patients under the age of two years (211 boys and 157 girls). Skin symptoms were graded globally mild, moderate or severe. Total serum IgE and specific antibody titer to dog dander were measured. We asked them whether they kept dogs and specifically, where they kept dogs, outdoor, indoor, in their own house, or in their grandparents' house. 197 patients had no contact with dogs, 90 patients kept dogs outdoor and 81 patients did indoor. The positive rate of RAST (> or = 0.7 Ua/ml) to dog dander was 6.1%, 17.8% and 46.9% respectively in these three groups. There were strong statistical differences between three groups. On the other hand, among the 81 patients who kept indoor, the RAST positive rates were almost same regarding where the dogs were kept, in their own house or their grandparents' house. Interestingly this difference happens only with patients under the age of 3 months. Patients older than 4 months showed no significant differences in the positive RAST rates, whether they kept dogs indoor or outdoor. This suggests the sensitization occurs before the age of 3 months. Speaking of symptoms, patients who kept dogs indoor showed significantly more severe symptoms than patients who had no contact with dogs and patients who kept dogs outdoor. There was no significant difference between the symptoms of patients who had no contact with dogs and those of patients who kept dogs outdoor. This implies the patient's symptom will improve only by moving the dog out of the house. PMID:10666918

  10. Infantile Hepatic Hemangioendothelioma: An Uncommon Cause of Persistent Pulmonary Hypertension in a Newborn Infant

    PubMed Central

    Chatmethakul, Trassanee; Bhat, Ramachandra; Alkaabi, Maryam; Siddiqui, Abdul; Peevy, Keith; Zayek, Michael

    2016-01-01

    Multifocal and diffuse infantile hepatic hemangioendotheliomas commonly present with signs of high-output congestive heart failure. In addition, prolonged persistent pulmonary overcirculation eventually leads to the development of pulmonary hypertension at a later age. We report a 2-day old, full-term infant with multifocal, large infantile hepatic hemangioendothelioma, who presented with an early onset of pulmonary hypertension, managed successfully with supportive care and systemic therapy directed toward the involution of infantile hepatic hemangioendothelioma. PMID:27468364

  11. Malignant Pleural Mesothelioma

    PubMed Central

    Tsao, Anne S.; Wistuba, Ignacio; Roth, Jack A.; Kindler, Hedy Lee

    2009-01-01

    Malignant pleural mesothelioma (MPM) is a deadly disease that occurs in 2,000 to 3,000 people each year in the United States. Although MPM is an extremely difficult disease to treat, with the median overall survival ranging between 9 and 17 months regardless of stage, there has been significant progress over the last few years that has reshaped the clinical landscape. This article will provide a comprehensive discussion of the latest developments in the treatment of MPM. We will provide an update of the major clinical trials that impact mesothelioma treatment in the resectable and unresectable settings, discuss the impact of novel therapeutics, and provide perspective on where the clinical research in mesothelioma is moving. In addition, there are controversial issues, such as the role of extrapleural pneumonectomy, adjuvant radiotherapy, and use of intensity-modulated radiotherapy versus hemithoracic therapy that will also be addressed in this manuscript. PMID:19255316

  12. Atypical neuroleptic malignant syndrome.

    PubMed

    Collins, Ann; Davies, Drew; Menon, Sharmila

    2016-01-01

    A 57-year-old man was admitted to a psychiatric ward in a confused state. He had a 30-year history of lately stable schizophrenia and antipsychotic medication had recently been reduced. The clinical picture was characterised by confusion, agitation, autonomic instability, muscle rigidity and elevated creatine kinase. Despite no other identifiable cause, physicians were reluctant to accept a diagnosis of neuroleptic malignant syndrome (NMS) due to the absence of fever. Despite acute renal failure, the patient was repeatedly transferred between medical and psychiatric wards; diagnosis and management were delayed, with potentially catastrophic consequences. NMS is a rare, life-threatening neurological disorder that can present atypically and requires emergency medical rather than psychiatric care. Clinicians must proactively distinguish between medical emergencies (including acute confusional states/delirium) and mental illness. Prompt, accurate diagnosis, management on the appropriate ward and effective teamwork between specialties are essential to improve patient outcomes in this potentially fatal condition. PMID:27298291

  13. Sunburn and malignant melanoma.

    PubMed Central

    Green, A.; Siskind, V.; Bain, C.; Alexander, J.

    1985-01-01

    We investigated the relationship between cutaneous malignant melanoma and multiple sunburns in the Queensland population. Interview data were gathered from 236 case-control pairs concerning their lifetime experience of severe sunburns, their occupational and recreational sun exposure, and their skin type. Excluding the lentigo maligna melanoma subtype, an association between multiple sunburns and melanoma was evident. After controlling for other major risk factors there was a significant dose-response relationship (P less than 0.05): the estimated relative risk associated with 2-5 sunburns in life was 1.5, and with 6 or more was 2.4. This observation extends the hitherto circumstantial evidence of a causal relationship between exposure to solar ultraviolet radiation and melanoma, and suggests that precautionary measures could prevent the development of this disease in a proportion of cases in fair-skinned populations. PMID:3970815

  14. [Acupoint Selection Laws for Massage Therapy of Infantile Anorexia: an Analysis Based on Data Mining].

    PubMed

    Liu, Kai; Wang Jie; Wang, Yan-guo

    2016-06-01

    Massage prescriptions for treating infantile anorexia in Chinese Academic Journal Full-Text Database (CNKI, 1979-2012), Chinese Scientific and Technological Journal Full-Text Database (VIP, 1989-2012) and Wanfang Database (1990-2012) were collected. By using Chinese Medicine Inheritance Auxiliary Platform (Version 2.0) Software, 286 massage prescriptions for treatment of infantile anorexia were screened involved 76 acupoints, 20 commonly used acupoints, and 57 core acupoint combinations. Infantile Tuina specific points were used as main acupoints in massage therapy for infantile anorexia, and core acupoints covered Jizhu, Pi meridian, abdomen, Nei-Bagua, Zusanli (ST36), and Ban-men. PMID:27491238

  15. Primary intrahepatic malignant epithelioid mesothelioma

    PubMed Central

    Perysinakis, Iraklis; Nixon, Alexander M.; Spyridakis, Ioannis; Kakiopoulos, George; Zorzos, Charalampos; Margaris, Ilias

    2014-01-01

    INTRODUCTION Primary malignant hepatic mesotheliomas are extremely rare. We report the case of a patient with primary intrahepatic malignant mesothelioma who was treated in our department. PRESENTATION OF CASE A 66-year old male patient was admitted to our department for the evaluation of anemia. An abdominal computed tomography scan revealed a large space occupying lesion in the right liver lobe. DISCUSSION The tumor was subsequently resected and a diagnosis of primary intrahepatic malignant mesothelioma was made after pathologic examination. The patient did not receive adjuvant therapy and is currently alive and free of disease, 36 months after the resection. CONCLUSION To our knowledge this is the eighth adult case of primary intrahepatic malignant mesothelioma reported in the literature. These tumors are rarely diagnosed preoperatively. Absence of previous asbestos exposure does not exclude malignant mesothelioma from the differential diagnosis. Proper surgical treatment may offer prolonged survival to the patient, without adjuvant therapy. PMID:25460485

  16. Interleukin 1 Receptor Antagonist Deficiency Presenting as Infantile Pustulosis Mimicking Infantile Pustular Psoriasis

    PubMed Central

    Minkis, Kira; Aksentijevich, Ivona; Goldbach-Mansky, Raphaela; Magro, Cynthia; Scott, Rachelle; Davis, Jessica G.; Sardana, Niti; Herzog, Ronit

    2012-01-01

    Background Deficiency of interleukin 1 receptor antagonist (DIRA) is a recently described autoinflammatory syndrome of skin and bone caused by recessive mutations in the gene encoding the interleukin 1 receptor antagonist. Few studies have been published about this debilitating condition. Early identification is critical for targeted lifesaving intervention. Observations A male infant, born to nonconsanguineous Puerto Rican parents, was referred for management of a pustular eruption diagnosed as pustular psoriasis. At 2 months of age, the infant developed a pustular eruption. After extensive evaluation, he was confirmed to be homozygous for a 175-kb genomic deletion on chromosome 2 that includes the IL1RN gene, commonly found in Puerto Ricans. Therapy with anakinra was initiated, with rapid clearance of skin lesions and resolution of systemic inflammation. Conclusions Recent identification of DIRA as a disease entity, compounded by the limited number of reported cases, makes early identification difficult. It is critical to consider this entity in the differential diagnosis of infantile pustulosis. Targeted therapy with the recombinant human interleukin 1 receptor antagonist anakinra can be lifesaving if initiated early. A high carrier frequency of the 175-kb DIRA-associated genomic deletion in the Puerto Rican population strongly supports testing infants presenting with unexplained pustulosis in patients from this geographic region. PMID:22431714

  17. Infantile myofibroma: a firm, round plaque in an infant.

    PubMed

    Amano, Shinya; Halsey, Mark; Yasuda, Mariko; O'Donnell, Patrick; Csikesz, Courtney

    2016-01-01

    Infantile myofibroma is a rare fibromatous tumor that is variable in presentation and is frequently mistaken for hemangioma or rhabdomyosarcoma. We describe a 14-month-old boy who presented with multiple, enlarging, firm lesions on the shoulder. Biopsy revealed a proliferation of small spindle cells with myxoid and hyalinized stroma infiltrating into the superficial adipose tissue. We provide a brief review of the clinical presentation, histopathologic features, management, and recent advances in our understanding of this rare condition. PMID:27617527

  18. Validation of the rat model of cryptogenic infantile spasms

    PubMed Central

    Chachua, Tamar; Yum, Mi-Sun; Velíšková, Jana; Velíšek, Libor

    2011-01-01

    Purpose To determine whether a new model of cryptogenic infantile spasms consisting of prenatal priming with betamethasone and postnatal trigger of spasms by N-methyl-D-aspartic acid responds to chronic ACTH treatment, and has similar EEG signature, efficacy of treatments, and behavioral impairments as human infantile spasms. Methods Rats prenatally primed with betamethasone on gestational day 15 were used. Spasms were triggered with N-methyl-D-aspartic acid between postnatal days (P) 10-15 in a single session or in multiple sessions in one subject. The expression of spasms was compared to prenatally saline-injected controls. Effects of relevant treatments (ACTH, vigabatrin, methylprednisolone, rapamycin) were determined in betamethasone-primed rats. In the rats after spasms, behavioral evaluation was performed in the open field and and elevated plus maze on P20-22. Key Findings NMDA at P10-15 (the rat “infant” period) triggers the spasms significantly earlier and in greater numbers in the prenatal betamethasone-exposed brain compared to controls. Similar to human condition, the spasms occur in clusters. Repeated trigger of spasms is associated with ictal EEG electrodecrements and interictal large-amplitude waves, a possible rat variant of hypsarrhythmia. Chronic ACTH treatment in a randomized experiment, and chronic pretreatment with methylprednisolone significantly suppress number of spasms similar to human condition. Pretreatment with vigabatrin, but not rapamycin, suppressed the spasms. Significant behavioral changes occurred following multiple bouts of spasms. Significance The model of infantile spasms has remarkable similarities with the human condition in semiology, EEG, pharmacological response, and long-term outcome. Thus, the model can be used for search of novel and more effective treatments for infantile spasms. PMID:21854372

  19. Infantile Marfan syndrome in a Korean tertiary referral center

    PubMed Central

    Seo, Yeon Jeong; Lee, Ko-Eun; Kwon, Bo Sang; Bae, Eun Jung; Noh, Chung Il

    2016-01-01

    Purpose Infantile Marfan syndrome (MFS) is a rare congenital inheritable connective tissue disorder with poor prognosis. This study aimed to evaluate the cardiovascular manifestations and overall prognosis of infantile MFS diagnosed in a tertiary referral center in Korea. Methods Eight patients diagnosed with infantile MFS between 2004 and 2014 were retrospectively evaluated. Results Their median age at the time of diagnosis was 2.5 months (range, 0–20 months). The median follow-up period was 25.5 months (range, 0–94 months). The median length at birth was 50.0 cm (range, 48–53 cm); however, height became more prominent over time, and the patients were taller than the 97th percentile at the time of the study. None of the patients had any relevant family history. Four of the 5 patients who underwent DNA sequencing had a fibrillin 1 gene mutation. All the patients with echocardiographic data of the aortic root had a z score of >2. All had mitral and tricuspid valve prolapse, and various degrees of mitral and tricuspid regurgitation. Five patients underwent open-heart surgery, including mitral valve replacement, of whom two required multiple operations. The median age at mitral valve replacement was 28.5 months (range, 5–69 months). Seven patients showed congestive heart failure before surgery or during follow-up, and required multiple anti-heart failure medications. Four patients died of heart failure at a median age of 12 months. Conclusion The prognosis of infantile MFS is poor; thus, early diagnosis and timely cautious treatment are essential to prevent further morbidity and mortality. PMID:26958064

  20. Infantile desmoid-type fibromatosis in an Akita puppy.

    PubMed

    Cook, J L; Turk, J R; Pope, E R; Jordan, R C

    1998-01-01

    A 10-week-old Akita puppy was evaluated for a reported umbilical hernia. Repair of the hernia had been attempted three times prior to referral. A defect in the ventral abdominal wall with an associated soft-tissue mass was identified on abdominal radiographs. Exploratory surgery was performed; the mass was resected and the abdominal wall defect was repaired. Histopathological evaluation of the mass was consistent with infantile desmoid-type fibromatosis. PMID:9657161

  1. Infantile-onset glaucoma and anterior megalophthalmos in osteogenesis imperfecta.

    PubMed

    Bohnsack, Brenda L

    2016-04-01

    Osteogenesis imperfecta (OI) is an inherited condition in which defects in type 1 collagen cause abnormalities in many tissues and organs, including bone, teeth, heart valves, and eyes. We describe a 6-month-old boy with OI who presented with anterior megalophthalmos of the right eye and infantile-onset glaucoma of the left eye. To our knowledge, this is the first reported case of these types of congenital eye anomalies in an infant with OI. PMID:26994503

  2. Malignant eroticized countertransference.

    PubMed

    Chessick, R D

    1997-01-01

    Gabbard (1994) divided the pathology of therapists, both male and female, who commit sexual boundary violations into those who are psychotic, those who are predatory psychopaths, those engaging in masochistic surrender, and those called "the lovesick therapist." Lovesick therapists are the most common type and manifest crucial narcissistic themes of "a desperate need for validation by their patients, a hunger to be loved and idealized, and a tendency to use patients to regulate their own self-esteem" (p. 127). Among the psychodynamic aspects of this curiously circumscribed area of loss of reality testing that makes it difficult for the therapist to see how self-destructive and harmful such enactment is, are an unconscious reenactment of incestuous longings, a misperception of the patient's wish for maternal nurturance as a sexual overture, enactments of rescue fantasies, a projected idealization of the self of the therapist, a confusion of the therapist's needs with the patient's needs, a fantasy that love is curative, acting out disavowed rage at the patient, or rage at an organization, an institute, or one's training analyst, a manic defense against mourning, a narcissistic fantasy that their sexual affair is an exception, insecurity regarding masculine identity, and assorted primitive preoedipal themes. Gabbard's (1991) erotized countertransference is one variety of what I have termed malignant eroticized countertransference. His variety is a development that occurs under the pressure of the patient's preemptive and compelling expressions of lust and love, the patient's erotic transference. But malignant eroticized countertransference can also occur without the patient having offered any such expressions; it can even occur on first meeting the patient when he or she walks into the office! This is akin to the romantic "love-at-first-sight" theme so favored in the movies and by novelists, but it is always pathological when it occurs in the therapeutic situation

  3. Stereoacuity Outcomes Following Treatment of Infantile and Accommodative Esotropia

    PubMed Central

    Birch, Eileen E.; Wang, Jingyun

    2009-01-01

    Purpose To review what is known about the normal maturation of stereoacuity, the stereoacuity deficits associated with infantile and accommodative esotropia, the rationale for making improved stereoacuity a goal of treatment, and strategies for improving stereoacuity outcomes. Methods Studies of stereoacuity maturation during normal development, studies of stereoacuity outcomes following treatment for infantile and accommodative esotropia, and studies of primate models of esotropia are reviewed. Results Stereoacuity maturation normally proceeds rapidly during the first year of life. Infantile and accommodative esotropia are associated with profound and permanent disruption of stereopsis. While rehabilitation of stereoacuity following treatment of esotropia remains a challenge, even the achievement of subnormal stereoacuity may have real benefits to the child. Conclusions Some abnormalities in stereoacuity may exist before the onset of esotropia, but others may result directly from abnormal binocular experience. Several strategies for improving stereoacuity outcomes in esotropia are currently under active investigation. Improved stereoacuity outcomes are associated with better long term stability of alignment, reduced risk for and/or severity of amblyopia, improved achievement of sensorimotor developmental milestones, better reading ability, and improved long-term quality of life. PMID:19390468

  4. Acupuncture in Practice: Investigating Acupuncturists' Approach to Treating Infantile Colic

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Infantile colic is common, but no safe and effective conventional treatment exists. The use of acupuncture has increased despite weak evidence. This practitioner survey explores and discusses how infantile colic is regarded and treated in Traditional Chinese Medicine (TCM). The study is based on personal communication with 24 acupuncturists from nine countries. These acupuncturists specialize in pediatric acupuncture and represent different styles of acupuncture. Their experiences are discussed and related to relevant books and articles. Informants claimed good results when treating infants with colic. The TCM patterns commonly described by informants matched the textbooks to a great extent. The most common syndromes were “stagnation of food” and “Spleen Qi Xu.” Regarding treatment, some informants followed the teachers' and the textbook authors' advice on differentiated treatment according to syndrome. The points used most often were LI4, ST36, and Sifeng. Other informants treated all infants alike in one single point, LI4. The results demonstrate the diversity of TCM. The use of acupuncture for infantile colic presents an interesting option, but further research is needed in order to optimize the effects and protect infants from unnecessary or less effective treatment. PMID:24324513

  5. Infantile amnesia reconsidered: a cross-cultural analysis.

    PubMed

    Wang, Qi

    2003-01-01

    A number of theories have been offered over the past hundred years to explain the phenomenon of infantile amnesia, the common inability to remember autobiographical experiences from the first years of life. Recent comparative studies that examine autobiographical memories in different populations, particularly populations in North America and East Asia, have yielded intriguing findings that provide a unique opportunity to revisit some of the major theoretical views and to propose new accounts. In light of these findings, this article discusses five theoretical explanations for infantile amnesia, including cognitive and social discontinuity, the emergence of the self, early parent-child memory sharing, functions of autobiographical memory, and the complexity of life experience. The reconsideration of infantile amnesia from a cross-cultural perspective suggests that while the basic mechanisms and contributing factors may be universal, the specific ways in which these mechanisms and factors are manifested differ qualitatively across cultures. A theoretical approach that takes the larger cultural context into account can help us understand this long-standing puzzle. PMID:12653489

  6. [Malignant Pleural Mesotheliomas].

    PubMed

    Biancosino, C; Redwan, B; Krüger, M; Eberlein, M; Bölükbas, S

    2016-09-01

    Malignant pleural mesotheliomas (MPM) are very aggressive tumors, which originate from the mesothelial cells of the pleural surface. The main risk factor associated with MPM is exposure to asbestos. The latency period between asbestos exposure and MPM can be 30-60 years. Clinical symptoms and signs are often nonspecifc. The diagnosis of MPM requires an adequate tissue specimen for pathological examination, and video assisted thoracoscopic surgey (VATS) is associated with the highest diagnostic yield. MPM are histologically classified into epitheloid, sacromatoid and biphasic (mixed) sub-types. Accurate staging with invasive tests, if needed, is an important step before an interdisciplinary team can decide on an optimal (multi-modal) treatment approach. A multi-modal treatment approach (surgery, radiation oncology and chemotherapy) is superior to all approaches relying only on a single modality, if the patient qualifies for it from an oncological and functional standpoint. The goal of the surgical therapy is to achieve macroscopic complete resection. There are two competing surgical approaches and philosophies: extrapleural pneumonectomy (EPP) and radical pleurectomy (RP). Over the last years a paradigm shift from EPP to RP occurred and RP is now often the preferred surgical option. PMID:27612329

  7. Childhood ovarian malignancy.

    PubMed

    Mahadik, Kalpana; Ghorpade, Kanchanmala

    2014-04-01

    Objective of this article is to appraise diagnostic aspects and treatment modalities in childhood ovarian tumor in background of available evidence. Literature search on Pubmed revealed various aspects of epidemiology, histopathological diagnosis, and treatment of pediatric ovarian tumor. 85 % of childhood tumors are germ cell tumors. The varied histopathological picture in germ cell tumors poses a diagnostic and therapeutic challenge. Immunohistochemistry and newer genetic markers like SALL4 and karyopherin-2 (KPNA2) have been helpful in differentiating ovarian yolk sac tumor from dysgerminoma, teratomas, and other pictures of hepatoid, endometrioid, clear cell carcinomatous, and adenocarcinomatous tissues with varied malignant potential. Before platinum therapy, these tumors were almost fatal in children. Fertility-conserving surgery with bleomycin, etoposide, and cisplatin has dramatically changed the survival rates in these patients. This modality gives cancer cure with healthy offspring to female patients with childhood ovarian tumor. Evidence also supports this protocol resulting in successful pregnancy rates and safety of cytotoxic drugs in children born to these patients. PMID:24757335

  8. Extensive facial and orbital infantile hemangiomas associated with high intraocular pressure.

    PubMed

    Shatriah, Ismail; Norazizah, Mohd-Amin; Wan-Hitam, Wan-Hazabbah; Wong, Abd-Rahim; Yunus, Rohaizan; Leo, Seo-Wei

    2013-01-01

    High intraocular pressure is a rare ophthalmic condition associated with infantile hemangiomas that involves the orbit, eyelid, or both. Here, we describe a patient with extensive facial and orbital infantile hemangiomas associated with high intraocular pressure in the affected eye. The prompt management of this challenging condition is essential. PMID:22329437

  9. Bile duct malignancies.

    PubMed

    Tucek, S; Tomasek, J; Halámkova, J; Kiss, I; Andrasina, T; Hemmelová, B; Adámková-Krákorová, D; Vyzula, R

    2010-01-01

    Bile duct malignancies include intrahepatic cholangiocarcinoma (ICC), extrahepatic cholangiocarcinoma (ECC), gall bladder carcinoma (GC) and carcinoma of Vater's ampulla (ampulloma). Bile duct neoplasms are rare tumours with overall poor prognosis. The overall incidence affects up to 12.5 per 100,000 persons in the Czech Republic. The mortality rate has risen recently to 9.5 per 100,000 persons. The incidence and mortality have been remarkably stable over the past 3 decades. The survival rate of patients with these tumours is poor, usually not exceeding 12 months. The diagnostic process is complex, uneasy and usually late. Most cases are diagnosed when unresectable, and palliative treatment is the main approach of medical care for these tumours. The treatment remains very challenging. New approaches have not brought much improvement in this field. Standards of palliative care are lacking and quality of life assessments are surprisingly not common. From the scarce data it seems, however, that multimodal individually tailored treatment can prolong patients'survival and improve the health-related quality of life. The care in specialized centres offers methods of surgery, interventional radiology, clinical oncology and high quality supportive care. These methods are discussed in the article in greater detail. Improvements in this field can be sought in new diagnostic methods and new procedures in surgery and interventional radiology. Understanding the tumour biology on the molecular level could shift the strategy to a more successful one, resulting in more cured patients. Further improvements in palliative care can be sought by defining new targets and new drug development. The lack of patients with bile duct neoplasms has been the limiting factor for any improvements. A new design of larger randomized international multicentric clinical trials with prompt data sharing could help to overcome this major problem. Defining standards of palliative care is a necessity

  10. Malignant hyperthermia: a review.

    PubMed

    Rosenberg, Henry; Pollock, Neil; Schiemann, Anja; Bulger, Terasa; Stowell, Kathryn

    2015-01-01

    Malignant hyperthermia (MH) is a pharmacogenetic disorder of skeletal muscle that presents as a hypermetabolic response to potent volatile anesthetic gases such as halothane, sevoflurane, desflurane, isoflurane and the depolarizing muscle relaxant succinylcholine, and rarely, in humans, to stressors such as vigorous exercise and heat. The incidence of MH reactions ranges from 1:10,000 to 1: 250,000 anesthetics. However, the prevalence of the genetic abnormalities may be as great as one in 400 individuals. MH affects humans, certain pig breeds, dogs and horses. The classic signs of MH include hyperthermia, tachycardia, tachypnea, increased carbon dioxide production, increased oxygen consumption, acidosis, hyperkalaemia, muscle rigidity, and rhabdomyolysis, all related to a hypermetabolic response. The syndrome is likely to be fatal if untreated. An increase in end-tidal carbon dioxide despite increased minute ventilation provides an early diagnostic clue. In humans the syndrome is inherited in an autosomal dominant pattern, while in pigs it is autosomal recessive. Uncontrolled rise of myoplasmic calcium, which activates biochemical processes related to muscle activation leads to the pathophysiologic changes. In most cases, the syndrome is caused by a defect in the ryanodine receptor. Over 400 variants have been identified in the RYR1 gene located on chromosome 19q13.1, and at least 34 are causal for MH. Less than 1 % of variants have been found in CACNA1S but not all of these are causal. Diagnostic testing involves the in vitro contracture response of biopsied muscle to halothane, caffeine, and in some centres ryanodine and 4-chloro-m-cresol. Elucidation of the genetic changes has led to the introduction of DNA testing for susceptibility to MH. Dantrolene sodium is a specific antagonist and should be available wherever general anesthesia is administered. Increased understanding of the clinical manifestation and pathophysiology of the syndrome, has lead to the

  11. Ibrutinib for B cell malignancies

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Research over the role of Bruton’s agammaglobulinemia tyrosine kinase (BTK) in B-lymphocyte development, differentiation, signaling and survival has led to better understanding of the pathogenesis of B-cell malignancies. Down-regulation of BTK activity is an attractive novel strategy for treating patients with B-cell malignancies. Ibrutinib (PCI-32765), a potent inhibitor of BTK induces impressive responses in B-cell malignancies through irreversible bond with cysteine-481 in the active site of BTK (TH/SH1 domain) and inhibits BTK phosphorylation on Tyr223. This review discussed in details the role of BTK in B-cell signaling, molecular interactions between B cell lymphoma/leukemia cells and their microenvironment. Clinical trials of the novel BTK inhibitor, ibrutinib (PCI-32765), in B cell malignancies were summarized. PMID:24472371

  12. AMG 319 Lymphoid Malignancy FIH

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-01-20

    Cancer; Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia; Diffuse Large Cell Lymphoma; Hematologic Malignancies; Hematology; Leukemia; Low Grade Lymphoma; Lymphoma; Mantle Cell Lymphoma; Non-Hodgkin's Lymphoma; Oncology; Oncology Patients; T Cell Lymphoma; Tumors

  13. Malignant external otitis: CT evaluation

    SciTech Connect

    Curtin, H.D.; Wolfe, P.; May, M.

    1982-11-01

    Malignant external otitis is an aggressive infection caused by Pseudomonas aeruginosa that most often occurs in elderly diabetics. Malignant external otitis often spreads inferiorly from the external canal to involve the subtemporal area and progresses medially towards the petrous apex leading to multiple cranial nerve palsies. The computed tomographic (CT) findings in malignant external otitis include obliteration of the normal fat planes in the subtemporal area as well as patchy destruction of the bony cortex of the mastoid. The point of exit of the various cranial nerves can be identified on CT scans, and the extent of the inflammatory mass correlates well with the clinical findings. Four cases of malignant external otitis are presented. In each case CT provided a good demonstration of involvement of the soft tissues at the base of the skull.

  14. Drugs Approved for Malignant Mesothelioma

    Cancer.gov

    This page lists cancer drugs approved by the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) for malignant mesothelioma. The list includes generic names and brand names. The drug names link to NCI's Cancer Drug Information summaries.

  15. Telomerase Activation in Hematological Malignancies.

    PubMed

    Ropio, Joana; Merlio, Jean-Philippe; Soares, Paula; Chevret, Edith

    2016-01-01

    Telomerase expression and telomere maintenance are critical for cell proliferation and survival, and they play important roles in development and cancer, including hematological malignancies. Transcriptional regulation of the rate-limiting subunit of human telomerase reverse transcriptase gen (hTERT) is a complex process, and unveiling the mechanisms behind its reactivation is an important step for the development of diagnostic and therapeutic applications. Here, we review the main mechanisms of telomerase activation and the associated hematologic malignancies. PMID:27618103

  16. Microwave Ablation of Hepatic Malignancy

    PubMed Central

    Lubner, Meghan G.; Brace, Christopher L.; Ziemlewicz, Tim J.; Hinshaw, J. Louis; Lee, Fred T.

    2013-01-01

    Microwave ablation is an extremely promising heat-based thermal ablation modality that has particular applicability in treating hepatic malignancies. Microwaves can generate very high temperatures in very short time periods, potentially leading to improved treatment efficiency and larger ablation zones. As the available technology continues to improve, microwave ablation is emerging as a valuable alternative to radiofrequency ablation in the treatment of hepatic malignancies. This article reviews the current state of microwave ablation including technical and clinical considerations. PMID:24436518

  17. Cryptococcus neoformans infection in malignancy.

    PubMed

    Schmalzle, Sarah A; Buchwald, Ulrike K; Gilliam, Bruce L; Riedel, David J

    2016-09-01

    Cryptococcosis is an opportunistic invasive fungal infection that is well described and easily recognised when it occurs as meningitis in HIV-infected persons. Malignancy and its treatment may also confer a higher risk of infection with Cryptococcus neoformans, but this association has not been as well described. A case of cryptococcosis in a cancer patient is presented, and all cases of coincident C. neoformans infection and malignancy in adults published in the literature in English between 1970 and 2014 are reviewed. Data from these cases were aggregated in order to describe the demographics, type of malignancy, site of infection, clinical manifestations, treatment and outcomes of cryptococcosis in patients with cancer. Haematologic malignancies accounted for 82% of cases, with lymphomas over-represented compared to US population data (66% vs. 53% respectively). Cryptococcosis was reported rarely in patients with solid tumours. Haematologic malignancy patients were more likely to have central nervous system (P < 0.001) or disseminated disease (P < 0.001), receive Amphotericin B as part of initial therapy (P = 0.023), and had higher reported mortality rates than those with solid tumours (P = 0.222). Providers should have heightened awareness of the possibility of cryptococcosis in patients with haematologic malignancy presenting with infection. PMID:26932366

  18. Basic and clinical aspects of malignant melanoma

    SciTech Connect

    Nathanson, L. )

    1987-01-01

    This book contains the following 10 chapters: The role of oncogenes in the pathogenesis of malignant melanoma; Laminin and fibronectin modulate the metastatic activity of melanoma cells; Structure, function and biosynthesis of ganglioside antigens associated with human tumors derived from the neuroectoderm; Epidemiology of ocular melanoma; Malignant melanoma: Prognostic factors; Endocrine influences on the natural history of human malignant melanoma; Psychosocial factors associated with prognostic indicators, progression, psychophysiology, and tumor-host response in cutaneous malignant melanoma; Central nervous system metastases in malignant melanoma; Interferon trials in the management of malignant melanoma and other neoplasms: an overview; and The treatment of malignant melanoma by fast neutrons.

  19. Spectrum of Infantile Esotropia in Primates: Behavior, Brains and Orbits

    PubMed Central

    Tychsen, Lawrence; Richards, Michael; Wong, Agnes; Foeller, Paul; Burhkalter, Andreas; Narasimhan, Anita; Demer, Joseph

    2009-01-01

    Introduction Recent studies of human infants have described a spectrum of early-onset esotropia, from small-variable-angle to large heterotropias.1 We report here a similar spectrum of early-onset esotropia in infant monkeys, with emphasis on the relationship between visuomotor deficits, central nervous system (CNS) circuitry and orbital anatomy. Methods Eye movements were recorded in macaque monkeys with natural, infantile-onset esotropia (n=7) and in control monkeys (n=2) to assess alignment, latent nystagmus, dissociated vertical deviation (DVD), and pursuit/optokinetic nystagmus (OKN) asymmetries. Acuity was measured by preferential-looking technique or spatial sweep VEP (SSVEP). Geniculo-striate pathways were then analyzed with neuroanatomic tracers and metabolic labels. Extraocular muscles were examined by high-resolution magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and anatomic sectioning of whole orbits. Results Esotropia ranged from 4-13.5° (7-24 prism diopters [PD]) with fixation preference (if any) varying idiosyncratically (as in human). Severity of ocular motor dysfunction (i.e. nystagmus velocity, DVD amplitude, pursuit-OKN nasal bias index), increased as the magnitude of esotropia angle. Animals with greater ocular motor deficits tended to have greater visual area V1 (striate cortex) neuroanatomic deficits, evident as fewer binocular horizontal connections in V1. Orbital MRI/anatomic analysis showed no difference in horizontal rectus cross sectional areas, muscle paths, innervation densities or cytoarchitecture compared to normal animals. Conclusion The infantile esotropia spectrum in non-human primates is remarkably similar to that reported in human infants. Concomitant esotropia in these primates cannot be ascribed to abnormalities of the extraocular muscles or orbit. These findings, combined with epidemiologic studies of human, suggest that perturbations of CNS binocular pathways in early development are the primary cause of the infantile esotropia syndrome

  20. Surgical Treatments for Infantile Purulent Meningitis Complicated by Subdural Effusion

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Xianshu; Zhang, Xiaoru; Cao, Hongbin; Jing, Shiyuan; Yang, Zhiguo; Cheng, Zhenghai; Liu, Ye; Li, Xin; Gao, Feifei; Ji, Yuanqi

    2015-01-01

    Background Infantile purulent meningitis (PM) is a commonly severe intracranial infectious disease in infants under age 1 year. In recent years, several diagnostic and treatment methods were reported, but in these cases the neurological complications and sequel were often observed, among which subdural effusion (SE) is the most common complication in PM. Timely diagnosis and early intervention are vital for better outcomes. In this study, the surgical treatments for infantile PM complicated by SE were investigated. Material/Methods Patients who had PM complicated by SE in the Children’s Hospital of Hebei Province from June 2000 to June 2012 were retrospectively analyzed and 170 patients were enrolled in the study. Surgical treatment for each patient was adopted according to producing effusion time, leucocyte count, protein content, intracranial pressure, and bacteria culture, coupled with cranial ultrasound examination, CT, and MRI scans. Results Nearly, 15 patients were cured using serial taps, with a 50% cure rate. Seventeen out of 30 (56.6%) patients receiving subcutaneous reservoir drainage had better outcome. Nearly 80% of patients (55/69) who underwent minimally invasive trepanation and drainage were positive. Surgical procedure of minimally invasive trepanation and drainage combined with drug douche was effective in 63% of patients (19/30). In addition, 6 patients were cured with subdural-peritoneal shunt. Only 1 patient died, after the recurrence of meningitis, and the remaining 4 patients were cured by craniotomy. Conclusions For infantile PM complicated with SE, treatment needs be chosen according to the specific situation. Surgical procedure of minimally invasive trepanation and drainage is a very effective treatment in curing PM complicated by SE. The treatment was highly effective with the use of drug douche. Subdural-peritoneal shunt and craniotomy were as effective as in refractory cases. PMID:26482715

  1. Asfotase Alfa Treatment Improves Survival for Perinatal and Infantile Hypophosphatasia

    PubMed Central

    Rockman-Greenberg, Cheryl; Ozono, Keiichi; Riese, Richard; Moseley, Scott; Melian, Agustin; Thompson, David D.; Bishop, Nicholas; Hofmann, Christine

    2016-01-01

    Context: Hypophosphatasia (HPP) is an inborn error of metabolism that, in its most severe perinatal and infantile forms, results in 50–100% mortality, typically from respiratory complications. Objectives: Our objective was to better understand the effect of treatment with asfotase alfa, a first-in-class enzyme replacement therapy, on mortality in neonates and infants with severe HPP. Design/Setting: Data from patients with the perinatal and infantile forms of HPP in two ongoing, multicenter, multinational, open-label, phase 2 interventional studies of asfotase alfa treatment were compared with data from similar patients from a retrospective natural history study. Patients: Thirty-seven treated patients (median treatment duration, 2.7 years) and 48 historical controls of similar chronological age and HPP characteristics. Interventions: Treated patients received asfotase alfa as sc injections either 1 mg/kg six times per week or 2 mg/kg thrice weekly. Main Outcome Measures: Survival, skeletal health quantified radiographically on treatment, and ventilatory status were the main outcome measures for this study. Results: Asfotase alfa was associated with improved survival in treated patients vs historical controls: 95% vs 42% at age 1 year and 84% vs 27% at age 5 years, respectively (P < .0001, Kaplan-Meier log-rank test). Whereas 5% (1/20) of the historical controls who required ventilatory assistance survived, 76% (16/21) of the ventilated and treated patients survived, among whom 75% (12/16) were weaned from ventilatory support. This better respiratory outcome accompanied radiographic improvements in skeletal mineralization and health. Conclusions: Asfotase alfa mineralizes the HPP skeleton, including the ribs, and improves respiratory function and survival in life-threatening perinatal and infantile HPP. PMID:26529632

  2. Distant metastatic spread of molecularly proven infantile fibrosarcoma of the chest in a 2-month-old girl: case report and review of literature.

    PubMed

    van Grotel, Martine; Blanco, Esther; Sebire, Neil J; Slater, Olga; Chowdhury, Tanzina; Anderson, John

    2014-04-01

    Infantile fibrosarcoma (IFS) is a malignant neoplasm, arising in children younger than 2 years of age and with a hallmark chromosomal translocation t(12;15)(p13;q26) encoding an ETV6-NTRK3 fusion oncoprotein. A review of the world literature found no reported cases of molecularly proven IFS with distant metastatic spread at presentation. We report the case of a 2-month-old infant girl presenting with a chest wall primary IFS bearing and expressing the ETV6-NTRK3 fusion, who had several pulmonary metastatic deposits at diagnosis. She achieved complete remission with chemotherapy and surgery. To our knowledge, this is the first reported case of molecularly proven IFS with distant metastatic spread. PMID:24276045

  3. [Motor-coordination disorders in patients with infantile cerebral palsy].

    PubMed

    Aslanov, A M; Avakian, G N; Bulaeva, N V; Kovaleva, N I

    1984-01-01

    A clinico-electrophysiological study of motor-coordinatory impairments was carried out in 117 patients with infantile cerebral paralysis. The results obtained suggest a possibility of a slow rate of myelinization, inadequate development of the coordinatory systems due to early damage to the brain associated with the systemic localization of the defect, and the obligatory involvement of extrapyramidal impairments in the realization of pathological dyskinesias. The clinical and electrophysiological examination made it possible to sum up all clinical manifestations of the pathology under a heading "discoordinatory extrapyramidal dyskinesias". PMID:6506951

  4. Clinical Characteristics and Treatment Options of Infantile Vascular Anomalies

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Bin; Li, Li; Zhang, Li-xin; Sun, Yu-juan; Ma, Lin

    2015-01-01

    Abstract To analyze the clinical characteristics and treatment outcomes of vascular anomalies, and determine which therapy is safe and effective. The data of vascular anomalies pediatric patients who arrived at Beijing children's Hospital from January 2001 to December 2014 were analyzed retrospectively, including the influence of gender, age, clinical manifestation, diagnosis, treatment options, and outcomes. As to infantile hemangiomas, the outcomes of different treatments and their adverse reactions were compared. As to spider angioma and cutaneous capillary malformation, the treatment effect of 595 nm pulsed dye laser (PDL) is analyzed. A total number of 6459 cases of vascular anomalies were reclassified according to the 2014 ISSVA classification system. Among them, the gender ratio is 1:1.69, head-and-neck involved is 53.3%, the onset age within the first month is 72.4%, the age of initial encounter that younger than 6 months is 60.1%. The most common anomalies were infantile hemangiomas (42.6%), congenital hemangiomas (14.1%), and capillary malformations (29.9%). In treating infantile hemangiomas, laser shows the lowest adverse reactions rate significantly. Propranolol shows a higher improvement rate than laser, glucocorticoids, glucocorticoids plus laser, and shows no significant difference with propranolol plus laser both in improvement rate and adverse reactions rate. The total improvement rate of 595 nm PDL is 89.8% in treating spider angioma and 46.7% in treating cutaneous capillary malformation. The improvement rate and excellent rate of laser in treating cutaneous capillary malformation are growing synchronously by increasing the treatment times, and shows no significant difference among different parts of lesion that located in a body. Vascular anomalies possess a female predominance, and are mostly occurred in faces. Definite diagnosis is very important before treatment. In treating infantile hemangioma, propranolol is recommended as the first

  5. Is infantile autism a universal phenomenon? An open question.

    PubMed

    Sanua, V D

    1984-01-01

    What we have tried to do in this paper is to question the universality of Infantile Autism as implied by the various definitions which have been provided. Our research of the literature has convinced us that infantile autism appears to be an illness of Western Civilization, and appears in countries of high technology, where the nuclear family dominates. We indicated that no research studies were located in the U.S.A. on Hispanics, in spite of their large number. Furthermore, it was found to be quite rare among Black families. We also saw that the illness seems to be quite infrequent in Latin American countries, Africa, and India, while the rate is high in Japan, but only in westernized families. Tinbergen (1974) likewise feels that infantile autism is "actually on the increase in a number of Western and westernized societies". Two major variables which are interconnected seem to be responsible for the confusion in the findings. One of them is the problem of diagnosis. It would seem that many researchers have extended the definition of infantile autism to include other seriously afflicted children, including those who are brain-damaged. This is no surprise, since such conflicts exist as Ritvo (1981) estimating that there are 300,000 autistic children in the U.S., while a report by the National Institute for Handicapped Research estimates the number of autistic children to be 71,000 (1981). Another aspect of the findings which has been contradictory is that some investigators have found that parents of autistic children tend to be of higher S.E.S., particularly in European studies, while some studies in the U.S.A. did not find such a difference among the parents of autistic and non-autistic children. We have provided some illustrations to indicate that studies which have found no differences were not dealing exclusively with autistic children as defined by Kanner, and often used childhood schizophrenia and autism interchangeably. Cantwell, Baker, and Rutter (1978

  6. Review of topical beta blockers as treatment for infantile hemangiomas.

    PubMed

    Painter, Sally L; Hildebrand, Göran Darius

    2016-01-01

    The treatment of infantile hemangiomas changed from the use of oral corticosteroids to oral propranolol on the serendipitous discovery of propanolol's clinical effectiveness in 2008. Since then, clinicians have begun to use topical beta blockers--in particular, timolol maleate 0.5% gel forming solution--with good effect. Topical beta blockers are now used for lesions with both deep and superficial components and those that are amblyogenic. When initiated in the proliferative phase of the lesion, the effectiveness of the treatment can be seen within days. There is no consensus on dosing, treatment bioavailability, or clinical assessment of lesions, but these are topics for future research. PMID:26408055

  7. [Clinical guidelines for infantile-onset Pompe disease].

    PubMed

    Pascual-Pascual, S I; Nascimento, A; Fernandez-Llamazares, C M; Medrano-Lopez, C; Villalobos-Pinto, E; Martinez-Moreno, M; Ley, M; Manrique-Rodriguez, S; Blasco-Alonso, J

    2016-09-16

    Infantile-onset Pompe disease has a fatal prognosis in the short term unless it is diagnosed at an early stage and enzyme replacement therapy is not started as soon as possible. A group of specialists from different disciplines involved in this disease have reviewed the current scientific evidence and have drawn up an agreed series of recommendations on the diagnosis, treatment and follow-up of patients. We recommend establishing enzyme treatment in any patient with symptomatic Pompe disease with onset within the first year of life, with a clinical and enzymatic diagnosis, and once the CRIM (cross-reactive immunological material) status is known. PMID:27600742

  8. Cytology of canine malignant histiocytosis.

    PubMed

    Brown, Diane E.; Thrall, Mary Anna; Getzy, David M.; Weiser, M. Glade; Ogilvie, Gregory K.

    1994-01-01

    Cytologic features of bone marrow, tissue, and abdominal fluid in seven cases of malignant histiocytosis in dogs are described, and histopathology, hematology, and serum biochemistry of the cases are reviewed. Diagnosis of malignant histiocytosis was confirmed by tissue morphology and immunohistochemistry; neoplastic cells in all cases had positive immunoreactivity to lysozyme. This stain can be used to definitively establish the diagnosis of malignant histiocytosis on cytology specimens as well as tissue sections. Cytologic findings included numerous pleomorphic, large, discrete mononuclear cells with abundant, lightly basophilic, vacuolated, granular cytoplasm. Nuclei were round to oval to reniform with marked anisocytosis and anisokaryosis; nucleoli were prominent. Mitotic figures, often bizarre, were occasionally seen. Multinucleated giant cells and phagocytosis of erythrocytes and leukocytes were prominent features in cytologic preparations in four cases. Four dogs were anemic, five dogs were thrombocytopenic, and three dogs were hypercalcemic. Breeds affected included Doberman Pinscher (1), Golden Retriever (2), Flat Coated Retriever (3), and mixed-breed dog (1). PMID:12666013

  9. Gastrointestinal malignancy and the microbiome.

    PubMed

    Abreu, Maria T; Peek, Richard M

    2014-05-01

    Microbial species participate in the genesis of a substantial number of malignancies-in conservative estimates, at least 15% of all cancer cases are attributable to infectious agents. Little is known about the contribution of the gastrointestinal microbiome to the development of malignancies. Resident microbes can promote carcinogenesis by inducing inflammation, increasing cell proliferation, altering stem cell dynamics, and producing metabolites such as butyrate, which affect DNA integrity and immune regulation. Studies in human beings and rodent models of cancer have identified effector species and relationships among members of the microbial community in the stomach and colon that increase the risk for malignancy. Strategies to manipulate the microbiome, or the immune response to such bacteria, could be developed to prevent or treat certain gastrointestinal cancers. PMID:24406471

  10. [Genodermatoses with malignant skin tumors].

    PubMed

    Hübinger, L; Frank, J

    2014-06-01

    Cutaneous malignancies can manifest as isolated and sporadic tumors as well as multiple and disseminated tumors. In the latter case they often point to a genetic disease, which either can be restricted to the skin exclusively or also involve extracutaneous organs in the context of a hereditary tumor syndrome. Such hereditary tumor syndromes are clinically and genetically very heterogeneous. Therefore, the prevailing specific skin tumors play an important diagnostic role in the case of complex symptom constellations. Elucidation of the genetic basis of rare monogenetically inherited disorders and syndromes can contribute to a better understanding of the pathogenesis of frequently occurring cutaneous malignancies because the mutated genes often encode proteins, which have a key position in metabolic signaling pathways that are of high significance for the development of targeted therapies. Here we provide an overview of genodermatoses, which are associated with basal cell carcinomas, sebaceous carcinomas, keratoacanthomas, squamous cell carcinomas and malignant melanomas. PMID:24898507

  11. Dyskeratosis congenita with malignant transformation

    PubMed Central

    Ray, Jay Gopal; Swain, Niharika; Ghosh, Ranjan; Richa; Pattanayak (Mohanty), Sweta

    2011-01-01

    Dyskeratosis congenita (DC) is a rare genodermatosis characterised by a classic triad of dystrophic nails, reticular skin pigmentation and mucous membrane leukoplakic patches, which have a high rate of malignant transformation. The case report presented here deals with a sporadic case of DC without similar clinical presentation in the first-degree and second-degree relatives. Of note in this case, there was rapid malignant transformation in the non-homogeneous nodulo-speckled leukoplakic patch on the dorsum of the tongue. PMID:22715219

  12. Campomelic dysplasia and malignant hyperthermia

    PubMed Central

    Barros, Andreia; Teixeira, Filomena; Camacho, Maria Carmo; Alves, Cristina

    2011-01-01

    Campomelic dysplasia (CD) is a rare clinical entity, usually fatal in the first year of life. It is characterised by bowing and angulations of long bones, along with other congenital anomalies. The occurrence of malignant hyperthermia is rare, but it has been associated with skeletal dysplasias. The authors present the case of a boy, born at 40 weeks of gestational age, with multiple congenital anomalies and subsequently diagnosed with CD, who died at 16 months of age as a consequence of malignant hyperthermia. PMID:22691592

  13. Stenting in Malignant Biliary Obstruction.

    PubMed

    Almadi, Majid A; Barkun, Jeffrey S; Barkun, Alan N

    2015-10-01

    Decompression of the biliary system in patients with malignant biliary obstruction has been widely accepted and implemented as part of the care. Despite a wealth of literature, there remains a significant amount of uncertainty as to which approach would be most appropriate in different clinical settings. This review covers stenting of the biliary system in cases of resectable or palliative malignant biliary obstruction, potential candidates for biliary drainage, technical aspects of the procedure, as well as management of biliary stent dysfunction. Furthermore, periprocedural considerations including proper mapping of the location of obstruction and the use of antibiotics are addressed. PMID:26431598

  14. The paradoxes of the infantile sexual: A case of extemporal temporality.

    PubMed

    Kahn, Laurence

    2014-10-18

    The theoretical tension raised by the concept of infantile neurosis is featured all through the Freudian corpus - caught at the crossroads between the psychic facts of the child's development (infantile history and clinical study of pathologies) and the universal structure of unconscious complexes, including the Oedipus complex (the model of intrapsychic conflicts and of the process of "civilisation" undergone by the child). Inscribed in diachronic "temporality" like every individual lived experience and its vicissitudes, or "extemporal" like every organising schema and the structuring of repressions that it elicits, infantile neurosis leads us to examine the metapsychological status of defence mechanisms. PMID:25327258

  15. Infantile fibrosarcoma of ethmoid sinus, misdiagnosed as an adenoid in a 5-year-old child

    PubMed Central

    Geramizadeh, Bita; Khademi, Bijan; Karimi, Mehran; Shekarkhar, Golsa

    2015-01-01

    Infantile fibrosarcoma of head and neck is rare and the presence of this tumor in ethmoid sinus is even more uncommon. To the best of our knowledge, <5 cases have been reported in the last 20 years in the English literature, so far, only one of which has been infantile type in a 15 months old girl. In this case report, we will explain our experience with a rare case of infantile fibrosarcoma originating from ethmoid sinus in a 5-year-old boy who presented with dyspnea and epistaxis. After biopsy, it was diagnosed as fibrosarcoma of sinus origin. PMID:26604519

  16. Astrocytosis in infantile neuronal ceroid lipofuscinosis: friend or foe?

    PubMed

    Shyng, Charles; Sands, Mark S

    2014-10-01

    Infantile neuronal ceroid lipofuscinosis (INCL; infantile Batten disease) is an inherited paediatric neurodegenerative disease. INCL is caused by a deficiency in the lysosomal enzyme palmitoyl-protein thioesterase-1 (PPT1) and is thus classified as a lysosomal storage disease. Pathological examination of both human and murine INCL brains reveals progressive, widespread neuroinflammation. In fact, astrocyte activation appears to be the first histological sign of disease. However, the role of astrocytosis in INCL was poorly understood. The hallmark of astrocyte activation is the up-regulation of intermediate filaments, such as glial fibrillary acidic protein (GFAP) and vimentin. The role of astrocytosis in INCL was studied in a murine model lacking PPT1 and the intermediate filaments GFAP and vimentin (triple-knockout). This murine model of INCL with attenuated astrocytosis had an exacerbated pathological and clinical phenotype. The triple-knockout mouse had a significantly shortened lifespan, and accelerated cellular and humoural neuroinflammatory response compared with the parental PPT1(-/-) mouse. The data obtained from the triple-knockout mouse strongly suggest that astrocyte activation plays a beneficial role in early INCL disease progression. A more thorough understanding of the glial responses to lysosomal enzyme deficiencies and the accumulation of undergraded substrates will be crucial to developing effective therapeutics. PMID:25233404

  17. Early vs. late refeeding in acute infantile diarrhea.

    PubMed

    Gazala, E; Weitzman, S; Weizman, Z; Gross, J; Bearman, J E; Gorodischer, R

    1988-03-01

    A randomized ambulatory trial was performed to compare early (6-h) vs. late (24-h) refeeding in acute infantile diarrhea. Ninety infants with mild dehydration were enrolled in the study. Following an initial oral rehydration period (WHO formula), refeeding was introduced using a diet based on either breast milk or cow's milk. Early (n = 53) and late (n = 37) refeeding groups were similar in ethnic background, socioeconomic level, relevant past history, nutritional and clinical state, and stool pathogens. Infants were assessed upon their initial visit, at 24 and 48 h, and at 7 and 14 days thereafter for evaluation of weight, hydration state, stool frequency and need of hospitalization. No significant differences in the above parameters were observed between the two groups. Different patterns of refeeding (breast milk vs. cow's milk) in both early and late refeeding groups showed no significant differences in the features studied. Since the short-term clinical outcome following early refeeding in acute infantile diarrhea is not different from late refeeding, we suggest that early refeeding should be preferred, particularly in developing populations, in order to minimize the adverse nutritional effects of prolonged fasting during recurrent bouts of gastroenteritis. PMID:3286579

  18. Polygraphic study during whole night sleep in infantile spasms.

    PubMed

    Fukuyama, Y; Shionaga, A; Iida, Y

    1979-01-01

    The whole night EEG were polygraphically recorded and analyzed in 9 patients with infantile spasms prior to ACTH therapy. The subjects were divided into two groups, favorable and unfavorable, depending upon the response to the ACTH therapy. (1) Among the unfavorable group, the deep sleep stage was not observed; while the light sleep stage tended to dominate. (2) REM sleep period was noted less among the unfavorable than among the favorable group. REM density also tended to be lower among the unfavorable group. (3) Of the 4 unfavorable cases, 2 did not manifest REM sleep at all. Of the remaining 2, 1 had a remarkably long REM interval period. Even among the favorable cases, REM sleep tended to be short and appear frequently. (4) The period of muscle atonia during NREM sleep was markedly prolonged in all cases. (5) Body movements of both types (gross and twitch) were less frequent comparing to those of normal younger children, more remarkably in unfavorable cases. From the above findings, a disorder of the pontine reticular formation would be suggested in cases of infantile spasms. Reduction of body movements at each sleep stage might indicate abnormalities of monoamine metabolism in the brain stem of patients with this condition. PMID:230967

  19. Infantile anorexia nervosa: a developmental disorder or separation and individuation.

    PubMed

    Chatoor, I

    1989-01-01

    Infantile anorexia nervosa is an eating disorder that has its onset during the early developmental stage of separation and individuation between the ages of six months and three years. Infantile anorexia nervosa is characterized by food refusal and leads to failure to thrive. The infant refuses to eat in an attempt to achieve autonomy and control with regard to the mother, a maneuver that serves to involve the mother more deeply in the infant's eating behavior and to meet the infant's need for attention. Mother and infant become embroiled in a battle of wills over the infant's food intake. The infant's feeding is directed by his emotional needs instead of physiological sensations of hunger and satiety, and he fails to develop somatopsychological differentiation. The infant's temperament and maternal conflicts over control, autonomy, and dependency appear to contribute to this eating disorder. Treatment is aimed toward helping the parents understand and promote the developmental process of somatopsychological differentiation. Initially, a behavioral-cognitive approach is used; however, parents who struggle with unresolved issues around dependency and control require further psychotherapy. PMID:2470708

  20. Infantile spasms associated with proximal duplication of chromosome 15q.

    PubMed

    Bingham, P M; Spinner, N B; Sovinsky, L; Zackai, E H; Chance, P F

    1996-09-01

    We describe a case of infantile spasms associated with a chromosome abnormality (supernumerary inverted duplication of chromosome 15 [47,XX,+inv dup(15)]). The patient was nondysmorphic and presented with mild hypotonia and delay in acquisition of gross motor milestones before the diagnosis of seizures at age 7 months. Additional features included unilateral sensorineural deafness and torticollis. Molecular cytogenetic studies confirmed that the patient has a large inv dup(15). Inv dup(15) chromosomes are variable with respect to the size and genetic composition of the chromosome and in their phenotypic effects. Patients with small inv dup(15s) may have no phenotypic abnormalities, whereas patients with large inv dup(15s) may have multiple abnormalities. ACTH therapy resulted in prompt remission of seizures and resolution of EEG abnormalities. This is the second report of a patient with IS and a supernumerary inv dup(15). Several genes code for neurotransmitter receptor subunits located in the duplicated region of chromosome 15, and abnormal dosage of these genes may be involved in the genesis of seizure activity in carriers of the inv dup(15). Chromosome analysis may lead to a specific diagnosis in infants with unexplained infantile spasms. PMID:8888053

  1. Malignant transformation of uterine leiomyoma

    PubMed Central

    Al Ansari, Afaf A.; Al Hail, Fatima A.; Abboud, Emad

    2012-01-01

    A rare case of malignant transformation of uterine leiomyoma is reported. A 54 year old lady, nulliparous and 2 years postmenopausal presented to gynecology clinic with a pelvi – abdominal mass and ultrasound scan suggestive of multiple uterine fibroid. Total abdominal hysterectomy performed. Histopathology report showed leiomyosarcomative changes from benign leiomyoma within the huge mass. PMID:25003044

  2. Malignant haemangioendothelioma involving the liver

    PubMed Central

    Pollard, Stella M.; Millward-Sadler, G. H.

    1974-01-01

    The features of four cases of malignant haemangioendothelioma involving the liver and other organs are described. Two cases were associated with a microangiopathic haemolytic anaemia. The nature of the tumours and possible pathogenesis for the anaemias are discussed. Images PMID:4832301

  3. The Origin of Malignant Malaria

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Plasmodium falciparum is the causative agent of malignant malaria, which is among the most severe human infectious diseases. Despite its overwhelming significance to human health, the parasite’s origins remain unclear. The favored origin hypothesis holds that P. falciparum and its closest known rel...

  4. Pre- and postnatal enzyme analysis for infantile, late infantile and adult neuronal ceroid lipofuscinosis (CLN1 and CLN2).

    PubMed

    Van Diggelen, O P; Keulemans, J L; Kleijer, W J; Thobois, S; Tilikete, C; Voznyi, Y V

    2001-01-01

    The recent development of simple, fluorogenic enzyme assays for infantile and late infantile neuronal ceroid lipofuscinosis (INCL and LINCL; CLN1 and CLN2) has greatly facilitated the diagnostic process for these diseases. In leucocytes and fibroblasts from INCL (n = 38) patients we found profound deficiencies of palmitoyl-protein thioesterase I (PPT1), the residual activity was < 5% of mean control activity. In fibroblasts from LINCL patients we found a similar deficiency of tripeptidyl-peptidase I activity (TPP-I), with < 2% activity in 16 patients. The residual TPP-I activity in leucocytes from LINCL patients seemed substantially higher. We also showed the feasibility of reliable prenatal enzyme analysis. In five first-trimester and two second-trimester prenatal analyses for INCL, four affected foetuses were detected (PPT activity 3-6%). Two first trimester pregnancies at risk for LINCL were analysed and a clear TPP-I deficiency was detected in both cases (TPP-I activity 3-4%). The first patient with adult neuronal ceroid lipofuscinosis (ANCL) due to a deficiency of PPT is presented; her present age is 53 years and the onset of the disease was at 38 years with psychiatric symptoms. PMID:11588995

  5. [Acupuncture and Vojta therapy in infantile cerebral palsy--a comparison of the effects].

    PubMed

    Stockert, K

    1998-01-01

    Acupuncture and Vojta therapy are using more or less identical points and identical muscle chains for the treatment of infantile cerebral palsy. Therefore a common utilization seems to be sensible. PMID:10025039

  6. Do We Know What Causes Malignant Mesothelioma?

    MedlinePlus

    ... Next Topic Can malignant mesothelioma be prevented? Do we know what causes malignant mesothelioma? Researchers have found ... genes – the instructions for how our cells function. We usually look like our parents because they are ...

  7. Malignant phylloides tumor in pregnancy.

    PubMed

    Blaker, Kristen M; Sahoo, Sunati; Schweichler, Maria R; Chagpar, Anees B

    2010-03-01

    Malignant phylloides tumors are exceedingly rare with few cases being reported in pregnancy. We describe the first case ever reported of a malignant phylloides tumor presenting in the first trimester of pregnancy and provide insight into the complexities of management as well as a review of the known literature. An extensive PubMed literature search for "cystosarcoma," "phylloides," and "pregnancy" was performed. References of each citation were reviewed. Only six previous cases of phylloides tumor in pregnancy were found, none of which were in the first trimester. Medical records of a patient presenting to our institution at 9 weeks gestation with a malignant phylloides tumor were reviewed. We further provide a review of the current literature of the management of phylloides tumor in pregnancy. A 27-year-old white G2P0SA1 woman with no family history of breast cancer presented with a right breast mass at her first prenatal examination at 9 weeks of pregnancy. Ultrasound confirmed a solid mass measuring 24 mm. Core needle biopsy demonstrated a malignant phylloides tumor. She previously had a fibroadenoma removed from the same breast 7 years previously. The current tumor was excised to clear margins. Histopathological examination revealed a 4-cm fibroepithelial tumor with marked stromal cellularity and a high mitotic count (five to seven mitoses/high-power field), confirming the diagnosis of malignant phylloides tumor. The patient continued her pregnancy without complications. Six other cases of phylloides tumor presenting in pregnancy have been reported in the literature, one of which had bilateral disease. Of these, the average patient age was 32 years (range, 28 to 35 years). The majority of these patients presented in their third trimester (mean, 29 weeks; range, 20 to 36 weeks) and often had large tumors (mean, 15 cm; range, 5 to 21 cm). Four of the seven tumors (57%) required a mastectomy. Previous cases have shown phylloides tumors to present in the third

  8. Effectiveness of Mentha piperita in the Treatment of Infantile Colic: A Crossover Study.

    PubMed

    Alves, João Guilherme Bezerra; de Brito, Rita de Cássia Coelho Moraes; Cavalcanti, Telma Samila

    2012-01-01

    Background. Infantile colic is a distressing and common condition for which there is no proven standard treatment. Objective. To compare the efficacy of Mentha piperita with simethicone in treatment for infantile colic. Methods. A double-blind crossover study was performed with 30 infants attending IMIP, Recife, Brazil. They were randomized to use Mentha piperita or simethicone in the treatment of infantile colic during 7 days with each drug. Primary outcomes were mother_s opinion about responses to the treatment, number of daily episodes of colic, and time spent crying, measured by a chronometer. Mann-Whitney and chi-square tests were used to compare the results. This study was previously approved by the Ethical Committee in Research at IMIP. Results. At baseline daily episodes of infantile colic was 3.9 (±1.1) and the mean crying time per day was 192 minutes (±51.6). At the end of the study daily episodes of colic fell to 1.6 (±0.6) and the crying duration decreased to 111 (±28) minutes. All mothers reported decrease of frequency and duration of the episodes of infantile colic and there were no differences between responses to Mentha piperita and simethicone. Conclusions. These findings suggest that Mentha piperita may be used to help control infantile colic. However, these results must be repeated by others studies. PMID:22844342

  9. Effectiveness of Mentha piperita in the Treatment of Infantile Colic: A Crossover Study

    PubMed Central

    Alves, João Guilherme Bezerra; de Brito, Rita de Cássia Coelho Moraes; Cavalcanti, Telma Samila

    2012-01-01

    Background. Infantile colic is a distressing and common condition for which there is no proven standard treatment. Objective. To compare the efficacy of Mentha piperita with simethicone in treatment for infantile colic. Methods. A double-blind crossover study was performed with 30 infants attending IMIP, Recife, Brazil. They were randomized to use Mentha piperita or simethicone in the treatment of infantile colic during 7 days with each drug. Primary outcomes were mother_s opinion about responses to the treatment, number of daily episodes of colic, and time spent crying, measured by a chronometer. Mann-Whitney and chi-square tests were used to compare the results. This study was previously approved by the Ethical Committee in Research at IMIP. Results. At baseline daily episodes of infantile colic was 3.9 (±1.1) and the mean crying time per day was 192 minutes (±51.6). At the end of the study daily episodes of colic fell to 1.6 (±0.6) and the crying duration decreased to 111 (±28) minutes. All mothers reported decrease of frequency and duration of the episodes of infantile colic and there were no differences between responses to Mentha piperita and simethicone. Conclusions. These findings suggest that Mentha piperita may be used to help control infantile colic. However, these results must be repeated by others studies. PMID:22844342

  10. Infantile cortical hyperostosis – a report of Saudi family

    PubMed Central

    ALBagshi, Muneer H; ALZoayed, Heji I

    2015-01-01

    A 2-weeks-old Saudi neonate was apparently well till the 10th day of life when a swelling of the right groin was noted accompanied by irritability and fever, without history of trauma. On examination: the girl was irritable and febrile, the mass was firm, ill defined, fixed and tender. The state of the underlying skin was normal. There was family history of 3 siblings with similar swellings in the neonatal period and one of them had recurrence of the condition till the age of 7 year. The radiological findings indicated diaphysis hyperostosis, sparring of the epiphysis and the benign course of the disease. With exclusion of syphilis, osteomyelitis and trauma, the likely diagnosis would be infantile cortical hyperostosis. Such diagnosis should not be overlooked when faced by bony swellings in neonates. PMID:27493423

  11. [Neurovegetative and hypothalamic syndromes in children with infantile cerebral palsy].

    PubMed

    Maslova, O I; Lebedev, B V

    1980-01-01

    An analysis of the neuropsychic and vegetative status of 108 children aged 3 months to 7 years suffering from infantile cerebral paralysis has shown that in a great part of the patients a neurovegetative or hypothalamic syndrome can be additionally specified. An analysis of the totality of the background vegetative characteristics shows that the effection of this division of the nervous system is of a mixed character. Different direction of the vegetative reactions, i.e. sympathetic or parasympathetic, can be noted in different forms of the paralysis. The neurovegetative syndrome can be discerned in children with a noticeable psychic defect, while the hypothalamic one in children with a good psychic development. PMID:7435028

  12. Rare association of central pontine myelinolysis with infantile tremor syndrome.

    PubMed

    Datta, Kalpana; Datta, Supratim; Dutta, Indranil

    2012-01-01

    Central pontine myelinolysis (CPM) is an acute demyelination within the central basis pontis. Though exact mechanism is not known it is seen commonly with rapid correction of hyponatremia and also with pontine ischemia or infarction, demyelinating diseases, pontine neoplasm and different metabolic diseases. We report a rare association of CPM in a patient of Infantile Tremor Syndrom (ITS). ITS is a syndrome of tremor, mental and physical retardation, pigmentary changes of hair and skin and anemia in malnourished children. Though first reported in Indian subcontinent many identical cases were reported from around the world. Our case is a 15 month old child with generalized tremor, mild hepatosplenomegaly with features of grade II malnutrition including skin and hair changes. All the signs and symtoms of tremor improved after treatment with the World Health Organization (WHO) protocol for protein energy malnutrition (PEM) and administration of propranolol without any side effects. PMID:22412274

  13. [The infantile sexual seduction: revolution and aftermath of Freud's theory].

    PubMed

    Figueroa, Gustavo C

    2014-01-01

    There is no question about the negative effects of child sexual abuse. Freud's seduction theory asserts that psychoneuroses in adults are caused by reactivation of forgotten recollections of gross sexual abuse (involving the genitals) that had taken place prior to the age of 8 to 10 years. His contribution consisted in the discovery of specific events, prior to puberty, which were indispensable to the formation of psychoneuroses. If an adult patient recalled an infantile sexual experience, Freud assumed the interference of a pervert: a child was sexually innocent unless it had been traumatized. But Freud's technique of clinical exploration had not attained adequate reliability and was not immune to prejudices. Freud himself dropped his mechanical, static theory that presupposed a single type of accidentally occurring trauma prior to puberty, allowing him to develop his new drive and fantasy theory. PMID:24861119

  14. Molecular basis of infantile reversible cytochrome c oxidase deficiency myopathy

    PubMed Central

    Kemp, John P.; Tuppen, Helen A. L.; Hudson, Gavin; Oldfors, Anders; Marie, Suely K. N.; Moslemi, Ali-Reza; Servidei, Serenella; Holme, Elisabeth; Shanske, Sara; Kollberg, Gittan; Jayakar, Parul; Pyle, Angela; Marks, Harold M.; Holinski-Feder, Elke; Scavina, Mena; Walter, Maggie C.; Çoku, Jorida; Günther-Scholz, Andrea; Smith, Paul M.; McFarland, Robert; Chrzanowska-Lightowlers, Zofia M. A.; Lightowlers, Robert N.; Hirano, Michio; Lochmüller, Hanns; Taylor, Robert W.; Chinnery, Patrick F.; Tulinius, Mar; DiMauro, Salvatore

    2009-01-01

    Childhood-onset mitochondrial encephalomyopathies are usually severe, relentlessly progressive conditions that have a fatal outcome. However, a puzzling infantile disorder, long known as ‘benign cytochrome c oxidase deficiency myopathy’ is an exception because it shows spontaneous recovery if infants survive the first months of life. Current investigations cannot distinguish those with a good prognosis from those with terminal disease, making it very difficult to decide when to continue intensive supportive care. Here we define the principal molecular basis of the disorder by identifying a maternally inherited, homoplasmic m.14674T>C mt-tRNAGlu mutation in 17 patients from 12 families. Our results provide functional evidence for the pathogenicity of the mutation and show that tissue-specific mechanisms downstream of tRNAGlu may explain the spontaneous recovery. This study provides the rationale for a simple genetic test to identify infants with mitochondrial myopathy and good prognosis. PMID:19720722

  15. Infantile-onset saccade initiation delay (congenital ocular motor apraxia).

    PubMed

    Salman, Michael S

    2015-05-01

    Infantile-onset saccade initiation delay, also known as congenital ocular motor apraxia, typically presents in early infancy with horizontal head thrusts once head control is achieved. Defective initiation of horizontal saccades and saccade hypometria with normal saccadic velocity are characteristic findings. Isolated impairment of vertical saccades is rare. Impaired smooth ocular pursuit may be seen. Other relatively common features include developmental delay, hypotonia, ataxia, or clumsiness. Brain MRI may be normal or show a diverse range of abnormalities, most commonly involving the cerebellum. Defective slow phases of the optokinetic response are commonly associated with brain MRI abnormalities. Isolated defect of vertical saccade initiation may indicate supratentorial brain abnormalities on MRI. Joubert syndrome, a developmental midbrain-hindbrain malformation, and ataxia telangiectasia are both commonly associated with defective volitional and reflexive saccade initiation, saccade hypometria, and head thrusts. Both horizontal and vertical saccades are impaired in these two disorders. PMID:25783597

  16. Immunological Aspects of Malignant Gliomas.

    PubMed

    Cohen-Inbar, Or; Zaaroor, Menashe

    2016-07-01

    Glioblastoma Multiforme (GBM) is the most common malignant primary brain neoplasm having a mean survival time of <24 months. This figure remains constant, despite significant progress in medical research and treatment. The lack of an efficient anti-tumor immune response and the micro-invasive nature of the glioma malignant cells have been explained by a multitude of immune-suppressive mechanisms, proven in different models. These immune-resistant capabilities of the tumor result in a complex interplay this tumor shares with the immune system. We present a short review on the immunology of GBM, discussing the different unique pathological and molecular features of GBM, current treatment modalities, the principles of cancer immunotherapy and the link between GBM and melanoma. Current knowledge on immunological features of GBM, as well as immunotherapy past and current clinical trials, is discussed in an attempt to broadly present the complex and formidable challenges posed by GBM. PMID:27324313

  17. [Histological spectrum of malignant melanoma].

    PubMed

    Brenn, T

    2015-02-01

    The diagnosis of melanocytic tumors is one of the most problematic areas in dermatology and diagnostic pathology. Melanoma is a malignant melanocytic tumor and the risk for metastasis and associated mortality is mainly dependent on tumor thickness and depth of invasion. Early recognition and correct diagnosis is therefore important for successful and effective treatment. The correct diagnosis of melanoma is, however, challenging due to the wide morphological spectrum. Historically, the disease was subdivided into superficial spreading, nodular, lentigo maligna and acral lentiginous melanoma but many more subtypes have subsequently been added. Some of these melanoma variants also show differences relating to the genetic background, clinical presentation, prognosis and treatment and may be associated with a specific differential diagnosis. In this article four of these melanoma variants, desmoplastic melanoma, nevoid melanoma, malignant blue nevus and pigment synthesizing melanoma will be discussed in more detail. PMID:25589353

  18. Gastrointestinal Malignancy and the Microbiome

    PubMed Central

    Abreu, Maria T.; Peek, Richard M.

    2014-01-01

    Microbial species participate in the genesis of a substantial number of malignancies—in conservative estimates, at least 15% of all cancer cases are attributable to infectious agents. Little is known about the contribution of the gastrointestinal (GI) microbiome to the development of malignancies. Resident microbes can promote carcinogenesis by inducing inflammation, increasing cell proliferation, altering stem cell dynamics, and producing metabolites such as butyrate, which affect DNA integrity and immune regulation. Studies in humans and rodent models of cancer have identified effector species and relationships among members of the microbial community in the stomach and colon that increase the risk for malignancy. Strategies to manipulate the microbiome, or the immune response to such bacteria, could be developed to prevent or treat certain GI cancers. PMID:24406471

  19. Malignant change in dermatitis artefacta.

    PubMed Central

    Alcolado, J. C.; Ray, K.; Baxter, M.; Edwards, C. W.; Dodson, P. M.

    1993-01-01

    Dermatitis artefacta is a chronic skin lesion produced by self-trauma. Avoidance of further trauma, topical steroids and psychological therapy all play a part in the treatment of such lesions. Unresolved lesions may become large and disfiguring and subject to infection. We report a case of one such lesion in an elderly woman who persistently excoriated a cholecystectomy scar over 40 years. Malignant transformation occurred in a manner analogous to the neoplastic change observed in other types of chronic ulcer (Marjolin's ulcer). The squamous cell carcinoma presented with widespread metastases from which the patient eventually died. Recent literature concerning Marjolin's ulcers is reviewed and it is noted that this is the first reported case of death caused by malignant change in dermatitis artefacta. Images Figure 1 PMID:8234114

  20. Tumor Metabolism of Malignant Gliomas

    PubMed Central

    Ru, Peng; Williams, Terence M.; Chakravarti, Arnab; Guo, Deliang

    2013-01-01

    Constitutively activated oncogenic signaling via genetic mutations such as in the EGFR/PI3K/Akt and Ras/RAF/MEK pathways has been recognized as a major driver for tumorigenesis in most cancers. Recent insights into tumor metabolism have further revealed that oncogenic signaling pathways directly promote metabolic reprogramming to upregulate biosynthesis of lipids, carbohydrates, protein, DNA and RNA, leading to enhanced growth of human tumors. Therefore, targeting cell metabolism has become a novel direction for drug development in oncology. In malignant gliomas, metabolism pathways of glucose, glutamine and lipid are significantly reprogrammed. Moreover, molecular mechanisms causing these metabolic changes are just starting to be unraveled. In this review, we will summarize recent studies revealing critical gene alterations that lead to metabolic changes in malignant gliomas, and also discuss promising therapeutic strategies via targeting the key players in metabolic regulation. PMID:24217114

  1. IRF4: Immunity. Malignancy! Therapy?

    PubMed Central

    Shaffer, Arthur L.; Tolga Emre, N. C.; Romesser, Paul B.; Staudt, Louis M.

    2009-01-01

    IRF4, a member of the IRF family of transcription factors, is expressed in cells of the immune system where it transduces signals from various receptors to activate or repress gene expression. IRF4 expression is a key regulator of several steps in lymphoid, myeloid and dendritic cell differentiation, including the differentiation of mature B cells into antibody-secreting plasma cells. IRF4 expression is also associated with many lymphoid malignancies, with recent evidence pointing to an essential role in multiple myeloma, a malignancy of plasma cells. Interference with IRF4 expression is lethal to multiple myeloma cells, irrespective of their genetic etiology, making IRF4 an “Achilles’ heel” that may be exploited therapeutically. PMID:19383829

  2. Transcatheter therapy for malignant neoplasms.

    PubMed Central

    Coldwell, D M; Mortimer, J E

    1989-01-01

    Interventional radiology has developed into a subspecialty with application in the treatment and palliation of patients with advanced malignant diseases. A directed catheter delivers high concentrations of chemotherapy directly into the tumor bed. Embolic particles may be injected to stop hemorrhage or to occlude the blood supply of a cancer, resulting in pain relief or tumor shrinkage. These techniques can be incorporated into a multidisciplinary approach to cancer. Images PMID:2686168

  3. [Malignant wounds in palliative care].

    PubMed

    Fromantin, Isabelle; Rollot, Florence; Nicodeme, Marguerite; Kriegel, Iréne

    2015-01-01

    In the alsence of effective cancer treatment, malignant wounds evolve. The decisions taken by the multi-disciplinary team with regard to their care vary depending on whether the patient is in the initial, advanced or terminal phase of palliative care. Modern dressings can be used to control bleeding, odours and drainage. The aim is to control the symptoms and improve the quality of life, until its end. PMID:26027186

  4. Endobronchial metastases from extrathoracic malignancies.

    PubMed

    Akoglu, Sebahat; Uçan, Eyüp S; Celik, Gülperi; Sener, Gülper; Sevinç, Can; Kilinç, Oğuz; Itil, Oya

    2005-01-01

    Endobronchial metastases (EBM) from extrapulmonary malignant tumors are rare. The most common extrathoracic malignancies associated with EBM are breast, renal and colorectal carcinomas. In this study, we aimed to evaluate the clinical, radiographic and bronchoscopic aspects of patients with EBM who were diagnosed between 1992 and 2002. Data about patients' clinical conditions, symptoms, radiographic and endoscopic findings, and histopathological examination results were investigated. EBM was defined as bronchoscopically visible lesions histopathologically identical to the primary tumor in patients with extrapulmonary malignancies. We found 15 cases with EBM. Primary tumors included breast (3), colorectal (3), and renal (2) carcinomas; Malignant Melanoma (2); synovial sarcoma (1), ampulla of Vater adenocarcinoma (1), pheochromocytoma (1), hypernephroma (1), and Hodgkin's Disease (1). The most common symptoms were dyspnea (80%), cough (66.6%) and hemoptysis (33.3%). Multiple (40%) or single (13.3%) pulmonary nodules, mediastinal or hilar lymphadenopathy (40%), and effusion (40%) were the most common radiographic findings. The mean interval from initial diagnosis to diagnosis of EBM was 32.8 months (range, 0-96 months) and median survival time was 18 months (range, 4-84). As a conclusion, various extrapulmonary tumors can metastasize to the bronchus. Symptoms and radiographic findings are similar with those in primary lung cancer. Therefore, EBM should be discriminated from primary lung cancer histopathologically. Although mean survival time is usually short, long-term survivors were reported. Consequently, treatment must be planned according to the histology of the primary tumor, evidence of metastasis to other sites and medical status of the patient. PMID:16475029

  5. Molecular biology of malignant gliomas.

    PubMed

    Belda-Iniesta, Cristóbal; de Castro Carpeño, Javier; Casado Sáenz, Enrique; Cejas Guerrero, Paloma; Perona, Rosario; González Barón, Manuel

    2006-09-01

    Gliomas are the most common primary brain tumours. In keeping with the degree of aggressiveness, gliomas are divided into four grades, with different biological behaviour. Furthermore, as different gliomas share a predominant histological appearance, the final classification includes both, histological features and degree of malignancy. For example, gliomas of astrocytic origin (astrocytomas) are classified into pilocytic astrocytoma (grade I), astrocytoma (grade II), anaplastic astrocytoma (grade III) and glioblastoma multiforme (GMB) (grade IV). Tumors derived from oligodendrocytes include grade II (oliogodendrogliomas) and grade III neoplasms (oligoastrocytoma). Each subtype has a specific prognosis that dictates the clinical management. In this regard, a patient diagnosed with an oligodendroglioma totally removed has 10-15 years of potential survival. On the opposite site, patients carrying a glioblastoma multiforme usually die within the first year after the diagnosis is made. Therefore, different approaches are needed in each case. Obviously, prognosis and biological behaviour of malignant gliomas are closely related and supported by the different molecular background that possesses each type of glioma. Furthermore, the ability that allows several low-grade gliomas to progress into more aggressive tumors has allowed cancer researchers to elucidate several pathways implicated in molecular biology of these devastating tumors. In this review, we describe classical pathways involved in human malignant gliomas with special focus with recent advances, such as glioma stem-like cells and expression patterns from microarray studies. PMID:17005465

  6. Comparative effectiveness in hepatic malignancies.

    PubMed

    Page, Andrew J; Cosgrove, David; Pawlik, Timothy M

    2015-01-01

    The benefits of applying comparative effectiveness research (CER) strategies to the management of cancer are important. As the incidence of cancer increases both in the United States and worldwide, accurate analysis of which tests and treatments should be applied in which situations is critical, both in terms of measurable and meaningful clinical outcomes and health care costs. In the last 20 years alone, multiple controversies have arisen in the diagnosis and treatment of primary and metastatic tumors of the liver, making the management of liver malignancies a prime example of CER. Contributing factors to the development of these controversies include improvements in molecular characterization of these diseases and technological advances in surgery and radiology. The relative speed of these advances has outpaced data from clinical trials, in turn making robust data to inform clinical practice lacking. Indeed, many of the current treatment recommendations for the management of liver malignancies are based primarily on retrospective data. We herein review select CER issues concerning select decision-making topics in the management of liver malignancies. PMID:25677025

  7. Management of Inoperable Malignant Neoplasms.

    PubMed

    Kiess, Ana P; Quon, Harry

    2016-01-01

    For patients with inoperable salivary gland malignancy, radiation therapy has significant limitations but has been the mainstay of treatment. With standard photon radiation (X-rays), the 10-year loco-regional control (LRC) and overall survival rates are only ∼25%. Neutron radiation has potential biological advantages over photon radiation because it causes increased DNA damage, and studies of patients with inoperable salivary gland malignancy have shown improved 6-year LRC and overall survival of ∼60%. However, neutron radiation may also increase the risk of late toxicities, especially central nervous system toxicities after treatment of tumors involving the base of the skull. Proton radiation has potential physical advantages due to minimal exit dose through normal tissues, and a recent study has demonstrated 90% 5-year LRC after combined proton/photon radiation for adenoid cystic carcinoma involving the base of the skull. Stereotactic radiosurgery has also been used in combination with neutrons or standard photons as a technique to boost the skull base. The use of concurrent chemotherapy as a radiosensitizer has been considered based on extrapolation of data on squamous cell carcinomas, but further data are needed on inoperable salivary gland malignancies. Newer targeted therapies are also under investigation, and clinical trial enrollment is encouraged. PMID:27093559

  8. Malignant cancer and invasive placentation

    PubMed Central

    D'Souza, Alaric W.; Wagner, Günter P.

    2014-01-01

    Cancer metastasis is an invasive process that involves the transplantation of cells into new environments. Since human placentation is also invasive, hypotheses about a relationship between invasive placentation in eutherian mammals and metastasis have been proposed. The relationship between metastatic cancer and invasive placentation is usually presented in terms of antagonistic pleiotropy. According to this hypothesis, evolution of invasive placentation also established the mechanisms for cancer metastasis. Here, in contrast, we argue that the secondary evolution of less invasive placentation in some mammalian lineages may have resulted in positive pleiotropic effects on cancer survival by lowering malignancy rates. These positive pleiotropic effects would manifest themselves as resistance to cancer cell invasion. To provide a preliminary test of this proposal, we re-analyze data from Priester and Mantel (Occurrence of tumors in domestic animals. Data from 12 United States and Canadian colleges of veterinary medicine. J Natl Cancer Inst 1971;47:1333-44) about malignancy rates in cows, horses, cats and dogs. From our analysis we found that equines and bovines, animals with less invasive placentation, have lower rates of metastatic cancer than felines and canines in skin and glandular epithelial cancers as well as connective tissue sarcomas. We conclude that a link between type of placentation and species-specific malignancy rates is more likely related to derived mechanisms that suppress invasion rather than different degrees of fetal placental aggressiveness. PMID:25324490

  9. Phenotypes and PRRT2 mutations in Chinese families with benign familial infantile epilepsy and infantile convulsions with paroxysmal choreoathetosis

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Mutations in the PRRT2 gene have been identified as the major cause of benign familial infantile epilepsy (BFIE), paroxysmal kinesigenic dyskinesia (PKD) and infantile convulsions with paroxysmal choreoathetosis/dyskinesias (ICCA). Here, we analyzed the phenotypes and PRRT2 mutations in Chinese families with BFIE and ICCA. Methods Clinical data were collected from 22 families with BFIE and eight families with ICCA. PRRT2 mutations were screened using PCR and direct sequencing. Results Ninety-five family members were clinically affected in the 22 BFIE families. During follow-up, two probands had one seizure induced by diarrhea at the age of two years. Thirty-one family members were affected in the eight ICCA families, including 11 individuals with benign infantile epilepsy, nine with PKD, and 11 with benign infantile epilepsy followed by PKD. Two individuals in one ICCA family had PKD or ICCA co-existing with migraine. One affected member in another ICCA family had experienced a fever-induced seizure at 7 years old. PRRT2 mutations were detected in 13 of the 22 BFIE families. The mutation c.649_650insC (p.R217PfsX8) was found in nine families. The mutations c.649delC (p.R217EfsX12) and c.904_905insG (p.D302GfsX39) were identified in three families and one family, respectively. PRRT2 mutations were identified in all eight ICCA families, including c.649_650insC (p.R217PfsX8), c.649delC (p.R217EfsX12), c.514_517delTCTG (p.S172RfsX3) and c.1023A > T (X341C). c.1023A > T is a novel mutation predicted to elongate the C-terminus of the protein by 28 residues. Conclusions Our data demonstrated that PRRT2 is the major causative gene of BFIE and ICCA in Chinese families. Site c.649 is a mutation hotspot: c.649_650insC is the most common mutation, and c.649delC is the second most common mutation in Chinese families with BFIE and ICCA. As far as we know, c.1023A > T is the first reported mutation in exon 4 of PRRT2. c.649delC was previously reported in

  10. Malignant Peripheral Nerve Sheath Tumor -A Rare Malignancy in Mandible

    PubMed Central

    Majumdar, Sumit; Kotina, Sreekanth; Uppala, Divya; Kumar, Singam Praveen

    2016-01-01

    Malignant Peripheral Nerve Sheath Tumor (MPNST) is biologically an aggressive tumor that is usually found in the extremities, trunk and infrequently found in the head and neck area particularly in the jaws, arising from the cells allied with nerve sheath. Mandibular MPNST may either arise from a preexisting neurofibroma or develop de novo. Because of the greater variability from case to case in overall appearance both clinically and histologically, a case of MPNST of the mandible in a 25-year-old female patient is reported. The lesion was excised and immunohistological studies (S-100 & Neuron specific enolase) were conducted to confirm the neural origin. PMID:27504425