Sample records for infect rice citrus

  1. Transcriptional response of Citrus aurantifolia to infection by Citrus tristeza virus

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Mónica Gandía; Ana Conesa; Gema Ancillo; José Gadea; Javier Forment; Vicente Pallás; Ricardo Flores; Nuria Duran-Vila; Pedro Moreno; José Guerri

    2007-01-01

    Changes in gene expression of Mexican lime plants in response to infection with a severe (T305) or a mild (T385) isolate of Citrus tristeza virus (CTV) were analyzed using a cDNA microarray containing 12,672 probes to 6875 different citrus genes. Statistically significant (P<0.01) expression changes of 334 genes were detected in response to infection with isolate T305, whereas infection with

  2. Spectral difference analysis and airborne imaging classification for citrus greening infected trees

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Citrus greening, also called Huanglongbing (HLB), became a devastating disease spread through citrus groves in Florida, since it was first found in 2005. Multispectral (MS) and hyperspectral (HS) airborne images of citrus groves in Florida were acquired to detect citrus greening infected trees in 20...

  3. Metabolite signature of Candidatus Liberibacter asiaticus infection in two citrus varieties

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Huanglongbing (HLB), also known as Citrus Greening Disease, is caused by the bacterium ‘Candidatus Liberibacter asiaticus’ (Las), and is severely damaging the citrus industry. Infection causes malformation of fruit, reduced fruit yields, discoloration of leaves, and twig dieback, eventually causing ...

  4. Transcriptional response of Citrus aurantifolia to infection by Citrus tristeza virus.

    PubMed

    Gandía, Mónica; Conesa, Ana; Ancillo, Gema; Gadea, José; Forment, Javier; Pallás, Vicente; Flores, Ricardo; Duran-Vila, Nuria; Moreno, Pedro; Guerri, José

    2007-10-25

    Changes in gene expression of Mexican lime plants in response to infection with a severe (T305) or a mild (T385) isolate of Citrus tristeza virus (CTV) were analyzed using a cDNA microarray containing 12,672 probes to 6875 different citrus genes. Statistically significant (P<0.01) expression changes of 334 genes were detected in response to infection with isolate T305, whereas infection with T385 induced no significant change. Induced genes included 145 without significant similarity with known sequences and 189 that were classified in seven functional categories. Genes related with response to stress and defense were the main category and included 28% of the genes induced. Selected transcription changes detected by microarray analysis were confirmed by quantitative real-time RT-PCR. Changes detected in the transcriptome upon infecting lime with T305 may be associated either with symptom expression, with a strain-specific defense mechanism, or with a general response to stress. PMID:17617431

  5. A Sensitive and Reliable RT-Nested PCR Assay for Detection of Citrus tristeza Virus from Naturally Infected Citrus Plants

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Charith Raj Adkar-Purushothama; P. K. Maheshwar; Teruo Sano; G. R. Janardhana

    2011-01-01

    A specific and sensitive reverse transcriptase-nested polymerase chain reaction assay (RT-nPCR) was developed for the detection\\u000a of Citrus tristeza virus (CTV) from naturally infected citrus samples. Two sets of primer pairs were designed by alignment of nucleotide sequences\\u000a available in GenBank database for different genotypes of CTV. RT-nPCR reaction components and thermal cycling parameters were\\u000a optimized and reaction conditions were

  6. Three genes of Citrus tristeza virus are dispensable for infection and movement throughout some varieties of citrus trees.

    PubMed

    Tatineni, Satyanarayana; Robertson, Cecile J; Garnsey, Stephen M; Bar-Joseph, Moshe; Gowda, Siddarame; Dawson, William O

    2008-07-01

    Citrus tristeza virus (CTV), a member of the Closteroviridae, possesses a 19.3-kb positive-stranded RNA genome that is organized into twelve open reading frames (ORFs). The CTV genome contains two sets of conserved genes, which are characteristic of this virus group, the replication gene block (ORF 1a and 1b) and the quintuple gene block (p6, HSP70 h, p61, CPm, and CP). With the exception of the p6 gene, they are required for replication and virion assembly. CTV contains five additional genes, p33, p18, p13, p20 and p23, in the 3' half of the genome, some of which (p33, p18 and p13) are not conserved among other members of this virus group, and have been proposed to have evolved for specific interactions with the citrus host. In the present study, the requirements for systemic infection of citrus trees of p33, p6, p18, p13 and p20 were examined. Viral mutants with a deletion in the p6 or the p20 ORF failed to infect citrus plants systemically, suggesting their possible roles in virus translocation/systemic infection. However, we found that deletions within the p33, p18 or p13 ORF individually resulted in no significant loss of ability of the virus to infect, multiply, and spread throughout citrus trees. Furthermore, deletions in the p33, p18 and p13 genes in all possible combinations including deletions in all three genes allowed the virus to systemically invade citrus trees. Green fluorescent protein-tagged CTV variants with deletions in the p33 ORF or the p33, p18 and p13 ORFs demonstrated that the movement and distribution of these deletion mutants were similar to that of the wild-type virus. PMID:18456299

  7. Amplification of Citrus Tristeza Virus from a cDNA Clone and Infection of Citrus Trees

    Microsoft Academic Search

    T. Satyanarayana; M. Bar-Joseph; M. R. Albiach-Marti; M. R. Albiach-Mart??; M. A. Ayllón; S. Gowda; M. E. Hilf; P. Moreno; S. M. Garnsey; W. O. Dawson

    2001-01-01

    Isolates of the Closterovirus, Citrus tristeza virus (CTV), are populations of disparate genotypes and defective RNAs developed during long periods of vegetative propagation of citrus trees. Because it has not been possible to obtain pure cultures of the virus, it is not known what components of the population are primarily responsible for induction of diseases. We previously developed an infectious

  8. PURIFICATION OF VIRUS-LIKE PARTICLES FROM CITRUS CHLOROTIC DWARF INFECTED CITRUS

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Citrus chlorotic dwarf (CCD) is a new disease of citrus having been found in Turkey in the mid 1980s. Disease symptoms in the field consist of chlorotic leaf patterns, crinkling, leaf distortion, shoot malformation and stunting in young trees. CCD is vectored by the bayberry whitefly and is graft ...

  9. Citrus

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Madhugiri Nageswara Rao; Jaya R. Soneji; Leela Sahijram

    \\u000a Citrus is one of the most important fruit crops grown in the subtropical and tropical areas of the world and has great economic,\\u000a health, religious, and cultural values. While there are conservation and management efforts, the lack of sufficient descriptions,\\u000a specimens, and original habitats has made it difficult for the biogeographers to define precisely the centers of origin and\\u000a ancestors

  10. Agroinoculation of Citrus tristeza virus causes systemic infection and symptoms in the presumed nonhost Nicotiana benthamiana.

    PubMed

    Ambrós, Silvia; El-Mohtar, Choaa; Ruiz-Ruiz, Susana; Peña, Leandro; Guerri, José; Dawson, William O; Moreno, Pedro

    2011-10-01

    Citrus tristeza virus (CTV) naturally infects only some citrus species and relatives and within these it only invades phloem tissues. Failure to agroinfect citrus plants and the lack of an experimental herbaceous host hindered development of a workable genetic system. A full-genome cDNA of CTV isolate T36 was cloned in binary plasmids and was used to agroinfiltrate Nicotiana benthamiana leaves, with or without coinfiltration with plasmids expressing different silencing-suppressor proteins. A time course analysis in agroinfiltrated leaves indicated that CTV accumulates and moves cell-to-cell for at least three weeks postinoculation (wpi), and then, it moves systemically and infects the upper leaves with symptom expression. Silencing suppressors expedited systemic infection and often increased infectivity. In systemically infected Nicotiana benthamiana plants, CTV invaded first the phloem, but after 7 wpi, it was also found in other tissues and reached a high viral titer in upper leaves, thus allowing efficient transmission to citrus by stem-slash inoculation. Infected citrus plants showed the symptoms, virion morphology, and phloem restriction characteristic of the wild T36 isolate. Therefore, agroinfiltration of Nicotiana benthamiana provided the first experimental herbaceous host for CTV and an easy and efficient genetic system for this closterovirus. PMID:21899435

  11. A sensitive and reliable RT-nested PCR assay for detection of Citrus tristeza virus from naturally infected citrus plants.

    PubMed

    Adkar-Purushothama, Charith Raj; Maheshwar, P K; Sano, Teruo; Janardhana, G R

    2011-05-01

    A specific and sensitive reverse transcriptase-nested polymerase chain reaction assay (RT-nPCR) was developed for the detection of Citrus tristeza virus (CTV) from naturally infected citrus samples. Two sets of primer pairs were designed by alignment of nucleotide sequences available in GenBank database for different genotypes of CTV. RT-nPCR reaction components and thermal cycling parameters were optimized and reaction conditions were standardized. Sequencing of the PCR products from direct and nested-PCR reactions confirmed the specificity of both primer pairs. Presence of CTV specific amplicons in asymptomatic samples which were collected from diseased orchards indicated the sensitivity of the test. As RT-nPCR technique, developed in the present study, is specific and efficient in detecting CTV, this could be envisioned for diagnostic applications and surveillance. PMID:21298268

  12. The Influence of Glomus mosseae on Tylenchulus semipenetrans-Infected and Uninfected Citrus limon Seedlings

    PubMed Central

    O'Bannon, J. H.; Inserra, R. N.; Nemec, S.; Vovlas, N.

    1979-01-01

    Greenhouse studies have shown that when rough lemon (Citrus limon) seedlings infected with TyIenchulus semipenetrans were transplanted into soil infested with Glomus mosseae, the mycorrhizal fungus infection increased seedling growth compared to nonntycorrhizal seedlings. Tylenchulus semipenetrans significantly suppressed seedling growth below that of mycorrhizal seedlings. Histological observations of nematode-free mycorrhizal roots showed that hyphae penetrated the epidermis and invaded the cortex, giving rise to arbuscules and vesicles. Nematode infection sites in T. semipenetrans-infected roots grown in soil infested with G. mosseae did not show evidence of vesicle development in the cortex but did show arbuscule development. PMID:19300642

  13. Infection of rice plants by rice black streaked dwarf virus improves an egg parasitoid, Anagrus nilaparvatae (Hymenoptera: Mymaridae), of rice planthoppers.

    PubMed

    Xu, Hongxing; He, Xiaochan; Zheng, Xusong; Yang, Yajun; Tian, Junce; Lu, Zhongxian

    2014-10-01

    The effects of rice plants infected by rice black streaked dwarf virus (RBSDV) on the host preference, duration of immature stages, sex ratio, and adult longevity and parasitic capacity of an egg parasitoid, Anagrus nilaparvatae Pang et Wang, of rice brown planthopper, Nilaparvata lugens Stål, were evaluated. Tests of response to plant volatiles using an olfactometer showed that A. nilaparvatae preferred rice plants harboring rice brown planthopper eggs over plants free of rice brown planthopper eggs. However, both the response to plant volatiles and the host selectivity test showed no significant differences in host preference between RBSDV-infected plants and healthy plants when both contained rice brown planthopper eggs. The developmental duration at immature stage of the male A. nilaparvatae in rice brown planthopper eggs on RBSDV-infected rice plants was significantly prolonged, and the parasitic capacity of rice brown planthopper eggs was significantly increased in comparison with the A. nilaparvatae parasite in rice brown planthopper eggs on healthy rice plants. There were no significant differences between RBSDV-infected rice plants and healthy rice plants in other ecological fitness parameters, including the developmental duration of female adults, female percentage, and adult longevity of A. nilaparvatae. PMID:25199055

  14. Analysis of full-length sequences of two Citrus yellow mosaic badnavirus isolates infecting Citrus jambhiri (Rough Lemon) and Citrus sinensis L. Osbeck (Sweet Orange) from a nursery in India.

    PubMed

    Anthony Johnson, A M; Borah, B K; Sai Gopal, D V R; Dasgupta, I

    2012-12-01

    Citrus yellow mosaic badna virus (CMBV), a member of the Family Caulimoviridae, Genus Badnavirus is the causative agent of mosaic disease among Citrus species in southern India. Despite its reported prevalence in several citrus species, complete information on clear functional genomics or functional information of full-length genomes from all the CMBV isolates infecting citrus species are not available in publicly accessible databases. CMBV isolates from Rough Lemon and Sweet Orange collected from a nursery were cloned and sequenced. The analysis revealed high sequence homology of the two CMBV isolates with previously reported CMBV sequences implying that they represent new variants. Based on computational analysis of the predicted secondary structures, the possible functions of some CMBV proteins have been analyzed. PMID:22926812

  15. Effect of Citrus reticulata on Serum Protein Fractions of Mice After Schistosoma mansoni Infection

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Nagy-Saba El-Rigal; Mona H. Hetta

    2006-01-01

    The effect of the ethanolic extract of Citrus reticulata roots or the oleo-resin extract from Myrrh of Commiphora molmol tree (Mirazid) were studied as new antischistosomal drugs. The total protein and the different serum proteins namely albumin, prealbumin, beta-lipoproteins, macroglobulins, alpha-1-acid glycoprotein, alpha-1-antitrypsin, cholinesterase, ceruloplasmin, haemopexin, haptoglobin, transferrin and lipoprotein were measured in both infected and treated mice. Also, liver

  16. Transcriptional and Microscopic Analyses of Citrus Stem and Root Responses to Candidatus Liberibacter asiaticus Infection

    PubMed Central

    Aritua, Valente; Achor, Diann; Gmitter, Frederick G.; Albrigo, Gene; Wang, Nian

    2013-01-01

    Huanglongbing (HLB) is the most destructive disease that affects citrus worldwide. The disease has been associated with Candidatus Liberibacter. HLB diseased citrus plants develop a multitude of symptoms including zinc and copper deficiencies, blotchy mottle, corky veins, stunting, and twig dieback. Ca. L. asiaticus infection also seriously affects the roots. Previous study focused on gene expression of leaves and fruit to Ca. L. asiaticus infection. In this study, we compared the gene expression levels of stems and roots of healthy plants with those in Ca. L. asiaticus infected plants using microarrays. Affymetrix microarray analysis showed a total of 988 genes were significantly altered in expression, of which 885 were in the stems, and 111 in the roots. Of these, 551 and 56 were up-regulated, while 334 and 55 were down-regulated in the stem and root samples of HLB diseased trees compared to healthy plants, respectively. Dramatic differences in the transcriptional responses were observed between citrus stems and roots to Ca. L. asiaticus infection, with only 8 genes affected in both the roots and stems. The affected genes are involved in diverse cellular functions, including carbohydrate metabolism, cell wall biogenesis, biotic and abiotic stress responses, signaling and transcriptional factors, transportation, cell organization, protein modification and degradation, development, hormone signaling, metal handling, and redox. Microscopy analysis showed the depletion of starch in the roots of the infected plants but not in healthy plants. Collapse and thickening of cell walls were observed in HLB affected roots, but not as severe as in the stems. This study provides insight into the host response of the stems and roots to Ca. L. asiaticus infection. PMID:24058486

  17. Differential tropism in roots and shoots infected by Citrus tristeza virus.

    PubMed

    Harper, S J; Cowell, S J; Robertson, C J; Dawson, W O

    2014-07-01

    Virus tropism is a result of interactions between virus, host and vector species, and determines the fate of an infection. In this study, we examined the infection process of Citrus tristeza virus (CTV) in susceptible and resistant species, and found that the tropism of CTV is not simply phloem limited, but tissue specific. In resistant species, virus infection was not prevented, but mostly restricted to the roots. This phenomenon was also observed after partial replacement of genes of one CTV strain from another, despite both parental strains being capable of systemic infection. Finally, the roots remained susceptible in the absence of viral gene products needed for systemic infection of shoots. Our results suggest that all phloem cells within a plant are not equally susceptible and that changes in host or virus may produce a novel tropism: restriction by the host to a location where further virus spread is prevented. PMID:25010274

  18. Effect of temperature on peroxidase activity, isozyme patterns and concentration of threadlike particles in tristeza—infected citrus plants

    Microsoft Academic Search

    M. Bar-Joseph; G. Loebenstein

    1973-01-01

    Peroxidase activity (PA) in various tristeza-infected citrus varieties was significantly higher than in healthy controls.\\u000a In leaves and bark of Egyptian sour lime and Palestine sweet lime, PA was correlated with symptom severity and content of\\u000a threadlike particles (TLP). In infected roots of Egyptian sour lime, there was an increase in PA but TLP content was minimal.\\u000a \\u000a Temperatures above 22°C

  19. Predisposition of citrus foliage to infection with Xanthomonas citri subsp. citri

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Citrus canker (caused by Xanthomonas citri subsp. citri, Xcc) is a serious disease of susceptible citrus in Florida and other citrus-growing areas of the world. The effect of leaf preconditioning as a route for entry of the bacteria is poorly characterized. A series of experiments were designed to i...

  20. Expression profiling of common and specific defense responses of rice to Magnaporthe oryzae infection using deep sequencing technologies

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Rice blast caused by Magnaporthe oryzae is a serious disease in rice production. Wild type Nipponbare and transgenic rice plants (carrying the Pi9 blast resistance gene) were challenged with the rice blast strain KJ201 to identify the early, mid and late host responses to M. oryzae infection at the ...

  1. SHORT COMMUNICATION SEROLOGICAL DETECTION OF CITRUS PSOROSIS VIRUS IN SEEDS BUT NOT IN SEEDLINGS OF INFECTED MANDARIN AND SOUR ORANGE

    Microsoft Academic Search

    A. M. D'Onghia; K. Djelouah; V. Savino; Via Ceglie

    2000-01-01

    SUMMARY Seed transmission of Citrus psorosis virus (CPsV) was investigated in mandarin cv. 'Grosso di Puglia' and in the Egyptian sour orange cv. 'Baladi'. Seeds collected from infected mandarin trees were subdivided into two lots, one of which was exposed to a hot water treatment (10 min at 52°C) followed by a fungicide treatment be- fore testing by DASI-ELISA. In

  2. Rice-based oral antibody fragment prophylaxis and therapy against rotavirus infection

    PubMed Central

    Tokuhara, Daisuke; ?lvarez, Beatriz; Mejima, Mio; Hiroiwa, Tomoko; Takahashi, Yuko; Kurokawa, Shiho; Kuroda, Masaharu; Oyama, Masaaki; Kozuka-Hata, Hiroko; Nochi, Tomonori; Sagara, Hiroshi; Aladin, Farah; Marcotte, Harold; Frenken, Leon G.J.; Iturriza-Gómara, Miren; Kiyono, Hiroshi; Hammarström, Lennart; Yuki, Yoshikazu

    2013-01-01

    Rotavirus-induced diarrhea is a life-threatening disease in immunocompromised individuals and in children in developing countries. We have developed a system for prophylaxis and therapy against rotavirus disease using transgenic rice expressing the neutralizing variable domain of a rotavirus-specific llama heavy-chain antibody fragment (MucoRice-ARP1). MucoRice-ARP1 was produced at high levels in rice seeds using an overexpression system and RNAi technology to suppress the production of major rice endogenous storage proteins. Orally administered MucoRice-ARP1 markedly decreased the viral load in immunocompetent and immunodeficient mice. The antibody retained in vitro neutralizing activity after long-term storage (>1 yr) and boiling and conferred protection in mice even after heat treatment at 94°C for 30 minutes. High-yield, water-soluble, and purification-free MucoRice-ARP1 thus forms the basis for orally administered prophylaxis and therapy against rotavirus infections. PMID:23925294

  3. RL-SAGE and microarray analysis of the rice defense transcriptome after Rhizoctonia solani infection

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Sheath blight caused by the fungal pathogen Rhizoctonia solani is an emerging problem in rice production worldwide. To elucidate the molecular basis of rice defense to the pathogen, RNA isolated from R. solani-infected leaves of Jasmine 85 was used for both RL-SAGE library construction and microarra...

  4. Stem pitting Citrus tristeza virus predominantly transmitted by the brown citrus aphid from mixed infections containing non-stem pitting and stem pitting isolates

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Citrus tristeza virus (CTV) is a phloem-limited closterovirus that produces a variety of symptoms in various Citrus spp. One of these symptoms is stem pitting (SP). SP does not occur in all Citrus spp. but when it does it may cause low tree vigor, decline and an economically-significant reduction ...

  5. Study on Citrus Response to Huanglongbing Highlights a Down-Regulation of Defense-Related Proteins in Lemon Plants Upon ‘Ca. Liberibacter asiaticus’ Infection

    PubMed Central

    Nwugo, Chika C.; Duan, Yongping; Lin, Hong

    2013-01-01

    Citrus huanglongbing (HLB) is a highly destructive disease of citrus presumably caused by ‘Candidatus Liberibacter asiaticus’ (Las), a gram-negative, insect-transmitted, phloem-limited ?-proteobacterium. Although almost all citrus plants are susceptible to HLB, reports have shown reduced susceptibility to Las infection in lemon (Citruslimon) plants. The aim of this study is to identify intra-species specific molecular mechanisms associated with Las-induced responses in lemon plants. To achieve this, comparative 2-DE and mass spectrometry, in addition to Inductively Coupled Plasma Spectroscopy (ICPS) analyses, were applied to investigate differences in protein accumulation and the concentrations of cationic elements in leaves of healthy and Las-infected lemon plants. Results showed a differential accumulation of 27 proteins, including an increase in accumulation of starch synthase but decrease in the production of photosynthesis-related proteins in Las-infected lemon plants compared to healthy plants. Furthermore, there was a 6% increase (P > 0.05) in K concentration in leaves of lemon plants upon Las infection, which support results from previous studies and might represent a common response pattern of citrus plants to Las infection. Interestingly, contrary to reports from prior studies, this study showed a general reduction in the production of defense-related pathogen-response proteins but a 128% increase in Zn concentration in lemon plants in response to Las infection. Taken together, this study sheds light on general and intra-species specific responses associated with the response of citrus plants to Las. PMID:23922636

  6. The effectiveness of grapefruit (Citrus paradisi) seeds in treating urinary tract infections.

    PubMed

    Oyelami, O A; Agbakwuru, E A; Adeyemi, L A; Adedeji, G B

    2005-04-01

    Three middle-aged males and one female were diagnosed as having urinary tract infections (UTIs) between 2001 and 2003 in the Wesley Guild Hospital, Ilesa, a unit of Obafemi Awolowo University Teaching Hospitals Complex, Ile Ife, Osun State, Nigeria. Of the 4 patients, only the female was asymptomatic. The 3 males had Pseudomonas aeruginosa, Klebsiella species, and Staphylococcus aureus, respectively, in their urine samples, while the female had Escherichia coli. All 4 patients were treated with grapefruit seeds (Citrus paradisi) orally for 2 weeks and they all responded satisfactorily to the treatment except the man with P. aeruginosa isolate. However, the initial profuse growth of Pseudomonas isolate in the patient that was resistant to gentamicin, tarivid, and augmentin later subsided to mild growth with reversal of the antibiotic resistance pattern after 2 weeks' treatment with grapefruit seeds. These preliminary data thus suggest an antibacterial characteristic of dried or fresh grapefruit seeds (C. paradisi) when taken at a dosage of 5 to 6 seeds every 8 hours, that is comparable to that of proven antibacterial drugs. PMID:15865506

  7. Infection of Ustilaginoidea virens intercepts rice seed formation but activates grain-filling-related genes.

    PubMed

    Fan, Jing; Guo, Xiao-Yi; Li, Liang; Huang, Fu; Sun, Wen-Xian; Li, Yan; Huang, Yan-Yan; Xu, Yong-Ju; Shi, Jun; Lei, Yang; Zheng, Ai-Ping; Wang, Wen-Ming

    2015-06-01

    Rice false smut has become an increasingly serious disease in rice (Oryza sativa L.) production worldwide. The typical feature of this disease is that the fungal pathogen Ustilaginoidea virens (Uv) specifically infects rice flower and forms false smut ball, the ustiloxin-containing ball-like fungal colony, of which the size is usually several times larger than that of a mature rice seed. However, the underlying mechanisms of Uv-rice interaction are poorly understood. Here, we applied time-course microscopic and transcriptional approaches to investigate rice responses to Uv infection. The results demonstrated that the flower-opening process and expression of associated transcription factors, including ARF6 and ARF8, were inhibited in Uv-infected spikelets. The ovaries in infected spikelets were interrupted in fertilization and thus were unable to set seeds. However, a number of grain-filling-related genes, including seed storage protein genes, starch anabolism genes and endosperm-specific transcription factors (RISBZ1 and RPBF), were highly transcribed as if the ovaries were fertilized. In addition, critical defense-related genes like NPR1 and PR1 were downregulated by Uv infection. Our data imply that Uv may hijack host nutrient reservoir by activation of the grain-filling network because of growth and formation of false smut balls. PMID:25319482

  8. Stem pitting and seedling yellows symptoms of Citrus tristeza virus infection may be determined by minor sequence variants.

    PubMed

    Cerni, Silvija; Rusci?, Jelena; Nolasco, Gustavo; Gatin, Zivko; Krajaci?, Mladen; Skori?, Dijana

    2008-02-01

    The isolates of Citrus tristeza virus (CTV), the most destructive viral pathogen of citrus, display a high level of variability. As a result of genetic bottleneck induced by the bud-inoculation of CTV-infected material, inoculated seedlings of Citrus wilsonii Tanaka displayed different symptoms. All successfully grafted plants showed severe symptoms of stem pitting and seedling yellows, while plants in which inoculated buds died displayed mild symptoms. Since complex CTV population structure was detected in the parental host, the aim of this work was to investigate how it changed after the virus transmission, and to correlate it with observed symptoms. The coat protein gene sequence of the predominant genotype was identical in parental and grafted plants and clustered to the phylogenetic group 5 encompassing severe reference isolates. In seedlings displaying severe symptoms, the low-frequency variants clustering to other phylogenetic groups were detected, as well. Indicator plants were inoculated with buds taken from unsuccessfully grafted C. wilsonii seedlings. Surprisingly, they displayed no severe symptoms despite the presence of phylogenetic group 5 genomic variants. The results suggest that the appearance of severe symptoms in this case is probably induced by a complex CTV population structure found in seedlings displaying severe symptoms, and not directly by the predominant genomic variant. PMID:18074213

  9. Deciphering the Bacterial Microbiome of Citrus Plants in Response to ‘Candidatus Liberibacter asiaticus’-Infection and Antibiotic Treatments

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Muqing; Powell, Charles A.; Benyon, Lesley S.; Zhou, Hui; Duan, Yongping

    2013-01-01

    The bacterial microbiomes of citrus plants were characterized in response to ‘Candidatus Liberibacter asiaticus’ (Las)-infection and treatments with ampicillin (Amp) and gentamicin (Gm) by Phylochip-based metagenomics. The results revealed that 7,407 of over 50,000 known Operational Taxonomic Units (OTUs) in 53 phyla were detected in citrus leaf midribs using the PhyloChip™ G3 array, of which five phyla were dominant, Proteobacteria (38.7%), Firmicutes (29.0%), Actinobacteria (16.1%), Bacteroidetes (6.2%) and Cyanobacteria (2.3%). The OTU62806, representing ‘Candidatus Liberibacter’, was present with a high titer in the plants graft-inoculated with Las-infected scions treated with Gm at 100 mg/L and in the water-treated control (CK1). However, the Las bacterium was not detected in the plants graft-inoculated with Las-infected scions treated with Amp at 1.0 g/L or in plants graft-inoculated with Las-free scions (CK2). The PhyloChip array demonstrated that more OTUs, at a higher abundance, were detected in the Gm-treated plants than in the other treatment and the controls. Pairwise comparisons indicated that 23 OTUs from the Achromobacter spp. and 12 OTUs from the Methylobacterium spp. were more abundant in CK2 and CK1, respectively. Ten abundant OTUs from the Stenotrophomonas spp. were detected only in the Amp-treatment. These results provide new insights into microbial communities that may be associated with the progression of citrus huanglongbing (HLB) and the potential effects of antibiotics on the disease and microbial ecology. PMID:24250784

  10. Processes involved in the dispersal of Xanthomonas citri pv. citri from canker-infectd citrus canopies, and in the infection of citrus foliage

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Citrus canker (Xanthomonas citri subsp. citri, Xcc) is now considered endemic in Florida, and epidemics result in yield loss and market penalties both in Florida, and elsewhere where the pathogen occurs, and susceptible citrus is cultivated. The bacterium is dispersed in rain splash, and storms wit...

  11. Observations on the Foliar Nematode, Aphelenchoides besseyi, Infecting Tuberose and Rice in India.

    PubMed

    Khan, Matiyar R; Handoo, Zafar A; Rao, Uma; Rao, S B; Prasad, J S

    2012-12-01

    The foliar nematode Aphelenchoides besseyi causes white tip disease in rice (Oryza sativa L.) and floral malady in tuberose (Polianthes tuberosa L.). This nematode is widely distributed in the rice fields of many states of India, including West Bengal (WB), Andhra Pradesh (AP), Madhya Pradesh (MP) and Gujarat (GT). In order to generate information on intraspecific variations of A. besseyi as well as to confirm the identity of the nematode species infecting these important crops, morphological observation was undertaken of A. besseyi isolated from tuberose and rice from WB and rice from AP, MP and GT. The molecular study was only done for rice and tuberose populations from AP and WB. The variations were observed among the populations in the tail, esophageal and anterior regions, including the occurrence of four as well as six lateral lines in the lateral fields. The morphometrics of observed populations showed variations and those could be regarded as a consequence of host-induced or geographical variations. PCR amplification of the rDNA ITS 1 and 2 region of rice (AP) and tuberose (WB) populations of A. besseyi generated one fragment of approximately 830 bp, and the size of the ITS region was 788 bp and 791 bp for tuberose and rice population, respectively. Alignment of the two sequences showed almost 100% similarity. Blast analysis revealed a very high level of similarity of both the Indian strains to a Russian population. The Indian and Russian strains could be differentiated using restriction enzyme Bccl. Host tests revealed that rice (cv. IET 4094), oat (cv. OS-6) and teosinte (cv. TL-1) showed a typical distortion due to the infection of A. besseyi. Five germplasm lines of oat showed no infection of the nematode under field conditions. Local cultivars of onion, maize, chrysanthemum, gladiolus, and Sorghum halepense were also not infected by A. besseyi. PMID:23482906

  12. Observations on the Foliar Nematode, Aphelenchoides besseyi, Infecting Tuberose and Rice in India

    PubMed Central

    Khan, Matiyar R.; Handoo, Zafar A.; Rao, Uma; Rao, S. B.; Prasad, J. S.

    2012-01-01

    The foliar nematode Aphelenchoides besseyi causes white tip disease in rice (Oryza sativa L.) and floral malady in tuberose (Polianthes tuberosa L.). This nematode is widely distributed in the rice fields of many states of India, including West Bengal (WB), Andhra Pradesh (AP), Madhya Pradesh (MP) and Gujarat (GT). In order to generate information on intraspecific variations of A. besseyi as well as to confirm the identity of the nematode species infecting these important crops, morphological observation was undertaken of A. besseyi isolated from tuberose and rice from WB and rice from AP, MP and GT. The molecular study was only done for rice and tuberose populations from AP and WB. The variations were observed among the populations in the tail, esophageal and anterior regions, including the occurrence of four as well as six lateral lines in the lateral fields. The morphometrics of observed populations showed variations and those could be regarded as a consequence of host-induced or geographical variations. PCR amplification of the rDNA ITS 1 and 2 region of rice (AP) and tuberose (WB) populations of A. besseyi generated one fragment of approximately 830 bp, and the size of the ITS region was 788 bp and 791 bp for tuberose and rice population, respectively. Alignment of the two sequences showed almost 100% similarity. Blast analysis revealed a very high level of similarity of both the Indian strains to a Russian population. The Indian and Russian strains could be differentiated using restriction enzyme Bccl. Host tests revealed that rice (cv. IET 4094), oat (cv. OS-6) and teosinte (cv. TL-1) showed a typical distortion due to the infection of A. besseyi. Five germplasm lines of oat showed no infection of the nematode under field conditions. Local cultivars of onion, maize, chrysanthemum, gladiolus, and Sorghum halepense were also not infected by A. besseyi. PMID:23482906

  13. Supplementation of moist and dehydrated citrus pulp in the diets of sheep artificially and naturally infected with gastrointestinal nematodes on the parasitological parameters and performance.

    PubMed

    Nordi, E C P; Costa, R L D; David, C M G; Parren, G A E; Freitas, A C B; Lameirinha, L P; Katiki, L M; Bueno, M S; Quirino, C R; Gama, P E; Bizzo, H R; Chagas, A C S

    2014-10-15

    The inclusion of industrial byproducts such as citrus pulp in the composition of animal diets has been widely recommended due to sustainability aspects and their high level of carbohydrates. Limonene is found in citrus pulp and has been described elsewhere as a major compound of citrus essential oils with excellent anthelmintic activity. The objective of this study was to evaluate the parasitological parameters of lambs artificially infected (Experiment 1) with Haemonchus contortus and naturally infected (Experiment 2) by gastrointestinal nematodes, fed diets with dehydrated citrus pulp or silage of moist orange pulp. Both experiments had three treatments (C: control, DP: diet+dehydrated citrus pulp, and MP: diet+silage of moist orange pulp). The diets were isoproteic (11% crude protein) and the concentrate was corrected every 14 days according to animal weight. Parasitological parameters were evaluated for both experiments each 14 days (body weight, body condition; fecal egg counts-FEC, egg hatch assay-EHA, coproculture, and packed cell volume-PCV). Analysis of variance (GLM of the SAS software) was performed with repeated measures in time, and the means were compared by the Tukey test. Gas chromatography with mass spectrometry was used to detect constituents of dry or moist citrus pulp. Dehydrated citrus pulp had 0.02% essential oil (major compounds were 85.9% limonene and 7.6% valencene). Moist orange pulp contained 1.5% essential oil (major compounds were 65.5% limonene and 31.2% alpha- and gamma-terpineol). In both experiments, the weight gain among the treatments was similar (p>0.05) demonstrating that both moist and dehydrated orange pulp can be used to replace corn kernels to feed infected lambs. The supplementation with orange pulp did not decrease natural or artificial infections of gastrointestinal nematodes according to the FEC results (p>0.05). However, PCV increased from animals fed dehydrated and moist pulp in natural infection (Experiment 2, p<0.05) in comparison with the control group. In addition, the consumption of the dehydrated citrus pulp from animals infected with H. contortus (Experiment 1) caused lower hatching rates after 42 days of consumption (p<0.05), suggesting a tendency to shed fewer eggs to the environment. PMID:25282048

  14. Rice Xa21 primed genes and pathways that are critical for combating bacterial blight infection

    PubMed Central

    Peng, Hai; Chen, Zheng; Fang, Zhiwei; Zhou, Junfei; Xia, Zhihui; Gao, Lifen; Chen, Lihong; Li, Lili; Li, Tiantian; Zhai, Wenxue; Zhang, Weixiong

    2015-01-01

    Rice bacterial blight (BB) is a devastating rice disease. The Xa21 gene confers a broad and persistent resistance against BB. We introduced Xa21 into Oryza sativa L ssp indica (rice 9311), through multi-generation backcrossing, and generated a nearly isogenic, blight-resistant 9311/Xa21 rice. Using next-generation sequencing, we profiled the transcriptomes of both varieties before and within four days after infection of bacterium Xanthomonas oryzae pv. oryzae. The identified differentially expressed (DE) genes and signaling pathways revealed insights into the functions of Xa21. Surprisingly, before infection 1,889 genes on 135 of the 316 signaling pathways were DE between the 9311/Xa21 and 9311 plants. These Xa21-mediated basal pathways included mainly those related to the basic material and energy metabolisms and many related to phytohormones such as cytokinin, suggesting that Xa21 triggered redistribution of energy, phytohormones and resources among essential cellular activities before invasion. Counter-intuitively, after infection, the DE genes between the two plants were only one third of that before the infection; other than a few stress-related pathways, the affected pathways after infection constituted a small subset of the Xa21-mediated basal pathways. These results suggested that Xa21 primed critically important genes and signaling pathways, enhancing its resistance against bacterial infection. PMID:26184504

  15. Incidence and severity of huanglongbing and Candidatus Liberibacter asiaticus titer among field-infected citrus cultivars

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Incidence and severity of Huanglongbing (HLB) disease were assessed in April, 2010 among eight citrus cultivars representing diverse scion types growing in commercial groves in Florida’s Indian River region, an area with high incidence of HLB. Twenty trees of each cultivar were rated for visual HLB...

  16. Kernel infection of Bluebonnet 50 rice by Helminthosporium oryzae and its effect on yield and quality

    E-print Network

    Fazli, Syed Fazal Imam

    1964-01-01

    of maturity. Thus, Bluebonnet 50 rice is most sus- ceptible to H. ~or zae at flowering and milk stages. Increased infection percentages in *he flowering and milk stages indicate that soft and. tender young seed tissue offer little resist- an e to fungal.... , PAGEi R. M. , TULLIS, E. C. , and MORGAN, T. L. 1947. Studies on factors affecting infectivity of Helminthos orium o~r zae. Phytopathology 37:281-290. 12. SUNDARABAMN, S. 1922. Helminthosporium disease of rice. Bull. Agric. Res. Inst. Puss 128, 7 p...

  17. Transcriptome Analysis of Early Responsive Genes in Rice during Magnaporthe oryzae Infection.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yiming; Kwon, Soon Jae; Wu, Jingni; Choi, Jaeyoung; Lee, Yong-Hwan; Agrawal, Ganesh Kumar; Tamogami, Shigeru; Rakwal, Randeep; Park, Sang-Ryeol; Kim, Beom-Gi; Jung, Ki-Hong; Kang, Kyu Young; Kim, Sang Gon; Kim, Sun Tae

    2014-12-01

    Rice blast disease caused by Magnaporthe oryzae is one of the most serious diseases of cultivated rice (Oryza sativa L.) in most rice-growing regions of the world. In order to investigate early response genes in rice, we utilized the transcriptome analysis approach using a 300 K tilling microarray to rice leaves infected with compatible and incompatible M. oryzae strains. Prior to the microarray experiment, total RNA was validated by measuring the differential expression of rice defense-related marker genes (chitinase 2, barwin, PBZ1, and PR-10) by RT-PCR, and phytoalexins (sakuranetin and momilactone A) with HPLC. Microarray analysis revealed that 231 genes were up-regulated (>2 fold change, p < 0.05) in the incompatible interaction compared to the compatible one. Highly expressed genes were functionally characterized into metabolic processes and oxidation-reduction categories. The oxidative stress response was induced in both early and later infection stages. Biotic stress overview from MapMan analysis revealed that the phytohormone ethylene as well as signaling molecules jasmonic acid and salicylic acid is important for defense gene regulation. WRKY and Myb transcription factors were also involved in signal transduction processes. Additionally, receptor-like kinases were more likely associated with the defense response, and their expression patterns were validated by RT-PCR. Our results suggest that candidate genes, including receptor-like protein kinases, may play a key role in disease resistance against M. oryzae attack. PMID:25506299

  18. Transcriptome Analysis of Early Responsive Genes in Rice during Magnaporthe oryzae Infection

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Yiming; Kwon, Soon Jae; Wu, Jingni; Choi, Jaeyoung; Lee, Yong-Hwan; Agrawal, Ganesh Kumar; Tamogami, Shigeru; Rakwal, Randeep; Park, Sang-Ryeol; Kim, Beom-Gi; Jung, Ki-Hong; Kang, Kyu Young; Kim, Sang Gon; Kim, Sun Tae

    2014-01-01

    Rice blast disease caused by Magnaporthe oryzae is one of the most serious diseases of cultivated rice (Oryza sativa L.) in most rice-growing regions of the world. In order to investigate early response genes in rice, we utilized the transcriptome analysis approach using a 300 K tilling microarray to rice leaves infected with compatible and incompatible M. oryzae strains. Prior to the microarray experiment, total RNA was validated by measuring the differential expression of rice defense-related marker genes (chitinase 2, barwin, PBZ1, and PR-10) by RT-PCR, and phytoalexins (sakuranetin and momilactone A) with HPLC. Microarray analysis revealed that 231 genes were up-regulated (>2 fold change, p < 0.05) in the incompatible interaction compared to the compatible one. Highly expressed genes were functionally characterized into metabolic processes and oxidation-reduction categories. The oxidative stress response was induced in both early and later infection stages. Biotic stress overview from MapMan analysis revealed that the phytohormone ethylene as well as signaling molecules jasmonic acid and salicylic acid is important for defense gene regulation. WRKY and Myb transcription factors were also involved in signal transduction processes. Additionally, receptor-like kinases were more likely associated with the defense response, and their expression patterns were validated by RT-PCR. Our results suggest that candidate genes, including receptor-like protein kinases, may play a key role in disease resistance against M. oryzae attack. PMID:25506299

  19. Bacterial diversity analysis of Huanglongbing pathogen-infected citrus, using PhyloChip and 16S rRNA gene clone library sequencing

    SciTech Connect

    Shankar Sagaram, U.; DeAngelis, K.M.; Trivedi, P.; Andersen, G.L.; Lu, S.-E.; Wang, N.

    2009-03-01

    The bacterial diversity associated with citrus leaf midribs was characterized 1 from citrus groves that contained the Huanglongbing (HLB) pathogen, which has yet to be cultivated in vitro. We employed a combination of high-density phylogenetic 16S rDNA microarray and 16S rDNA clone library sequencing to determine the microbial community composition of symptomatic and asymptomatic citrus midribs. Our results revealed that citrus leaf midribs can support a diversity of microbes. PhyloChip analysis indicated that 47 orders of bacteria from 15 phyla were present in the citrus leaf midribs while 20 orders from phyla were observed with the cloning and sequencing method. PhyloChip arrays indicated that nine taxa were significantly more abundant in symptomatic midribs compared to asymptomatic midribs. Candidatus Liberibacter asiaticus (Las) was detected at a very low level in asymptomatic plants, but was over 200 times more abundant in symptomatic plants. The PhyloChip analysis was further verified by sequencing 16S rDNA clone libraries, which indicated the dominance of Las in symptomatic leaves. These data implicate Las as the pathogen responsible for HLB disease. Citrus is the most important commercial fruit crop in Florida. In recent years, citrus Huanglongbing (HLB), also called citrus greening, has severely affected Florida's citrus production and hence has drawn an enormous amount of attention. HLB is one of the most devastating diseases of citrus (6,13), characterized by blotchy mottling with green islands on leaves, as well as stunting, fruit decline, and small, lopsided fruits with poor coloration. The disease tends to be associated with a phloem-limited fastidious {alpha}-proteobacterium given a provisional Candidatus status (Candidatus Liberobacter spp. later changed to Candidatus Liberibacter spp.) in nomenclature (18,25,34). Previous studies indicate that HLB infection causes disorder in the phloem and severely impairs the translocation of assimilates in host plants (5,27,40). Tatineni and colleagues discovered that the HLB bacteria were unevenly distributed in phloem of bark tissue, vascular tissue of the leaf midrib, roots, and different floral and fruit parts (43). Unsuccessful attempts in culturing the pathogen are notably hampering efforts to understand its biology and pathogenesis mechanism. Using a modified Koch's Postulates approach, Jagoueix and colleagues were able to re-infect periwinkle plants from a mixed microbial community harvested from HLB diseased plants (25). Emergence of the disease in otherwise healthy plants led to the conclusion that HLB was associated with Candidatus Liberibacter sp. based on its 16S rDNA sequence (18,25). Currently, three species of the pathogen are recognized from trees with HLB disease based on 16S rDNA sequence: Ca. Liberibacter asiaticus (Las), Ca. Liberibacter africanus (Laf), and Ca. Liberibacter americanus (Lam); Las is the most prevalent species among HLB diseased trees (5,12,18,25,44). Las is naturally transmitted to citrus by the psyllid, Diaphorina citri Kuwayama, and can be artificially transmitted by grafting from citrus to citrus and dodder (Cuscuta campestris) to periwinkle (Catharanthus roseus) or tobacco (Nicotiana tabacum Xanthi) (5). Based on current research regarding the associations of Liberibacter in planta there is not enough evidence to implicate Liberibacter as the definitive causal agent of HLB disease due to its resistance to cultivation in vitro. It is possible that HLB disease may be the result of complex etiology where Liberibacter interacts with other endophytic bacteria. However, there is not enough evidence regarding its association(s) in planta to make this conclusion, nor is it known whether associated microbial communities play a role in expression of pathogenic traits. The main objective of the study was to test the hypothesis that other bacteria besides Ca. Liberibacter spp. are associated with citrus greening disease. The differences between the relative abundance, species richness and phylogenetic diversity of the microbial communitie

  20. Brome mosaic virus Infection of Rice Results in Decreased Accumulation of RNA1.

    PubMed

    Kitayama, Masahiko; Hoover, Haley; Middleton, Stefani; Kao, C Cheng

    2015-05-01

    Brome mosaic virus (BMV) (the Russian strain) infects monocot plants and has been studied extensively in barley and wheat. Here, we report BMV can systemically infect rice (Oryza sativa var. japonica), including cultivars in which the genomes have been determined. The BMV capsid protein can be found throughout the inoculated plants. However, infection in rice exhibits delayed symptom expression or no symptoms when compared with wheat (Triticum aestivum). The sequences of BMV RNAs isolated from rice did not reveal any nucleotide changes in RNA1 or RNA2, while RNA3 had only one synonymous nucleotide change from the inoculum sequence. Preparations of purified BMV virions contained RNA1 at a significantly reduced level relative to the other two RNAs. Analysis of BMV RNA replication in rice revealed that minus-strand RNA1 was replicated at a reduced rate when compared with RNA2. Thus, rice appears to either inhibit RNA1 replication or lacks a sufficient amount of a factor needed to support efficient RNA1 replication. PMID:26024443

  1. G Protein Regulation of Disease Resistance During Infection of Rice with Rice Blast Fungus

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    Sarah M. Assmann (Penn State University; Biology Department REV)

    2005-11-15

    When the effects of specific pathogen-produced elicitor compounds on plant cells are recognized by specific plant resistance (R) gene products, a local defense response called the hypersensitive response is triggered. Production of reactive oxygen species (ROS) and induction of defense genes are components of this response. In rice cultivars harboring null mutations in the G protein ? subunit, RGA1, ROS production and defense gene induction by the rice blast fungus Magnaporthe grisea and its sphingolipid elicitors are reduced or delayed. These results implicate heterotrimeric guanine nucleotide–binding proteins (G proteins) as important players in plant pathogen response.

  2. Spatial pattern analysis of citrus canker-infected plantings in são paulo, Brazil, and augmentation of infection elicited by the asian leafminer.

    PubMed

    Gottwald, T R; Bassanezi, R B; Amorim, L; Bergamin-Filho, A

    2007-06-01

    ABSTRACT Eradication of Asiatic citrus canker (ACC) has become increasingly difficult over the last decade, following the introduction of the Asian leafminer into Brazil and Florida, which has led to changes in the eradication protocols. The present study, undertaken in Brazil, was aimed at characterizing the spatial patterns of ACC in commercial citrus plantings to gain better understanding of the dynamics of the disease subsequent to introduction of the leafminer. The spatial patterns of ACC were mapped in 326 commercial citrus plantings and statistically assessed at various spatial dimensions. The presence of "within-group" aggregation in each plot was examined via beta-binomial analysis for groups of trees parsed into three-by-three-tree quadrats. The relative intensity of aggregation was expressed as a binomial index of dispersion (D) and heterogeneity among plots expressed as the intracluster correlation coefficient, rho. The population of data sets was found to fall into three D categories, D < 1.3, 1.3 3.5. These categories then were related to other spatial characteristics. The binary form of Taylor's power law was used to assess the overdispersion of disease across plots and was highly significant. When the overall population of plots was parsed into D categories, the Taylor's R (2) improved in all cases. Although these methods assessed aggregation well, they do not give information on the number of foci or aggregations within each plot. Therefore, the number of foci per 1,000 trees was quantified and found to relate directly to the D categories. The lowest D category could be explained by a linear relationship of number of foci versus disease incidence, whereas the higher two categories were most easily explained by a generalized beta function for the same relationship. Spatial autocorrelation then was used to examine the spatial relationships "among groups" composed of three-by-three-tree quadrats and determine common distances between these groups of ACC-infected trees. Aggregation was found in >84% of cases at this spatial level and there was a direct relationship between increasing D category and increasing core cluster size, and aggregation at the among-group spatial hierarchy was generally stronger for the within-row than for the across-row orientation. Clusters of disease were estimated to average between 18 and 33 tree spaces apart, and the presence of multiple foci of infection was commonplace. The effectiveness of the eradication protocol of removing all "exposed" trees within 30 m surrounding each "ACC-infected tree" was examined, and the distance of subsequent infected trees beyond this 30-m zone from the original focal infected tree was measured for each plot. A frequency distribution was compiled over all plots to describe the distance that would have been needed to circumscribe all of these outliers as a theoretical alternative protocol to the 30-m eradication protocol. The frequency distribution was well described by a monomolecular model (R(2) = 0.98) and used to determine that 90, 95, and 99% of all newly infected trees occurred within 296, 396, and 623 m of prior-infected trees in commercial citrus plantings, respectively. These distances are very similar to previously reported distances determined for ACC in residential settings in Florida. PMID:18943598

  3. Genetic variation in strigolactone production and tillering in rice and its effect on Striga hermonthica infection.

    PubMed

    Jamil, Muhammad; Charnikhova, Tatsiana; Houshyani, Benyamin; van Ast, Aad; Bouwmeester, Harro J

    2012-03-01

    Tillering in cereals is a complex process in the regulation of which also signals from the roots in the form of strigolactones play an important role. The strigolactones are signalling molecules that are secreted into the rhizosphere where they act as germination stimulants for root parasitic plants and hyphal branching factors for arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi. On the other hand, they are also transported from the roots to the shoot where they inhibit tillering or branching. In the present study, the genetic variation in strigolactone production and tillering phenotype was studied in twenty rice varieties collected from all over the world and correlated with S. hermonthica infection. Rice cultivars like IAC 165, IAC 1246, Gangweondo and Kinko produced high amounts of the strigolactones orobanchol, 2'-epi-5-deoxystrigol and three methoxy-5-deoxystrigol isomers and displayed low amounts of tillers. These varieties induced high S. hermonthica germination, attachment, emergence as well as dry biomass. In contrast, rice cultivars such as Super Basmati, TN 1, Anakila and Agee displayed high tillering in combination with low production of the aforementioned strigolactones. These varieties induced only low S. hermonthica germination, attachment, emergence and dry biomass. Statistical analysis across all the varieties confirmed a positive correlation between strigolactone production and S. hermonthica infection and a negative relationship with tillering. These results show that genetic variation in tillering capacity is the result of genetic variation in strigolactone production and hence could be a helpful tool in selecting rice cultivars that are less susceptible to S. hermonthica infection. PMID:21947621

  4. MicroRNAs responding to southern rice black-streaked dwarf virus infection and their target genes associated with symptom development in rice.

    PubMed

    Xu, Donglin; Mou, Guiping; Wang, Kang; Zhou, Guohui

    2014-09-22

    Southern rice black-streaked dwarf virus (SRBSDV) is a recently emerged rice virus that has spread across Asia. This devastating virus causes rice plants to produce a variety of symptoms during different growth stages. MicroRNAs (miRNAs) comprise a large group of 21-24-nt RNA molecules that are important regulators of plant development processes and stress responses. In this study, we used microarray profiling to investigate rice miRNAs responding to SRBSDV infection at 3, 9, 15, and 20 days post-inoculation (dpi). Expression levels of 56 miRNAs were altered in SRBSDV-infected rice plants, with these changes classified into eight different regulation patterns according to their temporal expression dynamics. Fourteen miRNAs belonging to six families (miR164, R396, R530, R1846, R1858, and R2097) were significantly regulated at 20 dpi. We used RT-qPCR to search for expression level correlations between members of these families and their putative targets at 3, 9, and 15 dpi. Some members of the miR164, R396, R530, and R1846 families were found to be positively or negatively correlated with their respective targets during 3-15 days after SRBSDV infection, whereas in more cases the rice miRNAs were not in correlation with their targets along the post-inoculation period, suggesting that some additional factors may be involved in rice miRNA-target interactions. The reported functions of rice genes targeted by the miR164, R396, R530, R1846, and R1858 families indicated that these genes are associated with symptom development. These results provide insights into miRNA-mediated SRBSDV-rice interactions. PMID:25038403

  5. Herbivory by the insect diaphorina citri induces greater change in citrus plant volatile profile than does infection by the bacterium, Candidatus Liberibacter asiaticus

    PubMed Central

    Hijaz, Faraj; El-Shesheny, Ibrahim; Killiny, Nabil

    2013-01-01

    The volatile organic compound (VOC) profile in plant leaves often changes after biotic and abiotic stresses. Monitoring changes in VOCs in plant leaves could provide valuable information about multitrophic interactions. In the current study, we investigated the effect of Asian citrus psyllid (ACP) infestation, citrus greening pathogen (Candidatus Liberibacter asiaticus [CLas]) infection, and simultaneous attack by ACP and CLas on the VOC content of citrus leaves. Leaf volatiles were extracted using hexane and analyzed with gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS). Although ACP is a phloem-sucking insect that causes minimal damage to plant tissues, the relative amount of 21 out of the 27 VOCs increased 2- to 10-fold in ACP-infested plants. The relative amount of d-limonene, ?-phelandrene, citronellal, and undecanal were increased 4- to 20- fold in CLas-infected plants. A principle component analysis (PCA) and cluster analysis (CA) showed that VOC patterns of ACP-infested and CLas-infected plants were different from each other and were also different from the controls, while the VOC pattern of double-attacked plants was more like that of the controls than that of ACP-infested or CLas-infected plants. VOC amounts from leaves were compromised when plants were attacked by ACP and CLas. The results of this study showed that a simple direct extraction of citrus leaf volatiles could be successfully used to discriminate between healthy and CLas-infected plants. Information about the effects of insect and pathogen attack on the VOC content profile of plants might contribute to a better understanding of biotic stress. PMID:23857364

  6. Infection with strains of Citrus tristeza virus does not exclude superinfection by other strains of the virus.

    PubMed

    Folimonova, Svetlana Y; Robertson, Cecile J; Shilts, Turksen; Folimonov, Alexey S; Hilf, Mark E; Garnsey, Stephen M; Dawson, William O

    2010-02-01

    Superinfection exclusion or homologous interference, a phenomenon in which a primary viral infection prevents a secondary infection with the same or closely related virus, has been observed commonly for viruses in various systems, including viruses of bacteria, plants, and animals. With plant viruses, homologous interference initially was used as a test of virus relatedness to define whether two virus isolates were "strains" of the same virus or represented different viruses, and subsequently purposeful infection with a mild isolate was implemented as a protective measure against isolates of the virus causing severe disease. In this study we examined superinfection exclusion of Citrus tristeza virus (CTV), a positive-sense RNA closterovirus. Thirteen naturally occurring isolates of CTV representing five different virus strains and a set of isolates originated from virus constructs engineered based on an infectious cDNA clone of T36 isolate of CTV, including hybrids containing sequences from different isolates, were examined for their ability to prevent superinfection by another isolate of the virus. We show that superinfection exclusion occurred only between isolates of the same strain and not between isolates of different strains. When isolates of the same strain were used for sequential plant inoculation, the primary infection provided complete exclusion of the challenge isolate, whereas isolates from heterologous strains appeared to have no effect on replication, movement or systemic infection by the challenge virus. Surprisingly, substitution of extended cognate sequences from isolates of the T68 or T30 strains into T36 did not confer the ability of resulting hybrid viruses to exclude superinfection by those donor strains. Overall, these results do not appear to be explained by mechanisms proposed previously for other viruses. Moreover, these observations bring an understanding of some previously unexplained fundamental features of CTV biology and, most importantly, build a foundation for the strategy of selecting mild isolates that would efficiently exclude severe virus isolates as a practical means to control CTV diseases. PMID:19923189

  7. Comparison of FTIR spectra between Huanglongbing (citrus greening) and other citrus maladies.

    PubMed

    Hawkins, Samantha A; Park, Bosoon; Poole, Gavin H; Gottwald, Tim R; Windham, William R; Albano, Joseph; Lawrence, Kurt C

    2010-05-26

    Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy has the ability to quickly identify the presence of specific carbohydrates in plant materials. The presence of the disease huanglongbing (HLB) in the leaves of infected citrus plants has a distinctive spectrum that can be used to distinguish an infected plant from a healthy plant. However, many citrus diseases display similar visible symptoms and are of concern to citrus growers. In this study several citrus diseases (citrus leaf rugose virus, citrus tristeza virus, citrus psorosis virus, and Xanthomonas axonopodis ) and nutrient deficiencies (iron, copper, zinc, manganese, and magnesium) were compared with HLB using FTIR spectroscopy to determine if the spectra alone can be used to identify plants that are infected with HLB instead of another disease. The results indicate that the spectra of some diseases and deficiencies more closely resemble those of apparently healthy plants and some share the carbohydrate transformation that has been seen in the spectra of HLB-infected plants. PMID:20438136

  8. Transcriptional responses and carbohydrate metabolism of citrus infected with Candidatus Liberibacter asiaticus, the causal agent of Huanglongbing in Florida

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Huanglongbing (HLB) is a devastating disease of citrus occurring in most citrus growing regions worldwide. It is caused by a phloem-limited, fastidious bacterium of the genus Candidatus Liberibacter, which is transmitted through insect vectors. HLB causes the decline of trees within few years afte...

  9. RNA-Seq analysis of Citrus reticulata in the early stages of Xylella fastidiosa infection reveals auxin-related genes as a defense response

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Citrus variegated chlorosis (CVC), caused by Xylella fastidiosa, is one the most important citrus diseases, and affects all varieties of sweet orange (Citrus sinensis L. Osb). On the other hand, among the Citrus genus there are different sources of resistance against X. fastidiosa. For these species identifying these defense genes could be an important step towards obtaining sweet orange resistant varieties through breeding or genetic engineering. To assess these genes we made use of mandarin (C. reticulata Blanco) that is known to be resistant to CVC and shares agronomical characteristics with sweet orange. Thus, we investigated the gene expression in Ponkan mandarin at one day after infection with X. fastidiosa, using RNA-seq. A set of genes considered key elements in the resistance was used to confirm its regulation in mandarin compared with the susceptible sweet orange. Results Gene expression analysis of mock inoculated and infected tissues of Ponkan mandarin identified 667 transcripts repressed and 724 significantly induced in the later. Among the induced transcripts, we identified genes encoding proteins similar to Pattern Recognition Receptors. Furthermore, many genes involved in secondary metabolism, biosynthesis and cell wall modification were upregulated as well as in synthesis of abscisic acid, jasmonic acid and auxin. Conclusions This work demonstrated that the defense response to the perception of bacteria involves cell wall modification and activation of hormone pathways, which probably lead to the induction of other defense-related genes. We also hypothesized the induction of auxin-related genes indicates that resistant plants initially recognize X. fastidiosa as a necrotrophic pathogen. PMID:24090429

  10. Leaf Gas Exchange and Chlorophyll a Fluorescence Imaging of Rice Leaves Infected with Monographella albescens.

    PubMed

    Tatagiba, Sandro Dan; DaMatta, Fábio Murilo; Rodrigues, Fabrício Ávila

    2015-02-01

    This study was intended to analyze the photosynthetic performance of rice leaf blades infected with Monographella albescens by combining chlorophyll (Chl) a fluorescence images with gas exchange and photosynthetic pigment pools. The net CO2 assimilation rate, stomatal conductance, transpiration rate, total Chl and carotenoid pools, and Chl a/b ratio all decreased but the internal CO2 concentration increased in the inoculated plants compared with their noninoculated counterparts. The first detectable changes in the images of Chl a fluorescence from the leaves of inoculated plants were already evident at 24 h after inoculation (hai) and increased dramatically as the leaf scald lesions expanded. However, these changes were negligible for the photosystem II photochemical efficiency (Fv/Fm) at 24 hai, in contrast to other Chl fluorescence traits such as the photochemical quenching coefficient, yield of photochemistry, and yield for dissipation by downregulation; which, therefore, were much more sensitive than the Fv/Fm ratio in assessing the early stages of fungal infection. It was also demonstrated that M. albescens was able to impair the photosynthetic process in both symptomatic and asymptomatic leaf areas. Overall, it was proven that Chl a fluorescence imaging is an excellent tool to describe the loss of functionality of the photosynthetic apparatus occurring in rice leaves upon infection by M. albescens. PMID:25163009

  11. Visible/near-infrared spectroscopy for discrimination of HLB-infected citrus leaves from healthy leaves

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Researchers have used various hyperspectral systems, covering several areas of the electromagnetic spectrum to investigate all types of disease/plant interactions. The purpose of this research was to investigate using visible and near-infrared (400-1100nm) spectroscopy to differentiate HLB infected...

  12. Quantification and localization of hesperidin and rutin in Citrus sinensis grafted on C. limonia after Xylella fastidiosa infection by HPLC-UV and MALDI imaging mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Soares, Márcio Santos; da Silva, Danielle Fernandes; Forim, Moacir Rossi; da Silva, Maria Fátima das Graças Fernandes; Fernandes, João Batista; Vieira, Paulo Cezar; Silva, Denise Brentan; Lopes, Norberto Peporine; de Carvalho, Sérgio Alves; de Souza, Alessandra Alves; Machado, Marcos Antônio

    2015-07-01

    A high performance liquid chromatography-ultraviolet (HPLC-UV) method was developed for quantifying hesperidin and rutin levels in leaves and stems of Citrus limonia, with a good linearity over a range of 1.0-80.0 and 1.0-50.0?gmL(-1) respectively, with r(2)>0.999 for all curves. The limits of detection (LOD) for both flavonoids were 0.6 and 0.5?gmL(-1), respectively, with quantification (LOQ) being 2.0 and 1.0?gmL(-1), respectively. The quantification method was applied to Citrus sinensis grafted onto C. limonia with and without CVC (citrus variegated chlorosis) symptoms after Xylella fastidiosa infection. The total content of rutin was low and practically constant in all analyses in comparison with hesperidin, which showed a significant increase in its amount in symptomatic leaves. Scanning electron microscopy studies on leaves with CVC symptoms showed vessel occlusion by biofilm, and a crystallized material was noted. Considering the difficulty in isolating these crystals for analysis, tissue sections were analyzed by matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization mass spectrometry imaging (MALDI MSI) to confirm the presence of hesperidin at the site of infection. The images constructed from MS/MS data with a specific diagnostic fragment ion (m/z 483) also showed higher ion intensities for it in infected plants than in healthy ones, mainly in the vessel regions. These data suggest that hesperidin plays a role in the plant-pathogen interaction, probably as a phytoanticipin. This method was also applied to C. sinensis and C. limonia seedlings, and comparison with the graft results showed that the rootstock had an increased hesperidin content ?3.6 fold greater in the graft stem than in the stem of C. sinensis seedlings. Increase in hesperidin content by rootstock can be related to induced internal defense mechanisms. PMID:25749617

  13. The effect of ‘Candidatus Liberibacter asiaticus’ infection on the proteomic profiles and nutritional status of pre-symptomatic and symptomatic grapefruit (Citrus paradisi) plants

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Huanglongbing (HLB) is a highly destructive citrus disease which threatens citrus production worldwide and ‘Candidatus Liberibacter asiaticus’ (Las), a non-culturable phloem-limited bacterium, is an associated causal agent of the disease. To better understand the physiological and molecular processes involved in host responses to Las, 2-DE and mass spectrometry analyses, as well as ICP spectroscopy analysis were employed to elucidate the global protein expression profiles and nutrient concentrations in leaves of Las-infected grapefruit plants at pre-symptomatic or symptomatic stages for HLB. Results This study identified 123 protein spots out of 191 spots that showed significant changes in the leaves of grapefruit plants in response to Las infection and all identified spots matched to 69 unique proteins/peptides. A down-regulation of 56 proteins including those associated with photosynthesis, protein synthesis, and metabolism was correlated with significant reductions in the concentrations of Ca, Mg, Fe, Zn, Mn, and Cu in leaves of grapefruit plants in response to Las infection, particularly in symptomatic plants. Oxygen-evolving enhancer (OEE) proteins, a PSI 9 kDa protein, and a Btf3-like protein were among a small group of proteins that were down-regulated in both pre-symptomatic and symptomatic plants in response to Las infection. Furthermore, a Las-mediated up-regulation of 13 grapefruit proteins was detected, which included Cu/Zn superoxide dismutase, chitinases, lectin-related proteins, miraculin-like proteins, peroxiredoxins and a CAP 160 protein. Interestingly, a Las-mediated up-regulation of granule-bound starch synthase was correlated with an increase in the K concentrations of pre-symptomatic and symptomatic plants. Conclusions This study constitutes the first attempt to characterize the interrelationships between protein expression and nutritional status of Las-infected pre-symptomatic or symptomatic grapefruit plants and sheds light on the physiological and molecular mechanisms associated with HLB disease development. PMID:23578104

  14. Pest management practices aimed at curtailing citrus huanglongbing disease

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Huanglongbing (HLB) is a devastating, insect-vectored disease of citrus sometimes referred to as citrus greening disease and putatively caused by phloem-limited bacteria within the genus Candidatus Liberibacter. Citrus trees infected by this disease decline in productivity; produce misshapen, inedib...

  15. Current status of Citrus tristeza virus in Central California

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The Lindcove Research and Extension Center (LREC), Exeter, CA has 51 ha of citrus and is the field site and screenhouses for the University of California Citrus Clonal Protection Program (CCPP). LREC maintains a zero tolerance of Citrus tristeza virus (CTV) infected trees to protect the CCPP and re...

  16. Trailers transporting oranges to processing plants move Asian citrus psyllids

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Huanglongbing (citrus greening) is one of the most serious of citrus diseases. Movement of the disease occurs as a result of natural vector-borne infection and by movement of plant material. We demonstrate here that Diaphorina citri Kuwayama (vector of citrus greening pathogens) can be transported i...

  17. Infection-Associated Nuclear Degeneration in the Rice Blast Fungus Magnaporthe oryzae Requires Non-Selective Macro-Autophagy

    PubMed Central

    He, Min; Kershaw, Michael J.; Soanes, Darren M.; Xia, Yuxian; Talbot, Nicholas J.

    2012-01-01

    Background The rice blast fungus Magnaporthe oryzae elaborates a specialized infection structure called an appressorium to breach the rice leaf surface and gain access to plant tissue. Appressorium development is controlled by cell cycle progression, and a single round of nuclear division occurs prior to appressorium formation. Mitosis is always followed by programmed cell death of the spore from which the appressorium develops. Nuclear degeneration in the spore is known to be essential for plant infection, but the precise mechanism by which it occurs is not known. Methodology/Principal Findings In yeast, nuclear breakdown requires a specific form of autophagy, known as piecemeal microautophagy of the nucleus (PMN), and we therefore investigated whether this process occurs in the rice blast fungus. Here, we report that M. oryzae possesses two conserved components of a putative PMN pathway, MoVac8 and MoTsc13, but that both are dispensable for nuclear breakdown during plant infection. MoVAC8 encodes a vacuolar membrane protein and MoTSC13 a peri-nuclear and peripheral ER protein. Conclusions/Significance We show that MoVAC8 is necessary for caffeine resistance, but dispensable for pathogenicity of M. oryzae, while MoTSC13 is involved in cell wall stress responses and is an important virulence determinant. By functional analysis of ?Moatg1 and ?Moatg4 mutants, we demonstrate that infection-associated nuclear degeneration in M. oryzae instead occurs by non-selective macroautophagy, which is necessary for rice blast disease. PMID:22448240

  18. Comparison of different detection methods for citrus greening disease based on airborne multispectral and hyperspectral imagery

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Citrus greening or Huanglongbing (HLB) is a devastating disease spread in many citrus groves since first found in 2005 in Florida. Multispectral (MS) and hyperspectral (HS) airborne images of citrus groves in Florida were taken to detect citrus greening infected trees in 2007 and 2010. Ground truthi...

  19. Genetic Variation of Citrus Tristeza Virus Isolates from California and Spain: Evidence for Mixed Infections and Recombination

    Microsoft Academic Search

    LUIS RUBIO; MARIA ANGELES AYLLON; P. Kong; A. Fernandez; M. Polek; J. Guerri; P. Moreno; B. W. Falk

    2001-01-01

    We examined the population structure and genetic variation of four genomic regions within and between 30 Citrus tristeza virus (CTV) isolates from Spain and California. Our analyses showed that most isolates con- tained a population of sequence variants, with one being predominant. Four isolates showed two major sequence variants in some genomic regions. The two major variants of three of

  20. INITIAL SURVEY FOR SPIROPLASMA CITRI, A LEAFHOPPER-TRANSMITTED PATHOGEN INFECTING CITRUS AND OTHER CROPS IN CENTRAL CALIFORNIA.

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Spiroplasma citri, a phloem-limited, Gram positive prokaryote lacking a true cell wall, is the causal agent of citrus stubborn disease. The vectors of S. citri in California are reported to be leafhoppers (Homoptera: Cicadellidae) and includes the beet leafhopper, Circulifer tenellus, and Scaphytop...

  1. Transgenic expression in citrus of single-chain antibody fragments specific to Citrus tristeza virus confers virus resistance

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Magdalena Cervera; Olga Esteban; Maite Gil; M. Teresa Gorris; M. Carmen Martínez; Leandro Peña; Mariano Cambra

    2010-01-01

    Citrus tristeza virus (CTV) causes one of the most destructive viral diseases of citrus worldwide. Generation of resistant citrus genotypes through\\u000a genetic engineering could be a good alternative to control CTV. To study whether production of single-chain variable fragment\\u000a (scFv) antibodies in citrus could interfere and immunomodulate CTV infection, transgenic Mexican lime plants expressing two\\u000a different scFv constructs, separately and

  2. Cloning and sequence analysis of an infectious clone of Citrus yellow mosaic virus that can infect sweet orange via Agrobacterium-mediated inoculation.

    PubMed

    Huang, Q; Hartung, J S

    2001-10-01

    Citrus yellow mosaic virus (CYMV), a member of the family Caulimoviridae, genus Badnavirus, causes citrus mosaic disease, a disease that occurs commonly in India. The CYMV genome has been cloned and its complete nucleotide sequence determined. Its DNA genome is 7559 bp in length and contains six putative open reading frames (ORFs), all on the plus-strand of the genome and each capable of encoding proteins with a molecular mass of greater than 10 kDa. ORF 3, the largest ORF, encodes a putative polyprotein for functions involved in virus movement, assembly and replication. The other ORFs encode proteins whose exact functions are not completely understood. The genome also contains a plant tRNA(met)-binding site, which may serve as a primer for minus-strand DNA synthesis, in its intergenic region. Phylogenetic analysis of the badnaviruses revealed that CYMV is most closely related to Cacao swollen shoot virus. It was demonstrated that a construct containing 1.4 copies of the cloned CYMV genome could infect sweet orange via Agrobacterium-mediated inoculation. PMID:11562547

  3. The effect of 'Candidatus Liberibacter asiaticus' infection on the proteomic profiles and nutritional status of pre-symptomatic and symptomatic grapefruit (Citrus paradisi) plants

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Huanglongbing (HLB) is a highly destructive citrus disease which threatens citrus production worldwide. Among three known ‘Candidatus Liberibacter’ species associated with HLB, ‘Ca. Liberibacter asiaticus’ (Las) is the most prevalent. To better understand the physiological and molecular processes in...

  4. Transcriptome markers of viral persistence in naturally-infected andes virus (bunyaviridae) seropositive long-tailed pygmy rice rats.

    PubMed

    Campbell, Corey L; Torres-Perez, Fernando; Acuna-Retamar, Mariana; Schountz, Tony

    2015-01-01

    Long-tailed pygmy rice rats (Oligoryzomys longicaudatus) are principal reservoir hosts of Andes virus (ANDV) (Bunyaviridae), which causes most hantavirus cardiopulmonary syndrome cases in the Americas. To develop tools for the study of the ANDV-host interactions, we used RNA-Seq to generate a de novo transcriptome assembly. Splenic RNA from five rice rats captured in Chile, three of which were ANDV-infected, was used to generate an assembly of 66,173 annotated transcripts, including noncoding RNAs. Phylogenetic analysis of selected predicted proteins showed similarities to those of the North American deer mouse (Peromyscus maniculatus), the principal reservoir of Sin Nombre virus (SNV). One of the infected rice rats had about 50-fold more viral burden than the others, suggesting acute infection, whereas the remaining two had levels consistent with persistence. Differential expression analysis revealed distinct signatures among the infected rodents. The differences could be due to 1) variations in viral load, 2) dimorphic or reproductive differences in splenic homing of immune cells, or 3) factors of unknown etiology. In the two persistently infected rice rats, suppression of the JAK-STAT pathway at Stat5b and Ccnot1, elevation of Casp1, RIG-I pathway factors Ppp1cc and Mff, and increased FC receptor-like transcripts occurred. Caspase-1 and Stat5b activation pathways have been shown to stimulate T helper follicular cell (TFH) development in other species. These data are also consistent with reports suggestive of TFH stimulation in deer mice experimentally infected with hantaviruses. In the remaining acutely infected rice rat, the apoptotic pathway marker Cox6a1 was elevated, and putative anti-viral factors Abcb1a, Fam46c, Spp1, Rxra, Rxrb, Trmp2 and Trim58 were modulated. Transcripts for preproenkephalin (Prenk) were reduced, which may be predictive of an increased T cell activation threshold. Taken together, this transcriptome dataset will permit rigorous examination of rice rat-ANDV interactions and may lead to better understanding of virus ecology. PMID:25856432

  5. Suppression of cell wall-related genes associated with stunting of Oryza glaberrima infected with Rice tungro spherical virus

    PubMed Central

    Budot, Bernard O.; Encabo, Jaymee R.; Ambita, Israel Dave V.; Atienza-Grande, Genelou A.; Satoh, Kouji; Kondoh, Hiroaki; Ulat, Victor J.; Mauleon, Ramil; Kikuchi, Shoshi; Choi, Il-Ryong

    2014-01-01

    Rice tungro disease is a complex disease caused by the interaction between Rice tungro bacilliform virus and Rice tungro spherical virus (RTSV). RTSV alone does not cause recognizable symptoms in most Asian rice (Oryza sativa) plants, whereas some African rice (O. glaberrima) plants were found to become stunted by RTSV. Stunting of rice plants by virus infections usually accompanies the suppression of various cell wall-related genes. The expression of cell wall-related genes was examined in O. glaberrima and O. sativa infected with RTSV to see the relationship between the severity of stunting and the suppression of cell wall-related genes by RTSV. The heights of four accessions of O. glaberrima were found to decline by 14–34% at 28 days post-inoculation (dpi) with RTSV, whereas the height reduction of O. sativa plants by RTSV was not significant. RTSV accumulated more in O. glaberrima plants than in O. sativa plants, but the level of RTSV accumulation was not correlated with the degree of height reduction among the four accessions of O. glaberrima. Examination for expression of genes for cellulose synthase A5 (CESA5) and A6 (CESA6), cellulose synthase-like A9 (CSLA9) and C7, and ?-expansin 1 (expansin 1) and 15 precursors in O. glaberrima and O. sativa plants between 7 and 28 dpi with RTSV showed that the genes such as those for CESA5, CESA6, CSLA9, and expansin 1were more significantly suppressed in stunted plants of O. glaberrima at 14 dpi with RTSV than in O. sativa, suggesting that stunting of O. glaberrima might be associated with these cell wall-related genes suppressed by RTSV. Examination for expression of these genes in O. sativa plants infected with other rice viruses in previous studies indicated that the suppression of the expansin 1 gene is likely to be a signature response commonly associated with virus-induced stunting of Oryza species. These results suggest that stunting of O. glaberrima by RTSV infection might be associated with the suppression of these cell wall-related genes at the early stage of infection with RTSV. PMID:24550897

  6. Analysis of the Structure of the AVR1-CO39 Avirulence Locus in Virulent Rice-Infecting Isolates of Magnaporthe grisea

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The AVR1-CO39 gene that came from a Magnaporthe grisea isolate from weeping lovegrass controls avirulence on the rice cultivar CO39. AVR1-CO39 was not present in the genome of the rice-infecting M. grisea isolate Guy11 from French Guyana, suggesting that the gene had been deleted. Molecular analysis...

  7. Quantitative distribution of Candidatus Liberibacter asiaticus in the aerial parts of the field grown HLB-infected citrus trees in Texas

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The Asian citrus psyllid, Diaphorina citri Kuwayanna, one of the vectors for citrus greening disease or Huanglongbing (HLB) has been present in Texas for over a decade, but the detection of the disease is recent. HLB has been confirmed in only two adjacent commercial citrus groves of grapefruit and...

  8. Screening molecules for control of citrus Huanglongbing (HLB) using an optimized regeneration system for 'Candidatus Liberibacter asiaticus' infected periwinkle (Catharunthus roseus) cuttings

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Citrus huanglongbing (HLB) ( also known as citrus greening) is one of the most destructive diseases of citrus worldwide. The disease is associated with three different species of Candidatus Liberibacter, of which, ‘Ca. L. asiaticus’ (Las) is the most widely-distributed. An improved system using HLB-...

  9. [Discrimination and spectral response characteristic of stress leaves infected by rice Aphelenchoides besseyi Christie].

    PubMed

    Liu, Zhan-Yu; Shi, Jing-Jing; Wang, Da-Cheng; Huang, Jing-Feng

    2010-03-01

    An ASD Field Spec Pro Full Range spectrometer was used to acquire the spectral reflectance of healthy and diseased leaves infected by rice Aphelenchoides besseyi Christie, which were cut from rice individuals in the paddy field. Firstly, foliar pigment content was investigated. As compared with healthy leaves, the total chlorophyll and carotene contents (mg x g(-1)) of diseased leaves decreased 18% and 22%, respectively. The diseased foliar content ratio of total chlorophyll to carotene was nearly 82% of the healthy ones. Secondly, the response characteristics of hyperspectral reflectance of diseased leaves were analyzed. The spectral reflectance in the blue (450-520 nm), green (520-590 nm) and red (630-690 nm) regions were 2.5, 2 and 3.3 times the healthy ones respectively due to the decrease in foliar pigment content, whereas in the near infrared (NIR, 770-890 nm) region was 71.7 of the healthy ones because of leaf twist, and 73.7% for shortwave infrared (SWIR, 1 500-2 400 nm) region, owing to water loss. Moreover, the hyperspectral feature parameters derived from the raw spectra and the first derivative spectra were analyzed. The red edge position (REP) and blue edge position (BEP) shifted about 8 and 10 nm toward the short wavelengths respectively. The green peak position (GPP) and red trough position (RTP) shifted about 8.5 and 6 nm respectively toward the longer wavelengths. Finally, the area of the red edge peak (the sum of derivative spectra from 680 to 740 nm) and red edge position (REP) as the input vectors entered into C-SVC, which was an soft nonlinear margin classification method of support vector machine, to recognize the healthy and diseased leaves. The kernel function was radial basis function (RBF) and the value of punishment coefficient (C) was obtained from the classification model of training data sets (n = 138). The performance of C-SVC was examined with the testing sample (n = 126), and healthy and diseased leaves could be successfully differentiated without errors. This research demonstrated that the response feature of spectral reflectance was obvious to disease stress in rice leaves, and it was feasible to discriminate diseased leaves from healthy ones based on C-SVC model and hyperspectral reflectance. PMID:20496693

  10. Effect of Citrus Stubborn Disease on Navel Orange Production in a Commercial Orchard in California

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The impact of citrus stubborn disease (CSD), caused by Spiroplasma citri, on citrus is not fully understood or quantified. The objective of this work was to measure the impact of S. citri infection on citrus production and assess bacterial distribution in trees differing in symptom severity. Infecte...

  11. Molecular cloning and differential expression of an aldehyde dehydrogenase gene in rice leaves in response to infection by blast fungus

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Chun-xia Wu; Sheng-chang Su; You-liang Peng

    2007-01-01

    Aldehyde dehydrogenase (ALDH) superfamily is a group of enzymes metabolizing endogenous and exogenous aldehydes. Using differential\\u000a display RT-PCR and cDNA library screening, a full-length aldehyde dehydrogenase cDNA (ALDH7B7) was isolated from rice leaves infected by incompatible race of blast fungus Magnaporthe grisea. The deduced amino acid sequence consists of 509 amino acid residues and shares 74?81% identity with those of

  12. Citrus leprosis virus vectored by Brevipalpus phoenicis (Acari: Tenuipalpidae) on citrus in Brazil.

    PubMed

    Rodrigues, J C V; Kitajima, E W; Childers, C C; Chagas, C M

    2003-01-01

    Citrus leprosis is caused by Citrus leprosis virus (CiLV) that is transmitted by mites in the genus Brevipalpus (Acari: Tenuipalpidae). This disease directly reduces production and the life span of the citrus plant. The main symptoms of the disease include lesions on fruits, leaves, and twigs or small branches, causing premature fruit drop, defoliation, and death of the twigs or branches leading to serious tree decline. Leprosis is a highly destructive disease of citrus, wherever it occurs. The Brazilian citrus industry spends over 100 million US dollars annually on acaricides to control the vector, Brevipalpus phoenicis (Geijskes). This review contains information about the history of the etiology of citrus leprosis, its geographical distribution, host range, the role of the mite vectors, viral morphology and relationships with the infected cell, and transmissibility of the virus by the mite. In addition, data on the mite-virus-plant relationship, disease damage, and strategies for controlling disease spread are presented. PMID:14756415

  13. A cDNA clone from a defective RNA of citrus tristeza virus is infective in the presence of the helper virus.

    PubMed

    Yang, G; Mawassi, M; Ashoulin, L; Gafny, R; Gaba, V; Gal-On, A; Bar-Joseph, M

    1997-07-01

    A naturally occurring defective RNA of 2379 nt (D2.3) from the VT strain of citrus tristeza closterovirus (CTV) was cloned and sequenced. The D2.3 RNA is a fusion of two regions of 1521 and 858 nt from the 5' and 3' ends of the CTV genome, respectively. A cDNA clone of D2.3 RNA was tagged by the insertion of a 0.47 kb chimeric DNA fragment and the recombinant cDNA was inserted downstream of the cauliflower mosaic virus 35S promoter. The resulting construct was bombarded into CTV-infected tissue, which was then grafted onto virus-free plants. The presence of recombinant RNA in systemically infected leaves was demonstrated by RT-PCR. Sequencing the RT-PCR products synthesized from double-stranded RNA confirmed the presence of the chimeric segment used for tagging. This is the first report of an infectious cDNA molecule derived from CTV D-RNA. PMID:9225053

  14. Citrus aurantium

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Anders Westanmo

    \\u000a Citrus aurantium has enjoyed a rich history of uses in food, cosmetics, and medicine Recent misuse of this product for weight loss, however,\\u000a is threatening to tarnish the holistic reputation of this fruit Manufacturers are isolating and concentrating the synephnne\\u000a content from the 0 33 mg\\/g contained in the pulp of whole fruit to 20 mg\\/g in some dietary supplements,

  15. Morphological and morphometric variations in Aphelenchoides besseyi infecting tuberose and rice

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The foliar nematode Aphelenchoides besseyi causes the white tip disease of rice and a floral malady in tuberose in West Bengal (WB), India. The same nematode is widely distributed in many other states of India, including Andhra Pradesh (AP) and Madhya Pradesh (MP) rice fields. In order to generate i...

  16. Observations on the foliar nematode, Aphelenchoides besseyi, infecting tuberose and rice in India

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The foliar nematode Aphelenchoides besseyi causes white tip disease in rice (Oryza sativa L.) and floral malady in tuberose (Polianthes tuberosa L.). This nematode is widely distributed in the rice fields of many states of India, including West Bengal (WB), Andhra Pradesh (AP), Madhya Pradesh (MP) a...

  17. Laboratory Evaluation of Citrus Cultivars Susceptibility and Influence of Fruit Size on Fortune Mandarin to Infection by Alternaria alternata pv. citri

    Microsoft Academic Search

    A. Vicent; J. Badal; M. J. Asensi; N. Sanz; J. Armengol; J. García-Jiménez

    2004-01-01

    Young leaves of 62 citrus cultivars were inoculated with conidia of three Spanish isolates of Alternaria alternata pv. citri, the causal agent of brown spot of citrus. Hybrids with Dancy mandarin, King mandarin or their derivates as a parent, grapefruit cultivars and the mandarin cultivars Guillermina, Emperor, Clemenpons and Esbal were highly susceptible to the pathogen. Satsuma cultivar Clausellina and

  18. Cloning and sequence analysis of an infectious clone of Citrus yellow mosaic virus that can infect sweet orange via Agrobacterium-mediated inoculation

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Qi Huang; John S. Hartung

    2001-01-01

    Citrus yellow mosaic virus (CYMV), a member of the family Caulimoviridae, genus Badnavirus, causes citrus mosaic disease, a disease that occurs commonly in India. The CYMV genome has been cloned and its complete nucleotide sequence determined. Its DNA genome is 7559 bp in length and contains six putative open reading frames (ORFs), all on the plus-strand of the genome and

  19. Host Status of Citrus and Citrus Relatives to Tylenchulus graminis.

    PubMed

    Inserra, R N; O'Bannon, J H; Keen, W M

    1989-10-01

    Studies were conducted on the host suitability of four citrus rootstocks--rough lemon (Citrus limon), sour orange (C. aurantium), trifoliate orange (Poncirus trifoliata cv. Argentina), and Swingle citrumelo (C. paradisi x P. trifoliata)--to Tylenchulus graminis which was previously considered a "grass" race of T. semipenetrans. In an uncultivated field, sour orange seedlings grown with T. graminis-infected broomsedge (Andropogon virginicus) were not infected with this nematode after 18-month's exposure to T. graminis population densities ranging from < 0.01 to 0.4 second-stage juveniles (J2)/cm(3) soil. In a greenhouse test, two T. graminis populations from two Florida locations did not infect sour orange seedlings grown for 2 years in soil naturally infested with 0.3 and 1.3 J2/cm(3). Rough lemon, trifoliate orange, and Swingle citrumelo seedlings suppressed T. graminis initial population densities of 7 to final values of < 0.1 J2/cm(3) soil. Final values of > 70.0 J2/cm(3) occurred in soil with broomsedge. These findings provide conclusive evidence that T. graminis is a specific parasite of grasses and does not infect citrus. PMID:19287668

  20. Host Status of Citrus and Citrus Relatives to Tylenchulus graminis

    PubMed Central

    Inserra, R. N.; O'Bannon, J. H.; Keen, W. M.

    1989-01-01

    Studies were conducted on the host suitability of four citrus rootstocks--rough lemon (Citrus limon), sour orange (C. aurantium), trifoliate orange (Poncirus trifoliata cv. Argentina), and Swingle citrumelo (C. paradisi x P. trifoliata)--to Tylenchulus graminis which was previously considered a "grass" race of T. semipenetrans. In an uncultivated field, sour orange seedlings grown with T. graminis-infected broomsedge (Andropogon virginicus) were not infected with this nematode after 18-month's exposure to T. graminis population densities ranging from < 0.01 to 0.4 second-stage juveniles (J2)/cm³ soil. In a greenhouse test, two T. graminis populations from two Florida locations did not infect sour orange seedlings grown for 2 years in soil naturally infested with 0.3 and 1.3 J2/cm³. Rough lemon, trifoliate orange, and Swingle citrumelo seedlings suppressed T. graminis initial population densities of 7 to final values of < 0.1 J2/cm³ soil. Final values of > 70.0 J2/cm³ occurred in soil with broomsedge. These findings provide conclusive evidence that T. graminis is a specific parasite of grasses and does not infect citrus. PMID:19287668

  1. Nutritional deficiency in citrus with symptoms of citrus variegated chlorosis disease.

    PubMed

    Silva-Stenico, M E; Pacheco, F T H; Pereira-Filho, E R; Rodrigues, J L M; Souza, A N; Etchegaray, A; Gomes, J E; Tsai, S M

    2009-08-01

    It is well known that citrus plants that have been infected by Xylella fastidiosa display nutritional deficiencies, probably caused by production of extracellular polymers by the bacteria that block normal nutrient flow through the xylem. The aim of this work was to study the mineral composition of specific foliar areas in different stages of infection in citrus. Thus, the concentrations of macro and micronutrients in leaves of citrus infected by X. fastidiosa were measured. Samples from four infected citrus orchards in the State of São Paulo, Brazil, were respectively collected from Santa Rita do Passa Quatro, Neves Paulista, Gavião Peixoto and Paraíso counties. The presence of X. fastidiosa in leaves was confirmed by polymerase chain reaction (PCR) using specific PCR primers. To understand the variation in leaf-nutrient content in citrus plants, we used foliar nutrient values from control (non-symptomatic) plants as a reference. Chemometric analysis showed that the deficiency of P and K in symptomatic trees for all orchards and high concentrations of Fe, Mn and Zn were observed in chlorotic areas, although other studies revealed deficiency of zinc in leaves. This is the first report showing that a correlation between chlorotic citrus leaf and higher concentrations of Fe, Mn and Zn are observed when infected and healthy plants were compared. PMID:19802445

  2. Morphological and molecular characterization of Magnaporthe oryzae (fungus) from infected rice leaf samples

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Muni, Nurulhidayah Mat; Nadarajah, Kalaivani

    2014-09-01

    Magnaporthe oryzae is a plant-pathogenic fungus that causes a serious disease affecting rice called rice blast. Outbreaks of rice blast have been a threat to the global production of rice. This fungal disease is estimated to cause production losses of US55 million each year in South and Southeast Asia. It has been used as a primary model for elucidating various aspects of the host-pathogen interaction with its host. We have isolated five isolates of Magnaporthe oryzae from diseased leaf samples obtained from the field at Kompleks Latihan MADA, Kedah, Malaysia. We have identified the isolates using morphological and microscopic studies on the fungal spores and the lesions on the diseased leaves. Amplification of the internal transcribed spacer (ITS) was carried out with universal primers ITS1 and ITS4. The sequence of each isolates showed at least 99% nucleotide identity with the corresponding sequence in GenBank for Magnaporthe oryzae.

  3. Complete Genome sequence of citrus huanglongbing bacterium, ‘Candidatus Liberibacter asiaticus’ obtained through metagenomics

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Citrus huanglongbing (HLB) is the most destructive disease of citrus worldwide. It is spread by the citrus psyllids (Diaphorina citri and Trioza erytreae), and is associated with low-titer, phloem-limited infections by any of the three uncultured species of a-Proteobacteria: 'Candidatus Liberibact...

  4. REPEATABILITY AND COMPARISION OF IMAGE ANALYSIS AND VISUAL ASSESSMENT FOR DISEASE ASSESSMENT OF CITRUS CANKER

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Citrus canker, a disease of several citrus species, is caused by the bacterial pathogen Xanthomonas axonopodis pv citri (Xac). The disease is of concern in several wet tropical and subtropical citrus growing regions as infection results in yield loss and severely blemished fruit unsuitable for the f...

  5. Bacterial brown leaf spot of citrus, a new disease caused by Burkholderia andropogonis

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    A new bacterial disease of citrus was recently identified in Florida and named as bacterial brown leaf spot (BBLS) of citrus. BBLS-infected citrus displayed flat, circular and brownish lesions with water-soaked margins surrounded by a chlorotic halo on leaves. Based on Biolog carbon source metabolic...

  6. Rice blast disease in Texas

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Rice is an important agricultural commodity in Texas, with an economic impact of more than $1 billion annually. Rice blast, caused by Magnaporthe oryzae, is one of the most devastating diseases in rice. Texas Rice Belt provides a warm, humid climate favorable for the infection and reproduction of M....

  7. Selection of optimized candidate reference genes for qRT-PCR normalization in rice (Oryza sativa L.) during Magnaporthe oryzae infection and drought.

    PubMed

    Bevitori, R; Oliveira, M B; Grossi-de-Sá, M F; Lanna, A C; da Silveira, R D; Petrofeza, S

    2014-01-01

    Drought and rice blast disease caused by Magnaporthe oryzae are two of the most serious threats to global rice production. To explore the mechanisms underlying gene expression induced in rice by stresses, studies involving transcriptome analyses have been conducted over the past few years. Thus, it is crucial to have a reliable set of reference genes to normalize the expression levels of rice genes affected by different stresses. To identify potential reference genes for studies of the differential expression of target genes in rice under M. oryzae infection and drought conditions, the present study evaluated five housekeeping genes for the normalization of gene expression. The stability of the expression of these genes was assessed using the analytical software packages geNorm and NormFinder. For all samples analyzed, the stability rank was UBQ5 > GAPDH > eIF-4?> ?-TUB > 18S rRNA. The data showed that the UBQ5, GAPDH, and eIF-4?genes are appropriate, high-performing reference genes and will be highly useful in future expression studies of fungal infections and drought in rice. PMID:25501189

  8. Non-transgenic RNAi technology to control insects on citrus

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    This research demonstrated a non-transgenic delivery method for ribonucleic acid interference, RNAi, that reduced fitness as measured in increased mortality over time, of two insect pests of citrus, ie. psyllids and leafhoppers. The Asian citrus psyllid transmits a deadly plant-infecting bacterium o...

  9. Phylogenomic analysis uncovers the evolutionary history of nutrition and infection mode in rice blast fungus and other Magnaporthales

    PubMed Central

    Luo, Jing; Qiu, Huan; Cai, Guohong; Wagner, Nicole E.; Bhattacharya, Debashish; Zhang, Ning

    2015-01-01

    The order Magnaporthales (Ascomycota, Fungi) includes devastating pathogens of cereals, such as the rice blast fungus Pyricularia (Magnaporthe) oryzae, which is a model in host-pathogen interaction studies. Magnaporthales also includes saprotrophic species associated with grass roots and submerged wood. Despite its scientific and economic importance, the phylogenetic position of Magnaporthales within Sordariomycetes and the interrelationships of its constituent taxa, remain controversial. In this study, we generated novel transcriptome data from 21 taxa that represent key Magnaporthales lineages of different infection and nutrition modes and phenotypes. Phylogenomic analysis of >200 conserved genes allowed the reconstruction of a robust Sordariomycetes tree of life that placed the monophyletic group of Magnaporthales sister to Ophiostomatales. Among Magnaporthales, three major clades were recognized: 1) an early diverging clade A comprised of saprotrophs associated with submerged woods; 2) clade B that includes the rice blast fungus and other pathogens that cause blast diseases of monocot plants. These species infect the above-ground tissues of host plants using the penetration structure, appressorium; and 3) clade C comprised primarily of root-associated species that penetrate the root tissue with hyphopodia. The well-supported phylogenies provide a robust framework for elucidating evolution of pathogenesis, nutrition modes, and phenotypic characters in Magnaporthales. PMID:25819715

  10. Phylogenomic analysis uncovers the evolutionary history of nutrition and infection mode in rice blast fungus and other Magnaporthales.

    PubMed

    Luo, Jing; Qiu, Huan; Cai, Guohong; Wagner, Nicole E; Bhattacharya, Debashish; Zhang, Ning

    2015-01-01

    The order Magnaporthales (Ascomycota, Fungi) includes devastating pathogens of cereals, such as the rice blast fungus Pyricularia (Magnaporthe) oryzae, which is a model in host-pathogen interaction studies. Magnaporthales also includes saprotrophic species associated with grass roots and submerged wood. Despite its scientific and economic importance, the phylogenetic position of Magnaporthales within Sordariomycetes and the interrelationships of its constituent taxa, remain controversial. In this study, we generated novel transcriptome data from 21 taxa that represent key Magnaporthales lineages of different infection and nutrition modes and phenotypes. Phylogenomic analysis of >200 conserved genes allowed the reconstruction of a robust Sordariomycetes tree of life that placed the monophyletic group of Magnaporthales sister to Ophiostomatales. Among Magnaporthales, three major clades were recognized: 1) an early diverging clade A comprised of saprotrophs associated with submerged woods; 2) clade B that includes the rice blast fungus and other pathogens that cause blast diseases of monocot plants. These species infect the above-ground tissues of host plants using the penetration structure, appressorium; and 3) clade C comprised primarily of root-associated species that penetrate the root tissue with hyphopodia. The well-supported phylogenies provide a robust framework for elucidating evolution of pathogenesis, nutrition modes, and phenotypic characters in Magnaporthales. PMID:25819715

  11. Analysis of the structure of the AVR1-CO39 avirulence locus in virulent rice-infecting isolates of Magnaporthe grisea.

    PubMed

    Farman, Mark L; Eto, Yukiko; Nakao, Tomomi; Tosa, Yukio; Nakayashiki, Hitoshi; Mayama, Shigeyuki; Leong, Sally A

    2002-01-01

    The AVR1-CO39 gene that came from a Magnaporthe grisea isolate from weeping lovegrass controls avirulence on the rice cultivar CO39. AVR1-CO39 was not present in the genome of the rice-infecting M. grisea isolate Guyll from French Guyana, suggesting that the gene had been deleted. Molecular analysis of the deletion breakpoints in the AVR1-CO39 locus revealed the presence of a truncated copy of a previously unknown retrotransposon at the left-hand border. At the right-hand border was a truncated copy of another repetitive element that is present at multiple locations in the genome of Guyll. The structures of avr1-CO39 loci were further examined in 45 rice-infecting isolates collected in Brazil, China, Japan, India, Indonesia, Mali, and the Philippines. Most isolates showed no hybridization signal with the AVR1-CO39 probe and had the same locus structure as Guyll. Some isolates from Japan showed a signal with the AVR1-CO39 probe, but the region specifying avirulence activity was rearranged. These findings suggest that widespread virulence to 'CO39' among rice-infecting M. grisea isolates is due to ancestral rearrangements at the AVR1-CO39 locus that may have occurred early in the evolution of pathogenicity to rice. PMID:11843304

  12. Recent advances in Citrus psorosis virus.

    PubMed

    Achachi, Asmae; Ait Barka, Essaïd; Ibriz, Mohammed

    2014-01-01

    Psorosis is a globally devastating disease of citrus caused by an infectious filamentous ophiovirus, Citrus psorosis virus (CPsV), which causes annual losses of about 5 % and a progressive decline of trees by affecting the conductive tissues. The disease can be harboured asymptomatically in many citrus species. In the field, the most characteristic symptoms of the disease in adult trees are bark scaling in the trunk and main branches and also internal staining in the underlying wood. The virus has a tripartite single-stranded RNA genome, and has been inadvertently spread to most citrus growing areas through the movement of citrus propagative material. No natural vectors have been identified except in limited citrus areas in some cases. Management strategies for CPsV involving shoot-tip grafting and thermotherapy or somatic embryogenesis from stigma and style cultures have been successfully used to eliminate CPsV from plant propagating material. Molecular pathogen-mediated strategies have been used to produce citrus plants. Such a strategy protects against infections by the virus from which the resistance gene and promising resistance may emerge from trials. Certification programs are among the best established means of increasing phytosanitary health, and some of those for citrus are among the oldest in the world. In conjunction with quarantine and clean stock programs, they remain important weapons in the ongoing fight against citrus diseases. One of the elements essential for successful certification programs to produce such propagation material is the availability of sensitive and effective diagnostic methods. In this review, we discuss an updated status of CPsV disease. PMID:25674593

  13. Comparative Transcriptome and iTRAQ Proteome Analyses of Citrus Root Responses to Candidatus Liberibacter asiaticus Infection

    PubMed Central

    Jiang, Nong-hui; Jiang, Bo; Zhang, Yong-yan; Wu, Bo; Hu, Min-lun; Zeng, Ji-wu; Yan, Hua-xue; Yi, Gan-jun; Zhong, Guang-yan

    2015-01-01

    Root samples of ‘Sanhu’ red tangerine trees infected with and without Candidatus Liberibacter asiaticus (CLas) were collected at 50 days post inoculation and subjected to RNA-sequencing and isobaric tags for relative and absolute quantification (iTRAQ) to profile the differentially expressed genes (DEGs) and proteins (DEPs), respectively. Quantitative real-time PCR was subsequently used to confirm the expression of 16 selected DEGs. Results showed that a total of 3956 genes and 78 proteins were differentially regulated by HLB-infection. Among the most highly up-regulated DEPs were sperm specific protein 411, copper ion binding protein, germin-like proteins, subtilisin-like proteins and serine carboxypeptidase-like 40 proteins whose transcript levels were concomitantly up-regulated as shown by RNA-seq data. Comparison between our results and those of the previously reported showed that known HLB-modulated biological pathways including cell-wall modification, protease-involved protein degradation, carbohydrate metabolism, hormone synthesis and signaling, transcription activities, and stress responses were similarly regulated by HLB infection but different or root-specific changes did exist. The root unique changes included the down-regulation in genes of ubiquitin-dependent protein degradation pathway, secondary metabolism, cytochrome P450s, UDP-glucosyl transferases and pentatricopeptide repeat containing proteins. Notably, nutrient absorption was impaired by HLB-infection as the expression of the genes involved in Fe, Zn, N and P adsorption and transportation were significantly changed. HLB-infection induced some cellular defense responses but simultaneously reduced the biosynthesis of the three major classes of secondary metabolites, many of which are known to have anti-pathogen activities. Genes involved in callose deposition were up-regulated whereas those involved in callose degradation were also up-regulated, indicating that the sieve tube elements in roots were hanging on the balance of life and death at this stage. In addition, signs of carbohydrate starvation were already eminent in roots at this stage. Other interesting genes and pathways that were changed by HLB-infection were also discussed based on our findings. PMID:26046530

  14. Distinctively variable sequence-based nuclear DNA markers for multilocus phylogeography of the soybean-and rice-infecting fungal pathogen

    E-print Network

    McDonald, Bruce

    of the soybean- and rice-infecting fungal pathogen Rhizoctonia solani AG-1 IA Maisa B. Ciampi1 , Liane Rosewich to infer the phylogeographical history of the Basidiomycetous fungal pathogen Rhizoctonia solani AG-1 IA of migration and to reveal cryptic recombina- tion in Rhizoctonia solani (Rosewich et al., 1999; Ceresini et al

  15. Comparative proteomics reveals differential induction of both biotic and abiotic stress response associated proteins in rice during Xanthomonas oryzae pv. oryzae infection.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Anirudh; Bimolata, Waikhom; Kannan, Monica; Kirti, P B; Qureshi, Insaf Ahmed; Ghazi, Irfan Ahmad

    2015-07-01

    Xanthomonas oryzae pv. oryzae (Xoo) causes bacterial blight disease in rice and brutally affects the yield up to 50 % of total production. Here, we report a comparative proteomics analysis of total foliar protein isolated from infected rice leaves of susceptible Pusa Basmati 1 (PB1) and resistant Oryza longistaminata genotypes. Two-dimensional gel electrophoresis (2-DE) coupled with matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization time-of-flight (MALDI-TOF) approaches identified 29 protein spots encoding unique proteins from both the genotypes. Identified proteins belonged to a large number of biological and molecular functions related to biotic and abiotic stress proteins which are potentially involved during Xoo infection. Biotic and abiotic stress-related proteins were induced during Xoo infection, indicating the activation of common stress pathway during bacterial blight infection. Candidate genes conferring tolerance against bacterial blight, which include germin-like protein, putative r40c1, cyclin-dependent kinase C, Ent-isokaur-15-ene synthase and glutathione-dependent dehydroascorbate reductase 1 (GSH-DHAR1), were also induced, with germin-like proteins induced only in the resistant rice genotype O. longistaminata. Energy, metabolism and hypothetical proteins were common among both the genotypes. Further, host defence/stress-related proteins were mostly expressed in resistant genotype O. longistaminata, indicating possible co-evolution of the pathogen and the wild rice, O. longistaminata. PMID:25648443

  16. Dooryard Citrus Production: Citrus Diseases Exotic to Florida1

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Timothy M. Spann; Ryan A. Atwood; Jamie D. Yates; Ronald H. Brlansky; Kuang-Ren Chung

    2010-01-01

    Florida is world famous for its citrus production, and many homeowners in Florida enjoy growing citrus in their yards. Unfortunately, citrus is susceptible to a large number of diseases caused by plant pathogens, and losses due to plant diseases can be severe. Major citrus diseases that are present in Florida include citrus tristeza virus (CTV), blight, greasy spot, Alternaria brown

  17. Gene expression in Citrus sinensis fruit tissues harvested from huanglongbing-infected trees: comparison with girdled fruit

    PubMed Central

    Liao, Hui-Ling; Burns, Jacqueline K.

    2012-01-01

    Distribution of viable Candidatus Liberibacter asiaticus (CaLas) in sweet orange fruit and leaves (‘Hamlin’ and ‘Valencia’) and transcriptomic changes associated with huanglongbing (HLB) infection in fruit tissues are reported. Viable CaLas was present in most fruit tissues tested in HLB trees, with the highest titre detected in vascular tissue near the calyx abscission zone. Transcriptomic changes associated with HLB infection were analysed in flavedo (FF), vascular tissue (VT), and juice vesicles (JV) from symptomatic (SY), asymptomatic (AS), and healthy (H) fruit. In SY ‘Hamlin’, HLB altered the expression of more genes in FF and VT than in JV, whereas in SY ‘Valencia’, the number of genes whose expression was changed by HLB was similar in these tissues. The expression of more genes was altered in SY ‘Valencia’ JV than in SY ‘Hamlin’ JV. More genes were also affected in AS ‘Valencia’ FF and VT than in AS ‘Valencia’ JV. Most genes whose expression was changed by HLB were classified as transporters or involved in carbohydrate metabolism. Physiological characteristics of HLB-infected and girdled fruit were compared to differentiate between HLB-specific and carbohydrate metabolism-related symptoms. SY and girdled fruit were smaller than H and ungirdled fruit, respectively, with poor juice quality. However, girdling did not cause misshapen fruit or differential peel coloration. Quantitative PCR analysis indicated that many selected genes changed their expression significantly in SY flavedo but not in girdled flavedo. Mechanisms regulating development of HLB symptoms may lie in the host disease response rather than being a direct consequence of carbohydrate starvation. PMID:22407645

  18. Genetic transformation of sweet orange with the coat protein gene of Citrus psorosis virus and evaluation of resistance against the virus

    Microsoft Academic Search

    María Cecilia Zanek; Carina Andrea Reyes; Magdalena Cervera; Eduardo José Peña; Karelia Velázquez; Norma Costa; Maria Inés Plata; Oscar Grau; Leandro Peña; María Laura García

    2008-01-01

    Citrus psorosis is a serious viral disease affecting citrus trees in many countries. Its causal agent is Citrus psorosis virus (CPsV), the type member of genus Ophiovirus. CPsV infects most important citrus varieties, including oranges, mandarins and grapefruits, as well as hybrids and citrus\\u000a relatives used as rootstocks. Certification programs have not been sufficient to control the disease and no

  19. Genetic Transformation in Citrus

    PubMed Central

    Donmez, Dicle; Simsek, Ozhan; Izgu, Tolga; Aka Kacar, Yildiz; Yalcin Mendi, Yesim

    2013-01-01

    Citrus is one of the world's important fruit crops. Recently, citrus molecular genetics and biotechnology work have been accelerated in the world. Genetic transformation, a biotechnological tool, allows the release of improved cultivars with desirable characteristics in a shorter period of time and therefore may be useful in citrus breeding programs. Citrus transformation has now been achieved in a number of laboratories by various methods. Agrobacterium tumefaciens is used mainly in citrus transformation studies. Particle bombardment, electroporation, A. rhizogenes, and a new method called RNA interference are used in citrus transformation studies in addition to A. tumefaciens. In this review, we illustrate how different gene transformation methods can be employed in different citrus species. PMID:23983635

  20. Alterations in Gas Exchange and Oxidative Metabolism in Rice Leaves Infected by Pyricularia oryzae are Attenuated by Silicon.

    PubMed

    Domiciano, Gisele Pereira; Cacique, Isaías Severino; Chagas Freitas, Cecília; Filippi, Marta Cristina Corsi; DaMatta, Fábio Murilo; do Vale, Francisco Xavier Ribeiro; Rodrigues, Fabrício Ávila

    2015-06-01

    Rice blast, caused by Pyricularia oryzae, is the most important disease in rice worldwide. This study investigated the effects of silicon (Si) on the photosynthetic gas exchange parameters (net CO2 assimilation rate [A], stomatal conductance to water vapor [gs], internal-to-ambient CO2 concentration ratio [Ci/Ca], and transpiration rate [E]); chlorophyll fluorescence a (Chla) parameters (maximum photochemical efficiency of photosystem II [Fv/Fm], photochemical [qP] and nonphotochemical [NPQ] quenching coefficients, and electron transport rate [ETR]); concentrations of pigments, malondialdehyde (MDA), and hydrogen peroxide (H2O2); and activities of superoxide dismutase (SOD), catalase (CAT), ascorbate peroxidase (APX), glutathione reductase (GR), and lypoxigenase (LOX) in rice leaves. Rice plants were grown in a nutrient solution containing 0 or 2 mM Si (-Si or +Si, respectively) with and without P. oryzae inoculation. Blast severity decreased with higher foliar Si concentration. The values of A, gs and E were generally higher for the +Si plants in comparison with the -Si plants upon P. oryzae infection. The Fv/Fm, qp, NPQ, and ETR were greater for the +Si plants relative to the -Si plants at 108 and 132 h after inoculation (hai). The values for qp and ETR were significantly higher for the -Si plants in comparison with the +Si plants at 36 hai, and the NPQ was significantly higher for the -Si plants in comparison with the +Si plants at 0 and 36 hai. The concentrations of Chla, Chlb, Chla+b, and carotenoids were significantly greater in the +Si plants relative to the -Si plants. For the -Si plants, the MDA and H2O2 concentrations were significantly higher than those in the +Si plants. The LOX activity was significantly higher in the +Si plants than in the -Si plants. The SOD and GR activities were significantly higher for the -Si plants than in the +Si plants. The CAT and APX activities were significantly higher in the +Si plants than in the -Si plants. The supply of Si contributed to a decrease in blast severity, improved the gas exchange performance, and caused less dysfunction at the photochemical level. PMID:25607719

  1. Detection of Citrus tatter leaf virus with reverse transcription—polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR)

    Microsoft Academic Search

    D. L. Hailstones; K. L. Bryant; P. Broadbent; C. Zhou

    2000-01-01

    Citrus tatter leaf virus (CTLV) has the potential to cause major losses to the Australian citrus industry if an infected clone is propagated, because\\u000a the predominant rootstocks are intolerant of CTLV infection. We have developed a robust and specific semi-nested reverse transcription—polymerase\\u000a chain reaction (RT-PCR) assay which detects CTLV in a range of citrus tissues. The sensitivity of the assay

  2. Examination of the responses of different genotypes of citrus to huanglongbing (citrus greening) under different conditions.

    PubMed

    Folimonova, Svetlana Y; Robertson, Cecile J; Garnsey, Stephen M; Gowda, Siddarame; Dawson, William O

    2009-12-01

    ABSTRACT Citrus Huanglongbing (HLB) is one of the most devastating diseases of citrus worldwide. The causal agent of HLB in Florida is thought to be 'Candidatus Liberibacter asiaticus'. In this work, we examined the responses of 30 different genotypes of citrus to Florida isolates of 'Ca. L. asiaticus' under controlled conditions in the greenhouse or growth room. Although 'Ca. L. asiaticus' was able to multiply in all of the plants, a wide range of responses was observed among different hosts. Based on the symptoms developed and the ability of plants to continue growth, the different genotypes were grouped into four categories: sensitive, which exhibited severe chlorosis on leaves, greatly reduced growth, and eventual death; moderately tolerant, which exhibited some scattered distinct symptoms but little or no growth reduction and no plant death; tolerant, which exhibited very minimal symptoms; and genotypes, which exhibited variable reactions. Interestingly, although 'Ca. L. asiaticus' was unevenly distributed within each particular plant, comparison of titers of the bacterium in different citrus genotypes revealed that most accumulated similar levels of 'Ca. L. asiaticus', demonstrating that there is no strict correlation between bacterial titer and severity of disease. Incubation of infected plants in the growth room with continuous light greatly affected symptoms production by reducing the time before distinctive symptoms developed and significantly increasing severity of chlorosis of leaves of all citrus genotypes. These results provide additional evidence of the correlation between disruption of phloem translocation of carbohydrates during HLB infection and the appearance of chlorotic symptoms in leaves of infected trees. We also examined interaction between 'Ca. L. asiaticus' and Citrus tristeza virus, which usually occurs in trees that become infected with HLB, and found no synergistic effect of the two pathogens. We trust that observations reported here will provide reagents for further examination of the 'Ca. L. asiaticus'-citrus interaction to advance the understanding of how 'Ca. L. asiaticus' causes disease and to develop methods or trees to overcome the disease. PMID:19900000

  3. Wind speed effects on the quantity of Xanthomonas citri subsp. citri dispersed downwind from canopies of grapefruit trees infected with citrus canker

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The epidemic of citrus canker (Xanthomonas citri subsp. citri, Xcc) in Florida continues to expand since termination of the eradication program in 2006. Storms are known to be associated with disease spread, but little information exists on the interaction of fundamental physical and biological proc...

  4. SPATIAL PATTERN ANALYSIS OF CITRUS CANKER INFECTED PLANTINGS IN SAO PAULO BRAZIL AND IMPLICATION OF THE ASIAN LEAFMINER ON POTENTIAL DISPERSAL PROCESSES

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Eradication of Asiatic Citrus Canker (ACC) has become increasingly difficult over the last decade following the introduction of the Asian leafminer into Brazil and Florida. This prompted epidemiological studies in both countries that resulted in changes in the eradication protocols. The objective ...

  5. Citrus tristeza virus infection induces the accumulation of viral small RNAs (21-24-nt) mapping preferentially at the 3'-terminal region of the genomic RNA and affects the host small RNA profile.

    PubMed

    Ruiz-Ruiz, Susana; Navarro, Beatriz; Gisel, Andreas; Peña, Leandro; Navarro, Luis; Moreno, Pedro; Di Serio, Francesco; Flores, Ricardo

    2011-04-01

    To get an insight into the host RNA silencing defense induced by Citrus tristeza virus (CTV) and into the counter defensive reaction mediated by its three silencing suppressors (p25, p20 and p23), we have examined by deep sequencing (Solexa-Illumina) the small RNAs (sRNAs) in three virus-host combinations. Our data show that CTV sRNAs: (i) represent more than 50% of the total sRNAs in Mexican lime and sweet orange (where CTV reaches relatively high titers), but only 3.5% in sour orange (where the CTV titer is significantly lower), (ii) are predominantly of 21-22-nt, with a biased distribution of their 5' nucleotide and with those of (+) polarity accumulating in a moderate excess, and (iii) derive from essentially all the CTV genome (ca. 20 kb), as revealed by its complete reconstruction from viral sRNA contigs, but adopt an asymmetric distribution with a prominent hotspot covering approximately the 3'-terminal 2,500 nt. These results suggest that the citrus homologues of Dicer-like (DCL) 4 and 2 most likely mediate the genesis of the 21 and 22 nt CTV sRNAs, respectively, and show that both ribonucleases act not only on the genomic RNA but also on the 3' co-terminal subgenomic RNAs and, particularly, on their double-stranded forms. The plant sRNA profile, very similar and dominated by the 24-nt sRNAs in the three mock-inoculated controls, was minimally affected by CTV infection in sour orange, but exhibited a significant reduction of the 24-nt sRNAs in Mexican lime and sweet orange. We have also identified novel citrus miRNAs and determined how CTV influences their accumulation. PMID:21327514

  6. Citrus Waste Biomass Program

    SciTech Connect

    Karel Grohman; Scott Stevenson

    2007-01-30

    Renewable Spirits is developing an innovative pilot plant bio-refinery to establish the commercial viability of ehtanol production utilizing a processing waste from citrus juice production. A novel process based on enzymatic hydrolysis of citrus processing waste and fermentation of resulting sugars to ethanol by yeasts was successfully developed in collaboration with a CRADA partner, USDA/ARS Citrus and Subtropical Products Laboratory. The process was also successfully scaled up from laboratory scale to 10,000 gal fermentor level.

  7. Citrus Diseases Exotic to Florida: Citrus Variegated Chlorosis (CVC)1

    Microsoft Academic Search

    K.-R. Chung; R. H. Brlansky

    2009-01-01

    Citrus is susceptible to a large number of diseases caused by plant pathogens. Economic losses due to plant diseases can be severe, but fortunately, not all pathogens attacking citrus worldwide are present in Florida. Citrus diseases of economic importance that are currently present in Florida include tristeza, blight, greasy spot, Alternaria brown spot, Phytophthora-induced diseases, melanose, scab, citrus canker, and

  8. A cDNA clone from a defective RNA of citrus tristeza virus is infective in the presence of the helper virus

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Guang Yang; Munir Mawassi; Lilach Ashoulin; Ron Gafny; Victor Gaba; Amit Gal-On; Moshe Bar-Joseph

    A naturally occurring defective RNA of 2379 nt (D2.3) from the VT strain of citrus tristeza clostero- virus (CTV) was cloned and sequenced. The D2.3 RNA is a fusion of two regions of 1521 and 858 nt from the 5« and 3« ends of the CTV genome, respectively. A cDNA clone of D2.3 RNA was tagged by the insertion of

  9. Certification Programs for Citrus

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Citrus certification programs designed to ensure that healthy plants of the highest genetic potential are being planted in the field are the basic building block of an integrated pest management program. Certification programs began for citrus began with the discovery that the diseases were graft t...

  10. Quantitative distribution of 'Candidatus Liberibacter asiaticus' in citrus plants with citrus huanglongbing.

    PubMed

    Li, Wenbin; Levy, Laurene; Hartung, John S

    2009-02-01

    Citrus huanglongbing (HLB), or greening disease, is strongly associated with any of three nonculturable gram-negative bacteria belonging to 'Candidatus Liberibacter spp.' 'Ca. Liberibacter spp.' are transmitted by citrus psyllids to all commercial cultivars of citrus. The diseases can be lethal to citrus and have recently become widespread in both São Paulo, Brazil, and Florida, United States, the locations of the largest citrus industries in the world. Asiatic HLB, the form of the disease found in Florida, is associated with 'Ca. Liberibacter asiaticus' and is the subject of this report. The nonculturable nature of the pathogen has hampered research and little is known about the distribution of 'Ca. L. asiaticus' in infected trees. In this study, we have used a quantitative polymerase chain reaction assay to systematically quantify the distribution of 'Ca. L. asiaticus' genomes in tissues of six species of citrus either identified in the field during survey efforts in Florida or propagated in a greenhouse in Beltsville, MD. The populations of 'Ca. L. asiaticus' inferred from the distribution of 16S rDNA sequences specific for 'Ca. L. asiaticus' in leaf midribs, leaf blades, and bark samples varied by a factor of 1,000 among samples prepared from the six citrus species tested and by a factor of 100 between two sweet orange trees tested. In naturally infected trees, above-ground portions of the tree averaged 10(10) 'Ca. L. asiaticus' genomes per gram of tissue. Similar levels of 'Ca. L. asiaticus' genomes were observed in some but not all root samples from the same plants. In samples taken from greenhouse-inoculated trees, levels of 'Ca. L. asiaticus' genomes varied systematically from 10(4) genomes/g at the graft inoculation site to 10(10) genomes/g in some leaf petioles. Root samples from these trees also contained 'Ca. L. asiaticus' at 10(7) genomes/g. In symptomatic fruit tissues, 'Ca. L. asiaticus' genomes were also readily detected and quantified. The highest levels of 'Ca. L. asiaticus' in fruit tissues were found in the locular membranes and septa (10(8) genomes/g), with 100-fold lower levels of 'Ca. L. asiaticus' in the meso and pericarp of such fruit. Our results demonstrate both the ubiquitous presence of 'Ca. L. asiaticus' in symptomatic citrus trees as well as great variation between individual trees and among samples of different tissues from the same trees. Our methods will be useful in both the management and scientific study of citrus HLB, also known as citrus greening disease. PMID:19159305

  11. Abundance of citrus leafminer larvae on citrus and citrus-related germplasm

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The citrus leafminer, Phyllocnistis citrella Stainton (Lepidoptera: Gracillariidae), is a key pest in most citrus growing regions worldwide. Adult citrus leafminers oviposit primarily on young elongating flush of citrus as well as other Rutaceae and some ornamental plants. Larvae feed on the epiderm...

  12. Citrus leaf blotch virus invades meristematic regions in Nicotiana benthamiana and citrus.

    PubMed

    Agüero, Jesús; Vives, María Carmen; Velázquez, Karelia; Ruiz-Ruiz, Susana; Juárez, Jose; Navarro, Luis; Moreno, Pedro; Guerri, José

    2013-08-01

    To invade systemically host plants, viruses need to replicate in the infected cells, spread to neighbouring cells through plasmodesmata and move to distal parts of the plant via sieve tubes to start new infection foci. To monitor the infection of Nicotiana benthamiana plants by Citrus leaf blotch virus (CLBV), leaves were agroinoculated with an infectious cDNA clone of the CLBV genomic RNA expressing green fluorescent protein (GFP) under the transcriptional control of a duplicate promoter of the coat protein subgenomic RNA. Fluorescent spots first appeared in agroinfiltrated leaves 11-12 days after infiltration, indicating CLBV replication. Then, after entering the phloem vascular system, CLBV was unloaded in the upper parts of the plant and invaded all tissues, including flower organs and meristems. GFP fluorescence was not visible in citrus plants infected with CLBV-GFP. Therefore, to detect CLBV in meristematic regions, Mexican lime (Citrus aurantifolia) plants were graft inoculated with CLBV, with Citrus tristeza virus (CTV), a virus readily eliminated by shoot-tip grafting in?vitro, or with both simultaneously. Although CLBV was detected by hybridization and real-time reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) in 0.2-mm shoot tips in all CLBV-inoculated plants, CTV was not detected. These results explain the difficulty in eliminating CLBV by shoot-tip grafting in?vitro. PMID:23560714

  13. A highly sensitive heminested RT-PCR assay for the detection of citrus psorosis virus targeted to a conserved region of the genome

    Microsoft Academic Search

    G. G Legarreta; M. L Garc??a; N Costa; O Grau

    2000-01-01

    Psorosis is a widespread and damaging disease of citrus in many parts of the world. The causal agent is a multipartite virus with RNA genome present in very low concentration in infected citrus tissue. Diagnosis is made by biological indexing on indicator citrus seedlings, but it is a slow and costly procedure and therefore it is not used generally. No

  14. Modeling huanglongbing transmission within a citrus tree

    PubMed Central

    Chiyaka, Christinah; Singer, Burton H.; Halbert, Susan E.; Morris, J. Glenn; van Bruggen, Ariena H. C.

    2012-01-01

    The citrus disease huanglongbing (HLB), associated with an uncultured bacterial pathogen, is threatening the citrus industry worldwide. A mathematical model of the transmission of HLB between its psyllid vector and citrus host has been developed to characterize the dynamics of the vector and disease development, focusing on the spread of the pathogen from flush to flush (a newly developing cluster of very young leaves on the expanding terminal end of a shoot) within a tree. This approach differs from that of prior models for vector-transmitted plant diseases where the entire plant is the unit of analysis. Dynamics of vector and host populations are simulated realistically as the flush population approaches complete infection. Model analysis indicates that vector activity is essential for initial infection but is not necessary for continued infection because infection can occur from flush to flush through internal movement in the tree. Flush production, within-tree spread, and latent period are the most important parameters influencing HLB development. The model shows that the effect of spraying of psyllids depends on time of initial spraying, frequency, and efficacy of the insecticides. Similarly, effects of removal of symptomatic flush depend on the frequency of removal and the time of initiation of this practice since the start of the epidemic. Within-tree resistance to spread, possibly affected by inherent or induced resistance, is a major factor affecting epidemic development, supporting the notion that alternate routes of transmission besides that by the vector can be important for epidemic development. PMID:22783015

  15. RICE CRICKET CLUB Rice University

    E-print Network

    Mellor-Crummey, John

    RICE CRICKET CLUB Rice University 6100 Main St, Houston, TX-77005 www.ruf.rice.edu/~rcc Email: rcc@rice.edu MEMBERSHIP AGREEMENT I, ____________________________ desire to participate in activities conducted by RICE CRICKET CLUB which includes practice sessions, games and social gatherings conducted on and off the Rice

  16. Antifeedant and lethal effects of the fungi Isaria fumosorosea on the Asian citrus psyllid Diaphorina citri

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    An insect-infecting fungal pathogen increases mortality of Asian citrus psyllids (Diaphorina citri,Hemiptera:Psyllidae). The entomopathogenic fungi(Isaria fumosorosea [Ifr])sold as the product PFR 97™ was shown to be effective at killing and reducing feeding of the Asian citrus psyllid. The psyllid ...

  17. Reovirus-like sequences isolated from adult Asian citrus psyllid, (Hemiptera: Psyllidae: Diaphorina citri)

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Though wide spread in nature, this is the first report of a Fijivirus from North America and which was detected in a new virus host species, the Asian citrus psyllid. Few viruses have ever been reported from psyllids. We discovered an insect infecting virus in field collected Asian citrus psyllids i...

  18. Reovirus-like sequences isolated from adult Asian citrus psyllid, (Hemiptera: Psyllidae: Diaphorina citri)

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Though wide spread in nature, this is the first report of a fijiviruses from North America detected in a new virus host species, the Asian citrus psyllid. Few viruses have ever been reported from psyllids. We discovered an insect infecting virus in field collected Asian citrus psyllids in Florida. T...

  19. Characterization of complete sequences of RNA 1 and RNA 2 of citrus variegation virus

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Citrus variegation virus (CVV), a member of the genus Ilarvirus, was originally isolated from citrus but was reported to infect many herbaceous plants under greenhouse conditions. The virus particles are approximately 30 nm in diameter, and are composed of coat proteins (CP) with a Mr of 26 kDa, and...

  20. Developing Transgenic Citrus for Resistance to Huanglongbing and Citrus Canker

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Huanglongbing (HLB) and Citrus Bacterial Canker (CBC) are serious threats to citrus production, and resistant transgenic citrus is desirable. Genes for antimicrobial peptides (AMPs) with diverse promoters have been used to generate thousands of rootstock and scion transformants. D35S::D4E1 transfor...

  1. Citrus Diseases Exotic to Florida: Huanglongbing (Citrus Greening) 1

    Microsoft Academic Search

    K.-R. Chung; R. H. Brlansky

    Citrus is susceptible to a large number of diseases caused by plant pathogens. Economic losses due to plant diseases can be severe, but fortunately, not all pathogens attacking citrus are present in Florida. Major citrus diseases currently present in Florida include tristeza, blight, greasy spot, Alternaria brown spot, Phytophthora-induced diseases, melanose, scab, canker, and postbloom fruit drop (PFD). There are

  2. Citrus diseases with global ramifications including citrus canker and huanglongbing

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Although there are a number of diseases that plague citrus production worldwide, two bacterial diseases are particularly problematic. Both are of Asian origin and currently cause severe economic damage: Asiatic citrus canker (ACC) and citrus huanglongbing (HLB). Although ACC has been found in the ...

  3. Genetic diversity of Citrus tristeza virus isolates spreading in Central California

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    A rapid increase in the number of trees infected with Citrus tristeza virus (CTV) was observed in several locations in Tulare, County, CA during 2007. Since trees had been tested annually, these infections represent new infections. Leaf and bark tissue were sampled from infected trees and used for...

  4. Design of a dryer for citrus peels

    Microsoft Academic Search

    M. Carsky

    2008-01-01

    Citrus peels are important source of production of food additives. South Africa is the third largest citrus exporter in the world but presently no citrus peels are used for further processing. On contrary the country is forced to import these chemicals from overseas in spite of a good quality raw material source in the form of citrus waste. Because citrus

  5. Citrus tristeza virus-host interactions

    PubMed Central

    Dawson, W. O.; Garnsey, S. M.; Tatineni, S.; Folimonova, S. Y.; Harper, S. J.; Gowda, S.

    2013-01-01

    Citrus tristeza virus (CTV) is a phloem-limited virus whose natural host range is restricted to citrus and related species. Although the virus has killed millions of trees, almost destroying whole industries, and continually limits production in many citrus growing areas, most isolates are mild or symptomless in most of their host range. There is little understanding of how the virus causes severe disease in some citrus and none in others. Movement and distribution of CTV differs considerably from that of well-studied viruses of herbaceous plants where movement occurs largely through adjacent cells. In contrast, CTV systemically infects plants mainly by long-distance movement with only limited cell-to-cell movement. The virus is transported through sieve elements and occasionally enters an adjacent companion or phloem parenchyma cell where virus replication occurs. In some plants this is followed by cell-to-cell movement into only a small cluster of adjacent cells, while in others there is no cell-to-cell movement. Different proportions of cells adjacent to sieve elements become infected in different plant species. This appears to be related to how well viral gene products interact with specific hosts. CTV has three genes (p33, p18, and p13) that are not necessary for infection of most of its hosts, but are needed in different combinations for infection of certain citrus species. These genes apparently were acquired by the virus to extend its host range. Some specific viral gene products have been implicated in symptom induction. Remarkably, the deletion of these genes from the virus genome can induce large increases in stem pitting (SP) symptoms. The p23 gene, which is a suppressor of RNA silencing and a regulator of viral RNA synthesis, has been shown to be the cause of seedling yellows (SY) symptoms in sour orange. Most isolates of CTV in nature are populations of different strains of CTV. The next frontier of CTV biology is the understanding how the virus variants in those mixtures interact with each other and cause diseases. PMID:23717303

  6. Citrus tristeza virus-host interactions.

    PubMed

    Dawson, W O; Garnsey, S M; Tatineni, S; Folimonova, S Y; Harper, S J; Gowda, S

    2013-01-01

    Citrus tristeza virus (CTV) is a phloem-limited virus whose natural host range is restricted to citrus and related species. Although the virus has killed millions of trees, almost destroying whole industries, and continually limits production in many citrus growing areas, most isolates are mild or symptomless in most of their host range. There is little understanding of how the virus causes severe disease in some citrus and none in others. Movement and distribution of CTV differs considerably from that of well-studied viruses of herbaceous plants where movement occurs largely through adjacent cells. In contrast, CTV systemically infects plants mainly by long-distance movement with only limited cell-to-cell movement. The virus is transported through sieve elements and occasionally enters an adjacent companion or phloem parenchyma cell where virus replication occurs. In some plants this is followed by cell-to-cell movement into only a small cluster of adjacent cells, while in others there is no cell-to-cell movement. Different proportions of cells adjacent to sieve elements become infected in different plant species. This appears to be related to how well viral gene products interact with specific hosts. CTV has three genes (p33, p18, and p13) that are not necessary for infection of most of its hosts, but are needed in different combinations for infection of certain citrus species. These genes apparently were acquired by the virus to extend its host range. Some specific viral gene products have been implicated in symptom induction. Remarkably, the deletion of these genes from the virus genome can induce large increases in stem pitting (SP) symptoms. The p23 gene, which is a suppressor of RNA silencing and a regulator of viral RNA synthesis, has been shown to be the cause of seedling yellows (SY) symptoms in sour orange. Most isolates of CTV in nature are populations of different strains of CTV. The next frontier of CTV biology is the understanding how the virus variants in those mixtures interact with each other and cause diseases. PMID:23717303

  7. Annotation of gene function in citrus using gene expression information and co-expression networks

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background The genus Citrus encompasses major cultivated plants such as sweet orange, mandarin, lemon and grapefruit, among the world’s most economically important fruit crops. With increasing volumes of transcriptomics data available for these species, Gene Co-expression Network (GCN) analysis is a viable option for predicting gene function at a genome-wide scale. GCN analysis is based on a “guilt-by-association” principle whereby genes encoding proteins involved in similar and/or related biological processes may exhibit similar expression patterns across diverse sets of experimental conditions. While bioinformatics resources such as GCN analysis are widely available for efficient gene function prediction in model plant species including Arabidopsis, soybean and rice, in citrus these tools are not yet developed. Results We have constructed a comprehensive GCN for citrus inferred from 297 publicly available Affymetrix Genechip Citrus Genome microarray datasets, providing gene co-expression relationships at a genome-wide scale (33,000 transcripts). The comprehensive citrus GCN consists of a global GCN (condition-independent) and four condition-dependent GCNs that survey the sweet orange species only, all citrus fruit tissues, all citrus leaf tissues, or stress-exposed plants. All of these GCNs are clustered using genome-wide, gene-centric (guide) and graph clustering algorithms for flexibility of gene function prediction. For each putative cluster, gene ontology (GO) enrichment and gene expression specificity analyses were performed to enhance gene function, expression and regulation pattern prediction. The guide-gene approach was used to infer novel roles of genes involved in disease susceptibility and vitamin C metabolism, and graph-clustering approaches were used to investigate isoprenoid/phenylpropanoid metabolism in citrus peel, and citric acid catabolism via the GABA shunt in citrus fruit. Conclusions Integration of citrus gene co-expression networks, functional enrichment analysis and gene expression information provide opportunities to infer gene function in citrus. We present a publicly accessible tool, Network Inference for Citrus Co-Expression (NICCE, http://citrus.adelaide.edu.au/nicce/home.aspx), for the gene co-expression analysis in citrus. PMID:25023870

  8. Detection of Xanthomonas oryzae pv. oryzae in artificially inoculated and naturally infected rice seeds and plants by molecular techniques

    Microsoft Academic Search

    N. Sakthivel; C. N. Mortensen; S. B. Mathur

    2001-01-01

    A polymerase chain reaction (PCR) technique was developed for detecting the presence of Xanthomonas oryzae pv. oryzae, the bacterial leaf blight (BLB) pathogen in rice seed and for studying the transmission of this bacterium from seed to plant. Primers TXT and TXT4R from an insertion sequence (IS1113) of the pathogen were used to amplify a 964-bp DNA fragment. A combined

  9. Molecular detection of Xanthomonas oryzae pv. oryzae, Xanthomonas oryzae pv. oryzicola, and Burkholderia glumae in infected rice seeds and leaves

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Polymerase chain reaction (PCR) is particularly useful for plant pathogen detection. In the present study, multiplex PCR and SYBR green real-time PCR were developed to facilitate simultaneous detection of three important rice pathogens, Xanthomonas oryzae pv. oryzae, X. oryzae pv. oryzicola, and Bur...

  10. Citrus stubborn disease (CSD)

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    CSD is caused by Spiroplasma citri, a phloem-limited, cell-wall-less bacterium. S. citri is transmitted in a propagative, circulative manner by several leafhoppers including Circulifer tenellus and Scaphytopius nitridus in citrus-growing regions of California and Arizona and by C. haematoceps (syn....

  11. Studies of Seedling Yellows Amelioration of Citrus tristeza virus Strain Mixtures to Elucidate Mechanisms of Cross Protection

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Citrus tristeza virus (CTV) cross-protection involves a mild strain of CTV preventing or interfering with infection or symptom expression by a severe strain. It is used to protect citrus when virulent stem pitting strains of CTV and efficient aphid vectors are endemic. However, the mode of action ...

  12. Differentially-expressed genes in rice infected by Xanthomonas oryzae pv. oryzae relative to a flagellin-deficient mutant reveal potential functions of flagellin in host–pathogen interactions

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Plants have evolved a sensitive defense response system that detects and recognizes various pathogen-associated molecular patterns (PAMPs) (e.g. flagellin) and induces immune responses to protect against invasion. Transcriptional responses in rice to PAMPs produced by Xanthomonas oryzae pv. oryzae (Xoo), the bacterial blight pathogen, have not yet been defined. Results We characterized transcriptomic responses in rice inoculated with the wildtype (WT) Xoo and flagellin-deficient mutant ?fliC through RNA-seq analysis. Digital gene expression (DGE) analysis based on Solexa/Illumina sequencing was used to investigate transcriptomic responses in 30 day-old seedlings of rice (Oryza sativa L. cv. Nipponbare). 1,680 genes were differentially-expressed (DEGs) in rice inoculated with WT relative to ?fliC; among which 1,159 genes were up-regulated and 521 were down-regulated. Expression patterns of 12 randomly-selected DEGs assayed by quantitative real time PCR (qRT-PCR) were similar to those detected by DGE analyses, confirming reliability of the DGE data. Functional annotations revealed the up-regulated DEGs are involved in the cell wall, lipid and secondary metabolism, defense response and hormone signaling, whereas the down-regulated ones are associated with photosynthesis. Moreover, 57 and 21 specifically expressed genes were found after WT and ?fliC treatments, respectively. Conclusions DEGs were identified in rice inoculated with WT Xoo relative to ?fliC. These genes were predicted to function in multiple biological processes, including the defense response and photosynthesis in rice. This study provided additional insights into molecular basis of rice response to bacterial infection and revealed potential functions of bacterial flagellin in the rice-Xoo interactions. PMID:25187853

  13. Lateral organ boundaries 1 is a disease susceptibility gene for citrus bacterial canker disease

    PubMed Central

    Hu, Yang; Zhang, Junli; Jia, Hongge; Sosso, Davide; Li, Ting; Frommer, Wolf B.; Yang, Bing; White, Frank F.; Wang, Nian; Jones, Jeffrey B.

    2014-01-01

    Citrus bacterial canker (CBC) disease occurs worldwide and incurs considerable costs both from control measures and yield losses. Bacteria that cause CBC require one of six known type III transcription activator-like (TAL) effector genes for the characteristic pustule formation at the site of infection. Here, we show that Xanthomonas citri subspecies citri strain Xcc306, with the type III TAL effector gene pthA4 or with the distinct yet biologically equivalent gene pthAw from strain XccAw, induces two host genes, CsLOB1 and CsSWEET1, in a TAL effector-dependent manner. CsLOB1 is a member of the Lateral Organ Boundaries (LOB) gene family of transcription factors, and CsSWEET1 is a homolog of the SWEET sugar transporter and rice disease susceptibility gene. Both TAL effectors drive expression of CsLOB1 and CsSWEET1 promoter reporter gene fusions when coexpressed in citrus or Nicotiana benthamiana. Artificially designed TAL effectors directed to sequences in the CsLOB1 promoter region, but not the CsSWEET1 promoter, promoted pustule formation and higher bacterial leaf populations. Three additional distinct TAL effector genes, pthA*, pthB, and pthC, also direct pustule formation and expression of CsLOB1. Unlike pthA4 and pthAw, pthB and pthC do not promote the expression of CsSWEET1. CsLOB1 expression was associated with the expression of genes associated with cell expansion. The results indicate that CBC-inciting species of Xanthomonas exploit a single host disease susceptibility gene by altering the expression of an otherwise developmentally regulated gene using any one of a diverse set of TAL effector genes in the pathogen populations. PMID:24474801

  14. Biomphalaria species distribution and its effect on human Schistosoma mansoni infection in an irrigated area used for rice cultivation in northeast Brazil.

    PubMed

    Barboza, Delmany Moitinho; Zhang, Cangjie; Santos, Nathaly Cardoso; Silva, Marília Matos Bezerra Lemos; Rollemberg, Carla Virgínia Vieira; de Amorim, Fabio Jorge Ramalho; Ueta, Marlene Tiduko; de Melo, Claudia Moura; de Almeida, José Antônio Pacheco; Jeraldo, Verónica de Lourdes Sierpe; de Jesus, Amélia Ribeiro

    2012-09-01

    The role of irrigated areas for the spread of schistosomiasis is of worldwide concern. The aim of the present study was to investigate the spatial distribution of the intermediate snail host Biomphalaria in an area highly endemic for schistosomiasis due to Schistosoma mansoni, evaluating the relationship between irrigation and types of natural water sources on one hand, and the influence of place and time of water exposure on the intensity of human infection on the other. A geographical information system (GIS) was used to map the distribution of the intermediate snail hosts in Ilha das Flores, Sergipe, Brazil, combined with a clinical/epidemiological survey. We observed a direct correlation between the intensity of human infection with S. mansoni and irrigation projects. Malacological studies to identify snail species and infection rates showed that B. glabrata is the main species responsible for human schistosomiasis in the municipality, but that B. straminea also plays a role. Our results provide evidence for a competitive selection between the two snail species in rice fields with a predominance of B. glabrata in irrigation systems and B. straminea in natural water sources. PMID:23032275

  15. Comparison of antifungal activities of Vietnamese citrus essential oils

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Pham Van Hung; Pham Thi Lan Chi; Nguyen Thi Lan Phi

    2012-01-01

    Citrus essential oils (EOs) are volatile compounds from citrus peels and widely used in perfumes, cosmetics, soaps and aromatherapy. In this study, inhibition of citrus EOs extracted from Vietnamese orange (Citrus sinensis), mandarin (Citrus reticulata Blanco), pomelo (Citrus grandis Osbeck) and lime (Citrus aurantifolia Swingle) on the growth of plant pathogenic fungi, Mucor hiemalis, Penicillium expansum and Fusarium proliferatum was

  16. Overexpression of a citrus NDR1 ortholog increases disease resistance in Arabidopsis

    PubMed Central

    Lu, Hua; Zhang, Chong; Albrecht, Ute; Shimizu, Rena; Wang, Guanfeng; Bowman, Kim D.

    2013-01-01

    Emerging devastating diseases, such as Huanglongbing (HLB) and citrus canker, have caused tremendous losses to the citrus industry worldwide. Genetic engineering is a powerful approach that could allow us to increase citrus resistance against these diseases. The key to the success of this approach relies on a thorough understanding of defense mechanisms of citrus. Studies of Arabidopsis and other plants have provided a framework for us to better understand defense mechanisms of citrus. Salicylic acid (SA) is a key signaling molecule involved in basal defense and resistance (R) gene-mediated defense against broad-spectrum pathogens. The Arabidopsis gene NDR1 (NON-RACE-SPECIFIC DISEASE RESISTANCE 1) is a positive regulator of SA accumulation and is specifically required for signaling mediated by a subset of R genes upon recognition of their cognate pathogen effectors. Our bioinformatic analysis identified an ortholog of NDR1 from citrus, CsNDR1. Overexpression of CsNDR1 complemented susceptibility conferred by the Arabidopsis ndr1-1 mutant to Pseudomonas syringae strains and also led to enhanced resistance to an oomycete pathogen Hyaloperonospora arabidopsidis. Such heightened resistance is associated with increased SA production and expression of the defense marker gene PATHOGENESIS RELATED 1 (PR1). In addition, we found that expression of PR1 and accumulation of SA were induced to modest levels in citrus infected with Candidatus Liberibacter asiaticus, the bacterial pathogen associated with HLB disease. Thus, our data suggest that CsNDR1 is a functional ortholog of Arabidopsis NDR1. Since Ca. L. asiaticus infection only activates modest levels of defense responses in citrus, we propose that genetically increasing SA/NDR1-mediated pathways could potentially lead to enhanced resistance against HLB, citrus canker, and other destructive diseases challenging global citrus production. PMID:23761797

  17. Development of loop-mediated isothermal amplification and SYBR green real-time PCR methods for the detection of Citrus yellow mosaic badnavirus in citrus species.

    PubMed

    Anthony Johnson, A M; Dasgupta, I; Sai Gopal, D V R

    2014-07-01

    Citrus yellow mosaic badnavirus (CMBV) is an important pathogen in southern India spread by infected citrus propagules. One of the measures to arrest the spread of CMBV is to develop methods to screen and certify citrus propagules as CMBV-free. The methods loop-mediated isothermal amplification (LAMP) and SYBR green real-time PCR (SGRTPCR) have been developed for the efficient detection of CMBV in citrus propagules. This paper compares the sensitivities of LAMP and SGRTPCR with polymerase chain reaction (PCR) for the detection of CMBV. Whereas PCR and LAMP were able to detect CMBV from a minimum of 10 ng of total DNA of infected leaf samples, SGRTPCR could detect the same from 1 ng of total DNA. Using SGRTPCR, the viral titres were estimated to be the highest in rough lemon and lowest in Nagpur Mandarin of the five naturally infected citrus species tested. The results will help in designing suitable strategies for the sensitive detection of CMBV from citrus propagules. PMID:24675064

  18. A stable RNA virus-based vector for citrus trees.

    PubMed

    Folimonov, Alexey S; Folimonova, Svetlana Y; Bar-Joseph, Moshe; Dawson, William O

    2007-11-10

    Virus-based vectors are important tools in plant molecular biology and plant genomics. A number of vectors based on viruses that infect herbaceous plants are in use for expression or silencing of genes in plants as well as screening unknown sequences for function. Yet there is a need for useful virus-based vectors for woody plants, which demand much greater stability because of the longer time required for systemic infection and analysis. We examined several strategies to develop a Citrus tristeza virus (CTV)-based vector for transient expression of foreign genes in citrus trees using a green fluorescent protein (GFP) as a reporter. These strategies included substitution of the p13 open reading frame (ORF) by the ORF of GFP, construction of a self-processing fusion of GFP in-frame with the major coat protein (CP), or expression of the GFP ORF as an extra gene from a subgenomic (sg) mRNA controlled either by a duplicated CTV CP sgRNA controller element (CE) or an introduced heterologous CE of Beet yellows virus. Engineered vector constructs were examined for replication, encapsidation, GFP expression during multiple passages in protoplasts, and for their ability to infect, move, express GFP, and be maintained in citrus plants. The most successful vectors based on the 'add-a-gene' strategy have been unusually stable, continuing to produce GFP fluorescence after more than 4 years in citrus trees. PMID:17651777

  19. Certification Programs for Citrus

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Richard F. Lee

    Certification programs are important for the long term sustainability of citrus and other crops which are vegetatively propagated.\\u000a The certification program provides a basic platform for all integrated pest management practices, it is important for the\\u000a management of insect and fungal pests, and the program ensures that the grower is planting healthy germplasm of the highest\\u000a horticultural quality. Graft transmissible

  20. Conservation of US citrus collections using cryopreservation

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The USDA-ARS National Plant Germplasm System and the University of California Citrus Variety Collection maintain more than 850 unique accessions of Citrus, Fortunella, and citrus wild relatives. We have developed a method to back-up critical screenhouse and greenhouse Citrus collections using cryopr...

  1. Citrus Virus Symptoms in Sardinia

    Microsoft Academic Search

    A. Bruno

    1964-01-01

    SARDINIA was believed to be a virus-free citrus region until Boselli1 first noted a disorder showing symptoms commonly referred to as the psorosis virus complex. Following this, the main citrus areas of the Island have been surveyed with the view of recognizing and recording virus or virus-like manifestations.

  2. Detection of mechanical and disease stresses in citrus plants by fluorescence spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Belasque, J., Jr.; Gasparoto, M. C. G.; Marcassa, L. G.

    2008-04-01

    We have investigated the detection of mechanical and disease stresses in citrus plants (Citrus limonia [L.] Osbeck) using laser-induced fluorescence spectroscopy. Due to its economic importance we have chosen to investigate the citrus canker disease, which is caused by the Xanthomonas axonopodis pv. citri bacteria. Mechanical stress was also studied because it plays an important role in the plant's infection by such bacteria. A laser-induced fluorescence spectroscopy system, composed of a spectrometer and a 532 nm10 mW excitation laser was used to perform fluorescence spectroscopy. The ratio of two chlorophyll fluorescence bands allows us to detect and discriminate between mechanical and disease stresses. This ability to discriminate may have an important application in the field to detect citrus canker infected trees.

  3. Comparison of ?-glucosyl hesperidin of citrus fruits and epigallocatechin gallate of green tea on the Loss of Rotavirus Infectivity in Cell Culture

    PubMed Central

    Lipson, Steven M.; Ozen, Fatma S.; Louis, Samantha; Karthikeyan, Laina

    2015-01-01

    A number of secondary plant metabolites (e.g., flavonoids) possess antiviral/antimicrobial activity. Most flavonoids, however, are difficult to study, as they are immiscible in water-based systems. The relatively new semisynthetic ?-glucosyl hesperitin (GH), and the natural plant product epigallocatechin gallate (EGCG) are unique among most flavonoids, as these flavonoids are highly soluble. The antiviral activity of these plant metabolites were investigated using the rotavirus as a model enteric virus system. Direct loss of virus structural integrity in cell-free suspension and titration of amplified RTV in host cell cultures was measured by a quantitative enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (qEIA). After 30 min. 100 × 103 ?g/ml GH reduced RTV antigen levels by ca. 90%. The same compound reduced infectivity (replication in cell culture) by a similar order of magnitude 3 to 4 days post inoculation. After 3 days in culture, EGCG concentrations of 80, 160, and 320 ?g/ml reduced RTV infectivity titer levels to ca. 50, 20, and 15% of the control, respectively. Loss of RTV infectivity titers occurred following viral treatment by parallel testing of both GH and EGCG, with the latter, markedly more effective. Cytotoxicity testing showed no adverse effects by the phenolic concentrations used in this study. The unique chemical structure of each flavonoid rather than each phenolic’s inherent solubility may be ascribed to those marked differences between each molecule’s antiviral (anti-RTV) effects. The solubility of EGCG and GH obviated our need to use potentially confounding or obfuscating carrier molecules (e.g., methanol, ethanol, DMSO) denoting our use of a pure system environ. Our work further denotes the need to address the unique chemical nature of secondary plant metabolites before any broad generalizations in flavonoid (antiviral) activity may be proposed. PMID:25972850

  4. Novel delivery of the fungi Paecilomyces formosoroseus (Deuteromycotina: Hyphomycetes) for managing the Asian citrus psyllid (Psyllidae: Hemiptera)

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    A method was developed to increase efficacy and reduce grower costs when using the biological control fungal agent Paecilomyces fumosoroseus blastospores (Deuteromycotina: Hyphomycetes) to infect adult Asian citrus psyllids, Diaphorina citri (Psyllidae: Hemiptera). We analyzed the efficacy of this A...

  5. 78 FR 63369 - Citrus Canker, Citrus Greening, and Asian Citrus Psyllid; Interstate Movement of Regulated...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-10-24

    ...plant disease that is caused by a complex of Xanthomonas spp. bacteria and that affects plants and plant parts of citrus and citrus...the protocol document are adhered to, there should be no bacterium within the nursery or compartment. In that same section...

  6. High codon adaptation in citrus tristeza virus to its citrus host

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Citrus tristeza virus (CTV), a member of the genus Closterovirus within the family Closteroviridae, is the causal agent of citrus tristeza disease. Previous studies revealed that the negative selection, RNA recombination and gene flow were the most important forces that drove CTV evolution. However, the CTV codon usage was not studied and thus its role in CTV evolution remains unknown. Results A detailed comparative analysis of CTV codon usage pattern was done in this study. Results of the study show that although in general CTV does not have a high degree of codon usage bias, the codon usage of CTV has a high level of resemblance to its host codon usage. In addition, our data indicate that the codon usage resemblance is only observed for the woody plant-infecting closteroviruses but not the closteroviruses infecting the herbaceous host plants, suggesting the existence of different virus-host interactions between the herbaceous plant-infecting and woody plant-infecting closteroviruses. Conclusion Based on the results, we suggest that in addition to RNA recombination, negative selection and gene flow, host plant codon usage selection can also affect CTV evolution. PMID:22698086

  7. Citrus tristeza virus: a pathogen that changed the course of the citrus industry.

    PubMed

    Moreno, Pedro; Ambrós, Silvia; Albiach-Martí, Maria R; Guerri, José; Peña, Leandro

    2008-03-01

    Citrus tristeza virus (CTV) (genus Closterovirus, family Closteroviridae) is the causal agent of devastating epidemics that changed the course of the citrus industry. Adapted to replicate in phloem cells of a few species within the family Rutaceae and to transmission by a few aphid species, CTV and citrus probably coevolved for centuries at the site of origin of citrus plants. CTV dispersal to other regions and its interaction with new scion varieties and rootstock combinations resulted in three distinct syndromes named tristeza, stem pitting and seedling yellows. The first, inciting decline of varieties propagated on sour orange, has forced the rebuilding of many citrus industries using tristeza-tolerant rootstocks. The second, inducing stunting, stem pitting and low bearing of some varieties, causes economic losses in an increasing number of countries. The third is usually observed by biological indexing, but rarely in the field. CTV polar virions are composed of two capsid proteins and a single-stranded, positive-sense genomic RNA (gRNA) of approximately 20 kb, containing 12 open reading frames (ORFs) and two untranslated regions (UTRs). ORFs 1a and 1b, encoding proteins of the replicase complex, are directly translated from the gRNA, and together with the 5' and 3'UTRs are the only regions required for RNA replication. The remaining ORFs, expressed via 3'-coterminal subgenomic RNAs, encode proteins required for virion assembly and movement (p6, p65, p61, p27 and p25), asymmetrical accumulation of positive and negative strands during RNA replication (p23), or suppression of post-transcriptional gene silencing (p25, p20 and p23), with the role of proteins p33, p18 and p13 as yet unknown. Analysis of genetic variation in CTV isolates revealed (1) conservation of genomes in distant geographical regions, with a limited repertoire of genotypes, (2) uneven distribution of variation along the gRNA, (3) frequent recombination events and (4) different selection pressures shaping CTV populations. Measures to control CTV damage include quarantine and budwood certification programmes, elimination of infected trees, use of tristeza-tolerant rootstocks, or cross protection with mild isolates, depending on CTV incidence and on the virus strains and host varieties predominant in each region. Incorporating resistance genes into commercial varieties by conventional breeding is presently unfeasible, whereas incorporation of pathogen-derived resistance by plant transformation has yielded variable results, indicating that the CTV-citrus interaction may be more specific and complex than initially thought. A deep understanding of the interactions between viral proteins and host and vector factors will be necessary to develop reliable and sound control measures. PMID:18705856

  8. Transgenic expression in citrus of single-chain antibody fragments specific to Citrus tristeza virus confers virus resistance.

    PubMed

    Cervera, Magdalena; Esteban, Olga; Gil, Maite; Gorris, M Teresa; Martínez, M Carmen; Peña, Leandro; Cambra, Mariano

    2010-12-01

    Citrus tristeza virus (CTV) causes one of the most destructive viral diseases of citrus worldwide. Generation of resistant citrus genotypes through genetic engineering could be a good alternative to control CTV. To study whether production of single-chain variable fragment (scFv) antibodies in citrus could interfere and immunomodulate CTV infection, transgenic Mexican lime plants expressing two different scFv constructs, separately and simultaneously, were generated. These constructs derived from the well-referenced monoclonal antibodies 3DF1 and 3CA5, specific against CTV p25 major coat protein, whose mixture is able to detect all CTV isolates characterized so far. ScFv accumulation levels were low and could be readily detected just in four transgenic lines. Twelve homogeneous and vigorous lines were propagated and CTV-challenged by graft inoculation with an aggressive CTV strain. A clear protective effect was observed in most transgenic lines, which showed resistance in up to 40-60% of propagations. Besides, both a delay in symptom appearance and attenuation of symptom intensity were observed in infected transgenic plants compared with control plants. This effect was more evident in lines carrying the 3DF1scFv transgene, being probably related to the biological functions of the epitope recognized by this antibody. This is the first report describing successful protection against a pathogen in woody transgenic plants by ectopic expression of scFv recombinant antibodies. PMID:20204695

  9. Flavonoids in tropical citrus species.

    PubMed

    Roowi, Suri; Crozier, Alan

    2011-11-23

    HPLC with PDA and MS(2) detection was used to identify and quantify flavonoids in the tropical citrus species Citrus microcarpa , Citrus hystrix , Citrus medica var. 1 and 2, and Citrus suhuiensis . Most of these species contained high amounts of flavones, flavanones, and dihydrochalcone C- and/or O-glycosides, which were identified on the basis of HPLC retention times, cochromatography with available authentic standards, absorbance spectra, and mass spectral fragmentation patterns. Among the major compounds detected were apigenin-6,8-di-C-glucoside, apigenin-8-C-glucosyl-2?-O-rhamnoside, phloretin-3',5'-di-C-glucoside, diosmetin-7-O-rutinoside, hesperetin-7-O-neohesperidoside, and hesperetin-7-O-rutinoside. Most of the dihydrochalcone and flavone C-glycosides have not previously been detected in tropical citrus. C. microcarpa contained a high amount of phloretin-3',5'-di-C-glucoside. Most of the tropical citrus flavanones were neohesperidoside conjugates, which are responsible for imparting a bitter taste to the fruit. Only C. suhuiensis fruit contains rutinoside, a nonbitter conjugate. PMID:21978223

  10. Differential expression of rice Nramp genes in response to pathogen infection, defense signal molecules and metal ions

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Xiangjun Zhou; Yinong Yang

    2004-01-01

    The Nramp genes encode a class of metal transporters that universally exist in both eukaryotes and prokaryotes. In animals such as the mouse, the Nramp1 gene is important for natural host resistance to the infection of intracellular pathogens. To investigate the potential role of Nramp genes in plant defense response, we have conducted expression analysis of three OsNramp genes in

  11. Distinctively variable sequence-based nuclear DNA markers for multilocus phylogeography of the soybean- and rice-infecting fungal pathogen Rhizoctonia solani AG-1 IA

    PubMed Central

    2009-01-01

    A series of multilocus sequence-based nuclear DNA markers was developed to infer the phylogeographical history of the Basidiomycetous fungal pathogen Rhizoctonia solani AG-1 IA infecting rice and soybean worldwide. The strategy was based on sequencing of cloned genomic DNA fragments (previously used as RFLP probes) and subsequent screening of fungal isolates to detect single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs). Ten primer pairs were designed based on these sequences, which resulted in PCR amplification of 200-320 bp size products and polymorphic sequences in all markers analyzed. By direct sequencing we identified both homokaryon and heterokaryon (i.e. dikaryon) isolates at each marker. Cloning the PCR products effectively estimated the allelic phase from heterokaryotic isolates. Information content varied among markers from 0.5 to 5.9 mutations per 100 bp. Thus, the former RFLP codominant probes were successfully converted into six distinctively variable sequence-based nuclear DNA markers. Rather than discarding low polymorphism loci, the combination of these distinctively variable anonymous nuclear markers would constitute an asset for the unbiased estimate of the phylogeographical parameters such as population sizes and divergent times, providing a more reliable species history that shaped the current population structure of R. solani AG-1 IA. PMID:21637462

  12. Citrus tristeza virus: survival at the edge of the movement continuum.

    PubMed

    Folimonova, Svetlana Y; Folimonov, Alexey S; Tatineni, Satyanarayana; Dawson, William O

    2008-07-01

    Systemic invasion of plants by viruses is thought to involve two processes: cell-to-cell movement between adjacent cells and long-distance movement that allows the virus to rapidly move through sieve elements and unload at the growing parts of the plant. There is a continuum of proportions of these processes that determines the degrees of systemic infection of different plants by different viruses. We examined the systemic distribution of Citrus tristeza virus (CTV) in citrus species with a range of susceptibilities. By using a "pure" culture of CTV from a cDNA clone and green fluorescent protein-labeled virus we show that both cell-to-cell and long-distance movement are unusually limited, and the degree of limitation varies depending on the citrus host. In the more-susceptible hosts CTV infected only a small portion of phloem-associated cells, and moreover, the number of infection sites in less-susceptible citrus species was substantially decreased further, indicating that long-distance movement was reduced in those hosts. Analysis of infection foci in the two most differential citrus species, Citrus macrophylla and sour orange, revealed that in the more-susceptible host the infection foci were composed of a cluster of multiple cells, while in the less-susceptible host infection foci were usually single cells, suggesting that essentially no cell-to-cell movement occurred in the latter host. Thus, CTV in sour orange represents a pattern of systemic infection in which the virus appears to function with only the long-distance movement mechanism, yet is able to survive in nature. PMID:18434397

  13. Evaluation of the effects of light source and plant materials in psyllid trapping levels in the traps for citrus shipping containers

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The Asian citrus psyllid (ACP), the principle vector for Huanglongbing (HLB), has been reported to be transported in truckloads of oranges in Florida. Citrus, especially Key limes and lemons, are shipped to the U.S. from Mexican states that are heavily infested with HLB and live, infected psyllids c...

  14. A survey of survival and activity of citrus canker lesion populations on foliage, fruit and shoots in a Florida grapefruit orchard in 2009 and 2010

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Citrus canker (Xanthomonas citri subsp. citri (Xcc)) can infect several species of citrus. The disease can develop on the leaves, shoots and fruit, causing erumpent lesions, that on fruit precludes sale to the fresh market. We assessed lesion activity in orchard-grown grapefruit to provide informa...

  15. Complete 3' end genome analysis of the asymptomatic citrus tristeza virus isolate B192 and its eight single aphid transmitted subisolates

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The most important viral disease of citrus is caused by Citrus tristeza virus (CTV). CTV infection often exists in field isolates as a complex of multiple genotypes. Aphid transmission is important for CTV dispersal. The complete 3' terminal half sequences of the asymptomatic CTV isolate B192 and it...

  16. Past and future of a century old Citrus Tristeza virus collection: A California citrus germplasm tale

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The California Citrus Clonal Protection Program (CCPP) provides a mechanism for introduction and distribution of pathogen-free citrus varieties to California for use in research, variety improvement, or commercial production. Citrus tristeza virus (CTV) is a serious citrus pathogen worldwide. The pr...

  17. Citrus Diseases Exotic to Florida: Citrus Tristeza Virus Stem Pitting (CTV-SP)1

    Microsoft Academic Search

    K.-R. Chung; R. H. Brlansky

    Citrus is susceptible to a large number of diseases caused by plant pathogens. Economic losses due to plant diseases can be severe, but fortunately, not all pathogens attacking citrus are present in Florida. Major citrus diseases currently present in Florida include: Alternaria brown spot, blight, citrus canker, greasy spot, melanose, Phytophthora-induced diseases (foot and root rot, brown rot), postbloom fruit

  18. Effective disinfection of rough rice using infrared radiation heating

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The objective of this study was to investigate the effect of infrared (IR) heating and tempering treatments on disinfection of Aspergillus flavus in freshly harvested rough rice and storage rice. Rice samples with initial moisture contents (IMCs) of 14.1 to 27.0% (wet basis) were infected with A. fl...

  19. CITRUS CANKER: PLANT PATHOLOGY VERSUS PUBLIC POLICY

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Increasing international travel and trade has resulted in an unprecedented number of plant pathogen introductions, including Xanthomonas axonopodis pv citri, (Xac), the bacterium that causes citrus canker. The disease affects commercial and dooryard citrus, and has far-reaching politi...

  20. Citrus Preferences Among Customers of Selected Stores. 

    E-print Network

    Bitting, H. Wayne; Bayton, James A.; Fugett, Kenneth A.

    1950-01-01

    Summary of Replies to Questions Asked Homemakers ............ 29 ......................... Paired Comparisons of Taste Preference 47 ............................................ Taste Test Ballot 48 BULLETIN 722 JUNE 1950 Citrus Preferences Among... made in the laboratory of the vitamin content of fresh and processed citrus; and the relative cost of fresh citrus, canned citrus juices and frozen orange juice concentrate. A "taste test" panel was also conducted in the laboratory to compare...

  1. Citrus tristeza virus-host interactions

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Citrus tristeza virus (CTV) is a phloem-limited virus whose natural host range is restricted to citrus and related species. Although the virus has killed millions of trees, almost destroying whole industries, and continually limits production in many citrus growing areas, most isolates are mild or s...

  2. Citrus tristeza virus-aphid interactions

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    A review chapter on aphid transmission of Citrus tristeza virus is provided for a book on “Vector-Mediated Transmission of Plant Pathogens”. Earliest uses of citrus goes back over two millennia as items of trade, gifts and medicinal compounds. Citrus propagation during this period was by seed and si...

  3. Refinement of the Citrus tristeza virus resistance gene (Ctv) positional map in Poncirus trifoliata and generation of transgenic grapefruit (Citrus paradisi) plant lines with candidate resistance genes in this region.

    PubMed

    Rai, Mamta

    2006-06-01

    Citrus tristeza virus (CTV) is a major pathogen of Citrus. A single dominant gene Ctv present in the trifoliate relative of Citrus, Poncirus trifoliata confers broad spectrum resistance against CTV. Refinement of genetic maps has delimited this gene to a 121 kb region, comprising of ten candidate Ctv resistance genes. The ten candidate genes were individually cloned in Agrobacterium based binary vector and transformed into three CTV susceptible grapefruit varieties. Two of the candidate R-genes, R-2 and R-3 are exclusively expressed in transgenic plants and in Poncirus trifoliata, while five other genes are also expressed in non-transformed Citrus controls. Northern blotting with a CTV derived probe for assessment of infection in virus inoculated plants over a span of three growth periods, each comprising of six to eight weeks, indicates either an absence of initiation of infection or it's slow spread in R-2 plant lines or an initial appearance of infection and it's subsequent obliteration in some R-1 and R-4 plant lines. Limited genome walk up- and downstream form R-1 gene, based on it's 100% sequence identity between Poncirus and Citrus, indicates promoter identity of 92% between the two varieties. Further upstream and downstream sequencing indicates the presence of an O-methyl transferase and a Copia like gene respectively in Citrus instead of the amino acid transporter like gene upstream and a sugar transporter like gene downstream in Poncirus. The possibility of recombinations in the resistance locus of Citrus and the need for consistent monitoring for virus infection and gene expression in the transgenic Citrus trees is discussed. PMID:16830176

  4. Inheritance of resistance to rice tungro spherical virus in a near-isogenic line derived from Utri Merah and in rice cultivar TKM6

    Microsoft Academic Search

    O. Azzam; T. Imbe; R. Ikeda; P. D. Nath; E. Coloquio

    2001-01-01

    Resistance to rice virus diseases is an important requirement in many Southeast Asian rice breeding programs. Inheritance\\u000a of resistance to rice tungro spherical virus (RTSV) in TW5, a near-isogenic line derived from Indonesian rice cultivar Utri\\u000a Merah, was compared to that in TKM6, an Indian rice cultivar. Both TKM6 and Utri Merah are cultivars resistant to RTSV infections.\\u000a Crosses were

  5. Indian citrus ringspot virus: localization of virus in seed tissues and evidence for lack of seed transmission

    Microsoft Academic Search

    V. K. Baranwal

    Indian citrus ringspot disease is an important viral disease in kinnow mandarin orchards where disease incidence up to 100%\\u000a has been recorded. The disease is caused by Indian citrus ringspot virus (ICRSV), a positive sense flexuous RNA virus. The transmission of ICRSV is generally through budwood. Association of ICRSV\\u000a with pollens of naturally infected flowers from cv. ‘Kinnow’ mandarins has

  6. PRODUCTION OF INDIAN CITRUS RINGSPOT VIRUS FREE PLANTS OF KINNOW EMPLOYING CHEMOTHERAPY COUPLED WITH SHOOT TIP GRAFTING

    Microsoft Academic Search

    SANJEEV Sharma; BALWINDER Singh; AVINASH Nagpal

    2007-01-01

    Indian citrus ringspot virus (ICRSV) is known to cause serious problem in Kinnow (Citrus nobilis Lour × C. deliciosa Tenora). This paper reports the elimination of ICRSV from Kinnow by chemotherapy coupled with shoot tip grafting under in vitro conditions. Nodal segments from infected mother plant (indexed by indirect ELISA and RT-PCR) were cultured on MS medium containing 2-iP (1mg\\/l)

  7. Bud emergence and shoot growth from mature citrus nodal segments

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Bud emergence and shoot growth from adult phase citrus nodal cultures were studied using Citrus mitis (calamondin), Citrus paradisi (grapefruit), and Citrus sinensis (sweet orange). The effects of 6-benzylaminopurine (BA), indole 3-acetic acid (IAA), and citrus type on shoot quality and growth fro...

  8. Florida Citrus Industry Oral Histories

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    What's so special about oranges? They are a major cash crop for Florida and other warm weather places, and this fascinating oral history project from the University of South Florida (USF) explores the very nature of this industry. Working together with the USF's Patel Center for Global Studies, oral historian William Mansfield conducted 20 interviews regarding the impact of globalization on the Florida citrus industry. Visitors can listen to or read the interviews, as well as look over the online exhibition, "Selling Sunshine: Florida's Citrus Industry." The exhibition details Florida's unique relationship with the citrus industry, incorporating documents, promotional material, and post cards with its information. The website hosts a remarkable collection that will be of interest to oral historians, folks with an interest in Florida, and many others.

  9. Rice seeds as sources of endophytic bacteria.

    PubMed

    Kaga, Hiroko; Mano, Hironobu; Tanaka, Fumiko; Watanabe, Asuka; Kaneko, Satoshi; Morisaki, Hisao

    2009-01-01

    Endophytic bacteria are considered to originate from the external environment. To examine the hypothesis that rice (Oryza sativa, cultivar Kinuhikari) seeds are a source of endophytic bacteria, we isolated endophytic bacteria from the shoots, remains of the seeds, and roots of rice seedlings that were aseptically cultivated in vitro from surface-disinfected seeds. Of the various bacterial strains isolated, the closest relatives, identified by 16S rRNA gene sequencing, were: Bacillus firmus, B. fusiformis, B. pumilus, Caulobacter crescentus, Kocuria palustris, Micrococcus luteus, Methylobacterium fujisawaense, Me. radiotolerans, and Pantoea ananatis. The latter three species have been detected frequently inside both rice seedlings and mature rice plants. These results indicate that rice seeds are an important source of endophytic bacteria. The bacteria that colonize the seed interior appear to infect the subsequent generation via rice seeds and become the dominant endophytic species in the mature plant. PMID:21566368

  10. Citrus Orchard Management in Texas. 

    E-print Network

    Hancock, Bluefford G.

    1962-01-01

    and vines in citrus orchartls. The grass and weeds are useful as soil- im1lrnlging cover crops, but vines are a menace. ; kills cover crops and partially covers them il. This hastens decay of the above-ground I of the cover crop, and the death...\\th of the hanging fruit crop and may weaken the trees to the point where they may be killed b\\ Ifir\\ temperatures. Soil temperatures are high enouqli during the winter to encourage root developmert of citrus trees and this activity prevents the ces(1 tion...

  11. Huanglongbing, a Systemic Disease, Restructures the Bacterial Community Associated with Citrus Roots?

    PubMed Central

    Trivedi, Pankaj; Duan, Yongping; Wang, Nian

    2010-01-01

    To examine the effect of pathogens on the diversity and structure of plant-associated bacterial communities, we carried out a molecular analysis using citrus and huanglongbing as a host-disease model. 16S rRNA gene clone library analysis of citrus roots revealed shifts in microbial diversity in response to pathogen infection. The clone library of the uninfected root samples has a majority of phylotypes showing similarity to well-known plant growth-promoting bacteria, including Caulobacter, Burkholderia, Lysobacter, Pantoea, Pseudomonas, Stenotrophomonas, Bacillus, and Paenibacillus. Infection by “Candidatus Liberibacter asiaticus” restructured the native microbial community associated with citrus roots and led to the loss of detection of most phylotypes while promoting the growth of bacteria such as Methylobacterium and Sphingobacterium. In pairwise comparisons, the clone library from uninfected roots contained significantly higher 16S rRNA gene diversity, as reflected in the higher Chao 1 richness estimation (P ? 0.01) of 237.13 versus 42.14 for the uninfected and infected clone libraries, respectively. Similarly, the Shannon index of the uninfected clone library (4.46) was significantly higher than that of the infected clone library (2.61). Comparison of the uninfected clone library with the infected clone library using LIBSHUFF statistics showed a significant difference (P ? 0.05). Quantitative PCR analysis revealed that the bacterial community changes not only qualitatively but also quantitatively. The relative proportions of different groups of bacteria changed significantly after infection with the pathogen. These data indicate that infection of citrus by “Ca. Liberibacter asiaticus” has a profound effect on the structure and composition of the bacterial community associated with citrus roots. PMID:20382817

  12. Exogenous treatment with salicylic acid attenuates occurrence of citrus canker in susceptible navel orange (Citrus sinensis Osbeck).

    PubMed

    Wang, Yin; Liu, Ji-Hong

    2012-08-15

    Citrus canker caused by Xanthomonas axonopodis pv. citri (Xac) is a devastating bacterial disease threatening the citrus industry. Salicylic acid (SA) plays a key role in plant defense response to biotic stress, but information is scarce concerning the application of SA to enhancing Xac resistance. In the present research attempts were made to investigate how exogenous application of SA influenced canker disease outbreak in navel orange (Citrus sinensis). Exogenously applied SA at 0.25 mM significantly enhanced the endogenous free and bound SA, particularly the latter. Upon exposure to Xac, lower disease incidence rate and smaller lesion sites were observed in the samples pre-treated with SA, accompanied by repression of bacterial growth at the lesion sites. Concurrent with the augmented disease resistance, SA-treated leaves had higher H?O? level and smaller stomata apertures before or after Xac infection when compared with their counterparts pre-treated with water (control). SA treatment elevated the activities of phenylalanine ammonia-lyase and ?-1,3-glucanase, but only the latter was higher in the SA-treated samples after Xac infection. In addition, mRNA levels of two pathogenesis-related genes, CsCHI and CsPR4A, were higher in the SA-treated samples relative to the control. Taken together, our results strongly suggest that the exogenously applied SA has evoked a cascade of physiological and molecular events that function singly or in concert to confer resistance to Xac invasion. PMID:22658220

  13. Characteristic expression of twelve rice PR1 family genes in response to pathogen infection, wounding, and defense-related signal compounds (121\\/180)

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Ichiro Mitsuhara; Takayoshi Iwai; Shigemi Seo; Yuki Yanagawa; Hiroyuki Kawahigasi; Sakino Hirose; Yasunobu Ohkawa; Yuko Ohashi

    2008-01-01

    Pathogenesis-related (PR) proteins have been used as markers of plant defense responses, and are classified into 17 families.\\u000a However, precise information on the majority members in specific PR families is still limited. We were interested in the individual\\u000a characteristics of rice PR1 family genes, and selected 12 putatively active genes using rice genome databases for expressed genes. All were upregulated

  14. Structural and biochemical characteristics of citrus flowers associated with defence against a fungal pathogen

    PubMed Central

    Marques, João Paulo Rodrigues; Amorim, Lilian; Silva-Junior, Geraldo José; Spósito, Marcel Bellato; Appezzato-da Gloria, Beatriz

    2015-01-01

    The constitutive characters of plants can be structural or biochemical and play an important role in their defence against pathogens. Citrus postbloom fruit drop (PFD) caused by Colletotrichum spp. is one of the most important fungal diseases of citrus. The pathogen infects the flowers, leading to premature fruit drop and reducing citrus production. However, flower buds smaller than 8 mm long are usually not infected by Colletotrichum spp. Thus, this study investigated whether there are constitutive mechanisms in flower buds related to Colletotrichum spp. infection. We studied flower buds that were 2, 3, 4, 8, 12 and 15 mm long and petals, after anthesis, of sweet orange ‘Valência’ using light and scanning electron microscopy and histochemistry. We evaluated the effect of volatile organic compounds (VOCs) in flowers (R-limonene and linalool) on the in vitro growth of Colletotrichum acutatum. We found that the arrangement of the epidermal papillae in the petal primordia, the occurrence of prismatic crystals and the distribution of oil glands are the main differences between buds smaller than 8 mm and buds 8–15 mm long. Osmophores at the tips of petals produced and accumulated phenols, terpenes and lipophilic compounds. Flower buds smaller than 8 mm long have constitutive structural and biochemical barriers to Colletotrichum spp. infection. In addition, this is the first time that osmophores have been reported in citrus. Our study shows that natural terpenes of Citrus flowers inhibit the fungal growth in vitro, highlighting the potential use of terpenes for the chemical control of PFD in citrus. PMID:25535209

  15. RL-SAGE ANALYSIS OF THE RICE DEFENSE TRANSCRIPTOME DURING RICE AND RHIZOCTONIA SOLANI INTERACTION

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Sheath blight caused by the fungal pathogen Rhizoctonia solani is an emerging problem in rice production worldwide. To elucidate the molecular basis of rice defense to the pathogen, two RL-SAGE libraries were made from the R. solani infected and control plants of Jasmine 85, which is moderately resi...

  16. Rice Diseases. 

    E-print Network

    Jones, Roger K.

    1987-01-01

    (Blank P~ge in O .... a1-BUUetinl ? ~" -: . . r ". ./ RICE DISEASES Roger K. Jones * Rice diseases reduce yields in Texas by an average of 12 percent each year. The yield loss in certain fields with a history of disease may exceed 30... percent in some seasons. Disease development in individual fields depends upon the interaction of several factors including the genetic resistance of the variety planted, cropping practices, environmental conditions (such as temperature, dew periods...

  17. Characterization of citrus HSVd isolates

    Microsoft Academic Search

    A. Palacio-Bielsa; J. Romero-Durbán; N. Duran-Vila

    2004-01-01

    Summary. Seven citrus isolates of Hop stunt viroid (HSVd) were subjected to retrotranscription and DNA amplification (RT-PCR), cloning and sequencing. Single stranded polymorphism (SSCP) analysis demonstrated the existence of variability among and within cachexia inducing sources of HSVd. The electrophoretic profiles of SSCP appeared to be able to discriminate between non-cachexia and cachexia sources of HSVd. Sequence analysis demonstrated that

  18. A combined indexing and budwood propagation method for citrus

    Microsoft Academic Search

    M. Bar-Joseph; Y. Ben-Shalom

    1993-01-01

    Several budwood-transmitted citrus diseases, including citrus tristeza virus, citrus psorosis, citrus impietratura and a range\\u000a of citrus viroids, were tested both visually and biochemically on a combined indicator (CInd) plant consisting of an Alemow\\u000a (Citrus macrophylla) rootstock grafted with Etrog citron (C.medica) and Sour orange (C.aurantium) or Sweet orange (C.sinensis) buds. Indexing on CInd plants is economical for limited testing

  19. Lateral organ boundaries 1 is a disease susceptibility gene for citrus bacterial canker disease

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Y. Hu; J. Zhang; H. Jia; D. Sosso; T. Li; W. B. Frommer; B. Yang; F. F. White; N. Wang; J. B. Jones

    2014-01-01

    Citrus bacterial canker (CBC) disease occurs worldwide and incurs considerable costs both from control measures and yield losses. Bacteria that cause CBC require one of six known type III transcription activator-like (TAL) effector genes for the characteristic pustule formation at the site of infection. Here, we show that Xanthomonas citri subspecies citri strain Xcc306, with the type III TAL effector

  20. Citrus stubborn symptom severity and Spiroplasma citri location within the tress canopy

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The severity of symptoms of citrus stubborn disease (CSD) within an orchard can range from mild to severe, but whether factors other than pathogen titer or duration of infection impact severity is not known. We tested the hypothesis that the canopy distribution of the pathogen, Spiroplasma citri, i...

  1. An update on the effect of citrus greening on flavor and taste of orange juice

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    There have been some anecdotal reports that Huanglongbing (HLB) or citrus greening disease, recently introduced in Florida, may impart off flavor to orange juice. It is of interest to the processing industry to determine what affect fruit from trees of various stages of infection would have on proce...

  2. A multiplex polymerase chain reaction method for reliable, sensitive and simultaneous detection of multiple viruses in citrus trees

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Avijit Roy; Amer Fayad; G. Barthe; R. H. Brlansky

    2005-01-01

    A multiplex polymerase chain reaction (mPCR) assay was developed to detect six RNA and one DNA citrus virus: Citrus leaf rugose virus (CLRV), Citrus psorosis virus (CPsV), Citrus tatter leaf virus (CTLV), Citrus tristeza virus (CTV), Citrus variegation virus (CVV), Citrus yellow mosaic virus (CYMV), and Indian citrus ringspot virus (ICRSV) from citrus plants. These seven viruses are classified in

  3. Symptom-based diagnosis of Huanglongbing (citrus greening) disease by PCR in sweet orange (Citrus sinensis Osbeck) and acid lime (Citrus aurantifolia Swingle)

    Microsoft Academic Search

    K. Gopal; V. Gopi; L. Kalyani; M. Sreelatha; B. Sreenivasulu

    2010-01-01

    Huanglongbing (HLB), previously known as citrus greening disease, is one of the most destructive diseases of citrus and responsible for the decline of citrus orchards in Andhra Pradesh (AP) and other citrus growing areas in the country. Polymerase chain reaction (PCR) amplification of 1160 bp fragment of 16S rDNA of HLB was observed in mottling symptoms, yellow vein symptoms, symptoms

  4. Rice University | Rice Facts Index Undergraduates Graduates Faculty & Researchers Staff Alumni

    E-print Network

    Richards-Kortum, Rebecca

    Rice University | Rice Facts Index Undergraduates Graduates Faculty & Researchers Staff Alumni Rice Facts Rice Facts Index Rice Culture Academics Campus Features Rice Administration Resources Historical Facts Archives About OIR Rice News Feed Font Size Rice Facts Rice Culture Mission History

  5. Citrus tristeza virus replicates and forms infectious virions in protoplasts of resistant citrus relatives

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Maria R. Albiach-Marti; Jude W. Grosser; Siddarame Gowda; Munir Mawassi; Tatineni Satyanarayana; Stephen M. Garnsey; William O. Dawson

    2004-01-01

    Citrus tristeza virus (CTV) is the most economically important viral disease of citrus worldwide. Cultivars with improved CTV tolerance or resistance are needed to manage CTV-induced diseases. The citrus relatives Poncirus trifoliata (L.) Raf., Swinglea glutinosa (Blanco) Merr., and Severinia buxifolia (Poir) Ten. are potential sources of CTV resistance, but their resistance mechanisms are poorly characterized. As a first step

  6. Registered Pesticides and Citrus Terpenes as Blackbird Repellents for Rice

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Scott J. Werner; John L. Cummings; Patricia A. Pipas; Shelagh K. Tupper; Robert W. Byrd

    2008-01-01

    Nonlethal management alternatives are needed to minimize bird depredation of agricultural crops. We conducted 8 caged feeding tests and 2 field studies to evaluate 2 registered fungicides (GWN-4770, Gowan Company, Yuma, AZ; Quadrist, Syngenta Crop Protection, Greensboro, NC), a neem oil insecticide (Aza-Directt, Gowan Company), and a novel terpene formulation (Gander Gone, Natural Earth Products, Winter Springs, FL) as avian

  7. Diphenylurea Derivatives Induce Somatic Embryogenesis in Citrus

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Angela Carra; Fabio De Pasquale; Ada Ricci; Francesco Carimi

    2006-01-01

    The present research investigates the possibility that three diphenylurea (DPU) derivatives, N-phenyl-N?-benzothiazol-6-ylurea (PBU), N,N?-bis-(2,3-methilendioxyphenyl)urea (2,3-MDPU) and N,N?-bis-(3,4-methilendioxyphenyl)urea (3,4-MDPU), stimulate the induction of somatic embryogenesis in three Citrus species. The hypothetical embryogenic activity was assessed using stigma and styles of Citrus myrtifolia Raf., Citrus madurensis Lour. and Citrus limon (L.) Burm. The three compounds influenced the production of somatic embryos differently

  8. Citrus Allergy from Pollen to Clinical Symptoms

    PubMed Central

    Iorio, Rosa Anna; Del Duca, Stefano; Calamelli, Elisabetta; Pula, Chiara; Lodolini, Magda; Scamardella, Fortuna; Pession, Andrea; Ricci, Giampaolo

    2013-01-01

    Allergy to citrus fruits is often associated with pollinosis and sensitization to other plants due to a phenomenon of cross-reactivity. The aims of the present study were to highlight the cross-reactivity among citrus and the major allergenic pollens/fruits, throughout clinical and molecular investigations, and to evaluate the sensitization frequency to citrus fruits in a population of children and adults with pollinosis. We found a relevant percentage of sensitisation (39%) to citrus fruits in the patients recruited and in all of them the IgE-mediated mechanism has been confirmed by the positive response to the prick-to-prick test. RT-PCR experiments showed the expression of Cit s 1, Cit s 3 and a profilin isoform, already described in apple, also in Citrus clementine pollen. Data of multiple sequence alignments demonstrated that Citrus allergens shared high percentage identity values with other clinically relevant species (i.e. Triticum aestivum, Malus domestica), confirming the possible cross-allergenicity citrus/grasses and citrus/apple. Finally, a novelty of the present work has been the expression of two phospholipaseA2 isoforms (PLA2 ? and ?) in Citrus as well as in Triticum pollens; being PLA2 able to generate pro-inflammatory factors, this enzyme could participate in the activation of the allergenic inflammatory cascade. PMID:23308273

  9. Pharmacological properties of citrus and their ancient and medieval uses in the Mediterranean region

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Beatriz Álvarez Arias; Luis Ramón-Laca

    2005-01-01

    This paper reviews the pharmacological properties of Mediterranean-grown citrus species (Citrus L., Rutaceae), including citron (Citrus medica L.), lime (Citrus ×auantiifolia [Christm.] Swingle), lemon (Citrus ×limon [L.] Osbeck), bitter orange (Citrus ×aurantium L.) and pomelo (Citrus maxima [Burm.] Merr.), as referred to in ancient, medieval and 16th century sources. The virtues of the species reported in these texts were compared

  10. Citrus leprosis and its status in Florida and Texas: past and present.

    PubMed

    Childers, C C; Rodrigues, J C V; Derrick, K S; Achor, D S; French, J V; Welbourn, W C; Ochoa, R; Kitajima, E W

    2003-01-01

    According to published reports from 1906 to 1968, leprosis nearly destroyed the Florida citrus industry prior to 1925. This was supported with photographs showing typical leprosis symptoms on citrus leaves, fruit, and twigs. Support for the past occurrence of citrus leprosis in Florida includes: (1) presence of twig lesions in affected orange blocks in addition to lesions on fruits and leaves and corresponding absence of similar lesions on grapefruit; (2) yield reduction and die-back on infected trees; and (3) spread of the disease between 1906 and 1925. Transmission electron microscopy (TEM) examination of tissue samples from leprosis-like injuries to orange and grapefruit leaves from Florida in 1997, and fruits from grapefruit and sweet orange varieties from Texas in 1999 and 2000 did not contain leprosis-like viral particles or viroplasm inclusions. In contrast, leprosis viroplasm inclusions were readily identified by TEM within green non-senescent tissues surrounding leprosis lesions in two of every three orange leaf samples and half of the fruit samples obtained from Piracicaba, Brazil. Symptoms of leprosis were not seen in any of the 24,555 orange trees examined across Florida during 2001 and 2002. The authors conclude that citrus leprosis no longer exists in Florida nor occurs in Texas citrus based on: (1) lack of leprosis symptoms on leaves, fruit, and twigs of sweet orange citrus varieties surveyed in Florida: (2) failure to find virus particles or viroplasm inclusion bodies in suspect samples from both Florida and Texas examined by TEM; (3) absence of documented reports by others on the presence of characteristic leprosis symptoms in Florida; (4) lack of its documented occurrence in dooryard trees or abandoned or minimal pesticide citrus orchard sites in Florida. In view of the serious threat to citrus in the U.S., every effort must be taken to quarantine the importation of both citrus and woody ornamental plants that serve as hosts for Brevipalpus phoenicis (Geijskes), B. californicus (Banks), and B. obovatus Donnadieu (Acari: Tenuipalpidae) from countries where citrus leprosis occurs. PMID:14756416

  11. Prophage-Mediated Dynamics of ‘Candidatus Liberibacter asiaticus’ Populations, the Destructive Bacterial Pathogens of Citrus Huanglongbing

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Lijuan; Powell, Charles A.; Li, Wenbin; Irey, Mike; Duan, Yongping

    2013-01-01

    Prophages are highly dynamic components in the bacterial genome and play an important role in intraspecies variations. There are at least two prophages in the chromosomes of Candidatus Liberibacter asiaticus’ (Las) Floridian isolates. Las is both unculturable and the most prevalent species of Liberibacter pathogens that cause huanglongbing (HLB), a worldwide destructive disease of citrus. In this study, seven new prophage variants resulting from two hyper-variable regions were identified by screening clone libraries of infected citrus, periwinkle and psyllids. Among them, Types A and B share highly conserved sequences and localize within the two prophages, FP1 and FP2, respectively. Although Types B and C were abundant in all three libraries, Type A was much more abundant in the libraries from the Las-infected psyllids than from the Las-infected plants, and Type D was only identified in libraries from the infected host plants but not from the infected psyllids. Sequence analysis of these variants revealed that the variations may result from recombination and rearrangement events. Conventional PCR results using type-specific molecular markers indicated that A, B, C and D are the four most abundant types in Las-infected citrus and periwinkle. However, only three types, A, B and C are abundant in Las-infected psyllids. Typing results for Las-infected citrus field samples indicated that mixed populations of Las bacteria present in Floridian isolates, but only the Type D population was correlated with the blotchy mottle symptom. Extended cloning and sequencing of the Type D region revealed a third prophage/phage in the Las genome, which may derive from the recombination of FP1 and FP2. Dramatic variations in these prophage regions were also found among the global Las isolates. These results are the first to demonstrate the prophage/phage-mediated dynamics of Las populations in plant and insect hosts, and their correlation with insect transmission and disease development. PMID:24349235

  12. Citrus psorosis is probably caused by a bipartite ssRNA virus.

    PubMed

    Garcia, M L; Grau, O; Sarachu, A N

    1991-01-01

    Isolate 90-1-1 Concordia (Argentina) of the citrus psorosis agent was graft-transmitted to citrus and mechanically transmitted to Chenopodium quinoa, which was used as a local lesion assay host. Infected citrus and C. quinoa plant lesions were used as starting materials for the purification of the psorosis-associated agent. In extracts partially purified by differential centrifugation, infectivity was abolished by RNase treatment, even in 0.3 M NaCl, indicating that ssRNA is required for biological activity. The total loss of infectivity produced by proteinase K treatment and the decline in infectivity caused by phenol extraction indicated that protein may be essential for infectivity. When partially purified extracts were subjected to sucrose density gradient centrifugation, infectivity on C. quinoa from certain 2-fraction combinations was higher than expected, compared to the infectivity of the individual fractions. Therefore, infectivity was not associated with a single component but with the combination of at least two components which were distinguishable on sedimentation. The infectious material was present in the top and bottom zones of a sucrose gradient, which on further purification by a second gradient and agarose gel electrophoresis, revealed the presence of a 50-kDa protein. This protein was absent in comparable gradient fractions from healthy plants, and therefore most likely represented the capsid protein of both the top and bottom sucrose gradient zone components. Taken together, these results led to the conclusion that the citrus-psorosis-associated virus (CPsAV) is a multipartite virus, containing ssRNA and a 50-kDa coat protein.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:1724569

  13. Investigating alternatives to traditional insecticides: effectiveness of entomopathogenic fungi and Bacillus thuringiensis against citrus thrips and avocado thrips (Thysanoptera: Thripidae).

    PubMed

    Zahn, Deane K; Morse, Joseph G

    2013-02-01

    Citrus thrips, Scirtothrips citri (Moulton) (Thysanoptera: Thripidae), is a plant-feeding pest most widely recognized for causing damage to citrus (Citrus spp. L. [Rutaceae]) and mango (Mangifera indica L. [Anacardiaceae]) fruits. This insect has recently broadened its known host range to become a significant pest of California grown blueberries. Avocado thrips, Scirtothrips. perseae Nakahara (Thysanoptera: Thripidae), is a recent, invasive pest of California avocados, Persea americana Mill. (Laurales: Lauraceae). Effective alternatives to traditional pesticides are desirable for both pests to reduce impacts on natural enemies and broaden control options in an effort to minimize pesticide resistance via rotation of control materials. We evaluated Bacillus thuringiensis (Bt) subsp. israelensis proteins (Cyt 1A and Cry 11A, activated and inactivated) and multiple strains (GHA, 1741ss, SFBb1, S44ss, NI1ss, and 3769ss) of Beauveria bassiana (Balsamo) Vuillemin against both species. Avocado thrips and citrus thrips were not susceptible to either Bt protein tested, regardless of activation status. All strains of B. bassiana were able to infect both avocado thrips and citrus thrips. However, the commercially available GHA strain was the most effective strain against both species and had a faster rate of infection then the other strains tested. Citrus thrips were more susceptible than avocado thrips to all B. bassiana strains (LC50 and LC95 of 8.6 x 10(4) and 4.8 x 10(6) conidia per ml for citrus thrips, respectively). Investigation of citrus thrips field control using the GHA strain of B. bassiana is therefore justified. PMID:23448016

  14. Distribution of citrus viroids and Apple stem grooving virus on citrus trees in Japan using multiplex reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Takao Ito; Nobuyuki Namba; Tsutae Ito

    2003-01-01

    The distribution of citrus viroids – Citrus exocortis viroid (CEVd), Citrus bent leaf viroid (CBLVd), Citrus viroid (CVd)-I-LSS, Hop stunt viroid (HSVd), Citrus viroid III (CVd-III), Citrus viroid IV (CVd-IV), and Citrus viroid OS (CVd-OS) – and Apple stem grooving virus (ASGV; synonym: Citrus tatter leaf virus) were investigated using the multiplex reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction\\u000a on samples from

  15. Simultaneous detection of six citrus viroids and Apple stem grooving virus from citrus plants by multiplex reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Takao Ito; Hiroyuki Ieki; Katsumi Ozaki

    2002-01-01

    We developed a multiplex reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) to detect six citrus viroids: Citrus exocortis viroid (CEVd), Citrus bent leaf viroid (CBLVd), Hop stunt viroid (HSVd), Citrus viroid III (CVd-III), Citrus viroid IV (CVd-IV) and Citrus viroid OS (CVd-OS) and Apple stem grooving virus (ASGV, synonym: Citrus tatter leaf virus (CTLV)) from citrus plants. The multiplex RT-PCR was

  16. Incidence and severity of Asiatic citrus canker on citrus and citrus–related germplasm in a Florida field planting

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Xanthomonas citri ssp. citri (Hasse), is the causal agent of Asiatic citrus canker (ACC), a commercially important disease in Florida citrus, as well as in many other regions. In this study we evaluated occurrence of foliar lesions from ACC on progenies of 94 seed-source genotypes (hereafter called ...

  17. QCM immunoassay for recombinant cysteine peptidase: a potential protein biomarker for diagnosis of citrus canker.

    PubMed

    Afonso, André S; Zanetti, Bianca F; Santiago, Adelita C; Henrique-Silva, Flavio; Mattoso, Luiz H C; Faria, Ronaldo C

    2013-01-30

    Citrus canker is one of the most important agricultural citrus diseases worldwide. It is caused by Xanthomonas citri subsp. citri (Xcc) bacterium that infects leaves and the fruits produce a cysteine peptidase (CPXaC), which makes it a potential target for the development of effective and rapid detection methods for citrus canker. We report here the studies on the development of piezoelectric immunoassay for CPXaC using a polyclonal antibody against CPXaC (anti-CPXaC). Three different strategies for covalent immobilization of anti-CPXaC on gold surfaces were evaluated by monitoring the frequency (?f) and energy dissipation (?D) variation in real time when 64.5×10(-8) mol L(-1) CPXaC was added. Anti-CPXaC immobilized with 11-mercaptoundecanoic acid (MUA) showed the best relation between the frequency and dissipation factor variation, and strong values for the kinetic and equilibrium binding constant were obtained. The immunosensor showed a detection limit of 13.0 nmol L(-1) with excellent specificity, showing no response for different proteins that include another cysteine peptidase that is used as a target to detect Xylella fastidiosa bacterium, responsible for another important citrus disease. These results provide good perspectives for the use of CPXaC as a new biomarker for citrus canker. PMID:23597909

  18. Combination of Kluyveromyces marxianus and sodium bicarbonate for controlling green mold of citrus fruit.

    PubMed

    Geng, Peng; Chen, Shaohua; Hu, Meiying; Rizwan-Ul-Haq, Muhammad; Lai, Kaiping; Qu, Fei; Zhang, Yanbo

    2011-12-01

    Biocontrol efficacy of an antagonistic yeast Kluyveromyces marxianus was evaluated individually or in combination with sodium bicarbonate (SBC) against green mold of citrus fruit caused by Penicillium digitatum. Their effects on postharvest quality of citrus fruit were also investigated. The results indicated that the antagonistic activity of K. marxianus at 1×10? CFU/mL on green mold of citrus fruit was enhanced by 2% SBC treatment. In artificial inoculation trials, disease control after 3 and 6 days, respectively, with the mixture of K. marxianus and 2% SBC (18.33%, 58.33%) was significantly improved over that obtained with K. marxianus (41.67%, 70.00%) or SBC (43.33%, 81.67%) alone. The combination of K. marxianus with SBC was as effective as the imazalil treatment in natural infection trials, which gave about 90% control of green mold. Addition of 2% SBC significantly stimulated the growth of K. marxianus in citrus fruit wounds after 72 h. Moreover, K. marxianus, SBC and their combination did not impair quality parameters including weight loss, fruit firmness, total soluble solids, titratable acidity and ascorbic acid at 4 °C for 30 days followed by 20 °C for 15 days. These results suggested that the use of SBC is a useful approach to improve the efficacy of K. marxianus for the postharvest green mold of citrus fruit. PMID:21920618

  19. Cooperation in the Conservation of Citrus Genetic Resources: Riverside, California

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    A consortium of cooperating programs for the conservation and utilization of citrus genetic resources is centered at the University of California, Riverside (UCR). University units include the Citrus Clonal Protection Program (CCPP), Citrus Variety Collection (CVC), and Citrus Breeding Program (CBP...

  20. Citrus Viruses in Guatemala: Application of Laboratory-Based Assays

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    In preparation for a citrus certification in Guatemala, there was an urgent need to determine which graft transmissible citrus pathogens were present. Because of the lack of biological indicator plants, Citrus tristeza virus (CTV) and Xylella fastidiosa, causal agent for citrus variegated chlorosis...

  1. Citrus Diseases Exotic to Florida: Black Spot1

    Microsoft Academic Search

    K.-R. Chung; N. A. Peres; L. W. Timmer

    Citrus is susceptible to a large number of diseases caused by plant pathogens. Economic losses due to plant diseases can be severe, but fortunately, not all pathogens attacking citrus are present in Florida. Major citrus diseases currently present in Florida include tristeza, blight, greasy spot, Alternaria brown spot, Phytophthora-induced diseases, melanose, scab, postbloom fruit drop (PFD), and citrus canker. An

  2. Citrus Diseases Exotic to Florida: Sweet Orange Scab (SOS)1

    Microsoft Academic Search

    K.-R. Chung; L. W. Timmer

    Citrus is susceptible to a large number of diseases caused by a wide range of plant pathogens. Economic losses due to plant diseases can be severe, but fortunately, not all pathogens that attack citrus worldwide are present in Florida. Citrus diseases of economic importance currently in Florida include: Alternaria brown spot, blight, citrus canker, greening, greasy spot, melanose, Phytophthora-induced diseases

  3. VIRUS AND VIRUS-LIKE DISEASES OF CITRUS IN EPIRUS

    Microsoft Academic Search

    L. Barbarossa; G. Loconsole; C. Vovlas

    2007-01-01

    SUMMARY In 2005 a survey was conducted in the main citrus- growing areas of Epirus. Commercial groves and nurs- eries were inspected for symptoms of virus and virus- like diseases and a total of 123 samples were collected. Molecular hybridisation was used to test for Citrus tris- teza virus (CTV), Citrus psorosis virus (CPsV), Citrus in- fectious variegation virus (CVV),

  4. Effective Antibiotics against ‘Candidatus Liberibacter asiaticus’ in HLB-Affected Citrus Plants Identified via the Graft-Based Evaluation

    PubMed Central

    Powell, Charles A.; Doud, Melissa S.; Yang, Chuanyu; Duan, Yongping

    2014-01-01

    Citrus huanglongbing (HLB), caused by three species of fastidious, phloem-limited ‘Candidatus Liberibacter’, is one of the most destructive diseases of citrus worldwide. To date, there is no established cure for this century-old and yet, newly emerging disease. As a potential control strategy for citrus HLB, 31 antibiotics were screened for effectiveness and phytotoxicity using the optimized graft-based screening system with ‘Candidatus Liberibacter asiaticus’ (Las)-infected citrus scions. Actidione and Oxytetracycline were the most phytotoxic to citrus with less than 10% of scions surviving and growing; therefore, this data was not used in additional analyses. Results of principal component (PCA) and hierarchical clustering analyses (HCA) demonstrated that 29 antibiotics were clustered into 3 groups: highly effective, partly effective, and not effective. In spite of different modes of actions, a number of antibiotics such as, Ampicillin, Carbenicillin, Penicillin, Cefalexin, Rifampicin and Sulfadimethoxine were all highly effective in eliminating or suppressing Candidatus Liberibacter asiaticus indicated by both the lowest Las infection rate and titers of the treated scions and inoculated rootstock. The non-effective group, including 11 antibiotics alone with three controls, such as Amikacin, Cinoxacin, Gentamicin, Kasugamycin, Lincomycin, Neomycin, Polymixin B and Tobramycin, did not eliminate or suppress Las in the tested concentrations, resulting in plants with increased titers of Las. The other 12 antibiotics partly eliminated or suppressed Las in the treated and graft-inoculated plants. The effective and non-phytotoxic antibiotics could be potential candidates for control of citrus HLB, either for the rescue of infected citrus germplasm or for restricted field application. PMID:25372135

  5. Effective antibiotics against 'Candidatus Liberibacter asiaticus' in HLB-affected citrus plants identified via the graft-based evaluation.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Muqing; Guo, Ying; Powell, Charles A; Doud, Melissa S; Yang, Chuanyu; Duan, Yongping

    2014-01-01

    Citrus huanglongbing (HLB), caused by three species of fastidious, phloem-limited 'Candidatus Liberibacter', is one of the most destructive diseases of citrus worldwide. To date, there is no established cure for this century-old and yet, newly emerging disease. As a potential control strategy for citrus HLB, 31 antibiotics were screened for effectiveness and phytotoxicity using the optimized graft-based screening system with 'Candidatus Liberibacter asiaticus' (Las)-infected citrus scions. Actidione and Oxytetracycline were the most phytotoxic to citrus with less than 10% of scions surviving and growing; therefore, this data was not used in additional analyses. Results of principal component (PCA) and hierarchical clustering analyses (HCA) demonstrated that 29 antibiotics were clustered into 3 groups: highly effective, partly effective, and not effective. In spite of different modes of actions, a number of antibiotics such as, Ampicillin, Carbenicillin, Penicillin, Cefalexin, Rifampicin and Sulfadimethoxine were all highly effective in eliminating or suppressing Candidatus Liberibacter asiaticus indicated by both the lowest Las infection rate and titers of the treated scions and inoculated rootstock. The non-effective group, including 11 antibiotics alone with three controls, such as Amikacin, Cinoxacin, Gentamicin, Kasugamycin, Lincomycin, Neomycin, Polymixin B and Tobramycin, did not eliminate or suppress Las in the tested concentrations, resulting in plants with increased titers of Las. The other 12 antibiotics partly eliminated or suppressed Las in the treated and graft-inoculated plants. The effective and non-phytotoxic antibiotics could be potential candidates for control of citrus HLB, either for the rescue of infected citrus germplasm or for restricted field application. PMID:25372135

  6. Small RNA Profiling Reveals Phosphorus Deficiency as a Contributing Factor in Symptom Expression for Citrus Huanglongbing Disease

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Hongwei; Sun, Ruobai; Jin, Hailing

    2013-01-01

    Huanglongbing (HLB) is a devastating citrus disease that is associated with bacteria of the genus ‘Candidatus Liberibacter’ (Ca. L.). Powerful diagnostic tools and management strategies are desired to control HLB. Host small RNAs (sRNA) play a vital role in regulating host responses to pathogen infection and are used as early diagnostic markers for many human diseases, including cancers. To determine whether citrus sRNAs regulate host responses to HLB, sRNAs were profiled from Citrus sinensis 10 and 14 weeks post grafting with Ca. L. asiaticus (Las)-positive or healthy tissue. Ten new microRNAs (miRNAs), 76 conserved miRNAs, and many small interfering RNAs (siRNAs) were discovered. Several miRNAs and siRNAs were highly induced by Las infection, and can be potentially developed into early diagnosis markers of HLB. miR399, which is induced by phosphorus starvation in other plant species, was induced specifically by infection of Las but not Spiroplasma citri that causes citrus stubborn—a disease with symptoms similar to HLB. We found a 35% reduction of phosphorus in Las-positive citrus trees compared to healthy trees. Applying phosphorus oxyanion solutions to HLB-positive sweet orange trees reduced HLB symptom severity and significantly improved fruit production during a 3-year field trial in south-west Florida. Our molecular, physiological, and field data suggest that phosphorus deficiency is linked to HLB disease symptomology. PMID:23292880

  7. Pesticide residues survey in citrus fruits

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Didier Ortelli; Patrick Edder; Claude Corvi

    2005-01-01

    The use of pesticides is widespread in citrus fruits production for pre- and post-harvest protection and many chemical substances may be applied in order to control undesirable moulds or insects. A survey was carried out to evaluate levels of pesticide residues in citrus fruits. Two multiresidue analytical methods were used to screen samples for more than 200 different fungicides, insecticides

  8. Functional analysis of block deesterified citrus pectins

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    After removal of soluble sugars and other compounds by washing, citrus peel is largely composed of pectin, cellulose and hemicellulose. In order to utilize the greatest amount of citrus peel product, it would appear reasonable that one or all three of these polysaccharides be converted to a useful ...

  9. Evaluating the effects of cold water diffusates against Xanthomonas oryzae Pv. Oryzae causing bacterial leaf blight (BLB) in rice

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Rukhsana Jabeen; Muhammad Ashraf; Iftikhar Ahmad

    2009-01-01

    The crude extracts of 63 plants were used for testing antibacterial activity against Xanthmonas oryazae Pv. oryzae that causes bacterial leaf blight (BLB) in rice plants. Only ten aqueous extracts of botanicals (Thuja orientalis, Prunus domestica, Citrus limon, Allium sativum, Vitis vinefera, Mangifera indica, Phyllanthus emblica, and Terminalia chebula) showed maximum activity against Xanthmonas oryazae in a plate agar diffusion

  10. Tolerance of the trifoliate citrus hybrid US-897 (Citrus reticulata Blanco x Poncirus trifoliata L. Raf.) to Huanglongbing

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Huanglongbing (HLB) is a destructive disease of citrus in most citrus-producing countries worldwide. The disease, presumably caused by phloem-limited bacteria of the genus Candidatus Liberibacter, affects all known citrus species and citrus relatives with little known resistance. Typical disease s...

  11. Antennal and behavioral response of the Asian citrus psyllid (Diaphorina citri Kuwayama) to degradation products of citrus volatiles

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Asian citrus psyllid, Diaphorina citri Kuwayama (Hemiptera: Liviidae) vectors the bacterial causal pathogen of the deadly citrus disease, Huanglongbing (citrus greening) which is a major threat to citrus industry worldwide. We studied antennal and behavioral responses to principal components of head...

  12. Transcriptome Profiling of Citrus Fruit Response to Huanglongbing Disease

    PubMed Central

    Martinelli, Federico; Uratsu, Sandra L.; Albrecht, Ute; Reagan, Russell L.; Phu, My L.; Britton, Monica; Buffalo, Vincent; Fass, Joseph; Leicht, Elizabeth; Zhao, Weixiang; Lin, Dawei; D'Souza, Raissa; Davis, Cristina E.; Bowman, Kim D.; Dandekar, Abhaya M.

    2012-01-01

    Huanglongbing (HLB) or “citrus greening” is the most destructive citrus disease worldwide. In this work, we studied host responses of citrus to infection with Candidatus Liberibacter asiaticus (CaLas) using next-generation sequencing technologies. A deep mRNA profile was obtained from peel of healthy and HLB-affected fruit. It was followed by pathway and protein-protein network analysis and quantitative real time PCR analysis of highly regulated genes. We identified differentially regulated pathways and constructed networks that provide a deep insight into the metabolism of affected fruit. Data mining revealed that HLB enhanced transcription of genes involved in the light reactions of photosynthesis and in ATP synthesis. Activation of protein degradation and misfolding processes were observed at the transcriptomic level. Transcripts for heat shock proteins were down-regulated at all disease stages, resulting in further protein misfolding. HLB strongly affected pathways involved in source-sink communication, including sucrose and starch metabolism and hormone synthesis and signaling. Transcription of several genes involved in the synthesis and signal transduction of cytokinins and gibberellins was repressed while that of genes involved in ethylene pathways was induced. CaLas infection triggered a response via both the salicylic acid and jasmonic acid pathways and increased the transcript abundance of several members of the WRKY family of transcription factors. Findings focused on the fruit provide valuable insight to understanding the mechanisms of the HLB-induced fruit disorder and eventually developing methods based on small molecule applications to mitigate its devastating effects on fruit production. PMID:22675433

  13. Isolation and identification of citrus psorosis virus Egyptian isolate (CPsV-EG).

    PubMed

    Ghazal, S A; El-Dougdoug, Kh A; Mousa, A A; Fahmy, H; Sofy, A R

    2008-01-01

    Citrus psorosis ophiovirus (CPsV), is considered to be of the most serious and deter mental virus pathogen's citrus species trees in Egypt. CPsV-EG was isolated from infected citrus grapefruit (C. paradisi Macf.) at Agric. Res. Centre (ARC). The grapefruit which used for CPsV-EG isolate was found to be free from CTV, CEVd and Spiroplasma citri where as gave -ve results with DTBIA, tissue print hybridization and Diene's stain respectively. CPsV-EG was detected on the basis of biological indexing by graft inoculation which gave oak leaf pattern (OLP) on Dweet tangor and serological assay by DAS-ELISA using Mab specific CPsV. CPsV-EG was reacted with variable responses on 16 host plants belonging to 6 families. Only 8 host plants are susceptible and showed visible external symptoms which appeared as local, systemic and local followed by systemic infections. CPsV-EG isolate was transmitted from infected citrus to citrus by syringe and grafting and herbaceous plants by forefinger inoculation and syringe. The woody indicators and rootstocks were differed in response to CPsV-EG isolate which appeared as no-response, response, sensitivity and hypersensitivity. The serological characters represented as the antigenic determinants of CPsV-EG isolate related to monoclonal antibodies specific CPsV strain where as appeared precipitation reaction by DAS-ELISA and DTBIA. The partial fragment of RNA3 (coat protein gene) of CPsV-EG (-1140bp and -571bp) was amplified by reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) from grapefruit tissues using two sets primers specific CPsV (CPV3 and CPV4) and (PS66 and PS65) respectively. The virus under study was identified as CPsV-EG isolate according to biological, serological and molecular characters. PMID:19226765

  14. Population structure of Citrus tristeza virus from field Argentinean isolates.

    PubMed

    Iglesias, Néstor G; Gago-Zachert, Selma P; Robledo, Germán; Costa, Norma; Plata, María Inés; Vera, Osmar; Grau, Oscar; Semorile, Liliana C

    2008-02-01

    We studied the genetic variability of three genomic regions (p23, p25 and p27 genes) from 11 field Citrus tristeza virus isolates from the two main citrus growing areas of Argentina, a country where the most efficient vector of the virus, Toxoptera citricida, is present for decades. The pathogenicity of the isolates was determinated by biological indexing, single-strand conformation polymorphism analysis showed that most isolates contained high intra-isolate variability. Divergent sequence variants were detected in some isolates, suggesting re-infections of the field plants. Phylogenetic analysis of the predominant sequence variants of each isolate revealed similar grouping of isolates for genes p25 and p27. The analysis of p23 showed two groups contained the severe isolates. Our results showed a high intra-isolate sequence variability suggesting that re-infections could contribute to the observed variability and that the host can play an important role in the selection of the sequence variants present in these isolates. PMID:17999168

  15. Brassica cover cropping for management of sheath blight of rice

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Sheath blight, caused by Rhizoctonia solani, is the most important disease limiting rice production in Texas and other rice-producing states. The fungal pathogen survives between crops as soilborne sclerotia and mycelium in infected plant debris. These sclerotia and colonized plant debris float on t...

  16. Chemical Nature of a Plant-Virus Inhibitor from Rice

    Microsoft Academic Search

    W. A. Jones; M. Jacobson; R. P. KAHN

    1959-01-01

    THE inhibition of tobacco mosaic virus infection of primary bean leaves (Phaseolus vulgaris L. var. Pinto) by extracts of various portions of rice plants has been described recently1. The inhibitor or inhibitors present in rice resemble those derived from other plants such as spinach (Spinacea oleracea L.)2, poke weed (Phytolacca acinosa Roxb. var. esculenta)3, New Zealand spinach (Tetragonia expansa Murr.)4,

  17. Accumulation of the sesquiterpenes nootkatone and valencene by callus cultures of Citrus paradisi, Citrus limonia and Citrus aurantium.

    PubMed

    Del Río, J A; Ortuño, A; Puig, D G; Iborra, J L; Sabater, F

    1991-10-01

    The production of the sesquiterpenes nootkatone and valencene by callus cultures of Citrus species is described. The levels of these compounds were examined by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry and their yields were compared with the amounts found in mature fruits. A simultaneous increase and decrease in the levels of nootkatone and valencene, respectively, were observed with the aging of callus cultures of Citrus paradisi. These results suggest that valencene might be a possible precursor of nootkatone in this species. The high level of nootkatone detected in 9-month-old callus cultures of Citrus paradisi might be associated with the corresponding cell morphological changes observed. PMID:24221735

  18. Citrus biotechnology: Achievements, limitations and future directions.

    PubMed

    Singh, Sandeepa; Rajam, Manchikatla V

    2009-01-01

    Citrus is one of the most important commercial and nutritional fruit crops in the world, hence it needs to be improved to cater to the diverse needs of consumers and crop breeders. Genetic manipulation through conventional techniques in this genus is invariably a difficult task for plant breeders as it poses various biological limitations comprising long juvenile period, high heterozygosity, sexual incompatibility, nucellar polyembryony and large plant size that greatly hinder cultivar improvement. Hence, several attempts were made to improve Citrus sps. by using various in vitro techniques. Citrus sps are widely known for their recalcitrance to transformation and subsequent rooting, but constant research has led to the establishment of improved protocols to ensure the production of uniformly transformed plants, albeit with relatively low efficiency, depending upon the genotype. Genetic modification through Agrobacterium-mediated transformation has emerged as an important tool for introducing agronomically important genes into Citrus sps. Somatic hybridization has been applied to overcome self and cross-incompatibility barriers and generated inter-specific and inter-generic hybrids. Encouraging results have been achieved through transgenics for resistance against viruses and bacteria, thereby augmenting the yield and quality of the fruit. Now, when major transformation and regeneration protocols have sufficiently been standardized for important cultivars, ongoing citrus research focuses mainly on incorporating such genes in citrus genotypes that can combat different biotic and abiotic stresses. This review summarizes the advances made so far in Citrus biotechnology, and suggests some future directions of research in this fruit crop. PMID:23572908

  19. Diversity of endophytic bacterial populations and their interaction with Xylella fastidiosa in citrus plants.

    PubMed

    Araújo, Welington L; Marcon, Joelma; Maccheroni, Walter; Van Elsas, Jan Dirk; Van Vuurde, Jim W L; Azevedo, João Lúcio

    2002-10-01

    Citrus variegated chlorosis (CVC) is caused by Xylella fastidiosa, a phytopathogenic bacterium that can infect all Citrus sinensis cultivars. The endophytic bacterial communities of healthy, resistant, and CVC-affected citrus plants were studied by using cultivation as well as cultivation-independent techniques. The endophytic communities were assessed in surface-disinfected citrus branches by plating and denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis (DGGE). Dominant isolates were characterized by fatty-acid methyl ester analysis as Bacillus pumilus, Curtobacterium flaccumfaciens, Enterobacter cloacae, Methylobacterium spp. (including Methylobacterium extorquens, M. fujisawaense, M. mesophilicum, M. radiotolerans, and M. zatmanii), Nocardia sp., Pantoea agglomerans, and Xanthomonas campestris. We observed a relationship between CVC symptoms and the frequency of isolation of species of Methylobacterium, the genus that we most frequently isolated from symptomatic plants. In contrast, we isolated C. flaccumfaciens significantly more frequently from asymptomatic plants than from those with symptoms of CVC while P. agglomerans was frequently isolated from tangerine (Citrus reticulata) and sweet-orange (C. sinensis) plants, irrespective of whether the plants were symptomatic or asymptomatic or showed symptoms of CVC. DGGE analysis of 16S rRNA gene fragments amplified from total plant DNA resulted in several bands that matched those from the bacterial isolates, indicating that DGGE profiles can be used to detect some endophytic bacteria of citrus plants. However, some bands had no match with any isolate, suggesting the occurrence of other, nonculturable or as yet uncultured, endophytic bacteria. A specific band with a high G+C ratio was observed only in asymptomatic plants. The higher frequency of C. flaccumfaciens in asymptomatic plants suggests a role for this organism in the resistance of plants to CVC. PMID:12324338

  20. Rice Young Alumni Information

    E-print Network

    Palem, Krishna V.

    Rice Young Alumni Detailed Information: Houston Young Alumni Committee Programs 2011-2012 #12; Rice Young Alumni Information Alumni.rice.edu The Houston Young Alumni Committee Helps Shape Your Young Alumni Programs The Houston Young Alumni Committee represents the over 2,300 Rice undergrad

  1. RICE GENETICS IV

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    With the genome sequencing of the two major subspecies of rice (Oryza sativa ssp. indica and japonica) and the close genetic relationship of rice with other cereal crops, interest in rice as a model plant system has never been greater. This review of the book Rice Genetics IV, which represents a co...

  2. Comparison of antifungal activities of Vietnamese citrus essential oils.

    PubMed

    Van Hung, Pham; Chi, Pham Thi Lan; Phi, Nguyen Thi Lan

    2013-03-01

    Citrus essential oils (EOs) are volatile compounds from citrus peels and widely used in perfumes, cosmetics, soaps and aromatherapy. In this study, inhibition of citrus EOs extracted from Vietnamese orange (Citrus sinensis), mandarin (Citrus reticulata Blanco), pomelo (Citrus grandis Osbeck) and lime (Citrus aurantifolia Swingle) on the growth of plant pathogenic fungi, Mucor hiemalis, Penicillium expansum and Fusarium proliferatum was investigated. The EOs of the citrus peels were obtained by cold-pressing method and the antifungal activity of EOs was evaluated using the agar dilution method. The results show that the EOs had significant antifungal activity. Lime EO was the best inhibitor of M. hiemalis and F. proliferatum while pomelo EO was the most effective against P. expansum. These results indicate that citrus EOs can be used as antifungal natural products in the food, pharmaceutical and cosmetic industries. PMID:22799453

  3. Characterization of the Asian Citrus Psyllid Transcriptome

    PubMed Central

    Reese, Justin; Christenson, Matthew K.; Leng, Nan; Saha, Surya; Cantarel, Brandi; Lindeberg, Magdalen; Tamborindeguy, Cecilia; MacCarthy, Justin; Weaver, Daniel; Trease, Andrew J.; Ready, Steven V.; Davis, Vincent M.; McCormick, Courtney; Haudenschild, Christian; Han, Shunsheng; Johnson, Shannon L.; Shelby, Kent S.; Huang, Hong; Bextine, Blake R.; Shatters, Robert G.; Hall, David G.; Davis, Paul H.; Hunter, Wayne B.

    2014-01-01

    The Asian citrus psyllid, Diaphorina citri Kuwayama (Hemiptera: Psyllidae) is a vector for the causative agents of Huanglongbing, which threatens citrus production worldwide. This study reports and discusses the first D. citri transcriptomes, encompassing the three main life stages of D. citri, egg, nymph and adult. The transcriptomes were annotated using Gene Ontology (GO) and insecticide-related genes within each life stage were identified to aid the development of future D. citri insecticides. Transcriptome assemblies and other sequence data are available for download at the International Asian Citrus Psyllid Genome Consortium website [http://psyllid.org/download] and at NCBI [http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/bioproject/29447]. PMID:24511328

  4. Observations on the entomopathogenic fungus Hirsutella citriformis attacking adult Diaphorina citri (Hemiptera: Psyllid) in a managed citrus grove

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    A two-year field study was conducted in an orange grove (0.7 ha) in Florida to characterize the phenology of the entomopathogen Hirsutella citriformis Speare infecting adults of the Asian citrus psyllid, Diaphorina citri Kuwayama. On the average over the two-year study, 23 percent of adults observed...

  5. Investigation of seedling yellows cross protection by mild components of the Dekopon strain of Citrus tristeza virus

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Virulent strains of Citrus tristeza virus (CTV) can be controlled by pre-infection by mild strains of CTV which is called cross protection. However, the mode of action of cross protection is unknown and its durability unpredictable. RNA silencing is a regulatory mechanism to maintain genome integri...

  6. Stylet morphometrics and citrus leaf vein structure in relation to feeding behavior of the Asian citrus psyllid Diaphorina citri, vector of citrus huanglongbing bacterium

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The Asian citrus psyllid (ACP), Diaphorina citri (Hemiptera: Psyllidae), is the primary vector of the phloem-limited bacterium Candidatus Liberibacter asiaticus (LAS) associated with huanglongbing (HLB, citrus greening), considered the world’s most serious disease of citrus. Stylet morphometrics of ...

  7. Leadership Rice The mission of Leadership RiceistohelpRiceUniversityundergraduates

    E-print Network

    Richards-Kortum, Rebecca

    189 Leadership Rice The mission of Leadership RiceistohelpRiceSummerMentorship ExperienceandtheLeadershipCertificate.LEAD309isofferedonlyduring thefall.Othercoursesmaybetakenindependently.LeadershipRiceLeadershipCertificateforstudentseagertoexperience personalgrowthandreflectdeeplyontheiractivitieswhileatRice.Theintention ofthecertificateisnottohavestudentsburdenedbydoingmorebuttogetmore

  8. Hang.Yu@rice.edu lzhong@rice.edu

    E-print Network

    Zhong, Lin

    Hang Yu Hang.Yu@rice.edu Lin Zhong lzhong@rice.edu Ashutosh Sabharwal ashu@rice.edu Department of Electrical & Computer Engineering, Rice University, Houston, TX 77005 All current mobile devices are omni

  9. Considering the citrus grove of the future

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Revolutionary changes now face the Florida citrus industry as producers grapple with economically profitable production using greening susceptible material. Changing economic realties have encouraged many tree fruit industries to modify planting density, tree architecture, and training/production s...

  10. Symmetric and asymmetric hybridization in citrus spp. 

    E-print Network

    Bona, Claudine M.

    2009-05-15

    The United States is the second largest producer of oranges and grapefruit. However, the US citrus industry experiences constraints in production due to pests, diseases and environmental concerns. Furthermore, due to the ...

  11. Citrus fruit recognition using color image analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Huirong; Ying, Yibin

    2004-10-01

    An algorithm for the automatic recognition of citrus fruit on the tree was developed. Citrus fruits have different color with leaves and branches portions. Fifty-three color images with natural citrus-grove scenes were digitized and analyzed for red, green, and blue (RGB) color content. The color characteristics of target surfaces (fruits, leaves, or branches) were extracted using the range of interest (ROI) tool. Several types of contrast color indices were designed and tested. In this study, the fruit image was enhanced using the (R-B) contrast color index because results show that the fruit have the highest color difference among the objects in the image. A dynamic threshold function was derived from this color model and used to distinguish citrus fruit from background. The results show that the algorithm worked well under frontlighting or backlighting condition. However, there are misclassifications when the fruit or the background is under a brighter sunlight.

  12. A Polygalacturonase from Citrus Leaf Explants

    PubMed Central

    Riov, J.

    1974-01-01

    The relationship between polygalacturonase activity and abscission of citrus leaf explants was studied. Determination of polygalacturonase activity in citrus tissues requires concentration of the enzyme, use of a proper assay method, and inhibition of an oxidase present in the extracts which oxidizes the reaction products of the polygalacturonase. The polygalacturonase from citrus leaf explants is an exopolygalacturonase and appears to be a soluble enzyme. Polygalacturonase activity increased during abscission of citrus leaf explants and was localized in the separation layer. Ethylene accelerated the increase in polygalacturonase activity, but its effect was evident only after at least an 8-hour lag period. 2,4-Dichlorophenoxyacetic acid and cycloheximide inhibited abscission and polygalacturonase activity. It is concluded that polygalacturonase, in addition to cellulase, plays a role in abscission. Images PMID:16658697

  13. Citrus phytophthora diseases: Management challenges and successes

    E-print Network

    Graham, J.; Feichtenberger, E.

    2015-01-01

    soil conditions such as high pH, calcium iocv_journalcitruspathology_27203 Table 2 Differential susceptibility of the major rootstocks planted in Florida and Brazilsoils. HLB, the most destructive disease of citrus world- wide, was detected in Brazil

  14. The aconitate hydratase family from Citrus

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Research on citrus fruit ripening has received considerable attention because of the importance of citrus fruits for the human diet. Organic acids are among the main determinants of taste and organoleptic quality of fruits and hence the control of fruit acidity loss has a strong economical relevance. In citrus, organic acids accumulate in the juice sac cells of developing fruits and are catabolized thereafter during ripening. Aconitase, that transforms citrate to isocitrate, is the first step of citric acid catabolism and a major component of the citrate utilization machinery. In this work, the citrus aconitase gene family was first characterized and a phylogenetic analysis was then carried out in order to understand the evolutionary history of this family in plants. Gene expression analyses of the citrus aconitase family were subsequently performed in several acidic and acidless genotypes to elucidate their involvement in acid homeostasis. Results Analysis of 460,000 citrus ESTs, followed by sequencing of complete cDNA clones, identified in citrus 3 transcription units coding for putatively active aconitate hydratase proteins, named as CcAco1, CcAco2 and CcAco3. A phylogenetic study carried on the Aco family in 14 plant species, shows the presence of 5 Aco subfamilies, and that the ancestor of monocot and dicot species shared at least one Aco gene. Real-time RT-PCR expression analyses of the three aconitase citrus genes were performed in pulp tissues along fruit development in acidic and acidless citrus varieties such as mandarins, oranges and lemons. While CcAco3 expression was always low, CcAco1 and CcAco2 genes were generally induced during the rapid phase of fruit growth along with the maximum in acidity and the beginning of the acid reduction. Two exceptions to this general pattern were found: 1) Clemenules mandarin failed inducing CcAco2 although acid levels were rapidly reduced; and 2) the acidless "Sucreña" orange showed unusually high levels of expression of both aconitases, an observation correlating with the acidless phenotype. However, in the acidless "Dulce" lemon aconitase expression was normal suggesting that the acidless trait in this variety is not dependent upon aconitases. Conclusions Phylogenetic studies showed the occurrence of five different subfamilies of aconitate hydratase in plants and sequence analyses indentified three active genes in citrus. The pattern of expression of two of these genes, CcAco1 and CcAco2, was normally associated with the timing of acid content reduction in most genotypes. Two exceptions to this general observation suggest the occurrence of additional regulatory steps of citrate homeostasis in citrus. PMID:20958971

  15. Agrobacterium -mediated transformation using embryogenic calli in Satsuma mandarin ( Citrus unshiu Marc.) cv. Miyagawa wase

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Seong Beom Jin; Jeong Won Park; Hyeon Jin Sun; Su Hyun Yun; Hyo Yeon Lee; Dong Sun Lee; Quan Chun Hong; Yong Woo Kim; Key Zung Riu; Jae Hoon Kim

    2011-01-01

    Agrobacterium-mediated transformation in Satsuma mandarin (Citrus unshiu Marc.) cv. Miyagawa wase was achieved with reasonable transformation efficiency of about 22%, which was the percentage of\\u000a transgenic plantlets confirmed by genomic PCR (37 plantlets\\/168 hygromycin-resistant calli). Embryogenic calli of Miyagawa\\u000a wase were infected with Agrobacterium tumefaciens strain EHA105 harboring binary vector pCAMBIA1300 that contained miraculin gene (a taste-modifying protein) and hygromycin

  16. The p23 Protein of Citrus Tristeza Virus Controls Asymmetrical RNA Accumulation

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Tatineni Satyanarayana; A. Ayllon; R. Albiach-Martõ; Shailaja Rabindran; William O. Dawson

    2002-01-01

    Citrus tristeza virus (CTV), a member of the Closteroviridae, has a 19.3-kb positive-stranded RNA genome that is organized into 12 open reading frames (ORFs) with the 10 3 genes expressed via a nested set of nine or ten 3-coterminal subgenomic mRNAs (sgRNAs). Relatively large amounts of negative-stranded RNAs comple- mentary to both genomic and sgRNAs accumulate in infected cells. As

  17. Citrus psorosis, ringspot, cristacortis and concave gum pathogens are maintained in callus culture

    Microsoft Academic Search

    J. Navas-Castillo; P. Moreno; N. Duran-Vila

    1995-01-01

    Callus cultures were established from citrus explants infected with several virus-like pathogens of the psorosis group (psorosis A, psorosis B, ringspot, cristacortis, or concave gum), and successively subcultured for up to 16 months. ‘Pineapple’ sweet orange or ‘Duncan’ grapefruit seedlings graft-inoculated with callus pieces, and incubated in a temperature-controlled greenhouse, developed symptoms characteristic of these diseases, whereas similar indicator plants

  18. Impacts of Horticultural Mineral Oils and Two Insecticide Practices on Population Fluctuation of Diaphorina citri and Spread of Huanglongbing in a Citrus Orchard in Sarawak

    PubMed Central

    Leong, Stephen Chan Teck; Abang, Fatimah; Beattie, Andrew; Kueh, Roland Jui Heng; Wong, Sing King

    2012-01-01

    Aspects of the incidence and spread of the citrus disease huanglongbing (HLB) in relation to the vector Diaphorina citri population fluctuation were studied from January 1999 to December 2001 seasons in a 0.8?ha citrus orchard at Jemukan (1° 33?N, 110° 41?E), Southwest Sarawak in Malaysia. In relation to insecticide and horticultural mineral oils (HMOs) use, levels of HLB infection rose quite rapidly over the next 3 years in the unsprayed control and less rapidly in the other treatments such as imidacloprid, nC24HMO, and triazophos/cypermethrin/chlorpyrifos. Levels of HLB as determined by Polymerase Chain Reaction (PCR) were 42.2%, 9.4%, 11.4%, and 22.7%, respectively. The effects of nC24HMO and conventional pesticides on the citrus psyllid population and parasitoids in citrus orchard were also determined. PMID:22629178

  19. Update on USDA advanced citrus scion selections for Indian River Citrus League

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    In an effort to help maintain the Florida citrus industry, the USDA US Horticultural Research Laboratory (USHRL) citrus breeding team is working to make advanced selections available for limited testing earlier and more broadly than in the past to quickly identify material with commercial potential....

  20. Characterization of grapefruit plants ( Citrus paradisi Macf.) transformed with citrus tristeza closterovirus genes

    Microsoft Academic Search

    V. J. Febres; C. L. Niblett; R. F. Lee; G. A. Moore

    2003-01-01

    Grapefruit (Citrus paradisi Macf. cv Duncan) plants were transformed with several sequences from citrus tristeza closterovirus (CTV) that varied in terms of position in the CTV genome and virus strain origin in an attempt to obtain resistant plants. The sequences included the capsid protein gene from three different strains, a nontranslatable version of the capsid protein gene, the replicase (RdRp),

  1. Insecticidal control of Asian citrus psyllid and Asian citrus leafminer on Hamlin oranges, 2003

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The insecticide trial was initiated to determine the efficacy of various pesticide products for control of Asian citrus pysllid (ACP) and Asian citrus leafminer (CLM) under Florida field conditions. The trial was conducted during the rainy season (cumulative rainfall = 15.6 inches) in a commercial ...

  2. Ecoport Slide Shows on the Internet Related to Citrus and Citrus Diseases

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The EcoPort website was launched in 2000 to provide a knowledge database of biodiversity. As of September 2005, the EcoPort website contained over one half million references, over 42,000 pictures and over 200 slide shows, of which 59 pertain to citrus and citrus virus and virus-like diseases. As ...

  3. The complete nucleotide sequence of RNA 3 of citrus leaf rugose and citrus variegation ilarviruses

    Microsoft Academic Search

    S. W. Scott; X. Ge

    1995-01-01

    Complete sequence data for the RNA 3 of both citrus leaf rugose (CiLRV) and citrus variegation (CVV) ilarviruses have been determined. The RNAs are 2289 nt (CiLRV) and 2309 nt (CVV) in length and both contain the typical Bromoviridae arrangement of two open reading frames (ORFs) which, when translated, code for proteins that correspond to the M r 32 000

  4. Postphloem, Nonvascular Transfer in Citrus

    PubMed Central

    Koch, Karen E.; Avigne, Wayne T.

    1990-01-01

    Postphloem, nonvascular assimilate transport occurs over an unusually long area in citrus fruit and thus facilitates investigation of this process relative to sugar entry into many sink structures. Labeled photosynthates moving into juice tissues of grapefruit (Citrus paradisi Macf.) slowed dramatically after entering the postphloem transport path (parenchyma cells, narrow portions of segment epidermis, and hair-like, parenchymatous stalks of juice sacs). Kinetic, metabolic, and compositional data indicated that transfer through the nonvascular area was delayed many hours by temporary storage and/or equilibration with sugars in compartments along the postphloem path. Labeled assimilates were generally recovered as sucrose throughout the path, and extent of hexose formation enroute bore no apparent relationship to the assimilate transfer process. Even after 24 hours, radiolabel was restricted to discrete, highly localized areas directly between vascular bundles and juice sacs. Postphloem transfer occurred against an ascending sucrose concentration gradient in young fruit, whereas a descending gradient (favoring diffusion/cytoplasmic streaming) developed only later in maturation. Involvement of a postphloem bulk flow is complicated in the present instance by the extremely limited water loss from juice sacs either via transpiration or fluid backflow. Nonetheless, tissue expansion can account for a collective water inflow of at least 1.0 milliliter per day throughout the majority of juice sac development, thus providing a modest, but potentially important means of nonvascular solution flow. Overall, data indicate postphloem transfer (a) can follow highly localized paths through sizable nonvascular areas (up to 3.0 centimeters total), (b) appears to involve temporary storage and/or equilibration with compartmentalized sugars enroute, (c) can occur either against an overall up-hill sugar gradient (young tissues) or along a descending gradient (near full expansion), and (d) appears to involve at least some contribution by nonvascular mass flow accommodated by tissue expansion. Images Figure 1 Figure 4 PMID:16667632

  5. Red Rice Research and Control. 

    E-print Network

    Baker, John B.; Baldwin, Ford L.; Bourgeois, W.J.; Cox, Clodis H.; Craigmiles, Julian P.; Dishman, William D.; Eastin, E. Ford; Helpert, Charles W.; Hill, Lewis C.; Huey, Bobby A.; Klosterboer, Arlen D.; Sonnier, Earl A.

    1980-01-01

    ...................................................... INTRODUCTION 5 J. P. Craigmiles RED RICE PROBLEMS - A SEEDSMAN'S VIEWPOINT ........................ 7 C. H. Cox ........................ RED RICE PROBLEMS - A PRODUCER'S VIEWPOINT 9 W. D. Dishman CULTURAL CONTROL OF RED RICE... ...................................... 10 E. A. Sonnier RED RICE CONTROL IN ALTERNATE CROPS ................................ 16 F. L. Baldwin ..# RED RICE CONTROL ..................................................lg B. A. Huey and F. L. Baldwin RED RICE HERBICIDE SCREENING TESTS...

  6. Validation of high-throughput real time polymerase chain reaction assays for simultaneous detection of invasive citrus pathogens.

    PubMed

    Saponari, Maria; Loconsole, Giuliana; Liao, Hui-Hong; Jiang, Bo; Savino, Vito; Yokomi, Raymond K

    2013-11-01

    A number of important citrus pathogens are spread by graft propagation, arthropod vector transmission and inadvertent import and dissemination of infected plants. For these reasons, citrus disease management and clean stock programs require pathogen detection systems which are economical and sensitive to maintain a healthy industry. To this end, multiplex quantitative real-time PCR (qPCR) assays were developed allowing high-throughput and simultaneous detection of some major invasive citrus pathogens. Automated high-throughput extraction comparing several bead-based commercial extraction kits were tested and compared with tissue print and manual extraction to obtain nucleic acids from healthy and pathogen-infected citrus trees from greenhouse in planta collections and field. Total nucleic acids were used as templates for pathogen detection. Multiplex reverse transcription-qPCR (RT-qPCR) assays were developed for simultaneous detection of six targets including a virus, two viroids, a bacterium associated with huanglongbing and a citrus RNA internal control. Specifically, two one-step TaqMan-based multiplex RT-qPCR assays were developed and tested with target templates to determine sensitivity and detection efficiency. The first assay included primers and probes for 'Candidatus Liberibacter asiaticus' (CLas) and Citrus tristeza virus (CTV) broad spectrum detection and genotype differentiation (VT- and T3-like genotypes). The second assay contained primers and probes for Hop stunt viroid (HSVd), Citrus exocortis viroid (CEVd) and the mitochondrial NADH dehydrogenase (nad5) mRNA as an internal citrus host control. Primers and TaqMan probes for the viroids were designed in this work; whereas those for the other pathogens were from reports of others. Based on quantitation cycle values, automated high-throughput extraction of samples proved to be as suitable as manual extraction. The multiplex RT-qPCR assays detected both RNA and DNA pathogens in the same dilution series as singleplex assays and yielded similar quantitation cycle values. Taken together, high throughput extraction and multiplex RT-qPCR assays reported in this study provided a rapid and standardized method for routine and simultaneous diagnosis of different RNA and DNA citrus pathogens. PMID:23891873

  7. Global efforts in managing rice blast disease

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Rice blast disease caused by the fungus Magnaporthe oryzae is a major destructive disease threatening global food security. Resistance (R) genes to M. oryzae are effective in preventing infections by strains of M. oryzae carry the corresponding avirulence (AVR) genes. Effectiveness of genetic resist...

  8. Transformation of rice mediated by Agrobacterium tumefaciens

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Yukoh Hiei; Toshihiko Komari; Tomoaki Kubo

    1997-01-01

    Agrobacterium tumefaciens has been routinely utilized in gene transfer to dicotyledonous plants, but monocotyledonous plants including important cereals were thought to be recalcitrant to this technology as they were outside the host range of crown gall. Various challenges to infect monocotyledons including rice with Agrobacterium had been made in many laboratories, but the results were not conclusive until recently. Efficient

  9. First report of Citrus psorosis virus in Japan

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Takao Ito; Takane Furuta; Nobuyuki Namba

    2011-01-01

    Citrus psorosis virus (CPsV) was detected from citrus trees for the first time in Japan. The diagnosis was confirmed by molecular, serological,\\u000a and biological indexing. RT-PCR detected CPsV from two citrus trees among ca. 200 tested. Both trees were variety Shiranui\\u000a of [Citrus unshiu Marc. × C. sinensis (L.) Osb.] × C. reticulata Blanco, and neither had the bark scaling symptom typical of CPsV.

  10. Conventional and transgenic resistance/tolerance to Huanglongbing in citrus

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Huanglongbing (HLB) is severely impacting Florida citrus, and has been found in California and Texas. Citrus researchers are immersed in extensive and broad-ranging efforts to identify solutions to HLB. Previous research indicates susceptibility to HLB throughout cultivated citrus: in FL none are im...

  11. Intercropping of citrus and guava trees for management of Huanglongbing

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Recent studies conducted in Viet Nam by Vietnamese, Japanese and Australian scientists indicate that interplanting citrus with guava negated infestations of Asian citrus psyllid and consequently huanglongbing, a serious disease caused by a bacterium vectored by the psyllid. Young citrus interplanted...

  12. Absorption and Mobility of Boron in Young Citrus Plants

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Rodrigo Marcelli Boaretto; José Antonio Quaggio; Francisco de Assis Alves Mourão Filho; Maria Fernanda Giné; Antonio Enedi Boaretto

    2008-01-01

    Boron (B) deficiency is widespread in Brazilian citrus orchards and has been considered an important soil constraint to citrus yield. The aim of this work was to study B uptake and its mobility in young citrus trees, under different B statuses, in two rootstocks. The experiment was carried out in a greenhouse, with ‘Valencia’ sweet orange trees budded on Rangpur

  13. Chemical and Microbiological Aspects of Soil Amended with Citrus Pulp

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Salvatore Marco Meli; Andrea Baglieri; Maurizio Porto; Adalgisa Belligno; Mara Gennari

    2007-01-01

    Citrus pulp is the pulp and peel waste generated by citrus fruit processing. It can be a pollutant when it is disposed of by burning or dumping, but it is rich in organic carbon (monosaccharides, polysaccharides, pectins, and organic acids), suggesting that it could also be a valuable soil amendment. For the purpose of studying the effects of citrus pulp

  14. Cryopreservation of citrus for long-term conservation

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    More than 850 varieties of Citrus, Fortunella, and Citrus-related species are maintained within the USDA-ARS National Plant Germplasm System and the University of California Citrus Variety Collection. These genetic resources are held within duplicated field, screenhouse, and greenhouse collections a...

  15. Molecular analysis of citrus rust (Phyllocoptruta oleivora) populations in Texas

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Phyllocoptruta olevoria (Acari: Eriophyidae) or the citrus rust mite (CRM) is one of the most economically important mite pests of citrus worldwide. CRM originated from Asia, however it is found in most citrus producing areas, such as, Brazil, Morocco and the United States. Though CRM is a major pes...

  16. Preharvest measures for postharvest improvement in marketable fresh citrus

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Citrus canker, caused by the bacterium Xanthomonas citri supsp. citri, (Xcc),was once the scourge of the Florida citrus industry from the early 1900’s on and off until the early 1990’s. It has been replaced, for the most part, by citrus greening but still continues to be a problem for Florida fres...

  17. Automating the assessment of citrus canker symptoms with image analysis

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Citrus canker (CC, caused by Xanthomonas citri) is a serious disease of citrus in Florida and other citrus-growing regions. Severity of symptoms can be estimated by visual rating, but there is inter- and intra-rater variation. Automated image analysis (IA) may offer a way of reducing some of ...

  18. SCREENING CITRUS GERMPLASM FOR RESISTANCE TO XANTHOMONAS AXONOPODIS PV. CITRI

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Numerous studies have been conducted to identify sources of resistance to Xanthomonas axonopodis pv. citri (Xac) among citrus and citrus relatives (Gottwald et al., 2002 and references therein). Kumquats (Fortunella sp.) and Calamondins (Citrus mitis) have shown to be highly resistant and mandarins...

  19. Preharvest measures for postharvest improvement in marketable fresh citrus

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Citrus canker caused by the bacterium Xanthomonas citri supsp. citri, (Xcc), was once the scourge of the Florida citrus industry from the early 1900’s on and off until the early 1990’s. It has been replaced, for the most part, by citrus greening but still continues to be a problem for Florida fresh ...

  20. Texas Rice Production Guidelines 

    E-print Network

    Way, M. O.; Cockrell, Jay

    2008-03-11

    This publication gives Texas rice farmers the latest research-based information about producing rice in Texas. Recommendations are based on research conducted by the Texas Agricultural Experiment Station and the USDA.

  1. Genetic variation and recombination of RdRp and HSP 70h genes of Citrus tristeza virus isolates from orange trees showing symptoms of citrus sudden death disease

    PubMed Central

    Gomes, Clarissa PC; Nagata, Tatsuya; de Jesus, Waldir C; Neto, Carlos R Borges; Pappas, Georgios J; Martin, Darren P

    2008-01-01

    Background Citrus sudden death (CSD), a disease that rapidly kills orange trees, is an emerging threat to the Brazilian citrus industry. Although the causal agent of CSD has not been definitively determined, based on the disease's distribution and symptomatology it is suspected that the agent may be a new strain of Citrus tristeza virus (CTV). CTV genetic variation was therefore assessed in two Brazilian orange trees displaying CSD symptoms and a third with more conventional CTV symptoms. Results A total of 286 RNA-dependent-RNA polymerase (RdRp) and 284 heat shock protein 70 homolog (HSP70h) gene fragments were determined for CTV variants infecting the three trees. It was discovered that, despite differences in symptomatology, the trees were all apparently coinfected with similar populations of divergent CTV variants. While mixed CTV infections are common, the genetic distance between the most divergent population members observed (24.1% for RdRp and 11.0% for HSP70h) was far greater than that in previously described mixed infections. Recombinants of five distinct RdRp lineages and three distinct HSP70h lineages were easily detectable but respectively accounted for only 5.9 and 11.9% of the RdRp and HSP70h gene fragments analysed and there was no evidence of an association between particular recombinant mosaics and CSD. Also, comparisons of CTV population structures indicated that the two most similar CTV populations were those of one of the trees with CSD and the tree without CSD. Conclusion We suggest that if CTV is the causal agent of CSD, it is most likely a subtle feature of population structures within mixed infections and not merely the presence (or absence) of a single CTV variant within these populations that triggers the disease. PMID:18199320

  2. Detection of Citrus psorosis virus in the northwestern citrus production area of Argentina by using an improved TAS-ELISA

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Maria Cecilia Zanek; Eduardo Peña; Carina Andrea Reyes; Julia Figueroa; Beatriz Stein; Oscar Grau; Maria Laura Garcia

    2006-01-01

    Citrus Psorosis in Argentina is a serious disease. Citrus is produced in two regions located in the northeast (NE) and northwest (NW) area of the country. These two areas have different climates and soil types, and therefore different citrus species and varieties are cultivated. In the NE region, Psorosis is epidemic, and in the NW region, the disease was described

  3. Transgenic citrus plants expressing the citrus tristeza virus p23 protein exhibit viral-like symptoms.

    PubMed

    Ghorbel, R; López, C; Fagoaga, C; Moreno, P; Navarro, L; Flores, R; Peña, L

    2001-01-01

    Summary The 23 kDa protein (p23) coded by the 3'-terminal gene of Citrus tristeza virus (CTV), a member of the genus Closterovirus with the largest genome among plant RNA viruses, is an RNA-binding protein that contains a motif rich in cysteine and histidine residues in the core of a putative zinc-finger domain. On this basis, a regulatory role for CTV replication or gene expression has been suggested for p23. To explore whether over-expression of this protein in transgenic plants could affect the normal CTV infection process, transgenic Mexican lime plants were generated carrying the p23 transgene, or a truncated version thereof, under the control of the cauliflower mosaic virus (CaMV) 35S promoter. Constitutive expression of p23 induced phenotypic aberrations that resembled symptoms incited by CTV in non-transgenic lime plants, whereas transgenic plants expressing the p23 truncated version were normal. The onset of CTV-like symptoms in p23-transgenic plants was associated with the expression of p23, and its accumulation level paralleled the intensity of the symptoms. This demonstrates that p23 is involved in symptom development and that it most likely plays a key role in CTV pathogenesis. This is the first case in which a protein encoded by a woody plant-infecting RNA virus has been identified as being directly involved in pathogenesis in its natural host. This finding also delimits a small region of the large CTV genome for the future mapping of specific pathogenic determinants. PMID:20572989

  4. The Recursion . . . Extended Rice . . .

    E-print Network

    Gallier, Jean

    The Recursion . . . Extended Rice . . . Creative and . . . Home Page Title Page Page 388 of 405 Go . . . Extended Rice . . . Creative and . . . Home Page Title Page Page 389 of 405 Go Back Full Screen Close Quit Rice . . . Creative and . . . Home Page Title Page Page 390 of 405 Go Back Full Screen Close Quit

  5. RICE UNIVERSITY Houston, Texas

    E-print Network

    Pentus, Mati

    RICE UNIVERSITY Houston, Texas Hierarchical Attribute Grammars: Dialects, Applications and Evaluation Algorithms by Alan Carle carle@cs.rice.edu A Thesis Submitted in Partial Fulfillment of the Requirements for the Degree Doctor of Philosophy May, 1992 Rice University Department of Computer Science

  6. Rice Pudding Ingredients

    E-print Network

    Liskiewicz, Maciej

    Rice Pudding Ingredients: 2 cups brown rice, cooked 2 cups skim milk 1/3 cup sugar 1 tablespoon margarine 1/2 teaspoon vanilla 1/4 cup raisins Cinnamon Directions 1. Place cooked rice, milk, sugar, raisins, and margarine in saucepan. 2. Place saucepan over medium heat. Cook 25 to 30 minutes without

  7. Rice Production and Marketing.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Briers, Gary; Lee, Jasper S.

    This guide contains lesson plans for use in secondary programs of agricultural education in geographical areas in which rice is produced. Six units and 13 problem areas are organized into teaching plans that cover the broad nature of rice production. The six units are: (1) determining the importance and history of rice production; (2) determining…

  8. Rice Insect Management. 

    E-print Network

    Drees, Bastiaan M.

    1983-01-01

    and flower parrs of rice after fertilization, but causes no appreciable yield losses. A larger (I 1/ 4- to I 1/ 2-inches long) light brown to yellowish grasshopper with 2 black bands on the inside of each jumping leg can be more serious. This species... Management Practices ............... . Rice Water Weevil ......................... 4 Fall Armyworm. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .. 6 Grasshoppers. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .. 6 Rice Stink Bug...

  9. Transgenic expression of coat protein gene of Rice tungro bacilliform virus in rice reduces the accumulation of viral DNA in inoculated plants.

    PubMed

    Ganesan, Uma; Suri, Sarabjeet Singh; Rajasubramaniam, Shanmugam; Rajam, Manchikatla Venkat; Dasgupta, Indranil

    2009-08-01

    Rice tungro, a devastating disease of rice in south and southeast Asia, is caused by the joint infection of Rice tungro bacilliform virus (RTBV) and Rice tungro spherical virus (RTSV). In order to obtain transgenic resistance against RTBV, indica rice cultivar Pusa Basmati-1 was transformed to express the coat protein (CP) gene of an Indian isolate of RTBV. Rice plants containing the transgene integrated in low copy numbers were obtained, in which the CP was shown to accumulate in the leaf tissue. The progenies representing three independent transformation events were challenged with Indian isolates of RTBV using viruliferous Green leafhoppers, and the viral titers in the inoculated plants were monitored using DNA dot-blot hybridization. As compared to non-transgenic controls, two independent transgenic lines showed significantly low levels of RTBV DNA, especially towards later stages of infection and a concomitant reduction of tungro symptoms. PMID:19387813

  10. Complete genome sequence of citrus huanglongbing bacterium, 'Candidatus Liberibacter asiaticus' obtained through metagenomics.

    PubMed

    Duan, Yongping; Zhou, Lijuan; Hall, David G; Li, Wenbin; Doddapaneni, Harshavardhan; Lin, Hong; Liu, Li; Vahling, Cheryl M; Gabriel, Dean W; Williams, Kelly P; Dickerman, Allan; Sun, Yijun; Gottwald, Tim

    2009-08-01

    Citrus huanglongbing is the most destructive disease of citrus worldwide. It is spread by citrus psyllids and is associated with a low-titer, phloem-limited infection by any of three uncultured species of alpha-Proteobacteria, 'Candidatus Liberibacter asiaticus', 'Ca. L. americanus', and 'Ca. L. africanus'. A complete circular 'Ca. L. asiaticus' genome has been obtained by metagenomics, using the DNA extracted from a single 'Ca. L. asiaticus'-infected psyllid. The 1.23-Mb genome has an average 36.5% GC content. Annotation revealed a high percentage of genes involved in both cell motility (4.5%) and active transport in general (8.0%), which may contribute to its virulence. 'Ca. L. asiaticus' appears to have a limited ability for aerobic respiration and is likely auxotrophic for at least five amino acids. Consistent with its intracellular nature, 'Ca. L. asiaticus' lacks type III and type IV secretion systems as well as typical free-living or plant-colonizing extracellular degradative enzymes. 'Ca. L. asiaticus' appears to have all type I secretion system genes needed for both multidrug efflux and toxin effector secretion. Multi-protein phylogenetic analysis confirmed 'Ca. L. asiaticus' as an early-branching and highly divergent member of the family Rhizobiaceae. This is the first genome sequence of an uncultured alpha-proteobacteria that is both an intracellular plant pathogen and insect symbiont. PMID:19589076

  11. Microbial Production of Pectin from Citrus Peel

    PubMed Central

    Sakai, Takuo; Okushima, Minoru

    1980-01-01

    A new method for the production of pectin from citrus peel was developed. For this purpose, a microorganism which produces a protopectin-solubilizing enzyme was isolated and identified as a variety of Trichosporon penicillatum. The most suitable conditions for the pectin production were determined as follows. Citrus (Citrus unshiu) peel was suspended in water (1:2, wt/vol), the organism was added, and fermentation proceeded over 15 to 20 h at 30°C. During the fermentation, the pectin in the peel was extracted almost completely without macerating the peel. By this method, 20 to 25 g of pectin was obtained per kg of peel. The pectin obtained was special in that it contained neutral sugar at high levels, which was determined to have a molecular weight suitable for practical applications. Images PMID:16345556

  12. Noninvasive maturity detection of citrus with machine vision

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ying, Yibin; Xu, Zhenggang; Fu, Xiaping; Liu, Yande

    2004-03-01

    A computer vision system was established to explore a method for citrus maturity detection. The surface color information and the ratio of total soluble solid to titratable acid (TSS/TA) were used as maturity indexes of citrus. The spectral reflectance properties with different color were measured by UV-240 ultraviolet and visible spectrophotometer. The biggest discrepancy of gray levels between citrus pixels and background pixels was in blue component image by image background segmentation. Dynamic threshold method for background segmentation had best result in blue component image. Methods for citrus image color description were studied. The citrus spectral reflectance experiments showed that green surface and saffron surface of citrus were of highest spectral reflectance at the wavelength of 700nm, the difference between them reached to maximum, about 53%, and the image acquired at this wavelength was of more color information for maturity detection. A triple-layer feed forward network was established to map citrus maturity from the hue frequency sequence by the mean of artificial neural network. After training, the network mapper was used to detect the maturity of the test sample set, which was composed of 252 Weizhang citrus with different maturity. The identification accuracy of mature citrus reached 79.1%, that of immature citrus was 63.6%, and the mean identification accuracy was 77.8%. This study suggested that it is feasible to detect citrus maturity non-invasively by using the computer vision system and hue frequency sequence method.

  13. Citrus tristeza virus: characterization of Texas isolates, studies on aphid transmission and pathogen-derived control strategies 

    E-print Network

    Herron, Caroline Mary

    2004-11-15

    Citrus tristeza virus (CTV), an economically important graft-transmissible pathogen of citrus, causes major global declines in citrus production. In the commercial citrus of the Lower Rio Grande Valley of Texas (LRGV), ...

  14. Effective disinfection of rough rice using infrared radiation heating.

    PubMed

    Wang, Bei; Khir, Ragab; Pan, Zhongli; El-Mashad, Hamed; Atungulu, Griffiths G; Ma, Haile; McHugh, Tara H; Qu, Wenjuan; Wu, Bengang

    2014-09-01

    The objective of this study was to investigate the effect of infrared (IR) heating and tempering treatments on disinfection of Aspergillus flavus in freshly harvested rough rice and storage rice. Rice samples with initial moisture contents (IMCs) of 14.1 to 27.0% (wet basis) were infected with A. flavus spores before the tests. The infected samples were heated by IR radiation to 60°C in less than 1 min, and then samples were tempered at 60°C for 5, 10, 20, 30, 60, or 120 min. High heating rates and corresponding high levels of moisture removal were achieved using IR heating. The highest total moisture removal was 5.3% for the fresh rice with an IMC of 27.0% after IR heating and then 120 min of tempering. IR heating followed by tempering for 120 min resulted in 2.5- and 8.3-log reductions of A. flavus spores in rough rice with the lowest and highest IMCs, respectively. To study the effect on disinfection of rewetting dried storage rice, the surface of the dry rice was rewetted to achieve IMCs of 14.7 to 19.4% (wet basis). The rewetting process for the dry rice had a significant effect on disinfection. IR heating followed by tempering for 60 min resulted in 7.2-log reductions in A. flavus on rewetted rough rice. The log-linear plus tail model was applied to estimate the tempering time needed to achieve a 5-log reduction of A. flavus in rice of different IMCs. At least 30 and 20 min of tempering were needed for fresh rice and rewetted rice, respectively, with the highest IMCs. The recommended conditions of simultaneous disinfection and drying for fresh rice was IR heating to 60°C followed by tempering for 120 min and natural cooling, resulting in a final MC of 16.5 to 22.0%, depending on the IMC. For the rewetted dry rice with an IMC of 19.4%, the recommended condition for disinfection and drying involved only 20 min of tempering. The final MC of the sample was 13.8%, which is a safe MC for storage rice. PMID:25198845

  15. A genetic system for Citrus Tristeza Virus using the non-natural host Nicotiana benthamiana: an update.

    PubMed

    Ambrós, Silvia; Ruiz-Ruiz, Susana; Peña, Leandro; Moreno, Pedro

    2013-01-01

    In nature Citrus tristeza virus (CTV), genus Closterovirus, infects only the phloem cells of species of Citrus and related genera. Finding that the CTV T36 strain replicated in Nicotiana benthamiana (NB) protoplasts and produced normal virions allowed development of the first genetic system based on protoplast transfection with RNA transcribed from a full-genome cDNA clone, a laborious and uncertain system requiring several months for each experiment. We developed a more efficient system based on agroinfiltration of NB leaves with CTV-T36-based binary plasmids, which caused systemic infection in this non-natural host within a few weeks yielding in the upper leaves enough CTV virions to readily infect citrus by slash inoculation. Stem agroinoculation of citrus and NB plants with oncogenic strains of Agrobacterium tumefaciens carrying a CTV-T36 binary vector with a GUS marker, induced GUS positive galls in both species. However, while most NB tumors were CTV positive and many plants became systemically infected, no coat protein or viral RNA was detected in citrus tumors, even though CTV cDNA was readily detected by PCR in the same galls. This finding suggests (1) strong silencing or CTV RNA processing in transformed cells impairing infection progress, and (2) the need for using NB as an intermediate host in the genetic system. To maintain CTV-T36 in NB or assay other CTV genotypes in this host, we also tried to graft-transmit the virus from infected to healthy NB, or to mechanically inoculate NB leaves with virion extracts. While these trials were mostly unsuccessful on non-treated NB plants, agroinfiltration with silencing suppressors enabled for the first time infecting NB plants by side-grafting and by mechanical inoculation with virions, indicating that previous failure to infect NB was likely due to virus silencing in early infection steps. Using NB as a CTV host provides new possibilities to study virus-host interactions with a simple and reliable system. PMID:23847598

  16. A genetic system for Citrus Tristeza Virus using the non-natural host Nicotiana benthamiana: an update

    PubMed Central

    Ambrós, Silvia; Ruiz-Ruiz, Susana; Peña, Leandro; Moreno, Pedro

    2013-01-01

    In nature Citrus tristeza virus (CTV), genus Closterovirus, infects only the phloem cells of species of Citrus and related genera. Finding that the CTV T36 strain replicated in Nicotiana benthamiana (NB) protoplasts and produced normal virions allowed development of the first genetic system based on protoplast transfection with RNA transcribed from a full-genome cDNA clone, a laborious and uncertain system requiring several months for each experiment. We developed a more efficient system based on agroinfiltration of NB leaves with CTV-T36-based binary plasmids, which caused systemic infection in this non-natural host within a few weeks yielding in the upper leaves enough CTV virions to readily infect citrus by slash inoculation. Stem agroinoculation of citrus and NB plants with oncogenic strains of Agrobacterium tumefaciens carrying a CTV-T36 binary vector with a GUS marker, induced GUS positive galls in both species. However, while most NB tumors were CTV positive and many plants became systemically infected, no coat protein or viral RNA was detected in citrus tumors, even though CTV cDNA was readily detected by PCR in the same galls. This finding suggests (1) strong silencing or CTV RNA processing in transformed cells impairing infection progress, and (2) the need for using NB as an intermediate host in the genetic system. To maintain CTV-T36 in NB or assay other CTV genotypes in this host, we also tried to graft-transmit the virus from infected to healthy NB, or to mechanically inoculate NB leaves with virion extracts. While these trials were mostly unsuccessful on non-treated NB plants, agroinfiltration with silencing suppressors enabled for the first time infecting NB plants by side-grafting and by mechanical inoculation with virions, indicating that previous failure to infect NB was likely due to virus silencing in early infection steps. Using NB as a CTV host provides new possibilities to study virus-host interactions with a simple and reliable system. PMID:23847598

  17. Consumer demand patterns for fresh citrus and citrus products in Houston, Texas

    E-print Network

    Stack, Thomas N

    1951-01-01

    which all citrus producing sect1ons of the nation have sought to fill. A second important factor which induced increasing demand and production was a growing realization by the public of the nutritive value of citrus and the readiness of the medical... on Double Log Paper . . . . . . . 24 Demand Curve: Grapefruit Juice - High Incosm Area . 31 10 Demand Curves Grapefruit Juice - Hedium income Area 32 Demand Curve: Grapefruit Juice - Iow Incaae Area . . 33 Demand Curves Grapefruit Juice - All Income...

  18. Efficient production of transgenic citrus plants expressing the coat protein gene of citrus tristeza virus

    Microsoft Academic Search

    A. Domínguez; J. Guerri; M. Cambra; L. Navarro; P. Moreno; L. Peña

    2000-01-01

    The coat protein gene of citrus tristeza virus (CTV) has been introduced into Mexican lime (Citrus aurantifolia Swing.) plants by using an improved Agrobacterium-mediated genetic transformation system. Internodal stem segments from greenhouse-grown seedlings were co-cultivated with\\u000a A. tumefaciens strain EHA 105 carrying the binary plasmid pBI 121\\/CTV-CP in a medium rich in auxins that provided the explant cells with the

  19. The closely related citrus ringspot and citrus psorosis viruses have particles of novel filamentous morphology

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Maria Laura Garcia; E. Dal Bo; O. Grau; Robert G. Milne

    1994-01-01

    Some properties of the particles of citrus ringspot virus (CtRSV) and the related citrus psorosis-associated virus (CPsAV) are described. The particles of CtRSV have been reported to be sinuous linear structures about l0 nm in diameter and of two lengths (300 to 500 nm and 1500 to 2500 nm) representing 'top' and 'bottom' sedimentation components. We show that these particles

  20. Yield and quality responses of citrus (Citrus reticulate) and tea (Podocarpus fleuryi Hickel.) to compound fertilizers.

    PubMed

    Wang, Rui; Shi, Xue-gen; Wei, You-zhang; Yang, Xiao-e; Uoti, Juhani

    2006-09-01

    Experiments were carried out with citrus (Citrus reticulate) and tea (Podocarpus fleuryi Hickel.) to study the effects of compound fertilizers on their yields and quality. In the citrus experiment, application of compound fertilizers increased available P, K and Mg contents in soil but decreased alkali-hydrolyzable N contents in soil and N, P and K contents in leaves. In the tea experiment, application of compound fertilizers increased available P, K and Mg contents in soil and N, P, K and Mg contents in leaves but decreased alkali-hydrolyzable N in soil compared with the urea treatment. Application of compound fertilizers could improve the quality of citrus and tea, increase their yields and enhance their economical profits significantly. Compared with the control, application of compound fertilizers increased citrus yields by 6.31, 12.94 and 17.69 t/ha, and those of tea by 0.51, 0.86 and 1.30 t/ha, respectively. Correspondingly, profits were increased by 21.4% to 61.1% for citrus and by 10.0% to 15.7% for tea. Optimal rates of compound fertilizers were recommended for both crops. PMID:16909469

  1. A highly sensitive heminested RT-PCR assay for the detection of citrus psorosis virus targeted to a conserved region of the genome.

    PubMed

    Legarreta, G G; Garciá, M L; Costa, N; Grau, O

    2000-01-01

    Psorosis is a widespread and damaging disease of citrus in many parts of the world. The causal agent is a multipartite virus with RNA genome present in very low concentration in infected citrus tissue. Diagnosis is made by biological indexing on indicator citrus seedlings, but it is a slow and costly procedure and therefore it is not used generally. No sensitive wide-spectrum assay for Citrus Psorosis virus (CPsV) has been reported based on RT-PCR. A highly sensitive heminested RT-PCR assay is described for the detection of CPsV. Fragments of 313 bp amplified from RNA 1 of different isolates were cloned and sequenced. Very high homology was found among six isolates from the citrus producing region of Argentina: 96.6-100% in nucleotide sequence. The consensus sequence obtained was used for the design of the primers for heminested PCR assay. It has been tested on different Argentine isolates, employing various methods for RNA extraction from infected tissue. This test is able to detect CPsV in dilutions of 10(10) of the original sample. PMID:10644083

  2. Leadership Rice Leadership Rice exists to encourage and equip Rice students to obtain

    E-print Network

    Richards-Kortum, Rebecca

    Leadership Rice Leadership Rice exists to encourage and equip Rice students to obtain leadership roles at Rice and beyond. We provide leadership development opportunities to undergraduates from every. Leadership Rice classes prepare students for the challenges and opportunities leaders face today. Classes

  3. Leadership Rice The mission of Leadership Rice is to help Rice University undergraduates from

    E-print Network

    Richards-Kortum, Rebecca

    189 Leadership Rice The mission of Leadership Rice is to help Rice University undergraduates from. Leadership Rice explores how heart and mind, theory and practice, and ideas and actions come together during the fall. Other courses may be taken independently.Leadership Rice's Summer Mentorship Experience

  4. Leadership Rice Leadership Rice exists to encourage and equip Rice students to obtain significant

    E-print Network

    Richards-Kortum, Rebecca

    206 Leadership Rice Leadership Rice exists to encourage and equip Rice students to obtain significant leadership roles at Rice and beyond. We provide leadership development opportunities and ability to translate ideas to action. Leadership Rice also sponsors the Toastmaster's International club

  5. Leadership Rice The mission of Leadership Rice is to help Rice University undergraduates

    E-print Network

    Richards-Kortum, Rebecca

    194 Leadership Rice The mission of Leadership Rice is to help Rice University undergraduates from Rice explores how heart and mind, theory and practice, and ideas and actions come together. LEAD 309 is offered only during the fall. Other courses may be taken independently. Leadership Rice

  6. PROTEOMIC AND GENETIC APPROACHES TO IDENTIFYING DEFENSE-RELATED PROTEINS IN RICE CHALLENGED WITH THE FUNGAL PATHOGEN RHIZOCTONIA SOLANI

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Sheath blight, caused by the fungus Rhizoctonia solani, is a major disease of rice worldwide, but little is known about the host response to infection. The objective of this study was to identify proteins and DNA markers in resistant and susceptible rice associated with response to infection by R. s...

  7. Use of Ozone in the Citrus Industry

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Hakan Karaca

    2010-01-01

    The use of ozone for postharvest sanitation and decay control of fruits, vegetables and their products during handling, processing and storage has been investigated for commercial applications. Due to their significant contribution to world trade and human nutrition, citrus fruits are thought to be important commodities. Decay can be observed in these products because of microbial activity and ethylene accumulation

  8. Ecology of the Asian citrus pysllid

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Host selection by psyllids in general appears to involve taste rather than olfaction. Adults are often less discriminating than nymphs. A priori, there is good reason to doubt that Asian citrus psyllid (ACP) uses a long-distance sex pheromone or that ACP orients to host plant volatiles over large (m...

  9. Treated municipal wastewater for citrus irrigation

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Mongi Zekri; Robert C. J. Koo

    1994-01-01

    Treated, reclaimed municipal wastewater was evaluated on citrus trees in central Florida for over six years. The effects of irrigation with reclaimed wastewater on soil water content, soil chemical analysis, leaf mineral status, and fruit quality were compared with those of irrigation with well water. Irrigation with reclaimed water increased mineral residues in the soil profile, altered leaf mineral concentration

  10. Resistance and tolerance to huanglongbing in citrus

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Huanglongbing (HLB) is severely impacting Florida citrus. Productivity declines in many HLB-affected genotypes, often with greatly thinned canopies. Fruit size and quality are often adversely affected as the disease advances. HLB was assessed in diverse cultivars in commercial groves with high HLB-i...

  11. Pectin from galgal ( Citrus pseudolimon Tan.) peel

    Microsoft Academic Search

    B. L. Attri; S. B. Maini

    1996-01-01

    During the extraction of juice from galgal fruits (Citrus pesudolimon Tan.), peel, which accounts for about 25–35% of the weight of the fruit, is thrown away and causes an ecological problem when dumped around the processing plants. A process has been standardized for maximum recovery of pectin from these peels by employing various extractants and varying extractant: peel ratios, extraction

  12. Asian citrus psyllid - biology and seasonal ecology

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The seasonal ecology of Diaphorina citri was investigated in a non-irrigated citrus grove of mature orange trees beginning January 2005 in east central Florida. No insecticides were applied during the study. Predators including lady beetles, lacewings and syrphid flies were observed during the stud...

  13. Citrus viruses in sub-Saharan Africa

    Microsoft Academic Search

    C. P. R. Cronjéa

    There are approximately 20 known citrus viruses. The most important ones in South Africa used to be CiTV (trizteza), exocortis, and porosis. Since the initiation of the Cultivar Improvement Programme (CIP), exocortis and psorosis were excluded from new planting material by the use of shoot tip grafting. The only virus which is still of major importance is trizteza, especially on

  14. Assessment of Stubborn Disease Incidence in Citrus

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Citrus stubborn disease, caused by Spiroplasma Citri, has occured in California for more than 90 years, however, detection methods for estimating disease incidence have not been well developed. Two 8 ha plots in Kern Co. CA were established and sampled in July and August, 2006. Different tissues o...

  15. Red Yeast Rice: An Introduction

    MedlinePLUS

    ... links Read our disclaimer about external links Menu Red Yeast Rice: An Introduction On this page: Key ... will help ensure coordinated and safe care. About Red Yeast Rice Red yeast rice is made by ...

  16. Profiling of the small RNA populations derived from sour orange seedlings cross-protected against seedling yellows strains of Citrus tristeza virus

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Control of Citrus tristeza virus (CTV) in central California changed in 2009 from removal of all CTV-infected trees to only those which react positive in tests with selective probes for potentially severe CTV strains. Therefore, new strategies for CTV control are needed. Greenhouse tests have show...

  17. Viability of 'Candidatus Liberibacter asiaticus' prolonged by addition of citrus juice to culture medium.

    PubMed

    Parker, Jennifer K; Wisotsky, Sarah R; Johnson, Evan G; Hijaz, Faraj M; Killiny, Nabil; Hilf, Mark E; De La Fuente, Leonardo

    2014-01-01

    Huanglongbing, or citrus greening disease, is associated with infection by the phloem-limited bacterium 'Candidatus Liberibacter asiaticus'. Infection with 'Ca. L. asiaticus' is incurable; therefore, knowledge regarding 'Ca. L. asiaticus' biology and pathogenesis is essential to develop a treatment. However, 'Ca. L. asiaticus' cannot currently be successfully cultured, limiting its study. To gain insight into the conditions conducive for growth of 'Ca. L. asiaticus' in vitro, 'Ca. L. asiaticus' inoculum obtained from seed of fruit from infected pomelo trees (Citrus maxima 'Mato Buntan') was added to different media, and cell viability was monitored for up to 2 months using quantitative polymerase chain reaction in conjunction with ethidium monoazide. Media tested included one-third King's B (K), K with 50% juice from the infected fruit, K with 50% commercially available grapefruit juice, and 100% commercially available grapefruit juice. Results show that juice-containing media dramatically prolong viability compared with K in experiments reproduced during 2 years using different juice sources. Furthermore, biofilm formed at the air-liquid interface of juice cultures contained 'Ca. L. asiaticus' cells, though next-generation sequencing indicated that other bacterial genera were predominant. Chemical characterization of the media was conducted to discuss possible factors sustaining 'Ca. L. asiaticus' viability in vitro, which will contribute to future development of a culture medium for 'Ca. L. asiaticus'. PMID:23883155

  18. Biological control of sheath-blight of rice in india with antagonistic bacteria

    Microsoft Academic Search

    T. Vasantha Devi; R. Malar Vizhi; N. Sakthivel; S. S. Gnanamanickam

    1989-01-01

    Strains of fluorescent and nonfluorescent bacteria that were isolated from rice rhizospheres of Southern India and showed\\u000a antagonism towardsRhizoctonia solani were evaluated for biological control of rice sheath-blight (ShB). Efficient strains of bacteria inhibited mycelial growth\\u000a ofR. solani, affected sclerotial viabilityin vitro and protected IR 20 and TKM 9 rice seedlings from infection byR. solani in greenhouse tests. Pretreatment of

  19. Red Stripe of Rice Is Caused by a Bacterium Microbacterium sp

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Hisatoshi KAKU; Siti SUBANDIYAH; Hirokazu OCHIAI

    2000-01-01

      In an etiological study to identify the causal agent of red stripe of rice, white bacterial colonies were consistently isolated\\u000a from all diseased leaf samples collected in Indonesia. All the bacterial isolates were pathogenic to rice and caused symptoms\\u000a similar to red stripe. The bacterial infection in rice leaves was confirmed histologically. Bacterial masses were observed\\u000a in the lumina of

  20. Cyclic Lipopeptides from Bacillus subtilis ABS–S14 Elicit Defense-Related Gene Expression in Citrus Fruit

    PubMed Central

    Waewthongrak, Waewruedee; Leelasuphakul, Wichitra; McCollum, Greg

    2014-01-01

    Effects of cyclic lipopeptides (CLPs) obtained from Bacillus subtilis ABS-S14 on eliciting defense-related gene transcription and activity of defense-related enzymes; glucanase (GLU), chitinase (CHI), peroxidase (POX) and lipoxygenase (LOX) in Citrus sinensis cv. Valencia fruit were determined. The maximum level of GLU transcripts induced in fruit treated with fengycin was significantly greatest among treatments at 48 h. Surfactin enhanced the LOX and POX transcripts. In parallel, corresponding enzyme activities were correlated with changes in gene expression observed in fruit inoculated with Penicillium digitatum following treatment with individual CLPs. Synergistic effects of fengycin and iturin A, fengycin and surfactin were shown in gene transcript of GLU and CHI, respectively, and surfactin induced POX and LOX gene expression of citrus flavedo without pathogen infection. These results suggest that fengycin and surfactin act as elicitors of defense-related gene expression in “Valencia” fruit following infection. PMID:25329301

  1. Cytological and molecular analysis of nonhost resistance in rice to wheat powdery mildew and leaf rust pathogens.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Yulin; Yao, Juanni; Zhang, Hongchang; Huang, Lili; Kang, Zhensheng

    2015-07-01

    Cereal powdery mildews caused by Blumeria graminis and cereal rusts caused by Puccinia spp. are constant disease threats that limit the production of almost all important cereal crops. Rice is an intensively grown agricultural cereal that is atypical because of its immunity to all powdery mildew and rust fungi. We analyzed the nonhost interactions between rice and the wheat powdery mildew fungus B. graminis f. sp. tritici (Bgt) and the wheat leaf rust fungus Puccinia triticina (Ptr) to identify the basis of nonhost resistance (NHR) in rice against cereal powdery mildew and rust fungi at cytological and molecular levels. No visible symptoms were observed on rice leaves inoculated with Bgt or Ptr. Microscopic observations showed that both pathogens exhibited aberrant differentiation and significantly reduced penetration frequencies on rice compared to wheat. The development of Bgt and Ptr was also completely arrested at early infection stages in cases of successful penetration into rice leaves. Attempted infection of rice by Bgt and Ptr induced similar defense responses, including callose deposition, accumulation of reactive oxygen species, and hypersensitive response in rice epidermal and mesophyll cells, respectively. Furthermore, a set of defense-related genes were upregulated in rice against Bgt and Ptr infection. Rice is an excellent monocot model for genetic and molecular studies. Therefore, our results demonstrate that rice is a useful model to study the mechanisms of NHR to cereal powdery mildew and rust fungi, which provides useful information for the development of novel and durable strategies to control these important pathogens. PMID:25547964

  2. Citrus Variety Trends in the Lower Rio Grande Valley. 

    E-print Network

    Alderman, D. C. (DeForest Charles)

    1951-01-01

    thousands of citrus trees and the growers were faced with a tremendous replanting program, which, in turn, had focused interest on varieties. Fruit production figures, yields per acre, and monetary returns per acre for five varieties of grapefruit... Horticulturist Lower Rio Grande Valley Experiment Station, Weslaco, Texas CONSUMERS FOR THE MOST PART are not concerned about the differences among varieties of citrus fruits. The citrus producer, however, is constantly on the lookout for new and better...

  3. In Vitro Response of Two Citrus Rootstocks to Salt Stress

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Wagdish Sh. Ghaleb; Jamal S. Sawwan; Muhanad W. Akash; Ayed M. Al-Abdallat

    2010-01-01

    The in vitro response of two citrus rootstocks (sour orange, Citrus aurantium L. and Volkamer lemon, Citrus volkameriana Ten. & Pasq.) to two types of salts (NaCl and CaCl2) of different concentrations (0, 50, 100, 150, 200, or 300 mM) was investigated. Results showed that increasing NaCl level in the growth medium led to increased Na and Cl accumulation and

  4. Functional Characterization of Citrus Polygalacturonase-inhibiting Protein

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Sarunya NALUMPANG; Yukie GOTOH; Hiroyuki TSUBOI; Kenji GOMI; Hiroyuki YAMAMOTO; Kazuya AKIMITSU

    2002-01-01

      A cDNA encoding a polygalacturonase-inhibiting protein gene (SaiPGIPA) was identified from the citrus cultivar Sainumphung (Citrus sp.), one of the most popular cultivars in northern Thailand. SaiPGIPA was expressed in Escherichia coli cells, and the functional properties of citrus PGIP were analyzed. The PGIP fusion protein inhibited by a maximum of about\\u000a 60% of the endopolygalacturonase activity, and a mixture

  5. Occurrence of Citrus psorosis virus in Campania, southern Italy

    Microsoft Academic Search

    D. Alioto; A. Troisi; A. Peluso; G. Quatrano; V. Masenga; R. G. Milne

    2000-01-01

    Citrus psorosis virus (CPsV), genus Ophiovirus, is associated with a severe disease of citrus worldwide. Double antibody sandwich (DAS) ELISA using a polyclonal antiserum, and triple antibody sandwich (TAS) ELISAs, employing the IgG monoclonal antibody (mab) 13C5, and the IgM mab 2A3, were used to detect CPsV in orchards of different citrus varieties in Campania, southern Italy. TAS ELISA with

  6. Combination of multispectral remote sensing, variable rate technology and environmental modeling for citrus pest management.

    PubMed

    Du, Qian; Chang, Ni-Bin; Yang, Chenghai; Srilakshmi, Kanth R

    2008-01-01

    The Lower Rio Grande Valley (LRGV) of south Texas is an agriculturally rich area supporting intensive production of vegetables, fruits, grain sorghum, and cotton. Modern agricultural practices involve the combined use of irrigation with the application of large amounts of agrochemicals to maximize crop yields. Intensive agricultural activities in past decades might have caused potential contamination of soil, surface water, and groundwater due to leaching of pesticides in the vadose zone. In an effort to promote precision farming in citrus production, this paper aims at developing an airborne multispectral technique for identifying tree health problems in a citrus grove that can be combined with variable rate technology (VRT) for required pesticide application and environmental modeling for assessment of pollution prevention. An unsupervised linear unmixing method was applied to classify the image for the grove and quantify the symptom severity for appropriate infection control. The PRZM-3 model was used to estimate environmental impacts that contribute to nonpoint source pollution with and without the use of multispectral remote sensing and VRT. Research findings using site-specific environmental assessment clearly indicate that combination of remote sensing and VRT may result in benefit to the environment by reducing the nonpoint source pollution by 92.15%. Overall, this study demonstrates the potential of precision farming for citrus production in the nexus of industrial ecology and agricultural sustainability. PMID:17222960

  7. Differential response of stomata to air humidity in the parasitic mistletoe ( Phthirusa pyrifolia ) and its host, mandarin orange ( Citrus resitulata )

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Mabrouk A. El-Sharkawy; James H. Cock; Ana Pilar Hernandez

    1986-01-01

    Measurements of CO2 and H2O exchange rate and the calculated leaf conductance of attached leaves were conducted over a range of leaf-to-air vapour pressure difference (VPD) (1.5 to 5.5 kPa) to compare the response of the parasitic mistletoe, Phthirusa pyrifolia, with that of its host, the mandarin orange, Citrus reticulata. Seedlings of the host infected with the parasite were grown

  8. Identification of putative TAL effector targets of the citrus canker pathogens shows functional convergence underlying disease development and defense response

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Transcriptional activator-like (TAL) effectors, formerly known as the AvrBs3/PthA protein family, are DNA-binding effectors broadly found in Xanthomonas spp. that transactivate host genes upon injection via the bacterial type three-secretion system. Biologically relevant targets of TAL effectors, i.e. host genes whose induction is vital to establish a compatible interaction, have been reported for xanthomonads that colonize rice and pepper; however, citrus genes modulated by the TAL effectors PthA“s” and PthC“s” of the citrus canker bacteria Xanthomonas citri (Xc) and Xanthomonas aurantifolii pathotype C (XaC), respectively, are poorly characterized. Of particular interest, XaC causes canker disease in its host lemon (Citrus aurantifolia), but triggers a defense response in sweet orange. Results Based on, 1) the TAL effector-DNA binding code, 2) gene expression data of Xc and XaC-infiltrated sweet orange leaves, and 3) citrus hypocotyls transformed with PthA2, PthA4 or PthC1, we have identified a collection of Citrus sinensis genes potentially targeted by Xc and XaC TAL effectors. Our results suggest that similar with other strains of Xanthomonas TAL effectors, PthA2 and PthA4, and PthC1 to some extent, functionally converge. In particular, towards induction of genes involved in the auxin and gibberellin synthesis and response, cell division, and defense response. We also present evidence indicating that the TAL effectors act as transcriptional repressors and that the best scoring predicted DNA targets of PthA“s” and PthC“s” in citrus promoters predominantly overlap with or localize near to TATA boxes of core promoters, supporting the idea that TAL effectors interact with the host basal transcriptional machinery to recruit the RNA pol II and start transcription. Conclusions The identification of PthA“s” and PthC“s” targets, such as the LOB (LATERAL ORGAN BOUNDARY) and CCNBS genes that we report here, is key for the understanding of the canker symptoms development during host susceptibility, or the defenses of sweet orange against the canker bacteria. We have narrowed down candidate targets to a few, which pointed out the host metabolic pathways explored by the pathogens. PMID:24564253

  9. Transcriptional Analyses of Mandarins Seriously Infected by ‘Candidatus Liberibacter asiaticus’

    PubMed Central

    Zheng, Zheng; Dai, Zehan; Tao, Yang; Deng, Xiaoling

    2015-01-01

    A range of leaf symptoms, including blotchy mottle, yellowing, and small, upright leaves with a variety of chlorotic patterns resembling those induced by zinc deficiencies, are associated with huanglongbing (HLB, yellow shoot disease), a worldwide destructive citrus disease. HLB is presumably caused by the phloem-limited fastidious prokaryotic ?-proteobacterium ‘Candidatus Liberibacter spp.’ Previous studies focused on the proteome and transcriptome analyses of citrus 5 to 35 weeks after ‘Ca. L. spp.’ inoculation. In this study, gene expression profiles were analyzed from mandarin Citrus reticulate Blanco cv. jiaogan leaves after a 2 year infection with ‘Ca. L. asiaticus’. The Affymetrix microarray analysis explored 2,017 differentially expressed genes. Of the 1,364 genes had known functions, 938 (46.5%) were up-regulated. Genes related to photosynthesis, carbohydrate metabolic, and structure were mostly down-regulated, with rates of 92.7%, 61.0%, and 80.2%, respectively. Genes associated with oxidation-reduction and transport were mostly up-regulated with the rates of 75.0% and 64.6%, respectively. Our data analyses implied that the infection of ‘Ca. L. asiaticus’ could alter hormone crosstalk, inducing the jasmine acid pathway and depressing the ethylene and salicylic acid pathways in the citrus host. This study provides an enhanced insight into the host response of citrus to ‘Ca. L. asiaticus’ infection at a two-years infection stage. PMID:26196297

  10. PROGRESS IN DEVELOPING RNA MARKERS FOR DETERMINING DISEASE REACTIONS IN THE RICE BLAST SYSTEM

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Hypersensitive cell death as indicated by the presence of autofluorescent materials, and rapid defense gene activations are two significant outcomes in rice plants during their resistant reaction to M. grisea infection. A resistant rice cultivar, Katy, and a Sekiguchi like-lesion mimic mutant of Ka...

  11. Analysis of rice PDR-like ABC transporter genes in sheath blight resistance

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Sheath blight caused by Rhizoctonia solani is one of the most damaging diseases of rice worldwide. To understand the molecular mechanism of resistance, we identified 450 differentially expressed genes in a resistant rice cultivar Jasmine 85 after R. solani infection with a combination of DNA microar...

  12. DISTRIBUTION OF BLAST RESISTANCE GENE PI-TA IN THE USDA RICE CORE COLLECTION

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The Pi-ta gene in rice (Oryza sativa L.) prevents the infection by the fungal pathogen Magnaporthe grisea (causal organism of rice blast) isolates containing the corresponding avirulence gene AVR-Pita in a gene-for-gene manner. Pi-ta has been effectively used for blast control over decades in the U...

  13. Distribution of aflatoxins in shelling and milling fractions of naturally contaminated rice

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The objective of this study was to determine the distribution of an economically-important class of mycotoxins, the aflatoxins, in rice milling fractions. Rice plants grown under field production condition are frequently infected with types of pathogenic fungi which produce toxic metabolites (mycot...

  14. Dietary rice bran promotes resistance to Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium colonization in mice

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Dietary rice bran consists of many bioactive components with disease fighting properties; including the capacity to modulate the gut microbiota. Studies point to the important roles of the gut microbiota and the mucosal epithelium in the establishment of protection against enteric pathogens, such as Salmonella. The ability of rice bran to reduce the susceptibility of mice to a Salmonella infection has not been previously investigated. Therefore, we hypothesized that the incorporation of rice bran into the diet would inhibit the colonization of Salmonella in mice through the induction of protective mucosal responses. Results Mice were fed diets containing 0%, 10% and 20% rice bran for one week prior to being orally infected with Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium. We found that mice consuming the 10 and 20% rice bran diets exhibited a reduction in Salmonella fecal shedding for up to nine days post-infection as compared to control diet fed animals (p?rice bran fed mice (p?rice bran extracts to reduce Salmonella entry into mouse small intestinal epithelial cells. Conclusions Increasing rice bran consumption represents a novel dietary means for reducing susceptibility to enteric infection with Salmonella and potentially via induction of native Lactobacillus spp. PMID:22583915

  15. Transgenic strategies to confer resistance against viruses in rice plants.

    PubMed

    Sasaya, Takahide; Nakazono-Nagaoka, Eiko; Saika, Hiroaki; Aoki, Hideyuki; Hiraguri, Akihiro; Netsu, Osamu; Uehara-Ichiki, Tamaki; Onuki, Masatoshi; Toki, Seichi; Saito, Koji; Yatou, Osamu

    2014-01-13

    Rice (Oryza sativa L.) is cultivated in more than 100 countries and supports nearly half of the world's population. Developing efficient methods to control rice viruses is thus an urgent necessity because viruses cause serious losses in rice yield. Most rice viruses are transmitted by insect vectors, notably planthoppers and leafhoppers. Viruliferous insect vectors can disperse their viruses over relatively long distances, and eradication of the viruses is very difficult once they become widespread. Exploitation of natural genetic sources of resistance is one of the most effective approaches to protect crops from virus infection; however, only a few naturally occurring rice genes confer resistance against rice viruses. Many investigators are using genetic engineering of rice plants as a potential strategy to control viral diseases. Using viral genes to confer pathogen-derived resistance against crops is a well-established procedure, and the expression of various viral gene products has proved to be effective in preventing or reducing infection by various plant viruses since the 1990s. RNA interference (RNAi), also known as RNA silencing, is one of the most efficient methods to confer resistance against plant viruses on their respective crops. In this article, we review the recent progress, mainly conducted by our research group, in transgenic strategies to confer resistance against tenuiviruses and reoviruses in rice plants. Our findings also illustrate that not all RNAi constructs against viral RNAs are equally effective in preventing virus infection and that it is important to identify the viral "Achilles' heel" gene to target for RNAi attack when engineering plants. PMID:24454308

  16. Enhancement or Attenuation of Disease by Deletion of Genes from Citrus Tristeza Virus

    PubMed Central

    Tatineni, Satyanarayana

    2012-01-01

    Stem pitting is a common virus-induced disease of perennial woody plants induced by a range of different viruses. The phenotype results from sporadic areas of the stem in which normal xylem and phloem development is prevented during growth of stems. These alterations interfere with carbohydrate transport, resulting in reduced plant growth and yield. Citrus tristeza virus (CTV), a phloem-limited closterovirus, induces economically important stem-pitting diseases of citrus. CTV has three nonconserved genes (p33, p18, and p13) that are not related to genes of other viruses and that are not required for systemic infection of some species of citrus, which allowed us to examine the effect of deletions of these genes on symptom phenotypes. In the most susceptible experimental host, Citrus macrophylla, the full-length virus causes only very mild stem-pitting symptoms. Surprisingly, we found that certain deletion combinations (p33 and p18 and/or p13) induced greatly increased stem-pitting symptoms, while other combinations (p13 or p13 plus p18) resulted in reduced stem pitting. These results suggest that the stem-pitting phenotype, which is one of more economically important disease phenotypes, can result not from a specific sequence or protein but from a balance between the expression of different viral genes. Unexpectedly, using green fluorescent protein-tagged full-length virus and deletion mutants (CTV9?p33 and CTV9?p33?p18?p13), the virus was found at pitted areas in abnormal locations outside the normal ring of phloem. Thus, increased stem pitting was associated not only with a prevention of xylem production but also with a proliferation of cells that supported viral replication, suggesting that at random areas of stems the virus can elicit changes in cellular differentiation and development. PMID:22593155

  17. Enhancement or attenuation of disease by deletion of genes from Citrus tristeza virus.

    PubMed

    Tatineni, Satyanarayana; Dawson, William O

    2012-08-01

    Stem pitting is a common virus-induced disease of perennial woody plants induced by a range of different viruses. The phenotype results from sporadic areas of the stem in which normal xylem and phloem development is prevented during growth of stems. These alterations interfere with carbohydrate transport, resulting in reduced plant growth and yield. Citrus tristeza virus (CTV), a phloem-limited closterovirus, induces economically important stem-pitting diseases of citrus. CTV has three nonconserved genes (p33, p18, and p13) that are not related to genes of other viruses and that are not required for systemic infection of some species of citrus, which allowed us to examine the effect of deletions of these genes on symptom phenotypes. In the most susceptible experimental host, Citrus macrophylla, the full-length virus causes only very mild stem-pitting symptoms. Surprisingly, we found that certain deletion combinations (p33 and p18 and/or p13) induced greatly increased stem-pitting symptoms, while other combinations (p13 or p13 plus p18) resulted in reduced stem pitting. These results suggest that the stem-pitting phenotype, which is one of more economically important disease phenotypes, can result not from a specific sequence or protein but from a balance between the expression of different viral genes. Unexpectedly, using green fluorescent protein-tagged full-length virus and deletion mutants (CTV9?p33 and CTV9?p33?p18?p13), the virus was found at pitted areas in abnormal locations outside the normal ring of phloem. Thus, increased stem pitting was associated not only with a prevention of xylem production but also with a proliferation of cells that supported viral replication, suggesting that at random areas of stems the virus can elicit changes in cellular differentiation and development. PMID:22593155

  18. Virus-mediated chemical changes in rice plants impact the relationship between non-vector planthopper Nilaparvata lugens Stål and its egg parasitoid Anagrus nilaparvatae Pang et Wang.

    PubMed

    He, Xiaochan; Xu, Hongxing; Gao, Guanchun; Zhou, Xiaojun; Zheng, Xusong; Sun, Yujian; Yang, Yajun; Tian, Junce; Lu, Zhongxian

    2014-01-01

    In order to clarify the impacts of southern rice black-streaked dwarf virus (SRBSDV) infection on rice plants, rice planthoppers and natural enemies, differences in nutrients and volatile secondary metabolites between infected and healthy rice plants were examined. Furthermore, the impacts of virus-mediated changes in plants on the population growth of non-vector brown planthopper (BPH), Nilaparvata lugens, and the selectivity and parasitic capability of planthopper egg parasitoid Anagrus nilaparvatae were studied. The results showed that rice plants had no significant changes in amino acid and soluble sugar contents after SRBSDV infection, and SRBSDV-infected plants had no significant effect on population growth of non-vector BPH. A. nilaparvatae preferred BPH eggs both in infected and healthy rice plants, and tended to parasitize eggs on infected plants, but it had no significant preference for infected plants or healthy plants. GC-MS analysis showed that tridecylic aldehyde occurred only in rice plants infected with SRBSDV, whereas octanal, undecane, methyl salicylate and hexadecane occurred only in healthy rice plants. However, in tests of behavioral responses to these five volatile substances using a Y-tube olfactometer, A. nilaparvatae did not show obvious selectivity between single volatile substances at different concentrations and liquid paraffin in the control group. The parasitic capability of A. nilaparvatae did not differ between SRBSDV-infected plants and healthy plant seedlings. The results suggested that SRBSDV-infected plants have no significant impacts on the non-vector planthopper and its egg parasitoid, A. nilaparvatae. PMID:25141278

  19. Electron microscopic investigations and indexing studies of psorosis and citrus ringspot virus of citrus / by Margaret Atchison Barkley 

    E-print Network

    Barkley, Margaret Atchison

    1979-01-01

    sinensis Osbeck) scion wood onto sour orange (Citrus aurantium L. ) seedlings, bark pieces from trees to be indexed were placed in the sour orange stocks as soon as the bark began slipping. Indicator seedlings inoculated with bark pieces from greenhouse... sinensis Osbeck leaf from seedling inoculated with psorosis expressing flecking symptom associated with psorosis 15 Citrus aradisi Macf. leaves showing mature leaf symp- tom characteristic of citrus ringspot virus. . . . . . . . . . . . . 16 Healthy...

  20. Bioethanol production from rice washing drainage and rice bran.

    PubMed

    Watanabe, Masanori; Takahashi, Makoto; Sasano, Kazuo; Kashiwamura, Takashi; Ozaki, Yuich; Tsuiki, Tomohiro; Hidaka, Harutaro; Kanemoto, Shigeharu

    2009-12-01

    Bioethanol production from rice washing drainage and rice bran derived from a rinse-free process of rice manufacturing was established using the combinations of an enzymatic procedure and an ultra-sonic procedure of rice washing drainage for a sample pre-treatment. The maximum ethanol concentration was attained at 6.2% (v/v). PMID:19914587

  1. EXIT INTERVIEW SUMMARY FORM Life after Rice...

    E-print Network

    Richards-Kortum, Rebecca

    1 EXIT INTERVIEW SUMMARY FORM Life after Rice... Rice ID: _____________________ * Medical benefits - Your Rice medical benefits will end on: __________________________ * Vesting in the 401(a) Rice. * Rice retiree - If you qualify as a Rice retiree, in accordance with the Rice University Human Resources

  2. Comparative Transcriptome Analysis of Two Rice Varieties in Response to Rice Stripe Virus and Small Brown Planthoppers during Early Interaction

    PubMed Central

    Zheng, Wenjing; Ma, Li; Zhao, Jiaming; Li, Zhiqiang; Sun, Fuyu; Lu, Xiaochun

    2013-01-01

    Rice stripe, a virus disease, transmitted by a small brown planthopper (SBPH), has greatly reduced production of japonica rice in East Asia, especially in China. Although we have made great progress in mapping resistance genes, little is known about the mechanism of resistance. By de novo transcriptome assembling, we gained sufficient transcript data to analyze changes in gene expression of early interaction in response to SBPH and RSV infection in rice. Respectively 648 and 937 DEGs were detected from the disease-resistant (Liaonong 979) and the susceptible (Fengjin) varieties, most of which were up-regulated. We found 37 genes related to insect resistance, which mainly included genes for jasmonate-induced protein, TIFY protein, lipoxygenase, as well as trypsin inhibitor genes and transcription factor genes. In the interaction process between RSV and rice, 87 genes were thought to be related to RSV resistance; these primarily included 12 peroxidase biosynthesis genes, 12 LRR receptor-like protein kinase genes, 6 genes coding pathogenesis-related proteins, 4 glycine-rich cell wall structural protein genes, 2 xyloglucan hydrolase genes and a cellulose synthase. The results indicate that the rice-pathogen interaction happened both in disease-resistant and susceptible varieties, and some genes related to JA biosynthesis played key roles in the interaction between SBPHs and rice. When rice was infected by RSV a hypersensitive reaction (HR) in the disease-resistant variety was suppressed, which resulted from an increase in peroxidase expression and down-regulation of LRR receptor-like protein kinase and pathogenesis-related proteins, while, the changes of peroxidase biosynthesis, glycine-rich cell wall structural protein, cellulose synthase and xyloglucan endotransglucosylase/hydrolase could lead to the strengthening of physical barriers of rice, which may be an important resistance mechanism to RSV in rice. PMID:24358146

  3. Registration of 'Medark' Rice

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    ‘Medark’ rice is a high-yielding, early maturing, semidwarf, medium-grain cultivar. It originated from the cross ‘Bengal’/’Short Rico’ and is similar in maturity to Bengal. It has improved disease resistance to rice blase, brown spot and straighthead. Medark has a lodging resistance slightly less...

  4. Induced mutations in rice

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Induced mutations have a long history in both applied and basic aspects of rice research. During the past fifty years, over 500 rice varieties have been developed worldwide, either directly from induced mutants or as a result of crossing such mutants with other breeding lines. More recently, the gen...

  5. Rice Diseases Atlas.

    E-print Network

    Walla, Walter

    1977-01-01

    . 448. au., S.H. 1972 Rice Diseases. Eastern Press Ltd., London and Reading, England. Whitney, N. G. and Richard A. Frederiksen, 1975 Kernel Smut of Rice. Texas Agricultural Experiment Station Bulletin MP-1231. (Blank Page in Original Bulletin... CONTENTS INTRODUCTION .......... . .. . ........ . SEEDLI NG DISEASES ... . ... . .. . ........ . FOLIAGE DISEASES ................... .. SHEATH AND STEM DISEASES .......... . DISEASES ATT ACKI NG THE KERNEL ..... . PHYSIOLOGICAL Di...

  6. Spanish Rice Ingredients

    E-print Network

    Liskiewicz, Maciej

    Spanish Rice Ingredients: 2 cups brown rice, cooked Vegetable oil spray 1 onion 1 cup salsa skillet to medium. Cut the ends off of the onion, and peel off the brown layers. Run under water to remove any dirt. Cut the onion in half lengthwise, and place the flat side on the cutting board. Slice across

  7. Making rice even healthier!

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Rice is a naturally healthy food, but what if it could be made even healthier? Would Americans eat more rice if it could be advertised to be a 'New and Improved' source of calcium to promote bone growth, or iron to prevent anemia? Grocery stores are full of foods that are vitamin enhanced to attract...

  8. Rice transformation: bombardment

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Paul Christou

    1997-01-01

    Bombardment-based methodology is responsible for the effective genetic manipulation of major cereals including rice. Many groups reported significant advances on various aspects of rice molecular biology and genetic engineering using procedures based on bombardment technology. Molecular and genetic characterization of large numbers of these plants (more than 500 independent transgenic plants) provided information on structure, expression and stability of integrated

  9. [Isolation and identification of Metarhizium from Citrus grandis 'tomentosa' GAP base].

    PubMed

    Ma, Weisi; Xu, Jiang; Qiao, Haili; Chen, Jun; Li, Xiangming; Qin, Rongmin; Cheng, Huizhen

    2012-04-01

    A type of entomopathogenic fungus of soil in Citrus grandis 'tomentosa' production base was isolated and identified with morphological and molecular biological methods, including pathogenesis, spore characteristic and ITS sequence analysis were conducted. The results showed that eighteen entomopathogenic fungi strains were isolated from the Tenebrio molitor infected in the soil samples, which were identified as Metarhizium anisopliae var. anisopliae. Based on results above, we concluded that there was quantity of Metarhizium resources in this area. These provided the useful information for controlling some pests of C. grandis by using these strains of fungus. PMID:22792782

  10. Segregation of distinct variants from Citrus tristeza virus isolate SY568 using aphid transmission.

    PubMed

    Velazquez-Monreal, J J; Mathews, D M; Dodds, J A

    2009-10-01

    A well-studied severe isolate of Citrus tristeza virus (CTV) known as SY568 has previously been shown to contain multiple variants of the virus which differ in their genetic and biological characters. Aphid transmission was used in an attempt to segregate some of these variants for further characterization. Resulting infections gave symptoms which varied from asymptomatic to more severe than the inoculum source. RNase protection assays (RPAs) were used to compare nine regions of the CTV genome and determine whether unique strains could be identified. Five aphid-transmitted subcultures, with fingerprints that were different from those of the inoculum sources in at least one genomic area, were then cloned, sequenced, and compared with known isolates. An asymptomatic strain was shown to be different in every area of the CTV genome when examined by RPA and sequencing of selected regions. Mixed-infection studies using graft transmission of the asymptomatic subculture and two of the more severe aphid-transmitted subcultures showed that the mild strain was not able to compete well when in the presence of any of the severe variants tested, and its titer was significantly reduced from that seen in single infection. The mild strain and a selected severe strain were singly graft inoculated into five different citrus hosts (sweet orange, grapefruit, sour orange, lemon, and lime), where they maintained their distinct biological and genetic characteristics. PMID:19740030

  11. Citrus Canker: The Pathogen and Its Impact

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    2002-01-01

    This Web site, currently featured on the home page of the American Phytopathological Society, contains a research report regarding the Asiatic citrus canker that has had devastating effects on Florida's citrus industry. The report, in a journal article format, thoroughly relates the natural history and current status of the disease, as well as detailing the methods and results of the (primarily genetic) experiments conducted in this study. One of the most appealing features of this Web site is the quality of the photos within the report. These photos can be viewed separately from the report in a slide show. While navigating this site is relatively straightforward, the lack of a table of contents can make finding your place in the body of the text somewhat confusing.

  12. Information: Rice Young Alumni Information

    E-print Network

    Palem, Krishna V.

    Rice Young Alumni Detailed Information: Houston Events 2011-2012 #12; Rice Young Alumni Information Alumni.rice.edu 2 Join the Parliament in HoustonHouston Young Alumni Events This page to this site for more information and visit our Rice Young Alumni Houston Facebook page for special details

  13. Rice and red rice interference. II. Rice response to population densities of three red rice (Oryza sativa) ecotypes

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Red rice, which grows taller and produces more tillers than domestic rice and shatters most of its seeds early, is a major weed in many rice-growing areas of the world. Field experiments were conducted at Stuttgart, AR in 1997 and 1998 to evaluate the growth response of the Kaybonnet (KBNT) rice cul...

  14. Upland Rice Production in Brazil

    Microsoft Academic Search

    M. P. Barbosa Filho; T. Yamada

    Most of the upland rice produced in Brazil is on Oxisols with low water-holding capacity and often with low fertility. This article outlines some of the management practices being studied for sustainable rice production systems. Upland rice occupied 2.4 million ha or 64 percent of the total rice area in Brazil in 1999 (Table 1). However, due to lower productivity

  15. Bioengineering nitrogen acquisition in rice

    E-print Network

    Britto, Dev T.

    Bioengineering nitrogen acquisition in rice: can novel initiatives in rice genomics and physiology to recombinant DNA technology. Here, we focus on the promise of these moderntechnologies inthe area of nitrogen acquisitionin rice, recognizing that nitrogen deficiency compromises the realization of rice yield potential

  16. Red rice control in rice using herbicides plus safeners 

    E-print Network

    Price, James Bain

    1977-01-01

    RED RICE CONTROL IN RICE USING HERBICIDES PLUS SAFENERS A Thesis by JAMES BAIN PRICE, IV Submitted to the Graduate College of Texas A&M University in partial fulfillment of the requirement for the degree of MASTER OF SCIENCE May 1977 Major... Subject: Agronomy RED RICE CONTROL IN RICE USING HERBICIDES PLUS SAFENERS A Thesis by JAMES BAIN PRICE, IV Approved as to style and content by: (Chairman of Committee Head of Department (Member) (Member) Memb May 1977 ABSTRACT Red Rice...

  17. Pectin—a product of citrus waste

    Microsoft Academic Search

    R. M. McCready; H. S. Owens

    1954-01-01

    The annual processing of citrus fruit wastes in the United States has reached two million tons. Forty thousand tons of pectin\\u000a could be produced, compared with current production of three thousand tons. The physical and chemical properties of pectic\\u000a substances are important botanically and industrially. Pectic substances aid in maintaining texture of fruits and vegetables\\u000a and serve as jellying agents

  18. Hormonal Modulation of Citrus Responses to Flooding

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Vicent Arbona; Aurelio Gómez-Cadenas

    2008-01-01

    In this work, variations in endogenous levels of several hormones were measured in citrus under conditions of continuous flooding\\u000a following a time-course design. The use of three genotypes differing in their ability to tolerate waterlogging has allowed\\u000a the discrimination between common and specific hormonal responses. Data suggest an essential involvement of the aerial part\\u000a in the regulation of tolerance to

  19. Flavonoid glycosides and limonoids from Citrus molasses

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Masanori Kuroyanagi; Hiromi Ishii; Nobuo Kawahara; Hiroyuki Sugimoto; Hideo Yamada; Kiyoshi Okihara; Osamu Shirota

    2008-01-01

    Molasses of tangerine orange (Citrus unshiu Markovich) is obtained as a waste product in the course of tangerine orange juice production. This molasses is expected to\\u000a be a useful source of organic compounds such as flavonoids and limonoids. To elucidate a use for this molasses waste, we isolated\\u000a and identified its organic constituents. Two new flavanonol glycosides were isolated from

  20. Screening citrus rootstocks for alkalinity tolerance 

    E-print Network

    Sudahono

    1991-01-01

    prepared seedbeds of calcareous soils containing 2. 15% CaCO3 and 0. 20% CaCO3. They found that seedlings of all sweet orange (Citrus sinensis (L. ) Osbeck) cultivars showed moderate or severe iron chlorosis. Mandarin (Cirrus reticulate Blanco.... mecrophylfa Wester were highly resistant. C. voikamerisna (Pasq. ) Tan. , C. auranfium, C. reticulate and C. iimonis were moderately tolerant. C. faiwsnica (Tan. ) Shim. , C. sinensis (L. ) Osbeck, Troyer (poncirus trifoliate (L. ) Raf. x C. sinensis...

  1. Genetic transformation of sweet orange with the coat protein gene of Citrus psorosis virus and evaluation of resistance against the virus.

    PubMed

    Zanek, María Cecilia; Reyes, Carina Andrea; Cervera, Magdalena; Peña, Eduardo José; Velázquez, Karelia; Costa, Norma; Plata, Maria Inés; Grau, Oscar; Peña, Leandro; García, María Laura

    2008-01-01

    Citrus psorosis is a serious viral disease affecting citrus trees in many countries. Its causal agent is Citrus psorosis virus (CPsV), the type member of genus Ophiovirus. CPsV infects most important citrus varieties, including oranges, mandarins and grapefruits, as well as hybrids and citrus relatives used as rootstocks. Certification programs have not been sufficient to control the disease and no sources of natural resistance have been found. Pathogen-derived resistance (PDR) can provide an efficient alternative to control viral diseases in their hosts. For this purpose, we have produced 21 independent lines of sweet orange expressing the coat protein gene of CPsV and five of them were challenged with the homologous CPV 4 isolate. Two different viral loads were evaluated to challenge the transgenic plants, but so far, no resistance or tolerance has been found in any line after 1 year of observations. In contrast, after inoculation all lines showed characteristic symptoms of psorosis in the greenhouse. The transgenic lines expressed low and variable amounts of the cp gene and no correlation was found between copy number and transgene expression. One line contained three copies of the cp gene, expressed low amounts of the mRNA and no coat protein. The ORF was cytosine methylated suggesting a PTGS mechanism, although the transformant failed to protect against the viral load used. Possible causes for the failed protection against the CPsV are discussed. PMID:17712560

  2. Pesticide residues survey in citrus fruits.

    PubMed

    Ortelli, Didier; Edder, Patrick; Corvi, Claude

    2005-05-01

    The use of pesticides is widespread in citrus fruits production for pre- and post-harvest protection and many chemical substances may be applied in order to control undesirable moulds or insects. A survey was carried out to evaluate levels of pesticide residues in citrus fruits. Two multiresidue analytical methods were used to screen samples for more than 200 different fungicides, insecticides and acaricides. A total of 240 samples of citrus fruits including lemon, orange, mandarin, grapefruit, lime, pomelo and kumquat were taken in various markets in the Geneva area during the year 2003. Ninety-five percent of the 164 samples issued from classical agriculture contained pesticides and 38 different compounds have been identified. This high percentage of positive samples was mainly due to the presence of two post-harvest fungicides, imazalil and thiabendazole, detected in 70% and 36% of samples respectively. Only three samples exceeded the Swiss maximum residue limits (MRLs). Fifty-three samples sold with the written indication "without post-harvest treatment" were also controlled. Among theses samples, three exceeded the Swiss MRLs for penconazole or chlorpyrifos and 18 (34%) did not respect the written indication since we found large amounts of post-harvest fungicides. Finally, 23 samples coming from certified organic production were analysed. Among theses samples, three contained small amounts of pesticides and the others were pesticides free. PMID:16019813

  3. Citrus tristeza virus (CTV) resistance in transgenic citrus based on virus challenge of protoplasts

    Microsoft Academic Search

    O. Olivares-Fuster; G. H. Fleming; M. R. Albiach-Marti; S. Gowda; W. O. Dawson; J. W. Crosser

    2003-01-01

    Summary  A strategy for the sereening of candidate virus-derived sequences to provide RNA-mediated citrus tristeza virus (CTV) resistance\\u000a and early selection of virus-resistant citrus is presented. The system is based on the polyethylene glycol-(PEG) mediated\\u000a cotransformation of protoplasts using virus-derived sequences and green fluorescent protein as a single selectable marker,\\u000a followed by an in vitro assay of virus inoculation into transgenic

  4. Genetic diversity and a heterogeneous population of Citrus mosaic virus within a single citrus tree

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Takao Ito; Tsutae Ito; Hiroshi Shiotani; Toru Iwanami; Katsumi Ozaki; Kazuyuki Muramoto

    2007-01-01

    Plural variants of Citrus mosaic virus (CiMV), a Satsuma dwarf virus (SDV) strain, were detected from a single citrus tree. Reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction amplification of 1139\\u000a nucleotides (nt) of 3?-terminal RNA1 and analyses of nucleotide sequences revealed three CiMV variants that differed by up\\u000a to 5.4%. The analyses of 1403–1493?nt of 3?-terminal RNA2 showed four CiMV variants, two of

  5. Susceptibility of rice to the blast fungus, Magnaporthe grisea.

    PubMed

    Ribot, Cécile; Hirsch, Judith; Balzergue, Sandrine; Tharreau, Didier; Nottéghem, Jean-Loup; Lebrun, Marc-Henri; Morel, Jean-Benoit

    2008-01-01

    The interaction between rice and the blast fungus Magnaporthe grisea is the focus of extensive studies on rice disease resistance and fungal infection mechanisms. Here, we review the characteristics of susceptible rice blast infections in terms of physiology, cytology and both host and pathogen transcriptional responses. The success of the infection and the type of disease symptoms strongly depend on environmental and developmental cues. After its penetration into a host cell, the fungus differentiates invasive hyphae that fill up the plant cell lumen and are in direct contact with the membrane of the infected cell. The infected plant cell is alive, displaying considerable vesicle accumulation near the fungus, which is consistent with the establishment of a biotrophic phase at this stage of the infection. Colonization of host tissues by the fungus occurs through the perforation of cell walls from adjacent cells, likely using plasmodesmata as breaking points, or through hyphal growth in the apoplasm. After a few days of biotrophic growth within rice tissues, the fungus switches to a necrotrophic-like phase associated with the onset of sporulation, leading to visible lesions. Genome-wide transcriptomic studies have shown that classical plant defence responses are triggered during a susceptible infection, although the kinetics and amplitude of these responses are slower and lower than in resistant interactions. Infected rice cells are submitted to an intense transcriptional reprogramming, where responses to hormones such as auxins, abscissic acid and jasmonates are likely involved. Consistent with the extensive plant-fungal exchanges during the biotrophic phase, many rice genes expressed during infection encode plasma membrane proteins. At the onset of lesion formation (5 days after the start of infection), M. grisea is actively reprogramming its transcription towards active DNA, RNA and protein syntheses to sustain its rapid growth in infected tissues. A striking characteristic of M. grisea genes expressed at this stage of the infection is the over-representation of genes encoding secreted proteins, mainly of unknown function. However, some of these secreted proteins are enzymes involved in cell wall, protein and lipid degradation, suggesting that the fungus is starting to degrade host polymers and cell walls or is remodelling its own cell wall. The next challenge will be to decipher the role of these induced plant and fungal genes in the susceptible interaction. PMID:17905473

  6. CLASSICAL BIOLOGICAL CONTROL OF CITRUS PESTS IN FLORIDA AND THE CARIBBEAN: INTERCONNECTIONS AND SUSTAINABILITY

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Marjorie A. HOY

    Beginning in 1993, Florida's citrus industry has been invaded by citrus leafminer (Phyllocnistis citrella Stainton, Lepidoptera: Gracillariidae), brown citrus aphid (Toxoptera citricida Kirkaldy, Homoptera: Aphididae), and the Asian citrus psylla (Diaphorina citri Kuwayama, Homoptera: Psyllidae). The source(s) of these pests remain unknown but other countries in the Carib- bean, as well as Central and South America, also have suffered invasions

  7. Correlation of ethylene synthesis in Citrus fruits and their susceptibility to Alternaria alternata pv. citri

    Microsoft Academic Search

    A. Ortuño; I. Nemsa; N. Alvarez; A. Lacasa; I. Porras; A. Garcia Lidón; J. A. Del Río

    2008-01-01

    The susceptibility of Fortune (Citrus clementina×Citrus reticulata), Citrus paradisi and Citrus limon fruits to Alternaria alternata pv. citri was investigated using different artificial inoculation methods. The results obtained reveal that the C. paradisi and C. limon fruits are less susceptible to A. alternata pv. citri than Fortune fruits, although all showed symptoms of Alternaria brown spot when the cuticle was

  8. Citrus Diseases Exotic to Florida: Witches' Broom Disease of Lime (WBDL)1

    Microsoft Academic Search

    K.-R. Chung; I. A. Khan; R. H. Brlansky

    Citrus is susceptible to a large number of diseases caused by plant pathogens. Economic losses due to plant diseases can be severe, but fortunately, not all pathogens attacking citrus are present in Florida. Major citrus diseases currently present in Florida include: Alternaria brown spot, blight, citrus canker, greasy spot, melanose, Phytophthora-induced diseases (foot and root rot, brown rot), postbloom fruit

  9. Characterization of the antioxidant properties of phenolic extracts from some citrus peels

    Microsoft Academic Search

    G. Oboh; A. O. Ademosun

    This study sought to determine the distribution of free and bound phenolics in some Nigerian citrus peels [orange (Citrus sinensis), grapefruit (Citrus paradisii) and shaddock (Citrus maxima)] and characterize the antioxidant properties. The free phenolics were extracted with 80% acetone, while the bound phenolics\\u000a were extracted from the alkaline and acid hydrolyzed residue with ethyl acetate. Free phenolic extracts had

  10. Gene expression analysis to understand cold tolerance in citrus

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Citrus cultivars show a wide range of tolerance to cold temperatures. Lemons and limes are known to be sensitive to cold while certain mandarins and trifoliate oranges can endure severe winters. To understand the mechanism of cold tolerance in citrus, we selected three known cold-sensitive and three...

  11. Growth inhibitory effect of peel extract from Citrus junos

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Shinsuke Fujihara; Tokurou Shimizu

    2003-01-01

    Extract from yuzu fruit peel (Citrus junos Sieb. ex Tanaka) strongly suppressed the germination of lettuce seeds while that from the peel of other citrus fruits such as navel orange (C. sinensis) and lemon (C. limon Burm. f.) had very little or no effect. The highest inhibitory activity was located in the peel followed by the segment but no significant

  12. Assessment of biosorption mechanism for Pb binding by citrus pectin

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Ankit Balaria; Silke Schiewer

    2008-01-01

    Bio sorption of lead (Pb) from aqueous solution using citrus peels can provide an efficient and cost-effective solution for lead removal from industrial wastewaters. These peels contain the biopolymer pectin that has a strong affinity for metal ions. A better understanding of the chemistry behind these interactions can help in the preparation of commercial biosorbents using waste citrus peels. This

  13. Vibrofluidized bed drying of citrus processing residue for byproduct recovery

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Eric A Roe

    2003-01-01

    Approximately 44% of the citrus that is processed becomes processing residue. The residue consists of the non-juice components of a citrus fruit, primarily peel and pulp, and is recovered by conversion to animal feed. The material is hygroscopic, agglomerating, has a wide particle size distribution, and must be carefully dried to avoid thermal damage to nutrients and flavors. This dissertation

  14. Arbuscular Mycorrhizal Fungi and Acclimatization of Micropropagated Citrus

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Qiang-Sheng Wu; Ying-Ning Zou; Gui-Yuan Wang

    2011-01-01

    Micropropagated plantlets lack mycorrhizal symbionts and therefore present some physiological hindrances when transferred from axenic to ex vitro conditions. The purpose of the present study was to research the effects of Glomus mosseae and G. versiforme on growth, photosynthesis, and nutrient uptake of micropropagated citrus plantlets at the acclimatization stage. The two mycorrhizal fungi successfully colonized the roots of citrus

  15. New enzymes for hydrolysis and fermentation of citrus waste

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The expense involved to dry citrus processing waste into citrus pulp pellets (CPP) for use as a cattle feed continues to increase with rising fuel costs. While there have also been recent increases in the value of CPP, this value fluctuates considerably and does not always cover processing costs. Th...

  16. Progress on dissecting and controlling the citrus huanglongbing complex

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Citrus huanglongbing (HLB) is a century-old and emerging disease that impedes citrus production worldwide. ‘Candidatus Liberibacter asiaticus’ (Las) is the globally prevalent species of HLB bacteria. Here we describe our molecular characterizations of Las, and our newly-developed control methods for...

  17. Development of a global conservation strategy for citrus genetic resources

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Citrus is an economically important world tree fruit crop with production in more than 146 countries. The center of origin for citrus is considered to be Southeastern Asia including southern China, northeastern India, and Malaysia, with secondary centers in surrounding areas. Novel and commercially ...

  18. Cytotoxic Effects of Essential Oils of Some Iranian Citrus Peels

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Ramesh Monajemi; Shahrbanoo Oryan; Ali Haeri-Roohani; Alireza Ghannadi; Abbas Jafariane

    There have been efforts to overcome the problem in treatment of cancer using medicinal plants. It has been shown that Citrus essential oil of contains different terpens with antitumor activities. In this study we sought to determine the cytotoxicity of essential oils of Iranian Citrus limon (L.), C. medica (L.), C. sinsensis (L.) peels on cancer cell lines. Essential oils

  19. Characterizing the citrus cultivar Carrizo genome through 454 shotgun sequencing.

    PubMed

    Belknap, William R; Wang, Yi; Huo, Naxin; Wu, Jiajie; Rockhold, David R; Gu, Yong Q; Stover, Ed

    2011-12-01

    The citrus cultivar Carrizo is the single most important rootstock to the US citrus industry and has resistance or tolerance to a number of major citrus diseases, including citrus tristeza virus, foot rot, and Huanglongbing (HLB, citrus greening). A Carrizo genomic sequence database providing approximately 3.5×genome coverage (haploid genome size approximately 367 Mb) was populated through 454 GS FLX shotgun sequencing. Analysis of the repetitive DNA fraction indicated a total interspersed repeat fraction of 36.5%. Assembly and characterization of abundant citrus Ty3/gypsy elements revealed a novel type of element containing open reading frames encoding a viral RNA-silencing suppressor protein (RNA binding protein, rbp) and a plant cytokinin riboside 5?-monophosphate phosphoribohydrolase-related protein (LONELY GUY, log). Similar gypsy elements were identified in the Populus trichocarpa genome. Gene-coding region analysis indicated that 24.4% of the nonrepetitive reads contained genic regions. The depth of genome coverage was sufficient to allow accurate assembly of constituent genes, including a putative phloem-expressed gene. The development of the Carrizo database (http://citrus.pw.usda.gov/) will contribute to characterization of agronomically significant loci and provide a publicly available genomic resource to the citrus research community. PMID:22133378

  20. Diversity and Phylogenetic Relationships of the Citrus Varieties Collection

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Twenty-five simple sequence repeat (SSR) markers were used to detect molecular polymorphisms among 370 Citrus accessions from the Citrus Variety Collection located at The University of California, Riverside. The number of alleles detected per locus ranged from three to thirty. A total of 298 alle...

  1. Transmission of Citrus leprosis virus C by Brevipalpus phoenicis (Geijskes) to Alternative Host Plants Found in Citrus Orchards

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The equivalent of US$ 75 million is spent each year in Brazil to control Brevipalpus phoenicis, a mite vector of Citrus leprosis virus C (CiLV-C). In this study we investigated the possibility that hedgerows, windbreaks, and weeds normally found in citrus orchards could host CiLV-C. Mites reared on ...

  2. ESTABLISHMENT OF A DISEASE-FREE CITRUS NURSERY SYSTEM AND DEMONSTRATION OF INTEGRATED CROP HEALTH MANAGEMENT OF CITRUS ORCHARDS

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Ha Minh Trung; Le Thi; Thu Hong; Ngo Vinh Vien

    In Vietnam, greening and tristeza are the citrus diseases of high economic importance. Because both diseases are transmitted by planting material insect vectors, the setting up of a pathogen-free nursery system and the practice of integrated pest management are the most important components of citrus disease control in Vietnam. Through successful international cooperation with FFTC, CIRAD, ACIAR, JIRCAS, and other

  3. Coccinellid predators do not track populations of the Asian citrus phyllid (Diaphorina citri) in citrus in Puerto Rico

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Yellow sticky cards were used to survey populations of Diaphorina citri, the vector of Huanglongbing, the most devastating bacterial disease of citrus worldwide. The numbers of coccinellids, potential predators of Diaphorina citri, were also surveyed. Citrus surveyed included a variety of species (V...

  4. Sodium sulphite yields improved DNA of higher stability for PCR detection of Citrus yellow mosaic virus from citrus leaves

    Microsoft Academic Search

    V. K. Baranwal; S. Majumder; Y. S. Ahlawat; R. P. Singh

    2003-01-01

    Citrus yellow mosaic virus (CYMV), a non-enveloped bacilliform DNA virus causes a severe mosaic disease in sweet oranges in India. CYMV is weakly immunogenic, thus serodiagnosis is not a preferred method for its detection. As an alternative a rapid and reliable detection protocol by polymerase chain reaction (PCR) was developed. However, high levels of polyphenolics and tannins in citrus leaves

  5. Antennal response of the Asian citrus psyllid to citrus volatiles and their degradation product

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Asian citrus psyllid antennae reacted strongly when stimulated with citral and ocimene stimulus tubes that had been aged for 3-5 days. When 20 µl of neat ocimene or citral were aged on filter paper strips in sealed Pasteur pipette stimulus tubes for 6 days on the laboratory bench, voltage changes we...

  6. Citrus psorosis and Mirafiori lettuce big-vein ophiovirus coat proteins localize to the cytoplasm and self interact in vivo.

    PubMed

    Peña, Eduardo José; Robles Luna, Gabriel; Zanek, María Cecilia; Borniego, María Belén; Reyes, Carina Andrea; Heinlein, Manfred; García, María Laura

    2012-12-01

    Citrus psorosis (CPsV) and Mirafiori lettuce big-vein virus (MiLBVV) belong to the family Ophioviridae, plant viruses with filamentous nucleocapsids and segmented genomes of negative polarity, causing the worldwide distributed citrus psorosis and lettuce big-vein diseases, respectively. To gain insight into the replication cycle of these viruses, the subcellular localization of the viral coat proteins (CP) was studied. Immunoblot analysis of fractionated extracts derived from natural and experimental infected hosts indicated that the CP of CPsV occurs in the soluble cytoplasmic fraction. The cytoplasmic localization of this protein was confirmed by confocal microscopy of fluorescent protein (FP)-tagged CP following its expression in either CPsV-infected and healthy Citrus sinensis plants or in Nicotiana benthamiana plants. The same localization was observed for FP-tagged CP of MiLBVV. The CPs of CPsV and MiLBBV can undergo homologous and heterologous interactions as revealed by fluorescent lifetime imaging microscopy and co-immunoprecipitation analysis. A putative leucine zipper motif that is conserved among ophiovirus CP sequences may account for these interactions. PMID:22921760

  7. Failure of Phyllosticta citricarpa pycnidiospores to infect Eureka lemon leaf litter

    Microsoft Academic Search

    M. Truter; P. M. Labuschagne; J. M. Kotzé; L. Meyer; L. Korsten

    2007-01-01

    Pycnidiospores of Phyllosticta citricarpa from pure cultures, symptomatic citrus black spot Valencia orange fruit and peelings were evaluated for their potential to\\u000a infect and colonise citrus black spot-free Eureka lemon leaf litter in a controlled environment and in the field in different\\u000a production regions of South Africa. Leaf litter, consisting of freshly detached green and old brown leaves that were

  8. Rice Diseases Atlas. 

    E-print Network

    Walla, Walter

    1977-01-01

    . This condition is common early in the growing season when soil temperatures are cool FOLIAGE DISEASES Rice Blast - (fungus Piricularia oryzae) - Blast is one of the most important rice diseases in Texas. This disease varies in severity from year to year.... ~ ______________________________________________________________________ 5 Brown Leaf Sppt - (fungus He/minthosporium oryzae) - The disease is found on leaves, leaf sheath, panicle branches, glumes and grain. The fungus causes brown circular to oval spots on the first leaf sheath while it is still below ground...

  9. Rice consumption in China 

    E-print Network

    Lan, Jin

    1989-01-01

    RICE CONSUMPTION IN CHINA A Thesis by JIN LAN Submitted to the Office of Graduate Studies of Texas ASM University in partial fulfillment of the requirements for the degree of MASTER OF SCIENCE August 1989 Major Subject: Agricultural... Economics RICE CONSUMPTION IN CHINA A Thesis by JIN LAN Approved as to style and content by: E, We ey F. Peterson (Chair of Committee) James E. Christiansen (Member) Carl Shaf (Member) Daniel I. Padberg (Head of Department) August 1989...

  10. Rice consumption in China

    E-print Network

    Lan, Jin

    1989-01-01

    RICE CONSUMPTION IN CHINA A Thesis by JIN LAN Submitted to the Office of Graduate Studies of Texas ASM University in partial fulfillment of the requirements for the degree of MASTER OF SCIENCE August 1989 Major Subject: Agricultural... Economics RICE CONSUMPTION IN CHINA A Thesis by JIN LAN Approved as to style and content by: E, We ey F. Peterson (Chair of Committee) James E. Christiansen (Member) Carl Shaf (Member) Daniel I. Padberg (Head of Department) August 1989...

  11. Population structure of putative rice-red rice hybrid derivatives in the Southern U.S.

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Rice and red rice can readily intercross in southern U.S. rice fields, however, the extent to which progeny of these rice-red rice hybrids may have successfully moved into red rice populations is unknown. Approximately 430 red rice accessions were obtained from farm samples in 1999 and 2000. Forty...

  12. DEVELOPMENT AND CHARACTERIZATION OF RICE MUTANTS ALTERED IN THE RICE BLAST RESISTANT GENE PI-TA-MEDIATED DISEASE RESISTANCE PATHWAY

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The Pi-ta gene in rice prevents the infection of the fungal pathogen Magnaporthe oryzae races containing the corresponding avirulence gene AVR-Pita. The Pi-ta gene encodes a putative cytoplasmic protein with a centrally localized nucleotide binding site and a leucine rich domain. AVR-Pita is a met...

  13. Increasing herbicide selectivity between rice and red rice 

    E-print Network

    Koetz, Paul Howard

    1982-01-01

    INCREASING HERBICIDE SEIZCTIVITY BETWEEN RICE AND RED RICE A Thesis by PAUL HOWARD KOETZ Submitted to the Graduate College of Texas AAN University 'n partial fulfillment of the requirement for the degree of' WASTER OF SCIENCE August 1982... major Subject: Agronomy INCREASING HERBICIDE SELECTIVITY BETWEEN RICE AND RED RICE A Thesis by PAUL HOWARD KOETZ Approved as to style and content by (Chairman of Committee) (Member (Member) (Head of Departmen August l982 ABSTRACT Increasing...

  14. Superinfection exclusion by Citrus tristeza virus does not correlate with the production of viral small RNAs.

    PubMed

    Folimonova, Svetlana Y; Harper, Scott J; Leonard, Michael T; Triplett, Eric W; Shilts, Turksen

    2014-11-01

    Superinfection exclusion (SIE), a phenomenon in which a preexisting viral infection prevents a secondary infection with the same or closely related virus, has been described for different viruses, including important pathogens of humans, animals, and plants. Several mechanisms acting at various stages of the viral life cycle have been proposed to explain SIE. Most cases of SIE in plant virus systems were attributed to induction of RNA silencing, a host defense mechanism that is mediated by small RNAs. Here we show that SIE by Citrus tristeza virus (CTV) does not correlate with the production of viral small interfering RNAs (siRNAs). CTV variants, which differed in the SIE ability, had similar siRNAs profiles. Along with our previous observations that the exclusion phenomenon requires a specific viral protein, p33, the new data suggest that SIE by CTV is highly complex and appears to use different mechanisms than those proposed for other viruses. PMID:25248160

  15. Rice University Rice Outdoor Programs and Education (ROPE) Internship

    E-print Network

    Rice University Rice Outdoor Programs and Education (ROPE) Internship Fall and Spring Semester 2012-2013 Position: Internship - Paid Location: Rice University, Houston, Texas Start Date: August 13th, 2012 End-lead students on outdoor adventure trips, aid in the teaching of a college course, and assist with supervision

  16. Competitive N uptake between rice and weedy rice

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Weedy rice, red rice (Oryza sativa L.), is a serious problem in rice-producing areas of the southern U.S. and various regions worldwide. It competes for production inputs, increases weed control costs, reduces yield and grain quality, and could eliminate economic returns. Research was conducted to...

  17. RNAi-based strategy for Asian citrus psyllid (Diaphorina citri) Control: A method to reduce the spread of citrus greening disease

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Citrus greening disease is a serious bacterial disease of citrus worldwide and is vectored by the Asian citrus pysllid (Diaphorina Citri). The only effective control strategy includes vigorous control of the psyllid, primarily through heavy reliance on pesticides. As a more sustainable and environm...

  18. Polymerase chain reaction detection of greening bacterium (Candidatus Liberibacter asiaticus) and Citrus mosaic virus in citrus tissues, by means of a simplified template-preparation protocol

    Microsoft Academic Search

    V. K. Baranwal; K. N. Gupta; R. P. Singh

    2007-01-01

    Application of a simplified protocol for nucleic acid preparation for polymerase chain reaction (PCR) detection of greening bacterium (Candidatus Liberibacter asiaticus; Cla) and Citrus mosaic virus (CMBV) associated with citrus is described. Crude extracts of citrus tissues in NaOH - ethylenediaminetetraacetic acid solution, prepared without the use of liquid nitrogen, were spotted on a nitrocellulose membrane (NCM) and then eluted

  19. Genetic variation and recombination of RdRp and HSP 70h genes of Citrus tristeza virus isolates from orange trees showing symptoms of citrus sudden death disease

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Clarissa PC Gomes; Tatsuya Nagata; Waldir C de Jesus; Carlos R Borges Neto; Georgios J Pappas Jr; Darren P Martin

    2008-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Citrus sudden death (CSD), a disease that rapidly kills orange trees, is an emerging threat to the Brazilian citrus industry. Although the causal agent of CSD has not been definitively determined, based on the disease's distribution and symptomatology it is suspected that the agent may be a new strain of Citrus tristeza virus (CTV). CTV genetic variation was therefore

  20. RICE UNIVERSITY BEAMSWITCH: DIRECTIONAL TRANSMISSION

    E-print Network

    Zhong, Lin

    RICE UNIVERSITY BEAMSWITCH: DIRECTIONAL TRANSMISSION FOR ENERGY-EFFICIENT WIRELESS COMMUNICATION guidance and support throughout my research and study at Rice. This work would not be possible without his

  1. Somatic hybridization for citrus rootstock breeding: an effective tool to solve some important issues of the Mediterranean citrus industry.

    PubMed

    Dambier, Dominique; Benyahia, Hamid; Pensabene-Bellavia, Giovanni; Aka Kaçar, Yildiz; Froelicher, Yann; Belfalah, Zina; Lhou, Beniken; Handaji, Najat; Printz, Bruno; Morillon, Raphael; Yesiloglu, Turgut; Navarro, Luis; Ollitrault, Patrick

    2011-05-01

    The prevalence of sour orange rootstock in the southern and eastern part of the Mediterranean Basin is presently threatened by the spread of Citrus Tristeza Virus (CTV) and its main vector Toxoptera citricida, combined with abiotic constraints such as drought, salinity and alkalinity. The search for alternative CTV-resistant rootstocks that also withstand the other constraints is now considered an urgent priority for a sustainable citrus industry in the area. Complementary progenitors can be found in citrus germplasm to combine the desired traits, particularly between Poncirus and Citrus genera. The production of somatic hybrids allows cumulating all dominant traits irrespective of their heterozygosity level, and would appear to be an effective way to solve the rootstock challenge facing the Mediterranean citrus industry. This paper presents the results obtained during a regional collaborative effort between five countries, to develop new rootstocks by somatic hybridization. New embryogenic callus lines to be used for somatic hybridization have been created. Protoplast fusions have been performed at CIRAD and IVIA laboratories, focusing on intergeneric combinations. Analysis of ploidy level by flow cytometry and molecular markers confirmed the acquisition of new interesting tetraploid somatic hybrids for six combinations. Diploid cybrids with intergeneric (Citrus × Poncirus) nucleus and C. reticulata or C. aurantifolia mitochondria were also identified for four combinations. The agronomical performance of a pre-existing somatic hybrid between Poncirus trifoliata and Citrus reticulata was validated in calcareous soils in Morocco. Somatic hybridization is now integrated into the breeding programs of the five Mediterranean countries. PMID:21225429

  2. Simultaneous RNA-Seq Analysis of a Mixed Transcriptome of Rice and Blast Fungus Interaction

    PubMed Central

    Kawahara, Yoshihiro; Oono, Youko; Kanamori, Hiroyuki; Matsumoto, Takashi; Itoh, Takeshi; Minami, Eiichi

    2012-01-01

    A filamentous fungus, Magnaporthe oryzae, is a causal agent of rice blast disease, which is one of the most serious diseases affecting cultivated rice, Oryza sativa. However, the molecular mechanisms underlying both rice defense and fungal attack are not yet fully understood. Extensive past studies have characterized many infection-responsive genes in the pathogen and host plant, separately. To understand the plant-pathogen interaction comprehensively, it is valuable to monitor the gene expression profiles of both interacting organisms simultaneously in the same infected plant tissue. Although the host-pathogen interaction during the initial infection stage is important for the establishment of infection, the detection of fungal gene expression in infected leaves at the stage has been difficult because very few numbers of fungal cells are present. Using the emerging RNA-Seq technique, which has a wide dynamic range for expression analyses, we analyzed the mixed transcriptome of rice and blast fungus in infected leaves at 24 hours post-inoculation, which is the point when the primary infection hyphae penetrate leaf epidermal cells. We demonstrated that our method detected the gene expression of both the host plant and pathogen simultaneously in the same infected leaf blades in natural infection conditions without any artificial treatments. The upregulation of 240 fungal transcripts encoding putative secreted proteins was observed, suggesting that these candidates of fungal effector genes may play important roles in initial infection processes. The upregulation of transcripts encoding glycosyl hydrolases, cutinases and LysM domain-containing proteins were observed in the blast fungus, whereas pathogenesis-related and phytoalexin biosynthetic genes were upregulated in rice. Furthermore, more drastic changes in expression were observed in the incompatible interactions compared with the compatible ones in both rice and blast fungus at this stage. Our mixed transcriptome analysis is useful for the simultaneous elucidation of the tactics of host plant defense and pathogen attack. PMID:23139845

  3. Rheological properties of rice-blackgram batter while replacing white rice with brown rice.

    PubMed

    Manickavasagan, Annamalai; Al-Marhubi, Insaaf Mohd; Dev, Satyanarayan

    2014-06-01

    Rice-blackgram batter is a raw material for many traditional convenience foods in Asia. Reformulation of traditional convenience food by replacing white rice with whole rice (brown rice) is a novel method to reduce the consumption of refined grain and increase the intake of whole grain in our diet. In this study, rheological properties of rice-blackgram batter was investigated while replacing white rice with brown rice at five levels (T1--0% replacement (control), T2--25% replacement, T3--50% replacement, T4--75% replacement, and T5--100% replacement). The shear stress versus shear rate plot indicates that the rice-blackgram batter exhibited non-Newtonian fluid behavior (shear thinning property) even after 100% replacement of white rice with brown rice. The rheological characteristics of rice-blackgram batters fitted reasonably well in Cassan (r2 = 0.8521-0.9856) and power law (r2 = 0.8042-0.9823) models. Brown rice replacement at all levels did not affect the flow behavior index, yield stress, consistency coefficient, and apparent viscosity of batter at 25 degrees C. However, at higher temperature, the viscosity was greater for T4 and T5 (no difference between them) than T1, T2, and T3 (no difference between them) batters. Further research is required to determine the sensory attributes and acceptability of the cooked products with brown rice-blended batter. PMID:23751544

  4. Molecular evolution and strong selective sweep at the rice blast resistance gene Pi-ta during crop domestication

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The Pi-ta gene in rice has been effectively deployed worldwide to prevent the infection by the blast fungus Magnaporthe oryzae in a gene for gene specificity. The genomic region spanning Pi-ta and six flanking genes in 157 rice accessions composed of seven Oryza species including US and Asian culti...

  5. Texas Rice, Highlights in Research 

    E-print Network

    2004-01-01

    cherry oat aphid on seedling rice and investigating chinch bug damage on ratoon rice. Extension The Entomology Project continues to make on-site inspections of problem rice fields. This year false chinch bug, Nyssius raphanus, was found in very high...

  6. Rice Boulevard Track/Soccer

    E-print Network

    Mellor-Crummey, John

    Rice Boulevard Track/Soccer Stadium Reckling Park Founder's Court Sunset Boulevard Main Street University Boulevard Entrance 1 Entrance 2 Entrance 8 Entrance 20Entrance 18 Rice Stadium Vistor Parking Vistor Parking Vistor Parking L L L L L L L L L L L L L L L L L L L L L L Rice University Centennial

  7. Huajian Gao James R. Rice

    E-print Network

    Huajian Gao James R. Rice Division of Applied Sciences, Harvard University, Cambridge, Mass. 02138 Shear Stress Intensity Factors for a Planar Crack With Slightly Curved Front Recent work (Rice, 1985a be found. Rice (1985a) showed how the knowledge of such solutions enables one to calculate the changes

  8. Huajian Gao James R. Rice

    E-print Network

    Huajian Gao James R. Rice Division of Applied Sciences, Harvard University, Cambridge, MA 02138 is based on the perturbation technique developed by Rice (1985) for solving the elastic field of a crack is suppressed and configurationally unstable if there is no such restraint. Introduction Rice (1985) developed

  9. Overexpression of citrus polygalacturonase-inhibiting protein in citrus black rot pathogen Alternaria citri.

    PubMed

    Katoh, Hiroshi; Nalumpang, Sarunya; Yamamoto, Hiroyuki; Akimitsu, Kazuya

    2007-05-01

    The rough lemon (Citrus jambhiri) gene encoding polygalacturonase-inhibiting protein (RlemPGIPA) was overexpressed in the pathogenic fungus Alternaria citri. The overexpression mutant AcOPI6 retained the ability to utilize pectin as a sole carbon source, and the overexpression of polygalacturonase-inhibiting protein did not have any effect on the growth of AcOPI6 in potato dextrose and pectin medium. The pathogenicity of AcOPI6 to cause a black rot symptom in citrus fruits was also unchanged. Polygalacturonase-inhibiting protein was secreted together with endopolygalacturonase into culture filtrates of AcOPI6, and oligogalacturonides were digested from polygalacturonic acid by both proteins in the culture filtrates. The reaction mixture containing oligogalacturonides possessed activity for induction of defense-related gene, RlemLOX, in rough lemon leaves. PMID:17223223

  10. Effect of Nigerian citrus (Citrus sinensis Osbeck) honey on ethanol metabolism.

    PubMed

    Onyesom, I

    2004-12-01

    The effect of Nigerian citrus (Citrus sinensis Osbeck) honey on ethanol metabolism was tested using 45 consenting individuals in apparent good health and between the ages of 25 and 35 years. The subjects were moderate social drinkers matched in terms of body weight and build. The results obtained showed that on average, honey significantly (p < 0.05) increased the blood ethanol clearance rate by 68% and decreased the intoxication period by 43%, but insignificantly (p > 0.05) reduced the degree of intoxication by 9%. Honey could be a promising anti-intoxicating agent, but its long-term biochemical evaluation, possibly as a complement in the management of alcohol intoxication, deserves further study. PMID:15662998

  11. Citrus tristeza virus p23: a unique protein mediating key virus-host interactions.

    PubMed

    Flores, Ricardo; Ruiz-Ruiz, Susana; Soler, Nuria; Sánchez-Navarro, Jesús; Fagoaga, Carmen; López, Carmelo; Navarro, Luis; Moreno, Pedro; Peña, Leandro

    2013-01-01

    The large RNA genome of Citrus tristeza virus (CTV; ca. 20 kb) contains 12 open reading frames, with the 3'-terminal one corresponding to a protein of 209 amino acids (p23) that is expressed from an abundant subgenomic RNA. p23, an RNA-binding protein with a putative zinc-finger domain and some basic motifs, is unique to CTV because no homologs have been found in other closteroviruses, including the type species of the genus Beet yellows virus (despite both viruses having many homologous genes). Consequently, p23 might have evolved for the specific interaction of CTV with its citrus hosts. From a functional perspective p23 has been involved in many roles: (i) regulation of the asymmetrical accumulation of CTV RNA strands, (ii) induction of the seedling yellows syndrome in sour orange and grapefruit, (iii) intracellular suppression of RNA silencing, (iv) elicitation of CTV-like symptoms when expressed ectopically as a transgene in several Citrus spp., and (v) enhancement of systemic infection (and virus accumulation) in sour orange and CTV release from the phloem in p23-expressing transgenic sweet and sour orange. Moreover, transformation of Mexican lime with intron-hairpin constructs designed for the co-inactivation of p23 and the two other CTV silencing suppressors results in complete resistance against the homologous virus. From a cellular point of view, recent data indicate that p23 accumulates preferentially in the nucleolus, being the first closterovirus protein with such a subcellular localization, as well as in plasmodesmata. These major accumulation sites most likely determine some of the functional roles of p23. PMID:23653624

  12. Citrus tristeza virus p23: a unique protein mediating key virus–host interactions

    PubMed Central

    Flores, Ricardo; Ruiz-Ruiz, Susana; Soler, Nuria; Sánchez-Navarro, Jesús; Fagoaga, Carmen; López, Carmelo; Navarro, Luis; Moreno, Pedro; Peña, Leandro

    2013-01-01

    The large RNA genome of Citrus tristeza virus (CTV; ca. 20 kb) contains 12 open reading frames, with the 3?-terminal one corresponding to a protein of 209 amino acids (p23) that is expressed from an abundant subgenomic RNA. p23, an RNA-binding protein with a putative zinc-finger domain and some basic motifs, is unique to CTV because no homologs have been found in other closteroviruses, including the type species of the genus Beet yellows virus (despite both viruses having many homologous genes). Consequently, p23 might have evolved for the specific interaction of CTV with its citrus hosts. From a functional perspective p23 has been involved in many roles: (i) regulation of the asymmetrical accumulation of CTV RNA strands, (ii) induction of the seedling yellows syndrome in sour orange and grapefruit, (iii) intracellular suppression of RNA silencing, (iv) elicitation of CTV-like symptoms when expressed ectopically as a transgene in several Citrus spp., and (v) enhancement of systemic infection (and virus accumulation) in sour orange and CTV release from the phloem in p23-expressing transgenic sweet and sour orange. Moreover, transformation of Mexican lime with intron-hairpin constructs designed for the co-inactivation of p23 and the two other CTV silencing suppressors results in complete resistance against the homologous virus. From a cellular point of view, recent data indicate that p23 accumulates preferentially in the nucleolus, being the first closterovirus protein with such a subcellular localization, as well as in plasmodesmata. These major accumulation sites most likely determine some of the functional roles of p23. PMID:23653624

  13. Ectopic expression of the p23 silencing suppressor of Citrus tristeza virus differentially modifies viral accumulation and tropism in two transgenic woody hosts.

    PubMed

    Fagoaga, Carmen; Pensabene-Bellavia, Giovanni; Moreno, Pedro; Navarro, Luís; Flores, Ricardo; Peña, Leandro

    2011-12-01

    Citrus tristeza virus (CTV), a phloem-restricted closterovirus infecting citrus, encodes three different silencing suppressors (p25, p20 and p23), one of which (p23) is a pathogenicity determinant that induces aberrations resembling CTV symptoms when expressed ectopically in transgenic citrus hosts. In this article, the effect of p23 ectopic expression on virus infection was examined in sweet orange (SwO), a highly susceptible host, and sour orange (SO), which severely restricts CTV cell-to-cell movement. Transgenic plants of both species ectopically expressing p23, or transformed with an empty vector, were graft inoculated with the mild CTV isolate T385 or with CTV-BC1/GFP, a clonal strain derived from the severe isolate T36 carrying the gene for the green fluorescent protein (GFP). CTV distribution in infected tissues was assessed by direct tissue blot immunoassay and fluorescence emission, and virus accumulation was estimated by quantitative real-time reverse transcriptase-polymerase chain reaction. CTV accumulation in p23-expressing and control SwO plants was similar, whereas the viral load in transgenic SO expressing p23 was 10-10(5) times higher than in the cognate control plants. Although few infection foci composed of a single cell were observed in the phloem of CTV-infected control SO, the number of foci in p23-expressing plants was higher and usually comprised two to six cells, indicating viral cell-to-cell movement. CTV was detected in mesophyll protoplasts and cells from infected SO and SwO expressing p23, but not in similar protoplasts and cells from infected control plants. Our results show that the ectopic expression of p23 enables CTV to escape from the phloem and, in addition, facilitates systemic infection of the resistant SO host. This is the first report of a viral-encoded protein that enhances virus accumulation and distribution in woody hosts. PMID:21726389

  14. Enhancement of beta-carotene synthesis by citrus products.

    PubMed

    CIEGLER, A; NELSON, G E; HALL, H H

    1963-03-01

    beta-Ionone, a stimulatory compound in the microbiological production of beta-carotene by mated cultures of Blakeslea trispora, could be replaced with low-cost agricultural by-products (citrus oils, citrus pulp, or citrus molasses) with as good or better carotene yields. Peak yields (81 to 129 mg of carotene per g of dry solids) were achieved in 5 days. The various citrus products tested did not change the pigments produced; all trans-beta-carotene remained the pre-dominant pigment. The acid-hydrolyzed soybean meal and corn used in previous production media could be replaced with unhydrolyzed cottonseed embryo meal and corn in a medium that also contained a natural lipid, deodorized kerosene, nonionic detergent, and a precursor. PMID:14021337

  15. 7 CFR 319.56-41 - Citrus from Peru.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ...c) Approved growing areas. The fruit must be grown in one of the following approved citrus-producing zones: Zone I, Piura; Zone II, Lambayeque; Zone III, Lima; Zone IV, Ica; and Zone V, Junin. (d) Grower registration and...

  16. 7 CFR 319.56-41 - Citrus from Peru.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ...c) Approved growing areas. The fruit must be grown in one of the following approved citrus-producing zones: Zone I, Piura; Zone II, Lambayeque; Zone III, Lima; Zone IV, Ica; and Zone V, Junin. (d) Grower registration and...

  17. Molecular systematics of citrus-associated Alternaria species.

    PubMed

    Peever, T L; Su, G; Carpenter-Boggs, L; Timmer, L W

    2004-01-01

    The causal agents of Alternaria brown spot of tangerines and tangerine hybrids, Alternaria leaf spot of rough lemon and Alternaria black rot of citrus historically have been referred to as Alternaria citri or A. alternata. Ten species of Alternaria recently were described among a set of isolates from leaf lesions on rough lemon (Citrus jambhiri) and tangelo (C. paradisi × C. reticulata), and none of these isolates was considered representative of A. alternata or A. citri. To test the hypothesis that these newly described morphological species are congruent with phylogenetic species, selected Alternaria brown spot and leaf spot isolates, citrus black rot isolates (post-harvest pathogens), isolates associated with healthy citrus tissue and reference species of Alternaria from noncitrus hosts were scored for sequence variation at five genomic regions and used to estimate phylogenies. These data included 432 bp from the 5' end of the mitochondrial ribosomal large subunit (mtLSU), 365 bp from the 5' end of the beta-tubulin gene, 464 bp of an endopolygalacturonase gene (endoPG) and 559 and 571 bp, respectively, of two anonymous genomic regions (OPA1-3 and OPA2-1). The mtLSU and beta-tubulin phylogenies clearly differentiated A. limicola, a large-spored species causing leaf spot of Mexican lime, from the small-spored isolates associated with citrus but were insufficiently variable to resolve evolutionary relationships among the small-spored isolates from citrus and other hosts. Sequence analysis of translation elongation factor alpha, calmodulin, actin, chitin synthase and 1, 3, 8-trihydroxynaphthalene reductase genes similarly failed to uncover significant variation among the small-spored isolates. Phylogenies estimated independently from endoPG, OPA1-3 and OPA2-1 data were congruent, and analysis of the combined data from these regions revealed nine clades, eight of which contained small-spored, citrus-associated isolates. Lineages inferred from analysis of the combined dataset were in general agreement with described morphospecies, however, three clades contained more than one morphological species and one morphospecies (A. citrimacularis) was polyphyletic. Citrus black rot isolates also were found to be members of more than a single lineage. The number of morphospecies associated with citrus exceeded that which could be supported under a phylogenetic species concept, and isolates in only five of nine phylogenetic lineages consistently were correlated with a specific host, disease or ecological niche on citrus. We advocate collapsing all small-spored, citrus-associated isolates of Alternaria into a single phylogenetic species, A. alternata. PMID:21148834

  18. Red rice (Oryza sativa L.) control in herbicide tolerant rice (Oryza sativa L.) 

    E-print Network

    Steele, Gregory Lee

    2000-01-01

    Red rice has interfered with production of commercial rice in the United States for over 150 years. Because of the genetic and physiological similarities between red rice and commercial rice, herbicides have been unsuccessful in adequately...

  19. Control of citrus green and blue molds by Chinese propolis

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Shuzhen Yang; Litao Peng; Yunjiang Cheng; Feng Chen; Siyi Pan

    2010-01-01

    Green and blue molds, caused by Penicillium digitatum and Penicillium italicum, respectively, are economically important postharvest diseases of citrus fruits. In this study, Chinese propolis ethyl acetate\\u000a extract (PEAE) was evaluated to control P. digitatum and P. italicum on postharvest citrus fruits. The results indicated PEAE strongly inhibited mycelia growth and induced hyphae prominent abnormal\\u000a morphological alterations. Also, PEAE had

  20. Imazalil residue loading and green mould control in citrus packhouses

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Arno Erasmus; Cheryl L. Lennox; Hennie Jordaan; Joseph L. Smilanick; Keith Lesar; Paul H. Fourie

    2011-01-01

    Imazalil (IMZ) is commonly applied in South African citrus packhouses for the control of green mould, caused by Penicillium digitatum, yet the disease still causes significant postharvest losses. The maximum residue limit (MRL) for IMZ on citrus fruit is 5?gg?1, whereas 2–3?gg?1 is a biologically effective residue level that should at least inhibit green mould sporulation. Standard compliance auditing of

  1. Chlorophyllase activity in chlorophyll-free citrus chromoplasts

    Microsoft Academic Search

    K. R. Hirschfeld; E. E. Goldschmidt

    1983-01-01

    Chromoplast fractions from mature, chlorophyll-less ‘Valencia’ orange (Citrus sinensis L. Osbeck) flavedo (= the outer coloured layer of citrus peel) showed considerable chlorophyllase activity. Acetone powders prepared from chromoplast fractions had 2.5× higher specific activity than those prepared from whole flavedo. Exposure of mature, chlorophyll-less fruit to ethylene caused a 2.5 to 4.0 fold increase in chlorophyllase activity. Juice chromoplasts

  2. The distribution and spread of citrus canker in Emerald, Australia

    Microsoft Academic Search

    C. F. Gambley; A. K. Miles; M. Ramsden; V. Doogan; J. E. Thomas; K. Parmenter; P. J. L. Whittle

    2009-01-01

    Citrus canker is a disease of citrus and closely related species, caused by the bacterium Xanthomonas citri subsp. citri. This disease, previously exotic to Australia, was detected on a single farm [infested premise-1, (IP1). IP is the terminology\\u000a used in official biosecurity protocols to describe a locality at which an exotic plant pest has been confirmed or is presumed\\u000a to

  3. Citrus tristeza virus-based RNAi in citrus plants induces gene silencing in Diaphorina citri, a phloem-sap sucking insect vector of citrus greening disease (Huanglongbing).

    PubMed

    Hajeri, Subhas; Killiny, Nabil; El-Mohtar, Choaa; Dawson, William O; Gowda, Siddarame

    2014-04-20

    A transient expression vector based on Citrus tristeza virus (CTV) is unusually stable. Because of its stability it is being considered for use in the field to control Huanglongbing (HLB), which is caused by Candidatus Liberibacter asiaticus (CLas) and vectored by Asian citrus psyllid, Diaphorina citri. In the absence of effective control strategies for CLas, emphasis has been on control of D. citri. Coincident cohabitation in phloem tissue by CLas, D. citri and CTV was exploited to develop a novel method to mitigate HLB through RNA interference (RNAi). Since CTV has three RNA silencing suppressors, it was not known if CTV-based vector could induce RNAi in citrus. Yet, expression of sequences targeting citrus phytoene desaturase gene by CTV-RNAi resulted in photo-bleaching phenotype. CTV-RNAi vector, engineered with truncated abnormal wing disc (Awd) gene of D. citri, induced altered Awd expression when silencing triggers ingested by feeding D. citri nymphs. Decreased Awd in nymphs resulted in malformed-wing phenotype in adults and increased adult mortality. This impaired ability of D. citri to fly would potentially limit the successful vectoring of CLas bacteria between citrus trees in the grove. CTV-RNAi vector would be relevant for fast-track screening of candidate sequences for RNAi-mediated pest control. PMID:24572372

  4. Identification of a new enamovirus associated with citrus vein enation disease by deep sequencing of small RNAs.

    PubMed

    Vives, Mari Carmen; Velázquez, Karelia; Pina, José Antonio; Moreno, Pedro; Guerri, José; Navarro, Luis

    2013-10-01

    To identify the causal agent of citrus vein enation disease, we examined by deep sequencing (Solexa-Illumina) the small RNA (sRNA) fraction from infected and healthy Etrog citron plants. Our results showed that virus-derived sRNAs (vsRNAs): (i) represent about 14.21% of the total sRNA population, (ii) are predominantly of 21 and 24 nucleotides with a biased distribution of their 5' nucleotide and with a clear prevalence of those of (+) polarity, and (iii) derive from all the viral genome, although a prominent hotspot is present at a 5'-proximal region. Contigs assembled from vsRNAs showed similarity with luteovirus sequences, particularly with Pea enation mosaic virus, the type member of the genus Enamovirus. The genomic RNA (gRNA) sequence of a new virus, provisionally named Citrus vein enation virus (CVEV), was completed and characterized. The CVEV gRNA was found to be single-stranded, positive-sense, with a size of 5,983 nucleotides and five open reading frames. Phylogenetic comparisons based on amino acid signatures of the RNA polymerase and the coat protein clearly classifies CVEV within the genus Enamovirus. Dot-blot hybridization and reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction tests were developed to detect CVEV in plants affected by vein enation disease. CVEV detection by these methods has already been adopted for use in the Spanish citrus quarantine, sanitation, and certification programs. PMID:23718835

  5. The LOV Protein of Xanthomonas citri subsp. citri Plays a Significant Role in the Counteraction of Plant Immune Responses during Citrus Canker

    PubMed Central

    Kraiselburd, Ivana; Daurelio, Lucas D.; Tondo, María Laura; Merelo, Paz; Cortadi, Adriana A.; Talón, Manuel; Tadeo, Francisco R.; Orellano, Elena G.

    2013-01-01

    Pathogens interaction with a host plant starts a set of immune responses that result in complex changes in gene expression and plant physiology. Light is an important modulator of plant defense response and recent studies have evidenced the novel influence of this environmental stimulus in the virulence of several bacterial pathogens. Xanthomonas citri subsp. citri is the bacterium responsible for citrus canker disease, which affects most citrus cultivars. The ability of this bacterium to colonize host plants is influenced by bacterial blue-light sensing through a LOV-domain protein and disease symptoms are considerably altered upon deletion of this protein. In this work we aimed to unravel the role of this photoreceptor during the bacterial counteraction of plant immune responses leading to citrus canker development. We performed a transcriptomic analysis in Citrus sinensis leaves inoculated with the wild type X. citri subsp. citri and with a mutant strain lacking the LOV protein by a cDNA microarray and evaluated the differentially regulated genes corresponding to specific biological processes. A down-regulation of photosynthesis-related genes (together with a corresponding decrease in photosynthesis rates) was observed upon bacterial infection, this effect being more pronounced in plants infected with the lov-mutant bacterial strain. Infection with this strain was also accompanied with the up-regulation of several secondary metabolism- and defense response-related genes. Moreover, we found that relevant plant physiological alterations triggered by pathogen attack such as cell wall fortification and tissue disruption were amplified during the lov-mutant strain infection. These results suggest the participation of the LOV-domain protein from X. citri subsp. citri in the bacterial counteraction of host plant defense response, contributing in this way to disease development. PMID:24260514

  6. Determination of the change of flavonoid components as the defence materials of Citrus unshiu Marc. fruit peel against Penicillium digitatum by liquid chromatography coupled with tandem mass spectrometry

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Hae Gyeong Kim; Gon-Sup Kim; Jung Han Lee; Semin Park; Won Young Jeong; Yun-Hi Kim; Jae Hoon Kim; Soo Taek Kim; Young Ah Cho; Won Sup Lee; Soo Jung Lee; Jong Sung Jin; Sung Chul Shin

    2011-01-01

    A healthy fruit peel of Citrus unshiu Marc. and one infected by Penicillium digitatum were analysed for flavonoids via high-performance liquid chromatography coupled with tandem mass spectrometry (HPLC–MS\\/MS) in the positive mode with selected ion monitoring (SIM). Among 16 flavonoid components characterised in C. unshiu Marc., four flavanones and nine flavones were identified for the first time. The identified compounds

  7. Texas Rice, Volume VII, Number 4 

    E-print Network

    2007-01-01

    was determined by counting the number of heads infected with rotten neck blast. Plots were combine harvested and yields expressed in lb/A at 12% moisture. Milling samples were collected and total and head rice percent- ages determined. Percent control... was determined and plotted over time. Historical data from 30 years of testing showed that control of rotten neck blast by Benlate decreased from 70 - 60% to below 50% from 1976 to 2001, with light disease pressure and from 50 - 60% to 10 - 20% Photo shows...

  8. Physicochemical characteristics of citrus seed oils from kerman, iran.

    PubMed

    Reazai, Mohammad; Mohammadpourfard, Issa; Nazmara, Shahrokh; Jahanbakhsh, Mahdi; Shiri, Leila

    2014-01-01

    Recently, there has been a great deal of attention on usage, byproducts, and wastes of the food industry. There have been many studies on the properties of citrus seeds and extracted oil from citrus grown in Kerman, Iran. The rate of oil content of citrus seeds varies between 33.4% and 41.9%. Linoleic acid (33.2% to 36.3%) is the key fatty acid found in citrus seeds oil and oleic (24.8% to 29.3%) and palmitic acids (23.5% to 29.4%) are the next main fatty acids, respectively. There are also other acids found at trivial rates such as stearic, palmitoleic, and linolenic. With variation between 0.54?meg/kg and 0.77?mgq/kg in peroxide values of citrus seed oils, acidity value of the oil varies between 0.44% and 0.72%. The results of the study showed that citrus seeds under study (orange and sour lemon grown in Kerman province) and the extracted oil have the potential of being used as the source of edible oil. PMID:25136460

  9. Digestion kinetics of carbohydrate fractions of citrus by-products.

    PubMed

    Lashkari, Saman; Taghizadeh, Akbar

    2015-01-01

    The present experiment was carried out to determine the digestion kinetics of carbohydrate fractions of citrus by-products. Grapefruit pulp (GP), lemon pulp (LE), lime pulp (LI) and orange pulp (OP) were the test feed. Digestion kinetic of whole citrus by-products and neutral detergent fiber (NDF) fraction and acid detergent fiber (ADF) fractions of citrus by-products were measured using the in vitro gas production technique. Fermentation kinetics of the neutral detergent soluble carbohydrates (NDSC) fraction and hemicelluloses were calculated using a curve subtraction. The fermentation rate of whole was the highest for the LE (p < 0.05). For all citrus by-products lag time was longer for hemicellulose than other carbohydrate fractions. There was no significant difference among potential gas production (A) volumes of whole test feeds (p < 0.16). Dry matter (DM) digestibility contents of LE and LI were the highest (p < 0.02). The NDF digestibility was the highest (p < 0.05) in LI and GP, while the lowest (p < 0.03) values of ADF digestibility were observed in LI and LE. According to the results of the present study, carbohydrate fractions of citrus by-products have high potential for degradability. It could also be concluded that carbohydrate fractions of citrus by-products have remarkable difference in digestion kinetics and digestive behavior. PMID:25992250

  10. Genetic Transformation of Citrus paradisi with Antisense and Untranslatable RNA-dependent RNA Polymerase Genes of Citrus tristeza closterovirus

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Richard F. LEE; Charles L. NIBLETT

    Protein and RNA-mediated forms of pathogen-derived resistance (PDR) have been developed against many viruses in different plants. However, no resistance has been reported against Citrus tristeza virus (CTV), a closterovirus, in Citrus species transformed with coat protein genes or other sequences of CTV. The successful use of replication-associated genes in RNA-mediated resistance in other crops prompted the use of the

  11. Effects of southern rice black-streaked dwarf virus on the development and fecundity of its vector, Sogatella furcifera

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Southern rice black-streaked dwarf virus (SRBSDV) threatens rice production in China and Vietnam. The virus is vectored by the migrating white-backed planthopper (WBPH, Sogatella furcifera) in a circulative, propagative, and persistent manner. A persistently-transmitted plant virus might affect its vector’s development and fecundity directly by infecting the vector itself and/or indirectly altering the host plant. This study evaluated the direct and indirect effects of SRBSDV on WBPH performance to better understand the virus–vector–host plant relationship in terms of its effects on the biological parameters of the vector. Methods Three experimental WBPH populations were established. Viruliferous and non-viruliferous populations were fed on SRBSDV-infected rice seedlings for 48 h as first-instar nymphs; infection status was confirmed by RT–PCR after they died. The control population was fed on healthy rice. Each insect was individually transferred to a healthy rice plant grown in a glass tube at 20°C, 25°C, or 28°C. Life parameters, including nymphal duration, survival rate, adult sex ratio, macropterous proportion, longevity, and oviposition amounts, of each population were measured at each temperature. Results The life parameter data indicated that SRBSDV and infected rice plants adversely influenced WBPH; the effects were temperature dependent. Compared with the control population, viruliferous populations showed significant changes, including prolonged nymphal stages and reduced survival rates at 20°C, while the non-viruliferous population had higher survival rates at 20°C and lower rates at 28°C compared with the control. Both populations had significantly shorter adult life spans at 25°C and lower oviposition amounts at 28°C relative to the control. Conclusions Both SRBSDV-infection and feeding on infected rice plants affected vector performance. Although a longer nymphal period benefits viral acquisition and transmission by nymphs and might increase rice infection rate, in general, SRBSDV infection of the vectors and host plants was unfavorable to WBPH population expansion. PMID:23663428

  12. Naringin Levels in Citrus Tissues 1

    PubMed Central

    Jourdan, Pablo S.; McIntosh, Cecilia A.; Mansell, Richard L.

    1985-01-01

    The quantitative distribution of the flavanone-7-neohesperidoside, naringin, in seeds, seedlings, young plants, branches, flowers, and fruit of Citrus paradisi Macfad., cv `Duncan' was analyzed by radioimmunoassay. High levels of naringin were associated with very young tissue and lower levels were found in older tissues. Seed coats of ungerminated seeds and young shoots had high naringin concentrations whereas cotyledons and roots had very low concentrations. Light-grown seedlings contained nearly twice as much naringin as etiolated seedlings and, in young plants and branches, the naringin content was highest in developing leaves and stem tissue. In flowers, the ovary had the highest levels of naringin, accounting for nearly 11% of the fresh weight. There was a net increase in the total naringin content of fruits during growth. However, due to the large increase in fruit size, there was a concomitant decrease in the naringin concentration as the fruit matured. PMID:16664159

  13. Pharmacognostical evaluation of Citrus jambhiri Lush. fruit

    PubMed Central

    Chaudhari, Swapnil Y.; Harisha, C. R.; Galib, Ruknuddin; Prajapati, P. K.

    2014-01-01

    Background: Citrus jambhiri Lush., commonly known as Jamb?ra Nimb? in Sanskrit is medium to large indigenous tree with spreading habit, less spiny than lemon and belonging to the family Rutaceae. In Ayurveda, it is used in many pharmaceutical procedures of purification (?odhana), calcination (M?ra?a) etc., Though it is an important plant, till date, no pharmacognostical reports have been available on its fruit. Materials and Methods: Study of fruit and its powder, histochemical tests and preliminary physicochemical investigations were done. Results and Conclusion: Results showed prismatic crystals of calcium oxalate, aerenchyma cells, oil globules, pitted vessels, scalariform vessels, juicy sac, etc., Preliminary physicochemical analysis revealed loss on drying (1.1%), ash value (1.4%), alcohol soluble extract (28.6%), and water soluble extract (53.3%). These observations can be of use in future studies. PMID:25861144

  14. Texas Rice, Volume 1, Number 4 

    E-print Network

    2001-01-01

    . It is distributed by email, mail, DTN, PDF, or fax under a low-cost subscription program. A sister company, RiceOnline is a rice informa- tion site for the worldwide rice industry. Features in- clude: Up-to-date rice market news, rice futures and quotes, directories...

  15. Rhizobium-initiated rice growth inhibition caused by nitric oxide accumulation.

    PubMed

    Perrine-Walker, Francine M; Gartner, Elena; Hocart, Charles H; Becker, Anke; Rolfe, Barry G

    2007-03-01

    Isolates of Rhizobium leguminosarum bv. trifolii (the clover root-nodule endosymbiont) from the Nile River delta have been found to infect rice roots and colonize the intercellular spaces of the rice roots. Some of these isolates inhibit rice seedling growth but one in particular, R4, has been found in rice roots which develop and grow normally. We present evidence that the induced growth inhibition is due to a toxic accumulation of nitric oxide (NO), from the reduction of nitrate, and suggest that the reason that R4 does not inhibit rice root growth is because it is capable of completing the reduction of NO through to nitrogen gas. Thus, strain R4 is a candidate for engineering into a future biological nitrogen fixation system within these roots. PMID:17378431

  16. Citrus Bioactive Compounds: Isolation, Characterization and Modulation of Bacterial Intercellular Communication and Pathogenicity 

    E-print Network

    Vikram, Amit

    2012-07-16

    The secondary metabolites of citrus such as limonoids and flavonoids constitute an important part of human diet. The present work was undertaken to elucidate the effect of citrus limonoids and flavonoids on the bacterial ...

  17. Characterization of an ATP/ADP translocase in the citrus huanglongbing bacterium, Candidatus Liberibacter

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Citrus huanglongbing (HLB), a disease currently threatening the citrus industry worldwide, has been associated with three different species of Alphaproteobacteria known as Candidatus Liberibacter. A complete genome sequence was recently obtained via metagenomics for Ca. L. asiaticus (Las), the prom...

  18. Rice bran phytonutrients

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The bran layer of the whole grain rice contains potential health-beneficial compounds. These include vitamin E homologs (tocopherols, tocotrienols), oryzanol fractions, simple phenolics and poly-phenolics. These are antioxidants that are believed to provide protection against diseases such as cancer...

  19. Flooded Wild Rice River

    USGS Multimedia Gallery

    Wild Rice River at Great Bend North Dakota, streamflow 1,890 cubic feet per second.  Photograph taken during spring 2010 flooding looking downstream of the bridge which was clogged with debris.  The river also had flooded over the road approaching the bridge....

  20. Direct Seeding of Rice

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Virender Kumar; Jagdish K. Ladha

    2011-01-01

    Rice (Oryza sativa L.), a staple food for more than half of the world population, is commonly grown by transplanting seedlings into puddled soil (wet tillage) in Asia. This production system is labor-, water-, and energy-intensive and is becoming less profitable as these resources are becoming increasingly scarce. It also deteriorates the physical properties of soil, adversely affects the performance

  1. Highly asymmetric rice genomes

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Jing Ding; Hitoshi Araki; Qiang Wang; Pengfei Zhang; Sihai Yang; Jian-Qun Chen; Dacheng Tian

    2007-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Individuals in the same species are assumed to share the same genomic set. However, it is not unusual to find an orthologous gene only in small subset of the species, and recent genomic studies suggest that structural rearrangements are very frequent between genomes in the same species. Two recently sequenced rice genomes Oryza sativa L. var. Nipponbare and O.

  2. RICE MICROSTRUCTURE - COMPARING CULTIVARS

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The microstructures of short, medium, long and waxy grain rices were compared for microstructural characteristics using scanning electron and light microscopies. The cultivars in this study included three short grain (Akitakamachi, Koshihikari and S102); three medium grain (Bengal, M202 and M401); f...

  3. visitor parking rice village

    E-print Network

    Richards-Kortum, Rebecca

    Central Campus Garage visitor parking tennis courts rice village apartments at 2410 shakespeare st visitor parking faculty, staff, student, contract parking Greenbriar Lot West Lot 4 W faculty, staff, student West Lot 2 faculty, staff, student West Lot 3 resident students faculty, staff, student parking SC

  4. In vivo and in vitro expression analysis of the RNA-dependent RNA polymerase of Citrus tristeza virus

    Microsoft Academic Search

    B. Çevik; R. F. Lee; C. L. Niblett

    2008-01-01

    Summary  Expression of the RNA-dependent RNA polymerase (RdRp) of Citrus tristeza virus (CTV) was studied in vivo and in vitro using a polyclonal antiserum raised against the recombinant CTV-RdRp protein. Although a 57-kDa CTV-RdRp was expected to\\u000a be expressed by a +1 translational frameshift at the carboxyl terminus of a 400-kDa polyprotein, a 50-kDa protein was detected\\u000a in CTV-infected but not

  5. Diagnosis and Management of Virus and Virus like Diseases of Citrus

    Microsoft Academic Search

    C. N. Roistacher

    This chapter covers fifteen virus and virus like diseases of citrus plus thermotherapy, with emphasis on the citrus tristeza\\u000a disease. Included in this chapter are the citrus disease of psorosis, cristacortis, citrus chlorotic dwarf, impietratura,\\u000a satsuma dwarf, vein enation, leprosis, tatter leaf, infectious variegation, exocortis, cachexia, gum pocket, stubborn and\\u000a concave gum. Epidemiology of tristeza is presented in some detail

  6. Phylogenetic analysis of Citrus based on sequences of six nuclear genes

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Citrus has a long history of cultivation. The phylogenetic relationships between the different cultivars of citrus are not clearly understood because of hybridization, nucellar embryony and somatic mutations. Earlier studies on citrus taxonomy and phylogeny were based on isozymes analyses, microsate...

  7. Sequencing of diverse mandarin, pummelo and orange genomes reveals complex history of admixture during citrus domestication

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Cultivated citrus are selections from, or hybrids of, wild progenitor species whose identities and contributions to citrus domestication remain controversial. Here we sequence and compare citrus genomes—a high-quality reference haploid clementine genome and mandarin, pummelo, sweet-orange and sour-o...

  8. Selection of citrus varieties highly productive for the neohesperidin dihydrochalcone precursor

    Microsoft Academic Search

    J. A. Del Río; M. D. Fuster; F. Sabater; I. Porras; A. García-Lidón; A. Ortuño

    1997-01-01

    The levels of the flavanones, neohesperidin and naringin, and the neohesperidinnaringin ratio in immature and mature fruit of different varieties of Citrus aurantium and the Citrus paradisi Macf. × Citrus depresssa Hayata hybrid are compared, and the flavonic content is analysed for the first time. Fruits of the hybrid, which are used to obtain neohesperidin for industrial-scale transformation into the

  9. Psyllid Biology: Expressed Genes in Adult Asian Citrus Psyllids, Diaphorina citri Kuwayama

    Microsoft Academic Search

    W. B. Hunter; S. E. Dowd; C. S. Katsar; C. L. McKenzie; D. G. Hall

    2009-01-01

    Where it occurs the Asian citrus psyllid, Diaphorina citri, Kuwayama (Hemiptera: Psyllidae) is considered the primary vector of Huanglongbing, HLB, disease of citrus trees. The plant pathogenic bacterium associated with HLB causes economic losses to citrus industries worldwide. To better understand the general biology of D. citri, we undertook a sequencing project from adult psyllids. Few genes have been isolated

  10. Land cover classification and economic assessment of citrus groves using remote sensing

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Rahul J. Shrivastava; Jennifer L. Gebelein

    2007-01-01

    The citrus industry has the second largest impact on Florida's economy, following tourism. Estimation of citrus area coverage and annual forecasts of Florida's citrus production are currently dependent on labor-intensive interpretation of aerial photographs. Remotely sensed data from satellites has been widely applied in agricultural yield estimation and cropland management. Satellite data can potentially be obtained throughout the year, making

  11. Consumer preferences for fresh citrus: Impacts of demographic and behavioral characteristics

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    From 2000 to 2006, per capita consumption of fresh citrus fruit increased by 11.0%, but the relative shares of types of citrus consumed changed. Per capita consumption of the historically dominant citrus fruit, fresh oranges, experienced a continuous decline from 12.4 pounds to 7.4 pounds from 1990 ...

  12. Descriptions of new varieties recently distributed from the Citrus Clonal Protection Program

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The Citrus Clonal Protection Program (CCPP) is operated through the Department of Plant Pathology and Microbiology at University of California (UC) Riverside and is funded in large part by The California Citrus Research Board (CRB). The CCPP processes citrus propagative material in two phases. First...

  13. Citrus Diseases Exotic to Florida: Phaeoramularia Fruit and Leaf Spot (PFLS)1

    Microsoft Academic Search

    K.-R. Chung; L. W. Timmer

    Citrus is susceptible to a large number of diseases caused by plant pathogens. Economic losses due to plant diseases can be severe, but fortunately, not all pathogens attacking citrus are present in Florida. Citrus diseases present in Florida include: Alternaria brown spot, blight, canker, greasy spot, greening (Huanglongbing), melanose, Phytophthora-induced diseases (foot and root rot, brown rot), postbloom fruit drop

  14. Enhancement of cold tolerance and inhibition of lipid peroxidation by citrus dehydrin in transgenic tobacco

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Masakazu Hara; Shogo Terashima; Tomoko Fukaya; Toru Kuboi

    2003-01-01

    Citrus (Citrus unshiu Marcov.) dehydrin in response to chilling stress was overexpressed in tobacco (Nicotiana tabacum L.), and the cold stress tolerance of transgenics at low temperature was analyzed. The freezing at ?4 °C for 3 h of 24 independent lines indicated that a phenotype expressing citrus dehydrin showed less electrolyte leakage than the control. Dehydrin protein content was correlated with freezing

  15. HISTOLOGY OF SWEET ORANGE STEM PITTING CAUSED BY AN AUSTRALIAN ISOLATE OF CITRUS TRISTEZA VIRUS

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Some strains of the citrus tristeza virus (CTV) cause stem pitting in sweet orange (Citrus sinensis (L.) Osbeck). This abnormality causes tree decline and reduction in fruit size and yield of affected citrus trees. Stem-pitting symptoms can occur on trunks, on all sizes of limbs, and on the twigs ...

  16. Update on packing line protocols for citrus canker and their effects on bacterial survival

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Markets for Florida citrus are severely restricted by regulations in place to minimize the spread of citrus canker to citrus producing areas. Included in these regulations are accepted protocols for sanitation and coating of fruit. However, these measures do not eradicate all the living bacterial ce...

  17. Gene flow between Clearfield™ rice and red rice

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Vinod K. Shivrain; Nilda R. Burgos; Merle M. Anders; Satyendra N. Rajguru; Jerry Moore; Marites A. Sales

    2007-01-01

    Imidazolinone-herbicide-resistant Clearfield™ (CL) rice allows the selective chemical control of red rice (Oryza sativa L.), a major weed problem in rice-growing areas of the southern US, using herbicides that otherwise are toxic to the crop. However, selection imposed by the herbicide of resistant individuals resulting from gene flow, and of naturally tolerant individuals, is a major concern. Experiments were conducted

  18. Simultaneous detection of six citrus viroids and Apple stem grooving virus from citrus plants by multiplex reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction.

    PubMed

    Ito, Takao; Ieki, Hiroyuki; Ozaki, Katsumi

    2002-12-01

    We developed a multiplex reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) to detect six citrus viroids: Citrus exocortis viroid (CEVd), Citrus bent leaf viroid (CBLVd), Hop stunt viroid (HSVd), Citrus viroid III (CVd-III), Citrus viroid IV (CVd-IV) and Citrus viroid OS (CVd-OS) and Apple stem grooving virus (ASGV, synonym: Citrus tatter leaf virus (CTLV)) from citrus plants. The multiplex RT-PCR was also designed to distinguish CVd-I-LSS (a distinct variant of CBLVd) from CBLVd. By the multiplex RT-PCR, one to eight fragments specific to the pathogens were simultaneously amplified from one sample and identified by their specific molecular sizes in 6% polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis. The results of the multiplex RT-PCR were consistent with those of other diagnoses, such as uniplex RT-PCR, to detect each of the pathogens. The multiplex RT-PCR provides a simple and rapid method for detecting various viroids and ASGV in citrus plants, which will help diagnose many citrus plants at a time. PMID:12393154

  19. Swamp rice development, schistosomiasis, and onchocerciasis in Southeast Sierra Leone.

    PubMed

    White, P T; Coleman, M; Jupp, B P

    1982-05-01

    Seventy-four villages in eastern Sierra Leone, West Africa, many having a recently developed rice swamp, were surveyed for the presence of schistosomiasis and onchocerciasis, and their vectors. Prevalence rates for Schistosoma haematobium and S. mansoni were low, although the infections were widespread. There is some evidence that S. mansoni is extending its range in Sierra Leone although this is problematical because of the apparent absence of Biomphalaria pfeifferi, the recognized snail vector, from areas where the disease now occurs. The characteristics of rice swamp environment now being created in Sierra Leone are described and results of snail collections, which were with few exceptions small, are presented. Reasons for the apparent unsuitability of the developed rice swamp as a snail habitat are discussed. Onchocerciasis was found in all villages and the prevalence rate, almost 50%, was high. The rice swamp is not a suitable breeding site for Simulium damnosum s.l., but the study area is crossed by several major rivers and all villages in the area are within flying distance of potential breeding sites. There was no positive evidence that expansion of swamp rice farming will increase the incidence of water based/related diseases but a control program for onchocerciasis, which is a major rural health problem, would seem to be a national priority. PMID:7081542

  20. Interference by western flower thrips in rearing Asian citrus psyllid: damage to host plants and facultative predation

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The Asian citrus psyllid (ACP), Diaphorina citri Kuwayama, is an important pest of citrus primarily because it vectors a bacterium responsible for a serious citrus disease known as huanglongbing (HLB) (also known as citrus greening disease). Researchers seeking solutions to HLB often depend on labor...

  1. Past and future of a century old Citrus tristeza virus collection: a California citrus germplasm tale

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Jinbo; Bozan, Orhan; Kwon, Sun-Jung; Dang, Tyler; Rucker, Tavia; Yokomi, Raymond K.; Lee, Richard F.; Folimonova, Svetlana Y.; Krueger, Robert R.; Bash, John; Greer, Greg; Diaz, James; Serna, Ramon; Vidalakis, Georgios

    2013-01-01

    Citrus tristeza virus (CTV) isolates collected from citrus germplasm, dooryard and field trees in California from 1914 have been maintained in planta under quarantine in the Citrus Clonal Protection Program (CCPP), Riverside, California. This collection, therefore, represents populations of CTV isolates obtained over time and space in California. To determine CTV genetic diversity in this context, genotypes of CTV isolates from the CCPP collection were characterized using multiple molecular markers (MMM). Genotypes T30, VT, and T36 were found at high frequencies with T30 and T30+VT genotypes being the most abundant. The MMM analysis did not identify T3 and B165/T68 genotypes; however, biological and phylogenetic analysis suggested some relationships of CCPP CTV isolates with these two genotypes. Phylogenetic analysis of the CTV coat protein (CP) gene sequences classified the tested isolates into seven distinct clades. Five clades were in association with the standard CTV genotypes T30, T36, T3, VT, and B165/T68. The remaining two identified clades were not related to any standard CTV genotypes. Spatiotemporal analysis indicated a trend of reduced genotype and phylogenetic diversity as well as virulence from southern California (SC) at early (1907–1957) in comparison to that of central California (CC) isolates collected from later (1957–2009) time periods. CTV biological characterization also indicated a reduced number and less virulent stem pitting (SP) CTV isolates compared to seedling yellows isolates introduced to California. This data provides a historical insight of the introduction, movement, and genetic diversity of CTV in California and provides genetic and biological information useful for CTV quarantine, eradication, and disease management strategies such as CTV-SP cross protection. PMID:24339822

  2. Past and future of a century old Citrus tristeza virus collection: a California citrus germplasm tale.

    PubMed

    Wang, Jinbo; Bozan, Orhan; Kwon, Sun-Jung; Dang, Tyler; Rucker, Tavia; Yokomi, Raymond K; Lee, Richard F; Folimonova, Svetlana Y; Krueger, Robert R; Bash, John; Greer, Greg; Diaz, James; Serna, Ramon; Vidalakis, Georgios

    2013-01-01

    Citrus tristeza virus (CTV) isolates collected from citrus germplasm, dooryard and field trees in California from 1914 have been maintained in planta under quarantine in the Citrus Clonal Protection Program (CCPP), Riverside, California. This collection, therefore, represents populations of CTV isolates obtained over time and space in California. To determine CTV genetic diversity in this context, genotypes of CTV isolates from the CCPP collection were characterized using multiple molecular markers (MMM). Genotypes T30, VT, and T36 were found at high frequencies with T30 and T30+VT genotypes being the most abundant. The MMM analysis did not identify T3 and B165/T68 genotypes; however, biological and phylogenetic analysis suggested some relationships of CCPP CTV isolates with these two genotypes. Phylogenetic analysis of the CTV coat protein (CP) gene sequences classified the tested isolates into seven distinct clades. Five clades were in association with the standard CTV genotypes T30, T36, T3, VT, and B165/T68. The remaining two identified clades were not related to any standard CTV genotypes. Spatiotemporal analysis indicated a trend of reduced genotype and phylogenetic diversity as well as virulence from southern California (SC) at early (1907-1957) in comparison to that of central California (CC) isolates collected from later (1957-2009) time periods. CTV biological characterization also indicated a reduced number and less virulent stem pitting (SP) CTV isolates compared to seedling yellows isolates introduced to California. This data provides a historical insight of the introduction, movement, and genetic diversity of CTV in California and provides genetic and biological information useful for CTV quarantine, eradication, and disease management strategies such as CTV-SP cross protection. PMID:24339822

  3. Citrus MAF1, a Repressor of RNA Polymerase III, Binds the Xanthomonas citri Canker Elicitor PthA4 and Suppresses Citrus Canker Development1

    PubMed Central

    Soprano, Adriana Santos; Abe, Valeria Yukari; Smetana, Juliana Helena Costa; Benedetti, Celso Eduardo

    2013-01-01

    Transcription activator-like (TAL) effectors from Xanthomonas species pathogens act as transcription factors in plant cells; however, how TAL effectors activate host transcription is unknown. We found previously that TAL effectors of the citrus canker pathogen Xanthomonas citri, known as PthAs, bind the carboxyl-terminal domain of the sweet orange (Citrus sinensis) RNA polymerase II (Pol II) and inhibit the activity of CsCYP, a cyclophilin associated with the carboxyl-terminal domain of the citrus RNA Pol II that functions as a negative regulator of cell growth. Here, we show that PthA4 specifically interacted with the sweet orange MAF1 (CsMAF1) protein, an RNA polymerase III (Pol III) repressor that controls ribosome biogenesis and cell growth in yeast (Saccharomyces cerevisiae) and human. CsMAF1 bound the human RNA Pol III and rescued the yeast maf1 mutant by repressing tRNAHis transcription. The expression of PthA4 in the maf1 mutant slightly restored tRNAHis synthesis, indicating that PthA4 counteracts CsMAF1 activity. In addition, we show that sweet orange RNA interference plants with reduced CsMAF1 levels displayed a dramatic increase in tRNA transcription and a marked phenotype of cell proliferation during canker formation. Conversely, CsMAF1 overexpression was detrimental to seedling growth, inhibited tRNA synthesis, and attenuated canker development. Furthermore, we found that PthA4 is required to elicit cankers in sweet orange leaves and that depletion of CsMAF1 in X. citri-infected tissues correlates with the development of hyperplastic lesions and the presence of PthA4. Considering that CsMAF1 and CsCYP function as canker suppressors in sweet orange, our data indicate that TAL effectors from X. citri target negative regulators of RNA Pol II and Pol III to coordinately increase the transcription of host genes involved in ribosome biogenesis and cell proliferation. PMID:23898043

  4. Reproducible RNA Preparation from Sugarcane and Citrus for Functional Genomic Applications

    PubMed Central

    Damaj, Mona B.; Beremand, Phillip D.; Buenrostro-Nava, Marco T.; Riedel, Beth; Molina, Joe J.; Kumpatla, Siva P.; Thomas, Terry L.; Mirkov, T. Erik

    2009-01-01

    High-throughput functional genomic procedures depend on the quality of the RNA used. Copurifying molecules can negatively impact the functionality of some plant RNA preparations employed in these procedures. We present a simplified, rapid, and scalable SDS/phenol-based method that provides the high-quantity and -quality RNA required by the newly emerging biotechnology applications. The method is applied to isolating RNA from tissues of two biotechnologically important crop plants, sugarcane and citrus, which provide a challenge due to the presence of fiber, polysaccharides, or secondary metabolites. The RNA isolated by this method is suitable for several downstream applications including northern blot hybridization, microarray analysis, and quantitative RT-PCR. This method has been used in a diverse range of projects ranging from screening plant lines overexpressing mammalian genes to analyzing plant responses to viral infection and defense signaling molecules. PMID:20148085

  5. Using metabolic profiling to assess plant-pathogen interactions: an example using rice ( Oryza sativa) and the blast pathogen Magnaporthe grisea

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Oliver A. H. Jones; Mahon L. Maguire; Julian L. Griffin; Young-Ho Jung; Junko Shibato; Randeep Rakwal; Ganesh K. Agrawal; Nam-Soo Jwa

    2011-01-01

    A metabolomics based approach has been used to study the infection of the Hwacheong rice cultivar (Oryza sativa L. cv. Hwacheong) with compatible (KJ201) and incompatible (KJ401) strains of the rice blast fungal pathogen Magnaporthe grisea. The metabolic response of the rice plants to each strain was assessed 0, 6, 12, 24, 36, and 48 h post inoculation. Nuclear\\u000a Magnetic Resonance

  6. RICE UNIVERSITY The Barbara and David Gibbs

    E-print Network

    Alvarez, Pedro J.

    RICE UNIVERSITY The Barbara and David Gibbs RECREATION CENTER MEMBERSHIP CANCELLATION FORM Date for Cancellation:____________________________________________________ I authorize Rice University to terminate my

  7. Texas Rice, Highlights in Research 

    E-print Network

    2002-01-01

    Texas Rice Special Section Texas Rice Special Section - I Highlighting Research in 2002 Dr. Fred Turner Dr. Turner’s Soil and Plant Nutrition Project evaluates main and ratoon crop yield and quality of potential Ark, La, Miss and Texas rice... rates, plant population effect on yield, plant development for predicting growth stages, sheath blight resistance, plant height, lodging potential, variety strengths and weaknesses and an economic ranking for main, ratoon and total crop yield based...

  8. Cooking with Rice (not instant)

    E-print Network

    Anding, Jenna

    2008-12-09

    or washed before cooking. Rice Salad (makes 6 servings) What you need 3 cups cooked rice, cooled 2 hard-cooked eggs, chopped ? cup mayonnaise-type salad dressing ? cup finely chopped green onions... ? cup chopped sweet pickles 1 teaspoon prepared mustard ground black pepper (as much as you like) How to make it 1. Wash your hands; make sure your cooking area is clean. 2. Combine the rice, eggs, mayonnaise, onions...

  9. Ecology and behavior of Pezothrips kellyanus (Thysanoptera: Thripidae) on citrus.

    PubMed

    Vassiliou, V A

    2010-02-01

    The most common thrips species found in Cyprus citrus orchards between 2003 and 2008 were Pezothrips kellyanus (Bagnall) (Thysanoptera: Thripidae), Frankliniella occidentalis (Pergande) (Thysanoptera: Thripidae), and Thrips tabaci (Lindeman) (Thysanoptera: Thripidae). Only Pezothrips kellyanus, Kelly's citrus thrips (KCT) causes feeding damage on citrus fruits in Cyprus. KCT adults prefer to concentrate mostly in the northern and eastern sides of both lemon and grapefruit canopies. The attractiveness of white, sky blue, marine blue, and yellow color to KCT was evaluated. White was found to be the most attractive color to adults of KCT, F. occidentalis, and T. tabaci. A range of incidental and breeding host plants grown within and outside citrus orchards in Cyprus were identified. KCT adults were found on flowers of all citrus varieties, and various other flowering plants including Malva nicaeensis, Malva silvestris, Sinapis alba, Oxalis pes-caprae, Calendula arvensis, Urospermum picroides, Jasminum officinale, Gardenia jasminoides, Jasminum sambac, Prunus dulcis, Mangifera indica, Persea americana, and Eriobotrya japonica. KCT larvae were found only on lemon, grapefruit, Jasmine spp., and Gardenia flowers. PMID:20214367

  10. [Chemical composition and bioactive compounds of flour of orange (Citrus sinensis), tangerine (Citrus reticulata) and grapefruit (Citrus paradisi) peels cultivated in Venezuela].

    PubMed

    Rincón, Alicia M; Vásquez, A Marina; Padilla, Fanny C

    2005-09-01

    The purpose of this research was to evaluate the chemical composition and some bioactive compounds in the peel's flour of some of the most consumed citrus fruits cultivated in Venezuela. Chemical composition as well as some trace elements, ascorbic acid, carotenoids dietary fiber, total polyphenols and their antiradical efficiency, using the 2,2-diphenyl-1-picrylhidracyl (DPPH) were assessed in the dried peels of orange (Citrus sinensis), tangerine (Citrus reticulata) and white grapefruit (Citrus paradisi). Moisture, fat, protein and ash content for all samples showed statistical differences (p < 0.05). Tangerine's peel showed the highest magnesium and carotenoid content, while highest ascorbic acid and carotenoid content was found in the grapefruit's peel. Dietary fiber content presented significant high value in the tangerine peel. All samples presented high content of extractable polyphenols (4.33; 7.6 and 5.1 g/100g). The highest antiradical efficiency was shown by the tangerine's peel, value which correlates with the polyphenol content. These results suggest that tangerine peel should be the most suitable, to reduce risk of some diseases such as cardiovascular and some associated to lipid oxidation. Studied samples are good sources of dietary fiber and phenolic compounds, whose use could be useful in the formulation of functional foods, taking advantage of the presence of dietary fiber and antioxidant compounds in only one ingredient. PMID:16454058

  11. Drying Rough Rice in Storage. 

    E-print Network

    Sorenson, J. W. Jr.; Crane, L. E.

    1960-01-01

    the rice for the following reasons: (. tem. the wettest layer of rice is at the top whe sampling is easily accomplished; (2) heat frc 7.2, 9.0 and 10.8 cfm per barrel of rice are given the motor and fan can be utilized in drying; in Table 1. (3) under..., was developed. Loading storage bins to a depth of 2 to 3 feet succession until all storage space was utilized, I sulted in the maximum fan capacity on the wette rice. This procedure also resulted in faster dryir and reduced the possibility,o'f damage from...

  12. Texas Rice, Highlights in Research 

    E-print Network

    2007-01-01

    Entomology/Weed Management Sequential sampling plans for rice stink bug (RSB) recently have been developed by Luis Espino, graduate student under Mo Way. The plans minimize sampling effort to help you more easily make an accurate decision regarding RSB... in the analysis. Table 2 is similar to Table 1 but pertains to dough rice given an economic threshold of 10 adult RSB per 10 sweeps. Rice Stink Bug Research Table 1. Sequential sampling table for sampling rice stink bugs using the sweep net method (Economic...

  13. Studies of binding interactions between Dufulin and southern rice black-streaked dwarf virus P9-1.

    PubMed

    Li, Xiangyang; Liu, Jing; Yang, Xia; Ding, Yan; Wu, Jian; Hu, Deyu; Song, Baoan

    2015-07-01

    Southern rice black-streaked dwarf virus (SRBSDV) is an important rice virus that can cause considerable crop losses. During infection, SRBSDV P9-1 accumulates viroplasms in SRBSDV-infected plant and insect cells, which may facilitate the formation of SRBSDV particles. Our field trial results showed that Dufulin inhibited infection activity in SRBSDV-infected rice. However it is not clear how Dufulin inhibits the infection activity. Therefore we studied the interactions between Dufulin and SRBSDV using P9-1 as a potential target, and found that Dufulin inhibited SRBSDV P9-1 gene expression and had a micromole affinity for the arginine 175 residue. Substituting arginine with glycine resulted in a mutant that was significantly less sensitive to Dufulin. Based on these results, we speculate that Dufulin inhibits the virulence of SRBSDV by binding with arginine 175 in the internal pore of P9-1 octameric protein. PMID:25934228

  14. Detection of Citrus psorosis virus in the northwestern citrus production area of Argentina by using an improved TAS-ELISA.

    PubMed

    Zanek, Maria Cecilia; Peña, Eduardo; Reyes, Carina Andrea; Figueroa, Julia; Stein, Beatriz; Grau, Oscar; Garcia, Maria Laura

    2006-11-01

    Citrus Psorosis in Argentina is a serious disease. Citrus is produced in two regions located in the northeast (NE) and northwest (NW) area of the country. These two areas have different climates and soil types, and therefore different citrus species and varieties are cultivated. In the NE region, Psorosis is epidemic, and in the NW region, the disease was described on several occasions since 1938, but it is not observed commonly in the orchards. Recently, trees with symptoms of Psorosis were observed in the Tucumán and Salta Provinces located in the NW region. Epidemiological studies in Argentina and Texas suggested that the disease is spread naturally by an unknown vector. The causal agent of the disease is the Citrus psorosis virus (CPsV), which can be detected by TAS-ELISA, RT-PCR and indicator plants. A new more rapid TAS-ELISA-HRP (horseradish peroxidase) is described which is more reliable, faster and more sensitive than the currently used for this virus, the TAS-ELISA-AP (alkaline phosphatase). Psorosis was detected by this improved method in few trees in the orchards of the Tucumán Province, in the NW citrus region, although natural spread does not seem to occur. PMID:16872685

  15. A real-time RT-PCR assay for detection and absolute quantitation of Citrus tristeza virus in different plant tissues.

    PubMed

    Ruiz-Ruiz, Susana; Moreno, Pedro; Guerri, José; Ambrós, Silvia

    2007-11-01

    A real-time RT-PCR assay using SYBR Green was developed for specific and reliable quantitative detection of Citrus tristeza virus (CTV) in infected plants. A general primer set designed from conserved sequences in ORFs 1b and 2 enabled amplification of the genomic RNA (gRNA) while excluding most subgenomic and defective RNAs. Single RT-PCR products of 204 bp (isolate T36) or 186 bp (other isolates) were obtained with no primer-dimer or non-specific amplifications detected. Melting curve analysis revealed distinct melting temperature peaks (T(m)) for severe and mild isolates. External standard curves using RNA transcripts of the selected target allowed a reproducible quantitative assay, with a wide dynamic range of detection starting with 10(2) gRNA copies and with very low variation coefficient values. This protocol enabled reliable assessments of CTV accumulation in different tissues and from different citrus species, grown in the greenhouse or under field conditions, and infected with CTV isolates differing in their pathogenicity. CTV accumulation was higher in bark and fruits than in roots or leaves and showed minimal differences among several susceptible citrus species, but it was significantly lower in sour orange. This quantitative detection assay will be a valuable tool for diagnosis and molecular studies on CTV biology. PMID:17573130

  16. Characterization of grapefruit plants (Citrus paradisi Macf.) transformed with citrus tristeza closterovirus genes.

    PubMed

    Febres, V J; Niblett, C L; Lee, R F; Moore, G A

    2003-01-01

    Grapefruit (Citrus paradisi Macf. cv Duncan) plants were transformed with several sequences from citrus tristeza closterovirus (CTV) that varied in terms of position in the CTV genome and virus strain origin in an attempt to obtain resistant plants. The sequences included the capsid protein gene from three different strains, a nontranslatable version of the capsid protein gene, the replicase (RdRp), the minor capsid protein (p27), a highly transcribed gene of unknown function (p20) and the more conserved 3' end of the genomic RNA. Transgenic plants were generated from all of the constructs, except from the p20 and p27 genes. Southern and Western blot analyses demonstrated that stably transformed grapefruit plants were obtained and that at least some transgenes were expressed. In a first effort at virus challenge, 25 transgenic lines were graft inoculated with a severe strain of CTV. Although some transgenic plants averaged lower titers of virus than controls, there was great variability in titer in both controls and transgenic plants, and all were apparently susceptible to the virus. PMID:12789444

  17. Volatile constituents of redblush grapefruit (Citrus paradisi) and pummelo (Citrus grandis) peel essential oils from Kenya.

    PubMed

    Njoroge, Simon Muhoho; Koaze, Hiroshi; Karanja, Paul Nyota; Sawamura, Masayoshi

    2005-12-14

    The volatile constituents of cold-pressed peel essential oils of redblush grapefruit (Citrus paradisi Macfadyen forma Redblush) and pummelo (Citrus grandis Osbeck) from the same locality in Kenya were determined by GC and GC-MS. A total of 67 and 52 compounds, amounting to 97.9 and 98.8% of the two oils, respectively, were identified. Monoterpene hydrocarbons constituted 93.3 and 97.5% in the oils, respectively, with limonene (91.1 and 94.8%), alpha-terpinene (1.3 and 1.8%), and alpha-pinene (0.5%) as the main compounds. Sesquiterpene hydrocarbons constituted 0.4% in each oil. The notable compounds were beta-caryophyllene, alpha-cubebene, and (E,E)-alpha-farnesene. Oxygenated compounds constituted 4.2 and 2.0% of the redblush grapefruit and pummelo oils, respectively, out of which carbonyl compounds (2.0 and 1.3%), alcohols (1.4 and 0.3%), and esters (0.7 and 0.4%) were the major groups. Heptyl acetate, octanal, decanal, citronellal, and (Z)-carvone were the main constituents (0.1-0.5%). Perillene, (E)-carveol, and perillyl acetate occurred in the redblush grapefruit but were absent from the pummelo oil. Nootkatone, alpha- and beta-sinensal, methyl-N-methylanthranilate, and (Z,E)-farnesol were prominent in both oils. PMID:16332132

  18. The complete nucleotide sequence of RNA 3 of citrus leaf rugose and citrus variegation ilarviruses.

    PubMed

    Scott, S W; Ge, X

    1995-04-01

    Complete sequence data for the RNA 3 of both citrus leaf rugose (CiLRV) and citrus variegation (CVV) ilarviruses have been determined. The RNAs are 2289 nt (CiLRV) and 2309 nt (CVV) in length and both contain the typical Bromoviridae arrangement of two open reading frames (ORFs) which, when translated, code for proteins that correspond to the Mr 32,000 (32K) putative movement proteins (ORF 1) and the coat proteins (ORF 2) of the respective viruses. The 3' termini of both viruses can be folded to form a secondary structure similar to those reported for other ilarviruses. These are the first complete nucleotide sequences for RNA 3 of members of subgroup 2 of the ilarviruses. The two viruses share substantial homology in nucleic acid sequence, code for identically sized coat proteins and share high levels of identity in the translated products of both ORFs. Although related, these viruses differ sufficiently to be considered distinct. The RNA 3s of CiLRV and CVV appear to be distinct from those of other ilarviruses for which comparable sequence data are available and also from the closely related alfalfa mosaic virus. PMID:9049342

  19. The closely related citrus ringspot and citrus psorosis viruses have particles of novel filamentous morphology.

    PubMed

    García, M L; Dal Bó, E; Grau, O; Milne, R G

    1994-12-01

    Some properties of the particles of citrus ringspot virus (CtRSV) and the related citrus psorosis-associated virus (CPsAV) are described. The particles of CtRSV have been reported to be sinuous linear structures about 10 nm in diameter and of two lengths (300 to 500 nm and 1500 to 2500 nm) representing 'top' and 'bottom' sedimentation components. We show that these particles are collapsed double-stranded forms of nucleocapsid-like, highly flexuous open circles formed of filaments 3 to 4 nm in diameter. Top-component filaments had contour lengths of 600 to 1000 nm, i.e. twice that reported for the corresponding collapsed form. Bottom-component filaments had contour lengths about four times longer than those of top-component filaments. The structures suggest that CtRSV represents a new genus (possibly family) related to the tenuiviruses. However, we failed to demonstrate any serological relationship between CtRSV and several tenuiviruses; moreover, the capsid protein sizes and host ranges are quite different. We offer the name Ophiovirus for the proposed new genus. PMID:7996151

  20. Content evaluation of 4 furanocoumarin monomers in various citrus germplasms.

    PubMed

    Xu, Juan; Ma, Lili; Jiang, Dong; Zhu, Shiping; Yan, Fuhua; Xie, Yunxia; Xie, Zongzhou; Guo, Wenwu; Deng, Xiuxin

    2015-11-15

    Due to the furanocoumarin compounds in the fruit, the production and consumption of grapefruit have been affected in the past decades since the 'grapefruit juice effect' was declared. To provide elite germplasm and obtain knowledge for future citrus breeding programs, the contents of 4 furanocoumarin monomers (FCMs) in the juice sacs from 73 citrus germplasms were evaluated using ultra-performance liquid chromatography. 6',7'-Dihydroxybergamottin and bergamottin were dominant in all the tested grapefruits, while there were some pomelos with dominant epoxybergamottin, and some with dominant 6',7'-dihydroxybergamottin and bergamottin. The contents of FCMs were low or below detection in sweet oranges, mandarins, lemons and trifoliate oranges. The results also show that the dominant patterns of FCMs are genotype-related, and crossing and selection are effective approaches to alter FCM profiles in citrus breeding. Furthermore, the contribution of pomelo as a parent to grapefruit regarding their FCM profiles was discussed. PMID:25977000

  1. The push-pull strategy for citrus psyllid control.

    PubMed

    Yan, Huaxue; Zeng, Jiwu; Zhong, Guangyan

    2015-07-01

    The Asian citrus psyllid (ACP), Diaphorina citri Kuwayama (Hemiptera: Psyllidae), is the only natural vector of Candidatus Liberibacter asiaticus that causes citrus huanglongbing (HLB), a most destructive disease of citrus. Currently, no remedial therapy exists for the disease, and so effective control of ACP is very important in curbing the transmission of the disease. The push-pull strategy should be thoroughly explored as an approach to ACP management. This mini-review summarises the current progress towards more effective repellent and attractant chemicals through investigating known repellent and attractive plants. Interactions between ACP and its host plants are also addressed, with emphasis on the possible involvement of the host biochemicals in attracting the insect. Potential ways to increase the effectiveness of the pull-push strategy are briefly discussed. It is expected that the pull-push strategy will be gradually developed following more extensive research. © 2014 Society of Chemical Industry. PMID:25256398

  2. Pharmacological properties of citrus and their ancient and medieval uses in the Mediterranean region.

    PubMed

    Arias, Beatriz Alvarez; Ramón-Laca, Luis

    2005-02-10

    This paper reviews the pharmacological properties of Mediterranean-grown citrus species (Citrus L., Rutaceae), including citron (Citrus medica L.), lime (Citrus xauantiifolia [Christm.] Swingle), lemon (Citrus xlimon [L.] Osbeck), bitter orange (Citrus xaurantium L.) and pomelo (Citrus maxima [Burm.] Merr.), as referred to in ancient, medieval and 16th century sources. The virtues of the species reported in these texts were compared to those known to modern science. A much broader spectrum of pharmacological properties was recorded by these early writers than one might expect. The use of the citron and lemon as antidotes for 'poison and venom' is recorded in the very earliest material. According to modern scientific literature the citron and the bitter orange may possess anti-cancer activity, lime may have an immunomodulatory effect in humans, and the pomelo may be useful for treating circulatory problems. Lemons might even ease hangover symptoms. Research is required to confirm these properties. PMID:15652281

  3. Rheological properties of rice dough for making rice bread

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Hema P. Sivaramakrishnan; B. Senge; P. K. Chattopadhyay

    2004-01-01

    The rheological properties of two varieties of rice with Hydroxy propyl methyl cellulose (HPMC) added as gluten substitute were studied using a farinograph and a rheometer and compared with wheat dough to find its suitability for making rice bread. The water absorption and dough development time data were obtained from the farinogram. The tests conducted in the rheometer were oscillation

  4. Flavonoid glycosides and limonoids from Citrus molasses.

    PubMed

    Kuroyanagi, Masanori; Ishii, Hiromi; Kawahara, Nobuo; Sugimoto, Hiroyuki; Yamada, Hideo; Okihara, Kiyoshi; Shirota, Osamu

    2008-01-01

    Molasses of tangerine orange (Citrus unshiu Markovich) is obtained as a waste product in the course of tangerine orange juice production. This molasses is expected to be a useful source of organic compounds such as flavonoids and limonoids. To elucidate a use for this molasses waste, we isolated and identified its organic constituents. Two new flavanonol glycosides were isolated from tangerine orange molasses, along with several flavonoids such as hesperidine, narirutin, eriodictyol, 3',4',5,6,7,8-hexamethoxy-3-O-beta-D-glucopyranosyloxyflavone, and 3',4',5,6,7,8-hexamethoxy- 3-beta-D-[4-O-(3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaloyl)]-glucopyranosyloxyflavone, and limonoids such as limonin, nomilin, and cyclic peptide, citrusin III. The structures of the new flavanonol glycosides were determined as (2R,3R)-7-O-(6-O-alpha-L-rahmnopyranosyl-beta-D-glucopyranosyl)-aromadendrin and 7-O-(6-O-alpha-L-rahmnopyranosyl-beta-D-glucopyranosyl)-3,3',5,7-tetrahydroxy-4'-methoxyflavanone by means of spectral analyses using (1)H-NMR, (13)C-NMR, and 2D-NMR. Of these compounds, flavanone glycoside, hesperidin and narirutin were isolated as the main constituents. Thus, molasses is a promising source of flavonoid glycosides. PMID:18404354

  5. Monoclonal antibody-based serological assays and immunocapture-RT-PCR for detecting Rice dwarf virus in field rice plants and leafhopper vectors.

    PubMed

    Wu, Jianxiang; Ni, Yuequn; Liu, Huan; Ding, Ming; Zhou, Xueping

    2014-01-01

    Rice dwarf virus (RDV) causes Rice dwarf disease, which leads to considerable losses in rice production in Asia. Purified RDV virions were used as the immunogen to prepare monoclonal antibodies (mAbs). Three murine mAbs against RDV were prepared. Plate-trapped antigen enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (PTA-ELISA), dot enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (dot-ELISA) and immunocapture-RT-PCR (IC-RT-PCR) were then developed for sensitive, specific, and rapid detection of RDV in rice and leafhopper samples obtained in the field using the mAbs. The PTA-ELISA, dot-ELISA and IC-RT-PCR detected the virus in infected tissue crude extracts diluted at 1:81,920, 1:10,240 and 1:655,360 (w/v, g mL(-1)), in individual viruliferous rice green leafhopper crude extracts diluted at 1:25,600, 1:6400 and 1:3,276,800 (individual leafhopper/?L), respectively. 878 rice field samples and 531 leafhopper field samples from ten provinces of China were screened for the presence of RDV using the two serological assays and the IC-RT-PCR and the results indicated that 37 of the 878 rice samples and 22 of the 531 leafhopper samples were infected by RDV. All positive samples were from Yunnan Province, indicating that RDV is prevalent in this province, but not in the other nine provinces. The dot-ELISA is suitable for routine detection of large-scale rice and leafhopper samples in field surveys. PMID:24121134

  6. Citrus consumption and cancer incidence: the Ohsaki cohort study.

    PubMed

    Li, Wen-Qing; Kuriyama, Shinichi; Li, Qiang; Nagai, Masato; Hozawa, Atsushi; Nishino, Yoshikazu; Tsuji, Ichiro

    2010-10-15

    Basic research and case-control studies have suggested that citrus consumption may protect against cancer. However, the protective effect has been observed from few prospective studies. This study investigated the association of citrus consumption with cancer incidence among 42,470 Japanese adults in the Ohsaki National Health Insurance Cohort, which covered an age range of 40-79 years, and was followed up from 1995 to 2003 for all-cancer and individual cancer incidence. Citrus consumption was assessed using a self-administered questionnaire. The Cox proportional hazard model was applied to estimate relative risks (RRs) and 95% CIs. During the 323,204 person-years of follow-up, 3,398 cases were identified totally. Citrus consumption, especially daily consumption, was correlated with reduced all-cancer incidence, the RRs were 0.89 (95% CI = 0.80-0.98) for total participants, 0.86 (0.76-0.98) for males and 0.93 (0.79-1.09) for females, as well as multiple cancers at individual sites, especially pancreatic (RR = 0.62, 95% CI = 0.38-1.00) and prostate cancer (RR = 0.63, 95% CI = 0.41-0.97). Joint effect analysis showed a reduced risk of overall cancer existed only for subjects who consumed >or=1 cup green tea/day (RR = 0.83, 95% CI = 0.73-0.93) as well as for males (RR = 0.83, 95% CI = 0.71-0.97) or females (RR = 0.82, 95% CI = 0.68-0.99). These findings suggest that citrus consumption is associated with reduced all-cancer incidence, especially for subjects having simultaneously high green tea consumption. Further work on the specific citrus constituents is warranted, and clinical trials are ultimately necessary to confirm the protective effect. PMID:20104526

  7. Analysis of genetic and molecular identity among field isolates of the rice blast fungus with an international differential system, rep-PCR and DNA sequencing

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The Pi-ta gene deployed in the Southern US rice germplasm is effective in preventing the infection by strains of Magnaporthe oryzae isolates that carry the avirulence gene AVR-Pita1. In the present study, a total of 169 isolates from rice (Oryza sativa) cultivars, with and without Pi-ta, were analyz...

  8. Structural and functional analysis of the avirulence gene AVR-Pita1 of the rice blast fungus in isolates of Magnaporthe oryzae worldwide

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The avirulence gene AVR-Pita1 of the rice blast fungus triggers race-specific resistance when races of Magnaporthe oryzae that contain AVR-Pita1 infect rice cultivars that contain the resistance gene Pi-ta. In the present study, a panel of 221 isolates from the US, China, Colombia, Egypt, India and ...

  9. Differential Gene Expression Reflects Morphological Characteristics and Physiological Processes in Rice Immunity against Blast Pathogen Magnaporthe oryzae

    PubMed Central

    Mahmood, Maziah; Abdullah, Siti N. A.; Hanafi, Mohamed M.; Nejat, Naghmeh; Latif, Muhammad A.

    2015-01-01

    The rice blast fungus Magnaporthe oryzae is a serious pathogen that jeopardises the world’s most important food-security crop. Ten common Malaysian rice varieties were examined for their morphological, physiological and genomic responses to this rice blast pathogen. qPCR quantification was used to assess the growth of the pathogen population in resistant and susceptible rice varieties. The chlorophyll content and photosynthesis were also measured to further understand the disruptive effects that M. oryzae has on infected plants of these varieties. Real-time PCR was used to explore the differential expression of eight blast resistance genes among the ten local varieties. Blast disease has destructive effects on the growth of rice, and the findings of our study provide evidence that the Pikh, Pi9, Pi21, and Osw45 genes are involved in defence responses in the leaves of Malaysian rice at 31 h after inoculation with M. oryzae pathotype P7.2. Both the chlorophyll content and photosynthesis were reduced, but the levels of Pikh gene expression remained constant in susceptible varieties, with a developed pathogen population and mild or severe symptoms. The Pi9, Pi21, and Osw45 genes, however, were simultaneously upregulated in infected rice plants. Therefore, the presence of the Pikh, Pi9, Pi21, and Osw45 genes in the germplasm is useful for improving the resistance of rice varieties. PMID:26001124

  10. Differential Gene Expression Reflects Morphological Characteristics and Physiological Processes in Rice Immunity against Blast Pathogen Magnaporthe oryzae.

    PubMed

    Azizi, Parisa; Rafii, Mohd Y; Mahmood, Maziah; Abdullah, Siti N A; Hanafi, Mohamed M; Nejat, Naghmeh; Latif, Muhammad A; Sahebi, Mahbod

    2015-01-01

    The rice blast fungus Magnaporthe oryzae is a serious pathogen that jeopardises the world's most important food-security crop. Ten common Malaysian rice varieties were examined for their morphological, physiological and genomic responses to this rice blast pathogen. qPCR quantification was used to assess the growth of the pathogen population in resistant and susceptible rice varieties. The chlorophyll content and photosynthesis were also measured to further understand the disruptive effects that M. oryzae has on infected plants of these varieties. Real-time PCR was used to explore the differential expression of eight blast resistance genes among the ten local varieties. Blast disease has destructive effects on the growth of rice, and the findings of our study provide evidence that the Pikh, Pi9, Pi21, and Osw45 genes are involved in defence responses in the leaves of Malaysian rice at 31 h after inoculation with M. oryzae pathotype P7.2. Both the chlorophyll content and photosynthesis were reduced, but the levels of Pikh gene expression remained constant in susceptible varieties, with a developed pathogen population and mild or severe symptoms. The Pi9, Pi21, and Osw45 genes, however, were simultaneously upregulated in infected rice plants. Therefore, the presence of the Pikh, Pi9, Pi21, and Osw45 genes in the germplasm is useful for improving the resistance of rice varieties. PMID:26001124

  11. Transgenic plant production mediated by Agrobacterium in Indica rice

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Hamid Rashid; Shuuji Yokoi; Kinya Toriyama; Kokichi Hinata

    1996-01-01

    A reproducible system has been developed for the production of transgenic plants in indica rice using Agrobacterium-mediated gene transfer. Three-week-old scutella calli served as an excellent starting material. These were infected with an Agrobacterium tumefaciens strain EHA101 carrying a plasmid pIG121Hm containing genes for ß-glucuronidase (GUS) and hygromycin resistnace (HygR). Hygromycin (50 mg\\/l) was used as a selectable agent. Inclusion

  12. Guide for Citrus Production in the Lower Rio Grande Valley. 

    E-print Network

    Maxwell, Norman P. (Norman Paul); Bailey, Morris A.

    1963-01-01

    , Weslaco. minerals must be considered when determinin, suitability of irrigation water. These include h chloride, sodium, and residual carbonate plus I bonate concentrations. Only water with less tk ppm of boron are recommended for citrus i! tion.... The best waters contain less than 0.3 boron. Irrigation waters containing between and 1.0 ppm boron may cause some boron toxicit! citrus. When necessary to use waters of the la group, occasional irrigations with low boron wait (less than 0.3 ppm...

  13. Efficient Procedure for Extracting Tylenchulus semipenetrans from Citrus Roots

    PubMed Central

    Greco, N.; D'Addabbo, T.

    1990-01-01

    Investigations were undertaken to determine the suitability of sucrose and magnesium sulphate solutions and a silica colloidal suspension with centrifugation for extracting Tylenchulus semipenetrans from citrus roots. The efficiency of incubation, sodium hypochlorite, centrifugation, and maceration methods was also compared. Numbers of females recovered by centrifugation with colloidal silica were greater than those from sucrose or magnesium sulphate. Incubation, sodium hypochlorite, and centrifugation methods were satisfactory for extracting eggs, second-stage juveniles, and males, whereas the maceration-sieving method was less efficient. Combining the sodium hypochlorite method with a 15-second maceration followed by centrifugation in colloidal silica reduced the recovery of T. semipenetrans females from citrus roots. PMID:19287763

  14. Energy conservation in citrus processing. Final project report

    SciTech Connect

    Leo, M.A.; Lari, R.I.; Moore, N.R.; Broussard, M.R.; Gyamfi, M.

    1981-11-01

    Alternative energy conserving systems for use in citrus processing plants were synthesized and evaluated in terms of energy savings and economic return. The energy intensive operations that are carried out in citrus processing plants include conveying and extraction, concentration, peel drying, refrigeration, and pasteurization. The alternative energy conserving systems are synthesized from components and subsystems that are arranged to make use of energy cascading and thermodynamic regeneration to reduce the overall energy usage. System requirements such as air pollution rules and plant processing load cycles, a characterization of major operations, description of alternative system concepts, and the evaluation of alternative systems in terms of economic parameters and energy usage are identified.

  15. Convenient Detection of the Citrus Greening (Huanglongbing) Bacterium ‘Candidatus Liberibacter asiaticus’ by Direct PCR from the Midrib Extract

    PubMed Central

    Fujikawa, Takashi; Miyata, Shin-Ichi; Iwanami, Toru

    2013-01-01

    A phloem-limited bacterium, ‘Candidatus Liberibacter asiaticus’ (Las) is a major pathogen of citrus greening (huanglongbing), one of the most destructive citrus diseases worldwide. The rapid identification and culling of infected trees and budwoods in quarantine are the most important control measures. DNA amplification including conventional polymerase chain reaction (PCR) has commonly been used for rapid detection and identification. However, long and laborious procedures for DNA extraction have greatly reduced the applicability of this method. In this study, we found that the Las bacterial cells in the midribs of infected leaves were extracted rapidly and easily by pulverization and centrifugation with mini homogenization tubes. We also found that the Las bacterial cells in the midrib extract were suitable for highly sensitive direct PCR. The performance of direct PCR using this extraction method was not inferior to that of conventional PCR. Thus, the direct PCR method described herein is characterized by its simplicity, sensitivity, and robustness, and is applicable to quarantine testing. PMID:23437295

  16. Rice University Electrical and Computer Engineering Learn more at cmc.rice.edu

    E-print Network

    Rice University Electrical and Computer Engineering Wireless Learn more at cmc.rice.edu or ece.rice in either orthogonal time-slots (TDD) or frequency bands (FDD). In 2010, Rice re-purposed off-the-shelf MIMO Wireless project directed by Prof. Edward Knightly at Rice University aims to develop fundamental

  17. Effect of rice plants on CH4 production, transport, oxidation and emission in rice paddy soil

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Zhongjun Jia; Zucong Cai; Hua Xu; Xiaoping Li

    2001-01-01

    To understand the integrated effects of rice plants (variety Wuyugeng 2) on CH4 emission during the typical rice growth stage, the production, oxidation and emission of methane related to rice plants were investigated simultaneously through laboratory and greenhouse experiments. CH4 emission was significantly higher from the rice planted treatment than from the unplanted treatment. In the rice planted treatment, CH4

  18. Fertilizers for Rice in Texas. 

    E-print Network

    Wyche, R. H. (Robert Henry)

    1941-01-01

    . Although applications of potash have produced small increases in yield of rice, the. increases were not large enough to justify the general use of potash for rice. Applications of manganese, iron, copper, zinc, and boron did not increase the yield... ........................................ Tests in Liberty County 14 ........................................ Tests in Orange County 15 ................ Work with Manganese, Copper. Zinc. Iron. and Boron 16 Acknowledgments .......................................... 16 Summary...

  19. RICE: Rapid interconnect circuit evaluator

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Curtis L. Ratzlaff; Nanda Gopal; Lawrence T. Pillage

    1991-01-01

    This paper describes RICE, an RLC interconnect evaluation tool based upon the moment-matching teehnique of Asymptotic Waveform Evaluation (AWE). The RLC circuit moments are calculated by a path-tracing algorithm which enables the analysis of large interconnect models several thousand times faster than a circuit simulation while requiring 5 to 10 times less memory. RICE also includes anew approach for determining

  20. Advances in Transgenic Rice Biotechnology

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Hitesh Kathuria; Jitender Giri; Himani Tyagi; Akhilesh K. Tyagi

    2007-01-01

    Rice is the most amenable crop plant for genetic manipulation amongst monocots due to its small genome size, enriched genetic map, availability of entire genome sequence, and relative ease of transformation. Improvement in agronomic traits of rice is bound to affect a sizeable population since it is a primary source of sustenance. Recent advances like use of ‘clean gene’ technology

  1. Microstructure Analysis of Rice Kernel

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Dong Li; Li-Jun Wang; De-Cheng Wang; Xiao Dong Chen; Zhi-Huai Mao

    2007-01-01

    The microscopic structure of rough rice kernel has been investigated using Scanning Electron Microscope (SEM) after solar drying in order to identify the mechanisms of the initiation and propagation of stress induced cracks. The structure of the endosperm tissue of rice kernel has been found damaged slightly due to drying. Stress induced cracks were evident. The cracks were also found

  2. Texas Rice, Highlights in Research

    E-print Network

    2003-01-01

    from municipal sludge, is not allowed in organic rice production. We are evaluating a Helena nitrogen foliar spray product that is applied at 2-10 lbs N/acre during the reproductive stage of rice growth. Its increased efficiency is attributed to its...

  3. SOLID MECHANICS James R. Rice

    E-print Network

    1 SOLID MECHANICS James R. Rice School of Engineering and Applied Sciences, and Department of Earth: February 2010 Downloadable at: http://esag.harvard.edu/rice/e0_Solid_Mechanics_94_10.pdf TABLE OF CONTENTS provided on last three pages, pp. 87-89 INTRODUCTION The application of the principles of mechanics to bulk

  4. Huanglongbing (Citrus Greening) Detection Using Visible, Near Infrared and Thermal Imaging Techniques

    PubMed Central

    Sankaran, Sindhuja; Maja, Joe Mari; Buchanon, Sherrie; Ehsani, Reza

    2013-01-01

    This study demonstrates the applicability of visible-near infrared and thermal imaging for detection of Huanglongbing (HLB) disease in citrus trees. Visible-near infrared (440–900 nm) and thermal infrared spectral reflectance data were collected from individual healthy and HLB-infected trees. Data analysis revealed that the average reflectance values of the healthy trees in the visible region were lower than those in the near infrared region, while the opposite was the case for HLB-infected trees. Moreover, 560 nm, 710 nm, and thermal band showed maximum class separability between healthy and HLB-infected groups among the evaluated visible-infrared bands. Similarly, analysis of several vegetation indices indicated that the normalized difference vegetation index (NDVI), Vogelmann red-edge index (VOG) and modified red-edge simple ratio (mSR) demonstrated good class separability between the two groups. Classification studies using average spectral reflectance values from the visible, near infrared, and thermal bands (13 spectral features) as input features indicated that an average overall classification accuracy of about 87%, with 89% specificity and 85% sensitivity could be achieved with classification models such as support vector machine for trees with symptomatic leaves. PMID:23389343

  5. Association of Alcaligenes faecalis with wetland rice

    Microsoft Academic Search

    C. B. You; W. Song; H. X. Wang; J. P. Li; M. Lin; W. L. Hai

    1991-01-01

    Alcaligenes faecalis isolated from rice roots is widespread in paddy soil of China. It was found to be a close association with rice.A. faecalis accumulate on the rice root surface, and part of them could enter into the rice root. It can grow in the intercellular space, especially inside the root cells, and multiply and fix dinitrogen there.A. faecalis could

  6. Rice University Electrical and Computer Engineering Neuroengineering

    E-print Network

    Rice University Electrical and Computer Engineering Neuroengineering Learn more at ece.rice function. At Rice, we develop technologies to understand, repair, replace, enhance, or treat the diseases, the university has established the Rice Center for Neuroengineering (RCNE). The center's goal is to integrate

  7. Tecnologa para todos Sistema Inalmbrico de Rice

    E-print Network

    Tecnología para todos Sistema Inalámbrico de Rice Andrea Trevino Rice University http://www.techforall.org/tfa_wireless.html http://tfa.rice.edu #12;Por qué en Pecan Park? La Misión de TFA: Proporcionar conocimientos a la comunidad. El propósito de Rice: Usar este programa para explorar la siguiente generación del sistema

  8. RICE SEQUENCES OF RELATIONS ANTONIO MONTALBAN

    E-print Network

    Montalbán, Antonio

    RICE SEQUENCES OF RELATIONS ANTONIO MONTALB´AN Abstract. We propose a framework to study computational ways of measuring the complexity of relations. The key notion of this paper is the one of rice sequence of relations, where rice stands for relatively intrinsically computably enumerable. A rice

  9. MOLECULAR CONTROL OF THE RICE BLAST DISEASE

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Rice blast disease caused by Magnaporthe grisea is a major constraint to rice production worldwide. The rice blast system is one of the best-characterized monocot model systems. The goal of this project is to understand molecular mechanisms of disease resistance using rice blast as a model system....

  10. THE VOLATILE COMPOSITION OF WAXY RICE

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Waxy rice contains no amylose and has a characteristic aroma described as starchy/grainy. Waxy rice is used in traditional Japanese rice cakes, crackers, and is preferred for making rice wines and sake throughout the Orient. Gas chromatographic/mass spectral data showed a greater presence of lipid...

  11. LASER SAFETY MANUAL 2014 RICE UNIVERSITY 1

    E-print Network

    Natelson, Douglas

    LASER SAFETY MANUAL 2014 RICE UNIVERSITY 1 Rice University Laser Safety Manual Environmental Health and Safety MS 123 P.O. Box 1892 Houston, TX 77251-1892 January 2014 #12;LASER SAFETY MANUAL 2014 RICE UNIVERSITY 2 Introduction The objective of the Rice University Laser Safety program is to assist all levels

  12. Protein requirements of preschool children consuming rice-milk, rice-toasted mung bean, and rice diets

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Maria A. Isabel Cabrera-Santiago; Carmen L. L. Intengan; Benigan V. Roxas; Bienvenido O. Juliano; Consuelo M. Perez; Anacleta S. Loyola; Emma R. Alejandro; Jovina N. Abadilla; Gracia FE B. Yu; Aida C. Mallillin

    1986-01-01

    Rice-milk and rice-toasted mung bean diets, and a high-protein rice (IR58 milled rice) were evaluated as part of a study on the protein requirements of toddlers consuming rice-based diets following the multilevel N balance method. Milk or mung bean contributed 1\\/3 of dietary N. At a daily energy intake of 418 kJ\\/kg body weight, weight losses were observed for all

  13. Production of cecropin A antimicrobial peptide in rice seed endosperm

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Cecropin A is a natural antimicrobial peptide that exhibits rapid, potent and long-lasting lytic activity against a broad spectrum of pathogens, thus having great biotechnological potential. Here, we report a system for producing bioactive cecropin A in rice seeds. Results Transgenic rice plants expressing a codon-optimized synthetic cecropin A gene drived by an endosperm-specific promoter, either the glutelin B1 or glutelin B4 promoter, were generated. The signal peptide sequence from either the glutelin B1 or the glutelin B4 were N-terminally fused to the coding sequence of the cecropin A. We also studied whether the presence of the KDEL endoplasmic reticulum retention signal at the C-terminal has an effect on cecropin A subcellular localization and accumulation. The transgenic rice plants showed stable transgene integration and inheritance. We show that cecropin A accumulates in protein storage bodies in the rice endosperm, particularly in type II protein bodies, supporting that the glutelin N-terminal signal peptides play a crucial role in directing the cecropin A to this organelle, independently of being tagged with the KDEL endoplasmic reticulum retention signal. The production of cecropin A in transgenic rice seeds did not affect seed viability or seedling growth. Furthermore, transgenic cecropin A seeds exhibited resistance to infection by fungal and bacterial pathogens (Fusarium verticillioides and Dickeya dadantii, respectively) indicating that the in planta-produced cecropin A is biologically active. Conclusions Rice seeds can sustain bioactive cecropin A production and accumulation in protein bodies. The system might benefit the production of this antimicrobial agent for subsequent applications in crop protection and food preservation. PMID:24755305

  14. RICE PI-TA GENE IS CLOSELY LINKED WITH RESISTANCE TO THE MAJOR PATHOTYPES OF THE RICE BLAST FUNGUS IN THE U.S.

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The Pi-ta gene, allelic to Pi-ta2, in rice is effective in preventing the infection of Magnaporthe grisea isolates containing the corresponding avirulence gene AVR-Pita. Pi-ta encodes a putative cytoplasmic receptor that appears to bind to a predicted processed AVR-Pita to elicit a defense response...

  15. Gene flow from herbicide-resistant and non-resistant rice into red rice populations in U.S. rice fields: A survey of current evidence

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Diverse red rice types infest U.S. rice fields. These infestations have remained widespread despite recent successes in controlling red rice in newly-introduced herbicide-resistant rice systems. As a result, the distribution and genetic background of red rice, and the degree to which red rice inte...

  16. Naringin Levels in Citrus Tissues : II. Quantitative Distribution of Naringin in Citrus paradisi MacFad.

    PubMed

    Jourdan, P S; McIntosh, C A; Mansell, R L

    1985-04-01

    The quantitative distribution of the flavanone-7-neohesperidoside, naringin, in seeds, seedlings, young plants, branches, flowers, and fruit of Citrus paradisi Macfad., cv ;Duncan' was analyzed by radioimmunoassay. High levels of naringin were associated with very young tissue and lower levels were found in older tissues. Seed coats of ungerminated seeds and young shoots had high naringin concentrations whereas cotyledons and roots had very low concentrations. Light-grown seedlings contained nearly twice as much naringin as etiolated seedlings and, in young plants and branches, the naringin content was highest in developing leaves and stem tissue. In flowers, the ovary had the highest levels of naringin, accounting for nearly 11% of the fresh weight. There was a net increase in the total naringin content of fruits during growth. However, due to the large increase in fruit size, there was a concomitant decrease in the naringin concentration as the fruit matured. PMID:16664159

  17. Managing citrus canker for the fresh fruit industry

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The establishment of citrus canker in Florida changed the way the $400 million dollar industry grows, packs ships and stores fruit. Canker regulations have become less strict, but there is still a requirement for compliance for growers and packers to move fruit from Florida to other areas. The comp...

  18. Comparative genomic characterization of citrus-associated Xylella fastidiosa strains

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Vivian S da Silva; Cláudio S Shida; Fabiana B Rodrigues; Diógenes CD Ribeiro; Alessandra A de Souza; Helvécio D Coletta-Filho; Marcos A Machado; Luiz R Nunes; Regina Costa de Oliveira

    2007-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The xylem-inhabiting bacterium Xylella fastidiosa (Xf) is the causal agent of Pierce's disease (PD) in vineyards and citrus variegated chlorosis (CVC) in orange trees. Both of these economically-devastating diseases are caused by distinct strains of this complex group of microorganisms, which has motivated researchers to conduct extensive genomic sequencing projects with Xf strains. This sequence information, along with other

  19. Inhibition of acetylcholinesterase activity by essential oil from Citrus paradisi.

    PubMed

    Miyazawa, M; Tougo, H; Ishihara, M

    2001-01-01

    Inhibition of acetylcholinesterase (AChE) activity by essential oils of Citrus paradisi (grapefruit pink in USA) was studied. Inhibition of AChE was measured by the colorimetric method. Nootkatone and auraptene were isolated from C. paradisi oil and showed 17-24% inhibition of AChE activity at the concentration of 1.62 microg/mL. PMID:11858553

  20. Photographic sensing of boron and chloride toxicities of citrus trees

    Microsoft Academic Search

    R. Cardenas; A. Paynado; H. W. Gausman; A. H. Gerbermann; R. L. Bowen

    1971-01-01

    Film density measurements were used to discriminate between healthy Red Blush grapefruit trees and trees whose foliage exhibited boron (B) and chloride (Cl⁻) toxicity symptoms (affected). Citrus trees were photographed from an aircraft (3000 ft altitude) and a Truco's aerial lift (9 ft above trees) with a Hasselblad camera. Light reflectance of foliage of B⁻ and Cl⁻-affected trees produced pinkish