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Sample records for infected checken embryo

  1. Zebrafish Embryo Model of Bartonella henselae Infection

    PubMed Central

    Lima, Amorce; Cha, Byeong J.; Amin, Jahanshah; Smith, Lisa K.

    2014-01-01

    Abstract Bartonella henselae (Bh) is an emerging zoonotic pathogen that has been associated with a variety of human diseases, including bacillary angiomatosis that is characterized by vasoproliferative tumor-like lesions on the skin of some immunosuppressed individuals. The study of Bh pathogenesis has been limited to in vitro cell culture systems due to the lack of an animal model. Therefore, we wanted to investigate whether the zebrafish embryo could be used to model human infection with Bh. Our data showed that Tg(fli1:egfp)y1 zebrafish embryos supported a sustained Bh infection for 7 days with >10-fold bacterial replication when inoculated in the yolk sac. We showed that Bh recruited phagocytes to the site of infection in the Tg(mpx:GFP)uwm1 embryos. Infected embryos showed evidence of a Bh-induced angiogenic phenotype and an increase in the expression of genes encoding pro-inflammatory factors and pro-angiogenic markers. However, infection of zebrafish embryos with a deletion mutant in the major adhesin (BadA) resulted in little or no bacterial replication and a diminished host response, providing the first evidence that BadA is critical for in vivo infection. Thus, the zebrafish embryo provides the first practical model of Bh infection that will facilitate efforts to identify virulence factors and define molecular mechanisms of Bh pathogenesis. PMID:25026365

  2. INFECTIVITY OF METARHIZIUM ANISOPLIAE IN GRASS SHRIMP EMBRYOS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Developing embryos of the estuarine grass shrimp, Palaemonetes pugio, were exposed to Metarhizium anisopliae conidiospores. Attachment of conidiospores was often followed by germination and outgrowth on embryo surface. Penetration of the embryonic envelopes by M. anisopliae allow...

  3. A genetic component of resistance to fungal infection in frog embryos

    PubMed Central

    Sagvik, Jörgen; Uller, Tobias; Olsson, Mats

    2008-01-01

    The embryo has traditionally been considered to completely rely upon parental strategies to prevent threats to survival posed by predators and pathogens, such as fungi. However, recent evidence suggests that embryos may have hitherto neglected abilities to counter pathogens. Using artificial fertilization, we show that among-family variation in the number of Saprolegnia-infected eggs and embryos in the moor frog, Rana arvalis, cannot be explained by maternal effects. However, analysed as a within-females effect, sire identity had an effect on the degree of infection. Furthermore, relatively more eggs and embryos were infected when eggs were fertilized by sperm from the same, compared with a different, population. These effects were independent of variation in fertilization success. Thus, there is likely to be a significant genetic component in embryonic resistance to fungal infection in frog embryos. Early developmental stages may show more diverse defences against pathogens than has previously been acknowledged. PMID:18319211

  4. Kinetic Study of Yellow Fever 17DD Viral Infection in Gallus gallus domesticus Embryos.

    PubMed

    Manso, Pedro Paulo de Abreu; E P Dias de Oliveira, Bárbara Cristina; Carvalho de Sequeira, Patrícia; Rodrigues Maia de Souza, Yuli; Dos Santos Ferro, Jessica Maria; da Silva, Igor José; Gonçalves Caputo, Luzia Fátima; Tavares Guedes, Priscila; Araujo Cunha Dos Santos, Alexandre; da Silva Freire, Marcos; Bonaldo, Myrna Cristina; Pelajo Machado, Marcelo

    2016-01-01

    Yellow fever continues to be an important epidemiological problem in Africa and South America even though the disease can be controlled by vaccination. The vaccine has been produced since 1937 and is based on YFV 17DD chicken embryo infection. However, little is known about the histopathological background of virus infection and replication in this model. Here we show by morphological and molecular methods (brightfield and confocal microscopies, immunofluorescence, nested-PCR and sequencing) the kinetics of YFV 17DD infection in chicken embryos with 9 days of development, encompassing 24 to 96 hours post infection. Our principal findings indicate that the main cells involved in virus production are myoblasts with a mesenchymal shape, which also are the first cells to express virus proteins in Gallus gallus embryos at 48 hours after infection. At 72 hours post infection, we observed an increase of infected cells in embryos. Many sites are thus affected in the infection sequence, especially the skeletal muscle. We were also able to confirm an increase of nervous system infection at 96 hours post infection. Our data contribute to the comprehension of the pathogenesis of YF 17DD virus infection in Gallus gallus embryos. PMID:27158977

  5. Kinetic Study of Yellow Fever 17DD Viral Infection in Gallus gallus domesticus Embryos

    PubMed Central

    Manso, Pedro Paulo de Abreu; E. P. Dias de Oliveira, Bárbara Cristina; Carvalho de Sequeira, Patrícia; Rodrigues Maia de Souza, Yuli; dos Santos Ferro, Jessica Maria; da Silva, Igor José; Gonçalves Caputo, Luzia Fátima; Tavares Guedes, Priscila; Araujo Cunha dos Santos, Alexandre; da Silva Freire, Marcos; Bonaldo, Myrna Cristina; Pelajo Machado, Marcelo

    2016-01-01

    Yellow fever continues to be an important epidemiological problem in Africa and South America even though the disease can be controlled by vaccination. The vaccine has been produced since 1937 and is based on YFV 17DD chicken embryo infection. However, little is known about the histopathological background of virus infection and replication in this model. Here we show by morphological and molecular methods (brightfield and confocal microscopies, immunofluorescence, nested-PCR and sequencing) the kinetics of YFV 17DD infection in chicken embryos with 9 days of development, encompassing 24 to 96 hours post infection. Our principal findings indicate that the main cells involved in virus production are myoblasts with a mesenchymal shape, which also are the first cells to express virus proteins in Gallus gallus embryos at 48 hours after infection. At 72 hours post infection, we observed an increase of infected cells in embryos. Many sites are thus affected in the infection sequence, especially the skeletal muscle. We were also able to confirm an increase of nervous system infection at 96 hours post infection. Our data contribute to the comprehension of the pathogenesis of YF 17DD virus infection in Gallus gallus embryos. PMID:27158977

  6. INFECTIVITY AND TETRATOGENICITY OF BEAUVERIA BASSIANA IN MENDIA BERYLLINA EMBRYOS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Developing embryos of the inland silverside fish, Menidia eryllina, were exposed to conidiospores of the insect pathogenic fungus, Beauveria bassiana, that possessed activity against the migratory grasshopper, Melanoplus sanquinioes. arious adverse effects were observed in Menidi...

  7. Yellow Fever 17DD Vaccine Virus Infection Causes Detectable Changes in Chicken Embryos

    PubMed Central

    Manso, Pedro Paulo de Abreu; Dias de Oliveira, Barbara C. E. P.; de Sequeira, Patrícia Carvalho; Maia de Souza, Yuli Rodrigues; Ferro, Jessica Maria dos Santos; da Silva, Igor José; Caputo, Luzia Fátima Gonçalves; Guedes, Priscila Tavares; dos Santos, Alexandre Araujo Cunha; Freire, Marcos da Silva; Bonaldo, Myrna Cristina; Pelajo-Machado, Marcelo

    2015-01-01

    The yellow fever (YF) 17D vaccine is one of the most effective human vaccines ever created. The YF vaccine has been produced since 1937 in embryonated chicken eggs inoculated with the YF 17D virus. Yet, little information is available about the infection mechanism of YF 17DD virus in this biological model. To better understand this mechanism, we infected embryos of Gallus gallus domesticus and analyzed their histopathology after 72 hours of YF infection. Some embryos showed few apoptotic bodies in infected tissues, suggesting mild focal infection processes. Confocal and super-resolution microscopic analysis allowed us to identify as targets of viral infection: skeletal muscle cells, cardiomyocytes, nervous system cells, renal tubular epithelium, lung parenchyma, and fibroblasts associated with connective tissue in the perichondrium and dermis. The virus replication was heaviest in muscle tissues. In all of these specimens, RT-PCR methods confirmed the presence of replicative intermediate and genomic YF RNA. This clearer characterization of cell targets in chicken embryos paves the way for future development of a new YF vaccine based on a new cell culture system. PMID:26371874

  8. Leptospira interrogans stably infects zebrafish embryos, altering phagocyte behavior and homing to specific tissues.

    PubMed

    Davis, J Muse; Haake, David A; Ramakrishnan, Lalita

    2009-01-01

    Leptospirosis is an extremely widespread zoonotic infection with outcomes ranging from subclinical infection to fatal Weil's syndrome. Despite the global impact of the disease, key aspects of its pathogenesis remain unclear. To examine in detail the earliest steps in the host response to leptospires, we used fluorescently labelled Leptospira interrogans serovar Copenhageni to infect 30 hour post fertilization zebrafish embryos by either the caudal vein or hindbrain ventricle. These embryos have functional innate immunity but have not yet developed an adaptive immune system. Furthermore, they are optically transparent, allowing direct visualization of host-pathogen interactions from the moment of infection. We observed rapid uptake of leptospires by phagocytes, followed by persistent, intracellular infection over the first 48 hours. Phagocytosis of leptospires occasionally resulted in formation of large cellular vesicles consistent with apoptotic bodies. By 24 hours, clusters of infected phagocytes were accumulating lateral to the dorsal artery, presumably in early hematopoietic tissue. Our observations suggest that phagocytosis may be a key defense mechanism in the early stages of leptospirosis, and that phagocytic cells play roles in immunopathogenesis and likely in the dissemination of leptospires to specific target tissues. PMID:19547748

  9. Genome-wide host responses against infectious laryngotracheitis virus vaccine infection in chicken embryo lung cells

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Infectious laryngotracheitis virus (ILTV; gallid herpesvirus 1) infection causes high mortality and huge economic losses in the poultry industry. To protect chickens against ILTV infection, chicken-embryo origin (CEO) and tissue-culture origin (TCO) vaccines have been used. However, the transmission of vaccine ILTV from vaccinated- to unvaccinated chickens can cause severe respiratory disease. Previously, host cell responses against virulent ILTV infections were determined by microarray analysis. In this study, a microarray analysis was performed to understand host-vaccine ILTV interactions at the host gene transcription level. Results The 44 K chicken oligo microarrays were used, and the results were compared to those found in virulent ILTV infection. Total RNAs extracted from vaccine ILTV infected chicken embryo lung cells at 1, 2, 3 and 4 days post infection (dpi), compared to 0 dpi, were subjected to microarray assay using the two color hybridization method. Data analysis using JMP Genomics 5.0 and the Ingenuity Pathway Analysis (IPA) program showed that 213 differentially expressed genes could be grouped into a number of functional categories including tissue development, cellular growth and proliferation, cellular movement, and inflammatory responses. Moreover, 10 possible gene networks were created by the IPA program to show intermolecular connections. Interestingly, of 213 differentially expressed genes, BMP2, C8orf79, F10, and NPY were expressed distinctly in vaccine ILTV infection when compared to virulent ILTV infection. Conclusions Comprehensive knowledge of gene expression and biological functionalities of host factors during vaccine ILTV infection can provide insight into host cellular defense mechanisms compared to those of virulent ILTV. PMID:22530940

  10. Transcriptional profiling of host gene expression in chicken embryo lung cells infected with laryngotracheitis virus

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Infection by infectious laryngotracheitis virus (ILTV; gallid herpesvirus 1) causes acute respiratory diseases in chickens often with high mortality. To better understand host-ILTV interactions at the host transcriptional level, a microarray analysis was performed using 4 × 44 K Agilent chicken custom oligo microarrays. Results Microarrays were hybridized using the two color hybridization method with total RNA extracted from ILTV infected chicken embryo lung cells at 0, 1, 3, 5, and 7 days post infection (dpi). Results showed that 789 genes were differentially expressed in response to ILTV infection that include genes involved in the immune system (cytokines, chemokines, MHC, and NF-κB), cell cycle regulation (cyclin B2, CDK1, and CKI3), matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs) and cellular metabolism. Differential expression for 20 out of 789 genes were confirmed by quantitative reverse transcription-PCR (qRT-PCR). A bioinformatics tool (Ingenuity Pathway Analysis) used to analyze biological functions and pathways on the group of 789 differentially expressed genes revealed that 21 possible gene networks with intermolecular connections among 275 functionally identified genes. These 275 genes were classified into a number of functional groups that included cancer, genetic disorder, cellular growth and proliferation, and cell death. Conclusion The results of this study provide comprehensive knowledge on global gene expression, and biological functionalities of differentially expressed genes in chicken embryo lung cells in response to ILTV infections. PMID:20663125

  11. Micro-Raman spectroscopy study of ALVAC virus infected chicken embryo cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Misra, Anupam K.; Kamemoto, Lori E.; Hu, Ningjie; Dykes, Ava C.; Yu, Qigui; Zinin, Pavel V.; Sharma, Shiv K.

    2011-05-01

    Micro- Raman spectroscopic investigation of ALVAC virus and of normal chicken embryo fibroblast cells and the cells infected with ALVAC virus labeled with green fluorescence protein (GFP) were performed with a 785 nm laser. Good quality Micro-Raman spectra of the Alvac II virus were obtained. These spectra show that the ALVAC II virus contains buried tyrosine residues and the coat protein of the virus has α-helical structure. A comparison of Raman spectra of normal and virus infected chicken embryo fibroblast cells revealed that the virus infected cells show additional bands at 535, 928, and 1091 cm-1, respectively, corresponding to δ(C-O-C) glycosidic ring, protein α-helix, and DNA (O-P-O) modes. In addition, the tyrosine resonance double (833 and 855 cm-1) shows reversal in the intensity of the higher-frequency band as compared to the normal cells that can be used to identify the infected cells. In the C-H stretching region, the infected cells show bands with higher intensity as compared to that of the corresponding bands in the normal cells. We also found that the presence of GFP does not affect the Raman spectra of samples when using a 785 nm micro-Raman system because the green fluorescence wavelength of GFP is well below the Stokes-Raman shifted spectral region.

  12. Microbial Infections Are Associated with Embryo Mortality in Arctic-Nesting Geese.

    PubMed

    Hansen, Cristina M; Meixell, Brandt W; Van Hemert, Caroline; Hare, Rebekah F; Hueffer, Karsten

    2015-08-15

    To address the role of bacterial infection in hatching failure of wild geese, we monitored embryo development in a breeding population of Greater white-fronted geese (Anser albifrons) on the Arctic Coastal Plain of Alaska. During 2013, we observed mortality of normally developing embryos and collected 36 addled eggs for analysis. We also collected 17 infertile eggs for comparison. Using standard culture methods and gene sequencing to identify bacteria within collected eggs, we identified a potentially novel species of Neisseria in 33 eggs, Macrococcus caseolyticus in 6 eggs, and Streptococcus uberis and Rothia nasimurium in 4 eggs each. We detected seven other bacterial species at lower frequencies. Sequences of the 16S rRNA genes from the Neisseria isolates most closely matched sequences from N. animaloris and N. canis (96 to 97% identity), but phylogenetic analysis suggested substantial genetic differentiation between egg isolates and known Neisseria species. Although definitive sources of the bacteria remain unknown, we detected Neisseria DNA from swabs of eggshells, nest contents, and cloacae of nesting females. To assess the pathogenicity of bacteria identified in contents of addled eggs, we inoculated isolates of Neisseria, Macrococcus, Streptococcus, and Rothia at various concentrations into developing chicken eggs. Seven-day mortality rates varied from 70 to 100%, depending on the bacterial species and inoculation dose. Our results suggest that bacterial infections are a source of embryo mortality in wild geese in the Arctic. PMID:26048928

  13. Microbial Infections Are Associated with Embryo Mortality in Arctic-Nesting Geese

    PubMed Central

    Hansen, Cristina M.; Meixell, Brandt W.; Van Hemert, Caroline; Hare, Rebekah F.

    2015-01-01

    To address the role of bacterial infection in hatching failure of wild geese, we monitored embryo development in a breeding population of Greater white-fronted geese (Anser albifrons) on the Arctic Coastal Plain of Alaska. During 2013, we observed mortality of normally developing embryos and collected 36 addled eggs for analysis. We also collected 17 infertile eggs for comparison. Using standard culture methods and gene sequencing to identify bacteria within collected eggs, we identified a potentially novel species of Neisseria in 33 eggs, Macrococcus caseolyticus in 6 eggs, and Streptococcus uberis and Rothia nasimurium in 4 eggs each. We detected seven other bacterial species at lower frequencies. Sequences of the 16S rRNA genes from the Neisseria isolates most closely matched sequences from N. animaloris and N. canis (96 to 97% identity), but phylogenetic analysis suggested substantial genetic differentiation between egg isolates and known Neisseria species. Although definitive sources of the bacteria remain unknown, we detected Neisseria DNA from swabs of eggshells, nest contents, and cloacae of nesting females. To assess the pathogenicity of bacteria identified in contents of addled eggs, we inoculated isolates of Neisseria, Macrococcus, Streptococcus, and Rothia at various concentrations into developing chicken eggs. Seven-day mortality rates varied from 70 to 100%, depending on the bacterial species and inoculation dose. Our results suggest that bacterial infections are a source of embryo mortality in wild geese in the Arctic. PMID:26048928

  14. Microsatellite instability in Marek’s Disease Virus infected primary chicken embryo fibroblasts

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Marek’s disease virus (MDV), an oncogenic α-herpes virus, causes a devastating disease in chickens characterized by development of lymphoblastoid tumors in multiple organs. Microsatellite instability (MSI), a symptom of defect in DNA mismatch repair function, is a form of genomic instability frequently detected in many types of tumors. However, the involvement of MSI in MDV-infected cells has not been investigated. In this study, we determined the presence and frequency of MSI in primary chicken embryo fibroblasts infected with or without MDV strain in vitro. Results 118 distinct microsatellite markers were analyzed by polymerase chain reaction (PCR) in 21 samples. MSI was found in 91 of 118 markers, and 12 out of 118 demonstrated frequency of MSI at ≥ 40%. 27 of 118 microsatellite loci did not show microsatellite instability. Conclusions These findings showed that MSI was a real event occurring in primary chicken embryo fibroblasts infected with MDV in vitro as evidenced by the high frequency of MSI, and may be specifically associated with genome alteration of host cells during MDV infected. PMID:22967357

  15. Gene Expression Profiles of Chicken Embryo Fibroblasts in Response to Salmonella Enteritidis Infection

    PubMed Central

    Szmolka, Ama; Wiener, Zoltán; Matulova, Marta Elsheimer; Varmuzova, Karolina; Rychlik, Ivan

    2015-01-01

    The response of chicken to non-typhoidal Salmonella infection is becoming well characterised but the role of particular cell types in this response is still far from being understood. Therefore, in this study we characterised the response of chicken embryo fibroblasts (CEFs) to infection with two different S. Enteritidis strains by microarray analysis. The expression of chicken genes identified as significantly up- or down-regulated (≥3-fold) by microarray analysis was verified by real-time PCR followed by functional classification of the genes and prediction of interactions between the proteins using Gene Ontology and STRING Database. Finally the expression of the newly identified genes was tested in HD11 macrophages and in vivo in chickens. Altogether 19 genes were induced in CEFs after S. Enteritidis infection. Twelve of them were also induced in HD11 macrophages and thirteen in the caecum of orally infected chickens. The majority of these genes were assigned different functions in the immune response, however five of them (LOC101750351, K123, BU460569, MOBKL2C and G0S2) have not been associated with the response of chicken to Salmonella infection so far. K123 and G0S2 were the only ’non-immune’ genes inducible by S. Enteritidis in fibroblasts, HD11 macrophages and in the caecum after oral infection. The function of K123 is unknown but G0S2 is involved in lipid metabolism and in β-oxidation of fatty acids in mitochondria. PMID:26046914

  16. Microbial infections are associated with embryo mortality in Arctic-nesting geese.

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hansen, Cristina M.; Meixell, Brandt W.; Van Hemert, Caroline R.; Hare, Rebekah F.; Hueffer, Karsten

    2015-01-01

    To address the role of bacterial infection in hatching failure of wild geese, we monitored embryo development in a breeding population of Greater white-fronted geese (Anser albifrons) on the Arctic Coastal Plain of Alaska. During 2013, we observed mortality of normally developing embryos and collected 36 addled eggs for analysis. We also collected 17 infertile eggs for comparison. Using standard culture methods and gene sequencing to identify bacteria within collected eggs, we identified a potentially novel species of Neisseria in 33 eggs, Macrococcus caseolyticus in 6 eggs, and Streptococcus uberis and Rothia nasimurium in 4 eggs each. We detected seven other bacterial species at lower frequencies. Sequences of the 16S rRNA genes from the Neisseria isolates most closely matched sequences from N. animaloris and N. canis (96 to 97% identity), but phylogenetic analysis suggested substantial genetic differentiation between egg isolates and known Neisseria species. Although definitive sources of the bacteria remain unknown, we detected Neisseria DNA from swabs of eggshells, nest contents, and cloacae of nesting females. To assess the pathogenicity of bacteria identified in contents of addled eggs, we inoculated isolates of Neisseria, Macrococcus, Streptococcus, and Rothia at various concentrations into developing chicken eggs. Seven-day mortality rates varied from 70 to 100%, depending on the bacterial species and inoculation dose. Our results suggest that bacterial infections are a source of embryo mortality in wild geese in the Arctic.    

  17. Transcriptional response of chicken embryo cells to Newcastle disease virus (D58 strain) infection.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Ramesh; Kirubaharan, J John; Chandran, N Daniel Joy; Gnanapriya, N

    2013-09-01

    Newcastle disease virus (NDV), the causative agent of Newcastle disease (ND) in chicken causes significant economic loss for the poultry industry worldwide. The mechanism involved in host response to NDV infection is not well understood. For better understanding of the virus-host interaction; transcriptional profile of some genes of chicken embryo (CE) cells infected with NDV vaccine strain D58 was established using quantitative RT-PCR SYBR Green method. The relative standard curve method was used to measure the level of transcripts of the cellular genes against an endogenous control (β actin) gene. Among the genes studied, IFN α, IFN γ, MHC I and DDX 1 were up-regulated while IL 6 was down regulated. The expression of viral genes (M and F) in the infected CE cells was also confirmed by relative quantification. The host cellular genes involved in pro-inflammatory response, interferon-regulated proteins and the cellular immune response were affected by NDV infection, indicating involvement of complex signaling pathways of host cell responses to the infection. Thus, this study contributes to the understanding of the pathogenesis of ND and provides an insight into the virus-host interaction. PMID:24426287

  18. Effect of complement depletion by cobra venom factor on fowlpox virus infection in chickens and chicken embryos.

    PubMed Central

    Ohta, H; Yoshikawa, Y; Kai, C; Yamanouchi, K; Taniguchi, H; Komine, K; Ishijima, Y; Okada, H

    1986-01-01

    The course of infection with an attenuated strain of fowlpox virus (FPV), which is known to induce antibody-independent activation of complement via the alternative pathway, was investigated in 1- to 3-day-old chickens and 14-day-old chicken embryos by treatment with cobra venom factor (CVF). CVF was found to inhibit complement activity transiently via the alternative pathway but not via the classical pathway. In chickens treated with CVF, virus growth in the skin was enhanced, and pock lesions tended to disseminate, leading to fatal infection in some birds. Histologically, an acute inflammation at an early stage of infection (within 3 days) was inhibited, and virus content in the pock lesion was increased. In chicken embryos with immature immune capacities, CVF treatment caused changes in pock morphology from clear pocks to diffuse ones, an increase in virus content in the pock, and inhibition of cell infiltration. Thus, FPV infection was aggravated in both CVF-treated chickens and chicken embryos. These results are discussed in relation to roles of complement in the elimination of virus at an early stage of FPV infection. Images PMID:3003397

  19. Nervous Necrosis Virus Replicates Following the Embryo Development and Dual Infection with Iridovirus at Juvenile Stage in Grouper

    PubMed Central

    Hsu, Hao-Hsuan; Chen, Peng-Peng; Lee, Szu-Hsien; Chen, Young-Mao; Tsai, Tieh-Jung; Wang, Chien-Kai; Ku, Hsiao-Tung; Lee, Gwo-Bin; Chen, Tzong-Yueh

    2012-01-01

    Infection of virus (such as nodavirus and iridovirus) and bacteria (such as Vibrio anguillarum) in farmed grouper has been widely reported and caused large economic losses to Taiwanese fish aquaculture industry since 1979. The multiplex assay was used to detect dual viral infection and showed that only nervous necrosis virus (NNV) can be detected till the end of experiments (100% mortality) once it appeared. In addition, iridovirus can be detected in a certain period of rearing. The results of real-time PCR and in situ PCR indicated that NNV, in fact, was not on the surface of the eggs but present in the embryo, which can continue to replicate during the embryo development. The virus may be vertically transmitted by packing into eggs during egg development (formation) or delivering into eggs by sperm during fertilization. The ozone treatment of eggs may fail to remove the virus, so a new strategy to prevent NNV is needed. PMID:22563447

  20. THE VALUE OF DUCK-EMBRYO VACCINE AND HIGH-EGG-PASSAGE FLURY VACCINE IN EXPERIMENTAL RABIES INFECTION IN GUINEA-PIGS.

    PubMed

    VEERARAGHAVAN, N; SUBRAHMANYAN, T P

    1963-01-01

    The authors have compared the value of multiple doses of duck-embryo and HEP Flury vaccine with that of pooled 5% sheep-brain vaccine in experimental rabies infection in guinea-pigs. They found that the duck-embryo vaccine given in a dosage corresponding to 14 ml of 10% vaccine (the dosage recommended for human treatment), either alone or with antirabies serum, gave no protection and that, even when administered in a dosage corresponding to 140 ml of 5% pooled vaccine, both the duck-embryo and the HEP Flury vaccines, whether alone or with serum, conferred little protection. Pooled phenolized vaccine under identical conditions gave good results. The immunogenicity of duck-embryo and HEP Flury vaccines, given before infection, was also inferior to that of pooled vaccine; and the duck-embryo vaccine was found to be a poorer antigen than the pooled vaccine in mouse potency tests.The authors conclude that the dosage of duck-embryo vaccine recommended for human treatment is inadequate and that the HEP Flury vaccine in its present form is unsuitable for post-infection treatment. PMID:14065070

  1. Effect of road deicing salt on the susceptibility of amphibian embryos to infection by water molds.

    PubMed

    Karraker, Nancy E; Ruthig, Gregory R

    2009-01-01

    Some causative agents of amphibian declines act synergistically to impact individual amphibians and their populations. In particular, pathogenic water molds (aquatic oomycetes) interact with environmental stressors and increase mortality in amphibian embryos. We documented colonization of eggs of three amphibian species, the wood frog (Rana sylvatica), the green frog (Rana clamitans), and the spotted salamander (Ambystoma maculatum), by water molds in the field and examined the interactive effects of road deicing salt and water molds, two known sources of mortality for amphibian embryos, on two species, R. clamitans and A. maculatum in the laboratory. We found that exposure to water molds did not affect embryonic survivorship in either A. maculatum or R. clamitans, regardless of the concentration of road salt to which their eggs were exposed. Road salt decreased survivorship of A. maculatum, but not R. clamitans, and frequency of malformations increased significantly in both species at the highest salinity concentration. The lack of an effect of water molds on survival of embryos and no interaction between road salt and water molds indicates that observations of colonization of these eggs by water molds in the field probably represent a secondary invasion of unfertilized eggs or of embryos that had died of other causes. Given increasing salinization of freshwater habitats on several continents and the global distribution of water molds, our results suggest that some amphibian species may not be susceptible to the combined effects of these factors, permitting amphibian decline researchers to devote their attention to other potential causes. PMID:18976747

  2. Epicatechin gallate, a naturally occurring polyphenol, alters the course of infection with β-lactam-resistant Staphylococcus aureus in the zebrafish embryo

    PubMed Central

    Stevens, Christina S.; Rosado, Helena; Harvey, Robert J.; Taylor, Peter W.

    2015-01-01

    (-)-epicatechin gallate (ECg) substantially modifies the properties of Staphylococcus aureus and reversibly abrogates β-lactam resistance in methicillin/oxacillin resistant (MRSA) isolates. We have determined the capacity of ECg to alter the course of infection in zebrafish embryos challenged with epidemic clinical isolate EMRSA-16. At 30 h post fertilization (hpf), embryos were infected by injection of 1–5 × 103 colony forming units (CFU) of EMRSA-16 into the circulation valley or yolk sac. Infection by yolk sac injection was lethal with a challenge dose above 3 × 103 CFU, with no survivors at 70 hpf. In contrast, survival at 70 hpf after injection into the circulation was 83 and 44% following challenge with 3 × 103 and 1–5 × 103 CFU, respectively. No significant increases in survival were noted when infected embryos were maintained in medium containing 12.5–100 μg/mL ECg with or without 4 or 16 μg/mL oxacillin. However, when EMRSA-16 was grown in medium containing 12.5 μg/mL ECg and the bacteria used to infect embryos by either the circulation valley or yolk sac, there were significant increases in embryo survival in both the presence and absence of oxacillin. ECg-modified and unmodified, GFP-transformed EMRSA-16 bacteria were visualized within phagocytic cells in the circulation and yolk sac; pre-treatment with ECg also significantly increased induction of the respiratory burst and suppressed increases in IL-1β expression typical of infection with untreated EMRSA-16. We conclude that exposure to ECg prior to infection reduces the lethality of EMRSA-16, renders cells more susceptible to elimination by immune processes and compromises their capacity to establish an inflammatory response in comparison to non-exposed bacteria. PMID:26441953

  3. Transcriptional Profiling of Host Gene Expression in Chicken Embryo Fibroblasts Infected with Reticuloendotheliosis Virus Strain HA1101

    PubMed Central

    Miao, Ji; Bao, Yanqing; Ye, Jianqiang; Shao, Hongxia; Qian, Kun; Qin, Aijian

    2015-01-01

    Reticuloendotheliosis virus (REV), a member of the Gammaretrovirus genus in the Retroviridae family, causes an immunosuppressive, oncogenic and runting-stunting syndrome in multiple avian hosts. To better understand the host interactions at the transcriptional level, microarray data analysis was performed in chicken embryo fibroblast cells at 1, 3, 5, and 7 days after infection with REV. This study identified 1,785 differentially expressed genes that were classified into several functional groups including signal transduction, immune response, biological adhesion and endocytosis. Significant differences were mainly observed in the expression of genes involved in the immune response, especially during the later post-infection time points. These results revealed that differentially expressed genes IL6, STAT1, MyD88, TLRs, NF-κB, IRF-7, and ISGs play important roles in the pathogenicity of REV infection. Our study is the first to use microarray analysis to investigate REV, and these findings provide insights into the underlying mechanisms of the host antiviral response and the molecular basis of viral pathogenesis. PMID:25973612

  4. Conception rate, uterine infection and embryo quality after artificial insemination and natural breeding with a stallion carrier of Pseudomonas aeruginosa: a case report

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Pseudomonas aeruginosa may cause venereal disease and infertility in horses. A Pseudomonas aeruginosa - carrier stallion, often unresponsive to artificial vagina collection, was used to naturally breed mares. Semen collected from the same stallion was also used to perform artificial inseminations. Pregnancy rates, embryo quality and incidence of uterine infection were compared between inseminated or naturally-bred mares. Methods P. aeruginosa was isolated from swabbing of the penis, prepuce and distal urethra of the stallion. Before being bred or inseminated, clitoral/vestibular samples were collected from all mares, and cultured for isolation of P. aeruginosa. At the first observed estrus, endometrial swabs were also collected. All mares subjected to natural mating (NS) were re-evaluated for P.aeruginosa by culture of clitoral and endometrial swabs. Artificial inseminations (AI) were performed either with fresh-extended semen (11 AI/7 mares) or frozen semen (10 AI/7 mares). The stallion was also used to breed 3 mares (4 services). For embryo collection, 2 mares were inseminated with fresh-extended semen (1 AI/mare), and 2 additional mares were inseminated with frozen semen (2 AI/mare). Two mares were naturally-bred with a total of 9 services, for embryo collection. All mares were examined after AI or natural service (NS), for uterine pathologies. Embryo recoveries were attempted passing a catheter with inflatable cuff connected to a sterile flexible 2-way flushing catheter, through the cervix. Flushed media was recovered into an Em-Con filter, and embryos searched using a stereoscope. Embryos were graded from 1 (excellent) to 4 (degenerated/dead). Results Pregnancy rates obtained after NS was 50% per cycle. However, more than half of the NS resulted in uterine disease, while uterine pathology was seen only in 22% of the time following AI. Half of the mares bred by NS got positive to P. aeruginosa. Percentage of embryo recovery rates was identical after

  5. Calcium homeostasis in mitochondrion-mediated apoptosis of chick embryo cecal epithelial cells induced by Eimeria tenella infection.

    PubMed

    Cui, Xiao-zhen; Zheng, Ming-xue; Zhang, Yan; Liu, Rui-li; Yang, Sha-sha; Li, Shan; Xu, Zhi-yong; Bai, Rui; Lv, Qiang-hua; Zhao, Wen-long

    2016-02-01

    In this study, the process of Eimeria tenella-induced apoptosis and the effect of calcium homeostasis were investigated in chick embryo cecal epithelial cells. In particular, we examined cytochrome c release into the cytoplasm, mitochondrial permeability transition pore (MPTP) opening, and changes in [Ca(2+)]c and apoptosis in host cells. Apoptosis, MPTP opening, cytochrome c release, and [Ca(2+)]c in host cells increased following infection. This trend was reversed by blocking the increase in [Ca(2+)]c using BAPTA/AM and EGTA (intra- and extracellular chelators of Ca(2+), respectively) and by applying heparin sodium and ryanodine (blockers of the inositol triphosphate and ryanodine receptors of the endoplasmic reticulum, respectively). These results indicate that [Ca(2+)]c plays a significant role in host cell mitochondrial apoptosis, which is induced via modulation of extracellular Ca(2+) levels and endoplasmic reticulum Ca(2+) channels. Thus, agents that restore Ca(2+) homeostasis may be useful for managing E. tenella infection in chickens. PMID:26850556

  6. Roles of Toll-like receptors 2 and 6 in the inflammatory response to Mycoplasma gallisepticum infection in DF-1 cells and in chicken embryos.

    PubMed

    Tian, Wei; Zhao, Chengcheng; Hu, Qingchuang; Sun, Jianjun; Peng, Xiuli

    2016-06-01

    While Mycoplasma gallisepticum (MG) is a major pathogen that causes chronic respiratory diseases in chicken, the molecular mechanism of MG infection is not clear. In this study, we investigated the roles of Toll-like receptor 2 (TLR2) and 6 (TLR6) in MG infection. We found that TLR2 type 2 (TLR2-2) and TLR6 had differential expressions in chicken embryo fibroblasts (DF-1 cells), where TLR6 was highly expressed, but TLR2-2 was barely expressed. Upon MG infection, TLR6 expression was upregulated, followed by upregulation of downstream factors, MyD88, NF-κB, IL2, IL6, and TNF-α. Knockdown of TLR6 expression by shRNA abolished the MG-induced inflammatory responses. More interestingly, in the presence of TLR6, TLR2-2 didn't respond to MG infection in DF-1 cells. When TLR6 was knocked down by shRNA, however, TLR2 was upregulated upon MG infection, which was followed by upregulation of proinflammatory genes. Finally, we tested effects of the MG infection on expression of TLR2-2 and TLR6 in the lungs and trachea tissues of chicken embryos. We found both TLR2-2 and TLR6 were upregulated upon MG infection, followed by upregulation of the downstream NF-κB-mediated inflammatory responses. This study was the first to report the differential roles of TLR2-2 and TLR6 in MG-infected DF-1 cells and chicken embryos. PMID:26797426

  7. Risk and prevention of bovine viral diarrhea virus (BVDV) transmission through embryo production via somatic cell nuclear transfer (SCNT) using oocytes from persistently infected donors.

    PubMed

    Gregg, K; Riddell, K P; Chen, S H; Galik, P K; Xiang, T; Guerra, T; Marley, M S; Polejaeva, I; Givens, M D

    2010-07-01

    The objective was to assess the risk of transmission of bovine viral diarrhea virus (BVDV) through embryo production via somatic cell nuclear transfer (SCNT), with oocytes obtained from persistently infected (PI) donors. Using ultrasound-guided follicular aspiration following superstimulation, oocytes were obtained from five female beef cattle, including three that were PI and two that were negative for BVDV. In the three PI cattle, seven aspirations yielded 32 oocytes (PI-1: three aspirations yielding six oocytes; PI-2: two aspirations yielding 14 oocytes; and PI-3: two aspirations yielding 12 oocytes). The oocyte recovery rate was better in negative control cattle, with 32 oocytes obtained from the two cattle in a single superstimulation and aspiration session. Oocytes were processed individually for SCNT, evaluated, and tested for BVDV. Nearly all (31/32) oocytes from the three PI donors were positive for BVDV by PCR, with detected viral RNA copy number ranging from 1 to 1.1 x 10(5). The proportion of oocytes acceptable for SCNT embryo production (based on oocyte quality and maturation status) was only 16 to 35% from PI donors, but was 81% from control donors. Therefore, routine testing of unacceptable (discarded) oocytes could be an effective approach to identify batches that might contain infected oocytes from PI donors. Identification and removal of high-risk batches of oocytes would minimize the risk of BVDV transmission through SCNT embryo production. PMID:20188405

  8. Viral proliferation and expression of tumor-related gene in different chicken embryo fibroblasts infected with different tumorigenic phenotypes of avian leukosis virus subgroup J.

    PubMed

    Qu, Yajin; Liu, Litao; Niu, Yujuan; Qu, Yue; Li, Ning; Sun, Wei; Lv, Chuanwei; Wang, Pengfei; Zhang, Guihua; Liu, Sidang

    2016-10-01

    Subgroup J avian leukosis virus (ALV-J) causes a neoplastic disease in infected chickens. The ALV-J strain NX0101, which was isolated from broiler breeders in 2001, mainly induced formation of myeloid cell tumors. However, strain HN10PY01, which was recently isolated from laying hens, mainly induces formation of myeloid cell tumors and hemangioma. To identify the molecular pathological mechanism underlying changes in host susceptibility and tumor classification induced by these two types of ALV-J strains, chicken embryo fibroblasts derived from chickens with different genetic backgrounds (broiler breeders and laying hens) and an immortalized chicken embryo fibroblasts (DF-1) were prepared and infected with strain NX0101 or HN10PY01, respectively. The 50% tissue culture infective dose (TCID50) and levels of ALV group-specific antigen p27 and heat shock protein 70 in the supernatant collected from the ALV-J infected cells were detected. Moreover, mRNA expression levels of tumor-related genes p53, c-myc, and Bcl-2 in ALV-J-infected cells were quantified. The results indicated that the infection of ALV-J could significantly increase mRNA expression levels of p53, c-myc, and Bcl-2 Strain HN10PY01 exhibited a greater influence on the three tumor-related genes in each of the three types of cells when compared with strain NX0101, and the TCID50 and p27 levels in the supernatant collected from HN10PY01-infected cells were higher than those collected from NX0101-infected cells. These results indicate that the infection of the two ALV-J strains influenced the gene expression levels in the infected cells, while the newly isolated strain HN10PY01 showed higher replication ability in cells and induced higher expression levels of tumor-related genes in infected cells. Furthermore, virus titers and expression levels of tumor-related genes and cellular stress responses of cells with different genetic backgrounds when infected with each of the two ALV-J strain were different

  9. Toxoplasma Gondii Infection of Chicken Embryos Causes Retinal Changes and Modulates HSP90B1 Gene Expression: A Promising Ocular Toxoplasmosis Model.

    PubMed

    Nasaré, Alex M; Tedesco, Roberto C; Cristovam, Priscila C; Cenedese, Marcos A; Galisteo, Andrés J; Andrade, Heitor F; Gomes, José Álvaro P; Guimarães, Érik V; Barbosa, Helene S; Alonso, Luis G

    2015-12-01

    HSP90B1 is a gene that codifies heat shock protein 108 (HSP108) that belongs to a group of proteins induced under stress situation, and it has close relation with the nervous system, especially in the retina. Toxoplasma gondii causes ocular toxoplasmosis that has been associated with a late manifestation of the congenital toxoplasmosis although experimental models show that morphological alterations are already present during embryological development. Here, we used 18 eyes of Gallus domesticus embryos in 7th and 20th embryonic days to establish a model of congenital ocular toxoplasmosis, experimentally infected in its fifth day correlating with HSP90B1 gene expression. Embryos' eyes were histologically evaluated, and gene expression was performed by real-time polymerase chain reaction (PCR). Our data showed parasite present in the choroid, unusual migration of retinal pigment epithelium, and chorioretinal scars, and a tendency to a lower expression of the HSP90B1 gene upon experimental infection. This is a promising model to better understand T. gondii etiopathogeny. PMID:26716020

  10. Cross-talk interactions of exogenous nitric oxide and sucrose modulates phenylpropanoid metabolism in yellow lupine embryo axes infected with Fusarium oxysporum.

    PubMed

    Morkunas, Iwona; Formela, Magda; Floryszak-Wieczorek, Jolanta; Marczak, Łukasz; Narożna, Dorota; Nowak, Witold; Bednarski, Waldemar

    2013-10-01

    The aim of the study was to examine cross-talk of exogenous nitric oxide (NO) and sucrose in the mechanisms of synthesis and accumulation of isoflavonoids in embryo axes of Lupinus luteus L. cv. Juno. It was verified whether the interaction of these molecules can modulate the defense response of axes to infection and development of the pathogenic fungus Fusarium oxysporum f. sp. lupini. Sucrose alone strongly stimulated a high level of genistein glucoside in axes pretreated with exogenous nitric oxide (SNP or GSNO) and non-pretreated axes. As a result of amplification of the signal coming from sucrose and GSNO, high isoflavonoids accumulation was observed (+Sn+GSNO). It needs to be stressed that infection in tissues pretreated with SNP/GSNO and cultured on the medium with sucrose (+Si+SNP/+Si+GSNO) very strongly enhances the accumulation of free isoflavone aglycones. In +Si+SNP axes phenylalanine ammonia-lyase activity was high up to 72h. As early as at 12h in +Si+SNP axes an increase was recorded in gene expression level of the specific isoflavonoid synthesis pathway. At 24h in +Si+SNP axes a very high total antioxidant capacity dependent on the pool of fast antioxidants was noted. Post-infection generation of semiquinone radicals was lower in axes with a high level of sucrose than with a deficit. PMID:23987816

  11. Differential Expression Profile of Chicken Embryo Fibroblast DF-1 Cells Infected with Cell-Adapted Infectious Bursal Disease Virus

    PubMed Central

    Hui, Raymond K.; Leung, Frederick C.

    2015-01-01

    RNA-Seq was used to unveil the transcriptional profile of DF-1 cells at the early stage of caIBDV infection. Total RNAs were extracted from virus-infected cells at 0, 6 and 12 hpi. RNA-Seq datasets of respective samples mapped to 56.5–57.6% of isoforms in the reference genome Galgal4.73. At 6 hpi, 23 isoforms underwent an elevated expression, while 128 isoforms were up-regulated and 5 were down-regulated at 12 hpi in the virus-infected group. Besides, 10 isoforms were exclusively expressed in the virus-infected cells. Though no significant change was detected in cytokine and interferon expression levels at the first 12 hours of infection, modulations of the upstream regulators were observed. In addition to the reported regulatory factors including EIF2AK2, MX, OAS*A, GBP7 and IFIT, IBDV infection also triggered a IFIT5-IRF1/3-RSAD5 pathway in the DF-1 cells which potentially restricted the viral replication cycle in the early infection stage. Over-expression of LIPA and CH25H, together with the suppression of STARD4, LSS and AACS genes implied a modulation of membrane fluidity and lipid raft arrangement in the infected cells. Alternative splicing of the EFR3 homolog A gene was also through to be involved in the lipid membrane regulation, and these cumulative responses projected an inhibition of viral endocytosis. Recognition of viral RNA genomes and intermediates was presumably enhanced by the elevated levels of IFIH1, DHX58 and TRIM25 genes which possess properties on detecting viral dsRNA. On the other hand, the caIBDV arrested the host's apoptotic process by inducing the expression of apoptosis inhibitors including NFKBIA/Z, TNFAIP2/3 and ITA at the first 12 hours of infection. In conclusion, the differential expression landscape demonstrated with RNA-Seq provides a comprehensive picture on the molecular interactions between host cells and virus at the early stage of infection. PMID:26053856

  12. Evaluation of anticoccidial drugs in chicken embryos.

    PubMed

    Xie, M Q; Fukata, T; Gilbert, J M; McDougald, L R

    1991-01-01

    Infections of Eimeria tenella in chicken embryos were used to compare the anticoccidial activity of ten drugs. The minimal inhibitory concentration (MIC) and minimal toxic concentration (MTC) were affected by the time of inoculation into the embryos and by the chemical nature of the compounds. Some compounds (nicarbazin, amprolium) had no effect on the development of coccidia when they were injected into embryos after the day of infection. Drugs that act early in the life cycle of coccidia (robenidine, clopidol, decoquinate, diclazuril, halofuginone, monensin, salinomycin, and lasalocid) were active at 5-125 micrograms/embryo when they were injected on the day of infection. The ionophores and halofuginone were highly toxic to embryos; most synthetic compounds were nontoxic. The incubation of merozoites in drug suspensions prior to the infection of embryos did not result in embryo toxicity, but the resultant MICs were much higher than those obtained when drugs were injected directly into the embryos. Several products were essentially inactive. Neither nicarbazin nor amprolium prevented oocyst formation. The widely divergent endpoints for the MIC and MTC of anticoccidials in embryos seriously limits the application of this technique as a screen for anticoccidial drugs. PMID:1792230

  13. Identification of the Zinc Finger Protein ZRANB2 as a Novel Maternal Lipopolysaccharide-binding Protein That Protects Embryos of Zebrafish against Gram-negative Bacterial Infections.

    PubMed

    Wang, Xia; Du, Xiaoyuan; Li, Hongyan; Zhang, Shicui

    2016-02-19

    Zinc finger ZRANB2 proteins are widespread in animals, but their functions and mechanisms remain poorly defined. Here we clearly demonstrate that ZRANB2 is a newly identified LPS-binding protein present abundantly in the eggs/embryos of zebrafish. We also show that recombinant ZRANB2 (rZRANB2) acts as a pattern recognition receptor capable of identifying the bacterial signature molecule LPS as well as binding the Gram-negative bacteria Escherichia coli, Vibrio anguilarum, and Aeromonas hydrophila and functions as an antibacterial effector molecule capable of directly killing the bacteria. Furthermore, we reveal that N-terminal residues 11-37 consisting of the first ZnF_RBZ domain are indispensable for ZRANB2 antimicrobial activity. Importantly, microinjection of rZRANB2 into early embryos significantly enhanced the resistance of the embryos against pathogenic A. hydrophila challenge, and this enhanced bacterial resistance was markedly reduced by co-injection of anti-ZRANB2 antibody. Moreover, precipitation of ZRANB2 in the embryo extracts by preincubation with anti-ZRANB2 antibody caused a marked decrease in the antibacterial activity of the extracts against the bacteria tested. In addition, the N-terminal peptide Z1/37 or Z11/37 with in vitro antibacterial activity also promoted the resistance of embryos against A. hydrophila, but the peptide Z38/198 without in vitro antibacterial activity did not. Collectively, these results indicate that ZRANB2 is a maternal LPS-binding protein that can protect the early embryos of zebrafish against pathogenic attacks, a novel role ever assigned to ZRANB2 proteins. This work also provides new insights into the immunological function of the zinc finger proteins that are widely distributed in various animals. PMID:26740623

  14. Embryos, microscopes, and society.

    PubMed

    Maienschein, Jane

    2016-06-01

    Embryos have different meanings for different people and in different contexts. Seen under the microscope, the biological embryo starts out as one cell and then becomes a bunch of cells. Gradually these divide and differentiate to make up the embryo, which in humans becomes a fetus at eight weeks, and then eventually a baby. At least, that happens in those cases that carry through normally and successfully. Yet a popular public perception imagines the embryo as already a little person in the very earliest stages of development, as if it were predictably to become an adult. In actuality, cells can combine, pull apart, and recombine in a variety of ways and still produce embryos, whereas most embryos never develop into adults at all. Biological embryos and popular imaginations of embryos diverge. This paper looks at some of the historical reasons for and social implications of that divergence. PMID:26996410

  15. Can Chlamydia abortus be transmitted by embryo transfer in goats?

    PubMed

    Oseikria, M; Pellerin, J L; Rodolakis, A; Vorimore, F; Laroucau, K; Bruyas, J F; Roux, C; Michaud, S; Larrat, M; Fieni, F

    2016-10-01

    The objectives of this study were to determine (i) whether Chlamydia abortus would adhere to or penetrate the intact zona pellucida (ZP-intact) of early in vivo-derived caprine embryos, after in vitro infection; and (ii) the efficacy of the International Embryo Transfer Society (IETS) washing protocol for bovine embryos. Fifty-two ZP-intact embryos (8-16 cells), obtained from 14 donors were used in this experiment. The embryos were randomly divided into 12 batches. Nine batches (ZP-intact) of five embryos were incubated in a medium containing 4 × 10(7)Chlamydia/mL of AB7 strain. After incubation for 18 hours at 37 °C in an atmosphere of 5% CO2, the embryos were washed in batches in 10 successive baths of a phosphate buffer saline and 5% fetal calf serum solution in accordance with IETS guidelines. In parallel, three batches of ZP-intact embryos were used as controls by being subjected to similar procedures but without exposure to C. abortus. The 10 wash baths were collected separately and centrifuged for 1 hour at 13,000 × g. The washed embryos and the pellets of the 10 centrifuged wash baths were frozen at -20 °C before examination for evidence of C. abortus using polymerase chain reaction. C. abortus DNA was found in all of the infected batches of ZP-intact embryos (9/9) after 10 successive washes. It was also detected in the 10th wash fluid for seven batches of embryos, whereas for the two other batches, the last positive wash bath was the eighth and the ninth, respectively. In contrast, none of the embryos or their washing fluids in the control batches were DNA positive. These results report that C. abortus adheres to and/or penetrates the ZP of in vivo caprine embryos after in vitro infection, and that the standard washing protocol recommended by the IETS for bovine embryos, failed to remove it. The persistence of these bacteria after washing makes the embryo a potential means of transmission of the bacterium during embryo transfer from

  16. Detection of reticuloendotheliosis virus by immunohistochemistry and in situ hybridization in experimentally infected Japanese quail embryos and archived formalin-fixed and paraffin-embedded tumours

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Reticuloendotheliosis virus (REV) infection can result in immunosuppression, runting syndrome, high mortality, acute reticulum cell neoplasia, or T- and/or B-cell lymphomas, in a variety of domestic and wild birds. Histopathological changes in REV infection are not sufficient to differentiate it fro...

  17. Mouse Embryo Compaction.

    PubMed

    White, M D; Bissiere, S; Alvarez, Y D; Plachta, N

    2016-01-01

    Compaction is a critical first morphological event in the preimplantation development of the mammalian embryo. Characterized by the transformation of the embryo from a loose cluster of spherical cells into a tightly packed mass, compaction is a key step in the establishment of the first tissue-like structures of the embryo. Although early investigation of the mechanisms driving compaction implicated changes in cell-cell adhesion, recent work has identified essential roles for cortical tension and a compaction-specific class of filopodia. During the transition from 8 to 16 cells, as the embryo is compacting, it must also make fundamental decisions regarding cell position, polarity, and fate. Understanding how these and other processes are integrated with compaction requires further investigation. Emerging imaging-based techniques that enable quantitative analysis from the level of cell-cell interactions down to the level of individual regulatory molecules will provide a greater understanding of how compaction shapes the early mammalian embryo. PMID:27475854

  18. Tribolium embryo morphogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Benton, Matthew A; Pavlopoulos, Anastasios

    2014-01-01

    Development of multicellular organisms depends on patterning and growth mechanisms encoded in the genome, but also on the physical properties and mechanical interactions of the constituent cells that interpret these genetic cues. This fundamental biological problem requires integrated studies at multiple levels of biological organization: from genes, to cell behaviors, to tissue morphogenesis. We have recently combined functional genetics with live imaging approaches in embryos of the insect Tribolium castaneum, in order to understand their remarkable transformation from a uniform single-layered blastoderm into a condensed multi-layered embryo covered by extensive extra-embryonic tissues. We first developed a quick and reliable methodology to fluorescently label various cell components in entire Tribolium embryos. Live imaging of labeled embryos at single cell resolution provided detailed descriptions of cell behaviors and tissue movements during normal embryogenesis. We then compared cell and tissue dynamics between wild-type and genetically perturbed embryos that exhibited altered relative proportions of constituent tissues. This systematic comparison led to a qualitative model of the molecular, cellular and tissue interactions that orchestrate the observed epithelial rearrangements. We expect this work to establish the Tribolium embryo as a powerful and attractive model system for biologists and biophysicists interested in the molecular, cellular and mechanical control of tissue morphogenesis. PMID:24451992

  19. Recommendations for gamete and embryo donation: a committee opinion.

    PubMed

    2013-01-01

    This document provides the latest recommendations for evaluation of potential sperm, oocyte, and embryo donors, incorporating recent information about optimal screening and testing for sexually transmitted infections, genetic diseases, and psychological assessments. This revised document incorporates recent information from the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, the US Food and Drug Administration, and the American Association of Tissue Banks, with which all programs offering gamete and embryo donation services must be thoroughly familiar, and replaces the document titled, "2008 Guidelines for Gamete and Embryo Donation: A Practice Committee Report," last published in Fertil Steril 2008;90:S30-44. PMID:23095142

  20. Impact of EmbryoGlue as the embryo transfer medium.

    PubMed

    Hazlett, William David; Meyer, Liza R; Nasta, Tricia E; Mangan, Patricia A; Karande, Vishvanath C

    2008-07-01

    Routine use of EmbryoGlue did not significantly improve pregnancy or implantation rates in nonselected patients receiving either a day 3 or day 5 embryo transfer compared with standard culture media. Future prospective randomized studies need to be performed to determine whether EmbryoGlue is beneficial in a selected patient population. PMID:17765233

  1. [Apoptosis during embryo development].

    PubMed

    Jezek, Davor; Kozina, Viviana

    2009-10-01

    The development of human embryo includes two essential processes, i.e., rapid mitotic activity of cells and gradual differentiation of tissues and organs. The latter process is very often characterized by extensive migration of cells from their site of origin to the site of definitive location, inductive action of the neighboring germ layers and programmed cell death (apoptosis). This paper describes examples of proliferative and apoptotic processes during the development of human embryo. The development of trilaminar germ disk, skin, gonads, central and peripheral nerve system as well as limbs provides instructive examples of how apoptosis regulates the development and differentiation of cells. PMID:19999545

  2. The First Human Cloned Embryo.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cibelli, Jose B.; Lanza, Robert P.; West, Michael D.; Ezzell, Carol

    2002-01-01

    Describes a process known as parthenogenesis which produces cloned, early-stage embryos and human embryos generated only from eggs. Speculates that this technology puts therapeutic cloning within reach. (DDR)

  3. The Virtual Embryo Project

    EPA Science Inventory

    The v-Embryo™ is a far reaching new research program at the US EPA to develop a working computer model of a mammalian embryo that can be used to better understand the prenatal risks posed by environmental chemicals and to eventually predict a chemical’s potential developmental to...

  4. Infection.

    PubMed

    Saigal, Gaurav; Nagornaya, Natalya; Post, M Judith D

    2016-01-01

    Imaging is useful in the diagnosis and management of infections of the central nervous system. Typically, imaging findings at the outset of the disease are subtle and nonspecific, but they often evolve to more definite imaging patterns in a few days, with less rapidity than for stroke but faster than for neoplastic lesions. This timing is similar to that of noninfectious inflammatory brain disease, such as multiple sclerosis. Fortunately, imaging patterns help to distinguish the two kinds of processes. Other than for sarcoidosis, the meninges are seldom involved in noninfectious inflammation; in contrast, many infectious processes involve the meninges, which then enhance with contrast on computed tomography (CT) or magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). However, brain infection causes a vast array of imaging patterns. Although CT is useful when hemorrhage or calcification is suspected or bony detail needs to be determined, MRI is the imaging modality of choice in the investigation of intracranial infections. Imaging sequences such as diffusion-weighted imaging help in accurately depicting the location and characterizing pyogenic infections and are particularly useful in differentiating bacterial infections from other etiologies. Susceptibility-weighted imaging is extremely useful for the detection of hemorrhage. Although MR spectroscopy findings can frequently be nonspecific, certain conditions such as bacterial abscesses show a relatively specific spectral pattern and are useful in diagnosing and constituting immediate therapy. In this chapter we review first the imaging patterns associated with involvement of various brain structures, such as the epidural and subdural spaces, the meninges, the brain parenchyma, and the ventricles. Involvement of these regions is illustrated with bacterial infections. Next we illustrate the patterns associated with viral and prion diseases, followed by mycobacterial and fungal infections, to conclude with a review of imaging findings

  5. Embryo Aggregation in Pig Improves Cloning Efficiency and Embryo Quality.

    PubMed

    Buemo, Carla Paola; Gambini, Andrés; Moro, Lucia Natalia; Hiriart, María Inés; Fernández-Martín, Rafael; Collas, Philippe; Salamone, Daniel Felipe

    2016-01-01

    In this study, we analyzed the effects of the cloned embryo aggregation on in vitro embryo development and embryo quality by measuring blastocyst diameter and cell number, DNA fragmentation levels and the expression of genes associated with pluripotency, apoptosis, trophoblast and DNA methylation in the porcine. Zona-free reconstructed cloned embryos were cultured in the well of the well system, placing one (1x non aggregated group) or three (3x group) embryos per microwell. Our results showed that aggregation of three embryos increased blastocyst formation rate and blastocyst diameter of cloned pig embryos. DNA fragmentation levels in 3x aggregated cloned blastocysts were significantly decreased compared to 1x blastocysts. Levels of Oct4, Klf4, Igf2, Bax and Dnmt 1 transcripts were significantly higher in aggregated embryos, whereas Nanog levels were not affected. Transcripts of Cdx2 and Bcl-xl were essentially non-detectable. Our study suggests that embryo aggregation in the porcine may be beneficial for cloned embryo development and embryo quality, through a reduction in apoptotic levels and an improvement in cell reprogramming. PMID:26894831

  6. Embryo Aggregation in Pig Improves Cloning Efficiency and Embryo Quality

    PubMed Central

    Buemo, Carla Paola; Gambini, Andrés; Moro, Lucia Natalia; Hiriart, María Inés; Fernández-Martín, Rafael; Collas, Philippe; Salamone, Daniel Felipe

    2016-01-01

    In this study, we analyzed the effects of the cloned embryo aggregation on in vitro embryo development and embryo quality by measuring blastocyst diameter and cell number, DNA fragmentation levels and the expression of genes associated with pluripotency, apoptosis, trophoblast and DNA methylation in the porcine. Zona-free reconstructed cloned embryos were cultured in the well of the well system, placing one (1x non aggregated group) or three (3x group) embryos per microwell. Our results showed that aggregation of three embryos increased blastocyst formation rate and blastocyst diameter of cloned pig embryos. DNA fragmentation levels in 3x aggregated cloned blastocysts were significantly decreased compared to 1x blastocysts. Levels of Oct4, Klf4, Igf2, Bax and Dnmt 1 transcripts were significantly higher in aggregated embryos, whereas Nanog levels were not affected. Transcripts of Cdx2 and Bcl-xl were essentially non-detectable. Our study suggests that embryo aggregation in the porcine may be beneficial for cloned embryo development and embryo quality, through a reduction in apoptotic levels and an improvement in cell reprogramming. PMID:26894831

  7. Ensoulment and IVF embryos.

    PubMed Central

    Shea, M C

    1987-01-01

    This paper examines the metaphysical question of 'ensoulment' in relation to the theory, put forward in an earlier paper, that human life begins when the newly formed body organs and systems of the embryo begin to function as an organised whole, at which stage there is evidence of a change of nature. Although Roman Catholic theology teaches that a human being is a union of physical body and spiritual soul, it is incorrect to interpret this in a dualistic sense. The meaning of 'soul' is considered and the conclusion reached that although both in the religious context and apart from it abortion is difficult to justify at any stage after conception, it does not follow that the use of 'spare' In Vitro Fertilisation (IVF) embryos should be rejected. If 'ensoulment' does not occur until the new organism functions as a whole then a decision not to make use of IVF embryos for medical purposes would be a heavy responsibility and not a 'safe' way out. PMID:3612702

  8. Real protection for the embryo.

    PubMed

    Mazzoni, Cosimo Marco

    2005-01-01

    This article fundamentally analyses the current protection that the Italian law offers to the embryo. Likewise, the author, contrary to those who are of the opinion that the embryo is a person subject to law, exposes his polemic theory in which he places the embryo within the scope of things. Specifically, he argues that the embryo has a quasi-personal category. In order to justify this, he analyses the moral and legal history of the statute of the embryo, he makes a difference between the biological life and the legal life. The author establishes that the concept of the person has been and will continue to be a very controversial concept, concluding with a study on the Italian legislation in respect to the protection of the embryo. PMID:16385794

  9. Sterilising embryos for transgenic chimaeras.

    PubMed

    Aige-Gil, V; Simkiss, K

    1991-07-01

    1. Experiments were undertaken to attempt to sterilise fowl embryos with ultraviolet light. Such sterilised embryos would be useful as recipients of genetically manipulated germ cells. 2. The germinal crescents of embryos were exposed to a calibrated UV source at stages 4 and 8 to 10 of incubation for 30 s, 3 min and 10 min. Teratological and sterility effects were studied at periods up to 6 d of incubation. 3. Simply exposing embryos by opening the shell produced a number of abnormalities and mortalities. These decreased with the age of the embryo but increased with the dosage of irradiation. 4. Although there was abundant evidence for UV-induced cell damage, the sterility of the embryos was usually less than 75%. PMID:1893258

  10. Gender determination of avian embryo

    DOEpatents

    Daum, Keith A.; Atkinson, David A.

    2002-01-01

    Disclosed is a method for gender determination of avian embryos. During the embryo incubation process, the outer hard shells of eggs are drilled and samples of allantoic fluid are removed. The allantoic fluids are directly introduced into an ion mobility spectrometer (IMS) for analysis. The resulting spectra contain the relevant marker peaks in the positive or negative mode which correlate with unique mobilities which are sex-specific. This way, the gender of the embryo can be determined.

  11. Investigating embryo deaths and hatching failure.

    PubMed

    Rideout, Bruce A

    2012-05-01

    Investigation of all embryo and neonatal mortalities is essential for optimizing productivity in artificial incubation and hand rearing programs. Because artificial incubation is a complex process with many variables, thorough and systematic evaluations are necessary to identify potential problems. Every step of the process from egg lay through incubation and hatching should be evaluated in conjunction with comprehensive data on management of the breeding population. The most common sources of significant problems include nutrition and management of the breeding population, insufficient parental incubation prior to artificial incubation, abnormal egg weight loss during incubation, and infections of the yolk sac or umbilicus. PMID:22640533

  12. Cryopreservation of embryos: an overview.

    PubMed

    Engelmann, Florent

    2011-01-01

    Cryopreservation (liquid nitrogen, -196°C) is the only safe and cost-effective option for long-term -conservation of genetic resources of non-orthodox seed species. Cryopreservation protocols have been developed for various materials including seeds, dormant buds, cell suspensions, calli, apices, zygotic, and somatic embryos of numerous plant species. Zygotic embryos or embryonic axes of almost 100 different species and somatic embryos of almost 40 different species from both temperate and tropical climates, comprising crops, fruit, and forest trees as well as wild species, whose seeds displayed orthodox, intermediate, and recalcitrant storage characteristics, have been successfully cryopreserved. With zygotic embryos and embryonic axes, the desiccation technique has been used with the majority of the species tested, leading to highly variable survival and recovery after freezing, especially during earlier experiments. More recently, new cryopreservation techniques viz. encapsulation-dehydration and vitrification have been employed, leading to generally improved results. With somatic embryos, different cryopreservation methods have been used viz. desiccation, pre-growth-desiccation, encapsulation-dehydration, vitrification, encapsulation-vitrification, and droplet-vitrification. There are also a few examples of the utilisation of slow controlled freezing, which correspond to the earlier experiments performed with somatic embryos. The development and application of cryopreservation is significantly more advanced for somatic embryos, in comparison with zygotic embryos, mainly because of the different origin and characteristics of the species treated. In most cases, zygotic embryos originate from tropical, wild species, for which knowledge and techniques relevant to the development of cryopreservation protocols are limited, or even non-existent. By contrast, somatic embryos are generally produced from cultivated species, which have already been studied extensively

  13. Pollen tubes introduce Raspberry bushy dwarf virus into embryo sacs during fertilization processes.

    PubMed

    Isogai, Masamichi; Yoshida, Tetu; Shimura, Takuya; Yoshikawa, Nobuyuki

    2015-10-01

    We developed a fertilization method in which pollen tubes entered into embryo sacs without any need to contact surrounding female sporophytic cells by using Torenia fournieri (Torenia) plants under the condition of hindering movement of the virus from a stigma, which is the first infection site leading to systemic infection. When RBDV-infected Torenia pollen grains were used for the developed fertilization method, the virus was transmitted to the seeds by pollen tubes germinating from them. On the other hand, no seeds were infected with the virus when Torenia plants were pollinated with healthy Torenia pollen grains in combination with RBDV-infected raspberry pollen grains, which caused the virus infection in the stigma by penetration of their pollen tubes arrested in its style. Our results indicate that vertical transmission of RBDV by pollen occurs in the transport of the virus into embryo sacs by pollen tubes reaching the embryo sacs. PMID:26176979

  14. Metabolomic assessment of embryo viability.

    PubMed

    Uyar, Asli; Seli, Emre

    2014-03-01

    Preimplantation embryo metabolism demonstrates distinctive characteristics associated with the developmental potential of embryos. On this basis, metabolite content of culture media was hypothesized to reflect the implantation potential of individual embryos. This hypothesis was tested in consecutive studies reporting a significant association between culture media metabolites and embryo development or clinical pregnancy. The need for a noninvasive, reliable, and rapid embryo assessment strategy promoted metabolomics studies in vitro fertilization (IVF) in an effort to increase success rates of single embryo transfers. With the advance of analytical techniques and bioinformatics, commercial instruments were developed to predict embryo viability using spectroscopic analysis of surplus culture media. However, despite the initial promising results from proof-of-principal studies, recent randomized controlled trials using commercial instruments failed to show a consistent benefit in improving pregnancy rates when metabolomics is used as an adjunct to morphology. At present, the application of metabolomics technology in clinical IVF laboratory requires the elimination of factors underlying inconsistent findings, when possible, and development of reliable predictive models accounting for all possible sources of bias throughout the embryo selection process. PMID:24515909

  15. Diseases of amphibian eggs and embryos

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Green, D.E.; Converse, K.A.

    2005-01-01

    Amphibians generally are prolific egg producers. In tropical and semi-tropical regions, deposition of eggs may occur year-round or may coincide with rainy seasons, while in temperate regions, deposition of eggs usually occurs immediately after emergence from hibernation. Numbers of eggs produced by each species may vary from a few dozen to thousands. Accordingly, some eggs may be infertile and wastage of embryos is to be expected. Fertility, viability and decomposition of eggs and embryos must be considered before it is assumed that diseases are present. An important consideration in the evaluation of egg masses is the fact that some will contain infertile and non-viable eggs. These infertile and nonviable eggs will undergo decomposition and they may appear similar to eggs that are infected by a pathogen. Evaluation of egg masses and embryos for the presence of disease may require repeated observations in a given breeding season as well as continued monitoring of egg masses during their growth and development and over successive breeding seasons. Amphibian eggs rarely are subjected to a comprehensive health (diagnostic) examination; hence, there is scant literature on the diseases of this life stage. Indeed, the eggs of some North American amphibians have yet to be described. Much basic physiology and normal biomedical baseline data on amphibian eggs is lacking. For example, it is known that the aquatic eggs of some species of shrimp quickly are coated by a protective and commensal bacterium that effectively impedes invasion of the eggs by other environmental organisms and potential pathogens. In the absence of this bacterium, shrimp eggs are rapidly killed by other bacteria and fungi (Green, 2001). The possibility that amphibian eggs also have important symbiotic or commensal bacteria needs to be investigated. Furthermore, the quantity and types of chemicals in the normal gelatinous capsules of amphibian eggs have scarcely been examined. Abnormalities of the

  16. Ethics and embryos.

    PubMed Central

    Poplawski, N; Gillett, G

    1991-01-01

    In this paper we argue that the human form should be seen to exist, in a longitudinal way, throughout the continuum of human growth and development. This entails that the moral value of that form, which we link analytically to the adult, interacting, social and rational being, attaches to all phases of human life to some extent. Having established this we discuss the consequences it has for the moral status of the human embryo. We then apply this argument, and the resulting moral status, to the area of reproductive technology. In doing this we show that there are certain regulations and controls which ought to apply to the use of these infertility treatments. PMID:1870084

  17. Pantropic retroviruses as a transduction tool for sea urchin embryos.

    PubMed

    Core, Amanda B; Reyna, Arlene E; Conaway, Evan A; Bradham, Cynthia A

    2012-04-01

    Sea urchins are an important model for experiments at the intersection of development and systems biology, and technical innovations that enhance the utility of this model are of great value. This study explores pantropic retroviruses as a transduction tool for sea urchin embryos, and demonstrates that pantropic retroviruses infect sea urchin embryos with high efficiency and genomically integrate at a copy number of one per cell. We successfully used a self-inactivation strategy to both insert a sea urchin-specific enhancer and disrupt the endogenous viral enhancer. The resulting self-inactivating viruses drive global and persistent gene expression, consistent with genomic integration during the first cell cycle. Together, these data provide substantial proof of principle for transduction technology in sea urchin embryos. PMID:22431628

  18. Cryobiological preservation of Drosophila embryos

    SciTech Connect

    Mazur, P.; Schreuders, P.D.; Cole, K.W.; Hall, J.W. ); Mahowald, A.P. )

    1992-12-18

    The inability to cryobiologically preserve the fruit fly Drosophila melanogaster has required that fly stocks be maintained by frequent transfer of adults. This method is costly in terms of time and can lead to loss of stocks. Traditional slow freezing methods do not succeed because the embryos are highly sensitive to chilling. With the procedures described here, 68 percent of precisely staged 15-hour Oregon R (wild-type) embryos hatch after vitrification at -205[degree]C, and 40 percent of the resulting larvae develop into normal adult flies. These embryos are among the most complex organisms successfully preserved by cryobiology.

  19. Ion currents in embryo development.

    PubMed

    Tosti, Elisabetta; Boni, Raffaele; Gallo, Alessandra

    2016-03-01

    Ion channels are proteins expressed in the plasma membrane of electrogenic cells. In the zygote and blastomeres of the developing embryo, electrical modifications result from ion currents that flow through these channels. This phenomenon implies that ion current activity exerts a specific developmental function, and plays a crucial role in signal transduction and the control of embryogenesis, from the early cleavage stages and during growth and development of the embryo. This review describes the involvement of ion currents in early embryo development, from marine invertebrates to human, focusing on the occurrence, modulation, and dynamic role of ion fluxes taking place on the zygote and blastomere plasma membrane, and at the intercellular communication between embryo cell stages. Birth Defects Research (Part C) 108:6-18, 2016. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:26989869

  20. Expectant Fathers, Abortion, and Embryos.

    PubMed

    Purvis, Dara E

    2015-01-01

    One thread of abortion criticism, arguing that gender equality requires that men be allowed to terminate legal parental status and obligations, has reinforced the stereotype of men as uninterested in fatherhood. As courts facing disputes over stored pre-embryos weigh the equities of allowing implantation of the pre-embryos, this same gender stereotype has been increasingly incorporated into a legal balancing test, leading to troubling implications for ART and family law. PMID:26242955

  1. Embryo protection in contemporary immunology

    PubMed Central

    Fraune, Sebastian; Augustin, René

    2011-01-01

    Early embryos of many vertebrates and invertebrates develop outside the mother and are exposed to a myriad of potential microbial colonizers. Here we discuss how these embryos are protected from microbial attacks and how they might control and shape their microbiota. In essence we delineate a new role for antimicrobial peptides both in selecting particular bacterial partners during early development and in being important components of a “be prepared” strategy providing transgenerational protection. PMID:21966549

  2. DNA repair in mammalian embryos.

    PubMed

    Jaroudi, Souraya; SenGupta, Sioban

    2007-01-01

    Mammalian cells have developed complex mechanisms to identify DNA damage and activate the required response to maintain genome integrity. Those mechanisms include DNA damage detection, DNA repair, cell cycle arrest and apoptosis which operate together to protect the conceptus from DNA damage originating either in parental gametes or in the embryo's somatic cells. DNA repair in the newly fertilized preimplantation embryo is believed to rely entirely on the oocyte's machinery (mRNAs and proteins deposited and stored prior to ovulation). DNA repair genes have been shown to be expressed in the early stages of mammalian development. The survival of the embryo necessitates that the oocyte be sufficiently equipped with maternal stored products and that embryonic gene expression commences at the correct time. A Medline based literature search was performed using the keywords 'DNA repair' and 'embryo development' or 'gametogenesis' (publication dates between 1995 and 2006). Mammalian studies which investigated gene expression were selected. Further articles were acquired from the citations in the articles obtained from the preliminary Medline search. This paper reviews mammalian DNA repair from gametogenesis to preimplantation embryos to late gestational stages. PMID:17141556

  3. Avian embryos in hypoxic environments.

    PubMed

    León-Velarde, F; Monge-C, C

    2004-08-12

    Avian embryos at high altitude do not benefit of the maternal protection against hypoxia as in mammals. Nevertheless, avian embryos are known to hatch successfully at altitudes between 4,000 and 6,500 m. This review considers some of the processes that bring about the outstanding modifications in the pressure differences between the environment and mitochondria of avian embryos in hypoxic environments. Among species, some maintain normal levels of oxygen consumption ( VO2) have a high oxygen carrying capacity, lower the air cell-arterial pressure difference ( PAO2 - PaO2 ) with a constant pH. Other species decrease VO2, increase only slightly the oxygen carrying capacity, have a higher PAO2 - PaO2 difference than sea-level embryos and lower the PCO2 and pH. High altitude embryos, and those exposed to hypoxia have an accelerated decline of erythrocyte ATP levels during development and an earlier stimulation of 2,3-BPG synthesis. A higher Bohr effect may ensure high tissue PO2 in the presence of the high-affinity hemoglobin. Independently of the strategy used, they serve together to promote suitable rates of development and successful hatching of high altitude birds in hypoxic environments. PMID:15288603

  4. Feminists on the inalienability of human embryos.

    PubMed

    McLeod, Carolyn; Baylis, Francoise

    2006-01-01

    The feminist literature against the commodification of embryos in human embryo research includes an argument to the effect that embryos are "intimately connected" to persons, or morally inalienable from them. We explore why embryos might be inalienable to persons and why feminists might find this view appealing. But, ultimately, as feminists, we reject this view because it is inconsistent with full respect for women's reproductive autonomy and with a feminist conception of persons as relational, embodied beings. Overall, feminists should avoid claims about embryos' being inalienable to persons in arguments for or against the commodification of human embryos. PMID:17111554

  5. Replication-defective vectors of reticuloendotheliosis virus transduce exogenous genes into somatic stem cells of the unincubated chicken embryo

    SciTech Connect

    Bosselman, R.A.; Hsu, R.Y.; Boggs, T.; Hu, S.; Bruszewski, J.; Ou, S.; Souza, L.; Kozar, L.; Martin, F.; Nicolson, M.

    1989-06-01

    Replication-defective vectors derived from reticuloendotheliosis virus were used to transduce exogenous genes into early somatic stem cells of the chicken embryo. One of these vectors transduced and expressed the chicken growth hormone coding sequence. The helper cell line, C3, was used to generate stocks of vector containing about 10/sup 4/ transducing units per ml. Injection of 5- to 20-..mu..l volumes of vector directly beneath the blastoderm of unincubated chicken embryos led to infection of somatic stem cells. Infected embryos and adults contained unrearranged integrated proviral DNAs. Embryos expressed the transduced chicken growth hormone gene and contained high levels of serum growth hormone. Blood, brain, muscle, testis, and semen contained from individuals injected as embryos contained vector DNA. Replication-defective vectors of the reticuloendotheliosis virus transduced exogenous genes into chicken embryonic stem cells in vivo.

  6. 9 CFR 98.16 - The embryo collection unit.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... CERTAIN ANIMAL EMBRYOS AND ANIMAL SEMEN Ruminant and Swine Embryos From Regions Where Rinderpest or Foot-and-Mouth Disease Exists § 98.16 The embryo collection unit. Ruminant and swine embryos may...

  7. 9 CFR 98.16 - The embryo collection unit.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... CERTAIN ANIMAL EMBRYOS AND ANIMAL SEMEN Ruminant and Swine Embryos From Regions Where Rinderpest or Foot-and-Mouth Disease Exists § 98.16 The embryo collection unit. Ruminant and swine embryos may...

  8. 9 CFR 98.16 - The embryo collection unit.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... CERTAIN ANIMAL EMBRYOS AND ANIMAL SEMEN Ruminant and Swine Embryos From Regions Where Rinderpest or Foot-and-Mouth Disease Exists § 98.16 The embryo collection unit. Ruminant and swine embryos may...

  9. 9 CFR 98.16 - The embryo collection unit.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... CERTAIN ANIMAL EMBRYOS AND ANIMAL SEMEN Ruminant and Swine Embryos From Regions Where Rinderpest or Foot-and-Mouth Disease Exists § 98.16 The embryo collection unit. Ruminant and swine embryos may...

  10. 9 CFR 98.16 - The embryo collection unit.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... CERTAIN ANIMAL EMBRYOS AND ANIMAL SEMEN Ruminant and Swine Embryos From Regions Where Rinderpest or Foot-and-Mouth Disease Exists § 98.16 The embryo collection unit. Ruminant and swine embryos may...

  11. Untwisting the Caenorhabditis elegans embryo

    PubMed Central

    Christensen, Ryan Patrick; Bokinsky, Alexandra; Santella, Anthony; Wu, Yicong; Marquina-Solis, Javier; Guo, Min; Kovacevic, Ismar; Kumar, Abhishek; Winter, Peter W; Tashakkori, Nicole; McCreedy, Evan; Liu, Huafeng; McAuliffe, Matthew; Mohler, William; Colón-Ramos, Daniel A; Bao, Zhirong; Shroff, Hari

    2015-01-01

    The nematode Caenorhabditis elegans possesses a simple embryonic nervous system with few enough neurons that the growth of each cell could be followed to provide a systems-level view of development. However, studies of single cell development have largely been conducted in fixed or pre-twitching live embryos, because of technical difficulties associated with embryo movement in late embryogenesis. We present open-source untwisting and annotation software (http://mipav.cit.nih.gov/plugin_jws/mipav_worm_plugin.php) that allows the investigation of neurodevelopmental events in late embryogenesis and apply it to track the 3D positions of seam cell nuclei, neurons, and neurites in multiple elongating embryos. We also provide a tutorial describing how to use the software (Supplementary file 1) and a detailed description of the untwisting algorithm (Appendix). The detailed positional information we obtained enabled us to develop a composite model showing movement of these cells and neurites in an 'average' worm embryo. The untwisting and cell tracking capabilities of our method provide a foundation on which to catalog C. elegans neurodevelopment, allowing interrogation of developmental events in previously inaccessible periods of embryogenesis. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.10070.001 PMID:26633880

  12. Untwisting the Caenorhabditis elegans embryo.

    PubMed

    Christensen, Ryan Patrick; Bokinsky, Alexandra; Santella, Anthony; Wu, Yicong; Marquina-Solis, Javier; Guo, Min; Kovacevic, Ismar; Kumar, Abhishek; Winter, Peter W; Tashakkori, Nicole; McCreedy, Evan; Liu, Huafeng; McAuliffe, Matthew; Mohler, William; Colón-Ramos, Daniel A; Bao, Zhirong; Shroff, Hari

    2015-01-01

    The nematode Caenorhabditis elegans possesses a simple embryonic nervous system with few enough neurons that the growth of each cell could be followed to provide a systems-level view of development. However, studies of single cell development have largely been conducted in fixed or pre-twitching live embryos, because of technical difficulties associated with embryo movement in late embryogenesis. We present open-source untwisting and annotation software (http://mipav.cit.nih.gov/plugin_jws/mipav_worm_plugin.php) that allows the investigation of neurodevelopmental events in late embryogenesis and apply it to track the 3D positions of seam cell nuclei, neurons, and neurites in multiple elongating embryos. We also provide a tutorial describing how to use the software (Supplementary file 1) and a detailed description of the untwisting algorithm (Appendix). The detailed positional information we obtained enabled us to develop a composite model showing movement of these cells and neurites in an 'average' worm embryo. The untwisting and cell tracking capabilities of our method provide a foundation on which to catalog C. elegans neurodevelopment, allowing interrogation of developmental events in previously inaccessible periods of embryogenesis. PMID:26633880

  13. Embryo adoption: Some further considerations.

    PubMed

    Patterson, Colin

    2015-02-01

    Recent discussions of embryo adoption have sought to make sense of the teaching of the Congregation for the Doctrine of the Faith (CDF) document Dignitas personae which appeared to provide a negative judgment on such a practice. This article aims to provide a personalist account of the process of fertilization and implantation that might serve as the basis for the negative judgment of the CDF document. In doing so, it relies upon the idea that a person, including an embryo, is not to be considered in isolation, but always in relation to God and to others. This approach extends the substantialist conceptualizations commonly employed in discussions of this issue. More generally, the article seeks to highlight the value of a personalist re-framing for an understanding of the moral questions surrounding the beginning of life. Lay summary: This article seeks to make sense of what appears to be a clear-cut rejection, set out in the Congregation for the Doctrine of the Faith (CDF) document Dignitas personae, of the proposal for women to "adopt" surplus frozen embryos. It draws upon more recently developed modes of philosophical/theological reasoning to argue that, in human procreation, both fertilization and implantation represent constitutive dimensions of divine creative activity and so must be protected from manipulative technological intervention. Since embryo adoption requires this kind of technology, it makes sense for the Church document not to approve it. PMID:25698841

  14. Embryo adoption: Some further considerations

    PubMed Central

    Patterson, Colin

    2015-01-01

    Recent discussions of embryo adoption have sought to make sense of the teaching of the Congregation for the Doctrine of the Faith (CDF) document Dignitas personae which appeared to provide a negative judgment on such a practice. This article aims to provide a personalist account of the process of fertilization and implantation that might serve as the basis for the negative judgment of the CDF document. In doing so, it relies upon the idea that a person, including an embryo, is not to be considered in isolation, but always in relation to God and to others. This approach extends the substantialist conceptualizations commonly employed in discussions of this issue. More generally, the article seeks to highlight the value of a personalist re-framing for an understanding of the moral questions surrounding the beginning of life. Lay summary: This article seeks to make sense of what appears to be a clear-cut rejection, set out in the Congregation for the Doctrine of the Faith (CDF) document Dignitas personae, of the proposal for women to “adopt” surplus frozen embryos. It draws upon more recently developed modes of philosophical/theological reasoning to argue that, in human procreation, both fertilization and implantation represent constitutive dimensions of divine creative activity and so must be protected from manipulative technological intervention. Since embryo adoption requires this kind of technology, it makes sense for the Church document not to approve it. PMID:25698841

  15. Embryo technologies in the horse.

    PubMed

    Squires, E L; Carnevale, E M; McCue, P M; Bruemmer, J E

    2003-01-01

    Recent studies demonstrated that zwitterionic buffers could be used for satisfactory storage of equine embryos at 5 degrees C. The success of freezing embryos is dependent upon size and stage of development. Morulae and blastocysts <300 microm can be slowly cooled or vitrified with acceptable pregnancy rates after transfer. The majority of equine embryos are collected from single ovulating mares, as there is no commercially available product for superovulation in equine. However, pituitary extract, rich in FSH, can be used to increase embryo recovery three- to four-fold. Similar to human medicine, assisted reproductive techniques have been developed for the older, subfertile mare. Transfer of in vivo-matured oocytes from young, healthy mares into a recipient's oviduct results in a 70-80% pregnancy rate compared with a 30-40% pregnancy rate when the oocytes are from older, subfertile mares. This procedure can also be used to evaluate in vitro maturation systems. In vitro production of embryos is still quite difficult in the horse. However, intracytoplasmic sperm injection (ICSI) has been used to produce several foals. Cleavage rates of 60% and blastocyst rates of 30% have been reported after ICSI of in vitro-matured oocytes. Gamete intrafallopian tube transfer (GIFT) is a possible treatment for subfertile stallions. Transfer of in vivo-matured oocytes with 200,000 sperm into the oviduct of normal mares resulted in a pregnancy rate of 55-82%. Oocyte freezing is a technique that has proven difficult in most species. However, equine oocytes vitrified in a solution of ethylene glycol, DMSO, and Ficoll and loaded onto a cryoloop resulted in three pregnancies of 26 transfers and two live foals produced. Production of a cloned horse appears to be likely, as several cloned pregnancies have recently been produced. PMID:12499026

  16. Muskmelon embryo rescue techniques using in vitro embryo culture.

    PubMed

    Nuñez-Palenius, Hector Gordon; Ramírez-Malagón, Rafael; Ochoa-Alejo, Neftalí

    2011-01-01

    Among the major cucurbit vegetables, melon (Cucumis melo) has one of the greatest polymorphic fruit types and botanical varieties. Some melon fruits have excellent aroma, variety of flesh colors, deeper flavor, and more juice compared to other cucurbits. Despite numerous available melon cultivars, some of them are exceedingly susceptible to several diseases. The genetic background carrying the genes for tolerance and/or resistance for those diseases is found in wild melon landraces. Unfortunately, the commercial melon varieties are not able to produce viable hybrids when crossed with their wild melon counterparts. Plant tissue culture techniques are needed to surpass those genetic barriers. In vitro melon embryo rescue has played a main role to obtain viable hybrids originated from commercial versus wild melon crosses. In this chapter, an efficient and simple embryo rescue melon protocol is thoroughly described. PMID:21207265

  17. Induction of autophagy improves embryo viability in cloned mouse embryos

    PubMed Central

    Shen, XingHui; Zhang, Na; Wang, ZhenDong; Bai, GuangYu; Zheng, Zhong; Gu, YanLi; Wu, YanShuang; Liu, Hui; Zhou, DongJie; Lei, Lei

    2015-01-01

    Autophagy is an essential cellular mechanism that degrades cytoplasmic proteins and organelles to recycle their components. Moreover, autophagy is essential for preimplantation development in mammals. Here we show that autophagy is also important for reprogramming in somatic cell nuclear transfer (SCNT). Our data indicate that unlike fertilized oocytes, autophagy is not triggered in SCNT embryos during 6 hours of activation. Mechanistically, the inhibited autophagic induction during SCNT activation is due to the cytochalasin B (CB) caused depolymerization of actin filaments. In this study, we induced autophagy during SCNT activation by rapamycin and pp242, which could restore the expected level of autophagy and significantly enhance the development of SCNT embryos to the blastocyst stage when compared with the control (68.5% and 68.7% vs. 41.5%, P < 0.05). Furthermore, the treatment of rapamycin and pp242 accelerates active DNA demethylation indicated by the conversion of 5 mC to 5 hmC, and treatment of rapamycin improves degradation of maternal mRNA as well. Thus, our findings reveal that autophagy is important for development of SCNT embryos and inhibited autophagic induction during SCNT activation might be one of the serious causes of low efficiency of SCNT. PMID:26643778

  18. Electroporation into Cultured Mammalian Embryos

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nomura, Tadashi; Takahashi, Masanori; Osumi, Noriko

    Over the last century, mammalian embryos have been used extensively as a common animal model to investigate fundamental questions in the field of developmental biology. More recently, the establishment of transgenic and gene-targeting systems in laboratory mice has enabled researchers to unveil the genetic mechanisms under lying complex developmental processes (Mak, 2007). However, our understanding of cell—cell interactions and their molecular basis in the early stages of mammalian embryogenesis is still very fragmentary. One of the major problems is the difficulty of precise manipulation and limited accessibility to mammalian embryos via uterus wall. Unfortunately, existing tissue and organotypic culture systems per se do not fully recapitulate three-dimensional, dynamic processes of organogenesis observed in vivo. Although transgenic animal technology and virus-mediated gene delivery are useful to manipulate gene expression, these techniques take much time and financial costs, which limit their use.

  19. Zeatin reductase in Phaseolus embryos

    SciTech Connect

    Martin, R.C.; Mok, David, W.S.; Mok, M.C. )

    1989-04-01

    Zeatin was converted to O-xylosylzeatin in embryos of Phaseolus vulgaris . O-xylosyldihydrozeatin was also identified as a zeatin metabolite. Incubation of embryo extracts with {sup 14}C-zeatin and {sup 14}C-O-xylosylzeatin revealed that reduction preceeds the O-xylosylation of zeatin. An enzyme responsible for reducing the N{sup 6}-side chain was isolated and partially purified using ammonium sulfate fractionation and affinity, gel filtration and anion exchange chromatography. The NADPH dependent reductase was zeatin specific and did not recognize cis-zeatin, ribosylzeatin, i{sup 6}Ade or i{sup 6}Ado. Two forms of the reductase could be separated by either gel filtration or anion exchange HPLC. The HMW isozyme (Mr. 55,000) eluted from the anion exchange column later than the LMW isozyme (Mr. 25,000). Interspecific differences in zeatin reductase activity were also detected.

  20. Comparison of static immersion and intravenous injection systems for exposure of zebrafish embryos to the natural pathogen Edwardsiella tarda

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background The zebrafish embryo is an important in vivo model to study the host innate immune response towards microbial infection. In most zebrafish infectious disease models, infection is achieved by micro-injection of bacteria into the embryo. Alternatively, Edwardsiella tarda, a natural fish pathogen, has been used to treat embryos by static immersion. In this study we used transcriptome profiling and quantitative RT-PCR to analyze the immune response induced by E. tarda immersion and injection. Results Mortality rates after static immersion of embryos in E. tarda suspension varied between 25-75%, while intravenous injection of bacteria resulted in 100% mortality. Quantitative RT-PCR analysis on the level of single embryos showed that expression of the proinflammatory marker genes il1b and mmp9 was induced only in some embryos that were exposed to E. tarda in the immersion system, whereas intravenous injection of E. tarda led to il1b and mmp9 induction in all embryos. In addition, microarray expression profiles of embryos subjected to immersion or injection showed little overlap. E. tarda-injected embryos displayed strong induction of inflammatory and defense genes and of regulatory genes of the immune response. E. tarda-immersed embryos showed transient induction of the cytochrome P450 gene cyp1a. This gene was also induced after immersion in Escherichia coli and Pseudomonas aeruginosa suspensions, but, in contrast, was not induced upon intravenous E. tarda injection. One of the rare common responses in the immersion and injection systems was induction of irg1l, a homolog of a murine immunoresponsive gene of unknown function. Conclusions Based on the differences in mortality rates between experiments and gene expression profiles of individual embryos we conclude that zebrafish embryos cannot be reproducibly infected by exposure to E. tarda in the immersion system. Induction of il1b and mmp9 was consistently observed in embryos that had been systemically

  1. Generation and Developmental Characteristics of Porcine Tetraploid Embryos and Tetraploid/diploid Chimeric Embryos

    PubMed Central

    He, Wenteng; Kong, Qingran; Shi, Yongqian; Xie, Bingteng; Jiao, Mingxia; Huang, Tianqing; Guo, Shimeng; Hu, Kui; Liu, Zhonghua

    2013-01-01

    The aim of this study was to optimize electrofusion conditions for generating porcine tetraploid (4n) embryos and produce tetraploid/diploid (4n/2n) chimeric embryos. Different electric field intensities were tested and 2 direct current (DC) pulses of 0.9 kV/cm for 30 μs was selected as the optimum condition for electrofusion of 2-cell embryos to produce 4n embryos. The fusion rate of 2-cell embryos and the development rate to blastocyst of presumably 4n embryos, reached 85.4% and 28.5%, respectively. 68.18% of the fused embryos were found to be 4n as demonstrated by fluorescent in situ hybridization (FISH). Although the number of blastomeres in 4n blastocysts was significantly lower than in 2n blastocysts (P < 0.05), there was no significant difference in developmental rates of blastocysts between 2n and 4n embryos (P > 0.05), suggesting that the blastocyst forming capacity in 4n embryos is similar to those in 2n embryos. Moreover, 4n/2n chimeric embryos were obtained by aggregation of 4n and 2n embryos. We found that the developmental rate and cell number of blastocysts of 4-cell (4n)/4-cell (2n) chimeric embryos were significantly higher than those of 2-cell (4n)/4-cell (2n), 4-cell (4n)/8-cell (2n), 4-cell (4n)/2-cell (2n) chimeric embryos (P < 0.05). Consistent with mouse chimeras, the majority of 4n cells contribute to the trophectoderm (TE), while the 2n cells are mainly present in the inner cell mass (ICM) of porcine 4n/2n chimeric embryos. Our study established a feasible and efficient approach to produce porcine 4n embryos and 4n/2n chimeric embryos. PMID:24120753

  2. Radioactive labeling of proteins in cultured postimplantation mouse embryos. I. Influence of the embryo preparation method

    SciTech Connect

    Nowak, J.; Klose, J. )

    1989-07-01

    Conditions for optimum incorporation of radioactive amino acids into proteins of cultured postimplantation mouse embryos were investigated under the aspect of using these proteins for two-dimensional electrophoretic separations followed by fluorography. The aim was to obtain highly radioactive proteins under conditions as physiological as possible. Embryos at Days 10, 11, and 12 of gestation were prepared in different ways and incubated for 4 h in Tyrode's solution containing ({sup 3}H)amino acids (mixture) at a concentration of 27 microCi/ml medium. The preparations were: (a) yolk sac opened, placenta and blood circulation intact; (b) yolk sac and amnion opened, placenta and blood circulation intact (Day 10 embryos only); (c) placenta, yolk sac, and amnion removed (embryo naked); (d) naked embryos cut randomly into pieces (Day 10 embryos only). After incubation whole embryos or certain parts (tail, liver, rest body) were investigated by determining the radioactivity taken up by the protein. The results are given in dpm per mg protein per embryo. Radioactivity of proteins was about 3 times higher in naked embryos than in embryos left in their yolk sacs. This was true for all three stages investigated. However, the degree of radioactivity in the various parts of naked embryos differed by a factor of 15, whereas radioactivity was evenly distributed in embryos incubated in their yolk sacs. Therefore, embryos prepared according to the first method (see above) fulfilled the conditions required at the best.

  3. Genetic regulation of egg and embryo survival.

    PubMed

    Warner, C M; Cao, W; Exley, G E; McElhinny, A S; Alikani, M; Cohen, J; Scott, R T; Brenner, C A

    1998-06-01

    In both mice and humans, 15-50% of embryos die during the preimplantation period from mechanisms that are largely unknown. Two major criteria predict preimplantation embryo quality, the rate of development and the degree of fragmentation. We review evidence that both of these criteria have a genetic basis. Rate of development and subsequent embryo survival are controlled by a gene, Ped, we discovered in the mouse. Although progress is being made in the search for the human homologue of the mouse Ped gene, it has not yet been identified. Fragmentation, observed in both mouse and human embryos, is probably the result of apoptosis. We analysed transcription of two genes that regulate apoptosis, bcl-2 and bax, and found that both are transcribed in mouse and human preimplantation embryos. Overall, the literature reviewed and new data presented in this paper support the concept that there is a genetic basis for preimplantation egg and embryo survival. PMID:9755423

  4. Heat Shock Memory in Preimplantation Mouse Embryos

    PubMed Central

    Jia, Yanwei; Hartshorn, Cristina; Hartung, Odelya; Wangh, Lawrence J.

    2010-01-01

    To investigate the consequences of possible physiological stress to embryos caused by the in vitro fertilization procedures, we used as a model heat shock response in preimplantation mouse embryos. A heat shock “memory” was discovered that renders cleavage-stage embryos more responsive at the transcriptional level to secondary perturbation with very low doses of heat, even several cell cycles after the initial stress has occurred. PMID:20378108

  5. Vitrification of buffalo oocytes and embryos.

    PubMed

    Parnpai, Rangsun; Liang, Yuanyuan; Ketudat-Cairns, Mariena; Somfai, Tamas; Nagai, Takashi

    2016-07-01

    During the past decade, vitrification has been acknowledged as an efficient alternative to traditional slow-rate freezing in both human and animal embryology. The buffalo is the major milk and meat producing farm animal in many developing countries. Cryopreservation of buffalo oocytes and embryos is very important in preserving this species for future use. This review discusses the recent buffalo oocytes and embryos vitrification procedures, different types of cryoinjuries, and other factors affecting the vitrification of buffalo oocytes and embryos. PMID:27160442

  6. The role of paf in embryo physiology.

    PubMed

    O'Neill, Chris

    2005-01-01

    Embryo-derived paf (1-o-alkyl-2-acetyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphocholine) is produced by de novo synthesis. This synthesis commences soon after fertilization and persists throughout the preimplantation phase. Paf is produced and released by the embryos of all mammalian species studied to date. Its release from the embryo involves binding to extracellular albumin in a manner that protects paf from enzymatic degradation. Released paf causes a range of alterations in maternal physiology, including platelet activation, changes in oviductal, endometrial and maternal immune function. Paf also acts in an autocrine fashion as a trophic/survival factor for the early embryo. In vitro, supplementation of culture media with paf improves embryo development. Embryo-derived paf's autocrine actions are transduced by 1-o-phosphatidylinositol-3-kinase, which induces characteristic calcium transients within the early embryo. The calcium transients require both the influx of external calcium and release of inositol trisphosphate-dependent internal calcium stores. Buffering these transients compromised embryo development in a manner that was reversed by exogenous paf. Assisted reproductive technologies compromise the production of paf by some embryos and retard the expression of the paf receptor. This deprivation of paf's action is one of the factors limiting the survivability of embryos produced by assisted reproductive technologies. Paf is one of several autocrine and paracrine trophic/survival factors that act on the early embryo. These factors probably act cooperatively and may, to some degree, be mutually redundant. As the earliest-released and the best-described embryotrophin, paf provides an important exemplar for understanding the role of ligand-mediated trophic support of the early embryo. PMID:15790601

  7. 9 CFR 98.20 - Embryos refused entry.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 9 Animals and Animal Products 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Embryos refused entry. 98.20 Section... CERTAIN ANIMAL EMBRYOS AND ANIMAL SEMEN Ruminant and Swine Embryos From Regions Where Rinderpest or Foot-and-Mouth Disease Exists § 98.20 Embryos refused entry. If any embryos are determined to be...

  8. 9 CFR 98.20 - Embryos refused entry.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 9 Animals and Animal Products 1 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Embryos refused entry. 98.20 Section... CERTAIN ANIMAL EMBRYOS AND ANIMAL SEMEN Ruminant and Swine Embryos From Regions Where Rinderpest or Foot-and-Mouth Disease Exists § 98.20 Embryos refused entry. If any embryos are determined to be...

  9. 9 CFR 98.20 - Embryos refused entry.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 9 Animals and Animal Products 1 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Embryos refused entry. 98.20 Section... CERTAIN ANIMAL EMBRYOS AND ANIMAL SEMEN Ruminant and Swine Embryos From Regions Where Rinderpest or Foot-and-Mouth Disease Exists § 98.20 Embryos refused entry. If any embryos are determined to be...

  10. 9 CFR 98.20 - Embryos refused entry.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 9 Animals and Animal Products 1 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Embryos refused entry. 98.20 Section... CERTAIN ANIMAL EMBRYOS AND ANIMAL SEMEN Ruminant and Swine Embryos From Regions Where Rinderpest or Foot-and-Mouth Disease Exists § 98.20 Embryos refused entry. If any embryos are determined to be...

  11. 9 CFR 98.20 - Embryos refused entry.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 9 Animals and Animal Products 1 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Embryos refused entry. 98.20 Section... CERTAIN ANIMAL EMBRYOS AND ANIMAL SEMEN Ruminant and Swine Embryos From Regions Where Rinderpest or Foot-and-Mouth Disease Exists § 98.20 Embryos refused entry. If any embryos are determined to be...

  12. Cryopreservation of immature embryos of Theobroma cacao.

    PubMed

    Pence, V C

    1991-06-01

    Immature, white zygotic embryos of Theobroma cacao L. (cacao) retained the ability to produce callus and to undergo somatic embryogenesis after slow hydrated freezing and desiccated fast freezing in liquid nitrogen. The highest rate of somatic embryogenesis occurred in embryos which were precultured on a medium containing 3% sucrose, frozen slowly with cryoprotectants before exposure to liquid nitrogen, and recovered on a medium containing 3 mg/liter NAA. Embryos precultured on media containing sucrose increasing to 21% had a higher rate of survival but were less embryogenic after freezing. These results suggest that immature embryos might be used for long-term germplasm storage of T. cacao germplasm. PMID:24221494

  13. Research on human embryos--a justification.

    PubMed Central

    Brown, J

    1986-01-01

    The philosophical debate surrounding the moral status of the embryo has reached the public arena. The author of this paper examines some of the common arguments against embryo experimentation, including an influential article by Professor Ian Kennedy. He concludes that these arguments do not succeed in demonstrating that the intentional creation of embryos for research purposes is wrong, unless they also succeed in demonstrating that contemporary liberal abortion laws are also wrong. The author also criticises the conclusions of the Warnock Report, and suggests that the reasons for permitting embryo research must be given a wider public audience. PMID:3806632

  14. Risk assessment of transmission of bovine viral diarrhea virus (BVDV) in abattoir-derived in vitro produced embryos.

    PubMed

    Perry, G H

    2007-07-01

    Bovine virus diarrhea virus (BVDV) is a pathogen of the bovine reproductive system causing reduced conception rates, abortions and persistently infected calves. Most if not all strains of BVDV are transmissible by natural mating and AI. For international trade, it is recommended that in vitro fertilized embryos be washed according to the IETS Manual. However, BVDV may not be entirely washed out, resulting in possible transmission risks to recipients. Donor cows, donor bulls and biological agents are all possible sources of contamination. The process for producing in vitro produced (IVP) embryos is complex and non-standard, and some procedures can contribute to spread of BVDV to uninfected embryos. The structure of the zone pellucida (ZP) of IVP embryos permits adherence of BVDV to the ZP. To estimate the risk of producing infected recipients and persistently infected calves from abattoir-derived IVP embryos, a quantitative risk assessment model using Microsoft Excel and Palisade @Risk was developed. Assumptions simplified some of the complexities of the IVP process. Uncertainties due to incomplete or variable data were addressed by incorporating probability distributions in the model. Model variables included: disease prevalence; the number of donor cows slaughtered for ovaries; the number of oocytes collected, selected and cultured; the BVDV status of ovaries, semen, biological compounds and its behavior in the IVP embryo process. The model used the Monte Carlo method to simulate the IVP process. When co-culture cells derived from donor cows of unknown health status were used for in vitro culture (IVC), the probability of a recipient cow at risk of infection to BVDV per oocyte selected for IVP processing averaged 0.0006. However, when co-culture free from BVDV was used, the probability was 1.2 x 10(-5). Thus, for safe international trade in bovine IVP embryos (i.e. negligible risks of transmission of BVDV), co-culture cells, if used during IVC for producing IVP

  15. Biosafety in embryos and semen cryopreservation, storage, management and transport.

    PubMed

    Bielanski, A

    2014-01-01

    This chapter summarizes pertinent procedures, data and opinions on the potential hazards of disease transmission through liquid nitrogen (LN)-cryopreserved and banked germplasm and tissues for somatic cell nuclear transfer (SCNT) The importance of applying internationally adopted sanitary washing procedures to germplasm as a crucial step towards their successful microbial-free cryopreservation and storage is emphasised. Special attention is given to the survival of pathogens in LN, variety of vitrification methods, sterility of LN, risks associated with the use of straws and cryovials, and LN Dewars including dry shippers. It was experimentally demonstrated that cross-contamination between LN and embryos may occur, when infectious agents are present in LN and if embryos are not protected by use of a sealed container. It is important, therefore, to prevent direct contact of germplasm and reproductive tissues with LN during cryopreservation and their storage as a mandatory measure for reducing the risk of contamination. This includes the usage of hermetically sealed high quality shatter proof freezing containers and/or the application of a secondary enclosure such as "double bagging or straw in straw". A periodic disinfection of cryo-Dewars should be considered as an additional precaution to diminish the potential for inadvertent cross-contamination. It would be advisable to use separate LN Dewars to quarantine embryos derived from infected donors of valuable genotypes or from unknown health status, extinction-threatened species. PMID:25091919

  16. Analysis of the Molecular Mechanisms of Reepithelialization in Drosophila Embryos

    PubMed Central

    Matsubayashi, Yutaka; Millard, Tom H.

    2016-01-01

    Significance: The epidermis provides the main barrier function of skin, and therefore its repair following wounding is an essential component of wound healing. Repair of the epidermis, also known as reepithelialization, occurs by collective migration of epithelial cells from around the wound edge across the wound until the advancing edges meet and fuse. Therapeutic manipulation of this process could potentially be used to accelerate wound healing. Recent Advances: It is difficult to analyze the cellular and molecular mechanisms of reepithelialization in human tissue, so a variety of model organisms have been used to improve our understanding of the process. One model system that has been especially useful is the embryo of the fruit fly Drosophila, which provides a simple, accessible model of the epidermis and can be manipulated genetically, allowing detailed analysis of reepithelialization at the molecular level. This review will highlight the key insights that have been gained from studying reepithelialization in Drosophila embryos. Critical Issues: Slow reepithelialization increases the risk of wounds becoming infected and ulcerous; therefore, the development of therapies to accelerate or enhance the process would be a great clinical advance. Improving our understanding of the molecular mechanisms that underlie reepithelialization will help in the development of such therapies. Future Directions: Research in Drosophila embryos has identified a variety of genes and proteins involved in triggering and driving reepithelialization, many of which are conserved in humans. These novel reepithelialization proteins are potential therapeutic targets and therefore findings obtained in Drosophila may ultimately lead to significant clinical advances. PMID:27274434

  17. The evolution of embryo implantation.

    PubMed

    McGowen, Michael R; Erez, Offer; Romero, Roberto; Wildman, Derek E

    2014-01-01

    Embryo implantation varies widely in placental mammals. We review this variation in mammals with a special focus on two features: the depth of implantation and embryonic diapause. We discuss the two major types of implantation depth, superficial and interstitial, and map this character on a well-resolved molecular phylogenetic tree of placental mammals. We infer that relatively deep interstitial implantation has independently evolved at least eight times within placental mammals. Moreover, the superficial type of implantation represents the ancestral state for placental mammals. In addition, we review the genes involved in various phases of implantation, and suggest a future direction in investigating the molecular evolution of implantation-related genes. PMID:25023681

  18. Effects of Fluoxetine on Human Embryo Development.

    PubMed

    Kaihola, Helena; Yaldir, Fatma G; Hreinsson, Julius; Hörnaeus, Katarina; Bergquist, Jonas; Olivier, Jocelien D A; Åkerud, Helena; Sundström-Poromaa, Inger

    2016-01-01

    The use of antidepressant treatment during pregnancy is increasing, and selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors (SSRIs) are the most widely prescribed antidepressants in pregnant women. Serotonin plays a role in embryogenesis, and serotonin transporters are expressed in two-cell mouse embryos. Thus, the aim of the present study was to evaluate whether fluoxetine, one of the most prescribed SSRI antidepressant world-wide, exposure influences the timing of different embryo developmental stages, and furthermore, to analyze what protein, and protein networks, are affected by fluoxetine in the early embryo development. Human embryos (n = 48) were randomly assigned to treatment with 0.25 or 0.5 μM fluoxetine in culture medium. Embryo development was evaluated by time-lapse monitoring. The fluoxetine-induced human embryo proteome was analyzed by shotgun mass spectrometry. Protein secretion from fluoxetine-exposed human embryos was analyzed by use of high-multiplex immunoassay. The lower dose of fluoxetine had no influence on embryo development. A trend toward reduced time between thawing and start of cavitation was noted in embryos treated with 0.5 μM fluoxetine (p = 0.065). Protein analysis by shotgun mass spectrometry detected 45 proteins that were uniquely expressed in fluoxetine-treated embryos. These proteins are involved in cell growth, survival, proliferation, and inflammatory response. Culturing with 0.5 μM, but not 0.25 μM fluoxetine, caused a significant increase in urokinase-type plasminogen activator (uPA) in the culture medium. In conclusion, fluoxetine has marginal effects on the timing of developmental stages in embryos, but induces expression and secretion of several proteins in a manner that depends on dose. For these reasons, and in line with current guidelines, the lowest possible dose of SSRI should be used in pregnant women who need to continue treatment. PMID:27378857

  19. Effects of Fluoxetine on Human Embryo Development

    PubMed Central

    Kaihola, Helena; Yaldir, Fatma G.; Hreinsson, Julius; Hörnaeus, Katarina; Bergquist, Jonas; Olivier, Jocelien D. A.; Åkerud, Helena; Sundström-Poromaa, Inger

    2016-01-01

    The use of antidepressant treatment during pregnancy is increasing, and selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors (SSRIs) are the most widely prescribed antidepressants in pregnant women. Serotonin plays a role in embryogenesis, and serotonin transporters are expressed in two-cell mouse embryos. Thus, the aim of the present study was to evaluate whether fluoxetine, one of the most prescribed SSRI antidepressant world-wide, exposure influences the timing of different embryo developmental stages, and furthermore, to analyze what protein, and protein networks, are affected by fluoxetine in the early embryo development. Human embryos (n = 48) were randomly assigned to treatment with 0.25 or 0.5 μM fluoxetine in culture medium. Embryo development was evaluated by time-lapse monitoring. The fluoxetine-induced human embryo proteome was analyzed by shotgun mass spectrometry. Protein secretion from fluoxetine-exposed human embryos was analyzed by use of high-multiplex immunoassay. The lower dose of fluoxetine had no influence on embryo development. A trend toward reduced time between thawing and start of cavitation was noted in embryos treated with 0.5 μM fluoxetine (p = 0.065). Protein analysis by shotgun mass spectrometry detected 45 proteins that were uniquely expressed in fluoxetine-treated embryos. These proteins are involved in cell growth, survival, proliferation, and inflammatory response. Culturing with 0.5 μM, but not 0.25 μM fluoxetine, caused a significant increase in urokinase-type plasminogen activator (uPA) in the culture medium. In conclusion, fluoxetine has marginal effects on the timing of developmental stages in embryos, but induces expression and secretion of several proteins in a manner that depends on dose. For these reasons, and in line with current guidelines, the lowest possible dose of SSRI should be used in pregnant women who need to continue treatment. PMID:27378857

  20. Embryo development in dairy cattle.

    PubMed

    Lonergan, Pat; Fair, Trudee; Forde, Niamh; Rizos, Dimitrios

    2016-07-01

    During the past 50 years, the fertility of high-producing lactating dairy cows has decreased, associated with intensive selection for increased milk production. The physiological and metabolic changes associated with high milk production, including decreased (glucose, insulin, IGF-I) or increased (nonesterified fatty acids, ketone bodies) concentrations of circulating metabolites during nutrient partitioning associated with negative energy balance as well as uterine and nonuterine diseases have been linked with poor reproductive efficiency. Fertilization is typically above 80% and does not seem to be the principal factor responsible for the low fertility in dairy cows. However, early embryonic development is compromised in high-producing dairy cows, as observed by most embryonic losses occurring during the first 2 weeks after fertilization and may be linked to compromised oocyte quality due to a poor follicular microenvironment, suboptimal reproductive tract environment for the embryo, and/or inadequate maternal-embryonic communication. These and other factors related to embryo development will be discussed. PMID:27158131

  1. Mechanisms of plant embryo development.

    PubMed

    Bai, S; Chen, L; Yund, M A; Sung, Z R

    2000-01-01

    1. Evolution in plants has favored both a simpler body plan with fewer cell types and the epigenetic flexibility to regenerate, via growth, dedifferentiation, and redifferentiation, to recover from environmental insults. It has become increasingly apparent that a plant cell uses external signals to differentiate and to maintain or to change the differentiated state. A cell-cell signaling and positional information strategy seems to be the predominant mechanism employed in plant development. 2. An axis can be initiated by physical/chemical forces such as light and ion current, requiring no new gene action. Random chemical fluctuations and physicochemical forces could explain the initiation of differences among cells of equal developmental potential. Amplification of chemical polarizing events may lead to biochemical differences, new gene expression, and finally shoot/root axis establishment. 3. Radial and axial patterning may be governed by a mechanism involving polar auxin transport. 4. Because the meristems and the three fundamental tissues formed during embryogenesis are renewed and extended throughout the life of the plant, with some exceptions, most genes expressed in the embryo are also expressed during postgermination development. 5. Embryogenic competence is acquired during reproductive development. While the zygote is determined for embryogenesis, the developing embryo and often the seedling remain embryogenic. Embryogenic potential declines during vegetative development. The embryogenic strength of a tissue is correlated with its developmental distance from the zygote. PMID:10948450

  2. Embryo Disposition Disputes: Controversies and Case Law.

    PubMed

    Cohen, I Glenn; Adashi, Eli Y

    2016-07-01

    When prospective parents use in vitro fertilization, many of them hope to generate more embryos than they intend to implant immediately. The technology often requires multiple attempts to reach a successful pregnancy, and couples can cryopreserve any excess embryos so that they have them on hand for later attempts. As part of obtaining informed consent for IVF or cryopreservation, clinics typically ask patients to specify their preferences for the embryos in the event of divorce or death, offering options such as use of the embryos by a specified partner, donation to research, or discarding the remaining embryos. Still, many courts face a recurring problem: the partners dissolve their relationship (typically through divorce), and one party wants to use the frozen embryos over the objections of the other. Courts and legislatures have struggled with how to handle these cases, which seem to pit one partner's right to procreate against the other's right not to procreate. In this essay, we use one of the most recent decisions in this line of cases-the Appellate Court of Illinois's decision in Szafranski v. Dunston-to explain the current state of the law and make recommendations for changes. The issue is ripe for revisiting because in the last year, embryo disputes have become a battlefront for larger conflagrations over the moral status of embryos. PMID:27417864

  3. The Virtual Embryo Project (v-Embryo™)

    EPA Science Inventory

    The v-Embryo is a far reaching new research program at the US EPA to develop a working computer model of a mammalian embryo that can be used to better understand the prenatal risks posed by environmental chemicals and to eventually predict a chemical's potential developmental tox...

  4. Neural network classification of sweet potato embryos

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Molto, Enrique; Harrell, Roy C.

    1993-05-01

    Somatic embryogenesis is a process that allows for the in vitro propagation of thousands of plants in sub-liter size vessels and has been successfully applied to many significant species. The heterogeneity of maturity and quality of embryos produced with this technique requires sorting to obtain a uniform product. An automated harvester is being developed at the University of Florida to sort embryos in vitro at different stages of maturation in a suspension culture. The system utilizes machine vision to characterize embryo morphology and a fluidic based separation device to isolate embryos associated with a pre-defined, targeted morphology. Two different backpropagation neural networks (BNN) were used to classify embryos based on information extracted from the vision system. One network utilized geometric features such as embryo area, length, and symmetry as inputs. The alternative network utilized polar coordinates of an embryo's perimeter with respect to its centroid as inputs. The performances of both techniques were compared with each other and with an embryo classification method based on linear discriminant analysis (LDA). Similar results were obtained with all three techniques. Classification efficiency was improved by reducing the dimension of the feature vector trough a forward stepwise analysis by LDA. In order to enhance the purity of the sample selected as harvestable, a reject to classify option was introduced in the model and analyzed. The best classifier performances (76% overall correct classifications, 75% harvestable objects properly classified, homogeneity improvement ratio 1.5) were obtained using 8 features in a BNN.

  5. Human stem cell ethics: beyond the embryo.

    PubMed

    Sugarman, Jeremy

    2008-06-01

    Human embryonic stem cell research has elicited powerful debates about the morality of destroying human embryos. However, there are important ethical issues related to stem cell research that are unrelated to embryo destruction. These include particular issues involving different types of cells used, the procurement of such cells, in vivo use of stem cells, intellectual property, and conflicts of interest. PMID:18522846

  6. IN VITRO CULTURE OF POSTIMPLANTATION HAMSTER EMBRYOS

    EPA Science Inventory

    In vitro culture of intact rat and mouse embryos has been described extensively, but information on the culture of other species is sparse. The present study examined some culture requirements of early somite stage hamster embryos and assessed the embryotoxic effects of sodium sa...

  7. Intrauterine embryo transfer with canine embryos cryopreserved by the slow freezing and the Cryotop method

    PubMed Central

    HORI, Tatsuya; USHIJIMA, Hitoshi; KIMURA, Taku; KOBAYASHI, Masanori; KAWAKAMI, Eiichi; TSUTSUI, Toshihiko

    2016-01-01

    Canine embryos (8-cell to blastocyst stages) frozen-thawed using the slow-freezing method with glycerol (four recipients) or dimethyl sulfoxide (three recipients) as a cryoprotectant and vitrified-warmed using the Cryotop method (five recipients) were surgically transferred into the unilateral uterine horn of recipient bitches. As a result, the morphology of embryos frozen-thawed using the slow-freezing method was judged to be normal, but no conception occurred in any of the recipient bitches. Two of the five bitches that received transferred embryos (morula to early blastocyst stages) vitrified-warmed using the Cryotop method became pregnant and produced normal pups (1/9 embryos, 11.1% and 1/6 embryos, 17.0%). It was concluded that the Cryotop method was more appropriate for canine embryo cryopreservation than the slow-freezing method, which is used for the cryopreservation of embryos of other mammalian species. PMID:27041356

  8. Intrauterine embryo transfer with canine embryos cryopreserved by the slow freezing and the Cryotop method.

    PubMed

    Hori, Tatsuya; Ushijima, Hitoshi; Kimura, Taku; Kobayashi, Masanori; Kawakami, Eiichi; Tsutsui, Toshihiko

    2016-08-01

    Canine embryos (8-cell to blastocyst stages) frozen-thawed using the slow-freezing method with glycerol (four recipients) or dimethyl sulfoxide (three recipients) as a cryoprotectant and vitrified-warmed using the Cryotop method (five recipients) were surgically transferred into the unilateral uterine horn of recipient bitches. As a result, the morphology of embryos frozen-thawed using the slow-freezing method was judged to be normal, but no conception occurred in any of the recipient bitches. Two of the five bitches that received transferred embryos (morula to early blastocyst stages) vitrified-warmed using the Cryotop method became pregnant and produced normal pups (1/9 embryos, 11.1% and 1/6 embryos, 17.0%). It was concluded that the Cryotop method was more appropriate for canine embryo cryopreservation than the slow-freezing method, which is used for the cryopreservation of embryos of other mammalian species. PMID:27041356

  9. Physiological and molecular determinants of embryo implantation

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Shuang; Lin, Haiyan; Kong, Shuangbo; Wang, Shumin; Wang, Hongmei; Wang, Haibin; Armant, D. Randall

    2014-01-01

    Embryo implantation involves the intimate interaction between an implantation-competent blastocyst and a receptive uterus, which occurs in a limited time period known as the window of implantation. Emerging evidence shows that defects originating during embryo implantation induce ripple effects with adverse consequences on later gestation events, highlighting the significance of this event for pregnancy success. Although a multitude of cellular events and molecular pathways involved in embryo-uterine crosstalk during implantation have been identified through gene expression studies and genetically engineered mouse models, a comprehensive understanding of the nature of embryo implantation is still missing. This review focuses on recent progress with particular attention to physiological and molecular determinants of blastocyst activation, uterine receptivity, blastocyst attachment and uterine decidualization. A better understanding of underlying mechanisms governing embryo implantation should generate new strategies to rectify implantation failure and improve pregnancy rates in women. PMID:23290997

  10. Embryo technology: implications for fertility in cattle.

    PubMed

    Greve, T; Callesen, H

    2005-04-01

    During the past thirty years, basic and experimental studies on classical (superovulation; non-surgical recovery and transfer of cattle embryos) and advanced embryo technologies (in vitro embryo production; cloning by somatic cell nuclear transfer) have generated structural and functional information on oocyte development and quality, fertilisation and conceptus development. This information has provided new insight, not only into these technologies per se but also into the factors contributing to fertility in cattle. It is now known that the peripheral and follicular endocrine profiles have a profound influence on the subsequent developmental competence of the embryo. It is also well established that manipulation of the oocytes or embryos may adversely affect embryonic and foetal development, leading to the so-called 'large offspring syndrome'. Information from such studies has alerted scientists to the importance of epigenetics in cattle reproduction. PMID:16110905

  11. Undernutrition affects embryo quality of superovulated ewes.

    PubMed

    Abecia, J A; Forcada, F; Palacín, I; Sánchez-Prieto, L; Sosa, C; Fernández-Foren, A; Meikle, A

    2015-02-01

    To determine the effect of undernutrition on embryo production and quality in superovulated sheep, 45 ewes were allocated into two groups to be fed diets that provided 1.5 (control, C; n = 20) or 0.5 (low nutrition, L; n = 25) times daily requirements for maintenance, from oestrous synchronization with intravaginal sponges to embryo collection. Embryos were collected 7 days after the onset of oestrus (day 0). Low nutrition resulted in lower live weight and body condition at embryo collection (P < 0.05). Diet (P < 0.01) and day of sampling (P < 0.001) significantly affected plasma non-esterified fatty acid (NEFA) and insulin concentrations. Plasma leptin concentrations decreased on day 7 only in L ewes. A significant effect of dietary treatment (P < 0.05) and day (P < 0.0001) was observed on plasma insulin-like growth factor (IGF)-I concentrations. The number of recovered oocytes and embryos did not differ between the groups (L: 15.4 ± 0.4; C: 12.4 ± 0.4). Recovery rate was lower (P < 0.05) in the L (60%) than in the C group (73%). The total number of embryos and number of viable-transferable embryos (5.0 ± 0.3 and 3.4 ± 0.3 embryos, respectively) of the L group were lower (P < 0.1) when compared with controls (8.4 ± 0.4 and 6.2 ± 0.4 embryos, respectively). Undernutrition during the period of superovulation and early embryonic development reduced total and viable number of embryos. These effects might be mediated by disruption of endocrine homeostasis, oviduct environment and/or oocyte quality. PMID:24103562

  12. Evaluating recipient and embryo factors that affect pregnancy rates of embryo transfer in beef cattle.

    PubMed

    Spell, A R; Beal, W E; Corah, L R; Lamb, G C

    2001-07-15

    The objectives of this experiment were to determine the effects of corpus luteum characteristics, progesterone concentration, donor-recipient synchrony, embryo quality, type, and developmental stage on pregnancy rates after embryo transfer. We synchronized 763 potential recipients for estrus using one of two synchronization protocols: two doses of PGF2alpha (25 mg i.m.) given 11 d apart (Location 1); and, a single norgestomet implant for 7 d with one dose of PGF2alpha (25 mg i.m.) 24 h before implant removal (Location 2). At embryo transfer, ovaries were examined by rectal palpation and ultrasonography. Of the 526 recipients presented for embryo transfer, 122 received a fresh embryo and 326 received a frozen embryo. Pregnancy rates were greater (P < 0.05) with fresh embryos (83%) than frozen-thawed embryos (69%). Pregnancy rates were not affected by embryo grade, embryo stage, donor-recipient synchrony, or the palpated integrity of the CL. Corpus luteum diameter and luteal tissue volume increased as days post-estrus for the recipients increased. However, pregnancy rates did not differ among recipients receiving embryos 6.5 to 8.5 days after estrus (P > 0.1). There was a significant, positive simple correlation between CL diameter or luteal tissue volume and plasma progesterone concentration (r = 0.15, P < 0.01 and r = 0.18, P < 0.01, respectively). There were no significant differences in mean CL diameter, luteal volume or plasma progesterone concentration among recipients that did or did not become pregnant after embryo transfer. We conclude that suitability of a potential embryo transfer recipient is determined by observed estrus and a palpable corpus luteum, regardless of size or quality. PMID:11480620

  13. Genetic Analysis of Human Preimplantation Embryos.

    PubMed

    Garcia-Herrero, S; Cervero, A; Mateu, E; Mir, P; Póo, M E; Rodrigo, L; Vera, M; Rubio, C

    2016-01-01

    Preimplantation development comprises the initial stages of mammalian development, before the embryo implants into the mother's uterus. In normal conditions, after fertilization the embryo grows until reaching blastocyst stage. The blastocyst grows as the cells divide and the cavity expands, until it arrives at the uterus, where it "hatches" from the zona pellucida to implant into the uterine wall. Nevertheless, embryo quality and viability can be affected by chromosomal abnormalities, most of which occur during gametogenesis and early embryo development; human embryos produced in vitro are especially vulnerable. Therefore, the selection of chromosomally normal embryos for transfer in assisted reproduction can improve outcomes in poor-prognosis patients. Additionally, in couples with an inherited disorder, early diagnosis could prevent pregnancy with an affected child and would, thereby, avoid the therapeutic interruption of pregnancy. These concerns have prompted advancements in the use of preimplantation genetic diagnosis (PGD). Genetic testing is applied in two different scenarios: in couples with an inherited genetic disorder or carriers of a structural chromosomal abnormality, it is termed PGD; in infertile couples with increased risk of generating embryos with de novo chromosome abnormalities, it is termed preimplantation genetic screening, or PGS. PMID:27475859

  14. Characterization of embryo-specific genes

    SciTech Connect

    Sung, Z.R.

    1988-01-01

    The objective of the proposed research is to characterize the structure and function of a set of genes whose expression is regulated in embryo development, and that are not expressed in mature tissues -- the embryogenic genes. In order to isolate these genes, we immunized a rabbit with total extracts of somatic embryos of carrot, and enriched the anti-embryo antiserum for antibodies reacting with extracts of carrot somatic embryos. Using this enriched antiserum, we screened a lambda gt11 cDNA library constructed from embryo poly A{sup +} RNA, and isolated 10 cDNA clones that detect embryogenic mRNAs. Monospecific antibodies have been purified for proteins corresponding to each cDNA sequence. Four cDNA clones were further characterized in terms of the expression of their corresponding mRNA and protein in somatic embryos of carrot. In some cases, comparable gene sequences or products have been detected in somatic and zygotic embryos of other plant species. The characteristics of these 4 cDNA clones -- clone Nos. 8, 59, and 66 -- are described in this report. 3 figs.

  15. Permanent embryo arrest: molecular and cellular concepts.

    PubMed

    Betts, D H; Madan, P

    2008-08-01

    Developmental arrest is one of the mechanisms responsible for the elevated levels of embryo demise during the first week of in vitro development. Approximately 10-15% of IVF embryos permanently arrest in mitosis at the 2- to 4-cell cleavage stage showing no indication of apoptosis. Reactive oxygen species (ROS) are implicated in this process and must be controlled in order to optimize embryo production. A stress sensor that can provide a key understanding of permanent cell cycle arrest and link ROS with cellular signaling pathway(s) is p66Shc, an adaptor protein for apoptotic-response to oxidative stress. Deletion of the p66Shc gene in mice results in extended lifespan, which is linked to their enhanced resistance to oxidative stress and reduced levels of apoptosis. p66Shc has been shown to generate mitochondrial H(2)O(2) to trigger apoptosis, but may also serve as an integration point for many signaling pathways that affect mitochondrial function. We have detected elevated levels of p66Shc and ROS within arrested embryos and believe that p66Shc plays a central role in regulating permanent embryo arrest. In this paper, we review the cellular and molecular aspects of permanent embryo arrest and speculate on the mechanism(s) and etiology of this method of embryo demise. PMID:18511487

  16. In-vivo Centrifugation of Drosophila Embryos

    PubMed Central

    Tran, Susan L.; Welte, Michael A.

    2010-01-01

    A major strategy for purifying and isolating different types of intracellular organelles is to separate them from each other based on differences in buoyant density. However, when cells are disrupted prior to centrifugation, proteins and organelles in this non-native environment often inappropriately stick to each other. Here we describe a method to separate organelles by density in intact, living Drosophila embryos. Early embryos before cellularization are harvested from population cages, and their outer egg shells are removed by treatment with 50% bleach. Embryos are then transferred to a small agar plate and inserted, posterior end first, into small vertical holes in the agar. The plates containing embedded embryos are centrifuged for 30 min at 3000g. The agar supports the embryos and keeps them in a defined orientation. Afterwards, the embryos are dug out of the agar with a blunt needle. Centrifugation separates major organelles into distinct layers, a stratification easily visible by bright-field microscopy. A number of fluorescent markers are available to confirm successful stratification in living embryos. Proteins associated with certain organelles will be enriched in a particular layer, demonstrating colocalization. Individual layers can be recovered for biochemical analysis or transplantation into donor eggs. This technique is applicable for organelle separation in other large cells, including the eggs and oocytes of diverse species. PMID:20613707

  17. Glassfrog embryos hatch early after parental desertion.

    PubMed

    Delia, Jesse R J; Ramírez-Bautista, Aurelio; Summers, Kyle

    2014-06-22

    Both parental care and hatching plasticity can improve embryo survival. Research has found that parents can alter hatching time owing to a direct effect of care on embryogenesis or via forms of care that cue the hatching process. Because parental care alters conditions critical for offspring development, hatching plasticity could allow embryos to exploit variation in parental behaviour. However, this interaction of parental care and hatching plasticity remains largely unexplored. We tested the hypothesis that embryos hatch early to cope with paternal abandonment in the glassfrog Hyalinobatrachium fleischmanni (Centrolenidae). We conducted male-removal experiments in a wild population, and examined embryos' response to conditions with and without fathers. Embryos hatched early when abandoned, but extended development in the egg stage when fathers continued care. Paternal care had no effect on developmental rate. Rather, hatching plasticity was due to embryos actively hatching at different developmental stages, probably in response to deteriorating conditions without fathers. Our experimental results are supported by a significant correlation between the natural timing of abandonment and hatching in an unmanipulated population. This study demonstrates that embryos can respond to conditions resulting from parental abandonment, and provides insights into how variation in care can affect selection on egg-stage adaptations. PMID:24789892

  18. Glassfrog embryos hatch early after parental desertion

    PubMed Central

    Delia, Jesse R. J.; Ramírez-Bautista, Aurelio; Summers, Kyle

    2014-01-01

    Both parental care and hatching plasticity can improve embryo survival. Research has found that parents can alter hatching time owing to a direct effect of care on embryogenesis or via forms of care that cue the hatching process. Because parental care alters conditions critical for offspring development, hatching plasticity could allow embryos to exploit variation in parental behaviour. However, this interaction of parental care and hatching plasticity remains largely unexplored. We tested the hypothesis that embryos hatch early to cope with paternal abandonment in the glassfrog Hyalinobatrachium fleischmanni (Centrolenidae). We conducted male-removal experiments in a wild population, and examined embryos' response to conditions with and without fathers. Embryos hatched early when abandoned, but extended development in the egg stage when fathers continued care. Paternal care had no effect on developmental rate. Rather, hatching plasticity was due to embryos actively hatching at different developmental stages, probably in response to deteriorating conditions without fathers. Our experimental results are supported by a significant correlation between the natural timing of abandonment and hatching in an unmanipulated population. This study demonstrates that embryos can respond to conditions resulting from parental abandonment, and provides insights into how variation in care can affect selection on egg-stage adaptations. PMID:24789892

  19. [Parasitic infections in pregnancy and congenital parasitoses. II. Helminth infections].

    PubMed

    Bialek, R; Knobloch, J

    1999-01-01

    The main sequela of helminthic infections is anemia, causing increased perinatal mortality and morbidity worldwide. During pregnancy symptomatic treatment is usually sufficient to control the disease. The specific and very effective treatment with albendazole, mebendazole, ivermectin and praziquantel has embryo-, fetotoxic, mutagenic and teratogenic potential. Therefore, it should be delayed until after delivery. In some cases immediate specific therapy might be mandatory. Congenital helminthic infection in humans is a rarely described event. PMID:10448707

  20. Vitrification-based cryopreservation of Drosophila embryos

    SciTech Connect

    Schreuders, P.D.; Mazur, P.

    1994-12-31

    Currently, over 30,000 strains of Drosophila melanogaster are maintained by geneticists through regular transfer of breeding stocks. A more cost effective solution is to cryopreserve their embryos. Cooling and warming rates >10,000{degrees}C/min. are required to prevent chilling injury. To avoid the lethal intracellular ice normally produced at such high cooling rates, it is necessary to use {ge}50% (w/w) concentrations of glass-inducing solutes to vitrify the embryos. Differential scanning calorimetry (DSC) is used to develop and evaluate ethylene glycol and polyvinyl pyrrolidone based vitrification solutions. The resulting solution consists of 8.5M ethylene glycol + 10% polyvinylpyrrolidone in D-20 Drosophila culture medium. A two stage method is used for the introduction and concentration of these solutes within the embryo. The method reduces the exposure time to the solution and, consequently, reduces toxicity. Both DSC and freezing experiments suggest that, while twelve-hour embryos will vitrify using cooling rates >200{degrees}C/min., they will devitrify and be killed with even moderately rapid warming rates of {approximately}1,900{degrees}C/min. Very rapid warming ({approximately}100,000{degrees}C/min.) results in variable numbers of successfully cryopreserved embryos. This sensitivity to warming rite is typical of devitrification. The variability in survival is reduced using embryos of a precisely determined embryonic stage. The vitrification of the older, fifteen-hour, embryos yields an optimized hatching rate of 68%, with 35 - 40% of the resulting larvae developing to normal adults. This Success rite in embryos of this age may reflect a reduced sensitivity to limited devitrification or a more even distribution of the ethylene glycol within the embryo.

  1. Deep cytoplasmic rearrangements in ventralized Xenopus embryos

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brown, E. E.; Denegre, J. M.; Danilchik, M. V.

    1993-01-01

    Following fertilization in Xenopus, dramatic rearrangements of the egg cytoplasm relocalize maternally synthesized egg components. During the first cell cycle the vegetal yolk mass rotates relative to the egg surface, toward the sperm entry point (SEP) (J. P. Vincent, G. F. Oster, and J. C. Gerhart, 1986, Dev. Biol. 113, 484-500), while concomitant deep cytoplasmic rearrangements occur in the animal hemisphere (M. V. Danilchik and J. M. Denegre, 1991, Development 111, 845-856). In this paper we examine the role of vegetal yolk mass rotation in producing the animal cytoplasmic rearrangements. We inhibited rotation by uv-irradiating embryos during the first cell cycle, a treatment that yields an extremely ventralized phenotype. Both uv-irradiated embryos and unirradiated control embryos show cytoplasmic rearrangements in the animal hemisphere during the first cell cycle. Cytoplasmic rearrangements on the SEP side of the embryo associated with the path of the sperm pronucleus, plus a swirl on the anti-SEP (dorsal) side, are seen, whether or not yolk mass rotation has occurred. This result suggests a role for the expanding sperm aster in directing animal hemisphere cytoplasmic movements. In unirradiated control embryos the anti-SEP (dorsal) swirl is larger than that in uv-irradiated embryos and often extends into the vegetal hemisphere, consistent with the animal cytoplasm having been pulled dorsally and vegetally by the sliding vegetal yolk mass. Thus the yolk mass rotation may normally enhance the dorsalward cytoplasmic movement, begun by the sperm aster, enough to induce normal axis formation. We extended our observations of unirradiated control and uv-irradiated embryos through early cleavages. The vegetal extent of the anti-SEP (dorsal) swirl pattern seen in control embryos persists through the early cleavage period, such that labeled animal cytoplasm extends deep into dorsal third-tier blastomeres at the 32-cell stage. Significantly, in uv-irradiated embryos

  2. Piglets born after intrauterine laparoscopic embryo transfer.

    PubMed

    Wieczorek, J; Koseniuk, J; Mandryk, I; Poniedziałek-Kempny, K

    2015-01-01

    The aim of the study was the preliminary development of laparoscopic transfer of embryos to the uterus in the pig, which can become the alternative for more invasive surgical methods. We proposed the original method of embryo transfer. Donors (n = 40) and recipients (n = 15) of embryos were sows of age of 6-8 months. The estrus cycle of both recipients and donors was routinely synchronized. The experimental animals were divided into two groups. In the first group (10 donors and 3 recipients) embryos were transplanted according to the method described earlier and in the second group (30 donors and 12 recipients) embryos were transplanted according to our own proposed method. As the control group, we used 16 sows after insemination (AI). In animals from both experimental groups pregnancy was diagnosed between 28-31 day after transplantation and in the control group between 28-31 day after insemination. All animals were observed during pregnancy and weaning period in pig farm. Embryos at the development stage of 2-4 cell were obtained surgically and cultured in vitro for 4 days. Obtained blastocysts were transferred to donors. The original set of catheters for blastocysts transfer to pig uterus was constructed. Three trocars were placed in abdominal cavity for inserting endoscope and 2 grasps for uterus stabilization. After uterus stabilization, the slide was inserted into abdomen which was used for putting the needle to puncture uterus. Through this needle catheter with embryos was inserted into the uterus cavity. Embryos were placed by injection into lumen of the one uterine horn. From 12 recipients pregnancy was diagnosed in 6 recipients. From 6 litters, 57 piglets were born. We weaned 41 piglets (71.9%). In our study we obtained 50% efficacy, with the mean number of 9.5 alive piglets in litter and 6.8 weaned piglets. The efficacy of developed method of laparoscopic transfer of porcine embryos allows it to be used in routine practice. PMID:26172194

  3. Growth, development and pairing of Leucochloridiomorpha constantiae (Trematoda) metacercariae on the chorio-allantois of chick embryos cultivated in vitro.

    PubMed

    Fried, B; Fine, R H; Felter, B L

    1980-08-01

    A simple in vitro technique was devised to culture chick embryos in Petri dishes from the 4th to the 21st day of incubation. Leucochloridiomorpha constantiae (Trematoda) metacercariae were placed either singly or multiply (5/embryo) on the chorio-allantois of in vitro grown embryos on day 7 and were removed on day 14. Growth and development studies were also made on worms grown singly or multiply (5/chick) in the bursa of Fabricius of the domestic chick. Worms grown singly or multiply in embryos were sexually mature, although eggs from these worms were abnormal when compared with eggs from worms recovered from chicks. The mean body area of worms from chicks was 2-3 times greater than that of worms from embryos. The mean body area of single worms from embryos was significantly larger than that of worms grown multiply in this site. However, the mean body area of multiple worms from the chick was significantly larger than that of single worms from this site. Worm pairs or clusters were seen in all embryos with the multiple infections. PMID:7422365

  4. Embryo Transfer (Techniques, Donors, and Recipients).

    PubMed

    Phillips, Patrick E; Jahnke, Marianna M

    2016-07-01

    Commercial embryo transfer has evolved as an art and as a science since the early 1970s. Today's multiple ovulation embryo transfer is a widely used reproductive tool on many farms and is performed by veterinarians throughout the world. Propagation of the female genomes of select donors, through embryo transfer, has allowed a rapid progression of genetic gain in many breeds, much like what happened with artificial insemination since the 1940s. Advancement of this technology is migrating to in vitro fertilization technology today, allowing a higher volume of offspring to be produced with sex selection in the laboratory. PMID:27140299

  5. 9 CFR 98.9 - Embryos refused entry.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... Disease; and Embryos of Horses and Asses § 98.9 Embryos refused entry. Any embryo refused entry into the... prevent the possible introduction into the United States of infectious animal diseases. If such embryo is... introduction into the United States of infectious animal diseases....

  6. 9 CFR 98.9 - Embryos refused entry.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... Disease; and Embryos of Horses and Asses § 98.9 Embryos refused entry. Any embryo refused entry into the... prevent the possible introduction into the United States of infectious animal diseases. If such embryo is... introduction into the United States of infectious animal diseases....

  7. 9 CFR 98.9 - Embryos refused entry.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... Disease; and Embryos of Horses and Asses § 98.9 Embryos refused entry. Any embryo refused entry into the... prevent the possible introduction into the United States of infectious animal diseases. If such embryo is... introduction into the United States of infectious animal diseases....

  8. 9 CFR 98.9 - Embryos refused entry.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... Disease; and Embryos of Horses and Asses § 98.9 Embryos refused entry. Any embryo refused entry into the... prevent the possible introduction into the United States of infectious animal diseases. If such embryo is... introduction into the United States of infectious animal diseases....

  9. Approaches to biosecurity in bovine embryo transfer programs.

    PubMed

    Givens, M D; Marley, S D

    2008-01-01

    Although transfer of bovine embryos is much less likely to result in transmission of pathogens than transport of postnatal cattle, the epidemiologic risk associated with bovine embryo transfer merits examination. Much research has validated the efficacy of internationally approved processing protocols to render bovine in vivo-derived embryos free of specified pathogens. The purpose of this review is to summarize current sanitary recommendations for bovine embryo transfer, while emphasizing recent research to develop and validate novel approaches to biosecurity. Continued research will enable the development and validation of novel embryo treatments and culture reagents to minimize requirements for testing of embryo or oocyte donors, and testing of embryo recipients. PMID:18028999

  10. Nuclear transfer procedures in the ovine can induce early embryo fragmentation and compromise cloned embryo development.

    PubMed

    Xue, Lian; Cheng, Lei; Su, Guanghua; Kang, Feng; Wu, Xia; Bai, Chunling; Zhang, Li; Li, Guang-Peng

    2011-07-01

    Cytoplasmic fragmentations are frequently observed in early mammalian embryos, and especially in the human. In our research we have observed subtle clues that the occurrence of fragmentation was most likely a result of somatic cell nuclear transfer (NT) protocols, and in particular, the in vitro culture system. In this study we examined various putative factors that might induce early embryo fragmentation in the ovine. The results indicate that nuclear transfer protocols such as the fusion parameter, activation treatment, and especially the choice of culture medium affected embryo cleavage rates and resulted in a higher incidence of fragmented embryos. Upon using the same fusion parameter, activation parameters that were based upon amino acids containing synthetic oviduct fluids (SOFaa) culture system resulted in significantly lower fragmentation rates than when utilizing a Charles Rosenkrans 1 (CR1aa) culture system. Fragmented embryos typically exhibited irregular numbers of blastomeres with the majority of blastomeres devoid of chromatin. Factors such as fusion DC pulse, activation treatment and culture system led to higher fragmentation and also affected in vitro and in vivo embryo development. The SOFaa based culture system produced a higher number of quality NT embryos resulting in higher pregnancy rates and the birth of live lambs as compared to the CR1aa based system (P<0.05). We conclude that early embryo fragmentation in the ovine is caused by suboptimal cloning protocols, and NT embryo development is especially affected by the culture system used. PMID:21700405

  11. Heterotopic pregnancy after a single embryo transfer

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Ji Sun; Cha, Hyun-Hwa; Han, Ae Ra; Lee, Seong Goo

    2016-01-01

    Heterotopic pregnancy is a rare and life-threatening condition which is defined as coexistent intrauterine and ectopic gestation. The risk of ectopic and heterotopic pregnancy is increasing due to the increased risk of multiple pregnancies with the aid of assisted reproductive technologies. However, it hardly happens in the setting of single embryo transfer, since single embryo transfer significantly reduces the incidence of multiple pregnancies. Surprisingly, we experienced a case of heterotopic pregnancy after a single embryo transfer caused by coincidental natural pregnancy during assisted reproductive technologies. An infertile woman who underwent, during her natural cycle, transfer of a single embryo that had been cryopreserved for 3 years was found to be heterotopically pregnant. After an early and successful management with laparoscopic right salpingectomy, she finally reached at full-term vaginal delivery. PMID:27462600

  12. Crazy making: embryos and gestational mothers.

    PubMed

    Annas, G J

    1991-01-01

    Annas discusses the legal and public policy aspects of two 1990 in vitro fertilization cases. In Davis v. Davis, a Tennessee case involving disputed custody of frozen embryos in a divorce, an appellate court reversed a trial judge and ruled that the couple, not just the woman, should decide the disposition of the embryos. In Johnson v. Calvert, a surrogate mother in California failed to gain custody of the child she bore after gestating an embryo from the ovum and sperm of the couple who hired her. The judges in both cases based their decisions on the genetic relationship of the adult parties to the embryos or child. Annas is critical of determining parenthood exclusively on the basis of genes and argues for continuing the current legal presumption that a woman who gives birth to a child should be considered its legal mother. PMID:2004902

  13. Valuing embryos as both commodities and singularities.

    PubMed

    Legge, Michael; Fitzgerald, Ruth

    2016-03-11

    An argument put forward against gamete and embryo donation, sale and research, is that to do so would treat the gametes or embryos as objects with no intrinsic value as human. Instead, gametes and embryos created and used for donation, sale or research, can be considered more like a commodity created and traded for economic exchange--something that is valuable only for the amount of money or other goods and services that others are willing to exchange. While Kant asserts that humans have dignity rather than object worth, the provision of human gametes and embryos are progressively becoming utilities for resolving childlessness and for certain research investigations. In this paper we discuss the commodity market and the relationship to human reproduction material. PMID:27005877

  14. Tissue morphodynamics shaping the early mouse embryo.

    PubMed

    Sutherland, Ann E

    2016-07-01

    Generation of the elongated vertebrate body plan from the initially radially symmetrical embryo requires comprehensive changes to tissue form. These shape changes are generated by specific underlying cell behaviors, coordinated in time and space. Major principles and also specifics are emerging, from studies in many model systems, of the cell and physical biology of how region-specific cell behaviors produce regional tissue morphogenesis, and how these, in turn, are integrated at the level of the embryo. New technical approaches have made it possible more recently, to examine the morphogenesis of the mouse embryo in depth, and to elucidate the underlying cellular mechanisms. This review focuses on recent advances in understanding the cellular basis for the early fundamental events that establish the basic form of the embryo. PMID:26820524

  15. Defining embryo donation: an Ethics Committee opinion.

    PubMed

    2016-07-01

    Building families through the adoption of children has been supported by human society throughout history. The ethical appropriateness of patients donating embryos to other patients for family building, or for research, is well established and is affirmed by this Committee. The use of the term ''adoption'' for embryos is inaccurate and should be avoided. This document replaces the ASRM Ethics Committee statement by the same name, last published in 2013 (Fertil Steril 2013;99:1846-7). PMID:27001380

  16. Effects of rat cytomegalovirus on the nervous system of the early rat embryo.

    PubMed

    Sun, Xiuning; Guan, YingJun; Li, Fengjie; Li, Xutong; Wang, Xiaowen; Guan, Zhiyu; Sheng, Kai; Yu, Li; Liu, Zhijun

    2012-08-01

    The purpose of the study was to investigate the impact of rat cytomegalovirus (RCMV) infection on the development of the nervous system in rat embryos, and to evaluate the involvement of Wnt signaling pathway key molecules and the downstream gene neurogenin 1 (Ngn1) in RCMV infected neural stem cells (NSCs). Infection and control groups were established, each containing 20 pregnant Wistar rats. Rats in the infection group were inoculated with RCMV by intraperitoneal injection on the first day of pregnancy. Rat E20 embryos were taken to evaluate the teratogenic rate. NSCs were isolated from E13 embryos, and maintained in vitro. We found: 1) Poor fetal development was found in the infection group with low survival and high malformation rates. 2) The proliferation and differentiation of NSCs were affected. In the infection group, NSCs proliferated more slowly and had a lower neurosphere formation rate than the control. The differentiation ratio from NSCs to neurons and glial cells was significantly different from that of the control, showed by immunofluorescence staining. 3) Ngn1 mRNA expression and the nuclear β-catenin protein level were significantly lower than the control on day 2 when NSCs differentiated. 4) The Morris water maze test was performed on 4-week pups, and the infected rats were found worse in learning and memory ability. In a summary, RCMV infection caused abnormalities in the rat embryonic nervous system, significantly inhibited NSC proliferation and differentiation, and inhibited the expression of key molecules in the Wnt/β-catenin signaling pathway so as to affect NSCs differentiation. This may be an important mechanism by which RCMV causes embryonic nervous system abnormalities. PMID:22899431

  17. Intrauterine inoculation of seronegative heifers with bovine viral diarrhea virus concurrent with transfer of in vivo-derived bovine embryos.

    PubMed

    Gard, J A; Givens, M D; Marley, M S D; Galik, P K; Riddell, K P; Edmondson, M A; Rodning, S P

    2010-05-01

    Bovine viral diarrhea virus (BVDV) has been shown to be associated with single transferable in vivo-derived bovine embryos despite washing and trypsin treatment. Hence, the primary objective was to evaluate the potential of BVDV to be transmitted via the intrauterine route at the time of embryo transfer. In vivo-derived bovine embryos (n=10) were nonsurgically collected from a single Bos tarus donor cow negative for BVDV. After collection and washing, embryos were placed into transfer media containing BVDV (SD-1; Type 1a). Each of the 10 embryos was individually loaded into an 0.25-mL straw, which was then nonsurgically transferred into the uterus of 1 of the 10 seronegative recipients on Day 0. The total quantity of virus transferred into the uterus of each of the 10 Bos tarus recipients was 878 cell culture infective doses to the 50% end point (CCID(50))/mL. Additionally, control heifers received 1.5 x 10(6) CCID(50) BVDV/.5 mL without an embryo (positive) or heat-inactivated BVDV (negative). The positive control heifer and all 10 recipients of virus-exposed embryos exhibited viremia by Day 6 and seroconverted by Day 15 after transfer. The negative control heifer did not exhibit a viremia or seroconvert. At 30 d after embryo transfer, 6 of 10 heifers in the treatment group were pregnant; however, 30 d later, only one was still pregnant. This fetus was nonviable and was positive for BVDV. In conclusion, the quantity of BVDV associated with bovine embryos after in vitro exposure can result in viremia and seroconversion of seronegative recipients after transfer into the uterus during diestrus. PMID:20129656

  18. The use and disposal of stored embryos.

    PubMed

    Dickens, Bernard M

    2016-07-01

    Claims that human embryos are "human beings" or "persons" cannot be agreed, because philosophies and approaches differ, awarding them statuses from full human to property. In 1984, the UK (Warnock) Committee of Inquiry into Human Fertilisation and Embryology made recommendations that still offer legal and ethical guidance. It is widely agreed, for instance, that embryos created through in vitro fertilization (IVF) should not be transferred for reproductive purposes without relevant consent, whether for gamete donors' or others' family-building. A consequence of courts enforcing parties' IVF agreements on stored embryo use or balancing parties' competing interests is that one party-usually the male-can veto the other's use of the embryo for reproduction on termination of a partnership. The extent to which surplus IVF embryos can be donated for research ranges from prohibition to infertility treatment and more, but wider needs for embryology research are appearing that, despite prevailing bans, may require embryos for study created to genetic specifications. PMID:27177517

  19. Cryopreservation of Arachis pintoi (leguminosae) somatic embryos.

    PubMed

    Rey, H Y; Faloci, M; Medina, R; Dolce, N; Engelmann, F; Mroginski, L

    2013-01-01

    In this study, we successfully cryopreserved cotyledonary somatic embryos of diploid and triploid Arachis pintoi cytotypes using the encapsulation-dehydration technique. The highest survival rates were obtained when somatic embryos were encapsulated in calcium alginate beads and precultured in agitated (80 rpm) liquid establishment medium (EM) with daily increasing sucrose concentration (0.50, 0.75, and 1.0 M). The encapsulated somatic embryos were then dehydrated with silica gel for 5 h to 20% moisture content (fresh weight basis) and cooled either rapidly (direct immersion in liquid nitrogen, LN) or slowly (1 degree C per min from 25 degree C to -30 degree C followed by immersion in LN). Beads were kept in LN for a minimum of 1 h and then were rapidly rewarmed in a 30 degree C water-bath for 2 min. Finally, encapsulated somatic embryos were post-cultured in agitated (80 rpm) liquid EM with daily decreasing sucrose concentration (0.75 and 0.5 M) and transferred to solidified EM. Using this protocol, we obtained 26% and 30% plant regeneration from cryopreserved somatic embryos of diploid and triploid cytotypes. No morphological abnormalities were observed in any of the plants regenerated from cryopreserved embryos and their genetic stability was confirmed with 10 isozyme systems and nine RAPD profiles. PMID:24441368

  20. Toxicity induced by emodin on zebrafish embryos.

    PubMed

    He, Qiuxia; Liu, Kechun; Wang, Sifeng; Hou, Hairong; Yuan, Yanqiang; Wang, Ximin

    2012-04-01

    Emodin, a widely available herbal remedy, has a variety of pharmacological actions and valuable clinical applications. The potential effect of emodin on zebrafish (Danio rerio) embryos was evaluated. Zebrafish embryos were incubated with 0.1-2 μg/mL of emodin from 7 hours to 6 days postfertilization (dpf). Emodin, at concentrations of 0.25 μg/mL and above, negatively affected embryo survival and hatching success. Emodin induced a large suite of abnormalities on zebrafish embryos, such as edema, crooked trunk, and abnormal morphogenesis. To elucidate the mechanism of action, the transcript levels of drug-metabolism genes (CYP3A) and a multiple drug-resistance gene (MDR1) were detected by reverse-transcript polymerase chain reaction. Embryos showed increases in mRNA accumulation of CYP3A and MDR1. The above-described results indicated that emodin impaired zebrafish embryo development and some organ morphogenesis, and CYP3A and MDR1 were involved in the process. These findings suggest that emodin was toxic to zebrafish lavae at relatively low concentrations. PMID:21834668

  1. RNA Interference in Chicken Embryos

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van Hateren, Nick J.; Jones, Rachel S.; Wilson, Stuart A.

    The chicken has played an important role in biological discoveries since the 17th century (Stern, 2005). Many investigations into vertebrate development have utilized the chicken due to the accessibility of the chick embryo and its ease of manipulation (Brown et al., 2003). However, the lack of genetic resources has often handicapped these studies and so the chick is frequently overlooked as a model organism for the analysis of vertebrate gene function in favor of mice or zebrafish. In the past six years this situation has altered dramatically with the generation of over half a million expressed sequence tags and >20,000 fully sequenced chicken cDNAs (Boardman et al. 2002; Caldwell et al., 2005; Hubbard et al., 2005) together with a 6X coverage genome sequence (Hillier et al., 2004). These resources have created a comprehensive catalogue of chicken genes with readily accessible cDNA and EST resources available via ARK-GENOMICS (www.ark-genomics.org) for the functional analysis of vertebrate gene function.

  2. In vitro bovine embryo production in a synthetic medium: embryo development, cryosurvival, and establishment of pregnancy.

    PubMed

    Moreno, D; Neira, A; Dubreil, L; Liegeois, L; Destrumelle, S; Michaud, S; Thorin, C; Briand-Amirat, L; Bencharif, D; Tainturier, D

    2015-10-15

    The aim of this study was to develop an in vitro embryo culture medium without either fetal calf serum or BSA, using various growth factors and cytokines (GFs-CYKs; IGF-I, IGF-II, bFGF, LIF, GM-CSF, TGF-β1, and PDGF-BB), and other molecules with surfactant and embryotrophic properties, such as recombinant albumin (RA) and hyaluronan (HA). The first part of the study was dedicated to define the best combination of GFs-CYKs + RA + HA for optimal embryonic development. Next, we compared development rates and embryo quality (inner cell mass [ICM]-to-total cell number [TCN] ratio), and postthaw survival and hatching rates using this synthetic medium (T1) and a control medium: synthetic oviduct fluid + BSA + ITS (insulin, transferrin, and selenium). The blastocyst rates were significantly higher with T1 than those with the control at 7 and 8 days after fertilization. There was no significant difference in TCN or the ICM/TCN ratio between the two treatments. Survival and hatching rates 48 hours after thawing were similar for both treatments. Finally, nine embryo transfers were conducted using fresh and previously frozen Day-7 blastocysts to evaluate the in vivo viability of embryos produced in this synthetic medium; four gestations were obtained from six fresh embryos and one gestation from three frozen embryos. In conclusion, the fetal calf serum and BSA-free medium, supplemented with GFs-CYKs + RA + HA, improved embryo development and gave comparable ICM/TCN ratios and postthaw survival rates to the control with BSA. Fresh and frozen embryos produced in this medium are viable for embryo transfer. This fully synthetic method of embryo culture is a useful means of reducing the risk of disease transmission via embryo transfer. PMID:26279312

  3. Coculture of Preimplantation Embryos With Outgrowth Embryos Improves Embryonic Developmental Competence in Mice.

    PubMed

    Kim, Jihyun; Lee, Jaewang; Kim, Seok Hyun; Jun, Jin Hyun

    2016-07-01

    Mammalian embryonic development is an intricate succession of physiological and morphological events. Many studies have focused on optimizing in vitro culture systems for improvement in embryonic development. In this study, we established a novel coculture method with outgrowth embryos and investigated how this coculture system improves the preimplantation and peri-implantation embryonic development both in vitro and in utero. We found that outgrowth embryos secrete vesicles, as observed by time-lapse monitoring and scanning electron microscopy. Coculture with outgrowth embryos also significantly increased the percentages of morula, blastocyst, hatching, and outgrowth (P < .01). The total number of cells and inner cell mass were increased, and apoptotic index was decreased (P < .05) by upregulating Survivin and Lif messenger RNA expression levels (P < .05) in the coculture compared to the control group. Furthermore, implantation rates in utero after embryo transfer were significantly higher for cocultured embryos than those for the control group (P < .05). We conclude that embryotrophic factors secreted from outgrowth embryos could improve the developmental competence of in vitro cultured mouse preimplantation embryos. Findings of specific embryotrophic factors from outgrowth embryos might be valuable for advancing reproductive technologies in the future. PMID:26704525

  4. Transcriptomic response of zebrafish embryos to polyaminoamine (PAMAM) dendrimers.

    PubMed

    Oliveira, Eva; Casado, Marta; Faria, Melissa; Soares, Amadeu M V M; Navas, José María; Barata, Carlos; Piña, Benjamin

    2014-08-01

    The progressive practical applications of engineered nanoparticles results in their ever-increasing release into the environment. Accurate assessment of their environmental and health risks requires the development of methods allowing their monitoring in different environmental compartments and the evaluation of their potential toxicity at different levels of organization. Toxic effects of third-generation (G3) and fourth-generation (G4) poly(amidoamine) dendrimers (ethylenediamine cored, imine-terminated) were assessed on zebrafish embryos during the first two days post-fertilization. Particle characterization by dynamic light scattering showed no tendency to form aggregates in the assay conditions. G3 particles showed somewhat a higher acute toxicity than G4 particles, with LC50 values of 1.8 and 2.3 mg/L, respectively. At sublethal concentrations, both particles affected the zebrafish transcriptome following similar patterns, suggesting a similar mode of action. About 700 transcripts were affected by at least one of the treatments, following a pattern with significant correlations to the effects of bacterial infection in zebrafish embryos. We concluded that the response to G3 and G4 dendrimers was consistent with the activation of the innate immune response, a still unreported potential effect of these particles. These data may contribute to the characterization of hazards of these nanomaterials for both human health and the environment. PMID:24266889

  5. Cryopreservation of peach palm zygotic embryos.

    PubMed

    Steinmacher, Douglas A; Saldanha, Cleber W; Clement, Charles R; Guerra, Miguel P

    2007-01-01

    Cryopreservation is a safe and cost-effective option for long-term germplasm conservation of non-orthodox seed species, such as peach palm (Bactris gasipaes). The objective of the present study was to establish a cryopreservation protocol for peach palm zygotic embryos based on the encapsulation-dehydration technique. After excision, zygotic embryos were encapsulated with 3 percent sodium alginate plus 2 M glycerol and 0.4 M sucrose, and pre-treated or not with 1 M sucrose during 24 h, followed by air-drying. Fresh weight water contents of beads decreased from 83 percent and 87 percent to 18 percent and 20 percent for pre-treated or non-pretreated beads, respectively, after 4 h of dehydration. Sucrose pre-treatment at 1 M caused lower zygotic embryo germination and plantlet height in contrast to non-treated beads. All the variables were statistically influenced by dehydration time. Optimal conditions for recovery of cryopreserved zygotic embryos include encapsulation and dehydration for 4 h in a forced air cabinet to 20 percent water content, followed by rapid freezing in liquid nitrogen (-196 degree C) and rapid thawing at 45 degree C. In these conditions 29 percent of the zygotic embryos germinated in vitro. However, plantlets obtained from dehydrated zygotic embryos had stunted haustoria and lower heights. Histological analysis showed that haustorium cells were large, vacuolated, with few protein bodies. In contrast, small cells with high nucleus:cytoplasm ratio formed the shoot apical meristem of the embryos, which were the cell types with favorable characteristics for survival after exposure to liquid nitrogen. Plantlets were successfully acclimatized and showed 41+/-9 percent and 88+/-4 percent survival levels after 12 weeks of acclimatization from cryopreserved and non-cryopreserved treatments, respectively. PMID:17369958

  6. Arabidopsis mitochondrial protein slow embryo development1 is essential for embryo development.

    PubMed

    Ju, Yan; Liu, Chunying; Lu, Wenwen; Zhang, Quan; Sodmergen

    2016-05-27

    The plant seeds formation are crucial parts in reproductive process in seed plants as well as food source for humans. Proper embryo development ensure viable seed formation. Here, we showed an Arabidopsis T-DNA insertion mutant slow embryo development1 (sed1) which exhibited retarded embryogenesis, led to aborted seeds. Embryo without SED1 developed slower compared to normal one and could be recognized at early globular stage by its white appearance. In later development stage, storage accumulated poorly with less protein and lipid body production. In vitro culture did not rescue albino embryo. SED1 encoded a protein targeted to mitochondria. Transmission electron microscopic analysis revealed that mitochondria developed abnormally, and more strikingly plastid failed to construct grana in time in sed1/sed1 embryo. These data indicated that SED1 is indispensable for embryogenesis in Arabidopsis, and the mitochondria may be involved in the regulation of many aspects of seed development. PMID:27109472

  7. Patients' Attitudes towards the Surplus Frozen Embryos in China

    PubMed Central

    Jin, Xuan; Wang, GongXian; Liu, SiSun; Liu, Ming; Zhang, Jing; Shi, YuFa

    2013-01-01

    Background. Assisted reproductive techniques have been used in China for more than 20 years. This study investigates the attitudes of surplus embryo holders towards embryos storage and donation for medical research. Methods. A total of 363 couples who had completed in vitro fertilization (IVF) treatment and had already had biological children but who still had frozen embryos in storage were invited to participate. Interviews were conducted by clinics in a narrative style. Results. Family size was the major reason for participants' (dis)continuation of embryo storage; moreover, the moral status of embryos was an important factor for couples choosing embryo storage, while the storage fee was an important factor for couples choosing embryo disposal. Most couples discontinued the storage of their embryos once their children were older than 3 years. In our study, 58.8% of the couples preferred to dispose of surplus embryos rather than donate them to research, citing a lack of information and distrust in science as significant reasons for their decision. Conclusions. Interviews regarding frozen embryos, including patients' expectations for embryo storage and information to assist them with decisions regarding embryo disposal, are beneficial for policies addressing embryo disposition and embryo donation in China. PMID:23509811

  8. Antiviral activity of Inonotus obliquus fungus extract towards infection caused by hepatitis C virus in cell cultures.

    PubMed

    Shibnev, V A; Mishin, D V; Garaev, T M; Finogenova, N P; Botikov, A G; Deryabin, P G

    2011-09-01

    Fractions of Inonotus obliquus fungus water extract exhibited a virucidal effect towards hepatitis C virus: it 100-fold reduced its infective properties within 10 min. The antiviral effects of fungus extracts manifested after preventive (24 h before infection) and therapeutic use (during infection of porcine embryo kidney cells). Moreover, the data indicate that the birch fungus extracts inhibit production of infective virus by porcine embryo kidney cells. PMID:22462058

  9. Metabolite profiling of somatic embryos of Cyclamen persicum in comparison to zygotic embryos, endosperm, and testa.

    PubMed

    Winkelmann, Traud; Ratjens, Svenja; Bartsch, Melanie; Rode, Christina; Niehaus, Karsten; Bednarz, Hanna

    2015-01-01

    Somatic embryogenesis has been shown to be an efficient in vitro plant regeneration system for many crops such as the important ornamental plant Cyclamen persicum, for which this regeneration pathway of somatic embryogenesis is of interest for the vegetative propagation of parental lines as well as elite plants. However, somatic embryogenesis is not commercially used in many crops due to several unsolved problems, such as malformations, asynchronous development, deficiencies in maturation and germination of somatic embryos. In contrast, zygotic embryos in seeds develop and germinate without abnormalities in most cases. Instead of time-consuming and labor-intensive experiments involving tests of different in vitro culture conditions and plant growth regulator supplements, we follow a more directed approach. Zygotic embryos served as a reference and were compared to somatic embryos in metabolomic analyses allowing the future optimization of the in vitro system. The aims of this study were to detect differences in the metabolite profiles of torpedo stage somatic and zygotic embryos of C. persicum. Moreover, major metabolites in endosperm and testa were identified and quantified. Two sets of extracts of two to four biological replicates each were analyzed. In total 52 metabolites were identified and quantified in the different tissues. One of the most significant differences between somatic and zygotic embryos was that the proline concentration in the zygotic embryos was about 40 times higher than that found in somatic embryos. Epicatechin, a scavenger for reactive oxygen species, was found in highest abundance in the testa. Sucrose, the most abundant metabolite was detected in significantly higher concentrations in zygotic embryos. Also, a yet unknown trisaccharide, was significantly enriched in zygotic embryos. PMID:26300898

  10. Comparison of clinical outcomes between fresh embryo transfers and frozen-thawed embryo transfers

    PubMed Central

    Shen, Chunjuan; Shu, Defeng; Zhao, Xiaojie; Gao, Ying

    2014-01-01

    Background: Advances in embryo culture technology and cryopreservation have led to a shift in in vitro fertilization (IVF) from early fresh or frozen-thawed cleavage embryo transfer to fresh or frozen-thawed blastocyst stage transfer. Objective: To compare the clinical outcomes of fresh embryo transfers and frozen-thawed embryo transfers. Materials and Methods: In this retrospective case control study, patients undergoing IVF cycles from January 2012 to December 2012 were enrolled in Assisted Reproduction of Wuhan Union Hospital were enrolled. A total of 1891 cycle contains 1150 fresh embryo transfers and 741 frozen-thawed embryo transfers were studied. All data were transferred directly to SPSS 18 and analyzed. Results: Clinical pregnancy rates of fresh cleavage-stage embryo transfers compared with fresh blastocyst transfers, frozen-thawed cleavage-stage embryo transfers, post thaw cleavage-stage extended blastocyst culture transfers and frozen-thawed blastocyst transfers were 52.7%, 35.88%, 35.29%, 47.75%, 59.8% in patients under 35 years of ages and 41.24%, 26.92%, 11.32%, 46.15%, 55.8% in patients older than 35 years old, respectively. The multiple pregnancy rates, abortion rates and ectopic pregnancy rates did not differ significantly among the five groups. Conclusion: The clinical pregnancy rates were not different significantly between fresh cleavage-stage embryo transfers and fresh blastocyst transfers. But the clinical pregnancy rate of frozen-thawed blastocyst transfer was the highest among fresh/frozen-thawed embryo transfers. PMID:25071849

  11. Metabolite profiling of somatic embryos of Cyclamen persicum in comparison to zygotic embryos, endosperm, and testa

    PubMed Central

    Winkelmann, Traud; Ratjens, Svenja; Bartsch, Melanie; Rode, Christina; Niehaus, Karsten; Bednarz, Hanna

    2015-01-01

    Somatic embryogenesis has been shown to be an efficient in vitro plant regeneration system for many crops such as the important ornamental plant Cyclamen persicum, for which this regeneration pathway of somatic embryogenesis is of interest for the vegetative propagation of parental lines as well as elite plants. However, somatic embryogenesis is not commercially used in many crops due to several unsolved problems, such as malformations, asynchronous development, deficiencies in maturation and germination of somatic embryos. In contrast, zygotic embryos in seeds develop and germinate without abnormalities in most cases. Instead of time-consuming and labor-intensive experiments involving tests of different in vitro culture conditions and plant growth regulator supplements, we follow a more directed approach. Zygotic embryos served as a reference and were compared to somatic embryos in metabolomic analyses allowing the future optimization of the in vitro system. The aims of this study were to detect differences in the metabolite profiles of torpedo stage somatic and zygotic embryos of C. persicum. Moreover, major metabolites in endosperm and testa were identified and quantified. Two sets of extracts of two to four biological replicates each were analyzed. In total 52 metabolites were identified and quantified in the different tissues. One of the most significant differences between somatic and zygotic embryos was that the proline concentration in the zygotic embryos was about 40 times higher than that found in somatic embryos. Epicatechin, a scavenger for reactive oxygen species, was found in highest abundance in the testa. Sucrose, the most abundant metabolite was detected in significantly higher concentrations in zygotic embryos. Also, a yet unknown trisaccharide, was significantly enriched in zygotic embryos. PMID:26300898

  12. Conflict over moral status of embryos continues.

    PubMed

    Callahan, S

    1988-04-01

    Ethical questions are addressed that have arisen due to the rapid development of new medical technology involving the fertilized human ovum. Moral issues have arisen with the new progesterone antagonist, RU-486, and in vitro fertilization (IVF). 3 different ethical views of the embryo are presented: A permissive pro-choice position states either that the moral value of the fertilized egg depends on each pregnant woman's decision to humanize the embryo in her body or that the moral value of the fertilized egg increases as human development progresses. Some pro-life advocates argue that after implantation an irreversibly developing human being exists who has all the rights of a human being. The author suggests that some medical technological interventions and experimentation on embryos may be morally permissible to these pro-life advocates. The Vatican statement that the human being must be respected--as a person--from the very 1st instant of his existence sums up the 3d, view of an embryo's status. New knowledge of the very complex earliest stages of development, combined with other concepts and worldviews, appear to create honest doubt about the fertilized egg's status. For example, approximately 50% of fertilized ova are naturally lost, and the combination of 1 or more embryos into a mosaic casts doubt on the existence of an irreversible human. Relevant worldviews of postmodern understandings of science, the universe, and a new theology of creation must be considered to solve these ethical dilemmas. PMID:10286446

  13. Effect of incubation volume and embryo density on the development and viability of mouse embryos in vitro.

    PubMed

    Lane, M; Gardner, D K

    1992-04-01

    The morphology, cleavage rate and viability of preimplantation embryos from random bred Swiss mice were assessed after culture in different incubation volumes and embryo densities. Decreasing the incubation volume, from 320 to 20 microliters, significantly increased blastocyst cell number (P less than 0.01) and embryo development after transfer (P less than 0.01). Increasing the number of embryos incubated per drop from 1 to 16 significantly increased the number of two-cell embryos reaching the blastocyst stage in 5 or 320 microliters. Culturing embryos in groups significantly increased blastocyst cell numbers in all volumes employed and elevated embryo viability. Such observations are consistent with the hypothesis that the preimplantation mammalian embryo produces a factor(s) which can stimulate its own development. The results of this study have implications for clinical in-vitro fertilization, where embryos are routinely cultured individually in relatively large volumes. PMID:1522203

  14. Use of Lentiviral Vectors to Deliver and Express Bicistronic Transgenes in Developing Chicken Embryos

    PubMed Central

    Semple-Rowland, Susan L; Berry, Jonathan

    2013-01-01

    The abilities of lentiviral vectors to carry large transgenes (~ 8Kb) and to efficiently infect and integrate these genes into the genomes of both dividing and non-dividing cells make them ideal candidates for transport of genetic material into cells and tissues. Given the properties of these vectors, it is somewhat surprising that they have seen only limited use in studies of developing tissues and in particular of the developing nervous system. Over the past several years, we have taken advantage of the large capacity of these vectors to explore the expression characteristics of several dual promoter and 2A peptide bicistronic transgenes in developing chick neural retina, with the goal of identifying transgene designs that reliably express multiple proteins in infected cells. Here we summarize the activities of several of these transgenes in neural retina and provide detailed methodologies for packaging lentivirus and delivering the virus into the developing neural tubes of chicken embryos in ovo, procedures that have been optimized over the course of several years of use in our laboratory. Conditions to hatch injected embryos are also discussed. The chicken-specific techniques will be of highest interest to investigators using avian embryos, development and packaging of lentiviral vectors that reliably express multiple proteins in infected cells should be of interest to all investigators whose experiments demand manipulation and expression of multiple proteins in developing cells and tissues. PMID:23816789

  15. Assay using embryo aggregation chimeras for the detection of nonlethal changes in X-irradiated mouse preimplantation embryos

    SciTech Connect

    Obasaju, M.F.; Wiley, L.M.; Oudiz, D.J.; Miller, L.; Samuels, S.J.; Chang, R.J.; Overstreet, J.W.

    1988-02-01

    We have developed a short-term in vitro assay for the detection of sublethal effects produced by very low levels of ionizing radiation. The assay utilizes mouse embryo aggregation chimeras consisting of one irradiated embryo paired with an unirradiated embryo whose blastomeres have been labeled with fluorescein isothiocyanate (FITC). X irradiation (from 0.05 to 2 Gy) and chimera construction were performed with four-cell stage embryos, and the chimeras were cultured for 40 h to the morula stage. The morulae were partially dissociated with calcium-free culture medium and viewed under phase contrast and epifluorescence microscopy to obtain total embryo cell number and the cellular contribution of irradiated (unlabeled) and control (FITC labeled) embryos per chimera. In chimeras where neither embryo was irradiated, the ratio of the unlabeled blastomeres to the total number of blastomeres per chimera embryo was 0.50 (17.8 +/- 5.6 cells per unlabeled embryo and 17.4 +/- 5.5 cells per FITC-labeled partner embryo). However, in chimeras formed after the unlabeled embryos were irradiated with as little as 0.05 Gy, the ratio of unlabeled blastomeres to the total number of blastomeres per chimera embryo was 0.43 (P less than 0.01). The apparent decreases in cell proliferation were not observed in irradiated embryos that were merely cocultured with control embryos, regardless of whether the embryos were zona enclosed or zona free. We conclude that very low levels of radiation induce sublethal changes in cleaving embryos that are expressed as a proliferative disadvantage within two cell cycles when irradiated embryos are in direct cell-to-cell contact with unirradiated embryos.

  16. [Successful pregnancies after oocyte and embryo vitrification].

    PubMed

    Salazar, Francisco Hernández; Loza, Erik Omar Okhuysen; Lucas, Maria Teresa Huerta J; Gutiérrez, Gustavo Romero

    2008-02-01

    Cryopreservation of human oocytes represents a solution for ethic conflict about frozen embryo storage for patients with risk to develop ovarian hyperstimulation syndrome; also is an available technique to preserve fertility in women with cancer under treatment, in poor response patients, in case of premature ovarian failure or aging and for other medical or social conditions that require to delay pregnancies, as well as to make easier oocyte donation programs. This paper reports two cases of successful pregnancies after embryo and oocyte vitrification, as well as their results. The technique of vitrification with the cryotop method is an excellent alternative, efficient, fast and cheap for oocyte and embryo cryopreservation with high ranges of fertilization, cleavage and pregnancies with a normal evolution. PMID:18798404

  17. Characterization of embryo-specific genes

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1989-01-01

    The objective of the proposed research is to characterize the structure and function of a set of genes whose expression is regulated in embryo development, and that is not expressed in mature tissues -- the embryonic genes. In the last two years, using cDNA clones, we have isolated 22 cDNA clones, and characterized the expression pattern of their corresponding RNA. At least 4 cDNA clones detect RNAs of embryonic genes. These cDNA clones detect RNAs expressed in somatic as well as zygotic embryos of carrot. Using the cDNA clones, we screened the genomic library of carrot embryo DNA, and isolated genomic clones for three genes. The structure and function of two genes DC 8 and DC 59 have been characterized and are reported in this paper.

  18. Embryo aggregation does not improve the development of interspecies somatic cell nuclear transfer embryos in the horse.

    PubMed

    Gambini, Andrés; De Stéfano, Adrián; Jarazo, Javier; Buemo, Carla; Karlanian, Florencia; Salamone, Daniel Felipe

    2016-09-01

    The low efficiency of interspecies somatic cell nuclear transfer (iSCNT) makes it necessary to investigate new strategies to improve embryonic developmental competence. Embryo aggregation has been successfully applied to improve cloning efficiency in mammals, but it remains unclear whether it could also be beneficial for iSCNT. In this study, we first compared the effect of embryo aggregation over in vitro development and blastocyst quality of porcine, bovine, and feline zona-free (ZF) parthenogenetic (PA) embryos to test the effects of embryo aggregation on species that were later used as enucleated oocytes donors in our iSCNT study. We then assessed whether embryo aggregation could improve the in vitro development of ZF equine iSCNT embryos after reconstruction with porcine, bovine, and feline ooplasm. Bovine- and porcine-aggregated PA blastocysts had significantly larger diameters compared with nonaggregated embryos. On the other hand, feline- and bovine-aggregated PA embryos had higher blastocyst cell number. Embryo aggregation of equine-equine SCNT was found to be beneficial for embryo development as we have previously reported, but the aggregation of three ZF reconstructed embryos did not improve embryo developmental rates on iSCNT. In vitro embryo development of nonaggregated iSCNT was predominantly arrested around the stage when transcriptional activation of the embryonic genome is reported to start on the embryo of the donor species. Nevertheless, independent of embryo aggregation, equine blastocyst-like structures could be obtained in our study using domestic feline-enucleated oocytes. Taken together, these results reported that embryo aggregation enhance in vitro PA embryo development and embryo quality but effects vary depending on the species. Embryo aggregation also improves, as expected, the in vitro embryo development of equine-equine SCNT embryos; however, we did not observe positive effects on equine iSCNT embryo development. Among oocytes

  19. Migration and growth of protoplanetary embryos. I. Convergence of embryos in protoplanetary disks

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Xiaojia; Lin, Douglas N. C.; Liu, Beibei; Li, Hui

    2014-12-10

    According to the core accretion scenario, planets form in protostellar disks through the condensation of dust, coagulation of planetesimals, and emergence of protoplanetary embryos. At a few AU in a minimum mass nebula, embryos' growth is quenched by dynamical isolation due to the depletion of planetesimals in their feeding zone. However, embryos with masses (M{sub p} ) in the range of a few Earth masses (M {sub ⊕}) migrate toward a transition radius between the inner viscously heated and outer irradiated regions of their natal disk. Their limiting isolation mass increases with the planetesimals surface density. When M{sub p} > 10 M {sub ⊕}, embryos efficiently accrete gas and evolve into cores of gas giants. We use a numerical simulation to show that despite stream line interference, convergent embryos essentially retain the strength of non-interacting embryos' Lindblad and corotation torques by their natal disks. In disks with modest surface density (or equivalently accretion rates), embryos capture each other in their mutual mean motion resonances and form a convoy of super-Earths. In more massive disks, they could overcome these resonant barriers to undergo repeated close encounters, including cohesive collisions that enable the formation of massive cores.

  20. Migration and Growth of Protoplanetary Embryos. I. Convergence of Embryos in Protoplanetary Disks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Xiaojia; Liu, Beibei; Lin, Douglas N. C.; Li, Hui

    2014-12-01

    According to the core accretion scenario, planets form in protostellar disks through the condensation of dust, coagulation of planetesimals, and emergence of protoplanetary embryos. At a few AU in a minimum mass nebula, embryos' growth is quenched by dynamical isolation due to the depletion of planetesimals in their feeding zone. However, embryos with masses (Mp ) in the range of a few Earth masses (M ⊕) migrate toward a transition radius between the inner viscously heated and outer irradiated regions of their natal disk. Their limiting isolation mass increases with the planetesimals surface density. When Mp > 10 M ⊕, embryos efficiently accrete gas and evolve into cores of gas giants. We use a numerical simulation to show that despite stream line interference, convergent embryos essentially retain the strength of non-interacting embryos' Lindblad and corotation torques by their natal disks. In disks with modest surface density (or equivalently accretion rates), embryos capture each other in their mutual mean motion resonances and form a convoy of super-Earths. In more massive disks, they could overcome these resonant barriers to undergo repeated close encounters, including cohesive collisions that enable the formation of massive cores.

  1. Toxicity of chlorine to zebrafish embryos

    PubMed Central

    Kent, Michael L.; Buchner, Cari; Barton, Carrie; Tanguay, Robert L.

    2014-01-01

    Surface disinfection of fertilized fish eggs is widely used in aquaculture to reduce extraovum pathogens that may be released from brood fish during spawning, and this is routinely used in zebrafish (Danio rerio) research laboratories. Most laboratories use approximately 25 – 50 ppm unbuffered chlorine solution for 5 – 10 min. Treatment of embryos with chlorine has significant germicidal effects for many Gram-negative bacteria, viruses, and trophozoite stages of protozoa, it has reduced efficacy against cyst or spore stages of protozoa and certain Mycobacterium spp. Therefore, we evaluated the toxicity of unbufferred and buffered chlorine solution to embryos exposed at 6 or 24 hours post-fertilization (hpf) to determine if higher concentrations can be used for treating zebrafish embryos. Most of our experiments entailed using an outbred line (5D), with both mortality and malformations as endpoints. We found that 6 hpf embryos consistently were more resistant than 24 hpf embryos to the toxic effects of chlorine. Chlorine is more toxic and germicidal at lower pHs, and chlorine causes elevated pH. Consistent with this, we found that unbufferred chlorine solutions (pH ca 8–9) were less toxic at corresponding concentrations than solutions buffered to pH 7. Based on our findings here, we recommend treating 6 hpf embryos for 10 min and 24 hpf for 5 min with unbuffered chlorine solution at 100 ppm. One trial indicated that AB fish, a popular outbred line, are more susceptible to toxicity than 5Ds. This suggests that variability between zebrafish lines occurs, and researchers should evaluate each line or strain under their particular laboratory conditions for selection of the optimum chlorine treatment procedure. PMID:24429474

  2. Transcriptome analysis of embryo maturation in maize

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Maize is one of the most important crops in the world. With the exponentially increasing population and the need for ever increased food and feed production, an increased yield of maize grain (as well as rice, wheat and other grains) will be critical. Maize grain development is understood from the perspective of morphology, hormone responses, and storage reserve accumulation. This includes various studies on gene expression during embryo development and maturation but a global study of gene expression of the embryo has not been possible until recently. Transcriptome analysis is a powerful new tool that can be used to understand the genetic basis of embryo maturation. Results We undertook a transcriptomic analysis of normal maturing embryos at 15, 21 and 27 days after pollination (DAP), of one elite maize germplasm line that was utilized in crosses to transgenic plants. More than 19,000 genes were analyzed by this method and the challenge was to select subsets of genes that are vitally important to embryo development and maturation for the initial analysis. We describe the changes in expression for genes relating to primary metabolic pathways, DNA synthesis, late embryogenesis proteins and embryo storage proteins, shown through transcriptome analysis and confirmed levels of transcription for some genes in the transcriptome using qRT-PCR. Conclusions Numerous genes involved in embryo maturation have been identified, many of which show changes in expression level during the progression from 15 to 27 DAP. An expected array of genes involved in primary metabolism was identified. Moreover, more than 30% of transcripts represented un-annotated genes, leaving many functions to be discovered. Of particular interest are the storage protein genes, globulin-1, globulin-2 and an unidentified cupin family gene. When expressing foreign proteins in maize, the globulin-1 promoter is most often used, but this cupin family gene has much higher expression and may be a

  3. Third Party Reproduction: Sperm, Egg, and Embryo Donation and Surrogacy

    MedlinePlus

    ... SOCIETY FOR REPRODUCTIVE MEDICINE Third-party Reproduction Sperm, egg, and embryo donation and surrogacy A Guide for ... third-party reproduction” refers to the use of eggs , sperm , or embryos that have been donated by ...

  4. Using fertile couples as embryo donors: An ethical dilemma

    PubMed Central

    Alizadeh, Leila; Omani Samani, Reza

    2014-01-01

    The use of donated embryos has offered hope for infertile couples who have no other means to have children. In Iran, fertility centers use fertile couples as embryo donors. In this paper, the advantages and disadvantages of this procedure will be discussed. We conclude that embryo-donation should be performed with frozen embryos thus preventing healthy donors from being harmed by fertility drugs. There must be guidelines for choosing the appropriate donor families. In countries where commercial egg donation is acceptable, fertile couples can be procured as embryo donors thus fulfilling the possible shortage of good quality embryos. Using frozen embryos seems to have less ethical, religious and legal problems when compared to the use of fertile embryo donors. PMID:24799876

  5. Sourcing human embryos for embryonic stem cell lines: problems & perspectives.

    PubMed

    Mehta, Rajvi H

    2014-11-01

    The ability to successfully derive human embryonic stem cells (hESC) lines from human embryos following in vitro fertilization (IVF) opened up a plethora of potential applications of this technique. These cell lines could have been successfully used to increase our understanding of human developmental biology, transplantation medicine and the emerging science of regenerative medicine. The main source for human embryos has been 'discarded' or 'spare' fresh or frozen human embryos following IVF. It is a common practice to stimulate the ovaries of women undergoing any of the assisted reproductive technologies (ART) and retrieve multiple oocytes which subsequently lead to multiple embryos. Of these, only two or maximum of three embryos are transferred while the rest are cryopreserved as per the decision of the couple. in case a couple does not desire to 'cryopreserve' their embryos then all the embryos remaining following embryo transfer can be considered 'spare' or if a couple is no longer in need of the 'cryopreserved' embryos then these also can be considered as 'spare'. But, the question raised by the ethicists is, "what about 'slightly' over-stimulating a woman to get a few extra eggs and embryos? The decision becomes more difficult when it comes to 'discarded' embryos. As of today, the quality of the embryos is primarily assessed based on morphology and the rate of development mainly judged by single point assessment. Despite many criteria described in the literature, the quality assessment is purely subjective. The question that arises is on the decision of 'discarding' embryos. What would be the criteria for discarding embryos and the potential 'use' of ESC derived from the 'abnormal appearing' embryos? This paper discusses some of the newer methods to procure embryos for the derivation of embryonic stem cell lines which will respect the ethical concerns but still provide the source material. PMID:25673530

  6. Sourcing human embryos for embryonic stem cell lines: Problems & perspectives

    PubMed Central

    Mehta, Rajvi H.

    2014-01-01

    The ability to successfully derive human embryonic stem cells (hESC) lines from human embryos following in vitro fertilization (IVF) opened up a plethora of potential applications of this technique. These cell lines could have been successfully used to increase our understanding of human developmental biology, transplantation medicine and the emerging science of regenerative medicine. The main source for human embryos has been ‘discarded’ or ‘spare’ fresh or frozen human embryos following IVF. It is a common practice to stimulate the ovaries of women undergoing any of the assisted reproductive technologies (ART) and retrieve multiple oocytes which subsequently lead to multiple embryos. Of these, only two or maximum of three embryos are transferred while the rest are cryopreserved as per the decision of the couple. In case a couple does not desire to ‘cryopreserve’ their embryos then all the embryos remaining following embryo transfer can be considered ‘spare’ or if a couple is no longer in need of the ‘cryopreserved’ embryos then these also can be considered as ‘spare’. But, the question raised by the ethicists is, “what about ‘slightly’ over-stimulating a woman to get a few extra eggs and embryos? The decision becomes more difficult when it comes to ‘discarded’ embryos. As of today, the quality of the embryos is primarily assessed based on morphology and the rate of development mainly judged by single point assessment. Despite many criteria described in the literature, the quality assessment is purely subjective. The question that arises is on the decision of ‘discarding’ embryos. What would be the criteria for discarding embryos and the potential ‘use’ of ESC derived from the ‘abnormal appearing’ embryos? This paper discusses some of the newer methods to procure embryos for the derivation of embryonic stem cell lines which will respect the ethical concerns but still provide the source material. PMID:25673530

  7. Zebrafish Embryo Disinfection with Povidone-Iodine: Evaluating an Alternative to Chlorine Bleach.

    PubMed

    Chang, Carolyn T; Amack, Jeffrey D; Whipps, Christopher M

    2016-07-01

    Mycobacteriosis is a common bacterial infection in laboratory zebrafish caused by several different species and strains of Mycobacterium, including both rapid and slow growers. One control measure used to prevent mycobacterial spread within and between facilities is surface disinfection of eggs. Recent studies have highlighted the effectiveness of povidone-iodine (PVPI) on preventing propagation of Mycobacterium spp. found in zebrafish colonies. We evaluated the effect of disinfection using 12.5-50 ppm PVPI (unbuffered and buffered) on zebrafish exposed at 6 or 24 h postfertilization (hpf) to determine if this treatment is suitable for use in research zebrafish. Our results show that 6 hpf embryos are less sensitive to treatment as fewer effects on mortality, developmental delay, and deformity were observed. We also found that buffered PVPI treatment results in a greater knockdown of Mycobacterium chelonae and Mycobacterium marinum, as well as results in decreased harmful effects on embryos. Treatments of shorter (2 min vs. 5 min) duration were also more effective at killing mycobacteria in addition to resulting in fewer effects on embryo health. In addition, we compared the efficacy of a rinsing regimen to rinsing and disinfecting. Based on the findings of this study, we recommend disinfecting embryos for 2 min with buffered PVPI at 12.5-25 ppm. PMID:27351620

  8. Survival Study of Zebrafish Embryos Under Gamma Irradiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mena, Pamela; Allende, Miguel; Morales, José Roberto

    2010-08-01

    Zebrafish embryos have interesting biological properties for the study of human diseases. The present work uses zebrafish embryos in a particular development state, to study biological effects due to gamma radiation, arising from a calibrated 60Co source. Initially, the lethal dose for fish embryos was determined and subsequent irradiations were performed at sub-lethal doses, in order to study more subtle effects.

  9. Embryo dignity: the status and juridical protection of the in vitro embryo.

    PubMed

    Raposo, Vera Lúcia; Osuna, Eduardo

    2007-12-01

    In the context of research and reproduction, the status of the human in vitro embryo ranges from being regarded as a person to being regarded as mere property. As regards the first view, one extreme of the spectrum for offering possible legal protection considers that the embryo constitutes a legal person from the moment of conception. For opponents of this view life is a continuum that runs from conception until death. In this process one of the most important stages is birth, the reason being that birth represents the transition between a potential person and a person. The term "embryo" is used to express the being that exists after fusion of the egg and a spermatozoon during the process of embryogenesis until it reaches eight weeks, after which time it is termed a foetus. The embryo's life is recognized as a constitutional value which deserves juridical protection, but not as a person. It only becomes a person with birth. PMID:18284114

  10. Facial Transplants in Xenopus laevis Embryos

    PubMed Central

    Sive, Hazel

    2014-01-01

    Craniofacial birth defects occur in 1 out of every 700 live births, but etiology is rarely known due to limited understanding of craniofacial development. To identify where signaling pathways and tissues act during patterning of the developing face, a 'face transplant' technique has been developed in embryos of the frog Xenopus laevis. A region of presumptive facial tissue (the "Extreme Anterior Domain" (EAD)) is removed from a donor embryo at tailbud stage, and transplanted to a host embryo of the same stage, from which the equivalent region has been removed. This can be used to generate a chimeric face where the host or donor tissue has a loss or gain of function in a gene, and/or includes a lineage label. After healing, the outcome of development is monitored, and indicates roles of the signaling pathway within the donor or surrounding host tissues. Xenopus is a valuable model for face development, as the facial region is large and readily accessible for micromanipulation. Many embryos can be assayed, over a short time period since development occurs rapidly. Findings in the frog are relevant to human development, since craniofacial processes appear conserved between Xenopus and mammals. PMID:24748020

  11. Triploid-diploid mosaic chicken embryo.

    PubMed

    Bloom, S E; Buss, E G

    1966-08-12

    Cytological analysis of an underdeveloped chicken embryo at 6 days of incubation revealed a triploid-diploid mosaic condition. Of the 30 metaphases observed, 19 were triploid and 11 diploid. The triploid cells were 3A-ZZZ and diploid cells 2A-ZZ, as determined for the six largest pairs of chromnosomes. PMID:5328678

  12. Mouse embryo manipulations with OCT guidance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Garcia, Monica D.; Syed, Saba H.; Coughlin, Andrew J.; Wang, Shang; West, Jennifer L.; Larin, Kirill V.; Larina, Irina V.

    2014-03-01

    Optical coherence tomography (OCT) is a three-dimensional, non-invasive optical imaging technique that relies on low-coherence interferometry. OCT has the capability of imaging 2 - 3 mm into tissue, which enables imaging of deeper structures within the embryo with a relatively high spatial resolution (2 - 15μm). Within the past decade, OCT has been increasingly used as a live imaging tool for embryonic cardiovascular research in several animal models. Research in our lab has recently shown that OCT can be used in combination with embryo culture for the visualization of early mammalian cardiovascular development (E7.5 - E10.0). Here, we demonstrate that OCT can be used for the guided microinjection of gold-silica nanoshell suspension into the cardiovascular system in live embryos without deleterious effect. This approach shows a promising application for the OCT guided delivery of contrast agents, viral vectors, therapeutic or pharmacological agents, signaling molecules or dyes to specific organ systems or tissues in live embryos and demonstrates a great potential for gold-silica nanoshells as a contrast agent in embryonic studies.

  13. Culture of Cells from Amphibian Embryos.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stanisstreet, Martin

    1983-01-01

    Describes a method for in vitro culturing of cells from amphibian early embryos. Such cells can be used to demonstrate such properties of eukaryote cells as cell motility, adhesion, differentiation, and cell sorting into tissues. The technique may be extended to investigate other factors. (Author/JN)

  14. Egg embryo development detection with hyperspectral imaging

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    In the U. S. egg industry, anywhere from 130 million to over one billion infertile eggs are incubated each year. Some of these infertile eggs explode in the hatching cabinet and can potentially spread molds or bacteria to all the eggs in the cabinet. A method to detect the embryo development of in...

  15. Formation of planetary embryos from planetesimals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rafikov, Roman Ravilevich

    This thesis is devoted to studying some aspects of the formation of terrestrial planets. Although it is currently widely accepted that terrestrial planets form by agglomeration of a large number of rocky or icy bodies called planetesimals there is still a number of unresolved issues hindering our understanding of this process. I concentrate my research on the dynamical interaction of planetesimal disk with the planetary embryos—precursors of protoplanets. I investigate the development of nonuniformities in the planetesimal disk using analytical techniques employing the methods of statistical mechanics, which is justified by the huge number of planetesimals under consideration. This treatment self-consistently accounts for the evolution of the planetesimal kinematic properties, which is coupled to spatial redistribution of planetesimals in the disk. Planetesimal-planetesimal and embryo- planetesimal interactions are studied in two different velocity regimes: when the average approach velocities of interacting bodies are dominated by their epicyclic motion (dispersion-dominated regime) and when they are dominated by the differential shear in the disk (shear- dominated regime). The intermediate regime is modeled by interpolation. I show that the embryo always tries to repel planetesimals away and produce a depression in planetesimal surface density around its semimajor axis, while the planetesimal-planetesimal scattering acts as a source of effective viscosity which opposes this tendency and tries to smooth any inhomogeneities in the disk. The mutual gravitational interaction between planetesimals also increases their epicyclic motion throughout the disk. Embryo-planetesimal interaction leads to the same dynamical effect but localized spatially in the narrow zone around the embryo's orbit. The formation of inhomogeneities and excitation of planetesimal epicyclic motion in the disk nearby strongly affects the accretion rate of the embryo. I demonstrate that the

  16. Quality of embryos produced from dairy cows fed whole flaxseed and the success of embryo transfer.

    PubMed

    Petit, H V; Cavalieri, F B; Santos, G T D; Morgan, J; Sharpe, P

    2008-05-01

    The objective of the experiment was to determine the effects of fat supplementation on embryo quality of dairy cows and the subsequent success of embryo transfer into recipient heifers fed the same sources of fat. A total of 30 lactating Holstein cows were allotted on d 18 postpartum to 2 groups of 15 donor cows blocked for similar calving dates. Total mixed diets based on silage and fat supplements were fed for ad libitum intake. On a dry matter basis, diets fed to donor cows contained 7.9% whole flaxseed or 2.8% calcium salts of palm oil and those fed to recipient heifers contained 11.4% whole flaxseed or 4.2% calcium salts of palm oil. The experiment with donor cows was carried out between d 18 and 109 of lactation. The experimental diets were fed to 121 recipient heifers from wk 8 before estrus synchronization and superovulation to d 50 of gestation. Dietary fat fed to donor cows had no effect on the number of viable embryos per cow (3.7 +/- 0.5), the number of degenerated embryos per cow (1.8 +/- 0.4), or the number of unfertilized oocytes per cow (2.1 +/- 0.8). But feeding flaxseed decreased fertilization rate (64.3 vs. 78.4%) and the percentage of grade 1 to 2 embryos (56.5 vs. 74.1%) and increased the embryo degeneration percentage (27.4 vs. 18.2%) compared with feeding calcium salts of palm oil. There was no effect of diets fed to donor cows and those fed to recipient heifers for pregnancy rate of heifers. Supplementation with a rich source of n-3 fatty acids decreased quality of embryos from donor lactating dairy cows compared with feeding calcium salts of palm oil, but had no effect on the subsequent pregnancy rate of heifers receiving frozen grade-1 embryos. PMID:18420609

  17. Inhibition of Mitosis and Macromolecular Synthesis in Rat Embryo Cells by Kilham Rat Virus

    PubMed Central

    Tennant, Raymond W.

    1971-01-01

    The effects of Kilham rat virus multiplication were studied in cultured rat embryo cells to examine the mechanisms by which virus infection might be related to developmental defects in rats and hamsters. The virus was found to inhibit motosis and deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA) synthesis within 2 to 10 hr after infection. However, total ribonucleic acid synthesis was relatively unaffected until about 20 hr after infection, and total protein synthesis did not decline significantly until loss of viable cells was apparent in the cultures. No effect on chromosomes was detected. The effect of Kilham rat virus on DNA synthesis appears to be due to inhibition of macromolecular synthesis rather than to an inhibition of uptake of precursors into cells. The effect of the virus on mitosis may be an addition to the effect on DNA synthesis, since mitosis is inhibited even in cultures in which cells are able to divide at the time of infection and which have presumably completed DNA synthesis. PMID:5167023

  18. The effect of mitochondrial ATP-sensitive potassium channels on apoptosis of chick embryo cecal cells by Eimeria tenella.

    PubMed

    Yang, Sha-sha; Zheng, Ming-xue; Xu, Huan-cheng; Cui, Xiao-zhen; Zhang, Yan; Zhao, Wen-long; Bai, Rui

    2015-04-01

    The objective of this study was to investigate the effect of mitochondrial ATP-sensitive potassium (mitoKATP) channels on apoptosis induced by Eimeria tenella. At 24, 48, 72, 96 and 120 h after Eimeria tenella infection, TUNEL assays and translation of phosphatidyl serines to the host cell plasma membrane surface showed that diazoxide-treated chick embryo cecal cells underwent less apoptosis (P <0.05), while light microscopy showed that infection rates of treated cells were higher (P <0.01) than untreated cells. Caspase 9 and caspase 3 of infected cells were activated less (P <0.01) in diazoxide-treated cells than untreated cells. These results indicate that opening mitoKATP channels can protect chick embryo cecal cells from mitochondria-dependent apoptosis induced by Eimeria tenella by inhibiting activations of caspase 9 and caspase 3. PMID:25744434

  19. Lipidome signatures in early bovine embryo development.

    PubMed

    Sudano, Mateus J; Rascado, Tatiana D S; Tata, Alessandra; Belaz, Katia R A; Santos, Vanessa G; Valente, Roniele S; Mesquita, Fernando S; Ferreira, Christina R; Araújo, João P; Eberlin, Marcos N; Landim-Alvarenga, Fernanda D C

    2016-07-15

    Mammalian preimplantation embryonic development is a complex, conserved, and well-orchestrated process involving dynamic molecular and structural changes. Understanding membrane lipid profile fluctuation during this crucial period is fundamental to address mechanisms governing embryogenesis. Therefore, the aim of the present work was to perform a comprehensive assessment of stage-specific lipid profiles during early bovine embryonic development and associate with the mRNA abundance of lipid metabolism-related genes (ACSL3, ELOVL5, and ELOVL6) and with the amount of cytoplasmic lipid droplets. Immature oocytes were recovered from slaughterhouse-derived ovaries, two-cell embryos, and eight- to 16-cell embryos, morula, and blastocysts that were in vitro produced under different environmental conditions. Lipid droplets content and mRNA transcript levels for ACSL3, ELOVL5, and ELOVL6, monitored by lipid staining and quantitative polymerase chain reaction, respectively, increased at morula followed by a decrease at blastocyst stage. Relative mRNA abundance changes of ACSL3 were closely related to cytoplasmic lipid droplet accumulation. Characteristic dynamic changes of phospholipid profiles were observed during early embryo development and related to unsaturation level, acyl chain length, and class composition. ELOVL5 and ELOVL6 mRNA levels were suggestive of overexpression of membrane phospholipids containing elongated fatty acids with 16, 18, and 20 carbons. In addition, putative biomarkers of key events of embryogenesis, embryo lipid accumulation, and elongation were identified. This study provides a comprehensive description of stage-specific lipidome signatures and proposes a mechanism to explain its potential relationship with the fluctuation of both cytoplasmic lipid droplets content and mRNA levels of lipid metabolism-related genes during early bovine embryo development. PMID:27107972

  20. Retarded Embryo Development 1 (RED1) regulates embryo development, seed maturation and plant growth in Arabidopsis.

    PubMed

    Du, Qian; Wang, Huanzhong

    2016-07-20

    Plant seeds accumulate large amounts of protein and carbohydrate as storage reserves during maturation. Thus, understanding the genetic control of embryo and seed development may provide bioengineering tools for yield improvement. In this study, we report the identification of Retarded Embryo Development 1 (RED1) gene in Arabidopsis, whose two independent T-DNA insertion mutant lines, SALK_085642 (red1-1) and SALK_022583 (red1-2), show a retarded embryo development phenotype. The embryogenesis process ceases at the late heart stage in red1-1 and at the bent-cotyledon stage in red1-2, respectively, resulting in seed abortion in both lines. The retarded embryo development and seed abortion phenotypes reverted to normal when RED1 complementation constructs were introduced into mutant plants. Small red1-2 homozygous plants can be successfully rescued by culturing immature seeds, indicating that seed abortion likely results from compromised tolerance to the desiccation process associated with seed maturation. Consistent with this observation, red1-2 seeds accumulate less protein, and the expression of two late embryo development reporter transgenes, LEA::GUS and β-conglycinin::GUS, was significantly weak and started relatively late in the red1-2 mutant lines compared to the wild type. The RED1 gene encodes a plant specific novel protein that is localized in the nucleus. These results indicate that RED1 plays important roles in embryo development, seed maturation and plant growth. PMID:27477025

  1. Nonsurgical Embryo Transfer Device Compared with Surgery for Embryo Transfer in Mice

    PubMed Central

    Steele, Kendra H; Hester, James M; Stone, Barbara J; Carrico, Kimberly M; Spear, Brett T; Fath-Goodin, Angelika

    2013-01-01

    The use of a murine nonsurgical embryo transfer (NSET) device had been described previously for the transfer of blastocysts, morulae, DNA-microinjected embryos, and embryonic stem cell-containing embryos to create genetically modified mice. However, physiologic effects of the NSET device and traditional surgical methods had not been compared directly. Here we used electrocardiography and fecal corticosterone levels to monitor pseudopregnant mice that underwent anesthesia only, the NSET procedure with or without anesthesia, or surgery. These procedures were performed without the use of actual embryos, to focus on effects of the procedures themselves rather than on any physiologic effects due to the deposition of embryos. As compared with surgery and anesthesia, the NSET procedure was associated with less fluctuation in cardiac rhythm and lower levels of the stress biomarker fecal corticosterone. These results indicate that use of the NSET device avoids these physiological perturbations as well as other disadvantages of surgery (for example, postoperative pain and need for postoperative analgesia) and therefore provides a valuable refinement of existing mouse embryo transfer procedures. PMID:23562028

  2. Embryo Transfer in the Canadian Cattle Industry: Canada's Regulatory Approach

    PubMed Central

    L'Ecuyer, C.

    1986-01-01

    In 1978, Canada was the first country to regulate animal embryo transfer in a manner similar to regulations for artificial insemination. Research has shown that the risk of disease transmission by bovine embryos is minimal therefore regulations are evolving to recognize this potential. The Canadian Embryo Transfer Association plays a key role in regulatory decisions. Importing embryos is based on risk assessment and on the impact of potentially introduced disease agents. Export strategy is based on negotiation of valid conditions, on effective certification of embryos and on full involvement at the international level. PMID:17422618

  3. Tissue densities in developing avian embryos. [under acceleration stresses

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smith, A. H.; Abbott, U. K.; Morzenti, A.

    1984-01-01

    The density changes in the components of the incubated egg, the embryo, and the embryo's body parts were measured in the course of 21 days of incubation. In the first two-thirds of the incubation period there is a sequence of increasing density among egg contents: amniotic fluid, embryo, yolk, and albumin. As a result, the embryo is located at the bottom of the amniotic fluid, but at the top of the albumin. This position provides the embryo with mechanical protection and a proximity to the egg's air cell. The observed density changes and the asymmetry of these changes among various body parts of the embryo suggest a functional relationship. The density distributions among the body parts are particularly important in gravitational investigations of embryogenesis since they will produce forces tending to dislocate parts of the embryo.

  4. A fully automated robotic system for microinjection of zebrafish embryos.

    PubMed

    Wang, Wenhui; Liu, Xinyu; Gelinas, Danielle; Ciruna, Brian; Sun, Yu

    2007-01-01

    As an important embodiment of biomanipulation, injection of foreign materials (e.g., DNA, RNAi, sperm, protein, and drug compounds) into individual cells has significant implications in genetics, transgenics, assisted reproduction, and drug discovery. This paper presents a microrobotic system for fully automated zebrafish embryo injection, which overcomes the problems inherent in manual operation, such as human fatigue and large variations in success rates due to poor reproducibility. Based on computer vision and motion control, the microrobotic system performs injection at a speed of 15 zebrafish embryos (chorion unremoved) per minute, with a survival rate of 98% (n = 350 embryos), a success rate of 99% (n = 350 embryos), and a phenotypic rate of 98.5% (n = 210 embryos). The sample immobilization technique and microrobotic control method are applicable to other biological injection applications such as the injection of mouse oocytes/embryos and Drosophila embryos to enable high-throughput biological and pharmaceutical research. PMID:17848993

  5. A Fully Automated Robotic System for Microinjection of Zebrafish Embryos

    PubMed Central

    Gelinas, Danielle; Ciruna, Brian; Sun, Yu

    2007-01-01

    As an important embodiment of biomanipulation, injection of foreign materials (e.g., DNA, RNAi, sperm, protein, and drug compounds) into individual cells has significant implications in genetics, transgenics, assisted reproduction, and drug discovery. This paper presents a microrobotic system for fully automated zebrafish embryo injection, which overcomes the problems inherent in manual operation, such as human fatigue and large variations in success rates due to poor reproducibility. Based on computer vision and motion control, the microrobotic system performs injection at a speed of 15 zebrafish embryos (chorion unremoved) per minute, with a survival rate of 98% (n = 350 embryos), a success rate of 99% (n = 350 embryos), and a phenotypic rate of 98.5% (n = 210 embryos). The sample immobilization technique and microrobotic control method are applicable to other biological injection applications such as the injection of mouse oocytes/embryos and Drosophila embryos to enable high-throughput biological and pharmaceutical research. PMID:17848993

  6. Oxamflatin Treatment Enhances Cloned Porcine Embryo Development and Nuclear Reprogramming*

    PubMed Central

    Mao, Jiude; Zhao, Ming-Tao; Whitworth, Kristin M.; Spate, Lee D.; Walters, Eric M.; O'Gorman, Chad; Lee, Kiho; Samuel, Melissa S.; Murphy, Clifton N.; Wells, Kevin; Rivera, Rocio M.

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Faulty epigenetic reprogramming of somatic nuclei is thought to be the main reason for low cloning efficiency by somatic cell nuclear transfer (SCNT). Histone deacetylase inhibitors (HDACi), such as Scriptaid, improve developmental competence of SCNT embryos in several species. Another HDACi, Oxamflatin, is about 100 times more potent than Scriptaid in the ability to inhibit nuclear-specific HDACs. The present study determined the effects of Oxamflatin treatment on embryo development, DNA methylation, and gene expression. Oxamflatin treatment enhanced blastocyst formation of SCNT embryos in vitro. Embryo transfer produced more pigs born and fewer mummies from the Oxamflatin-treated group compared to the Scriptaid-treated positive control. Oxamflatin also decreased DNA methylation of POU5F1 regulatory elements and centromeric repeat elements in day-7 blastocysts. When compared to in vitro–fertilized (IVF) embryos, the methylation status of POU5F1, NANOG, and centromeric repeat was similar in the cloned embryos, indicating these genes were successfully reprogrammed. However, compared to the lack of methylation of XIST in day-7 IVF embryos, a higher methylation level in day-7 cloned embryos was observed, implying that X chromosomes were activated in day-7 IVF blastocysts, but were not fully activated in cloned embryos, i.e., reprogramming of XIST was delayed. A time-course analysis of XIST DNA methylation on day-13, -15, -17, and -19 in vivo embryos revealed that XIST methylation initiated at about day 13 and was not completed by day 19. The methylation of the XIST gene in day-19 control cloned embryos was delayed again when compared to in vivo embryos. However, methylation of XIST in Oxamflatin-treated embryos was comparable with in vivo embryos, which further demonstrated that Oxamflatin could accelerate the delayed reprogramming of XIST gene and thus might improve cloning efficiency. PMID:25548976

  7. Plasminogen-independent fibrinolysis by proteases produced by transformed chick embryo fibroblasts.

    PubMed Central

    Chen, L B; Buchanan, J M

    1975-01-01

    The fibrinolytic activity of proteases secreted by chick embryo fibroblasts infected with Rous sarcoma virus was studied by use of a procedure in which a fibrin clot was formed with highly purified fibrinogen and thrombin above the cell layer. This procedure results in the formation of fibrin that is apparently a more suitable substrate for studies on fibrinolysis than is fibrin prepared by other methods. Since neither plasminogen nor serum were included in the assay system in the present studies, the fibrinolytic activity observed cannot be ascribed to the conversion of the plasminogen in serum to plasmin by a plasminogen activator produced by transformed cells. Our procedure, therefore, measures proteolytic activities other than those reported by previous investigators. Maintenance of some of the transformed phenotypes of Rous sarcoma virus transformed chick embryo fibroblasts such as morpholigical change and increased rate of glucose uptake apparently does not depend on the presence of plasminogen in the culture medium. Images PMID:165484

  8. Infectious bursal disease virus changes the potassium current properties of chicken embryo fibroblasts.

    PubMed

    Repp, H; Nieper, H; Draheim, H J; Koschinski, A; Müller, H; Dreyer, F

    1998-07-01

    Infectious bursal disease virus (IBDV) is the causative agent of an economically significant poultry disease. IBDV infection leads to apoptosis in chicken embryos and cell cultures. Since changes in cellular ion fluxes during apoptosis have been reported, we investigated the membrane ion currents of chicken embryo fibroblasts (CEFs) inoculated with the Cu-1 strain of IBDV using the patch-clamp recording technique. Incubation of CEFs with IBDV led to marked changes in their K+ outward current properties, with respect to both the kinetics of activation and inactivation and the Ca2+ dependence of the activation. The changes occurred in a time-dependent manner and were complete after 8 h. UV-treated noninfectious virions induced the same K+ current changes as live IBDV. When CEFs were inoculated with IBDV after pretreatment with a neutralizing antibody, about 30% of the cells showed a normal K+ current, whereas the rest exhibited K+ current properties identical to or closely resembling those of IBDV-infected cells. Incubation of CEFs with culture supernatant from IBDV-infected cells from which the virus particles were removed had no influence on the K+ current. Our data strongly suggest that the K+ current changes induced by IBDV are not due to virus replication, but are the result of attachment and/or membrane penetration. Possibly, the altered K+ current may delay the apoptotic process in CEFs after IBDV infection. PMID:9657954

  9. Microfluidic EmbryoSort technology: towards in flow analysis, sorting and dispensing of individual vertebrate embryos

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fuad, Nurul M.; Wlodkowic, Donald

    2013-12-01

    The demand to reduce the numbers of laboratory animals has facilitated the emergence of surrogate models such as tests performed on zebrafish (Danio rerio) or African clawed frog's (Xenopus levis) eggs, embryos and larvae. Those two model organisms are becoming increasingly popular replacements to current adult animal testing in toxicology, ecotoxicology and also in drug discovery. Zebrafish eggs and embryos are particularly attractive for toxicological analysis due their size (diameter 1.6 mm), optical transparency, large numbers generated per fish and very straightforward husbandry. The current bottleneck in using zebrafish embryos for screening purposes is, however, a tedious manual evaluation to confirm the fertilization status and subsequent dispensing of single developing embryos to multitier plates to perform toxicity analysis. Manual procedures associated with sorting hundreds of embryos are very monotonous and as such prone to significant analytical errors due to operator's fatigue. In this work, we present a proofof- concept design of a continuous flow embryo sorter capable of analyzing, sorting and dispensing objects ranging in size from 1.5 - 2.5 mm. The prototypes were fabricated in polymethyl methacrylate (PMMA) transparent thermoplastic using infrared laser micromachining. The application of additive manufacturing processes to prototype Lab-on-a-Chip sorters using both fused deposition manufacturing (FDM) and stereolithography (SLA) were also explored. The operation of the device was based on a revolving receptacle capable of receiving, holding and positioning single fish embryos for both interrogation and subsequent sorting. The actuation of the revolving receptacle was performed using a DC motor and/or microservo motor. The system was designed to separate between fertilized (LIVE) and non-fertilized (DEAD) eggs, based on optical transparency using infrared (IR) emitters and receivers.

  10. Microbead Implantation in the Zebrafish Embryo

    PubMed Central

    Gerlach, Gary F.; Morales, Elvin E.; Wingert, Rebecca A.

    2015-01-01

    The zebrafish has emerged as a valuable genetic model system for the study of developmental biology and disease. Zebrafish share a high degree of genomic conservation, as well as similarities in cellular, molecular, and physiological processes, with other vertebrates including humans. During early ontogeny, zebrafish embryos are optically transparent, allowing researchers to visualize the dynamics of organogenesis using a simple stereomicroscope. Microbead implantation is a method that enables tissue manipulation through the alteration of factors in local environments. This allows researchers to assay the effects of any number of signaling molecules of interest, such as secreted peptides, at specific spatial and temporal points within the developing embryo. Here, we detail a protocol for how to manipulate and implant beads during early zebrafish development. PMID:26274386

  11. Control of segment number in vertebrate embryos.

    PubMed

    Gomez, Céline; Ozbudak, Ertuğrul M; Wunderlich, Joshua; Baumann, Diana; Lewis, Julian; Pourquié, Olivier

    2008-07-17

    The vertebrate body axis is subdivided into repeated segments, best exemplified by the vertebrae that derive from embryonic somites. The number of somites is precisely defined for any given species but varies widely from one species to another. To determine the mechanism controlling somite number, we have compared somitogenesis in zebrafish, chicken, mouse and corn snake embryos. Here we present evidence that in all of these species a similar 'clock-and-wavefront' mechanism operates to control somitogenesis; in all of them, somitogenesis is brought to an end through a process in which the presomitic mesoderm, having first increased in size, gradually shrinks until it is exhausted, terminating somite formation. In snake embryos, however, the segmentation clock rate is much faster relative to developmental rate than in other amniotes, leading to a greatly increased number of smaller-sized somites. PMID:18563087

  12. Vitrification of oocytes, embryos and blastocysts.

    PubMed

    Mukaida, Tetsunori; Oka, Chikahiro

    2012-12-01

    In assisted reproductive technology, cryopreservation of human oocytes and embryos has been significantly improved by refined slow-cooling and the new vitrification method. The slow-cooling method requires a programmed cryo-machine, and usually takes several hours. It is, however, difficult to eliminate injuries resulting from ice formation completely. Vitrification has become a reliable strategy because it is simple, can lead to high survival rates and viability, and has better clinical outcome. Vitrification transforms cells into an amorphous glassy state inside and outside the vitrified cell with ultra-rapid cooling and warming steps by plunging the oocytes and embryos into liquid nitrogen, instead of ice-crystal formation. Over the past decade, several advances in vitrification technologies have improved clinical efficiency and outcome. In this chapter, we focus on vitrification technologies for cryopreservation in human assisted reproductive technology. PMID:22940094

  13. Cells, embryos and development in space

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Krikorian, A. D.

    1984-01-01

    Work continues to focus on the demonstrable totipotency of cultured somatic cells of various higher plants and has examined the conditions which regulate this propensity to be controllably released. This was done with special reference to cells obtained from cultured explants of daylily and carrot. For purposes of identifying the variables in question, work was carried out almost exclusively in liquid media. The events that intervene between the aseptic isolation of tissue explants, the culture of small derived units and free cells and the propagation in large numbers of adventive or somatic embryos to plantlets were traced and certain definitive stages at which control is exercised were identified. In daylily, morphologically competent units are now propagated with a high degree of precision in rotated liquid cultures in bulk, and under the conditions of continuous neutralized gravity, the development progresses so that embryo-plantlets are obtained.

  14. Detection of Smad Signaling in Zebrafish Embryos.

    PubMed

    Liu, Xingfeng; Wang, Qiang; Meng, Anming

    2016-01-01

    Nodal and BMPs play critical roles in germ layer induction and patterning in early zebrafish embryos. Smad2/3 and Smad1/5/8 are intracellular effectors of Nodal and BMPs, respectively. These Smads regulate, in cooperation with other factors, transcription of hundreds of target genes in the nucleus. The activity and stability of Smads are regulated by phosphorylation modifications. To better understand the regulatory network of Smads-mediated signaling and its biological implications, it is necessary to monitor the signaling activity in an in vivo model system. In this chapter, we describe the methods used in zebrafish embryos for dissecting Smads signaling, including TGF-β/Nodal- and BMP-responsive luciferase reporter assays, Western blotting for Smads, co-immunoprecipitation for Smads and their interacting proteins, chromatin-immunoprecipitation for identification of Smad2-binding sites, and immunostaining for detection of active Smad1/5/8. PMID:26520131

  15. Central line infections - hospitals

    MedlinePlus

    ... infection; CVC - infection; Central venous device - infection; Infection control - central line infection; Nosocomial infection - central line infection; Hospital acquired infection - central line infection; Patient safety - central ...

  16. Techniques for slow cryopreservation of embryos.

    PubMed

    Gosden, Lucinda Veeck

    2014-01-01

    The slow cryopreservation of embryos has been used for nearly three decades as a means of storing surplus conceptuses from single IVF (in vitro fertilization) cycles. Doing so has allowed caregivers to maximize pregnancy rates without wastage of precious biological materials. Very detailed methods are described here using a popular biological freezing unit manufactured by Planer PLC (Middlesex, UK). Culture media preparation and tranfer protocols, including replacement in both natural and stimulated cycles, are included. PMID:24782021

  17. Localization of tropomyosin in mouse embryo fibroblasts.

    PubMed

    Jorgensen, A O; Subrahmanyan, L; Kalnins, V I

    1975-04-01

    Antiserum to chick skeletal muscle tropomyosin was used to localize tropomyosin in mouse embryo fibroblasts by the indirect fluorescein labeled antibody technique. Specific staining was observed cytoplasmic fibers, which extended out into the cell processes. The staining pattern in these cells is similar to that previously described by others for actin. This observation suggests that in fibroblasts tropomyosin, like actin, is localized in fibers in the cytoplasm. PMID:50726

  18. Developmental toxicity of cartap on zebrafish embryos.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Shengli; Dong, Qiaoxiang; Li, Shaonan; Guo, Jiangfeng; Wang, Xingxing; Zhu, Guonian

    2009-12-13

    Cartap is a widely used insecticide which belongs to a member of nereistoxin derivatives and acts on nicotinic acetylcholine receptor site. Its effects on aquatic species are of grave concern. To explore the potential developmental toxicity of cartap, zebrafish embryos were continually exposed, from 0.5 to 144h post-fertilization, to a range of concentrations of 25-1000microg/l. Results of the experiment indicated that cartap concentrations of 100microg/l and above negatively affected embryo survival and hatching success. Morphological analysis uncovered a large suite of abnormalities such as less melanin pigmentation, wavy notochord, crooked trunk, fuzzy somites, neurogenesis defects and vasculature defects. The most sensitive organ was proved to be the notochord which displayed defects at concentrations as low as 25microg/l. Both sensitivity towards exposure and localization of the defect were stage specific. To elucidate mechanisms concerning notochord, pigmentation, and hatching defects, enzyme assay, RT Q-PCR, and different exposure strategies were performed. For embryos with hatching failure, chorion was verified not to be digested, while removing cartap from exposure at early pre-hatching stage could significantly increase the hatching success. However, cartap was proved, via vitro assay, to have no effect on proteolytic activity of hatching enzyme. These findings implied that the secretion of hatching enzyme might be blocked. We also revealed that cartap inhibited the activity of melanogenic enzyme tyrosinase and matrix enzyme lysyl oxidase and induced expression of their genes. These suggested that cartap could impaired melanin pigmentation of zebrafish embryos through inhibiting tyrosinase activity, while inhibition of lysyl oxidase activity was responsible for notochord undulation, which subsequently caused somite defect, and at least partially responsible for defects in vasculature and neurogenesis. PMID:19923012

  19. A ray of light about frozen embryos.

    PubMed

    Clayton, Ellen Wright

    1992-12-01

    The Tennessee Supreme Court's decision in Davis v. Davis, a case that raises the question of how to allocate frozen embryos in the event of divorce, addresses many of the legal issues posed by in vitro fertilization. The decision considers the interests of the progenitors as well as of the children who may result. For example, the court held that gamete providers' discretion regarding the disposition of embryos can be limited only when their decisions would harm the children who might be born. The court also made clear that efforts to seek genetic parenthood are protected only when accompanied by a desire to raise the resulting children, a conclusion that also affects other reproductive technologies. In addition to elaborating an analytic framework, the court set guidelines for resolving disputes when the couples had made no prior agreements, including holding that while the embryos are ex-utero the desire to avoid genetic parenthood almost always trumps the wish to become a parent. The well-reasoned analysis in Davis v. Davis should help shape legal and ethical discussion regarding the use of in vitro fertilization for many years to come. PMID:11645754

  20. Characterization of embryo-specific genes

    SciTech Connect

    Sung, R.

    1992-06-12

    The objective of the proposed research is to characterize the function and regulation of a set of embryonic genes which are expressed in the embryos, not in the plants. 22 cDNA clones were isolated from a cDNA library we constructed using mRNAS of -carrot somatic embryos. These cDNA clones identified mRNA species that are present in the somatic and zygotic embryos, but not in adult plants. The sequence of all 22cDNA clones were determined; genomic clones for three cDNA clones, DC8, DC59, and DC49 were isolated and gene sequences determined. DC8, DC49, and several other genes identified by the cDNA sequences belong to the category of late embryogenesis abundant protein genes, Lea. The function of these gens have not yet been determined, but they share common structural features, are regulated by ABA and are speculated to play a role in seed desiccation.

  1. In vivo photoacoustic imaging of mouse embryos

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Laufer, Jan; Norris, Francesca; Cleary, Jon; Zhang, Edward; Treeby, Bradley; Cox, Ben; Johnson, Peter; Scambler, Pete; Lythgoe, Mark; Beard, Paul

    2012-06-01

    The ability to noninvasively image embryonic vascular anatomy in mouse models is an important requirement for characterizing the development of the normal cardiovascular system and malformations in the heart and vascular supply. Photoacoustic imaging, which can provide high resolution non invasive images of the vasculature based upon optical absorption by endogenous hemoglobin, is well suited to this application. In this study, photoacoustic images of mouse embryos were obtained ex vivo and in vivo. The images show intricate details of the embryonic vascular system to depths of up to 10 mm, which allowed whole embryos to be imaged in situ. To achieve this, an all-optical photoacoustic scanner and a novel time reversal image reconstruction algorithm, which provide deep tissue imaging capability while maintaining high spatial resolution and contrast were employed. This technology may find application as an imaging tool for preclinical embryo studies in developmental biology as well as more generally in preclinical and clinical medicine for studying pathologies characterized by changes in the vasculature.

  2. Genetic analysis of embryo dormancy. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Galau, G.

    1998-09-01

    Primary dormancy is the inability of mature seed to immediately germinate until specific environmental stimuli are perceived that predict that future conditions will support plant growth and seed set. The analysis of abscisic acid deficient and insensitive mutants, in particular in Arabidopsis, suggests that embryo abscisic acid may be directly involved in the development of primary dormancy. Other studies implicate the continued accumulation of LEA proteins as inhibiting germination in dormant embryos. The results of these physiological, molecular and genetic approaches are complex and equivocal. There is a real need for approaches that test the separate nature of vivipary inhibition and primary dormancy and deliberately seed to decouple and dissect them. These approaches should be of help in understanding both late embryo development and primary dormancy. The approach taken here is to directly isolate mutants of Arabidopsis that appear to be deficient only in primary dormancy, that is fresh seed that germinate rapidly without the normally-required cold-stratification. The authors have isolated at least 8 independent, rapidly germinating RGM mutants of Arabidopsis. All others aspects of plant growth and development appear normal in these lines, suggesting that the rgm mutants are defective only in the establishment or maintenance of primary dormancy. At least one of these may be tagged with T-DNA. In addition, about 50 RGM isolates have been recovered from EMS-treated seed.

  3. Embryos, DOHaD and David Barker.

    PubMed

    Fleming, T P; Velazquez, M A; Eckert, J J

    2015-10-01

    The early embryo and periconceptional period is a window during which environmental factors may cause permanent change in the pattern and characteristics of development leading to risk of adult onset disease. This has now been demonstrated across small and large animal models and also in the human. Most evidence of periconceptional 'programming' has emerged from maternal nutritional models but also other in vivo and in vitro conditions including assisted reproductive treatments, show consistent outcomes. This short review first reports on the range of environmental in vivo and in vitro periconceptional models and resulting long-term outcomes. Second, it uses the rodent maternal low protein diet model restricted to the preimplantation period and considers the stepwise maternal-embryonic dialogue that comprises the induction of programming. This dialogue leads to cellular and epigenetic responses by the embryo, mainly identified in the extra-embryonic cell lineages, and underpins an apparently permanent change in the growth trajectory during pregnancy and associates with increased cardiometabolic and behavioural disease in adulthood. We recognize the important advice of David Barker some years ago to investigate the sensitivity of the early embryo to developmental programming, an insight for which we are grateful. PMID:25952250

  4. Preimplantation Mouse Embryo Selection Guided by Light-Induced Dielectrophoresis

    PubMed Central

    Valley, Justin K.; Swinton, Paul; Boscardin, W. John; Lue, Tom F.; Rinaudo, Paolo F.; Wu, Ming C.; Garcia, Maurice M.

    2010-01-01

    Selection of optimal quality embryos for in vitro fertilization (IVF) transfer is critical to successful live birth outcomes. Currently, embryos are chosen based on subjective assessment of morphologic developmental maturity. A non-invasive means to quantitatively measure an embryo's developmental maturity would reduce the variability introduced by the current standard. We present a method that exploits the scaling electrical properties of pre-transfer embryos to quantitatively discern embryo developmental maturity using light-induced dielectrophoresis (DEP). We show that an embryo's DEP response is highly correlated with its developmental stage. Uniquely, this technique allows one to select, in sequence and under blinded conditions, the most developmentally mature embryos among a mixed cohort of morphologically indistinguishable embryos cultured in optimized and sub-optimal culture media. Following assay, embryos continue to develop normally in vitro. Light-induced dielectrophoresis provides a non-invasive, quantitative, and reproducible means to select embryos for applications including IVF transfer and embryonic stem cell harvest. PMID:20405021

  5. Propylthiouracil Is Teratogenic in Murine Embryos

    PubMed Central

    Benavides, Valeria C.; Mallela, Murali K.; Booth, Carmen J.; Wendler, Christopher C.; Rivkees, Scott A.

    2012-01-01

    Background Hyperthyroidism during pregnancy is treated with the antithyroid drugs (ATD) propylthiouracil (PTU) and methimazole (MMI). PTU currently is recommended as the drug of choice during early pregnancy. Yet, despite widespread ATD use in pregnancy, formal studies of ATD teratogenic effects have not been performed. Methods We examined the teratogenic effects of PTU and MMI during embryogenesis in mice. To span different periods of embryogenesis, dams were treated with compounds or vehicle daily from embryonic day (E) 7.5 to 9.5 or from E3.5 to E7.5. Embryos were examined for gross malformations at E10.5 or E18.5 followed by histological and micro-CT analysis. Influences of PTU on gene expression levels were examined by RNA microarray analysis. Results When dams were treated from E7.5 to E9.5 with PTU, neural tube and cardiac abnormalities were observed at E10.5. Cranial neural tube defects were significantly more common among the PTU-exposed embryos than those exposed to MMI or vehicle. Blood in the pericardial sac, which is a feature indicative of abnormal cardiac function and/or abnormal vasculature, was observed more frequently in PTU-treated than MMI-treated or vehicle-treated embryos. Following PTU treatment, a total of 134 differentially expressed genes were identified. Disrupted genetic pathways were those associated with cytoskeleton remodeling and keratin filaments. At E 18.5, no gross malformations were evident in either ATD group, but the number of viable PTU embryos per dam at E18.5 was significantly lower from those at E10.5, indicating loss of malformed embryos. These data show that PTU exposure during embryogenesis is associated with delayed neural tube closure and cardiac abnormalities. In contrast, we did not observe structural or cardiac defects associated with MMI exposure except at the higher dose. We find that PTU exposure during embryogenesis is associated with fetal loss. These observations suggest that PTU has teratogenic potential

  6. Embryo collection in prepubertal gilts and attempts to develop an improved embryo transfer technique.

    PubMed

    Wallenhorst, S; Holtz, W

    2002-06-15

    Prepubertal gilts were treated with 1,500 iu equine chorionic gonadotrophin, followed 72 hours later by 500 iu human chorionic gonadotrophin (hCG), and inseminated 36 and 48 hours later. Embryos were collected at slaughter 168 hours after the hCG treatment. Blastocysts classified as 'good' or 'fair' were transferred to synchronised recipients, either by conventional surgical means or by a 'semi-endoscopic' approach, and the recipients were slaughtered four weeks later. Of 238 donor gilts, 98.4 per cent had responded with a mean (se) 23.5 (1.0) ovulations and 19.1 (1.0) ova or embryos, of which 47 per cent were considered morphologically intact and transferable. The large proportion of non-transferable embryos was not associated with the age or weight of the gilts, the season or with their housing conditions. Conventional surgical transfer of 15 to 20 (mean 17.4) blastocysts to synchronised recipients yielded 88 percent (14 of 16) pregnancies with between seven and 14 (mean 8.2) viable fetuses, and an embryo survival rate of 47 per cent in the pregnant recipients and 41 per cent in all the recipients. The corresponding data for the semi-endoscopic transfers were 16 to 20 (mean 17.7) blastocysts transferred, 47 per cent (eight of 17) pregnancies, four to 12 (mean 7.3) viable fetuses per pregnant recipient and an embryo survival rate of 41 per cent in the pregnant recipients and 19 per cent in all the recipients. Significantly fewer of these recipients became pregnant and a significantly smaller proportion of the embryos survived (P<0.05). PMID:12092622

  7. Fiber optic light-scattering measurement system for evaluation of embryo viability: light-scattering characteristics from live mouse embryo

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Itoh, Harumi; Arai, Tsunenori; Kikuchi, Makoto

    1997-06-01

    We measured angular distribution of the light scattering from live mouse embryo with 632.8nm in wavelength to evaluate the embryo viability. We aim to measure the mitochondrial density in human embryo which have relation to the embryo viability. We have constructed the light scattering measurement system to detect the mitochondrial density non-invasively. We have employed two optical fibers for the illumination and sensing to change the angle between these fibers. There were two dips on the scattering angular distribution from the embryo. These dips existed on 30 and 85 deg. We calculated the scattering angular pattern by Mie theory to fit the measured scattering estimated scattering size and density. The best fitting was obtained when the particle size and density were 0.9 micrometers and 1010 particles per ml, respectively. These values coincided with the approximated values of mitochondrial in the embryo. The measured light scattering may mainly originated from mitochondria in spite of the existence of the various scattering particles in the embryo. Since our simple scattering measurement may offer the mitochondrial density in the embryo, it might become the practical method of human embryo on in vitro fertilization-embryo transfer.

  8. Raphides in Palm Embryos and their Systematic Distribution

    PubMed Central

    ZONA, SCOTT

    2004-01-01

    • Background and Aims Raphides are ubiquitous in the palms (Arecaceae), where they are found in roots, stems, leaves, flowers and fruits. Their occasional presence in embryos, first noticed over 100 years ago, has gone largely unexamined. • Methods Embryos from 148 taxa of palms, the largest survey of palm embryos to date, were examined using light microscopy of squashed preparations under non‐polarized and crossed polarized light. • Key Results Raphides were found in embryos of species from the three subfamilies Coryphoideae, Ceroxyloideae and Arecoideae. Raphides were not observed in the embryos of species of Calamoideae or Phytelephantoideae. The remaining subfamily, the monospecific Nypoideae, was not available for study. • Conclusions Within the Coryphoideae and Ceroxyloideae, embryos with raphides were rare, but within the Arecoideae, they were a common feature of the tribes Areceae and Caryoteae. PMID:14980977

  9. Developmental arrest in grass shrimp embryos exposed to selected toxicants

    SciTech Connect

    Wilson, J.E.H.

    1998-12-31

    Excised embryos of the grass shrimp (Palaemonetes pugio) were exposed to single pulse concentrations of selected pollutants for 4 days. The following toxicity endpoints were monitored: rate of embryonic development, embryo mortality, and types of embryo malformation. Each endpoint exhibited concentration--response relationships which were modified by the embryonic age at which exposure commenced. Developmental retardation of up to 3 days was effected by phenol at 0.01% (V/V) and complete developmental arrest occurred at 0.05% and 0.1% (V/V). Similarly for methylene chloride, developmental retardation of 1003 days were observed at 0.1% (V/V) depending on the age of the embryos at the start of the tests. The morphological abnormalities of the embryos are described. The ecological significance of these findings and implications for the development of short-term toxicity tests using grass shrimp embryos are discussed.

  10. Digital Microfluidic Processing of Mammalian Embryos for Vitrification

    PubMed Central

    Abdelgawad, Mohamed; Sun, Yu

    2014-01-01

    Cryopreservation is a key technology in biology and clinical practice. This paper presents a digital microfluidic device that automates sample preparation for mammalian embryo vitrification. Individual micro droplets manipulated on the microfluidic device were used as micro-vessels to transport a single mouse embryo through a complete vitrification procedure. Advantages of this approach, compared to manual operation and channel-based microfluidic vitrification, include automated operation, cryoprotectant concentration gradient generation, and feasibility of loading and retrieval of embryos. PMID:25250666

  11. Cryoprotectants protect medaka (Oryzias latipes) embryos from chilling injury.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Qing-Jing; Zhou, Guang-Bin; Wang, Yan-Ping; Fu, Xiang-Wei; Zhu, Shi-En

    2012-01-01

    This study was conducted to investigate the effect of six cryoprotectants (dimethyl sulfoxide (DMSO), glycerol (Gly), methanol (MeOH), ethylene glycol (EG), 1,2-propylene glycol (PG) and N,N-dimethylformamide (DMF) on the survival of medaka (Oryzias lapites) embryos at low temperatures (0 and -5C). Firstly, the embryos at 8 to 16-cell stages were exposed to different concentrations (1 to 4 mol per L) of DMSO, Gly, MeOH, EG, PG and DMF for 40min at 26C. After removal of the cryoprotectants (CPAs), the embryo survivals were assessed by their development into live fries following 9 day of culture. The results showed that the higher concentration of the CPA, the lower survival of the embryos; and that the toxicity of the six CPAs to medaka embryos is in the order of PG < MeOH = DMSO < Gly < EG < DMF (P < 0.05). Secondly, based on the results obtained above, embryos at 8 to 16-cell stages or other stages were exposed to 2 mol per L of PG, MeOH or DMSO for up to 180 min at 0C and up to 80 min at -5C respectively. The 8 to 16-cell embryos treated with MeOH at low temperatures showed highest survival. Thirdly, when embryos at different stages were treated with 2 mol per L of MeOH at -5C for 60 min, 16-somite stage embryos showed highest survival, followed by 4-somite, neurula, 50 percent epiboly, blastula, 32-cell and 8 to 16-cell embryos. These results demonstrated that PG had the lowest toxicity to medaka embryos among the six permeable CPAs at 26C, whereas MeOH showed highest cryoprotective efficiency under chilling conditions and chilling injury decreased gradually with the development of medaka embryos. PMID:22576114

  12. In ovo gene manipulation of melanocytes and their adjacent keratinocytes during skin pigmentation of chicken embryos.

    PubMed

    Murai, Hidetaka; Tadokoro, Ryosuke; Sakai, Ken-Ichiro; Takahashi, Yoshiko

    2015-04-01

    During skin pigmentation in avians and mammalians, melanin is synthesized in the melanocytes, and subsequently transferred to adjacently located keratinocytes, leading to a wide coverage of the body surface by melanin-containing cells. The behavior of melanocytes is influenced by keratinocytes shown mostly by in vitro studies. However, it has poorly been investigated how such intercellular cross-talk is regulated in vivo because of a lack of suitable experimental models. Using chicken embryos, we developed a method that enables in vivo gene manipulations of melanocytes and keratinocytes, where these cells are separately labeled by different genes. Two types of gene transfer techniques were combined: one was a retrovirus-mediated gene infection into the skin/keratinocytes, and the other was the in ovo DNA electroporation into neural crest cells, the origin of melanocytes. Since the Replication-Competent Avian sarcoma-leukosis virus long terminal repeat with Splice acceptor (RCAS) infection was available only for the White leghorn strain showing little pigmentation, melanocytes prepared from the Hypeco nera (pigmented) were back-transplanted into embryos of White leghorn. Prior to the transplantation, enhanced green fluorescent protein (EGFP)(+) Neo(r+) -electroporated melanocytes from Hypeco nera were selectively grown in G418-supplemented medium. In the skin of recipient White leghorn embryos infected with RCAS-mOrange, mOrange(+) keratinocytes and transplanted EGFP(+) melanocytes were frequently juxtaposed each other. High-resolution confocal microscopy also revealed that transplanted melanocytes exhibited normal behaviors regarding distribution patterns of melanocytes, dendrite morphology, and melanosome transfer. The method described in this study will serve as a useful tool to understand the mechanisms underlying intercellular regulations during skin pigmentation in vivo. PMID:25739909

  13. Chimerism in piglets developed from aggregated cloned embryos.

    PubMed

    Huang, Yongye; Li, Zhanjun; Wang, Anfeng; Han, Xiaolei; Song, Yuning; Yuan, Lin; Li, Tianye; Wang, Bing; Lai, Liangxue; Ouyang, Hongsheng; Pang, Daxin

    2016-04-01

    Porcine chimeras are valuable in the study of pluripotency, embryogenesis and development. It would be meaningful to generate chimeric piglets from somatic cell nuclear transfer embryos. In this study, two cell lines expressing the fluorescent markers enhanced green fluorescent protein (EGFP) and tdTomato were used as donor cells to produce reconstructed embryos. Chimeric embryos were generated by aggregating two EGFP-cell derived embryos with two tdTomato-cell derived embryos at the 4-cell stage, and embryo transfer was performed when the aggregated embryos developed into blastocysts. Live porcine chimeras were successfully born and chimerism was observed by their skin color, gene integration, microsatellite loci composition and fluorescent protein expression. The chimeric piglets were largely composed of EGFP-expressing cells, and this phenomenon was possibly due to the hyper-methylation of the promoter of the tdTomato gene. In addition, the expression levels of tumorigenicity-related genes were altered after tdTomato transfection in bladder cancer cells. The results show that chimeric pigs can be produced by aggregating cloned embryos and that the developmental capability of the cloned embryo in the subsequent chimeric development could be affected by the growth characteristics of its donor cell. PMID:27239442

  14. Wheat (Triticum aestivum L.) transformation using mature embryos.

    PubMed

    Medvecká, Eva; Harwood, Wendy A

    2015-01-01

    In most protocols for the Agrobacterium-mediated transformation of wheat, the preferred target tissues are immature embryos. However, transformation methods relying on immature embryos require the growth of plants under controlled conditions to provide a continuous supply of good-quality target tissue. The use of mature embryos as a target tissue has the advantage of only requiring good-quality seed as the starting material. Here we describe a transformation method based on the Agrobacterium-mediated transformation of callus cultures derived from mature wheat embryos of the genotype Bobwhite S56. PMID:25300842

  15. Embryo fossilization is a biological process mediated by microbial biofilms

    PubMed Central

    Raff, Elizabeth C.; Schollaert, Kaila L.; Nelson, David E.; Donoghue, Philip C. J.; Thomas, Ceri-Wyn; Turner, F. Rudolf; Stein, Barry D.; Dong, Xiping; Bengtson, Stefan; Huldtgren, Therese; Stampanoni, Marco; Chongyu, Yin; Raff, Rudolf A.

    2008-01-01

    Fossilized embryos with extraordinary cellular preservation appear in the Late Neoproterozoic and Cambrian, coincident with the appearance of animal body fossils. It has been hypothesized that microbial processes are responsible for preservation and mineralization of organic tissues. However, the actions of microbes in preservation of embryos have not been demonstrated experimentally. Here, we show that bacterial biofilms assemble rapidly in dead marine embryos and form remarkable pseudomorphs in which the bacterial biofilm replaces and exquisitely models details of cellular organization and structure. The experimental model was the decay of cleavage stage embryos similar in size and morphology to fossil embryos. The data show that embryo preservation takes place in 3 distinct steps: (i) blockage of autolysis by reducing or anaerobic conditions, (ii) rapid formation of microbial biofilms that consume the embryo but form a replica that retains cell organization and morphology, and (iii) bacterially catalyzed mineralization. Major bacterial taxa in embryo decay biofilms were identified by using 16S rDNA sequencing. Decay processes were similar in different taphonomic conditions, but the composition of bacterial populations depended on specific conditions. Experimental taphonomy generates preservation states similar to those in fossil embryos. The data show how fossilization of soft tissues in sediments can be mediated by bacterial replacement and mineralization, providing a foundation for experimentally creating biofilms from defined microbial species to model fossilization as a biological process. PMID:19047625

  16. [On hybrid embryo culture in vitro of Syringa L].

    PubMed

    Zhou, Li; Luo, Fengxia; Dai, Limin

    2003-03-01

    Syringa L. is the famous ornamental shrub in China, but its embryo always dies before seed mature during cross breeding, and hence, the breeding work is very difficult. The main object of this study is using embryo culture in vitro to get the seedling directly and to improve the succeed rate of cross breeding. The factors that influenced the embryo culture were researched in detail. The results showed that the optimal medium for embryo culture was Monnier, and the second was MS or LS, which meant that the embryo of Syringa needed abundant macroelements and microelements, especially Ca2+ and K+. The optimal sugar concentration was 50 g.L-1. At this level, the sugar could offer enough nutrition and high osmotic pressure for embryo. When the embryo age was 50-60 days, the culture was easy to be succeed. At this time, the cotyledon in ovule began to form, or organ began to differentiation, so, the embryo was very easy to germinate, and the seedling was very easy to form. Proper coconut milk, glutamic acid or glutamine, and activated charcoal could improve the germination and growth of the embryo. When the BA of low concentration (0.01 mg.L-1) was joined in the medium, the germination rate could be improved. The best NAA concentration was 0.01 mg.L-1. PMID:12836546

  17. Preimplantation death of xenomitochondrial mouse embryo harbouring bovine mitochondria

    PubMed Central

    Kawahara, Manabu; Koyama, Shiori; Iimura, Satomi; Yamazaki, Wataru; Tanaka, Aiko; Kohri, Nanami; Sasaki, Keisuke; Takahashi, Masashi

    2015-01-01

    Mitochondria, cellular organelles playing essential roles in eukaryotic cell metabolism, are thought to have evolved from bacteria. The organization of mtDNA is remarkably uniform across species, reflecting its vital and conserved role in oxidative phosphorylation (OXPHOS). Our objectives were to evaluate the compatibility of xenogeneic mitochondria in the development of preimplantation embryos in mammals. Mouse embryos harbouring bovine mitochondria (mtB-M embryos) were prepared by the cell-fusion technique employing the haemagglutinating virus of Japan (HVJ). The mtB-M embryos showed developmental delay at embryonic days (E) 3.5 after insemination. Furthermore, none of the mtB-M embryos could implant into the maternal uterus after embryo transfer, whereas control mouse embryos into which mitochondria from another mouse had been transferred developed as well as did non-manipulated embryos. When we performed quantitative PCR (qPCR) of mouse and bovine ND5, we found that the mtB-M embryos contained 8.3% of bovine mitochondria at the blastocyst stage. Thus, contamination with mitochondria from another species induces embryonic lethality prior to implantation into the maternal uterus. The heteroplasmic state of these xenogeneic mitochondria could have detrimental effects on preimplantation development, leading to preservation of species-specific mitochondrial integrity in mammals. PMID:26416548

  18. Myosin II Dynamics during Embryo Morphogenesis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kasza, Karen

    2013-03-01

    During embryonic morphogenesis, the myosin II motor protein generates forces that help to shape tissues, organs, and the overall body form. In one dramatic example in the Drosophila melanogaster embryo, the epithelial tissue that will give rise to the body of the adult animal elongates more than two-fold along the head-to-tail axis in less than an hour. This elongation is accomplished primarily through directional rearrangements of cells within the plane of the tissue. Just prior to elongation, polarized assemblies of myosin II accumulate perpendicular to the elongation axis. The contractile forces generated by myosin activity orient cell movements along a common axis, promoting local cell rearrangements that contribute to global tissue elongation. The molecular and mechanical mechanisms by which myosin drives this massive change in embryo shape are poorly understood. To investigate these mechanisms, we generated a collection of transgenic flies expressing variants of myosin II with altered motor function and regulation. We found that variants that are predicted to have increased myosin activity cause defects in tissue elongation. Using biophysical approaches, we found that these myosin variants also have decreased turnover dynamics within cells. To explore the mechanisms by which molecular-level myosin dynamics are translated into tissue-level elongation, we are using time-lapse confocal imaging to observe cell movements in embryos with altered myosin activity. We are utilizing computational approaches to quantify the dynamics and directionality of myosin localization and cell rearrangements. These studies will help elucidate how myosin-generated forces control cell movements within tissues. This work is in collaboration with J. Zallen at the Sloan-Kettering Institute.

  19. (Re)constructing embryos in stem cell research: exploring the meaning of embryos for people involved in fertility treatments.

    PubMed

    Parry, Sarah

    2006-05-01

    The use of human embryos is a key controversy in public debates on stem cell research (SCR), yet little attention has been given to the context or sources from which embryos are obtained: people involved in fertility programmes. How they feel about the use of embryos in SCR, and what may lead them to agree or refuse to donate embryos, remains unexplored. In this paper, I investigate the views of people involved in fertility programmes who may be approached to donate their embryos for SCR, drawing on focus group discussions with two support groups in Scotland. I illustrate how people come to make particular decisions and what factors shape this, and show that participants' views are context-bound, borne out of lived experiences both within the clinic and wider society. In particular, the evidence highlights the importance of understanding their views of what constitutes a 'spare' embryo and what areas of medical research are considered potentially legitimate for using embryos. Peoples' understandings of embryos as potential lives, and the context in which embryos are created, have direct implications for their views about donating embryos for SCR. Attention is paid to how SCR further disrupts the teleology of embryos and undermines the narrative of life that suffuses the hopes of people undergoing fertility treatment. The paper also brings to the fore the sense of moral obligation experienced by participants who feel they have little means or power for influencing the topic and content of SCR. In this context, I suggest there is a need to explore further the views of people involved in fertility treatments in order to identify mechanisms for limiting the potential for coercion when SCR is embedded in and dependent on fertility practices. Debates about using embryos for SCR must, therefore, include the voices of those who thus remain marginalised. PMID:16289740

  20. Somatomedin inhibitors from the serum of diabetic rats: Effects on mouse embryos in whole embryo culture

    SciTech Connect

    Balkan, W.E.

    1988-01-01

    Somatomedin inhibitors (SIs) are elevated in the serum of diabetic rats and in human sera during certain disease states, suggesting that serum from human diabetes similarly has enhanced SI activity. A serum fraction of M{sub r} = 800-1080 daltons obtained from diabetic rats and possessing SI activity, was added to the medium used to grow mouse conceptuses in whole embryo culture. Low concentrations of this SI caused malformations in embryos while their visceral yolk sacs (VYSs) were opaque and contained large vacuoles (vesicles) within the endoderm cells. DNA content and the incorporation of {sup 3}H-thymidine into DNA was reduced in both the embryo and its VYS. Concomitantly, the protein content of the embryo was decreased while that of the VYS was increased. Evidence from a variety of experiments indicted that the excess protein in the VYS was not due to de novo protein synthesis but to its sequestering of serum proteins. The failure of the normal VYS function of protein degradation was not due to an inhibition of the lysosomal enzyme, cathepsin B, indicating that some other aspect of protein degradation was affected by the presence of the SI.

  1. Molecular analysis of chicken embryo SPARC (osteonectin).

    PubMed

    Bassuk, J A; Iruela-Arispe, M L; Lane, T F; Benson, J M; Berg, R A; Sage, E H

    1993-11-15

    SPARC is a secreted glycoprotein that modulates cell shape and cell-matrix interactions. Levels of SPARC are increased at sites of somitogenesis, osteogenesis, and angiogenesis in the embryo and during wound repair in the adult. We have cloned and characterized SPARC from chicken embryo. A 2.2-kbp cDNA, obtained by a novel use of the polymerase chain reaction, was determined to encode a 298-residue protein that is 85% identical to human SPARC. Antigenic sites in particular appear to be highly conserved, as antibodies against C-terminal sequences of murine and bovine SPARC reacted with a 41-43 kDa protein in chicken embryo extracts. Chicken SPARC can be defined by four sequence signatures: (a) a conserved spacing of 11 cysteine residues in domain II, (b) the pentapeptide KKGHK in domain II, which is contained within a larger region of 31 identical residues, (c) a 100% conserved region of 10 residues in domain III, and (d) a C-terminal, calcium-binding EF-hand motif. SPARC mRNAs in the 10-day-old chicken embryo are represented by three sizes of 1.8, 2.2 and 3.0 kb. The relative steady-state levels for the 2.2-kb mRNA were determined as aorta > or = skeletal muscle > calvarium > vertebra > anterior limb > kidney > heart > brain > skin and lung > liver. The relative abundance of the 1.8-kb and 2.2-kb mRNAs varied among tissues and indicated that differential processing of SPARC mRNAs might occur. All three RNA species were detected by a cDNA probe for the N-terminal part of the coding region. Thus, the three mRNA species appear to arise from differential 3' splicing and/or polyadenylation. Collective evidence demonstrates that SPARC has been well-conserved during vertebrate evolution, a finding that indicates a fundamental role for this protein in development. PMID:7916692

  2. YODA signalling in the early Arabidopsis embryo.

    PubMed

    Musielak, Thomas J; Bayer, Martin

    2014-04-01

    During early embryogenesis, flowering plants establish their principal body plan starting with an apical-basal axis. An asymmetric division of the zygote gives rise to apical and basal cells with different developmental fates. Besides WOX (WUSCHEL-RELATED HOMEOBOX) transcription factors and the plant hormone auxin, the YDA (YODA)/MAPK (mitogen-activated protein kinase) pathway plays a major role in establishing different cell fates after the first zygotic division. In the present review, we summarize the available data on YDA signalling during embryogenesis. The role of YDA in other developmental processes was taken into account to highlight possible implications for this pathway in the embryo. PMID:24646252

  3. Crystalline embryos at ice-vapor interfaces

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bartley, D. L.

    1976-01-01

    The nucleation of small monolayer ice-like clusters at the basal and prism ice-vapor interfaces is considered. It is found that the basal surfaces prefer triangular embryos with an orientation that reverses from layer to layer, whereas the most stable clusters on the prism surfaces are rectangular in configuration. At any given saturation ratio, the preferred prism clusters are found to have a critical energy of formation significantly lower than that of the basal clusters, basically because of differences in cluster corner free energies.

  4. [Congenital cervical agenesis: pregnancy after transmyometrial embryo transfer].

    PubMed

    Huberlant, S; Tailland, M-L; Poirey, S; Mousty, E; Ripart-Neveu, S; Mares, P; de Tayrac, R

    2014-09-01

    Cervical agenesis is a rare congenital pathology linked to an anomaly of development of the Mullerian system. We described a case report about a 22-year old woman, consulting for infertility, who had a complete cervical agenesis. The first evaluation suggested a 46 XX karyotype and a normal ovarian reserve. The surgical examination confirmed the absence of cervix with impossibility of catheterization. She became pregnant thanks to an in vitro fertilization (IVF) with transmyometrial embryo transfer. Caesarean was decided at 36 weeks of gestation (WG) due to spontaneous uterine contractions. An injection of medroxyprogesterone was made after the placenta delivery in order to warning the partum hemorrhage. The ultrasound examination, realized 15 days after caesarean, underlined a good uterine involution. The surgery by cervico-vaginal anastomosis can be offered to patients because it offers chances of spontaneous pregnancies. But this surgery exposes women to a risk of failure, and of severe complications such as pain or infection, and might end in a hysterectomy. By choosing the transmyometrial transfer by vaginal way, the patient was exposed to the risk of spontaneous miscarriage. It was raising the problem of the uterine evacuation. This delivery after 34 WG is encouraging for the infertility by cervical agenesis. PMID:24842642

  5. Specificity of Rel-inhibitor interactions in Drosophila embryos.

    PubMed Central

    Tatei, K; Levine, M

    1995-01-01

    The Rel family of transcription factors participate in a diverse array of processes, including acute responses to injury and infection, lymphocyte differentiation, and embryonic patterning. These proteins show homology in an extended region spanning about 300 amino acids (the Rel homology domain [RHD]). The RHD mediates both DNA binding and interactions with a family of inhibitor proteins, including I kappa B alpha and cactus. Previous studies have shown that an N-terminal region of the RHD (containing the sequence motif RXXRXRXXC) is important for DNA binding, while the C-terminal nuclear localization sequence is important for inhibitor interactions. Here we present a structure-function analysis of the Drosophila dorsal RHD. These studies identify another sequence within the RHD (region I) that is essential for inhibitor interactions. There is a tight correlation between the conservation of region I sequences and the specificity of Rel-inhibitor interactions in both flies and mammals. Point mutations in the region I sequence can uncouple DNA binding and inhibitor interactions in vitro. The phenotypes associated with the expression of a modified dorsal protein in transgenic Drosophila embryos suggest a similar uncoupling in vivo. Recent crystallographic studies suggest that the region I sequence and the nuclear localization sequence might form a composite surface which interacts with inhibitor proteins. PMID:7791770

  6. Gibberellins in Embryo-Suspensor of Phaseolus coccineus Seeds at the Heart Stage of Embryo Development 1

    PubMed Central

    Piaggesi, Alberto; Picciarelli, Piero; Lorenzi, Roberto; Alpi, Amedeo

    1989-01-01

    Gibberellins (GAs) in suspensors and embryos of Phaseolus coccineus seeds at the heart stage of embryo development were analyzed by combined gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS). From the suspensor four C19-GAs, GA1, GA4, GA5, GA6, and one C20 GA, GA44, were identified. From the embryo, five C19-GAs GA1, GA4, GA5, GA6, GA60 and two C20 GAs, GA19 and GA44 were identified. The data, in relation to previous results, suggest a dependence of the embryo on the suspensor during early stages of development. PMID:16667026

  7. Evaluation of the role of exogenous pathogens on the incidence of embryo loss during early pregnancy in mice.

    PubMed

    Baines, M G; Billingsley, K A; De Fougerolles, A R; Duclos, A J; Olney, H J; Pomerantz, D K; Gendron, R L

    1994-01-01

    The mating of CBA/j female mice (H2k) by DBA/2j male mice (H2d) typically results in an elevated incidence of spontaneous embryo loss thus providing an ideal genetically controlled laboratory model for the study of the factors causing early embryo loss during pregnancy. There is now considerable data on the cells and factors involved in fetal resorption but little is known about the events which activate this process. While the activation of the maternal response to the fetal implant could have endogenous or genetic origins, a role for exogenous factors including microbial pathogens could also be involved. In order to investigate these possibilities, the reproductive success of CBA/j female x DBA/2j male matings in a conventional animal care facility were compared with matings in a specific pathogen free (SPF) animal facility. All animals housed under these conditions were routinely screened by immunoassay and culture, for the presence of a number of viral and bacterial pathogens of mice. The incidence of spontaneous embryo loss in specific pathogen free CBA female mice mated by DBA and other male strains was found to be virtually identical to that of CBA female mice infected with multiple viral pathogens and housed under otherwise identical conditions (non-SPF). However, the numbers of implantation per pregnancy was significantly greater in an SPF facility. Therefore, exposure of mating mice to exogenous viral and bacterial pathogens did not appear to alter the overall incidence of spontaneous embryo resorption. It was concluded that the immunomodulatory effects of infection by common murine pathogens neither augmented nor reduced post-implantation embryo losses. PMID:8040834

  8. Culture of bovine embryos on a polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) microwell plate.

    PubMed

    Akagi, Satoshi; Hosoe, Misa; Matsukawa, Kazutsugu; Ichikawa, Akihiko; Tanikawa, Tamio; Takahashi, Seiya

    2010-08-01

    We fabricated a polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS)-based microwell plate (PDMS-MP) containing 100 microwells with a rounded bottom and examined whether it can be used for culture of individual in vitro fertilized (IVF) embryos or parthenogenetically activated zona-free embryos in cattle. In Experiment 1, we examined the in vitro developmental ability of IVF embryos cultured individually on PDMS-MP. After IVF, 20 embryos were transferred into 100 microl drops on PDMS-MP and cultured individually in each well of PDMS-MP (PDMS group). After 7 days of culture, the embryos in the PDMS group developed to the blastocyst stage at the same rate of those in the control group cultured in a group of 20 embryos without PDMS-MP. There were no differences in total number of cells and the ratio of inner cell mass to total cells between the PDMS and control groups. In Experiment 2, we examined the in vitro developmental ability of parthenogenetically activated zona-free bovine embryos cultured individually on PDMS-MP. The zona-free embryos were cultured individually in each well of a PDMS-MP or in each well produced by pressing a darning needle onto the bottom of a culture dish (WOW group). After 7 days of culture, the blastocyst formation rate and cell number of blastocysts in the PDMS group did not differ from those of the zona-intact embryos in the control group. Also, there were no differences in the blastocyst formation rate and cell number of blastocysts between the WOW and PDMS groups. These results suggest that the culture system using PDMS-MP is useful for individual embryos or zona-free embryos in cattle. PMID:20484872

  9. Improved efficiency of the walnut somatic embryo gene transfer system.

    PubMed

    McGranahan, G H; Leslie, C A; Uratsu, S L; Dandekar, A M

    1990-01-01

    AnAgrobacterium-mediated gene transfer system which relies on repetitive embryogenesis to regenerate transgenic walnut plants has been made more efficient by using a more virulent strain ofAgrobacterium and vectors containing genes for both kanamycin resistance and beta-glucuronidase (GUS) activity to facilitate early screening and selection. Two plasmids (pCGN7001 and pCGN7314) introduced individually into the disarmedAgrobacterium host strain EHA101 were used as inoculum. Embryos maintained on medium containing 100 mg/l kanamycin after co-cultivation produced more transformed secondary embryos than embryos maintained on kanamycin-free medium. Of the 186 GUS-positive secondary embryo lines identified, 70% were regenerated from 3 out of 16 primary embryos inoculated with EHA101/pCGN7314 and grown on kanamycin- containing medium, 28% from 4 out of 17 primary embryos inoculated with EHA101/ pCGN7001 and grown on kanamycin medium, and 2% from one out of 13 primary embryos inoculated with EHA101/pCGN7001 but not exposed to kanamycin. Because kanamycin inhibits but does not completely block new embryo formation in controls, identification of transformants formerly required repetitive selection on kanamycin for several months. Introduction of the GUS marker gene allowed positive identification of transformant secondary embryos as early as 5-6 weeks after inoculation. DNA analysis of a representative subset of lines (n=13) derived from secondary embryos confirmed transformation and provided evidence for multiple insertion events in single inoculated primary embryos. PMID:24226275

  10. A new direct transfer protocol for cryopreserved IVF embryos.

    PubMed

    Sanches, Bruno Valente; Lunardelli, Paula Alvares; Tannura, Juliana Hayashi; Cardoso, Bruna Lopes; Pereira, Marcos Henrique Colombo; Gaitkoski, Douglas; Basso, Andrea Cristina; Arnold, Daniel Robert; Seneda, Marcelo Marcondes

    2016-04-01

    The global demand for in vitro-produced (IVP) embryos of determined sex has greatly increased over the last decade. Efficient protocols for the direct transfer of IVP embryos are lacking. This study aimed to compare the pregnancy rates for fresh, vitrified, or frozen/directly transferred IVP dairy cow embryos. Oocytes (n = 3171) recovered by ovum pickup (n = 112) from Girolando (Holstein-Gir) females (n = 36) were selected and submitted to IVM for 24 hours at 38.5 °C with 5% CO2 in air with saturated humidity. In vitro fertilization was performed with the thawed, sexed semen from 5 Holstein bulls. After IVF, presumptive zygotes were denuded and cultured for 7 days under the same IVM and IVF conditions of temperature and humidity, except with 5% CO2 and 5% O2. Grade I blastocysts were randomly assigned for either the transferred fresh, vitrified/thawing, or frozen/directly embryo transfer into previously synchronized recipient females. Conception rates were analyzed by binomial logistic regression, and a probability level of P < 0.05 was considered significant. The conception rates were 51.35 ± 1.87% (133/259) for the fresh embryos, 35.89 ± 3.87% (84/234) for the vitrified embryos, and 40.19 ± 4.65% (125/311) for the frozen directly transferred embryos. These data demonstrate that IVP embryos with sexed semen could be directly transferred into recipient cows with similar conception rates to vitrified embryos. The comparison found that the use of frozen embryos in direct transfer provides easier logistics and a more practical approach for the transfer of IVP embryos on dairy farms. PMID:26739533

  11. Sex and PRNP genotype determination in preimplantation caprine embryos.

    PubMed

    Guignot, F; Perreau, C; Cavarroc, C; Touzé, J-L; Pougnard, J-L; Dupont, F; Beckers, J-F; Rémy, B; Babilliot, J-M; Bed'Hom, B; Lamorinière, J M; Mermillod, P; Baril, G

    2011-08-01

    The objective of this study was to test the accuracy of genotype diagnosis after whole amplification of DNA extracted from biopsies obtained by trimming goat embryos and to evaluate the viability of biopsied embryos after vitrification/warming and transfer. Whole genome amplification (WGA) was performed using Multiple Displacement Amplification (MDA). Sex and prion protein (PRNP) genotypes were determined. Sex diagnosis was carried out by PCR amplification of ZFX/ZFY and Y chromosome-specific sequences. Prion protein genotype determination was performed on codons 142, 154, 211, 222 and 240. Embryos were collected at day 7 after oestrus and biopsied either immediately after collection (blastocysts and expanded blastocysts) or after 24 h of in vitro culture (compacted morulae). Biopsied embryos were frozen by vitrification. Vitrified whole embryos were kept as control. DNA of biopsies was extracted and amplified using MDA. Sex diagnosis was efficient for 97.4% of biopsies and PRNP genotyping was determined in 78.7% of biopsies. After embryo transfer, no significant difference was observed in kidding rate between biopsied and vitrified control embryos, whereas embryo survival rate was different between biopsied and whole vitrified embryos (p = 0.032). At birth, 100% of diagnosed sex and 98.2% of predetermined codons were correct. Offspring PRNP profiles were in agreement with parental genotype. Whole genome amplification with MDA kit coupled with sex diagnosis and PRNP genotype predetermination are very accurate techniques to genotype goat embryos before transfer. These novel results allow us to plan selection of scrapie-resistant genotypes and kid sex before transfer of cryopreserved embryo. PMID:21121967

  12. TERATOGENICITY OF CYCLOPHOSPHAMIDE IN A COUPLED MICROSOMAL ACTIVATING/EMBRYO CULTURE SYSTEM

    EPA Science Inventory

    Using the coupled microsomal activating/embryo culture system, in vitro experiments were performed to establish the role of metabolism in the embryo toxicity and teratogenicity of cyclophosphamide. Cyclophosphamide in the coupled microsomal activating/embryo culture system produc...

  13. Pseudomonas aeruginosa infection in embryonated hen's eggs. An alternative in vivo model for the screening of antibacterial substances.

    PubMed

    Härtl, A; Möllmann, U; Schrinner, E; Stelzner, A

    1997-09-01

    Embryonated hens' eggs can be reliably infected by Pseudomonas aeruginosa in laboratory experiments. Therapy tests with the antibiotics azlocillin (CAS 37091-66-0) and gentamicin (CAS 13291-74-2) on this type of infected hens' eggs demonstrate that this test system offers a realistic alternative to septic experiments with small laboratory rodents. Chick embryos survive a lethal Pseudomonas infection when azlocillin or gentamicin in a relevant therapeutic dose are administered immediately after the infective agent. The use of Pseudomonas infected chick embryos in the screening for new antiinfectives allows, therefore, a considerable reduction of the number of laboratory rodents required. PMID:9342424

  14. Meningococcal Infections

    MedlinePlus

    ... are a type of bacteria that cause serious infections. The most common infection is meningitis, which is an inflammation of the ... also cause other problems, including a serious bloodstream infection called sepsis. Meningococcal infections can spread from person ...

  15. Antioxidant activities of chick embryo egg hydrolysates

    PubMed Central

    Sun, Hao; Ye, Ting; Wang, Yuntao; Wang, Ling; Chen, Yijie; Li, Bin

    2014-01-01

    Chick embryo egg hydrolysates (CEEH) were obtained by enzymatic hydrolysis of chick embryo egg in vitro-simulated gastrointestinal digestion. The antioxidant activities of CEEH were investigated by employing three in vitro assays, including the 2,2′-azinobis-(3-ethylbenzthiazoline-6-sulfonate)/1,1-diphenyl-2-picrylhydrazyl (ABTS/DPPH)/hydroxyl radical-scavenging assays. The radical-scavenging effect of CEEH (1.0 mg/mL) was in a dose-dependent manner, with the highest trolox equivalent antioxidant capacity for ABTS, DPPH, and that of hydroxyl radicals found to be 569, 2097, and 259.6 μmol/L, respectively; whereas the trolox equivalent antioxidant capacity of unhatched egg for ABTS, DPPH, and that of hydroxyl radicals were found to be 199, 993, and 226.5 μmol/L, respectively. CEEH showed stronger scavenging activity than the hydrolysates of unhatched egg against free radicals such as ABTS, DPPH, and hydroxyl radicals. The antioxidant amino acid analysis indicated that the 14-day CEEH possess more antioxidant amino acids than that of the unhatched egg. In addition, essential amino acids analysis showed that the 14-day CEEH have the highest nutritional value. Combined with the results of the amino acid profiles, CEEH were believed to have higher nutritive value in addition to antioxidant activities than the unhatched egg. PMID:24804065

  16. Twinning of amphibian embryos by centrifugation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Black, S. D.

    1984-01-01

    In the frog Xenopus laevis, the dorsal structures of the embryonic body axis normally derive from the side of the egg opposite the side of sperm entry. However, if the uncleaved egg is inclined at lg or centrifuged in an inclined position, this topographic relationship is overridden: the egg makes its dorsal axial structures according to its orientation in the gravitational/centrifugal field, irrespective of the position of sperm entry. Certain conditions of centrifugation cause eggs to develop into conjoined twins with two sets of axial structures. A detailed analysis of twinning provided some insight into experimental axis orientation. First, as with single-axis embryos, both axes in twins are oriented according to the direction of centrifugation. One axis forms at the centripetal side of the egg and the other forms at the centrifugal side, even when the side of sperm entry is normal to the centrifugal force vector. Second, if eggs are centrifuged to give twins, but are inclined at lg to prevent post-centrifugation endoplasmic redistributions, only single-axis embryos develop. Thus, a second redistribution is required for high-frequency secondary axis formation. This can be accomplished by lg (as in the single centrifugations) or by a second centrifugation directed along the egg's animal-vegetal axis.

  17. Macroevolutionary developmental biology: Embryos, fossils, and phylogenies.

    PubMed

    Organ, Chris L; Cooper, Lisa Noelle; Hieronymus, Tobin L

    2015-10-01

    The field of evolutionary developmental biology is broadly focused on identifying the genetic and developmental mechanisms underlying morphological diversity. Connecting the genotype with the phenotype means that evo-devo research often considers a wide range of evidence, from genetics and morphology to fossils. In this commentary, we provide an overview and framework for integrating fossil ontogenetic data with developmental data using phylogenetic comparative methods to test macroevolutionary hypotheses. We survey the vertebrate fossil record of preserved embryos and discuss how phylogenetic comparative methods can integrate data from developmental genetics and paleontology. Fossil embryos provide limited, yet critical, developmental data from deep time. They help constrain when developmental innovations first appeared during the history of life and also reveal the order in which related morphologies evolved. Phylogenetic comparative methods provide a powerful statistical approach that allows evo-devo researchers to infer the presence of nonpreserved developmental traits in fossil species and to detect discordant evolutionary patterns and processes across levels of biological organization. PMID:26250386

  18. Analysis of Oxidative Stress in Zebrafish Embryos

    PubMed Central

    Mugoni, Vera; Camporeale, Annalisa; Santoro, Massimo M.

    2014-01-01

    High levels of reactive oxygen species (ROS) may cause a change of cellular redox state towards oxidative stress condition. This situation causes oxidation of molecules (lipid, DNA, protein) and leads to cell death. Oxidative stress also impacts the progression of several pathological conditions such as diabetes, retinopathies, neurodegeneration, and cancer. Thus, it is important to define tools to investigate oxidative stress conditions not only at the level of single cells but also in the context of whole organisms. Here, we consider the zebrafish embryo as a useful in vivo system to perform such studies and present a protocol to measure in vivo oxidative stress. Taking advantage of fluorescent ROS probes and zebrafish transgenic fluorescent lines, we develop two different methods to measure oxidative stress in vivo: i) a “whole embryo ROS-detection method” for qualitative measurement of oxidative stress and ii) a “single-cell ROS detection method” for quantitative measurements of oxidative stress. Herein, we demonstrate the efficacy of these procedures by increasing oxidative stress in tissues by oxidant agents and physiological or genetic methods. This protocol is amenable for forward genetic screens and it will help address cause-effect relationships of ROS in animal models of oxidative stress-related pathologies such as neurological disorders and cancer. PMID:25046434

  19. Surveillance for persistent bovine viral diarrhea virus infection in four artificial insemination centers.

    PubMed

    Howard, T H; Bean, B; Hillman, R; Monke, D R

    1990-06-15

    Four large bovine artificial insemination centers implemented a program of surveillance of resident and newly acquired bulls for persistent bovine viral diarrhea virus infection. Infection was identified in 12 of 1,538 bulls. Several clinical abnormalities, including acute and chronic mucosal disease, were evident among the persistently infected bulls. Semen produced by such bulls consistently contained bovine viral diarrhea virus, and such contamination was not always accompanied by diminished seminal quality. Infected bulls were detected by means of virus isolation tests performed on blood specimens, but not by use of serologic testing. Ten of the 12 persistently infected bulls were results of embryo transfer. Virologic surveillance of breeding herds, artificial insemination and embryo transfer centers, and the cattle trade is necessary to prevent spread of this virus by modern cattle breeding practices. Attention is also necessary to prevent contamination by this virus of the fluids used for recovery, in vitro manipulation, and transfer of bovine embryos. PMID:2163996

  20. Early embryo development in Fucus distichus is auxin sensitive

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Basu, Swati; Sun, Haiguo; Brian, Leigh; Quatrano, Ralph L.; Muday, Gloria K.

    2002-01-01

    Auxin and polar auxin transport have been implicated in controlling embryo development in land plants. The goal of these studies was to determine if auxin and auxin transport are also important during the earliest stages of development in embryos of the brown alga Fucus distichus. Indole-3-acetic acid (IAA) was identified in F. distichus embryos and mature tissues by gas chromatography-mass spectroscopy. F. distichus embryos accumulate [(3)H]IAA and an inhibitor of IAA efflux, naphthylphthalamic acid (NPA), elevates IAA accumulation, suggesting the presence of an auxin efflux protein complex similar to that found in land plants. F. distichus embryos normally develop with a single unbranched rhizoid, but growth on IAA leads to formation of multiple rhizoids and growth on NPA leads to formation of embryos with branched rhizoids, at concentrations that are active in auxin accumulation assays. The effects of IAA and NPA are complete before 6 h after fertilization (AF), which is before rhizoid germination and cell division. The maximal effects of IAA and NPA are between 3.5 and 5 h AF and 4 and 5.5 h AF, respectively. Although, the location of the planes of cell division was significantly altered in NPA- and IAA-treated embryos, these abnormal divisions occurred after abnormal rhizoid initiation and branching was observed. The results of this study suggest that auxin acts in the formation of apical basal patterns in F. distichus embryo development.

  1. Cryopreservation of embryos of Lucilia sericata (Diptera: Calliphoridae)

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Embryos of Lucilia (Phaenicia) sericata (Meigen) (Diptera: Calliphoridae), the green blowfly, were successfully cryopreserved by vitrification in liquid nitrogen and stored for 8 yr. Embryos incubated at 19 deg. C for 17 h after oviposition were found to be the most appropriate stage to cryopreserve...

  2. Early Embryo Development in Fucus distichus Is Auxin Sensitive1

    PubMed Central

    Basu, Swati; Sun, Haiguo; Brian, Leigh; Quatrano, Ralph L.; Muday, Gloria K.

    2002-01-01

    Auxin and polar auxin transport have been implicated in controlling embryo development in land plants. The goal of these studies was to determine if auxin and auxin transport are also important during the earliest stages of development in embryos of the brown alga Fucus distichus. Indole-3-acetic acid (IAA) was identified in F. distichus embryos and mature tissues by gas chromatography-mass spectroscopy. F. distichus embryos accumulate [3H]IAA and an inhibitor of IAA efflux, naphthylphthalamic acid (NPA), elevates IAA accumulation, suggesting the presence of an auxin efflux protein complex similar to that found in land plants. F. distichus embryos normally develop with a single unbranched rhizoid, but growth on IAA leads to formation of multiple rhizoids and growth on NPA leads to formation of embryos with branched rhizoids, at concentrations that are active in auxin accumulation assays. The effects of IAA and NPA are complete before 6 h after fertilization (AF), which is before rhizoid germination and cell division. The maximal effects of IAA and NPA are between 3.5 and 5 h AF and 4 and 5.5 h AF, respectively. Although, the location of the planes of cell division was significantly altered in NPA- and IAA-treated embryos, these abnormal divisions occurred after abnormal rhizoid initiation and branching was observed. The results of this study suggest that auxin acts in the formation of apical basal patterns in F. distichus embryo development. PMID:12226509

  3. Use of blue crab (Callinectes sapidus) embryos for toxicity testing

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, R.; O`Malley, K.

    1995-12-31

    After fertilization, blue crab embryos develop in egg sacs attached to the female pleopods, often referred to as the sponge. Lipovitellin and lipid droplets in the egg sacs provide energy and nutrition for the developing embryos. Embryos were removed from the sponge and transferred to 24 well culture plates containing sea water with or without toxicants, Each well contained 10 embryos. After 7 to 10 days, embryos hatched to swimming zoea. The effects of toxicants at various concentrations on hatching were determined and the EC{sub 50} calculated. For example, the EC{sub 50} for tributyltin, fenvalerate and mercuric chloride were 50, 30 and 90 ng/liter, respectively. The hatching success of control embryos ranged from 95 to 98%. Formation of the heart, eyespot formation, appendage formation and utilization rate of lipovitellin were also effected by exposure to toxicants. At a low concentration of mercuric ion (30ng/liter) the heart formed, but there was no heart beat. Eyespot formation was abnormal in the presence of high concentrations of cadmium (2 {micro}g/liter) and zinc (5 {micro}g/liter), Crab embryos offer many advantages for toxicity testing of pure compounds or mixtures in water, including toxicity testing of sediment pore water. The crab embryos may also serve as models to understand the effect of specific toxicants on the heart and eye spots of crustaceans.

  4. An Arabidopsis thaliana embryo arrest mutant exhibiting germination potential

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The ability to initiate radicle elongation, or germination potential, occurs in developing embryos before the completion of seed maturation. Green embryos after walking-stick stage in developing Arabidopsis thaliana seeds germinate when excised from seeds and incubated in MS media containing 1 % suc...

  5. Transmyometrial versus very difficult transcervical embryo transfer: efficacy and safety.

    PubMed

    Khairy, Mohammed; Shah, Hany; Rajkhowa, Madhurima

    2016-05-01

    A difficult and traumatic embryo transfer can negatively impact on embryo implantation. This study retrospectively compared the outcomes of "very difficult transcervical embryo transfer" (vdTCET) versus transmyometrial embryo transfer (TMET) in a single centre over 10 years, reporting on 128 patients with vdTCET and 46 patients with TMET. The definition of vdTCET was a procedure rated by an experienced practitioner (with more than 100 transfers per year for >2 years) as very difficult and required two or more of the following: use of tenaculum, change of embryo transfer catheter and use of a stylet, reloading of the embryos or cancelling the procedure and freezing the embryo to transfer after cervical dilatation. The clinical pregnancy rates for TMET and vdTCET were 32.6% and 25%, respectively and the live birth rates were 26.1% and 16.4%, respectively. There was only one case of minor bleeding in the TMET group (2.2%). This study showed that TMET is a good alternative option in cases of vdTCET where it is impossible to achieve transcervical embryo transfer and may benefit cases with repeated failed cycles after vdTCET. Its superiority over vdTCET however could not be demonstrated. PMID:26968927

  6. Permeability barriers to embryo cryopreservation of Pectinophora gossypiella (Lepidoptera: Gelechiidae)

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The aim of this study was to develop a method to cryopreserve the embryos of the pink bollworm moth, Pectinophora gossypiella (Saunders). Previously developed dipteran cryopreservation protocols were not directly adaptable to use with the embryos of this lepidopteran species. Physiochemical and ele...

  7. 9 CFR 98.9 - Embryos refused entry.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 9 Animals and Animal Products 1 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Embryos refused entry. 98.9 Section 98.9 Animals and Animal Products ANIMAL AND PLANT HEALTH INSPECTION SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE EXPORTATION AND IMPORTATION OF ANIMALS (INCLUDING POULTRY) AND ANIMAL PRODUCTS IMPORTATION OF CERTAIN ANIMAL EMBRYOS AND ANIMAL SEMEN Ruminant...

  8. Molecular Characterization of the First Bovine Herpesvirus 4 (BoHV-4) Strains Isolated from In Vitro Bovine Embryos production in Argentina.

    PubMed

    González Altamiranda, Erika; Manrique, Julieta M; Pérez, Sandra E; Ríos, Glenda L; Odeón, Anselmo C; Leunda, María R; Jones, Leandro R; Verna, Andrea

    2015-01-01

    Bovine herpesvirus 4 (BoHV-4) is increasingly considered as responsible for various problems of the reproductive tract. The virus infects mainly blood mononuclear cells and displays specific tropism for vascular endothelia, reproductive and fetal tissues. Epidemiological studies suggest its impact on reproductive performance, and its presence in various sites in the reproductive tract highlights its potential transmission in transfer-stage embryos. This work describes the biological and genetic characterization of BoHV-4 strains isolated from an in vitro bovine embryo production system. BoHV-4 strains were isolated in 2011 and 2013 from granulosa cells and bovine oocytes from ovary batches collected at a local abattoir, used as "starting material" for in vitro production of bovine embryos. Compatible BoHV-4-CPE was observed in the co-culture of granulosa cells and oocytes with MDBK cells. The identity of the isolates was confirmed by PCR assays targeting three ORFs of the viral genome. The phylogenetic analyses of the strains suggest that they were evolutionary unlinked. Therefore it is possible that BoHV-4 ovary infections occurred regularly along the evolution of the virus, at least in Argentina, which can have implications in the systems of in vitro embryo production. Thus, although BoHV-4 does not appear to be a frequent risk factor for in vitro embryo production, data are still limited. This study reveals the potential of BoHV-4 transmission via embryo transfer. Moreover, the high variability among the BoHV-4 strains isolated from aborted cows in Argentina highlights the importance of further research on the role of this virus as an agent with the potential to cause reproductive disease in cattle. The genetic characterization of the isolated strains provides data to better understand the pathogenesis of BoHV-4 infections. Furthermore, it will lead to fundamental insights into the molecular aspects of the virus and the means by which these strains circulate in

  9. Embryo apoptosis identification: Oocyte grade or cleavage stage?

    PubMed Central

    Bakri, Noraina Mohd; Ibrahim, Siti Fatimah; Osman, Nurul Atikah; Hasan, Nurhaslina; Jaffar, Farah Hanan Fathihah; Rahman, Zulaiha Abdul; Osman, Khairul

    2015-01-01

    Apoptosis is a programed cell death that is vital for tissue homeostasis. However, embryo apoptosis had been known to be related to embryo fragmentation which should be avoided in in vitro fertilization (IVF). The purpose of this study was to evaluate the relationship of embryo apoptosis with the grade of immature oocytes and cleavage stage of in vitro produced (IVP) cattle embryos. This study consisted of 345 oocytes collected through ovary slicing. Immature oocytes were graded as A, B and C. This grading was based on cumulus cell thickness and compactness. All oocytes then underwent an in vitro maturation (IVM) procedure. An IVF was done 24 h after IVM culture. Prior to staining, stage of cleaved embryos was determined and classified as either 2, 4, 8 or >8-cell embryo stage. Apoptosis status of cleaved IVP embryos was determined by using annexin V-FITC staining technique at 48 and 72 h post insemination (hpi). Apoptosis status for each embryo was classified as either early or late. The result showed that there was no significant difference (p > 0.05) of apoptosis status among grade A, B and C embryos. All grades of oocytes showed embryo apoptosis where 1.5% late apoptosis for grade A, 4.5% and 10.4% of early and late apoptosis for grade B and grade C. Early apoptosis was not seen in grade A embryo. We also noted no significant difference (p > 0.05) of apoptosis status between 2, 4, 8 and >8-cell embryo stage. Early apoptosis was also not seen in >8-cell stage. Even though there were no differences in apoptosis expression between the three classes, the cleavage rate of grade A oocytes was significantly higher (p < 0.01) than grade B and grade C. In conclusion, the apoptosis expression in the embryo can occur regardless of the oocyte quality and the cleavage stage of the embryo produced. PMID:26858565

  10. Embryo apoptosis identification: Oocyte grade or cleavage stage?

    PubMed

    Bakri, Noraina Mohd; Ibrahim, Siti Fatimah; Osman, Nurul Atikah; Hasan, Nurhaslina; Jaffar, Farah Hanan Fathihah; Rahman, Zulaiha Abdul; Osman, Khairul

    2016-01-01

    Apoptosis is a programed cell death that is vital for tissue homeostasis. However, embryo apoptosis had been known to be related to embryo fragmentation which should be avoided in in vitro fertilization (IVF). The purpose of this study was to evaluate the relationship of embryo apoptosis with the grade of immature oocytes and cleavage stage of in vitro produced (IVP) cattle embryos. This study consisted of 345 oocytes collected through ovary slicing. Immature oocytes were graded as A, B and C. This grading was based on cumulus cell thickness and compactness. All oocytes then underwent an in vitro maturation (IVM) procedure. An IVF was done 24 h after IVM culture. Prior to staining, stage of cleaved embryos was determined and classified as either 2, 4, 8 or >8-cell embryo stage. Apoptosis status of cleaved IVP embryos was determined by using annexin V-FITC staining technique at 48 and 72 h post insemination (hpi). Apoptosis status for each embryo was classified as either early or late. The result showed that there was no significant difference (p > 0.05) of apoptosis status among grade A, B and C embryos. All grades of oocytes showed embryo apoptosis where 1.5% late apoptosis for grade A, 4.5% and 10.4% of early and late apoptosis for grade B and grade C. Early apoptosis was not seen in grade A embryo. We also noted no significant difference (p > 0.05) of apoptosis status between 2, 4, 8 and >8-cell embryo stage. Early apoptosis was also not seen in >8-cell stage. Even though there were no differences in apoptosis expression between the three classes, the cleavage rate of grade A oocytes was significantly higher (p < 0.01) than grade B and grade C. In conclusion, the apoptosis expression in the embryo can occur regardless of the oocyte quality and the cleavage stage of the embryo produced. PMID:26858565

  11. State-of-the-art embryo technologies in cattle.

    PubMed

    Lonergan, P

    2007-01-01

    Over the past 30 years, basic and applied studies on classical and advanced embryo technologies have generated a vast literature on factors regulating oocyte and embryo development and quality. In addition, over this period, commercial bovine embryo transfer has become a large international business. It is well recognised that bovine embryos derived in vivo are of superior quality to those derived from in vitro maturation, fertilization and culture. Relatively little has changed in the techniques of producing embryos in vivo although there is increasing evidence of the importance of, for example, peripheral and follicular endocrine profiles for the subsequent developmental competence of the embryo. The in vitro production of ruminant embryos is a three-step process involving oocyte maturation, oocyte fertilization and in vitro culture. Only 30-40% of such oocytes reach the blastocyst stage, at which they can be transferred to a recipient or frozen for future use. We know now that the quality of the oocyte is crucial in determining the proportion of immature oocytes that form blastocysts while the post-fertilization culture environment has a major influence on the quality of the blastocyst. Use of sexed-sorted sperm in conjunction with in vitro embryo production is a potentially efficient means of obtaining offspring of the desired sex. Concerns regarding the use of sexed semen technology include the apparent lower fertility of sorted sperm, the lower survival of sorted sperm after cryopreservation and the reduced number of sperm that could be separated in a specified time period. Assessment of embryo quality is a challenge. Morphological assessment is at present the most popular method for embryo selection prior to transfer. Other non-invasive assessment methods include the timing of the first cleavage division which has been linked to developmental ability. Quantitative examination of gene expression is an additional valuable tool to assess the viability of

  12. Sex determination of duck embryos: observations on syrinx development

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Wilson, Robert E.; Sonsthagen, Sarah A.; Franson, J. Christian

    2013-01-01

    Ducks exhibit sexual dimorphism in vocal anatomy. Asymmetrical ossification of the syrinx (bulla syringealis) is discernable at about 10 days of age in male Pekin duck (Anas platyrhynchos domestica) embryos, but information is lacking on the early development of the bulla in wild ducks. To evaluate the reliability of this characteristic for sexing developing embryos, we examined the syrinx of dead embryos and compared results with molecular sexing techniques in high arctic nesting Common Eiders (Somateria mollissima). Embryos 8 days or older were accurately (100%) sexed based on the presence/absence of a bulla, 2 days earlier than Pekin duck. The use of the tracheal bulla can be a valuable technique when sex identification of embryos or young ducklings is required.

  13. High incubation temperatures enhance mitochondrial energy metabolism in reptile embryos

    PubMed Central

    Sun, Bao-Jun; Li, Teng; Gao, Jing; Ma, Liang; Du, Wei-Guo

    2015-01-01

    Developmental rate increases exponentially with increasing temperature in ectothermic animals, but the biochemical basis underlying this thermal dependence is largely unexplored. We measured mitochondrial respiration and metabolic enzyme activities of turtle embryos (Pelodiscus sinensis) incubated at different temperatures to identify the metabolic basis of the rapid development occurring at high temperatures in reptile embryos. Developmental rate increased with increasing incubation temperatures in the embryos of P. sinensis. Correspondingly, in addition to the thermal dependence of mitochondrial respiration and metabolic enzyme activities, high-temperature incubation further enhanced mitochondrial respiration and COX activities in the embryos. This suggests that embryos may adjust mitochondrial respiration and metabolic enzyme activities in response to developmental temperature to achieve high developmental rates at high temperatures. Our study highlights the importance of biochemical investigations in understanding the proximate mechanisms by which temperature affects embryonic development. PMID:25749301

  14. Heartbeat, embryo communication and hatching synchrony in snake eggs

    PubMed Central

    Aubret, Fabien; Blanvillain, Gaëlle; Bignon, Florent; Kok, Philippe J. R.

    2016-01-01

    Communication is central to life at all levels of complexity, from cells to organs, through to organisms and communities. Turtle eggs were recently shown to communicate with each other in order to synchronise their development and generate beneficial hatching synchrony. Yet the mechanism underlying embryo to embryo communication remains unknown. Here we show that within a clutch, developing snake embryos use heart beats emanating from neighbouring eggs as a clue for their metabolic level, in order to synchronise development and ultimately hatching. Eggs of the water snake Natrix maura increased heart rates and hatched earlier than control eggs in response to being incubated in physical contact with more advanced eggs. The former produced shorter and slower swimming young than their control siblings. Our results suggest potential fitness consequences of embryo to embryo communication and describe a novel driver for the evolution of egg-clustering behaviour in animals. PMID:26988725

  15. Redefining parenthood and protecting embryos: why we need new laws.

    PubMed

    Annas, G J

    1984-10-01

    Artificial methods of reproduction have raised profound social and ethical issues touching on the nature of family relationships and the value of the human embryo. Artificial insemination by donor has been handled by presuming the mother's husband to be the legal father of the child; now the technique of surrogate embryo transfer has further complicated the parenthood issue by making it possible to distinguish among the genetic mother, the gestational mother, and the rearing mother. Annas argues that it is in the interest of the family to codify the current legal presumption that the gestational mother is the legal mother, unless she agrees to relinquish parental rights. In the case of embryos that are not replaced in the ovum donor, he maintains that the gamete donors should have decision-making authority over whether the embryos may be frozen and for what purpose, and contends that sales of frozen embryos should be forbidden. PMID:6500920

  16. Biocompatibility assessment of fibrous nanomaterials in mammalian embryos.

    PubMed

    Munk, Michele; Camargo, Luiz S A; Quintão, Carolina C R; Silva, Saulo R; Souza, Eliza D; Raposo, Nádia R B; Marconcini, Jose M; Jorio, Ado; Ladeira, Luiz O; Brandão, Humberto M

    2016-07-01

    Currently there is a growing interest in the use of nanotechnology in reproductive medicine and reproductive biology. However, their toxic effects on mammalian embryos remain poorly understood. In this work, we evaluate the biocompatibility of two fibrous nanomaterials (NMs): cotton cellulose nanofibers (CNF) and carboxylated multiwalled carbon nanotubes (MWCNT-COOH), by performing an investigation of the embryonic development, gene expression (biomarkers focused on cell stress, apoptosis and totipotency) and in situ apoptosis in bovine embryos. Exposure to NMs did not interfere in preimplantation development or in the incidence of apoptosis in the bovine embryo, but they did affect the gene expression. The results presented are important for an understanding of the toxicity of cotton CNF and MWCNT-COOH on mammalian embryos. To our knowledge, we report the first evaluation of biocompatibility between these NMs on preimplantation embryos, which may open a new window for reproductive biomedical applications. PMID:26949162

  17. Chill sensitivity of honey bee, Apis mellifera, embryos.

    PubMed

    Collins, Anita M; Mazur, Peter

    2006-08-01

    Improved methods for preservation of honey bee, Apis mellifera L., germplasm would be very welcome to beekeeping industry queen breeders. The introduction of two parasites and the emergence of an antibiotic resistant disease have increased demands for resistant stock. Techniques for artificial insemination of queens are available, and semen has been cryopreserved with limited success. However, cryopreservation of embryos for rearing queens would mesh well with current practices and also provide drones (haploid males). Eggs at five ages between twenty-four hours and sixty-two hours were exposed to 0, -6.6, and/or -15 degrees C for various times, and successful hatch measured. Honey bee embryos show chill sensitivity as do other insect embryos, and the rate of chill injury increases dramatically with decrease in holding temperature. The 48 h embryos in both groups showed the greatest tolerance to chilling, although 44 h embryos were only slightly less so. PMID:16677625

  18. Heartbeat, embryo communication and hatching synchrony in snake eggs.

    PubMed

    Aubret, Fabien; Blanvillain, Gaëlle; Bignon, Florent; Kok, Philippe J R

    2016-01-01

    Communication is central to life at all levels of complexity, from cells to organs, through to organisms and communities. Turtle eggs were recently shown to communicate with each other in order to synchronise their development and generate beneficial hatching synchrony. Yet the mechanism underlying embryo to embryo communication remains unknown. Here we show that within a clutch, developing snake embryos use heart beats emanating from neighbouring eggs as a clue for their metabolic level, in order to synchronise development and ultimately hatching. Eggs of the water snake Natrix maura increased heart rates and hatched earlier than control eggs in response to being incubated in physical contact with more advanced eggs. The former produced shorter and slower swimming young than their control siblings. Our results suggest potential fitness consequences of embryo to embryo communication and describe a novel driver for the evolution of egg-clustering behaviour in animals. PMID:26988725

  19. Ovarian response, embryo recovery and results of embryo transfer in a Hungarian native pig breed.

    PubMed

    Rátky, J; Brüssow, K P; Solti, L; Torner, H; Sarlós, P

    2001-09-15

    The objective of the study was to use embryo transfer (ET) for propagation of the Swallow Belly Mangalica population. Mangalica is a native Hungarian pig breed adapted to extreme climate and housing conditions and distinguished for excellent meat and fat quality. However, due to their weak reproductive characteristics and relatively high fat proportion, Mangalica pigs have been replaced by modern breeds. Now, there is an increased interest again to safeguard the properties of this breed. We conducted two experiments. First, we used a total of 18 puberal Mangalica gilts to determine an optimal superovulatory treatment. Following estrus synchronization with Regumate, we injected gilts with either 750, 1000 or 1250 IU PMSG, followed by 750 IU hCG 80 h later. We scanned ovaries endoscopically 3 days after hCG administration. The application of 1000 and 1250 IU PMSG resulted in a higher rate of ovulation compared to 750 IU (24.2 +/- 3.6 and 21.0 +/- 2.3 vs. 13.7 +/- 2.7 P<0.05). The number of follicular cysts increased after administration of 1250 IU PMSG compared to 750 and 1000 IU (2.0 +/- 1.3 vs. 0.3 +/- 0.7 and 0.2 +/- 0.3, P<0.05). Thus, we chose 1000 IU PMSG for further stimulation of Mangalica gilts. In the second experiment, we induced superovulation in 10 Mangalica donor gilts by 1000 IU PMSG and 750 IU hCG. Gilts were fixed-time inseminated, and then five days later embryo collection was carried out surgically (n=6) or endoscopically (n=4). Out of the 187 ova recovered, 92.5% were at the morula/blastocyst stage. The embryo recovery rate was higher following surgical flushing than following endoscopy (91.5 +/- 4.4% vs. 71.4 +/- 12.7%, P<0.05). Altogether 143 embryos were transferred surgically or endoscopically into 8 Landrace recipients. Surgical and endoscopic transfer of Mangalica embryos into Landrace gilts resulted in pregnancies in 3 and 2 gilts, respectively; thus the overall farrowing rate was 62.5%. The birth of 59 Mangalica piglets from 5 embryo

  20. Production of Interspecific Germline Chimeras via Embryo Replacement.

    PubMed

    Choi, Hee Jung; Lee, Hyung Chul; Kang, Kyung Soo; Lee, Hyo Gun; Ono, Tamao; Nagai, Hiroki; Sheng, Guojun; Han, Jae Yong

    2015-08-01

    In avian species, primordial germ cells (PGCs) use the vascular system to reach their destination, the genital ridge. Because of this unique migratory route of avian germ cells, germline chimera production can be achieved via germ cell transfer into a blood vessel. This study was performed to establish an alternative germ cell-transfer system for producing germline chimeras by replacing an original host embryo with a donor embryo, while retaining the host extraembryonic tissue and yolk, before circulation. First, to test the migratory capacity of PGCs after embryo replacement, Korean Oge (KO) chick embryos were used to replace GFP transgenic chick embryos. Four days after replacement, GFP-positive cells were detected in the replaced KO embryonic gonads, and genomic DNA PCR analysis with the embryonic gonads demonstrated the presence of the GFP transgene. To produce an interspecific germline chimera, the original chick embryo proper was replaced with a quail embryo onto the chick yolk. To detect the gonadal PGCs in the 5.5-day-old embryonic gonads, immunohistochemistry was performed with monoclonal antibodies specific to either quail or chick PGCs, i.e., QCR1 and anti-stage-specific embryonic antigen-1 (SSEA-1), respectively. Both the QCR1-positive and SSEA-1-positive cells were detected in the gonads of replaced quail embryos. Forty percent of the PGC population in the quail embryos was occupied by chick extraembryonically derived PGCs. In conclusion, replacement of an embryo onto the host yolk before circulation can be applied to produce interspecies germline chimeras, and this germ cell-transfer technology is potentially applicable for reproduction of wild or endangered bird species. PMID:26063873

  1. Impact of different embryo loading techniques on pregnancy rates in in vitro fertlization/embryo transfer cycles

    PubMed Central

    Halvaei, Iman; Khalili, Mohammad Ali; Razi, Mohammad H; Agha-Rahimi, Azam; Nottola, Stefania A

    2013-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Embryo transfer (ET) technique is one of the important factors of in vitro fertlization success. Among the different steps in ET technique, less attention has been given to embryo loading (EL). The aim was to compare the impact of two different techniques of EL on pregnancy rate in IVF/ET cycles. MATERIALS AND METHODS: In this retrospective study, 144 and 170 patients were placed in groups A and B, respectively. In Group A, the embryos were drawn directly into the ET catheter from culture microdrop under the oil. In Group B, the embryos were transferred from culture microdrop into G2 medium in center-well dish. Then, the embryos were drawn into the catheter and finally transferred into the uterus. Both groups were adjusted for other parameters based on the EL technique. The main outcome measure was pregnancy rate. RESULTS: There were insignificant differences for etiology of infertility, source of sperm, type of stimulation protocol, percent of IVF or intracytoplasmic sperm injection type of ET catheter, cycles with good quality embryos and transferred embryos between two groups. The rate of both chemical and clinical pregnancy was higher in Group B compared to A, but the difference was insignificant (P = 0.09 and P = 0.1, respectively). CONCLUSION: It seems that there is no difference in the outcome by loading the embryo from microdrop or center-well dish. PMID:23869155

  2. Transcript profiles of maize embryo sacs and preliminary identification of genes involved in the embryo sac–pollen tube interaction

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Shuai Shuai; Wang, Fang; Tan, Su Jian; Wang, Ming Xiu; Sui, Na; Zhang, Xian Sheng

    2014-01-01

    The embryo sac, the female gametophyte of flowering plants, plays important roles in the pollination and fertilization process. Maize (Zea mays L.) is a model monocot, but little is known about the interactions between its embryo sac and the pollen tube. In this study, we compared the transcript profiles of mature embryo sacs, mature embryo sacs 14–16 h after pollination, and mature nucelli. Comparing the transcript profiles of the embryo sacs before and after the entry of the pollen tube, we identified 3467 differentially expressed transcripts (3382 differentially expressed genes; DEGs). The DEGs were grouped into 22 functional categories. Among the DEGs, 221 genes were induced upon the entry of the pollen tube, and many of them encoded proteins involved in RNA binding, processing, and transcription, signaling, miscellaneous enzyme family processes, and lipid metabolism processes. Genes in the DEG dataset were grouped into 17 classes in a gene ontology enrichment analysis. The DEGs included many genes encoding proteins involved in protein amino acid phosphorylation and protein ubiquitination, implying that these processes might play important roles in the embryo sac–pollen tube interaction. Additionally, our analyses indicate that the expression of 112 genes encoding cysteine-rich proteins (CRPs) is induced during pollination and fertilization. The CRPs likely regulate pollen tube guidance and embryo sac development. These results provide important information on the genes involved in the embryo sac–pollen tube interaction in maize. PMID:25566277

  3. PEI1, an embryo-specific zinc finger protein gene required for heart-stage embryo formation in Arabidopsis.

    PubMed Central

    Li, Z; Thomas, T L

    1998-01-01

    We used virtual subtraction, a new gene isolation strategy, to isolate several genes of interest that are expressed in Arabidopsis embryos. These genes have demonstrated biological properties or have the potential to be involved in important biological processes. One gene isolated by virtual subtraction is PEI. It encodes a protein containing a Cys3His zinc finger domain associated with a number of animal and fungal transcription factors. In situ hybridization results showed that PEI1 is expressed throughout the embryo from globular to late cotyledon stage. Transgenic Arabidopsis plants expressing a PEI1 antisense gene produced white seeds in which embryo development did not progress through heart stage. Aberrant embryos failed to form cotyledons, but the embryonic root appeared to be normal. Aberrant embryos did not turn green, and the expression of genes involved in photomorphogenesis was drastically attenuated. In culture, aberrant embryos did not form true leaves, but root formation was apparently normal. These results suggest that PEI1 is an embryo-specific transcription factor that plays an important role during Arabidopsis embryogenesis, functioning primarily in the apical domain of the embryo. PMID:9501112

  4. Expression and genomic integration of transgenes after Agrobacterium-mediated transformation of mature barley embryos.

    PubMed

    Uçarlı, C; Tufan, F; Gürel, F

    2015-01-01

    Mature embryos in tissue cultures are advantageous because of their abundance and rapid germination, which reduces genomic instability problems. In this study, 2-day-old isolated mature barley embryos were infected with 2 Agrobacterium hypervirulent strains (AGL1 and EHA105), followed by a 3-day period of co-cultivation in the presence of L-cystein amino acid. Chimeric expression of the b-glucuronidase gene (gusA) directed by a viral promoter of strawberry vein banding virus was observed in coleoptile epidermal cells and seminal roots in 5-day-old germinated seedlings. In addition to varying infectivity patterns in different strains, there was a higher ratio of transient b-glucuronidase expression in developing coleoptiles than in embryonic roots, indicating the high competency of shoot apical meristem cells in the mature embryo. A total of 548 explants were transformed and 156 plants developed to maturity on G418 media after 18-25 days. We detected transgenes in 74% of the screened plant leaves by polymerase chain reaction, and 49% of these expressed neomycin phosphotransferase II gene following AGL1 transformation. Ten randomly selected T0 transformants were analyzed using thermal asymmetric interlaced polymerase chain reaction and 24 fragments ranged between 200-600 base pairs were sequenced. Three of the sequences flanked with transferred-DNA showed high similarity to coding regions of the barley genome, including alpha tubulin5, homeobox 1, and mitochondrial 16S genes. We observed 70-200-base pair filler sequences only in the coding regions of barley in this study. PMID:25730049

  5. Accurate and noninvasive embryos screening during in vitro fertilization (IVF) assisted by Raman analysis of embryos culture medium Accurate and noninvasive embryos screening during IVF

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shen, A. G.; Peng, J.; Zhao, Q. H.; Su, L.; Wang, X. H.; Hu, J. M.; Yang, J.

    2012-04-01

    In combination with morphological evaluation tests, we employ Raman spectroscopy to select higher potential reproductive embryos during in vitro fertilization (IVF) based on chemical composition of embryos culture medium. In this study, 57 Raman spectra are acquired from both higher and lower quality embryos culture medium (ECM) from 10 patients which have been preliminarily confirmed by clinical assay. Data are fit by using a linear combination model of least squares method in which 12 basis spectra represent the chemical features of ECM. The final fitting coefficients provide insight into the chemical compositions of culture medium samples and are subsequently used as criterion to evaluate the quality of embryos. The relative fitting coefficients ratios of sodium pyruvate/albumin and phenylalanine/albumin seem act as key roles in the embryo screening, attaining 85.7% accuracy in comparison with clinical pregnancy. The good results demonstrate that Raman spectroscopy therefore is an important candidate for an accurate and noninvasive screening of higher quality embryos, which potentially decrease the time-consuming clinical trials during IVF.

  6. Superovulation, collection and transfer of embryos and demi-embryos from Boran(Bos indicus ) cows and heifers.

    PubMed

    Jordt, T; Lorenzini, E

    1988-08-01

    Twenty-three Boran(Bos indicus ) cows and heifers were superovulated with pregnant mare serum gonadotropin (PMSG); a total of four embryos and 4.1 +/- 0.3 (mean +/- SEM) ova per ova-producing donor resulted. Follicle stimulating hormone (FSH-P) was then used to superovulate 49 Boran cows for a total of 106 superovulations, of which 63 (59.4%) produced an average of 3.7 +/- 0.4 (mean +/- SEM) embryos. The embryo production was not influenced by either the season or the number of times(one to five) the cows were superovulated. A higher pregnancy rate was obtained when the selection of Boran recipients was based on their plasma-progesterone values (overall 52.5%, single embryos 63.3%, twin demi-embryos 45.8%) than when they were selected by palpation per rectum only (overall 43.8%, single embryos 50%, twin demi-embryos 36.4%). The twinning rate of twin demiembryos was 62.5%, whereas only single calves were born after transfer of two embryos per recipient. No pregnancies were produced following transfer of twin demi-embryos without zonae pellucidae. Transferring single demi-embryos gave a low pregnancy rate (13.3%). Twelve donor Boran cows (21 superovulations) bred with their fathers resulted in a high rate of early embryonic death; additionally, only 20.9% (overall) of the recipients became pregnant. Estrus synchronization of Boran cows with a progesterone releasing intravaginal device (PRID) for a short period (7 d) combined with one injection of prostaglandin (Day 6) produced a larger number of good quality recipients (70.5%) than using double prostaglandin injections (60%). PMID:16726476

  7. Natural Selection of Human Embryos: Decidualizing Endometrial Stromal Cells Serve as Sensors of Embryo Quality upon Implantation

    PubMed Central

    Teklenburg, Gijs; Salker, Madhuri; Molokhia, Mariam; Lavery, Stuart; Trew, Geoffrey; Aojanepong, Tepchongchit; Mardon, Helen J.; Lokugamage, Amali U.; Rai, Raj; Landles, Christian; Roelen, Bernard A. J.; Quenby, Siobhan; Kuijk, Ewart W.; Kavelaars, Annemieke; Heijnen, Cobi J.; Regan, Lesley; Brosens, Jan J.; Macklon, Nick S.

    2010-01-01

    Background Pregnancy is widely viewed as dependent upon an intimate dialogue, mediated by locally secreted factors between a developmentally competent embryo and a receptive endometrium. Reproductive success in humans is however limited, largely because of the high prevalence of chromosomally abnormal preimplantation embryos. Moreover, the transient period of endometrial receptivity in humans uniquely coincides with differentiation of endometrial stromal cells (ESCs) into highly specialized decidual cells, which in the absence of pregnancy invariably triggers menstruation. The role of cyclic decidualization of the endometrium in the implantation process and the nature of the decidual cytokines and growth factors that mediate the crosstalk with the embryo are unknown. Methodology/Principal Findings We employed a human co-culture model, consisting of decidualizing ESCs and single hatched blastocysts, to identify the soluble factors involved in implantation. Over the 3-day co-culture period, approximately 75% of embryos arrested whereas the remainder showed normal development. The levels of 14 implantation factors secreted by the stromal cells were determined by multiplex immunoassay. Surprisingly, the presence of a developing embryo had no significant effect on decidual secretions, apart from a modest reduction in IL-5 levels. In contrast, arresting embryos triggered a strong response, characterized by selective inhibition of IL-1β, -6, -10, -17, -18, eotaxin, and HB-EGF secretion. Co-cultures were repeated with undifferentiated ESCs but none of the secreted cytokines were affected by the presence of a developing or arresting embryo. Conclusions Human ESCs become biosensors of embryo quality upon differentiation into decidual cells. In view of the high incidence of gross chromosomal errors in human preimplantation embryos, cyclic decidualization followed by menstrual shedding may represent a mechanism of natural embryo selection that limits maternal investment in

  8. Transcriptomic analyses of Hand2 transgenic embryos.

    PubMed

    Funato, Noriko; Kokubo, Hiroki; Saga, Yumiko

    2016-09-01

    In this article, we further provide the data generated for the previously published research article "Specification of jaw identity by the Hand2 transcription factor." To better understand the downstream genes of the basic helix-loop-helix transcription factor Hand2, we generated double-transgenic mice (Hand2 (NC) ) by intercrossing CAG-floxed CAT-Hand2 mice with Wnt1-Cre mice for conditional activation of Hand2 expression in the neural crest. Altered expression of Hand2 induces transformation of the upper jaw to the lower jaw in Hand2 (NC) mutant mice. This data article provides Tables detailing the differentially expressed genes between wild-type and Hand2 (NC) mutant embryos. The raw array data of our transcriptomes as generated using Affymetrix microarrays are available on the NCBI Gene Expression Omnibus (GEO) browser (Reference number GSE75805). PMID:27408813

  9. Expression of Wise in chick embryos.

    PubMed

    Shigetani, Y; Itasaki, N

    2007-08-01

    We have performed in situ hybridization to study the expression of Wise in early chick embryos. Wise expression is first detectable in the ectoderm at posterior levels of late neurula. As development proceeds, Wise expression is seen in specific patterns in the ectoderm of the trunk region, pharyngeal arches, limb buds, and feather buds. In addition to these areas, particular cartilages such as the ones in the maxillary process and limbs start to express Wise at the late pharyngula stage, and the expression in these cartilages becomes stronger than that in epidermal components at later stages. Importantly, Wise is expressed in regions where other signaling molecules such as Wnt, Bmp, and Shh are known to function in morphogenesis and differentiation. Direct comparisons of the expression of Wise and these genes are also demonstrated. PMID:17654720

  10. Microwave effects on isolated chick embryo hearts

    SciTech Connect

    Caddemi, A.; Tamburello, C.C.; Zanforlin, L.; Torregrossa, M.V.

    1986-01-01

    This study was designed to examine the effects of microwaves on the electric activity of hearts as a means of elucidating interactive mechanisms of nonionizing radiation with cardiac tissue. Experiments were performed on isolated hearts of 9-12-day-old chick embryos placed in small petri dishes. Oxygenated isotonic Ringer's solution at 37 degrees C permitted heart survival. Samples were irradiated at 2.45 GHz with a power density of 3 mW/cm2. The heart signal was detected with a glass micropipet inserted into the sinoatrial node and examined by means of a Berg-Fourier analyzer. Pulsed microwaves caused the locking of the heartbeat to the modulation frequency, whereas continuous wave irradiation might have induced slight bradycardia. Pulsed fields induced stimulation or regularization of the heartbeat in arrhythmia, fibrillation, or arrest of the heart.

  11. [Cultural diversity in gamete and embryos donation].

    PubMed

    Epelboin, S

    2014-09-01

    Through gamete and embryo donation have successively emerged new ways of designing individuals who, in turn, have generated mutations in the concept of parenthood. A debate is open to the society, which often raises ideological cleavages. Indeed, donation practices mobilize the conflicting interests of donor of gametes, the recipient couple, child, whose origins are complex, although his filiation is legally clear. Its place in the family genealogy can be examined in relation to other societies, which admit plural concepts called "classificatory" kinship. They set up role partition between parents and educators. Setting anthropological perspective provides a broadening of the reflection to answer questions from the donation practices, including genealogical questions of revelation to the child of his conception, his incorporation in family and social group and the importance of compensation of donation. PMID:25153433

  12. The mitochondrial genome in embryo technologies.

    PubMed

    Hiendleder, S; Wolf, E

    2003-08-01

    The mammalian mitochondrial genome encodes for 37 genes which are involved in a broad range of cellular functions. The mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) molecule is commonly assumed to be inherited through oocyte cytoplasm in a clonal manner, and apparently species-specific mechanisms have evolved to eliminate the contribution of sperm mitochondria after natural fertilization. However, recent evidence for paternal mtDNA inheritance in embryos and offspring questions the general validity of this model, particularly in the context of assisted reproduction and embryo biotechnology. In addition to normal mt DNA haplotype variation, oocytes and spermatozoa show remarkable differences in mtDNA content and may be affected by inherited or acquired mtDNA aberrations. All these parameters have been correlated with gamete quality and reproductive success rates. Nuclear transfer (NT) technology provides experimental models for studying interactions between nuclear and mitochondrial genomes. Recent studies demonstrated (i) a significant effect of mtDNA haplotype or other maternal cytoplasmic factors on the efficiency of NT; (ii) phenotypic differences between transmitochondrial clones pointing to functionally relevant nuclear-cytoplasmic interactions; and (iii) neutral or non-neutral selection of mtDNA haplotypes in heteroplasmic conditions. Mitochondria form a dynamic reticulum, enabling complementation of mitochondrial components and possibly mixing of different mtDNA populations in heteroplasmic individuals. Future directions of research on mtDNA in the context of reproductive biotechnology range from the elimination of adverse effects of artificial heteroplasmy, e.g. created by ooplasm transfer, to engineering of optimized constellations of nuclear and cytoplasmic genes for the production of superior livestock. PMID:12887568

  13. Selection for rapid embryo development correlates with embryo exposure to maternal androgens among passerine birds

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Schwabl, H.; Palacios, M.G.; Martin, T.E.

    2007-01-01

    Greater offspring predation favors evolution of faster development among species. We hypothesized that greater offspring predation exerts selection on mothers to increase levels of anabolic androgens in egg yolks to achieve faster development. Here, we tested whether (1) concentrations of yolk androgens in passerine species were associated with offspring predation and (2) embryo and nestling development rates were associated with yolk androgen concentrations. We examined three androgens that increase in potency along the synthesis pathway: androstenedione (A4) to testosterone (T) to 5??- dihydrotestosterone (5??-DHT). Concentrations of none of these steroids were related to clutch size; only A4 was allometrically related to egg volume. Species that experience greater predation showed higher yolk concentrations of T and 5??-DHT. Higher concentrations of T and particularly 5??-DHT were strongly correlated with faster development during the embryo period and less so during the nestling period. Development rates were most strongly correlated with 5??-DHT, suggesting that potency increases along the androgen synthesis pathway and that effects are mediated by the androgen receptor pathway. These results are consistent with the hypothesis that selection for faster development by time-dependent offspring mortality may be achieved epigenetically by varying embryo exposure to maternal anabolic steroids. ?? 2007 by The University of Chicago. All rights reserved.

  14. Methods for imaging individual cilia in living echinoid embryos.

    PubMed

    Morris, Robert L; Pope, Hans W; Sholi, Adam N; Williams, Leah M; Ettinger, Chelsea R; Beacham, Gwendolyn M; Shintaku, Tatsushi; Abbott, Zachary D; Doherty, Elyse M

    2015-01-01

    The embryos of echinoids (sea urchins and sand dollars) serve as excellent models for studying cilia differentiation and stages of the cilia life cycle including ciliogenic initiation, growth, maintenance, and retraction. Early in echinoid development, uniform motile cilia form on all cells simultaneously but then rapidly differentiate into multiple cilia types that differ in morphology, motility, and signaling sensitivity. Metal ion treatments that shift germ layer boundaries and thereby "animalize" or "vegetalize" embryos can be used to enrich for low-abundance cilia types rendering those specialized cilia and the differentiation processes they exhibit much easier to study. The experimental advantages of having robust cilia growth and differentiation is tempered by the challenge of restraining ciliated embryos well enough to view the process of ciliogenesis live. We have developed four observation chambers as modifications of the Kiehart chamber for long-term light microscopic imaging of ciliated echinoid embryos. One of these systems employs paramagnetic beads to render ciliated larvae magnetic so they can be gently and reversibly trapped directly under the objective lens. With this magnetic trapping system, the larva can be positioned and repositioned until they achieve the orientation with the clearest view of any cilia of interest. These methods of gentle embryo restraint allow normal embryo development and the normal ciliogenic cycle and ciliary differentiation processes to continue in direct view. Sequential image series can then be collected and analyzed to quantitatively study the wide spectrum of cilia behaviors and properties that arise in developing echinoid embryos. PMID:25837394

  15. Zebrafish embryo development in a microfluidic flow-through system.

    PubMed

    Wielhouwer, Eric M; Ali, Shaukat; Al-Afandi, Abdulrahman; Blom, Marko T; Riekerink, Marinus B Olde; Poelma, Christian; Westerweel, Jerry; Oonk, Johannes; Vrouwe, Elwin X; Buesink, Wilfred; vanMil, Harald G J; Chicken, Jonathan; van't Oever, Ronny; Richardson, Michael K

    2011-05-21

    The zebrafish embryo is a small, cheap, whole-animal model which may replace rodents in some areas of research. Unfortunately, zebrafish embryos are commonly cultured in microtitre plates using cell-culture protocols with static buffer replacement. Such protocols are highly invasive, consume large quantities of reagents and do not readily permit high-quality imaging. Zebrafish and rodent embryos have previously been cultured in static microfluidic drops, and zebrafish embryos have also been raised in a prototype polydimethylsiloxane setup in a Petri dish. Other than this, no animal embryo has ever been shown to undergo embryonic development in a microfluidic flow-through system. We have developed and prototyped a specialized lab-on-a-chip made from bonded layers of borosilicate glass. We find that zebrafish embryos can develop in the chip for 5 days, with continuous buffer flow at pressures of 0.005-0.04 MPa. Phenotypic effects were seen, but these were scored subjectively as 'minor'. Survival rates of 100% could be reached with buffer flows of 2 µL per well per min. High-quality imaging was possible. An acute ethanol exposure test in the chip replicated the same assay performed in microtitre plates. More than 100 embryos could be cultured in an area, excluding infrastructure, smaller than a credit card. We discuss how biochip technology, coupled with zebrafish larvae, could allow biological research to be conducted in massive, parallel experiments, at high speed and low cost. PMID:21491052

  16. Ion/water channels for embryo implantation barrier.

    PubMed

    Liu, Xin-Mei; Zhang, Dan; Wang, Ting-Ting; Sheng, Jian-Zhong; Huang, He-Feng

    2014-05-01

    Successful implantation involves three distinct processes, namely the embryo apposition, attachment, and penetration through the luminal epithelium of the endometrium to establish a vascular link to the mother. After penetration, stromal cells underlying the epithelium differentiate and surround the embryo to form the embryo implantation barrier, which blocks the passage of harmful substances to the embryo. Many ion/water channel proteins were found to be involved in the process of embryo implantation. First, ion/water channel proteins play their classical role in establishing a resting membrane potential, shaping action potentials and other electrical signals by gating the flow of ions across the cell membrane. Second, most of ion/water channel proteins are regulated by steroid hormone (estrogen or progesterone), which may have important implications to the embryo implantation. Last but not least, these proteins do not limit themselves as pure channels but also function as an initiator of a series of consequences once activated by their ligand/stimulator. Herein, we discuss these new insights in recent years about the contribution of ion/water channels to the embryo implantation barrier construction during early pregnancy. PMID:24789983

  17. Radial extracorporeal shock wave treatment harms developing chicken embryos

    PubMed Central

    Kiessling, Maren C.; Milz, Stefan; Frank, Hans-Georg; Korbel, Rüdiger; Schmitz, Christoph

    2015-01-01

    Radial extracorporeal shock wave treatment (rESWT) has became one of the best investigated treatment modalities for cellulite, including the abdomen as a treatment site. Notably, pregnancy is considered a contraindication for rESWT, and concerns have been raised about possible harm to the embryo when a woman treated with rESWT for cellulite is not aware of her pregnancy. Here we tested the hypothesis that rESWT may cause serious physical harm to embryos. To this end, chicken embryos were exposed in ovo to various doses of radial shock waves on either day 3 or day 4 of development, resembling the developmental stage of four- to six-week-old human embryos. We found a dose-dependent increase in the number of embryos that died after radial shock wave exposure on either day 3 or day 4 of development. Among the embryos that survived the shock wave exposure a few showed severe congenital defects such as missing eyes. Evidently, our data cannot directly be used to draw conclusions about potential harm to the embryo of a pregnant woman treated for cellulite with rESWT. However, to avoid any risks we strongly recommend applying radial shock waves in the treatment of cellulite only if a pregnancy is ruled out. PMID:25655309

  18. Housekeeping gene transcript abundance in bovine fertilized and cloned embryos.

    PubMed

    Ross, Pablo J; Wang, Kai; Kocabas, Arif; Cibelli, Jose B

    2010-12-01

    The objective of this study was to compare housekeeping gene expression levels, relative to total mRNA, across different stages of bovine preimplantation development in embryos generated by IVF and somatic cell nuclear transfer (SCNT). We first analyzed the levels of total RNA recovered from different stages of preimplantation development. A similar RNA level was observed from oocytes to 16-cell stage embryos with a significant increase at morula and blastocyst stages. Then we used an absolute mRNA determination method that accounts for the RNA level in the embryo by quantifying copies of transcripts normalized to loaded cDNA amount. The number of housekeeping genes mRNA copies per nanogram of cDNA was compared among samples obtained from different stages of preimplantation IVF-derived embryos. None of the genes analyzed (GAPDH, PPIA, ACTB, RPL15, GUSB, and Histone H2A.2) maintained constant levels throughout preimplantation development, indicating that they are not suitable for normalizing gene expression across developmental stages. We then compared expression of housekeeping genes between IVF and SCNT embryos at different embryonic stages. We found different levels of transcript abundance between IVF and SCNT embryos for GAPDH, RPL15, GUSB, and ACTB. On the other hand, Histone H2A.2 and PPIA were similar between IVF and SCNT embryos at each stage analyzed, although they varied across stages as previously mentioned. PMID:20973679

  19. Should we be promoting embryo transfer at blastocyst stage?

    PubMed

    Maheshwari, Abha; Hamilton, Mark; Bhattacharya, Siladitya

    2016-02-01

    Improved laboratory standards and better culture media have made extended culture to blastocyst stage a reality to identify embryos with maximum implantation potential. The strategy of extended culture has become more popular across the world at a time when regulatory bodies have emphasized the need to increase the uptake of elective single embryo transfer, minimize complications associated with multiple births and aim for a healthy singleton live-birth as the preferred outcome in IVF. New data on perinatal outcomes suggest that pregnancies after embryo transfer at blastocyst stage are associated with a higher risk of preterm delivery, large for gestational age babies, monozygotic twins and altered sex ratio compared with those following embryo transfers at cleavage stage. In addition, concerns have been raised of increased congenital anomalies and epigenetic modifications with embryo transfer at blastocyst stage. Twenty-four years on from the first embryo transfer at blastocyst stage, we examine the reasons for extended embryo culture, evaluate the risks and benefits of this strategy and suggest the need to reconsider this policy in the interests of fetal safety. PMID:26673100

  20. High Frequency of Imprinted Methylation Errors in Human Preimplantation Embryos

    PubMed Central

    White, Carlee R.; Denomme, Michelle M.; Tekpetey, Francis R.; Feyles, Valter; Power, Stephen G. A.; Mann, Mellissa R. W.

    2015-01-01

    Assisted reproductive technologies (ARTs) represent the best chance for infertile couples to conceive, although increased risks for morbidities exist, including imprinting disorders. This increased risk could arise from ARTs disrupting genomic imprints during gametogenesis or preimplantation. The few studies examining ART effects on genomic imprinting primarily assessed poor quality human embryos. Here, we examined day 3 and blastocyst stage, good to high quality, donated human embryos for imprinted SNRPN, KCNQ1OT1 and H19 methylation. Seventy-six percent day 3 embryos and 50% blastocysts exhibited perturbed imprinted methylation, demonstrating that extended culture did not pose greater risk for imprinting errors than short culture. Comparison of embryos with normal and abnormal methylation didn’t reveal any confounding factors. Notably, two embryos from male factor infertility patients using donor sperm harboured aberrant methylation, suggesting errors in these embryos cannot be explained by infertility alone. Overall, these results indicate that ART human preimplantation embryos possess a high frequency of imprinted methylation errors. PMID:26626153

  1. Efficient reproduction of cynomolgus monkey using pronuclear embryo transfer technique.

    PubMed

    Sun, Qiang; Dong, Juan; Yang, Wenting; Jin, Yujuan; Yang, Mingying; Wang, Yan; Wang, Philip L; Hu, Yinghe; Tsien, Joe Z

    2008-09-01

    One of the technical bottlenecks in producing nonhuman primate models is that current assisted reproductive techniques, such as in vitro culture and frozen conservation of multicell-stage embryos, often result in poor embryo quality and subsequently lead to low birth rates. We investigated whether pronuclear embryo transfer can be used as an effective means for improving pregnancy and live birth rates of nonhuman primates. We collected 174 metaphase II oocytes by laparoscopy from 22 superovulated mature females and then fertilized these eggs using either in vitro fertilization or intracytoplasmic sperm injection, resulting in a 33.3% and a 50% fertilization rate, respectively. These 66 fertilized pronuclear-stage embryos were then tubally transferred to 30 recipients and led to 7 births and 1 abortion. Importantly, we observed that the highest live birth rate of approximately 64% was obtained when the transfer of pronuclear embryos was performed in the presence of new corpus luteum in the ovary of recipients between 24 h and 36 h after estradiol peak. Therefore, our experiments demonstrate that by matching the critical time window in the recipient's reproductive cycle for achieving optimal embryo-uterine synchrony, pronuclear embryo transfer technology can significantly improve the pregnancy rate and live birth of healthy baby monkeys. This efficient method should be valuable to the systematic efforts in construction of various transgenic primate disease models. PMID:18725640

  2. Seed architecture shapes embryo metabolism in oilseed rape.

    PubMed

    Borisjuk, Ljudmilla; Neuberger, Thomas; Schwender, Jörg; Heinzel, Nicolas; Sunderhaus, Stephanie; Fuchs, Johannes; Hay, Jordan O; Tschiersch, Henning; Braun, Hans-Peter; Denolf, Peter; Lambert, Bart; Jakob, Peter M; Rolletschek, Hardy

    2013-05-01

    Constrained to develop within the seed, the plant embryo must adapt its shape and size to fit the space available. Here, we demonstrate how this adjustment shapes metabolism of photosynthetic embryo. Noninvasive NMR-based imaging of the developing oilseed rape (Brassica napus) seed illustrates that, following embryo bending, gradients in lipid concentration became established. These were correlated with the local photosynthetic electron transport rate and the accumulation of storage products. Experimentally induced changes in embryo morphology and/or light supply altered these gradients and were accompanied by alterations in both proteome and metabolome. Tissue-specific metabolic models predicted that the outer cotyledon and hypocotyl/radicle generate the bulk of plastidic reductant/ATP via photosynthesis, while the inner cotyledon, being enclosed by the outer cotyledon, is forced to grow essentially heterotrophically. Under field-relevant high-light conditions, major contribution of the ribulose-1,5-bisphosphate carboxylase/oxygenase-bypass to seed storage metabolism is predicted for the outer cotyledon and the hypocotyl/radicle only. Differences between in vitro- versus in planta-grown embryos suggest that metabolic heterogeneity of embryo is not observable by in vitro approaches. We conclude that in vivo metabolic fluxes are locally regulated and connected to seed architecture, driving the embryo toward an efficient use of available light and space. PMID:23709628

  3. Cytological and physiological changes in orthodox maize embryos during cryopreservation.

    PubMed

    Wen, Bin; Wang, Ruling; Cheng, Hongyan; Song, Songquan

    2010-03-01

    Cytological and physiological changes during cryopreservation were studied in maize embryos at 35 days after pollination (DAP). Both dehydration and freezing caused cytological damage, such as plasmolysis, swelled mitochondria, increased heterochromatin, and nuclear shrinkage. Dehydration alone slightly impaired plasma membrane integrity while a drastic increase in electrolyte leakage was observed after freezing of embryos with moisture content above 23%. Damage to cellular ultrastructure and plasmalemma integrity was negatively related to moisture content in unfrozen embryos and positively related in frozen embryos. The pattern of changes in activity of antioxidant enzymes differed from one another during dehydration and/or freezing-thawing treatment. Dehydration increased activity of ascorbate peroxidase (APX) and glutathione reductase (GR) but decreased activity of superoxide dismutase (SOD) and dehydroascorbate reductase (DHAR). Freezing further decreased GR and SOD activity and resulted in extremely low DHAR activity. Embryos at intermediate moisture contents had low catalase (CAT) activity before freezing but highest CAT activity after freeze-thaw. Both dehydration and freezing promoted membrane lipid peroxidation which resulted in an approximately threefold increase at most in the malondialdehyde content in postthaw embryos. Changes in viability of postthaw embryos can be closely related to damage in cellular ultrastructure and plasmalemma integrity but directly related neither to antioxidants nor lipid peroxidation levels. PMID:19904484

  4. Protein Phosphorylation during Coconut Zygotic Embryo Development1

    PubMed Central

    Islas-Flores, Ignacio; Oropeza, Carlos; Hernández-Sotomayor, S.M. Teresa

    1998-01-01

    Evidence was obtained on the occurrence of protein threonine, serine, and tyrosine (Tyr) kinases in developing coconut (Cocos nucifera L.) zygotic embryos, based on in vitro phosphorylation of proteins in the presence of [γ-32P]ATP, alkaline treatment, and thin-layer chromatography analysis, which showed the presence of [32P]phosphoserine, [32P]phosphothreonine, and [32P]phosphotyrosine in [32P]-labeled protein hydrolyzates. Tyr kinase activity was further confirmed in extracts of embryos at different stages of development using antiphosphotyrosine monoclonal antibodies and the synthetic peptide derived from the amino acid sequence surrounding the phosphorylation site in pp60src (RR-SRC), which is specific for Tyr kinases. Anti-phosphotyrosine western blotting revealed a changing profile of Tyr-phosphorylated proteins during embryo development. Tyr kinase activity, as assayed using RR-SRC, also changed during embryo development, showing two peaks of activity, one during early and another during late embryo development. In addition, the use of genistein, a Tyr kinase inhibitor, diminished the ability of extracts to phosphorylate RR-SRC. Results presented here show the occurrence of threonine, serine, and Tyr kinases in developing coconut zygotic embryos, and suggest that protein phosphorylation, and the possible inference of Tyr phosphorylation in particular, may play a role in the coordination of the development of embryos in this species. PMID:9733545

  5. Danio rerio embryos on Prozac - Effects on the detoxification mechanism and embryo development.

    PubMed

    Cunha, V; Rodrigues, P; Santos, M M; Moradas-Ferreira, P; Ferreira, M

    2016-09-01

    In the past decade the presence of psychopharmaceuticals, including fluoxetine (FLU), in the aquatic environment has been associated with the increasing trend in human consumption of these substances. Aquatic organisms are usually exposed to chronic low doses and, therefore, risk assessments should evaluate the effects of these compounds in non-target organisms. Teleost fish possess an array of active defence mechanisms to cope with the deleterious effects of xenobiotics. These include ABC transporters, phase I and II of cellular detoxification and oxidative stress enzymes. Hence, the present study aimed at characterising the effect of FLU on embryo development of the model teleost zebrafish (Danio rerio) concomitantly with changes in the detoxification mechanisms during early developmental phases. Embryos were exposed to different concentrations of FLU (0.0015, 0.05, 0.1, 0.5 and 0.8μM) for 80hours post fertilization. Development was screened and the impact in the transcription of key genes, i.e., abcb4, abcc1, abcc2, abcg2, cyp1a, cyp3a65, gst, sod, cat, ahr, pxr, pparα, pparβ, pparγ, rxraa, rxrab, rxrbb, rxrga, rxrgb, raraa, rarab, rarga evaluated. In addition, accumulation assays were performed to measure the activity of ABC proteins and antioxidant enzymes (CAT and Cu/ZnSOD) after exposure to FLU. Embryo development was disrupted at the lowest FLU concentration tested (0.0015μM), which is in the range of concentrations found in WWTP effluents. Embryos exposed to higher concentrations of FLU decreased Cu/Zn SOD, and increased CAT (0.0015 and 0.5μM) enzymatic activity. Exposure to higher concentrations of FLU decreased the expression of most genes belonging to the detoxification system and upregulated cat at 0.0015μM of FLU. Most of the tested concentrations downregulated pparα, pparβ, pparγ, and raraa, rxraa, rxrab, rxrbb rxrgb and ahr gene expression while pxr was significantly up regulated at all tested concentrations. In conclusion, this study

  6. Abamectin induces rapid and reversible hypoactivity within early zebrafish embryos.

    PubMed

    Raftery, Tara D; Volz, David C

    2015-01-01

    During early zebrafish embryogenesis, spontaneous tail contractions represent the first sign of locomotion and result from innervation of primary motoneuron axons to target axial muscles. Based on a high-content screen, we previously demonstrated that exposure of zebrafish embryos to abamectin--an avermectin insecticide--from 5-25 hours post-fertilization (hpf) abolished spontaneous activity in the absence of effects on survival and gross morphology. Therefore, the objective of this study was to begin investigating the mechanism of abamectin-induced hypoactivity in zebrafish. Similar to 384-well plates, static exposure of embryos to abamectin from 5-25 hpf in glass beakers resulted in elimination of activity at low micromolar concentrations. However, abamectin did not affect neurite outgrowth from spinal motoneurons and, compared with exposure from 5-25 hpf, embryos were equally susceptible to abamectin-induced hypoactivity when exposures were initiated at 10 and 23 hpf. Moreover, immersion of abamectin-exposed embryos in clean water resulted in complete recovery of spontaneous activity relative to vehicle controls, suggesting that abamectin reversibly activated ligand-gated chloride channels and inhibited neurotransmission. To test this hypothesis, we pretreated embryos to vehicle or non-toxic concentrations of fipronil or endosulfan--two insecticides that antagonize the γ-aminobutyric acid (GABA) receptor--from 5-23 hpf, and then exposed embryos to vehicle or abamectin from 23-25 hpf. Interestingly, activity levels within abamectin-exposed embryos pretreated with either antagonist were similar to embryos exposed to vehicle alone. Using quantitative PCR and phylogenetic analyses, we then confirmed the presence of GABA receptor α1 and β2 subunits at 5, 10, and 23 hpf, and demonstrated that zebrafish GABA receptor subunits are homologous to mammalian GABA receptor subunits. Overall, our data collectively suggest that abamectin induces rapid and reversible

  7. Reproductive outcomes of retransferring retained embryos in blastocyst transfer cycles

    PubMed Central

    Yi, Hyun Jeong; Koo, Hwa Seon; Cha, Sun Hwa; Kim, Hye Ok; Park, Chan Woo

    2016-01-01

    Objective To determine the incidence of embryo retention (ER) in the transfer catheter following embryo transfer (ET) in blastocyst transfer and investigate whether retransferring retained embryos has an impact on reproductive outcomes in patients undergoing in vitro fertilization-ET. Methods We retrospectively analyzed the records of 1,131 blastocyst transfers, which comprised 223 single blastocyst transfer (SBT) and 908 double blastocyst transfer (DBT) cycles. Each SBT and DBT group was classified depending on whether ET was performed without retained embryos in the catheter during the first attempt (without-ER group) or whether any retained embryos were found following ET (ER group) for the purpose of comparing reproductive outcomes in a homogenous population. Results The overall incidence of finding retained embryos was 2.8% (32/1,131). There were no retained embryos in SBT cycles. In DBT cycles, implantation rates (30.0% vs. 26.6%), positive β-hCG rates (57.2% vs. 56.2%), clinical pregnancy rates (45.3% vs. 46.9%), and live birth rates (38.9% vs. 43.8%) were not significantly different between the without-ER and ER groups. There were no significant differences in the mean birth weight (g) 2,928.4±631.8 vs. 2,948.7±497.8 and the mean gestational age at birth (269.3±17.2 days vs. 264.2±25.7 days). A total of nine cases of congenital birth defects were found in this study population. Eight were observed in the without-ER group and one in the ER group. Conclusion Our results suggest that retransfer of retained embryos does not have any adverse impact on reproductive outcomes in blastocyst transfer cycles. Furthermore, our results support finding that SBT might be advantageous for decreasing the incidence of retained embryos in catheters. PMID:27358833

  8. The avian embryo responding to microgravity of space flight

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hullinger, Ronald L.

    1993-01-01

    Of all the many potential and real microenvironmental influences, only gravity would appear to have remained relatively constant and ubiquitous for developing organisms. Histo- and organogenesis as well as differential growth of the embryo and fetus may have evolved with a constant environmental factor of gravity. Chick embryos of 2-day and 9-day stages of incubation were flown in an incubator on the Space Shuttle during a 9-day mission. Significant differences in embryo response to this microgravity environment were observed. This paper offers an analysis and suggests mechanisms which may contribute to these results.

  9. 9 CFR 98.18 - Shipment of embryos to the United States.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 9 Animals and Animal Products 1 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Shipment of embryos to the United... IMPORTATION OF CERTAIN ANIMAL EMBRYOS AND ANIMAL SEMEN Ruminant and Swine Embryos From Regions Where Rinderpest or Foot-and-Mouth Disease Exists § 98.18 Shipment of embryos to the United States. (a)...

  10. 9 CFR 98.18 - Shipment of embryos to the United States.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 9 Animals and Animal Products 1 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Shipment of embryos to the United... IMPORTATION OF CERTAIN ANIMAL EMBRYOS AND ANIMAL SEMEN Ruminant and Swine Embryos From Regions Where Rinderpest or Foot-and-Mouth Disease Exists § 98.18 Shipment of embryos to the United States. (a)...

  11. Competing Views of Embryos for the Twenty-First Century: Textbooks and Society

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Maienschein, Jane; Wellner, Karen

    2013-01-01

    It might seem that an embryo is an embryo, and that there would be a fact of the matter. That seems especially true with respect to the way embryos are presented in textbooks, including high school biology textbooks. This paper looks at three co-existing, competing, and often conflicting views of embryos. Then with a close study of twentieth…

  12. 9 CFR 98.18 - Shipment of embryos to the United States.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 9 Animals and Animal Products 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Shipment of embryos to the United... IMPORTATION OF CERTAIN ANIMAL EMBRYOS AND ANIMAL SEMEN Ruminant and Swine Embryos From Regions Where Rinderpest or Foot-and-Mouth Disease Exists § 98.18 Shipment of embryos to the United States. (a)...

  13. 9 CFR 98.18 - Shipment of embryos to the United States.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 9 Animals and Animal Products 1 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Shipment of embryos to the United... IMPORTATION OF CERTAIN ANIMAL EMBRYOS AND ANIMAL SEMEN Ruminant and Swine Embryos From Regions Where Rinderpest or Foot-and-Mouth Disease Exists § 98.18 Shipment of embryos to the United States. (a)...

  14. 9 CFR 98.18 - Shipment of embryos to the United States.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 9 Animals and Animal Products 1 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Shipment of embryos to the United... IMPORTATION OF CERTAIN ANIMAL EMBRYOS AND ANIMAL SEMEN Ruminant and Swine Embryos From Regions Where Rinderpest or Foot-and-Mouth Disease Exists § 98.18 Shipment of embryos to the United States. (a)...

  15. Hookworm infection

    MedlinePlus

    Hookworm disease; Ground itch; Ancylostoma duodenale infection; Necator americanus infection; Parasitic infection - hookworm ... in getting the disease is walking barefoot on ground where there are feces of people who have ...

  16. Yeast Infections

    MedlinePlus

    ... antibiotics, it can multiply and cause an infection. Yeast infections affect different parts of the body in different ways: Thrush is a yeast infection that causes white patches in your mouth Candida ...

  17. Vaginal Infections

    MedlinePlus

    ... Two common vaginal infections are bacterial vaginosis and yeast infections . Bacterial vaginosis (BV) happens when a certain ... increases the chances that you’ll get BV. Yeast infections happen when a fungus (a type of ...

  18. Bone Infections

    MedlinePlus

    ... of the body, bones can get infected. The infections are usually bacterial, but can also be fungal. ... bloodstream. People who are at risk for bone infections include those with diabetes, poor circulation, or recent ...

  19. Eye Infections

    MedlinePlus

    Your eyes can get infections from bacteria, fungi, or viruses. Eye infections can occur in different parts of the eye and can affect just one eye or both. Two common eye infections are Conjunctivitis - also known as pinkeye. Conjunctivitis is ...

  20. PROVIDENCE VIRUS: A NEW MEMBER OF THE TETRAVIRIDAE THAT INFECTS CULTURED INSECT CELLS

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    We identified a new member of the Tetraviridae, Providence virus (PrV), persistently infecting a cell line derived from the midgut of Helicoverpa zea (corn earworm). Virus purified from these cells also productively infected a H. zea fat body cell line and a cell line from whole embryos of the beet...

  1. Haeckel's Embryos and Evolution: Setting the Record Straight.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wells, Jonathan

    1999-01-01

    Argues that Ernst Haeckel's drawings of vertebrate embryos (1891), which have been widely used in biology textbooks to illustrate his "Biogenetic Law", are factually flawed. Discusses the problems with Haeckel's drawings and his theory. Contains 14 references. (WRM)

  2. Embryo with XYY syndrome presenting with clubfoot: a case report.

    PubMed

    Athanatos, Dimitrios; Tsakalidis, Christos; Tampakoudis, George P; Papastergiou, Maria N; Tzevelekis, Fillipos; Pados, George; Assimakopoulos, Efstratios A

    2009-01-01

    Talipes equinovarus (clubfoot) is a skeletal anomaly of the embryo's legs, with a frequency of 1-3:1000 living born babies. It may occur as an independent anomaly, or as part of a syndrome with concomitant chromosomal abnormalities.XYY syndrome is a quite rare sex chromosomal abnormality with 47, XYY karyotype. Prenatal diagnosis is usually accidental because the syndrome is not associated with increased prevalence of sonographically detectable defects. The possibility of co-existence of skeletal anomalies in embryos with 47, XYY karyotype is scant, with only a few cases reported in the literature.An amniocentesis was performed in an embryo at the 21(st) week of gestation because clubfoot was detected in the 2(nd) trimester scan, and the embryo was found to have abnormal karyotype of 47, XYY. Current opinions and management dilemmas are discussed. PMID:19918427

  3. Leptin expression affects metabolic rate in zebrafish embryos (D. rerio)

    PubMed Central

    Dalman, Mark R.; Liu, Qin; King, Mason D.; Bagatto, Brian; Londraville, Richard L.

    2013-01-01

    We used antisense morpholino oligonucleotide technology to knockdown leptin-(A) gene expression in developing zebrafish embryos and measured its effects on metabolic rate and cardiovascular function. Using two indicators of metabolic rate, oxygen consumption was significantly lower in leptin morphants early in development [<48 hours post-fertilization (hpf)], while acid production was significantly lower in morphants later in development (>48 hpf). Oxygen utilization rates in <48 hpf embryos and acid production in 72 hpf embryos could be rescued to that of wildtype embryos by recombinant leptin coinjected with antisense morpholino. Leptin is established to influence metabolic rate in mammals, and these data suggest leptin signaling also influences metabolic rate in fishes. PMID:23847542

  4. vEmbryo In Silico Models: Predicting Vascular Developmental Toxicity

    EPA Science Inventory

    The cardiovascular system is the first to function in the vertebrate embryo, reflecting the critical need for nutrient delivery and waste removal during organogenesis. Blood vessel development occurs by complex interacting signaling networks, including extra-cellular matrix remod...

  5. Embryo research: the ethical geography of the debate.

    PubMed

    Khushf, G

    1997-10-01

    Three basic political positions on embryo research will be identified as libertarian, conservative, and social-democratic. The Human Embryo Research Panel will be regarded as an expression of the social-democratic position. A taxonomy of the ethical issues addressed by the Panel will then be developed at the juncture of political and ethical modes of reflection. Among the arguments considered will be those for the separability of the abortion and embryo research debates; arguments against the possibility of the preembryo being a person, especially arguments associated with totipotency and the significance of the primitive streak; and the various reasons for regulating embryo research, including those associated with respect for the preembryo, the protection of traditional views of human procreation, and the prevention of commercialization. PMID:9360200

  6. GENE EXPRESSION IN PRE-IMPLANTATION MAMMALIAN EMBRYOS

    EPA Science Inventory

    The pre-implantation mammalian embryo is initially under the control of maternal informational macromolecules that are accumulated during oogenesis. ubsequently, the genetic program of development becomes dependent upon new transcription derived from activation of the embryonic g...

  7. Environmental influences on the production of pre-implantation embryos.

    PubMed

    Diercks, Ann-Kathrin; Schwab, Anna; Rittgen, Werner; Kruspel, Andreas; Heuss, Edgar; Schenkel, Johannes

    2010-06-01

    Generation and cryopreservation of transgenic mice depend on reliable and continuous production of pre-implantation embryos. To suppress circannual and circadian rhythms driving the physiological and sexual behaviour of free living animals, laboratory animals are housed under standardized conditions. It remains to be elucidated if the artificial climate can cover all environmental effects. Here, we report that the humidity in an animal facility affects the embryo yield. The weather at the location of the facility, especially the temperature, influences the climate within an animal facility; weather peaks are obviously covered in part only, even if the facility is equipped with a powerful air-conditioning supply. Subsequently, external weather changes interact with the environment within the facility, influencing the production of embryos. Furthermore, noise and/or vibrations as generated by construction works, negatively affect the embryo yield. PMID:20171725

  8. Frozen Embryos May Boost Pregnancy Odds for Some Women

    MedlinePlus

    ... Women Study finds they beat fresh embryos in polycystic ovary syndrome patients undergoing IVF To use the sharing features ... for a successful pregnancy, researchers report. Women with polycystic ovary syndrome, a hormonal disorder that causes enlarged ovaries with ...

  9. The Effects of Experimentally Induced Adelphophagy in Gastropod Embryos

    PubMed Central

    Thomsen, Olaf; Collin, Rachel; Carrillo-Baltodano, Allan

    2014-01-01

    Adelphophagy, development where embryos grow large by consuming morphologically distinct nutritive embryos or their own normal siblings is widespread but uncommon among animal phyla. Among invertebrates it is particularly common in some families of marine gastropods and segmented worms, but rare or unknown in other closely related families. In calyptraeid gastropods phylogenetic analysis indicates that adelphophagy has arisen at least 9 times from species with planktotrophic larval development. This pattern of frequent parallel evolution of adelphophagy suggests that the embryos of planktotrophic species might be predisposed to evolve adelphophagy. Here we used embryos of three species of planktotrophic calyptraeids, one from each of three major genera in the family (Bostrycapulus, Crucibulum, and Crepidula), to answer the following 3 questions: (1) Can embryos of species with planktotrophic development benefit, in terms of pre-hatching growth, from the ingestion of yolk and tissue from experimentally damaged siblings? (2) Does ingestion of this material from damaged siblings increase variation in pre-hatching size? and (3) Does this experimentally induced adelphophagy alter the allometry between the velum and the shell, increasing morphological similarity to embryos of normally adelphophagic species? We found an overall increase in shell length and velum diameter when embryos feed on damaged siblings within their capsules. There was no detectable increase in variation in shell length or velum diameter, or changes in allometry. The overall effect of our treatment was small compared to the embryonic growth observed in naturally adelphophagic development. However each embryo in our experiment probably consumed less than one sibling on average, whereas natural adelphophages often each consume 10–30 or more siblings. These results suggest that the ability to consume, assimilate, and benefit from yolk and tissue of their siblings is widespread across calyptraeids

  10. [Research with human embryo stem cells. Foundations and judicial limits].

    PubMed

    Eser, Albin; Koch, Hans-Georg

    2004-01-01

    Research with human embryos, and particularly, the use for scientific purposes of human embryonic stem cells has given raise to different sort of problems at the international level. One of the most strict regulation in this field, is this lecture Professors Albin Eser and Hans-Georg Koch analyse the german legal framework in relation with the use of embryos and human embryonic stem cells for scientific purposes. PMID:15544142

  11. Mfn2 Affects Embryo Development via Mitochondrial Dysfunction and Apoptosis

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Qun; Xiang, Wenpei

    2015-01-01

    Background Growth factors, energy sources, and mitochondrial function strongly affect embryo growth and development in vitro. The biological role and prospective significance of the mitofusin gene Mfn2 in the development of preimplantation embryos remain poorly understood. Our goal is to profile the role of Mfn2 in mouse embryos and determine the underlying mechanism of Mfn2 function in embryo development. Methods We transfected Mfn2-siRNA into 2-cell fertilized eggs and then examined the expression of Mfn2, the anti-apoptotic protein Bcl-2, and the apoptosis-promoting protein Bax by Western blot. Additionally, we determined the blastocyst formation rate and measured ATP levels, mtDNA levels, mitochondrial membrane potential (ΔΨm), and apoptosis in all of the embryos. Results The results indicate that the Mfn2 and Bcl-2 levels were markedly decreased, whereas Bax levels were increased in the T group (embryos transfected with Mfn2-siRNA) compared with the C group (embryos transfected with control-siRNA). The blastocyst formation rate was significantly decreased in the T group. The ATP content and the relative amounts of mtDNA and cDNA in the T group were significantly reduced compared with the C group. In the T group, ΔΨm and Ca2+ levels were reduced, and the number of apoptotic cells was increased. Conclusion Low in vitro expression of Mfn2 attenuates the blastocyst formation rate and cleavage speed in mouse zygotes and causes mitochondrial dysfunction, as confirmed by the ATP and mtDNA levels and mitochondrial membrane potential. Mfn2 deficiency induced apoptosis through the Bcl-2/Bax and Ca2+ pathways. These findings indicate that Mfn2 could affect preimplantation embryo development through mitochondrial function and cellular apoptosis. PMID:25978725

  12. [Principles and juridical limits to human embryo research].

    PubMed

    de Sá, Maria de Fátima

    2003-01-01

    This work intends to provide a wide scope of the legal situation in Brazil referred to Human Embryos and how it has been developed through the 20th century. Across the last century, the human being got the possibility of making genetic experiments with human embryos. Our main goal is to assume the future responsibility of these actions through a juridical and ethical point of view. PMID:15032101

  13. Patients with polycystic ovary syndrome have successful embryo arrest

    PubMed Central

    Yin, Baoli; Hao, Haoying; Wei, Duo; Song, Xiaobing; Xie, Juanke; Zhang, Cuilian

    2015-01-01

    In this retrospective study, we investigate the relationship between embryo arrest and polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS) during in vitro fertilization-embryo transfer (IVF-ET). In this study, 667 subjects were enrolled, including 330 patients with PCOS and 337 subjects without PCOS. The subjects underwent in vitro fertilization/intracytoplasmic sperm injection and embryo transfer (IVF/ICSI-ET) cycles at the Reproductive Medical Centre of Henan Provincial Hospital from January 2009 to December 2012. Four protocols were used to stimulate the ovaries, including long protocol, super-long down-regulation protocol, short protocol and antagonist protocol. Oocytes were retrieved using transvaginal ultrasound guidance. Pronuclei were checked on the next morning after IVF/ICSI. Cleavage stage embryo was assessed after 62-66 hours. Women with PCOS had significantly elevated body mass index, basal luteinizing hormone, estradiol and testosterone compared with normal women. Basal Follicle stimulating hormone level in PCOS patients was lower compared with that in control group. After IVF-ET, PCOS patients had more available oocytes than subjects in control group. PCOS patients had slightly lower fertilization rate than the controls in IVF cycles, but in ICSI cycles, fertilization rate in PCOS patients was significantly higher than that in controls. For either IVF or ICSI, the embryo arrest rate was not changed by PCOS. Moreover, there was no significant difference in embryo arrest rate between both groups adopting different stimulation protocols. Interestingly, embryo arrest rate was not correlated with testosterone for patients in PCOS group. The data indicated that patients with PCOS had successful early embryo arrest during IVF-ET. PMID:26131233

  14. Study Progress on Tissue Culture of Maize Mature Embryo

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Hongzhen; Cheng, Jun; Cheng, Yanping; Zhou, Xioafu

    It has been paid more and more attention on maize tissue culture as it is a basic work in maize genetic transformation, especially huge breakthrough has been made in maize tissue culture utilizing mature embryos as explants in the recent years. This paper reviewed the study progress on maize tissue culture and plant regeneration utilizing mature embryos as explants from callus induction, subculture, plant regeneration and browning reduction and so on.

  15. [The human embryo after Dolly: new practices for new times].

    PubMed

    de Miguel Beriain, Iñigo

    2008-01-01

    The possiblity of cloning human beings introduced a lot of issues in our ethical and legal frameworks. In this paper, we will put the focus into the necessary changes in the concept of embryo that our legal systems will have to implement in order to face the new situation. The description of the embryo as a group of cells able to develop into a human being will be defended here as the best way of doing so. PMID:19334406

  16. Spemann's organizer and self-regulation in amphibian embryos.

    PubMed

    De Robertis, Edward M

    2006-04-01

    In 1924, Spemann and Mangold demonstrated the induction of Siamese twins in transplantation experiments with salamander eggs. Recent work in amphibian embryos has followed their lead and uncovered that cells in signalling centres that are located at the dorsal and ventral poles of the gastrula embryo communicate with each other through a network of secreted growth-factor antagonists, a protease that degrades them, a protease inhibitor and bone-morphogenic-protein signals. PMID:16482093

  17. Spemann's organizer and self-regulation in amphibian embryos

    PubMed Central

    De Robertis, Edward M.

    2008-01-01

    In 1924, Spemann and Mangold demonstrated the induction of Siamese twins in transplantation experiments with salamander eggs. Recent work in amphibian embryos has followed their lead and uncovered that cells in signalling centres that are located at the dorsal and ventral poles of the gastrula embryo communicate with each other through a network of secreted growth-factor antagonists, a protease that degrades them, a protease inhibitor and bone-morphogenic-protein signals. PMID:16482093

  18. Molecular biology of the stress response in the early embryo and its stem cells.

    PubMed

    Puscheck, Elizabeth E; Awonuga, Awoniyi O; Yang, Yu; Jiang, Zhongliang; Rappolee, Daniel A

    2015-01-01

    Stress is normal during early embryogenesis and transient, elevated stress is commonplace. Stress in the milieu of the peri-implantation embryo is a summation of maternal hormones, and other elements of the maternal milieu, that signal preparedness for development and implantation. Examples discussed here are leptin, adrenaline, cortisol, and progesterone. These hormones signal maternal nutritional status and provide energy, but also signal stress that diverts maternal and embryonic energy from an optimal embryonic developmental trajectory. These hormones communicate endocrine maternal effects and local embryonic effects although signaling mechanisms are not well understood. Other in vivo stresses affect the embryo such as local infection and inflammation, hypoxia, environmental toxins such as benzopyrene, dioxin, or metals, heat shock, and hyperosmotic stress due to dehydration or diabetes. In vitro, stresses include shear during handling, improper culture media and oxygen levels, cryopreservation, and manipulations of the embryo to introduce sperm or mitochondria. We define stress as any stimulus that slows stem cell accumulation or diminishes the ability of cells to produce normal and sufficient parenchymal products upon differentiation. Thus stress deflects downwards the normal trajectories of development, growth and differentiation. Typically stress is inversely proportional to embryonic developmental and proliferative rates, but can be proportional to induction of differentiation of stem cells in the peri-implantation embryo. When modeling stress it is most interesting to produce a 'runting model' where stress exposures slow accumulation but do not create excessive apoptosis or morbidity. Windows of stress sensitivity may occur when major new embryonic developmental programs require large amounts of energy and are exacerbated if nutritional flow decreases and removes energy from the normal developmental programs and stress responses. These windows correspond

  19. Aberrant DNA methylation reprogramming in bovine SCNT preimplantation embryos

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Sheng; Chen, Xin; Wang, Fang; An, Xinglan; Tang, Bo; Zhang, Xueming; Sun, Liguang; Li, Ziyi

    2016-01-01

    DNA methylation reprogramming plays important roles in mammalian embryogenesis. Mammalian somatic cell nuclear transfer (SCNT) embryos with reprogramming defects fail to develop. Thus, we compared DNA methylation reprogramming in preimplantation embryos from bovine SCNT and in vitro fertilization (IVF) and analyzed the influence of vitamin C (VC) on the reprogramming of DNA methylation. The results showed that global DNA methylation followed a typical pattern of demethylation and remethylation in IVF preimplantation embryos; however, the global genome remained hypermethylated in SCNT preimplantation embryos. Compared with the IVF group, locus DNA methylation reprogramming showed three patterns in the SCNT group. First, some pluripotency genes (POU5F1 and NANOG) and repeated elements (satellite I and α-satellite) showed insufficient demethylation and hypermethylation in the SCNT group. Second, a differentially methylated region (DMR) of an imprint control region (ICR) in H19 exhibited excessive demethylation and hypomethylation. Third, some pluripotency genes (CDX2 and SOX2) were hypomethylated in both the IVF and SCNT groups. Additionally, VC improved the DNA methylation reprogramming of satellite I, α-satellite and H19 but not that of POU5F1 and NANOG in SCNT preimplantation embryos. These results indicate that DNA methylation reprogramming was aberrant and that VC influenced DNA methylation reprogramming in SCNT embryos in a locus-specific manner. PMID:27456302

  20. Anaerobiosis and Release from Dormancy in Apple Embryos

    PubMed Central

    Barthe, Philippe; Bulard, Camille

    1983-01-01

    An anaerobic treatment released Pyrus malus L. cv Golden Delicious embryos from their primary dormancy. It also suppressed the inhibitory effect induced by exogenous abscisic acid (ABA) on after-ripened embryos. For the study of ABA metabolism, a two-step culture method was developed. Embryos in primary dormancy were cultivated aerobically in the presence of [14C]ABA (first culture). Some were directly analyzed to evaluate metabolism of absorbed ABA. The remaining embryos were cultivated on moist cotton without ABA, either in aerobic or anaerobic conditions (second culture). The amounts of ABA and its metabolites were measured both in the embryos and the water-leachates. After the second culture, the embryos showed a spectacular decrease in ABA content, with no difference between anaerobic and aerobic cultures. The amount of ABA glucose ester increased slightly in aerobiosis but diminished markedly in anaerobiosis. Radioactivity of the butanol fraction, which corresponded to polar conjugates, decreased considerably in anaerobiosis, whereas it increased in aerobiosis. Analysis of the water-leachates indicated that, compared to aerobic conditions, anaerobiosis increased total leaching of radioactive materials (× 4.2) as well as leaching of ABA (× 1.4). In addition, anaerobiosis induced leaching of conjugates, such as ABA glucose ester and butanol-soluble metabolites. We concluded that the anaerobic treatment affects mainly membrane permeability. PMID:16663111

  1. [Characteristics of morphogenesis of the Japanese quail embryos during microgravity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dadasheva, O. A.; Gur'eva, T. S.; Sychev, V. N.; Jehns, G.; Jahns, G. (Principal Investigator)

    1998-01-01

    Experiments performed in the period of 1995-1996 cooperatively with US investigators within the MIR/SHUTTLE and MIR/NASA space science projects continued exploration of avian embryogenesis in microgravity. Evaluation of Japanese quail embryos incubated in spaceflight microgravity showed that for the most part they were normally developed and compliant with duration of incubation. One of the major morphometric characteristics of embryo are its mass and size. Comparative analysis of body mass values in the space and laboratory and synchronous control groups pointed to a slight retardation. Body length of space embryos mimicked their mass curve. Data on the dynamics of mass and length of Japanese quail embryos support the well-known theory according to which growth and formation are distinguished by equifinality. No differences were revealed by the investigations of individual parts of embryonic bodies in the space and control groups. However, this finding was true only with regard to the embryos that had no developmental abnormalities. A part of embryos had defective eyes (microphtalmia), limbs (twisted fingers), and beaks.

  2. Embryo transfer in competition horses: Managing mares and expectations

    PubMed Central

    Campbell, M L H

    2014-01-01

    Embryo transfer (ET) is an accepted and successful technique for obtaining foals from mares without interrupting their competition careers. Recent research, however, suggests that the potential of factors including heat, exercise, repeated embryo flushing and repeated manipulation of the reproductive cycle using exogenous hormones to have a negative impact on fertility may have been underestimated. This paper reviews the evidence base for involvement of these factors in repeated failures to recover embryos from nongeriatric competition mares without obvious clinical or pathological indications of reproductive abnormalities. It concludes that, for some mares at least, a cessation of exercise for the periovulatory period and the period between ovulation and embryo flushing, combined with careful management of flushing-induced endometritis, and minimal hormonal manipulation of the reproductive cycle, may be necessary to optimise embryo recovery rates. Mare owners may have been encouraged to request ET for their mares following high-profile examples in the media of elite mares that have produced foals by ET whilst competing. The veterinarian should educate mare owners about the multiple factors that may affect the chances of recovering an embryo from their mares, and should manage the expectations of mare owners so that they do not approach ET programmes in the expectation that there will be no disruption to their training and competition plans. PMID:25977596

  3. Precision matters for position decoding in the early fly embryo

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Petkova, Mariela D.; Tkacik, Gasper; Wieschaus, Eric F.; Bialek, William; Gregor, Thomas

    Genetic networks can determine cell fates in multicellular organisms with precision that often reaches the physical limits of the system. However, it is unclear how the organism uses this precision and whether it has biological content. Here we address this question in the developing fly embryo, in which a genetic network of patterning genes reaches 1% precision in positioning cells along the embryo axis. The network consists of three interconnected layers: an input layer of maternal gradients, a processing layer of gap genes, and an output layer of pair-rule genes with seven-striped patterns. From measurements of gap gene protein expression in hundreds of wild-type embryos we construct a ``decoder'', which is a look-up table that determines cellular positions from the concentration means, variances and co-variances. When we apply the decoder to measurements in mutant embryos lacking various combinations of the maternal inputs, we predict quantitative changes in the output layer such as missing, altered or displaced stripes. We confirm these predictions by measuring pair-rule expression in the mutant embryos. Our results thereby show that the precision of the patterning network is biologically meaningful and a necessary feature for decoding cell positions in the early fly embryo.

  4. [Hybrid embryos as a source of embryonic stem cells].

    PubMed

    Beca I, Juan Pablo

    2007-11-01

    The HFEA (Human Fertilisations & Embryology Authority) recently accepted to perform research in hybrid embryos generated by transferring human somatic cell nucleus to cow enucleated oocytes, named cytoplasmatic hybrids. The aim is to obtain a source of embryonic stem cells without the use of human oocytes. The arguments for the approval are to avoid the risk of obtaining human oocytes and that these embryos will not be transferred to a female's womb for its development. Those who oppose the technique argue that it is a manipulation of the beginning of life and a disrespect to the dignity of human life because of the destruction of embryos. Nevertheless, the real nature of this new entity has not been established. Biologically it is an embryo with 99% of human genome and animal's cytoplasm, not generated from human gametes, it is not a new genome and it will be used only to cultivate stem cells. It does not seem possible to define its nature beyond any doubts. If it were considered as a human embryo it should be respected and protected as every human being. Once more, scientific progress opens new ethical and legal questions that we cannot answer in a definitive way. Researchers are exploring new roads to obtain pluripotential stem cells which should favor the development of innovative therapies. The main objection is the unavoidable destruction of human embryos, although in this case its origin and nature are not clear. PMID:18259646

  5. Research on embryos in Turkey with ethical and legal aspects

    PubMed Central

    Vatanoğlu-Lutz, Emine Elif

    2012-01-01

    Technically, the term embryo refers to the products of conception after implantation into the wall of the womb, usually nearly two weeks after fertilization, up until the eighth week. Embryos contain stem cells which, according to scientists, could be used to cure a wide range of conditions. Stem cells can be coaxed into growing cells of any other type, which makes them potentially very useful indeed. However, removing stem cells from an embryo will kill the embryo, which some people object to. From the mid 1970s, IVF was being developed and research was carried out on the spare embryos produced. This research helped to improve IVF techniques, as well as to better understand the earliest stages of human development. Research also shed light on a variety of inheritable disorders. In Turkish Law, assisted reproduction treatment (ART) services are regulated with the Regulation of Assisted Reproductive Treatment Centers Act (RAPTCA) The Regulation was issued in 1987, but it has been amended several times since. Also, article 90 of the Turkish Penal Code covers some aspects of research on embryos. At the same time, the Biomedicine Convention (Oviedo Convention), signed by Turkey and which entered into force in 2003, has binding regulations about this issue. Different legal regulations and some ethical guidelines are in conflict with each other, creating much confusion for the researchers. In this paper these conflicts are discussed, giving some practical proposals. PMID:24592037

  6. Preliminary studies on cryopreservation of snakehead (Channa striata) embryos.

    PubMed

    Mohd Sharifuddin, M; Siti Azizah, M N

    2014-08-01

    This paper reports the findings of the ongoing studies on cryopreservation of the snakehead, Channa striata embryos. The specific objective of this study was to collect data on the sensitivity of C. striata embryo hatching rate to low temperatures at two different developmental stages in the presence of four different cryoprotectants. Embryos at morula and heartbeat stages were selected and incubated in 1M dimethyl sulfoxide (Me2SO), 1M ethylene glycol (EG), 1M methanol (MeOH) and 0.1M sucrose solutions at different temperatures for a period of time. Embryos were kept at 24 °C (control), 15 °C, 4 °C and -2 °C for 5 min, 1h and 3h. Following these treatments, the embryos were then transferred into a 24 °C water bath until hatch to evaluate the hatching rate. The results showed that there was a significant decrease of hatching rate in both developmental stages following exposure to 4 °C and -2 °C at 1h and 3h exposure in each treatment. Heartbeat stage was more tolerant against chilling at -2 °C for 3h exposure in Me2SO followed by MeOH, sucrose and EG. Further studies will be conducted to find the best method to preserve embryos for long term storage. PMID:24726775

  7. From Stem Cell to Embryo without Centrioles

    PubMed Central

    Stevens, Naomi R.; Raposo, Alexandre A.S.F.; Basto, Renata; St Johnston, Daniel; Raff, Jordan W.

    2007-01-01

    Summary Centrosome asymmetry plays a key role in ensuring the asymmetric division of Drosophila neural stem cells (neuroblasts [NBs]) and male germline stem cells (GSCs) [1–3]. In both cases, one centrosome is anchored close to a specific cortical region during interphase, thus defining the orientation of the spindle during the ensuing mitosis. To test whether asymmetric centrosome behavior is a general feature of stem cells, we have studied female GSCs, which divide asymmetrically, producing another GSC and a cystoblast. The cystoblast then divides and matures into an oocyte, a process in which centrosomes exhibit a series of complex behaviors proposed to play a crucial role in oogenesis [4–6]. We show that the interphase centrosome does not define spindle orientation in female GSCs and that DSas-4 mutant GSCs [7], lacking centrioles and centrosomes, invariably divide asymmetrically to produce cystoblasts that proceed normally through oogenesis—remarkably, oocyte specification, microtubule organization, and mRNA localization are all unperturbed. Mature oocytes can be fertilized, but embryos that cannot support centriole replication arrest very early in development. Thus, centrosomes are dispensable for oogenesis but essential for early embryogenesis. These results reveal that asymmetric centrosome behavior is not an essential feature of stem cell divisions. PMID:17716897

  8. MAPK signaling in equations and embryos

    PubMed Central

    Shvartsman, Stanislav Y.; Coppey, Mathieu; Berezhkovskii, Alexander M.

    2009-01-01

    The Extracellularly Regulated Kinase/Mitogen Activated Protein Kinase (ERK/MAPK) signaling pathway is a critical regulator of cellular processes in adult and developing tissues. Depending on the cellular context, MAPK cascade can act as a rheostat, a switch, or an oscillator. The highly conserved structure of the cascade does not imply a rigid function, as was suggested by the early mathematical models of MAPK signaling, and can instead produce a wide range of input-output maps. Given a large number of pathway components and modes of regulation, it is essential to establish experimental systems that will allow both manipulating the MAPK cascade and monitoring its dynamics. The terminal patterning system in the Drosophila embryo appears to be ideally suited for this purpose. Our recent experiments characterized dynamics of the MAPK phosphorylation gradient in the terminal system and proposed that it is regulated by a cascade of diffusion-trapping modules. Here we discuss a biophysical model that can describe the observed dynamics and guide future experiments for exploring the relative importance of multiple layers of MAPK cascade regulation. PMID:19182542

  9. Generation of transgenic Hydra by embryo microinjection.

    PubMed

    Juliano, Celina E; Lin, Haifan; Steele, Robert E

    2014-01-01

    As a member of the phylum Cnidaria, the sister group to all bilaterians, Hydra can shed light on fundamental biological processes shared among multicellular animals. Hydra is used as a model for the study of regeneration, pattern formation, and stem cells. However, research efforts have been hampered by lack of a reliable method for gene perturbations to study molecular function. The development of transgenic methods has revitalized the study of Hydra biology(1). Transgenic Hydra allow for the tracking of live cells, sorting to yield pure cell populations for biochemical analysis, manipulation of gene function by knockdown and over-expression, and analysis of promoter function. Plasmid DNA injected into early stage embryos randomly integrates into the genome early in development. This results in hatchlings that express transgenes in patches of tissue in one or more of the three lineages (ectodermal epithelial, endodermal epithelial, or interstitial). The success rate of obtaining a hatchling with transgenic tissue is between 10% and 20%. Asexual propagation of the transgenic hatchling is used to establish a uniformly transgenic line in a particular lineage. Generating transgenic Hydra is surprisingly simple and robust, and here we describe a protocol that can be easily implemented at low cost. PMID:25285460

  10. Neutron induced bystander effect among zebrafish embryos

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ng, C. Y. P.; Kong, E. Y.; Kobayashi, A.; Suya, N.; Uchihori, Y.; Cheng, S. H.; Konishi, T.; Yu, K. N.

    2015-12-01

    The present paper reported the first-ever observation of neutron induced bystander effect (NIBE) using zebrafish (Danio rerio) embryos as the in vivo model. The neutron exposure in the present work was provided by the Neutron exposure Accelerator System for Biological Effect Experiments (NASBEE) facility at the National Institute of Radiological Sciences (NIRS), Chiba, Japan. Two different strategies were employed to induce NIBE, namely, through directly partnering and through medium transfer. Both results agreed with a neutron-dose window (20-50 mGy) which could induce NIBE. The lower dose limit corresponded to the threshold amount of neutron-induced damages to trigger significant bystander signals, while the upper limit corresponded to the onset of gamma-ray hormesis which could mitigate the neutron-induced damages and thereby suppress the bystander signals. Failures to observe NIBE in previous studies were due to using neutron doses outside the dose-window. Strategies to enhance the chance of observing NIBE included (1) use of a mono-energetic high-energy (e.g., between 100 keV and 2 MeV) neutron source, and (2) use of a neutron source with a small gamma-ray contamination. It appeared that the NASBEE facility used in the present study fulfilled both conditions, and was thus ideal for triggering NIBE.

  11. Embryos without secrets: an expert panel study on comprehensive embryo testing and the responsibility of the clinician.

    PubMed

    Hens, Kristien; Dondorp, Wybo; de Wert, Guido

    2013-02-01

    The introduction of comprehensive testing techniques, such as microarray technology or whole genome sequencing, in embryo testing has the potential to change the practice of Preimplantation Genetic Diagnosis (PGD) and Preimplantation Genetic Screening (PGS). However, the extra information these procedures yield may potentially generate dilemmas for couples and professionals regarding the scope of the tests and the selection of the right embryo. In order to understand this complexity and reflect on its consequences, we organized two expert panels consisting of professionals working in the field of assisted reproduction and/or genetics. We found that there is great uncertainty amongst professionals how to tackle questions related to comprehensive screening, such as which conditions to test for and who should have the final say on which embryo to select, and a lack of a framework from which such questions can be answered. Moreover, the complexity of genetic information comprehensive tests may yield may make it impossible to select the best embryo altogether. PMID:23131419

  12. Effects of donor fibroblasts expressing OCT4 on bovine embryos generated by somatic cell nuclear transfer.

    PubMed

    Goissis, Marcelo D; Suhr, Steven T; Cibelli, Jose B

    2013-02-01

    The production of healthy, live, cloned animals by somatic cell nuclear transfer (SCNT) has been hampered by low efficiencies. Significant epigenetic changes must take place to ensure proper chromatin remodeling in SCNT. We hypothesized that exogenous expression of OCT4 in donor fibroblasts prior to its fusion with enucleated oocytes would facilitate SCNT reprogramming. We infected bovine adult fibroblasts with retroviral vectors containing yellow fluorescent protein (YFP) only, or the OCT4 gene fused to YFP (YO). We found that development to the blastocyst stage was not different between NT-YFP and NT-YO groups. NT-YFP embryos had the fewest trophoblast cells, measured by numbers of CDX2-positive cells. Fibroblasts expressing OCT4 had reduced levels of histone 3 lysine 9 or 27 trimethylation (H3K9me3 and H3K27me3, respectively). NT-YO blastocysts displayed higher H3K9me3 levels than IVF and NT-YFP embryos; however, they did not have different H3K27me3 levels. Levels of XIST mRNA expression in NT-YO and NT-YF were higher when compared to in vitro-fertilized blastocysts. We observed no differences in the expression of SOX2, NANOG, and CDX2. Although overexpression of OCT4 in donor cells increased H3K9me3 and did not reduce XIST gene expression, we show that a single transcription factor can affect the number of trophectoderm cells in bovine SCNT embryos. PMID:23276226

  13. Effect of Embryo Density on In Vitro Development and Gene Expression in Bovine In Vitro-fertilized Embryos Cultured in a Microwell System

    PubMed Central

    SUGIMURA, Satoshi; AKAI, Tomonori; HASHIYADA, Yutaka; AIKAWA, Yoshio; OHTAKE, Masaki; MATSUDA, Hideo; KOBAYASHI, Shuji; KOBAYASHI, Eiji; KONISHI, Kazuyuki; IMAI, Kei

    2012-01-01

    Abstract To identify embryos individually during in vitro development, we previously developed the well-of-the-well (WOW) dish, which contains 25 microwells. Here we investigated the effect of embryo density (the number of embryos per volume of medium) on in vitro development and gene expression of bovine in vitro-fertilized embryos cultured in WOW dishes. Using both conventional droplet and WOW culture formats, 5, 15, and 25 bovine embryos were cultured in 125 µl medium for 168 h. The blastocysts at Day 7 were analyzed for number of cells and expression of ten genes (CDX2, IFN-tau, PLAC8, NANOG, OCT4, SOX2, AKR1B1, ATP5A1, GLUT1 and IGF2R). In droplet culture, the rates of formation of >4-cell cleavage embryos and blastocysts were significantly lower in embryos cultured at 5 embryos per droplet than in those cultured at 15 or 25 embryos per droplet, but not in WOW culture. In both droplet and WOW culture, developmental kinetics and blastocyst cell numbers did not differ among any groups. IFN-tau expression in embryos cultured at 25 embryos per droplet was significantly higher than in those cultured at 15 embryos per droplet and in artificial insemination (AI)-derived blastocysts. Moreover, IGF2R expression was significantly lower in the 25-embryo group than in the 5-embryo group and in AI-derived blastocysts. In WOW culture, these expressions were not affected by embryo density and were similar to those in AI-derived blastocysts. These results suggest that, as compared with conventional droplet culture, in vitro development and expression of IFN-tau and IGF2R in the microwell system may be insensitive to embryo density. PMID:23154384

  14. Effect of embryo density on in vitro development and gene expression in bovine in vitro-fertilized embryos cultured in a microwell system.

    PubMed

    Sugimura, Satoshi; Akai, Tomonori; Hashiyada, Yutaka; Aikawa, Yoshio; Ohtake, Masaki; Matsuda, Hideo; Kobayashi, Shuji; Kobayashi, Eiji; Konishi, Kazuyuki; Imai, Kei

    2013-01-01

    To identify embryos individually during in vitro development, we previously developed the well-of-the-well (WOW) dish, which contains 25 microwells. Here we investigated the effect of embryo density (the number of embryos per volume of medium) on in vitro development and gene expression of bovine in vitro-fertilized embryos cultured in WOW dishes. Using both conventional droplet and WOW culture formats, 5, 15, and 25 bovine embryos were cultured in 125 μl medium for 168 h. The blastocysts at Day 7 were analyzed for number of cells and expression of ten genes (CDX2, IFN-tau, PLAC8, NANOG, OCT4, SOX2, AKR1B1, ATP5A1, GLUT1 and IGF2R). In droplet culture, the rates of formation of >4-cell cleavage embryos and blastocysts were significantly lower in embryos cultured at 5 embryos per droplet than in those cultured at 15 or 25 embryos per droplet, but not in WOW culture. In both droplet and WOW culture, developmental kinetics and blastocyst cell numbers did not differ among any groups. IFN-tau expression in embryos cultured at 25 embryos per droplet was significantly higher than in those cultured at 15 embryos per droplet and in artificial insemination (AI)-derived blastocysts. Moreover, IGF2R expression was significantly lower in the 25-embryo group than in the 5-embryo group and in AI-derived blastocysts. In WOW culture, these expressions were not affected by embryo density and were similar to those in AI-derived blastocysts. These results suggest that, as compared with conventional droplet culture, in vitro development and expression of IFN-tau and IGF2R in the microwell system may be insensitive to embryo density. PMID:23154384

  15. Verification of Intraovum Transmission of a Microsporidium of Vertebrates: Pseudoloma neurophilia Infecting the Zebrafish, Danio rerio

    PubMed Central

    Sanders, Justin L.; Watral, Virginia; Clarkson, Keri; Kent, Michael L.

    2013-01-01

    Direct transmission from parents to offspring, referred to as vertical transmission, occurs within essentially all major groups of pathogens. Several microsporidia (Phylum Microsporidia) that infect arthropods employ this mode of transmission, and various lines of evidence have suggested this might occur with certain fish microsporidia. The microsporidium, Pseudoloma neurophilia, is a common pathogen of the laboratory zebrafish, Danio rerio. We previously verified that this parasite is easily transmitted horizontally, but previous studies also indicated that maternal transmission occurs. We report here direct observation of Pseudoloma neurophilia in the progeny of infected zebrafish that were reared in isolation, including microscopic visualization of the parasite in all major stages of development. Histological examination of larval fish reared in isolation from a group spawn showed microsporidian spores in the resorbing yolk sac of a fish. Infections were also observed in three of 36 juvenile fish. Eggs from a second group spawn of 30 infected fish were examined using a stereomicroscope and the infection was observed from 4 to 48 hours post-fertilization in two embryos. Intraovum infections were detected in embryos from 4 of 27 pairs of infected fish that were spawned based on qPCR detection of P. neurophilia DNA. The prevalence of intraovum infections from the four spawns containing infected embryos was low (∼1%) based on calculation of prevalence using a maximum likelihood analysis for pooled samples. Parasite DNA was detected in the water following spawning of 11 of the infected pairs, suggesting there was also potential for extraovum transmission in these spawning events. Our study represents the first direct observation of vertical transmission within a developing embryo of a microsporidian parasite in a vertebrate. The low prevalence of vertical transmission in embryos is consistent with observations of some other fish pathogens that are also readily

  16. Supplementation of bovine embryo culture medium with L-arginine improves embryo quality via nitric oxide production.

    PubMed

    Santana, Priscila Di Paula Bessa; Silva, Thiago Velasco Guimarães; da Costa, Nathália Nogueira; da Silva, Bruno Barauna; Carter, Timothy Frederick; Cordeiro, Marcela da Silva; da Silva, Bruno José Martins; Santos, Simone do Socorro Damasceno; Herculano, Anderson Manoel; Adona, Paulo Roberto; Ohashi, Otávio Mitio; Miranda, Moysés dos Santos

    2014-10-01

    Nitric oxide (NO) is a cell-signaling molecule that regulates a variety of molecular pathways. We investigated the role of NO during preimplantation embryonic development by blocking its production with an inhibitor or supplementing in vitro bovine embryo cultures with its natural precursor, L-arginine, over different periods. Endpoints evaluated included blastocyst rates, development kinetics, and embryo quality. Supplementation with the NO synthase inhibitor N-Nitro-L-arginine-methyl ester (L-NAME) from Days 1 to 8 of culture decreased blastocyst (P < 0.05) and hatching (P < 0.05) rates. When added from Days 1 to 8, 50 mM L-arginine decreased blastocyst rates (P < 0.001); in contrast, when added from Days 5 to 8, 1 mM L-arginine improved embryo hatching rates (P < 0.05) and quality (P < 0.05) as well as increased POU5F1 gene expression (P < 0.05) as compared to the untreated control. Moreover, NO levels in the medium during this culture period positively correlated with the increased embryo hatching rates and quality (P < 0.05). These data suggest exerts its positive effects during the transition from morula to blastocyst stage, and that supplementing the embryo culture medium with L-arginine favors preimplantation development of bovine embryos. PMID:25236163

  17. Artificial intelligence techniques for embryo and oocyte classification.

    PubMed

    Manna, Claudio; Nanni, Loris; Lumini, Alessandra; Pappalardo, Sebastiana

    2013-01-01

    One of the most relevant aspects in assisted reproduction technology is the possibility of characterizing and identifying the most viable oocytes or embryos. In most cases, embryologists select them by visual examination and their evaluation is totally subjective. Recently, due to the rapid growth in the capacity to extract texture descriptors from a given image, a growing interest has been shown in the use of artificial intelligence methods for embryo or oocyte scoring/selection in IVF programmes. This work concentrates the efforts on the possible prediction of the quality of embryos and oocytes in order to improve the performance of assisted reproduction technology, starting from their images. The artificial intelligence system proposed in this work is based on a set of Levenberg-Marquardt neural networks trained using textural descriptors (the local binary patterns). The proposed system was tested on two data sets of 269 oocytes and 269 corresponding embryos from 104 women and compared with other machine learning methods already proposed in the past for similar classification problems. Although the results are only preliminary, they show an interesting classification performance. This technique may be of particular interest in those countries where legislation restricts embryo selection. One of the most relevant aspects in assisted reproduction technology is the possibility of characterizing and identifying the most viable oocytes or embryos. In most cases, embryologists select them by visual examination and their evaluation is totally subjective. Recently, due to the rapid growth in our capacity to extract texture descriptors from a given image, a growing interest has been shown in the use of artificial intelligence methods for embryo or oocyte scoring/selection in IVF programmes. In this work, we concentrate our efforts on the possible prediction of the quality of embryos and oocytes in order to improve the performance of assisted reproduction technology

  18. Imaging Cell Shape Change in Living Drosophila Embryos

    PubMed Central

    Figard, Lauren; Sokac, Anna Marie

    2011-01-01

    The developing Drosophila melanogaster embryo undergoes a number of cell shape changes that are highly amenable to live confocal imaging. Cell shape changes in the fly are analogous to those in higher organisms, and they drive tissue morphogenesis. So, in many cases, their study has direct implications for understanding human disease (Table 1)1-5. On the sub-cellular scale, these cell shape changes are the product of activities ranging from gene expression to signal transduction, cell polarity, cytoskeletal remodeling and membrane trafficking. Thus, the Drosophila embryo provides not only the context to evaluate cell shape changes as they relate to tissue morphogenesis, but also offers a completely physiological environment to study the sub-cellular activities that shape cells. The protocol described here is designed to image a specific cell shape change called cellularization. Cellularization is a process of dramatic plasma membrane growth, and it ultimately converts the syncytial embryo into the cellular blastoderm. That is, at interphase of mitotic cycle 14, the plasma membrane simultaneously invaginates around each of ~6000 cortically anchored nuclei to generate a sheet of primary epithelial cells. Counter to previous suggestions, cellularization is not driven by Myosin-2 contractility6, but is instead fueled largely by exocytosis of membrane from internal stores7. Thus, cellularization is an excellent system for studying membrane trafficking during cell shape changes that require plasma membrane invagination or expansion, such as cytokinesis or transverse-tubule (T-tubule) morphogenesis in muscle. Note that this protocol is easily applied to the imaging of other cell shape changes in the fly embryo, and only requires slight adaptations such as changing the stage of embryo collection, or using "embryo glue" to mount the embryo in a specific orientation (Table 1)8-19. In all cases, the workflow is basically the same (Figure 1). Standard methods for cloning and

  19. Imaging cell shape change in living Drosophila embryos.

    PubMed

    Figard, Lauren; Sokac, Anna Marie

    2011-01-01

    The developing Drosophila melanogaster embryo undergoes a number of cell shape changes that are highly amenable to live confocal imaging. Cell shape changes in the fly are analogous to those in higher organisms, and they drive tissue morphogenesis. So, in many cases, their study has direct implications for understanding human disease (Table 1)(1-5). On the sub-cellular scale, these cell shape changes are the product of activities ranging from gene expression to signal transduction, cell polarity, cytoskeletal remodeling and membrane trafficking. Thus, the Drosophila embryo provides not only the context to evaluate cell shape changes as they relate to tissue morphogenesis, but also offers a completely physiological environment to study the sub-cellular activities that shape cells. The protocol described here is designed to image a specific cell shape change called cellularization. Cellularization is a process of dramatic plasma membrane growth, and it ultimately converts the syncytial embryo into the cellular blastoderm. That is, at interphase of mitotic cycle 14, the plasma membrane simultaneously invaginates around each of ~6000 cortically anchored nuclei to generate a sheet of primary epithelial cells. Counter to previous suggestions, cellularization is not driven by Myosin-2 contractility(6), but is instead fueled largely by exocytosis of membrane from internal stores(7). Thus, cellularization is an excellent system for studying membrane trafficking during cell shape changes that require plasma membrane invagination or expansion, such as cytokinesis or transverse-tubule (T-tubule) morphogenesis in muscle. Note that this protocol is easily applied to the imaging of other cell shape changes in the fly embryo, and only requires slight adaptations such as changing the stage of embryo collection, or using "embryo glue" to mount the embryo in a specific orientation (Table 1)(8-19). In all cases, the workflow is basically the same (Figure 1). Standard methods for

  20. The new Rapid-i carrier is an effective system for human embryo vitrification at both the blastocyst and cleavage stage

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    stage as well as the blastocyst stage. Use of this type of “closed” sealed system that prevents direct contact between the embryos and liquid nitrogen reduces the potential risk of sample cross-contamination or infection. These preliminary data and live birth outcomes have paved the way toward transitioning to a closed vitrification system in our own IVF program. PMID:23672340

  1. Somatic embryos of daylily in space

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krikorian, A. D.

    1999-01-01

    Poor growth and nuclear abnormalities observable in some space-grown plants have been hypothesized as due to a combination of factors such as degree of development, the specific way the plants are grown and the way they experience multiple stresses, some of which are space-specific. Data from a 132-day experiment on `Mir' using embryogenic cell cultures of daylily (Hemerocallis) allow seemingly contradictory evidence from earlier Shuttle missions to be harmonized: a) the more developed an embryo the less likely it is to suffer catastrophic cell stress during growth, whereas the less developed it is, the greater its vulnerability; (b) the extent to which the stress becomes manifest is also dependent on the extent of pre-existing stresses imposed by suboptimal growing conditions; (c) an appropriate, albeit undesirable, `stress match' with other non-equilibrium determinants, much like a `tug of war', can result in genomic variations in space. It is not understood what is/are the feature(s) of the space environment that cause the various cell division perturbations but they have not yet been mimicked on earth. The stress symptoms were found only in space materials and, as predicted, they were most frequently encountered in smaller, less-developed materials grown under non-optimized conditions. It is concluded that, while any substantial deviation from `optimum' can be a `stress', spaceflight subjects vulnerable materials to cell division or DNA-repair stress(es) that appear distinctive, but remain elusive so far. Fastidiously-controlled growing environments must be devised to resolve the matter of direct versus indirect effects of space. On a practical level, it is predicted that adapting plant biotechnologies to space conditions will not be a casual matter.

  2. [How can we nowadays select the best embryo to transfer?].

    PubMed

    Alter, L; Boitrelle, F; Sifer, C

    2014-01-01

    Multiple pregnancies stand as the most common adverse outcome of assisted reproduction technologies (ART) and the dangers associated with those pregnancies have been reduced by doing elective single embryo transfers (e-SET). Many studies have shown that e-SET is compatible with a continuously high pregnancy rate per embryo transfer. Yet, it still becomes necessary to improve the selection process in order to define the quality of individual embryos - so that the ones we choose for transfer are more likely to implant. First, analysis of embryo morphology has greatly helped in this identification and remains the most relevant criterion for choosing the embryo. The introduction of time-lapse imaging provides new criteria predictive of implantation potential, but the real contribution of this system - including the benefit/cost ratio - seems to be not yet properly established. In this context, extended culture until blastocyst stage is an essential practice but it appears wise to keep it for a population showing a good prognosis. Then, the failure of aneuploid embryos to implant properly led to achieve preimplantation genetic screening (PGS) in order to increase pregnancy and delivery rates after ART. However, PGS by fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) at day 3 is a useless process - and may even be harmful. Another solution involves using comparative genomic hybridisation (CGH) and moving to blastocyst biopsy. Finally, it is envisaged that morphology will also be significantly aided by non-invasive analysis of biomarkers in the culture media that give a better reflection of whole-embryo physiology and function. PMID:24951187

  3. Effects of perfluorinated compounds on development of zebrafish embryos.

    PubMed

    Zheng, Xin-Mei; Liu, Hong-Ling; Shi, Wei; Wei, Si; Giesy, John P; Yu, Hong-Xia

    2011-08-01

    Perfluorinated compounds (PFCs) have been widely used in industrial and consumer products and frequently detected in many environmental media. Potential reproductive effects of perfluorooctanesulfonate (PFOS), perfluorooctanoic acid (PFOA) and perfluorononanoic acid (PFNA) have been reported in mice, rats and water birds. PFOS and PFOA were also confirmed developing toxicants towards zebrafish embryos; however, the reported effect concentrations were contradictory. Polyfluorinated alkylated phosphate ester surfactants (including FC807) are precursor of PFOS and PFOA; however, there is no published information about the effects of FC807 and PFNA on zebrafish embryos. Therefore, this study was conducted to determine the effects of these four PFCs on zebrafish embryos. Normal fertilized zebrafish embryos were selected to be exposed to several concentrations of PFOA, PFNA, PFOS or FC807 in 24-well cell culture plates. A digital camera was used to image morphological anomalies of embryos with a stereomicroscope. Embryos were observed through matching up to 96-h post-fertilization (hpf) and rates of survival and abnormalities recorded. PFCs caused lethality in a concentration-dependent manner with potential toxicity in the order of PFOS > FC807 > PFNA > PFOA based on 72-h LC(50). Forty-eight-hour post-fertilization pericardial edema and 72- or 96-hpf spine crooked malformation were all observed. PFOA, PFNA, PFOS and FC807 all caused structural abnormalities using early stages of development of zebrafish. The PFCs all retarded the development of zebrafish embryos. The toxicity of the PFCs was related to the length of the PFC chain and functional groups. PMID:22828880

  4. Shared and Unique Patterns of Embryo Development in Extremophile Poeciliids

    PubMed Central

    Riesch, Rüdiger; Schlupp, Ingo; Langerhans, R. Brian; Plath, Martin

    2011-01-01

    Background Closely related lineages of livebearing fishes have independently adapted to two extreme environmental factors: toxic hydrogen sulphide (H2S) and perpetual darkness. Previous work has demonstrated in adult specimens that fish from these extreme habitats convergently evolved drastically increased head and offspring size, while cave fish are further characterized by reduced pigmentation and eye size. Here, we traced the development of these (and other) divergent traits in embryos of Poecilia mexicana from benign surface habitats (“surface mollies”) and a sulphidic cave (“cave mollies”), as well as in embryos of the sister taxon, Poecilia sulphuraria from a sulphidic surface spring (“sulphur mollies”). We asked at which points during development changes in the timing of the involved processes (i.e., heterochrony) would be detectible. Methods and Results Data were extracted from digital photographs taken of representative embryos for each stage of development and each type of molly. Embryo mass decreased in convergent fashion, but we found patterns of embryonic fat content and ovum/embryo diameter to be divergent among all three types of mollies. The intensity of yellow colouration of the yolk (a proxy for carotenoid content) was significantly lower in cave mollies throughout development. Moreover, while relative head size decreased through development in surface mollies, it increased in both types of extremophile mollies, and eye growth was arrested in mid-stage embryos of cave mollies but not in surface or sulphur mollies. Conclusion Our results clearly demonstrate that even among sister taxa convergence in phenotypic traits is not always achieved by the same processes during embryo development. Furthermore, teleost development is crucially dependent on sufficient carotenoid stores in the yolk, and so we discuss how the apparent ability of cave mollies to overcome this carotenoid-dependency may represent another potential mechanism explaining

  5. How couples who have undergone in vitro fertilization decide what to do with surplus frozen embryos.

    PubMed

    Nachtigall, Robert D; Mac Dougall, Kirstin; Harrington, Jennifer; Duff, Julia; Lee, Matthew; Becker, Gay

    2009-12-01

    In a qualitative interview study of 77 families with stored frozen embryos, we found that while embryo disposition decision making was influenced by individual life circumstances, embryo quantity/quality, personal values, embryo conceptualization, and clinic information, it was a stepwise process that could be represented as three sequential questions: (1) Will the embryos be used for additional attempts at conception? If not, (2) Will the embryos remain in storage? And if not, (3) Will the embryos be donated to other people or to science, or will they be destroyed? While almost two-thirds (63%) of participants kept their embryos in storage after 5 years, either passively through disagreement or indecision or actively to maintain embryo potential, avert feelings of loss, or as psychological or genetic "insurance," IVF clinic support and detailed information about options motivated families to make disposition decisions. PMID:19700150

  6. Live embryo imaging to follow cell cycle and chromosomes stability after nuclear transfer.

    PubMed

    Balbach, Sebastian T; Boiani, Michele

    2015-01-01

    Nuclear transfer (NT) into mouse oocytes yields a transcriptionally and functionally heterogeneous population of cloned embryos. Most studies of NT embryos consider only embryos at predefined key stages (e.g., morula or blastocyst), that is, after the bulk of reprogramming has taken place. These retrospective approaches are of limited use to elucidate mechanisms of reprogramming and to predict developmental success. Observing cloned embryo development using live embryo cinematography has the potential to reveal otherwise undetectable embryo features. However, light exposure necessary for live cell cinematography is highly toxic to cloned embryos. Here we describe a protocol for combined bright-field and fluorescence live-cell imaging of histone H2b-GFP expressing mouse embryos, to record cell divisions up to the blastocyst stage. This protocol, which can be adapted to observe other reporters such as Oct4-GFP or Nanog-GFP, allowed us to quantitatively analyze cleavage kinetics of cloned embryos. PMID:25287344

  7. The effects of superovulation of donor sows on ovarian response and embryo development after nonsurgical deep-uterine embryo transfer.

    PubMed

    Angel, M A; Gil, M A; Cuello, C; Sanchez-Osorio, J; Gomis, J; Parrilla, I; Vila, J; Colina, I; Diaz, M; Reixach, J; Vazquez, J L; Vazquez, J M; Roca, J; Martinez, E A

    2014-04-01

    This study aimed to evaluate the effectiveness of superovulation protocols in improving the efficiency of embryo donors for porcine nonsurgical deep-uterine (NsDU) embryo transfer (ET) programs. After weaning (24 hours), purebred Duroc sows (2-6 parity) were treated with 1000 IU (n = 27) or 1500 IU (n = 27) of eCG. Only sows with clear signs of estrus 4 to 72 hours after eCG administration were treated with 750 IU hCG at the onset of estrus. Nonhormonally treated postweaning estrus sows (n = 36) were used as a control. Sows were inseminated and subjected to laparotomy on Days 5 to 6 (Day 0 = onset of estrus). Three sows (11.1%) treated with the highest dosage of eCG presented with polycystic ovaries without signs of ovulation. The remaining sows from nonsuperovulated and superovulated groups were all pregnant, with no differences in fertilization rates among groups. The number of CLs and viable embryos was higher (P < 0.05) in the superovulated groups compared with the controls and increased (P < 0.05) with increasing doses of eCG. There were no differences among groups in the number of oocytes and/or degenerated embryos. The number of transferable embryos (morulae and unhatched blastocysts) obtained in pregnant sows was higher (P < 0.05) in the superovulated groups than in the control group. In all groups, there was a significant correlation between the number of CLs and the number of viable and transferable embryos, but the number of CLs and the number of oocytes and/or degenerated embryos were not correlated. A total of 46 NsDU ETs were performed in nonhormonally treated recipient sows, with embryos (30 embryos per transfer) recovered from the 1000-IU eCG, 1500-IU eCG, and control groups. In total, pregnancy and farrowing rates were 75.1% and 73.2%, respectively, with a litter size of 9.4 ± 0.6 piglets born, of which 8.8 ± 0.5 were born alive. There were no differences for any of the reproductive parameters evaluated among groups. In conclusion, our results

  8. Fresh embryo donation for human embryonic stem cell (hESC) research: the experiences and values of IVF couples asked to be embryo donors

    PubMed Central

    Haimes, E.; Taylor, K.

    2009-01-01

    BACKGROUND This article reports on an investigation of the views of IVF couples asked to donate fresh embryos for research and contributes to the debates on: the acceptability of human embryonic stem cell (hESC) research, the moral status of the human embryo and embryo donation for research. METHODS A hypothesis-generating design was followed. All IVF couples in one UK clinic who were asked to donate embryos in 1 year were contacted 6 weeks after their pregnancy result. Forty four in-depth interviews were conducted. RESULTS Interviewees were preoccupied with IVF treatment and the request to donate was a secondary consideration. They used a complex and dynamic system of embryo classification. Initially, all embryos were important but then their focus shifted to those that had most potential to produce a baby. At that point, ‘other’ embryos were less important though they later realise that they did not know what happened to them. Guessing that these embryos went to research, interviewees preferred not to contemplate what that might entail. The embryos that caused interviewees most concern were good quality embryos that might have produced a baby but went to research instead. ‘The’ embryo, the morally laden, but abstract, entity, did not play a central role in their decision-making. CONCLUSIONS This study, despite missing those who refuse to donate embryos, suggests that debates on embryo donation for hESC research should include the views of embryo donors and should consider the social, as well as the moral, status of the human embryo. PMID:19502616

  9. Phytohemagglutinin facilitates the aggregation of blastomere pairs from Day 5 donor embryos with Day 4 host embryos for chimeric bovine embryo multiplication.

    PubMed

    Simmet, Kilian; Reichenbach, Myriam; Reichenbach, Horst-Dieter; Wolf, Eckhard

    2015-12-01

    Multiplication of bovine embryos by the production of aggregation chimeras is based on the concept that few blastomeres of a donor embryo form the inner cell mass (ICM) and thus the embryo proper, whereas cells of a host embryo preferentially contribute to the trophectoderm (TE), the progenitor cells of the embryonic part of the placenta. We aggregated two fluorescent blastomeres from enhanced green fluorescent protein (eGFP) transgenic Day 5 morulae with two Day 4 embryos that did not complete their first cleavage until 27 hours after IVF and tested the effect of phytohemagglutinin-L (PHA) on chimeric embryo formation. The resulting blastocysts were characterized by differential staining of cell lineages using the TE-specific factor CDX2 and confocal laser scanning microscopy to facilitate the precise localization of eGFP-positive cells. The proportions of blastocyst development of sandwich aggregates with (n = 99) and without PHA (n = 46) were 85.9% and 54.3% (P < 0.05), respectively. Epifluorescence microscopy showed that the proportion of blastocysts with eGFP-positive cells in the ICM was higher in the PHA group than in the no-PHA group (40% vs. 16%; P < 0.05). Confocal laser scanning microscopy revealed that the total cell numbers of blastocysts from the PHA group of aggregation chimeras (n = 17; 207.8 ± 67.3 [mean ± standard deviation]) were higher (P < 0.05) than those of embryos without ZP and exposed to PHA (n = 30; 159.6 ± 42.2) and of handling control embryos (n = 19; 176.9 ± 53.3). The same was true for ICM cell counts (56.5 ± 22.0 vs. 37.7 ± 14.2 and 38.7 ± 12.4) and TE cell counts (151.2 ± 58.0 vs. 121.9 ± 37.4 and 138.3 ± 53.0), whereas the ICM/total cell number ratio was not different between the groups. Of the 17 chimeric blastocysts analyzed by confocal laser scanning microscopy, nine had eGFP-positive cells (three of them in the ICM, three in the TE, and three in both lineages). When integration in

  10. Infection and Cardiovascular Disease

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-02-17

    Cardiovascular Diseases; Coronary Disease; Cerebrovascular Accident; Heart Diseases; Myocardial Infarction; Infection; Chlamydia Infections; Cytomegalovirus Infections; Helicobacter Infections; Atherosclerosis

  11. Creating and selling embryos for "donation": ethical challenges.

    PubMed

    Klitzman, Robert; Sauer, Mark V

    2015-02-01

    The commercial creation and sale of embryos has begun, which poses a series of ethical questions that have received little scholarly attention. Some of the concerns that arise are similar to those posed by the sale of gametes, while other issues differ markedly. Questions emerge, first, regarding the rights of the unborn children and their ability to know their biological parents. Companies that create human embryos de novo may wish to keep gamete providers anonymous. Many of these offspring thus will never learn that their parents are not their biologic parents. Yet, such disclosures, regarding not only one but both of these biologic parents, may be important for these individuals; and a lack of this knowledge may impede their physical and psychological health. Second, questions surface regarding the fees that providers should charge for embryos and whether these amounts should vary based on the traits of 1 or both of the gamete donors. Some prospective parents may seek specific traits in a baby (eg, height or eye/hair coloring), which prompts the creation of embryos from 2 gamete donors who possess these characteristics. Third, ownership of embryos created without an advanced directive by patients poses dilemmas (eg, disposition of any remaining embryos). Fourth, guidelines do not yet exist to limit the number of embryos sold from each pair of gamete donors. Hence, unbeknownst to each other, full siblings could potentially meet, get married, and procreate. This discussion has several critical implications for future practice and professional education and policy. Patients with diseases associated with genetic tests may well ask obstetricians, gynecologists, and other physicians about these techniques and practices. Clinicians can refer such patients to assisted reproductive technology specialists; however, familiarity with the basic aspects of the issues and complexities involved could aid these providers and their patients Several of these issues can be

  12. Creating and Selling Embryos for “Donation”: Ethical Challenges

    PubMed Central

    Klitzman, Robert; Sauer, Mark V.

    2015-01-01

    The commercial creation and sale of embryos has begun, posing a series of ethical questions that have received little scholarly attention. Some of the concerns that arise are similar to those posed by the sale of gametes, while other issues differ markedly. Questions emerge, firstly, regarding the rights of the unborn children – their ability to know their biological parents. Companies that create human embryos de novo may wish to keep gamete providers anonymous. Many of these offspring will thus never learn that their parents are not their biological parents. Yet, such disclosures – regarding not only one, but both of these biological parents – may be important for these individuals; and lack of this knowledge may impede their physical and psychological health. Secondly, questions surface regarding the fees that providers should charge for embryos, and whether these amounts should vary based on the traits of one or both of the gamete donors. Some prospective parents may seek specific traits in a baby (e.g., height or eye/hair coloring), prompting creation of embryos from two gamete donors who possess these characteristics. Thirdly, ownership of embryos created without an advanced directive by patients poses dilemmas – e.g., disposition of any remaining embryos. Fourthly, guidelines do not yet exist to limit the number of embryos sold from each pair of gamete donors. Hence, unbeknownst to each other, full siblings could potentially meet, get married and procreate. This discussion has several critical implications for future practice, and professional education and policy. Patients with diseases associated with genetic tests may well ask obstetricians, gynecologists and other physicians about these techniques and practices. Clinicians can refer such patients to Assisted Reproductive Technology specialists, but familiarity with the basic aspects of the issues and complexities involved could aid themselves and their patients Several of these issues can be

  13. Of research and reproduction: defining embryo 'Research' in Canada.

    PubMed

    Cattapan, Alana; Snow, Dave

    2015-12-01

    This article traces how embryo research has been theorized in Canada from the late 1980s to the current day. We find that research on human embryos has gradually come to be viewed in dichotomous terms, with scientific research pulled apart from experimentation to improve assisted reproduction procedures within fertility clinics. This distinction has been made manifest most clearly in the federal government's 2007 consent regulations. The distinction between 'improvement of assisted reproduction procedures' and 'research' is problematic on two accounts. First, interviews reveal that many Canadian IVF patients do not distinguish between the improvement of assisted reproduction and broader conceptions of 'research'. This suggests that patients may be consenting to participate in embryo experimentation even where they do not understand its purposes. Second, the dichotomy may allow researchers and clinicians to evade research protocols that might otherwise apply in Canadian law. This could permit fertility clinics to conduct what might in other contexts fall under the category of 'research' without prescribed oversight, and may even enable clinicians and researchers to engage in practices that policymakers deliberately sought to proscribe. We call for a re-evaluation of the legal distinctions on embryo experimentation built into Canadian law, and indeed built into broader discussions of embryo research. PMID:26690918

  14. Hormetic effect induced by depleted uranium in zebrafish embryos.

    PubMed

    Ng, C Y P; Cheng, S H; Yu, K N

    2016-06-01

    The present work studied the hormetic effect induced by uranium (U) in embryos of zebrafish (Danio rerio) using apoptosis as the biological endpoint. Hormetic effect is characterized by biphasic dose-response relationships showing a low-dose stimulation and a high-dose inhibition. Embryos were dechorionated at 4h post fertilization (hpf), and were then exposed to 10 or 100μg/l depleted uranium (DU) in uranyl acetate solutions from 5 to 6 hpf. For exposures to 10μg/l DU, the amounts of apoptotic signals in the embryos were significantly increased at 20 hpf but were significantly decreased at 24 hpf, which demonstrated the presence of U-induced hormesis. For exposures to 100μg/l DU, the amounts of apoptotic signals in the embryos were significantly increased at 20, 24 and 30 hpf. Hormetic effect was not shown but its occurrence between 30 and 48 hpf could not be ruled out. In conclusion, hormetic effect could be induced in zebrafish embryos in a concentration- and time-dependent manner. PMID:27060238

  15. Interspecific transplantation of polar plasm between Drosophila embryos

    PubMed Central

    1976-01-01

    Posterior polar plasm of the Drosophila egg has been shown to function autonomously in germ cell determination after transplantation to either the anterior or mid-ventral region of the early embryo. By means of similar transplantations, we have tested the ability of polar plasm of Drosophila immigrans to induce the formation of pole cells in a Drosophila melanogaster embryo. After the transplantation of polar plasm, "hybrid" pole cells were found in which both pole cell-specific organelles, the polar granules and nuclear body, were structurally similar to those characteristic of the transplanted cytoplasm. In order to determine whether these hybrid cells can function as germ cell precursors, these cells were transplanted to the posterior tip of genetically marked embryos. Approximately 5% of the flies obtained from embryos receiving potential pole cells produce offspring derived from the induced pole cells. This result demonstrates that polar plasm can function in interspecific species combinations and indicates that the molecular mechanisms of germ cell determination are conservative in evolution. Finally, in order to test whether there is any evidence for cytoplasmic inheritance of polar granules, embryos derived from hybrid pole cells were examined for their polar granule morphology. The fine structure of the granules conformed to that of the nucleus. Thus, no evidence was found for the cytoplasmic inheritance of these particular organelles. PMID:820700

  16. Chlormequat chloride retards rat embryo growth in vitro.

    PubMed

    Xiagedeer, Bayindala; Wu, Shuang; Liu, Yingjuan; Hao, Weidong

    2016-08-01

    Chlormequat chloride is the most widely used plant growth regulator in agriculture to promote sturdier growth of grain crops by avoidance of lodging. Therefore, human exposure to chlormequat chloride is very common, but its developmental toxicity has not been studied. Thus, we investigated the developmental toxicity of chlormequat chloride by applying rat whole embryo culture (WEC) model, limb bud micromass culture and 3T3 fibroblast cytotoxicity test. Chlormequat chloride at 150μg/ml (0.93mM) retarded the rat embryo growth without causing significant morphological malformations and at 500μg/ml (3.1mM) caused both retardation and morphological malformation of the embryos. However, the proliferation and differentiation of limb bud cells were not affected by chlormequat chloride at as high as up to 1000μg/ml (6.2mM) applied. This concentration of chlormequat chloride did not affect the cell viability as examined by 3T3 fibroblast cytotoxicity test either, suggesting that cellular toxicity may not play a role in chlormequat induced inhibition of rat embryo growth. Collectively, our results demonstrated that chlormequat chloride may affect embryo growth and development without inhibiting cell viability. PMID:27165806

  17. Effects of taurine on human embryo development in vitro.

    PubMed

    Devreker, F; Van den Bergh, M; Biramane, J; Winston, R L; Englert, Y; Hardy, K

    1999-09-01

    Glutamine and taurine are reported to be beneficial for mouse embryo development in vitro, and we have recently shown that glutamine improves human blastocyst formation in vitro. This randomized study compared the development of supernumerary human embryos in the presence of 1 mmol/l glutamine and/or 5 mmol/l taurine from the 2-4-cell stage to the blastocyst stage. Blastocyst development and cell numbers were similar in the presence of glutamine or taurine: 52.6% and 58.3% of the embryos reached the blastocyst stage, respectively. Pyruvate uptake was similar in the presence of glutamine or taurine throughout development, as was lactate production after the 8-cell stage. Before this stage, lactate production was 4-fold higher in the presence of taurine (P < 0.001). The proportion of embryos reaching the blastocyst stage was similar with glutamine alone or with glutamine and taurine (62.5% and 47.2% respectively), as were the blastocyst cell numbers (63.0 +/- 4.6 and 61.0 +/- 5.1 respectively). In conclusion, taurine supports development of 2-4-cell human embryos to the blastocyst stage, although it does not further augment the beneficial effects of glutamine. PMID:10469709

  18. Filial cannibalism improves survival and development of beaugregory damselfish embryos.

    PubMed Central

    Payne, Adam G; Smith, Carl; Campbell, Andrew C

    2002-01-01

    Cannibalism of small numbers of offspring by a parent has been proposed as an adaptive parental strategy, by providing energy to support parental care. However, there are few empirical studies to support this hypothesis. We conducted field and laboratory experiments to investigate partial filial cannibalism in Stegastes leucostictus, a coral reef fish with paternal care. Partial cannibalism was shown to be common, and males were found to remove developing embryos from throughout a clutch in a random pattern, rather than in the more aggregated pattern seen during embryo predation. Males that received a diet supplement grew faster than control males, but did not engage in less cannibalism. Also, males did not concentrate cannibalism on early embryonic stages with the highest energetic value. Experimental reduction of embryo densities was found to significantly increase embryo development rate and survival from egg deposition to hatching, and experimental reduction of oxygen levels significantly increased rates of partial filial cannibalism by males. Artificial spawning sites with low oxygen levels were avoided by spawning females, and cannibalism rates by males were higher. We propose that partial filial cannibalism serves as an adaptive parental strategy to low oxygen levels in S. leucostictus by increasing the hatching success of embryos. PMID:12396483

  19. Developmental defects in pelagic fish embryos from the western Baltic

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    v. Westernhagen, H.; Dethlefsen, V.; Cameron, P.; Berg, J.; Fürstenberg, G.

    1988-03-01

    In February/March 1983 and 1984 a survey of pelagic fish eggs was conducted in the western Baltic (Kiel Bight), employing a horizontally towed plankton net (1 m Ø and 300 μm mesh). Maximum egg numbers in the upper meter of the S=21×10-3 salinity layer were 200·100 m-3. The most abundant eggs were cod (up to 142 eggs·100 m-3), followed by plaice (up to 74 eggs·100 m-3) and flounder (20 eggs·100 m-3). A considerable percentage of embryos of all species displayed aberrant development. In 1983 18% of cod, 22% of flounder and 24% of plaice eggs caught contained defective embryos; in 1984 this number was larger, ranging from 28% in plaice over 32% in cod to 44% in flounder. Early developmental stages showed the highest malformation rates (up to 51% in the case of early flounder embryos). With progressive development, malformations decreased in numbers, being lowest prior to hatching. Highest rates of malformations were recorded in the Mecklenburg Bight in 1983. A second area with high incidence of malformation rates was located south and east of the island of Langeland. Several reasons, including environmental and anthropogenic factors, for the occurrence of malformed embryos in pelagic fish eggs are discussed. The potential of malformation rates in embryos of pelagic fish eggs as a tool for monitoring is considered.

  20. Oviductal response to gametes and early embryos in mammals.

    PubMed

    Maillo, Veronica; Sánchez-Calabuig, Maria Jesus; Lopera-Vasquez, Ricaurte; Hamdi, Meriem; Gutierrez-Adan, Alfonso; Lonergan, Patrick; Rizos, Dimitrios

    2016-10-01

    The oviduct is a complex and organized thin tubular structure connecting the ovary with the uterus. It is the site of final sperm capacitation, oocyte fertilization and, in most species, the first 3-4days of early embryo development. The oviductal epithelium is made up of ciliary and secretory cells responsible for the secretion of proteins and other factors which contribute to the formation of the oviductal fluid. Despite significant research, most of the pathways and oviductal factors implicated in the crosstalk between gametes/early embryo and the oviduct remain unknown. Therefore, studying the oviductal environment is crucial to improve our understanding of the regulatory mechanisms controlling fertilization and embryo development. In vitro systems are a valuable tool to study in vivo pathways and mechanisms, particularly those in the oviducts which in livestock species are challenging to access. In studies of gamete and embryo interaction with the reproductive tract, oviductal epithelial cells, oviductal fluid and microvesicles co-cultured with gametes/embryos represent the most appropriate in vitro models to mimic the physiological conditions in vivo. PMID:27512123

  1. Patients' views on the embryo storage time limits.

    PubMed

    Pereira, Margarida; Samorinha, Catarina; Alves, Elisabete; Machado, Helena; Amorim, Mariana; Silva, Susana

    2015-08-01

    The establishment of the length of embryo storage has been based on socio-political criteria. There are different regulations, guidelines and health care policies worldwide. This mixed-methods study aimed to assess the opinion of patients about the embryo storage time limit, and the perception of the criteria underlying the establishment of the storage period offered to them. Between August 2011 and December 2012, 534 IVF patients from Portugal participated in a quantitative questionnaire and 34 couples were interviewed. Overall, 38% of participants preferred the duration of 4-5 years, 38% extended it beyond 5 years and 23% indicated 3 years. Having experienced at least one previous cycle was directly associated with agreeing with a duration of storage longer than 5 years, for both women and men. Having children was inversely associated with longer duration of storage, among women. One-third of the 34 interviewed couples stated that their knowledge concerning embryo storage was insufficient. Nevertheless, all the interviewees reported at least one possible reason for the legal establishment of the storage period offered to them, highlighting financial costs and decreased embryo quality. There are misconceptions and gaps in awareness of cryopreservation, which may shape patients' opinions. Accurate information regarding policy on storage of embryos is needed. PMID:26096027

  2. Drosophila embryos lacking N-myristoyltransferase have multiple developmental defects.

    PubMed

    Ntwasa, M; Aapies, S; Schiffmann, D A; Gay, N J

    2001-01-15

    Lipid modification of proteins by the addition of myristic acid to the N-terminal is important in a number of critical cellular processes, for example, signal transduction and the modulation of membrane association by myristoyl switches. Myristic acid is added to proteins by the enzyme N-myristoyltransferase (NMT) and in this paper we detail the effects on embryonic development of a null mutation in the Drosophila NMT gene. Mutant embryos display a range of phenotypes, including failures of head involution, dorsal closure, and germ-band retraction, morphogenetic processes that require cellular movements. Embryos with milder phenotypes have more specific defects in the central nervous system, including thinning of the ventral nerve chord and, in some embryos, specific scission at parasegment 10. Staining of mutant embryos with phalloidin shows that the mutant embryos have a disrupted actin cytoskeleton and abnormal cell morphology. These phenotypes are strikingly similar to those caused by genes involved in dynamic rearrangement of the actin cytoskeleton. For example the myristoylated nonreceptor tyrosine kinases Dsrc42A and Dsrc64B were shown recently to be key regulators of dorsal closure. In addition, analysis of cell death reveals widespread ectopic apoptosis. Our findings are consistent with the hypothesis that the myristoyl switches and signaling pathways characterized at the biochemical level have important functions in fundamental morphogenetic processes. PMID:11139338

  3. Filial cannibalism improves survival and development of beaugregory damselfish embryos.

    PubMed

    Payne, Adam G; Smith, Carl; Campbell, Andrew C

    2002-10-22

    Cannibalism of small numbers of offspring by a parent has been proposed as an adaptive parental strategy, by providing energy to support parental care. However, there are few empirical studies to support this hypothesis. We conducted field and laboratory experiments to investigate partial filial cannibalism in Stegastes leucostictus, a coral reef fish with paternal care. Partial cannibalism was shown to be common, and males were found to remove developing embryos from throughout a clutch in a random pattern, rather than in the more aggregated pattern seen during embryo predation. Males that received a diet supplement grew faster than control males, but did not engage in less cannibalism. Also, males did not concentrate cannibalism on early embryonic stages with the highest energetic value. Experimental reduction of embryo densities was found to significantly increase embryo development rate and survival from egg deposition to hatching, and experimental reduction of oxygen levels significantly increased rates of partial filial cannibalism by males. Artificial spawning sites with low oxygen levels were avoided by spawning females, and cannibalism rates by males were higher. We propose that partial filial cannibalism serves as an adaptive parental strategy to low oxygen levels in S. leucostictus by increasing the hatching success of embryos. PMID:12396483

  4. Validating a Noninvasive Technique for Monitoring Embryo Movement In Ovo.

    PubMed

    Pollard, A S; Pitsillides, A A; Portugal, S J

    2016-01-01

    Avian embryos are a commonly used model system for developmental studies, but monitoring of physiological parameters such as heart rate (HR) and movement in ovo poses a challenge to researchers. These are also increasingly common research objectives for ecological and embryo behavior studies in oviparous species. We therefore explored the validity of a new digital egg-monitoring system for the noninvasive monitoring of these parameters. We tested the relationship between frequency-of-movement values gathered by digital monitoring and those gathered by the current standard method, which is comparatively invasive and requires egg windowing, and demonstrated that the digital monitoring method effectively distinguishes individual movements but cannot reliably monitor HR in actively motile embryos. We therefore provide recommendations for the appropriate use of this technique for avian physiologists. We also applied the digital monitoring method to reveal how frequency of movement varies throughout prenatal ontogeny in the chicken and showed that commonly used protocols in developmental studies can themselves alter motility; egg windowing and application of light modulate frequency of movement. Recent work has revealed the importance of embryo motility in regulating gene expression and cellular activity during developmental processes. Together with our data, this highlights the value of noninvasive monitoring methods and the importance of controlling for altered embryo motility/behavior in developmental studies. PMID:27327183

  5. Automatic Dissection Position Selection for Cleavage-Stage Embryo Biopsy.

    PubMed

    Wang, Zenan; Ang, Wei Tech

    2016-03-01

    Embryo biopsies are routinely performed for preimplantation genetic diagnosis (PGD). In order to avoid blastomere membrane rupture and cell lysis, correct selection of a suitable dissection position on the zona pellucida (ZP) is necessary. Although, the technology for automated cell manipulation has advanced greatly over the past decade, fully automated embryo biopsy in PGD has not been realized yet. Automated PGD may ultimately set a new clinical standard that improves the consistency of outcomes, increases cell survival rates, flattens the learning curve of the manual procedure, and reduces the effects of human fatigue. In this paper, we present the first approach to automatically select a suitable ZP dissection position prior to embryo biopsy from a single focused embryo image based on edge detection. The proposed method consists of a technique that estimates the elliptical ZP boundaries and another two techniques that select the suitable position for ZP dissection. These techniques achieved success rates of 96%, 94%, and 94% respectively. In addition, the proposed ZP boundary estimation technique has the potential to perform ZP thickness variation (ZPTV) test and other ZP morphology measurements with further improvement in the future. Our methods provide a starting point for fast position selection prior to automatic embryo biopsy. PMID:26259216

  6. Developmental atlas of the early first trimester human embryo.

    PubMed

    Yamada, Shigehito; Samtani, Rajeev R; Lee, Elaine S; Lockett, Elizabeth; Uwabe, Chigako; Shiota, Kohei; Anderson, Stasia A; Lo, Cecilia W

    2010-06-01

    Rapid advances in medical imaging are facilitating the clinical assessment of first-trimester human embryos at increasingly earlier stages. To obtain data on early human development, we used magnetic resonance (MR) imaging and episcopic fluorescence capture (EFIC) to acquire digital images of human embryos spanning the time of dynamic tissue remodeling and organogenesis (Carnegie stages 13 to 23). These imaging data sets are readily resectioned digitally in arbitrary planes, suitable for rapid high-resolution three-dimensional (3D) observation. Using these imaging datasets, a web-accessible digital Human Embryo Atlas (http://apps.devbio.pitt.edu/humanatlas/) was created containing serial 2D images of human embryos in three standard histological planes: sagittal, frontal, and transverse. In addition, annotations and 3D reconstructions were generated for visualizing different anatomical structures. Overall, this Human Embryo Atlas is a unique resource that provides morphologic data of human developmental anatomy that can accelerate basic research investigations into developmental mechanisms that underlie human congenital anomalies. PMID:20503356

  7. Preparation of Rat Serum Suitable for Mammalian Whole Embryo Culture

    PubMed Central

    Takahashi, Masanori; Makino, Sayaka; Kikkawa, Takako; Osumi, Noriko

    2014-01-01

    Mammalian whole embryo culture (WEC) is a widely used technique for examining pharmacological toxicity in developing mouse and rat embryos and for investigating the mechanisms of developmental processes. Immediately centrifuged (IC) rat serum is commonly used for WEC and is essential for the growth and development of cultured mouse and rat embryos ex vivo. For the culture of midgestation embryos (i.e., E8.0-12.5 for the mouse, and E10.0-14.5 for the rat), 100% rat serum is the best media for supporting the growth of the embryo ex vivo. To prepare rat serum suitable for WEC, the collected blood should be centrifuged immediately to separate the blood cells from the plasma fraction. After centrifugation, the fibrin clot forms in the upper layer; this clot should be squeezed gently using a pair of sterile forceps and subsequently centrifuged to completely separate the blood cells from the serum. In this video article, we demonstrate our standard protocol for the preparation of optimal IC rat serum, including blood collection from the abdominal aorta of male rats and extraction of the serum by centrifugation. PMID:25145996

  8. Live Imaging Fluorescent Proteins in Early Mouse Embryos

    PubMed Central

    Xenopoulos, Panagiotis; Nowotschin, Sonja; Hadjantonakis, Anna-Katerina

    2016-01-01

    Mouse embryonic development comprises highly dynamic and coordinated events that drive key cell lineage specification and morphogenetic events. These processes involve cellular behaviors including proliferation, migration, apoptosis, and differentiation, each of which is regulated both spatially and temporally. Live imaging of developing embryos provides an essential tool to investigate these coordinated processes in three-dimensional space over time. For this purpose, the development and application of genetically encoded fluorescent protein (FP) reporters has accelerated over the past decade allowing for the high-resolution visualization of developmental progression. Ongoing efforts are aimed at generating improved reporters, where spectrally distinct as well as novel FPs whose optical properties can be photomodulated, are exploited for live imaging of mouse embryos. Moreover, subcellular tags in combination with using FPs allow for the visualization of multiple subcellular characteristics, such as cell position and cell morphology, in living embryos. Here, we review recent advances in the application of FPs for live imaging in the early mouse embryo, as well as some of the methods used for ex utero embryo development that facilitate on-stage time-lapse specimen visualization. PMID:22341233

  9. Respiration and Mitochondrial Biogenesis in Germinating Embryos of Maize 1

    PubMed Central

    Ehrenshaft, Marilyn; Brambl, Robert

    1990-01-01

    Function of the cyanide-sensitive mitochondrial electron transport system was required for germination of the Zea mays embryo. Respiration of the standard electron transport system (rather than the alternate oxidase) began immediately upon initiation of imbibition. This respiration depended upon cytochrome c oxidase and ATPase that were conserved in an active form in the quiescent embryo rather than upon newly synthesized or assembled enzyme complexes. Immunoprecipitation of radiolabeled subunits of these enzymes showed that the initiation of mitochondrial biogenetic activities, including de novo synthesis of nuclear- and mitochondrial-encoded enzyme subunit peptides, was strongly induced after 6 hours of embryo germination. Undetectable or very low levels of transcripts for subunits 1 and 2 of the F1-ATPase and subunit 2 of cytochrome c oxidase were present in the quiescent embryo; these transcripts accumulated rapidly between 6 and 12 hours of germination and their translation products were rapidly synthesized between 6 and 24 hours. An exception was the gene for subunit 9 of the ATPase; transcripts of this mitochondrial gene were abundant in the dry embryo and rapidly accumulated further upon initiation of imbibition; they were translated actively during the first 6 hours. We isolated and sequenced a near full-length cDNA for subunit 2 (beta) of the F1-ATPase, and we compared the deduced protein sequence with related sequences of other organisms. Images Figure 2 Figure 3 Figure 5 PMID:16667450

  10. Recent developments in embryo sexing and its field application.

    PubMed

    Bredbacka, P

    1998-01-01

    This review focuses on polymerase chain reaction (PCR) sexing of bovine embryos in commercial situations with emphasis on new developments. Simplifications of the biopsy technique is one of the major simplifications over the last few years. The stabilization of the embryo by means of protein-free medium or scratches produced on the bottom of the Petri dish makes it possible to perform a biopsy with a single microinstrument. The traditional PCR sexing approach utilizes electrophoresis, which involves the risk of deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA) contamination of subsequent assays. Such contamination, resulting in females misdiagnosed as males, is avoided efficiently by using a non-electrophoretic method in which the sex is determined based on fluorescence of unopened tubes. However, female samples cannot be distinguished from blank samples in the non-electrophoretic assay, which thus relies on accurate transfer of biopsy into tubes. Nevertheless, an accuracy of about 95% can be reached with both approaches. High pregnancy rates (50-70%) can be reached with biopsied Grade 1 embryos, but there is evidence that pregnancy rates with Grade 2 embryos is 15-20% lower. Recent data indicate that pregnancy rates of 50% can be achieved with frozen-thawed biopsied Grade 1 embryos. In conclusion, recent developments in biopsy techniques, detection systems and freezing should increase interest in PCR sexing. PMID:9932294

  11. Reactive oxygen species in bovine embryo in vitro production.

    PubMed

    Dalvit, G C; Cetica, P D; Pintos, L N; Beconi, M T

    2005-08-01

    Oxidative modifications of cell components due to the action of reactive oxygen species (ROS) is one of the most potentially damaging processes for proper cell function. However, in the last few years it has been observed that ROS participate in physiological processes. The aim of this work was to determine ROS generation during in vitro production of bovine embryos. Cumulus-oocyte complexes were recovered by aspiration of antral follicles from ovaries obtained from slaughtered cows and cultured in medium 199 for 22 h at 39 degrees C in 5% CO2: 95% humidified air. In vitro fertilization was carried out in IVF-mSOF with frozen-thawed semen in the same culture conditions and embryo in vitro culture in IVC-mSOF at 90% N2: 5% CO2: 5% O2. ROS was determined in denuded oocytes and embryos at successive stages of development by the 2',7'-dichlorodihydrofluorescein diacetate fluorescent assay. ROS production was not modified during oocyte maturation. However, a gradual increase in ROS production was observed up to the late morula stage during embryo in vitro culture (P < 0.05). In expanded blastocysts, ROS level decreased to reach values similar to the corresponding in oocytes. In the bovine species, the variation in ROS level during the complete process of embryo in vitro production was determined for the first time. PMID:16187501

  12. Noninvasive Metabolomic Profiling of Human Embryo Culture Media Using a Simple Spectroscopy Adjunct to Morphology for Embryo Assessment in in Vitro Fertilization (IVF)

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Qinghong; Yin, Tailang; Peng, Jin; Zou, Yujie; Yang, Jing; Shen, Aiguo; Hu, Jiming

    2013-01-01

    Embryo quality is crucial to the outcome of in vitro fertilization (IVF); however, the ability to precisely distinguish the embryos with higher reproductive potential from others is poor. Morphologic evaluation used to play an important role in assessing embryo quality, but it is somewhat subjective. The culture medium is the immediate environment of the embryos in vitro, and a change of the substances in the culture medium is possibly related to the embryo quality. Thus, the present study aims to determine whether metabolomic profiling of the culture medium using Raman spectroscopy adjunct to morphology correlates with the reproductive potential of embryos in IVF and, thus, to look for a new method of assessing embryo quality. Fifty seven spent media samples were detected by Raman spectroscopy. Combined with embryo morphology scores, we found that embryos in culture media with less than 0.012 of sodium pyruvate and more than −0.00085 phenylalanine have a high reproductive potential, with up to 85.7% accuracy compared with clinical pregnancy. So, sodium pyruvate and phenylalanine in culture medium play an important role in the development of the embryo. Raman spectroscopy is an important tool that provides a new and accurate assessment of higher quality embryos. PMID:23528887

  13. Local activation of uterine Toll-like receptor 2 and 2/6 decreases embryo implantation and affects uterine receptivity in mice.

    PubMed

    Sanchez-Lopez, Javier Arturo; Caballero, Ignacio; Montazeri, Mehrnaz; Maslehat, Nasim; Elliott, Sarah; Fernandez-Gonzalez, Raul; Calle, Alexandra; Gutierrez-Adan, Alfonso; Fazeli, Alireza

    2014-04-01

    Embryo implantation is a complex interaction between maternal endometrium and embryonic structures. Failure to implant is highly recurrent and impossible to diagnose. Inflammation and infections in the female reproductive tract are common causes of infertility, embryo loss, and preterm labor. The current work describes how the activation of endometrial Toll-like receptor (TLR) 2 and 2/6 reduces embryo implantation chances. We developed a morphometric index to evaluate the effects of the TLR 2/6 activation along the uterine horn (UH). TLR 2/6 ligation reduced the endometrial myometrial and glandular indexes and increased the luminal index. Furthermore, TLR 2/6 activation increased the proinflammatory cytokines such as interleukin (IL)-1beta and monocyte chemotactic protein (MCP)-1 in UH lavages in the preimplantation day and IL-1 receptor antagonist in the implantation day. The engagement of TLR 2/6 with its ligand in the UH during embryo transfer severely affected the rate of embryonic implantation (45.00% ± 6.49% vs. 16.69% ± 5.01%, P < 0.05, control vs. test, respectively). Furthermore, this interference with the embryo implantation process was verified using an in vitro model of human embryo implantation where trophoblast spheroids failed to adhere to a monolayer of TLR 2- and TLR 2/6-activated endometrial cells. The inhibition of TLR receptors 2 and 6 in the presence of their specific ligands restored the ability of the spheroids to bind to the endometrial cells. In conclusion, the activation of the innate immune system in the uterus at the time of implantation interfered with the endometrial receptivity and reduced the chances of implantation success. PMID:24621922

  14. Dual Positive Regulation of Embryo Implantation by Endocrine and Immune Systems--Step-by-Step Maternal Recognition of the Developing Embryo.

    PubMed

    Fujiwara, Hiroshi; Araki, Yoshihiko; Imakawa, Kazuhiko; Saito, Shigeru; Daikoku, Takiko; Shigeta, Minoru; Kanzaki, Hideharu; Mori, Takahide

    2016-03-01

    In humans, HCG secreted from the implanting embryo stimulates progesterone production of the corpus luteum to maintain embryo implantation. Along with this endocrine system, current evidence suggests that the maternal immune system positively contributes to the embryo implantation. In mice, immune cells that have been sensitized with seminal fluid and then the developing embryo induce endometrial differentiation and promote embryo implantation. After hatching, HCG activates regulatory T and B cells through LH/HCG receptors and then stimulates uterine NK cells and monocytes through sugar chain receptors, to promote and maintain pregnancy. In accordance with the above, the intrauterine administration of HCG-treated PBMC was demonstrated to improve implantation rates in women with repeated implantation failures. These findings suggest that the maternal immune system undergoes functional changes by recognizing the developing embryos in a stepwise manner even from a pre-fertilization stage and facilitates embryo implantation in cooperation with the endocrine system. PMID:26755274

  15. Embryo development. A cysteine-clamp gene drives embryo polarity in the midge Chironomus.

    PubMed

    Klomp, Jeff; Athy, Derek; Kwan, Chun Wai; Bloch, Natasha I; Sandmann, Thomas; Lemke, Steffen; Schmidt-Ott, Urs

    2015-05-29

    In the fruit fly Drosophila, head formation is driven by a single gene, bicoid, which generates head-to-tail polarity of the main embryonic axis. Bicoid deficiency results in embryos with tail-to-tail polarity and no head. However, most insects lack bicoid, and the molecular mechanism for establishing head-to-tail polarity is poorly understood. We have identified a gene that establishes head-to-tail polarity of the mosquito-like midge, Chironomus riparius. This gene, named panish, encodes a cysteine-clamp DNA binding domain and operates through a different mechanism than bicoid. This finding, combined with the observation that the phylogenetic distributions of panish and bicoid are limited to specific families of flies, reveals frequent evolutionary changes of body axis determinants and a remarkable opportunity to study gene regulatory network evolution. PMID:25953821

  16. Coronavirus Infections

    MedlinePlus

    Coronaviruses are common viruses that most people get some time in their life. They are common throughout the world, and they can infect people and animals. Several different coronaviruses can infect people ...

  17. Rotavirus Infections

    MedlinePlus

    Rotavirus is a virus that causes gastroenteritis. Symptoms include severe diarrhea, vomiting, fever, and dehydration. Almost all ... the U.S. are likely to be infected with rotavirus before their 5th birthday. Infections happen most often ...

  18. Infection Control

    MedlinePlus

    ... lost because of the spread of infections in hospitals. Health care workers can take steps to prevent the spread of infectious diseases. These steps are part of infection control. Proper hand washing is the most effective way ...

  19. Staphylococcal Infections

    MedlinePlus

    ... Most staph skin infections are easily treated with antibiotics or by draining the infection. Some staph bacteria such as MRSA (methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus) are resistant to certain antibiotics, making ...

  20. Staphylococcal Infections

    MedlinePlus

    ... best way to prevent staph is to keep hands and wounds clean. Most staph skin infections are easily treated with antibiotics or by draining the infection. Some staph bacteria such as MRSA (methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus) are ...

  1. Spinal Infections

    MedlinePlus

    ... Surgical risk factors include a long surgical time, instrumentation and re-operations. Infections occur in up to 4% of surgical cases despite the numerous preventative measures that are taken. The likelihood of an infection ...

  2. Bacterial Infections

    MedlinePlus

    ... make you sick. Examples of bacteria that cause infections include Streptococcus, Staphylococcus, and E. coli. Antibiotics are the usual treatment. When you take antibiotics, follow the directions carefully. Each ... infection that those antibiotics cannot cure. NIH: National Institute ...

  3. Use of the Chick Embryo Model in Uveal Melanoma

    PubMed Central

    Kalirai, Helen; Shahidipour, Haleh; Coupland, Sarah E.; Luyten, Gregorius

    2015-01-01

    Animal models play a crucial role in basic and translational oncology research. Conventional rodent experiments, however, face ethical, practical and technical issues that limit their use. The chick embryo represents an accessible and economical in vivo model, which has long been used in developmental biology and for the study of angiogenesis. It is also a recognised xenograft model, and because of its lack of immune system in early development, the chick embryo has established itself as a key model system for cancer research, with which to study various steps in the metastatic process. In this chapter, we review the chick embryo model and the technical approaches adopted by cancer biologists, including advances in real-time imaging, and discuss how this has been or can be applied to improve our understanding of the biological events during uveal melanoma development and metastasis. PMID:27171889

  4. Embryo with XYY syndrome presenting with clubfoot: a case report

    PubMed Central

    Tsakalidis, Christos; Tampakoudis, George P; Papastergiou, Maria N; Tzevelekis, Fillipos; Pados, George; Assimakopoulos, Efstratios A

    2009-01-01

    Talipes equinovarus (clubfoot) is a skeletal anomaly of the embryo’s legs, with a frequency of 1-3:1000 living born babies. It may occur as an independent anomaly, or as part of a syndrome with concomitant chromosomal abnormalities. XYY syndrome is a quite rare sex chromosomal abnormality with 47, XYY karyotype. Prenatal diagnosis is usually accidental because the syndrome is not associated with increased prevalence of sonographically detectable defects. The possibility of co-existence of skeletal anomalies in embryos with 47, XYY karyotype is scant, with only a few cases reported in the literature. An amniocentesis was performed in an embryo at the 21st week of gestation because clubfoot was detected in the 2nd trimester scan, and the embryo was found to have abnormal karyotype of 47, XYY. Current opinions and management dilemmas are discussed. PMID:19918427

  5. Estrogen-Initiated Protein Interactomes During Embryo Implantation.

    PubMed

    Padmanabhan, Renjini A; Laloraya, Malini

    2016-03-01

    Failed implantation is the major restraining factor in assisted reproduction and is defined as the 'black-box of assisted reproduction'. Although work on understanding the complex process of implantation has substantially advanced, it has been limited to studies on mechanism of steroid hormone-mediated signaling during embryo implantation and knocking out single molecules and assessing their impact on embryo implantation. It is important to realize that most proteins exert their function via interaction with other proteins in order to relay downstream signals and/or regulate gene expression via interactions within promoter complexes. Such networks of biomolecular interactions constitute the basis for life as protein interactions are obligatory for cellular functioning. Thus, this review will focus on highlighting protein interactions during the complex process of embryo implantation as they attain a larger significance as pregnancy is fundamental to childbirth and the continuity of life per se. PMID:26662181

  6. Spontaneous ovarian hyperstimulation syndrome following a thawed embryo transfer cycle

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Mi Kyoung; Shim, Sung Han; Cha, Dong Hyun; Yoon, Tae Ki

    2014-01-01

    This article reports a case of spontaneous ovarian hyperstimulation syndrome (OHSS) following a thawed embryo transfer cycle. OHSS, a potentially life-threatening condition, is an iatrogenic complication of controlled ovarian stimulation; therefore, it is very important to prevent and treat OHSS during treatment with ovulation-inducing agents. Despite our efforts to prevent OHSS, in this case, severe spontaneous OHSS occurred, which resulted in uncontrolled preterm labor and a preterm delivery and also persisted for 6 weeks after delivery. Freezing all embryos cannot entirely prevent the development of OHSS because OHSS can occur spontaneously. Although spontaneous OHSS remains a rare event, females with a history of OHSS may have an elevated risk for spontaneous OHSS. We suggest closely monitoring cases of pregnancy following thawed embryo transfer for early diagnosis of spontaneous OHSS and the use of conservative management. PMID:25309860

  7. Molecular control of the oocyte to embryo transition.

    PubMed Central

    Knowles, Barbara B; Evsikov, Alexei V; de Vries, Wilhelmine N; Peaston, Anne E; Solter, Davor

    2003-01-01

    The elucidation of the molecular control of the initiation of mammalian embryogenesis is possible now that the transcriptomes of the full-grown oocyte and two-cell stage embryo have been prepared and analysed. Functional annotation of the transcriptomes using gene ontology vocabularies, allows comparison of the oocyte and two-cell stage embryo between themselves, and with all known mouse genes in the Mouse Genome Database. Using this methodology one can outline the general distinguishing features of the oocyte and the two-cell stage embryo. This, when combined with oocyte-specific targeted deletion of genes, allows us to dissect the molecular networks at play as the differentiated oocyte and sperm transit into blastomeres with unlimited developmental potential. PMID:14511485

  8. Temperature and photoperiod responses of soybean embryos cultured in vitro

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Raper, C. D. Jr; Patterson, R. P.; Raper CD, J. r. (Principal Investigator)

    1986-01-01

    Temperature and photoperiod each have direct effects on growth rate of excised embryos of soybean (Glycine max (L.) Merrill). To determine if the effects of photoperiod are altered by temperature, embryos of 'Ransom II' were cultured in vitro at 18, 24, and 30 degrees C under photoperiod durations of 12 and 18 h at an irradiance of 9 W m-2 (700 to 850 nm) and a photosynthetic photon flux density of 58 micromoles m-2 s-1 (400 to 700 nm). Accumulation rates of fresh and dry weight were greater under 18-h than 12-h photoperiods over the entire range of temperature. Water content of the culture embryos was not affected by photoperiod but was greater at 18 and 30 than 24 degrees C. The accumulation rate of dry weight increased from 18 to 26 but declined at 30 degrees C.

  9. Hagfish embryos again: the end of a long drought.

    PubMed

    Holland, Nicholas D

    2007-09-01

    Hagfishes have long held a key place in discussions of early vertebrate evolution. Frustratingly, one basis for such discussions -- namely hagfish embryology -- is very incompletely known, because the embryos of these animals are notoriously difficult to obtain. Fortunately, a recent publication on a Far Eastern hagfish describes a workable procedure for obtaining embryos and then uses this precious material to show that the hagfish neural crest arises by cell delamination as in other vertebrates -- and not by epithelial outpouchings from the wall of the neural tube as previously claimed. Importantly, because hagfish embryos should now be available on a regular basis, the way is open for additional morphological and developmental genetic investigations to help evaluate existing evolutionary scenarios and perhaps suggest new ones. PMID:17691082

  10. [Embryo vitrification: French clinical practice analysis for BLEFCO].

    PubMed

    Hesters, L; Achour-Frydman, N; Mandelbaum, J; Levy, R

    2013-09-01

    Frozen thawed embryo transfer is currently an important part of present-day assisted reproductive technology (ART) aiming at increasing the clinical pregnancy rate per oocyte retrieval. Although slow freezing method has been the reference during 2 decades, the recent years witnessed an expansion of ultrarapid cryopreservation method named vitrification. Recently in France, vitrification has been authorized for cryopreserving human embryos. Therefore BLEFCO consortium decides to perform a descriptive study through questionnaires to evaluate the state of vitrification in the French clinical practice. Questionnaires were addressed to the 105 French centres of reproductive biology and 60 were fully completed. Data analysis revealed that embryo survival rate as well as, clinical pregnancy rate were increased after vitrification technology when compared to slow freezing procedure. Overall, these preliminary data suggest that vitrification may improve ART outcomes through an increasing of the cumulative pregnancy rate per oocyte retrieval. PMID:23962680

  11. Establishment of Eimeria tenella (local isolate) in chicken embryos

    PubMed Central

    Jiang, L.; Zhao, Q.; Zhu, S.; Han, H.; Dong, H.; Huang, B.

    2012-01-01

    Development of an in vitro Eimeria (E.) tenella model could be valuable as a tool for vaccine, coccidiostats or molecular biology research. 1.0 × 104 sporozoites per 0.1 mL were inoculated into the allantoic cavity of ten-day-old chicken embryos. The complete lifecycle of E. tenella was accomplished in eight-nine days at 37 °C and 70% humidity. The addition of 100 U insulin to the embryos could remarkably improve the output of oocysts. The development of the parasite within the embryos was systematically observed, allowing guidelines to be set regarding the appropriate times at which different developmental stages of the parasite may be sampled. PMID:22910673

  12. [The human embryo: a reality in need of protection].

    PubMed

    Junquera de Estéfani, R

    2000-01-01

    Today many advances in biotechnology involve the use of human embryos, which suffer the consequences of experimentation-research and are considered to be mere sources of raw materials. Given this the facto situation, it is crucial that embryos are afforded recognition. If they are considered to be human beings many of these actions should be banned. If not, then they should be permitted. At the root of this problem lies the great question facing philosophers and scientists, namely, when does life become human? This issue should be addressed in an interdisciplinary manner due to the ethical, religious, philosophical, biological and other aspects involved. However, aside from this debate, the mere fact that embryos belong to our species and possess intrinsic potential make them deserving of respect and protection. The Law therefore should intervene to provide this protection and prevent uncontrolled actions by researchers working alone in their laboratories. PMID:11147215

  13. Phenotype classification of zebrafish embryos by supervised learning.

    PubMed

    Jeanray, Nathalie; Marée, Raphaël; Pruvot, Benoist; Stern, Olivier; Geurts, Pierre; Wehenkel, Louis; Muller, Marc

    2015-01-01

    Zebrafish is increasingly used to assess biological properties of chemical substances and thus is becoming a specific tool for toxicological and pharmacological studies. The effects of chemical substances on embryo survival and development are generally evaluated manually through microscopic observation by an expert and documented by several typical photographs. Here, we present a methodology to automatically classify brightfield images of wildtype zebrafish embryos according to their defects by using an image analysis approach based on supervised machine learning. We show that, compared to manual classification, automatic classification results in 90 to 100% agreement with consensus voting of biological experts in nine out of eleven considered defects in 3 days old zebrafish larvae. Automation of the analysis and classification of zebrafish embryo pictures reduces the workload and time required for the biological expert and increases the reproducibility and objectivity of this classification. PMID:25574849

  14. Phenotype Classification of Zebrafish Embryos by Supervised Learning

    PubMed Central

    Jeanray, Nathalie; Marée, Raphaël; Pruvot, Benoist; Stern, Olivier; Geurts, Pierre; Wehenkel, Louis; Muller, Marc

    2015-01-01

    Zebrafish is increasingly used to assess biological properties of chemical substances and thus is becoming a specific tool for toxicological and pharmacological studies. The effects of chemical substances on embryo survival and development are generally evaluated manually through microscopic observation by an expert and documented by several typical photographs. Here, we present a methodology to automatically classify brightfield images of wildtype zebrafish embryos according to their defects by using an image analysis approach based on supervised machine learning. We show that, compared to manual classification, automatic classification results in 90 to 100% agreement with consensus voting of biological experts in nine out of eleven considered defects in 3 days old zebrafish larvae. Automation of the analysis and classification of zebrafish embryo pictures reduces the workload and time required for the biological expert and increases the reproducibility and objectivity of this classification. PMID:25574849

  15. Mitotic wavefronts mediated by mechanical signaling in early Drosophila embryos

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kang, Louis; Idema, Timon; Liu, Andrea; Lubensky, Tom

    2013-03-01

    Mitosis in the early Drosophila embryo demonstrates spatial and temporal correlations in the form of wavefronts that travel across the embryo in each cell cycle. This coordinated phenomenon requires a signaling mechanism, which we suggest is mechanical in origin. We have constructed a theoretical model that supports nonlinear wavefront propagation in a mechanically-excitable medium. Previously, we have shown that this model captures quantitatively the wavefront speed as it varies with cell cycle number, for reasonable values of the elastic moduli and damping coefficient of the medium. Now we show that our model also captures the displacements of cell nuclei in the embryo in response to the traveling wavefront. This new result further supports that mechanical signaling may play an important role in mediating mitotic wavefronts.

  16. Wavefronts and mechanical signaling in early Drosophila embryos

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Idema, Timon; Dubuis, Julien; Manning, Lisa; Nelson, Philip; Liu, Andrea

    2012-02-01

    Mitosis in the early syncytial Drosophila embryo has a high degree of spatial and temporal correlations, visible as mitotic wavefronts that travel across the embryo. This mitosis wavefront is preceded by another wavefront which corresponds to chromosome condensation. The two wavefronts are separated by a time interval that is independent of cell cycle and propagate at the same speed for a given embryo in a given cycle. We study the wavefronts in the context of excitable medium theory, using two different models, one with biochemical signaling and one with mechanical signaling. We find that the dependence of wavefront speed on cell cycle number is most naturally explained via a mechanical signaling, and that the entire process suggests a scenario in which biochemical and mechanical signaling are coupled.

  17. Pregnancy Rates to Fixed Embryo Transfer of Vitrified IVP Bos indicus, Bos taurus or Bos indicus × Bos taurus Embryos.

    PubMed

    Marinho, L S R; Sanches, B V; Rosa, C O; Tannura, J H; Rigo, A G; Basso, A C; Pontes, J H F; Seneda, M M

    2015-10-01

    The pregnancy rates obtained after the transfer of cryopreserved in vitro-produced (IVP) embryos are usually low and/or inconsistent. The objective of this study was to evaluate the pregnancy rates of Holstein, Gyr and Holstein × Gyr cattle after the transfer of vitrified IVP embryos produced with X-sorted sperm. Seventy-two Gyr and 703 Holstein females were subjected to ovum pickup (OPU) sessions, followed by in vitro embryo production using semen from sires of the same breeds. Embryos (1636 Holstein, 241 Gyr and 1515 Holstein × Gyr) were exposed to forskolin for 48 h prior to vitrification. The pregnancy rate achieved with Gyr dam and sire was 46.1%, which was similar (p = 0.11) to that of Holstein dam and Gyr sire (40.3%). Crossing Gyr dams with Holstein sires resulted in a pregnancy rate of 38.9% and did not differ (p = 0.58) from the pregnancy rate obtained with the cross between Holstein dams and Gyr sires. The rate obtained with Holstein dam and sire was 32.5%. The average pregnancy rate was 36.6%, and no difference was found in the proportion of female foetuses (88.8%, in average) among breeds (p > 0.05). In conclusion, transfer of cryopreserved X-sorted embryos represents an interesting choice for dairy cattle. Despite the small differences between pregnancy rates, we highlight the efficiency of this strategy for all of the racial groups studied. PMID:26280798

  18. Cotyledonary somatic embryos of Pinus pinaster Ait. most closely resemble fresh, maturing cotyledonary zygotic embryos: biological, carbohydrate and proteomic analyses.

    PubMed

    Morel, Alexandre; Trontin, Jean-François; Corbineau, Françoise; Lomenech, Anne-Marie; Beaufour, Martine; Reymond, Isabelle; Le Metté, Claire; Ader, Kevin; Harvengt, Luc; Cadene, Martine; Label, Philippe; Teyssier, Caroline; Lelu-Walter, Marie-Anne

    2014-11-01

    Cotyledonary somatic embryos (SEs) of maritime pine are routinely matured for 12 weeks before being germinated and converted to plantlets. Although regeneration success is highly dependent on SEs quality, the date of harvesting is currently determined mainly on the basis of morphological features. This empirical method does not provide any accurate information about embryo quality with respect to storage compounds (proteins, carbohydrates). We first analyzed SEs matured for 10, 12 and 14 weeks by carrying out biological (dry weight, water content) and biochemical measurements (total protein and carbohydrate contents). No difference could be found between collection dates, suggesting that harvesting SEs after 12 weeks is appropriate. Cotyledonary SEs were then compared to various stages, from fresh to fully desiccated, in the development of cotyledonary zygotic embryos (ZEs). We identified profiles that were similar using hierarchical ascendant cluster analysis (HCA). Fresh and dehydrated ZEs could be distinguished, and SEs clustered with fresh ZEs. Both types of embryo exhibited similar carbohydrate and protein contents and signatures. This high level of similarity (94.5 %) was further supported by proteome profiling. Highly expressed proteins included storage, stress-related, late embryogenesis abundant and energy metabolism proteins. By comparing overexpressed proteins in developing and cotyledonary SEs or ZEs, some (23 proteins) could be identified as candidate biomarkers for the late, cotyledonary stage. This is the first report of useful generic protein markers for monitoring embryo development in maritime pine. Our results also suggest that improvements of SEs quality may be achieved if the current maturation conditions are refined. PMID:25115559

  19. Acorns containing deeper plumule survive better: how white oaks counter embryo excision by rodents

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Mingming; Dong, Zhong; Yi, Xianfeng; Bartlow, Andrew W

    2014-01-01

    Several squirrel species excise the embryo of acorns of most white oak species to arrest germination for long-term storage. However, it is not clear how these acorns counter embryo excision and survive in the arms race of coevolution. In this study, we simulated the embryo excision behavior of squirrels by removing 4 mm of cotyledon from the apical end of white oak acorns differing in embryo depths to investigate the effects of embryo excision on acorn germination and seedling performance of white oak species. The embryo depth in the cotyledons was significantly different among white oak acorns, with Quercus mongolica containing the embryo most deeply in the acorns. We found that artificial embryo excision significantly decreased acorn germination rates of Quercus variabilis, Quercus acutissima, Quercus aliena, Quercus aliena var. acutiserrata, Quercus serrata. var. brevipetiolata but not Q. mongolica. Artificial embryo excision exerted significant negative impacts on seedling performance of all oak species except Quercus aliena. Our study demonstrates the role of embryo depth of acorns in countering embryo excision by squirrels and may explain the fact that squirrels do not perform embryo excision in acorns of Q. mongolica with deeper embryos. This apparent adaptation of acorns sheds light on the coevolutionary dynamics between oaks and their seed predators. PMID:24455161

  20. Automated Zebrafish Chorion Removal and Single Embryo Placement: Optimizing Throughput of Zebrafish Developmental Toxicity Screens

    PubMed Central

    Mandrell, David; Truong, Lisa; Jephson, Caleb; Sarker, Mushfiqur R.; Moore, Aaron; Lang, Christopher; Simonich, Michael T.; Tanguay, Robert L.

    2012-01-01

    The potential of the developing zebrafish model for toxicology and drug discovery is limited by inefficient approaches to manipulating and chemically exposing zebrafish embryos—namely, manual placement of embryos into 96- or 384-well plates and exposure of embryos while still in the chorion, a barrier of poorly characterized permeability enclosing the developing embryo. We report the automated dechorionation of 1600 embryos at once at 4 h postfertilization (hpf) and placement of the dechorionated embryos into 96-well plates for exposure by 6 hpf. The process removed ≥95% of the embryos from their chorions with 2% embryo mortality by 24 hpf, and 2% of the embryos malformed at 120 hpf. The robotic embryo placement allocated 6-hpf embryos to 94.7% ± 4.2% of the wells in multiple 96-well trials. The rate of embryo mortality was 2.8% (43 of 1536) from robotic handling, the rate of missed wells was 1.2% (18 of 1536), and the frequency of multipicks was <0.1%. Embryo malformations observed at 24 hpf occurred nearly twice as frequently from robotic handling (16 of 864; 1.9%) as from manual pipetting (9 of 864; 1%). There was no statistical difference between the success of performing the embryo placement robotically or manually. PMID:22357610

  1. Developmental capacity and implantation potential of the embryos with multinucleated blastomeres

    PubMed Central

    EGASHIRA, Akiyoshi; YAMAUCHI, Nobuhiko; TANAKA, Keiko; MINE, Chihiro; OTSUBO, Hitomi; MURAKAMI, Masao; ISLAM, Md. Rashedul; OHTSUKA, Misako; YOSHIOKA, Naomi; KURAMOTO, Takashi

    2015-01-01

    The presence of multinucleated blastomeres (MNBs) in embryos is associated with poor developmental competence in assisted reproductive technologies. This phenomenon is observed not only in humans but also in other animal species. The purpose of the present study was to investigate the characteristics of embryos with MNBs (MNB embryos) that could be utilized in embryo transfer. The developmental rate of MNB embryos to the blastocyst stage (50.8%) was significantly lower than that of normal embryos (73.3%) (P < 0.05). The clinical pregnancy rates of fresh embryo transfer (ET) using day 2 or day 3 embryos were significantly lower in MNB embryos (5.1%) compared with normal embryos (24.0%) (P < 0.05). In the case of frozen-thawed ET using a single vitrified/warmed blastocyst, however, the clinical pregnancy rate of MNB embryos was close to that of normal embryos (59.1% vs. 52.8%). Thus, the findings of the present study suggest that the frozen-thawed ET of MNB embryos might improve the potential for implantation followed by successful pregnancy. PMID:26346255

  2. Gastrointestinal Infections.

    PubMed

    Alby, Kevin; Nachamkin, Irving

    2016-06-01

    Gastrointestinal infections in the immunocompromised host are caused by the common bacterial, viral, fungal, and parasitic agents that also cause infections in the immunocompetent host. Of special consideration is that immunocompromised patients may be at increased risk for infection or disease severity and by pathogens not seen in the competent host. This chapter reviews the various agents, risk factors, and diagnostic approaches to detect gastrointestinal infections in this patient population. PMID:27337464

  3. Attenuation mechanism of virulent infectious bronchitis virus strain with QX genotype by continuous passage in chicken embryos.

    PubMed

    Huo, Ya-fei; Huang, Qing-hua; Lu, Mei; Wu, Jia-qiang; Lin, Shu-qian; Zhu, Fengzhu; Zhang, Xiu-mei; Huang, Yan-yan; Yang, Shao-hua; Xu, Chuan-tian

    2016-01-01

    The virulent isolate SDZB0808 of QX-type infectious bronchitis virus (IBV) was continuously passaged in chicken embryos for 110 generations. The safety and immune efficacy of the 110th generation of IBVs (P110) were evaluated. Damage was not found in the appearance of the 3-day-old specific-pathogen-free (SPF) chicks immunized with 10(4.5) EID50 (median embryo infective dose) of P110 by intranasal and ocular administration. At 14 d after the vaccination with 10(4.5) EID50 of P110, all the 3-day-old SPF chicks were immune from the attack of the homologous virulent strain SDZB0808 and the heterologous virulent strain SDIB821/2012. The whole genome sequencing of SDZB0808 of different generations (P1-P110) indicated that the replicase 1a sequences of P60-P110 all lost a length of 30bp in the same region. Specific primers were designed according to the differences in the genomes of P1-P110. SYBR Green I real-time quantitative PCR was adopted to analyze the proportion of the viruses with 30bp deletion in P60, P100, and P110. Results showed that with the passage in chicken embryos, the proportion of the viruses with 30bp deletion gradually increased. Almost 100% of the viruses in the P110 had 30bp deletion in the replicase 1a sequence. Therefore, the attenuation of IBV's virulence may be the outcome of directional screening in the chicken embryos. This work confirmed the high safety and immune efficacy of P110 in SPF chickens. Thus, P110 can serve as an attenuated IBV vaccine candidate. PMID:26611202

  4. Embryo toxicity and teratogenicity of formaldehyde.

    PubMed

    Thrasher, J D; Kilburn, K H

    2001-01-01

    C-14 formaldehyde crosses the placenta and enters fetal tissues. The incorporated radioactivity is higher in fetal organs (i.e., brain and liver) than in maternal tissues. The incorporation mechanism has not been studied fully, but formaldehyde enters the single-carbon cycle and is incorporated as a methyl group into nucleic acids and proteins. Also, formaldehyde reacts chemically with organic compounds (e.g., deoxyribonucleic acid, nucleosides, nucleotides, proteins, amino acids) by addition and condensation reactions, thus forming adducts and deoxyribonucleic acid-protein crosslinks. The following questions must be addressed: What adducts (e.g., N-methyl amino acids) are formed in the blood following formaldehyde inhalation? What role do N-methyl-amino adducts play in alkylation of nuclear and mitochondrial deoxyribonucleic acid, as well as mitochondrial peroxidation? The fact that the free formaldehyde pool in blood is not affected following exposure to the chemical does not mean that formaldehyde is not involved in altering cell and deoxyribonucleic acid characteristics beyond the nasal cavity. The teratogenic effect of formaldehyde in the English literature has been sought, beginning on the 6th day of pregnancy (i.e., rodents) (Saillenfait AM, et al. Food Chem Toxicol 1989, pp 545-48; Martin WJ. Reprod Toxicol 1990, pp 237-39; Ulsamer AG, et al. Hazard Assessment of Chemicals; Academic Press, 1984, pp 337-400; and U.S. Department of Health and Human Services. Toxicological Profile of Formaldehyde; ATSDR, 1999 [references 1-4, respectively, herein]). The exposure regimen is critical and may account for the differences in outcomes. Pregnant rats were exposed (a) prior to mating, (b) during mating, (c) or during the entire gestation period. These regimens (a) increased embryo mortality; (b) increased fetal anomalies (i.e., cryptochordism and aberrant ossification centers); (c) decreased concentrations of ascorbic acid; and (d) caused abnormalities in enzymes of

  5. CHONDRULE FORMATION IN BOW SHOCKS AROUND ECCENTRIC PLANETARY EMBRYOS

    SciTech Connect

    Morris, Melissa A.; Desch, Steven J.; Athanassiadou, Themis; Boley, Aaron C.

    2012-06-10

    Recent isotopic studies of Martian meteorites by Dauphas and Pourmand have established that large ({approx}3000 km radius) planetary embryos existed in the solar nebula at the same time that chondrules-millimeter-sized igneous inclusions found in meteorites-were forming. We model the formation of chondrules by passage through bow shocks around such a planetary embryo on an eccentric orbit. We numerically model the hydrodynamics of the flow and find that such large bodies retain an atmosphere with Kelvin-Helmholtz instabilities allowing mixing of this atmosphere with the gas and particles flowing past the embryo. We calculate the trajectories of chondrules flowing past the body and find that they are not accreted by the protoplanet, but may instead flow through volatiles outgassed from the planet's magma ocean. In contrast, chondrules are accreted onto smaller planetesimals. We calculate the thermal histories of chondrules passing through the bow shock. We find that peak temperatures and cooling rates are consistent with the formation of the dominant, porphyritic texture of most chondrules, assuming a modest enhancement above the likely solar nebula average value of chondrule densities (by a factor of 10), attributable to settling of chondrule precursors to the midplane of the disk or turbulent concentration. We calculate the rate at which a planetary embryo's eccentricity is damped and conclude that a single planetary embryo scattered into an eccentric orbit can, over {approx}10{sup 5} years, produce {approx}10{sup 24} g of chondrules. In principle, a small number (1-10) of eccentric planetary embryos can melt the observed mass of chondrules in a manner consistent with all known constraints.

  6. Live birth of a bear cub following nonsurgical embryo collection.

    PubMed

    Boone, W R; Catlin, J C; Casey, K J; Dye, P S; Boone, E T; Schuett, R J

    1999-02-01

    In the near future, 6 of 8 bear species will face extinction mainly because of loss of their natural habitat. This loss of habitat will ultimately require some of these bears to be maintained in zoos and wildlife preserves in the hope of conserving genetic diversity. If the giant panda is representative of other bear species, reproductive performance will be inhibited in such an environment. In this study, we used the nonendangered American black bear (Ursus americanus) as the model for developing appropriate embryo transfer procedures. The donor bear mated numerous times between late May and early June. In late July we anesthetized her and used a series of telescoping sheaths to gain access to the uterus Then we passed a catheter through the largest sheath, inflated the balloon, and, using a 20-mL syringe, repeatedly infused into and then aspirated from the uterus PBS + BSA. We emptied the syringe into Petri dishes and observed 2 embryos. We rinsed the embryos, placed them in human tubal fluid + HSA + HEPES and then held them at 35 degrees C for 5 h. The recipient mated during mid-June; in late July we anesthetized her and, with the aid of laparoscopy, transferred an embryo into the cranial portion of the uterine horn ipsilateral to the ovary containing a CL. The recipient delivered 2 cubs in January. Necropsy results indicated that the neonates lived for 6 to 8 wk before succumbing to flooding in the den. The DNA from hair samples belonging to the neonates indicated that the male cub belonged to the donor, the female cub to the recipient. The delayed implantation mechanism in bears probably allowed for the successful development of the embryo in the presence of a substantial asynchrony between the donor and the recipient (13 d). We conclude that embryo transfer is possible in the American black bear and can lead to the birth of live cubs. PMID:10729038

  7. Bessel beam fluorescence lifetime tomography of live embryos (Conference Presentation)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Dongli; Peng, Leilei

    2016-03-01

    Optical tomography allows isotropic 3D imaging of embryos. Scanning-laser optical tomography (SLOT) has superior light collecting efficiency than wide-field optical tomography, making it ideal for fluorescence imaging of live embryos. We previously reported an imaging system that combines SLOT with a novel Fourier-multiplexed fluorescence lifetime imaging (FmFLIM) technique named FmFLIM-SLOT. FmFLIM-SLOT performs multiplexed FLIM-FRET readout of multiple FRET sensors in live embryos. Here we report a recent effort on improving the spatial resolution of the FmFLIM-SLOT system in order to image complex biochemical processes in live embryos at the cellular level. Optical tomography has to compromise between resolution and the depth of view. In SLOT, the commonly-used focused Gaussian beam diverges quickly from the focal plane, making it impossible to achieve high resolution imaging in a large volume specimen. We thus introduce Bessel beam laser-scanning tomography, which illuminates the sample with a spatial-light-modulator-generated Bessel beam that has an extended focal depth. The Bessel beam is scanned across the whole specimen. Fluorescence projection images are acquired at equal angular intervals as the sample rotates. Reconstruction artifacts due to annular-rings of the Bessel beam are removed by a modified 3D filtered back projection algorithm. Furthermore, in combination of Fourier-multiplexing fluorescence lifetime imaging (FmFLIM) method, the Bessel FmFLIM-SLOT system is capable of perform 3D lifetime imaging of live embryos at cellular resolution. The system is applied to in-vivo imaging of transgenic Zebrafish embryos. Results prove that Bessel FmFLIM-SLOT is a promising imaging method in development biology research.

  8. Hyaluronan and hyaluronidase, which is better for embryo development?

    PubMed

    Marei, Waleed F A; Raheem, Kabir A; Salavati, Mazdak; Tremaine, Tina; Khalid, Muhammad; Fouladi-Nashta, Ali A

    2016-09-01

    Our aim was to examine size-specific effects of Hyaluronan (HA) on preimplantation embryo development. We investigated the effects of Hyalovet (HA, 500-750 kDa; the size produced by HA synthase-3, which is abundant in the oviduct), or HA treated with Hyaluronidase-2 (Hyal2; also expressed in the oviduct that breaks down HA into 20 kDa fragments). In experiment 1 (in vivo), oviducts of synchronized and superovulated ewes (n = 20) were surgically exposed on Day 2 post-mating, ligated, and infused with either Hyalovet, Hyalovet + Hyal2, Hyal2, or PBS (control). Ewes were killed 5 days later for recovery of embryos and oviductal epithelial cells (OEC). Blastocyst rates were significantly higher in Hyal2 and Hyalovet + Hyal2 oviducts. Hyaluronidase-2 infusion resulted in higher blastocyst cell numbers and hatching rates. This was associated with increased HSP70 expression in OEC. In contrast, Hyalovet resulted in the lowest development to blastocyst stage and lowest hatching rates, and decreased IGF2 and IGFBP2 expression in OEC. IGF1 and IL1α expression were not affected. In experiment 2, to rule out indirect effects of oviductal factors, ovine embryos were produced and cultured with the same treatments in vitro from Day 2 to 8. Hyaluronidase-2, but not Hyalovet, enhanced blastocyst formation and reduced inner cell mass apoptosis. Hyalovet inhibited hatching. In conclusion, the presence of large-size HA (500-750 kDa) in the vicinity of developing embryos appears to disturb the oviductal environment and embryo development in vivo and in vitro. In contrast, we show evidence that breakdown of HA into smaller fragments is required to maximize embryo development and blastocyst quality. PMID:27091071

  9. Apoptosis in mammalian preimplantation embryos: regulation by survival factors.

    PubMed

    Brison, Daniel R.

    2000-01-01

    The formation of a developmentally competent mammalian blastocyst requires the transition from a unicellular state, the fertilized zygote, to a differentiated multicellular structure. In common with other developing organisms, generation of the required cell population involves the processes of cell division, differentiation and cell death, all of which can be regulated by peptide growth factors. Cell death in the preimplantation embryo occurs by apoptosis and, by analogy with other systems, may serve to eliminate unwanted cells during the critical developmental transitions that take place during this period. Cells may be eliminated because they are abnormal or possess defects, including damaged DNA or chromosomal abnormalities. At the early cleavage stages, apoptosis may be associated with activation of the embryonic genome and may contribute to the blastomere fragmentation commonly observed in human IVF embryos. The major wave of apoptosis occurs in a number of species in the inner cell mass of the blastocyst, as identified using nuclear labelling including terminal transferase-mediated dUTP nick end labelling (TUNEL) and fluorescence and confocal microscopy. Apoptosis may protect the integrity and cellular composition of the inner cell mass, by eliminating damaged cells or possibly those with an inappropriate phenotype. Preimplantation embryos express genes involved in the regulation and execution of apoptosis and their cells can undergo this default pathway in the absence of exogenous survival signals. Evidence is now accumulating from several species that apoptosis in the embryo is regulated by soluble peptide growth factors acting as survival factors in an autocrine or paracrine manner. To date, these include transforming growth factor alpha and members of the insulin-like growth factor family. Apoptosis may also be affected by environmental factors, including culture conditions and the composition of media. The regulation of apoptosis in the preimplantation

  10. Importance of embryo transfer technique in maximizing assisted reproductive outcomes.

    PubMed

    Schoolcraft, William B

    2016-04-01

    Embryo transfer is arguably the most critical process in the sequential events that encompass an IVF cycle. Several variables play a role in the success of a transfer, including catheter type, atraumatic technique, and the use of ultrasound guidance. The inclusion of hyaluronan in the ET media also has a benefit for implantation. Because of the adverse effects of controlled ovarian hyperstimulation on the endometrium, frozen embryo transfers have demonstrated improved pregnancy rates as well as better obstetric outcomes. This review will talk about various aspects of ET as it is currently performed, variables affecting its success, and methods of optimization. PMID:26940790

  11. Perturbations to the hedgehog pathway in sea urchin embryos.

    PubMed

    Warner, Jacob F; McClay, David R

    2014-01-01

    The Hedgehog pathway has been shown to be an important developmental signaling pathway in many organisms (Ingham and McMahon. Genes Dev 15:3059-3087, 2001). Recently that work has been extended to developing echinoderm embryos (Walton et al. Dev Biol 331(1):26-37, 2009). Here we describe several methods to perturb the Hedgehog signaling pathway in the sea urchin. These include microinjection of Morpholinos and mRNA constructs as well as treatments with small molecule inhibitors. Finally we provide simple methods for assaying Hedgehog phenotypes in the sea urchin embryo. PMID:24567217

  12. Recent microfluidic devices for studying gamete and embryo biomechanics.

    PubMed

    Lai, David; Takayama, Shuichi; Smith, Gary D

    2015-06-25

    The technical challenges of biomechanic research such as single cell analysis at a high monetary cost, labor, and time for just a small number of measurements is a good match to the strengths of microfluidic devices. New scientific discoveries in the fertilization and embryo development process, of which biomechanics is a major subset of interest, is crucial to fuel the continual improvement of clinical practice in assisted reproduction. The following review will highlight some recent microfluidic devices tailored for gamete and embryo biomechanics where biomimicry arises as a major theme of microfluidic device design and function, and the application of fundamental biomechanic principles are used to improve outcomes of cryopreservation. PMID:25801423

  13. Reprogramming the genome to totipotency in mouse embryos.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Li-quan; Dean, Jurrien

    2015-02-01

    Despite investigative interest, the artificial derivation of pluripotent stem cells remains inefficient and incomplete reprogramming hinders its potential as a reliable tool in regenerative medicine. By contrast, fusion of terminally differentiated gametes at fertilization activates efficient epigenetic reprogramming to ensure totipotency of early embryos. Understanding the epigenetic mechanisms required for the transition from the fertilized egg to the embryo can improve efforts to reprogram differentiated cells to pluripotent/totipotent cells for therapeutic use. We review recent discoveries that are providing insight into the molecular mechanisms required for epigenetic reprogramming to totipotency in vivo. PMID:25448353

  14. Reprogramming the genome to totipotency in mouse embryos

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Li-quan; Dean, Jurrien

    2014-01-01

    Despite investigative interest, the artificial derivation of pluripotent stem cells remains inefficient and incomplete reprogramming hinders its potential as a reliable tool in regenerative medicine. By contrast, fusion of terminally differentiated gametes at fertilization activates efficient epigenetic reprogramming to ensure totipotency of early embryos. Understanding the epigenetic mechanisms required for the transition from the fertilized egg to the embryo can improve efforts to reprogram differentiated cells to pluripotent/totipotent cells for therapeutic use. We review recent discoveries that are providing insight into the molecular mechanisms required for epigenetic reprogramming to totipotency in vivo. PMID:25448353

  15. Regeneration of cilia in heavily irradiated sea urchin embryos

    SciTech Connect

    Rustad, R.C.

    1981-12-01

    Cilia were removed from blastulae, gastrulae, and plutei of the sea urchins Arbacia punctulata and Lytechinus variegatus by shaking the embryos in hypertonic media. Exposure to 50 krad (and in some experiments 100 krad) of ..gamma.. radiation either before or after deciliation had no effect on the time of appearance of regenerating cilia. There were no visually obvious differences in the rate of growth of the cilia in control and irradiated embryos. The cilia commenced beating at the same time, but the initial beating sometimes seemed less vigorous following irradiation. The data support the hypothesis that radiation has no major effect on the assembly from mature basal bodies of the microtubules of cilia.

  16. Detection of T-Cadherin Expression in Mouse Embryos

    PubMed Central

    Rubina, K. A.; Smutova, V. A.; Semenova, M. L.; Poliakov, A. A.; Gerety, S.; Wilkinson, D.; Surkova, E. I.; Semina, E. V.; Sysoeva, V. Yu.; Tkachuk, V. A.

    2015-01-01

    The aim of the present study was to evaluate T-cadherin expression at the early developmental stages of the mouse embryo. Using in situ hybridization and immunofluorescent staining of whole embryos in combination with confocal microscopy, we found that T-cadherin expression is detected in the developing brain, starting with the E8.75 stage, and in the heart, starting with the E11.5 stage. These data suggest a possible involvement of T-cadherin in the formation of blood vessels during embryogenesis. PMID:26085949

  17. Functional Studies of Regulatory Genes in the Sea Urchin Embryo

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cavalieri, Vincenzo; Bernardo, Maria Di; Spinelli, Giovanni

    Sea urchin embryos are characterized by an extremely simple mode of development, rapid cleavage, high transparency, and well-defined cell lineage. Although they are not suitable for genetic studies, other approaches are successfully used to unravel mechanisms and molecules involved in cell fate specification and morphogenesis. Microinjection is the elective method to study gene function in sea urchin embryos. It is used to deliver precise amounts of DNA, RNA, oligonucleotides, peptides, or antibodies into the eggs or even into blastomeres. Here we describe microinjection as it is currently applied in our laboratory and show how it has been used in gene perturbation analyses and dissection of cis-regulatory DNA elements.

  18. The Constitution of the Human Embryo as Substantial Change.

    PubMed

    Alvargonzález, David

    2016-04-01

    This paper analyzes the transformation from the human zygote to the implanted embryo under the prism of substantial change. After a brief introduction, it vindicates the Aristotelian ideas of substance and accident, and those of substantial and accidental change. It then claims that the transformation from the multicelled zygote to the implanted embryo amounts to a substantial change. Pushing further, it contends that this substantial change cannot be explained following patterns of genetic reductionism, emergence, and self-organization, and proposes Gustavo Bueno's idea of anamorphosis as a means to encapsulate criticism against such positions. PMID:26850033

  19. Perspectives on emerging biomarkers for non-invasive assessment of embryo viability in assisted reproduction.

    PubMed

    Aydiner, F; Yetkin, C E; Seli, E

    2010-03-01

    A key step in assisted reproduction is the assessment of embryo viability in order to identify the embryo(s) most likely to result in pregnancy. Currently used embryo assessment systems are largely based on morphology and cleavage rate. While these systems have been pivotal in improving implantation and pregnancy rates and reducing multiple gestations, their precision is still insufficient. The limitations of strategies based on morphology have led to the investigation of adjunctive technologies for non-invasive assessment of embryo viability in assisted reproduction. These include the measurement of glucose, pyruvate, or amino acid levels in the embryo culture media, assessment of oxygen consumption by the embryo, genomic and proteomic profiling, and most recently, analytical examination of the embryonic metabolome. As the number of ART cycles increases worldwide, improvements in the ability to quickly and non-invasively identify the best embryos for transfer become an increasingly more important goal for reproductive medicine. PMID:20196727

  20. [Controversy in ART: should we cryopreserve oocytes or embryos? Do prefer oocytes].

    PubMed

    Boyer, P

    2014-09-01

    Since the beginning of IVF, cryopreservation concern spermatozoa or embryos due to the poor efficiency of oocyte freezing. To date, oocyte vitrification allows changing our practice privileging female gamete vitrification instead of human embryo freezing. PMID:25153440

  1. CELL DEATH IN RAT AND MOUSE EMBRYOS EXPOSED TO METHANOL IN WHOLEEMBRYO CULTURE

    EPA Science Inventory

    Methanol induces developmental toxicity in rats and mice producing exencephaly, cleft palate, cervical ribs, sternebral defects, reduced body weight, and increased embryo/fetal death. xposure to methanol in whole embryo culture also induces developmental retardation, dysmorphogen...

  2. TORCH infections.

    PubMed

    Neu, Natalie; Duchon, Jennifer; Zachariah, Philip

    2015-03-01

    TORCH infections classically comprise toxoplasmosis, Treponema pallidum, rubella, cytomegalovirus, herpesvirus, hepatitis viruses, human immunodeficiency virus, and other infections, such as varicella, parvovirus B19, and enteroviruses. The epidemiology of these infections varies; in low-income and middle-income countries, TORCH infections are major contributors to prenatal, perinatal, and postnatal morbidity and mortality. Evidence of infection may be seen at birth, in infancy, or years later. For many of these pathogens, treatment or prevention strategies are available. Early recognition, including prenatal screening, is key. This article covers toxoplasmosis, parvovirus B19, syphilis, rubella, hepatitis B virus, hepatitis C virus, and human immunodeficiency virus. PMID:25677998

  3. Identification of the glycerol kinase gene and its role in diapause embryo restart and early embryo development of Artemia sinica.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Cheng; Yao, Feng; Chu, Bing; Li, Xuejie; Liu, Yan; Wu, Yang; Mei, Yanli; Wang, Peisheng; Hou, Lin; Zou, Xiangyang

    2014-03-01

    Glycerol kinase (GK) catalyzes the rate-limiting step in glycerol utilization by transferring a phosphate from ATP to glycerol, yielding glycerol 3-phosphate, which is an important intermediate for both energy metabolism and glycerolipid production. Artemia sinica has an unusual diapause process under stress conditions of high salinity, low temperature and lack of food. In the process, diapause embryos of A. sinica (brine shrimp) accumulate high concentrations of glycerol as a cryoprotectant to prevent low temperature damage to embryos. Upon embryo restart, glycerol is converted into glucose and other carbohydrates. Therefore, GK plays an important role in the diapause embryo restart process. However, the role of GK in diapause termination of embryo development in A. sinica remains unknown. In the present study, a 2096 bp full-length cDNA of gk from A. sinica (As-gk) was obtained, encoding putative 551 amino acids, 60.6 kDa protein. As a crucial enzyme in glycerol uptake and metabolism, GK has been conserved structurally and functionally during evolution. The expression pattern of As-gk was investigated by quantitative real-time PCR and Western blotting. Expression locations of As-gk were analyzed using in situ hybridization. As-gk was widely distributed in the early embryo and several main parts of Artemia after differentiation. The expression of As-GK was also induced by stresses such as cold exposure and high salinity. This initial research into the expression pattern and stress response of GK in Artemia provides a sound basis for further understanding of the function and regulation of genes in early embryonic development in A. sinica and the stress response. PMID:24365596

  4. Use of DNA strand damage (Comet assay) and embryo hatching effects to assess contaminant exposure in blue crab (Callinectes sapidus) embryos

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, R.F.; Steinert, S.A.; Nakayama, K.; Oshima, Y.

    1999-07-01

    After fertilization, blue crab eggs are embedded in a sponge which is attached to the female abdomen during embryo development. Embryos after 9 stages in the egg sac hatch into a swimming zoea stage (stage 10). The authors have developed a bioassay where embryo development is monitored in culture plates with and without toxicants in the water. Toxicant effects are based on determining the percentage of embryos which hatch to zoea. Hatching EC{sub 50} (toxicant concentration at which 50% of the embryos fail to hatch) for a number of pesticides, organometallics and metals were determined. The test takes from 2 to 6 days depending on the embryo stage selected for the study. In addition to embryo development effects the prevalence of DNA single-strand breaks in individual embryo cells were determined using the single cell gel electrophoresis method (Comet assay). A good correlation between DNA strand breakage and embryo defects was found after exposure to genotoxic contaminants. Thus, the bioassay linking DNA damage to embryo hatching effects is rapid, sensitive and mechanistically relevant.

  5. The polar auxin transport inhibitor NPA impairs embryo morphology and increases the expression of an auxin efflux facilitator protein PIN during Picea abies somatic embryo development.

    PubMed

    Hakman, Inger; Hallberg, Henrik; Palovaara, Joakim

    2009-04-01

    Auxin and polar auxin transport have been implicated in controlling embryo patterning and development in angiosperms but less is known from the gymnosperms. The aims of this study were to determine at what stages of conifer embryo development auxin and polar auxin transport are the most important for normal development and to analyze the changes in embryos after treatment with the polar auxin inhibitor N-1-naphthylphthalamic acid (NPA). For these studies, somatic embryos of Norway spruce (Picea abies L. Karst) were used. Growth on medium containing NPA leads to the formation of embryos with poor shoot apical meristem (SAM) and fused cotyledons, and to a pin-formed phenotype of the regenerated plantlets. The effect of NPA on embryo morphology was most severe if embryos were transferred to NPA-containing medium immediately before cotyledon initiation and SAM specification. Indole-3-acetic acid (IAA) was identified by immunolocalization in developing embryos. The highest staining intensity was seen in early staged embryos and then decreased as the embryos matured. No clear IAA-maxima was seen, although the apical parts of embryos, particularly the protoderm, and the suspensor cells appear to accumulate more IAA, as reflected by the staining pattern. The NPA treatment also caused expanded procambium and a broader root apical meristem in embryos, and a significant increase in the expression of a PIN1-like gene. Taken together, our results show that, for proper cotyledon initiation, correct auxin transport is needed only during a short period at the transition stage of embryo development, probably involving PIN efflux proteins and that a common mechanism is behind proper cotyledon formation within the species of angiosperms and conifers, despite their cotyledon number which normally differs. PMID:19203973

  6. A three-dimensional culture system using alginate hydrogel prolongs hatched cattle embryo development in vitro.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Shuan; Liu, Zhen-Xing; Gao, Hui; Wu, Yi; Fang, Yuan; Wu, Shuai-Shuai; Li, Ming-Jie; Bai, Jia-Hua; Liu, Yan; Evans, Alexander; Zeng, Shen-Ming

    2015-07-15

    No successful method exists to maintain the three-dimensional architecture of hatched embryos in vitro. Alginate, a linear polysaccharide derived from brown algae, has characteristics that make it an ideal material as a three-dimensional (3D) extracellular matrix for in vitro cell, tissue, or embryo culture. In this study, alginate hydrogel was used for IVC of posthatched bovine embryos to observe their development under the 3D system. In vitro-fertilized and parthenogenetically activated posthatched bovine blastocysts were cultured in an alginate encapsulation culture system (AECS), an alginate overlay culture system (AOCS), or control culture system. After 18 days of culture, the survival rate of embryos cultured in AECS was higher than that in the control group (P < 0.05), and the embryos were expanded and elongated in AECS with the maximal length of 1.125 mm. When the AECS shrinking embryos were taken out of the alginate beads on Day 18 and cultured in the normal culture system, 9.09% of them attached to the bottoms of the plastic wells and grew rapidly, with the largest area of an attached embryo being 66.00 mm(2) on Day 32. The embryos cultured in AOCS developed monovesicular or multivesicular morphologies. Total cell number of the embryos cultured in AECS on Day 19 was significantly higher than that of embryos on Day 8. Additionally, AECS and AOCS supported differentiation of the embryonic cells. Binuclear cells were visible in Day-26 adherent embryos, and the messenger RNA expression patterns of Cdx2 and Oct4 in AOCS-cultured embryos were similar to those in vivo embryos, whereas IFNT and ISG15 messenger RNA were still expressed in Day-26 and Day-32 prolong-cultured embryos. In conclusion, AECS and AOCS did support cell proliferation, elongation, and differentiation of hatched bovine embryos during prolonged IVC. The culture system will be useful to further investigate the molecular mechanisms controlling ruminant embryo elongation and implantation. PMID

  7. Roles of arabinogalactan proteins in cotyledon formation and cell wall deposition during embryo development of Arabidopsis.

    PubMed

    Zhong, Jing; Ren, YuJun; Yu, Miao; Ma, TengFei; Zhang, XueLian; Zhao, Jie

    2011-07-01

    Arabinogalactan proteins (AGPs) are a class of highly glycosylated, widely distributed proteins in higher plants. In the previous study, we found that the green fluorescence from JIM13-labeled AGPs was mainly distributed in embryo proper and the basal part of suspensor but gradually disappeared after the torpedo-stage embryos in Arabidopsis. And (β-D-Glc)(3) Yariv phenylglycoside (βGlcY), a synthetic reagent that specifically binds to AGPs, could inhibit embryo development. In this study, as a continuous work, we investigated the AGP functions in embryo germination, cotyledon formation, and cell wall deposition in Arabidopsis embryos by using immunofluorescent, immunoenzyme, transmission electron microscopy (TEM), and Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR) techniques. The results showed that 50 μM βGlcY caused inhibition of embryo germination, formation of abnormal cotyledon embryos, and disorder of cotyledon vasculature. Compared with the normal embryos in vitro and in vivo, the AGPs and pectin signals were quite weaker in the whole abnormal embryos, whereas the cellulose signal was stronger in the shoot apical meristem (SAM) of abnormal embryo by calcofluor white staining. The FTIR assay demonstrated that the cell wall of abnormal embryos was relatively poorer in pectins and richer in cellulose than those of normal embryos. By TEM observation, the SAM cells of the abnormal embryos had less cytoplasm, more plastid and starch grains, and larger vacuole than that of normal embryos. These results indicated that AGPs may play roles in embryo germination, cotyledon formation, cell wall cellulose and pectin deposition, and cell division potentiality during embryo development of Arabidopsis. PMID:20830495

  8. 10 CFR 835.206 - Limits for the embryo/fetus.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 4 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Limits for the embryo/fetus. 835.206 Section 835.206... Exposure § 835.206 Limits for the embryo/fetus. (a) The equivalent dose limit for the embryo/fetus from the... provided in § 835.206(a) shall be avoided. (c) If the equivalent dose to the embryo/fetus is determined...

  9. 10 CFR 835.206 - Limits for the embryo/fetus.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 4 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Limits for the embryo/fetus. 835.206 Section 835.206... Exposure § 835.206 Limits for the embryo/fetus. (a) The equivalent dose limit for the embryo/fetus from the... provided in § 835.206(a) shall be avoided. (c) If the equivalent dose to the embryo/fetus is determined...

  10. 10 CFR 835.206 - Limits for the embryo/fetus.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 4 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Limits for the embryo/fetus. 835.206 Section 835.206... Exposure § 835.206 Limits for the embryo/fetus. (a) The equivalent dose limit for the embryo/fetus from the... provided in § 835.206(a) shall be avoided. (c) If the equivalent dose to the embryo/fetus is determined...

  11. 10 CFR 835.206 - Limits for the embryo/fetus.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 4 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Limits for the embryo/fetus. 835.206 Section 835.206... Exposure § 835.206 Limits for the embryo/fetus. (a) The equivalent dose limit for the embryo/fetus from the... provided in § 835.206(a) shall be avoided. (c) If the equivalent dose to the embryo/fetus is determined...

  12. 10 CFR 835.206 - Limits for the embryo/fetus.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 4 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Limits for the embryo/fetus. 835.206 Section 835.206... Exposure § 835.206 Limits for the embryo/fetus. (a) The equivalent dose limit for the embryo/fetus from the... provided in § 835.206(a) shall be avoided. (c) If the equivalent dose to the embryo/fetus is determined...

  13. Efficacy of the International Embryo Transfer Society (IETS) washing procedure for rendering oocytes matured in vitro free of bovine viral diarrhea virus (BVDV).

    PubMed

    Lalonde, A; Bielanski, A

    2011-07-15

    To ensure the freedom of embryos from pathogenic agents prior to embryo transfer (ET), a specific sanitary washing procedure has been recommended by the International Embryo Transfer Society (IETS). In the present study, the efficacy of removing the bovine viral diarrhea virus (BVDV) from cumulus-free matured oocytes at the stage of extruded first polar body (N = 240) was evaluated, using the IETS-recommended 10 sequential wash procedure, after exposure in vitro to BVDV type 2 (strain PA-131, 1 × 10(5.2) TCID(50)/mL for 1 h). In general, the percentage of contaminated oocytes was reduced (P < 0.03) after the first two washes. Nevertheless, after 10 washes, approximately 20% of oocytes still remained infectious or contaminated with virus, as detected by the virus isolation test (VI) and quantitative reverse transcription PCR (qRT-PCR) of viral RNA (on average 13 copies/oocyte). Similarly, a higher percentage of positive washing fluid samples were detected in the first three washes (50-100%). The six subsequent washes had lower but variable proportions of fluid samples contaminated with infectious virus. We concluded that the standard washing procedure may not render all oocytes free from the infectious virus adhered to the zona pellucida (ZP), and application of an additional method of oocyte disinfection was warranted to ensure nontransmission of BVDV to recipients by embryos derived from infected oocytes. PMID:21497387

  14. Evaluation of a quail embryo model for the detection of botulinum toxin type A activity

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The quail embryo was evaluated for use as a bioassay to detect biologically active botulinum toxin serotype A (BoNT/A). Day 15 of incubation embryos were injected with decreasing dosages of BoNT/A from 250 to 0.5 ng of toxin. At 1 day post-injection, embryos receiving 20 ng of BoNT or higher had m...

  15. LOWERING PH INCREASES EMBRYONIC SENSITIVITY TO FORMATE IN WHOLE EMBRYO CULTURE

    EPA Science Inventory

    The effects of formate exposure on mammalian embryo development were investigated using the rat whole embryo culture system as a model. ay 9.5 (presomite) rat embryos were explanted and cultured for 48 hours in rotating bottles containing rat serum with 0, 0.2, 0.4, 0.8, 1.2 or 1...

  16. Transcriptomic and proteomic analysis reveals mechanisms of embryo abortion during chrysanthemum cross breeding

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Fengjiao; Wang, Zhiquan; Dong, Wen; Sun, Chunqing; Wang, Haibin; Song, Aiping; He, Lizhong; Fang, Weimin; Chen, Fadi; Teng, Nianjun

    2014-01-01

    Embryo abortion is the main cause of failure in chrysanthemum cross breeding, and the genes and proteins associated with embryo abortion are poorly understood. Here, we applied RNA sequencing and isobaric tags for relative and absolute quantitation (iTRAQ) to analyse transcriptomic and proteomic profiles of normal and abortive embryos. More than 68,000 annotated unigenes and 700 proteins were obtained from normal and abortive embryos. Functional analysis showed that 140 differentially expressed genes (DEGs) and 41 differentially expressed proteins (DEPs) were involved in embryo abortion. Most DEGs and DEPs associated with cell death, protein degradation, reactive oxygen species scavenging, and stress-response transcriptional factors were significantly up-regulated in abortive embryos relative to normal embryos. In contrast, most genes and proteins related to cell division and expansion, the cytoskeleton, protein synthesis and energy metabolism were significantly down-regulated in abortive embryos. Furthermore, abortive embryos had the highest activity of three executioner caspase-like enzymes. These results indicate that embryo abortion may be related to programmed cell death and the senescence- or death-associated genes or proteins contribute to embryo abortion. This adds to our understanding of embryo abortion and will aid in the cross breeding of chrysanthemum and other crops in the future. PMID:25288482

  17. IN VITRO/IN VIVO COMPARISON OF YOLK SAC FUNCTION AND EMBRYO DEVELOPMENT

    EPA Science Inventory

    Yolk sac function and development of rat embryos grown in vitro for 24 hrs starting on day 10.5 were compared to those of embryos grown in utero. he embryos grown in vitro had significantly fewer somites, shorter crown-rump length and smaller yolk sac diameter when compared to th...

  18. CO-CULTURE OF RAT EMBRYOS AND HEPATOCYTES: 'IN VITRO' DETECTION OF A PROTERATOGEN

    EPA Science Inventory

    Rat embryos removed from the dam on day 10 of pregnancy were successfully co-cultivated in vitro with primary cultures of rat, rabbit, or hamster hepatocytes. Embryos co-cultivated with hepatocytes developed normally, as did embryos exposed to a test chemical, cyclophosphamide. I...

  19. Avian Egg Odour Encodes Information on Embryo Sex, Fertility and Development

    PubMed Central

    Webster, Ben; Hayes, William; Pike, Thomas W.

    2015-01-01

    Avian chemical communication is a rapidly emerging field, but has been hampered by a critical lack of information on volatile chemicals that communicate ecologically relevant information (semiochemicals). A possible, but as yet unexplored, function of olfaction and chemical communication in birds is in parent-embryo and embryo-embryo communication. Communication between parents and developing embryos may act to mediate parental behaviour, while communication between embryos can control the synchronicity of hatching. Embryonic vocalisations and vibrations have been implicated as a means of communication during the later stages of development but in the early stages, before embryos are capable of independent movement and vocalisation, this is not possible. Here we show that volatiles emitted from developing eggs of Japanese quail (Coturnix japonica) convey information on egg fertility, along with the sex and developmental status of the embryo. Specifically, egg volatiles changed over the course of incubation, differed between fertile and infertile eggs, and were predictive of embryo sex as early as day 1 of incubation. Egg odours therefore have the potential to facilitate parent-embryo and embryo-embryo interactions by allowing the assessment of key measures of embryonic development long before this is possible through other modalities. It also opens up the intriguing possibility that parents may be able to glean further relevant information from egg volatiles, such as the health, viability and heritage of embryos. By determining information conveyed by egg-derived volatiles, we hope to stimulate further investigation into the ecological role of egg odours. PMID:25629413

  20. Evaluation of a quali embryo model for the detection of botulism toxin type A activity

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The Japanese quail embryo (Coturnix japonica) was evaluated for use as a bioassay to detect biologically active botulinum toxin serotype A (BoNT/A). Day 15 of incubation embryos were injected with decreasing dosages of BoNT/A from 250 to 0.5 ng of toxin. At 1 day post-injection, embryos receiving ...

  1. Molecular Characterization of the First Bovine Herpesvirus 4 (BoHV-4) Strains Isolated from In Vitro Bovine Embryos production in Argentina

    PubMed Central

    González Altamiranda, Erika; Manrique, Julieta M.; Pérez, Sandra E.; Ríos, Glenda L.; Odeón, Anselmo C.; Leunda, María R.; Jones, Leandro R.; Verna, Andrea

    2015-01-01

    Bovine herpesvirus 4 (BoHV-4) is increasingly considered as responsible for various problems of the reproductive tract. The virus infects mainly blood mononuclear cells and displays specific tropism for vascular endothelia, reproductive and fetal tissues. Epidemiological studies suggest its impact on reproductive performance, and its presence in various sites in the reproductive tract highlights its potential transmission in transfer-stage embryos. This work describes the biological and genetic characterization of BoHV-4 strains isolated from an in vitro bovine embryo production system. BoHV-4 strains were isolated in 2011 and 2013 from granulosa cells and bovine oocytes from ovary batches collected at a local abattoir, used as “starting material” for in vitro production of bovine embryos. Compatible BoHV-4-CPE was observed in the co-culture of granulosa cells and oocytes with MDBK cells. The identity of the isolates was confirmed by PCR assays targeting three ORFs of the viral genome. The phylogenetic analyses of the strains suggest that they were evolutionary unlinked. Therefore it is possible that BoHV-4 ovary infections occurred regularly along the evolution of the virus, at least in Argentina, which can have implications in the systems of in vitro embryo production. Thus, although BoHV-4 does not appear to be a frequent risk factor for in vitro embryo production, data are still limited. This study reveals the potential of BoHV-4 transmission via embryo transfer. Moreover, the high variability among the BoHV-4 strains isolated from aborted cows in Argentina highlights the importance of further research on the role of this virus as an agent with the potential to cause reproductive disease in cattle. The genetic characterization of the isolated strains provides data to better understand the pathogenesis of BoHV-4 infections. Furthermore, it will lead to fundamental insights into the molecular aspects of the virus and the means by which these strains circulate

  2. PFOA INDUCES DYSMORPHOGENESIS IN MOUSE WHOLE EMBRYO CULTURE

    EPA Science Inventory

    PFOA Induces Dysmorphogenesis In Mouse Whole Embryo Culture.

    MR Blanton1, JM Padowski2, ES Hunter1, JM Rogers1, and C Lau1. 1Reproductive Toxicology Division, NHEERL, ORD, US EPA, RTP, NC, USA. 2Curriculum in Toxicology, UNC, Chapel Hill, NC, USA

    Perfluorooctanoa...

  3. Exogenous retroelement integration in sperm and embryos affects preimplantation development.

    PubMed

    Kitsou, C; Lazaros, L; Bellou, S; Vartholomatos, G; Sakaloglou, P; Hatzi, E; Markoula, S; Zikopoulos, K; Tzavaras, T; Georgiou, I

    2016-09-01

    Retroelement transcripts are present in male and female gametes, where they are typically regulated by methylation, noncoding RNAs and transcription factors. Such transcripts are required for occurrence of retrotransposition events, while failure of retrotransposition control may exert negative effects on cellular function and proliferation. In order to investigate the occurrence of retrotransposition events in mouse epididymal spermatozoa and to address the impact of uncontrolled retroelement RNA expression in early preimplantation embryos, we performed in vitro fertilization experiments using spermatozoa preincubated with plasmid vectors containing the human retroelements LINE-1, HERVK-10 or the mouse retroelement VL30, tagged with an enhanced green fluorescence (EGFP) gene-based cassette. Retrotransposition events in mouse spermatozoa and embryos were detected using PCR, FACS analysis and confocal microscopy. Our findings show that: (i) sperm cell incorporates exogenous retroelements and favors retrotransposition events, (ii) the inhibition of spermatozoa reverse transcriptase can decrease the retrotransposition frequency in sperm cells, (iii) spermatozoa can transfer exogenous human or mouse retroelements to the oocyte during fertilization and (iv) retroelement RNA overexpression affects embryo morphology and impairs preimplantation development. These findings suggest that the integration of exogenous retroelements in the sperm genome, as well as their transfer into the mouse oocyte, could give rise to new retrotransposition events and genetic alterations in mouse spermatozoa and embryos. PMID:27450800

  4. Genetics of Lipid-Storage Management in Caenorhabditis elegans Embryos.

    PubMed

    Schmökel, Verena; Memar, Nadin; Wiekenberg, Anne; Trotzmüller, Martin; Schnabel, Ralf; Döring, Frank

    2016-03-01

    Lipids play a pivotal role in embryogenesis as structural components of cellular membranes, as a source of energy, and as signaling molecules. On the basis of a collection of temperature-sensitive embryonic lethal mutants, a systematic database search, and a subsequent microscopic analysis of >300 interference RNA (RNAi)-treated/mutant worms, we identified a couple of evolutionary conserved genes associated with lipid storage in Caenorhabditis elegans embryos. The genes include cpl-1 (cathepsin L-like cysteine protease), ccz-1 (guanine nucleotide exchange factor subunit), and asm-3 (acid sphingomyelinase), which is closely related to the human Niemann-Pick disease-causing gene SMPD1. The respective mutant embryos accumulate enlarged droplets of neutral lipids (cpl-1) and yolk-containing lipid droplets (ccz-1) or have larger genuine lipid droplets (asm-3). The asm-3 mutant embryos additionally showed an enhanced resistance against C band ultraviolet (UV-C) light. Herein we propose that cpl-1, ccz-1, and asm-3 are genes required for the processing of lipid-containing droplets in C. elegans embryos. Owing to the high levels of conservation, the identified genes are also useful in studies of embryonic lipid storage in other organisms. PMID:26773047

  5. Poisonous plants: Effects on embryo and fetal development

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The impact of natural toxins from poisonous plants on the embryo, fetus, and neonate are dramatic and economically significant to livestock producers worldwide. In livestock, reproductive success is the single most important economic multiplier for livestock producers in the U.S. followed by carcas...

  6. METHOXYCHLOR ACCELERATES EMBRYO TRANSPORT THROUGH THE RAT REPRODUCTIVE TRACT

    EPA Science Inventory

    The estrogenic pesticide methoxychlor (MXC) is known to compromise implantation, and, in our previous work, this reduction in fertility has been attributed to a direct effect on uterine function. he present study was designed to investigate the effect of MXC on embryo transport r...

  7. The VIRTUAL EMBRYO. A Computational Framework for Developmental Toxicity

    EPA Science Inventory

    EPA’s ‘Virtual Embryo Project’ (v-Embryo™) is focused on the predictive toxicology of children’s health and developmental defects following prenatal exposure to environmental chemicals. The research is motivated by scientific principles in systems biology as a framework for the g...

  8. Thermal effects in laser-assisted embryo hatching

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Douglas-Hamilton, Diarmaid H.; Conia, Jerome D.

    2000-08-01

    Diode lasers [(lambda) equals 1480 nm] are used with in-vitro fertilization [IVF] as a promoter of embryo hatching. A focused laser beam is applied in vitro to form a channel in the zona pellucida (shell) of the pre-embryo. After transfer into the uterus, the embryo hatches: it extrudes itself through the channel and implants into the uterine wall. Laser-assisted hatching can result in improving implantation and pregnancy success rates. We present examples of zone pellucida ablation using animal models. In using the laser it is vital not to damage pre-embryo cells, e.g. by overheating. In order to define safe regimes we have derived some thermal side-effects of zona pellucida removal. The temperature profile in the beam and vicinity is predicted as function of laser pulse duration and power. In a crossed-beam experiment a HeNe laser probe detects the temperature-induced change in refractive index. We find that the diode laser beam produces superheated water approaching 200 C on the beam axis. Thermal histories during and following the laser pulse are given for regions in the neighborhood of the beam. We conclude that an optimum regime exists with pulse duration

  9. Perflurooctanoic Acid Induces Developmental Cardiotoxicity in Chicken Embryos and Hatchlings

    EPA Science Inventory

    Perfluorooctanoic acid (PFOA) is a widespread environmental contaminant that is detectable in serum of the general U.S. population. PFOA is a known developmental toxicant that induces mortality in mammalian embryos and is thought to induce toxicity via interaction with the peroxi...

  10. Use of infrared imaging for investigation of chicken embryo development

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Frye, Ryan A.; Hsieh, Sheng-Jen; Girón Palomares, José Benjamín D.

    2011-05-01

    The focus of this study is two-fold: first, to investigate the feasibility of thermal imaging for characterizing the development of chicken embryos; and second, to compare the effects of photo periods of 11 hours of light followed by 11 hours of darkness (11-11) versus 24 hours of darkness (24 dark) during the incubation cycle on embryo development. Previous reported work has used invasive methods, such as ultrasound, tomography, and MRI to study chicken embryos with some success. However, very little work has been reported on use of thermography, which is a non-invasive method. Results suggest that use of a cooling-heating-cooling cycle can reveal the anatomy of chicken embryos. A statistical comparison of image data from the two photo periods found no difference in the average cooling rates. However, the 11-11 group of eggs did hatch earlier overall than 24-dark group. Of the hatched eggs, all the chickens from the 24-dark group appeared to be in normal physical condition. However, two of the chickens from the 11-11 group appeared to have leg weakness shortly after hatching. Of these, one fully recovered the next day and the second remains the same after two days of observation. In addition, the second chicken took about 48 hours to fully emerge from its shell.

  11. RAINBOW TROUT EMBRYOS: ADVANTAGES AND LIMITATIONS FOR CARCINOGENESIS RESEARCH

    EPA Science Inventory

    Rainbow trout embryos are sensitive to the initiation of neoplasms in various tissues by brief exposures to solutions of water-soluble carcinogens. This characteristic was first demonstrated with the sparingly soluble liver carcinogen, aflatoxin B1(AFB1). A 30-minute exposure of ...

  12. Role of uterine stromal-epithelial crosstalk in embryo implantation.

    PubMed

    Hantak, Alison M; Bagchi, Indrani C; Bagchi, Milan K

    2014-01-01

    Embryo implantation is a crucial step for successful pregnancy. Prior to implantation, the luminal epithelium undergoes steroid hormone-induced structural and functional changes that render it competent for embryo attachment. Subsequent invasion of the embryo into the maternal tissue triggers differentiation of the underlying stromal cells to form the decidua, a transient tissue which supports the developing embryo. Many molecular cues of both stromal and epithelial origin have been identified that are critical mediators of this process. An important aspect of uterine biology is the elaborate crosstalk that occurs between these tissue compartments during early pregnancy through expression of paracrine factors regulated by the steroid hormones estrogen and progesterone. Aberrant expression of these factors often leads to implantation failure and infertility. Genetically-engineered mouse models have been instrumental in elucidating what these paracrine factors are, what drives their expression, and what their effects are on neighboring cells. This review provides an overview of several well-characterized signaling pathways that span both epithelial and stromal compartments and their function during implantation in the mouse. PMID:25023679

  13. Self-organization of the in vitro attached human embryo.

    PubMed

    Deglincerti, Alessia; Croft, Gist F; Pietila, Lauren N; Zernicka-Goetz, Magdalena; Siggia, Eric D; Brivanlou, Ali H

    2016-05-12

    Implantation of the blastocyst is a developmental milestone in mammalian embryonic development. At this time, a coordinated program of lineage diversification, cell-fate specification, and morphogenetic movements establishes the generation of extra-embryonic tissues and the embryo proper, and determines the conditions for successful pregnancy and gastrulation. Despite its basic and clinical importance, this process remains mysterious in humans. Here we report the use of a novel in vitro system to study the post-implantation development of the human embryo. We unveil the self-organizing abilities and autonomy of in vitro attached human embryos. We find human-specific molecular signatures of early cell lineage, timing, and architecture. Embryos display key landmarks of normal development, including epiblast expansion, lineage segregation, bi-laminar disc formation, amniotic and yolk sac cavitation, and trophoblast diversification. Our findings highlight the species-specificity of these developmental events and provide a new understanding of early human embryonic development beyond the blastocyst stage. In addition, our study establishes a new model system relevant to early human pregnancy loss. Finally, our work will also assist in the rational design of differentiation protocols of human embryonic stem cells to specific cell types for disease modelling and cell replacement therapy. PMID:27144363

  14. Transcriptomic Analysis of the Porcine Endometrium during Embryo Implantation.

    PubMed

    Lin, Haichao; Wang, Huaizhong; Wang, Yanping; Liu, Chang; Wang, Cheng; Guo, Jianfeng

    2015-01-01

    In pigs, successful embryo implantation is an important guarantee for producing litter size, and early embryonic loss occurring on day 12-30 of gestation critically affects the potential litter size. The implantation process is regulated by the expression of numerous genes, so comprehensive analysis of the endometrium is necessary. In this study, RNA sequencing (RNA-Seq) technology is used to analyze endometrial tissues during early pregnancy. We investigated the changes of gene expression between three stages (day 12, 18, and 25) by multiple comparisons. There were 1557, 8951, and 2345 differentially expressed genes (DEGs) revealed between the different periods of implantation. We selected several genes for validation by the use of quantitative real-time RT-PCR. Bioinformatic analysis of differentially expressed genes in the endometrium revealed a number of biological processes and pathways potentially involved in embryo implantation in the pig, most noticeably cell proliferation, regulation of immune response, interaction of cytokine-cytokine receptors, and cell adhesion. These results showed that specific gene expression patterns reflect the different functions of the endometrium in three stages (maternal recognition, conceptus attachment, and embryo implantation). This study identified comprehensive transcriptomic profile in the porcine endometrium and thus could be a foundation for targeted studies of genes and pathways potentially involved in abnormal endometrial receptivity and embryo loss in early pregnancy. PMID:26703736

  15. Opportunities for embryo transfer in the age of DNA testing

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Embryo transfer (ET) has contributed to increasing selection intensity in cattle breeding for many years. Preimplantation DNA testing offers the opportunity to increase selection response further through increasing within-family selection intensity. Further increases in between-family selection inte...

  16. DEVELOPMENT OF CHICKEN EMBRYOS IN A PULSED MAGNETIC FIELD

    EPA Science Inventory

    Six independent experiments of common design were performed in laboratories in Canada, Spain, Sweden, and the United States of America. ertilized eggs of domestic chickens were incubated as controls or in a pulsed magnetic field (PMF); embryos were then examined for developmental...

  17. Lipid composition and metabolism in embryos of Brassica napus

    SciTech Connect

    Sparace, S.A. ); Pomroy, M.K. )

    1990-05-01

    Seven and 14-day old microspore-derived developing embryos of the low-erucate Brassica napus L. (cv. Topas) were analyzed for their acyl lipid composition and capacity to incorporate ({sup 14}C)acetate into lipid. The most significant changes in the lipid compositions of these ages of embryos are (1) increased total lipid from 2 to 5% of fresh weight; (2) increased proportion of TAG from 31 to 74%, and shifts in the fatty acid composition of TAG from 25 to 50% 18:1; 28 to 23% 18:2; and 24 to 13% 18:3. Lipids of 7-day embryos also consist of primarily 8% DAG, 2% MG, 12% FFA, 10% DGDG, 15% PA and approximately 5% each of PC, PE and PG. The levels of these lipids generally decrease as the embryos mature and accumulate TAG. ({sup 14}C)Acetate is incorporated into all lipids and fatty acids except 18:2 or 18:3. As much as 39, 59 and 34% of the fatty acid radioactivity of Mg was recovered in 20:0, 22:0 and 24:0, respectively.

  18. Planetary Embryo Bow Shocks as a Mechanism for Chondrule Formation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mann, Christopher R.; Boley, Aaron C.; Morris, Melissa A.

    2016-02-01

    We use radiation hydrodynamics with direct particle integration to explore the feasibility of chondrule formation in planetary embryo bow shocks. The calculations presented here are used to explore the consequences of a Mars-size planetary embryo traveling on a moderately excited orbit through the dusty, early environment of the solar system. The embryo’s eccentric orbit produces a range of supersonic relative velocities between the embryo and the circularly orbiting gas and dust, prompting the formation of bow shocks. Temporary atmospheres around these embryos, which can be created via volatile outgassing and gas capture from the surrounding nebula, can non-trivially affect thermal profiles of solids entering the shock. We explore the thermal environment of solids that traverse the bow shock at different impact radii, the effects that planetoid atmospheres have on shock morphologies, and the stripping efficiency of planetoidal atmospheres in the presence of high relative winds. Simulations are run using adiabatic and radiative conditions, with multiple treatments for the local opacities. Shock speeds of 5, 6, and 7 km s-1 are explored. We find that a high-mass atmosphere and inefficient radiative conditions can produce peak temperatures and cooling rates that are consistent with the constraints set by chondrule furnace studies. For most conditions, the derived cooling rates are potentially too high to be consistent with chondrule formation.

  19. What if stem cells turn into embryos in a dish?

    PubMed

    Pera, Martin F; de Wert, Guido; Dondorp, Wybo; Lovell-Badge, Robin; Mummery, Christine L; Munsie, Megan; Tam, Patrick P

    2015-10-01

    Recent studies show that pluripotent stem cells can undergo self-organized development in vitro into structures that mimic the body plan of the post-implantation embryo. Modeling human embryogenesis in a dish opens up new possibilities for the study of early development and developmental disorders, but it may also raise substantial ethical concerns. PMID:26418764

  20. Transferrin-a modulates hepcidin expression in zebrafish embryos

    PubMed Central

    Gibert, Yann; Holzheimer, Jason L.; Lattanzi, Victoria J.; Burnett, Sarah F.; Dooley, Kimberly A.; Wingert, Rebecca A.; Zon, Leonard I.

    2009-01-01

    The iron regulatory hormone hepcidin is transcriptionally up-regulated in response to iron loading, but the mechanisms by which iron levels are sensed are not well understood. Large-scale genetic screens in the zebrafish have resulted in the identification of hypochromic anemia mutants with a range of mutations affecting conserved pathways in iron metabolism and heme synthesis. We hypothesized that transferrin plays a critical role both in iron transport and in regulating hepcidin expression in zebrafish embryos. Here we report the identification and characterization of the zebrafish hypochromic anemia mutant, gavi, which exhibits transferrin deficiency due to mutations in transferrin-a. Morpholino knockdown of transferrin-a in wild-type embryos reproduced the anemia phenotype and decreased somite and terminal gut iron staining, while coinjection of transferrin-a cRNA partially restored these defects. Embryos with transferrin-a or transferrin receptor 2 (TfR2) deficiency exhibited low levels of hepcidin expression, however anemia, in the absence of a defect in the transferrin pathway, failed to impair hepcidin expression. These data indicate that transferrin-a transports iron and that hepcidin expression is regulated by a transferrin-a–dependent pathway in the zebrafish embryo. PMID:19047682

  1. Characteristics of sugar uptake by immature maize embryos

    SciTech Connect

    Griffith, S.M.; Jones, R.J.; Brenner, M.L.

    1986-04-01

    Characteristics of sugar uptake by immature maize embryos were determined in vitro utilizing a /sup 14/C-sugar solution incubation method. Hexose uptake rates were greater than those for sucrose, however, all showed biphasic kinetics. Glucose and fructose saturable components were evidence at <50 mM and sucrose at <5 mM. Chemical inhibitors (CCCP, DNP, NaCN, and PCMBS) and low temperature reduced sugar uptake. Sucrose influx was pH dependent while glucose was not. Embryos maintained a high sucrose to hexose ratio throughout development. At 25 days after pollination sucrose levels exceeded 200 mM while hexose levels remained below 5 mM. Glucose was rapidly converted to sucrose upon transport into the embryo. These circumstantial data indicate that sugar uptake by immature maize embryos is metabolically dependent and carrier mediated. Furthermore, sucrose transport appears to occur against its concentration gradient involving a H+/sucrose cotransport mechanism, while glucose influx is driven by its concentration gradient and subsequent metabolism.

  2. Bulk elastic properties of chicken embryos during somitogenesis

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    We present measurements of the bulk Young's moduli of early chick embryos at Hamburger-Hamilton stage 10. Using a micropipette probe with a force constant k ~0.025 N/m, we applied a known force in the plane of the embryo in the anterior-posterior direction and imaged the resulting tissue displacements. We used a two-dimensional finite-element simulation method to model the embryo as four concentric elliptical elastic regions with dimensions matching the embryo's morphology. By correlating the measured tissue displacements to the displacements calculated from the in-plane force and the model, we obtained the approximate short time linear-elastic Young's moduli: 2.4 ± 0.1 kPa for the midline structures (notocord, neural tube, and somites), 1.3 ± 0.1 kPa for the intermediate nearly acellular region between the somites and area pellucida, 2.1 ± 0.1 kPa for the area pellucida, and 11.9 ± 0.8 kPa for the area opaca. PMID:20353597

  3. Sperm is epigenetically programmed to regulate gene transcription in embryos.

    PubMed

    Teperek, Marta; Simeone, Angela; Gaggioli, Vincent; Miyamoto, Kei; Allen, George E; Erkek, Serap; Kwon, Taejoon; Marcotte, Edward M; Zegerman, Philip; Bradshaw, Charles R; Peters, Antoine H F M; Gurdon, John B; Jullien, Jerome

    2016-08-01

    For a long time, it has been assumed that the only role of sperm at fertilization is to introduce the male genome into the egg. Recently, ideas have emerged that the epigenetic state of the sperm nucleus could influence transcription in the embryo. However, conflicting reports have challenged the existence of epigenetic marks on sperm genes, and there are no functional tests supporting the role of sperm epigenetic marking on embryonic gene expression. Here, we show that sperm is epigenetically programmed to regulate embryonic gene expression. By comparing the development of sperm- and spermatid-derived frog embryos, we show that the programming of sperm for successful development relates to its ability to regulate transcription of a set of developmentally important genes. During spermatid maturation into sperm, these genes lose H3K4me2/3 and retain H3K27me3 marks. Experimental removal of these epigenetic marks at fertilization de-regulates gene expression in the resulting embryos in a paternal chromatin-dependent manner. This demonstrates that epigenetic instructions delivered by the sperm at fertilization are required for correct regulation of gene expression in the future embryos. The epigenetic mechanisms of developmental programming revealed here are likely to relate to the mechanisms involved in transgenerational transmission of acquired traits. Understanding how parental experience can influence development of the progeny has broad potential for improving human health. PMID:27034506

  4. Developmental toxicity assay using high content screening of zebrafish embryos

    PubMed Central

    Lantz-McPeak, Susan; Guo, Xiaoqing; Cuevas, Elvis; Dumas, Melanie; Newport, Glenn D.; Ali, Syed F.; Paule, Merle G.; Kanungo, Jyotshna

    2016-01-01

    Typically, time-consuming standard toxicological assays using the zebrafish (Danio rerio) embryo model evaluate mortality and teratogenicity after exposure during the first 2 days post-fertilization. Here we describe an automated image-based high content screening (HCS) assay to identify the teratogenic/embryotoxic potential of compounds in zebrafish embryos in vivo. Automated image acquisition was performed using a high content microscope system. Further automated analysis of embryo length, as a statistically quantifiable endpoint of toxicity, was performed on images post-acquisition. The biological effects of ethanol, nicotine, ketamine, caffeine, dimethyl sulfoxide and temperature on zebrafish embryos were assessed. This automated developmental toxicity assay, based on a growth-retardation endpoint should be suitable for evaluating the effects of potential teratogens and developmental toxicants in a high throughput manner. This approach can significantly expedite the screening of potential teratogens and developmental toxicants, thereby improving the current risk assessment process by decreasing analysis time and required resources. Published 2014. This article is a U.S. Government work and is in the public domain in the USA. PMID:24871937

  5. Embryonic stem cell identity grounded in the embryo

    PubMed Central

    Plusa, Berenika; Hadjantonakis, Anna-Katerina

    2016-01-01

    Pluripotent embryonic stem cells (ESCs) can be derived from blastocyst-stage mouse embryos. However, the exact in vivo counterpart of ESCs has remained elusive. A combination of expression profiling and stem cell derivation identifies epiblast cells from late-stage blastocysts as the source, and functional equivalent, of ESCs. PMID:24875737

  6. The effect of uterine fibroids on embryo implantation.

    PubMed

    Horne, Andrew W; Critchley, Hilary O D

    2007-11-01

    Uterine fibroids are common but their role in infertility and effect on embryo implantation is unclear. There is evidence that submucosal fibroids are associated with poor reproductive outcome and that treatment with myomectomy is associated with an improvement in pregnancy rates. Various theories have been proposed to explain this relationship. Fibroids cause a mechanical distortion of the endometrial cavity-their presence may alter gamete and embryo transport (due to blockage of the tubal ostia or by altering uterine contractility and peristalsis) and subsequent embryo implantation (due to compression of the endometrium). They may lead to disruption of the junctional zone within the myometrial layer, affecting general uterine function in the initial stages of embryo invasion and later placentation. Altered vasculature due to the abnormal expression of angiogenic factors by uterine fibroids (such as basic fibroblast growth factor and platelet-derived growth factor) could play a role in a reduced implantation rate in patients with fibroids. Similarly, changes in the endometrium mediated by inflammation and factors involved in the process of fibrosis (such as transforming growth factor) could also have a detrimental effect. In addition, fibroids may affect gene expression pattern in the endometrium (such as HOXA10), disrupting the window of implantation. The supporting evidence for these theories is discussed in this review. PMID:17960533

  7. Pathology of the human embryo and previable fetus

    SciTech Connect

    Kalousek, D.K. ); Fitch, N.; Paradice, B.

    1990-01-01

    Topics covered in this book include a general review of normal embryonic and fetal development; abortion and the basic approach to the examination of aborted embryos and fetuses; and pathologic findings detected on examination of products of conception. The authors illustrate specific morphologic lesions and the variable expression of genetic syndromes in the embryonic and fetal periods.

  8. Antioxidant Rescue of Selenomethionine-Induced Teratogenesis in Zebrafish Embryos.

    PubMed

    Arnold, M C; Forte, J E; Osterberg, J S; Di Giulio, R T

    2016-02-01

    Selenium (Se) is an essential micronutrient that can be found at toxic concentrations in surface waters contaminated by runoff from agriculture and coal mining. Zebrafish (Danio rerio) embryos were exposed to aqueous Se in the form of selenate, selenite, and l-selenomethionine (SeMet) in an attempt to determine if oxidative stress plays a role in selenium embryo toxicity. Selenate and selenite exposure did not induce embryo deformities (lordosis and craniofacial malformation). l-selenomethionine, however, induced significantly higher deformity rates at 100 µg/L compared with controls. SeMet exposure induced a dose-dependent increase in the catalytic subunit of glutamate-cysteine ligase (gclc) and reached an 11.7-fold increase at 100 µg/L. SeMet exposure also reduced concentrations of TGSH, RGSH, and the TGSH:GSSG ratio. Pretreatment with 100 µM N-acetylcysteine significantly reduced deformities in the zebrafish embryos secondarily treated with 400 µg/L SeMet from approximately 50–10 % as well as rescued all three of the significant glutathione level differences seen with SeMet alone. Selenite exposure induced a 6.6-fold increase in expression of the glutathione-S-transferase pi class 2 (gstp2) gene, which is involved in xenobiotic transformation and possibly oxidative stress. These results suggest that aqueous exposure to SeMet can induce significant embryonic teratogenesis in zebrafish that are at least partially attributed to oxidative stress. PMID:26498942

  9. Sperm is epigenetically programmed to regulate gene transcription in embryos

    PubMed Central

    Teperek, Marta; Simeone, Angela; Gaggioli, Vincent; Miyamoto, Kei; Allen, George E.; Erkek, Serap; Kwon, Taejoon; Marcotte, Edward M.; Zegerman, Philip; Bradshaw, Charles R.; Peters, Antoine H.F.M.; Gurdon, John B.; Jullien, Jerome

    2016-01-01

    For a long time, it has been assumed that the only role of sperm at fertilization is to introduce the male genome into the egg. Recently, ideas have emerged that the epigenetic state of the sperm nucleus could influence transcription in the embryo. However, conflicting reports have challenged the existence of epigenetic marks on sperm genes, and there are no functional tests supporting the role of sperm epigenetic marking on embryonic gene expression. Here, we show that sperm is epigenetically programmed to regulate embryonic gene expression. By comparing the development of sperm- and spermatid-derived frog embryos, we show that the programming of sperm for successful development relates to its ability to regulate transcription of a set of developmentally important genes. During spermatid maturation into sperm, these genes lose H3K4me2/3 and retain H3K27me3 marks. Experimental removal of these epigenetic marks at fertilization de-regulates gene expression in the resulting embryos in a paternal chromatin-dependent manner. This demonstrates that epigenetic instructions delivered by the sperm at fertilization are required for correct regulation of gene expression in the future embryos. The epigenetic mechanisms of developmental programming revealed here are likely to relate to the mechanisms involved in transgenerational transmission of acquired traits. Understanding how parental experience can influence development of the progeny has broad potential for improving human health. PMID:27034506

  10. Transcriptomic Analysis of the Porcine Endometrium during Embryo Implantation

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Haichao; Wang, Huaizhong; Wang, Yanping; Liu, Chang; Wang, Cheng; Guo, Jianfeng

    2015-01-01

    In pigs, successful embryo implantation is an important guarantee for producing litter size, and early embryonic loss occurring on day 12–30 of gestation critically affects the potential litter size. The implantation process is regulated by the expression of numerous genes, so comprehensive analysis of the endometrium is necessary. In this study, RNA sequencing (RNA-Seq) technology is used to analyze endometrial tissues during early pregnancy. We investigated the changes of gene expression between three stages (day 12, 18, and 25) by multiple comparisons. There were 1557, 8951, and 2345 differentially expressed genes (DEGs) revealed between the different periods of implantation. We selected several genes for validation by the use of quantitative real-time RT-PCR. Bioinformatic analysis of differentially expressed genes in the endometrium revealed a number of biological processes and pathways potentially involved in embryo implantation in the pig, most noticeably cell proliferation, regulation of immune response, interaction of cytokine-cytokine receptors, and cell adhesion. These results showed that specific gene expression patterns reflect the different functions of the endometrium in three stages (maternal recognition, conceptus attachment, and embryo implantation). This study identified comprehensive transcriptomic profile in the porcine endometrium and thus could be a foundation for targeted studies of genes and pathways potentially involved in abnormal endometrial receptivity and embryo loss in early pregnancy. PMID:26703736

  11. Desiccation tolerance during different desiccation strategies in A. angustifolia embryos

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Brazilian pine (Araucaria angustifolia) is native to the Atlantic Rainforest of Brazil and is an endangered species. The mature seeds are recalcitrant and have large embryos (about 2.5 cm in length) that contain more than 1 g H2O.g dry mass (dm)-1. Successful cryopreservation requires reduction of ...

  12. Intersensory Redundancy Enhances Memory in Bobwhite Quail Embryos

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lickliter, Robert; Bahrick, Lorraine E.; Honeycutt, Hunter

    2004-01-01

    Information presented concurrently and redundantly to 2 or more senses (intersensory redundancy) has been shown to recruit attention and promote perceptual learning of amodal stimulus properties in animal embryos and human infants. This study examined whether the facilitative effect of intersensory redundancy also extends to the domain of memory.…

  13. Intersensory Redundancy Educates Selective Attention in Bobwhite Quail Embryos

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lickliter, Robert; Bahrick, Lorraine E.; Markham, Rebecca G.

    2006-01-01

    We assessed whether exposure to amodal properties in bimodal stimulation (e.g. rhythm, rate, duration) could educate attention to amodal properties in subsequent unimodal stimulation during prenatal development. Bobwhite quail embryos were exposed to an individual bobwhite maternal call under several experimental and control conditions during the…

  14. Culturing Chick Embryos--A Simplification of New's Method.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Downie, J. R.

    1979-01-01

    Describes a simplified version of New's method for culturing early chick embryos. The technique allows continuous observation of the critical first three days of development and the conditions for setting up successful cultures are also presented to help both teachers and students. (HM)

  15. A Marble Embryo: Meanings of a Portrait from 1900

    PubMed Central

    Hopwood, Nick

    2012-01-01

    Portraits of scientists use attributes of discovery to construct identities; portraits that include esoteric accessories may fashion identities for these too. A striking example is a marble bust of the anatomist Wilhelm His by the Leipzig sculptor Carl Seffner. Made in 1900, it depicts the founder of modern human embryology looking down at a model embryo in his right hand. This essay reconstructs the design and viewing of this remarkable portrait in order to shed light on private and public relations between scientists, research objects and audiences. The bust came out of a collaboration to model the face of the composer Johann Sebastian Bach and embodies a shared commitment to anatomical exactitude in three dimensions. His’s research agendas and public character explain the contemplative pose and unprecedented embryo model, which he had laboriously constructed from material a midwife supplied. The early contexts of display in the His home and art exhibitions suggest interpretive resources for viewers and hence likely meanings. Seffner’s work remains exceptional, but has affinities to portraits of human embryologists and embryos produced since 1960. Embryo images have acquired such controversial prominence that the model may engage us more strongly now than it did exhibition visitors around 1900. PMID:22606754

  16. Ex Ovo Model for Directly Visualizing Chick Embryo Development

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dorrell, Michael I.; Marcacci, Michael; Bravo, Stephen; Kurz, Troy; Tremblay, Jacob; Rusing, Jack C.

    2012-01-01

    We describe a technique for removing and growing chick embryos in culture that utilizes relatively inexpensive materials and requires little space. It can be readily performed in class by university, high school, or junior high students, and teachers of any grade level should be able to set it up for their students. Students will be able to…

  17. HALOACETIC ACIDS PERTURB PROTEIN PHOSPHORYLATION IN MOUSE EMBRYOS IN VITRO

    EPA Science Inventory

    HALOACETIC ACIDS PERTURB PROTEIN PHOSPHORYLATION IN MOUSE EMBRYOS IN VITRO. MR Blanton and ES Hunter. Reproductive Toxicology Division, NHEERL, ORD, US EPA, RTP, NC, USA.
    Sponsor: JM Rogers.
    Haloacetic Acids (HAAs) formed during the disinfection process are present in drin...

  18. [Impact of systematically freezing embryos on ovum donation].

    PubMed

    Lédée-Bataille, N; Olivennes, F; Blanchet, V; Righini, C; Fanchin, R; Kadoch, J; Frydman, R

    2001-06-01

    In France, all embryos obtained after ovum donation have to be frozen. We present a brief background on this policy and expose our results, then discuss the rationale of such a policy in order to upgrade knowledge on the mechanism of vertical HIV transmission. PMID:11431616

  19. Dignity, marriage and embryo adoption: a look at Dignitas Personae.

    PubMed

    Murphy, Timothy F

    2011-12-01

    The Catholic Church's 2008 Dignitas Personae discusses the moral implications of respecting the dignity of all human beings, regardless of the stage of development. In that text, the Vatican's Congregation for the Doctrine of the Faith argues that respect for this dignity is incompatible with the conception of embryos outside marriage as well as assisted reproduction treatments and certain kinds of human embryonic research. Not only that, but the Congregation also rejects efforts at embryo adoption. As a matter of secular moral philosophy, this view of dignity is disputable and this article shows how an alternate view of dignity--one that depends on interests as against status--serves as a better foundation for decisions about ways in which to help people have children. This view of dignity is entirely compatible with a wide array of assisted reproduction treatments and research and is compatible with the conception of embryos for single parents or opposite-sex couples looking to have children. Using its notion of human dignity, the Congregation makes a case against embryo adoption, but that case is unconvincing given the permissible exercise of individual conscience and the presumptive importance of rescuing human lives where they can be rescued. PMID:22023731

  20. In vitro fertilization and embryo transfer: a brief overview.

    PubMed Central

    DeCherney, A. H.

    1986-01-01

    The in vitro fertilization process breaks down into three essential components: induction of ovulation, fertilization of the oocyte, and development of embryos that are transferred into the uterus. Problems may arise resulting in failure at any one of these junctions. In 1984, the World Congress on In Vitro Fertilization was held, looking at 9,641 laparoscopies yielding 1,101 clinical pregnancies, with an overall pregnancy rate of 11 percent--clearly indicating that in vitro fertilization/embryo transfer (IVF/ET) was an idea whose time had come. Ovulation induction is monitored by both the use of ultrasound and daily estradiol levels, ultrasound indicating the number of oocytes that will be available for capture, and estradiol indicating in an indirect way the quality of those oocytes. It is a major aim in each patient to obtain at least four embryos, since this optimizes success rates. Ovulation induction at Yale is carried out with a high-dose human menopausal gonadotropin (HMG)/human chorionic gonadotropin (HCG) regimen. This regimen has insured us a success rate of 17 percent clinical pregnancies per laparoscopy. In the future, modification will occur in the process with cryopreservation of oocytes and embryos, and gamete manipulation. The modifications will be effected primarily to increase pregnancy rates. Research will continue mainly to delineate better biochemical markers for oocyte quality, but also to further explain the mystery of implantation. PMID:3532577

  1. Moist multi-scale models for the hurricane embryo

    SciTech Connect

    Majda, Andrew J.; Xing, Yulong; Mohammadian, Majid

    2010-01-01

    Determining the finite-amplitude preconditioned states in the hurricane embryo, which lead to tropical cyclogenesis, is a central issue in contemporary meteorology. In the embryo there is competition between different preconditioning mechanisms involving hydrodynamics and moist thermodynamics, which can lead to cyclogenesis. Here systematic asymptotic methods from applied mathematics are utilized to develop new simplified moist multi-scale models starting from the moist anelastic equations. Three interesting multi-scale models emerge in the analysis. The balanced mesoscale vortex (BMV) dynamics and the microscale balanced hot tower (BHT) dynamics involve simplified balanced equations without gravity waves for vertical vorticity amplification due to moist heat sources and incorporate nonlinear advective fluxes across scales. The BMV model is the central one for tropical cyclogenesis in the embryo. The moist mesoscale wave (MMW) dynamics involves simplified equations for mesoscale moisture fluctuations, as well as linear hydrostatic waves driven by heat sources from moisture and eddy flux divergences. A simplified cloud physics model for deep convection is introduced here and used to study moist axisymmetric plumes in the BHT model. A simple application in periodic geometry involving the effects of mesoscale vertical shear and moist microscale hot towers on vortex amplification is developed here to illustrate features of the coupled multi-scale models. These results illustrate the use of these models in isolating key mechanisms in the embryo in a simplified content.

  2. Lipid transport to avian oocytes and to the developing embryo

    PubMed Central

    Schneider, Wolfgang J.

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Studies of receptor-mediated lipoprotein metabolic pathways in avian species have revealed that physiological intricacies of specific cell types are highly analogous to those in mammals. A prime example for the power of comparative studies across different animal kingdoms, elucidated in the chicken, is that the expression of different lipoprotein receptors in somatic cells and oocytes are the key to oocyte growth. In avian species, yolk precursor transport from the hen's liver to rapidly growing oocytes and the subsequent transfer of yolk nutrients via the yolk sac to the developing embryo are highly efficient processes. Oocytes grow from a diameter of 5 mm to 2.5-3 cm in only 7 days, and the yolk sac transfers nutrients from the yolk stored in the mature oocyte to the embryo within just 2 weeks. The underlying key transport mechanism is receptor-mediated endocytosis of macromolecules, i.e., of hepatically synthesized yolk precursors for oocyte growth, and of mature yolk components for embryo nutrition, respectively. Recently, the receptors involved, as well as the role of lipoprotein synthesis in the yolk sac have been identified. As outlined here, lipoprotein degradation/resynthesis cycles and the expression of lipoprotein receptors are not only coordinated with the establishment of the follicular architecture embedding the oocyte, but also with the generation of the yolk sac vasculature essential for nutrient transfer to the embryo. PMID:26585559

  3. Ultrastructural localization of membrane phosphatases in teratocarcinoma and early embryos.

    PubMed Central

    Damjanov, I.; Cutler, L. S.; Solter, D.

    1977-01-01

    Ectodermal cells of the two- and three-germ layer-thick mouse egg-cylinders are considered to be the progenitors of embryonal carcinoma cells in embryo-derived teratocarcinomas. In an attempt to find differences between the tumor cells and equivalent embryonic cells, we have studied the electron microscopic cytochemical localization of alkaline phosphatase, 5'-nucleotidase, and Mg2+-activated adenosine triphosphatase (ATPase) in embryo-derived teratocarcinomas and mouse egg-cylinders. Alkaline phosphatase was detected in both embryonic and tumor cells, but its activity appeared much more intense in the tumor cells. No ATPase was demonstrated in embryonic ectodermal cells of 6-day-old embryos and only in occasional cells of 7- and 8-day-old embryos. No 5'-nucleotidase activity could be demonstrated in 6- to 8-day-old cylinders. There was marked ATPase and 5'-nucleotidase activity in the membranes of embryonal carcinoma cells. These data point out some differences on the plasma membrane between the embryonal carcinoma cells and equivalent embryonic cells. The potential significance of these differences is discussed with regards to the transformation of embryonic cells in tumor cells. (Am J Pathol 87:297-310, 1977). Images Figure 3 Figure 4 Figure 1 Figure 5 Figure 6 Figure 2 PMID:192083

  4. Maternal AP determinants in the Drosophila oocyte and embryo.

    PubMed

    Ma, Jun; He, Feng; Xie, Gengqiang; Deng, Wu-Min

    2016-09-01

    An animal embryo cannot initiate its journey of forming a new life on its own. It must rely on maternally provided resources and inputs to kick-start its developmental process. In Drosophila, the initial polarities of the embryo along both the anterior-posterior (AP) and dorsal-ventral (DV) axes are also specified by maternal determinants. Over the past several decades, genetic and molecular studies have identified and characterized such determinants, as well as the zygotic genetic regulatory networks that control patterning in the early embryo. Extensive studies of oogenesis have also led to a detailed knowledge of the cellular and molecular interactions that control the formation of a mature egg. Despite these efforts, oogenesis and embryogenesis have been studied largely as separate problems, except for qualitative aspects with regard to maternal regulation of the asymmetric localization of maternal determinants. Can oogenesis and embryogenesis be viewed from a unified perspective at a quantitative level, and can that improve our understanding of how robust embryonic patterning is achieved? Here, we discuss the basic knowledge of the regulatory mechanisms controlling oogenesis and embryonic patterning along the AP axis. We explore properties of the maternal Bicoid gradient in relation to embryo size in search for a unified framework for robust AP patterning. WIREs Dev Biol 2016, 5:562-581. doi: 10.1002/wdev.235 For further resources related to this article, please visit the WIREs website. PMID:27253156

  5. METHOXYCHLOR ACCELERATES EMBRYO TRANSPORT THROUGH THE RAT REPRODUCTIVE TRACT

    EPA Science Inventory

    The estrogenic pesticide methoxychlor (MXC) is known to reduce implantation, and, in our previous work, this reduction has been attributed to a direct effect on uterine function. The present study was designed to investigate the effect of MXC on embryo transport rate, another phe...

  6. TRANSCRIPTIONAL RESPONSES OF MOUSE EMBRYO CULTURES EXPOSED TO BROMOCHLOROACETIC ACID

    EPA Science Inventory

    Transcriptional responses of mouse embryo cultures exposed to bromochloroacetic acid

    Edward D. Karoly?*, Judith E. Schmid* and E. Sidney Hunter III*
    ?Curriculum in Toxicology, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, Chapel Hill, North Carolina and *Reproductive Tox...

  7. Chicken embryo origin-like strains are responsible for Infectious laryngotracheitis virus outbreaks in Egyptian cross-bred broiler chickens.

    PubMed

    Shehata, Awad A; Halami, Mohammad Y; Sultan, Hesham H; Abd El-Razik, Alaa G; Vahlenkamp, Thomas W

    2013-06-01

    Infectious laryngotracheitis virus (ILTV) continues to cause respiratory disease in Egypt in spite of vaccination. The currently available modified live ILTV vaccines provide good protection but may also induce latent infections and even clinical disease if they spread extensively from bird-to-bird in the field. Four field ILTV isolates, designated ILT-Behera2007, ILT-Giza2007, ILT-Behera2009, and ILT-Behera2010 were isolated from cross-bred broiler chickens. The pathogenicity based on intratracheal pathogenicity index, tracheal lesion score, and mortality index for chicken embryos revealed that ILT-Behera2007, ILT-Behera2009 and ILT-Behera2010 isolates were highly pathogenic whereas ILT-Giza2007 was non-pathogenic. To study the molecular epidemiology of these field isolates, the infected cell protein 4 gene was amplified and sequenced. Phylogenetic analysis revealed that ILT-Behera2007, ILT-Behera2009, and ILT-Behera2010 are chicken embryo origin (CEO) vaccine-related isolates while ILT-Giza2007 is a tissue culture origin vaccine-related isolate. These results suggest that CEO laryngotracheitis vaccine viruses could increase in virulence after bird-to-bird passages causing severe outbreaks in susceptible birds. PMID:23288626

  8. A Chemically Defined Medium for Rabbit Embryo Cryopreservation

    PubMed Central

    Bruyère, Pierre; Baudot, Anne; Joly, Thierry; Commin, Loris; Pillet, Elodie; Guérin, Pierre; Louis, Gérard; Josson-Schramme, Anne; Buff, Samuel

    2013-01-01

    This study evaluates a new synthetic substitute (CRYO3, Ref. 5617, Stem Alpha, France) for animal-based products in rabbit embryo cryopreservation solutions. This evaluation was performed using two approaches: a thermodynamic approach using differential scanning calorimetry and a biological approach using rabbit embryo slow-freezing. During the experiment, foetal calf serum (FCS) was used as a reference. Because FCS varies widely by supplier, three different FCS were selected for the thermodynamic approach. The rabbit embryo slow-freezing solutions were made from Dulbecco's phosphate buffer saline containing 1.5 M Dimethyl Sulfoxide and 18% (v.v−1) of CRYO3 or 18% (v.v−1) of FCS. These solutions were evaluated using four characteristics: the end of melting temperature, the enthalpy of crystallisation (thermodynamic approach) and the embryo survival rates after culture and embryo transfer (biological approach). In the thermodynamic approach, the solutions containing one of the three different FCS had similar mean thermodynamic characteristics but had different variabilities in the overall data with aberrant values. The solution containing CRYO3 had similar thermodynamic properties when compared to those containing FCS. Moreover, no aberrant value was measured in the solution containing CRYO3. This solution appears to be more stable than the solutions containing a FCS. In the biological approach, the in vitro embryo survival rates obtained with the solution containing CRYO3 (73.7% and 81.3%) and with the solution containing a FCS (77.6% and 71.9%) were similar (p = 0.7). Nevertheless, during the in vivo evaluation, the implantation rate (21.8%) and the live-foetuses rate (18.8%) of the CRYO3 group were significantly higher than the implantation rate (7.1%, p = 0.0002) and the live-foetuses rate (5.3%, p = 0.0002) of the FCS group. The pregnancy rate was also higher in the CRYO3 group compared to the FCS group (81.3% and 43.8%, respectively, p = 0

  9. Low Temperature Mitigates Cardia Bifida in Zebrafish Embryos

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Che-Yi; Huang, Cheng-Chen; Wang, Wen-Der; Hsiao, Chung-Der; Cheng, Ching-Feng; Wu, Yi-Ting; Lu, Yu-Fen; Hwang, Sheng-Ping L.

    2013-01-01

    The coordinated migration of bilateral cardiomyocytes and the formation of the cardiac cone are essential for heart tube formation. We investigated gene regulatory mechanisms involved in myocardial migration, and regulation of the timing of cardiac cone formation in zebrafish embryos. Through screening of zebrafish treated with ethylnitrosourea, we isolated a mutant with a hypomorphic allele of mil (s1pr2)/edg5, called s1pr2as10 (as10). Mutant embryos with this allele expressed less mil/edg5 mRNA and exhibited cardia bifida prior to 28 hours post-fertilization. Although the bilateral hearts of the mutants gradually fused together, the resulting formation of two atria and one tightly-packed ventricle failed to support normal blood circulation. Interestingly, cardia bifida of s1pr2as10 embryos could be rescued and normal circulation could be restored by incubating the embryos at low temperature (22.5°C). Rescue was also observed in gata5 and bon cardia bifida morphants raised at 22.5°C. The use of DNA microarrays, digital gene expression analyses, loss-of-function, as well as mRNA and protein rescue experiments, revealed that low temperature mitigates cardia bifida by regulating the expression of genes encoding components of the extracellular matrix (fibronectin 1, tenascin-c, tenascin-w). Furthermore, the addition of N-acetyl cysteine (NAC), a reactive oxygen species (ROS) scavenger, significantly decreased the effect of low temperature on mitigating cardia bifida in s1pr2as10 embryos. Our study reveals that temperature coordinates the development of the heart tube and somitogenesis, and that extracellular matrix genes (fibronectin 1, tenascin-c and tenascin-w) are involved. PMID:23922799

  10. The role of apoptosis in human embryo implantation.

    PubMed

    Boeddeker, Sarah J; Hess, Alexandra P

    2015-04-01

    The process of embryo attachment and invasion through the endometrial epithelial cells and subsequent implantation into the decidualized endometrial stroma is the groundbreaking step for the establishment of a successful pregnancy. Necessary prerequisites are a receptive endometrium, a good-quality embryo and a well-orchestrated molecular dialog between embryo and maternal endometrium. The embryo-maternal dialog is conducted via a wide scope of factors, including secreted cytokines, chemokines, and growth factors in addition to the expression of corresponding receptors and co-receptors. Several embryonic proteins, including the aforementioned, are involved in the process of apoptosis, which necessarily needs to take place at the maternal endometrium to allow the embryo to invade. The endometrial epithelium is thereby disintegrated completely within a particular area, whereas the endometrial stroma seems to require a more depth-limited apoptosis. As of today, the exact mechanisms and factors mediating the apoptotic process involved in those apparently differently regulated incidents are not fully understood, particularly with regard to stromal cell apoptosis. There is evidence though, that cytokines and their respective receptors play a major role. A suggested important co-receptor for cytokines, which is highly upregulated in the receptive human endometrium, is the heparan sulfate proteoglycan syndecan-1. It is present on the cell surface and involved in the regulation of cell-cell-interaction, cell binding, cell signaling and cytoskeletal organization and therefore represents a possible mediator of apoptosis regulation in human endometrium. Herein, the literature on endometrial epithelial and stromal apoptosis in general, and in light of the influence of syndecan-1, is reviewed. PMID:25779030

  11. Functional characterization of SOX2 in bovine preimplantation embryos.

    PubMed

    Goissis, Marcelo D; Cibelli, Jose B

    2014-02-01

    To date, efforts to establish pluripotent embryonic stem cells from bovine embryos have failed. The lack of reliable pluripotency markers is an important drawback when attempting to derive these cells. This study aimed to identify genes upregulated in the inner cell mass (ICM) of bovine blastocysts, and we selected SOX2 for further characterization. Spatial and temporal localization of the SOX2 protein revealed that its expression starts at the 16-cell stage and then becomes restricted to the ICMs of blastocysts. To study the role of SOX2 during the early development of bovine embryos, we designed siRNA to target SOX2. We began by injecting this siRNA into zygotes; the rate at which blastocysts developed declined compared to noninjected or scramble-injected controls. When only one blastomere of a two-cell embryo was injected with SOX2 siRNA, we observed development rates similar to those of controls. Daughter cells of the injected blastomere were tracked by TRITC fluorescence and found to contribute to the ICM, as select cells also lacked SOX2. Gene expression analysis revealed a decrease in SOX2 and NANOG gene expression in siRNA-injected embryos, but OCT4 expression remained unchanged. We conclude that SOX2 localizes exclusively in the ICM of bovine blastocysts, and its downregulation negatively impacts preimplantation development; however, it is still unclear as to why downregulation of SOX2 in one cell of a two-cell embryo does not affect the composition of the ICM. PMID:24389873

  12. Short latency vestibular evoked potentials in the chicken embryo

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jones, S. M.; Jones, T. A.

    1996-01-01

    Electrophysiological responses to pulsed linear acceleration stimuli were recorded in chicken embryos incubated for 19 or 20 days (E19/E20). Responses occurred within the first 16 ms following the stimulus onset. The evoked potentials disappeared following bilateral labyrinthectomy, but persisted following cochlear destruction alone, thus demonstrating that the responses were vestibular. Approximately 8 to 10 response peaks could be identified. The first 4 positive and corresponding negative components (early peaks with latencies < 6.0 ms) were scored and latencies and amplitudes quantified. Vestibular response latencies were significantly longer (P < 0.01) and amplitudes significantly smaller (P < 0.001) than those observed in 2-week-old birds. Mean response threshold for anesthetized embryos was -15.9dBre 1.0 g/ms, which was significantly higher (P < 0.03) than those observed in 2-week-old birds (-23.0dBre 1.0 g/ms). Latency/intensity functions (that is, slopes) were not significantly different between embryos and 2-week-old animals, but amplitude/intensity functions for embryos were significantly shallower than those for 2-week-old birds (P < 0.001). We presume that these differences reflect the refinement of sensory function that occurs following 19 to 20 days of incubation. The recording of vestibular evoked potentials provides an objective, direct and noninvasive measure of peripheral vestibular function in the embryo and, as such, the method shows promise as an investigative tool. The results of the present study form the definitive basis for using vestibular evoked potentials in the detailed study of avian vestibular ontogeny and factors that may influence it.

  13. Pollination and embryo development in Brassica rapa L. in microgravity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kuang, A.; Popova, A.; Xiao, Y.; Musgrave, M. E.

    2000-01-01

    Plant reproduction under spaceflight conditions has been problematic in the past. In order to determine what aspect of reproductive development is affected by microgravity, we studied pollination and embryo development in Brassica rapa L. during 16 d in microgravity on the space shuttle (STS-87). Brassica is self-incompatible and requires mechanical transfer of pollen. Short-duration access to microgravity during parabolic flights on the KC-135A aircraft was used initially to confirm that equal numbers of pollen grains could be collected and transferred in the absence of gravity. Brassica was grown in the Plant Growth Facility flight hardware as follows. Three chambers each contained six plants that were 13 d old at launch. As these plants flowered, thin colored tape was used to indicate the date of hand pollination, resulting in silique populations aged 8-15 d postpollination at the end of the 16-d mission. The remaining three chambers contained dry seeds that germinated on orbit to produce 14-d-old plants just beginning to flower at the time of landing. Pollen produced by these plants had comparable viability (93%) with that produced in the 2-d-delayed ground control. Matched-age siliques yielded embryos of equivalent developmental stage in the spaceflight and ground control treatments. Carbohydrate and protein storage reserves in the embryos, assessed by cytochemical localization, were also comparable. In the spaceflight material, growth and development by embryos rescued from siliques 15 d after pollination lagged behind the ground controls by 12 d; however, in the subsequent generation, no differences between the two treatments were found. The results demonstrate that while no stage of reproductive development in Brassica is absolutely dependent upon gravity, lower embryo quality may result following development in microgravity.

  14. Identification of emergent motion compartments in the amniote embryo

    PubMed Central

    Loganathan, Rajprasad; Little, Charles D; Joshi, Pranav; Filla, Michael B; Cheuvront, Tracey J; Lansford, Rusty; Rongish, Brenda J

    2014-01-01

    Abstract The tissue scale deformations (≥1mm) required to form an amniote embryo are poorly understood. Here, we studied ∼400 μm-sized explant units from gastrulating quail embryos. The explants deformed in a reproducible manner when grown using a novel vitelline membrane-based culture method. Time-lapse recordings of latent embryonic motion patterns were analyzed after disk-shaped tissue explants were excised from three specific regions near the primitive streak: 1) anterolateral epiblast, 2) posterolateral epiblast, and 3) the avian organizer (Hensen's node). The explants were cultured for 8 hours—an interval equivalent to gastrulation. Both the anterolateral and the posterolateral epiblastic explants engaged in concentric radial/centrifugal tissue expansion. In sharp contrast, Hensen's node explants displayed Cartesian-like, elongated, bipolar deformations—a pattern reminiscent of axis elongation. Time-lapse analysis of explant tissue motion patterns indicated that both cellular motility and extracellular matrix fiber (tissue) remodeling take place during the observed morphogenetic deformations. As expected, treatment of tissue explants with a selective Rho-Kinase (p160ROCK) signaling inhibitor, Y27632, completely arrested all morphogenetic movements. Microsurgical experiments revealed that lateral epiblastic tissue was dispensable for the generation of an elongated midline axis— provided that an intact organizer (node) is present. Our computational analyses suggest the possibility of delineating tissue-scale morphogenetic movements at anatomically discrete locations in the embryo. Further, tissue deformation patterns, as well as the mechanical state of the tissue, require normal actomyosin function. We conclude that amniote embryos contain tissue-scale, regionalized morphogenetic motion generators, which can be assessed using our novel computational time-lapse imaging approach. These data and future studies—using explants excised from overlapping

  15. Development of a new rapid measurement technique for fish embryo membrane permeability studies using impedance spectroscopy

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, T.; Wang, R.Y.; Bao, Q-Y.; Rawson, D.M.

    2006-01-01

    Information on fish embryo membrane permeability is vital in their cryopreservation. Whilst conventional volumetric measurement based assessment methods have been widely used in fish embryo membrane permeability studies, they are lengthy and reduce the capacity for multi-embryo measurement during an experimental run. A new rapid ‘real-time’ measurement technique is required to determine membrane permeability during cryoprotectant treatment. In this study, zebrafish (Danio rerio) embryo membrane permeability to cryoprotectants was investigated using impedance spectroscopy. An embryo holding cell, capable of holding up to 10 zebrafish embryos was built incorporating the original system electrods for measuring the impedance spectra. The holding cell was tested with deionised water and a series of KCl solutions with known conductance values to confirm the performance of the modified system. Untreated intact embryos were then tested to optimise the loading capacity and sensitivity of the system. To study the impedance changes of zebrafish embryos during cryoprotectant exposure, three, six or nine embryos at 50% epiboly stage were loaded into the holding cell in egg water, which was then removed and replaced by 0.5, 1.0, 2.0 or 3 M methanol or dimethyl sulfoxide (DMSO). The impedance changes of the loaded embryos in different cryoprotectant solutions were monitored over 30 min at 22 °C, immediately following embryo exposure to cryoprotectants, at the frequency range of 10–106 Hz. The impedance changes of the embryos in egg water were used as controls. Results from this study showed that the optimum embryo loading level was six embryos per cell for each experimental run. The optimum frequency was identified at 103.14 or 1380 Hz which provided good sensitivity and reproducibility. Significant impedance changes were detected after embryos were exposed to different concentrations of cryoprotectants. The results agreed well with those obtained from conventional

  16. A Review of The Society for Assisted Reproductive Technology Embryo Grading System and Proposed Modification

    PubMed Central

    Hossain, Amjad; Phelps, John; Agarwal, Ashok; Sanz, Eduardo; Mahadevan, Maha

    2016-01-01

    The Society for Assisted Reproductive Technology (SART) method of embryo grad- ing is unique, simple, and widely practiced, and its use has been mandatory for SART membership programs since 2010. Developed by SART in 2006, the current embryo grading system categories, “good, fair, and poor,” are limited because they do not describe the best 1-2 embryos in the interest of keeping pace with the shift in clinical practice to be more selective and to transfer fewer embryos. This inspired us to conduct a review on the SART embryo grading system. In this retrospective study, the literature on evaluation of human embryo quality in gen- eral, and the SART method of evaluation in particular, were reviewed for the period of 2000 to 2014. A multifaceted search pertaining to methods of embryo grading and trans- fer using a combination of relevant terms [embryo, mammalian, embryo transfer, grade, grading, morphology, biomarkers, SART, and in vitro fertilization (IVF)] was performed. The inclusion and exclusion in this review were dictated by the aim and scope of the study. Two investigators independently assessed the studies and extracted information. A total of 61 articles were reviewed. Very few studies have evaluated the efficacy of the SART embryo grading method. The present study suggests the necessity for revision of the current SART grading system. The system, as it is now, lacks criteria for describing the cohort specific best embryo and thus is of limited use in single embryo transfer. The study foresees heightened descriptive efficiency of the SART system by implementing the proposed changes. Strengths and weaknesses of the SART embryo grading were identified. Ideas for selecting the best cohort-specific embryo have been discussed, which may trigger methodological improvement in SART and other embryo grading systems. PMID:27441045

  17. Influenza A virus infection in zebrafish recapitulates mammalian infection and sensitivity to anti-influenza drug treatment.

    PubMed

    Gabor, Kristin A; Goody, Michelle F; Mowel, Walter K; Breitbach, Meghan E; Gratacap, Remi L; Witten, P Eckhard; Kim, Carol H

    2014-11-01

    Seasonal influenza virus infections cause annual epidemics and sporadic pandemics. These present a global health concern, resulting in substantial morbidity, mortality and economic burdens. Prevention and treatment of influenza illness is difficult due to the high mutation rate of the virus, the emergence of new virus strains and increasing antiviral resistance. Animal models of influenza infection are crucial to our gaining a better understanding of the pathogenesis of and host response to influenza infection, and for screening antiviral compounds. However, the current animal models used for influenza research are not amenable to visualization of host-pathogen interactions or high-throughput drug screening. The zebrafish is widely recognized as a valuable model system for infectious disease research and therapeutic drug testing. Here, we describe a zebrafish model for human influenza A virus (IAV) infection and show that zebrafish embryos are susceptible to challenge with both influenza A strains APR8 and X-31 (Aichi). Influenza-infected zebrafish show an increase in viral burden and mortality over time. The expression of innate antiviral genes, the gross pathology and the histopathology in infected zebrafish recapitulate clinical symptoms of influenza infections in humans. This is the first time that zebrafish embryos have been infected with a fluorescent IAV in order to visualize infection in a live vertebrate host, revealing a pattern of vascular endothelial infection. Treatment of infected zebrafish with a known anti-influenza compound, Zanamivir, reduced mortality and the expression of a fluorescent viral gene product, demonstrating the validity of this model to screen for potential antiviral drugs. The zebrafish model system has provided invaluable insights into host-pathogen interactions for a range of infectious diseases. Here, we demonstrate a novel use of this species for IAV research. This model has great potential to advance our understanding of

  18. Norovirus Infection

    MedlinePlus

    ... About NIAID News & Events Volunteer NIAID > Health & Research Topics > Norovirus Infection Skip Website Tools Website Tools Print this page Get email updates Order publications Volunteer for Clinical ...

  19. Imaging infection.

    PubMed

    Ketai, Loren; Jordan, Kirk; Busby, Katrina H

    2015-06-01

    Thoracic imaging is widely used to detect lower respiratory tract infections, identify their complications, and aid in differentiating infectious from noninfectious thoracic disease. Less commonly, the combination of imaging findings and a clinical setting can favor infection with a specific organism. This confluence can occur in cases of bronchiectatic nontuberculous mycobacterial infections in immune-competent hosts, invasive fungal disease among neutropenic patients, Pneumocystis jiroveci pneumonia in patients with AIDS, and in cytomegalovirus infections in patients with recent hematopoietic cell transplantation. These specific diagnoses often depend on computed tomography scanning rather than chest radiography alone. PMID:26024600

  20. Formulation of nutrient medium for in vitro somatic embryo induction in Plantago ovata forsk.

    PubMed

    Saha, Priyanka; Bandyopadhyay, Subhendu; Raychaudhuri, Sarmistha Sen

    2011-05-01

    A nutrient medium has been formulated by altering the macro- and micro-elemental concentration in the culture medium for in vitro somatic embryo induction of economically important medicinal plant Plantago ovata Forsk .A comparison was made between induced embryos with normal embryos (produced in Murashige and Skoog (MS) medium) to observe frequency of embryo induction and also to determine regeneration efficiency. In the present investigation, three different media have been formulated. Among them, FM3 (formulated media, treatment 3) was the most suitable for increasing the frequency of somatic embryo production and regeneration of P. ovata Forsk. Better result was obtained using formulated medium than with MS medium. PMID:20405339